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Full text of "Official and statistical register of the state of Mississippi"

Gc M.tS 

976.2 

M69o 

1917 

pt.2 

1579319 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



G-c. 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00824 8632 



THE 



Official and Statistical Register 



OP THE 



STATE OF MISSISSIPPI 



CENTENNIAL EDITION 
1917 



_at 



Z ■ ^ 



BY 

DUXBAK ROWI. AXl^. T.L. D. 



DIRECTOR 



Department of Archives and History; Member American Historical 
Association; Secretary Mississippi Historical Society. 




Madksox, Wic;. 

[iE.MOCRAT r-RIXTING CoitPANY 

1917 



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Vf Ai 



EXECUTIVE DEl'AKTMEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 513 

and poultry, drainage, sub-soiling, irrigntion, sheep raising, wool and 
silk culture: to take part in the eradication of the cattle tick and to 
direct the distribution of tags for commercial fertilizers; to prepare 
a handbook dealing witli mines, minerals, forest soil, climate, water, 
waterpower, flowers, fisheries, streams, etc. 



OFFICE OF COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AND COMMERCE. 

Commissioner P. P. Gar>'Ee 

.1 ssistan t Miss Louike Cr-vxl 

Assist(uit G. C. Carotiiebs 

Assistant S. M. Thomas 

Clerk Miss Mazie Dat 

1579319 

Hexry Edward Blakeslee 

Henry Edward Blakeslee of Jackson, ex-Commissioner of Agriculture 
and Commerce of the State of Mississippi, was bom November 22, 
1866. at Pine Grove, Benton County, Miss. He is the son of Charles 
Thomas Blakeslee and wife, Mattie (Klyce) Blakeslee. Charles Thom- 
as Blakeslee was a native of Ashtabula County, Ohio, removing to 
Tennessee in 1854. He rendered faithful service as a soldier in the 
Thirteenth Tennessee Regiment, Vaughn's Brigade, during the Civil 
War, and after the surrender removed to Mississippi, where he en- 
gaged in farming. 

Commissioner Blakeslee was reared on a farm and attended the pub- 
lic schools of ]Mississippi. He acquired a common school education, 
and though he did not attend college, his educational equipment was 
such that at the age of twenty-five he easily entered the newspaper 
profession, in which he rapidly advanced. He edited newspapers at 
New Albany from 1891 to 1901; was at Tupelo in 1902, after which he 
was made Superintendent of the State Capitol Grounds at Jackson, 
1904 — 5. He was appointed Commissioner of Agriculture and Com- 
merce May 1, 1906. and in 1907 was elected to the office for the regular 
term; was re-elected in 1911, and is now entering upon his third term, 
1916—20. 

Mr. Blakeslee has filled his position as Commissioner of Agriculture 
and Commerce with marked ability and has filled a department of 
much value to the State. He has widely advertised the State's agri- 
cultural resources and has used much energy in awakening interest in 
the advantages to be found here by homeseekers. He resigned in 1916 
to accept the position of Director of the Mississippi Centennial Exposi- 
tion and was succeeded by P. P. Garner. 

33 — m 



514 EXKCUTIVE DEPART.MEXTj^. OFFICES AXD P.OARDS 

Mr. IJhikeslee is a Democrat and was a dek^ate to the Xaiionai 
Democratic Convention of 1896 and 1900. He is a member of the INIeth- 
odist Church Sourh. and belongs to the fraternal orders of Masonry. 
Templar and .Shriners. Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and Woodmen 
of the World. 

On January 10, 1895, he was married to Jennie Crockett Mothrs- 
head. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeslee have five children, Car'i? Capplemaii, 
Lewie Crockett, Anna Yardanian, Henry Edward, and Marie Virginia. 

REVENUE DEPARTMENT 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF THE REVENUE AGENT. 

The Revenue Agent is charged with the following duties. To collect 
post due and unpaid taxes by suit or otherwise, to sue for damages for 
the violation of public contracts: to examine the books, accoimts ana 
vouchers of all fiscal offers of State, county or municipality; to make 
additional assessments of properly of individuals or corporations not 
properly assessed: to settle monthly with the Treasurer; to notify 
the Governor of the embezzlement of public funds; to retain 2u per 
cent on all amounts collected and turned over by him. (Code of 1906. 



OFFICE OF REVENUE AGENT. 

Rrrenup Arimt S. V. Robkiitsox 

Deputtj W. H. Cook 

Veputt/ M. H. Mooiu. 

Deputy Gkr-vui) Br.vndo.n 

Deputy G. C. Roceutso.n 

Deputy C. B. Ros.s 



STOKES VERNON ROBERTSON. 

Stokes Vernon Robertson of Jackson, State Revenue Agent of Mis- 
sissippi, was born July 26th, 1881, Williamsburg, Covington County, 
Miss., and is the son of George Carson Robertson and Maitie Adaline 
Holcomb of Hattiesburg, Forrest County, Miss. George Carson Robert- 
son was a member of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Hatties- 
burg two terms, and was for twelve years Justice of the Peace of 
Perry County. Miss. He was the son of Frank Robertson and wife, 
Lou Robertson of Wiliiamsburg, Covington County, Miss. 



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EXRCL'TIVE DEf'ART.MEXTS. OFFICES .VXD F.OARDS 515 

Stokes Vernon Robertson'? mother, Mat tie Adaline Holcomb, was 
the daughter of Levi Moloonib and wife, of Williamsburg, Covington 
County, Mi^^s. His paternal ancestors were of Scotch descent and 
came to Mississippi from Georgia. 

Mr. Robertson \v;.s educated in the public schools of Mississippi 
and was graduated from the High School of Hattiesburg in 1898. He 
entered the University of :\Hssissippi in 1901 and finished with the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1905. He took Freshman and Soph- 
omore medals for oratnry and represented the University in the Inter- 
collegiate Oratorical Association, in 1904, winning the second prize. 
He also won the Senior Debater's medal in the Hermean Literary So- 
ciety in 1905, and received a medal at the Crystal Springs Chau- 
tauqua, the same year. He studied law at home and was admitted to 
the bar in 1907, immediately beginning his practice at Hattiesburg 
Mr. Robertson represented Forrest County in the Legislature of 
190S-10-11, and was Clerk of the House of Representatives in the ses- 
sions of 1912-13-14. On November 7, 1915, he was elected State Revenue 
Agent. His friends regard him as a man of ability, intere.?ted in the 
moral and material uplift of the state. 

Mr. Robertson is a Democrat, and a deacon in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Haitiesbur-z. He is a member of the fraternal orders oi 
Woodmen of the World and Odd Fellows. 

On November 20th, 1907, he was married to Sudie ^lason Burt, 
daughter of Dr. Paul S. Burt and Mamie Stainback Burt of Oxford. 
Miss. Mrs. liobertson is the grand-daughter of Dr. G. T. Stainback, a 
Cumberland Presbyterian minister. 

Mr. and IMrs. Robertson have one chi.d, Stokes Vernon Robertson, 
Jr. 



RAILROAD DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF THE RAILROAD COMMISSION. 

The Railroad Commission is charged with the following duties: 
To hold monthly meetings and keep minutes of proceedings; to elect 
a secretary; to supervise common carriers, express companies, tele- 
graph, telephone and sleeping car companies operating in the State: 
to assess for taxation s-id corporations; to fix rates; to issue process 
for witnesses; to inspect roadbed and stations; to investigate acci- 
dents; to see that proper stations are provided and conveniently located. 
(See Code of 1906. Chai<ter 139). 



516 EXKOl.TLViC DEPART.MEXTS, OFFICES .VXD BOARDS 



RAILROAD CO.MMISSIOX, 

First District. G. R. EDW'.Vr.ns 

Second District F. M. Sheitakd, Pre?i ni:xT 

Third District W. B. Wii.so.v 

Srcretanj j. G. Galcerax 

Rate Erpert M. C. Moore 

Asst. Rate Exijcrt T. C. Russeli. 



FR-VXCIS MaHIOX SlIEI'PARr). 

Francis Marion Sheppard of Richton. Miss., President of the Rail- 
road commission of ilississippi, was born December 22. 1S6S. near 
Monticello, Lawrence County, :Mis3. He is the son of Ausustus Wash- 
ington Sheppard and Permelia (Phillips) Sheppard of Monticello 
His father was a Magistrate, a farmer, and a member of the State 
Guard during the Civil War. His parents were Thomas Sheppard 
and Nancy Sessions Sheppard of South Carolina. The family moved 
to Mississippi in 1S19. and settled in what is now Perry County. They 
were among the progressive citizens of the ante-bellum period of the 
State and contributed freely to its development. 

Mr. Sheppard's mother Avas the daughter of Charles Ph^'ips and 
Cynthia Phillips of Covington County. Miss. He received his elemen- 
tary training from the public schools of Lawrence and Marion Counties 
and the High School of Lumberton, ^liss. He later entered the Uni- 
versity at Louisville, Ky., and was graduated from its Medical Depart- 
ment, in 1S93. From that date, he was a practicing physician in 
Wayne County and Waynesboro until 1901: in Laurel, Mis;., until 
1904; and in Richton, Miss., until 1910. He became a Representative 
of his county in the Legislature of 1S9'5 and continued to bold that 
office until 1900: he was State Senator from 1900 to 1904: and in 
these positions he was always active in promoting all legislation that 
touched the best interests of his State. In 1910, he becam.^ Railroad 
Commissioner, which office he has filled with great ability, his present 
term expiring in July, 1920. He has been President of this Commis- 
sion since 1912. He has always been a patriotic and pub'ic-spirited 
citizen and during the Si-anish-American War, in 1S98, gave up his 
private and political affairs to become Surgeon in the First Mississippi 
Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, a service which continued until hos- 
tilities ceased and his regiment was disbanded. 

Dr. Sheppard is a Democrat: a member of the Baptist Churc'\ and 
bplongs to rh^ fratf rnal oraors cf I. 0. 0. F., K. of P., E. P. O. K. and 
in Masonry he has been Past Master of Lodge and is a Chapter Mason. 



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53 






STATE OFFICIALS 





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W. A. MONTGOMERY 
Prison Trustee 



L. Q. STONE 

Prison Trustee. 3rd District 




W. ' "I1P I »W, I PJ ■- ?! »."- '■ " ' ■ UW^Vjj J Ugi ' ^.'VWiJ.^ . ^Jj 




J. F. THAMES 
Prison Trustee, lin'l District 



M. A. EROWX 
Land Oonuiiis.sioner 



EXECUTIVK DKPART.VIEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 517 

In 1894, be was unirod iu marriagu to Miss Josie Best, dausbter of 
Harbeit Best and Elizabetb Best, of Henderson, vrayne County, Miss. 
Dr. and :Mrs. Shenpard bave tbree cbildien: Editb, Zellein, and Allen 
Augustus. 



Geokck Rorkut Edwards, Jr.. 

George Robert Edwards, Jr., of McCool, Railroad Commissioner of 
tbe State of :\Jissis?ipi)i, was born January 7, 1873, at Cartbage, Leake 
County, Miss. He is tbe son of George Robert Edwards and wife. 
Emma (Colbert) Edwards. His paternal ancestors came from Georgia 
to Mississippi: bis father was a soldier in Walthall's Brigad',-, and 
took part in ihe battles of Murfreesboro, Cbickamauga and En.koui 
Mountain; was taken prisoner and confined at Rock Island. 111., for 
sixteen months. 

Mr. Edwards obtained bis early education at Cartbage High School 
and at French Camp Academy; attended the Southwestern Presbyter- 
ian University at Clarksville, Tenn., during tbe years 1890-91. 

He began life as a teacher in the common schools of Mississippi and 
taught for several years in Attala and Holmes Counties. He then 
learned stenography and reporting at Meridian, and from 1S95 to 1903 
was Private Secretary of Hon. John Sharp Williams. He became Gov- 
ernor James K. Vardamann's Private Secretary, January 16, 1904, and 
held that po.st till November 1, 1906; was elected Srate Treasurer No- 
vember 5, 1907. and Railroad Commissioner, November 7, 1911. ■ In No- 
vember, 191.-3, Mr. Edwards was re-elected Railroad Commissioner and 
he is at present in the performance of the duties connected wiib ihat 
office. Mr. Edwards has been one of tbe most successful men in the 
public life of :^Iississippi. having always maintained an unquestioned 
popularity with the people. 

Mr. Edwards is a Democrat; belongs to several Masonic organiza- 
tions, also Woodmen of the World, Knights and Ladies of Honor and 
the Farmers' Educational and Cooperative Union. He was marrbd at 
McCool, June IS, 1903, to Nina Winters, daughter of Calvin Jiles Win- 
ters and Nancy Margaret Winters. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards have one 
child. Margaret Ruth. 



PENITENTIARY DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF STATE PENITENTIARY TRUSTEES. 

The Trustees of the State Penitentiary are charged with the follow- 
ing duties: To purchase supplies for the penitentiary; to sell all 
crops made on the State farms; to adopt rules and regulations for the 



I; ■I'.' :■•-<< 



51S EXEtTTIVE IjEPART.ME.VTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

government of convicts and employes: to visit monthly <nicli State 
farm and report in writing of conditions; to hold monthly m etings; 
to pay into the treasury all money arising from the sale of farm prod- 
ucts; to report failure- of duty of the Superintendent to the Governor; 
to investignte charges of misoonduct of all convicts or employes. (See 
Code of 1!)0«, Chapter 108). 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES STATE PEXITEXTIARY. 

(Code of 1906, Chapter 107, Sections 3o89-3652.) 

Pn-sidoit L. Q. Stoxf. 

Trustee \V. A. Montcomkry 

Trustee J H. Thames 

Superintendent J. J. O'Keefe 

Secretary J. J. Comax 

Assistant Secretarij Mi;s. 0. M. Spickard 

Clerk John H. Rowax 



WiLi-iAM Alexander MoxTt.o:,rKi:Y. 

William Alexander .Montgomery of Edwards, Miss., Penitentiary 
Trustee for the State of Mississippi, was born October IS, 1844. at 
Davis Mill, Winston County, Miss., and is the son of Charles Warren 
Montgomery and Olivia (Feree) Moore. Charles Warren Montgomery 
was the son of William Montgomery and Rebecca Kincaid Montgomery, 
who removed from Columbia, S. Carolina, and settled at Edwards in 
Hinds County, Miss., after having lived a while at Starkville and in 
Winston County. He served in the Confederate army, being Quarter- 
Master. His father, William Montgomery was the son of Charles 
Montgomery, who was a soldier under General Marion and a native 
of Ireland. 

William Alexander Montgomery's mother was the daughter of Gen. 
William Moore and wife, Betsey Moore of Tullahoma. Tenn. Gen. 
Moore was a car-tain in the Seminole War and carried the open 
wound of a poisoned arrow received in one of the battles. He was 
with Gen. Jackson in the War of 1812. Though very old, he raised the 
8th Tennessee Regiment for service in the Civil War. His son, W. L. 
Moore, was elected Colonel of this regiment and was killed at Mur- 
freesboro, Tenn.. while leading his command in a charge, where sixty- 
nine per cent of the regiment were killed or wounded. He carried 
the Secession Ordinance of his State to Richmond, and filled many 
positions of trust for his county in connection with secession, being 
intensely patriotic. 



EXF.rUTIVE DETARTMEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 510 

William Alexander Montgomery's early education was received at 
home under private tutors. He was prepared for the Sophomore 
Class at Union University of Murfreesboro, Tenn.. whore he was a 
student when the Civil War began. He served in Company A. li'th. 
Mississippi Regiment in Virginia, having enlisted as a private. He 
was commissioned as Captain in March, 1S64. 

After the War, he attended law lectures at the Transylvana Uni- 
versity of Le.xington, Ky. His father dying while he was at college, 
the son gave up his studies and took charge of the father's business, 
caring for his mother and younger brotliers. 

Capt. Montgomery was admitted to the bar in Raymond, Hinds 
County, Miss., in 1S»5S and engaged in this profession until he was 
elected Trustee of the State Penitentiary in 19<>7. He was a member 
of the State Senate in 1878; of the House of Representatives in lS9Js. 
He was made Colonel in the United States army in 1S98 for the 
Spanish-American War. and was a Major commanding the citizeii 
soldiery in 1875", during the Reconstruction period. 

Col. Montgomery is a Democrat; has served as Trustee of the State 
Penitentiary since 1908; is a member of the Baptist Church; and 
served for several years as Trustee of Mississippi College. He lb 
Past Master and Past High Priest of the Masonic Lodge; Pasc Noble 
Grand of Odd Fellows; member of Knights of Pythias, and of Knights 
of Honor; is a Woodman of the World; and was Past Grand Cyclops 
of the Ku Klux Klan. during the days of Reconstruction after the 
Civil War. Col. IMontgomery has been honored with the highest posi- 
tion in the State organization of United Confederate Veterans, an oj 
ganization in which he has always taken much interest. 

On December 23, 1868. he was married to :Mella Deupree, daughter of 
Col. James Deupree*and wife, Charlotte (Biggs) Deupree, of Browns 
ville. Hinds County, Miss. After her death, he married Bettie Henr:' 
of Edwards, daughter of Capt. Ben Wilkins Henry and Sue Randolph 
Henry, the latter being descended from Thomas Jefferson Randolph 
of Vii'ginia. Capt. Ben Wilkins Henry was a son of Gen. Patrick 
Henry of Brandon and a brother of Major Pat Henry of that place. 
Col. Montgomery's children by his first wife are: Patrick Henry. 
Charles Warren, Mrs. Olivia (Montgomery) Birdsong. Second wife's 
children are: William Alexander, Jr., and Wilkins Henry. 



J.xMcs Fka.vklix Tii.v:.n:s. 

James Franklin Thames of Mendenhall, Miss., Trustee of the State 
Penitentiary, v.as born January Z. 1874. at Magee. Simpson County, 
Miss., and is the son of Richard Thames and Mary S. (Tullos) Tiiames 
of Simpson County. When about sixteen years of age, Richard 



I 



i 



ii 



520 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 

Tliames enlisted as a siU).'?titute in the Confederate Army, in 1S61. 
Later he enlisted regularly as a private in Co. F, 39th Miss. Regimeni 
of Inf. and served until the close of the war. He was the tjon of 
Timothy Thames and wife, Martha Thames, of Simpson County, Miss. 
The Thames on immigrating to America first settled in the older south- 
ern states. Later they removed to Mississippi and were among tne 
pioneer families of Simpson County. James Franklin Thames' mother 
was the daughter of John Tullos and Dorcas Tullos of Westville, Miss. 

Mr. Thames first attended the primary and high schools of Simpson 
County, and later the Sylvarena High School of Smith County. His 
college course was had in Harperville College. 

After leaving college, Mr. Thames occupied many positions of trust 
in the public service. He was Chancery Clerk of Simpson County 
from January, 1S96 to 1912; Trustee of the Mississippi Penitentiary 
from the Southern District, from July 17, 1013, to date. 

Mr. Thames is a Democrat, being a member for six years of the 
Democratic Executive Committee of the Sixth Congressional District. 
He was also a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee 
from 1908 to 1912. 

He is a member of the Baptist Church, was superintendent of Sun- 
day School for a number of years, and is at present Deacon of the 
Baptist Chtirch of Mendenhall, Miss. He is a Mason and Woodman 
■ of the World and served as Master of the Westville and Mendenhall 
Lodges; also, as Consul Commaudnr of the Woodmen. 

In all these positions of public trust, Mr. Thames has proved capable 
and efficient and his services have been of great value to the State; 
few men in Mississippi have a stronger hold upon the people of their 
locality. 

On April 24, 1901, Mr. Thames was married to Mary Bishop, of West- 
ville, Simpson County, Miss. 'Mrs. Thames is the daughter of James I. 
Bishop and Mary Josephine Bishop. Her father was a Confederate 
soldier and served in the Fourth Regiment of Mississippi Cavalry, 
Company A., C. S. A. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thames ha:ve three children, James I. Thames, 
Mary D. Thames, and Frank Bishop Thames. 



Lucius Qui.vcy Stone. 

Lucius Quincy Stone of Tupelo, Miss., President of the Board of 
Trustees of the Mississippi Penitentiary, was born November 11, 1S72, 
at Tremont, Itawamba County, Miss. His father. John Henry Stone, 
\va:: a native of Marion, Perry County, .Mabama. From Alabama, 



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STATE OFFICIALS 



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W. F. BOXD 
Superintendent of Education 



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STOKES V. ROBERTSOX 
Revenue Agent 



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HON'. WILLIAM H. SMITH 
Ex-Superintendent of Education 



F. M. SHEPPARD 
Railroad Commissioner 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 521 

he reniove(5 to Tremont, Mis?., where he still resides. He is the son 
of Delnius Johnson Stone and Pamelia Ann Stone, who removed to 
Tremont from the State of Alabama. 

Lucius Quincy Stone's mother is the daughter of .John Yates Cowden 
and Eliza Jane Cowden of Shotville, Marion County, Ala. Mr. Stone 
is of Irish descent, his ancestors having settled in Virginia and South 
Carolina. His great-grandfather, John Stone, was a native of Han- 
over County, Va., and in very early life removed from that place to 
Spartanburg District, S. C, and was there married to Anna Lyle. He 
was a gallant soldier in the American army during the War of 1S12, 
having served throughout the war. It was by his son. Delmas Johnson 
Stone, that the family was brought to the lower South by way of 
Alabama, in which state they resided until their removal to :\Iississippi. 
John Henry Stone, father of the subject of this sketch, is a man of 
sterling worth and integrity. In early life he taught school and was 
active in all movements for the advancement of his locality. He has 
served the County of Itawamba two terms as sheriff and enjoys the 
unusual honor of having served as Postmaster of the town of Tremont 
for fifty years without intermission. 

Lucius Quincy Stone was educated in the public schools of Itawamba 
County, and in the Oakland Normal College in the same county. 
Since leaving school, he has engaged in -farming and stock-raising, 
and in connection with his agricultural business, he has served as 
United States deputy from 1890 to 1S04. 

In 1915, he was elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Mississippi Penitentiary, in whicli position he serves as President 
of the Board with marked ability. He is conscientious and faithful in 
his service to the State. 

Mr. Stone is a Democrat, a member of the Executive Committee of 
Itawamba County, and belongs to the fraternal orders of Masons, 
Odd Fellows and Woodmen of the World. He is an active member of 
the Methodist Church, in which he has served as steward for sixteen 
years. 

On November 25. 1894, he was married to Lydia T. Kennedy of 
Rara Avis. Miss. Mrs. Stone is the daughter of Irvin Lafayette Ken- 
nedy and Elmina L. Lockridge of Shotsville, Ala. The family is of 
Irish ancestry, Mrs. Stone's paternal ancestors, Joseph Kennedy and 
Eugenia Trippit Kennedy, having settled in America in early times. 
Her grandfather. Irvin Kennedy, was a native of Tennessee from which 
state he removed to Alabama. His wife was Martha S. Z^Iachow of 
Charleston, S. C They removed from Alabama to Texas, where the 
former died at Peoria. Mrs. Stone's father was a gallant soUlier in 
the Confederate army, enlLsting in the State of Alabama. He ren- 
dered faithful and continuous service throughout the war, his regi- 



-,■22 KXHriTIVE L)i:rARTME.\"TJ<. OFFICES AND BOARDS 

uicnt huving served in Anasirong's Brigade, X. H. Jackson's Division, 
Company H. After tlie war, lie made his lionie in Mississippi and 
assisted in all movenienrs to restore law and order in his locality, 
which had been overthrown by reconstruction. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stone have three children. Tone Earleen, Henry 
Lafayette, and Lucius Herman. 



LAND DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICLVL DUTIES OF THE LAND COMMISSIONER. 

The Land Commissioner is charged with the following duties: To 
have supervision of the public lands of the State; to have custody of 
all public land records; to issue patents; to prosecute suits concern- 
ing public lands; to rent the public lands; to make monthly reports 
to Auditor and turn over monthly the proceeds of land sales; to pro- 
tect public lands from trespass; to release redeemed lands. (See 
Code of 1906, Chapter 77). 



OFFICE OF THE LAND COMMISSIONER. 

Com 1)1 issionrr M. A. Brow.v 

DrpK til Tho.s. J. Buow.v 

Dcijuty , C. R. Br.\i>.sii.\v.- 



M.\RK Anthony Brown. 

Mark Anthony Brown of Jackson. Miss., Land Commissioner of the 
State of Mississippi, was born April 25, 1852, in the County of Louder- 
dale. Miss. He is the son of John Brown and wife Eliza Daverscn 
Brown, daughter of James Daverson. John Brown was born in Mobile, 
Ala. He served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of Lauder- 
dale County for twenty years. He was of English ancestry, and his 
wife was Scotch-Irish. Their parents came from the British Isle? 
and settled in North Carolina, from which state they removed to 
Alabama, and later to Mississippi, settling on a farm ten miles north 
of Meridian. 

Mr. Brown attended the country schools of Lauderdale County, but 
received few school advantages, deserving therefore, more credit foi 
what he has accomnlished than the man who is poorly equipl'od after 



KXECLTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 523 

having enjoyed a liberal educational opportunity. He has always en- 
gaged in farming and has taken great interest in the advancemeni 
of the farmers' ors-anization. 

Mr. Brown was elected to the office of Srate Land Commissionoi. 
January 15. I'jl., which office he holds at present. He was lecturei 
for the Farmers' Alliance, holding many important positions in that 
organization. He was very useful in building up the Farmers' Union 
in Mississippi, in which organization he held several important posi- 
tions, being a member of the Legslative and Executive Committees and 
State Lecturer, for five years, when he resigned to become a candidate 
for the position of Land Commissioner, in 1911. After a term of four 
years he Avas reelected in HUd. He took much interest in the Nor- 
mal Training School and in the establishment of the Agricultural High 
Schools, and though having been denied its advantages, he has always 
expressed himself as a friend to higher education. A sketch of Mr. 
Brown, written by his friend, Mr. H. W. Bradshaw, is very com- 
plimentary of all his efforts. 

He is strictly a self-made man, who has received high position 
through the popular vote, by his interest in the callings of the labor 
ing classes. 

Mr. Brown is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, member 
of the Woodmen of the World. On January 22. 1872, he was married 
to Olie Rebecca White of Lauderdale County. Miss.. Mrs. Brown i£ 
the daughter of James and Eliza White of Lauderdale County, :Miss. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brown have nine children, Alma (Brown) Stokes. 
Carrie (Brown) Jones, Cora (Brown) Lamons, Annie (Brown) Lun- 
grin, Charles Cornelius. Benjamin Franklin, George Edward, Thomas 
Jefferson and John Walton. 



GEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY COMMISSION. 

(Created February 9. 1906.) 

COMMI.S.SIO-NF.n.S. 

T. G. Bilbo. 1912 

Dunbar Rowland, Secretary 1906 

Joseph N. Powers 1907 

W. H. Smith 1914 

W. F. Bond 191T 



524 EXECUTIVE DErART.MEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 



STATE GFOLOOISTS. 

Under Law of March 5, 1S50.) 

John Millington 1S51 

Oscar M. Leiber 1851 

B. L. C. "W'ailcs 1851 -1S53 

Lewis Harper 1853-185." 

Eugene W. Hilsard 1855-l.S6fi 

George Little 186(5-1871 

Eugene W. Hilgard 1872 

The law creating the survey was never repealed, but no appropria- 
tion for its support was made after 1872. 



DIKKCTORS OF GEOI.OGrCAL .STRVFTY. 

(Under Law of lfi06.) 

Albert F. Crider 1906-19<;if> 

Ephraim X. Lowe -; 1909 

Ephriani X. Lowe ^ Director 

E. M. Jones Assistani 

Miss Frances H. Walthall Assistant 



Ephraim Xohlk Lowe. 

Ephraim Xoble Lowe, of Oxford, iliss., Director of the Geological 
Survey, was born May 5, 1864, at Bear Creek. Hinds County, Miss., 
and is the son of Dr. Edmund Fielder and Emily (Peyton) Lowe: his 
ancestors were from South Carolina and Georgia; his grandfather was 
Chief Justice Ephraim G. Peyton, of the Mississippi Supreme Court; 
received his primary education in the rural schools of Hinds County; 
entered the University of Mississippi and was graduated in 1884 with 
the degree of B. P.; was graduated at Tulane Unversity in 1892, with 
degree of M. D; practised medicine for a short time in Hinds County; 
removed to Colorado in 1S92; abandoned the practice of medicine and 
devoted his attention to mining and geological study, and in his pres- 
ent position has advanced the State's interests materially; was As- 
sistant Professor of Biology and Geology in the University of Missis- 
sippi, 1904-08; took advanced work in Biologj"^ and Geology in the 
University of Chicago, 1904-05-06; Professor of Biology and Geology 
University of Mi.ssissippi. 1908-09; elected Director of the Mississippi 
Geological Survey June 4, 1909. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTJIEXTS, OFFICE? AND BOARDS 



525 



Dr Lowe is a Democrat, member of the MeUiodist Church and Knight 
of Pythias. He is the author of a number of monographs on scienuhc 
subjects and is regarded as one of the best equipped men in the South 
for the vahiable work in which he is engaged, a work that has pro- 
c-ressed rapidlv uncjer his careful supervision. 

" Dr. Lowe was married to Sarah M. Yeager on November 28, 18!».5. 
On March 4. 1898, she died, leaving him two children, Edmund Peyton 
and':^Iargaerite Emily. He was married a second time, May 4, 19.03, 
to Laura Edna Haley, daughter of Herman MilviUe Haley and Emma 
Eugenia (Ford) Haley. Mrs. Lowe's father was a Confederate soldier, 
and Sheriff of Copiah County for fifteen years. 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

The Adjutant-General is charged with the following duties: To 
keep his office at the seat of government; to perform all such services 
as pertain to his office as Adjutant of the Commander-in-Chief; to obey 
his lawful orders and discharge such other duties as may be required 
by law. (See Code of 1906, Chapter 96..) 



OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

eral Ee 

StenogruDher >!'«• I^^'th Torgeksox 



Adjutant-Gcneral EaiE C. Sca.es 



EuiE Cakr Scax-es. 

Erie Carr Scales, of Jackson, Adjutant General of Mississippi, was 
born October 23, 1879, at Brooksville, Noxubee County, Miss. He is 
the son of Noah Scales and Florence Annette Owen Scales of Craw, 
ford, Brooksville and ilacon, Miss. General Scales is of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. His grandfather, Dr. Nathaniel F. Scales, and wife, Mildred 
Ann Scales were also residents of the little toAvu of Crawford, the 
family were also residents of the little town of Crawford, the family 
having resided in the State for a long period. 

General Scales' mother was the daughter of Dr. David F. Owen and 
Isabel :Milling Owen of Crawford and Okolona, Miss. His father was 
too young for service in the Civil War, but four brothers gave hon- 



526 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT?. OFFICES AND BOARDS 

orahle service to the Confederacy. The family claims descent from a 
distinguished soldier, Anthony Wedwille, Lord Scales, afterwards Eari 
of Rivers. His maternal .grandfather was a general in the Mexican 
War and his maternal Great-grand-grandfather was Revolutionary 
General Milling. 

General Scales early education was obtained in the schools of Macon, 
Miss. Afterwards, he attended the Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege of Mississippi, Webb Brothers College at Belbuckle, Tenn.. and 
Eastman National Business College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

After leaving school, he engaged in the mercantile business at Macon 
and Louisville, I^Iiss. In May, 1906, he was commissioned First Lieu- 
tenant Mississippi National Guard ; commissioned Captain in same, ou 
31st day of December, 1906; appointed Adjutant General ou 14th day 
of January, 1914, and commissioned Brigadier General; re-appointed 
Adjutant General by Governor T. G. Bilbo, on January 24, 1916. 

General Scales is a capable, efficient, public officer and has de- 
veloped the State Department which he supervises to a point of great 
efficiency and usefulness. His re-appointment to office was asked for 
by the people. He is a Democrat and member of Knights of Pythias. 

On April 23, 1901, he was married to Etheldra Bush of Macon, Miss. 
Mrs. Scales is the daughter of A. H. and Edna Bush of Macon. Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Scales have one child, Erie Owen Scales. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF STATE LIBRARIAN. 

The State Librarian is charged with the followin.g duties: To have 
charge of all books and property of the State Library; to issue cata- 
logs of books; to purchase books on the approval of the trustees; to 
carry out the rules and regulations for the government of the library 
made by the trutsees; to appoint an assistant librarian on the approval 
of the Governor; to report to the Legislature every two years; to act 
as Secretary of Board of Trustees. (See Code of 1906, Chapter 131.) 



OFFICE OF STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Librarian Mus. W. F. M.^h^hall 

Asaistont Lihrtiridu Mr.s. F. H. Bravle.s 



-A) c 



I I iiii"»f Kt^T.'-T f:^in sf 



. > 'io :•! 



RXECT'TIVE DErART.MEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 527 

MODEXA SWAIX ;M A Its II A LI.. 

Modena Swain Marsha"! of New Albany, Miss., State Librarian, was 
born March Ift. 1^76. in Union County. Miss., and is the daughter of 
Richard Americus Sivain and wife, Margaret Estes Swain. 

Mrs. Marshall is of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry and is des- 
cended iruni John Swain and wife, Luciada Xorris Swain, wlio re- 
moved from South Carolina to Mississippi before the Civil War; and 
from Andrew Jackson Estes and wife, Mahala Killian Estes, of Cald- 
well County, X. Carolina, who were formerly of Virginia. Her pater- 
nal great-great-grandparents immigrated to America in the latter part 
of the eighteenth century and settled in Rhode Island. 

Mrs. Marshall's father was a Confederate soldier and rendered faith- 
ful service in Company E., 7th Alis^^issippi Cavalry, under Gen. E.ui 
VanDoru; was paroled in May, ]S65. She obtained her early education 
in the rural schools of Union County, Miss., and later graduate 1 Irom 
the Blue Mountain Female College on June the llth. with thi degree 
of B. S. As the principal in public schools for sixteen years, in tha 
Blue Mountain High School, and New Albany High School, she won 
for herself distinction as a capable and conscientiou.s educator. Her 
election to the office of State Librarian was an honor of which she is 
in every way worthy and her service in that position, is most satisfac- 
tory to the public. Slie is a member of the Baptist Church and of the 
Woodmen Circle. 

Mrs. Marshall was married February 8, UiUO, tj 'Sir. William Fred- 
erick Marshall of New Albany. Mr. Marshall served the State of Mis- 
sissippi as Traveling Sergeant of the State Penitentiary during Gov. 
E. F. Noel's administration. He died May ^1. 1911. leaving one child 
by a former ' marriage, Davis Harbert. Mrs. Marshall has two chil- 
dren, Frederick Speight and Zilargaret Vivian. 

Mrs. ^Marshall's assistant in the State Library is Mrs. F. H. Broyles. 
who is one of the most capable and affab'.e assistants in thy public of- 
fices of the State Capitol. 



BANKLNG DEPARTMENT. 

OFFICIAL DUTIES OF THE BANK EXAMINERS. 

The Banking Department is charged with the duty of seeing to the 
execution of all laws relating to corporations and individuals doing or 
carrying on banking business in the State of M;s.-is.'=ippi. The board 
of bank examiners consists of three members elected by the people, 
one from each Supreme Court district. 



528 EXECUTIVE DErART.MEXTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

Bank Exami.veiis 

E. F. Anderson First District 

J. S. Love _ Second Districi 

S. S. Harris Third District 

H. K. Walter _ Kxamincr 

R. Ij. Hall Secretary 



Edgap. Fkke.max A-N'PEK-O.X. 

Edgar Freeman Anderson of Clinton, State Bank Examiner of Mis- 
sissippi, was born Marcli 11, iSl'i, at Vaideu, Carroll County, Miss., 
and is the son of William Cary Anderson and wife, Kate (Durham) 
Anderson. His father moved to Holmes County, Miss., when a youth. 
He v\-as a soldier in the Confederate army and served through the war. 
On his reiura, he engaged in mercantile business and, later, entered 
the profession of pub ic school teaching in Smith County and other 
points in South ^Mississippi. His mother was the daughter of David 
Durham, and was a native of North Carolina. 

Mr. Anderson received his early education principally from his 
father. He, later, took a course through the Junior year at Missis- 
sippi College, Clinton, Miss., and afterwards, a business course at At- 
lanta, Ga. He first taught school six years in Pearl River County, Miss. 
In 1902, he accepted a position in the First National Bank at Vicksburg, 
Miss., and remained there until the spring of 190-5, when he removed 
to Clinton and took a position in a bank being organized there, in 
which position he remained until 1914, when he was appointed State 
Bank Examiner. 

He is a member of the Baptist Church, is a valuable citizen and a 
capable, conscientious public orlicial, filling his office with marked 
ability. 

In January, lf:!04, Mr. Anderson married Marietta Thornhill of Pop- 
larville. Miss. Mrs. Anderson is the daughter of Dr. Joseph Martin 
Thornhill and wife, Esther Lucy Thornhill of Poplarville. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have four children, Agnes, Marietta, Edgar 
Freeman, Jr., and George Howard. 



jAiIE.S SaMOPvI) L<)VE. 

James Sanford Love of Hatticsburg, Bank Examiner of tlie State 
of Mississippi, was born January 2.5. ISTT, at Brooksville, Noxubee 
Ck>unty, Miss., and is the son of Davis Milton Love and wife, Mary 



STATE OFFICIALS 



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^ 




« ■ -•«lW'-fi^tr^t|-|liiriii'ail ■'^'*'^--*'*''^ 



E. F. ANDERSON 
Bank Examiner, 1st District 






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■H 



;,^s£eta&-. 



S. S. HARRIS 
Bank Examiner, Srd District 





W. J. BUCK 
Secretary to Governor 



MRS. W. F. MARSHALL 
State Librarian 



EXECUTIVE DErAKT.MEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 529 

Jane Cockrel Love of Brooksville, Miss. His father settled at Brooks- 
viKe before the Civil War. He served in the Confederate Array two 
years, enlisting in the Noxubee County Rifles. He was severely 
wounded in the fir.<t battle of Manassas. He was the son of Milton 
Love and his wife. Mary (Cockrell) Love of Macon, Miss. Mary Jane 
Cockrell I^ove, mother of James Sanford Love, was the daughter of 
William Cockrell and wife, :\Iary Harrison Cockrell of Macon, Miss. 
Mary Harrison Cockrell was a direct descendent of President Benja- 
min Harrison. 

Mr. Love obtained his early education from the public schools of 
Brooksville, Miss. He attended Mississippi College three years, fin- 
ishing the Junior course. He entered the banking business in 1898, 
at Macon, Miss., with the Merchants' and Farmers' Bank. He was 
cashier of the First National Bank of Lumberton from 190) to 1907, 
was cashier of Hattiesburg Trust and Banking Company from IOCS to 
1913. In April, 1914, he received a commission as State Bank Exam- 
iner in a competitive examination, which lasted for a term of twenty 
months; was nominated in August and elected in November, 1915, for 
a full term of four years. Mr. Love is well fitted for his position, 
bringing to it long experience, energy and ability, and in his care the 
work will receive the best attention. 

He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, and member of 
the Knights of Pythias. :Mr. Love was married to Lillie Bufkin, May 
27, 1903, at Hattiesburg, Miss. Mrs. Love is the daughter of Charles 
William Bufkin and wife, Corinne Heidelberg of Hattiesburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Love have three children, Elizabeth Eloise, Llllle Al- 
leen, and James Sanford. 



Samuel Stoky H.vrris. 

Samul Story Harris of Tupelo, Bank Examiner of the State of Mis- 
sissippi, was born June 30, 1882, near Newbern. Dyer County, Tenn. 
He is the son of James Polk Harris and wife, Manassah Virginia Story 
of Newbern, Tenn. His father served in Bell's Brigade of mounted 
Infantry, Forrest's Division of the Confederate Army. James Polk 
Harris was the son of Dr. Allen Harris and Mary Ann Parker Harris 
of Tennessee. 

Mr. Harris' mother, Manassah Virginia Story Harris, v.as the daugh- 
ter of David Wilson Harris and Eliza Jane Borum of West Point, 
Miss. 

Mr. Harris was educated in the public and hig]i schools of Nrwb^^rn, 
Tenn. Having received a good educational equipment for a business 

34— m 



5rtO EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

profession, he began work in the Newborn Bank of Newborn. Tenn., 
in April 1901; afterwards was with the Bank of T.'.pelo, and tho Peo- 
ple's Bank & Trust Company of Tupelo. Miss. 

Mr. Harris is especially fitted for his position, which he fills witli 
much ability. He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church. 
He was married to Jennie Newell on June 30, 1915. at Tupelo, Miss. 

Mrs. Harris is the daugliter of Samuel William Newell and Margaret 
Scott Kimmons Newell of Oxford, Miss. 



LIST OF TRUSTEES AND BOARDS OF STATE INSTITUTIONS. 
ETC., COMPILED JULY 16, 1917. 

State Insane Hospital. — Dr. R. M. Butler, Superintendent; R. B. Mayes, 
Jackson; George Butler, Jackson; John L. McGehee, GlosLor; Fied 
McRae, Jackson; R. J. Williams, MoComb. 

State Board of Ldutation. — W. F. Bond, Jaclcson; Jos. W. Power, Jai k- 
son; Ross A. Collins, Jackson. 

Capitol Coiti mission. — Theo. G. Bilbo, Governor; Jus. W. Power, Sec- 
retary of State; Stokes V. Robertson, Revenue Agent; T. M. Henry, 
Insurance Commissioner. 

State Board of EUetion Cominissioners. — Theo. G. Bilbo, Governor; 
Ross A. Collins, Attorney-General; Jos. W. Power, Secretary oL 
State. 

Board of Public Contracts. — Ross A. Collins, Attorney-General; Jos. 
W. Power, Secretary of State; R. E. Wilson, Auditor oi Public 
Accounts; W. F. Bond, Superintendent of Education; P. P. Gar- 
ner, Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce. 

East Mississippi Lisane Hospital. — Dr. J. M. Buchanan, Superintend 
ent. Meridian; Dr. H. S. Tucker, Meridian; C. H. Dabbs, Meridian; 
J. M. Carter, Quitman; Allen McCants, Meridian; William Perry, 
Jr., Meridian. 

Deaf and Dunth Institute. — R. S. Dobyns, Superintendent, Jackson; 
Clayton D. Potter, Jackson; H. C. Roberts, Jackscn; G. I. Redditt, 
McCarley; W. M. Yandell, Canton; E. J. Kail. Jackson. 

Blind Institute. — Dr. R. S. Curry, Superintendent, JacksDn; Dr. J. P. 
Taylor, Jackson; William Hemingway, Jackson; Icey W. Day, 
Kosciusko; R. H. Watts, iMeridian; F. F. Parsons, Lucien. 

State Charity Hospital, Jackson. — Dr. L. S. Rogers, Superintendent, 
Jackson; J. R. East, Brandon; J. M. Grittin, Blodgett; Dr. J. P. 
Conn, Monticello. (This term e.xpires in April 1018). 

Those whose terms expire in April, J9tS. — W. E. Williams, Jackson; 
Dr. R. E. Howard, Durant. 






^A 



bAOOa 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTS! ENTS. OFFICES^ AND BOARDS 53l 

State Ch'jnty HospltnL X'(^7(rt.— Joseph J. Friedler. Natchez. Super- 
intendent; William Lyle. Natchez; W. D. Deterly, Natchez: Wil- 
liam Dardeii. Fayette; F. F. Parsons. Lucien; W. P^ Tucker, Wood- 
ville. 
State Charltn Hospital. yichsbtirg.—T)v. G. Y. Hides. Superintendent. 
Vicksburg; B. M. Brady. Jackson; W. L. Nicholson. Vicksburg; S. 
E. Mackey. Vicksburg; Henry Kahn. Vicksburg; A. Tonar. Tonar. 
ConjCiUrnte Hospital Annex. \ irk abunj.— yirs. J. M. Duncan. Vicks- 
burg; Mrs. A. O. Hardenstein. Vicksburg: Mrs. R. L. Dent. Vicks- 
burg. 
Mattie Hersee Hospital. Meridian.— TSi. M. Everett, Hickory; John A. 
Bailey, Bailey; John A. Martiniere, Shubuta; T. A. McCormick, 
Meridian; W. E. Rogers. Porterville. 
Kings Daug'nters' Hospital and Training School, Gulf port. — James C. 

C. Elmer, Gulf port; J. W. Bradley, Gulfport. 
Beaiivoir Soldiers' Home. R. F. D. Xo. 1. G» ^/porf .—Elnathan Tartt, 
Superintendent, R. F. D. No. 1, Gulfport: J. Hiram McGehee, Lit- 
tle Springs; Dr. R. P. Crump. Nitta Yuma; H. M. Carter. Jack- 
son; \V. H. Cook, Hattiesburg; S. J. Taylor, Jackson; U. S. Rob- 
erts, Carthage. 
Oyster Conimis.^io'i.—\\. A. McDonald, Bay St. Louis; Louis Hahn, Bi- 
loxi, (Vice Kellier, resigned. Term expires Aug. 1917); Frank H. 
Lewis, Pascagoula. (Terra expires Avig. 30, 1918); J. D. Minor, 
Bay St. Louis. (Term expires Aug. 30, 1919); F. W. Elmer, Jr., 
(Term expires Aug. 30, 1920). 
State Board of Health.— Dr. L. L. McDougal. Booneville; Dr. J. H. 
McNeill, Olive Branch; Dr. A. J. Ware, Greenville; Dr. C. D. 
Mitchell, Pontotoc; Dr. Tom W. Reagan, Union; Dr. H. F. Garri- 
son, Seminary; Dr. B. Lampton Crawford, Tjiertown; Dr. W. H. 
Watson. Brandon; Dr. S. W. Glass. Lyon; Dr. S. C. Eason, New 
Albany; Dr. T. F. Elkin. Tupelo; Dr. T. H. Seay, Laurel; Dr. J. 
H. Johnson, Brookhaven; Dr. W. S. Leathers, Secretary, Jackson. 
State Board of Phnniiaerufieal Examiners.— Fred W. Smith, Poplar- 
ville; S. C. Lindsay, Eupora; J. Clyde McGee. Jackson; H. L. 
Boyd, Kosciusko; J. Hawk Stribling. Philadelphia. 
State Board of Dental Examiners.— Br. J. H. Arledge, PoplarvlUe; Dr. 
J. H. Chapman, Columbia; Dr. T. L. Massey, Bay Springs; Dr. 
Burt J. Marshall, Marks; Dr. Albert E. Russell, Oxford. 
Commissio7iers Mississippi Levee District.— Dr. J. D. Sraythe. Green- 
ville; M. M. Spiars, Mayersville; Marcus L. Kaufman, Rosedale: 
Walter Sillers, Rosedale; G. M. Baggett, Rolling Fork; Dr. J. T. 
Atterbury, Greenville. 



532 EXECrriVE DEPARTMEXTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

Commissioners of Yazoo-ilississippi Delta Levee District. — A. E. Dag- 
ger, Clarksdale; R. L. Cobb, Friars Point; John L. Harri^^, Holly- 
wood: E. P. Mangum, Tunica; Henry L. Cooke, Pentoa: J. U. 
Abernathy, Marks; Ed Franklin, Ruleville; Frank Jones. Green- 
wood; J. S. Watson, Lexington; Owen W. Baldwin, Benton: No;-- 
fleet Hawkins, Swan Lake; M. P. Sturdivant, Glendora. 
Trustees of the Universiti/ and Colleges. — W. C. Trotter, Winona, (for 
six years from Marcli 9, 1916); J. S. Howerton, Guntcwn, (fo;- 
six years from March 9, 1916); J. R. Tipton, (for University; 
four years from March 9, 1916); Robert Powell, Jackson, (term 
expires IMarch 9, 191Si; O. F. Lawrence, Grenada; (term expires 
March 9, 1920); E. L. Brien, Vicksburg, (term expires March 9, 
1920);. Theo. G. Bilbo, Governor; W. F. Bond, Jackson, S..periu- 
tendent of Education; T. B. Franklin, Columbus, (term expires 
March 9, 1920). 
Trustees of State Normal College. — First District, W. E. Stokes, Ma- 
con; Fourth District, T. C. Kimbrough, West Point; Fifth Dis- 
trict, H. 'SI. Threefoot, (deceased); Eighth District, E. E. Frantz, 
Jackson. These terms expire April 7, 1919. F. W. Foota, Hat- 
tiesburg, Sixih District: Jos. E. Norwood, Magnolia, Seventh 
District; J. F. Burrow, Rulevilie, Third District; Fred B. S.nilh. 
Ripley, Second District. 
Nurses' Examining Hoard. — Miss Katherine Kent, re-appoinied by 
Governor; Miss Rose Keating, Jackson; Miss M. H. Trigg, (term 
expires June 5, 1918); Miss J. ^L Quinn, (term expires June 5. 
1919); Dr. B. B. iNIartin, Vicksburg, (term expires June 5, 1920). 
Live Stock Sanitarii Board — Theo. G. Bilbo, Governor; Dr. E. Bar- 
nett. Secretary of Animal Husbandry, Agricultural College; Dr. 
E. M. Ranck, Agricultural College; Ross A. Collins, Attorney- 
General; Albert W. Meyers Jr., Holly Springs; 0. W. Connor, Sem- 
inary; Dr. Hudson Chadwick, Jackson, State Inspector. 
Board of V'^terinari/ Examiners — Dr. 0. M. Norton, Greenville: Dr. 
W. P. Ferguson, Dr. J. L. Lewis, Dr. John Oliver and Dr. E. M. 
Ranck, these latter three being selected by the State Board or As- 
sociation of Veterinarians 
State Text Book Commission — First District, ^V. V. Frierson, Jr., Col- 
umbus; Second District, L. H. Jobe, Ripiey; Third District, H. B. 
Heidelberg, Clarksdale; Fourth District, B. L. Coulter, Acker- 
man; Fifth District, Tom S. Sykes, Meridian: Sixth District, R. 
H. Watkins, Laurel; Seventh District, J. G. Bridges, Meadville; 
Eigth District, Monroe Ball. 
Sttite Highway Commi.ision — J. M. McBeath, Presdent, Meridian; D. 
W. Robbins, Tupelo; W. T. Denman, McComb; Xavier A. Kramer, 
Magnolia, State Highway Engineer. 



•-^Ui^'Y 



.-.f li 



EXECUTIVK DErARTMKNTS. OFFICES AXl) BOARDS 533 

South Mississippi Hospital— Rev. L. G. Gates, Laurel; Dr. Dave Wal- 
ley, Ricliton; Dr. S. C. Culpepper, Bond; E. il. Lane, Taylors- 
ville; J. E. Davis. Haltiesburg. 

Industrial Jnstitvte and Training School — L. C. Franklin, President, 
Clarksdale, (3 years); A. B. Schauber, Secretary, Laurel, (3 
years); J. B. Lawrence, Jackson. (2 years); H. K. Rous?, Pop- 
larville. (2 years); Rev. J. L. Lett, Grenada, (3 years). 

Sintr Tax Coinuiission — O. A. Lu< kett, Kosciusko, 1st Supreme Court 
District; T. A. Rawls, Poplarvi'le, 2nd Supreme Court District: 
D. L. Thompson. President of Commission, 3rd Supreme Court 
District. 

Board of Pardons— J. B. Crawford. Jackson. Secretary; Rev. J. L. Cul- 
pepper, Poplarville: T. J. Lilly, Tupelo; J. C. Street, Laurel; Dr. A. 
G. Everett, Friars Point. 

All appointed for a term of four years. 

State Board of Lata Examiners — Southern District, W. A. Shipman, 
Poplarville; Middle District, R. F. Cochran, Meridian; Northern 
District, Geo. T. Mitchell, Tupelo. 



JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 
Supreme Court. 

(Judges elected by the people since 1916, for a term of eight years.; 

Chief Justice Sidxev McCain Smith 

Associate Jvtsicc Sam C. Cook 

Associate Justice Jonx Morga.v Stevens 

Associate Justice J- B. Hoi.df.n 

Associate Justice E. O. Sykes 

Associate Justice George H. Ethri[)c.e 

Supreme Court Cl^-rk George Clifton Myers 

Deputy W. J. Brown 

Division A. 
Sidney McCain Smith J. B. Holden' 

• E. O. Sykes 

Division B. 

Sam C. Cook John Morgan Stevens 

George H. Eth ridge 

Slenoijraphcrs. 
L. T. Ramsey C. B. Howard 



534 EXECUTIVE DEPAKT.MEXTS. OFFICE.S AND BOARDS 



SrD.NKV McCaix Smith. 

Sidney McCain Smith, of Lexington. Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of Mississippi, was born April 9. 1869, at Lexing- 
ton, Miss., and is the son of Thomas White Smith and Sarah (Wfst) 
Smith. His father was a gallant soldier of the Confederacy, and served 
as a private in Company A., Twenty-eighth Mississippi Regiment, 
throughout the war, ane^ was the son of John Prior Smith and Ann 
Eliza Smith, of Marshall County, Miss. Judge Smith's mother was the 
daughter of John M. West of Lexington, Miss. Judge Smith attended 
the primary schools of Lexington; entered the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of ^lississippi, and was graduated in June, 1893, with the de 
gree of LL. B.; began the practice of law at Yazoo City, Miss., in July, 
1893; returned to Lexington in February, 1894; elected to the House 
of Representatives from Holmes County in 1899; re-elected November 
3, 1903. He Vas appointed Circuit Judge of the 4th District in 1906 by 
Governor Vardamau, and Jutsice of the Supreme Court, in 1909 by 
Governor Noel. In November. 1916. Judge Smith was re-elected to 
the position of Supreme Judge for a term of eight years. Possessing 
ability and energy in the performance of his duties Judse Smith has 
rapidly advanced in his profession and is prominent in the public life 
of the state. He has handed down some very important opinions, 
and is regarded by his friends as well equipped for his position. 

Judge Smith is a Democrat; has served on county and state com- 
mittees; member of the Baptist Church, deacon; is a Mason, chapter, 
council, Knights Templar. Master of Lodge and Council and Eminent 
Commander of Lexington Commandery No. 3. Has been Secretary. 
Treasurer and President of State Bar Association; married April 9, 
1896, at Crystal Soring. Miss.,. to Mattie Lee Smith, daughter of James 
C. Smith and wife. Matilda, of Crystal Springs. Upon the resignation 
of Judge R. B. Mayes, Judge Smith became Chief Justice of the Court. 



S.v^i C. Cook. 

Sam C. Cook, of Clarksdale. Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
State of Mississippi, was born July 13th, 18^5. at Oxford. Mississippi, 
and is the son of Mi'.as J. and Martha (Bumpass) Cook, natives of 
North Carolina. Among the Colonial settlers of America, the family 
assisted in founding the American Republic and in upholding the tru- 
est ideals of liberty and democracy. Judge Cook received his early 
education in the public schools of Oxford, entered the University of 
Mississippi and was graduated in 1878 with t'.'e Degree LL. B. He 
began the practice of law in Holmes County; after remaining tlure 
one year he moved to Batesville in 1880; in 1886 he represented Pan- 



'♦.ft 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT 



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Chief Justice Supreme Court 



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SAM C. COOK 

Justice Supreme Court 



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J. M. STEVENS 
Justice Supreme Court 



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GEO. H. ETHRIDGE 
Justice Supreme Court 



EXECCTU-i: l)KI'AKT.Mi:XTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 535 

Ola County in the State Legislature; in 18S8 he removed to Clarks- 
dale and represented Coahoma County in lS90-18It2-lS94; from 1900 
to 1002 he was attorney for the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee Board; 
in 1902 he was appointed Circuit Judge of the Eleventh District by 
Governor Longine, was re-appointed by Governor Vardaman in 1906 
and by Governor Noel in 1910: was appointed by Governor Brewer 
a Justice of the Supreme Court and took his seat on the bench 
May 10th, 1912. Few men in the State of Mississippi have borne 
themselves in high public ofRce with more dignity and ability than 
Judge Sam C. Cook. With the purest motives and clearest concep- 
tions of right, he combines a generous sympathy for his fellowraen, 
and his career as a member of the Supreme Court of Mississippi has 
been an exceptional one for ability, justice and integrity of purpose. 
Judge Cook is one of the best equipped jurists who has in the cur- 
rent history of the State occupied a place on the Supreme Bench 
and the people of Mississippi owe much to him for sustaining the 
high record made by the able jurists of the past. 

Judge Cook Is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Church. 
He was married to Elizabeth :Murphy. October 2oth. 1882, daughter of 
Dr. Charles T. and Ann Eliza (Harrington) Murphy, of Durant, Holmes 
County. Judge and Mrs. Cook have four children, Charles. Edwin, 
Marjorie and Sam C, Jr. 



JOH>" MORGAX StE\'E>S. 

John Morgan Stevens of Jackson and Hattiesburg, Justice o^ the 
Supreme Court of :Mississippi, was born May 27, 1876, at Old Augusta.. 
Perry County, Miss. He is the son of Benjamin Stevens and Lorena 
Annette Breland of Augusta, Miss. His father was a native of Jack- 
son County. Miss. He always resided at Augusta, where he engaged 
in farming, having extensive interests in stock raising and timber 
business. For a while he followed mercantile business and was a 
speculator in timber lands. He was a gallant soldier of the Con- 
federacy, serving throughout the war and was Captain of a Cavalry 
Regiment, in Steed's Battalion, and at the close of the war was acting 
Colonel, but without commission. Colonel Stevens was a true South- 
erner and an ardent admirer of the heroes of the ConfecJeracy, as an 
evidence of which he gave to his six sons, each the name of a Con- 
federate general. 

The Stevens family was among the early settlers of Mississippi. 
They were originally from England where they lost their estates be- 
cause of having followed the fortunes of Oliver Cromwell. Chauncey 
Bigelow Stevens and Lucy (Ferrill) Stevens were the paternal grand- 
parents of Judge Stevens. An 'interesting family history places his 



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536 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

grandfather among the btiilders and makers of America. He was 
born at Lee, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, February 27, 1793. He 
began life as a New England teacher and while still a young man, he 
moved to Virginia, where he met and married an aunt of Stonewall 
Jackson. After the early death of his young wife, he grew restless 
and sought adventure and change of scene to assuage his grief. Join- 
ing the great stream of immigration flowing southward, he came down 
the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers on a flat-boat, which was at that time 
the mode of transportation. After a brief stay in New Orleans, he 
came to Jackson County. Miss., and resumed his profession of 
teaching. He married Lucy Ferrill. a native of that county, and 
continued to teach in that and the surrounding counties, where he 
was known as a devout member of the :Methodi5t Church, and where 
he died, an honored patriarch at the age of ninety years. It is inter- 
esting to note that an ancestry of this kind flows in the veins of much 
of our population. 

Judge Stevens' mother was the daughter of Hiram Breland and Lucy 
(Moody) Breland of Washington. Greene County, Miss., whose an- 
cestors came to Mississippi from South Carolina. They reared a large 
family who have always contributed to the development of the State. 
Judge Stevens received his early education from the public schools 
of Augusta, and later attended Millsaps College during the first three 
years of its organization. From his entrance at the University of 
Mississippi, his career has been an unusually brilliant one. His pri- 
mary claim to distinction consisted of his winning the medal of the 
Hermaean Literary Society in the Senior debate; he was soon after 
made President of that Society and was also, for some time. President 
of the University Y. M. C. A.; at his graduation in the class of 1898, 
with B. A. de.gree, he was first-honor man and valedictorian. He read 
law at the University of Mississippi, and later a special course 
under the tutelage of his oldest brother, William Forrest Stevens, then 
Circuit Judge of the Fifth District. After a year of this preparation, 
he entered for the State Bar E.\-amination under Chancellor Byrd, and 
was admitted to practice upon a certificate from the Supreme Court, 
grading and complimenting examination papers. He located at Lex- 
ington. Holmes County. Miss, where he formed a branch office for the 
law firm of Southworth & Stevens. L. M. Southworth of Carrollton be- 
ing senior partner. In 1901, he removed to Hattiesburg, when that 
city was just beginning to boom, and formed a partnership with his 
older brother, H. Sttiart Stevens, this firm being known as Stevens 
& Stevens, afterwards as Stevens, Stevens & Cook. 

Early in 1912. he was appointed by Governor Erev.er, as Chancellor 
of the Eighth District. The Legislature passed the Elective Judiciary 
Act. which cut his term as Chancellor and threw him into an election 
in 1914. He immediately began his campaign and was elected for a full 



JUDGES SUPREME COURT 



J. B. HOLDEX 
Justice Supreme Court 




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CLATTOX D. POTTER 
Justice Supreme Court 






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E. O. STKE5 
Justice Supreme Court 



GEORGE C. MYERS 
Clerk Supreme Court 



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EXKCUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD BOiUlDS 537 

term as Chancellor and ^vas serving in that capacity when he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Brewer for a full nine-years term as Supreme 
Judge, which office he now holds. In this high otTicial capacity. Judge 
Stevens has served with exceptional ability and is recognized as a 
strong and able jurist. 

In political faith, Judge Stevens is a Democrat and has served as a 
member of the Forrest County Executive Committee and as County 
Election Commissioner. He is an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South, and has aided in the work of that denomin- 
ation, in the various places of his residence, being now identifiea 
with the Galloway ilemorial Church of Jackson. Miss. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and Elks, and ib 
a Master Mason. 

On June 7, 1905, Judge Stevens was married at Ciystal Springs, 
Miss., to Ethel Featherstun, who is the daughter of Rev. Honry Walter 
Featherstun and Emily Edwards (White) Featherstun. Mrs. Stevens' 
father spent many years of his early married life as an itinerant min- 
ister of the Methodist Church in California; more recently, he has 
pursued the same high calling in various pastorates of Mississippi. 
His father was also a Methodist minister, Francis Marion Featherstun. 
of W^arren County, Miss. Mrs. Stevens" maternal grandfather was 
Fi-anklin White, a noted physician of Vicksburg, Warren County. Miss. 

Judge and Mrs. Stevens have four children, John Morgan, Jr., Em- 
ily White, Stuart Featherstun and Ethelwyn Featherstun. 



JOH-X BlKTOX HOLDEX 

John Burton Holden of McComb, Mississippi, Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Mississippi, was born January 5th, 1S73, at the old Holden 
Place in Franklin County, Mississippi. He is the son of Dr. John 
Everly Holden and Laura (Curtis) Holden of Franklin County. Dr. J. 
E. Holden was born in Pike County, most of his life being spent in 
Franklin County. He graduated from the iMedical Department of Tu- 
lane University, New Orleans, La., in 1861; almost immediately joined 
the Franklin County Rifles and served four years in the Confederate 
Army. He was a prominent and successful physician and surgeon up 
to the time of his death in 1S89. He was the son of Dr. John Holden 
and Elizabeth Strickland Holden, who were among the progressive 
families of Franklin County. Mississippi. 

Judge Holden's mother was the daughter of John Curtis of Catahoula, 
Parish, La. He received his education in the public schools of Frank- 
lin County and studied law in the offices of Col. T. R. Stockdale, C. E. 
Williams and Judge W. P. Cassady. He was admitted to the Missis- 
sippi Bar in June 18f)4 and practiced at Summit for nineteen years 



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538 EXECLTIVE DErARTMEXTS. OFFICES AXD DOAKDS 

Judge Holden was Mayor of Suiuniit for twelve years and became 
Prosecuting Attorney for Pike Comity in 1911. Removing to McComl., 
he continued his practice until appointed Circuit Judge in -May, 1914. 
and having filled the office satisfactorily, he w^as elected for a four 
years term in November of that year. The Legislature of 1916 added 
throe judges to the Supreme Bench and Judge Holden was appointed as 
one of these. To this exalted position he brings ability, a wide ex- 
perience and an earnest desire to perform with di.^tinction the duties 
incumbent upon the oihce. He is popular with the people of his section 
and a future of mucn usefulness in his profession lies before him. 

Judge Holden is a Democrat and has always taken an active pan 
in the political affairs of his State. Is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and of the fraternal orders of Masons, Odd Fellows, Elks, 
Woodmen of the World, and B. of R. T. 

On October 17th, 1S94. he was united in marriage to Mary Cassedy, 
daughter of Judge Hiram Cassedy and Bettie (Durfey) Cassedy of 
Brookhaven, Mississippi. Her paternal grandparents were Judge Hi 
ram Cas.sedy and Mary (Proby) Cassedy, the latter being the daughter 
of Captain William Proby of the Franklin County Rifles, C. S. A. 

Judge and Mrs. Holden have one son, Hiram Cassedy, a graduate of 
1916, in Washington & Lee University, Lexington, Va. 



ElGFNE 0(. T.VVE SYKKS 

Eugene Octave Sykes of Aberdeen, Miss., Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Mississippi, was born July 16, 1876, at Aberdeen, Miss. He is the 
son of Eugene Octavius Sykes and India (Rogers) Sykes of Aberdeen, 
Miss. His father was a native of Alabama from which State he re- 
moved to Mississippi. He was a soldier in the Confederate Army, 
serving throughout the War and was a member of the Constitutionai 
Convention of 1890. He was for two terms a member of the Mississippi 
Legislature and served twelve years as Circuit Judge. He was the 
son of Dr. W. A. Sykes and India Barrett Sykes of Decatur, Ala. and 
later of Aberdeen. 

John Sykes' mother was the daughter of F. M. Rogers and India 
Sykes of Aberdeen. Miss. F. M. Rogers served as Circuit Judge of 
his district, before the Civil War, when he was but twenty-four years 
old; was a captain of the Confederate Army and was killed at Fort 
Donelson; was once candidate for Governor on the Whig ticl.et. 

The Sykes are of Virginia ancestry, the family having come from 
that Stale to North Mississippi along with the tide of emigration from 
the older Southern States, after the country was purchased from the 
Indians. 



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EXECmVE DEPARTMEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 539 

Judge E. 0. Sykes received his elementary training in the public 
schools of Aberdeen. Later, he attended Bell Buckle College, Tenn., 
St. John's College and L'. S. Naval Academy. Annapolis. Md., and the 
University nf Mis?i.-Hi{ipi. He was graduated from the latter in 1897 
with degree of LI.. B.. and began practice in the city of Aberdeen. He 
later moved to Rosedale and formed a partnership with Hon. Charles 
Scott. After a successful practice of two years, he moved back to Aber- 
deen and formed a partnership with his brother, J. A. Sykes. He was 
Presidential Elector for the State at large, in 1904. Judge Sykes has 
risen rapidly in his profession. In 1916 he was appointed a member of 
the Supreme Court by Gov. Theo. G. Bilbo, whom he supported for Gov- 
ernor. Later he was elected to that place from the Northern District 
over Judga R. H. Knox. 

In political faith. Judge Sykes is a Democrat and has been a member 
of the State Democratic Executive Committee. He is a member of the 
Episcopal Church, is a Mason, an Elk, and belongs to the College Fra- 
ternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

In 1903, he was married to Malvina May Scott, daughter of Hon. 
Charles Scott and Malvina (Yerger) Scott of Rosedale, Miss. Hon. 
Charles Scott was a prominent figure in the legal history of the state 
and was one of the wealthiest cotton planters in the south. Judge 
and Mrs. Sykes have three children, Charles Scott, Octavia, and Mal- 
vina Yerger. 



Gkof;ge Hamilton Ethkfdge 

George Hamilton Ethridge of Jackson. Justice of the Supreme Court 
of the State of Mississippi, son of Mark DeKalb Ethridge and Virginia 
Rebecca (White) Ethridge. was born February 26, 1871. at Ft. Steph- 
ens, Kemper County, Miss. Mark DeKalb Ethridge was the son of 
Soloman Ethridge and Rebecca (Lister) Ethridge of Fort Stephens 
and Rio, Miss. He served duirng the Civil War in the 14th Mississippi 
Regiment, as a private, tirst in the infantry and later in the cavalrv 
under Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. 

Judge Ethridge's mother is the daughter of William Hamilton White 
and Hulda (Cochran) White of Daleville. Miss. He is of pure English 
ancestry, both paternal and maternal grandfathers were natives of 
North Carolina, the family having settled there before the Revolution. 
His father and his wife's father both held public office in Lauderdale 
County prior to the Civil War, and their families have always been 
identified with tlie best interests of Mississippi. 

Judge Ethridge's early education was obtained in the public schools 
of Kemper County. He later took an academic course at Iron Springs 
Institute and Linden Academy. He taught in the public schools of 
Kemper County for three years, winning for himself a high reputation 



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540 EXECUTIVE DEPAKTMEXTS, OFFICES .VXD BOARDS 

for faithful and capable service. He studitd law in a private office 
under Elhridge ic ^IcBeath of Meridian, Miss., and was admitted to 
practice in November, 1894. locaiing in Meridian, where he remained 
until 1898 when he removed to DeKalb and formed a partnership with 
J. H. Currie, then a leading lawyer of Mississippi. On the election 
of J. H. Currie to the office of District Attorney, the partnership was 
dissolved. 

Judge Etnridge returned to Meridian and was elected to the State 
Legislature in 1903 and served with distinction four years in the lower 
house. He was attorney for the. Board of Supervisors from 1903 to 
1911, and was appointed Assistant Attorney-General and served from 
1912 to 1917. 

Judge Ethridge has been identified with many movements for the 
moral and civic advancement of his State. He was lecturer of the 
Law and Order League of Kemper County, and has contributed num- 
erous articles to the press on educational, social, economic and po- 
litical subjects. 

During his terms of office as Assistant Attorney-General, General 
Ethridge displayed exceptional ability, giving proof of unusual ac- 
quaintance with his profession and in every instance evincing fearless- 
ness, impartiality and justice in the opinions that he rendered. 

In November. 1916, he was elected Justice of the Supreme Court and 
though one of the youngest members who has ever occupied a place iii 
Mississippi's highest court, he takes tirst rank in the present body and 
reflects distinguished credit upon himself and the State for his just 
interpretation of the law. 

On September I'Stli, 1904, he was married to Lula Pauline Tann, 
daughter of Thomas M. Tann and Annie (Brown) Tann of DeKalb, 
Mississippi. Mrs. Ethridge's grandfather was Rev. Thomas Tann, a 
Methodist minister and a soldier in the Confederate Army. Her ma- 
ternal gran.dfather, O. G. Brown, was a prominent citizen of Kemper 
County, being Justice of the Peace in his district for twenty-eight 
years. 

Judge and Mrs. Ethridge have four children: — George D.. Alice 
Ophelia, F:dna Meredith and Thomas Tann. 



Cl.vyton Daniei. PoTxr.R 

Clayton Daniel Potter, Justice of the Supreme Court of Mississiiipi. 
was born near Jackson, Miss., January 12, 1880. He is the sou of 
Daniel M. and Octavia Potter, of Jackson, and the gnmdson of Judge 
Gn)rge L. Potter, who was a prominent member of the Mississittpi bar 
before the Civil Wav. Judge George L. Potter was an active figure 



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EXKCUTIVK DKPARTMKNTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 541 

in the Reconstruction Period of Mississippi and ^^•as among: the most 
influential men of his community in all questions pertainin? to tne 
restoration and advancement of the South after the v,^t. The family 
has been prominent in Mississippi since early pioneer days, noth m 
the social and public affairs of the State. Judge Wiley H. Potter an 
uncle of Judge Clayton Potter occupies a high position in his profes- 
sion in the City of Jackson, and is greatly beloved and honored by its 

people. . .1 w 

Judge Clavton Potter's early education was obtained m the public 
schools of Hinds County. He later attended the Jackson Graded 
Schools, after which he entered Milsaps College. He was graduated 
from the literarv department of this institution in 1902. and one year 
later during which time he was employed as a commercial teacher, 
he entered the Law Department of Milsaps College, where he re- 
mained one year, completing his law course in 1904. He located for 
practice in the City of Jackson and soon won a reputation as an in- 
dustrious and capable young attorney. In 1907, he was elected to the 
State Senate and served his first term in that body when twenty- 
seven years of age. He was re-elected in 1911 and while a member of 
that body was influential and active in much of its legislation. Among 
the laws for which he was responsible while a member of the Senate, 
are the county and municipal depository laws; the law for placing the 
County Treasurer on a fixed salary of §300.00. instead of a fee basis. 
the law abolishing the office of municipal treasurer. In addition to 
these, he was the a'lthor of the law abolishing the fellow servant rule 
as to all persons and corporations using "engine cars and any con- 
trivances whatever propelled by the dangerous agency of steam, gas, 
■ gasoline and electricity;" author of the law abolishing the def.mse of 
contributory negligence, substituting therefor the present system of 
comparative negligence. Ju(5ge Potter has had the support of the Su- 
preme Court of Mississippi in these measures, the "fellow-servant act" 
being sustained in an appeal to the Supreme Court of the United 
States. 

Judge Potter in his official capacity and as an attorney, has been 
connected with a great deal of constructive legislation.. He was in- 
strumental in having submitted, at the 1914 session of the Legislature, 
the six amendments having in view the increase of the Supreme Court, 
providing that it could work in two divisions, and that the judges 
therefor should be elected by the people. 

At the Bar As.^ociation in Gulfport in 1914, he secured the adoption 
of resolutions providing that the president should appoint a committee 
to give publicity to the Supreme Court amendments. As secretary of 
the committee, Judcie Potter was active in securing a favorable vote 
for the ratification of the Supreme Court amendments. 



542 EXE("UTIVIO DErAKTMKXTS. OFKICES AXD BOARDS 

He has been engaged in a number of important, cases, among them 
being a suit of the Natchez Southern Railroad Company against Craw- 
ford, in whicli the constitutionality of the contributory negligence stat- 
ute was upheld by the Mississippi Supreme Court; the case involving 
the right of the City of Jackson to allow the library to be situated in 
Smith Park, and settling the question of title to Smith Park. Also, the 
suit upholoing the constitutionality of the law exempting building and 
loan associations and kindred money lending concerns from the gen- 
eral S per cent law. 

Judge Potter is a Democrat; in religious faith leans to the Christian 
Church. He is a member of the fraternal Orders of Masons, {Knight 
Templar and Shriner) ; Knights of Pythias; Woodmen of the Worla. 

He Mas appointed a justice of the Supreme Court in 1916 and is 
among the youngest members who ever served in that capacity. Judge 
Potter is unmarried. 



George Clifton Mvlrs 

George Clifton Myers of Jackson, Mi.ss., Clerk of the Supreme Court 
of Mississippi, was born September 2nd. 1S5_\ at Byhalia, Marshall 
County, Mississippi, and is the son of George Boggan Myers and Usebia 
Saxon (Rodgers) Myers of Marshall County, Miss. 

George Boggan Myers was the son of Absalom Myers and Adeline 
Boggan Myers. He was born at Wadesboro, Anson County, N. Caro- 
lina. In 1S48, he moved v\-ith his parents to Byhalia. Miss. He entered 
the Confederate service as Captain of Company I, 10th Mississippi 
Regiment. He was seriously wounded at Munfordsville, Ky. ; was pro- 
moted to Lieutenant-Colcnel of the 10th Mississippi Regiment, and 
lost his left arm at Jonesboro, Ga., in 1864. He was captured and kept 
a prisoner at Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, until the close of the war, 
being paroled in May. 1865. 

The mother of George Clifion Myers was the daughter of James 
Saxon Rodgers and wife. Emily Ware of Laurens District, S. Carolina, 
from which place they moved to Byhalia, Miss, in 1848. Hi^;- great- 
grandfather. Marraaduke Myers, immigrated to America and settled on 
the eastern shores of Maryland, afterwards removing to North Caro- 
lina. His maternal ancestors came from England and settled in South 
Carolina; Joseph S. Rodgers. his maternal grandfather, served in the 
Seminole War. 

Mr. :Myers received his early education in the pay schools of Marshall 
County during the Civil War. and after the close of the war attended 
Chalmers' Institute at Holly Springs. He took a course of law at 
Holly Siirings. also a course in book-keepin.g, but never practiced law, 
as he was appointed Clerk of the Circuit Court in 1879, and under the 
Statute, could not practice while in office. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 543 

In this position he served from May 5th. lS7f> to September 22ud, 
1903. He was first appointtd to the office by Gov. John M. Stone, to 
succeed his father who died May 4th, 1879, after which he was re- 
elected six consecutive terms. 

In 1903, Mr. Myers was appointed, by Gov. A. II. Longino, Supreme 
Court Clerk to succeed E. W. Brown, and has entered on his fourth 
term. 

Mr. Myers was a member of the "Red Shirt Brigade" in 1875, when 
the State was carried by the Democratic party and the Republicans 
were removed from office. He was largely instrumental in carrying 
the County of Marsliall for Democracy. He was elected Captain of a 
company from Holly Springs, in 1S9S, for the Spanish-American War. 
He brought one hunderd men to Jackson for the First Regiment of 
Mississippi Volunteer.s. On physical examination he failed and did not 
go to Chickamauga with the regiment. 

Mr. Myers is a member o^ the Episcopal Church, member of the 
vestry, and secretary of St. Andrew's Church. Jackson, Miss. He is 
Past Master of Masons, Past Grand High Priest of Royal Arch Chap- 
ter of Mississippi; Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery of 
Mississippi; Past Grand Protector of Knights and Ladies of Honor; 
Past Chancellor of Knights of Pythias; and is at present Master of 
Kadosh of Albert Pike Consistory of Scottish Rite Masons, and Orient 
of Mississippi Valley of Jackson. 

Mr. Myers is a prominent and influential citizen of Jackson, and, 
though having, nearly all of his life, been connected with the political 
life of his State, his ideals of right have never been subverted for sel- 
fish purposes. With a high standard of citizenship, he accepts no favor 
with a price that entails a loss of honor, disdaining place and position 
if not worthily won. He has been honored with high office in the 
Sons of Confederate Veterans and other organizations, and in every 
position of life has reflected honor upon Mississippi. 

On January 20, 1S80, Mr. :\Iyers was married to Ida Greer Bracken 
of Holly Springs, Miss. Mrs. Myers is the daughter of Elvis Jett 
Bracken and Frances Wright Bracken of Holly Springs. The latter's 
niother was a Miss Lewis, related to Meriwether Lewis; her brother, 
Gen. Marcus J. Wright of Washington City, was a Brigadier General 
in the Confederate States Army, and now holds an important position 
in the Confederate Records Division of the War Department. 

Mr. and Mrs. Myers have four children, George Boggan Myers. 
a noted Episcopal clergyman and dean of Trinity Cathedral in Havana, 
Cuba; Clayton Hull, Elvis Lucas, and Benjamin McKie. 



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544 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 



CHANXELLORS 

Abnf.r Johx ^[cIntykk 
First District 

Abner John Mclntyre, of Booneville, Chancellor of the First Dis- 
trict, was born November 29, 1872. at Tiplersville, Tippah County. 
Miss. He is the son of "William James Mclntyre and Sarah Elizabeth 
(McCoy) Mclntyre. The paternal grandfather and grandmother of 
Chancellor Mclntyre were born in Scotland, and later lived in Cumber- 
land County. X. C. their names being Wm. J. :\lclntyre and ^lary 
Stewart Mclntyre. The latter was a descendant of the Stewarts of 
Scotland. 

Chancellor 31clntyre's father moved from North Carolina to Ripley, 
Miss., where he ser\ed for fouiteen years as County Tax Assessor, and 
for twelve years as Chancery Clerk. His wife was the daughter of 
Abner McCoy and ^Mary McCoy of Tippah County. 

Chancellor Mclntyre received his early education in the country 
schools of Tippah County, principally under the instruction of his 
father. Upon completion of the course of the High School at Ripley, 
Miss., he entered the University of Mississippi for the study of law, 
where he graduated in 1S97, with the degree of LL. B. He immedi- 
ately began the practice of law in Ripley and after marked success, he 
removed, in 1.90S. to Booneville, where he continued his professional 
career. In January, 1914, he accepted the position of Chancellor for his 
District, the Fir.^t. Since that time he has been faithful and untiring 
in the duties of his office, and has won for himself a high reputation as 
an able jurist and a fair and conscientious judge. He leads in every 
movement for the general uplift of his section; he is a Democrat, chair- 
man of the Congressional Executive Committee of the Second District 
in 1900-1902; was Chairman of the Executive Committee of Prentiss 
County; and resigned that office when elected Chancellor of tlie First 
District. He has been a member of the State Executive Committee. 

He is a Baptist, member of the State Executive Committee of the 
LajTnen's work of the Baptist Church. He is a member of the fra- 
ternal orders of Masons, Knights of Pythias, and Woodman of the 
World. 

On April 21, 1904, he was married to Stella Ora Tays, daughter of 
Jas. Polk Tays and Sarah Gabell Tays, who lived at Booneville. Miss. 
Chancellor and Mrs. Mclntyre have three children, James Abner. 
John Tays. and Elmer Sharp. 



CHANCELLORS 



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A. J. McIN'TVRE 
Chiincellor. 1st District 




J. G. McGOWE.N 
Chancellor. 3rd District 



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G. C. TANN' 
Chancellor, 2d Dii?trict 



R. W. CUTRER 
Chancellor, lih District 



EXECUTIXE DKrAKT.MEXTS. OFFICEtJ AND BOARDS 543 

Gkoiu.e Clakkl Tanx 

Second District 

George Clarke Tanu-of Hickory, Miss.. Chancellor of the Second 
District, was born June 6. 1S5.S, at Mokalussa. Miss. He is the son of 
Thomas Austin Tann and Matilda Ann (Floyd) Tann of Alabama and 
Mississippi. His father was a gallant soldier in the Confederate Army. 
was wounded at Miirfreesboro. Tenn.. and died a few days after at 
Bethel Springs, Tenn. He was the son of Alfred Tann and Mary Daniel 
Tann of Eutaw and Jones' Bluff, Ala. 

Chancellor Tann's paternal grandfather. Alfred Tann, was a soldier 
under William Henry Harrison at the Battle of Tippecanoe and also 
served, a long time at Fort Yincennes. He was a pioneer of the State 
of Indiana, but came to Alabama in 1S17. settling near what is now 
Tuscaloosa, Ala., and was afterward in the Creek War. He died in 
1863 in Jones Bluff, Sumter County, Ala., after an active and heroic 
pioneer life. 

Chancellor Tann's mother was the daughter of Preslie Floyd and 
Winifred (Hodges) Floyd, of Moscow. Kemper County. Miss. Preslie 
Floyd removed from North Carolina to Kemper County. Miss., in th ■ 
year 1840, where he resided until his death in 1851. 

Chancellor Tann obtained his early education at home; went one 
year to the Baptist College at Cleburne, Texas and four years in Do.le- 
ville. Miss., graduating at the latter place in 1S84, with degree of A. B. 
He had always been a student and whenever possible, spent nitich 
time in the study of classic literature. He studied law in an cfhce in 
Philadelphia. Miss., and was licensed to practice in 1SS7. in Philadel- 
phia and Hickory. , 

He is a Democrat, has never asked nor held any political office, until 
January. 1915. when he became Chancellor. He served on the Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee from 1905 to 1909. and also on the County 
Executive Committee from l^'iiO to 1909. As a public official he renders 
efficient and faithful service, and althou2h he har'i never sou.sht politi- 
cal office prior to the position he now holds, he is popijlar with the 
people of his section, and is destined to remain a prominent figure iit 
the political life of his District. 

He is a member of the Methodist Church, and of the fraternal Order 
of Masons. On October 20, 1887. he married Beulah Isabella Yates, a 
daughter of Thomas E. Yates and Susan Lee Yates, of Philadelphia. 
Miss. Mrs. Tann's grandfather. Darling Yates, moved from Georgia 
into Alabama in 1840. and from Alabama into Mississippi about 1850. 
Chancellor and Mrs. Tann have two children, Rob Roy Tann. 
married and has one child. Court St?no2:rapher. educated at L'niversity 
of Mississippi. Georgia Beulali educat-d at Martha Washington Col- 
lege at Abingdon, Ya., now teaching at Columbus, Mis3.« 

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546 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

James Gukkr MtGowcx 
Third District , 

James Greer McGowen of "VN'ater Valley, Mi^^s.. Chancellor of the 
Third District, was born September 19, 187i\ at Xesbit, DeSoto County, 
Miss. He is the son of James Greer McGowen. Sr. and ;Mary E. (Dean; 
McGowen. Ho is of Scotch-Irish and English descent. His father, a 
native of Lafayette County, Miss., was a soldier in the Confederate 
Army, enlisted as First Lieutenant of the "Horn Lake Volunteers" 
and was acting as Captain when his company was captured at the 
Battle of Franklin, Tenn., after a desperate struggle nearly every 
member was either killed or wounded. 

Chancellor McGowen's paternal grandfather. John H. McGowcn. was 
a lineal descendant of General John McGowen, who took part in the 
American Revolution, in the Carolinas. The Mississippi family coming 
of a worthy and distinguished ancestry, continued to render faithful 
service to their county and state. 

Determined to give his children as good advantages as his circum- 
stances permitted, the father kept his son James in the common 
schools of DeSoto County, where he obtained a good High School edu- 
cation. He afterwards attended the State University at Oxford. Miss., 
and took a business course in Leddin's Business College, in Memphis. 
Tenn. 

In 189S, Chancellor McGowen began 'the practice of law in DeSoto 
County, afterwards removing to Water Valley, where he successfully 
continued his profession. His rapid advancement in his professional 
life indicated the possession of those qualities that make for leader- 
ship in public life. He is one of the most influential men of his com- 
munity, in the progress of which he is deeply interested. In 1904-08, 
he represented his county in the Legislature; was city attorney for 
Water Valley from 1906 to 1913; attorney for Yalobusha County in 
1912-1913, and was appointed Chancellor by Governor Earl Brewer, on 
September 15. 1913, as successor to Judge Duke M. Kimbrough; was 
elected to that office in August. 1914. 

Chancellor McGowen is a Democrat; steward and Sunday school su- 
perintendent in the IMethodist Episcopal Church South; deleeate to 
General Conference from the Xorth Mississippi Conference: Trustee 
of Grenada College; and Chairman Sunday-school Board Xorth Mis- 
sissippi Conference. He is a Mason, a member of the Woodmen of the 
World, and presiding officer of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. 

On November 8. 1893, he was married to Lucia Lamar Richmond, 
daughter of Dr. D. F. Richmond and Susan Randall Richmond of Eu- 
dora. Miss. They have three children. James Greer, Jr.. Hardy 
Richmond ^nd Miriam LeClair. 



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OSCAR B. TAYLOFl 
Chancellor. 5th District 



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J. A. MAY 
Chancellor, 7th District 



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A. Y. WOODWARD 
Chancellor, 6th District 



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D. M. RUSSELL 
Chancellor, 10th District 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 547 

RlCHABD WII.TZ ClTKKK 

Fourth District 

Richard Wiltz Cutrer of Magnolia, :\Iiss., Chancellor of the Fourth 
District, was born May S. 1S76, at Osyka, Pike County, Miss. He is 
the son of Isaac Wesley Cutrer and Mary (Sullivan) Cutrer, the 
former being originally from Tangipahoa Parish, La., and the latter 
from Mobile, Ala. They lived at various times in Covington and New 
Orleans, La., and in Osyka. Miss. I. W. Cutrer -was a merchant in 
Covington, commission merchant in New Orelaus, merchant at Osyka, 
mayor of that town, and Justice of the Peace of the Fifth Supervisors' 
District of Pike County, Miss. Chancellor Cutrer's paternal grand- 
father emigrated from France and settled in South Carolina, where 
he married Miss Sarah Brown and moved to a farm near Tangipahoa, 
La., where they spent the remainder of their lives. Chancellor Cutrer's 
maternal grandfather came from Ireland, first settled in Virginia and 
later removed to Alabama, where he married Miss Ale Wiltz, a first 
cousin of Governor Wiltz of Louisiana. 

Chancellor Cutrer early enjoyed good educational advantages. He 
received his primary education in the private and public schools of 
Osyka and later attended Mississippi College, Clinton, :Miss., and the 
University of Kentucky, graduating from the commercial department 
of the latter. During 1900-1901, he attended the Law Department of 
the University of Mississippi and began the practice of his profession 
at Osyka, in 19')1. In September of that year, he moved to Magnolia 
and has since enjoyed a large practice, appearing as counsel in many 
of the most important criminal and civil cases in his section. In April, 
1910, Governor Xoel appointed him as Prosecuting Attorney for Pike 
County, the term lasting to January, 1912. He was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Earl Brewer in October, 1913, as Chancellor of the Fourth Chan- 
cery District. In November, 1914. he was elected to the same office 
for four years, beginning January 1, 1915. Chancellor Cutrer has 
been very successful in his practice and is one of the promising young 
lawyers of the state. 

He is a Democrat; a deacon of the Presbyterian church; is a Sbriner 
Mason and Woodman of the World. On February 10, 1904, he married 
Elizabeth Lewis at Lebanon, Ky. She is the daughter of George Wash- 
ington Lewis and Annie Montgomery Lewis, who lived at Campbells- 
ville, Ky. Geo. W. Lewis was the son of James Lewis and Elizabeth 
Cain. James Lewis was the son of John and Mary Lewis of Virginia. 
His parents removed to Campbellsville, Ky.. whore they reared their 
children, giving them the ad%-antages usually enjoyed by the better 
classes. Elizabeth Cain was the daughter of James O. Cain and Eliza 
beth (Hayette) Cain, whose father was an English nobleman, who dis- 



548 EXEi^rTlVK DKPAr.TMEXT.-5. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

inherited iier because of hor marriage with one not of tlie nobility. 
Mrs. Cutrer's mother was the daughter of Nathaniel and Patsey (Wins- 
ton) Montgomery, who was a first cousin of Governor Bolivar Buckner 
of Kentucky. 

At the close of the Civil War, Chancellor Cutrer's father found his 
wealth gone and at his death in 1S89, the young son, a boy of tliir- 
teen, was left to care for bis mother and younger children. H"^ met his 
responsibilities bravely and by hard work on the farm and as clerk, 
made enough to take a business course. After completing this, he 
engaged in book-keeping and thus paid his expenses, while taking his 
law course, be.£:innin.g his practice in 1901. 

Chancellor and Mrs. Cutrer have throe children, Lewis Wesley, 
Mary Ellena and Elizabeth Tillie. 



Oscar BorAu Taylor 
P'ifth District 

Oscar Bomar Taylor of Jackson, ?vliss , Chancellor of the Fiftli Dis- 
trict, was born October 1.5, 18S0, at Lodi, iliss. He is the son of Wil- 
liam Prevatt Taylor of Lcdi. and Wilmoth Ann (Hurt) Taylor of Wi- 
nona, Miss. William P. Taylor was a native of Kentucky. He was 
engaged in farmin.g after his removal to Mississippi and took part in 
all the movements in his community for the improvement of society. 
Chancellor Taylor's mothei' was the daughter of Dr. Nesbit Hurt and 
Elizabeth Miriam. Hurt of Montgomery County. Miss. 

Chencellor Taylor oljttined his early education in the rural schools 
of Montgomery County a'nd tlie High School of Winona, near which 
place his mother's family resided. Having laid the foundation of a lib- 
eral education, he attended Mississippi College and was graduated 
from that institution with the degree of A. B. and second honors. He 
afterwards graduated from the Law Department of ^Milsaps College 
and., in 1907, began his practice in Jackson, Miss. He has rapidly 
advanced in his profession and is not a blind partisan of any political 
faction. 

From 190.S to 1912. he- served as Trustee of the State Insane Hos- 
pital; in 1910, he became Prosecuting Attorney for Hinds County. 
Miss.: and in 191-5, he was elected Chancellor of the Fifth District. 
which office he still holds. 

Chancellor Taylor in political faith is a Democrat; is a deacon and 
Financial Secretary of the First Baptist Church of Jackson, Miss., was 
Superintendent of that Sunday-sf-hool from 1914 to 1916, when he re- 
."^ign^d on account of the duties of his profession and ofTicial position. 
In the fraternal Order of Masons, Chancellor Taylor has taken the de- 



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ROWL.AXD W. HEIDELBERG 
Circuit Judge, 10th District 



H. H. RODGERS 
Circuit Judye. 5th District 





J. F. GUYXES 
Circuit Judge. 14th District 



E. D. DIXKIXS 
Circuit Judj;,e, 17th District 



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KXKOCTIVE T'EPART-MEXTS, OFFICKS AXD BOAPIDS 549 

groes of Knights Teuinlar, Thirty-second Degree, Scottish Iviie and V\a 
habi Temple A. A. O. oi Mystic ^hriue. He is also a Knight of Pythias 
and a Woodman of the World. 

On April 24, litll. Chancellor Taylor was married to Lillie Belle 
Rowan, daughter of Dr. Elias Alford Rowan and Julia Lamb Rowan, 
of Wesson, .Miss. Chancellor and Mrs. Taylor have one ciiild, Oscar Bo- 
mar Taylor, Jr. 



Alukut Yor.Nd Woodwaiu) 
Si.xlh District 

Albert Young Woodward of Louisville, Miss., Chancellor of the 
Sixth District, was born August lU, 1S79. He is the son of Dr. George 
Prentice Vv'oodward and Susan Catherine (Metts) Woodward of Win- 
ston County. His mother was the daughter of Captain .Mike A. Metis 
and Mary Nash Metts of Louisville. Dr. G. P. Woodward resided in 
Louisville for near a half century and was for thirty-five years the 
leading physician in the town and county. He v,-as public-spirited and 
benevolent, and took an active part in all movements for the benefit of 
society and the advancement cf his section. His parents, Dr. George 
Young Woodward and Nancy (Carlisle) Woodward, were among the 
oldest' settlers of Louisville, and became one of its leading families. 
The Woodwards came to Mississijipi from South Carolina, where Chan- 
cellor Wocdwardi's paternal grandfather was born in Fairiield District, 
December 2, 1830. His father's mother was ". native of Chester Dis- 
trict, S. C, and was a member of the celebrated Carlisle family thai 
furnished so many distinguished preachers to the Methodist Church. 
Chancellor Woodward's maternal grandfather, Capt. Mike A. Metts, was 
a native of Newberry District, S. C. He took an active part in the po- 
litics of Winston County, Miss., and served as Sheriff of that countv 
for fourteeen years. He also served as State Senator and Representa- 
tive for many years. He was Captain of ilett's Legion in the Civii 
War. Chancellor Woodward's maternal grandmother was born in .A.ber- 
ville District, September 1, 1830. She was the granddaughter of Gen 
eral Washington Hodgts and a niece of Major John Hodges of Revolu 
tionary fame. The latter lived to a great age and it is recorded that 
he often, at the ripe old age of lu.5. walked fifteen miles for his dinner. 

The Woodwards and Metts have been influential religious and po- 
litical leaders of their section for over fifty years. Dr. Georg'e Y. 
Woodward was one of the leading business men and physicians of his 
section for fifty years, and served as a Surgeon in the Confederate 
.\rmy. 

Chancellor Woodwai-d's early education was obtained iu the public 
schools of Louisville, .Miss., and he graduated from the Louisville Nor- 



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lual College. Aiterwardo, he attended Milsaps College, and took a Law 
course at the University of ^Mississippi. He obtained license to prac- 
tice and began at Okolona; moved to Hattiesburg and became senior 
partner in the law firm of Woodward & Johnson. For the last twolv- 
years, he has practiced at Louisville. He was Mayor of LouLsville 
for two terms and declined re-election. On August 18, 1914, he was 
elected ChancUor of the Sixth District, which office he still fills to the 
entire satisfaction of his constituents. This is Chancellor "Woodward's 
first term in an office of this nature and the people of his District have 
made a wise selection. 

Chancellor Woodward has been a life-long Democrat; was Chairman 
of the Winston County Executive Committee for twelve years and re- 
signed this office to become a candidate for Chancellor. 

For the past twelve years, he has been a steward in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South, at Louisville; also District Steward of the 
Durant District; and a member of the Sunday-school Board of North 
Mississippi Conference. 

He is a member of the Phi Kappa Psi Greek Letter Fraternity, ond 
of the fraternal Orders of xMasons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
Eastern Star and Maccabees Lodge, a Past Master, Past High Priest, 
Past Chancellor Commander, Past Noble Grand and a Past Worthy 
Patron. 

On June 27, 1906, he was married to Ellen Bailey Sullivan, daughter 
of William V. Sullivan and Belle Murray Sullivan of Oxford, Miss. 
Mrs. Woodward's paternal grandfather was Dr. John I. Sullivan, a 
surgeon in the Confederate Army. Her maternal grandparents were 
James Murray and Belle Anderson Murray. The latter was a descend- 
ant of William Preston and Margaret Adair Anderson, also of John 
Adair v, ho lived at Chester District, S. C. and entered the Revolution- 
ary Army in 1777, at the age of twenty. He served as private, captain 
and major in Colonel Sumter's Regiment. After the war he went to 
Kentucky, later served as Governor and United States Senator, and 
commanded the Kentucky troops at the Battle of New Orleans, as 
Brigadier General. :.Irs. Woodward's father was a prominent lawyer 
and United States Senator from :\Iississippi. She is a niece of Joseph 
W. Bailey, Former United States Senator from Texas. 

Chancellor and -Mrs. Woodward have one child, Albert Young 
Woodward, Jr. 



Joseph Albert May. 

Seventh District. 

Joseph Albert May, of Sumner, was born June 2J, 1882, in Simraon 
County, Miss., and is the son of Joseph May and Parnecy Catherine 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 551 

(Howeil) May, of Mendeiiliall, Miss. He now fills with ability the po- 
sition of Chancellor of the Seventh District. He is of English ancestry, 
his great-great-graudfather, Joseph :May, having eaiigrated from Eng- 
land to America, served in the Army of the Revolution, being present 
when Covnwallls surrendered at Yorktown. After the war he settled 
in Virginia and later moved to Georgia. His sou, William ]^Iay, moved 
from Georgia to Simpson County, Miss., and served for years as Pro- 
bate Judge of that county. His son, Joseph May, father of Chancellor 
May, was born in Simpson County, Miss., and enlisted in the Confeder- 
ate army at the beginning of the war, as a private, and served through 
the war, having been elected Lieutenant. He served under Generals 
Hood, Lowry, Loring, Johnston, and Eeauregard and fought in the bat- 
tles of Baker's Creek, Franklin, Manassas, Vicksburg, and others. 

Chancellor May's mother, Parnecy Catherine May, is the daugi^ter of 
Lewis Howell and Ruth Howell, who were prominent in the early 
history of Rankin County, Miss. 

Mr. May worked on the farm in his early youth and graduated at 
Braxton Collegiate Institute in Simpson County, Miss. Later, he grad- 
uated at Mississippi College, Clinton, Miss., receiving the B. A. de- 
gree. He is also a graduate of the Law Department of Millsaps Col- 
lege, Jackson, ^liss., in which he received the LL. B. degree. He be- 
came a practising attorney at Sumner, Miss., where he has made for 
himself a high reputation as a lawyer. He was elected State Repre- 
sentative in 1911, and in 191 i was elected Chancellor of the Seventh 
District. In the Legislature, Mr. May was a member of the following 
committees: — Mississippi Levees, Corporations, Constitution, Judiciary, 
Public Printing, and Drainage. He has always taken a leading part in 
the movements for the benefit of his country and has been a progves- 
sive and helpful citizen in his section of the State. 

He is a member of the Baptist Church, a Columbian Woodman, 
Woodman of the V/orld, and a Mason. On the 2.5th of January, 1911, 
he was married to Miss iNIinnie Maude McMuUen, of Sumner. Mis.s.. 
daughter of Nathan James McMuUen and Anne (Powers) McMuUen 
of that place. !Mrs. May is the great-great-grand-niece of Patrick Hen- 
ry of Revolutionary fame, and the grand-niece of Brigadier-General 
Barry of the Confederate array. 



Wat.ter McKexxox Denny, Jr. 

Eighth District. 

Walter McKennon Denny, Jr., of Pascagoula, Miss., Chancellor of the 
Eighth District was born April 1, 1876. at ^loss Point, Jackson County, 
Miss. He is the son of Walter McKennon Denny and Hu'da (Rindall) 
Denny of Moss Point, and Pascagoula. His father served as Circuit 



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552 EXECUTIVE DEPART.MEXTS. OFFICES .VXD BO-\RDS 

and Chaucery Clerk of Jackson County for thirteen years and at the 
expiration of that time was elected to the lower House of Congress 
from the Sixth Congressional Distiict. He was the son of Walter Den- 
ny and Xancy McKenuon Denny, of Moss Point. 

Chancellor Denny is of Xew England ancestry, his maternal grand- 
father, Lyman Randall, coming to Jackson County, Miss., from Massa- 
chusetts when about eighteen years of age. Soon after his becoming 
of age, he served one term as Sheriff of his county; afterwards con- 
ducted a general mercantile busint ss until his death. He was a veter- 
an of the Confederate Army. 

Walter Denny, paternal grandfather of Chancellor Denny, was a na- 
tive of Greene County. Miss. He was a Confederate soldier and after 
the Civil War, settled in Jackson County and engaged in the manufac- 
ture of yellow pine lumber, an occupation common to that region o." 
Mississippi which abounds in extensive pine forests. 

Chancellor Denny obtained his early education in the schco's ol 
Pascagoula, Ja< kson County, Misss. He then attended Spring Hill 
College at Mobile, Ala. and, later, the Columbian University of Wash- 
ington. D. C. Having received a good preliminary preparation at 
home, he finished his professional course as an attorney, at C lumbian 
College, Washington. D. C. Being thoroughly equipped for lis pro- 
fession he was soon recognized as one of the leading yoting men of hi;; 
section. He began the practice of law in September, 1902. at Pasca- 
goula and continued j.ractice until May 10. 1915, when he tecame 
Chancellor of the Eighth Chancery Court District by tempor.iry ap- 
pointment, and was elected to fill the unexpired terra of his predeces- 
sor, J. M. Stevens, at a special election, held July 6, 1915. 

He is a Democrat; served for one year as a member of the Jackson 
County Democratic Executive Committee and member of th3 Eig th 
Chancery Court Executive Committee, until ?ilay 10, 1915. He is a 
member of the Catholic Church and of the Woodmen of the World and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of E;ks of America. 

On July 14, 1901, he was married to Irene Grifhn at Pascagoula 
Miss., daughter of Jacob Washington Griffin and "^lary Brown Grif- 
fin, wlio have lived at Moss Point, Enterprise and Meridian. Miss. 

Chancellor and Mrs. Denny have three children, Walter McKen- 
non. Frank Gritlin and Lvman Randall. 



EmMF-T XiCUOL>>ON TriOMAS. 

Xinth District. 

Emmet Xicholson Thomas of Greenville, Miss., Chancellor of th^ 
Xinth District, was born June in, IS.'j.j, at Gonzales, Texas, ;!ud is the 
son of Wi liara Thomas and Ann (Rodgers) Thomas of Tenr.escee. 



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Circuit Judge, 2nd District 




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J. L. BATES 
Circuit Judge, 3rd District 




J. D. CARR 
Circuit Judge. 8th District 



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Circuit Judge, 4ih District 



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EXECT-TTVT: PKPAr.TMF.XT.-^. OFFICES AND BOARDS 553 

"William Thomas lived in Vicksbur?, prior to the Civil War, b?iu2: a 
commission merchant of rhat place. He held the ofp.ce of Probate 
Judge in Texas durin? the war. Ann Rodgers Thomas was a direct 
descendent of the Campbells of Scotland, while her husband was of 
Welsh descent. It should be observec'i here that from a long expe- 
rience in tracing- genealogies, the author has found that family tra- 
ditions, in nearly every instance, contain much truth, sometimes in- 
accurate as to detail, but true in substance. 

Chancellor Thomas received his elementary training at the primary 
schools of Gonzales. Texas, afterwards entering college at that place. 
He, later, attended Mississippi College, Clinton, Mississippi, where 
he graduated in ISTfi, with the degree of B. A. and where he afterwards 
received the degree A. M. He read law in the office of Judge Robt. 
B. Campbell rnd began the practice in ISSO, at Greenville where he 
soon built up a successful practice. Ho was solicited to represent his 
county in the Legislature, and served as a member of the lower Hous3 
in 1890_96-1900. In sessions of 1904-6, he was Speaker of tho Hovse 
He was a member of the Board of :Mississippi Levee Commissioners 
in 190S-9. and Chancellor of the Ninth District from May, 1910 
to the present tine. He has held continuously, since 1890. some pub- 
lic office — City, County. District or State. In his long public caree.-. 
he has always rendeird faithful and efficient service and is regarded 
as one of the ablest men of his section. 

In political faith Chancellor Thomas is a Democrat. In 189t) he be- 
gan to urge reform in the State's penal system and was very active 
in the long effort for better conditions, which culminated in the pres- 
ent system. 

He is an elder in the First Presbyterian Church ot Greenville. lu 
the fraternal Order of Masons, he was Grand Master in 1903; is Chair- 
man on Committee on Masonic Law and Jurisprudence, whic'i posi- 
tion he has held since 1904. He is the author of "Judicial Laws. D;-- 
cisions and Digest of the Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons 
of Mississippi, 181S to 1914, inclusive." 

On January 28, 1885, Chancellor Thomas was married to ^larlhi H. 
Shakelford. daughter of John H. and Anne Shakelford of St. Louis, 
Missouri. They have three children, Mary, Samuel B., and Anne 
(Thomas) Dyer, (Mrs. Howard Dyer). 



D.vMK.i, Moxr.oE Rr.s.sF.LU 

Tenth District. 

Daniel Monroe Russell of Magee, Simpson County, Miss., Chancellor 
of the Tenth District, was born May 3, ISTI. near Raleigh, Smith 
County, Miss. He is the son of Frank Russell and Mary Catherine 



5=54 EXECT'TIVE DEPARTMEXTf, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

McLaiirin. Frank Russell removed, with his father, from Coffee Coun- 
ty. Ala., when he was only eight years old. The family settled in 
Smith County, Miss. With the exception of two years spent in Texas. 
he has always lived in this State. He was the son of John Ruspel! 
and Annie Jane Russell of Alabama and later of Bezer, Smith Coun- 
ty, ^liss. 

Chancellor Russell is of Ensrlish and Irish ancestry. His father was 
of Eri.2lish and his mother of Irish descent. The ancestors of each 
settled in North Carolina, later removing to Geors:ia, and thence to 
Alabama. The first settlers of the family fought in the American Rev- 
olution and were among the builders and makers of the Republic. 
John Russell served in the Confederate Army throughout the Civil 
War. He survived to rear a large family and died May 22, 191.'. 

Chancellor Russell's father, Frank Russell, was a j'oung man dur- 
ing Reconstruction days, in which troublesome time he assisted in re- 
viving the industrial life of his State, which had been largely neg- 
lected during the war. He settled on a farm and by industry and rigid 
economy soon accumulated a nice property, engaging in mercantile 
business in connection with farming. He was a man of sterling worth, 
and reared and educated ten cliildren. 

Chancellor Russell's maternal ancestors were of the Highlands of 
Scotland from which country they immigrated to America and settled 
in the Carolinas. the McLaurins locating in South and the Buchannans 
in North Carolina. His maternal grandfather. Hugh Laughlin McLau- 
rin. was born in South Carolina in the year 1S15, being a cousin of 
Laucli McLanrin (father of the late Senator Anselm J. McLaurin). 
Hugh Laughlin McLaurin came to Mississippi before attaining his ma- 
jority, locating in Smith County, where he married Mary Adaline Buch- 
annan about the year 1850. She was a native of Kemper County, Miss., 
her ancestors having emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina in 
colonial times, thence to Kemper County. Miss. This family settled 
in Smith County where they reared a large family, and their oldest 
daughter married Frank Russell and their youngest son is a prom- 
inent attorney at law in Covington County. This couple. Frank Russell 
and Mary Catherine McLaurin. were the parents of Daniel Monroe 
Russell, the subject of this sketch. 

Chancellor Russell obtained his early education in the common and 
high schools of Smith and Jasper Counties, from which he received a 
thorough elementary training. In 1894. he graduated in college with 
the B. S. degree with honor; read law and taught school for some time. 
entered the University of Mississippi, completing his course in l;iw 
at that institution in 1897-8. He began his practice at Raleigh. M;?-.. 
removed to Taylorsville, same county, in 1903, went to Texas in lO'iT. 
but returned to his native town in 19*^9, locating at his present home 
in Smith County, entering partnership with his uncle, R C Russell. 
This continued until he was appointed Chancellor in April, 1914. Judge 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 555 

Russell has devoted himself to his profession and has made a fine rec- 
ord as a civil and chancery lawyer. He had never held any political 
ofRce nor had he ever been a candidate for one except when a very 
young man, he offered for chancery clerk and was defeated by only 
twenty votes. He has never performed any military service nor held 
any military position. 

Judge Russell is a Democrat and his first political service was in 
the year he reached his majority, when President Cleveland was first 
elected. He was Secretary of the local Democratic Campaign Club and 
was in demand for speeches throughout his section. He has frequent- 
ly represented his county on executive committees and State conven- 
tions. 

Judge Russell has been a member of the Baptist Church, since early 
manhood, and has for years been a deacon and superintendent of the 
Sunday-school. He is a very active layman and has represented his 
chtirch in many of the large denominational assemblies 

He is a Master Mason: a Woodman of the World since 1809; and 
a Knight of Pythias, h.iving held the higliest positions in the local or- 
ganizations of the two latter orders. 

On May 3, 1S&6, he was married to Beulah Harvey Watkins at Ra- 
leigh, Miss. :\Irs. Rupsell is the daughter of .Tames Thomas Watkins 
and Josephine (Hill) Watkins, who lived at Raleigh, Smith County, 
Miss. Her father is the editor of "The Taylorsville Signal," and has 
been a prominent newspaperman of his vicinity, for nearly thirty 
years, during which time he has ably filled the offices of superintend- 
ent of edtication, assessor, circuit clerk and mayor of Taylor.-ville. 
He is the son of Capt. William Watkins who distinguished himself in 
the Civil AVar. Mrs. Russell's mother, Mrs. Josephine Watkins. was 
the daughter of Eli Hi 1, brother of Senator R. H. Hill of Smith Coun- 
ty, and half-brother of Judge T. A. Wood of Gulfport. Miss. 

Judge and Mrs. Russell have six children, Anselm Bryan, Irl Wat- 
kins, Mary Irene, Truett Miley, Lilian Josephine, and Daniel Vv'cod- 
row. 



CIRCUIT JUDGES 

Clald Clayton* 

First District 



*When no skett hes appear biographical daia wa.s not furnished. 



556 EXECUTIVE DEPARTS' KNTS, OFFICES AXD EOARDS 

James Hki;vl.v Xf.vili.e. 
Second District. 

James Hervey Neville of Giiltport. Judge of the Second Circuit Couri 
District of Mississippi, was born September 13, IS')-, near Gainesvilh, 
?unipter County, Ala. He is the son of Andrew Lindsey Neville and 
Mary (McDow) Neville of Sumpter County, Ala. His fatlier was a 
native of South Carolina, from which state he moved to iMobile, Ala- 
bama. He is the son of William Neville of Soiith Carolim and of 
Sumpter County. Alabama. Like so many rtsid^uts of the older 
southern states, William Neville came with his family to the lower 
South in search of opportunities that had become more restricted in 
the first Colonial states. In this manner the ^vlississippi Territory oi' 
which Alabama was a portion, received into her population a stain 
of the best blood that colonized America. 

Judge Neville obtained his early education in the private schools of 
Sumpter County, Ala., in which institutions he was carefully trained. 
He wss a good student and, although he never attended college, ho 
acquired a good English education by close application and study, 
supplemented with extensive reading. In 1874, he read law in the 
office of Charles Cooke of Gainsville. Ala., and began the practice in 
that city, whence he removed to Kemper County, IMiss., and oiiened 
a law o.Tice in 1S75. His advancement was rapid and he soon rose to 
distinction in his profession. His first public position was that of Al- 
derman of the town of Scooba, Miss , in the year 1878. In November 
1885. he was elected District Attorney of the Second Judicial District 
of Mississippi and w.^s appointed Judge of the Second Judicial Di-strict 
by Gov. A. H. Longino, in v. hich position he served two years. In No- 
vember l.')]4, he resigned this position and was elected Circuit Judge 
of the same District, During Gov. John M. Stone's last administra- 
tion, he held the position of Judge Advocate General of the Missis- 
sippi National Guard. He is one of the ablest members of tha Missis- 
sippi Ear, and the state claims no citizen whose ideals of justice and 
equity are purer than are those of Judge James Hervey Neville. 

Judge Neville is a Democrat, member of the County Democratic Ex- 
ecutive Committee of Kemper County and member of the State Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee; is an *^.lder in the Presbyterian Church; 
member of the Fraternal Order of Mr: sons, in which he has held the 
position of Past Master. On May 22, 1878, he was married to Su.=an 
C. Hart, daughter of James Edward Hart and Susan Ellison Hart of 
Scooba. Miss. Judge and Mrs. Neville have four childrpn. Florence C. 
(Mrs. Virgil A. Griffith), James H. Jr., William H. and Edward McDow 



•>.:f 



I r.ii 



\k-.\ '.,{) 



I '•■■ !i I'.'MiH bit* 



EXECUTIVE DEl'ARTMEXTS, OFFICES AXD HOARDS 557 

JOHX Lr.n Bates. 

Thiid District. 

John Lee Bates of Oxford. Circuit Judge of the Third District, was 
born, July 12, 1S77, on Cole's Creek in Calhoun County, Mississippi. 
He is the son of George W. Bates and Minerva Jane (Bailey; Bates, 
his father living at Cole's Creek, and mother at Wiliamsville, Miss, 
before the marriage. His family were among the early settlers of his 
section and were attached to their places of residence, his father living 
at Cole's Creek for sixty-one years. George W. Bates was the son of 
John Thomas Bate's and Sarah Bates of Cole's Creek, to which place 
they removed from South Carolina. Judge Bates' mother was the 
daughter of J. T. Bailey and Mary Bailey of Williamsville, Miss., and 
formerly of Choctaw County. 

Judge Bates received his early education at Cole's Creek Academy, 
an institution of much local influence in Calhoun County. He also at- 
tended Prof. H. B. Abcrnathy's school at Houston. Miss., and upon 
leaving this, he entered the Mississippi Normal College at Houston, 
where he distinguished himself as a student of exceptional ability. 
After teaching in the public schools for some three years, he entered 
the University of Mississippi for the study of law. From this institu- 
tion, he graduated in Vj>)2. He immediately began the practice of his 
profession in Pittsboro. Calhoun County. Miss., and continued a suc- 
cessful practitioner, serving as a member of the Legislature of 1904 and 
1906, until he was elected Circuit Judge of his District, his succiss 
being very complimentary to him and gratifying to his friends. While 
a member of the Legislature of 1904-6. Judge Bates won for himself 
high reputation as an advocate of the best interests of his State, along 
educational and all progressive lines. 

He is a Democrat, a member of the ^^lethodist Episcopal Church 
South, and of the fraternal Order of INIasons. In his present position, 
he has rendered faithful service to the people of his Distriit, with 
whom he is very popular. He is unmarried. 



Fu.vxK Edgar Evkkett. 

Fourth District. 

Frank Edgar Everett of Indiauola. Judge of the Fourth Circuit 
Court District, wns born January 22, 1S75, at Little Springs. Frank- 
lin County, Miss. He is the son of Alexander John Everett and Keren 
Hapoc (Walker) Everett of Tangipahoa and Little Springs, Miss. His 
father after his removal from Tangipahoa, settlement at Little 
Springs, the Civil War, where he continued to live until his death oa 



35S EXECUTIVE DEPARTIMEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

March 19, 1012. He was the principal of the school at that place for 
a numher of years. He was the son of Thomas Everett and Martha 
Ann Everett of Tangipahoa, Amite County, Miss. He conies of one of 
the early, substantial families of Mississippi which, in each generation 
has taken a prominent part in the development of the State, alons all 
lines of progress. 

Judge Everett's mother was the daughter of John Walker and Ca- 
mille "Walker of Sinithdale, Amite County, Miss. His early education 
was conducted by his father, who was an educator of much ability. 
Under this careful supervision, he was prepared to take up the study 
of a special profession and entered the Law Department of Millsaps 
College, from which he was graduated in the class of 1900-1901. Be- 
ing admitted to the bar, he began his practice at Meadville, Franklin 
County, Miss., in January 1902, but moved from there to Brookhaven, 
and later to Indianola in July, 1905, where he followed his profession 
until appointed Circuit Judge by Governor Brewer, on October 4, 1913. 
When the elective judiciary law went into effect in 1914, he became a 
candidate for election. Having filled the office with great ability, he 
had become very popular with the people and was elected to a full 
term without opposition. Prior to his incumbency in this office, he 
had served as Prosecuting Attorney for a number of years. Judge 
Everett is one of the most influential men of his section and has de- 
voted his time and talents to the promotion of all measures for the 
public good that come within the province of his profession. 

Judge Everett is a Democrat; a member of the Presbyterian Church; 
and a member of all branches of Masonry, from Blue Lodge to Snrine. 

On November 17, 1909, he was married to Sadie Elizabeth Luster of 
Edwards, Miss. Z^Irs. Everett is the daughter of Dr. George Luster 
and Ida Elizabeth Luster. 

Judge and Mrs. Everett have two children, Frank Edgar,_Jr., and 
George Alexander. 



Hexry Herman Rodgers. 

Fifth District. 

Henry Herman Rodgers of Louisville, ^Miss.. Judge of the Fifth Cir- 
cuit Court District, was born October 22, 1869, near Noxapater, Xes:.- 
oba County, Miss. He is the son of Samuel Adams Rodgers and Hazie 
Ann (Singleton) Rodgers of Montgomery County, Ala., and N ^fhohu 
County, Miss. His father was a native of Chester County, Soiuh C r- 
olina and was the son of Israel Rodgers and Rachel Adams Rodg- rs of 
Chester, South Carolina. Judge Rodgers is of Welsh descent ou pa- 
ternal side. His greatgrandfather, and two brothers, fought under Gen- 
eral Braddock and were present at his defeat. His maternal ancestors 



CIRCUIT JUDGES 



ROBERT EDGAR JACKSON 
Circuit Judge, 6tli District 




PAUL B. JOHNSON 
Circuit Judge, 12th District 





W. H. HUGHES 
Circuit Judge, 13th District 



THOS. B. CARROLL 
Circuit Judge, 16th District 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AN'D BOARDS 559 

were English on liis grandfather's side, and German on his grand- 
mother's side, and through the latter, he is related to the Heflins of 
Alabama. The preponcJerance of English and Welsh ancestry, how- 
ever, makes this family of the uniform type of Mississippians, a race 
composed largely of the descendents of natives of the British Isles. 

Judge Rodgers received his early education under the instruction 
of his cousin, Miss Shields, and his sister, Mrs. Samuel Adams, the 
former a private teacher, employed by Judge Rodgers' father anti his 
neighbors. Such teachers usually served longer terms than the teach- 
ers of the free schools after the Civil War. The private school was a 
universal custom before the Civil War, and a frequent, occurrence after- 
wards. 

After this preliminary training, Judge Rodgers attended the State 
A. & M. College; took a scientific course in a Normal School, and 
taught school for three years, and studied law at Cumbarland Uni- 
versity, Lebanon, Tenn., where he graduated in 1805. His pro.es- 
sional practice has now extended over some twenty years, gradually 
increasing, and giving him the opportunity of coming in close contact 
with the people of his community. In the important and respon- 
sible position which he now holds, there lies before him a wide field 
of usefulness to his state and country. 

He is a Democrat, a member of the ^Methodist Church, and of the 
fraternal orders of Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias. His wife 
was Leita Louise Davis, daughter of Dr. H. H. Davis and Lelia Louise 
Davis, of Louisville, IMiss. 

Judge and }tlrs. Rodgers have three children, Henry Lee, Hazie 
Louise, and Herman Davis. 



Robert Edgar Jacksox. 

Sixth District. 

Robert Edgar Jackson of Liberty, Amite County, Miss., Judge of the 
Sixth Circuit Court District, was born May 20, 1882, near Summit, 
Amite County, Miss. He is the son of Thomas X. Jackson and Mary 
Alice (Causey) Jackscn of Amite County. His father was a gallant 
soldier in the Confederate army, in a cavalry regiment. After his mar- 
riage, he was prominent in church and school work and took an active 
part in ridding his county of Carpet-bag Rule, during the Reconstruc- 
tion Period. He later was a candidate for Congress on the Populito 
ticket. His parents, David Jackson and Celina (Causey) Jackson, re- 
moved from the Carolinas and were among the pioneer settlers of 
Amite County, from which branches of the family settled throughout 
South-west Mississippi. The Jacksons were of Scotch-Irish ancestry 



'jis^ali 



oGO EXE("UT1VE DEPART.MEXTS, <,)FFICES A.VD BOARDS 

and furuishfd soldiers to the Revolution and the War of IS 12. Davlj 
Jackson was related to General Andrew Jackson and possessed many of 
his sturdy qualities. He was one of the large planters of Amite County 
and there amassed an extensive fortune, before the Civil War. 

Judge Jackson's mother was a member of the Causey family, who 
coming from the British Isles to America, became colonial Scfttlers, and 
the faaiily trace descent from English, Scotch-Irish, and Welch an- 
cestors. His maternal grandfather, James M. Causey, was a soldier in 
the Confederate army and after the war he represented Amite County 
in the Legislature of IblS and was one of the first trustee.? 0£ the A. & 
M. College. He was a successful agriculturist. 

