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\: 



I 



m m PROPERTY Or 




ARTES SCIENTIA VERITAS 



A-B-iMaAa^ 



Hibract <>( ^axbam Qnitensit;. 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR, 



LIBRARIAN. 



No. 41. 




SEVENTH LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS 
OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY AND ITS OFFICERS, 

WITH THE CHIEF PUBLICATIONS ON THE UNIVERSITY. 
1889-1890. 

By WILLIAM HOPKINS TILLINGHAST, 
At*ittanl Librarian. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. ; 
inuti bg Hit libtats of Pfariisrb BnlbR«iti>. 



. J-J»3^^ Already issued' or in preparation 



VOL. I. 



f 



I. EDWARb S. HoLDBN. Index-Cataloguc oi Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

a. Justin WiNsoR. ShakespeaTe*8 Poems : a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Charles Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 

the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Pieti«s et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

$. List op Apparatus in different Labomtories of the 
Uniled States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. Thx Collection op Books and Autographs, be- 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor, 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lanb. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt I. ' 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvardr. 

College Library. 

9. George Lincoln Goodale. The Floras of different 

countries. 

10. Justin Winsor. HalliwcUiana : a Bibliography of the 

Publications of James Orchard Halliwell.Phillipps. 



:.'..'■ . Fossil 

* le Historical 
Shoal in the 

Authors in Geology 



II. Samuel H. Scudder. The Entom 
of the United States. 

la. First List op the Publicai 
versity and its Officers. i9ri 

13. Samuel H. Scudder. A • *■/. 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillin -ti v • • 

Hydrography of :' e 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney I . * ^ • . 

and PalsBon: .1 v^ 

16. Richard B i- ■* index to the Maps in 

Petermanft's » -^^ .le Mittheilungen. 1855- 

18S1. 

17. Richard Bliss. Cla>. ified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830* 
. - . ,1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy'l 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsok. 'Ilie Kohl Collection of Early Maps 

aa William C. Lane. Index to Recent Refcrena 
Lists, no. I. 18S4-1885. 



VOL. II. 



SI. Second List op the Publications of Harvard Uni. 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1S85. 

aa. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

a3. William H. TiLLiNOHAsT. Third List ofthe Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1885- 
1886. 

a4. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Usls, 
nol a. 1S85-1886. 

as. W. G. Faklow and William Tbelease. List of 

Works on North American Fungu 
a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 
a7. Andrew McF. I >avis. A few notes on the Records 

of Harvard College. 
aS. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publica. 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1886- 
1887. 



ap. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference List . 
no. 3. 1887. 

30. Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem **'\ . 

Skylark,** with notes. 

31. W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Wo*- 

North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, 178a-' 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth Kst of P 

of Harvard University and iu Officers. ▼ 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Colle 

Harvard College and Boston Public 7 i*. - 

35. George E. Woodbbrry. Notes on tl"^ ^ 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat C *• 9 r. 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Weitenkampp. Bibliogrb^i 



VOL. III. 



38. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publica. 

tions of Harvard University and ite Officers. 188S- 
18S9. 

39. Alfred C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 



40. William C. Lane. Indr 

no. 4. 1890. 

41. William H. Tilling!' • 

tions of Harvard U*>^ 
1890. 



1 .. 



i*T 



,;L- 



/ 



k 



A LIST OF THE PUHIJCATIONS 

OF HARVARD UNTIYERSITY AKD ITS OFFICERS, 

wrrn the chief publications on the univehsity. 

From September 30, 1889, to September 30, 1890. 

*^* The list of publications of the officers of the Uniyersity has been prepared from information 
received from the officers in response to a circular issued by the editor ; for the record of the publica- 
tions of the University, and for that of the articles relating to it, the editor is responsible. It is pro- 
posed to continue this list for successive academic years. 



THB ^TTNIVSBSITY. 

Quinquennial catalogue of the officers and graduates of Harvard University, 1636- 
1890. Cambridge. 1890. 1. 8^ pp.441. 
Edited by W. H. TilUnghast. 

The Harvard University catalogue, 1889-90. Cambridge. 1889. 8**. pp. 408, 
map. 

Edited [by H. E. Scott. 

Much of the matter in the Catalogue is also printed for distribution in the '* Admission," *' Elective," 
and ''Graduate" pamphlets, etc., having the following titles: Selected sheets from the Harvard 
University catalogue^ 1889-90, containing all necessary information for persons intending to enter 
Harvard College. — AnnouneemefU of courses of instruction provided by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences^ 
for the academic year 1890-91. pp. 42. June,11890. -^Announcement of the graduate school^ 1890- 
91. pp.71. June, 1890. — Information for speciaJ, students in Harvard College, pp.10. June, 1890. 
— Sheets describing various departments : Summer courses of instruction^ the Gymnasium, Scientific 
School, Library^ etc. 

The Departments Issue their own portions of the Catalogue separately, in some cases with additions : 
the 107th AnnucU catalogue of the Medical School contains the examination papers of 1889 ; the 22nd 
Annual announcement of the Dental School contains a complete list of graduates ; the 7th Annual 
announcement of the School of Veterinary Medicine contains the admission examination papers and a 
view of the Village* Street hospital. 

Directory of the officers and students of Harvard University, October 18, 1889. 

Cambridge. 1889. 8**. pp. 27. 
: . Edited by H. E. Scott. 

-- Annual reports of the President and Treasurer of HarA^ard College, 1888-89. Cam- 

bridge. 1890. 8^ pp. 203, 61. 

This report contains also the reports from the various departments and institutions of the University. 
The report of the Treasurer and those of several of the Departments are also issued separately. 

^ Harvard University calendar. No. 303-337 ; Sept.-Oct. 1889^June, 1890. 

( The calendar is issued in term-time only. 

, - [Programme of the exercises at Commencement, 1890.] 4®. pp. xii. 

I Contains, in Latin, the names of those who receive degrees and academic honors in all departments. 

; Regulations of the Faculty of Harvard College, 1889. 8**. pp.12. [Nov. 1889.] 

Harvard University. Facultj' of Arts and Sciences. Regulations for Harvard College, 
1890. 8^ pp. 12. 
y A broadside was issued separately calling atten^ ^n to the changes from the edition of 1889. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences concerning college studies, 1890-91. 
12^ pp. 12. [June, 1890.] 

Opportunities provided for religious worship, instruction, and fellowship, 1890-91. 
12^ pp. 8. 

Harvard University aid funds. 12®. pp. 16. 

Instruction in Classical Philology and in Sanskrit, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 35. 

Programmeof the department of English, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 12. 

Syllabus, Pine Arts I. and II. 8®. pp. 7. 

French department, 1890-91. [Description of the French courses.] 12®. pp. 13. 

Programme of the department of Geology, 1890-91. [Description of the courses in 
Greology, Physical Greography, Meteorology, Mineralogy, Petrography and Palaeontology.] 
12®. pp. 11. 

General account of the instruction and equipment in the department of Geology, with 
a supplement describing the instruction in Mineralogy, 1890. 8®. pp. 39. 

Programme of the German department, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 12. 

Department of History, 1890-91. [Description of courses.] 12®. pp. 20. 

Description of the courses of instruction in Italian, Spanish, and Romance Philology, 
1890-91. June, 1890. 12®. pp. 12. 

Programme of the Mathematical department, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 18. 

Prc^amme of the Musical department, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 8. 

Programme of the Philosophical department, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 15. 

Programme of the department of Physics, 1890-91. June, 1890. 12®. pp. 12. 

Department of Political Economy, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 11. 

Semitic department, 1890-91. [Description of courses.] 12®. pp. 12. 

Information concerning the Zoological department, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 9. 

Courses of instruction in the Divinity School, 1890-91. 12®. pp. 12. 

Descriptive list of elementary physical experiments. Intended for use in preparing 
students for Harvard College. October, 1889. 12®. pp. 83. 

List of experiments in physical measurements. Intended for use in Physics C and 
for preparing students for the admission examination in advanced physics in Harvard 
College. Part I. General measurements in mechanics and hydrostatics. — Sound. — 
Light. Part n. Heat. — Magnetism. — Electricity. May, 1890. 12®. pp.55. 

By Professor Trowbridge. The two parts were also issued separately. 

Examinations for women. [Explanatoiy.] 1890. 1889. 12®. pp. 12. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used hi ."< > ■ 3sion examinations held 
at Cambridge, Quincy, Andover, Worcester, Southboi^ . ' ler, Concord, New York, 
Albany, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Chicago, Minneapo!)^ * •. .^ > ;iSj, San Francisco, Lon- 
don (England), and Bonn (Germany), June, 1890. * • 1890. 8®. pp. 24. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers set '' t -^ i . <- laminations in Harvard 
College, June, 1890. Cambridge. 1890. 8®. 4pa-i\ 

Namely: Ancient languages {Hebrew^ Sanskrit^ Oreeka^' / pp. 48. — Modem languages 

{English J German, French^ Italian , and Spanish), pp. 43. — , * Political Economy, History, 

Roman Law, Pine Arts, and Music, pp. 35. — Mathematics, J' •■■"'-. ' 'i*\ isif^, and Natural History. 
pp. 33, -*' 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Fiii 



?■ 



)(^l Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the annaal examinations in law 

held at Harvard University, June, 1890. Cambridge. 1890. 8**. pp. 40. 

iDl^i Harvai'd University examinations. Papers used at the examination for women, 1890. 

Cambridge. 1890. 8°. pp. 24. 

Rank-lists for 1889-90. 12**. pp. 35. 

The soldier's field. June 10, 1890. 8°. pp. 12. 

Address by H. L. Higginson, concerning his gift to the College of a plot of land in memory of 
James Savage, Charles Russell Lowell, Edward Barry Dalton, Stephen George Perkins, James Jackson 
Lowell, Robert Gould Shaw. 

13. In the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. Oct. 8, 1890. Ileport of a special 

committee on changes in the academic department and in its relation to the professional 
schools. 8**. pp. 18. [Signed by H. W. Putnam and R. Wolcott.] 

In the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. Nov. 20, 1889. Report of a special 
pommittee upon the i^eorganization of the visiting committees. 8^. pp. 14. [Signed by 
Charles F. Adams, C7Mw*rman.] 

[Statement of the Committee oa the regulatlon^of athletic sports to the Facolty Com- 
mittee on out-door sports, Princeton College.] Dated 18 Dec. 1889. 8**. pp. 18. 

Report of the Committee of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College on Indo- 
Iranian languages. 8°. pp. 7. [11 June, 1890.] Signed by G^o. W. Wales, John 
Fiske, H. C. Warren. 

This report describes the proposed Harvard Oriental series, and recommends the establishment of 
a general publication agency by the University. 

A list of the names and addresses of living alumni of Harvard College. 1890. 
[Second year.] Cambridge. March 15, 1890. 8**. pp. 110. 

Prepared by the Secretary of the University from material furnished by the class secretaries, the 
Editor of the Quinquennial Catalogue, the Librarian of the Law School, and numerous individual 
graduates. 

Scientific Serial Fublieations. 

The Quarterly Joamal of Economics. Vol. iv. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 8**. pp. 484. 

ConUnU: — iv. z. (October, 1889.) On some applications of the theory of international trade. 
C. F. Bastable. — The depreciation of farming land. A. H. Peters, — President Walker's theory of 
distribution. S. N. Patten. — *' Nationalism" in the United States. N. P. Oilman. — Appendix: An 
act concerning insurance in case of disability and old age. 

iv. a. (January, 1890.) The rise of American cities. A. B. Hart. — The prohibition of railway 
pools. A. T. Hadley. — The theory of interest. F. H. Giddings. — ApptfoAvL : Statistics on the popu- 
lation of American cities. 

iv. 3. (April, 1890.) Protection and protectionists. F. A. Walker. — Bicardo and his critics. 
E. C. K. Conner. — The silver situation in the United States. F. W. Taussig. 

iv. 4. (July, 1890.) Cooperative production in France and England. E. Cummings. — The 
residual theory of distribution. F. B. Hawley. — The silver situation. H. Whit6. — Fr6d6ric Le Play. 
H. Higgs. — Appendix: A family monograph of Le Play's. — The Bampal legacy to aid cooperative 
societies. 

Each number also contains notes on current topics, correspondence, and a bibliography. 

Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. Edited by a committee of the classical 

instructors of Harvard Univei*8ity. Vol. i. Boston : Ginn & Co. London : Ginn & Co. 

Leipsic: Otto Harrassowitz. 1890. 8**. pp. (6), 206. 

Contents: — The fauces of the Roman house. J. B. Greenough. — De ignis eliciendi modis apud 
antiques. M. H. Morgan. — On the origin of the construction of od fi'^ with the subjunctive and the 
future indicative. W. W. Goodwin. — On some disputed points in the construction of fdet, xfl*)"* ®^*> 
with the infinitive. W. W. Goodwin. — Notes on Quintilian. G. M. Lane. — Some Latin etymologies. 
J. B. Greenough. — On 'egregium publicum' (Tac. Ann. iii. 70. 4). C. L. Smith. — On the use of the 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



perfect inflniUve in Latin with the force of the present. A. A. Howard. — Plutarch xepi e^Bv/dat. 
H. N. Fowler. — Vitruviana. G. M. Richardson. — The social and domestic position of women in 
Aristophanes. H. W. Haley. — Notes. 

Harvard Historical Monographs. No. 1. The veto power, its origin, development, 
and function in the government of the United States (1789-1889). By Edward Campbell 
Mason. Edited by Albert Bushnell Hart. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1890. 8^ pp. 232. 

Outlines and GKudes for the Use of Students in certain Crourses of Instruction. 

*^* The works recorded here have not the official character of university publications, hut are prepared 

by instructors or students in the respectiye courses. 

The work of students in the courses in the historj' of the United States, History 13, 17, 
and 20 (d). To be given at Harvard College in the academic year 1889-90. Cambridge. 
1889. 8^ pp. 46. 

History 13 and 17. Topical outline of the courses in constitutional and political 
liistory of the United States given at Harvard College in the academic year 1889-91. 
By Albert Bushnell Hart. Part I. (1783-1829) and part II. (1829-61). Cambridge. 
Wheeler. 1890. 8^. pp. 267. 

Pamphlet for the use of students in courses History 13, 14, and 27 (History of the 
United States) given at Harvard College in the academic year 1890-91. Cambridge. 
Wheeler. 8°. pp. 50. 

ABNOLD ABBORSTTJM. 

Annual report of the Director of the Arnold Arboretum [C. S. Sargent] to the Presi- 
dent and Fellows of Harvard College, for 1888-89. 1890. 8°. pp. 4. 
Reprinted from the President's annual report. 

Notes from the Arnold Arboretum. Garden and Forest, 1889-90. 
Occasional notes concerning such new, little known, or especially desirable plants in the collections 
as maj appear worthy of record. 

ASTRONOMICAL OBSBBVATORY. 

Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard College. Vol. xviii. 10, xxi. 1-2,. 

xxiv., XXX. 1. Cambridge. 1889-90. 4°. 

CoTitenU : — zviii. zo. Meridian-circle ohserrations of stars near the south pole. pp. 302. — 
Appendix. Index to yariahle stars, pp. 808-[308]. Vol. ZTiii. is now complete. 

xxi. z. Ohserrations of the New England Meteorological Society in the year 1888. Cambridge. 

1889. pp. (4), 105, i^rts, 

xxi. a. Investigations of the New England Meteorological Society in the year 1889. Cambridge. 

1890. pp. (4), 107-278, plates 14. 

xxIt. Results of obserTakions with the meridian photometer during the years 1882-88. By Edward 
C. Pickering, Director, and Oliyer C. Wendelli Assistant in the Observatory. Cambridge. 1890. 
pp. (4), 266, (1). 

XXX. z. Observations made at the Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory, Massachusetts, U. S. A., 
in the year 1889. With a statement of the local weather predictions under the direction of A. Lawrence 
Rotch. Cambridge. 1890. pp. xiii. 1-76, map, 

Henry Draper memorial. Fourth annual report of the photographic study of stellar 
spectra conducted at the Harvard College Observatory, Edward C. Pickering, Director. 
With two plates. Cambridge. 1890. 4*^. pp. 9,p^el. 

Forty-fourth annual report of the Director of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvai'd 
College. Presented to the visiting committee, December 14, 1889. By Edward C. 
Pickering. Cambridge. 1890. 8®. pp. 11. 

The report includes a list of the scientific articles published by the officers of the Observatory during 
the year. It is also included in the annual report of the President. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Aid to astronomical research. [Broadside dated] 15 July, 1890. 

Bulletin of the New England Meteorological Society in cooperation with the Astro- 
nomical Observatory of Harvard College, No. 60-71 ; Oct. 1889— Sept. 1890. 4**. Also: 
Appendix for the year 1889. 4**. pp. 107-153, charts. 

Issued in monthly numbers. The first number pubUshed with the cooperation of the Astronomical 
Obseryatory was January, 1888. The enlarged form was adopted to accord with the size of the Annals 
of the Observatory, in order that the permanent matter of each Bulletin may be electrotyped and pub- 
lished later in the Annals of the Obserratory. 

BOTANIC OABBEN. 

Notes from the Botanic Garden. Garden mid Forest^ 1889-90. 
Occasional notes concerning new or little-known plants, etc. 

BUS8EY INSTITTJTION. 

Bulletin of the Bassey Institution, Jamaica Plain, Boston. 

Nothing has been issued within the period coyered by this list. The Bulletin is published by Allyn 
& Bacon, Boston. 

The annual report of the Dean of the Bussey Institution will be found in the President's report. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

Quinquennial catalogue of the oflScers and students of the Law School of Harvard 
University. 1817-1889. Cambridge. 1890. pp. xv. 260. 
Edited by J. H. Arnold, Librarian of the Law School. 

Cases on evidence. For the use of the class in evidence at the HaiTard Law School. 
8°. pp. 21. 



Harvard University bulletin, no. 44-46. Vol. v. 7, vi. 1, 2. Oct. 1889 — May, 
1890. 

Contents (besides the list of Accessions ^ the votes of the Corporaiion and ike Overseers^ and the 
Necrology) : — 44. Notes on the us. of Shelley in the Harvard College Library. G. E. Woodberry. 
pp. 467-470, facsimile, pp. 6. 

46. Bibliograpliy of Beaumont and Fletcher. A. C. Potter, pp. 95-104. 

Bibliographical contributions. Edited by Justin Winsor. In part republished from 
the Bulletin of Harvard University. The following numbers have been issued since 
Sept. 1889: — 

34. William Coolioge Lank. The Dante collections in the Haryard College and Boston Public 
Libraries. 1890. pp. 116. 

Contains an Index of subjects, an Index of passages of the Divina^Commedia, and a Note on the 
portraits of Dante contained in this collection. 

35. George Edward Woodberry. Notes on the us. volume of Shelley's poems in the Library of 
Harvard College. 1889. pp. 6, facsimile, pp. 6. 

The facsimile is that of the poem ** To a Skylark," which was printed as no. 80 of this series. 

86. William Coolidge Lank. Catalogue of a collection of works on ritualism and doctrinal 
theology presented by John Harvey Treat, 1889. pp. 59. 

37. Frank Weitenkampf. A bibliography of William Hogarth. 1890. pp. 14. 

88. William Hopkins Tillinghast. Sixth list of the publications of Harvard University and its 
officers, with the chief publications on the University. 1888-89. 1890. pp. 29. 

Twelfth report (1888-89) of Justin Winsor, librarian of Harvard University. 8^ 
pp. 11. 

Included in the annual report of the President, and also printed separately. 



8 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



MEDICAL SOHOOL. ^ 

Medical School of Harvard University. Courses for graduates for 1890-91. Boston. 
1890. 12^ pp. 15. 

MXrSBUM OF COKPABATIVB ZOOLOaY. 

Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. Vol. xvi. 3 
(end),xvii. 1. 4^ 

Contents : — xvi. 3. Genesis of the Arietidae. By A. Hyatt. Published in conjunction with the Smith- 
sonian Institution. Cambridge, pp. zi. 288; plates, unnumbered^ 1 ; nwmhered (with explanation), 14; 
folding tables 6. (Nov. 1889.) 

xvii. I. The immature state of the Odonata. Part III. Sub-family Cordulina. By L. Cabot. 
Cambridge, pp. (8), 52, plates 6, (Feb. 1890.) 

Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College, in Cambridge. 
Vol. xvi. (Geological series, vol. ii.), 6-9 ; xvii. 5, 6 ; xix. 1-4 (complete) ; xxT. 1, 2. 

Contents : — xvi. 6. The intrusive and extrusive triassic trap sheets of the Connecticut valley. By 
W. M. Davis and C. L. Whittle, pp. 99-138, plates 6. (Dec. 1889.) — 7. The topography of Florida. 
By N. S. Shaler. With a note by A. Agassiz. pp. 139-158, Tnap. (March, 1890.) — 8. On some occur- 
rences of ottrelite and Umenite schist in New England. By J. E. WolflP. pp. 169-166. (April, 1990.) 
— 9. On keratophyre from Marblehead Neck, Massachusette. By J. H. Sears, pp. 167-172. (July, 
1890.) 

xvii. 5. The morphology of the carotids, based on a study of the blood-vessels -of Chlamydosela^us 
anguineus, Oarman. By H. Ayers. pp. 191-223, plate 1 (double). (Oct. 1889.) — 6. Cave animals from 
southwestern Missouri. By S. Carman, pp. 226-240, plates 2. (Dec. 1889.) 

xix. z. Studies on Lepidosteus. Part I. By E. L. Mark. pp. 1-127, plates 9 (with explanations). 
(Feb. 1890.) — 2. On the egg membranes and micropyle of some osseous fishes. By C. H. Eigenmann. 
pp. 129-164, plates 8. (March, 1890.) — 3. Report on the results of dredging, under the supervision of 
Alexander Agassiz, in the Gulf of Mexico (1877-78) and in the Caribbean Sea (1879-80), by the U. S. 
coast survey steamer "Blake." XXXII. Report on the nudibranchs. By R. Bergh. pp. 166-181, 
plates 3. (March, 1890.) — 4. A third supplement to the fifth volume of the Terrestrial air-breathing 
moUusks of the United States and adjacent territories. By W. 6. Binney. pp. 183-226, plates 11. 
(May, 1890.) 

XX. X. The histology and development of the eye in the lobster. By G. H. Parker, pp. 1-60, 
plates 4. (Aug. 1890.) — a. On the rate of growth of corals. By A. Agassiz. pp. 61-68, plates 4. 
(Aug. 1890.) 

Annual report of the Curator [Alexander Agassiz] of the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology at Harvard College, to the President and Fellows of Harvard College, for 
1888-89. Cambridge. 1889. 8^ pp. SI, plates 10, 

This pamphlet contains, beside the main report of the Curator, which is also included in the report 
of the President, special reports by officers of the Museum on the departments placed under their charge 
respectively, and lists of the publications of the Museum and its officers. 

The present issue contains views and plans of the Museum building. 

PBABODY MU8BXJM OF AMERICAN ABOHAEOLOaY AND ETHNOLOGY. 

No report has been issued within the period covered by this list. 

SCIENTIFIC PAPEBS FROM THE LABORATORIES AND SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

*^* These papers represent work done in the laboratories or departments, but are not necessarily 
written by officers of the University, or issued as official publications of the University or the depart- 
ments. Papers by officers of the University are not mentioned, as a rule, unless they occur in a 
series having a general title. 

Astrononxical Observatory. 

Spectra of S and /m Centauri. By Mrs. M. Fleming. Astron. Nachrichten, cxxiii. 383. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



New variable in Caelum. By Mrs. M. Fleming. Ibid, exxiv. 176. 

Stare having peculiar spectra. By Mre. M. Fleming. Ibid. cxxv. 155. 

Two new variable stare near the cluster 5 M Librae. By Mrs. M. Fleming. Ibid. 
cxxv. 157. 

Transit observations in photography. By W. P. Gerrish. Sidereal Messenger ^ ix. 121. 
A simple break circuit for clocks. By W. P. Gerrish. Ibid. ix. 124. 

See also pubUcations of the AstroDomical Obeervatorj (p. 6), and of E. 0. Fickbrino, W. H. 
PiGKBiinro, J. RiTCHiB, Jr., A. Sbablb, O. C. Wbkdbll. 



Contributions from the Chemical Laboratory of Harvard College. 

The reactions of sodic alcoholates with tribromdinitrobenzol and tribromtrinitrobenzol. 
By C. L. Jackson and W. H. Warren. Froc. Am. Acad. xxv. 164-191. 

The analysis of cupric bromide, and the atomic weight of copper. By T. W. Richards. 
Ibid. xxv. 195-214. 

On cupric oxybromide. ^y T. W. Richards. lUd. xxv. 215-217. 

ContributioxiB from the Cryptogamic Laboratory of Kannurd College. 
Concerning the structure and development of Tuomeya fluviaXUiSy Harv. By W. A. 
Setchell. Froc. Am. Acad. xxv. 

Carpologic stmcture and development of the CoUemaceae and allied groups. By W. 
C. Sturgis. Ibid. 

Notes on Zonaria variegata^ Lamx. By H. M. Ricluurds. Ibid. 
See also pubUcations of W. 6. Farlow. 

Contributions from the Jeftoraon Physical Laboratory. 
Mode of reading mirror galvanometers. By R. W. Willson. Am. Jaum. Sd.^ July, 
1888 ; 3d ser. cxxxvii. 50-52, ciUa, 

Note on the measurement of the internal resistance of batteries. By B. O. Peirce and 
R. W. Willson. Ibid. Dec. 1889 ; 3d ser. cxxxviii. 465-468. 

The magnetic field in the Jefferson Physical Laboratory. By R. W. Willson. Ibid. 
Feb., June, 1890; 3d ser. cxxxix. 87-93, 456-470, cuts. • 

See also publications of B. O. Pbircs, W. C. Sabimb, J. Trowbridob. 

Papers representing work done in the Museum of Oomparative Zodlogy. 
Rot in iris Germanica. By R. T. Jackson. Garden and Forest^ 1889 ; ii. 522. 

Phylogeny of the Pelecypoda, studies of the Aviculidae and their allies. By R. T. 
Jackson. Mem. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist., 1890; iv. no. 8, pp. 277-400, pto«« 8, cuts. 
Thesis offered for degree of Doctor of Science in Harrard University, May, 1889. 

On keratophyre from Marblehead Neck, Massachusetts. By J. H. Sears. BuU. Mus. 
Comp. ZodL, July, 1890; xvi. no. 2, pp. 167-172. 

The immature state of the Odonata. Part III. Sub-family Cordulina. By Louis 
Cabot. Mem. Mus. Comp. Zo6l.^ vol. xvii. no. 1, pp. 52, plates 6. 

A revision of the edentalous genera of Curimatinae. By C. H. and Mrs. R. S. Eigen- 

mann. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. vol. iv. 

See also publications of the Mnsenm (p. 8), the Zoological Laboratory (p. IQ), and A. Aoassiz, 
W. Bbbvster, W. M. Davis, W. Faxok, S. GARiiAir, H. A. Hagbn, A. Hyatt, E. L. Mark, G. H. 
Parkbr, N. S. Shalbb, D. D. Sladb, J. D. WnrniBT, J. E. Wolvf. 



lO OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



OontributioziB fix>m the Zotniogical Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative 

Zoology. 

XV. Studies on Lepidosteus. Part I. By E. L. Mark. Bull Mus. Comp. ZooLy Feb., 
1890 ; xix. 1, pp. 1-127, plates 9, ttrith text. 

xvi. On the egg membrane and micropyle of some osseous fishes. By C. H. £igen- 
mann. Ibid.y March, 1890 ; xix. 2, pp. 129-154, plates 3, with text, 

xvii. The histology and development of the eye in the lobster. By G. H. Parker. 
Ihid.y May, 1890 ; xx. 1, pp. 1-60, plates. 
See also publications of £. L. Mabk. 

PUBLICATIONS OF HOLDEBS OF FELLOWSHIPS AT HABVABD UNIVERSITY. 

Ansvat Freclavio Fo«rate. 

Morgan Fellow, 

The palaeontologi6al horizon of the limestone at Nahant, Mass. Proc, Boston Soc. 
Nat. Hist., May, 1889— April, 1890; xxiv. 261-263. 

Notes on Clinton group of fossilB, with special reference to collections of Indiana, 
Tennessee, and Georgia. /6id., pp. 2GS-S55y plates 5. 

Lewla Edwarda Gatea. 

John Thornton Kvrkland Fellow. 

Positivist churches in London. Nation^ 13 Feb., 1890 ; i. 128. 



Wadaworth Malmy. 

Morgan Fellow. 

The social and domestic position of women in Aristophanes. Hai'vard Stvdies in 
Class. Fhilol.j 1890; i. 159-186. 

Lewla JdtMotm Jaokaoii. 

Parker Fellow. 

On chlorpyromudc acids. With Henry B. Hill. Proc. Am. Acad. xxiv. pp. 820-364. 

Ueber Structurbestimmnng aliphatischer Sauren und die sogennante ^^dynamische 
Isomerie." With K. Auwers. Ber. d. deutsch. client, Oesell. xxiii. 1599. 

Frank Lewla VaaOleef. 

Rogers Fellow. 

De attraetionis in enuntiationibus relativis usu Platonico. Bonn. 1890. 8^. pp. 56. 

COLLEGE PAFEB8, etc. 
The Daily Crimson. Vol. xv., xvi. September 26, 1889— June 20, 1890. 

The Harvard Advocate. Vol. xlvii., xlviii. Oct. 17, 1889— June 21, 1890. Fortnightly. 

The Harvard Lampoon. Second series. Vol. xvii.,xviii. October 16, 1889 — ^June27, 
1890. FortniglUly. 

The Harvard Monthly. Vol. viii., ix. October, 1889— June, 1890. 



•V 

9 



• * 
• • « a* > * * 

•'• \ : ' ' 

• ••• • • 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. II 



The Harvard Law Review. Vol. iii. 3-8 ; iv. 1, 2. October, 1889— May, 1890. 

Published monthly dnring the academic year by Harrard law students. 

Contents: — iii. 3. The history of the register 'of original writs, i. F. W. Maitland. — Is the stat- 
utory action for injuries causing death transitory? J. W. Lilienthal. — The doctrine of stare decisis as 
applied to decisions of constitutional questions. D. II. Chamberlain. — 4. Presumptions and the law 
of evidence. J. B. Thayer. — The history of the register of original writs, ii. F. W. Maitland. — 
5. The police power and the right to compensation. E. V. Abbot. — Infringement cases in patent law. 
S. G. Croswell. — The history of the register of original writs, iii. F. W. Maitland. -r- 6. A brief 
survey of equity jurisprudence, v. C. C. Langdell. — Davies vs, Mann : Theory of contributory neg- 
ligence. W. Schofield. — 7. Judicial notice and the law of evidence. James B. Thayer. — The 
disseiMin of chattels, ii. J. B. Ames. — 8. The disseisin of chattels, iii. J. B. Ames. — State juris- 
diction in tide water. C. F. Chamberlayne. 

iv. X. The story pf mortgage law. H. W. Chaplin. — The right of access and the right to wharf 
out to navigable water. A. E. McCordie, W. G. Crosby. — Defective alimony decrees in Massachusetts. 
G. F. Ormsby. — 2. The burden of proof. J. B. Thayer. — Elevated road litigation. £. A. Hibbard. 
— Taxation of pipes in public streets. J. H. Beale, Jr. 

The Harvard Portfolio, 1889-90. An annual illustrated record of men and events of 
permanent interest to Harvard students. Vol. I. Cambridge. Published by students 
of Harvard University, sm. 4**. pp. (8), 19 platea with text. 

Edited by E. L. Renyon and W. H. Wiggin, Jr. Plates 20, 21, 22, mentioned in the index o' 
illustrations, were not published. 

The Harvard Index for 1889-90. A university directory. Vol. xvi. Complete ath- 
letic, base-ball, foot-ball and boating records and lists of the officers and members of the 
college societies. Cambridge. 1889. 12"*. pp. 260, p2d<6 1. 

Edited by W. R. Bigelow and C. A. Hight 

OIjASS rspobts. 

1865. Seventh report of the secretary of the Class of 1865 of Harvard College. 
June, 1885-June, 1890. Printed for the use of the class. New York. 1890. 8°. pp.67. 
The class secretary is T. F. Brownell. 

1877. Harvard College. Class of 1877. Secretary's report. No. IV. 1890. 
Cambridge. 1890. 8*^. pp. viii. U^, plates 6. 

The cUss secretary is W. E. Russell. This report was prepared by J. F. Tyler. 

1879. Harvard College. Class of 1879. Secretary's report. No. IV. [Buffalo, 
N. Y.] 1890. 8^. pp. xxix. 148, plales 1. 
The class secretary is F. Almy. 

1882. Harvard College. Class of 1882. Secretary's report. No. III. April, 1890. 
Boston. 8®. pp. 137, pZa<c« 4. 

The class secretary is A. E. Miles. 

1883. Harvard CoUege. Class of 1883. Secretary's report. No. III. July, 1890. 
8°. pp. \^b^ plates 2. 

The class secretary is F. Nichols. 

1887. Harvard College. Class of 1887. Secretarj-'s report. No. II. 1890. Mel- 
rose. 1890. 8*. pp. 106. 

The class secretary is G. P. Furber. 

1889. Harvard College. Class of 1889. Secretary's report. No. 1. Cambridge. 
1890. 8**. pp. 132. 

The class secretary is J. H. Ropes. 



12 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



OOLLEGE 800IETIES. 

The scholar and the state. Oration delivered June 26, 1890, before the Phi Beta 
Kappa Chapter of Harvard University. By Henry C. Potter. New York. E. P. Dutton 
& Co. 1890. 8'. pp. 32. 

Ode read before the Society of the Phi Beta Kappa, Harvard University, June 26, 
1890. By Richard Watson Gilder. Critic, 28 June, 1890 ; xiii. 823. 

Canadian dub of Harvard University. Cambridge, U. S. A. 1890. 8"*. pp. 21. 
Two editions have appeared. 

Association hand-book presented by the Young Men's Christian Association (Society 
of Christian Brethren) of Harvard University, 1890-91. [Cambridge. 1890.] 18**. pp.40. 

The southern question, past and present. An address by Richard P. Hallowell. 
Delivered before the Harvard Historical Society of Harvard College, in Boylston Hall, 
Cambridge, Mass., March 12, 1890. Boston. 1890. W. pp. 34. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



*«* For the purpose of completing the record, a few articles omitted fh>m fonner lists are inserted here. 



FimHois Elllacvood AblMit. 

Instructor in Philosophy, 1888-89. 

X. The way out of agnosticism, or the philosophy 
of free religion. Boston. Little, Brown & 
Co. 1890. 12«. pp. zi. 83. 

Based (with the exception of the Introduction) on lectares 
deliTered in Philosophy 13. 



AbWtt. 

Preacher to the Uhiveriity. 

X. Flaws in IngersoUism. North Am. Rev. April, 
1890; cl. 446-467. 

2. No theology vs. new theology. Forum, April, 

1890; ix. 187-197. 

3. Christian re-union. Church Rev. April, 1890 ; 

Ivii. 136-188. 

4* The wages system. Forum, July, 1890; ix. 
518-529. 

5. Industrial democracy. Ibid. Aug. 1890; ix. 

658-669. 

6. Dr. Abbott is editor of the Christian Union. 



Curator of the Museum of Comparative Zodlogy. 

1. On the rate of growth of corals. Bull. Mus. 

Comp. Zodl. Aug. 1890; xx. no. 2. pp. 61- 
63, plates 4. 

2. Report as Curator of the Museum of Compara- 

tive Zoology at Harvard College, 1888-89. 
Cambridge. 1889. 

3. Edited the Memoirs and the Bulletin of the 

Museum of Comparative Zoology, and Studies 
froin the Newport Marine Laboratory. See 
Official publications : Museum of Compara- 
tive Zoology. 

4. Sundry reviews and notices in Nature, the 

American Journal of Science, and Nation. 

AXmwmMdvr Viets CSxiiirold All«a* 

Lecturer on Ecclesiastical History. 

X. Jonathan Edwards. Boston. Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. 1889. 12*. pp. xi. 401. 

In the Mries : American religlou9 leader*. 
2. The Norman period of the English church. 
The Church in the British Isles: sketches of 
its continuous history from the earliest 
times to the Restoration. Lectures delivered 
in 1889 under the auspices of the Church 
aub of New York. New York. E. & J. B. 
Young & Co. 1890. W. pp.268. 



3-6. Articles entitled ' * Church of England," '* Epis- 
copacy," ** Protestant Episcopal Church," 
"Reformed Episcopal Church," contributed 
to ' * A concise dictionary of religious knowl- 
edge." Edited by Rev. S. M. Jackson. Mag. 
Christian Lit. April, May, 1890. 

I^pedarie ]>«For«at All«a* 

Professor of Classical Philology. 

x-6. Notes : — On ^oCot in Alcman. — Proxuma 
fatnisieei, OIL. I. 199. — ^topruceAotuu Schol. 
Aristoph. Ran. 18. — ipriia in the Heraclean 
Tables. — Aristophanes Frogs. 180 fig. — 
Herodotus YI. 57 and the votes of the Spar- 
tan kings. Bar^. Studies in Class. Philol. 
1890; i. 187-191. 



Bussey Professor of La/w, 

X. The disseisin of chattels. II. The nature of 
ownership. HcLrvard Law Review, Feb. 
1890; m. 813-828. 

2. The disseisin of chattels. III. Inalienability 
of choses in action. lUd. March, 1890; iii. 
337-846. 



JaoM* Hia«a Armold. 

Librarian of the Lom School. 

I. Quinquennial catalogue of the officers and 

students of the I^w School of Harvard 

University, 1817-1889. Cambridge. 1890. 
pp. XV. 260. 



Curator of Maps. 

X. Why Elder Badger was so dissatisfied with 

Dr. Channing's letter. Herald of Oospel 

Liberty, 27 Feb. 1890. 

Reprinted, in part, under the title : FatthAil wounds of a 
friend. Unitarian Rev. April, 1890. 

a. Emerson's agnosticism. {Tnt^aWan J2e«. April, 
1890 ; xxxiii. 331-345. 

3. A fourth form of Christianity. Ibid. Sept. 
1890; xxxiv. 193-208. 



Instructor in Forensics. 

X. Brothef Filippo; a story in two parts. New 
England Mag. Feb., March, 1890; n.s. i. 
630-639, ii. 73-86. , 



H 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Glmveaoe Joka Blak«t 

Professor of Otology. 

z. The Boston City Hospital. Boston Med, and 
Surg. Joum, 8 July, 1890; cxxiii. 1, 2. 

2. Remarks on Slirapnell perforation and excision 

of the membrana tympani. Trans. Am. Oto- 
logical Soc. 15 July, 1890. 

3. Reduplications of mucous membrane in the 

normal tympanic cavity : their clinical im- 
portance. Arch, of Otology J vol. xix. no. 4. 

Frank BoUm. 

Secretary of the University, 

z. A list of the names and addresses of living 
alumni of Harvard College. Cambridge. 
1890. 9^. pp. 110. 

a. Harvard Universjty aid funds. 1890. 12*". 
pp. 16. 

3. Report on the graduate department for 1888- 

1889. Annual Reports of the President and 
Treasurer of Harvard CoUege, 1888-89; 
pp. 100-108. 

4. Barred owls in captivity. , The Avky April, 

1890; vu. 102-114. 

5. Harvard University. College and School 

[Utica, N.Y.], May, 1890. 
Also iMued Mpiurately. 8*. pp. 4. 

6. Snake skins in the nests of Myiarchus crinitus. 

The Auk, July, 1890; vii. 288. 

7. Toung cedarbirds and great-crested fly-catch- 

ers. Ibid. July, 1890; vii. 290. 

8. Editorial articles in the Boston Post, Herald, 

and Jo^umal, on topics connected with the 
University, or with ornithology. 

Hoiiy PiolMriBC Bowdltok. 

Professor of Physiology, and Dean of the Medical 

Foxutty, 

z. The knee jerk and its physiological modifica- 
tions. With J. W. Warren, M.D. Journal 
of Physiology, Jan. 1890; xi. 25-64, Ulustr. 

2. Ueber den Nachweis der Unermfldlichkeit der 

Saugethiernerven. Arehi/v fUr Anat. und 
Phys, Fhysiologische Abtheilnng. 1890. 
pp. 505-508, iUusir, 
Also printed separately. 

3. The physique of women in Massachusetts. 

Annual Report of Mom. State Board of 
HeaHh, 1889. 

Also issued separately : BoetOQ. 1890. 8*. pp. 20, /oMin^ 
ptaU\, 

4. Is Harvard a university? Harvard Monthly, 

Jan. 1890; ix. 148-151. 
Also issned separately. 

Edward HtekHiiK BnUUbvd. 

Instructor in Surgery and Orthopedics, 

1. A treatise on orthopedic surgery. By E. H. 
Bradford, M.D.. and R. W. Lovett, M.D. 
New York. Wm. Wood & Co. 1890. pp. 
790, illustr. 



WlUiaat Br«water. 

Assistant in Ornithology and Ma/mnuUogy at the 
Museum of Comparative Zo'ology. 

Z-Z2. In The Auk : — i. The present status of the 
wild pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) as a 
bird of the United States, with some notes 
on its habits. Oct. 1889; vi. 285-291. — 2. 
Birds through an opera glass. (Review of a 
work by this title by Miss Florence A. Mer- 
riam.) Oct. 1889 ; vi. 380. —3. Nesting habits 
of the parrakeet {^Conurus carolinensis.) 
Oct. 1889 ; vi. 386-337. —4. Melanerpes caro- 
linus eating oranges. Oct. 1889 ; vi. 337-338. 
5. The little brown crane ( Orus canadensis) 
in Rhode Island. Jan. 1890 ; vii. 89. — 6. 
Capture of a Canada jay (Perisoreus cana- 
densis) near Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jan. 
1890; vii. 91-92. — 7. Bullock's oriole in 
Maine. Jan. 1890; vii. 92. — 8. Recent oc- 
currence of the turkey vulture in eastern 
MassachusetU. April, 1890 ; vii..204-205. — 
9. Capture of a third specimen of the barn 
owl ill Massachusetts. April, 1890; vii. 205. 
— 10. Food of young hummingbirds. April, 
1890; vii. 206-207. — II. The purple grackle 
at Charleston, South Carolina. April, 1890; 
vii. 208. — 12. The Acadian sharp-tailed spar- 
row and Scott's seaside sparrow on the coast 
of South Carolina. April, 1890; vii. '212. 

13. Evening grosbeak in New England. Forest 

and Stream. 6 Feb. 1890; xxxiv. 44-45. 

14. The evening grosbeak. Ibid, 27 Feb. 1890; 

xxxiv. 104. 

15. Notes on the heath hen ( Tympanuchus eupido) 

of Massachusetts. Ibid, 25 Sept. 1890; 
XXXV. 188. 

Mr. Brewster is a member of the committee on publication 
of The Auk. 



I«e Baron &iuaell Brlscs, 

Professor of English. 

I 

I. The correction of bad English, as a requirement 

for admission to Harvard College. Academy 
(Boston), Sept. 1890; v. 802-312. 

Joksk Qraham Brooks. 

Instructor in Political Economy. 

I. A school for the science of charity. EthiccU 
Record, April, 1890 ; i. 20-30. 

Horbort Leslie Burrell. 

Demonsiraior of Surgical Appliances. 

I. Aseptic surgery. With G. R. Tucker. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 8 Oct. 1889; cxxi. 
827-332. — Med. Communications Mass. Med. 
Soc. 1889; xiv. (no. 3) 561-670. 

a. Recent progress in surgery. With H. W. 
Cushing. Ibid. 13, 20, 27 March, 1890; 
cxxu. 247, 272, 295. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



'5 



Arthur Traoj Cabot. 

Clinical Instructor in Oeniio-urinary Surgery, 

I. The choice of operation for stone in the 
bladder. Joum, Am. Med. Assoc. 9 Nov. 

1889. 

a. Two cases of abscess of the liver implicating 
the pleural cavity : operation with recovery. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 9 Jan. 1890; 
cxxii. 30, 31. 

3. A successful case of uretero-llthotomy for an 

impacted calculus. Ibid. 11 Sept. 1890; 
cxxiii. 247-249. 

4. A case of cyst of the kidney apparently cured 

by a single aspiration. Joum. Cutaneous 
and OeniiO'Urinary Diseases^ Sept. 1890. 



Gteorce Rioe Carp«nter, 

Instructor in English, 

1. Elementary exercises in rhetoric and English 
composition. For the use of students in 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Boston. 1890. 8®. pp. 88. 

a. Ibsen's *' The Lady of the Sea." Translated 
from the German of Julius Hoffory. Har- 
vard Monthly, Nov., Dec. 1889; ix. 65-85, 
93-185. 

• Edward Chamilm. 

Assistant Professor of jlistory. 

I. The navigation laws. Proe. Am. Antiq. Soc. 

Oct. 1889; N.8. vi. 160-179. 
Also printed separately. 

Haman Wbite Ghaplln. 

Ijeeturer on Criminal Loajo. 

X. The story of mortgage law. Harvard Law 
Rev. April, 1890; iv. 1-14. 

David Wllliaau Chaevar. 

Professor of Surgery. 

X. Ketro-pharyngeal sarcoma removed by external 
excision. Trans. Am. Surg. Assoc. 1890; 
vol. viii. — Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 
29 May, 1890; cxxu. 515, 516. 

a. Lupus of the tongue. Trans. Am, Surg, 
Assoc. 1890. 

3. Irreducible hernia ; a discussion at the annual 

meeting of the Massachusetts Medical Soci- 
ety, Boston, 10 June, 1890. [Boston. 1890.] 
8*. pp. 33-56. 

4. Old and new surgery. Boston Med. and Surg. 

Joum. 2 Jan. 1890; cxxii. 1, 2. 

5. A short address to the Boylston Medical So- 

ciety of tlie Harvard Medical School, on the 
way of success in practice. Ibid, 10 April, 
1890 ; cxxii. 337. 



Fredariek Edward Ghaaajr* 

Instructor in Ophthalmology at the School of 
Veterinary Medicine, 

z. Hysterical mydriasis, paralysis of the accom- 
modation and blindness, following the use of 
the hydrobromate of homatropine. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum, 23 Jan. 1890; cxxii. 
82-^4. 

a. Errors of refraction and insufficiencies of the 
ocular muscles as causes of chorea, with 
cases. Ibid. 20 Feb. 1890; cxxii. 176-182. 

AIko printed separately : Boston. Damrell, Upbam & Co. 
16*. pp. 38. 

Hanrjr Miahaal CUS^ird* 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

z. Aseptic and antiseptic dentistry. Archives of 
Dentistry, July, 1890; vii. 296. 

ColUar CoM, 

Assistant in Oeology. 

1, Special geography of North Carolina. New 
York. A. S. Barnes & Co. 1889. 4*'. 
Map, cuts. 

North Carolina edition of Bamen's Complete Geography. 

a. School map of North Carolina. Raleigh, N. C. 
Alfred Williams & Co. 1889. 42X78 inches. 

Fifth edition. First edition issned in 1880. 

3. The peopling of North Carolina. Parts I. and 

II. Winston, N. C. 

4. North Carolina in colonial days. Parts I. and 

II. Winston, N. C. 
N08. 3 and 4 appeared in The Schoolteacher. 

5. Letters from Cambridge. State Chronicle, 

(Raleigh, N. C.) 

6. Short articles on various subjects and book- 

reviews in New York and Boston Sunday 
papers. 

Adalpka Oalut. 

Assistant Professor of French. 

I. Emile Augier (a critical and biographical 
sketch). Harvard Monthly, June, 1890; 
X. 127-131. 

Jaaiak Paraaaa Caoka. 

Erving P^'ofessor of Chemistry and Mineralogy ; 
Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 

z. Report as Director of the Chemical Labora- 
tory. Annual Reports of the President, etc. 
1888-89; pp. 158-166. 

a. Report of the Director of the Chemical Lab- 
6rat6ry 6f Han'ard College. Presented to 
the Visiting Committee of the Overseers, 
April 9, 1890. 8*. pp. 16. 

Contains a historical sketch of the Laboratory. 

3. Professor Cooke edits the Proceedings of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
and is an associate editor of the American 
Journal of Science, 



i6 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



WUllMn Parkar Cooks. 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

z. Irregularities of the teeth. Archives of Den- 
tistry, 1890; pp. 60. 

Edword Oowlos. 

Clinical Instructor in Mental Diseases. 

z. Seventy-second annual report of the McLean 
Asylum for the Insane for the year 1889. 
Annual report Mass. Oeneral Hospital for 
1889. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 1890. S^*; 
pp. 89-90. 

a. The mechanism of insanity. Fart I. Am. 
Joum. Insanity, April, 1890 ; pp. 457-486. 

3. The training schools of the future. Seven- 
teenth annual report of the proceedings of 
the National Conference of Charities and 
Correction, at Baltimore, May 14-21, 1890; 
pp. 115-180. 

Also iMued •epimtely : Boston. 6«orgo H. Ellis. 1800. 
8*. pp. 16. 

E11»idco Oorry Outlor, 

Instructor in the Theory and Practice of Physic. 

z. Some hospital cases of typhoid fever. Boston 
Med, and Surg, Journ, 26 Dec. 1889; czxi. 
621-628. 

2, Impacted gallstone, ulceration into duodenum. 

Ibid. 26 Dec. 1889 ; cxzi. 630. 

Fraaela Henrjr DaToaport. 

Assistant in Gynaecology, 

z,a. Report of progress in gynaecology. Boston 
Med. and Surg, Joum. 6 Feb., 14 Aug. 1890 ; 
cxxii. 131, cxxiii. 153. 

3. A case of vaginal hysterectomy. /5u2. 28Aug. 

1890 ; cxxiii. 200, 201. 

Wllliaat Morris Daris. 

Professor of Physical Geography. 

z. Structure and origin of glacial sand plains. 
Bull, Oeol, Soc, America, 1890; i. 192-202, 
plates 8. 

a. Ferrel's convectional theory of tornadoes. By 
W. M. Davis and Charles Emerson Curry. 
Am. Met, Joum. 1889-90; vi. 387-349, 418- 
431, 448-463. 

AI90 printed separately. 

3. The geographic development of northern New 

Jersey. By W. M. Davis and J. Walter 
Wood, Jr. Proc. Boston Soc Nat. Hist. 1880 ; 
xxiv. 865-428. 
Also printed separately. 

4. The intrusive and extrusive triassic trap sheets 

of the Connecticut valley. By W. M. Davis 
and Charles Levy Whittle. Bull, Mus, Comp, 
Zo'61, Dec. 1889; xvi. (Geol. series ii.) no. 6, 
pp. 99-138, plates 5. 



5,6. Review of Ferrel's ''Popular treatise on the 
winds." Science, 28 Feb. 1890; xv. 142-144. 
^Nation, 26 Dec. 1889; xlix. 525. 

7. The rivers of northern New Jersey, with notes 

on the classification of rivers in general. 
Nat. Qeogr. Mag. 1890; ii. 81-110. 
Also printed separately. 

8. Dr. Hann's studies on cyclones and anti- 

cyclones. Science^ 30 May, 1890; xv. 332. 

9. An outline of meteorology. Abstract of six 

lectures delivered to the class in physical 
geography at the Johns Hopkins University 
in January, 1890. Johns Hopkins Univ. Cir- 
cular, May, 1890. 

zo. Secular changes in climate. A paper read at 
the eighteenth meeting of the New England 
Meteorological Society at Providence, R. I., 
15 April, 1890. Am. Met, Jov^-n, 1890; vii. 
67-78. 

zz. Types of New England weather. Investiga- 
tions of the New England Meteorological 
Society, Appendix to Bull. N. E, Met, Soc. 
for 1889. (Annals Astron. Observatory of 
Ha/rvard College, vol. xxi. pt. ii. 116-136.) 
Also printed separately. 

za. An investigation of the sea-breeze. By W. M. 
Davis, H. G. Schultz, and R. De C. Ward. 
Ibid. pp. 215-263, plates 8. 

Z3, Z4. Review of Blanford's ** Climates and weather 
of India." Nation, 17 Oct. 1889; xlix. 817, 
318. — Science, 9 Aug. 1889; xiv. 101. 

Z5. Review of Wright's ** Ice age in North Amer- 
ica.'* Nation, 10 Oct. 1889; xlix. 295, 296. 

z6. Professor Davis edited the moifthly Bulletin, 
and the Annual Investigations of the New 
England Meteorological Society. 

Frank Wiatlirop Draper. 

Professor of Legal Medicine, 

1, The legal relations of obstetrics. Boston 
Med, and Surg. Joum. 16 Jan. 1890 ; cxxii. 
49-54. 

a. Legal medicine. Annual of the Universal 
Medical Sciences, 1890 ; vol. iv. sect. J. 

3. Recent progress in legal medicine. Boston 

Med, and Surg, Joum, 27 Feb. 1890; cxxii. 
199-201. 

4. A medico-legal problem : was it murder or 

was it suicide? Ibid, 6 March, 1890; cxxii. 
217-220. 



Tlunnaa Dwlcht. 

Parkman Professor of Anatomy. 

I. A series of casts of the duodenum. Boston 
Med. and Surg, Joum, 13 March, 1890 ; cxxii. 
255. 

a. The closure of the cranial sutures as a sign of 
age. Ibid, 24 April, 1890; cxxii. 389-^92. 

This is part of a paper entitled " Medico-Legal studies od 
the haman skeletou '* read Dec. 27, 188fl, at the meeting of 
the Association of American AnatomiKtii at Philadelphia. 
The number of heads examined was then 69. The observations 
have since been carried to 100, and the paper has been prac- 
tically rewritten. 

3. Recent progress in anatomy. Ibid. 5 June, 
1890 ; cxxii. 646-649. 



PUBLICATIONS OP THE OFFICERS. 



17 



4. The joints and muscles of contortionuts. Proc. 

Bofton Soc. Nat. Hist. 1890; xziv. 855-357. 

5. The significance of the third trochanter and of 

similar bony processes in man. Joum. AncU. 
and Physiol. Oct. 1889; xziv. 61. 

6. The sternum as an index of sex, height, and 

age. Ibid. July, 1890; xxiv. 527. 

7. Irregfular union of the first and second pieces 

of the sternum in man and apes. Ibid. July, 
1890; xxiv. 636. 

8. Reviews and editorials in the Boston Med, and 

Surg. Joum. 

Chmrlmm William Eliot. 

President of the University. 

z. The gap between common schools and colleges. 
Arena, June, 1890 ; ii. 24. 

a. The forgotten millions. Century, August, 
1890 ; xl. 556-564. 

3. Annual reports of the President and Treasurer 
of Harvard College, 1888-89. Cambridge. 
1890. 8*. 



Winn Professor of EccUsi^tical History. 

I. German unity in the Tvrol. Nation, 17 Oct. 
1889 ; xlix. 309, 810. 

a. The '' Cultnrkampf " in Bavaria. Ibid. 5 Dec. 
1889 ; zlix. 447, 448. 

3. Wilhelm von Giesebrecht. Ibid. 30 Jan. 1890: 

1. 89, 90. 

4. Labor day in Europe. Ibid. 2f9 May, 1890; 

1. 429, 430. 

Harold Glaronoo Ernst. 

Instructor in Bacteriology. 

X. How far may a cow be tuberculous before her 
milk becomes dangerous as an article of food? 
Trans. Assoc. Am, Physicians, vol. iv. Also 
Am. Joum, Med. Sciences, Nov. 1889; An- 
nual report New Hampshire State Board of 
Health, 1890 ; Bull. Hatch Experiment sta- 
tion, I89O; /Vo^i/tonfr (Edinburgh), Sept. 
1890; Etudes experimentales et din. sur la 
tuberculosie (Paris), 1890; ii. 412. 

Read at the annual meetiug or the Association of American 
Phyridans at Washington, D. C, Sept. 1889. 

a. Demonstrations of pathological specimens. 
Trans. Assoc. Am. Physicians, May, 1890; 
vol. V. 

3. Edited the department of bacteriology in ^71- 
nual of Medical Sciences, 1890 ; vol. iv. sec- 
tion L. 



Gkarloa Carroll Ewerett. 

Bussey Professor of Theology; Dean qf the 

Divinity School. 

X. Relation of Unitarianism to philosophy. Uni- 
tarianism : its origin and its history. Bos- 
ton. Am. Unitarian Soc. 1890. 8"; pp.329- 
358. 



a. Robert Browning: a memorial address. Me- 
morial to Robert Browning under the au- 
spices of the Brovming Society of Boston, etc. 
Printed for the society. Cambridge. 1890 ; 
pp. 21-46. 

3. The natural history of dogma. Forum, Dec. 

1889 ; viii. 440-448. 

4. The moral aspect of civil service reform. 

Christian Register, 21 Nov. 1889; Ixviii. 51. 

5. Robert Browning. Ibid. 19 Dec. 1889 ; Ixviii. 

51. 

6. The African at Harvard. Ibid. 10 July, 1890 ; 

Ixix. 28. 

7. Dr. Hedge. Ibid. 28 Aug. 1890 ; Ixix. 36. 

8. Three leaders. TAf ^ni7arian(Tokio, Japan), 

Aug. 1890; i. 6. 
In Japanese translation. 

9. The philosophv of the sublime. Andover Rev. 

Aug. 1890; xiv. 113-127. 

10. Report on the Divinity School, 1888-1889. 
Annual reports of the Prfsident and Treas- 
urer, 1888-1889; pp. 106-111. 

William GiUoM Farlow. 

Professor of Cryptogamic Botany, 

z. A provisional host index of the fungi of the 
United States. Part II. Gamopetalae — 
Apetalae. With A. B. Seymour. Cambridge, 
Sept. 1890. 1. 8*. pp. 65-133. 

a. Poisonous action of Claihrus columnatus. 
Botanical Gazette, Feb. 1890; xv. 45, 46. 

3. Professor Farlow is co-editor of tlie Annals of 
Botany (Oxford), and has contributed to 
Garden and Forest. 

Walter Faxon. 



Assistant in Zo'ology at the Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology. 

I. Notes on North American crayfishes, family 
Astacidae. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. May, 1890; 
xii. 619-634. 

Theodore Willis Fisker. 

Lecturer on Mental Diseases. 

I. Fifty-first annual report of the Boston Lunatic 
Hospital. Boston. Rockwell & Churchill. 
1890. 12". pp. 47. 

Contains hiRtorical noten, 1752-1889. 

RegiBald Heber Fits. 

Shattuek Professor of Pathological Anatomy. 

1. Acute pancreatitis. Report of a case, and 
reference to recent contributions. Trans. 
Assoc. Am. Physicians, 1890; v. 191. — 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 12 June, 
1890 -, cxxii. 672-575. 

a. .appendicitis: soiue of the results of the 
analysis of seventy-two cases seen in the 
past four years. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 19 June, 1890; cxxii. 619. 



i8 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Kviio Fraaoke. 

Assistcvni Professor of German. 

I. Luther's return to the principle of authority. 
Unitarian Rev. Feb. 1890; xxxiii. 128-185. 

a. Modern ideas in the Middle Ages. Publica- 
tions Mod. Lang. Assoc. America j April- 
June, 1890; V. 175-184. 

3. A description of student life at Paris in the 

12th century. Am. Joum. Philol. April, 
1890; xi. 80-86. 

4. Ein Liederbuch der deutschen Burschenschaft. 

New Yorker Belletristisches Joum, 2 July, 
1890; xxxix. no. 27. 

5. Groethes Beziehungen zu Cogswell. Die Nation 

(Berlin) 12 July, 1890; vii. no. 41. — Goethe 
and Cogswell. Harvard Monthly, June, 
1890; X. 132-187. 

6. Amerikanische Erziehungsideale. Beilage zur 

Allgemeinen Zeiiung (Miinchen), 25 Sept 
1890. 

Reprinted in the Sonntagsblatt der Ne\o Yorker StaaU- 
seitung, 19 Oct. 1800. 

7. A difference in German and American uni- 

versity methods. NcUion, 18 Feb. 1890; 
i. 182, 133. 

8. A review of Minor's Schiller. Mod. Lang. 

Notes, May, 1890; v. 289-291. 



WlUiaat Fraaols Ganons. 

Instructor in Botany. 

z. The economic mollusca of Acadia. Bull. Nat. 
Hist. Soe. New Brunstcick, Oct. 1889; viii. 
8-116, cuts. 

Issued separately : St. John, N. B. Barnes & Co. 1889. 
8*. pp.116. 

a. The cartography of the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
fh>m Cartier to Cham plain. Proc. and Trans. 
Royal Soe. Canada, May, 1890 ; vii. sect. ii. 
17-68. 

3. Note on the orlg^in of the name '* Quebec." 

Canadiana, Dec. 1889 ; i. 192. 

4. The itinerary of Jacques Cartier*8 first voyage. 

Ibid. May, 1890; ii. 86-88. 

5. The Natural History Society. St. John (N. B. ) 

Daily Telegraph, 27 March, 1890. 

6. On collecting, preserving, and studying marine 

invertebrate animals. Educational Review, 
April, May, July, 1890; iii. 199, 221 ; iv. 29. 

7. A maritime province university. University 

Monthly, Aug. 1890 (special no.) ; pp. 13-16. 

8. John Robert Willis. The first Nova Scotian 

conchologist. Eilited by W. F. Ganong and 
Harry Piers. Trans. Nova Scotian Inst. 
Nat. Science, Sept. 1890; vii. 404-428. 



Mr. (YMiione contributed the introductory section, biblio- 
frraphiciil una c " " " 
QOUi> to the H»t. 



iphiciii and critical notice of his works, and the annota- 



Editorial notes and sketches in Educational 
Review^ and book-reviews in Boston Post. 



Oeorce Mlaot CSkurland. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

T. Gastric neurasthenia. Boston Med. and Surg. 

Joum. 3 Oct. 1889 ; cxxi. 321-327. 

Read at the meeting of the Association of American 
Physicians at WashiuKton, D. C, 19 Sept. 1889. 

a. Euphrasia officinalis. Ibid. 7 Nov. 1889; 
cxxi. 453-454. 



Samuel Oarman. 

Assistant in Herptology and Ichthyology at the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology. 

z. Cave animals from southwestern Missouri. 
Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. Dec. 1889; xvii. 
no. 6, pp. 225-240, plates 2. 

2. On the species of the genus Chalcinus in the 

Museum of Comparative Zoology. Bull. 
Essex Inst. Jan.-March, 1890; xxii. 1-7. 

3. On species of Gasteropelecus. Ibid. pp. 8-10. 

4. On species of Cynopotamus. Ibid. pp. 11-14. 

5. On the species of the genus Anostomus. Ibid. 

pp. 15-28. 

6. Reviews and book notices in the Nation. 

Oeorsa Waahiastoii Gay* 

Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

z. A case of gastrostomy. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 4 Sept. 1890; cxxiii. 221, 222. 

a. Irreducible hernia ; a discussion at the annual 
meeting of the Massachusetts Medical So- 
ciety, 10 June, 1890. 8* pp. 16-20. 

Woloott Gibba. 

Rumford Professor and Lecturer on the Applica- 
tion of Science to the Useful Arts, Emeritus. 

I. A systematic study of the action of definitely 
related chemical compounds upon animals. 
By Wolcott Gibbs, M.D., and H. A. Hare, 
M.D. Am. Chem. Joum. Oct, 1889; March, 
June, 1890; xi. 435, xii. 145, 365. 



Qeorffa I«inooln Goodala. 

Fisher Professor of Natural History. 

I. The problem of heather in North America. 
Garden and Forest, 5 Feb. 1890 ; iii. 62, 63. 

William WatMm Goodwin. 

Eliot Professor of Greek Literature. 

I. Syntax of the moods and tenses of the Greek 
verb. Uewriiton antl enlarged. London : 
Macmillan & Co. 1889. Boston : Ginn & 
Co. 1890. 8°. pp. xxxii. 464. 

See also p. 5, JETarv. Studies in Clatt. Philol. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



^9 



Fisher Professor of yai-ural History* 

I. Manual of the botany of the northern United 
States, inclading the district east of the Mis- 
sissippi, and north of North Carolina and 
Tennessee. By Asa Gray. Sixth edition. 
Revised and extended westward to the 100th 
meridian, by Sereno Watson, Curator of the 
Gray Herbarium, Harvard University, and 
John M. Coulter. Professor of Botany in 
Wabash College, assisted by specialists in 
certain groups. New York, etc. Ivison, 
Blakeman&Co. 1890. 8<l pp. 760, j>/a<«« 25. 

Jolui Ghlpaiaa Gimy. 

RoycUl Professor of Law. 

1. Select cases and other authorities on the law 

of property. Vol. iv. Cambridge. Charles 
W. Sever. 1890. 1. 8^1 pp. xiii. 841. 

Chmrlmm lI«Btr»vlll« Qofmau 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 

X. A case of labor with triplets, at full term. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 13 March, 
1890; czxii. 246, 246. 

2. The influenza epidemic as observed at the 

Boston Lying-in Hospital. Ibid. 17 July, 
1890 ; cxxiU. 55-57. 

3. Semi-annual reports on prog^ss in obstetrics. 

Ibid. 16 Jan., 7 Aug. 1890; cxxii. 58, cxxili. 
180. 

4. Reviews of obstetrical works in the Boston 

Med. and Surg. Journ. 

5. Address on the duties and conduct of nurses 

in private nursing. Delivered at the Boston 
City Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
June 7, 1889. Report of the Trustees of the 
Boston City Hospital. 1890. 

Joka OriM Gve«a« 

Clinical Professor of Otology. 

X. Cases of meningitis from inflammation of the 
^mpanum. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
19 June, 1890; cxxii. 599-602. 

Fraada Boott Greeaoasli* 

Clinical Instructor in Syphilis. 

X. Clinical notes on herpes zoster. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Journ. 5 Dec. 1889; cxxi. 549- 
552. 

Read at the annual meeting of the American Dermatological 
Association, Bonton, 17, 18, 19 Sept. 1889. Also pablisbed 
separately : Boston. Dami-ell & Upham. 1889. 

NoTS. — For articles by Professor J. B. GanMonaH see 
p. 5, liarv. StudUt in CUf. Philol. 



Professor of Entomology. 

z. Unsere gegenwartige Kenntniss der Epheme- 
riden. Stettiner Uniomologische Zeitung, 
1890; li. 11-13. 

2. New synopsis of the Odonata of North America. 

i. Calopterygina. Psyche, Ang.-I>eo. 1889; v. 241-250. 
IL Auax. Ibid. Feb. 1890; v. §03-308. 
iii. Two species of Aeschna. Ibid. July, 1890; v. 363- 

356 
iv. Cordiilina. Ibid. July, 1890; t. 867-873, ptaU 1. 
V. Notes and descriptions of some North American Libel- 

Inlina. Ibid. Aog.-Oct. 1890; v. 383-887. 
vi. A synopsis of the odonat genus Lencorbinia, Britt. 
TYan*. Am. Entomol. 80c. Jaly, 1890; xvii. 229- 
236, plate» 10. 

3. Otiorhynchus sulcatns injurious to plants in 

greenhouses in Massachusetts. Psyche^ 
Marcli-April, 1890; v. 838-834. 



Cnkarlas Harrlncton. 

Instructor in Materia Medica and Hygiene^ and 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

1. Thirty-first annual report of the inspector of 

milk and vinegar. Boston City Document 31. 
1890. pp. 53. 

2. Report on the analysis of foods. Twenty-first 

annual report of the State Board of BeaUh 
of Mass. Boston. 1890. pp. 111-119. 



Albert Bvahnell H«rt. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

z. The work of students in the courses in the 
history of tlie United States, History 18, 17, 
and 20(<2). To he given at Harvard College 
in the academic year 1889-90. Cambridge. 
1889. 8**. pp. 46. 

a. History 13 and 17. Topical outline of the 
courses in constitutional and political history 
of the United States given at Harvard Col- 
lege in the academic year 1889-1891. Part I 
(1783-1829) and Part II (1829-1861). Cam- 
bridge. Wheeler. 1890. 8". pp. 267. 

3. Pamphlet for the use of students in courses 

History 13, 14, and 27 (History of the United 
States) given at Harvard College in the aca- 
demic year 1890-91. Cambridge. Wheeler. 
8®. pp. 50. 

4. Federal constitution of the Swiss confederation 

(of May 29, 1874). [Translation with bib- 
liographical notes.] 
General series, no. 
Heath & Co. 1890. 

5. The rise of American cities. Quarterly Journ. 

Economics, Jan. 1890; iv. 129-157,241-244. 

6. Do the people wish reform? Forum^ March, 

1890 ; ix. 47-56. 



Old South Leaflets. 
18. Boston. D. C 
sm. 8^. pp. 28. 



Instructor in History. 

I. The gild merchant: a contribution to British 
municipal history. 2 vols. Oxford. Claren- 
don Press. 8®. 



An anonymous translation, under the title *' Wie Yolk nnd 
Politiker zur Civil-dienst Reform stehen," appeared in the 
BelUtrUHnche Journal, 19, 26 MXrz, 1890. 

7. Harvard College and the First Church in Cam- 
bridge. Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc. 2d series, 
V. 396-416. — Cambridge Tribune souvenir 
number^ June, 1890. pp. 5, 6. 

Also in two separate reprints. 



20 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



8. Governroent and tariff in Canada. Niattony 

1 May, 1890; 1. 348,849. 

9. The status of athletics in American colleges. 

Atlantic Mo. July, 1890; Ixti. 63-71. 



Henry Barker Hill. 

Professor of Chemdstry. 

I. Zur constitution der Methylbrenzschleimsaure. 
With W. S. Hendrixson. £er, deutsch. 
chem, Oesellsch, (March, 1890) ; zziii. 452. 

WlUiaa Barker HUU. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

1. Report on medical chemistry. Boston Med. 

and Surg. Joum. 3 July, 1890 ; cxxlii. 6-10. 

OllTer Wendell Hebnee. 

Parkman Professor of Anatomy^ Emeritus. 

z. Over the teacups, ii.-xii. Atlantic Mo. Jan.- 
Nov. 1890; Ixv., Ixvi. 

No. i. was published in March, 1888. 

Tlie following pocnu are contained in these papers: — To 
the eleven ladies who presented roe witli a silver loving cnp 
on the 29t)i of August, hdccclzzxix. Jan. ; Ixv. 121. — After 
the curfew. Feb.; Ixv. 243. — Cacoetlies scribeudi. March; 
ixv. 412. — The rose and the fern. April; Ixv. 560. — I like 

Jon and I lovejrou. May; Ixv. 703. — Too voung for love, 
uly ; Ixvi. 105. — The broomstick train ; or, tne return of the 
witches. Aug. ; Izvi. 246. — Tartarus. ' Sept. ; Ixvi. 899. — At 
the turn of tlie road. Oct. ; Ixvi. 547. — Invita Minerva. 
Nov. ; Ixvi. 671. 

2. Ralph Waldo Emerson. Chamher^s Encyclo- 

ptedia. 



Joka Homaiu* 

Clinical Instructor in the Diagnosis and Treat' 
ment of Ovarian Tumors. 

I. Appendicitis, or typhloSnteritis. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Joum. 16, 23, 80 Jan. 1890; cxxii. 
54, 77, 109. 

a. Case of multiple fibroid tumor of the uterus 
removed by laparotomy. Recovery. Ibid. 
3 April, 1890; cxxii. 323. 

3. Two rare dislocations. Ibid. 29 May, 1890; 
cxxii. 522. 



Franklin Henrjr Hooper, 

Clinical Instructor in La/ryngology. 

1. A combined nasal snare and ^craseur. Boston 

Med. and Surg. Journ. 19 Dec. 1889 ; cxxi. 
606, 607, cut. 

2. Tumors of the septum narium. Joum. Re- 

spiratory Organs ^ April, 1890. 

OllTor Wkipple Hnntlnffton. 

Instructor in Mineralogy and Chemistry. 

I. A talk about meteorites. Pop. Sci. Mo. July, 
1890 ; xxxvii. 366-374. 



Alpkena Hyatt* 

Assistant in Palaeontology at the Museum of 
Comparative ZoSlogy. 

X. Curator's report on the museum. Proc. Bos- 
ton Soc. Nat. Hist. May 1890; xxviii. 1-19. 

a. Genesis of the Arietidae, Mem. Mus, Comjp. 
Zo'ol. Nov. 1889; vol. xvi. no. 3. pp. xii. 238, 
plates 14, tables 6, figs. 35. — Smithsonian 
Contrib. to Knowledge ^ no. 673 , pp. 238. 



Gkarles Iiorlnc JaokMin. 

Professor of Chemistry. 

I. Ueber die sogenannte anilintrisulfosaure. With 
6. T. Hartshorn. Ber. deutsch, chem. Oe^ 
sellsch. xxiii. 2143. 

a. The reactions of sodic alcoholates with tri- 

bromdinitrobenzol and tribromtrinitrobenzol. 

With W. H. Warren. Proc. Am. Acad. xxv. 

164-191. 

Nob. 3 and 5 to 9 of last year's report have been repabliahed 
in Am. Chem. Journal: 3. xi. 448-456; 5. 541-557; 6. xii. 
7-22; 7. 164-182; 8. 189-807; g. 307-818. 



Hans Carl GUntker von Jage; 

Assistant Professor of German. 

z. Separable compound verbs in German. Mod. 
Lang. Notes, Jan. 1890; v. 1-10. 

a. Professor Von Jagemann is an associate editor 
of Modem Language Notes. 



WlUiaa Ji 

Professor of Psychology. 

I. The principles of psychology. New York. 
Henry Holt & Co. 1890. 2 vols. 8*". pp. xii. 
689, 704. 

a. The hidden self. Scribner's Mag. March, 
1890; vii. 361-373. 

3. The importance of individuals. Open Court, 
7 Aug. 1890; iv. 2437. 

Georce Iiyman Kittredc** 

Instructor in English. 

I. A brief history of the English language. By 
James Hadley. Revised by George Lyman 
Kittredge. Webster*s International Diction- 
O'Ty of the English Language. Springfield. 
1890. pp. xxix.-xliv. 

a. Anmerkungen zum mittelenglischen Ipomadon. 
Englische Studien. Heilbronn. 1890. xiv. 
386-392. 

3. Zwei Berichtigungen. I. Alexanderbruch- 

stiicke. II. Robin Hood and the Monk. 
Ibid. 392, 393. 

4. On Marlowe's Tamburlaine. Mod. Lang. 

Notes, May, 1890; v. 272, 273. 

5. Edited, with E. S. Sheldon and S. Primer, 

Dialect Notes. Published by the American 
Dialect Society. Parte I., II. Boston. 1890. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



21 



6. Harrard College. 1882-90. Secretary's Re- 
port, Class o/18a2. No. III. Boston, April, 
1890; pp. 102-110. 

Reprinted in CUu9 cf 1879, Secretary's Report, No. IV. 
pp. XTL-xxiv., and in (7te«« of 1880, Secretary's Report, 
Ko.rV. pp.ll&-lSi. 

Pldllp Coombs Kiutpp. 

Clinical Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous 

System, 

1. lodism and Byphilis. Therapeutic Gazette, 

Jane, 1889. 

2. Recent progress in the pathology of the 

nerrons system. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 10, 17 Oct. 1889; cxxi. 359, 386. 

3. Methods of examination in medico-legal cases 

InTolving suits for damages for real or sup- 
posed injuries to the brain and spinal cord. 
• Ihid. 19, 26 Dec. 1889 ; cxxi. 697, 625. 
Ako reprint: Boston. DaoireU & Upham. 12*. pp.24. 

4. What galvanometer should be used in the 

Apostoli method of the treatment of uterine 
fibroids? Ibid. 9 Jan. 1890; cxxii. 81. 

5. The insanity of doubt. Am, Joum, of Psy- 

diology, Jan. 1890; iii. 1. * 
Also reprint. 8*. pp. 8S. 

6. The family treatment of the chronic insane. 

Boston Med, and Surg, Joum. 13 Feb. 1890 ; 
cxxii. 149-161. 

7. Accidents from the electric current: a con- 

tribution to the study of the action of 
currents of high potential upon the human 
organism. Ibid. 17, 24 April, 1890; cxxii. 
365, 392. 
Also reprint : Boflton. Damrell <& Uphain. 12". pp.48. 

8. Injuries from electrical currents. Ibid, 15 

May, 1890 ; cxxii. 484. 

9. Also various reviews of works on diseases of 

the nervous system in the Boston Medical 
and Surgical Journal, with editorials, etc. 

Frodorlok Irvliic Knlftht. 

Clinical Professor of Laryngology. 

I. The climatic treatment of bronchial asthma. 
Trans, Am, Climatolog. Assoc. 1889 ; p. 159. 

NoTB. — For article by Professor G. M. Lane see p. 5, 
Bare. Studies in Class, Philol. 

William Coolidco JLaao, 

Assistant Librarian, 

I. Dante bibliography for the year 1889. Ninth 
Ann, Kept. Dante Society. Cambridge. 
1890; pp. 21-46. 

a. The Dante collections in the Harvard College 

and Boston Public Libraries. Cambridge. 

1890. 8*. pp. 116. 

Bibliographical contributions of Harvard College Library, 
no. 34. Bepriuted from the ELarvard UniTcrsity Bulletin. 

. 3. Catalogue of a collection of works on ritualism 
and doctrinal theology, presented by John 
Harvey Treat. Cambridge. 1889. 8*». pp.29. 

Bibliographical contributions of Harvard College Library, 
no. 36. 

4. Review of Wheatley's '* How to catalogue a 
library." Library Journal, March, 1890; 
XV. 72-74. 



Chriatopkor Columbiu liancdoU. 

Dane Professor of Law, 

I, A brief survey of equity jurisdiction. Harvard 
Law Review, Jan. 1890; iii. 237. 

Oluurloo Rockwell liftiiman. 

Professor of Sanskrit, 

I. The beginnings of Hindu pantheism: an ad- 
dress delivered at the twenty-second annual 
meeting of the American Philological Asso- 
ciation, Norwich, Connecticut, July 8, 1890, 
by the president. Cambridge. C W. Sever. 
1890. 



William liftwronoo. 

Preacher to the University. 

X. Report of the Faculty of the Episcopal Theo- 
logical School, Cambridge, Mass. Catalogue 
Epise, Theol, School, 1889-90. 

Also printed separately. 

Daniol Dawid I«oe. 

Instructor in Anatomy at the School of Veterinary 

Medicine. 

I. Six cases of tumors. Joum. Comp. Med, and 
Vet. Archives (Phila.), Jan. 1890. 

a. The present attitude of veterinarians on the 
subject of tuberculosis. Ibid. March, 1890. 

Also printed in the report of the Cattle Conmiisgiouers of 
Mas8aciiusctts, entitled Tuberculosis: its relations to agri- 
cultural industry and public A< alth. May, 1890. 

James Rnasoll LowoU. 

Smith Professor of the French and Spanish Lan- 
guages and Literatures, and Professor of Belles- 
Lettres, Emeritus. 

I. In a volume of Sir Thomas Browne. Atlantic 
Mo. July, 1890; Ixvi. 63. 

a. For a memorial bust of Fielding. Ibid. Sept. 
1890; Ixvi. 322. 

3. Introduction to : The complete angler, or the 
contemplative man's recreation of Izaak 
Walton, and Charles Cotton. Boston. Little, 
Brown & Co. 1889. 2 vols. 

David Ctordon L jon* 

Ilollis Professor pf Divinity. 

t. Notice of F. E. Peiser's Keilschriftliche Acten- 
stiicke. Proc. Am. Orient. Sac. May, 1890; 
p. xviii. 

Alozandor MoBlob^Io. 

Preacher to the University. 

X. Address at the installation of Uev. Lyman 
Abbott, D.D., Brooklyn, N. Y., Jan. 16, 
1890. 
Pablished with other addresses on tlie occasion. 



22 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



2. Sennon on Mary and Martha in ^amhridge 

Chronicle, 15 March, 1890. 

3. Address at the 225th anniversary of the First 

Church in Newton, Oct. 7, 1889. 
Pobliahed with other addressen on the occasion. 

SUab Maronfl llaovaae. 

McLean Professor of Ancient and Modem 

History. 

z. The working principles of political economy. 
New York. Maynard. 16*. pp. x. 392. 

Ed^rard lianrens Mark. 

Hersey Professor of Anatomy. 

z. Studies on Lepidosteus. Part I. Bull. Mus. 
Comp. Zo'dl. Feb. 1890; xix. no. 1, pp. 1-128, 
plates 9. 

OontributUma from the Zodlofficat Laboratory of Uu Mu- 
geum of (Jomparatiw Zodtogy, no. xv. 

a. Dr. Mark supervised the preparation and pub- 
lication of Nos. XVI. and xvii. of the Con- 
tributions from the Zo'ol. Laboratory, etc. 
See p. 10. 



Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

I. Cases of sub-diaphragmatic abscess, in one 
instance containing air and simulating pneu- 
mothorax. Autopsies. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Journ. 31 Oct. 1889 ; cxxi. 449, 469. 

a. A case of pyo-pneumothorax with operation 
and recovery. Ibid. 7 Nov. 1889 ; cxxi. 467. 

3. Influenza in Boston in 1889-90, especially as 
it appeared at the Boston City Hospital. Ibid. 
6 Feb. 1890 ; cxxii. 145-148. 

Adolph CMipar Miller. 

Instructor in Political Economy. 

I. The conversion of the English debt. Quar- 
terly Journ. EconomicSy July, 1890; iv. 487. 

GkarleB Sedswlok Minot. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Ernbryology. 

z. Segmentation of the ovum with especial ref- 
erence to the mammalia. Am. Naturalist, 
June, Sept. 1889; xxiii. 463-481, 753-769. 

a. The use of the njicroscope and the value of 
embryology. Canadian Practitioner, 1890. 

3. The national medical dictionary. By J. S. 

Billings, M.D. , assisted by C. S. Minot, M.D., 
and others. Philadelphia. Lea Bros. & Co. 
1890. 2 vols. 8*". pp. 731, 799. 

4. Die Placenta des Kaninchens. Biol. Centralbl. 

X. 114-122. 

5. Die Entstehung der Arten durch raumliche 

Sonderung. Von Mori tz Wagner. [Review.] 
Science, 16 May, 1890; xv. 306-306. 

6. Evolution of the medullary canal. Am. NcU- 

uralist, Nov. 1889 ; xxiii. 1019-1021. 



7. Growth and age. Annual of the Med. Sciences, 

u. 4. 

8. The concrescence theory of the vertebrate 

embryo. Am. Naturalist, xxiv. 501-516, 
617-629. 

Georc^ How a rd Ifomka. 

Assistant in Operative Surgery. 

z. A case of appendicitis in the scrotum. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. June, 1890; cxxii. 
443, 444. 

Also printed separutelj' : Boston. 1890. 10". pp. 4. 

Gkarles Herbert Moore. 

Instructor in Draunng and the Principles of 

Design. 

z. Development and character of Gothic architec- 
ture. London and New York. Macmillan 
& Co. S*'. pp. 333, illustr. 

2. Materials for landscape art in America. At- 

lantic Mo. Nov. 1889; Ixiv. 670-681. 

MorrlB Hiokjr Ifersaa. 

Tvior in Greek. 

1. Two editions of Andocides. Classical Review, 
March, 1890; iv. 118. 

a. De ignis eliciendi modis apud antiquos. Har- 
vard Studies in Classical Philology , 1890; 
i. 13-64, illustr. 

Jolui Gnatmiitcs Ifimro. 

Assistant in Anatomy. 

I. An analysis of three hundred and thirty-three 
cases of head injury admitted to the Boston 
City Hospital between January 1, 1877, and 
January 1, 1887. Collated and analyzed by 
Drs. R. W. Lovett and J. C Munro. Medical 
and Surgical Reports of the City Hospital 
of the Ctty of Boston, 1889 ; ser. iv. 9-27. 

a. Report of twenty-four cases of acute miliary 
tuberculosis. Ti-ans. Sixth Annual Meeting 
Am. Climatological Assoc. 1889 ; p. 14. 

Frank Walter Nioolaoa. 

Instructor in Latin. 

I. On the interpretation of Aristoph. Ach. 849. 
Proc. Am. Philol. Assoc. 1889; pp. xx.-xxi. 

Gharlet Eliot Norton. 

Professor of the History of Art. 

1. Eleventh annual report of the Archaeological 
Institute of America. May, 1890. 8"*. 

a. The building of the church of St. Denis. 
Harper's New Monthly Mag. Oct. 1889; 
Ixxix. 766-776, illustr. 

3. The building of the cathedral at Chartres. 

Ibid. Nov. 1889; Ixxix. 944-955, illustr. 

4. Harvard University in 1890. Hamper's New 

Monthly Mag. Sept. 1890; Ixxxi. 581-^92. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



23 



Instructor in Oreek and Latin, 

X. Handbook of Latin writing. By Henry Preble 
and C. P. Parker. Revised edition. Boston. 
Ginn & Co. 11^ 1890. 



Instructor in Zoology. 

X. The histology and development of the eye in 
the lobster. . Bull, Comp. Zodl. May, 1890; 
zx. no. 1, pp. 1-60, plates 4. 

2. Report upon the organisms, excepting the bac- 

teria, found in the waters of the state. July, 
1887, to June, 1889. Report Mass. StcUe 
Board of Health on Water supply and Sewer- 
agcy Dec. 1889 ; i. 579-620. 

3. Report of the Biologist (on the water supply 

of Springfield) . Twenty-first annueU Report 
Mass, State Boa/rd of Health, 1890; pp. 45- 
47. 

Aadiww Preatom Peabodjr* 

Ptecu^r to the University y and Plummer Professor 
of Christian Morals, Emeritus. 

X. Harvard graduates whom I have known. Bos- 
ton, eU. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1890. 9^, 
pp. 255. See p. 31. 

2. Sermon commemorative of Rev. Henry Wilder 

Foote, preached at King's Chapel, June 9, 
1889. Boston. 1890. 

3. Fires in American cities, reprinted from the 

International Review, Jan. 1874. Boston. 
Damrell, Upham & Co. 1890. 8<l pp. 27. 

4. The Farmer's Weekly Museum. Proc. Am. 

Antiq. Soc. at the annual meeting, Oct. 28, 
1889. Worcester. 1890; pp. 104-129. 

5. Preaching. Homiletie Review, J An., "Feb. IS90. 

6. Formative influences. Forum%y Aug. 1890. 

7. The first mayor of Cambridge : James Diman 

Green (H. U. 1817). The Cambridge Tri- 
bune souvenir number, June, 1890 ; pp. 4. 

8. Report of the Council of the American Anti- 

quarian Society, 28 Oct. 1889. pp. 81. 

Fraaela Gve«awood Peabodjr. 

Plummer Professor of Christian Morals. 

X. Industrial cooperation in England. Forwm, 
Nov. 1889 ; viu. 274-285. 

2. Creation waiting for the sons of God. A ser- 
mon. Christian Union, 15 May, 1890. 

3-5. Vesper addresses : The Christian life in the 
present age. — Follow thou me. — Vision. 
Christian Register, August, 1890. 

Benjamin Ossood Pelroe. 

Hollis Professor of MaihemcUics and Natural 

Philosophy, 

1, Elements of the theory of the Newtonian po- 
tential function. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1890. 

This is an enlarged edition ; the original wan publiBbed in 
1886. 



a. Note on the measurement of the internal re- 
sistance of batteries. With R. W. Willson. 
Am. Joum. Sci, Dec. 1889 ; 8d ser. xxzviii. 
465-468. 



Edward Gharlea Piokerinc* 

Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy, and 
Director of the Astronomical Observatory. 

X. Circular on aid to astronomical ^research. 
Cambridge. 1890. 

Reprinted in Nature, xlii. 299, The Observatory, xiii. 286, 
and Sidereal Mettenger, ix. 329. 

2. Henry Draper memorial. Fourth annual 

report of the photographic study of stellar 
spectra conducted at the Harvard College 
Observatory. Edward C. Pickering, Director. 
Cambridge. 1890. 

Reprinted in the Memoria delta Socieid degli Spettrot' 
copUH Italiani, xix. 86. 

3. 8ur les r^snltats photom^triques auzquels pent 

conduire la photographie celeste. Bull, du 
Comiti International Permanent pour Vexi- 
euiion photographique de la Carte du del 
(Paris), 1890; 5«« fasc. 350. 

4. Letter to Admiral Mouchez. Ibid. pp. 871. 

5. On the spectrum of ^ Ursae Majoris. Am. 

Joum. Sci. Jan. 1890 ; 8d ser. czxxix. 46, 47- 

Reprinted in The Observatory, xiii. 80, and Sidereal Me%- 
eenger, ix. 80. 

6. Photographic chart of the heavens. The Ob- 

servatory, xil. 875. 

7. New variable star in Cygnus. Sidereal Mes- 

senger, ix. 232. 

8. Southern stars having peculiar spectra. Astron, 

Nachrichten, cxxiii. 95. 

9. Spectrum of Pleione. Ibid, cxxiii. 95. 

10. Variable star in cluster G. C. 3636. Ibid. 
cxxiii. 207. 

XX. The star 12»»- 18">-0 — 48° 43' (1875.0) Ibid, 
cxxiv. 22. 

xa. New class of binary stars. Manthly Notices of 
the Royal Astronomical Society, 1. 296. 

13. Forty-fourth annual report of the Astronom- 
ical Observatory of Harvard College. Cam- 
bridge. rB90. pp. 11. 



William Henrjr Piokwlsc. 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

X. Efficiency of photographic telescopes. Knowl- 
edge, Dec. 1889 ; p. 35. 

a. Great nebula in Orion. Sidereal Messenger^ 
1890; p. 1. 

3. Occultation of Jupiter. Ibid. 1890; p. 148. 

4. Photographs of the surfkce of Mars. Ibid. 

1890; p. 254. 

5. Use of the swing-back versus the sliding-front. 

International Annual of Anthony*s Bulletin, 
1890 ; p. 252. 

6. Visual observation of the surface of Mars. 

Sidereal Messenger, 1890 ; p. 369. 



24 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Gharlas BunhAia Part«r. 

P^'oftssor of Clinical Surgery. 

z. Clinical surgery case book. Boston. J. S. 
Parkhill & Co. 1889. 

a. Report of two cases of operation for recurring 
appendicitis in the period of remission. 
Trans, Am. Surg, Assoc, viii. 160. 

3. Fracture of the skull. Boston Med. and Surg. 

Journal, 10 April, 1890; cnii. 387-339. 

4, Extroversion of the bladder. Journ. Am. Med. 

Assoc. 1890 ; xiv. 529. 

Fredeiiok Wftrd Putnam* 

Peabody Professor of American Archaeology and 
Ethnology, and Curator of the Peabody Museum 
of American Archaeology and Ethnology. 

I. Prehistoric remains In the Ohio valley. Cen- 
tury Mag. ^arch, 1890; xxxiz. 698-703, 
illustr. • 

a. The Serpent mound of Ohio. Ibid. April, 
189Q; ixxii. 871-888, illustr. 

3. The Peabody Museum of American Archae- 

ology and Ethnology in Cambridge. Read at 
the meeting of the American Antiquarian 
Society, Oct. 1889. Proc. Am. Antiq. Soc. 
N.8. vol. vi. pt. 2. 
Also printed separately : Worcester. 1890. 8*. pp. 18. 

4. Remarks upon the Nanipa image. Proc^ Boston 

Soc. Nat. Hist. 1890; xxiv. 

5. American ethnology : an interesting sugges- 

tion for the Columbian exposition. Chicago 
Tribune, 31 May, 1890. 

6. Suggestions relating to an ethnographical exhi- 

bition, 8ubmitte<l by F. W. Putnam, Profes- 
sor of American Archaeology and Ethnology 
in Harvard University. Appendix to the 
report of the Committee on Permanent Or- 
ganization submitted to the meeting of the 
Commissioners of the World's Columbian 
Exposition, Sept. 1.5, 1890. Chicago. 1890. 

Reprinted by the newspapers of Chicago, Boston, New 
York, and other places. 

James Jaokson Putnam. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous System. 

I. Three cases of cerebral tumor, with autopsies. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 10 April, 
1890 ; cxxii. 339-345. 

a. On the frequency with which arsenic is found 
in the urine ; with notes on some new cases 
of poisoning from wall-papers and fabrics. 
Ibid. 1 May, 1890; cxxii. 421-424. 

3. A form of polyneuritis, probably analogous to 
or identical with beri-beri, occurring in sea- 
faring men in northern latitudes. Ibid. 11 
Sept. 1890; cxxiii. 244-247. 

Edward Reynolds. 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 

I. A case of septic peritonitis promptly relieved 
by Epsom salts. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 13 March, 1890; cxxii. 263. 



a. A case of rudimentary uterus. Ibid. 

3. A case of labor in an obliquely contracted, 

anchylosed pelvis. Am. Journ. Obstet. yol. 
xxiii. no. 7. 

4. On the frequency of contracted pelvis among 

American women, deduced from 2227 cases 
of labor. Trans. Am. Gynaecological Soc. 
part 15, 1890. 

Theodore William Bieliards. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

X. The analysis of cupric bromide, and the atomic 
weight of copper. Proc. Am. Acad. xxv. 
195-214. 

a. On cupric oxybromide. Ibid. xxv. 216-217. 

Contributions frofn the Chemical Laboratory of Harvard 
College. 

Manrioe Howe Biohardaon. 

Assistant Professor of Anaiomy. 

I. A successful case of gastrotomy for removal of 
foreign bodies. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 21 Aug. 1890; cxxui. 177, 178. 

