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Full text of ""On the banks of the Wabash" : sesquicentennial, 1812-1962, St. Francisville, Illinois, July 2, 3, and 4, 1962"

"Oh the Banks of the Wabash" : Sesqui- 

centennial 1812-1962, St. Francisville, I 

Illinois 



ILLINOIS Hi^i'wfitxlAL SURVES 



"Oh tlte lia^tki 0/ tk^ WaLcuik '' 





^^ 



SesquiceriWTniial 
1812 — 1962" 




St. Francisville, Illinois 






Compliments Of 



COUCH INSURANCE AGENCY 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 
SINCE 1920 




We want to meet and greet you 
at our Sesquicentennial ! 



Floyd E. Couch 



Margaret McCormlck 



Samuel M. Brian 



^▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲A^ ▲▲▲▲ ^.▲▲▲Ai*^'*^^^^'*^ 



// 



On tke lianki 0/ ^ WcMoaU '^ 



Sesquicentennial 
1812 — 1962 



St. Francisville, Illinois 



JULY 2, 3, and 4, 1962 



There's a lot of hard work in putting on a sesquicentennial. but there's a lot of fun, too. The spirit 
of cooperation among St. Francisville residents was an inspiring example to every other community. 



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Foreword 



We are presenting a short history of St. Francisville, Illinois. We 
have attempted to deal with phases of the development of our com- 
munity by recording events in story form, a.s they are connected with 
our lives — past and present. It is impossible to give full credit to the 
many persons who have been so helpful in compiling this material. 
Our sincere thanks are extended to everyone who has contributed 
material, clippings, and pictures for the book: for advertisements con- 
tributed by interested people; and to all those who have helped w.nVe 
our Sesquicentennial a success. 



Meditation on the Wabash 

MRS. N J. PEPPLE 



The evening sun is setting 
O'er the Wabash old and gray. 

And I watch its lengthening shadows, 
As the bright light fades away. 

And I fancy many pictures 

As the waters roll along, 
And I wonder not the poet 

Has its beauty told in song. 

And I wonder not one's lonely 
As they wander many ways. 

And the thoughts so often linger 
On the scents of other days. 

So I view the rolling Wabash, 

And I note its every form, 
Sometimes shining in the sunlight. 

Sometimes angry m the storm 

Then I see the moonlight gleaming 
O'er the waters calm and still. 

And WE hear the distant echo 
As it soundeth o'er the hill. 

'Tis a bell we hear so often 
Calling on the other shore. 

Someone's on the other side 
Waiting to be ferried o'er. 

Then we see ths busy boatman 
Row across the waters wide 

And he lands the weary traveler 
Safe upon the other side. 



Then we see the fortune hunter 

With his anchor at his side. 
Drifting in the deepest waters. 

For 'tis there the pearls abide. 

Then we see the boats come freighted 
Some with produce, some with sand; 

Man must labor on the water 
Just the same as on the land. 

So I've watched the rolling waters 

Of the Wabash far away 
And I see it moving onward 

In course that none can stay. 

Then I think that life's a river 

And we are drifting down the stream. 

And the way laid out before us 
Is no vain and idle dream. 

For the hand that guides the boatman 
O'er the waters dark and wild. 

With an anchor safely grounded. 
Never will forsake a child. 

So we're sailing toward the city 
While the sunset lingers near. 

And we'll anchor in the harbor 
Ere the morning dawneth clear. 

There to rest bsside life's river 

Is a promise that is given. 
And to meet the many loved ones 

Will increase the joys of heaven 



Then we'll know why all life's changes 

As we drifted on its way. 
And we'll praise our blesed Savior 

In that land that's fair as day. 

Mrs. Pepple was the mother of Oris Pepple who lived in the home now occupied by 
Truman Barnett. She wrote this poem while Uving in sight of the Wabash ferry 
and could see the musselers digging for pearls. 



• 1 ) 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Collison's General Merchandise 




Toys 



IN OPERATION OVER 30 YEARS 

Qofhing Shoes For The Family ..... Yard Goods 

Buster Brown Shoes For Children 
Meats Fancy and Staple Groceries 

Now Operated By 

Ray and Geraldine O'Dell 



Notioas 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^j^^^^^^^^J.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



I 2 



St. Francisville — My Home Town 



The little town of St. Francisville nestles on 
a sandstone bluff overlooking the Wabash River 
or Wa-ba, which is an Indian word meaning 
"summer cloud moving swiftlj'." 

This is one of the oldest French settlements 
in Illinois. John Mason Peck's 'New Gazetteer of 
Illinois (2nd edition 1837) states "French settle- 
ment, in the southeastern part of Lawrence 
County, ten miles fi'om Lawrenceville, is a tim- 
bered tract and rather broken. Of the population 
which consists of sixty families, about one half 
are French." From 'Pioneer History of Illinois' by 
John Reynolds, 1852, we learn "These early 
French had many customs in relation to the com- 
mon fields that were just and equitable. There 
was a time fixed that all should have their crops 
gathered. After that tlie fences were not attended 
to; and the same in the Spring to repair the fence 
and keep the stock out of the field. The Indian 
corn was not so much cultivated as was wheat. A 
species of Indian or hominy corn was rai.sed for the 
voyagers which was an article of commerce." 

"The old plow used by the French would be 
a curiosity at this date 1852. It had not much iron 
about it. The French seldom plowed with horses, 
but used oxen. The Fi-ench cart was constructed 
without an atom of iron about it. When "Amer- 
icans" came to this country they called these carts 



"bare-footed carts", because they had no iron on 
the wheels." 

The true French element has, in a great 
measure past;ed from our community. Names of 
families today connote emigration into our areas 
(1) from Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia, (2) the 
oil industry brought people from later generations 
from the same areas a.'; well as from West Virginia 
and Pennsylvania. 

In the earlj 1700's a military post was estab- 
lished on the present site of Vincennes, Indiana, 
by Sieur de Vincennes. The French led in the early 
settlement of Illinois. Their first object was trade 
with the Indian tribes. Second, the missionaries 
gained the grudging esteem and respect of the 
Indians. 

Many of the French settlers in Vincennes 
came with their families from Canada. Others 
came directly from France! Later these came to 
the trading po.st on the Wabash — the present site 
of St. Francisville. 

Joseph Tougas, (now Tougaw) is credited 
as being the first permanent settler of Lawrence 
County. There are conflicting records as to the 
date of his coming. One gives 1803 or 1804 — 
another states he settled on the present site of St. 
Francisville in 1804 or 1805. He came to St. Fran- 
(Continued on Page Five) 



There was a flurry of excitement at the depot when the Cannonball Express boomed into town. 
Trains, in the old days, had the fascination of today's jets. 



!./• 




( 3 ) 







▼ ▼■▼^ 






► —ORGANIZED 1936— 


. 




^ Pays Tribute to Its Home Town 




► Membership 






^ Marjorie Auerswald > Mae Hall 


Helen Pierson 




► Mabel Baum Marian Hovermale 


Irene Rigg 




^ Betty Brian . Laverda Keneipp 


Pat Spencer 




^ Edith Brooke Helen T,ane 


Betty Spidel 




y lone Buchanan , Margaret Ray Lynn 


Jeanne Spidel 




► Isabel Clark Neva Lynn 


Blanche Stephenson 




^ Joan Diver Margaret McCormick 


Margaret Stephenson 




^ Mabel Deckard , ■: Lois McKelfresh 


Mildred Stevens 




► Alice Portner Bonnie Milhouse 


Violet Tougaw 




^ Betty Freshour Essie Moody 


Helen Tustin 




^ Jo Gray , Geraldine O'Dell 


Lucille Vanwey 




► Orene Giiv - Margaruite Pace 


Gerry York 




► Past Presidents 






^ Inza Snider Corrine Bell 


Vera Cabbasier 




^ Vera Laughliii Jacqueline McKelfresh 


Lucille Vanwey . . 




r Louise Williams . Betty Brian 


Jeanne Spidel 




^ Imogene Brian , Pat Tougaw 


Jo Robbins 




^ Bonnie Litherland Inez Hart 
► Laura Corrie Dorothy Pox 
* Lois McKelfresh Geraldine O'Dell 


Blanche Stephenson 
Mae Hall 




^ Isabelle Ravellette Sally WUliams 


Marian Hovermale 


▲ ▲^ 



( 4 > 




Indiana was wet, and St. Francisville was dry, so this tavern was located across the river and under 
the trees. Why was it called "The Dragout"? Ask your daddy, son! 

St. Francisville - My H oine Town . . . 



(Continued from page three) 
cisville from Vincennes. History pictures Joseph 
as a giant in stature with characteristics of c/ur- 
age and daring. He gained the admiration of the 
Indians by defeating their braves in their own 
games and contests. 

Joseph cleared the land on which the town 
now stands and also a great deal of other land 
in this vicinity. He was the leading character in 
I-fiwrence and Wabash Counties — a man of pro- 
minence! He was married to Frances Valle, the 
daughter of Alexander Valle. 

In 180.5-1806 Joseiih established the first 
ferry, which by its location on the westward trail 
became one of the most famous on the Wabash Riv- 
er. It was near this site that George Rogers Clark 
crossed the Wabash River when making his his- 
toric advance upon Vincennes. Those early traders 
travelling by canoe from Quebec and Montreal, 
Canada, disposed of their wares at this French 



trading post on the Wabash. Often the settlers 
accompanied the traders part of the way back 
and then walked or rode down again on rafts con- 
structed from timbers on the shore. Men travel- 
led in numbers for protection from wild beasts 
and Indians. At a later period there was "the old 
shanty house" wherein supplies were kept — and 
the bell by which one summoned the ferryman. 
Pete Coy at one time used a wire pulloy and ^vo 
horses to operate the ferry. Mr. A. B. Jordan told 
me many times how he put up the first cable 
across the river. Today our ferry is one of the 
very few cable ferries in use. 

Many changes have come since the day of 
the steamboats, showboats, (routes Torre H-iito, 
Vincennes, New Orleans) and flatboats with Dave 
Hoyle as pilot. Hoyle knew the river from Vin- 
cennes to New Orleans, so Mr. Doug Fields (de- 
ceased 195;?) told rne during an interview in 19;)2. 
(Continued on page seven) 



( 5 ) 



NF.F.I.F.Y'S SHOE SHOP 

Invisible Half Soles 
Polices and Laces 

805 Eleventh St. Lawrenceville, 111. 


Compliments of ^ 

TOUVER PAINT & WALLPAPER CO. ^ 

603 Twelfth St. Lawrenceville, 111. ^ 
"Bring Your Paint Problems to Paint People" , 


BARR BUICK CO. 
Sales and Service 

1204 Main St. Vincennes, Ind 
Telephone TU 2-5367 


BARNETT'S BARBER SHOP < 
St. Francisville, 111. j 

Truman and Gib 4 


Compliments of 

HF.ODE GIFT & BABY SHOP 

"Everything for the younger set" 
Lawrenceville, 111. 


Best Wishes to a Fine Community ^ 

For a Successful a 

Sesquicentennial Celebration ^ 

CHARLES L. HFDDE ^ 

Lawrenceville, HI. 4 


DELZELL'S 

Lawrenceville, 111. 

> 
> 


Compliments of J 

HARRIS MARKET \ 

South Side of Square in 4 
Lawrenceville, 111. 4 


> 

^ Compliments of 

I ABERNATHY HARDWARE 

» Phone 426 

► "A Good Store in a Good Town" 

► Lawrenceville, 111. 

* Have a successful Sesquicentennial! 
> 


Compliments of ^ 

I. B. MAYFIELD & SON < 

Westinghouse — Gibson ^ 

Gifts — Appliances — TV Antennas ^ 

Sales — Service 4 

Lawrenceville, 111. ^ 


► 

* Compliments of 

I COGDILL'S GROCERY 

► "Your Friendly General Store" 

Sand Barrens Corner 

Bill, Marjorie, Dennis and Andy 


Compliments of ^ 

MILLER'S PAINT, WALLPAPER and TV ^ 

Easo of Post Office 4 

"Buy Zenith— America's Best Selling TV" j 
Lawrenceville, 111. 4 



( 6 ) 



St. Francisville, My Home Town . . 

(Continued irom page 5) 
The cargo of corn, pork, hay, flour, pelts, and 
beeswax always provided quick cash. Often times 
one disposed of the flat boat along with the cargo 
and returned on steamboat or on foot. Wood was 
cut, stacked along the river bank, and sold at two 
dollars per cord to supply the steamboats. 