Judge Jackson attended the public schools of Amite Ccunty and by 
cose application, much' hard study at nigiit, and some special instruc- 
tion from the various teachers of his community, prepared himself to 
teach. He began teaching at an early age and continued for four 
years, being principal of the school at Liberty, Miss, for one year. D<;- 
termined to complete his education, lie attended Mississippi College 
three years, where he v\'on high reputation as a ready debater and hald 
the position of literar\- orator in 1904. He afterwards took a course 
in the Law Department of Millsaps College and on June 11, ]906, was 
graduated with the degree of E. L. In July 1906, he represented the 
Law School at Gulfport, in a debate between Mississippi, Louisiana, 
Ala'oama and Tennessee, and won the honors o'f the occasion. 

After graduating in Law, he located at Liberty, Miss, .Aug:.st 25, 
1906 v.-here he has since resided and practiced. He has mad? a spec- 
ialty of Criminal Law and has been connected with many i.ni ortant 
suits, in a large percentage of which he has been successful. 

In 1909, he served as Alderman at Liberty, :Miss. He became State 
Senator in 1911, representing Amite and Wilkinson Counties in the 
session of 1912 and the extra session of 1913. On November 10, 1913, 
Governor Brewer appointed him Circuit Judge of the Sixth District, 
and just a year after, he was elected to the same position, without 
opposition, for a term of four years. 

Judge Jackson i.s a Democrat and has. on several occasions, served 
as a delegate to County and State Democratic Conventions. He is an 
ardent supporter of Woodrow Wilson, being among the first to urge 
his nomination in the Convention. 

He is a deacon in the Baptist Church of his home town and is a 
member of the following fraternal organizations:— Masons, Knights of 
Pythias, Woodmen of the World. He was a member of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity at 3Ill;saps Coilegc. 

On April 28. 1: 09, Jud:e Jackson was i.-.ar" led to Edith Bates, daugh- 
ter of Charlr.s C. Bates r.nd ,Mai;d3 E. M.Lo:.:i B.:t-;. who lived at 
Liberty, Misi. 



EXECUTIVE 1)E1>ART-MEXTS, OFFICES AXD HOARDS 561 

Judge Jackson has been a prominent citizen of his section since early 
manhood. While Iw is conservative, he is open-minded and progressive 
and has taken special interest in all the benevolent and church work 
of his community. 

Judge and Mrs. Jackson have, two children, Charles Nathaniel and 
Jean. 

W. H. POTTKR. 

Seventh District. 



John David Cahii. 
Eighth District. 

John David Carr of Newton, Jud^e of the Eighth Circuit Court 
District of Mississippi was born April 9, 1871, at Stratton, Newton 
County. Miss, and is the sou of Cicero Anderson Carr and Martha Ann 
(Duke) farr of the same county. His father was the son of David 
Stuart Carr and Elizabeth (Hartsfield) Carr of Newton County. 

Judge Carr is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. The family removed from 
North Carolina to Georgia in the early part of the ICth century, and 
from Georgia to .Mis.sissippi in 1848. His father enlisted as a young 
private in the Confederate army, in April 18t)3. in Company E. 7th 
Mississippi Battalion; was wounded at Atlanta, Ga. in July 1864; was 
parolled at Meridian in 186.5. 

Judge Carr received his early education in the public schools of 
Newton County, Conehatta Institute, and Lexington Normal College. 
When a young man, he entered Millsaps College, where he graduated 
in the Law Department in the year 1902, making an excellent class 
record. Locating in Newton, he has since built up a successful prac- 
tice. He was City Attorney in 1904; Mayor in 190.J-1906; always In- 
terested in the pub'.ic questions affecting the welfare of the Sate, he 
was solicited by the people of his county to become a candidate for the 
Legislature and was elected to a seat in that body in November. 191)7 
and served four years. During his public service on the Judiciary, 
Corporations, Penitentiary and Public Printing Com.mittees, h3 at- 
tracted the attention of his friends and constituents by his ability and 
faithful performance of duty. He was induced by his constitut uts to 
remain in public service and become a candidate for Circuit Judge of 
the Eighth Judicial District; wi;s elected to that office in Nov-niber 
1914, a position which he fills with distinction. 
36 — m 



V !l<lj, 



562 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

Judge Carr is a Democrat; his parents both Primitive Baptists; he 
is a Woodman of the World. On June -S, 1S96, Judge Carr was mar- 
ried to Edna Earl Pace, daughter of John C. Pace and Nancy (Ware) 
Pace, who lived near Lake, Miss. 

Judge and Mrs. Carr have ftve children, John ^Marshall, James 
Vardaman, Cecil Anderson. Mabel, John L>avid, Jr., and Edna Earl. 



E. L. Bkilx. 
Ninth District. 

liOWLAXD WEBSTEU HEIDELBERG. 

Tenih District. 

Rowland Webster Heidelberg of Shubuta, Miss., Judge of the lOlh 
Circuit Court District, was born September 1, 188G, at Shubuta, 
Clarke County, Miss. He is the son of Daniel Webster Heidelberg and 
Theora K. (Dees) Heidelberg of Shubuta. 

Daniel Webster Heidelberg is a native of Clarke County, Miss, and 
lived in that and Jasper county until of age, when he attended Coop- 
er's Institute at Daleville, Lauderdale County, Miss After his grad- 
uation, he located in Shubuta where he has since resided. He served 
two terms in the State Senate, representing Clarke and Jasper Coun- 
ties, in which office he performei faithful service. His parents, Sam- 
uel C. Heidelberg and Martha (Granberry) Heidelberg were among 
the best and most progressive settlers of Clarke County. 

Judge R. W. Heidelberg's mother was the daughter of M. B. Dees 
and Anne Beatty Dees of Shubuta. 

In his youth, he attended the public schools of Shubuta, where he 
laid the foundation of a thorough English education In iyOo-4, he 
attended Millsaps College and became a good student and a member of 
the K. A. fraternity. Returning home, he studied law in his father's 
office and was admitted to the bar on July 16, 1909, since which time 
he has been a member of the firm of Htidelberg & Heidelberg, consist- 
ing of the father and son. 

Judge Heidelberg became very influential in his practice and was 
appointed by Gov. Earl Brewer, Judge of the 10th Circuit Court Dis- 
trict, succeeding Judge Venable who became a Representative in 
Congress. Judge Heidelberg received this office on January 8, 1916; 
w-as elected to same office on March 7th, 1910, and fills the office with 
e.xceptional ability, giving great care and attention to iiis official 
duties. 



jiitiih 1 :/.JV/oJl 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 563 

Devoted through life to the Democratic Party, he became a mem- 
ber of the Congressional Democraiic Execuiive Committee of the 5th 

District. , ^, 

Judge Heidelberg is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South- and is a Mason. On June leth. 1900. he married Ruby Ne- 
vada Nettles, daughter of James M. and Henrietta Slay Nettles, of Shu- 
buta. Miss. Judge and ^Irs. Heide.berg have one child, Dorothy. 



Will FAM Aristides Alcorn. 

Eleventh District. 

William Aristides Alcorn, Jr., of Clarksdale, Circuit Judge for the 
Eleventh District, was born October 20, 1S6S, at Friar's Point. Mis- 
sissippi, and is the son of George Randolph Alcorn and wife. Mar, 
(Cooper) Alcorn. His ancestors came to America from Ireland and 
settled in Pennsylvania, tlience to Kentucky, and later in Miss s-i..pi. 
The father of the subject of this sketch was a soldier of the Confed- 
eracy, being a Lieutenant of Captain Porter's Company of Chalmer.' 
Battalion; was Chancery Clerk of Coahoma County, 1866 to 1876. and 
Sheriff of the County; cousin of Governor J. L. Alcorn; died of yell.w 
fever in 1878. :^Ir. Alcorn attended the private school of Miss Emma 
Lewis of Ripley, Tenne.^see, at Friar's Point, and the primary schools 
of Friar's Point; entered St Mary's College, .Clarion County, Ken- 
tucky, and pursued studies until 1SS8; attended Louisville Law School 
in 1888; admitted to the bar ia 1892; located at Clarksdale; Ch..n- 
cery Court Clerk of Coahoma County, 1890-1S92; elected to the House 
of Representatives in 1899; reelected November, 1903, and November 

1907. 

Mr. Alcorn is a Democrat, has served as County and Congressional 
Committeeman; member of Episcopal Church; Knight of Pythias and 
Elk. On May 20, 1S91, he was married at Memphis, Ttnnessz-e, to 
Florence Pearl Yates, daughter of Meredith Yates and wife. Elizabeth 
Cannon. Mrs. Alcorn is a descendant of Col. William Yates of the 
Army of the Revolution, and of George Walton, one of the signers of 
the Declaration; in the maternal line she is related to the Lees of 
Virginia. 

During his legislative service. Judge Alcorn was distingtiished as 
an eloquent, forceful speaker and skillful parlimentarian and he is re- 
garded as one of the foremost lawyers of the State. He was appointed 
Circuit Judge of the Eleventh District in VjV2 and has served continu- 
ously since that time. 



I ii*?v»iva 



564 TCXECrTlVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 

Paul Bl'kney Johnson. 
Twelfth District. 

Paul Ilurney Johnson of Hattiesbiirg. Jinli^e of the Twelfth Circuit 
Court District of .Mississippi, was born March 23, ISSO, at Hil'sboro. 
Scott County, Miss. He is the son of Thomas Benton Johnson and 
Jane Catherine (McClenahan) Johnson of same place, and of Meridian, 
Miss. His father was the son of Jordan Johnson and Sarah Burney 
Johnson of Monticello. Lawrence County, Miss. His mother was the 
daughter of William Hayes McClenahan and Sarah Gray McClenahan 
of Hillsboro, :Miss. 

Judge Johnson's paternal grandfather was a native of Richmond, 
Va. Both grandmothers were native :\Iissiasippians. His maternal 
grandfather came from Ireland when a lad of fourteen years, landed 
in New York, and later moved to Mobi'e, Ala. Thence, he moved to 
Mississippi, where he established a permanent residence and shared 
in th development of his locality. Judge Johnson's father was a gal- 
lant soldier in the Confederate Army serving from 1S61 to 1865. Aftor 
the surrender, he, with other worn-out soldiers of the stranded CoiifeQ- 
eracy, began the economic and industrial rehabilitation of the State. 
By industry, energy and patience, he met and overcame the many 
difficulties that cuiuronted the inhabitants of the impoverished country 
and was enabled to give his children what common school advantages 
the State afforded. 

Judge Johnson attended the public schools of the county and after 
finishing his literary course at Harperville College, he entered Mill- 
saps, where he took a law course in 1903, locating at Hattiesburg for 
practice. He was for a number of years Police Judge of that city, and 
in 1910 he was appointed Circuit Judge of the Twelfth District serving 
four years. In this capacity he gave so much satisfaction that he was 
elected to the same office in 1914. 

In political faith. Judge Johnson is a Democrat and has always been 
eager for the national success of that party, there being little cause for 
local feeling in the matter, since the State of Mississippi is almost 
solidly Democratic. 

Judge Johnson is a Mason, Odd Fe'.low, Woodman of the World, and 
Knight of Pythias, membership at Hattiesburg, Miss. ~ On February 
10, 1915, he was married to Corinne Venable, daughter of Thomas L. 
Venable and Corinne (Reynolds) Venable of McComb City, Miss. 

Judge Johnson has not furnished as full data for a sketch of his li.e 
as was desired. However it will be seen that his advancement, from 
boyhood, was steady and that he was aspiring, honorable and straight- 
forward in his efforts to win success. It gives the authors pleasure to 
note that these biographical sketches bear evidence of a high grade of 
citizenrv and conserve much of our political and social history. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD HOARDS 565 

\ViLLiA>r HousTOx Hughes. 
Thirteentli District. 

William Houston Huszhes of Ralei.sh, Miss.. Judge of tlie Thirteenth 
Circuit Court District of Mississippi, was born June '21, 18G9. at Tren- 
ton. Miss., in Smith County. He is the son of George Matthews Hughes 
and Sarah (Lacy) Hughes, of Lauderda'e County, IVIiss. He is of Welsh 
descent on the paternal side, his father the son of James Hughts of 
Alabama moved to Lauderdale County, Miss, when a lad of twelve 
years. He was a private in the Confederate army and his wife was the 
daughter of Stephen Lacy, and was of English-Scotch-Irish descent. 

Judges Hughes, like nearly all of Mississippi's piesent sate offi- 
cials is the son of a Confederate veteran, and has inherited the Icve of 
liberty and democracy, ideals so characteristic of the native American. 
He obtained his early education in the common schools of his county 
and in Burns" High School and Cooper Institute. Later, he took a 
course in the Law Department of Millsaps College and was graduated 
in 1S97, with degree of LL. B. He imnie6iately began an extensive 
practice, which proved remunerative for thirteen years, when in ISl ) 
he was appointed by Governor E. F. Noel to the Circuit Judgeship of 
his District; was appointed again, by Governor Brewer in 1914, for a 
short term; and in August. 1914, was elected by the people for a four 
years term. His decisions as Circuit Judge have vt ry seldom been 
reversed by the Supreme Court, and he has won distinction witli the 
bar as an accurate and just judge. 

Judge Hughes is a Democrat and was a member of the Stat? Demo- 
cratic Executive Committte from 190S to 1911. He is a steward in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and is a Mason. Since early man- 
hood, Judge Hughes has advocated the best progress along educa- 
tional and material lines. He has especially recommended bstter 
equipped schools and more elficient teachers; the construction of b':t- 
ter roads; the proper enforcement of law: and bettei conditions in 
farm life. Among the le-:!slation for which he ha.=; actively worktd is 
that of State and National Prohibition. 

On May 28, 1899, Judge Hughes was married to Katie Kelly, dargh- 
ter of Lanch Kelly and Rebecca J. Kelly of Trenton, ;Miss. S::e is a 
grand-niece of Laughlin McLaurin, father of Senator -McLaurin 

Judge and Mrs. Hughes have five children, Lacy Hargrove. Wil- 
liam Lanch, Clyde Annetta, Sarah Katherine and Mary Elizabeth. 



566 EXECUTIVE DEPART>[EXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

jAsrFR Felix Guvnes. 
Fourteenth District. 

Jasper Felix Guvnes of Hazlehurst. Circuit Judge of the Fourteenth 
District, was born February 21, 1875, near Hazleluirst, Copiah County, 
Miss. He is the son of Albert Brown Guynes and Emma Jane (Ram- 
sey) Guynes. Judge Guynes is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, his family 
being among the early emigrants to America. His father was a native 
of Copiah County and lived at different periods at Gallnian and Hazle- 
hurst; was residing at the latter place in 1914. when he was made 
Sergeant on the State Farm and removed to Parchman. He was a 
brave and faithful private soldiier of the Confederacy; was a member 
of the Legislature in 1SS4-18S6-1S92, and a member of the Mississippi 
Constitutional Convention of 1890. He Avas the son of Henry Hall 
Guynes and Mary Finley Guynes of Copiah County, his family having 
been long established in Mississippi and active in all public move- 
ments for the good of the section in which it resided. Judge Guynes' 
mother was the daughter of Thomas J. Ramsey and Rebecca Ramsey 
of Copiah County. 

Judge Guynes obtained his early education in the common schools 
of Copiah County, where he prepared himself for college. He at- 
tended :Mississippi College, Clinton, :Miss., from 1891 to lSr'5, inclusive, 
and then entered the University of Mississippi, where he graduated 
in 1898, with the B. A. degree. From the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity, he graduated in 1902, with degree of LL. B. His education 
has been very broad and few men in his profession are better equipped 
for its duties. 

Locating in Hazlehurst, Miss., he soon achieved success in his pro- 
fession and became prominent in the public affairs of his county. 
Upon the death of State Senator E. A. Rowan, Mr. Guynes was elected 
to fill the vacancy, and served with much satisfaction to his constitu- 
ents, in that office during 1913 and 1914. On February 1st, 1916, he 
was appointed Judge of the Fourteenth Circuit Court District, a posi- 
tion which h«3" fills with marked ability He is a Democrat, has served 
as delegate to various State and County conventions, and is a memb3r 
of the Executive Committees for Congressional Fifth Chancery Ccurt 
and Fourteenth Circuit Court Districts. 

Judge Guynes is a member of the Baptist Church; also of the }.ra- 
sonic Lodge of which he has served as Master; member of the Wood 
men of the World and for sevei'al years was Counsel Commander; 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star. Judge Guynes is unmarried. 



A. E. Weathersby. 
Fifteenth District. 



EXECUTIVE DEPART^TEXTS. OFFICES -VXD BOARDS 567 

Thomas Battij: Carroll. 
Sixteenth District. 

Tlioma.s Battle Carroll of Starkville, Judge of the Sixteenth Circuit 
Court DistrioT of :\Iississippi, \%"as born March IS, 1S60 near Starkville. 
Oktibbeha County, Miss. He is the son of Dr. John Gillespie Carroll 
and Xarcissa Elizabeth (Williams) Carrol! of Alabama. His father 
moved from Carrollton, Ala., in 1S57 to Oktibbeha County, Miss, where 
he practiced medicine and engaged in farming. He represented his 
county in the Legislature of 1S63. Later he served in the Legislat- 
ure, sessions of 1880-82, 1888-90 and 1896 — 1900. He was a Confederate 
soldier, rendering faithful service in Company K, Soth Mississippi Reg- 
iment. Dr. Carroll was one of the most useful citizens of his county, 
and was greatly attached to his locality. He was the son of Zedekiah 
Carroll and Jane (Gillespie) Carroll of Alabama. Zedekiah Carroll 
was the son of John Carroll of North and South Carolina, a Revolu- 
tionary soldier who served in the Carolinas during the last years o: 
that war. The Carrolls emigrated from Ireland and settled in 
X'orth Carolina; later, removed to South Carolina and from that state 
to Alabama, his children removing to Mississippi, where the family 
has established a permanent home, its various members taking part 
in the best progress of the state. 

Judge Carroll's mother was the daughter of Thomas Battle Williams 
and Phoebe Carter (Brooks) William.s of Pickens County, Ala. His 
great-grandfather. Colonel Thomas Williams, served as Representative 
and State Senator from the counties of Piikens and Tuscaloosa. Ala.; 
also served in the same capacity in Georgia, before he came to Ala- 
bama. His maternal great-grandfather, Allen Brooks, served in thj 
War of 1812, in Captain Adam Heath's Company, First Georgia Regi- 
ment. Allen Brooks' father, Joab Brooks, emigrated from Wales and 
settled in Warren County, Georgia, between ITSO and 1790. Allen 
Brooks moved to the ^lississipni Territory just after the close of the 
War of 1S12, and settled on Warrior River, in what is now the State 
of Alabama. Between 1S30 and 1835, he moved to the western border 
of what is now Lowndes County, Miss, near Crawford, where he lived 
until his death in 1866. 

The tracing of families to their first establishment as permanent 
residents of r^Iississippi. brings them, in the majority of instancts, 
over the same route, through Virginia and the Carolinas, by way of 
Georgia, thence to the Mississippi Territory, which became the states 
of Mississippi and Alabama. It will be seen from these biographies 
that a strain of the best population of the older Southern States was 
constantly infusing into our civilization the noblest idea's of the 
American Republic. These in earlier times often came by way of 
Kentucky and Tennessee, leaving along every route they traveled some 



568 EXECn-TIVE DEPARTMEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 

member of their family to enrich the oonimunity in which he. for a 
time, dwelt. In addition to this emigration, Mit^t-issippi sometimes re- 
ceived representatives from the New England States, the records of 
the patriotic societies showing many families of New England descent. 
With the exception of some early pure Scotch blood that came to us in 
the quaint old colonies of Scotic and Union Chtirch, very little foreign 
immigration reached the State and even to this day. it is scarce. Tho 
author feels sure that this digression, dea'ing as it does, with s«. In- 
teresting a phase of our social history, will be welcomed. 

Judge Carroll, the subject of this sketch, received his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of his county. At the age of fifteen he 
attended a hoarding school at Summerville, Noxubee County. Miss., 
and later entered the South-western Baptist University at Jackson, 
Tenn., where he remained for several years. Choosing Law as hia, 
profession, he entered the Law Department of the University of Mis- 
sissippi, and was graduated in June, lS7!i, ranking second in his class. 
In the succeeding September, he was admitted to the bar and began his 
practice in Starkville, while residing in the country. In 1882, he 
moved into town and formed a partnership with M. R. Butler wh-^ 
was at that time District Attorney. In "1890, the partnership wa^ dis- 
solved, which event was folowed by the death of Mr. Butler. Judg? 
Carroll continued the practice alone, until 1S91J, when ha took in as 
partner W. W. Magruder, which connection conciaued until his ap- 
pointment as Circuit Judge, in April, 1910. 

Judge Carroll served as Representative of Oktibbeha County in the 
Legis'ature during sessions of 1886 and 1888 and was not a candidate 
for re-election He was never a candidate for any oth.r office until 
his appointment as Circuit Judge in 1810, in which he serv.d until 
May 1, 1914, when he was elected by the people for the four-year term, 
beginning January 1, 1915 

He is a Democrat, a mirmber of the Baptist Church, and of the Odd 
Fellows Lodge 

On October 14, 1SS5, Judge Carroll was .married to Miss G;rtr^de 
Perkins, at her home in Agency, Oktibbeha County, Miss. Mrs. Car- 
ro'I is the daughter of Dr. Joseph Bolivar Perkins and Mary (Washing- 
ton) Perkins, honored citizens of Oktibbeha County. Her paternal 
grandfather, Joseph Perkins, was a private soldier in the War of 1812. 
serving in Captain John Looney's company, in the Second Regiment of 
West Tennessee militia anc'i performing active service in the Battle of 
New Orleans. Two of Mrs. Carroll's great-great-grandfathers, Jesse 
Spencer and Thomas Washington, from Virginia, served in the Ameri- 
can Revolution, Thomas Washington being a Lieutenant in Lee's Bat- 
talion of Light Dragoons. 



EXECUTIVE DEPART^^E^-TS. OKFTCES AXD BOARDS 



569 



Judge Carroll is now Vice-President and Director of the Security 
State Bank in StarkviUe. Miss., having held these positions since the 
organization of the bank, in 1898. 

Judge and Mrs. Carroll have four children, Stanley, ^vho married 
Julia Nash, Gertrude, who married W. H. Buckley, Eva May and 
Miriam. 



Etmix Daxcy Dinkixs. 

Seventeenth District. 

Edwin Dancy Dinkins of Charleston. Tallahatchie County, Miss.. 
Judge of the Seventeenth Circuit Court District of Mississippi, was 
born Mav "M. 1867, at Canton. Mr.dison County. Miss. He is the son 
of James Alexander Dinkins and Margaret (Wadlington. Dinkins. His 
mother was the daughter of Mercer Wadlington and Mary HesUp of 
Princeton, Ky., and later of Vernon, Madison County. Miss. His 
father, the son of Lewis Dinkins and Harriet E. Erwin Dinkins. was a 
native of Mecklenburg County, X. C. In 1S40. he moved to Madison 
County, Miss, where he lived at Canton and MadisonviUe until 18So, 
when "lie removed to Rolling Fork, Sharkey County, Miss., where he 
died November 11, 1893. He served four years in the Civil War, first 
in the Eighteenth Mississippi Regiment and later in an artillery com- 
pany known as "Ward's Battery." A sketch of the Dinkins family 
states that the history of the family is not known earlier than 1500, 
when in Wales. This sketch, which is very interesting, is given here 
on account of its historical value in genealogical research. 

"The history of the Dinkins family is known as early as 1500 when, 
in Wales, tradition says, the name originated and signified "Devil in 
the Bush," and where the be?.rers of it fought against the government 
for wrongs thought to have been suffered by them and who on account 
thereof left Wales early in the sixteenth century, removing to ths low- 
lands of Scotland, whence, later, they went to Londonderry in the 
north of Ireland where they continued until 1717. when three brothers 
James, John and Samuel Dinkins removed to America, landing first at 
Charleston, S. C. From there the three brothers, in 1740, removed to 
Mecklenburg County, N. C, and from them the American family 
sprung, it being the only family of the name, even to this time, in 
the United States." 

"The Dinkins famiy in Mississippi have lived mainly in Madiscn 
County where the members of it intermarried with other families and 
unlike many others the descendants wearing the family nante. seem 
to be decreasing in numbers, though collateral descendants are many. 
The family has been little in politics, living quietly but always sus- 



570 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

taining the hightest ideals of citizenship. Among the most distinguished 
lati'^r-day relations of the family is Charles Belts Galloway, late 
Bishop of the M. E. Church. South. Other relatives, still living, are W. 
L. Dinkins of Canton, Captain James Dinkins and his son Lynn H. 
Dinkins of New Orleans. La., and H. C. Dinkins of Mexico City." 

Judge Edwin Dancy Dinkins obtained his early education in the 
public schools of Madison County, and possessing a natural fondness 
for study, by industry and close application, he acquired an educa- 
tion that equalled in many respects a course in college. He read law 
in the office of H. J. and R. L. McLaurin of Rolling Fork, Sharkey 
County, Mississippi. He was admitted to the bar in October 1893, on 
a written examination, and by order of the Supreme Court of Missis- 
sippi. Judge Dinkins continued in the practice of his profession, at 
his first location. Rolling Pork, until September, 1S95, and at Charles- 
ton, Tallahatchie County, until September, 1914, when he was appointed 
Circuit Judge, for the Seventeenth District of Mississippi. 

Judge Dinkins has always been prominent in the public affairs of his 
section and is fearless and independent in maintaining his convictions. 
In 1S96, he was chosen Presidential Elector, by the Democratic party, 
when W. J. Bryan waS first nominated for the Presidency; was ap- 
pointed District Attorney of the Seventeenth District, on May S, 1914 
when he was appointed by Governor Brewer as Circuit Judge to fill an 
unexpired term for that year. In the November election of 1914, he 
was elected by the people, for a four-year term, having one opponent. 

He is a Democrat; elder and active Sunday-school worker in the 
Church of Christ, (Christian). He has held various oflBces in the 
Knights of Pythias. 

On January 2, 1S:<5, Judge Dinkins was married to Pearl Cayce, at 
Nashville, Tenn. She was the daughter of John M. Cayce and Virginia 
I. Cayce, who lived at Franklin and Nashville, Tenn. Her father was 
a soldier in the Confederate army. He was an inventor of some note, 
perfecting several useful inventions, some of which are still in use. 
He was a jeweler at Frank. in, Tenn. and the owner of "'Cayce Springs," 
near Franklin, one of the most beautiful places in the state. Mrs. 
Dinkins' mother's maiden name Avas also "Cayce," she having married 
her cousin. She was born in Madison County, Miss., but lived most of 
her young life in Memphis. Tenn. where she became an accomplished 
musician and composer of several pieces of instrumental music of con- 
siderable merit. 

Judge and ^Irs. Dinkins' children are, Marjorie Wadington, Vir- 
ginia Cameron, Edwin Lewis, Hermine, and Paul. 



■: J ( 



i: / 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 571 

DISTRICT ATTORN E VS. 

First District. 

JuMUS Edwix Bft.uy. 

Julius Edwin Berry of Booneville, Miss., District Attorney of the 
First Circuit Court District of Mississippi, was born January 30, 1878, 
at Baldwyn, Prentiss County, Miss. He is the son of Julius Simpson 
Berry and Margaret Henrietta (Walker) Berr>- of that place. The 
father's parents were Joel Holbert Berry and Martha Melinda Berry 
of Tippah County, Miss. Joel Holbert Berrj^ was State Senator from 
his district for eight years, just prior to the Civil War, and held the 
high distinction of being the author of the first public-school bill for 
Mississippi, that authorized the expenditure of public money for edu- 
cational purposes. (This is an interesting fact, since it shows the at- 
titude of the people's mind upon the subject of public education before 
the Civil War, a calamity that obstructed all educational efforts in the 
State, except in the instance of schools maintained by private individu- 
als. ) Senator Berry signed the Ordinance of Secession, in 1S61. 

An interesting incident is found in the history of "The Women of 
the American Revolution" which describes an adventure of an an- 
cestress of Mr. Berry with Briiish soldiers during the war for Amer- 
ican independence, a reference to which is well worthy of being made 
here: The lady, Mrs Bratton, a loyal patriot, had her home and its en- 
tire contents burned by the enemy with the exception of a few articles 
saved by personal efforts, that she prized as future gifts to her de- 
scendants; a Colonial silver spoon has in this way descended to the 
family of Judge Berry and is one of its most valued household treas- 
ures. The beloved Bishop Bratton of Mississippi is also a descendant 
of this patriotic woman of Revolutionary fame whose loyalty and 
heroism have descended to her posterity and enriches the social life 
of the commonwealth. 

Mr. Berry's mother, was the daughter of Porter Walker and Eliza 
Jane Walker. His maternal grandfather was for a number of years 
Sheriff of Tishomingo County before the Civil War. 

Julius E. Berry, who was to continue the family history with honor 
and credit, and was carefully trained in ihe elementary branches oy 
Mary M. Duval, author of "Duvall's History of Mississippi." He after- 
wards attended the public schools of Baldwyn and Booneville. Missis- 
sippi. In 1S9S he entered Mississippi College and in 1902 graduated 
with the degree of B. S. Later he took a two years post-graduate 
course at Vanderbilt University and one year at the University of Chi- 
cago. He serv'ed as associate Professor of English in Mississippi Col- 
It^ge for a year and held a Fellowship at Vandtrbilt for tvco years. 
Choosing law as his profession, he enterecJ Millsaps College and studied 



ViUhujii vi 



r;72 p:xi:cutive departmexts, op'fices axd hoards 

through the Law course under Judsie AlbiTt Whittield iuid Judge W. 11. 
Harper, graduating in 1910, with B. L. degree. His advantages have 
been liberal and he holds the three degrees of B. S., M. A., and B. L. 

He was adniitted to the bar and began his practice at Booneville. 
Miss., in ilie summer of 1910; was elected Mayor of the town and d*"- 
clined a re-election; was chosen District Attorney just five years af- 
ter he began his practice, a position whiph he still holds with great 
ability and success. 

Mr. Berry is a Dpmocrat: he has occupied various imi ortant posi- 
tions in his party, among them Secretary of the Democratic Executive 
Committee for Prentiss County, Secretary of the Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee for the First Congressional District of Mississippi, and 
delegate to the Convention of 1912. 

He is a Baptist, having served as Superintendent or teacher for 
some fifteen yeais. in his places of residence. He is a Mason, Wood- 
man of the Vv'orld. and Knight of Pythias. 

On June 2-3, 1913. Mr. Berry w-as married to Annie T. Lee Shin- 
nault, daughter of William W. Shinault and Siddie Burress Shinault of 
Greenville and Booneville. Miss. 



Second District. 
E. J. Ford. 
(Gulfport) 

Third District. 

RU.SH HroiITOWF.K Kxox. 

Rush Hightower Knox of Hou.ston, Miss., District Attorney for the 
third Judicial District of Mississippi, was born September 24, 1S79, in 
Calhoun Couniy, :\Ii£s. He is the son of Isaac Nicholson Knox and 
Martha (Hightower) Knox of Chickasaw County. His father was a na- 
tive of Houston, where he resided \mtil the outbreak of the Civil War, 
Avhen he joined the "Chickasaw Guards." at the age of seventeen. This 
company was afterwards known as "Company E"' of the famous 11th 
Mississippi Regiment, in whicli Isaac X. Knox served until wounded at 
Gaines ilill and was discharged. Recovering, he joined the cavalry, in 
which he remained until the surrender. He is now living at a ripe old 
agf^ in Pontotoc. ^lirs. He was the son of ^Matthew Knox of South 
Carolina. The latter, after liis marriage,- moved to Chickasaw Coimty, 
Miss., settling near the town of Houston, one of the oldest towns of thai 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 





S. G. SALTER 
District Attorney, 11th District 



GUY J. RENCHER 
District Attorney, 16th District 



XM^ 






•\ 



\ ' 



lu^ii-ifca. -i-v 



mi 



-.IT triHii 



TOXEY HADL 
District Attorney, loth District 






._^ ..■.■.i#. V' 




RICHARD DEX.MAN 
District Attorney, 17th District 



i i 



JvlDiiU .11', 1 



EXECUTIVK "DKrARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 573 

section. When the County of Chickasaw was formed in 1836, h? wa=: 
appointed Probate Judsre. serving twelve years, and bein,s< the first man 
to hold that office in the County. 

The Knox family is of Scotch descent, tracing directly to John Knox 
the great religious Reformer of Scotland. Matthew Knox's father. 
Robert Knox, with his brother. James, and two other brothers, emi- 
grated from Scotland to the Carolinas. James Knox's oldest daughter 
became the mother of James Knox Polk, eleventh President of the 
United States, the name James Knox having been given to him in 
honor of his maternal grandfather. Of the four brothers who came 
to America, one settled in Pennsylvania, one in Tennessee, the others 
in the Carolinas. A little grocery store in Tennessee w?.s known as 
Knox's Store, and from, this small beginning came the city of Knox- 
ville in the County of Knox. In Mississippi, the family has been 
among the most active and progressive in all movements for the 
advancement of the State's best interests. 

Mr. Knox's mother was the daughter of Thomas Hightower. a mem- 
ber of a' prominent Mississippi family. He received his ea^lv educa- 
tion in the schools of Calhoun and Pontotoc Counties completing his 
Hish School course in the Town of Pontotoc. Tn 1S9S, he entered M's- 
sissippi Collesre. finishing his literary course in 1901. Tn th? fall of 
1901. he began the Junior and Senior law course in the University of 
Mississippi and was admitted to the bar on June 1, 1902. 

Mr. Knox conr-'^nced his practice in connection with Hon R. V. 
Fletcher, now G^^^ral Counsel for the T. C. Railroad, the beginning 
of a large and successful practice. He has served tAvo terms as INIayor 
of Houston and was appointed District Attorney to succeed Hon. H. 
D. Stephens, resigned. In 1911, he was elected District Attorney by a 
large majority and was re-elected in 1915. without opposition. Vr. 
Knox is one of the most brilliant and popular men of his section and 
few have enjoyed a more universal respect and confidence of the peo- 
ple. In 191(^. he announced as a candidate for justice of the Sunrem" 
Court against Judge E. 0. Sykes. an appointee of Gov. Bilbo, but was 
defeated by a small majority. 

He is a Democrat in political faith, a Baptist in relig!Ous faith, anl 
a Shriner in the fraternal Order of Masonry. On Xovembsr 2. 1904, 
he was united in marriage to Florence Felicia Bigliam. at Po^'tot'i^c, 
Miss. Mrs. Knox is the daughter of D. C. M. Bigham and Elirab-^th 
(Simmons) Bigham of that place. Her father was the son of S-muel 
Bigham a prominent minister of the Methodist Church in North M's- 
sissippi. during his earlier years. He came to Mississippi from Sonfi 
Carolina during the 30's, was a practical farmer and also one of the 
surveyor's who, in the employ of the United States Government, laid 
off much of the land in the northern part of this State. D. C M. Big- 
ham graduated in the University of Mississippi with first honors: was 
a Confederate soldier, wounded twice, was Superintendent of Educa- 



574 EXECUTIVE DETARTMEXTS, OFFICES VXD BOARDS 

tion for Pontotoc County, for sixteen years, and with his wife tau.srht 
school during their early married life. Mr. and Mrs. Knox have two 
children, Olivia May and Martha Elizabeth. 



Fourth Distrirt. 
JuLirs Moisc For.MAx. 

Julius Moise Fonnan of Inverness, Miss.. District Attorney of the 
Fourth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born August 13, 1880, in 
Amite County, Miss. He is the son of Edward James Forman and 
Mary C. Forman of Liberty, Amite County, Miss. His mother was the 
daughter of Ismay Forman and Catherine (Troxell) Forman, who 
lived at Monterey, La. His father was a man of influence in his com- 
munity and served as Justice of the Peace of Amite County, for six 
years. Later, he was elected to the Board of Supervisors and served 
twelve years, resigned to accept a seat in the Legislature where he 
served in 1904 and 1906. He was a private in Company K, Seventh 
Regiment of the Confederate Army, serving from October 1861, to 
the close of the war. His parents were Ephraim J. Forman, (a min- 
ister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South) and Amanda (Rob- 
erts) Forman of Amite County. 

Attorney Julius Moise Forman is of Scotch and English ancestry. 
His gre:;t-grandfather, Edward James Forman, was a native of New 
Jersey, a descendent of Engli.sh parentage. After leaving that State, 
he lived for a while in Jefferson County, Miss., but finally sett'ed in 
Amite. ]\Ir. Forman's maternal great-grandfather, Robert Rob?rts. 
came from Scotland and settled in South Carolina, later rexoving to 
Amite County. He served as an Orderly Sergeant in the War of 1812, 
and was in the Battle of New Orleans. 

Mr. Forman received his earlier education in the public schools of 
Amite County, and later attended the High School of Greensburg, La. 
Also attended the ileridian Male College at Meridian, Miss., and later 
Ruskin Cave College, at Ruskin, Tenn. Deciding to make the law his 
profession, he took an extensive course in the Law School of Chicago 
University, and later was graduated from the University of Missis- 
sippi, with the degree of B. L. His course in the Chicago University 
included Criminal Law, Law of Contracts, and the Law of Domestic 
Relations. 

After his graduation, Mr. Forman taught school for six years begin- 
ning the practice of law in 1909, at Gloster, Miss. In January, 1913, 
he made his permanent home in Inverness, Sunflower County, Miss. 
Here he began a career of marked success, acting at present a.s i Trus- 
tee of the Sunflower High School. Having become very popular with 



EXECUTIVE KETART.MEXTS, OFFICES AXD BOAFvDS 575 

the people of his county, he was induced to become a candidate for 
for District Attorney of the Fourth Judicial District, comprising the 
counties of Washington, Sunflower, Leflore and Holmes, to which of- 
fice he was elected by a large majority. 

Mr. Forman is a Democrat; has served as Superintendent of the 
M. E. Sunday-school and member of the Board of Stewards, since early 
manhood; was a delegate to the Annual Conference at Hazelhurst in 
December, 1912. He is a Master Mason, a Woodman of the World, and 
was Clerk of W. O. W. Camp at Gloster for four years. 

On December 22, 1000, he was married to Bertha L. Carruth, daugh- 
ter of Edward T. Carruth and Mary (Terrell) Carruth, of Amite 
County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Forman have two children, Ruth Jewel and Julius 

Moise, Jr. 



Fifth District. 

Joiix Fkanklin Allex. 

John Franklin Allen, of Kosciusko, District Attorney of the Filth 
Judicial District of Mississippi, was born October 26, 1S71, near New 
Port, Atta'a County, Miss. He is the son of George Franklin Allen 
and Susan Rebecca (Cain) Allen of Attala County. His family for a 
number of generations have resided near New Port, where they have 
engaged in farming. They have always assisted in the progress and 
development of the county and have been active in promoting the be.-,t 
interests of their locality. George Franklin Allen was the sen of 
James P. Allen and Sicily Allen, who resided near New Port. 

Mr. Allen's mother was the daughter of John G. Cain and Margar- 
ette Cain- of Attala County. George Franklin Allen, ambitious to edu- 
cate his children, sent them early to the public srhools of his home 
county, and it was in these free schools that the son, John Franklin 
Allen, received his elementary education. 

After thorough preliminary training, he entered French Camp Acad- 
emy in 1SS7. Later, he entered the University of Mississippi for a 
literary course, and later still, he was graduated from the law course 
of this institution. He began his law practice in 1897 at Kosciusko, 
Miss., and immediately entered upon a successful career. 

Having always taken an interest in State affairs and the public 
questions of the day, he was induced to become a candidate for the 
Legislature and served continuously in that body from 1S96 to 190S 
In 1815, he was City Attorney of Kosciu.sko. He is one of the ablest 
men of his District and tills his present position with much satisfac^ 
tion to his people. 



576 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES A^N^D BOARDS 

.Mr. Allen is a Democrat; member of the fraternal orders of Masons, 
Knights of Pythias, and Woodman of the World. On May 6, 1806. he 
was married to Nannie Parker of Spring Grove, Attala County, Miss. 
She is the daughter of E. B. Parker and Eudora Parker, of Mississippi. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen have three children, Mrs. Eudora (Allen) Smith- 
son, Joe Franklin, and John Percy. 



Sixth Distritf. 
PtOBECT Eli Bennett. 

Robert Eli Bennett of Meadville, Miss.. District Attorney of the 
Sixth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born September 25, 1871, at 
Little Springs, Franklin Cotmty. Miss. He is the son of James Paul 
Bennett and Sarah Rebecca (Carruth) Bennett of Franklin County. 
His father was a soldier in the Confederate army: enlisted as a pri- 
vate in Company A. Seventh Mississippi Regiment, known as the 
"Franklin Rifles." He became Orderly Sergeant and served through- 
out the war. Mr. Bennett's paternal and maternal ancestors were, a-- 
was the case in so many other instances, natives of the Carolinas ani 
removed to thp State of Mississippi in its pioneer period. James Paul 
Bennett reared his family at Little Springs, where he engaged in 
farming. His son soon manifested a desire for an education and in 
the public schools of Little Springs and the High School of Aub/rn. 
he secured a thorough preparation for college. He was afterwards i'l 
Millsaps College where he pursued his literary studies, and finally en 
tered the Law Department, in which he completed his law course in 
190.3. 

During the intervening periods, he taught school in Lincoln ana 
Franklin Counties to defray his college expenses. Since 1905, he has 
been in the active practice of law in his town and county. 

In 1900, he filled an unexpired term as County Superintendent o." 
education. Having become interested in all public questions that con- 
cerned the welfare of the State, he offered for the Legis'ature and was 
elected to the House of Representatives, (Floater) of November 5, 1907. 
On May 1, 1910, he was appointed to fill the unexpired term of Dis- 
trict Attorney, a vacancy being caused by the resignation of Mr. Wail, 
to accept appointment in a new District. During hi.^ term of ofii e. 
Mr. Bennett was fearless in promoting the enforcement of law. Since 
that period, he has engaged in the practice of his profession and was 
thus engaged when he was nominated in the first primary for th-^ of- 
fice of District Attorney, which ofT^ce he at present fills witii excep- 
tional ability, 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 



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JULIUS E. BERRY 
District Attorney, 1st District 



JXO. F. ALLEN 
District Attorney, 5th District 




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J. M. FORE.MAX 
District Attorney, 4th District 



J. H. HOWIE 
District Attorney. 7lh District 



EXECUTIVK DEP.VRT>[EXTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 577 

.Mr. Bennett is a Democrat: a member of the Methodist Church, and 
of the Orders of Woodmen of the Worlds Odd Fellows, and Masons. He 
was married on Se;v ember 25, 1907, to Augusta Lena Newman, daugh- 
ter of Rudolph Sessions Newman and Sarah Edith (Cowart) Newman 
of Veto, Miss. Mr.s. Bennett's family is descended from the pioneers 
of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have one child, Sarah Edith. 



Seventh District. 
John- Hixes Howie. 

John Hines Howie of Jackson, Miss.. District Attorney of the Sev- 
enth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born. February 5, 1S76, at 
Trenton, Smith County, :Miss. He is the son of John Houston Howie 
and Caroline Lucinda (Thomas) Howie of Mississippi. His father 
was a native of Uniontown. Perry County, Ala., at which place he re- 
sided about twenty-five years, when removed to Smith County, Miss., 
where he died in April 1895. He was the son of John Howie and Mar- 
garet Houston Howie of Waxhaw, N. C. District Attorney Howie is oi 
Scotch ancestry, his paternal great-grandfather, John Howie, Sr., hav- 
ing emigrated to the United States from Scotland. 

Mr. Howie's mother was the daughter of William Thomas and Ma- 
tilda (Wiseman) Thomas of Lexington, N. C. who moved to Smith 
County, Miss., soon after their marriage. In Mississippi both paternal 
and maternal ancestors have established worthy and influential fam- 
ilies and have become a part of the best social life, taking an active 
and helpful part in the public welfare. 

Mr. Howie received his early education in the public schools of 
Smith County. He later attended Mississippi College, from which 
institution he was graduated with the degrees of A. B. and M. A. in 
1S99. He studied law at the University of IMississippi and, in 1901, 
graduated with the degree of B. L. He began the practice of his pro- 
fession at McComb, where he remained until 1907, when he removed 
to Jackson, where he has become one of the leading lawyers of the 
city. He soon obtained the position of Prosecuting Attorney for the 
City, which position he held during 1909 and 1910. In 1912, he was 
made District Attorney of the Seventh Circuit District, which office 
he still holds. During his public service Mr. Howie has won for him- 
self a high reputation as an official and has become very popular with 
the people of the city and District. 

He is a Democra':; a member of the Methodist ChurcTi; member of 
the fraternal orders of Masons, Knights of Pythias and Woodmen oi 
the World. 

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378 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. OFFICES AXD BOARDS 

On December 30, I'^rrj, he was marru^d to Mary Tal'v Xorgress of 
Patterson, La. She is the daughter of Jos:ph and Missouri Tally Xor- 
gress of Patterson, La. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howie have six children, Joseph Hines, Mary Helen, 
Hilda Stewart, Margaret Edna, Adele Xorgress, and Birdie Caroline. 



Eighth District. 
Woops C. Eastland, Forest. 

Niyith District. 
James D. Thames, Vicksburg. 

Tenth District. 
:NLvrtI-\ Van Bfrex Mii.eer. 

Martin Van Buren Miller of Meridian, Miss.. District Attorney for 
the Tenth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born July 22, 18S6, at 
Meridian, Lauderdale County, Miss. He is the son of Dr. Martin Van 
Buren Miller and Caroline (Blanks) Miller. His father was a native 
of Sumpter County, Ala. He removed from Sumpter County Ala., to 
Meridian, Miss., in 1S82. He was at one time President of the Medical 
Association of his county; also, president of the Board of Trustees of 
the Meridian Public Schools. He was the son of Robert Miller and 
Ciceley Halsell Miller of Sumpter County, Ala. 

The Millers are of Irish ancestry. A remote ancestor of our sub- 
ject settled in South Carolina in the Colonial period, whence he re- 
moved to Sumpter County Ala. His grandfather. Robert Miller, was 
Colonel of an Alabama regiment during the Mexican War and served 
as a private during the Civil War. His maternal grandfather, James 
Lafayette Blanks, came to Mississippi before 1861 and settled in 
Lauderdale County. He served as a private in the Confederacy and 
took part in all local movements for the restoration of his section 
after the Civil War. 

Mr. Miller received his elementary and High School training under 
able instructors in the public schools of Meridian, graduating in 1904. 
He then entered the University of Mississippi, where be took a full 
four-years course from 1904 to 1908. during which time he won the 
Hermean Junior medal for oratory and the Hermean Phi Sigma Senior 



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EXECUTIVK DEPAIiTMEXTS. OFFICES AND BOARDS 579 

medal for joint debate. In addition to his taste for cultural pursuits 
he was fond of athletics and was The successful manager of the Univer- 
sity football team in lynS. He studied law in Meridian in 1909 and 
was admitted to the bar in 1910. He soon established a good practice 
and bcconMng very popular with the peoi le. he announced for Prose- 
cuting Attorney of Lauderdale County in IPll. and was elected with- 
out opposition. He continued in this office until he was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney for the Tenth Judicial District, which position he fills 
with marked ability. 

Mr. Miller from 1905 to 1907 was a member of Battery I. Mississippi 
Militia, and rendered patrol service on the coast of Mississipi;i during 
the yellov\' fever quarantine of 1905. 

He is a Democrat; member of the Baptist Church: member of Scot- 
tish Rite Consistory. Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World, 
Praetorians, Ji;n'or Order United American ^Mechanics and the local 
Blacksmiths' Union. He is a Past Chancellor of K. of P., Mount 
Barton. No. 13. 

Mr. Miller is unmarried. 



Eleventh District. 
SiMPsox Goodwin- Sai,ter. 

Simpson Goodwin Salter of Clarksdale, Miss., District Attorney for 
the Eleventh Judicial District of Mississippi, was born October 29th, 
1S81, near Hazlehurst, Copiah County, IMiss. He is the son of Simp- 
son Goodwin Salter and Mary Quinn Salter of Copiah County. His 
father was a native of Edgefield County. South Carolina, from which 
place he removed to Copiah County, Miss., when about thirty years old. 
He was a soldier in the Confederate Army, his service extending 
throughout the w^ar. He was a member of the Board of Supervisors 
of his county for eighteen yea.rs and was County Treasurer for four 
years. His parents were. Rev. John Salter, (a Baptist minister) and 
Fanny Goodwin Salter, of Edgefield County, S. C. 

Mr. Salter's mother was the daughter of William Weathersby and 
Sallie Slater Weathersby of :\ronticello. Lawrence County, Miss. He 
received his early training in the schools of Copiah County and at- 
tended the High Schools of Wesson, Hebron and Hazlehurst, graduat- 
ing from the last, in May, 1899. In September, 1899. he entered Missis- 
sippi College and took a full four-year course in three years, graduat- 
ing in May, 1902. After leaving college, he taught in Amite and 
Copiah Counties until the spring of 1907, studying law throughout this 
period. In the summer of 1907. he took a law course in the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. He passed his professional examination conducted 
by Chancellor Lyell, at Monticello, Miss., in November, 1907. After 



5S0 KXrOOUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AXi> BOARDS 

practising- law for a while, as junior partner of the firm of Touchstone 
and Salter at IMonticello. Miss., he entered the Law Department of 
the University of Texas, where he spent three sessions in close appli- 
cation, completing the course in May, 1912. A month afterwards, he 
became senior partner in the law firm of Salter & Longino at Clarks- 
dale. Miss., which position he has since held. ^Iv. Salter enjoyed 
unusual advantages in the study of law and being thoroughly equipped 
for his profession, he has become a successful practitioner, though 
caring little for public ofRce his popularity with the people brought 
about his candidacy for the office of District Attorney. He was elected 
on November 2, 191 o, which position he now fills to the entire satisfac- 
tion of his constituents. He is a private in Company E, First Regi- 
ment Mississippi National Guards. 

Mr. Salter is a Democrat, has been a member of Company E, First 
Regiment Mississippi National Guard, and is a deacon of the First 
Baptist Church of Clarksdale, Miss. He belongs to the fraternal orders 
of Masons, and Knights of Pythias. 

On June 16, 1908. he was united in marriage to Ellen Riley at 
New Hebron. Lav.-rence County, Miss. Mrs. Salter is the daughter 
of Franklin L. and Balsorah I. Riley of New Hebron. Her father was 
a Confederate soldier and founded the town of New Hebron. 

Mr. and Mrs. Salter have three children, Simpson Goodwin III, 
Nell, and Ora May. 



• Tn-elftfi District. 

Ror.ERT Samuel Hall. 

Robert Samuel Hall of Hatriesburg, District Attorney for the Twelfth 
Judicial District of ^lississippi, was born March li\ 1877, at "Williams- 
burg, Covington County, Miss. He is the son of Evans Hall and Effie 
Little (^McDonald) Kail, and is of Scotch and French descent, his an- 
cestors having first settled in South and North Carolina. His pater- 
nal grandfather removed from North Carolina some time during the 
30's and settled at ^^ount Carmel: maternal ancestors came from 
South Carolina about the same time and located near Mount Olive in 
Simpson County. Miss. His paternal grandmother was reared near 
Covington. La. The families have for several generations resided in 
Mississippi. Evans Hall was born at Mount Carmel, Miss., and was 
Circuit and Chancery Clerk of that county for eighteen years and 
Mayor of the City of Hattiesburg for five years. He was a soldier in 
the Confederate Arniy. rendering faithful service in Company B., 
Fourth Regiment of Mississippi Cavalry. He was the son of Dr 
Alexander H. Hall and Mary Ann (Evans) Hall of Monticello, Mips. 
Dr. Alexander Hall was a graduate from the University of Pennsyl- 



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DISTRICT ATTORNEYS 



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MARTIN' VAX B. .MILLER 
District Attorney, 10th District 



GEORGE R. XODLES 
District Attorney. 13th District 



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R. S. HALL 
District Attorney, 12th District 




HUGH V. WALL 
District Attorney, 14th District 



EXECUTIVE DEPAUTMEXTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 581 

vania, and praciisod nifdiciiic iu Mississippi for many years. He was 
twice a delegate to the Constitutional Conventions of Mississippi after 
the Civil War; was appointed by President Johnson Revenue Assessor 
of the Southern District of Mi?pissippi, and was Registrar of the Land 
Office when located at Augusta. He was Superintendent of Education 
of Covington County for several years, during the SO's. District At- 
torney Hall's mother was the daughter of Alexander and Elizabetu 
(McXair) McDonald of Mount Olive, Miss. 

He received his elementary and high-school education at Williams 
burg and Hattiesburg and, later, took a law course at Millsaps College, 
graduating in 1899, and locating for practice at Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Mr. Hall has held many positions of honor and public trust in 
Mississippi. He ^^as editor of the Hattiesburg Citizen from 1S96 to 
1S9S, during which time he was a vigorous advocate of law enforce 
ment and better public schools, and was active in all movements for 
the development of his section. He was elected State Senator in 1900; 
Prosecuting Attorney of Forest County in 1910-11; Attorney for the 
Twelfth Judicial District 191:2-ltj. and re-elected to this office for 
191G-:.'0. He was a delegate to the Democratic X'ational Convention at 
Denver, in 1908. 

He is a Democrat; member of the Executive Committee of Forest 
County from 1906 to 1910; member of Presbyterian Church, and of the 
orders of Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights and Ladies of Honor, :\Iacca- 
bees. Elks, Woodmen of the World. Knights of Pythias. 

On April 10th, 19Mit. he was married to Lenore Stanton Robinson, of 
Hattiesburg. Mrs. Hall is the daughter of Wyman A. Robin&on and 
Mary (Staneon) Robinson, of Ontario, Canada. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hall have five children, Stanton Augu>tus, Robert 
Waldemar, Edward Currie, Jack and Efiie Lenore. 



Thirteenth District. 

Gkorge Roscoe Xohles. 

George Roscoe Nobles of Raleigh, IMiss., District Attorney of the 
Thirteenth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born November 13th, 
1S7S, at Shiloh, Rankin County, Miss., and is the son of B. H. Nobles 
and Laura Ann (Martin) Nobles. His father was a native of Alabama: 
from which state he removed to Shiloh, Rankin County. Miss. Mr. 
Nobles' mother was the daughter of James JL Martin and Eliza Martin 
of Rankin County. They have, since the establishment of the family 
in Mississippi, taken part in all the movements for the betterment 
of society and were zealous advocates of education, early placing 
their son In the public schools of Rankin Countv. 



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582 EXECUTIVE r>EPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

In the common scliools of this progressive county, Mv. Nobles re- 
ceived his elementary training, and afterwards took a thorough liter- 
ary course in the Braxton Collegiate Institute. He, later, entered 
Milsaps College, from which institution he was gi'aduated with the 
A. B. degree in 1903. He was admitted to the bar iu 1907 and located 
for practice, first at Taylorsville, Smith County, and later at Raleign. 
During this period, he became very popular with the people and was 
elected to his present office by a good majority. He has always stooa 
for the best advancement of society and has been behind all move- 
ments for its improvement. He is one of the influential men of his 
community and district which he serves with great honor to his pro- 
fession. 

Mr. Nobles is a Democrat, and was a member of the Democratic 
Executive Committee, 1908-1912; is a member of the Methodist Church, 
and of the fraternal orders of Masons. 

On August 2i>th, 1906, he was married to Pearl Russell of Daniel, 
Smith County, Miss. Mrs. Nobles is the daughter of Victor Hugo 
Russell and Susan Jones Russell of Smith County. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nobles have two children, Mary George and IMildreU 
Russell. 



Fourteenth District. 
High VER>ro.\ Wall. 

Hugh Vernon 'Wall of Brookhaven, Miss., District Attorney for the 
fourteenth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born March 8, 1S78, 
near Gillsburg, Amite County, Miss. He is the son of David Jerome 
Wall anci Miranda (Morgan) Wall of Amite County. His father was a 
native of Mississippi and spent his entire life on the old plantation 
wiiere he was born. He was a gallant Confederate soldier, serving 
throughout the war. His parents. Tucker Wall and wife Rebecca 
Hurst Wall, came from North Carolina to South Mississippi, and were 
among the early ante-bellum settlers of that portion of the State, 
giving their strength, energy and talents to the development and ad- 
vancement of Mississippi during the early years of its statehood. 
Their parents, Drew Wall and Rebecca Hurst came from England and 
settled in North Carolina. The Wall family rendered faithful service 
to the Confederacy, Tucker Wall having sent five of his young sons 
into battle, two of whom were killed. The youngest son of this family 
became the father of Hugh Vernon Wall. 

Mr. Wall's maternal grandparents came from England and settled 
near Jackson, La. He received liis early education in the public schools 
of Amite County, attending irregularly on account of the farm work 
which demanded his time. In" September, 1S94, he entered Gillsburg 



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EXECUTIVE DEPART-MENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 583 

Collegiate Institute, from '^•hich he graduated in 1S9S. He spent one 
year at the Southwestern Baptist University, Jackson, Tenn., and 
entered the University of Mississippi, in October, 1900. From this he 
graduated in ll'i'J, -vvitli degree Bachelor of Law. He located at 
Summit, Pike County, Miss., and soon formed a partnership with 
Clem V. Ratcliff, which continued until Mr. Wall was elected District 
Attorney, in 1907, for the Sixth Judicial District. In 1910, the Legis- 
lature changed the districts and created the llth District and as Mr. 
Wall was then living in Erookhaven in the latter District, he was 
commisisoned as District Attorney for it; in 1911, he was re-elected 
to succeed himself; again in 1915 and is now serving his term which 
will expire in 1920. Since his incumbency, he has rendered faithful 
service to his State, has been active in the prosecution of many im- 
portant cases, involving the interests of the State, and has been un- 
tiring in his efforts to stamp out the liqtior trafnc. 

Mr. Wall is a Democrat; was a delegate to the State Convention of 
1912, and to the National Convention of 190S. 

He is a member of the Baptist Church and of the Masonic Lodge, 
was master of Blue Lodge for two years; is now member of lloyal 
Arch Council, Commandery and Shriner Lodges. 

On December 16, 190S, he was married to Ethel Pitts, daughter of 
Dr. Albert B. Pitts and Rosa (Sumrall) Pitts of Hazlehurst, Miss. 



Fifteenth District. 
ToxEY Hall. 

Toxey Hall of Columbia, Marion County, Miss., District Attorney of 
the Fifteenth Judicial District of Mississippi, was born September IS, 
1882, at Chunkey, Lauderdale County. He is the son of Dr. Wesley 
White Hall and Julia Emma (Wright) Hall of Meridian, Miss., and ot 
Opelika, Ala, His father was a native of Meridian, near which city he 
practised medicine for SQme four years, thence removing to Rose Hili, 
Jasper County, where he continued his profession for several years, 
after which he moved to Estabuchie, Jones County, where he remained 
for six years, and moved to Lumberton in Lamar County, where after 
a practice extending over three years, he died in 1902. He was a grad- 
uate of Mobile Medical College. He was the son of Colonel Wesley 
White Hall and Sarah Amanda Eastis, who lived near Meridian. Miss. 
Col. W. W. Hall represented Lauderdale County in the Legislature dur- 
ing two terms, just before or during the Civil War. 

Mr. Hall's mother was the daughter of William Wright and Lucinda 
Robinson who lived at Opelika, Ala., from which place the family 
removed to Mississippi, where it has since resided. He received 



584 EXECUT1^■E DEPART.MEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

bis early education in the Poplarville High School and graduated in 
May, 1902,. from this institution, which under the leadership of Prot. 
W. I. Thames, one of the strongest, best equipped and most influputial 
educators in Mississippi, became noted for its high grade of ^vork. 
and for its strict discipline. Mr. Hall attended Mississippi College 
dui-ing sessions of 1902-03-04, winning the Junior medal for oratory 
in 1904, and representing the Hermenian Literary Society as second 
orator, on its 1904 anniversary. He attended the University of Mis- 
sissippi during session of 1905, and graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment of Millsaps College in 1906, with degree of B. L. 

Mr. Hall immediately located at Columbia, Miss., where he has been 
a busy and useful attorney thoroughly identified with the best inter- 
ests of his chosen residence. During 1909 and 1910, he served as 
Mayor of the City of Columbia and was elected District Attorney for 
the Fifteenth Judicial District, in 1911; was re-elected in 1915, by a 
vote of three to one and is one of the best equipped officials in the pub- 
lic life of the State. 

Mr. Hall is a life-long Democrat; since 1900, a member of the Bap- 
tist Church; was in 1910. Worshipful Master of St. Albans Lodge, No. 
80, Free and Accepted Masons; a member of the "Woodmen of the 
World and. in June. 1909, was a delegate to the Sovereign Camp 
W. O. W. at Detroit, Mich.; is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

On October 25, 1911. Judge Hall was married to Pearl Ethel Watts, 
daughter of John Watts and Domer (Tyrone) Watts of Columbia, 
Miss. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hall have one child, Toxy AVatts Hall. 



SixtcentlL District. 
Guy J.\ck Rkxciieu. 

Guy Jack PLencher of DeKalb, Miss., District Attorney of the Sixteenth 
Judicial District, was born December 18, 1877, near Scooba, Kemper 
County, Miss. He is the son of A. M. Rencher and May Jack Rencher 
of Scooba. His father was a member of the 36th Alabama Regiment, 
service extending throughout the Civil War. He was the son of 
Daniel Grant Rencher of Sumpter County, Ala. 

Mr. Rencher's mother was the daughter of Abner Jack of Scooba, 
Miss. He unites Iri.sh ancestry, from both father and mother. Hia 
ancestors first settled in America before the Revolutionary War, and 
his maternal great-great-great-grandfather, Patrick Jack, was a mem 
ber of the Mecklenburg Convention, and carried the famous "Mecklen 
burg Declaration of Independence" to the Continental Convention in 
Philadelphia. Both the Rencher and the Jack families have furnished 



EXECUTIVE DEPART.MEXTS, OFFICES AXD BOARDS 5S5 

soldiers in every war in which the United States has engaged. Mr. 
Rencher's paternal relatives trace relationship with Lord Ne'.son. 
They removed finin the Carolinas to Alabama and thence to Missis- 
sippi; where tliey have been prominout in the development of the 
Stare and have been identified with all movements for the advance 
ment and betterment of society. 

Mr. Rencher received his education in the schools of Binnsville, 
Miss.: at Fairview College; and the luka Normal. He did not attend 
school regularly, but by hard study and close application, he was 
thoroughly prepared to enter the Law Department of the Universitj 
of Mississippi, taking two years work in one, and making for himself 
a worthy record in that institution. 

In September, 1901, he was admitted to the Bar and settled for 
practice at DeKalb, where he has since built up an extended practice. 

He was a member of the Legislative Sessions of 1908-1912-1914-1 91G, 
and during his entire membership in that body, he performed for the 
State faithful and efficient service. He was elected Attorney of the 
Sixteenth Judicial District in 191.5, which office he fills with much 
ability. Mr. Rencher is a Democrat, was three times selected as 
Chairman of County Conventions, and was a delegate to the National 
Convention of 1908, which nominated William Jennings Bryan, at 
Denver. During President Wilson's candidacy. Mr. Rencher was re- 
quested to make speeches on behalf of the Democratic party. 

He is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and a member of the 
benevolent orders of Masons. Elks and Woodmen of the World. Three 
times made Worthy Master of INIasonic local lodge. 

On May 4, 1904, he was married to Rosa Mae Flake, at DeKalb. 
Miss., who is the daughter of John and Eliza Flake, now at Oak Grove, 
Miss., formerly of North Carolina. 



Seventeenth District. 

Richard Dexmax. 

Richard Denman of Charleston, District Attorney for the Seventeenth 
Circuit Court District of Mississippi, was born May 11, 18So, at Paynes, 
Tallahatchie County, Miss. He is the son of Dr. Thomas Denman and 
Ada Elizabeth (Crenshaw) Denman of Tallahatchie County. His 
father was a native of Carroll County and at the age of seven removed 
with his parents, Richard and Mary Elizabeth Denman, to Paynes, 
Tallahatchie County. Dr. Denman enjoyed good educational advan- 
tages and is a succes.sful physician of his secrion. His wife wa.s the 
daughter of Robert and Mary Crenshaw of Scobey, Miss. 



r;S6 EXECITIVE DEPAPTMEXTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

Richard Denman was reared on a farm near Charleston, being the 
third chihl of a happy family of ten children. He received his early 
education in the public schools of his native county and afterwards 
attended Mississippi College, Clinton, Miss., where he graduated in 
1908. Choosing law for his profession, he studied through the session 
of 1909, in the Univer.sity of Virginia, representing that institution in 
the Southern Triangular debate at Athens. Ga. In 1910, he entered 
the Law Department of the University of Mississippi, which he repre- 
sented and for which he won honors in the Southern Pentangular De- 
bate at Baton' Rouge, La. 

Thoroughly equipped for his profession, he began his practice at 
Charleston, in IMay, 1911, where he still resides and where he has won 
a high reputation among the people of his town and section. On 
August 24, 1915. he received the nomination for Attorney for the 
Seventeenth Judicial District, a position which he fills with signal 
ability. 

Mr. Denman is a member of the Baptist Church and Superintendent 
of that Sunday-school in Charleston. He is a member of the fraternal 
orders of Masons and Woodmen of the World. 

On June 19, 1912, Mr. Denman was united in marriage to Rosa Lee 
Ashford, of Pocahontas. Miss., who is the daughter of Dr. J. T. Ash- 
ford and Mary Ashford of Bolton, Miss. Judge and Mrs. Denman 
have one child, Alice Vivian. 



COUNTY PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS WHO TOOK OATH OF 
OFFICE ON .-^ANUARY 1, 1916. 

Adams— Wilmer Shields, Natchez. 
Alcorn — T. H. Johnston, Corinth. 
Bolivar — Charles Clark, Cleveland. 
Carroll — J. G. Hemingway, Carrollton. 
Chickasaw — Jeff Busby, Houtson. 
Claiborne — M. M. Satterfield. Port Gibson. 
Clarke — Wm. Edwards. Shubuta. 
Coahoma— R. H. Kirby, Friars Point. 
Forrest — Alexander Currie, Hattiesburg. 
Harrison— R. C. Cowan, Gulfport. 
Hinds— P. D. Ratliff, Raymond. 
Issaquena— J. D. Parish, Mayersville. 
Jasper — G. N. Brown, Bay Springs. 
Jefferson— John S. Logan, Fayette. 
Jones — T. Weber Wilson, Laurel. 
Kemper, L. C. Hutton, DeKalb. 
Lamar — J. E. Cooper, Purvis. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES AND BOARDS 

Lauderdale— Cliff Mulloy. Meridian. 
Lawrence— Luther E. Grice, Monticello. 
Leake— F. E. Leach, Carthage. 
Lee— John M. Boggan, Tupelo. 
Leflore— Means Johnston. Schlater. 
Lincoln— J. Warren McNair, Brookhaveu. 
Madison— Xowland M. Reid. Canton. 
Marion — B. J. Gose, Columbia. 
Marshall— Wall Doxey, Holly Springs. 
Monroe — G. M. Holmes, Aberdeen. 
Neshoba— J. M. Wadswonh. Philadelphia. 
Newton— D. M. Anderson, Newton. 
Noxubee— D. F. Allgood, Macon. 
Oktibbeha— John B. Ferkins, Starkville. 
Panola — R. Denman, Batesville. 
Pike— Frank C. Lee, McComb City. 
Sharkey— John S. Joor, Jr., Rolling Fork. 
Sunflower— James L. Williams, Indianola. 
Tallahatchie — J. M. Kuykendall, Charleston. 
Tate — M. H. Thompson. Senatobia. 
Tunica — C. A. Jaquess, Tunica. 
Union — Landen K. Carlton. New Albany. 
Walthall— J. Monroe Alford, Tylertown. 
Warren— John J. O'Neill, Vicksburg. 
Washington— William Ray Toombs, Greenville. 
Wayne — Luther K. Saul, Waynesboro. 
Yazoo — R. R. Norquist, Yazoo City. 



587 



SEXATUK8 AXJ) IJEPrvESEXTATIVES IX 

rjoxGiu:8S Yium Mississippi 



JOHN SHARP WILLIAMS. 

Johu Sharp Wil'.iams of Odar Grove, Farm, Yazoo County, Mi-s., 
United States Senator from .Mississippi, was born July 30, 1854, at 
Memphis, Tenn. He is the son of Christopher Harris Williams and 
wife, Annie Louise Sharp. John Williams, a paternal ancestor, was 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Hillsboro Minute men and afterwards Col- 
onel of the Ninth North Carolina Line Army of the American Revolu- 
tion; Christopher Harris Williams, his grandfather, was for ten years 
a member or the National House of Representatives from Tennessee. 
John M. Sharp, his maternal grandfather, was Captain of Company 
A, Jeflerson Davis Rifles, under the command of Colonel Jefferson 
Davis, in the Me.xicnn War; the father of the subject of this sketch 
was Colonel of the Twenty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers, Confederate 
Army, and was killed at the Battle of Shiloli. Mr. Wllliarrs' descent 
from Colonel John Williams, Colonel of ihe Ninth North Carolina 
Line, Revolutionary War, confers upon him the rare distinction of 
membership in the Society of the Cincinnati. 

From the southeastern states, his family removed to Tennessee, 
where they remained until during the Civil 'War. W'hen the City cf 
Memphis was threatened with capture by the Federal Army, his fam- 
ily removed to his mother's liome in Yazoo County, Miss. Mr. V.'il- 
liaras attended the private schools of ?klemphis and Yazoo City, after- 
wards attended successively the Kentucky Military Institute near 
Frankfort; the University of the South at Sewanee, Tenn.; the 
University of Virginia: and the University of Heidelberg. Ger- 
many. He subsequently studied law under Professors Minor and 
Southall at the University of Virginia, and in the law office of Harris, 
McKisick &. Turley. in ^lemphis, Tennessee. He was licensed to prac- 
tloe in March, 1877, and in Dereniber, 1S7S, he removed to Yazoo City. 
Miss., where he engaged in tlie practice of his profession and the 



,,..,.,,/ 



SEXATORS AND REl'KKSKXTATIVES rx COXGRESS .'.89 

varied pursuits of cotton planter. He nas a delegate to the Chicago 
Convention which nominated Cleveland and Thurman; was elected to 
the Fifty-third, Fifty-founh, Fifty-fifih, Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh 
Congresses, as a Representative of the Fifth Congressional District, 
and was elected from the new Eighth District to the Fifty-eighth Con- 
gress in November 1902, and in November, 1904, without opposition. 
Mr. Williams is a Democrat; member of the Episcopal Church; ^lason, 
Knight of Pythias and Elk; was married at Livingstone, Alabama, 
October 2, 1S77, to Bettie Dial Webb, daughter of Dr. Robert Dickens 
Webb and wife, Juiia Fulton Webb of Livingstone, Ala. Mr. and Mrs. 
Williams have seven children, Mary (Williams) Holmes, Robert Wtbb, 
John Sharp, Jr., Mrs. Julia (Williams) Boykin, Allison Ridley, .Mrs. 
Sallie (Williams) Bunkley, and Christopher Harris. 

Mr. Williams was the candidate of the Democratic party for Speaker 
of the Fifty-eighth Congress and was leader of the minority on the floor 
of the House. He was a delegate to the National Democratic Conven- 
tion of 1904, and was Temporary Chairman and a member of the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions of that Convention. Mr. Williams was re- 
elected to the Fifty-eighth and Sixtieth Congresses wiiiiout opposi- 
tion, and was a member of the Rules, and the Ways and Means Commit- 
tees, and the leader of the Democratic party on the floor of the House. 
In 1906, he aiinouuced as a candidate for the United States Senate to 
succeed Senator H. D. Money, who did not offer for re-election. In 
the Democratic Primary of August 1, 1907, Mr. Williams was nomi- 
nated as the party candidate tor United States Senator, in January, 
1908, he was elected to the Senate by the Legislature, and took his 
seat March 4, 1911. He is a member of the following committees: 
Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, Finance, 
Military Affairs, Public Health and National Quarantine, University 
of the United States. He was reelected to the Senate by the popular 
vote in 1916 without opposition. His term will expire March 3, 1923. 
In all the preparations connected with the war with Germany Sen- 
ator Williams has been a national leader. 

An estimate of Senator Williams' influence on the public affairs of 
the nation would make his biography too lengthy for tlie present pub- 
lication. To say that he is recognized by all parties as one of the 
foremost, safest and soundest leaders and figures in public life of the 
United States, is only repeating the estimate made daily of him by the 
leading writers of public affairs in America. In addition to his un- 
usual ability as a statesman and leader, he is a cultured author and 
publicist, and a friend and advocate of all social movements for the 
benefit of society. 

Senator Williams is an authority on the life and times of Thomas 
Jefferson. In 1912 he wa.s invited by Columbia University to deliver 
a series of lectures on that great statesman, and these have been pub- 



•liiJq jJTH'iJ -J 



590 SEXATORS AXD REPRESENTATIVES IX CONGRESS 

lished in book form by the University. Seuator Williams has been one 
of the warmest friends anci advocates of the Mississippi Department 
of History and his deep interest in its welfare has been a constant 
source of gratification and encouragement to those engaged in the 
preservation of Mississippi's history. 



JAMES KIMBLE VAR DAMAN. 

James Kimble Vardaman, of Jackson, United States Senator from 
Mississippi, was born July 26, 1861, in Jackson County, Texas. He is 
the son of W. S. Vardaman and Anna Elizabeth (Fox) Vai daman. 
His father was a native of Copiah County. IMiss., and moved to Texas 
in 1858. He served through the Civil War as a faithful Confederate 
soldier, and in 1S68 returned tc Yalobusha County, Miss. Senator Var- 
daman's paternal grandfather was an ofBcer of the United States in the 
War of 1812. 

Senator Vardaman when a youth attended the public schools of Yalo- 
busha County under the instructions of Dr. William Bemis, who is still 
living near Pope Station, Miss. He read law in Carrollton, Miss., in 
the office of Helm and Somerville; began his practice in Winona in 
1882; edited the Winona Advance in 1883; removed to Greenwood and 
edited the Greenvood Enterprise from 1890 to 1S96; founded The Com- 
monuealth in 1896; represented Leflore County in the Legislature of 
1890, 1892, and 1S94; was Speaker of the House in 1894; was Demo- 
cratic Presidential Elector in 1892 and 1896; was President of the 
Electoral College in 1892 and 1896 and has filled many positions of 
honor in the state. 

He served during the Spanish-American War in 1898; was Captain 
of Company A., Fifth Regiment U. S. V. Infantry; promoted to Ma- 
jor; served in Santiago, Cuba, from August, 1S9S to May, 1899; was a 
candidate for Governor in 1895 and 1899; was nominated for Governor 
by the Democratic party in the first general primary election ever held 
in the State, receiving in the first primary 39,679 votes, to 34,813 for 
F. A. Critz, and 24,233 for E. F. Noel; in the second primary, in which 
F. A. Critz was the opposing candidate, receiving 53,032 to 26,249 for 
Critz, being nominated by a majority of 6,783; and was elected Gover- 
nor November 3, 1903. 

Senator Vardaman is a Democrat and is a member of the Methodist 
Church. He belongs to the Knights and Ladies of Honor, Masons, and 
Knights of Pythias. 

He was married May 31, 1883, at Winona, Miss., to Mrs. Anna E. 
(Burleson) Robinson, daughter of Dr. A. A. Burleson. Mrs. Varda- 
man is a native of Alabama, and her family has been distinguibhed in 
that State and in Texas. 



.'. •••in/. 



SEXATORS AND REPRESEXTATIVES IX COX'GRESS 591 

Senator Yardaman was the first chief executive inaugurated in the 
new capitol, his inauguration taking place in the House of Repre- 
sentatives January 19, 1904. 

Senator Vardaman was elected to the United States Senate in 1911, 
which position he occupies at present. He is a brilliant and resource- 
ful speaker, his oratorical powers and picturesque appearance making 
him very popular with his constituents, by whom he has long been re- 
garded as an idol and leader. Possessed of an eloquence that appeals 
to the people, he is magnetic and persuasive and sways his audience. 
During his administration as Governor, though partisan in his friend- 
ships, he was very diplomatic in his relations with the various state 
officials and had little friction, as he rarely interfered with the func- 
tions of the various state departments. It was after his term as Gov- 
ernor that his bitterest campaigns were waged for higher office, but 
during his incumbency of the Gubernatorial chair he conducted the 
affairs of the state in a manner that gave opportunity for both edu- 
cational and material progress. While a known, leader of the work- 
ing classes lie has always been interested in Mississippi's cducaJonai 
advancement. 



KK]Mn:Si:XTATIVES (;i>XI) COXCiKKSS 



FlKST DlSTP.K T. 



Counties, Alcorn. Itawamba. Lee. Lowndes, Monroe, Noxubee, Oktib- 
beha. Prentiss, and Tishomingo (9 counrifs). Population IftlO. 205,637 

EzKKiF.r. Samukl CA.vni.Eu, Jr. 

Ezekie". Samuel Candler. Jr., of Corinth, was born in Beilville. Ham- 
ilton County, f'la., January IS, 1S62, but moved with his parents to 
Tisliomingo County, Mi.ss., when S years old, and grew to manhood in 
tliat county; is the oldest son of Ezekiel Samuel Candler. Sr., and 
Julia Beville Candler, who were natives oC Georgia; is a direct des- 
cendent of Col. William Candler, who was a colonel in the Army of 
the American Revolution and the ancestor of the Candler family oi 
Georgia, who have been prominently identified with the history of that 
State from the days of the Revolution up to and including the pres- 
ent. Belonging to one of the best families of the South and inherit- 
ing an aspiration for the truest and best things of life, Congrtssman 
Candler early gave evidence of those qualities which afterwards won 
for him a high place in Mississippi. He received a common-school 
education in the luka ^.lale Academy, at luka, Miss.; attended the law 
department of the University of Missi.'^sippi, at Oxford, term of 1880- 
81, and on June 30, IsSl, graduated in Law, when a little over 19 years 
of age, and having had his disabilities of minority remove ' by th< 
Chancery Court, so as to enable him to practice his profesrion, he at 
once commenced the practice of law witli his father at lu'-; md'jr the 
firm name of Candler and Candler, which p^^rtnership ^isivfj until 
the death of his father, on July 30, 1915. 

Mr. Candler was Chairmru of the Democratic Execulf**' "ommittee- 
of Tishomingo County in 1SS4, when b.it 22 years oldf mov^d fron 
luka to Corinth J. uuary i, 1887, where hi- has since res.dct., the firm 
of Candler ii Candler having an oflTico ai Liku and another xt. Cor- 
inth; he wa.s nominated by the Democratic State Convention in ISSS 



REPRESENTATIVES, 62nd CONGRESS 




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EZEKIEL, S. CANDLER. Jr. 
First District 



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B. G. HUMPHREYS 

Third District 



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H D. STEPHENS 
Second District 





THO^rAS U. SISSON 
Fourth District 



REPRESENTATIVES, 62XD CONGRESS 593 

by acclamation, when 26 years old, for presidential elector for the 
first congressional district, and was elected by the largest majority 
received by any district presidential elector at tluit election in the 
State, and voted for Cleveland and Thurman; he was for 10 years a 
member of the Democratic Executive Committee of Alcorn County. 
He is a member of the following committees: Alcoholic Liquor Traffic; 
Chairman of Agricultural Committee. 

Mr. Candler is a member of the Baptist Church, and was, from 1896 
to 1905, the moderator of the Tishomingo Baptist Association, and 
several times represented that Association in the Southern Baptist 
Convention, which is the largest religiotis organization in that dt^nom- 
iuation. He is a IMason, Odd Fellow, Woodman, Beta Theta Pi. Knight 
of Honor, Elk, and Knight of Pythias, of which last-named order he 
was Grand Chancellor in the domain of Mississippi from May 1904 to 
May 19U.J. He was unanimously elected head advisor of the Woodmen 
of the World ar Columbus. Miss., at the meeting of Head Camp M. in 
1909 and was unanimously re-elected at the meeting of Head Camp 
M. at Biloxi, Miss.. March 1911, and at Meridian, Miss. 

Mr. Candler was married to Nancy Priscilla Hazlewood, on April 
26, 18S3, at Cherokee, Ala. Mrs. Candler is the daughter of Thomas 
B. and Susan Hazlewood of Alabama. Congressman and Mrs. Candler 
have three children. Mis. Julia Bevill Swift. Mrs. Susan Hazelwcod 
Small, and Lucia Alice Candler. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

Counties, Benton. DeSoto Lafayette, INIarshall, Panola, Tallahatchie, 
Tate, Tippah and Union (9 counties). Population 1910, 195,748. 

Hubert Dcrrett Stephen. s. 

Hubert Durrett Stephens of New Albany, Congressman from the 
Second District of Mississippi, was born July 2, 1S75, at New Albany, 
Union County, Miss. He is the son of Z. M. Stephens and Letha A. 
(Cokerj Stephens. His father is a native of Itawamba County, 
Miss., and in early manhood came to New Albany, where he became 
an influential citizen. He served two terms in the lower house of the 
Legislature and one term as State Senator. He was Presidential Elec- 
tor in 1884; i nd served one term as Circuit Judge. For more than forty 
years, he has practiced law at New Albany and he enjoys the con- 
fidence of his community. He was the son of Dr. R. B. Stephens an« 
Mrs. Isabella S. Stephens, of New Albany. This family, having buen 

38 — m 



VJl1-.>.'J 



•i^tT.cei .oici 



594 REPRESEXTATIVES, 62ND COXGRESS 

one of the old established families of Mississippi, became prominent, 
after the removal of the Indians, in the development of the northern 
portion of the State. 

Congressman Stephens' mother was the daughter of E. M. Coker 
and Jennie Coker of Union County. At au early age the son gave evi- 
dence of intellectual ability and made rapid progress in the pub- 
lic schools. He, later, attended the University of Mississippi, where 
he graduated in the law class of 1S96, and was admitted lo the bar on 
June 9, about a month before he attained his majority. Returning to 
his native town, he established a good practice and served as alder- 
man during one term. On January 1, 190S, he was elected District 
Attorney of the Third Judicial District, having previously been ap- 
pointed to that office, to fill a vacancy. In April, 1910, he resigned the 
above position to become a candidate for Congress, and was elected 
to that high office in the si.xty-second Congress, where he is now serv- 
ing his third term, having always reflected honor upon his party and 
performing faithful service in behalf of his County and his State. 

Congressman Stephens is a Democrat and in the National Congress 
he is a member of the following important Committees: Banking and 
Currency, Claims, Expenditures in State Department, Roads and Elec- 
tions. He is a membfr of the Methodist Church and of the fraternal 
orders of Mason, Woodmen of the Vv'orld, Elks, and Knights of Pyth- 
ias. 

On October 18, 1S99, Mr. Stephens was married to Delia Gleim of 
Courtland, Miss. She is the daughter of Joseph K. Glenu and Fannie 
Glenn of the same place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephens have two children, Hubert D., Jr., and Mar- 
ion Glenn. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 

Counties, Bolivar, Coahoma, Holmes, Issaquena, Leflore, Quitman, 
Sharkey, Sunflower, Tunica, and Washington (10 counties). Popula- 
tion 1910, 292,713. 



Benjamin Grcbb Humphreys. 

Benjamin Grubb Humphreys of Greenville, Miss., was born August 
17, 1865, at Lucknow Plantation, Claiborne County, Miss. He is the 
son of Benjamin Grubb Humphreys and Mildred Hickman Maurv 
Humphreys, of Claiborne and Leflore Counties. His father was born 
on the Hermitage Plantation in Claiborne County; was Brigadier-Gen- 
eral in the Confederate Army and was the author of a histoiy entitled, 
"War on Southern States." After the Civil War, he was a member 



REPRESENTATIVES. 62nd CONGRESS 



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BYROX P. HARRISON 
Sixth District 



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PERCY E, QUIN 
Seventh District 



J. W. COLLIER 
Eighth District 



REPRKSEXTATITES. GiXD COXGRESS 595 

of the State Senate and Governor of Mississippi, having taken an 
active and heroic part in the re-habilitation of his State. While Gov- 
ernor of the State, lSt55 -6S, he was forcibly ejected from the Execu- 
tive office and residence, by Federal soldiers under the command of 
Brigadier-General Adelbert Ames. U. S. A., who, as military governor, 
succeeded him. His ancestors came from Virginia and Tennessee to 
Mississippi. Ralph Humphreys, paternal great grandfather of Congress- 
man Humphreys, was colonel of a Virginia Regiment in the Revolution- 
ary Army. His wife, Agnes, was a daughter of Colonel George Wilson 
of Pennsylvania who was of the family of James Wilson, one of the sign- 
ers of the Declaration of Independence. George Wilson was a colonel 
in the Revolutionary Army. George Wilson Humphreys, (son of Ralph 
Humphreys and grandfather of Congressman Humphreys) and wife 
Sarah Smith lived at the Hermitage Plantation in Claiborne County, 
where Governor Humphreys was born. Sarah Smith Humphreys was 
the daughter of Major David Smith, a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War. His son, Benjamin F. Smith, served under General Jackson in 
the Creek Indian War when but a lad of fifteen, and later was at the 
Battle of New Orleans. The family removed from Kentucky to Mis- 
sissippi and settled in Hinds County after that region was transferred 
to the State by the Choctaws, Benjamin F. Smith becoming the first 
representative of Hinds County in the Legislature. Major David 
Smith's wife, Sarah Terry, was the daughter of Joseph Terry, who was 
killed at the Battle of King's ^Mountain. 

Congressman Humphreys' mother, ilildred Hickman Maury Hum- 
phreys, was the daughter of James Henry Maury and Lucinda Smitn 
of Port Gibson, and formerly of Tennessee. By tracing the history of 
such families here, it will be seen what blood flows in the veins of 
Mississippi's present population, nearly all of her public officials, 
whether occupying high or low position, showing in their genealogies 
descent from the builders and makers of America. 

Mr. Humphreys was early given good educational advantages. He 
attended the Lexington Male and Female College for some years and 
entered the University of Mississippi, where he remained four years, 
18S0-1884. He afterwards took a law course in that institution and 
was admitted to the bar at Greenwood, in 1891, where he practiced 
until elected District Attorney in 1895. Among other numerous posi- 
ons <of public trust held by Mr. Humphreys was that of Justice of the 
Peace at Itta Bena, 1S90; Superintendent of Education, Leflore County, 
1892-95; District Attorney for the counties Tunica. Quitman, Coa- 
homa, Bolivar. Washington, Sunflower, Leflore and Tallahatchie, 1895- 
1903. In every position, he gave the State valuable service, few pub- 
lic men of Mississippi being as popular with the people, irrespective 
of partisanship and factional alliances. 



,< r. 



596 REPRESEXTATIVI-^S, 62N'D CONGRESS 

When the United States was drawn into war with Spain for the lib- 
eration of Cuba, I\Ir. Kiimphreys responded eagerly to his country's 
call and was eKct''d First Lieutenant of Company B., Second Missis- 
sippi Volunteers of Infantry, which he raised in Greenwood. He was, 
at the time, District Attorney and he offered his resignation to Gov. 
A. H. Longino in order to leave with his company for the war. Gov- 
ernor Longino declined to accept his resignation, but granted hiui 
leave of absence. During the Spanish-American War, he rendered 
faithful service, under General Fitzhugh Lee, at Panama, Florida, in 
the Second Mississippi fiegiment of Volunteer Infantry. 

In 1900, Mr. Humphreys became a candidate for Congress, but was 
defeated by Patrick Henry of Vicksburg. In 1902, Mr. Humphreys 
was nominated without opposition in the Democratic Primary, was 
elected in November to the Fifty-eighth Congress, and has served con- 
tiutiously since that time. His principal Congressional work has b^en 
the improvement of the Mississippi River and the preventicn of its 
floods. He is the author of the law requiring the United States In- 
ternal Revenue Collector to furnish, to State authorities, a list of 
parties paying taxes as liquor dealers; also author of the liiw forbid- 
ding common carriers to convey intoxicating liquors in interstate 
commerce, C. O. D.; also author of the law for improvement of Big 
Sunflower River, with locks and dams; also author of the law creat- 
ing Delta Division of United states Court. He has promoted numer- 
ous other legislation looking to the benefit of his section and the en- 
tire country, and has 'reflected much honor on Mississippi in the pub- 
lic services which he has rendered her people. 

Congressman Humphreys is a Democrat and is a member of the Con- 
gressional Committees, Rivers and Harbors, Chairman of Committee 
on Territories in the 61si Congress. 

He was a Presbyterian, btit afterwards became a member of the 
Episcopal Church, of which his wife was a member. He is a member 
of the fraternal order of Elks and is greatly esteemed by its member- 
ship. Mr. Humphreys is the author of a valuable manuscript entitled 
"Floods and Levees of the Mississippi River," a subject which has al- 
ways interested him deeply. 

On October 9, 1889. he was married to Louise Yerger, at Biloxi, 
Miss. :Mrs. Humphreys is the daughter of William Yerger and Lucy 
(Green) Yerger, both of whom are deceased. They were among thi 
most prominent familie.s of Mississippi. Major William Yerger was 
a brave and gallant officer in the Confederate Army and gave const ;nt 
service to the Confederacy throughout the war; was in many battles 
and engagements and participated in the siege of Vicksburg; was on 
the staff of Gen. Charles Clark and of Gen. Pemberton. and subse- 
quently was with Major Armistfad's Cavalry Regiment. RefjrnlK.r to 
civil life after the surrender, Major Yerger served twenty-five years as 



<.<;.'<j <ui n\ I' 



3i; k vt. -> I 



RErRE:SP:XTATIVES, 62X1) C<-)X(;RESS 597 

Mayor of the City of Greenville, and was one of the most popular mt n 
of his section, being highly esteemed by all classes. Mrs. Lucy Green 
Yerger, his wife, was the daughter of A. A. Green and Caroline :Maury 
of Jefferson County and Port Gibson. She was one of the best beloved 
and most accomplished women of Mississippi. As President of the 
State Division, U. D. C. her service was full of devotion and marked 
by the highest and purest ideals. 

Congressman and :\Irs. Humphreys have two children, Willinm Yer- 
ger. and Mildred Maury. 

For further genealog\- of the Yerger family, see biography of Wil- 
liam Yerger in the "Encyclopedia of Mississippi History." 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Counties: Attala, Calhoun. Carroll, Chickasaw. ChoctaAV, Clay, 
Grenada, Montgomery, Pontotoc, Webster, Yalobusha. (11 counties.) 
Population 1910, 216,215. 

Thomas Uptox Srs.sox. 

Thomas Upton Sisson of Winona, Montgomery County, was born 
September 22, 1869, in Attala County, Miss., and is the son of Charles 
Augustus Sisson of Georgia and Repinkerton Miller Sisson, Jackson, 
Miss., and later of Attala County, Miss. When a small child, his 
father moved to Mississippi before the Civil War. When the war 
broke our, he enlisted in the Confederate Army from Choctaw County 
and served as a private in Forrest's Cavalry. He was the son of 
Thomas Sidney Sisson and wife Louise Sisson (nee Bush), who lived 
in Montgomery and Choctaw Counties, Miss. 

Congressman Sisson's mother, was the daughter of Upton Miller 
and Elizabeth Clark Miller of Jackson, Miss., and later of Attala 
County. Her father was a member of the State Senate from Hinds 
County and president pro tern of the Senate, before the Civil \Var 
James Clark, his maternal great-grandfather, was the founder of the 
Christian (Campbellite) Church in Mississippi, and was also State 
Treasurer during one term. 

Mr. Sisson obtained his early education in the country schools of 
Choctaw County and in French Camp Academy. He, later, entered 
the Southwestern Presbyterian University at Clarkesville, Tenn., and 
received the degree of A. B. from that institution in 1S90; he after- 
wards entered the Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn., and was 
graduated from that college in 189.5, with the degree of L.L. B. 

Mr. Sisson's boyhood home was one of refinement and culture, and 
though not a "self-made man" in the sense of having no early advan- 



598 REPRESENTATIVES, 6 2ND COXGRESS 

tages, he contended with the same conditions that everywhere handi- 
capped the young men of the South in obtaining an education, after 
the Civil War and the Reconstruction Period. When a lad, he worked 
on his father's farm, in a saw and a grist mill, and ran a traveling 
threshing-machine, during the summers. Such industry could but bear 
rich fruit in the boy's character in after years. Nothing daunted by 
lack of means, he early in life taught the public school at Kenago, 
Choctaw County, and from the money made in this work he paid his 
college expenses. Later, he continued to teach and was principal of 
the High School at Carthage, :\Iiss., 1890-1S91; also principal of the 
Kosciusko School 1S91-2-3. 

Mr. Sisson practised law in Memphis, Tenn., during the year 1895. 
The desire to return to his native State and share in its progress and 
advancement became so strong that he removed to Winona, Miss., in 
1896, and continued the practice of law until he was elected a Repre- 
sentative of his District in Congress, in 1908. 

Prior to his oleciion to Congress, Mr. Sisson held many oflflces of 
public trust. During these years his advance in public life was steady, 
and his associates and acquaintances recognized in him the qualities, 
of leadership that would stand the test of time. When quite a young 
man he was a member of the Board of Aldermen of Winona; after- 
wards, he became City Attorney, and County Attorney of Montgomerv 
County. In 1898, he was elected to the State Senate to fill out the 
unexpired term of Dr. Thomas Somerville, serving only for a short 
session. He was elected District Attorney in 1903 and resigned in 
January, 1907, to enter the race for Governor, for which ofhce he was 
defeated by only a small plurality. In 1908, he was elected to Con 
gress, and re-elected in 1910-12-14. 

He is a Democrat, elector for the State at large, in 1900, on the 
Democratic ticket. 

He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, (Royal Arch Mason, member 
of the Council, Commandery and Shrine), and Past Grand Master. 
He also belongs to the fraternal orders of Odd Fellows, Knights of 
Pythias, Woodmen of the World, Junior Order of American Mechanics, 
Modern Woodmen, and S. A. E. Fraternity. 

On June 6, 1901, :Mr. Sisson was married to Mary Helen Pumell, 
daughter of James C. Purnell and Jennie Hawkins Purnell, of Winona, 
Miss. Mrs. Sisson died March 27, 191.5, her youngest child dying a 
few months later. Mr. Sisson has four living children, Thomas Up- 
ton, Jr., James C, Charles A., and Mary Helen. 



REPRESENTATIVES, 62XD CONGRESS 599 



FIFTH DISTRICT, 

Counties. Clarke Jasper, Kemper, Lauderdale, Leake, Neshoba, New- 
ton, Scott, Smith and Winston (10 counties). Population 1910, 217,223. 



William Webb Vexable. 

William Webb Tenable, of Meridian, the son of Dr. R. A. Venable. 
one of the most prominent Baptist ministers of the South, was born 
in Clinton, Miss., September 25, 18S0, but shortly thereafter removed 
to :Memphis, Tenn., with his father. v.-ho was pastor of the First Bap- 
tist Church at that place for ten years; removed to Clinton, Miss., 
where his father was president of Mississippi College for a number of 
years, and from which institution young Venable was graduated, re- 
ceFving A. B. degree; one-year post graduate course; graduated from 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., with LL. B. degree. He has 
resided in Meridian, Lauderdale County, since 1S94; member National 
Guard of Mississippi one year; becran the practice of law in Meridian 
sumn^er of 1905; was appointed county attorney of Lauderdale County 
when that otnce was created, in April, 1910; v.as appointed District 
attorney in October, 1910, to succeed Hon. J. Hector Currie, deceased; 
served unexpired term of one year and two months; was elected with- 
out opposition to a full term as district attorney; served three years 
of this term, when he was elected judge of the tenth judicial district 
of Mississippi by a larje majority; resigned as district attorney Janu- 
ary 1, 191-5, to take up his new duties as circuit judge; on the death 
of Hon. S. A. Wiiherspoon, Judge Venable announced as a candidate 
to represent the fifth congressional district. He had as his opponer.ts 
Hon. J. R. Byrd of Newton, Newton County; Hon. C. L. Dobbs, of Phil- 
adelphia, Neshoba County; Hon. I. S. Wat.son, of Union, Newton 
County: Hon. W. A. Ellis, of -Carthage, Leake County; and Hon. AV. 
H. Joyner, formerly secretary to Congressman Witherspoon. Judge 
Venable and his opponents, except Mr. Watson and Mr. Joyner, ran 
upon a platform indorsing the Democratic administration. Judge 
Venable was elected over all of his opponents by special election on 
January 4, 1916, receiving a plurality of 50;l. He was re-elected in 
1916, and fills his position to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. 
Judge Venable is one of the ablest and truest men in the National 
Congress and it is with a deep sense of satisfaction that Mississippi 
claims him for her son. 

Data taken from Congressional Directorj- of May, 1916, page 55. 



600 REPKESEXTATIVES, 62ND COXGRESS 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 



Counties, Covington. Forrest, George, Greene, Hancock. Harrison. 
Jackson, Jefferson Davis, Jones, Lawrence, ilai ion, Lamar, Pearl 
River, Perry, Simpson, Wayne, and Stone (17 counties). Population 
1910, 244.949. 



BvRox Patiox Hariusox. 

Byron Patton Harrison of Gulfport, Congressman from the Sixth 
District, was born at Crystal Springs, Copiah County, Miss., on Aug- 
ust 29. 1S81. He is the son of Robert Adams Harrison and Mary 
Ann (Patton) Harrison of Crystal Springs. Robert Adams Harrison 
was the son of Benjamin Harrison and Hettie Bryant Harrison, tlie 
former belonging to the Southern branch of the Harrison family of 
New England. 

Mr. Harrison obtained his early education in the schools of Crystal 
Springs, where he made rapid progress and was a bright, aspiring 
lad. He attended the University of Louisiana and choosing law as a 
profession, he began the practice at Leakesville. Miss., in September, 
1902. He served as District Attorney from 1905 to 1911, beginning 
his first term of office at the age of 24. During that period, he becamc- 
very popular in his section of the State. In 1910. h? resigned this po- 
sition to accept the nomination to the Sixty-second Congress; was 
elected by a majority of 3.940; was re-elected in 1912 and 1914. 

Congressman Harrison, though a young man, is rapidly making his 
way to the front in the political life of .Mississippi and being a fear- 
less advocate of right, and of high social and political idea's, he has 
w^on the confidence of the people of his State and country. He is a 
Democrat and a member of the following committees: Foreign Af- 
fairs, and Committee on Rules. 

Congressman Harrison is a strong supporter of President Woodrow 
Wilson and was the permanent ch-iirman of the Democratic State Con- 
vention of May, 1916, that instructed the Misisssippi delegation to the 
National Convention, to vote for the re-nomination of President Wil- 
son. During the Convention, he played a prominent part and deliv- 
ered a speech of great force and power on behalf of Preparedness and 
other administrative measures. 

Mr. Harrison is a moirtber of the Methodist. Church and is a Mason, 
Odd Fell(>w, Knight of Pythias, Woodman of the World and Elk. 

On January 19, 190.5. he was married to Mary Edwina Mclnnis of 
Leakesvi'ie, Miss. Mrs. Harriron is the daughter of Hugh Mclnnis 
and Matilda Mclnnis of Leakesville, Miss. 

Congre.ssman and Mrs. Harrison have three childri>n. Byron Parton, 
Jr., Catherine, and Mary Anne. 



.:. -ii-.T 



REPRESEXTATIVES, 62ND CONGRESS 601 



SEVEN III DISTBICT. 

Counties. AdaiiiK, Amite, Caliborne, Copiah, Franklin, Jefferson, 
Lincoln, Pike, and Wilkinson (9 counties). Population lOlu, 218,898. 

Percy Edward.s Quix.v. 

Percy Edwards Quin of McComb City, Congressman from the Sev- 
enth District, was born October 30, 1872, in Amite County, Miss., and 
is the son of Henry Graham Quin and Virginia Elizabeth (Davis) 
Quin of Pike County. 

Mr. Quiu is of Irish ancestry, his great-grandfather, Peter Qiiinn and 
wife Judith Robinson, having emigrated from that countrj- to York 
County, South Carolina; thence, when his children were grown, to 
Spanish West Florida, in 1790, thus making his family one of the 
colonial families of Mississippi. Peter Quin was a soldier in the 
American Revolution. After his removal to the Southern territory 
from which Mississippi was made, he later settled in Pike County 
when that county was formed in the State of Mississippi. The fam- 
ily has since resided in this section of the State, and has been a prom- 
inent and influential one. 

Henry Quin, grandfather of Percy Edwards Quin, was the first Cir- 
cuit Clerk of Pike County and served in the War of 1812, from Mis- 
sissippi. He married Minerva Graham of Pike County. 

Henry Graham Quin, father of Percy Edwards Quin, was a native 
of Pike Cotmty and was Justice of the Peace in Amite County, to 
which he removed. He was a Baptist minister and also engaged in 
farming before the Civil War. At the breaking out of hostilities be- 
tween the North and the South, he entered the Confederate Army. He 
was a lieutenant in the 33rd Mississippi Regiment, and made a record 
as a fearless and faithful soldier. His wife was the daughter of Sam- 
uel Randolph Davis and Emma Edwards Davis, who were residents 
or Wilkinson County, Miss. 

Percy Edwards Quin received his early education at the Grange Hall 
pub'ic school in Amite County. He later entered the Gilisburg Col- 
legiate Institute of Amite County, where he was graduated with the 
degree of B. S. in 1S90. Entering Mississippi College,, he graduated 
from that institution with the degree of A. B. in 1893. While a stu- 
dent at the college, he was lieutenant of the Mississippi College Rifles. 

Mr. Quin entered t!ie profession of public-school teaching and while 
engaged in teaching in the High School, he took up the study of law, 
under the in.struction of Wiliiain B. Mixon and Judge J. H. Price, to 
whom he is strongly attached. He began the practice of law in Mc- 
Comb City, ia October, 1894, where he became very popular as an at- 



602 REPRESEXTATIVES, 62XD CONGRESS 

torney, and was City Attorney for the corporation of McComb City in 
1895. He represented Pike County in the Legislature for four years, 
during Gov. A. H. Longino's administration, 1890-94, inclusive. 

Mr. Quin is a Demoorat and has always been fearless, and independ- 
ent in his political career. Having always enjoyed the confidence of 
his party and constituents; he has had little opposiiiou and is re- 
garded as a young man of great promise. 

He is a member of the Baptist Church, Odd Fellow, Knight of Pyth- 
ias, Woodman of the World, Columbian Woodman and JMaccabee. 

On October 1, 1913, Mr. Quin was married to Aylette B. Conner of 
Natchez, Miss. Mrs. Quin is the daughter of Richard Ellis Conner and 
Margaret B. Conner. 

Congressman and Mrs. Quin are very popular in the political and 
social circles of Washington. 



EIGHTH DISTEICT. 

Counties, Hinds, Madison, Warren, Rankin, and Yazoo (5 counties). 
Population 1910, 205,333. 

Ja.mes William Collier. 

James William Collier of, Yicksburg, was born at "Glenwocd Plan- 
tation," near Yicksburg. in Warren County, 3Iiss., September 2S, 1872. 
As a lad he attended the public schools of his county, taking the 
High School course later. In ISSO, he entered the State University, 
and in 1894 he graduated in law from that institution. In 1&!»5. he 
was elected a member of the Lower House of the Mississippi Legisla- 
ture, being the youngest member of that body. He was elected Circuit 
Clerk of Warren County in 1899, and re-elected without opposition in 
1903 and 1907; in 1908, he was nominated by the Democratic party for 
the Sixty-first Congress and re-elected without opposition, refeiving 
5,657 votes; was re-elected to the Sixty-second Congress. 

He is a member of the following committees: Elections No. 1, In- 
dustrial Arts and Expositions, Merchant Marine and Fisheries. 

Mr. Collier is rtgarded as one of the most brilliant young men in 
the National House of Representatives and his career in public life 
is one in which the entire State is deeply interested, since few men 
have rendered the country more disinterested and helpful service. 

In 1900, Mr. Collier married Emma Klein; they have two children. 



■:ii v.: 



%:,'/ buy, 



iil 



■iL 



PART V. 



State Institutions — - 

The University of Mississippi. 
Mississippi Industrial Institute and College. 
The Mississippi A. 6c M. College. 
The Mississippi Normal College. 
The Alcorn A. &: M. College. 

History of First Mississippi Infantry. 
Statistics for Mississippi. 

The Magnolia — State Flower of Mississippi. 






.iqqiie'vtKM \q i^w> 



STATE IXST1TUT10X8 



THE UNIVERSITY OF .MISSISSIPPI 



r,Y .\I.KKi;i) HLME, LL. l>. 



LOCATION, GROUNDS, BUILDINGS. 

The University is situated in the outskirts of the town of Oxford, in 
Lafayette County. Its elevation above sea level is about 500 feet. The 
surrounding country is hilly, affording excellent drainage. The cain- 
pus is a large grove of magnificent forest trees, with a carpeting of 
grass, covering sixty acres, in the center of a square mile of forest land 
belonging to the institution. This site combines the quiet, the beauty, 
and the vigor and physical healthfulness of the country, with the con- 
veniences of urban life. The University's extensive domain is admir- 
ably suited for the largest development. Ot its tract of six hundred 
and forty acres, approximately five hundred, lying west of the line of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, form one compact block available for 
University uses. 

The University buildings u.'^ed for educational purposes together 
with the chapel, the dormitories, the power house, and the hospital, 
present a frontage aggregating approximately seventeen hundred feet, 
and a total depth of about nine hundred feet. All are of brick, and 
three stories in height, except the Lamar Hall, the power house, and 
Taylor Hall, which are two-story buildings; the liospita!, witl\ one 
story; and the observatory, portions of which have two stories. 

In addition to these are fourteen residences. The Chancellor's is at 
the east end of the observatory; the other thirteen, widely separated, 
are the homes of members of the faculty. 



i> YT 



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606 STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 

The po\ver plant furnislips -vvator and lisrht to all the campus build- 
ings and steam heat to all except eight of the residences and tbe small- 
est of the dormitories. 

The total value of the University buildings is about $46_5,000.00. The 
furnittire, machinery, scientific apparatus, and books in the buildings 
on the campus, together with the grounds, are valued at §210,000.00. 

The Lyceum, occupying the most commanding position on the cam- 
pus, was completed in 1S4S. A few years later its capacity was nearly 
doubled by an extension in the rear. Much larger additions were made 
in 1903, the original central portion being flanked by north and south 
wings. This building contains class rooms for the Departments of 
Mathematics, Latin, Cbemistry, Germanic Languages, and Romance 
Languages; the chemical laboratories; the lecture rooms, drawing- 
rooms, and testing laboratory, of the Engineering School; the assem- 
bly hall of the Y. M. C. A.; the gymnasium, with baths; and the ad- 
ministration offices. 

The Astronomical Observatory, built in the late fifties, contains the 
lecture room of the School of Physics, the physical laboratory, the cab- 
inet of physical apparatus, transit room, computing room, a small 
equatorial telescope, and the large telescope of the "twin equatorial" 
pattern. Originally the Department of Astronomy was planned on a 
very large scale and the erection of this instrument in 18r*2 marked a 
long step toward the carrying out of the original design. At that time 
there was only one telescope in the South superior to it. 

The Chapel was completed in 1853. The auditorium occupies the 
first and second floors, with a seating capacity of five hundred and 
thirty on the first floor, and about four hundred in the galleries. The 
halls of the Hermaean and the Phi Sigma societies, and several living 
rooms for students, are on the third floor. 

Lamar Hall was erected in 1SS9 as the University library, and was 
used for library purposes until 1911. Since 1911 it has been the home 
of the Law School. 

The Library, erected in 1910-11, contains the general University li- 
brary and reading rooms, and lecture rooms of the Departments of 
Greek and History. 

Science Hall was built during the session of 1906-07. Including a 
basement, chiefly above ground, it has four stories. In this building 
are found lecture halls, laboratories, and professors' offices, for the 
School of Medicine. The School of Pharmacy has commodious quar- 
ters in the basement. 

Peabody Hall, completed during the session of 1912-13, is the home 
of the School of Education. The building contains eight lecture rooms, 
one auditorium with provision for a stereopticou, and rooras for the 
teaching of domestic science and manual training. 



!«) . OOi 



ST.VTE IXSTITL'TIOXS 607 

The Hospital, completed early in 1907. contains one large ward and 
several private ones. ph\sician's office, sterilizing and operating rooms, 
bath and toilet rooms, apartments for matron and nurse, kitchen, din- 
ing-room, pantries, etc 

The Po^vcr House, and the new heat and light distributing systems, 
were completed late in 1008. at a cost of ?33,000.00. 

The Cottages in the grove south of the Lyceum are designed for mar- 
ried students and their families. 

Gordon Hall, a dormitory f6r men. was begun in the autumn of 1908 
and completed in June. 1909. It is thoroughly modern in all its ap- 
pointments, and will accommodate two hundred students. Broad cor- 
ridors and stairways give easy access to all parts of the building. Im- 
mediately back of the main entrance is a spacious lobby, from which 
hallways extend right and left; wide double stairs lead to a landing 
connected by a single flight with the second floor. 

The front of the building is nearly two himdred feet long, and there 
are two wings, each with a little less than one hundred feet in depth. 
Within the quadrangular space thus formed and in connection with 
the dormitory is a beautiful dining hall, capable of seating four hun- 
dred. In the rear are the kitchen, pantries, storage room, etc. 

LaBauve. Madison, and Washington Halls constitute one building 
used as a dormitory for men since 1848 and containing rooms for about 
sixty students. 

Odom, Jackson, and Calhoun Halls constitute a men's dormitory-, 
erected about 1S57, and accommodating at present fifty or more stud- 
ents. 

Taylor Hall, built in 1903, is a dormitory containing sixteen rooms. 
Ricks Hall, erected in 1903, and situated in a retired and convenient 
location on the University grounds^ is open only to women students 
and affords a University home combining protection with freedom and 
dignity. It is provided with all modern conveniences, including a din- 
ing-room. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

[In preparing this sketch the writer has drawn very largely, for the 
historical facts, from papers by Drs. R. B. Fulton and Edward 
Mayes, ex-Chancellors of the University, and from University cata- 
logues and bulletins.] 
The Univer.-^ity of Mississippi, like the state universities in all the 
states of the Union, excepting the original thirteen, owes its origin to 
the policy adopted by the Continental Congress in the ordinance which 
became lav.- July 13, 1787, and which was enacted for the government 
of the Northwest Territory. Its provisions were afterwards extended 



-liLlj 



c T'.Mifi ;u niwyoB butt 



>ai M/i ill '.r,::!' 



aOT8IH 



o08 STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 

in general to all of the public domain. This ordinance declared in ref- 
erence to education in the region to which it applied that "religion. 
moralitj", and knowledge, being necessary to good government and 
the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall 
forever be encouraged." 

In the carrying out of this policy, the State of Mississippi, when or- 
ganized, received from the federal government the equivalent of one 
section in every township of land for common schools, and by the act 
of February 20, IS 19, received one township of land for the support of 
a seminary of learning, or state university. This act of Congress wa.s 
intended to grant two townships of land to the state. The deficiency 
in the amount actually received was ignored or forgotten from 1819 to 
1892. In 1892 the attention of the board of trustees was called to the 
matter by the chancellor of the University, and authority was given 
him in 1893 to undertake to secure the grant needed to make up the 
deficiency. 

A memorial was duly presented to Congress clearly showing the ex- 
istence of a deficiency and explaining the manner in which it occurred, 
and urging that the grant made to the State for the University be 
increased from one township to four townships of land, four town- 
ships being the largest amount given to any State for this purpose. 
The matter was actively urged before Congress with the cooperation 
of all members from this State. The result was the granting to the 
State of another township of land for the University by an Act of 
June 20, 1894. 

The lands embraced in the original township granted in 1819 were 
leased in part from 1829 to 1833. In 1831 the legislature directed that 
the lands be sold. Thirty-five and one-half sections were sold in the 
manner prescribed by the legislature, about the year 1833, for the sum 
of $277,332.52. The act of the legislature of February 20, 1840, appro- 
priated all the proceeds of the sale of the seminary lands "for the use 
and benefit of the University of the State of Mississippi," and on the 
same day the legislature provided for the location of the University, 
which had not yet been established. Upon the report of commissioners 
appointed under this act, the present location in Lafayette County was 
fixed by the legislature by a majority of one vote. On the 24th of Feb- 
ruary, 1844, the University of Mississippi was duly chartered by the 
legislature, and its first board of trustees named. 

This body was composed of men who ranked among the most dis- 
tinguished citizens of the State. Among these, Hon. James Alexander 
Ventress has the distinction of being the author of the bill, which be- 
came a law in 1844. organizing the University. He received his edu- 
cation in the common schools of Wilkinson County, Mississippi, at the 
University of Edinburgh, the Academie de Paris, and the University 
of Berlin. He was a brilliant scholar and writer. While in Berlin he 
was the German correspondent and assistant editor of the Revue de 



STATE INSTITUTION'S ' 609 

Deux Mondes. To the organization, equipment and maintenance of 
the University of Mississippi he devoted his talents and his large po- 
litical influence ^s a' member of the Legislature and Speaker of the 
House of Representatives. He was continuously a member of the 
Board of Trustees from 1844 to 1867, the time of his death. An even 
longer period, twenty-six years, was covered by the valuable services 
of another member of the first Board, Judge James M. Howry. FYom 
1844 to 1S70 this devoted friend of the University gave freely of his 
time and talents in untiring efforts to advance the interests of the in- 
stitution. During the greater part of this time he discharged with 
eminent ability and conspicuous fidelity the duties of the combined 
offices of Secretary and Treasurer. It Avas Judge Howry who success- 
fully led the forces favoring the introduction of the Evidences of 
Christianity into the curriculum and establishing the University on a 
basis distinctly Christian. 

The first meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in the capitol 
of the State, January 15, 1S45, at which time an organization was 
effected. Under the original charter, the board was a self-perpetuat- 
ing corporation consisting of thirteen members. In 1S57, by an act 
of the legislature, the governor became, ex o^cio, a member and presi- 
dent of the board. Since the Civil War. vacancies have been filled by 
the governor's appointment. An act of the legislature of 1870 states 
that such appointments are to be made with the advice and consent of 
the senate. In 1876, the number of trustees was increased to fifteen. 
There are now ten members of the board, eight of them appointed for 
a term of six years, two of them, the governor, and the superintendent 
-of education, serving ex officio In this board is vested the supreme 
control of the University. 

The second regular meeting of the Board of Trustees was held in 
Oxford, July 14, 1845. The Board accepted two half sections of land. 
lying immediately -west of the town of Oxford, the south half of sec- 
tion 20. and the north half of section 29, township S. range 3 W., 
which had been purchased by citizens of Oxford and Lafayette county, 
and donated to the state for the location of the University. At this 
meeting of the Board of Trustees, preliminaries were arranged for the 
erection of buildings. At the next meeting, in January, 1846. William 
Nicholl, an Englishman, was elected supervising architect. Plans were 
received and adopted for the front of the Lyceum building, the two 
contingent dormitories, and residences for four professors. Work was 
begun on these buildings soon afterwards. In July, 1848, the election 
of the first faculty was held, and November 6. 1848. the first session 
opened with a faculty of four members and about fifty students pres- 
ent. From its opening until ISSO the University was maintained by 
annual appropriations made by the legislature. In 1S56 a special 
appropriation of $100,000, to be paid in five annual installments, was 

39 — m 



oin STATE IX?TITUTIONS 

made by the legislature, and -with the aid of this the University made 
its first large growth in facilities and equipment. The University of 
Mississippi speedily took rank as one of the best equipped institutions 
in the country. The value of the prestige thus attained was tangible 
and has been permanent. 

In the spring of 1S61 the excitement due to political events seriously 
interrupted the work of the University. Many students withdrew be- 
fore the close of the session, in order to enlist in the Confederate 
army. A company of students, which has become historic, was or- 
ganized on the campus under the title "University Greys." 

It is probable that four-fifths of all the young men whose names 
appear on the rolls as students of the University, from Its organization 
up to the beginning of the civil war, enlisted In the Confederate serv- 
ice. A very large proportion, much larger than the average of Con- 
federate soldiers, sacrificed their lives in the senMce of the State. 
During the ante-bellum period eleven classes were graduated from the 
University, the fir.st In ISol, the last in 1861. with two hundred and 
ninet.v-six graduates. Of these, forty-six were "honor men," and the 
records show that more than half of this number saw active service 
in the Army of the Confederacy. 

In the fall of 1S81. owing to the existing Civil "War. only four 
students appeared for matriculation, the faculty resigned and exer- 
cises were suspended until the fall of 1S65. The Board of Tmsteps, 
appointed Professors A. J. Quinche and Burton H. Harrison as cus- 
todians of the buildings and other property of the University. Pro- 
fessor Quinche remained In charge during the period of the Civil 
War and succeeded in preserving intact the property Intrusted to his 
care. Professor Harrison resigned his place at the University and 
served as secretary to the President of the Confederate States. 

During the war the buildings of the University were occujtled some- 
times by Confederate and sometimes bv Federal soldiery. Soon aftpr 
the batt'e of Shlloh they were nsed for hospital purposes, and ^re 
their shelter to some 1.500 sick and wounded Confederate soldiers. 
More than 700 of these sleep in unmarked graves In a cemetery near 
the University campus on University ground. 

Immediately after the Civil TTar the halls of the University were 
filled with a class of students never before seen In any American 
college. They were the sons of parents who had been wealthy but 
whose wealth had been entirely swept away by the Civil "War. Per- 
haps half of these young men had served in the Confederate Army. 
With such preparation for college as these circumstances suggest. 
they came with possibly as little of scholastic attainments as those 
students who enfpr^d In 194^: but they came with a determination 
born of necessity. The efforts put forth and the Influence felt while 
here resulted in the development of a type of manly character and 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 611 

power which cannot be equalled by the records of any other American 
college. A study of the lifework of this group of students fully veri- 
fies this strong statement as fact. 

It was during these trying days of "reconstruction" when the in- 
stitution was, for several years, in great straits that the Chancellor of 
the University, in an "Open Letter" of September, 1870, stated that 
he and his colleagues would resign before they would matriculate 
negro students. This, combined with other forces, "saved the Univer- 
sity." 

Throughout all its history', the University, as with similar institu- 
tions generally, bas had an. atmosphere, a spirit, a life, all its own. 
It has ever been, and it is today, not so much a factory as it is a 
field, and not so much a field as it is a force. It is not a place where 
machinery works with dead material, turning out lifeless forms as 
paying products but rather a place where living beings are in process 
of gro\rth and development, where mental and moral forces are mould- 
ing character and shaping destinies, both of individuals and states. 

Dating from the opening in 1S48. the oldest division of the Univer- 
sity as at present organized is the College of Liberal Arts, formerly 
known as The Department of Literature, Science and Art. or the 
Academic Department. During the early years of its history it was 
the University and. for more than half a century from its establish- 
ment in 1848, it stood alone, save for the Law Department founded 
In 1854. From It, as a center, radiate Influences that vitally and 
powerfully affect the professional schools associated with it and. both 
directly and indirectly, the welfare of the entire State from which it 
draws its students and into which it sends its graduates. It Is the 
heart of the institution and Its pulse-beat Is felt throughout every mem- 
ber imparting larger life and lasting vigor. This source of energy and 
vitality must be kept strong and unimpaired. Or, to change the figure, 
the foundation must be secure, laid broad and deep, that the super- 
structure may be builded with reasonable prospect of permanence 
and stability. 

The Professional Schools of Law, Engineering. Medicine, Education, 
and Pharmacy, are quick to acknowledge their Indebtedness to the 
College and their dependence upon it for much of their best material, 
the superior quality of their own products being due. in large measure, 
to the training received in the older Departments of the Arts and 
Sciences. 

In fitting men and women for lives of useful service, as lawyers, 
doctors, engineers, teachers, and pharmacists, the University does not 
forget that these workers in the various fields of human endeavor are 
not only better prepared for their professional studies by courses in 
the College of Liberal Arts, but also that they are thus far more ade- 
quately equipped for their life work as they mingle with their fellow 



612 STATE IXSTITUTIONS 

men. The curriculum of the Cnlleee Is intendef! to broaden sympa- 
thies, widen horizons, deepen the foundations of character, strengthen 
manhood and ■u-onianhood, — in a word, to furnish and equip for in- 
telligent and contented citizenship. It seeks to develop the ability to 
think clearly, honestly, connectedly, logically, deeply, and, through 
Its thinkers, to handle the industrial, social, political, and religious 
problems which have to do with good citizenship. It would thus fit 
young men and women for safe and wise leadership in whatever com- 
munities their lots may be cast and, In this way. It would make Its 
contribution to the State and Nation. 