Jolm Bitohie, Jr. 

Assistant in the Observatory in charge of the 
DistHbution of Astronomical Information. 

1. Composed, edited, and published Science Ob- 

server special circulars, nos. 88-92. Boston. 
8** 

Contents : 1889. 88. Discovery, elements, and ephemeris 
of comet /, 1889, Swift (George Scarle) . 26 Nov. — 80. Dis- 
covery, positioDR, and orbit of cornet^, 1889, Boirelly (Zclbr) . 
27 Dec — 1890. 90. Discover)', elements, Riid ^hemeris 
of comet a, 1890, Brooks (Wra. Bellamy). 29 March. — 91. 
Discovery, positions, and orbit of comet 6, 1890, Co^gia 
(Wm. Bellamy); discovery of comet c, 1890, Dennmsr. 
25 July. — 9a. Elements and ephemeris of comet c, 1890, 
Denning (LeuHchner and Wm. Bellamy) . 6 Aug. 

2. Science Observer international circulars, nos. 

32-34. Berlin, Germany. 8°. 

Contents: 1889. 39. Elements and ephemeris of comet/, 
1889, Swift (George Searle). 26 Nov. — 1890. 33. Elements 
and ephemeris of comet a, 1890, Brooks (Wm. Bellamy). 
29 March. — 34. Elements and ephemeris of comet b, 1800, 
Coggia (Wm. Bellamy). 

3. Report of Councillor of Art. (Appalachian 

Mountain Club.) Appalcuhia, vol. vi. no. 1. 

4. Report of Excursion Committee. Ibid. vol. 

vi. no. 1. 



Joka Career Rolfe. 

Instructor in Greek and Latin. 

I. The scientific knowledge of the ancient Greeks 

and Romans. Popular Science News, Dec. 

1889, Jan. Feb. March, 1890; xxiii. 180, 

xxiv. 6, 21, 37. 
a. Arithmetical calculations among the ancient 

Greeks and Romans. Ibid. Aug. 1890 ; xxiv. 

114. 

3. Report on excavations at Anthedon. Am. 
■ Journ. Archaeology, March-June, 1890; vi. 

96. 

4. Report on excavations at Thisbe. Ibid. 112. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



25 



5. A new fragment of the preamble to Diocletian's 

edict, **De pretiis rerum venalinm." With 
F. B. TarbeU- Ibid, Dec. 1889 ; v. 428. 

6. Inscriptions from Plataia. With F. B. Tarbell. 

Ibid, March-Jane, 1890; vi. 108. 

7. Inscriptions from Thisbe. With F. B. Tarbell. 

Ibid. 113. 

8. Beport on excavations at Plataia. With C. 

Waldstein and F. B. Tarbell. Ibid, Dec. 
1889 ; T. 489. 

9. Heaaton Timommenos of Terence. Text. 

Edited with stage directions by J. C. Rolfe. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1890. 12'*. pp. 61. 

Abbott liawTMioe Rotch^ 

Assistant in Meteorology. 

X. Observations made at the Blue Hill Meteoro- 
logical Observatory, Massachusetts, U. S. A., 
in the y^r 1889. Cambridge, 1890. 4". 
pp. xiii. 1-76, map, 

"Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of IlarTanl 
College," XXX, 1. 

a. American Meteorological Journal. An illus- 
trated monthly devoted to scientific meteor- 
ology and allied branches of study. Edited 
by M. W. Harrington, A, Lawrence Rotch, 
and W. J. Herdman, M.D. Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 

3. Meteorology at the Paris exposition. Am, 

Met. Journ. Nov., Dec. 1889; vi. 292-30P, 
862-^68. 

4. The international meteorological congress at 

Paris. Ibid. Feb. 1890; vi. 473-485. 

5. The international hydrological and climatolog- 

ical congress at Paris. Ibid. April, 1800; 
vi. 659-662. 

6. Mr. Rotch has also contributed reviews and 

translations to the Am. Met, Journ. 



Tbomas MorKaB Rotoh. 

Assistant Professor of Children's Diseases, 

1. The management of human brenst-nnlk in 

cases of difficult infantile digestion. Trans. 
Am, Pediatric Soc in the Archives of Pedi- 
atrics, Nov. 1890; p. 841. 

2. Report on diseases of children. Boston Med. 

and Surg, Journ, 2 Jan. 1890; cxxii. 8-10. 

Joaiah Rojoe. 

Assistant Professor in Philosophy, 

X. Address before the Harvard Club of Minne- 
sota at St. Paul, June 28, 1890. Printed by 
the Club. St. Paul. 1890. sq. 16°. pp. (16). 

2. A neglected study. Harvard Monthly, July, 
1890; X. 169-179. 

WallMM Clement SaUne. 

Assistant in Physics. 

1. Electrical oscillations in air. Witli John 
Trowbridge. Proc. Am. Acad. 1890; xxv. 
109-123. 



Instrv^or in Philosophy. 

X. Lotze's moral idealism. Mind, April, 1890; 
XV. 191-212. 

2. Souvenir: from tlie French of Alfred de 

Mnsset. Harvard Monthly, March, 1890; 
X. 8-14. 

3. Walt Whitman : a dialogue. Ibid, May, 1890 ; 

X. 86-92. 

Charles Sprague Sarsei&t. 

Arnold Professor of Arboriculture, 

X. The silva of North America : a description of 

the trees which grow naturally in North 

America exclusive of Mexico. Illustrated 

with figures and analyses drawn from nature 

by Charles Edward Faxon, and engraved by 

Philibert and Eugene Picard. Vol. i. Mag- 

noliaeea to Ilicinece. Boston. Houghton, 

Mifliin & Co. 1890. 4«. 

It is proposed to fiDish this work in twelve volumes, each 
with fifty mil page plates. 

a. Garden and Forest. A journal of horticulture, 

landscape art, and forestry. Conducted iiy 

C. S. Sargent. New York. 1889-90. t°. 

niustr. 

Published weekly. Professor Sargent has contributed, be- 
sides much unsigned matter, the following signed articles : — 

1889. (Vol. ii.) Notes upon some North American trees, 
xii. 2 Oct, ill. — Abii Fra»erl, ibid. 472. — Notes upon some 
North American trees, xiii., xlv. 0, 16 Oct. 484, 496. — The 
bur oak, 16 Oct. 497. — New or little-known plants : Spiraea 
Mille/oUum, 23 Oct. 509. — rtft»*r»i//«» lnni<inoidf9, Nor. 
631. — Borne Japanese trees in New England, 6 Nov. 537. — 
New or little-known plants : Staphyleu Bolanderi, 13 Nov. 
644; Viburnum Sieboldii, 20 Nov. 656; Yucca elata, 2mov. 
568. — The river birch, 11 Dec. 591. 

1890. (Vol. ill.) New or little-known plants : Viburnum 
paucfflorum, 1 Jan. 4; Hydrangea veittiia, var. 8 Jan. 16. — 
The nettle tree, 22 Jan. 39. — New or little-known plants: 
Picea Bretreriana, ft Feb. 63. — Viburmim pubeftcen»y 12 
Mar. 124. — New or little-known plants : Syrinpa Pekineuiui, 
2 April, 164. — Notes on some North American trees, xvi. 
16 April, 186. — Two American honeysuckles, ibid. 187.— 
New or little-known plant^i: BucMeya dlHtichophylla^ 14 
May, 336; Berberin Sieboldii, 21 May, 248. — Notes on some 
North American tree?, xvii. 28 May, 261. — New or little- 
known plants: Symphoricarj)U9 otcidentalin, 18 June, 206. 

— Notes on some Nortli American troefs, xviii. 9 July, .3i}l. — 
New or little-known plants : Ptelea nptera, ibid. 332. —Notes 
on some North American trees, xix. xx. 16, 23 July, 344, 3.55. 
—New or little-known plant<< : Rona vmltiflora, 20 Aue. 404. 

— Pyrwt arbutijtora, 27 Aug. 416, — Ne'w or little-known 
plants : a curiouM form o( Kalmia, 17 Sept. 452. 

3. Report of the Director of the Arnold Arhor- 
etum to the President of Harvard College. 
Reports of the President and Treasurer of 
Harvard College foi' 1888-89. 

Dudley Alien Sars^at. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Training, and 
Director of the Hemenway Gymnasium. 

X. The system of physical training at the Hemen- 
way Gyrana«ium. Physical training. A full 
report of the papers and discussions of the 
Conference held in Boston in November, 1889. 
Boston. Ellis. 1890. 8^; pp. 62-76. 

a. The physical test of a man. Pi'oc. Am, Assoc. 
Adv. Phys. Education, 5th annual meeting 
at Cambridge and Boston, 4, 5 April, 1890. 
Ithaca. 1890; pp. 36-52. 



26 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



3. The gymnaaium of a great univeraity. The 
Cosmopolitan t May, 1890. Illusir, 

William SohoilelcL 

Instructor in Roman Law^ and in Torts, 

z. Davies v. Mann : theory of contributory neg- 
ligence. Harvard Law Revieto, Jan. 1890 ; 
Ui. 283. 

Charles Looke Soi&ddar. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, 

z. A report of eighteen cases of chronic disease 
of the ankle and tarsns, with observations 
npon the operative treatment. Trans, Am, 
Orthopaedic Assoc, ii. 53. — Boston Med. and 
Surg. Journ, 80 Jan., 6 Feb. 1890; cxxii. 
100, 123. 

Bead at the third annaal meeting of the American Ortho- 
paedic Asftooiation. 

2. A determination of the strength of the back 

mnscles in growing g^rls. Its relation to the 
etiology of lateral spinal curvature. Trans, 
Am, Orthopa^edic Assoc, iii. 

3. A report of two cases of congenital dislocation 

of the shoulder-joint. Archives of Pedi- 
atrics, April, 1890. 

Arthur Searle. 

Phillips Professor of Astronomy, 

z. Observations of the zodiacal light made at 
Harvard College Observatory. Astron. NcLchr 
richten, czxiv. 405. 

WUliaa Alhwt Setohell. 

Assistant in Biology. 

I, Concerning the structure and development of 
Tuomeyaflu^atiliSf Harv. Proc, Am, Acad, 
XXV. 53-68. 

Arthur Bliss Seya&onr. 

Assistant in the Cryptogamic Herbarium. 

I. Economic fungi. A series of specimens de- 
signed chiefly to illustrate the fungus diseases 
of useful and noxious plants. Fasc. I. nos. 
1-50. Edited and published by A. B. Sey- 
mour and F. S. Earle. Cambridge. Jan. 1, 
1890. 1. S** 

a. A race of flowerless plants: Fungi. I.-V. 
Am. Garden, Feb. March, April, May, June, 
1890; xi. 79, 135, 215, 276, 353, illustr. 

3. Damping oS. Ibid. June, 1890; xi. 349, 

illustr. 
See alM> p. 17, W. G. Farlow. 

Nathaaial Somthsate Shalsr. 

Professor of Geology. 

z. Aspects of the earth; a popular account of 
some familiar geological phenomena. New 
York. 1889. 1. 8« pp. xix. 344, illiuir. 68. 

" The greater part of the OAsays iu this volume have already 
been printed in Scribner^n Magatine: tlic laxt chapter, that 
conceruing soilti had not been before printed, and to others 
conaideraDie additions have been made."— Prtfact. 



2. The geology of the island of Mt. Desert, Me. 
f Eighth annucU report of the Director of the 

*? U. S. Geol, Survey. Washftigton. 1889 ; 
pp. 987-1061, maps 2, illustr. 30. 

3. Soils of Massachusetts. A lecture delivered 

at the annual meeting of the Massachusetts 
State Board of Agriculture, Feb. 6, 1890. 
Boston. Wright & Potter. 1890. pp. 16. 

4. The topography of Florida, with a note by 

Alexander Agassiz. Bull. Mus. Comp. Zodl, 
July, 1890; xvi. (Geol. series ii.) no 7. 
pp. 10, plate 1, 

5. Tertiary and cretaceous deposits of eastern 

Massachusetts. Bull. Geol, Soc, Am, i. 443- 
i62, plate 1, 

6. Common roads. 8cribner*s Ma^. Oct. 1889 ; 

vi. 473-483. 

7. The work of underground waters. Chautau- 

quanj Dec. 1889. 

8. College scientific expeditions. Ibid. 

9. School vacations. Atlantic Mo. Dec. 1889; 

Ixiv. 824-^83. 

zo. Science and the African problem. Ibid. July, 
1890 ; Ixvi. 36-46. 

zz. The use and limits of academic culture. Ibid. 
Aug. 1890; Ixvi. 160-170. 

za. Critical points in the continuity of natural phe- 
nomena. Unitarian Rev. Jan. 1890 ; xxxiii. 
1-18. 

Z3. Knees of the bald cypress. Garden and Porest, 
29 Jan. 1890 ; iii. 57. 

Z4. Rock gases. Arena, May, 1890. 

Z5. Glacial climate. Proc, Boston Soc, Nat, Hist, 
xxiv. 460-465. 

z6. Note on the value of saliferous deposits as 
evidence of former climatal conditions. Ibid. 
xxiv. 580-585. 

17, Nature and man in North America, I. Scrib- 
ntr^s Mag. Sept. 1890; viii. 360-376. 

Frederick Gheever Sliattaok* 

Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicime, 

I, Reports on progress in thoracic disease. Bos- 
ton Med. and Surg. Journ. 7 Nov. 1889, 
10 April, 1890; cxxi. 467, cxxii. 348. 

a. Some remarks opening a discussion on influ- 
enza. Ibid. 13 Feb. 1890 ; cxxii. 148. 

3. The relation of pneumonia to influenza in 

Boston. N. Y, Med, Journ. 14 June, 1890; 
p. 650. 

4. The modern methods of diagnosis in diseases 

of the stomach. Trans. Assoc. Am. Phys. 
1890 ; V. 232. — Boston Med. and Surg. Journ, 
5 June, 1890; cxxii. 539-541. 

5. A case of endocarditis secondary to colitis, 

with remarks. Boston Med. and Surg, Journ, 
24 July, 1890; cxxiii. 79. 

6. As associate editor, article on diseases of the 

mouth, stomach, liver, and pancreas, in the 
Annual of the Medical Sciences [Phila- 
phia], 1889. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



27 



Edwmrd Btmrmmm gheldaa, 

AsMtstani Professor of Romance Fhilology, 

I. The revised etymologies in Wehsier*s Tntema- 
tion€U Dictionary of the English Languoufe. 
Springfield. 1890. 

a. A New EngUnder's English and the English 
of London. Dialect Notes, 1890; part ii. 
38-42. 

3. Pennsylvania Qerman and the American Dia- 

lect Society. Mod. Lang, Notes, June, 1890 ; 
V. 188. 

4. Review of Helen L. Webster's " Zur Gattural- 

frage im Gotischen." Classical Review, Oct. 
1890; iv. 380. 

5. Professor Sheldon is one of the editors of 

Dialect Notes, published by the American 
Dialect Society. 



Daniel Pfimlaow Slade* 

Lecturer on Osteology. 

1. A New England country gentleman in the last 

century. New England Mag. March, 1890. 

2. Osteological notes. — Absence of the patella 

in the marsupials. Science, 25 July, 1890; 
xvi. 61. 

3. Water in landscape gardening. Garden and 

Forest, 9 July, 1890; iii. 330. 

4. One ** abandoned farm** less in New Hamp- 

shire. Nation, 4 Sept. 1890; li. 189. 



Clement lia* 



Professor of Latin and Dean of the College^ 

Facvity. 

z, a. College series of Latin authors. Edited by 
Clement Lawrence Smith and Tracy Peck. 

I. Tacitiu, the Annala. Books I.-VI. Edited, with iotro* 
dnction, notes, and indexes, by WiUUm Francis Allen, Pro- 
fe-asor of Ilistorv in the University of Wisconsin. Boston 
and London. Ginn & Company. 1890. 8*. pp. xlii. 444. 

9. Hie same (text edition). Edited and pobltshed as 
above. 8*. pp. 238. 

3. On Egregivm pvhliettm (Tacitus, Annals, iii. 

70. 4). Harvard Studies in ClassiccU Phi- 
lology, 1890; i. 107-110. 

4. Report of the Dean of the College Faculty. 

AnnucU Reports of the President and Treas- 
urer of Harvard College, 1888-89 ; pp. 38- 
100. 



Instructor in International Law. 

z. A defence of congressional government. Pa- 
pers Am. Hist. Assoc. July, 1890; iv. 109- 
128. 



Arthur H«Bry Stoddard. 

Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. 

z. Porcelidn fillings. Archives of Dentistry, 
March, 1890; vu. 110. 



Franois Hvatphrays Storer. 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, and Dean 
of the Bussey Institution. 

I. Obituary notice of Michel Eugene Chevreul. 
Ptoc. Am. Acad. 1889; xxiv. 452. 

Charlas Pratt Stroas. 

Assistant in Oynaecology. 

z. Cases illustrative of some of the more unusual 
forms of bladder disease among women. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 17 July, 
1890; cxxili. 53-55. 

Also printed separately. 

WUliaa Codman Stnrcis. 

Assistant in Cryptogamic Botany. 

z. On the carpologic structure and development 

of the OoUemaceae and allied groups. 1890. 

8^. pp. 52, illustr. 

Reprinted flrom the Proceedlngt of the American Academy 
of Art* and Science*, vol. xxv. no. 11. 

FrMteio C^sar da flhualahraat. 

Assistant Professor of French. 

1. Andromaque, trag^die en cinq actes, par Jean 
Racine. With introduction and notes. New 
York. W. R. Jenkins. 12*. pp. viii. 89. 

a. Horace, trag^die en cinq actes, par Pierre 
Corneille. With introduction and notes. 
New York. W. R. Jenkins. 12'. pp. ix. 101. 

3. L'Honneur et Targent, com^die en cinq actes, 

par Fran9ois Ponsard. With introduction 
and notes. New York. W. R. Jenkins. 12*1 
pp. V. 180. 

4. The untold word, — in vignettes, real and ideal. 

Boston. DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. 12**. pp57. 

5. Valkyrie in British waters. Outing, Oct. 

1889 ; XV. 40-44. 

6. Yacht racing in Great Britain. Ihid. April, 

May, 1890; xvi. 58-61, 96-102. 

7. Ladies at the helm. Ihid. June, 1890; xvi. 

184-189. 

8. Summer days in Cape Breton. Morning 

Chronicle (Halifax, N. S.). 

9. Letters from Boston. Ihid. 

Frank Blcalow TarbelL 

Instructor in Oreek. 

z. Inscriptions from Stamata in Attika. Am, 
Joum. Archaeology, 1889 ; v. 426. 

a. A new fragment of the preamble to Diocletian's 
edict, *'De pretiis rerum venalium." With 
J. C. Rolfe. Ihid. 428. 

3. Inscriptions from Anthedon. With C. D. Buck. 

Ihid. 443. 

4. Inscriptions from Platiua. With J. C. Rolfe. 

Ihid. 1890 ; vi. 108. 

5. Inscriptions from Thisbe. With J. C. Rolfe. 

Ihid. 113. 



28 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Frank WUliaa Taiuais. 

Assistant Professor of Political Economy. 

1. Translation, with commenta, of "An act con- 

cerning insurance against disability and old 
age." Quarterly Journal of Economies ^ 
Oct. 1889; iv. 103-128. 

2. Workmen's insurance in Germany. Forum^ 

Oct. 1889; viil. 159-169. 

3. The silyer situation in the United States. 

Quarterly Journal of Economics j April, 1890 ; 
iv. 291-815. 

4. Edited the Quarterly Journal of Economics 
. for 1889-90. 

James Bradley Thajer. 

Professor of Law. 

1. Presumptions and the law of evidence. Har- 

vard Law Review, Nov. 1889 ; iii. Ul-166. 

a. Notice of George P. Bradford. Boston Post, 
1 Feb. 1890. 

3. Judicial notice and the law of evidence. Ha/r- 

vard Law Review, Feb. 1890 ; iii. 285-812. 

4. Trial by jury of things supernatural. Atlantic 

Mo. April, 1890; Ixvi. 466-481. 

5. The burden of proof. Harvard Law Review, 

May, 1890 ; iv. 45. 

Joeeph Henry Thayer. 

Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism 
and Interpretation. 

X. Theodore D. Woolsey. Atlantic Mo» Oct. 
1889 ; Ixiv. 667-562. 

2. List of books for students of the New Testa- 

ment. Cambridge. John Wilson & Son. 
1890. 12* pp. iv. 58. 

3. Haverford College Studies. Numbers 1 and 2. 

Published by the Faculty of Haverford Col- 
lege. Noticed in the Andover Review, Feb. 
1890; xiii. 231. 

4. Geschichte des Jiidischen Volkes im Zeitalter 

Jesu Christi. Von D. Emil Schiirer. . . . 
ErsterTheil. Erste Halite. Leipzig. 1889. 
Reviewed in the Andover Review, March, 
1890 ; xiii. 840. 

5. Novum Testamentum Graece. . . . Constan- 

tinus Tischendorf. Editio octava critica 
maior. Vol. iii. Prolegomena. Scripsit 
C. R. Gregory, additis curis fEzrae Abbot. 
Pars altera. Leipzig. 1890. Noticed in the 
Andover Review, April, 1890; xiii. 462. 

6. H KAINH AIAOHKH. Novum TesUmentum, 

etc. Oxon. 1889. (Bishop Lloyd's Greek 
Testament, re-edited by Professor Sanday.) 
Noticed in the Andover Review, April, 1890 ; 
xiii. 464. 

7. The language of the New Testament. By 

William Henry Simcox. (A volume of the 
*' Theological Educator.") Reviewed in the 
Presbyterian and Reformed Review, April, 
1890; p. 807. 



WUliaa HopUiis TllHiighttrt, 

Assistant Librarian, and Editor of the Quin- 
quennicU Catalogue. 

1 . Quinquennial catalogue of Harvard University, 

1636-1890. Cambridge. 1890. 1. S'l pp.441. 

2. Sixth list of the publications of Harvard 

University and its officers, with the chief 

publications on the University. 1888-89. 

Cambridge. 1890. pp. 29. 

Bibliographical contributionB of Harvard College Library, 
no. 38. 

3,4. Necrology of Harvard graduates in each 
number of the Harvard University Bulletin. 
Necrology for 1889-90, Boston Daily Adver- 
tise^', Post, Journal, etc. 25 June, 1890. 



Charles Wendell TownseiicL 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 

X. A case of delivery of the breech by the forceps. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 31 Oct. 1889 ; 
cxxi. 482. 

a. Five hundred and nine cases of labor; an 
analysis of all the cases in the out-patient 
department of the Boston Lying-in Hospital 
and of the Boston Dispensary in the year 
1888. Ibid. 19 Dec. 1889; cxxi. 60S-605. 

3. A case of eclampsia. Ibid. 6 Feb. 1890 ; cxxii. 

129. 

4. Notes on the infectious nature of acute lobar 

pneumonia. Ibid. 27 Mar. 1890; cxxii. 
291-293. 
With bibliographical references. 

5. An epidemic of measles with remarks on 

Rotheln. Archives of Pediatrics^ April, 
1890 ; vii. 269. 

Crawford Howell Toy* 

Hancock Professor of Hebrew and other Oriental 
Languages, and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical 
Literature. 

1. Ethics and religion. Popular Science Monthly, 

April, 1890 ; xxxvi. 727-744. 

2. ''That it might be fulfilled." Unitarian, June, 

1890 ; V. 284. 

John Trowbridse. 

Rumford Professor and Lecturer on the Applica- 
tion of Science to the Useful Arts, and Director 
of the Jefferson Physical Lcbboraiory. 

z. List of experiments in physical measurements. 
Intended for use in Physics C, and for pre- 
paring students for the admission examina- 
tions in advanced physics in Harvard College. 
Published by the University, March, 1890. 

a. Neutralization of induction. With S. Sheldon. 
Am. Journ. Set. Jan. 1890 ; 8d series, xxxix. 
17-21. 

3. Dangers of electricity. Atlantic Mo. March, 

1890; Ixv. 413-418. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



29 



Electrical oscillations in air. With W. C. 
Sabine. Proc. Am, Acad. 1890; xxv. 109- 
12B. — London Philosophical Mag. Oct. 1890. 

Physical notes in American Journal of Science 
as joint editor. 1889-90. 



Fruik Viokery. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

z. The treatment of chonic diarrlioea. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 20 Feb. 1890; cxxii. 
174-176. 

2. Diseases of the heart, pericardium, and ar- 
teries. With E. N. Whittier, M.D., and 
£. M. Greene, M.D. Annual of the Uni- 
versal Medical Sciences (Philadelphia) , i. B 1- 
B64. 



Joaeph Weathrliead WarreB. 

Instructor in Physiology. 

z. The knee-jerk and its physiological modifica- 
tions. With H. P. Bowditclv M.D. Jour- 
neU of Physiology i Jan. 1890 ; xi. 25-64. 

Beqjalnlii Marston Watson, Jr. 

Instructor in Horticulture. 

z. The education of young gardeners. Amei-ican 
Florist, 16 March, 1890; v. 857. 

2. Damping-off. Amei-ican Garden, June, 1890; 

ix. 348. 

3. The propagation of cactuses. I hid, Sept. 

1890: ix. 630. 



OUtw Falrlleld Wadswortk. 

Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmoscopy. 

z. Two cases of extraction from the vitreous of 
steel which had passed through the lens. 
Trans, Am. Ophihalmological Soc. 1889; v. 
849. — Boston Med. and Surg. Jo urn. 12 Dec. 
1889 ; cxxi. 679-581, 

a. Spastic torticollis, apparently due to faulty 
position of the eyes, and cured by tenotomy. 
Trans. Am. Ophihalmological Soc. 1889; v. 
381. — Boston Med. and Surg. Jo urn. 21 Nov. 
1889; cxxi. 605, 506. 

3. Mydriasis of one eye with intact accommoda- 
tion, lasting four months after application 
of homatropine to both eyes. Trans. Am. 
Ophihalmological Soc. 1889 ; v. 408. 



Georce Uaooln Waltea. 

Clinical Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous 

System. 

1, Dislocation of cervical vertebrae without fatal 
results. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 
8 May; 1890; cxxii. 439-441, t7/i/5<r. 

Abo priDted separately: Boston. Damrcli A Upham. 
1890. le*. pp. 11. 

a. Contribution to the study of the traumatic 
neuro-psychoses. Joum, of Nervous and 
Mental Disease (N. Y.), July, 1890. 

Also printed sepanitelj : 8*. pp. 18. 



JoliB Calllns Warren. 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 

z. A case oi fracture of the temporal bone, with 
remarks on trephining for fracture of the 
base oi the skull. Am. Joum. Medical Sci- 
ences, May, 1890; xcix. 439. 

AJso printed scparatolj'. 

a. Irreducible hernia; a discussion at the annual 
meeting of the Afassachunetts Medical Soci- 
ety, June JO, 1890. [Boston. 1890.] «^. 
pp. 9-15, Q0S2. 



Sereno Watson. 

■ 

Curator of the Herbarium. 

I, Manual of the botany of the northern United 
States, including the district east of the Mis- 
sissippi and north of North Carolina and 
Tennessee. By Asa Gray. Sixth edition. 
Revised and extended westward to the 100th 
meridian, by Sereno Watson and John M. 
Coulter, assisted by specialists in certain 
groups. New York and Chicago. Ivison, 
Blakeman&Co. 1890. 8''. pp. 760, plates 25. 



2.3. 



Contributions to American botany: — i. Mis- 
cellaneous notes upon North American plants, 
chiefly of the United States, with descriptions 
of new species. — ii. Descriptions of new 
species of plants, from northern Mexico, 
collected cliietiy by Mr. C. G. Pringle, in 
1888 and 1889. Proc. Am. Acad. xxv. 124- 
163. Also issued separately as '* Contribu- 
tions to American Botany, xvii. ," with index. 

4. New or little-known plants : Rosa foliolosa. 

Garden and Forest, iii. 100, illusir, 

5. New or little-known plants : Schuhertia grandi- 

fiora. Ibid. iii. 868, illustr. 



Barrett Wendell. 

Assistant Professor of English. 

z. Sonnet: In memory of F. B. Harvard 
Mo, March, 1890; x. 22. 

a. Rosamond. Scribner's Mag. June, 1890; viii. 
788-788. 

Oliver Clinton Wendell. 

Assistant in the Astronomical Observatory. 

I, Comets of 1887-88. Sidereal Messenger, ix. 
38. 

a. Orbit of comet 1890 I. Ibid. ix. 89. 

3. Observations of comets 1887 V, 1888 V, and 

1889 I. Astron. Nachrichten, cxxiii. 295. 
— Astron. Joum. ix. 91. 

4. Transit of comet 1889 V over a star. Sidereal 

Messenger, ix. 134. 



30 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



5. Observations of comets 1889 VI and 1890 I. 

Astron. Nachrichien^ cxxiv. 118. — Astron. 
Journ. iz. 169. 

6. An approximate solution of £uler*8 equation 

for parabolic motion. Sidereal Messenger^ 
ix. 176. 

7. Observations of comet 1886 VII. Astron. 

Ndckrickten, cxxiv. 363. — Astron. Journ, 
ix. 191. 

8. Observations of comets 1889 I, 1889 V, com- 

panion to 1889 V, comet a 1890, comet b 1890, 
and comet c 1890. Astron. Nachriehtent 
cxxvi. 48. — Astron. Journ. x. 69. 

g. Ephemeris of comet a 1890. Sidereal Messen- 
geVy ix. 276. 

10. Elements and ephemeris of comet a 1890. 
Ibid. ix. 324. 

XX. Ephemeris of comet e; 1890. Ibid. ix. 374. 



James Clarke White. 

Professor of Dermatology. 

I. Rare cases of dermatitis venenata. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 12 Dec. 1889 ; cxxi. 
583. 

a. Hereditary dermatoses. Comptes-rendus Con- 
gres Intemat. Dermatol. Paris. 1890. 

Read at the International Congress of Dermatology, at 
Bariii, 1889. 

3. Keratosis follicularis (psorospermose), a sec- 

ond case. Journ. Cutaneous Diseases^ Jan. 
1890. 

4. On the poisonous effects of Primula obcouica. 

Boston Med. and Surg. Jowrn. 1 May, 1890; 
cxxii. 425. 

5. The relations of the Massachusetts Medical 

Society to medical education. A plea for 
medical independence. The annual discourse 
before the Mass. Med. Society, June 11, 
1890. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 12, 19 
June, 1890 ; cxxii. 567, 595. — Med. Commun. 
Mass. Med. Soc. 1890; xv. 1-47. 
Also printed Acparately : Bofiton. 1800. 8". pp.47. 

6. The control of syphilis. Boston Med. and 

Surg. Journ. 31 July, 1890; cxxiii. 107. 

Harold Whiting. 

Instructor in Physics, 

I. A short course of experiments in physical meas- 
urement. In four parts. Part I. Density, 
heat, light, and sound. Cambridge. John 
Wilson & Son. 1890. 8*1 pp. xii. 278, 
N illusir. 



Franois Henry WilUaau. 

Assistant Professor of Therapeutics. 

1. Monthly contributions in editing the depart- 

ment of therapeutics in the American Jour- 
nal of Medical Sciences. 

2. Quarterly reports on progress in therapeutics 

in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal. 



Henry Willard WiUlaau. 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

I. An obituary notice of Prof. Franciscus Cor- 
nelius Donders, of Utrecht, Holland. Proc. 
Am. Acad. vol. xxiv. 

Also printed separately. 

Justin Wlnaor. 

Librarian cjf the University. 

I. The new world and the old. Nation, 28 Aug. 
1890; li. 169. 

a. The perils of historical narrative. Atlantic 
Mo. Sept. 1890 ; Ixvi. 289-302. 

3. British libraries and local museums. Naiion, 

25 Sept. 1890 ; li. 244-246. 

4. Edited Harvard University Bulletin, nos. 44, 

45, 46; Oct. 1889— May, 1890. 

5. Edited Bibliographical Contributions of the 

Library of Har\'ard University, nos. 34r-38.. 
See p. 7. 

6. Twelfth report of the librarian of Harvard 

College. 1888-89. Included in the annual 
report of the President, and also issued 
separately. 

Charleii Francis WitUnston. 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

I. Some extra-medical manifestations of hysteria. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 28 Aug. 1890; 
cxxiii. 193-196. 

a. Dr. Withiugton is assistant editor of the Boston 
Medical and Surgical Journal. 

John Eliot Wolff. 

Instructor in Petrography. 

I. On some occurrences of ottrelite and ilmenite 
schist in New England. Bull. Mus. Comp. 
Zobl. April, 1890; xvi. no. 8, pp. 159-165. 

Charles Pomeroy Worf)ester« 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

I. Milk analyst's report. Report Ma^s. State 
Board of Health, 1889; xxi. 120. 

John Henry Wrisht. 

Professor of Greek. 

I. Classical education in the United States. 
Classical Review^ 1890; iv. 51-56. 

a. The classical teacher's aims. Journ. Educa- 
tion, 1889; XXX. 387, 388. 

Abstract of an address before the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Association, Nov. 29, 1889. 

3. On Homer in the preparatory schools. Acad- 

emy (Syracuse), 1889. 

Abstract of remarks made at tlie autumn meeting of the 
New England Association of Colleges and Preparatory 
School!*, Oct. 12, 1889. {Adilre8>tts, proceedhign, etc. pp. f>6, 
57.) 

4. Professor Wright is American editor, with 

T. D. Seymour and W. G. Hale, of the 
Classical Review, (London and Boston.) 



PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 

Being such as have come, incidentally, to the notice of the Editor. 



BESCBIPTIVB AND HISTOBICAL. 

Reference book for Harvard stndents, 1890-91. 
Cambridge. 1890. 16*» 

The early coUege-buildings at Cambridge. From 
Ptoeeedings of the American Antiquarian Society y 
April 30, 1890. By Andrew McFarland Davis. 
Worcester. 1890. 8*». pp. 29. 

Proc. Am. Aniiq. Soc. ir.a. ri. pt. 3, 333~S40. 

History of federal and state aid to higher educa- 
tion in the United States. By F. W. Blackmer. 
Washington, D. C. 1890. Harvard College, pp. 
85-92. 

Bureau of Edacation, circular of information. 1890. No. 1 ; 
being no. 9 of contributions to Amprican educational history. 
Edited by U. B. Adams. 

Cambridge Tribune souvenir number, June, 
1890. Cambridge, f. pp. 32. 

Harvard College and tlie First Church in Cambridge. 
By A. B. Hart. — Harvard Universitv. — Early buildingp of 
Harvard College. By A. McF. Davis. 

Ubtnlmtionn : — Harvard Square, 1766. — Tablets from the 
Johnston gate. — Paul Rercre plate. — General view of the 
college buildings, 1890. — Botanic garden. — Observatory. — 
Johnston gate. — The yard. — View of Ilarvard, Massachu- 
setts, and Stoughton in 1739. By W. Price. — Full page 
portrait of President Eliot. 

Notes on the commencements at Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1803-1848. By Rev. John Pierce. Proc. 
Mass. Hist. Soc. Jan. 1890; 2d series, v. 167-258. 

Comparative expanses of three graduates of 
Harvard University. [1769, 1793, 1881.] By 
Charles C. Smith. Ibid. 258-262. 

Harvard College and the First Church in Cam- 
bridge. By A. B. Hart. Ibid. March, 1890; 
2d series, v. 396-416. Also in Cambridge Tribune 
souvenir number. 

Harvard University. By F. BoUes. 8*. pp. 4. 

Reprinted from ColUge and School [Udca, N. Y.], May, 
1890. 

Universit^s transatlantiqnes. Pierre de Cou- 
bertin. Paris. Hachette. 1890. 12''. 
Harvard College, pp. 7^100. 

Etching of the Johnston gate. By C. H. Wood- 
bury. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers : Proposal 
for a president of Harvard College in 1671. Com- 
municated by John Mackay. N. E. Hist. Oen. 
Reg. Oct. 1889; xliii. 854-356. — The growth of 
Harvard. Boston Post, 24 Oct. 1889. — Harvard 
and the continental universities. F. C. Lowell. 
Harv. Mo. Nov. 1889 ; ix. 43-49. — Sir Edwin 
Arnold at Harvard. N. E. Mag. Nov. 1889; n.s. 
i. 816-317. — Some early Harvani customs. Helen 
M. North. North Am. Rev, Nov. 1889 ; cxlix. 637. 
— The new Harvard gateway. Nation, 12 Dec. 
1890 ; xlix. 472. —The Harvard catalogue for 1890. 



Boston Post, Herald, 20 Dec. 1890. — Is Harvard 
a university? H. P. Bowditch. Ha/rva/rd Mo. 
Jan. 1890; ix. 143-151. — The Schiif Semitic 
museum. Boston Post, 11 Jan. 1890. — The 
change in the college faculty. Harvard Mo. June, 
1890; X. 157-161. — The university sparrows. 
Boston Transcript, 13 June, 1890. — Cambridge 
lions. Ibid. 25 June, 1890. — The Indian college 
at Cambridge. A. McF. Davis. Mag. Am. Hist. 
July, 1890; xxiv. 33-89. —A search for a lost 
building. A. McF. Davis. Atlantic Mo. Aug. 1890 ; 
Ixvi. 211-219. — The temporalities at Harvard. 
F. J. Stimson. Boston Advertiser, 18 Aug. 1890. 
— Harvard geologists. Ibid. 21 Aug. 1890. — Les 
Iib6ralit6s priv6es en faveur des universit^s aux 
£tat8-Uni8. [Confined almost entirely to Harvard 
College.] Revue Scientifique, 30 Aug. 1890; Ixvi. 
268-273.— The staccato cheer. Nation, 11, 25 
Sept. 1890; li. 211, 248. — Harvard College, 1642- 
1890. Chicago Sunday Tribune, 14 Sept. 1890. — 
Architecture at Harvard. H. Van Brunt. Nation, 
18 Sept. 1890; li. 226. — Architecture at Harvard. 
A Harv. A.M. Nation, 25 Sept. 1890; li. 248. — 
Harvard University in 1890. C E. Norton. Har- 
per*s Mag. Sept. 1890; Ixxxi. 581-592. 

GBADUATBS. 

Harvard graduates whom I have known. By 
A. P. Peabody. Boston, etc. Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. 1890. 16''. pp. (6), 252. 

C-onUiiM biographical sketches of Joshaa Fisher, Nathan 
Dane, John Pierce, John Pickering, William Wells, William 
Jenkfl. Daniel Applccon White, Charles Lowell, Ichabod 
Nichols, James W^ilker, Jared Sparks, Saronel Atkins Eliot, 
(xcorge Barrel! Emerson, Stephen Salisbury, Nathaniel Wood, 
Nathaniel Silsbee, Cazneau Palfrey, Samuel Hu^ Walley, 
Stephen Minot Weld, Increase Sunmer Wheeler. 

App4(ndir : — Henry Donster, first President of Harvard 
Colfefi^e. — Charles Ciiauncy, second President of Ilarvard 
College. 

Positions held by alumni. R. H. Greene. N. E. 
Hist. Oen. Reg. July, 1890; xliv. 286-290. 



IXSTBirCTION. 

Algebra examination papers for admission to 
Harvard, Yale, Amherst, Dartmouth, Brown, and 
to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 
June, 1878, to Sept. 1889, inclusive. Edited by 
Wm. F. Bradbury. Boston. Thompson, Brown 
& Co. [1889.] 8*» pp. iv. (2), 99. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Courses 
in ethics in Harvard College. J. Royce. Ethical 
Record, Oct. 1889 ; ii. 138-143. — Pedagogy at the 
universities. Nation, 28 Nov. 1889 ; Ixix. 432. — 
Harvard and Yale universities. Boston Post, 23 
Dec. 1889. — Harvard and Yale, Ibid. 28 Dec. 
1889.— Harvard and Yale. Ibid. 2 Jan. 1890.— 
Recent historical work in the colleges and uni- 



32 



PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 



venities of Europe and America. C. K. Adams. 
Papers Am. Hisi. Assoc. Jan. 1890; iv. 39-65. 
Mag. Am. Hist. Feb. 1890; xxiii. 111-181. — A 
difference in German and American university 
methods. K. Francke. NtUion, 13 Feb. 1890: 
L 133. — Colleges and ft-ee trade. Boston Adver- 
tiser, 6 March, 1890; Boston Post, 7 March, 1890. 

— Protection in the colleges. Nation , 6 March. 
1890 ; 1. 194. — Political economy at Harvard. 
S. W. Mendum. Boston Post, 11 March, 1890. — 
Instruction in German and in American univer- 
sities. George Hempl. Nation, 20 March, 1890 ; 
1. 241. — German university methods again. K. 
Krancke. Ihid. 27 March, 1890; 1. 266.— The 
influence of elective conrses. Boston Advertiser, 
26 June, 1890. —The correction of bad English at 
the admission examinations at Harvard. L. B. R. 
Briggs. Academy (Syracuse) , Sept. 1890 ; v. 802- 
312. 

THS THBEE-TEABS COUBSE. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Three 
years or four? E. Fuller. Harvard Mo. Oct. 
1889; ix. 1-6. — The universities and the profes- 
sions. Nation, 28 Nov. 1889 ; xlix. 425. —Letters 
on the same subject from ** Teacher," C. F. Gum- 
mey, R. H. Dabney. Ibid. 12 Dec. 1889; xlix. 
471. — College attendance. L. N. D., *• Senex.*' 
Ihid. 26 Dec. 1889; xlix. 518. — Can our courses 
of stndy be shortened? Andover Rev. Jan. 
1890; xiii. 75-79. — Shortening college courses. 
" Alumna Mo. State Univ." Nation, 2 Jan. 1890 : 
1. 13. — Secondary school programmes, French 
and Americans. G. W. Beaman. Pop. Sci, Mo. 
May, 1890 ; xxxvii. 48-69. — Three years for a col- 
lege course. Opinions of prominent teachers;. 
Boston Sunday Herald, 1 June, 1890. — A similar 
article in New York World. — Three-years* course. 
Boston Advertiser, 2 June, 1890; Boston Globe, 
3 June, 1890. — The changes at Harvard. Boston 
Post, 6 June, 1890. — Three years or four? some 
possible undesirable results of the proposed change 
at Harvard. J. M. Hallowell. Ibid. 6 June, 1890. 

— College policy. American (Phila.), 7 June. 
1890. — The discussion at Harvard. Boston Ad- 
vertiser, 9 June, 1890. — The three-years* course. 
Boston Transcript, 10 June, 1890. — The Harvard 
changes in the light of experience at the University 
of Virgihia. W. R. R. Boston Post, 12 June, 
1890. — Harvard changes edging towards the short 
course. Boston Adve^'iiser, 17 June, 1890. — The 
shortening of the university course. Nation, 19 
June, 1890 ; 1. 483. — Summary of the action in 
regard to the three-years plan. Boston Advertiser, 
20 June, 1890. — The Harvard plan. "• Graduate." 
Ibid. 21 June, 1890. — College or university? 
Ibid. 21 June, 1890. — The proposed curtailment 
of the Harvard course. R. F. Leighton. N. E. 
Journal of Education, 26 June, 1890; xxxii. 9. — 
The facts in regard to the proposed reduction of 
the college course. Harvard Mo. July, 1890; x. 
201-206. — Shortening the college course. R. E. 
Carson, L. N. D. Nation, 3 July, 1890; li. 12. 

— The three-years university course. W. Houston . 
Ibid. 24 July, 1890; li. 70. — Shortening the col- 
lege course. Ibid. 7 Aug. 1890; li. 106. — Th«. 
use and limits of academic culture. N. S. Shaler. 
Atlantic Mo. Aug. 1890; Ixvi. 161-170.— Curtail- 
ment at Harvard. I. Thomas. N. E. Journal of 
Education, 14 Aug. 1890: xxxii. 100.— The Har- 
vard three-years course. E. Ginn. Nation, 1<^ 
Sept. 1890; li. 227. 



ATHIiSTICS. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — A French 
view of college athletics. Scribner*s Mag. Oct. 
1889; viii. 525. — The way they play now: con- 
siderations suggested by the football game with 
Princeton. W. R. Thayer. Boston Post, 20 Nov. 
1889. — Reform it altogether. Boston Advertiser ^ 
21 Nov. 1889. — Harvard's act criticised. John 
Codman, Jr. Boston Post, 25 Nov. 1889. —The 
great football question. Ibid. 26 Nov. 1889. — 
Tlie football question again. * ' Another graduate. " 
Ibid. 28 Nov. 1889. — Interviews upon Harvard 
sports. Boston Record, 2 Dec. 1889. — Why 
Harvard loses. Howard. Boston Globe, 2 Dec. 
1889. — The position of Harvard on the football 
question once more stated. L. McK. Garrison. 
Boston Post, 5 Dec. 1889. — Students' athletic 
management. Neta York Evening Post, 14 Dec. 
1889. — Statement of the Harvard Athletic Com- 
mittee in reply to Princeton. Boston Post, 20 
Dec. 1889. [The full statement was printed as an 
official pamphlet (see p. 0). The Princeton Ath- 
letic Committee issued a counter statement, which 
did not appear in the newspapers.] — Why Harvard 
fails in athletics. Boston Advertiser, 28 Dec. 
1889. —Why does not Harvard win? Springfield 
Republican, about 1 Jan. 1890. — Why Harvard 
loses. Boston Advertiser, 10 Jan. 1890. — Pres- 
ident Eliot on athletics. Boston Post, 7 Feb. 1890. 

— Discussion of the rule limiting games to New 
England. Boston Advertiser, 17 Jan. 1890. — The 
athletic question. W. H. Goodwin, Jr. Harvard 
Mo. April, 1890 ; x. 43-51. — College athletics : the 
position taken by Harvard. Boston Herald, 12 
May, 1890. — Disorders of May 31st. Boston 
Herald, and other papers, 2, 3 June, 1890. — Mass 
meetings of the students. Ibid. 8, 4 June, 1890. — 
College influence. Boston Hetald, 3 June, 1890. 

— The status of athletics in American colleges. 
A. B. Hart. Atlantic Mo. July, 1890; Ixvi. 68-71. 

DSPABTMENTS. 

History of the Harvard College Observatory 
during the period 1840-1890. By D. W. Baker. 
Reprinted from the Boston Evening Traveller. 
Cambridge. 1890. S* pp. 82, illustr. 

Appeared in the Traveller on 2 Aagunt, and succMsive 
Satartlays. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Harvard 
Observatory jubilee, semi-centennial of the comet 
of 1843. Boston Transcript, 21 June, 1890.— 
The Gray Herbarium. BotaniccU Gazette, April, 
1890; XV. 99. — The physical symmetry compe- 
tition at Cambridgre. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joui-n. 11 Sept. 1890; cxxui. 257. — The gymna- 
sium of a great university. D. A. Sargent. Cos- 
mopolitan, May, IS90, illustr. — The methods of 
the Harvard and Boston I^aw Schools. Boston 
Transcript, 25 June, 1890. — The Shelley us. vol- 
ume in the Harvard Library. Athenaeum, 7 Dec. 
1889. — The relation of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society to medical education : a plea for profes- 
sional independence. Med. Comm. Mass. Med. Soc. 
1890; XV. 1-47. Also Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 12. 19 June, 1890. — The magnetic field 
in the Jefferson Physical Lal>oratory. R. W. 
Willson. Am. Journ. Sci., Feb., June, 1890; 8d 
series, cxxxix. 87, 456, cuts. — The Peabody Mu- 
seum of American Archaeology and Ethnology at 
Cambridge. F. W. Putnam. Proc. Am. Antiq. 
Soc. Oct. 28, 1889; ic.s. vi. 180-190. 



Libratf o( l^dKtni JBntbmsft;. 




Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR, 

LIBRARIAN. 



N'o. 43. 




THE ORATORS AND POETS 

PHI BETA KAPPA, ALPHA OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Bv WILLIAM HOPKINS TILLINGHAST, 
Atttttant Liirarian. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 
ittmt'b bj; ttie libarg of ^BXbaxi Kln{i)tt»itae. 



Already issued or in preparation: 



VOL. I. 



I. Edward S. Holdbn. Index-Catalogue of Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

a. Justin WiNSOR. Shakespeare's Poems: a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Charles Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 

the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Piet:is et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List op Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 

United States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. The Collection op Books and Autographs, be. 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor, 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. George Lincoln Goodale. The Floras of different 

countries. 

la Justin Winsor. Halliwelllana: a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard Halliweli.PhiUipps. 



II. Samuel H. Scuddrr. The Entomological Libraries 
of the United States. 

I a. First List op the Publications of Harvard Uni. 
versity and its Officers. iSyo-iSSo. 

13. Samuel H. Scudder. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinghast. Notes on tlie Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann*s Geographische Mittheilungen. 1855- 
1881. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 
1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsok. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

ao. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 18S4-1885. 



VOL. II. 



ai. Second List op the Publications of Harvard Uni. 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1885. 

aa. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

a3. William H. Tillinghast. Third List ofthe Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 18S5- 
1886. 

34. William C. Lane. Index to Rcoenl Reference TJsts, 

no. a. 1885-1886. 

35. W. G. Fablow and William Tbeleabb. TJst of 

Works on North American Fungi. 

a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 

a7. Andrew McF. I >avis. A few notes on the Records 
of Harvard College. 

a8. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth Litft of Publica. 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1S86- 
1887. 



99. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference LisU, 
no. 3. 1887. 

30. Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem " To a 

Skylark," with notes. 

31. W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Works on 

North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, i78>-i839. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publications 

of Harvard University and ita Officers. 1887-1888. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. George E. Woodbbrry. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat Collection on Rilu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Wettenkampp. Bibliogn^>hy of Hogarth. 



VOL. III. 



38. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publica. 

tiona of Harvard University and its Officers. 188S- 
1889. 

39. Alpred C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 189a 



41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1889- 
1890. 

4a. William H. Tillinghast. The Orators and Pocte 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachusetta. 



THE ORATORS AND POETS 



OF 



PHI BETA KAPPA, ALPHA OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

WITH A 

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION OF THOSE ORATIONS AND POEMS 

WinCH ARE m HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

By William Hopkins Tillinghast, Assistant Librarian. 

*«* This list is based apon the record of orators and poets g:iTeii in the Catalogue of the llarrard chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. 
The revision incident upon the preparation of a new edition of this Catalogue has shown that the indication of publication 
giren in the edition of 1885 is not trustwortliy ; eight or ten more names huve now been marked, but it is possible that other 
performances, unknown to the compiler, have appeared in print. 

It will be seen that, in several cases, where publication is indicated, no copy has been found in the College Library. 
Anyone knowing of the existence of an oration or poem not recorded here will greatly oblige the compiler by informing him 
of the fact, whether the publication be in the form of a pamphlet, or an article in a periodical. 

A 9tar U affixed to the name9 of those orators and poets whose productions have been printed or published j when no 
copy of the performance has been found in the CoUfge Library. 

The names of poets are distinguished fry o f* 



1782. — Elijah Paine. 

1783. — Samuel Kendal. 
1784. — Joshua Paine. 
1785. — Henry Ware. 
1786. — John Andrews. 

1787. — John Lowell. 

Nathaniel Freeman. 

1788. — John Quincy Adams.* 

1789. — William Emerson.* 

1790. — Tuaddeus Mason Harris. 

Thomas Woodbridoe Hooper. 

1791. — Joseph Bartlett. 

1792. — John Phillips. 

1793. — Henry Dana Ward. 
1794- — Charles Coffin.* 

JosiAH Quincy. 
'795- — William Harris. 

1796. — Timothy Bioblow. An oration, pro- 
nounced at Cambridge, before the <l> B K, at their 
annual meeting on Thursday, July 21, 1796. It 
being the day following the public Commencement. 
Boston. Manning and Loring. 1797. 8°. pp.16. 

• The oration deals with the origin and churacter of the 
society of Phi Beta Kappa. 

1797. — George Bradbury. 

t Robert Treat Paine. The ruling pas- 
sion : an occasional poem. Written by the appoint- 
ment of the society of the €> B K and spoken, on 



their anniversary, in the chapel of the Uniyersity, 
Cambridge, July 20, 1797. By Thomas Paine, A.M. 
Published according to Act of Congress. Boston. 
Manning and Loring. 1797. sm. 4*1 pp. 82. 

The author, disliking the asAociations of his name, subse- 
quently dropped the •*Tliomas*' in feyor of " Robert Treat." 

1798. — John Thornton Kirkland. An oration, 
delivered at the request of the society of * B K, 
in the chapel of Harvard College, on the day of 
their anniversary, July 19, 1798. Boston. John 

Russell. 1798. S"*. pp. 24. 

** But it may be more useful and agreeable, on this occa- 
siou, to confine our attention to those principles, manners, and 
iu<«titntion8 which are the price and pledge of all [America's] 
other blessings." 

Tliis copy is the one presented by President Kirkland to 
Professor Ebeling of Hamburg, and contains on the back of 
the title-page a brief vs. note explaining the character of the 
society. Upon Ebeling's deatli his library was purchased 
and presented to the College. 

t Charles Pincknby Sumner. 

I799' -t Joseph Bartlett. * 

t William Biolow. Education : a poem, 
spoken at Camhridge, at the request of the Phi 
B.'ta Kappa, July 18th, 1799. — Train up a child 
in the way he should go, and when he is old he will 
not depart from it. Solomon. — Salem. Joshua 
Cushing. 1799. 8*». pp. 17. 
1800. — Ariel Abbot.* 

t James Richardson. 



THE ORATORS AND POETS 



1801. — Francis Dana Channino. 

t David Evkbbtt. 
x8o2. — Joseph McKean. 

t William Merchant Richardson. 
1803. — John Pipon. 

t William Jenks.* 

1804. — John Allyn. 

t John Knapp. 

1805. — Oliver Fiske.* 

- fTHADDEus Mason Harris. 
Peter Oxenbridoe Thacher. 

1806. — Thomas Boylston Adams. 

t Benjamin Whitwell. Experience, or, 
folly as it flies. A poem, delivered at Cambridge, 
on the anniversary of the 4> 6 K society. Aug. 28, 

180«- pnru8 

non eget 

venatis gravida sagittis 

pharetra. * Hor. 

Boston. Anthology office. 1806. S"*, pp. 28. 

1807. — Theodore Dehon.* 

1808. — James Richardson. An oration, de- 
scribing the influence of commerce on the pros- 
perity, character & genius of nations. Written 
at the request of the society of <l> B K and deliv- 
ered on their anniversary, at Cambridge, September 
1, 1808. Published by desire. Boston. Russell 
and Cutler. 1808. S"*, pp. 20. 

i8og. — Joseph Stevens Buckminster. Dis- 
course on the dangers and duties of men of letters. 
Pronounced at Cambridge before the society of 
*. B. K., on Thursday, August 31, 1809. Works of 
Joseph Stevens Buckminster, with memoirs of his 
life. (2 vols. Boston. 1889.) vol. ii., pp. 339- 

862. 

t Joseph Head. Enthusiasm. An occa- 
sional poem, written by appointment of the society 
of 4> B K, and delivered at Cambridge, on the anni- 
versary of their institution, August 31, 1809. 
Us track . . . 

Glory pursues and generous shame, 
The unconquerable mind, and freedom's holy flame. 

Oray. 
Boston. Anthology press. 1809. 8**. pp. 10. 
x8io. — William Allen. 

t Washington Allston.* 
All8ton'9 Poemt appeared in 1813, but notliing in the yol- 
uine distinguishes the Phi Beta Kappa poem, and tiie same 
is trae of tlie enlarged edition published in 1850. 

1811, — John Stickney. 

t Jacob Bigelow. A poem on profes- 
sional life, delivered by appointment of the society 
of Phi Beta Kappa, at their anniversary, August 
29,1811. Boston. J. Belcher. 1811. 8*. pp.15. 
i8ia. — James Savage. 

t Edward Everett. American poets. 

8^. pp. 11. 

Printed by llilliard & Metcalf, Cambridge, 1812, for private 
distribution. A form of presentation is printed at the head 



fo the pamphlet. The copy in tlie College Library contains 
an insertion of ms. lines in continuation of the reference to 
the removal of Beacon hill monument. 

18x3. — Alexander Hill Everett. 

t Nathaniel Lanqdon Frothingham. 

1814. — George Ticknor. 

1815. — William Tudor. 

t Samuel Gilman. Human life. Con- 
tHhutions to literature^ descriptive, criticaly hu- 
morous, biographical, philosophical, andpoeticcU, 
By Samuel Gilman, D.D. (Boston. 1856.) pp. 
612-643. 

1 816. — Francis Galley Gray.* 

t Henry Ware, Jr. 

1817. — William Crafts. An oration on the 
influence of moral causes on national character, 
delivered before the <l> B K society, on their anni- 
versary, 28 August, 1817. Cambridge. Hilliard 
and Metcalf. 1817. 8". pp. 16. 

Reprinted from the Korih American Review and Mttcel- 
laneous Journal, November, 1817. 

t John Ware. Poem, delivered before 
the * B K society of Harvard University, on their 
anniversary, August 28, 1817. A few introductory 
lines, and some other passages, which were spoken, 
are omitted in printing. Cambridge. Hilliard 
and Metcalf. 1817. 8". pp. 11. 

The poem is a criticism of the fiction of the day. 
i8i8. — Edward Tyrrel Channino. 

t William Howard Gardiner. 
x8ig. — John Brazer. 
t Caleb Gushing. 

1820. — John Glen King. 

t Gamaliel Bradford. 

1821. — John Chipman Gray.* 

t William Cullen Bryant. The ages. 

Poems by William Cullen Bryant. (Cambridge. 

Hilliard and Metcalf. 1821.) pp. 7-24. 

Appeared also in the later editions of Bryant's poems. 

1822. — WiLT.iAM Jones Spoonbr. An address 
delivered at Cambridge, before the society of Phi 
Beta Kappa, at their annual meeting, August 29, 
1822. Boston. Oliver Everett. 1822. 8* pp.34. 

The subject of the oration is the prospects of American 
literature. 

t Oliver William Bourn Peabody. 

1823. — Henry Holton Fuller. 

t George Bancroft.* 

Bancroft's little volume of Poemn was published in 1828, 
but the Phi Beta Kappa poem is not designated. Doubtless 
there are those among the older members of the society who 
remember it. 

1824. — Edward Everett. An oration pro- 
nounced at Cambridj^e, before the society of Phi 
Beta Kappa, August 27 [26], 1824. Published by 
request. Boston. Oliver Everett. 1824. 8*. 

pp. 67. 

The oration is dedicated to Major General Lafayette, who 
was present at the delivery. The subject of the oration is 
*' the peculiar motives to intellectual exertion in America." 



OF PHI BETA KAPPA. 



The same. Fourth edition. Bos- 



ton. 1825. 

This copy is imperfect. 

The circumstances favorable to 

the progress of intellectual life in America. Ora- 
tions and Mpeeekes on varunis oeeasiont. By 
Edward Everett, (Boston. 1850.) vol. i., pp. 
9-44. 

t Henry Ware, Jr. The vision of lib- 
erty : recited before the Phi Beta Kappa society of 
Harvard University, August 26, 1824. Published 
by request. Boston. Oliver Everett. 1824. 8^. 
pp. 12. 

Z825. — Nathaniel Lanodon Frothinoham. 
t David Hatch Barlowi 

1826. — Joseph Story. A discourse pronounced 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society, at the anni- 
versary celebration, on the thirty-first day of Au- 
gust, 1826. Boston. Hilliard, Gray, Little, and 
Wilkins. 1826. 8«. pp. 58. 

" What I propose to myself on the present occasion . . . 
is to trace out some of the circumstances of our age, which 
connect themselres closely with the canse of science and 
letters." 

The same. The miscellaneous 

writings, etc. of Joseph Story, (Boston. 1885.) 
pp. 8-38. 

t William Bourn Oliver Pbabody. 
1827. — Jambs Walker. 

t Gamaliel BRADroRD. 
i8a8. — Jonathan Porter. 

t Frederic Henry Hedge.* 
Z839. — CoNYERS Francis. 

t Charles Spraoue. Curiosity : a poem, 
delivered at Cambridge, before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society, August 27, 1829. Second edition. Boston. 
J. T. Buckingham. July, 1884. 8*". pp. 30. 

1830. — Orville Dewey. An oration delivered 
at Cambridge before the society of Phi Beta Kappa, 
August 26, 1830. Boston. Gray and Bowen. 
1830. 8®. pp. 82. 

" The loftiest attainments of the mind In ereiy sphere of 
its exertion are immediately . . . the fruit of nothing but the 
deepest study.'* 

fGRENViLLE Mellbn. The age of print : 

a poem delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa so- 
ciety, at Cambridge, 26 August, 1830. Boston. 
Carter and Hendee. 1830. 8^. pp. 40. 

183Z. — James Trbcothick Austin. 
t Benjamin Kent. 

Harrard College Library has a us. of this production, 
entitled: Poem delivered before the Alpha of the <l> 6 K 
society, at Cambridge, Sept. 1, 1881. 4'. pp. 8. 

183a. — Jared Sparks. 

t Cornelius Conway Felton. 

1833. — Edward Everett. Education of man- 
kind. Orations and speeches on varioits occasions. 
By Edward Everett* (Boston. 1850.) vol. i., 
pp. 404-441. 



This oration was originally delivered before the Tale chap- 
ter of the I%i Beta Kappa, at New Haven, 20 August, 1833. 
The orator appointed by the Harvard chapter (Mr. Adams) 
being unable to deliver his oratiou, Mr. Everett was requested, 
on August 29, to repeat this address ; he consented, and spoke 
Qpon the following day, August 30. 

t Henry Wadsworth Longpbllow. 

This poem does not appear in Longfellow's published 
works. The title was " The past and the present," and the 
subject. Education. It was a re-writing of a poem delivered 
the preceding year before the Bowdoin chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa. See The li/e of Henry Wadsitorth Longfeliow, etc. 
edited by Samuel Longfellow. (Boston. 189L) vol. i., 
p. 195. 

1834. — William Howard Gardiner. An ad- 
dress, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society 
of Harvard University, 28 August, 1834, on classi- 
cal learning and eloquence. 

Quid voveat dulci nutricula majus alumno 

Quam sapere, et fari ut possit quae sentiat? 

Hor. Ep. I. iv. 8. 

Cambridge. James Munroe and Co. 1884. 8^. 

pp. 68. 

t Ralph Waldo Emerson. 

The poem was not published; a few lines describing 
Webster are printed in the Appendix to Emerson's Poemt 
in the Riverside edition. (Boston. 1884.) p. 312. 

1835. — Theophilus Parsons. An address, 
delivered before the Phi Beta ELappa society of 
Harvard University, 27 August, 1836, on the duties 
of educated men in a republic. Boston. Russell, 
Odiome and Co. 1835. 8*1 pp. 28. 

fEPHRAIM PeABODT.* 

1836. — Francis Watland. 

The oration was npon " the practical uses of the principles 
of &ith.'* FrancU Wayland, By J. O. Murray. (Boston. 
180L) p. 79. 

t Oliver Wendell Holmes. Poetry: 
a metrical essay. Poems. By Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. (Boston. 1836.) pp. 8-39. Also in 
later editions. 

Z837. — Ralph Waldo Emerson. An oration, 
delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society, at 
Cambridge, August 31, 1837. Second edition. 
Boston. James Munroe 'and Co. 1838. 8*1 
pp. 82. 

The American scholar. An ora- 
tion delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society, 
at Cambridge, August 31 , 1837. Nature^ addressesy 
and lectures. (Boston. 1884.) pp. 83-116. Also 
in other editions of Emerson's miscellanies. 

t William Parsons Lunt.* 
1838. — Caleb Stetson. 

t James Cook Richmond. 
• 1839. — Caleb Cushino. 

t James Flint. Change: a poem deliv- 
ered before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard 
University, August 29, 1839. Printed, not pub- 
lished. Salem. Printed at the Observer Press. 
1848. 8'* pp. 24. 



THE ORATORS AND POETS 



1840. — Leonard Woods, Jp. 

t Francis Callef Gray. Poem spoken 
at Cambridge, before the Phi Beta Kappa society 
of Harvard University, Augast 27, 1840. Boston. 
Charles C. Little and James Brown. 1840. 8^. 
pp. 36. 

" Is there no Music in thin Western world? 
No brow round which the Poet's wreath is curled? 

Is ail here darlc and grovelling? '* 

184Z. — Frederic Henry Hedge. Conserva- 
tism and reform. An oration delivered before the 
^. B. K. society of Harvard College, at their first 
meeting after the change in their constitution en- 
larging the terms of membership. Martin Luther 
and other essa/ys. (Boston. 1888.) pp. 129-166. 
t George Goldthwait Ingeesoll. 

Z842. — William Bradford Reed. 

1843. — George Stillman Hillard. The re- 
lation of the poet to his age. A discourse delivered 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard Uni- 
versity, on Thursday, August 24, 1843. Boston. 
Charles C. Little and James Brown. 1848. 8*1 
pp. 53. 

t Chandler Bobbins. 

1844. — George Putnam. An oration delivered 
at Cambridge, before the Phi Beta Kappa society 
in Harvard University, 29 August, 1844. Boston. 
Charles C. Little and James Brown. 1844. 8^. 
pp. 36. 

" My subject, therefore is The Connection between Intel- 
lectual and Moral Culture ; between Scholarship and Char, 
aoter, Literature and Life.'* 

Certain strictures passed upon the moral character of 
Voltaire, Byron, and Bums produced a reply entitled : Re- 
marks upon an oration delivered at Cambridge, by Geoi^ 
Putnam, before the Phi Beta Kappa society, in Harvard 
Univemity, August 29, 1844. By a member of the Suffolk 
bar. Boston. William D. Ticknor & Co. 1844. 8". pp.36. 
t William Wetmore Story. Nature and 
art : a poem delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society of Harvard University; August 29, 1844. 
Boston. Charles C. Little and James Brown. 
1844. 8*. pp. 48. 

1845. — Andrew Preston Peabodt. The con- 
nection between science and religion. An oration 
delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society of 
Harvard University, August 28, 1845. Boston. 
Charles C. Little and James Brown. 1845. 8^. 
pp. 29. 

t Charles Timothy Brooks. A poem 
pronounced before the Phi Beta Kappa society, at 
Cambridge, August 28, 1845. Boston. Charles 
C. Little and James Brown. 1845. 8*. pp. 86, 

1846. — Charles Sumner. The scholar, the 
jurist, the artist, the philanthropist. An address 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard 
University, at their anniversary, August 27, 1846. 
*' Then I would say to the young disciple of Truth 
and Beauty, who would know how to satisfy the 



noble impulse of his heart, through every oppo- 
sition of the century, — I would say, Give the 
world beneath your influence a direction towards 
the good, and the tranquil rh3rthm of time will 
bring its development." Schiller. Boston. William 
D. Ticknor & Co. 1846. 8"*. pp. 72. 

The oration commemorates John Pickering, Joseph Story, 
Washington AUston, William Ellery Channing, then lately 
deceased. 

t James Freeman Clarke. A poem, 
delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society. Alpha 
of Massachusetts, on its anniversary, August 27, 
1846. Boston. Wm. Crosby and H. P. NichoUs. 
1846. 8<l pp. 24. 

** Our Country, and its Hopes, the theme 1 choose." 

X847. — GeoHgb Perkins Marsh. Human 
knowledge : a discourse delivered before the Mas- 
sachusetts Alpha of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, 
at Cambridge, August 26, 1847. Boston. Charles 
C. Little and James Brown. 1847. 8''. pp. 42. 

1848. — Horace Bcshnell. An oration deliv- 
ered before the society of Phi Beta Kappa, at 
Cambridge, August 24, 1848. Cambridge. George 
Nicholls. 1848. 8<> pp. 39. 

The oration treats of Work and Play under various aspects. 
t Epes Saroent, Jr. 

1849. — George Washington Bethunb. The 
claims of our country on its literary men. An 
oration before the Phi Beta Kappa society of 
Harvard University, July 19, 1849. Cambridge. 
John Bartlett. 1849. 8''. pp. 52. 

fJoHN Brooks Felton. The horse- 
shoe : a poem spoken before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society in Cambridge, July 19, 1849. Cambridge. 
John Bartlett. 1849. 8''. pp. 29. 

1850. — Timothy Walker. The reform spirit 
of the day. An oration before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society of Harvard University, July 18, 1850. 
Boston and Cambridge. James Munroe and Co. 
1850. 8*. pp. 88. 

t Bayard Taylor. The American legend. 
A poem before the Phi Beta Kappa society of 
Harvard University, July 18, 1850. Published by 
request. Cambridge. John Bartlett. 1850. 12**. 
pp. 27. 

1851. — William Buell Spragde. An oration 
pronounced before the Phi Beta Kappa society of 
HarvardUniversity, July 17, 1851. Albany. Gray, 

Sprague and Co. 1851. 8*. pp. 60. 

*' The American mind — her character and destiny.** 
tJoHN PlERPONT. 

1853. — Henry Whitney Bellows. The ledger 
and the lexicon : or business and literature in ac- 
count with American education. An oration before 
the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard College, 
July 26, 1853. Cambridge. John Bartlett. 1858. 
S°, pp. 53. 

t Jambs Thomas Fields. 



OF PHI BETA KAPPA. 



Z855. — Hbnrt Ward Beecheb. 

t William Hekbt Hublbut. Wealth 
and beanty. A poem read before the Phi Beta 
Kappa society in Cambridge, July 19, 1865. Cam- 
bridge. John Bartlett. 1855. 12<*. pp. 81. 

1856. — Leonard Bacon. 

1858. — Thomas Hill. Liberal education. An 
address delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa so- 
ciety of Harvard College, July 22, 1858. Cam- 
bridge. John Bartlett. 1858. 8*1 pp. 34. 

1859. — Babnas Sears. 

i86x. — Geoboe Sewall Boutwell. 

fELBBiDGE Jeffebson Cutleb. Re- 
veille. A poem read before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society at Cambridge, July 18, 1861. War poems. 
By Elbridge Jefferson Cutler, (Boston. Little, 

Brown and Company. 1867.) pp. 9-17. 

The delivery of this poem, which deservedly produced 
a otrong effect, is described in the Memoir of Mr. Cutler, 
and in Bev. E. E. Hale's notice in the OhrUtian Exam- 
iner (Sept. 1861). A MB. note on the fly leaf of the copy of 
Warpoemt in this library giyes a curious bit of literaiy his- 
tory. "* Reveille' wa« reprinted in the South during the 
war, with such changes as made it serve the Confederate 
cause. It was afterward reprinted in England as evidence 
of the spirit which animated the Confederacy." 

The poem was also issued as a tract by the American Uni- 
tarian Association, with the foUowinfif title : — 

Liberty and law. A poem for the 

hour. Army series. No. 4. [Boston.] 1861. 
8*1 pp. 11. 

i86a. — Geobge William Cubtis. 

t Samuel Fbancis Smith. 
Z864. — William Gbeenleaf Eliot. 
1865. — Joseph Pabbish Thompson. 

t Geoboe Henby Bokeb. Our heroic 
themes. A poem read before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society of Harvard University, July 20, 1866. Bos- 
ton. Ticknor and Fields. 1865. W. pp. 20. 

1867. — Ralph Waldo Emebson. Progress 
and culture. Address read before the ^ B K so- 
ciety at Cambridge, July 18, 1867. Letters and 
Social aims. New and revised edition, (Boston. 
1884.) pp. 197-222. Also in other editions. 

fJosiAH Phillips Quinct. 

1868. -t William Evebett. Hesione : or Eu- 
rope unchained. A poem delivered before the ^. 
B. K. fraternity of Harvard College, July 16, 1868. 
Boston. Little, Brown and Co. 1868. 8^. (large 
paper.) pp. 28. 

1870. -t Oliveb Wendell Holmes. Mechan- 
ism in thought and morals. An address delivered 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard 
University, June 29, 1870. With notes and after- 
thoughts. — *" Car il ne faut pas se m^connaltre, 
nous sommes automates autant qu'esprit." — Pascal : 
Pens^es, chap. xi. § 4. — Boston. James R. Osgood 
and Co. 1871. 12«. pp. 101. 

t William Reed Huntington. 



1871. — Noah Pobteb. 

t Fbancis Bbet Habte. Aspiring Miss 
DeLaine. (A chemical narrative. ) Poetical works. 
Household edition. (Boston. Houghton, Mifflin 
and Co.) pp. 212-218. 

1873. — Chables Fbancis Adams. An address 
delivered at Cambridge before the society of the 
Phi Beta Kappa, 26 June, 1873. Cambridge. John 
Wilson and Son. 1873. 8*. pp. 28. 

The subject of the oration is the relation between the Col- 
lege and the state. 

1874. — Chables Cabboll Eybbett. The gain 
of history. Unitarian Review, August, 1874; ii. 
1&-86. 

fCHBiSTOPHEB Peabsb Cbanch. The 
century and the nation. Read before the Phi Beta 
Kappa society of Harvard College, June 25, 1874. 
The bird and the hell, with other poems, (Bos- 
ton. 1875.) pp. 251-269. 

1875. — Theodobb Dwight Woolsey. The 
relations of honor to political life. An address 
delivered before the society of the Phi Beta Kappa 
of Harvard College, July 1, 1875. New Haven. 
Judd and White. 1875. 8«. pp. 28. 

t Walteb Mitchell. The mocking-bird. 
[A poem delivered in the Chapel of Harvard Uni- 
versity, Thursday, July 1, 1875, before the Phi 

Beta Kappa society.] Serihner*s Monthly, Dec. 
1875 ; xi. 171-176. 

1876. — Jebemiah Lewis Dim an. The aliena- 
tion of the educated class from politics. An ora- 
tion before the Phi Beta Kappa society at Cam- 
bridge, June 29, 1876. Providence. Sidney S. 
Rider. 1876. 8*1 pp. 37. 

1877. — Thomas Fbancis Ba yabd. * ♦ Unwritten 
law." An address delivered before the Phi Beta 
Kappa society of Harvard University, at Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, June 28, 1877. Boston. 
A. Williams and Co. 1877. 8*. pp. 47. 

t Edmund Clabence Stedman. Haw- 
thorne. Poetical works. Household edition. 
(Boston. Houghton, Mif&in and Co.) pp. 391-398. 
This poem first appeared in "Hawthorne and other poems.'* 
Boston. Houghton, Mifflin and Co. 

1878. — John William Dawson. The pres- 
ent rights and duties of science. Princeton review, 
November, 1878. pp. 674-696. 

Also printed separately as "Article no. 8 firom the Prince- 
ton Beview.*' 

fRiCHABD Henbt Stoddabd. Hlstory. 
Poems, Complete edition. (New York. 1880.) 

1879. — Chables Smith Bbadlet. 

"The profession of the law as an element in society " was 
the subject of the oration, according to the B^ton Adver- 
tiser. 

z88o. — RiCHABD Salteb Stobbs. The recog- 
nition of the supernatural in letters and in life. 
An oration [delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa 
society of Harvard College, 1 July, 1880]. New 



8 



THE OBATORS AND POETS. 



York. Anson D. F. Randolph and Co. [1881.] 
8*». pp. 67. 

t Edgar Fa WCBTT. The republic. Read 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Haryard Col- 
lege, June [sic] 1880. Song and story. Letter 
poems. (Boston. James R. Osgood and Co. 1884. 
B'*.) pp. 61-66. 

z88x. — Wendell Phillips. The scholar in a 
republic. Address at the centennial anniyersarj 
of the phi Beta Kappa of Harvard College, June 
80, 1881. Boston, Lee and Shepard; New York, 
Charles T. Dillingham. 8<'. pp. 86. 

Also printed in the Boston Daily AdvertLser, 1 July, 1881, 
and in Uie Boston Commonwealth, 9 Joly, 1881. 

t Charles Godfkbt Lbland. 
1 88a. — Carl Sghurz. [Oration, on the con- 
dition and prospects of American society, deliyered 
before the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard 
College, 29 June, 1882.] Boston Daily AdveriU- 
er, 30 June, 1882. 

1883. — Charles Francis Adams. A college 
fetich. An address delivered before the Harvard 
chapter of the fraternity of the Phi Beta Kappa, 
in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, June 28, 1888. 
Boston, Lee and Shepard ; New York, Charles T. 
Dillingham. 1883. 8<l pp. 88. 

The same. Second edition. Bos- 
ton, etc. 1888. 8^. pp. 38. 

The same. Third edition, with 

supplementary matter. Boston, etc. 1884. 8^. 

pp. 71. 

The address was printed in fall in the Boston Herald, 29 
Jane, 1883, and in the Independent, 9 Ang. 1883. A bibli- 
ography of the discussion aroused by the paper, will be 
found in "A list of the Publications of Harvard University 
and its officers, etc. 1880-85.*' Cambridge. 1886. [Biblio- 
graphical contributions of the Library of Hanrard (College. 
No. 21.] pp. 9-12. 

t Robert Grant. Yankee Doodle. A 
poem delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa society 
of Harvard University, June 28, 1883. Boston. 
Cupples, Upham and Co. 1888. 16®. pp. 81. 

1884. — Richard Claverhouse Jebb. Some 
ancient organs of public opinion. An address de- 
livered before the members of the <l>. B. K. society 
at Harvard College, June 26, 1884. Cambridge. 



[EngUnd]. Printed at the University Press. 1884. 
8®. pp. 24. 

Z885. — William Hbnrt Rawlb. The case of 
the educated unemployed. An address delivered 
before the Harvard chapter of the fraternity of 
the Phi Beta Kappa society in Sanders Theatre, 
Cambridge, June 25th, 1885. Second edition. 
Boston, Little, Brown and Co. ; London, Sampson 
Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington. 1885. 1. 8®. 
pp. 81. 

t John White Chadwick. A legend of 
good poets. A poem delivered June 25th, 1885, 
to the Phi Beta Kappa Fraternity of Harvard 
University. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 1885. 8®. 
pp. 20. 

x886. — Daniel Coit Oilman. An address be- 
fore the Phi Beta Kappa society of Harvard Uni- 
versity, July 1, 1886. [Baltimore.] 1886. 8<l 
pp. 88. 

The Rnbject of the oration it the characteristics of a uni- 
versity. 

1888. — Charles William Eliot. The work- 
ing of the American democracy. An address 
delivered before the fraternity ^ B K of Harvard 
University, June 28, 1888. Cambridge. John 
Wilson and Son. 1888. 8®. pp. 24. 

Z889. — Edward John Phelps. International 

relations. Address before the Phi Beta Kappa 

society of Harvard University, June 29 [27], 1889. 

Burlington [Vt.]. Free Press Association. 1889. 

1. 8''. pp. 81. 

Also printed in the Boston Daily AdvertUer and Bo%ton 
Pott of 28 June, 1889. 

fPERGivAL Lowell. 
Z890. — Henrt Codman Potter. The scholar 
and the state. Oration delivered June 26, 1890, 
before the Phi Beta Kappa chapter of Harvard 
University. New York. E. P. Dutton and Co. 
1890. pp. 82. 

t Richard Watson Gilder. Ode : read 
before the society of the Phi Beta Kappa, Harvard 
University, June 26th, 1890. pp. (8). 

Printed on one side of the page only. The poem, which 
is an address to "The spirit of beanty," appeared in the 
CriHct 28 Jane, 1890 ; ziU. 828. 



Library oC tartan iant&eriac;. 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR, 

LIBRARIAN. 

I^o. 43. 




A CLASSIFIED LIST OF BOOKS 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



By CHARLES GROSS, Ph.D., 

iHstmctoT in History, in Harvard University. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. ; 
Isoaeb b]! tfit l^ibtars of fj^arttaiti Snfbnsltir. 



Already issued or in 'preparation: 



VOL. I. 



I. Sdwarb S. Holdbn. Index-Catalogue of Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

3. Justin Winsor. Shakespeare's Poems : a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Charles Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 

the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Pietas et Gratulatlo. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List of Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 

United States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. Ths Collection of Books and Autographs, be. 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor, 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lank. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. George Lincoln Goodalb. The Floras of different 

countries. 

10. Justin Winsor. Halliwelliana: a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard HalliwelUPhillipps. 



II. Samuel H. Scuddbr. The Entomological Libraries 
of tlie United States. 

la. First List of the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1870-1880. 

13. Samuel H. Scuddbr. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinohast. Notes on the Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann's Geographlsche Mittheilungen. 1855- 
18S1. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 
18S3. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

ao. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 1884-188$. 



VOL. II. 



31. Second List of the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1885. 

sa. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

33. William H.TiLLiNGH AST. Third List ofthe Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1885- 
1886. 

34. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference T«ists, 

no. a. 1885-1886. 

35. W. G. Fablow and William Tbeleabb. TJst of 

Works on North American FungL 

a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 
37. Andrew McF. I>avis. A few notes on the Records 
of Harvard College. 

a8. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publica. 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1886- 
1887. 



39. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 
no; 3. 1887. 

3a Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem " To a 
Skylark," with notes. 

31. W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Works on 
North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, 1789-1839. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publications 

of Harvard University and its Officers. 18S7-188S. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. George E. Woodbbrrt. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Prank Weitenkampf. Bibliography of Hogarth. 



VOL. III. 



38. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publics^ 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1888- 
1889. 

39. Alfred C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 1890. 



41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1889- 
1890. 

4a. William H. Tillinghast. The Orators and Poets 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachusetts. 

43. Charles Gross. A Classified List of Books relating 
to British Municipal History. 



A CLASSIFIED LIST OF BOOKS 

SBLATINO TO 

BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 

By CHARLES GROSS, Ph.D. 

The following list is a selection from a bibliography comprising nearly 4000 titles, which I haye 
almost ready for the press. The works relate, wholly or in part, to British municipal history, in other 
words, to the gOTernmental or constitutional history of the cities and boroughs of Great Britain. I haye 
tried to make the list a useful guide, not merely to librarians and general readers, but also to investigators 
of the whole or any particular phase of the subject. For a general criticism of the literature of the 
subject the reader may consult my essay '*A plea for reform in the study of English municipal 
history" (Papers of the American historical association, vol. t.). 

The asterisks indicate a smaller selection of books of prime importance. H signifies that a book is 
in the Library of Harvard College. Books not in the Harvard College Library which may be found in 
the Boston Public Library are indicated by a B. 



PART I. — GENERAL AUTHORITIES. 



BIMlosraphlM. 

The following two bibliognphiet are the most useAil, but 
they are verr incomplete, and ao not flruide the reader through 
the labjrrinth of works on municipal nistory. For AiUer listB 
of books relating to particular towns, the special county bib- 
Uographiea should be consulted. 

Anderson, J. P. The book of British topogra- 
phy. London. 1881. 4'' and S"". H 

GoMMB, 6. L. The literature of local institu- 
tions. London. 1886. 16"*. H 



PmUlo lUoorda and otlMr Oricinal 
Axiihoritimm* 

All the sources mentioned below are inraluable for the 
study of general municipal history. The most important are 
the Reports of the Corporations commission and of the His- 
torical manuscripts commission. Most of the publications of 
the Record commission are also useful, e. g, the " Statutes 
of the realm,'* " Rotuli parliamcntorum,'' *' Quo warranto 
rolls," •« Rymer's Foedera," etc. 

See below under '* Parliamentary representation," "Gilds," 
"Cinque Ports," "Wales," " Ireland," and "Scotland," for 
original authorities relating especially to these subiects ; see 
also Part n.f under the names of particular boroughs. 

Ancibnt laws and institutes of England. Edited 
by Benj. Thorpe. (Record commission.) [Lon- 
don.] 1840. f». H 

DiPLOMATARiUM angUcum aevi saxonici. Ed- 
ited by Benj. Thorpe. Londonl 1865. 81 H 

Useftil for the study of Anglo-Saxon gilds. 



^DOMBSDAY book. 



4 vols. 



London. 1788-1816. 

H 

Volumes iiL and It. published by the Record commission. 



Gesetzb (Die) der angelsachsen. Herausge- 
geben tou Reinhold Schmid. Leipzig. 1882. 81 
[Second edition. Leipzig. 1858. 81] H 

This, like Thorpe's Ancient laws, contains most of the 
material extant relating to Anglo-Saxon boroughs. The 
second edition is far superior to the first. 

^Reports of the commissioners appointed to in- 
quire into the municipal corporations in England 
and Wales. First report, with appendix. (Par- 
Ham, papers, 1885, yoIs. xxiii.-xzTi.) 4 vols. 
London. 1835. f*, H 

♦ Analytical index. (Parliam. papers, 1889, 

vol. xviii.) London. 1889. f1 H 

* Second report, London and Southwark. 

(Parliam. papers, 1887, vol. xxv.) London. 1887. 



f1 



H 



* Reports upon certain boroughs. (Parliam. 

pai)ers, 1887-88, vol. xxxv.) London. 1837-88. 
f1 H 

♦ First report of the commissioners ap- 
pointed to inquire into the municipal corporations 
in Ireland. (Parliam. papers, 1835, vols, xxvii., 
xxviii. ; 1836, vol. xxiv.) [Report and appendix, 
in four parts.] 3 vols. London. 1835-36. T. H 

♦ General report of the commissioners . . . 

in Scotland. (Parliam. papers, 1835, vol. xxix. ; 
1836, vol. xxiii.) 2 vols. London. 1835-^6. f*. H 

* Report of the commissioners appointed to 

inquire into municipal corporations not subject to 
the Municipal corporations acts. (Parliam. pa- 
pers, 1880, vol. xxxi.) London. 1880. f1 H 

* Reports of the royal commission on historical 
manuscripts. First report, 1870 — thirteenth re- 
port, 1891. London. 1870-91. T. H 



BOOf S j»'!:r:.TTNG TO 






HoTULi chartanim, 1199-1216. Edited b} \\ i * 
Hardy. (Record commiBsion.) London. :^ .. 
f*. H 

Stubbs, Wm. Select charters and other .: <- 
trations of English constitutional history. C \ 
1870. «^. [Sixth edition. Oxford. 1888. b. 

Aoooimts of General Mnnioipal History 

a. — Frineipal TrecUises, 

There is no ^od general history of English municipv. . •^. 
Bradf is sophistical and antiquated. Honest Madoz . • 
helpiul, for he gives us numerous extracts from un* 

guDlic records. The material in Mere wether and St -{« ;- 
I valuable, but many of their s^neral conclusions are •i-.'v.i.. 
ble. Thompson's little book w readable but fragmcnt-ii y . 

Brady, Robert. An historical treatise of citie^* I 
and burghs. London. 1690. £^. [Second edi- 
tion. London. 1704. fl New edition. London. 
1777. 8^. This last edition has errors and omis- 
sions.] H 

*Madox, Thomas. Firma burgi, or an historical 
essay concerning the cities, towns, and boroughs of 
England. London. 1726. f. H 

• *Meb£W£th£r, H. a., and Stephens, A. J. The 
history of the boroughs and municipal corporations 
of the United Kingdom. 3 vols. London. 1885. 
8<» H 

Thompson, James. An essay on English muni- 
cipal history. London. 1867. 8**. H 

b. — Short Accounts, 

Feilden ^ives the main fitcts in a very few paffes. Gneist's 
views are interesting, but he follows Merew^her and Ste- 
phens too closely. 

Feilden, H. St. Clair. A short constitutional 
history of England. Oxford. 1882. 81 [Second 
edition. Oxford. 1887. 8*1] H 

Glasson, Ernest. Histoire du droit et des in- 
stitutions politiques de TAngleterre. 6 vols. Paris. 
1882-88. 8*1 H 

Gneist, Rudolf. Englische yerfassungsge- 
schichte. Berlin. 1882. ^, H 

History of the English constitution, trans- 
lated by P. A. Ashworth. 2 vols. London. 1886. 8<». 
[Second edition. 2 vols. London. 1889. 8*'.] H 

♦ Die geschichte des selfgovemment in 

England. Berlin. 1863. 8°. H 

Selfgovemment, communalverfassungund 

verwaltungsgerichte in England. 3teauflage. Ber- 
lin. 1871. 8° H 

Merewethek, H. a. a sketch of the history 
of boroughs. London. 1822. 81 

By Periods. 

a. — Anglo-Saxon Period. 

Stubbs gives the most trustworthy account of Anglo-Saxon 
boroughs. Kcmble is fbller and more readable, but should 
be used with caution; he tends to confuse the municipal 
history of England with that of the Continent. Coote and 
Wright attempt (In ray opinion, without success) to show the 
survival of Koman institutions in Anglo-Saxon boroughs. 
Stubbs and Green maintain the opposite \iew. 



CooTE, H. C. The Romans of Britain. Lon- 
don. 1878. S** H 

Green, J. R. The conquest of England. Lon- 
don. 1883. 8° H 

The making of England. London. 1881. 

9- H 



Kbmblb, J. M. The Saxons in England. 2 vols. 
{.ondon. 1849. 8^ H 

* Stubbs, Wm. The constitutional history of 

J. inland. 8 vols. Oxford. 1874-78. 8*. [In 

' : sT editions the text has not been materially 

' hi.nged.] H 

''^RiOHT, Thomas. On the existence of muni- 
( i M 1 privileges under the Anglo-Saxons. ( Archaeo- 
i-^g!i, vol. xxxii. London. 1847. 4^.) H 

b. — From the Norman Conqiiest to 1485. 

Stubbs is the best guide for this period. 

Birch, W. de Gray. Domesday book. London. 
1S87. 16**. H 

^ ^CoLBT, C. W. Growth of oligarchy in English 
towns. (Englis^i historical review, vol. v. Lon- 
don. 1890. 8«».) H 

*Ellis, Henry. General introduction to Domes- 
day book. (Record commission.) 2 vols. [Lon- 
don.] 1888. 8*. H 

Gross, Charles. The affiliation of mediaeval 
boroughs. Reprinted from the Antiquary. Lon- 
don. 1886. 4*». H 

Hallam, Henry. View of the state of Europe 
in the middle ages. Tenth edition. 8 vols. Lon- 
don. 1853. 8"*. H 

Morgan, J. F. England under the Norman 
occupation. London. 1858. 8". H 

Round, J. H. Danegeld and the finance of 
Domesday. (In Domesday studies, being the pa- 
pers read at Domesday commemoration, 1886. 
Vol. i. London. 1888. 8*») H 

^Stubbs, Wm. The constitutional history of 
England. 8 vols. Oxford. 1874-78. 8«. H 

c,—From 1485 to 1789. 

Merowether and Stephens g^ve a detailed account of this 
period, and are more tmstwortliy hero than in the earlier 
portions of their treatise. 

^Hallam, Henry. The constitutional history of 
England. (Henry VII. — George II.) Eighth 
edition. 8 vols. London. 1855. 8*1 H 

North, Roger. Examen. London. 1740. 4l*. H 
Seizure of charters of corporations, pp. S0&-645. 

Pleadings (The) ... in the court of Kings- 
Bench upon the quo warranto, touching the char- 
ter of the city of London [and points concerning 
other corporations]. London. 1696. fl H 

Power (The) of the kings of England to exam- 
ine the charters of particular corporations. Lon- 
don. 1684. r. 

Seasonable reflections on dissolving corpora- 
tions, in the late two reigns. London. 1689. f*. 

d. — The Nineteenth Century. 

See also below, under " Parliamentary representation.*' 
May and Walpole contain good general accounts of this 
period. Vine is fuller for the years 1886-1879. Chalmers 
and Escott describe the present municipal organization of 
England. For some recent changes, see Chambers and 
HoIdBworth. 

Black book (The) ; or, corruption unmasked . . . 
forming a complete exposition of the . . . corrup- 
tion of borough government. 2 vols. London. 
1820-23. 8^. [New editions in one volume ap- 
peared in 1832 and 1835.] H 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



*Chalmbs8, M. D. E. S. Local gorernment. 
(English citizen series.) London. 1883. 8®. H 

ChambkrSi Geo. F. Popular summary of the 
law relating to local government, forming a com- 
plete guide to the new act of 1888. London. 1888. 
4<l [Second edition. London. 1888. 4*'.] H 

CocKBUBH, A. J. E. The corporations of Eng- 
land and Wales ; containing a succinct account of 
the constitution, etc. of each corporation. London. 
1885. 8«. 

Cox, Homersham. The institutions of the Eng- 
lish goTemment. London. 1868. 8^. H 

EscoTT, T. H. S. England : its people, polity, 
and pursuits. 2 toIs. London, etc. [1879.] 8*1 
[New edition. London. 1886. 8®.] H 

Fletcher, Joseph. Statistics of the municipal 
institutions of English towns. (Quarterly journal 
of the statistical society of London, vol. v. Lon- 
don. 1842. 8<t) H 

HoLDSwoRTH, W. A. Treatise on the Local'goT- 
emment act, 1888. London. 1888. 8°. 

Lbrot-Beaulieu, Paul. L'administration locale 
en France et en Angleterre. Paris. [1872.] 8*1 H 

Local government and taxation. Edited hy 
J. W. Probyn. (Cobden club essays.) London. 
1875. 8®. [Another edition. London. 1882. 8*".] H 

*Mat, T. £. The constitutional history of Eng- 
land, 1760-1860. 2 vols. London. 1861-62. 8<'. 
[Third edition, to 1871. 8 vols. London. 1871. 
8*] H 

McCarthy, Justin. The epoch of reform, 1830- 
1850. (Epochs of modem history.) London. 
1882. le^l H 

MoLBSWORTH, W. N. Hlstory of England, 
1830-1874. 8yol8. London. 1874. le*". H 

Vol. i. ch. vi. " Corporation reform." 

Palorave, Francis. Corporate reform. Lon- 
don. 1833. 8'1 

Rathbonb, Wm., and Whitbbead, Sam. Local 
government. 2 pts. [London.] 1877. f*. 