A "lighter", or small barge, carried 120 bar- 
rels of flour from Mt. Carmel to Vincennes. In 
Mr. Fields' words, "the boat was manned by 'two 
niggers', with a white man to steer." They would 
exchange the flour for merchandise. Doug re- 
called "'Cobweb ' was one steamboat which plied 
the river. 

He also told me that back of the present Mrs, 
Ivers' property was a grist and saw mill. TVe 
same steam power was used and there were cer- 
tain days for grinding grain and others for saw- 
ing logs. 

Before the railroad was built in the 1880's 
Frank Root's house, the present site of Lawrence 
Bell's store marked the west edge of town. The 
Wabash Cannontjall, one of the finest early trains 
came through St. Francisville on its run from Cairo 
to Vincennes. The tracks were west of the Catholic 
block in the heart of St. Francisville. The depot 
was just west of the Cabbasier filling station. 
There have been three depots. One in the north 
part of town and the last one at the end of north 
Eleventh street. 

Mr. Fields watched the emigrating of the 
Indians from Indiana to Oklahoma. They were 
taken by soldiers of the U.S. Army to the reserva- 
tion. Again, we see evidence of our stra- 
tegic location on the westward trail. It was a good 
day for St. Francisville when Charles Parkinson 
came to our town. He had a store and eventually 
a bank, whose vault remains in east side of pre- 
sent building of the fire department. 

The exact spot on which Joseph Tougav/ 
built his mansion house is unknown. It had tax- 
able value of $300.00. In 1812 there was much 
unrest amoung the Indians, and to provide pro- 
tection for himself and his neighbors, a picket or 
stockade fort was erected on the present site of 
St. Francisville, and named Fort Tougas. The 
pickets were 12-14 feet high and formed a city 
wall. At two corners watch houses or towers were 
erected. Within this wall were a number of log 
dwellings, for families seeking protection, and 
a negro hut for the slaves. (In 1814 Joseph Tougas 




Ur. R. J. McMurray on'ned the first horseless carriage 
in St. Francisville, and here his two granddaughters 
whizzed along — as fast as 15 mph, maybe. 



and John Stillwell were the only slave owners in 
Edwards County. Lawrence County was once a 
part of Edwards County.) 

At night heavy oaken doors swung to and 
were barred. Guards took their places in watch 
towers, while the inmates rested. 

A traditional story is that Joseph Tougaw 
was taken captive near Logansport,; Indiana, by 
hostile Indians. He was given a choice of death 
by violence or acceptance of a "poisoned morsel." 
Joseph accepted the latter — was set at liberty — 
mounted his horse hoping to reach help before the 
"morsel" could do its work. This Was not to be 
and thus ended the life of St. Franoisvillc's first 
permanent settler. Another version is that he 
died from natural causes. 

In 1834 the northeast section of the village 
was laid out by Wiiliam Jackman and named 
Van Buren. Jackman v.-as the grandfather of 
Aunt Jessie Clark (deceased in 1040). He was a 
prominent officer in the Black Hawk War. He 
located on a farm west of Bunker Hill and in 1836 
moved to St. Francisville. On the north side of 
his home on 5th steet he established a grocery 
store, later moved to tiie corner of 4th and Main 
street. In 1835 the land of Frances Tougaw, widow 
of Jo.seph, was laid out by William Jackman and 
surveyor Walter Buchanan, great grandfather of 
Walter Buchanan, RED 1, St. Francisville. Illinois, 

A hundred fifty years ago records were not 
as well kept as they are today. There are several 
'Continued on Page 51) 



( 7 ) 



^▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ^▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^▼^^^>r^^^-^ 

Better Foods for Better Living at... 



SAVE TWICE WITH 




AT 
SAND BARRENS CORNER 



Mes Amis 

du ville de St. Francis: 

J'espere pour vous 
Une celebration 

magnifique! 



Roscoe D. Cunningham 

State's Attorney 
of Lawrence County, IIL 



Christy Texaco Service 



AND 



Firestone Store 

'On the Square 



Phone 309 



LAWRENCEVILLE. IIJ, 



« TIRES 

• BATTERIES 

e ROAD SERVICE 

• LUBRICATIONS 



• BICYCLES 

• TRICYCLES 

• TOYS 

• RADIOS 



< 8 ) 



St, Francisville Sesquicentennial Celebration 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



GENERAL COMMITTEE— John G. England, chairman; 
Fred Puntney, vice-chairman; Mae Hall, co-chairman; 
Betty Brian, secretary; Joe Vangilder. treasurer. 



NOVELTIES — Ray and Gerry O'Dell, Stephen Ounn, BUI 
and Jerry Brian, Gene and Eileen Gray, Sam and 
Betty Brian. 



PAGEANT — Lois McKelfresh. John and Margaret Stephen- 
son, Helen Motor, Charles Tougaw. Betty Freshour. 
Evelyn Puntney, Don Moody, Elizabeth Eggebrecht, 
Virginia Cabbasier, Helen Lane. Nelly PuUeyblank. 



CONCESSIONS— faul Gher, Bob Gillespie, John McKlm. 

ADVERTISING— Prank McCormlck, Irene Rlgg». Anna 
Lee Pool. 



SESQUICENTENNIAL BOOK— Mae Hall, Gerry O'Dell. 
Ruth England, Prank and Margaret McCormlck. Mar- 
garuite Pace, Betty Brian, Evelyn Puntney, Stephen 
Gunn, Gerald Lane. John McKelfresh, Charles and 
Marian Hovermale, Dr. Carl McCammon. 

PUBLICITY- Gerry O'Dell, Margaret Stephenson. 

INVITATIONS AND CORRESPONDENCE— Josie Poss. 
Nellie Wolfe, Alice Pierson, Betty Buchanan, Helen 
Foss Tougaw, Eloise Buchanan. 

DECORATIONS — Forest Fortner, Lomer Guite, Vie Bu- 
chanan, John McKelfresh. 

PARADE— Bill Pavitt, Paul Tougaw, John Stephenson. 
Frank Potts, Sam Gray. 

WABASH BELLES — Lucille Vanwey, Arma Lee Pool, Beu- 
lah Hovermale. 

WABASH BELLES CONTEST— Marjorle Cogdlll, Audvey 

Ireland, Virginia Pavitt. 

WABASH BUDDIES— Gene Stangle, Lawrence Vanwey, 
Clark Pool. 

FIREWORKS— William (Bud) Freshour. Verle Tredway. 
Lyman Tetidrick. 

BODGET— W. H. Riggs, Ray O'Dell. Sam Brian. 

PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM AND LIGHTS— Prank Mc- 
Cormlck, Alfred Siegle Jr., Don Moody. 

RESERVATIONS— Audrey Ireland. Naomi Bell, Carol 
Wirth. 



ANTIQUES — Joe and Joan Diver, George and Ann Sechrist. 

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING— Pred Puntney. 
Denison Fire Protection District. American Legion. 

PUBLIC SAFETY AND FIRST AID-Denlson Pire Pro- 
tection District, Civilian Defense, Nurse Ruth Spldel. 

VETERANS COMMITTEE— Gene Stangle. 

PROGRAM— Clark Pool, Harrel Howard. Harry Eggebrecht. 
Gene Stangle. John Stephenson, Merle Holsen. Mar- 
jorie Codgill. Marcie Rldgley, Nellie Wolfe. 

KANGAROO COURT-John Stephenson, Paul Tougaw. Pat 
Diver, Don Moody, Lyman Tetidrick. 

PUBLIC HEALTH— Stanley Pierson. 

WINDOW DISPLAYS-Charles and Marion Hovermale, 
John and Jacquelinr McKelfresh. 

REGISTRATIONS-Lucille Jordan Lyons, Emma Sharp, 
Wreath Ramsey Jordan, Blanche Le Vleux. 

SIGNS AND PAINTING-Larry Reynolds, David Pierson 
Carl Donnoe, Doroth* Bledsoe. Margie GoodUnk. 
Danny Odle. 

CASHIERS AND GATES-Lawrence Bell. Paul Utherland, 
C. H. Simpson, Don Martin. 

GROUNDS— Lester Ensor, Gerald Spldel, 4-H Boys, Boy 
Scouts, Key Club. 

CLASS REUNION— Sam and Orene Gray, Clyde and Jean 
Leathers, Margaruits Pacf 



( 9 ) 



People^s National Bank 



in 



Lawrenceville, lUmois 



''Make Our Bank Your Bank'' 



Shop and Save at 



HU 






*> 



S 



Complete Food Market 



Roger and William Leighty, proprietors 



Lawrenceville, Illinois 



( 10 > 



Queen to Reign Over Celebration 



A Queen is to he selected to reign over the festivities of the Sesquicentennial. On the opening even- 
ing of the celebration the winning contestant will l)e crowned "Miss Sesquicentennial." Queen candidates 

and their sponsors are : 



Karen Rhinehart Masonic Lodge 

MarjorieEdgin Kiwanis 

Dolores Parisien Catholic Church 

Estella Christy Pisgah Church 

Marlena Potts American Legion Auxiliary 

Barbara Tougaw Home Bureau 

Winnie Hoh Sand Barrens E.U.B. Church 

Sue Ravellette High School 

Judy Fleenor American Legion 

Carol Wirth Woman's Club 

Mary Lou Gognat Denni on Fire Protection District 



The town's first elevator and implement store was located on Main Street, adjacent to the railroad. 
Later (about 1898) it was moved to Indiana. The picture below was taken between 1890 and 1893. 




( U ) 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Standard Oil Dealers 
Of St. Francisville 

Nub" Fortner Damon Fortner Paul Gher 4 



NEWELL & RIBLEY 



Ford Sales & Service 
714 TENTH ST. TELEPHONE 1370 

LAWRENCEVILLE, ILL 



Deewood Stock Farms 

POLLED SHORTHORN CATTLE 

CALVES ON DISPLAY BY 

Lynnwood Objective <and Lynnwood Crusader 

Rural Route l-Br[dgeport, III. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Siegle Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hull 



- COMPLIMENTS OF - 

Lawrenceville National Bank & Trust Co. 

" Serving the Comunisnity for Over a Half Century 

LAWRENCEVILLE, ILLINOIS 

< 12 ) 



St. Francisville Physicians 



J. B. McCarty — The first physician, about 1840. Certi- 
ficate and registration 1840. College unknown. 

O. A. Lovejoy — About 1860. Dr. Lovejoy also sold di-ugs 
H. P. Cleary — Date of registration unkown. (Also 
practiced in Bridgeport.) 

W. P. Harvey— Born in Kentucky in 1836. Certificate 
Dec. 29, 1877, recorded Jan. 5. 1878. He was a surgeon in 
the Union Army. Attended Indiana Medical College, Indi- 
anapolis, 1877. 

Robert J. McMurray — Dr. McMurray was born in 
H£.nover, Indiana, in 1852. He attended Medical Collese 
of Ohio in Cincinnati— graduating in February, 1878. Later 
he attended graduate sc^ool at Northwestern University. He 
began his mcdiCal practice in Linn (Orio), Illinois, in 
November, 1878. In the early 1900's he moved to St. Fraii- 
ville, whei'e he practiceu for several years. Dr. McMurray 
passed away in Sebring, Florida, in 1923. 

William A. Apple — Certificate 1892, Hospital College 
of Medicine, Louisville, Ky., 1892. 

Dr. Vontress — Date unknown. College unknown. 

W. A. Lyons — Dr. Lyons was born near Liberty vicinity 
April 23, 1861, the son of John and Sara Jackman Lyons. 
H-j graduated from tha University of Tennessee College 
of Medicine Feb. 2G, 1884, and began the practice of medi- 
cine in St. Fiancisville in 1887. In 1895 he became a reg- 
istered pharmacist. He died in 1899 and his practice was 
taken over by Dr. J. R. Brian. 

Harry N. Leeds— Certificate and registration unknown. 

Anson T. Abell— Certificate June 18, 1895, recoi-ded 
July 31, 1895. Attended Hospital Medical College, Louis- 
ville, 1895. Dr. Abell also practiced in Mattoon and Charles- 
ton. 

Dr. John R. Brian— Dr. Brian was born in Waba.sh 
County, 111, Feb. 9, 1871, a son of Martin and Melissa 
Schrader Brian. He taught in the district schools for 
seven winters and meanwhile attended school himself. Oii'i 
year at Danville and two year.s at Valpariso, Inti. He at- 
tended sBarne* Medical College in St. Louis from which he 
was graduated in 1899. Dr. Brian was in practice 43 year;. 
Just after World War I he moved to Vin?ennc.<;, Ind.. and 
practiced ihere until 1936, when he came back to St. Fran- 
cisville and continued in practice here until his death 
Nov. 19, 1944. 