The College ever seeks to keep alive the truth that the hidden, the 
invisible, the silent, the spiritual, forces ultimately and surely shape 
and determine thines visible and material. Tt teaches, as does all 
experience as well, that applied science mtist wait upon pure science; 
that the chemical, physical, and biological laboratories must labori- 
ously train students in principles and processes if they are to success- 
fully use these in professional studies or In practice; that strong 
courses in pure mathematics must form the back-bone of any first- 
class course In Ensrlneering. — civil, electrical, mechanical, or mining, 
to say nothins' of the same need in that branch of Military Science so 
supremely Important today, gunnery and artillery: that some knowl- 
edge of the history and language of other peoples, not only give one a 
broader and more sympathetic outlook, a truer Insight Into the past, 
but enables him more correctly to interpret the present and to pene- 
trate the future; that the study of mental, moral, economic, and political 
sciences, philosophy and literature. Is a potent factor in moulding 
men with Ideas and Ideals, of making patriotic citizens and constructive 
statesm.en. 

Such are some of the aims of the Colleee of Liberal Arts. The State 
will always need men with the kind of training which the University 
supplies and the Colles^e of Arts and Sciences will, to a very great ex- 
tent, determine the tone, colour, character, and Individuality, of the 
Unlversitv as a whole. Accordingly, it Is confidently believed that the 
University's Collesre of Liberal Arts Is one of the State's greatest 
servants In building up and perpetuating all that Is really -worth 
while. Its province is to lead rather than to follow, and to serve 
rather than to rule. But in order to serve best. It must be most free — • 
free to expand, to develop, to grow, to see visions, to breathe a clear, 
pure atmosphere, freed from the suffocating smoke of commercialism, 
and to live a life which, while in close and sympathetic touch with 
every Interest of the State, Is yet untouched by the mercenary spirit 
of the utilitarian extremist. Unhampered thus. It will prove more 
and more an invaluable power for the amelioration of unhappy con- 
ditions and a mighty force for the uplifting of all people. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 6l3 

While in the original plan of the University the establishment of a 
course in Governmental Science and Law was provided for, six years 
elapsed before, in lS5t, a law department was organized. The Roster 
of the Graduates of the Law School is long and interesting and their 
record of achievements is a highly honorable one. 

In 1872 the policy of separate departments with optional studies, 
and with undergraduate courses leading to academic degrees besides 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, was adopted in place of the close 
curriculum. 

The requirements for the B. A. and the B. S. degrees have been 
modified from time to time with a view of keeping in touch with the 
general trend of the educational world. They are very much the same 
as those in the leading xVmerican universities. The scheme for gradu- 
ation as published in the current catalogue of the University, embrac- 
ing "prescribed studies," "group electives," and "free electives," is in 
all essential features strikingly like the plan followed in some of the 
older and larger state universities. While the content of the degree 
has been greatly changed, some requirements having been dropped 
and others added, there has been no "letting down of bars" or lower- 
ing of standards. 

The plan of combining collegiate with professional and technical 
courses is well night universal. Nearly every University of any 
standing in the United States allows such work to count towards the 
B. A. and B. S. degrees. The College of Liberal Arts has accorded 
cordial, though tardy and somewhat reluctant, recognition to the pro- 
fe.--3ional schools with the result that combined courses are now in 
successful operation in all quarters. The combination referred to i-s 
allowed with medicine, law, engineering, education, etc. It was a 
little more than a decade ago that this principle was adopted by the 
University of Mississippi. At that time the movement in the country 
at large had already passed the experimental stage. While there were 
then, as there are now, some very earnest protests again.st combina- 
tion courses, yet, there was, and there is, among state universities a 
decided preponderance of sentiment favoring the counting of pro- 
fessional and technical work toward college degrees. 

That the University of Mississippi, in its attitude toward these 
matters, is in the best of company, and that it has simply kept step 
with the onward march of progressive institutions in its steadfast 
endeavor to give the youth of Mississippi every possible advantage 
and to keep them abreast of the times, is already known to those 
who have informed themselves as to the facts of the case. 

In allowing two years of medicine to count towards a college degree 
the University of Mississippi stands in line with a very large number 
of the leading institutions of the land. It should be ixoted in thi3 
connection that the student who takes his degree with two years of 



iO «1»9X OWj I) 



614 - STATE INSTITUTIONS 

collegiate studies followed by two of medicine does at least 10% more 
work than is required of the purely academic student. And, too, the 
quality of the work does not suffer by comparison with that of ' any 
other college or department of the University. Such results are 
rendered possible by extensive and expensive laboratory equipment in 
the hands of scientifically trained specialists who make teaching a 
profession. It should be constantly borne in mind that medical educa- 
tion today, measured both quantitatively and qualitatively, is vastly 
superior to that of a quarter of a century ago. 

By the act of March 5, 1880, the legislature of the state adjusted 
the indebtedness of the state to the University on account of the sale 
of the first township of land granted by Congress, said indebtedness 
being declared to be the sum of ?544,061.22, on which sum interest at 
six per cent is paid. 

To this period belongs the great controversy of 1887 on the Endow- 
ment Act of 1880 in which discussion the Chancellor of the University 
made such a masterly argument that the settlement of the question 
at issue has remained unshaken. 

In the autumn of 1882, the doors of the University were opened to 
women upon the same terms and conditions as to men. During the 
session 1916-17 eighty-one women were enrolled in the College of 
Liberal Arts. It is a pleasure to bear testimony to the earnestness, 
seriousness of purpose, high character, and success which characterize 
the women students as a body. 

In 1892 preparatory courses in the University were discontinued. 
Since that time the grade of educational work has been advanced fully 
one year, and the number of bona fide college students has increased 
from 176 to 601, as shown by the tabulation accompanying this paper. 
The reasonably high standard of admission to the University has 
proven a great help to the secondary schools all over the State. By 
getting out of their way and declining to occupy the territory properly 
belonging to them, the University has offered opportunity and incentive 
for the building up of first-class local high schools. Hundreds of 
communities have thus received a blessing, the presence of a genuine 
high school being stimulating to its social and intellectual life in the 
highest degree. The plan benefits the University also for thereby it 
is enabled to cultivate more effectively its own field which is dis- 
tinct from that of the high school. Again, that large majority of 
boys and girls who can never go far from home for higher educational 
advantages are most vitally concerned with this matter. But for the 
policy pursued by the University in having no preparatory department 
and in maintaining a high standard for admission, there would be 
relatively few communities in the State maintaining first-class high 
schools. Under the protection which this policy has afforded many 
schools have broadened their work, thus enlarging and enriching the 
courses which are open to the thousands who never go to college. The 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 615 

history of educational development in Mississippi, as elsewhere, shows 
that, in general, the institutions of higher learning provide the forces 
which elevate the standards of the lower schools. It is the University 
pulling more than ihe schools pushing that has lifted both to higher 
planes of service and usefulness. The hearty co-operation between 
the schools and the University and the appreciation which each has 
for the other's work promise greater and better things to come. The 
claim is confidently, definitely, and positively made, that the Univer- 
sity has served the best interests of the entire State by its effort to 
raise the standards of high school education. All classes and condi- 
tions have derived benefit in the way of vastly improved schools which 
would have been very slow in coming with a preparatory department 
at the University and a low standard of admission there. Today there 
are more than one hundred and forty schools in the State affi'iated 
with the University and able to prepare students for Freshman classes. 

The University of Mississippi, in administering its system of entrance 
requirements, has carefully avoided every extreme. The position which 
it occupies on this question is a safe and sane middle-ground. While 
a few institutions, whose standing cannot be questioned, accept any 
subject that leads to graduation in an approved high school, the 
University of Mississippi prescribes three units in English, two and 
one-half in Mathematics, and two in History, allowing large lattitude 
and freedom in choosing the remaining six and one-half units. 

As progress has been made in developing and standardizing the new 
subjects which have been introduced into the high school, the Uni- 
versity has recognized their value and has agreed to accept them as 
meeting, in part, its entrance requirements. Vocational subjects are, 
at present, allowed to count to the extent of three units, this being 
in harmony with the custom now prevalent with state universities. 

In the fall of 1892, the Chancellor and Faculty of the University be- 
gan arranging for Summer Schools. The following summer this work 
was inaugurated and has been repeated every summer, save one, and 
with ever increasing thoroughness and enlargement of the coui-ses 
offered. 

The authorities of the University are interested in every means 
that tends to stimulate any to seek a higher education. They fully 
realize the responsibilities that attach to the University as the Head 
of the Educational System of the State, and while continually improv- 
ing and urging the importance of its great work, in its establish ?d 
curriculum, during the regular session, they desire to extend in every 
practicable way the influence and stimulus that may come from con- 
tact with the forces of education provided at the University. 

In 1894, by the act of Congress of June 20, the University received 
an addition to its endowment in the form of a second township o! 



616 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

land. The institutiou has received occasional appropriations from the 
state for the maintenance of its buildings, the grant of land by Con- 
gress being intended for current expenses of the institution. 

Between 1S95 and 1900 the University introduced systems of water- 
works and sewerage and installed a steam heat and electric light 
plajit. At that time and in this section the improvements thus ac- 
complished, meant pioneer work on the part of the Chancellor. 

November 6th-Sth. 1898, the Semi-Centennial Anniversary of the 
University was appropriately observed. 

On March 1*3, 1900, the state treasurer gave credit to the University 
for the sum of $134,685.24, being the proceeds of the sale by the trus- 
tees of the University of Mississippi made on the 10th of March, 1900, 
of the timber on 16,833.53 acres of land, a part of the grant of 23,040 
acres of land made by Congress in the act of July 20, 1894. This fund 
is known as the 1894 land grant fund. To it was added, October 10, 
1905, the sum of $20,405.00 from the sale of timber on other parts of 
the township. 

In 1900 the Fanny J. Ricks Summer Term of the University began 
a much-needed work for those who cannot attend the regular session. 
This work was maintained in the summer of 1900, 1901, 1902, and 1903, 
through the liberality of Mrs. Ricks. Her generosity secured addi- 
tional funds for 1903 which greatly enlarged the work in scope and 
usefulness. 

The six weeks Summer School is now a regular term at the Uni- 
versity. 

The School of Engineering was organized in 1900 and has been in 
continuous operation ever since. Engineering courses were first in- 
troduced into the University just after the Civil War. After, one de- 
cade they were discontinued. 

. This School, as now organized, looks upon Engineering as preemi- 
nently a profession of progress, as essentially constructive, standing 
for useful service on a large scale. The University rejoices in the 
privilege of training young men of the State for the profession of 
civil engineering and of rendering whatever other service in the fields 
of engineering activity may be in its power. Institutions of learning 
in general, state universities in particular, through the experimental 
and research work of their laboratories are coming more and more to 
cooperate heartily and enthusiastically with the industrial world. 
They are losing their aloofness and making more sympathetic and 
closer contact with the great throbbing life about them. 

The School of Civil Engineering offers to the people of the State 
every facility which it possesses for testing road-making materials, ce- 
ments, concrete, metals, stones, and timbers. It is well equipped with 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 617 

such machines as are needed for makinsj these tests in a thoroughly 
satisfactory manner. The entire outfit is for use. not display, and it 
is used constantly with students. 

Engineering graduates of the University quickly secure attractive 
positions. Many are placed before graduation and the majority even 
of Freshmen and Sophomores find steady employment during the sum- 
mer vacations. 

In 1903, Schools of Education and Medicine were added. For six 
years, only the first half of a regular four-year course in medicine was 
offered. During the session of 1910-11, the work of the last two years 
was given at Vicksburg in connection with the state charity hospital 
of that place. The work at Vicksburg was discontinued after one year; 
and the University reverted to the plan of giving only the first two 
years of the medical course. 

The Medical School of the University of Mississippi is classed as an 
"A" school by the American Medical Association, and is a member of 
the Association of American Medical Colleges. 

The students who have completed the two-years course in the Uni- 
versity have obtained advanced standing without examination in in- 
stitutions of the highest grade. 

Of the large number who have completed the two-years medical 
course, only three have failed on examinations before any state licens- 
ing board. This covers a period of twelve years. There were fourteen 
students completing the two-year course in June 1911. These gradu- 
ated in medicine in other schools in June 1913. Of this number twelve 
secured excellent hospital appointments on a competitive basis. This 
is illustrative of the standing of the students. 

In November, 1909, the Medical School of the University of Missis- 
sippi was inspected by the official representative of the Carnegie Foun- 
dation for the advancement of medical training. Dr. Abraham Flex- 
ner who made the inspection of the department, stated in his report 
that the "Medical School at Oxford is distinctly creditable," and he 
stated further, that, "It would be fortunate, indeed, if henceforth the 
members of the medical profession of Mississippi would get their first 
two years at Oxford." 

The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1908. 

During its comparatively brief existence it has sent out a goodly 
number of well-trained Pharmacists. 

In 1902 the legislature appropriated the sum of $93,700 for various 
improvements, $24,000 of this being for current expenses. This fund 
enabled the University to enlarge its facilities greatly; with it were 
constructed substantial additions to the public buildings and a com- 
modious dormitory for women students. 



618 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

In 1910, by action of the Board of Trustees. Fraternities in the Uni- 
versity were abolished and in 1912 the State Legislature passed the 
Anti-Fraternity Bill. 

In the past ten years special appropriations have added to the equip- 
ment of the University. Science Hall was erected in 1906-7: Gordon 
Hall in 1908-09; the library building, partly the gift of Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie, was constructed in 1910-11: and the George Peabody Hall, 
the erection of which was largely provided for by the trustees of the 
Peabody fund, was built in 1912-13. 

While it is not possible in a paragraph to make further mention of 
the outstanding events in the University's history, yet several eras are 
so marked by unusual progress and development that special reference 
to them is proper. The first of these, covering a period of about five 
years, immediately preceding the Civil War, was characterized by a 
broadening of the curriculum, the erection of the Observatory Build- 
ing, very large and costly additions to the equipment of all the scien- 
tific departments, and a general expansion and improvement both phys- 
ical and intellectual. The next era which no faithful historian can 
ever overlook began in 1892 and extended through some fifteen years. 
During that time preparatory classes were abolished and high schools 
throughout the state grew in numbers and in strength; the Summer 
School was introduced and flourished; the School of Law was ex- 
panded, Schools of Engineering, Medicine and Education were added 
with a corresponding increase in the corps of instructors and the num- 
bers of students; a tovvn.ship of valuable pine land was secured from 
Congress; water-works, sewerage, electric lights and steam heat, were 
introduced; Ricks Halls, the large additions to the Lyceum, Science 
Hall, the Hospital, the original Power House, and four residences for 
Professors belong to this period, the University having obtained and 
expended within this time on buildings and equipment nearly two 
hundred thousand dollars, which about doubled the value of the ma- 
terial equipment. This remarkable widening of scholastic opportuni- 
ties, this expansion into a University with professional schools, this 
large increase in endowment, in buildings, equipment, faculty and stu- 
dents, all together gave the University still higher rank and standing, 
causing it to command the respect of other institutions throughout 
the country. The last era to which reference will be made extended 
through another period of approximately five years from 1908 to 1913. 
This was a time of marked material development. To it belong Gor- 
don Hall, the Library, George Peabody Hall, the new Power House 
and Plant, and the concrete walks, all of which added greatly to the 
beauty of the campus and the comfort of the faculty and students. 

But all this growth and development are preliminary, leading up to 
the threshold of a still brighter day of larger and broader usefulness. 
Every effort is now being made to bring the University and the people of 



STATE INSTITUTIONS gig 

the State in closest possible contact, to make the institution a public ser- 
vant in the highest and best sense, and to democratize higher education 
as far as may be. Expenses have been much reduced, additional living 
quarters have been provided to meet the demands of a greatly in- 
creased enrollment. The number of students reached a maximum in 
1916 being 601. There is at present, a prevailing spirit of harmony, 
a feeling of confidence, and, except for the war, a bright outlook. 
Many students and graduates of this and other years are now in the 
Officers' Training Camps, the Army and the Xav>'. The University is 
offering all its resources, both men and equipment, to the Nation. 

The Historical Catalogue of the University, published in 1910, con- 
tains biographical sketches of its Presidents and Chancellors, a regis- 
ter of all trustees, professors, and students, historical sketches of the 
Departments and Schools, etc. Those desiring fuller information 
about the University than is found in this article may consult the 
volurfie referred to, a copy of which will be sent upon application. 

The number of individual students who have attended the Univers- 
ity during the regular sessions (excluding the summer terms) is 
more than eight thousand. 

The following table will prove of interest as it contains many facts 
both suggestive and valuable: 



620 



STATE INSTITUTION'S 





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622 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 



TABLE 

The following have served as the chief executive officers of the Uni- 
versity under the titles and for the periods indicated: 



President — George Frederick Holmes, LL. D 

President — Augustus B. Longstreet, LL. D., D. D... 
President— Frederick A. P. Barnard, LL. D., D. D. 
Chancellor — Fred. A. P. Barnard, LL. D., D. D... 
Chancellor — John Neiv:on Waddell, LL. D., D. D. 

Chancellor — Gen. Alexander P. Stewart 

Chairman of Fucult'j—Bdw. .Mayes, LL. D., F. S. C 

* C ha nee ilor— Edward Mayes, LL. D., F. S. C 

V ice-Chancellor — Robert Burwell Fulton, A. M.. 
Chancellor — Robt. Burwell Fulton, A. M., LL. D 

Vice-Chaneellor — Alfred Hume, C. E., D. So 

Chancellor — Andrew A. Kincannon, LL. D 

Chancellor — Joseph Neely Powers, LL. D 



1848- 
1849- 
1856- 
1859- 
1865- 
1874- 
1886- 
1889- 
1892- 
1892- 
1906- 
1907- 
1914- 



1843 
lS3o 
1859 
18-:i 
1874 
■1SS5 
1SS9 
1S91 
•1892 
■1906 
■1907 
■1914 



The present organization of the University follows: 

BOAKD OF TRC.^TEES. 

Governor Theo. G. Bilbo, ex-officio President Jackson 

Hon. W. F. Bond, State Superintendent, ex-officio Jackson 

Hon. Robert Powell (1912-1918) Jackson 

Hon. J. W. Cutler (1912-1918) Clarksdale 

Hon. T. B. Franklin (1912-1918) Columbus 

Hon. 0. F. Lawrence (1914-1920), Secretary Grenada 

Hon. E. L. Brien (1914-1920) Vicksburg 

Hon. J. R. Tipton (1916-1920) Hernando 

Hon. W. C. Trotter (1916-1922) Winona 

Hon. J. S. Howerton (1916-1922) Guntown 



♦Chancellor Mayes resigTied Januarj" 1st, 1892. 



S*rATE INSTITUTIONS 623" 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph Nefly Powers. M. A., LL. D., Chancellor. 

Alfred Humk, C. E., D. Sc, LL. D., Vice-ChanccUor, Dean of the Coh 
lege of Liberal Arts, Professor of Mathe)natics. B. E., Vanderbilt 
University 1887; C. E., 1SS8; D. Sc, 1890; LL. D., Mississippi Col- 
lege, 1916; Fellow and Assistant in Civil Engineering, Vanderbilt 
University, 1S87-90; Professor of IMathematics, University of Mis- 
sissippi, since 1890; Acting Professor of Civil Engineering, Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, 1909-02; Vice-Chancellor and Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. University of Mississippi, since 190.5; Pro- 
fessor of Astronomy and Acting Chancellor, session 19015-07. 

Alexander Lee Bondurant, A. B., M. A., Professor of Latin Language 
and Literature. A. B., Hampden-Sidney College, 188-1; A. M. (lb.) 
1892; Instructor in Latin and Greek, Round Rock Institute, Texas, 
1885-87; graduate student, Latin and Greek, University of Texas, 
1886-87; graduate student. University of Virginia, 1887-89 (holder 
of Carey scholarship) ; Assistant and Associate Professor of Latin 
and Greek, University of Mississippi, 1889 — 94; Profesor of Latin 
and Greek, 1S94: Professor of Latin since 1895; graduate student. 
Harvard University, 1892-93; holder of Morgan fellowship, A. M. 
(Harvard); student University of Pennsylvania, 1896 (summer j; 
Munich and Rome, 1905 (summer); Berlin, 1907 (summer); re- 
search work in Berlin University and in Italy, 1910-11. 

Waller S. Leathers, M. D., Dean of Medical School, Professor of Biol- 
ogy and Histology. A. 2^1., Schools of Biolog>', Chemistry, and 
Geology, University of Virginia, 1891; M. D., 1894; graduate stu- 
dent, Johns Hopkins, 1895; University of Chicago, 1897, 1900, 1901. 
1903, 1907 (summers) ; 2,'ew York Marine Biological Laboratory, 
1896 (summer); U. S. Marine Biological Laboratory, 1898 (sum- 
mer); Member of Rocky Mountain Scientific Expedition, 1898; 
studied in Harvard University, 1905, 1906 (summers); studied in 
Hospitals of Chicago, 1904 (summer); graduate student, hospitals 
of New York City (summer), 1908; Instructor in Biology, Univers- 
ity of Virginia, 1894; Assistant Professor of Biology* and Geology, 
University of Mississippi, 1894-95; Head of the Department of Sci- 
ence, Miller School, Virginia, 1895-96; Professor of Biology and Ge- 
ology, University of South Carolina, 1896-98; Professor of Biology 
and Geology, University of Mississippi 1898-1905; Professor of Bi- 
ology and Physiolog>', University of Mississippi, 1905-16; Profes- 
sor of Biology and Histology, University of Mississippi, since 1916. 

Peter W. Rowland, M. D., Professor of Pharmacology. M. D., Memphis 
Hospital Medical College, 1882; New York Polyclinic, 1887; special 
work in Physical Diagnosis, Northwestern Dispensary, New York, 
1887; President Mississippi State Medical Association, 1894; stu- 



624 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

dent in hospitals of Philadelphia, 1896; Member State Board of 
Health, Second Congressional District, 1900; Member State Board 
of Health, str,te-at-large, 1904-1908; student iu Department ol 
Pharmacology, University of Chicago, 1908 (summer); Professor 
of Materia Medica and Pharmacolog^y, University of Mississippi, 
since 1903. 

David Horace Bishop, M. A., Professor of English Language ami Liter- 
ature. A. B., Emory and Henry, 1891; M. A.. Vanderbilt Univers- 
ity, 1S97; Instructor in Vanderbilt University, 1S97-99; Professor 
of English Millsaps College, 1900-04; Professor of English and 
Rhetoric and Belles-Letters, University of Mississippi, 1904-1905; 
Professor of the English Language and Literature, University of 
Mississippi, since 1905. 

Calvin S. Brown, M. S., D. Sc. Ph. D., Professor of Modern Languages 
and Literatures. B. S., Vanderbilt University, 1888; M. S., the 
same, 1891; D. Sc, the same, 1892; Assistant in French and Eng- 
lish, the same, 1892-93; Acting Assistant Professor of English, 
University of :Missouri, 1893-94; student at Universities of Paris 
and Leipzig, 1S94-95; Instructor in English, Vanderbilt Univers- 
ity, 1895-96; Instructor in English and Comparative Literature. 
University of Colorado, 1898-1900; Ph. D., University of Colorado, 
1899; Acting Professor of Modern Languages, University of Mis- 
sissippi, 19u2; Student in Spain, Italy, and Greece, 1903-04; Ger- 
many and France, 1913 (summer); Acting Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages, University of Missouri, 1904-05; University 
of Mississippi, since 1905. 

John H. Dorroh, B. E., C. E., Dean of Engineering School, Professor of 
Civil Engineering. B. E., Vanderbilt University, 1903; C. E., the 
same 1913; engaged in practice of Engineering, 1903-06; Assistant 
Professor of Civil and Municipal Engineering, University of Missis- 
sippi, 1906-08; Professor of Municipal and Sanitary Engineering, 
1908-12; Professor of Civil Engineering, since 1912; Dean since 
1915. 

Henry Minor Faser, Ph. G., Dean of the School of Pharmacy, Professor 
of Pharmacy. Ph. G., St. Louis College of Pharmacy, 1902; 
Special work same, summer of 1908; Member of Mississippi State 
Board of Pharmaceutical Examiners, 1904-08; President of Board 
1912-16; engaged in retail drug business fourteen years; Acting 
Professor of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, 1908-10; Profes- 
sor of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, since 1910; Dean of 
the School, since 1914. 

James Warsaw' Be'l, B. P., M. A., Professor of Economics and Politi-al 
Science. (On leave of absence at Columbia University, 1916-1917.) 
B. P., University of Mississippi, 1898; Principal of Schools, 1898- 
1903; Associate Professor of Pedagogy and High School Visitor, 



STATE INSTITUTION'S 



625 



University of Mississippi, 1903-04; Professor of Mathematics, Mis- 
sissippi Industrial Institute and College, 1904-07; student,' Uni- 
versity of Michisan, 190G (summer); student. University of Chi- 
cago 190S, 1912 (summers); Student Columbia University, 1909- 
1910 (summers); University of Mississit)pi, since 1907; Dean of 
the Department of Education, 1910-1915. 
. Winn David Hedleston, A. B., D. D., Professor of Philosophy and Eth- 
ics. A. B., University of Mississippi, 1883; D. D., Central Univers- 
ity of Kentucky, 1902; Acting Professor of Philosophy and Ethics, 
University of Mississippi, 1909-10; Professor of Philosophy and 
Ethics, University of Mississippi, since 1910. 
John Clayton Fant, A. M., Ph. D., Dean of the School of Education. 
Profesor of Secondary Education. A. B., Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, Virginia. 1SS9; A. M., the same; Pd. M., New York Univers- 
ity. 1895; President Mississippi State Teachers' Association, 1900; 
A. M., University of Mississippi, 1912; Ph. D., New York Univers- 
ity, 1913; Principal Public School Newton, Miss., 1889-1893; Sup- 
erintendent of Schools, Water Valley, Miss., 1895-189G; Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Meridian, Miss., 1S96-1910; Professor of Sec- 
ondary Education, University of Mississippi, since 1910. Dean of 
School of Education, since 1915. 
Alfred William Milden, B. A., Ph. D., Professor of Greek Language 
and Literature. B. A., University of Toronto, 1888; Instructor in 
Greek and Latin, Barrie Collegiate Institute. Ontario, 1SS9-1896; 
graduate student in Johns Hopkins University, 1896-1900; Fel- 
low in Greek. Johns Hopkins University, 1S9S-1899; Ph. D the 
same, 1899; Professor of Greek and Latin. Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, 1900-1910; Professor of Greek, University of Mississippi, 
since 1910. 
•Leonard Jerome Farley. B. S., LL. D. Dean of the Laio School, Pro- 
fessor of Laic. B. S., University of Mississippi, 1884; Professor of 
Law, University of Mississippi, since 1910; LL. D., Mississippi 
College, 1913; Dean of Law School, since 1913 
William Lee Kennon, M. S., Ph. D.. Professor of Physics and Astron- 
omy. B. S., Mil saps College. Mississippi, 1900; M S 1901- Pro- 
lan? no °^ Chemistry and Physics. Kentucky Wesleyan College, 
■iJUl-Oo; student in Johns Hopkins Universitv, 1903-06- Univers- 
ity Scholar 1904-05; Fellow in Chemistry, 1905-06- Ph ' D 190r,- 
Instructor in Williams College, Massachusetts, 1906-09; Assistant 
professor of Chemistry. University of Mississippi. 1909-19r^- Act- 
ing Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 1911-12; Professor of 
Physics and Astronomy, since 191-^ 
Duke McDonald Kimbrough. A. B.. LL." B., Professor of Law A B 
Lmversity of Mississippi. 1896; LL. B., the same 1899; Professor 
or Law, Lmversity of Mississippi, since 1913. 

40— m. 



626 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

James Edward Winston, B. A., M. A.. Pli. D., Professor of History. B\ 
A., University of Virginia, 1900; M. A., the same, 1901; M. A., Har- 
vard University, lOO.j; Ph. D., University of Pennsylvania, 1914; 
Instructor iu History, University of Kentucky, 1902-04; Instructor 
in History, University of Texas, 1907-08; Instructor in History, 
Politics, and Economics, Princeton University, 1911-13; Instruc- 
tor in History and Politics, the same, 1913-14; Professor of His- 
tory, University of INIiasissippi, since 1914. 
John Xesbit Swan, A. il.. Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. A. B., West- 
minister College, Pennsylvania, 1SS6; A. M., the same, 1889; Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry in Westminister College, Pennsylvania, 1S89- 
91; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins, 1S93; Professor of Chemistry in Mon- 
mouth College, 1893-1915; Acting Professor of Chemistry in Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, 1912-13; Professor of Chemistry, the same, 
since 1915. 
-Billy Sylvester Guytou, M. A., M. D., Professor of Pathology and Bac- 
teriology. B. S., Mississippi College, 190S; B. S., University of 
Mississippi, 1910; M. A., the same, 1911; Student Assistant in His- 
tology, University of Mississippi, 1910-11; M. D., University of 
Virginia, 1913; Interne in 2klartha Jefferson Sanatorium, Char- 
lottesville, Virginia, 1912-13; Interne in Orange Memorial Hos- 
pital, Orange, New Jersey, 1913-14; General Practice of Medicine, 
Ingomar, Mississippi, 1014-15; Professor of Pathology and Bac- 
teriology-, University of Mississippi, since 1915. 
Roswell W. Rogers, B. S., A. M., Professor of Education. B. S., Poly- 
technic College, Fort Worth, 1906; student University of Texas, 
1907 (summer); A. M., University of Chicago, 1911; Instructor in 
Mathematics and Physics, Goodnight College, Texas, 1902-1903; 
Instructor in Mathematics, Polytechnic College, 1905-1907; Prin- 
cipal of High School, Hillsboro, Texas, 1907-1912; President of 
John Tarleton College, 1912-1913; Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion, University of Mississippi, 1913-15; Professor of Education, 
University of Mississippi, since 1915. 
Donald Fraser McLeod, C. E., Professor of Municipal Engineering. C. 
E., Cornell University, 1S97; Professor of Mathematics and Civil 
Engineering, Clarkson College of Technology, 1906-1907; Profes- 
sor of Civil Engineering, the same, 1907-1908; practice of Engin- 
eering;, 1908-1915; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Uni- 
veristy of Mississippi, 1915 to Jan. 1917; Professor of Municipal 
Engineering, University of Mississippi, since Jan. 1917. 
Joseph Otterbein Crider, M. D.. Professor of Physiology. M. D., Uni- 
versity of Virginia, 1012; Assistant in Physiologj-, the same 1911- 
12; Instructor in Physiology, the same, 1912-13; Associate Profes- 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 627 

sor of Physiology' and Histology, University of Mississippi, from 
1913-16; Professor of Physiolog>', University of Mississippi, since 
1916. 

Charles F. DeGaris, A. B., M. D., Professor of Anatomy. {Absent on 
leave.) M. D.. Washington University, 1912; Interne, St. Louis 
City Hospital, 1912-13; Resident Pathologist, St. Louis City Hospi- 
tal, 1913; Assistant in Anatomy, University of Wisconsin, 1913- 
15; B. A., University of Wisconsin, 1915; Instructor in Anatomy, 
the same, 1915-16; Professor of Anatomy, University of Mississippi, 
since 1916. 

Charles Harry Chase, B. S., Actinc; Professor of Economics. B. S., 
Columbia University, 1913; student, the same 1913-16; student in 
France, Italy, and Switzerland, portions of 1913 and 1914; Lecturer 
in Economics, Extension Department, Columbia University, 1916; 
Acting Professor of Economics, University of Mississippi, 1916-17. 

Byron L. Robinson, A. B., Acting Professor of Anatomy. A. B., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1914; Student Assistant in Zoology, the 
same, 1913-14; Assistant in Biology Marquette Medical School, 
1914-15; Assistant in Anatomy, 1915-16; Acting Professor of Anat- 
omy, University of Mississippi, 1916-17. 

Robert Torrey, B. P., Associate Professor of Mathematics. (On leave 
of absence at the University of Chicago, 1916-17.) B. P., Univer- 
sity of Mississippi, 1910; Superintendent of Schools, Yazoo City, 
Mississippi, 1895-1905; High School Visitor, University of Miss- 
issippi. 1905-06; Superintendent of Schools, Canton, Misisssippi, 
1906-07; Superintendent of Schools, Jackson, Miss., 1907-08; stu-^ 
dent Columbia University 1909 (summer); University of Chicago, 
1910, 1912 (summer); Professor of Pedagogy, University of Miss- 
issippi, 1908-10; Associate Professor of Mathematics, since 1910. 

Christopher Longest, B. A., Ph. D., Associate Professor of Latin. B. A., 
University of Mississippi, 1900; Ph. D., University of Chicago', 
1915; Teacher of English in the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; In- 
structor in English in Johns Hopkins University, 1904-05; student 
in Johns Hopkins University. 1904-08; student, Universitv of 
Chicago, 1908; 1909, 1911 (summers); Assistant Professor of Latin, 
University of Mississippi, 1908-1910; Associate Professor since 
1910. 

Frederick Lee Hisaw, A. B., A. M., Associate Professor of Biology. 
A. B., University of Missouri. 1914; B. S. in Education and A. M.. 
the. same, 1916; Friday Harbor Marine Biological Laboratory, 
1913 (summer); Colorado Mountain Biological Laboratory, 1914. 
1910 (summers); Assistant in Zoology, University of :^IissourI* 
1914-16; Associate Professor of Biology, University of Mississippi. 
since 1916. 



g28 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

James Tarpley Spann, B. S., Acting Associate Professor of Mathematics. 
B. S., University of Mississippi, 1910; Assistant in Mathematics, 
University of Mississippi, 1908-11; University of Chicago. 1910, 
1913 (summers); State High School work; Acting Associate Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics, University of Mississippi, 1916-17. 

John C. Culley, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Minor Surgery ana 
Physical Diagnosis. A. B., Southwestern Presbyterian University, 
1906; M. D., Vanderbilt University, 1909; Assistant Professor, Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, since 1912. 

Edward Jones Erwin, B. A., M. A., Assistant Professor of English. 
A. B., Davidson College, 1906; A. M., the same, 1907; Instructor 
McCaliie School, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1907-1909; student 
Columbia University, 1910-1912; Instructor DeWitt Clinton High 
School, New York, 1912-191-1; Assistant Professor of English, 
University of Mississippi, since 1914. 

Harry Meredith Bryan, LL. B., Assistant Professor of Laio. LL. B., 
University of Mississippi, 1916; Assistant Professor of Law, Uni- 
versity of Misisssippi, since 1916. 

Milton Saxon Cushman, A. B., A. M., Assistant Professor of History. 

A. B., Tulane University, 1910; A. M., the same, 1914; student, 
University of Chicago, 1911, 1913 (summers), 1914 (spring); Act- 
ing Professor of English and Assistant in Social Sciences, Mc- 
Kendres College, 1914-15; Instructor in History and Economics, 
Stanford College, 1915-16; University of Misisssippi, since 1916. 

Guy Haines Woollett, B. S.. M. S., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1910; M. S.., the same, 1916; 
Teacher of Science, High Schools, 1910-14; University of Missis- 
sippi, since 1916. 

Claude Clayton Kiplinger, A. B., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
A. B., Western Reserve University, 1910; Teacher of Physics and 
Chemistry, Lincoln, 111., High School, 1910-13; Instructor in Chem- 
istry and graduate student, Iowa State College, 1913-16; University 
of Mississippi, since 1916. 

Lester A. Twigg, A. B., Assistant Professor of Oratory. A, B., West- 
em Maryland College, 1916; University of Mississippi, since 1916. 



Instructors, Lecturers, axd Other Officers. 

Daniel Lycurgus Ross, B. S., LL. B., Secretary. L .B., University of 
Mississippi, 1907; Secretary University of Mississippi, since 1904. 

Miss Margaret Roudebush, B. A..J)ean of Women. Instructor in Home 
Economics. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 629 

Raymer W. Tin?ley. B. A., yi. A., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
B. A., University of Kentucky, 1912; Europe, 1912, 1914 (sum- 
mers); M. A., University of Illinois, 1915; Instructor in Modem 
Languages. University of Mississippi, since 1915. 
Alexander H. Schutz, Ph. B., Instructor in Modern Languages. Ph. B., 
University of Chicago, 1915; graduate student, the same, 1915; 
Instructor in Modern Languages, University of Mississippi, since 
1915. 
William Arthur Darden, A. B., A. M., Instructor in EngJisyi. A. B., 
University of North Carolina, 1910; A. M., Columbia University. 
1912; student at Columbia University, 1911-1914; Teacher in 
Boys' High School. Brooklyn, 1914-1915; Instructor in English, 
University of Mississippi, since 1915. 
Miss Alice Mayes. Librarian. 

Clarke Milton Cleveland, Herman Jesse Bankston, Jr., Student Assist- 
ants in Phi'sics. 
George Clyde McKinstrj-, Thomas Hadden Swan, Student Assistants in 

Chemistry. 
Irvin William Barrett, Charles H. Kirkpatrick, Jr., Student Assistants 

in Anatomy. 
James O. Lowe, Student Assistant in Bacteriology and Pathology. 
Roy G. Grant, Student Assistant in Physiology and Histology. 
Mrs. Charles Fitzgerald, Matron of the Hospital. 
Miss Minnie Brady, Hospital Xurse. 
E. T. Block, Superintendent of Poiver Plant. 
John DeWitt Furr, B. S., M. A., Assistant Superintendent of Power 

Plant. 
Ray H. Legate, B. S., M. A., Secretary of Y. M. C. A. B. S., University 
of Arkansas. 1905; Secretary of Y. M. C. A., Clemson College, 1905- 
1908; M. A., Yale University, 1910; Secretary of Y. M. C. A., Van- 
derbilt University, 1910-1914; with International Committee of 
Y. M. C. A., 1914-15; University of Mississippi since 1915. 
Fred A. Robins, Director of Athletics. Assistant Coach of foot-ball 
team, Vanderbilt University, 1913: Director of Athletics and 
Coach of Athletic teams. Mercer University, 1914-1913; University 
of Mississippi, since 1915. 
Miss Mary Betsy Maltby, Secretary to the Chancellor. 
Frank Matthews. Secretary to the Secretary. 
Kathleen Baldwin, B. S., Assistant Secretary to the Cha7iceUor. 



EiTEBrnTS Professors. 

Richard Marion Leavell, M. A.. LL. D., Emeritus Professor of Mental 
and Moral Philosophy, of Logic, and of Political Economy. _A. B., 
University of Mississippi, 1859; LL. D., Mississippi College, 1890; 



.ic\:.w5' 



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630 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

Principal of Verona ^^ale Academy. 1S65-1S70; Professor of Eng- 
lish Language and Literature, Mississippi College, 1S82-18S9; Pro> 
fessor of English and Belles-Lettres, University of Mississippi, 
1S89-1S90; Professor of Philosophy and Political Economy, Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, 1890-1900; Emeritus Professor, since 1909. 

John Greer Deupree, M. A., LL. D.. Emeritus Professor of Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. B. A., and M. A., of Howard College, Ala- 
bama; LL. D., of the S. W. B. U., Tennessee; Professor in Waco, 
Texas, University. 1S77-1878; President of Okolona Female College, 
1878-1882; Professor in Mississippi College, 1882-1883; Professor in 
S. W. B. U., 1883-1884; Professor in Mississippi College. 1S84- 
1895; Superintendent of Meridian, Miss., Schools, 1S95-1896; Pro- 
fessor of Pedagogy, University of ^Mississippi. 1896-1905; Professor 
of Greek, University of Mississippi, 1905-1910; Emeritus Profes- 
sor, since 1010. 

Thomas Hugh Somerville. LL. B., LL. D., Emeritus Dean of La'c De- 
partment. LL. B.. Washington and Lee University, 1872; LL. D., 
the same. 1900; Professor of Law, University of Mississippi, 1S97- 
1913; Dean of Department, 1906-1913; Professor of Medical Juris- 
prudence, 1903-1913; Emeritus Dean, since 1913. 



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STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 631 



MISSISSIPPI INDUSTKIAL IXSTITUTE AXD COLLEGE. 



BY DABXEY I-IPSCOMB, A. M., I.L. D., MEMBER OF THE FACrLTT AXD EX- 
TRUSTEE OF THE COLLEGE. 



First among the States to charter an institution for the higher edu- 
cation of young women, first to remove the common-law disabilities of 
married women, and first to establish and support an institution for 
the industrial and collegiate education of its daughters — such is in 
part what Mississippi proudly stands for in the great American Union. 
The education of their girls has always been a chief concern with Mis- 
sissippians, knowing that the home, the church, and the state are 
largely what women make them. The institutes and seminaries for 
girls before the war were about the same in numbers as the schools 
and academies for boys, and generally better equipped and as well 
taught. To Miss Sallie E. Reneau, of Grenada, Mississippi, is accorded 
the distinction of first proposing a State school for young women, with 
collegiate, normal, and fine arts departments, according to her me- 
morial, which Governor McRae in 1858 commended in his message to 
the favorable consideration of the Legislature. But political condi- 
tions were too unsettled, the future too uncertain for the State to 
found new institutions or expend its revenue for any other than nec- 
essary purposes. War soon came, and this, with all else that looked 
to the advancement of the State, was swept, away before its awful 
blasts. 

Reconstruction followed and prolonged the wreck and gloom. But 
scarcely had its horrors ended when the hearts of the parents were 
turned again to the education of their children as the best and now 
generally the only provision they could make for their future. Changed 
conditions imperatively called for more varied and practical instruc- 
tion and training for the youth. In response to this demand the Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College was chartered in 1878. and in 1880 be- 
gan its well known career of increasing popularity and usefulness. A 
University and an Agricultural and Mechanical College for the boys 



632 STATE IXSTITUTIONS 

and a college for the negroes, and nothing for the girls soon raised the 
question: Why not similar provision by the State for its daughters. 
The subject was vigorously discussed in the papers and otherwise 
earnestly advocated for several years by :\Irs. Annie C. Peyton, of Co- 
piah County, Mrs. John C. Hastings, of Claiborne County, and other 
enthusiastic promoters of the enterprise, both men and women. Hon. 
John McC. Martin, of Port Gibson, introduced the bill which passed 
March 12, 1S84, incorporating the Mississippi Industrial Institute and 
College. The original bill was entitled: "An Act to create and estab- 
lish an Industrial Institute in the State of Mississippi, and a College 
for the education of white girls in the arts and sciences." Governor 
Robert Lowry, in his message to the Legislature that year, had pre- 
viously endorsed the movement. Col. W. H. McCardle and Dr. G. S. 
Roudebush were prominent among the men who warmly seconded the 
efforts of the patriotic women to secure a State institution for broader 
and higher education of ^lississippi girls. 



IXDUSTKIAI. IXSTITUTK AND COLLITGE, COLL'lIBUS, MiS.S. 

The offer of about -^00,000 in grounds, buildings, and bonds by the 
city of Cohmibus secured for that place the location of the new col- 
lege, superseding the Columbus Female Institute, established in 18-18. 
The buildings and grounds of this institute, it may be of interest to 
add, had in 1870 been formally tendered by its Board of Trustees to 
the Trustees of the University of Mississippi for use as a department 
of the State University for the education of women, indicating the de- 
mand very soon after the war for additional educational advantages 
for women. But Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College had not 
yet been founded, and the admission of negroes to the University then 
being pressed, not yet disposed of, rightly caused the Trustees to de- 
cline to complicate their problem more. 

To its first President, Dr. R. \V. Jones. Christian gentleman, scholar, 
and able edticator, the arduous and complex task of construction, equip- 
ment, and organization of the College was chiefly committed, and that 
he did his work so well added to his distinction and largely insured 
the results of subsequent years. To the enthusiastic co-operation of his 
well chosen faculty much credit Is also due, and linked indissolubly 
with the name of the College will always be the names of the devoted 
women who served it in the early days. 

From its opening in October, 1885, the purposes of the institution, as 
set forth In Section 2524 of the Annotated Code of 1906, collegiate, 
normal, and Industrial, have been closely adhered to, with emphasis 
on each as equipment has been provided and conditions would admit. 
Under Dr. Jones, the first president, the foundation of all the depart- 
ments was laid and a school of music and fine arts added, with tuition 



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STATE INSTITUTIONS 633 

fees for instruction in them. Stress was laid naturally and necessarily 
on the collegiate work, lack of means requiring the postponement of 
the full development of the industrial features; not an unwise policy, 
perhaps, even if means had been adequate for both. Dr. Jones' resig- 
nation at the end of three years was deeply regretted throughout the 
State; due, it was thought, to his conclusion that his powers as presi- 
dent were inadequate to the successful execution of liis plans. 

This limitation of the powers of the president was more apparent in 
the next three administrations, when the divergent purposes of the 
institution, difTicult to harmonize under the most favorable conditions, 
began to be championed zealously and too exclusively, it seems, by 
some inside as well as outside the College. Mr. Chas. H. Cocke, the 
second president, a cultured, scholarly gentleman, sought to keep in 
the line of his predecessor and advance the work in some directions, 
but he found himself out of harmony with influential members of the 
faculty and unsupported by the Board of Trustees. He consequently 
tendered his resignation in March 1890. An interregnum of three 
months followed, during which Miss M. J. S. Callaway served as acting 
president. Professor Alf Beals was chosen president in June, 1890, 
and resigned at the end of one year. 

Dr. Robert Frazer was next called to the presidency, and held the 
office from 1891 to 1898. Some improvements were made during this 
period, and tlie attendance continued to tax fully the capacity of the 
dormitories. On the whole, however, there was little growth; friction 
continued, the purposes of the institution seemed still to clash, and 
the powers of the president remained undefined or inadequate. 

Fearing that the usefulness of the College was being impaired and 
that a continuance of these condi*'icns would menace its existence. 
Governor McLaurin and the board of Trustees, in 1898, induced Mr. A. 
A. Kincannon. State Superintendent of Education, to assume the 
presidency, with the assurance that ample . powers would be granted 
him, such as nominating his faculty, arranging the courses of study, 
and establishing rules of discipline (Section 2538, Code 1906). 

An era of popularity and expansion was introduced. Two dormi- 
tories were built, a commodious, up-to-date hospital was erected and 
successively industrial hall, a capacious laundry, music hall, science 
hall, and a large new power-house rose upon the grounds, evidencing 
the executive ability of President Kincannon and the influence of the 
Legislature and the people in his administration of the College. Mean- 
while the attendance was more than doubled, the enrollment, with age 
limit raised to sixteen, was 816 in 1906 — 07, and over one hundred more 
were refused admittance for lack of accommodations. The enlargement 
and better equipment of the industrial department and the growth 
of the music department to conservatory dimensions, with entertain- 
ments furnished by artists of world-wide reputation, may be added as 
characteristic of this administration. Also, that in 1906 the College 



634 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

courses were revised and made elective. From being rigidly prescribed 
nearly one-half of the work of the junior class and about two-thirds of 
that of the senior c'.ass became elective, preserving the distinctive A. 

B. and B. S. course.-, and yet affording advanced students in either of 
these courses an opportunity to broaden as much as possible the range 
of their culture or to specialize in certain directions, according to in- 
clination or prospective need. 

After declining the offer in November, 1906, Mr. Kincannon was 
again elected to the Chancellorship of the University of Mississippi in 
June 1907. With reluctance he severed his connection with the I. 1. & 

C. in response, as he said, as much to the call of duty as to that of 
professional ambition. The Board of Trustees unanimously elected 
as his successor Mr. Henry L. Whitfield, then State Superintendent of 
Education, and the new president assumed the duties of his office July 
11, 1907. 

Under its sixth president the twenty-third session of the College 
began auspiciously September 25, 1907. The opening exercises were 
unusually interesting. President Whitfield's inaugural address, in its 
spirit and grasp of the situation and in the policy outlined, gave as- 
surance of continued prosperity to the College under his administra- 
tion. The effect of his thorough inspection of the internal affairs of the 
institution to the details of each department was soon discernible in 
the spirit and work oi the school. 

The most definite features of the present administration are perhaps 
the following: Expansion and thorough reorganization of the Normal 
Department in 1907 -OS; organization of a Physical Education Depart- 
ment in the same year; building of Gymnasium and Library with ap- 
propriation of 190S; athletic field marked off, graded, and equipped; 
raising of college entrance requirements in 1909, to conform to require- 
ments of the Southern Association of Colleges; inauguration of stud- 
ent government organization and civil league in 1910; new dormitory 
and dining hall completed with appropriation made in 1910; 
continued improvement of grounds and growth and increasing service- 
ableness of the library; simplification of the college course in 1911, 
with prescribed work in first and second years and major and minor 
electives for most of the work of the third and fourth years; stricter 
and more scientific gradation of the music and industrial courses in 
1912, in order to correlate them with the collegiate course; steady in- 
crease in the size of graduating classes. 

The formation of reading and study circles among the teachers, gen- 
erally led by the president; and the more frequent applications for 
leave of absence by teachers for special or post-graduate study in the 
universities of the United States or Europe, might also be said to 
mark this administration and show the increasing breadth and pro- 
gressiveness of the faculty. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 635 

The erection in 1913 of the Mahel Ward Practice Home, on plans 
prepared largely by the girls to occupy it, marks a distinct advance 
in the training of the pupils in the various domestic arts. By groups 
members of the senior class take their turn in the management of this 
well equipped home laboratory; buying and keeping accounts, cooking 
and serving meals, and performing all other duties of a well ordered 
household, each taking in prescribed order the part assigned to her. 
A bulletin in 191-i by the president, entitled "Progress and Present 
Standards of the I. I. and C", so clearly and comprehensively sets 
forth the growth of the college and its adaptation to the changing de- 
mands of modern life that it merits special record and should be care- 
fully read by every one seeking thorough knowledge of the history 
of the Industrial Institute and College. 

Systematized extension work in a group of nearby rural schools, 
to help make their courses more practical, varied, and vitally related 
to what better home conditions and soT;ial life in the country now 
call for, was a notable expansion of college activities in 1915 — 16. 
Cutting off of the under-freshman classes and raising of entrance re- 
quirements to the fourteen unit standard is another indication of note- 
worthy progress in recent years in response to improved standards 
in the high schools of the state. 

Notwithstanding higher entrance requirements and hard times, in 
the session of 1916 — 17 the attendance was 912 and the graduating 
class numbered 142 — setting new records in both these particulars. In 
the last two months of this session, owing to the impending war, the 
general work of the College was largely redirected in order to meet 
more promptly and effectively conditions that threatened soon to con- 
front life in every home in the land. Significant of this new line of 
work were the large classes organized in First Aid Red Cross Courses. 
About four hundred completed these courses and received certificates. 
A summer term of the College, offering also special courses in primary 
work and in home economics, was successful beyond expectations. 

The session of 1917-18 will begin with the curriculum revised to 
the extent that elective major courses will begin in the Sophomore year 
and electives correlating with the majors will be more strictly regu- 
lated than heretofore. The fourteen unit entrance requirement, un- 
conditional, will also as has been announced be enforced. In spite of 
war conditions, applications for enrollment indicate a full attendance 
the coming session. 

During the thirty-two years of its existence more than seven thousand 
young women have sought instruction at this College. Of these over 
nine hundred forty-two are now in school, sixteen hundred have taken 
certificates of proficiency in industrial arts, and eight hundred and 
fifty-eight have received academic degrees. A.s statod in the catalogue, 
this Institute and College "seeks to improve the intellect by the best 



636 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

methods which philosophy and experience suggest, to afford means for 
broad and thorough culture, and to preserve and improve every char- 
acteristic of refined womanhood. This high mission demands high 
standards. Every incentive to diligence and thoroughness is afforded 
and corresponding earnestness is expected of every pupil. The object 
Is to secure to our young women accurate and adequate preparation 
for life. Let all who seek admission bear in mind that high achieve- 
ment involves high endeavor. 

Special mention of individual trustees, teachers, and officers of the 
College entitled by length or character of service to such distinction 
would add to the interest of this sketch, but would transgress its limits 
if done satisfactorily, for reference to only a few would certainly seem 
indivious. Omission will be less reprehensible, hence no attempt in 
this direction is ventured. 



The present organization of the college is as follows: 
H. L. Whitfield, B. L., LL. D., President. 
Dabney Lipscomb, A. B., A. M. LL. D., Vice-President. 



Collegiate Depabtment 

Laweexce G. Paixter, Professor of English Language and Literature- 
A. B. Brown University, 1900; LL. B., University of Maryland 1903; 
A. M. Harvard University, 1909. 

Elise Timcerlake, Professor of Teaching of English. Graduate, Hill- 
man College, 1893; Student, University of Chicago, 1S98 (one 
term and one quarter) ; B. S. Teachers' College Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1910; A. M., Columbia University, 1911. 

MiKiAM Green JPasley, Professor of Ancient Languages. A. B., M. I. 1. 
and C, 1889; Student, University of Mississippi, 1890-1891; Han- 
over, 1893 (Summer); Sauvear School of Languages, 1897 (Sum- 
mer); Cornell University, 1898 (Summer); Harvard University, 
1899 (Summer); Paris, 1900 (Summer); Student of Archaeology, 
University of Zurich, 1903-1904; Rome, 1904, 1905, (Summers); 
Student University of Munich, 1904-1905; A. M., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1911; Student Columbia University, 1911-1912. 

Gessner T. Smith, Pro/e.s.svjr of Modern Languages. Student, Hohere 
Tochter Schule, Leipsig, 1885-1886; Spain 1886 (Summer); Chi- 
cago University 1897, 1907 (Summers); The Sorbonne, Paris, 
1900-01; Gottingen, 1912 (Summer). 

Bessie Heath, Professor of History. A. B., M. L L and C, 1901; A. 
B., Leland Stanford Junior University, 1911. A. M. Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1916. 



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STATE INSTITUTIONS 637 

Dabnky Lipscomb. Professor of Civics. Economics, and PhilosopJiij. 
A. B., University of Mississippi, 1S79; A. M., University of Mis- 
sissippi, 1S81; Student, Columbia University, 1904-05; LL. D., 
University of Mississippi, 1911. 

Annie L. Faxt. Professor of Psychology and Education. A. B., M. I. I. 
and C, 1893; A. M., Columbia University. 

Fraxce.s p. Hooper. Professor of Biology B. S., University of Mis- 
sissippi, 1885; A. M., University of Michigan, IBIO; Harvard Bi- 
ological Station, Bermuda Islands, 1904; University of Wisconsin, 
1907 (Summer). 

H. G. MrGowAX. Professor of Agriculture and Floriculture. Student, 
Millsaps College, 1898-1900; University of Chicago, 1904 (one 
term); Cornell University, 19*^6 (Summer). 

Martha O. Eckford, Professor of Hygiene B. S., M. I. I. and C, 
1907; A. M. Columbia University, 1913. 

Cora Q. Walker, Professor of Chemistry A. B.. M. I. I. and C, 1889; 
A. M., University of Mississippi. 1900; Student, University of Vir- 
ginia, lS89-'94 (Summers); University of Chicago, lS95-'99 (four 
quarters) and 1900-'01; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1912-'13. 

Lena Vaughan, Professor of Physics. B. S., 1902, M. S., 190R. Univer- 
sity of Chicago; Student, University of Chicago, 1908-10. 

Tom F. McBeath, Professor of Mathematics. B. S. and A. B., 1882, 
Glasgow, "(Ky.) Normal School. 

Charles SrnxArLT Brooks, Professor of Textiles. B. S., Mississippi 
A. and M. College. 1914. 

SrsiE Will Guxter. Professor of Home Science. Normal Diploma, 
1910; A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1911; Post Graduate student, M. I. I. 
and C, 1912; Columbia University (Summer), 1915. 

AvA E. Allex, Director of Practice School. Student, Nashville College, 
Nashville, Tennessee; University of Mississippi (Summer 1911); 
University of Tennessee (Summers 1910 and 1912); University of 
Chicago (Summer 1913); Columbia University (Summer 1915). 

♦Bessie W. Newsom, .Assistant in English. B. A., and M. A., degrees 
from Vanderbilt University. Special certificate from Harvard 
University in summer 1911. 

Hattie Guixedge, Assistant in English. A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1904; 
student of University of Chicago, 1903 (three months). 1910 (three 
months), 1915, (three months); studied at Summer School, Knox- 
vllle, 1905 (six weeks), 1911, (six weeks). 

Ella Lor Terry, Assistant in English B. S., George Peabody College 
for Teachers; Student, University of Chicago 1912 (three months), 



* Absent on leave. 



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638 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

1916 (six weeks); Student, University of Michigan. 1913 (eight 
weeks), 1914 (eight weeks); Student, University of "Wisconsin, 
1915 (six weeks). 
Mariox E^rETH TuTTLE. Assistont in English. A. B., Trinity College; 
A. M.. Columbia University; Student, Chicago University (Sum- 
mer 1914). 

Annie Caulfield, Assistant in English. A. B.. M. I. I. and C, 1906; 
A. M., University of Wisconsin, 1912. 

Mary Callaway. Assistant in English. A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1912; 
M. A., Stanford University, 1916. 

CoRXKLLTA HiT).'=;o>r. Assistant in Latin. A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1899; 
Student, University of Chicago, 1905 (Summer) ; Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1908 (Summer). 

Elolse McCaskill, Assistant in Latin. A. B., M. I. I. & C. 1916. 

Ri"BY CArxFiELD, Assistaut in Modern Languages. A. B., M. I. I. and 
C, 1908: Student in Germany, 1910 (Summer). A. M., University 
of Wisconsin. 1916. 

ErjzABExn Celestixe Rotit. Assistant in Modern Languages. Stad- 
tische hohere Tochterschule. Gottingen, Germany. 1900-1907; Eng- 
lish Boarding School, Gottingen. Germany, 1907-1911; Student, 
University of Michigan. 1913-14. 

Ellex Crawford. Assistant in Modern Languages. A. B., University 
of Michigan. 1910. 

Lexa Boyd Eixixgtox. Assistant in History. A. B., M. I. I. and C. 
1906; Student, University of Chicago, 1912; A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1913-14 

Mrs. Alma Willis Sydexsteicker, Assistant in History. Ph. D., Woos- 
ter University, Wooster. Ohio; Certificate pupil in Semetlc Lan- 
guages of Dr. W. R. Harper. 

Mary Gore Wyatt.* Assistant in History. B. D. and A. B. luke Nor- 
mal College, Mississippi. 1891; Student. University of Mississippi, 
1904-05; University of Chicago, 1916 (one term) ; University of the 
South, 1912 (Summer). 

Lottie Howard. Assistant in History. B. S., M. I. I. and C, 1909; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, session of 1914-1915. 

Fraxce.'^ ^r. Moore,* Assistant in History A. B., M. I. I. and C. 1910. 

Nellie Ketrx, Assistant in Psychology and Educatvm. A. B., M. I. 1. 
and C, 1906; A. M., University of Wisconsin, 1912. 

Alice Wildmax, Assistant in Psychology and Education. B. S., Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University, 1910; Graduate student, Colum- 
bia University, 1915. 

Sarah Fraxces Rowax, Home Science Extension Department. B. S., 
M. I. I. and C, 1912; took course in Rural Leadership, Cornell, 
191.'5 (Summer): Student, Columbia, 1913. 



* Absent on leave. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS 639 

Clytf.i: Evans, Assistant in Biologu B. S., Mississippi I. I. and C, 
1911; University of Vermont 1913, (Summer); University of Chi- 
cago, 1915-16; University of Chicago 1915, (Summer). 

Margauet L. Baskekvit.l. Assistant in Hiigicnc A. B., Randolpii-Ma- 
con Woman's College, 190S; University of Chicago, 1910, 1912 (one 
quarter). 

Floy Cinmngham, Assistant in Chemistry. B. S., :M. I. I. and C, 
1913; Columbia University (Summer, 1915). 

Makgarkt Boy-d, Assistant in ilatnematics. A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1903; 
Student University of Chicago, 1905-1906. 

*Katk Albkight, Assistant in Mathematics. A. B., M. I. I. and C, 1898; 
Student, Summer School of the South, Tennessee, 1903. 

GiYTOx Teagi-e, Assistant in Home Science B. S., M. I. I. and C, 
1913. 

MaPvGI-erite G. Mau.ox, Assistant in Home Science. B. S., Lewis In- 
stitute, Chicago, 1915; M. S., University of Chicago, 1916. 

AxxK Walker, Assistant in Practice School. Graduate, State Normal 
College, Farmville, Ya., 1912; Emory and Henry College, 1910 
(Summer). 

Rosa R. K.vox, Director of Kindergarten. University of Chicago 1916 
(Summer); Graduate Agnes Scott Institute 1899; Graduate Atlan- 
ta Kindergarten Normal School. 1902; Graduate Chicago Kinder- 
garten College, 1906; Student, Chicago Froebel Association, 1907 
-'08; Student, University of Chicago, (Kyten-Elementary Educ); 
Summer, 1907 (one term) — Session 1908-09; Summer 1914, (one 
term). 

Cox.sTA.xcE Latshaw, Profcssor of Bihie. A. B., University of Missouri, 
1912: Bible Work at Missouri Bible College. 

St'E Fay Natx, Director of Oratorical and Oral Expression Department. 
Pupil of Henry Lawrence Southwick, Boston; Blanche Gutman, 
School of Expression Art, New York; Trippe, Chicago; School of 
Expression. Shakespearian Reading Course, Tulane University, N. 
O. La., Byron W. King, School of Oratory, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



Indcstrlvl Department 

Bks.sie K. Daigherty. Director. 

Charles Shixailt Brooks. Professor of Textiles. B. S., Mississippi A. 

and M. College, 1914. 
LiDA W. SvKE.s. Stenography and Bookkeeping. Graduate, Nashville 

College. Na.shville, Tenn., 18S9; Student, Stenography, M. I. I. ana 

* Absent on leave. 



640 STATE INSTITUTIONS 

C, 1904-05; Colorado Business College, Boulder, Col., 1913 (Sum- 
mer) ; Bowling Green Business University, Ky., 1914 and 1916, 
(Summer). 
Jeffeksox Johx.sox, Drcssinaking. Student, M. I. I. and C, 18S9-92 
Student under S. T. Taylor, New York, 1894, 1896, 1898 (Summers) 
Studied at Royal, Xew York, 1905 (Summers); Studied in Chi 
cago, 1909 (Summer) ; Student University of Chicago, 1913 (term) 
Columbia University (Summer, 1915). 
Mary H. Pexnexl, Fine Arts. Academy of Design, Xew York. 1889-90 
Art Students' League, Xew York. 1890-01; Chase School of Art 
Xew York 1892-93; Painting in studio of W. M. Chase and Mrs. M 
F. Scott, Xew York, 1892-93: Studied under; Mrs. Henderson, Cin 
cinnati, 1890 (Summer); Franz B. Aulich, Chicago, 1893 (Sum 
mer) ; Art Students' League, Xew York, 1895 (Summer); Frank 
O. Drummond, 1900, 1905 (Summers) ; Chautauqua, 1906 (Sum- 
mer) ; Robert Henri, 1907 (Summer); Columbia University, 1910 
Summer). 
Bettie McArthur. Director of Applied Design. Studied in Cincinnati 
Art Academy, 1890-97: Studied in Paris. 1900-02;- Xewcomb School 
of Design, 1905-06 (Winter) ; Columbia University, Department 
of Household Arts, 1910 (Summer). 
AxxA Barrixger, Director of Xormal Art. Newcomb College, Xew 
Orleans, La., 1902-03; Xew York School of Art, 1905-06; B. S., 
Columbia University. 

JiMMiE H. YouxG. MiUiverii. Student, Levis Zukoski's Millinery, St. 
Louis, 1899-1912 (seasons): B. D. Fisk, Chicago, 1901 (fall sea- 
son); Chicago University, 1912 (Summer); Chicago University, 
1914 (Summer). 
Su.siE Will Gl-xter, Professor of Home Science. Xormal Diploma, 
1910; A. B., M. I. L and C, 1911; Post Graduate Student, M. I. I. 
and C, 1912; Columbia University (Summer 1915). 
Marguerite G. Mallox. Assistant in Home Science. B. S., Lewis In- 
stitute. Chicago, 1913: M. S., University of Chicago, 1916. 
GcYTox Teagl-e. Assistant in Home Science. B. S., M. I. I. and C, 
Kate Miller, Assistant in Dr/ssniaking Certificate in Dressmaking, 
M. I. I. and C, 1902; Kiester's Ladies' Tailoring School, Kansas 
City, Mo., 1907 (Summer); Columbia University (Summers 1913- 
1915). 

Mrsic Departmext 

Piano 

Weexoxah Poixdexter. Director. Graduate of Xev.- England Con-f-rv- 
atory of Music, 1894; Studied under: Carl Stasney, Xew England 
Conservatory of Music, 1897, 1904 (Summers); Emil Llebling, CM- 



STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 641 

cago, 1S98, 1900 (Sumniprs) ; Dr. Goetschius. New York. 1906 (Svira- 
mer) ; Felix Fox, Fox-Buonaniici School of Music, 1908 (Summer); 
Dr. Goetschius, New York, 1909-10. 

.M.VTxrK MoNTC.ASTLE, Assistout. Studied under Miss Blass, Mass., 1889 
and 1890; Carl Stasny, New England Conservatory of Music, six 
months. 1891-92; Dr. Elesenheime, College of Music, Cincinnati, 
1898 (Summer); Dr. Hachett, of Brooklyn, 1899; Mr. Sherwood. 
Chautauqua, 1900, 1901. 1902, 1903 (Summers); Dr. Goetschius, 
190S (Summer); Studied in Berlin, 1909-10. 

EiT.v Atwell, Assistant. Graduate in Music. M. I. I. and C. 1903: 
Graduate, Sherwood Music School, Chicago, 1909, under W. H. 
Sherwood. Studied with: Sherwood in Chautauqua, 1903, 1904, 1907, 
1908 (Summers); Mrs. E. T. Tobey, Tennessee, two months, 1905. 

EvELYX WiXDiiAM, Assustcmt. Graduate of Cincinnati Consffvatory 
of Music. 190-5; two years post-graduate work, Cincinnati Conserv- 
atory of Music, 1905-06 and 1903-07. 

Eiii DouGL.\ss, Assistant. Student, New England Conservatory ot 
Music, 1909-10, 1911-12. 

Susie S.wfokd, Assistant. Student: Ferdinand Dewey, Temple Con- 
servatory of :\rusic. Philadelphia, 1900-02 William H. Sherwood, 
Sherwood Music School, Chicago, 1903; J. Strahm, Mont Eagle, 
Tenn.. 19u5 (gummer). American Institute of Applied Music, New 
York City, 1913-16. 

i Voice 

Mattie Lou Browx, Director. Studied with Mrs. S. S. Todd. Hunts- 
ville, Ala., 1890-91; B. F. Foley, Cincinnati. Ohio', 1893 (Winter); 
George Sweet, New York City, 1S97-9S-99 (Summers); J. Allen 
Price. Chicago, 1915 (Summer); Frank Webster, Chicago, 1906 
Summer); Alexander Van Lieltz, Chicago, 1909 (Summer). 

M.vRiE Searles, Assistant. Student, Chicago Music College. 1901-02; 
Mrs. Broadus. St. Louis, Mo., 1002-05; Teachers' Certificate, Wa.sh- 
ington College of Music, Washington, D. C, 1910-11. 

•Gertrude Crawford. Sight Singing. Student under: L. Gaston Gotts- 
chalk, Chicago. 1891-95; Fred W. Root, 1895-97; Madam :^[ara, Ber- 
lin. Germany, 1909 (Summer); J. Barlett Campbell, 1895; L. Low- 
enthal, 1896, Chicago. 



Phy.sical Education- Department 

Emma Ody Pour. Phi/siral Director. Student at Chautauqua. New 
York School of Phy.sical Education and Expres.sion; University of 

• Resigned. 

41-^m. 



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g42 STATE INSTITUTIONS , 

Missouri; University of Illinois; Cook County Normal, Chicago 
(Summer); Chicago School of Physical Education and Expression 
(Summer); Columbia University; Chalif Normal School of Danc- 
ing; Chicago Normal School of Dancing (Summer); Ilinman 
School, Chicago (Summer). 

Gkace Masskngaie, Assistant. A. B., M. I. I. & C. 1916. 

Myrti.k Dick Fitzgi:uald, Assistant. B. S., M. I. I. & C. 1916. 



Officers. 

D. T. Gasto.v, Secretary and Treasurer. 

H. C. Hamiltox, Assistant Seartanj and Treasurer. 

Mr.s. H. M. Wapdell, Second Assistant Secretary and Treasurer. 

Be.s.sie K. Daugherty, Registrar. 

Sarah D. Neiesox, Assistant Registrar. 

W. H. McClaxahax, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

JoHX A. NEIL.S0X, Proctor. 

Bei-eaii Cuubert.^ox, Librarian. 

UxDiXE Le%'y, Assistant Librarian. 

CoxsTAXCE K.VTSHA\v, Y. W. C. A. Secretary. 

Emily C. Ruxyox. 'M. D., Physician. 

Jaxe LrciLE WiLKi. N.SOX, R. N., Trained Xurse. 

LiLLiAX J. Hay", R. N., Trained Xurse. 

Cei.este L. Callaway, Superintendent of Donnitories. 

Be.«:.sie Hearox. Assistant. 

Mrs. M. L. SHAXfucK, Housekeeper. 

T. C, Wyatt, Superintendent of Laundry. 

J. S. BoLXHER. Engineer. 

Mlss Bettie Whitfield, Supervisijr of Buildings. 



Staxdixg Committee.s of the Faclxty. 

1917-191S. 

Registration — Mrs. Sykes, Miss Evans. Miss Montcastle. 

Examinations — Mr. McEeath, Miss Wildman, r^Iiss Pennell. 

Library — Miss Fant, Mr. Lipscomb, Miss Ellington. 

Student Labor Fund — Miss Johnson, Mrs. Callaway, Mrs. Young. 

Course of Study— President "Whitfield, Mr. Lipscomb, Mrs. Smith. 
Miss Paslay, Mr. McBeath, Miss Hooper. 

Athletics — Miss Pohl, Miss Barrinser. Miss A. Caulfield. 

Affiliation — INIlss Keirn. Miss Eckford. Miss R. Caulfield. 

Advanced Standing — Miss Vaughan. Miss Timberlake, Miss E. Craw- 
ford, Miss Heath. 



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STATE INSTITUTION'S 



643 



[ppoi)it),tcut—:Sh: Painter, Miss Timberlake, Miss C. Q. Walker Miss 

Fant. 
Advisory Comuiittrr Student Government— ^liss Tuttle, Mrs. Snyden- 

stricker, Misses Howard, Massengale, and Wildraan. 
Advisory Board Y. ir. c. A.— Mrs. Snydenstricker, Misses Douglass. 

Johnson, Levy, A. Caulfield. Hay, and Dr. Runyon. 
Uniform— Miss Johnson, Mrs. Young, Miss Miller, Miss Eckford. 
Collei/r Publivations—yir. McBeath, Miss Tuttle, Miss Gulledge. 
(•olk'fjr Enfenaunnrnts— Miss Nail and a student representative from 

each college class. 
Dramatic Costumes— Miss Fant. Miss Ellington, Miss McArthur. 
Diplomas — Miss Vaughan, Miss Boyd. 
Classification, Collrgiate and Industrial— Mrs. Daughertv. Misses 

Hooper. C. Q. Walker, and E. Tuttle. 
Classification, Education— Misses Fant, Boyd, and A. CauISeld. 



544 STATE INSTITUTION; 



TiiK .Mississiri'i A. .1 ^r. collk.'ik. 



By Dk. B. .M. Wai.kkr. 



The Mississippi Agricultural & Mechanical College opened its doovs 
for the admission of students in October 1S80, and the eight menib'-rs 
of the first graduati'^.g class received their diplomas in 18S3. 

When the College opened in ISSO, the conditions were very crude 
and primitive. The College boys worked in the fields, grubbing 
stumps, clearing land and filling ditches, at 8 cents an hour for their 
work. At night they brought in their own coal to their rooms and 
made their fires; they drew their water from the deep wells of the 
campus with rone and bucket and carried it up to their rooms in the 
dormitories. The mess hall, kitchen and dining room were in the 
basement of the old chapel building, with only dirt floors a part of the 
time. 

The College faculty was limited and the college was considered as 
an experiment; book-farming was even sneered at and scientific agri- 
culture was at a great discount; the value of science was not recog- 
nized in educational circles and industrial education in the South was 
in its infancy. 

The inventory of College property in 1883 showed a total value of 
5174.857.09; in 1S93, $230,316.14; in 1903, $532,270.54; and in 1913, it 
footed up a grand total of $1,238,812.50. The appropriation made by 
the State Legislature in 1916 for the biennial period is the liberal sum 
of $251,874.72. 

The influences of the College for good have been so potent in the 
state that the legislature, in its wisdom, appropriated .$32,000.00 for 
Farmers' Institutes in Agricultural Extension; $.j6,'000.00 for the 
Branch Agricultural Experiment Stations, and |51,63S.OO for cliemical 
work and analysis, as additional agencies in the state. 

The dormitories and College buildings are well furnished and have 
steam heat, hot and cold water, and electric lights. The dining room 
and kitchen are sanitary, modern and up-to-daie, with both equip- 
ment and fixtures. 



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STATE IXSTITUTIONS 645 

The aiteiidauce during the current session is fully abreasc with the 
attendance as compared with former years; 12S0 in the regular ses- 
sion; 4S7 in the summer school; making a total attendance of 1767. 

The spirit in the student body is the best it has been for several 
years. Obedient to authority, responsive to discipline, much greater 
interest in the Military Department, and witli attention turned to a 
higher standard in gentlemanly conduct, morality, and excellency in 
scholarship. There is unity and harmony in the faculty, which num- 
bers '261 employees, when we include the faculty proper and other oiti- 
cers of the college and the force of extension workers. 

As to how well the graduates are succeeding when thrown into com- 
petition in the open markets of the world, is beautifully shown by the 
important and responsible positions they are now filling satisfactorily. 

Today the Co.lege is purely democratic in its government and has no 
aristocratic lines of class distinction in the student body. The poor 
boy has an equal chance with the son of the wealthy banker and each 
must rely upon his own merits, scholarship and conduct for promotion 
and distinction. The institution is indeed the poor boy's opportunity. 
The total expenses for the scholastic year averages about $150.00 pel 
saident and fully SoO or more students work to pay part if not all, o.; 
their expenses through college. Furthermore, the college cannot pro- 
vide sufficient work to accommodate all students who desire to reduce 
thtir college expenses by their labor. 

The organization of the college is carefully planned along sound 
business lines on a broad educational basis and consists of the fol- 
lowing schools and departments: A school of Agriculture, a school of 
Engineering, a school of Industrial Education, a school of General Sci- 
ence; the department of Agricultural Experiment Stations, the de- 
partment of Farmers' Institutes, the department of Agricultural Ex- 
tension, the Service Bureau, and the departments of English, Mathe- 
matics, History and Civics, and Military Science and Tactics, and 
Physical Education. 

The School of Agriculture comprises the departments of Agronomy, 
Chemistry, Dairy Husbandry, Horticulture, Zoology, and Entomology-, 
Farm. Management, Rural Engineering, Botany and Forestry, Veter- 
inary Medicine, Animal Husbandry, Poultry Husbandry, Markets and 
liurul Economics, and Bacteriology. The School of Engineering com- 
prise.s the departments of ilechanical Engineering, Electrical Engi- 
neering, Civil Engineering and Drawing, Geology and Geography, Phy- 
sics, and Mathematics. 

The Sciiool of Industrial Education comprises the division of Edu- 
cation the Departments of Philosophy and Soriology, Modern L:m- 
guages, and the division of Business and Industry. The School of 
General Science (omprises the Dei)artments of Bacteriology, Botany, 
Chemistry, Geology, Phy<:ics, Physiology and Zoology. 



646 STATE IXSTITT/TIOXS 

The Service Bureau is divided into five divisions as follows: 

1. The Department of Correspondence Instruction. 

2. The Department of Public Discussion. 

3. The Department of General Information and Welfare. 

4. The Department of Municipal and County Reference. 
5 The Department of Visual Instruction. 

While the instruction in the departments devoted to general edu- 
cation and culture runs through all the different Schools. In each 
school are offered regular courses of instruction leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science and which require four years for completion; 
also two-year short practical courses in Agriculture, Mechanical Engi- 
neering, and Industrial Training. The theoretical instruction is 
mainly technical and necessitates preparation of a high order. 

The number enrolled in technical lines, show an increase and the 
number of student withdrawals is cut down fully fifty per cent. This 
increased enrollment in technical lines and the great reduction in the 
withdrawals show an increasing interest in technical education and a 
good healthy working spirit in the student body. In the Agricultural 
School the lines of study commanding the most attention are Agron- 
omy, Animal Husbandry, Chemistry, Veterinary Science, Dairyinji, 
Markets and Rural Economy, and Horticulture. In the school of En- 
gineering, the interest is pretty evenly divided between Civil Engi- 
neering. Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. 

This is the South's greatest school of practical education. It offers 
many courses of study allowing specialization in a dozen different 
lines. The instruction at the College is of the highest importance and 
is such as to direct the minds and tastes of students to agriculture, 
horticulture, care and growth of stock, management of farms, manner 
of performing labor and to train the students in the different engi- 
neering lines, in general science, in the knowledge of industrial edu- 
cation. Public Affairs, Business and Industry. The great central 
thought is to teach the boys of Mississippi how to develop the great 
natural resources of the state; to build up the worn out soils; to di- 
versify our agriculture; to develop manufacturing plants and other 
lines of industry and to balance them up with our agriculture. 

The college has succeeded beyond the most sanguine hopes of its 
loyal supporters. It is bigger and healthier today than it was yester- 
day, and tomorrow it will be larger still. 









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STATE IXSTITUTION'S 647 



THE MlSSISSJPn XOKMAL COLLEGE. 



By Prof. T. P. Scott. 

The history of the establishment of tlie Mississippi Normal College 
is the history of the growth and development of teacher influence in 
Mississippi during the past thirty years. It is a record that reflects 
no credit on the wisdom of our law-makers during that period; a rec- 
ord that will be examined with surprise by the future historian, who 
will puzzle ills brain to reconcile the fact that the State that prided 
itself as being the pioneer in so many radical reformations and im- 
provements could permit itself to be the last State in the Union to 
recognize the need of trained teachers for its public school system. 

It is indeed a shame, and little short of a disgrace, that the teachers 
of the State should have been permitted to plead in vain for this in- 
stitution for more than two decades, and even then be granted — what? 
The mere privilege of establishing a training school, provided they 
could get some community to contribute the money! What a magnan- 
imous concession on the part of the people's representatives! 

But while this record is one of little credit to the law-makers of 
the State, it is. one of glory to the humble teachers who so vahantly 
fought for the rights of childhood. 

What does this record show? 

The establishment of a teachers' training school was recommended 
by the Mississippi Teachers' Association in the form of resolutions of 
18S8, 1S89, 1S90, and almost every year thereafter. Committees were 
also appointed almost every year to study the question and urge the 
necessity of such an institution. 

In 1901, the president of the State Teachers' Association, Mr. G. F. 
Boyd (now deceased), made an argument for this school in his ad- 
dress, and in response to his recommendation the association author- 
ized the appointment of a committee to memorialize the Legislature 
to establish "a high grade State Normal School." This committee 
consi-sted of H. L. Whitfield, E. E. Bass, J. C. Fant. E. L. Bailey and 
J. 0. Looney. One year later this committee reported t'aat its efforts 
had met with failure, and again the association passed a res lution, 
offered by Prof. J. C. Hardy, unqualifiedly endorsing the establishment 



.:_ i:L':JcirU. 



648 STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 

of a Stato Normal College. At the same meeting the report of the 
Coniinittee of Ten on Rural Schools contained an exhaustive argument 
in favor of the establishment of such a school. Following is a brief 
excerpt from ihat rei ort: "Your committee is glad to say that th? 
necessity for such a .^chool is no longer discussed by the profession in 
this State, only the ways and means to secure it. Indeed, we have 
gotten the highest recognition of ihe fact of its necessity in the recom- 
mendation of Governor Longino to the session of 1902 of th? State 
Legis'ature. 

"The purpose of the Normal should be the instruction of persons in 
the art of teaching, and in all the various branches pertaining to thfc 
public schools of :Mississippi. The Institution should stand for t re? 
essentials in the preparation of the teacher: (1) A high grad : of 
scholarship; (2) The study of education as a science; (3) Practice 
in teaching under expert supervision and criticism. It should b: re- 
sponsible to the State for the character and scholarship of thcs^ i' 
sends out to teach in our public schools. . . . 

"It is the opinion of this committee that this school should not be 
connected with any other school of the State, public or private, but 
should be a school well equipped with paraphernalia peculiar to its 
needs, and standing out prominently among the schools of the State." 

In 1903, the president of the association, Supt. E. E. Bass, devoted 
considerable attention in his annual address to the need of a train- 
ing school for teachers. Among other things he said: "There might 
have been a time when the belief prevailed that teachers, like poets, 
were born and not made, but it is a dangerous policy, and learning by 
experimentation on so valuable a commodity as childhood is not to bs 
countenanced in this, the twentieth century. GeVmany, the school- 
mistress of the world, trusts no child to any but trained teachers." 

At this meeting, the following resolution was adopted by the asso- 
ciation: "Resolved, That this association begs to present to the Leg- 
islature the consideration of the need for a State Normal School as 
a separate and distinct center, and further prays that honorable body, 
in the effort to make more efficient the means of education in the 
State, to establish such an institution for the training of teachers for 
the public schools." 

In 1904, Dr. P. H. Saunders was president of the association and in 
his address commented on the failure of the Legislature to heed the 
request of the teachers in this matter. He emphasized the fact that 
it is not a wise policy to make large appropriations for the public 
schools and at the same time to make no provision for the training of 
those who are to rereive the most of this, namely, th? rural teachers. 

In 1905, Supt. E. L. Bailey was president of the association and 
cr.l ed attention to this matter in his annuTl aidress, saying: "The 
rcc-rd for the [.asi twenty years sliows that ihi.s a.■^sociat.ion has anau 
ally commended this question to the favorable consideration of the 



STATE INSTITUTION'S 649 

legislative bodies. * * * i am fully persuaded that our school 
system -^ill never measure up to the high standard set by other com- 
monwealths until we make adequate provision for the education and 
equipment of teachers." 

Next in order came President C. E. Saunders, who said in his ad- 
dress to the association in 1906: "It is with disappointment and regret 
that I announce the failure of our last Legislature to establish a train- 
ing "school for teachers of Mississippi. * =^ * As individual mem- 
bers of this body and teachers of this State we should use our every 
effort to impress our representatives with the importance and value 
of such an institution." 

In 1907, Supt. .Joe Cook, in his annual address as president of the 
association devoted more than two thousand words to an argument 
in favor of a training school for teachers. He closed with this appeal: 
"Mr. Whitfield, in his last report to the Legislature called their atten- 
tion to the necessity for such a school, and then in the name of .5.000 
white teachers and more than three hundred thousand white c'nldren 
begged the Legislature to establish such a school. The Legislature 
turned Mr. Whitfield down. Why? Because they did not belif^^e 
that Mr. Whitfield was speaking for five thousand teachers and threo 
hundred thousand children. * * * Let us help make the Legis'a- 
ture believe Mr. Whitfield. Let us five thousand teachers speak for 
ourselves and ask the fathers of more than three hundred thousand 
white children to speak for them!" 

And thus began the real organized effort on the part of the teac'^ers 
of the State to stimulate public sentiment on this vital question. Thus 
began the so-called "educational trust" that crowned its efforts in 
1910 by overruling a majority rtport from a hostile Education Com- 
mittee in the House and wresting victory from defeat at the very last 
moment I 

But it was not an easy victory. It cost three years of struggle and 
determined effort on the part of the loyal teachers of Mississippi. 

After another failure in the legislative session of 1908, the campaign 
committee of the association reported: "Our first step was to addres.^ 
:i communication to each of the candidates for Governor, each or 
^v^lom answered favorably, * * * and Governor Noel redeemed his 
pledges most handsomely after election by calling especial att- ntion 
to the need of such a school in his inaugural address, and by later 
sending a special message to the Legislature when the matter came uo 
for consideration. * * * we wrote personally to every candidate 
for legislative positions and received many favorable replies. * * *" 

After explaining in detail the history of the failure of the bill by Its 
being pigeon-holed in the Education Committee of the House, th? re- 
port closed with a hopeful note: "Let us take heart and continue th ; 
good work among the pooi)le. and when the people speak th'- Normal 
will be established." 



650 STATE INPTITUTIOXS 

At this same meeting, President Rose said in his address: "We "vWll 
have a Normal Training School in Mississippi. If the Legislature 
should ultimately refuse, pliilanthropy will come to our rescue. Bur 
the Legislature is not going to refuse. The bill will pass two years 
hence." 

And so it did. 

But not without one of the hardest fights ever known -in the history 
of legislation in this State. 

Not without the most urgent appeals on the part of State Superin- 
tendent Powers and Governor Noel. Not without petitions signed by 
thousands of trustees and patrons in every county of the State. Not 
without hundreds of personal letters and telegrams addressed to Mis- 
sissippi's law-makers. 

But the cause of childhood won! 

A bill was passed which was thought by its enemies (and some of 
its friends) to be worth less than the paper on which it was written. 
A bill which carried no appropriation, but merely gave the bare riaht 
to establish a Normal College if there could be found those who wou'.d 
put up the money for its construction! 

This, however, proved to be an easy task. 

The first Board of Trustees of the college was composed as follows: 
Governor E. F. Noel and Supt. J. N. Powers, ex-officio; W. T. Lowrey, 
P. H. Saunders, Joe Cook, W. H. Smith, J. C. Fant, J. E. Brown, G. T. 
Thomas and T. P. Scott. Within the first year ilessrs. Fant, Smith 
and Thomas resigned and there were appointed in their places T. C. 
Kimbrough. H. L. McCleskey and R. E. "Wilburn. 

Soon after its ajipoinrment, the board advertised for bids in the 
nature of land and cash bonus for the location of the college. It wa.-> 
stipulated that no bid of less than $100,000 would be considered. When 
the time arrived for the opening of the bids it was found that three 
communities, Jackson, Laurel and Hattiesburg, had entered the com- 
petition and that the lowest bid included §200,000 cash and a suitable 
free site. The location v.as awarded to Hattiesburg for the considera- 
tion of ?258,000 cash, 120 acres for a site, and an additional 640 acr.s 
located near by. 

With this money the board constructed one large three-story, fire- 
proof building known as College Hall, for oflfices, class rooms, labora- 
tories, etc.; two three-story, fire-proof dormitories; one twc-story, 
brick building for an industrial cottage, one two-story brick residence 
for the president's home, and a frame bungalow for the vice-president's 
home. 

These buildings, with -^40,000 worth of equipment and 8,000 acres of 
land were turned over to the State as a gift from the people of Hat- 
tiesburg and Forrest County. 

The Legislature of 1912 appropriated ?78,500 to complete the equip- 
ment of the buildings. It also made liberal provision for mainte-. 



1 



il lUl li 



. STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 651 

nance, and at its session in 1914 made an appropriation of $80,000 for 
the construction and equipment of a third dormitory, this being the 
first building on the campus erected with State funds. 

It is but fair to state just here that when the Normal College at last 
became a reality, the Legislature was found to be very friendly 
toward it, and this friendly attitude has expressed itself in 
liberal biennial appropriations for the support of the college. It 
seems certain now that the institution is well established in tlie favor 
of both the people and their representatives at the state capital, and 
its friends are very confident that this popularity can be retained in- 
definitely. 

The first session of the college opened September IS, 1912, under the 
direction of President Joe Cook, formerly superintendent of the city 
schools of Columbus, Miss. Daring the first session the capacity o' 
the dormitories was taxed beyond comfort and the total enrollment 
reached 876 before the session closed. The enrollment has increased 
each year, reaching a total of 1334 during the fourth session. For the 
fifth session it was only 1243, a slight decrease due to the war. 

The total number of students (no dup"icates) enrolled since th? col- 
lege opened its doors in September, 1912, is 3420. These students have 
come from practically every county in the State and almost all o: 
them have gone back lo their own country communities, filled with the 
Normal College spirit, impressed with the need of magnifying the ad- 
vantages and opportunities of country life, and fired with an aubition 
to help in every way possible to improve conditions and make of rural 
Mississippi the veritable garden spot of the world that God intsnded 
it to be. 



652 STATK IXSTITUTIOXS 



TliK AIJ OKX A. .X; M. roLUaiK 



L. J. ROWAX. PUESIOENT, 



Oakland College was founded in 1S28 by the Presbj-terians of Missis- 
sippi, Arkansas and Louisiana under the leadership of Jeremiah 
Chamberlain, a native of Gettysburg. Penn. 

The College was advertised for sale, and in 1S71 it was purchased 
by the state of ^Mississippi and dedicated to the higlier education ot 
negro men. The Governor of the State interested himself in the edu- 
cation of the negroes and the College was named for him, Alcorn Uni- 
versity. 

Hiram R. Revels was the first President of Alcorn University and 
he served ten years. Revels was succeeded by J. H. Burrus. whose 
term of service covered a period of ten years likewise. During the ad- 
ministration of Burrns, in 1S78, the Legislature reorganized the school 
under the name of Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College, the 
better to comply with the act of Congress of July 1862, establishing 
Land Grant Colleges, U. 3. Statutes, vol. 12, chap. 130, p. 503. 

Since then the tendency has been to empha,size industrial training 
at the College, which disposition has been more and more understood 
and appreciated by the people, and the negroes themselves have come 
to such an appreciation of this character of education that each session 
is characterized by an attendance of students far surpassing the ca- 
pacity of the school to accommodate all applying. 

There has been a demand for industrial training of girls, too, at 
the College, and the Board of Trustees and the Legislature of 1902 
made provision to receive negro girls on the campus and to train 
them industrially. A dormitory v\a5 erected and three female teach- 
ers were chosen to in-rtruct the girls in sev.ing, cooking, laundering 
and in nurse training. Five hundred girls applied at once to be admit- 
ted to the College and the institution has greatly prospered with 
this new departure, and the enrcieucy of tlie school has been greatly 
enhanced by thus extending its iniiuenee iu a more vital sense to 
the colored race. 



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STATE IXSTITUTIOXS 653 

J. H. Burrus was succeeded by W. H. Reynolds, who died in three 
months after his inauguration, and T. J. Calloway succeeded to the 
Presidency and served two years. Rev. E. H. Triplett was elected 
President of Alcorn A. & M. College in 1896 and held the office thiee 
years. W. H. Lanier was chosen to the Presidency in 1S9S and served 
five years. 

The College is supported as follows: 

It draws an annual income of $6,814.50 from the Agricultural Land 
Script Fund established by Congress in 1862, and in addition the Col- 
lege has an income of $5,777.77 as interest on proceeds of the sale 
of College lands. Chapter 46, Acts 1S98. At present Alcorn College 
draws from the new J.Iorriil bill, approved }iiarch 1, 1902, about 
125,243.60 per annum. Tue amount of this latter item varies from 
time to time, as the distribution of the Morrill fund is apportioned 
to the Starkville A. & Al. College and Alcoi'n according to the ratio 
of tiie two races in the State. The Legislature supplements these sums 
by specia; appropriatiuus when neces.sary. 

-Many have been the graduates of Alcorn College, there being a 
class graduated each year from its various departments, but the great- 
est influence for good to the State is wielded by its vast number of un- 
der-graduates whicu peruieaie the State with their impress upon the 
mas.ses of the negro people. 

A recent appraisement of the property at Alcorn College reckons the 
plant to be worth ;j2UU,0'.iO, and the whole consists of 900 acres of land 
which comprise the farm and campus. 

Thirty-three build ini^s, great and small, adorn the grounds. The 
campus is shaped like a hoi'seshoe, upon the crest of which the princi- 
pal or original buildings, brick structures, are arranged and an orna- 
mented driveway reaches each building, passing trom one heei of the 
crescent ridge to the other. 

Bruinsburg is four miles from the College, which point marks the 
place where General d'ant crossed the Mississippi during the siege of 
V'icksburg in the time of the Civil War; and the same is the point 
where Aaron Burr was arrested for treason many years ago. 

L. J. Rowan, the present President, a native of Mississippi and an 
alumnus of the school, was called from the Chair of English to the 
head of the school on the 31st of May, 1905, to succeed W. H. Lanier. 

The school has an increased patronage from the negroes of Missis- 
sippi, Louisiana and Arkansas, and the numbers turned away each 
year demonstrate that dormitory accommodations are inadequate. 

A postoffice on the College campus, and a heating and lighting plant, 
costing about $20,000, are among the latest improvements. 



634 STATi:: IXSTITUTIOXS 

In 1911, J. A. Martin, Principal of the Jackson Graded School and 
an alumnus of the Alcorn A. 6: M. College, succeeded L. J. Rowan, as 
President. 

He served till Nov. 9, 1914, when he died in office. L. J. Rowan, 
then the vice-president, served as the Acting President, till the end of 
that session and was for the second time, called to the presidency of 
the college, and as such is serving at this writing. 








MAGNOLIA — STATE FLOWER OF MISSISSIPPI 



THE MAGXOLIA 



STATE FLOAVEPt OF MISSISSIPPI. 



By Mrs. Duxbar Rowland. 

At the request of the teachers and pupils of the State of Mississippi, 
an election for the purpose of selecting a State Flower was held on 
November 28, 1900. The vote was confined to the pupils of the schools 
and the Secretary of State, Col. J. L. Power, received returns from 
237 schools, 23,278 votes having been cast, of which the magnolia re- 
ceived 12,745, the cotton bloom 4.171 and the Cape Jasmine 2."''S4. 
It was very fortunate that the Cape Jasmine was not selected since 
while adapting itse'.f readily to our c'imate, it is not a native of the 
State, the exquisite Yellow Jasmine, a graceful vine with a profu- 
sion of deep yellow, very fragrant blossoms being the variety indigenous 
to our soil. The Cotton Bloom, which received the next highest vote 
to the magnolia, also appeals strongly to the people of Mississippi and 
has been adopted by the State Federation of Womens' Clubs. 

It was, however, the idealistic aspiration and temperament that pre- 
vailed in the selection of our State Flower, and no more appropriate 
nor pleasing choice could have been made than that of the stately 
Magnolia-Grandiflora, the marvelous beauty of which has attracted the 
admiration of all botanists and lovers of nattire. Magnificent forests 
of this superb evergreen tree are found in the southern portion of 
Mississippi, while tall specimens loom along the rivers and streams 
for many miles above the coast line and are seen in groves or solitary 
position in the cities and hamlets throughout the State. In Jackson, 
the Capital of the State, a number of graceful, young trees ado:n the 
grounds of the new State Capitol, while others of a size varying from 
immense forest trees to slim, young saplings grow on the lawns of 
the handsome homes of the city. 



-f/'Jolii 



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656 STATE FI.OWEU— THE MAGNOLIA 

In botanical classiticaiion, the magnolia belongs to the order ilag- 
noliaceae. It contains about t'.venty species found in Japan, China, 
the Himalayas and North America. It was named for Pierre Magno!, 
a Professor of Medicine ani Botany of ^Montpellier, France. The 
various varieties grow from the size of shrubs to towering fore.=t tre;s, 
the Magnolia Campbellii of India reaching the height of one hundred 
and fifty feet, with a girth of from six to twelve feet. It bears large 
white and deep rose colored flowers of an immense size, which appear 
before the leaves. Tiiis tree, though one of the handsomest species, is 
not an evergreen. 

The flowers of the different groups of magnolia are white, cream- 
white, rose, purple and a stria of these colors. In several varieties, 
the large solitary flowers have a calyx of three sepals, a corolla of six 
to twelve petals and numerous carpeis and stamens. The fruit, notes 
the Encyclopedia Britannica, consists of a number of follicles which 
are borne on a more or less conical receptacle, and dehisce along the 
outer eige to alow the scarlet seed to escape; the sezd, however,- re- 
main susr^ended by a long slender thread (the funicle). One of the 
earliest varieties known is the iMagnoIia Yulan or Conspicuna, which 
was first cultivated in China where it was used as a flavoring for rice 
and as a medicine, tlie wood beius of little value. It was introduced 
into Europe in 17SG. 

While many attractive varieties of the magnolia exist in various 
parts of the world, the most beautiful specimen, with the possible ex- 
ception of the CampbeLii, which forms one of the mcst striking feat- 
ures of the scenery of Darjeeling, is the Magnolia Grandiflora, a na- 
tive growth of Mississippi and one of the most magnificent trees of the 
American forests. Several other North American varieties are found 
in the State, among which are the cordata, macrophylla, glauca and 
auriculatta; the European varieties have also been successfully intro- 
duced. The most superb specimen, however, £s has already been ob- 
sorved, is the towering Grandiflora, sometimes called by botanists the 
"laurel Magnolia.'' While a native of the entire Southeastern States, 
it comes to perfection alcne in the far South an(^ grows nowhere in 
the world as it does in the State of Mississippi. This variety has 
coriaceous, oval leaves and large, very fragrant, cream-white blossonis 
measuring from six to eight inches across. It flowers in May and 
Jime with an occasional bloom as late as the middle of July. Giori- 
ana of the Mississippi flora, it i^ a perpetual delight, and holds a place 
in the affections of the i:eople in some such sense as a sacred tree. 

After the white blcsj:oms have aisa'ppeared, a plentiful crop o: olive 
green cones take their place from which, in time, is suspended by al- 
most invisibl;- threads, a fringe of .scarlet se.-d, making brilliant 
epiotches of f o or among the shining green foliag- u.iring the autumn. 
The dried cones strew the ground in winter w^hen the dark green fol- 



STATE FLOWER— THE >rAGXOLIA 657 

iage, though stung by the icy breath of numberless frosts, responds 
with a glossier green than ever. When the tree is ready for its spring 
aAvakening, the tender apple-green leaves shoot out so rapidly along 
its branches that the disappearance of last year's foliage, falling inci- 
dentally as it were, is scarcely noticeable. 

This stately tree, the cherished flower of a land of democracy, 
though aristocratic in appearance and mien, is nevertheless wholly 
democratic in growth and habit. In the deepwoods it flourishes close 
up beside its fellows and when removed to isolated positions on lawns 
and in gardens, accommodates itself equally as well to its new environ- 
ment. Here, as in the forest, it struggles for mastery, often to the dis- 
advantage of the royal rose and lily and other green things growing 
about it. For this reason and the fact of its casting its foliage 
throughout the spring, admired as it is by the people, many city resi- 
dents hesitate to plant it on small lawns. 

Several interesting, historical accounts of this stately tree aipear 
in the early records of provincial Mississippi. In 1777, John Bartram 
was sent by the Botanical Society of London to explore the flora of 
the Gulf Coast region and he there beheld in absolute perfection the 
Aiagnolia Grandiflora. The great forests and groves of these hand- 
some trees, with their massive green foliage and superb, white blos- 
soms; must have held for him a deep fascination since countless refer- 
ences are made to them in his observations around Natchez, which are 
today preserved in the IMississippi Historical Department. 

Sir William Dunbar, the Mississippi ScientLst. was also enamored 
of the tree and gave a glowing account of its marvelous beauty in his 
official report to the Spanish Government, a bit of which word painting 
we quote: 

"One of the grandest and most admirable productions is the Mag- 
nolia Major eminently beautiful from the shining deep green of its 
leaves on the upper side, and an elegant tender buff color of the re- 
verse, exhibiting one of the most glorious flowers of nature of the tulip 
kind and when full blown is not less than eight inches in diameter, 
shed-iing a most delicious perfume. It is one of the most perfect of 
fevergxeens, retaining the full lustre of its foliage during the winter." 
His observation that it would not yield to domestication has been 
proved an erroneous opinron. 

It is a happy coincidence that the State of Mississippi, also derives 
its nickname from tlie Magnolia, being known in the si-sterhood of 
States as the "Magnolia State." . 

The following verses are presented with this article with the hope 
that it will call forth other and better tributes to our beautiful State 
Flower, the Magnolia Grandiflora— Regnant Queen of the Mississippi 
Forest: 

42— m. 



ivviontiuj'Si 



658 STATE FLOWER— THE MAGXOLIA 



THE MAGNOLIA. 

An eversi'een tree in our fair land grows, 
(How kind of Heaven to bestow it!) 

O'er our pioneer fathers it spread its cool shade. 
And their children came early to know it. 

It grows on the hill in the deepwood and vale. 
And the mocking birds nest in its bower; 

In June its blossoms star valley and glen — 
The sunimerland's wealthiest dower. 

O, fragrant white bloom, so stately and pure, 
For its rare perfection we chose it. 

With a yearning deep in our heart of hearts 
To make ourselves worthy of it. 

Fair symbol of the hopes a people hold dear, 
From green bough to beautious flower. 

No leaflet shall fade 'neath the blighting touch 
Of the ruthless despot's power. 

The feet of the tyrant shall never pollute 
The soil where our rivers are flowing. 

And none but the free shall inhabit the land 
Where the white Magnolia is growing. 



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HISTORY OF FIKST MISSISSIPPI 
INFAXTEY, 



BY SERGEANT MAJOR G. H. SMITH 

On the call of the President of the United States, June ISth, 1916 for 
troops to suppress trouble witlx the Mexicans ou the border, Mississippi 
offered such companies in the first, second, fourth and fifth indepen- 
dent Battalions of Infantry and such separate companies of Infantry 
Mississippi National Guard that had withstood the rigid Federal In- 
spection a few months previous, as the First Regiment of Infantry. 
The Companies selected with date of reporting at Livingston Park, 
Jackson, Miss, with otficers and men, as follows: — 

Offi- 

First Independent Battalion of Infantry. Date cers Men 
Co. A, Hattiesburg, later Co. G, 1st Miss. Inf 6/22 3 140 

Second Independent Battalion of Infantry. 

Co. C, Columbus, Later Co. I, 1st Miss. Inf 6/25 3 99 

Co. G, West Point, later Co. L, 1st Miss. Inf 6/25 3 91 

Fourth Independent Battalion of Infantry. 

Co. D, Yazoo City, later Co. E, 1st Miss. Inf 6/22 3 75 

Co. F, Jackson, later Co. F, 1st Miss. Inf 6/19 3 76 

Co. H, Brookhaven, later Co. H, 1st Miss. Inf 6/22 3 129 

Co. K, Kosciusko, later Co. K, 1st Miss. Inf 6/25 3 81 

Fifth Independent Battalion of Infantry. 

Co. B, Natchez, later Co. B, 1st Miss. Inf 6/25 2 84 

Co. C. Greenville, later Co. C, 1st Miss. Inf 6/25 3 90 

Co. I, Vicksburg, later Co. D, 1st Miss. Inf 6/22 3 130 

1st Independent Co. of Infantry, Arkabutla, later Co. M..fi/25 3 ■ 77 

2nd Independent Co. of Infantry, Vicksburg, later Co. A. .6/25 3 84 

1st Independent Band, Jackson 6/iy 30 



0: 



08 



660 HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IXFAXTRY 

The field and Staff OfTicers were selected as follows: 

Major George C. Hoskins, 4th. Iiidpt. Bn., as Colonel. 

Major E. B. Boyd, 2nd. Indpt. Bn., as Lieutenant Colonel. 

Major William C. OFerrall. 

Major George E. Hogaboom, .".th. Indpt. Bn.. as Major 1st. Battalion. 

Major Charles R. Dalbey, 1st. Indpt. Bn. as Major 2ud. Battalion. 

Major Andrew H. Patterson, unassigned list, as Major 3rd. Battalion. 

Captain C. O. Heiss. unassigned list, as Captain and Adjutant. 

Captain R. L. Montgomery, unr.ssigned list, as Captain and Quarter- 
master. 

Captain Sam W. Clark, 1st Lt. and Adj. 2nd. IndpL Bn. Inf. as Capt. 
and Com. 

1st. Lt. T. M. Rotjinson, 5th Indpt. Bn., as 1st Lt. and Adj. 1st. Bn. 

1st Lt. Burton H. Storm, 5th Indpt. Bn. as 1st. Lt. and Adj. 2nd. Bn. 

1st. Lt. Charles E. Feltus, 1st. Indpt. Bn. as 1st. Lt. and Adj. 3rd. Bn. 

On July 14th, 1916, Captain H. 0. Heiss was relieved as Adjutant of 
the Regiment and placed in command of Company H, vice Captain 
Joseph Storm, discharged. Captain H. N. Scales. Q? M. Corps, Mis- 
sissippi National Guard was chosen to nil the vacancy caused by the 
transfer of Captain Heiss. 

On July 12th, ItHB. Company E, 1st. Independent Battalion Infantry 
was ordered to Jackson, Miss. This Company under command of Cap- 
tain E. F. Bartlett was assigned as Company IM to take the place of 
the men who refused to taka the Federal Oath (Arkabutla Company, 
Brookhaven Company and Columbus Company) Captain J. C. Sheffield, 
Company M was transferred to the command of Company I, vice Cap- 
tain W. C. INIuilens, deceased. 

On October 1st, 191^\ Company B, 2nd Independent Battalion of In- 
fantry Aberdeeen, Miss., was ordered to Jackson, Miss. They reported 
on October 3rd., 1916 with one officer and twenty-five men, fifteen of 
whom passed the physical examination. These men with others from 
various organizations from the 1st .Mi.-s. Inf. was formed into the Ma- 
chine Gun Company and was conmianded by Captain Sam W. Clark. 

On October 8th, 1916 the Supply Company was formed of men from 
various companies of the First ilississippi Infantry and was com- 
manded by Captain R. 1. Montgomery. 

On October 8th, 1916 the Headquarters Company was formed of Band. 
Xon-commissioned Staff and men detailed from various companies in 
the Regiment, to the command of which Captain H. N. Scales wfis as- 
signed. 

On October 13th., 1916, the Regiment was ordered to report zo me 
Commanding General. Southeastern Department at Fort Sam Houston. 
Texas. The Reglmtui left Jack.-^on, Mississippi, on October 17th, ll'l^, 
arriving at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, on the 19th; then went into 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPri IXIWXTKY 661 

camp immodiately and were put in the 1st Brigade, 12th, Provisional 
Division with the I'nd. Kansas Infantry and the 7th Illinais Infantry. 
On about the 27th. of October, the 2nd West Virginia was assigned to 
the 1st Brigade, relieving the 2nd. Kansas who were ordered -to Fort 
Riloy, Kansas for muster out of the Federal service. 

On November the 3rd. the 1st Miss. Infantry, 2nd. West Virginia of 
the 1st. Brigade and the :3rd.. District of Columbia of the 2nd. Bri- 
gade was formed into a provisional brigade commanded by Colonel L. 
W. V. Kennon, 9th., United States Infantry and ordered to march to 
New Beaunfiels, Texas, a distance of thirty-five miles. The first night 
out was spent at Luxello, Texas, a distance of fifteen miles. The next 
afternoon the Brigade arrived at Landas Park, near New Braunftols, 
Texas and went into camp, the men in good condition and excellent 
spirits. Sunday was spent in camp and Monday morning the Brigade 
proceeded on their return to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, spending the 
first night at Luxello, Texas and reaching Fort Sam Houston, Texas 
the next day at about 1:00 P. M. 

On December 4th, 1&16. the same Provisional Brigade proceeded to 
Leon Springs, Texas, a distance of twenty-six miles, for rifle practice, 
remaining there until December 21st, 1916, when they returned to Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas, arriving there in the early morning of the 22nd. 
The Regiment remained at Fort Sam Houston, Texas until March 
the 19th., 1917 when they were ordered to Jackson, Miss., for muster 
out of the Federal service, reaching Camp Jackson, [Miss., on the 
morning of March 21st, 1917. The regiment was mustered out at 8:00 
A. M. in the morning, March 27th., 1917. At 1:00 P. M. orders were re- 
ceived from the War Department lo muster the Regiment back into 
the service on account of the serious relations existing bet«-een United 
States and the Imperial German Government. The strength of the 
regiment at muster out was fifty-six officers and 1176 men. More than 
23i)0 men have been in this regiment at some time or other since June 
19, 1916, approximately 1000 having received discharge from the serv- 
ice. At one time the morning reports showed 5.3 officers and li''.S7 
men in the regiment. 

The Mississippi Medical Corps of Hickory, Miss., commanded by Ma- 
jor J. W. D. Dicks of Natchez, Miss.. w?s attached to the 1st Mississippi 
Infantry during its service. :Much credit is due the Ofllcers and men 
of this command for the eificient way in which the health of the men 
and the sanitation of the camps was handled, only t\\ o men dying dur- 
ing the nine months service, and these two men died after they had 
been removed to the Base Hospital at Fort Sara Houston, Texas, from 
under the jurisdiction and care of our medical otficers. 



It IS tlie purpose- of the St.ite Hi.storical Department to preserve and 
rnihli.-^h a (umpl.-tc rpcoid of all .Mi.-.-issippi soklieis in the World War. Thi'-- 
record IS the only one available for publication at this date Augi-ist 1 I'JlT 



66: 



HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IXFAXTRY 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IXFAXTRT 



699 



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HISTORY OF FIRST :MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY 



701 



rHI>»IM5C'.iCOO»--iOT-lr-('1'OOOT-IJOOO<r:cr5r-l»rMOO'«t't--iOl-He'JOOOCC<10000C--T--l 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY 



703 



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704 HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IXFAXTRY 

,; 1 C'l CO c-i c^ ift efl c-i T-i -^ 'M ci »-i -*i C5 e-;i rH e^ en iM 00 ui C5 e>j ^- c; 00 <J3 ev5 

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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI TXFAXTRT 



705 







3: fe "X i^ 




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HISTORT OF FIRST MISSISSIFPT INFANTRY 



fe 





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HISTOKV OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI INFAXTRY 



707 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPri INFANTRY 



O 





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HISTORY, OF FIRST MISSISSIITI INFANTRY 



709 






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710 



HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IXFAXTRY 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI IN'FANTRT 



711 



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HISTORY OF FIRST MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY 



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STATISTIC'8 roK MISSISSIPPI 

1910-1917 



ESTIMATES OF POPULATION, 1917. 



Cuunty. 



j Males 

Zsti- ; 21-So 

muted ' years, 

popula- 1 both in- 

tiou. elusive. 



County. 



Adams 

Alcorn 

Aiuite 

Attala ... 
Btutoa ... 
Bolivar ... 
Callioun .. 
Carroll ... 
Chickasaw 
Choctaw . 
Claiborne 
Clarke 



Coahoma 

Copiah 

Covington 

De ^^ato 

Forrest 

Franklin 

tieorge 

Greene 

Grenada 

Hancock 

Harrison 

JJackson (city; 

<Hinds 

Holmes 

Issaquena 

Itauamha 

Jackson 

Jaspor 

Jellerson 

Jefferson Davis 

Jones 

Keinp<?r 

Lafayette , 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Leake 

Lee 



25,265 


2,249 


2u,47i 


l.s-22 


■24,. 5^2 


2,llt> 


30,7ol 


2,737 


10,245 


912 


58,744 


5,22s 


1S,(J13 


1,C57 


2.S.SSG 


2.1JG 


25,00-2 


2.225 


15,322 


l,3'>t 


17,403 


l,54y 


24,-169 


2,178 


20,671 


1,840 


40,00C» 


3,5-30 


37,023 


3,-J'y 


21,135 


l.Scsl 


23,130 


2,0-59 


2S,U31 


2,495 


16,298 


1,451 


7,420 


e-^ 


6,803 


tx.6 


16,906 


1,5':'5 


11,207 


9y7 


37,0'j6 


3, 31 '2 


31,104 


2.768 


40,761 


3,0-8 


40,738 


3.626 


10.676 


9-y) 


15,243 


1,357 


17,374 


1,54-; 


20,762 


1,S4S 


la, 221 


1.0J2 


16,074 


1,431 


38,673 


3,442 


20,348 


1,811 


21,883 


I,y4« 


15,74;* 


1.41/2 


53,321 


4,746 


16.349 


1,455 


IS, 984 


1,69"; 


33,&38 


3,022 



Esti- 
mated 
popula- 
tion. 



Males 

21-30 
years, 
botn in- 
clusive. 



Leflore 43,381 

Lincoln ' 33,73^ 

L^jwndes j 31,877 

Madison I 34,243 

Marion I 15,922 

Marshall ' 26,7U6 

Monroe 38,070 

Montgonierv ' 18, .559 

Neshoba j 21,SlG 

Newton ' 23,551 

Xoxube>^ i 28, 50:^ 

Oktibbeha : 10,676 

Panola i 32,912 

Pearl River 14,208 

Perry 10.395 

Pike ; 29.3r2 

Pontotoc ; 20,719 

Prentiss 17,763 

Qnitinan 16,087 

Rankin I 26,124 

Scott 18,479 

Shark"V 18,260 

Simpson 20,413 

Snuth 19,191 

Stone 7,531 

Sunflower 38,058 

Tallahatchie 35,996 

Tate 19,n4 

Tippah 15,834 

Tisnomineo 15,215 

I'unica . .". 20,227 

Union 20.803 

Ualtliall 2tJ,000 

U'arren 37,488 

Washington 48,933 

Wayne 16.292 

Webster 1 15,7.53 

Wilkinson ■ 18,075 

Winston I 19.338 

Yalobusha | 22,817 

Yazoo ■■■ 48,660 



4,03d 
3,'-«.*3 
2,^37 
3,048 
1,417 
2,385 
3,388 
l,'i52 

2.274 
2,5;J7 
1.751 
2,929 
l,-26r> 

L'25 
2,614 
1,844 
1,.581 
1.40-2 
2,323 
1,645 
1,625 
1,817 
1,7l6 

670 
3,S>7 
3, 2' 4 
1,755 
l,4i'9 
1,3.54 

i.ao 

1,S51 
l,7y^ 

4, 3.' 5 
1,450 
1,4'>2 
l.&iO 
1,721 
2,031 
4,331 



•Prepared spetiHlly bv the D<-partir.*nt of <onunerce. Bureau of the Census, for 
the rX'partment of Archiv«-s and Historj-. The Director of the Department takes great 
pleasure in thanking Mr. W. L. Harris for tiie excellent work. 



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THE COTTON PL.\.NT 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



719 



TABLE II. — POPULATION BY COUNTIES — 1790-1870. 



ATHITE. 



Counties. 



Total 

Variunces from 
fonuer official 
totals 



,;i82, S96 3-33, S99 •i'>.-..TlS 179, 07i 70, U 



1830 



1S20 



1810 



ISOO 



1700 



a6,4-22 



Ailains 

.Vlcorn .. .. 

AJiuite 

Attala .... 
BaMwin . . 
Bolivar ... 
Calhoun .. 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 
Choctaw . . 
Claiborne . 

Clark 

Coahoma . 

Copiah 

Covington- 
lx> Soto . . . 
Franklin . . 

Greene 

Grenada .. 
Hancock .. 
Harrison .. 

Hinds 

Holmes ... 
Issaquena . 
Itawamba 
Jackson ... 

.Jasper 

.Jefferson . . 

Jones 

KfUijier 

Lafayette . 
Laudeniale 
Lawrence . 

Leake 

Lse 

Lincoln ... 
Lowndes . . 
M;:dison ... 

Marion 

.Marshall .. 
Monroe ... 
Neshoba . . 
X'-wtun ... 
Noxubee . . 
Oktihbi-ha 

Panola 

Perry 

Pik? 

Por.tOtOC . 
Prentiss ... 

Rankin 

."^coti 

isimpsoa . . 

Smith 

Sunflower . 



i,7fJ7 . 5,6i8 3,948 

7,663 : 

i.l9C 4,i27 . 

8,828 i 9,142 i 



3.641 
7.571 



1,900 : 
8,361 : 
»,497 
9.S30 

12,. 526 ' 
3.390 
4,073 : 
l,7C:i ; 

10.217 

3.106 i 
14,276 ' 

3,e98 ! 
1.6C6 i 
3,929 I 
3,053 ! 
4,36S 
9,859 
6,145 
741 
6,826 
3,167 1 
5,801 I 
3,215 I 
3,005 ! 
5,706 I 

in, 819 j 
7,051 
3.678 ' 
5,491 i 

11, KW i 
6,022 ! 
7,480 I 
5,S<W j 
2,.-)62 I 

12,917 ! 
8,6;n i 
3,419 i 
6,. 356 

5.107 I 
3,i>?7 
8,1(39 
1.971 
3,900 
9,513 I 
7, 194 : 
'..7'ii 
4,1^0 , 
3,5o9 
5,415 I 
1,772 ; 



1,393 
7,695 
8,214 
7,3:5S 
11,523 
3,339 
5,092 
1,521 
7,432 
2,845 
9,349 
3,49S 
1,526 



2,282 
3,751 
8,940 
5,806 
.587 
14,15'> 
2,9:5 
6,4.53 
2,91S 
2.916 
5,fi36 
8, 9; 9 
8,224 
5. .513 
6,2::6 



6,891 
5,26'J 
2,. 500 

n,.376 
8,545 
6,131 
6,279 
5,171 
5,. 328 
5 237 
i',i.5S 
6,174 

14,513 



0.. ";',•! 
5,l;0 
3,744 
5,43-5 
1,1U2 



393 



3,053 
;>,j:87 
8,420 
3.449 
3,823 
1,387 
6,. 303 

9i4S7 
2, .540 
l,37l> 



3,!:6l 4, 



741 
955 



3,810 4,OJ6 



3S4 



4,2.55 



,136 
,148 
,443 
,232 
,076 
700 
,161 
,S<11 
,975 
063 



3,5.59 



5, ■_•:{:? 

I,t49 1,824 



2,412 2.277 l,2ffe 
1,316 1,(.0;5 



2.444 

s',690 
5,547 
3(i6 
11,395 
2,2t« 
4,293 

2, est 

1,S57 

7,1:38 
8, .34!! 
6,052 
3,. 549 
3,982 



1,.345 1,142 



6,778 j 


5,419 








3,8.52 t 


















4.652 










1,4.59 : 


1,:J5:J 


i,3<;o . 






2.701 






2, .389 i 
1 </)4 


3,0.38 
1 3.?» 


3,1.54 


2,189 


2,1.^S 


4,612 
3,076 
3,992 


















3,i:4S 


3,477 


3,919 . 






1,014 








6,523 
4,328 
2,215 

14,271 
9,418 
3,303 
3,432 
4,976 
4.300 
5,^21 
1,679 
4,225 

12,126 



5,73.) 
3,980 
2,121 
9,258 
5,146 
1,69:3 
1,9S<J 
3.817 
2,064 
2,2.17 
1,425 
3,7.56 
2,895 



2,1114 
2,781 
1,970 



l,>>fi4 



2,904 



1,465 
3, 7! '7 



1,.5:?9 
3,443 



3.: 44J 

3,073 

348 



l,lt9 
2,473 
l,5i2 



1,695 



2,014 



(20 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



TABLE II. — POPULATION BY COUNTIES — 1790-1870. — Cont'd 

WHITE— Continued. 



Counties. 


1S70 


ISC') 


1S.50 


I&IO 


1S30 


1S20 ! 


1310 


ISOO j 


1790 


Tallahatchie .. 
Tippah 


. . 3.215 

. . i.i.es'j 


2,^35 
16,2C6 
19,159 

1,212 

5,5!<3 
7,il5 
o.iCi," 


2.C06 

15,H>7 1 
13,32S 
3 6 

5:6 , 
i,-;99 . 
3,b-4 
5,17S 1 
b,?>52 
4,'jt>'J 


1.392 
7.309 
5,852 

01)6 
5,223 

654 
1.141 
3,2-J9 
3,061 
ti,&{U 
3,11b 










Tishf'Uiingo ... 


. . 1,231 












l\inica 






Wurren 


7,W.' 


3,350 

7S5 

1,704 

3,7;9 


1,401 

2,250 1 
3.937 j 


622 

a2,010 

972 

2.. 32 






Wasliiugton .. 
Wayne 


.. 2,1.>1 
2, 070 


a733 . 




W.lKinson 


."),j72 
. . t>,2'.'2 
.. 4,>54 
















::;:::::;;::::::i::::::::i;;::;;:: 




4 ,07a 






1 



FREE COLOKED. 



Countits. 



l;7o lico ! 1S50 ii;40 , 1SX» ', 1820 < IslO | laOO 1790 



Total 444, I'll 



9;>> I 1,306 



a59 a23 

".l!> 458 , ISl ' 15:^ 



Variants from 
former official 
totals 


i 




1 


1 








\ 






















14,:ar7 
, 2 , T'-lo 
1 6,777 
.: 5,r48 


225 


25a 


■1,3 


IZo 


US 


76 




.-Vlcorn 






9 

10 


3 ^ 

8 : 


29 
2G6 . 


29 


14 


16 




Attala 




Baldwin 






a43 




Bolivar 

Calhoun 


i 7.!;16 
. 2,C";<J 
11,550 
10,069 
4,462 
9.'.'VJ 
3.J32 
' 5,f;j:i 

1,647 
17,745 

372 




2 


1 . 








Carroll 


13 

1 

44 
3 

1 

is' 

1 


26 

4 
42 

2 
11 
2 

14 
1 . 


1 . 
1 . 
3 . 
93 
1 .. 










Chickasaw . . . 




