*Vine, J. R. Somers. English municipal insti- 
tutions ; their growth and development from 1835 
to 1879. London. 1879. V". H 

Walpolb, Spencer. A history of England from 
1815. 5 vols. London. 1878-86. 8^ H 

WiLLLAMS, J. W. H., and Vine, J. R. S. The 
English municipal code : being the Municipal cor- 
porations act, 1882, with historical introduction. 
London./ 1882. 8*". 



ParliaaiMitaiy Ilepr«a«atatloii« 

a. — OentrcU, 

The most important original sources are '* Parliamentary 
writs" and "Botoli parliamentorum." The ** Reports on 
the dignity of a peer" contain a detailed history of English 
legisumve assemblies, andiUso many extracts fh>m public 
records illostrating the subject. Gneist gives a short general 
account of parliamentary history. Cox and Riess are valua- 
ble for particular phases of the subject. 

Bban, Wm. W. The parliamentary representa- 
tion of Uie six northern counties of England, 1603- 
1886. HuU. 1890. 8"* H 

BoHUN, Wm. A collection of debates, etc. of 
the house of commons, toucMng the right of elect- 
ing members. London. [1702.] P. 



[Carew, Thomas.] An historical account of the 
rights of elections of the several counties, cities, 
and boroughs of Great Britain. By a late member 
of Parliament. 2 pts. London. 1755. n 

CoRBETT, Uvedale. Inquiry into the elective 
franchise of . . . the corporate counties in England 
and Wales. London. 1826. 8*1 

Cox, Homersham. Antient parliamentary elec- 
tions. London. 1868. 8°. H 

Gneist, Rudolf. Das englische parlament, vom 
9. bis zum ende des 19. jahrhunderts. Berlin. 
1886. 8"*. [Second edition. Berlin. 1886. 8"*.] 

The English parliament. Translated by 

B. J. Shee. London. 1886. 8*1 H 

The students' history of the English par- 
liament. New English edition, rewritten by A. H. 
Keane. London. 1887. 81 H 

Members of parliament. Return of the name 
of every member of the lower house of parliament 
from 1213 to 1874. (Parliam. papers, 1878, vol. 
Ixii. pts. i.-ii.) 2 vols. London. 1878. 41 
[Reprinted, with additions, in 1891.] H 

Oldfibld, T. H. B. The representative history 
of Great Britain and Ireland. 6 vols. London. 
1816. 81 H 

^Parliahentaut writs. Edited by F. Palgrave. 
2- vols, in 4 pts. (Record commission. ) [London. ] 
1827-34. h H 

Parry, C. H. The parliaments and councils of 
EngUnd to 1688. London. 1839. 81 H 

Prtnne, Wm. A brief register, kalendar and 
survey of parliamentary writs. 4 vols. London. 
1669-64. 41 H 

'Reports from the lords' committees appointed 
to search for all matters touching the dig^ty of a 
peer of the realm. (Parliam. papers, 1821, vol. 
xi. ; reprinted with appendixes, and reports ii.-iv., 
ibid., 1826, vols. vi.-ix.) H 

*RiE88, Ludwig. Geschichte des wahlrechts zum 
englischen parlament. Leipzig. 1885. 81 H 
An excellent monograph. 

'RoTULi parliamentorum. 6 vols. [London. 
1766?] f». H 

Continued in the Journals of the bouse of lords and Journals 
of the house of commons. 



b. — ParliamewtcLry Refom^, 

May and Walpole (see above, under "Nineteenth century") 
give g^d short accounts. Of the f^eneral histories of parlia- 
mentary reform, 1832-1884, Beaton's is the best. Moles- 
worth and Roebuck are the fullest aathorities for the reform 
of 1882 ; Cox, for that of 1867 ; and Lucy, for that of 1884. 

Anstby, T. C. Plea of the unrepresented com- 
mons for restitution of franchise. London. 1866. 
81 B 

Contains also a good sketch of the history of borough 
snifrage. 

Baoehot, Walter. Essays on parliamentary re- 
form. London. 1888. 81 H 

Bright, John. Speeches on parliamentary re- 
form. London. [1866.] 81 H 

Cox, Homersham. A history of the reform 
bills of 1866 and 1867. London. 1868. 81 H 

DiLKE, C. W. Parliamentary reform. London. 
1879. 81 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



Disraeli, Benj. Parliamentary reform. A se- 
ries of speeches. Edited by M. Corry. London. 
1867. 8«» B 

Gladstone, W. £. Speeches on parliamentary 
reform in 1866. London. 1866. S^, B 

Grby, H. G. (Earl). Parliamentary govern- 
ment considered with reference to a reform of par- 
liament. London. 1858. 8^. [New edition. Lon- 
don. 1864. 8<»] H 

*Heaton, Wm. The three reforms of parlia- 
ment. A history, 1830-85. London. 1885. d^. H 
A Ittcid, compact account. 

Lucy, H. W. A diary of two parliaments [1874- 
1885]. 2 vols. London. 1885-86. S*". B 

Cont^na an account of the reform of 1884. 

McCartht, Justin. The epoch of reform, 1830- 
1850. London. 1882. Id^". H 

Mill, J. S. Thoughts on parliamentary reform. 
London. 1859. 8^. [Second edition. London. 
1859. 8^] H 

MoLBs WORTH, W. N. Hlstory of the reform bill 
of 1832. London, etc. 1865. 8*". H 

Murdoch, James. A history of constitutional 
reform In Great Britain and Ireland ; with a full 
account of the three great measures of 1832, 1867, 
and 1884. London. 1885. 8<'. 
Pretentious but unreliable. 

Paul, Alex. The history of reform. London. 
1884. W. [Fifth edition. London. 1885. 12<>.] 
A brief sketch. 

Ravbit, John. The parliamentary history of 
England, from the passing of the reform bill of 
1882. London. 1885. 8*1 B 

Roebuck, J. A. History of the whig ministry 
of 1830. 2 Tols. London. 1852. 8''. H 

Gilds. 

Many documents relating to gilds are printed by Smith and 
Gross. Walford's book Is encyclopaedic and superficial. 
Brentano*8 sketch is brilliant but unreliable. Salrioni fol- 
lows pretty closely in Brentaiio*s tracks. Von Ochenkowski 
is helpftil for the study of craft fraternities. Ashley, Cun- 
ningham, and Seligman give good short accounts of the 
whole subject. For a brief criticism of the principal authori- 
ties, see Gross, Gild Merchant, App. A, and Ashley. 

AsHLET, W. J. An introduction to economic 
history and theory. London. 1888. 8^. H 

Brentano, Lujo. On the history and develop- 
ment of gilds. [A reprint of the introductory essay 
in Smith's English gilds.] London. [1870.] 8<>. H 

CuNviKOHAM, Wm. Growth of English industry 
and commerce. Cambridge. 1890. 8^. H 

*Gross, Charles. The gild merchant. A contri- 
bution to British municipal history. 2 toIs. Ox- 
ford. 1890. 8<>. H 

^OoHBHKOWBKi, W. YOU. England's wirthschaft- 
liche entwickelung im ausgange des mittelalters. 
Jena. 1879. 8<l H 

Salyioki, G. B. Le glide inglesl. Firenze. 
1888. 8<> H 

Selioman, £. R. A. Two chapters on the me- 
diaeval guilds of England. [Baltimore.] 1887. 
8«. ' H 

*Smith, J. T. English gilds. (Early English 
text society.) London. 1870. 8^. H 

Walford, Cornelius. Gilds : their origin, con- 
stitution, objects, and later history. London. 1888. 
8*. H 



Comity Histories (Hwglaiid). 

Many county histories are useful for the study of municipal 
history. 1 mention here only those that are particularly 
valuable for the study of this subject. A fuller list will m 
found in Anderson's bibliography. 

Bainbs, Edward. History of the county of Lan- 
caster. 2 Yols. Liverpool. 1824. 8^. [New 
edition. 4 vols. Manchester. 1888-91. 4'*.] H 

*Blomefield, Francis. An essay towards a to- 
pographical history of the county of ^Norfolk. 
6 vols. Fersfield and Lynn. 1739-1776. fl 
[Another edition. 11 vols. London. 1805-10. 
«^, and 4*'.] H 

Complete (A) parochial history of Cornwall. 
4 vols. Truro. 1867-1872. 8«. H 

Dallaway, James. History of the western di- 
vision of the county of Sussex. 2 vols, in 8 parts. 
London. 1815-30. 41 B 

*Eyton, R. W. Antiquities of Shropshire. 12 
vols. London. 1854-60. S^. B 

Hasted, Edward. History and topogi:^phical 
survey of the county of Kent. 4 vols. Canter- 
bury. 1778-99. f*. [Third edition. Part i. 
London. 1886. f*.] H 

"^ Ho ARE, R. C. History of modern Wiltshire. 
6 vols. London. 1822-44. f* B 

Hodgson, John. History of Northumberland. 
Pts. ii.-iii. 6 vols. Newcastle. 1820-40. 4*1 B 

HoRSFiELD, T. W. History of Sussex. 2 vols. 
Lewes. 1885. 4**. B 

♦HuTCHiNs, John. History of Dorset. 2 vols. 
London. 1774. f*. [Third edition. 4 vols. 
Westminster. 1861-74. f».] H 

Mannikg, Owen. History and antiquities of 
Surrey. Continued by W. Bray. 8 vols. Lon- 
don. 1804-14. f>. B 

MoRANT, Philip. History and antiquities of 
Essex. 2 vols. London. 1768. f^. H 

Nash, T. B. Collections for the history of 
Worcestershire. 2 vols. London. 1781-82. f*. 
[A supplement, and also a second edition, appeared 
in 1799.] B 

Nichols, John. History of the county of Lei- 
cester. 4 vols. London. 1795-1815. T. B 

NicoLSOK, J., and Burn, R. History of West- 
moreland and Cumberland. 2 vols. London. 
1777. 4<». H 

^Ormerod, George. History of the county and 
city of Chester. 3 vols. London. 1819. fl 
[New edition. 3 vols. London. (1875)-1882. 
h] H 

'^SuRTBES, Robert. History of the county of 
Durham. 4 vols. London. 1816-40. f*. H 

Woodward, B. B. General history of Hamp- 
shire. 3 vols. London. [1861-69.] 4'*. B 



dnque Ports. 

^Burrows, Montagu. Cinque Ports. London. 
1888. 8«. H 

The best short account. 

*Jbake, Samuel. Charters of the Cinque Ports. 
London. 1728. f?, B 

Knocker, Edw. An account of the Grand court 
ofShepway. London. 1862. 4*1 B 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



Ltok, John. Historj of Dover; with a short 
account of the Cinque Ports. Dover. 1813-U. 
4» H 

Mantell, Thomas. An account of the Cinque 
Ports meetings. Dover. 1811. 4^. 

Wales. 

^Archaeolooia cambrensis. (Cambrian arch- 
aeological association.) London. 1846-91. 8^. H 

See inter alia the supplementary volame of original docu- 
ments, 1877. 

Bte-gokes relating to Wales and the border 
counties. 8 vols. Oswestry. [1871-89.] 4°. H 

CoiXBCTiONs relating to Montgomeryshire. 
(PowysUnd club.) London. 1868, etc. 8*. 

Metsick, S. R. History and antiquities of the 
county of Cardigan. London. 1810. 4°. B 

Reoistrum vulgariter noncupatum ** The record 
of Caernarvon." (Record commission.) [Lon- 
don.] 1838. f». H 

Contains several town charters, etc 

Report of the Municipal corporations commis- 
sion. See above, under ''Public records." H 

Ireland* 

The most valuable original sources are " Chartae Iliber- 
niae," "Historic documents," and tlie "Report of the Cor- 
porations commission." Gale and Lynch tnrow much light 
on the general history of Irish boroughs. 

^Chartae, privilegiae et immunltates Hibemiae, 
1171-1395. (Irish record commission.) [London. 
1829-80.] f* [Reprinted in 1889.] H 

"^Galb, Peter. An inquiry into the ancient cor- 
porate system of Ireland. London and Dublin. 
1834. 12« H 

^Historic and municipal documents of Ireland, 
1172-1320. Edited by J. T. Gilbert. (Rolls se- 
ries.) London. 1870. 8"*. H 

Liber munerum publicorum Hibemiae (1152- 
1827). Edited by R. Lascelles. (Irish record 
commission.) 7 pts. 2 vols. [London. 1852.] 
f» H 

Ltkch, Wm. The law of election in the ancient 
cities and towns of Ireland. London. 1831. S**. H 

^Report of the Municipal corporations commis- 
sion. See above, under '* Public records." H 

Rules, orders, and directions by the lord lieu- 
tenant [Arthur Capel] and council for the regu- 
lating of all cities, towns, and corporations. Dub- 
lin. 1672. f» [Reprinted in 1701 and 1742.] 

Sootlaiid* 

The most important original sources are "Ancient laws," 
"Miscellany of records society," "Records of the Conven- 
tion." and the "Report of the Corporations commiMion." 
Innes, Inrin^, and Mackintosh gire intereotinK sketches of 
municipal history. Goudy and Smith describe the present 
organization of boroughs. 

♦Acts of the parliament of Scotland (1124-1707). 
(Record commission.) 12 vols. [London.] 1814- 
76. r. H 

♦Ancient laws and customs of the burghs of Scot- 
land. [Edited by Cosmo Innes.] (Scottish burgh 
records society.) Edinburgh. 1868. 4". H 

Constitution of the royal burghs of Scotland. 
Glasgow. 1818. 8"*. H 

A reprint of the Report of 1793 mentioned below. 



Documents connected with the question of re- 
form in the royal burghs of Scotland. Second 
edition. Edinburgh. 1819. 8"". [The first edi- 
tion appeared in 1817.] H 

[Goudy, H., and Smith, W. C] Local govern- 
ment [in Scotland]. Edinburgh and London. 
1880. ft 

Innes, Cosmo. Scotland in the middle ages. 
Edinburgh. 1860. S*". H 

Lectures on Scotch legal antiquities. Ed- 
inburgh. 1872. 8*1 H 

Irvino, Joseph. The origin and influence of 
burghs in Scotland. Reprinted from the transac- 
tions of the Glasgow archaeol. society, vol. i. , pt. iv. 
Glasgow. 1866. 8<'. H 

Mackay, John. The Convention of the royal 
burghs of Scothind to 1707. Edinburgh. 1884. 9^. H 

Mackintosh, John. History of civilisation in 
Scotland. 4 vols. London and Edinburgh. 1878- 
88. 8<l B 

♦Miscellany of the Scottish burgh records so- 
ciety. Edinburgh. 1881. 4"*. H 

Origines parochiales Scotiae. (Bannatyne 
club.) 2 vols. Edinburgh. 1850-55. 4''. H 

♦Records of the Convention of the royal burghs 
ofScotUind. [1295-1738.] [Edited by J. D. Mar- 
wick.] 6 vols. Edinburgh. 1866-1890. 4<». H 

Report from the committee to whom the sev- 
eral petitions presented to the house of commons 
from the royal burghs of Scotland . . . were re- 
ferred. (Parliam. papers, Commons reports, 1798- 
1802, vol. xiv.) London. 1793. fl H 

The same, 1819. [Second report, with a 

reprint of the report of 1793.] (Parliam. papers, 
1819, vol. vi.) London. 1819. f». H 

♦Report of the Municipal corporations commis- 
sion. See above, under *' Public records." H 

Robertson, E. W. Scotland under her early 
kings. 2 vols. Edinburgh. 1862. 8°. H 

Rogers, Charles. Social life in Scotland. 
8 vols. Edinburgh. 1884-86. 8<'. H 

Sets (The) or constitutions of the royal burghs 
ofScotUnd. Edinburgh. 1787. 4*1 H 

Tlie " sets," in a more complete form, are also printed in 
the Miscellany of the burgh records society 

Wight, Alex. An inquiry into the rise and 
progress of parliament, chiefly in Scotland. Edin- 
burgh. 1784. 4* H 

MisoellAn««iu. 

Freeman, E. A. English towns and districts. 
London. 1888. 8o. H 

GoHME, G. L. Index of municipal offices. (In- 
dex society.) London. 1879. 4*'. H 

The old land-rights of municipal corpora- 
tions. (The antiquary, vol. ix. London. 1884. 
4".) H 

Traces of the primitive village community 

in English municipal institutions. (Archaeologia, 
vol. xlvi. London. 1881. 4°.) H 

Gross, Charles. A plea for reform in the study 
of English municipal history. (Papers of the 
American historical association, vol. v. New York. 
1891. 8°) H 

Roberts, Geo. The social history of the peo- 
ple of the southern counties of England. London. 
1866. 8*» H 



8 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



PART n.— PARTICULAR TOWNS. 

In this list many small boroughs are omitted. Under the names of the boronghs included in the 
list, only those books are mentioned which I consider most important for the study of the derelopment 
of municipal government. 



Aberdeen. 

*Bain, Ebenezer. Merchant and craft gilds. 
A history of the Aberdeen incorporated tnides. 
Aberdeen. 1887. 8°. H 

UseAil for the general history of Scotch gilds. 

*Charteb8 and other writs illustrating the history 
of Aberdeen, 1571-1704. Edited with transition 
by P. J. Anderson. Aberdeen. 1890. 4**. 

Extracts from the accounts and registers of 
Aberdeen. (Spalding club. Miscellany, toI. v. 
Aberdeen. 1852. 4*'.) H 

'^Extracts from the council register of Aberdeen, 
1898-1625. (Spalding club.) 2 vols. Aberdeen. 
1844-48. 4<'. 

* The same, 1625-1747, (Scottish burgh rec- 
ords society.) 2 vols. Edinburgh. 1871-72. 4°. H 

Kennedy, Wm. Annals of Aberdeen. 2 vols. 
London. 1818. 4*1 
The best general history of Aberdeen. 

Ross, Jas. A. Record of municipal affairs in 
Aberdeen since 1838. Aberdeen. 1889. 8^. B 

Alnwlok. 

Tate, Geo. History of Alnwick. 2 vols. Aln- 
wick. 1866-69. 8*. H 

Altrlnoluuiu 

Inoham, Alfred. History of Altrincham and 
Bowdon. Altrincham. 1879. 4**. 

Arbroatlu 

"^Hat, Geo. History of Arbroath. Arbroath. 
1876. 4°. H 



Stuart, James. Historical memoirs of the city 
of Armagh. Newry. 1819. 8°. 

Anuidel. 

TiERNBT, M. A. History and antiquities of 
Arundel. 2 vols. London. 1834. 8''. B 

Ajlesbiiry. 

GiBBS, Robert. History of Aylesbury. Ayles- 
bury. 1885. 4**. 

Ayr. 

^Charters of Ayr. (Printed for the Ayr and 
Wigton archaeol. association.) Edinburgh. 1888. 
4^ B 

Bandeii. 

Bennett, Geo. History of Bandon. Cork. 
1862. S"*. [New edition. Cork. 1869. 8<'.] H 

Barnstaple. 

Chanter, J. R. The Barnstaple records. (North 
Devon journal, 1879-81 ; North Devon herald, 
1879-81.) 
A valuable collection of extracts from the borough archivcB. 



Grirrle, J. B. Memorials of Barnstaple. Barn- 
staple. 1830. 8^ H 



"^Batgent, F. J., and Millard, J. E. History of 
Basingstoke. Basingstoke and London. 1889. 
8«. B 

An excellent work. 

Bath. 

Falconer, R. W. List of charters, etc. con- 
nected with Bath. [Bath. 1858.] 8''. 

*KiNO, A. J., and Watts, B. H. The municipal 
records of Bath, 1189-1604. London. [1885.] 
4'* H 

Warner, Richard. History of Bath. 1801. 4<'. 

Bedford. 

Bltth, T. a. History of Bedford. London 
and Bedford. [1873.] 81 

Hurst, Geo. The corporation of Bedford. 
(Royal historical society. Transactions, vol. viii. 
London. 1880. 8<>.) H 

Schedule (A) of the records and other docu- 
ments of the corporation of Bedford. Bedford. 
1883. 4». 

Belfitft. 

Benn, Geo. History of Belfast. London and 
Belfast. 1877. 8<l H 



♦Scott, John. Berwick-upon-Tweed. History 
of the town and guild. London. 1888. 4?. H 

Beverley. 

♦PouLSON, Greo. Beverlac. 2 vols. London. 
1829. 4*1 B 

Birmingham. 

♦BuNCE, J. T. History of the corporation of 
Birmingham. 2 vols. Birmingham. 1878-85. 
8<l H 

Dent, R. E. Old and new Birmingham. 8 pts. 
Birmingham. 1879-80. 4^. 

Langford, J. A. A century of Birmingham 
life, 1741-1841. 2 vols. Birmingham and London. 
1868. 8*. H 

Modern Birmingham, 1841-71. 2 vols. 

Birmingham. 1873-77. 8^ 

Blaokbnm. 

Arram, W. a. History of Blackburn. Black- 
bum. 1877. 8«. 



Maclean, John. Parochial and family history 
of Bodmin. London. 1870. 4*". 

[Wallis, John.] The Bodmin register. Bodmin. 
1827-38. S"*. B 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



Thompson, Pisbey. Collections for an account 
of Boston. London and Boston. 1820. 8^. B 

• History and antiquities of Boston. Bos- 
ton and London. 1856. 8"*. H 

BnMuiwtt* 

HoLROTD, Abraham. Collectanea Bradfordiana. 
Saltaire. 1878. 8«. 

Jambs, Jobn. EUstory and topography of Brad- 
ford. London and Bradford. 1841. 8«. [Con- 
tinuation and additions. London and Bradford. 
1866. B\1 H 



Black, D. D. History of Brechin. Brechin. 
1889. 8^ [Second edition. Brechin. 1867. 
8*.] ^ H 



Ja&man, S. G. History of Bridgwater. London. 
1889. 8^ B 



Mabtin, Henry. History of Brighton. Brighton. 
1871. 8^. B 

BristoL 

*Chabtbb8 (The) and letters patent granted to. 
Bristol. By Samuel Seyer. Bristol. 1812. 4°. H 

Hunt, Wm. Bristol. London. 1887. 8'*. H 
A good short hutory. 

Latimeb, John. Annals of Bristol in the nine- 
teenth century. Bristol. 1887. 8*1 B 

'^NiCHOLLS, J. F., and Tatlob, J. Bristol, past 
and present 8 yoIs. Bristol. 1881-82. 4*1 H 
The best general hfstoiy. 

RiGABT, Robert. The maire of Bristowe is 
kalendar. Edited by L. T. Smith. (Camden soci- 
ety.) Westminster. 1872. 4°. H 

Sbtbb, Samuel. Memoirs of Bristol. 2 vols. 
Bristol. 1821-28. 4?. H 

A Talujible work. 

Tatlob, John. A book about Bristol. London 
and Bristo . 1872. 8«. B 



Willis, Browne. History of Buckingham. 
London. 1755. 4®. 

Biiry 8t« Edmiinda. 

Chbonica Jocelini de Brakelonda. (Camden 
society.) London. 1840. 4''. H 

Ttmms, Samuel. Handbook of Bury St. Ed- 
munds. Fifth edition. Bury St. Edmunds. 1885. 
8» H 

Tatbs, Richard. An illustration of the history of 
St. Edmunds Bury. London. 1805. A° [Some 
additional sheets, with the words ** second edition " 
on the tiUe-page, were published in 1848.] B 

*CoopBB, C. H. Annals of Cambridge. 5 yoIs. 
Cambridge. 1842[-58]. S^. H 



iterbiiry. 

Bbbnt, John. Canterbury in the olden time. 
Canterbury. 1860. 8*1 [Second edition. Lon- 
don and Canterbury. 1879. 8''.] H 



Hastbd, Edw. History of Canterbury. Can- 
terbury. 1799. r. [Second edition. 2 vols. 
Canterbury. 1801. 8*.] 

^Minutes collected from the ancient records of 

Canterbury. ByCivis. [Canterbury. 1801-2.] f*. 

A valuable collection of extracts from the civic maniments. 
It contains inter alia the ordinances of several craft gilds. 

Tbanslation (A) of the charters granted to Can- 
terbury. By a Citizen [C. R. Bunce] . Canterbury. 
1791. 8« 

CmrUmU. 

Cbbiohton,M. Carlisle. London. 1889. 8^. H 
The best short general history. 

'^Ebbouson, R. S. Carlisle and its corporation. 
[Carlisle. 1882.] 4<'. 

An excellent sketch of municipal history. 

Cumberland and Westmoreland M.P's, 

1660-1867. London and Carlisle. 1871. 8<*. H 

"^Somb municipal records of the city of Carlisle. 
Edited by R. S. Ferguson and W. Nanson. fCum- 
berland and Westmoreland antiquar. and archaeol. 
society.) Carlisle and London. 1887. 8*1 H 



"^RoTAL charters and historical documents relating 
to Carmarthen. By J. R. Daniel-Tyssen. Car- 
marthen. 1878. 8"*. 

Spubbbll, Wm. Carmarthen and its neighbour- 
hood. Carmarthen. 1860. 8^ [Second edition. 
Carmarthen. 1879. 8<'.] H 

Gliester. 

"^Hemingwat, Jos. History of Chester. 2 vols. 
Chester. 1831. 8o. H 

Political history of Chester. Chester. 1814. 
81 H 

A nsefbl sketch. 

OhMiterlleld* 

[FoBD, Thomas.] History of Chesterfield. 
Chesterfield. 1889. 8<'. B 

Rbcobds of the borough of Chesterfield. Col- 
lected by Fym Yeatman. Chesterfield and Sheffield. 
1884. S^. H 

Chiohaster. 

Hat, Alex. History of Chichester. Chichester. 
1804. 8^. B 

Glitliaro. 

*Ancibnt charters and other muniments of Clith- 
ero. By John Harland. Manchester. 1861. 4°. H 

Oololiestar. 

*Cbomwbll, T. E. History of Colchester. 2 vols. 
London. 1825. 8"". B 

CuTTS, E. L. Colchester. London. 1888. 
S". H 

A good short account. 

Habbod, Henry. Calendar of the Court rolls 
of Colchester. Colchester. 1865. 4°. B 

Consleton. 

*Hbad, Robert. Congleton, past and present. 
Congleton. 1887. 8<'. H 

Cork. 

^Council book of the corporation of the city of 
Cork (1609-1800). Edited by Richard Caulfield. 
Gmldford. 1876. 4?, H 



lO 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



61B8OK, C. B. History of Cork. 2 yoIs. Lon- 
don and Cork. 1861. 81 

Corentiy. 

"^ Poole, Benj. Coventry: its history and an- 
tiquities. London and Coventry. 1870. 4**. H 

Onllen. 

Crahokd, Wm. Annals of Cullen. Second 
edition. Buckie. [1888.] 8<l 

Bbybridoe, David. Culross and TulUallan. 
2 vols. Edinburgh and London. 1885. 8*1 H 

Cnpar. 

Chastbks and other muniments belonging to 

Cupar. Translated by G. Home. Cupar-Fife. 

1882. 41 H 

DmJ. 

Pritchasd, Stephen. History of Deal. 1864- 
8» H 

Williams, John. Ancient and modem Den- 
bigh. Denbigh. 1856. B", 

Mediaeval history of Denbighshire. — 

The records of Denbigh. Wrexham. 1860. 81 

Derby. 

HuTTOK, Wm. History of Derby. London. 
1791. 81 [Second edition. London. 1817. 
81] B 

SiMPSoH, Robert. A collection of fragments 
illustrative of the history of Derby. 2 vols. 
Derby. 1826. 81 



H18TOBT of Devizes. London. 1859. 81 H' 

Watlbn, James. Chronicles of Devizes. Lon- 
don. 1889. 81 

Donoagtw. 

*ToicLnr80N, John. Doncaster from the Roman 
occupation to the present time. Doncaster. 1887. 
41 H 

Dover. 

♦Ltow, John. History of Dover. 2 vols. Dover. 
1818-14. 41 H 

A very valiuble work. 



D'Alton, John. History of Drogheda. 2 vols. 

Dublin. 1844. 81 H 

DnUin* 

*Calbki>ab of ancient records of Dublin. By 

J.T.Gilbert. 2 vols. Dublin. 1889-91. 81 H 

*GiLBBBT, J. T. History of Dublin. 8 vols. 

Dublin. 1854-59. 81 H 



^DuMBABTON burgh records, 1627-1746. Dum- 
barton. 1860. 41 H 

Glen, John. History of Dumbarton. Dum- 
barton. 1847. 121 

Maclbod, Donald. Dumbarton. Dumbarton. 
1884. 81 



Dumfiries. 

♦McDowjijLL, Wm. History of Dumfries. Edin- 
burgh. 1867. 81 [Second edition. Edinburgh. 
1873. 81] H 

Dnnliar. 

MiLLBB, James. History of Dunbar. Dunbar. 
1830. 121 [New edition. Dunbar. 1859. 81] H 

Dundee. 

* [Bb ATTs , John. ] The municipal history of Dun- 
dee. Dundee. 1873. 81 [New edition. Dundee. 
1878. 81] 

^Chabtebs and public documents of Dundee, 
1292-1880. Dundee. 1880. 41 

^Maxwell, Alex. History of Dundee. Edin- 
burgh and Dundee. 1884. 41 H 

Thomson, James. The history of Dundee. 
Dundee. 1847. 81 [New edition, by J. Mac- 
laren. Dundee. 1874. 81] 

*Wabden, a. J. Burgh laws of Dundee, with 
the history, etc. of the guild of merchants and fra- 
ternities of craftsmen. London. 1872. 81 H 



Chalmbbs, Peter. Account of Dunfermline. 
2 vols. Edinburgh and London. 1844-59. 81 

Hendbbson, Ebenezer. Annals of Dunfermline. 
Glasgow. 1879. 41 H 

Dniuitaple. 

Annalbs prioratus de Dunstaplia. (Annales 
monastici, vol. iii. Edited by H. R. Luard. Rolls 
series.) London. 1866. 81 H 

Durham. 

HiSTOBiCAL and descriptive view of Durham. 
Durham. [1824.] 121 [Another edition. Dur- 
ham. 1847. 81] 

There 1b no good history of Durham. The best aocoant of 
its municipal deyelopment is given by Surtees in his Histoiy 
of the county of Dnrliam, toI. iv. 

Dymort. 

MniB, Wm. The antiquities of Dysart. Kirk- 
aldy. 1865. 81 

Gleanings from the records of Dysart, 

1545-1796. Edinburgh. 1862. 41 

[ ] Notices from the local records of Dysart. 

(Maltland club.) Glasgow. 1858. 41 B 

Edinburgh. 

Acts, statutes, etc. of the provost, bailies, and 
council of Edinburgh, 1529-1531. (Maitland club. 
Miscellany, vol. ii. Edinburgh. 1840. 41) B 

Abkot, Hugo. History of Edinburgh. Edin- 
burgh. 1779. 41 [Other editions appeared in 
1789, 1816, and 1818.] H 

*Chabteb8 and other documents relating to Ed- 
inburgh, 1148-1540. (Scottish burgh records so- 

1871. 41 H 



Guildry of Edinburgh. Ed- 



ciety.) Edinburgh. 

Colston, James, 
inburgh. 1887. 41 

"^ExTBACTS from the records of Edinburgh [1408- 
1589]. (Scottish burgh records society.) 4 vols. 
Edinburgh. 1869-82. 41 H 

Gbakt, James. Old and new Edinburgh. 8 vols. 
London. [1881-88.] 41 H 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



II 



Historical sketch of the mnnicipal constitution 
of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. 1826. 12''. 

[Mackib, a. K.] Historical notes regarding the 
Merchant company of Edinburgh. Edinburgh. 
1862. 4<l 

♦Maitland, Wm. History of Edinburgh. Edin- 
burgh. 1768. f» H 

For the stady of manicipal development this is more nseftil 
than any of the recent general histones of Edinburgh. 

*Sbtt or decreet arbitral of James VI. (1588.) 
2 pts. Edinburgh. 1683. 12^. [Other editions, 
appeared in 1700, 1726, 1742, 1783.] 



May, Geo. History of Evesham. Evesham. 
1884. 8"*. 

A descriptive history of Evesham. Eve- 
sham. 1845. 8"*. B 



Cotton, W., and Woollcombb, H. Gleanings 
from the records of Exeter. Exeter. 1877. 8^. H 

^Fbbbman, E. a. Exeter. London. 1887. 8"*. H 
A good short history. 

*Olivbb, Geo. History of Exeter. Exeter. 1821. 
8<l [New edition. Exeter. 1861. 8<l] H 

Flint. 

*Tatix>r, Henry. Historic notices of Flint. 
London. 1888. 8"*. H 

TolkmttUukm* 

Mackzb, S. J. Account of Folkestone. Folke- 
stone. 1856. 8^. [Second edition. Folkestone. 
(1888.) 8«] B 

Galway. 

*Hardiman, James. History of Galway. Dub- 
lin. 1820. 4<l B 



BuRQH records of Glasgow, 1578-1581. (Mait- 
land club.) Glasgow. 1832. 4<>. B 

Campbbll, Wm. History of the cordiners. 
Glasgow. 1883. 8®. 

^Crawfurd, Geo. Trades* house of Glasgow. 
Glasgow. 1858. 8^. 
Valoable for the study of gilds. 

"^Extracts from the records of Glasgow, 1573- 
1662. (Scottish burgh records society.) 2 vols. 
Glasgow. 1876-81. 4<> H 

^Glasgow, past and present. [Edited by J. 
Pagan.] 3 vols. GUsgow. 1851-56. 8<'. [An- 
other edition. Edited by D. R[obertson]. 3 vols. 
Glasgow. 1884. 4*".] H 

Gordon, J. F. S. Glasghu fades: a view of 
Glasgow. 2 pts. Glasgow. [1873.] S^, B 

*rHiLL, W. H.] View of the Merchants* house of 
Glasgow. Glasgow. [1866.] 4"*. 
Valuable for the study of gilds. 

MacGreoor, Geo. History of Glasgow. Glas- 
gow and London. 1881. 8°. 

Memorabilia of Glasgow, selected from the 
minute books, 1588-1750. Glasgow. 1835. 4''. 
[New edition. Glasgow. 1868. 4^*. — Index. 
(Maitland club.) Glasgow. 1836. 4''.] B 



Gloncoatcr. 

Fosbrokb, T. D. An original history of Glou- 
cester. London. 1819. T. B 



Crudek, R. p. 
1843. 8<l 



GraTeaeiid. 

History of Gravesend. 



London. 
H 



Campbell, Dugald. Historical sketches of 
Greenock. 2 vols. Greenock. 1879-81. 8®. 

Weir, Daniel. History of Greenock. Greenock. 
1829. 8<* 

Oliver, Geo. Monumental antiquities of Great 
Grimsby. Hull. 1825. 8^ B 

¥• Byrde of Gryme. Grimsby. 1866. 

8*. H 

Chilloftivd* 

*Hi8TORT and description of Guildford. Guild- 
ford. 1777. 8<». [Second edition. Guildford. 
(1800.) 81 Another edition. Guildford. 1801. 

8"0 



Davis, J. W. The Halifax corporation, etc. 
(Wm. Smith's Old Yorkshire, vols. ii. and v. Lon- 
don. 1881-84. 8^1) H 

Watson, John. History and antiquities of Hali- 
fax. London. 1775. 41 [Second edition. Pts. 
i.-iU. London. (1869-71.) fl] 

Hmrtl«pooL 

*Sharp, Cuthbert. History of Hartlepool. Dur- 
ham. 1816. 81 [New edition. Hartlepool. 
1851. 81] H 



CoopBR, W. D., and Boss, T. Notices of 
Hastings and its municipal institutions. Lewes. 
1862. 81 

*Mo88, W. G. History and antiquities of Hast^ 
ings. London. 1824. 81 H 

The best history of Hastings. 



" Ha VBRFORDWB8T and its story. Haverfordwest. 
1882. 81 H 

AMP0«HrCl« 

Dbvlin, J. D. Helps to Hereford history. 
London and Hereford. 1848. 161 H 

^JoBNSON, Richard. Ancient customs of Here- 
ford. London and Hereford. 1868. 41 [Second 
edition. London. 1882. 41] H 



TuRNOR, Lewis. History of Hertford. Hert- 
ford. 1880. 81 



Horsham : its history and antiquities. London. 
1868. 81 

Hull. 

"^Frost, Charles. Notices relative to the early 

history of Hull. London. 1827. 41 H 

Sheahan, J. J. General and concise history of 

Kingston-upon-HuU. London and Beverley. 1864. 

81 [Second edition. Beverley. 1866. 81]. B 



12 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



Huntingdon. 

C[ARRnTHERs], R[obert]. History of Hanting- 
don. London. 1824. 8<l 

♦Griffith, Edw. A collection of ancient records 
relating to Huntingdon. London. 1827. 8^, 



History and description of Inverness. Inver- 
ness. 1847. le*". 

Macintosh, C. F. Invernessiana. Inverness. 
1876. S^l 

Invemrie. 

Davidson, John. Inverurie and the earldom of 
the Garioch. Edinb. and Aberdeen. 1878. 41 B 

Ipswiolu 

*Bacon, Nathaniel. The annalls of Ipswiche. 
Edited by W. H. Richardson. Ipswich. 1884. 
4<» H 

*DoMESDAT de Gippewyz. (Printed in vol. ii. of 
The Black book of the admiralty. Rolls series. 
London. 1878. 8<>) • H 

Principal charters granted to Ipswich . . . trans- 
lated. London. 1754. 81 

*WoDDBR8POON, Johu. Memoiials of Ipswich. 
Ipswich. 1850. 81 H 

The best history of Ipswich. 

Irvine. 

^Muniments of the burgh of Irvine. (Ayrshire 
and Galloway archaeol. assoc.) Edinburgh. 1890. 
41 B 

KeUo. 

Haio, James. Topographical and historical ac- 
count of Kelso. Edinburgh. 1825. 81 

Kendal. 

Local chronology. London and Kendal. 1865. 
41 

Nicholson, Cornelius. Annals of Kendal. Ken- 
dal. 1882. 81 [Second edition. London. 1861. 
81] 

KUnuumoek. 

McKat, Archibald. History of Kilmarnock. 
Kilmarnock. 1848. 121 [Fourth edition. Kil- 
marnock. 1880. 81] H 

KOmanrs. 

Charters of Kilmaurs. Kilmarnock. 1874. 41 



BiDBN, W. D. History and antiquities of Kings- 
ton. Kingston. 1852. 81 

The charters of Kingston, translated by Geo. 
Roots. London. 1797. 81 



Kiniale. 

^Council book of Kinsale (1652-1800). 
by Richard Caulfield. Guildford. 1879. 



Edited 
41 H 



Cowan, W. A. History of Lanark. Lanark. 
1867. 81 

Davidson, W. History of Lanark. Lanark. 

1828. 121 B 



Simpson, Robert. History and antiquities of 
Lancaster. Lancaster. 1852. 81 H 

Lannoeaton. 

*Pbtbr, R., and Peter, O. B; The histories of 
Launceston and Dunheved. Plymouth. 1885. 
81 H 

RoBBiNS, A. F. Launceston, past and present. 
Launceston. 1884. 81 

Leeds. 

Acts of parliament relating to Leeds. Leeds. 
1851. 81 

* Wardell, Jas. The municipal history of Leeds. 
London and Leeds. 1846. 81 B 

Leioester. 

Paul, J. D. Origin of the corporation of Lei- 
cester. London. 1885. 81 H 

Rbad, Robert. Modem Leicester. London and 
Leicester. 1881. 81 

""Thompson , Jas. History of Leicester to the end 
of the seventeenth century. Leicester. 1849. 81 
The best hLstory of Leicester. 

History of Leicester in the eighteenth 

century. Leicester. 1871. 81 



Horsfield, T. W. History and antiquities of 
Lewes. 2 vols. Lewes. 1824-27. 41 [A sup- 
plement appeared in 1832.] B 



Harwood, Thomas. History and antiquities of 
Lichfield. Gloucester. 1806. 41 B 

Short account of Lichfield. Lichfield and Lon- 
don. 1819. 81 

Iilmerlok* 

Ferrae, John. History of Limerick. Lim- 
erick. 1767. 121 [New edition. Limerick. 
1787. 81] 

Lenih AN, Maurice. Limerick. Dublin. 1866. 81 



^CrviTAS Lincolnia, from its municipal and other 
records. Lincoln. 1870. 81 

[Stark, Adam.] History of Lincoln. Lincoln. 
1810. 121 

There is do good histoiy of Lincoln. 

TilnHthgow. 

Waldie, Greo. History of Linlithgow. Lin- 
lithgow. 1858. 161 [Third edition. 1879.] 



Allen, John. History of Liskeard. London 
and Liskeard. 1856. 81 

UverpooL 

Raines, Thomas. History of the commerce and 
town of Liverpool. London and Liverpool. 1852. 
81 B 

Charters (The) granted to Liverpool. Liver- 
pool. 1810. 81 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HI8T0ET. 



13 



^PiCTOK, J. A. Memorials of Liyerpool. 2 vols. 
London. 1878. 8®. [Second edition. London. 
1876. 8«] H 

The best history of Liyerpool. 

'Selbctions from the municipal archires of 
Liverpool, from the 13th to the 17th century inclu- 
nve. By J. A. Picton. Liverpool. 1883. 4**. 

• Municipal archives (1700-1835). By J. A. 

Picton. Liverpool. 1886. i^ H 



It it difficalt to make a selection fix)m the vast array of 
books relating to London. To supplement the lint given be- 
low, the reader should consult the Catalogue of the London 
Guildhall library (1889). Loftie's Historyls the best general 
account; Norton's Commentaries is the best constitutional 
history; Pnlliii||^s Treatise contains the Aillest information 
concerning particular laws and customs ; Birch siTcs the char- 
ters of the citj; Herbert, ArundeU, and the C^tr of London 
Liverj companies commission's report are the best general 
authorities on the Livery companies ; Welch gives informa- 
tion concerning works on particular companies or ^Ids; 
Firth's Municipal London is the ablest treatise on municipal 
reform; and the Report of the Municipal corporations com- 
mission (1887), the Munimcnta Gildhallae, and Riley's Me- 
morials are particulariy valuable for the study of London 
municipal history. 

a. — General Hittories, 

*Loms, W. J. History of London. 2 vols. Lon- 
don. 1883. 8®. [Supplement. London. 1884. 8''. 
Second edition. 2 vols. London. 1884. 8''.] H 

London. London. 1887. 8*. H 

A condensation of his History of London. 

NooBTHoucK, John. New history of London. 
lK>ndon. 1778. 4". H 

Stow, John. Survay of London. Written at 

first in 1698 [1598] by John Stow. Enlarged in 

1720 hy John Strype. Sixth edition. 2 vols. 

London. 1754. f*. [New edition, edited by 

Henry Morley. London. 1890. 8*1] H 

For the yarloua editions, issued before and after 1754, see 
Morley's prefiMe, p. 20. 

b. — Old Chronicles, 

Chbokiclk of the grey friars of London. Edited 
by J. G. Nichols. (Camden society.) [London.] 
1852. 4'*. H 

Ch&oniolb (A) of London, 1089-1483. [Edited 
by B. Tyrrell.] London. 1827. 4'*. H 

Chbomiclbs of the mayors and sheriffs of Lon- 
don, 1188-1274, translated from the *' Liber de an- 
tiquis legibus." The French chronicle of London, 
1259-1343, translated from the '*Croniques de 
London." By H. T. Riley. I-^ndon. 1863. 4°. B 

Chboniglbb of the reigns of Edw. I. and Edw. II. 
Edited by Wm. Stubbs. (Rolls series.) 2 vols. 
London. 1882-88. 8^. H 

VoL L : Annales Londonienses, and Annales Pauliiii. 

"^Cboniques de London, 44 Hen. III. — 17 Edw. 
III. Edited by 6. J. Aungier. (Camden society.) 
London. 1844. 4<'. H 

*De antiquis legibus liber; cronica maiorum et 
vicecomitum Londoniarum [1188-1274]. Edited 
by T. Stapleton. (Camden society.) London. 
1846. 4^ H 

Fitz-Stephen, Wm. Descriptio nobillisimae 
dvitatis Londoi^ae. (In his Vita S. Thomae. 
Materials for the history of Thomas Becket, vol. 
iii. Rolls series. London. 1877. 8*".) H 

H18TOBICAL collections of a citizen of London. 
Containing . . . III. William Gregory's Chronicle 
of London [1189-1469]. Edited by J. Gairdner. 
(Camden society.) [London.] 1876. 4''. H 



Thbbe fifteenth-century chronicles, with his* 
torical memoranda by John Stowe [including a 
London chronicle]. Edited by J. Gairdner. (Cam- 
den society.) [Westminster]. 1880. 4°. H 

c. — City Archives. Extracts from Records, 

All the works mentioned under this head, except Uie Muni- 
menta Gildhallae, were prepared b^ the authority, and at Uie 
expense, of the corporation of the city of London. 

Akalttical Indexes to volumes ii. and viii. of the 
series of records known as the Remembrancia, 
1580-1664. London. 1870. 8°. H 

Analytical index to the Remembrancia, 

1579-1664. London. 1878. 8«. H 

Calendab of letters from the mayor and corpo- 
ration of London , 1350-70. Edited by R. R. Sharpe. 
London. 1885. %"*, H 

Calendab of wills enrolled in the court of Bust- 
ing, 1258-1688. Edited by R. R. Sharpe. 2 vols. 
London. 1889-90. 8«. H 

*Memobial8 of London and London life in the 
xiiith, xivth, and xvth centuries. A series of ex- 
tracts from the archives of London, 1276-1419. 
Translated and edited by H. T. Riley. London. 

1868. 8<». H 

^MuNiMENTA Gildhallae Londoniensis : Liber al- 
bns, Liber custumarum, et Liber Horn. Edited 
by H. T. Riley. (Rolls series.) 8 vols. London. 
1859-62. 8*». H 

One of the richest sources of English municipal history. 

Liber albus : the White book of the city of 

London. Translated by H. T. Riley. London. 
1861. 8° H 

d. — Laws, Charters, and Privileges, 

BoHDN, Wm. Privilegia Londini. London. 
1723. 8« H 

See below, " PrirUegia." 

H18TOBICAL (The) charters and constitutional 
documents of London. By W. de Gray Birch. 
Revised edition. London. 1887. 4°. [The first 
edition appeared under the pseudonym '* An anti- 
quary." London. 1884. 4**.] H 

Jacob, Giles. City liberties : or, the rights and 
privileges of freemen. [London.] 1732. 8®. 
[Reprinted in 1738]. H 

LuFFMAN, John. The charters of London. 
London. 1793. 8«. H 

♦NoBTON, George. Commentaries on the history, 
constitution, and franchises of London. London. 
1829. 8°. [Third edition. London. 1869. 8*».] H 

Pbivilegia Londim-nsis; or, the laws, customs, 
and privileges of London. London. 1702. 8*^ H 

Reprinted in 1716 and again in 1723, with additions by 
Wm. Bobun (see abore). 

"^Fulling, Alex. A practical treatise on the laws, 
customs, and regulations of London. London. 
1842. 8''. [New editions appeared in 1849 and 
1854.] H 

e. — Gilds and Companies. 

Abundell, Thomas. Historical reminiscences 
of London and its Livery companies. London. 

1869. 8*. ' B 

♦City of London Livery companies commission. 
Report and api)endiz. (Par Ham. papers, 1884, 
vol. xxxix.) 5 pts. London. 1884. fl H 



H 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



CooTE, H. C. Ordinancefl of some secular guilds 
of London, 1854-1496. (Reprinted from the Trans- 
actions of the London and Middlesex archaeologi- 
cal society.) London. 1871. 8*^. 

He also considers Anglo-Saxon gilds. 

'^Herbert, Wm. History of the twelve great 
Livery companies. 2 vols. London. 1836-37. 8^. 

The best general history of the London companies. H 

MiLDMAT, Wm. The method of proceeding upon 

all elections in the city of London. By Sir Wm. 

Mildmay. With ... an historical review of the 

incorporated mysteries. By H. K. S. Causton. 

London. 1841. 12*1 

Caaston considers in detail the relations of the craft frater- 
nities to the civic government of London. 

ScHULTES, Henry. Inquiry into the elective 
franchise of the citizens of London, and the gen- 
eral rights of the Livery. London. 1822. S**, 

Welch, Charles. Bibliography of the Livery 
companies. (The Library, vol. ii. London. 1890. 
8^.) H 

f. — Municipal Reform. 

For the reforms introduced by the Local fi^vcmment act 
of 1888, see below under " g. — Miscellaneous." 

Allen, W. F. The corporation of London. 
London. 1858. 8<l 
A defence of the corporation. 

Carpekter, Wm. The corporation of London, 
as it is and as it should be. London. 1847. 12°. 

Clark, J. W. Concerning London government. 
London. 1884. 8<^. 
Against reform. 

Dexter, J. T. The government of London. 
London. 1875. 8*". B 

A plea for reform. 

Firth, J. F. B. London government and how 
to reform it. London. 1882. 8°, 

* Municipal London. London. 1876. 8*1 

B 

An elaborate exposition of the arguments in favor of a 
reform. 

Reform of London government and of 

city guilds. London. 1888. 8''. ' H 

A good brief sketch of the views of the reformers. 

♦Gilbert, Wm. The City. An inquiry into the 
corporation, etc. London. 1877. 8^. H 

In favor of reform. 

Hare, Thomas. London municipal reform. 
London. 1882. S°. 

A plea for reform. 

♦Report (Second) of the commissioners ap- 
pointed to inquire into municipal corporations. 
(Parltam. papers, 1887, vol. xxv.) London. 1837. 
f. H 

♦Report of the commissioners appointed to in- 
quire into the existing state of the corporation of 
the city of London. (Parliam. papers, 1854, vol. 
xxvi.) London. 1864. r. H 

♦Scott, Bcnj. A statistical vindication of the city 
of London. London. 1867. 8*'. [Third edition. 
London. 1877. 8*.] B 

An elaborate defence of the city of London. 

g. — Miscellaneous. 

♦Firth, J. F. B., and Simpson, £. R. I^ndon 
government under the Local government act. 
London. 1888. 8'*. 

Gneist, Rudolf. Die Stadtverwaltung der city 
von London. Berlin. 1867. 8''. H 



GoHMB, G. L. On the early municipal history 
of London. (London and Middlesex archaeological 
society, Transactions, vol. vi. London. 1885. 8*1) 

The London county council, according to 

the act of 1888. London. 1888. 8''. ^ 

GuYOT, Yves. L*organisation municipale de 
Paris et de Londres. Paris. 1883. 12"* H 

Palgrave, Francis. The merchant and the 
friar. London. 1837. 16^. [Second edition. 
London. 1844. 16«.] H 

Ch. iii. throws lif^ht on the medieval constitution of London. 

Price, J. E. A descriptive account of the Guild- 
hall of London : its history, etc. London. 1886. 
4'* H 

UsefVil, notwithstanding the lack of scholarship displayed 
by the author. 

liOndfKBdeny. 

♦Ordnance survey of the county of London- 
derry. Vol. i. Memoir of the city of Londonderry. 
DubUn. 1887. 4'. H 

ICompiled under the direction of Colonel T. Colby. The 
historical and topographical sections were written by 6. Pe- 
trie, assisted by John O'Donovan. 

Ludlow. 

Baker, Oliver. Ludlow town and neighbour- 
hood. Ludlow. 1888. 4°. H 

Churchwardens accounts of Ludlow [1540- 
1600]. (Camden society.) [Westminster.] 1869. 
4° H 

Copies of the charters and grants to Ludlow. 
Ludlow. [1821.] 8«. 

Wright, Thomas. History of Ludlow. Lud- 
low. 1852. 8**. [Earlier editions appeared in 
1822, 1826, 1841, and 1843.] 



Roberts, George. History of Lyme-Regis. 
Sherborne. 1823. 8''. 

History and antiquities of Lyme-Regis. 

London. 1884. 8"*. 

* The municipal government of Lyme- 

R^gis. Lyme-Regis. [1834.] 8*1 

Lymlxictaii. 

Records of the corporation of New Lymington, 
in the county of Southampton. Extracted from the 
town muniments. By Charles St. Barbe. London. 

[1848.] r. 

Ljrnn-Resla. 

Richards, Wm. History of Lynn. 2 vols. 
Lynn. 1812. 8*. B 

♦Taylor, Wm. The antiquities of King's Lynn. 
Lynn. 1844. 8<l H 

Maooleafleld. 

Earwaker, J. P. East Cheshire ; or, a history 
of the Hundred of Macclesfield. 2 vols. London. 
1877-80. 4'». 

Malmesbiiry. 

GoMME, G. L. Malmesbury as a village com- 
munity. (Archaeologia, vol. 1. London. 1887. 
4".) H 

MoFFATT, J. M. History of Malmesbury. Tet- 
bury. 1805. 8*». B 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL mSTORT. 



IS 



Azov, W. E. A. Annals of Manchester. Man- 
chester and London. 1886. 9\ H 

[Ck»fjRT leet records.] A volume of court leet 
records. Edited by John Harland. (Chetham 
society.) Manchester. 1864. 4". H 

Continuation, 1586-1602. Edited by John 

Harland. (Chetham society.) Manchester. 1865. 
4« H 

• Court leet records of Manchester (1562- 

1846). Edited by J. P. Earwaker. 12 vols. Man- 
chester. 1884-90. 8!^. H 

*Habland, John. Mamecestre. (Chetham so- 
ciety.) 8 pts. Manchester. 1861-62. 4**. H 

Collectanea relating to Manchester. 

(Chetham society.) 2 vols. Manchester. 1866- 
67. 4'. H 

Hibbbrt-Warb, Sam. The ancient parish 
church of Manchester. Manchester. 1848. 4°. 

Saintbburt, Geo. Manchester. London. 18^7. 
8« H 

A good short hiBtory. 

Whitakbb, John. The charter of Manchester. 
Manchester. 1838. 8''. 

*Watlbn, James. History of Marlborough. 
London. 1854. 8^. H 



Chabtbrs of Monmouth. Newport. 1826. 8°. 

Hbath, Charles. Ancient and present state of 
Monmouth. Monmouth. 1804. 4^. 



MiTCHBLL, David. History of Montrose. Mon- 
trose. 1866. 8®. 



*HoD080N, John. History of Morpeth. New- 
castle. 1882. 41 



Paterson, James. History of the regality of 
Musselburgh. Musselburgh. 1857. 8**. 



Hall, James. History of Nantwich. Nantwich. 
1883. 4". H 

Keatk. 

Original charters and materials for a history 
of Neath. Collected by G. G. Francis. Swansea. 
1845. 8''. 

Brown. Cornelius. Annals of Newark. London 
and Newark. 1879. 4''. B 

*MoNBr , Walter. History of Newbury. Oxford 
and London. 1887. fV", H 

NewoAstle-upooB-^pM. 

*Brand, John. History and antiquities of New- 
castle. 2 vols. London. 1789. 4**. H 
The best history of NewcMtle. 



Brown, John. Short account of the customs 
and franchises of Newcastle. Newcastle. 1828. 81 

Collier, John. An essay on charters, in which 
are particularly considered those of Newcastle. 
Newcastle. 1777. 81 

Gibson, J. F. The Newcastle improvement acts 
and bye-laws, 1837-77. With an introductory his- 
torical sketch. Newcastle. 1881. 81 

The introdaction contains a good sketch of the mnnicipal 
history of Newcastle. 

Hinds, J. H. The early municipal history of 
Newcastle. (Society of antiquaries of Newcastle, 
Archaeologia aeliana, new series, vol. iii. New- 
castle. 1859. 81) 

Walkbb, J., and Richardson, M. A. Armorial 
bearings of the incorporated companies of New- 
castle, with an account of each company. New- 
castle. 1824. 81 

Wblford, Rich. History of Newcastle and 
Gateshead in the 14th and 15th centuries. Lon- 
don and Newcastle. [1883.] 81 H 

Ifovtluunptwi* 

*Hart8hornb, C. H. Historical memorials of 
Northampton. Northampton and Oxford. 1848. 
161 H 

An excellent work. 

^Blombfibld, Francis. History of Norwich. 
Norwich. 1745. f1 [New edition. 2 vols. Lon- 
don. 1806. 81] H 

Part of Blomefleld's Norfolk. This is the most detailed 
acconnt of the history of Norwich. 

Harrod, Henry. Extracts from coroners' rolls 
and other documents of Norwich. (Norfolk and 
Norwich archaeol. society. Norfolk archaeology, 
vol. ii. Norwich. 1849. 81) B 

*HuD80N, W. Traces of the early development 
of municipal organization in Norwich. (Archaeo- 
logical journal, vol. xlvi. London. 1889. 81) B 

An admriabie piece of work. 

Bailbt, Thomas. Annals of Nottinghamshire, 
including the borough. 4 vols. London and Not- 
tingham. [1852-^5.] 81 B 

Hbathcotb, Charles. An English translation 
of the [inspeximus] charter of Henry VI. to Not- 
tingham. Nottingham. [1807.] f1 

*Rbcobd8 of the borough of Nottingham ; a se- 
ries of extracts f^om the archives of Nottingham. 
[Edited by W. H. Stevenson.] 4 vols. London 
and Nottingham. 1882-89. 81 H 

A model work of its kind, excelled by no other collection 
of borough records. 

OkehMttptoB. 

Bbidobs, W. B. Some account of Okehampton. 
Plymouth. [1889.] 81 [New edition, by W. H. K. 
Wright. Tiverton. 1889. 81] H 

Oswestry. 

CATHRALL,Wm. History of Oswcstiy. Oswestry. 
[1855.] 81 

*Lbiohton, Stanley. Records of the corporation 
of Oswestry. Oswestry. 1884. 81 

Important collection of extracts flrom the town archives. 
Beprmted from the Transactions of the Shropshire archaeol. 
and natoral history sodeQr* 



i6 



BOOKS RELATING TO 



Oxford. 

*BoA8E, C. W. Oxford. London. 1887. 8*. B 
A good short account. 

Green, J. R. Early history of Oxford. (In 
Green's Stray studies. London. 1876. 8*".) H 

*0xFORD city documents, 1268-1665. Edited by 
J. E. T. Rogers. (Oxford hist, society.) Oxford. 
1891. 8''. H 

Pabkbr, John. Early history of Oxford, 727- 
1100. (Oxford historical society.) Oxford. 1885. 
8« H 

* Selection 8 from the records of the city of Ox- 
ford, Henry VIII.— Eliz. Edited by W. H. Turner. 
Oxford and London. 1880. SI H 

Wood, A. 1, and Peshall, J. Antient and pres- 
ent state of Oxford. Chiefly collected by Anthony 
k Wood ; with additions by Sir J. Peshall. London. 
1778. 4*» 

*Brown, Robert. History of Paisley. Paisley. 
1886. d^l H 

Peeblas. 

[Chambers, Wm.]. Peebles and its neighbor- 
hood. Edinburgh. 1866. 8®. 

^Charters and documents relating to Peebles, 
1165-1710. (Scottish burgh records society.) 
Edinburgh. 1872. 4''. H 

Pertlu 

*HcNT, Colin A. The Perth Hammermen book 
(1518-1668), with introductory sketch by Colin A. 
Hunt. Perth. 1889. 4**. 

Useful for the general history of gilds. 

Marshall, T. H. History of Perth. Perth. 
1849. 8<'. H 

Mem OBABILLA of the city of Perth. Perth. 1806. 
8«. H 

Peacock, David. Perth: its annals and its 
archives. Perth. 1849. 8*. 

Penny, Geo. Traditions of Perth. Perth. 
1886. 8*. H 

Pittenweem. 

[Cook, David.] Annals of Pittenweem, 1526- 
1793. Anstruther. 1867. 8''. 

Pljatontli. 

Jewitt, Llewellynn. History of Plymouth. 

London and Plymouth. 1878. 4*". B 

*WoRTH,R.N. History of Plymouth. Plymouth. 

1871. 8*1 [Second edition. Plymouth. 1873. 

8*. New edition. Plymouth. 1890. 8«.] H 

Pontefiraot* 

Booke of entries of the Pontefract corporation, 
1653-1726. Edited by Richard Holmes. Ponte- 
fract. 1882. 8<* H 

BooTHROTD, Beiy. History of Pontefract. 
Pontefract. 1807. 8*1 B 

Fox, Oeorge. History of Pontefract. Ponte- 
fract. 1827. 8*> B 

Poole. 

Sydenham, John. History of Poole. Poole. 
1839. 8*". H 



Allen, Lake. History of Portsmouth. London. 
1817. 12''. 

Saunders, W. H. Annals of Portsmouth. 
London. 1880. 8*1 H 



Abram, W. a. Preston guild merchant, 1882* 
Memorials of the Preston guilds. Preston. 1882. 
4**. H 

The Aillest history of the gUd. There is a list of older 
books relating to the gild on pp. 148-149. 

^Charters (The) granted to Preston. Trans- 
lated by John Lingard. 2pt8. Preston. 1821. 8*1 

*DoB80N, W., and Harland, J. History of 
Preston guild. Preston. 1862. 12*". [Second 
edition. Preston. 1862. 12*1] 

Useftd for the general monidpal history of Preston. 

Extracts from ancient documents in the archives 
of Preston. [By John Addison.] Preston. [1842.] 

Rolls of burgesses at the guilds merchant of 
Preston, 1397-1682. Edited by W. A. Abram. 
(Record society of Lancashire and Cheshire.) 
[London.] 1884. 8*> H 

TuLKBT, Marmaduke [Peter Whittle]. Ac- 
count of Preston. 2 vols. Preston. 1821-1837. 12*1 



Records of the burgh of Prestwick, 1470-1782. 
(Maitland club.) Glasgow. 1834. 4*". B 



*CoATE8, Charles. History and antiquities of 
Reading. London. 1802. 4*1 [A valuable sup- 
plement appeared in 1809.] B 

Contains oseAxl extracts firam the mnnidpal archives. 

[DoRAN, J.] History and antiquities of Reading. 
Reading. 1835. 8*1 [Another edition. Reading. 
1836. 8*1] B 

Man, John. History and antiquities of Reading. 
Reading. 1816. 4*". 

Rlohnumd* 

Clarkson, Christopher. History and antiquities 
of Richmond. Richmond* 1821. 4*1 

Rookestor. 

Authentic copy of the charter and bye-laws of 
Rochester. Rochester. 1816. 8*1 

HisTORT and antiquities of Rochester. Roches- 
ter. 1772. 8*1 [Second edition. Rochester. 
1817. 8*1] H 

RntlMrsloaA* 

Ure, David. History of Rutherglen. Glasgow. 
1793. 8*». H 

Rjo. 

*HoLLOWAY, Wm. History and antiquities of 

Rye. London. 1847. 8*1 B 

The best history of Bye. Uselnl also for the general his< 
tory of the Cinque Ports. 

Stockdale, F. W. L. Concise historical sketch 
of Hastings, Wincheisea, and Rye. London. 

[1817.] 8*1 • B 



BRITISH MUNICIPAL HI8T0RT. 



17 



8t« AIImuu. 

Charter (The) and coiutitutioiiB granted to 
St. Albans. Translated by £. Farrinton. St. 
Albans. [1818.] 8?. 

*6iBBS, A. £. The corporation records of St. 
Albans. St. Albans. 1890. S"*. H 

*WAL8iiroHAM, Thomas. Qesta abbatum monas- 
terii Sancti Albani [793-1411]. (Rolls series.) 
8 Tols. London. 1867-69. 8®. H 

CioDtAixis manj documents, etc. relating to the history of 
the borough. 

Williams, F. L. Description of Verulam. 
2 pts. St. Albans. 1822. 8^. 

Salislrary. 

*Brn8on, R., and Hatcher, H. Old and new 
Sanun. (Vol. yi. of Hoare*s History of modem 
WilUhire.) London. 1848. f. B 

A Taluftble work. 

Saadwicli* 

*BoY8, Wm. Collections for an history of 
Sandwich, with notices of the other Cinque Ports. 
Canterbury. 1792. 4*. H 

One of the best local histories. 



Baker, J. B. History of Scarborough. London 
and Leeds. 1882. 9?. H 

SImAoIcU 

HcNTER, Joseph. Hallamshire. The history 
of Sheffield. London. 1819. f*. [New edition, 
by A. Gatty. London. 1869. f.] H 

Leader, J. D. Extracts from the earliest 
book of accounts of Sheffield, 1566-1707. Shef- 
field. 1879. 8<l 

Parker, J., and Ward, H. G. Chapters in the 
political history of Sheffield, 1832-49. Sheffield. 
1884. 8». 

♦[OwEW, H., and Blakkwat, J. B.] History of 
Shrewsbury. 2 vols. London. 1825. 4^. H 
The best liistory of Slirewsbury. 

PiDGEON, Henry. Memorials of Shrewsbury. 
Shrewsbury. 1887. 12". [Second edition. Shrews- 
bury. [1861.] 8»] 



Slice. 

O'RoRKE, Terence. History of Sligo. 
Dublin. [1889.] 8<'. 

Sonthamptiln. 

*Datibs, J. S. History of Southampton, 
ampton and London. 1888. 8". 
Att excellent work. 

StafforcU 

Calyert, Charles. History of Stafford, 
ford. 1886. 8». 
A brief sketch. 

Cherry, J. L. Stafford in olden times, 
ford. 1890. 8«. 



2 vols. 

B 



South- 
H 



Staf- 



Staf- 
H 



StttHifivrtt* 

Burton, Geo. Chronology of Stamford. Stam- 
ford and London. 1846. 12'1 

Nevikson, Charles. History of Stamford. Stam- 
ford and London. 1879.. 8*. B 
Not as useful as Burton for municipal history. 

Stirling 

^Charters and other documents relating to Stir- 
ling, 1124-1706. Glasgow. 1884. 4'». H 

♦Extracts from the records of Stirling, 1295- 
1752. (Glasgow Stirlingshire and sons of the 
rock society.) 2 vols. Glasgow. 1887-89. 4* H 

General history of Stirling. Stirling. 1794. 12''. 
Contains a good sketch of the municipal liistory of Stirling. 

Stookport. 

♦Heginbotham, Henry. Stockport, ancient and 
modem. Vol. i. London. 1882. 4^*. H 

Stoke-upon-Trent* 

Ward, John. The borough of Stoke-upon- 
Trent. London. 1843. 81 

SirifciforcL 

Halliwell, J. O. Stratford-upon-ATon in the 

times of the Shakespeares. London. 1864. fl B 

For other works of Hallivrell-PhiUipps relating to Stratford, 
see Harvard library bibliographical contributions, voL L 

*Lee, S. L. Stratford-on-ATon. London. 1885. 
f». H 

Su&derlaad* 

Summers, J. W. History and antiquities of 
Sunderland. Sunderland.^ 1868. 8"*. 



♦Charters granted to Swansea. Edited by G. G. 
Francis. [London.] 1867. f*>. 

Tenliy. 

NoRRis, Charles. Historical sketch of Tenby. 
Second edition. Tenby. 1856. 12*1 

Tmwkmmharym 

Bennett, James. History of Tewkesbury. 
Tewkesbury. 1830. 8**.'*[ Another edition. Tewkes- 
bury. 1885. 12*] B 

Tiverton* 

Harding, Wm. History of Tiverton. 2 vols. 
Tiverton. 1846-47. S**. B 

TorqnAj. 

White, J. T. History of Torquay. Torquay. 
1878. S^. B 

Totnea. 

Cotton, Wm. Sketch of antiquities of Totnes. 
London and Plymouth. 1850. 4**. H 

Walllngford. 

*Hbdge8, J. K. History of Wallingford. 2 vols. 
London. 1881. 8*» H 



i8 



BOOKS RELATING TO BRITISH MUNICIPAL HISTORY. 



WaUall. 

Glbw, £. L. Histoiy of WaUall. Walsall. 
1856. 8«. B 

Sims I Rich. Calendar of documents belonging 
to Walsall. Walsall. 1882. 8"*. 

•WnxMORE, F. W. Histoiy of Walsall. Wal- 
sall. 1887. 8?. H 
The best faistoiy of Walsall. 



DnoDALEi Wm. Antiquities of Warwick. War- 
wick. 1786. 8*. B 

Pabkes, Joseph. Governing charter of War- 
wick. London. 1827. 8^. 

Waterford. 

Gbeat charter of Waterford. Translated by 
T. Cunningham. Dublin. 1752. 81^, 

Ryland, R. H. History of Waterford. Lon- 
don. 1824. 8^. B 

WalflhpooL 

Materials for the history of Welshpool. [By 
M. C. J.] (Powysland club. Collections, toI. 
vii.-xxi. London. 1874-87. 8*.) 

Ellis, G. A. History and antiquities of Wey- 
mouth and Melcombe-Regis. Weymouth and Lon- 
don. 1829. 8"*. H 

MouLE, H. J. Descriptiye catalogue of char- 
ters, etc. of Weymouth and Melcombe-Regis, 
1252-1800, with extracts. Weymouth. 1883. 
4^. B 

Whltliy. 

Young, Geo. History of Whitby. 2 vols. 
Whitby. 1817. 8«. B 

Wicaa. 

Charters of Wigan. Warrington. 1808. 4*. 

^Sinclair, David. History of Wigan. 2 vols. 
Wigan. 1882. 4*1 H 

WlaohielBMu 

Cooper, W. D. History of Winchelsea. Lon- 
don and Hastings. 1850. 8^. 

WI]io]ieBt«r, 

HisTORT and antiquities of Wiychester. 2 vols. 
Winchester. 1773. 12*. 

•KiTCHiK, G. W. Winchester. London. 1890. 
S*'. H 

A good short history. 

*LiBER Winton. (Printed in vol. iv. of Domes- 
day Book. Record commission. London. 1816. 
^.) H 

MiLNER, John. History of Winchester. 2 vols. 
Winchester. [1798-1801.] 4«. [Third edition. 
2 vols. Winchester. 1839. 8*».] B 

^Smirks, Edward. Ancient consuetudinary of 
Winchester. (Archaeological journal, vol. ix. 
London. 1852. 8*.) B 



^Transcripts from the municipal archives of 

Winchester. By Charles Bailey. Winchester. 

' 1856. S^. H 

*Ye old usages of Winches tre. (Smith's English 
GUds, pp. 849-369. London. 1870. 8*.) H 

Windsor. 

LoFTiE, W. J. Windsor. London. 1885. f>. 

*TiOHB, R. R., and Davis, J. £. Annals of 
Windsor. 2 vols. London. 1858. 8''. H 

The best history of Windsor. 

Woodstook* 

Marshall, Edward. Early history of Wood- 
stock. Oxford and London. 1873. 8°. [A sup- 
plement appeared in 1874.] B 

Woroester, 

Greek, Valentine. Survey of Worcester, Wor- 
cester. 1764. 8*1 

History and antiquities of Worcester. 

2 vols. London. 1796. 4**. B 
The most detailed history of Worcester. 

*NoAKE, John. Worcester in olden Umes. Lon- 
don. 1849. 16*1 H 
A valuable little book. 

Charters and grants relating to' Chipping Wy- 
combe. Wycombe. 1817. 4*. 

Parker, John. Early history of Wycombe. 
Wycombe. 1878. 4*1 

Tamumth (Gv«at). 

[Manship, Henry.] Booke of the foundacion 
and antiquitye of Greate Yermouthe. Edited by 
C. J. Palmer. Yarmouth. 1847. 4*. 

History of Great Yarmouth. Edited by 

C. J. Palmer. Yarmouth. 1854. 4''. B 

Palmer, C. J. History of Great Yarmouth, a 
continuation of Manship*s history. Great Yar- 
mouth. 1856. 4*1 H 

* The perlnstration of Great Yarmouth. 

3 vols. Yarmouth. 1872-75. 4°. 

*SwiNDEN, Henry. History and antiquities of 
Great Yarmouth. Norwich. 1772. 4*1 B 

This and Palmer's Perlusti*ation are the most useful works 
on the municipal history of Yarmouth. 



*Drake, Francis. Eboracum. London. 1786. 
fo. H 

The most valuable history of York. 

Eboracum : or, the history and antiquities of 
York. 2 vols. York. 1788. 8«. H 

^Extracts from the municipal records of York. 
By Robert Davis. London. 1843. 8*1 H 

♦Council book of Youghal, 1610-1800. Edited 
by Richard Caulfield. Guildford. 1878. 4**. H 



tiirai:? of fartiart) iHmtergitf. 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR, 

LIBRARIAN. 



No. 44. 




EIGHTH LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS 

OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY AND ITS OFFICERS, 

WITH THE CHIEF PUBLICATIONS ON THE UNIVERSITY. 

1890-189I. 

By WILLIAM HOPKINS TILLINGHAST, 
Assillani Itihrarian. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 

iesucli bg ti|E Eifararg of l^aibaib imniijCTsil^. 

189!. 



Already issued or in ■preparation 



VOL. I. 



I. Edwakd S. Holdbn. Iiidex*Cata]ogiie of Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

a. Justin Winsor. Shakespeare's Poems : a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Crarlbs Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 

the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Pict'ts et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List op Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 

United States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. Thb Collbction op Books and Autographs, be- 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor- 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lanb. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt. I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. Gborgb Lincoln Goodalb. The Floras of different 

countries. 

10. Justin Winsor. Halliwelliana: a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps. 



II. Samuel H. Scuddbr. The Entomological Libraries 
of the United States. 

IS. First List op thb Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1S70-18S0. 

13. Samubl H. Scuddbr. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinghast. Notes on the Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann*8 Geographische Mittheilungen. 18^- 
iSSi. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 
18S3. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

aa William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 1884-18S5. 



VOL. II. 



Si. Second List op the Publications of Harvard UnU 

versity and its Officers. 1SS0-18S5. 
sa. Justin Winsor. Calendar of the Sparks Manuscripts 

in Harvard College Library, 
as. William H. Tillinghant. Iliird List of the Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1SS5- 

1886. 
•4. WiLUAM C Lane. Index to Rooent Reference I Jsts, 

no. a. 1S85-1SS6. 
a5. W. G. Fablow and William Tbblbabb. list of 

Works on Nortli American Fungi. 
96. William C Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 
a7. Andrew McF. i>avi8. A few notes on the Records 

of Harvard College. 
98. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publica 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1SS6- 
1S87. 



99. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 
no. 3. 1SS7. 

30. Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem ** To a 

Skylark," with notes. 

31. W. G. Far LOW. Supplemental List of Works on 

North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badger. Matliematical Theses, 1783-1839. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publications 

of Harvard University and its Officers. 1SS7-1S8S. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. Geokge E. Woodberry. Notes on the MS. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Ubniry. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Weitbnkampp. Bibliography of Hogarth. 



VOL. III. 



38. Wiluam H. Tillinghast. SixUi List of Publics. 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. ib8S- 
18S9. 

39. Alprbd C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 1890. 

41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 18S9- 
1890b 



4a. William H. Tillinghast. The Orators and Poets 
ofPiii Beta Kappu, Alpha of Massachusetts. 

43. Charles Gross. A Clussi<^**d List of Books relating 

to British Municipal History. 

44. William H. Tillinghast. Eighth List of Publics* 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1890- 
1891. 

45. William C. Lane and Charles K. Bolton. Notes 

on Special Collections in American libraries. 

46. The Class op i8a8, with a list of the publications of 

its members. 



A LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS 

OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY AND ITS OFFICERS, 

WITH THE CHIEF PUBLICATIONS ON THE UNIVERSITY. 
From Septembeb 30, 1890, to September 80, 1891. 

*4i* The list of publications of the officers of the Uniyersity has been prepared from information 
received from the officers in response to a circular issued bj the editor ; for the record of the publica- 
tions of the University, and for that of the articles relating to it, the editor is responsible. It is pro- 
posed to continue this list for successive academic years. 



THS UNIVEBSITY. 

The Harvard Universit}- catalogue, 1890-91. Cambridge. 1890. 8**. pp. 444, 
ffiap. 

Edited by H. £. Scott and F. L. Van Cleef. 

Much of the matter in the Catalogue is also printed for distribution in the '* Admission," '* Elective," 
and ** Graduate'* pamphlets, having the following titles: Selected sheets from the Ilarvard University 
cataloguet 1890-91, containing all necessary information for persons intending to enter Harvard 
College. — Announcement of courses of instruction provided by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences j for 
the academic year 1891-92. pp. 49. June, 1891. — Announcement of the graduate school^ 1890-91. 
Second edition, pp. 42. March, 1891. 

The Departments issue their own portions of the Catalogue separately, in some cases with additions : 
the 108th Annual catalogue of the Medical School contains the examination papers of 1890 ; the 23rd 
Annual announcement of the Dental School contains a complete list of graduates ; the 8th Annual 
announcement of the School of Veterinary Medicine contains the admission examination papers and a 
view of the Village Street hospital. 

Directory of the officers and students of Harvard University, October 8, 1890. 

Cambridge. 1890. 8^ pp. 29. 
Edited by H. E. Scott. 

Annaal reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College, 1889-90. Cam- 
bridge. 1891. 8**. pp. 242, 66. 

Tliis report contains also the reports from the various departments and institutions of the University. 
The report of the Treasurer and those of several of the Departments are also issued separately. 

Harvard University calendar. No. 338-374 ; Sept.-Oct. 1890— June, 1891. 
The calendar is issued in term-time only. 

[Programme of the exercises at Commencement, 1891.] 4°. pp. xv. 

Contains, in Latin, the names of those who receive degrees and academic honors in all departments. 

[Amendments to the Regulations of tiie Faculty of Arts and Sciences.] Dated 
4 June, 1891. p. 1. 

Harvard University. A brief statement of what Harvard University is, how it may 

be entered, and how its degrees may be obtained. Cambridge. Published by the 

University. 8°. pp. 56. 

By Frank Bolles, Secretary of the University. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Regulations of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences concerning college studies, 1891-92. 
12**. pp. 12. [June, 1891.] 

Abstracts from the regulations of tlie Faculty of Arts and Sciences concerning studies 
for Freshmen in Harvard College. 

Regulations concerning the choice of studies by special students in Harvard College, 
pp. 2. 

Opportunities provided for religious worship, instruction, and fellowship. 1891-92. 
12^ pp. 8. 

Harvard University aid funds. 1891-92. 12**. pp. 22. 

Programme of the Semitic department, 1891-92. 12°. pp. 12. 

Instruction in Classical Philology and in Sanskrit, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 87. 

Programme of the department of English, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 12. 

German department, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 12. 

Programme of the French department, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 11. 

Description of the courses in Italian, Spanish, and Romance Philology, 1891-92. 12**. 
pp. 13. 

Programme of the Philosophical department, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 17. 

Department of Political Economy, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 10. 

Programme of the History department, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 24. 

Seminary of American history, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 11. 

Programme of the Mathematical department, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 19. 

Chemical Laboratory and Mineralogical Museum, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 12. 

Programme of the department of Geology, 1891-92. 12**. pp. 12. 

Announcement of courses for teachers on methods of instruction, 1891-92. 8**. pp. 8. 

Announcements of summer courses in English, French and German, Field Engineering, 
Physics, Chemistr}', Botan}-, Geology, Physiology and Hj-giene, Methods of Instruction. 

Committee on reception of students. List of rooms for rent [not including those in 
the College dormitories] . 
. The Committee issued seTeral other circulars. 

Examinations for women. [Explanatory.] 1892. 1891. 12**. pp.16. 
Oives a list of successful candidates since 1881. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the admission examinations held 
at Cambridge, Quincy, Groton, Andover, Southborough, Worcester, Exeter, Concord, 
New York, Albany, Buffalo, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis, 
St. Louis, Denver, San Francisco, Portland (Or.), Bonn (Germany), and Tokyo (Japan), 
June, 1891. Cambridge. 1891. 8^ pp.24. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers set for final examinations in Harvard 

College, June, 1891. Cambridge. 1891. 8**. 4 pams. 

Namely : Ancient languages (^Hebrew ^ Sanskrit^ Oreek and Latin), pp. 48. — Modem lcbnguage$ 
(English, German, French, Italian, and Spanish), pp. 64. — Philosophy, Political Economy, History, 
Roman Law, Fine Arts, and Music, pp. 85. — Mathemaiics, Physics, Chemistry, Boia/ny, Zoology, 
and Geology, pp. 36. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the annual examinations in law 
held at Harvard Universitj', June, 1891. Cambiidge. 1891. 8**. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the examination for women, 1891. 
Cambridge. 1891.' 8^ pp. 24. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Bank-lists for 1 890-9 1 . 12^. pp. 38. 

In the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. Report of the committee on elections. 
Signed by Geo. O. Shattuck, W. G. Russell, Edmund Wetmore, Samuel Hoar, Henry H. 
Sprague. pp. 4. 

Recommending the adoption of the Anstralian ballot. 

Report on voting for Overseers by graduates of the professional schools. Signed by 
John T. Morser Jr., George B. Shattuck, Francis Rawle. Dated 10 June, 1891. S"". 
pp. 4. 

In the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. Oct. 8, 1890. Report of a special 
committee on changes in the academic department and in its relation to the professional 
schools. Signed by Henry W. Putnam, Roger Wolcott. 8**. pp. 18. 

Report of the committee of five (of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences) to which was 
referred (Nov. 4) the following vote of the Board of Overseers (adopted Oct. 22) : 
"That at the suggestion of the President of the University the Faculty be invited to 
present in print to this Board its reasons for the proposals transmitted to the Corporation 
relating to the reduction of the College course." Dated 1 Dec. 1890. 8®. pp. 16. 

[Statement to the Board of Overseers of reasons for opposing the proposal of the 
College Faculty for the reduction of the college course.] Signed by J. D. Whitney, and 
27 others. 8°. pp. 7. 

In the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. April 8, 1891. Supplementary 
report of the special committee on changes in the academic department and in its relations 
to the professional schools. Signed by Henry W. Putnam, Roger Wolcott. 8**. pp. 8. 

Reports of the visiting committees of the Board of Overseers, i.-ix. 

i. Report of the committee on the Chemical Laboratory. 6 Feb. 1890. pp. 1-20. — ii. Report of 
the committee on the School of Veterinary Medicine. 5 April, 1890. p. (21). — Hi. Report of the 
committee on the Jefferson Physical Laboratory. 29 April, 1890. p. (22). — !▼. Report of the com- 
mittee on modern history and international law. 21 May, 1890. pp. 23-26. — t. Report of the com- 
mittee on the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology. 21 May, 1890. pp. 27, 28. 
— yi. Report of the committee on Indo-Iranian languages. 11 June, 1890. pp. 29-85. — vii. Report 
of the committee on the Arnold Arboretum. 24 June, 1890. pp. 86, 37. — viii. Report of the committee 
on music. 24 June, 1890. p. (38). — ix. Report of the committee on the Lawrence Scientific School. 
24 Sept. 1890. p. (39). 

Iv BoABD OF Oyerseers, 17 Dec. 1890. Voiedf Jhat the Secretary be instructed to cause the 
reports of the sereral Visiting committees read under section 29 of the existing By-Laws to be numbered 
and printed consecutirely after they shall have been acted on by this Board. 

Names and addresses of living bachelors and masters of arts and of the holders of 

honorary degrees of Harvard University. 1891. (Third year.) Cambridge. March 

15, 1890. 8^ pp. 117. 

Prepared by the Secretary of the University from material furnished by the class secretaries, the 
Editor of the Quinquennial Catalogue, the Librarian of the Law School, and numerous IndiTidual 
graduates. 

Scientific Serial PublicationB. 

The Quarterly Journal of Economics. Vol. v. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 8°. pp. 

xii. 522. 

Contents: — t. x. (October, 1890.) Some experiments on behalf of the unemployed. Amos G. 
Warner. — Boehm-Bawerk on value and wages. S. M. Macvane. — A century of patent law. Chauncey 
Smith. — The Southern Railway & Steamship Association. Henry Hudson. — Appendix: Agreement 
of the Southern Railway & Steamship Association. — Statistics of the German laborers' colonies. 

V. a. (January, 1891.) The value of labor in relation to economic theory. James Bonar. — 
Reform in railroad passenger fares. Edmund J. James. — The tobacco tax. Frank L. Olmsted. — The 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Yerein f iir sozial-politik. Eugen von Philippovich. — Appendix : Ratio of the cost of labor to the 
whole cost of the manufactured article. — Statistics relating to the tobacco tax in the United States, 
1868-90. 

▼. 3. (April, 1891.) The law of the three rents. John A. Hobson. — Distribution as determined 
by a law of rent. John 6. Clark. — Marshall's " Principles of economics." Adolf Wagner. — The gild 
merchant in England. Wm. Cunningham. — Appendix : Social and economic legislation of the states 
in 1890. Wm. B. Shaw. 

V. 4. (July, 1891.) The academic study of political economy. Charles F. Dunbar. — The doctrine 
of rent, and the residual claimant theory of wages. Francis A. Walker. — A contribution to the theory of 
railway rates. F. W. Taussig. — Cooperative insurance and endowment schemes. William Morse Cole. 

Each number also contains notes on current topics, correspondence, and a bibliography. 

Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. Edited by a committee of the classical 
instructors of Harvard University. Vol. ii. Boston : Ginn & Co. London : Ginn & Co. 
Leipsic: Otto Harrassowitz. 1891. 8**. pp. (4), 213. 

Contents: — Quaestiones Fetronianae. H. W. Haley. — Greek and Roman barbers. Frank W. 
Nicolson. — Some constructions in Andocides. Morris H. Morgan. — Gajus or Ghius. Frederic D. 
AUen. — An inscribed Kotylos from Boeotia. John C. Rolf e. — Nedum. J. W. H. Walden. — Some 
uses of neque (nee) in Latin. J. B. Greenough. — The participial construction with rvyx^petv and 
Kvpeitf. J. R. Wheeler. — The * stage ' in Aristophanes. John Williams White. 

The editorial committee consists of Professors James B. Gbsekough, Fkedekic D. Allen, and 
JoHK Williams White. 

Harvard Historical Monographs. No. 2. Introduction to the study of federal 
government. By Albert Bushneli Hart. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8^. pp. x. 200. 

Outlines and Guides for the Use of Students in certain Courses of Instruction. 

*^* The works recorded here have not the official character of university puhlications, hut are prepared 

bj instractors or students in the respective courses. 

History 13 and 17. Topical outline of the courses in constitutional and political 
history of the United States given at Harvard College in the academic year 1889-90. 
By Albert Bushneli Hart. Part I. (1783-1829) and part II. (1829-61). Cambridge. 
Wheeler. 1890. 8^ pp. 267. 

Pamphlet for the use of students in courses History 13, 14, and 27 (History of the 
United States) given at Hai-vard College in the academic year 1890-91. Cambridge. 
Wheeler. 8*. pp. 50. 

Cases on criminal law. A collection of reported cases on some of the leading heads 
of the criminal law. By Heman White Chaplin. Prepared for use in the Law School 
of Harvard University. Boston. 1891. 

Cases on evidence. [A list.] For the use of the classes in evidence at the Harvard 
Law School. By James B. Thayer. Cambridge. 1890. 8^ pp.21. 

ABNOLD ABBOBETTTM. 

Annual report of the Director of the Arnold Arboretum [C. S. Sargent] to the Presi- 
dent and Fellows of Harvard College, for 1889-90. 1891. 8°. pp. 3. 
Reprinted from the President's annual report. 

Notes from the Arnold Arboretum. Garden and Forest, 1890-91, pa«sim. 

ASTBONOMICAIi OBSEBVATOBT. 

Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard College. Vol. xxiii. 1, xxvi. 1, 
xxvii., XXX. 2. Cambridge. 1890-91. 4°. 

Contenia : — xxiii. i. Discussion of observations made with the meridian photometer during the 
years 1882-«8. By Edward C. Pickering, Director, and Oliver C. Wendell, Assistant in the Observatory. 
Cambridge. 1890. pp. (6), 1S6, plate 1. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



zxTi. X. Preparation and discussion of the Draper catalogue. By Edward C. Pickering. Cam- 
bridge. 1891. pp. zxiy. 192. 

xxtIL The Draper catalogue of stellar spectra photographed with the 8-inch Bache telescope as a 
part of the Henry Draper memorial. Cambridge. 1890. pp. iv., (2), 888, plate 1. 

xzx. a. Observations made at the Blue Hill meteorological obserTatory, Massachusetts, U. S. A., 
in the year 1890. Under the direction of A. Lawrence Rotch. With appendices containing obseryations 
at Boston, and at Blue Hill, during the lustrum 1886-1890. Cambridge. 1890. pp. 77-201. 

Variable stars of long period. E. C. Pickering. Cambridge. 1891. 4^. pp. 8, 
pUxJte 1. 

Forty-fifth annual report of the Director of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard 
Ck>llege for the year ending October 31, 1890. By Edward C. Pickering. Cambridge. 
1890. 8^ pp. 12. 

The report includes a list of the scientific articles published by the officers of the Obserratory daring 
the year. It is also included in the annual report of the President. 

Bulletin of the New England Meteorological Society in cooperation with the Astro- 
nomical Observatory of Harvard College, No. 61-83 ; Oct. 1890— Sept. 1891. 4°. 

Issued in monthly numbers. The permanent matter of each Bulletin is electrotyped and published 
later in the Annals of the Observatory. 

BOTANIC GABDEN. 

Notes from the Botanic Garden. Oardeii and Forest^ 1890-91. 
Occasional notes concerning new or little-known plants, etc. 

BXXSSEY INSTirnTION. 

Bulletin of the Bussey Institution, Jamaica Plain, Boston. 
Nothing has been issued within the period covered by this list. 

DENTAL SCHOOL. 

A report of the twentieth anniversary of the Harvard Dental School. March 11, 
1889. Published by the Harvard Dental Alumni Association. Boston. 1890. 8^. 
pp. 69. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

Law School of Harvard University. 12**. pp. 6. 

An extract from the report upon the Law School for the year 1889-90, made by the Dean of the Law 
Faculty to the President of the Uniyersity, and dated Dec. 12, 1890. 

The Harvard Law Review. Vol. iv. 3-8 ; v. 1, 2. October, 1889— May, 1890. 

This Keyiew is published by students of the Law School, and not by the Law Faculty, but it fills the 
place of an official journal as a medium of publication. 

Besides the leading articles each number contains lecture notes from the Law School, summaries 
of recent cases, reviews, and titles of leading articles in exchanges. 

ConienU: — iv. 3. (October, 1890.) A brief survey of equity jurisprudence. VI. C. C. Langdell. 
^-On contracts in restraint of trade. Amasa M. Eaton. — 4. (November, 1890.) **Law and fact** 
in Jury trials. James B. Thayer. — Total disability in accident insurance. Marland C. Hobbs. -^ 
5. (December, 1890.) The right to privacy. Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis. — The 
police p0wer and inter-state commerce. Wiliiam -R. Howland. -^ 6. (January, 1891.) Poles and wire« 
in the streets for the electric railway. Edwatd Q. Keasbey. — Land transfer reform. The AnstrsililA 
sjrstein. John T. Hassam. — Land transfer reform. Suggestions as to the question of constltutioi&alitj^ 
H, W. Chaplin. —7. (February, 1891.) The doctrine of Price r. Neal. J. B. Ames. —The case of 
Gelpcke v. Dubuque. James B. Thayer. — On certiiin cases analogous to trade-marks. Grafton Delany 
Gushing. — 8. (Man-h, 1891.) Agency. I. 0. W. Holmes, Jr. — The true meaning of the term 
** liberty" in those clauses in the federal and state constitutions which protect '*Iife, liberty, and 
property." Charles £. Sliattuck. 



8 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



y. z. (April, 189L) Agency. II. O. W. Holmes, Jr. — The priyilege of witaesses in federal 
courts against compulsory self-incrimination. Louis M. Greeley. — Constitutional checks upon muni- 
cipal enterprise. Jabez Fox. — a. (May, 1891.) The older modes of trial. James B. Thayer. — 
Kemo tenetur seipsum prodere. John H. Wigmore. 

LAWBEKCE SOIENTIFIG SCHOOL. 

Provisional list of graduates of the Lawrence Scientific School. Cambridge. May, 
1891. 8^ pp. 10. 

A revised edition with the same title-page, but containing 12 pages, has been issued. 

TiTBTJAHY. 

Special publications. II. Index to the subject catalogue of Harvard College Library. 
Cambridge. 1886-91. pp. iv. 165. 

Prepared by W. C. Lane, Assistant Librarian. 

Harvard University bulletin, no. 47-49. Vol. vi. 3-5. Oct. 1890— May, 1891. 

OonienU (beUdes the list of AccessiatUt the votes of the Corporation and the Overseers^ and the 
Necrology)', — 47. Bibliography of Beaumont and Fletcher. A. C. Potter, pp. 151-158. — 48. Index 
to recent reference lists. No. 4. W. C. Lane. pp. 196-218. — 49. Orators and poets of Phi Beta 
Kappa. W. H. Tillinghast. pp. 265-270. 

Bibliographical contributions. Edited by Justin Winsor. In part republished from 
the Bulletin of Harvard University. The following numbers have been issued since 
Sept. 1890 : — 

89. Alfred Claohork Potter. A bibliography of Beaumont and Fletcher. 1890. pp. 20. 

40. William Coolidgb Lane. Index to recent reference lists. No. IV. 1890. 1891. pp. 25. 

41. William Hopkiks Tillikohast. Serenth list of the publications of Harrard University and 
its officers, with the chief publications on the University. 1891. pp. 82. 

42. William Hopkins Tillinghast. The orators and poets of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massa- 
chusetts. 1891. pp. 8. 

Thirteenth report (1890) of Justin Winsor, librarian of Harvard University. 8**. 

pp. 14. 

Included in the annual report of the President, and also printed separately. 

KEDIGAIi SCHOOL. 