Dr. Randolph F. Snider — Dr. Snider was born January 
20, 1889, in Charleston, 111., a son of Edward and Mai-y 
Snider, farmers. He attended common school and hith 
school in Charleston, 111., the Hahnemann Medical Schoc)l 
in Chicago (graduating in 1913 i, the Army Sanitary School, 
Langres, France. During World War 1 he was a captain 
in the Medical Corps, 356th Infantry, 1917-1919. Dr. Snider 
came to St. Francisville in 1914 and practiced medicine 
until his retirement in 1956. 

Vicltor MacMurray Brian^Dr. Brian, affectionately 
known to his friends as "Cheeso," was torn in Linn, 111., 
in Wabash County on August 7, 1891, a son of Martin 
and Melissa Brian. He attended grade and high school in 
St. Francisville ValparLso University, National University 
of Arts and Science, St Louis, and CJeorge Washington 
University Medical School, Wa^ington, D.C., from which 
he graduated in 1917. He was surgeon for the Cerro-de- 
Pasco Copper Corporation, Peru, S.A., in 1918. He practiced 
medicine in St. Francisville from 1919 to 1936. FYom 1926 
to 1932 he was District Health Superintendent, and during 
this time he was instrumental in having the St. Francisville 
school children to be among the first in the state to be 
immunized against communicable diseases. He moved to 
Lawrenceville, Illinois, in 1936, and practiced medicine 
and surgery until his death March 27, 1945. 

Frank Arnold— Dr. Arnold came to St. Francisville 
from Chicago in the early I930's. He was born February 
16,-1891, near Greenfield, Indiana. His parents were faim- 




Dr. R. J. McMurray, beloved physician, began 
his practice in 1878. 



ers. He attended common school npar Grpenfipld. Indiana, 
and High- school at Rawleigh and Muncie, Indiana. He a'i.so 
attended Valparifo University and Lovola University Medi- 
cal School, graduating in 1927. In 1936 Dr. Arnold moved 
to Lawrenceville and Continued the ^practice of medicijje 
until ill health forced him to retire. 

Lee Roy ifplana — Lee -Roy Ireland. M. D.. was born 
in St. Francisville, 111.. April 3. 1910, the son of Roy and 
Sara Breen Ireland. He was educated in the St. Francis- 
ville public schools. He also attended high school in Law- 
renceville. His pre-med school was taken at the University 
of Illinois in Champaign. He received his Bachelor of 
Medicine degree ip 1933 from the Chicago Medical School, 
anr" Doctor of Medicine and Surgei-y 'degree in 1936 from 
the same school. Interned one year at West Side Hospital 
of Chicago, and. six months of internship at Francis E. 
Wiilard Hospital, also oi Chicago. He practiced two years 
in Chicago, then came to St. Francisville in the year of 
1939. His present. office is at. 905. Majtj, Street. St. Francis- 
ville. I i 



(From "Medical Records of Lawrence County," 
compiled by Dr. Tom Kirkwood and Byron R. 
LetWs.) - . .: ^ ^ • 



( 13 ' ) 



[ Sand Barrens 


Compliments of 

McCormack 


[ Texaco Service 


Motor Sales 


I THE FRIENDLY CHRISTYS 


• PONTIAC 


^ GROVER AND CLARENCE 


• OLDSMOBILE 




• BUICK 


► Phone I69F5 


Sales and Service 


r St. Francis ville, Illinois 


Phone 512 
Lawrenceville, Illinois 


I James H. Buchanan 

^ Plumbing and Heating 

w Furnaces — Boilers 
^ Peerless Pumps — Water Heaters 
^ Kohler, Crane and other brands 
^ Plumbing Fixtures 

► Phone 4961 


Glen Wolfe Gara 

Brake Service 
Wheel Balancing 

Springfield Moto-Mowers 

Tillers — Plows — Mowers 

Hahn Spray Equipment 

and Chemicals 


^ BRIDGEPORT, IU„ 
► 118 W. Olive St. 


Sales and Service 


^ NIGHT: Phone I54FI3 
^ St. Freincisville, III. 


Phone 74 
St. Francisville, 111. 



4 
< 



.£. A •■ A. N 



( 14 ) 




Mrs. Mary Pierson opened her first shop in 190), making hats. She lived up to her motto, "Keep 
busy if you want to be happy," finding joy and satisfaction in a rich, full life. 



OPENED MILLINERY SHOP IN 1900 



By Addie McKelfresh 
(From 1947 Vincennes 'Commercial') 

Sprightly and still young at "past 74," St. Praiwis- 
vine's milliner for the past 47 years, Mrs. Mary Pierson, 
would say to the v.'omcn who envy her good health and 
vital interest in life, '•Kucp busy if you want to be happr." 

And it would seem to be good advice, for this woman 
wl^iose only hobby, in her own words, has been "makins 
a living" finds happiness and satisfaction whereever she 
turns — in her business, .'n her church work, and in her 
friends. St. Prancisville is her town; she's as proud of it 
as she is of the hats she has made for its feminine citizens. 

"Making hats was an art in those days," observed Mrs. 
Pierson, recalling 1900, when she opened her first shop 
on the site opposite v/hcre her church, St. Francis Xavier, 
now stands. "You had to have a knack for it." (Plus, ap- 
parently, the patience— and stamina— to work until mid- 
night and after during rush seasons in the spring and fall, 
getting out orders for women who came in one Saturday 
to pick out the color, material, flowers and feathers and 
who returned on the next Saturday for the finished crea- 
tion, and "creations" they were, too, for Mrs. Pierson de- 
siT-ied her own hats, fitting the hat to the customer's 
personality — as much as the customer would allow. 

It's easier, though, to suit the personality than It is 
to suit the customer. "You can see the type of hat for 
a woman," she says, "but you can't see what she will like." 

She has seen styles come and go — and come again. 



Today's fashion trend, for instance, seems to favor the 
feathers-for-trim of the milliner's heyday and to prove 
her point she presents the case of the ostrich plumes she 
dug out of a box in her smokehouse not too long ago — 
ani sold. She had had them for 30 years. 

Hats turned out by Mrs. Pierson and her aides, a num- 
bsi' of whom later established businesses of their own, sold 
for from $5 to $25, averaging from $8 to $10 during what 
Mrs. Fierson called "high times." 

"It's the workroom that makes the money in the mil- 
linery business," confided Mrs. Pierson, adding that she 
"handled a lot of money but didn't keep it." In the work- 
room the milliner saw her dreams take shape as her deft 
fingers manipulated the wire that went into the framt?, 
the basic material, the braid or feathers that were added 
instead of the bright ornaments that later became the 
fad I "Why," she sa>s, without bitterness, "anybody can 
sell hats nowadays." 

Mrs. Pierson's customers came from all over Lawrence 
and Wabash counties, and many women from Vincennes 
made the trip to St. F'l-ancisville on the old Cannonball 
and bought their hats from her. "I could make hats cheap- 
er than they could in Vincennes," boasted the white-haired 
business woman. 



(Mrs. Pierson's business was closed In 1957 and she 
pased away July 20, 1959, at the age of 86.) 



( 15 ) 



I Compliments and Best ^Fishes to the Sesquicentennial \ 

\ Audrey Beauty Shop i 

► PHONE 140 * 

\ St. Francisville, Illinois \ 

\ AUDREY IRELAND— Owner and Operator J 

► CAROLE WIRTH— Operator J 

► 'City Curls at Country Prices ' \ 

— — —A 


^ Congratulations and 
^ Best Wishes 
J to the 
^ St. Francisville 


Compliments of ^ 

Black's Jewelry Store \ 

Lawrenceville, 111. * 
"QUALITY and SERVICE" OUR GUARANTEE ^ 


w Sesquicentennial 

y Studley's 
X Rexall Store 

r Eleventh and State 
^ I awfenceville, 111. 

f REGISTERED PHARMACISTS TO SERVE YOU 


COMFLIMENTS OF a 

Breyfogle's Booterie \ 

Lawrenceville, HI. ^ 
"Put Your Feet in Our Hands" ^ 


We may not sell all the pastry sold, ^ 
but we sell the best at ^ 

PARIS BAiCE^Y \ 

PHONE 200 A 
North 12th. St. Lawrenceville. 111. ^ 

j A 



L^ 



( 16 ) 



ji 



The Lumber and Blacksmith Business 

At the Turn of The Ceiilui), There Were Many Blacksmiths, 
An Important Business in Early Days 



In 1902 William A. Brian and Samuel Brian, 
brothers, stax'ted a lumber yard in a building 
where the present Collison's Store now stands; 
a building with two large rooms and a stable be- 
hind with a fenced enclosure. 

The brothers were working in yt. Louis 
and their father, Martin Brian, who had pre- 
viously moved to St. Franri^viile from Linn 
(Orio), operated the 
yard for them along 
with his blacksmith 
shop. 

In 1904 the broth- 
ers returned and mov- 
ed their business fur- 
ther "uptown" in a 
building where the pre- 
sent Post Office now 
stands. They organized 
the St. Francisville Sup- 
])ly Company. The 
stockholders were: Wil- 
liam A. Brian. Samuel 



Brian, Dr. 

Mc Murray, 
Bri;m and 
Moore. At 



Robert J. 
Dr. J. R. 
Charles 
this time 




there was no telephone 

in the-r office and when 

it was necessary to make a call, they had to go 

to the Exchange. 

Another yard, McClures, was operating at 
the present site of the Builder's Supply Company. 
In 190S it was purchased by the St. Franc i.'^ville 
Supply Company and they moved to this site. 
Martin Brian operated his blacksmith shni) in 
an adjoining building, where he was actively 
engaged in this work until he was 90 years 
of age. He continued in busine.ss in the same 
location making brooms, until he was past 95 
years of age. Before movintr to St. Francisville 
in 1900 he built the first buggy ever made in 
Lawrence and Wabash counties. He also as.sist- 
ed in designing and constructing an airplane 
before the turn of the century. 

The lumber business at this time was quite 
prosperous. Among employees were Marion 



Blacksmithing was an important trade, and Uncle 
Mart Brian plied it until he was past ninety. He built 
the first buggrj' made in Lawrence County, and de- 
signed an airplane. 



Fyffe, Asa Armstrong and James Edwards. 
The first two remained many years, until their 
retirement. 

Lumber was shipped from a distance — 
from as far as Texas. Redwood shingles, used 
for roofing, came from California. They were 
partners with William Freshour in a sawmill 
located where the Nick Potts hom.e now .stands. 

Mr. Freshour operated 
the sawmill and met 
his death while felling 
a tree. 

When the oil boom 
came to Lawrence 
County the first wells 
were near Bridgeport 
and Billett. Sdm Brian 
opened a yard in Billett 
to supply the oil com- 
panies with the mater- 
ials they needed to 
drill and put the wells 
into operation. This 
yard closed as the 
drilling n e ar e d St. 
Francisville. 

They did not have 
delivery equipment of 
their own in the earlier 
days, but hired city draymen Eugene Laughlin, 
Frank Wilson and Jud Black to deliver supplies 
for them. In one year they supplied materials for 
45 hou.ses built in St. Francisville. 

After Samuel Brian's death in 1917, William 
Brian managed the business. In the early 1930's 
the lumber yard was sold to Fred Brian, Sumner, 
Illinois, and became the Brian Lumber Company. 
Later it was renamed the Builder's Supply Com- 
pany. 

TELEPHONING 

The first telephone in St. Francisville was Installed In 
the Dr. Wm. A. Lyons Drug Store with an extension in his 
home. It was a private line from Vincennes, Ind. Later, in 
the year 1900, a switchboard with about twenty-two num- 
bers was installed in the home of Mrs. Lizzie Lyons (widow 
of Dr. Lyons), the present home of Merle Fox. It was a 
small boxlike affair which hung on the wall. It was large 
emugh as there were cnly about eight or ten subscribers. 

The present office of the General Telephone Co. of 
Illinois is located in the- National Bank Building on North 
7th and Main. —Mary Edith Beard 



( 17 ^ 



* Best Wishes From ^^^^^^^ 

> RIGG'S SUB-DIVISION ^^^K ;, 

k Web, Irene, Kenneth, Lea and Ruby 


Compliments of ^ 

D T Y' S i 

"We Suit Lawrence County' A 

Lawrenceville, 111. . 


^ Compliments and 
w Best Wishes of 

^ MODERN CHEVROLET SALES CO. 

► Lawrenceville, 111. 


The Place to Eat ... a 
Where Old Friends Meet ^ 

CLARK'SCAFE ^ 

Allendale, 111. ^ 


^ "Say It With Flowers" 

► LAWRENCEVILLE GREENHOUSES 

^ Phone 153 Highway 50 West 
^ Lawrenceville, 111. 