Claiborne 

Clark 


63 


30 


12 














Copiah 


1 

6 . 
13 


9 

2 









Covington 




:'::::: 




1 




3 


9 
2 


13 








Gn-nada 








i"::'.:: 


1,1SG 
1,4-27 

20. •J-'.. 

. :3,2;5 

. ti.l46 
1,1'.'4 

: i.tafe 

' 10,r,-« 


^3' 

10 

11 

60 
5 
35 


12 

oii . 
25 
4 

6 

105 

4 

66 


74 ; 


64 


■"m 














31 . 


14 






■ ■■ 











Issaquena 










^■^ l' 
2 j. 

85 j 












3> 


61 




1 








Jefferson 


17 


33 


20 


4 1 



(Mftl 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



721 



TABLE II.— POPULATIOX BY COUNTIES — 1790-1870. — Cont'd 
FREE COLORED— Continued. 



Counties. 


1S70 


1S60 


1S50 


1S40 


1 

1830 1 

j 


1S20 


ISIO 


ISOO ! 1790 

1 


Jon<>s 


.308 
7,214 
7,963 
6,411 
3,l.42 
3,005 
4,6.55 
4,162 
23,022 
15,l;.9 
l,64y 
16,49".) 
14,ui.".) 
l,7t>3 
3,C5'i 
15,79S 
9,3:4 

i2,.:6j 

723 
5,312 
3,012 
1,7.54 
7.273 
3,jjr 
2,1.9 
1,711 
3,243 
4,637 
5.091 
741 
4,127 

lS.Sti2 

12,405 
1,636 

10, iW 
3.403 
7,U52 

12. 39-5 


5" 

1 
i 
2 


1 

4 




11 
13 
13 


1 I 
i 










Kemper 










Lafayette 


1 











I.:iud<rdale 








( 




9 


6 




1 




' 


6 




1 


I>^e 








1 


Lincoln 


:::::::::::::;::!:;:::::: ::::::;:i;:::;:::i:::::::: 


1 




4 
4 

1 

9 


2^ 

i" 

37 


12 
11 

8 

21 


5 

25 

6 






i 


Madi.^on 




a6 












Marshall 












1^ I 


















Ni'« ton 


3 




1 


1 

1 

'I 
10 
21 
3 
























Oktibbeha 


la 

10 
2(> 

4 


18 
3 
10 

1 

























Perry 


15 ; 

3 ; 


7 
1 








Pike 







Pontotoc 







Prenti>- 










Rankin 


•2 

ii 

8 

1 

13 
9 

37' 


11 
1 
3 


3 
2 




2 i 









Scott 










6 








Smith 








Sunflower 




e" 

1 
1 

2S 
7 












Tallahatchii? 




2 

1 
1 
4 
104 
6 










Tippah 








1 


Tisheniiugo 
























22 1 

'7 i 


5 

s' 

20 


19 

a 10 

19 

6 






Washington 


a23 




5 

6 


30 
10 
9 


SO 





Yalabusha 


i 











2 

1 


















1 



SLAVE. 



Counties. 



1670 IgoO 



IS-iO 



a2,565 ! a49I 
Total ; 436,6.31 .3119, S7S 1'j5,211 65,659 32,814 14,523; 2,9J5 



1830 1S20 



1800 



Variances from 
former otiicial 
totals 



Adunii 
Alcorn 
Amite 



... 14, "j2 


14,3:^5 


14,241 


10,142 


7,953 


5,671 2,257 






' 1 7.&06 


6,050 


5,741 


4,0t9 ! 


2.t33 


i.422 '..; ' 



46 — m 



122 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



TABLE II. — POPULATION BY COUNTIES— 179U-1870.— Cont'd 

SLAVi;— Cominutd. 



Attala 

Baldwin 

Bolivar 

Callioun 

Carroll 

Ciiickasaw 

Choctaw 

Claiborne 

Clark 

Coahoma 

Copiah 

Covington 

De boto 

Fniuklin 

Greeae 

Grenada 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hinds 

Holme 

IsscQUtna 

ItawaioDa 

Jackson 

Jaspsr 

Jeil'erson 

Jones 

Kemper 

Lafayette 

Laud'-rdale 

Lawrence 

Leake 

Lee 

Lincoln 

Lowndi s 

iladison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Xeshoba 

Newton 

NoxTjbee 

Oktibbeha 

Panola 

Ferry 

Pike 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Rankin 

Scott 

Simpson 

Smith 

Sunnower 

Tallahatchie 

Tippah 

'ilshemiuijo 

Tunica 

Warren 

Washmgton 

Wayne 

Wilkinson 

Winston 

Valubujha 

i'azoo 




STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



723 



TABLE II. — POPULATION BY COUNTIES— 1790-1870. — Cont'd 

CHINESE. 



Counties. 


1S70 


iseo 


1850 


1S40 


1830 


lS-0 


1810 


ISOO 


: 1790 

i 


Total 


16 






1 

1 


i 











Varianet'S from 
former ot^k•ial 
totals 



Bolivar 



INDIAN. 



Counties. 



Total. 



Variancts from 
former official 
totals 



.Attala . 
Copiah . 
Jiickson 
Jasper . 
Neshoba 
Ne^vton 
Pike .... 
Winston 



la7^'» 



^9 



1£60 



IKO 



1 
1 

18.5 
317 
2»5 

1 



1790 



AGGREGATE. 



Counties. 



1860 



1850 



1S40 



Total 

Variane<>s from 
former official 
totals , 



;S-:7,9-22 :791,305 606,526 ZT^.K-l 136,621 



' af>,<M6 al,2.50 
7.5,445 : 31,306 ; 7,600 



Adam.i . . 
Alcorn (b) 
.A.mite (f) 
.\ttala .. 
Baldwin 
Bolivar . 
CalhOiiU 



19, OM: 20,105 ' 18,601 19,434 U,937 | 12,076 i 10,0<i2 

10,431 ' ; 

10,&-73 12,336 I 9,604 9, .511 7,934 
14.776 ' 14,169 10,991 , 4,:»3 



4,0'X) 



l,3->i 



9,73-2 10,471 2, 

10,.:61 : 9,5l5 

Carroll (c) ] 21,047 ^ 22,030 , 18,491 10,4.>1 

Chickasaw ' 19.899 ' 16,426 ' 16,369 2,935 



6,853 4,750 t- 



724 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



TABLE II. — POPULATION BY COUNTIES— 1790-1 870. — Cont'd 
AGGREGATE— Continii"U. 



Counties. 



Choctaw (c) ....■ 16,G8S 

Claiborne : 13,3?/; 

Cark ' T,.t05 

Coahoma ' 7,li4 

Copiah (I) ■ -20, 608 

Covington ' 4,753 

r»e Soto : 32,021 

Franklin (f^ 7,493 

Grecno ' 2,033 

Grenada (c) ; 10,571 

Hancock 4-,23f» 

Harrison 5,795 

Hinds 3(),4>S 

Holmes ' 19,370 

Issaquena • 6,S87 

Itawamba ' 7,S12 

Jackson : i,3G2 

Jasper i 10,S*4 

Jetlerson (d) ...■13,i!l8 

Jonos ; 3,313 

Kemper 12,920 

Lafayette 15, 6.^ 

Laudtrdale 13,402 

LauTence (.f) ' 6,720 

L-ake ' 8,490 

Lee 15,955 

Lincoln U) 10,lSi 

Lowndes ; 3J,502 

Madisou 20,948 

ilariou i 4,211 

iliirsjail ' 2y,416 

Monroe ' 22,631 

Ntshoba j 7, -.39 

Xtwton ! 10,067 

-VOSUDBfc j 2o,yii5 

Oktibbeha | 14,&ai 

ir'anola 20,754 

Perry 2,694 

Pike (i) ll.iJtJo 

Pontotoc 12, .525 

Prent.ss i,k) 9,34S 

Rankin 12,&7i 

Scott ' 7,647 

Simpson 5,71S 

Smith 7,11:6 

Suutiower o.ulj 

Tallahatchie (c>; ' 7,t52 

Tippah (.b; 20,727 

Xishemiugo(,bJ(g); 7,3.50 

Tiinica : 5,3.58 

Warrtn 26,709 

\VaSL.ington 14,509 

Wayne 4,2'j6 

Wilkinson 12,703 

Winston 8,9-Ji 

\ali;busna (c> ... 13,2.54 
Yazoo 17,:i79 




13,6;i5 

8,139 

6,680 

7,638 

5,019 

7,s&J 

22,550 

24,li'J 

4,360 

20,696 

15,ti79 

3,t:ui 

15,933 

9,611 

16,952 

22,373 



2,985 

9,444 

o.tiel 

8^1 

15,820 
7,-2«T 
2.120 

14,193 
4,650 

12,i;48 

10,4iO 



1 




, 1 


, 7,861 

1,976 

2,7&1 

11,666 


2,693 


' "3,323 ' 
9.71s 


1,114 

a2,'jiO 

1,2.;3 

5,06e 




al,Jo<j 








6,550 








• 



(n) Xow in Alabama. 

(b) In ISTO Alcorn from Tippah and Tishemingo. 

(c) In 1-70 Gr'-iKida from Carroll, Choctaw, Tallahatchie, and Yalabusha. 

(d) In lb"2 niiiiie changed from Pickering to Jeiterson. 

(f; in 1:570 Lincoln trom Amite, Copiah, Franklin. Lawrence, and Pike, 
(g) In 16,0 Prentiss from Tigheiningo. 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



725 



POPULATION OF MISSISSIPPI, (a) 



County 



1910 



liWO 



1890 



Alcorn 

Amite 

Attala 

Benton 

Bolivar 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 

Choctaw 

Claiborne 

Clarke 

Clay 

Coahoma 

Copiah 

Covinpton 

De Soto 

Forre?t 

Franklin 

Georg' 

Greeno 

Grenada 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hin.is 

Holmes 

Issaquena 

Itawamba 

Jackson 

-TasD'^r 

.TefTerson 

.Trfferson Davis - 

.Tone 

Kemper 

Lafayette 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence ... 

Leake 

I.e" 

Leflore 

Lincoln 

Lowndes 

Madi-on 

Marion (b) . 
Marshall ... 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Neshoba 

Newton 

Noxube" .... 
Oktibbeha .. 

Panola 

Pear! River . 

P<rry 

Pike(b> .... 
Pontotoc ... 

PTpnti.*.-- 

Quitman ... 

Rankin 

Scott 




18,1.^9 
52.954 
2S,S51 
10,54.5 
4S.90.5 
17,72fi 
23,1.^9 
22.846 
14.S.57 
17,403 
21 ,6.30 
20,203 
34.217 
3.- ,914 
15.9119 
e.3,130 
20.722 
l.i.lOR 
6,. 599 
6,050 
1.5,727 
11,207 
34.653 
63, "20 
39,088 
10,or^ 
14,526 
15.4.51 
IS.Jfif? 
18,221 
12.8'^0 
29.835 
20,348 
21,8&3 
11,741 
46,919 
13.080 
1«.298 
2S,S94 
36.290 
28,597 
30.703 
33,5CB 
15,599 
26,796 
35,178 
17.706 
17,980 
23,085 
28.. 503 
19.67G 
31,274 
10,59.3 
7,685 
37,272 
19,688 
16,;«l 
11, .'93 
23, 014 
16.723 



33,150 


29.661 


15,103 . 


12,313 


17,360 


14,803 


21,956 


20,040 


23,834 


16,809 


21 ,.5.52 


17,912 


29.095 


■^,047 


32.403 


27.321 


13,-501 


9.. 532 


27,674 


26,043 


.51,216 


30,730 


16,.5-6 


14,4.59 


12,726 


11,1)6 


19.708 


16,625 


30.846 


27,3.38 


20,183 


17.694 


29,027 


26.977 


6,697 • 


2,9.57 


14,682 


6,494 


27,.54.5 


21 .203 


18.274 


14.940 


15.7SS 


13.679 


5.435 


3,286 


20,955 


17.922 


14,316 


11.740 



21.. 501 
9.4:0 
13.146 
20,470 
10.246 
13.-547 
28.244 
25!S66 
6,901 
29.3.30 
28..5-53 
L3,.343 
8.741 
13.436 
29.874 
15,973 
28,352 



3,427 
16,6S8 
13,8-53 
12,158 

1.407 
16,752 
10,843 



726 



STATI.^TICS FOR INIISSISSIFPI 



POPULATION OF MISSISSPPI. (a) — ^fontinued. 



County 


1910 


1900 


1 
1890 1 ISSO 


Sharkn- 


In.fCt 12.178 
17.201 12.8fiO 
16.6fi3 13.0-5.5 
2S,7S7 16,084 
29,078 19,000 
19,714 20,618 

14 ti31 I' 05W 


8,382 
10.1.38 
10.635 

9,384 
14,361 
19.2.53 
12,951 

9,302 
12,158 
15,606 


6.. 306 
8,008 
8.083 
4,661 
10,926 
18,721 
12.867 
8,774 
8,461 

i3,a:o 


Sinip«on 


Smith 


Sunflower 


Tallahatchie 

Tate 


1^'ppah .'. 


Tishomingo 


13,<X',7 
18,646 
18,997 


10.124 
16,479 
16,. 522 


Union 


Walthall (h) 




37,488 
48,933 
14,709 
14,8.5;3 
18.07.5 
17,139 
21,519 
46,672 


40,912 
49.216 
12,. 539 
13,619 
21,453 


33,164 
40,414 

9,817 
12,06() 
17,. 592 


31,238 

25,367 

8.741 

""^ .534 


Washington 


VWhstcr 




17 815 


Winston 


14,V*4 


1-' nS') 


10,087 
15,619 




19.742 16.6:9 
43,948 36,. 394 


Yazoo 


33,815 



(a) For ehans-'os in county areas and organization of nfw counties see page C':i8, .Sup- 
plement for Mississippi, 1910. 

(b) Walthall County organized from parts of Marion and Fik° Counties in 1914. 



POPULATION — WHITE — MISSISSIPPI, (b) 



County 



Adams 

Alcorn 

Amite .... 

Attala 

Benton ... 
Bolivar ... 
Calhoun .. 
Carroll ... 
Chickasavr 
Choctaw .. 
Claiborne . 
Clarke ... 

Clay 

Coahoma . 
Copiah ... 
Covington 
De Soto ... 
rnrre^t ... 
Franklin .. 

George 

Grc-ne 

On-nada . 
Hancock . 
Harrison . 
Hinds .... 



1910 


19-X> 


1890 


18^ 




786,111 


i541.2iX» 


.=;44.851 


47;\.^-'8 


6,353 


6,439 


6.128 


4.796 




13,881 


11,162 


9,605 


9,S63 




10.. 362 


8,400 


7,600 


5.494 




15.624 


13,875 


12,742 


11.653 




5,208 


5,310 


5,665' 


5,777 




6,098 


4.107 


3 222 


2,694 




13,914 


-12.415 


11.276 


10,191 




9.6<^>4 


9,197 


8,161 


7.8?1 




10,1.V> 


8.148 


8.491 


7,696 




10.185 


9,451 


8,208 


6,.->:J7 




3,786 


4,-565 


3,.V>3 


3.910 




11,319 


9,245 


7,716 


7,181 




6,096 


5,927 


5,624 


5 , 2 >5 




3,b06 


3.ncl 


2,245 


2.412 




15,927 


16,3.55 


14,»>32 


13,101 




11,685 


8,471 


5,319 


4, '^4 




5,5.5.5 


6,2.13 


6,957 


7,. 581 




13.a37 










S,.3fU 


6,«73 


5,484 


4.6.52 




4,772 
4,701 










4.941 


2,9.36 


2,3.si 




4,.-)65 


.3,828 


3.W6 


3.2.''.6 




6,819 


8,3.56 


5,770 


4,'>i; 




24.003 


14,632 


9,163 


5,749 




1 ,18,313 


13,037 


10,892 


11,875 





'04 



it^.Xf I 



'■^^^ i 



STATISTIC? FOR MTSSTSSTPTI 



727 



POPULATION— WHITE — MISSISSIPPI, (b) — Continued. 

I>OPUI..\TIOX— WHITE— MISSTSSIPPr (b)-Continnp.1. 



County 


1910 


1900 


1890 


1880 


Holmes 


7,Sno 

IS. 3-^5 

21.4"7 

2?i.f«7 

7.9';"' 

11.«7S 
.T.R49 

9 . '"^4 
7. 4. -J 
l.-,fiifl 

,«.r7o 

14..-V17 

4 . n.i-. 

7.'~00 

lo.rao 

S,1"0 

.=5,104 
19.«71 
14 9fi1 
14.0.-(? 

o 79^ 

9.703 
1 .7?1 
n.2S-2 
13,69.5 


8,12o 
6">? 

•JO o,-io 

lo.f^rc 
7 7'''0 

4.n--'o 


7.0S4 
7.30 
10,7'>3 
7,814 
7,3^ 
3,. 589 


6.911 


T=«ann°na 


8«6 


Itnwamba 


9. .5.5.5 


.TncVeon 


5.124 


.Ta«Tior 


6,244 




4,260 








i.'^.i.-'-. 
s r^r) 
12,. ^78 


7.0^-> 

7,8r;o 

11.700 


3 469 


Kpmper 


7.100 


T.a'iTPtte 


11 .3^-5 








lO.KVi 

10.747 
1.'? "07 
0.70^ 
12.311 
7,1"'l 
6.."i 
O.TS 
? 0<"« 

12.".T 

7 0-^3 
^l 
11 »"9 

f! .'Vn 
9,fi61 
4.904 
8'"« 
13. ,'^20 
13.4<7 
12,6-7 

8,670 
8.107 
1.440 
7,816 
10,695 


14,671 
6.240 
0,.3.V» 

1-..510 

lo..32r^ 

6,009 
6,031 
6 -130 
0,7.31 

l-MW 
-.448 
8.311 

10.119 
4.709 

5,r,9 

9.248 
2,. ■^11 

10.-81 

lo,r.s.-i 

10.833 

894 

7,. 507 

7,000 

1.223 

6.229 

8,924 


9.9.59 


T.a^' T-iincf* 


4.937 


L'-alcp 


8,104 


T.fp 


12,656 


T.'fidrp 


2 •''.30 


T.inpnln 


7,701 




5,5.CS 


Mtiili-on 

M-irinn fb) 


5 946 

4 450 


Vnrshall 


10 002 


Mnnror 


10..5-1 


ATonf-oromprv 

y"sl>nba .." 


6 671 
6,-55 


V^wtrm 


8,428 




5,302 


nvtihheha 


5.119 
9,. 521 






P-^rrv 


2,. 3-7 


PiVp fh") 


8.. "2 




9 609 


Prpnti=« '. . . - 


9.737 


Onftman 


502 




7,193 


Srott . . 

Sharlcrv . 


6,6.^3 
1,405 


Simpson .. 

Smfth 


4.994 
6.4.5' 




7.239 




.=;,495 

8,G04 
8.179 
n,S30 
11.077 
1 ,723 
14,780 


4,006 
6,.3iiS 
S.439 
10.080 
9,073 

1 ..-:-9 

12,. 380 


2.. -.30 
5,1-4 

8,49.-; 

10.026 
8.311 
1,2.50 

11,608 


1.T64 


Tallahatchie 

Tat€ 

Tippah 


4.168 
9,094 
9.8<12 


Ti-hominsro 


7.611 
1 ,2.-6 


mion 


9,ri32 


VTalthall fb) 




Warren 


11.290 
7.201 
8,Sfi6 

11,.V>7 
4.171 

10,269 
1 K',;a7 

11,157 


10.. 346 

5,0<12 

7.4.S1 

9,694 

4.384 

1 8,19-2 

■ 9,284 

1 10,043 


8,S«? 
4,8.38 
5,790 
9,080 
3,962 
' 6,987 
7,083 
8,690 


8,717 


Washington 


3.478 




4,971 


Wph-itT 






3 570 


Winston . 


6.113 




7, 5.53 




8,408 







(a) For chanvr-s in poui'.ty arpa= and organization of new countiPs .«ee page (>i8. Sup- 
plement for Mi<>i-<ippi. lOH*. 

(b) Walthall County organized from parts of Marion and Pike Counties in 19U. 



«rt> R 






f*r >» 









ftir.nr 






fTi U 






(■MA., If 
TL?..»r 



ir:i.r- 




iVrt.Cf 


rw.ir 




a^oH 




)"■?.? 




aw.fl 




JfW.O 




fPT.f 


. .. 



728 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



POPULATION — COLORED— MISSISSIPPI, fa) 



County 



1310 



1900 



1890 



1880 



LOILOO.? 



910, mo 



744,749 



652,199 



Adams 

Alrorn 

.^niite 

Attala 

Benton 

Bolivar 

Calhonn 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 

Choctaw 

Claiborne 

Clarke 

Clay 

Co;ihoina 

Copiah 

Coving^tcin 

DeSoto 

Forrest 

Franklin 

George 

Greene 

Grenada 

Hancock 

HarriJon 

Hinds 

Holme? 

IssafiUf-na 

Itawamba 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jefferson Davis 

.Jones 

Kemper 

Lafayette 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Leake 

L"e 

Lr-fiore 

Lincoln 

Lowniks 

Madison 

Marion (b) ... 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Montpomery ... 

Neshoba 

Newton 

Noxubee 

Oktibbeha 

Panola 

Pearl River 

Perry 

Pikefb) 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Quitman 

llankin 

bcott 



15,012 

4.275 

12,502 

13.227 

5.037 

42.?ri7 

3.S12 

13.475 

12,716 

4.|fi9 

13, '117 

10,281 

14,1OT 

30,411 

19,J«r7 

5,224 

17,375 

7,0S5 

6.629 

] ,827 

1,349 

11,162 

4.;?SS 

in,f;.5o 

45,413 

31.1<tS 

9,f'49 

l,X:rg 

5,4« 

9,050 

U.2S7 

6.757 

S,12S 

11.7&3 

9.yi5 

3,tjl9 

21,b^2 

5.147 

6,420 

10.674 

3o,f:v4i 

12,'T-^ 

21. -S4 

27.310 

6,f»>5 

19,342 

19,535 

8.927 

3,4;J3 

9,077 

23.948 

12.076 

21,225 

2,423 

2.5.S1 

17,0"! 



8,8.J3 
14,249 
7 .|>J0 



23,672 

3,825 
12,308 
12,373 

5,2W 
31.230 

4.097 
12,919 
11,744 

3, -580 
16.222 

8,496 
13,636 
23,212 
18,040 

i,rm 

18,518 



6,805 



1,854 
10,254 
3,. 5,30 
6,:?70 
39,540 
23, 70S 
9,778 
1,342 
5,816 



10,903 
3,510 

10,-598 

9,4n 

4,920 
26, 7.58 

3,412 
10,612 
11,400 

2,639 
10,98:5 

8.110 
12,983 
10,097 
15,601 

2,9?0 
17,226 



4,940 



970 

11,078 

2.548 

3,318 

2S,3&7 

•23.886 

11,. 582 

9&5 

i,437 



17.85.3 
4,409 
8,510 
8,. 335 
5.246 

15,958 
3,. 301 
9,964 

10.2fi9 
2.499 

12,858 
7,840 

12.11-2 

11,156 

14,451 
1,959 

15,343 



4,877 



813 
8. 835 
1.804 
2,146 
32,2^3 
20,2.-3 
9,178 
1,108 
2,483 



7,665 


7,417 


5!8S2 


17,272 


15,3-38 


13,054 


4,690 


1 ,251 


3.]9 


' 11,823 


10,092 


8,619 


' 9,r32 


8.853 


10,286 


18,960 


14,990 


11,-542 


7,. 568 


6,078 


4,483 


6,613 


5,4.53 


5,042 


8,659 


7,5-30 


7,814 


21,0:58 


14,272 


8.016 


9,211 


7,-587 


5,846 


21.974 


21,0:58 


22,6.56 


25.919 


21 ,290 


19.920 


4.323 


3.002 


2,4.51 


18,708 


16.312 


18, -3-38 


18,661 


18,621 


18,002 


8,-573 


7.011 


6.677 


2,a52 


2,795 


2.186 


8,049 


6,5<H) 


5,003 


26,147 


22.629 


24,-572 


13,820 


11,9-3.5 


10.869 


19.366 


17,729 


18,8.31 


1,793 
4,874 


656 




1,912 


1.070 


13.716 


10,622 


S.116 


4,827 


4,-3-55 


4- 249 


3,131 


2,S46 


2,421 


4,177 


2,392 


815 


12.270 


10.415 


9,550 


6,21.9 


4.740 


4 212 



flit :; 
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'_ 


! 


lyC'.M 


ICT.* 






' ?'r«.»t 


WT.kt 




.' " , ' 


I^:*.*"! 


w.m 


<r 




JIO.T 


«M.« 


- 




w:.? 


t.A.& 




- '«■ . 


JN£.A 


r;iit.« 





Mr K 


1 






' £ji."r 

1 WT,> 





STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



729 



POPULATION — COLORED — MISSISSIPPI, (a) — ^'Continued. 
POPL'LATIOX— C OLORED— MISSISSIPPI (a)— Continued. 



County i 1910 


1900 


1890 


1S60 


Sharkey l 13,973 


10,729 
4.954 

2, aw 


7,1.J9 


A Ctiil 


Simpson ' 5,909 


3,909 1 3,014 

1,711 1 1 l^^fi 


jjmith 2,908 






2,2l'5 

9 ft'iT 


Suiitlower 23, ''92 


12,078 
13,292 
12,179 
2,9'>3 
1,(.>51 
14,920 
4.142 


6,854 


Tallahatchie 2o,lfc4 

Tate 11,535 


9.207 1 5! 753 
10,758 a H'T 


Tippah r?,!;^! 

Tishomingo l,09u 

Tunica 10,918 


2,925 

991 

10,899 

3.<t<« 


3,<>i5 

i.iej 

7 VS 


Union 4,217 


3.098 


\\"althall(bj 


' I -,— 




Warrt-u 2(i,19S 


30,50(i 

44,214 

5,0:jS 

3,9vo 

17, W9 

5,932 

1<J,4.58 

33,905 


3o,.')76 
4,018 
2,900 

13,630 
5,102 
8,9l6 

27,r04 


22,521 


Washington 41,642 

Wayne 5,S43 

Webster 1 3,2«C 


21.Si9 
3,770 




14,245 


Winston t),s>7o 


3.9 1 4 


Yolabu^ba ■ 11,1*2 


8 116 




25.347 





(a) For changes in county areas and organization of new counties see page OOe, Sup- 
plenient for Alissisiippi, 19^0. 
(b; Walthall county organized from parts of ilariou and Pike Counties in 1914. 



MAXUFACTURES- 



-NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN 
MISSISSIPPI. 



County. 


1910 

1 


i:«jo 


1890 


1&S<> 


1S70 


1860 


1850 


Total 


..; 2.51.8 ' 


4,772 


1,G9S 


1,479 


1.731 


976 


'^77 








Adams 




80 

<SS 
69 
S9 
29 

;i7 

47 
45 
33 
47 
42 

eo 

70 
78 
137 
42 
61 


116 
29 

1(K 
17 
31 
13 
10 
14 
37 
5 
4 
27 
15 
14 
41 
10 
25 


52 
65 
44 
.55 
19 
2(J 
20 
21 

19 , 
29 
1 
20 
24 
.3 

50 , 
12 i 

32 ; 


./9 
31 
14 
43 


la 










Amite 


j 


32 
25 




Attala 


1 




Bi'nton 


? ' 




Bolivar 




4 

50 
49 
51 
14 


1 
23 
20 
34 

*^ 
20 

11 












2 




Chickasaw 


.2 








Claiborne 


. .,. . ~ . . 




Clarke . 


la 




Clay 


'..\'.'. ^ '.'. 






5 
58 
11 
75 








14 
13 




Cov'ngton 

Dp hoto .. 


::'::. ^ :; 






Forrpst . 






Franklin 




33 


2 


s 


G 


5 




( j^orge .... . . 






Gre«'ne 


.J 


25 


12 




12 





730 



STATISTICS FOR -MISSISSIPPI 



MANUFACTURES — NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN 
MISSISSIPPI. — Continued. 



County. 



Grenada 

Hancock 

Harri.sou 

HiD.is 

Holmes 

Issa'iufna , 

Itauaiuba 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jelferion 

Jefferson I>avis 

Jones 

Kemper 

lyafayette 

Lamar 

LaiKicrdale 

Lawrence 

Leake 

Lee 

Leflore 

Lincoln 

Lowndes 

iladison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Montgomery .. 

Neshoba 

Newton 

Xoxulwe 

Oktibb.ha 

Panola 

Pearl River 

Perry 

Pike 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Quitman , 

Rankin 

Scott 

Sharkey 

Simpson 

Smith 

Sumner 

Sunflower 

Tallahatchie 

Tate 

Tippah 

Tishomingo 

Tunica 

Union 

Walthall 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Web=t»i 

Wilkinson 

Winston 

Yalobusha 

Yazoo 



19i 


9<J 


43 


14 


48 


13 


7r> 


2.') 


97 


12 


S9 


31 


103 


13 


75 


18 


43 


16 


98 


36 


91 


27 


61 


20 


og 


13 


63 


24 


7S 


34 


.09 


16 


&5 


IS 


:« 


6 



.50 
78 
.5j 
50 
13 
44 
28 
44 
27 
46 




97 1 


l\ • 


.33 


7 1 




' 1 




4 


14 1 . . 




17 


8 1 


10 


9 . 




8 ; 




STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



731 



MANUFACTURES— CAPITAL INVESTED IN MISSISSIPPI. 




Total.... 



72, S1>3,(jO0;35,S07, 419 14, 806, SS4 4,727,600 4, .501, 714 -4,384,492 ;]. 83:3,420 



Adams ; il 

Alcorn 

Aniitf ' 

Attala 

B^ntoQ I 

Bolivar i 

Calhoun : i 

Carroll ' 

Chickasaw ' 

Choctaw ■. . . ; 

Claiborne — 

Clarke 

Clay 

Coahoma 

Copiah 1 

Covington 

De Soto 

Forrest 

Fraaklin 

George 

Greene 

Grenada j 

Hancock 1 



,474,448 1, 
.545,635 I 
142,919 I 
135,275 

37,. 505 ' 
407,508 I 

95,1.51 

80,050 

72,620 

83,112 I 
5-5!>,411 I 
977,535 I 
2f)S,201 
S.i0,4Sl ; 
,1.-,9.214 2 
276,. S21 
193,477 



2r)5,1^69 

235,316 

115,015 

25,436 

76,284 

95,131 

19,286 

16.903 

74,220 

5,810 

29<;i,497 

352,989 

31,695 

1.54 ,C92 

3-53,. "52 

15,410 

70,178 



427,325 
66,910 
4i;,7i.H» 
70,440 
24,250 
24,475 
3:J,240 
38,300 
35,1.50 
23,1.50 
3,000 

1-20,240 
34,8(^10 
38,700 
1,006,510 
15,000 
30,980 



128,460 
65,650 


161,000 

1 


97,55(J 


7,!-K^.5 
4o,»jo0 


50,11.0 i 
lU.&JO ! 


&9,1T5 


7,3W 

3:^,950 

270,140 

52,325 

9,375 


2,000 
28,585 
50,775 
72,495 i 
142,030 1 
108,100 
45,000 




67,230 
14.770 
58,455 
36,400 


■ 57,625 


7,850 


1 oim 


< 1 





614,4^5 I 62,500 

4,5.50 1 15,450 

73,325 i 



29,650 
5,900 
41,165 



87,115 



5,970 i 8,400 I 11,500 I 14,000 



Harrison 

Hinds .. 

Holmes I 

Issaquena I-. Z 

Itawamba |. . s 

Jackson |.. '_ 

Jasp°r I.. ^ 

Jeflerson 1.. ; 

Jefferson Davis '.. - 

Jones ■;.. - 

Kemper !.. ■ 

Lafayette .. j 

Lamar .. : 

Lauderdale .. 1 

Lawrence |.. 

Leake I.. - 

Lee !. . ■^ 

Leflore j.. 

Lincoln j.. 

Lowndes I - 

Madison j ; 

Marion i : 

Marshall j 

Monroe j 

Montgomery 

Neshoba | , 

Xewton j 

Xoxube? '• ' 

Oktibb€ha , 

Panola j ' 

Pearl River 1 

Perry | ! 

Pike 1 

Pontotoc ] 

Prentiss ' 

Quitman i ; 

Rankin ' ; 

Stott ' 



182,73:3 
263,788 
9a:', 92 7 
494,229 
192,758 
270,9:30 
174,390 

63,4-32 
383,413 

44,024 
147,929 



12.4(J6 

40,6iiO 

251,l;Xl 

130,605 

3.57, ;311 

52,095 



30,905 
889,144 
32,330 
20,975 



4,S?0 
27, tor) 
9:{,6(iO 
7fci,4.50 

218, < 00 

31,100 

1,000 

15,880 

116,000 
13,.5<:»0 
18,150 



12.725 
51,.:'.J0 
106.(X)i> 
117.600 
134,6.55 
37,750 
2,700 



IW.Of.HJ 

170,0.')0 

3,01 KJ 

27,525 



86,700 

167,790 

9,800 

3,000 

55,990 

246,100 I i 37,000 

4,800 1 1 10,865 

8,085 i 17,000 I 20,300 



17,283 




732 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



MANUFACTURES— -CAPITAL INVESTED IN MISSISSIPPI.— Con. 




Sliarkey 

isiuiiisun 

Suiitb 

tsuujuer 

Suuflower 

Tallauatchie 

Tats 

Tippah 

Ti:jnomiD{jo 

Tunica 

L'niou 

Waitliall 

\V'urr-;n 

W'ashiugton 
Wayne 
Webster 
Wilki:ison 

Willitou 

Yaloljushu 

Yazf'O 

All otiier 
counties (a; 



(a) Includes Frankiiu, Sunflower, and Tunica. 



MANUFACTURES- 



-WAGE EARNERS, AVERAGE NUMBER. 
MISSISSIPPI. 



County. 



liSX) 



1&30 



Total 


50,284 


26,41S ' 


15,S17 ' 


5,S27 


5,941 


4,775 


3,173 


.Adams ^. .. 




sn 

593 1 
113 1 
ISl 

37 
3&3 ! 

7;i 

69 ' 

7S \ 
lir> i 

i;>7 ; 

575 ' 
228 '■ 
475 j 
l.i^7 

2yi 

125 


1,142 
213 i 
437 
73 
2ftl 
113 

-'f 
54 1 

148 

7 

180 

327 1 

.52 i 

IJl 

1,641 ' 

20 ; 

148 : 


417 
139 

57 
131 

51 

51 ; 

38 

70 

42 

5:3 

5 

155 

59 

6<J 

&:9 

IS 


227 
S8 
18 
81 


156 


131 








Amite 




l</3 


2 


Attala 


w 


129 




.:s 






"Z 


5 
95 

199 
110 
24 


10 
65 
53 

87 

ltd 

120 

09 






z. 





C;irroll 


. . i 


15G 


Chicka.<a\v 

Clioctaw 


. . ^ 


63 

84 






74 


Clarke 


173 


VJ 


Clay 








r 


15 
352 




Copiah 

Covington 

I>e Note 


.. - .. 


74 

27 


47 

12 
1U2 


Forr"*-' 








Franklin 


.. -^ .. 


111 , 




12 , 


21 


23 


10 




" 


i 








252 ; 

1,^/77 1 
1.577 ' 


6.3 1 
410 


12 

4.'> 

s.? 
or, 


43 
39 
214 
2t« 




Gr'[ii!rla 








Hancock ... . 






lit- 


Harri.son 




178 


■286 



-'.AdinrjK aoAJiaYA 



s 



»»5 



1'41 



' OAW— ea^i i;t') ATJviAK 



.UloT 



;u,i 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



733 



MANUFA-CTURES— WAGE EARNERS. AVERAGE XUMBER.- 
illSSISSIPPI. — Continued. 



County. 


1910 


1900 


1?90 


i 

18S:> 


1870 


j 1S60 

1 


1850 

1 


Hind? 




944 
214 
66 
53 
1.3-^9 
28 
84 


423 
69 


220 
45 
3 
12 
103 
22 
46 



204 
7"i 
32 


269 

41 

1 

lOO 


1 


Holmes 






TsFaqnona 




' "^^ 


Itaivnmha 




48 
568 
62 
.52 


' " 35 " 


JaokKon 




10 
19 


.TapDer 








.TefFer?on 




27 


• ■ 


.TeTor^on Davis 






■Ton^ 




l,l-'8 
98 
110 


356 
65 
.37 



6 
9f> 

41 




19 


1 


KeiriDPr 




51 
102 


' ii" 

1 124 


I,afav<^tt9 




i 74 


T ainnr 





T.a!!fl"rdal" 




1,6.39 
77 
69 
175 
.V3 
997 
583 
147 
260 
ISl 
.500 
20fi 
27 
17^ 
149 
106 

nn 

697 

84" 

1,233 

S3 

143 

84 
59 

o7 


1,151 

31 

49 

155 

88 

477 

121 

60 

177 

135 

162 

PS 

32 

8t 

19-2 

.53 

215 
1«9 
S90 
15 
l.<« 

1.5 

141 
23 

25 
45 
14 


373 
15 
19 
62 
11 
132 
"00 
25 




101 

45 

20 


1 59 


T.awrcncp 




IT 
43 


T/'ake 






l,j>ei 






T.-oflore 




1 




T inroln 




175 
368 
145 


, j 


LoTrnries 

M-'di=on 


■ 1 •■ 


1 .335 

2 

3^9 
120 


1 268 

1 ^'- 
15 
IfiO 


Marion 


Vflr=hall 


c 


15' 
113 
65 
23 
61 
1.37 
]''5 
73 


192 
17 


'^Tonroo 


o .. 
o 
■ 


Afonfeomery 




Voshoha 


12"' 

1'3 

76 

119 


76 
PS 
52 




Newton 





\ox'7'^e<> 

nvtihhPha 

Panola 


87" 
3.8 


Pearl River 


- 




P»rrv 


:: 1 ;: 


6 

66 


19 
ICS 
6" 
4-3 


4' 

41 
S6 




T>iV'' 


45 
T9 


■Pontotoc 

Prpnti«s 


'^uitman 






R^n^-in 




.56 
14 


"9 

.58 


1"1 
31 


19 


Scott 




Sharkpy 






Simpson 




13 
"2 


25 
14 






Smith 




25 


21 


S'lrmor 




Sur'Aowpr 




3i2 

9<i 1 
136 

71 . 

43 ; 
125 

94 




20 

55 






Tal'ahatphie 




13 

93 
59 


81 
53 
P 
3 
50 


23 




Tat° , 






Tir^Dih ; 




103 
1.06 


1"9 
492 


81 
61 


Tishomingo i 




Tniica ' 




Tiinn 





87 








^"althall 











U'arren ' 




1,490 j 
592 1 
358 i 
103 
58 ; 
30 

474 i 
404 1 


1,706 
443 

2S8 
"89 
17 1 

55 1 

206 j 
24 


3.32 
1?7 
108 


498 

7 

20 


436 


184 


Washington 










w-Phst^r '. 






Wilkinson > 


6 
21 

^4 
137 


15 

20 

.'i.'^4 

40 

1 


" 14.3 


■t.« 
5-1 

0" 
86 


Winston , 




Vaiob'ifha i 




J.' ■ ■ 

3 


Yazoo 1 




.411 othor 1 
counties (a) i 


' 










' 







(a) Includes Franklin, Sunflower, and Tunica counti'^s. 



<>*« 



734 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



MANUFACTURES— VALUE OF.— MISSISSIPPI. 



County. ; 


1910 


loon 


1890 


1880 


1870 


1860 


is:o 


Total 


S<1.5.55,000 40.4-31 ..386 


1 
18,705.83! 


7.518, .302 


8.1--4.7.->8 


6.500 r,<u 


2.07\>::S 






1 3*' 171 


1,2.38,733 

3"4.'^41 

20<t,a55 

.50.907 

177,. 3r8 

130.945 

17.317 

''5. J 49 

77,6.53 

4,290 

2.54.2-55 

266, «r9 

36 5*0 

.3.30.8=7 

1 ,.563.2.39 

23,. 300 

110,115 


-<M.765 

I.rr, 441 
.^6.785 

131.614 
51 .9n9 
43 950 
60.380 
44.6.38 

l<r!.512 
65, 4, '0 
3.000 

173.. 526 
ri 0.33 


192.5!" 

1.33.. ■5? S 

19,.5.-.5 

140.!>22 


214 9-Vj 


"(•7 '5') 


Alcorn 





S78.?"V, 
145.762 
18.5,. yrt 
47.6"5 
541 ,9«7 
71.4\8 
40.8"'' 
68.918 
111,-391 
6-1.. 324 
602.582 

4tO,f,-n 

831 .fC9 

l,077,f'87 

3.36.87? 

162,. 564 




.Amit" 




io-.itn 

151,9.-0 


5 '>00 


.Attala 1 


121,0^3 


B°nton 




Bolivar 

Calhoun 


'>.9'"K> 

14t.0S' 
1.58.952 

iJ-.n5 

31,473 


8,000 
54,0-7 
117.482 
114.161 
217.986 
l,co,.39) 
9-, 229 




Carroll 


11' 6^6 


Chickasaw 

Choctaw 


3-.4~l 
<;i 000 


Claiborne 


66 rjig 


Cl'rte 


193,410 




Clay 






70.600 

787.844 

29,263 

47,696 


23,60t-> 

4-56,-555 

24,276 

188,659 






<^oi)inh 


9? 9-0 

25,1.50 


•■.■i VO 


Covinijton 

De .Soto 


11,137 
irO.O.^ 


Forrest 






Franklin 




127 ,.340 





7.350 


14,70<:> 


23,400 


11 445 


(rPOrgl* 






Greene 


•/. 


243.340 

255.2fr2 

1,446.344 

2,310.624 

l,0f,O..V>2 

256,3'"9 

IIP,. 363 

63,694 

1,037,7112 

35.044 

128,990 


17,793 

.37,4-38 

469.027 

34".. 045 

-579.462 

-59.-5-59 

.34,276 

618,2-55 
48,446 
50,234 


16 ,,320 

.38.718 

9*,. 5.50 

2» 1,6.50 

l'".6.450 

.5.3.458 

2,7.50 

27.604 

.3^^?,760 

2 1. 0.55 

23,675 


45 873 ' 




Grenaiia 


.52,7' 
315.101) 
157,7fr> 
3-14,9^ 
74,3.30 
27.050 






Hancock 


~ 


97.688 


Harri.^on 

Hinds 


... 3 .. 


26:^ , 490 

223.403 

46,725 

2. .500 

140,629 


1SI.51V) 
S <> lO 


Holme? 

Ts.saqiT^na 

Itawamba 


J 


eo.'X'o 
.■^4.090' 




406,280 
11.162 
18,375 


46,100 


.Ta«Drr 


'-J 




2o.no 


Jefferson 

.Tefferson Davis 


32,825 


46,910 


Jonfs 


■J 


2,087,6.v, 

?6,Of;7 

1.38,5.52 


4.53.. 586 
.-3.770 
21 .905 


9,3«; 

72.180 
86,033 





.37,50> 
''91 650 ' 




Kemnrr 


87.^90 
390 !»» 


15.700 


Lafayette 

Lamar 


2 . ■ 


125.365 


LaudTdale 




3,292,923 

63.975 

62,069 

277,46ri 

933^799 

1,767.239 

8fi6.6?f"> 

233,732 

379. 17S 

192 'V.'; 

665. 990 

361,223 

27,-573 

2&5.297 

133.820 

149.677 

115.165 

874,-579 

1,185,^10 

1,5.53,442 

62,6<)S 

178,602 

.3<\6'4 

103,6:52 


1,8^6,512 

23.864 

37.. 302 

123,825 

24.225 

863,011 

1'1,.'?97 

46,939 

185,324 

121,075 

120,682 

.52! 600 

19.441 

44,142 

107.7.59 

83. 570 

47.6S9 

284,5riO 

509,952 

9-58,687 

12,Cf(0 

181,838 

9,2<X> 

144..3-X5 

25.033 


431,461 

25.270 

44.960 

71, "83 

8.700 

20'-|.m5 

264,. -.36 

.39,747 

'204^.305 
1^.-580 
51 ,568 




106 .C<K) 
66.. 560 
19,811 


8-^,2'6 


Lawrence 

Leake 

Lee ^. . . . 




15,3&5 
21,460 
37,480 


41.785 
4,c40 


Leflore 








Lincoln 


1.52,7.37 
412 .ro7 
106,426 

2"5.56S 
149,220 






Lownd°s 




^98.2^^ 
1.56 ."415 
2, .300 
770.7:'3 
197,000 


'>0s;7Q7 


M'di.«on 




"S..^"^ 


Marion 




5.. 500 


MRrs*iall 




153. 54-' 


Afonro" 




40,370 


iIontgnm"ry 






Xe^hoba 




i4.613 
6-\450 
irO.142 
81.929 
5 3.. 517 


12,212 
136..-91 
210,9-9 

71,(V59 
129,969 


72,261 




Newton 






Xoxiibf>e 




116,8.-.0 
217.6.50 
ia5,--07 


43,050 


Oktiblx'ha 




21,4.33 


Panrla 




Pparl River 






Perry 




5,540 
124.480 
39.^53 
68,<>j5 


15,6.30 
103. 64S 
86,69<? 
41.6'JO 


4,300 
38,220 
128,087 




Pike 

Pontotoc 


91.58) 
61,2u5 


PrpDti.ss 






Quitman 








Rankin 




44.60!) 
11.497 


24 .J>2 
74,5.',0 


241,654 
29,500 


l.e 100 


Scott 







(•:, .i-n 



vr.n 

6,.. '.,..;» 

■ - -■■', -'^ 












STATI.-<TICS FOR :MISSISSIFPI 



735 



MANUFACTURES — VALUE OF\ — MISSISSIPPI. — Continued. 



County. 


1910 


190«) 


1 
1590 i 


'- 
18S0 


1S70 


lS<in 


18.50 


Sharkey 





ll.-5,021 
121,274 
&J,672 


14,150 ! 
26.1:57 
9,523 












19, a); 

■25, 4«) 
11.625 


28,250 
21,951 

22,875 
64,515 

213,679 
140,120 


'•i-iiir:' 


40,515 




11,;£0 




T. 




Sunflower 


— 


017.202 
lS:i,6lO 
247,260 
W,777 
04,432 
2.5.5,522 
131,S<>4 






Tallahatchie 


3 


7,S0O 

25,525 

75.9<« 

103,273 

"'mjisb' 


25,774 
71.363 
70,930 
85, W4 
2,8.50 
56,741 


28.920 

199. 7c6 
462,782 




Tate 




Tippah 


.. - .. 


S5,4!>7 
67.2.50 


Tunica 


•• >. •- 








. 




Walthall 


5 












2,404,797 
1.473,739 
484, (X«4 
147,;»2 
62,215 
40,066 
408,346 
862,919 


2,905,4*8 

7lO,»>4n 

223. 7]. 3 

60 577 


.596,274 
18S,."63 
206,. 58:5 


1,237,217 
14, 0») 
10,800 


643,700 


280,550 


Washington 












Wpb<tpr 






Wilkinson 


.. z ■■ 


13.635 1 
31,342 
435,278 1 
276.S50 

17,319 


9,150 
28,024 
51,443 
122,237 


28,.3CO 

21,480 

475,. 582 

41.475 


1.51,735 


33,600 
3'^ 0»)0 


Yalobusha 




48,625 
4,C0O 


65,7.50 
96,«0 


All other 



















(a) Includes Franklin, SunflowiT, and Tunica counties. 



MANUFACTURES— COST OF MATERIALS— MISSISSIPPI. 



County. 



1910 



ia> 



1860 



1850 



Total '36,926,000 21,C92,092 10.064,897 4,667,153 4.334, 206 



3,146,6:>6 1,290,271 



Adams ... 
AJcom — 

Aiiiite 

Attala — 
B«nton ... 
Bolivar . . 
Calhoun . 
Carroll . . . 
Chickasaw 
Choctaw . 
Claiborne 
Clarke .... 

Clay 

Coahoma 
Copiah ... 
Covington 
De Soto . . 
Forrest . . 
Franklin . 
G«orge . . . 
Greene — 
Gr<;n;i<la .. 
Hancock . 
Harrison . 



718,172 
162,743 
60,966 ; 
77,870 ' 
28,147 I 
222,075 ! 
26,186 I 
16,232 I 
20,569 I 
52,063 I 
464,051 I 
381,235 I 
230,3fc7 I 
483,119 

124. yj8 I 
70,822 ' 



6l5,:'i4 
1.5,835 ' 

89.517 : 
26,406 1 
&5,</2S i 
53,5;J7 1 
11,417 i 
10,104 ■ 
45,919 I 

1,523 ' 
VJ7,TAii : 
168.992 i 

23.612 i 
190,524 I 
891,843 I 

17.6.55 j 

45.518 I 
I. 



,S-'l ! 

'j.:.6 I 

,373 ; 
,718 • 
264 !. 

i02 ; 

Ol»5 I 

533 I 

6iO j 

b<X> • 

*>J<J '. 

551 1 

375 '. 

700 : 
2i^ 
444 
320 



72,922 
64.443 
10.720 
W.315 



69.5- «) 



45. 7o. 
6 J, 4; 4 



2.3i.O 

S5.1S2 I 

94,443 

1110,397 

19,842 



1'JS,637 



2,000 
17,214 
43, L)50 
49,019 
121,526 
62.169 
56,710 



10.10>J I I t 

2Li«i,Ul5 I 27,13') 1 - 

16.615 I 8,3w c 

114.216 ■ >^ 



65.759 



3,;'64 



6,126 10,94<J 



94,424 7,100 

l.iS.772 14,951 

746,710 ' 23j5,298 

1,334,412 I 137,536 



12,0S 

22,525 
66,:^^6 
123,910 



24,400 

29,f;iJ5 

4t;,i3(io 

61,742 



69,214 



736 



STATISTIC? FOR MISSISSIPPI 



MANUFACTURES — COST OF MATERIALS— MISSISSIPPI. — 

Continued. 



County. 


1910 i 19<10 


1?90 


18«0 


1870 


1860 


IS.50' 


'^in/^a 




1.17''. ■'99 
11R..'3< 
49..'r'S 

^Fi 8'39 
9'.'?. 9^7 

71 ,.tTO 


3-''S.R6S 
23.516 

301 . 1^70 
.3".?79 
24,Oi->2 


r4.^61 

.'^r..76i 

1.400 

■•>n .0.13 
'i6,'f^n 

8,775 


l.T7.5-^8 
''7..3on 
11,678 


121 314 

14. "90 

1,175 

74,094 


























^rr?,o-v> 
3,61" ;. 
8,495 1 




.Tn'-->T 




14.2.-10 














TfjnpQ * j 'l '>Qft RJO 


2*^ ,869 
.■^2.100 
10,441 


7.202 
.■u.ooo 
f^.OTS 


"0,035 . 


.31,000 






6*,183 




T.nfnv"tt(> j 


201, 2(X) 


.38.. 525 






l,n3.4no 
1^,383 
22.101 
49. 73-' 
3.9-.2 
468. 9'U 
90.677 
2<'>,'^.36 

43.701 
62. '^6^ 
16.383 
10.171 
23,122 
72.613 
6n.r.30 
22.000 
116 .3^0 


300 6-8 
19.3-9 
."^8. 200 
.54.080 
5,9-'5 
122,870 
177.423 
.31,389 


7.703 1 

11.668 1 

20,660 j 

'. 


23.900 
.30,0' 
10,210 






?4,.=;28 
32,?0S 
1«,P?^4 
574,956 
962. 5?9 
401, ?27 
102,:-61 
l.«2.0n4 
7r,5.=!9 

1S0',1,«4 
10,674 

l^O.OS.T 
ri .8:13 
R.5 Rns 










T/>P 


















62,409 !■ 
245. .';65 1 
65,424 






Townrl'^S 

Ma.ii?on 


■A 

■ ■ i: 


''70,.^'i-9 

53,0'-2 

1.3.5f) 

4«7,950 
57,l.-.0 


w 


>rarshall 


l<"«.6-7 
121. iro 
20.170 
.37.061 
'2.268 
139.70^ 
J3.010 
51, .520 


86,279 1 
110,300 j 




^'onrop 


3 


a 






"...: § 


Xf»=hoha 

Npwtf^n 


9, .300 J 

57.J11 1. 

149. .5.31 1 

44, '17 1 

74,76? 1 


48,977 


>. 


yoxii>^'"» 

Oktihtx^ha 


. ^ .. 


."^7.07-^ 
211,290 
33,5.50 


-s 

a 

u 
3 


Panola 

Ppprl River 


. n ..i ^9,0gfi 


Porry 


a 


fi79,.?.nl 

26,947 
8n.J35 
10,911 
44,418 
44,4fil 
4.'>,5S6 
&4,3n 
47,133 


240. f4? 

3'^1.367 

8,42S 

118.r67 

70,060 
14.113 

.5 ,'"'33 
14,5.30 

7.324 


4,225 
83,49'? 

.53! 71 5 


9,260 ; 
43,7^6 ' 
49,878 ! 
24,720 ,. 


2.050 

13,90'1 

75,. 391 






Pile e 


u 





Pontotoc 


■u 


Prpntiss 


. . >■ 




Ouitman 








30.907 

6,780 


1^,985 1 
43,480 ; 


1.-^,6.52 
14,750 




Sfott 




Sharkpv 




Simpson 


13.850 

20,588 

6,.5SO 

""is;70.5' 
39,061 
46.156 
60,909 
1,1.50 
44,996 


19,42.5 

17,7&^ 






Smith 


8,707 




Sninner 




Sunflower 


a=;3,6.->5 

74,91f5 
14.=i,476 

3S,fi67 

42,373 
147,812 

63,862 


14.0?0 
36,f«l 
53,48.5 


15,000 . 
34,886 






Tallahatchip 


13, .310 




Tato 




Tippah 


139,200 ; 

81,138 j 


129,992 
195.874 




Ti'homingo 






Tunica 







Union 




26,460 






Walthall 









WaTTPn 




1,302,207 


1,R81..«80 

409,. 524 

114,-308 

27,0r,8 

3,79S 

17,9.i9 

2.=;.5,S85 

179,443 

6,. 522 


206,. 361 
l'"'2,3W 
136,50) 


674,165 
9,000 . 
1,800 . 


223, .500 




Wa=hinsrton 




744.. "Trg 
341.610 
.W,5.57 
21 19S 




Wavno 






WPh?t»r 






Wilkinson 




3.2.50 
•;3,221 
22. W> 
73. Of 13 


11,300 
16,150 '. 
206,849 ( 
13,. 347 1 


67,014 




Winston 




20,111 
168,420 
533,202 




Yalobusha 




15,212 
2,000 




Yozoo 






All other 
counties (a) " 














■ 







(a) Includes Franklin, Sunflower, and Tunica counties. 



h>r 



1'? i~E ' g"-'."'"! 

rt' r 



) >^;r,'i! 









j otrr.? 

,...!.. ■ 







STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



737 



MANUFACTURES— WAGES— MISSISSIPPI. 



County.. 



Total... 



il8,7«8,0<X> 



Adain.s 

Alcorn 

Amite 

Attala 

Benton 

Bolivar 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Chickasaw 

Choctaw 

Claiborne 

Clarke 

Clay 

Coahoma 

Copiah 

Covington 

De .'^oto 

Forrest 

Franklin 

George 

Greene j . . .S 

Grenada .. c 

Hancock '.. = 

Harrison I.. 5 

Hiniis I.. ^ 

Holmes .. ^ 

Issaquena .. "" 

Itawamba L. % 

Jackson |.. C 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jefferson Davis . 

Jones 

K"mpor 

Lafayette 

Lamar 

Lauderdale 

Lawrence 

Leake 

Lee 

Leflore 

Lincoln 

Lo\mde< 

Mailison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Neshoba 

Xe«ton 

Xoxiib-e 

Oktibbeha 

Panola 

Pearl Riv-r 

Perry 

Pike 

Pontotoc 

Prentiss 

Quitman 

Rankin 

Scott 



1880 



,4n.SS(5 4. !)!.';. S<i3 



lST,lt>T 

a5,271 

94,79S 

n,tM:2 

9,043 

11..5.5C 

•20,fe.j4 

77.-ii4 

118,217 

6:^.213 

139,944 

2.->S,S-24 

80, 3 W 

2.3,oiKj 



1870 



18C0 



1850 



l,iy2,<>4', il..->47,i2.>i 1,61S,.t:0 



373, (i23 
8^,^72 
.")7,7ti2 I 
14,!)13 
H.SiH) 
85,612 

2,9*» 

9,710 
17,040 

l,S.-5!> 
40,.'?12 
6:},401 

S,,»ll 
39,47.-) 
402, 1»3 

2,822 
31.970 



27,161 



69,292 

36,7.16 

27n,S."S 

427.173 

310,21.5 

43,646 

13.98!^ 

10,240 

424,513 

4, .541 

15,935 



5,072 
14, IS"! 

107,.»!»-) 

1.50 !7< a 
17,409 



7,130 

1.57,969 

7,l'j5 

21,373 



3,50,114 
14,68:5 
17,140 



118,1.52 
8,713 
5.040 



613.112 

13,«.>7o 

9,278 

40,195 

94.817 

281,103 

145.7:« 
34. ■.'"'I 
*>8,322 
39,4S6 

126.48.5 
.57.tSS 
3,662 
44,141 
24,04-« 
21,477 
16,891 

200.64>; 

228,1.54 

483.5.55 

23!,S:3<i 
3.874 
13.872 
12,695 



ii!o,8<;8 

28,410 

5,478 

17,. 573 

5,160 

5,728 

4,507 

14,840 

6.517 

5.946 

500 

23,n71 

10. .559 

16,5riO , 

134,880 ! 

3,177 ' 

5,003 i 



46,046 

21,3.50 

l,.3tX) 

14,284 



82,9.J2 



27.9(0 
41,628 



200 
7,820 

:r7,024 

13,745 
5,085 



39, Si 10 



3,(XK> 
n.lfxi 
15,8<;t 
30.5e4 
44.2.56 
51 ,7.56 
17.820 



6,9<10 

106,896 

1,450 

25, no 



30,810 

8,88<J 



1,1-54 



2,450 



6,os6 



295 
107 
5S5 
2W 
,278 i 
310 j 
1.50 i 
,268 ' 
,215 ' 



40 

I. •:>■>» 

6,150 



9,(X»0 
10,0.50 

2*16,1^^100 

48,9<K) 
68,042 
15,325 
6.100 

"48,280" 

700 

3,;?40 



60,816 
51 ,060 
15,264 
300 
24,108 



8,700 



433 

4,800 
5,795 



8.200 
18,7(« 



2,928 
26! 484 



422.. 579 

4,779 

6,341 

33,262 

7,428 i 
1S4.924 ; 
32.r'95 i 
10.;i51 
47.705 . 
43.847 
.35,8S1 
20,641 I 

4,805 
10.1.3/3 
18.154 i 
12,<«i2 I 
14,138 I 
64,652 1 
f«,223 I 
462,797 i 

I.49S 1 
«,fi66 i 

5.u2o 1 
38,685 

5,509 



.59,6<r3 

1,310 

1,9.50 

4,844 

7.50 

22.910 

;36,019 

4,482 



770 
3.310 
9,170 



27.6'6 
9,180 
5,772 



42,. 528 

21.685 

9,610 

2, an 

5,810 
17,141 
25,</02 
12,405 



14, .595 
74.398 
23,7:52 



41,970 
7,68*1 



108,360 

60,180 

'J60 

16*). Si 10 
41,340 



1.40O 
26,2.58 
23,072 

6,.30:J 
22,907 



13,788 



21, 8 SO 
34,620 
26.988 



295 
1.3,345 
2.738 
7,062 



1,100 
16.200 



4,620 



1,320 

9,600 
27,264 



3,781 
2,264 



4,6<iO 
7,825 



30,876 
7,440 



738 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



MANUFACTURES — WAGES — MISSISSIPPI. — Continued. 



County. 



1910 



1900 



1890 



188) 



1870 



ISCO 



1850 



Sharkey 

Simpson 

Smith i.. 

Sumner I.. 5 

Sunflower '.. ~ 

Tallahatchie |... ~ 

Tate !.. o 

Tippah i.. " 

Tishomingo |.. >, 

Tunica j.. ■^ 

Union .. ^ 

Walthall .. o 

Warren .. Z 

Washington |.. 3 

Wayne j... ~ 

Webster I . . . ^ 

Wilkinson j... ■^ 

Winston I.. ■^ 

Yalobusha [... 

Yazoo 

AJ] other | 
counties (a) | 



12,9?9 
20,207 



3,375 
6,329 
1,357 



1,425 
1,911 



8,550 
450 



7,260 



87.5"6 
27,<!w52 
30,290 
14.42-4 
6,9<:»3 
33,132 
18, SCO 



2,272 
6.963 
14,746 
21,822 

i6!.536' 



2,369 

15,597 

3,191 

9,902 

3,375 



3,532 
13,150 



8,508 



15.530 
29,338 



30,628 
150, 2(H 



597, "92 
196. So") 
S0,ei6 

is,e&7 

179,978 
85,422 



798,169 

174,179 

50,922 

16,622 

6,5:«> 

5,856 

157,773 

51,637 

3,657 



135,968 I 179,970 
40,600 1 3,000 
2S,110 j 5,000 



2OT,540 



1,522 2.790 

1,&'« 2,906 

:0,6O2 I 211,i>i8 

26,461 6,592 



33,000 



21,120 
900 



(a) Includes Franklin, Sunflower, and Tunica counties, 



MANUFACTURES— VALUE OF HOME-MADE— MISSISSIPPI. 




County 




l.Cf 

Lfflore 

Lincoln 

Lowndes 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall .... 

Monroe 

Montg-omery. 
\e>hoba .... 

N"wton 

N'oxuh-^^ 

Oktibbeha .. 

Panola 

Pearl River . 

Perry 

Pike 

Pontotoc ... 

Prentiss 

Quitman 

Rankin 

.Scott 



8,353 



12,231 
48 
316 
5,661 
2,295 
5,480 



1660 ! IffiO 



9,596 

IS. 628 
10,773 
49,656 
22.944 



18,780 
12..'533 
3,365 
7,473 
4,616 



4,325 

2,887 

4,863 

17,189 



1,024 



ig.c-ss 

11.209 
9.513 

2S,S96 
6,813 



7,186 
17,644 
57.320 



11.457 
14,723 



28,»42 
11.. 560 
10.402 
42,435 
31,329 



10,6.31 
20,<>-8 
16,95S 
14,234 
80 



16.5'i5 
21,375 
32,36-3 



14,742 



OBKI 






STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



739 



MANUFAX:TURES— VALUE OF HOME-MADE- 

Continued 



-MISSISSIPPI. — 



County 



Greene 

Grenada 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hinds 

Holmes 

Issaquena 

Itawamba 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jefferson Davis 

Jones 

Kemper 

Lafayette 

Lamar 

Lauderdale ... 

Lawrence 

Leake 



1S70 



5,665 
2,458 



l,-t75 
1,225 



4,851 



1.CT4 
1,016 
9,477 



10,501 
370 



86,690 

6,355 

20.820 

40.782 



10,838 
9,289 



10.132 
8,512 
9,554 



19,063 
10,367 
14,278 



1850 



1,581 



1.441 

370 

14,013 

11,949 

IK 

48,424 

2,474 

20,33^2 

5,5S9 



19,7S> : 8,?« 
17,684 i 41,643 
27,490 I 129,944 



28,234 
21,217 
10.976 



County 



1870 



I Sharkey 

I Simpson 

1 Smith 

i Sunflower 

[Tallahatchie.. 

I Tate 

I Tippah 

lllshomingo .. 

i Tunica 

I Union 

Walthall .... 

I Warren 

j Washington 

I Wayne 

I Webster 

Wilkinson 

'Winston 

I Yalobusha ... 

Yazoo 



45,442 
18,450 



1860 



13,275 
31,263 



54,197 
17,620 



10,812 

1,143 

11,936 



2,30S 



144,269 
83,990 



428 

14,820 

220 



1850 



38,063 
21,6,T7 



4,637 



.53,648 

39.7'>3 

1,055 



51,798 2,787 
i]285' ......v..'. 



1,081 
2l,6'i8 
49,D66 

6.763 



STATISTICS FOR MISSISSIPPI 



an X 
CO W 

o 



_ I 





1 


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to 


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is 

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w: "o • • 


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apemspaBA »::"•• "'^S 



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I bI 



»^9 



PART VI 



Legislative Department — 
Sketches of Senators. 
Sketches of Members of the House, 

The City of Gulfport. 

County Government. 



JosflunavoO x^nuoD 

I 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAKTMENT 



REPRESENTATION. 



The legislative power of this State shall be vested in the Legislature, 
which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. (Con- 
stitution, Sec. 33.) 



ARTICLE XIII. 

APPORTIONMEXT. 

Section 254. The number of Representatives in the Lower House of 
the Legislature shall be one hundred and thirty-three, to be appor- 
tioned as follows: 

First. — The Counties of Choctaw, Covington, Greene, Hancock, Issa- 
quena, Jones, Lawrence, Leflore, Marion, Neshoba, Pearl River, Perrr, 
Quitman, Scott. Sharkey, Simpson,* Smith, Sunflower, Tallahatchie, 
Tishomingo, Tunica, Wayne and Webster, each shall have one Repre- 
sentative. 

Second. — The Counties of Alcorn, Amite. Attala, Bolivar, Calhoun, 
Carroll, Chickasaw, Clay, Coahoma, DeSoto, Kemper. Lafayette ^ladi- 
son, Newton, Pike, Pontotoc, Prentiss. Rankin, Tate, Union, Wilkin- 
son and Yalobusha, each shall have two Representatives. 

Third. — The Counties of Copiah. Holmes, Marshall, Monroe, Noxu- 
bee, Panola, Warren and Washington each shall have three Represen- 
tatives. 

Fourth. — The Counties of Franklin and Lincoln each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Fifth. — The Counties of Tippah and Benton each shall have one Rep- 
resentative 'and a floater between them. 

Sixth. — The Counties of Claiborne and Jefferson each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Seventh. — The Counties of Clarke and Jasper each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Eighth. — The Counties of Grenada and Montgomery each shall have 
one Representative and a floater between them. 



744 LEGISr.ATIVE DETARTMEXT 

Xinth. — The Counties of Leake and Winston each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Tenth. — The Counties of Harrison and Jackson each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Eleventh. — The Couniy of Yazoo shall have three Representatives, 
and the County of Hinds shall have three Representatives, and they 
shall have a floater between them. 

Twelfth. — The County of Lauderdale shall have three Representa- 
tives, one to be elected by the City of Meridian, one by the county out- 
side the city limits, and one by the whole county, including Meridian. 

Thirteenth. — The County of Adams, outside of the city of Natchez, 
shall have one Representative, and the City of Natchez one Represen- 
tative. 

Fourteenth.— ThQ County of Lowndes shall have three Representa- 
tives, two of whom shall be elected by that part of the county east of 
the Tombigbee River, and one by that portion of the county west of 
said river. 

Fifteenth. — The County of Oktibbeha shall have two Representa- 
tives, one of whom shall be elected by that portion of the county east 
of the line running north and south between ranges thirteen and four- 
teen, and the other by that portion of the county west of said line. 

Sixteenth. — The County of Lee shall have two Representatives, the 
County of Itawamba one, and a floater between them. 

Seventeenth.— In counties divided into legislative districts, any cit- 
izen of the county eligible for election to the House of Representatives 
shall be eligible to represent any district thereof. 

(The Counties of Lamar. Forrest, Jefferson Davis, George, and Stone 
each have one Representative.) 



THK SENATE. 

Sec. 255. The number of Senators shall be forty-five, and are ap- 
portioned as follows: 

First. — The County of Harrison shall constitute the First District 
and e^ect one Senator. 

Second. — The Counties of Wayne and Jones, the Second District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Third. — The Counties of Jasper and Clarke the Third District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Fourth.- -The Counties of Simpson and Covington, the Fourth Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Fifth.— The Counties of Rankin and Smith the Fifth District, and 
elect one Senator. 



■;t --"t 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 745 

Sixth. —The Counties of Pike and Franklin the Sixth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Seventh. — The Counties of Amite and Wilkinson the Seventh Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Eighth. — The Counties of Lincoln and Lawrence the Eighth District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Xinth. — The County of Adams the Ninth District, and elect one Sen- 
ator. 

Tenth. — The Counties of Claiborne and Jefferson the Tenth District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Eleventh.—The County of Copiah the Eleventh District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Twelfth. — The Counties of Hinds and Warren the TT\elfth District, 
and elect one Senator each and a Senator between them, to be chosen 
from the counties alternately beginning with Warren. 

Thirteenth. — The Counties of Scott and Newton the Thirteenth Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Fourteenth. — The County of Lauderdale the Fourteenth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Fifteenth. — The Counties of Kemper and Winston the Fifteenth Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Sixteenth. — The County of Noxubee the Sixteenth District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Seventeenth. — The Counties of Leake and Neshoba the Seventeenth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Eighteenth. — The County of Madison the Eighteenth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Nineteenth. — The County of Yazoo the Nineteenth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twentieth. — The Counties of Sharkey and Issaquena the Twentieth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Twejity-first. — The County of Holmes the Twenty-first District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenti/second. — The County of Attala the Twenty-second District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-third. — The Counties of Oktibbeha and Choctaw the Twenty- 
third District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fourth.— The Counties of Clay and Webster the Twenty-fourth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fifth. — The County of Lowndes the Twenty-fifth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenty-sixth. — The Counties of Carroll and Montgomery the Twenty- 
sixth District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-seventh. — The Counties of Leflore and Tallahatchie the 
Twenty-seventh District, and elect one Senator. 



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746 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Ticentij-eightJi. — The counties of Yalobusha and Grenada the Twenty- 
eighth District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-ninth. — The Counties of Washington and Sunflower the 
Twenty-ninth District. The County of Washington shall elect one Sena- 
tor, and the Counties of Washington and Sunflower a Senator between 
them. 

Thirtieth. — The County of Bolivar the Thirtieth District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Thirty-first. — The Counties of Chickasaw, Calhoun and Pontotoc the 
Thirty-first District, and elect two Senators. Both Senators shall at no 
time be chosen from the same county. 

Thirty-second. — The County of Lafayette the Thirty-second District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-third.— The County of Panola the Thirty-third District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Thirty-fourth. — The Counties of Coahoma, Tunica and Quitman the 
Thirty-fourth District, and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-fifth. — The County of DeSoto the Thirty-fifth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Thirty-sixth. — The Counties of Union, Tippah, Benton, Marshall and 
Tate the Thirty-sixth District, and elect three Senators. The Counties 
of Tate and Benton shall be entitled to one, the Counties of Union and 
Tippah one, and the County of Marshall one. 

Thirty-seventh. — The Counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn and Prentiss 
the Thirty-seventh District, and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-eighth. — The Counties of Monroe, Lee and Itawamba the 
Thirty-eighth District, and elect two Senators, one of whom shall be a 
resident of the County of Monroe and the other a resident of Lee or 
Itawamba Counties. 

Thirty-ninth. — The Counties of Jefferson Davis, Marion and Wal- 
thall, the Thirty-ninth District, and elect one Senator. 

Fortieth. — The Counties of Lamar, Pearl River and Hancock, the For- 
tieth district, and elect one Senator. 

Forty-first. — The Counties of George, Green and Jackson the Forty- 
first District, and elect one Senator. 

Forty-second. — The Counties of Forrest and Perry the Forty-second 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Sectiox 256. The Legislature may at the first session after the State 
census of 1895, and decennially thereafter, make a new apportionment 
of Senators and Representatives. At each apportionment each county 
then organized shall have at least one Representative. New counties 
afterwards created shall be represented as may be provided by law 
until the next succeeding apportionment. The Counties of Tishomingo, 
Alcorn, Prentiss, Lee, Itawamba, Tippah, Union, Benton, Marshall, La- 
fayette. Pontotoc, Monroe, Chickasaw, Calhoun, Yalobusha, Grenada. 
Carroll, Montgomery, Choctaw, Webster, Clay, Lowndes and Oktibbeha, 



T.EGISI.ATIVE DBPARTMEXT 747 

or the territory now comprising them, shall together never have less 
than forty-four Representatives. The Counties of Attala, Winston, Nox- 
ubee, Kemper, Leake, Neshoba, Lauderdale, Newton, Scott, Rankin, 
Clarke, Jasper, Smith, Simpson, Copiah. Franklin, Lincoln, Lawrence, 
Covington. Jones. Wayne, Green, Perry, Marion. Pike. Pearl River. Han- 
cock, Harrison and Jackson, or the territory now composing them, shall 
together never have less than forty-four Representatives; nor shall the 
remaining counties of the State, or the territory now composing them, 
ever have less than forty-four Representatives. A reduction in the 
number of Senators and Representatives may be made by the Legisla- 
ture if the same be uniform in each of the three said divisions; but the 
■number of Representatives shall not be less than one hundred, nor 
more than one hundred and thirty-three; nor the number of .Senators 
less than thirty, nor more than forty-five. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sees. 34 and 3=;.) 



STATE SENATORS, EIGHTY-FOURTH SESSION. 

OrFH'KR.S OK TtfE .SF.NATK. 

President Lieut. Gov. Lke M. Rissell 

President pro tern Cakroll Kexdrick 

Secretary J. W. T. Falkner, Jr. 

Assistant Secretarj/ J. K. Vardamax, Jr. 

Sergeant-at-Arws I. L. Tigert 

Doorkeepers W. H. Rees and W. H. Benton 

Postmistress Miss Caerie Ou\'eb 

Stenographers Misses Aoele Day and Corine Bei.k 

Pages W. C. Phipps and F. H. Oliphant 



MISSISSIPPI LEGISLATURE, 1916-20. 

SENATORS. 

Session 1916-18. 

First District.— F. M. Johnson, (1916), Ford; Z. T. Champlin, (1918), 
Biloxi. 

Second District. — C. W. Walley, Waynesboro. 

Third District.— J. W. White, Rose Hill. 

Fourth District.— H. C. Yawn, Lumberton, (1916); Bee King, (1918), 
Mendenhall. 

Fifth District.— E. M. Lane, Taylorsville. 



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748 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Sixth District.— C. E. Thompson, Garden City. 
Seventh Distriet.—B. W. Huff, Centerville. 
Eighth Difitrict. — E. Harvey McGehee, Monticello. 
Ninth District. — W. C. Bowman, Natchez. 

T€7ith District. — B. H. Wade, Tillman. 
Eleventh District. — J. M. Coen, Mizpah. 

Ticelfth District.— J. A. Baker, Jackson: G. E. Williams. (1916), 
Jackson; George Anderson, (1918), Vicksburg; H. K. Murray, Vicks- 
burg. 

Thirteenth District. — L. Q. C. Williams, Union. 

Fourteenth District. — R. E. Thompson, Toomsuba. 

Fifteenth District. — John A. Clark, DeKalb. 

Sixteenth District. — J. Q. Poindexter, Ravine. 

Seventeenth District. — E. S. Richardson. Philadelphia. 

Eighteenth District. — C. B. Greaves, Flora. 

Nineteenth District. — S. P. Stubblefield, Yazoo City. 

Twentieth District. — L. C. Dulaney, Grace. 

Ticenty-first District. — H. H. Casteel, Pickens. 

Tn-entii-sei^ond District. — David E. Crawley, Kosciusko. 

Ticenty-third District. — W. R. Chrismond, Ackerman. 

Twenty-fourth District.— S. A. Miller, West Point. 

Twenty-fifth District. — W. P. Stribling, Columbus. 

Twenty-sixth District. — L. S. Hemphill. Valley Hill. 

Txcenty-serenth District. — W. M. Whittinsrton. Greenwood. 

Tvoenty-eighth District. — J. A. Blount. Grenada. 

Ticenty-n\nth District. — Van B. Boodie, (1916), Greenville: Walton 
Shields, (1918). Greenville: J. F. Burrow. Ruleville. 

Thirtieth District. — W. B. Parks. .Merisrold. 

Thirty-first District.— S. W. Bradford, Houston: Marshall T. Adams, 
Pontotoc. 

Thirty-second District. — J. C. Eskridge, DeLay. 

Thirty-third District. — C. B. Vance, Batesville. 

Thirty-fourth District.— I.. C. Franklin. Clarksdale. 

Thirty-fifth District.— J. W. Barbce, Hornando, (1916); J. N. Brown. 
(1918), Olive Branch. 

Thirty-sixth District.— W. H. Dyson, Hickory Fiat; S. C Mims. Holly 
Springs; H. Clay Collins. Myrtle. 

Thirty-seventh District. Dr. C. Kendrlck, Kendrick. 

Thirty-eighth District.— T. K. Boggan, Tupelo; A. J. Cox, Smithville. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 749 

KEW DISTRICTS AND SENATORS UXDER CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT OF 

1916. 

Thirty-ninth District, Jefferson Davis, Clarion. Walthall. — S. J. 
Hathorn, Columbia. 

Fortieth District, Lamar, Pearl River, Hancock. — H. C. Yawn, Lum- 
berton. 
Forty-first District, George, Greene, Jackson. — F. M. Johnson, Ford. 
Forty-second District, Forrest, Perry. — Claude E. Hill, Hattiesburg. 



List or Standing CoiiMiTTEEs of the Senate. 

Rules. — Lieut. Gov. Russell, Pres. pro tern. Kendrick, Burrow Frank- 
lin, Walley, Boggan, Casteel, Eskridge, Hemphill. 

Constitution. — Yawn, Chairman; Burrow, McGehee, Thompson of 
€th, Walley, Baker, Crawley, Coen, Johnson. 

Judiciary. — Boggan, Chairman; Burrow, Murray, Whittington, 
Adams, Baker, Barbee, Blount, Boddie, Bowman, Lane, McGehee, Will- 
iams of 12th, Minis, Stubblefield, Stribling, Richardson, Franklin, 
Greaves, Clark, Crawley, Cox, Bradford. 

Finance. — Eskridge, Chairman; Walley, White, Thompson of 6th, 
Cox, Poindexter, Chrismond, Miller, Dyson, Hemphill, Kendrick, Yawn. 

Local and Private Legislation. — Casteel, Chairman; Walley, Boggan, 
Parks, Adams. 

Agriculture and Commerce. — Poindexter, Cnairman; White, Walley, 
Crawley, Eskridge, Hemphill, Dyson, Parks, CoUin.s, McGehee, Thomp- 
son of 6th, Williams of 13th, Miller. 

Public Education. — Williams of 13th, Chairman; Lane, Stribling, 
Blount, Whittington, Walley, McGehee, Thompson of 6th, Yawn. 

Public Works. — Greaves, Chairman; Collins, Minis, Parks, Williams 
of 13th. 

Printing. — Cox, Chairman; Coen, Walley, Yawn, Miller. 

Railroads and Franchises. — Williams of 12th, Chairman; Burrow, 
Yawn, Boggan, Hemphill, Coen, Walley, Whittington, Williams or 13th. 

Claims. — Clark, Chairman; Bowman, Barbee, Johnson, Williams of 
13th, Stribling, Greaves. 

Military Affairs. — Barbee, Chairman; Miller, Bowman, Williams of 
12th, Blount. 

Federal Relations. — Coen, Chairman; Thompson of 6th, Johnson, 
Stribling, White. 

County Aijdirs. — Mims, Chairman; Williams of 13th, Johnson, Bow- 
man, McGehee, Chrismond, Coen. 

Immigration. — .Miller, Chairman; Greaves, Boggan, Thompson of 
6th, Yawn, Johnson, Kendrick. 



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750 LEGISIvATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Registration and Elections. — Thompson of 6th, Chairman; Strlbling, 
Barbee, Casteel, Coen, "Walley, Wade. 

UnfinisJied Business. — Huff, Chairman; Wade, Collins. 

Banks and Banking. — Murray, Chairman; Burrow, Crawley, Whit- 
tington, Vance, Blount, Collins, Stribling, Parks. 

Contingent Expenses. — Stubblefield, Chairman; Lane, Adams. 

Penitentiary. — Hemphill, Chairman; Burrow, Collins, White, Poin- 
dexter. Yawn, Chrismond, Cox, Franklin. 

Humane and Benevolent Institutions. — Adams, Chairman; Casteel, 

Lane, Williams of 12th. Cox, Mims, Bowman, Clark, Huff. 

Public Lands. — Lane, Chairman; Franklin, Walley, Vance, Boggan, 
Huff, Hemphill, Baker. 

Corporations. — Burrow, Chairman; Franklin, Adams, Dyson, Walley, 
Chrismond, White, Hemphill, Eskridge. 

Levees. — Parks, Chairman; Boddie, Greaves, Barbee, Burrow, Frank- 
lin, Whittington, Blount, Stubblefield. 

Engrossed Bills. — Blount, Chairman; Dulaney, Thompson of 6th, 
Wade, Stubblefield. 

Public Health and Quarantine. — Kendrick, Chairman; Poindexter, 
Casteel, Wade, White, Lane, Williams of 12th, Coen. 

Temperance. — Walley, Chairman; Mims, Thompson of 6th, Poindex- 
ter, Baker, Franklin, Blount, Whittington, Yawn. 

Pensions. — Vance, Chairman; Adams, Coen, McGehee, Huff, Poin- 
dexter, Clark, Johnson. 

Insurance. — Whittington, Chairman; Clark, Stubblefield, Williams 
of 12th, Murray, Cox, Bowman, Baker, McGehee. 

Fisheries and Game. — Richardson, Chairman; Collins, Miller, Parks, 
Stribling, Greaves, Christmond. 

Drainage. — Stribling, Chairman; Eskridge, Franklin, Hemphill, 
Thompson of Gth, Walley, Yawn. 

Municipalities. — McGehee, Chairman; Stubblefield, Boddie, Mims, 
Whittington, Bradford, Crawley. 

Roads. — Clark, Chairman; Boddie, Bradford, Poindexter, Coen, Bog- 
gan, Baker, Chrismond, Whittington. 

Fees and Salaries. — Franklin, Chairman; McGehee, Thompson of 
14th, Chrismond, Burrow, White, Eskridge, Walley, Richardson. 

Oyster Industry. — Johnson, Chairman; Casteel, Franklin, Poindexter, 
Murray, Yawn, Adams. 



Joi.vT Committees. 

Executive Contingent Fund. — Chrismond, Chairman; Miller, Coen. 
State Library. — Bowman, Chairman; Baker, Mims. 
Enrolled Bills. — Dyson, Chairman; Mims, Lane, Richardson, Brad- 
ford. 



11 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 751 

Universities nnd Colleges. — Crawley, Chairman; Stribling, Williams 
of 12tli. Miller, Barbee, Adams, BoA\inan. 

Investigate P^tate Offices. — Coen, Chairman; Poindexter, Kendrick, 
Hemphill, Walley, Murray, Franklin. 



Sexators and Their Committees for 1916-20. 

Adams. Marshall T., Pontotoc, Thirty-first District. — Committees: 
Local and Private Legislation; Contingent Expenses; Humane 
and Benevolent Institutions (Chairman); Corporations; Pensions, 
Oyster Industry. 

Baker, J. A., Jackson, Twelfth District. — Committees: Constitution, 
Judiciary, Public Lands, Temperance, Insurance, Roads. 

Barbee, J. W., Hernando, Thirty-fifth District. — Committees: Judic- 
iary, Claims, Military Affairs fChairman), Registration and Elec- 
tions, Levees. 

Blount, J. A., Grenada, Twenty-eighth District. — Committees: Judic- 
iary, Public Education, IMilitary Affairs, Banks and Banking, 
Levees, Engrossed Bills (Chairman), Temperance. 

Boddie, Van B., Greenville, Twenty-ninth District. — Committees: Ju- 
diciary, Levees, Municipalities, Roads. 

Boggan, T. K., Tupelo, Thirty-eighth District. — Committees: Rules, 
Judiciary (Chairman), Local and Private Legislation, Railroads 
and Franchises, Immigration, Public Lands, Roads. 

Bowman, W. C, Natchez, Ninth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Claims, Military Affairs, County Affairs, Humane and Benevolent 
Institutions, Insurance. 

Bradford, N. W., Houston, Thirty-first District. — Committees: Judic- 
iary, Municipalities, Roads. 

Burrow, J. F., Ruleville, Twenty-ninth District. — Committees: Rules, 
Constitiftion, Judiciary, Railroads and Franchises, Banks and 
Banking, Penitentiary, Corporations (Chairman), Levees, Fees and 
Salaries. 

Casteel, H. H., Pickens, Twenty-first District. — Committees: Rules, 
Local and Private Legislation (Chairman), Registration and Elec- 
tions, Public Health and Quarantine, Oyster Industry. 

Clark, John A., DeKalb, Fifteenth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Claims (Chairman), Humane and Benevolent Institutions, Pen- 
sions, Insurance, Roads (Chairman). 

Collins, H. Clay, Myrtle, Thirty-sixtli District. — Committees: Agri- 
culture and Commerce, Public Works, Unfinished Business, Banks 
and Banking, Penitentiary, Fisheries and Game. 

Crawley, David E., Kosciusko, Twenty-second District. — Committers: 
Constitution, Judiciary, Agriculture and Commerce, Banks and 
Banking, Municipalities. 



752 LEGISI.AT1VE DEPARTMENT 

Crismond, W. R., Ackernian. Twenty-third District. — Committees: Fi- 
nance, County Affairs, Penitentiai-y, Corporations, Fisheries and 
Game, Roads, Fees and Salaries. 

Coen, J. M., Hazlehurst, Eleventh District. — Committees: Constuu- 
tion. Printing:, Railroads and Franchises, Federal Relations (Chair- 
man), County Affairs, Registration and Elections, Public Health 
and Quarantine, Pensions, Roads. 

Cox, J. A., Smithville. Thirty-eighth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Finance, Printing (Chairman), Penitentiary, Humane and Benev- 
olent Institutions. Insurance. 

Dulaney, L. C, Grace, Twentieth District. — Committee: Engrossed 
Bills. 

Dyson, W. H., Hickory Flat, Thirty-sixth District. — Committees: Fi- 
nance, Agriculture and Commerce, Corporations. 

Eskridge, J. C, DeLay, Thirty-second District. — Committees: Rules, 
Finance (Chairman), Agriculture and Commerce, Corporations, 
Drainage, Fees and Salaries. 

Franklin, L. C, Clarksdale, Thirty-fourth District. — Committees: 
Rules, Judiciary, Penitentiary, Public Lands, Corporations, Levees. 
Temperance, Drainage, Fees and Salaries (Chairman), Oyster In- 
dustry. 

Greaves, C. B., Flora, Eighteenth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Public Works (Chairman), Claims, Immigration, Levees, Fisheries 
and Game. 

Hemphill, L. S., Valley Hill. Twenty-sixth District. — Committees: 
Rules, Finance, Agriculture and Commerce, Railroads and Fran- 
chises, Penitentiary, (Chairman), Public Lands, Corporations, 
Drainage. 

Huff, D. W., Centerville, Seventh District. — Committees: Unfinished 
Business (Chairman), Public Lands, Pensions, Humane and Be- 
nevolent institutions. 

Johnson, F. M., Ford, First District. — Committees: Constitution. 
Claims, Federal Relations, County Affairs, Immigration, Pensions, 
Oyster Industry (Chairman). 

Kendrick, Dr. C, Kendrick, Thirty-Seventh District. — Rules, Finance, 
Immigration, Public Health and Quarantine (Chairman). 

Lane, E. M., Taylorsville, Fifth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Public Education, Contingent Expenses, Humane and Benevolent 
Institutions, Public Lands (Chairman), Public Health and Quar- 
antine. 

McGehee, Harvey, Monticello, Eighth District. — Committees: Consti- 
tution, Judiciary, Agriculture and Commerce, Public Education. 
County Affairs, Pensions. Insurance. Municipalities ( Chairman •, 
Fees and Salaries. 






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LKGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 753 

Miller, S. A., West Point, Twenty-fourth District.— Comaiittees: Fi- 
nance, Agriculture and Commerce, Printing, Military Affairs, Im- 
migration (Chairman), Fisheries and Game. 
Mims, S. C, Holly Springs, Thirty-sixth District. — Committees: Ju- 
diciary, Public Works, County Affairs (Chairman), Humane and 
Benevolent Institutions, Temperance, Municipalities. 
Murray, H. K., Vicksburg, Twelfth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 

Banks and Banking (Chairman), Insurance, Oyster Industry. 
Parks, W. B., Merigold, Thirtieth District. — Committees: Local and 
Private Legislation, Agriculture and Commerce, Public Works, 
Banks and Banking, Levees (Chairman), Fisheries and Game. 
Poindexter, J. Q., Ravine, Sixteenth District.— Committees: Finance, 
Agriculture and Commerce (Chairman), Penitentiary, Public 
Roads, Health and Quarantine, Temperance, Pensions, Oyster In- 
dustry. 
Richardson, E. S., Philadelphia, Seventh District. — Committees: Ju- 
diciary, Fisheries and Game (Chairman), Fees and Salaries. 
Stribling, S. P., Columbus, Twenty-fifth District. — Committees: Ju- 
diciary, Public Education, Claims, Federal Relations, Registration 
and Elections, Banks and Banking, Fisheries and Game, Drainage 
(Chairman). 
Stubblefield, S. P., Yazoo City, Nineteenth District. — Committees: Ju- 
diciary, Contingent Expenses (Chairman), Levees, Engrossed Bills, 
insurance. Municipalities. 
Thompson. C. E., Garden City, Sixth District. — Committees: Consti- 
tution, Finance, Agriculture and Commerce, Public Education, 
Federal Relations, Immigration, Registration and Elections 
(Chairman), Engrossed Bills, Temperance, Drainage. 
Thompson, R. E.. Toomsuba, Fourteenth District. — Committee: Fees 

and Salaries. 
Vance, C. B., Batesville. Thirty-third District. — Committees: Banks 

and Banking, Public Lands, Pensions (Chairman). 
Wade, W. H., Tillman, Tenth District. — Committees: Registration and 
Elections, Unfinished Business, Engrossed Bills, Public Health and 
Quarantine. 
Walley, W. C, Clara, Second District. — Committees: Rules, Constitu- 
tion, Finance, Local and Private Legislation, Agriculture and 
Commerce, Public Education, Printing, Railroads and Franchises, 
Registration and Elections, Public' Lands, Corporations, Temper- 
ance (Chairman). Drainage, Fees and Salaries. 
White, J. W., Rose Hill. Third District. — Committees: Finance, Agri- 
culture and Commerce, Federal Relations, Penitentiary, Corpora- 
tions, Public Health and Quarantine, Fees and Salaries. 

48— m 



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754 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Williami;, G. E., Jackson, Twelfth District. — Committees: Judiciary, 
Railroads and Franchises (Chairman), Military Affairs, Humane 
and Benevolent Institutions, Public Health and Quarantine, Insur- 
ance. 

Williams, L. Q. C, Union, Thirteenth District. — Committees: Agricul- 
ture and Commerce. Public Education (Chairman), Public Works, 
Railroads and Franchises, Claims, County Affairs. 

Whittington, \V. M., Greenwood, Twenty-seventh District. — Committee: 
Judiciary, Public Education. Railroads and Franchises, Banks and 
Banking, Levees, Temperance, Insurance (Chairman), Municipal- 
ites. Roads. 

Yawn, H. C, Lumberton. Fourth District. — Committees: Con.stitution 
(Chairman), Finance. Public Education, Printing, Railroads and 
Franchises, Immigration, Penitentiary, Temperance, Drainage, 
Oyster Industry. 



legisLlATIVE department 755 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE TO BIOGRAPHICAL SECTION. 



In the preparation of the biographical section of the Register it is 
the purpose to bring togetlier in one place, easily accessible to the 
people, biographical sketches of the men who represent them in the 
public service of the State,- — their birth, lineage, occupation, edu- 
cational equipment and special qualifications for the work assigned 
them. The sketches have been prepared as well as it has been pos- 
sible from the somewhat defective data submitted. Handwriting in 
some instances has made it impossible to determine the spelling of 
names, and if any mistakes occur in that particular, it is deeply 
regretted. 

In presenting the sketches it may be well to observe that it is 
highly important that the majority of the people, who rarely have 
the opportunity of coming in contact with the public officials of the 
State except when they are candidates for ofhce, soliciting votes, 
should have some means of acquainting themselves with men 
who fill public ofhce. As Major S. A. Jonas, the late lamented edi- 
tor of that clean, wholesome and all together fearless newspaper, 
the Aberdeen Examiner, once observed in commenting on the bio- 
graphical section of the Register, "The biography of every man who 
serves the people should be easily accessible to the press and to the 
people." 

Aside from local purposes, the origin and general character of 
the population of the State is among the first inquiries of the home- 
seeker. That Mississippi is among the States of the Union whose 
population is made up of the descendants of the original founders 
of the American Republic, — a land of democracy, humanity and 
large opportunity, — is readily proved by a perusal of these sketches. 

There has been no attempt in these biographies to discuss the rel- 
ative merits or demerits of legislation promoted by any of the rep- 
resentatives of the State; that belongs to another historical pre- 
sentation. 

In the preparation of this section of the Register, I wish again 
to acknowledge my obligation to the faithful assistants who have 
rendered invaluable aid in the completion of the arduous task, 
which has involved such a great expenditure of time and labor. 



756 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAKT.MENT 



SKETCHES OF SENATORS 



FIRST DISTRICT. 



t gi^m,ii;j00^,'jf ! ^jm f> f:^ ,.: 




Francis M. Johnson 



FRANCIS MARIOX JOHXSOX " of Ford, Stale 
Senator from the Fir^t Senatorial District of 
Mississippi, was born October 22, 1S50, at Am- 
ericus, Jackson Countj-, Miss. He is the son of 
Samuel Wyles Johnson and Marie Louise 
(Graham) Johnson of Americus Jackson County. 
His father was a native of Georgetown Dis- 
trict, S. C. and removed to Jackson County, 
Miss., where he reared his family and shared 
actively in the development of his section, be- 
ing always ready to respond to the call of his 
country in time of war. As a mere youth, he 
saw service in the Seminole War; served in 
the Mexican War; and though advanced in years, 
was a gallant soldier and officer of the Con- 
federacy, for which he gave up his life at the 
Battle of Missionary Ridge, near Lookout Moun- 
tain, in 1S63. He was the son of Frank Johnson 
and Elizabeth Greaves of Georgetown District. S. 
C. The Johnsons are of English, Irish and Scotch 
ancestry, as was a large portion of the South 
Carolina colonial population. An ancient map 
in the archives of that state shows that a 
part of Alississippi was once included in the 
Province of South Carolina, in the earliest 
colonial period, and though tinie has restricted 
the boundary of that proud old state, her chil- 
dren's children now dwell where her ancient 
borders extended, and even as far south as Spain 
had established her two Floridas. This is the 
case with the Johnson family. Senator 
Johnson's mother was a native Mlssiss- 
ippian, daughter of William Graham and 
wife Elizabeth Cumbert of East Pascagoula, 
Miss. Being a youth of some fifteen years at 
the close of the Civil War, Francis Marion John- 
son had little opportunity for education, other 
than that gained by the daily occurrences of 
the momentious periods of War and Recon.-^truc- 
tion, in which last though in the first years of 
manhood, he took part as a member of the 
famous Ku KIux Klan, which organization pre- 
served the white civilization of the South. As 
a youth, he attended the schools of his county 
and by close application, prepared himself for 



LEGISI^VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



757 



the study of law and after completing- his law 
rourse, was admitted to the bar in 1S79. His chief 
business, liowev-or, was the handling-, purchase 
and sale cf lumber. Though he never practiced 
law, his studies along- that line were of bene- 
fit to him, making- him a safer and more intelli- 
erent business man. Senator Johnson has served 
as ^^agistrate, member of the County Board of 
Supervisors, and Alderman of the town of Moss 
Point, his residence. He has represented his 
county in a number of State Conventions, and 
was elected to the House of Representatives. 
November 7, 1911. While a member of this 
body he served on the following- committees: 
Fisheries, Chairman of Commerce and Shippintj 
Committee, Penitentiary, Railroads. Ways and 
Means, Public Printing-, and Contingent Ex- 
penses. In November 1915, he was elected to 
the State Senate and is one of the able members 
of the body. His efforts In behalf of the preser- 
vation of Mississippi's Old Capitol, unselfish, 
continuous and untiring- throughout the session 
of 1916. should always entitle him to the .grati- 
tude of the people of Missis.= ippi. In the Senate, 
he serves on the following- committees: Con- 
stitution, Claims. Fedeial Relation, County Af- 
fairs, Immigration. Pensions, Oyster Industry of 
which he is chairman. Senator Johnson is a 
Democrat, member of the Methodist Church, 
Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the World. 
Served a term as Grand Chancellor K. of P., 
1906-7. He has been married three times: 
First to Josephine Nelson, February, 1871; sec- 
ond to Louise C. Rouble in 1S77; third to Annie 
M. Kirkwood in 1879. They were all of Jackson 
County, Miss. Senator Johnson has two chil- 
dren: Louise R. Johnson, child of second mar- 
riage, (now Mr.<?. Paul Smith); T. Ford Johnson, 
son of present wife. 



ZACHARY TAYLOR CHAMPLIN, of Biloxi, 
Miss., was born March 28, 1S47, at Handsboro, 
Harri-son County. Miss., He is the son of Will- 
iam Aaron and Margaret Smith Champlin of 
North Stonington, Connecticut. The family 
came to Mississippi in the antebellum period of 
'he State and settled in its coast country, 
^'illiam A. Champlin was the first Probate Clerk 
')f Harrison Countj' and served in the Legisla- 
ture -during the days of Reconstruction, at 
which time he rendered valuable assistance in 
restoring law and order to the commonwealth. 
Mr. Champlin is of English descent, his mother 
h.ivinsr been a native of Liverpool. England. He 
received his early education in the private 
schools of Harrison County and at. the tender 



;» P^ 



w 

Zachary T. Champlir) 



ros 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



ag-e of fifteen, when scarcely more than a child, 
he entered the Confederate service, bcci'min^ a 
'•Hiprh Private" in Company C. Moorman'.-; Bat- 
talion, Wirt Adams' Brigade. Forre.st's Division. 
After the war. Mr. Champlin. who with so many 
of the young- men of that period, had been 
denied liberal educational advantages, persisted 
in the effort to obtain an education and to pre- 
pare himself for a professional career. After a 
careful study of law. he was admitted to prac- 
tice in February. 1907. He served as Justice of 
the Peace fioni 1SS8 to 1912 and became Police 
Justice of Biloxi from 1912 to 1917. Having be- 
come widely known and popular throughout his 
section, he was induced by his many friends to 
enter state politics and was elected to the State 
Senate on February 10, 1917, to repres<^nt the 
First District, consisting of Harrison and Stone 
Counties. Senator Champlin is a Democrat and 
is independent of any political faction prefer- 
ing- to do his o^vn thinking in matters concern- 
ing the State's welfare. He is a deacon of the 
Baptist Church: a member of the fraternal or- 
ders of Masons and Woodmen of the World. He 
has been twice married, his first wife being 
Virginia White, after whose death he married 
•Wilhelmina Schulze of Clinton, La. Senator and 
Mrs. Champlin have six children: William 
Henry Champlin. Mrs. Margaret Virginia 
Roberts, Mrs. E. G. Bond, Mrs. D. J. Gay, Lieu- 
tenant Walter Gates Champlin, and Mrs. Rosa 
Champlin Smith. 

Xoto: The data furnished in handwriting is 
sometimes very difficult to decipher, especially 
in the matter of spelling proper names. The 
writer, however, makes every effort to give all 
names correctly. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



f"^ 



L<*te_^. 



^ 






Columbus W. Walley 



COLUMBUS WESLEY WALLEY of Clara, 
Senator of the Se'^ond Senatorial District of 
Mississippi, was born February 7. 1876. near the 
present town of Richton, Greene County, Miss. 
He is the son of "U'iley Walley and Sarah Ann 
(Bradley) Walley of Henderson, Greene County, 
Miss., and of Old Augusta, Perry County, Miss. 
His father was too young to enter the Civil 
War; has resided .always in the place of* his 
birth where, in peace and contentment, he reared 
his family on a small farm. In addition to 
farming, he engaged to a small extent, in manu- 
facturing and .^.-iw-milling. Wiley. Walley was 
the son of Dr. John Walley and Cancada Walley of 
Greene County, Miss., the family having been 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTIMENT 



759 



established in Mississippi in its early develoi>inent. 
Senator "W'alloy's mother was the daughter of 
Sion Bradley and Aquila Bradley of Perry County. 
His maternal grandfather came to Mississippi 
from North Carolina and served in the War 
of 1812 ; his grandmother was a native of South 
Carolina. Both were of Iri.sh descent. Dr. John 
■\Valley was the son of Gooseberrj' Walley and his 
wife. Susie Gardner Walley. They were the first 
of the family to settle in Missi.«sippi, having come 
by way of Tennessee from North Carolina to 
finally settle on Thomson Creek, in what is now 
known as Wayne County, Miss. Goosebei-ry 
Walley served in the War of 1S12 and Dr. John 
Walley was a private in the Confederate Army. 
Senator Walley received his early education in 
the public schools of Greene County; attended the 
High Schools of Leakesville. Greene County, and 
Waynesboro. Wayne County, in which institutions 
he obtained a tliorough preparation for college. 
Later, he entered the Agricultural and ^Mechanical 
College. Starksville. Miss. He ha^s been largely 
engaged in teaching and other school work for 
nineteen years, serving on Text-book Commission, 
on School Board Commission, and Board of Exam- 
iners ; also, served ^Vayne County as Superin- 
tendent of Education from 1914 to 1916. Senator 
Walley is a Democrat ; a minister of the Methodist 
Church ; and is a member of the fraternal order of 
Masons. His wife was formerly Miss Eleanor 
Almeada Smith, daughter of John A. Smith and 
Spicy (^Kittrell) Smith, who lived at Jonathan, 
Greene County, Miss. Mrs. "Walley's father was 
a member of the Board of Supervisors for three 
terms, and represented his county in the lower 
house of the Legislature from 1896 to 1904. 
Senator and Mrs. Walley have three children : 
Dwight Jjuther. Andrew, and Denton. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 



JOHN WOFFORD WHITE of Rose Hill, 
Miss., State Senator from the Third District, is 
the son of Benjamin Wofford White and Eliza 
(Chatham) White and was born at Rose Hill, 
on November 18, 1863. His father was born at 
Spartanburg, in Spartanburg County, S. C. and 
with his parents, Moses AVhite and Martha 
White, removed to Mississippi and settled at 
Rose Hill, Jasper County. Mr. White's mater- 
nal grandparents were Spen<er Chatham and 
Elizabeth Chatham, of Rosehill. Mis.s. His great- 
grandfathers. White and Wofford, served in the 



io^, 




John W. White 



760 



LEGISr.ATlVE DEPARTMENT 



Continental anny of the American Revolution. 
A brother of his paternal grandmother. Ben 
Wofford, was the founder of Wofford'.-s College, 
and was the firs^t Methodist in the world to give 
$100,000.00 to education. Mr. White received his 
education in the Rose Hill Institute. His in- 
terests lay in the business of planting and he 
has always engaged in that pursuit. With his 
practical knowledg-e and his fondness' for the 
work, he aided greatly in the work of the 
Farmers" Alliance and Farmers' I'nion. He has 
been active in temperance and prohibition work. 
He was a member of the People's Party until its 
dissolution, since which he has been a Democrat. 
He was elected to the State Senate in 1915. He 
serves on the following committees : Finance. Agri- 
culture and Commerce. Federal Relations. Peniten- 
tiary. Corporations. Public Health and Quarantine 
and Fees and Salaries. He is a member of the 
Methodist Church, and hns served as Steward and 
member of the Boaid of Trustees, and as Superin- 
tendent of the Sunday School for over 20 years. 
He is a member of the Woodmen of the ^Vo^ld and 
of the Columbian Woodmen ; was a member of 
the F. E. C. U. and County president for two years. 
In earl.v life, he married at Rose Hill, Miss., 
Clara Alice McKinnon. who died in young wom- 
anhood, leaving two children, a son and a 
daughter. On July 2.5, 1897, he married Mary 
Tryphenia Aycock, daughter of Andrew .Jack- 
son and Mary Jane Aycock of Rose Hill. Mis.-s. 
Mrs. "\\Tiite's maternal grandmother was a Robin- 
son. Mr. \\niite has five children : Daniel McKin- 
non. Clara Amelia. (Mrs. James Taylor) of Paohuta. 
Miss. ; by first marriage. John Harold. Wilbur 
Wofford. and Avie Lee, by second marriage. 



1 



-^ ^ 




Henry C. Yawn 



FOURTH DISTRICT 

HENRY CLAY YAWX, of Lumberton, Miss., 
State Senator from the Fourth District of Miss- 
issippi, was born July 5, 1S59 at Columbia Henry 
County, Alabama, and is the son of Green Berry 
Yawn and Malinda Yawn of Covington County, 
Miss. His father was a native of South Caro- 
lina, removed to Mississippi in 1S60, entered 
the Confederate Army and served through the 
four years. He was the son of Isaac Yawn and 
Delilah Yawn who lived in South Carolina and 
afterward.s moved to Georgia. Senator Yawn's 
paternal great-grandfather served in the Revo- 
lutionary War, his grandfather, Isaac Yawn, 
served in the Seminole "V\'ar and his father In 
the Civil War. Senator Yawn's mother wag the 



i 



LEGlSL.vTIVE DErARTMEXT 761 



daughter of Jaokson Tawn and Louisa Yawn 
of Alabama. His mother and father's families 
though having the same name were not known 
to be related. He received his early education 
in the rural schools of Coving'ton County, and 
at >[ount Carmel and Culumbla Hig^h Schools. 
After taking a special Commercial Course, he 
taught for several years in Columbia, Lumber- 
ton and Purvis High Schools. He was for some 
years treasurer of the town of Lumberton and 
was never a candidate for public office until at 
the solicitation of the voters of the Fourth Dis- 
trict he became a candidate for the State Senate. 
AmonjT other legislation, he was a supporter of the 
bill for the Prohibition Laws that were enacted. 
In political faith, Senator Yawn is a Deniocrat ; 
is a member and steward in the Methodist Church, 
having been for fourteen years superintendent of 
his Sunday-school. In 190 4, he was Deputy Grand 
Master of Mississippi Masons : was Grand Mastei- in 
1907 ; is at pie.sent an ofhcei- in the Grand Chapter 
Royal Arch Masons, and Grand Patron of O. E. S. ; 
a Knight of Pythias and a Woodman of the 
World. On August 22, 1S93, Senator Yawn was 
united in marriage to Fannie Lea Limbaugh, 
daughter of Joseph Limbaugh and Sarah Ann 
Limbaugh, who live at Burns. Miss., both being 
natives of South Carolina. Joseph Limbaugh 
served ;n tlie Confederate Army four years. 
Senator and Mrs. Yawn's children are: Gladys, 
Fannie Lois, Henry Clay, Jr., Howard Hinton, 
and Rosalind. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

EDGAR MOORE LAXE. of Taylorsville, Miss., 
State Senator from the Fifth District of ^riss- ■ •'^>:f^ 

issippi, was born September 2. 1884, at Lorena, 
Smith County, Miss. He is the son of George 
Oscar Lane and Viola Susan (Anderson) Lane, 
who lived at Lorena. Geo. O. Lane was a native 
of the state and lived at Burns. Miss., until twelve 
years old ; then moved with his parents. Francis 
Asbury Lane and Harriet Lane, to Texas, where 
they lived one .year; then moved back to Lorena 
in Smith County. Mr. Lane is of English and 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. His paternal ancestors 
came from England to America before the Am- 
erican Revolution. They belonged to the class 
of English gentry known as Cavaliers. His ma- 
ternal ancestors settled in America just after 
the Revolution. Both garndfathers, Francis 
Asbury Lane and Alfred Anderson, served four 
years in the Confederate Army rendering valli- 



^: 




Edgar M. Lane 



i 



762 



IjEgislative department 



ant service throughout the entire war. His 
mother was the daughter of Alfred Anderson 
and Catherine Anderson, and from this, the ma- 
ternal side, Mr. i.ane receives his Scotch-Irish 
blood. The common schools of Smith County 
furnished to Mr. i.ane his early education, and he 
was a very studious youth. Later, he entered 
Mississippi CoUeso, where he won fame as a 
debater and graduated in 190S with the B. A. 
degree and •distinction." After studying law 
by a correspondence cour.se, he entered the 
Univer-sity of Virtjinia for resident work. Com- 
pleting this course in one year he began prac- 
tice at Taylorsville and Raleigh. Miss., in 1910. 
He soon established a lucrative practice and 
becoming widely known through his profession 
he was induced to t-nter the political field. He 
was elected State Senator in 1915. and during 
the session of 1916. he was very active in pro- 
moting all legislation which he believed would 
redound to the best interests of his state. 
He is one of the best equipped of the younger 
members of the Legislature and takes great 
interest in the work of State Legislation, and is 
as steadfast and immovable as gi-anite in his ideals 
of honesty. and iniet,'rity in public service. Sena- 
tor Lane is a Democrat and served as Secretary 
of the Democraiic Executive Committee of 
Smith County, in 1?07-1911. He is a steward in 
the ^Methodist Church, and belongs to the fra- 
ternal Orders of Masons and Woodmen of the 
World. On March 10, 1911, at Taylorsville, Miss., 
he was married to Hasseltine Rainer, daughter of 
George W. Rainer of Sylvarena. Miss. Her an- 
cestry was Scotch-English. Senator and Mrs. 
Lane have two children: Rabian Dahl and 
Chalnn^rs Keith. 



SLXTH DISTRICT. 



r-r^mr 



I '^ HWL.t) ■-'•M.rmi. ' 



i^ 






Charles E. Thompson 



CHARLES ERXE.ST THOMPSON, of Garden 
City, Miss.. Senator from the Sixth District of 
Mississippi, was born March 7, 18S9 at Oak 
Grove Plantation in Franklin County, Miss. He 
is the son of Pharaoh Carter Thompson and 
Mary Sam. (Marshall) Thompson of that county. 
His father is ,i man of generous public serv- 
ice, having been for many years deacon of the 
Spring Hill Bapti.st Church. Superintendent of 
the Sunday-school of that church, moderator of 
Carey Baptist Association, and Post-master of 
Garden City. He is the son of Bartlett Ciila- 
han Thompson and Adeliza Adelia Thompson, 
originally from Wales, and settled in Xorth 
of Franklin County. The Thompson family is 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAKTMEXT 753 



Carolina in colonial times, various branches of 
the family having representatives in the Revo- 
lutionary Army, amon^ whom, was Absalom 
Griffin who served with distinction under Gen- 
eral Green in the Carolinas and Virginia. JMajor 
David Thompson, a soldier of the American 
Revolution and a Major of militia in the War 
of 1812, was the first of the family to remove 
to Mississippi, settling on the Homochitto River, 
in what is now Franklin County. John L. 
Thompson, born in cJouth Carolina, accompanied 
his parents in this emigration which occurred 
in the early part of the nineteenth century. He 
served as Major in the War of 1S12. He was 
the father of Bartlett Calahan Thompson, who 
lived on the same estate, until a short time 
before his deatn. when he removed to Osyka in 
Pike County. He early volunteered in the serv- 
ice of the Confederate States, but was soon af- 
ter discharged on account of ill-health. After 
the war, he held various ofrices in his county. 
His second son, Pharaoh Carter Thompson, be- 
came the father of Charles Ernest Thompson. 
Senator Thompson's mother is the daughter 
of Samuel Gibbon Marshall and Lina (Hooper) 
Marshall of Hazelhurst and Crystal Springs, 
Miss., the latter's mother having been a mem- 
ber of the famous Alston family of South Caro- 
lina. Philip Gaines Alston came from South 
Carolina to Raymond, Miss., where he became a 
prominent and influential citizen. Senator 
Thompson received his early education under 
private tutors and did not attend public schools. 
He later entered Mississippi College from which 
he was graduated in 1914, with degree of B. .?. 
While in college he was, at times. President and 
anniversarian of the Demosthenean Debating 
Society; Attorney and Secretary of the Philoma- 
thean Literary Society; Judge of the Moot Court 
Bar Association; a member of the Debating 
Council and of the Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; repre- 
sented Mi.?sissippi College in the Inter-collegi- 
ate Debate. After graduation from Missi.-Js-ppi 
College he entered the University of Mississippi 
in 1916 and was graduated in 1917 with degree 
of LL. B. Senator Thompson is a member of the 
Independent Progressive Democratic party. His 
occupation has been that of a planter and stock- 
raiser. He is not a professional politician, hav- 
ing never asked for nor held any political office, 
until upon the solicitation of the voters of his 
community he consented to become a candidate 
for the State Senate in which body he has made 
for himself a worthy record among the young 
members. He stands for the high'-st and purest 
Ideals in public service and is destined to come 
to the front in the future history of his state. 



764 



LEGISL-VTIVK DEPARTMENT 



His people are to be congratulated upon their 
selection of one to represent them whose honesty 
and integrity is unswerving. He is a member 
of the Baptist Church, is a Mason, and has never 
married. 




Uaiiiel "VV. Hurt 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

DANIEL WEBSTER HUFF, of Centreville, 
Miss., Senator from the Seventh District of 
Mis.iissippi, was born September 20, 1S54, at 
Old Centreville, Amite County, Miss. He is the 
son of Dr. Holioway Huff and Caroline t.Pome- 
roy) Huff of Wilkinson County, Miss. Dr. 
Holioway Huff was the son of Holioway Huff 
and wife, Katherine Longmire. of Gloster. Amite 
County, iliss. He practised m,edicine at Old 
Centreville for many years, after which he re- 
moved to Wilkin.son County and engaged in cot- 
ton planting. Senator Huff's mother was the 
daughter of Ralph Wheelock Pomeroy and Mary 
(Starr) Pomeroy of Philadelphia, Pa. The fami- 
ly in Mississippi has shared in the educational 
and agricultural progress and advancement of 
the State and its representative in the Missis- 
sippi Senate has kept up the high standard of 
ideals and principles that are so characteristic 
of the better class of Mi.ssissippians. Senator 
Huff is a cotton planter and has served as a 
member of the Board of Supervisors of Wilk- 
inson County. He represented his county in the 
House of Representatives in 1904-06. As a pres- 
ent member of the State Senate, he is known 
as one of the capable and thoughtful members, 
and is independent of party factions, unpreju- 
diced and fair to all the interests of the state. 
In political faith, he is a Democrat; is a mem- 
ber of the fraternal Order of Knights of Pythias 
and was christened in the Presbyterian Church. 
In the Senate he serves on the following com- 
mittees : Public Land : Pensions ; Humane and 
Benevolent Institutions; Unfinished Business of 
^which he is chairman. On February 1, 1ST7. he 
was united in marriage to Mary Narcissus Lane- 
hart of Woodville. Miss., whose father. Hans- 
ford Lanehart, served as Second Lieutenant in 
the Confederate army. The mother died, leaving 
eight children. On March 31, 1902. he married 
Birdie Albertino Whitstone. of New Orleans. I.A., 
whose parents were Rawlins C. Whitstone and 
Evelyn N'etterville Whitstone of Woodville. Miss. 
Senator Huff has nine children : Holioway Percy, 
Eva, Stella Lanehart. Mary Anna. Byron Pomeroy, 
Myrtis Lilian, Henry Van Eaton, Georgia Adams, 
and Mary Narcissus, the last being the child of 
his second marriage. 



LEOTSLATTVE DEPARTMEXT 



76c 



EIGHTH DISTRICT 



HARVET M'GEHEE. of :Monticello. Miss.. State 
Senator from the Eisrhth District of Mississippi, 
was born June 11. 1SS7. at Little Spring's. Frank- 
lin County. Miss. He is the son of John Hiram 
McGehee and Alice Katherine (Ford) McGehee. 
He is of Scotch ancestry, his forbears emiErrat- 
ing from that country with the first settlers 
of Virg-inia. For three g-enerations, the family 
has resided at Little Spring-s. John Hiram Mc- 
Gehee during the period after the Civil "War 
gave valuable public service to the State, hav- 
ing been a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1S90, member of State Senate ses- 
sions of 1S92-4. and 19nO-2. He has been on 
the Board of Trustees of the Beauvoir Soldiers' 
Home since its establishment. His parents were 
James ^radison :McGee and Rebecca Ann Jone.=: 
of Little Sprin.srs. Senator Harvey McGehee's 
mother was a dau.ghter of Bartlett Ford and 
Rebecca Ann Cain of Bunkley. Franklin Tounty. 
Miss. He received his elementary training in 
the schools of Little Springs and was graduated 
from the High School in 1906. An intere.sting 
sketch of Senator ^TcGehee, in the Lawrence 
County Press of February 11, 191i>. gives the 
following- account of his youthful efforts to at- 
tain front rank among the worthy sons of his 
State: "In colleg'e he was as popular and de- 
serving: as he is todav. ar-^ Tv-a=: ^^-^ vo-i-^i^n- .-.f 
unusual honors. During- the summer of 1907. 
between his junior and senior years, he repre- 
sented Mis.sissippi College at the State Oratori- 
cal Contest at the Crystal Springs Chataqua. 
At the celebration of the fifty-sixth anniversary 
of his college literary society he was the an- 
niversarian. being chosen to that position 
unanimously, which was an exceptional honor. 
Later, when takinar his law course at the L^ni- 
vt^rsity of Mississippi, he was chosen to repre- 
sent Mississippi at the Tri-state Debate, com- 
posed of . representatives of Vanderbilt Univer- 
sitv, Baylor University, and the University of 
M'issi.ssippi. After graduating- in the la-w, he 
Sf'ttled at Monticello. Miss., in 1909, where he 
has continued to practise as a member of the 
firm of Patterson & McGehee." "His reputation 
as a brilliant and polished orator has increased 
•with the years, for -we find him in demand at 
almost every Woodmen celebration or unveiling 
within hailing distance, and the number of 
school commencements in which he has figured 
as principal speak<^r is too large to mention. 
Ho si-rved three years as messenger boy in the 
State Senate, the very body he is no-w seeking 
to f>nter as a member, and at an ag-e when !m- 



Harvey M'Gehee 



766 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTxMENT 



presslons count for most. The experience that 
he eralned then will prove Invaluable should he 
be elected. As a lawyer he Is keen, alert, dis- 
criminating, careful, and very successful, and 
no worthier, more conscientious Christian gen- 
tleman lives than he." In the fall of 1015, Mr. 
McGehee T\'as elected to the Senate and his repu- 
tation as a member of that body la one that 
should inspire all young Misslsslpplans and 
Judging from the present a brilliant career of 
much usefulness to his state awaits htm. Sena- 
. tor MoGehee is a Democrat in political faith: 
is a member of the Baptist Church, Knights of 
Pythias and Woodmen of the "^Vorld. He was 
married on April IS, 1916. to Miss Willie-Belle 
Brinson. daiighter of V,''. W. Brinson and wife, 
Lena Br>-ant P.iinson of Monticello, Miss. 



NINTH DISTRICT. 



,, , i...iiiia.ii iTTrr-TiM WILLIAM CHAPMAN BOWM.^N. of Natchez, 

I ^ Miss.. Senator from the Ninth District of Missis- 

sippi, was born September 14. 19?2. near Monroe. 
Ouchlta Parish. La. He Is the son of Francis 
fj^. Edwin Bowman and Pauline fChapm.an) Bow- 

man of Alphenia Plantation, Tensas Parish, La. 
_-,, His father left Louisiana and resided in West- 

"_^ V ern Texas from 1883 to 1S9S. when he returned 

''^'^ 'S^ to his plantation in Louisiana. He was a soldier 

\ ^ In the Confederate Army, entering the service 

at the age of sixteen, during the latter part of 
the war. -u'hen the youth of the country was so 
heavily drawn upon In defense of the South. 
H" rvas the .<!on of James P.o-wman and Caroline 
S. Bowman, residents of the same plantation 
William C. Bowman ^^^^^ whl^h drew th'-ir son back from Texas. 