Medical publications. Harvard Medical School. 1890. 8^. 

Consists of separate papers bound together and provided with a title-page. 

Contents : — The sternum as an index of sex, height, and age. Thomas Dwight. — Irregular union 
of the first and second pieces of the sternum in man and apes. Thomas Dwiirht. — Observations on the 
steadiness of the hand and on static equilibrium. W. N. BuUard and E. 6. Brackett. -^ An experi- 
mental investigation of stryclmine poisoning. Robert W. Lovett. — The physique of women in Massa- 
chusetts. H. P. Bowditch. — The movements of the lower jaw. Charles £. Luce. — The anti-bacterial 
action of iodoform. J. Amory Jeffries. — Valves in the veins of the human intestines. W. S. Biyant 

— Effects of varying rates of stimulation on the action of the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Franklin H* 
Hooper. — On the sterilization of milk and foods for infants. J. Amory Jeffries. «« The reioforpemenl 
and Inhibition of the knee-jerk. H. P. Bowditch. ^Voluntary control of tiie heart* Ddwyd AWfii 
?U«^. <-T How far may a cow be tuberculous before her milk become dangerons as to trtlcli of footft 
Harold C. Ernst. — Ueber den Kachweis der Unermudliehkeit der Saugethiemerven. H. P.- Bowditch. 

— The closure of the cranial sutures as a sign of age. Thomas Dwight. — M^thode de demonstration 
des mouvements laryngiens. Franklin H. Hooper. — The knee-jerk and its physiological modifications. 
H. P. Bowditch and J. W. Warren. — A case of fracture of the temporal bone, with remarks on tre- 
phining for fracture of tlie base of the skull. J. Collins Warren. — Demonstration of pathological 
specimens. Harold C. Ernst. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



mrSBUM OF COMPABATIVB ZOOLOGY. 

Memoirs of the Mnseum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. 
Nothing published within the period corered by this list. 

BoUetiu of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College, in Cambridge. 
Vol. xvi. (Geological series, vol. ii.), 10 ; xz. 3-8 ; xxi. 1-5. 

Oonienis: — xri. • zo. Metamorphism of cUstic feldspar In conglomerate schist. J. £. Wolff, pp. 
178-183, pUUes 2. (Sept. 1891.) 

zx. 3. Preliminary account of the fossil mammals from the White River and Loup Fork forma- 
tions, contained in the Mnsenm of Comparative Zoology. Part II. Carnivora and Artiodactyla. W. B. 
Scott. Perissodactyla. Henry F. Osborn. pp. 65-100, plaie$ 8. (Nov. 1890.)— 4. Oistatella: the 
origin and development of the individual in the colony. C. B. Davenport, pp. 101-162, plates 11. 
(Nov. 1890.) ^ 5. The eye9 in blind crayfishes. 6. H. Parker, pp. 158-161, plate 1. (Nov. 1890.) — 
6. Notice of Calamocrinus diomedae, a new stalked crinoid from the Galapagqs, dredged by the U. S. 
Fish Commission steamer *' Albatross,'* Lieut. -Commander Z. L. Tanner, U. S. N., commanding. 
Alexander Agassis, pp. 164-167. (Dec. 1890.) — 7. The origin and development of the central 
nervous system in Llmaz maximus. Annie P. Henchman, pp. 169-208, plates 10. (Dec. 1890.) — 
a. Hie parietal eye in some lizards from the western United States. W. £. Bitter, pp. 209-228, plates 
4. (Jan. 1891.) 

zzi. z. Contributions to the morphology of Turbellaria. I. On the structure of Phagocata 
gracilis, Leidy. W. M. Woodworth. pp. 1-42, plates 4. (April, 1891.) — a. The compound eyes in 
crustaceans. O. H. Parker, pp. 45-140, plates 10. (Hay, 1891). — 3. On some points in the anatomy 
and histology of Sipunculus nudus, L. Henry B. Ward. pp. 143-182, plates 8. (May, 1891.) — 
4. Three letters from Alexander Agassis to the Hon. Marshall McDonald, on the dredging operations 
off the west coast of Central America to the Galapagos, to the west coast of Mexico, and in the Gulf of 
California, carried on by the U. S. Fish Commission steamer ** Albatross.** pp. 183-199. (June, 1891). 
— 5. The development of the pronephros and segmental duct in Amphibia. Herbert H. Field, pp. 201- 
840, plates 8. 

Annoal report of the Curator [Alexander Agassiz] of the Muneum of Comparative 
Zodlogy at Harvard College, to the President . and Fellows of Harvard College, for 
1889-90. Cambridge. 1890. 8^ ]^p. S2, folding plate 1. 

This pamphlet contains, beside the main report of the Curator, which is also included in the report 
of the President, special reports by officers of the Museum on the departments placed under their charge 
respectlTely, and lists of the publications of the Museum and its officers. 

PXABODT mrBETm OF AMXRIOAN ABCHABOIiOaT AND ETHNOLOaY. 

Archaeological and ethnolo^cal papers of the Peabody Museum, Harvard University. 

Vol. i. 2, 8. Cambridge. 1891. 

Contents: — i. a. The Karankara Indians, the coast people of Texas. Albert S. Gatschet. With 
notes by Charles A. Hammond and Alice W. Oliver and a rocabulary obtained from Alice W. Oliver, 
pp. yiii. 108 (69-167). — 3. The atlatl or spear thrower of the ancient Mexicans. Zelia Nuttall. pp. 80 
(171-198), plates 8. 

Twenty-third and twenty-fourth annual repoi-ts of the Trustees of the Peabody 
Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, in connection with Harvard Univer- 
sity. Presented to the President and Fellows of Harvard College. 1889 and 1890. 
VoL iv. nofl. 3, 4. Cambridge. 1891. 8''. pp. 61-110. 

Contains abstracts from the records by the Secretary, Henry Wheatland, reports of the Curator, 
F. W. Putnam, and reports of the Treasurer, Francis C. Lowell. 



lO OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



SCIENTIFIC PAPEBS FBOM THE LABOBATOBIES AND SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE UNIVEItSITT. 

*4i* These papers represent work done in the laboratories or departments, but are not necessarily 
written by o£Elcers of the University, or issued as official publications of the University or the depart- 
ments. Papers by officers of the University are not mentioned, as a rule, unless they occur in a 
series having a general title. 

Contributions from the A8tronomic%l Observatory. 
Professor Edward C. Pickbriko, Director, 

Stars having peculiar spectra, including new variable stars in Triangulum and Hydra. 
By M. Fleming. Aatron* Nachnchten^ cxxvi. 117. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. By M. Fleming. Ibid, cxxvi. 165. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. New variable stars in Perseus, Triangulum, and 
Hydra. By M. Fleming. Sidereal Messenger^ x. 7. 

Astronomical expedition to Peru. 'Ry M. Fleming. Ibid, x. 105. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. New variables in Aquarius and Delphinus. By M. 
Fleming. Ibid. x. 106. 

New variable star in Camelopardalis. By M. Fleming. Ibid. x. 152. 

The new red star in Auriga. By M. Fleming. English Mechanic^ liii. 50. 

Objects of interest on spectrum plates and two new variable stars in Perseus. By 
M. Fleming. Astron. Nachrichten^ cxxvi. 163. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. New variable stars in Aquarius, Delphinus, and 
Camelopardalis. By M. Fleming. Ibid, cxxvii. 5. 

New planetary nebula. DM. — 12** 1172. By M. Fleming. Sidereal Messenger^ x. 240. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. New variable star in Sagittarius. B. A. 19^ 51.8". 
Dec. — 42** 7'. By M. Fleming. Astron. NachricJUen. cxxviii. 11. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. New variable star in Lacerta. DM. -|-39*' 4851. By 
M. Fleming. Ibid, cxxviii. 121. 

Contributions from the Chemical Laboratory of Harvard College. 

Professor Josiah P. Cooke, Director. 

A new meteoric iron from Stutsman county, North Dakota. Oliver Whipple Hunting- 
ton. Proc. Am. Acad. xxv. 229-232, plate 1, cut. 

On chlorsulphopyromucic acids. Henry B. Hill and Walter S. Hendrixson. Ibid, 
xxv. 283-295. 

The prehistoric and Kiowa county pallasites. Oliver Whipple Huntington. Ibid. 
xxvi. 1-12, plates 3. 

On the products obtained by the action of nitric acid upon bromtrinitrophenylmalonic 
ester. C. Loring Jackson and W. B. Bentley. Ibid, xxvi. 67-97. 

Notes on tribrommononitrobenzol. C. Loring Jackson and W. B. Bentley. Ibid. 
xxvi. 98-101. 

A revision of the atomic weight of copper. Fourth paper. Theodore W. Richards. 
Ibid. 

The reactions of sodic alcoholates with tribrom-dinitro-benzene and tribrom-trinitro- 
benzene. C. Loring Jackson and W. H. Warren. Am. Chem. Journal^ March, 1891 ; 
xiu. 164-193. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. II 



OontributiozLB from the Cryptogamic Laboratory of Harvard College. 
Under the direction of Professor William G. Fablow. 

ziT. PrelimiDarj notes on the species of Doassansia, Cornu. William Albert SetchcU. 
Reprinted from Ptoc. Am. Acad. xxvi. 13-19. 

XV. On the structure and dcA'elopment of Choreocolax poljsiphoniae, Reinsch. Her- 
bert Maule Richards. Reprinted from PrtK, Am. Acad. xxvi. 46-63, plates 2. 

xvi. On a kephir-Iike yeast found in the United States. Charles L. Mix. Reprinted 
from Proc. Am. Acad. xxvi. 102-114. 

xvii. Concerning the life-history of Saccorhiza dermatodea (De la Pj'l.)- J* Ag. 
William Albert Setchell. Repiinted from Proc. Am. Acad. xxvi. 177-217, plates 2. 

Notes on Corticium Oakesii, B. & C, and Michenera Artocreas, B. & C. George 
James Peirce. Bidl. Torrey Botan. Club, 9 Dec. 1890 ; xvii. 301-310, plate 1. (Issued 
without a number.) 

A consecutive numbering for this series wm not adopted until the fifth number was issued. As 
several later numl>ers have been recorded in these Lists without serial numbers the following resume is 
given : — 

i.-viiL See Fourth list of publications (18S6-87), p. 8. 

iz. Notes on the genus Taphrina. Benjamin L. Robinson. Annals of Botany ^ Nov. 1887 ; ii. 163- 
176. (This piiper has not been recorded in any previous List.) 

X. See Fifth list of publications (1K87-88), p. 9. where it is recorded without number. (In its 
separate form this paper was numbered, incorrectly, iz.) 

zi., zii., ziii. See Seventh list of publications (1889-90), p. 9, where the pspers are not numbered 
and are arranged incorrectly. They should run : xi. Sturgts ; xii. Setchell ; ziii. Richards. 

Unnumbered: See Sizth list of publications (1888-89), p. 8. 

Papers from the Laboratory of Physical Geography of Harvard College. 

Under the direction of Professor William M. Davis. 

▼. Professor Russell's theory of cold waves. S. M. Ballou. 8°. pp. 14. 

Earlier numbers in this series : x. Causes of anticyclonic cold in winter. W. R. Dewey. Am. 
Met. Journal, 1886; iii. 25-82. — a. Water-spouts in the Gulf Stream in winter. H. B. Gibson. Ibid. 
pp.. 119-127. — 3. Ferrers convectional theory of tornadoes. W. M. Davis and C. E. Curry. Ibid. 
1889-90. pp. 837-849. — 4. A general account of land and sea breezes. W. M. Davis and R. DeC. 
Ward. Ann. Astron Observ. ffarv. Coll. 1890 ; zzii. pt. 2, 215-288. 

• 

Oontributions from the ZcOlogical Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative 

Zoology. 

Under the direction of Professor Edward L. Mark. 

xix. Cristatella : the origin and development of the individual in the colony. C. B. 
Davenport. Bull. 3fu8. Comp. Z06L, Nov. 1890; xz. 4, pp. 101-151, j^^e^f 11, with 
text* 

TJL* The eyes in blind crayfishes. 6. H. Parker. Ibid., Nov. 1890 ; xx. 5, pp. 153- 
162, plate 1, vjith text. 

xxL The origin and development' of the central nervous system in Liraax iofiximw. 
Annie P. Henchman. Ibid., Dec. 1890 ; xx. 7, pp. 169-208, plates 10, with text. 

xxii. The parietal eye in some lizards from the western United States. W. E. Ritter. 
Ibid., Jan. 1891 ; xx. 8, pp. 209-228, plaies 4, with text. 

xTiii. Preliminary notice on budding in Bryozoa. C. B. Davenport. Proc. Am. 
Acad. XXV. 278-282. (Feb. 1891.) 



12 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



iv. Contributions to the morphology of the Tnrbellaria. I. On the Btnictnre of 
Phagocata gracilia, Leidj. W. M. Woodworth. BtUL Mus. Comp. ZoUl.^ April, 1891 ; 
xxi. 1, pp. 1-42, plates 4, with text. 

xzv. The compound eyes of crastaceana. G. H. Parker. Ibid.j May, 1891 ; xxi. 2, 
pp. 45-140, plates 10, with text. 

zxvi. On some points in the anatomy and histology of Sipunculus nudus, L. Henry 
B. Wai*d. Ibid., May, 1891 ; xxi. 3, pp. 143-182, plates 8, with text. 

xxviL The development of the pronephros and segmental duct in Amphibia. Herbert 
H. Field. Ibid.j June, 1891 ; xxi. 5, plates 8, with text. 

THE BTTDLEIAN LECTUBE. 

Revealed religion. Dudleian lecture delivered in Appleton Chapel, 23 Oct. 1890, by 
Rt. Rev. John J. Eeane. Pilot (Boston), tNov. 1890. 

PUBLIOATIONS OF H0LDEB8 OF FELLOWSHIPS AT HAJtVABD UNIVEBSITT. 

John H«Biy Gvaj. 

MogerB FelUne, 

The German economic association (Verein fOr sozial-politik) . Annals Acad. Polit. 
afnd Social /Sd.y Jan. 1891 ; i. 515. 

IffaTline B6oh«r» 

Parker Fellow, 

Ueber die Reihenentwickelungen der potential theorie; von der philoeophischen 
Facultiit der Universit&t Gdttingen gekr5nte Preisschrift. GOttingen. 1891. 4"*. pp.66. 

Avcnst TrecUrio Faerste. 

Piarker Fellow. 

Notes on Clinton group fossils, with special reference to collections from Indiana, 
Tennessee, and Georgia. Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist.j May, 1889 ; xxiv. 263-355, 
plates 5. 

Botanical Notes. Bull. Torrey Bot. Clvb, Oct. 1889 ; xvi. 266-268, plaJle 1. 

On the Clinton o61itic iron ores. Am. Joum. Sci.y Jan. 1891 ; 3d series, xli. 28, 29. 



Wadivortk Hal«7. 

Parker Fellow. 

Quaestiones Petronianae. Harvard studies in Class. PhUol., 1891 ; ii. 1-40. 

Lovls Miiottlii Jaekuw. 

Parker Fellow. 

Die Phenylhydrazinverbindungen des Succinylobemsteinsfture&thers. With Adolf 
Baeyer and R. Jay. Ber. d. deutsch. c&em* Ofesdl. zziv. 14, 2690. 



Morgan Fellow, 

On some points in the anatomy and histology of Sipunculus nudus, L. BuU. Mus. 
Comp. Zool., May, 1891 ; xxi. 3, pp. 143-183, ^ates 3. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 1 3 



Ozias Ooodwin Memorial Fellow, 

Amendments to the constitution of the United States. A paper read before the 
seventh annual meeting of the American Historical Association at Washington, D. C, 
29--81 Dec. 1891. Papers Am. Hist. Assoc.^ vol. v., pt. 4, pp. 19-29. 

WilliMA Edward Bucliardt DuBols. 

Henry BromJUld Rogert Memorial Fellow. 

Does education pay ? A lecture delivered before the National Colored League, Boston, 
10 March, 1891. Bostm Courant, 21, 28 March, 4, 11 April, 1891. 

Harvard themes. J6id., weekly, June, 1890 — October, 1891. 

OOLLSGX ,PAPBB8, etc. 
The Daily Crimson. Vol. xviii., zix. September 25, 1890— June 19, 1891. 
The Harvard Advocate. Vol. 1., li. October 1, 1890— June 19, 1891. Fortnightly. 

The Harvard Lampoon. Second series. Vol. xz., zzi. October 24, 1890 — June 19, 
1891. FortnighJtly. 

The Harvard Monthly. Vol. xi., xii. October, 1890— July, 1891. 

The Harvard Portfolio, 1890-91. An annual illustrated record of men and events of 
permanent interest to Harvard students. Vol. U. Cambridge. Published by students 
of Harvard University, pp. (\0)^ plates 28, with text. 

Edited by W. H. Wiggin, Jr., and E. L. Kenyon. 

The Harvard Index for 1890-91. A university directory. Vol. xvii. Complete ath- 
letic, base-ball, foot-ball and boating records and lists of the officers and members of the 
college societies. Boston. 1890. 12"*. pp. 268. 

Edited by W. B. Bigelow and C. A. Higfat. 

OOMMEKOEMENT S8SAYB. 

Harvard commencement essays. I. The Harvard senior. By Henry B. Gledhill. — 

II. Edward Rowland Sill. By Charles W. Wlllard. — III. A remedy for American pbi- 

listinism. By Charles Lewis Slattery. New England Magaainey August, 1891 ; n. s. 

vol. iv. 786-742. 

CLASS BEPOBTS. 

iseo. Report of the Class of 1860. 1880-1890. Printed for the use of the class. 

Boston. 1891. 8^ pp. 120,p^el. 
The c1m« secretary it F. M. Weld. 

18d6. The eighth secretary's report of the Class of 1866, of Harvard College. 
June, 1886 — June, 1891. Printed for the use of the class. Boston. 1891. 8^. pp. 61. 
The class secretary is C. £. Stratton. 
1875. Harvard College. Class of 1875. Secretary's report. No. VI. 1875-1891. 

8^ pp. 125. 

The class seoretary is W, A. Reed. 

1800. Harvard CoU^e. Class of 1890. Secretary's report. No. I. Cambridge. 

1891. 8*. pp. 148. 

The class secretary is J. W. Lund. 

18d9. The Utest poems of the Class of 1829. 1882-1889. [PartllL]. 8^ pp. 
201-282. 



14 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



COLUSaB SOCIETIES. 

The present and future of Harvard College. An address delivered before the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society at Cambridge, Mass., June 25, 1891, by William Watson Goodwin. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. S"". pp. 42. 

Poem delivered by Henry G. Chapman before the Phi Beta Eappa Society of Harvard 
University, June 25, 1891. 8**. pp. 12. 

The orators and poets of Phi Beta Eappa, Alpha of Massachusetts. By William 
Hopkins TilUngliast. Cambridge. 1891. 8°. pp. 8. 

BibliogrHpliical contributions of Harvard College Library, No. 42. 

Eleventh catalogue of the officers and members of the Hasty Pudding Club in Harvard 
College. Containing a brief sketch of the club and an index of names. Cambridge. 
1891. 16^ pp.301. 

Catalogue of the officers and members of the Harvard Law School Association. 
April 1, 1891. Boston, 1891. 8^ pp. lOS, plates 2, 

University extension at Harvard. Prospect Progressive Union. [April, 1891.] 8^. 
pp. (3). 

First annual report of the graduate treasurer [of the athletic associations of Harvard 

University] for the year ending September 30, 1890. Boston. 1890. 16*. pp. 28. 
William Hooper, graduate treasurer. 

What can ethics do for us? An address given before the Philosophical Club of 
Harvard University, Sanders Theatre, March 27, 1890. Wm. Mackiutire Salter. Chicago. 
C. H. Kerr & Co. 1891. 12°. pp. 32. 

' The mental element in the treatment of disease. Prize essay of the Boylston Medical 
Society of Harvard University, 1891. By Edward Wyllys Taylor. Boston. 1891. 8°. 
pp. 31. 

Association hand-book presented by the Young Men's Christian Association (Society 
ofChristianBrethren)of Harvard University, 1891-92. [Cambi-idge. 1891.] 18". pp.40. 

Harvard's better self. By William Reed Bigelow. Reprinted from New England 
Magazine for December, 1890. Published at 86 Federal St., Boston. 8^. pp. 8. 
Beprinted and distributed by the Young Men's Christian Association of Harrard University. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 

\* For the purpose of completing the record, a few articles omitted from former lists are inserted here. 



Al 



Al&T i^ j>^***»- 



Cfurator of ike Museum of Comparative Zodlogy. 

I. Notice of Calamocriiras diomedae, a new 
stalked crinoid, dredged bj the U. S. Fish 
Commission steamer ** Albatross." Buii. 
Mum, Comp. Zo'dL Dec. 1890; xx. no. 6. 
pp. 164-167. 

a. Three letters to the Hon. Marshall McDonald, 
United States Commissioner of Fish and 
Fisheries, on the dredging operations off the 
west coast of Central America to the (xala- 
pages, to the west coast of Mexico, and in 
the Gulf of California, in charge of Alexander 
Agassiz, carried on by the U. 8. Fish Com- 
mission steamer '* Albatross,'* Lieut.-Com- 
mander Z. L. Tanner, U. 8. N., commanding. 
Ihtd. June, 1891 ; xx. no. 8. pp. 185-200. 

3. Report as Curator of the Museum of Compara- 
tive Zoology at Harvard College. 1889-90. 
Cambridge. 1890. 

4* Edited the Memoirs and the Bulletin of the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology. See Of- 
ficial publications : Museum of Comparative 
Zoology. 

5. Sundry reviews and notices in Nature, the 
American Journal of Science, add Nation. 

Professor of CicusiccU Philology. 

X. [Review of] H. T. Peck's ** Latin Pronuncia- 
tion." Class. Rev. v. 60, 61. 

a. Gajns or Gaius? Harv. Studies in Class. 
Philol. 1891; ii. 71-87. 

3. The Prometheus bound of Aeschylus, snd the 
fragments of Prometheus unbound. With in- 
troduction and notes by N. Wecklein, trans- 
lated by F. D. Allen. Boston, etc. Ginn & 
Co. 1891. 12'*. pp. 178. 

College Series of Greek Aothon. 



Bussey Professor of Law. 

X. The doctrine of Price v. Neal. H(Mrv, Load 
Bev. Feb. 1891 ; iv. 297-810. 

Curaior of Maps, 

z. Onr Antio<'h ideals. Spirit and Life, Oct., 
Nov. 1890. 

a. Harvard College chnrter changes : how one 
gootl school got under weigh. Ibid. Jan. 
1891. 



3. How unbound maps are kept at Harvard Col- 

lege Library. Library Joum. March, 1891. 

4. Ivanoff. Spirit and Life, March, April, May, 

1891. 

5. The gospel according to Herbert Spencer. 

Unitarian Rev. June, 1891 ; xxxv. 462-474. 

Tliia article, soinewbat enlarged, was issued separately 
under the following title : 

6. Mr. Savage's unitarian catechism: its philos- 

ophy. 8"*. pp. 28. 

7. The triumph of unitarianism. Bostan Evening 

Transcript, 6 June, 1891. 



Instructor in English. 

I. The children of Paule's. Harvard Mo. May, 
1891 ; xii. 85-98. 



WiUiMA Kmawj Bakor. 

Professor of Gynaecology. 

X. Fibro-sarcoma of both ovaries; coeliotomy; 
recovery. Boston Med. and Surg. Jowm. 
2 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 885, 836. 

a. Small sub-serous fibroids of uterus the occasion 
of great intolerance of the bladder. Ibid. 
20 Aug. 1891; cxxv. 189, 190. 

3. Cancer of the cervix uteri. Result in its 
tn*atment by high amputation. Philadelphia. 
1891. ^. pp. 38. 

Beprinted from the TmtuMicHon* e^f the American Oyne- 
cologtcal Ateociation, Sept. 1801. 



Joa«ph H«Biy BMde, Jr. 

Lecturer on the Law of Damages, 

z. A treatise on the measure of damages, by 
Theodore Sedgwick. Eiglith edition. Re- 
vised, rearranged, and enlarged by Arthur G. 
Sedgwick and Joseph H. Beale, Jr. New 
York. Baker, Voorhls & Co. 1891. 8 vols. 
8*. 

davemoe John BIaIm* 

Professor of Otology. 

z. Boston hospitals. A lecture delivered before 
the Thursday Evening Club. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Journ. 5 March, 1891 ; cxxiv. 
225-229. 

'* Plan of Boston shnwinfr pojiidon^ of hospitals " Inserted. 

2. Otolgia. Ibid. 13 Aug. 1891; cxxv. 165, 166. 

3. Mastoid cases. Trans. Am. Otological So^* 

23 Sept. 1891. 



i6 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Frank BoIIas. 

Secretary of the University, 

X. Harvard University. A brief statement of 
what Harvard University is, bow it may be 
entered and how its degrees may be obtained. 
Cambridge. March, 1891. 8"*. pp. 56. 

a. Names and addresses of living bachelors and 
masters ot arts and of the holders of honor- 
ary degrees of Harvard University. 1891. 
(Third year.) Cambridge. March, 1891. 
8** pp. 117. 

3. Aid Funds, 1891-92. Cambridge. Sept. 1891- 
12^. pp. 22. 

4-Z4. " The O. W. L. letters," in the Boston Post: 

— 4. Sunday in the snow. Jan. 18, 1891. — 
5. Sunday in the ice. Jan. 21. — 6. A storm, 
Jan. 29. — 7. A foretaste of spring. Feb. 3. 

— 8. A Sunday by the sea. Feb. 10. — 9. 
Two views through winter sunshine. Feb. 
17. — 10. Waverley oaks and Bussey hem- 
locks. Feb. 24. — II. Winchester hills and 
Lincoln hollows. March 3. — la. The minute 
man in a snow drift. March 10. — 13. The 
coming of the birds. March 21. — 14. A 
day in early spring. March 30. 

15. Sap»ucking woodpeckers and forest trees. 
Oarden and Forest^ 15 April, 1891. 

x6. Yellow-bellied woodpeckers and their uninvited 
guests. The Auk, July, 1891 ; viii. 256-270. 
Also reprinted sepimtely. 
17. Edited the Harvard University Calendar, nos. 
338-374. Oct. 1890— June, 1891. 

H«Biy Piokeriiic Bowdltoltp 

Professor of Physiology, and Dean of the Medical 

Faculty. 

I. The growth of children studied by Galton's 
method of percentile grades. Twenty-second 
RepH Mass. State Board of Health, (1890.) 
Boston. 1891. pp. 479-522. 



duurlM Albert Br aolntt. 

Professor of Denial Pathology. 

z. Concerning third molars. IntemcU. Dental 
Joum. Jan. 1891 ; xii. 10. 

Bead before the American Academy of Dental Science, 
March 6, 1890. 

Edward HinliHns Bradford. 

Instructor in Surgery and Orthopedics. 

I. The treatment of deformities of spastic para- 
lysis. Boston Med. and Surg. Jowm. 25 
6e|>t. 1880; escziii. 803. 

ft. I'he treatment of lateral curvature. (Ab«tract) 
Ihid. 2 Oct. 1890 ; exxiii. 327. 

3. The surgical treatment of spastic paralysis in 

children. Ihid. 20 Nov. 1890; exxiii. 485- 
487. 

4. Hugh Owen Thomas. lUd. 22 Jan. 1891; 

cxxiv. 108. 



5. Two cases of spina bifida. Ihid. 9 April 1891 ; 

cxxiv. 852-354, illwir. 

6. Cerebellar tumor; operation; haemorrhage 

from defect of occipital bone; death; gen- 
eral remarks. Ihid. 30 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 
421-426, illustr. 

William Brewster. 

Assistant in Ornithology and Mammalogy at the 
Museum of Comparaiive Zoology. 

z. Summer tobin roosts. The Auky Oct 1890; 
vii. 360-873. 

a. A new subspecies of the solitary sandpiper. 
Ihid. pp. 877-379. 

3. Breeding of the pileated woodpecker in Wor- 

cester Co., Mass. Ihid. pp. 400, 401. 

4. A study of Florida Gallinules, with some notes 

on a nest found at Cambridge, Mass. Ihid. 
Jan. 1891 ; viu. 1-7. 

5. Notes on the birds of the Lower Suwanee River. 

With F. M. Chapman. Ihid. April, 1891; 
viii. 125-185. 

6. Description of seven supposed new North 

American birds. Ihid. pp. 139-149. 
Also issued separately, 17 Feb. 1891. 

7. Notes on Bachman's warbler {Helminthophila 

Bachmani). Ibid. pp. 149-157. 

8. The whistling swan in Massachusetts. Ihid. 

p. 232. 

9. Megascops asio macfarlanei; a correction. 

Ibid. p. 237. 
zo. The woodcock's whistle. Forest and Stream, 

25 Dec. 1890; xxv. 453, 454. 
Mr. Brewster is a ifaember of the committee on publication 
of The Auk. 

Edwmrd Cemelina Brlgse. 

Assistant Professor of Dented Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics. 

1. Removal of the pulp by the use of cocaine. 
Intemai. Dental Joum. Mtij, 1891 ; xii. 296. 

LeBeroa Rnaaell Brlgse. 

Professor of English, and Dean of Harvard 

College. 

z.- Original charades. New York. Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons. 1891. 18<l pp. (4), 72. 

Three of the charades appeared in Scribner'e MaMsine, 
Jan. 1891 ; ix. 106, and three more in the same periodical, 
Feb. 1891 ; ix. 195. 

WiliiMA Sohier Bryaat. 

Assistant in Anatomy. 

z. Observations on the topography of th^ tiormal 
human tympanum. ArSUves of Otology, ziz. 
no. 4, p. tl7. 



Instructor in the Diseases of Children. 

z. Influenza in the out-patient service of the 
Boston City Hospital. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Journ. 9 Oct. 1890; exxiii. 34S-M5. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



17 



Assistant in Clinical Surgery, and Demonstrator 
of Surgical Appliances, 

I, a. Report on the recent progress of surgery. 
With H. W. Gushing, M.D. Boston Med, 
and Surg. Joum, 2 Oct. 1890, 9, 16, 28 April, 
21 May, 2 July, 1891 ; exxiii. 319, 324, cxxit. 
357, 388, 407, 506, cxzv. 12. 



Artkvr Traej' CalMit. 

(Uinical Instructor in Oenito-urinary Surgery. 

I. Bigelow as a surgeon. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 27 Nov. 1890; exxiii. 510, 511. 

a. Notes on the non-operative treatment of en- 
larged prostate. Ibid. 4 Dec. 1890; exxiii. 
529-^2. 

3. Another successful case of uretero-lithotomy. 

Ihid. 25 Dec. 1890; exxiii. 613, 614. 

4. A case of relapsing appendicitis in which the 

appendix was removed in an interval between 
the attacks; with recovery. Ibid. 15 Jan. 
1891 ; cxxiu. 57, 58. 



- Recorder. 

I. The birds of Greenland. By Andreas T. 
Hagerup. Translated from the Danish by 
Frimann B. Amgrimson. Edited by Mon- 
tague Chamberlain. Boston. Little, Brown 
& Co. 1891. 9^. pp. viii. 62. 

« 

Hmbab yamtm OhapUa. 

Lecturer on Criminal Law, 

I. Cases on criminal law. A collection of re- 
ported cases on some of the leading heads of 
the criminal law. Prepared for use in the 
Law School of Harvard University. Boston. 
1891. 

a. Land transfer reform. Suggestions as to the 
question of constitutionality, ffarv. Law 
Rev, Jan. 1891 ; iv. 280-282. 

Bttvid Williama Ohmmwmr. 

Professor of Surgery. 

I. Is the study of medicine a liberal profession? 
Boston Med, and Surg. Journ, 16 April, 
1891 ; cxxiv. 378-875. 

a. A case of compound dislocation of the hip. 
Ibid, 28 May, 1891 ; cxxiv. 528, 524, cut, 

TrmdmH/ok Edward ClMaay. 

Instructor in Ophthalmoiogy at the School of 
Veterinary Medicine, 

X. Some practical points in the differential diag- 
nosis of iritis and conjunctivitis. Boston 
Med. and Surg, Journ, 4 June, 1891 ; cxxiv. 
554. 



FnuaoU Jaikm Child. 

Professor of English, 

I, The English and Scottish popular ballads. 
Part VII. Boston. Houghton, MifBin & Co. 
1890. 4^ pp. (6), 1-254. 

Williiuii Mane Cola. 

Instructor in Political Economy, 

I. Cooperative insurance and endowment schemes. 
Quart. Journ. Economics, July, 1891; v. 
46G-489. 

WiUiMA M«rritt Gonaat. 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 

z. Cysts of the labium. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum, 4 June, 1891 ; cxxiv. 549, 550, 



JosIaIi Pi 



Cooke. 

Erving Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy; 
Director of the Chemical Laboratory, 

1. Report as Director of the Chemical Laborar 

tory. Annual Reports of the President, etc. 
1889-90; pp. 172-181. 

2. A plea for liberal culture. Cambridge. John 

Wilson & Son. 1890. \^, pp. 83. 

Contains a Memorial to the Board of Oveneen of Harvaid 
College in oppoKition to the propoecd redaction of the col- 
lege course, and a Lectare delivered before the Freshman 
class of Harvard College, 25 Sept. 1890. 

3. Report of the Director of the Chemical Labor- 

atory to the visiting committee of the Over- 
seers. 2 March, 1891. 8*. pp. 41-57. 

4. Laboratory practice. A series of experiments 

on the fundamental principles of chemistry. 
A companion to " The new chemistry.** New 
York. D. Appleton & Co. 1891. 12^. pp. 
2, 191. ^^ 

5. Professor Cooke edits the Proceedings of ihe 

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
and is an associate editor of the American 
Journal of Science. 

WniUm Pmrkor Cooke. 

CliniccU Lecturer in Operative Dentistry, 

1, Formations in the pulp-cavity. International 
Dental Joum. Dec. 1890 ; xl. 725. 

Edword Cowlos. 

Clinical Instructor in Mental Diseases, 

X. Seventy-third annual report of the McLean 
Asylum for tlie Insane for the year 1890. 
Annual report Mass. Oen'l Hosp. for 1890. 
Boston. L. Barta & Co. 8*. pp. 42-71. 

a. The mechanism of insanity. Parts II. and 
III. Am, Journ. Insanity, April, July, 
1891 ; pp. 471-495, 48-70. 



i8 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



3. Neurasthenia and its mental symptoms. The 
Shattuck Lecture for 1891. Med. Communi-' 
ecUions Mom. Med. Society, 1891 ; zv. ii. 
287-888. —^o^on Med. and Surg. Journ. IB, 
23. 80 July, 6, 18, 20, 27 August, 1891 ; czzt. 
49, 73, 97, 126, 163, 181, 209. 

Also ijiBued separately: Boston. David Clapp A Son. 
1891. 8*. pp. 105. 



Elliridge Qmrvj CuH&r. 

Instructor in the Theory and Practice of Physic. 

X. A case of multiple neuritis due to arsenic. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 13 Nov. 1890 ; 
cxxiii. 463. 

a. A case of pseudo-muscular hypertrophy in an 
adult. Ibid. 13 Nov. 1890 ; czxi'ii. 465. 

3. An unsuccessful case of digital dilatation of 
the pylorus for cicatricial stenosis. With 
M. U. Kichardson. Ibid. 18 Dec. 1890; 
cxxiu. 581, 682. 



Gliarl«s Beaediet Daveaport. 

Assistant in Zoology. 

X. Cristatella: the origin and deyelopment of 
the individual in the colony. BiUl. Mus. 
Comp. Zool. Nov. 1890 ; xx. no. 4, pp. 101- 
Ibl^plaies 11. 

a. Preliminary notice on budding in Bryozoa. 
Proc. Am. Acad. vol. xxv. 278-282. 

CoDtributionji from the Zodlofrical laboratory of the Mn- 
•eum of Comparaclye Zoology at Harvard College, xiz., zxiii. 

Fraaois H«Biy Daveaport. 

Instructor in Gynaecology. 

X. Semi-annual report of the progress in gynecol- 
ogy. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 2 April, 
1891 ; cxxiv. 334, 335. 

a. Some forms of amenorrhoea and their treat- 
ment. Ibid. 16 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 380-382. 

3. A case of incontinence of urine due to malpo- 
sition of the ureter. Trans. Am. Oyneeo' 
logical Soc. 1890; xv. 343. 



William Morris Davia. 

Professor of Physical Geography. 

X. Two belts of fossiliferous black shale in the 
triassic formation of Connecticut. With S. 
W. Loper. Bull. Oeol. Soc. America^ 1891 ; 
u. 415-430. 

a. Dr. Hann*8 studies on cyclones and anti- 
cyclones. Science, 2 Jan. 1891 ; xvii. 4, 5. 

3. The geographical exhibition of the Brooklyn 
Institute. Nation, 26 March, 1891; lu. 267. 

4-6. Abstracts of three lectures delivered {it Johns 
Hopkins University in January, 1891: — 4. 
Tornadoes, a story of a long inheritance. — 
5. The physical geography of southern New 
England. — 6. The triassic sandstones of the 
Connecticut valley. Johns Hopkins Univ. 
Circulars, April, 1891. 



7. European weather predictions. Am. Met. 

Journ. June, 1891 ; viii. 63-58. 

8. The story of a long inheritance. Atlantic Mo. 

July, 1891; Ixviii. 68-78. 

9. The geological dates of origin of certain topo- 

graphic forms on the Atlantic slope of the 
United States. BuU. Oeol. Soc. America^ 
1891; ii. 641-586. 

10. The geographical exhibition. Appaladida, 
July, 1891; vi. 236-241. 

XX. Edited Papers from the Laboratory of Physical 
Geography. See p. 11. 

Fraak Wiathrop ]>raper« 

Professor of Legal Medicine. 

X. Recent progress in legal medicine. Sajous* 
AnnucU of the Universal Med. Sciences, 1891 ; 
iv. sect. J. 

a. Carbolic acid poisoning. An illustrative case. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 1 Jan. 1891 ; 
cxxiv. 11, 12. 

3. A case of tubal pregnancy, with rupture and 

fatal haemorrhage at an early stage. Ibid. 
8 Jan. 1891 ; cxxiv. 28, 29. 

4. Recent progress in legal medicine. Ibid. 29 

Jan. 1891; cxxiv. 112-114. 

Gharlas Fraaklia DuaVar* 

Professor of Political Economy, and Dean of (he 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

X. Chapters on the theory and history of banking. 
New York, etc. G. P. Putnam's Sons. 1891. 
sm. 8**. pp. vi. 199. 

a. Laws of the United States relating to currency, 
finance, and banking, from 1789 to 1891. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8^. pp. 309. 

3. The academic study of political economy. 

Quart. Joum. Economics, July, 1891; v. 
397-416. 

4. Edited vol. v. of the Quart. Joum. Economdes. 



Parhman Professor of Anatomy. 

X. The scope and the teaching of human anatomy. 

An introductory lecture to the first class at the 

Harvard Medical School, delivered Sept. 29, 

1890. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 9 Oct. 

1890 ; cxxiii. 337-340. 
Also reprinted : Boeton. Damrcll ft Upbam. 1880. 16*. 

pp. 18. 

a. The claim that the merit of introducing ether 
belongs to the late Dr. Henry J. Bigelow. 
Ibid. 4 Dec. 1890 ; cxxui. 653. 

3. The first administration of ether. Ibid. 8 Jan. 

1891 ; cxxiv. 50. 

4. Methods of teaching anatomy at the Harvard 

Medical School; especially corrosion pre- 
parations. Ibid. 14 May, 1891 ; cxxiv. 475- 

477. 

Bead before the American Academy of Arte and Sciences, 
April 8, 1801. Contains a list of the corrosion preparatioos 
in the Warren Anatomical Moseiun. 



PPBLtCATlONS OF THB OPFICEhS. 



10 



5, 6. Recent progress in anatomy. Ibid. 23 Oct. 
1890, 4 June, 1891 ; czziii. 390, cxxiv. 554. 

7. What is right-handedness? Scribner'B Mag. 
April, 1891; ix. 465-476, illusir. 

8, 9. Dr. Andrew D. White's " Warfare of Science." 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 80 July, 3 
Sept. 1891 ; cxxv. 122, 258. 
The four following were wriUen Jointly with T. M. RoCch, 

10. The spine in infancj. Archives of Pediairies, 
March, 1891; viii. 162. 

zi. The thorax in infancy. Ibid. Maj, 1891 ; viii. 
821. 

la. The abdomen in infancy. Ibid. Jnly, 1891; 
▼Ui. 481. 

13. The neck and head in infancy. Ibid. Sept. 
1891 ; viii. 641. 



duurlM WilliMA EUot. 

President of the University. 

z. The enlargement of Gore Hall. Harvard Mo. 
Not. 1890; xi. 43-47. 

a. Family stocks in a democracy, /brum, Dec. 
1890 ; z. 394-409. 

3. Edncation in relation to business affairs. Uni' 

versity Mag. Dec. 1890, pp. 35-38. 

4. Address on the action of the Harvard College 

Faculty in regard to the three-years course, 
delivered at the annual meeting of the Class- 
ical and High School Association. Boston 
Journal, 4 April, 1891. 

5. Annual reports of the President and Treasurer 

of Harvard College, 1889-90. Cambridge. 
1891. 9^. 



John Whoelock EUiot. 

Assistant in CiinictU Surgery. 

z. Nephrectomy for pyonephrosis. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Jowm. 7 May, 1891 ; csdv. 457, 
458. 

a. Appendicitis: a year's experience in private 
practice. Ibid. 21 May, 1891; cxxiv. 499- 
503. 

3. Excision of the vermiform appendix between 

the attacks in a case of chronic appendicitis ; 
the appendix being found in an ileo-caecal 
fossa. Am, Journ. Med. Sei. June, 1891. 

4. The diagnosis and treatment of inflammations 

of the appendix. A discussion. Med. Com- 
munications Mass. Med. Soe. 1891 ; xv. no. 2, 
pp. 549-^51. 



Ephrmlat EaMrtom. 

Winn Professor of Eedesiastieal History. 

1. [Review of] C. R. Fletcher's *» Gustavus Adol- 
phus and the struggle of protestantism for 
existence." Edueational Rev. March, 1891 ; 
L 295-297. 



Harold GUuromoo Enut* 

Instructor in Bacteriology. 

z. Koch's treatment of tuberculosis. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 22, 29 Jan. 1891; 
cxxiv. 77, 106. 

An ibddreu delivpird Jan. 8, 1801, »t the MiWMchaavtts 
General Elovpital to the medical prnfpMion, and at the Har- 
Tard Medical School, Jan. 10, 1891, to the stadents of the 
Unirenity. 

a. Rabies. New York Med. Journ. Jan. 1891. 

An addreH delivered before the Nenrological section of 
the New York Academy of Medicine. 

3. An address upon rabies delivered before the 

Massachusetts Boards of Heidth Association. 
Trans. Mass. Boards of Health Assoc. 1891. 

4. Koch and tuberculosis. ToutVs Companion^ 

May, 1891. 

5. A preliminary report upon the clinical use of 

tuberculin. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ* 
2, 9, 16, 23, 30 July, 6 Aug. 1891; cxxv. 5, 
25, 55, 76, 105, 131. 

6. Tuberculosis and tuberculin. Trans. Assoc. 

Am. Phys. 1891. 

An address delivered before the Association of American 
Physicianii at Washington, 1881. 

7. Edited the department of bacteriology in Sajous* 

Annual of the Universal Med. Sciences, rhil- 
adelphia. 1891. 



diarloo GoxToU Erorott. 

Bussey Professor of Theology, and Dean of the 

Divinity School, 

z. The science of thought. Revised edition. 
Boston. 1890. pp. 431. 

a. Review of Caird's ** Critical philosophy of 
Kant." Christian Register, 18 Dec. 1890; 
Ixix. no. 51. 

3. The extension of civil service reform. Ibid. 

28 April, 1891; Ixx. ao. 17. 

4. The Michigan experiment. Ibid. 21 May, 

1891 ; Ixx. no. 21. 

5. Report on the Divinity School. Annual re- 

ports of the President and Treasurer, 1889- 
90; pp. 119-126. 



WilliMA Gilson Fmrlow. 

Professor of Oryptogamie Botany. 

z. Diseases of trees likely to follow mechanical 

injury. Trans. Mass. Hortieult. Soc. 1891. 
An address delivered before the society, 7 March, 1891. 

a. Curious case of germination in Citrus decu- 
mana. Botanical Gazette, June, 1891 ; xvi. 
179, 180. 

3. A provisional host-index of the fungi of the 

United States. With A. B. Seymour. £n- 
dogens — Supplement. Cambridge. June, 
1891 ; pp. 185-219. 

4. Edited Contributions from the Cryptogamic 

Laboratory. Bee p. 11. 



Id 



HJBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Theodore WUlii Fisher* 

Lecturer on Mental Diseases. 

z. Fifty-second annual report of the Boston 
Lunatic Ho8pital. Boston. Rockwell & 
Churchill. 1891. 12". pp. 40. 

a. Impressions of the Berlin Medical Congress, 
and European liospital notes. Trans, Assoc. 
Med, Supts. Am. Institutions for Insane, 
1891. 

Reglwld Heher Fita. 

ShoMuek Professor of Pathological Anatomy. 

z. Henrj Jacob Bigelow, M.D. A tribute of 
respect inspired by affection, admiration, and 
obligation. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
27 Nov. 1890; cxxiii. 611-614. 

With a list of some of die more importaut of Dr. Bigelow's 
contributions to medical literuture. 

a. Perforating gastric ulcer ; circumscribed peri- 
tonitis ; death on the fifteenth day. Ihid. 18 
Dec. 1890; cxxiii. 688. 

3. The diagnosis and treatment of inflammations 
of the appendix : discussion. Med. Commur 
nications Mass. Med. Soc. 1891 ; xv. no. 2, 
686, 687. 

Kmio Fraaoke. 

Assistant Professor of German. 

z. MoDumenta Germaniae historica. Libelli de 
lite imperatorum et pontificum. Vol. I. 
Hannover.' Uahn. 1891. 4*^. pp. 261-460. 
plates 2. 

The following were edited by Dr. Francke : Gebehardi 
Saliabunrensia archiepiscopi epifftola ad Uerimannum Met- 
trn.<em epi»copum data. pp. 261-279. — Wenrici scholafltici 
TreTirensis epivtola nub Tlieodortri episcopi VirdunenMs 
nomine componta. pp. 280-209. — Manogoldi ad Gebeliardum 
libor. pp. aOO-430. — Dicta cuinsdam de discordia papae et 
regis, pp. 454-400. 

a. The German school reform. Nation, 1 Jan. 
1891; Hi. 6, 6. 

3. Karl Follen and the German liberal movement, 

1816-1819. Papers Am. Hist. Assoc. 1891; 
V. 66-81. 
Also printed separately. 

4. The growth of subjectivism in German litera- 

ture during the later Middle Ages. Mod. 
Lang. Notes, June, 1891 ; vi. 822-386. 

5. The attitude of the socialist party in Germany. 

Nation, 6 Aug. 1891 ; liii. 98. 



William Fraiioii Ganonc* 

Instructor in Botany, 

I. Zoological notes. Bull. New Brunstnck Nat, 
Mist. Soc. Jan. 1891 ; ix. 46-69. 

a. On the early history of New Brunswick. By 
Moses H. Perley. A portion of a lecture de- 
livered in 1841, now for tlie first time pub- 
lished. With notes by W. F. Ganong. St. 
John, N. B. 1891. Barnes & Co. 16"*. pp. 
29. 

Reprinted from Educational Rev. (St. John, N. B.), Feb.- 
June, 1801. 



3. The geographical distribution of plants. Printed 

in abstract in the Boston CommonwecUth, 28 

Feb. 1891. 

A lecture delivered before tlie Mass. Horticultural Society, 
21 Fell. 1891. It was aUo printed in abstract on separate 
sheets for the nse of members. 

4. The physiology of a tr^e. Educational Rev, 

(St. John, N. B.), April, 1891; iv. 200-203. 

5. Southern invertebrates on the shores of Acadia. 

Trans. Royal Soc. Canada, April, 1891 ; viii. 
sect. 4, pp. 167-186. 

6. On raised peat-bogs in New Brunswick. Botan- 

ical Gazette, May, 1891 ; xvi. 123-126. 

7. The Harvard summer schools. Educational 

Rev, (St. John, N. B.), June, 1891 ; v. 11. 

8. Botanical and other notes in the EducaiiontU 

Rev. (St. John, N.B.). 

SamiMl Chunnaa. 

Assistant in Herpetology and Ichthyology at the 
Museum of Comparative Zodlogy, 

z. On a genus and species of the Characinet 
(Ilenochilus Wheatlandii, gen. n. et tp. n.). 
Bull. Essex Inst. April-June, 1890; xxii. 
49-62, piate 1 . 

2. On Balistes vetula, Linn6. Ibid, pp. 63-66. 

3. Silunis (Parasilurus) Aristotelis. Glanis 

Aristotelis, Ag. 1866, Proc. Am. Acad. 833. 
Ibid. pp. 66-69. 

4. On the *'Gila monster" (^Heloderma suspeo- 

tum). Ibid. pp. 60-69. 

Copied in Nature* 9 Realm, Rural C1iz/</bmton, and various 
other publications. 

5. On a tortoise found in Florida and Cuba (CV- 

nostemum Baurii). Ibid. 

6. The blizzard fossils. Nation, 9 Oct. 1890 ; U. 

286. 
7-9. Massachusetts carp ; The river or brown trout ; 
New England saibling. Rep't Mass. Comm, 
for Inland Fisheries and Game, for 1890; 
Appendix B, pp. 82-42, plates 6. 

8 and 9 were reprinted in the American Angler and in 
Shooting and Finking. 

10. The golden trout. Forest and Stream, 27 
Nov. 1890. 
Reprinted in Shooting and Fishing. 

z 1-15. In Shooting and Fishing : 11. The Sunapee 
saibling. 16 Dec. 1890. — 12. Salmo alpinus, 
1758^8. aureolus, 1888. 12 Feb. 1891 (also 
in the American Angler, 7 Feb.). — 13. 
Freshwater salmon. 26 Feb. 1891 (also in 
the American Angler, 28 Feb.). — 14. Black 
salmon and white salmon. 28 May, 1891 
(also in the American Angler, 80 May). — 
15. A new trout from Maine, 4 June, 1891. 

z6. German translation by Dr. Alfred Nehring, 
and reprint in the Naiurwissenschaftliche 
Wochenschrift (28 Dec. 1890, p. 616) ot "The 
blizzard fossils," from the Nation; **A pos- 
sible cause of the extinction of the post- 
tertiary horses (American)," from Nature; 
and a portion of a report of similar bearing 
in the Annual report of the Curator of the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology for 1881-82. 

17. Reviews and book-notices in the Nation, 
Nos. 1-8, 4, b, 7-0 were reprinted sepanitelj. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



21 



Lecturer on the Psychology of Music, 

z. Znlll melodies. Joum. Am. EihnoL and 
Archaeol. Ed. by J. Walter Fewkes. Boston. 
1891. i. 65-91, •fnv«f£. 

WilliMA Watson Ck>odwin. 

Eliot Professor of Oreek Literature, 

I. The present and future of Harvard College. 
Address delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society at Cambridge, Mass., 25 June, 1891. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8**. pp. 42. 



John Chipnuut Qermj* 

RoycUl Professor of Law. 

z. Select cases and other authorities on the law 
of property. Vol. V. Cambridge. Charles 
W. Sever. 1891. 

Chmxlmm MontraTllle Gtomi. 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 

z, a. Semi-annual reports on recent progpress in 
obstetrics. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
22 Jan., 8 Sept. 1891 ; cxxiv. 87, cxxv. 248. 

3. A report of six months work in the out-patient 

department for diseases of women at the 
Boston City Hospital. With Dr. George 
Haven. Ibid. 2 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 329-333. 
Also printed sepHmtely. 

4. Pessaries : their use and $ibuse. [Opened dis- 

cussion on tills subject before Section in ob- 
stetrics and gynaecology, at annual meeting 
of Mass. Med. Society, 9 June, 1891.] Ibid. 
25 June, 1891 ; cxxiv. 636. Abstract in Med. 
Communications Mass. Med. Soc. 1891; xv. 
no. 2, p. 462. 

5. Reviews of obstetrical works in the Boston 

Med. and Surg. Journ. 

John Ome GreMi. 

Clinical Professor of Otology. 

z. A case of abscess and softening of the brain 
with chronic disease of the tympanum. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 21 May, 
1891; cxxiv. 503, 504. 

a. The treatment of inflammations of the mastoid, 
with an analysis of eighty operations. Am. 
Joum. Med. Sci. (Philadelphia), Dec. 1890. 

Aim reprinted, pp. 12. 

Professor of Latin. 

z. Vocabulary to selections from OWd. Boston. 
Ginn & Co. S^l 

a. Livy. Books I. and 11. Edited, with intro- 
duction and notes, by J. B. Greenmigh. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8°. pp. xvii. 
270. — Also text edition of the same. pp. IGl. 

College leries of Latin authors. 

3. Some Uftes of neque (nee) in Latin. Harvard 
Studies in Class. Philol. 1891 ; ii. 129-141. 



Gliarl«s GhroM* 

Instructor in History. 

1. General view of the political history of Europe. 

By Ernest Lavisse. Translated by Charles 

Gross. New York, etc. Longmans, Green 

& Co. 8!^. pp. xi. 188. 
a. The Jews of Russia. A lecture delivered in 

Troy, N. Y. Troy Times, 4 Feb. 1891. 

3. Causes of Russia's persecution of the Jews. 
Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 29 
Aug. 1891. 

4. -A plea for reform in the study of English 

municipal history. Papers Am. Hist. Assoc. 

1891; V. pt. 4, pp. 45-58. 

Also printed separHtely: New York. 6. P. Putnam's 
Sous. 1891. 8*. pp. 16. 

5. A classified list of books relating to British 

municipal history. Cambridge. 1891. 8*. 
pp. 18. 
Bibliefrrapliieal contributions of Harvnrd College Library, 
no. 43. Keprinted from the IlHrvard University Bulletiiu 

6. .Various book-reviews in the Nation, 1890-91. 

Hermaiin Angnst Haffea. 

Professor of Entomology. 

I. Notes and descriptions of some North Ameri- 
can Libellulina. Synopsis of Neuroptera. 
Second edition. Psyche, Aug.-Oct. 1890; 
V. 383-387. 

Edwin H«r1iert HaU. 

Assistant Professor of Physics. 

I. A thermo-electric method of studying cylinder 
condensation in steam cylinders. Trans. 
Am. Inst. Electrical Engineers. May, 1891 ; 
viii. no. 5. 

Fraaoii Bishop Harrlncitoii. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery. 

1. The value of "primary anaesthesia" in minor 

surgical operations. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 6 Nov. 1890; cxxiii. 484, 486. 

2. Rheumatic flatfoot. Ibid. 9 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 

334, 335. 

Albert BnslineU Hart. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

X. Pamphlet for the use of students in courses 
History 18, 14, and 27 (History of the United 
States) given at Harvard College in the 
academic year 1890-91. Cambridge. 1890. 
8". pp. 60. 

a. Introduction to the study of federal gov^n* 
ment. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8''. pp.200. 
Harvard Historical MonofEraphs, no. 2. 

3. Federal constitution of the SwIas confedefation 

(of May 29, 1874). Translation, reprinted 
in J. M. Vincent's " State an;l federal govern- 
ment in Switzerlnnd," pp. 194-222. (.lohns 
Hopkins University Studies in Historical 
and Political Science ^ extra, vol. ix.) — The 
bibliographical note reprinted in New Eng- 
land Magazine, Aug. 1891. 



22 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



4. The veto power : its origin, development, and 

ftinction in the government of the United 
States (1789-1889). B7 Edward Campbell 
Mason. Edited by Albert Bushnell Hart. 
Boston. Glnn & Co. 1890. 9^. pp. 232. 
Hanrard Historical Monogmplis, no. 1. 

5. The colonies. 1492-1750. By Reuben Gold 

Thwaites. Edited by Albert Bushnell Hart. 
With four maps. New York, etc. Long- 
mans, Greene & Co. 1891. 12*1 pp. 801. 

Epochs of AmerirMi History, vol. i. A second edition, 
with animportant changes, 1891. 

6. Hermann von Hoist. Polit. Set. Quarterly^ 

Dec. 1890 ; v. 677-687. 

7. The Speaker as premier. Ailantte Mo. March, 

1891 ; Izvu. 880-886. 

8. A southern arcadia. Nation, 28 April, 1891 ; 

lii. 886. 

9. [Review of] "Tabular views of universal his- 

tory.'* Educaiional Rev, May 1891 ; i. 500, 
50L 



HllL 

Professor of Chemistry. 

I. On ch1orsulphop3rromucic acids. With Walter 
S. Hendrizson. Proc. Am. Acad. xzv. 288- 
295. 

Williiuii Barker Hilla. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

X. Report on medical chemistry. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Journ. 9 July, 1891 ; cxxv. 82-35. 

01iT«r Wendell Holmea. 

Parkman Professor of Anaiomy, Emeritus. 

1, Memoir of the late Henry J. Bigelow for the 
Boston Medical Association. Proc. Am. 
Acad. vol. zzvi. 839-351. 

a. Remarks at the memorial meeting of the 
Boston Society for Medical Improvement 
held upon the death of Dr. Bigelow. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 27 Nov. 1890 ; cxziv. 
506-508. 

3. But one talent. Poem. Atlantic Mo. Dec. 
1890 ; Izvi. 833. 

Joim Hemaiuu 

Clinic€U Instructor in the Diagnosis and Treat* 
m^ni of Ovarian Ihimors. 

X. A case of vaginal hysterectomy for cancer; 
recovery. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 

28 Aug. 1890; cxziii. 201. 

a. A case of sarcoma of the tonsil removed by 
external incision; recovery. Ibid. 6 Not. 
1890; cxxiii. 433,434. Also London LcMcetj 

29 Aug. 1891. 

3. Two cases of laparotomy for intra-alxlominal 

haemorrhnge. Ibid. 8 Jan. 1891 ; cxxiv. 
27, 28. 

4. Two cases of pelvic haematocele. Ibid. 27 

Jan. 1891; cxxiv. 110, 111. 



5. A case of successful trephining for subdural 

haemorrhage produced by contre-coup. With 

G. L. Walton. Boston Med. and Surg. 

Journ. 12 Feb. 1891 ; cxxiv. 154-157, illustr. 

Also reprinted : Boston. Damrell ft Upbam. 1801. 18*. 
pp. 82. 

6. Three cases of tumor of the uterus. Ibid. 

19 Feb. 1891 ; cxxiv. 181, 182. 

7. The treatment of fibroid tumors of the uterus 

after the method of Dr. Apostoli. Ibid. 12, 
19 March, 1891 ; cxxiv. 249, 280. 
Also reprinted : Boston. 1881. 

8. A case of successful removal of a retro-peri- 

toneal fatty tumor by laparotomy. Am. 
Journ. Med. Sci. April, 1891. 
Also reprinted. 

Fraaklfa Henry Hooper* 

Instructor in Laryngology. 

z. Report on laryngology and rhinology. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 30 Oct. 1890 ; cxxiii. 
413-417. 

« 

3. A case of tumor of the larynx, showing amy- 
loid degeneration. New York Med. Record, 
7 March, 1891. 

3. Diseases of the thyroid gland. With J. Payson 
Clark, M.D. Sajous* Annual of the Universal 
Med. Scieftces. Philadelphia. 1891. 

Albert Andrew Howard* 

Tutor in Laiin. 

I. On the use of the perfect infinitive in Latin 
with the force of the present. Uarv. Studies 
Class. Philol. 1890; 1. 111-138. 

Henry Hndson* 

Assistant in Physics. 

z. The Southern Railway and Steamship Asso- 
/siation. Quart. Journ. Economics, Oct. 1890 ; 
V. 70-94, and appendix, 115-130. 

« 

Oliver WUpple Huntington* 

Instructor in Mineralogy and Chemistry, 

1. A new meteoric iron from Stutsman county, 

North Dakota. Proc. Am. Acad. 10 Dec. 
1890; XXV. 229-232, plate 1, cut. 

2. The prehistoric and Kiowa county pallasites. 

Ibid. 8 April, 1891 ; xxvi. 1-12, plates 3. 

Both belonir to the series Ck>ntributions firom the CHiemical 
Lftboratory of Harvard College. 

Alpkeni Hyntt. 

Assistant in Palaeontology ai the Museum of 
OomparaUve IMlogy. 

z. Guides for science teaching. No^ VIII. In* 
secta. By Alplien^ Hyatt and J. M. Arms. 
Bo8ton. 'D. C. Heath & Co. 1890. pp. 
323, illustr. 

a. The next stage in the development of public 
parks. Atlantic Mo. Feb. 1891 ; Ixvii. 215- 
224. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



n 



3. Report on the moseam [of the Boston Society 

of Naturftl History]. Proc, Boston Soe. Nat. 
Hist, 1891 ; xxt. 1-19. 

4. Carboniferous cephiilopods. OeoL Survey of 

Texas, Second annual report, pp. 829^56, 
illustr, 

5. Report on palaeontolofiry* Annual report 

Curator Mus. Comp, Zool. 1890-91. 



John Oeorce Jaok. 

Lecturer at the Arnold Arboretum. 

X. Notes on shrnbs. Garden and Forest, 15, 29 
Oct.. 6, 19, 26 Nov. 1890; 5 June, 1891; ill. 
503, 529, 538, 563, 577, iv. 258. 

a. Jx>nicera quinquelocularis. Ibid. 10 Dec. 
1890; iii. 600. 

3. Notes on some hardy wild roses. I.-V. Ibid. 

7, 14, 21. 28 Jan., 11 Feb. 1891; iv. 5, 18, 
31, 44, 66. 

4. Oar trees in ice-storms. Ibid, 25 Feb. 1891 ; 

iv. 87. 

5. An insect pest of Cattleyas (Isosoma orchide^ 

arum). Ibid. 4 March, 1891 ; iv. 99, cut. 

6. Can the gy psy-motli be exterminated? Ibid. 

11 March, 1891; iv. 111. 

7. Notes on some insects and insect remedies. 

Ibid. 22 April, 1891 ; iv. 184. 

8. Weevils in leguminons tree seeds. Ibid, 17 

Jane, 1891 ; iv. 280, cuts, 

9. Some early spiraeas. Ibid. 24 June, 1891; 

iv. 297. 

zo. Notes on three species of Hylotoma. Psyche, 
Jan. 1891 ; vi. 10. 



diarlaa I«oriBC JaokMm. 

Professor of Chemistry, 

I. On the products obUiined by tlie action of 
nitric acid upon bromtrinitrophenylmalonic 
e^ter. Witli W. B. Bentley. Proc. Am. 
Acad. xzvi. 67-97. 

a. Note on tribrommononitrobenzol. With W. 
B. Bentley. Ibid. xzvi. 98-101. 

Both tlie above belong to rlic spricn Contributions from the 
Chemical LMboratory uf llHrvHitl Coliegr. No. 2 of Inst 
year's report has been reuoblisbed in Am, Ohem. Juum. xiii. 
164-193. 



Professor of Psychology, 

z. The proposed shortening of tlie college course. 
Harvard Mo. Jan. 1891 ; zi. 127-137. 

a. The moral philosopher nnd the moral life. 
Iniernat. Journ, Ethics^ April, 1891 ; i. 330- 
354. 

Instructor in Engineering, 

I. Provisional list of graduates of tlie Lawrence 
Scientific Scliool. Published by the Univer- 
sity. May, 1891. 8''. pp. 10. 

A fevised iNUcion containing 12 pages has been issued. 



Assistant Professor of English, 

1. Syllabus of a course of lectures introductory 

to the stu ly of Shakspere. Brooklyn. 1891. 

2. English folk-tales in America. The little 

cakeen. Journ. Am. Folk Lore, Oct.-Dec. 
1890; iii. 291. 

3. Sir Thomas Wyatt. Mod. Lang. Notes, Jan. 

1891 ; vi. 34-42. 

4* Mr. Fleay on Nicholas Udall. Ibid. May, 
1891 ; vi. 264-266. 

5. With E. S. Sheldon and S. Primer, edited 
DicUeet Notes, published by the American 
Dialect Society. Part III. Boston. 1891. 

Pliilip CooaVa Knapp* 

Clinical Instructor in Diseases of ihe Nervous 

System. 

1. The pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of 

intra-cranial growths. Boston. Rockwell & 
Churchill. 1891. 8<>. pp. viii. 165. 
Fitke prize Amd dissertation. No. XLL 

2. Recent progress in diseases of the nervous 

system. Boston Med, and Surg. Journ. 1, 
8 J»in. 1891 ; czziv. 8, 81. 

3. Peripheral nervous diseases, muscular dystro- 

phies, and general neuroses. Saious* Annual 
of the Universal Med. Sciences (VbiUAelphiti) , 
1891 ; ii. c. pp. 1-82. 

4. Also letters, book-reviews, etc. in the Boston 

Medical and Surgical Journal. 

Tvdmriok ItyIbs Kaisl^t. 

CliniecU Professor of 'Laryngology. 

z. On the return of cured tubercular patients 
from high altitudes. Trans, Am. Glimaio' 
logical Assoc. 1890 ; vii. 189. 

WllllAm CooUilc« liSAe. 

Assistant Librarian. 

X. Index to the subject catalogue of Harvard 

College Library. Cambridge. 1886-91. 8<1 

pp. iv. 165. 
Library of Harvard Univf»rsity. Special publications. II. 
a. The relation of the librarian to the faculty [in 

college libraries]. Library Journ. Dec. 

1890; XV. 141-142. 

3. The place of the seminary library in the uni- 

versity. Ibid. Dec. 1890; xv. 142-143. 

4. [Review of] ** Eclectic card catalogue rules." 

By K. A. LinderfeU. Ibid. May, 1891; xv. 
148-149. 

5. Index of reference lists and special bibliogra- 

phies included in periodical and other publi- 
cations of recent date. No. 4. Harvard 
University Bulletin, Jan. 1891 ; vi. 196-218. 

A.lso published separately as No. 40 of the Bibliographical 
contribucionn. 

6. Additions to the Dante collection in the Har- 

vard College Library, May I, 1890— May 1, 
1891. Tenth Ann. Rep't Dante Sos. 1891; 
pp. 15-81. 



24 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Chfflatophttr GoEumlnu Iiaiis<l«lL 

Dane Ptofeuor of Law. 

I. Abriefsnrvey of equity jurisdiction. Harva/rd 
La/w Rev. Oct. 1890; It. 101-188. 

WllHam Lawreaoe* 

Preacher to the University. 

z. A point in financial education. Harvard Mo. 
Oct. 1890; xi. 1-8. 

a. Report of the faculty of the Episcopal Theo- 
logical School, Cambridge, Mass. Catalogue 
Epise. Theol. School, 1890-91. 

Alflo printed separately. 

3. Sermon in memory of Bishop Paddock. 

Churchman, 4 April, 1891. 

4. Baccalanreate sermon of the class of 1891 of 

Harvard University. Boston Post, 15 June, 
1891. 

Daniel DaTid Lee. 

Instructor in Anatomy in the School of Veterinary 

Medicine. 

z. A peculiar monstrosity. Joitm. Comp^ Med. 
and Veterinary Archives (Philadelphia), 
Jan. 1891 ; xii. 8, illustr. 

a. The prevalence of tuberculosis. Ibid. (New 

York), June, 1891; xU. 274. 

An omitted paragraph of this article was publithed in 
July, p. 845. 

David GerdoB Lyon* 

Mollis Professor of Divinity. 

I. Address delivered at the opening of the Har- 
vard Semitic Museum, May 18, 1891. Am, 
Hebrew (New York), 22 May, 1891; xlvu. 
68-70. 

a. [Review of] Professor C. H. Toy's *< Judaism 
and Christianity.'* Old and New Testamewt 
Student (New Haven), June, 1891 ; xii. 867- 
878. 



McLean Professor of Ancient and Modem History. 

z. Boehm-Bawerk on value and wages. Quart. 
Joum. Economics, Oct. 1890; v. 24-48. 

a. The three-years course. Harvard Mo. March, 
1891 ; XU. 1-18. 

Fvaidi Burr Kallorjr* 

Assistant in Histology. 

z. Phospho>molybdic acid haematoxylon. Ana- 
tomischer Anzeiger, 1891 ; vi. 875, 876. 



Hersey Professor of Anatomy. 

1, Edited Contributions from the Zoological Lab- 
oratory of the Museum of Comparative Zool- 
ogy, no». zix-xxvii. For the full list see p. 1 1 . 



a. Annual report to the Curator of the Museum 
of Comparative Zoology, incorporated in his 
Annunl report to the President and Fellows 
of Harvard College for IBS9-90 ; pp. 16, 16. 



Charles Se dgwick Mimot. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

z. Tricks in mind reading. Touth*s Companion, 
1888; Ivi. 122. 

a. The mounting of serial sections. Microscope, 
May, 1888. 

3-6, Growth and age. Sajous' Annual of the 
Universal Med. Sciences (Philadelphia), suc- 
cessive years, 1888-1891. 

7-za. In Buck's Reference Handbook of the Medical 
Scie7ices,vo\. vi. : — 7. Proamnion. — 8. Seg- 
mentation of the body. — 9. Segmentation of 
the ovum. -^zo. Senility. — zz. Sex. — za. 
Spermatozoa. 

Z3. In the same, vol. vii. : — Umbilical cord. 

Z4. Uterus and embryo: — I. Rabbit. — II. Man. 
Joum. Morphology, ii. 841-462, plates 4. 

Z5. The mesoderm and the coelom of vertebrates. 
Am. Naturalist, Oct. 1890; xxiv. 877-898, 
illustr. 
Lint of authorities cited. 

z6. Zur Morphologic der Blutkorperchen. Ana- 
tomischer Anzeiger, 1890 ; v. 601-604. 

Z7. Morphology of the blood corpuscles. Am, 
Naturalist, Nov. 1890; xxiv. 1020-1028. 

z8. About worms. Touth*s Companion, 1890; 
Ixiii. 681. 

zg. On the fate of the human decidua reilexa. 
Anatomischer Anzeiger, 1890; v. 689-648. 

ao. On certain phenomena of growing old. P^-oe. 

Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 1890; xxxix. 271-289, 

dictgr. 
Address as vice-president of the section of biologf. 
az. A theory of the structure of the placenta. 

Anatomischer Anzeiger, 1891 ; vii. 125-81. 

aa. Senescence and rejuvenation : z. On the weight 
of Guinea pigs. Joum. Physiology, 1891 ; 
xii. 97-158, plates 8. 



Hersey Professor of the Theory and Proxies of 

Physic. 

z. The health and longevity of medical men. 
Boston Mid. and Surg. Joum. 17 Sept. 
1891; cxxv. 285-287. 

Address delivered before the anooal meeting of the Rhode 
IsUnd Medical Society, 11 June, 1891. 



SaanelJi 

Demonstraior_of Anatomy. 

z. Malignant stricture of the oesophagus. Its 
treatment by Symond*s method of permanent 
tubage. With cases. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 18 Oct. 1890, 1 Jan. 1891 ; czxiii. 885, 
cxxiv. 5, illustr. 

Beprlnted: Boston. DamrellAUpham. 1801. 18*. pp.U. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



25 



s. Resection of second and third divisions of fifth 
nerve at the foramina rotnndam and ovule. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 18 Aug. 1891 ; 
czzT. 164, 165. 

Beprinted: BoMoD. Dtmrell A Uphsm. 1891. 18*. pp.7. 



AMStMtani in Clinical and OperoHve Surgery, and 
Instructor in Surgical Paihology in the Dental 
School. 

I. Operations for correcting the deformity dne to 
prominent ears. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 22 Jan. 1891 ; czziv. 84-86, cuts. 

a. The remains of a broken lead-pencil (sur- 
rounded by phosphatic deposits), and the 
metal tip of the pencil removed from the 
bladder by perineal section. Ibid. 19 Feb. 
1891 ; czxiv. 182, 183, cuU. 

Charles Havbevt Moova. 

Assistant Professor of Design in the Fine Arts. 

I. Letter to the Editor on the roofing of Roman- 
esque buildings, and on the early pointed 
architecture of Italy. Am. Joum, Archaeol. 
1890; vi. 476. 



MMvia Hiekjr 

Assistant Professor of Oreek and Latin. 

X. Lindsay's Juvenal. Class. Rev. July, 1891; 
vii. 3*26-329. 

a. Some constructions in Andocides. ffarvcuxl 
Studies in aass. Philol. 1891 ; ii. 57-69. 

Alfred B«ll KiolMila. 

Instructor in Oerman. 

X. [Review of] Buchheim's **Jungfrau von Or- 
leans.'* Mod. Lang. Notes, Jan. 1891. 

Tmnk Walter Kloolaan. 

Instructor in Latin, 

X. P. Terenti Afri Phormio. Text, with stage 
directions. Prepared for use in sight reading. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1890. pp. 66. 

a. Greek modes of hair-cuts as set forth by Pollux. 
Proe. Am. Philol. Assoc. 1890; xxi., Trans. 
x.-xii. 

3. Greek and Roman barbers, ffarv. Studies in 
Class. Philol. 1891 ; U. 41-56. 

Oharlas Eliot K«rtea« 

Professor of the History of Art. 

I. Translation of Dante^s Pivine Comedy. Vol. I. 
Hell, Boston. Houghton, Mifilin A Go. 
1891. IT. pp. xzzvi. 198. 

a. Preface to ** Translation of Dante's eleven 
letters." by C. S. Latham. Boston. Hough- 
ton, Mifilm & Co. 8"*. and 12*1 

3. Introductions to works by John Ruskin. Brant- 
wood edition. New York. C. £. Merrill & Co. 
1891. 12n 



WUliMA Fan Oacoed. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

X. Zur Theorie der sum algebraischen Gebilde 
y* =s R (x) gehorigen Abelschen Functionen. 
Gottingen. 1890. 8*". 

Inaagnral-DiMertation zur Erlangang der Doktnrwttrde der 
boheu phil<Mophi8chen FnkalCiU der Uuiversitilt Erlangen. 

Oeorce Herbert Palmer. 

Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral 
Philosophy, and Civil Polity. 

X. The Odyssey of Homer. Translated by G. H. 
Palmer, cr. 8®. Boston. Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. 1891. 

' a. The glory of the imperfect. An address given 
at the first commencement of the Woman's 
College of Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland, Ohio, June, 1891. Boston. D. C. 
Heath & Co. 1891. 12<>. 

3. Hexameters and rhythmic prose. Atlantic 
Mo. Oct. 1890 ; Ixvi. 526-534. 

4* Reminiscences of Professor Sopiiocles. Atlan- 
tic Mo. June, 1891 ; Ixvii. 779-788. 

5. The ownership of books. Christian Union, 
July 11, 1891; xliv. 78,79. 



Instructor in Zoology. 



X. 



a. 



The eyes in blind crayfishes. Bull, Mus. 
Comp. Zodl. Nov. 1890: xx. no. 5, pp. 163- 
162, plate 1. 

Tlie compound eyes in crustaceans. Ibid. 

May, 1891; xxi. no. 2, pp. iS-UO, plates 10. 

Thin paper wan prrnented and ocropted a^ a tnenis for the 
degree of 8.D. in Jane, 1801. Both papers belong to the 
Contribation* from the Zoillogical Laboratoryof the Museum 
ot Comparative Zo61og>'. 



Andrew Fre a te m Peabedy. 

Preacher to the University, and Piummer Professor 
of Christian MorcUs, Emeritus. 

X. King's Chapel sermons. Boston. Houghton, 
Mifllin & Co. %'*. 1891. pp. 840. 

a. Internal tokens of authorship in the fourth 
gospel. The fourth gospel. Evidence ex- 
ternal and interned of its Johannean author^ 
ship. New York. Scrtbner's Sons. 1891. 
pp. 109-127. 

D^. Peabodj edited this volume, which rnntaiiifi aluo Dr. 
Abbot's essay "The authorship of the fourth vospel; exter« 
nal evideaoe," and an artids by Bishop l«ightfabc -, 

3. The life and times of Plato. Andover Rev. 

April, 1891 ; xv. 858-867. 
Also reprinted. 

4. Nathan Parker [H. U. 1803]. Unitarian Rev. 

May, 1891 ; xxxv. 352-362. 

5. Slavery as it appeared to a northern man in 

1844. Andover Rev. Aug. 1891 ; xvi. 155-1 C6. 
Aiso reprinted. 



^6 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE 0FFICEB8. 



Beqjaodit Osgood Peiroe« 

Hollii Professor of MeUkemaiics and NtxturcU 

Fhtlosophy. 

z. On some theoremB which connect together cer- 
tain line and surface int4*grals. iVof. Am. 
Acad. zxvi. 20-23. 

s. On some simple cases of electric flow in flat 
circular plates. Ibid. xxvi. 218-289. 

3. Various theorems and problems in the Educor 
tional Times (London). 



Oeorce Jamaa Peiroe* 

Assistant in Botany. 

z. Notes on Corticium Oakesii, B. & C, and 
Michenera Artocreas, B. & C. Bull. Torrey 
Botanical Clvh^ vol. xvii. no. 12, p. 801. 

a. Beneficial association among plants and ani- 
mals. Nature* s Realms May, 1891 ; ii. 166. 

JamM Mills Peiroe. 



Perkins Professor of Astronomy and Mathemaiics, 
and Dean of the OradtuUe School. 

1. Remarks at the dinner of the Harvard Club of 
New York, 20 Feb. 1891. n. p., n. d. pp. 11. 

Chmrlmm Edward Piekarlas* 

Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy, and 
Director of the Astronomical Observatory. 

z. Aid to astronomical research. Reprinted in 
Sidereal Messenger^ ix. .478, and in Nature, 
4 Dec. 1890 ; xlili. 105. 

a. Close binary stars. Sidereal Messenger, x. 5. 

3. A fifth type of stellar spectra. Asiron. Nach- 
richten, cxxvii. 1. 

4« The discovery of double stars by means of 
their spectra. Ibid, cxxvii. 155. 

5. Spectrum of /9 Lyrae. Ibid, cxxviii. 89. 

Observdhry 180, 841. 

6. The Draper catalogue. Nature, xliv. 228. 

7. Preparation and discussion of the Draper cata- 

logue. Cambridge. 1891. 4". pp. xxiv. 192. 
Annuls of the Astronomical Ob^ervatorj, xxri. 1. 

8. Variable stars of long period. Cambridge. 

1891. 4». pp. 8,i7to<el. 

9. Edited Annals of the Astronomical Observatory 

of Harvard College, vol. xxiii. 1, xxvi. 1, 
xxvii., XXX. 2. See p. 6. 

See aim) p. 10 for articles bj assistants in the Observatory 
prepared nnder the direction of Professor Pickering and 
commooicated by bim. 

zo. Forty-fifth annual report of the Plreetor of 
t^e Astronomical Observatory of Harvard 
College. Cambridge. 18^0. 6^. pp. 12. 



PoU. 

Instructor in German. 

z. Notker's 'Psalms.' Mod. Lang. Notes, Nov. 
1690; V. 417, 418. 



Oharlaa Bnmkaat Porter. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

I. Two cases of relapsing appendicitis; operation 
between attacks; removal of appendix; re- 
covery. ■ Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 25 
Dec. 1890; cxxiii. G11-C18. 

a. In recurring appendicitis is excision of the 
appendix during a remission a justifiable 
operation, and if so, in what class of cnses, 
an I how should it be done? Ibid. 2 April, 
1891 ; cxxiv. 825-r829. 



Abner Post. 

Clinical Instructor in Syphilis, 

1. Prostatotnmy in a patient of forty-two. Boston 
Mtd. and Surg. Journ. 28 April, 1891 ; cxxiv. 
405, 406. 

Wmiam Henry Potter. 

Clinical Lecturer in Operative Dentistry. 

1. Creolin. Internat. Dental Journ. April, 1891 ; 
xii. 209. 

a. Edited the Proceedings of the American Acad- 
emy of Dental Science. Proceedings are 
published in the IntemationcU Denial Journ. 

Frederic Werd Putnam. 

Peabody Professor of American Archaeology and 
Ethnology, and Curator of the Peabody Museum 
of Amrcrican Archaeology and Ethnology. 

1. A singular ancient work at Foster's, Warren 
Co., Ohio. Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 1890; 
xxxix. 889. 

a. A singular ancient work in Ohio. Proc. Am. 
Antiquarian Soc. 21 Oct. 1890; vii. 136, 187. 

3. Obituary notice of Charles L. Flint. Proc. 

Boston Soc. Nat. Hist. 1890; xxiv. 199. 

4. Remarks on early man in America. Ibid. 

1890; xxiv. 468. 

5. On the ancient hearths in the Little Miami 

valley. Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 1890; 
xxxix. 889. 

6. Report as permanent secretary of the Ameri- 

can Association for the Advancement of 
Science. Ibid. 1891; xxxix. 486. 

7. Edited the Proceedings of the American Asso- 

ciation for the Advancement of Science, voL 
xxxix. 1891. 

8. Twetttf-third and twenty-fourth aonuid reports 

of the Trustees of the Peabody Museim of 
American Archaeology and Ethnology. Pre- 
sented to the President and Fellows of Har- 
vard College. 1891. 

9. Edited the Arclineological and Ethnological 

Papers of the Peabody Museum, nos. 2 and 8, 
1891. 
For contents see p. 9. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



27 



JaoksMi Pntnaau 

Instructor in JHteaset of the Nervous System, 

X. Toxic affections from arsenic and lead. Cyc- 
lopctedta of the Diseases of Children (Keat- 
ing), vol. iv. 1890; p. 599. 

a. Peripheral nervous system ; general physiolog- 
ical considerations ; neuralf^a of the stump ; 
peripheral palsy of third cranial nerve ; tri- 
geminal neuralgia. Inter nat. Clinics, 1891 ; 
p. SOS. 

3. A group of cases of scleroses of the spinal 

cord, associated with diff^use collateral degen- 
erative ; occurring in enfeebled persons past 
middle life, and especially in women ; studied 
with particular reference to etiology. Joum. 
Nervous and Mental Disease, Feb. 1891; 
xvi. 69. 

4. The character of the evidence as to the injuri- 

ousness of arsenic as a domestic poison. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 25 June, 
1891 ; cxziv. 628-626. 

5. Personal observations on the pathology and 

treatment of neuralgias of the fifth pair. 
Ibid. 13, 20 Aug. 1891 ; cxxv. 157, 186, cuts. 

Edward Rojaolds. 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 

X. On the extraction of the after-coming head and 
arms. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 26 
Feb. 1891 ; cxxiv. 205, 206. 

a. On axis-traction forceps. Am. Joum. Obstet- 
rics, vol. xxiii. 178. 

3. A case of labor in an obliquely contracted, 

anchylosed pelvis. Ibid. vol. xxiii. 709. 

4. On the frequency of contracted pelvis among 

American women. Trans. Am. Gynaeco- 
logical Soc. vol. xv. 367. 

TlModore Wllliaiii Rioharda. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

X. UeberCupriammonium Bromide. Ber.detUsch. 

Chem. Oesellsch. xxiii. 3790, 3791. 
a. A revision of tlie atomic weight of copper. 

Fourth paper. Proe. Am. Acad. xxvi. 240- 

295. 

ManHoe Howo Rioluurdaan. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

X. Cyst of the pancreas treated by laparotomy 
and drainage; recovery. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 29 Jan. 1891; cxxiv. Ill, 112. 

John Ritoliie, Jr. 

Assistant in the Observatory, in charge of the 
Distribution of Astronomical Intelligence^ 

X. Composed, edited, and published Science Ob- 
server special circulars nus. 93-95. Boston. 
8* 
OonUnU: — 1890. 93. Disooverr of comet e 1890, Zona 

2V. W. Campbell): dUoovery of comot / 1890, Spitaler; 
•covcry of wtteroid Palina (301) . 21 Nov. — 94. Two orbiu 
of comet / 1890, Spitalor ((». M. Searle aud Spitaler). 
2S Dec — 1801. 95. Uiflcovery and orbit of comet a 1891, 
BMiuud(J.M.^aeberlo). 4 April. 



a. Science Observer international circular no. 85. 
Berlin, Germany. 8^. 

Ckmtent9 : — 1890. Elements and ephemerli of Zona's 
comet (W. W. Campbell). 

3. [Review of] '*Bolletino del Club Alpino Itali- 

ano per Tanno 1889." Appalaehia, vi. 2. 

4. Report of the Councillor of Art [of the Appa- 

lachian Mountain Club]. Ibid. vi. 8. 

5. Report of the judges of group F, Educational 

Exhibits t etc., at the 17th exhibition of the 
Mass. Charitable Mechanics Association. 
Mass. Charitable Mechanics Assoc. Report. 

6. Our knowledge of Mars. CommonwecUth 

(Boston), 18 Oct. 1890. 
Reprinted in Sidereal Ifewenger, Nov. 1890. 

7. Also articles and reviews, scientific and lit- 

erary, signed and unsigned, in the Common- 
.tcecUth. 

Benjamin T^tiioolii RoUhmmu 

Assistant in the Herbarium. 

z. Two new plants from the Cascade Mountains. 
Botanical Gazette, Feb. 1891 ; xvi. 48. 

a. Two undescribed species of Apodanthes. Ibid. 
March, 1891 ; xvi. 82. 

3. Note on the varieties of Silphium laciniatum, 

L. Ibid. April, 1891 ; xvi. 114. 

4. Descriptions of new plants, chiefiy Gamope- 

talae, collected in Mexico by C. G. Pringle 
in 1889 and 1890. Ptoc. Am. Acad. 1891; 
xxvi. 164. 

5. Botanical reviews in the Am^erican Journal of 

Science, Jan. — June, 1891. 

John Garew Rolfo. 

Instructor in Greek and Laiin. 

z. The Heauton Timorumenos of Terence. Text, 
with stage directions. Boston. Ginn & Co. 
1890. 16«». pp. 68. 

a. An inscribed Kotylos from Boeotia. Harv, 
Studies in Class. Philol. 1891; ii. 89-101, 
illustr. 



AblHitt La 



oa Roteli. 



Assistant in Meteorology. 

z. Observations made at the Blue Hill Meteoro- 
logical Observatory, Massachusetts, U. S. A., 
in the year 1890, with appendices containing 
observations at Boston and at Blue Hill dur- 
ing the lustrum 1886-1890. Cambridge. 
1891. 4» pp. 77-201. 

Annals of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard Col- 
lege, XXX. 2. 

a. American meteorological journal. An illus- 
trated monthly devoted to scientific meteor- 
ology and allied branches of study. Edited 
by Mark W. Harrington, A. Lawrence Rotch, 
and W. J. Herdman, M.D. Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mr. Rotcli has contributed reviews and notes to the Am. 
Met. Journal, besides the following articles : — 

3. Meteorological congress at Limoges, France. 
Am. Met. Jowm, Oct. 1890; vii. 816. 



28 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



4. The meteorological observatoiy recently estba- 

lished on Mt. Blanc. Ibid, Jan. 1891 ; yii. 
443. 

5. A French tornado. Ibid. April, 1891 ; vil. 677. 

6. The local weather predictions of the Blue Hill 

Observatory. Ibid, June, 1891 ; viii. 68. 

Bead before the Now Englttnd Meteorological Society, 
18 April, 18&1. 

7. On a meteorological observatoiy recently estab- 

lished on Mt. Blanc. Rep'i Leeds Meeting 
Brit. Assoc. Adv. Sci, Transactions of 
Section A^ p. 747. 

8. Qaelques r^sultats des obserrations an Mont 

Blanc. Notes ei Memoires de P Assoc. Fran- 
qaise pour VAvancemeni des Sciences ^ Session 
de LimogeSj p. 312. 

9. Sur la mesure de la nebulosity pendant la nuit 

et de son enreglstrement. Ibid. p. 318. 

zo. Mountain meteorology. Extracts from three 
lectures delivered in 1891 before the Lowell 
Institute of Boston. Am. Met, Journ. Aug., 
Sept. 1891; viii. 146, 193. 

Thoauw Morgan Rotoh. 

Assistant Professor of Children*s Diseases. 

z. Address before the training school for nurses, 
27 June, 1890. Twenty-seventh report of the 
City Hospital, Boston, 1890; p. 146. 

a, 3. Recent progress in the diseases of children. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 26 Dec. 1890, 
26 June, 1891 ; cxxi'd. 614, cxxiv. 628. 

Joalali Rojoe* 

Assistant Professor in Philosophy, 

z. Fremont. Atlantic Mo, Oct. 1890; Ixvi. 648- 
667. 

a. [Review of] Dr. Abbot's **Way out of agnos- 
ticism. Intemat. Journ, Ethics, Oct. 1890; 
i. 98-113. 

3. A new study of psychology. Ibid. Jan. 1891 ; 

i. 148-169. 
A review of Profetnor James'i "Principles of psychology." 

4. Is there a science of education? Educational 

Rev. Jan., Feb. 1891; i. 16, 121. 

5. Two philosophers of the paradoxical. I. 

Hegel. Atlantic Mo, Jan. 1891 ; Ixvii. 

6. Two philosophers of the paradoxical. II. 

Schopenhauer. Ibid, Feb. 1891 ; Ixvii. 161- 
173. 

7. Montgomery and Fremont : new documents on 

the Bear Flag affair. Century, March, 1891 ; 
xli. 780-783. 

8. The Fremont legend. Nation, 21 May, 1891 ; 

m. 423-426. 

9. [Review of] ** On the doctrine of morality in its 

relation to the grace of redemption." By R. 
B. Fairbaim. Intemat, Journ. Ethics, July, 
1891 ; i. 602, 603. 

zo. [Review of] '* Outlines of a critical theory of 
ethics." ByJ. M.Dewey. /W<f. pp. 603-605. 

zz. Present ideals of American university life. 
Scribner's Mo, Sept. 1891 ; x. 376-388. 

za. Dr. Royce is a member of the editorial com- 
mittee of the International Jonmal of Ethics. 



Robert Lavis flkmdMnMm* 

Assistant Professor of French, 

z. Trois contes choisis, par Daudet. With notes 
by Robert Louis Sanderson. Boston. D. C. 
Heath & Co. 1891. pp. 39. 



Gliarlea Spra^iiA SarsoBt. 

Arnold Professor of Arboriculture, 

1, The silva of North America : a description of 
the trees which grow naturally in North 
America exclutiive of Mexico. Illustrated 
with figures and analyses drawn Arom nature 
by Charles Edward Faxon, and eng^ved by 
Philibert and Eugdne Picard. Vol. ii. Cyril- 
laceae to Sependaceae. Boston. Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co. 1891. 4<*. 

It is proposed to finish tliis work in twelve volumes, each 
with fifty roll page pliites. 

a. Garden and Forest. A journal of horticulture, 
landscape art, and forestry. Conducted by 
C. S. Sargent. New York. 1890-91. f. 
Blustr, 

Published weekly. Professor Sargent has contributed, be- 
sidps much uunigned matter, the following signed articles: — 

i8go. (Vol. iu.) New or little-known plants : Rom Wat- 
9onwna, 1 Oct. 476. — Leucopkyllum Texanum, 8 Oct. 488. — 
Two AmericHU St. John»worts, 29 Oct. 524. — Cela9tru9 artt' 
culata, 12 Nov. 551.— ClenuUU panniculata, 24 Dec. 890. 

iSgi. (Vol. iy.) Notes on North American trees, zzi. 
xxii. 7, 14 Jan. 4, 15. — New or little-known plants : Viburnum 
moUe, 21 Jan. 29. — Clethra aJn^foUa, var. tomentota, 11 Feb. 
64. — Notes on North American trees, xxiii. xxiv. 18 Feb., 4 
March, 75, 100. — The fruit of Akebia qainata, 26 March, 136. 
— Note^ on North American trees, xxv. 1 April, 147. — New 
or little-known plants : Vibumu/m dilataium, 1 April, 148. — 
Ilex laevigata, IS May, 220. — ClematU catiruUa, 20 May, 
234. — The Japanese Hamamells, 8 J une, 256. — Alnus mari- 
tima, 10 June, Q/BS. — Arbutun ArUonica, 8 July, S17. — Pop- 
ulu* Moniicota, 15 July, 880. ~ Notes on North American 
trees, xxvi. 22 July, 840. — The Japanese Photinia, 12 Auff. 
876. — Notes on North American trees, xxvii., zxviii. 16, 
23 Sept. 435, 448. 

3. Beport of the Director of the Arnold Arbor- 
etum to the President of Harvard College. 
Reports of the President and Treasurer of 
Harvard College for 1889-90. 



Dndloy Alien Sarsoit. 

Assistant. Professor of Physical Training, and 
Director of the ffemenway Gymncuium, 

z. Is the teaching of physical training a trade or 
profession? Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Phys, 
Education, 6th annual meeting at Cambridge 
and Boston, 3, 4 April, 1891. Ithaca. 1891 ; 
pp. G-19. 



Gliarles Look* Soiidd«r« 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, 

z. Excision of the elbow joint; ultimate resnlts 
at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Bos- 
ton, Mass. Boston Med, and Surg, Journ, 
16 April, 1891 ; cxziv. 875-380. 

a. The clinical course and the principles of treat- 
ment of chronic ankle-joint disease in child- 
hood. Ibid. 16 July, 1891; cxzr. 59-^1. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



29 



3. The muscular element in the etiology of lateral 
spinal cnrvature. /Voc. Am, Assoc. Adv, 
Phys. Fdueatiofit 6th annual meeting at 
Boston, 3, 4 Apr. 1891. Ithaca. 1891; pp. 
106-111. 