Serving i .awrence County ' 
For 22 Years j 

PIONEER FINANCE i 


► BRIDGEPORT WHOLESALE CO. 

p Large selection novelties and 
r souvenirs at low wholesale prices. 

^ Bridgeport, III. 


HARRY A. RICE 1 

INSURANCE J 

(All Kinds) m 

1010 11th. St Ph. 986 Lawrenceville, 111. ^ 


I PAULUN SHEI ,1 , STATION 
^ Allendale, 111. 

^ Otis and Inez 


GHER HATCHERIES i 

PURINA CHOW A 
BABY CHICKS \ 

Ph. 299-3131 Allendale, III. i, 


^ SPERRY'S VARIETY STORE 

^ We Sell For Less 
► Come See 

^ Bridgeport, 111. 
k. . . . 


For the Latest in Hair Styling A 
See ... J 

MR. HARRY ^ 

Mt. Carmel, 111. A 
Harry — Arthur — Bill j 



X 



( 18 ) 




ABOVE — McKelfresh's Hardware Store used to sell carloads of buggies every year. It wa. 
a real thrill to drive a new buggy behind a fine, high-stepping horse. The miles flew, es- 
pecially if a pretty girl was sitting beside you. McKelfresh's kept all the latest models in 
Hot Blast Florence heating stoves, too, as may be seen. 

FAR RIGHT — Tobias Ramsey, grandfather of Mrs. Wreath Jordan, answered his country's 
call to colors in 1862, with many other St. Francisville patriots. This picture is a typical 
picture of the Civil War soldier. 








^' 



ABOVE — Yesterday's Tou- 
gaws: Joseph Tougaw, son of 
the original Francis Tougaw, 
great - great - great - grand- 
father of Mrs. M. B. Fucht- 
man, and his wife. 



AT RIGHT — Today's Tou- 
gaws, brothers Paul, Bill and 
Charles stand behind their 
uncle, Joseph Tougaw. 




( 19 ) 



The First National Bank 



Allendale, Illinois 




Phone 299-4411 




Mt. Carmel Auto Dealers Assn. 

Carlton Motor Co. 

, Ford — Mercury — Lincoln 

Class Donner Chev-CadlQac Co. 

Chevrolet — Odillac 

Calborti-Fisher Motors 

Pontiac — Rambler 

Kamp Motor Co. 

Do<Ige — Chrysler 

Lindsay Motor Cg. 

Buick — Oldsmobile 

^^ ▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲ A AA^A AA. A AAA ▲ 'A^^ A A^ A ^^AAJkA^^ ▲▲▲▲▲▲▲/< 

' ( 20 > 



St. Francisville Churches 



St. Francisville residents have always loyally supported 
their churches and have devoted much of their time to 
their religious observances. Each of the five denominations 
now having congregations has a fine structure in which 
to conduct services. 

Much of the early history of the city is entwined 
around St. Francis Xavier Church, for the original sett.e- 
ment was French, and the early pioneers predominanlly 
Catholic. Through the excellent records kept by the parish, 
present day citizens are able to learn a great deal concern- 
ing the early days of the tovm and of the state of Illinois. 
(See "My Home Town" for further details). Father Joini 
Spors is the present pastor. 

In 1891, the Free Methodist Chui-ch of St. Fi-ancisville 
was founded. At first, services were held in the house now- 
occupied by Truman Barnett, and the first minister was 
the Rev. A. F. Niswonger. In the beginning, tliere were 
six charter members. The present pastor is L. B. Egglestcn. 

The United Brethren, which later became the Evan- 
gelical United Brethi-en Church was established in 1878, 
and the first pastor was the Rev. P. P. Kettering, who lacer 
moved to Terre Haute, Ind. Its first meeting of record 
consisted of ten persons who met on the banks of the 
Wabash and affected an organization. One member of irs 
congregation, Dr. Paul W. Milhouse, is now Bishop. T!'.e 
present pastor is the Rev. LaVerl Cook. 

The Methodist Church was organized very early in 
the 20th Century, either in 1903 or 1905, and the church 
was assigned a pastor by the Southern Illinois Conference. 



The St. Francisville church was on a circuit with Bethel. 
Simpson, and Allendale, and the first minister was Rev. 
I. N. Johnson. Rev. Roscoe Rose is now the minister serv- 
ing the church. 

The St. Fi-ancisville Christian Church was organized 
in October, 1894, the congregation at first meeting in 
homes and in an upstair:> room of a building on the comer 
of Sixth and Main Streets. The first communion set, pur- 
chased by the congregation in 1911, is still in use. Rev. 
Larry Reynolds is the present minister. 





Evans-elical United Brethren Church 



Christian Church 





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St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church 



rr;c Methodist Church 



( 21 ) 



COURTESY OF 

AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 947 

OFFICERS 



COMMANDER E. E. Stangle 

SENIOR VICE COMMANDER Fiank A. Potts 

JUNIOR VICE COMMANDER ... Woodrow Wolfe 

ADJUTANT Verle Tredway 

SGT. AT ARMS Paul York 



FINANCE OFFICER Paul Gher 

CHAPLAIN Eddie Tussey 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICER . . Wm. A. Preshour 

SERVICE CHAIRMAN Paul Tougaw 

POPPY CHAIRMAN Clark N. Pool 



MEETINGS 2nd and 4th WEDNESDAYS 



1962 MEMBERSHIP 



Robert R. Ackinan 
Max Adams 
Cleaver Allison 
Robert Amnions 
Prank Armstrong 
George A. Abernathy 
Richard Auerswald 
Ted H. Andrews 
Robert Ayers 
Randall R. Brooke 
James H. Buchanan 
William F. Baum 
Joe D. Breen 
John Bledshoe, Jr. 
Donald R. Brooke 
Jesse P. Brothers 
Samuel M. Brian 
Gilbert Barnett 
Harold W. Brinkley 
Jack Berkshire 
James H. Bailey 
James A. Blevins 
Howell D. Bell 
Wesley Jr. Boyer 
Chester Brothers 
Kenneth IP. Clark 
Sterling M. Couch 
Donald R. Clark 
Dode E. Clai-k 
William W. Carter 
Andrew J. CogdiU 
Jack E. Cerden 
Charles J, Concur 
Isaac O. Caldwell 
Floyd E. Couch 
Harold A. Clifford 
Sam Clark 
Richard Caudell 
Robert J. Carrico 
Jules Cunningham 
■/•a trick E. Diver 
William F. Dunlap 
Robert Durham 
Victor Donnoe 
Edward A. Daywalt 
John H. DeBoeuf 
Russel F. Emmons 
Hairy E. Eggebrecht 
John G. England 
Morris Eggebrecht 
Billy G. Faith 
Thomas E. Poss 



Ernest R. Portner 
William A. Fi-eshour 
William E. Frederick 
William H. Portner 
John F. Fearheiley 
William M. Pox 
Louis S. Frederick 
Thomas R. Flanders 
Paul P. Fleenor 
Melvin L. Glenn 
Bemell W. Gray 
Eugene H. Gray 
Gilbert L. Garvey 
John H. Garvey 
Robert B. Gillespie 
Lomer Guite 
Paul Gher 
Marion E. Glenn 
James A. Gray 
Joseph Jr. Grounds 
Ernest Henderson 
Charles Hovermale 
R. K. Hothem 
Earl Hoh 
Frederick Halter 
Curtis D. Haycock 
Otto C. Hunt 
Jack Hershey 
Eddie J. Holsen 
Harrison G. Hughes 
Thurman Highsmith 
Robert P. Johnson 
William D. Johann 
John C. Johnson 
Randolph W. Johnson 
Leaman V. Jones 
Paul W. Jones 
Paul Jones 
Clyde Kendall 
James L. Keneipp 
John A. Kasinger 
William Kellams 
Joseph E. Keneipp 
Bobby D. Lawrence 
Gerald S. Lane 
George M. Legout 
Clarence Legg 
Joe A. Leighty 
Joseph Legout 
Richard Litherland 
Thomas E. Litherland 
Paul Litherland 



Joseph F. Lyons 
William H. Lynn 
B. B. McCormack 
Walter R. McClure 
Lindell McCullough 
John G. McFarland 
Miles S. McCammon 
John E. McKelfresh 
G. W. McCormick 
Frank A. McNew 
Charles E. McMillen 
Pay Moody 

Roger J. Muckway, Mrs. 
Donald E. Martin 
Homer E. Moffitt 
Joseph D. Mayhall 
Bennie A. Mason 
Michael E. Murphy 
Donald L. Moody 
Ira Moody 
Floyd A. Maxey 
John N. Naylor 
Robert Newman 
Rollie Jr. Osmon 
Killian J. Ochs 
Clarence E. iFond 
Calvin S. Potts 
Alfrad S. Pierson 
Alva R. Perry 
Frank M. Price 
Frank A. Potts 
Clark N. Pool 
Harold L. Padgett 
Lawrence E. Potts 
Billie N. Favitt 
Paul W. Potts 
Walter Pohmeier 
Marshall Potts 
Calvin F. Pulleyblank 
Robert R. Pulleyblank 
Walter W. Rather 
John R. Ridgley 
William B. Ravellette 
James Riley 
John C. Ridgley 
John H. Rasico 
Bill G. Reeves 
Hugo M. Rehwald 
Robert C. Roach Jr. 
Walter L. Simmons 
Billy L. Stallai-d 



Billie J. Stangle 
Luther Selby 
Melvin A. Steimel 
Theron L. Smith 
Joseph L. Stark 
Phillip R. Stone 
Edmund E. Stangle 
August Stangle 
John M. Stephenson 
Gerald A. Sharum 
Otto Sharum 
Ronald L. Simmons 
Randolph F. Snider 
Harry B. Sparks 
George E. Spencer 
Bobby J. Saltzgaver 
James H. Schoonover 
Robert G. Seed 
Forrest W. Spidell 
Chauncey Soots 
Durward W. Selby 
Lloyd W. Sanders 
Eugene D. Tarpey 
Oliver A. Tussey 
William Tustin 
Howard W. Taggart 
Francis G. Tebbe 
Charles J. Tougaw 
Paul C. Tougaw 
Arthur W. Tussey 
Eddie T. Tussey 
Frank Toops 
Harley Toy 
Charles V. Tredway 
John H. Thompson 
William H. Tredway 
Thomas L. Talley 
Ted Vanmathre 
Robert E. Vanwey 
John E. White 
Floyd T. Wakins 
Joe K. Wilcox 
V/oodrow J. Wolfe 
Otto Waller 
Nathern B. Wirth 
P. F. Weeden 
Noble Walls 
William L. Whittinghill 
Jefferson Wise 
Kenneth Worstell 
Paul A. York Jr. 



( 22 ) 



Courtesy of 



American Legion Auxiliary 



Post No. 947 



PRESIDENT 

Eninia Stangle 

FIRST VICE-PRES. 

Betty Potts 

SECOND VICE-PRES. 

Marie Johnson 

SECRETARY 

Anna Lee Pool 




Blanche Alsop 
Opal Ammon 
Ellen Ai-mstrong 
Lula Barber 
Mabel Baum 
Edith Marie Beard 
Naomi Bell 
Gail Bloom 
Irene Boyer 
Betty Brian 
Nellie Brothers 
Aliene Briner 
Emma Caldwell 
Lydia Campbell 
Stella Condiff 
Sally Couch 
Helen Conour 
Barbara Cunningham 
Helen Dardeen 
Olive Davis 
Martha Daywalt 
Betty DeBoL-uf 
Edna Donnoe 
Lura Durham 



MEETINGS 4th. THURSDAY 

1962 MEMBERSHIP 



Kate Emmons 
Blanche Fitch 
Frances Ford 
Tillie Fortner 
Dorothy Fox 
Juna Frederick 
Betty Preshour 
Lucy Garvey 
Erma Jean Gher 
Mary Hershey 
Feme Hunt 
Audrey Ireland 
Helen Johnson 
Marie Johnson 
Bernice Jordan 
Pauline Keneipp 
Edith Lane 
Helen Lane 
Alberta Lewis 
Jeanne Litherland 
Lucille Lyons 
Ann Martin 
Jane Mayhall 
Elizabeth McDole 



Jean McFarland 
Lavada McQuay 
Essie Moody 
Marie Moody 
Ruth Moody 
Helen Pavitt 
Virginia Favitt 
Alice Pierson 
Lucille Pohmeler 
Anna Lee Pool 
Peggy Pool 
Betty Potts 
Marlena J. Potts 
Vivian Price 
Pearl Pulleyblank 
Madge Pulleyblank 
Helen Rasico 
Loretta Rasico 
Margaret Rehwald 
Violet Sandwell 
Ailene Sowders 
Pat Spencer 
Betty Spidel 
Lovella Spidel 



TREASURER 

Virginia Pavitt 

CHAPLAIN 

Cecil Wolfe 

SGT.-AT-ARMS 

Ann Martin 

HISTORIAN 

Edna Donnoe 



Emma Stangle 
Viola Stangle 
Bonnie Stark 
Kay Steimel 
Blanche Stephenson 
Margaret Stephenson 
Ethel Sutton 
Violet Tougaw 
Emma Toy 
Mary Treadway 
iPatty Treadway 
Wanda Tussey 
Clara Weeden 
Betty White 
Cecil WoUe 
Gerry York 
Patty Thorne 

JUNIORS 

Nancy Ohl 
Pamela Potts 
Melissa Potts 
Annie Wolfe 
Katie Wolfe 



( 23 ) 



\ Cleff Bros. 