The Bowmans were of the old Planter class of 
, Louisiana and for many generations they clung 

to their ancestral hom<^ with the same love that 
characterized their English ancestors. Senator 
Bowman's mother was the daughter of Wllliara 
W. Chapman and Saluda Chapman of Clinton 
and Monroe, La. He first attended th^^ schools 
of Runnels County, Texas, and later those of 
Belton, Texas. Upon his parents' return to 
Louisiana, the young son attended the public 
schools of Natchez. Miss., for t^vo sessions. 
From 1900 to 1904 he wns a student at >Ttns.nDs 
Colleg-p. Jaekson. Miss., from which he was 
graduated in 1^104, with B. A. d^srree. The Tnlv- 
erslty of Mississippi next cl.Tlmed him as a 
student of law and In that course, he frraduated 
In 190?). Youner P.o'^man's surrounding'.^ were 
such as to Inspire youth with noble ambitions 
and when he entered Millsaps College in the 



LEGISLATR'E DEPART^IEXT 



767 



fall of 1900, he was prepared in every way to 
reflect honor upon that Institution. He was 
grrariuaterl In 1904 with the Pe?-ree of B. A. He 
afterwards took a law course at the University 
of Mississippi, takinar two years in one and 
erraduatins- in 1905. After graduation, during 
the summer of 1905. he located for practice in 
the' city of Xatchez with Cahriel Benoist Shields 
and remained with him until the Tatter's d^ath 
in 1907. For a year Mr. Bo-^vman practiced alone 
and then formed a partnership with Judsre 
William C. Martin, remainlns? with him four 
years when he took Judere Richard Reed's place 
in the firm of Brandon & Reed. Judere Re^d hav- 
Iner accepted a place on the Supreme Bench of 
the State. Fpon Jud.ge Reed's retiring from the 
bench he reentered his old firm In .Tune. 1917. nnd 
Senator Bowman is now practicinsr Tinder the 
firm name of Reed. Brnndon & Bowman. His 
modestv has prevented the writer from e:atherin?r 
any but the simple facts of hi."? life, but the record 
which he has made is so brilliant and so con- 
dusive of ^Tis.=ipsippi's best interests that anyone 
who is nt all acquainted with the worthy, .srifted 
and thoroughly eouipned ynuns: men of the State 
could not fail to see in William C. Bowman one of 
the stronsest. ablest and most trustworthy men of 
Mississippi. His first entrance into the public 
affairs of State was in the Senate of 1916 and his 
presence In that body was alike inspirlns: to his 
fellow-members and the people who attended the 
sessions. Senator Bowmnn is ,a Democrnt. member 
of the Methodist Church and has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Stewards for t=n years. 
Since his jrraduation from collesre h" has con- 
ptantly brrr a teach'^r of the Sunday Schools 
and is at present the teacher of the Men's Bi^le 
Class of his Church. Hp heloners to the frater- 
nal orders of ^Tason."?. Woodmen of the World 
and the collesre fraternity of Kappa Sisma. On 
October 21st. 19ns. he was united in marriage 
to Sammye Parker of Natchez. Mississippi. Mr*:. 
Bowman is the dausrhter of Samuel and Gert- 
rude Parker of that place. 



TENTH DISTRICT. 






i 
V' 



^» »;- 



R.VTTATT.T E H.\RRTSON "U'.VDE of Tillman 
Miss.. State Senator of th^ Tenth District, was 
born September 14. 1856. at Prospect Hill 
Plantation." .Teffprson County. Miss., and Is the 
son of Isaac Ross Wade and Catherine E. Dun- 
bar of Jefferson County. His father was a na- 
tive of South Carolina from which state he re- 
moved with his parents to Mississippi and set- 



Battaille H. Wade 



768 legislati\t: department 



tied first at Oak Hill Plantation, then Prospect 
Hill Plantation, where he remained until his 
death which occured in his seventy-sever.ih 
year, in 1891. He was the son of Daniel Wade 
and Jane Brown Ross of South Carolina and 
later of Oak Hill Plantation, Jefferson CouTity. 
Miss. Senator Wade's mother is the daughter 
of James Dunbar and Cetsey Bisland of "Dun- 
barton Plantation," Adams County, Miss. His 
gi'eat-grandfather. Isaac Ross, served in the 
South Carolina troops as a captain under 
General Sumpter, in the Revolutionary "U'ar. 
He removed to Mississippi in 180S and settled 
at Prospect Hill Plantation, where he died in 
1836. Isaac Ross emancipated 1S6 negroes in 
1835 and colonized them in Liberia. The colony 
left Jefferson County, Miss., in 1845, after a con- 
test of ten years over the will of Captain Ross. 
Senator Wade was a boj- of ten years after the 
closQ of the Civil War, and his early education 
was received in the private and later in the 
public schools of his community. As with that of 
so many of the youths of the South, the Civil War 
interfered witli his higJier education, but the in- 
fluence of a cultured home and community, and 
an active participation in the public affairs of 
his county gave him an experience and equipment 
that made him an influential citizen of his section. 
He has rendered his community and section a 
service that has been both generous and val- 
uable. He served as a member of the Board 
of Supervisors from 1904 to 1908 in Jefferson 
County ; has been Trustee of the Jefferson 
County High School at Fayette. since its 
organization in 1S9S; Trustee of Chamberlain- 
Hunt Academy at Fort Gibson, since 1904; and 
Trustee of Red Lick Consolidated School from 
its organization in 1913. His election in 1&15 
to the high office of State Senator from his Dis- 
trict was an honor well deserved and his in- 
fluence in that body is always cast upon the 
si4e of right. Senator Wade is a Democrat, a 
deacon in the Presbyterian Church, and is aflaii- 
ated with the fraternal order of Masons. On 
December 20, 1S.S2, he was married to Caroline 
Olivia Wade of Cottage Home Plantation, Miss. 
Mrs. Wade is the daughter of Dr. Patrick Henry 
Wade and Martha Darden Wade of "Cottage 
Home Plantation." Senator and ilrs. Wade have 
six children: John Tate, Robert Dunbar. Pat- 
rick Henry, Edgar Guy, Olivia Wade, Battaille 
Harrison Wade, Jr. 



LECISr.ATIVE DETARTMEXT 



769 



ELEVENTH [.I.^TUTCT. 



JA.MES M. rOE.V of .Mizp.ih. Miss.. SeriMlo- 
fi-om the Eleventh District, was born Sept. 3. 
1S49. at Linden, Copiah County. Miss. He is the 
son of James Coen onrl Sarah Moore Coen. His 
father was a native of New To»-k City and rt- 
sided for a tinu' at I'^ort Gibson. ;Mis.«»., whei-e 
he married and later removed to Copiah County. 
At the time of his death, he was a resident of 
Linden. ^Ii.<s. Senator Coen received his early 
education in the private schools of Copiah 
County, tiie iniblic school .system of ^rissi.ssippi 
not having- been established at that period of 
the State's history. The Civil War interrupted 
his further education and along- with the mass 
of the youth of the State, he entered the serv- 
ice of the Confederacy. He was a private in Com- 
pany G., 2 4th Mis.-sissippi Battalion of Cavalry and 
after years of fnirliful service to his counli-y he was 
paroled by the Federal Government at Jackson, 
Miss., in lSfi4. After the war. he returned to 
his native county and engaared in farming- in 
which calling- he has continued. Senator Coen 
took part in all community efforts and move- 
ments for the restoration "f the State, which 
had been depleted by the ravages of the Civil 
War. During the days' of reconstruction . lie 
joined the famous Ku Klus: Klan and -was ac- 
tive in all efforts for the preservation of order 
during the carpet-bag regime. Later he served 
as Justice of the Peace in his district for three 
terms, during 1SS5-1891. During- the adminis- 
tration of this office he was untiring in his ef- 
forts to bring about respect for the la-vv in his 
community and in promoting all legislation for 
the advancement of his section. He was elected 
to the State Senate in Xo\einbei-. 191.j. in wiiicii 
body he serves with ability. His ideals of pub- 
lic service are of a nature that command ad- 
miration of his colleagues and he is always 
found laboring for the moral and civic uplift of 
Mississippi. Senator Coen is a Democrat in 
political faith, is a member of the ^Methodist 
Church. He has never been a member of the 
fraternal orders and owes his popularity and 
advancement entirely to individual merit. In 
18S1 he was married to Carrie if. Segrist at 
Brandywine, Claiborne County, iliss., daughter 
of B. L. Segrist and Ann Wheeler Segrist of 
Claiborne County. 



r'/ y-J "■" '^- 



1 



James .^r. Coen 



4 9 — m 



.1'. v..r.'' 1 



P 



770 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 




Joseph A. Baker 



JOSEPH ATKIXS BAKER of Jaikson. Soim- 
tor from the Twt^lfth District, was born Octo- 
ber 7, 18S3, at Sharon, Madison County, Miss., 
and is the son of "William. Jackson Baker and 
Almyra Atkins of Madison County. His fath.-r 
was a resident of ."^liaron until 1884, after whic'n 
he removed to hi.-^ plantation near Pocahontas, 
Hinds County, Miss. At the age of sixteen he 
entered the Confederate service and was a mem- 
ber of the State Militia the first year of the 
war and was later transferred to the Army of 
Northern Virprinia, in which service he re- 
mained until the close of the war. His service 
as a Confederate soldier was conspicuous for 
courage and heroism and his name appears on 
the rolls as present at all the great battles in 
which the Army of Virginia was engaged. Serv- 
ing with him was his brother, James M. Baker, 
and his father, Samuel Smith Baker, all of 
whom served throughout the war. After the 
surrender of the Confederate armies. William 
J. Baker took an active part during the days of 
reconstruction in restoring order in his county. 
His parents, Samuel Smith Baker, and wife. 
Eliza Austin Baker, of Sharon were among the 
prosperous antebellum families of Mississippi. 
Senator Baker's mother was the daughter of 
Joseph Washington Atkins and Eleanor Savage 
of Louisville, "U'inston County, Miss. The At- 
kins family came to America from England dur- 
ing the early part of the eighteenth century and 
settled on the Yadkin River in North Carolina, 
and later- removed to Virginia where they held 
land grants from the crown. William Atkins, 
great-grandfather of Senator Baker, was a 
Revolutionary soldier and was married to Eliza- 
beth O'Connell, an Irish lady. In colonial times 
the Atkins were close friends of the Washing- 
tons, Joseph Washington Atkins havina: been 
named for the family. The Bakers are of Irish 
and English ancestry. They came from England 
to America during the early part of the eigh- 
teenth century and settled in South Carolina, 
where they held land grants from the crown. 
After the Revolutionary War, they settled in 
West Tennessee. Samuel Baker, Senator Baker's 
great-grandfather, served in the Revolutionary 
War. In the early part of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, he removed to Madison County Miss., and 
afterwards to T^xas, taking all his family ex- 
cept Samuel Smith Baker who continuod to re- 
side at Sharon until his death. At this place 
he reared a worthy family among whom was 
the father of S>^n.-i.tor Baker. The latter re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



771 



of :\radison County and later attended the 
Phreveport Higli School. He entered Millsaps 
College in 1901 in the Preparatory Department 
and finished with the degrees of B. S. and Ph. B. 
in 1906. In 190S-9, he took a law course in the 
same college with the degrree of L. L. B. He 
was editor in chief, lfiii5-6 of "The Collegian," 
and was president of the Galloway Literary 
Society in 190fi; also, member of the Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity. After leaving- college, he 
taught for three years in the schools of Flora, 
\\';irre!itoii, Pittsburg of which he was prin- 
c'pal. In 1910. he located in Jackson for the 
practice of law in which profession he was en- 
gaged when elected to the State Senate. He 
was elected to this honorable position in 1915 
and serves ab'y on the following committees: 
Constitution; Judiciary; Public Lands: Temper- 
ance; Insurance and Roads. Senator Baker is a 
Democrat, member of the Methodist Church; is 
a member of the Blue Lodge Chapter and Coun- 
cil of Odd Fellows; also, of Knights of Pythias, 
and Woodmen of the Woi-ld, holding responsible 
ofTicial position in the first mentioned. Senator 
Baker is also an active member of the local 
organiz.ations of the city. He is unmarried, but 
says that he does not intend for this to be a 
life condition. Senator Baker is now training for 
the military service of his country. 



G. E. WILLIAMS of Jackson, was elected to 
the State Senate in November. 1913 and i.? 
ainong the most brilliant and capable of the 
yainger members of that body. He is a lawyer 
by profession and has been practicing for sev- 
(■ral years in Jackson, his equipment for the law- 
being the best. In his relations with clients he 
is prompt, industrious and obliging. In the 
Senate his service is marked by an intelligent 
performance of all public duties. Senator 
Williams was a member of the following com- 
mittees: Judiciary; Military Affairs; Humane 
and Benevolent Institutions; Public Health and 
Quarantine; Insurance; Railroads and Fran- 
chises, of which last named he served as Chair- 
man. Mr. Williams furnishes little family his- 
tory, he however bears one of the most dis- 
tinguished family names in Mississippi's history 
and the numberless branches of this family in 
America have furnished the country distinguished 
representations in all the leading professions and 
avocations. 




G. E. Williams 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAUT.MEXT 






.-.-i 



H. K. .\rnrrMv 



H. K. -MURRAY of Vicksl.urs. Scn:.tur fron. 
the Twelfth District, was elected in Xovember 
1915. He is a practicing lawyer at the Warren 
County bar and ranks as one of the leaders 
atnons' the yoiin.arer members. His equipment 
from a literary and professional standpoint i.s 
^^<!ual to the demands upon him as one of the 
State's lawmakers. He has a plea.-jing addre.^s 
has the hi.s:hest conception of his duty as a 
member of the State Senate and is popular with 
his colleacrues. He is a member of the Judiciary 
Committee, one of the most important commit- 
tees of the Senate. He i.s also a member of the 
following- conmiittees; Insurance: Oyster In- 
dustry: Banks and Bankiner, of which last named 
he is Chairman, ilr. Murray is a member of one 
of Mississippi's best and most progressive fami- 
lies and while he furnishes no detailed family 
history, the records of both Colonial Revolu- 
tionary and Confi^derate armies show that many 
of his name have served their country in vari- 
ous military capacities since the coming- of the 
family to .America. 



thtrtf:exth district 




k 

Lamar Q. C. AVilliams 



la:mar quixti's cixcixxatl's will- 
lams of T'nion. Senator from the Thiiteenlh Dis- 
trict, was born April 18. 1881. at Bee-h Springs, 
Xeshoba County. Miss, and Is the son of Oscar Lane 
Williams and Malee Stewart W'lliams of Beech 
Springs. His father, a native of Hinds County, 
spent his early bo\hood near Raymond, where he 
engaged in teaching and cleiking for s,;-vi-ral years 
aftei- which he permanently located at Beech 
Springs, where he rear? d his family. His repre- 
sented X'e.-ihoba County for one term in the Legis- 
latiH-e. Senator Williams' mother wa.s the daugh- 
ter of W. L. Stewart of Damascus, Scott County, 
Miss. Senator Williams received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of X'eshoba County and 
at Harpersvillle College. He later entered Millsaps 
College where he remained until he had finished th.- 
Sophomore work, leaving to take charge of a school. 
He continued to teach during the period of 1904- 
1909, after which he opened up a general mercan- 
tile busine.<;s in which he is at present engagfxi. 
Senator Williams was a member of the Board of 
.Mderman of the town of Union for two years; 
member of the Democratic E.xccutive Committee 
of X'ewton County for four years ; member of the 
Board of Education for Greene County for two 
years ; and a member of ilie Text-book Conmiission 
of Mississippi, during the administration of Gov- 



I.EGIS]>ATIVE PEPART.MEXT 

ernor James K. Vardainan. As a member of tlie 
1916-19:;o toiiii of t!ie Stale Eegishiuue his ser- 
vi<:es have been distinguished foi- faithfulness and 
devotion to the best ideals for which the peiiple 
siand. His deep intet-esi in tiie educational up- 
lift of Mississippi gives him a special work to per- 
form in his t'Ui)i:c service to the state and it is 
to such wortliv representatives that wc look to 
assist in abolishing- illiteracy from our stale. Sena- 
tor Williams is a Democrat and was a delegate to 
the State Convention from Newton County, and 
Executive Commiili'c man from Xewton Coimty 
for four years. He is a member of the Methodist 
t'hurch in whith lie has seived as steward and 
Superintendent of the Sunday-school from 1907 to 
the present time. He has been active in chui'ch 
woik and in all social efforts for the uplift of his 
community ; is a membei- of the fraternial order of 
Woodmen of the World and holds or^e degree in 
Masonr\'. On December 2S. igo.'j, he was married 
to Josie Mae McDonald of Beech Springs, iliss. 
Mrs. Williams is the daughter of Daniel. Josepii 
McDonald and Mar>- Ella McDonald of Beech 
Springs. Senator and Mrs. Williams have two 
children; Lamar Cari-uih Williams and ^lary Ella 
Williams. 



FOURTEEXTH DISTRICT 



RICHARD EDcJAR THO.MRSOX of Toomsuba, 
Miss., State Senatoi- from the Fourteenth District, 
was boi-n December IS, 1871, at Toomsuba, Laudei- 
dale County, Miss, and is the son of John Daniel 
Thompson and Susan .lane (Camp) Thompson of 
Toomsuba. His father, owing to a bodily arTliciion, 
was unable to join the Confederate service when 
war was declared between the States, but iiis 
pati'iotism was man'fested in many ways for his 
section. Though a ci'ipple throughout life, he was 
a man of exceptional inilustiy and enei'gy .uml 
reared a lai'ge and woithy famil.v. He was thi 
son of Ralph Tliompson an'i Mary Eouis.i ( l't.a\y . 
Thompson of Daleville and Toomsuba, Miss. The 
Thompson family is of Scotch and English ancestry, 
iuiving emigrated to the Carolinas in colonial limes, 
the family finally removing to Alabama and from 
that state to Mississippi in 1846. Ralph Thomi)son 
was the first representative of the family in 
Mississippi. Hi.'S wife, Mary Louisa Thompson, 
was a native of Cuba. Ala., her family having re- 
moved to that state from Florida. She belonged 
to the old and aiistoci'atic fanjilies of Gordons and 
Peavys of the eaiiy days of the latter state, sev- 



^5 



•/\ 




[tichard E. Thompson 



774 LEGISLATn-E DEPARTMENT 



eral representatives of which are now in the Staty 
of Mississippi. Senator Thompson's niotlier, Susan 
Jane (Camp) Thompson was tiie daughter of 
Richmond Harris Camp and Cyntliia Caroline 
(Phillips) Camp of Lauderdale County. His ma- 
ternal great-g-randfatiier. Xathan Camp, came from 
Georgia to Winchester Tenn. where he was married 
to Martha McCIendon, a lady of Scotch ancestry. 
Richmond Harris Camp was born at Winchester, 
from which place he removed with his widowed 
mother to Aberdeen and assisted in building the 
first house ever erected in that city. He entered 
the Methodist ministry and later was married to 
Cynthia Phillips. He afterwards entered the Bap- 
tist ministry and was always known for his great 
piety. The Phillips family is of Ii'ish descent and 
after coming to America, removed from tlie Caro- 
linas to Tennessee and thence to Mississippi, where 
they are still represented by a family connection 
near Old Collinsviile, the birthplace of Attorney 
General Ross Collins of Mississippi. Senator 
Thompson's early educational opportunities were 
limited, but coming of a sturdy moral ancestry, he 
was possessed of high ambitions and ideals and 
through poverty and harsh rural conditions he 
made his way up to a position of honor and trust 
in his native State. As a lad- he mastered Web- 
ster's Blue Back Spelling Book, at home, and later 
attended a small country school from which he 
obtained sufficient education to take his place in 
the world with a fighting chance for victory. He 
continued to work on the farm and in his father's 
shop until he was inade assistant Fost-master and 
railroad agent at Kewanee. Lauderdale County. 
Miss, in which position he served until he estab- 
lished a mail order job printing business. While 
serving as postmaster of Toomsuba, he helped 
to establish a R. F. D. Route and in many other 
ways assisted in advancing the best interests of 
his county. Senator Thompson is a strong ad- 
vocate of Peace and Conciliation among the na- 
tions and expresses himself very decidedly against 
the inhumanity of war. but is with his country 
in its struggle against the oppression of any 
foreign foe. He was a stanch supporter of the 
Populist party from its birth to its death ; was 
elected a delegate from Lauderdale County to the 
State Convention which met in the Old State 
Capitol in Jackson. Miss., in the summer of 180-3. 
for the purpose of formulating a state platform 
and nominating a candidate for governor, on the 
Populist ticket. Senator Thompson is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church but is very tolerant 
of all religious denominations beliexing thai 
sincere life filled with good works makes 



;t 



Legislative department 



775 



the Christian. He is a Master Mason of Toomsuba 
Lodge Xo. 130 of the F. and A. M. and has been 
offered several other positions in the Order, whicn 
he regards as one of the most helpful if its kind. 
Though a ilason, he is not an ad\-ocate of secret 
societies generally. Senator Thompson is the 
author of "Life in Mississippi,' an extended sketch 
published in the Columbus Ohio Medical Journal. 
This he hopes to publisli in book form at some fut- 
ure time. 

On December 13, 1891, he was married to MoUie 
Elizabeth Hurtt near Toomsuba, Miss. Mrs. 
Thompson is the daughter of Obediah Jackson 
Hurtt and Amelia Ann (Mitchell) Hurtt of Lauder- 
dale County. Her father was a native of South 
Carolina from which state he removed first to 
Alabama and then to Lauderdale County, Miss. 
He served in the Confederate army throughout the 
war and was seriously wounded. Senator and 
Mrs. Thompson have no children of their own, but 
in May 1905 they adopted two children:- Paul 
and Carl Jordan. The former is at present with 
the Second Infantry Company, United States Army, 
stationed at Honolulu, Hawaii. 



FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. 



JOHN ARCHIBALD CLARK, of De Kalb, Miss., 
State Senator from the Fifteenth District, was born 
August 24, 1SS3 at Pea Ridge. Kemper County, 
Miss., and is the son of Alexander John Clark and 
Frances Jane (Henson) Clark of Pea Ridge. His 
father was a native of South Carolina and removed 
from that State with his father. Malcolm W. Clark, 
when but five years of age. The family has re- 
mained in the same locality since its removal to 
Mississippi. Senator Clark's mother was the 
daughter of Edward Henson of Kemper County, 
Miss. He received his early education in the 
High Schools of Cleveland. Miss., and later at- 
tended Cooper Institute of Daleyville, Miss. In 
1903, he was graduated from Millsaps College of 
law and began practice well equipped for the pro- 
fession. He located for practice at DeKalb in 1903, 
where he has since practiced. He was a member 
of the Board of AMei^nen and City Attorney for 
the Town of DeKalb in 1913. 1914 and 1915; also, 
attorney for Board of Supervisors of Kemper 
County in 1915. In 1915 he was elected to a seat 
in the Senate and is an ardent supporter of the 
present administration. He serves on the fol- 
lowing committe-js ; Humane and Benevolent In- 
stitutions ; Judiciary ; Pensions ; Insurance ; Roads ; 



pij.Hyi i jnt,' ; ,JM ' >^j | g<gWJW ' .r»'. 



'^h^. 



^ 



4:\ 



^~ '- ■■■ ■■-■■ ■■■■■•"?.-.-.■ 



John A. Clark 



Mi 



ToiHTeia HTvcaaTU'i 



r76 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART>rENT 



Claims, servin?,' as chairman of tlie last two men- 
tioned. Senator Clark i.s a Democrat; member ot 
the Methodist Clmnli. in which he served as 
steward in Iftl.",. He is a membe;- of the 
Masonic Ordei- and the Columbian Woodmen. 
On October L'3. lOn^. ho was married to Matilda 
Tann of Meridian. Mrs. Clark is the daughter of 
Thomas .Meredith Tann and Annie E. Tann of 
DeKalb. Miss. Senator and Mrs. Clark have one 
child : — flelen Alexandra Clark. 



SIXTEENTH DISTRICT 




Jo 



Im Q. I'oindexter 



JOHX QUARLES FOIXDEXTER of Ravine, 
Miss., State Senator from the Sixteenth District 
was born .March 10. IS.54. at Gainesville., Ala. He 
IS the sun of William Rice Roind-'xter and Martha 
Jane (JJariieit) I'oindexter of Macon, Miss. His 
father was a native of Frederickshuig, Virginia. 
In young manhood he removed to Alabama where he 
tc'Ught a femalf school at Gainesville. Ala., in 1853- 
34 and one at Hollywood. Ala., across the Eav of 
Mobile, after wh.ch he removed to Macon, Miss, "arid 
founded a female (olloge known as the Calhoun 
Institute, which he conducted until the second vear 
of the Civil War. becoming: at that lime priVate 
sec-.etary to Mississippi's war Goveinor. Charles 
t'la.k. He died of yellow fever in 1870 and was 
bur...d at Macon. .Miss. He was the son of Thomas 
Pom.lextei", a lawyer of Xew Orleans who is buried 
at Woodville, Miss. 

Senator Poindexter's mother was the daughter of 
Chailes Barnett and Eliza Jane Gresham Barnett 
of Osriesthrope County, Ga. He obtained his earlv 
education under his father's instruction in the Cal- 
houn Institute of Macon. .Miss., and Hollvwood, A.la 
After the death of his father, he attended the 
Reagan High School at .Morristown, East Tennessee, 
for four years. After leaving school he became a 
successful planter and merchant. 

Senator Foindexter was an advocate of the 
bill for the preservation of -Mississippis Old Capitol 
and other legislation. In political faith he is a 
Democrat : a memb..r of the Presbyterian Church, 
in wh.ich he takes an active interest, and a mem- 
ber of the fraternal order of Masons. 

On June 10. 1878 he was married to F.uc inc:a 
Geoi'ge Richards at .Mashulaville, .Miss. .Mrs. Foin- 
dexter is the daughter of Littleton B. Richards and 
Caroline S. Cochran. Senator and Mrs. Foin<lexter 
have f.Ktr children :- .l..l;n Bainett. .Marlhi l.iule- 
ion. Ethel Roby. and Orin Quarles. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



777 



SEVEN'TEEXTH DISTRICT 



EARL STRIBLIXG RICHARDSON of Philadel- 
phia. Miss.. St.ite Senator from tlie Seventetnth Dis- 
trict was born .May JO. ISTO, in X'eshoba County, 
Miss. He is the son of William Wescott Richardson 
and N'ancy Kenoliclo (StriblJng) Rirliardson or 
Xoshoba Count.v. His f.iMier was a native of Lol- 
niont. Sumpter County. .\la , where he lived until 
ininiediately after the Ci\!l "War. when he removed 
to ^liss'ssippi. Ho was one of tli^' founders and 
promoters of tlie Xeshoba County K.iir of which he 
was a life time director He was a member of 
Board of Supe-'visors of his county, wliich office he 
held until his death in 190 6. He was the son of 
Wescot Richa;-dson of Alabama, a representative 
of one of the early families of that state. 

Senator Richai-dson received his elementai-y train- 
ings in the pubPc schools of Xeshoba Count.v. after 
which he attended "Waldo Hiisrh School, and late:' 
entered Millsaps Colle-e. wiiere he jsraduated in the 
Law Class of li>02 and 1903. Immediately upon his 
graduation, he beg^an the practice of law as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Rj-rd. Wilson and R'chardson. 
.\t the beginnins of his career he was with such 
able lawyers ns Congressman Adam Byrd and Sena- 
tor Cr. E. Wilson and wlien the partnership ended 
in 1910. he was appointed City Attorne>'. which 
office he held until 1912. 

He was president of the X'eshoba County Fair for 
.nbout ten years. He is a Democrat a member of 
the Method'st Church, and is affiliafed with the 
fraternal orders of Masons. Odd Fellows "Wood- 
men of th.e Worlil and Knights of Pyth'"as. 

On July 1. 1907. he was married to El'zalje'h 
Crockett, daughter of Thomas X". Crockett and 
Josephine Crockett of Pliiladelphia, Miss. Thoma.« 
X'. Crockej^t was for many yeai-s Circuit Clerk of 
X'eshoba Count.v. 

Senator and Mrs. Richardson have two children • 
.'iterling Richardson (son) rind Tommie Eai-hnt 
(■daughter) . 

EIGHTEEX"^TH DISTRICT 

CLAREXCE BUDXEY GREAVES, of Flora. 
Miss.. Senator from the Eighteenth District, was 
born August 22. 1SG3, at Livingston. Madi.son 
Count.v. Miss. He is the son of Stephen Arne 
Decatur Greaves and Sarah (Lowe) Greaves. His 
ancestors came to America from England ; paternal 
grandfather. .loseph IJl>the Greav>'s. was a solilier 
in the Revolution from South Cai-olina. The f.itii-r 
of .Senator Greaves was First Lieutenant of thi- 
Downing Rifles, First Regiment of Mississippi 



i ,- 




Earl S. Richardson 



^1^ 



^t "*> 



A 



Clarence B. Gi'eaves 



778 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Volunteers, ^^exican War, under Oie command of 
Col. Jefferson Davis ; was a lawyer at Raymond. 
Miss., and represented Hinds County in the Legis- 
lature. 

Senator Greaves attended the primary schools 
of Madison County ; attended for one session the 
Mississippi Agricultural & Mechanical College; read 
law and was admitted to the bar at Canton. Miss., 
in 1889 : located at Flora. Miss. : was elected to the 
State Senate from ^Tadison County in 189.5 : elected 
to the House of Representatives November 3, 1903. 
In the House of 190 4-6. he was a member of the 
following' committees: Judiciary, Railroads. Execu- 
tive. Contingent Fund, Engrossed Bills. Re-Dis- 
tricting- the State. He was elected to the Senate 
November 7. 1911. which position he has since held 
continuously. In the first sessions of the Senate of 
1916-20. he won much honor and distinction by his 
fer\-ent advocacy of the constructive legislation 
which marked that body. He is one of the most 
eloquent speakers and best debaters of the Senate, 
and his high sense of honor makes him one of the 
most trusted public servants in the state's service. 

On July 16. 1893, at Pocahontas. Miss.. Senator 
Greaves was married to Elizabeth Baker, daughter 
of James M. and Fannie (Pettus) Baker. Mrs. 
Greaves' ancestors came to America from Ireland. 
She is the granddaughter of "U'llliam Austin of 
Hinds County. 

Senator and Mrs. Greaves have four children : — 
Leila Crisler, Harry Battley, Clarence Budney. Jr.. 
and Eleanor Elizabeth. He is a member of the 
following committees: — Judicial^", Claims. Immi- 
eration. Levees. Fisheries and Game. Public "^'orks 
of which he is chairman. 



NINETEENTH DISTRICT 




Peter Stubblefield 



PETER STUBBLEFIELD of Yazoo City. Senator 
from the Nineteenth District, was born March 12, 
1SS8, near Vaughn in Yazoo County, Miss., and is 
the son of Simon Peter Stubblefield and Elizabeth 
\Vatl'ngton of Yazoo County. His father was a 
native of the same county, where he spent his life. 
During the Civil War. he enlisted in the 18lh Mis- 
sissippi Regiment : was wounded in the second 
Battle of Manassas and was afterwards transferred 
to 'Withers' Artillery. He made a faithful .soldier 
and shared in all the achievements of the command 
to which he belonged. He was the son of William 
Henr>- Stubblefield and Mary (King) Stubblefield, 
the third generation to represent the family in 
Yazoo City. 

Senator Stubblefleld's mother was the daughter 



I I 



LECISLATIVE r)EPART^rE^'T 



779 



of William Watlinerton and Elizabeth Wilniore Wat- 
lintrton of Yazoo City. His maternal great-grand- 
father. Julius "Watlington, was a colonel of United 
State tioops in the year 1S12 and lus father, John 
"VVatlington and uncle, Paul Watlingon. were both 
capta'iis of the Virginia Colonial troops in tht- 
Revolutionary War. 

Senator Stubblefleld is broadly educated. He 
attended the community schools of his county in 
early >-outh. and later was a student of iMississippi 
College, for the years 1903-4-5. after which he at- 
tendr-d the University of Mississippi, from which 
he was srraduated in 190S, with the degree of B. 3. 
After graduating, he took a post graduate course 
in tlie Colleee of Political Science at the George 
Washington University in St. Louis. He studied 
law in both the University of ^Mississippi and the 
Georse Washinerton University, his unusual school 
advantages having thoroughly equipped him for 
that profession. During 1911 and 1912. he was 
clerk for Ignited States Senator, John Sharp Wil- 
liams. 

Haviner becom*^ influential and populai" in his 
section, he was urged to enter the race for State 
Senator in 191.5 and was elected in the following 
Xovember. In that body, he has won for himself 
a hig-h reputation as an advocate of all legislation 
conducive to the welfare of the State and on every 
side throughout the session was heard the remark: 
"Pete Stubblefleld is one of the best equipped and 
strongest members of the Senate " His ideals of 
honor and justice are clear-cut and his advocac.v 
of any legislation strenErthens the measu'-e. 

In poiltif^al faith. Senator Stubblefleld is a Demo- 
crat and has always rendered that party faithful 
ser\Mce In 1911, he was married to ^lary Augusta 
Smith of Irf-'nola, Miss. Mrs. Stublefield is the 
daughter of Addison Burrows Smith and Beatrice 
Holt Sr"ith of Indianola. Senator and Mrs. Stub- 
blefleld have one child : — Gloria, 



TWENTIETH DISTRICT 



S 

\ 



LORRAINE C.\TCHINGS DULANEY of Grace, 
Miss., State Senator from the Twentieth District, 
was born December 29th. 1862, at Pearl Cottage 
Plantation. Madison County, Miss. He is the son 
of Dr. "\Villiam Johnston Dulaney and Lorraine 
Catchings Dulanf^y of Madison County. Dr. Dulaney 
was a native of Orange County, Va.. whence he 
removed to Mississippi in 1835, first living at So- 
ciety Ridge. Hinils County, and afterwards In Mad- 
ison, the adjoining county. He was a graduate of 




Lorraine C. Dulaney 



r»nnu/>.ii -J 



780 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



the Mcdifjil Deprtrtmont of tlir- T'nivor.*ity of Vir- 
ginia in 1S33 and practised medicine until liis d«;itli 
in ISSO. He was tlie son of William Diilaney and 
Sarah Oieaves nulanoy of Orange Cnuiihouse. Va. 

Senator Dulancys ancestors, both paternal and 
maternal, came from England and settled in Vir- 
.ETinia in the early colonial ilays. They were anions; 
the ante-bellum pioneers of INIississippi and have 
been actJve in th(^ development and progiess of the 
State. The Dulaneys are closely related to Richard 
M. .Tohiiston, the hero of the battle of Thames, 
vice-president of the T'nited States, and comucror 
of the frreat Indi.in cliitf Tecumseh. 

Senator Dulanoy's mothei- was the daughter of 
.\u2:iistus Catchingrs and Harley Cassidy Catchin^s 
of Hinds Count\-. .Mrs. rat<hins:s was a s'ster of 
Major A. J. Cisidy of Confe.lerate fame. The 
family has. for many iienerations. been identified 
with the best inteiests of ^Mississippi and it- var- 
ious repre.'sentatives have always ranked witli the 
truest exponents of the social, civic and political 
honor of the State. 

Senator rndaney received his education in the 
public schools of Hinds and Madison counties, sup- 
plemented by a business course in Fouphkeepsie, 
X.. Y. He is a practical, intellisent and self-made 
man who has won a high place in the affaiis of the 
State. Owins; to financial losses brought about by 
the Civil "War, he had to strusrg-le for an education 
and livelihoo'l. when a. .voung" man. After his 
father's deatli Sen;Uor Dulaney, just entering man- 
hood, was thrown on his own ''esources and has 
carvec from the practical e.xperience of life a suc- 
cessful and influential cai-eer. Though cotton- 
planting and stock-raising has been his calling and 
has brought him good return.s, he has since earl.v 
manhood taken an active part in the affairs of his 
county and. more recentl.v. he has served his State 
in high positions of honor nnd trust. He was twice 
a member of the House of Representatives from his 
county : was levee commissioner, beginning work in 
1882. when twent.v years of age : was cotton tax 
coHe'toi- : anrl was cliairman of the county Demo- 
cratic Committee for twelve years. He is also a 
memb>'r of the State Executive Committee. 

He 's a Democrat an<l has always rendei-ed his 
party faithffl s<=-rvice : a member of the Methodist 
Churih. Though not allied with an\; of the fi'a- 
ternal ordei-s, he is one of the most successful office 
holder.? in the State. 

He has been twice married : his first wife. Emma 
Mkinson. having been a member of a promin'-nt 
lackson faniilv. .\fi-r her death, .5>.'nator Dulanev 
was married, August 5. 1889, to Caroline Harris, 
daughter of Capt. ^Villiam Mercer Harris and Sue 



■flu 'rit'J)r. 



tu'itu) 






LEGISLATIVE DEPAUT.MEXT 



7S1 



Griffins Ilatiis. Mrs. Dulaney is the n<.ioe of Gen. 
X.itlianiel II. Harris. Drigmlier-General of the 16lh. 
llUh. IStli and 12th Rogiments. during- the Civil 
W'ai-. By his first marrias^e Senator Didaney has 
one iliild : — Mrs. Emma Pulnnoy Fiel«l. wife of 
Oscar Addi.^on Field cif St. Loui.';, Mo. 



TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT 

HO.MER HARRIS CASTEEL, of Pickens. Miss.. 
was born April 14. 1879. at Walnut Grove, Miss., 
the son of Marion Lafayette Casteel and Virginia 
iLmdsey; Casteel. His paternal ancestors were 
French : maternal. Scotch. Hi.s great-grrandfath'i- 
served in the Mexican War. and both grandparents 
rendered heroic service in the Civil War. Senator 
Casteol's early education was obtained in the com- 
mon schools of Leake County, latei- lio aaendca 
ihe Mississippi Central Xormal at Walnut Grove. 
He has alwa>s been a farmer, and hi.* first civil 
office came to him in Iiis election to tiie State 
Senate, Xovembei' 7, I'.ill. fioiii liie T\v. nl\ -tir.-c 
District. He was re-elected in lOl.j for tlie term 
of 1916-20. 

Senatoi- c^'asteel is a De?nocrat : a ilethodist ; a 
Knisht of Pythias and a Mason, and has served 
as Junior and Senior Warden in the Masonic Order. 
He is unmarried. 

In the campaign for State Senator in 1911. he 
advocated a guai-antee bank law. which his opponent 
Dpposed. and he was elected on that issue. During 
his fii-st term in the Senate he was a member of 
the following committees: — Registratio.T and Elec- 
tions, Banks and Banking (Chairman). Finance, 
Public Health & Quarantine, Agricidture, Comrriei-ce 
and Manufactures. He is much interested in tn> 
reform of tlie Vianking laws of the State, and as a 
membei- jj^f^iic Senate of 1!>16 — 1920 has taken 
great interest in legislation. 



TWEXTY-SECOXD DISTRICT 



f^ 




Homer H. Ciisteel 



\ 



DAVID EPHRAIM CRAAVLEY of Kosciusko. 
Miss.. State Senator from the Twenty-second Dis- 
trict, was born Februai-y 11, 1886. at Center, Attala 
County. Miss. He is the son of Dr. James Tanne* 
Crawlev and Lucy Catherine (Dicken) Crawley of 
Attala County. Dr. James T. Crawle.v was the son 
of David P. Crawley ami Margarette Russell of 
Gainsville. SumrtT (^ounty, Ala. David P. Crawley 
was a native of X'orth Carolina, his wife being a 
native of Alabama. He was commissioned as Cap- 



-/ 



David E. Ciawley 



t^ 



I 



782 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



•S'f' 



tain of a company of volunteers by Governor A. G. 
Brown in 18 47. He also took part in the removal 
of tho Indians from this country to the West. 

Senator Crawley's mother was the daughter of 
Ephraim Dicken and Sarah Stone Dicken of Stone 
Mountain. Ga. Ephraim Dicken was a member of 
Company C. 11th Confederate Cavalry and rcndei-ed 
faithful service to the Confederacy throughout the 
Civil War. 

Senator Crawley obtained his early education in 
the common schools of the village of Center, and 
later attended the High School of Kosciusko. He 
entered the University of Mississippi in 1904. where 
he completed a full literary course in 1911. During 
this time he won the Freshman medal of the Iler- 
mean Societj-, the Marcus Taylor medal in Ciiemis- 
try, and the medal offered by tlie United Daughters 
of the Confederacy for the best essay on Patriotism. 
This six-years course included his legal education, 
•in which he graduated in June. 1911. He began 
practice of his profession in Kosciusko, Attala 
County, and in Carthage, Leake County, pursuing 
his work in both counties. 

Senator Crawley gives but a meager outline of 
his success at the bar and of his participation in 
the various activities of his county and section, but 
it can be readily surmised from the ability he dis- 
played in the State Senate, to which he was elected 
from the Twenty-second District for 1916. that he 
had made for himself an enviable reputation, both 
as a successful lawyer and as a public spirited citi- 
zen, of whom any section of the State has a right 
to be proud. His influence for or against a measure 
invariably brought out the giants of debate in the 
Senate, for it was soon recognized that it took the 
best equipped speakers of the body to coi)e with 
him. Well prepared, ardent and convincing, he 
fought his opponents with weapons hari^ to with- 
stand and more than once during the heated de- 
bates of the session, his masterly efforts won ap- 
plause even from those whom he opposed. The 
writer remembers on one occasion to have listened 
spellbound to a powerful speech delivered by him 
in opposition to a measure of the deepest interest 
to many. But while Senator Crawley was a dreaded 
antagonist, he took no mean advantage of his op- 
ponents and so clear-cut were his ideals of truth 
and honor that the bitterest opponent could but 
admire him. His influence upon legislation was 
felt throughout the session. 

In political faith ho Is a Democrat and has al- 
ways rendered his party valuable service. He be- 
longs to the fraternal orders of Masons. Woodmen 
of the World, and Order of the Eastern Star. He 
is unmarried. 



.^n-L-.tlC. T*i.f.'Ji<! * '' 



li noqi' 






"^^ 



r, .. ,M w; ji 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



783 



Senator Crawley is at present in the service of 
the United States in the war with Germany and no 
more gallant spirit ever followed the Flag in the 
cause of Liberty and Humanity. 



TWEN'TY-THIRD DISTRICT 



WILLIAM RILET CHRISMOND of Ackernian, 
Miss., State Senator from the Twenty-third District. 
was born April 30, 186S, at Greensboro, Webster 
County, 2iliss. He is the son of David Edwin 
Chrismond and Elvenie Tyson Chrismond of Greens- 
boro. David Edwin Chrismond wa.s the son of 
John B. and T\'innie Chrismond who lived near 
Louisville, Miss. He was among' the progressive 
farmers of Webster County and was active in the 
development of the social and civic life of his com- 
munity. John B. Chrismond was a native of "West 
Virgrinia. from which state he removed to Missis- 
sippi and settled in Winston County, where he re- 
sided until a short period before the Civil "War. 
when he removed to Sumner (now Webster) 
County. Miss. He was a veteran of the War of 
1812 and, as long as he lived, drew a pension from 
the United States. He died near "VValthall in 1S34. 

Senator Chrismond's mother was the daughter of 
John Wesley Tyson and IMary Ann Tyson of Web- 
ster County. Senator Chrismond attended the pub- 
lic schools of "Webster Counr\- until 1888, in which 
he was carefully prepared in the elementary 
branches. His early youth was such as to develop 
a strong, useful career. Reared in a rural district, 
far from the railroads, he spent his time in labor 
on the farm. 

In IS^'D. he entered the Bellefontaine High School 
in which 'he received a preparation for his life 
work, whicii* was that of teaching in the public 
schools of the State, a profession which he followed 
for ten years. 

In 1899, Senator Chrism.ond was elected Justice 
of the Peace in his district, in which capacity he 
served four years ; was afterwards elected Sheriff 
of Choctaw County in 1911 and ser\ed four years. 
He was elected State Senator from the Twenty- 
third District. 

Senator Chrismond is a Democrat and has al- 
ways taken a keen interest in politics, both state 
and national. He has been a member of the Eaptfst 
Church for many years : does not belong to any 
societies nor fraternal orders. 

On December 10, 1893, he was united in marriage 
to Willie Florence Stephenson, daughter of John 




William R. Chrismond 



784 



LKGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Wesley Stephenson and Josephine Stephenson of 
Choctaw County, Miss. 

Senator and Mrs. Chrismond have six livintr chil- 
dren : — Dewey Lee. Longino I^wton. Ruth. Stella. 
Thelma and Bessie. 



TWEXTY-FOURTH DISTRICT 



■lill*,, _ ij«-ait»wj,i .1 ) -^ 




Scheller A. Miller 



\ 



SCHELLER ALEXANDER MILLER of "V\">st 
Point, State Senator from the Twenty-fourth Dis- 
trict, was born June 1. 1SS.5. at L'na. -Clay County. 
Mi^s.. and is the son of Thomas 'U'esley Miller and 
Jimniie Adrian Shell of Una. Kis father was a 
native of Abbott. Clay County, Miss. At the age of 
sixteen he enli.«ted in the Confederate service in 
which he rendered faithful service throughout the 
four years of its existence. He wa-s a member of 
the famous Palo Alto Rifles and was wounded at 
Missionary Rid?:e. After the war he engraged in 
farmins, shariner in all the vicissitudes of Recon- 
struction, during which period he was active In 
promoting all movements for the restoration of his 
section, which had been ravaged by war. He was 
the son of Alex Miller of Spartanburg, S. C. The 
first of the paternal line to come to America landed 
in Charleston. S. C. a penniless youth, near the 
close of the Revolutionary "War, and in the land 
of freedom, democracy and large opportunity took 
his place in the ranks of the builders and makers 
of America. 

Senator Miller's mother was the daughter of 
John She.l and Susan "Westbrooks of Aberdeen, 
Miss. His maternal great-great-grandfather West- 
brooks was a soldier in the Revolution. One ances- 
tral line traces this family back to the French 
Huguenots of South Carolina ; another to England. 
In America, the family has furnished numerous 
representatives to its public service. 

Senator Miller received his early education in 
the public schools of his community, after which 
he entered the Mississippi Agricultural and Me- 
clianical College, where he graduated in 1907 with 
the degree of B. Sc, after which he taught in the 
rural schools for three years. He later graduated 
at Cornell University with a like degree. He then 
entered agricultural work. He was for several 
years agricultural and industrial agent for railway 
companies. He later was employed in the State of 
Xew York in connection with the dairj- indu.stry, 
which gave him an opportunity to travel over Xew 
York and many other states. 

His talents and energ\- did not admit of his long 
remaining in obscure positions and the citizens of 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

his community soon recognized his ability, and 
iirsred him to enter the poliiioul field. After a suc- 
irssful canvass, he was elected to the State Senate 
fium the Twenty-fourth District. In the work of 
that body he has proved worthy of the splendid 
[.eople of his District. He entertains no personal 
i)itiernfss for th.ose with whom he differs and his 
ni.mner is affable and kindly to all. liis sincerity 
of purpose bein^? recognized and admired. 

In the summer of 1916, Senator Miller was ap- 
ixiinted Superintendent of the Agricultural High 
School of Chickasaw t.'ounty. Tlie school is re- 
garded as one of the best state institutions and is 
beautifully located in the prairie belt of Mississippi. 

Senator Miller is a member of the Methodist 
Churcli. is unmarried, a Mason, and partial to 
agricultural piusuits. 



TWEXTY-FII'^H 1>ISTRICT 



WILLIAM PLEASANT STRIBLIXG of Colum- 
bus. Miss., State Senator from the Twenty-fifth Dis- 
trict, was born August 12, 1S73, at Fulton. Ita- 
wamba County. Miss., and is the son of Shelton 
Randolpii Stribling and Marj- Jane (Cates) Strib- 
l.ng of Tirlton. and hiter of Columbus, Lowndes 
County, IMiss. 

Senatoi Stribling is of English and Scotch a?-.- 
cestry. Hi? family first settled in South Carolina. 
from which s\ "te they came to Tennessee and later 
to Mississippi. His lather was a native of Mad- 
ison County, Tenn., from which place he re- 
moved to Itawamba County, Miss., soon after 
the Civil War and engaged in the mercantile 
business at Fulton. He later removed to Colum- 
bus, where he died, January 25. 1914. He was 
the son of Wi "'■am Stribling of Madison County 
Tenn. Senator fc "ibling's mother is the daugh- 
ter of Pleasant and Hettie Anderson Cates of 
Fulton. They removed to Mississippi from Ten- 
, nessee. He received his elementary training in 
the public schools of Fulton and later attended 
Bfellbuckle College in Tennessee. He afterwards 
entered Cumberland University in 1891. De- 
ciding upon law as his profession, he first took 
the law course at the University of Mississippi 
and then entered the Law department of Cum- 
berland University, from which he was grad- 
uatt^d in 1896. After his admission to the bar 
at Tupelo, Miss., he practised at that place for 






William P. Stribling 



50 m 



.86 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



a time, and deciding- to see the "West." he 
practised his profession for a short tin--.-? at 
Muskogee, Indian Territory and at .\r--';:n 
Texas. After one year he returned to Tu;)rlo 
and in 1904 located at Columbus, at which place 
he is at present engag-ed in the practice of liis ;.ro- 
fession. He was elected to the St.-it^ .<pnate in l.^lj. 
Senator Stribling- is a Democrat, an elder of 
the Cumberland F'resbyterian Church, a rr-rm- 
ber of the fraternal orders. Knights of Pytiias. 
and Beta Theta Pi (Mu Chapter), of Cumber- 
land L'niversity. On Augrust 20. 1916, he -rras 
married to Frances P.lanche Eddins at Carrdl. 
La. She is tlie daugliter of Jo.-^iaii Edd'ns .-.nd 
Sarah Frances (Duncan) Eddins of Pickr^ns 
County, Ala. 



TWEXTV-SIXTH DISTFIICT. 



^ye^ • '*t . '. " ' fe.! *' a'- yf 



-."-> 






Lewis S. HeinphiU 



LEWIS SIMPSOX HEMPHILL of Valley H;":!. 
State Senator from the Twenty-Sixth Distr;:-t, 
was born March 9, 1&.')3, at that place, the son 
of James Simpson Hemphill and Anne Eliza 
Olabry) Hemphill. His father's family came 
to Mississippi fiom Alabama, and his mother's 
from Petersburg.', Virjiinia. Mr. Hempliill re- 
tained his early education in the public schools 
of his county, and has boen eng-aged in farm- 
ing at Vallej' Hill since early manhood. Ke 
was elected to the ^Mississippi Legislature in 
1896, to fill the unexpired term of Judge W. F. 
Stevens; was re-elected in 1899. serving four 
years; was elected to the House of Representa- 
tives November 7. 1911. He was elected to the 
State Senate in November, 1915. He is a Demo- 
crat and was made Chairman of ti:e Execu- 
tive Committee of hi.^ county in 1892, a.r.1 
served several years. He is a member of the 
Episcopal Church; member of the Masonic Order, 
the Odd Fellows. Elks, and Woodmen of the 
World. He was married December 16, 1S83, 
at Valley Hill, to Ida Julia ilartin. They 
have four children:- Bessie, James Simpson, 
Everette Martin and Vassar Deu ey. Senator 
Hemphill is a member of the following Cont- 
mittees:- Rules, Finance. Agriculture and Com- 
merce; Railroads and Franchises; Public Lands; 
Coroprations; Drainage; Penitentiary, of which 
he is chairman. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 787 



["^ "'^' '"^"^ 



Will. M. Whittington 



TWEXTY-SEVEXTH DISTRICT. 

WILLIAM ^LVDISOX WHITTIXGTOX of f""^ 
Green-wood, :\Iiss.. State Senator from the 
Twenty-seventh District, was born Jilay 4, 1878, I - 1 

at Little Springs, Franklin County, Miss, and ^ ., 3 

is the son of Alexander Madison Whittington ' * 

and Margaret Isaplitne McGehee of lOddiceion. | 

Franklin County, Miss. His father was a na- 
tive of Amite County from which he removed ' ' 
to Franklin County. He has been for many >-'' ' 
years engaged in mercantile and farming pur- 
suits and for a while lived at Gloster and i 
Roxie, :Miss., but is at present a citizen of Ed- 
diccton. He was the son of William Whit- 
tington and Evelyn Whittington of Little 
Springs. The Whittingtons, like so many ante- 
bellum ^Mississippi families, came of an ances- 
tral long identified with agricultural pursuits 
and for many generations assisted in the de- 
velopment of the State's agricultural intt^-rests, 
also taking an active part in the social and 
political affairs of Franklin County. Senator 
Whittington obtained his early education in the 
public schools of Franklin and Ami:e <.;oun..if.5 
and later attended Mississippi Cfllegs from 
which institution he was graduated in ISaS, 
with the degree of B. A., taking first honors in 
his class. He afterwards entered the Law De- 
partment of the University of 2ilississippi in 
1S99 and was graduated with distinction, hold- 
ing the degree of LL. B. and being chosen as 
one of the Commencement orators for hi.s class. 
He began practice at Meadville, with office at 
Roxie, Franklin County, Miss., in January, 1900, 
where he remained some four years. In 1904, 
he located in Green\Vood, Leflore County, and 
formed a successful partnership with former 
Attorney-General ^Monroe McClurg and A. F. 
Gardner, under the firm name. .Mcclury, Gaid- 
ner & Whittington. After the dissolution of 
this firm, he associated himself with Samuel 
J. Osborn with whom he has continued to prac- 
tice in the city of Greenwood, to tlie present 
time, winning for himself a high reputation 
as a lawyer. Interested in the welfare of his 
adopted city, he served as a member of the 
Board of Aldermen from January, 1907 to Jan- 
uary. 1911. His interest in educational, reli- 
gious and political affairs brought him much in 
contact with the people of his city and adjacent 
section of the State, and he was induced to 
become a candidate for the State Senate. His 
election to that office in November, 1915, was 



7S8 LEGISLATIVE DEPART.MEXT 



very satisfactory to the people of his city and 
flistriot ancT his subsequf-nt good work in pro- 
moting all legislation that atfeots the best in- 
terests of the State, has rendered him very pop- 
ular with the people of his section and throug-h- 
out the entire State. As a member of a body of 
distinguished :Mississippians, Senator Whitting- 
ton took front rank with its able debateis and 
leaders in the discussion of all questions that 
relate to the social and political welfare of 
Mississippi, ever proving himself a ready and 
earnest defender of any measure which he 
deemed of intrinsic value to the people. He has 
been frequently mentioned as a probable candi- 
date for Governor. In addition to his professional 
career, to whicli most of his time is devoted, he ha.-s 
always followed the life of a planter and his planting 
interests in Leflore Count.v have been a sou!Tf- 
of much pleasure to him. Senator Whittington 
is a Democrat in political faith; a member of 
the Baptist Church and has filled many official 
positions in that denomination. He has been 
Superintendent of the First Baptist Church of 
Greenwood since 190S. was President of the 
Mississippi Baptist Convention in 1910-12, and 
has been President of the Baptist Education 
Commission of that Convention since 1912. He 
was also Vice-President of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention in 1911. He is affiliated with 
the fraternal orders of Masons, Woodmen of 
the World, and Elks. On July 18, 1910, he was 
married to Anna Ward Aven of Clinton, Miss. 
She is the daughter of Prof. Algernon Jasper 
Aven and ilary Bailey Aven of Clinton, :Miss. 
Mrs. Whittington is highly accomplished and 
holds the degree of Ph. D. from Bryn Mawr 
College. She also enjoys the distinction of be- 
ing the only woman who has ever graduated 
from Mississippi College, this privilege having 
been awarded her on account of her father's 
having been so long in service for the College. 
Her parents are among the most cultured people 
of the State. Prof. A. J. Aven has been Profes- 
sor of Latin in Mississippi College for twenty- 
seven years. He is an A. B. of the University 
of Mississippi and has been honored by his 
Alma Mater with the degree of LL. D. Mrs. 
Aven is also highly accomplished in many fields 
of culture and has been Librarian of Mississippi 
College for ten years. Senator andMrs. Whittington 
have two children: Mary Bailey and William Madi- 
son. 



i.f:gist.attve departmkxt 7§9 






. .^1 -"irii^iiuiiniiii 



TWEXTT-EIGirTH DISTRICT 

JAMES A.\T>RE\V lU.Ol'XT of Gninn.la. .Miss. 
State Senator froin the Twenty-eishth District, 
was born Decenilier 29. ISSl. at \Yillianisl.urg-. 
Covington County, Miss, and is the son of 
Thomas C. Blount was the .<;on of William 
of Collins. Miss. His father entei-ed the Con- 
federate service in 1S62. at the early aare of 
fifteen, as a private in the Fourth Mississippi 
Cavalry Resrinient. under Captain William 
Barnes and Gen. Xathan B. Forrest. He shared 
in the many heroic efforts of these brave de- 
fenders of tlie .'^outh ttiroug-hout the Civil War 
Thon-.as C. Blount was the son of Willie "i 
Blount and Mary Loflin Blount of Blountsville, 
Miss. Tlie family, which h.is man.v reprosentiuives J-imes A. Bloui t 

in the earl.v militan,- annals of America, settled in 
Mississippi befoi-e the Civil War and took part in 
the pioneer development of Eawrcnce County. I'e- 
movinj? later to Covin.£:ton nnd Grenada Counties in 
which last Senator Blount resides. His nioilier is 
the daugrhter of I.awrence McCollum and .lane .Mc- 
Collum of Williamsburg', Miss. He received his 
early education in the public schools of Ci)V- 
ington County : entered Millsaps Collo.i::e in 19(,> i 
from which he was graduated in 1908. with 
the degree of Ph. D. and B. S. In the sum- 
mer of 1909-10. he took a post gi'aduate cour.so 
at the University of Mississippi. He was Super- 
intendent of the public schools of Charleston, 
Miss for three years, in which position he was 
very successful. Thous-'h having already en- 
joyed unusual educational advantages, being 
very ambitious to equip himself thoroughly for 
his life work, he attended Harvard University 
in 1911 and received from that institution a 
certificate of education, and later studied law 
at the University of Chicago, 1912, and Milsaps 
College, 1913, graduating with the degree of 
L.Jj. B. After g-raduating in law. in 1913. he 
located for practice at Grenada. Miss., and soon 
was recognized as one of the leading lawye--.-^ 
of Xoi'th Mississippi. Becoming ver.v pouula- 
with the people of his section, he was induced 
to offer for the State Senate, to which position 
he was fleeted in X'o\ember. 191 o. .Senator 
Blount is recognized as one of the ablest young 
members of the I egislature of 1916-20. and no 
representative of that body entertains higher con- 
ceptions of dut.v to the .^late. He is .t Democrat, a 
deacon in the Presbyterian Church and is affiliated 
wiih the fraternal orders of Masons. Woodmen of 
the \\',orM. and the Kappa Alpliii, Fraternity of 
Millsaps College. Senator Blount is unmarrieil. 
Senator Blount is at present In the service of his 



790 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTilENT 



countrj-, to which service he is ardently and paf 
sionately devoted. 




Van Buren Boddie 



TWEXTY-XIXTH DISTRICT 

VAX I:T-REX boddie of (Irocnville State 
Senator from the Twenty-ninth District, was 
born January 20, 1S69, at Memphis, Tenn.. the 
son of Van Buren Boddie and Anna (Jewell) 
Boddie. Senator Boddie obtained his early edu- 
cation in the common schools of his vicinity, 
did not enter collcg-e but read law in the office 
of ilessers. Yergrer and Percy in Greenville; 
he was admitted to the bar in 1893, beginning 
practice in that city. He was a member of the 
Legislature during- the session of 1902 and 1906, 
filling the unexpired term of F. E. Larkin in 
the first-named year, and that of Percy Bell 
in the second; elected to the House ot Repre- 
sentatives X'os'ombei- ."i. 190 7. Senator Boddie 
never does things by halves, but throws all the 
force and energy of his being into the accom- 
plishment of his aims and purpose.^s. Hi.=; po- 
litical ideals are of the best that characterize 
pure Democracy and he takes a high place a- 
mong the distinguished members of the Missis- 
sippi Senate. His keen appreciation of both the 
agricultural and educational interests of the State 
renders him a safe representative of the people in 
any office within their gift. Senator Boddie is a 
Democrat, an Episcopalian, a Mason, and a member 
of the Benevolent and F'rotective Order of Elks. 
He was married March 13. 1S9.5, at Greenville, to 
Fay Shields, daughter of John "W. Shields and 
Sallie (Walton) Shields, of Oxford, Miss. In 
the House in 1906. Mr. Boddie was menibei- oi 
the following committees: Judiciary, Railroads, 
Immigi'ation and Labor (Chairman), Corpcri-.- 
tions, Levees and Penitentiai-y, and is the author 
of the anti-future gambling bill. In the House 
of 1908-10, he was a member of the following 
committees: Judiciarj-. AVays and Means. Missis 
sippi Levees. He was elected to the Senate 
November 7. 1911, and was a member of the 
following committees: Judiciary, :Municipalities, 
Registration and Elections, Enrolled Bills. Pub- 
lic Health and Quarantine. He was re-elected 
to the Senate in 1915 and served on the follow- 
ing committees: Judiciary; Levees; Municipal- 
ities, Roads. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



791 



JOHX FLEET BURROW of Ruleville, Miss. 
State Senator from the Twenty-ninth District, 
was born Xoveniber 6. 1SS5, at Prentiss, Law- 
rence (now Jefferson Davis) County, Miss., the 
son of Jolin Alexander and Margaret (Odonii 
Burrow of Lawrence County. His father was a 
native and resident of Columbia, iTarion County, 
Miss, and was the son of John William Burrow 
and Xaney Tatum Burrow of Columbia. Marion 
County. Senator BiuTow's maternal giandfatb.er. 
Joseph Evans Odom. of Mount Carmel. Covington 
County. Miss., was a faithful soldier in the 
Confederate Army and served with the Army 
of X^orthern Virginia. C. S. A., in whicli service 
he continued throughout the war. The paternai 
grand-father of Senator Burrow served in the 
Seminole War and was one of the pioneers of 
Marion County. Senator Burrow is of English 
and Scotch ancestry; his father's ancestors came 
from England in 1775 to South Carolina, thence 
to Tennessee, and later to Mississippi; his ma- 
ternal forbears emigrated from Scotland, in 1780, 
to Virginia, thence to Alabama, and thence to 
Mississippi. Senator Burrow obtained his early 
education in the public schools of Lawrence 
County: entered >ris.?issippi Colles^e In 1901, 
where he remained three years: became princi- 
pal of high schools at Bunker Hill, Hebron 
and Carson, all of Mississippi. In 1907. he en- 
tered the University of Lebanon, Ohio, from 
which he -was graduated in June 1908, with the 
degree of B. Ph In 19no-io. he was a stud-^nt 
in the University of Tennessee; in 1911-12, 
studied law at Milsaps College. Jackson, iliss., 
from which he was graduated with LL. B. de- 
gree. "While attending Mississippi College, he 
was Fall Orator in 1903: was editor of the 
Mississippi College ^lagazine in 1905. Having 
completed his literary and laws courses. Sena- 
tor Burrow located at Ruleville, Sunflower 
County, for his legal practice. He had previous- 
ly filled several important positions, such as 
Secretary of the DomO'^ratic Committee of 
Jefferson Davis County, in 1907-11; delegate to 
the Democratic Xafional Convention in Denver, 
in 190 8 : was elected to the lower house of the 
Mississippi Legislature in Xovember, 1911. In 
Xovember. 1915. they elected him to a seat in the 
State Senate as floater from the Twenty-n-nth 
District, composed of 'U'ashington and Sunflower 
counties. In his church affiliations. Senator Burrow 
Is a Baptist and is superintendent of his Sunday- 
school. Ho holds the office of .lunior Warden in 
the Masonic Tx^dTc of his town, ard i.s a mem.ber 
of the Phi Kappa Alpha fraternity. He is un^ 
married. 



I'l' irtiMjiiiiiftSffiaaiiirirfiifiii Ti 

John F. Burro%v 



792 



LEOTSLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 




THIRTIETH DISTRICT 

M-ALTER B. PARKS ,,f M^iigoI.I. Miss.. St:,re 
Senator fr.,m the Thirtieth Distiiot. was born 
Augrust 27. 1S68. in I'niDii Count.v, the s.m of Will- 
mm Beat.s- Parks and Cali.sta Vir^jnia (Hu.lsun. 
Parks. His father sei-ved as a private in the Con- 
federate Army, for n.-arl.v four years: his grand- 
parents oanie to Mississippi from Virginia and 
Maryland, and shared in all the efforts foi- the earl> 
development of, the State. Mr. Parks obtain.vl hi"- 
early education at Pine Rluff .^^chool. near Tor- 
copola. Mi.^s. : also attended Toccopola Polle^^ 
under AVilliam B. Gilmer. Principal, but d-d nor 
^^ alter D. Parks srraduate. He began work in a store of V M 

Wayne, at Shelby, in isr>n : went into the mercan- 
tile business at Merl^old in 1895. and has continued 
m that bu.^iness ever since: has also been ensased 
m banking as well as operating several plantaM'onv 
He was successful in all bus-ness enternrises and in 
^ addition to being President and Director of ^ever.-,. 

banks, he is the owner of a fine stock farn, upop 
which he raises Hereford cattle. 

Mr. Parks was Post-master of his town in 1905-9 : 
and Town Treasurer in 19n4-S: elected to 
the House of Representatives Xovember 7 
1911: 6lecte.i t,> the Stat« Senate in Xovem- 
ber. 1913. His Committee a«sienm«nts in fb^t body 
are numerous and a number of bills -nfmdur.prl bv 
him are among the best of tTie se5:«ir>n j^.-^ busi- 
ness aunliflcations m:,ke him one of t.,e mn.-^ 
valued members of the Senate. S-nat.^- r>.,Tri.-, ;., 
a Democrat : a member of the B. P. O E'ks : 
has no church connection. He was mnr.jci Octo- 
ber -1. 1900. to Man- Eli^nheth Wvnn- of M.-mnhis 
Tenn . M-ho father w.-.s ■, merchant r, t Shelhv 
and later moved to :\remphis. where he died in 
1901. Senator and yWs. P^.a-s have three chi'd.-pn : 
Annie Claire. Virginia ar.l Frances. Tp the H6u<« 
of Representatives. 191->-16 Senator fa-ks was a 
member of the follo"-it,- r^ommjttees: Fees and 
Salaries. Banks and Banking. Mississipni Levees 
Eleemosynary Institutions. M'ays and Means. Drain- 
age. In the Senate of 1916 he serxed on the fol- 
lowing committees: Local and Private legislation- 
Agriculture and Commer. e ; Public Works; Banks 
and Banking: Fisheries and Game: Levees, of 
which he is chairman. 



'1'i«|IJ trrjRt ^ "it* 



••/>rn o''! '' • 



I.EOISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



793 



THIKTY-FIKST L'ISTRICT. 

NATHANIEL WEST BRADFORD, of Houston. 
Miss., State Senator from the Thiity-fiist Dist- 
rict, was born February 14. 1S54 at I'ontotoo. 
Miss., tlie son of Malcolm Dougherty Bradfor-.l 
and Rosalie Dandridge Bradford of Farquier 
County, VsL. He is of En^rlish lineage, his an- 
cestors having emigrated ti- America during the 
early Colonial period and ;:ettling in the Prov- 
ince of Virginia. The family became one of 
the most prominent of the Colonial and Revolu- 
tionary period. Through liis maternal line 
Senator Bradford is related to the Dandridge.« 
West.s, Fontaines. Spotswoods. Wallers and Henrys 
of Virginia. ^^■illiam Dandridge married a Mi.~s 
West, the grand-daughter of Col. John West, 
who was Royal Governor of Virginia in 163^. 
and a younger brother of Thomas West. Lord 
Delaware. Senator Bradford's matei-nal grand- 
mother was Maitha Henry, eldest daughter 
ter of Patrick Henry. In ilississippi the family 
Fias always been one of prominence and culiur.^ 
and lias been identified with and interested in 
the best progress of the State. Senator Brad- 
ford, along with many other young men of th> 
South during and after the Civil War. was re- 
.stricted in educational opportunities. The r-.r- 
source for intellectual improvement was tn-r 
well-stoied library which could be found in the 
home.s of the better class throughout the South : 
and it was from this source that he drew 
largely, in the absence of college privileges. He 
obtained his e-irly education in the schools ot 
Pontotoc, in which he continued until he was 
thoroughly equipped for the study of a pro- 
fession. He read law in his father's office and 
made such rapid progress that he was admitted 
to the bar 'at the age of twenty-one years. He 
served a.s ilayor of the City of Pontotoc and 
later removed to Houston at which plact> he has 
since continued in the successful practice of 
his prof'=-ssion. Having always been an exten- 
sive read<-r and a thoughtful student of public 
affairs, he was pi-epan-d to render his State serv- 
ice of a high order when he entered public 
life. While serving in the Legislature of 19fi- 
his influence in that body was very marked and 
as a member of the Senate of 1916-20, he ha.-^ 
won the reputation of being one of the most 
profound and best prepared member of the 
body. His deep concern for Mississippi's wel- 
fare was never more apparent than in his cease- 
less efforts to have enacted la'ws that would 
iiive to the State the best roadways in the 
Sviuth. Knowing that the State was largely 



\ 




X. W. Bradford 



'94 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



agricultural and that the small farmer depended 
to a groat extent upon th" lovt-nue derived ii-om 
the disposal of various products throughout the 
year, he felt that little legislation could be en- 
acted that would mean more to the people of 
the State than that of securinjj good roads in 
order that the marketing- of such oiops niight 
become an easy matter. His interest in all leg- 
islation that touched the betterment of rural 
communities was deep and sincere, and thiough- 
out the session his conscientious adherence to 
principle won for him the truest admiration and 
respect of the entire membership of the Senate 
and of the public audience that came in contact 
with him, as well. Senator Bradford i.s a Demo- 
crat; member of the Presbj'terian Church in 
which he is an elder. He belongs to the frater- 
nal orders of Odd Fellows and Woodmen of the 
World. On November 24, 1SS6. he was united in 
marriage to Tula Lee Baskins, daughter of 
Joseph Berry Baskins and Carrie Baskins of 
Pototoc, Miss. Senator and Airs. Bradford have 
four children: Joe Baskins, William Dougherty, 
Annie, and Paul Williams. Joe Baskins Brad- 
foi-d was married to Betiie Caiines. He died 
July 11, 1915. leaving an infant daughter, Laura 
Audrey, to whom Senator Bradford is deeply 
devoted. , 



MARSHAL TURNER ADAMS of Pontotoc. 
State Senator from the Thirty-first District, was 
born September 2.3, 1886, at Chestervilli. Ponto- 
toc County, ^[iss., the son of George Turner 
Adam.s and Clara Emma (Carruth) Adams of 
that county. His father was a native and for 
many years a resident of the same count\' hi.s 
present home being Belden, in Lee County, 
which adjoin.s Pontotoc. Since early manhood 
he has been a farmer and merchant. His par- 
ents were John Garrison Adams and Sarah Win- 
ter Adams of Pontotoc County. Senator Adams' 
mother was the daughter of Adrien Brown Car- 
ruth and Amanda Brown Carruth of Pontotoc. 
Marshal T. Adams He is of English and Irish ancestry. Three Car- 

ruth brothers emigrated from Ireland and one 
of these. Leander Peary Carruth, settled in 
South Carolina, whence he and his family moveo 
to Pontotoc County, Miss. From these three 
brothers came all of that name, scattered over 
the United States. Drs. A. B. and L. H. Carruth. 
grandfather and grand uncle of Senator Adams, 
served as distinguished surfei.ons in th<j Confedurate 
Army, throughout the War. Senator Adams' 




.b»30Vt»t> 



10 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT t95 



paternal great-grandfather was John Jenkins 
Adams, in which ancestral line was Rev. Jere- 
miah Winters, a noted Presidini^ Elder of the 
Methodist Church in London. England. He came 
to America in 1S30 and continued his minister- 
ial work in Charleston, S. C. It was in this city 
ll.at John Garrison Adams, grandfatlier of Sena- 
tor Adams, was married to Sarah Elizabeth 
Winters, the two families uniting a lar^-e and 
forceful following in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church South. In ^Mississippi, the family con- 
tinues its all'3t?iance to this cliurch. Senator 
Adams was reared on a farm in Pontotoc County 
and his early education was obtained in the 
free .'^cliools of li^it and rlie adjoining county 
of Lee. He later attended a college pre- 
paratory school at McKenzie, Tenn.. from 
1903-190" ; entered the I'niversitly of Missis- 
sippi in 1907. where he remained thi-outrli the 
JunioT- course. In 1909. he entered the Law 
Department of this L'niversity and was gradu- 
ated in 1911, with the degree LL. B. Immedi- 
ately after graduating, he located for the prac- 
ti'-e of his profession in Pontotoc County, Miss., 
where he remained until his election to the 
State Senate, a position which he fills with ex- 
ceptional ability. His thoughtful, conservative 
attitude in dealing with various policies and 
problems that affect the State's best interests, 
has won for him the confidence of his colleagues, 
who regard him as one of the strong young men 
of the Senate. Senator Adams' deer> interest in 
all institutions that affect the material welfare 
of the State, did not blind him to the need of 
a higher intellectual and moral advancement of 
the people and his public service was marked 
by an increasing concern for ^Mississippi's honor 
and progress among the states of the Union. 
In political faith, he is a Democrat; he is secre- 
tary of the Board of Stewards and President 
of the Baraca Cla.'^s of the Methodist church in 
Pontotoc. Miss.; he is a ?iIason and a member 
of the i^igma Chi fraternity of the Unive!-st% 
of Mi?-sissippi. On November 12, 1913. he was 
married to Willye Mae Fletcher, at McKenzie. 
Tenn. Mrs. Adams is the daughter of Samuel 
Josephus Fletcher and Mary Olivia Gregory 
Fletcher. Her father was a native of Kentucky 
and her mother of Tennessee, both families be- 
ing among the best citizens of those States. 



79<> LEGISLATIVE DKPART.MEXT 



r~ 1 



'^ 



TIIIRTY-SECOXD DISTRICT. 

JAMES CLARENTE ESKRIDCJE of Delny 
:MiPS., State Senator from the Thirty-sfcond Dis- 
trict, was born April 26. 1S73. at Houston 
Mississippi, the son of William Laurel and Eliza- 
beth Catherine (Hilli Eskridu'e. His p.uernal 
ancestors came from England, immig-rating- to 
the Virginia colony in the latter part of the 
seventeenth, or <=-arly in the eight.^enih tentuiy : 
his grreat-grandfatlier came from Vi-s:inia and 
settled in Chickasaw County, Miss. His grand- 
father shared in all the excitement and pre- 
i -J Paration connected with the outbreak of the 

,.iaii«*i..i^_.i _. . -. ^^^ Civil War. and served with distinction in Com- 
pany E., Thirty-first Mississippi Cavalry, C. S. 
James C. E.VKrui«e a., in McCollough's Brigade. Senator Eskridge 

obtained his early education in the common 
schools of Chicka.-^aw County : entered Tula Noi- 
mal Institute, grraduating- in ISSS, and in 1889 
took a teacher's course at luka Xorma! Insti- 
tute. Hi> taught school in Pontotoc Counc.N 
that year and the following year in Panola 
County; since that time he has been engaged in 
the lumber and mercantile business. He rep- 
resented his people in the Legislature of 1912- 
1916 and served on numerous important com- 
mittees. His service as a Representative of his 
county rendered him very popular with l-,js con- 
stituents and he w;;s urged by his friends to be- 
come a candidate fur the State Senate. He wa.s 
elected in Xovember, 191.5. Senator EskrUK-e is in- 
dependent in his convictions and is not a tool 
of any political faction, preferring to use his 
own judgment in matters of right and wrong 
rather than to be led by others. He is a Demo- 
crat, a Baptist, a ilason (now Senior \varaen 
In Tula Masonic Lodge), a Woodman ■-{ ihf 
W.=rld, and Clerk of the Columbian Woodmen 
of Delay. He was married to Jimmie Phee 
Lynch at Delay, March 1, 1899; his wifes pater- 
nal ancestors came from Georgia, her father 
having served in the Confederate Army. Con. 
pany C, Duff's Battalion, Rucker's Brigade of 
Forrest's Cavalry. Senator and Mrs. Eskridge 
have three children: Samuel Richard, James 
Laurel, and Clarence Wade. 



A< 



i.EGl.<:L^'LTrVE DEPARTMENT 



7f)7 



THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT. 



(.'ALVIX RROOKS VAXCE of Katf-svillo. Slat.- 
Senator from the Thirty-third District, was born 
I i.iH-mlnr 26, 1S44, on a cotton plantation in 
I'annla County. Miss., the son of Elislitx Quinby 
\'anco and Cypressa C. (.Brooks) Vance. His 
paternal ancestors came from Scotland to Ani- 
f rica before the Revolutionary War, flrst locat- 
ing" near P'redericksburg-, Va. Subsequently part 
of the family moved to tlie Carolina.-^, whence 
the grandfather of Senator Vance moved to 
Kentucky, and his soti came from tliat state 
to Panola County, Miss., in isiO. Senator Vance 
obtained his earl\- education at Panola schools, 
later studied at the Kentucky Military Institute 
and the University of Virginia, but left the 
la.st-named institution in lSt>l to join a Missis- 
sippi regiment and go to the foi'efront of battle ; 
he bec'ime a lieutenant of artillery : was com- 
missioned Captain before the close of the strug- 
gle, and was severelv wounded at the siege of 
Vicksburg. His service as a soldier was con- 
spicuous for heroism and gallantry. After the 
war, from 1S64 to 1875, Senator Vance was en- 
gaged in manaaing his plantation; assisted in 
all efforts to build up his section which had suf- 
fered the ravages of war: from lST-5 to 1S7S 
he was editor of a newspaper; he is now Presi- 
dent of the Bank of Batesville and is at the head 
of several local coi-porations. Ho still i-eta'n.s 
the old homestead, built in the SO's. which is in 
a good state of preservation and stands as a 
striking landmark and reminder of pioneer 
days. During the troubled days of reconstruc- 
tion Senator Vance was unceasingly active in 
his effort to break down carpet-bag rule and to 
restore honest government to the State. As a 
member of the famous Ku Klux Klan, he ren- 
dered his State a valuable service in upholding 
the white civilization of tlie South. In 1876 he 
was made Brigadier-General of State Militia; 
from 1S78 to 1880 he was a member of the State 
Senate, which office he now liolds. Senator Vance 
is one of the distinguished members of the L,cgi&- 
lature who was reared in the antebellum period 
of the state. He is a Democrat : has been several 
times Chairman of the County Executive Com- 
mittee ; and is Commander of the T'nited Con- 
federate veterans, and has had many honors con- 
ferred upon him by his comrades. He was mar- 
ried. October. 27, 1889, in Ciiattanooga. Tenn., to 
IJda Butler, daughter of Vl'illiam and Mary Butler 
of Memphis. Tenn. Senator and Mrs. V.?nce have 
thi-ee children: EHsha Q'linsby, Calvin Brooks. 
Jr.. and John David. 



'^ 'i-;^^- 



/ i 



Calvin B. V; 



798 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



pw-^«:-'> ' 



Lester C. Franklin 



TirinTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. 

LESTER CICERO P'RAXKLIX of Clatks- 
dale. Miss.. State Stntaor from, the Thirty-fourth 
Di.-^trict. was born at Eupora, Webster County, 
Miss., July 2S, 1SS6, the son of Cicero Howard 
Franklin and Mary ^ Riddle) Franklin of Choc- 
taw County, Miss. His father served as County 
Treasurer and Tax A.-sossor of that countj\ He 
was the son of Jackson Fr.inklin and Mary 
Franklin of La Granpre Hall, !Mis.s. Jackson 
Franklin moved from South Carolina to Choc- 
taw County. Mis.s. before the Civil War. He 
went, with his two sons, from that county to 
join the Confederate Army. Both sons lost 
th' ir lives in battle. Senator Franklin's mater- 
nal grandfather was John Riddle, wlio emi- 
grated from Iieland and in this country was a, 
teacher of note. He and his three sons all 
served in the Confederate Army. Senator Frank- 
lin obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Choctaw County. He later attended 
Bennett ,\.cademy. whence he was graduated 
with literary honors and first honors in o"atory. 
In 1910, he was graduated from Mississippi 
College, havin? won the Freshman. Sophomore 
and Junior medals for oratory. He was anni- 
versarian for the Philomathian Literary Soc!et\" 
and represented the collei-Te in first Chatauqua in 

1909, winning second honors. He also represented 
Mississippi Colle.sre in the M. I. O. A . in 

1910, at Greenville. Mis.'^.. aff.ain tak:'ner >^eo- 
ond honors. After finisliins: his literary roiir.>;e. 
Senator Franklin enteced ("'umberland I'niver- 
sity at Lebanon, Tenn.. for the stud>' of 
law. From' this institution he graduated in 1911 
with degree of LL. B. During his stay there, 
he won the State medal for oratory, in the 
Inter-collegiate Oratorical Association. During 
the following summer, he took a course in law 
at Millsaps College, under Chief-Justice A. H. 
Whitfield. In the autumn of 1911, he located 
at Clarksdale, Miss., and began an active and 
lucrative legal practice, in which he is still 
engaged. His influence "was felt in his ccm- 
nnunity. not only in his profession but in the 
affairs of the State and he was urged 'to pre- 
sent his claims for public office. In the sum- 
mer of 191.5, he announced for the Senate from 
the Thirty-fourth District and was chosen by 
the people as their representative in that body. 
In the ensuing Xovember election. In politi- 
cal faith Senator Franklin is a Democrat : he 
Is a member of the Baptist Church; he ^ifRliates 
with the frat-^rnal orders of Masons, T'nights 
of Pythias. Woodmen of the "World. Modem 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMB:xT 



799 



Woodmen. Columbian Woodmen, and Order cf 
0\vl.«. On Ausrust 2S, 1911. Senator Franklin 
was united in marriaare to Eulalie Frances Roet- 
ers. daughter of Een O. Rog-ers and Mary Kirhy 
Rogers of Lebanon, Tenn. Her father foug-ht 
iindei- General Jaekson at the Battle of Xew 
Orleans in the "War of 1812: he was also a Con- 
federate soldier and was severely woimded in the 
Civil "War. Her grandfather and his seven brothers 
fought in the Revolutionarj' "War. Senator and 
Mrs. Franklin have one child: Lester Cicero, Jr. 



THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. 



JOHX "WESLEV BARBEE. .Jr.. of Hernando. 
State Senator from the Thirty-fifth District, was 
bom Feb. 12. 18S.5, near Horn Lake. De Soto 
County. Miss. He is the son of John Wesley 
Barbee. wlio was a f;iithful and conscientious mein- 
ber of the Ku Klux Klan. and is at pre.sent Sheriff 
of DeSoto County. His wife, Isabella McKamy 
Frazier. was fi-om Alabama and of Scotch descent 
Paternal ancestors were from Ireland. A maternal 
ancestor. Samuel Frazier, was an officer under 
General Nathaniel Greene, in the army of the 
Revolution. Senator Barbee attended the puMic 
schools of DeSoto County until his fifteenth year 
under Prof. S. P. Walker; entered Bethel Col- 
leg-e, Tenn., in 1900; spent one year, 1902, in 
the Mississippi Agricultural and :Mechanical Col- 
lege; was graduated from Bethel College in 
1905. with B. S. degree; attended Cumberland 
University. Leb.anon, Tenn.. in 190.3-1906 ; tciok 
degree of LL. B. at this University in 1910; was 
class orator upon his graduation. He began the 
practice of law in May, 1911. and -was elected 
to the House of Representatives, Xovember 7, 
1911. His faithful and intelligent service in 
that body was rewarded by his constitutents 
in a determination to honor him, with election 
to the State Senate, a position upon which he 
reflects the highest credit. Though among the 
younger members of the body he bears himself 
well in debate, and his friends safely predict 
for him a bright political career. He is a Demo- 
crat, a Knight of Pythias, and a member of Phi 
Kappa Alpha Fraternity. He is unmarried. 
Senator Barb'=e serves on the following com- 
mittees: Judiciary; Claims; Registrations and 
Elections; Levees; Military Affairs, of which 
last named he is Chairman. On his election as 
County Attorney for DeSoto County, Senator 
Barbee resigned from the Senate and was suc- 
ceeded by Senator J. N. Brown. 




John W. Barbee. Jr. 



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^sHntl V/ nriioi 



800 



LEGISLATIVE DEE'ART.MEXT 



J 


a 



Joseph X. Brown 



JOSEPH XEAL DROWN, of Olive Dranch. 
Miss., was horn October 2. 1S49. at Mount Pleas- 
ant. Marshall County, Miss., and is the son <<i 
Georsre \V. Brown and Ellen Huffman Brown of 
Tennessee. Georg-e W. Brown %\-as a trusted and 
honored educator in his home town. Mount 
Pleasant, where he spent many years of a use- 
ful life. He was the son of Joseph l?rown. for 
whom he named his son. This Joseph Riown 
was a First Lieutenant in the American Revi^lu- 
tion, a distinction which entitles his descend- 
ants to hig-h position in the various patriotic 
organizations commemorating' that war. Joseph 
Xeal F'rown was educated in the private schools 
uf his community, the Civil War having- inter- 
fered with his college education. He, however, 
gained a g-oodly store of useful knowledge while 
engaged in agricultural labors on his father's 
fatm. In the school of experience, he fitted him- 
self for positions of honor and trust in his com- 
munity. He was for years one of the Board of 
Supervisors of his county, serving as president 
of the Board. In 1875-76, he was an active 
participant in ridding the State of Republican 
rule and was unceasing in his efforts to restore 
law and order. He is a Democrat and has for 
years been a member of the State E.xecutive 
Committee: also. Chairman of the County Ex- 
ecutive Committee for twelve years. He now 
fills the important position of Senator from the 
Thirty-fifth District, having been chosen, at .a 
special election, to succeed Hon. J. H. Barbee, 
of Hernando, De Soto County, Miss. Senator 
Brown is a deacon of the Baptist Church: a 
Royal Arch Mason and IMaster of Oak Giove 
Lodge, No. 293, for twenty years: repre.-^ented 
this Lodge in th^ meetings of the Grand Lodge, 
for twelve years: has been Council Commander 
of the Woodmen of the World, for eighteen 
years. There could be no better proof of the 
confidence of his home people than these long 
continued terms of office, continuing as they 
do in his election to even a more influential and 
important State service. He w^as first married. 
August 27. 1877. to Pattie Brooks, daughter of 
Aaron T. and Martha Brooks; on February 16. 
1916, he was married to Willie Wilson, in the 
city of Memphis. Tenn. She is the daughter of 
Robert Wilson and Mary E. Matthews Wilson of 
Center Hill, Miss. Her ancestor. Major Mussen- 
den Matthews was a soldier in the Revoluti'-n- 
ary Army, serving chiefly in the campaigns of 
North Carolina. (See Hunter's History of North 
Carolina). Senator and Mrs. Brown have one 
child: Pearl Rivers, wife of T. H. Norvell. Mr. 
and Mrs. Norvell have two children: Eugenia 
and Joseph Winston. 



I^EGISLATIVE DEP.AJRTMEXT 



801 



THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. 



SAM COCHRAX MIMS of Holly Springs. Miss., 
State Senator from the Thirty-sixth District. 
was born November 27. 1880, at Chulahoma, Mar- 
shall County, Miss., the son of Sam Cochran 
Mims and Jessie Thompson Mlms of Mahon, Mar- 
shall County, Miss. His father was born at 
Chulahoma. where he resided until 1892, when 
he removed to Byhalia. Mi.ss. He is a public- 
spirited citizen and has served several times as 
a member of the Board of Supervisors of his 
county. His ambition for his family was al- 
ways along educational lines and the unusual 
college advantages which his son, Sonatoi- 
Mims, has enjoyed is evidence of the father's 
aspiration for the things worth while in life. 
Senator Mims' mother is the daughter of Major 
John Clark Thomp.son of Hernando, DeSoto 
County, Miss., both fam.ilies having been promi- 
nent in all movements for the social and civic 
welfare of their several counties. Senator Mims 
obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Byhalia, after which he entered the 
Southern Normal University of Tennessee. He 
later entered the University of Mississippi, In 
which institution he ranked as one of the most 
worthy students. Choosing law as his profes- 
sion, he was admitted to the bar In 1909, In 
Marshall County, where he has since continued 
his practice. In May, 1910, he was appointed 
County Attorney by Gov. E. F. Noel, and was 
elected for a full term of that office In Novem- 
ber, 1911. He has served as County Attorney of 
Marshall County for five years and seven 
month.". While in the public service of the 
State, his talent, energy and capacity was soon 
recognized by the people of his county and 
he was urged to become a candidate for the 
State Senate, to which position he was elected 
for the term of 1916-1920. In that high office. 
Senator Mims reflects credit upon hi^ consti- 
tuents, and no man in the Mississippi Legisla- 
ture displays higher or finer Ideals of honor 
and Justice in handling the public affairs of the 
State. Among the younger members of the 
Senate, he takes high rank as an able, thought- 
ful, conservative member. Senator Mim.s Is a 
Democrat; a member of the Methodist Church, 
in which he served on the official board for 
two years; is also a member of the Masonic and 
Elk lodges. On December 1.5. 1915. he was 
united In marriage to Virginia Stone of Holly 
Springs. Miss. Mrs. Mims Is the daughter of 
I- A. Stone and Margaret Stone of Henderson, 
Tenn. 



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Sam C. ilims 



51— m 



802 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



i^ 




William H. 



Dyson 



WILIJAM HUXTER DYSON of Hirkory Flat. 
Miss., State Senator from the Thirty-sixth Dist- 
rict, son of Lewis Woodward Dyson and Fannie 
Elizabeth Ellis, daug-hter of Redden Ellis and 
Elizabeth Eeachman Ellis of Pontotoc. Miss, was 
born August 15. 18S2 at Esperanza, Pontotoc 
County, Miss. Lewis Woodward Dyson was the 
son of John Dyson and Sarah Jane Ray Dyson 
of Ing-omar. Miss. He was born near Ingomar. 
Union County, Miss. Senator Dyson's maternal 
grandfather. Redden Ellis, was educated at 
Columbus. Miss., moved to Pontotoc County be- 
fore the Civil War and taug-ht school in that 
county throusrhout the war. There were few 
schools continued regularly during- the Civil 
War and it was g-reatly to any t<^wn'8 credit 
when its Institutions of learning- were not suf- 
fered to go out of existence. Senator Dyson had 
only the education of the country schools. His 
lessons of life came from experience and prac- 
tical knowledge. He has been a barber by tradp 
at Hickory Flat since 1905. He Is a member of 
the Modern "U^oodmen of America. His good 
common-sense and large acquaintance with public 
questions made him an available candidate for 
the State Senate from the Thirty-sixth District. 
He was elected In 1915 for the term of 1916-1920 
and ser\-es with a high conception of right 
and Justice and a deep sense of his respon.sibllitles 
upon the following committees : Finance. Agri- 
culture and Commerce: Corporations. He mar- 
ried Sarah Rebecca Johnson at Thaxton. Fontotoc 
County. Miss., on October 20. 1902. She Is the 
daughter of Andrew Jackson McLaughlin Johnson 
and his wife, Annie Loiiise Donaldson, who lived 
at Pontotoc, ^riss. Senator and Mrs. Dyson have 
two children : Christine Lenora and Harold Payne, 



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Henry C. Collins 



HENTIT CLAY COLLIXS of ^fyrtle. Miss.. 
State Senator from the Thirty-sixth District, 
was born December 20. 1883. at Myrtle. Union 
County. Miss. He Is the son of Alva Collins. 
who was bom and lived In Myrtle. Miss., serv- 
ing for a time as treasurer of Union County, and 
Fannie Virginia CCraham) Collins, daughter of 
Joseph T. Graham and M.artha Stowe Graham 
of Rutherford County. Nnrth Cirolina. Senator 
Collins was t"he grandson of Elijah Walker Col- 
lins and Eliza D. Miller Collins of Tuscaloosa. 
Ala. The Collins family Is of English descent : 
the Graham family of Scotch-Trlsh. Elijah 
Walker Collins came from North Carolina and 
settled in Mlssi.-jsippl In 183< and held the office 
of magistrate In his county for a numb-rr of 
jrears. William Gra>iam, Sr., ancestor of Henry 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



803 



Clay Collins, was a signer of the Mechlenburg- 
Declarations. General George and Genorai 
Joseph Graham of Revolutionary fame, are also 
of the same family. Henry Clay Collins gained 
his education in the common schools of his 
county. He attended Chalybeate Springs Insti- 
tute, (now Tippah County Agricultural School) 
for two years. He graduated at Mississippi Col- 
lege, Clinton. Miss., in 1910 with degree of Ph. 
B. While at this college he was treasurer of 
the Young Men's Christian Association, and was 
librarian of his society. He was also class poet 
of the Junior year, member of foot-ball team, 
deputy marshal of athletic field, and vice- 
president of his Society. While at college, he 
took a course in professional training as a 
teacher, and after leaving school he taught for 
four years, at the following places : Blue 
Springs High School, Tillatoba High School of 
Yalobusha County, Hickory Fla* High School 
of Benton County. He was policeman of Louisi- 
ana Chatauqua In 1905. He is a Democrat 
and was not elected by either of the present 
political factions of Mississippi. He is a Bap- 
tist, having served as Church Clerk, member of 
Educational Committee of the Baptist As.=^ocia- 
tion. and deleg.ate to aspociations He is a 
Master Mason of Myrtle Lodgp Mo. 4S9 F. and 
A. M. ; also member of ^Tyrtle Camp, Woodmen 
of the World. Senator Collins married Marietta 
Bridges at Myrtle. Miss.. Nov. 24. 1910. She 
was the daughter of William Graves Bridges 
and Mollie E. fPickens') Bridges of Rocky Ford, 
Miss. William Graves Bridges was at one time 
supervisor and road commissioner of Union 
County. Mrs. Collins maternal grandfather waa 
Dr. Pickens. Senator Collins is a man of high 
Ideals and noble standards of civic progress and 
educational advancement nf his community. His 
course In the State Senate is marked for integrity 
and firmness of purpose and he holds the con- 
fidence of the entire body. 



thirty-se\'t:nth district 

CARROLL KENDRirTC of Kendrick. Miss.. State 
Senator from the Thirty-Seventh District, was born 
May 24. 18.52. near Hamburg. Hardine: County. 
Tenn.. the son of Allen and Nancy (Rose) Ken- 
drick. His father was a minister of the Christinn 
Church, ser\-ing as pastor for congregations in Lex- 
ington and Louisville. Ky. and in Philadelphia. Pa. 
He was a speaker of great eloquence and force. 
Senator Kendrick's mother belonged to the dl."»- 
ttngulshed Rose family of Colonial Virginia, which 




Carroll Kendrick 



g04 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



has today representatives In all parts of the coun- 
try. He attended the prlmnry schools of North 
Mississippi and later receiveJ a college education, 
attendins: first the luka Normal College from which 
he was graduated with the degree of A. B. I-atcr 
he attended the Hiram College in Ohio, whore he 
recceiv-ed the desrree of M. A. He was too young 
to take part In the Civil War, being a lad of only 
nine years when it broke out. His ardent love for 
his section, however, caused him when little more 
than a youth to take nn active part in the restora- 
tion of social and political order in the State, after 
the defeat of the Southern Confederacy. Tlirough- 
out the trv-ing- days of re-construction he bolonsred 
to the famous Ku Klux ITIan. an organization 
which was unremitting In Its efforts to preserve 
white supremacy In the South. The fine oil palnt- 
Ine of this Order which has been presented to the 
Historical Department to represent the great body 
of ex-Confederate veterans known as the Ku Klux 
Klan durlnsr the days of re-construction presents 
full lengrth portraits in official robes of two 
members of the org-anization. one of whom Is 
Senator Kendrick and the other Mr. J. S. McFall 
of Oklahoma. The palntlncr was made from an 
orlgrlnal photograph and is a fac simile In every re- 
spect In 1S73. Senator Kendrick was graduated 
from the ^^edical Department of the University of 
Louisville. Ky.. with the degree of M. D., receiving 
a gold medal for the best thesis. After leaving 
college. Dr. Kendrick located at Kendrick. Alcorn 
County. Miss., for the practice of medicine. HI-s 
popularity as a physician and deep Interest In the 
public welfare attracted to him a strong following 
and he was urged to enter political life as a candi- 
date for membership In the House of Representa- 
tives, to which position he was elected, serving 
from 1884 to 1S86. In November. 1903, he was 
elected State Senator and served on many Im- 
portant committees In that body, among which were 
those on County Affairs. Contineent Expenses. Hu- 
mane and Benevolent Institutions, Public Health 
and Quarantine. Temperance, and the joint Com- 
mittee on Engrossed Bill.". He was again elected 
to the Senate In 1911 snd continued to render 
faithful and efficient serr-ice to the State, proving 
such a valuable representative that his constituents 
returned him to the Senate of 1916-20. .\s a mem- 
ber of the distinguished body of men who at 
present compose the State Senate of Mississippi. 
Dr. Kendrick stands in the front rank as a sup- 
porter of all legislation that affects the social, 
moral and political welfare nf the State. With 
a kln'!:y, s>-mpathetlc nature he urito' the 
firmest adherence to the principles of right and 
Justice, and his support of any measure touch- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



805 



ins the State's interest carries great influence 
In securing its passage. Among the numerous 
bills which he has introduced in the. Senate was Uie 
one for the pitservauon of Mississippi's Old Cap- 
itol and the faithful and untiring services which 
he rendered in SL-curing the passage of the bill will 
always be remembered by the women of Uie State 
In iy07. Dr. Kendrick was President of the State 
Medical Association and as Uie official head of that 
organization and throughout his political service to 
the state he has been active and effective in his 
efforts for the advancement of medical science m 
Dolitical faith he is a Democrat and has always 
rendered his party lo-al and faithful service As 
a member of the Christian Church, he has beer, 
enthusiastic and helpful in all movements for the 
spiritual and moral uplift of his section, and com- 
munity. On October 30, 18S2 he was married ai 
Corinth. Miss., to Gayle Adams, who died August 
8. 19U1. On September 19, 1903, Dr. Kendrick waa 
married to Mary William McAnulty, daughter of 
Jonn W. and Julia (Hartgrove) McAnulty of 
Kossuth. Miss. Her father was a faithful soldier 
of the Confederacy and rendered constant service 
to the Cause, throughout the Civil War Mrs 
Kendrick-s interest in tlie preservation of the Old 
Capitol was very marked and the happiness which 
the passage of the bill gave her and hundreds of 
other patriotic women of Mississippi, was one of the 
most pleasing incidents of the Legislative session 
Senator Kendrick serves on the following com- 
mittees: Rules; Finance; Immigration; Public 
Health and Quarantine of which he is chairman. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 

THOMAS KE.VDALL BOGOAN of Tupelo. Miss 
State Senator from the Thirty-eighth District, was 
born February 2. 18S0. at MooresviUe. Lee Countv 
Miss., the son of Thomas Armstrong Boggan and 
Mittie Catherine Mitchener of Lee County His 
father was a native of Alabama, from which star- 
he removed to MooresviUe. At the early age of 
fifteen, he joined the Confederate army and served 
until the close of the Civil War. He represented 
Lee County in the State Legislature one term, and 
was health officer for that county in 1911-l-> He 
resided a few years in Itawamba Countv. but'spent 
the latter part of his life in Tupelo. Miss. He was 
the son of Dr. James Hardy Boggan and Mary 
Anne Prewett Boggan of Alabama, and later of 
Monroe County, >.ri.,. Dr. Jamrs Hardv Bof.'gan 
Joined the Confederate army from Itawamba County 



■W«B..-'*;WW"v''^ .V^ ■^■J',*im 




Thoma.? K. BoTgan 



806 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



at the beginning of the Civil War. However his 
services as a physician were in such demand 'that 
the people of his vicinity petitioned for his re- 
turn and he practiced medicine among them until 
his death. Senator Bojr^an is of Irish and En- 
glish ancestry and is descended from one of three 
Boggan brothers who came from Ireland and set- 
tled in the Carolinas. Sarah Grizzard, his great- 
grandmother on the paternal side, was also of Irish 
descent. His English ancestry was derived through 
his great-grandmother Prewett, who was a Miss Mc- 
Gee. A maternal ancester was Catherine Boone 
Mnchner. a descendant of Daniel Boone. In his 
family also appear the names of Smith and Mc- 
Means. It is a matter of great interest and pride 
to us that Mississippi's population is made up of 
such families as are found in this sketch of Sena- 
tor Boggan. Senator Boggan's early education was 
obtained in the public schools of Mooresville. He 
later attended the public schools at Fulton, Miss., 
and in September. 1898, he entered the Tupelo 
High School, finishing: the entire course of study. 
With the foundation of a good education well laid, 
he entered the University of his own State in 1899^ 
from which institution he was graduated with the 
degree of B. P. in June, 1903. Deciding upon the le- 
gal profession, he attended the University of 
Michigan for thiee summer sessions and afterwards 
took a senior course in the Law Department of 
the University of Mississippi, graduating there with 
the degree of LL. B. in June 1912. While pre- 
paring himself for the practice of law. he engaged 
in school work for a number of years ; was super- 
intenden'. of the public schools at Collins, Miss., 
June 1903-07; superintendent of the Magnolia pub- 
lic schools, June 1907-08; superintendent of the 
Eiloxi public school.-', June 1908-11. Like so many 
other young Mississipians, Senator Boggan de- 
pended upon teaching while he was preparing him- 
self for his profession and this experience, has 
doubtless, been a most valuable one in after life. 
In November, 1912. he began the practice of his 
profession in Meridian, Miss. From that city, he 
removed to Tupelo, Miss., where he has been in a 
constant and successful practice. He served as a 
member of the State Text-book Commission, from 
the Sixth Congressional District, from 1905-10. His 
election to the State Senate was the next step in his 
public career. In political faith he is a Democrat; 
a member of the Methodist Church ; and of the 
fraternal orders of Masons. Woodmen of the World, 
and Knights of Pjthias. in which orders he has 
always held high positions. On December 2h, 1904. 
he was united in marriage to Shirley Sue Xeill of 
Oxford. Miss. Mrs. Boggan is the daughter of 



10 



LEGISLATIVE DEP^VRTMENT 



807 



William Constantine Xeill and Mary Emnieline 
Phipps of Oxford. Her failier's family removed to 
Mississippi from Tennessee and originally came 
from Ireland to Burke County, North Carolina, 
some time during the 18th century. The Pliipps 
came to Tennessee from Petersburg, Va. A pa- 
ternal ancestor of Mrs. Boggan, Richard Long, was 
a gallant soldier in the Revolutionary War. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT 



ANTHOXY JEROME COX of Smithville, Mii^s., 
State Senator from the Thirty-eighth District, was 
born October 21, 1890, near Smithville. Monroe 
County, Miss. He is the son of James P. Cox and 
Polly Annie (Irvin) Cox of Monroe County. James 
P. Cox was born near the historic old city of 
Charleston, South Carolina and when a lad of ten 
years, he removed with his parents, Jerome and 
Elizabeth Davis Cox. from South Carolina to :Mon- 
roe County, Miss., in which place he still resides. 
Senator Cox's paternal ancestors came from Irelanil 
and settled in South Carolina in the early part of 
the eighteenth century and their descendants ha%'e 
since been among tlie best representatives of Ameri- 
can citizenry. His mother was the daughter of 
Anthony Irvin and Jane (Webb) Irvin of Green- 
wood Springs, Monroe Count}', Miss. Senator Cox 
received his early education in the public schools 
of Monroe County and later took high school work 
at Hatley and Smithville. Though a very young 
man when he completed his scholastic course, be- 
ing well prepared to teach along the requirements of 
that day, he taught very successfully for a number 
of years, during which time he read extensively. 
Having been reared in a rural community, he al- 
ways found country life and agricultural pursuits 
congenial and he is at present engaged in farming 
and stock-raising. However, his interest in the 
public affairs of his county and state was none thi- 
less keen because of agricultural pursuits and his 
popularity with the people drew him into the race 
for the State Senate, to which higii position he was 
elected for the term of 1916-20. He serves on the 
following Committees: Judiciary: Finance; Peni- 
tentiary ; Humane and Benevolent Institutions ; In- 
surance ; Printing, of which he is chairman. Sena- 
tor Cox gives but a meager outline of his various 
activities in promoting the welfare of his commun- 
ity, but his rapid advancement in public positions of 
the highest trust, at so youthful an age, is evidence 
of the strong hold that he has upon the people of 
his community. As a member of the State Senate, 




Anthony J. Co.x 



SOS 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAKTMENT 



he has displayed much ability and his interest iu 
the higher intellectual advancement of Mississippi 
places him among the best representatives of the 
State. In political faith. Senator Cox is a Demo- 
crat ; a member of the fraternal order of the "Wood- 
men of the World. He is unmarried. 



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Isaac L. Tigert 



ISAAC LAGROXE TIGERT. Sergeant-at-Arms of 
the Mississippi Senate, was born March 11, 1892, at 
Dumas, Tippah County. Miss., and is the son cf 
Hugh I'orter Tigert and Addie Irene (Hovis) 
Tigert of Dumas. His father resided for a time at 
Ripley, the county site of Tippah, and served as 
Post-master at Dumas. He was the son of Thomas 
Bell Tigert and Marguerite Elizabeth (McCord) 
Tigert. Mr. Tigerfs mother is the daughter of Col. 
Lawson Berry Hovis and Laura (Phyfer) Hovis of 
Ripley, Miss. Her parents came from North Caro- 
lina to Mississippi, in the late 30's. Col. Hovis was 
a soldier in the JMexican War and rendered effi- 
cient service. He also served in the Civil War, ana 
while leading his regiment, the 2nd Mississippi, he 
was mortally wounded, near Moscow, Tenn. 

Mr. Tigert is of Scotch-Irish descent, his paternal 
ancestors having emigrated to America in the early 
days of its colonization. The history of the South- 
ern States shows that the population was thickl> 
studded with Scotch-Irish emigrants, who have con- 
tinued to be a sturdy type and who have repre- 
sentatives in all prominent pursuits and profes- 
sions. 

Mr. Tigert received his early education in the 
Dumas Institute, after which he attended the Ripley 
High School. He later entered Chamberlain-Hunt 
Academy at Port Gibson, Miss., from which insti- 
tution he was graduated in 1913, having been presi- 
dent of both the Sophomore and Junior classes. 
After having finished his literarj- course, Mr. Tigert 
entered the Law Department of Millsaps College, 
from which he was graduated in 1916. with degree 
of LL. B. During this course, he was president of 
the Senior I>aw Class. He had just begun the 
practice of law when he was elected Sergeant-at- 
Arrns of the State Senate. 

One who has known him always says of Mr. 
Tigert, "While it cannot be said that he has initi- 
ated any notable reforms, he has always been allied 
with those who labor for social and civic righteous- 
ness, and his unswerving honesty, high sense of 
duty, and his purity of thought and purpose, to- 
gether with his laudable ambition to attain high 
rank among the best edu'uted and mo.<5t trust-worthy 
leaders of public life, make him easily a criterion 
worthy the emulation of the youth of our State, 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 809 



who are struggling for plaoe and position in Its 
social and political life. 

Mr. Tigert is a Democrat ; member of the Metho- 
dist Church ; member of the college fraternities Pi 
Kappa Alpha of the Alpha Iota Chapter. He is 
unmarried. 



W. H. REESE and W. H. BEXTON 

It has long been a custom of the Mississippi Legis- 
lature to honor themselves by paying tribute to 
gallant Confederate soldiers in having them guard 
the portals of the Legislative Halls. This custom 
will continue so long as the veterans live. In W. 
H. Reese and W. H. Benton the Senate has daily 
before it examples of faithfulness, integrity, cour- 
age and self-sacriflce that are worthy of its emu- 
lation. 



810 LEGISLATIVE DEPART.MEXT 



REPKKSENTATIVES EIGHTY-FOURTH SESSION 



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE. 

Speaker M. S. Con>t:b 

Clerk G. B. Poweb 

Sergeant-at-Ar/iis J. V. Gandy 

■Post Mistress Miss Bf.ssie Harris 

Doorkeepers W. S. Roberts, J. F. Price 

Stenographers Miss Maude Allen, Miss Alice Haney 

Pages 

Heber Everett, Troy Nunnery, Alvix Weeiis, S. B. Alexander, Jb. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
1916-18 

Adams — Walter G. Green, Natchez; Albert Sojourner, Natchez. 

Alcorn — R. B. Cotton. Corinth; J. B. Splann, Kendrick. 

Amite — J. F. Cassels, Gloster; D. J. Wall, Peoria. 

Attala— J. C. Wasson, Ethel R. F. D.; Icey W. Day, Ethel. 

Benton — R. B. McGill, Falkner. 

Bolivar — Walter Sillers, Jr., Rosedale; Stanley F. Gaines, Boyle. 

Calhoun — J. B. Going, Calhoun City; Dennis Murphree, Pittsboro. 

Carroll— Br. G. I. Redditt, McCarley; J. L. Lett, Grenada, R. F. D. 
No. 1. 

Chickasaic — I. V. Abernethy, Okolona; E. M. Verrell, Houston. 

Choetaxc — C. A. Lindsey, Eupora. 

Claiborne — T. A. Luster, Utica, R. F. D. No. 2. 

Clarke— H. L. Miller, Quitman, R. P. D. No. 4. 

Clay—B. S. Semmelman, West Point; F. B. Stephens, West Point. 

Coahoma — 0. G. Johnston, Clarksdale; R. L. Ralston, Coahoma. 

Copiah — J. A. Smylie, Crystal Springs; Benj. King, Hazlehurst, Geo. 
W. Russell, Hazlehurst. 



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LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT gH 

Covin (jton~yi. S. Conner, Seminary, (Speaker) 

DeSoto—DaRon F. Warren. Olive Brancli; J. G. Lauderdale, Bright. 
Forest— E. A. Anderson, Hattiesburg. 
Franklin— C. A. Everett, Monroe. 
George— L,. W. Maples, Clarence. 
Greene— W. i. McLain. liichton, Route No. 1. 
Grenada— \\\ A. ^Yinter, Grenada, 
fl'ancocfc— Robert L. Genin, Bay St. Louis. 
Harrison— Y.. E. O'Neal. Saucier. 

Hinds— E. H. Green, Jackson; V. P. Ferguson, Learned; J. S 
Rhodes, Jackson. 

Holmes— N. L. White, Lexington; H. H. Johnson. Lexington; T. G. 
Stephenson, Lexington, R. F. D. No. 1. 
Issaguena—R. E. Foster, Shiloh. 
Itawamba— W. C. Gray, Fulton. 
Jackson— W. R. David, Carterville. 
Jasper— n. L. Finch, Heidelberg, 
/e^erson— William M. Darden. McNair. 
- Jefferson Davis— 0. C. Luper, Prentiss. 
Jones— J. Hartley Bush, Laurel. 
Kemper— J. j. Daniel. DeKalb; E. J. Irby, Scooba. 
Lafayette— B. F. Hoyle, Paris; H. L. Davis, Tula. 
Law or— John A. Yeager, Lumberton. 

Lauderdale— Tho^. L. Bailey, Meridian; Willis M. Taylor, Meridian; 
J. D. Bounds, Bailey. 
Lawrence— Qha.s. E. Gibson, Monticello. 
Leafce— Martin M. Miller, Edinburg, R. F. D. No. 2. 
Lee— J. S. Howerion, Baldwyn; F. L. Kincannon, Tupelo. 
Leflore— W. S. Barry, Greenwood. 
Lincoln— J. Frank Cole, Bogue Chitto, R. F. D. 

Lowndes— J. R. Thomas, Bent Oak; John F. Frierson, Columbus; D 
L. Ervin, Columbus. 
Madison— Tip Ray. Canton; J. B. Dendy, Pickens. 
Mari07i—E. Isaac Singley, Columbia. 

Marshall— J. A. Hardin, Potts Camp; W. L Spears, Byhalia; W. W 
Stamps, Collierville, Tenn.. R. F. D. 

Monroe— W. L. C. Bailey, Aberdeen, R. No. 7; A. A. Tubb, Amory, 
R. F. D.; W. H. Kolb, Aberdeen, R. F. D. No. 3. 

Montgomeri/—E. M. Thompson. Winona, R. F. D No 1 
Neshoba— T. B. Williams, Philadelphia. 

Xetcto7i^l^. M. Everett, Hickory; Benj. W. Bearing, Newton. 
Noxubee— T. W. Brame. Macon; C. E. Dorroh, Macon; Prince D 
Hubbard, Shuqualak. 

Oktibbeha— Joe S. Rice, Starkville; John D. Green, Sturges. 



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812 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Panola— A. S. Kyle, Batesville; R. Taylor Keys, Sardis; F. H. Nel- 
son, Pope. 

Pearl River — J. E. Stockstlll, Picayune. 

Perry — G. D. Draughn, New Augusta. 

Pike — F. D. Hewitt, McComb; J. E. Norwood, Magnolia. 

Pontotoc — Frank Rcberson (1916) Pontotoc (Resigned to become 
Asst. Atty. Genl.), T. J. Wingo (1918). Toccapola; W. J. Stogall, Pon- 
totoc. 

Prentiss — R. E. L. Sutherland, Wheeler; B. L. Breedlove, Boonevllle. 

Quitman — U. B. Ross, Lambert. 

Rankin — W. E. Mclntyre, Brandon; R. H. Watts, Pisgah. 

Scott — W. L. Weems, Sun. 

Sharkey — S. B. Alexander, Rolling Fork. 

Shnpson— W. F. Stroud, Pinola, R. F. D. No. 2. 

Smith — H. C. Thornton, Taylorsville. 

Stone — A. Batson. 

Siinffoiccr — Arthur B. Clark, Indianola. 

Tallahatchie — Rowe Hayes, Sumner. 

Tate — S. L. Crockett, Tyro; W. J. East, Senatobia. 

Tippah — W. R. Wildman, Ripley. 

Tishomingo — J. R. Mann, luka, R. F. D. No. 1. 

Tunica — J. M. Anderson, Hollywood. 

Union — Sam J. Purvis, Blue Springs; J. N. IMagill, Bethany. 

Walthall— ^V. W. Pope, Tylertown. 

Warren — R. L. C. Barrett, Vicksburg; T. R. Foster, Vicksburg; 
(xeorge R. Hawkins, Bovina. 

Washington — A. G. Paxton, Greenville; A. H. Stone, Dunlieth; W. S. 
Knotts, Belzoni. 

Wayne — G. C. Clark, Waynesboro. 

Webster — S. S. Gore, Embry. 

Wilkinson— C. T. Netterville, Wilkinson; J. R. Hutcheson, Centre- 
vllle. 

Winston — F. M. Glenn, Nosapater. 

Yalobusha — G. E. Denley, Coffeeville; W. A. Nolen, Water Valley. 

Yazoo — P. C. Meagher, Bentonia; Excell Coody, Phoenix; D. F. Rob- 
erts, Satartia. 



FLOATER REPRESENTATIVES. 

Franklin and Lincoln — F. A. Wright, Lucien (Franklin County). 
Tippah and Benton— Fred B. Smith, Ripley (Tippah County). 
Claiborne and Jefferson— S. R. Young, Pattison (Claiborne County). 
Clarke and Jasper— W. L. West, Vossburg (Clarke County). 
Grenada and Montgomery — W. H. Dyre, Winona (Montgomery 
County). 



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LEGISLATIVE DEP.VRTMENT 813 

Leake and Winston — J. C. Holton, Louisville (Winston County). 
Harrison and Jackson — J. M. Hairston, Gulf port (Harrison County). 
Lee and Itawamba — R. S. Sheffield, Dorsey (Itawamba Uouniy). 
Yazoo and Hinds — V. M. Perry (1916) deed., R. D. Bowman, Benton 
(Yazoo County). 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 1916-1918 STANDING COM- 
MITTEES. 

Rules — Mr. Speaker, ^Messrs. Norwood, Everett of Newton, Mclntyre, 
Howerton, Kyle, Lindsey. 

Judicianj—'^ilr. Norv.-ood, Chairman; Messrs. Mclntyre, Everett of 
Newton, Hewitt, Barry, Stockstill, King, Ray, East, Brame, Roberson, 
Johnson of Holmes, Johnston cf Coahoma, Clark of Sunflower, Finch, 
Gibson, Hays, Green of Adams, Green of Oktibbeha, Green of Hinds, 
Luper, Rhodes, Foster of Warren, Barrett, Day Anderson of Forest, 
Hairston, Genin, Gaines, Sillers, Yeager, Smith, Knotts, Bailey of 
Lauderdale, Dorroh. Crockett, Kincannon, Rice, Tubb, Wasson, White, 
Smiley, Frierson, McGill of Benton, Paxton, David, Miller of Clark. 
Constitution — Mr. Hewitt, Chairman; Messrs. Hayes, Coody, Green 
of Oktibbeha, Alexander, David, Kincannon, Davis, Genin, King, 
Stockstill, Gibson, Bush, Finch Darden. 

Ways and Means — Everett of Newton, Chairman; Messrs. Roberson, 
Cotton, Howerton. Clark of Wayne, Going Hewitt, Sojourner, Paxton, 
Brame, Irby, Finch, Abernethy, Bailey of Monroe, Rhodes, Pur.is, 
Spears, Redditt, Thompson, Warren, Maples. Alexander Darden, Stegall, 
Bounds, Hutcheson, Luster, Watts, Gibson. 

Appropriations — Mr. Howerton, Chairman; Messrs. Lindsey, Everett 
of Newton, Stephenson, Davis, Ervin, Green of Oktibbeha, Bush, Hays, 
Wright, Ray, Luper, Dyre, Y'eager, Hardin, Williams, Weems, Nor- 
wood, Keys, Magill of Union, Miller of Leake, McLain, Stockstill, 
Singley, David, Crockett, Verrell, Roberts Cassels. 

Agriculture — Mr. Cotton, Chairman; Messrs. Russell, Bush, Gore, 
Gray, Holton, Abernethy, Daniels, Mann, Draughn, Netterville, Foster 
of Issaquena, Dearing, Thomas, Wall, Winter, Finch, Hardin, Pope, 
Miller of Clarke, Wildman, Breedlove. 

Education — Mr. Sutherland, Chairman; Messrs. Clark of Wayne, 
Purvis, Kincannon, I^Iurphree Miller of Clarke, Knotts, Stone, Hoyle,. 
Gore, Singley, Stockstill, Wildman, Frierson, Keys, Gray, Dyer, West, 
Irby, Taylor, Ricer McGill of Benton, Maples, Crockett, Tubb, Wall, 
Wright, Stephens, Cole. 

Railroads — Mr. Green of Hinds, Chairman; Messrs. Cotton, Hewitt, 
Johnston of Coahoma, Watts, Brame, Smith, Bounds, Cole, Breedlove, 



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814 LKGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Denley, Weems, Thornton, Williams. Bailey of Monroe, Thomas, Steph- 
ens, Stegall, Russell, Hardin, Xetterville, Splann, Tubb, Ferguson, 
Hoyle. ^V|^ 

Claims — Mr. Ray, Chairman; Messrs. Knotts, East, Anderson of 
Forest, Magill of Union, McLain, Russell, Verrell, Wall, Kyle, Cole. 

Corporations — Mr. Bailey of Lauderdale, Chairman; Messrs. Ervin 
Miller of Clark, King, Hutcheson, Lindsey, Everett of Newton, Sem- 
melman, Nelson, Pope, Hubbard. Green of Adams, Ross, Sheffield, 
Thompson, Young, Warren, Miller of Leake, Ray. 

Public Lands — Mr. Gibson, Chairman; ^lessrs. Ross, Frierson, Thorn- 
ton, Stephens, Foster of Warren, Thomas, Dendy, Johnson of Holmes. 

Local and Private Legislation — Mr. Mclntyre, Chairman; Messrs. 
Barry, Clark of Wayne, Luper, Yeager, Johnson of Holmes, Hays. 

Census and Apportionment — Mr. Bush, Chairman; Messrs. Genin, O'- 
Neal, Sraylie, Stroud, McLain. White, Green of Hinds, Holton, Mc- 
lntyre, West, Nelson, Rice, Hubbard, Netterville, Pope, Perry. 

Public Hfjalth and Quarantine — Mr. Stroud, Chairman; Messrs. Ev- 
erett of Franklin, Perry, Redditt, Spears, Kyle, Murphree, Foster of 
Warren, Sutherland. 

Mississippi Levees — Mr. Barry, Chairman; Messrs. Ross, Ralston, Al- 
exander, Anderson of Tunica, Clark of Suniiower, Coody, Foster of 
Issaquena, Hays, Johnston of Coahoma, Johnson of Holmes, Knotts, 
Lauderdale, Meagher, Paston, Perry, Roberts, Stephenson, Sione, War- 
ren Sillers. 

Registrations and Elections — Mr. Green, of Oktibbeha, Chairman; 
Messrs. Taylor, Bearing, Netterville, Thornton, Everett of Franklin, 
Nelson, Hutcheson, Gray, Hawkins, Pope, Denby, Miller, Rice, Cassels. 

Manufactures — Mr. Sillers, Chairman; Messrs. West, Stamps, Hol- 
ton, Rice, Sutherland, Wildman, Singly, Glenn. 

Public Printing — Mr. Murphree, Chairman; Messrs. Kincannon, Nor- 
wood Going, Yeager, Winter, White, Wasson, Warren Taylor, Stephens, 
Splann, Sheffield, Roberts, Denley, Meagher, Hoyle, Holton, Abernethy. 

Eleemosynary Institutions — Mr. Darden, Chairman; Messrs. Nolen, 
Redditt, Day, Meagher, Ervin, Winter, Perry, Everett of Franklin, 
Stroud, Taylor, Coody, West, Thornton, Genin Foster of Warren, Green 
of Adams, Rhodes, Kincannon, McLain, Stamps, EMDrroh, Nelson, King, 
Stegall. 