Artkor Searle. 

Phillips Professor of Astronomy, 

X. A possible secondary cause of the phenomenon 
of Oegenschein. Astron, Nachriehten^ 1890 ; 
czxri. 115. 



Natluudal Sonthsate Slud«r. 

Professor of Geology, 

X. Nature and man in North America. New 

York. Scribner*8 Sons. 1891. 8*. pp. ii. 

290. 

A part of the work wan originally pablivhed in Scribnn-** 
Magiuine: I. Sept. 1890; viii. 360.^11. Oct. 1890; viii. 
478. — lU. Not. 1890; ▼lii. M5. 

a. The peculiarities of the south. North Aftieri' 
can Rev, Oct. 1890; ccli. 477-488. 

3. The antiquity of the last glacial period. Proc, 

Bost, Soc. Nat. Hist, Jan. -May, 1891 ; xzt. 
pt. 2, 258-267. 

4. The nei^ro race question. Arena^ Nov. 1890. 

5. College examinations. Atlantic Mo, July, 

1891; Izziii. 95-102. 

6. The geology of Cape Ann, . Massachusetts. 

Ninth annual report of the Director of the 
U, S, OeoL Survey, Washington. 1890; 
pp. 529-611, plates 46, cuts. 

7. General account of the fresh-water morasses 

of the United States, with a description of 
the Dismal Swamp dif<trict of Virginia and 
North Carolina. Tenth annual report U. S, 
Oeol. Survey, Pt. I. Washington. 1890; 
pp. 255-389, plates 14, cuts, 

8. g. Administrative reports : 8. Ninth annual 

report U, S, Oeol, Survey, Pt. I. pp. 71- 
74. — 9. Tenth annucU report^ etc. Pt. I. 
pp. 117-119. 

10. Report of Mass. Commissioners of Topographic 
Surrey and Map. With F. A. Walker and 
H. L. Whiting. 

XI. Report of Mass. Gypsy Moth Commission. 



SVederlok Cheever Shattnok. 

Jiiekson Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

I. Auscultation and percussion. Detroit. 1890. 
12*. pp. 121. 

a. A case of suppurating unilocular hydatid cyst 
of the liver, with multiple hepatic abcess. 
Boston Med. and Surg, Jowrn, 3 Jan. 1891 ; 
caKxiv. g«6. 

3. Tricuspid stenosis, with the report of a case 
and specimen. Ihid. 26 March, 1891 ; czxiv. 
307-309. 

4, 5. Uraemic convulsions ; epilepsy ; dysphaj^la, 
due perhapH to the pressure of a stray thyroid 
gland. Intemat, Clinics^ April, 1891 ; i. 84. 

Two clinical lectorea delivered at the MasRacliasetts Gen- 
eral Hospital. 



Edward Stevens Sheldon* 

Assistant Professor of Romance Philology. 

I, Wh in America. Mod. Lang, Notes, June, 
1891 ; vi. 189-191. 

a. The annual meeting of the [American Dialect] 
Society. DiaJ,ect Notes, 1891 ; iii. 174-178. 

3. Professor Sheldon is one of the editors of 
Dialect Notes, Published by the American 
Dialect Society. Part III. Boston. 1891. 

Baniel Beniaon Slade. 

Lecturer on Osteology. 

X. Osteological notes. Science, 12 Dec. 1890, 5 
June, 24 July, 1891; xvi. 333, xvii. 317, 
xviii. 53. 

a. On the genus Chlamydophorus. Am. Natu- 
ralist, July, 1891 ; xxv. 540-548, illustr. 

3. The preservation of beautiful and historical 
places. Garden and Forest, 10 June, 1891; 
iv. 274. 

Glement Lawrence Smith. 

Professor of Latin, and Dean of Harvard College, 

I, a. College series of Latin authors. Edited by 
Clement Lawrence Smith and Tracy Peck. 

X. Liv.v. Bookfi I. and II. Eilited, with introduction and 
noteit, by .J. B. Greenougb. Bof*ton and London. Giun & 
Company. 1891. 8*. pp. xvii. 270. 

9. The* Bamc (text edition). Edited and published as 
above. 8*. pp. 161. 

3. Professor [William F.] Allen. Class. Rtv, 

Nov. 1890 ; iv. 426-428. 

4. Report of the Dean of Harvard College. An- 

nual reports of the President and Treasurer 
of Harvard College, 1889-90; pp. 40-111. 

Freen&an Snow. 

Instructor in International Law, 

1. The New Orleans riot. Christian Register, 
16 April, 1891 ; Ixx. 244. 

Jere Edmnnd Stanton. 

Instructor in Oral Anatomy and Physiology, 

I. The function of the odontoblasts. Intemat, 
Dental Jowrn, March, 1891 ; zii. 163. 

Ghnrles Pratt Strong. 

Assistant in Gynaecology. 

X. Amenbrrhoea: clinical report of four cases 
successfully treated by gslvanism. Boston 
Med, and Swrg. Joum. 16 April, 1891 ; ctxiv. 
382, 383. 

a. Removal of the uterine aj>pen<lapres in a person 
deformed by spinal curvature fr<»ni caries of 
the vertebrae. Am. .Journ. Obstetrics and 
Dis. of Women and Children, May, 1891; 
zxiv. 554. 



30 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



3. Laparotomy, verifying the diagnosis of pelvic 
cellutitin. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 9 
July, 1891 J cxxv. 32. 

Reprints of all these papers have been published. 



FrM^rlo Cteur de Smnlolirast. 

Assistant Professor of French. 

z. French lexicography. Mod. Lan^. Notes ^ June ^ 
1891 ; vi. 870-876. 

A review of A. Hatzfeld and A. Darmestetcr^s "Diction- 
naire g^n^ial de la langue frangaise.*' 

a. ReTiews and notes contributed to the Nation, 



Gliarlea Hntohins Taft. 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

X. The progress of science and its influence on 
modern civilization. 

An address delivered before the American Academy of 
Deutal Science at its twenty-third annual meeting held in 
Boston, Nov. 12, 1890. Published by that society tlie follow- 
ing month in pamphlet form. 



Frank Bi^elow Tarbell. 

Instructor in Oreek and Latin. 

X. [Review of] ** An intermediate Greek-English 
lexicon, founded upon the seventh edition of 
Liddell and Scott's Greek-English lexicon." 
Class. Rev. Oct. 1890; iv. 370, 871. 

a. [Review of] Harrison and Verrall's "Mythol- 
ogy and monuments of ancient Athens." 
Ibid. Nov. 1890 ; iv. 430-432. 

3. The ** house at Delos." Ibid. March, 1891; 

V. 130, 181. 

4. Greek deliberative subjunctive in relative 

clauses. Ibid. July, 1891; v. 302. 

5. On the infinitive after expressions of fearing 

in Greek. Am. Journ. Philol. April, 1891 ; 
xii. 70-72. 

6. Reply to Mr. Faton*s comment oh Tarbell's 

"Study of the Attic phratry." Am. Journ. 
Archaeol. Sept. 1890; vi. 318-320. 



Ralph Stockman Tarr* 

Assistant in Oeology. 

X. Superimposition of the drainage in central 
Texas. Am. Journ. Set. Nov. 1890; xl. 
359-362. 

a. The phenomenon of rifting in granite. Ibid. 
April, 1891 ; xli. 267-272. 

3. A norther in Texas. Am. MeteoroL Journ. 

April, 1891; vii: 580-:562. 

4. A recent lava flow in New Mexico. Am. 

Naturalist^ June, 1891 ; xxv. 524-627. 

5. Physical geography of Texas. Goldihwaiie' s 

Geographical Mag. Sept. 1891 ; ii. 627-630. 

6. Also varions contributions to the Geographic 

cat Magazine^ American Agriculturist, and 
other periodicals. 



Frank Wllliaiii Tannic. 

Assistant Professor of Political Economy. 

X, The working of the new silver act Forum, 
Oct. 1890; X. 165-173. 

a. La tarifa McKinley. Giomale degli Econo- 
misti, Jan. 1891; pp. 1-29. — The McKinley 
tariff act. [The same, translated, with revision 
by the author. ] Economic Journal (London) , 
July, 1891 ; i. 326-350. 

3. A contribution to the theory of railway rates. 
Quart. Journ. EcoThomics, July, 1891; v. 
438-465. 



James Bradley Thayer. 

Professor of Law. 

X. Cases on evidence. [A list.] For the use of 
the classes in evidence at the Harvard Law 
School. Cambridge. 1890. S°. pp. 21. 

a. Law and fact in jury trials. Harvard La/w 
Rev. Nov. 1800; iv. 147-176. 

3. The case of Gelpcke v. Dubuque. Ibid. Feb. 

1891; iv. 311-320. 

4. The older modes of trial. lUd. May, 1891 ; 

V. 45-70. 

5. American judges and the interests of labor. 

Quart. Journ. Economics, July, 1891; t. 
503-506. 

6. Speech on the Indian question before the 

Massachusetts Reform Club. Boston Post, 
2 April, 1891. 



Joseph Henry Thayer. 

Bussey Professor of New Testam^ent Criticism and 

Inte rpr elation. 

X. The change of attitude towards the Bible. A 
lecture given under the auspices of the Boston 
Board of the American Institute of Sacred 
Literature. Boston, etc. Houghton, Mifflin 
& Co. 1891. 8*1 pp. 69. 

a. [Review of] Haverford College studies. Part 
III. Andover Rev. Jan. 1891; xv. 117-119. 

3. [Review of] Sanday's "The oracles of God." 

Ibid. March, 1891 ; xv. 838, 839. 

4. [Review of] Bishop Westcott's *• Commentary 

on the Epistle to the Hebrews.*' Cla^s. Rev. 
Feb. 1891. 

5. [Review of] Simcox*s ** Language of the New 

Testament." Part II. Presbyterian jind 
Reformed Rev. July, 1891. 

6. Revised translation of the '* Teaching of the 

Twelve Apostles," edited anonymonftly for 
the American Unitarian Association. 



William Goodrich Thompson. 

Instructor in Forensics. 
1. Specimen briefs. English C. Oct. 15, 1890. 



Pt^LlCATlONS OF TflE OFFICERS. 



3t 



WlUiaa HapUas TtlHwgliaiit, 

AMwistani Librariatiy and Editor of the Quin- 
quennial Catalogue. 

I. Serenth list of the publications of Harvard 

University and its officers, with the chief 

publications on the University. 1889-90. 

Cambridge. 1891. pp. 32. 

Biblk^T»phical contribatioDS of Harvard College Librarji 
DO. 88. 

a. The orators and poets of Phi Beta Kappa, 

Alpha of Massachusetts. Cambridge. 1891. 

pp. 8. 

Bibliographical contributioiit of Harvard College Library, 
DO. 42. 

3, 4. Necrology of Harvard graduates in each 
number of the Harvard University Bulletin. 
Necrology for 1890-91, Boston Daily Adver- 
tiser, Post, Journal, etc. 24 June, 1891. 

JoMpk Tarrmjf Jr. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

z. Steam engine fly wheels : their design and 
proportions. Am. Machinist, ziv. no. 81, 34. 

Gliarlea Weadall Townsend. 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 

I. A case of haemophilia as observed at the first 
menstrual period. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 27 Nov. 1890; cxxiii. 616, 617. 

8. Summer diarrhoea in infants : being an analy- 
sis of the cases treated at the Sea Shore 
Home during the summers of 1887, 1888, and 
1889. Trans. Am. Pediatric Soc. vol. ii. 
p. 101. — Archives of Pediatrics, Nov. 1890. 
BepriDted separately. 

3. A case of congenital influenza. Ibid. p. 206. 

4. Haemorrhages in the new-born. Boston Med. 

and Surg. Joum. 27 Aug. 1891 ; cxxv. 218- 
220. 
Beprioted separately. 

Orawfbrd Howall Toy. 

Bancoek Ptofessor of Hebrew and other Oriental 
Languages, and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical 
Literature. 

I. Judaism and Christianity. A sketch of the 
progress of thought from Old Testament to 
New Testament. Boston. Little, Brown & 
Co. 1890. 8*. pp. xvii. 466. 

a. Analysis of Genesis ii., iii. Joum. Biblical 
Lit. Jan. 1891; x. pt. i. 1-19. 

3. The religious element in ethical codes. In- 
temat. Joum. Ethics, April, 1891 ; 1. 289-311. 

Joha Trowliridse. 

Rumford Professor and Lecturer on the Applica- 
tion of Science to the Useful Arts, and Director 
of the Jefferson Physical Laboratory. 

z. Damping of electrical oscillations on iron wires. 
Proc, Am. Acad. 1891; xxvi. — Am. Joum. 
ad. Sept. 1891 ; cxlii. 228-280. 



a. Motion of atoms in electrical discharges. 
Phiios. Mag. and London, Edinburgh, and 
Dublin Joum. Sci. Dec. 1890; xxx. 480-483. 

3. Physical notes in American Journal of Science 
as joint editor. 1890-91. 



Hemy Van Djks. 

Preacher to the University, 

z. The poetry of Tennyson. Revised and en- 
larged ediition. New York. Scribner*s Sons. 
1891. 8°. pp. xviii. (2), S70, portr. 

a. On the study of Tennyson. Century Mag. 
Aug. 1891; xlli. 602-610. 

3. The revision of the confession of faith. Five 
articles in The New York Evangelist, 27 Aug. 
—30 Sept. 1891. 

HemuMi Frank Vioksrj. 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

z. A case of triplets. Med. Communications 
Mass. Med. Soc. 1891 ; ii. no. 2, 463-468. 

a. Diseases of the heart and bloodvessels. With 
E. N. Whittier, M.D., and £. M. Greene, 
M.D. Sajous' Annual of the Universal 
Med. Sciences, 1891; i. B 1-B 7. 

3. Two unusual obstetric cases. Boston Med. 

and Surg. Joum. 30 Oct. 1890; cxxiii. 412, 
413. 

4. Menorrhagia in a patient afflicted with haemo- 

philia. Ibid. 27 Nov. 1890 ; cxxiii. 520. 

Oliver Falrlleld WacUworth* 

Professor of Ophthalmoscopy. 

z. A case of metastatic carcinoma of the choroid. 
Trans. Am. OphthcUm^logiccU Soc. 1890; v. 
pt. 3, p. 664. — Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 20 JNov. 1890; cxxiii. 489, 490. 

a. Thrombosis of arteria centralis retinae — large 
retino-ciliary artery — central vision unim- 
paired. Trans. Am. Ophthalmological Soc. 
1890 ; V. pt. 3, 672. — Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 11 Dec. 1890; cxxiii. 669, 660. 

G«orce Ltnooln Walton. 

Clinical Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous 
System, and Instru4^or in Neurology in the 
Dental School. 

I. Fatal case of lead poisoning in which ataxia 
was the principal symptom (pseudo-tabes). 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 30 Oct. 1890 ; 
cxxiii. 411,412. 

Also reprinted : Boston. Damrell ft Upbftm. 1890. 16*. 
pp. 6. 

a. A case of successful trephining for subdural 

haemorrhage produced by contre-coup. With 

Dr. John Uomans. Ibid. 12 Feb. 1891; 

cxxiv. 163-157, illustr. 

AIao reprinted : Boston. Damrell & Upham. 1801. 18'. 
pp. 32. 

3. The methodical examination of patients with 
diseases of the nervous system. Intemai. 
Clinics, July, 1891 ; pp. 226-236. 



32 



PITBLICATI0K8 OF THE OFFICERS. 



Robert DeConroy Ward. 

Assistant in Physical Geography and Meteorology. 

z. The climatic history of Lake Bonneville. Am. 
Meteorol. Jo urn. viii. 164. 

John Collins Warren. 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 

z. The parasitic origin of cancer. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Journ. 8 Jan. 1891 ; cxxiv. 53-56. 

2. Five cases of laparotomy for pelvic abscess. 
Ibid. 19 Feb. 1891 ; cxxiv. 183-185. 

'William Homer Warren. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

1, The reactions of sodic alcoholates with tri- 
bromdinitrobenzol and tribromtrinitrobenzol. 
Am. Chem. Journ. xiii. 164-193. 

Benjamin Marston Watson. 

Instructor in Horticulture. 

1. In-door gardens. Am. Garden^ Dec. 1890; 

xi. 766. 

2. Out-door roses. Ibid. p. 758. 

3. Tuberous begonias. Ibid. Jan. 1890; xii. 25. 

4. The chrysanthemum. Annals of Horticulture 

in North America^ 1890. New York. Rural 
Publ. Co. 1891 ; p. 38. 

Francis Sedgwick Watson. 



Clinical Instructor in Genito-urinary Surgery^ 
and Assistant in Surgery. 

1, A new means to assist in the removal of intra- 1 
vesical growths, through a supra-pubic cys- 
totomy. Lancet (London), 18 Oct. 1890. 

Tliis paper was presented to the SurglcAl Section of the 
Intemutional Medical Congress in Berlin, Aug. 7, 1890. 

Serene Watson. 

Curator of the Herbarium. 

1. On the genus Eriogynia. Botanical Gazette, 
XV. 241, 2i2, plate 1. I 

a. The relation of the Mexican flora to that of the I 
United States. Proc. Am. Assoc, Adv. Sci. , 
xxxix. 291, 292. 

3-6. Contributions to American botany : — i. De- 
scriptions of some new North American j 
species, chiefly of the United States, with a 
revision of the American species of the 
genus Erythronium. — ii. Descriptions of 
new Mexican species, collected cliiefly by Mr. 
C. G. Pringle in 1889 an 1 1890. — iii. Upon 
a wild species of Zea from Mexico. — iv. 
Notes upon a collection of plants from the 
Island of Ascension. Proc. Am. Acad. xxvi. 
124-163. Also issued separately as '* Contri- 
butions to American Botany, xviii.," with 
index. 



Barrett Wendell. 

Assistant Professor of English, 

I. English Composition. Eight lectures given at 
the Lowell Institute. New York. Charles 
Scribner*8 Sons. 1891. 8*^. pp. x. 316. 

Tbese lectures were reported, as delivered, in the Boston 
newspapers. Nor. and Dec. 1890. 

Oliver Clinton Wendell. 

Assistant in the Astronomical Observatory. 

z. Observations of comet 1890 IV. Astron. Niach. 
cxxvi. 121. — Astron. Journ. x. 102. 

a. Second series of observations of comet 1890 
IV. Astron. Na^h. cxxvii. 297. — Asiron, 
Journ. X. 133. 

3. Observations of comet 1882 II. Asiron. Nach. 

cxxvii. 293. 

4. Observations of comet 1889 I, comet 1890 II, 

comet 1890 III, comet 1890 VI, and comet a 
1891. Astron. Nach. cxxvii. 297. — Asiron. 
Journ. xi. 4. 

5. Ephemeris of comet 1890 VI for November, 

1890. Sidereal Messenger <, ix. 419. 

6. Ephemeris of comet 1890 II for December, 

1890. Ibid. ix. 465. 

7. Orbit and ephemeris of comet 1890 IV. Ibid. 

X. 85. 

8. Ephemeris of comet 1890 IV for February, 

1891. Ibid. X. 102. 

9. Ephemeris of comet 1890 II for March, 1891. 

Ibid. X. 147. 

zo. Ephemeris of comet 1890 II for April, 1891. 
Ibid. X. 201. 

zz. Orbit and ephemeris of comet a 1891. Ibid. 

X. 288. 

Z2. Ephemeris of comet a 1891 for July, 1891. 
Ibid. X. 368. 

James Glarke WUte. 

Professor of Dermatology. 

1. Immigrant dermatoses. Journ. Cutaneous and 
Genito-urinary Diseases, Oct. 1890 ; pp. 369- 
879. 

Read Sept. 1890, at the meeting of the American Dermato- 
logical Association. Also reprinted : 1890. 8'. 

a. [Discussion on psorospermosis before the 
Boston Society for Medical Improvement]. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 15 Jan. 1890; 
cxxiv. 66. 

3. [Discussion on action of tuberculin (Koch) 
before Boston Society for Medical Improve- 
ment]. Ibid. 6 Aug. 1891 ; cxxv. 139, 140. 

John Williams Wbite. 

Professor of Greek. 

t. The beginner's Greek book. Advance pages. 
Bo.^ton. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8*". pp. iv. 168. 

2-7. College series of Greek authors. Edited 
under the supervision of John Williams 
White and Thomas D. Seymour. 

9. Plato's Gorgias. Edited on the basis of the Deuschle- 
Cron edition, by (vonzalez Lodge, Pli.D., Associate in Bryn 
Maivr College. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1890. 8*. pp. iv. 308. 



PUBLICATIONS OP THE OFFICERS. 



33 



3. Text edition of tbe NLine. pp. 118. 

4. Homer's Iliad. Bookii Iv.-Vl. Edited on the banis of 
the Ameis-ilentze edition by Thomas D. Seymour, Ilillhoase 
Professor of Greek in Yale College. Boston. Ginn & Co. 
1890. 8*. pp. iii. 213. 

5. Text edition of the same. pp. 66. 

6. The Prometheus bound of Aeschylus and tlie An^rments 
of the Prometheus unbound. With introduction and notes by 
N. Wecklein, Rector of the MaximiUan Gymnasium in 
Munich, translated by F. D. Allen, Professor in llanrard 
University. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. pp. iii. 178. 

7. Text edition of the same. pp. 55. 

8. The stage in Aristophanes. Barv. Studies 
in Class. Philol. 1891 ; ii. 169-206. 

Also reprinted : Jan. 1891. 8*. pp. 47. 

g. Professor White is one of the editorial com- 
mittee in charge of the Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology. 



Harold Wbitliis. 

Instructor in Physics. 

z. A course of experiments in physical measure- 
ments. In four parts. Boston. D. C. Heath 
& Co. 1891. 8*". pp. 1226. 

OontenU : — x. Density, heat, light, and sound. — a. Sound, 
dynamics, magnetism, and electricity. — 3. Notes on the 
principles and methods of physical nieasurement.s, with 
matliematicHl and phy«ical tables for the use of students. — 
4. Appendix for the use of teachers. 

The four parts were issued separately: — i. Cambridge. 
John Wilson & Son. pp. 1-278. — 9. Cambridge. John 
Wilson & Son. pp. yiii. 279-^83.-3. Cambridge. John 
Wil8<m & Son. pp. viii. 685-900. — 4. Boston. D. C. Heath 
ft Co. pp. 901-1228. 



Franois Henzy Williams. 

Assistant Professor of Therapeutics. 

x-3. Reports on progress in therapeutics. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 20 Nov. 1890, 26 
Feb., 28 July, 1891; cxxiii. 49(M93, cxxiv. 
208-211, cxxv. 81-83. 

4. Nourishment in acute diseases. Ibid. 3 Sept. 
1891; cxxv. 246-248. — J/fd. Communica- 
tions Mass. Med. Soc. 1891 ; xv. pt. 2,427-431. 

Samuel Williston. 

Assistant Professor of Law. 

X. Can an insolvent debtor insure his life for the 
benefit of his wife? Am. Law Rev. March — 
April, 1891 ; xxv. 186. 

Arthur Brown Willmott. 

Assistant in Mineralogy. 
z. Nickel. Young Canadian (Montreal), 1891 ; i. 

Kaaalm Winalow. 

Imtructor in Maieria Medica and Botany in the 
School of Veterinary Medicine. 

I. Action of cold and other antipyretic agencies 
on bodily temperature. Veterinary Rev. 
July, 1891. 

a. Clinical aspects of influenza from a compara- 
tive standpoint. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 2 July, 1891 ; cxxxv. 9, 10. 



Justin 'Winaor. 

Librarian of the University. 

1-15. In The Nation : — i. English cathedral li- 
braries. 9 Oct. 1890; li. 284.-2. Letters and 
sports in Scotland. 6 Nov. 1890; li. 358. ~ 
3. A Scottish university lecture- room. 13 
Nov. 1890; li. 377.-4. Reform of the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh. 27 Nov. 1890; li. 417. 

— 5. An English university in winter. 8 Jan. 
1891; Hi. 26.-6. With Bradford and Har- 
vard. 22 Jan. 1891 ; Iii. 67. — 7. The monu- 
ments of Southwark. 12 Feb. 1891 ; Hi. 132. 

— 8. The public records in England. 26 
Feb. 1891; Hi. 176. — 9. English views of 
the copyright act. 29 Jan. 189 1 ; Iii. 87. — 
10. America at the Guelph exhibition. 12 
March, 1891 ; Iii. 215. — 11. London archives 
of American history. 26 March, 1891; Hi. 
258. — za. Columbiana. 9 April, 1891; Iii. 
297. — 13. The Venetian archives. 4 June, 
1891 ; Iii. 456. — 14. America in Italian 
libraries. 2 July, 1891; liii. 9. — 15. The 
condition of Italian libraries. 9 July, 1891 ; 
liii. 26. 

x6. Letter from London on the Wintlirop map of 
New England. Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc. Jan. 
1891 ; 2d ser. vi. 259. 

17. Edited Harvard University Bulletin, nos. 47, 

48, 49: Oct. 1890— May, 1891. 

18. Edited Bibliographical Contributions of the 

Library of Harvard University, nos. 89-48. 
See p. 8. 

19. Thirteenth report of the librarian of Harvard 

College. 1890-91. Included in the annual 
report of the President, and also issued 
separately. 



Gharlea Franois Withinffton* 

Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

I. Prodromal and early symptoms of Bright's 
disease. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 10 
Sept. 1891; cxxv. 263-267. — ifed. Commu- 
nications Mass. Med. Soc. 1891 ; xv. no. 2, 
485-441. 

John Eliot WoUr. 

Instructor in Petrography. 

X. On the lower Cambrian age of the Stockbridge 
limestone. Bull. Geol. Soc. America^ ii. 
331-838. 

a. Metamorphism of clastic feldspar in conglom- 
erate schist. Bull. Mus. Comp. Zobl. Sept. 
1891 ; xvi. no. 10, 173-183, plates 2. 

William MoMiohaol Woodworth. 

Assistant in Microscopical Anatomy. 

I. Contributions to the morpliology of the Tur- 
bellaria. I. On the structure of Phagocata 
gracilis, Leidy. Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 
April, 1891; xxi. no. 1, 1-42 y plates 4. 



34 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



John Henzy Wright. 

Professor of Greek, 

z. [Review of] Gwatkin and Shuckburgh's ^'Aes- 
chines in Ctesiphonta." Class, Rev. 1891 ; v. 
149-158. 

a. [Review of] Rubensohn's "Crinagorafl." Ibid. 
V. 817, 318. 



3. The Aristotle papyrus. Naiion^ 7 Maj, 1891 ; 

nil. 882-884. 

4. Literary notes in the NaUon, nos. 1854, 1865, 

1866, 1868, 1369. 

5. Professor Wright is American editor, with 

T. D. Seymour and W. G. Hale, of the 
ClassiccU Review, (London and Boston.) 



PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 



Being Buch aa have come, incidental! j, to the notice of the Editor. 



DESCBIPTIVE AND HZBTORICAL. 

An historical sketch of Harrard UniTersity from 
its foundation to May, 1890. By WUliam R. 
Thayer. [Reprinted from the History of Middle- 
sex county, Massachusetts.] Cambridge. 1890. 
4". pp. 66. 

Harvard Unirersity. A brief statement of what 
Harvard University is, how it may be entered and 
how its degrees may be obtained. Cambridge. 
Published by the University. 8*. pp. 66. 

By Frmok BolleSp SecreUry of the tToivertitj. 

The present and future of Harvard College. An 
address delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society at Cambridge, Mass., June 25, 1891, by 
William Watson Goodwin. Boston. Ginn & Co. 
1891. B"*. pp. 42. 

Harvard Club dinner. New Bedford, Jan. 80, 
1891. n. p. n. d. B'. pp. 49. 

Harvard College, 1786-87. By Henry Adams. 
HistoriccU essays. New York. Charles Scribner's 
Sons. 1891; pp. 80-121. 

Tliis article was originally printed in the Korth American 
Review t Jan. 1872. 

The soldier's field. Henry Lee Higginson. 8*^. 

pp. (6), 12. 

Copies of the pamphlet were distributed to members of the 
Military Order of the Loyal Lcffion of the United States, 
introduced by a not« fVoni the I^ibmry committee, and the 
records of the officers commemorated by Uie gift. 

Etching of the College Yard. By Robert R. 
Wiseman. 

Etching of the transept in Memorial Hall. Bj 
Henry R. Blaney. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Reminis- 
cences of Gov. Lincoln at the inauguration of 
Presiiient Quincy. Proc. Mass, Hist. Soe. Oct.- 
Nov. 1890; n. 8. vi. 166-168. — Ready hands for 
demolition [of inartistic buildings]. Nation, 16 
Oct. 1890; li. 304— A lost college building. By 
A. McF. Davis. Commonwealth (Boston), 22 Nov. 
1890. — Heview of the Annual catalogue. Boston 
Post, 18 Nov. 1890; Boston Advertiser, 19 Nov. 
1890. —At Harvard. By C. W. Bardeen. School 
Bulletin (Syracuse, N. Y.), Dec. 1890. — A sketch 
of Harvard University. By Charles D. M. Cole. 
University Mag. Dec. 1890; pp. 83-91, illustr.— 
Harvard echoes. New England Mag. Jan. 1891 ; 
N. 8. iii. 680. — Harvard commons : evolution of 
the Harvard Dining Association. By G. P. W. 
Boston Traveller, 24, 31 Jan. 1891. — Reviews of 
the Annual report of the President and Treasurer. 
Boston Journal, Boston I/erald, 2 Feb. 1891. 
Educational Rev. March, 1891; i. 282-284. —The 
pressure towards the universities. Boston Herald, 
2 Feb. 1891. — Harvard College during the war of 
the rebellion. By Nathan Appleton. New Eng- 
land Mag. March, 1891; iv. 8-23. — President 



£liot*s western trip. Boston Posi^ 18 March, 1891. 
— President Eliot's strong points. Ibid. 26 March, 
1891. — The Fayerweather will case. Boston 
Transcript, 17 March, 1891. — College men in 
politics. New Englander and Tale Rev. April, 
1891. — Geographical distribution of the students 
of Harvard and Yale. Boston Olohe^ 5 April, 
1891. — Memoir of James Walker, D.D. [Presi- 
dent of Harvard College, 1853-1860.] By O. B. 
Frothingham. Proe. Mass. Historical Soc. May, 
1891 ; N. 8. vi. 443-468. — The Hopkins scholar- 
ships. Boston Post, 22 May, 1891. — Reminis- 
cences of Professor Sophocles. By Professor 
G. H. Palmer. Atlantic Mo. June, 1891; Izvii. 
779. — Memories of Professor Sophocles. Boston 
Transcript, 4, 13 June, 1891. — Settlement of the 
John Hancock will case. Boston Post, 10 June, 
1891. — Australian ballot proposed for the election 
of overseers. Ibid. 11 June, 1891. — Famous 
halls at Harvard. Boston Sunday Herald, 14 
June, 1891. 



INSTBUOnOK. 

The teaching and history of mathematics in the 
United SUtes. Washington, D.C. 1890. S"*. 

Barean of Education. Circular of Information. No. 8, 
1890. Uanrard College, pp. 18-28, 67-61, 127-161. 

Considerations on new Harvard methods. By 
Albert Stickney. Printed for private distribution. 
[New York. 1891.] 8«. pp.32. 

Supplemental considerations on the new Harvard 
methods. [New York. 1891.] 8"*. pp. d. 

In Periodical8 and Newspapers. — The fu- 
ture of American universities. By A. D. White. 
North Am. Rev. Oct. 1890; li. 443-452. — Har- 
vard's graduate schools. Boston Advertiser, 2 
Oct. 1890. — The three-years course. Professor 
Royce's St. Paul speech. Ibid. 8 Oct. 1890.— 
The courses at Harvard. Why the proposed plan 
should not be adopted. W. F. Warren. Boston 
Post, 31 Oct. 1890. —The Harvard degree. Presi- 
dent Warren*s staiements regarding the proposed 
change examined. W. Ibid. 19 Nov. 1890. —The 
Harvard degree. W. F. Warren. Ibid. 21 Nov. 
1890. — The collegiate course. Boston Advertiser, 
5 Dec. 1890. — A course in three years. Boston 
Post, 6 Dec. 1890. — English at Harvard. Boston 
Transcript, 24 Dec. 1890. — The next step in 
education. C. K. Adams. Forum, Feb. 1891 ; x. 
618-632. — The ideal college education. J. G. 
Schurman. Andover Rev. Feb. 1891 ; xv. 151- 
160. — Facts for the Harvard overseers. W. F. W. 
Boston Post, 2 Feb. 1891. — Circular to under- 
graduates on the three-years course. Boston 
IleraJd, 20 Feb. 1891. — Astronomical courses at 
Harvard. Ibid. 21 Feb. 1891. — Botany at Har- 
vard. Boston Sunday Herald, 22 Feb. 1891.— 
The three-years course. Prof. Macvane. Harv, 



36 



PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 



Mo, Mar. 1891; xii. 1-13.-— The growth of New 
England colleges. A. M. Comey. Edncaiio-nal 
Rev. Mar. 1891; i. 209-219. — Fmal action of the 
overseers on the three-years course. Boston 
Herald^ 9 April, 1891. — Shortening the college 
course. S. C. Bartlctt. Education, June^ 1891; 
xi. 585-590. — The three-years course. Boston 
Potty 5 June, 1891. — The new rules at Harvard. 
Ibid. 9 June, 1891. — The new elective courses. 
Ibid. 11 Junej 1891. — How to save two years. 
Boston Sunday Herald, 28 June, 1891. — Summer 
schools. Ibid. 80 June, 1S9I. — The Harvard 
overseers. Boston Post, 2 July, 1891. — Address 
on the action of the Harvard College Faculty in 
regard to the three-years course, delivered at the 
annual meeting of the Classical and High School 
Association. President Eliot. Boston Journal, 
4 April, 1891. — The proposed shortening of the 
college course. Professor William James. Har- 
vard Mo. Jan. 1891; xi. 127-137. 



TTNDEBGBADUATE AFFAIRS. 

Harvard's hotter self. By William Reed Bige- 

low. Reprinted from the Neio England Mag. for 

December, 1890 [n. 8. iii. 504-511]. Published 

at 86 Federal Street, Boston. 8*1 pp. (8). 

This article is n-printod and distributod hy t!ie Touiig 
Men*B Cliriftian As^tociatiou of Harvard Uuivi-r9ity. 

Echoes of the Harvard- Yale football game of 

1890, being a collection of ephemeral but interest- 
ing expressions of rejoicings of the hour. Cam- 
bridge. C. H. Thurston. 1890. pp. 24. 

The story of John the orange-man. By one of 
his • Frinds.' Cambridge. John Wilson & Son. 

1891. 12°. pp. 46, i7/a<«5 3. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — A series 
of letters, some twenty in number, by an under- 
graduate (signed G. P. W.), appeared in the 
Boston Traveller on successive Saturdays between 
Dec. 1890, and June, 1891; they depicted various 
phases of undergraduate life. — The Harvard 
board of preachers. Boston Advertiser, 4 Oct. 
1890. — Religion at Harvard. Ibid. 8 Oct. 1890. 
— The Foxcroft Club reorganized. Ibid. 10 Dec. 
1890. — College athletics. Ibid. 10 Dec. 1890.— 
Morals at Harvard. " Horatio." Boston Tran- 
script, 31 Jan. 1891. — The expenses of my Fresh- 
man year at Harvard. By A. Tessin. College- 
man, Feb. 1891; i. 52. — The Prospect progressive 
tmion. Boston Advertiser, 11 Feb. 1891. — The 



I 



** Conference Fran9aise " plays. Boston Journa^ 
9 May, 1891. — An account of "Poco." Boston 
Globe, 10 May, 1891. — Harvard-Yale graduate 
cup. Boston Post, 11 May, 1891. — Police raids 
on Harvard clubs. Boston Globe, 6 June, 1891. — 
Harvard at Parker's and Young's. Boston Trav- 
eller, 8 June, 1891. ^-Changes at Memorial Hall. 
Boston Herald, 1 1 June, 1891. — Z 4^ fines. Ibid. 
18 June, 18yK — A Harvard man on claas-day. 
Boston Transcript, 20 June, 1891. — "Fair Har- 
vard" and liquor nuisances. Boston Traveller^ 
22 June, 1891. — Social life in our large colleges. 
Boston Post, 30 June, 1891. — Every-day life at 
Harvard. Boston Transcript, 26 Sept. 1891. 

DEPABTMENTS. 

The William Hayes Fogg art museum. Boston 
Post, 10 Jan. 1891. 

Student subscriptions for a new reading-room. 
^05/071 Post, 2 Oct. 1890. — The Harvard Library 
reading-room. By A. McF. Davis. Common- 
wealth (Boston), 11 Oct. 1890. — The enhirgemeut 
of Gore Hall. By President Eliot. Harvard Mo. 
Nov. 1890; xi. 43-47. — Harvard Library exten- 
sion. By E. T. Lander. Home Journal, 5 Nov. 

1890. — New Harvard Library. [Circular signed 
by H. A. Davis.] University Mag. Dec, 1890. — 
The library of Harvard College. By W. C. Lane. 
Christian Union, 18 Dec. 1890. — Need of more 
room at the college library. Boston Herald, 21 
Feb. 1891. — Freer use of libraries. By R. Luce. 
Boston Traveller, 28 March, 1891. 

Tlie Sears laboratories of the Harvard Medical 
School. Boston Med. and Surg. Jovrn. 29 Jan. 

1891. — Harvard Medical School Association. 
Ibid. 12 Feb. 1891. — Harvard Medical Associa- 
tion organized. Boston Herald, 1 May, 1891 ; 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 7 May, 1891. — A 
four-years course at the Harvard Medical School. 
Jbid. 28 May, 1891. — The medical course at 
Harvard. Boston Post, 23 June, 1891. 

The mineralogical museum at Harvard. New 
York Evening Post, 19 Dec. 1890. 

The Pea body Museum at Harvard. Boston Ad- 
re7iiser, 20 Oct. 1890. —The Peahody Museum at 
Harvard. Aew York Evening Post, 12 Dec. 1890. 

Semitic literature and history as illustrated in 
a new collection recentlv opened at Cambridge. 
Biblia, July, 1891 ; iv. 98-100. 



tibtatv oE l^arteHi Clnifietsitr. 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR, 



ISTO. 45. 




NOTES ON SPECIAL COLLECTIONS IN AMERICAN LIBRARIIS. 



By WILLIAM COOLIDGE LANE, 



CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, 

Ai>hlt:ii/ in Hurvard College Library. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 
Hasueb bs tlie HiliiaTg of l^srbarti finiberdtt^. 



Already issued or in -preparation: 



VOL. I. 



I. Edward S. Holdrn. Index-Catalogue of Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercnry. 

a. Justin Winsor. Shakespeare's Poems : a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Charlbs Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 
the Life and Works of Michelang^o, with Notes. 

' 4. Justin Winsor. Pietas et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 
into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List op Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 
United States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6w Thk Collkction op Books and Autographs, be- 
queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor, 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lanb. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. PL I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. GxoROB Lincoln Goodalk. The Floras of different 

countries. 

lOb Justin Winsor. Halliwelliana : a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard HalliwelUPhillipps. 



13 



H 



II. Samubl H. Scuddbr. The Entomological Libraries 
of the United States. 

IS. First List op thb Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1870-1SS0. 

Samuel H. Scuddbr. A Bibliography of Fossil 
Insects. 

William H. Tillinghast. Notes on the Historical 
Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen. 1855- 
18S1. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 
1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

aa William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 18S4-1885. 



VOL. II. 



SI. Second List op the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and iU Officers. 1SS0-1885. 

as. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

a3. William H. Tillinghast. 'lliird List ofthe Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1885- 
1886. 

14. WiLUAM C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 
no. a. 18^-1886. 

35. W. G. Pablow and William Trelbasb. IJst of 
Works on North American Fungi. 

a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 

37. Andrew McP. Davis. A few notes on the Records 

of Harvard College. 
aS. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publics. 

tkms of Harvard University and its Officers. 1886- 

1887. 



39. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 
no. 3. 1887. 

3a Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem " To a 
Skylark," with notes. 

W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Works on 
North American Fungi. 

H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, I78a-i839. 

William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publications 
of Harvard University and its Officers. 18S7-1888. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. George B. Woodbbrry. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Wbitbnkampp. Bibliography of Hogarth. 



3> 

3» 
33 



VOL. III. 



38. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 188S- 
1889. 

39. Alpred C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 1890. 

41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 18S9- 
189a 



4a. William H. Tillinghast. The Orators and Poe a 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachusetts. 

43. Charles Gross. A Classified List of Books relating. 

to British Municipal History. 

44. William H. Tillinghast. Eighth List of Publics 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1890 
1891. 

45. William C. Lane and Charles K. Bolton. Notei 

on Special Collections in American libraries. 

46. The Class of i8a8, with a list of the publications ol 

its members. 



EXPLANATORY NOTE. 

In March, 1889, a circular letter of enquiry was sent to all the libraries in the United States of ten 
thousand volumes and upwards, and to such smaller ones as were thought to contain material that might 
contribute to the object in view. The circular was as follows : — 

The Library of HarvArd Unirersity desires to publish as one of its Bibliographical Contribution* a list of tlic principal 
libraries in the United States which possess extensiyc and valuable collections of works in one or more special departments, 
with notes in regard to these special collections stating briefly their character and extent. Tlic object of such a publication 
is to show scholars and investigators where tliey are most likely to find material connected with the subject of their studies. 

I have the honor to request your cooperation to this end and beg that you will furnish me information for this purpose 
in regard to the library under your charge. It is impossible for me, of course, to give any precise measure of tlic extent or 
value a collection should have in order to be included with advantage in such a list. It must depend largely on tlie character 
of tlie subject, but, in general, information is desired concerning any specialty for which your library has had exceptional 
opportunity or has made distinct efforts to gather material. In the case of libraries devoted to medicine, hiw, tlieology, etc., 
to which this circular may be sent, tlie enquiry is directed not so much to their collections taken as a whole as to the separate 
parts in which they may be exceptionally strong, and so in all cases, the more precise and limited the subjects mentioned, 
the more valuable will be the information to the special student, e. g. the fact that a library has 200 voliunes of Miltoniana is 
more to the point than that it has 5000 volumes of English literature. 

A large number of replies to this circular were received, but stress of other work made it necessary 
to lay them aside for a time. At length in the spring of 1892 the task could be resumed ; circulars were 
sent again to those libraries which had not answered the earlier application, and from nearly all of 
them replies were received. 

The Notes which follow have been compiled from the information thus obtained, and the printer's 
proof has been submitted in every case to the librarian or other responsible officer for correction and 
completion to date. The statements may therefore be considered as authoritative. 

It is evidently impossible to fix any standard by which to measure and compare the special collections 
of different libraries. The estimate of their importance has been necessarily left to the librarian, the 
result of which is that in some cases subjects are not mentioned which well deserve to be, wliile in 
others, collections of relatively small extent are given an importance which does not properly belong 
to them. On the other hand the compilers have not hesitated to omit from the reports sent them items 
which seemed to them unimportant, and occasionally to leave out a library altogether, even though the 
librarian has been at some pains to furnish them with information. 

For the evident incompleteness and unevenness of these Notes, the compilers desire to offer 
their apologies. Such shortcomings, however, they feel are to no small degree inevitable in a new 
undertaking of this kind, and they hope that, should this first attempt be found of real service to 
scholars, they may be able at some future time, with the continued cooperation of the libraries of the 
country, to make a second edition more complete and systematic. 

The Index includes the names of all topics referred to in the Notes, the names of private owners 
whose collections have passed into the possession of public libraries, and the names of the libraries 
themselves when not derived from the name of the place where they are situated. 

To the many librarians whose ready help and obliging answers have made the accomplishment of 
their task possible, the compilers beg to return their gratcfnl acknowledgments. 

WILLIAM COOLIDGE LANE, 
CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON. 



NOTES ON SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



TO BB FOUND Dl THB 



PUBLIC LIBEAEIES OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Alhmajf JV. Y, — Statb Libbabt. (Melvil 
Dewey, Director.) 

Marly American sermons: 8000 pamt., from 
Rer. William B. Sprague. 

Early Americana : about 10,000 toIb. , increaa- 
ing yearly. 

OenecUogtes : 2080 vols., increafling yearly. 

American local histories: 5000 toIb., increasing 
yearly. 

Wm. Ptynnt^s works: 128 Tolt., from Henry 
Steyena of London. 

The library publishes a Bulletin of Additions 
containing a list of all additions (except law books, 
which the library will include in its annual law 
bibliography) closely classed by subject, followed 
by author and minute alphabetic subject indexes. 

An Author Catalogue was published in 1856, with 
supplement in 1861 ; and a Subject Index in 1872, 
with supplement to it in 1882. A catalogue of 
maps, manuscripts, engrarings, coins, etc. was 
printed in 1857, and one covering bibliography, 
typography, and engraving in 1858. 

Mabuscbipt Dbpabtmbnt. (Gkorge 

R. Howell, Archivist.) New York and .Vermont 
papers, 200 vols., from Henry Stevens of Bamet, 
Yt. ; Gov. Daniel D. Tompkins papers, 15 vols., 
from Minthom Tompkins ; Sir Wm. Johnson pa- 
pers, 22 vols., from J. T. Cooper; Gov. Geo. 
Clinton papers, 52 vols.; documents relating to 
early New York history, 842 vols. 

Law Dbpabtmbbt. (8. B. Griswold, 

Librarian.) In completeness of sets, ranks as the 
first law library in the United States ; in size, the 
second. Adds both American and foreign law as 
fast as obtainable. 

Jfew York Court of Appeals (cases) : 1550 vols., 
official collection, kept up to date by law. 

Supervisors of counties, proceedings of the 
boards: 560 vols., official collection, kept up to 
date by law. 

AmericcM constitutional coweentionsj journals, 
and debates : 240 vols. 

1 



Hindu law, and reports of the courts of India : 
300 vols. 

Treaty of Washington, printed papers relat- 
ing to the treaty : 275 vols. ; a complete set col- 
lected by A. S. Draper, R. S. Hale, and Lord 
Tenterden. 

A Subject Catalogue was printed in 1882. The 
library publishes a Bulletin of Legislaiion, which 
is a minutely classified annual summary of new 
laws passed by all the States, followed by a full 
alphabetic index of specified topics. Though 
printed specially to enable New York legislators to 
utilize with a minimum of labor the experience of 
other States, it is of course equally useful to all 
legislators and students of comparative legislation 
elsewhere. To enable the consulter to determine 
which laws he needs to look up, each is briefly 
summarized under its specific head, and cited 
exactly, usually by State, chapter, number, and 
date of approval. Elaborate charts of fhnds and 
expenditures show for each State and each object 
the payments of the last fiscal year. 



Mass, — Amhbbbt Colleob. (W. L 
Fletcher, Librarian.) 

Geology and palcsontology : 1250 vols., with an 
especially good collection of state reports. 

Mineralogy and crystallography : 850 vols. 

Lichenography : 280 vols, and many pamphlets, 
collected and presented by the late Prof. £. Tuck- 
erman. 

To these collections additions are made irregu- 
larly. 

AnBapoUa* Md, — ^Uvited States Naval Aoab- 
EMT. (A. N. Brown, Librarian.) 

The library contains over 82,000 vols., and has 
had an annual appropriation for additions of $2000 
since 1851. A catalogue of the library was printed 
in 1860. A complete card catalogue was made in 
1868 and is kept up to date. There are in maihe- 
matics including mathematical journals 2200 vols. ; 
navcU architecture and marine engineering 1100 
vols. ; naval magazines 1200 vols. ; seamanship 

2 



^ 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



650 vols. ; navigation 900 vols., and ordnance and 
gunnery 1000 vols. 

A complete set of U. S. Coast Surrey charts, and 
partial sets of British Admiralty charts and ** La 
pilote flrangaise " are also in the library. 

SOO specimens of ^n« belonging to the academy 
are not displayed. 

Ana Arbor« Mich. — ^Ukiyersitt of MiCBiOiiN. 
(R. C. Davis, Librarian.) 

Shakespeariana : over 8500 vols., bought with 
money given for the purpose by Hon. James Mc- 
MiUan of Detroit, in 1882. 

Ooethe: 850 vols., bought with money contrib- 
uted chiefly by (German- American citizens. There 
is a small fund invested for making additions. 



»« Md. — Johns Hopkiks Univebsitt. 
(N. Murray, Librarian.) 

StoisM history and instittUions : 476 vols., 700 
pams. and 20 mss., the library of Prof. J. C. 
Bluntschli of Heidelberg, supplemented by a large 
gift from the Swiss government. Presented to the 
University in 1882 by German citizens of Baltimore. 

Mediaeval philoeophy and scholastic divinity: 
800 vols., many rare, bought of the collector, Mr. 
C. S. Peirce. 

Coins t Greek and Roman : 1825, collected by Dr. 
Helbig, formerly head of the German Archaeol. 
Inst, in Rome. 

Beowulf: 15 editions, 16 translations, and 84 
dissertations on the poem. Very complete. 

Slavery: the Bimey collections of books and 
pamphlets, numbering over 1000 titles, relating 
chiefly to slavery, collected by the late James G. 
Bimey and his son, General William Bimey, and 
by the latter presented to the University in 1891. 

Southern history and the War between the 
States : the Scharf collection, consisting of 50,000 
pams., unpublished manuscripts, autograph letters, 
official documents, and historical curios, pertaining 
chiefly to the history of Maryland, the Southern 
States, and the war between the States. Presented 
to the University in 1891 by Colonel J. Thomas 
Scharf, of Baltimore. 

Art, archaeology, and travels : the McCoy col- 
lection, of about 5000 vols., presented to the Uni- 
versity by John W. McCoy, of Baltimore. It is 
especially rich in illustrated works of the great 
artists. 

Periodicals : the collection of periodicals is note- 
worthy. It includes over 1000 journals received 
yearly, and there are complete files of about 500 
periodicals. 

Balttatore, Md. — Martlakd Historical So- 
ciety. (John G. Morris, D.D., Librarian.) 

The library of the Society is rich in original 
sources for the study of Maryland history, includ- 
ing:— 



Calvert papers: 1101 titles, purchased from 
descendants of the Calverts, and nearly all in us. 
See Fund publication, no. 28. 

Documentary history of the State of ICaiyland : 
850 vols. 

Records of seventeen parishes of Maryland, from 
1692 down. 

United States documents: an almost unbroken 
series from the First Congress. 

newspapers: mostly of Maryland, from 1728 
to date. A list was printed in the Magazine of 
American history, June, 1881. 

The Society has recently received an interesting 
series of eight photographs of the Calverts, from 
the originals in England. 

A catalogue of mss., maps, medals, etc., was 
issued by the Society in 1854. 

Baltlmore« Md. — Peabody Institute. (Philip 
R. Uhler, Librarian.) 

From the gift of George Peabody in 1857 has 
grown a library of 110,000 vols., now one of the 
best reference libraries in the country. There are 
5000 vols, in individual biography; 8500 vols, of 
special collections relating to English history, such 
as are issued by the Harleian and Camden Socie- 
ties ; 2000 vols, of Archives, Recueils, etc. relating 
to French history, besides 500 vols, on the Frenth 
revolution; 600 vols, on Egyptian antiquities; 
Shakespeare, 500 vols. ; Dante, 175 vols. ; and re- 
prints of rare English texts, Chaucer, etc., 450 
vols. 

There is no separate apportionment for any 
subject. The catalogue of the library is in 
course of publication, five volumes being now in 
print 

B^attj, Penn. — St. Vincent Collbos. (Au- 
gustine V. Muenkel, Librarian.) 

The more important collections in the library 
are: 

Holy Scripture and Exegesis: 2250 vols., in 
various languages. 

Theology : 8400 vols, and 450 pams., in various 
languages, with constant additions. 

Canon and civil law: 900 vols., with constant 
additions. 

Liturgies : 600 vols, and 160 pams. 

Philosophy (mental) : 850 vols., with occasional 
additions. 

Oreek and Laiin classics : 1800 vols. 

Dante: 240 vols., in various languages, many 
with illustrations. 

Historical works: 8900 vols, and 300 pams., in 
different languages, with occasional additions. 

Coins : about 5000, valued at $30,000. 

Stamps: about 5000, including a number, of 
rarities. 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



B«rkel«7t Cai. — Uniyebsitt of California. 
(J. C. Rowell, Librarian.) 

The Bacon collection of standard English litera- 
ture, 1410 vols., the gift of Henry D. Bacon, is note- 
worthy for its fine bindings in hand-tooled calf; 
458 Yols. are by Francis Bedford, 177 by Riviere, 
45 by Hayday. A catalogue of the collection was 
published as Library bulletin no. 8 in 1882. 

The library is rapidly being furnished with com- 
plete files of all periodictU liieraiure and the pub- 
lications of learned eoeieties, with the intent that 
it shall be in this respect practically complete for 
purposes of reference. 

A collection of over 1800 phoiographe of ancient 
and modem sculpture formed by John S. Hittell 
and presented to the library is catalogued in Li- 
brary bulletin no. 6, 1885. Additions are made 
irregularly by gift. 

The library also possesses a collection of eoine 
and medals, ancient and modem, numbering 1900 
pieces. Additions are made by gift. 



L, Penn* — Moravian Thrological 
Seminary. (Frank E. Raub, Librarian.) 

There are in the library about 1000 vols, relating 
to the history, doctrine, ritual and worship of the 
Moravian (Episcopal) church. 

Engravings and photographs of clergymen of the 

church are collected, and pictures of historical 

places. 

The Malin Library, named from the collector, the Ute 
Mr. Malin of Fhiladelphia, containing probably the largest 
collection of Moravian books now in existence, together 
with palntingt, etc., ibnns a part of the "Bethlehem 
Archives." 

BosttoBt Mom. — American Academy of Arts 
AND Sciences. (Henry Williamson Haynes, 
Librarian.) 

In 1790 the Academy came into possession of the 
library of Gov. James Bowdoin, its first president, 
containing many works on mathematics and Idn- 
dred subjects, and this may be said to have formed 
the beginning of the collection. The library now 
contains 2270 vols, on maihemaiic* and the phyei- 
eal scienceSt including, general works, 200 vols. ; 
mathematics, 800; astronomy, 850; physics, 810; 
light, 250 ; heat, 180 ; electricity, 220 ; chemistry, 
260 ; technology and engineering, 250. Works on 
light and heat are purchased by appropriations from 
the income of a fund given by Count Rumford, 
and in these two branches and in electricity addi- 
tions are constantly made. 

The Mcieniific periodical number 4750 vols. ; 
the publica^ons of learned eocieiies (mostly re- 
ceived in exchange for the Academy's publica- 
tions), 8020 vols. ; and ajironomical and meteoro' 
logical observations etc., and nautical almanacs, 
lOi^O vols. 



Boston, Mass. — American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions. (Rev. N. G. 
Clark, Librarian.) 

The library, numbering nearly 8000 vols., relates 
chiefly to Christian foreign missions ; it was com- 
menced before 1828, the secretary being authorized 
in that year to procure a bookcase and invest $50 in 
books. There are a few valuable mss. in the library. 

Boston, Mass. — Appalachian Mountain Club. 
(F. W. Freeborn, Librarian.) 

The library of the Club relates chiefly to Alpine 
and touristic literature and contains over 700 vols, 
and about 1000 pams. on this subject ; about 500 
of these are Proceedings of Alpine or geographical 
societies, obtained by exchange with corresponding 
societies since 1876. f 

The club possesses over 900 maps, and about 
400 photographs of mountain districts. 

Boston, McLss, — Boston Athenaeum. (C. A. 
Cutter, Librarian.) 

There are three important collections in the li- 
brary : 

Washington: 884 vols, that belonged to the 
President, also 421 vols, and 1019 pams. of Wash- 
ingtoniana, besides 389 separate portraits of Washr 
ington and 6 sheets of grouped portraits. Addi- 
tions are made as opportunity offers, from a fund 
of $8151. About one third of Gen. Washington's 
private library, left at Mt. Vernon, with other books 
collected by Bushrod Washington, were bought by 
Henry Stevens for a syndicate of Boston gentle- 
men who gave them to the Athenaeum. 

Byron : 206 vols, and 46 pams., bought of J. W. 
Bouton in 1885. 

Braun's carbon photographs after pictures in the 
European galleries; numbering 4818 at present, 
besides about 600 photographic copies of draw- 
ings by celebrated masters. An alphabetical list 
of 8898, with a chronological list under countries, 
was issued Jan. 1, 1890. More photographs will be 
bought for the collection. 

Boston, Mass. — Boston Medical Library 
Association. (James R. Chadwick, A.M., M.D., 
Librarian.) 

Founded in 1875, and has 22,000 vols, and 22,000 
pams., with an increase of 1500 vols, a year. The 
specialty of the library is in periodicals relating to 
medicine and cognate sciences, of which there are 
over 18,000 vols. 

Boston, Mcus. — Boston Society of Natural 
History. (Samuel Henshaw, Librarian.) 

The library dates from the foundation of the 
Society (May, 1880), and contains about 20,000 
vols., 1150 incomplete vols., and 9200 pams. ; it is 
rich in serials and in the transactions of societies 
relating to the natural sciences. 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



8 



Among the special coUectioiu mention should 
be made of the Greene (botanical), Emerson 
(botanical), Binney (conchological) , Mayo (con- 
chological), Harris (entomological), and Bailey 
(microscopical) coUections. The average num- 
ber of additions each year for the past ten years 
is a little over 2400, a very large proportion 
being obtained through exchange ; the income of a 
special fund of $10,000, given by J. Huntington 
Wolcott, Esq., in memory of his son Huntington 
Frothingham Wolcott, is spent for books and 
binding, also for maps, etc. There is no printed 
catalogue. 

The manuscript material, though not extensive, 
is important; among others may be mentioned 
the Binney (conchological), Abbot, Fitch, and 
Harris (entomological), and Hentz (arachnolog- 
ical) papers and drawings. 

Boston, Mcui. — Bubbau or Statistics of 
Labor. (Horace G. Wadlin, chief; Chas. F. Pid- 
gin, chief clerk.) 

The Bureau was established in 1870, and its li- 
brary of 9802 vols, is growing rapidly. Additions 
are acquired by a limited expenditure of money and 
by exchange of its publications for reports, official 
documents, papers relating to the lahor question, 
industricU affain, and Modal Mcience, and for #to- 
iisticcU publicaiiona of all countries. A catalogue 
is being prepared. 

BosAom, MeuM, — Conobeoational Libbabt. 
(William Henry Cobb, Librarian.) 

The following special collections have in many 
cases a historical as well as a theological interest. 

Early CongregcUional literature: 880 vols., 
mostly included in Dr. H. M. Dexter's bibliogra- 
phy to 1650 inclusive; 112 are rare originals prior 
to 1620, with 257 in tlie period 1620-50, and 11 ms. 
copies of rare works in the British Museum made 
under Dr. Dexter*s supervision. These manuscript 
copies are dated 1584-1620, and the matter in them, 
as well as that in many of the printed books, is 
invaluable to students of Brovmiem. 

Mather collection : 145 vols. , works of Richard, 
Increase, Cotton, the Samuels, and Nathaniel, and 
composite works. It includes a part of Cotton 
Mather's diary, supplementing other portions in 
the libraries of the American Antiquarian Society 
and the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Election iermons, Massachusetts, 1721-1880, 
177; Connecticut, 1751-1830, 110. 

Town histories : 1000 vols, and 2000 pams. 

Genealogy : 330 vols, and 820 pams. 

Church manuals : over 1600. 

Boston, Mass, — Dibbctobt Libbabt. (Wm. 
E. Murdock, Librarian, 155 FrankUn St.) 

Aims to get every directory and gazetteer pu^ 
lished in this country. The collection was begun 



by Mr. George Adams in 1846 and now numbers 
7000 vols., including some leading foreign cities and 
files of old directories of Boston, Albany, and other 
places. A catalogue was printed in 1880. 



McLss. — Gbnbbal Theological Li- 
bbabt. (Luther Famham, Librarian.) 

The library was begun in 1860, and now has 
16,000 vols, and 26,000 pams., strong in theology , 
thurch history, ethics, missions, commentaries, and 
reference books. It is for the public at large, and 
as far as known is the only general Christian library 
of its kind in the world. Its books have circulated 
in 500 towns all over the United States. There 
are special funds for additions which at present 
amount to about 750 vols, annually. Its reading- 
room receives regularly about 100 periodicals. 

BostoBL, Mass, — Lotal Legiok Libbabt. 
(Col. Henry Stone, Librarian.) 

The library of the Massachusetts Commandery 
of the Loyal Legion (about 2000 vols, and 500 
pams.) was begun in 1881, and the additions aver- 
age 150 vols, a year by gift and by purchase, 
$800 being the usual yearly appropriation for the 
library. Besides the literature of the Civil war, 
1861-65, should be mentioned a complete collection 
of Sanitary Commission papers, brought together 
by F. L. Olmsted, one of the organizers and for 
two years the general secretary of the U. S. Sani- 
tary Commission (425 nos. in 25 vols.) ; Northern, 
Souti^em, and English newspapers, 1861-65 ; scrap- 
bookb of matter relating to the Rebellion and to 
the companions of the Loyal Legion ; maps, chiefly 
of battlefields ; and a collection of over 11,000 pho- 
tographs, containing portraits of every general 
officer on the Union side and a large proportion of 
those on the Confederate side, with many views. 

BositoB« Mass. — Massachusetts College of 
Phabmact. (C. C. Williams, M.D., Librarian.) 

Fharmacy: 8000 vols, and 1000 pams., the 
Sam'l A. D. Sheppard library. There are aboat 
1300 vols, on pure pharmacy. 

Pharmcu!opasicu : 265 vols, embracing those of 
all countries published up to about 1890. 

Dispensatories and commentaries on Pharmaco* 
pceias : a very large collection. Also many Phar* 
maceutical association reports, and all the leading 
Pharmaceutical journals, American and foreign. 

Boston, Mcus, — Massachusetts Histobical 
Societt. (Samuel Abbott Green, Librarian.) 

The library, begun in 1791, covers American 
history in general, but purchases are mainly made 
in the line of New England local history, of which 
it has a large collection shown in the general Cata- 
logue of the Library, printed in two volumes in 
1859-60. Later accessions are recorded only in its 
manuscript catalogue. 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



lO 



Special attention has been given to forming a 
collection on the Civil war (1861-65), which now 
amounts to 1900 vols, and 4800 pams. 

The Dowse library, formed by Thomas Dowse 
of Cambridge, is a collection of best editions and 
rarities in English literature, mainly, with some 
examples of early Americana. A catalogue was 
printed in 1856 ; and again in 1870. 

The library has a cabinet of historical relics, 
coins, medals, etc., relating to New England per- 
sonages and events ; and its gallery of portraits 
embraces oil paintings, miniatures, and early en- 
gravings of many distinguished New Englanders, 
of the Colonial and later periods, besides some 
others not of New England. A catalogue of these 
was printed in 1885. The Society also preserves 
photographs of its members. 

The library also contains probably the largest 
mass of historical jfSS. possessed by any similar 
American society, going back to the earliest periods 
of American history, and includes the papers and 
notes gathered by James Savage, in the preparation 
of hiB ** Genealogical Dictionary of New England," 
and the collection of original papers and copies 
formed by Francis Parkman in the pursuit of his 
historical researches. A merely tentative list of 
these manuscripts, as they existed in 1868, is given 
in the Proceedings of the society, vol. x. p. 158, etc. ; 
but the MS. indexes kept in the library roust be 
consulted for better knowledge of them. A cal- 
endar of them is in preparation. Certain indi- 
cations of them will be found here and there, 
particularly under Massachusetts, in the appendix 
on MS. sources of American history in vol. viii. 
of the *' Narrative and Critical History of America." 



L, Mass, — Massachusetts Hortxcul- 
TUBAL Society. (Robert Manning, Librarian.) 

Has a library of over 6000 vols, and 6000 pams. 
confined to horticulture, botany, agriculture, and 
kindred subjects; besides 4000 nursery, seed, and 
other catalogues. Illustrated botanical works, 
those with colored plates preferred, have been 
specially sought for; a catalogue of plates is in 
preparation, taking first those not in Pritzers In- 
dex. A collection of the bulletins of agricultu- 
ral experiment stations in the United States and 
Canada will be made as complete as possible. A 
catalogue of the library was printed in 1878, and a 
card catalogue is being prepared. 

From the formation of the Society in 1829 to 
1869 books were purchased from the general funds. 
Beginning with 1869 the income of the Stickney 
Fund, amounting to $700 per annum, the gift of 
Josiah Stickney, Esq. ex-President of the society, 
with an annual appropriation of $300, has been 
applied to the purchase of books. Photographs of 
members are collected to some extent. 



The printed reports of the librarian give informa- 
tion of important additions as they are made. 

Bofltoiit Mass, — Massachusetts Institutb 
OF Techkoloot. (Clement W. Andrews, Li- 
brarian.) 

The library contains 25,000 vols, and 10,000 
pams. In each of the ten departments there is a 
very good working collection of books, chosen 
rather from the practical thnn the historical side ; 
and over 800 current periodicals, mostly scientific 
and technical. 

The following departments are especially strong : 

Chemistry, pure and applied: 8500 vols, and 
1200 pams. 

Engineering, particularly sanitary engineer^ 
ing, strength of materials, railroad and road engi- 
neering, and bridge construction: 8600 vols, and 
2000 pams. 

Modem physics, particularly electricity: 3000 
vols. 

Political economy (theoretical) : 1000 vols., the 
property of Pres. Francis A. Walker. 

Statistics: a large collection, deposited by the 
American Statistical Association. 

Boston* Mass. — Massachusetts New-Church 
Union. (Edward A. Whiston, Librarian.) 

The library, which is open to the public, was 
begun in 1864. It is primarily a collection of 
New-Church literature, containing 481 vols, of 
the scientific and theological writings of Emanuel 
Swedenborg in the original Latin, and in English, 
French, Oerman, Italian, Danish, and Swedish 
translations; 1037 vols, of the works of New- 
Church authors, and 327 vols, of New-Church 
periodicals. 

Boston, Mass. — Museum of Fine Arts. (Ed- 
ward H. Greenleaf, Librarian.) 

The library was established Jan. 16, 1879, and 
all the books, as well as many of the illustrations 
in them, are catalogued. In a/rchitecture and ar- 
chcBology there are about 750 vols, and 2000 pams. ; 
besides 647 vols, on architecture, the library of the 
late Alfred Greenough, and 300 vols, on arche- 
ology, the library of Mr. Edward Robinson, curator 
of Classical Antiquities, both which collections are 
at present deposited in the Museum. 

The Museum owns about 4700 photographs, and 
8600 prints ; the ** Oray Collection of Engravings,** 
numbering about 6000 prints and deposited in the 
Museum, is the property of Harvard University. 
A catalogue of the Collection, compiled by Louis 
Thies, was printed by Harvard University in 1869. 

The School of Drawing and Painting which is 
located at the Museum, also possesses about 700 
photographs and colored plates which are used by 
the students in the Decorative Class. 



II 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



12 



Boston, Masi. — New England Methodist 
HiSTOBiCAL Society. (Willard S. AUen, Li- 
brarian, P. 0. East Boston.) 

Was formed in 1880 to found and perpetuate a 
library of books, pamphlets, and manuscripts, and 
a collection of portraits and relics ol the post, to 
illustrate the history and promote the interest of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. This library has 
now over 4000 vols, and 16,000 pams., and an 
inrested fund of ^8 , 600. In Methodist newspapers 
and books relating to Methodism the collection is 
the best in New England. 

There are also many valuable manuscript his- 
tories of local Methodist churches and memoirs of 
Methodist ministers and laymen. 

A list of works in the library on Methodist 
church history is being published in the annual 
numbers of the Society's Proceedings, beginning 
with 1887. 

Boston, Mass. — Public Libkabt. (Theodore 
!F. Dwight, Librarian.) 

This library, the second in size in the United 
States, contains 660,000 vols. It is especially 
strong in fine arts ; architecture ; useful arts ; 
American history (particularly the Civil war) ; 
English history (especially county history and to- 
pogpraphy) ; genealogy ; literary history ; French^ 
German J and Italian; archaeology ; Egyptology ; 
and all departments of science. In its Bulletin 
since 1875 it has printed from time to time valua- 
ble notes on the literature of many topics, among 
which have been the following relating to the 
branches noted above: Costume, 1876, vol. ii. 
p. 348, and again in 1891, ix. 481; Ornament and 
decoration, 1875, ii. 889; Architecture, 1875, 11. 
429; Music, 1875, iii. 34; Numismatics, 1879, iv. 
429 ; Heraldry, 1879, iv. 29 : Renaissance, 1879-82, 
iv.-v. ; Trees and forests, 1879, iv. 31 ; Parks and 
landscape gardening, 1880, iv. 268 ; American local 
history, a check list, 1876-79, iii.-iv., and a list of 
material in historical collections, 1883-89, v.-viii. ; 
Boston in 1761-77, 1875-76, ii.-iii. ; America before 
Columbus, 1876, iii. 65; Early explorations in 
America, 1876, iii. 103 seq. ; Notes of Americana, 
1877, iii. 206; Early history of Virginia, Norum- 
bega, and the Popham Colony, 1877, iii. 269 ; News- 
papers of the 18th cent., 1879, iv. 106; Benjamin 
Franklin, 1882, v. 217 seq. ; French spoliations, 
1886, vi. 393; Genealogy, 1879, iv. 62 seq., 1891, 
X. 225 ; Mysteries and miracle plays, 1879, iv. 181 ; 
Eddas, 1884, vi. 74; Matthew Arnold, 1884, vi. 84; 
Rousseau, 1891, x. 81 ; Historical fiction, a 3d edi- 
tion, begun in 1892, x. 298 ; Spanish grammars and 
dictionaries, 1884, vi. 240; Mental philosophy, 
1876-79, iii.-iv. (unfinished) ; Ornithology, 1880, 
iv. 173; Electricity, 1892, xi. 48; Bibliography of 
special subjects, 1890, ix. 135. A statement in 



regard to the musical department made in 1871 
will be found in the Bulletin, i. 348 ; and a descrip- 
tion of the department of medicine in the Bulletin 
for April, 1872, U. 61. 

The following special collectionB should be 
mentioned : — 

Early New England history and theology (the 
Prince library) : 2935 vols. , collected by the Rev, 
Thomas Prince (1687-1768) and bequeathed by 
him to the Old South Church of Boston. Cata- 
logue printed in 1870. Among the mss. of the col- 
lection are the Mather papers, 1632-89; Cotton 
papers, 1632-86 ; and Prince papers, 1676-99. 

The Parker library, 14,116 vols., collected by 
Theodore Parker and received by the library in 
I860.* The collection consists of theology, the 
classics , magic, slavery, etc. The books on slavery 
are well supplemented by a large collection in the 
general library. The titles are included in the 
printed Supplement of 1866. 

Mathematics and astronomy (Bowditch library) , 
now 5609 vols. The nucleus of this collection was 
the bequest of Nathaniel Bowditch in 1858 ; it has 
been increased by members of his family, particu- 
larly by J. IngersoU Bowditch, who gave $500 a 
year during his life and left a bequest of $10,000 
at his death in 1889. 

The Ticknor library of Spanish and Portuguese 
books, 5981 vols., the bequest of George Ticknor 
in 1871, with a fund of $4000 for additions. A 
catalogue was printed in 1879. 

The Barton library of Shakespeariana and early 
and rare editions of English dram^ and poetry, 
also early French literature in choice bindings, 
13,740 vols., collected by Thomas P. Barton, and 
purchased by the library in 1873. See a prelimi- 
nary notice of it in the Bulletin, ii. 164; a cata- 
logue was printed in 1880-88. 

The Hunt library of works relating to the West 
Indies and slavery therein, about 700 vols., be- 
sides M88. and charts, bequeathed by Benj. P. Hunt, 
formerly of Port au Prince, in 1877. 

Benjamin Franklin : 465 vols. The nucleus of 
this collection was the gift by Dr. S. A. Green in 
1880 of 140 books and pams., with eighty different 
portraits and engravings. A catalogue of works 
written by, printed by, and relating to Franklin, 
was printed in the Bulletin in 1882-83, and' the 
Trustees desire to add to the library's collection 
everything not now included there. A fund of 
$2000 is devoted to it. A catalogue of the Franklin 
portraits in the possession of the library will be 
issued in 1892. 

Dr. W. E. Channing's library, 285 vols, and 2259 
punis., was presented by his heirs in 1871. It is 
principally devoted to theology, and illustrates very 
fully the phases of the Unitarian controversy of 
Dr. Clianning's day. 



13 



IN AMEHICAN LIBRARIES. 



H 



Mrs. Louise C. Palfrey has just presented 287 
irols. of works upon mxUiary history ^ intended as 
the foundation of a military collection, to he known 
as the Twentj-flrst Regiment library. 

Th^ Gen. SyWanus Thayer library of military 
science, 18S vols., received in 1872. Gen. Thayer 
was also the library's adviser in selecting the mili- 
tary books at the beginning. 

The Thayer library; 890 vols., given by Miss 
Eliza Mary Thayer of Rozbury, in 1877; after- 
wards increased by her sisters, ahd now num- 
bering 8963 vols. The collection is of a general 
character, but principally relates to English his- 
tory, particularly in the Stuart period. It includes 
many extrorillustrated books, containing several 
thousand portraits. A catalogue of the original 
bequest is given in Bulletin for April, 1879, iv. 58. 

The Tosti collection of engravings, given in 
1869 by Thomas G. Appleton, consisting of about 
10,000 prints, formerly the property of Cardinal 
Tosti. A catalogue of the portion contained in 
bound volumes (about 5100) was printed in the 
Bulletin, 1870, 1. 221, 270; a list of the framed 
engravings in Bates Hall will be found in the Bul- 
letin, 1872, ii. 47. A catalogue of the portraits 
was separately printed for sale. 

The John A. Lewis library of early American 
literature, the Mathers and other early New Eng- 
land divines, etc., including also a set of the issues 
of the press of John Foster, the first printer in 
Boston; 600 vols., the gift of Mrs. John A. Lewis. 
The purchases made at the Barlow sale and the 
books of this collection, have greatly strengthened 
the library in Americana. A catalogue will be 
published in 1892. 

Methodism: the library of the Rev. Chester 
Field was bought in 1864. 

The Patent library (4269 vols.) receives the 
patent specifications from the United States and 
British governments. The library also possesses 
a complete set of the French patent specifications 
and the German reports of late years. 

Congressional documents : a set based on the 
collections made by Peter Force, Edward Everett, 
and Josiah Quincy, and said to be the most com- 
plete in the country. The Index and Supplement 
to the Bates Hall Catalogue afford under '* United 
States'* an index down to 1866, which has been 
continued in a ms. index. The Parliamentary ses- 
sional papers of Great Britain are received as issued. 

For many years it has been the policy of the 
library to make special collections of newspapers, 
pamphlets, etc., in relation to notable current 
events, such as the assassination of President 
Lincoln, the election of General Grant, the death 
of Edward Everett, the Portland fire, the Humboldt 
anniversary, Decoration Pay of May 1869, the 
semi-centennial of the Odd-Fellows, etc. 



Boston, Mass. — State Boabd of Health. 
(Samuel W. Abbott, Secretary of the Board.) 

The library of the Board contains 3500 vols, 
and 2000 pams. on public hygiene, with a card 
catalogue only, and is for reference but not for 
general circulation. Some of the subjects treated 
are water-supply, sewerage, inspection of food and 
drugs, school hygiene, infectious diseases, disposal 
of the dead, offensive trades, health of workmen, 
and hygiene of workshops and tenements. 

There are included in the library full sets of 
reports of all the State Boards of Health, the Na- 
tional Board of Health, the medical officers reports 
of the Privy Council (England), the Local Govern- 
ment Board and the Royal Health Board (Gesund- 
heitsamt) of Germany ; health reports of cities and 
towns of Mass. and other places, American and 
foreign ; many parliamentary documents upon sani- 
tary matters; water-supply and sewerage reports 
of cities and towns of Mass. , with maps and plans ; 
American and foreign sanitary journals, etc. 



I, Mass. — State Library. (C. B. Til- 
linghast, Librarian.) 

Six important departments are very complete 
in the State* Library, and additions are continually 
made : 

Statutes of the United States and of all the states 
and territories. 

Laws of foreign countries: about 1900 vols., 
perhaps the finest collection in the United States 
except that at Washington, including the statutes, 
codes, etc. of the following countries, namely : 
Ajmeer, Antigua, Argentine Republic, Austria- 
Hungary, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Bengal, 
Bermudas, Bombay, Brazil, British Columbia, 
British Guiana, British Honduras, British Kaffra- 
ria, Canada, Cape of Good Hope, Central Provinces 
(India), Ceylon, Chili, Colombia, Coorg, Costa 
Rica, Cyprus, Denmark, Ecuador, ^tablissements 
Fran^ais de Tlnde, Falkland Islands, Fiji, France, 
French Guiana, Gambia, Geneva, Germany, Great 
Britain, Grenada, Griqualand West, Guadeloupe, 
Guatemala, Hawaiian Islands, Hayti, Heligoland, 
Honduras, India, Isle of Man, Italy, Jamaica, 
Jersey, Labuan, Leeward Islands, Lower Cali- 
fornia, Lower Provinces, Madras, Malta, Mani- 
toba, Martinique, Mexico, Natal, Netherlands, 
Nevis, New Brunswick, New South Wales, New 
Zealand, Newfoundland, North- West Territories, 
North- Western Provinces (India), Nova Scotia, 
Ontario, Orange Free State, Oudh, Panama, Peru, 
Portugal, Prince Edward Island, Punjab, Quebec, 
Queensland, Isle de la Reunion, St. Lucia, Saint 
Pierre and Miquelon, Senegal, South Australia, 
Spain, Straits Settlements (East Indies), Switzer- 
land, Tasmania, Trinidad, Venezuela, Victoria, 
Western Australia. 



15 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



16 



Reports of oi&cerfl of the cities and towns of 
Massachusetts : practically complete from 1866. 

Political economy : chiefly English and American 
works, about 2500 vols. 

Local history of Mcusaehusetts : about 2200 
vols. 

Genealogy : about 1100 vols. 

Brooklyn, JV. T. — Bbookltn Institute of 
Abts and Sciences. (Mary I. Crandall, Li- 
brarian.) 

The library, containing about 16,000 vols., is 
strongest in the following subjects : — 

American colonial history : 860 vols. 

Brooklyn, Long Island, and New York (state 
and city): 486 vols. 

Entomology : 600 vols, and 1500 pams., period- 
icals, monographs, etc. 

Geography : over 1100 works, containing a large 
collection of maps, globes, text-books, helps to 
teachers, books of travel and exploration, etc. 
Brought together as an educational collection, 
these books and maps were placed on public ex- 
hibition in Brooklyn and afterwards in New York 
and Boston, in 1891. A catalogue was printed in 
connection with the exhibition. 

A^dditions are made to all of the above coUec 
tions. The library has many first editions of 
American publications in history and literature 
from 1780 to 1840. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. — Long Island Historical 
Society. (Emma Toedtcberg, Librarian.) 

The society was organized in March, 186S, and 
is particularly rich in local history and genealogical 
collections, especially the older books, having over 
5000 vols. , not including English local history, of 
which there are several hundred volumes. Addi- 
tions are constantly made. 

Among the unpublished mss. in the possession 
of the Society are : a large portion of the papers 
of Henry Laurens ; the correspondence of his son, 
Col. John Laurens ; letters of R. H. Lee, Horatio 
Gates, and other eminent men of the period ; and 
a series of 123 original letters of Washington, 
recently printed by the Society. 



I, Maine. — Bowdoin College 
LiBRABT. (George T. Little, Librarian.) 

Of special interest are the collections of French 
public documents, 1789-93, 140 vols., the gift of 
Hon. James Bowdoin; of the works of Joseph 
Priestley, 96 titles (see General catalogue, 1868) ; 
versions of the Bible, 250 vols. (Catalogue of 
1868) ; and works relating to Maine and by Maine 
authors, about 1600 vols, and 2000 pams. The last 
two collections are increased by additions, espe- 
cially that of works relating to Maine. 



The library, for one of its size, is rich in col- 
lected travels, political pamphlets, English and 
American (1770-1810), and United States govern- 
ment publications. 

Buffalo, N. Y, — Buffalo Histobical So- 
ciety. (Geo. G. Bamum, Librarian.) 

The library, principally historical, biographical, 
and genealogical, was formed in 1862, and its addi- 
tions since then have been by donations and by 
exchange. 

Civil war : the collection of *■ * Lincolniana," made 
by the late Julius E. Francis, consists of 127 vols, 
relating to the history of the Civil war, 1400 illus- 
trated envelopes used during the war, 11,822 auto- 
graphs of soldiers and sailors, including members 
of the 43d Congress, and many relics. 

Bibles : Bibles, and parts of the Bible, in twenty- 
eight different languages. 

Newspapers : 1000 bound vols. 

The library of the Society includes also the pri- 
vate library of the late Mrs. Millard Fillmore 
(800 vols, and pams.), and that of Rev. Dr. John 
C. Lord (8000 vols, and pams.), besides many por- 
traits, and several cabinets containing coins, post- 
age stamps, Egyptian antiquities, etc. A catalogue 
is now being made of all the possessions of the 
Society. 

Buffalo, N Y — Buffalo Library. (J. N. 
Lamed, Superintendent.) 

Has special collections in the local history and 
local literaiure of Buffalo, amounting to 1047 vols, 
and 1912 pams., besides 38 maps. The library also 
has a rather notable collection of autograph manu- 
scripts and letters, chiefly of English anl American 
authors. Many of the mss. are of entire works, 
including, among others, the original of Emerson's 

Representative Men." 



ti 



Bnrllnston, Vt. — University of Verhont 
— George P. Marsh Library. (Henry A. P. 
Torrey, Librarian.) 

Of the 44,000 vols, now belonging to the Univer- 
sity about 13,000, once the private library of Hon. 
George P. Marsh, U. S. Minister to Italy, were 
purchased and presented by Hon. Frederick Bil- 
lings of Woodstock, Vt. Among these there are : — 

In Italian, including Italian dialects and philol- 
ogy, 2400 vols. 

In the literature and philology of the Danish, 
Swedish, and Icelandic languages, about 2000 vols. 

In forestry 140 vols., with other special collec- 
tions in physical geography, travels, the Catalan 
dialect, and other European dialects. Early Eng- 
lish, Dutch, and works on the Catholic church, A 
catalogue of the Marsh library, compiled by H. L. 
Koopman, is now in press. 



17 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



l8 



Gambridse, Mcu$. — Harvard Unitersity 
LiBRART. (Justin Winsor, Librarian.) 

♦«* Tlic distinction between the Uuivers«ity Library and 
tlio CoUcpe Library should be borne in mind. Tlie former 
embraces the College (or central) library', as well as the 
nine departmental libraries (Law School, Divinity School, 
Mu<eumf>, A»tronomical Observatory, Herbarium, etc.), 
eight laboratory libraric9, and thirteen claw-room or sem- 
inary libraries. 

Tho College Library (in Gore Hall). The 
collection relating to ^mert<;an history t biography, 
genealogy, and geography numbers 22,348 vols., 
of which 16,762 rehitu to the l/nited States. This 
is independent of contributions to American his- 
tory which may be contained in collections too 
general to be classed as Americana, and it does 
not include the official publications of the federal 
and state governments and of cities and towns. 
The basis of the collection was the libraries formed 
by Professor Ebeling and David B. Warden, the 
former the gift of Col. Israel Thomdike of Boston 
in 1818, and the latter presented by Mr. Samuel 
A. Eliot in 1823. (Nar. and Crit. Hist. America, 
vol. i. p. iii.) Pains have been taken constantly 
to fill such gaps as exist. The early ecclesiastical 
history of America, particularly of New England, 
so intimately connected with the civil government, 
is also not included in this enumeration, but will 
be found with the later history in the ecclesiastical 
department of the College Library, supplementing 
that in the library of the Divinity School. 

The collection of books and tracts illustrating 
the rise and growth of American slavery numbers 
869 vols, as bound, much the larger part being 
volumes made up of many pamphlets bound to- 
gether. In the subject catalogue the titles under 
the heading Slavery number about 2300. The 
collection is largely tlie result of the assiduity 
of the late Charles Sumner and of Col. Thomas 
Wentworth Iligginson. 

The Library has also a very good and growing 
collection of British local history and topography ; 
and that part of the collection illustrating specially 
British municipal history is represented in Biblio- 
graphical Contributions, No. 43, edited by Dr. 
Charles Gross, an authority in this field. 

In the sources of mediaeval European history 
the library has all the large or important collec- 
tions relating to countries as a whole, and many of 
the more useful and extensive documentary works 
relating to single cities and monasteries. The lat- 
ter branch of the subject has been much strength- 
ened by the recent gift of several hunlred volumes 
relating to early German history and law from 
Demnan W. Ross of Cambridge, and by the be- 
quest of Professor E. W. Gurney's private library. 

In the Roman or Civil law the catalogue of the 
Library shows about 950 vols. Professor Gurney's 
library has also notably iucreased this department, 



many of his books being still uncatalogued and 
not included in the number given above. Many 
of the volumes placed on the shelves under Roman 
political antiquities stand in close relation to this 
subject, but are likewise not included in the num- 
ber mentioned. 

The collection of United States Congressional 
documents numbers 28(X) vols., and is one of the 
most complete in the country ; many of the earlier 
and rarer volumes having been received with the 
Ebeling library. 

The collection of books by and relating to Dante 
numbers 1372 vols. In 1884 Professor Charles 
Eliot Norton gave the larger part of his valuable 
collection on Dante to the College Library, and 
since that time the Dante Society has made an 
annual appropriation for the purchase of books 
in this department. It has but little manuscript 
material, but of printed books it has everything 
of the first importance required by scholars for 
critical study, and a large proportion of the sup- 
plementary and expository writings on Dante and 
his times. No. 34 of the Bibliographical Con- 
tributions published by the Library is Mr. Wm. 
C. Lane's '* Dante CoUections in the Harvard Col- 
lege and Boston Public Libraries" (Cambridge, 
1890). This enumeration includes additional titles 
from the private collections of Professor Norton 
and the late Professor George Ticknor. 

A collection of books by and upon Milton, num- 
bering 278 vols. , is largely made up of one formed 
by the late George Ticknor. 

The Library received under the will of Thomas 
Carlyle his collection of books on Cromwell and 
Frederick the Oreai, numbering 422 vols., which 
are enumerated in No. 26 of the Bibliographical 
Contributions. At a later day some additions 
were made to Mr. Carlyle's own bequest by Mrs. 
Alexander Carlyle, and these books are noted in 
the University Bulletin, No. 62. 

The coUection of folk lore and mediaeval ro- 
manees number 5822 vols., and is supposed to be 
the largest in existence. Its Slavic section is 
remarkably good. Professor F. J. Child has 
based upon the collection his well-known English 
and Scottish Popular Ballads, the final edition of 
which is now nearly completed. There are in- 
cluded in the collection a very large number of 
Chap-books; and manuscript copies of all the 
important collections of popular ballads in the 
British Museum, which have not been printed. 
The large collection of French' popular ballads 
(with music) which was made by a commission 
appointed by Napoleon III. has also been copied. 

The collection of classics and classical philology 
numbers 17,848 vols., and is supplemented by the 
collection of the Classical Seminary in Harvard 
Hall, and by illustrative archaeology in the archae- 



10 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



20 



ological and art cUssiflcations of the College 
Library. 

The collection of Sanskrit literature includes 
about 400 printed texts^ about 500 mss., the gift of 
Mr. Fitzedward Hall, and about 500 more mss. 
purchased in India by Professor Lanman for the 
Library, Many of the printed books were given 
by the late Henry W. Wales, and his brother, 
Mr. Geo. W. Wales, has since annually given $200 
to increase the collection. 

The Library is well supplied, particularly with 
the older books, in all departments of theology 
and Biblical criticism. Including the collection 
in the Divinity School library, it probably excels 
any other in Unitarian theology and controversial 
works. It has a very fine collection of the rarest 
Bibles selected by the late George Livcrmore and 
Ezra Abbot, authorities in the bibliography of the 
Scriptures. Professor Abbot's private library was 
bequeathed to the Divinity School and still farther 
enriched this department. The collection of printed 
sermons probably numbers about 10,000. 

In 1888 Mr. John Harvey Treat presented his 
collection of works on ritualism and doctrinal 
theology^ numbering 687 titles. It is catalogued 
in Bibliographical Contributions, No. 36. 

The late President of the College, Jared Sparks, 
left his collection of manuscripts — mostly copies, 
but including some OQginals, such as the papers 
of Gov. Bernard, one of the royal governors of 
Massachusetts — to the Library. A calendar of 
them, and of other minor collections of papers 
relating to American history ^ constitutes No. 22 of 
the Library's Bibliographical Contributions. The 
most considerable collection of original manu- 
scripts in this field, possessed by the Library, is 
the papers of Arthur Lee, which were left to the 
Library in 1827; two other parts of the same 
collection being given at the same time to the 
American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia 
and to the library of the University of Virginia. 
A calendar of the portion in Harvard College 
Library is given in No. 8 of the Bibliographical 
Contributions. 

No. 6 of the Library's Bibliographical Contribu- 
tions (1879) shows part of the books and auto- 
graphs bequeathed to the Library by Hon. Charles 
Sumner. The collection is a general one, but 
embraces many books of curious and bibliograph- 
ical interest, and interesting autographs. 

The Library has some treasures in American 
aboriginal linguistics. Chief among them is the 
Abenaki Dictionary of Sebastian Basle, which was 
printed under the editing of John Pickering in 1833 
by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 
(see Bibliographical Contributions, No. 22, p. 8C). 

The linguistic contributions to the study of the 
Delaware and other aboriginal languages of the 



Indians living in the present Middle States, by 
David Zeisberger, a Moravian missionary, were 
given to the Library in 1845. See Bibliographical 
Contributions, No. 22, pp. 86-88, and the enu- 
meration in J. C. Pilling's Algonquian Languages 
(Washington, 1892). 

The most interesting of the manuscripts of a 
character other than American history — and the 
Library has a small collection — is perhaps a book 
in which the poems of Shelley when he composed 
them were written either by himself or by his wife. 
This manuscript is described, with a fac-simile of 
the poem *' To a Skylark," in Bibliographical Con- 
tributions, Nos. 30 and 35. 

The collection of loose maps is the largest in 
the country, numbering about 12,000 sheets, — the 
basis of the collection being that formed by the 
late Professor Ebeling of Germany, which came 
to the Library with his collection of Americana 
in 1818. It has been added to from time to time, 
particularly so as to complete the cartographical 
publications of the United States government and 
the ordnance surveys of the principal European 
countries. The collection of bound maps and 
atlases is also large (about 700 vols.), including 
such fac-simile collections as those of Santarem, 
Nordenskiold, etc. , and the printed editions of the 
early geographers like Ptolemy, Mela, Wytfliet, 
Miinster, Mercator, Ortelius, etc. In maps illus- 
trating the historical geography of America, the 
collection (to judge from a comparison made with 
its printed catalogue) is quite as good as that of 
the British Museum. Efforts have been made to 
procure all printed books which are useful in facili- 
tating the use of the collection. There is a ms. 
subject catalogue of the maps. 



Divinity School. (R. S. Morison, 



Librarian.) 

This library, containing about 23,000 vols., 
though mainly devoted to theology and Biblical 
and ecclesiastical subjects, is not limited to those 
departments. Its theological collection has already 
been spoken of above. A collection of the works 
of Joseph Priestley and the Greek Testaments de- 
serve separate and special mention. In both sub- 
jects the additional works in the College Library 
form important supplements. 



Law Scuool. (J. H. Arnold, 



Librarian.) 

The aim of the library of the Law School is to 
maintain and constantly increase a useful working 
collection for the benefit of the School. It pos- 
sesses a very large and valuable collection of 
works on the Roman law, an unusually full col- 
lection of treatises on Scotch law down to 1840 
(over 400 vols.), and a very good collection of 






21 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



22 



works on modem Oerman law^ especially on com- 
mercial law, of nearly 1000 vols. 

While the library is very complete in its reports of 
the various Courts of the United States and of foreign 
countries, it cannot be said to differ in this respect 
from other important law libraries in this country. 

In one respect, however, the library is believed to 
be exceptional, namely, in the quality and number 
of its editions of important legal treatises. Much 
care has been taken to accomplish this result, 
which is of especial use to students, writers, and 
investigators, who often find in an early or par- 
ticular edition of a work matter of especial interest 
and value, not to be found elsewhere. 

Museum of Compabatxvb Zool- 

OOT. (Miss F. M. Slack, Librarian.) 

This library, of about 22,000 vols., is almost 
exclusively devoted to zoology and geology. Its 
nucleus was the private library of Professor L. G. 
de Koninck, collected between 1835 and 1860. 
The books on embryology number about 300 vols, 
and 1000 pams. The entomological collection is 
described by Mr. S. H. Scudder in Bibliographical 
Contributions, No. 11, as the most valuable in 
America. It includes the private collection of 
Professor H. A. Hagen, and in 1880 contained 
about 2000 vols, and 3000 pams. It has many sets 
of the older magazines, many works of great 
rarity, and is particularly rich in papers on the 
Neuroptera and Pseudoneuroptera and in the bib- 
liography of entomology. In the College Library 
are some 500 vols, more relating to insects, mainly 
selected while Pr. Harris was librarian. The 
private library of Mr. S. H. Scudder should also 
be mentioned here ; it contained, in 1880, 765 vols, 
and nearly 2000 pams., and is particularly rich in 
works relating to Orthoptera and to fossil insects. 