I COMPUTE 
t HOME 


COMPLIMENTS OF ^ 


^ "wr^w TW'h 7m TWi^ rm^ "^v^ /^ 


MODERN AS TOMORROW \ 


X FURNISHIISGS 
► Tiawrenceville 


LAWRENCEVILLE'S i 
NEWEST AND FINEST t 

Phone 536 111. Rt. 1 South i 


1 McCLAIN'S 

\ PHILLIPS 66 SERVICE 

► COMPLEl'E LINE OF 

^ AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS 

^ 24-HOUR 
^ WRECKER 

► SERVICE 

► 1 400 STATE ST. 

► LAWRENCEVILLE, ILL, 

Vj^ ^^ J^ ^ -A- ^^ '^^ '^^ '^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ .^^ .<A .^L ^^ ^k. ^k i 


COMPLIMENTS OFi < 

1 )oweirs \ 
Florists j 

"WE ALWAYS HAVE i 
SOMETHING DIFFERENT' ^ 

\ 525 Lexington Ave. Lawrenceville, 111. \ 



i 24 




In 1905, Anna Belle Buchanan, Oma Fern :3tolt2, Maude Griggs, Oscar Li. Potts and Heber Brian made 
up the St. Francisville graduating class. 



Truman B:;rnett Oldest Barber 

Truman Barnctt, at 83 ths o:d st active birber in 
the state of Illin iiS- or i.craa « cv u .aiy ^c-at , givej a 
haircut to a ninety year old customer. 

Barnett had four sens (Clarence, B •; on, Dexter. an<l 
Giltert) follow in his footsteps as barb r5. The youngest, 
Eldon, is a foreman in a steel mill at Hammond. 

He has workca a^ -i ^ profession for 71 years, and 

recalls that haircuts used 
to be 10c and shaves 5c. 
During his lifetime he 
has had only one vaca- 
tion — and that wa.s 
foiced on him by major 
surgery. He feels fine, 
now. 

Mr. Barnett has no 
special formula for lon- 
gevity, but says that he 
quit smoking early in his 
long life. 

He recalls vividly the 
Doom times in his shop, 
when the Irish workmen 
laid the track of the Big 
Pour, and gave him their 
patronage. 




August LeVieux Operated Livery 

August UVicux built the fir^'. ho 'se in St. Prancl"'"!" 
to have a modern bathroom, whr.i hs op:;n';d his livry 
business in 1904. 

He had a surrey with a fringe arouni th» top whyh 
was reserved— sometimes weeks ahead — for thr yo^fS 
blood; to take their sweethearts riding. 

The Winston bus. which met the train; at the de- o^. 
once transported the Chicago White SO'i to ih' ' .I'.perV 
and Jean Griggs, St. Francisv.lle's star, pitched^ aga.- st 
them. Between innings, the city "band played on." 




( 25 ) 



r^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^r ^ ^r ^ v^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ v^ 

► COMPLIMENTS OF 

1 1' h e 

f OHIO 
f OIT- 

f Company 

► Shoppers Wise — 
X Economize . . . at 

I Sizemore's 

|SAV-MOR 

^ • • Main Street 

^ Bridgeport, III. 

^ BONDED MEATS WITH SATISFACTION 

^ GUARANTEED 

W Finest in Garden-Fresh Produce 

^ NATIONALLY-KNOWN BRANDS FEATURED 

^ Open 8 a.m.— 9 p.m. Phone 4551 


i^omplimentd \ 

ENGLAND'S j 
CAFE i 

in St. Francisville < 

JOHN AND THELMA < 
ENGLAND < 

Wolfe 1 

Furniture Store < 

FURNITURE... RUGS i 
LAMPS ..UNOLEUMS < 
METAL CABINETS 4 
GIFT ITEMS i 

Sherwin - Williams Paint < 

Phone 101 ^ 

Main Street St. Francisville, 111. j 



( 26 ) 



Pr 



roqredA in 



In f etroie 



earn 




The picture at left is of an early oil well. At right, the modern petroleum engineer employs the 
principle of the simple suction pump to lift oil to the surface. 



A Typical Family Picnic Dinner in 1912 




27 ) 



St. Francisville Sesquicentennial Ce 



Sesquicentennial Pageant 

LOIS McKELFRESH, Director 

Presented July 1, 3 and 4, 1962 

-SYNOPSIS- 

INTRODUCTION 

This is the true story of St. Francisville. We present in episode form scenes which 

represent different periods in the history of our town. 

PROLOGUE 
Miss Sesquicentennia I and her attendants 



EPISODE ONE 

George Rogers Clark 

On their way to Vincennes, Clark and his men waded 
th3 waters of the flooded Wabash. It is thought that they 
marched near the ore.sent site of St. Fi-ancisville a<nd 
crossed the river a short distance north of the ferry. 

EPISODE TWO 

Joseph Tougras 

This scene shows the arrival of Joseph Tougas, the 
first white man to settle in this vicinity. 

EPISODE THREE 

Fort Tougas 

Fort Tougas erected in 1812 was a place of protection 
for the early settlers. 

EPISODE FOUR 
The Early Church 

In the early days the Catholic Church Service was held 
in one of the homes. Bishop Brute, a Jesuit missionai-y, 
would come here and say Mass, when the weather was too 
severe for him to make longer trips. 

EPISODE FIVE 

The Stage Coach 

William Jackman and others eagerly await the arrival 
of the stage coach. 

EPISODE SIX 
The Trading Post 

Canadians on their way south stopped here and ex- 
changed furs and pelts for powder, guns and food. 

EPISODE SEVEN 
The Early School 

In 1843 Colonel S. B. Smith taught the one room school. 

EPISODE EIGHT 
The Civil War 

Young men from this vicinity answered the call for 
volunteers to fight for the preservation of the Union. 



EPISODE NINE 
The First Raih-oad 

The railroad was built and trans started operating 
here about 1880.. The Wabash Cannonball, one of the finest 
early trains came through St. Francisville on Its run from 
Cairo to Vincennes. 

EPISODE TEN 

The Kings Ball 

Kings Balls were very popular in St. FYancisville, es- 
pecially among the people of French descent. The social 
season extended from New Year's to Shrove Tuesday «,nd 
during this time many parties and dances were enjoyed by 
the people. 

EPISODE ELEVEN 
Wold War I 

In 1917 the United States entered the War that was 
to make the world safe for democracy. 

EPISODE TWELVE 
World War U 

In the 1940's we were again plunged into war. This 
time oui- boys were sent to many parts of the world, some 
to places almost unheard of before the war. 

EPISODE THIRTEEN 

The Soaring Sixties 

We have briefly relived scenes of the past. Now let 
us return to the present "the soaring sixties." 

FINALE 

A Salute to the Future 
All groups of the pageant assemble. 



FIREWORKS 



( 28 ) 



bration 



. July 2, 3 & 4, 1962 



Sesquicentennial Program 



Sunday, July 1: 

Morning — Religious services at all churches. 

1:00-5:00 p.m. — School reunion in the gym- 
nasium. 

12:30 p.m. — Boat show in the river. 

2:00-6:00 p.m. — Horse show. 

8:00 p.m. — Union Vesper Services at the 
river. 

Monday, July 2: 

7:00 a.m. — Flag Raising. 

10:00 a.m. to G:00 p.m. — Registration of visi- 
tors. 

All Day — Antique displays and visits to 
points of interest. 

2:00 p.m. — Go-Cart races. 

5:30-7:00 p.m. — Special music. 

7:00 p.m. — Beard contest. 

7 :30 p.m.- -Crowning of queen. 

8:30 p.m. — Historical pageant. 

10:00 p.m.. — Fireworks. 



Tuesday, July 3: 

7:00 a.m. — Flag Raising. 

10:00 a.m. to G:00 p.m. — Registration of visi- 
tors. 

All Day — Display of antiques and visits to 
places of interest. 

10:00 a.m. — Dressparade and .style show con- 
test on Main Street. 

11:00 a.m. — Sesquicentennial Band and Wa- 
bash Belle Bonnette serenade on Main 
Street. 

4:00 p.m. — Boat display and water show. 

6:00 p.m. — Special mu.sic. 

7:30 p.m. — Boy Scout Indian Dance. 

8:30 p.m. — Historical Pageant. 

10:00 p.m. — Fireworks. 

Wednesday, July 4: 

7:00 a.m. — Flag Raising. 

10:00 a.m. to G:00 p.m.— Registration of visi- 
tors. 

All Day — Display of antiques and visits to 
points of interest. 

10:00 a.m.-12:00 — Special music. 

1 :00 p.m. — Grand Parade. 

4:30 p.m. — Special music. 

8:30 p.m. — Historical Pageant. 

10:00 p.m. — Grand Finale and Fireworks. 

(Note: This program is not complete, and is 
subject to change.) 



( 29 ) 



^ COMPLIMENTS OF 




\ Lumber 


Jaquaes j 


I Co. 


+ + + ; 


t Bridgeport^ Illinois 


lawrencevllle \ 


\ COMPLIMENTS OF | 


1 BLEI 


)SOE i 


! OIL WELL SERVICE \ 


► Rods — Tubing — Sand Pumping i 


► —FULLY INSURED— i 


^ St. Francisville, IlL i oo 17.1 1 
I Phone 182-F4 ^ 



' 30 ) 




Sharp's 


store 







Line awaiting ferry duriiis Hood 



Bi'-Gone Days 



( 31 



Congra tu la tions 



The Bank o 



Mt. Carme!, 



• • 




Colburn's 

Academy of Beauty Culture 

A Beauty Career Offers 

Unlimited Opportunities for 

Men and Women 

COLBURN'S 

OFFERS THE BEST IN TRAINING 

USING— 

Franchised Al Tate Visual Aid System 

and 

Franchised Linda Brooks 

Modeling Course 



i 



Mt. Carmel. 111. 



Phone 262-7335 



Compliments of 



Gray's Cabinet Shop 

Everything in Woodworking 



St. Francisville. Illinois 



y^jk.M.^..^^.^.^k.M.^.M.^.A.M.^M.^ 



' 32 ) 



They Helped Make Sesquicentennial a Success 





The "Wabash Buddies" helped niightily 



Members of the Sesquicentennial Executive Committee 
are shown above. Seated (left to right) are Betty Brian 
and Eva Mae Hall. Standing are (left to right) Fred Punt- 
ney, Joe Vangilder, John England and Frank McCormick. 



-trnr. 





IMcmbers of the Denison Fire District volunteers 
(above) labored long and well to clear the banks of the 
Wabash for the historical pageant site. 



Chairmen of all the various committees 



I 






!» 



(^ - '^ 





The younger set aUiays enjoys "dressing up." 



i;. mn.iiii-. I !ub cimperatfd luil> 



( 33 ) 



GEORGE'S SHOE SERVICE 

905 Market St. 
Mt. Carmel. 111. 



EGGEBRECHT PASTRY SHOP 

We Specialize in Part; Orders and 
Decorated Cakes for Any Occasion 



Phone 262-59S2 



Mt. Carmel, Ill- 



Get Yonr Favorite CJroceries at 

THE FAIRVIEW GROCERY 

Also Open Sundays and Holidays, 6 a.m. — 7:30 p.m. 

John and Marie Johnson 

St. Francisville. III. 



SHURTLEFF TIN SHOP 

Sheet Metal and Built Up Roofing 

Mt. Carmel, 111. 
Sam and Irene Clark 



AUCTIONEER 

When you have an auction ... to get 

the most money — 

Call 262-5354 

M. M. MOBLSY 

Mt. Carmel, HI. 