Penitentiary — Mr. Ross, Chairman; Messrs. Anderson of Tunica, 
Ralston, Watts, Howerton, Coody, Mann, Stroud, Semmelman, Everett 
of Franklin. Verell, Russell, Luper, Magill of Union, Dendy, Hoyle, 
Clark of Sunflower, Ferguson, Roberts, Gibson, Hubbard, Kolb, Nolen, 
Sheffield, Alexander. , 

Immigration and Labor — Mr. Lindsey, Chairman; Messrs. Alexan- 
der, Watts. Barrett, Bailey of Monroe, Coody, Day, East, Dyre, Splann. 
Green of Hinds, Keys, Smith, O'Neal, David. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 815 

Fees and Salaries — Mr. Roberson, Chairman; Messrs. Yeager, Kolb, 
Clark of Wayne, Abernethy, Bounds, Kincannon, Miller of Leake, Dan- 
iels, Darden, Sillers, Draughn, Hawkins, Cassels, Anderson of Forest. 

County Affairs — Mr. Stephenson, Chairman; Messrs. Maples, Mcln- 
tyre, Kolb, Daniels, Foster of Issaquena, Denley, Nolen, Hubbard, Dear- 
ing, Lett, Magill of Union, Sutherland, Thomas, Luster. 
' Roard. Ferries and Bridges — Mr. Ralston, Chairman; Messrs. Hew- 
itt, Kincannon, Ferguson, Splann. Stamps, Dearing, Ross, Davis, Wild- 
man, Magill of Union, Denley, Bounds, Lauderdale, Glenn. 

Federal Relations — Mr. Finch, Chairman; Messrs. Magill of Union, 
Bailey of Monroe, Gaines, Cassels, Draughn, Gray, Hawkins, Hutch- 
eson, Nolen, Day. 

House Contingent Expenses — Mr. Purvis, Chairman; Messrs. Rus- 
sell, Bush, Green of Adams, West, Ralston, Dyre. 

Liquor Traffic — Mr. Singley, Chairman; Messrs. Verell, Hoyle, Lett, 
Weems, Young, Anderson of Tunica, O'Neal, Breedlove, Huteheson, 
Wall, Thornton, Mann, Murphree, Sheffield, Kolb, Draughn, Brame, 
Denley. 

Propositions and Grievances — Mr. Maples, Chairman; Messrs. East, 
Draughn, Hubbard, Stephens, Thornton, Young. 

Engrossed Bills — Mr. Barrett, Chairman; Messrs. Gore, Nelson, West 
and Taylor. 

Public Buildings and Grounds — Mr. Anderson of Tunica, Chairman; 
Messrs. Sojourner, Stone, Irby, Clark of Sunflower, Gaines, Stamps. 
Hardin, Hawkins. 

Military Affairs — Mr. Rhodes, Chairman; Messrs. Ray, Dorroh, Er- 
vin, Semmelman, White, Sojourner, Hairston, Hawkins, Bailey of Lau- 
derdale, Holton, Gaines, Genin, Winter, Rice. 

Fisheries, Co)iimerce and Shipping — Mr. David, Chairman; Messrs. 
Maples, Spears, Hairston, O'Neal, Genin, Alexander. 

Pensions — Mr. Thompson, Chairman; Messrs. Stephenson, Pope, 
Weems, Cassels, Daniels, Foster of Issaquena, Fester of Warren, Er- 
vin, Denley, Mann, ?kliller of Leake, Hawkins, Roberts, Smylie, Spears, 
Young, Williams. 

Insurance — Mr. Luper, Chairman, Messrs. Barry, Glenn, Gray, 
Gaines, Stone, Everett of Franklin. Meagher, Smith, Johnston of Coa- 
homa, Wright, Wasson, Wildman, Smylie, Semmelman, Kolb. 

Banks and Banking — Mr. Kincannon, Chairman; Mes.srs. Green of 
Oktibbeha, Redditt, Irby, Stockstill, Wasson, Lauderdale, Kyle, Sil- 
lers, Clark of Sunflower, Knotts, Davis, Going, Barry, East. 

Municipalitii's — Mr. Yeager, Chairman; Messrs. Rhodes, Bailey of 
Lauderdale, Anderson of Forrest, Semmelman, Hairston, Barrett, Day, 
Denley, Gore, Tubb. 



816 LEGISI^VTIVB DEPARTMENT 

Drainage — ^Ir. Alexander, rhairman; Messrs. Verell, Sojourner, 
Lindsey, Splann, Kyle, Crockett, Foster of Issaquena, Gore, Clark of 
Sunflower, Lott, Meagher, Stegall, Mann, Smith. 

Mileage — Mr. Russell Chairman; Messrs. Roberson, Purvis, Green of 
Adams, Frierson. 



JOINT CO.MMITTEES 
(House Members) 

Executive Contingent Fund — Mr. Stockstill, Chairman; Messrs. Hew- 
itt, Lauderdale, Lott, Cotton. 

State Library — Mr. Stone, Chairman; Messrs. Crockett, Young, Pur- 
vis, Irby. 

Enrolled Bills — Mr, Going, Chairman; Messrs. Cole, Wright, O'Neal, 
Stone. 

Colleges and Universities — Mr. Johnson of Holmes, Chairman; 
Messrs. Ray, Clark of Sunflower, Clark of Wayne, Coody, Dyre, Dor- 
roh, Maples, Wright, Green of Adams, Keys, King. 

Investigation of State Offices — Mr. Brarae, Chairman; Messrs. Rals- 
ton, Sojourner, Glenn, Bearing, Netterville, Roberson, Ferguson, Mc- 
Lain. 



MEMBERS OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND THEIR COM- 
MITTEES, FOR 1916-1920 

Abernathey, I. V., Okolona. Chickasaw Co. Committees: Ways and 
Means; Agriculture: Public Printing; Fees and Salaries. 

Alexander, 3. B., Rolling Fork, Sharkey Co. Committees: Constitu- 
tion; Ways and Means; Mississippi Levees; Penitentiary: Immi- 
gration and Labor; Fishing, Commerce and Shipping; Drainage 
(Chairman). 

Anderson, E. A., Hattiesburg, Forrest Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Claims; Penitentiary; Fees and Salaries; Municipalities. 

Anderson, J. M., Hollywood, Tunica Co. Committees: Mississippi 
Levees; Liquor Traffic; Public Buildings and Grounds (Chm.). 

Bailey, Thos. L., Meridian, Lauderdale Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Corporations (Chm.); Military Affairs; Municipalities. 

Bailey, W. L. C, Aberdeen, R. F. D. No. 2, Monroe Co. Committees: 
Ways and Means; Railroads; Immigration and Labor: Federal 
Relations. 

Barrett, R. L. C, Vicksburg, Warren Co. Committees: Judiciary; Im- 
migration and Labor; Engrossed Bills (Chm.); Municipalities. 



-KO: 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 817 

Barry, W. S., Greenwood, Leflore Co. Committees: Judiciary; Local 
and Private Legislation; Mississippi Levees (Chm.); Insurance; 
Banks and Banking. 
Bounds, J. D., Bailey, Lauderdale Co. Committees: Ways and Means; 

Railroads; Fees and Salaries; Roads, Ferries and Bridges. 
Brame, Thos. \V., Macon, Noxubee Co. Committees: Judiciary; Ways 

and Means; Railroads; Liquor Traffic. 
Breedlove, Lonnie, Booneville, Prentiss Co. Committees: Agriculture; 

Railroads; Liquor Traffic. 
Bush, J. Hartley, Laurel, Jones Co. Committees: Constitution; Appro- 
priations; Agriculture; Census and Apportionment (Chm.); House 
Contingent Expenses. 
Cassels, J. F., Gloster, Amite Co. Committees: Appropriations; Reg- 
istrations and Elections; Fees and Salaries; Federal Relations; 
Pensions. 
Clark, Arthur B., Indianola, Sunflower Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Mississippi Levees; Penitentiary; Public Buildings and Grounds; 
Banks and Banking; Drainage. 
Clark, G. C, Waynesboro, Wayne Co. Committees: Ways and Means; 

Education; Local and Private Legislation; Fees and Salaries. 
Cole, Frank, Bogue Chitto, R. F. D., Lincoln Co. Committees: Educa- 
tion; Railroads; Claims. 
Conner, M. S., Seminary, Covington Co. Committees: Rules. 
Coody, Excell, Phoenix, Yazoo Co. Committees: Constitution; Missis- 
sippi Levees; Eleemosynary Institutions; Penitentiary; Immigra- 
tion and Labor. 
Gotten, R. S., Corinth, Alcorn Co. Committees: Ways and Means; Ag- 
riculture (Chm.); Railroads. 
Crockett, S. L., Tyro, Sunflower Co. Committees: Judiciary; Appro- 
priations; Mississippi Levees; Penitentiary; Public Buildings and 
Groimds; Banks and Banking; Drainage. 
Daniels, J. J., DeKalb, Kemper Co. Committees: Agriculture; Fees 

and Salaries; County Affairs; Pensions. 
Darden, Wm. M. McNair, Jefferson Co. Committees: Constitution; 
Ways and Means; Eleemosynary Institutions (Chm.); Fees and 
Salaries. 
David, W. R., Ocean Springs, Jackson Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Constitution; Appropriations; Immigration and Labor; PMsheries, 
Commerce and Shipping (Chm.). 
Davis, H. L., Tula, Lafayette Co. Committees: Constitution; Appro- 
priations; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Banks and Banking. 
Day, Icey W.; Ethel, Attala Co. Committees: Judiciary; Eleemosyn- 
ary Institutions; Immigration and Labor; Federal Relations; 
Municipalities. 

52— M 



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gl8 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Dearing, Beuj. W., Newton, Newton Co. Committees: Agriculture; 
Registrations and Elections; County Affairs; Roads, Ferries and 
Bridges. 

Dendy, J. R., Pickens, Madison Co. Committees: Railroads; Public 
Lands; Registrations and Elections; Public Printing; Peniten- 
tiary; County Affairs; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Liquor Traf- 
fic; Pensions. 

Denley, G. E., Coffeeville, Yalobusha Co. Committees: Municipalities; 
Railroads, Public Printing; Liquor Traffic. 

Dorroh, C. E., Macon, Noxubee Co. Committees: Judiciary; Eleemo- 
synary Institutions; Military Affairs. 

Draughn, C. D., New Augusta, Perry Co. Committees: Agriculture; 
Fees and Salaries; Federal Relations; Liquor Traffic; Propositions 
and Grievances. 

Dyre, Hackett, Winona, Route 7, Montgomery and Grenada Counties. 
Appropriations; Education; Immigration and Labor; House Con- 
tingent Expenses. 

East, W. J., Senatobia, Tate Co. Committees: Judiciary; Claims; Im- 
migration and Labor; Propositions and Grievances; Banks and 
Banking. 

Ervin, D. L., Columbus, Lowndes Co. Committees: Appropriations; 
Corporations; Eleemosynary Institutions; Military Affairs; Pen- 
sions. 

Everett, Dr. C. A. Monroe, Franklin Co. Committees: Public Health 
and Quarantine; Registrations and Elections; Eleemosynary In- 
stitutions; Insurance. 

Everett, N. M., Hickory, Newton Co. Committees: Rules; Judiciary; 
Ways and Means (Chm.); Appropriations; Corporations. 

Ferguson, V. P., Utica, Hinds Co. Committees: Railroads; Peniten- 
tiary; Roads, Ferries and Bridges. 

Finch, H. L., Heidelberg, Jasper Co. Committees: Judiciary; Consti- 
tution; Ways and Means; Agriculture; Federal relations (Chm.) 

Foster, R. E., Shiloh, Issaquena Co. Committees: Agriculture; Mis- 
sissippi Levees; County Affairs; Pensions; Drainage. 

Foster, T. R., Vicksburg, Warren Co. Committees: Judiciarj-; Public 
Lands; Public Health and Quarantine; EleemosynaiT Institu- 
tions; Pensions. 

Gaines, Stanley, Boyle, Bolivar Co. Committees: Judiciary; Federal 
Relations; Public Buildings and Grounds; Military Affairs; In- 
surance. 

Genin, Rol)€rt L., Bay St. Louis, Hancock Co. Committees: Judici- 
ary; Constitution; Census and Apportionment: Eleemosynary 
Institutions; Military Affairs; Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping. 



J 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 819 

Gibson, Chas. E., Monticello, Lawrence Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Constitution; Ways and Means; Public Lands (Chm.); Penitenti- 
ary. . ^ 

Glenn, F. M., Noxapater, Winston Co. Committees: Manufactures; 
Roads; Ferries and Bridges; Insurance. 

Going, J. B., Calhoun City, Calhoun Co. Committees: Ways and 
Means; Public Printing; Banks and Banking. 

Gore, S. S., Embry, Webster Co. Committees: Agriculture; Educa- 
tion; Engrossed Bills; Municipalities; Drainage. 

Gray, Wm. Claud, Fulton, R. F. D. No. 1, Itawamba Co. Committees: 
Agriculture; Education; Registrations and Elections; Federal Re- 
lations; Insurance. 

Green, Edward H. Jackson, Hinds Co. Committees: Judiciary; Rail- 
roads (Chm.); Census and Apportionment; Immigration and La- 
bor. 

Green, John D., Sturgis, Oktibbeha Co. Committees: Judiciary; Con- 
stitution; Appropriations; Registrations and Elections (Chm.); 
Banks and Banking. 

Green, Walter G., Natchez, Adams Co. Committees: Judiciary; Cor- 
porations; Eleemosynary Institutions; House Contingent Ex- 
penses; Mileage. 

Hairston, J. M., Gulr'port, Harrison and Jackson Counties. Commit- 
tees: Judiciary; Military Affairs; Fisheries, Commerce and Ship- 
ping; Municipalities. 

Hardin, J. A., Potts Camp, Marshall Co. Committees: Appropria- 
tions; Agriculture; Railroads; Public Buildings and Grounds. 

Hawkins, Geo. R., Vicksburg, Warren Co. Committees: Registrations 
and Elections; Fees and Salaries; Federal Relations; Public 
Buildings and Grounds. 

Hayes, Rowe, Sumner, Tallahatchie Co. Committees: Judiciary; Con- 
stitution; Appropriations; Local and Private Legislation; Missis- 
sippi Levees. 

Hewitt, F. D., McComb, Pike Co. Committees: Judiciary; Constitu- 
tion (Chm.); Ways and Means; Railroads; Roads, Ferries and 
Bridges. 

Howerton, J. S., Guntown, Lee Co. Committees: Rules; Ways and 
Means; Appropriations (Chm.); Penitentiary. 

Hoyle, D. E., Paris, LaFayette Co. Committees: Education; Rail- 
roads; Public Printing; Penitentiary; Liquor Traffic. 

Hubbard, Prince, Shuqualak, Noxubee Co. Committees: Corporations; 
Census and Apportionment; Penitentiary; County Affairs; Propo- 
sitions and Grievances. 

Hutcheson. J. R., Centreville, Wilkinson Co. Committees: Ways and 
Means; Corporations; Registrations and Elections; Federal Re- 
lations; Liquor Traffic. 



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820 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Holton, J. C, Louisville, Winston and Leake Cos. Committees: Ag- 
riculture; Census and Apportionment; Manufactures; Public 
Printing; Militarj' Affairs. 

Irby, E. J. Scooba, Kemper Co. Committees: Ways and Means; Edu- 
cation; Public Buildings and Grounds; Banks and Banking. 

Johnson, H. H., Lexington, Holmes Co. Committees; Judiciary; Pub- 
lic Lands; Local and Private Legislation; Mississippi Levees. 

Johnston, Oscar G., Clarksdale, Coahoma Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Railroads; Mississippi Levees; Insurance. 

Keys, R. Taylor, Sardis, Panola Co. Committees: Appropriations; 
Education; Immigration and Labor. 

Kincannon, F. L., Tupelo, Lee Co. Committees: Judiciary; Constitu- 
tion; Education; Public Printing; Eleemosynary Institutions; 
Fees and Salaries; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Banks and Bank- 
ing (Chm.) 

King, Benjamin, Hazlehurst, Copiah Co. Committees: Judiciary; Con- 
stitution; Corporations; Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Knotts, W. S., Belzoni, Washington Co. Committees: Judiciary; Edu- 
cation; Claims; Mississippi Levees; Banks and Banking. 

Kolk, W. H., Aberdeen, R. F. D. No. 3, Monroe Co. Committees: Pen- 
itentiary; Fees ajid Salaries; County Affairs; Liquor Traffic; In- 
surance. 

Kyle, A. S. Batesville, Panola Co. Committees: Rules; Claims; Public 
Health and Quarantine; Banks and Banking; Drainage. 

Lauderdale, J. C, Bright, DeSoto Co. Committees: Mississippi Le- 
vees; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Banks and Banking. 

Lindsey, C. A., Eupora, Choctaw Co. Committees: Rules; Appropria- 
tions; Corporations; Immigration and Labor (Chm.); Drainage. 

Lott, L. J., Grenada, R. F. D. No. 3, Carroll Co. Committees: County 

Affairs; Liquor Traffic; Drainage. 

Luper, 0. C, Prentiss, Jefferson Davis Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Appropriations; Local and Private Legislation; Penitentiary; In- 
surance, (Chm.) 

Luster, T. A., Utica, R. F. D. No. 2, Claiborne Co. Committees: Ways 
and Means; County Affairs. 

Magill, J. N., Bethany, Union Co. Committees: Appropriations; 
Claims; Penitentiary; County Affairs; Roads, Ferries and 
Bridges; Federal Relations. 

Mann, J. R., luka, R. F. D. No. 1, Tishomingo Co. Committees: Ag- 
riculture; Penitentiary; Liquor Traffic; Pensions; Drainage. 

Maples, L. W., Clarence, George Co. Committees: Ways and Means; 
Education; County Affairs; Propositions and Grievances; Fish- 
eries, Commerce and Shipping. 

McGill, R. B., Falkner, Benton Co. Committees: Judiciary and Educa- 
tion. 



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LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 821 

McLain, "W. I., Rich ton. Route No. 1; Greene Co. Committees: Appro- 
priations, Claims; Census and Apportionment; Eleemosynary 
Institutions. 

Mclntyre, W. E., Brandon, Rankin Co. Committees: Rules; Judiciary; 
Local and Private Lesrislation; (Cbm.); Census and Apportion- 
ment; County Affairs. 

Meagher, P. C, Bentonia, Yazoo Co. Committees: Mississippi Levees; 
Public Printing; Eleemosynary Institutions; Insurance; Drain- 
age. 

Miller, H. L.. Quitman, Clarke Co. Committees: Judiciary; Agri- 
culture; Education; Corporations; Registrations and Elections. 

Miller, Martin M., Edinburgh R. F. D. No. 2, Leake Co. Committees: 
Y Appropriations; Corporations; Fees and Salaries; Pensions. 

Murphree, Dennis, Pittsboro, Calhoun Co. Committees: Education; 
Public Health and Quarantine; Public Printing (Chm). 

Nelson, F. H., Pope, Panola Co. Committees: Corporations; Census 
and Apportionment; Registrations and Elections; Eleemosynary 
Institutions; Engrossed Bills. 

Netterville, C. T. Wilkinson, Wilkinson Co. Committees: Agriculture; 
Railroads; Census and Apportionment; Registrations and Elec- 
tions. 

Nolen, W. A., Water Valley, Yalobusha Co. Committees: Eleemosy- 
nary Institutions; Penitentiary; County Affairs; Federal Rela- 
tions. 

Norwood, Joseph E., Magnolia, Pike Co. Committees: Rules; Judic- 
iary (Chm.); Appropriations; Public Printing. 

O'Neal, E. E., Saucier, Harrison Co. Committees: Census and Appor- 
tionment; Immigration and Labor; LiquOr Traffic; Fisheries, 
Commerce and Shipping. 

Paxton, A. G., Greenville, Washington Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Ways and Means; Mississippi Levees. 

Perry, Dr. V. M. (dec'd.), Satartia, Yazoo Co. Committees: Census and 
Apportionment; Public Health and Quarantine; Mississippi Le- 
vees; Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Pope, W. W., Tylertown, Walthall Co. Committees: Agriculture; 
Corporations; Census and Apportionment; Registrations and 
Elections; Pensions. 

Purvis, Sam J., Blue Springs, Union Co. Committees: Ways and 
Means; Education; House Contingent Expenses (Chm.); Mileage. 

Ralston, R. L., Coahoma, Coahoma Co. Committees: Mississippi Le- 
vees; Penitentiary; Roads, Ferries and Bridges (Chm.); House 
Contingent Expenses. 

Ray, Tip, Canton, Madison Co. Committees: Judiciary; Appropria- 
tions; Claims (Chm.); Corporations; Military Affairs. 
40 — m 



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822 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Redditt, Dr. G. Irby. McCarley, Carroll Co. Committers: Ways and 
Means; Public Health and Quarantine; Eleemosynary Institutions; 
Banks and Banking. 

Rhodes, John S., Jackson, Hinds Co. Coraniittees: Judiciary; Ways 
and Means; Eleemosynary Institutions; Military Affairs (Chm.) 
Municipalities. ■■ 

Rice. Joe, Starkville, Oktibbeha Co. Committees: Judiciary; Educa- 
tion; Census and Apportionment; Registrations and Elections; 
Manufactures; Military Affairs. 

Roberson, Frank, Pontotoc, Pontotoc Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Ways and Means; Fees and Salaries (Chm.); Mileage. 

Roberts, Judge D. F., Satartia, Yazoo Co. Committees; Appropria- 
tions; Mississippi Levees; Public Printing; Penitentiary; Pen- 
sions. 

Ross, U. B., Lambert. Quitman Co. Committees: Corporations; Pub- 
lic Lands; Mississippi Levees; Penitentiarj' (Chm.); Roads, 
Ferries and Bridges. 

Semmelman, B. S., West Point, Clay Co. Committees: Corporations; 
Penitentiary: Military Affairs; Insurance; Municipalities. 

Sheffield, Robt. S., Dorsey, Itawamba and Lee Cos. Committees: Cor- 
porations; Public Printing; Penitentiary; Liquor Traffic. 

Sillers, Walter, Jr., Rosedale, Bolivar Co. Committees: Judiciary; 
Mississippi Levees; Manufactures (Chm.); Fees and Salaries; 
Banks and Banking. 

Singley, Isaac, Columbia, Marion Co. Committees: Appropriations; 
Education; Manufactures; Liquor Traffic (Chm.); 

Smith, Fred B., Tippah and Benton Cos., Ripley, Committees: Judic- 
iary; Railroads; Immigration and Labor; Insurance; Drainage. 

Smylie, J. A., Crystal Springs, Copiah Co. Committees: Judiciary; 

Census and Apportionment; Pensions; Insurance. 
Sojourner, Albert, Natchez, Adams Co. Committees: Ways and 

Means; Public Buildings and Grounds; Military Affairs; Drainage. 
Spears, W. I., Byhalia, Marshall Co. Committees: Ways and Means; 

Public Health and Quarantine, Fisheries, Commerce and Fishing; 

Pensions. 
Splann, J. B., Kendrick, Alcorn Co. Committees: Railroads; Public 

Printing; Immigration and Labor; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; 

Drainage. 
Stamps, W. W., Collierville, Tenn., R., Marshall Co. Committees: 

Manufactures; Eleemosynary Institutions; Roads, Ferries and 

Bridges; Public Buildings and Grounds. 
Stegall, Wm. T., Pontotoc, Pontotoc Co. Committees: Ways and 

Means; Railroads; Eleemosynary Institutions; Drainage. 



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LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 823 

Stephens F. B., West Point. Clay Co. Committees: Educntion; Rail- 
roads; Public Lands; Public Printing; Propositions and Griev- 
ances. 
Stephenson, T. C, Lexington, Holmes Co. Committees: Appropria- 
tions; Mississippi Levees. County Affairs (Chm.); Pensions. 
Stockstill, J. E., Picayune, Pearl River Co. Committees: Judiciary: 

Constitution; Appropriations; Eduration; Banks and Banking. 
Stone, A. H., Dunleith. Washington Co. Committees: Education; Mis- 
sissippi Levees; Public Buildings and Grounds; Insurance. 
Stroud, Dr. W. F., Pinola R. F. D. No. 2, Simpson Co. Committees: 
Census and Apportionment; Public Health and Quarantine 
(Chm.); Eleemosynary Institutions. 
Sutherland. R. E. L., Wheeler, Prentiss Co. Committees: Education 
(Chm.); Public Health and Quarantine; Manufactures; County 
Affairs. 
Taylor, Willis M., Meridian Route 5, Lauderdale Co. Committees: Ed- 
ucation; Regi.'itrations and Elections; Public Printing; Eleemosyn- 
ary Institutions; Engrossed Bills. 
Thomas, J. R., Bent Oak, Lowndes Co. Committees: Agriculture; 

Railroads; Public Lands; County Affairs. 
Thompson, E. M., Winona R. F. D. No. 1, Montgomery Co. Commit- 
tees: Ways and Means: Corporations: Pensions (Chm.). 
Thornton, H. C, Mize R. F. D. No. 2, Smith Co. Committees: Rail- 
roads; Public Lands; Registrations and Elections; Eleemosy- 
nary Institutions; Liquor TrafBc; Propositions and Grievances. 
Tubb, A. A., Amory R. F. D., Monroe County, Committees: Judiciarj'j 

Education; Railroads; ^Municipalities. 
Verrell, E. N., Houston. Chickasaw Co. Committees: Appropriations; 

Claims; Penitentiary; Liquor Traffic; Drainage. 
Wall, D. J., Jr.. Peoria, Amite Co. Committees: Agriculture; Edu- 
cation; Claims; Liquor Traffic. 
Warren, Dalton F., Olive Branch, DeSoto Co.— Committees: Ways and 

Means; Corporations; Mississippi Levees; Public Printing. 
Wasson, J. C, Ethel, R. F. D.. Attala Co. Committees: Judiciary; 

Public Printing; Insurance; Banks and Banking. 
Watts, R. H., Leesburg, Rankin Co. Committees: Ways and Means; 

Railroads; Penitentiary; Immigration and Labor. 
Weems, W. L., Sun, Scott Co. Committees: Appropriations; Rail- 
roads; Liquor Traffic; Pensions. 
West, W. L., Nancy, Clarke i Jasper Cos. Committees: Education; 
Census and Apportionment: Manufactures; Eleemosynary Insti- 
tutions; House Contingent Expenses; Engrossed Bills. 
White, L. N., Lexington, Holmes Co. Committees: Judiciary; Census 
and Apportionment; Public Printing; Military Affairs, 



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824 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

Wildman, W. R., Ripley, Tippah Co. Committees: Agriculture; Edu- 
cation; jManufactures; Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Insurance. 

Williams, T. B., Philadelphia, Neshoba Co. Committees: Appropria- 
tions; Railroads; Pensions.. 

Winter, W. A. Grenada, Grenada Co. Committees: Agriculture; Public 
Printing; Eleemosynar>- Institutions; , ^lilitary Affairs. 

Wright, F. A., Lucien, Franklin and Lincoln Cos. Committees: Ap- 
propriations; Education; Insurance. 

Yeager, John A., Lumberton, Lamar Co. Committees: Judiciary; Ap- 
propriations; Local and Private Legislation; Public Printing; 
Fees and Salaries; Municipalities (Chm.). 

Young, S. R., Pattison, Claiborne and Jefferson Cos. Committees: 
Corporations; Liquor Traffic; Propositions and Grievances; 
Pensions, 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



82c 



SKETCHES OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE. 



ADAMS COUXTT 



WALTER GALLOWAY GREEN of Natchez, who 
represents Adams County, -was bom in the city of 
Natchez June 2D, 1832. His father. Thos. Keenan 
Green, was born near Jackson, Hinds County, 
Mississippi. He remained in Hinds County until 
about 1878. when he removed to Concordia Parish. 
Louisiana, where he became a cotton planter. 
In 1886 he moved his family back to their 
native State, settling them in Natchez, while he 
^himself retained his citizenship in Louisiana. That 
same year he was elected Sheriff of Concordia 
Parish, and two years thereafter was elected to tiie 
House of Representatives of Louisiana. 

The paternal g-randparents of Walter Galloway 
Green, Thos. K. Green and Roena (York) Green, 
were natives of Greensboro, North Carolina. They 
were of Scotch orig-in. 

His mother's maiden name was Ellen Hay Shot- 
well ; she was the daughter of Bourbon Shotwell 
and Laura (Hay) Shotwell of Tougaloo, Hinds 
County, Mississippi. She traces descent from 
Mathew Hay, who was born in the North of Ire- 
land about 1670. and immigrated to America in 1700, 
settling near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His son 
bore the patriot arms in the Re\-olutionary War. 

Representative Green is broadly educated, having 
secured his education at a variety of institutions. 
He completed his preparatory training at the 
Natchez High School ; he then attended the Culver 
Military Academy at Culver, Indiana ; later became 
a student at Tulane University, New Orleans. 
Louisiana, and finally entered the Law Department 
of the University of Mississippi, from which he was 
graduated in 1914 with the degree of LL. B. That 
same year he entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession in his home city, ajid the following year 
was honored by being elected to the Lower House 
of the Legislature for the term of 1916-1920. where, 
notwithstanding his youth, he has served ably upon 
the following committees: Judiciary: Corpora- 
tions ; Eleemosynary Instructions ; House Contin- 
gent Expenses ; Mileage. 



Walter G. Green 



''". SS'T 



826 



LEGISLATIVE DIOPARTMBNT 



Mr. Green is a Democrat and a member of the 
Episcopal Church. He belongs to the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon College Fraternity, and is a Master Mason 
of Harmony Ix)age Xo. 1, F. & A. M., at Natchez. 
He is still unmarried. 



m'f^-'^F^- 




Albert B. Sojouner 



ALBERT BOYD SOJOUNER, whose address is 
R. F. D. Xo. 1, Natchez, Mississippi, represents 
Adams County in the Lower House. He was born 
February 4, 1872, at Kingston, Mississippi, when- 
his father, Absolom Hardy Sojouner, was also born, 
and lived all his life, except for four years spent 
in the Civil War. He was a private in the famous 
Jeff Davis Legion of Cavalry Army of Northern 
Virginia. His parents were Harry Sojouner and 
Missouri (Thomas) Sojouner of Kingston. The 
Sojouners came from South Carolina, and the 
Thomas family from Tennessee. 

The family of Representative Sojouner's mother 
were from Wyth County, Virginia. Her name was 
Laura Josephine Boyd, and she was the daughter 
of Alexander Boyd and Wealthy (Thomas) Boyd 
of Kingston. 

Mr. Sojouner secured his early education in the 
rural schools of Kingston, where his teachers were 
Walter Steward. Clarence Raymond and Hon. Clif- 
ton N. Winston. After completing the elementary 
schools he learned to be a mechanic, and made a 
livelihood by working at his trade in Kentucky, Illi- 
nois and Missis.sippi. The experience that he gained 
by traveling is an education in itself. He then 
returned to his native State and took up the 
occupation of farming. He served as Justice of 
the Peace in Adams Countj-, District No. 2. from 
1909 to 1915, an office in which he gave general 
satisfaction. He was then nominated for the Legis- 
lature and elected to serve during the present term 
of 1916-20. Representative Sojouner has proved 
himself worthy in every way of the trust reposed 
in him by the people of his county. Gifted with the 
highest ideals of right and justice, he is always 
found laboring with the safe leaders who have the 
State's true welfare at heart. He is very popular 
with the members of the Legislature. He is ren- 
dering faithful service on the following committees: 
Ways and Means ; Public Buildings and Grounds ; 
Military Affairs ; Drainage. 

Mr. Sojouner is a Democrat, and a member of 
the Woodmen of the World, S. S. Prentiss Camp 
No. 4 at Natchez. 

He married Kate Aubrey Bailey, November 27, 
1907, near Washington. Mi.^.-'issippi. Slie was the 
daughter of George W. Bailey and Kate Aubrey 
(Jackson) Bailey of that place. The Jacksons are 



■jiu ij\iit .nrni^-\f.i 



:\j:> vi-ij 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



827 



descendents of English cavaliers who settled m 
Virginia. George Bailey's ancestors vere Virgin- 
ians of Xorthumberland County. Mrs. Sojounor also 
had Scotch. French and Spanish ancestry. She 
died December 13, 1915, and was buried at Natchez, 
Mississippi. 

Mr. So.louner has five children : — Absolom Hardy, 
Carol Pickett, Alexander Boyd, William Aubrey, 
and Laurence Jackson. 



ALCORN COUNTY 



ROBERT BELL COTTON of Corinth, Miss., was 
born June S, 1859, In Tippah County, the son of 
James Madison Cotton and his wife, Martha Ellen 
(Bell) Cotton. His fatlier was a native of Shelby- 
vUIe, Tenn., who when a young man moved with 
his parents to Tippah County, Miss., and taught 
school tliere until the Civil War, when he enlisted 
In the 32nd Regiment, and became Captain of Com- 
pany E. His grandfather, Fetter Cotton, came 
from Scotland before the Revolution and fought in 
that war for American Independence ; also in the 
War of 1812. His maternal ancestors came from 
Ireland to South Carolina and in 1857 moved to 
Mississippi. 

Mr. Cotton obtained his early education in the 
public schools of Dumas and Ripley ; he clerked for 
several years and finally went into business at 
Tiplersville. but soon returned to the fatiii on ac- 
count of his failing health. He is a Democrat, a 
Presbyterian, a Woodman of the World'; was a 
prominent member of the Farmers' Allianco during 
the existence of that organization, and is now a 
member of the Farmers' Union. 

He was elected to the House of P^epresentatives 
at a special election held to select a successor to 
W. T. Bennett ; served in the special session of 
1911; re-elected to the House, November 7, 1911. 
He Is the author and secured the passage of the 
Six Per-cent Exemption Act ; took an active part 
!n the enactment of the Guarantee Banking Law, 
the Anti-Corporation Land Law. He is also the 
author at the current session of the bill to estab- 
lish a system of co-operative markets for agri- 
cult\iral products ; also author of an act providing 
for the incorporation of co-operative associations or 
societies for the purpose of transacting business in 
a co-operative way. In 1915 Mr. Cotton was again 
elected representative of his county and serv-es abiy 
on the committees of Ways and Means ; Agriculture 
of which he is chairrr-.an. 

Mr. Cotton was married November 26, 1885, at 




Robert B. Cotton 



828 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 




Ripley, to Eldora Wiggs. a daughter of Dr. Marcus 
Wiggs of Tennessee, whose ancestors came from 
Scotland to Souili Carolina, and uhence to Missis- 
sippi in the early settlement of the Slate. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cotton have seven children: — Edna (Mrs. J. D. 
Brewer), Lucile (Mrs.- W. H. Davis), Lester! 
Robert, Ethridge, Elizabeth, and AUene. Repre- 
sentative Cotton is a member of the following com- 
mittees:— Federal Relations (Chairman); Agricul- 
ture ; Railroads ; and Tublic Lands. 



JOHX BEXJAMLX SPL.1NN of Kendrick, Miss., 
son of John Edwin Splann and Mollie N. (Howell) 
Splann, the latter a daughter of Benjamin Howell 
and .Nancy (Green) Howell of Giles County, Tenn., 
was born June Tl, 1875, in McXairy County, Tenn., 
aoout seven miles north of Corinth, Miss. His 
fatuer, John E. Splann, son of John Splann and 
EsLiier irrazier of southern Alabama, was born m 
tnat section, but has lived for the greater part of 
his hfe in Alcorn County, Miss. 

Mr. Splann was educated in the common schools 
of his locality. He was a farmer up to isi*:, , 
blacksmith for next ten years; after which he be- 
came a merchant, with interests in milling ana 
ginning business. He has never held a public oitice 
'except that of Notary Public, but has always been 
aeepiy interested in all questions touching com- 
munity and county welfare, and for the past few 
years has been interested in State affairs, with 
a desire to be of some benefit to the people of lis 
section. As a member of the Legislature of 1916-:;u 
he gives the Slate's business his closest attention 
ana while an economist, he has no desire to block 
any legislation that seeks to properly support the 
educational institutions of the State. He is a valu- 
able member of the following committees : — Rail- 
roads ; Public Printing; Immigration and Labor; 
Roads, Ferries and Bridges ; Drainage. 

Representative Splann is a member of the 
Christian Church, in which he has served as clerk 
for fifteen years, and is a man of consistent chris- 
tian life. He was ordained to the ministry of that 
denomination in 1902. 

On January 15, 1901, he was married to Maude 
Potts, at Kendrick. Miss. She is the daughter 
of Aaron Potts and Sarah (Wolf) Potts, of Ken- 
drick. Representative and Mrs. Splann have four 
children : — Bessie E., Ena May, John Benjamin, Jr., 
and Carroll E. 



LEGTSLATITE DErARTMENT 



829 



A^^TE COUNTY 

JOHN FRANTCLTN- CASSELS of Gloster. Repre- 
sentative of Amite County, was born October 27. 
IfSS. in a farmer's home near Mt. Carmel. "Wil- 
kinson County. Miss. His fatlier, John Cassels, 
son of Reuben Cassels and Mary Sojoimer of Adams 
County, was also a native of "Wilkinson County. 
Miss., and was a public-spirited and prosresslvr 
citizen, deeply interested in all community affairs 
In his locality. He served as a member of the 
Board of Stipervlsors for a number of years. His 
wife. Parah Nix Colllnsworth. was a native of 
Amite County. 

The Cassels are of Scotch ancestry and trace 
their lineape directly back to the Hi^iilands of 
Scotland. The Sojouners are of Irish descent and 
Mr. Cassels can claim direct line to these two coun- 
tries, his grandfather havlnsr be^n born in Scotland 
and his grrandmother In Ireland. His mother was 
the dauehfer of Rev. TVIllIam CoUtnworth. a Metho- 
d'st minister before the divi.?lon in 'Methodism took 
place. 

Mr. Cassels attended the private schools of his 
neighborhood, after which he entered the Hlg-h 
School at Natchez. MI.«^s. Having been reared on a 
farm, his tastes were nattirally in that direction 
nnd he has alwavs been closelv allied with the in- 
terests of the farming class. In the "Farmers' Alli- 
ance and the Southern Cotton Association he has 
'i<»1d important offices and always manifested much 
interest in these organizations, when they were in 
operation. Having' been popular in his section, he 
was induced to become a candld.ate and wf^s elected 
In l!)!."). as Representative from Amite County. In 
*^c 1916 se«!sIon of the Leeislature. Mr. Cassels took 
the deepest Interest in all pxibllc questions of re- 
form and progress and. thoueh carins: little for 
political preferment, he bids fair to be the choice 
of his people for many years. 

Representative Cassels. in political faith, is a 
Democrat : he is a member of the "Methodist Church, 
in which he has been a steward for twenty-flve 
vears. a Sunday-school Sunerlntendent for thirty 
vears. and recordlner secretarv for the Quarterly 
("""onfprence for twenty years He has been a Mason 
for forty-two years. On .January 2. 1879. Mr. Cas- 
sels was married to Lettie Virginia Jackson of 
Amite Countv. Mrs. Cassels is the daughter of 
r>avld Jackson and Cellna Causey Jackson of Olio. 
Amite County, Miss. Mr. and Mrs. Cassels have 
two sons: — Rev. Delos Howard Cassels and "Worth 
Wmiam Cassels. 

"Nfr. Cassels is serving ably on the following 
committees: — Appropriations; Reglstratlona and 




John F. Cassels 



830 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 




Elections; Fees and Salaries; Federal Relations; 
Pensions. 



DRURT JOSEPH WALL. Jr.. of Peoria, who 
represents Amite County, was born at Gillsburgr, In 
that County February 1.5. ISTl. His f^vtiier. Drurj" 
William Wall, was born and lived at Gills- 
burg'. He was at one time Constable of his county. 
Fifth District. His parents were Reuben Tucker 
Wall and his wife, Rebecca Champion (Wurst) 
Wall, who lived in Amite County. 

Wr. Wall's pp.ternal ancestors were originally 
from North Carolina. He is a relative of the Hon. 
John Wall. Senator from Amite Countv. Missis- 
sippi, 1837-1846 

His mother, ^^artha Jane (Tate) Wall, was from 
Louisiana. She was the dausrhter of Charles and 
^fatilda (Bates) Tate of that State. 

Representative Wall was educated in the public 
schools of Amite County, and in the Glll.sburp 
Hig-h School. He did not attend colleg-e. but after 
leaving hi^h school took up the duties of an active 
life as farmer and merchant. He has had con- 
siderable experience In public life. From 1907 to 
1912 he was Ju.^tice of the Peace In Amite County: 
notary public from 1912 to 1916 ; and Registrar 
of Vital Statistics of his County. HavinEr filled 
these positions with much credit to himself he was 
sought by the people of his county for a hlg-her 
office and In 191" was urged to represent his County 
In the Legislature. He began his first term as 
Representative in 1916, and has ser\-ed with great 
diligence upon the following committees: — Agricul- 
ture ; Education Claims : Liquor Traffic. 

Mr. Wall Is a Democrat: from 1913 to 1916 he 
was an able and energetic member of the Demo- 
cratic Executive Committee of his County. He be- 
longs to the Baptist Church, Missionary-, Is a 
Trustee of the R.->binson Baptist Church of Peoria 
and a member of the building committee. He Is a 
Mason and a "Woodmen of the World : han been 
Council Commander, Clerk, and Banker of the 
Woodmen. 

He was married at Gillsbure. August 12. 1594, to 
Miss Rubine Gemlna Hughes, the dauehtcr of 
Robert Fluker Hughes and his wife. Eliza Gertrude 
(Balleyt Hughes, of Gillshurg. Robert Fluker 
Hughes rendered faithful sen-ices as a Confederate 
soldier in the Civil War. His father was a Ken- 
tuckian. his family having' settled In that State 
In the early pioneer days of the State. Represen- 
tative Wall and wife have five children : — Clifton 
Lamar : Maurice Herman : Xellle May ; Robert 
Covert; and Ruble Drury, 



LEGISLATrVE DEPARTMENT 



831 



ATTALA COU^TTT 

TCET "WILEY DAT of Ethel. Representative 
from Attala Count, was born at that place on July 
first, 1891. and is therefore one of our youngest 
legislators. He is the son of John Vandiver Day, 
of Ethel, who was born in Harris Count>-. Georgia, 
May 17, 1S5S. The year after John Vandiver Day's 
birth, his parents, "Wiley P. and Sarah (Gaston) 
Day. removed from Georgia to Mississipjii. The 
family in the paternal line is of Irish descent, and 
on the maternal side is Scotch-Irish. 

Mr. Day's mother. Anne Eliz.ibeth fV^Hlson) Day. 
is of Scotch-Irish ancestors. Her parents. Isom 
"W. "Wilson and his wife, Sarah Elizabeth fPulen) 
"Wilson, were residents of Attala County. ^Tlssis- 
sippi. Her father was a brave Confederate soldier 
in Forrest's Cavalry, and her grandfather Pulen 
served both in the "War of 1S12 and in the "War 
with Mexico. 

At the age of thirteen Mr. Day entered the State 
Institution for the Blind, at Jackson. Misslssinpr. 
and remained there until he was nineteen fin the 
vear 1910). He then continued his education at 
the University of 'Mississippi. He obtained his pro- 
fessional training in law at that Institution, re- 
ceiving the desree of I^L. B. in 1913. with honors. 
He was a member of the Hermean Literary Society. 
In 1913 he began the practice of his profession at 
Kosciusko. ^Mississippi, and two years thereaft'^r 
(■November. 1915) was elected to the House of 
Representatives. He has already shown his ability 
as a public official of unusual ability in the work he 
has done upon the following committees: — .Judic- 
iary : Eleemosynary Institutions ; Immigration and 
Labor; Federal Relations: 'Municipalities. 

Representative Day 5s a Democrat, and a member 
of the Baptist Church. 

On September 13, 1912, at Duck Hill. Mississippi, 
he was married to Miss Hugh Annie Taylor, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin B. Taylor and his wife, Elizabeth 
(Coreley) Tayor. residents of Montgomery County, 
Mississippi. Mr. Taylor was a Confederate soldier 
and rendered faithful service in the Fifth Missis- 
sippi Regiment during the Civil "War, and died in 
Montgomer>- County at the advanced age of eighty- 
eight. 




Icey W. Day 



832 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 




-^ 



James C. Wasson 





1 


4 .«r^-^| 


4 
1 


' ^ J 




■ /.K "** 


^ 




^a 




M 




m 



Roderick B. lIcGill 



JAMES CARLISLE TVASSON of Ethel, Miss.. 
Representative from Attala County, was bom 
March 31. ISSG, at Creek In that county. His 
paternal grandfather. John A. Wasson, was born 
in North Carolina, moved to Cobb County, Ga., 
thence to Attala County, Miss. His son, Newton 
Copeland Wasson. born in Cobb County, Ga., when 
twelve years old accompanied his father to Attala 
County, Miss., where he lived and became the 
fatlier of James Carlisle "U'asson. He was a loca' 
preacher In Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

Mr. Wasson's maternal grandfather, Zacharlah 
Ratliff. was bom in Tennessee, and moved suc- 
cessively to Madison, Leake and Attala Counties. 

The paternal grandmother of Mr. Wasson was 
Eliza Bush ( Copeland 1 Wasson; the maternal. 
Sarah Lucretia (Adams) Ratliff. His mother was 
Mary Jane Ratliif. 

Among the early settlers of Leake and Madison 
Counties, the N. C. "Wasson family shared in all 
the first development of the country and James 
Carlisle Wasson Is a worthy descendent of these 
honorable parents, having Inherited from them the 
aspirations that are characteristic of a people who 
enjoy the blessings of a Democracy. He obtained 
his early education in a modest log school-house 
at Shady Grove In Attala County, Miss. He then 
attended Millsaps College throughout the Sophomore 
Class and studied law at Millsaps in 19'1.t-16. He 
is at present engaged in teaching and farming. 

He was elected Representative in 1915 and has 
assumed the duties of a Legislator in an intelli- 
gent, fearless and manly manner that bids fair to 
win for him future honors from the people whom 
he represents. He serves ably on the following 
committees: — Judiciary: Public Prl-ntlng : Insur- 
ance; Banks and Banking. 

Representative Wasson is a Democrat; in the 
Order of Masons, he Is Junior Warden In Chapel 
Lodge ISO ; also Chaplain In O. E. S. ; member of 
Methodist Episcopal Church. South. He Is un- 
married. ■ '^'"'"^^ 



BENTON COUNTY 

RODERICK BENTON M-^GILL of Faulkner, who 
represents Benton County in the Lower House, was 
born on the 15th day of July, 1888. at Faulkner, Jn 
the Count>- of Tippah. His father, Henry Augustus 
McGill was born in Dumas In that County, and 
lived at Ripley, Mississippi, and also at Corinth. 
Mississippi, where he was engaged in the mercan- 
tile business. The paternal grandparents of 
Roderick Benton McGill. who were James S. and 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 833 

Mary Jane (Burrow) ^[cGill. lived in Middle Ten- 
nessee. Their parents came directly from Ireland. 
During: the Revolutionary AVar the McGills were 
patriots, and bore an active pait in the struggle 
for American liberty. 

The maiden name of Representative McGill's 
.mother was Jessie Marthia Elliott. She was the 
daughter of AVilliam Henry Elliott and his wife, 
Mary Jane (Xorton) Elliott, who lived at Ripley, 
Mississippi. 

Mr. McGill received hi-s earl\- edu<?ation in the 
public schools of Tippah County, and his high school 
training at Mississippi Heights Academy, and at 
Blue Mountain. Mis.«i.ssippi. .Vmong the teachers j 

who most influenced him during his preparatory 
schooling was PVof. John Edd Brown. 

Mr. McGill made law his chosen profession, and 
entered upon his legal course at the Universitj" of 
Mississippi, where he remained one year. His 
occupation at present is farming, but he has con- 
tinued his legal studies at home, in which he has 
always taken keen interest. Having become very 
popular with the people of his covmty, he was 
urged to become a candidate for public office and 
was elected to the Legislature in 1915. and has ably 
served the State upon the following important com- 
mittees : — Judiciary; Education. 

Mr. McGill is a consistent Democrat, a member 
of the Baptist Church, and belongs to the "Wood- 
men and Columbian Woodmen of the "World, as 
soliciting agent. He is unmarried. 



BOLIVAR COUN'TT 

WALTER SILLERS. Jr.. of Rosedale, Repre- 
sentative from Bolivar County, was born April 13, 
1888, at Rosedale and is the son of Walter Sillers 
and Florence Warfleld Sillers. 

Walter Sillers. Sr., the younge.-=t son of Joseph 
and Matilda Sillers, was born on his father's plan- 
tation in Jefferson County, Mississippi, near Fayette, 
I and when two years old removed with his parents to 

Bolivar County in this State, where he has lived 
ever since. He studied law at the University of 
Mississippi, formed the law firm of Sillers & Clark 
in 1887, and entered upon a practice that has 
grown until he is one of the foremost lawyers 
of his State. For eight years he was attorney for 
the Mississippi Levee District, and is now Presi- 
dent of the Levee Board of that District. He is ' 
still in active practice as senior member of the ' 
firm of Sillers and Sillers. During the recon- 
struction period he took a leading part in ridding < 




53— M 



>- _t '^*'^ ^ » t «a 



834 LEGISLATIVE DEFARTilENT 



the country of carpet hag and radical control ; in 
1875 he organized the first Democratic club of 
Bolivar County, and in 1SS6 served in the Missis- 
sippi Legrislature. Since then, though he has sev- 
eral times been a member of the State Democratic 
Executive Committee and has been intei-esied in 
local politics, he has never cared to run for office, 
as his time has been largely taken up by the 
duties of his profession. . 

His father. Joseph Sillers, came with his father. 
Walter Sillers, from North Carolina to Missis.'^ippi 
while Mississippi was still a territory and settled 
in what is now Jefferson County. Joseph Sillers 
served in the Jefferson Davis Regiment in the 
Mexican War, and was Lieutenant in Bolivar 
Troop during: the Civil War. In 1854 he removed 
to the Bolivar County. Near the close of the War 
he was captured and Ji«d at Vicksburg- in the 
.spring of 1865. 

Ihe mother of M'alter Sillers, Jr.. wa.s Florence 
Warfleld, daughter of Elisha Warfield, who was 
Colonel of an Arkansas Regiment throughout the 
Civil War, and who raised the world-famous race 
horse. "Lexington." at Lexington, Kentucky, where 
his father. Elisha Warfleld. Sr., had settled In 
early times. Elisha Warfleld, Sr., was a soldier 
of the Revolution and the descendant of Richard 
Warfleld. who came to America with Lord Balti- 
more and received a grant in Ann Arundel County, 
Maryland, from the King. One branch of the 
Sillers family, the Carsons. are descended from the 
Rev. James Carson, a Methodist minister who came 
to New York from the Xorth of Ireland in 1799 and 
settled in 1820 in Xatchez. Governor Charles Clark 
of Mississippi, great-uncle of Representative Sillers, 
and General In the Confederate Army, was de- 
scended from the Clarks who came to America with 
Lord Baltimore. John T. Griffith of Adams County, 
great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was 
a literary man whose charming Indian stories were 
copied in English Journals. 

Walter Sillers. Jr., was educated in the Rosedale 
High Schools, Sewanee, Tennessee, and the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi. After having completed his 
law course at the Universitj- of Mississippi, he was 
admitted to the bar in 1909, beginning practice 
at Rosedale, Mississippi. Mr. Sillers has been very 
successful in the practice of his profession, his in- 
terest, however, in all public questions tliat con- 
cern the welfare of his State, drew him into 
political life, and he was induced by tiie people of 
his section to ser\-e as their representative for the 
term beginning in 1916. Mr. Sillers is one of the 
best equipped members of the lower Flouse. His 
Influence upon matters of legislation is of a certain 



ic «s rlounlsiaaj In 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

and telling- quality, and the supporters of any 
measure are always eager to secure his assistance 
He represents the best ideals in the public life of 
the State, and it is to such men that the people of 
>riss'ssippi look to exact and enforce honesty and 
integrity in public ofRce. The Mississippi Legisla- 
ture is stronger for the presence of Walter Sillers 
and his career in that body w:ll be watched with 
interest by his many friends. He serves on the 
following committees: — Judiciary; Missisi'ippi 
Levees; Fees and Salaries; Banks and Banking: 
Manufactures, of which he is chairman. 

Though constantly engaged in the practice of h's 
profession. Representative Sillers has served as a 
member of the Democratic Executive Committee of 
Bolivar County from 1912 to 191.5. He is a 
Mason, in which organization he holds official posi- 
tion. On November 22. 1911. he was married to 
Lena Roberts, daugliter of "William B. Roberts and 
Minnie Poole Roberts, of Rosedale. Mississippi 
Jirs. S:l!ers is one of the most chaimins< and capLiMe 
members of the ^Mississippi Society of the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution, in which organi- 
zation she is regent of the Rosedale Chapter. 



STANLEY FRANCIS GAINES of Boyle. Repre- 
.sentative from Bolivar County, is by birth a Ken- 
tuckian. He was born February 12. 1891. at ji^- 

Bowling Green. Warren County. Kentucky. His ,^ 

father. Len H. Gaines, was born in Oakland in thai ^ 

same county, but left Kentucky at the age of seven- -* 

teen, nnd has been a resident of Bolivar Coimty, 
Mississippi, for the past twenty year-. His parents. ^■ 

George Morton Gaines and :Martha Gaines, camt- 
to Kentucky from Virginia when in their twenties 
and continued to reside in Kentucky until their 
death. When this young couple left Virginia, there y-',, 

came with them to K<'ntucky another young man 
and wife. "William and Lettia Francis. They also 
remained in Kentucky, giving to that State one of 
its most progressive families. Their daughter, 
Mary Jannette Francis, became the wife of their 
friends' son. Len H. Gaines, and the mother of 
young .Stanley F. Gaines, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Mr. Gaines has been thoroughly educated at vari- 
ous Southern institutions. He obtained his early 
education in both private and public schools in the 
town of Boyle, where he lives. He was fitted for 
college at the University Training School at Oxford. 
Mississippi, and at the Sewanee Grammar School. 
Sew.", nee, Tennessee. He attended the universities 
of both those ijr'P^f.atrry pchool.=, tlio TTniversity 
of Mississippi, at Oxford, and the University of the 



1^^ i 



Stanley F. Gaines 



836 



LEGISLATIVK DEPARTMENT 



South at Sewanee. Mr. Gaines ]:as also had ir.:!l- 
tary experience, as First Lieutenant. I. S. A. P.. 
Fiftli Battalion of the Mississippi National Guc^rd. 
He was Alderman of the town of Boyle from 1913 
to 1915, in which latter year he was elected to the 
lower house of the State Legislature. Mr. Gaines 
is one of the most promising young members of the 
Legislature. He is espet:ially well fitted for his 
position and has served with signal ability upon the 
following Committees: Judiciary. Federal Rela- 
tions ; Public Buildings and Grounds ; Military Af- 
fairs ; Insurance. Mr. Gaines belongs to the Ma- 
sonic order. Boyle Lodge Xo. 544. master the year 
1915 ; belongs to the J. J. Brooks Chapter of the 
Eastern Star, worthy patron. 1916 : and is a ntr-m- 
her of the Elks Lodge Xo. 977. Clarksdale, Missis- 
sippi. December 28. 1915, the newly elected repre- 
sentative was married, at Jonestown, Coahoma 
County. Mississippi, to Louise Chapmen Coj.is. 
daughter of .John Ren Coats and Annie E. Coats 
"of tliat place. John Ren Coats was a native of 
Shiloh, Alabam.a. and came to Mj.«sissippi in 1SS6. 
His wife was the daughter of S. D. Cheavis of 
Dublic, Mississippi, where she was born in 1ST6. 
Her mother's maiden name was Mattie Hodges. 




Dennis Murphree 



DEXXIS MURPHREE of Pittsbo-o. Representa- 
tive from Calhoun County, was born at Pittsboro. 
January 6. 1SS6. His father, Thomas Martin Mur- 
phree, was born at Oldtown, Calhoun County, and 
lived in that County all his life, holding a promi- 
nent place in local affairs. In 1861 he enlisted in 
Company F of the Fourth Missis.=ippi Infantry, 
the first volunteer company to go from Calhoun 
Countj', and rendered faithful service for four years. 
He was Justice of the Peace two terms, member of 
the school board. Public Examiner, twice Circuit 
Clerk, and twice elected Representative from his 
County. He died while serving his second term. 
He established the Monitor, a weekly paper pub- 
lished at Pittsboro. His wife was Callle Cooper. 
Dennis Murphree"s paternal grandfather. Thomrs 
Martin Murphree, Senior, was one of the founders 
of Calhoun County, and was one of the commis- 
sioners who located the present county site. H*" 
was a member of the Board of Police of Chickasaw 
County before Calhoun County was formed. Dur- 
ing the "War of 1S12 he was a member of General 
Jackson's Tennessee Riflemen, who defeated the 
British at X'ew Orleans. The first American an- 
cestors of this worthy family were three brothers, 
named Murphy, who had taken part in Emmet's 
Rebellion and had fled the country. Th'-^y came to 
America changed their name to Murphree, and 



LEGISL-VTIVE DEPARTMENT 837 



settled in Tennessee and -Alabama where they 
have been fighting the battles for Democracy 
and honest government with a cotirage and valor 
that has characterized every succeeding generation. 
The connection is a large one : at a family reun- 
ion held at Oldtown Chuicli. Calhoun County, in 
1914, there were seven hundred of the connection 
present. Callie (Cooper) Murphree, imother of 
Dennis Murphree, was the daughter of William 
Cooper of Sarepta, Calhoun County, who was killed 
at Franklin. Tennessee, while in the service of the 
Confederacy. Mr. Murphree was educated in the 
public schools of his county, and in the printing 
office of his father, which he entered at the age 
of fourteen, and of which he took entire charge at 
nineteen. Through this paper he has wielded great 
influence for the botterment of his community. 
Mr. Murphree is one of the strongest and most 
fearless advoca'res in the state of high standards 
and honesty in public service and is destined ro 
wield an influence for great good in Mississippi. 
During the year 1908-09 he was commissioner or 
Calhoun County. In 1911 he was elected from his 
county and with a majority of two to one. He was 
re-elected in 1915 and has been one of the ablest 
members of the following committees : Education . 
Public Health and Quarantine : Public Printing, of 
which he is chairman. November 7. 1909, he mar- 
ried Clara Minnie Martin, at Okolona. Mississippi, 
daughter of Hiram H. and Fannie (Smith) Martin 
of Pittsboro. Their children are Mary Francis 
Loise and Thomas Martin. 



CALHOUX COUNTY 

JOHN BYRD GOING, Representative from Cal 
houn County, has his home i.". Calhoun City, Cal 
houn County, ilississippi. He was born in that '"'~ " \ 

County on the 26th day of January, 1872. Mr. 
Going has. with characteristic modesty, said little .5^ ^^--X- 

of his family, but as a native of Calhoun Cnunt^- ^^ 

he belongs to a sturdy race of pioneers who had ■-,. ) 

part in the early history of this County, which is 
one of the best and most progressive in the State. 
Mr. Going obtained his early education in the pub- 
lic schools of his vicinity and then attended th'' 
High School at Pittsboro. Mississippi. He is a 
Journalist by profession and takes great interest in 
newspaper woik. December 19th, 1903, he e.^- 
tablished the Dixie Herald at Pittsboro ; later he 
moved his editorial ofllce to Calhoun City, where 
he still edits tlie paper as a v,-eekl.v. He has been 
prominent in local politics f cr sonie years and is 



>^.\ 



John B. Going 



S3S LEGISLATIVE DEl'ARTIMEXT 



indepL'ndcnt of an>- p(.>liiical faction. Srandins for 
and insisting on honesty and integi-ity in piibl'.c 
ofRce, the State's best intei-est is his cliief concern. 
Sf-vei-al times he has served on the Executive Con;- 
niittee of the Deniociatic Party for his County ; 
has held the office of Alderman, and has n-pn=- 
sentcd his County since 1908 in the State Le=;i£- 
lature. He was elected in 191.5 to serve from 
1916 to 1920. He has done excellent work in that 
body as a nieniber of the Committees on: — Ways 
and Means ; Public Pi-inting: Banks and Bankin^r. 
Mr. Going is a Deacon of the Baptist Cha-.rih. and 
belongs to the Fraternal orders of the Knij;lus of 
F'ythias and the "Woodmen of the World. In May 
1906. he was mariied to Randa Steele. Mr. and 
Mrs. Going have three children. 



CARROLL COUNTY 



■■"^"■.;P"'4fl 



'■^'^ I 



DOCTOR GEORGE IRBY REDDITT of Mc- 
^ Carley. Representative from Carroll County, was 
born at Teoc in that County, September 2, 1863. 
His parents were David Lorenzo Redditt and Mary 
Elizabeth (Sledge) Redditt. His father, D. L 
Redditt, wa.>^ boi-n in Albemarle Cotmty, Xorth 
*' i Carolina, in 1S13, but lived at Teoc, near Carrollton. 

\ - ' ' from 1833 until his death, in 1893. On accouni 

?.?:; of his age he did not enlist as a regular soldier 

f)' during the Civil War, but was on home guard 

duty. He was the son of William Joseph Redditt 
and Cynthia (Warbritten) Reditt, who lived during 
their latter years at Teoc. Mississippi. The mother 
Mary Elizabeth (Sledge) Redditt. was the daughter 
Dr. George I. Redditt of .lohn Henry and Rebecca Sledge of E>uck Hill. 
Mississippi. Both her ancestors and those of the 
father, D. l^ Redditt. wei-e of Scotch Ir.'sh ori.gin. 
They settled first in Xorth Carolina. Then dur- 
ing the Choctaw land sales, they purchased land 
in Mississippi, and were among the early settlers 
of that portion of the State. Dr. Irby Red- 
ditt obtained his early education in the common 
schools of Carroll County where he was pri-partJ 
for college. He took his professional training at 
Louisville Medical College, (1S8T) . Kentucky School 
of Medicine (1888), and in Tulane University of 
Louisiana, where he received the M. D. degree 
in 1889. In May of that year he began to practice 
at McCarley. continued for twelve years, and then 
retired from the profes.sion. He was elected Vice- 
F'resident of the People's Bank of N^orth Carrollton. 
Mi-ssissippi. a position that he is still ably filling. 
He also h^s large farming inteiest.s. In 1915 he 
entered publit life by his election to tlie S ale Leg- 



■.ir. MfUr. 






■^ ..1 '.I,, 



LEGISL.VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



839 



islature for the term of 1916-1920. There he has 
served -nith great ability upon llie following com- 
mittees: Ways and Means; Public Health and 
Quarantine: Eleemosynary Institutions: Banks and 
Banking. Doctor Rediit is a Democrat, a Deacon 
in the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to the 
Masons and the Woodmen of the World. His ideals 
of liberty and Democracy are of the most ardent 
nature. May 6, 1893. near McCarley, he was niai- 
ried to Maybell Alice Hill, daughter of Captain 
Hiram Shelton Hill and Elizabeth (Edmonson? 
Hill of McCarley. Captain Hill and wife came to 
Mississippi fram Alabama in 1842. He was a 
Captain in the Confederate Army under General J. 
Z. George, and was a brave and competent officer. 
Dr. and :klrs. Redditt's children are Mabel Irby, 
Gladys Xorine and Mary Elizabeth. 



LAFAYETTE .JOSEPH LOTT of Grenada. Rep- 
resentative from Carroll County, was born in 
Carroi\ County, Mississippi. His parent.-? were John 
James Lott and Margarette Jane (McDonald) Lott. 
His father was tlie son of John and Margaretre 
Jane Lott of CarroUton, Mississippi. The famil>- 
came from South Carolina to Mississippi, near 
CarroUton. where John James Lott lived for sixty 
years. The grandfather, John Lott. like so many of 
our best families, was a native of Scotland. Rep- 
resentative Lott's ancestors on both sides came fioni 
Ireland and Scotland. His mother was the daugh- 
ter of William and Margarette (Richmond) McDon- 
ald of Duck Hill, Mississippi. His maternal great- 
grandmother came from Ireland in 1795. Mr. Lott 
was educated in the country schools, where he re- 
ceived a good public school education. He was not 
given the opportunity to secure a college education 
but like so many of the country's most sticcessfut 
citizens, is a self-made man. He has always been 
a farmer, and is greatly interested in the welfare 
of the farming class. He has been a leader in a 
number of agricultural organizations, speaker at 
Farmer's Alliance meetings, and organizer for the 
Farmer's. Union for five years, 1905-1910. From 
1888 to 1S91 he was Justice of the Peace. Having- 
shown his ability in these positions the people se- 
lected him for a wider field of usefulness to the 
State. In 1915 he was elected to ser\-e as Repre- 
sentative in the State Legislature, where he ha» 
done excellent work on the following committees : 
County Affairs ; Liquor Traffic ; Drainage. Mr. 
Lott is a Democrat. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist Church, and for seventeen years a minister of 
that denomination, having from four to si.x churches 
under his cliarge. He is Counsel Commander of 
the Woodmen of the World, and District Commandjr 




LaFayette J. Lott 



840 



I.EGISr^VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



General of Columbian Woodmen for the past 
nine years. December 19. 1880. he was niarrie-d" 
near Carrolton. to Sarah Holland, daughter or 
Bluford and Sarah (Taylor) Holland of Duck Hr.l. 
Mississippi. Her paternal ancestors came from 
England, and her maternal ancestors from Ireland. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lott have a large and interesting 
family of nine children: Sallie (Lott) Vance, Min- 
nie (Lott) Nail, Lillie (Lott) Corley, Helen (Lot:) 
Abel, Rosa (Lott) Nail. ToUie (Lott) Herbert, 
Mattie May, Davie Anninda, and Joseph B.. of 
Grenada. 



CHICKASAW COUNTY 




Tr\in Abernathy 



IRVIN ABERNATHY of Okolona, Representa- 
tive from the County of Chickasaw, was born 
Augaist 23, 18.52, at Troy. Pontotoc County. Mis-ss- 
sippi. His father. Marion Abernathy came from 
Alabama and removed to Mississippi in 1849. where 
ho lived until his death in Pontotoc County, ISO .3. 
With him to :Mississippi came his parents, Sarti- 
uel Abernathy and wife, who were North Carolin- 
ians by birth. Irvin Abernathy is of English anl 
Irish ancestry. His mother. Martha (Wilson) Aber- 
nathy, lived, prior to her marriage, with her 
parents in I'ontotoc County, who were among the 
best people of their section. Mr. Abernathy re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of three 
different counties of ilis.sissippi, Pontotoc, Tunica 
and Chickasaw. For four years he followed suc- 
cessfully the occupation of teaching. He is at 
present a farmer and is one of the most worthj 
and public spirited citizens of Chickasaw County. 
Though true to his convictions he is open-minded 
and is always actuated by the highest ideals of 
honesty and justice in the service he gives his 
state. Before his election to the Legislature, in 
1915, Representative Abernathy was for years a 
member of the Board of Supervisors of Chlckasaw 
County. and for ten years filled the office of public 
cotton weigher. In both capacities he served the 
public with ability and integrity and was urged to 
seek higher office. In the Legislature he has been 
placed on several important committee!" where he 
renders faithful and conscientious service : 'Ways 
and Means; Agriculture; F\iblic Printing; Fees 
and Salaries. Mr. Abernathy is a Democrat, and 
has been a member of the County E.\ecutive Com- 
mittee of his party. He is a Deacon in the Bap- 
tist Church, an Odd Fellow, and a Woodman of 
the World. April 20, 1882. he was n>ariied to Mi.?.- 
Mary Jane Laughlin, the daughter of Thomas and 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



841 



Elizabeth (Park) Laughlin of Chickasaw County 
The I^aug-hlins are of srood Scotch ancestry and 
were amonp the early settlers of America in the 
Colonial period. Mi", ar.d Mrs. Abernathy have 
eight children: Mabry Lucile. Annie Lee. Ollie 
Burtrand. ^ViIliam Grady, Luther, C. V.. Myrtle, 
and Mary Evelyn. 



EUGEXE MILTERX VERELL of Hou.<;ton. Ml.s- 
.•sissippi. Representative from Chicka.saw County, 
was born in "Webster County. Mississippi, Xovem- 
ber 26. 1S59. His father. Charles Edward Verell. 
was a Virginian, descended from Scotch ancestors 
who settled in Virginia and shared in the early 
history of America. He was the son of Benjamin 
Verell. who came from Scotland to the Virgrinia 
Province. The maiden name of Representative 
Verell's mother was Leah Malindy Terr>-. dausrht'ir 
of ^Villiam Terrj'- The Terrys were originally from 
North Carolina. Mr. Verell was educated in the 
schools of Cumberland. T\'ebster County, where hrs 
teachers were R. C. McDonnal and H. A. Gould. 
His father was in very poor circumstances, and 
thus the son was compeled to bear his own expense 
throueh .•'chool. In spite of thi.'' great obtsacle he 
persevered until he had fitted himself for teaching. 
He began that .work •with .luccess in the rural 
schools, but later decided to take up farming in- 
stead, an occupaion in which he has continued until 
the present and from which he derives both profit 
and pleasure. Besides his farm work he has beer- 
acting as minister of rhe Primitive Baptist Church 
ttince 1886. Representative Verell though opposed 
to an extravagant administration In the use of 
public funds 1."! in favor of each State department 
receiving justice and cannot be led or pre.iudi'^ed 
in any question but believes in a square deal for 
all. In 1915 his community nominated him for 
the State Legislature, to which he was electe<l 
to serv^e from 1916 to 1920. He has performed 
his duties there with justice and fairness to all 
the state institutions and has served on the follow- 
ing committees: Appropriations: Claims; Peniten- 
tiary ; Liquor Traffic : Drainage. Mr. Verell is a 
member of the Democratice Part>' and of the Pr-'m- 
Itive Baptist Church. He married Susan Eurena 
■^'iddleton in March. ISS.t. Her parents were Elder 
Thomas Holland >riddleton and Marthy Ann T\"ils 
Middleton. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Verell 
are: Modfra ( VerelU W"il.<>on. Clara f Verell) Little, 
Charles Edward Verell. of Houston : Orie Estcl, 
Thor.as Howard. Effle. Graden and Roberta. 



p r ^ . .,, 







Eugene M. Verell 



84i 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



CHOCTAW COUXTY 




Carlton A. Limlsey 



CARLTOX ALEXAXDER LIXDSEY of Eupora. 
Representative of Choctaw County. Miss., was born 
February 4. 1853. near Huntsville. Choctaw County. 
He is the son of Cai-lton and Martha Susan (Caper- 
ton) Llndsey. His paternal ancestors wero from 
Kentucky ; his maternal from Georgia. His father 
entered the Confedei'ate Army as a private, was 
promoted ro lieutenant, and served under Gen. N. 
B. Forrest through the war. Representative Lind- 
sey attended the common schools In his youth, but 
had no opportunity for advanced education. He 
has been a farmer nil his life, an occupation in 
which ho takes great pleasure and interest. He 
was a member of the People's Party from 1894 to 
1900 ; was Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the p-eople's Party of his county ; is now a 
Democrat. He has ably served his people a number 
of times in the State Legislature. He was elected 
to the House of Representatives, X'ovember 3. 1907, 
and has long been a familiar figure in public life. 
In the sessions of 1908-10. he served his constit- 
uents so intelligently and faithfully that he was 
re-elected to that body In November. 1915. Durins 
the session of 1916, he served, with much ability, 
on the following committes: Rules; Appropriations; 
Corporations: Drainage: Immigration and I^abor, 
of which he is chairman. Representative Lindsey 
is a man of deep convictions as to all moral 
questions of political life and Is not a blind fol- 
lower of any political faction, but uses his own 
judgment in all matters concerning the State's 
welfare. He is thoughtful and careful in dealing 
with all State problems and is especially earnest in 
his views of all public matters. He has always 
been a friend to the various State institutions and 
i-s just and fair to those who differ with him. On 
March 15, 1S83, he was married to Mattie Emelia 
Love, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ijove of Hunts- 
ville, which family came from South Carolina. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey have five children : Samuel, 
Mamie, Kyle, Mozell and Eva. 



I»i '.nfl?. : a*il*JlilT 



I 1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 843 

CLAIBORXE COUNTY 

TALBERT ARMAXD H'STKR of rticii. .Mis- .- 
sissippK Representative from Claiborne County. wt^.'J 
born March 9. 1S6S. at Cayuga, Hintls County. Mis- 
sissippi, yiv. Luster is of Virginia ancestry and hv- 
longs by horeditj' to the professional class. His /; 

father. Miles Jerome Luster, was a physii-ian, who 
was bom at Cayuga and lived and practised there 
all of his life: and his patern.al grandfather wa> 
born and grew to manhood near Fincastle, Vir- 
ginia. The name of the latter was Miles Lustci'. 
He married Mary Norrell. Mr. Luster's mother, 
whose maiden name was Eliza Ann Xixon. • / 

was the daughter of Reverend Thomas Xixon. Sua^-ioiit^- 
a famous local preacher of the M. E. Chui'ch 

South. Thomas X'ixon was boi-n and reared in Ten- Talbert A. lAi.^ter 

nessee. married Mary Elizabeth Rarols. migratea 
to Marion County. Mi.^sissippi. and became one of 
the pioneer preachers of the State. Representative 
Luster secured his early education in the public 
schools of Hinds County. He then studied for one 
year at the Centenary College of Jackson. Louisi- 
ana, and completed his colle'jiate training at thi- 
luka Normal Institute, where he remained for two 
>ears, graduating with the B S. degree. Mr. Luster 
was born on a farm, and he assisted with the farm 
work until he was twenty-one years old. For seven 
years he was in the itineracy of the M. E. Church 
South ; he then settled on a farm in Claiborne 
County, where he has since remained, taking gi-eat 
pleasure and interest in agricultural pur.'^uits. From 
1912 to 1916 he served his first term in the State 
Legislatui-e to the entire sati^^faction and the best 
interests of his constituents, and was re-elected 
to serve from 1916 to 1920. He is a thoughtful, 
painstaking legislator and has done excellent 
work as a member of the committees on Ways and 
Cleans : County Affairs. Mr. Luster is a member 
of the M. E. Church, in which he is still a local 
preacher. He is also a Mason and a 'Woodman of 
the World, and is Junior Warden in his Masonic 
Lodge. His fiist wife was :May Rebecca Williams. 
whom he married December 27, 1893, near Summit, 
F'ike County, Mississippi. She was the daughter of 
Zebidie and Rozilla (Huffman) Williams, who lived 
near Summit. His second wife was Charlie Doug- 
as McDowell, daughter of Solomon W. McDowell, 
M. D.. and Matilda Love (McLaurin) McDowell, of 
the citv of Jackson. Thev were marr'ed Deceni- 

r 

ber 2.5. 1907, at Byram in Hinds County. By the 
first marriage there are two children. Miles Roddy 
and Annie Mny. 



844 



LECISLATIVE DErART.MEXT 



CL-\RKE COUXTY 



■ ■•■^"rtiitif'i 



Howard L. Miller 



1 

J 



HOWARD LEE MILLER. Representative from 
Clark County, i.^ a lesident of Quitman, 'Nrississippi, 
but was born at Increase. Lauderdale County. 
Mississippi, on the 6th day of July, ISSS. His 
father. Ely Carmichael Miller, was also born in 
Mississippi, in Theadsville, in Clarke County. His 
parents were Michael Miller and Matheny (Brod- 
head) Miller. He afterwards lived at Increase and 
also at Middleton. where he engaged in farming. 
Howard Lee Miller is of French descent. 
His paternal ancestors were amon'4 the first 
settlers in this country and show by their 
names that they were among the promi- 
nent Colonial families. They came to South Caro- 
lina in the early part of the 17th century, and 
thence removed to Alabama, finally settling ii. 
Mississippi. His mother's ancestors came from 
France, and settled in Louisiana. Her maiden 
name was Martha Ann Dearman. and she was the 
daughter of William Dearman and Nancy (Ousley) 
Dearman of MTiynot. Lauderdale County, Missis- 
sippi. Representative Miller received his early ed- 
ucation at the Harvard Schoon. one of the public 
Schools of Clarke County. While a pupil there he 
was Very studious and made such good use of his 
time that he became a teacher at a very early age. 
and taught successfully for six years in the public 
schools of his county, continuing his studies with 
great diligence. He then took up the study of law ; 
enterel the Law Department of Millsaps College, 
and in 1914 received the degree of LL. B. In 1915 
he began the practice of his profession at Quitman, 
and has given promise of becoming one of the abl- 
est laA;v>-ers of the State. Being widely known 
through his profession and acquiring influence with 
a host of friends and admirers, he was elected a 
member of the Legislature in 191.5. and has taken 
great interest and performed valuable work on 
his committees which are: Judiciar>- ; Agriculture; 
Education ; Corporations ; Registration and Elec- 
tions. Mr. Miller is a Democrat, a member of the 
Baptist Church, and belongs to the Woodmen of the 
World and the Columbian Woodmen. He has not 
yet married. 



h( 



ba 



I.EGISL.VTIVE PEr'ARTMEXT 

CLAY COUNTY. . 

BARXEY SAMUEL SEM.MELMAX of West 
I'oint, Representative of Clay County, was born 
Jani'.ary 22, 187S. at Lautenberg. Gennany, 
wlieijce his father. Charles Semmelman, had come 
from SiciTJe, in the County of Flock, Poland. 
Wliea Barney was about ten years old, the family 
removed to the United States, and made their home 
\n X^ew York City. The Semmelman family are 
Hebrews of ancient Polish lineage. The grand- 
father of Representative Semmelman, Samuel Bar- 
uch Semmelman. lived at Sierpe. Plock, Poland. 
The son of Samuel Baruch Semmelman married 
'lis first cousin Helen Semmelman. who was the 
I'dausrhter of Herch Semmelman and his wife Esther. 
Mr. Semmelman received his early education in 
public and private schools of Germany. After the 
family came to America he attended the New York 
City public schools for a sliort time. He is a 
distingT^iished member of the Mississippi X'ational 
g'uard, having served for many years as Captain 
of Company G, 2nd. Ind. Battalion. He has been a 
resident of Clay County for seventeen years. In 
1915 he was nominated for the Legislature ; and 
it is noteworthy that, although foreign-born, he 
received the largest vote ever given a man in Clay 
County when he had opposition. Mr. Semmelman 
was one of five worthy candidates, but received 866 
votes out of approximately 1300 polled. In pre- 
senting him for office the West Point Leader made 
ilie following comment : "We take pleasure in an- 
nouncing the name of Barney S. Semmelman for 
the Legislature. He has been a citizen cf the 
county for many years, and by his exem.plary 
life and square dealings, has gained a high place 
in the estimation of all who know him. He has ever 
been among the foremost to advocate all public in- 
terests and has never turned down an appeal for 
help to boost the city or to help charitable and 
benevolent causes. He is well posted along the 
lines that will fit him for a true representative 
of the best interests of the people. His popularity 
is only limited by lack of knowledge of his ex- 
cellent traits by those who have not come into 
social and business relations with him. He will 
make a good conservative legislator. Our Barne> 
Is all right." Mr. Semmelman Is a sound con- 
servative legislator. He has served on the following 
committees : Corporations ; Penitentiary ; Military 
Affairs ; Insurance : Municipalities. Representative 
Semmelman is a Democrat, a member of the Jew- 
i-^h Synagogue, .ind belongs to the following fra- 
t'lnal orders: Odd Fellows, in which he is Grand 
Master (1915-16) ; Elks, in which he is Exalted 



845 



L_^ 




Bainev S. Semmelman 



;i 



846 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Ruler, West Point Lodge No. 9.')1 ; Masons (thirty- 
second degree) : Shi'inors) Hanui.sa Teinple, Meri- 
dian. Miss.) Woodmen of the AVorld : Columbian 
Woodmen ; Josepti Horz lodge of the Jewisli Fra- 
ternal Order of "Enai Brith.' He is still un-mar- 
ried. Mr. Semnielmnn i.s now an officer in the 1st 
Mississippi Infantry. V. S. A. 




Frank B. Stephens 



FRANK B. STEPHEN'S of West Point, Repre- 
sentative from Clay County, was born in Griffith, 
in that County, May 2. 188J). His parents are 
James L. Stephens and wife Addie Stephens. James 
L. Stephens was also born at Griffith, and has 
lived there all his life. He is the son of Louis 
and Mary Stephens, who were both North Caro- 
linians by birth. Louis Stephens was bom in 
Wake County. North Carolina, August 18. ISOO, and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Watkins, was 
born August 31, 1S20. Louis Stephens removed 
from North Carolina to Green County. Alabama, 
in 182.'>, and in 1849 settled in Mississippi. Two 
of their sons served with distinction in the Army 
of the Confederacy during the Civil War. The 
Stephens are of English descent, and belong to the 
same family as did Alexander H. ."Stephens or 
Georgia, who was Vice President of the Confeder- 
acy. The "U'atkins family are also English. 
They were among the earliest settlers in this coun- 
try, and several of the members served in the 
Revolutionar>- War. Frank B. Stephens' mother 
was a Burnitt ; she is the daughter of James and 
Jane Burnitt of Griffith, Mississippi. James Bur- 
nit, was born August 8, 1819 in Green County, 
Alabama; his wife was born in Concord. North 
Carolina, March 13, 1825, and Is still living. Jane 
Burnitt's maiden name was Ary. Her father was 
a soldier of the Revolution, and her seven brothers 
all fought in the :Mexican War. The mother of 
Jane (Ary) Burnitt was a Clingman, of FrencM 
descent. Tlie family settled in North Carolina prior 
to the Revolution. Tom Clingman, the uncle of 
Jane Burnitt. was for years a noted member of the 
United States Senate from North Carolina. Rep- 
resentative Stephens was reared on a farm, and 
had many obstacles that are apt to confront a 
country boy ; but he overcame them, and has suc- 
ceeded in everything he has undertaken. He ob- 
tained his education in a country school at Griffith 
where he had the good fortune to have as his first 
teacher the present Superintendent of Education 
of Clay County. Professor Paul Townsend. During 
the sessions of 1909-1910 Mr. Stephens taught school 
at Rocky Hill, Clay County. The following year 
he accepted a position as salesman in a general 



i;' 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



847 



merchandise store ; he is still employed by the samn 
firm, and now holds the responsible position of 
General Manager. In 1911 he became a candidate 
for the office of representative, but was not elected. 
Ambitious and aspiring he determined not to be 
discouraged, and entered the race again. The 
people rallied to his suppoi't and this time he was 
elected to serve from 1916 to 1920. He has given 
most valuable service on the following committees : 
Education; Railroads; Public Printing; P^iblic 
Lc-vnds ; Propositions and Grievances. Mr. Stephens 
is a member of the Democratice Party, and of 
Cedar Bluff Camp No. 828, Woodmen of the World. 
He is unmarried. 



COAHOMA COUXTY 



OSCAR GOODBAR .JOHNSTON of Clarksdale, 
Coahoma County, Miss., was born January 27, 
1880, at Jackson. Miss., son of John Calvin John- 
ston and Emma Elizabeth (Goodbar) Johnston 
His immediate ancestors on the father's side were 
Mississippians. Maternal ancestors weie from 
Tennessee. His father held the office of 
Deputy State Auditor for a number of years, and 
was Revenue Agent of the State of Mississippi 
during the Brewer administration. Mr. Johnston 
in his boyhood, attended the public and private 
schools of Jackson, Miss. : also schools at Kansas 
City, Mo., and Memphis. Tenn. ; he was also 
sent to a private school at Friar's Point, Miss. ; 
hus literary education was obtained at Kentucky 
Military Institute, where he was graduated in June, 
1899, with first honors and as Salutatorian of his 
class ; studied law for one term at the University 
of Mississippi, then went to Cumberland Univer- 
sity, Lebanon, Tenn., to complete his law course, 
graduating with Bachelor's degree June 6, 1901 ; 
was also class orator. He was elected to the 
House of Representatives of Mississippi November 
5. 190T. In the House of 1908-10. he was a mem- 
ber of committees on Judiciary, Federal Relations, 
Corporations, Mississippi Levees. He was re- 
elected November 7, 1911, served through sessions 
of 1912 and 1914, distinguishing himself as one or 
the ablest and strongest men in the public service 
of Mii^sissippi. His keen, analytical powers and 
broad comprehension of every question under dis- 
cussion render him one of the most successful 
champions and formidable antagonists that has ap- 
peared in public life in many years. His intelec- 
tual equipment, fearlessness, scathing denunciation 
of wrong, and high standards of justice flt him 



r- 




Oscar G. Johnston 



848 



LEGIS1^\TIVE DEPARTMENT 



for any public position witlun Hie gift of the 
people. It is to such men as Oscar Johnston that 
Mississippi looks for a complete revolution in her 
political life. He would fill with distinguished 
ability any office within the gift of the people. 
Mr. Johnston is a Democrat, a Methodist, a 
Mason ; while Senior Warden of his local Ma- 
sonic Lodge, he is also an Odd Fellow, and a 
member of the college fraternity D. K. E. On 
February 21, 190.5. at Pine Bluff, Ark., he was 
married to Martha ^[ottley Anderson, daughter of 
Samuel Mottley and Jessie Finley Anderson. He 
is a member of th following Committees: Judiciary ; 
Mississippi Levees ; Railroads ; Inurance. 




Robert L. Ralston 



ROBERT L. RALSTOX of Coahoma, Coahoma 
County, representative from that County, was 
born at Smyrna, Rutherford County, Tennessee, 
February 12, 1S60. He is the son of Robert Lock 
Ralston, who was also boi'n at Smyrna, and who 
passed his life in Tennessee, at Smyrna, Humboldt, 
and Franklin. Robert Lock Ralston was the eldest 
of six brothers. \Vhen the Civil War broke out 
he was too old for military service, but all of his 
five brothers enlisted in the Cpnfederate Army in 
which they rendered faithful service. He married 
Miss Mary M. Stephens, the mother of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Robert L. Ralston received his 
education in the public schools of Franklin. Ten- 
nessee. His principal teachers were C. R. Berry, 
and Patrick and Andrew Campbell. At an early 
age he began the occupation of farming, and has 
since been a planter. He has always taken an 
active part in community affairs, and has stood 
for the reform r-lement in both the social and civil 
life of the State. His popularity with his con- 
stituents is shown by the fact that for sixteen 
years he held the office of Mayor of Coahoma. 
For the past twenty-five years he has been an 
active advocate of the cause of prohibition, ren- 
dering the movement the most faithful and in- 
telligent service. In 191.5 he was elected to the 
State Legislature, where he has been selected for 
the following committees, upon which he serves 
with much ability ; Mississippi Levees ; Peniten- 
tiary ; House Contingent E.Kpenses : Roads, Ferries 
and Bridges, serving the latter as chairman. Rep- 
resentative Ralston is a Democrat, and was for 
twelve years a member of the Democratice Execu- 
tive Committe of Coahoma County. He has always 
taken great interest in leligious and charitable 
work : has been for twenty-two years Steward of 
th? Methodist Church and is a member of the 
Knight.? of F'ythias. He was married January 8, 



lurfl ■ vfy.). ,!i> ;a . f.- 



t '♦•'I'j jii ,>i 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



849 



1S91, at Lawshill. Marshall County. :Mississippi. to 
Mary Elizabeth Shaw, daughter of Frank M. Shaw 
and his wife. M. E. Shaw of Lawshill. Mi-, and 
•Mrs. Ralston have ihno children : Robert Shaw 
Ralston. Georsre ]"r;ink .tti<i Edith Loui.se. 



COPIAH COUNTY 



JOHX ALEXANDER S.MYLIE of Cry.stnl 
Springs. Mississippi, Representative from Copiah 
County, was boin in Union Count>-, Arkan.sa.<. 
shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War. July 
26, 1861. His father, however. John Donan Siny- 
lie. was a Mississippian. He was the son of 
Matthew and Rachael Smylie of Copiah County, 
where he was born. When a young man he went 
to Arkansas, where he was married to Mai-y Jane 
McCall. He remained in Arkansas until about 
two years after his manir.ge. when he returned 
to Copiah County. Mississippi. His son. John 
Alexander, was then about six montlis old. In 
1862 John D. Smylie enlisted in the Confederate 
Army. He was at luka Mississippi at the time of 
the battle which occurred there, and it is supposea 
that he was killed in that engagement. His widow. 
Mar>' Jane Smylie. died in 1863. leaving their boy 
an orphan. John Alexander Smylie obtained his 
early t-ducation in the public schools of Union 
Church and Zion Hill. Jefferson County, Mississippi. 
He pursued a college coiu-se at the University of 
Mississippi for four years, graduating in 189 7 
with the B. A. degree. In 1903 he completed the 
law course at Millsaps College. Mr. Smylie has 
had a long successful career as a teacher. Before 
entering the University he taught in the public 
schools for ten years. He also taught in the 
Union Church High School, Jefferson County, for 
five years ; in Stanton College. Natchez, one year ; 
in the City schools of Meridian for a year ; and in 
the Hazelhurst schools for a year. He is well 
fitted to represent the educational interests of 
Mississippi, and is a strong advocate of all meas- 
ures that tend to advance the material and intellec- 
tual progress of the State. After completing his 
law course in 190-5. he began the practice of law 
at Hazelhurst, Mississippi, in May of that same 
year. Interested in all public questions that con- 
cerned the State's welfare he was urged to enter 
politics and in 1915 was elected a member of the 
Legislature for the term of 1916-20, where he has 
distinguished himself by his able work upon the 
following committees: Judiciary; Census and Ap- 
portionment: Pensions: Insurance. Mr. Smylie be- 

54— M 



'*'r''*l?W(*w<T5)!gjB 






John A. Smylie 



850 



LEGISL_A.TIVE DEPARTMr-:NT 



long^s to the Presbyterian Churc}i. in which he 
holds the otTice or" Elder. The maiden name of his 
wife was Mamie ^^'arren ; she is ihe daughter of 
Dr. Daniel Caniei'on Warren and his wife. Inez 
Warren, of Union Church. Jefferson County, ilis- 
sissippi. Mr. and Mrs. Smylie have three children: 
Alfred Warren, Dorothy McXair and Robert Tor- 
rey. 






1 



Benjamin King 



BEN'JAMIX KIXG of Hazelhurst. Represen- 
tative from Copiah County, was born December 
30, 1S90, at Beauregard. i!i Copiali County. Eis 
parents were Benjamin and Ada Caroline (Eagan) 
King. Benjamin King. Sr., was born at Galla-:n, 
the old County Seat of Copiah County. HLs 
father's name was also Benjamin King; his mother 
was Evaline (Harris) King. In ISTO he removed 
with his parents to Beauregard. He was a lawyer 
by profession. During tlie War he served as ccn- 
script hunter when he was but sixteen years old 
In 1878 and again in ISSO he v . 
State Senate fr-om the ^ovn i - ' f 
borne He died at Beauregard in 1912. after a 
useful and honorable life. The maternal grand- 
parents of the subject of this sketch were Martin 
Warren Eagan and Laura (Stackhouse) Eagan of 
Cedar Hill Plantation. Crystal Springs, Mississippi. 
The Eagan family came to this country frcm 
County Clare, Ireland. Martin Warren Eagan was 
in 1S32 proprietor of the old Eagle Hotel in Jack- 
son, Mississippi, near the Old Capitol. In 1S31. 
his brother Daniel B. Eagan, was representative 
from Copiah County ; and his uncle. Justice E. G. 
Peyton, was a prominent man in Copiah Couniy 
when Gallatin was the county seat, in 1832 and 
the years following. Representative King received 
his early education in the Beauregard Public 
School. He afterwards attended the Wesson High 
High School, graduating with first honors in 1905 : 
he then spent two years at Ruskin Cave College 
in Tennessee, where he ranked high in his class. 
He was reared on a farm and in connection with 
his interest In farm life was a conscientious stu- 
dent. For three years lie taught sch'^ol in Copiah 
County, and is deeply interested in educational 
matters. He has always favored better rural con- 
ditions, the building of gravel roads and con- 
solidated schools in his section, and has written 
for the press upon those subjects. He studied 
law privately with such diligence that in 1912 he 
was able to pass the bar examination, and began 
to practice at Hazlohurst. Though scarcely more 
than a youth the people sought him for a public 
position and at the early age of twenty-four he 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



851 



was elected to the Lepislarure over ten opponents, 
solely on his own merits. A brilliant and useful 
public career is predicted for him by his friends. 
In the House "he is ably servinp on the followine: 
committees: — Judiciary: Constitution; Corpora- 
tions : Eleemosynary Institutions. Mr. King: is a 
Democrat, and has served on the Copiah County 
Executive Committee. He is a Methodist and a 
member of the ^Voodmen of the "U'crld. He is 
not married. 



GEORGE "WASHINGTON RUSSELL of Hazle- 
hursc. Repie.'^entative from Copiali County, was 
born November 14, 1S79. near Monticello, in Law- 
rence County, Mississippi. His father, Fletcher 
Russell, was born near Birmintrham, Alabama, 
where he lived until about ten years of age, when 
he removed to Louisiana. It was while he was 
living in that state that the Civil War broke out. 
and he enlisted and served two years as a private 
in the Confederate army. After the war he re- 
moved to :Mississippi. He was the son of James 
A. and Sarah A. (Moore) Russell. George Wash- 
ington Russell's mother was Sallie Elizabeth 
Bass, the daughter of James Bass. Represen- 
tative Russell obtained his education in the 
public school of Shady Grove, Copiah County, 
and in the Hazleluirst High School. He has 
passed his entire life on his farm, three miles 
east of Hazlehuist. with the e.xception of two 
years that he spent in Jackson as representative of 
the Farmers' E.lucational and Co-operative Union. 
Mr. Russell was one of the first to join that organ- 
ization, and he was its first local and first counr>- 
Secretary-Treasurer. On March 13. 1906. he was 
selected Secretarj-Treasurer for the State, in 
which office he served for four years with great 
credit to himself and with the most excellent re- 
sults for the Union. Mr. Russell has had con- 
siderable business experience. For several years 
he traveled as coliertor and salesman for a fertil- 
izer house : he was an incorporator, and secretary 
of taie Executive Board, of the Memphis Cotton 
Company of Memphis. Tennessee; was a mem'oer 
of the Executive Board of the Farmers' Union . 
"Warehouse (Cotton) Company, of Jackson. Missis- 
sippi; and was. during 1908. editor and manager 
of the Union Advocate. "VMien the people of his 
County sought to find a representative who should 
unite the qualities of a successful farmer and an 
able business man. they naturally selected Mr. 
Russell as nominee. He was elected to serve from 
1916 to 1920. and has already done good work 
upon several of the important committees. Mr. 




George W. Russell 



852 LEGISLATIVE DEPART^tE^•T 



Russell has long: been a leader in church and com- 
munity work. In 188S he united with the Metho- 
dist Church, and in 1915 Joined the Baptist Cluirch 
at Damascus. Ho has been Secretary' cf the Shady 
Grove Sunday School for fifteen yenrs, and a 
trustee of the school ever since he joined it. He 
is a member of the Kni.shts of Pythias and the 
Woodmen of the World. The maiden name of Mr. 
Russell's wife was Lena Pearl Price : she is the 
daughter of Tom C. and Lula Norman Price, of 
Hazlehurst. Mr. and Mrs. Russell have three 
children: Louise Elizabeth; Price Bass; and 
Wayne Collins. 



COVINGTON' COUNTY 

M. S. CONNER of Seminary, Representative 
r-—— -,,,..,,..., from Coving-ton County and Speaker of the House, 

'■_ is one of the youngest men ever elected by the 
Mississippi Legislature to that important and re- 
. f sponsible position. His election, coming as it did, 

, during his first term and over some of the ablest 

^ ' members, was a high tribute to his ability. Mr. 

Conner has been broadly educated, both literary 
f . and legal education being extensive and thorough, 

f , He obtained his degree in law at the University of 

Lf ii>'*' ""'■■. Mississippi and located at Seminary for the prac- 

I .-». y ^^ tice of his profession. Deeply interested in all pub- 
• ' I lie questions, in 1913, he was elected to the House 

i of Representatives and on the assembling of that 
body in January, 1916. was elected Speaker. As a 
M. S. Conner presiding officer he is fair and painstaking and 

well versed in parliamentary procedure. His rul- 
ings are founded on the best precedents. Mr. 
Conner is a logical, eloquent speaker and is one 
of the promising young lawyers of Mississippi. 
His name is being connected with further posi- 
tions of honor and trust, and it is believed that his 
non-partisan course in public life and courage to 
rise above any selfish political affiliations will keep 
him prominently before the people. In the 1916 
session of the Legislature he favored much con- 
structive legislation. Mr. Conner is a Democrat 
and is unmarried. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

DE SOTO COUNTY 

KALTOX FRAN'KI.IX ^VARREX of Olive 
Rranch, Repreentative from De Soto County, was 
born May 28. 1S94. at his present liome. His 
father is "William Marten Warren, son of Dennis 
Pascel Warren and his wife. Katie (Smith) 
Warren, of High Po'nt, Xorth Carolina. Williain 
Marten Warren was boi'n at Bristol. Bristol 
County. Tennessee ; for a number of years he was 
engaged in the contracting business at Cockvum, 
Missis.sippi. He has always been one of the truest 
advocates of Democracy and high standards of 
righteousness in government. He was too young 
•■o enter the Confederate service during the Civil 
War, but has since borne his part in the up- 
building of his section. Rf^presentaiive Warren's 
grandparents on both sides came from Ireland. On 
his father's side he is descended from Gen. Joseph 
E. Warren of Revolutionary fame. His mother 
was Lydia Amelia Brigance. daughter of Benjamin 
Franklin Brigance and Lucy (Hudson) Brigance 
of Olive Branch. Her people were noted for hav- 
ing been of a mechanical turn of mind. His great- 
grandfather. Melvin Brigance, was an extensive 
planter, and at one time the largest taxpayer In 
De Soto County. Mr. Wai'i'en pursued his early 
education in the public schools of his county, where 
he was greatly encouraged and assisted by Profes- 
sor H. R. Whitten, to whom lie still feels indebted. 
He attended Mississippi Heights Academy (1910- 
1911 "I. and then entered the De Soto County Argi- 
cultural High School, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1913. There he organized the Goozilian 
Literary Society, and served for two terms as its 
President. He was anniversarian for the society 
and orator and historian for his class. After leav- 
ing College he engaged in the business of contract- 
ing. He is fond of books and is an extensive 
reader and student, especially of. history and law. 
The people of his section are to be congratulated 
upon the selection of Dalton Franklin "Warren as 
the Representative of their Coimty, and a bright 
career of service to his State is freely predicted. 
In 1915 he was elected to the State Legislature, 
and has the distinction of being one of the youngest 
and most gifted young men in that body. He has 
done promising work on the committees of Ways 
and Means : Corporatluns : Mississippi Levees ; Pub- 
lic Printing. Mr. "Warren is a staunch Democrat 
and a member of the Methodist Church ; has served 
as president of the Epworth League and Secretary 
of Sardis District Epworth Leagxie. He has not 
yet married. 



;"T:?a 



Dalton F. Warren 



I 



854 LEGISLATIVE DEFART^rE^•T 

fiin..HiPiw» i...i ■^°"^' ^^^^ LAUDERDALE of Bright, Repre- 

^ —»»-■■ "■■'•i^-'.--^ sentative from Do Soto County, was born at Lewis- 
burg in tills State. September 20. 1872 His parents 
:uv Eli Benton Lauderdale and Leonora (Cobb) 
Lauderdale. The fatlier. E. B. Lauderdale, son of 
J')lin G. Laudenlale and Penelope (Xlchols) 
Lauderdale, of Atlien.-:. Alab.ima. was born at 
Athens. Limestone County, in tliat State, but at 
tlie age of three came willi his parents to De Soto 
County. Mississippi, where he has since lived. He 
has served his community acceptably a.s magistrate 
and as member of the Board of Supervisors. For 
three years he rendered faithful service in the 
Army of the Confederacy. His father was .l^hn 
John C. Lauderdale ^^ Lauderdale, who was a native of the Pendleton 

District of South Carolina. He was born in 1798. 
removed with his parents to Middle Tennessee, and 
afterwards went to Limestone County, Alabama, 
where he married Miss Kichols. The coupie 
removed to De Soto County, Mississippi, where 
they reared a large family, some of whom still 
reside at that place. The maternal g-randfather 
of the subject of this sketch, Pharaoh Cobb, was 
boin at Bean's Station. Granger County, Tennessee, 
in 1798, and was the son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Smith) Cobb. Repre-^entative Lauderdale was 
educated in the scliools of his native county, where 
he took the full Higrh School course, and made sucn 
grood use of his time that he fitted himself for 
teaching. He is a citizen of wide influence in his 
county. For eleven >f.irs he was a prominent 
teacher in De Soto County, and for ten .vears 
ser\-ed as a member of the Board of Examine-.; of 
teachers. His occupation at present is fai-min^. 
but he has continued his interest in the .'d irationai 
progress of the Stfite. In 191.5 he entered public 
life at the request of the people and secured 
election to the House of Representatives of his 
State, wheie he has serv<-d ably and zealously upon 
the following committees : :\Iississippi Levees; Roads, 
Ferries and Bridges ; Banks and Banking. Mr. 
Lauderdale is a Democrat, and for tweatv year.-? 
has belonged to the .\r. E. Church. South : has 
served as stewatil and district steward LecTuber 
23, 1907. he was married at Myrtle. Mississippi, 
to Roberta Xichols. daugter of John James Xichols 
and Elizabeth (Dunn) Xichols of Maple Springs, 
Lafayette Count.\-. Mis.-issippi. Her paternal 
grandparents came fi'oui Alabama, an! her 
maternal grandparents from South Carolina. Mr. 
and Mrs. I.,auderdale have two children : John 
Cobb, Jr ;■ and Eli X^ichols. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



S55 



FOREST COUNTY 



ELISHA ALEXA.\'I>ER AXDERSOX of Harties- 
bvnp, Representativo from Foi-est County, was born 
in the County of Perry, Mississippi. October 14. 
1868. His father. Daniel Austin Anderson, who 
served during the Civil War as a Confederate sol- 
dier in Steed's Battalion, was also a native of tha^ 
County. He was the son of John Anderson, who 
fornierly lived in X'oi thwestorn Georgia. The fan-iil>- 
came originally from Entjland. The great-grrand- 
fatlier of Elisha Alexandet- Anderson. Daniel Austin 
Anderson, of Perry County, was a Major under 
General Amlrew .Jackson in the War of 1812. Mj. 
Anderson's mother. Henrietta Rebecca (Stafford) 
Anderson, was the daughter of Edward Barry 
Stafford and his wife, Susan (Sanford) Stafford. 
Her father was also a soldier in the War of 1S12 : 
and it is a remarkable coincidence that in the 
Battle of Xew Orleans both the paternal and 
maternal granilfathers of Elisha Alexander Ander- 
son took part. His grandfather Stafford came to 
the southern part of Mississippi to live about the 
year 1816. When a boy. Mr. Anderson attended 
the public schools of Perry County. With the in- 
tention of fitting himself for the legal profession, 
he entered the law offiee of H. B Leverett, Esq., 
of Hattiesburg. as clerk. He then took a course 
in the Law Department of Millsaps College, which 
he completed in 1892. with the degree of LL.B. 
After graduation he began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Hattiesbui-g. and has continued there 
ever since. He is one of the leading lawyers in 
that section. Mr. Anderson has had some military 
experience, having been a private in Company C 
of the 2nd Regiment of the X'ational Guard, in 
which he enlisted at the time of the Spanish- 
American War. He was elected to the Legisla- 
ture in 1912. .served from 1912 to 1916. and was 
re-elected in 191.3. As a representative he has 
always favored progressive legislation. He is the 
author of the following important labor legisltr- 
tion passed at the session of 1912-14: The ten- 
hour law for men and women ■workers, the twice- 
a-month pay day law. our child labor Law. and 
the law prohibiting the discount of pay checks 
for labor. He is a staunch friend of the working 
classes, and is equipped for any public service to 
which he may be called by the people of his State. 
He has ser\ed on the following committees , 
Judiciary: (r'laims: Penitentiary: Fees and Salar- 
ies: Municipalities. Mr. Anderson is a Democrat, 
a Baptist, and n member of the Masons and Wood- 
men <-'f the World. .Mrs. And' rson was, befoi-e 
her marriage. Miss Julia Smith. She is the daugh- 



Kj^uAJL. 




Elisha A. Anderson 



856 



LEGISLaVTIVE detartment 



ter of George and Katherine (Bell) Smith, of 
Pearl River County. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have 
four childri'n: George Dunon ; Cephas; Pannuir>- , 
and Hou.ston. 



FRAXKLIN' COUNTY 




CHARLES ALVIE EVERETT of Monroe, Flepre- 
feentative from Franklin County, was born July 8, 
1883, at Tnngii)ahoa, Amite County, Mi.«sis.«ippi. 
His father, William. Albert Everett, was bom at 
the same place, but later lived at Little Springs, 
Franklin County. Mi.ssi.<.<ippi. The paternal ances- 
tors of the Everetts were Ii-ish. The great- 
grandparents of Chaile.*; Alvie Everett came from 
lielantl to South Carolina. Their son. Thomas 
Everett, married Ann Felder. and made his home 
at Tangipahoa. ;Mississippi. During the AVar of 
1812 he served as a private soldier, and was under 
the command of General Andrew .Jackson at the 
Battle of Xew Orleans. The mother of the subject 
of our sketch was. prior to her marriage. Louretta 
Jane McGehee. She was the daughter of James 
Madison McGehee and his wife. Rebecca (Jcnes) 
McGehee of Little Springs, Mississippi. Doctor 
Everett pursued his early eilucation in the public 
schools of Little Springs, took his college course 
at Clinton. Mississippi, and secured his professional 
education at the L'niversity of Louisville. Kentucky„ 
where he was graduated June 30, 1910. with the 
degree of M. D. He enteied upon his profession 
as allopathic physician October 18, 1907, at Little 
Springs, and later bu'lt up an extensive practice 
in Monroe. From 1913 to 191.5 he served as alder- 
man. His practice as pliysician gave him a wide 
circle of influence and he was urged by the people 
to enter the political field. In 191.5 he was elected 
to serve in the House of Representatives from 1916 
to 1920. He takes a keen interest in public affairs, 
and has demonstrated his ability by his service 
on the following committees: Public Health and 
Quarantine : Registrations and Elections ; Elee- 
mosynar\ Institutions : Insurance. Dr. Everett is 
a Democrat, a Baptist, a >'ason (Lodge Xo. 11, 
Meadville, ^Mississippi) , and a Woodman of the 
World, in which his official position is Camp 
Physician. September 24. 1905. he was married to 
Eunice J. Jones, at Little Springs. Mississippi, 
where her parents, Charles P. Jones and Mary Ann 
(Wroten) Jones, resiiled. Her father .served 
throughout the Civil War as a gallant Confederate 
soldier; her grandfather was a Baptist minister. 
Dr. and Mrs. Everett have two children: Lexlne 
and Lillian. 



i 



LEGISLATIVE DETAHTAIEXT 857 



'^"^ 



L. _^JI 1 

i 



GEORGE COrXTY 

LUTHER WHIT MAPLES, who resides at 
Clarence, and represents George County in th*? 

Lower House, was born at Clarence on the Hth i 

day of Xovember. 1S91. His parents are John ; 

Maples and Josephine (Bond) Maples. His ' ^ 

father, John Maples. i.-= a native of Alabama, and 
was born at Pierce Level in Mobile County of 
that State. His parents are Seme and Emmie 
Maples of Fierce Level. The various branches of 
the family came to Alabama from the older 
Southern States and later from that State to Mis- 
sissippi, where they have taken part in its best 
progress. Josephine (Bond) ilaples, mother of 

the subject of our sketch, is tlie daugther of Buck Luther \V. Maples 

Bond of Dantzler, :Mis£!Ssippi. After completing 
his elementary schooling. Luther Whit Maples en- 
tered the Daisy-Vestry High Scliool. where he 
finished. After leavins: high school. Mr. Maples 
spent three years at Mississippi College, at 
Clinton, which advantages gave him a good equip- 
ment for his future career. Like most country 
boys, he early learned the responsibilities of farm 
life and assisted his father in his work. Missis- 
sippi being largely an agricultural state, the occu- 
pation of farming is one that appeals to her youth 
and no state in the Union offers better advantages 
to young men in this particular calling. When Mr. 
Maples arrived at Manhood he decided his best 
opportunities awaited him. in that business, and 
therefore made farming his life work He also 
takes interest in the public affairs of the State 
and In 191.5 he was elected to serve in the State 
Legislature from 1916 to 1920. Although one of 
the youngest members of the House he has at- 
tacked the business of legislation in a thoughtful 
manner that promises good things for his future. 
He is a member of the followirtg committees: 
Ways and Means ; Education ; County Affairs , 
Propositions and Grievances; Fisheries; Commerce 
and Shipping. Mr. Maples i.s a Democrat and a 
member of the Baptist Church. He has not as yet 
married. Like so many of the younger membei's 
of the Legislature, Repiest-ntative Alaples has 
joined America's armies in tiie struggle against the 
tyrannical oppression of Germany. w;th the same 
devotion that he served his State in times of peace 
he now stakes his young life for Freedom and 
Humanity. 



S58 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMKXT 



GREENE COUXTT 



.A^ 



,ii£!?*<. 




Ik.^ 



William I. McLain 



WILLIAM I. MoLAlX of Richton. Representa- 
tive from Green County, was born July 22, 1S90, 
in tlie country near Richton. He is the son of 
Jolin A. McLi\!n anil Margaret Emily (Jones) 
Mel^ain. The fatlier, John A. McLain, is the son 
of John McLain and Eliza McLain, of Richton i R. 
1). Mississippi, Avhere lie was boi-n. He took up 
the occupation of farming: and has pursued it suc- 
cessfully. The grandfather. John McLain, serv'ed 
for a short time, as a soldier in the Confederate 
Army during the Civil War ; and his father, Alex- 
ander McLain, great-grandfather of the subject 
of our sketch, held the office of Chancery Judge 
and was one of the prominent men of his locality. 
The family of William I. McLain's mother lived 
at Avera, Mississippi. Her father and mother 
were Enoch S. and Susan Jones. Mr. McLain 
obtained his early education at the E\iblio. School 
of Indian Hill, where his instructors carefully 
prepared him for college. He secured his high 
school ti-aining at the Mississippi Heights Aca- 
demy at Blue ilountain at which institution he 
was graduated with honors. He then entered 
upon a professional course to fit himself for teach- 
ing, in 1912, at Brookhaven, Mississippi. In 1914 
he began his work in that profession, and has 
been teaching successfully ever since. He is also 
much interested in farming, and is an active mem- 
ber of the Farmer's Educational Co-operative 
Union of America, in which he hol<ls the respon- 
sible office of Secretary and Treasurer. His in- 
terc.-^t in public affairs and especially in the edu- 
cational progress of the State prompted him to 
enter politics where he could influence legislation 
upon all needful reforms and progressive mea- 
sures touching the State's welfare. In 1915 he 
received tlie nomination to the State Legislature. 
and was elected to that body, where he has done 
excellent work on the following committees, al- 
though he is one of the youngest members of the 
House: Appropriations: Claims: Census and Ap- 
portionment: Eleemosynary Institutions. Mr. Mc- 
Lain is a Democrat, and a member of the Bap- 
tist Church. He takes a great deal of interest 
in religious work, and has been Sunday School 
Superintendent and President of the B. Y. P. L'. 
On August 26, 191-5, at Algoma. Mississippi, he 
was married to Miss Gertie Tate, daughter Oi 
James and Zadie Tate of that plact-. 



- ft'"' . • ' 



J 



LEGISLATIVE LEPARTMEXT g59 

GREXADA COUNTY 

WILLLVM AYL.ALER WLXTER of Grenada. v.,«,»^.— »,« 

Represtntative frotu <;rona(la County, was born in ' i 

that County. >tar(h :;2. 1872. His father. "William I 

Brown Winter, was horn IS ST. in the County of | 

Yalobuslia. Mississippi, and p issed his life as a J 

lesident of that County and of Grenada County. ■ 

At the earb age of sixteen lie enlisted as a Con- 
federate soldier in Capt. AVilliani Forest's Corn- i 
pany of P'orest's cavalry, and notwith-standing hi- 
youth, bore an active part in all the engagements of 
his company until the close of the War. He re- 
ceived his parole Api-il 1S6 5. in the State or 
Alabama, at Gainesville. He is tlie son of William 
H. and Elvira (Brown) Winter, who lived in Yalo- 
busha County, and in the City of Grenada. The "William A. Wintei 
Winter family is of English origin. William Aylmer 
Winter's first American ancestor of that name 
settled in Elfton Hills, Maryland. Kittle Wash- 
ington, his greatgrandmother. was a niece of Col. 
Wm. Washington, the victor of the Battle of 
Cowpens. The mother of Representative Winter. 
Amelia (Fisher) Winter, was the daughter of 
Ephraim S. Fisher and Martha (.Townes) Fisher, 
who lived at Coffeeville, then at Panola, and 
later at Grenada Mississippi. Judge P'isher was 
by profession a lawyer, and was, from 1852 to 
1836, a judge of the Mississippi High Court of 
Errors and Appeals. The Townes family is also 
of English descent. Capt. Isaac Brown, commander 
of the Confederate Ram. Arkansas, was ilr. Win- 
ter's great-uncle. William Aj'lmer Winter ob- 
tained his early education in the pi-ivate and 
publi-c schools of Grenada and Tallahatchie 
Counties. His college education was secured at 
the luka Normal Institute of Mississippi, where, 
in 1S91, he was graduated wiih the A. B. degree, 
Recognizing the fact that the profession of farm- 
ing hold.s great opportunities for the man of edu- 
cation. Mr. Winter decided to devote himself to 
that work. He is one of the most respected and 
trusted men of his community and in casting a- 
bout for a representative of their county in the 
.State Legislature the people of his section se- 
lected him to represent them. In November, 1913. 
he was elected to this office and has represented 
his constituents faithfully and ably, and has 
served upon the following committees: Agriculture; 
Public Printing; Eleemosynary Institutions; Mil- 
itary Affairs. Mr. Winter is a Democrat, a 
Pre.=ibyterian. a Ma.ster Ma.son. and a Woodman of 
the World. He i.s unmarried. 



860 



LEGISI^A.TIVE DEPARTMEXT 




Robert I>. Gen in 




t-i nest E. O'Xeal 



IIAXCOCK COUXTY 

ROBERT LAWREXCE GEXIX of Bay St 
Louis. Mississippi, Representative from Hancock 
County, was born at Xew Orleans. Jiilv l' isS6 
His father, John Genin, was a French 'artist" 
born in Paris. His mother. Delphine (Murr) 
Genin. daughter of Augrust and Delphine (<;uth) 
Murr, was also of French descent. August Murr 
u-as a soldier in the Confederate Army and was 
killed in battle. Mr. Genin obtained his earlv 
education in the public schools, first at XeAv 
Orleans, and later at Bay St_ Louis. He was 
graduated from the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, with the degree of LL. B.. 
June 2. 1909, and entered upon the practice of 
his profession at Bay St. Louis in July of that same 
year. From 1905 to 190D he was Manager of the 
Cumberland Telegraph and Telephone Company, 
at Bay St. Louis. And from March, 1910 to 
January, 1912. he served his City ably in ' the 
office of councilman. He was elected to the 
State Legislature for the term of 1912-1916, and 
did excellent work as a member of the followin,^ 
committees: Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping, 
Military Affairs, Fees and Salaries, Judiciary! 
Librar>- and Claims. Mr. Genin is one of the 
ablest and most popular members of the Legisla- 
ture. The first bill for the protection of the 
coast line of Mississippi was int!'oduced by him 
and he also introduced the bill to connect the 
Mississippi coast with Xew Orleans by dredg- 
ing Pearl River. So acceptable has been his 
public services that he was elected to succeed 
himself for the following term, without oppo- 
sition, and has been placed " upon the follow- 
ing important com.mittees: Judiciary; Constitu- 
tion ; Census and Apportionment ; Eleemosynary 
Institutions: Militaiy Affairs; Fisheries: Com- 
merce and Shippinsr. Mr. Genin is a member of 
the Roman Catholic Church, the Woodmen of the 
"World, and the Knights of the Maccab.es. He Is 
unm.arried. 



HARRISON' COUXTY 

ERXEST ELIJAH Q-XEAL of Saucier, Repre- 
sentative from Harrison County, was born at 
that place Xovember 28. 1880, and is the son of 
Eli ^Vashington OXeal. who was born at Black 
Creek in that same Ccunty. He was a Confed- 
erate soldier and a man of sterling character and 
upright life. His pirent.-s were William and Su- 
sana O'X'eal. The ancestors of the O'X'eals were 



T'i 



leCtISlattve department 861 



sturdy Scotch-Irish emifrrants who settled first 
in Virginia, and thence came to Mississippi. Mary 
(Rouse) O'Xeal. motlier of Ernest Elijah O'Xeal, 
was the daughter of William Rouse and his wife. 
Martha (Flurry) Rouse, who lived at Airey, 
Mississippi. Representative O'Xeal obtained his 
early education in the public school at Poplar 
Head. Missis.^ippi. .Vfter completing his elemen- 
tary schooling he decided to take a business 
course, and entered the Massey Business College 
at Birmingham, Alabama, where he studied Book- 
keeping and Commercial Law. Later he studied* 
Shorthand and Typewriting at McLendon Busi- 
ness College. Hattie.*burg. Mississippi. He then 
entered upon a business career as turpentine oper- 
ator. At present he is successfully engaged in 
farming and in the saw mill business. For two 
years (190S-1010) :Mr. O'Xeal was Postmaster of 
"Whortham, and for four years (1911-191.5) Mayor 
of the town of Saucier. The two terms that he 
served as Mayor were marked by- great munici- 
pal progress. He instituted sanitary laws, laws 
for the building of streets and improvement of 
roads, and laws for the benefit of education. 
Moreover, he saw that these laws, as well as the 
prohibition and other laws, were strictlj' enforced. 
His experience in public office fitted him for a 
broader field in the affairs of state and this lead 
to his candidacy as a Repicsentative of his county 
for the State Legislature. In 191-5 he was elected 
a member of that body where he has been placed 
on the following committees : Liquor Traffic, Cen- 
sus and Apportionrrent : Immigration and Labor : 
Fisheries. Commerce and Shipping, and Enrolled 
Bills. Mr. O'X'eal is a member of the Methodist 
Church, in which he is Steward both of his home 
church and of the district, and a very active 
worker in the Sunday School. being Presi- 
dent of the Harri.son County International Sun- 
day School Association : he is also a member 
of the Mississippi Conference, the Sunday School 
Board and President of the Palmer Creek Camp 
Ground, On March 10, 1907. he was married to 
Miss Inez Leila Margaret Ram.^ay. daughter of 
James Polk Ramsay and Margaret (Read) Ram- 
say, of Lorraine, Mississippi. Mrs. O'Xeal's father 
enlisted in the Civil War as a Confederate soldier. 
at the early age of sixteen, and ser\-ed with great 
gallantry and devotion until it.=i close. His family 
were all loyal Mississippians : his wife was of 
English descent. Mr. and Mrs. O'Xeal have five 
children: Margaret Mirl, Leola Ruth, Gladys 
Mary. Ernest Elijah, Jr., and Inez Bertha. 




■;) 
1 



862 LEGISLATIVE nF:PARTMr:XT 

HINDS COUNTY 

VERELL F-ENNINGTON FEROrSON, who re- 
sides at Learned ami represents Hinds County, 
i. was born July 21st. 1859, at Vaiden, Carroll 

.' County, Mississippi. His father, Daniel Echols 

,' -^-^ ^ Ferguson, was also a Mississippian. and was bor.-. 

{ *^ at Union Church, in Copiah County. His parents 

I ' ' were William and Martha (McDonald) Ferguson, 

( ^ with wliom he removed to Horse Cri>ek, near Vai- 

r ; •• den. Mississippi, where he , continued to live. 