The private geological and geographical library 
of Professor J. D. Whitney will eventually become 
a part of the Museum library. It consists of some 
10,000 vols, and contains many scarce pamphlets, 
the reports of State and United States geological 
surveys and works on geology, palaeontology, 
mineralogy, and geography. 

Peabody Museum of Amebicax 

Abchaeolooy akd Ethnolooy. (F. W. Putnam, 
Curator.) 

The library of the Museum (1232 vols, and 1340 
pams.) forms a useful working collection of books 
on archaeology, ethnology^ and dnthropology, but 
does not call for special notice. The principal 
anthropological and ethnological journals are regu- 
larly received. 

ASIBOKOMICAL ObSBBVATORY. (E. C 

Pickering, Director.) 

The library of the Observatory contains in all 
7000 vols., and is strong, through the exchange of 



its Annals, as well as by purchase, in the publica- 
tions of astronomical, meteorological, and mag^ 
netic observatories. Geodesy and physics (more 
particularly those branches connected with optics) 
should also be mentioned. 

The Observatory has a special fund for the main- 
tenance of a mountain observatory, and in connec- 
tion with this work provides its library with the 
literature relating to the geography of mountainous 
countries throughout the world. The collection 
of books in practical mathemaiics, including old 
astronomical treatises, is of some importance. 

The library at present is being put in more ser- 
viceable condition, arranged according to subjects, 
with accompanying lists. 

— LiBBARY OF THE GbAY HbBBABIUM. 

(B. L. Robinson, in charge.) 

This library contains about 6000 vols, and 3000 
pams. Its nucleus was Professor Asa Gray's pri- 
vate botanical library of some 1600 vols, and 
about tlie same number of pams., which was pre- 
sented by him to the Herbarium in 1864. The 
same year John A. Lowell also presented his 
botanical library of 350 vols. , including a number 
of works of especial rarity and value. 

The branch in which the Herbarium library is 
strongest is the systematic botany of phaenogams 
and icones illustrative of this subject. The col- 
lection of botanical periodicals is also very good. 
While the departments of cryptogamic, structural, 
and physiological botany take a secondary place, 
they are nevertheless represented by several hun- 
dred volumes and many pamphlets. For works on 
these subjects the College Library should also be 
consulted. 

Bibliographical Contribution, No. 9 (1879), is a 
list of the floras of different countries by Professor 
G. L. Goodale, almost all of which are either in 
the Herbarium or the College Library. 

Gaaton, JV. Y. — St. Lawbekcb UNrvEBSiTT 
— Hbbbino Libbaby. (Profs. C. K. Gaines and 
H. P. Forbes, Librarians.) 

Contains the Credner collection, 2850 vols., the 
library of Prof. K. A. Credner of Giesscn, Ger- 
many, formed between 1810 and 1865, and rich in 
works on dogmatic theology of the Reformation 
era; the Loveland collection, 600 vols., mostly 
philological, formed by Rev. S. C. Loveland ; and 
a large collection of Universalist periodicals and 
pamphlets of the period from 1800 to 1850. Whole 
number of bound volumes about 11,000, and nearly 
as many pamphlets. 

GarboiidAle, ///. — Southebk Illinois Nob- 
MAL Univebsity. (John T. Galbrath, Acting 
Librarian.) 

Began in 1883 to make a special collection of 
works on pedagogy and education in general. 



2.3 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



24 



1850 Tols. and 1000 pams. are now collected, and 
it is intended to make the University a centre in 
southern Illinois for this kind of educational in- 
formation. The library contains in all 10,286 vols, 
and 2214 pams. 

Camon City, Nevada, — State Libbaby. (J. 
Ponjade, Librarian.) 

The library, created by statute of 1865, has a 
very good law department; and all the Nevada 
newspapers since 1883, in 400 vols. 

A catalogue of the library appeared in 1890. 

Cedar Rapids, Icywa. — Iowa Masonic Li- 
bbaby. (T. S. Par V in, Librarian.) 

This is the oldest Grand Lodge library in the 
country, organized in 1844, and founded by the 
present librarian. It now contains 12,000 vols, 
of masonic and anti-masonic works, including 
the proceedings of all Masonic Grand Bodies of 
the world and many periodicals. Antiquarian re- 
searches and archaeology are well represented also, 
works on ruins, pyramids, temples, and the mound 
builders. There is a fair but varying appropriation 
each year ; by this means and by gifts the additions 
reach 300 and 400 vols, yearly. A full catalogue 
was printed in 1873 and a supplement in 1883. 

The library has about 100 mss., mostly of a 
Masonic character, a few relating to the early hiS' 
iory of Iowa ; also a large collection of masonic 
and government medals^ engpravings, and photo- 
graphs of masons, and autographs of distinguished 
men and masons. 

Charleston, S. C. — Chablbston Libbaby So- 
ciety. (Miss Anne £. Pinckney, Librarian.) 

Tlie library was founded in 1748, and has files 
of the loccU newspapers from the year 1732, more 
or less complete; including the Charleston City 
Gazette, 1788-1816; the South Carolina Gazette, 
1732-1786; South Carolina Journal, 1768-1774; 
and the Charleston Courier, 1803-1889. Of these 
files, numbering over 500 vols., a catalogue was 
printed in 1884. 

Cbioaco, ///. — Chicago Colleob of Phab- 
MAOY. (A. £. Hiss, Actuary.) 

The library (about 2000 vols.) consists princi- 
pally of books on chemistry, pharmacy, physics, 
microscopy, geology, and botany, and includes 
many old works. 

The standard reference books and very complete 
files of scientific journals and proceedings of so- 
cieties add much to its value. 

Chioaso, m, — Chicago Histobical Society. 
(John Moses, Librarian.) 

The Society, since its new building was erected 
in 1877, has increased its library at the rate of 
about 1500 vols, and 2000 pams. a year, and now 



owns 20,000 vols, and 45,000 pams. and papers, 
including 71 vols, of mss. There is a special fund 
for the purchase of books amounting to $13,500. 

In Western Americana there are 1300 vols, and 
2000 pams. ; and about one half that number of 
historical society publications and genealogies ; also 
3300 bound vols, of newspapers and periodicals. 

The Society has a large collection of maps and 
atlases, many coins and engravings, and 32 oil 
portraits. 

Cbioaco, HI. — Nbwbebby Libbaby. (W. F. 
Poole, Librarian.) 

Has special collections in bibliography, Ameri- 
cana, early printed books, and music. 

An entire musical library of Italian books at 
Florence was purchased, including many valuable 
volumes; these with large additions recently re- 
ceived make the musical library equal to any in the 
country. A detailed statement of works in this 
department appeared in the Nation, May 2, 1889. 

The library of a well-known collector in Cincin- 
nati has been bought, consisting of early editions of 
the Bible, Dante, Shakespeare, and other authors, 
with specimens of binding from the time of Grolier 
to Trautz-Bauzonnet and the modern French art- 
binders. 

Cbioaffo, III. — Public Libbaby. (Frederick 
II. Hild, Librarian.) 

The library contains abont 175,000 vols., the 
large number of books in foreign languages illus- 
trating its cosmopolitan character. Its collection 
of Bohemian literature, over 3900 vols., is proba- 
bly larger than any other in the United States, and 
its Scandinavian literature exceeds 4000 vols. 

The principal specialty of the library is its peri- 
odicals, numbering 19,000 vols., containing almost 
every periodical given in Poole's Index, with com- 
plete sets of many of the best foreign reviews, 
and the transactions of learned societies. 

In patents there is a complete set of British 
patents (including specifications and drawings) 
from 1617 to date ; also American, French, Cana- 
dian and German patent reports. 

The library is strong also in bibliography, Ameri- 
cana, genealogy, fine arts, general reference books, 
and the literature of the Civil War. 

Cbioaco, ///. — Univebsity of Chicago. 
( , Librarian.) 

The University has purchased the collection of 
books made by the German publishing firm of 
S. Calvary & Co., numbering about 60,o6o vols, 
and 40,000 pams. This library contains among 
other valuable material: — 

200 Mss. of the 8th-19th centuries, including 
three original letters of Raphael. 

1600 vols, in palcBography. 



25 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



26 



5,000 Tola, of the pablicationd of European 
learned iocieiies, Al80 many philosophical, phil- 
ological and scientific journals of Europe and 
America. 

5,000 vols, of Greek and Roman archtBological 
works. 

5,000 vols, of Greek and Latin eloMMtes, 

25,000 vols, of dissertations and scientific pa- 
pers, including a contplete collection of disserta- 
tions published from 1824 to 1863. 

A complete set of the acts of Parliament^ witli 
Hansard's continuation. 

Ctncinaati, 0. — Cuvibs Club Libkabt. 
(Chas. Dury, Librarian.) 

Zodlogy and ichthyology : donated by members 
of the Club, and from the library of Alexander 
Starbuck, Esq. ; additions are made to a limited 
extent. The Cuvier Club library is strictly one of 
reference ; it contains about 1000 vols. 

dacinaati, 0. — Histobical and Philosoph- 
ical Society or Ohio. (Mrs. C. W. Lord, 
Librarian.) 

The library has 12,000 vols, in American history, 
relating especially to Western and Ohio history y 
with the interest from a fund of $3000 for addi- 
tions. There is a card catalogue; a list of the 
Torrence papers — mostly letters of the first half 
of the century — has been printed in pahiphlet 
form (1887, pp. 21). 

develand, 0. — Adelbebt College of Wbst- 
bbn Resbbvb Ukivebsitt. (Samuel Ball Platner, 
Librarian.) 

The private library of Wilhelm Scherer, pro- 
fessor of the history of modern German literature 
in the University of Berlin until his death in 1886, 
now belongs to the College. It contains about 6000 
vols, and 1500 pams. on the philology of the Oer- 
manic languages and history of German litera- 
ture. The College has no special fund as yet for 
additions. 

There is also an excellent collection of French 

literature since the 16th century. 

Prof. E. W. Morley of Adelbert has a private Chemical 
library, of about 3000 toIs. 

Cleveland, 0. — Westebn Resebve Histori- 
cal Society. (D. W. Manchester, Secretary.) 

Prehistoric man : Col. Charles Whittlesey, the 
first president of the Society, was an authority on 
this subject, and the works on prehistoric man and 
the mound-builders are numerous and carefully 
selected. Lord Kingsborough*s ** Antiquities of 
Mexico " was presented by the late Leonard Case, 
who also contributed a notable collection of 2000 
Indian photographs. 

In maps, directories, autographs, and histories 
illustrating the development of Ohio, the library is 



very complete. It now owns also the private 
library of Hon. Harvey Rice, 180(>>1891. 

In a ''Historical sketch" of the Society, pub- 
lished by the secretary in 1888, will be found a 
detailed account of 15 vols, of mss. , mostly written 
before 1800; also a description of the newspaper 
files belonging to the Society. 

CliatiMt, N, T, — Hamiltok College. (Clinton 
ScoUard, Librarian.) 

Oriental travel and resectrch : many rare and 
old works collected by Edward Robinson, D.D., in 
1825-60. 

Classics: 1250 vols., given by Judge C H. 
Truax of New York. 

Education : 1000 vols. , the Danforth collection. 

Law : the Noyes law library of 5000 vols. , the 
gift of the late William C. Noyes, consists of all 
the American reports down to 1864, the English 
reports of law and chancery and in the exchequer 
down to 1860, all the Scotch decisions in the justi- 
ciary, session courts, and House of Lords, and the 
Irish reports in law and equity. 

Colles« Hill, Mass. — Univbbsalist Histobi- 
cal Society. (Thomas J. Sawyer, Librarian.) 

The library contains about 4000 vols, and 2000 
pams. The object of the Society is to collect and 
preserve books, pamphlets, and papers relating to 
the doctrine of the final salvation of the whole 
human race, and the controversies on the subject 
pro et con. By the will of the late Rev. Seth 
Chandler the Society received 650 vols, from his 
library, containing a large portion of the Unitarian 
publications of his time. 

The Society at present occupies rooms in Tufts 
College, but has no organic connection with it. 

CoBoord, Mass, — Fbbb Public Libbaby. 
(Ellen F. Whitney, Librarian.) 

The only special collection in the library is the 
** Concord Alcove," including more than SOO vols, 
and about the same number of pamphlets, written 
by Concord authors or about Concord and its 
people. Among these are most of the first edi- 
tions of Fmerson*s works, and several scrap-books 
relating to Concord local history. 

Conoord, JV. IT, — New Hahpshibe Histobi- 
cal Society. (Charles L. Tappan, Librarian.) 

Besides the town histories and publications of 
historical societies in the library there is a collec- 
tion of 1600 vols, made by Hon. C H. Bell, com- 
prising New Hampshire imprints and books relat- 
ing to New Hampshire and New Hampshire people. 
Additions are made to this collection, but no cata- 
logue has been issued. 

Among the msb. of the Society the most note- 
worthy are Ex-Gov. William Plummer's Genealog- 
ical and Biographical Sketches^ 5 vols, of about 



27 



SPECIAL COLLKGTIONS 



28 



600 pages each; Daniel Webster's papers, in 20 
vols. ; and the following relating to the Revolu- 
tionary war : — 

Gen. John Sulliyan's letters, 4 vols. 

Gen. Jonathan Chase's papers, 1 vol. 

Col. Timothy Bedel's papers, 1 yoI. 

Records Committee of Congress, 1780, 354 folio 
pages, 1 vol. 

Records Committee of New England States, 
1776-77, 1 vol. 

Concord, N. H. — State Library. (Arthur 
R. Kimball, Librarian.) 

Contains about 80,000 vols, in all, with a stand- 
ing appropriation for additions of $3000 yearly. 
American law reports are complete and English 
law reports are nearly so. The library has also 
very full sets of the laws and documents of the 
states and territories, the United States, and 
Canada. The library aims to make a complete 
collection of New Hampshire local "history^ and 
has already practically all the books upon New 
Hampshire biography and history that have been 
published, besides a good collection of pamphlets 
and maps relating thereto. 

Danvillot Ky, — Dakyille Theological Sem- 
iNABY. (Rev. John M. Worrall, D.D. , Librarian.) 

The library consists of about 10,000 vols. A 
valuable part relates to the Roman Caikolic contro- 
versy ^ collected by the late Dr. R. J. Breckinridge, 
who was at one time deeply engaged in controversy 
with the friends of the Roman Catholic Church. 

Dea Moines, la, — State Library. (Mary 
H. Miller, Librarian.) 

Contains 22,000 vols, of IT. S, documents and 
works relating to law^ with 11,000 vols, in general 
literature. An appropriation of $3000 per annum 
is made for additions; a catalogue appeared in 
1889. 

In M88. there are letters of Henry O'Reilly, 
1854-56, in regard to the survey of the Des Moines 
river and valley. Also the Aldrich collection of 
M88., autograph letters, engraved portraits and 
photographs, presented by Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Aldrich of Webster City. 

Dover, Del, — State Library. (John C. 
Gooden, Librarian.) 

Of the 19,000 vols, in the library over 8000 re- 
late to law. The library was begun in 1793, but 
has been principally formed since 1862. Additions 
are made by exchange and by purchase from an 
annual appropriation of $300. A catalogue was 
printed in 1881. 

Easton, Penn, — Lafayette Collegb. (F. A. 
March, Librarian.) 

Anglo- SoLXon and Middle English: a working 
library gathered since 1857 by Prof. March, and 



nearly complete for Anglo-Saxon. Early English 
texts and early editions of modern authors are also 
well represented. 

Church Fathers : from the fund given by Bei\j. 
Douglass of Chicago, in 1872 ; with special collec- 
tions of the editions of the authors edited for the 
Douglass series of texts. 

American history and biography: 2000 vols., 
many early and curious and some in foreign lan- 
guages ; also much biographical material, as auto- 
graphs, engravings, mss., newspaper cuttings, etc. 
collected by C. L. Ward, Esq., of Towanda, Pa., 
1840-1870. 

General Lafayette : a collection of portraits made 
by Pres. Cattell, and nearly complete in prints. 

The Ward library, 10,000 vols., has many small 
collections on Priestley, De Foe, Junius, etc. 

Evanston, ///. — Northwestern University. 

( , Librarian.) 

Greek and Roman classical literature and phi- 
lology : 5500 vols, and 6000 pams., being part of 
the library of Dr. Johann Schultze of the Ministry 
of Public Instruction, Berlin. These works were 
collected during a long public life ending in 1868. 
Small additions are made to the library out of the 
general appropriation. 

Gettysbnrs, Penn, — Theological Sem. of the 
GEN. synod of the Evangel. Lutheran church 
IN THE U. S. (Charles A. Hay, Librarian.) 

Contains a collection of Lutheran liturgies pur- 
chased by Mr. J. Harter of Canton, O., for the use 
of a committee appointed to prepare a Common 
Service for the English Lutheran churches in the 
U. S. 

The library consists mainly of old theological 
works collected in Germany by Rev. B. Kurtz, with 
some later donations and additions by purchase. 

In the Seminary building is deposited also the 
library of the Lutheran Historical Society, being 
the most complete collection in existence of Amer- 
ican Lutheran literature (including official docu- 
ments), in the English, German, and Scandinavian 
languages. The latest catalogue (1890) of tills 
library can be had gratis upon application to Rev. 
Charles A. Hay, Curator. 



S N, II. — Dartmouth College Li- 
brary. (M. D. Bisbec, Librarian.) 

The library, of about 72,000 vols., is strongest 
in English and American literature^ Latin and 
Greek authors and liter at urCf General history. 
Church history, New IJampshii-e history and laws, 
medicine, travels, and art. It has a collection of 
Websteriana, and several thousan:! old newspapers ; 
also papers (in ms.) of Eleazer Wheelock and of 
Gov. Wontworth, and the briefs in the Dartmouth 
College case. The income for the purchase of 
books is $1500 a year. 



29 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



30 



f, Penn, — State Libbart. (Wil- 
liam H. Egle, M.D., Librarian.) 

The library contains nearly 87,000 vols. ; of these 
30,000 Yols. are law books and Court reports, 10,000 
vols, are State documents, and 1500 toIs. relate to 
local history and genecUogy. In the latter subject, 
the private collection of the librarian numbers 
2500 vols. 

A general library catalogue, made in 1876, was 
printed in 1878; a new catalogue is now in pre- 
paration. 

Hartford, Conn, — Hartford Theological 
SsHnfART Library. (Alfred T. Perry, Libra- 
rian.) 

English hymnology : over 5000 vols., collected 
by Mr. Silas H. Paine of New York; the most 
complete in this country. Considerable material 
also in German hymnology and in liturgies. 

Luther: about 2000 vols., mostly purchased of 
Beck in Nordlingen in 1883. See his **Biblio- 
theca Lutherana." 

Schwenckfeldt : about 1000 vols, collected for 
Pres. Hartranft*s edition of the works of Schwenck- 
feldt. 

Facsimiles of ancient manuscripts: a rather 
good though not perfect collection. 

Bible polyglotts : an unusual number. 

The library has about 1000 vols, of Orientalia 
and Judaiea; a considerable collection of the 
Church fathers ; about 1000 vols, on music; and is 
relatively strong in sources for history (t . e. col- 
lections, etc.), and bibliography. 



Conn. — Library association. (Car- 
oline M. Hewins, Librarian.) 

English language: a collection of about 700 
pams. used by Noah Webster in preparing his Dic- 
tionary, almost all American and printed between 
1743 and 1834. He gave them to the Hartford Li- 
brary Company, which turned over its collection 
in 1839 to the Young Men's Institute, now the 
Hartford Library Association. They are deposited 
in the Watkinson Library, to be used only for 
reference. 

Hartfiord, Conn. — State Library. (Charles 
J. Hoadly, Librarian.) 

Law reports : a complete series of the English, 
Irish and American law reports (including Canada, 
New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, etc.). 

Statute laws : a pretty full series, with a remark- 
ably full collection of Colonial statutes. 

Connecticut: a fair collection of local history, 
and the ms. archives of the Colony in 150 vols. 
foUo. 

Also a very full collection of congressional doc- 
uments and a good collection of the writings of 
American statesmen. 



Hartford, Conn. — Trinity College Library. 
(Samuel Hart, Acting Librarian.) 

Protestant Episcopal Church: an almost com- 
plete collection of the Journals of the general and 
diocesan conventions (2200 nos.), and about 2500 
other historical pamphlets relating to the Church. 
Of these latter about 1000 are in a bound collec- 
tion formed by Bishop C. Chase of New Hamp- 
shire, and about 400 in a like collection made by 
Bishop Brownell of Connecticut. 

Theology: about 2000 English and Irish con- 
troversial pamphlets printed between 1700 and 
1840, collections formed by Dean J. Renncll of 
Winchester, and his father and grandfather. Rev. 
Caesar Otway of Dublin, and the Rt. Rev. Samuel 
Provoost, first bishop of New York. Also, a 
collection (86 pamphlets) formed about 1700 of 
tracts relating to Popery, mostly of the Restoration 
period. 

Liturgies: 225 vols, and 200 pams. with con- 
tinual additions. 

Canon law : 200 vols. 

Medicine: works published between 1600 and 
1750, 160 vols., the collections of Alex. Wolcott, 
surgeon in the French war, and Gershom Bulkley 
(c2. 1713), surgeon in King Philip's war. 

Oreek lexicons: 120 vols., fairly complete col- 
lection, with occasional additions. 

Mrs. Lydia Huntley Sigoumey : a collection 
of Sigoumey ana, not yet completed. 

Mathematics and science: Acta emditorum, 
complete; collected works of astronomers and 
mathematicians. 

English history: English state papers of the 
time of the Commonwealth. 

Haverford, Penn. — Haverford College Li- 
brary. (Allen C. Thomas, Librarian.) 

Society of Friends: over 1000 vols, and 400 
pams., the gift of various donors since the subject 
became a specialty in 1833. There are many 17th 
century editions of Fox, Penn, Barclay, Howgill, 
Parnell, and others, with six autograph letters 
of Wm. Penn. *' Anti-Quakeriana " are also fairly 
well represented. 



k, Mon. — Historical Society of Mon- 
tana. (William F. Wheeler, Librarian.) 

Of 2200 bound vols, and 1000 pams. a large part 
relate to the history and settlement of Montana ; 
mention should also be made of 800 vols, of Mon- 
tana newspapers since 1864 ; works relating to the 
Northwest; diaries of emigrants to Montana in 
1862-64 ; personal histories of 30 emigrants before 
the discovery of gold in 1860, taken down by the 
Librarian ; 2 vols, of contributions and mss. enough 
for four more vols. : portraits of early settlers. 

The Society receives all the Government docu- 
ments, numbering at present 1800 vols., and all the 



31 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



32 



newspapers of the State. In 1891 the collections 
and property of the Society were made over to the 
State, and the State now pays all the expenses of 
the Society, appropriating annually $750 for cur- 
rent expenses and $750 for each volume published, 
besides paying the salary of the librarian. The 
Society is still managed by its board of directors, 
who act as trustees for the State. 

Holland, ifiVA. — Hope Colleob. (Chas. 
Scott, President.) 

The library is making a special collection of 
works relating to Dutch history and literature. 

Indiaiiapolis, Ind, — State Library. (Jacob 
Piatt Dunn, Librarian.) 

The library is collecting the writings of Indiana 
authors, and all works bearing upon the history of 
the State. Indiana official publications are very 
fully represented ; a partial list was printed in the 
biennial report of 1887-88, and an almost complete 
list is given in the pamphlet of the Indiana His- 
torical Society devoted to that subject. 

The collection of United SiateM documents is very 
full from the 16th Congress to date. 

The library gives special attention to documents 
of the several states, and to state and national 
history; also to social science, agriculture, geog- 
raphy, and proceedings of learned societies. 

Ithaea* N. T, — Cornell Uniyerbity Library. 
(Geo. Wm. Harris, Librarian.) 

Is well provided in the departments of bibli- 
ography, mathematics (Catalogue, 1883), archi- 
tecture (Catalogue, 1882) , municipal and general 
American history, patent specifications, classical 
literature, and literary and scientific serials. 

The following special collections should be 
mentioned : — 

Oomparaiive and Oriental philology : 2800 vols. , 
collected by F. Bopp and known as the Bopp Li- 
brary. A catalogue was printed in 1868, but addi- 
tions have been constantly made since then. 

Folklore : about 800 vols. , chiefly from Eugene 
Schuyler, Esq., in 1885, when a catalogue was 
printed. Additions are made. 

Kant : about 100 vols. 

Rhato-Romanic literaiure and language : over 
1000 vols., including twenty mss. This collection 
was presented in 1891, by Willard Fiske. A cata- 
logue is in preparation. 

Slavery and anti-slavery: over 1000 vols, and 
2000 pams., with some letter books of the Frced- 
men's Aid Society in ms. The nucleus of the col- 
lection was formed by Rev. Samuel May. The 
additions are not large. 

Sparks coUcction of American history: about 
6000 vols., bought by the University in 1872, and 



increased by special grants and an annual appro- 
priation of $100 ; containing some manuscript let- 
ters of Washington and others. A catalogue of 
the Sparks library was printed in 1871. 

White historical library : over 20,000 vols., pre- 
sented by Hon. A, D. White. This collection re- 
ceives an annual grant of $800 for accessions. Of 
special note are : — 

Incunabula : 125 vols. 

Witchcraft and diabolism : 1500 vols, and pams. 
and 50 mss. A catalogue is in preparation. 

Torture : 150 vols. 

Reformation : over 1600 vols. Catalogue 1889. 

Thirty Years* War: 800 pams. 

Mazarinades : over 400 pams. 

French revolution: about 2000 vols., 8000 con- 
tempory pams. and many mss. A catalogue is 
nearly ready for the press. 

There is also a large collection of photographs, 

IfAiioaster, Mass. — Town Library. (Elatha- 
rine M. Marvin, Librarian.) 

In music there are at present deposited in the 
library 500 pieces of sheet music and 100 bound 
vols., by celebrated composers. A manuscript 
catalogue has been made. 

laawriiig, Mich, — State Board of Health. 
(Dr. Henry B. Baker, Librarian.) 

Has over 8000 vols, and pams. bearing, directly 
and indirectly, on public health administration 
and sanitary science. The library has been built 
up under the direction of Dr. Henry B. Baker, 
secretary of the board. A list of accessions is 
printed in the annual reports each year. 

liaimliig, Mich. — State Library. (Margaret 
Custer Calhoun, Librarian.) 

The library, comprising about 05,000 vols., con- 
tains a collection of the statute law of all the states ; 
also reports of the supreme and other courts in all 
the States ; United States and state documents ; and 
English, Scotch, Irish, and Canadian statute law, 
reports, and statutes. A catalogue was printed in 
1880, with supplements in 1883 and 1890. The 
library receives a biennial appropriation from the 
State ; but many of its accessions are obtained by 
gift or b^ interstate exchange. 

Lewlston, Me, — Bates Colleqb. (J. T. Stan- 
ton, Librarian.) 

Ornithology : a collection of 350 vols., including 
many expensive works and the leading ornithologi- 
cal magazines, has been made by Professor J. Y. 
Stanton ; and although not yet the property of the 
College the collection is open for the use of inves- 
tigators aa freely as if it formed a part of the Col- 
lege Library. 



33 



IN AMURICAN LIBRAKIES. 



34 



Iiezfnctoii, Mass. — Caby Libbaby. (Miss 
Florence E. Wliitcher, Librarian.) 

The library contuns no special collections of its 
own, but there is deposited here a collection of con- 
siderable value relating to the history of the town, 
and especially to the Battle of Lexington, includ- 
ing rare maps, sermons, and mss. This collection 
is, in part, the property of the Lexington Historical 
Society. 

lilnooln. Neb. — UifiyEBSiTY of Nbbbaska. 
(Ellen Smith, Custodian.) 

Chemistry, with 1200 vols., and the classics, with 
2000 vols., are the strongest departments of the 
library. Public documents number 1500 vols. 
The matriculation fees and occasional appropria- 
tions by the LegisUture provide for additions. 

IionisTllle, Ky. — Polytechnic Society of 
Kentucky. (Miss A. Y. Pollard, Librarian.) 

Has in its library 'nearly 50,000 vols., is strong 
in the various departments of science, and has 152 
vols, of Skakespeariana. From a lottery em- 
powered to sell tickets for *• Gift Concerts," part 
of the receipts from which were to be devoted to a 
library, $4,500,000 were realized ; of this $250,000 
were spent for books or invested in real estate. 
The franchise being exhausted, the property which 
could not be divided or sequestered was by consent 
of the Legislature transferred to the Polytechnic 
Society. The Art Gallery is valued at $25,000, 
and the Cabinets cost over $10,000 to the original 
collectors. 

Iiimett1rars« Vt. — Cutting's Libbaby. (Hi- 
ram A. Cutting, Librarian.) 

Has in geology 900 vols, and 1100 pams., and in 
medicine 4000 vols, and 2500 pams. , the latter col- 
lection having been begun by Dr. Dewey of Maid- 
stone. New works are added by purchase. 

Maoon, Oa. — Public Libbaby and Histobi- 
CAL Society. (T. S. Sanford, Librarian.) 

Has fully 200 bound vols, of local newspapers, 
dating from the foundation of Macon, about 1824. 

Madison, N. J. — Dbew Theological Semi- 
nab y. (S. G. Ayres, Librarian.) 

The Seminary Library has an interesting col- 
Aection of Methodistica, or first editions of Wes- 
ley's works and of the works of his opponents, etc. ; 
the original collector, George Osborn, was twice 
president of the British Wesleyan Conference. 
The works were brought together prior to 1875, 
and number 700 vols., 500 pams., and 16 mss., with 
some engravings of Wesley, Fletcher, Whitefield, 
and others. The collection of pamphlets used by 
Luke Tyerman in his biographies of the Wesleys 
numbers 3000. Many of them are not preserved 
elsewhere. 



Another collection of works relating to Method- 
ism has been received, containing the ms. of Dr. 
Adam Clark's Commentary, letters of the Wesleys, 
and of prominent Wesleyans from Clark to the 
present time. 

In hymnology there are in all 1500 vols., of which 
more than 800 were collected prior to 1872 by David 
Creamer, Esq. ; but no catalogue of either collec- 
tion has been printed. The library has also recently 
received accessions of early printed books. Nine 
Greek mss., and two Hebrew and one Syriac ms. 
belong to the library. 

Madison, Wis. — State Histobical Society 
OP Wisconsin. (Reuben G. Thwaites, Secretary ; 
Daniel S. Durrie, Librarian.) 

Since the re-organization of the Society in 1854 
the library has grown to 72,000 vols, and 74,000 
pams. Through the State appropriation of $5000, 
exchange of publications, and donations, the addi- 
tions reach 5000 titles annually. 

The «* Tank Library " of 5000 vols, in the Dutch 
language, the gift of Mrs. Otto Tank of Ft. Howard, 
Wis., was collected by her father, Rev. R. J. Van 
der Meulen, an Amsterdam clergyman. Theologi- 
cal and classical works are therefore many, although 
Dutch history, travel and jurisprudence are repre- 
sented. A list has been printed in the Society's 
Collections, and general catalogues of the library 
itself, in seven octavo volumes, have appeared 
since 1873. 

Manuscripts: the Lyman C. Draper collection 
of MSS., relating to trans-Alleghany settlement, 
and particularly to George Rogers Clark, Daniel 
Boone, Simon Kenton, and kindred border heroes 
is very large. It was acquired by the Society in 
1892, and is not yet accessible to the public. 
There are about 20,000 documents, many of them 
of inestimable value. The collection is described 
by Secretary Thwaites in his memoir of Draper ; 
vide Proceedings of the Society's 39th Annual 
Meeting. 

Another collection of mss., in 100 bound vols., 
relates chiefly to the history of fur-trading in 
Wisconsin. 

Skakespeariana : 1200 vols. 

British and American Patent reports : 6000 vols. 

The Rebellion : 3500 vols. 

War of the Revolution: 1500 vols. 

Political science : 2500 vols. 

Western history: A very large and valuable 
collection, embracing early travels, journals, etc. 

Genealogy and heraldry, over 1200 vols. 

Maps, numbering 1500, and 190 portraits in oil; 
with many portruts of early settlers. 

Newspapers: a valuable collection, including 
early Philadelphia and Boston papers, and nearly 
all Wisconsin papers from their inception. 



35 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



36 



See "Library Journal" for July, 1891, for his- 
torical sketch and description of the library, by 
Secretary Thwaites. 

Bfadison, Wis. — State Library. (John R. 
Berryman, Librarian.) 

This library, founded in 1836, is devoted to law, 
and is fairly complete in the general branches of 
law literature. About 900 yoIs. are added annu- 
ally by means of a yearly appropriation of $2000. 
The library now numbers 25,000 vols. A cata- 
logue is now in press. 



L« Wis, — University of "Wisconsin — 
General Library. (W. M. Smith, Librarian.) 

The Mimer collection of Norse sagas and Norse 
general literature numbers 850 vols. , largely the gift 
of the late Ole Bull. There is a limited yearly 
increase of the collection by purchase. 

Marietta, 0. — Marietta College Library. 
(R. M. Stimson, Librarian.) 

Americana : over 6000 vols, and 500 pams. relat- 
ing especially to the Mississippi Valley , including 
perhaps 1000 vols, on the war of the Rebellion. 

There are also many manuscripts and autograph 
letters of the period subsequent to the war of the 
Revolution. 

Meadville, Pa. — Allegheny College. (J. 
Ilamnett, Librarian.) 

The library of Allegheny College contains the 
private library of James Winthrop of Cambridge, 
received by bequest in 1821, and the library of 
Rev. William Bentley of Salem, who died in 1819. 
It also received in 1820 several hundred volumes 
from Isaiah Thomas of Worcester, almost all of 
them Amencan publications of the last years of 
the 18th century and the early years of the 19th. 
A catalogue of these tlirce collections and of other 
gifts was printed in 1828. 

Bfiddleto^vn, Conn. — Wesleyan University 
Library. (W. J. James, Librarian.) 

Methodists: 700 vols, and 1000 pams. on the 
early liistory of the Wesleyan denomination in 
England, bought in 1876 through B. F. Stevens of 
London. 

American history : about 5500 vols. , purchased 
chiefly with funds raised by the friends of the late 
Hon. Moses F. Odell in 1868. Considered at the 
time the books were brought together to be a col- 
lection of some importance, but the additions since 
that time have been scanty. 

Minneapolis, Minn, — Public Library. 
(James K. Hosmer, Librarian.) 

Periodical literature of Great Britain and the 
United States makes a collection of about 5000 
vols. , to which additions will be made constantly 
with a view to its forming the most serviceable 



department in the library. Of medical serials of 
Great Britain there are about 1 200 vols. Mr. Joseph 
Francis, the founder of the life-saving service, has 
signified his intention of presenting to the library 
his collection of pamphlets, documents, and mss., 
all bearing on the life-sewing service, 

Montpelier, Vt, — State Library. (Hiram 
A. Hnse, Librarian.) 

Tills is primarily a legislative and Icuw library ; 
with a general annual appropriation of $800 for 
purchase. A catalogue was issued in 1890. 

There are about 300 vols, in the library on Ver- 
mont history, including in two or three cases com- 
plete files of Vermont newspapers going back to 
1783. 

Morgan Park, lU, — Baptist Union Theo- 
logical Seminary. (Mrs. Zella A. Dixson, 
Librarian.) 

The private library of Dr. E. W. Hengstenberg, 
professor in the university of Berlin, numbering 
10,000 vols., is now a part of the Seminary library. 
It is especially rich in works of German theology 
and philosophy. 

The library of the American Bible Union, 8000 
vols., collected by Dr. T. J. Conant while trans- 
lating the Bihle, is the gift of Dr. T. M. Colwell 
to the Seminary. It is regarded as the finest trans- 
lotion collection in existence, and contains many 
of the old and celebrated Bibles. 

This institution has now become the Divinity 
School of the University of Chicago, and its library 
will be transferred to the University buildings in 
Chicago in October, 1892. 

Newark, iV. J, — New Jersey Historical So- 
ciety. (F. W. Ricord, Librarian.) 

The library of tlie Society, consisting of about 
13,000 vols, and many pams., has not been devoted 
to any special subject. It possesses copies of 
English state papers relating to the Colonial histoiy 
of the State, which, as well as the State archives, 
it has published. 

The Secretary of the Society, however, Mr. W. 
R. Weeks, has collected in his private library sev- 
eral thousand books and pamphlets relating to New 
Jersey, also New Jersey imprints before 1800, from 
which he intends eventually to compile a bibliog- 
raphy of the State. lie also has a large number 
of books and pamphlets relating to the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, and a good collection of 
Colonial and American coins and medals, including 
also about one hundred of all ages and countries 
relating to fires and firemen. The latter medals 
are to be used in illustrating a " Medallic History 
of Fires and Firemen," now in course of prepara- 
tion by Mr. Weeks. 



37 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



38 



Neir Bedford, Mdss. — Fbee Public Library. 
(Robert C. Ingraham, Librarian.) 

Is strong in English history , English and Ameri- 
can local history^ genealogy ^ and in matter relating 
to the Quakers, Additions in these subjects are 
constantly made, but no catalogue has yet been 
issued. Many of the books on the Quakers were 
received from Wm. J. Rotch about the year 1870. 
They formed a portion of the library of the late 
James Arnold. 

Neir Bnuiawlok, N. J. — Theological Semi- 

KART OF THE REFORMED ChURCH. — SaOB LI- 
BRARY. (Dr. John C. Van Dyke, Librarian.) 

From the libraries of the Dutch dominies of early 
New York the Seminary received a large collection 
of works pertaining to Dutch theology and literor 
ture. This collection is constantly increased, num- 
bering at present 5000 vols. The following sub- 
jects are also wortliy of notice : — 

Heidelberg caiechism : 200 vols. 

Synod of Dort : 200 vols. 

Arabic : 150 vols., with 30 vols, of msb. in Arabic 
and Coptic, relating to liturgies, hymns, Coptic 
church history, etc. 

President Garfield, sermons on his death : 180, 
presented by Rev. T. W. Chambers. 

Ecclesiastical history : 8000 vols. 

Bible versions : 1500 vols. 

For an interesting account of the Sage library 
see the '* Christian Intelligencer,'* July 4th, 11th, 
and 18th, 1888 ; also printed separately. 

Neir Haven, Conn. — American Oriental 
Society. (Addison Van Name, Librarian.) 

The library of the Society is devoted to Oriental 
literature, languages, history, etc., and numbers 
4550 titles of printed books and 177 mss. It has 
grown gradually since 1842, but, the source of its 
additions being principally gifts and exchanges for 
the Journal of the Society, it is not evenly devel- 
oped. It is noteworthy, however, for its long sets 
of the publications of learned societies. The li- 
brary has received the collection of the Hon. C. W. 
Bradley on India, China, etc., catalogued in the 
Journal, YII. xvi., VIII. xzxvi., Ixzii., and the 
collection of Dr. J. P. Thompson on Egypt, a cata- 
logue of which was also printed in the Journal, 
XI. zcii. 

New Haven, Conn, — New Haven Colony 
Historical Society. (D wight £. Bowers, Li- 
brarian.) 

Connecticut local history: 800 vols, and many 
pamphlets collected since 1863. Includes the Dix- 
well and Stiles papers ; a ms. history of East Ha- 
ven, Conn., by the late Rev. D. William Havens; 
and Guilford genealogies, by Alvan Talcott, M.D. 



Genealogy : 850 vols. Additions are constantly 
made to both collections, but it is only recently 
that systematic efforts to develop and increase 
them have been made. 

Neir Haven, Conn, — Yale University Li- 
brary. (Addison Van Name, Librarian.) 

The library has notable collections in the follow- 
ing departments : — 

Oriental languages and literature: the Salis- 
bury collection of 4000 vols, contains sets of the 
leading Oriental journals, the large works on 
Egypt, such as those of the French expedition, 
Champollion, Rossellini, and Lepsius, and is espe- 
cially full in Arabic and Sanskrit texts, including 
90 Arabic mbs. The collection was formed by 
Prof. Edward E. Salisbury, and given by him in 
1870 (then containing about 3000 vols.), together 
with the sum of $8000, which was expended for its 
increase. 

Chinese literature: 3000 vols., the gift of Hon. 
Yung Wing in 1878, of F. W. Williams in 1884 
(the collection of Prof. S. Wells Williams), and 
of F. E. Woodruff in 1891. The collection In- 
cludes a complete series of the dynastic histories 
of China, bound in 217 vols., and other large 
works. 

Japanese literature : 3000 vols., the gift of Prof. 
0. C. Marsh and F. W. Stevens in 1873. 

Russian literature: 3000 vols., containing, gen- 
eral periodicals and society publications, 1500 vols. ; 
literature, 400 vols. ; history and geography, 250 
vols. ; language, including other Slavonic tongues, 
250 vols. ; bibliography, 180 vols. 

CongregationcU history and polity and the his- 
tory of the Pilgrims : containing especially the 
collection of Rev. Henry M. Dexter, D.D., 1850 
vols., gathered between 1850 and 1890, and be- 
queathed by him to the University. In the biblio- 
gn'aphical appendix to his *' Congregationalism as 
seen in its literature," 1880, such of the books as 
were then in his collection were indicated. 

French drama : 5800 plays, separately published 
between 1770 and 1865 ; a collection made by Baron 
Lagrange, afterwards in the possession of Charles 
Reade. 

A large collection of the publications of learned 
societies and scientific journcUs, including many 
complete series ; also about 5000 vols, of the Eng- 
lish periodicals included in Poole*s Index, or five 
sixths of the whole number, besides many others ; 
of the eighteenth century alone 170 periodicals. 

The library possesses the mss. of President Ezra 
Stiles in 50 vols., including his Literary Diary, 
1769-1795, 15 vols., and his Itineraries and Me- 
moirs, 1760-1794, 6 vols. 

The following subjects also deserve mention: 
American history, both general and local ; Ameri- 



39 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



40 



can genecUogy, 700 yoIb., or, including the local 
histories containing genealogies and indexed in 
Dnrrie, 1000 vols. ; United States congressional 
documents^ the series complete since 1825 and for 
the earlier period reasonably full; meteorology ^ 
including the collection of Prof. Elias Loomis 
received in 1889; newspapers, 2500 bound vols, 
and many unbound files; pamphlets^ especially 
theological and political, 2000 bound vols, and a 
much greater number unbound. 

The University has a collection of coins, num- 
bering about 14,000 pieces, formed largely out of 
the collections of Henry Champion, Dr. Andrew T. 
Pratt, Dr. Jonathan Edwards, and C. Wyllys Betts. 
A catalogue of the Greek and Roman coins (now 
4000 pieces) was published in 1880. 

Law School Librart. (John A. 



Robinson, Librarian.) 

The bulk of the library (about 9000 vols.) is 
composed of American, English, Irish, and Cana- 
dian law reports, statutes, and digests. About 
1000 vols, of the Annals of Congress and American 
political history, 100 vols, on civil law, and 150 
vols, of special laio trials. The original ms. 
records (20 vols.) of all cases decided in the 
Connecticut supreme court of errors are preserved 
in this library. 

Sheffield Scientific School. 

In mathematics is included the collection of Dr. 
William Hillhouse, about 3000 vols., chiefly devoted 
to pure mathematics, which was purchased in 18G9. 
A catalogue was published in the Eighth annual 
report of the Sheffield Scientific School, 1869-70. 

DrviwiTT School. Church music : 



the library of Dr. Lowell Mason, presented by his 
family in 1873, about 8000 titles, divided about 
evenly between sacred and secular music. It in- 
cludes the collection of Dr. C. H. Rinck of Darm- 
stadt, with many mss. 

Foreign missions: a collection recently begun 
by Prof. George E. Day, which contains now nearly 
2000 vols, and receives continual additions. A 
catalogue was printed in January, 1892. 

New Haven, Conn. — Youno Men's Insti- 
tute. (W. A. Borden, Librarian.) 

Music: about 400 vols., principally classical 
piano music purchased in 1888. A catalogue was 
printed tlie same year, and additions are constantly 
made, but not from special funds. 

The collection of biography, numbering some 
1500 vols., while not large in itself has been cata- 
logued by country and date of birth and death, so 
that the catalogue shows all the biographies on 
hand covering any year or period of history. 

The library is planning for a collection of photo- 
graphs, mostly amateur work, the prints to be 



mounted on 9 X 11 cards, and arranged, in card 
catalogue style, according to a regular scheme of 
classification. 

New Tork, N. T. — American Bible Society. 
(Edward W. Gilman, Librarian.) 

Has a collection of Bibles in all languages, num- 
bering 4750 vols., and increased by gradual acces- 
sions since 181C. This includes : — 

The Revision library, collected 1871-188G for 
the use of the American Revision Committee, by 
Dr. Philip SchaflF: 150 vols. 

New versions or revisions of the Bible in English : 
250 vols. 

Scriptures in many tongues ; with Chinese and 
Japanese very fully represented. Also histories 
of the printed Bible, reports of Bible and mis- 
sionary societies, etc. 

• There are ten mss. in Hebrew, Syriac, Slavic, 
Armenian, etc. in the library. 

Annual lists of accessions are given in the Reports 
of the American Bible Society. 

NewTork, iV. K — American Geographical 
Society. (Geo. C. Hurlbut, Librarian.) 

The Society has about 23,000 vols., collected 
since 1855; consisting of geographical works, 
voyages, travels, and transactions and bulletins of 
Geographical societies. There is also a collection 
of atlases of the 17th and 18th centuries; and 
charts, principally of the U. S. government. Addi- 
tions are constantly made by contributions and ex- 
change, and by a yearly appropriation. 

New Tork« N. K — American Museum of 
Natural History. (Anthony Woodward, Ph.D., 
Librarian.) 

Conchology: 10(50 vols., the collection of Dr. 
J. C. Jay, given by the late Catherine Lorillard 
Wolfe, and kept up to date. 

Ichthyology : 900 vols, and 700 pams., collected 
by J. Carson Brevoort and presented by Robert L. 
Stuart. Additions were made up to 1876. 

Ornithology : 1000 vols, and 675 pams., col- 
lected by D. G. Elliot and presented by Cornelius 
Yanderbilt and Percy R. Pyne. 

Voyages and travels, between 1751 and 1855: 
350 vols. , from Hon. Hugh J. Jewett. 

PdUeontology and geology: 860 vols, and 912 
pams., collected by Prof. R. P. Whitfield and pur- 
chased by the trustees. 

Entomology : over 300 works, presented by C. T. 
Robinson and J. Carson Brevoort. 

Americana ; voyages, travels, entomology, and 
general natural history: about 9500 vols., pre* 
sented by Mrs. M. Sclmyler Elliot. 

Botany and microscopy : 100 vols., presented by 
Alexander I. Cotheal. 



41 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



42 



New Tork« JV. K — Ambbican Numismatic 
AVD Abchaeolooical Society. (Bauman L. 
Belden, Librarian.) 

The library numbers about 3600 vols. ; of these 
about 2500 relate to coins and medals, and a small 
number to archaeology. Periodicals germain to 
the subject are taken. A catalogue, including a 
subject index to the important articles in numis- 
matic periodicals, appeared in 1883. 

New York, N. Y. — Amebican Society of 
Civil Engineebs. (F. Collingwood, Secretary.) 

The Society has a large collection of works on 
the history of engineei'ing j with special reference 
to the early history of engineering in the United 
States ; also reports of railroads and other public 
works as given by pioneers in the profession, as 
well as current reports of a similar character. 

All the standard engineering periodicals, foreign 
and American, are received; and photographs of 
engineers and of their works are preserved by the 
Society. There are a few vols, of ms. memoranda 
given by members of the profession. 

A catalogue of the raHroad section of the library 
was issued in 1880. 

Neir York, N. Y. — Appbehtices Libraby. 
(J. Schwartz, Librarian.) 

ArckUeciure: 180 vols., forming at one time a 
part of the private library of the late J. Morgan 
Slade of New York. The books are for reference 
only. 

New York« N. Y. — Astob Libbaby. (Ro1> 
bins Little, Superintendent.) 

There are about 30 mss. in the library, the ear- 
liest 870 A.D. ; and of tarly printed books over 
600. Piolemy*s Geography is represented by 16 
editions, the earliest printed in 1478. The printed 
catalogue, in 8 'vols., comes down to the close of 
1880. 

New York, N. F. —Catholic Club. (J. Tho- 
ron, organizer.) 

Most of the funds obtained from the Club arc 
spent for books on the history of the Roman church 
in America and for English literature. 

The library, which now contains nearly 20,000 
vols., is especially rich in theological works, and 
in works on Ireland and in the Irish language^ 
in which departments it is considered one of the 
best in the country. 

It is also strong in works of the 16th and 16th 
centuries, with fine and rare engravings on cop- 
per ; with a number of illustrated works on the fine 
and ornamental arts, and some books on the numis- 
matics of the crusaders. All the members are lay- 
men, but the library is open to the clergy and schol- 
ars of every denomination for consultation free of 
charge. 






New York, JV. K — College of Phabmacy 
OP the City op New Yobk. (Charles Rice, 
Librarian.) 

Contains in its library about 600 vols, on botany, 
pharmacognosy, and allied branches, and about 
2000 each on chemistry and pharmacy, mostly col- 
lected since 1870. Additions of new works are con- 
stantly made, and a catalogue was printed in 1891, 
containing an index of subjects. 

An interesting private library of some 1200 works on the 
early hUtory 0/ medicine , including Arabic, Sanskrit, Chi- 
nese, Japanese, modem Indian (Hindu) and other aatliors, 
has been collected by the librarian of the College of Pharmacy. 

New York, N, Y. — Columbia College Li- 
bbaby. (Goo. H. Baker, Librarian.) 

Goethe ; 733 vols. 

Mary Queen of Scots: 277 vols., collected and 
given by Gen. J. Watts De Pcystor, by whom addi- 
tions are still made. 

Herodotus: 27G vols., largely the gift of S. W. 
Phoenix, Esq. 

Shakespeare : 706 vols. 

Dante : 281 vols. 

Kant: 282 vols. 

Machiavelli : 120 vols. 

Milton: 110 vols. 

Avery architectural library : 8000 Tols. 

Railroads: 575 vols. 

Labor : 494 vols. 

Socialism : 803 vols. 

United States constitutional law: 389 vols. 

Economic periodicals : 906 vols. 

Administrative law and local administraHon : 
1419 vols. 

The library of the Huguenot Society of America, 
devoted to the history and literature of the Hugue- 
nots is deposited here. A catalogue embracing 
657 vols, was printed in 1890. 

New Tork, N. K — Holland Society. (Theo- 
dore M. Banta, Secretary.) 

A collection of the works of Orotius and of works 
relating to him, 258 vols., was presented to the So- 
ciety in 1890 by its President, Hon. R. B. Roosevelt ; 
it had been purchased from a bookseller in Amster- 
dam the same year. A reprint of the bookseller's 
list was printed as a catalogue of the collection. 

The Society also possesses ms. copies of the 
existing records of membership, marriages, and 
baptisms of about thirty of the early Dutch Re- 
formed churches of America from their origin to 
the beginning of this century. 

Neir York, N.Y. — Lbhoz Libbaby. (— , 

Superintendent.) 

The library was chartered in 1870, and contains 
now about 70,000 vols. It is noted for the special 
collections of rare books and manuscripts made by 



43 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



44 



Mr. James Lenox during a period of more than 
thirty years. 

English Bibles : about 2200 vols. , comprising a 
remarkably full series of editions dating from 1535, 
editions of the New Testament from 1534, editions 
of the Psalms, including metrical versions, from 
1508, and other parts of the Bible from 1493. 

Bibles in other languages : about 1200 vols., 
comprising a selection of the earliest, rarest, and 
most noted editions, in over one hundred languages, 
including all the great Polyglots. This department 
contains five copies of Eliot's Indian Bible, with 
variations, and two copies of the Indian New 
Testament. 

Americanay Early Voyages and Travels : about 
6000 vols., mostly printed before 1700. This de- 
partment is exceptionally rich in the rarer books 
relating to America, its discovery and colonization. 
It contains very full collections of the early printed 
letters of Columbus, Vespucius, and Cortes, in 
their various editions, with the literature relating 
to them ; special collections of Las Casas, Gomara, 
Acosta, and other Spanish writers. Sir Walter 
Ralegh, Sir Francis Drake, Capt. John Smith, 
English works on New England and Virginia, Dutch 
publications on New Nether land, editions of Hen- 
nepin, Esquemelin and works on the Buccaneers, 
the works of Lescarbot, Champlain, and other early 
writers on Canada. The set of Jesuit Relations of 
New France is the most complete in existence, em- 
bracing nearly every edition and variety. The 
collection of early OHental travels includes many 
of the primitive editions of Marco Polo, Mande- 
ville, Peter van Suchen, Breydenbach, Barthema, 
Castanheda, Barros and Couto, Herbestain, etc. 
There is a very full collection of editions of 
Gonzalez de Mendoza's China, Ptolemy's Geog- 
raphy is represented by nearly every edition, be- 
ginning with the Bologna edition of 1462. Among 
the general collections of voyages and travels 
are remarkably full sets of Grynaeus, Ramusio, 
Hakluyt, Ilulsius and Hulsiana, Linschotcn, Schou- 
ten, Hartgers, Bontekoe and Raven, Spilbergen, 
De Veer, Thevenot and Thevenotiana, etc., in 
nearly every edition and variety. There is also an 
extraordinary set, or rather several sets, of the 
De Bry Collection of voyages ^ including the famous 
Rothelln, Albani, and Sobolewski copies, and a 
series of other works published by the De Bry. 

Incunabula : a very choice and valuable collec- 
tion of block books, illustrating the beginnings of 
printing, and containing various editions of the 
Biblia pauperum, the Ars moriendi, the Apoca- 
lypsis, the Speculum salutis, the Ars memorandi, 
Donatuses, etc. ; also a collection of the oldest and 
most notable books from the first printing presses 
established in Germany, Italy, France, Holland, 
and other parts of Europe. Among these afe a 



beautiful copy of the Mazarine or Gutenberg Bible 
of 1450-55, the Durandus of 1459, the Catholicon 
of 1460, the first Bible with a printed date, 1462, 
and many others remarkable for their interest and 
rarity. There are seven works from Caxton's 
press, exhibiting nearly every style of his type, 
and including a portion of the first book printed 
in the English language, about 1474; also books 
printed by Wynkyn de Worde, Richard Pynson, 
William de Machlinia, Peter de Trcveris, and other 
early English printers. The Mexican presses, the 
oldest in America, are represented by at least ten 
works printed before 1550, and many printed be- 
tween that date and 1700; the South American 
presses by choice specimens of the 16th and 17th 
centuries, beginning with 1585; the early Cam- 
bridge and Boston presses by their most remark- 
able productions, commencing with the Bay Psalm 
Book of 1640; and the first presses of Pennsyl- 
vania, New York, Connecticut, and other American 
colonies, by select examples. There are also speci- 
mens of printing in Polynesia, Africa, and Asia ; 
among the last a copy of the first book printed in 
India, 1561. 

Aldines: about 150 vols., being a selection of 
the earliest, rarest, and most noteworthy examples. 

The Roman Indexes ^ of prohibited and expurgated 
books, over sixty editions, 1550-1878. 

Shakespeare and Shakespeariana : a select col- 
lection of about 1000 vols., containing many of the 
early quartos, two copies of the first folio, seven 
of the second, two of the third, two of the fourth, 
all with variations, and the most important later 
editions. 

The Milton collection : about 250 vols. , contain- 
ing nearly every variety of the early editions. 
Among these are several volumes from Milton*s 
own library, with his autograph and annotations. 

Bunyan*s Pilgrim* s progress and Bunyaniana : 
about 500 vols., containing nearly 350 editions in 
English, beginning with the first in 1678, and trans- 
lations in many languages. 

Angling and ichthyology : the choice collection 
made by Thomas Westwood, of about 500 vols. 
This includes all the editions of Walton*s *' Com- 
plete angler,*' and many other rare works of early 
date. 

Bibliography: about 1000 vols. The section 
of American bibliography is especially full, and 
contains many works with important manuscript 
additions, such as Rich's own copies of his bibli- 
ographies, in duplicate, profusely annotated; the 
Ramirez copy of Beristain, Mr. Lenox's interleaved 
copies of Tcmaux, Rich, Lea Wilson, etc. 

The Duyckinck Library^ formed by Evert A. 
and George L. Duyckinck : about 15,000 vols., very 
full in works relating to literary history and biog- 
raphy y English and American poetry (1200 vols.), 



45 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



46 



and the drama (800 vols.). It contains special 
collections relating to proverbs and aphorisms 
(100 vols.), emblems and the Dance of Death (100 
vols.), hooks illustrated by Bewick and Anderson 
(over 100 vols.), by Cruikshank (250 vols.), and 
by other eminent engravers. Among the works 
illnstrated by Anderson is the engraver's own col- 
lection of proofs of his woodcuts, in ten large 
scrap-books. There is also a collection of Oreek 
and Latin Classics y including nearly 100 editions 
of Horace. 

The Drexel MusiccU Library, the legfacy of 
Josi*ph W. Drexel: about 7000 vols., relating to 
the history and literature of music. Many of these 
are of early date. There are also manuscripts and 
autograph letters by many of the famous com- 
posers, books and manuscripts from Dr. Rimbaulfs 
library, etc. 

The Astoin collection of French literature : about 
5000 vols., especially full in modem belles leltres, 
in bibliography, and in the fine arts. 

The Robert L. Stuart collection : about 8000 vols. , 
containing many rare and valuable works relating 
to natural history and the^nc arts, editions of the 
Bible in English, manuscript and printed Missals, 
etc. 

Spanish manuscripts relaiing to America : about 
200 vols. Among these are original autograph let- 
ters of Diego Columbus, the son of the discoverer. 
Francisco Koldan, Bobadilla, Juan de Trasierra, 
Nicolas de Ovando, and others, mostly written in 
America between the years 1500 and 1512; the 
original manuscripts of Castaneda's **Relacion de 
la Jornada do Cibola," of Mniioz*s '^Historia del 
Nuevo Mundo," and of other important documents ; 
transcripts of historical works, partly unpublished, 
by Las Casas, Oviedo, Duran, Sahagun, Tezozot 
moc, Zurita, Yxtlylxochitl, Columbus, Cortes, and 
others ; papers relating to California, Texas, New 
Mexico, Mexico and Yucatan, Central and South 
America, the Pacific, etc. The greater part of 
this collection was formed by Don Antonio de 
Uguina, of Madrid. It comprises almost every- 
thing of any interest that was collected by his friend 
MuQoz for the ^* Historia del Nuevo Mundo," of 
which only the first volume was published. Uguina 
was also the intimate friend of Navarrete, and fur- 
nished him with many of the materials for his 
**Coleccion de Viagcs de los Espafioles." After 
his death the manuscripts were purchased by 
M. Ternauz Conipans, of Paris, who translated 
and published some of them, and made some im- 
portant additions to tlie collection. They passed 
next into the hands of Mr. O. Rich, who added 
several manuscripts from the Kingsborough col- 
lection, and sold the entire lot to Mr. Lenox. 

The ChcUmers papers : comprising nearly 2000 
documents, original letters, extracts from state 



records, etc., bound in 21 vols, folio. This col- 
lection was formed by Mr. George Chalmers, the 
author of " Political annals of the United Colonics.*' 
It is classified as follows : Canada, IG92-1792, 
1 vol.; Connecticut, 1639-1757, 3 vols.; West 
Florida, 1763-1782, 1 vol.; Indians, 1750-1775, 
1 vol. ; Maryland, 1619-1812, 2 vols. ; New York, 
1G08-1792, 4 vols. ; Nova Scotia, 1745-1817, 1 vol. ; 
Pennsylvania, 1620-1779, 2 vols. ; Philadelphia, 
1760-1789, 2 vols. ; Virginia, 1606-1775, 4 vols. 

American manuscripts : a small collection com- 
prising the original manuscript of Washington's 
Farewell address, a long letter of Washington con- 
taining the original draft of the Farewell ad<1res8, 
several letters of Hamilton and Madison to Wash- 
ington, with their respective drafts of the Farewell 
address, autograph letters of Washington and of 
the signers of the Declaration of Independence, etc. 

Scottish histoHcal manuscripts : about 50 docu- 
ments, state papers, letters, etc., relating to Scot- 
tish liistory, 1561-1746, and containing autographs 
of John Knox, Mary Queen of Scots, Queen Eliza- 
beth, James I., Charles I., Oliver Cromwell, etc. 
Presented by Mr. John S. Kennedy. 

The Burns manuscripts: comprising over 150 
letters, poems, and extracts from poems of favorite 
authors, in the handwriting of Robert Burns, a 
very large proportion of which bear the indorse- 
ment of James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd. Pre- 
sented by Mr. John S. Kennedy. 

Six *' Contributions to a catalogue of the Lenox 
library " have been printed, covering the following 
special subjects : — 

i. Voyages of Hulsius, etc. 1877. 

ii. The Jesuit relations, etc. 1879. 

iii. The voyages of Thevenot, etc. 1879. 

iv. Bunyan's Pilgrim's progress, etc. 1879. 

V. Works of Shakespeare, etc. 1880. 

vi. Works of Milton, etc. 1881. 

There are two picture galleries attached to the 
library : the Lenox gallery, containing nearly 150 
paintings, and the R. L. Stuart gallery, containing 
240. 

New Torkf N K — Maimonides Librahy* 
(Max Cohen, Librarian.) 

The library has 410 vols, and 525 pams. on edu- 
cation (Catalogue, 24 pp. in 1886), and 950 vols, 
and 1170 pams. of Judaica and Hebraica (hs. 
catalogue). 

New Tork, N. Y. — Metropolitan Museum 
OP Art. (W. L. Andrews, Librarian; Dr. J. A. 
Paine, Assistant.) 

Art and archaeology: 2000 vols, and several 
hundred pamphlets, increased yearly by several 
hundred volumes from appropriations and from 
the income of a fund. 



47 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



48 



Design and industrial art : 600 vols., bequeathed 
by the late Edward C. Moore, of Tiffany & Co., 
embracing best authorities upon gold and silver 
work, glass, ceramics, textile fabrics, laces, etc. 

Frankliniana : 380 vols., known as the Hunt- 
ington collection, including an extensive collection 
of portraits of Franklin ; also a collection of mss. 
and early pi-inted books given by tlie late Mr. J. W. 
Drezel. 

New Tork, N. Y. — The New York Academy 
OF Medicine. (John S. Brownne, Kesidcnt Li- 
brarian.) 

The library, relating to medicine only, contains 
40,000 vols, and 15,000 panis., to which about 
1500 vols, are added per year from special funds. 
The files of medical journals are the most com- 
plete in the country outside of tlie Surgeon-Gcn- 
eral's Office in Washington ; a catalogue of British 
and American periodicals, transactions, and reports 
was printed in 1880. Part 2, a catalogue of Ger- 
man, French, Italian, Spanish, etc. periodicals, 
transactions, and reports is in press. 

New York, N. Y, — New York Acade of 
Sciences. (J. F. Kemp, Librarian.) 

The library contains over 10,000 vols, on natural 
and physical sciences and the proceedings of scien- 
tific societies. The collection has accumulated, 
mainly tlirough exchange of publications, since 
about the year 1830; additions now amount to 
about 1500 works annually. It is especially rich in 
the proceedings of scientific societies dating from 
its origin. The collection is deposited in the li- 
brary of Columbia College, and is open to the pub- 
lic on the same conditions as the college library. 

New York, y. Y. — New York Free Circu- 
lating LiiJRARY. (Ellen M. Coe, Librarian.) 

Has a carefully selected library of German 
books (about 12,000 vols.) in history, science, and 
literature. 

The library possesses about 20 vols., relating 
chiefly to slavery, from the library of the late 
Wendell Phillips ; most of them having valuable 
autograph notes. 

New York, N. Y. — New York Historical 
Society. (Charles Isham, Librarian.) 

The library of the Society numbers about 82,000 
vols, on subjects connected with American his- 
tory. The rhoenix collection of genealogical 
works sliould be mentioned. 

New York, y. Y, — New York Hospital. 
(Frank P. Foster, M.D., Librarian.) 

Has a library of 20,000 vols., devoted entirely 
to works on medicine, surgei'y, and collateral 
branches. From 800 to 600 vols, are added yearly 
from a special fund. 



New York, N, K — New York Law Insti- 
tute. (Wm. II. Winters, Librarian.) 

The library of the Institute has 39,000 works re- 
lating to law, with an increase of 800 vols, per 
annum. A catalogue was printed in 1874. 

New York, N. Y. — New York Society Li- 
URARY. (W. S. Butler, Librarian.) 

Founded as "The Public Library" in 1700; 
afterwards incorporated with tlie N. Y. Society Li- 
brary, formed in 1754, and received a royal charter 
from George III. in 1772. 

Fine arts: about 750 vols, in the "John C. 
Green Alcove," with a yearly income of $1200 for 
additions of costly illustrated works. An anno- 
tated catalogue of the collection was printed in 
1879 at the expense of Robert Lenox Kennedy. 

Arctic research: above 100 vols., presented by 
James Benkard, furnishing a complete liistory of 
the subject from the earliest period. 

The Hammond Library of 1800 vols., of which 
the greater number are extremely rare, comprises 
old novels dating from 1780 to 1820. A catalogue 
was printed in 18G8 when the collection was pre- 
sented by Robert Lenox Kennedy. 

The }Vinthrop collection of about 300 ancient 
and curious books, cliiefly in Latin, once owned by 
John Winthrop of Connecticut. 

The collection in the *' De Peyster Alcove," 
numbering about 1000 vols., is very full in certain 
special subjects, such as slavery, Sweden, and 
Cancuia, 



New York, N. Y. — Presbyterian Board of 
Foreign Missions. ( , Librarian.) 

The library has about 3000 vols, on general mis- 
sionary topics ; 163 vols, of biography ; 150 vols, 
of Chinese classics ; 200 vols, on the Indians and 
Mexico ; 367 vols, on Africa ; 372 vols, on India ; 
171 vols, on Arabia and Palestine; 320 vols, on 
China and Japan; also missionary reports and 
magazines. 

New York, N. Y. — Union Theological Semi- 
nary. (Rev. Charles R. Gillett, Librarian.) 

The Westminster divines and the Puritans of the 
xviith century: about 5000 titles; an unrivalled 
collection, formed by Prof. Chas. A. Briggs, D.D., 
and increased by means of the endowment of the 
McAlpin collection of British theology of wliich 
it is a part. The Westminster collection has no 
card catalogue. 

Deisiic, Dissenting, and Unitarian controver- 
sies in England: over 1200 vols., collected by 
Prof. E. H. Gillett, D.D. Unitarian, Univer- 
salist, etc. controversies in America, similarly 
collected. 

Ilymnology : over 6000 vols., collected by Prof. 
Edward Robinson, Dr. Edwin F. Hatfield, President 



49 



m AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



50 



Roswell D. Hitchcock, and others. The collec- 
tion of Prof. F. M. Bird, over 3000 vols., was pre- 
sented by Henry Day, Esq., of New York (not 
endowed). 

From Leandcr Van Ess of Marburg was pur- 
chased in 1838-39 his theological library, including 
patristic literature, 2000 vols. ; Roman Catholic 
and Reformation theology, 1500 vols. ; incunabula 
and rare books of the zvith and xviith centuries, 
1000 vols. The collection was composed in part 
of the 'Mibri prohibiti" of the Benedictine mon- 
astery of Marienmiinster, Paderbom, of which Van 
Ess was custodian. 

British theology: 10,000 vols., with ah endow- 
ment of $5000 by David H. McAlpin, Esq., of New 
York. 

American theology and history : a very consid- 
erable collection, with a very large collection of 
pamphlets derived from the libraries of Drs. Gil- 
lett, Hatfield, Marsh, Sprague, Field, and others ; 
similarly endowed by same donor. 

Immaculate conception: 100 vols., collected by 
Chas. W. Hassler, Esq., of New York. 

Philosophy: about 1500 vols., German, French, 
English, and American, endowed by the Alumni in 
memory of the late Prof. Henry Boynton Smith, 
D.D. ; growing constantly. 

Periodicals, theological and literary : a collec- 
tion of some 10,000 vols., American, English, 
German, French, Dutch, etc. ; over 100 current 
periodicals are on file. 

The Seminary has 185 mss., Syriac, Arabic, 
Latin, etc., not yet catalogued; also a collection 
of 450 coins, the gift of President R. D. Hitchcock, 
on exhibition; and a Christian and missionary 
museum. 

Neir York, N. Y, — Y. M. C. A. Librabt. 
(Reuben B. Poole, Librarian.) 

The special collections of not« are : — 

Engraved portraits : 17,000 in 170 vols., includ- 
ing 8000 portraits in 35 folio scnip-bojks collected 
and arranged by John Perceval, Earl of Egmont, 
and continued by John T. Graves. The subjects 
range from a.d. 1 to 1786, by eminent engravers. 

Engravings and engraving: 528 vols., includ- 
ing about 26,000 prints or plates, reproductions of 
Rembrandt, Turner, Hogarth, and others. 

Aniiquiiies : 310 vols., Greece, Egypt, Peru, etc. 

Fine arts: painting, 137 works; sculpture, 84 
vols., with about 3500 engravings; architecture, 
450 vols.; decoration, 118 vols., a rich collection. 

Newspapers: complete files of the New York 
Herald from 1860, the Times (nearly complete) 
from 1851, the Tribune, 1848-1860, and from 1872 
to date, the World (nearly complete) from 1868 ; 
with the Tribune Index from 1875. 

Eibles : before 1700, 54 vols. 



Bible MSS.: photographic fac-similes of the 
Codex Alexandrinus and Codex Vaticanus, and a 
printed f ac-simile of the Codex Frederico-Augusta- 
nus. 

Polar explorations : 102 vols., covering the pe- 
riod from 1817 to 1885. 

Ornithology : 132 vols. 

New OrleaASt La. — Howabd Memorial Li- 
DBABY. (William Beer, Librarian.) 

The library contains 20,000 books and pamphlets 
for reference and study, and has special collections 
on the history of Louisiana and AVir Orleans. It 
also makes a specialty of the literature of process 
sions and progresses, 

Nortliamptoii, Mass. — Smith College Ref- 
EBENCE LiBRABY. (Mary E. Gorham, Librarian.) 

The philosophical department contains about 
1200 works, chiefly from the library of Prof. M. 
Stuart Phelps. The Phelps Memorial Association 
has a fUnd for the department, and additions are 
constantly made. 

Notre Dame, Ind. — Univerbity of Notbb 
Dame — Lemonnieb Libbaby. (J. F. Edwards, 
Librarian.) 

The library, of over 45,000 vols., has an appro- 
priation of ^00 each year for the purchase of 
books. In American and Catholic history there is 
a large collection, made during the last twenty 
years by the Librarian, and about 2000 vols, of 
Roman Catholic newspapers and magazines. Re- 
ports of diocesan synods and Roman Catholic insti- 
tutions number about 1200 vols. ; there are several 
thousand vols, in Irish history collected by the late 
Laurence Kehoe of New York and others; many 
early American Catholic pamphlets and books col- 
lected by the late Father Finotti and by the Libra- 
rian ; several hundred works relating to American 
history, collected by the late John Gilmary Shea; 
several hundred religious works, collected by the 
late James A. McMaster of New York ; and thou- 
sands of original letters in Spanish, French, Ger- 
man, and English, written by bishops, priests, and 
laymen. There are also paintings, photographs, 
and relics of all kinds relating to the church (espe- 
cially the Roman Catholic bishops and priests of 
America), the Civil war, and Indian life, and a col- 
lection of coins from all parts of the world. 

Oberlin, 0. — Obeblin College Library. 
(Azariah S. Root, Librarian.) 

Slavery and anti-slavery : over 1200 books and 
pams. Contains the library of Wm. Goodell, Esq., 
and portions of the libraries of Oliver Johnson and 
Austin Willey. The collection is especially strong 
on the political aspect of the slavery question. 

Original sources for the study of church history 
also should be mentioned. 



"S 



SI 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



52 



Palo Alto, Cal, — Stanford University. (£. II. 
Woodruff, Librarian.) Of the library as a whole 
it is too soon to say anything. A railway collec- 
tion has however been founded by Timothy Hopkins, 
containing already about 1000 vols, and as many 
pams., and to be largely increased. It is intended 
to include both the technical and economic sides of 
the subject. 

PUladelphia, Penn. — Academy of Natural 
Sciences. (Edward J. Nolan, M.D., Librarian.) 

Contains in its library over 33,000 vols, and nearly 
12,000 pamphlets, devoted exclusively to the naiu- 
rai sciences^ with an annual increase of from 
700 to 800 vols. Additions are made by exchange 
and by purchase from the income of the I. V. 
Vniliamson and Thomas B. Wilson library funds. 

The eonchological collection is specially com- 
plete, with 1200 vols. ; and ornithology is well 
represented, all the illustrated folios being on the 
shelves. 

The library was begun in 1812, and has large files 
of scientific journals, proceedings of societies, etc. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — American Baptist His- 
torical Society. (Henry E. Lincoln, Librarian.) 

The library, containing about 8000 vols., is made 
up principally of books illustrating the history of 
the Baptist denomination and the works of Baptist 
authors. It includes 400 vols, and 20,000 pams. , 
the reports and annual minutes of Baptist socie- 
ties, conventions, and associations in the United 
States and abroad ; 780 vols, in hymnology^ a large 
proportion of these having been collected by the 
late Francis Jennings ; 300 vols, of the translations 
and publications of foreign missionaries ; and a 
large number of autographs and letters, and manu- 
script histories of churches and sketches of private 
individuals. The Society also aims to collect pho- 
tographs and pictures of Baptist ministers and lay- 
men, and views of churches, colleges, etc. of which 
several hundred have been secured. 

Philadelphia, Penn, — American Philosophi- 
cal Society. (Henry Phillips, Jr., Secretary and 
Librarian.) 

The library of the Society, founded in 1743, con- 
tains about 45,000 vols., is of a general and miscel- 
laneous character, and has been formed principally 
by exchange with other learned societies , the Trans- 
actions, for instance, of the Royal Society of Lon- 
don, going back to 1CG5, and those of the French 
Academy to 1G66. It has a large number of 18th 
century pamphlets and some valuable mss., among 
which the following pertain to our colonial and 
early federal history : — 

Correspondence of Benjamin Franklin, 59 vols. 

Correspondence of William Temple Franklin, 
8 vols. 



Correspondence of Arthur and Richard Henry 
Lee, supplementing other portions in the libraries 
of Harvard College and the University of Virginia, 
2 vols. 

Logan papers, 2 vols. 

T. and R. Penn, letters, 1747-71, 1 toL 

Recollections and other papers of Samuel Breck. 

John Pemberton's Letter-book, 1744-47. 

Heckewelder letters, 1816-22. 

Chief Justice Marshall's opinions, 1803-31. 

Dutch and English records of Pennsylvania. 

Thomas Sargeant's extracts from early Pennsyl- 
vania records. 

Records of indentures of individuals (Pennsyl- 
vania). 

Rough minutes of Provincial Councils. 

Unprinted laws of Pennsylvania, 1693-1700. 

William Pcnn*s Cash-book. 

History, and True history of the Dividing Line 
between Virginia and North Carolina, 2 vols. 

Minutes of Commissioners for determining the 
bounds between Pennsylvania and Maryland. 

The Connecticut and Wyoming controversy. 

Records of the Colony of New Sweden. 

Indian treaties (Pennsylvania). 

Indian military affairs, 1737. 

Louisiana papers (Jefferson, etc.), and a Spanish 
account of the province. 

A manuscript of La Harpers Journal (see Nar. 
and Crit. Hist. America, v. 64). 

French War papers, like army accounts, 1764-56 ; 
military journal, 1760-63; regimental book, 1754. 

Revolutionary records : importation of tea, 1773 ; 
Valley Forge orderly book, 1777-78; the disap- 
pearance of the papers of William Lee in Berlin ; 
Continental currency. 

Pertaining to early American linguistics and 
aboriginal history : — 

A Mexican tribute roll of Montezuma. 

Treatises in the Central American languages, and 
translations in those and other aboriginal tongues, 
12 vols. 

About 2500 Aztec relics (on exhibition at the 
Academy of Natural Sciences). 

Of scientific value are the following : — 

Lewis and Clark expedition, note books, 19 vols. 

The botanical journal of Andr6 Michaux. 

The mineralogical journal of Thos. P. Smith. 

A list of dried plants put in Dr. B. S. Barton's 
hands by Meriwether Lewis (Lewis and Clark), 
1804. 

Log books and ships' meteorological records. 

An old Greek manuscript (homilies). 

Two missals of the 14th and 15th centuries. 

The Society's collection of coins is on exhibition 
in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park. It has also 
various interesting relics, like Franklin's electrical 
machine, Rittenhoase*s clock and meridian instra- 



53 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



54 



ment, Jefferson's pantograph, a model of Fitch's 
steamboat, etc. A number of valuable busts (in- 
cluding Houdon's Franklin and Lafayette) and 
oil portraits. 

A classified catalogue of the library was printed 
in 1863--84. 

PUladAlphia, Penn. — American Sunday 
School Union. (Edwin W. Rice, Librarian.) 

Modern Sunday Schools: the history of their 
organization, best methods of instruction, etc. ; 
about 2000 vols., besides pamphlets and unpub- 
lished MS8. on the subject. 

The library was begun in 1824 and has at present 
over 8000 vols, and 2000 bundles of pams. 

Philadelphia,* Penn, — College of Piitsi- 
ciANS OF Philadelphia. (Charles Perry Fisher, 
Librarian.) 

Yellow fever and its history: over 600 vols.- are 
devoted to this subject, and over 200 to the Ameri- 
can history of vaccination and inoculation. 

Medical history during the Revolutionary war: 
a large collection of unpublished autograph letters 
and papers, and many books illustrating the early 
history of American medicine. 

About 400 current medical journals are con- 
stantly on file for consultation. The total number 
of volumes in the library, not including dupli- 
cates, is above 43,000, with about 16,000 unbound 
pams. 

Philadelphia, Penn, — Diyinitt School of 
THE P. £. Church. (Ezra P. Gould, Librarian.) 

Liturgies : a collection of 1500 vols, and many 
pamphlets, given by Rt. Rev. Wm. Bacon Stevens, 
D.D., Bishop of Penn. From the same donor the 
library has received the Journals of the General 
Convention, and diocesan journals, nearly if not 
quite complete from the beginning. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Drexel Institute of 
Art, Science, and Industry. (Alice B. Kroeger, 
Librarian. ) 

Manuscripts^ autographs^ and curious books : 
Mss. of complete works, 84 vols. ; autograph let- 
ters and MSS., 5 vols, folio; and other books con- 
taining valuable autographs, etc., the gift of Mr. 
George W. Childs. 

There are the following complete mss. : Andr6*s 
"The cow chace," Edwin Arnold's "Lotus and 
jewel," Bremer's "Hertha," Cooper's "Life of 
Richard Somers," Dickens's " Our mutual friend," 
Godwin's " Cloudesley," Uawthome's "Consular 
experiences,'* Lamb's "Witches and other night 
fears," Lowell's " Under the willows," Martineau's 
"Retrospect of western travel," a sermon from 
Ephesians i. 23, by Cotton Mather, Foe's "The 
murders in the Rue Morgue," Scott's " Chroni- 



cles of the Canongate," Thackeray's " Lecture on 
George III.," a sermon by Bishop White, Willis's 
" Need of two loves." 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Franklin Institute. 
(Alfred Rigling, Librarian.) 

The library is strictly scientific in character and 
contains at present 37,000 vols., nearly 23,000 
pams., and over 3000 maps, drawings, and photo- 
graphs. All the leading technical periodicals are 
received, as well as the transactions of the learned 
societies of the world. The library contains com- 
plete sets of the British (and Colonial), French, 
German, Anstro-Hnngarian, Russian, Swiss, and 
American patent records. 

Electricity forms a collection of 1800 vols., 2950 
pams., and 21 mss. ; and chemistry 1900 vols, and 
2 vols, of MSS. Each subject has a special fund 
for additions. A catalogue of electrical works 
was published in 1884, and one of chemistry in 
1876. 

Philadelphia, Penn, — Friends' Free Li- 
brary, Germantown. (William Kite, Librarian.) 

The writings of Friends ^ controversial and bio- 
graphical, form a collection of over 500 vols, and 
100 pams., which have been added to the library 
by purchase since 1873. These accessions are 
recorded in the Annual reports of the library. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Friends' Library, or 
Library of the Three Monthly Meetings of 
Friends. (John H. Dillingluim, Librarian.) 

Founded by Thomas Chalklcy, and has been 
growing since 1741, with additions by John Pem- 
berton and others, now amounting to 11,800 vols. 
Friends* books, and especially early Friends' litera- 
ture, form a collection of about 1800 vols. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Hebrew Education 
Society. (Cyrus Adier, Librarian.) 

Biblical and Jewish literature: 1700 vols., the 
library of Isaac Lecser of Philadelphia, formed 
between 1824 and 18G7. A catalogue was printed 
in 1883. There are no funds for additions. 

The library of the Society is, in the main, a col- 
lection of editions of and commentaries on the 
Hebrew Bible; it contains, however, pamphlets, 
sermons, and periodicals of interest for the history 
of the Jews in America. 

Philadelphia, Penn, — Historical Society 
OF Pennsylvania. (F. I). Stone, Librarian.) 

Genealogies and town and county histories re- 
lating to the Middle and Southern states : a largo 
collection. 

Political history of the United States from 1789 
to 18G2 : 3000 pams., bound in chronological order. 

Public institutions of Philadelphia : a large col- 
lection of pamphlets. 



55 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



56 



French revolution: 1810 vols., collected by Dr. 
Wm. Macluro in France early in the present 
century for the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
from which institution it was purchased for the 
Historical Society by Mr. William S. Wilson 
and Dr. Thomas B. Wilson. Described in the 
catalogue of the Acad, of Nat. Sciences, 1836, 
pp. 179-239. 

Books printed in Philadelphia, 1685-1786: 1796 
Yols. , many of them printed for the Germans settled 
in the section of the country about Philadelphia. 
Collected by the Society and the Trustees of the 
Gilpin Library of the Historical Society. Consult 
Hildeburn's ** Press in Pennsylvania, 1686-1785." 
Many have been added since this was published. 

American Colonial laws. The unrivalled collec- 
tion of Colonial laws made by the late Charlemagne 
Tower was presented to the Society in 1890 by 
Mrs. Tower. It embraces the first extant edition 
issued by each of the American colonies except 
Rhode Island, New Jersey, and Maryland, the first 
edition of the laws of Vermont as well as those of 
the British and Danish West Indies, also nearly 
aU the later revisions prior to 1800, and the origi- 
nal session laws of all the colonies except North 
Carolina and Georgia. The set of Pennsylvania 
laws numbers 151 titles, that of Massachusetts, the 
nucleus of which was the collection of Dr. George 
H. Moore, numbers 407 titles. A valuable collec- 
tion of other early Americana is likewise included. 
The careful and elaborate Catalogne printed by the 
Society shows 942 titles of Laws and 87 titles of 
Americana. 

The Society has begun, as supplementary to the 
Tower books, a collection of the minutes of Colonial 
assemblies which has already attained a respectable 
size. 

The following manuscripts deserve special no- 
tice : — 

Extracts from records of Friends* meetings : 
births, deaths, and marriages from 1682 to 18 — , 
62 MS. vols. ; still being increased. 

William Rawle papers ; insurrection in western 
Pennsylvania and in Northampton County : 2 vols. 

WcUlace papers^ including those of William 
Bradford, Atty. Gen. U. S. : 10 vols. 

James and William Irvine papers and letters, 
relating to the lievolution : 13 vols. Portions of 
the latter* have been printed in the Wasliington- 
Irvine correspondence, edited by Butterfield. 

Letters of Conrad Weiser; Indian affairs in 
Pennsylvania, 1741-1706: 2 vols. 

Letters of //. E. Muhlenberg ; botanical corre- 
spondence, 1781-1815 : 1 vol. 

Letters of Hon. John Langdon, 1659-1821 : 
1 vol. and mbs. The more imi>ortant papers of 
I^ngdon are in the possession of Rev. Alfred 
Langdon Elwyn of Penn. 



George, OeorgeJr., and William T, Read, 1716- 
1872 (Delaware, etc.) : 1 vol. 

Sir George Lee, Admiralty cases and opinions : 
4 vols. 

Thomas Hutehins, geographer general U. S. 
1774-1784 : 1 vol. 

Benjamin Franklin: agent of colony (1767- 
1771) ; minister to France and miscellaneous (1776- 
1785) : 4 vols. 

Shippen papers : correspondence and military 
papers relating to the colonial history of Penn. : 
10 vols. A portion of these have been printed in 
letters and ** Papers relating to the provincial 
lustory of Penn. Edited by T. Balch." 

Pennsylvania society for the promotion of the 
caution of slavery, etc., 1785-1868: 11 vols. 
Includes the correspondence and the minutes of 
the society. 

Court records of Philadelphia (a fragment). 
1697-1821 : 6 vols. 

Ecui and West Jersey boundary, 1664-1863 : sur- 
veys, maps, letters, etc. 

Jam^s Wilson, 1776-1792: 1 vol. He was a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. 

Henry Laurens^ 1774-1780: 8 vols., and a 
Letter book in one volume of ante-revolutionary 
date. A portion of the collection once owned by 
William Gilmore Simms. 

Commodore Barney, U. S. N., 1782-1818. War 
of 1812: 2 vols. 

Bartram MSS., 17S9-1818 : 4 vols. Botanical; 
miscellaneous. 

Register of German Redemptioners, 1786-1831 : 
2 vols. 

Thos, Bradford, Commissary of Prisoners ; mss. 
relating to exchange of British army and naval 
prisoners, 1777-1783: 9 vols. 

Elias Boudinot. Letters and papers relating to 
exchange of prisoners ; miscellaneous : 4 vols. 

Northampton County, Surveys, indentures, 
assessors' returns, letters, etc., 1762-1860: 128 
vols. 

Chester County, Surveys, indentures, letters, 
etc. : 19 vols. 

Penn. JfSS., 1681-1817. Petitions; land grants; 
boundary disputes of Pennsylvania and Maryland 
(1680-1768) , and Pennsylvania and Virginia (1773- 
1775) ; proprietary manors ; proclamations (1670- 
1775) ; charters and frame of government; papers 
relating to the Three Lower Counties (Delaware) ; 
Penn v. Baltimore; Indian affairs; private and 
official correspondence : 94 vols. 

Logan papers: colonial history of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Potts papers, 1776-1780: 2 vols. Dr. Jonathan 
Potts was Deputy Director General of the medical 
staff of the Revolutionary army. 

William Henry papers (of Lancaster, Penn.), 



57 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



58 



OHf/inal papers and JfSS. relating to the 
Thi'ee Lower Counties (dow forming the State of 
Delaware), 1655-1805: 1 vol. 

Lancaster County papers, 1772-1816 : 8 vols. 

Bucks County papers, 1682-1850 : 2 vols. 

York County papers : 1 vol. 

Berks County papers : 1 vol. 

Montgomery County papers : 1 vol. 

Bethlehem and 'vicinity^ 1741-1830 (Moravian) : 
3 vols. 

Rawle — Clifford — Pemherton papers, 1720- 
1830 : 30 vols, so far bound. 

J. R. Poinsett papers, 1785-1851 : 15 vols. Let- 
ters, diaries, etc. ; political history of U. S., Mexico, 
and Russia. See sketch of Poinsett in the Penn. 
mag. of history. 

Peters papers, relating to the colonial history of 
Pennsylvania. 

Mason and Dixon*s survey : field-book and map. 

Joshua Stoddard Johnson papers : political his- 
tory of U. S. 

Letters of the Hdmilt^ns of Pennsylvania, 1748- 

1770 : 1 vol. 

On manj of these see Nar. and Crlt. History of America, 
viii., pp. 450-452. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Law Association of 
Philadelphia. (Francis Rawle, Esq., Librarian.) 

The library contains all the transcripts of records 
of reported cases in the Supreme Court of the U. S. 
from 6 Peters to the present day, about 800 vols., 
with a yearly addition of about 25 vols. The early 
volumes were presented by Henry Baldwin, Esq. 

Also, complete sets of all English and U. S. 
Reports^ and nearly complets sets of session laws 
of all the States. 

The library possesses a large and valuable col- 
lection of East India Reports^ numbering about 
140 vols. 

It is also one of the few law libraries in tlic 
country to possess a complete card-catalogue of 
its contents. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Library Association 
OP Friends. (Anna 6. Carroll, Librarian.) 

Formed in 1835, and the library opened in 1836. 
The 11,500 or more volumes owned by the associa- 
tion include principally Friends* books — religious 
works, etc. ; also the current magazines. Addi- 
tions are made from year to year by fands raised 
. by voluntary contributions. 

The ** Caleb Clothier memorial teachers' library *» 
of 884 vols., works devoted exclusively to educa- 
tion j has recently been added. 

Philadelphia^ Penn. — Library Cohpant of 
Philadelphia. (James 6. Barnwell, Librarian.) 

Chess : over 1000 vols. , purchased from the estate 
of Prof. George Allen, with 237 autograph letters of 
eminent chess players. Catalogue printed in 1878. 



Geological reports: 600 vols., from Frederick 
C. Prime and others. 

ffymnology : over 400 vols., from John A. 
McAllister and others, also by purchase. 

Society of the Cincinnati : a catalogue has been 
printed in the Bulletin of the library : 135 titles. 

Civil War : (regimental histories) ; a catalogue 
appeared in 1886 in the Bulletin : 649 titles. 

The library is also strong in the following: 
Philadelphia directories (complete) ; newspapers 
(nearly complete sets of aJl Philadelphia news- 
papers of the xviiith century, and a selection 
during the xixth) ; city views, atlases j 18th century 
Americanoj and music (the gift of Mrs. James 
Rush). 

Philadelphia, Penn, — Mercantile Library. 
(John Edmands, Librariaa.) 

Civil war : 1000 vols. 

Irish history : 1000 vols., including 100 vols, of 
pamphlets and ballads. 

Junius: 120 vols., including 55 editions of the 
letters of Junius. Also bibliography, 3000 vols.; 
English drama, 1200 vols.; and Shakespeariana, 
100 vols. 

Philadelphia, Penn. — Presbyterian His- 
torical Society. (Rev. D. K. Turner, Librarian.) 

This is the only Society in the United States de- 
voted to the collection and preservation of papers 
and relics that illustrate the history and progress of 
the Presbyterian church. Its library contains many 
histories of churches, presbyteries, and synods, in 
manuscript or in printed form, prepared in accord- 
ance with the recommendation of the Assembly; 
and all the works issued by the Presbyterian board 
of publication. 

The library of the late Rev. J. B. Creigh, D.D. , of 
Mercersburg, Penn. , 1 100 vols. , was presented to the 
Society by his heirs, adding largely to the collec- 
tion in history and theology. The Society's library 
contains at present about 25,000 vols., and 70,000 
pams., periodicals, sermons, etc. Partial lists of 
additions are given in the annual reports of the 
Society. 

Philadelphia, P^nn. — University of Penn- 
sylvania. (Gregory B. Keen, Librarian.) 

Philology: 6000 vols., the libraries of Prof. 
George Allen of the University, A. F. Pott of Halle, 
and Ernst von Leutsch of Gottingen. 

Greek and Latin literature: 20,000 vols., from 
the same sources as the above; also 30 vols, of 

M88. 

Arabic literature: 1000 vols., and 20 vols, of 
iiss., purchased in 1890. 

Chinese and Japanese: 1500 vols., the libraries 
of D. B. McCartee and R. A. Bowie. 

Medicine: 7000 vols., libraries of Profs. Alfred 
StillC* and William Pepper. 



59 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



60 



Geology y zoology, botany : 6000 vols., libraries 
of Profs. F. V. Hayden and Joseph Leidy. 

Ejigineet-ing : 5000 vols., the gift of Fairman 
Rogers. 

Modern sptriiualism : 700 vols., the gift of 
Henry Seybert. 

Finance and political economy: 12,000 vols., 
libraries of Stephen Colwell and H. C. Carey. 

Law: 6000 vols., the library of Hon. Benjamin 
H. Brewster. 

Public documents: 10,000 vols., acquired by 
purchase. 

To each of these collections additions are made, 
but no catalogues have been printed. 

Pittsbnrg, Penn. — Library Association. 
(Mary F. Macrum, Librarian.) 

Shakespearean and early dramaiic literature : 
273 vols., collected in 1840-C8 by Alexander 
Mcllwainc and given in 1887 by Wm. Thaw. 

Bampton lectures : 87 vols. ; not quite complete. 

In science, arts, natural sciences, and engineer- 
ing, there are 1600 vols. , given by Andrew Carnegie. 

Pittsfield, Mass. — Berkshire Athenaeum. 
(H. H. Ballard, Librarian.) 

Besides works in local history y genealogy ^ epi- 
taphsy and a valuable miscellaneous collection of 
local antiquities, the Athenaeum has a complete 
file of local newspapers since 1800, and sev- 
eral hundred classified and catalogued pamphlets 
relating to Berkshire county ^ Mass., and its 
history. 

There is a valuable collection of old French 
pamphlets in 18 bound volumes, formed by Thomas 
Allen (from New Orleans). 