Lawrence County Council 

of 

THE AMERICAN LEGION 

Lav/renceville Post 28 
Bridgeport Post 62 
St. Fianclsville Post 947 



STANSFIELD'S 

... Of Course? 

"Better Clothes for Men and Boys" 

Mt. Carmel. EI. 



Compliments of 
Your Village Post Master 

CLARK N. POOL 



Best Wishes From 

VIRGINIA AND NELUE'S 
BEAUTY SHOP 



Phone 71 



3t. Prancisvllle, 111 



Everything for the Office 

At 

DEAN'S OFFICE SUPPLY 

Gifts for all occasions . . . Party SuppUes 
Monograming 

411 Market St. Mt. Carmel. HI. 

Compliments of 

AUERSWALD TEXACO SERVICE 

in heart of 
St. Francisville, 111. 

"Dick" 



HEATER DRUG STORE 

"Your Prescription Store" 



Phone 24366 



Mt. Carmel. lU 



^ 



( 34 ) 



Beards and Costumes . . . Tots and Grownups 
Candid Camera Targets During Sesquicentennial 




( 35 ) 



L^onaratulationd to 



f 



^L ^rancidi/liie on Jj^t^ 
^e^auicentennial ..y^nniverdaru ! 



Post 2244 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 



Lawrenceville, 111. 



< 36 ) 




ABOVE — Prentice Weed- 
en was "The Tinner" and 
came to town in 1907. He 
owned the shop from 1911 
until his death in 1953. 



The 1913 basketkball team played 22 games and lost 
only one. It won over Vuicennes University. Standing: 
(Left to right) Frank Cogburn. B. F. Shafer (coach), 
and Lee Beal. Seated: Olen King, Bernie Stivers, Wil- 
liam Smith, Merle Lewis and Howard Freshour. 

Remember When? 




ABOVE— W. F. Boycr is 
the town's oldest livinp. 
Frencii-born citizen. 



BELOW Wesley Schroyer vividly recalls those days of 1906, when overalls sold for 50 cents a pair 

and most brands of coffee were 18 cents a pound. 




( 37 ) 



► Rest Wishes 


COMPLIMENTS OF < 


I to 

► St, 1^'rancisville 


The Bakers of < 


► on its 

► Sesquicentennial 


SUNBKAM i 




BREAD ! 


I Campbe 's Ceaners 

> WEST SALEM, ILL. 


'' It's Batter Whipped ' \ 


I Don't Miss the 


COMPLIMENTS OF * 


: DAIRY 


M F A \ 


\ MAKl^ 


INSURANCK CO. \ 


► Sand Barrens Corner 


* \ 


► SOFT ICE CRFAM 




> . AND SNACKS 


GERALDS. LAVE \ 




AGENT \ 


P Raymond and Peggy Clark 


Phone 28 ' St. Francisville, 111. i 
^▲▲▲^^▲▲▲▲A A ▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲< 



( 38 ) 



f CO N GRATL LATIO N S \ 


I from ) 


; Lawrenceville Plant ; 


1 of j 


1 Texaco, Inc. \ 


► COMPUMENTS OF 


A COMPIF.TE LINE OF < 


I Smith Sa es & Service 


RCA VICTOR • 


I Your 


• COLORED TV ^ 

• BLACK AND WHITE TV i 

• TAPE RECORDERS 4 


^ International 


• RADIOS ^ 


I Dealer 


and a ' 
Complete Line of White Goods in , 

RCA WHIRLPOOL \ 

t i 


h TWO MILES EAST ON OLD U.S. 50 

r 

^ Lawrenceville, Illinois 
► IPHONES 890 or 891 


FOR THE LATEST MODELS . . SEE J 

Buzz TV Sales & Service < 

St. Prancisville, 111. ' 



( .59 ) 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Carmel Aerie 3066 



FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES 



Not the Biggest . . . But the Best! 



Mt. Carmel, Rlinois 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Funk's " G " Hybrids 



PRODUCED BY 



Clarence Akin 8e Sons 



St. Francisville, III. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



St. Francisville 
Ferry Co. Inc. 



Caldwel 



^ 
A 



( 40 ) 



First Grain Elevator^ Hardware and 
Lumber Business Established About 1890 





My Grandfather, Mr. John V. Griggs came to St. 
Fi"ancisvi!le from Bridgeport, Illinois soon aftor 1890, to 
establish the first grain, lumber yard, and hardware busi- 
ness here. The family remained in Bridgeport for a levv 
years, where he also maintained a 
grain elevator and stock yard. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griggs were the par- 
ents of four children— two boys and 
two girls, namely: Charlie, Bessie, Jess 
and Maude, who attended the Bridge- 
port Public School before moving to St. 
Fi-ancisville in 1896. 

Grand-dad, know-n to many as 
"Uncle John," later sold his Bridgepoit 
business and devoted his entire inter- 
est to the St. Francisville area, flor.j 
he expanded his business by buying the 
Main Street location at Eighth and 
Main adjacent to the railroad, which 
serviced the well known, "Wabash Can- 
non Ball." Here he built his grain 5'c- 
valor and second hardv.'are store. The lumber yard, stock 
yard, and small hardware store, first in operation soon 
after 18^G, were located on the corner of Eighth and Mam 
West, where the brick building bearing his name, now 
stands. This is the present location of CoUison's General 
Store, established and operated for thirty years by his 
daughter, Maude and her husband iMr. and Mrs. Clarence 
Collison) and now operated by Ray and myself (Mr. and 
Mrs. Ray W. O'Dell.) 

While engaging in these various businesses, my Grand- 
dad employed a number of local men, some of whom are 
living today. Mr. Bill Boyer, one of the oldest who was 
born in St. Fi-ancisville and lives today at the location of 
his birth, worked for Grand-dad. Mr. Boyer recalls that 
during the summer of 1895, he and Mr. Prank Wilson, de- 
ceased, helped pick and load watermelons into to.x cars 



John V. Griggs 



sidetracked at Billett. Grand-dad purchased these melons 
from the Kemp Farms now the "Arthur Akin Farms." As 
many as eight hundred watermelons were placed in each 
box car. Sometimes there were as many as three cars to 
fill to this capacity. 

Mr. Edward Murphy, a retired farmer, of the St. 
Francisville area, relates that, as a young farmer, he sold 
hi; first wagon load of corn to Grand-dad Griggs. He 
recollects other business transactions made at the first 
hardware store. 

Mr. Charlie Deckard, a resident of St. Francisville, 
recalls that at sixteen he sold "Mr. Griggs" a mule. Mr. 
Deckard then lived in Indiana. (It has been confirmed 
that Grandfather Griggs bought horses and mules for the 
United States Government.) 

In 1896 he was appointed a delegate from this district 
to the Republican National Convention in St. Louis 
when McKinley was nominated as a candidate for Presi- 
dent 

In 1909 Granfather started the "new building," as we 
in our family termed it. It was finished in 1910. The "boy^" 
Charlie & Jess were now^ associated with their father in 
tho business. 

Grand-dad had a great vision of a new and expanding 
type of business, because there were new products, such 
as the Reo Car being added to the list of items for salt. 
The old "Banner Buggie.s" must give way to the new gaso- 
line propelled buggies. "Morse & Fairbanks Engines," (types 
of generators for electric power) v.'ere being distributed and 
installed by the firms of John V. Griggs and Sons. In fact 
the new building had been wired for such an electric 
system and the power it provided pumped a deep well m 
thT rear of the building as well as operated the large eleva- 
to" lift to the second floor. 

St. Francisville was growing and many new buslnes.se8 

(Continued on page 43) 



Farmers brought their grain from miles around and waited in line for hours at the elevator. At 
least, the long wait gave them a chance to chat with their neighbors. 





( 41 ) 



David A. Spetl 



Sales and Service 



• F & W Automatic Water Softeners 

• F & W Automatic Water Systems 

• Rural Plumbing . . . Bathrooms 

• Automatic Water Heaters 

• Automatic Cattle & Has Fountains 

• Ditch Digging 

• Farm Hydrants 

• Plastic Pipe and Fittings 



Phone 299-3151 

Allendale, Illinois 

Charley's Block 

The most complete line of 
Fishing Tackle 

IF THE nSH LIKE IT— CHARLEY'S GOT IT 

Power Mowers and Tillers 
McCulloch Chain Saws 



516 Market Ph. 262-5971 

Mt. Carmel, III. 



COMPUMENTS OF 



W. F. Holland 

Wholesale Fruits 
and Vegetables 




VincenneSf Ind. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
ST. FRANCISVILLE 

From Your Friendly, Dependable 
L. R GAS DEALER 

Jet Gas Co. 



927 N. Market St. 



Mt. Carmel, III. 



Ph| 262-4972 
Call Collect! 



Propane— Tanks- Furnaces 



( 42 ) 



(Continued from page 41) 

had already teen established by other young business men. 
Grand-dad had sold his lumber yard (1902) to Mr. Wm. 
Brian and Mr. Sam Brian. This was moved to a new 
location soon afterward. 

The elevator at Eighth and Main was moved across 
the river, in order to accomodate the Indiana farmers, wlio 
had been coming by ferry to deliver their grain to Grand- 
dad, here. (The elevatoi was then reached by the upper 
ferry crossing.) Old pictures indicate that quite a number 
of wagons filled with grain, during harvest, crossed the 
Wabash each day, and lines of waiting wagons were in 
great evidence. In order to encourage business with his 
"Indiana Neighbors," Grand-dad had paid the ferriage for 
these customers. 

However, ho did not forsake the grain elevator business 
in St. Francisville. He built one at the West end of Main 
Street. Those same scales are still in use by Mr. Clarence 
Moody who v.eighs coai at this point. 

In February of 191.3. a tragedy occurred in our family. 
Grandfather was stricken with a severe paralytic stroke, 
which claimed his voice. 

He did not regain his speech during those remainji? 
thirty-two years of life. This ended his business career. 
But he never lost contact with the outside world. His great, 
interest was basketball. Although a whole new generation 
grew up not hearing his voice, he seemed to command their 
respect. He rarely missed a basketball game, and each 
season, the basketball beys saw him in their dressing room 
at half-time. He went to every practice and if he wasn't 
there they always inquired atout him. He was "Uncle 
John" to each of them All of this extra attention and 
kindness shown him, during those remaining semi-invalid 
years, gave Grand-dad a great measure of pleasure. 

jeraldine Griggs O'Dell 




Clarence L'mfleet was coach of this 1910 basketball 
team, and the varsity members were Lee Beal, O. E. 
Gher, Wm. Smith, Enoch Potts, Frank Cogburn and 
Bcrnie Stivers. 



People came for miles around to see the soda fountain 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Beal installed in the restaurant 
back in 1909. It had ,a marble bar and black bar, and 
sodas \viTi> Hi 




( 43 ) 



► i 

t Compliments of ^ 

i Byron R. Lewis : 

^ President of Lawrence Countv ^ 
► Historical Society 4 


^ COMPLIMENTS OF 

I I. B. "IKE" DAUGHERTi^ 

w LawrencevUle, III. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 4 

J. C. PENNEY COMPANY ^ 

LAWRENCEVILLE ^ 


^ COMPLIMENTS OF 

^ JULES CUNNINGHAM 
^ GARAGE 


Coni[)Iiinents of > 

Dale Foss ^ 


► 

y Congratulations 

^ I^wrence Cosinly 

► Voiture No„ 1284 
I of the 40 et 8 

► 1 


Compliments Of ^ 

Tlie ^ 

LawrencevUle ^ 

CIVITAN CLUB ^ 



C 44 ) 



THE ST. FRANCISVILLE TIMES 

The "St. Prancisville Times" was a weekly newspaper 
published from 1909-1942. The paper was founded in 1909 
by A. P. Spencer who operated it for approximately five 
years. Ai'ound 1915 he sold it to John Prout who edited 
and published it until the middle 1920's when he sold It 
to H. Brownfield Scott. Mi". Scott published the paper 
until it was purchased by Haskell Hall, who published it 
from 1930 until 1942. when he sold it to Mr. Roy Rucker 
of Bridgeport. Illinois. The Times is now a part of the 
Bridgeport Leader. 



C. p. HILLS EARLY GARAGE 

Cyrus P. Hill came to St. Prancisville in 1913 estab- 
lishing a repair shop located on Main Street. This building 
burned so a new business was started again, located on 
Main Street in the present Gray Woodworking Shop. The 
shop, through the years, offered different services to the 
community and surrounding area. Mi-. Louis P. Hovermale 
joined Mr. C. P. Hill in business in 1920 forming the 
C. P. Hill and Company which continued for 22 years 
"on the same corner." It grew from a repair shop to a Ford 
Car agency and garage and many remember the high-light 
from the change of the Model T car to the Model A Ford. 