Daniel E. Ferguson was with the Army of the 
Confederacy during the Civil War and rendered 
valuable service, having charge of forage wagons. 
As the names indicate. Mr. Ferguson's ancestors 
Verell P. Ferguson ^^^''^ Scotch. They came from Scotland in the 

18th century, settling flr.n in North (Carolina and 
removing thence to Mississippi in 180 4, where they 
were among the earliest and best settlers of the 
State. His mother was Caroline (Denman) Fer- 
guson, daughter of Prestage and Ainold Denman. 
who lived near Vaiden. Mississippi, ilr. Fer- 
guson was educated in the schools of his native 
State, where he was prepared for a successful 
career in life. Though entering upon manhood 
before the country had been fully restored from 
the ravages of the Civil War. he has nevertheless 
made a success of life and is one of the leading 
men of his County. His occupation is farming 
and planting and he has for some time been 
Secretary' of the Farmei-'s Union of his County. 
He has always be<^n interested in public questions. 
Having become very popular with the people of 
his community, he was urged to enter politics, 
and was elected to the State Legislature in 1911 and 
reelected in 191.5. He labors for the State's best 
welfare and the interest of his constituents in con- 
nection with his work on the following Committees: 
Railroads : Penitentiary : Roads. Ferries and Bridges. 
He is a member of the Democratic party, and of 
the Baptist Church, and is a prominent member of 
several fraternal organizations. Masons, Knights 
of Honor and Woodmen of the World. He has 
served as Dictator of the Knights of Honor and 
consul commander of the AVoodmen of the "U'orld. 
In March, 1R77. Mr. Ferguson was married to 
Ella Roberts, daughter of George W. Roberts and 
Martha (RoUand) Robert.? of Ebenezer. Yazoo 
County. Mississippi. Their children are Daniel ; 
GeorsiP R. : Abbie Ineza ; Mossye ; Eleitha : and 
Verell P. Jr. 



. isH ■<'rlil 
vim;./' <<^1 T> 



<>'>••" (UiaiMT.'T •'^ llen«Y 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



86' 



EDWARD HA.ArMOXD OREEX of Jackson, 
Representative from the County of Hinds, was 
born in that County, at Green's Crossing:, on tho 
29rh day of January, 1S91, and is therefore one 
of tlie youngest of our State Legislators. He is 
the son of Edward Hammond Green. Sr.. and 
.\nnie (Ball) Green. His father is the son of 
Thoma.s Keenan Green, of Madison County, Missis- 
sippi. He was born in that County, but later 
removed to Jackson. Dur;ns the Civil "War he 
saw conscicuous service as a member of Ratliff's 
Light Artillery of Mississippi. He too was once 
a membei of tlie Mississippi Legislature, having 
served in that body from 1896 to 1900. His reg- 
ular occupation was that of farming. Edwaril 
Hammond Green, Jr., has an excellent education. 
He obtained his elementary scliooling in the public 
schools of Hinds County, near Jackson, and also 
in the public schools of that City. He then en- 
tered ;Millsaps College, beginning in the prepara- 
tory department He ■was graduated from that 
institution in 1912 with the degree of A B. Dur- 
ing the foU'nving year he attended law school at 
Millsaps. He then decided to complete his pre- 
paration for tlie practice of law by becoming a 
clei'k in the ofRce of the Attorney General of 
the State, and woi-ked in that ofRce from 191.'? 
to 1914. He succeeded in being admitted to the 
bar the following year, and began the practice of 
his profession at Jackson on the first day of 
January. 1915. That same, year he entered poli- 
tics by becoming a candidate for the State Legis- 
lature, to which he was elected to serve from 
1916 to 1920. He has already amply demon- 
strated liis fitnes.s for the office, and has given 
assurance of great usefulness in the work on 
the following committees: Judiciary: Census and 
Apportionment: Immigration and Labor: Rail- 
roads, being Chairman of the latter. Mr. Green 
is a Democrat, a Baptist, anil a member of the 
Masons, the Odd Fellows and the "V\'oodmen of 
the World. Representative Green is now in the 
servfce of the United States, being one of the most 
gallant young officers of Battery B. 2nd Mississippi 
Regiment. 



.N 



:-, ^■,*^^a,iJXAm-i 



Ed\vai-d H. Green 



rr'»'>*iJ' ->1 btf-fWA 



.jLijint, 



J 

John Sivley Rhodes 



864 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 

„.- ..-^ -^ JOHN- PIVEEY RHODES of Jackson, Repre- 

' tentative from Hinds County, was born in tliat 

County, at Oakley,, December 9, 1888. His father 
j John Henry Rhodes, was a prominent physician of 
^ "^ ; this State. He was born at Brandon, Rankin 

County, Mississippi'. His parents were Samuel 
1 Decatur Rhodes and Jane Ormand Rhodes of 
. j Brandon and Pelahatchie. Mississippi. Dr. Rhodes 

' \ hiter lived at Learned and at Jackson. He prac- 

I \ i tisfed as a pfixsician and surgeon in Jackson from 

i ''■ i 1894 to 1905. and was President of a Sanato- 

rium in that City. He was at one time a health 
S nt ii nv ., ; -, ..-.- ,^^ officer of tlie State of Mississippi, a member of the 

State Board of Health, and President of the 
Mississippi Corn and Cotton Carnival. His father 
was a native of Xorth Carolina, and his mother a 
native of South Carolina. The maiden name of 
John Sivley Rhodes' mother was Ella Sivley, 
daughter of William Rufus Siveley and Lelia 
Josephine (Stokes) Sivley, of Oakley and Jackson. 
Mississippi. Mr. Sivley was a Virginian by birth, 
and his wife was a native of Alabama. Mr. 
Rhodes is one of our most thoroughly educated 
young legislators. He was graduated from the 
public Schools of Jackson in 1904, attended Mill- 
saps CoUeg.' during the year 190 4-0. t, and the 
University of Mississippi from 190.5 to 1909. In 
1909 he was graduated from that institution with 
the degree of B. A. He was one of the most 
popular members of his class and took part in 
many college activities. He was President of his 
class Presidf>nt of the Hermaean Literary Society, 
Senior debater, mana'^er of the glee club and 
tennis club, and commencement orator of the 
Law Department, from which he .secured his 
LL. B. degree in 1910. He began the practice of 
Tiis profession at Oxford, Mississippi. July 1. 1910. 
as a member of the firm of James Stone & Son. 
July 15, 1913, he removed to Jackson, where he 
has enjoyed a constantly increasing practice. He 
was elected to serve in the State Legislature from 
1916 to 1920. where he has already demonstrated 
unusual ability in his work on the following 
committees : Judiciary ; Ways and Means ; Elee- 
mosynary Institution.^ ; Municipalities ; Military 
Affairs, of whiclt he is chairman. Mr. Rhodes 
belongs to the Democratic Party, and is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church. On June 2, 1917, he 
was married to Virginia Lee McCray of Flora, Miss. 
Mrs. Rhodes is the daughter of William J. and Floy 
McCray. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



865 



HOLMES COUNTY 



THOMAS GILLESPIE STEPHENSON of Lex- 
ington, Representative from Holmes County, wits 
born January 1. 1S60, at Bridg-eville, Pickens 
County, Alabama : is the son of Mills Washington 
Stephenson and wife, Sallie Gillespie Stephenson. 
His father was a gallant and faithful Confederate 
soldier and died at Lakeland. Florida, in 1884. Mr. 
Stephenson is a self-made man : received hi.? 
primary education in the country schools of Ala- 
bama ; is a farmer : member of the Town Coun- 
cil of Lakeland, Florida; has served two term? 
as member of the Board of Supervisors of Holme.^ 
County ; President of the Holmes Coimty Farmer.?' 
Union, resigning to serve in the Legislature ; was 
elected to the Legislature November 7, 1911. and 
reelected in 1915 ; is a Democrat and was reared 
a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church : 
is a Mason and a member of the Farmers' Union. 
In December 18S8, near Lexington, Mississippi. 
Mr. Stephenson was married to Sallie Pettus. 
daughter of John T. Pettus and wife Amanda 
Pettus. Mrs. Stephenson's father was a steadfast 
Confederate soldier and is a nephew of Governor 
John J. Pettus. of Mississippi. Mr. and !Mrs. 
Stephenson have four children: Otis Leroy, Georgia 
Bell. Sallie ^lay and Mahlon. In the Legislature 
of 1912-16. Representative Stephenson ser\'ed his 
people with such signal ability that he was re- 
elected for the 1916-20 term. As a lawmaker. 
Mr. Stephenson is prudent, progressive and zealous 
In promoting the best interests of the State. As 
a member of the important committee on Appro- 
priations, he has the entire confidence of the House 
and no institution of the State is neglected or 
slighted by him but each treated with the fairness 
and justice that enables them to carry on such work 
as redounds to the honor and welfare of the State 
as a whole. He is a member of the following 
Committees: Appropriations; Mississippi Levees: 
County Affairs, serving as its Chairman ; Pensions. 



LELAND NOEL WHITE of Lexington. Missis- 
sippi, Representative from Holmes County, was 
born June 3. 1882. at Kosciusko, Mi.ssissippi. His 
father. Willi.am Benson TVTiite. who is still living 
and resides at Lexington, is the son of Stokeley 
White and Jane (Benson) "Uliite. fonnerly of 
Millersburg. Rutherford County, Tennessee. When 
a boy. "William B. White came with his parents 
to live in Attalia County. ;Mississippi. He served 
throughout the Civil War in the Confederate 
Army. Leland Noel \\'hite is the great-great- 
55— M 




Thomas G. Stephenson 



[ 




\ --J'. . 


■, 




1 

j 

A 



Lelani N. White 



866 LEGISLATIVE DEr.VRTMEXT 



grandson of Stephen "White, a North Carolinian 
hero of the Revolution. After the "U"ar he niigrateil 
to Kentucky .Tniong- the pioneers who conquerorl 
that dangerous region : from there he removed 
with his wife. Elizabeth (Searcy^ AVhite. to Ten- 
nessee, in 180 4. and took part in the formation of 
that State. Elizabeth Barton (Xoel) AVhite, the 
mother of the subject of our sketch, was the 
daughter of Leland Noel and IMargaret Dulaney 
(Sanders) Noel, of Franklin. Holmes County. Mis- 
sissippi. Her first American ancestor. Edmond 
Noel came to this country from England in 1680. 
settled on tlie shores of the Rappahannock in A'lr- 
ginia. and founded a family that became promi- 
nent in the his:or\' of that Colony. Hi.s six grand- 
sons served in the colonial army during the Revo- 
lution. The eldest. EMmond Favor Noel, was a 
member of the Virginia Legislature, and was the 
author of several valuable treatises on finance and 
economics. It was he who bought a large 
tract of land in Holmes County, Mississippi in 
18.35. sending his two sons. Leland and Edmond, to 
take charge of it. !^rr. White's gieat-grandfather 
Sanders. Dr. B. W. Sanders, served in the Missis- 
sippi Legislature, as did also T. "W. Dulaney. In 
183(5. The Du!aneys were originally from North 
Carolina where they settled in early times. Mr. 
"White attended quite a number of educational 
institutions. He obtained his early education In 
the schools of Kosciusko ; then he attended the 
Lexington Normal College, and also the A. & M. 
College at Starkville, Mississippi. He completed 
hi.'? educaHon at the State University at Oxford. 
He is a farmer, and takes great interest in every- 
thing that pertains to that business. He has also 
had considerable military experience, having ser- 
ved as Regimental Commissary Sergeant in the 
First Regiment of the Mississippi National Guard. 
1901 : R. M. Levy. Colonel. Captain and Quarter- 
master. 190$: a member of the staff of Col. Sam 
Montgomery, inos : and Major nnd A. D. C. on 
the staff of his uncle. Governor E. F. Noel. Before 
accepting the nomination for the Legislatur.' in 
191.T. he had never sought any ofTlce. But hia 
work on the following committees shows that he 
has the highest conceptions of his duty as a legis- 
la'tor : Judiciary : Census and Apportionment : P\jb- 
lie Printing; Military Affairs. He Is a Democrat, 
and has served his party as a member of the 
Congressional. Chancery and Circuit Executive 
Committees. He belongs to the BaptTst Church 
and to Sierma Alpha Epsllon Fraternity; Is un- 
married. Repr'-sentatlve "White has entered the 
service of the United Stat°s and Is a rall.nrt young 
officer In the 2nd Missls.slppI Refrlment. 



LEGISLu^TIVB DEPART:NrENT 



867 



HEXRY HERBERT JOIIXSON of Lexington, 
who represents Holmes Coiint>-. vras born in that 
County, at Aoona. on November fifth, 1SS6. His 
father, Henrj" Vohiey Johnson, was boin at Greens- 
boro. Choctaw County, Mississippi, but at the a?e 
of eleven removed to Holmes County, where he 
has resided ever since. He was the son of Andrew 
H. and Kittie (Hampton) Johnson, who removed 
from Choctaw County to Emory, Holmes County. 
The maiden name of Henry Herbert Johnson's 
mother was Ada L. Herbert. Her parents were 
John and Susan Herbert, who lived at Acona. 
Holmes County, Mississippi. Mr. Johnson first 
attended school at Acona, where his teacher was 
John Belford. When he was thirteen years of age, 
his parents removed to Durant, where he was 
taught by Prof. "W. H. Smith. He obtained his 
fui-ther education at the A. & M. College, where 
in 1906, he was ^aduated with the degree of B. S. 
At the time of his graduation he was 2nd Sergeant 
of Company A, a member of the Philotechnic 
Literary Soci-ety and one of the Senior speakers. 
To prepare himself for the practice of his chosen 
profession, law. he entered the Law Department 
of the University of Mississippi, where he studied 
for two years, completing his course in May. 1911. 
While a student there he became a prominent 
member of the Blackstone Club. In June follow- 
ing he began the practice of law at Lexington, 
as a member of th"& firm of Elmore & Ruff, and 
soon became very successful. Fitted in every way 
to enact legislation that would redound to the 
State's honor and welfare, he was Induced to be- 
come a candidate for the Legislatu-e and was 
elected in 191.o. He has ser\'ed on the following 
committees, with the marked ability that one would 
expect from a man of his excellent preparation: 
Judiciary : Public Lands : Local and Private Legis- 
lation : Mississippi Levees. Mr. Johnson Is a 
Democrat, and a member of the Methodi.'t Church 
of Lexington. He Is Secretary of the Men's Sun- 
day School Class of that Church, and Is a mem- 
ber of the ilasonlc Lodge, the S. A. E. Fraternity, 
and the Knights of P^'thias. He was married at 
Lexington. Mississippi. January 16. 1912. to Miss 
Mittle McBee, the daughter of John Harbour Mc- 
Bee and Alice (Cunliffe) McBee. of Lexington. 
Mrs. Johnson is a prominent member of the Xational 
Society of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution ; she belongs to the Benjamin Humphreys 
Chapter, to which she w.is admitted by virtue of 
her descent from Captain "Vaidra McBee ana 
James Anthony, both soldiers of the Revolution. 
Mr. and Mrs. .Johnson have one child, a daughter, 
Alice Dalton. 



Henry H. Johnson 



868 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



ISSOQUENA COUNTY 



Robert E. Foster 



ROBERT ELISHA FOSTER of Shiloh. Isso- 
quena County, Miss., was bom November 26, 1831, 
at Linden. Copiah County, :Miss., the son of Milton 
Hunter Foster, of Copiah County, who died in 1905. 
in his 82nd year. Mr. Foster received his early ed- 
ucation at Summerville Institute under Thomas S. 
Gathright. and has sei-ved as a member of the 
Board of Super\-isors of his county for 26 years, 
being TVesident of the Board most of the time. 
He is a man of wide influence in his community 
and was elected to the House of Representatives, 
November 5. 1911, and returned in 191.5. The 
faithful and honorabl.^ service which Mr. Foster 
has. for so many years, rendered his own county 
is reflected in his service for the State :it larse. 
He gives careful thought to every question that 
concerns the State's best interests and subordi- 
nates all partisanship to the public good. He is 
one of the most efficient and diligent members of 
the Legislature and is a capable representative of 
the Great Delta section of the State. On Jan- 
uary 17, 1877. he married Nannie E. Heath of 
Shiloh, Miss. In the Legislature of 1911. he was 
an able member of the following committees: 
Pensions. Mississippi Levees. Railroads. Public 
Lands. Public Buildings and Grounds. In the 
present Legislature he serves with experience 
and marked ability as a member of the following 
committees: Agriculture; Mississippi Levees; 
Count}- Affairs ; Pensions ; Drainage. 



ITATVA:\IBA COUNTY. 



[ 

i 












L 




^1. i-Aiia 



William C. Gray 



"VYTLLTAM CL.\UDE GRAY of Fulton, Miss., 
was born June 23. 1S91. at Fulton, the son of 
James Monroe Gray and Almira Lillian (Reed) 
Gray, the latter a daughter of John Reed and 
Mattie (Rodgers) Reed, of Reedsville. Miss. James 
Monroe Gray is the son of "William Newton and 
Anna Catherine (Riggs) Gray, and was born at 
Fayetteville, Ala., where he lived until twenty-one 
years of age. He then moved to Itawamba County. 
Mi.=;s.. where he still resides. He served as Justice 
of the Peace of his county from 1?99 to 19'13. 
Representative Gray's great-grandparents. John 
Riggs and Sarah Elizabeth (Conley) Rlggs. were 
bom in South Carolina of Engli.sh parentage. 
His maternal great-grandparents were William 
Reed of Scotch-Irish descent, and Elizabeth 
(•Tal.-^nt) -Reed of Ir-^h ancestry. 'NTr. Gray 
was educated In the free schools of Itawamba 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



869 



County and took High School training at Hen- 
derson, Tenn. ; later, took L. I. degree in Nat- 
ional Teachers' Xonjial & Business College, at 
Henderson, Tenu. With the same determination 
that characterized his eftorts in obtaining an edu- 
cation, he began a successful career as teacher 
and farmer combined. He has taught, for live 
years, in the rural schools of Itawamba County. 
Gaining in these two important home industries, 
the respect and confidence of his felow citizens. 
he was, in 1915, elected to the House of Representa- 
tives from his county. He has filled this position 
with exceptionable ability, his deep interest in the 
State's welfare being clearly manifested in all 
his work in that body. He has a high sense 
of justice and commands the respect and the 
good will of his legislative associates, as an able 
right-thinking and fair-minded law-maker. He 
serves on the following committees : Agricul- 
ture ; Education ; Regi.straiions and Election.=! ; 
Federal Relations ; Insurance. Mr. Gray is a 
Democrat and belongs to the Christian Church. 
On October 26, 1913, he was married to Miss Vela 
Moore, daughter of Clem Moore and Mary Lillie 
(Harden) Moore, of Fulton, Miss. 



JACKSON COUNTY 



WILLIAM ROSS DAVID of Carterville, Repre- 
sentative from Jackson County, was born in that 
County, November 17. 1870, at Dead Lake. His 
father, Edward David, was also born at Dead 
Lake. He served through the Civil War as a 
Confederate soldier in Company D of tlie 9th 
Mississippi Cavalry, under the command of Cap- 
tain Steed, whose company was under Col. Ben 
Stevens. The family is of French descent. Ed- 
ward Battles David, grandfather of William Ros« 
David, was of noble birtli ; he came to this coun- 
try from Bordeaux, France, in 1836, and had his 
residence at Dead Lake. His wife was Ann (Hav- 
ens) David. The mother of Representative David 
is of a Virginian family. Her maiden name was 
Margarett Lyons, and her parents were William 
and Mary Ann (Cates) Lyons, who lived at Ameri- 
cus, Mississippi. It was her grandfather, William 
Lyons, who came from Virginia to Mississippi. 
William Ross David attended the public schools of 
Red Hill and Red Creek Union, the latter of which 
is now called the Daisy-Vestr>- High School. After 
completing the public school course, he continued 
his education by private study at home. By hard 
work and concentration he succeeded so well that 





William R. D.-vid 



870 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



in 1915 he came up for examination in law be- 
fore Chancellor Denny at Pascagoula, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar. Besides the practice of law, 
Mr. David has also been engaged in the occupa- 
tions of farmer and stock raiser. From 1902 to 
1908 he was a member of the Board of Supervisors 
in beat 5 of Jackson County, and from 1904 to 
1908 was President of the Board. In 1915 he was 
brought out by the people for Representative of 
Jackson County and was elected to the lower 
house of the Legislature, for the term of 1916-20 
where he has won a reputation as a fair-minded, 
capable lawmaker. He serves faithfully and with 
exceptional ability upon the following committees: 
Judiciary ; Constitution ; Appropriations ; Immigra- 
tion and Labor ; Fisheries ; Conmierce and Ship- 
ping (Chm.). Mr. David is a Democrat. As 
a member of the Methodist Church he has 
filled the office of Steward and Superintendent 
of the Sunday School. He is a Mason. Past 
Master and Past Hiffli Priest. He belongs to 
the Farmers Union. On May 2nd, 1897. he 
was united in marriage to Miss ^lary M. Carter, 
who is the daughter of William and Sarah 
Ann (DavLs) Carter, of Carterville, Mississippi. 
Mr. and Mrs. David have five children : Elmon 
Carter, Edwenia, Estelle. Upton Sisson, and Lidian. 



JASPER COUNTY. 

HENRY LLOYD FINCH, who represents Jasper 
Count.v. where he resides, at the town of Heidel- 
bei-g. was born on the 10th of March. 1S88, at 
Trenton, Smith County, Mississippi. His father is 
Christopher Finch, who was also born in Smith 
County, but who later removed to Montrose in Jas- 
per County. He was the son of Richard Finch, and 
his wife Nancy (Ellis) Finch, who lived in Scott 
County, Mississippi, pi-ior to their removal to Smith 
County. Henry Lloyd Finch's mother (Mary Eliza- 
beth Evans, before her marriage), is the daughter 
of the Reverand John H. Evans and Elizabeth 
( Eckles ) Evans. Reverand Evans was formerly 
a menibi'r of the Mississippi Conference ; he is 
Henry Lloyd Finch ^^'1' living, at Collins. Covington County, Missis- 

sippi As a gallant Confederate soldier he served 
through jut the Civil War. In 1S6 4 he captured 
the uniform of the notorious Newton Knight, in 
Jones County, Mississippi, and turned it over to 
the Confederate authorities. Henry Lloyd Finch 
received his early education at the Mississippi 
Conference Training School. He then taught In 
the public schools of Jasper County for four years. 




Legislative department 



S71 



as a stepping stone to the profession of law. In 
1907 he was griaduated from the Law Department 
of Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi; with the 
degree of LL. B. On the first day of May, 1907, 
Mr. Finch enterod upon the practise of his pro- 
fes:sion. at Paulding, Jasper County, where he re- 
mained until December l-il, 1912. when he re- 
moved to his present place of residence. Heidel- 
berg. In 1915 he entered political life by being 
elected to represent his county in the Legislature. 
He is a close student of public questions, and abiy 
represents his county. He was appointed and has 
served with the ability that we expect from the 
trained legal mind, upon the following committees: 
Judiciary: Constitution; Ways and Means; Agri- 
culture ; Federal Relations, being Chairman of the 
latter. Representative Finch is a Democrat, a 
member of the M. E. Church South, and is Super- 
intendent of his Sunday School at Heidelberg. 
He is a ilason and Woodman : is Senior Warden of 
John M. Stone Lodge Xo. 479 and past Consul 
Commander of "White Oak Camp No. 30, Heidel- 
berg, He was married near Heidelberg. Novem- 
ber 16, 1905. to Miss Annie Risher, daughter of 
Singleton Teiral and Elizabeth Catherine Risher 
of Heidelberg. Mrs. Risher was the daughter of 
Charles Story Nolly Newell and Mary Ann Gavin 
Newell. Representative Finch and wife have thi-ee 
children ; Singleton Christopher, Katie Hazel, and 
Henry Lloyd, Jr. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 



WILLIAM McCALEB DARDEN. of .McNair, 
Miss., son of Thomas Landrum Darden and Sophia 
Moore (McCaleb) Darden, was born Sei tember 'i. 
1873. near Fa.vette. Jefferson County. Miss. His 
paternal grandparents were John P. Darden an'l 
Margarette F. Daiden of Fayette. Miss. ; his mt-- 
ternal, were James Dunbar McCaleb and Mary E 
McCaleb, who lived in Adams County, Miss 
Thomas Landrum Darden and wife were nativ^.- 
of Jefferson County and lived near Fayette through- 
out their lives. They were much esteemed in 
their locality and during the Civil War the fathe • 
entered the Confederate army and served as 1st 
Sergeant of his Company. He was afterwards 
Tieasurer of tlie State Fai-meis' Alliance, a mem- 
ber of the Early Granger organization in rh'- State 
and a member of the Legislature that called tl'.f 
Constitutional Constitution of 1890. Wi!li,im Mc- 
Caleb Darden, the subject of this sketch, in boy- 
hood attended the public schools of his locality 




Darden 



LEG'SLc-VTlVE DEPARTMEXT 

and, later, entered the Mississippi Agricultural 
and Mechanical College, where he remained through 
the Sophomore year, laying the foundation for a 
useful, progressive future. He has engaged in 
farming all his life, but has found time to fill 
various positions of trust and responsibility when- 
ever his people have called upon him. Some of 
these were, Constable, Enumerator of U. S. Census 
of 1900. Secretary of Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee of Jefferson County, Election Commissioner 
of Jefferson County, Post-master at McXair, Miss., 
and Magistrate. He was a private for some years 
in the Jefferson Davis Volunteers of Fayette, Miss., 
commanded by Capt. E. X. Coffey of tlie U. S. 
Army. In 1911, Mr. Darden was elected to the 
House of R.epresentatives and was re-elected in 
1915. He has always stood for the cause of edu- 
cation in all its phases ; for equal rights for all 
and special privileges to none. In the 1916 ses- 
sion of the Legislature. Mr. Darden was against 
any increase of taxation and always upheld 
the best interests of the people. The State's 
welfare has been his chief concern throughout 
his public service. He is a Democrat, a trustee 
in the Christian Church, and is a member of the 
Woodmen of the "World. On November 18, 1S96, 
he married Charlotte Brooks Field, daughter of 
William Brooks Field and Medora (Cotton) Field. 
who lived in Adams County. Mr. Dryden served 
with much ability on the following Committees : 
Constitution ; Ways and Means ; Fees and Salaries ; 
Eleemosynary Institutions, serving as Chairman 
of the latter. 



JEFFERSON DAVIS COUNTY. 




Oliver C. Luper 



OLIVER CLIFFTON LUPER of Prentiss. Miss., 
was born October 3, 1S82, at Prentiss (then Blount- 
v;i), Jefferson Davis (then Lawrence) County. 
Miss., the son of Julius Albert Luper and Mary 
Elizabeth (Applewhite) Luper. the latter being the 
daughter of Woodard Applewhite and Sarah Apple- 
white, of Eassfield, Miss. Mr. Luper's father. J. A. 
Luper, son of Calvin Luper and Mary Jane (Mc- 
Colksey) Luper, of Blountville. Miss., was a nat- 
ive of that town and has always resided there. 
Through his paternal grandparents. Mr. Luper 
claims Scotch-Irish descent, his grandfather, Calvin 
Luper. being the son of a native of Ireland, who 
ffniigrated to South Carolina and thence to Missi.«- 
.^ippi; his grandmother, Mary J.ir.-? M'^Colksey 
Luper, was the daughter of a Scotchman who 
came to North Carolina, thence to Mississippi. 



.a gfllVJ^a •'- u to 



l«Jqi««l**'' 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



873 



The maternal ancestors of Mr. Luper were of 
Engrlish parentage and came to ^rississippi from 
South Carolina. "U'oodard Applewhite was a lieu- 
tenant in the Confederate army. Mr. Luper's edu- 
cation was gained at Blountsvill, and Silver Creek, 
Miss. He later attended the literary department 
of Millsaps College and finally graduated in Law. 
with the degree of LL. B., in 1910. He located 
in his home town, now called Prentiss, and has 
since practised his profession there. He soon be- 
came widely and favorably known for his sound 
business sense, sterling integrity and high sense 
of justice and "was elected to the Legislature in 
1915. He is a Democrat; a member of the Metho- 
dist Church : belongs to the Kappa Alpha frater- 
nity ; and is a Knight of Pythias, having filled ever\- 
oflflce in this association, except the oflice of 
Chancellor Commander, ilr. Luper is one of the 
most genial and popular members of the Legisla- 
ture and is a stanch advocate of independent 
tl'.ougiit and action in matters of State government. 
While firm in his convictions of right, he is in 
no sense a blind partisan. During the Legislative 
session of 1916. he was happily married to Miss 
Lola Virginia "U'eldy, of Lucedale, Miss., daughter 
of William "Wesley and Julia Virginia Weldy. 
March 26, 1916, at Hattiesburg. Miss. He is an 
attentive and valuable member of the following 
committees: Judiciary; Appropriations: Local and 
Private Legislation ; Pentientiary and Insurance of 
which last mentioned he is Chairman. 



JONES COUNTY. 



JAMES HARTLEY BUSH, Representative from 
Jones Count\', has his home at Laurel, Mississippi, 
where he was born, January 5. 1861. His father. 
Jefferson Jackson Bush, was a native of Georgia, 
and was born at Americiis. in Sumpter County of 
that State. With his parents. Harrison and Mahala 
(Scott) Bush, Jefferson Jackson Bush removed to 
Laurel, Mississippi, in 1849, and spent practically 
all the rest of his life on a farm near that place. 
For three years (1S62-1863) he served in the Con- 
federate Army and rose to the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant. The Bush family, like so many families 
of the South are of English blood. Prescott Bush, 
great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
was born in England ; but he had immigrated to 
America before the Revolution, and during that 
struggle served as Orderly Sergeant. He was a 
Baptist minister, and was married to a lady whose 
pnajdo]! name w.is Susan Hinds. Sus.in (Mathis) 



James H. Bush 



874 



LEGISI^VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



Bush, mother of the subject of this sketch, was the 
daug-hter of James anil Marg-aret (Carlton) Mathis. 
of Lowndes County. (",eorgia. James Hartley Bu.^h 
was educated in the old field schools of the South. 
Among his teachers were Jerry Jones, Jesse Bush. 
and Jeff T. Herrincton. at present Circuit Clerk of 
Jones County. He has always been greatly in- 
terested in education, and from IDOS to 1912 served 
as a member of the School Board of his County. 
He is a man of wide influence in his County : has 
always stood for honesty in public service and i.s 
just and fair to all opponents, believing that a pub- 
lic servant should be independent of political fac- 
tions and seek only the State's welfare in public 
service. He is one of our farmer members of 
the Leg^islature, to which he was first elected in 
1911. He was re-elected in 191.5 and during- the 
term of 1916-1920 he was an able member of the 
following: Committees : Constitution ; Appropria- 
tions ; Agriculture : House Contingent Expenses : 
Census and Apportionment, being- Chairman of the 
last mentioned. Repre.«entative Bush was elected 
by the Democratic Party. He is an active mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church, having- served as Dea- 
con, and as Clerk of the Tallahala Asssociation for 
six years. He is a prominent Mason ; was Master 
of Breckinridge Lodge No. 309 one year; Master 
of Laurel Lodge Xo. 414 for eight years: and haa 
represented his lodge in the State Grand Lodge on 
eight occasions. February 10, ISSl. he was mar- 
ried to Mary Ann Walters, near Ellisville, Missis- 
sippi. She is the daughter of John Wp.'iley Walters 
and Elizabeth (Kilgore) Walters, of Ellisville. 
Jones County. Mississippi. Elizabeth K. Walters 
was a daughter of Samuel Kilgore, who came to 
this State from South Carolina before 184.5. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Bush are George .Jeffer- 
son. John Wiggins, James Oliver, and Susan Ettie 
Elizabeth. 



"1 




Jo.seph J. Daniel 



KEMPER COUNTY. 

JOSEPH JOHN' DANIEL of DeKalb. representa- 
tive from Kemper County, was born November 4, 
1851. at Philadelphia, in the County of Neshoba, 
Mississippi. His father was W'illiam Simmons 
Daniel, who was born in York District in the 
State of South Carolina and who made his home 
in Little Rock, in that State. In 1817 William 
Simmons Daniel removed from South Carolina to 
Neshoba Count\-, Mississippi, riding the entire dis- 
tance on horseback. During the Civil AVar h'' 
rendered faithful service as a Confederate soldier 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



875 



in the Army of Tennessee. He was a private in 
Company B. 5th Mississippi Regiment of Infantry. 
The mother of Joseph John Daniel was Perminteny 
(Stewart) Daniel, a native of Tennessee. Mr. 
Daniel obtained his eai-ly education in the public 
schools of Xeshoba County, and his later educa- 
tion in the more ditTicult school of pi-actical life. 
A youth at the close of the Civil War, his oppor- 
tunities for colleg-e education like most young men 
in the South at that period were limited, but by 
personal effort he gained in early manhood recog- 
nition for the many sterling qualities that go to 
make up the character of the best citizens of 
our State. Representative Daniel has had a long 
and varied experience in public life. From 1892 
to 1896 he filled the office of Tax Assessor of Ne- 
shoba County ; from 1885 to 1889 he was post- 
master of Pliiladelphia. Mississippi : and for fout- 
years he was Coroner and Ranger of his County. 
Equipped with knowledge gained in these various 
positions of public trust, Mr. Daniel secured the 
nomination to the House of Representatives of 
Mississippi, and was elected to that body in 1913. 
He has served" ably on the following committees : 
Agriculture ; Fees and Salaries : County Affairs : 
Pensions. Representati\e Daniel is a Democrat, a 
member of the Methodist Church, and Superin- 
tendent of the Sunday Schools. He has been mar- 
ried four times : his first wife was Martha Pety ; 
his second Mary Eleby, the third Emma Suttle ; and 
the fourth, Terry Ann Watkins. By the first 
marriage there are two children, Horace Edward 
and Shula Pearl ; by the third marriage two child- 
ren, McLaurin and John "Willie ; and by the fourth 
marriage thrf-e children. Bryan, Claude and Fran- 



EDMUXD JOHX IRBY of Scooba. who repre- 
sents Kemper County, was born at "Anion," his 
family home, in the County of Xoxubee, Mississippi. 
May 12, 1862. His father, Richard Francis Irby, 
who was born in Mecklenbui-g County, Virginia, 
died about two years after the birth of his son. 
Richard Francis Iiby was graduated from the 
L^niversity of Mississippi about 185,5, and became 
a planter in X'oxubee County. During the Civil 
War he was a Confederate soldier. The Irby 
family is of English origin. Peter Irby, the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, and his . 
first American ancestor of that name, of whom 
we have record, lived at Stirling\ille, Mecklen- 
burg County, Virginia. His wife was Polly (Ford) 




Edmund J. Irby 



.luv.-iH ,1 



f 



876 LKGIST^ATIVE DEPART^^E^-T 



Irby. Wyatte Irby, was born at that place, stud- 
ied medicine at the old Transylvania Un!versit>- 
of Kentticky. rame from Virgrinia to JNIississippi. 
and settled on the Bisrbee River, a few miles abovo 
where the City of Columbus now stands. He re- 
moved to Columbus just after the villag-e was es- 
tablished, and later to Xoxuhee County, where he 
practised medicine and encraged in planting. He 
was elected as Representative to the State Leg-is- 
lature in 1854. and In that same year fell In a 
duel with Dr. Fant. in Pickens County, Alabama. 
Frances Wyatte Irby was married to a lady of 
■^'elsh blood. Susan Catouch Evans, dauerhter of 
Richard and Zelota fJones) Evans of Orcenville. 
Xorth Carolina. To them was born Richard Fran- 
cis Irby. father of the subject of this .'ketch. The 
maternal ancestry of Edmund John Tiby was En- 
glish. His mother, Mar>' Permela (Kennon) Irby 
was the daughter of Howell T.ewis Kennon and 
his wife. Elizabeth VT. CHendley) Kennon. daueh- 
*<^r- of .John P. Hendley and his wife, who before 
her marriasre to him. wa.s a widow. Mrs. T^ucy 
Smith. Howell Lewis Kennon was by birth a 
Virginian, son of John and Elizabeth '"TVood.'onl 
Kennon but removed from Virginia to Alabama. 
where he practi.sed medicine, at Falkland, and 
later at Sumter. He died nt Crawford, ^rississippl. 
tT-<! wife Elizabeth TV. Hendley. was a South 
• Carolin-'an Union District. Edmund John Trby. 
Representativ*^ of Kemper County, obtained his 
early education at , the free school of Crawford 
Mississinoi. He pursued his college education at 
the A. <t M. College of ^lississippi. where he took 
a special course, from 1881 to 188.i. He then 
studied art with the Artists' Association of N'e\^ 
Orlean.". nnd fo" f^'.'O rriite"<5 nti-ciTi^'l t cm"<-'-' 
course of readin? in the libraries of that City. 
Mr. Trby's avocation is painting, a profession !r 
which he has achieved a considerable reputation. 
Hp also engae'ed in the mercantile business, in 
nartnership with his brother. R. F. Irby. in Rlloxi 
Mississippi, from 189.5 to 1899. And in 1900 they 
establi.=hed their firm in Scooba. where they are 
doing business at present. ^Fr. Trby has served two 
terms as Mayor of Scooba. from 1907 to 1909. and 
from 1911 to 191.?. Elected to the Legislature in 
191.5 he has done able and effective work as mem- 
ber of the following committees :• Ways and 
Means; Education: Public Buildings and Grounds: 
Banks and Banking. Mr. Irby is a Democrat, and 
has served his party as a member of the County 
and Congre.s.sional Committee. He is a Mason, 
Royal Arch Chapter. He i.s unmarried. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAKTMEXT S77 

LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 

DAVID FRAXKLIX HOYLE of Paris. Missis- 
sippi, representative from the County of Lafay- 
ette, is the son of Robert Daniel Hoyle and 
Nancy (Willis) Hoyle of North Carolina. He 
•»va3 born in that State, at Shelby, Cleveland 
County, July 2, 1860. He was left fatherless at 
a very early age; his father, Robert I^. Hoyle, 
enlisted in the Civil War as a Confederate sold- 
ier in April of 1S62, and died in gallant service 
to the South in June of that same year. The 
Hoyle family came from Ireland. David Hoyle, 
grandfather of the subject of our sketch settled 
first in Virginia, and from there removed to ■ 
North Carolina. He 'was a patriot soldier in the 

Revolutionary War. He and his wife, Ellen I>avid F. Hoyle 

(Willis) Hoyle, made their home at Shelby, 
North Carolina, where their son, Robert Daniel 
Hoyle, was born. He afterwards made his home 
at Knob Creek, North Carolina. The maternal 
grandparents of David Franklin Hoyle were 
John and Elizabeth (.Black) Willis. They were 
neighbors of his paternal grandparents at Shel- 
by, North Carolina. :Mr. Hoyle came to Missis- 
sippi in his boyhood. He attended the public 
schools of Panola County in this State, where 
he was prepared for college. He obtained his 
collegiate education at the Tula Normal College, 
then under the control of Prof. C. C. Hughes, 
and was graduated from t±iat institution in 1S99. 
In the following year he entered upon a useful 
career as a minister in the Baptist Church, and 
has pursued that calling ever since. Believing 
that his influence would be valuable as a 
member of the State Legislature and that the 
civic life of the state is better for having some 
representatives of the ministry his friends nomi- 
nated him for that office, and he was elected 
in 1915. He has worked faithfully for pro- 
gressive legislation and better social conditions 
in connection with the following committees: 
Education; Railroads; Public Printing: Peniten- 
tiary; Liquor Traffic. Representative Hoyle is a 
Democrat and a Master Mason. In 1SS9 he was 
married to Miss Alice Powell, in Panola County, 
Mississippi. She is the daughter of William 
Robert Powell and Mary Hunter (Partee) 
Powell, of Batesville. Mississippi. The Partees 
came from Gibson County, Tennessee in 1850 
and settled at their present home. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoyle have but on'^- child, Willis Hunter Hoyle. 
of Clinton, Mississippi. 



i^T- 



iti 



878 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



\ 



\ 




V 



Henry L. Davis 



HEXRY LEE DAVIS of Tula, Mississippi, who 
represents Lafayette County, was born at Dal- 
lon, in the same County. His father, Aaron 
Davis, was also born in that County. He is 
the son of Aaron and Dincilla ( Bailey j Uavis. 
who were among the early settlers of the Coun- 
ty. Representative Davis is an American in the 
strictest sense of that term, as his family has 
been settled in this country for many genera- 
tions and his great-great-grandfathers were 
volunteer soldiers in the Revolutionary War. 
Like so many of our pioneer families, he is of 
Scotch-Irish descent. His mother, whose maiden 
name was Mary Burrow, was the daughter of 
Green and Sallie Burrow, who lived at Vernon, 
Alabama. Mr. Davis obtained his early educa- 
tion in the schools of his native County under 
capable instructors. He pursued his High School 
education under the direction of Prof. C. C. 
Hights, of Tula, where he took a full course in 
the English branches. After leaving school he 
continued to study and has been a constant 
reader of publications dealing with practical 
current affairs. He is a man of many and varied 
interests; his principal occupation is farming, 
but he is also connected with the stock raising 
industry, the mercantile business and banking. 
Though never having enjoyed college advant- 
ages he has had a successful career and is a 
man of wide influence in his county. For eight 
years he was a member of the Board of Sup- 
ervisors of his County, and has also been Mayor 
of Tula. His interest in public questions in- 
duced him to enter the political field, and in 
1915 he was elected to the Legislature, where he 
has shown much practical ability in his work 
for the State upon the following committees: 
Constitution; Appropriations; Roads; Ferries and 
Bridges; Banks and Banking. Mr. Davis was 
married September I8th, 1802, to Lenna Benton 
Davis, at Tula, Mississippi. His wife is the 
daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Davis of that 
place. Of this marriage there have been born 
seven children: Lillie Dell, Lela Emma, Bessie 
Lura, Curtis Gray, Vardaman Lee, Lucile and 
Van. 



iHmtt^it m 



JTaawniiw 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMKX'f 879 

LA^IAR COUXTT. 

JOHN ALEXAXDER TEAGER, RepreseTitative 
from Lamar County, resides at Lumberton, Lamar 
County, Mississippi. He was born January IT. 
1SS2, at Toonisuba, Lauderdale County, of this 
State, and is the son of Daniel Wayne Yeager, 
who was born at Centerville, Bibb County, Ala- 
bama, but removed thence to Mississippi in 1857. 
He was a soldier of the Confederacy ; he enlisted 
in Lauderdale County at the outbreak of the War, 
and rendered faithful service until its close; he 
fought under the command of Captain Rogers. 
Representative Yeager comes of figliting stock. 
His paternal ancestors came early to America. \ 
His grandfather. Lewis Yeager. was one of those 
frontiersmen who did so much to protect our wes- John \ Yeager 

tern borders from the British and Indians. He was 
born on Wolf River, Tennessee, fought in the Semi- 
nole War and in the War of 1812, as a sharpshooter. 

He took part in the Battle of New Orlean.s. ■ 

John Alexander Yeager's mother, Lucinda Jane 

(Dodd) Yeager. was the daughter of the Reverend ''■ 

Sidney Dodd. who lived at Lockhart, Lauderdale J 

County, Mississippi. He served as Captain in one 

of the home guards during the Civil War. The '* 

Dodds are of Scotch-Irish origin, and came to this ' 

country about the year 1800. In his boyhood Mr. i 

Yeager attended tfte public schools of Lauderdale i 

County. He did not pursue his academic edu- 
cation further, but determined to take up the study 

of law by correspondence. His experience shows j 

what can be accomplished by correspondence woi'k i 

when the student is a bright youth possessed with J 

the determination to succeed. He registered with ' 

the American Correspondence School of Law, com- 
pleted the three year's course in 1909. and passed \ 
his bar examination before Judge T. A. Wood, ' I 
at New Augusta, Perry County, Mississippi. Mr. < 
Yeager was foi-merly Mayor of Seminary, Coving- 
ton County. Mississippi. He has also been a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee of the Democratic I 
Party of Lamar County. In November, 1915, he - 
was elected to the Legislature and is one of the • ' 1 
truest and most thoughtful members of that ' 
body, being conscientious and just in his concep- 
tion of public dut.v. In his campaign he advocated 
the calling of a constitutional convention, the pas- 
sage of a rural credits law, the preservation of I 
Mississippi's old capitol. and opposed a change 

in the present jury system. Since his election ' 

he has taken a prominent part in the work of ' 

the following committees : Judiciary ; Appropria- 
tions ; Local and P"rivate Legislation : Public Print- 
ing ; Fees and Salaries: Municipalities, serving the ' 



880 legislativp: department 



last named as Chairman. As a member of the Meth- 
odist Church. Mr. Yeager has ser\-ed his congrega- 
tion as Steward and Lay Leader. He is a member 
of the Masonic Lodge. He has been twice married ; 
first, on January 14, 1903, at Toomsuba, Missis- 
sippi, to Miss Poarl Roberson, who died May 7, 
1910 ; then on June 11, 1911, to Miss Corcan An- 
derson, at Ellisvillo. Mississippi. His first wife 
was the daughter of Jasper Roberson, a Confed- 
erate soldier of the Civil War : his second wife 
is the daughter of Latson Anderson. Four Child- 
ren were born of the first marriage; Leona Pearl. 
Audie Eran, Mattie Dexter, and Temple Estelle. 
Of the second marriage there are two children, 
Bernice and Mildred Lillian. 



LAUDERDALE COUNTY 

THOMAS LOWRY BAILEY of Meridian, Rep- 

m^'<>>if>?v^^''-'"i,r'm^v^ resentative from Lauderdale County, was born 
January 6. 18S8, at Maben, Webster County, Mis- 
sissippi. His father. Anderson Bean Bailey, son 
of Samuel Johnson Bailey and Georgia (Bean) 
Bailey, of Maben, was born at Buena Vista, in 
Chickasaw County, Mississippi, but now lives 
at Mathiston, Mississippi-. He has been prom- 
inent in local politics, and has held several county 
offices. The Baileys were originally South Caro- 
linians. Thomas L. Bailey's grandfather, Samuel 
I Johnson Bailey, was born in Charleston, South 
• I i V I Carolina, but removed to Mississippi before tl e 

-^■* »• V-,.u.ijJ Civil WslT. He was a graduate of the University of 
Virginia ; he served with conspicuous gallantry 
in the Confederate Army throughout the Civil 
War and was several times wounded, and received 
promotions for heroic conduct. The maiden name 
of Thomas Lowry Bailey's mother was Rosa 
Powell. She was the daughter of Samuel Powell 
and Rosa (Willingham) Powell of Fheba, Missis- 
sippi. Her father came to Mississippi from Ken- 
tucky in the thirties. Thomas Lowry Bailey's 
ancestors were among the Colonial settlers of 
America and have been fighting the battles of 
freedom and good government for centuries. Mr. 
Bailey's early education was obtained in the Public 
Schools of Walthall and at the Europa Higli 
School and Collegiate Institute. In 1909 he was 
graduated from Millsaps Colleger, with the degree 
of A. B. He later entered the Law Department 
of the same institution, and completed the law 
course in 1912. "^^Tiile a college- student he had a 
nufi'.bcr of honors bestowed upon hini ; he repre- 
sented his College in the intercollegiate oratorical 



Thomas L. Bailey 



YT'^UOD CLl/.<Jn3.'TJP..J 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



SSI 



contest, and won tlie Senior medal for oratory. 
Before he began the practice of law Air. Balli >■ 
had some experience in teaching-. He taught in 
the Madison County Ag:ricultural High School at 
Camden, Mississippi, for a time and was Princi- 
pal of the Woodville Hifc'h School, 1911-1912. May 
1, 1913, he opened his law office at Meridian, and 
soon became so popular that his name was sug- 
gested for the State Legislature. He was elected 
to that body in November, 1915. Mr. Bailey is 
one of the ablest of the younger members of the 
Legislature, and a brilliant career lies before him. 
He is well equipped for the duties of public life, 
and has already shown much ability in connection 
with his work upon the following committees : 
Judiciary ; Military Affairs ; Municipalities, Cor- 
porations, of which last he is Chairman. Mr. 
Bailey belongs to the Democratic party and to the 
Methodist Church which he serves in the capacity 
of Sunday School Superintendent. He is a mem- 
ber of tlie Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and 
the Praetorians. He is as yet unmarried. 



WILLIS MONROE TAYLOR of Meridian. (Pv. 
F. D. No. 5), Representative from the County of 
Lauderdale, was born April 20, 1888, at Stinson, 
Mississippi. He comes of a splendid race of 
planters and farmers. His father, James Henry 
Taylor, was born at Stinson, and has always lived 
there, engaged in the occupation of farming. His 
grandparents. Marion and Martha Taylor, also 
passed their entire lives on a farm at Stinson. 
And his great-grandparents, who came from South 
Carolina just before the Civil War broke out, 
had settled at Stinson to engage in the work of 
farming. Marion Taylor, grandfather of Willis 
Monroe Taylor, fought as a private soldier in the 
Confederate Army. Willis Monroe Taylor's mother 
was, before her marriage, Jane Anderson, daughter 
of William Shields Anderson and Sarah Eliza- 
beth Anderson, also of Stinson. The Andersons 
came to Mississippi from Alabama. William 
Shields Anderson fought in the Civil War as a 
private in the Confederate ranks. ZMr. Taylor 
received his early education in the Stinson Pub- 
lic Schools where he was prepared for college. 
During the year 1904-05 he attended Clinton 
College : and from 1907-08, the A. & M. College of 
Mississippi. After leaving college he had three 
years' business experience, obtained by working 
in store and office. He then took up the profession 
of teaching, in which he has mot with markpil 
success. He has taugiit in some of the best school- 




"•v^^^-^ 



Willis M. Taylor 



56— M 



J82 LEGISLATIVE DErARTMENT 



of Lauderdale Oount\-. ile is now serving; in his 
first public office, that of State Representative, 
to which he was elected in 1915. In the woik of 
this body his interest in the educational progress 
of the State is not less marked than that which 
he evinces in all her material growth and progress. 
He is a man of strong purpose but is just and fair 
to his opponents. The excellent work that he 
has already done on the following committees 
promises well for his future career: — Education; 
Registrations and Elections ; Public Printing ; 
Eleemosynary Institutions ; Engrossed Bills. .Mr. 
Taylor is a Democrat ; though he is not a member 
of any church he is a man of high moral standing 
in his community, and has always tried to live 
up to his motto of "Be sure you are right, then 
go ahead." On May 23, 1912, he was married 
to iliss Maude Reta Collins, at Meridian, Missis- 
sippi. She is the daughter of James Madison 
Collins and Amanda Eliza Collins of Collinsville, 
Lauderdale County. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have one 
child, Eugene Lamar. 



JESSE DUDLEY BOUNDS, whose address is 
Bailey, R. 1. Representative from Lauderdale 
County, was born August 22, 1876, near Moscow, 
Kemper County, Mississippi. This locality was also 
the birthplace of his father. William Dudley Bounds, 
who has lived all his life in Kemper County, at 
Moscow and Fort Stephens. He named his son 
for the boy's pateinal grandfather, Jesse Bounds, 
who married Mary Lyle. and later removed fiom 
Moscow io Meridian, whore he and his wife both 
died. The Bounds family were among the early 
settlers of our State, and came of that sturdy 
stock, the Scotch-Irish, whose members possessed 
so many ideal qualities for pioneer life. The 
Jesse D. Bounds maiden name of Representative Bounds' mother 

was Dora Hall. She was the daughter of John 
and Harriett*? Hall, who were also residents of 
Kemper County in the vicinity of Moscow, Mr. 
Bounds' early education was obtained in the pub- 
lic schools of Lauderdale County. Aside from 
that schooling he has educated himself solely by 
the experiences of a busy career. He chose farm- 
ing as his occupation, and soon became a leader 
in the varied activities of his community. It was 
as constable of District No. 3, Lauderdale County, 
that he began his political life, serving for four 
years in that capacity. He then decided to be- 
come candidate for the office of Supervisor, but 
was defeated at his first trial. Four years later 
however he was elected to that oiTu-.'. whicli he 
filled very capably. During his term of four years 




LEGIST^A.TIVE DEPARTMENT 



8S3 



he succeeded in having Uiiriy-five miles of penna- 
n^nt road built a work of great value to a rural 
community. He was elected to the Legislature in 
November 1913. where he has served with marked 
ability upon the following committees : Ways and 
Means ; Railroads : Fees and Salaries ; Roads, 
Ferries and Bridges. Mr. Bounds belongs to the 
Democratic Party. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist Church, and for eight years served his con- 
gregation as clerk. He is a Woodman of the World, 
and a Master Mason. For two years he was 
Senior Warden of the Andrews Chapel No. 377, and 
Master one year. In December 1900, near Bailey, 
Lauderdale County, he was married to Anne P'hil- 
lips, daughter of James Phillips and his wife, 
Caroline Tinslcy Phillips, who lived near Oktibbeha, 
Kemper County. James Phillips was a Confederate 
soldier in the Civil War. Representative and 
Mrs. Boimds have seven children: Dora Caroline, 
Tht^lma Vinita, Ethel Aline. Sylvia Kathleen, James 
William, Jesse Dudley and Walter. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY 



CHARLES EDGAR GIBSON of Monticello, Rep- 
resentative from Lawrence County, was born at 
Sontag, in that County, on May 12. 1SS7. Ha 
is the son of William Randolph Gibson, Jr., who was 
born near the close of the Civil War. August 15, 
1864, at Beauregard, Copiah County, Mississippi. 
and the grand-son of William Randolph Gibson 
Sr., and his wife whose maiden name was Emily 
^Vatson. This couple lived at Beauregard. The 
Gibsons were a Scotch family originally. Large 
numbers of their clan came to America at an early 
date. It is one of the most numerous connections 
in L'nited States, especially throughout the Ten- 
nessee-KentucJty region. The branch to which 
Representative Gibson belonsrs first settled in Vir- 
ginia, and from there removed to Alabama. From 
that state the grandfather of Charles Edgar 
Gibson came to live in Mississippi. He fought as 
a Confederate soldier in the Ci\il War, to which 
cause he was ardently devoted. Mr. Gibson's 
maternal ancestors were native Mississippians of 
English descent. His mother, Mary (Warren) 
Gibon. was the daughter of Joseph Hardin Warren 
and his wife, Mary Warren, who lived at Wesson, 
Mississippi. Representative Gibson received his 
early education in his home community, and later 
attended school at Wesson, Mississippi, where hfs 
maternal grandparents resided. Then for three 
years he was a student at Mississippi College. 



Charles E. Gibson 



884 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



During 1907-190S he was Principal of the Allen 
High School. Deciding to enter the profession of 
law, he entered upon his studies at Millsaps, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1909 with the 
degree of LL. B. The year following he established 
himself in a law office at Monticello, where he has 
since lived and built up a successful practice. He 
is Attorney for the American Surety Company of 
Xew York. Mr. Gibson's entrance into politics 
was made when he was elected to the Legislature 
in 1915. He is well fitted to represent his section 
and has already shown his ability in his work 
on the committees of Judiciary ; Constitution ; Ways 
and Means ; Penitentiary ; Public Lands, of which 
latter he is Chairman. Mr. Gibson is a Democrat 
and an active member of the Baptist Church ; 
he has served as Clerk of the Lawrence County 
Baptist Association, and Assistant Superintendent 
of the Sunday School. He is a Junior Deacon of 
the Masonic order, Chancellor Commander of 
the Knights of Pythias, and belongs to the Eastern 
Star. He was married in ilonticello, Mississippi. 
November 27, 1911, to Miss Bonnie Lea Guess, 
daughter of William Lovin Guess and Sarah Millie 
(Wilson) Guess, of Monticello. ilrs. Gibson's 
paternal grandparents were Morgan Guess, who 
was born in Devonshire. England, 1773. and his 
wife, Nancy (Walker) Guess, born in Cork County, 
Ireland, 1770. Her maternal grandparents were 
Jonathan Wilson, a resident of Amite County, Mis- 
sissippi, and his wife Sarah M. (Carlyle) Wilson, 
a resident of Lawrence County, Mississippi, both 
of whom were early settlers of the State, whenc-i 
they came from Virginia. Mr. and ilrs. Gibson 
have one child, Edna Kendel. 



LEAKE COUNTY. 

y ^ . . i. . . ijatff j > "J^ « *«»w » s*Vf i ' l " ^ iL\RTIN MORG.\N :MILLER of Edinburg, 

Mississippi. Representative from Leake County, 
was born at that town on the 14th day of Sep- 
tember, 1888. His parents were James Thomas 
Miller and his wife. Treassie Miller. The father, 
John Thomas Miller, son of James Miller and Bet- 
tie Miller of Camden, in the County of Madison, 
Mississippi, was bom at Camden. His mother is 
the daughter of George W. Mooney and Harriett 
Mooney of Edinburg. Martin Morgan Miller ob- 
tained his early education in the elementary schools 
of his county. He then attended the Edinburg 
High School, where his teachers were Professor 
Alex McLindon ana Prn'r^.^^or R. H. P Ue. After 
Martin M. Miller completing his High School course he entered the 



H t^' 




LEGISE^VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



-885 



Queen City Eusin^ss College at Meridian, Missis- 
sippi, from which institution he was graduated 
in April, 1310. Mr. Miller is one of the most suc- 
cessful and prominent young- farmers of his County. 
During the year 1911 he was County Lecturer 
for the Farmers' Union of Leake County, and did 
much to bring about progressive methods in his 
section. He has also been of great assistance to 
the farming class of people financially, with whom 
he Is very popular. In 1913. having exerted 
a wide influence in his County he was elected 
to the office of Representative to the State 
Legislature, and has ably promoted the inter- 
ests of his constituents by his work on the 
following committees : Appropriations ; Corpora- 
tions ; Fees and Salaries : Pensions. Representative 
Miller belongs to the Democratic Party, and in 
1912 served his party as delegate to the state 
convention from Leake County. He is a Baptist, 
and belongs to the Woodmen of the "World. He is 
unmarried. 



LEE COUNTY. 



FRA^TK L. KINCAXXON of Tupelo. Repre- 
sentative from Lee County, was elected to the 
House of Representatives in November, 1915. His 
friends in the legislature from north-east Missis- 
sippi brought him out as a candidate for speaker 
and he received a very complimentary vote for 
that position. Though his modesty has prevented 
him from furnishing any family historj'. Repre- 
sentative Kincannon is a member of one of the 
most distingui.^hed families of Mississippi and he 
himself is one of the prominent men of his 
county. He is the editor and proprietor of the 
Tupelo Journal, one of tFie influential and pro- 
gressive weekly papers of the State. As a law- 
maker he is attentive and business-like in his 
work and seeks to be fair to both the agricultural 
and educational interests of Mississippi. His 
taste lies in the details of legislation rather than 
advocacy on the floor. He is a member of the 
following Committees: Judiciary; Constitution; Ed- 
ucation: Public Printing; Eleemosynary Institu- 
tions ; Fees and Salaries ; Roads, Ferries and 
Bridges; Banks and Banking, serving the las^ 
mentioned as its Chairm.an. 



"''^'Vf 



I-'TMOk 1^. Kincannon 



886 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 




/ 



James S. Ilowerton 




JAMES SANDERS HOWERTON" of Baldwvn. 
Representative from Lee County, was born in that 
County June 18. 1S66. His parents were Joel 
D. Howerton and Melissa C. (Butler) Howerton. 
His fatlier was a Confederate soldier in Company E. 
Fourth Mississippi Cavalry, and served througii 
many important battles from September. 1862, to 
June 18, 186t. when he was incapacitated by a 
severe wound. The Howertons are of English ori- 
gin ; the family settled first in Virginia, went 
from there to Alabama, and finally removed to 
Mississippi-. Mr. Howerton received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of his County, and his 
preparatory training at the Guntown High School, 
of which Prof. J. \V. Huey was then Principal. 
After studying- there for two years he entered the 
luka Xormal Institute, where he graduated in ISSS 
with the degree of B. S. For eight years following 
his graduation. Representative Howerton taught 
school in his native' county where he has many 
friends and followers. Since then he has been a 
farmer. From 1912 to 1916 he was a member of 
the State Legislature, where he served on the 
following committees: Appropriations; Registra- 
tion and Elections, and Federal Relation?. He 
was re-elected in 1915. and is now Chairman of 
the Appropriations Committee and a member of 
following committees: Rules: "Waj'S and Means: 
Penitentiary. Representative Howerton is a Demo- 
crat and an ordained minister of the Primitive Bap- 
tist Church and those who know him say that he i.-? 
a good Christian and seeks to honor the ministo'- 
He belongs to the Masons (in which lodge he has 
been Worshipful Master for six years and Srni >r 
Deacon for eight) : has been for three years Coun- 
cil Commander in the "Woodmen of the "U^orld : and 
Prelate in the Knights 'of Pj'thias. He was mar- 
ried December 25, 1888, at Baldwyn, to Miss 
Georgia A. Simmons. They are the parents of 
five children : Mrs. Rossie E. Roper, !Mrs. Lela A. 
Roper, Frank Burkitt, Ethel M. and Mattie L. 



LEFLORE COUNTY. 

"WILLIAM SHELBY BARRY of Greenwood. Le- 
flore County, was bom November 27, 1857, at 
Columbus Lowndes County. Mississippi, and is the 
son of 'William Sullivan and Sarah (Fearn) Barry. 
His father was a prominent antebellum salesman 
and was president of the famous Secession Con- 
vention of 1861. and .-ifterwards saw conspicuous 
service in the Confederate army. W. S. Barrv-'s 
pntemnl crandparents were Richard Barry ard 
M.'.'-y (Sullivan) Earrj', of Columbus, Mi.^sisslppl 



LEi-.TSI.ATIVE DKPART^rEXT 887 



The Barry family came oriffinally from Ens- 
land and settled first in Virginia. The mother 
of Representative Barry. Sarah Fearn. was the 
daughter of Doctor Thomas Fearn and his wife 
Sarah Shelby, of Huiitsville. Alabama. William 
Shelby Bari-y \vas educated in private schools in 
Lowndes and Oklibbeha County and prepared for 
college at the High School at Norwood. Virginia, 
after which he attended the University of Mi.'sis- 
sippi for one year. He studied for the bar by 
reading law at home and by taking summer courses 
at the University of Virginia. He began to prac- 
tice his profession at Greenwood in 1886. In 1SS8 
he and Judge S. R. Coleman formed the law firm 
of Coleman & Barry. Some years later he ceased 
to practice law and became a planter. He is the 
largest planter in his county, and is Pi-esident of 
the Planter's Oil Mill Company and the Cooper- 
ative Oil Mill Company at Morehead. Mississippi. 
Mr. Barry became a member of the State L'--gis- 
lature in 1888. From 1904 to 1908 he was Presi- 
dent of the Levee Board of Yazoo and Mississippi 
Valley. Again served in the House from 1912-16 
and was re-elected for the present term, and is 
numbered among the ablest legislators of that 
body. As a member of the Democratic Party. 
Representative Barry has served on both county 
and state executive committees. He is an ad- 
herent by faith of the Presbyterian Church and 
belongs to the following fraternal orders : Mason. 
Elks, Knights Templar, Shriners. Mr. Barry has 
been twice married, first to Bernice Shelby Stell. 
May 25. 188 2. at Huntsville. Alabama. She died 
in March of 1898. His second wife was Josephine 
Hallonquist. to whom he was married September 
12, 190 6, at Montgomery. Alabama. She is the 
daughter of Laurent Berney and Caralisa Champ 
(Lucas) HoUonquist of Montgomery. Mrs. Barry is 
descended froiTi several great European races. Her 
father's family came from Denmark and her 
mother's family, the Lucases, are Spanish-English. 
Her grandmother Berney was of French-En --lish 
descent, fiom Baronet Berney of Park Hall. She 
is also related to the famous Byrd family who 
came from England in 1674 and settled in Vir- 
genia, where they founded "We.stover". Hugo 
de Byrd, the first in England of that name, came 
over from France with 'William the Conqueror, 
^he only child of William Shelby Barry by his 
first marriago is William Shelby Barry, Jr. Of 
his si'cond mari-iage were born, Josephine. Caralisa, 
Putnam and Wingfleld. Mr. Bairy is an able 



888 



LEGISr.ATIVE DEPARTMENT 



member of the following' Committees: Judiciary; 
Local and Private Legislation : Insurance ; Banks 
and Banking: ; and is Chairman of the Committee 
on Mississippi Levees. 



LIXCOLN COUNTY. 




John F. Cole 



JOHN .FRANKLIN COLE of Bagrue Chitto. Rep- 
resentative from Lincoln County, was born at that 
place Dec. 24. 1887. His father was Henry Harri- 
son Cole, who was born at Amit. Miss, and re- 
moved to Pike County. Whilf still a very young 
man he ran what is yet known in that locality 
as the Stewarts ^Vater Mill. During the Civil 
War he served for 13 months. His parents were 
T\"ash and Sophronia (Curtis) Cole, of Summi't, 
Miss. Mr. Cole's mother was also of a Missis- 
sippi family, the Reeves, who were among the pro- 
gressive people of their community. Her name was 
Elizabeth, and she was tlie daughter of Warren and 
Marian Reeves, who lived near Tapison Baptist 
Church in Lincoln County. After completing his 
elementary education. Mr. Cole attended High 
School at Pleasant Hill during the year of 1908. 
While a student there he had the distinction of 
representing the district in the declamation con- 
test. His teachers at that school were Miss Vic- 
toria Hill and Miss Lulu McCullough. Like 
many of our coiintrj- boys, born after the Civil 
War, Representative Cole began work on the 
farm at an early age. He was but eight years 
old when he began to do his share of the 
labor, and he has continu.d farming ever since. Al- 
ways taking a keen interest in public affairs he was 
induced to enter politics and began his political life 
with his election to the lower house in 1915, and 
has ser%-ed ably upon the following committees : 
Education ; Railroads : Claims. He is a staunch 
Democrat. In church work he has held the office 
of Superintendent of the Sunday School in one 
of the branch Sunday Schools of the Baptist 
Church. In 1910, February 9th, he was united in 
marriage to Delia Burns, who was the daughter 
of Arthur and Julia Burns, residents of Eogue 
Chitto, Mississippi. Representative and Mrs. Cole 
fiave one child, Alphaeus Johnson, 



r'-1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART.AIEXT 



889 



LOWNDES COUNTY 



JOHN FOSTER FRIERSOX of Columbus, Rep- 
resentative from I^owndes County, was born at 
Okolona, Mississippi. July 1. 1876. Both his father 
and his paternal srandfather were ministers of 
the Presbyterian Church. Reverend William Vin- 
cent Frierson, son of Reverend "William Vincent 
Frierson, Sr. and Adeline (Fulton) Fiierson, 
was born in Groen County, Alabama, but removed 
to Mississippi in 1874. From 1874 to 1876 he 
lived at Okalona, and from 1877 to 18D4 at Pon- 
totoc, where he was pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church and President of the Chickasaw Female 
College. During- the Civil War he enlisted in the 
2nd Mississippi Regiment and served with gallantry 
and ardent devotion to the Southern Cause until 
he was wounded at Gettysburg. He is now Sup- 
erintendent of the Palmer Orphanage at Columbus. 
The maiden name of Representative Frierson's 
mother was Florence Foster, daughter of J. C. 
Foster and Catherine (Barr) Foster of Hopewell, 
Lafayette County, Mississippi. The ancestors of 
John Foster Frierson were all Scotch-Irish, and 
they all came from South Carolina except his 
maternal grandmother, who was from North Caro- 
lina. Mr. Frierson is one of the leading young 
attorneys of Mississippi ; gifted with unusual abil- 
ity and powers of oratory and actuated by the 
highest ideals of truth and justice, he is a citizen 
of whom Mississippi has a right to be proud. He 
was educated at Pontotoc, in an academy for males 
conducted by Professor J. M. Carter, and at the 
Southwestern Presbyterian University of Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee, where he was graduated in 1S99 
with the degree of B. A. He then studied law in the 
office of Hon. J. Mc. Martin at Port Gibson, Missis- 
sippi, and in January of 1906 was admitted to thu 
bar. He was made junior member of tlie law firm 
of Martin & Frierson. at Port Gibson, where he 
remained until 1910, and then went to Columbus, 
where he established the firm of Frierson & Hale. 
Mr. Frierson is one of the best equipped men in the 
public service of Mississippi. He has an extensive 
practice, and his wide circle of influence caused 
his entrance into public life. In 1907 he was 
elected on the Democratic ticket to serve from 
1908 to 1912 as Floater Repre.sentaiivo of Clai- 
borne and Jefferson Counties. In 1915 he was 
elected to represent Lowndes County. He has a 
strong influence in the Legislature, v.-here he 
serves as a safe representative of his icople. 
Mr. Frierson is an Elder in the Presbyterian 
Church, and is a member of the Masons and the 
Woodmen of the World. He is unmarried. 



;^-^": 




John F. Frierson 



890 LEGISLATIVE DEPART.MEXT 




Dabney L. Ervin 



DABNEY XIFSCOMB ERVIX. of Colunibud. 
Miss., was born February 17, ISo'j. near that town: 
the son of William Ethelbert Ervin and iNUrah 
Maget' (Kennedy) Ervin. Both his paternal and 
maternal ancestors served in the -Vmerican Revo- 
lution ; those on the maternal side were descen- 
dants of the French Hugenots ; on the paternal 
side, were Scotch-Irish. Mr. Ervin's early ed..catioii 
was obtained at Oak Grove High School, near 
Columbus ; his college education was prevented by 
the Civil War. His occupations have been ti.osL- 
of a planter and a newspaper solicitor. He was 
elected to the JNIississippi Legislature on Xovertbei 
7, 1911, and was returned to that body in I'Jlo. 
Mr. Ervin is one of the most thoughtful and pa:r.s- 
taking members of the Legislature. With wise 
economj- he combines a proper conception of the 
needs of educational advancement, knowing that 
the industrial development of a people is depen- 
dent upon intelligent methods and that this la 
never brought about until the people are given 
educational advintages. Uplifting tlie State mor- 
ally and- intellectually, he feels sure is the duty 
of the public servant, and his greatest desire is to 
banish fraud and illiteracy from the State He is 
greatly trusted and loved by his fellow members. 
Mr. Ervin is a Democrat, a member of the Metho- 
dist Church, being a Steward of the latter. He wa? 
married October 15, 1873, to Sallio Staples Hairston. 
in Lowndse County, Miss., daughter of Dr. Peter 
Constantine Hairston. Her ancestors came from 
Scotland to Virginia, in 1736, and founded one 
of the oldest and wealthiest families of Virginia 
and later of Mississippi, a paternal ancestor hav- 
ing been the laigest land and slave holder in 
America. (See Publications of Virginia Historical 
Society.) Mr. and Mrs. Ervin ha\ e six child- 
ren: Woodley Virginia. Eliza Holley Withoven. 
Samuel Harden. .James Edwin, Mrs. Annie 
Bryan Rector, and INIrs. Sallie Staples Weatherd- 
Mr. Ervin was in 1912-14 a member of the 
following committees : Eleemosynary Institutions : 
Education; "Ways and :Means ; Census and Ap- 
portionment. He now serves with great ability 
and with justice and fairness to all State inst:- 
tutions on the following committees: Appropria- 
tions ; Corporations ; Eleemosynary Institutions : 
Military Affairs, and Pensions. 



Joseph R. Thomas 



LEGISL.\TIVE DEPART^klEXT 891 

JOSEPH RALPH THOMAS of Columbus. Rep- ., i 

resentative from Lowndes Coimty, is by birth a 

Virginian. He was born. ."VTarch 14, 1S60. at How- ~> : 

ardsville, Albemarle County, in that State. For .' 

generations the family had occupied their homo- | 

stead there : they were of Eng-lish origin, and had < 

settli>d in Virginia prior to the Revolution and I 

were participants in that great struggle for Amer- i 

ican liberty. The father of Joseph Ralph Tlloma:^ • .^ I 

was Joseph Washington Thomas, a farmer, son or 1 ' 

Ralph Thomas. The mother of Joseph Ralph | ' 

Thomas was. before her marriagi?, Mary J. Cole- | ' 

man, daughter of Samuel Coleman, who lived in 
Appomatox County. Virginia. Mr. Thomas was 
educated in both the private and public schools of 
Albemai'le County, in his native State. As his 
occupation he chose that which has always ap- 
pealed to the Virginia gentleman, farming. In 
Mississippi Mr. Thomas has been among the best 
and most progressive citizens of his coninumity 
and has a wide influence throughout his Count>'. 
Previous to his election to the House of Repre- 
sentatives, he had not filled any political office. 
He had, however, served in the Cavalry of the 
Xational Guard, in the Company of Captain W. 
A. Lovp. As a member of the House he has 
served faithfully and with signal ability upon sev- 
eral important committees : Agriculture ; Railroads ; 
Public Lands ; County Affairs. Mr. Thomas is a 
staunch member of the Democratic Party : he be- 
longs to the ^Methodist Church, in which he has 
served as Steward : and is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Lodge. He has never married. 



MADISON COUNTY. 

JOHN BROCKTON DENDY of Pickens, Miss.. 
Representative from Madison County, was born 
June 9, 1S49, in Lowndes County, Ala.; the son 
of Edmond Taylor Dendy and Julia (Mother- 
shead) Dendy. His great-grandfather was John ..^j ^ 

Dendy (or Denby, as it was at first spelled), i ' 

who was a Virginian and immisrrated to South /' ' ? ' 



J 



Carolina before the Revolutionary War, and 
fought as a lieutenant under Sumpter and 
Marion. Our subject's father was a Baptist min- 
ister of Laurens County, S. C. Mr. Dendy was 
educated in the common schools of his county, 
and had no opportunity of college or profes- 
sional training, but his experience in farming ren- 
ders him a safe i-epresentative of the agricultural 

classes. He has alway.-- fnllowe.l th'-- life of a f firmer : ■^'''fir'- B. Dendy 

was Justice of the Peace in Leake County, Miss., 






fe>>w--.-..^iiVak frtm ii 



891 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



1S7S-1S79; Mayor of Pickens. 1885-18S9; Super- 
visor in Madison County, 1S96-1905, and 1908-- 
1912; was elected to the Legislature. November 
7, 1911. He was returned to the House of Rep- 
resentatives in 1915 and no member of that body 
renders the State more efficient and faithful 
service. Both the educational and agricultural 
interests of the State are safe in his hands. He 
is a Democrat, a Baptist, and a member of the 
Masonic Order. He married Amanda Louisa 
Edwards, of Madison County. They have five 
children: Mrs. Evie Julia (Dendy) Allen. Shelby 
Brockton Dendy. William Edmond Dendy, Vin- 
cent Clare Dendy, and Mrs. Cornelia Ethel 
(Dendy) Xickles. In the Legislature of 1912- 
1914, Mr. Dendy was a member of Commiciees on 
the subjects. Corporations, Liquor Traffic. Edu- 
cation, Census and Apportionment, Federal Re- 
lations. At present, he is a member of the fol- 
lowing ComnMttees: Railroads; Public Lands: 
Registrations and Elections: Public Printing; 
Penitentiary; County Affairs; Roads, Ferries 
and Bridges; Liquor Trafhc; Pensions. 



r 



n ^ranaiiiiikMfi kv... •i.-^a 



Tip Ray 



TIF RAT of Canton, Madison County, Missis- 
sippi, was born in that place on the 8th day of 
June, 1890. His father, James William Ray. was 
born in the County of Neshoba, Mississippi, and 
lived, during his manhood, at Meridian, and at 
Canton, Mississippi. His wife, the mother of 
the subject of this sketch, was Callie F. (Ander- 
son) Ray. As a boy. Tip Ray attended the Can- 
ton High School. In 1906 he matriculated at 
the University of Mississippi, where he pursued 
the four years' Scientific Course, graduating in 
1910 with the degree of B. S. He then spent an 
additional year in the Law Department of the 
University. Thus excellently equipped, he pass- 
ed the examination before the Chancellor, and 
was admitted to the bar in May. 1914. As is 
the case with many members of his profession, 
young Attorney Ray was soon attracted to poli- 
tics. Popular with a host of friends, with his 
sterling character, and splendid equipment for 
public service he had no trouble in securing of- 
fice. He was nominated for the State Legisla- 
ture in 1915 and elected to serve for 1916-1920. 
Mr. Ray is still a very young man. and stands 
just at the opening of a brilliant career. He 
has already ably served upon the following com- 
mittees: Judiciary; Appropriations: Corpora- 
tions; Military Affairs; Claims, serving the lat- 
ter as chairman. Mr. Ray Is a Democrat, a Bap- 
tist, and a mo.T.ber of three fraternal organiza- 
tions. Knights of Pythias, V/oodmen of the 
World, and the Benevolent and Protective Or- 



.sfiolBno^ ;'.>su.-.-«i 



.. ..,^,f,.-M noinf.J 



L.EGISLu\TIVE DEPARTMENT 



893 



der of Elks, in the last named of which he holds 
the office of Esquire, Canton I^odgre 458. He is 
as yet unmarried. 



MARION COUNTY. 



ETHET.BERT ISAAC SINGLET, whose address 
is Route 2, Columbia, Mississippi, Representative 
from Marion County, was born near Columbia, 
December 2, ISSS. His father. Seaborn Sing-ley, 
was born in the same county, at Improve, and 
lived there until 1901, when he removed to the 
country near Columbia; his paternal sramlpar- 
ents were John and Katherine Sin^ley, of Im- 
prove. His g-reat-grandparents were George 
Frederick and Margaret Singley. The family 
have long been residents of Mississippi and have 
been always identified with its best progress. The 
maiden name of Representative Singley's mother 
was Fannie Lang. Her parents were Thomas 
and Elizabeth Lang-, who resided at Advance, 
Mississippi. Mr. Singley was educated in the 
rural schools of Marion County, at the Advance 
and Morris Schools, where he has carefully pre- 
pared for college. He then attended South 
Mis.sissippi College. He was a studious and am- 
bitious young man and decided to make teaching 
his profession. He has no^ been a member 
of that profession for a number of years, having 
taught successfully at the following places : two 
years at Black Jack, Covington County : four years 
In Marion County ; one year at Centerville and one 
year at Union. In 1915 at the urgent request of 
his many friends he entered politics by becoming 
a candidate for the State Legislature, to which 
he was elected for the term of 1916-19 20. Mr. 
Singley is independent of factional politics and 
believes that the States best interest are pro- 
moted by fairness and justice to all state insti- 
tutions. He is a man of high standards of right 
and makes the State's welfare his prime object. 
He has rendered zealous and helpful service to 
the State on the following committees: Appro- 
priations ; Education ; Manufactures : Liquor 
Traffic, of which he is chairman. Represen- 
tative Singley is a member of the Improve 
Baptist Church and belongs to the "Woodmen 
of the World. February 12, 1912. he was 
married to Anna L. Hollaway. at Prentiss, Mis- 
sissippi. Her parents are Alexander and Ange- 
line Holloway of Mt. Carmel, Mississippi. Mr. 
and Mrs. Singley have two children, Robert 
Luther "Walter and Seaborn Alex. 



:-.| 



Ethelbert I. Singley 



894 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART.MEXT 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 



v 



William W. Stamps 



WILLIAM WALTOX STAMPS of Colliersville. 
Tennessee. Representative from Marshall County, 
son of Georg-f' ^Vashin,?ton Stamps ami Martiia 
Mildred Joyner Stamps, was born at Marshall 
Institute in Marshall County, Mississippi, Decem- 
ber 4. 1871. His father is the son of .Joshua 
and Elizabeth (Pettey) Stamps. He was born in 
Hinds County, Mississippi, but lived during his 
boyhood and young manhood at Centre Hill, 
De Soto County, r^[issi.ssi;.pi. His pnr-nis remov- 
ed from Centre Hill to White County, Arkansas. 
He attended Union University at Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee, and taug'ht school at luka, Missis- 
sippi, and in Marshall County. In 1S59 he es- 
f^blished at luka a boarding' school for young 
ladies. Although this school was broken up by 
the Civil War it was re-opened after the War 
was over. During- the War the young Professor 
served in the secret service under General For- 
rest. Some time after the War he removed to 
Marshall County, where he still resides. The 
mother of the subject of our sketch was the 
daughter of Revi>Tend Thomas .Joyner and Eliza- 
beth McGehee Joyner of the Marshall Institute. 
Reverend Joyner was for sixty years a Meth- 
odist minister in the Tennessee conference, his 
home being Just across the Tennessee line in 
Mississippi. The Joyners are of English descent; 
their ancestors settled first in North Carolina, 
but migrated to Tennessee early in the ISth 
Century. Rev. John McGee, great-grandfather 
on maternal side, served in the Revolution, as 
did also his wife's father. Col. Wm. Johnston. 
Rev. John McGee's father was an officer of the 
militia appointed by King George in 176.5. He 
was from Ireland, and died at Raleigh. North 
Carolina. Representative Stamps obtained his 
early education in the free schools of Missis- 
sippi; he spent one term at the High School of 
Augusta, Arkansas, and another term at Belle- 
view College, Colliersvillf-. Tennessee. In 1896 
he opened a small country store in Marshall 
County, and has since remained there. In the 
meantime his business has developed '"ito a 
large and lucrative one. His wide business re- 
lations have made him well known and popular 
In his community. In 1915 he was nominated 
for the State Legislature and elected to serve 
In that body from 1916 to 1920 Mr. Stamps 

Is a man of sterling worth and is deeply re- 
gardful of the State's welfare. He has given 
faithful and valuable service upon the following 
committees: Manufactures; Eleemosynary Insti- 
tutions; Roads; Ferries and Bridges; Public 



legisll.\tive department 



895 



Buildings and Grounds. Mr. Stamps Is a Demo- 
crat, a :Mason. a Woodman of the World, and a 
Columbian AW.odman. On December 25, 1901, at 
Somerville, Tennessee, he was married to Ollie 
Earl Folk, daujrliter of Edward H. and Anna 
Belle (Applewhite) Polk of Mt. Pleasant, Missis- 
sippi. Her family belong to the same line of 
descent as did that of the Ex-President, James 
K. Polk. Mr. and Mrs. Stamps have three child- 
ren: John Edward. Frances Anna Louise, and 
Xina Vivian. 



■V\'ILFRED IVAXHOE SPEARS of Byhalia. 
Missis.^ippi, Representative from Marshall Coun- 
ty, was boin in De Soto County. Mississippi, 
April 24, 1856. His father, Adolnhus Spear.«. 
was born on James River. Cumberland County, 
Virginia, in 1817, and removed from there to 
Panola County. Mississippi. In 1847 he went to 
De Soto County, where he bought a tract of 
land and lived there at '•Rose Cottage" until his 
death, January 4, 1880. At the very outbreak 
of the Civil War he enlisted in Company 1, 
Seventeenth Regiment of Mississippi Infantry, 
of which W. S. Featherstone was Colonel. This 
regiment, toaether with the 13th, ISth and 21st 
composed Barkdale's famous Mississippi Brigade. 
Mr. Spear's father remained in the service until 
the close of the war, his services to the Con- 
federacy having been conspicuous for heroism 
and devotion to duty. His paternal grandpar- 
ents were Professor Leonard Spears and De- 
bora (Fowler) Spears of Cumberland County. 
Virginia. His maternal ancesti^rs were also 
Virginians who had lived in that State for sev- 
eral generations. His mother's maiden name 
was Lindia Ann Botaner. She was the daughter 
of Captain Bntaner and was feared in Chatham. 
Virginia. Mr. Spears' great-grandr-irents un his 
mother's side came from England in the days 
of the colonies. A youth after the close of the 
Civil 'War his educational advantages were very 
meager. All the schooling he was able to se- 
cure was In a log schoolhouse in the country. 
In spite of this disadvantage, Mr. Spears suc- 
ceeded to a large degree in educating himself 
by reading and by practii-al experience. He hns 
long taken an interest in politics, and at the 
people's solicitations he became a candidate for 
the State Legislature in 191.5 and was elected 
for the term of 1916-1920. In a body noted for 
Its unusual ability, high standards of integrity 
and great moral force and courage Mr. Spears 
stands at the front. His strong convictions of 
right and unswerving integrity places him nmong 



:'i^ «k. 




Wilfred I. Spears 



896 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



the able members of the Legislature. He serves 
on the committees of Ways and Means; Public 
Plealth and Quarantine; Fisheries; Commerce 
and Fishing-; Pensions. He has always believed 
in the principlos of the Democratic Party, and 
belongs to the Methodist Church. February 9, 
18S6 he was married to Emma J. Fouche of 
Yazoo City. Mississippi, daughter of Col. Isaac 
J. Fouche, who was born and reared in Virsiniii, 
and whose grandparents came to that State from 
France. Mrs. Spears' mother was a Miss Drewry 
of Drewryville, Southampton County, Virginia. 
Representative and Mrs. Spears have only one 
child, Nora Inez. 




John A. Hardin 



JOHN ALLEN HARDIN, whose addre.ss is R. 
F. D. No. 3, Potts Camp, Mississippi, represents 
Marshall County in the Lower House. He was 
bcrn at Holly Springs, Marhsall County, Miss- 
issippi. January 29, 1S70. His parents were 
William Jackson Hardin and Eliza Jane (Garri- 
son) Hardin. His father, William Jackson 
Hardin, was a native of Alabama, having been 
born at Maringo in that State. Throughout the 
War Between the States he served with ardent 
devotion in the Confederate Army. After the 
War he removed to Missis.^ippi. and became one 
of the community builders of the State at a 
period when the Civil War had impovcri.«hed th<' 
South. Eliza Jane (Garrison) Hardin, mother of 
the subject of this sketch, was the daughter of 
Allen Turner Garrison and Nancy (Simmons) 
Garrison, of Franklin County, Georgia. Repre- 
sentative Hardin obtained his early education in 
the public schools of -Marshall County; and in 
place of a college education he chose the more 
practical training obtained in the school of ex- 
perience. He became a successful farmer and 
stock raiser, and is still engaged in those oc- 
cupations. He is one of the prominent farmerg ot 
his vicinity. His large knowledge of farming and 
planting fitted him in every way to take part In 
legislation in a state so largely agricultural. Being 
a man of wide influence, popular in his county, he 
was brought out by the people of his section to 
represent their interests in the Legislature and 
in 191.5 was elected to serve from 1916 to 1920. 
In the Legislature he has served faithfully and 
with ability upon the following committees: 
Appropriations; Agriculture; Railroad; Public 
Buildings and Grounds. He i.-^ a member or" the 
Baptist Church and takes an active part in the 
work of the Sunday School, being Superinten- 
dent of that body for twenty years. He is a 
Mason, a Master of his lodge, and has also taken 



j 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART-MEXT 



897 



the Past blaster's degree. In 1S92. in :MarshaIl 
County he was married to Isabella Frances 
H:»rrell duusrhter of James Xotley Harrell and 
Xannie (Morton) Harrell of Holly Spring^s, Miss- 
issippi-. They have a large and intv^re.-Jtin-; family 
of nine children, two boys and .^rvon i-iiils. names 
of which were not supplied in notes. 



MOXROE COUNTY. 

WILLIAM HARTWELL KOLB of Aberdeen, 
who represents :Monroe County, was born in that 
County during the progress of the Civil War 
(October 16. 1862) at Hamilton (Rees Store). 
His father, John Ervin Cobb, had an adventur- 
ous career. He was born at Caledonia, Lown- 
des County, Mississippi. \Mien the Civil War 
began, he enlisted, and made one of the bravest 
soldiers of Company G.. 41st Mississippi Infantry. 
After the war he returned home and remained 
there until 1869. For the following thirteen 
years he passed his life in what was then the 
frontier region. First he went to Texas, Where 
he lived for five years; thence he went to the 
Indian Territory, and later to Arkansas. In 
1882 he returned to settle down for good in hi.s 
native State. His parents were Milton and 
Elizabeth (Ellis) Kolb of Caledonia. The Kolbs 
were among the earliest settlers in Virginia. 
They were among the number of liberty loving- 
races that left their native lands on account of 
religious persecution. They came to Virginia 
in 1616. The branch to which Representative Kolb 
belongs migrated South to the Carolinas, and 
thence gradually through Georgia, Alabama and 
Mississippi. Mr. Kolb's great-grandfather, Peter 
Kolb. settled In Mississippi, near Caledonia, in 1818. 
The connection is a numerous one; in 1892 there 
were about 12000 persons of this surname living 
in the United States. They represent the best 
population of the communities in which they re- 
side. William Haitwell Kolb's maternal grand- 
parents were also Mississippians, — William 
Stewart and Sara (Thomas) Stewart, of Rees 
Store, or Hamilton. Monroe County. Their 
daughter. Artelia. married John Ervin Kolb and 
ia the mother of the subject of the present 
sketch. Mr. Kolb will tell you that he received 
his early education "at the fireside, by the pine 
knot light", and that his mother was his best 
teacher. After leaving the public schools he 
attended the Mississippi Xormal College at Troy, 
where he continut<i until within one year of 
graduation. Here he fitted himself for teach- 




William H. Kolb 



57— M 



898 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



ing, an occupation that he followed successfully 
for two years, — 1SS8 and 1889. He is a man of 
strong convictions and the purest ideals of pub- 
lic service. From Xovember 12. 1889 to January 
6. 1S96, Mr. Kolb held the office of Chancery 
Clerk of Monroe County. In 1?115 the people of 
his county honored him with election to the 1916- 
1920 term of the Lesrislature, and the State's honor 
and credit will always be safe in the hands of 
such men as William Hartwell Kolb. He is 
one of the most careful and efficient members of 
the Legislature and has served with marked ability 
on the following committees: Penitentiary: Fees 
and Salaries ; County Affairs : Lirjuor Traffic : In- 
surance. !Mr. Kolb is a Democrat, a Deacon in the 
Presbyterian Church, and a member of the follow- 
ing fraternal societies : Odd Fellows. Knights 
Pythias, and \A'oodmen of the \\'orld. He has also 
served for four years as President of the Execu- 
tive Board of the State Farmers" Union. Mr. Kolb 
was married. March 24, 1891. at Xettleton. Mis.'^is- 
sippi, to Miss Lizie T. Boyd, daughter of Thade- 
ous and Kate CMetts) Boyd, of Xettleton. The 
Boyds came originally from Lawrence Di.'trict. 
South Carolina. Of this marriage there have 
been born seven children, only two of whom 
are living: Lawrence Boyd, and James Richard. 




William L. C. Bailey 



WILLIAM LEMMOX COLEMAN" BAILEY of 
Aberdeen. Representative from the County of 
Monroe, was born March 16, 1871, In that coun- 
ty. His parents were James Asbury Bailey and 
Elizabeth Katherine ^Armstrong) Bailey. Hia 
father's family were South Carolinians. His 
father, who was the son of Coleman and Frances 
rShell) Bailey of Laurens District in that State, 
was born October 29. 1818. at Laurens. He was 
a teacher, and followed that profession after he 
came to Missis.^ippi in 1847. Here he was 
elected County Surveyor, an office that he held 
for thirty years. For four years he served with 
P'-eat gallantry in the Confederate Army in Com- 
pany L of the 24th Regiment of ^Mississippi Volun- 
teers, of which he was Orderly Sergeant. The 
Bailey family Is one of the best families of the 
state, having numerous branches that immisrrated 
to America in the days of the Colonies. Elizabeth 
Katherine (Armstrong) Bailey, mother of W. L. C. 
Bailey, was the daughter of James G. and Mary 
(Reneau) Armstrong of Monroe County. Mississippi. 
Mar>' Reneau Armstrong was born October 23. 181.5, 
in North Alabama, removed to Missi.ssippi In 
1840, and lived at Aberdeen until her death. 
Mr. Bailey was educated In the public schools 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



899 



of the State where he was carefully grounded 
in the English branches. He has had con- 
siderable experience in local politics, having held 
the office of County Surs'eyor from 1900 to 1905, 
and been Supervisor of the Fifth Beat in his 
county for eight years, an office that he flllr-d 
very capably. His interest in all public questions 
that effect Mississippi prestige and welfare caused 
him to yield to the solicitations of the voters of 
his county and become their Representative In the 
State Legislature. He is well equipped for his 
position and no truer man to the State's best in- 
terest occupies a seat in that body. For the 
term of 1916-1920 he is serving as a valuable 
member of the following' committees: "Ways 
and Means; Railroads; Immigration and Labor; 
Federal Relations. He is a Democrat, a Metho- 
dist, a Master Mason, and a Woodman of the 
World, being Consul Commander of Post Oil 
Camp No. 40.5 Wren. He married Lallie May 
Word. April 1, 191.5. She is the daughter of 
Charles and ilnry Rebecca (Shell) Word of Mon- 
roe County, Mississippi. Charles Word served for 
years as a faithful Confederate soldier. His great- 
grandfather came from Ireland to Virginia, and 
during the Revoltuion was a drummer boy in 
the Fifth Virginia Regiment, commanded by 
Colonel Charles Spotswood. 



ARNA ALFRED TUBE of Amory. Miss., Rep- 
resentative of Monroe County, was born June 
9. 1S85, at Tubb's Cross-Roads. in Monroe Count\-. 
Miss. He is the son of Alfred "William Tubb 
and Nancy Evaline (Seely) Tubb of Tubbs. Miss. 
Alfred William Tubb was a brave soldier in the 
Confederate Army and served from 1862 until 
the close of the Civil War. He took part in the 
Battle of Shiloh and in tlie siege of Vicksburg. 
His father, Benjamin Tubb and mother, Sarah 
Colley Tubb. were residents of Smith County, 
Tenn. Benjamin Tubb was a native of South 
Carolina, Aberville District. When a small boy 
he removed to Tennessee with his father, Wilson 
Tubb, whose wife was Polley Benson, a near 
relative of Jeffer.«on Dav:.=!. Ama Alfred Tubb's 
maternal grandfather, Spencer Wilson Seely was 
born In the Mississippi Territory, May 20, 1812. 
His father. Edw;ifd Rudolph Seely. who helped to 
survey the boundary line of Indiana, removed 
from Indiana to Mississippi with his wife. Mar- 
guerite Crosby Seely. The Tubb family has al- 
ways been among the pro^essive families of 
the State and has taken pnrt in its social, eco- 
nomic and politii^al dtvelopnient. R-^pie.sentative 
Tubb received his first scholastic training In the 



mi^fS^mm^f^iffyvrm, 



X 



"^ wfc-^ 



Arna A. Tubb 



900 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



public schools of Tubbs' Cross-Roads, which 
schools he attended until nineteen years ot age. 
He afterwards attended Oakland College in 
Itawamba Countj', Miss., where he received the 
degree of A. B. in 1906. He subsequently took a 
course in bookkeeping at a Business Colles-e of 
Memphis, Tenn. Mr. Tubb has devoted many 
years to teaching in the counties of Monroe and 
Yalobusha. Miss. He was assistant Post-n-.aster 
at xVrmory for a numbber of years. Plaving be- 
come identifle<l witli the various activities of his 
section, he was induced to become a candidate 
for the Legislature and was elected in 191.J. for 
the term of 1916-1920. Representative Tubb, in 
connection %\ iih his public duties, is combining 
the study of la-.v at Millsaps College. His ambi- 
tions have been very laudable and his many 
friends prophesy for him a brilliant future of 
much usefulness to his State. In the Legisla- 
ture he is serving ably on the following com- 
mittees: Judiciary; Education; Railroads; iluni- 
cipalities. On June 13, 1915, Mr. Tubb was mar- 
ried to Hattie Vernon Jones, daughter of Mc- 
Laurin Fannin Jones and Laura Alice Crutcher 
Jones of Coffeeville. Miss. McLaurin Jones' 
father was McLaurin Hamilton Jones, born 
January 9, 1826, near Nashville, Tenn. He was 
a son of Albert Oakley Jones who was born in 
1780 in North Carolina, where he married a Miss 
Hamilton, who was a native of Pennsylvania, and 
a relative of Alexander Hamilton. Both were of 
Scotch-Irish descent. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 




Elijah M. Thompson 



ELIJAH MARION THOMPSON, member of the 
House from Montgomery County, lives at 
Winona, Mississippi. He is the son of Thomas 
and Alcena Roberts (Watson) Thompson, and 
was born nf-ar Greensburg, Louisiana, May 30, 
1S43. Thomas Thompson was the son of Jerry 
Nias and Sarah (Tolley) Thompson of Washing- 
ton Parish, Louisiana, where he was born. Ho 
lived in later life near Greensburg in that State. 
The mother of the subject of our sketch was 
the daughter of Willis and Elizabeth (Bennett) 
Watson of Greensburg, St. Helena Parish, 
Louisiana. Mr. Thompson was educated in the 
country schools of his native parish. At an 
early age he took up the occupation of farming. 
in which he has been engaged throughout life. 
During the Civil War he faithfully served the 
Confederacy as S.'.-ond Pergennt of Conipar.y H. 
of the 27th Louisiana Regiment. IT.-.' has had a 
great deal of experience in public life. From 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



901 



1S70 to ISSO he served as Justice of the Peace; 
for four years he was a valuable member of the 
Board of Supervisors; for six years he was 
Sheriff, and in 1011 was elected to the State 
Legislature, in which he served on the following- 
committees: Liquor Traffic, Public Printing, 
Pensions, Census, and Appropriations. Always 
popular in his county and honored for the high 
position, he had reached with few educational 
advantages, the people of his section have, lime 
and again, placed him in public positions of 
trust. No man in the public service of the State 
is more independent in his convictions, and his 
high sense of justice in dealing with the vari- 
ous state institutions has made him trusted by 
all who have the State's welfare at heart. His 
constitutents were so well pleased with his. re- 
cord that they re-elected him for the term of 
1916—1920. He now serves on the committees of 
Ways and Means; Corporations; Pensions of 
which he is chairman. He is a Democrat, a 
Mason and a Baptist. December 18, 1861, he 
was married to Sarah Elizabeth Holiman, daugh- 
ter of John and Susan (Castle) Holiman of 
Lodi, Choctow County, Mississippi. Their family 
consists of, — !Mary Susan Thompson, Alcena Eu- 
genia (Thompson) Harpole, Dr. John Allen 
Thompson of Durmott. Arkansas, Christopher 
Trvin Thompson, and Pleasant Hamer Thomp- 
son. 



NESHOBA COUNTY. 



THOMAS BP.OWN WILLIAMS of PhiUidelphia. 
Mississippi, Representative from Neshoba County, 
was born in that County, near Edinburg, January 
24, 1883. His father, Isiah Williams, was also 
born near Edinburg (Route 2). and has lived at 
Remus, Mississippi. The paternal grandparents of 
Thomas Brown Williams were John P. and Sarali 
(McMichael) Williams, of Edinburg. The family 
has long been in the State and has been promi- 
nent in all movements for its social and civic ad- 
vancement. The Williams name is one of the 
early Colonial names of America and the various 
branches of the family have furnished numerous 
soldiers to the cause of American liberty. The 
maiden name of Representative AVilliams" mother 
was Jane Ballard. She was the daughter of Jack 
Ballard and Addie (McMurray) Ballard, who wer? 
residents of Remu.-*, ?ilississippi-. Mr. Williams ob- 
tained his education in the public schools of 
Coghlin, Remus and Edinburg. After completing 
his elementary education he took up a business 



y ;- .' ■■ "«w : gMW P W* ' H r '-. "j!^ 



L^ i AmtL, 



Tliomas B. Williams 



&02 



LEGISL.VTIVE UEPARTMENT 



course to fit him.^olf for a mercantile life- and in 
1S99, at -Marydelle, .Mississippi, he began a suc- 
cessful business of selling general merchandise 
^^ ith the exception of one year. 1900, during which 
he taught school at Remus, he has followed that 
occupation. From 1901 to 1309 he was located 
m Edmburg; he is now in West Philadelphia 
While he was at Marydelle he served a« V-=<i6iant 
Postmaster. By the year 1915 Mr. W^illiams had 
become so well and favorably known throughout 
his county that he was urged to enter the race 
for Representative and was tlie successful candi- 
date. He is independent of party leaders and fac- 
tions, and in his service to the State is not ac- 
tuated by any motives but those that promote 
Mississippi's welfare along both intellectual and ma- 
terial lines. In th,- House he has been placed on 
the following committees, where he has served 
with diligence and integrity: AppropriaUons • 
Railroads ; Pensions. He belongs to the Democratic 
Party, is a member of the Baptist Church, a Mason 
and a Woodman of the World. On the 24th of 
June, 1914, at Philadelphia, .he was married to 
Katie Lee Webb, daughter of T. J. Webb and Mary 
(McCrory) Webb, of Xeshota County. 



XEWTON COUXTY. 



.^y^y;,a,.BBf «w » ? >,,<,-a ^■ATHA.\ MORRIS EVERETT of Hickory. Rep- 

' -^ resentative from Xewton County, was born near 

Hickorj- on the 18th day of July. 1870. He is the 
son of Bailey Jojinson Everett, who was also born 
,% "ear Hickory and lived there all his life. He 

seived in the Confederate Army in the Civil War. 
, The paternal grandparents of X'. Morris Everett 
. were John and Elizabeth (Hailey) Everett. The 
1 Everett family came originally from England and 
a settled first in Georgia. From that State, Thomas 
I Everett and his wife, Pennie (Rogers) Everett, 
J great-grandparents of the subject of our sketch, 
tfa^i^ ----— S- -rif- '-rrr'ii'^ came to South Mississippi. Lawrence County, and 
^ from there to X'ewton County, the present home 

Nathan M. Everett ^f their descendants. The mother of Representa- 

tive Everett was, prior to her marriage. Anna Fara- 
lee Jolly, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (John- 
son) Jolly, who lived near Hickory at the time 
of their daughter's marriage, but later removed to 
Arkansas. Mr. Everett obtained his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Arkansas and Missis- 
sippi, which was supplemented by his reading 
and studying politics at home. He attended Hic- 
kory Institute for a time and then matriculated 
at the Xational X'^ormal University of Lebanon, 



ii 



LEGISLATIVR DEPARTME:XT 



d03 



Ohio, where he pursued both a business and a law- 
course, graduating from there with the degree of 
LL,. B. In 189 6 he was admitted to the bar, but 
he did not begin the practice of his profession 
until 1901. In tlie meantime he occupied liimself 
with teaching school. In addition to his law prac- 
tice he has been an able editor of a newspaper at 
Hickory since 1?01. During tliis time lie became 
very influential in his community, but did not be- 
come a candidate for office until 1912, when he was 
elected to the State Legislature. He then took an 
active part in legislation and is one of the strong 
members of that body. He is the author of the 
present Mississippi Age of Consent Law for the 
protection of wo.manhood, which raises the age 
from twelve to fourteen years. He advocated 
such progressive measures as the Guaranty Bank- 
ing Law, Parcel Post, Government Ownership of 
Railroads, Rural Credit System, and government aia 
in marketing farm produce. In 1915 he was re- 
elected to serve from 1916 to 1920 and his staunch 
Ideals of honesty, truth and justice make him a 
worthy and safe representative of his people. For 
this term he has been placed upon the following 
committees : Rules ; Judiciary : Appropriations ; Cor- 
porations ; Ways and Means, of which latter he is 
Chairman. Mr. Everett is a Jeffersonian Demo- 
crat, and has served his party as delegate to sev- 
eral conventions. He is past Chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias, and a Columbian "Woodman ; 
was a delegate from Mississippi to Eminent House- 
hold in 1914, and is a member of same. On 
Christmas Day. 1898. at Desarc. Arkansas, he was 
married to Hattie Leona I^ivesay, daughter of 
William T. and Ophelia Livesay of that place. The 
Livesays came from England to Virginia ; thence 
they removed to Tennessee, and finally settled in 
Arkansas. Mrs. Livesay's people came to Arkan- 
sas from Xorth Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Everett 
have four children: Livesay Morris, sixteen years 
old, Xoble Heber, twelve, Olin William, nine, and 
Merlene, seven. 



BENXIE WARREN' DEARIXG of Xewton, who 
represents Xewton Coimty, was born near that 
to\\-Ti on the 9th day of April in 1880. He bears 
the full name of his father, who was born near 
Atlanta. Georgia, and remo\ed to Mississippi in 
1858. Bennie Warren Dearing, Sr.. was ordained 
in X'ewton as a Baptist preacher. He assumed 
th(? pastorate of the Bethel Church, near Xewton. 
and served the people of that congregation until 
his death, December 1. 1894. During the Civil 
War he served as a Confederate soldier in Com- 






i 




Bennie W. Dearinj 



904 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



pany G, Sth Miss. Regiment of Infantry. To every 
call that a varied life demanded he responded with 
faithful service. When they came to America, the 
Dearings fiist settled in North Carolina. Thence 
they removed, some to Georgia, others to Alabama. 
The grandfather of Representative Dearing, Samut-I 
Malon Dfaring, came from Georgia to Mississippi 
with his son, the Reverend B. W. Bearing. Rep- 
)-esentative Bearing's mother was, in her girlhood, 
Margaret Frances Simmons, and was the daughter 
of Charles and Annis (McClendand) Simmons of 
Newton County. Mr. Bearing obtained his educa- 
tion in tiie public schools of Newton County having 
among his teachei-s I'rof. Anthony and Prof. James 
Roebuck. Nominated over six worthy candidates, 
he was elected to the House of Representatives In 
1915 for the term of 1916-20. As a member of 
the House he has constantly advocated the applying 
cf business principles to the task of running the 
state government. He is a thoughtful and pains- 
taking public official and has served with diligence 
and marked ability upon the following committees : 
Agriculture; Registrations and Elections; County 
Affairs ; Roads, Ferries and Bridges. IMr. Bear- 
ing is an enthusiastic Bemocrat. a member of th«i 
Baptist Church, and is Pretorian of Liberty Lodge 
896, Woodmen of the World. In 1904, Becember 
29th, Mr. Bearing was united in marriage to Allie 
B. Gary, at her home at Poplar Springs, five miles 
from Newton. She is the daughter of Marvin and 
Mary (Tom) Gary. Her maternal grandfather, 
Bennis Welch, was a Confederate soldier in the 
Civil War, where he rendered faithful service. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bearing have four children : Bennie Mar- 
vin, Lamar Edison, Charles Franklin, and Thurman 
Gary. 



NOXUBEE COUNTY. 



r 






Thomas W. Brame 



THOMAS "WEBB BRAME of Macon. Noxubee 
County, Miss., was born October IS, 1850, near 
Greensboro, Hale County, Ala., the son of Charles 
Edward Brame, of Petersburg, Va., who was a 
graduate of Princeton University, and a veteran of 
the Mexican and Civil Wars. Mr. Brame's mother 
was Mary Frances (Webb) Brame, daughter of 
Thomas Webb and Martha Brown Webb. He is of 
Scotch and Welsh descent, his ancestors settling 
originally in Virginia. The family coat-of-arms 
bears the motto, "Be what you appear to be." 
Judge Brame received his early educaLion from hi3 
father ; attended Southern University, Greensboro. 
Ala.; was graduated In 1871 with degree of P. B. ; 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



905 



studied law and was admitted to practice in 1873 at 
PeKalb. Miss., where he practiced for ten years ; 
he then removed to Scianton. and again to Shef- 
fltld, Ala. ; is at present engaged in law practice at 
Macon, Miss. : was Justice of the Peace in 1876 : 
elected to the House of Representatives. Xovember 
7, inil, and was returned in 1915. A short sketch 
for public record could hardly do justice to Thoma.<! 
Webb Erame. A tenacious fighter for every good 
that pertains to the welfare of Mississippi he is at 
the same time' kindly and considerate in his manner 
toward those who disagree with him. His earnest- 
ness and 2eal are only equalled by his high sense 
of justice and loyalty to every high Ideal. Missis- 
sippi has never had in her public service a more 
thoiightful, fearless and able representative. Judge 
Brame is a Democrat, a Deacon in the Baptist 
Church, and an Odd Fellow. On January 6, 1875, he 
was married, at Fannin. Miss., to Olivia Elizabeth 
Ellis, daughter of Jesse and Martha Loftln Ellis. 
Judge and Mrs. Brame have three children: ZSIartha 
Webb, Alfred Ellis, and Julius. In the session of 
1911, Judge Brame was a member of the following 
committees: Fees and Salaries; Railroads; Judi- 
ciary; Library; State Offices. In the present body 
he Is a member of committees on Judiciary ; Ways 
and Means ; Railroads ; T^iquor Traffic. 



CLINTON EDWARDS DORROH. Rppresentative 
from the County of Noxubee, resides at Macon. 
Mississippi. He was born April 3, 1887, at Shu- 
qualak in the county where he now lives. His par- 
ents are Chastian Brackett Dorroh and Nellie 
Jane (Edwards) Dorroh. The father, Chastian B. 
Dorroh, was born at Mashulaville, Noxubee County. 
After his marriage he removed to Gholson. Jlissis- 
sippi, where he engaged in the mercantile business 
and farming. Later he removed to Shuqualak, 
wherpi his son, Clinton Edwards was born. There he 
continued to follow thi? occupations of farmer and 
merchant until the year 1895, when he removed 
to Macon, where he was for a number of years, 
cashier of the Bank of !Macon. The parents of 
Chastian B. Dorroh were William and Eliza Ann 
Evans Dorroh. The family is of Welsh descent. 
The mother of Clinton Edwards Dorroh is also 
of Welsh blood, making Representative Dorroh a 
direct descendant of one of the purest arid olde!it 
races that inhabit the British Isles. His mother's 
maiden name was 'U'illie Jan*? Edwards, and she 
was the daughter of Elisha and Jane CNealy) 
Edwards of Kellis Store. Kemper County, Missis- 
sippi, the family having been among the early 
settlPTs of the State. Mr. Dorroh was educated in 




lintun E. Dorroh 



906 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



the rural schools of Kemper County, and in the 
public schools of Shuqualak and of Macon. For 
three years he was a student at the A. & M. Colleg-e. 
and later entered the University of Mississippi, 
graduating in the law class of 1914 with the degree 
of LL. B. He was admitted to the bar in that 
same year, and began the practice of law in Oc- 
tober at Macon, where he still has his office. A 
year later he was elected to the State Legislature 
to serve from 1916 to 1920, and has already 
given promise of being an able R^'presentative. He 
has served with exceptional ability on the following 
committees : Judiciary ; Eleemosynary Institutions : 
Military Affairs. Mr. Dorroh is a member of the 
Democratic Party. Hi' has had considerable mili- 
tary experience, having enlisted in the Mississippi 
National Guard on July 19, 1912. where he has 
filled the offices of First Lieutenant and Adjutant 
He is a Baptist, and a member of the Knights of 
P>-thias and the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He 
is unmarried. 

Representative Dorroli is now in the military 
service of his country in her struggle to free the 
world from tyranny and oppression. 



PRINCE DB ^YITT HUBBARD, Member of th^ 
House' from Noxubee County, has his home at 
Shuqualak in that County. He was born May 
4. 188.5, at Hashuqua, near Gholson, Noxubee 
County. He is the son of Walter Jones Hubbard 
and Margaret (Finch) Hubbard. His paternal 
grandparents were Elijah Jones Hubbard and 
Mary (Mangum) Hubbard, of Atlanta. Fulton 
County, Georgia, where his father, "Walter Jone.= 
Hubbard, was born. In 1846 the family removed 
to Hopevile, Georgia, where they lived until 1855. 
At the opening of the Civil War, Walter Jones 
Hubbard, then a youth of only fourteen years, 
enlisted in the 35th Mis.=issippi Regiment of th'? 
Confederate Army. He was takfn prisoner at the 
Siege of Vicksburg, but escaped and re-enlisted. 
At Nashville, Tennessee, he was again captured 
and was sent to the Federal prison at Camp Doug- 
las, where he was detained until tiie close of the 
War. From 1870 to 1887 he resided at Hashuqua. 
where his son Prince De Witt was born ; from 
1887 to 1889. he lived at Meridian, Mississippi: 
and from 1889 to dato at Shuqualak. The mother 
of the subject of this sketch, Margaret (Finch) 
Hubbard, is the daughter of Enoch Finch and 
Elizabeth f Stokes) Finch, who lived in the coun- 
try near Eutaw, Alabama to which place they re- 
moved when it was a part of the ML-=.*i>sippi Ter- 
ritory. Princfr De Witt Hubbard was educated In 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



907 



the Shuqualak High School, where he received a 
good education in the English branches. Since ho 
was ten years old he has been associated with 
his father in the mercantile business at Sliuqualak, 
and has met with mu(^h success in that work. 
Mr. Hubbard's deep interest in all public questions 
led him into public life, where he could extend 
his labors for the good of his state. Popular 
and influential with the people, in 1915. he was 
elected a member of the State Legislature to 
serve from 1916 to 1920. His long experience 
In business has well fitted him to master the de- 
tails of legislative work, and he has served with 
much ability on the following committees : Cor- 
porations ; Census and Apportionment; Peniten- 
tiary; County Affairs: Propositions and Griev- 
ances. Mr. Hubbard is a Presbyterian, and is a 
member and Past Master of Slaughter Lodge No. 
285 of the F. & A. M. On June 12, 1910, at Near 
Point, Louisiana, he was married to Cuba Sarah 
Terry, daughter of Robert Fulton Terry and Ma- 
lissa Ann (Dixon) Terry of Near Point. 



OKTIBBEH.\ COUNTY. 



JOSEPH SMITH RICE of Starkville. Repre- 
sentative' from Oktibbeha County, was born Dec. 
30. 1888. and is the son of Dr. Arthur H. Rice 
and Francis M. (Smith) Rice. He comes of dis- 
tinguished families on both sides of the house. 
Doctor Rice, son of John W. and Augusta (Hop- 
kins) Rice, was reared in Talladiga, Alabama, but 
spent a portion of each summer on his father's 
plantation in Oktibbeha County. Mis.-issippi. He 
attended school in Mobile, and when fourteen years 
of age went to Europe, where he studied for three 
years in France and two years in Germany. On 
his return to the United States he took a course 
in medicine' at the Mobile Medical College, where 
he was graduated in 1873. and then took post 
graduate work at various institutions and prac- 
ticed until 1873. when, on account of failing health 
he returned to his plantation, where, with the ex- 
ception of two years that he spent practicing in 
Mobile, he has resided ever since, engaged in 
practicing medicine, planting and stock raising. 
During the sessions of 1894 and 1896 he repre- 
sented his county in the State Legislature. Doctor 
Rice's father and mother were natives of South 
Carolina and Alab.ima. respectively. When a young 
man, John "VV. Rice removed with his parents 
to Alabama, where he en^raged in planting. He 
served for one year in the Mexican War, Inherited 
a large estate in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. 




.Joseph S. Rice 



908 



legtslati\t: department 



'■ I ", mm t f.^j. ' ^. ' . 



— * ./ 

■' Pi 



John D. Greene, Jr. 



and settled there for the remainder of his life. At 
the time of his death, in 1857, he was a member 
of the State Senate. His wif,» •w-as the daughter 
of Arthur F. Hopkins, a disting^iished statesman 
of Alabama, and at one time Chief Justice of 
that State. In 1879 Doctor Rice was married to 
the mother of the subject of this sketch. She was 
Francis MoFarland Smith, a native of Charlestown, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Joseph H. and Harriet 
(^McFarland) Smith, the father of Vermont, and 
the mother of Massachusetts. :Mr. Smith when a 
young man camp to Mobile, where he was engaged 
as clerk and was in the Confederate service. 
After the war he became Division Superintendent 
of the Mexican Central Railroad, and was later 
put in charge of the railroad hotel system of the 
Southern Pacific. He was first cousin of Senator 
Justin Morrill of Vermont. Joseph Smith Rice, 
Representative in the 1916-20 term of the Legisla- 
ture received his early education in the rural 
schools of his countj and afterwards attended 
Fre-nch Camp Academy where he was graduated 
in 1903. He also attended Chamberlin Hunt Aca- 
demy and the University of Mississippi, graduating 
from the latter institution in 1910 with the degree 
of B. S. He received the Bible History Medal and 
oratorical medal from Chamberlin Hunt Academy 
and the Freshman oratorical medal from the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi. Ho studied law at Cumberland 
University Law School receiving the LL. B. degree 
June 1914. He began the practice of law in Septem- 
ber of the same year in Starkville where he has 
built up a successful practice. He soon became 
widely k.iown through his profession and his deep 
interest in the welfare of the taxpayers of his County 
led him to seek a position where he could better 
serve their interests in assisting in making the 
laws that affected both the city and rural com- 
munities. He was elected to the Mississippi Legis- 
lature in 191.5 and is serving with markpd ability on 
the following committees : Judiciary ; Education : 
Census and Apportionment : Registrations and Elec- 
tions ; Manufactures ; Military Affairs. Representa- 
tive Rice is a Democrat and was a member of the 
Oktibbeha County Democratic Committee from 1912 
to 1916. He is a member of the Delta Tau Delta 
fraternity and is also a Mason. 

JOHN' DAXIEL GREEXE, JR.. Representative 
from Oktibbeha County, resides at Sturgis, Missis- 
sippi. He was born at Chester, in Choctaw County. 
Mississippi. March 2, 1892. His father. Richard 
ITrnry Greene, was also born in Choctaw County. 
He is the son of Henry L. Greene. Representative 
Greene's paternal ancestors came from Ireland and 



ii 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 909 



settled in Virginia at an early date, later going to 
South Carolina. His grandfather removed from 
South Carolina to Mississippi early in life, set- 
tling near Louisville, in this State. The Greene 
family was one of the most numerous and prom- 
inent of the Colonial States and various branches 
emigrated from Ireland, England and Scotland. 
John Daniel Greenes family having comy from Ire- 
land. Representative Greene obtained his early 
education in the public schools of his County. He 
was reared on a farm, where it was necessary for 
him to work, and he had to depend on his own 
efforts to secure his schooling. After completing 
his common school course he taught successfully for 
two years in the public schools of Oktibbeha 
County, reading law in his leisure moments. He 
then attended the University of Mis.sissippi for 
awhile, and was admitted to the bar in 191-4. He- 
began the practice of his profession at Sturgis. 
Mississippi, June 25, 191.5 and soon became in- 
fluential with the people of his County. His 
high standing in the community is shown by the 
fact that in the fall of 1915 he was elected to 
the State Legislature to serve from 1916 to 192ii. 
Mr. Greene, althou^'h one of the youngest men in 
the Lower House, has shown talent, ability and 
integrity in dealing with the affairs of state. 
He has done promising work as a member of the 
committees on: Judicir.ry , Constitution; Appro- 
priations; Banks and Banking; Registrations and 
Elections, seizing the latter Committee as Chair- 
man. Mr. Greene is a Deniocrat and a member of 
the Baptist Church. He is not yet married. 



PAXOLA COUXTT. 



ALBERT SIDNEY KYLE of Batesville, Fanola __^.,..^, ,-,^.--^ ..„-.'■ ^n 
County. Miss., was born February 27 1854, at P" ' " ■ . '. > -.^' 
Sardis, !Miss., and is the son of James Monroe 
Kylf and Susannah (Curtis) Kyle. His ancestors 
came to America from Ayrshire, Scotland, in 173.3. 
and feettled in Penn.sylvania, and later in Virginia. 
Thomas Kyle, a paternal ancestor, was a colonel 
in the Army of the Revolution and was severely 
wounded at tne Battle of Cowpens. The father of 
A S. Kyle enlisted in thf? first Confederate company 
that was organized in Panola County, but on ac- 
count of physical disabilities could not serve ; he 
however entered the military service of the Con- 
federacy at a later period and rendered faithful 
service until the close of hostilities. 'Mr. Kyle at- Albert S. Kyle 

tended the piimary schools of Panola County ; he 
has b^en a farmer ever since early manhood ; 



.;>**-<% 



910 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



was elected to tlie House of Representatives from 
Fanola County in 1S99, and served as CIi;iirman of 
tlie Committee on Appropriations; re-elected Xov- 
ember 3, 19Uo'. In the House of 1901-06, he was 
a member of tlie following committees: Ways and 
Means, Benevolent Institutions (Chairman), Rail- 
roads, Pensions, I'ublic Lands. He was elected to 
the Senate November 7, 1911. In the sessions of 
1912-14, lie was a member of the following com- 
mittees: Finance. Agriculture, Commerce and -Manu- 
factures; Claims; County Affairs; Unfinished Busi- 
ness. In November. 1915, Senator Kyle was elected 
to the House of Representatives, as the people 
wished to secure his valuable services in that branch 
of the Legislature. He is considered one of the 
ablest men of the Legislature and being one of 
its oldest members in point of service, his opinion 
on any question is eagerly sought. During his 
long service to the slate he has left his impress 
on much of the most important legislation enacted 
during tlie past eighteen years. He serves with 
distinguished ability on the following committees; 
Rules; Claims; Public Health and Quarantine; 
Banks and Banking ; Drainage. In political af- 
filiation Mr. Kyle is a Democrat ; has served on 
County Committees ; member of Cumberland Pres- 
byterian Church. (Elder), he is a Mason, Knight of 
P>'thias and Knight of Honor. Mr. Kyle was 
married January 2S. 1S8.5, at Sardis, Miss., to Mary 
Frank Heflin, daughter of W. D. Heflin and Mar>- 
(McLaurin) Heflin of Sardis, Miss. Mrs. Kyle and 
two children died in 190 4. Senator Kyle has 
five living children : Mary Heflin, Susie Munro, 
John William, Albert Sidney, Jr., and Franklin Mc- 
Kenzie. 



FELIX HEZEKIAH NELSON of Pope, Missis- 
.-w ' sippi. Representative from Panola County, was 

''^-'i-*-, born September 17, 1872, at Old Panola, Fanola 

County. His parents were Jeremiah Nelson and 
Margaret Narcissus (Rhodes) Nelson. The father, 
Jeremiah Nelson, was also born at Old Fanola, 
and spent his entire life there, with the exception 
of his four years of faithful service as a Confeder- 
ate soldier duiing the Civil War. He also served 
as magistrate of Beat 4. of Panola County. The 
mother, Margaret Narcissus (Rhodes) Nelson, was 
tlie daughter of Hezekiah Rhodes and Mary Rhodes, 
who lived at Pope, Mi.^sissippi. The Nelson fam- 
ily is an old Mississippi family to which State 
FelLx H. J^Telson ^^^y came from the older Southern States. Mr. 