The Athenaeum has one of the most complete 
collections of U. S. public documents in Massachu- 
setts, chronologically arranged; a collection of 
New England music, mainly church music, cover- 
ing nearly 100 years ; a valuable collection of local 
Mss., mainly historical, including a set of sermons 
by Rev. Thomas Allen, written in short-hand and 
cipher, with a recently- discovered key to the same ; 
a file of the Boston Advertiser, extending over 
more than 80 years ; and a growing collection of 
American school and college text-books, 

Portland, Me. — Maine Historical Society. 
(Hubbard Winslow Bryant, Librarian.) 

The works in the library on New England loccU 
history and genealogy number 3500 vols, and 
10,000 panis. There are no special funds, but 
additions are constantly made, chiefly by gift. 
Maine laws, books printed in Maine, and State 
newspapers are also well represented. 

The Cyrus Woodman collection of letters and 
documents relating to the town of Buxton, Me., 
the papers and records of the Pejepscot Co. and 



the Kennebec proprietors, the correspondence of 
Admiral G. H. Preble, Gov. Wm. King's papers, 
and other historical mss. , are owned by the Society. 

Portsmouth, N. H. — Portsmouth Athe- 
naeum. (Annie S. Hanscome, Librarian.) 

Incorporated 1817, and now contains over 16,700 
vols, and 1000 pams., with many rare works of the 
15th and 16th centuries, and a valuable collection 
of books relating to the history of New Hampshire, 
A catalogue was published in 1862, and another of 
books added 1863-1886 was issued in 1886. 

Tlie Athenaeum has the private libraries of John 
Fisher, Esq., of London, and Benjamin T. Tredick 
of Philadelphia. Additions to the library are made 
from the income of funds established by James E. 
Sheafe, Esq., in 1830, Horace A. Haven, in 1848, 
and others. 

There are also collections of coins, engravings, 
and charts. 

Priaooton, N, J, — College op New Jersey. 
(Ernest C. Richardson, Librarian.) 

There are the following special collections in the 
library of the college; to each of the first four 
additions are constantly made : — 

Civil war, 1861-65 : 3000 vols, and 2500 pams., 
the gift of John S. Pierson, Esq., of New York 
(Princeton '40). 

Anglo-Saxon language : 140 vols., the library of 
W. H. Medlicott of Longmeadow, Mass. 

Astronomy : 1000 vols. , partly from the library 
of Stephen Alexander. 

Aristotle and his philosophy : 300 works, from 
the library of Adolf Trendelenberg and by pur- 
chase from funds. 

Also Dante, 140 vols. ; Miltoniana, 65 vols., and 
Shdkespeariana, 540 vols. 

TIic libraries of Professor Libby in physical geography 
(Guyot library) and Professor Allan Marqnnnd in the history 
of art and archaeology can be consulted by those especially 
interested in these subjects. 

Priaoeton« N. J. — Presbyterian Theoloqi- 
CAL Seminary. (Rev. J. H. Dulles, Librarian.) 

English Puritan uyriiers : 2000 vols. The Puri- 
tan cjUection is said to be unequalled in this 
country. 

Baptism controversy : 2200 vols, and 3000 pams., 
collected by Samuel Agnew of Philadelphia, and in- 
creased by the purchase of all important new books. 

Sprague pamphlets, religious miscellany of the 
18th and 19th centuries : 17,000 nos., collected by 
Wm. B. Sprague, Esq. 

Roman Catholic controversy : 300 vols. 

ChHsiian evidences : 600 vols. 

Dogmatics : 600 vols. 

Sermons : 1200 vols. 

Church history: 3200 vols., many valuable seta, 
and fac-si miles of old mss. 



6i 



IN AMERICAN LIBKARIES. 



62 



Providenoet R. L — Brown University. 
(K. A. Guild, Librarian.) 

The Harris collection of American poetry : 7000 
vols., commenced by Judge Albert G. Greene, con- 
tinued by Caleb Fiske Harris, and bequeathed to 
the library in 1884 by Senator H. B. Anthony. 
There is a card catalogue, besides that printed in 
1886 with notes by Rev. J. C. Stockbridge. 

Botany : 2000 vols., including 700 vols, from the 
late Stephen T. Olney, received in 1878. A fund 
of 910,000 from Mr. Olney provides for additions. 

ShaJispeariana : 400 vols., collected by Thos. 
Rodd of London, and presented in 1846 by the late 
Moses B. Ives. The collection consists largely of 
bound pamphlets, many of them extremely rare. It 
includes a copy of Ireland's "Confessions," with 
notes and additions in the handwriting of the author. 

Sermons and addresses at ordinations, funerals, 
and anniversaries : collected in part and presented 
by Judge Theron Metcalf ; chiefly pertaining to 
New England history. Also 272 vols, of pamph- 
lets on civil and religious liberty j bequeathed to 
the library in 1815 by Wm. C. Richards of Lynn, 
England. The titles in this collection are given in 
the printed catalogue of 1843. The whole collec- 
tion of bound pamphlets numbers about 20,000. 

Betagaif or Buddhist Scriptures : 30 palm leaf 
volumes, a complete set, made by the Rev. J. N. 
Cushing (Brown '62) , a missionary at Rangoon for 
20 years. 

ProTid«noe, R, L — Public Library. (W. £. 
Foster, Librarian.) 

Contains the Harris collection of 653 vols, and 
7755 pams. on slavery and the Rebellion^ from the 
private library of Caleb Fiske Harris; now in- 
creased to more than 10,000 by other additions. 
Also about 200 vols, on the same subject from the 
late Sullivan Dorr. 

Italian literature : 670 vols., from the late Albert 
Jenkins Jones ; with a special fund for its yearly 
increase. 

StalisticcU publications bearing on economics, 
etc. : about 1800 vols., from heirs of Edwin Miller 
Snow, M.D., in 1889. 

Provldenoe, R, I. — Rhode Island Histori- 
cal Society. (Amos Perry, Librarian.) 

The library, begun in 1822, was devoted at the 
outset to the history of Rhode Island^ and now 
numbers over 15,000 vols. Its manuscripts cover 
every variety of State and local records, and in- 
clude a numerous collection of orderly books of 
the Revolutionary army. A part of the manu- 
scripts are arranged in more than 100 folio vols. , 
and contain such collections as the papers of 
Moses Brown, merchant, 1738-1836 (18 vols.); 
Theodore Foster, U. S. senator, 1640-1825 (18 
vols.); Tillinghast family, 1728-1834 (4 vols.); 



Field family, 1675-1716 ; Governor Nicholas Cooke, 
1732-1801 (3 vols.) ; Isaac Backus, Baptist histo- 
rian, 1638-1731 (2 vols.) ; Commodore Esek Hop- 
kins, 1728-1783; William Harris, an original set- 
tler of Providence, 1657-1716; Thomas Rice, 
sheriff of Kent Co., 1721-1803; Fenncr family, 
1611-1821; Updike family (of Narragansett), 
1743-1843; military papers of the Revolutionary 
period, 1775-1806 (4 vols.) ; papers of the Colony 
and State, largely original and .official, from Roger 
Williams*s time down (10 vols.) ; and collections 
formed by Dr. Solomon Drowne, Dr. Usher Par- 
sons, and others. 

The Society also has most of the publications of 
other historical societies with which it is in corre- 
spondence, and 1700 vols, of newspapers, most of 
them printed in Rhode Island, of which the New- 
port Mercury, 1772, and the Providence Gazette, 
1762, are the oldest. 

It has also numerous Indian relics, memorials, 
engravings, paintings, etc., such as properly belong 
to an historical museum. 

Raleisk, AT. (7. — State Library. (J. C. 
Birdsong, Librarian.) 

Makes a specialty of North Carolina liistory and 
the Civil war. A list of the newspaper files in 
the library was printed in its catalogue for 1891. 

Riohaiond, Va. — State Library. (Charles 
Poindexter, Librarian.) 

Virginiana: about 900 vols. ; and ms. copies of 
Virginia colonial papers from the British Record 
ofiice and other sources, 7000 pages. 

CivU tear: 800 vols, and a large collection of 
pamphlets. 

ShaJcespeariana : 250 vols., including Boydeli 
and Halliwell folios. 

American and British history are very fully 
represented, and the library has also a valuable 
collection of voyages and travels. 

The library, of about 40,000 vols., not including 
11,000 vols, in the Law department, has a yearly 
allowance of $3000 for the purchase of books< 
Catalogues were printed in 1829,. 1856, and 1877. 

Riohaiond, Va. — Virginia Historical So- 
ciety. (R. A. Brock, Corr. Secretary and Li- 
brarian.) 

The library of the Society, relating primarily to 
the history of Virginiay contains about 15,000 
titles, and many autographs and mss. 

Many of the mss., or selections from them, have 
been published in the series of the Society's " Col- 
lections." Among the still unpublished mss. of 
value may be mentioned the early minutes of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society of Willium and Mary Col- 
lege, the minutes of the Virginia branch of the 
Cincinnati, the records of the General Court of 



63 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



64 



Virginia, 1670-1676, papers of the Ludwell and 
Lee families, 1638-1870, and of the Adams, Cocke, 
and Massie families, 1670-1830, including import- 
ant documents relating to vine planting in Virginia, 
orderly books of the American Revolution, and 
papers of the late Charles Campbell, historian of 
Virginia. 
The Society has no endowment fund. 

St. Iionis, Mo. — Academy of Science. (G. 
Hambach, Librarian.) 

The library, containing about 15,000 vols., is 
largely composed of the publications of learned 
societiesy especially those relating to natural 
history. 

St. liOnis, Mo. — Mercantile Library. 
(Uoracc Kephart, Librarian.) 

The library has valuable sets of St. Louis news- 
papers from 1819 to date, and a good collection of 
works relating to Missouri or written by Missouri 
authors. It is making a specialty of western 
Americana. 

St. IfOnis, Mo. — Public Library. (Fred'k 
M. Crunden, Librarian.) 

The following special collections should be 
noticed : — 

Shakespeariana : 600 vols. 

Elocution : 500 vols. 

Archaeology : 400 vols. 

Sociology and political economy : over 2000 vols., 
principally English. A partial list appeared in the 
library's Class list of social science and pol. econ., 
Feb. 1889. 

Geology: 1088 vols., which formed the private 
library of Dr. B. F. Shumard, and now increased 
by additions. 

Natural history: 1250 vols., the collection of 
Prof. E. A. Rosmaessler, acquired in 1870-72, with 
recent additions. 

Text-books and works on pedagogy ^ forming a 
Teachers* Department, including 100 vols, given 
by the Froebel Association, comprising the best 
English and German works on the kindergaHen 
system, this whole department numbering over 
3000 vols. For lists of books in the Shumard and 
Rosmaessler collections see the library's Catalogue, 
1870. 

St. Paul, Minn. — Minnesota Historical So- 
ciety. (J. Fletcher Williams, Librarian.) 

Makes a special effort to have everything relating 
to Minnesota, even leaflets, newspaper cuttings, 
hand-bills, etc. The collection numbers at present 
1000 bound voli». and 2500 unbound pams., besides 
nearly 3000 vols, of Minnesota newspapers, com- 
mencing with 1849, and many iiss. A catalogue 
was printed in 1888. The mss. include the jour- 



nals, letter-books, and correspondence of Major L. 
Taliaferro, Indian agent at Ft. Snolling, 1819-1840; 
the same, of H. H. Sibley, Indian trader, 1830- 
1849 (the latter including several thousand pieces) ; 
the papers and writings of the missionary S. W. 
Pond, 1834-1851, etc. 

In the history of the Northwest (Nouvelle 
France) explorations, and especially the Hudson 
Bay region, there is much valuable material; 
500 vols, or more. 

In genealogy (800 works, catalogue 1888) and 
Indian history (500 vols.) the Society purchases 
everything that is offered. Photographs of pio- 
neers, Indian chiefs, and historical views number 
2000; and Congressional publications 1500 vols. 

Salem, Mass. — Essex Institute. (Chas. S. 
Osgood, Librarian.) 

The China library of the Essex Institute contains 
about 735 vols. , collected and presented by T. F. 
Hunt, Esq., and is probably one of the most com- 
plete collections of works relating to that country 
on the shelves of any library in the United States. 

There is also a special Art library, which now 
numbers 893 vols, and some 1000 pams. The 
library of the late Francis Peabody added greatly 
to this department. 

Directories, city and town, number over 1800 
vols., and are not confined to America. College 
catalogues, reports, etc. to the number of 300 vols, 
and 13,000 pams. ; music, 1000 vols, and 4000 pams. ; 
and material relating to Essex county, 1337 vols, and 
about 4219 pams., including complete Salem news- 
papers, make up the special collections of the 
library. 

The museum contains charts, sea journals, paint- 
ings, miniatures, coins, autog^'aphs, antique arti- 
cles and many us. papers and documents. 

The MSS. are voluminous, and include, partly 
in bound volumes, some arranged and many not 
yet arranged, papers of the Orne, English, Pick- 
ering, Hathorne, Coffin, Saltonstall, Derby, Ward, 
Tucker, Goodhue, Holyoke, and other families, 
from the early settlement of the country down to 
recent times, such as deeds, bills, accounts, etc., 
many papers relating to the Revolution, autograph 
letters, documents, and many books and papers of 
societies not now in existence. 

San Franoiaoo, Cal. — Sutro Library. 
(George Moss, Acting Librarian.) 

This library is intended to be mainly a scientific 
and technical one, free to the public fur reference. 
It is at present still in process of collection, and in 
temporary quarters, and therefore not ready for 
general use. Its historical and litmiry depart- 
ments, however, as well as the scientific, contain 
some noteworthy collections. In the former may 
be named : about 4000 vols, of incuna^ula^ mainly 



65 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



66 



from the duplicates of the gre&t Munich library ; 
extensive purchases of classical and early hooks 
from the Duke of Dalberg*s library and the mon- 
astery of Buxheim; about 10,000 pams. of the 
English Civil war and Commonwealth period, 
f ri>m the Sunderland library — a number since 
increased by other purchases to about 25,000 ; an 
equally large number of later English pamphlets, 
ranging down to the i^e o/ Oeorge III. and later, 
among which are many relating to the United 
States and our early struggles for independence, 
and many curious railroad pamphlets. There is 
a large collection of old English plays ; the great 
series of English Calendars of State Papers, and 
other solid collections for English history. About 
1000 Tols. were bought from the Chipstead Park 
library of the late Frederick Perkins, including 
fine illustrated books and the great European art- 
galleries. There is a remarkable collection of 
Mexican hooks, including about 20,000 pams., 
largely of the time of the Mexican war of inde- 
pendence, 1810-1820, but many of them earlier, 
and many more ranging down to the French inva- 
sion ; this collection includes also about 80,000 vols, 
of Mexican and Spanish books, many old, rare, and 
yaluable. There are two very curious collections 
of books of Semitic philology and literature ; one 
of Mss. , very old and of very great interest, bought 
in Jerusalem; the other the library of the late 
Schiller-Szinessy of Cambridge, England, being 
a working library of the Semitic and Hamitic 
languages, literature, theology, and history, of 
about 1500 vols. In the scientific part of the 
library may be noted: the working library for 
chemistry of the late Secretary Wells of the Eng- 
lish Society of Industrial Chemistry, about 2500 
vols; the military library collected by the late 
Col. David Wilder of San Francisco, about 1100 
vols. ; many large and valuable illustrated works 
on architecture, and many important series and 
single works on hotany, these two departments 
being at present exceptionally strong. Many im- 
portant works have also been bought on zoology, 
on scientific voyages, and other departments of 
natural science and mechanics. 

8«i^ajiae, Tenn. — University of the South 
— UoDOSON Library. (W. P. Trent, Acting 
Librarian.) 

Besides a good working classical library, and a 
growing collection of works illustrating ecclesias- 
tical history in the early and middle ages, there is 
a library of Liturgies consisting of 88 special vol- 
umes containing texts of missals, commentaries, 
etc. 

The library of the Fathers is tolerably complete, 
almost entirely in the best Benedictine editions, 
for all writers of the East and West down to 



A.D. 600, and for Western writers to 1400. The 
collection, in 276 vols., was made by T. Mozley 
Starke, and presented by Mrs. C. M. Manigault of 
England. 

Special attention is now being paid to collectin j 
books and pamphlets published in the SouihevK 
States or relating to their history. The collection 
is small at present but is constantly growing. 

South Hadley, Mass. — Mount Holyoke Semi- 
nary AND College. (Mary O. Nutting, Librarian.) 

Coins: Greek and Roman; SAG, carefiilly ar- 
ranged and catalogued, representing the centuries 
between Alexander and Constantine. There are 
also Cufic, Chinese (earlier than the Christian era), 
Japanese and Indian coins, not yet arranged. 

Sprinsfield, Mass. — City Library Associa- 
tion. (William Rice, Librarian.) 

United States documents : 2G48 vols. 

Early English literature : 532 vols. Additions 
are made each year from general funds and from 
the interest of the '* James M. Thompson endow- 
ment fund." 

Ai-t : 1250 vols. 

Shakespeariana : 3S4 vols. 

The library for its size is especially tall in the 
departments of history, theology, and periodical 
literature. 

Syraoiue» N. Y. — Syracuse University. 
(Henry O. Sibley, Librarian.) 

Methodist Episcopal periodicals, missionary, 
church, and Sunday-school reports and confer- 
ence minutes, and works on Methodist Episcopal 
hymnology, discipline, history, and literature. 
The minutes and missionary reports are complete, 
and the intention is to make the library the fullest 
in the world in works relating to the history of the 
Methodist church in the United States. 

The library of the historian Von Ranks was the 
gift of Mrs. J. M. Reid of New York to the Uni- 
versity. This important addition, numbering about 
18,000 vols., 3,000 pams., and 1500 vss., is espe- 
cially rich in German and Italian history, and 
in works relating to the French revolution, the 
collection of contemporaneous pamphlets on this 
last subject being rare and extensive. The 
vss., largely on Italian and German subjects, 
have been exhaustively catalogued by Dr. Wiede- 
mann of Berlin, Von Ranke*s amanuensis. A 
complete history of each ms. was written out, 
and an extensive index prepared. This catalogpie 
of MSB. is a magnificent work of bibliography, 
and took Dr. Wiedemann about three years to 
complete. 

The Von Ranke library is not at present avail- 
able to students, as the German catalogues have 
not as yet been adapted to the library. 



67 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



68 



Topeka, Kan. — Kansas State Histobical 
Society. (Franklin G. Adams, Secretary.) 

The library U devoted to Kansas local his- 
tory and works of general reference, and con- 
tains 64,152 nos. ; namely : 12,950 bound vols, 
of books; 11,414 bound vols, of newspapers and 
periodicals, of which 8412 are of Kansas; 40,152 
pams. ; 10,000 iiss., largely relating to missions 
and Indian afiairs; a large collection of local 
mapSf and at least 1200 photographsy oil paint- 
ings and engravings. About 6000 titles are added 
yearly, by gift and an appropriation of ^600 per 
annum. 

VrbaAAt 0. — Urban A Unitebsitt. (C. B. 
Chace, Librarian.) 

There are 750 vols, of New Church or Sweden- 
borgian literature and magazine publications, a 
nearly complete collection, to which new books as 
published and current magazine matter are added. 
Photogrraphs of Swedenborg's manuscripiSf dona- 
ted by the ** Kotch *' Fund, are being added as fast 
as they appear. 

The college possesses a collection of coins, in- 
cluding a nearly complete series of U. S. copper 
coins up to 1857. 

Washlacton, />. C. — Bureau of Education 
Library. (Henderson Presnell, Librarian.) 

College and school caialogues(^kmer\C2iri) : 80,000 
vols, and pams. 

Pedagogy: books, periodicals, etc., German, 
Austrian, and Swiss, 7000; French, 1200; Eng- 
lish, 2000; American. 10,000; Spain, Portugal, 
Netherlands, Italy, Scandinavia, Russia, South 
and Central American countries, 8,000; on soci- 
ology^ 1000; for reference, such as dictionaries, 
cyclopaedias, etc., 2000; text-books, 8000. Total: 
29,200 vols. 

Pamphlets not included in the above, over 75,000 ; 
number of separate treatises, 123,000. 

The Bureau is printing an index of its books 
by authors, and an analytic index of Barnard's 
journal. 

Waaliiiictoii, Z>. C. — Bureau of Ethnology. 
(Charles Darwin, Librarian.) 

Expects to develop a valuable library through a 
system of exchanges begun in 1889, and has 8,000 
carefully chosen books, selected with a view of not 
duplicating those already accessible in the Library 
of Congress ; also 6000 pams. The books of the 
Anthropological Society of Washington and of the 
Woman*s Anthropological Society are deposited 
here. 

The valuable private library of Mr. J. C. Pilling 
on Indian linguistics is accessible to students in 
the Bureau. 



Washlacton, Z>. (7. — Bureau of Statistics. 
(S. G. Brock, Chief of Bureau.) 

Over 5000 vols, and about 5000 pams. on com- 
mercial statistics and social science received by 
exchange with foreign and state governments, trade 
bodies, etc. 

Washlacton, D. C — Department of State. 
(Frederic Bancroft, Librarian.) 

The library contains about 50,000 vols, in diplo- 
ffuiey, international law^ etc. , and is increased by 
an annual appropriation of ^2000. 

The Revolutionary Archives of the State Depart- 
ment constitute a part of the library, and include 
the diplomatic papers and correspondence of the 
government to 1789, as well as the papers of Wash- 
ington, Madison, Monroe, Jefferson, Hamilton, and 
Franklin. The library also contains the Kohl col- 
lection of copies of early maps of America, of 
which an enumeration is given in Bibliographical 
Contributions of Harvard College Library, no. 19. 
There is a full description of this manuscript ma- 
terial in the Narrative and Critical History of 
America, vol. viii. pp. 414-426. 

The library contains also the laws of the United 
States as engrossed and signed by the presidents, 
and the records of claims and commissions, etc. 

Waaldastoiit D, (7. — Howard Uniyersity 
Library. (Miss Irene C. Tyler, Librarian.) 

About 400 vols, and as many pamphlets on the 
anti-slavery agitcUion^ in large part collected by 
the abolitionist Lewis Tappan of New York. Also 
4000 theological and religious works. 

The whole library contains about 18,000 vols. 

Waaldnctoii, D, C. — Hydrooraphic Office, 
Navy Department. (Lt. Comdr. Richardson 
Clover, U. S. N., Hydrographer.) 

The office forms a part of the Bureau of Naviga- 
tion, and has about 5000 vols, of sailing directions 
of all parts of the world, and kindred works per- 
taining to the subject ; a catalogue was printed in 
1891. There are also about 2500 mss. relating to 
surveys, shoals, the original work of longitude par- 
ties, etc. 

The meteorological division in the office contains 
about 700 vols. , relating in part to ocean meteor- 
ology ^ the use of oil in heavy seas, etc. 12,000 
foreign charts are in archives for reference. 

Wimliliigton, />. C. — Lioht-house Board. 
(Geo. W. Coffin, Comdr. U. S. N., Naval Secre- 
tary.) 

The library contains about 8600 vols., of which 
some 600 are pamphlets. Its specialty is pha- 
rology. It is rich in works on optics, on the 
building of light-ships and on tlie erection of 
light-houses, especially on submarine foundations. 
Additions average about 100 vols, a year. The 



69 



IN AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



70 



library was founded when the Board was organized 
in 1852. An index catalogue of the library of the 
Light-house Board was published in 1886. It is by 
authors only. 

The use of the library is virtually restricted to 
the officers of the light-house service, who are scat- 
tered throughout the maritime States of the Union. 
It is, as to them, a lending library. 

WAshliiCtoa, D, C. — National Museum. 
(John Murdoch, Librarian.) 

The library of the National Museum is under the 
charge of the librarian of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion, and is exclusively scientific. 

The Rau library of archaeology, 715 vols, and 
1722 pams., was bequeathed to the Museum by the 
Curator of archaeology, the late Dr. Charles Rau. 

The Isaac Lea collection, HOG vols, and pams., 
almost exclusively zodlogieal, was presented to 
the Museum by the heirs of the distinguished natu- 
ralist, Dr. Isaac Lea, of Philadelphia. 

The Samuel Brown collection, 150 vols., contain- 
ing many rare and curious old works on alchemy, 
chemistry, and kindred subjects, was presented by 
Dr. J. C. Brown, of Haddington, Scotland. 

** Sectional libraries*' are collections perma- 
nently loaned to the curators of special branches 
of science in the Museum from the accessions to 
the Smithsonian deposit in the Library of Congress 
as well as from books belonging exclusively to the 
Museum. Among these are the departments of : — 

Birds, 826 vols, and pams. ; chemistry, miner- 
alogy, etc. 758 ; ethnology, 565 ; fishes, 119; mam- 
mals, 515; marine invertebrates, 125; geology, 
1450; materia medica, 456; prehistoric antliro- 
pology, 160; oriental archaeology, 700; insects, 
1550; plants, 2080. 

There are two special collections kept in the 
central library : anthropology, 840 vols. ; and 
geological reports, government explorations, etc. 
365 vols. 



It D. C. — National Museum op 
Hygiene. (Philip S. Wales, Medical director in 
charge.) 

The library contains about 15,000 vols, on 
hygiene and kindred subjects, which includes the 
old Naval medical library of 3000 vols., and was 
founded in 1882 by its present director. 

Waaldngton, 7>. C. — Naval Observatory 
Library. (H. M. Paul, Librarian.) 

This is essentially a reference library, intended 
to be as complete as possible in astronomy and 
mathemxitics ; tlie collection of serials in these 
subjects is probably more complete than in any 
other library in the United States. From 1845, 
when the library was founded, until 1878, the 
growth was principally by exchange; since 1878 



the annual appropriation bills have contained a 
regular item of $1000 for the library, which has 
been expended in completing and keeping up the 
periodiccUM, and in purchasing old and rare books 
and such important new ones as could not be ob- 
tained by exchange. The library is especially rich 
in complete sets of the publications of the older 
academies of science and of the long-established 
periodicals devoted to astronomy and geodesy, 
mathematics, physics, and chemistry. It is prac- 
tically complete in the publications of astronomical 
ohservcUories and societies, of geodetic bureaus and 
of the older meteorological and magnetic observa- 
tories; also in star catalogues and charts, in astro- 
nomical tables and ephemerides, in the bibliography 
and history of astronomy and mathematics, and in 
the collected works of astronomers, mathemati- 
cians, and physicists. It has a pretty full collec- 
tion of mathematiccU tables, including some rare 
early prints of logarithm tables. 

Besides the endeavor towards completeness in 
all branches of astronomical literature and the 
other above-mentioned subjects, the library obtains 
the most important modern works (separate treati- 
ses and periodicals) in the various branches of 
mathematics, physics (especially full in optics), 
chemistry, electricity and magnetism, photography, 
engineering, geography, horology, and instrume '^- 
making. 

WasWngton, Z>. C. — Patent Office — Sci- 
entific Library. (Howard L. Prince, Librarian.) 

This library, containing about 60,000 vols, and 
pams., possesses the paient publications of all 
nations, and in addition a general collection of 
applied science* There are about 1300 vols, on 
electricity, in which the library has used more 
especial efiforts than in other branches to make its 
collection fairly complete, at least as far as recent 
publications are concerned. Next to this the col- 
lections on sanitation and photography may be 
mentioned. 

About 2000 vols, a year are added through pur- 
chase, gift, and exchange. A catalogue was printed 
in 1878 and supplements in 1883 and 1888. 

A card index of articles in about 200 scientific 
and technical periodicals in English and Continental 
languages, commencing Jan. 1, 1891, is now in use. 

Wasbliistcin, Z>. (7. — Post Office depart- 
ment. (Miss Lucy A. Henley, Librarian.) 

The library contains, besides government docu- 
ments, 1000 vols, on the postal service. 

Waahiacton, Z>. C. — Surgeon-oeneral's Of- 
fice, U. S. Army. (John S. Billings, Surgeon, in 
charge. ) 

The library of the Surgeon-general's Office, the 
largebt medical library in the world, has 104,000 



71 



SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 



72 



vols, and 159,000 pams. This is thought to include 
over ninety per cent, of the medical literature of 
the last ten years and about one eighth of the medi- 
cal works issued before 1500. The first volume 
of a printed catalogue appeared in 1880, and the 
twelfth, in 1891, comes down to Shuttleworth. 

Wasliiiicton, D. C — U. S. Coast akd Geo- 
detic SuBVET. (F. H. Parsons, Librarian.) 

The library contains 800 atlases, 12,000 charts, 
American and foreign, and 15,000 vols. 

The special directions in wMch additions are 
being made to this collection are along the lines of 
pure mathematics, astronomy, geodesy, metrology, 
and the publications of engineering and other set- 
entific societies. 

Waaldncton, D, C. — U. S. Geological Sub- 
VEY. (Charles Darwin, Librarian.) 

The library of the survey, begun in 1882, con- 
tains already 80,811 vols, and 60,000 pams. A 
small number of these were inherited from the old 
Hayden survey ; 1900 were purchased from Bobert 
Clarke of Cincinnati, and formed an almost com- 
plete collection of the official geological reports of 
the United States ; 700 vols, and 5000 pams. were 
bought at the sale of the Desnoyers collection in 
Paris, relating to European and early geology, and 
especially rich in vulcanology ; but the larger part 
of the collection has been received through a care- 
fully organized system of exchange with geological 
institutions and societies. 

The library is strictly confined to books relating 
to geology or containing matter of geological in- 
terest. Its collection of United States geological 
survey publications, both state and federal, is prac- 
tically complete. In pcUaeobotany its collection 
may be said to be complete as to North America, 
and nearly complete in descriptive and systematic 
works relating to all lands, and to all branches of 
the subject, with the exception of works treating 
of fossil diatomaceae. 

In geology it has tlie important works and in 
palaeontology good working collections as well as 
a large and fine collection of author's excerpts and 
separates. 

The library is collecting and indexing and arrang- 
ing all maps which would be of use to the scien- 
tific corps of the survey, and has already 20,000. 

A general bibliog[raphy of North American ge- 
ology is under way. 

Washington, D,C. — U. S. Weatheb Bubeact. 
(Oliver L. Fassig, Librarian.) 

The library, of about 13,000 vols., contains 6000 
vols, on meteorology, 600 meteorological charts, 
besides other scientific works. Additions at the 
rate of about 1000 vols, a year are due largely to 
exchanges with foreign and home meteorological 
services. A catalogue was printed in 1872 and 



again in 1880. The library has a card cataAogue 
of the printed literature of meteorology down to the 
close of 1881, with an incomplete supplement to 
the close of 1890. The portions of the catalogue 
relating to temperature, moisture, winds and storms 
— some 15,000 titles in all — have been included 
in 0. L. Fassig's Bibliography of meteorology, 
1889-91. 

In July, 1891, the Weather Bureau was trans- 
ferred from the Signal Service Bureau, War Dept., 
to the Agricultural Dept. There is at present in 
the Signal Corps, U. S. A., War Dept., a special 
library of about 500 vols, on military signalling 
and allied subjects. 

5^^ By a recent joint resolution of Congress 
the principal governmental collections in Washing- 
ton were declared to be '' accessible, under such 
rules and restrictions as the officers in charge of 
each collection may prescribe, or as are already, 
or hereafter may be, prescribed by act of Con- 
gress, to the students of any institution of higher 
education incorporated under the laws of Congress 
or of the District of Columbia." The object of 
the above resolution was stated to be "to encour- 
age the establishment and endowment of institu- 
tions of learning at the national capital by defining 
the policy of the Government with reference to 
the use of its literary and scientific collections by 
students." 

Wellesley, Mass, — Welleslet College Li- 
BBABT. (H. Hawes, Librarian.) 

Has a collection of over 400 works for the study 
of comparative philology, with special reference to 
North American languages ; the gift of Prof. E. N. 
Horsford. A catalogue was printed in 1888. 

The purchase of the Powell Library by Prof. 
Horsford in May, 1891, increased this collection by 
some 1020 vols, and pams. This library was col- 
lected by Major J. W. Powell, Director of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, and consists largely of works 
compiled by missionaries to further their religious 
labors among the Indians. Prof. Hosford has also 
added the mss. of Dr. Silas T. Rand, late missionary 
to the Micniac Indians. 

West Point, y, Y, — U. S. Militabt Academy. 
(Prof. Peter S. Michie, Librarian.) 

The library, founded in 1812, contains 31,000 
vols, and 8200 pams., the majority dealing with 
science, military tactics, mathematics, civil engi- 
neering, veterinary art, etc. ; and is for the use of 
professors, officers, and cadets only. 

Additions are now made by purchase from the 
annual appropriation of Congress, and average 800 
vols. 

A catalogue was printed in 1876 and a supple- 
ment in 1882 ; a card catalogue was begun in 1891. 



73 



IK AMERICAN LIBRARIES. 



74 



p, Penn, . — Wyoming Histori- 
cal AND Geological Society. ( Librarian.) 

The library, devoted to Amerteana and science, 
nnmbers about 5000 toIs. and 5000 pams. It has 
been formed principally by gift and exchange since 
1858, and makes a specialty of matter relating to 
the Wyoming Valley; it has about 1000 mss. re- 
lating to the latter subject ; also 7000 coins. 

The priyatc library of Her. Horaco Edwin Haydcn, one of 
the memben of the Society, relates to the same niibjecta and 
contains 4000 toIb. and 4000 pams. and 2000 coins. See his 
*' Bibliography of Wyoming" in the Proccedhigs of the 
Society, ii. M-4S1. 

WoVvm* Miiss. — Public Libraby. (W. R. 
Cutter, Librarian.) 

Has some 4000 mbs. relating to the local history of 
Wohumf and about 1000 surrey or's plans of Wobum 
estates, etc. ; also 200 toIs. of Shakespeariana, 

Woodstook, Md, — Collbob Libbaby. (A. J. 
Maas, S.J., Librarian.) 

Contains about 40,000 works, theology, philoso- 
phy, and ecclesiastical history being well repre- 
sented. 

BihU polyglots : the four great ones of Alcala, 
London, Paris, and Antwerp, and a number of 
smaller ones. 

Bible study: 4000 vols., many in foUo. 

Patristic theology : 2000 vols.; a complete set of 
Fathers, ecclesiastical writers and Doctors from 
S. Barnabas to Innocent III., 60 (y)-1216 a.d. 

Coins: 5000 specimens, Roman and modem, 
with several Papal medals. 

Jesuitica: 1000 vols. 

Bihliotheea Catholica Americana up to 1825: 
300 vols, and 50 pams. ; Jesuit missionary collec- 
tion for Maryland and Pennsylvania. A nearly 
complete set of the annual Province-catalogues of 
the Society of Jesus since its suppression in 1778. 

Wore— tTt Mass. — Fbbe Pubuc Library. 
(Samuel S. Green, Librarian.) 

Has valuable sets of foreign and American peri- 
odicals on mathematics, physics, chemistry, J>i- 

ology, engineering, and on the applications of 



science, in all 4500 vols. ; also periodicals on deco- 
rative painting, joinery, and furniture, and espe- 
cially those relating to the fine arts. In the last 
department may be mentioned a full set of the 
plates issued by the Arundel Society, and a con- 
siderable and growing collection of photographs 
of works by the great masters. The library has a 
complete set of Cobbett's Parliamentary history of 
England, Hansard^s Parliamentary debates, and 
complete sets of the Congressional globe, Con- 
gressional record, Niles's register, Annals of 
Congress and Congressional debates, and other 
material useful in the study of English and Ameri- 
can history. 

Funerai sermons : a collection beg^n by Samuel 
G. Drake ; 1500 pams. 

Laboring classes in England: 100 pams. col- 
lected by Senator Geo. F. Hoar, showing the feel- 
ing of laboring men there twenty or twenty-five 
years ago. 

Woro«fltor, Mass, — Worcester Society of 
Antiquity. (Thomas Adams Dickinson, Libra- 
rian.) 

The library of the Society, 14,000 vols., relates 
principally to local history and genealogy. The 
'* George Allen Library" of 2800 vols, and 2000 
pams. illustrates the theology of New England or 
Congregationalism, and contains many rare books 
once owned by distinguished ministers, with their 
notes, and with annotations by Mr. Allen. 

The John Downes collection comprises 681 al- 
manacs, with some fine specimens of English 
almanacs of the 17th and early part of the 18th 
centuries ; also about 500 vols, of scientific works 
used by Mr. Downes in making computations for 
the Nautical almanac; publications of Isaiah 
Thomas ; 12 different issues of the New England 
Primer from 1779 ; and a collection of early school 
books. 

Catalogues of the Downes collection and the 
Greorge Allen library are in preparation. There 
is a complete set of the Proceedings of Congress 
since 1789 in the Society's library. 



The Editors regret that they are unable to hiclude any account of the largest library in the United States, the 
Congressional Library in Washington. In tlie present crowded condition of that institution, the librarian has found it 
impossible to Aunish any satisfactory statement in detail of its resources. 



A tuperior ftgure * itkdieaUt a iecond notice in the tame column. 



Abbot. Ezn, 10. 
Abenaki msb. 19. 

AcAonnr or Nat. Scdencib, Phila, 61. 
ArosU, 43. 
Adams, Geo. 8. 
Adams fiunily papers, 63. 
Adklbbbt Collkgk, 25. 
Admiuistrative law, 42. 
Admiralty cases, Sir U. Lee, 56. 
Africa, «9. 
Agnew, S. 60. 

Agricultaral experiment stations, 9. 
Agriculture, 9, 81. 
Alchemy, 69. 
Aldines, 44. 
Aldricb, Charles, 27. 
Alexander, 8. 60. 
AlXI«HBNT CoLLsax, 35. 
Allen, Geo. 57, 58, 74. 
Allen, Thomas, 69. 
Almanacs, 74; nautical, 5, 70. 
Alpine literature, 6, 22. 
America. ^«e Americana; Buccaneers; 
Canada; Central America: Hudson 



Bay; Indians; Mexico; Mississippi 
Valley: Mound-builders; North 
West Territories; South America; 
United Butes; Yucatan; and the 
names of separate states and places. 
AxKBicAN Baptist Hibt. Soc. 51. 

AXKBICAN ACAOKXT OT ABTB AND Sci- 
■NCBB, 5. 

AxxBicAN Biblb Soc. 40. 
American Bible Union, 86. 

AXXUCAM BOABD OT COXMIBBIOHXBB 
FOB FOBBIGN MlBBIONB, 6. 

American ethnology, 21. 

AxBBicAN Gboo. Soc. 40. 

American literature, 15, 28; early eds. 

35, 44; poetry, 44, 61. 
Akbbican mubxum or Nat. IIibt. 40. 
Amxbican NumB. Ain> Abchabol. Soc. 

41. 
AxBBicAN Obibntal Scfc. 37. 
AxBBicAir Pbilobophical Soc. 51. 
American poetry, 44, 61. 
Amxbioan Soc. or Civil Enoibbbbs, 

41. 
American Statistical Association, 10. 
AxBBiCAB Sunday School Union, 58. 
Americana, 1, 9, 11>, 18, 15, 17, 24>, 28, 85, 

40. 43, 68, 78. 
bibliography, 44; biography, 28 ; co- 

lonial Taws, 55 ; minutes of colonial 

assemblies, 55: Northwest, 80, 64; 

Spanish xbb. 45 ; Western, 24, 26, 63. 
Anderson, engrayer, 45. 
Anglinff, 44. 
Anglo-Saxon language and literature, 27, 

60. 
Anthony, H. B. 61. 
Anthropology, 21, 67, 69. 
Antiquities. Hee Archaeology. 
Aphorisms, 45. 

Appalachian Moitntain Club, 6. 
Appleton, T. G. 13. 

Appbxntiobb' Libbabt, yew York^ 41. 
Arabia, 48. 

Arabic literature, 87, 88, 68. 
Arachnology, 7. 
Arboriculture, 11. 
Archaeology, 8, 10, 11. 21, 28, 25, 46, 49, 

60, 68, 69; »ee aleo Aztec relics; 

Egypt; Mound-builders. 
Architecture, 10, 11, 31, 41, 42, 66. 
Arctic yoyages, 48, 50. 
Aristotle, 60. 
Arnold, James, 87. 
Arnold, Matthowi 11. 



Art, 8, 11, 24, 28, 41, 45, 46, 48, 40, 60, 64, 
65, 66, 74; see aUo Architecture: 
Decorative art; Engravings; Gold 
and silver work; Photographs; 
Sculpture. 

Astoin collection, 45. 

Abtor Libbabt, 41. 

Astronomy, 5, 12, 21, 80, 60, 09, 71. 

Atlases. See Maps. 

Australia, 14. 

Autograph xbb. 16, 53; tee alto Manu- 
scripts. 

Autographs, 16, 19, 27, 58; American, 28; 
chess-players, 57; freemasons, 28. 

Aztec relics, 52. 

Backus, Isaac, papers, 62. 

Bacon, II. D. 5. 

Ballads. See Folklore. 

Baltimore. Lords. See Calvert. 

Bampton lectures, 59. 

Baptism, 60. 

Baptist Union Tbbol. Sbx. 86. 

Baptists, 36. 51. 

Barclay, John, 30. 

Barney, Commodore, papers, 66. 

Barros, 43. 

Barthema, 43. 

Barton, T. P. 12. 

Bartram xbb. 56. 

Batbb Collbob, 82. 

Bedel, Col. Timothy, papers, 27. 

Bell, C. H. 26. 

Benkard, J. 48. 

Bentlev. William, 85. 

Beowulf, 8. 

Bkbkbhirb Athbnaeux, 50. 

Berkshire Co. Mass. 59. 

Bernard, Gov. papers, 19. 

Betagat scriptures, 61. 

Bethlehem, Pa. usa, 57. 

Bethlehem archives, 5. 

Bctts, C. W. 89. 

Bewick. 45. 

Bibles, 4, 15, 16, 19, 20, 86, 87, 40, 43, 46, 

49; facsimiles of XBB. 60; polyglots, 

29,73. 
Biblical commentaries, 8. 
BibUcal criticism, 19. 20. 
Biblical literature, 54, 73. 
Bibliography, 24>, 29, 81, 44, 58; astro- 

nomical, 70. 
BiUings, F. 16. 
Bindings, fine, 5, 24. 
Biography. 4, 28, 39; tee alto Portraits. 
Bird, F. M. 49. 
Birds, 11, 32, 40, 60, 61. 
Bimey, J. G. 3. 
Bimey, Gen. W. 8. 
Bluntschli, J. C. 8. 
Bobadilla, 46. 
Bohemian literature, 24. 
Bontckoe, 43. 
Boone, Daniel, 84. 
Bopp, F. 31. 
BoUny, 7, 9, 22, 23, 40, 42, 69, 61, 65, 69; 

Bartram xbb. 56. 
Boudinot, Ellas, papers, 56. 
Bowditch, Natl. 12. 
Bowdoin, Gov. James, 5, 15. 
BowDoiN Collbob Libbabt, 15. 
Bowie, R. A. 58. 
Bradford, Thos. papers, 66. 
Bradford, W. papers, 55. 
Bradley, C. W. 37. 
Braun's photographs, 6. 
Breck, Sam. papers, 52. 
Breckinridge, B. J. 27. 
Brevoort, J, C. 40. 



Brewster, B. H. 59. 
Breydenbach, 43. 
Bridges, 10. 
Briggs, C. A. 48. 
Brooklyn, N- Y. 15. 
Brown, Dr. J. C. 69. 
Brown, Moses, papers, 61. 
Brown, Samuel, 09. 
Bbown Univbbbity, 61. 
Brownell, Bishop, 30. 
Brownism, 7. 
Buccaneers, 43. 
Buddhism, 61. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 16. 
Bulkley, Gershom, 30. 
Bull, Ole, 85. 
Bunyan, John, 44, 46. 
Bums, R. MM. 46. 
Buxheim, Monastery of, 05. 
Buxton, Me. 59. 
Byron, 6. 

California, 45. 

CALiroBNiA, Univbbbitt or, 5. 

Calvert (Lords Baltimore) papers, 4. 

Campbell, Charles, papers, 63. 

Canada, 48, 48; xbb. 46. 

Canon law, 4, 80. 

Cai-ey, H. C. 59. 

Carlyle, T. 18. 

Carnegie, A. 59. 

Cabt Libbabt, 33. 

Castanheda, 43. 

Catalan language, 16. 

Catholic church, 16, 27, 41, 49, 50, 60; 
tee alto Jesuits ; Popery. 

Catholic Club, 41. 

Cattell, Prcs. 28. 

Central American xbb. 52. 

Ceramics, 47. 

Chalmers, Geo. papers, 46. 

Chambers, T. W. 37. 

Champion, Henry, 89. 

Champlain, 43. 

Chandler, Seth, 26. 

Cbanning, W. £. 12. 

Chap-books, 18 ; tee alto Folklore. 

Charts, 3, 40, 60, 68, 71. 

Chase, Bishop C. SO. 

Chase, Gen. Jonathan, papers, 27. 

Chemistry, 5, 10, 23, 25, 33, 42, 54, 65, 60. 

Chess, 57. 

Chicago, 24. 

ChUd, F. J. 18. 

Childs, G. W. 53. 

China, 37, 43. 48. 64. 

Chinese literature, 38, 48, 58. 

Christian evidences, 60. 

Church fathers, 28, 29, 49, 65, 73. 

Church history, 8, 28, 37, 60, 60, 65; 
Dort, synod of, 37: lluguenoU*, 42; 
missions. 6, 8, 89, 48, 51, 67 ; Reforma- 
tion, 22, 32, 49; Sunday schools, 53; 
and other heads referred to under 
Theology. 

Church manuals, 7. 

Church music, 39, 59. 

Cincinnati, Society of, 58; XB. records, 
62. 

Civil law, 4, 17, 20, 30. 

CUrk, Geo. R. 34. 

Classical philology, 18, 25. 

CUasics, 4, 12, 18, 25, 26, 28>, 31, 83, 46, 58, 
65*. 

Clifford papers, 57. 

Clinton, Gov. Geo. papers, 1. 

Clothier, Caleb, 57. 

Cocke family papers, 68. 

Coffin ligimily papers, 64. 



78 



INDEX. 



Ck>i]]8, 8, 4, 6, 0, 24, 89, 41, 49, 50, 52, 80, 
66, 67, 78*; m« alio liiunisinatics. 

American, 86 ; Greek and Roman, 8. 

CoUege cataloRueii, 64, 67. 
CoLLsai OF Nkw Jsbsbt, 60. 
CoLumuA Coll. Libbaxt, 42, 47. 
Colnmbiu, C. 43, 46. 
Columbiu, Diego, 45. 
Colwell, Stephen, 59. 
ColweU, T. M. 86. 
Conant, T. J. 86. 
ConcboloK7, 7, 40, 51. 
Concord, liaas. 96. 

CoirOBSeATIONAL LnBABT, 7. 

Congregationalifm, 7, 88, 74. 
Connecncat, 29, 37, 52; election sermons, 

7; X8B. 46. 
ComnBCTicxTT Statb Libsabt, 29. 
Connecticat Supreme Court, 89. 
Constitutional conyentions, 1. 
Cooke, OoT. Nicholas, papers, 62. 
Cooper, J. T. 1. 
Coptic church, 87. 
CoBHSLL Unit. Luuubt, 81. 
Cortes, 48, 45. 
Costume, 11. 
Cotheal, A. I. 40. 
Cotton MSB. 12. 
Couto, 48. 

Creamer, David, 84. 
Credner, K. A. 22. 
Crcigh, J. B. 58. 
CromweU, Olirer, 18. 
Cruikshank, 45. 
Crjstallomuphy, 2. 
Cushing, J. N. 61. 

CUTTXNO'8 LiBBAXT, 88. 

CuYiXB Club Librabt, 25. 

Dalbexg, Dnke of, 65. 

Dance of Death, 45. 

Danforth coll. on education, 26. 

Danish literature, 16. 

Dante, 4*, 18, 42, 60. 

Dante Society, 18. 

Dabtmouth Collkos Libbabt, 28. 

Day, 6. E. 80. 

Day, Henry, 49. 

De Bry, 48. 

Decorative art, 10, 11, 74. 

Defoe, Daniel, 28. 

Deistic controversy, 48. 

De Koninck, L. G. 21. 

Delaware, mm. 57; Bead pikers, 56. 

Delaware language, 19. 

Dblawabb watb Libbabt» 27. 

De Peyster. J. W. 42, 48. 

Derby fiunily papers, 64. 

Des Moines Klver, 27. 

Desnoyers collection, 71. 

De Veer, 48. 

Dewey, Dr. 88. 

Dexter, H. M. 7, 88. 

Diplomacy, 68. 

Directories, 7, 64. 

Dispensatories, 8. 

Dissenting controversies, 48. 

Dissertations, inaugural, etc. 25. 

DiviNiTT School or tbs F. S. Chubob, 

58. 
Dizwell papers, 87. 
Dorr, Sullivan. 61. 
Dort, Synod or. 87. 
Douglass, Bei\). 28. 
DowneSjjJohn, 74. 
Dowse, Thomas, 9. 
Drake, Sir Francis, 48. 
Drake, S. 6. 74. 
Drama, 12, 45; tee tUeo English drama; 

French drama; etc. 
Draper, A. 8. 2. 
Draper, L. C. 84. 

Dbbw Thboloqigal Sbxib abt, 88. 
Drcxel, J. W. 45, 47. 
Dbexbl Institutb, 58. 
Drowne, Dr. Sol. 62. 
Duran, 45. 

Dutch literature. 16, 81. 34, 87. 
Dutch Beformea churches, 42. 
Duyckinck, E. A. and 6. L. 44. 

Early printed books. See Incunabula. 
East India Reports, 57. 
Ebeling, Flrof. 17, 20. 



Eddas, 11; sm aito loelaadic Uteratare. 
Education, 22, 26, 46, 57, 68, 67; coUese 

catalogues, 64, 67; Kindergarten, A; 

school catalogues, 67 ; text-books, 

59. 67, 74. 
Edwards,Dr. Jonathan, 89. 
Egmont, Earl of, 49. 
Egypt, 4, 11. a, 87, 88. 
Election sermons. ^Sm Sennons,eliectlon. 
Electricity, 5, 10, 11, 54, 70. 
EUot, S. A. 17. 
EUiot, D. G. 40. 
ElUot, Mrs. M. S. 40. 
Elocution, 68. 
Emblems, 45. 
Embryolosy, 21. 
Emerson, B. W. 26. 
Engineering, 5, 10, 41, 50>, 72 ; submarine, 

2, 68 ; eee alto Bailroads. 
England : Civil war and Commonwealth, 

65 ; historical pamphlets, 65 ; history, 

4, 11, 18. 80, 87, 02, 65, 74; laws, 14, 

25 : parliamentanr papers, 18. 
English drama, 12, 58, 59, 65. 
English fiction, 48. 
English laboring classes, 74. 
English language, 29. 
English literature, 28; eariy, 16, 27, 66. 
English poetry, 44. 
English nmily, papers, 64. 
Engravings, 10, 18, 24, 41, 45, 40, 60. 
Entomologpr, 7, 15, 21, 40. 
Ephemerides, 5, 70. 
Episcopal church, 80, 58. 
Episcopal Divinrt Schooi^ Phiia. 58. 
Epitaphs. 60. 
Esqnemelin, 48. 
Ess, L. van, 49. 
Essex County, Mass. 64. 

ESBBX IN WI T UTB , 64. 

Ethics, 8. 

Ethnology, 21, 67, 09. 
Everett, Edw. 18; death of; 18. 
Evidences. See Christian evidences. 
Experiment stations, 9. 
Extra-iUnstrated books, 18. 

Fathers. See Church fitthers. 

Fennerpapers, 62. 

Field, Chester, 18. 

Field papers, 62. 

Fillmore, Mrs. Millard, 16. 

Finance, 59 ; eee alto Political economy. 

Fine arts. See Art. 

Finotti, Father, 50. 

Fires, medals relating to, 86. 

Fisher, John, 60. 

Fishes, 25, 40, 44. 

Fishing,44. 

Fiske. WiUard, 81. 

Florida, West, xsfl. 46. 

Folklore, 18, 81. 

Force, Peter, 18. 

Forestry, 11, 16. 

Foesil insects, 21; ass aito Palaeon- 
tolo«y. 

Foster, John, printer, 13. 

Foster, Theo. papers, 61. 

Fox, George, 80. 

France, history, 4; tee alto French rev- 
olution. 

public documents, 15. 

Francis, Joseph, 36. 

Franklin, Beig. 11, 12, 47; papers, 51, 56, 
68. 

Franklin, W. T. letters, 51. 

Fbakklin Ih witutb , 54. 

Frederick the Great, 18. 

FreemasoniT, 23. 

French and Indian war, papers, 52. 

French drama, 38. 

French literature, 11, 12, 25, 45. 

French pamphlets, 59. 

French revolution, 4, 32, 55, 66. 

French spoliations, 11. 

Friends, 80, 87, 54>, 57; xs. records, 55. 

Fbibndb* Fbxx Libbabt, ^ermafUoion, 
54. 

Fbibnds' Libbabt, 54. 

Fur-trading, 84. 

Garfield, Pres. 87. 
Gates, Horatio, letters, 15. 
Gazetteers, 7. 



GenealogT, 1. 7, U, 15*, 16, M>, 96, 99, 
84, Sn, 88, 30, 47, 54, 60, 64, 74; sm 
alto under xss. die vanona fiunily 
papers. 

Gbhxbal Thboloqigal Libbabt, 8. 

Geodesy, 92, 70, 71. 

Geograpnical secietiaa, 6. 

Geography, 15, 21, 81, 40; sm alto 
Gaietteert; Monntaina; Ptolemy; 
Travels. 

physical, 16, 00. 

G«ok>gy, 2, 21, 28, 88,40, 68, 59, 68, 09, TL 

German literature, ll, 9a, 47. 

Germanic philology, 95. 

Qtrmtaj, history, 17, (16; law, 14, 17, 91. 

GmcttrE.H.48: 

GUpin library, 55. 

Glass, 47. 

Goethe, 8, 49. 

Gold and silver work, 47. 

Goinara,48. 

Gonxalez de Mendosa, 48. 

Goodell, W. 50. 

Goodhue fkmily papers, 64. 

Grant, U. & 18. 

Graves, J. T. 40. 

Gray, Asa, 99. 

Gray* F. C. 10. 

Ghat Hbbbabiux, 22. 

Great Britain. See EngUmd. 

Greek lexicons, 80. 

Greek literature. Ses Classics. 

Green, J. C. 48. 

Green, 8. A. 12. 

Greene, A. G. 61. 

Greenough, Alfred, 10. 

Grrotins,49. 

Grynaeus, 48. 

Gnmey, E. W. 17. 

Guyot, A. 00. 

Hagen, H. A. 21. 

Hakluyt,43. 

Hale, B. S. 2. 

Hall, Fitxedward, 19. 

Hamilton, Alex, papers, 68. 

Hamilton papers, 57. 

Hamilton Collbob, 26. 

Hammond coUectlon, 48. 

Harris, C. F. 61*. 

Harris, William, papers, 62. 

Harter, J. 28. 

Hartgers, 48. 

Habvabd UBrvBBsiTT Libbabt, 17. 

Hassler, C. W. 49. 

Hatfield, E. F. 48. 

Hathome fiunilv papers, 64. 

Haven, H. A. 60. 

Havens, D. W. 37. 

Havbbpobd Collbgb Libbabt, 80. 

Hayden, F. V. 59. 

Hayden, H. E. 78. 

Health, boards of, 14. 

public. See Hygiene; Sanitary 

science. 
Heat, 5. 
Hebraica, 46. 

Hbbbxw Eduoatiok Soc. 54. 
Heckewelder letters, 52. 
Heidelberg catechism, 87. 
Helbig, Dr. 3. 
Hengstenberg, E. W. 86. 
Hennepin, 43. 

Henry. William, papers, 56. 
Heraldry. 11, 84. 
Herbestoin, 48. 
Herodotus, 42. 
Higginson, T. W. 17. 
HiUhouae, W. 89. 
Hindu law, 2. 
Historical fiction, 11. 

HlSTOBICAL ABO PBlLOfl. SOO. OP OHIO, 
25. 

Historical societies, 24, 02. 

Historical sources, 29. 

History, 28; mediaeval, 17: tee alto Lit- 
erary history; Local niatory; Mili> 
tary history. 

Hitchcock, B. D. 48. 

HitteU, J. S. 5. 

Hoar, G. F. 74. 

HoDOBON Libbabt, 65. 

Holland, history, 81, 84. 

Holland Soc. 42, 

Holyoke fiunily papers, 64. 



INDEX. 



79 



HOPB COLLKOB, 31. 

Hopkins, Esek, papen, 62. 

Hopkins, Timothy, 51. 

Horace, 45. 

Horsford, E. N. 72. 

Horticulture, 9. 

Howaud Mbxobial Lixbabt, 50. 

Howard Univ. Libbaby, 68. 

Howgil, Francis, 30. 

Hudson Bay region, 64. 

HUGUBNOT SOCIBTT, 42. 

Huguenots, 42. 

Hulsius, 43, 46. 

Humboldt, Alex, von, 13. 

Hunt, B. P. 12. 

Hunt. T. F. M. 

Hutcnins, Tbos. papers, 56. 

Hydrography, 68. 

Hygiene, 69; public, 14, 32, 70. 

Hymnology, 29, 34, 48, 51, 58. 

Icelandic literature, 16, 85; see also 

Eddas. 
Ichthyology, 25, 40, 44. 
Immaculate Conception, 49. 
Incunabula, 24, 32, 34, 413, 43, 47^ 49^ 54; 

Aldines, 44. 
Indexes, Roman, 44. 
India, 37, 48. 
Indian languages (American), 19, 52, 67, 

72; Abenaki, 19; Delaware, 19. 
Indian trading, xss. 64. 
Indian treaties, 52. 
Indiana, 31. 

Indiana Statb Library, 31. 
Indians, American, 48, 64; mbb. 46, 67; 

photographs, 25; «<•« also American 

ethnology; Mound-builders. 
Industrial questions, 7 ; see also Labor; 

Political economy. 
International law, 68. 
Iowa, 23. 

Iowa Mabokic Library, 23. 
Iowa Statb Library, 27. 
Irish literature, 41. 
Irvine, J. & W. papers, 55. 
Italian literature, 11, 16, 61; see also 

Dante. 
Italy, history, 66. 
Ives, M. B. 61. 

Japan, 48. 

Japanese literature, 38, 58. 

Jay, J. C. 4A. 

Jennings, Francis, 51. 

Jefferson, Thomas, papers, 68. 

Jesuit Reflations, 43, 46. 

Jesuits, 73. 

Jcwett, H. J. 40. 

Jewish literature, etc. See Judaica. 

Johns Hopkins University, 3. 

Johnson, Joshua S. papers, 57. 

Johnson, O. 50. 

Johnson, Sir W. papers, 1. 

Jones, A. J. 61. 

Judaica, 29, 46, 54. 

Junius, 28, 58. 

Kansas, 67. 

Kansas Statb Hibt. Soc. 67. 

Kant, 31, 42. 

Kehoe. L. 50. 

Kennebec proprietors, papers, 60. 

Kennedy, J. S. 46. 

Kennedy, R. L. 48. 

Kenton, Simon, 84. 

Kbntucky Polyteohnio Soc. 33. 

Kinderfirarten, 63. 

King, William, papers, 60. 

Koopman, H. L. 16. 

Kurtz, B. 28. 

Labor, 7, 42, 74. 

Lace, 47. 

Lafayette, Gen. 28. 

Lataybtte College, 27. 

Lagrange, Baron, 88. 

La Ilarpc xs. 52. 

Langdon, John, letters, 56. 

Landscape garaeuing, 11. 

Lanman, C. R. 19. 

Las Casas, 43, 45. 

Latin literature. See Classics. 

Laurens, Henry, papers, 15, 56. 

Laurens, John, papers, 16. 



Law, 1, 20, 28, 27*, 39, 85, 86, 89, 48, 50; 
early editions, 21; adminibtrative 
law, 42; admiralty cases, 56; canon 
law, 4, 80; civil law, 4, 17, 20, 89; 
East India Reports, 57; Hindu law, 
2; international law. 68; local ad- 
min}stration|42; trials, 89. 

Law Assoc, oi' Philadelphl4, 57. 

Law reports, 26, 27, 29, 32, 57. 

Laws (statutes, codes, etc.), 14, 27, 29, 
32; American, 67; Amer. colonial, 
55; Maine, 50. 

Lea, Isaac, 69. 

Learned societies. See Society publica- 
tions. 

Lee, A. and R. H. letters and papers, 15, 
19, 52. 

Lee, Sir Geo. papers, 56. 

Lee, William, papers, 62. 

Lee family papers, 68. 

Leeser, I. 54. 

Leidy, Joseph, 59. 

Lbxonnibr Library, 50. 

Lenox Library, 42. 

Lescarbot, 43. 

Leutsch, Ernst von, 58. 

Lewis and Clark expedition, papers, 
52. 

Lewis, J. A. 18. 

Lexington, Mass. 33. 

Libbey, W'illiam. 60. 

Liberty, civil ana religions, 61. 

Library Abbgc. or Friends, 57. 

Lichenography, 2. 

Life-saving service, 36. 

Light. See Optics. 

Light-houses, 68. 

Lincoln, Abr. 13, 16. 

Linschoten, 43. 

Literary history, 11, 44. 

Liturgies, 4, SO, 53, 65; see also Missals. 

Livennore, Geo. 10. 

Local administration, 4!l. 

Local history, 15 ; American, 1, 7, 11, 81, 
37, 38, 54, 59, 74 ; Connecticut, 29, 37 ; 
England, 11, 15, 17, 87; Essex Co. 
Mass. 64; Indiana, 81; Kansas, 67; 
Louisiana, 50; Maryland, 4; Massa- 
chusetts, 16; Minnesota, 63; Mis- 
souri, 63; Montana, 30; New Eng- 
land, 8, 59; New Hampshire, 26, 27; 
North Carolina, 02; Ohio, 25; Penn- 
sylvania, 29 ; Vermont, 36 ; Wyoming 
valley. Pa. 73; see also names of 
towns. 

Logan papers, 52, 66. 

Long Island, 16. 

Long Island Historical Society, 
15. 

Loomis, Elias, 39. 

Lord, J. C. 16. 

Louisiana, 60, 52. 

Loveland, S. C. 22. 

Lowell, J. A. 22. 

Loyal Leoion Library (Boston), 8. 

Ludwell papers, 63. 

Luther, Martin, 29. 

Lutheran literatnre, 28. 

Lutheran liturgies, 28. 

Lutherah Thbol. SBxnrABT, 28. 

McAllister. J. A. 68. 

McAlpln, D. H. 49. 

McCartee, D. B. 68. 

McCoy, J. W. 3. 

Machiavelli, 42. 

Mcllwaine, A. 69. 

Maclure, W. 56. 

McMaster, J. A. 50. 

McMillan, James, 8. 

Madison, James, papers, 08. 

Magic, 12. 

Magnetic observadons, 70. 

Magnetism, 22. 

Maixonideb Library, 46. 

Maine, 16, 59; laws, 59^ see also Kenne- 
bec proprietors; Pejepscot company. 

Maine Hist. Soc. 69. 

Malin library, 5. 

Mandeville,43. 

Manigault, Mrs. C. M. 66. 

Manuscript facsimiles. See Palaeogra- 
phy. 

Manuscripts, 24, 63, 66; see also Auto- 
graphs* 



Manuscripts, Adams fiunily, 68. 

American, 9, 16, 19, 26*, 82, 84, 86, 

45, 46, 61, 66, 64; see also United 

States. 

Arabic, 87, 38, 68. 

Backus, I. 02. 

Ballads, 18. 

Baptists, 51. 

Barney, Commodore, 66. 

—— Bartram, 66. 

Bedel. Col. Timothy, 27. 

Berkshire Co. Mass. 60. 

Bernard, Gov. 19. 

Bethlehem, Fa. 67. 

BobadUIa, 46. 

Boudinot, Elias, 66. 

Bradford, Thoe. 66. 

Breck, Sam. 62. 

Brown, Moses, 61. 

Bums, B. 46. 

Buxton, Me. 69. 

Calvest papers, 4. 

Campbell, Chas. 68. 

Canada, 46. 

Catholic, 60. 

Chalmers, Geo. 46. 

Chase, Gen. Jonathan, 27. 

Cincinnati, Soc. of, 62. 

Clifford, 57. 

Clinton, Gov. Geo. 1. 

Cocke family, 63. 

Collin family, 64. 

Columbus, Diego, 46. 

Connecticut, 29, 46. 

Conn. Supreme Court, 89. 

Cooke, Got. N. 62. 

Coptic, 37. 

Cotton papers, 12. 

Delaware, 67. 

Derby family, 64. 

Dixwell papers, 37. 

Draper, L. C. 84. 

Dutch Reformed Churches, 42. 

English family, 64. 

Fenner family, 62. 

Field flftmily, 62. ||] 

Florida, West, 46. 

Foster. Theo. 61. 

FraokUn, Ben]. 61, 66, 68. 

Franklin, W. T. 61. 

Freedmen's Aid Soc. 81. 

Freemasonry, 28. 

French and Indian war, 62. 

French revolution, 32. 

Friends' records, 66. 

Fur-trading in Wisconsin, 84. 

Gates, Horatio, 16. 

Goodhue fkmily, 64. 

Greek, 34. 

Hamilton, Alex. 68. 

Hamiltons of Pa. 57. 

Harris, W. 62. 

Hathome family, 64. 

Heckewelder letters, 62. 

Henry, William, 66. 

Holvoke fkmily, 64. 

Hopkins, Esek, 62. 

Hutchins, Thos. 66. 

Hydrography, 68. 

Indian languages, 19, 62. 

Indian missions, 67. 

Indian trading, 64. 

Indians, 46. 

Iowa, 28. 

Irvine, J. and W. 66. 

Jefferson, Thomas, 68. 

Johnson, Joshua S. 67. 

Johnson. Sir W. 1. 

Kingy William, 60. 

La fiarpe, 62. 

Langdon, J. 65. 

Laurens, Henir, 16, 66. 

Laurens, Col. John, 16. 

Lee correspondence (Arthur and 

R. H.),16,19, 62. 

Lee, Sir (ieo. 66. 

Lee fiunily, 63. 

Lewis and Clark, 62. 

Logan papers, 62, 66. 

Logbooks, 62. 

Louisiana. 

Ludwell fiunily, 68. 

Madison, James, 68. 

Marshall. Cliief Justice, 69. 

Maiyland, 8, 46, 62. 



8o 



INDEX. 



Hanascripta, MaMie familj, 03. 

Matber, Cotton, 7. 

Mather papcn, 12. 

Methodism, 11, 33, 84. 

Michaax, Andr^, 52. 

Miimeiiota, 63. 

Monroo, James, 68. 

MonUna, 30. 

Moravians, 67. 

Muhlenberg, H. E. 55. 

Munoz, 45. 

Music, 30. 45. 

New York, 1, 46. 

North Carolina, 52. 

Nova Scotia, 46. 

O'Reilly, H. 27. 

Oriental, 37, 40, 49. 

Orne famih*, 64. 

Ovando, Nic. de. 45. 

Parkman, Francis, 9. 

Pejepscot Co. 59. 

Pemoerton, John, 52. 

Pemberton papers, 57. 

Penn, T. and JR. 52. 

Penn, W. 30, 52. 

Pennsylvania, 46, 52, 55, 56, 57. 

Penn. soc. for abolition of slavery, 

56. 

Peters papers, 57. 

Phi Beta Kappa Soc. 62. 

Philadelphia, 46. 

Phila. court records, 56. 

Fickering family, 64. 

Plummer, Gov, W. 26. 

Poinsett, J. R. 57. 

Pond, S. W. 64. 

Potts, Jonathan, 56. 

Preble, Adm. G. II. 60. 

Prince papers, 12. 

Band, S. T. 72. 

Raphael, 24. 

Ra«le, Seb. 19. 

Rswle, W. 55. 

Rawle papers, 57. 

Read papers, 56. 

Rcdemptioners, (ierman, 56. 

Rhaeto-Romanic, 81. 

Rhode Island, 61. 

Rice, Thos. 62. 

Roldan, Fr. 45. 

Saltonstall family, 64. 

Sanskrit, 19. 

Sargeant, Thos. 52. 

Savage, James, 9. 

Scharf, Col. T. J. 3. 

Scientific, 7. 

Scottish, 46. 

Semitic, 65. 

Shelley, P. B. 20. 

Shippen paper*, 56. 

Sibley, if. U. 64. 

Smith, T. P. 52. 

Sparks, J. 19. 

Stiles, Ezra, 38. 

— — Stiles papers, 37. 

Sullivan, Gen. John, 27. 

Taliaferro, L. 64. 

Tillinghast &mily^ 61. 

TompKins, Gov. D. D. 1. 

Torrence papers, 25. 

Trasierra, Juan de, 45. 

Tuclcer family, 64. 

United States. See American. 

Civil war, 8. 

Revolution, 27, 62, 55, 61, 63, 
64,68. 

Supreme court records, 67. 

Updike famUy, 62. 

Vermont, 1. 

Virginia, 46, 52, 62. 

WaUacc papers, 65. 

Ward family, 64. 

Washington, Geo. 15, 32, 46, 68. 

^>- Webster, Dan. 27. 

Weiser, C. 55. 

Wentworth, Gov. 28. 

Wesleys, 34. 

Wheefock, Elcazer, 28. 

Wilson, James, 56. 

Wobum, Mass. 78. 

Woodman, C>ru8, 59. 

Wyoming Valley, Pa. 73. 

Zeisberger, D. J». 

Maps, 6, 20, 34, 40, 64, 68, 71*; M« alw 
Charto. 



Maps, America, 68; educational, 16; 

Kansas, 67; New Hampshire, 27; 

U. S. civil war, 8. 
Marietta Collbgk, 36. 



Marquand, A. 60. 
Marsh, G. P. 16. 



Marsh, O. C. 38. 

Marshall, Chief Justice, 52. 

Mary. Queen of Scots, 42. 

Mar>iand, 3, 46, 52. 

Maryland Historical Socibtt, 8. 

Mason, Lowell, 39. 

Mason & Dixon's survey, 67. 

Masonic works. See Frccmasoniy. 

Massachusetts, local history, 15; election 
sermons, 7; town reports, 15; tee 
al»o Berkshire Co.; Essex Co. and 
names of towns. 

Ma08achu8Stt0 Bureau or Statis- 
tics OF Labor, 7. 

Mass. Collhok of Pharmacy, 8. 

Mass. Historical Society, 8. 

Mass. Horticultural Society, 9. 

Mass. Institute of Technology, 10. 

Mass. New Church Union, 10. 

Mass. State Board of Health, 14. 

Mass. State Library, 14. 

Massie papers, 63. 

Mathematics, 2, 5, 12, 22, 30,^31, 89, 69, 
71, 72. 

Mather, Cotton, diar}', 7. 

Mather family, books, 7, 13;" papers, 12. 

May, Samuel, 31. 

Mazarinados, 32. 

Medals, 4, 9, 23 ; American, 36 ; fires and 
firemen, 36; see aUo Coins. 

Mediaeval history, 17. 

Mediaeval philosophy, 3. 

Medicine, 6, 12, 14, 28, 30, 33, 36, 47', 53, 
58, 70 1 history of, 42; history of, in 
America, 53; veterinary, 72; »ee aUo 
Surgery. 

Medlicott, W. H. 60. 

Mela, Pomponius, 20. 

M creator, 20. 

Mctcalf, T. 61. 

Meteorology, 5, 22, 39, 68, 70, 71. 

Methodism, 11, 13, 33, 35, 66. 

Metrology, 71. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 46. 

Meulen, R. J. van der, 34. 

Mexican incunabula, 44. 

Mexican literature, 65. 

Mexico, 45, 48, 65. 

Michaux, Andre, mss. 52. 

Michigan State Board of Health, 32. 

Michigan State Library, 32. 

Michigan, University of, 3. 

Mic-roscom', 7, 23, 40. 

Military history, 13. 

Milit«r>- science, 13, 65, 72. 

Military signalling, 72. 

Milton,' John, 18, 42, 44, 46, 60. 

Mineralogy, 2. 

Minnesota', 63. 

Minnesota Hist. Soc. 63. 

Missals, 45. 

Missions, 6, 8, 39, 48, 51, 67. 

Mississippi Valley, 35. 

Missouri, 63. 

Monroe, James, papers, 08. 

Montana, 30. 

Montana Hist. Soc 30. 

Moore, E. C. 47. 

Moore, Geo. H. 55. 

Moral philosophy. See Ethics. 

Moravian Theological Seminary, 6. 

Moravians, 5; mss. 57. 

Mound-builders, 23, 26. 

Mountains, 6, 22. 

Mount Holyoke Seminary, 66. 

Muhlenberg, H. E. letters, 65. 

MUustcr, 20. 

Munoz, 45. 

Museum of Comparative ZoSlooy 
(Cambridge), 21. 

Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), 10. 

Music, 11, 12, 24, 29, 32, 39s, 45, 58, 64; 
New England, 59 ; Church music, 39, 
59. 

Mysteries and miracle plays, 11. 

National Museum (Washington), 69. 
Natural history*, 6, 45, 63, 69. 
Nautical almanacs, 6, 70. 



Naval architecture, 8. 

Navigation, 8. 

Nbbbabka Umitmbbitt, 88. 

Netherlands, history, 81, 84; law, 14, 

34. 
Nevada Statb Libbabt, 88. 
Nbwbbbby Library, 84. 
New Church, 10, 67. 
New England history, 8, 9, 12, 61; local 

history, 59; theolofi^, 12; •«« aUo 

names of states. 
New Englamd Mbthgdibt Hibtw Soo. 

11. 
New Hampshire, 86, 37, 88, 60. 
New Hampshire Hist. 6oc. 86. 
New Hampshire State Libbabt, 87. 
New Haven Colony Hibt. Soo. 37. 
New Jersey, 86: boandary papers, 66. 
New Jerbbt, Collboe of, 60. 
New Jersey Hibt. Soc. 86. 
New Mexico, 46. 
New Netherlands, 48. 
New Orleans, 60. 
Newspapers, 16, 84, 86, 28, 84, 89, 62; 

Berkshire Co. M:as8. 69; Charieston, 

S. C. 28; Macon, Ga. 88; Maine, 69; 

Maryland, 4; Methodist. 11 ; Minne> 

seta, 63; Montana, 30; Nevada, 23; 

New York, 49; Philadelphia, 68; 

Rhode Island, 02; Roman Catholic, 

60; St. Louis, 68; Salem, Mass. 64; 

Vermont, 36; Wisconsin, 84. 
New Sweden, 62. 
New York, 1, 15; mbb. 46. 
New York Court of Appeals, 1. 
Nbw Yobk Hist. Soc. 47. 
New York Statb Libbabt, 1. 
New York Supervisors of Counties, 1. 
Norse sagas. Ste Scandinavian Utera- 

ture. 
North Carolina, 62, 62. 
NoBTH Caboliha State Libbaby, 62. 

NOBTHWSSTBBN UNITBBBITY, 88. 

Norton, C. E. 18. 
Norumoega, 11. 
Notre Dame, Unit, of, 60. 
Nova Scotia, mss. 46. 
Noyes, W. C. 26. 
Numismatics, 11, 41*. 

Obbrlin Coll. Library, 60. 

Ocean meteorology, 68. 

Odd Fellows, 18. 

Odell, M. F. 86. 

Ohio, 25«. 

Ohio Hist, and Philos. Soo. 86. 

Olmsted, F. L. 8. 

Optics, 6, 22, 68, 70. 

Ordnance, 3. 

O'Reilly, H. letters, 87. 

Oriental mss. 37, 40, 49. 

Oriental phUology, 26, 29, 81, 87, 88. 

OrienUl travels, 26, 43. 

Ornament. See DecoratiTe art. 

Orne family papers, 64. 

Ornithology, 11, 82, 40, 60, 61. 

Ortelius, 20. 

Osbom, Geo. 88. 

Otway, Caesar, 80. 

Ovando, Nicolas de, 45. 

Oviedo, 45. 

Palaeobotany, 71. 

Palaeontology, 2, 21, 84, 39, 40, 71. 

Palestine, 48. 

Palfrey, Mrs. L. C. 18. 

Parker, Theodore, 18. 

Parkman, Francis, 9. 

Parks, 11. 

Parsons, Usher, 62. 

Patent Office, 70. 

Patents, 18, 24, 81, 84, 64, 70. 

Patristics. See Chorch Ikthers; Hie- 

ology. 
Peabody, Francis, 64. 
Peabody, Geo. 4. 

Peabody Institutb, Baltimore, 4. 
Peabody Museum, Cambridge, 81* 
Pedagogy. See Eancation. 
Peircc, C. 8. 8. 
Pejepscot Co. 69. 

Pemoerton, John, 64; letter>book, 68. 
Pemberton papers, 67. 
Penn, T. and R. letters, 58. 
Penn, William, 80; papers, 68. 



INDEX. 



81 



PennaylyanU, coun^ papers, 56, 67; 

XM. 46, 66, 56; records, 52; state 

docnments, 29. 
PnnrsTLTAinA Hiir. Soo. 54. 
Fxinf BTLTANiA 8tatb Libbaby, 29. 

FBHHSTLVAjnA, UNIY. OT, 68. 

Pepper, William, 68. 

Periodicals, 3, 24S, 36. 88, 49; astronomi- 
cal, 69; botanical, 22; economic, 42; 
engineering, 41 ; entomological, 21 ; 
mathematical, 69; medical, 6, 36, 47, 
63; navaL 2; Oriental, 38; pharma- 
ceatical,8; Boman Catholic, 60 ; mI- 
entiflc, 5, 6, 10, 23, 81, 88, 61, 70>, 78; 
technical, 64. 

Perkins, Frederick, 66. 

Peters papers, 67. 

Pharmacognosy, 42. 

PharmacopsBias, 8. 

Pharmacy, 8, 28, 42. 

PharoloffT, 68. 

Phelps, M. S. 60. 

Phi Beta Kappa us. records, 02. 

Philadelphia, 58 * early ooart records, 66 ; 
MBS. 46; public institutions, 64. 

Philadelphia imprints, 66. 

Phillips, Wendell, 47. 

PhUology, 81, 58. 

Philosophy, 4, 11, 49. 60; German, 86; 
Kant, 81, 42; mediaeTal,8; ethics, 8. 

Phoeniz, S. W. 42. 47. 

Photographs, 6, 10, 32, 80, 64, 67, 74; 
Indians, 26; sculpture, 5. 

Photography, 70. 

Physical geography, 16, 60. 

Physics, 10. &, 

Pickering family papers, 64. 

Plerson, J. 8. 60. 

Pilling, J. C. 67. 

Plummer, Got. W. M8B. 26. 

Polar exploration, 48, 60. 

Poinsett, J. B. papers, 67. 

Political economy, 7, 10, 15, 81, 69, 68, 
67. 

Political pamphlets, 39. 

Political science, 84. 

Polo, Marco, 43. 

POLYTXCHNIO SoO. OF KSNTUCKT, 88. 

Pond, S. W. papers, 64. 

Popery, 30; see also Catholic church. 

Portland, Me. 18. 

Portraits. 13, 24, 84, 49; Baptist*, 51; 
Franklin, Beig. 12, 47; Lafayette, 
28; Methodists, 11; New England, 
0; U. 8. Civil war, 8; Washington, 
Geo. 6. 

Portuguese literature, 12. 

Postace stamps, 4. 

Postalservice, 70. 

Pott, A. F. 58. 

Pottery, 47. 

Potts, Jonathan, papers, 66. 

PoweD. J. W. 72. 

Pratt, A. T. 89. 

Preble, Adm. G. H. letters, 60. 

Prehistoric man, 26; set ctUo Archae- 
ology. 

PBBSBTnBZAH BOABD OF FOB. MlS- 

noiTB, 48. 
Pbbsbttbbian Hibt. 8oo. 68. 
Pbbbbttxbian Thbol. 8bii. 60. 
Presbvterianism, 48, 68. 
Priestley, Joseph, 15, 20, 28. 
Prime, F. C. 68. 
Prince, Thomas, library, 12. 
Prince mm. 12. 
ProcessiouB, 60. 
Progresses, 60. 

Protestant episcopal church, 80, 63. 
Proverbs, 45. 
Provoost, Bishop, 30. 
Prynne, William, 1. 
Ptolemy, 20, 41, 48. 4 

PuriUn writers, 48, 60. 
Pyne, P. B. 40. 
Pyramids, 23; »ee alto Egypt. 

Quakers. See Friends. 
Quincy, Josiah, 13. 

Bailroads. 10, 41, 42, 51, 66. 

Baleigh,8irW.43. 

Bamusio, 43. 

Band, 8. T. paperv, 72. 

Banke, L. von, 66. 



Baphael xbb. 24. 

Basle, Seb. 10. 

Bau, Chas. 69. 

Baven, 43. 

Bawle, W. papers, 65. 

Bawle papers, 57. 

Bead papers, 56. 

Beade, Charles, 38. 

Bedemptioncni, (rcmian, register, 56. 

Boformarion, 22, 32, 49. 

Bbfobmed Church Theol. Sem. 37. 

Bold, Mrs. J. M. 66. 

Benaissance, 11. 

Bennell, Dean J. 30. 

Bhaeto-Bomanic literature, 31. 

Bhode Island, 61. 

Bhodb Island Hist. See. 61. 

Bice, Harvey, 26. 

Bice, Thos. papers, 62. 

Bich, O. 45. 

Bichards, W. C. 61. 

Bimbault, Dr. 46. 

Binck, C. H. 39. 

Bituiilism, 19. 

Bobinson, C. T. 40. 

Bobiuson, Edw. 10. 

Bobinson, Edw. D.D. 26, 48. 

Bodd, T. 61. 

Bogers, Fairman, 59. 

Boman, Francisco, 45. 

Boman Catholicidin. i<ee Catholic 

church; Popery. 
Bomances, 18. 
Boman law. /See Civil law. 
Boosevelt. B. B. 42. 
BosmacsHier, E. A. 63. 
Boss, D. W. 17. 
Botch, W. J. 37. 
Boueseau, T. T. 11. 
Bumford, Count, 5. 
Bush, Mrs. James, 58. 
Bussiau literature, 38. 

Saob Libbabt, 37. 

Sahagun, 45. 

Sailing directions, 68. 

St. Lawrence Tnivbrsitt, 22. 

St. Vincent College, 4. 

Salisbury, E. E. 38. 

Saltonfstall family papers, 64. 

Sanitar}' CommiH*«ion (U. S.), 8. 

Sanitary engineering, 10. 

Sanitarv science, 14. 32, 70. 

Sanskrit literature, 19, 38. 

Sargeant, Thos. pHpcrs, 52. 

Savage, James, 9. 

Bcanuinaviau literature, 24, 35. 

Schair, Philip, 40. 

Scharf, Col. J. T. 3. 

Scherer, W. 25. 

Schlller-SzineHsy, 65. 

Scholasticism, 3. 

School-books. See Text-books. 

School catalogues, 67. 

Schouten, 43. 

Schultze, Job. 28. 

Schuyler. Euffene, 31. 

Sohwenckfeldt, 29. 

Science, 5, 30, 47, 51, 54, 73. 

Scientific societies. See Society publi- 
cations. 

Scientific voragcs, 65. 

Scotch law, 20. 

Scotland, history, msb. 46. 

Scudder, 8. H. 21. 

Sculpture, photographs of, 5. 

Seamanship, 2. 

Semitic literature, 66. 

Sermons, 19, 60, 61; American, 1; elec- 
tion, 7 ; funeral, 74. 

Sewerage, 14. 

Seybert, II. 59. 

Sbakenpeare, 3, 4, 12, 33, 34, 42, 44, 46, 
58, 50, 60, 61, 62, 63, 66, 73. 

Shea, J. G. 50. 

Sheafe, J. A. 60. 

Sheffield Scientific School, 30. 

Shelley, P. B. msb. 20. 

Shells, 7, 40, 51. 

Sheppard, S. A. D. 8. 

Shippen, papers, 56. 

Shumard, B. F. 63. 

Sibley, 11. II. papers, 64. 

SignalliDg, mintary, 72. 

Sigoumey, Mrs. L. II. 30. 



Slade, J. M. 41. 

Slavery, 3, 12, 17, 31, 47, 48, 60, 61, 68 ; in 
West Indies, 12. 

Slavery, Penn. Soc. for abolition of, 
56. 

Slavic folklore, 18. 

Slavic philology, 38. 

Smith, II. B. 40. 

Smith, (*apt. John, 43. 

Smith, Thos. P. xbs. 52. 

Smith Coll. Library, 50. 

Snow, E. M. 61. 

Social science. See Political economy; 
Sociology. 

Socialism, 42. 

Society publications, 5, 6, 25, 81, 37, 88, 
51, 54, 63, 70, 71; alpine, 6; geo- 
graphical, 6; historical, 24, 62; sci- 
entific, 47, 51. 

Sociology, 31, 63, 67; see also Political 
econom}*. 

South American literature, early, 44. 

Southern Illinoib Normal Univ. 
22. 

Spanish language, 11. 

Spanish literature, 12. 

Spanish mss. 45. 

Sparks, Jared, 19, 31. 

Spilbergen, 43. 

Spiritualism, 59. 

Sprague, W. B. 1, 60. 

Stamps. See Postage stamps. 

Stanford Univ. 51. 

Star catalogues and charts, 70. 

Starbuck, Alex. 25. 

Starke, T. M. 66. 

Statistics, 7, 10, 61, 68. 

Statute law. See Laws. 

Stevens, Bishop W. B. 53. 

Stevens, F. W. 38. 

Stevens, Henry, of Bamet, 1. 

Stevens, Ilenrj-. of London, 1. 

Sticknev, Josiali, 9. 

Stiles, £zra, mbs. 38. 

Stiles papers, 37. 

Still4, A. 58. 

Stuart, B. L. 40, 45. 

Su<"hen, Peter van, 43. 

Sullivan, (ten. John, letters, 27. 

Sumner, Charles, 17, 19. 

Sunday schools, 53. 

Sunderland library, 65. 

SUROEON-<iENBRAL*S OFFICE, 70. 

Surgery, 47. 
Sutro' Library, 64. 
Sweden, 48. 

Swedenborg, Emanuel, 10. 
Swedenborgian literature, 10, 67. 
Swedish literature, 16. 
Switzerland, history, 3. 
Syracuse Univ. 66. 

Talcott, A. 37. 

Taliaferro, Mt^or L. papers, 64. 

Tank, Mrs. Otto, 34. 

Tappan, Lewis, 68. 

Technology, 5, 11, 70, 73. 

Tenterden, Lord, 2. 

Temaux-Compans, 45. 

Texas, 45. 

Text-books, 59, 67; early, 74. 

Textile fabrics, 47. 

Tezozomoc, 45. 

Thaw, William, 59. 

Thayer, Miss E. M. 13. 

Thayer, (Jen. Sylvanus, 13. 

Tlieological pamphlets, 39. 

Theolooical Sem. of Evan. Luthbban 
Church, 28. 

Theological Sem. of Befobmed 
Church, 37. 

Theology, 4, 8, 12«, 19, 20, 22, 27, 28, 30, 
41, 48, 50, 53, 60, 68; Dutch, 34, 37; 
German, 36; New England, 12, 13. 

baptism, 60 ; baptists, 36, 51 ; bibli- 
cal commentaries, 8; biblical criti- 
cism, 19, 20; biblical literature, 54, 
73; Browiiisra, 7; Catholic church, 
16, 27, 41, 40, 50, 60; Channing, 12; 
Chriiitian evidences, 60; church fath- 
ers, 28, 29, 40, 65, 73; church manu- 
als, 7 ; Congregationalism, 7, 38, 74; 
Coptic church, 37; Deistic contro- 
versy, 48; dissenting controversies, 
48; Dort, synod of, 37; Dutch Be- 



82 



INDEX. 



formod churchefl, 42; episcopal 
church, 80, 68; Heidelberig^ cate- 
chism, 87; Jesalts, 78: liturgies, 4, 
80, 68, 66 ; Luther, 29 ; Mather, 7, 12 ; 

Jresbytenanism, 48, 68; Priestlev, 
6, 20, 28; PnriUn writers, 48, 60; 
ritualism, 10; scholasticism, 8; uni> 
tarianism, 12, 19^26, 48; uniyereal- 
Ism, 22, 26, 48; Wesley, 38; West- 
minster dS^ncs, 48. 

Th^renot, 48, 46. 

Thies, Louis, 10. ' 

Thirty Years' War, 32. 

Thomas, Isaiah, 36, 74. 

Thompson, J. M. 66. 

Thompson, J. P. 37. 

Thomdike, Col. Israel, 17. 

Ticknor, €h!o. 12, 18. 

Tillinffhast papers, 61. 

Tompkins, Gov. D. D. papers, 1. 

Torrenco papers, 26. 

Torture, 82. 

Tosti, Cardinal, 18. 

Tower, Charl. 66. 

Town histories. See Local history. 

Trasierra, Juan de, 45. 

Travels, 8, 6, 16, 16«, 28. 40«, 48, 62; Ori- 
ental, 26, 43; eee aUo Arctic voy- 
ages ; Scientific voyages. 

Treat, J. H. 19. 

Treaty of Washington, 2. 

Tredick, B. T. 60. 

Trees, 11 ; m« aleo Forestry. 

Trendelenberg, Ad. 60. 

Trials, 80. 

Tbinitt Collbob Librabt, 30. 

Tniax, C. H. 26. 

Tucker family papers, 64. 

Tuckerman, £. 2. 

Tyerml^l, Luke, 88. 

Ugnlna, Antonio de, 46. 

Uhiob Thbol. Sbx. 48. 

Unitarianism, 12, 10, 26, 48; Channing, 
12 : Priestley, 15, 20, 28. 

United SUtes. Civil war, 8, 8, 0, 11, 13, 
16, 24, 84, 36, 58>, 60, 61, 02*. 

Colonial history, 16. 

Congressional documents, 4, 13, 16, 

18, 27, 29, 31, 83, 39, 69*, 64, 66. 

Constitution, 86. 

Constitutional law, 42. 

History, 17, 81>, 36, 38, 80, 47, 60, 54, 

62.74. 

Revolution, 34, 66; xbs. 62, 55, 56, 

68; medical history, 53; orderly- 
books, 61, 68. 

Southern states, 66. 

Statutes, 14. 

War of 1812, Barney papers, 56. 

West, 84». 



United States. See al»o Americana; 
Constitutional conventions ; Indians ; 
Local history; Slavery; and names 
of separate states. 

Unitbd States Bubbau or Educa- 
tion, 67. 

U. S. BrBBAU OF Ethnoloot, 67. 

U. 8. BuRBAU OF Statistics, 68. 

U. 8. Coast Survby, 3, 71. 

U. S. Dbp't of Statb, 68. 

U. 8. (iBOLOOICAL SUBVBY, 71. 

U. 8. Htdbogbaphig Office, 68. 

U. S. LiOHT-HOUSE Boabd, 68. 

U. 8. Military Academy, 72. 

U. S. National Museum, 09. 

U. S. National Museum of Hyqiene, 
69. 

U. 8. Naval Academy, 2. 

U. 8. Naval Obsbbvatoby, 69. 

U. 8. Patent Office, 70. 

U. 8. Post Office Dep*t. 70. 

U. 8. Sanitary Commission, 8. 

U. 8. Signal Cobps, 72. 

U. 8. Supreme Court, 57. 

U. 8. Weather Bureau, 71. 

Universalism, 22, 26, 48. 

Universalist Hist. See. 26. 

UNivBRsrrY OF California, 5. 

Univebsity of Chicago, 24. 

Univebsftt of Michigan, 3. 

Univebsity of Nebbaska, 33. 

Univebsity of Notbe Dame, 50. 

Univebsity of Pennsylvania, 58. . 

Univebsity of the South, 65. 

Univebsity of Vermont, 16. 

University of Wisconsin, 35. 

Updike papers, 62. 

Ubbana University, 67. 

Useful arts, 11, 70, 73; see aleo Engi- 
neering. 

Vaccination, 53. 
Vanderbilt, C. 40. 
Varthema, 43. 
Vermont, 1, 36. 

Vermont State Libraby, 36. 
Vebmont, Univebsity of, 16. 
Vespucius, 43. 
Veterinary medicine, 72. 
Vine planting in Virginia, 63. 
Virginia, 11. 46, 52, 62«. 
ViBoiNiA Hist. Soc. 02. 
ViBoiNiA State Libbaby, 62. 
Vovagcs. See Travels. 
Vulcanology, 71. 

Wales, G. W. 19. 
Wales, II. W. 19. 
Walker, F. A. 10. 
Wallace papers, 56. 
Walton, Isaac, 44. 



Ward, C. L. 28. 

Ward fitmily papers, 64. 

Warden, D. B. 17. 

Washington. Geo. 6; letters and papers, 

15, £2, 46, 68. 
Washington, City, Treaty of, 2. 
Water supply, 14. 
AVebstcr. Daniel, 28; papers, 27. 
Webster, Noah, 29. 
Weeks, W. R. 36. 
Weiser, Conrad, letters, 55. 
Wellesley College, 72. 
Wentworth, Gov. papers . 28. 
Wesley, 38. 