During these years, the garage was maintained. Delco 
Light Plants were sold and serviced to the rural commun- 
ities, the car dealership was changed to Chevrolets, and 
Firestone products were sold not only to close areas but 
many counties in Southern Illinois via an equipped truck 
that covered routes. 

These two friends in business were known to everyone 
as "Cy" and "Louie." Several men were employed during 
and through this partnership business. Acetylene welding 
service helped many people and farmers with their brokeri 
implements. This partnership was dissolved in 1924 with 
the war problems and Louis then worked in a government 
plant in EvansvUle, Indiana. 

Cy Hill continued the garage alone and enjoyed the 
machinist work. The business was sold in the 1940's to 
Mr. Amon Legg then to "Buzz" Eggebrecht. Mr. Hill cun- 
tinued his service until his death in 1949 across the street 
in the tin shop that is presently owned and used by the 
Gray's Shop. 

Enterprising C. P. Hill built the first garage in St. Prancisville, and his gas pump was supplied by 
the tank wagon at the right in the picture below. 



CITY LIGHT PLANT- 

An item from the St. Francisville Times— January 18. 
1917 "It is most gratifying to know that almost every family 
in the limitr, of this city have availed themselves of the op- 
portunity to use the city current, and in most every instance 
thr service has given entire satisfaction. It is even of more 
interest to know that the plant has been on a self support- 
ing basis financially, and that now it is showing even bet- 
ter returns." Among those employed at the Plant were 
Clarence CoUison. Sidney Abernathy, and Franklin Shaw. 




( 45 ) 



Congratulations^ St. FranchvUle ! 




n 






r 




West Saleni, UI. 
Phone 77 



Allendale, III. 
Phone 299-3141 



Security Bank 
and Trust Co. 



400 Market St. 



Mt. Cormel 



Bank With 
Security 



MEMBER F.D.I.C. 






ConipUments Of 




ayne Store 



Groceries and 
Hardware 



Allendale, Illinois 
Phone 299-3151 



( 46 ) 



.^ A. .&. A.-!^ 



Builder's Supply Company Says— 

Congratulations on a Job Well Done! 

WE OF BUILDER'S SUPP LY ARE PROUD TO BE A 
PART OF THIS RICHLY HISTORICAL COFfflUNITY 




Tverything to Bueld Anything' 



* PAINT 


• ALUMINUM 


• CEMENT 


» HARDWARE 


WINDOWS 


• GRAVEL 


• LUMBER 


DOORS 


e SAND 


• MILLWORK 


AWNINGS 

FREE DEUVERY— 


• CHAT 


THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU— 


LAWRENCEVILLE 


ST. FRANCISVILLE 


FLAT ROCK 


PH. 142 


FH. 53 


PH. 584-2990 



BUILDER'S SUPPLY COMPANY 
OIL HELD SERVICES DIVISION 

Offers You The Following Services — 

• BACKHOE SERVICE 
• DITCHING 

• WINCH CAT 

• WINCH TRUCKS 

• STEAM CLEANING 
• PAINTING 

• WELDING 




Complete Oil Field Construction and All Types Lease Work 

• 24-HOUR SERVICE Q 

OWNED AND OPERATED BY JOE VANGILDER 



Call: Day— 53 



Night— 144 or 149 



BUILDER'S SUPPLY CO. 



ST. FRANCISVILLE, ILLINOIS 



V 47 ) 



I Congratulations 

I St. Francisville 

► on its 

I Sesquicentennial 

► Hell's Grocery 

► Tiawrence and Naomi 


' ^ '^ y^ "^ 'w 'WW ^^ 'w "^ "^ "^ yr "w '^ 'yt 'w "^ yr ^^ '^ "^4 

Compliments Of ^ 

John McKelfresh \ 
Implement Co. t 

St. Francisville, 111. 1 

John McKelfreah Lomer Quite * 
Jackie McKelfresh Cecil Armstrong ^ 

Betty Potts James Viehe ^ 


I Compliments Of 

E HALTER 
I Distributing Co. 


Lyur manu tnanhd to ^ 
ail w no nelped make i 

tne S^t» . Trancidmiie i 

* ^edauicentenniai \ 

K^eiebra tion 4 

^t At t /~'/^/j A A. 4 


t DREWRY'S BEER 


► Tiawrenceville, 111. 


Cv DVtCCi^OD • • • J 

The Sesquicentennial i 
Committees ^ 



( 48 ) 










The picture above is of the Coy House between Third 
and Fourtli streets on Main St. The architecture of 
the house is typical French pioneer now rarely seen. At 
right, Jules Grandclair stands at the doorway of his 
home. Grandclair was a Frenchman by birth. The man- 
sion of Charles Parkinson was given to the Methodist 
Chuich as an Old Folks Home (lower right). At the 
lower left, 'Uncle Joe' and Caroline Tewell stand in the 
yard of one of the oldest houses in the city. 





V: v«"'t jl'.'. 




( 49 ) 




1 

i 



ISM 



Congratulations, St. Francisvillie, 
On Your Sesquicentennial 

WE JOIN OUR FELLOW CITIZENS IN 
COMaiEMORATING 150 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

CIPS has been an active citizen of St. Francisville 
since 1929. In that year, a St. Francisville home used 
375 kilowatt hours of electricity at an average cost of 
80 per kilowatt hour. Today, St. P^-ancisville residents 
are using more than 71/2 times as much . . . and paying 
less than one-half as much per kilowatt hour. 

CUPS is constantly planning and building ahead so 
that ample, low-cost electricity will aways be available 
for St. Francisville homes, businesses and industries. 



/W CEHTRAL ILUNOIS PUBLIC SERVICE COMPAHY 

AN INVISIM-OWNED UICTIIC UOHI AND rOWU COMfAN* . . . UIVINO ONHAl ANO lOUtHBN lUINCHS 



Compliments Of 




Grade A 
BOIHOGWZfl' 




DAIRY PRODUCTS 
THAT MUST PLEASE 



Prairie Farms Dairy 



Olney, Illinois 



( 50 ) 



St. Francis^ iile. My Home Town . . 

traditional stories as to how St. Francisville re- 
ceived its name — (1) Frances Valle Tongas 
named the town for the patron sainl of the diocese, 
St. Francis, for whoni so many churches were 
named *2) when the Jesuits came to tlie newly 
established villajje, they named it after St. Francis 
Xavier, their patron saint. 

Frances Toupaw sold ttio first goods and 
Mason Jones built the first blacksmith shop. 
Jackman's saw and grist mill wore built about 
1837. Ihe post office was established in 1838 with 
Willian! Thompson, postmaster at a salary of 
$7.52 per year. St. Francisville was incorporated 
in 1869 and its first election of officers was held 
February 27, 1869. 

Under the bluff, some dislance up in what 
was once the town, there was once a cave, hollow- 
ed out in th(> sandstone whore traders hid their 
furs and wines. South and west of this cave 
stood the trading post. Main street was a trail 
leading from the ferry to the post, where (-anad- 
ians brought their furs and pelts of northern 
game to exchange for powder, guns and edibles. 
This early prosperity was due largely to *^he 
visits of the Canadians, who came by canoe or rafts 
down the Great Lakes and filaumee River, to the 
Wabash and to St. Francisville. 

The second foundation by the Sisters of Pro- 
vidence of Saint Mary Of-The-Woods was St. 
Francisville, Illinois. Quote, the History of the 
Sisters of Provi<ience oy Sister Mary Borromeo 
Brown. 

"The next of the Indiana clergy to ask Sisters 
from Mother Theodore was Father Louis Uueoud- 
ray, St. Francisville, the second missionary venture 
of the Sisters of Providence in America, opened 
toward the end of the year 1842. Known earlier 
as Riviere du Chat, St. Francisville, was in 1842 
a poor and small Canadian French settlement 
tM-elve miles south of Vincennes as the o'ow flies. 
Riviere du Chat appears in the Catholic Directory 
for 1837 as visited from Vincennes and Bishop 
Flaget and Father Nicholas Petit, S.J., had in- 
cluded this little settlement in their missionary 
tours from Kentucky. 

"Sister Liguori was the local superior and 
Sister Augustine, her companion, 'a French sister 
and an English speaking sister' Father Ducoudray 
had asked for. 

"The little Bchool was a township school and 
the Sisters gave great satisfaction to the trnstpos. 
It was closed by Bi^•hop de la Hailandierc in It' 13. 



(The Bishop had learned that the eastern third of 
Illinois which was under the jurisdiction of Vin- 
cennes was to be transferred to the new diocese 
of Chicago which was to be established about 
1844.)" 

Reverend Ducoudray is credited with build- 
ing the first log school near the site of our pre- 
sent public school. (See "History of Schools"). 

The original frame church was down on the 
bluff overlooking the Wabash. The parish house 
stood approximately on the present site of the 
Yarber home and the church was about due South 
of the Parish house. Mrs. Frank Tougaw (deceas- 
ed 1954) confirmed this statement. 

She remembered attending church at that 
location. The building was later moved and used 
as a recreation hall. It stood on the northwest 
corner of the present lots. There have been three 
edifices. Mrs. Calista Breen (deceased) said un- 
doubtedly there had been a log structure before 
the first frame church was built. The present St. 
Xavier Church with its sturdy brick walls and 
beautiful stained glass windows offers a contrast 
to the first little church which overlooked the 
Wabash. 

With Joseph Tougas came his two brothers, 
William and August, and John Longlois, who soon 
moved to Wabash County. In 1809-1810 came 
Francis, another brother, who settled one and 
one-half miles north of St. Francis\'ille. 

Mr. Jesse Tougaw had an interesting collec- 
tion of records which were evidence of business 
transactions in the early years. The oldest was 
dated 1801 and was signed Joseph Tougas. There 
is also a land grant signed bv President James 
Monroe and dated October 1, 1821. Mr. Jesse 
Tougaw told me about his old home up north of 
town and bow his mother kept two "hired girls", 
so she would have time to visit with company. 

Mrs. Calista Breen — granddaughter of the 
first Francis Tougaw, brother of Joseph Sr.— 
whose home was on the site of the Ed Burns farm, 
told of hearing her mother telf how the Indians 
came when her father was a baby and wanted 
to take him for the day. They motioned to the 
we.st, meaning they'd bring the child back at sun- 
set. Though hesitant, the mother permitted the 
baby to be taken. The child was returned at set- 
ting sun. This was evidence of trust and faith 
and from then on. there was no trouble with the 
Indians. Joseph Tougaw, Jr. had a store on what 
is now the Truman Barnett property. The im- 
portant street of that time was Fourth street. 
(Continued on page 53) 



.■ji ) 



i ' 






now it's Pepsi -for those mm think young 



It's a great way of life: thinking young. Today more people are entering ^^^ V 
into the spirit of things, having more fun. This is the life for Pepsi-light, brae- mg^ ' 
ing, clean-tasting Pepsi. So go ahead-think young. Say "Pepsi, please!" ...^'^ j 

"PEPSI-COLA" AND "PEPSI" ARE TRADEMARKS OF PEPSI-COLA COMPANY, REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. © 1962 PEPSI-COLA COMPANY 



( 52 ), 



St. Francisville, My Home Town . . 

(Continued from page 51) 
Mr. John Boyer told me the oldest houses in 
St. Francisville today are the homes of Barbara 
Cunningham, Wra. Hankins, Truman Barnett, 
Adam Wise (now Nellie Wise), Oliver Tussey, 
the former Mandy Clark property at the north 
end of Sixth Street, and the Tewell property. 
Riverside Hotel, now the home of Mrs. Matilda 
Bullard. 

Mr. Boyer recalled as a boy there were no 
stock laws. Cattle were taken to the timber north 
of town in the spring. Milk cows were driven in 
at night and would take shelter under the porch 
of the Charlie Parkinson's Store (Present site of 
the Fire Department). 

John Collison (uncle of the late John and 
Clarence Collison) had a coffin shop near Ger- 
ald Lane's home. He kept lumber and trimmings. 
Coffins were made to order. A $45.00 burial was 
a big funeral. He was the first undertaker in 
St. Francisville and brought the first hearse to 
town. He sold his business to Hugh Cluxton. who 
located where the Methodi.-;t Church now stands. 
Mr. Cluxton in later years sold to Charles Spencer 
and Frank Abernathy. They in turn dispo.sed of 
the business to Burton and William Gillespie. Mr. 
Charles Winfree was the next undertaker. At the 
close of World War H, Lewis and Lyle Tougaw 
established the Tougaw Funeral Home. They, in 
1955 sold to Don Martin, present owner. 