Nelson obtained his education in the public schools 
of Pope and of Eureka. Mississippi. June 1, 1906, 
he entered the mercantile business at Pope, where 



>5 C. 




.a>liuK9'H 






■ r. :t^ 



IvEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



911 



hu has since resided. He has served as Marshal: 
of his villag-e, and as Tax Collectoi- from 190 6 to 
1910. filling both offices to the entire satisfaction 
of the voters. He takes an interest in agricultural 
as well as political affairs, and is a valuable mem- 
ber of the Farmers' Union. Through his good 
work in his couiuj- for all community improve- 
ment and efforts to advance tlie agricultural in- 
terests of his section he became widely known 
among the voters of his County and was elected 
to serve in the Lower House of the State Legis- 
lature from 1916 to 1920. He is in every way 
worthy of the honor bestowed upon him, has proved 
himself a careful, thoughtful legislator and has 
fully met the expectations of his constituents by 
his valuable work on the following committees: 
Corporations ; Census and Apportionment : Regis- 
trations and Elections ; Eleemosynary Institutions ; 
Engrossed Bills. He has long been prominent in the 
Democratic Party, having served on the Executive 
Committee of his County from 1911 to 1915. He 
is active in Church work, is a member of the M. E. 
Church South, a Sunday School teacher and Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Sunday School. Decem- 
ber 31, 1901, at Eureka Springs, Mississippi, he 
was married to Maude Alma Selby, daughter of 
Philip Hawker Selby and Margaret Rebecca (Hull) 
Selby of that place. They have three children. 
Jewel, Merle and Maxine. 



ROBERT TAYLOR KEYS of Sardis. Representa- 
tive from Panola County, was born at Cold Springs, 
in that County. March 13. 1890. He is th. son of 
George Thomas Keys and Mary Jane (Miller) 
Keys. Geoi'ge Thomas Keys is the son of Charles 
Matthew and Mary Keys, who lived at Petersburg. 
Virginia before they came to Pontotoc County, 
Mississippi, and he was born at Pontotoc in that 
County. Previous to and immediately following 
the Civil \Var he lived at Lafayette Springs, La- 
fayette County, Mississippi. During the War he 
enlisted, at Oxford, in Company A. 29th Mississippi 
Regiment, AValthall's Brigade, and took part In 
the Battles of Chickamauga and Lookout Moun- 
tain. He was captured at Lookout Mountain and 
held prisoner at Rock Island, Illinois, until the 
close of the War. His ancestors came from En- 
gland in the early days of the Revolution, and set- 
tled at Petersburg. "Virginia. They have always 
been among tht? ardent patriots of America. Mary 
Jnne (Miller) Keys, mother of the subject of our 
sketch, is the daughter of Christenburg and Eliza- 
beth Bost Miller of Concord, Cabarras County. 
Xorth Carolina, where the ancestors of th<r family 




Robert T. Keys 



912 



LEGISL.VTIVE DEPARTMENT 



settled on coming here from Holland. Representa- 
tive Keys, who is one of that splendid body of 
young Representatives who form a large contin- 
gent of the Mississippi Legislature, attended the 
public schools at Cold Springs and Panola and the 
Panola High School at Sardis, where his principal 
was Professor B. W. Gowdy. In 1912 he began 
teaching at Bluff, in Panola County ; he taught 
successfully for three years at Fredonia. and also 
taught at Harmon and Lespideza in Panola County. 
In September, 1915, Mr. Keys entered Millsaps Col- 
lege, and it was while he was a student there that 
he was honored with the office of State Representa- 
tive for 1916-1920, a position in which he has al- 
ready proved his ability by his good work on the 
following committees: Appropriations; Education; 
Immigration and Labor. In iiis service to the State 
Representative' Keys subordinates personal welfare 
to the public good. He is feailess. in his opposition 
to any influence that would retard the higher edu- 
cational advancement of Mississippi, is just to every 
State institution and labors for the good of all. 
He is a public official of great promise and has a 
bright career ahead of him. :Mr. Keys is a Demo- 
crat and a Methodist. At the age of fourteen he 
was chosen steward of his church and served eight 
years in that office. He is still unmarried. 



FEARL RIVER COUXTT. 




Jess E. Stockstill 



JESS EMERSOX STOCKSTILL of Picayune 
Mississippi, Representative from Pearl River 
County, was born November 12, 1884, near Nichol- 
son, Hancock County, Mississippi. His father, 
George "Washington Stockstill, was also born in 
that county, near Gainesville, and lived there until 
after the War. July, 1?61. G. 'W. Stockstill en- 
listed in the Gaines\ille Rifles of the Confederate 
Army. He served at the Siege and Battle of Vicks- 
burg. His father. Thomas Stockstill, was of Scotch- 
Irish descent and a native of South Carolina, but 
came to Mississippi in 1840, and married Harriet 
Warden. After the War, G. W. Stockstill removed 
to Xicholson, Mississippi, where he became a mer- 
chant, farmer and stock raiser. Frances Annie 
Stockstill. mother of the subject of our sketch, was 
born in Jackson County, Florida ; her maiden name 
was Smith. .Jordan Smith, her father, was a rich 
slave holder, who removed to Mississippi in 1845, 
bringing his slaves with him, and settled near 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 913 



Gainesville. He and his wife, Frances Ann (Whit- 
field) Smith, were both of Scotch descent; their 
parents came from Scotland to the southern coast 
of Florida during the period of colonial settlement. 
He served as a soldier in the Indian Wars, includ- 
ing the Seminole, that being the last one in which 
he took part. Mr. Stockstill obtained his early edu- 
cation in the rural schools of Hancock County. He 
was graduated with distinction from the Poplar- 
ville High School in 1906. During the .lime of his 
attendance there he was a teacher in Hancock 
County, teaching in summer schools to secure money 
to pursue his education. After completing high 
school he taught at Picayune and became very 
pi-orainent as one of the progressive members of 
the teaching profession. He did much toward put- 
ting reform ideas in practice, in the improvement of 
rural schools in the matter of grading, building, 
and consolidation. In 1907 he entered the Law 
Department of the University of Mississippi, and 
completed his course in 1909, with the LL. B. degree. 
In February of that year he began the practice of 
his profession at Picayune. He now has an exten- 
sive practice covering Hancock and Harrison Coun- 
ties, and reaching into the State of Louisiana. He 
is City Attorney of Picayune. Being admirably 
fitted to take part in all legislation bearing on pub- 
lic questions concerning the state he yielded to the 
request of the people and became a candidate for 
the Legislature. He was elected to serve in that 
body from 1916 to 1920, where his well trained 
legal mind and high sense of justic"; have made him 
a valuable member of the Committees on Judiciary ; 
Constitution : Appropriations ; Education ; Banks 
and Banking. Mr. Stockstill is a Democrat and 
a Baptist. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
and the Woodmen of the World, in both of which 
he has held ofRce. December 20, 1914 he married 
Inez Agnes Herrington, daughter of Reverend Oscar 
X. Herrington and Drucilla (Evans) Herrington, 
of Wiggins. Mississippi. Rev. Herrington is one 
of the foremost Baptist preachers of his State. 
He was born in Jones County, attended ^Mississippi 
College and has been in the work twenty-three 
years. His wife is of English-Dutch descent, and 
her family has shared in the best social and civic 
development of Mississippi since its residence in the 
State. 



58— M 



j»S*3if 



M 



914 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

FERRY COUXTY. 



/' 



^ GABRIEL DAXTZI.ER DRAUGHX of New Au- 

\ gusta, Representative from Perry County, was born 

April 14. 1S54. near Augusta, Pctry County. Missis- 
sippi. He is the son of Rufus T. and Sabry Ann 
(Davis) Dniugiin. wlio came from South Carolina 
i in 1819 ami first settled near the place where their 
I son was born and reared. The Draughns came 
? to Mississippi with that tide of splendid pioneer 

emigration that flowed southward from the Caro- 
linas to help make up some of the finest com- 
'' munities of the State. Representative Draughn 

grew up on his father's farm, and was educated 
Jabriel D. Drau&hn ^^ ^^^ schools of his community during: and after 

the Civil War. He has continued to reside in the 
community where he was born and has always 
followed the occupation of farming in which he is 
intensely interested. He is one of the promineni 
farmers of his district. From 190 S to 1912 he 
served as a member of the Board of Supervisors 
of Perry County, an otflce in which he gave entire 
satisfaction. Having become widely known in his 
community for his good business sense and high 
ideals of public service he was at the solicitation 
of the voters of his county induced to enter State 
politics. In 1915 he was elected to the House of 
Representatives of Mississippi, and has been an 
able member of the following committees : Agri- 
culture ; Fees and Salaries ; Federal Relations ; 
Liquor Traffic ; Propositions and Grievances. Mr. 
Draughn is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist 
Church, a Mason and a Woodman of the World. 
He was married December 1, 187.5 to Jane James, 
daughter of Phillip James and his wife, Mary 
(Smith) James. They liad four children, Susie, 
Cora, Rufus Ford and India. His first wife died 
in February 1888. He later married Katie Hinton, 
daughter of William Hinton and Martha (Everett) 
Hinton. They had three children, Ralph. :Martha, 
and Hinton James. His wife died November 15, 
1893. and he was again married January 11, 1897, 
to Martha Elizabeth Carpenter, daughter of James 
Carpenter and Martha (Hinton) Carpenter. They 
have three children. Blanche, Liston and Prosper. 



-t u»^ •-- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



915 



PIKE COUXTT. 



JOSEPH ELIAS XORWOOD of Magnolia. Pike 
County, Miss., •svas born May 5. 1873. at Richland 
Plantation, East Feliciana Parish. La. ; the son of 
Joseph Elias Xoi-wood ami Ann Lucretia (Godfry) 
Xorwood. His father was a gallant soldier in the 
Confederate army and his paternal grandfather 
served as Probate Judge of his parish. His ma- 
ternal grandfather. Rev. Jame.s A. Godfry, was a 
presiding elder in the' Mississippi Conference for 
thirty-two consecutive years. His paternal an- 
cestors were from England; his maternal, from 
Scotland. Mr. Norwood was educated in the 
public schools of Mississippi ; took collegiate liter- 
ary course in Southern University, Greensboro, Ala., 
received degree of LL. B. from Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity in 1894 ; was admitted to the bar at Magnolia, 
Miss., in July 1895 ; practised as parti.er with 
Judge James H. Price three yeais ; served as a 
member of the Board of Alderman. 1S98 to 1906 ; 
elected Mayor of Magnolia in 1910 and is one of 
tht' most vigorous and fluent editorial writers of 
the State, never dealing in cheap sensationalism, 
but always maintaining high standards of truth 
and justice. Mr. Norwood has enjoyed representa- 
tion in both houses of the Mississippi Legislature, 
having been elected to the Senate in 1911. Few 
men who have occupied a seat in that assembly 
have impressed the people more favorably than 
this fearless and able leader. Upon all questions 
that touch the vital interests of the State his 
championship is sought and throughout his career 
as a representative of the people, he has always 
proved a winner. With a dominant note of chal- 
lenge, he combines the gift to defend any position 
he takes. It is due to his advocacy that many re- 
foim and progressive measures have been enacted 
by the Legislature. Mr. Norwood is capable of 
filling any position within the gift of the people. 
He is a Democrat and was Secretary of Pike 
County Executive Committee, 1900 to 1911, and was 
elected to the Senate, November 7, 1911. He is a 
member of thtf Methodist Church, a Mason, a Wood- 
man of the World, and an Elk. He is now the 
editor and proprietor of the Magnolia Gazette. 
On December 9, 1896, at Camden, Madison County, 
Miss., he was married to Kittle Maxwell, daughter 
of Willis Leander and Frances (Thornhill) Max- 
well. He was in the 1912-14 sessions of the Legis- 
lature a member of the following Committees. 
Judiciary, To Investigate State OfRcers, Printing 



■r^ f^-j 



J \ 



Joseph E. X'orwood 



916 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 




(Chairman), Rules. Count>- Affairs. Humane and 
Benevolent Institutions, Penitentiary and Prisons. 
He is now serving: on the following committees : 
Rules; Appropriations; Public Printins; ; Judiciary, 
serving; the latter as its chairman. 



FEXELOX DOBYXE HEWITT of McComb City, 
Mississippi, Representative from Pike County, was 
born near Smiihdale in Amite County, Mississippi. 
February 26, 1SS3. His father, Thomas Jefferson 
Hewitt, was born near Smithdale, Amite County, 
Mississippi, and has always lived there. His 
motlier's maiden name was Emily Lorlin ; she was 
the daughter of James Loflin and Elizabeth Loilin. 

yof McComb City, Mississippi. Their families were 
among the early settlers of the State and th'j 
various members have always borne tlieir part in 
all the best movements for the advancement of 
F'enelon D. Hewitt ^^^^ social and civic welfare. Representative Hew- 

itt obtained his early education at the Mars Hill 
Public School in Amite County, near Smithdale, 
where he was carefully prepared for college. He 
then attended Millsaps College where he gradu- 
ated with honors in 1905. He afterwards attended 
the University of Mississippi at Oxfor.V from which 
he was graduated in 1907 with the degree of 
LL. B. Well equipped for a successful ca- 
reer he began tlie practice of his profession that 
same year at McComb City. From 10'j9 to 1915 
he was Judge of the Police Court, an office that 
he conducted with justice, fairness, sound conunon 
Sense and excellent legal ability. Having become 
popular in his section in 1915 he was elected to 
serve in the Lower House of the State Legisla- 
ture, where he has been an able and constructive 
member of the following committees: Judiciai-y : 
Ways and Means; Railroads; Roads, Ferries j nd 
Bridges; Constitution, of which latter he is Chair- 
man. Representative Hewitt is a prominent mem- 
^ ber of the Democratic Party having served on 

the Executive Committee of his County, and as 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of his city. 
He is a Baptist, a Knight Templar and a Shriner. 
He is fearless, open-minded and fair to his op- 
ponents and has a high sense of justice. Decem- 
ber 15, 1909 he married Ada Virginia Jackson, at 
Hillside Farm, Amite County, Mississippi. She is 
the daughter of Thomas Nathaniel Jackson and 
Alice Jackson of Thompson, Mississippi. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hewitt have two children, Billie and Mary 
Ellen. 






'1ft 



g0f^ ' 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 917 

PONTOTOC COUNTY. 

WILLIA:\r THOMAS STEGALL. whose artdress ,-'""" '"'^:>^ 

is Box 56. R. F. D. 1, Pontotoc, Mississippi, is ^^ 

representative from the County of Pontotoc. He ■: 

is the son of James Morrison Stegall and ilary .« 

Griffin Stegall, and was born May 19, 1857, in 4^^ •;^i.» , ' 

Pontotoc County. His father, James Morrison 
Steg-all, was born July 20. 1830, at Concord, Ca- 
barrus County, North Carolina, but removed in 
1835 to Mississippi, with his parents, Gerry M. 
Stegall and Margaret C. (Morrison) Stegall. 
During the Civil "War he served as a gallant 
Confederate soldier in the 41st Mississippi Regi- ^''"fei?. 

ment. Company A. His grandfather Stegall came 

to America from Wales in 1784, and his grand- William T. Stegall 

mother from Scotland in 1776. The maiden name 
of Representative Stegall's mother was ilary 
Griffin; she was the daughter of William Gray 
Griffin and Betty Ann (Hayney) Griffin of Union 
County, North Carolina. Her grandfather Grif- 
fin came from Ireland in 1790, and her grand- 
mother Griffin came from Scotland. Representa- 
tive Stegall is therefor of pure Celtic descent, 
his ancestors being Scotch, Irish or Welsh, races 
that have given strength and fibie to the Am- 
erican people. Until he was twenty years of 
age Mr. Stegall pursued his education in the 
free schools of Pontotoc County. He is a farmer 
by occupation and has been successful in all 
his undertakings and is very popular with the 
people of his section. He is one of our most 
prominent legislators, having served in the 
Lower House almost continuously since the year 
1896. It would be impossible in this brief sketch 
to record Representative Stegall's valuable serv- 
ice to the State of Mississippi. He has always 
been independent of political factions wlien 
questions that concerned the State's true wel- 
fare were involved. He is honorable, and Just 
and faithful to his friends, and one of the most 
effective speaker.^ of the body. He is now serving 
with much ability upon the following comraitr 
tees: Ways and Means; Railroads; Eleemosynary 
Institutions; Drainage. Mr. Stegall belongs to 
the Democratic Party and to the Baptist Church, 
of which he is clerk. He is a bachelor, 



91S 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



THOMAS JEFFERSON WIXGO 




Thomas 



THOMAS JEFFERSON WINGO, of Toccopola, 
Miss., was horn January 8, 1S36. near Spring- 
ville, Pontotoc County. Miss. He is the son of 
Oliver Perry Wing-o, a native of Spartanburg-, 
South Carolina, who removed to Mi.-jsissippi and 
located near Springville. He was a gallart 
Confederate soldier and, after the war. he re- 
turned home and engaged in farminir and stock- 
raising:, also serving- his county as Supervi>j.->r 
of the third district. Dr. Wingo's mother was 
Martha Brown of Blount County, Alabama and 
both his parents were respected and beloved b>- 
a wide circle of friends. Dr. Wingo received his 
early education in the schools of Pontotoc 
County; was graduated in the session of 1879-80 
from the Medical Department of Vanderbilt 
University, with the degree of M. D. ; began the 
practice of hi.« profession at Toccopola, Miss., 
in the summer of ISSO: during the course of his 
active work as a physician for a period of 
twenty-six years, he devoted himself untiringly 
to his profession and gained the complete con- 
fidence of the best people of his county. For 
ten years past, he has devoted himself more 
especially to his farming and mercantile inter- 
ests, has taken an active part in public affairs, 
and is prominent in the order of Knights of 
Pythias. In April. 1917, he was elected to the 
Legislature at a special election, to succeed 
Hon. Frank Roberson on his resignation to ac- 
cept the position of Assistant Attorney General. 
Dr. Wingo is a Democrat and a member of the 
Ba.itist Church. He was married to Elizabeth 
D. Hodges, daughter of John T. and Sarah 
Hodges. Dr. and :Mrs. Wingo have ten children: 
Thomas Madden, Oliver Perry, Galen, Loyd. 
Lora, Tony. Susie, Maude, John K., and Q. Belle. 




1 



tirtii^irii I -i^ 'iir^li' -^-3 

Robt. E. L. Sutherland 



PRENTISS COUNTY. 

ROBERT EDWARD LEE SUTHERLAND of 
Wheeler, Mis.^issippi. Representative from Pren- 
tiss Count>-, was born in that county, at New 
Site, May 1, ISTS. His father was Dr. William 
Walter Sutherland of Waynesboro, Wayne Coun- 
ty, Tennessee, where he was born. T'r. Suther- 
land lived at Warsaw, Missouri from the age of 
eight until the year 1861, when he entered the 
Confederate Arniy, .serving with great gallantry 
in Forest's Cavalry in the principal engagements 
in Tf-nnessee and Mississippi. He was transfer- 
red to the Artiller>-, ^lorton's Batieiy, ul.ere lie 
served until the war closed. After the war he 



i^ i.'ii« , .il ltilv>v ,-/!ii.'Jajm .iii-:i}' 



LEGISI, VTIVE DEPART:^rENT 919 



studied Medicine and practiced successfully in 
Prentiss County. Jilissi.^sippi, until his death, 
January 9, 1909. The Sutherlands came from 
Scotland to America soon after the Revolution 
and the family finally came to settle in jMississ- 
ippi. His paternal grandfather served in the 
Mexican War and shared in much of the excite- 
ment leading- up to the Civil War. The mother 
of 'Representative Sutherland was Anne Naomi 
Nelson, the daughter of Albert Gallatin Xelson 
and Lucinda Wallace (Plill) Nelson of Okolona. 
Mississippi. Albert Gallatin Nelson was born in 
Murray County, Tennessee. August 3, 1S16 and 
cam.e to Mississippi while a young man. He 
taug-ht school for years, was for a long time 
depot agent for the M. & O. R. R. at Okolona, 
and served in the Legislature from 1S5S to 1860. 
Mr. Sutherland secured his early schooling in 
Prentiss County, and attended the Hiah Schools 
of Jacinto and Osborne Creek. He then entered 
Peabody College, Nashville. Tennessee, where he 
was graduatted in 1905 with the honor of being 
class orator. He did special work in the T. M. 
C. A. of the University of Nashville, and took 
work in the medical department during the term 
1904—1905. He represented this department of 
the Y. M. C. A. at the conference in Asheville. 
North Carolina, June, 19'^5. He then returned to 
Prentiss County and took up the profession of 
teaching, in which he soon becam.e a leader. He 
taught at Blackland, Oak Ridjrt^. in tlie Osborne 
Creek High School and the Wheeler High School. 
From 1908 to 1912, and again from 1912 to 1916 
he was Superintendent of Schools of Prentiss 
County. Having become widely and favorably 
known in his section he ent-ered politics as a 
further means of benefiting the educational in- 
terests of his state. He combines with his intel- 
lectual aspiration for Mississippi the deepest in- 
terest in her material advancement and was 
sought by the people of his section as an ideal rep- 
resentative of their interests. He was elected to 
the .Legislature to serve from 1916 to 1920 and 
has done valuable work on the following com- 
mittees : Public Health and Quarantine ; Manufac- 
tures ; County Affairs : Education, of which he is 
chairman. Mr. Sutherland is a Democrat, a 
Baptist, and a member of the Masons, Kjiights 
of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the 
Junior Order of U. A. M. He is at present 
a member of tiie Second Regimental Band of 
the Mississippi National Guard. October 16, 
1910, at Whefler, Mississippi, he married OUi^ 



9-0 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Wallace, daughter of James Plarrison Wallace. 
and Nancy (Waters) Wallace of Wheeler. Rep- 
resentative and Mrs. Sutherland have two chil- 
dren. Bolivar Lee. and Miriam. 



I 



/ 



T^^:-—J^ " -^ BARTHO LONEY BREEDLOVE of Booneville. 

C^' ] Representative from Prentiss County, is the son 

of James William Breedlove and Rebecca Annie 
(Gentry) Breedlove and \vas born near Boone- 
ville on JanuaiT 20, 1SS.5. His father was born 
near Jacinto in Prentiss County, but lived most 
f ^ of his life near Booneville. Mississippi; and 

I ^. \ ^'^ paternal grandparents. Thomas and Mar:!ia 

I /, ^ ''^ (Grisham) Breedlove, were natives of Georgia. 

\ '■' ^ and were descendants of early colonial ancestor* 

; ) who settled in that State. The mother of the 

L.-. ^>..-^>.^^! ; , - ;nf^;-.J subject of our sketch, who was Rebecca Annie 
Gentry before her niarriag-e, was the daughter 
Bartho L. Breedlove "^^ Drew Gentry and his wife. Mary (Averett) 

Gentry, of Wheelers, ilississippi. Representa- 
tive Breedlove obtained his education in the 
common schools of Prentiss County. At an 
early age he took up the occupation of farming, 
and is now one of the leading farmers of his 
community. Like so many of the prominent and 
successful men of the Country districts he is 
self made and understands the needs of the tax- 
payers of the state. Having become influential 
in his county he was induced to enter public 
life. In 1915 he was nominated for the Legis- 
lature, and elected to serve in the Lower House 
during the term of 1916-1920. The interests of 
his constituents and of the entire commonwealth 
are safe in his hands. He has sound, con- 
servative views, and has been a valuable mem- 
ber of the committees on : Agriculture ; Railroads ; 
Liquor Traflflc. :Mr. Breedlove is a strong ad- 
herent of the Democratic Party, a member of 
the Methodist Church, which he is at present 
serving as Steward, and belongs to the Masons 
and the Woodmen of the "U'orld. February 
18, 1906, he was married to Bertie Luetia 
Smith, at Rienzi, Mississippi. She is the daugh- 
ter of Vincent Lue Allen Smith and Mary Etta 
Price Smith, who live near Booneville. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Breedlove are. Loney Chri.-ted 
and Harold Raymond. 



LEGISLATI\'E DEPARTMEXT 



921 



QUIT^rAN COUNTY. 

ULA BARKSDALE ROSS. Representative from 
Quitman County, has his home at Lambert. He 
was born at Banner, Calhoun County, Mississ- 
ippi, March 3, 1S69. His father George Wash- 
ington Ross, was a gallant soldier of the Confedti - 
ate Army and served during the Civil War in Com- 
pany K of the 17th .Mississippi Regiment of Infan- 
try. For further hi.-^tory of the Ross family tlie 
reader is referred to pages 70 4 and 705 of Good 
Speeds Memories of Mississippi Vol. II. This 
volume contains an interesting account of some 
length relative to various members of the fami- 
ly which like so many sturdy pioneer settlers 
of the Southwest, came finally to make their 
home in Mississippi. The mother of Representa- 
tive Ross, was Sarah Catherine Gedford Ross. 
The family has always shared in all progressive 
movements for the betterment of the community. 
TVTien a lad Mr. Ross received instruction in ih^ 
public schools of his native county where he 
was prepared for a successful practical career. 
He is in the real estate and insurance business, 
and devotes some attention also to farming, and 
has been successful in .nil of his undertakmgs. 
He has always been popular in his county and 
community. Previous to his election to the Legis- 
lature, Mr. Ross had held the office of .Mayor of 
Lambert, and had also served as Marshal of 
Banner, his birth place. As representative in the 
1916-1920 sessions of the Legislature he has 
given the state service of a very high order 
and is a valuable member of the committees on 
Corporations ; Public Lands ; Mississippi Levees ; 
Roads, Ferries and Bridges; Penitentiary. of 
which he is chairman. Representative Ross is a 
Democrat, belongs to the Baptist Church, and Ls 
a member of the Masons. Knights of Pythias and 
Odd Fellows. December 27th. 1887 he was mar- 
ried to Miss Myrtis McDowell Linder, the daugh- 
ter of the Reverend Lee Linder and his wife. 
Mattie Jone Linder, of Banner, Mississippi. Of 
this marriage there are three children: Herman 
Linder, aged twenty-six : George Lee, aged twenty- 
four and Thelma Vance a^jed fourteen. 






Ula B. Ross 



J 



\ir%»j i»i*^i Lry^* 



922 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 




William E. Mclntyre 




J H. Watts 



RAXKIN COUNTY. 

WILLLV.M EDWARD McJXTVKE, who repre- 
sents Kunkin County and resides at Brandon 
-Missi.ssippi, is tile son of M. C. -Mclntyre and 
-\Iinervia Jane Mclntyre of Rankin County. He 
was born in that County, at Johns, on the six- 
teenth day of August, 1S85. The family is of 
:-cotch descent and is among the earliest and 
be^t settlers of Amt-rica having- representatives 
111 nearly every state in the Union. Mr. Mcln- 
tyre is a man of broad education. He secured 
his early schooling in the public elementary and 
high schools of his native county; later he at- 
tended the Kentucky State Normal School, and 
then the University of Mississippi, where he 
pursued a course in law. He was graduated in 
1910 with the deg-ree of LL. B. The year before' 
his graduation he had been admitted to the bar, 
at Oxford, Mississippi, and following his gradu- 
ation, in IblO, he began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Brandon, where he now lives. He 
soon m.ade such a reputation for himself that 
in 1911 he was elected County Attorney of Ran- 
kin County, in which office he served one year 
and four months. For four years he also served 
on the Board of Supervisors of that County. In 
1915 he was elected a member of the House of 
Representatives of Mississippi and his constitu- 
ents are to be congratulated upon their choice. 
Mr. Mclntyre is a young man of brilliant powers of 
intellect and sterling character, and is one of 
the best equipped of the younger member.? of tne 
Legislature. As a representative he is thought- 
ful {,nd careful of the peoples interests and 
while firm in his conviction is open minded and 
unprejudiced. His ability has already been 
shown by his work upon the committees of 
Rules; Judiciary; Local and Private Legislation, 
(Chairman) Census and Apportionment; County 
Affairs. He is a Democrat, a Methodist, and a 
member of the following fraternal organiza- 
tions: Royal Arch Masons (blaster of the 
Lodge); Elks (Jackson Lodge); and Knight.s of 
Pythias, and is unmarried. 



RICHARD HEXRY W.VTTS of Pelahatchie. 
Representative from Rankin County, was born 
at Pi.sgah in Franklin County. .August 17, 1872. 
and is the son of Dallas and Julia Watts. 
Dallas Watts was born at Seminary, Covington 
County, Mississippi, but in 1867 settled near 
Pisgah. During the Civil War he served under 
Generals Bras-g and Forest from 1S61 to 1S65. 
He went to the front v.-hen quite a young man 
and was among the brave young defenders of 



l\ 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



923 



the South. He died in :!kreridian, :March 16, 1912. 
His parents were Louis and Jennie Watts. Af- 
ter the war he was an advocate of National 
Union and harmony. Dallas Watts married his 
third cousin, Julia, daughter of John and Pennie 
Watts of Monroe, Perry County, .Mississippi. 
Before the Civil War John Watts served in the 
Legislature of this State for a number of years. 
Representative Watts was educated in the free 
schools of Rankin County. His teachers were 
Will Robinson, ^Nlrs. Robert IMcLaurin and ilrs. 
J. P. Maxey. Although he had only sixteen 
months of schooling in all, he has been able, in 
a great measure, to supply this lack by reading 
and by practical experience. He spent five years 
as traveling salesman and six \ears in the serv- 
ice of the I. C. R. R. Co. Aside from that he 
has devoted himself to farming, an avocation in 
which he takes great interest. He has the in- 
terests of the working classes deeply at heart, 
and has represented organized labor in the Leg- 
islature. He was elected to serve in that body 
from 1916 to 1920, and has served with zeal and 
ability upon the following committees: Ways 
and Means; Railroads; Penitentiary; Immigra- 
tion and Labor. Mr. ^Vatts is a Democrat, a 
Baptist, a Ma-son, a Woodman of the World, and 
Praetorian. May 14, 1914, at Meridian, Mississ- 
ippi, he was married to Carrie Lee Patrick, 
daughter of .Tames !M. Patrick and Abbie S. P'at- 
rick of Hazelhurst, Mississippi. 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



WILLIAM LAFAYETTE WEEMS of Sun. Rep- 
resentative from Scott County, was born March 
15, 1848, at that place. His parents were Samuel 
Roseman Weems and Mary Ann (Rhodes) 
Weems. Samuel R. Weems, his father, son of 
Bartholemew and Catchrion (Jones) Weems, of 
the Abbeville District in South Carolina, was 
born there, but came to Mississippi at an early 
age, and resided at Sun for seventy-five years. 
He was a veteran of two wars. He enlisted at 
Clinton, Mississippi, in the Texan War against 
Mexico, and during the Civil War served for a 
year in the Confederate ranks, ilr. 'Weems 
comes of good fighting stock and is of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry on both sides. His paternal 
great-grandfather served under Washington in the 
patriot army. This ancestor was a cousin of 
Mason L. Weems, who wrote the Life of Wash- 
ington and the Life of Marion. The family is of 
English descent, and came to America during 
th(? Colonial period. His mother was the daugh- 




William L. Weems 



924 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



ter of Samuel and Elisabeth (Carr) Rhodes of 
Smith County, Mississippi. His maternal great- 
grandparents came from Germany. His father 
was left destitute by the War, and therefore his 
son's opportunities to secure an education were 
limited. He was a youth of indomnitable cour- 
age and purpose and though lacking college 
advantages as a consequence of the Civil War. 
he has made a success of life. He early became 
a farmer, and has been successful in that oc- 
, cupation. He was first elected to the Legisla- 
ture in 1890, and served until 1S96. with much 
sound sense and practical ability. During the 
present term he is a thoughtful and intelligent 
member of the following committees: Appro- 
priations; Railroad.-^; Liquor Traffic; Pensions. 
Mr. Weems has long- been a prominent figure in 
the Democrat Party in his section; for several 
years he served as a member of the Executive 
Committee of his county. He is a IMethodist; 
has served for forty-three years as steward, and 
has been a trustee of the church property. He 
is a Alason. Junior and Senior Warden and Mas- 
ter of Vienna Lodge No. 211. February 4, 188S, 
at Newton, Missis.sippi, he married Mary A. 
Thompson, daughter of W. Hopson Thompson 
and Louisa (Ballock) Thompson of Newton Sta- 
tion. Her father's people came to Mississippi 
from Alabama, and her maternal grandmother 
came from North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Weem.s 
have eight children: James Thompson, Robert 
Samuel, William Waddie. Mary Lou. and Alvin 
Lamar, Mack Dawson, Bessie Lois and Laura 
Zell. 



SHARKEY COUNTY. 




Samuel B. Al.j.Kander 



SAMUEL BRYCE ALEXANDER of Rollin? 
Fork, Mississippi, Representative from the Coun- 
ty of Sharkey, is a native of that County. His 
parents were Samuel Brice Alexander, Sr., and 
Amy Olive (Lloyd) Alexander. His father was 
born near De Kalb. in Kemper County, Mississ- 
ippi, and later lived at Spinks, in that County. 
He was a brave soldier in the Confederate Army 
in the 35th Mississippi Infantry, in the Company 
commanded by Captain Thomas Watts. He was 
wounded and obliged to return home; but later 
joined the Independent Scouts, at Woodville, 
Mississippi, an orgranization commanded by 
Colonel Powers. The Alexander family is one 
of the most numerous and prominent in America. 
The maiden name of Representativo Alexander's 
mother was Lloyd. She was the daughter of 
John Emery Lloyd and Olive Spinks Lloyd of 



Ij 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



925 



Kemper County. The family is of Welsh blood, 
and has borne its part in the development of 
the State. Mr. Alexander received his early 
education in the public schools of Rolling Fork. 
He then studied for a time at the :Mississippi 
Colleg-e, Clinton Mi?.= issippi, then at Georg-e- 
town Colleg-e, Georgetown, Kentucky, and final- 
ly took a course at the A. & M. College at Stark- 
ville, Mississippi. Since he left school he has 
been chiefly engas:ed in farming, and has brought 
to that profession the wide scientific knowledge 
that good educational advantages have given 
him. He is equipped to do good service for the 
agricultural interests of his state. He is also 
an ardent believer in the education of the youth 
of Mississippi. He had no experience in poli- 
tics previous to his election to the State Legis- 
lature in 1915; but he has performed valuable 
service for the State as a member of the follow- 
ing committees: Constitution; Ways and Means; 
Mississippi Levees; Penitentiary; Immigration 
and Labor; Fishing, Commerce and Shipping; 
Drainage (Chairman). He is a Democrat, and 
a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which 
he is Deacon. He belongs to the Masons, the 
Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the 
"World. March 14, 1903, he married Mayme 
Brooks, dau.ghter of James Jones Brooks and 
Lelia Wimberly Brooks, of ilemphis, Tennessee. 
They have two children: Samuel Bryce, Jr., and 
James Brooks. 



SIMPSON COUNTY. 



WILLIAM FLETCHER STROUD of Pinola, R. 
F. D., Miss., Representative from Simpson Coun- 
ty, was born October 31, 1875. in Neshoba Coun- 
ty, Miss., and is the son of William P. Stroud 
and Pernecie Dollar Stroud, of Alabama. Will- 
iam P. Stroud removed from Alabama to Miss- 
issippi and settled near Magee. where he en- 
gaged in farming. Dr. Stroud's mother was the 
daughter of Pinkney and Frances Dollar of Ala- 
bama. Daniel Stroud, his grandfather, was a 
faithful soldier in the Confederate Army. The 
family is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, having set- 
tled in America in the early period of its his- 
tory. Dr. Stroud received his early education 
in the public schools of his vicinity and after- 
wards attended the Westville High School, where 
he was prepared for college. In 1903, he at- 
tended the Memphis Hospital Medical College 
and began the practice of his profession in 
Simpson County, near Pinola, and l::tor located 
in pinola. Becoming Interested In the public 




William F. Stroud 



.YTV!U0O >t08*Il>n8 



cid 



326 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



fmm, 


»w 


















'' 










'. 




V- - 






^ 


^lii^ -t 1 1 




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""^ 



questions that concerned his section and the 
entire State and feeling that he could be of ad- 
vantage to the medical profession by becoming 
a member of the law-making body of the State, 
he offered for election to the Legislature and re- 
ceived a majority of the votes of his county. 
As a member of the legislative session of 1916, 
Dr. Stroud has labored earnestly and intelli- 
gently for every interest of the Commonwealth and 
is one of the most valuable members of the follow- 
ing committees : Census and Apportionment : Eleemo- 
synary In.stitutions ; Public Health and Quarantine, 
being chaiiman of the last mentioned. Dr. Stroud 
is a Democrat in political faith ; a member of the 
Baptist Church : a Mason and a member of the 
Woodmen of the World, In which last order he 
has served as ^iledical Examiner. On October 
28, 1902, he was married to Lola A. Royals, 
daughter of Jourdan Royals and Sophronia 
Royals, of Magee, Miss. Dr. and Mrs. Stroud 
have six children: Malone, Willie Belle, Mayo, 
Mary, Pernecie, and Emma. 



^MITH COUNTY. 

HEXRT CLAY THORXTOX of Taylorville, 
Mississippi. R. F. D. No. 2. Representative from 
Smith County, was born ilarch 7, 1889 in that 
County at Bezer. His parents are John Gibson 
Thornton and Martha (Rogers) Thornton. John 
Gibson Thornton was the son of Jack Thornton 
and Lyda Blackwell Thornton of Raleigh. Smith 
County, Mis.^issippi, where he was born and 
where he resided most of his life. For twenty- 
four years he served as Justice of the Peace. 
The Thorntons are of Irish descent. John 
Thornton, the great-grandfather of the subject 
of our sketch, came from Ireland, settled in X'orth 
Carolina and later removed to Smith County, 
iMississippi. He served as Captain and Colonel 
Henry C. Thornton .^^ ^.^^ Revolutionary War. He was a Baptist 

minister, and was the first Representative in 
the Mississippi Legislature from Smith County 
after the organization of that county. His son. 
Jack Thornton, grandfather of Henry Clay 
Thornton, lived at Raleigh. He served as Jus- 
tice of the Peace two terms and was one term 
on the Board of Supervisors. The Thornton 
family has always been among the progmssive 
community builders of the State and since 
its coming to America has borne a conspicuous 
part in the battles for freedom and democracy. 
Martha CRoger.^) Thornton, mother of the sub- 
ject cf this sketch, was the daughter of William 
Manning Rogers and Mary (Duckworth) Rogers 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART3IENT 



927 



of Strinsrer. Jasper County, Mississippi. Mr. 
Thornton obtained his early schooling at 
Raleiffh, Mississippi. He completed his course 
at Meridian, Mi.-^sissippi, in 1912 with the B. L. 
degree. He then studied law and took a busi- 
ness course by corre.^pondcnce. He then took 
up the profession of teaching, and has taught 
successfully for four years. He is well fitted 
to promote the educational interests of the State 
and is keenly interested in wiping out the illi- 
teracy in Mi.s.«is.?ippi. H,v i.^ .seivin- in the Leg- 
islature for the term 1916-1920. and has been 
placed on the following committees, where he 
has done excellent work: Railroads; Public 
Lands ; Registrations and Elections : Eleemosy- 
nary Institutions : Liquor Traffic ; Propositions 
and Grievances. Mr. Thornton is a Democrat 
and a member of the Methodist Church. 



SUNFLOWER COUNTY. 



ARTHITR B. CLARK of Tndianola. Represen- 
tative from Sunflower County, was elected in 
November. 191.5, in a campaign with some of 
the best men in his County. He is a lawyer by 
profession and a member of the bar of India- 
nola, where he has impressed himself upon his 
fellow lawyers and the community generally as 
having courage, abilit>" and an intellectual equip- 
ment of high order. Mr. Clark attracted the 
favorable notice of the House early in the 
session of 1916 in the discussion of a local ques- 
tion concerning his County. He is regarded as 
one of the rising young lawyers of the "Delta." 
In his If'^islative service he is thoughtful of the 
best interests of the people and intelligent and 
patriotic in the discharge of every public duty. 
Mr. Clark is a member of the following Com- 
mittees: Judiciary: Mis.=;ispippi Levees; Peni- 
tentiary; Public Buildings and Grounds. Banks 
and Banking: Drainage. At this writing. Mr. 
Clark is at the Officer's Training School at Fort 
Logan H. Root.>=. Little Ro<:-k, Arkansas, in the 
Military service of the United States. He was 
one of the first to re.'spond to his country's call, 
and America's great Twentieth Century War for 
Freedom and Humanity will not have a more 
gallant participant than this splendid young 
Misslssippian. The heart.= of our people are with 
him and all other noble young spirits who have 
left their native state to become a part of Am- 
erica'fl gr^^at army in her struggle to free the 
world from the tyranny and oppression of Ger- 
many, 



p 'l M . ^.; . .] l.j.»t^^ p _ I l> .^l|M 




Arthur B. Clark 



»rlJ 



928 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 



TALLAHATCHIE COUXTY 




ROWE HAYS of Sumner, Mississippi. Repre- 
sentative from Tallahatchie County, was born 
X'ovember 20. 1875 at Durant, Mississippi. His 
father, James Hays, son of Arthur and Emily 
(West) Hays, who was a sister of General A. 
M. West, was born in Arkansas, of Virginia par- 
entage. He was educated in Virgrinia, and after 
completing his college course, he returned to the 
home of his parents, then living In Lexington, 
Mississippi. At the outbreak of the Civil War 
he -was among the first Confederate volunteers 
to enlist, and served throughout the 'War. At 
the close of the War he ranked as captain. 
With this honorable war record he returned to 
Mississippi and settled at Durant, where he re- 
sided until his death in 1888. The maiden name 
of Representative Hays' mother was Mary Vir- 
ginia Rowe; she was the daughter of Dr. A. V. 
Rowe and Mary Ann (Johnson) Rowe. of Lex- 
ington. Mississippi. Dr. Rowe was a Virginian 
and his wife a Kentuckian. After the early 
death of his parents. Rowe Hays became the 
ward of his maternal uncle. Reverend A. V. 
Rowe of Winona. Mississippi, one of the best 
known and most influential ministers of the 
State. Rowe Hays received his early education 
in the public schools of Durant and Wimona, 
Mississippi. In 1891 he entered Mississippi Col- 
lege, from which he was graduated in 1893. 
Two years later he completed the law course at 
the University of ilississippi, and began the 
practice of law at Sumner in the Delta District 
of Tallahatchie County in 1905. For several 
years Mr. Hays has taken an active part In local 
politics. He is one of the most popular citizens 
of his community and his intellectual equipment 
and unswerving ideals of honesty and justice place 
him among the able public men of Missis.sippi. 
At the time of his election to the legislature in 
1915, he was serving his third term as Mayor 
of Sumner. In the House he is a valuable mem- 
ber of the following committees: Judiciary; 
Constitution; Appropriations; Local and Private 
Legislation ; Mississippi Levees. Mr. Hays is an 
active Democrat and a member of the Baptist 
Church. His wife, prior to her marriage, was 
Frances Talbert Carr, daughter of Edwin Spate 
Carr and Lillie Brame (Scott) Carr. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hays have one child, Arthur Rowe. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 929 



1 



William J. East 



TATE COL'NTy. 

WILLIAM JASPER EAST of Senatobia. Tate 
Countj-, Miss., was born September 1, 1854, in 
2iIonroe County, iliss., and is the son of Josiah i 

Robertson East and wife, Matilda (Callaluui) 1 

East, the latter, a cousin of Chancellor J. N. 
Waddell of the L'niver.'uty of ^Mississippi, died in 
1873. His maieinal anccstois came from Ire- 
land ; his patei'nal came to America from Eng- 
land about 1740 and settled in Henrico County, 
Virginia. The father of the subject of this 

sketch was a gallant soldier in ihe war for the ^ 

independence of Texas, the ilexican War, and i 

the Civil War, serving in Company H., 24th j 

Regiment jMississippi Infantry. Walthall's Bri- >^-^~- --—u^-~ --.^ ^---^ 
gade, C. S. A.; was killed July 22, 1864 at the 
siege of Atlanta. Air. East attended the pri- 
mary schools of Panola County, under the in- 
struction of Capt. J. A. Rainwater and others. 
As the oldest son, he supported his mother's 
family under hard and adverse condition.s after 
the war. He entered the University of ilississ- 
ippi in 1879 and studied there for two yeai-s ; 
taught in public schools two years; studied law 
and was admitted to the bar in 1883, locating 
at Senatobia:' Ma.vor of Senatohia. 18S7-1S8S : 
State Senator. 1892-1894; member of House of 
Representatives from Tate County, 1896-1S97- 
1898; Presidential Elector, 1900; elected to the 
House of Repre.«entatives, November 3, 1903. 
.He is the author of Section 1767. Code of 1906. 
and has served his State as a lawmaker for 
sixteen years. Mr. East is one of the most dis- 
tinguished members of the 1916-1920 term of 
the Mississippi Legislature, and occupies a high 
position among the members of an unusually 
strong body <if representative Alisslssipplans. 
From the beginning of the movement he has bei'n 
a staunch advocate of The presei^-ation of ifis.sls- 
sippi's old capitol. and was a conspicuous and able 
leader in the final effort for its preservation. 
He is a Df^Tciocrat : member of the Episcopal 
Church; Mason and Knight of Pythias; was mar- 
ried July 12. 1S02 to Lula Whitten. the talented 
daughter of Pn trick Henrv- Whitten' and wife, 
Marv' Hodges. Mrs. Ea.st's father was a soldier 
of the Confederacy. Mr. and Mrs. East have 
three children: Whitten, who was graduated at the 
United States Military Academy at West Point. 
July 12. 1915. now Major in the aero service of 
the United States Service in France ; Fletcher. 
a studen- at the A. & M. College of Mi.'sls- 
sippi ; and Lula. Tn the Hous^; of lOr.i-lOO^. 
Mr. East was a member of tiie following 
Committees: Judiciary, Constitution, Registrar 

59— M 



itiil'il i. (l: . 



hr.T :'. ^ 



,90 e I 1-- 



930 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



tion and Elections. He was elected to the Sen- 
ate, November 5. 1907 and to the House of Rep- 
resentatives of 1916-1020 in November, 1915; 
member of Judiciary, Claims, Immigration and 
Labor, Banks and Banking committees. 




Servetus L. Crockett 



SERVETUS LOVE CROCKETT of Tyro, Miss- 
issippi. Representative from Tate County, was 
bom near Tyro. September 2. 1886. His father 
was Powhatan Perkins Crockett, who was the 
son of James B. Crockett and Susie (Johnson) 
Crockett of Thyatira, De Soto County. Mississ- 
ippi. In 187.3. he removed to Tyro where he 
spent the rest of his life. During- the Civil War 
he was a gallant member of Company B of the 
Wirt Adams Cavalrj- commanded by Captain 
James Lewes. For two terms he served as 
Supervisor of the Fifth District of Tate County. 
He was a man of education and high principles, 
a leader in church and in the politics of his 
County. The paternal ancestors of Mr. Crockett 
were Scotch. They came to Mississippi from 
Middle Tenne.«see early in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Mr. Crockett is a direct descendant of 
David Crockett, statesman and warrior who was 
killed at the Alamo Au.snist 6. 1836 in the Mexi- 
can War. The maiden name of Mr. Crockett's 
mother was Annie Louise Eabb. daughter of 
Josephus Cook Babb and Emily Rogers Babb of 
Byhalia, Mississippi. Josephus Cook Babb was 
a teacher an'l .surveyor of Marshall County. 
During the Civil War he served in the Commis- 
sary Department. C. S. A. The Bahb family !.= 
of English descent. ' Mr. Crockett obtained his 
early education in the public schools of Tate 
County where he was carefully prepared for 
college. In 191.5 he was graduated from Millsaps 
College with the degree of B S.. and holds the 
degree of LL. B. from that same institution. 
While a college student, he won fmjr medals 
for Oratory. Though he is an attorney at law 
he has never practised, preferring to devote 
himself to farming, an avocation in which he 
takes great interest and pleasure, ilr. Crockett 
is the author of t^-o works. Eulopy on Dax-id 
Crockett and History of the Crockett Familv 
neither of which has yet been published. In 
1915 he was elected to the Lower House of his 
State, to serve from. 191(5 to 1920. where he hns 
evinced statemanlike abilities in hi.s valu.ihl.» 
work on the following committee-: Judiciary; 
Mississippi L..ve«^s; Penitentiary; Public Build- 
ings and Grounds: Banks and Banklrcr; Drain- 
age. Mr. Crockett is a Democrat and a member 
of the Alpha PI Sigma Literary Society, and is 
Intensely patriotic In his views concerning 'he 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 931 



war with Germany. Prior to her marriage, 
Representative Crockett's wife was Floy Emma 
Liles, daughter of Simeon and Mystie Devlin 
Liles of Looxahoma. Mississippi. She was mar- 
ried to Mr. Crockett, December 2 4, 1914. The 
Liles are of Scotch-Irish descent. They came 
from South Carolina lo Mississippi about 1S20. 
The Devlins came to Mississippi fiom Viri^inia. 



TIPPAH COLHSTTY. 

WILLIAM REED WILD:MAX of Ripley, Repre- 
sentative from Tippah County, is purely a product 
of Mississippi by botli ancestry and education. He 
was born July 5th. 1891, at Keownsville, in the 
County of Union. Both paternal and maternal 
grandparents livnd at Dumas, in Tippah County. 
His father, John William "U'ildman. is the son 
of Speaker and Xancy Wildman. His mother. 
Alice Wildman. is the daughter of John and 
Katherine Smith. John Smith served for four years 
as a Confedf^rate soldier in the Civil War, to 
which cause he was ardently devoted. Representa- 
tive Wildman received his education at the Dumas 
High School and the Dumas Institute. Under the 
direction of able instructors he was prepared for 
teaching, and has been successfully pursuing that 
profession for a number of years. He has also been 
devoting his attention to farming. Always taking 
a deep interest in public affairs, he yielded to the 
request of his friends and became a candidate 
for the State Legislature, to which office he was 
elected in 191.5 for the term 1916-20. He is inde- 
pendent of all political factions and stands for 
good government in both local and State life. 
During the 1916 session he was an active anfl 
capable member of the following Committees: 
Agriculture; Education: Manufactures; Roads. 
Ferries and Bridges ; Insurance. Mr. "U'ildman. as 
a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, has 
taken a leading part in religious work. For two 
years he was a director of a Bible School at Dumas. 
He holds a diploma from the International Sunday 
School Association, and Is an honorary life mem- 
ber of thf Christian Women's Board of Missions. 
The wife of Representative Wildman was Miss 
Minnie Lee .Teanes. They were marrlr'd at Ripley, 
Mississippi, where Mrs. Wildman's parents. David 
and Ellen Jeanes, residf^d. Both paternal and ma- 
ternal grandparents fought in the Civil War as 
Confederate soldiers, and rendered faithful and 
gallant sei-vice in the companies to which they be- 
longed. Mr. and Mrs. Wildman have one child, 
Kathlyn. 



William R. Wildman 



932 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

TISHOMINGO COUNTY. 

r"- JAMES RUFrS MANX of luka R.-proscntative 

from Tishomingo County, was born July 28, 1861, 
: at Senterville, Cherokee County, Alabama, where 

;' his father, AMiitefield Evans Mann, came to live 

i at the ag-e of six years, from Abbeville, South 

f^ Cn rolina. Whitfield Evans Mann was a farmer, 

t Durin,? the War he served four years as a faithful 

j Confederate sodier. His father was Amon Mann 

J of Abbeville. Nortli Carolina. The mother of the 
subject of our sketch was. before her marriag'e. 
Mary Elizabeth L.Tmbert : she was the daughter of 
John and Rebecca Lambert of Talladefra. Ala- 
brima. The Lambert name occurs often among 
James R. Mann ^^^^ Colonial settlers of America, and belong-g to 

the Huguenot f.nmilies of the Carolinas. Repre- 
sentativf? Mann was educated In the rural schools 
of Jef?er.?on County. Alabama. He had no oppor- 
tunity for hig-her education : he was a farmer's boy. 
and at an early aee began to share the labors and 
responsibilities of farm life. Through this early 
experience he learned to sympathize with the labor- 
ing and agricultural classes, and since reaching 
manhood has done much' toward thr' betterment of 
thf farming element. He is a firm believer In the 
doctrine of "equal rights to all and special privi- 
leges to nonf." H'» has given much time and ef- 
fort to advancing the principles of the Farmers 
Union. For two years he served as Constable of 
the Fifth District. He was elected to the Legis- 
lature for the term of 1916-1920. where he has 
worked zealously for the good of hif5 constituents. 
He has been an earnest and conscientious mem- 
ber of the following committees : Agriculture : Peni- 
tentiary : Liquor Traffic : Pensions : Drainage. Mr. 
Mann Is a Democrat and a member of the Bap- 
tist Church, which he has served for tsventy-two 
years as Deacon : belongs to the Masons, the 
Junior Order, and the Farmers' Union, of which he 
has been president and county lecturer. He mar- 
ried Miss Mar>- Masquiline Myze, September 21. 
1882, at Double Springs, Alabama. She is the 
daughter of Daniel Gaston Myze and Macy Myze 
of that place. Their children are Mrs. Belzie 
(Mann) Cummin: Mrs. Marion (Mann) Under- 
wood; Mrs Dora (Mann) Cagle ; ^D's. Emma 
(Mann) Byram ; Mrs. Ada (Mann) Byram and 
Ancey. 



1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 933 

TUNICA COUNTY. 

JAMES MARCELLUS AXDEKSOX of Tunica. ,- — -- ^ .- - 
in Tunica County, son of Augustus Alexander 
Anderson, was born Oct. 1. 1875. ar Arlvabutla. 
Tate County. Mississippi. His father was a nati\ ^ 
of Clay County, :Missouri, and was a Union solditf 

in the Civil War. Xot long after the close of th> J" 

War (in 1S66) he came to :Mississippi, where Ikj 
settled on a farm in Tate Count.v. The following 
year he was married, at Hernando. Mississippi, iv 
Miss Selina Dixon, daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth (Holmes) Dixon. Tlie maternal ancestors of 

James Marcellus Anderson were English people who J 

came to Georgia with General Oglethorpe when he 

founded that colony. His motiier, however, was James M. Anderson 

reared in Hunisville, Alabama. Her parents came 
thence to Mississippi in 1863. Mr. Anderson se- 
cured his early education in the elementary public 
schools and the high school of Tate County. He 
also pursued a business course at Arkabutla, Mis- 
sissippi. This knowledge proved of assistance to 
him in his occupation of merchant. Besides being 
a business man Mr. Anderson is also a planter 
and owns the plantations of Hollywood and Lost 
Lake in Tunica County. He was elected to the 
House of Representatives, term of 1916-20, in the 
legislation of which body he takes a keen interest. 
He is independent of political factions and has only 
the State's good in view. An earnest believer iu 
prohibition, he advocated the strongest prohibi- 
tion law that could be passed in keeping with the 
Constitution, his views in these matters being in 
unison with those adopted later by the national 
government. He is a joint author of the Ander- 
son— Roberson Prohibition Bill which passed in 
1916. Mr. Anderson is a Democrat, a mem- 
ber of tJie Methodist Church, and of th':? fraternal 
orders of tlie Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of 
the World, and the Elks (977 Clarkadale). Mr. 
Anderson's wife was ^linnie Hall, wliom he mar- 
ried at Senatobia, :Mississippi, Jan. IS, 1902. Her 
father Hiram Hall came to ^lissis.sippi from Ten- 
nessee; her mother Fanny (Woolfolk) Hall, be- 
longed to a family of Orange County, Virginia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have one child, ilary Dye. 
Repre.sentati%-e Anderson is an able member of th^^ 
following committees: Mississippi Levees; Liquoi 
Traffic; Public Buildings and Grounds (Chm.). 



934 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



UNION" COUNTY. 




John N. Magill 



JOHN NEWT .MAGILL of Bethany. Representa- 
tive from Union County, «-as born near Graham. 
Union County, Mi.ssissippi. December 31st. 1873. 
His parents were William AlexanJ.-r .Magill and 
Fanny Jane (AN'illiams) Magill. His rather, W. A. 
Magill, son of John and Vinecie Magill. was born 
in the Abbesville District of South Carolina, but 
came to Mississippi with his parents when a small 
boy and has lived in Union County ever since. 
John Magill. his father, came from Ireland with 
his parents at the age of twelve and settled in 
Charlestown, Soutli Carolina. He was an Elder m 
tl.e .V. R. Presbyterian Church at Bethany. Missis- 
sippi. The mother of Representative Magill is the 
daughter of Newton and Emily Williams of Gra- 
ham, Union County, Mississippi. Newton William.s 
came to this State from South Carolina. Mr. 
Magill obtained his early education in the public 
schools of Union County, where under able in- 
structors he was fitted for college. He attended 
the Mississippi Heights -A.cademy at Blue Moun- 
tain, Mississippi, and the Blue Springs Normal 
College of Blue Springs, Mississippi, where, by 
close application, he fitted himself for teaching. 
He entered that profession at the early age of 
eighteen, a profession which he has followed suc- 
cessfully for many years. He is also engaged m 
farming, an occupation in which he takes great 
interest. Mr. Magill is a man of wide influence in 
his community. Intensely interested in both the 
educational and material progress of the State, 
he is well fitted to represent the people in its 
law making body. In 1915 the voters of his county 
induced hirn to enter public life and he was 
elected to serve in the Legislature from 1916 to 
1920, where he has shown much sound and con- 
structive ability in his work on the following com- 
mittees: -Vppropiiations ; Claims: Penitentiary. 
County Affairs ; Roads, Ferries and Bridges ; Fed- 
eral Relations. He is a Democrat and a member 
of the Baptist Church, in which he has served as 
Deacon. April 1st. 1897, near Graham, Mississippi, 
he was married to Sallie Jane Gentry, daughter 
of James Thompson Gentry and Martha Cathern 
Gentry, who lived near Graham. Her ancestors 
came to Mississippi from South Carolina. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

SAM J. PURVIS of Blue Springs, Representative 
from Union County, was born September I, 1880. in 
the country, near Xew Albany, Union County. He 
is tlie son of Josh Furvis, who was born at Lenox, 
in the same County. Josh Purvis was the son oi 
George F'urvis. The Purvis family is of Scotch- 
Irish origin. They settled first in Tennessee. It 
was the grandfather of Representative Purvis who 
was the first of the family to remove from Ten- 
nessee to Mississippi. There he married his wife, 
Elizabeth, a native of North Carolina. The Purvis 
family is related to that of General Winfleld Scott. 

The mother of Sam J. Purvis was, prior to her 
marriage, Isabella Bell, whose parents, James and' 
Rosa Bell came from near Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, and settled in the country district near New 
Albany, Mississippi, During his boyhood, Sam J. 
Purvis attended the public schools of Union County, 
Mississippi and also Right's Academy. He was 
attracted toward the profession of teaching ; and 
to prepare himself for it he attended the Poplar 
Springs Normal College, and also Mississippi Col- 
lege. For some years thereafter he taught with 
great success in both the elementary and high 
schools of his State, While engaged in teaching 
his circle of influence became extended and he was 
selected to represent his County in the Legislature. 
Previous to his election to the State Legislature, 
in 1915, Mr. Purvis had not held office. To the 
service of his state he brings the high ideals that 
characterize the members of his profession, and 
every public question receives from him the most 
careful consideration. He was appointed and has 
served on the Committees of : Ways and Means ; 
Education ; Mileage ; House Contingent Expenses, 
serving as chairman of the latter. Sam J. Purvis 
is a Democrat, a Baptist and a member of the~foT^ 
lowing fraternal orders: Odd Fellows, Masons, 
Woodmen of the World, and Modern Woodmen of 
America. On October 6, 1909, at Blue Springi». 
Mississippi, he was married to Lena Love Speck, 
daughter of William P. Speck and Susan Sp.^ck of 
Blue Springs. "William P. Speck came originally 
from Alabama. He served as a Confederate sol- 
dier in General M. P. Lowrey's Brigade. His 
wif.>'s parents were from South Carolina. Mr. and 
Mrs. Purvis have but one living child, Rupert. 



935 




Sam J. Purvis 



\ 






'''^iwfcaiai^ 



S6i»^ 



&36 LEGISLATIVE DEI'AHT.MENT 

- WALTHALL COUXTY. 

WILLIAM \^^^'STO^' pope of Tylertown. Mis- 
"^ sissippi, Representative from Walthall County is 

\ the st)n of Jacob Pope and Eerthana (Magee) 

lopc. daugluer of John Magee and Claura ilagee 
(.f Dextci-, Marion County, Miss., (now Walthall 
County). He was born October 25, 1850, near 
t Columbia in Marion County. His father, Jacob 
I I'ope. son of Sampson and Esther (Barnes) I'ope. 
* was born near Columbia. He was First Lieutenant 
? of his company during the Civil War. Along with 

' six brothers, one of whom was Major Henry Pope, 

he gave to the cause his whole manhood, in 
the South's struggle for constitutional rights 
:ind liberties. The Pope family is believed by 
tlie present generation to have been descended frorn 
illiam U , Pope Tliomas Pope, who came from England to America 

in 1631 and settled at Plymouth, Mass, W. W. 
Pope's great-grandfather, Jacob Pope, moved from 
North Carolina to IMarion County, Miss, in 1811 and 
• ■ was among the wealthy slave-owners and stock- 

men of that section. His son. Sampson Pope owned 
one of the largest ranches in his county. He 
was well versed in medicine and, being a man of 
large wealth and leisure, he gave his neighbors and 
their slaves the benefit of his medical knowledge, 
free of cost to them. His wife, Esther (Barnes) 
P'ope, was well connected and owned in her own 
right quite a number of slaves, beside other prop- 
erty. Her sister. Charity Spear, married an officer 
of high rank in the War of 1S12, William Win- 
ston Pope was educated in the country schools 
of his locality, enjoying also the advantages of 
careful instruction and supervision by educated 
members of his family, a privilege that meant 
much at a time when the country was just emerg- 
ing from the dark clouds of Civil War, and was 
still contending with conditions that were not fav- 
orable to the establishment of schools and colleges. 
As a mere yotith, he assumed the responsibility of 
caring for his family, his fathfr having enlisted 
in the Confederate Army. Like so many young 
men of the South, after the war. he chose farming 
as his occupation and prompted, doubtless, by the 
trials and vexations of agricultural labor without 
proper implements, he invented the Pope Side 
Harrow, arid later made a stump burner on which 
he received, in December, 191.3. a patent. By the 
use of this latter invention, farmers make a gn-at 
saving on all former plans for removing stumps. 
Mr, Pope's fondness for agricultural pursuits, 
though of an absorbing nature, left him time to 
engage in many important movements for the 
social and political welfare of his section. He wa.<> 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 937 



active in all movements for the Prohibition Cause. 
During 1889-90. he wus assistant manager of a 
mercantil.' company in McComb City and at var- 
ious times has been employed as collector and 
iiaveling agent. His participation in public af- 
fairs biousrlit him into great popularity with the 
people and for three terms thoy have insisted 
that he should represent their interests in ih«» 
Legislature. As a member of this body, he has 
proved entirely worthy of their confidence and has 
ahva\s been a keen and intelligent obserwr and 
participant in all that effects the welfare of his 
county and his state, and serves upon the follow- 
ing committoes : Agriculture: Corporations; Census 
and Apportionment ; Registrations and Elections ; 
Pensions. Representative Pope is a Democrat : has 
served as a member of the Democratic Executive 
Committee in Marion County ; and has b.-en a 
delegate to County Nominating Conventions. A 
member of the Baptist Church, he has always 
been foremost in church work and has served in 
various positions connected with the business af- 
fairs of that denomination. He is a member of the 
fraternal order of Masons, in which he has served 
as secretary for a number of years : he was over- 
seer of the Farmers' Grange in the 70's ; was 
president of the local Lodge and lecturer of the 
County Farmers' Alliance. On October 14. 1879, 
Mr. Pope was married to Eugenia Conerly. daugh- 
ter of John M. and Lucinda (Lampton) Conerly of 
Tylertown, Miss. The Lampton family moved 
from T.-Tinessee to Mississippi ; the Conerlys from 
South Carolina to the same state. After the death 
of his first wife. Mr. Pope married Isabella For- 
tenberry. daughter of Willis and Lizzie (Pigotti 
Fortenberry, the ancestors of the latter hav- 
ing come to Mississippi from Georgia. Children 
of first marriage : — Mrs. Ozilla Sandifer, Mrs. 
Xellie Smith, Mrs. Charles Richardson Pope. Louis 
Laney Pope, who married Lois EUzey. Children 
second marriage: Ida Annette, William Marlow. 
Jackson Truett. Dudley Calvin, and Sampson. 



^-^ ^■*!HBtti!i?'*W*^'^-"~*''^>*y 



WARREN COUNTY. { 

{ 

THOMAS ROBBIN FOSTER of Vicksburg. \ 

was born March 20, 1852, at Mobile, and i.<» I^ 

the son of Hillary Foster and Lucy (Meacham^ '' iv^^- 

Foster. His ancestors cam.e to America from s 

England and Scotland and settled in Massa- i 



chusetts and Virginia. fSee Pierce's History 



*> 



ciiuseiis a.nu Virginia. (see Jr'ierce S irlisiorv ! ft J 

of the Fosters of America.) Samuel Glen, a |i . _ . J^ J. /. 
maternal ancestor, was a Captain in the Army 
of the Revolution. Thf> subjf^ct of this sketch Tl.om.is H. I" 



Jlitr*,, ..jfaAw 



938 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



is a descendant of Archer Great Forester of 
Flanders, who died in 837, and is a descendant 
of Sir John Foster, who was one of those 
who compelled King John to sign the Magna 
Charta in 1215. He died in 1220. Mr. Foster's 
father was President of the ^lobile D.ink 
and Mobile & Ohio R. R.. and wa.'^ a member 
of the mercantile firm of Boykin, McRae & 
Foster. Mr. Foster attended the schools of 
Mobile and Warrentown, N. C. He is a lawyer, 
and has been in active practice of law in 
Vicksburg since 1S80; elected Justice of the 
Peace in 1884; was Mayor of the town of Speeds 
Addition from 1S92 to 1902, when he resigned 
was elected to the House of Representatives 
from Warren County in 1002; re-elected in 
1903 and 1907. Mr. Foster is a Democrat; 
member of the Episcopal Church and Elks : 
was married November 29, 1SS2, at Vicksburg, 
Mi.ss., to Mary Sophia Moore, daugtiter of Henry 
Tierman Moore and wife. Harriet Ann Moore, 
of "Vicksburg, Miss. Mrs. Foster's father is 
said to have taught the first public school in 
Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Foster have one liv- 
ing child. Mary Corinne; have three dead: Hil- 
lary, Thomas Robbins and Henry Moore. In the 
House of 1904-1908 Mr. Foster was a member of 
the following committees: Ways and Means. 
Local and Private Legislation. Corporations. 
Insurance and Public Lands (Ch.) He Is an 
experienced lawmaker and capable parlimen- 
tarian, and is a member of the following com- 
mittees : Judiciary. Public Lands. Public Health ana 
Quarantine, Eleemosynary Institutions. Pensions. 







■if-'^'-ift- VfBrrtrf ■Htfitr" r'B 



George R. Hawkins 



GEORGE ROBERT HA\\'KIX?i of Vioksbur.ir. 
was born April 2S. 1849, in Warren County. 
Mississippi, the son of George Hawkins and 
wife. Eliza (Willson) Hawkins. Paternal an- 
cestors came to America from Ireland, ma- 
ternal from Scotland, in the early years of the 
nineteenth century. He obtained his education 
solely from the public schools in his vicinity 
and did not enter college. He ha.s always 
followed the occupation of farmer and cotton 
planter; was selected by the British Cotton 
Growing Association, of Manchester, England, 
as cotton expert, to go to West Africa to teach 
the English and natives how to raise and treat 
cotton, and spent two years there. Mr. Haw- 
kins was brought up in the Episcopal Church 
and has always stood for the highest ideals 
in his community, and no man in the public 
service of the State has a truer conception of 
his duty nor more courage to maintain his con- 
victions. He was elected to the House of Rep- 



il -.., 



LEGISLATIVE DErARTMENT 



939 



resentatives in November. 1907 and again 
elected in November 1915. He was married at 
Natchez. January 2Sth, 1S71, to Mary Agnes 
Adams, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and 
Charlotte Donahoe Adams, of Church Hill. By 
this marriag-p he had five children: Mrs. Sal- 
lie M. (Hawkins) Gates, Henry Downs, William 
Mercer, Harold Herbert, and Mrs. Agrnes (Haw- 
kins) Harvey. Mrs. Mary Agrnes Hawkins died 
in 1883. and Mr. Hawkins was married a 
second time to Lotta Child, daughter of Henry 
and Angelina Child; by this union he has one 
child, Evangeline Henri. Mr. Hawkins is a 
legislator of experience and ability, faithful 
to principles and friends and true to the be.^t 
interests of the State. He is one of the ablest 
members of the following Committees: Reg- 
istration and Elections : Fees and Salaries : 
Federal Relations; Public Buildings and 
Grounds. 



ROBERT LEIGHTON CRAWFORD BARRET, 
Representative from Warren County, resides at 
Vicksburg. Mississippi. He w-as born April 4, 
1880, at Louisa. Louisa County, Virginia, where 
his father Dr. Leighton Crawford Barret, -who 
was born near Louisa Courthouse in that 
County, practiced medicine for over fifty years. 
Dr. Barret held the office of County Physi- 
cian for Louisa County, rt one time, and dur- 
ing the Civil War was assistant surgeon in the 
Army of the Confederacy. He was the son of 
Thomas Johnson Bairet and his wife Lucy 
Ann (Crawford) Barret, who lived at "Rural 
Valley." in the Green Springs neighborhood 
of Louisa County, Virginia. Representative Bar- 
ret sprung from a distinguished ancestry, of 
English, Scotch. Irish and Welsh. On the pa- 
ternal side he is thi^ lineal descendant of 
Charles Barret, who in 1743 came from London. 
England, and settled in Louisa County. Vir- 
ginia. His son. Charles Barret, Jr., served in 
the Colonial Army as Colonel in the Revolu- 
tionary War. Through his paternal grand- 
mother Mr. Barret is descended from John 
Crawford, a Scotchman, who came to Virginia 
in 1630. Among his famous descendants were 
William H. Crawford, Secretary of War and 
Secretary of the Treasury, and George W. Craw- 
ford, Secretary of War uniler Fillmore, and at one 
time Governor of Georsia. Mr. R. L. C. Banet's 
mother was before her marriare. Annie Virginia 
Keene, daughter of Dennis and Sarah Ellen Keene, 
who lived at Vicksburg. Dennis Keene came 
to Mississippi from Maryboro. Ireland. Mr. 
Barret's inheritance of Welsh blood comes from 



■KT- 



Robert L. C. Barret 



940 legislat[vf: iiepartmext 



Jolin Yancey, who ceme to Virg-inia from Walea 
in the 17th century. His early education was 
obtained in the private schools of Louisa, Vir- 
f^inia, and at the Cohran School and the St. 
Aloysiiis Academy in V'ioksburg-. To complete 
his preparatory schoolings he returned to Vir- 
ginia, where he attended the Haley Hi^h School, 
at Louisa. Aftei- leaving that school he spent 
two years at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Bhicksburg:. \'irg:inia. Mr. Berret's professional 
education was obtained at the University ot 
the South. Sewanee, Tennessee, where, in 189S, 
at the early age of eighteen he completed a 
two years' law course with the degree of L.L. B. 
At gi-aduation he bore off the highest honors at- 
tained in the Law Department of that L'niversity 
during its history. During 1899-1900 he pursued a 
post graduate course in law at the New York La^ 
School. In 1901 Mr. Barret was admitted to the 
bar of Virginia and for the following year prac- 
ticed at Louisa. In 1906 he was admitted to the 
bar of Missis.sippi. and has also been admitted to 
practice in Louisiana. Mr. Barret's favorite 
pursuit is journalism. He is one of our most 
prominent newstiaper men. having done edi- 
torial work on the following well known 
newspapers: M>->nphis Comynercial Appeal. Slireve- 
port Times, Memphis Scimitar. Memphis Xews and 
Xeu- Orleans Times-Democrat. He has been city 
editor of the yiclcshiirg Herald, editor of the Vicks- 
burg Times-Democrat and Vicksbnrg Demoo-at, and 
acting editor of the Vicksbnrg Post. Mr. Barret 
entered political life in 191.5. when he was 
nomnated by the Democratic Paity for tlie 
Legislaturf, on the tlrst primary. In thi* 
body he has already begim to fulfill the bril- 
liant promise of his youth. He has work»:d 
with marked ability on the following commit- 
tees: Judiciary; Immigration and Labor; En- 
gros.sed Bills (Chm.) : Municipalities. Repre- 
sentative Barret began to serve the Democratic 
party at the age of twenty-one. as a committee- 
man of Louisa County, Virginia. He has also 
served on various political committees in War- 
ren County, :Mississippi, and in Vicksburg. He 
is a member of the Episcopal Church and of 
the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He has been 
prominent in all movements for community 
betterment: ha.^ at all times been an ardent 
enemy of all forms of demagogism and has 
vigorously opposed sham and hypocrisy. Aug- 
ust 24, 1903. at Hot Springs. Arkansas. Mr. 
Barret was married to Sara .Monroe, daugh- 
ter of Gustavu.s Lane and Margaret Darling 
(Burch) :Monroe. of Vicksburg, Missi.^sippi. Mrs. 
Barret is the lineal desc-ndant of President 



LECiISLATlVE I>EPAKT.\IEXT 



941 



Monroe's fir^^t American ancestor. Andrew :Mon- 
roe. Major of the Royal Army, who, after its 
defeat by Cromwell, at Preston, in 164S. came 
to America anrl settled in Westmoreland County, 
Virginia. Through her mother :Mrs. Barret is 
descended from the di.^tinguished Presbyterian 
divine, Rev. James K. Burch of Kentucky, 
grrandson of James Kerr, a signer of the Albe- 
maile County Declaration of Indi^pendence in 
1779. Mr. and Mrs. P>arrett have two sons. 
Robert Leighton Crawford. Jr., and Monroe. 



WASHIXGTON COUNTY. 

ALlFRED holt stone of "Dunleith Plan- 
tation," Mississippi, Representative of Wa.shing- 
ton County, was bom in New Orleans. Oc- 
tober 16. 1870, the son of Hon. W. W. Stone 
and Eleanor Holt Stone of Washington County, 
Mississippi. His maternal grandfather, Dr. Al- 
fred C. Holt, was a delegate from "Wilkinson 
County, Mississippi, to the Mississippi Secession 
Convention having been all his life a States 
Rights Democrat of the staunchest and most 
ardent kind. After the Civil War he practiced 
medicine in New Orleans in which city he re- 
sided until his death. He was a gallant sol- 
dier of the Confederate Army and served 
throughout the War. His son, W. W. Stone, 
also served in the Army of the Confederacy .and. 
like the father, remained in its service until 
the end. He was one of the most gallant de- 
fenders of the South during the Civil War and 
since peace has been restored to the two sec- 
tions, he is one of the truest advocates of uni(jn 
and harmony and i.s one of the most distin- 
guished citizens of the State. Just after the 
War, he removed to Washington County, where 
he has since engaged extensively in cotton 
planting. He has been a prominent figure in 
local and State politics for many years and was 
Auditor of Public Accounts of Mississippi from 
1S85 to 1<S9.5. He h;is been a merhber of the 
State Legislature.-; for ;i number of term.- and 
had the honor to a.ssist in inaugurating the move- 
ment for the preservation of the Old Capitol, a 
work for whicli he labored until the object was 
accomplished. In 1901 Senator Stone addressed 
the Legislature upon the subject asking that the 
building be preserved for historical puriJOse.s. 
Representative Alfred Holt Stone is a staunch 
advocate of his father's position, and had the 
pleasure of being one of the leaders in the final 
effort for the preservation of the building. 



Alfred H. Stone 



942 LEGISL.ATIVE DEPART.MEN'3 



Representative Stone, until a youth of six- 
teen, lived on a plantation and along with 
other opportunities for the study of many 
practical questions dealing with the welfare 
of a great agricultural section in the South, 
he was in a position to make a i^peoial study of 
the negro race, iis characteristics and probable 
future development. :Many able contributions to 
the literature of this subject have emanated from 
his pen. Mr. Stone was educated at the University 
of Mississippi, taking special work in the lit- 
erary department. In 1901 he was graduated 
in law, which profession he practiced from 
1891 to 1895. He has also been in the fire 
insurance business, but his taste for outdoor 
life has always led him back to the farm. He 
is one of the leading planters of Mississippi ar.d 
has been active in building up the agricultural 
interests of the State. His deep interest in 
the further development of the Siate'.s resour- 
ces led him into the field of politics where, with 
his superior equipment for the serious work 
of State legislation, he is in a position to in- 
fluence all vital questions that concern the 
best progress of Mississippi. As a representa- 
tive in the 191G session of the Legislature of 
1916-20. he was a leader in all the best move- 
ments that came before that body. No abler 
representative of the people has appeared in 
the public life of the State and few have com- 
bined more ability with as high standards of 
clean, upright manhood. He would fill with 
exceptionable ability any position within the 
gift of the people. Mr. Stone is both sincere 
and fearless in his convictions and while fair 
and honorable to his opponents, he does not 
readily yield a position when assured that he 
is in the right. He is quiet, strong and imper- 
turable in the legislative halls and Is thor- 
oughly prepared upon any subject that he dis- 
cusses. Caring little for newspaper notoriety 
and cheap flattery, he impresses one as having 
little need of such bolstering in official posi- 
tion. In acjdition to his wide knowledge and 
practical experience as a man of affairs, he is 
an author of note and has published a number of 
books and monographs. He is a memb€r of the 
American Academy of Political and Social Science, 
the American Social Science Association, the South- 
ern History Association, the American Economic 
Association, and the Mississippi Historical Society. 
He is a member of the committee of five appointed 
at the Detroit meeting of the American Economic 
Association, to inv^stic-ate and report upon the "tico. 
nomic Condition of the American Negro." From 
June, 1900. to June, 1901, he edited the Greenville 



LEGISI.ATIVE DEPART.MEXT 



943 



Times. He has contributed a valuable article to 
the Mississippi Historical Society entitled "The 
Early Slave Laws of Mississippi/' In 1896. he 
was married to :\Iary Bailey Ireys. Mrs. Stone 
is the daughter of H. T. Ireys and Bettie Taylor 
Iieys, of Greenville. .Mississippi. Representative 
Stone serves on the following committees: Edu- 
cation; ilississippi Levees; Public Buildings and 
Grounds; Insurance. 



ALEXANDER GALLATLV PAXTOX of (Green- 
ville, Representative from Washington County, 
was born near Areola in that County. January 
16, 185S. His father was Andrew Jackson Pax- 
ton, son of Elisha and Rachael (McXatt) Paxton. 
who lived near Lexington, Rockbridge County! 
Virginia. His father served throughout the 
Civil War in the supply department of Lee's 
Army, under his brother. James Gardner Pax- 
ton, who was Major Quartermaster. The Pax- 
tons are of a distinguislied family. They ar.- 
descended from James Paxton, who was a col- 
onel in the army of Oliver Cromwell and assisted 
at the execution of Charles First.' James Gard- 
ner Paxton was builder and first President of 
the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. Brigadier 
General Elisha Franklin Paxton was staff officer 
under Stonewall Jackson, and was later pro- 
moted to Brigadier General of Stonewall Bri- 
gade. The mother of Sam Houston, famous pio- 
neer, Governor of Tennessee and Governor of 
Texas, was a Paxton. Among Representative 
Paxton's noted relatives on the McXutl side was 
Gov. Alexander G. McX-utt. his grreatuncle. The 
mother of the subject of our sketch was Hannah 
Mary (Beasley) Faxton, daughter of John Beasley 
of Jackson. Miss. Mr. Paxton obtained his early 
education in a private school on Deer Creek 
and in the public schools of his county. In 1S73 
he attended the University of Mississippi, and 
later entered the Washington & Lee University 
of Virginia, from which he was graduated as a 
lawyer in 1880, tying for second honors. He 
then began to practise at Indianola. ilississippi. 
later removing to Vicksburg and finally to 
Greenville. As a lawyer Mr. Paxton has given 
especial attention to land litigation, a field In 
which he has been very successful. His life, 
previous to his election to the legislature, had 
been spent in civil pursuits. He opened and 
built up three cotton plantations, and was in- 
strumental in relieving cotton planters from oil 
mill trusts. He also established In Greenville 
the Mississippi Delta Cotton Corp-^ration. for 
the purpose of helping to reform methods of the 



Alexander G. Faxton 



94 4 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEXT 

sale of cotton. He enjoys the peculiar distinc- 
tion of having been elected to the Legislature 
without his knowledge or solicitation and with- 
out opposition. Mr. Paxton is one of the be.st 
men in even.- sense of the word in the public ser- 
vice of the state. For the term of 1916-1920 he 
has been placed on the following committees: Ju- 
diciary ; Ways and Means ; Mississippi Levees. Mr. 
Paxton is a Democrat, a member of the Jlethodist 
Church, and belongs to the Knights of Pythia.'*. 
Elks and Woodmen of the World. His first wife 
was Mary Xoland, to whom he was married Dec- 
ember 12, 1SS2. She is the daughter of Hal P. 
and Annie Aklridge Noland of Hickory Tree, War- 
ren County. Missi-ssippi. His second wife was An- 
nie Buie, to whom he was married May .3. 1893. at 
Brookhaven. Mississippi. She is the daughter of 
Joseph Paisley Buie and Elizabeth (Millsaps) 
Buie, sister of R. W. :Millsaps of Jackson, Missis- 
sippi. The children of the first marriage are: 
Annie Aldridge, Jennie Ruth, Mary Xoland. and 
Lucy Aldridge ; and of the second marriage, Josle 
Elise. Alexander Gallatin, Dorothy, John McX'utt. 
and Frances Houston. 

WALTER SCOTT KXOTTS who resides at Bel- 
zoni. Mississippi, and represents Washington 
County, was born in Byholia, :Marshall County, 
Mississippi. May 18, 1874. His father, James 
Milton Knotts, was a Xorth Carolinian, born 
in Lilesville. Anderson County, and lived for a time 
at Wadesboro, Xorth Carolina, then at Cheran, 
South Carolina, and finally settled in Mempliis. 
Tennessee, where he was in business for a number 
of years. He was a captain in the Confederate 
Armj-, and rendered faithful service throughout the 
entire four years of the Civil ^Var. The mother of 
Walter Scott Knotts was. prior to her marriage. 
Elizabeth Penelope Tyson. She was the daughter 
Walter S. Knotts ^f Horation and Caroline Matilda Tyson, who 

lived at Byhalia. Mr. Scott's maternal ancestors 
were also natives of Xorth Carolina; his grand- 
parents came to Mississippi from Richmond County, 
Xorth Carolina before the Civil War. Mr. Knotts 
completed his high school course at Waverly In- 
stitute. Byhalia, and later became a student in the 
literary department of the University of Mississippi. 
He then took up the study of law., and in 1907 
was admitted to the bar, at Greenville, Mississippi. 
In the same year he opened his office in Belzoni. 
%vhere he has sin<e enjoyed a steadily increasing 
practice. He. also, has considerable planting in- 
• terests near Belzoni. as well as bu.siness interests 

in the City. As a succes.sful professional and 
business man, he is well suited to hold public po- 




945 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

sition and has served as Clerk and Trensurer. Al- 
derman and Mayor (for two terms). In 1915 he 
was the peoples choice for repiesentative : was 
elected to the Legislature for thp term 1916-1920. 
He is independent of political factions and labors 
for the g-ood of the whole state, and has al- 
ready performed service of a high gi-ade upon 
the following committees: Judiciary; Educa- 
tion; Claims; Mississippi Levies; Banks and Bank- 
ing. Ml". Knotts is a member of the Democratic 
Party and of the Methodist Church, the church of 
his parents. He is a member of the board of 
Stewards. He is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias 
and wields a strong influence in his community and 
section in all matters pertaining to the public good. 
On May 23. 1S99. he was married to Annie Owen 
in Byhalia, Mississippi. She is the daughter or 
Christopher and Georgia (Mims) Bowen, of Chul- 
ahoma. Marshall County. iMississippi. They have 
five children ; Edward Bowden. Elizabeth. Walter 
Christopher. Sarah and Georgia. 



"U'ATXE COUXTT. 

GROVER CLEVELAND CLARK whos»- address 
is R. F. D. Xo. 2. Heidelberg, Mississippi, repre- 
sents Wayne County in the Lower House. He is 
the son of Thomas Jefferson Clark and Mattie 
Drusilla Clark, and was born September 22. 18S7. 
at Eucutta, in AVayne County. His father was also ** ^■. 

born at Eucutta and liv^d there all his life, en- 
gaged in farming. His parents were George W. 
and Emaline Tiner Clark. George W. Clark came 
to Mississippi from South Carolina in 1833. His 
ancestors jere English ; they came to America 
about the middle of the 18th Century, and helped J 
to wrest America from British control. His wife. |_ 
Emaline (Tiner) Clark, was born and reared in *'"^ 
Tennessee. At the outbreak of the Civil Wat G rover C. Clark- 

George W. Clark enlisted as a Confederate 
soldier ; but as he was severely wounded 
a short time thereafter he could do little 
actual service, although he contributed in various 
ways to the Confedprate cause, to which he was 
ardently devoted. The maiden name of Represen- 
tative Clark's mother was Mattie Drusilla Thomas ; 
she was the daught"T of John and Martha (Merrill) 
Thomas, of Heidelbf-rg. Mississippi. The family 
are of English descent. John Thomas came to 
Mississippi with his father in 1832. Mr. Clark se- 
cured his early education at Eucutta and Melvin. 
Mississippi. H.^ afterwards attended Millsaps Col- 
lege from 1902 to 1907. graduating with the B. S. 

60— M 



I 



946 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



degree as an honor student. He was Pressident of 
the Lamar Literary Society and President of ?;is 
Class, and won medals in oratorical conti'sts. In 
addition to his college work he took a course of 
■professional training at Hattiesburg Xortnal Col- 
lege to fit himself for teaching. Since then he has 
done very successful work in that profession, hav- 
ing taught in the High School at :sragee, Missi.^sit.pi 
(1912-1911), for a time in the Waynesboro K:gh 
School, and being now Principal of Pleasant Grove 
Consolidated Schools. He was elected to serve in 
the State Legislature from 1916 to 1920, and while 
economical in his views of State expenditures, hx is 
just to every institution, and has given many 
evidence of superior ability in his work on 
the following committees: Ways and Means; 
Education ; Local and Private Legislation ; Frts 
and Salaries. Mr. Clark is a Democrat and 
a member of the Baptist Church, in which he is 
Sunday School teacher. He belongs to the Ma.son^. 
and the Kappa Sigrr^a fraternity. .Vlong with the 
other young men in the State he is a patriotic and 
enthusiastic supi^orter of Americas cause in the 
war with Germany. June 12, 1912, at Jackson, 
Mississippi, he was married to Miss Charlie Nimn.D. 
daughter of Charles and Minnie (Van Hook; 
N'immo of that City. Her paternal great-gran 3- 
father came from England in early colonial tim^is. 
and her maternal ancestors came from Holland. 
Her grandfather. M. A. Van Hook, was a com- 
mission merchant of Mobile, Alabama, who moved 
to Jackson after the War, where he lived until his 
death. :Mr. and Mrs. Clark have two children. 
Hazel and Grover Cleveland. Jr. 



■ut:bster couxtt. 

'.iJW^K_K.u.«mi,^^Mmf.fj^ SOLOX STREETER GORE of Embry. Repre- 

' •,^ "• ^ sentative from Webster County, was born May 

*• ■ 6- 188S. at Cadaratta. "Webster County, Mississippi. 

He belongs by heredity to the professional class. 
Hjs father. William \Vesley Gore, a native of Pick- 
} ensville, Pickens County. Alabama, was a Doctor of 

J"" -'■ Medicine. His grandfather, the Reverend Ezekie! 

Gore, was a Methodist :Minister. Rev. Gore mar- 
' ried a Miss Mar>- Green. The Gore family haa 

^ ^^^^ been a distingui.«hed one in politics, and promt- 

V, "^ ^^ nent In the professions. Solon Streeter Gore's 

•f mother was born in Mississippi ; her maiden name 
I was Sallie Car\-er, and she was the daughter of 
■ T\':lliam and Lucy f Calloway) Carver, of Cadar- 
Solon S. Gore '^"'^- Representative Gore obtained his early edu- 

cation in the free schools of his native county. 



'(I ,; ' ' n . 



■w. .rntiav 



i.<(!j* i»ii'»i 



.?TVfUor> 



.•»» \ dirt ?o 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



947 



He later attended Henderson College in Tenncssei'. 
and is well equipped intellectually for his life 
work. Mr. Gore has been both a farmer and a 
teacher, and i.s one of the most brilliant orators 
of his section He taught from 1910 to 1914, three 
years in Webster and one in Quitman Counties, 
and has been very successful in that profession. 
In 1915 he entered political life as a member of 
the Legislature. As he is one of the younger 
members, his career lies before him and he is ex- 
pected to accomplish something of value to his 
state. While partisan in his political affiliations 
he never takes an undue advantage of his op- 
ponents. He has served ably upon the Committees 
of: Agriculture; Education; Engrossed Bills; 
Municipalities ; Drainage. He is as yet unmarried. 



WILKINSON' COUNTY. 



JAMES ROBERT HUTCHESON of Centerville. 
Mississippi, R.epres'jiitative from Wilkinson County, 
was born on a farm near Centerville. January 2Z. 
187 2. His father, John Williams Huteheson, son 
of Dr. Charles A. Huteheson and Elizabeth West- 
wood (Williams) Huteheson, was born in Hardi- 
man County, Tenn., in 1835, but in 1838 removed 
with his parents to Holly Springs, :Marshall County, 
Mississippi. He was reared in that County, but 
in 1858 removed to Wilkinson County, where he 
has lived ever since. His paternal grandparents 
were Virginians, and were of Scotc \ and Irisli 
descent. His maternal grandparents, William Ealy 
Williams and Martha (Haynes) Williams of North 
Carolina, were the good old ancestry of Welsh and 
English. In September, IS 61, John "\V. Huteheson 
onlisted in Captin Sam Norwood's Company of 
Homeguards, and remained with it until Marcn, 
1862. when he joined Company A of the 27th Louis- 
iana Infantry, went into active service, was finally 
raised to the rank of Second Lieutenant, and servea 
until the surrender. After the War he took an 
active part in ridding his county of carpet bag 
and radical rule. The mother of Representative 
Huteheson was, prior to her marriage, Charlotte 
Virginia Scudder, daughter of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Scudder. Thomas Scuader was bom in Ten- 
nessee in 1793, and served in tJie War of 1812 
under General Jackson ; his wife was a native of 
Columbia, South Carolina. James Robert Hutehe- 
son was a happy farmer boy, who epent his time 
out of school in plowing and helping on the 
farm. He obtained his education in the public 




James R. Huteheson 



948 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



schools of his County. When he was eighteen 
he began to alternate his farm work with 
clerking' in a store in the fall and winter months. 
In 1S98 he enlisted as a soldier in the Spanish- 
American War. and was sent to camp at Chick- 
aniauga, where he remained until the close of 
the War, receiving his discharge at Columbia. 
Tenn. Since that time he has been engaged in 
farm work and also in the mercantile business. 
He served a term very acceptably as Justice of 
the P'eace of the Third District of his County and 
became popular with tlie people, which led to his 
entrance into politics. In 1915 he was elected to 
the House of Representatives, where he is earn- 
ing a well merited reputation for thoughtfulness 
and care in dealing with public questions concern- 
ing the welfare of the state. He is performing 
excellent work on the following committees : Ways 
and Means ; Corporations ; Registrations and Elec- 
tions ; Federal Relations and Liquor Traffic. Mr. 
Hutcheson was married January 2. 190 4, to Carrie 
Louise McGraw, the only child of Robert A. and 
Mary E. McGraw. By this union there are two 
children, Robert Earle, and Mary Estelle. 



|PP5S^»Sf l^»H*J»?yfl" i^j^ 



3.> -r^. 



V 



^^ 




C. T. Xetterville. Jr. 



CHARLES THOMAS XETTBRVILLE, JR., of 
Wilkinson, Representative from Wilkinson County, 
was born at that place March 24. 1890. His parents 
are Charles Thomas Netterville, Sr., and Addie 
(Carter) Xetterville, of AVilkinson. His father is 
also a native of Wilkinson, and lived there all his 
life, following the occupation of farming. For twelve 
years he was a member of the Board of Supervisors 
of his county, and afterwards held the office of post- 
master until his death. His parents were Jessie and 
Mary Lanehart Xetterville of Wilkinson. The X'et- 
tervilles are among the oldest families of their 
County. The great grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, Tom X'etter\ ille, came with his wife and 
two brothers from Ireland, and settled in Wilkinson. 
Addie (Carter) Xetterville. mother of Representa- 
tive X'etterville was the daughter of X'emirah Carter 
and Sarah Lanehart Caiter of Wilkinson. Mr. X'et- 
terville obtained his eail.v education in the rural 
schools of Wilkinson, where he was inspired with 
an ambition for further knowledge. At the age of 
seventeen he left home to seek a higher education. 
He went to Xashville. Tennessee, where he worked 
his way through school for five and a half years. 
This gave him a good equipment for a practical 
business life in various pursuits. He has since 
been engaged in the occupation of farmiiiir and in 
the mercantile business, and has held the office of 
postmaster. His influence in his community en- 



1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



949 



abled Iiim to obtain a higrher position and in 
1915 he was elected a member of the State Legis- 
lature, where as one of the younger members 
he has shown very promising ability in connection 
with his work on the following committees: Agri- 
culture ; Railroads : Census and Apportionment : 
Registrations and Elections. Mr. Xetterville is an 
elder, is a great church worker, and brought about 
the building of his home church. He is also a 
Mason. September 22, 1912. near Wilkinson, he 
was married to Jennie McCraine. daughter of Wal- 
ter and EUt'-n McXeely McCraine of Glo.-iter, Missis- 
sippi. They have one child. Rush Edwards. 



WIXSTOX COUXTT. 



FRAXK McGEHEE GLEXX of Xoxapater. Rep- 
resentative from "Winston County, was born tn 
Singleton in that County, December 30. ^71. His 
father, Thomas Alexander Glonn. was a native of 
Xewberry County. South Carolina, but had re- 
moved to Singleton. Mississippi, before the birth of 
his son. The maiden name of Frank'' McGehec 
Glenn's motlier was Mary Francis Johnson. She 
was the daughter of "Wesley Johnson of Singleton. 
Mr. Glenn's ancestors were Scotch-Irish and came 
to America in the days of the colonies and were 
ardent believers in liberty and Democratic ideals. 
Mr. Gl.-Tin obtained hi.s education in the publi-c 
schools of Winston County. He did not attend 
college, preferring to enter the business world, 
in which he has had a successful career. He V>e- 
came a merchant, a member of the firm of Glenn 
& Glenn, of Xoxapater. where he is still engaged 
in that work. He is among the most influential 
men of his County ; is public spirited and helpful 
in his community. Mr. Glenn served as Mayor 
of Xoxapater from 1906 to 1912. During his term 
of office he gained * e full confidence of the people 
and in 1915 was presented as a candidate for the 
office of State Legislator, to which he was elected 
for the term of 1916-1920. His record in that 
body shows that he is a man of mature judgment, 
wide practical experience. and integrity of 
purpose. He is a valuable member ■ of the 
following committees : Manufactures : Roads. Fer- 
ries and Bridges ; Insurance : He is a Dem- 
ocrat, a member of the Lutheran Church and 
is prominent in the Masonic Lodge. June 11, 1905 
he was married, at Mashulovilce, Noxubee County, 
to Anna Lois "Watkin.*. daughter of J. M. and Ida 
I>ipscomb Watkins of Mashuloviee. Mississippi. 



-p,>^3Le£.- 



rrtrtlf'lH 



Fiank McG. Glenn 



950 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Their children are. Frank Milton. Rupert Sidney 
and Mary Francis. 



YALOBUSHA COUXTT 



^ •'■ • GEORGE ELIAS DEXLEY. of Coffeeville. repre- 

f sentativ,' from Yalobusha County, \\-as born August 

1 ^- 1^67. at Coles Creek. Mississippi. His father was 

f ' James Donley, -who r.-as the son of N-Jcholus P. 

: Denley and Sarah (Carter) Denley of South Mis- 

I sissippi. He was born in Yalobusha County, 

i and enlisted in the Confederate Army. Augaist 9. 

^ : l^*'!' 'n Company D. 42nd Mis?is.=ippi Regiment. 

f ~^,.^ »"'J served with ardent devotion to the Southern 

[ . ■ "> cause throughout the entire TYar. His regiment 

I ' ' I ^^^^ Pa^t In the campaigns fought in Maryland. 

I i Virginia and Pennsylvania. George Elias Denley's 

L — ^*.^^. ^z. ..^iJ mother. Margaret CSellers) Denley. was th(? daugh- 
ter of Phillip Sellers, of Coles Creek. Calhoun 
George E. Denley County. Mississippi. Representative Detiley was 

educated in the free schools of his county, and at 
Coles Creek Academy, where he spf-nt one term. 
His chief occupation has always been farmln'?. But 
from 1SS7 to 1SS9, and from 1896 to IDOO he'taughi 
school. Xot content with success along these twri 
lines, he became the successful proprietor and 
editor of the Coffeeville Courier, which he is con- 
ducting at the present time. He is also. agent and 
district manager of the Lamar Liff Insurance Com- 
pany and holds the responsible position of Trustee 
of the Yalobusha County Agricultural Hiirh School. 
From 1S9.T to 1R99 he was Justice of the Peace, 
and f.-om 1899 to 1907 he was an able member of 
the Board of Supervisors of his County. Mr. 
Denley is not only well equipped for public t^ervic''. 
but his sterling qualities and steadfast purpose In 
contending for the right makes him a safe servant 
of the people. Elected to the State Legislature in 
1915. he was placed upon the committees on Munl- 
/ cipalities, where he has faithfully served his con- 

stituents. Mr. Denley Is a Democrat, and Treasurer 
and Deacon of the Baptist Church. He belongs to 
th<=> Masons and the TYoodmen of the TVorld. 
January- 7. 1892. he was married, near Coffeeville. 
Missi.-^sippi. to Martha Ellen Williams, daughter of 
George "W. and Martha Ellen CVanhoozer) "Vrilliams 
of Yalobusha County. Mr. and Mrs. Denley have a 
large and interesting family of children, whose 
names are as follows: Martha Essie. Margaret 
Bessie. Chester Lamar, Mary Jessie. Gladys Ethel. 
Sellers Vanhoozer, Xelll" Tolise. Evelyn Grace, 
Gerald Hamilton, and George Edwin. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 951 

V.'II.LIAM ALVA XOLEN". representative from 
Yalobusha County, resides at Water Valley, ilissi?- 
sippi. He was born just after the close of the 
Civil War, (on July 2S. 18ti5). at Choctow. in what 
is now Webster County. Mississippi. His father. 
Samuel Lafayette Xolen, son of John Xolen and 
Nancy (Rueker) Nolen of Franklin County, Ala- 
bama, was born in that County, June 1, 1827. In 
1S5S he removed from Alabama to Mississippi. Dur- 
ing the War her served continuously for four years 
in a reg-iment of Confederate Infantry. Mr. Nolen 
is of pure Irish descent, a strain of blood that has 
enrichod the population of America since the early 
Colonial days. His great-grandfather Nolen came 

from Ireland to the United .=!tates in the latter part William A. Nolen 

of the 18th Century, and at about the same time 
cam€f also his maternal great-grandfather, whosf 
name was McGaughy. His son. James McGaughy, 
was married to Miss Martha Norton, and 11 "ed in 
Lawrence County. Alabama. Their daughter. 
Pricey Jane McGaughy. became the wife of Samuel 
L. Nolen. and thf mother of tha subject of this 
sketch. William Alva Nolen obtained his education 
in the public school^; of his Counir. where he was 
prepared for a successful business career. Until 
1904 he followed the occupation of farming: in 
that year he decided to enter the mercantile busi- 
ness, in which he has since been engaged. From 
1900 to 1908 he was Tax Assessor of his County. 
an office which he filled to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. He is one of the influential men in his 
County and his deep interest in the affairs of 
state made him an available candidate for higher 
office. In 191.5 he was brought out by the people 
and was elected to the Lower Hou.se of the State 
Legislature. He represents his people ably and 
faithfully, and has served with integrity and 
ability upon the following committees: Elee- 
mosynary Institutions: Penitentiarj- : County Af- 
fairs ; Federal Relations. Mr. Nolen is a staunch 
mPTnber of the Democratic Party, a Deacon in the 
Christian Church. Superintendent of the Sunday 
School, and a rr°mber of the Knights of Fj'thias and 
the Woodmen of the "World. He was married to 
Jennie Lee Corl'^y in 1891. She was the daughter 
of James and Eettie (Strahan) Corley of Copiah 
County, Mississippi. In 1904 she died, leaving one 
child, James Howard Nolen. Tn 1907 Mr. Nolen 
was again married. His second wife was Mary 
Alice Pears, daughter of George Pears and Evalina 
(Hyde) Pears, of Water Valley, Mississippi. 
George Pears was an Engli.shman by birth. He 
was bom in Warwickshire in 18.52 and in 1874 Im- 
migrated to L^'nited States, settling in Lafayette 
County, Mississippi. 



95: 



LEGISLATIVE DEPART^[E^-l 



YAZOO COUNTY 







Benjamin F. Roberts 



/ 



BEXJAMIX FRAXKLIX ROBERTS, of Sa- 
tartia. representative from the Covmty of YazVo. 
was born in Benton County. Alabama. December 
29. 18 19. He is the son of John I. Roberts, 
who removed from Alabama to Attala County. 
Mississippi, in 1853. when Benjamin Franklin 
was a child of four years. John I. Roberts was 
for some time a magistrate of Attala County. 
When the Civil "War broke out h.' enlisted in the 
30th Mississippi Regiment of Infantry, C. S. A. 
He was First Lieutenant of Company D, and served 
with much erallantry in the many enga.sements in 
which his Regiment took part. Thi? Roberts first 
settled in Virginia, and was one of the prominent 
families of the Province. Step Roberts, grand- 
father of B. F. Roberts, went from that State to 
Gforgia. His wife's maiden name was Ellen Burges. 
It was while they were living in Georgia that their 
son, John I. Roberts, was born. Mr. Roberts' 
mother, Cressie (Barnett) Roberts, was the daugh- 
ter of Uriah and K.izia Barnett. Bearing the name 
of Benjamin Franklin, he has all the rugged 
honesty and purity of purpose of that great 
American patriot. He received his early education 
in the public schools of Attala and Leak Coun- 
ties. He has devoted himself for the most part 
to the occupation of farming. From 1905 to 
1916 he ably filled the ofRce of Justice of the 
Peace of Beat 1. Yazoo County. Having become 
very popular in Ixis County, he was elected to 
the Legislature in 1915, for the term of 1916-20, 
and was madt' a member of the following commit- 
tees, on which he has ser\'ed diligently and for the 
best interests of the State and with fairness and 
justice to all State Institutions: Appropriations: 
Mississippi Levees: Public Printing; Penitentiary: 
Pensions. Mr. Roberts belongs to the Democratic 
Party, and to the Order of the Woodmen of the 
^Vorld, and the Columbian Woodmem He is a 
memboT of the Primitive Baptist Church. The 
wife of Representative Roberts was, prior to her 
marriage. Mary Ann Furr. daughter of Daniel and 
Lizzie (Brandon) Furr, of Lafayette County, Mis- 
sissippi. Daniel Furr served in the Mississippi State 
troops of the Confederacy during the Civil War. 
Mary Ann Furr was married to Mr. Roberts on 
June 22. 1873. in Attala County. Representative 
and Mrs. Roberts are the parents of a large and 
interesting family. The eldest is Joseph Eugene 
Roberts. Following him in the order of birtli are 
George Young. Lucy, Henry Ivison, Jessie. Eliza- 
beth, Mary Alice. Lulu May and Mattie Leona. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



953 



PATRICK CLAIBOURXE MEAGHER, whose 
address is Route 1. Yazoo City. Tazoo County, was 
born at Dover in that County February 18. 
1869. His father. Patrick Farrell :Meae:her. was 
born in the County of Tipperary. Ireland. After 
emigrating- from there to America he settled first 
at Shawn. Georgia, and in 1S53 removed to Missis- 
sippi. 'Wlien the call to arms came in 1861, he 
was loyal to his adopted State, which he ser\ed a.« 
a Confederate soldier. His parents were James and 
Mary (FarrelH Measrher. of Tipperary County in 
Ireland. On the maternal side. Mr. Meapher is 
also of Irish descent. His mother Mafrgie (Rileyl 
Meagher, was the daughter of \Villiam and Mary 
Riley of "U'est Mede. Ireland. Mr. Meagher ob- 
tained hia education in the free schools of his com- 
munity. TVhile never enjoying- Colleare advantages 
under the instruction of capable, conscientious 
teachers, he was prepared for a successful career. 
He is a farmer and dealer in cattle. His popularity 
and interest in nublic affairs led to his entrance 
into politics. He has held the office of County 
Treasurer of Tazoo County, an office which he 
has filled with ability and sterling honesty. His 
term expired in 1916, Januar>- 1st. and he was 
elected in 1915 to the State Legislature. Though 
this is Mr. IMeagher's first time in the Legisla- 
ture, he reflects great credit upon his constituency 
and he has served capably on the following com- 
mittees: Mississippi Levees: Public Printing: Elee- 
mosjTiary Institutions: Insurance; Drainage. Mr. 
Meagher has always been a staunch Democrat 
His life has been devoted to the work of main- 
taining and upholding the best ideals of the 
American government. He is a member of the 
Catholic Church and the order of the Knights of 
Columbus. He has never married. 



X 



Patrick C. Meagher 



EXCELL COODY, of Phoenix. Mississippi. Repre- 
sentative from Yazoo County, was born November 
19. 1889, near Phoenix, but in the County of War- 
ren. Mississippi. His father. Walter Alexander 
Coody, was b'^'-n near Phoenix, in Yazoo Count>- 
His parents were Archibald Stinson Coody and 
Georgia Hou-e Coody. Representative Goody's 
maternal ancestors were also Mississippians for sev- 
eral generations. His mother, who was Carrie 
Rebecca Butts before her marriage, was the daugh- 
ter of Reden Butts and his wife, Sallie (Terrel) 
Butts who lived near Phoenix in Warren County. 
After completing his elementary education, Mr. 
Coody attended the Phoenix High School. He then 
entered ihc Mississippi Heights Academy, of which 




Excell Coody 



954 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



Professor J. E. Brown was President at that time 
and Professor M. E. Moffit was Dean, and was 
graduated in 1910. The yoar follow insf his .srartu- 
ation, Mr. Coody took up the profession of teach- 
ing, which he has followed successfully ever since. 
From 1911 to 1913 he taught in the public school."? 
of "W'arren County, and in Yazoo County from 
1913-1915. In 1915 he was elected to represent 
his county in the lower house of the State Legisla- 
ture where he strives to be fair and just to every 
Interest of the State. He is openminded to ques- 
tions of public interest and is independent of 
political factions in questions of the State's wel- 
fare. He is one of the younger members of that 
body and has served on the following committees; 
Constitution ; Mississippi Levees : Eleemosynary In- 
stitutions ; Penitentiary ; Immigration & Labor. 
Representative Coody is a Democrat and a member 
of the Baptist Church. He is unmarried. 



?*9 



tl .rijioriO >Bi 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



965 



FLOATER REPRESENTATIVES 



FRA.VKLIX AND LIXCOLX 

FRED ARTHUR WRIGHT, floater represen- 
tative, has his home at Lucien. in Franklin 
County, Mississippi, and represents both tliat 
County and the County of Lincoln. He was born at 
Kennolia, Franklin County, May ill, 1S91. His 
father, James Ferdinand Wright, was also boin 
at that place, and has lived there his entire life, 
except for the four years that lie served in the 
Confederate Army during the AVar between the 
States. He was a teacher for a number of years. 
The paternal grandparents of Fred Arthur \Vright 
were Thomas Levi Wright and Elnor Wright, of 
Wright's J'ord, Mississippi. The ancestors of the 
Wright family came to America in Colonial days 
and settled in Virginia. The descendants of the 
Virginian settlers came from that State to Frank- 
lin County, Mississippi, and were among its most 
w^orthy and progressive families. Mr. Wright's 
mother prior to her marriage, was Miss Gertrude 
Chapman, daug'iter of Thomas S. Chapman and 
Sarah D. Chapman of "Wright's Ford. The 
Chapmans came from Ireland and were among 
the earliest settlers of Kentucky. The family 
removed from there directly to Franklin County, 
Mississippi. The great-great-grandparents of the 
subject of this sketch fought as patriot sol- 
diers in the Revolutionary War. Both his grand- 
parents were enlisted in the Confederate ranks in 
the Civil War, and served with great gallantry 
throughout the struggle. Representative Wright 
secured his early education in the rural public 
schools of Franklin County. He afterwards en- 
tered Mississippi College, and was graduated from 
there in 1916 with the degree of B. A. Before his 
graduation ilr. Wright had the unusual distinction 
of being elected to the State Legislature and is one 
of the strongest of the younger members of that 
body. Though firm in his convictions of right, he is 
in no wise a blind partisan and he always places the 
public welfare above pirry faction and divisions. 
His career in the Legislature is marked by a 
senr of justice to the various State institutions. 
Although he is one of thi? youngest men in that body 
he has already given promise of being one of its 
most capable and useful members and has served 
ably on the committees of: Appropriations: Edu- 
cation ; Insurance. He is a Democrat, a Baptist, 
and a Woodman of the World. He is as yet un- 
married. 




Fred A. Wright 



956 Legislative department 

tippah axd benton counties. 

. - - • FREDERIC EROUGHER SMITH \vho repre- 

sents botti Benton and Tippah Counties, ha? !-.is 
i "*♦■ '■ residence" in the latter County, at Ripley. H-. is 

J the son of Robert Bruce Smith, Sr., and Far."i*; 

^ (Pahner) Smitli. wb.o live near Ripley, and wa.= 

1*^ « born on his father's plantation, May 14. 1892. R..b- 

/ en Bruce Smith,- Sr., was born at Orzabra. in 

j Tippah County, and is still living on his planta-.:.->n. 

/ whei-e he has sp' nt almost his entire life. He is 

..._..■' X the son of Captain Tiiomas Smith, -who serve'! in 

the Confederate Army in P'alkner's Cavalry Regi- 
ment, and was killed in battle near Corinth, Missis- 
t. - ■ fc^A\ /^,„ . ...-^.,^rJ sippi, in 1863. The mother of Representative Smiih, 
Fannie (Palmer) Smith, is the daughter of Jchn 
Frederick B. Smith R. Palmer and Carrie C. Palmer, who lived near 

Ripley. Randolph Palmer, great-gi-andfather ot 
the subject of our sketch, was before the War the 
greatest slave holder of North Mississippi. 
Frederi-c Brougher. great-grandfaiher of Re;:re- 
. scntative Smith, moved to Tippah County from 
South Carolina, where he found the section a vast 
unbroken forest inhabited only by Indians. He 
built his house of burnt brick on tlie highest p>:'int 
of the State, where Blue Mountain College r.;w 
stands. Frederic Brougher, Jr., great-uncle of 
Representative Smith, was for a number of years 
Secretary of State. Frederic Brougher Sn::ih 
obtained his early education in the schools of 
Tippah County. He then attended the Missis- 
sippi Heights Academy, at Blue Mountain, where 
Professor J. E. Brown was then president, com- 
pleting his course in 1908. in 191- he was 
graduated from Millsaps College with the de- 
gree of B. S.. and holding many college honors. 
The following two years he took a law course at 
O.xford, Mississippi, in the University, and was 
graduated with the degree of EL. B. He there had 
the honor of being Editor-in-Chief of "Ole Miss." 
the University Annual. In July, following his grad- 
uation he began the practice of law at Ripley. Two 
weeks after entering upon his practice he was en- 
gaged in the famous Moore murder case, and has 
enjoyed a constantly increasing reputation as an 
able lawyer. In 1915 he was elected without op- 
position to the Lower House, where he has ser.ed 
with exceptional ability upon the following com- 
mittees: Judiciary: Railroads: Immigration and 
Labor; Insurance: Drainage. Mr. Smith is a Dem- 
ocrat and a Methodist: is President 'of the Bu.?i- 
ness Men's Bible Class of his church : and belongs 
to the Masons, Elks. Woodmen, Kappa Sigma and 
Kappa Upsilon. 



LEGISI-ATIVE DEPARTMENT 



957 



CI.AIEORXE AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES 



SAMUEL ROBERT YOUNG of Fattison. .'who 
represents Claiborne and Jefferson Counties, was 
born at Diamond Hill. Abbeville County, South 
Carolina. He is the son of James Touns. who was 
born at Level Land in Abbeville County, hut lived 
during his adult years at Diamond Hill. James 
Young was a farmer and a member of the Metho- 
dist-Church, in which he occupied the position of 
Steward. The Touns: family is Scotch-Irish origin. 
They settled in Abbeville County, South Carolina, 
about 17S.T. The Reverend John Young, a Cum- 
berland Pre.sbyterian minister, at one time Presi- 
dent of Erskine College, at Due West. South Caro- 
lina, was a great-uncle of the subject of this 
sketch. John and Sarah Young, grandparents, of 
Samuel Robert Young, lived at Level Land. South 
Carolina. Reverend Samuel Robert Young's mother. 
Mary (Black) Young, was the daughter of James 
and Betsie Black of South Carolina Representa- 
tive Young secured his oarly education in the coun- 
try schools of his native county. In 1866 he left 
.South Carolina and came to Hinds Coitnty. Missis- 
sippi. He took up the study of theolog>' and was or- 
dained to the Baptist ministry in 1SS2. Since that 
time he has baptised 1000 persons and married 750 
couples. He became greatly interested in Prohi- 
bition, and led In the light for Prohibition in Clai- 
borne County, under local option. Believing that 
he could serve reform movement best by being in 
ofRce. he decided to run for State Senator, and was 
elected for the session of 1912-1916. Duiing that 
session he was a prominent worker for prohibition 
legislation, thff age of consent law. and increased 
appropriation for educational purposes. In 1915 he 
was elected to the lower house, where he has been 
active and has rendered able service upon 
the following committees : Corporations ; Liq- 
uor Traffic ; Propositions and Grievances. Rep- 
resentative Young is a Democrat and a 
Mason. He was married. October S. 1867. at 
Chapel Hill. Hinds County. Mississippi', to Miss Mary 
Sophia Hamilton, daughter of James and Sarah 
(McNalr) Hamilton, of Ch.apel Hill. Thf^ir family 
consists of the following: Martin Monroe Young: 
Augustus Baldwin Young, Elizabeth, wife of Sam 
Price ; Sallie Ann, the wife of Y. D. Butler : and 
Mary Effie, wife of D. T. Cameron. 




Samuel R. Young 



L 



1 
J 



958 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

CLARKE AND JASPTIR COT'XTIES. 

WILLIAM LUTHER WEST wlio represents both 
Clark and Jasper Counties in the Lower House, has 
his residence at Vossburg-, Clarke County. Missis- 
sippi. He is the son of "William Zeno West and 
-^ ^— Amanda Jane (Merrill) "V\^est, and was born Jan- 

-X uary 7th. 1885. at Clear Creek In Wayne County. 

Mississipiii. The Wests, like so many of the In- 
bnbitants of our State, are of Engrlish descent. The 
family were originally South Carolinians, but have 
ninde their home in Mississippi' for many years. 
The paternal g-randpa rents of William Luther West, 
Wilson We.st and his wife. Martha (Houg-h) West, 
lived in Smith County, and there his father, William 
William L. West Zerio West, was born. This gentleman was a 

farmer, and also a minister of the Baptist Church. 
Near the close of the War he joined the State 
troops and after the War was active in the work of 
building up his section and restoring- law and 
order In the State. The family of Representa- 
tive West's mother, the Merrils, are of Irish blood. 
Her parents were Pinkney Merrill and Jane (Coo- 
ley) Merrill of Beaver Dam, Clarke County, Mis- 
sissippi. Mr. "U^est was educated in the rural 
schools of T\'ayne and Clarke Counties ; among 
the teachers who influenced him were Prof. A. R. 
Shoemaker and Prof. E. T. Colmen. He himself has 
been a successful teacher and takes great interest 
tn the educational advancement of the State. He 
is also engaged in farming. His interest in all 
questions pertaining to the welfare of his commun- 
ity and State led him into public life and at the 
people's request he became a candidate and in 191 1 
was elected a member of the Legislature of his 
State. He has done valuable work in that body 
and as a member of the following Committees: 
Education; Census and Apportionment: Manufac- 
tures ; Eleemosynary Institutions : House Contin- 
gent Expenses ; Engrossed Bills. Mr. West Is a loy- 
al Democrat, and belongs to the denomination in 
which his father was a minister, the Baptist. He 
Is one of the leading members of the Woodmen of 
the World, and has for years been Clerk of this 
order in his local camp. He is unmarried. 



I.EGTST.ATR-E DEPARTMENT 



959 



GREXADA AXD MONTGOMERY COUNTIES. 

WILLIAM HACKETT DYRE. of Winona. Mi^^iv. 
sippi, Floater Representative of Grenada and Mont- 
gomery Counties. -was born in Montgomery 
County, January 28. 1888. at Kilmichael. His 
father's people came from Virginia and settled at 
Huntsville, in Clioctaw County. Mississippi, where 
his father, Henry Dyre. was born. Henry Dyre's 
parents were William Henry Dyre and Ruth Dyre. 
and with them he remo%-ed to Lodi. Mississippi. 
Later he lived for a time at Clinton and then at 
Kilmichael, Mississippi, and is now engaged in farm- 
ing at Winona. Mississippi Representative Dyre's 
maternal ancestors came from North Carolina, and 
were among the first settlers of what is now Mont- 
gomery County. Mississippi. His mother's maid.-n 
name was Julia Threadgill. Her parents were Sam 
and Supelia Threadgill. The family lived at French 
Camp, Miss. Mr. Dyre obtained his elementary edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native county; 
he also attended The Kilmichael Hill School and the 
Winona High School. His collegiate education he 
pursued at a number of well known institutions 
Mississippi College, the University of Mississippi! 
and the university of Chicago, from which last he 
was graduated with the degree of B. A. This 
variety of educational advantages during his stu- 
dent career has given Mr. Dyre a breadth of mind 
that is a very desirable quality in an office holder. 
While attending these colleges he won a number 
of literary and oratorical honors. He was for 
a time Principal of the High School at Nation. 
Missi.ssippi. and also at Hemingway. He finally 
decided to make agriculture his life work, and 
is now engaged in that interesting occupation. 
Having become ver>- popular in his section, In 
1915 he was chosen State Representative and 
serves ably upon several committees: Appro- 
priations; Education; Immigration and Labor; 
House Contingent Expenses. Mr. Dyre has al- 
ways voted the Democratic ticket and Is a 
staunch advocate of Democracy ; he is a Baptist, a 
Master Mason, a member of the Eastern Star, and 
also, of the Woodmen of the World. He is not 
married.. 



'~t| 



William H. Dyre 



960 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



LEAKE AXD WIXSTOX COLWTIE?:. 



■^"rrfWi 



^. 



tlili"Tw'ii'lim-i'>»fii1iti«ii>i-\(iiii^i-t 



John C. Holton 



JOHN' CALVIX >I01.T0X'. Floater Ropresenta- 
tive from Loake and Winston Counties, lives at 
Louisville. Mississippi. He was born January 2J<, 
18 89, in Kemper County of this State, seven and a 
lialf mile northeast of De Kalb. His father. Robert 
Henry Holton. was born at Kelley's Stort', Kemper 
County, where he pa.s.^sert his life, engaged in the 
occupation of farniinc:. His parents, were John 
Alexandtn- and Sarah ( Adoock) Holton, of De Kalb. 
John Alexander Holton rendered his State faithful 
service as a Confederate .«:oldier, and was Corporal 
of Company K, 43rd Mississippi Re.giment of In- 
fantry. He was killed at the Battle of Corinth, in 
1S62. The maiden name of John Calvin Holton-s 
mother was Fanny C. Eethany : she was the daugh- 
ter of John and Amanda (Hammock) Bethany, 
who were neighbors of the Holton family at Kel- 
ley's Store and among the best representatives of 
their community. Representative Holton attended 
tlie public schools of Kemper County until he was 
sixteen. He then entered High School at Xoxa- 
pater. "Winston County, where he studied for one 
year. On leaving high school he spent one year 
at the H.-nde