Among the names of early French settlers wo 
find families of LaCoste, Greemore, Valley, Shir- 
key, Godaire, Bonaut. DeBeouf, Potvine, Des- 
chaut, Rasico, Ravellette, Deloria, Boyer, Rous- 
seauville, LeGout, Levieux, and Moyes (nicknam- 
ed Coy, meaning "spot" — originating, when 
Moyes went under the yoke from which his ox 
'"Coy" had dropped dead, and assisted in drawing 
the load). Mrs. Frank Tougaw was of the La- 
Costo family. Her grandmother's brother was 
tomahawked by an Indian, while hunting. They 
lived on the sand hill across the river in Indiana. 
There were a few persons who had come from 
rVance. Barbara Cunningham's father, Jule^j 
Cirandclair came from a little village called Blur- 
viile near Paris, France, in 1874 at the age of 
nineteen. He married Frances DeBoeuf in 1876, 
located on the present Roy Ridglev farm and 
later moved into St. Francisville. A custom in 



many French homes was that on New Year's Day 
tiie children would kneel and wish their parents 
a Happy New Year in French. The parent would 
respond with a i)at on the head and "God Ble.^s 
You" 1 

St. Francisville remained predominantly 
French and for years many traditions were pre- 
served. New Years to Shrove Tuesday was the 
social season. On New Year's Eve groups of young 
men (7 or 8) would trek from house to house 
singing a begging or treating sonor. Thev would 
be invited to entor and were given gifts of cookies, 
wine, liquor and tobacco. 

The King Ball was an imnortant social event. 
Invitations were given at random and the elabor- 
ateness of your "King Ball" doi-iended on your 
social and financial standing. Fifty pound^ pigs 
roasted whole were a common delicacy. Whiskey, 
the common drink, was supplied bv barrels. Danc- 
ing and eating went on all night. Guests departed 
before dinner the next dav. A big event of the 
evening was the crowning of the Queen. 

Byron R. Lewis, President of the Lawrence 
County Historical Society, gave the following in- 
formation taken from John Reynolds', 'Pioneer 
History of Illinois.' 

"About the 6th of January in each year, 
which is called le Jour de rois, a party is given 
and four beans are baked in a large cake; this 
cake is distribufpd amnriirst ^he gentlemen, and 
each one who receives a bean, is proclaimed King. 
These four kings are to give the next ball. These 
are called "King Balls". These Kings select each 
a Queen, and make her a suitable present. They 
arrange all things necessary for the dancing party. 
In these merry parties no set sunner is indulged 
in. Thev go there not to eat but be and make 
nierrv. The^ hnvp rpfrp^'hrnp-n*-'? of fake and ^nffee 
serT ed round at proner intervals. Sometimes Bouil- 
lion, as the French call it. takes the place of 
coffee. Towards the pnd nf tho nnrtv. thp oM 
Queens splpct each a new Kintr. and kisses him to 
nualifv him into office; then each new King 
chooses a nev.' Queen and goes throueh the cere- 
monv as before. In this manner the King Balls are 
]-pr,+ nn n11 throutrh the carnival. 

"In the ballroom much order and decorum 
are observed. Two aged discreet persons, are 
chosen, who arp called Provosts, one to select the 
ladies for the dance, the other for the gentlemen, 
so that each one dances in proper turn. It is in 
this mannpr that thesp innocent and merry people 
spend much of their nicrhts in the winter. The old 
people regulate all; the time to retire and time 
to meet again. By this regulation much of the 
excesses of dancing parties are avoided. The 
young people are not so capable to .iudge in these 
matters as the old." 

(Concluded on page 55) 



( 53 ) 



^▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼^ 



Compliments Of 





nison Township 



Don El. Martin, Supiervisor 



John D. Lindsay, Town Clerk 



Otto Waller, Road Commissioner 
Lambert Tustin, Assessor 

Joe Edgin, Lawrence Vanwey, Clarence Christy 

Auditors 



Bob's Sports Store 



COMPLETE LINE OF 
SPORTING GOODS 



Mercury Outboard Motors 
Sales and Service 



611-15 Market Si. 
Kit. Carmel. IH, 



Congratulations 
from 

Knights of Columbus 



Council 1343 



Mt. Carmel, III 



< 54 ) 



'JMHA'-ii ' I ' «. - f - ' I , :i.. ' i' ' '?! ,"f f 'T "' y'»yy***T.y^ 




Fine horses drew the hearses of the 1909 era. T. B ir'on Gillespie and J. R. Lyon? performed the last 
services for their friends and neisrhbors. 



St. Francisville, My Home Town . . 

(Continued from page 53) 

With the pasRinpf of the vears many families 
vould invite friends in for "Chicken Bouillon" 
on New Year's Eve to watch the old year out and 
the new one in. This supper would consist of 
chicken rice soup, crackers, celery and pickles. 
The evening was spent in card playing and 
dancing. 

We remember the grist mills: saw mills; but- 
ton factory; box and tomalo factories; livery 
barns, which have given way to fiHinir stations; 
blacksmith shops to garages; millinery stores; the 
old American Theater; the saloon > -ni their tales 
of bloody encounter; the River Showboats, that 
would tie up and put on a week's entertainment; 
the floods, especially the disastrous one of lOlS, 
and the big fires — '1) 1909 '-^^ich destroyed 
Brian and McMurry Building, Griggs home. Dr. 
Abell's barn (2) "L922 a business h]ock including 
Gillespie Furniture Store, I.O.O.F. Hall and dining 
room, store building, l.eVieux Barn nnd the Bovd 
home, (3) 1940 Farmer's Cooperative Grain 
Elevator — a $10,000.00 blaze. An oil boom de- 



veloped in this vicinity. A gusher v/as drilled in 
f'r^ fhe Michael Murphy farm in 1014. Our popula- 
tion wont urt to annroximatelv two thousand. The 
boom passed and today St. Franci.sville is a com- 
bination of an agricultural and oil community. 

There are three places T would like to call 
to your attention. First, the site of the frame 
church overlooking the Wabash. Second, the old 
spring which for years was the main source of 
water supply. Third, the site of the old Jackman 
Cemetery, which lies a few blocks north of tov, n. 

Tf v.-e take the date 1804-1805, the time 
Joseph Tou,gaw settled on the present site of St. 
Francisvills, our town is more than 150 years old. 
However, due to the fact that it is practically im- 
nussible to establish definitely the exact date of 
the first settlement in a given locality, the date 
the village plat is recorded is usually taken as 
the date of founding. In the case of St. Francis- 
ville, evidently this was 1887. In this Sesquicenten- 
nial Celebration of 1962 we are commemorating 
the building of Fort Tougas in 1S12. 

The End 



I 55 ) 



Compliments Of 



The Daily Record 



Lawrenceville, Illinois 

Your Hometown Newspaper 



Lawrence County's Foremost Advertising Medium 



Compliments Of 





r 







St. Francisvilk Illinois 

Don Ann 



< 56 ) 



Banking in St. Francisville 



Organized banking came to St. Francisville in the year 
1S07. Mr. Charles W. Parkinson had been conducting a 
private bank in a room of the building known as the Sharp 
Building at Sixth and Main Streets since the summer of 
1902. His business had grown quite rapidly, and through 
the activities of Mr. Parkinson, The Peoples Bank was or- 
ganized and opened for business on April 1. 1907. Mr. 
Parkinson was president; Dr. A. T. Abel, vice-president: 
George H. Corrie, cashier. The capital stock of $25,000 
came from residents in St. Francisville and farmers of the 
community. In 1909 Mr. Parkinson died. J. M. England 
became the president of the bank and Joseph E. Diver was 
seci:red as an assistant cashier and worked with Mr. Corrie 
in the bank. In 1910 the bank office was moved from the 
Sharp building to a new site on the south side of Main 
Street between Sixth and Seventh Streets. 

The National Bank was also organized in 1907 and was 
opened for business in September of that year in the Lyons 
building on the north side of Main Street. William H. 
Highfield and his son. Hugh, made up the office personnel. 
Others associated with the bank were C. L. Lewis. James 
H. Buchanan, Solomon Dager, and W. S. Cluxton. In 1011 
W. H. Highfield retired from the bank, and his place was 
taken by W. S. Cluxton. Later Thomas H. Gutteridge and 
James M. Corrie were added to the office force. In 1914 the 
National Bank moved to its new location at the corner 
of Seventh and Main Streets. 

In November of 1920. The Peoples Bank and The Na- 
tional Bank consolidated their operations and reorganized 
under the name of The Peoples National Bank of St. 
FYancisville. The National Bank building was used by the 
new organization. Its officers were T. H. Gutteridge, presi- 
dent: J. M. England and C. L. Lewis, vice presidents; 
George H. Corrie, cashier; J. M. Corrie and Carl T. Eng- 
land,, assistant cashiers. T. H. Gutteridge, J. M. England, 



C. L. Lewis. George' H. Corrie. W. S. Cluxton, 
C. L. Stephenson. George M. Highsmith, Joseph Gray, J. 
H. Buchanan, W. C. Gillespie, and W. D. Milligan made 
up the Board of Krectors. 

For a number of years the new organization was quite 
prosperous, having the reputation of being one of the 
soundest financial institutions in the State of Illinois. How- 
ever, with the stock crash of 1929 and the depression that 
followed, the bank in St. Francisville suffered along v;;th 
all other banks in the country. On October 31, 1931, the 
bank closed its doors and did not reopen on the next bank- 
ing day. The loyal people of St. Francisville and community 
came to the support of the bank. Stock changed hands, 
notes were purchased from the bank, and preferred stock 
was taken up by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. 
Within six weeks the bank was again open for business 
with no loss to any depositor. At the time of the bar;k 
moratorium in 1933, thu St. Francisville bank was clCJcd 
ju£t one day when permission was granted for its re- 
opening by the Comptroller of the Currency. It was the 
oniy bank in this section of the state for many months 
and the only one in the county for more than year. 

Economic conditions during the depression were such 
that banking was not profitable for small communities. 
By 1938 the stockholders of The Peoples National Bank 
decided to move their bank to the county seat. By so doing, 
it was hoped that the bank could serve more people, and 
that those who had invested their money in the capital 
of the bank would receive better returns on their invest- 
ment. In August of 1938, the bank was again reorganized. 
The State Bank of Birds was purchased by the new or- 
ganization which then moved to Lawrenceville under the 
new name of The Peoples National Bank in Lawrenceville. 

— Vera Laughlin 



St. 5> 



rancLdui 



tie ^oda 



^ 



Time has brought chanjje.s to our town. There 
are nevv names and new faces. Many old names 
and faces are gone. 

Organizations and clubs in our commun- 
ity are: American Legion. American Legion Auxil- 
iary, Junior Auxiliary, Home Bure.au, Kiwanis 
Club, Key Club, Woman's Club, Order of Eastem 
Star, Masonic Lodge, Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and 
4-TI Clubs. 

Busine.'JS establishmf-nt^ in and near town in- 
clude: five grocery stores, a general .store, a cab- 
inet shop, one barber shop, three garages, throe 
service stations, two bulk plants, three insurance 
agencies, one lumber yard, one T.V. and appliance 
store, a farm implement dealer, a restaurant, five 



beauty shops, one furniture store, a plumbing and 
heating establishment, two welding shops, a coal 
yard, a laundramat, a new dairy mart, a funeral 
home, general trucking and oil servicing. 

St. Francisville has one doctor. Dr. Lee R. 
Ireland, and a veterinarian, Dr. Carl McCammon. 

We have one nursing home. 

Recent improvements in our community in- 
clude: Denison Fire Protection District, tennis 
courts, a new sewer system, a park on the banks 
of the Wabash. 

We hope that this book has brought back old 
memories and pre.<ierved our present times for fu- 
ture memories. 



( 57 ) 



Credit Must Go to Every Organization, Group, Family, and Individual 
For Hard Work Done Toward the Success of St. Francisville's Sesquicentennial. 




( 58 ) 



Sincerest Best Wishes 



to the 



St. Frandsville Community 

in its 



^edaulcentennlat (^eiebrauon 




B.P.O.E. Elks Lodge No. 1208 



Uwrenceville, Illinois 



P.S.— Several "herds" of Elk will make the trek down the old Buffalo Trail to help 

observe your celebration! 

Kk. ^k ^L ^^ ^k.^^ M^ ^k ^ ^L. ^k, ^ ^k m^ ^L. ^k ^k ^ ^k ^k ^^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^" 



i 




Courtesy of 

ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Proceedings — Vol. I 

a903> 



URBANA 



:i! ;! .ii III I II II I m 
3 0112 000263472