Wesleyan Univ. Library, 35. 
Western Reserve Hist. Soc. 25. 
Western Reserve Univ. 25. 
West Indies, 12. 
WeHtminster divines, 48. 
Westwood. Thomas, 44. 
Wlieelock, Eleazer, papers, 28. 
White, A. D. 32. 
Whitfield, R. P. 40. 
Whitney, W. D. 21. 
Wiedemann, Dr. 66. 
Wilder, David, 65. 
Willey, A. 50. 
WilliamB, F. W. 38. 
Williams, 8. Wells, 38. 
Williamson, I. V. 51. 
Wilson, James, papers, 56. 
Wilson, T. B. 51, 66. 
Wilson, W. 8. 56. 
Wing, Yunff, 38. 
AVinthrop, James, 35. 
Winthrop, John, of Conn. 48. 
Wisconsin State Hist. Soc. 34. 
Wisconsin State Library, 35. 
Wisconsin Univ. 35. 
Witchcraft, 32. 
Wobum, Mass. 73. 
Wolcott, Alex. 30, 
Wolcott, J. H. 7. 
Wolfe, Miss C. L. 40. 
Woodman, Cj'rus, papers, 59. 
Woodruff, F. E. 38. 
Woodstock College, 78. 
Wyoming, 62. 

Wyoming IIibt. and Geol. Soc. 73. 
Wyoming Valley, Pa. 73. 
Wytfliet, 20. 

Yale Universfty Library, 38. 
Yellow fever, 53. 
Yucatan, 45. 
YxUylxochitl, 46. 

Zeisberger, David, 20. 
Zoolog}-, 21, 25, 40, 61, 59, 65, 60. 
Zurita. 45. 



/ 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR. 

LIBRARIAN. 



ISTo. 46. 




HARVARD COLLEGE. 



THE OLA-8S OF 1838, 



A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF ITS MEMBERS. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 
Xseuili bs ti)t SLitiiaTB of l^aibaib ISnibneitir. 



Already issued or in -preparation: 



VOL. I. 



I. Edwarb S. HoLDKir. Index-Catalogue of Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

a. Justin WursoR. Shakespeare's Poems: a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

5. Charlss Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 
the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Wiksor. Pietas eC Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List or Apparatus In different Laboratories of the 

United States, STailable for Scientific Researches 
iuTolYing Accurate Measurements 

6. Thr CoLLBcnoN OP Books and Axttograpbs, be. 

qneathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor, 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C Lank. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. Gsorgb Lincoln Goodalk. The Floras of different 

countries. 

la Justin Winsor. Halliwelliana : a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard HalliwelUPhUlipps. 



II. Samurl H. Scuddbr. The Entomological Libraries 
of the United States. 

IS. First List of thb Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and itB Officers. 1870-1880. 

13. Samurl H. Scuddbr. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinghast. Notes on the Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Wmitnby. List of American Autiiors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

i6k Richard Bliss. Classified Ind^z to the Maps in 
Petermann's Geographische Mittheilnngen. iQSS- 
1881. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 
1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

so. William C Lanr. Index to Recent Reference 
LisU, no. I. i884-i89s* 



VOL. II. 



ai. Srcond List of thb Publications of Harvard Uni. 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1885. 

aa. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Librazy. 

a3. William H. Tillinghast. Third List of the Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and ita Officers. i895- 
18S6. 

S4. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference TJsts, 
no. a. 18^-1886. 

a5. W. G. Fablow and William Tbrlbasb. 'list of 
Works on North American FungL 

a6. William C. Lanr. The Carlyle Collection. 

ay. Andrrw McF. Davis. A few notes on the Records 
of Harvard College. 

aS. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publics, 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1886- 
1887. 



S9. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference Lisu, 
no. 3. 1887. 

30. Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley's poem ** To a 

Skylark," with notes. 

31. W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Works on 

North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badorr. Mathematical Theses, 1783-1839. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publications 

of Harvard University snd ita Officers. 1887-1888. 

34. WiLLLAM C. Lanb. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. Gborgb S. Woodbbrrt. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lanb. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Wbttbnkampp. Bibliography of Hogarth. 



VOL. III. 



j8. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1888- 
1889. 

39. Alprbd C. Pottrr. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference Lista, 

no. 4. iSgob 

41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publics- 

tiona of Harvard University and its Officers. 1889- 
1890. 



4a. William H. Tillinghast. The Orators and Poets 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachusetts. 

43. Charlbs Gross. A Classified List of Books relating 

to British Municipal History. 

44. William H. Tillinghast. Eighth List of Publics. 

tiona of Harvard University and its Officers. i890> 
1891. 

45. William C. Lanb and Charlbs K. Bolton. Notes 

on Special Collections in American librariesl 

46. Thb Class of i8a8, with a list of the publications ot 

its members. 



HAKVARD COLLEGE. 



THIS OL^SS OF 1828, 

WITH 

A LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS OF ITS MEMBERS, 



Ok the death of Dr. Henry I. Bowditch, Jan. 14, 1892, the material relating to the history of 
this Class, which had accumnlated in his hands, as its Secretary, was with the assent of the Hon. 
Kobert C. Winthrop, the President of the Class, sent to the College Library for preservation. Seven 
members of the Class only surviyed its Secretary, and one of these has since died. Among this material 
is a Class book, a large folio with the title *<The Records and Biography, etc., etc., of the Class of 
1828. [Motto.] John G. Norwood, Secretary and Biographer." The record begins with a meeting 
held Feb. 26, 1828, in the Senior year of the Class. The eighth meeting of the Class, Ang. 25, 1829, 
was its first annual meeting, and then yearly gatherings were kept up till 1840, — after which they were 
of less frequent occurrence. The thirty-second meeting was on Commencement, 1878, when the Class 
had been graduated fifty years. The Class at graduation had fifty-three members, and at the Class 
dinner on June 24, of this year, fifteen were present. '* There are supposed to be only four other 
surviving graduates and as many more of those who were with us a part only of our college course/' 
says the record made by the Rev. Charles F. Barnard, then the Secretary. The same record preserves 
the speech made by tlie President at the table, and that of the Hon. George S. Hillard, who was present 
but unable to speak, so that his speech was read by the President. The last meeting of wliich record is 
made is the thirty-sixth, in the sixtieth year (1888) after graduation, when Mr. Winthrop spoke for the 
Class at the Commencement dinner, six members of the Class attending. The last record in the book is 
made by Dr. Bowditch relative to his meeting survivors of the Class at the Commencement of 1889. 
The Class book also contains a history of the Class fund, which in 1882 was turned into the treasury of 
the College for establishing (when it amounts to $3000) a *' scholarship of the Class of 1828." The 
required sum was reached in 1889. 

The rest of the volume is devoted to memorials of different members of the Class, including printed 
slips, letters from and concerning members, with details of their career, and often, photographs or 
engravings of them. The enumeration includes those also who belonged to the Class but did not 
graduate. Dr. Bowditch succeeded Mr. Barnard in the secretaryship in 1881, and the extent and 
fulness of the record of the Class have come in large part from his assiduity. 

Supplementing the Class book is a volume called "Various Memoranda of the Class of 1828: 
printed documents and letters to and from members or their friends, with a few reminiscences of some 
of the classmates from youth to age." It includes an account of the ** Semi-centennial Gathering of 
the Class on the eiKening of June 24, 1878, with Commencement exercise^, etc." It also contains the 
correspondence, etc., of the Class in " The Quarter-millennial of Alma Mater, 1886." A third book is 
called " 1888. Our Sixtieth year, with various incidents, letters, etc." 

The following passages from Mr. Winthrop*s speech in T888 summarizes the activity of the 
Class : — 

'* Sixty full years having elapsed since my Class received their degrees, the few survivors, agreeably 
to an honored usage, are called on to present themselves at this festal board to-day for a farewell 
recognition, and they look to the President of the Class to say a few words in their behalf. Only ten of 
us are left among the living out of the fifty-three whose names are on our roll, and many of the ten are 
prevented from being with us by the remoteness of their residence or by personal disabilities. . . . 

** And yet I do confess, Mr. President, tliat as I cast my eyes back to that Commencement Day, 
sixty years ago, it somehow does seem a long, long way off; and I look around in vain for any of those 
who gave it a special attraction and distinction. It was certainly a day not to be forgotten, and there 
were men sitting side by side on that Commencement stage of whom we may not soon see the like again. 



] 

THE CLASS OF 1828. I 



We had, indeed, no President of the College on that day. The beloved Kirkland had resigned, and the 
honored Quincy had not been elected or even named as his successor. The venerable Henry Ware, the 
Hollis Professor of Theology for half a century, signed our diplomas as vice-president and presented 
them to us with tremulous hands from the old Holyoke chair. But around him, as members of the 
Corporation, were Joseph Story, the eminent associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, and Nathaniel Bowditch, the author of the * Navigator ' and the translator of the ' M6canique 
Celeste,' and the accomplished Francis C. Gray, too often forgotten among our Harvard worthies. Levi 
Lincoln, too, was with them, the excellent Governor of Massachusetts. Good old Dr. John Pierce of 
Brookline was here to line out the hymn which we have just sung to the tune of ' St. Martinis.* Edward 
Everett and Daniel Webster were among the Overseers ; and, foremost of them all, John Quincy Adams 
was here as President of the United States, who, I cannot but remember, just twenty years afterwards, 
fell on the floor of the House of Representatives while addressing me as Speaker, and died in my official 
room at the Capitol. . . . 

** We had a poet — not a Longfellow, not a Holmes, not a Lowell, but a poet of no common promise, 
in James C. Richmond, who has left some lines of which we were proud at the time, and of which we 
are not ashamed now ; but who, perhaps, had too many of the eccentricities of genius for the clerical 
career in which he lived and died. But we had other classmates who would have responded to this call, 
if not in poetry, in words of worthy prose, far more impressive than any which I can command. George 
Stillman Hillard, to whom our highest honors were assigned, would have spoken here to-day, we all 
know how eloquently, for his voice has been but recently lost to us ; Gilchrist, the late chief justice of 
New Hampshire; Russell, the eminent naturalist; James Jackson, the rising hope of the profession 
which his father so long adorned; Nichols, the incomparable proofreader and critic; Barnard, the 
Warren Street Chapel philanthropist, whose place as Secretary of our Class is now filled by my fViend 
Dr. Henry I. Bowditch; Chapman, Fox, Loring, Dana, Gilmor, Welford, — I may not attempt to recall 
more names, but I certainly can say nothing about the * survival of the fittest' in view of such losses. 
I may not speak of the living ; but I should not be pardoned, I should not pardon myself, were I to omit 
the name, and something more than the name, of one more among the early dead, who was the very 
pride and glory of our Class — though, by some accident or oversight, the second honor was awarded to 
him instead of the first. I refer to Charles Chauncey Emerson, who died so sadly within eight years 
after he had taken his degree. If anyone here is ignorant what manner of young man he was, and how 
great was his loss to us and to the world, let him turn to the tribute paid him by liis elder brother, the 
late Ralph Waldo Emerson, and contained in Mr. Elliot Cabot's charming biography. There is nothing 
more tender and touching in Tennyson's < In Memoriam' or in Milton's * Lycidas,' or in the * Agricola' 
of Tacitus, or, I had almost said, in Vergil's exquisite allusion to the young Marcellus. Listen to a 
sentence or two of this most impressive and impassioned lament of our foremost classmate's death by 
him who knew him best, and who was best qualified to speak of the immense promise of his maturity : 
* He had the fourfold perfection of good sense, of genius, of grace, and of virtue, as I have never seen 
them combined. How much I saw through his eyes I I feel as if my own were very dim. He was 
bom an orator, and looked forward to the debates of the Senate on great political questions as to his first 
and native element And with reason ; for in extempore debate his speech was music, and the precision, 
the flow, and the elegance of his discourse equally excellent. I shall never hear such speaking as his ; 
for his memory was a garden of immortal flowers, and all his reading came up to him as he talked. 
Who can ever supply his place to me? None. I may (though it is improbable) see many as cultivated 
persons; but his elegance, his wit, his sense, his worship of principles — I shall not find them united — 
I shall not find them separate. The eye is closed that was to see nature for me and give me leave to 
see ; the taste and soul which Shakspeare satisfied ; the soul which loved St. John and St. Paul, Isaiah 
and David; the acute discernment that divided the good from the evil in all objects around him — in 
society, in politics, in church, in books, in persons ; the hilarity of thought which awakened good-humor 
and laughter without shame, and the endless endeavor after a life of ideal beauty — these all are gone 
from my actual world and will here no more be seien. 

**I may be excused for having dwelt so long on Charles Chauncey Emerson, for he was my '"hum 
^uring the only year of my having a room within the college walls. We spent our Senior year together 
in No. 24 Holworthy, and my latest associations of college life were thus with him. We read a little of 
Plato together occasionally for a year or two afterwards, while we were studying law, and kept up our 
familiar intercourse and friendship to the end. But he was soon called higher, and I might have been 
pardoned for exclaiming : * J?eu, quanto minus est cum reliquis versari qtuim tui meminisse! ' " . . . 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Joseph Aiiglar. 

Bom at Durham, N. H., 24 April, 1808 ; son of 
Dr. John and Rebecca Angier ; member in Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years ; graduated with 1829 ; 
Harvard Divinity School, 1832; pastor of Unitarian 
church in New Bedford, 1835; Unitarian church 
in Milton, 1837; resigned, 1845; d. 1871. 

He married, 25 April, 1836, Elizabeth, dau. of 
Joseph and Anna Smith Rotch of New Bedford. 
Children : William Rotch, b. 1837 ; d. 1880. Jose- 
phine, b. 1840; m. Wm. Binney of Providence, 
1871. 



He published : 

An Eulogy of William Henry Harrison, delivered 
at Milton, 14 May, 1841. (Boston, 1841.) 
Self -reckoning, a sermon. (Boston, 1842.) 
The Class book contains his photograph. 

Horatio Dawos Apploton* 

Bom at Baltimore, 11 Sept. 1808; d. 4 Sept. 
1828, the first death in the Class ; memoir in the 
Class book by his brother, C. D. Appleton. 

Gharles Babliidco* 

Bom in Salem, 27 Oct. 1806 ; teacher in Dux- 
bury for one year ; graduated at Harvard Divinity 
School, 1832; ordained at Fepperell, Mass. 18 
Feb. 1833 ; made chaplain (three months) of the 
Mass. Sixth Reg't, 1861 ; returned with them and 
enlisted for three years, as chaplain of Twenty- 
sixth Reg't Mass. Volunteers ; the semi-centennial 
of his settlement at Fepperell celebrated, 13 Feb. 
1883; received D.D. from Harvard, 1888; living 
at Fepperell. 

He married Eliza A. Bancroft. Children : John 
Laurens and Sarah Elizabeth Heald. 



He published : 

Claims of Congregational Churches. A centen- 
nial address : being a plea in vindication of the 
rights of the First Church in Fepperell, Mass., 
9 Feb. 1847. (Boston, 1847.) 

Also an historical address contained in — 

1833. February 13, 1883. Semi-centennial 
Anniversary of the Ordination of Rev. Charles 
Babbidge, in Fepperell. 

The Class book has his photograph. 



Gharlea Franoia Barnard* 

Born in Boston, 17 April, 1808 ; entered Sopho- 
more, 1825; graduated at Divinity School, 1831; 
appointed minister»at-large in Boston by the Amer. 
Unitarian Assoc. 1 Aug. 1882 ; began his mission- 
ary work to the children of Boston in the parlor of 
Dorothea L. Dix, 11 Nov. 1832; later conducted 
the work of the Warren Street Chapel, 1836 to 
1864 ; minister-at-large at Charlestown, Nov. 1869 ; 
continued in charge of the Harvard Chapel in 
Charlestown till 1878; in charge of Unitarian 
church in East Marshfield, 1878-79; continued 
there as minister-at-large; on account of failing 
health turned over the Class records to Dr. Bow- 
ditch, 1881 ; d. at McLean Asylum, SomerviUe, 9 
Nov. 1884. 

There were memorial services in the chapel at 
West Newton, and at Warren Street Chapel, 
Boston, of wMch parts were printed, as was a 
sermon on him by James Freeman Clarke, which 
was printed in the Forty-ninth Annual Report of 
the Chapel, 1885 ; he was further commemorated at 
the Semi-centennial of the Chapel, 81 Jan. 1886. 

The account in the Class book is partly by him- 
self ; and partly by Dr. Bowditch ; followed by a 
summary of Barnard's missionary work by E. R. 
Butler. 

Children: Charles, New York; James Munson, 
Savannah, Ga. ; Frank Holmes, Fort Wayne, Ind. ; 
Samuel, West Newton, Mass. ; Sally, m. William 
Eustis Barker, West Newton, Mass. 



The Class library contains : 

A little volume which the Secretary aas marked 
*' Stray leaves published at irregular times under 
the direction of Rev. C. F. Barnard," which show 
his ** peculiar methods of reaching the poor and 
their children." Some of these tracts are called 
** Chapel series," and they were printed 1836-37. 

A second volume, " Warren Street Chapel Re- 
ports, 1840-1880," contains more of these docu- 
ments. On the fly-leaves Dr. Bowditch gives a 
' sketch of his own interest in the Chapel work, 
which was also furthered by Hillard and Fox. 

A bound volume of " Monographs : Class of 
1828," contains Barnard's "First Report, 1883," 
"Second, 1834"; "Semi-annual, 1845"; "Re- 
port, 1858," and Barnard's account of the Chapel 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



boys in the Civil War in '* Occasional Papers of 
the Chapel," Boston, 1866, — these filling gaps in 
the other series of Barnard's publications. 

The College Library contains his — 

First and second report of his service as a mln- 
ister-at-large in Boston, 1838, 18S4, in American 
Unitarian Assoc. Tracts, vii. 76, 88. (Boston, 
1888-34.) 

Extracts from the Report of His Majesty's Com- 
missioners on the poor laws, 1834, dedicated to the 
Senate and House of Representatives of Massa- 
chusetts. [Edited by C. F. B.] (Boston, 1835.) 

The life of Collin Reynolds, the orphan boy and 
young merchant. (Boston, 1835.) 

Our New Year's Gift. (Boston, 1836.) 

To the Delegates of the Benevolent Societies of 
Boston [1836]. 

Reports of the Warren Street Chapel. (Boston, 
1888-1862.) 

The Chapel Hymn-book. Fourth ed. (Boston, 
1842.) In this he was associated with others as 
compilers. 

Circular [asking aid in helping the poor]. 
(Boston, 1851.) 

To the friends of the Warren Street Chapel. 
Dec. 1859. 

Appeal to his friends. (Boston, 1866.) 

Good News, a monthly magazine. (Boston, 
1866, etc.) 

The Voice of the People. (Boston, 1870.) 

From friend to friend. [1871.] 

The land of the disinterested Washington (1887). 

Fifty years in the Field, or Extracts from the 
journal, letters, and scrap-book of a minister-at- 
large. (Boston, 1879.) [Issued in numbers.] 

The Class book has a photograph and wood-cut 
likeness. 



Entered Junior. Living at Fredericksburg, Va. 



The Class library contains : 

Discourse on the character and services of 
Andrew Jackson, delivered in Fredericksburg, 
July 5, 1845, by A. H. H. Bernard. Second ed. 
(Fredericksburg, 1883.) 



Jmmmm Henrx Blak*. 

Bom 7 Oct 1808; son of Edward and Sarah 
(Parkman) Blake; entered Sophomore; left in 
Junior year; d. 14 Aug. 1867. 

Henrx Inseraoll Bowditoh* 

Born in Salem, 9 Aug. 1808 ; entered in Sopho- 
more year; sub-physician, Mass. General Hospital, 
1831-:d2; M.D. 1832; studied medicine in Europe, 
1833-35 ; member of the Amer. Acad, of Arts and 



Sciences, 1848; Jackson Professor of Clinical 
Medicine in Harvard University, 1869-1867 ; died 
14 Jan. 1892. 

He married, in New York, Olivia Yardley of 
London, July, 1838. Children: Nathaniel, b. 6 
Dec. 1839, killed in the CivU War, aged 23; 
Edward (H. C. 1869), m. Lucy Rathbone of 
Albany; Olivia Yardley ; Vincent Yardley (H. C. 
1875), physician in Boston. 



Dr. Bowditch prepared two bibliographical lists 
of his writings, one of which is in the Class book, 
and the other in a volume in the Class library 
marked ** Monographs. Bowditch. Vol. 2." In 
printing the following list the last-mentioned is 
taken as the basis, but a few data are added from 
other sources and from the other list. The Class- 
book list is prefaced as follows : '' June 20, 1885. 
To-day I permanently put here this short resumS 
of the evidences of my life-work, hitherto. I pre- 
sume I have virtually finished my course and I 
trust that I have generally kept the faith to my 
own convictions of whatever it was right or expe- 
dient to do, as the occasions have arisen. It has 
been my good fortune to be an humble, but active, 
earnest worker in the grand events which have led 
to the final destruction of . . . slavery . . . During 
all these years, however, I have clung to the pro- 
fession of my choice . . . For further details I 
must refer to my ms. Olimpses of Life-work.** In 
the MS. preface to the first volume of his " Mono- 
graphs " as bound by him for the Class library, he 
says : ' ' In certain trains of thought and action I 
do not think my life has been vainly or mis-spent. 
... I have at times a greater force from a certain 
'inspiration,' which compels me to act and to 
speak in a manner and for certain ends without the 
least thought of others (especially opponents) save 
in a determination to compel them to believe as I 
have believed. I look back now (1887) on those 
days of inspiration with unmingled satisfaction. 
Among them I call to mind the Latimer times, and 
their results in the State ; the years spent in urging 
physicians to believe in Thoracentesis, and in the 
law of soil moisture as provocative of consumption 
first proved by me for New England and three 
years afterwards rediscovered by Buchanan of 
London, to hold good in England. I remember 
with joy my necessarily persistent but successful 
efforts to persuade Congress to establish a proper 
ambulance system for the fighting armies of the 
Republic. Subsequent to the peace I remember 
with joy the years of patient but delightful work 
wMch our State Board of Health carried on, by 
which we endeavored to Indoctrinate our people 
with the laws of health, climate, and race influ- 
ences, as governing intemperance, etc. Mingled 
with these I see a silver thread of p urely^ rel igio- 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



scientific study, year after year, of the wonderful 
mystery of life, as seen in the microscopic ova of 
the Lymnaea; and with this study appear me- 
morials of dear and honored friends, — Louis, ' 
Twitchell, Deane, Jackson, Bigelow (with his 
philosophic calmness), Ellis, and Derhy. Finally 
I cannot hut rememher with satisfaction the fact 
that the International Medical Congnress which met 
in 1876, in Washington, D. C, voted to send my 
address on Public Hygiene in America to public 
bodies in all the States of this Union and to those 
of Canada, and that very recently Triibner of 
London has sent for it to meet orders from India." 

In 1878 Dr. Bowditch made up a collection of 
his pamphlet publications, and annotated some of 
them, and they are preserved in a bound volume 
in the College Library. 

Dr. Bowditch gives the following explanation 

of abbreviated references used in the appended 

list: — 

AAS. American Academy of Arts and Scieoces. 

AJMS. " Journal of Medical Sciences. 

AMA. ** Medical Association. 

AMM. *' Medical Monthly. 

AM. Atlantic Monthly. 

BMA. Boston Medical Almanac. 

BM8J. " Medical and Sorgical Journal. 

BP. " Pilot. 

BT. '* Transcript. 

CB. Class Book of 1828. 

CMJR. Charleston (S. C.) Medical Journal and Beview. 

CNC. " " News and Courier. 

CLO. Cincinnati Lancet and Observer. 

CD. City (Boston) Document. 

CHR. " " Hospital Report. 

C8J. Common School Journal (Horace Mann's). 

DA. Daily (Boston) Advertiser. 

DP. Documents, relative to portrait of Par^. 

I. Index (Boston). 

IC. Intemadoual Medical Congress ('76), Centennial. 

LC. The Latimer case of a fugitive from slavery. 

Li. My own library. 

Lib. (Garrison's) Liberator. 

LMTG. London Medical Times and Gazette. 

LP. " Practitioner. 

Man. My own manuscripts. 

MM8. Massachusetts Medical Society Transactions. 

M8BH. " State Board of Health Reports. 

MC. Memorial Cabinet to my son who fell in the war. 

MR. Medical Records of all my patients from '31 to '87. 

NEY. New EngUnder and Yale Review (New Haven). 

NOP. New Orleans Picayune. 

NYA. New York Academy of Medicine. 

PD. Public Documents. 

8. Sanitarian (New York). 

8D. State Documents. 

8H. Boston Suuda}' Herald. 

UR. '• Unitarian Review. 

WJ. " Woman's Journal. 

WSC. " Warren Street Chapel. 

YC. •• Youth's Companion. 



Dr. Bowditch entitles the list of his publications 
a *' Catalogue of my chief manuscripts and publi- 
cations since 1831. Glimpses of my life-work since 
leaving Alma Mater in 1828.' 



I* 



Exercises at the Green Street School in Salem : 

Latin dialogue and two single pieces (1822). MC. 

Harvard Exhibition : Latin dialogue (1827). CB. 

Conference (1828). CB. 

Conference at Commencement (1828). CB. 

Ifotes on Dr. James Jackson*s Physiology 
(1829-30). Man. 

Notes of Dr. James Jackson's lectures. Harvard 
Medical School (1831 ) . Man. 

Notes of Jacob Bigelow's lectures, Harvard 
Medical School (1831). Man. 

Notes of John Ware's lectures, Harvard Medical 
School (1831). Man. 

Notes of Dr. Jackson's Theory and Practice of 
Medicine (1832). Man. 

Notes of Louis' lectures at La Piti6, Paris 
(1832). Man. 

Notes of Prof. Jouflfroy, on Philosophy (1832). 

Man. 

Translation of Louis on Typhoid fevers. 2 vol. 
(Boston, 1836.) 

on Phthisis. (Cowan's, amended.) 1 vol. 

(Boston, 1836.) 

Reminiscences of Dr. Jackson, Jr., and of 
Charles C. Emerson (my classmates). 

For the children of the Warren Street Chapel. (Boston, 
1836.) 

Translation of Maunoir on Cataract (1837). 

M. was a very dear friend of Jackson and myself, while in 
Paris. Intellectually and morally he held the highest rank. 
He wan from Switzerland and became eminent as a physician 
at Geneva, where he died. 

Louis' ** Proper method of examining a 

patient" (1838). Li. 

Medical Records of every patient treated from 
1839 till 1887. MR. 

These records have been of immense value to me not only 
by enabling me to know the exact cause of diseases, or con- 
dition of private patients during long series of years; but 
from them I have been able to glean almost all the data 
needed in whatever publications I have made during my 
professional life. They are in one hundred (Jan. 1, 1887) 
bound volumes of pocket records-books and of from 800 to 
1000 pages in each volume. 

Remarks on Dr. Martyn Paine's unjust criticism 
of Louis and of his '' Numerical method " (1840). 

BMSJ. 

Rejoinder to Martyn Paine (1840). BMSJ. 

Life of Nathaniel Bowditch, LL.D., for children, 
prepared at the request of Hon. Horace Mann 
(1840). CSJ. 

This memoir in the Common School Journal was the germ 
of the life of father, prepared for the children of the Warren 
Street Chapel in 1840, and also of a second edition under the 
title of "Nat the Navigator" in 1870, by Shepard & Lee, 
Boston. 

Short sentences on Auscultation (1841). BMA. 
A pocket volume. The germ of the ** Toung Stethoscopist." 



8 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



Dr. Ricaud, Correspondence with; declining to 

have commercial relations for pecuniary profit with 

slave holders (1842). Lib., LC. 

My private letter published. Comincats by newspapers 
North and Soutli (cide Appendix to the Latimer case). 

The Latimer Case (1842). Li. 

George Latimer was a fugitive slave arrested lu and re- 
turned from Boston. It was my fii*9t slave case. The 
"case" is contained in a thick quarto volume, containing 
'*The Latimer Journal," "Tlie Great Petitions to Congress 
and to the Legislature of Massachusetts " ; comments from 
friends and foes (among the latter being an article from the 
Law Review) . As giving a compact and somewhat complete 
history of the events, I do not think tliex-e is another similar 
work. The *' Journal," with which I hod little to do save to 
help spread it broadcast over tlie State, ceased after the tentli 
number. Its last issue gives tlie result of our labors in 
arousing public opinion to such a degree that when " The 
Great Massachusetts Petition " was presented to the legisla • 
tare it was promptly received, and a law was passed forbid- 
ding the use of jails for the keeping of runaway slaves and 
our State officers from helping to return them. One journal 
called the Latimer case the '* Somerset case " of New Eng- 
land. The United States had the right to take and carry 
back slaves, and to prepare her own jails for their safe keep- 
ing, but Massachusetts, then and there, freed herself, so far 
as was possible, from the vile traffic. As I now (1886) look 
back upon those fifteen days of excitement and of labor I do 
so with unmingled satisfaction at the thought that I was not 
a laggard or a poltroon in those great hours, as, in their 
ultimate results, they surely were. 

Trichina spiraUs (March 22, 1842). BMSJ. 

A case and an aualy »is of cases recorded by others ; with 
plates illustrating the microscopic appearances. Modem 
science has revealed much that was unknown. 

Lymnaea (1845-49). Man. 

Development of ova of these minute snails, I studied 
with intense delight for four successive springs after Dr. 
Jeffries Wyman first showed them to me under his micro- 
scope. I saw, and yet I saw not, life developing under my 
eye through the microscope! — "a perpetual miracle," as 
Huxley finely calls it. During tltese hours of observation, 
year by year, my microscope was my noblest cathedral for 
the highest religious thought. I said to Agassiz : " I see that 
these minute germs of the snail in their revolutions upon 
their own axes and in their elliptical movements in their 
eggshells, obey laws similar to those governing the motions 
of the heavenly bodies." "Exactly so," was his quick 
response. 

The manuscript of these investigations fills 117 folio pages, 
vlosely written, with copious illustrations of the various 
periods of develop. nent from the primordial mass of granules, 
as seen immediately after the egg is deposited fW>m the ovary, 
up to the perfect animal. Specimens of various kinds of 
abnormal cell-development are given. In one egg was seen 
a parasite living and growing with the snail, neither of them 
apparently intei*fering with the other. Soon after showing 
the paper to Agassiz, I was chosen into the American Acad- 
emy of Alts and Sciences, with, as I have reason to believe, 
Agassiz as one of my sponsors. Tlie professor commended 
the paper and said to me : " You show us the development 
of the snail after leaving the ovary of its parent. To make 
the cycle complete you should now show us the gradual de- 
velopment of the ovum in the ovarj' of the adult." Accord- 
ingly I tore one or two of the living snails to sec tlie ovary 
in situ. But I soon found vivisection, even of this humble 
creature, very distasteful and painful to me, and as I did 
not think that any beneficial result would come from tlie 
work, I let the " cycle " remain incomplete. 



A League for Freedom (1846). Man. 

Prepared by a committee of forty appointed by a very 
earnest and crowded meeting at Fuuueil Hall. This meeting 
was called to protest against the illegal act by John II. 
Pearson, a Boston inercJiant, in secretly sending back to 
Savannali a nci^o, wlu), having concealed 'limscif on board 
one of the Boston and Savannah packets, had reached 
Boston. He was kept on board the vessel during its «tHy in 
Boston, confined and in secrcsy. When the news came out, 
after the vessel sailed for the South, the excitement and in- 
dignation at the act was very great. I was secretary of the 
committee, and issued the " Appeal to Massachusetts on the 
encroachments of the slave power." 

History of the establiBhment of the Boston 
Society for Medical Observation (1846). Man. 

Similar to the Soci^t^ Medicale d'Observation of which 
Louis was the president. It was formed at my office and 
was composed of a few persons who wished to cultivate the 
habit of accurately recording cases, and who were willhig 
to submit to the criticism of their peers. It was reorganized 
in 1872 and enlarged, and has become a Medical Journal 
Club of value to all; but its critici'«ras have fallen off in 
proportion. 

The Young Stethoscopist. A small pocket 
'^Vade Mecum" for students and practitioners. 
With plates. (Boston, 1846.) Li. 

Messrs. Wood & Co. of New York asked the privilege of 
issuing a second edition (1848). It was larger in size and 
much less convenient than the first edition, pp. 303. 

Introductory lecture to a course of clinical 
lectures at the Massachusetts General Hospital 
(1848). Li., Man. 

Umbilical hemorrhage in new-born children 
(1849). BMSJ. 

Malignant disease cured by a bread and milk 
diet (1849). CMJR. 

Dr. Amos Twitchell the patient. A very interesting and 
instructive case. 

Preface to Ancient Fortification in Ohio, with a 
plan by Winthrop Sargent in 1787 (1850). AAS. 

Tills paper by Sargent was found by me, hidden in the 
library of the American Academy, and published in its 
memoirs. 

Memoir of Amos Twitchell, M.D., witli an ap- 
pendix containing his addresses. (Boston, 1851.) 

Li. 
Thoracentesis in pleural effVi- Paper, voi. No. 



sions (1852-83). 

— (1854.) (Separate print, 
New York.) 

— (1867.) (Separate print, 
Boston.) 

— 12 yrs. experience (1863). 

— Before New York Acad. 
Med. (New York, 1870.) 

— Letters to Dr. Cliflford 



Ist 1 12 AJMS. 



2d 1 


11 


AMM. 


3d 1 


13 


BMSJ. 


4th 2 


6 


AJMS. 



(1873). 

— Letters to Dr. Holiday, 
Cincinnati (1876). 

— Remarks, Surg. Section 
Am. Med. Assoc. (1877). 

— Dangers, etc. (1880). 



5th 3 17 NYA. 

6th 3 18 LP. 

7th 4 13 CLO. 

8th 4 16 AM A. 
9th 4 24 BMSJ. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



Two fatal cases pleurisy 

(1882). Would not thora- 
centesis have saved life? 10th 4 37 BMSJ. 

Value of antiseptics in 

empyena (1883). 11th 4 48 BMSJ. 

Case of dilated bronclii. Autopsy (1852). BMSJ. 

Report of a Committee of the Suffolk District 
Medical Society on intermittent fever in Chelsea. 
(Boston, 1853.) BMSJ. 

Effects of a dam. 

A treatise on diaphragmatic hernia. (Buffalo, 
1853.) Buffalo Med. Jouraal, BMSJ. 

A very curious one, with au analysis of 88 cases found 
recorded {h>m 1610. It was most cnionrossing and delightAil 
work, made more pleasant by the fact that I used Louis' 
method in the preparation of the paper. (In 1884, an Eng- 
lish medical critic quotes it as one '* of the permanent con- 
tributions to medical literature.") 

Anti-Man hunting league (cujus pars fu%) 
records, etc. (1854). MC. 

Tlie rendition to slavery of Anthony Bums under the 
military power of Massachusetts, guarding every avenue to 
State and Court Streets from the Court House to the end of 
Long Wharf, and with a United States marine battery in the 
rear of the nefi^ro ; and the slave's march, with its horrible 
details, under that most infamous act " Tlie Fugitive Slave 
Bill," were the immediate causes of the formation of the 
letiguc. We had seen enough of the violence of tlie slave 
catchers and of the subserviency of their Northern abetters 
to make us feel that a " retort courteous " was called for. 
Accordingly the above league was conceived by two of us 
spectators. Our plan was to run off the slave-agent in case 
he declined to give up his victim after we had made reason- 
able propositions to him to that effect. It was a secret, 
oath-bound club. We met in Boston, regularly for some 
time, and had a regular diill carried on. By it we learned 
how to speedily lay a man down and to cany him in spite of 
his utmost efforts out of the room, without ii\)uring him. 
One of the party acted as slaveholder and he was urged to 
use the most violent measures in order to prevent us fW>m 
carrying out our purpose. The league's object was to take 
the slave-agent from Boston and keep him concealed at one 
of our country lodges until we gained our end, the fk^cing 
of the fugitive slave. We had 24 lodges in as many towns 
and 408 members. All classes were represented ^ all three 
of the professions, various trades, and not a few laborers 
were of our number. We kept up our drills and consulta- 
tions until Sumter fell and the Civil War broke out. 

Anthony Burns, with this great military display, was the 
last slave returned from the North by the civil power. 

The records and description of our method are now in the 
Memorial Cabinet to A. A. A. G. Lieut. Nathaniel Bowditch. 
Curious relics they are and the objects we had in view may 
seem absurd to modern thought, but they show to what ex- 
tremities we Abolitionists were driven in opposition to the 
insane idea that American slavcnb* was the comer stone of 
the American Constitution. Wrong-headed and absurd as 
the plan may seem to many if not all " reasonable " persons, 
I am proud to remember that I was among the first of those 
who advocated physical resistance tx> slavery a» we saw it in 
the North. 

Cases of an anomalous development of tubercles 
at the .base of the lung, resembling pneumonia. 
Separately printed (New York, 1856) from AMM. 

Canoe trip down the Penobscot from the head- 
waters to Bangor (1856). Li., Man. 



Journey to residence at the Isles of Shoals 
(1856). . Li., Man. 

Raw pork as an aliment. Separate print (Bos- 
ton, 1857) from BMSJ. 

Believed by Indian guides to be more nutritious than 
when cooked. 

Life and character of James Deane : an address 
(Aug. 4) at Greenfield. (Greenfield, 1868.) Li. 

Circular to the patrons of the Bowditch Library, 
with the documents on the occasion of its being 
presented to the Public Library of the City of 
Boston (Aug. 28, 1858). [Signed by Dr. Bowditch 
with the other sons of Nathaniel Bowditch, LL.D.] 

Burns centennial. Speech. Published in the 
Proceedings of the Committee. (Boston, 1859.) Li. 

Double aortic aneurism ; a cause of lung disease 
(Nov. 21, 1861). BMSJ. 

Peculiar aneurism of the left venticle of the 
heart Case. (Dec. 5, 1861.) BMSJ. 

Songs of the people during the war of the Re- 

belUon (1861-64). MC. 

Like the ** Latimer case," this is probably a unique 
volume. It consists chiefly of newspaper clippings of 
poetry. It illustrates well the phases of public opinion 
during the war, from tlie earliest hours of deep despair and 
a falling back upon (rod, as our only hope, up to the paeans 
of thanksgiving for a " glorious peace " and the " Commem- 
oration Ode " at Harvard ! The volume closes with over 100 
old-fashioned, "broad-side" songs. I saw them stretched 
upon a line attached to the railing of the King's Chapel 
burying-ground. Poetry from both sides appears in it, — 
" Butler the Beast," " De Niggers on de Fence," Dixie ahr 
with patriotic Northern verses. 

Memorials of Massachusetts soldiers, etc., who 
fell during the Rebellion (1861-64). MC. 

Chiefly newspaper scraps, manuscript letters from friends 
of the fallen; my own reminiscences, and anecdotes of 
some; and 150 (in two vols.) photographs — most of them 
of young mutyrs from Massachusetts. 

Journey to Mt. Desert, Me. (1861). Li., Man. 

Topographical distribution and local origin of 
consumption in Massachusetts. In Medical Com- 
munications of Mass. Med. Soc. ; and separately 
printed. (Boston, 1862.) Li. 

In this address I first proved to the world that one of the 
prime factors of consumption is a residence on a damp soil. 
It is in fact, I claim, a great cosmic law. 

Report to William J. Dale, Surgeon-General, 
Massachusetts (Oct. 1, 1862). Li. 

Signed by G. II. Gay; but embracing experiences of Dr. 
Bowditch. 

Letter to Governor Andrew on the hospitals in 
and around Washington, D. C. (1862). PD. 

Seven pamphlets on the urgent need of an ambu- 
lance corps of men, trained to take care of our 
wounded soldiers (1862). Li. 

These pamphlets were, I believe, of service. At the 
time of my first report to Governor Andrew, the wounded 
were left for hours, and perhaps to die, on the battlefield 
without help! Our Massachusetts Senators, Sumner and 
Wilson, seemed indlflerent to my appeal. The latter ratlier 
ridiculed my suggestion. I spread the pamphlets every- 
where. Public opinion finally was aroused and it forced 



lO 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



politicians to act and do simple justice to our wounded. 
The sufferings of my son at Kelly's Ford and what I saw 
during an ambulance drive to the battlefield of Centreville 
stimulated me to the most strenuous efforts. I look back 
upon these efforts and to the results tliereof with unmingled 
satisfaction. Two months after opposing with scorn my own 
or any plan, Mr. Wilson introduced into the United States 
Senate (see below) an order looking to the result X hoped 
for. ( Vide Daily Papers, yol. 2, Nos. 11, 14-19.) 

Sketch of the life and character of Nathaniel 

Bowditch, LL.D., made at the dedication of the 

Bowditch School (Jan. 7, 1862). Separate issue 

from CD. 

This schoolhouse lasted less than 20 years, when the 
necessities of business destroyed it, and the new school- 
houses had new names. 

Journey to the Saranac Lakes (1863). Li., Man. 

Apology for the medical profession, as a means 
of developing the whole nature of man [as a physi- 
cal, intellectual, moral, and religious heing]. Ad- 
dress (March 11) to the students of the Harvard 
Medical School, and published at their request. 
With additional remarks on a topic of importance 
at the present hour. (Boston, 1863.) Li. 

This appendix Is the followmg " Brief Flea." 

A brief plea for an ambulance system for the 

army of the United States, as drawn from the 

extra sufferings of the late Lieut. Bowditch and a 

wounded comrade. (Boston, 1863.) 

In the above "Apology" I had urged upon the youths 
before me, some of whom I knew were about to enter the 
army (at one time all of the older students volunteered as 
medical cadets), to take tender care of those wounded in 
the sacred war then going on. Within a week from that 
moment my eldest son fell mortally wounded, and as there 
was no ambulance corps to care for him, a stranger gave 
him his own horse and with difficulty placed him thereon 
and led the animal off the field, the wounded officer leaning 
forward and clinging to the horse's neck. This was torture 
owing to the severe wound in the abdomen of which he 
subsequently died. This fact drove me almost to despair 
and this Flea (appended to the address and also spread 
freely as a single document) was the result. In it I spared 
no one whom I deemed blameworthy for this gross neglect 
of our patriot young soldiers. I sent it eveiywhere in the 
Northern States. Its concluding .sentences cite our two 
Massachusetts Senators (Wilson and Sumner) as recreants 
to the calls of humanity and of common prudence in their 
opposition or neglect to do something towards the establish- 
ment of some system in our armies for the proper care of the 
wounded. 

The Ambulance system (1864). Li. 

From the Nortli American Review, with a preface by II. 
I. B. When the Review took up my side of the question I 
felt sure of success. 

Is consumption ever contagious? A paper pre- 
pared for the Boston Society for Medical Observa- 
tion. (Boston, 1864.) Li. 

I hold the affirmative. 

Reception by the teachers and pupils of Notre 

Dame Academy (1864). BP. 

My connections with three Catholic institutions for in. 
struction and for hospital care have always, save twice, been 
of a most delightftil character. I learned to respect Siiiters | 



of Charity in the Paris hospitals. Soon after coming home 
I became acquainted with that most remarkable woman, 
Slitter Anne Alexis. 8hc was one of the most thoroughly 
Christian, lovable, intelligent, bright, and happy women I 
ever met. We were like brother and sister, and for years I 
was the sole physician of her orjihan asylum. When the 
Carney Hospital was established by the donation of Mr. 
Carney's house and grounds, Sister Anne came to me for 
help in organizing the staff. When she died I was asked t-o 
be one of her pall bearers in tlic Catholic church, and I was 
only too glad to pay that last tribute of respect to her dear 
memory. In consequence of my long connection with Sister 
Anne I was asked to give medical and other counsel to the 
first Sister Superior of the Academy of Notre Dame. By 
my advice the community was removed to its present site in 
Berkeley Street, the land being bought at a moderate sum 
soon after the beginning of the filling in of the Back Bay. 
The community had been established in the low lands in the 
vicinity of Charles River, and one winter's night the tides 
flowed mto the cellar so plentifully that the ftimace fires 
were put out! I told them to come to Berkeley Street 
where they could be above all tides, resting upon 15 or 18 
feet of country gravel. . . . 

Witli these two exceptions my relations with all Catholics 
have been of the most pleasant nature, like those between 
the Catholic Bishop Fenwick of Boston and my father dur- 
ing his last days. That worthy and liberal prelate ordered 
the cathedral bell not to be rung at one time, for fear of dis- 
turbing the rest of the dying Protestant. 

Journey to and residence among the Saranac 
Lakes (1864). Man. 

Memorials of Lieut. Nathaniel Bowditch, A.' A. 
G. of First Cavalry Brigade, Second Division, 
Army of the Potomac — killed while leading a 
charge at Kelly Ford, Va. (1868. Privately 
printed, 50 copies.) MC. 

Memoir of the same, with many illustrations, 
photographs, etc. (1865). Man., MC. 

Four volumes of letters to and from Lieut. 
Nathaniel Bowditch, and others received after his 
fall. My journals of visits "to the front" and to 
battlefields, etc. (1865). MC. 

Review of Dr. Horace Green's work on Con- 
sumption ; topical applications to the throat (1865). 

BMSJ. 

Report on the Boston Public Library by the 
Examining Committee (1865). CD. 

I regret to say that by its plain statements of some short- 
comings of management, annoyance was given to some of 
the oldest of the trustees. 

Aortic aneurism. Treatment, rest, venesection, 
diet (1866). BMSJ. 

American Medical Association at Cincinnati 
(1866). Li., Man. 

Paris Abattoir: Hippophagic banquet (1867). 

BMSJ. 
Journal: visit to Europe (1867). LL, Man. 

Hippophagy. Reprinted f^om the New York 
Medical Journal, Aug. 1868. (New York; 1868.) 

Cases of perinephritic abscess and its treatment. 
Read before the Boston Society for Medical Ob- 
servation (1868). BMSJ. 



LIST OE MEMBERS. 



II 



Consumption in New England and elsewhere ; 

or soil moisture one of its chief causes. (Boston, 

1868.) Li. 

Prefatory and hiBtorical remarks to a second edition of 
tiie ttihlresN on consumption, printed separately. Tlie Col- 
lege Library ha» a copy witli MS. notes by the author. 

Down the St. Lawrence and up the Saguenay 
(1869). Li., Man. 

Report of the Committee on Climatology and 
Epidemics in Massachusetts, 1868-69. Phila- 
delphia. Extracted from the Proceedings (1869) 
of the AMA. 

Consumption in America. In Atlantic Monthly 
(1869, Jan., Feh., March) and printed separately. 

Remarks at the first meeting of the State Board 
of Health of Massachusetts (1869). BSBH. 

My estimate of the noble ends to be hold in view. 

Just claims of Morton as discoverer of etheriza- 
tion (1869-74). BMSJ. 

Dr. Bowdit«h also signed a circular soliciting aid for Dr. 
Morton's family, etc. 

Appeal made by the Carney Hospital. (1869, 
— a circular.) Li, 

Medical testimony and experts. A report to the 
Suffolk District Med. Soc. (1870). BMSJ. 

Visit to Europe. [H. I. and O. B.] (1870.) Man. 

Perinephritic abscess ; lung disease and pleurisy 
(1870). CHR. 

Letter from the Chairman of the State Board of 
Health concerning houses for the people, convales- 
cent homes, and the sewage questions. (Boston, 
Dec. 10, 1870.) MSBH. 

Letter to the London Med. Times and Gazette, 
criticisms of Oppolzers and Niemeyer's inefficient 
treatment of perinephritic abscess (18^0). Man. 

Thoracentesis and its general results during 
twenty years of professional life. Remarks made 
at a meeting of the New York Academy of Medi- 
cine, 7 April, 1870. Published by order of the 
Academy. (New York, 1870.) NYA. 

Papers, annually in Reports of Board of Health, 
1st to 7th, inclusive [vide below]. (Boston, 1870- 
76.) MSBH. 

Intemperance. Circular to U. S. Consuls in 
foreign countries. Analysis of returns and deduc- 
tion of a cosmic law (1870). MSBH. 

Night stroll, in London and Boston (1870). 

MSBH. 

Peabody buildings for the poor. Miss Hill 
(1870). MSBH. 

Sewage, etc. Ruskin's organized work (1871). 

MSBH. 

Convalescent homes : earth closets (1871). 

MSBH. 

Capital and philanthrophy in London. Miss 
Coutts (1871). MSBH. 

Venesection : its abuse formerly, its neglect at 
the present day. Separate reprint (1872) from 

MMS. 



Intemperance in New England. How shall we 
treat it? The data from official police reports 

(1872). BMSJ. 

I contended for the State Board of Health. My col- 
leagues, much to my regret, declined to publish the paper. 
Before Boston Soc. Med. Observation. 

Brief Memoirs of Louis and some of his con- 
temporaries in the Parisian School of Medicine of 
forty years ago (with manuscript letters from 
Mad. Louis, Sir Thomas Watson, etc.). Read 
before and published by the Boston Soc. of Med. 
Observation. (Boston, 1872.) 

Analysis of a correspondence on some of the 
causes of consumption (1872). MSBH. 

Intemperance as governed by cosmic and social 
law. How can we become a temperate people? 
Reprinted from the report (1872) of MSBH. 

Prohibition or license? Mild wines and beer? Grog- 
shops. Climate and race influence. 

N. B. (1886). — All grog-shops call themseWes "lager 
beer" saloons; hence my reasoning fails. 

Analysis of the correspondence on the use and 
abuse of intoxicating drinks throughout the globe ; 
or. Intemperance as seen in the light of cosmic 
law. [With an Appendix.] (Boston, 1872.) 

Coggia's comet: Observations on, while at 
Chateaugay Lake (1874). Man. 

Third Annual Report of the Boston Cooperative 
Building Company. (Boston, 1874.) 

Dr. Bowditch prepared a part of this report. 

Preventive medicine and the physician of the 
future. Separate print (1874) from the Fifth 
Annual Report of the MSBH. 

State medicine and public hygiene. An address 
before the Am. Med. Assoc. Separate print 
(Philadelphia, 1875) from the Transactions of 
the AMA. 

Memorials of Dr. George Derby. Read before 
the Am. Academy of Arts and Sciences (1875). 

AAS. 

Dr. D. was one of the noblest of men. Before the war, 
scarcely known to the profession saye as an honorable 
gentleman apparently as devoted to music as to the profes- 
sion. On the breaking out of the contest and fall of Sumter, 
he renewed his youth, took again special lessons in surgery, 
and then offered himself to Gov. Andrew for a post in a 
Massachusetts regiment then forming. Our War Governor 
gladly accepted and appointed hun to the 23d Regiment 
Mass. Volunteers. He gradually rose, through the oflSccs 
of Medical Inspector in Virginia and North Carolina; Sur- 
geon-in-Chief of Division, and, finally, was brevctted Lieut.- 
Col. U. S. Volunteers. He served during the war and prob- 
ably contracted his fatal disease while so occupied. After 
the war he became surgeon at the City Hospital, and entered 
upon an honorable career of civil life. Always interested in 
sanitary science he became more so during his army life. In 
1860 he became tiic first Secretary of the Mass. State Board 
of Health. He felt it a golden opportunity for carrying out 
his views of preventive medicine. With a noble self-sacrifice 
he detcrmhied to resign at the City Hospital and all private 
practice and devote himself wholly to the grand object 
which we all had in view. Never was there a man more 
wise, more cautions, but energetic, than he was during the 



12 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



remainder of his life. He was of incalculable senrice to the 
Board and to the public. He died in office lamented by all. 

Report on the sanitary condition of the State 
Prison at Charlestown (1876). [Signed by H. I. 
Bowditch, Richard Frothlngham, and C. F. 
Folsom.] 

Electrolysis in thoracic aneurism. Read at a 
meeting of the Suffolk District Medical Society, 
March 27, 1875. Separate reprint (1875) from 

BMSJ. 

Epidemic among horses, showing well the evils 
of bad hygienic influence (1875). BSBH. 

Journey to and residence at Chateaugay Lake 
(1875). Li., Man. 

Inebriate asylums or hospitals. From the Sixth 
Report (1875) of the MSBH. 

Sanitary hints. From the Seventh Report 
(1876) of the Mass. State Board of Health. Ty- 
phoid fever, etc. Separate issue from the MSBH. 

Closing remarks at the meeting of the American 
Medical Association. (1876, — no place.) 

Public hygiene in America. Centennial address 
(Sept. 5) before an International Medical Congress 
at Washington, D. C. (1876). S'^parately printed 
from the Transactions of the IC. 

The Congress yoted to send the address to the Governors 
of the several States and Territories for transmission to the 
legislatures: to the Sanitary Boards, and State Societies 
(Med.) and Sanitary Boards, of the various Statet> of the 
Union and of the Dominion of Canada. When Dr. S. D. 
Gross, President of the Congress, asked me to deliver an 
address on " public hygiene '* I declined on the ground that 
properly speaking, there was no *' public hygiene " or any 
thought of "preventive State medicine" in the country. 
** Then," replied he, " we will have no address on the sub- 
ject." Immediately I answered ** nay " to that decision, and 
said that if he wished I could tell of our shortcomings on 
that point. To that suggestion he gladly gave consent. Of 
course I felt gratified that my appeal in behalf of State pre. 
ventive medicine was so commended by tlie Congress. 

Prefatory remarks to the American edition of 

Dr. John Simon's '* Filth diseases." (Boston, 

1876.) Li. 

Printed under the direction of the Mass. State Board of 
Health. 

Public hygiene in America, being the Centennial 
discourse delivered before the International Medi- 
cal Congress, Philadelphia, Sept. 1876, with ex- 
tracts from correspondence from the several 
States ; together with a digest of American sani- 
tary law by Henry G. Pickering, Esq. (Boston, 
1877.) Li. 

Memoir of K. D. P. (Katharine Day Putnam), 
the young lady to whom Lieut. Nathaniel Bowditch 
was engaged (vide 1865 memorials of N. B.), and 
illustrations by friendly artistic hands (1876). 
2 vols. 4H Man., MC. 

Empyema, Treatment of, in a letter to Dr. Hol- 
Uday (1876). CLO. 

President's address before the American Medi- 
cal Association at its meeting (June) in Chicago 



(Boston 1877.) Journal of journey to and doings 
there. BMSJ., AMA., Man. 

Memorial tribute to Dr. L. P. Tandell of Louis- 
ville, Ky. (1877). BMSJ. 

Journal of the meeting of the American Medical 
Association. (Buffalo, 1878.) Li., Man. 

Remarks at the opening of the Boston Medical 
Library (1878). Li. 

Epidemic of diphtheria at Ferrisburg, Yt. 
Printed separately (1878) from the Transactions 
of the AMA. 

Journey to Chateaugay and Mt. Washington 
(1878). Li., Man. 

Remarks on the death of Dr. John B. S. Jackson 
(1879). BMSJ. 

At the time of his death " facile princeps '* as morbid 
anatomist in New England, and a most honest, high-minded 
man. No one has eyer exactly or equally filled his place. 

Cholera in New York as described by Dr. Jacob 
Bigelow (1879). BMSJ. 

Dr. B. as a philosopher and man, after blindness and 
physical helplessness had seized him. Admirable spectacle 
of contented resignation. Dr. John Ware, a most worthy 
son of a most revered sire. 

Prevention of consumption. A series of articles 
in the •« Youth's Companion " (1880). YC. 

Sanitary organization of nations. A paper read 
before the Boston Society for Medical Improve- 
ment, Dec. 8, 1879 (1880), with a preface ad- 
dressed "To all citizens of Massachusetts who 
desire that sanitary work may not fail of its highest 
fulfilment in future years in this Commonwealth.'* 

BMSJ. 

In addition to the general subject, I liave in the paper 
protested against the grotesque combination of lunacy and 
cliarity with health. I was a member fW)m the origin of the 
State Board of Health in 1860. The combination under the 
title of Board of Health, Lunacy, and Charity I soon found 
was fatal to all efficient sanitary work. The new board had 
been foolishly and for a political purpose recommended by 
the Governor and was accordingly created by the legislature. 
It was continued firom July 1 till 1886. In vain I tried to 
break up this grotesque alliance; but nothing could be 
done. In 1880 I resigned my membership *' as a protest." 
The amount of sanitary work had steadily lessened. It was 
impossible it could be otherwise. One year no sanitary 
report was made. Men were made chairmen who neither 
knew nor cared about sanitary matters. But the clhnax of 
absurdity was reached when a chairman declared to a news- 
paper reporter that the whole work about sanitation wa« a 
farce and that, for his part, he thought every one could be 
his own sanitary inspector and doctor. Finally, there was 
only one member (Dr. Walcott) remaining on the board i^ho 
seemed to care for, or work for the g^reat ends which we 
began with (1860). His term of service expiring, Governor 
Robinson ref\ised to reappoint him. In vain (in an inter- 
view which tlie Governor gnuited to me) I protested against 
tluH, on the ground that it would be gratifiyiug to the 
enemies of the board and would be the final blow to the 
idea of sanitary work in Massachusetts. Fortunately, the 
Massachusetts Medical Society effectually carried the day 
by petitions and Governor Robinson was induced to recom. 
mend the abolition of the Board of Health, Lunacy, and 
Charity and the re-establishment of simple Board of Health 
with vastly greater powers than the old one had. He nom- 



LIST OF MBMBEBS. 



13 



inated Dr. Walcott chairman. TbHa change was hrougrht 
about by flooding the State with petitions fW>m physicians 
belonging to every quarter of the State, and public opinion, 
as in the Latimer case, gained its end. I have g^ven the 
above details as a warning for us to avoid, if possible, all 
combinations of nanitary with any other work, however 
good, but which has no relation to sanitary labors. 

Laparotomy. Its great future (Feb. 3, 1881). 

BMSJ. 

On this question when an opinion (given by me in case of 
very threatening, painAil, and finally fatal disease) was 
criticised as an extraordinary one and wholly unwarranted, 
I claimed that under similar circumstances I would give the 
same advice again. I added, also, that I believed the 
opinion of my critic would be eventually looked upon as we 
regard the cautions given in the middle ages in regard to 
operations unhesitatingly done at the present day under the 
glorious uprising of modem antiseptic and clean surgery. 

In connection with the above see BMSJ., 8 Dec. 1886. 
Dr. Minot's case and my reply; also manuscript criticism in 
my own library. 

The three climateB of New England; viz., the 
oceanic, the shore, and the inland (1881). BMSJ. 

The Garrison Mob. In Oct. 19, 1881, of DA. 

Criticism of Mr. Ames's views about the " legal " work 
done by the authorities. This mob (1835) made me an Abo- 
litionist and the absurd position of Mr. Ames I thought 
ought to be exposed. I know nothing more grotesque than 
to say that anything legal was efficiently done by the author- 
ities at that time. The mob was composed of "men of 
property and standing.** 

My letter to Dr. Porcher, of Charleston, S. C, 
on the advantages to mankind of establishments of 
Boards of Health by various States (Dec. 31, 
1881). CNC. 

Good not only for Uie present but for all Aiture times. 

The Temperance alliance and Dr. Bowditch 

(Dec. 2, 1881). BT. 

My letter to Rev. A. A. Mhier, D.D. While considering 
" prohibition '* as generally understood to be impracticable, 
and impossible to be enforced, I was willing to vote to shut 
up all open grog-shops. 

Medical education of women : the present hostile 
position of the Harvard Medical School and of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society. What remedies 
therefor can be suggested (Sept. 29, 1881). BMSJ. 

Dr. Elliott of New Orleans proves that the truth 
of the law of soil moisture (1862) as discovered 
by myself, and by Dr. Buchanan three years after- 
wards in England, holds good at New Orleans 
(Jan. 23, 1882). NOP. 

Venesection, its (occasionally) great value. Re- 
marks on Dr. Dunn's case (April 8, 1882). BMSJ. 

Letter to the Sanitarian ; views on national and 
state sanitation (Dec. 8, 1882). S. 

Moral education in schools; in a letter to a 
teacher, Mr. Fisher of Brooklyn, N. Y., who had 
asked me to give an opinion on the question 
(1882). Li. 

In it I gave my experiences at school and at college of 
the vile influence of prizes and " marks ** in developing low 
instead of lofty ambition, and a comparison of one's self with 
others and not with one's own highest ideal of what he him- 
self can become. (See Mr. F.'s circular.) 



Two fatal cases of pleuritic eflflision. Would not 
thoracentesis have saved life (1882)? Reprinted 
at Cambridge (Jan. 19) from BMSJ. 

In this pamphlet is related a case in which a modem Ger- 
man clinical teacher was apparently as much opposed to 
aspiration in 1882 as the Boston surgeon was in the second 
case twenty-five years before. Both lives were, I think, lost 
by folly and ignor'nce, one in Berlin the other in Boston. 
Advice to travellers in Europe afflicted with pleurisy to 
seek for Dieulafoy at Paris. (Suff. Dis. Med. Soc, Dec. 8, 
1881.) 

Defence of the National Board of Health from 
an insinuation by the editor of the Boston Daily 
Advertiser, that as the board has been accused of 
doing little it had then an opportunity to study 
cholera in Mexico (Jan. 8, 1883). DA. 

In reply I claimed that the board could do no such thing, 
because all its funds had been taken from it and given to the 
Marine Hospital Service, and it had been itself treated con- 
temptuously by the President of the United States. 

Brief remarks made at a political primary meet- 
ing on the duty of every citizen to attend and take 
part in such meetings and of voting afterwards 
(Dec. 5, 1883). Daily papers and circulars, Li. 

I made the remarks on the spur of the moment, and they 
were used for circulation in the ward. I claimed that a man 
who takes no interest in politics cares nothing for his country, 
which is true doctrine, I think. 

Circular signed, ¥rith others, by me urging the 
colored people not to vote for Gen. Butler, on the 
ground that he would be faithless to them (1883). 

Li. 

Garibaldi. A letter from the Central Committee 
of the League of Italian Societies for Cremation 
urging that the remains of the hero should be dis- 
interred and cremated, according to the terms of 

his will (Nov. 17, 1883). AMAJ. 

With a letter Arom me to the editor of the American 
Medical Association Journal suggesting the propriety of 
having investtgations^made as to the value of cremation and 
the supposed dangers of burial; such Investigations being 
undertaken by the State Board of Health. No result. 

The Ethical results of Darwinism. An essay 
presented at the Liberal Union Club. '* Survival 
of the Fittest." ** Natural Selection" (Dec. 80, 
1883). SH. 

According to the essayist, self-sacrifice is wrong; the 
weak must succumb till a select few have come uppermost. 
Then the strife would be renewed to find who was the most 
powerftil among the "selected." I took (on being called 
upon for my opinion) the ground directly opposed to this 
and claimed that self-sacrifice is one of the noblest traits of 
humanity, seen perfectly in Christ's hour of death; and 
among the young soldiers. North and South, during our 
civil war; and in a great many other common events in this 
life. 

Woman Suffrage. Remarks before a Committee 
of the Legislature (1883). Daily papers, WJ. 

A brief and unexpected display of my idlosyncracy on 
the subject. 

. A long letter to Mr. William H. Thayer on Dr. 
Beard's assertion that the moral qualities degener- 
ate in old age as the physical and intellectual 
faculties do (1888). Man. 



H 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



I opposed Dr. Beftrd's views if carried out in their entirety. 
I held that mach depended on individual temperament, 
heredity, evil or good surroundings; and that while some 
degenerate, others become nobler in the moral qualities 
towards old age, and when the pliysical powers are tottering. 
In 1883 I held strongly this opinion and claimed that life 
would be all an absurd and vain thing if Dr. Beard's theories 
were true. Though still holding the opinion I am less clear 
and determined (Jan. 1887). 

Tobacco. Evils from the use of it. A most 
fruitful source of fees, however, to me it has been 
during all my professional life. Discussion on Dr. 
Otis*s paper (Dec. 1883, Jan. 1884). BMSJ. 

A letter in commemoration of Dr. Calvin Ellis 
(Feb. 14, 1884). BMSJ. 

Memorials of Dr. Calvin Ellis. Separate reprint 
(Cambridge, 1884) from Proceedings of AAS. 

The aspirator in pleural effusions. Reply to Dr. 

Ferguson of Troy that the operation *'had done 

more harm than good " in its various applications 

to difTerent parts of the body (1884). BMSJ. 

I took the ground that my experience in operations on 
the chest proved exactly the reverse. 

Letter to Dr. T. W. Richardson of New Orleans 

(1885). Man. 

Upon the evils resulting from the ruling of the council of 
the American Medical Association, whereby they required 
annual signatures to the code before being allowed to attend 
a meeting; the divisions in New York in consequence or in 
connection with such bigotry; my unwillingness to invite 
the Association to meet in Boston until a change is made ; 
and finally proposing that a committee be chosen to consider 
the subject and report at a subsequent meeting. The only 
result apparently was subsequently, at the noisy meeting at 
New Orleans — no conmiittee was chosen, and I was hurled 
soon after from the vice-presidency of the intended Interna- 
tional Congress for 1887. All this reminds me forcibly of 
old anti-slavery contests and I rest in peace and hope. I am 
glad that I wrote as I did to Dr. B. and that I opposed at a 
meeting of the Suffolk District Medical Society the propo- 
sition to invite the Association to Boston, while it holds the 
views which it does, and has held since 1883, when it virtu- 
ally expelled the New York State Medical Society frt>m its 
meetings. 

Invitation (April 18) from the College of Physi- 
dans of Philadelphia to attend its Conversazione 
and my reply in which, owing to ill-health, I de- 
clined (1885). Man. 

I sent a *' sentiment" bearing upon the " code question" 
of the American Medical Association, as follows: "The 
Sacred Brotherhood of Educated Physicians, which should 
exist throughout aU the world as an elevator of the medical 
profession as a whole, and as an efficient help to each one of 
its individual members. The idea underlying it should be 
above all creeds. It should require no annual signature 
from its members that they will behave honestly for the en- 
suing years. It will not require of them a pledge to obey 
the unautliorized decree of any council, however learned 
and august it might be, under penalty of exclusion from 
meeting friendly and honorable societies in case of refusal. 
It should never require of any member to violate his own 
sense of propriety in his relations with his fellows or violate 
his own conscience. God speed the day when such an asso- 
ciation shall exist In these United States and embrace the 
whole countiy." 



Medical Codes : an address prepared for the 

New York State Medical Society (1885^. . Man. 

Although requested by the president some time before 
the meeting to present some communication to the Society, 
and having received from him a statement that an address 
on "Codes" would not be objected to, I found, on my 
arrival at Albany, two circumstances which prevented the 
reading of tlie paper. First, a rule that the titles of all 
papers must be sent to the secretary sometime before the 
time of meeting, which I had not done, because I knew 
nothing of the rule. Second, I found there was a general 
wish not to say anything about the subject, believing that by 
silence the bitterness engendered by tlie discussion would 
soon be allayed. Finally, it was suggested that I might give 
my opinion in a speech after dinner. Of course, I was 
silent. I sent the address, however, to the president, who 
thought it would be printed. The committee felt that they 
had no right to print anything which had not been received, 
even by title, at the meeting — and I certainly thought the 
committee acted rightly. The address, " Codes and their 
evil influences on medical societies when governed by over- 
zealous partisanship," occupies 30 folio pages, and tlie sub- 
ject was treated as Ailly as I could in such an address. 

Treatment of pulmonary diseases by means of 
"pneumatic differentiation" by Vincent Y. Bow- 
ditch (1885). BMSJ., Man. 

With remarks by myself in the discussion thereupon, 
giving an account of my visit to Brooklyn, N. Y., to sec the 
cabinet, and the patients who had used it. 

Correspondence with Governor Robinson and 
Hon. F. O. Prince (candidates for the governor- 
ship) asking them whether if chosen they would 
advocate a separate and independent Board of 
Health instead of the combination then existing 
under the title of " Board of Health, Lunacy, and 
Charity" (1886). BP., Man. 

The correspondence helped to bring about the change 
urged by the Mass. Med. Society for the same objects, viz., 
the re-establishment of an independent board like tliat first 
established with vastly greater power. In connection with 
the above correspondence are letters frt>m Sir James Paget, 
Dr. George Buchanan, Sir Morell Mackenzie, of London, 
and William T. Gairdner of Glasgow on the actual workings 
of the local government board in sanitary matters. From 
these missives it seems that sanitary science has suflered by 
similar combinations in England. 

'* Garrison Mob." Semi-centennial celebration 

by the Garrison Lyceum (1885). DA., Man. 

From the Boston Daily Advertiser, Oct. 22. Report of 
this (to me and all old Abolitionists) very interesting meet- 
ing. My manuscript account of the same. 

Pierpont's (Rev. John) centennial birthday. 
Dr. Bartol, Unitarian Review. My reminiscences 
(1886). Man., UR. 

The International Medical Congress for 1887. 

BMSJ., Man. 

Various letters (1885) from Dr. Chaill^ of New Orleans 
and others, with replies in some instances from II. I. B. — 
all bearing on the position of the defenders of the code of 
the American Medical Association in their operations in the 
earlier arrangements for the congress. From all this can be 
seen my original appointment as vice-president; my expul- 
sion from that honorable office because I did not follow tlie 
supporters of the code ; my strange restoration to the place; 
and my final resignation of it. 



LIST 07 MEMBERS. 



15 



A copy of his letter of resignatioii reprinted from BM8J.* 
Oct. 16, 1885, in Vol. II. of " Bowditch Monographs " in tlic 
Class library, has mb. explanations. 

''Did Ralph Waldo Emerson sympathize with 
the Abolitiomsts? " Letters from T. W. Higgirison, 

H. I. B., Rev. S. May, Jr. (1886). I., Man. 

Also a reply to objectors to my declaration that Mr. £. 
never cared for, so far as one coold judge from his actions 
and writings, the Abolitiouist«, and that he was not with us 
in hard times. This final reply I decided not to print, be- 
cause just at the time the terrible eaithquake occurred at 
Charleston, S. C, and our hearts were all wrung at the great 
suffering consequent on that shock, so that marvelling over 
the opinions of dead men, however great, seemed a desecra- 
tion and an offense. 

Garrison's reviewers (T. W. Higginson, Leonard 
Woolsey Bacon, W. J. Potter) and my estimate of 
them and of the great liberator (1886). 

AM., NB., UR., Man. 

Austin Flint, Senior. Funeral at New York. 
Reflections on the evils produced upon his fine 
nature by the code excitement (1886). Man. 

Nathaniel Bowditch, Life of, as published in 
Horace Mann*s Common School Journal and at 
his request after hearing my address to the children 
of the Warren Street Chapel on the Sunday after 
father's death (1886). CSJ. 

Only' recently have I been able to obtain a copy of it. It 
was the nucleus whence came my Life of him published for 
the children of the same chapel {vide 1840). 

Correspondence with Dr. W. W. Potter of 
Buffalo on his invitation to attend a meeting of the 
New York State Medical Society (1886). Man. 

** Codes " and " mugwumpism " prominent in it. 

Correspondence (Feb.) with Dr. Collins about 
going to Providence to attend the meeting of Uie 
Rhode Island Medical Society (1886). Man. 

First copy of my address before the Rhode 
Island Medical Society (State) , by request of the 
president, on the topic : *' Our past, present, and 
future treatment of Homoeopathy, Eclecticism, 
and kindred delusions " (1886). Man. 

The sum uf the discourse is that these two sects have 
naturally arisen from the absurdities of our fathers; and 
that our persecution has built them up instead of destroying 
them. If we had ignored them, they would have died in 
thebr own follies after giving us the certain small items of 
truth which brought tliem forth. My arguments are drawn 
fh>m my own experience since student life and from the 
general history of medicine. 

Modern thoracentesis and thoracotomy : a paper 
prepared for Pepper's '* System of Medicine," and 
from which Dr. Donaldson has made copious ex- 
tracts in the preparation of his article on ** Affec- 
tions of the Pleura," now to be found in the above 
work by Dr. Pepper (1886). Man. 

Ambroise Par6. Has the Boston Society for 
Medical Improvement an authentic portrait of this 
great surgeon (1887)? 

The portrait was bought at Leonard's auction room in 
1848 and given then to the Society. It had no name and no 
history connected with it which was ever given, if known. 
It is a clever painting of a profesaor of surgery, as shown 



by the dress and the trephine and skull on the table. Park's 
engravings never represent him as professor, for the good 
reason that he never was one. The faculty of the School of 
Medicine at Paris were flghthig with him always, even to 
the last of his life. Moreover, all of the authentic likenesses 
of Par4 represent him with a head of magnificent propor- 
tions, whereas our portrait has poor, almost imbecile, fea- 
tures. My respect for Par^ as one of the noblest of men and 
greatest surgical genius, who rose from most humble life to 
become Counsellor of State and Chief Surgeon of four kings, 
as they successively ascended the French throne, was un- 
bounded, and from the day we received the painting I 
doubted its authenticity. Of late years, I have been gather- 
ing eyidences that my views were correct. No less than 16 
engravings, and casts of medals and the opinions of Dr. 
O. W. Uolmes, Sir James Paget, and every expert in paint- 
ing, whom I have asked to examine the evidence, all have 
confirmed these views. Notwithstanding all these proofs a 
few ultra conservatives decided (when making a report in 
the matter) to retain the name but add a ? to it and to put 
on the back of the canvas a reference to my dates, a " reductio 
ad absurdum " as palpable as I ever knew. I rejoice to say 
that tlie juniors of the Society were not prepared to stultify 
themselves and to send down to our successors a fklse like- 
ness of so great a personage. On the evening of 10 Jan. 
1887, by a very large minority, the name of Far4 was 
removed, and the inscription which I proposed was ordered. 

The past, present, and future treatment of 
homoeopathy. An address, June 10, 1886, before 
the Rhode Island Medical Society. Reprinted 
from the Transactions of the Society. (Boston, 
1887). Li. 

Open air travel as a curer and preventive of con- 
sumption, as seen in the history of a New England 
family. Reprinted (1889) from the Transactions 
of the American Climatological Association, Jnne, 
1889. Li. 

The Class book contains several photographs of 
Dr. Bowditch. 

Jaoob Caldwell. 

Born in Lunenburg, 26 July, 1808; entered 
Amherst College, 1825} entered Harvard, 1825; 
was two years in the Divinity School ; settled over 
the united Unitarian parishes of Hampton Falls 
and Kensington, N. H., till 1848; later at Lunen- 
burg, Mass., and at Standish and Calais, Me. ; 
lived later at Ithaca, N. T., and Newtonville, 
Mass. ; d. 15 Jan. 1889. 

He married Mary Ann Patch of Stowe ; was a 
widower thirty years and then married Sarah Hast- 
ings of Marietta, Ga. Child: George Chapman 
(by first wife), professor in Cornell University. 

The Class book has a photograph of him. 



Bom in Boston, 15 July, 1809 ; graduated at the 
Divinity School, 1831 ; preached in Louisville, Ky. , 
1882 ; settled in Framingham, 1833 ; d. 2 June, 1834. 



He published : 

A lecture on the uses of knowledge, before the 
Louisville Lyceum. (Louisville, 1832.) 



i6 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



A discourse in Ix)uisvllle on taking leave of 
[his] Society, June 23, 1833. (Louisville, Ky., 
1833.) 

Gharles Parker GofBa. 

Born at Brunswick, Me., 1810 ; studied medicine, 
1828; practised in Nashua, N. H., Cambridge, 
Lowell, Pontotoc, Miss. ; d. 15 May, 1868. 

He married Sarah Allen of Salem. Children : 
Rufus Lawrence, Memphis, Tenn. ; Charles P., 
Delta, Miss. ; Cora P., Pontotoc, Miss. ; Frank 
Hector, Tupelo, Miss. 

Joseph Warrea Gross* 

Bom at East Bridgewater, 16 June, 1808; in 
Harvard Divinity School, 1828; Theological Sem- 
inary at Andover; ordained at Bozboro', 1884; 
settled at West Boylston, 1840; living in West 
Boylston. 

He married, 8 March, 1829, Mary J. Danforth 
of Norton; shed. 20 May, 1831 ; m. Frances A. J. 
Vose of North Bridgewater ; she d. 21 July, 1870 ; 
m. Sarah Parker Fletcher, 30 Aug. 1872. Children : 
J. W., Jr., Keene, N. H. ; Lyman M., Athol, 
Mass. ; R. M., Lawrence, Mass. ; dau. m. George 
M. Laurie, West Boylston ; dau. m. Frederick J. 
Ryder, Lawrence, Mass. 



He published : 

An oration at Barnstable, July 4, 1832. Bam- 
stable [1832]. 

Frederiok Dalmey. 

Bom at Fayal, 1 Aug. 1809; returned to the 
Azores after graduation ; d. there 29 Dec. 1857. 

He married, 1835, Roxana, dau. of William 
Stackpole of Boston. Children: nine, of whom 
five sons reached aclult age. 

See Palmer*s Necrology of Harvard College^ p. 
195. (Boston, 1864.) 

Joseph WUlard Bana. 

Born 17 Sept. 1808; son of Francis and Sophia 
Dana of Cambridge; studied law at Lancaster; 
removed, 1829, to Cincinnati; thence, 1830, to 
Donaldson ville, La.; d. 5 Dec. 1830; never 
married. 



The Class library contains a scrap-book of let- 
ters and memoranda on Dana, who was a grandson 
of President Willard of Harrard College, and of 
Francis Dana, Chief Justice of Massachusetts. 

Bavid B. Eaton. 

Bora 9 Feb. 1808; did not graduate; known 
later as A. C. Eaton. 

See List of persons whose names have been 
changed in Massa^hv*etts^ 1780-1883^ p. 66. 



Charles Channeey Ibnorsoii. 

Bom in Boston, 1808 ; after graduation opened 
a private school in Boston ; then was for two years 
in the Harvard Law School ; and was admitted to 
the bar in 1832 ; d. 1836. 

A contemporary tribute by R. C. Winthrop ap- 
peared in the Boston Daily Advertiser. 

The Class book contains a photograph of a me- 
dallion by Mrs. Hawthorne, based on a silhouette, 
a reduced copy of which is also in the Class book. 



The Class library contains a bound book, *' Lec- 
tures and Papers of Charles Chauncey Emerson." 
He was a brother of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The 
lectures are type- written copies of the manuscripts, 
prepared under direction of his chum in the Senior 
year, R. C. Winthrop. Their subjects are "Soc- 
rates," ** Society: Man's duty," and ** American 
Slavery," prepared in 1833-34. An appendix 
covers sundry letters about C. C. £. 

In the Class library is R. 6. Parker's *' Aids to 
English Composition" (New York. 1861), which 
contains (p. 371) Mr. Emerson's Commencement 
oration on *' Public Opinion." 

Henrjr Field. 

Born in Salem ; did not graduate ; served in the 
Texan War of Independence and died in Texas. 

Thomas Bails7 Foz. 

Born 20 Aug. 1808 ; graduated at the Divinity 
School, 1831; ordained in Newburyport, Aug. 
1831; resigned, 1845; installed in Boston, 1847; 
d. 1 June, 1876. 

A memorial address by A. P. Peabody was pub- 
lished, as well as accounts of him in the Unitarian 
Review, Sept. 1876, and in the Christian Register, 
17 June, 1876. 

Children : Charles B. ; Oeorge W. ; John A. ; 
Feroline. 



He published : 

An oration delivered at the request of the Wash- 
ington Light Infantry Company in Newburyport, 
Feb. 22, 1832. (Newburyport, 1832.) 

A sketch of the Reformation. (Boston, 1836.) 

The ministry of Jesus Christ. (Boston, 1837; 
8d ed. 1845). 

The trae way. Address on the last day of 1837. 
(Boston, 1838.) 

The Sunday-school prayer-book. (Boston , 1838. ) 
The one thing needful. (Boston, 1840.) 
Hintsto Sunday-school teachers. (Boston, 1840.) 
A sermon to children. (Boston, [1848].) 
Allegories and Christian lessons for children. 
(Boston, 1845.) 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



17 



He published : 

Classical learning in its relations to active life. 
An address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of 
Dartmouth College, July 30, 1851. (Hanover, 
1851.) 

His decisions as Judge are in the Reports of his 
Court. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Robert Gilmor. 

Bom in Baltimore, May, 1808 ; was private sec- 
retary to Hon. W. C. Rives, U. S. Minister to 



Acts of the Apostles, arranged for families, with 
notes and questions. (Boston, 1846.) 

Need of the sanctuary in the city. (Boston, 
1847.) 

Biographical sketch of the Rev. John Pierce, 
D.D., of Brookline. (Boston, 1849.) Reprinted 
from the Christian Inquirer of New York, Sept. 1, 
1849, and appended to F. N. Knapp's *' Biograph- 
ical Discourse," etc. 

The school hymn-book. (Boston, 1850 ; 2d ed. 
1863.) 

Gems gathered in haste. (Boston, 1851.) 

Memorial of Henry Ware Hall : an address de- 
livered in Dorchester, July 17, 1864. (Boston, 
1864.) 

During the later years of his life he was editorial i 
manager and writer of the Boston Erening Tran- 
script. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Henry French. 

Born in Marblehead ; did not graduate ; entered 
the U. S. navy as midshipman, 1 Jan. 1828 ; died, 
as captain on the retired list, at East Boston, 22 
May, 1867. 

He left a widow and two sons. 

Jolin James Giloliriit. 

Bom in Medford, 16 Feb. 1809 ; entered Sopho- 
more ; began the study of the law at Charlestown, 
N. H., Sept. 1828; finished study at the Law 
School, Aug. 1831; represented Charlestown in 
the General Court of New Hampshire, 1835-36; 
made Justice of the N. H. Supreme Court, and 
later Chief Justice, 1840-1855 ; Judge of U. S. 
Court of Claims, 1855; LL.D. Dartmouth, 1852, 
and Harvard, 1856; d. 29 April, 1858. 

There is a long notice of him by G. S. Hillard 
in Boston Courier, 19 May, 1858. 

He married, 25 Aug. 1836, Sarah, dan. of Gov. 
Henry Hubbard of N. H. Children: James M., 
Boston ; dau. m. H. I. Daland, Boston. 

See Palmer's Necrology, p. 196. 



France, 1829 ; returned 1831 ; lived on an estate 
near Baltimore ; d. Feb. 1874. 

Children: Robert; William; Ellen, m. Alex. 
MacTavish and second G. H. Boyland ; Charles ; 
Harry, Lieut.-Col. Maryland Cavalry, under 
** Stonewall" Jackson; Howard; Richard Tilgh- 
man; Campbell; Graham; Meredith; Arthur; 
Mary. 

Patrick Ghrant. 

Born in Boston, 17 March, 1809 ; son of Patrick 
Grant and Anna Powell, dau. of Hon. Jona. Mason ; 
after graduation spent two years and a half in 
Italy ; then lived in New York for two years ; of 
the firm of William B. Reynolds & Co., Boston, 
1837 ; living in Boston. 

He married Sarah, dau. of John Bryant, 1840, 
and had Anna Mason, who m. Charles Frederick 
Lyman. His second wife was Charlotte Bordman, 
dau. of Henry G. Rice, who died in 1882, whose 
children were Robert, Henry Rice, Patrick, Flora. 

Jolin SInsleton Copley Greene. 

Born in Boston in 1811 ; son of Gardiner Greene ; 
M.D. at Harvard Medical School, 1831 ; in Europe, 
1831-34 ; rector of Episcopal church in Newton ; 
d. 6 July, 1872. 

He married dau. of Henry Hubbard; second, 
Marion, dau. of William Appleton, the mother of 
Dr. J. Copley Greene and Elizabeth, wife of 
Caspar Crowninshield ; third, Isabella McCulloch 
of Washingrton, mother of Mary Amory and 
Margaret. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Joseph Hale. 

Born in Ipswich, 17 May, 1806; became a 
schoolmaster ; d. 29 Oct. 1886. 

He married Gookin of Salem. Children : 

Joseph Augustine (H. C. 1857) ; Louisa Gookin. 



There is in the Class library : 

A volume of "Lectures before the American 
Institute of Instruction, Boston, 1845," which con- 
tains "Lecture VII. On school discipline. By 
Joseph Hale, Principal of the department of Writ- 
ing and Arithmetic in the Johnson School, Boston." 

He also published, in ** Remarks on the Seventh 
Annual Report of the Hon. Horace Mann, Secre- 
tary of the Massachusetts Board of Eilucation 
(Boston, 1844)," a paper (p. 103) on " School 
Discipline." To these remarks Mr. Mann made a 
'* Reply," which elicited a ''Rejoinder. Boston, 
1845," in which Mr. Hale wrote the " Rejoinder to 
the fourth section of the Reply." 



i8 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



Edward Holyoke Hedffe. 

Born in Cambridge, 18 July, 1807; at Harrard 
Law School, 1828-29 ; in Cincinnati ; in Camming- 
ton, La., 1884; d. 1837. 

He married a French lady in New Orleans ; one 
daughter survives him. 

JatAmh Dfniham Hedffe. 

Bom in Cambridge, 7 June, 1809, brother of 
preceding; began the study of divinity; changed 
to the study of medicine, 1830-82; practiced in 
Boston; removed to New York, 1833; at Cam- 
bridge, 1838 ; made librarian . of the Providence 
Athenaeum, 1857 ; d. 20 Aug. 1879. 

He married Abbie £. Sabin, who died before 
him ; no issue. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Gteorce StUlmaa HUlard. 

Bom in Machias, Me., 22 Sept. 1808; assistant 
after graduation in the Round Hill School at 
Northampton; graduated at Harvard Law School, 
1832 ; member of the Boston City Council ; of the 
Mass. House of Representatives and Senate; 
served in the Mass. Constitutional Convention, 
1853; overseer of the College; trustee of the 
Boston Public Library, 1872-76; member Amer. 
Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Mass. 
Historical Society; U. S. District Attorney in 
Boston ; Dean of the Law School of Boston Uni- 
versity ; LL.D. Trinity College, Connecticut, 1867 ; 
d. 20 Jan. 1879. 

There were tributes printed by the Bar Associa- 
tion and the Mass. Historical Society. 

He married Susan T. Howe of Northampton; 
had one son who died young. 



He published : 

Life of Captain John Smith (Boston, 1834) in 
Sparks's *' American Biography." 

Oration in Boston, July 4, 1835. (Boston, 1835.) 

Introductory observations on Spenser's " Fairy 
Queen " [and notes] in Spenser's poetical works. 
(Boston, 1839.) 

A translation of Guizot's Essay on Washiuflrton. 
(Boston, 1840.) 

The relation of the poet to his age. A discourse 
before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Harvard 
University. (Boston, 1843.) 

^emoir of H. R. Cleveland in H. R. Cleveland's 
Selections. (Boston, 1844.) 

The connection between geography and history. 
A lecture. (Boston, 1846.) 

Review of Ticknor's ** History of Spanish litera- 
ture." (Cambridge, 1850.) 

Report of a committee on a new organization 
for the relief of pauperism. (Boston, 1850.) 



The dangers and duties of the mercantile pro- 
fession. An address. (Boston, 1850.) 

The old Latin School house, in the '* Boston 
Book." (Boston, 1851.) 

The spirit of the Pilgrims. A discourse before 
the New England Society of New York. (New 
York, 1852.) 

Six months in Italy. (Boston, 1853, etc.) 

The letters of Silas Standfast to his friend 
Jotham, first published in the Boston Courier and 
Atlas, Oct. and Nov. 1853, and then in the Report 
of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of 
1853. 

Eulogy on Daniel Webster in the Memorial of 
Daniel Webster from the City of Boston (Boston, 
1852), which was edited by Mr. Hillard. 

Selections from the writings of Walter Savage 
Landor. Edited by G. S. H. (Boston, 1856.) 

Memoir of James Brown. (Boston, 1836, — 
privately printed.) 

The critic criticized and review of Hillard's 
Reader (1859). 

Address before the Norfolk Agricultural Society 
at Dedham, Sept. 26, 1860. 

Life and campaigns of George B. McClellan. 
(Philadelphia, 1865.) 

The political duties of the educated classes. 
Discourse before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of 
Amherst College. (Boston, 1866.) 

Biography of Fletcher Webster in the Harvard 
Memorial Biographies. (Cambridge, 1866.) 

Memoir of C C Felton in the Proceedings of 
the Mass. Historical Society. (Boston, 1867.) 

Memoir of Joseph Story, reprinted from the 
Proceedings of the Mass. Historical Society. 
(Boston, 1868.) 

Memoir and correspondence of Jeremiah Mason. 
(Cambridge, 1873, — privately printed.) 

Memoir of Hon. James Savage, from the Pro- 
ceedings of the Mass. Historical Society. (Boston, 
1878.) 

He also prepared a series of readers for schools : 
First class reader (Boston, 1855, etc.) ; Second 
class (Boston, 1856, etc.) ; Third class (Boston, 
1857; Cleveland, 1858, etc.); Fourth or Fourth 
class (Boston, 1857. 1863, etc.); Fifth (Boston, 
Philadelphia, New York, 1863, 1871, etc.) ; Sixth 
(Boston, Philadelphia, 1863, 1868, 1875, etc.). 
The Intermediate reader (Boston, 1863). The 
First, Second, and Third primary readers (Boston, 
1858, 1860, 1864, 1866, etc.). Primer (Boston, 
1864, etc.). 

He prepared, in connection with Loomis J. 
Campbell, a Franklin series of readers in nine 
volumes. 

He also prepared the first ten chapters of the 
** Life, letters, and journals of George Ticknor*' 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



19 



(Boston, 1876} — the rest of the book being com- 
piled by the widow and daughter of Mr. Ticknor. 

He contributed articles on Edward Everett and 
Rufus Choate to the New American Cyclopaedia. 

He contributed twenty-three articles to the North 
American Review, 1831-1864. He contributed a 
series of literary portraits to Buckingham's New 
England Magazine. He was a frequent contributor 
to the Christian Examiner. 

He edited, in connection with George Ripley, 
the Christian Register in 1833. He was at one 
time editor of the Jurist, and in 1857 he became 
owner and chief editor of the Boston Courier, and 
remained such till April, 1861. 

The Index to the Proceedings of the Mass. 
Historical Society, vol. i.-xx., shows various 
memoirs of his associates, and tributes to their 
memory, written by him subsequent to 1843, when 
he became a member. The Proceedings for June, 
1882, contain Gen. F. W. Palfrey's memoir of Mr. 
Hillard, embracing also a commemorative poem 
by W. W. Story. 

The Class book contains various newspaper 
tributes to deceased classmates. 

His lectures on John Milton before the Lowell 
Institute in Boston ( 1847) were not printed. 

Later were published : 

Catalogue of the autograph letters and manu- 
scripts belonging to the estate of Geo. 8. Hillard. 
(Boston, 1881.) 

Catalogue of the private Library of the late 
Qeo. S. Hillard. Sold at auction, 1879. (Boston, 
1879.) 

The Class book contains a photograph. 



Began the study of medicine in 1828; was a 
pupil of Louis in Paris, and took his degree at the 
Harvard Med. School, 1834 ; d. 27 Feb. 1834. 

There is a tribute by C. C. Emerson in the 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 

** His father prepared a memoir of him for 
private distribution. Subsequently we printed it 
for public distribution in the Warren Street 
Chapel series, with an appendix of my remini«- 
cences of him." — H. I. B. 



The Class library contains : 

A memoir of James Jackson, jr., M.D., with ex- 
tracts from his letters to his father and medical 
cases, collected by him. By James Jackson, M.D. 
(Boston, 1885.) Bound with it is an obituary 
notice from the Medical Magazine, April 15, 1834, 
by Dr. Pierson. 

Dr. Bowditch has written on a fly-leaf: * If 
Jackson had lived he would undoubtedly have 
more than taken his worthy father's place in medi- 



cine, not merely of this country, but throughout 
the world." 

XVanols Caleb Lorlns. 

Born in Boston, 29 Sept. 1809; studied law; 
admitted to the bar, 1831 ; d. Oct. 1874, at Nahant. 
He left one son and three unmarried daughters. 
There is a photograph in the Class book. 



>7 MoKi 

Born in Boston, 9 Feb. 1810 ; school teacher in 
Roxbury and Cambridge; entered Law School, 
1829 ; tutor in Latin, 1829 ; librarian of Mercantile 
Library, N. Y. ; civil engineer ; d. 17 May, 1867. 

He married Anna H. Hosmer, 8 Nov. 1861. 

See Palmer's Necrology, p. 141. 

Jolui Maynard. 

Born in Waltham, 16 April, 1804 ; was only two 
years with the Class ; d. 24 Sept. 1871. 

He married, 2 May, 1839, Catharine Beal of 
Hingham, and left two children, James Beal, b. 
1840, and John Francis, b. 1844. 

Epliraim Flint Millar. 

Bom in Greenfield, N. H., 2 Oct. 1808; studied 
law ; practised in Ipswich, Mass., till 1842 ; Deputy 
Collector of Salem till 1849; Collector till 1857; 
in Boston, 1857-61 ; again in Salem custom house ; 
d. 17 Aug. 1875. 

He married Catharine Seymour and left four 
children: Capt James, U. S. army; Ephraim; 
Mary, who married Henry A. Blood of Washing- 
ton, D.C., and — , who married Charles H. 
Higbee of New Ipswich, N. H. 

There is a photograph in the Class book. 

Gharlea Mimot. 

Bom at Haverhill, 30 Aug. 1810 ; son of Stephen 
(H. C. 1801) ; practised law till 1841 ; then devoted 
himself to railroad management ; d. 10 Dec. 1866. 

In his speech at the time of celebrating the 
fiftieth anniversary of the graduation of the Class, 
Mr. Winthrop said : *' It is not to be forgotten 
that a contingent bequest, which has since been 
realized, and which has added a round sum of fifty 
thousand dollars to the much-needed resources of 
the College Library, is credited to Charles Minot." 

Gharlaa Traoj Mnrdooh. 

Bom in Cuba, 5 Jan. 1809 ; admitted to the bar 
in Boston, 1832; d. 25 Nov. 1858. 
The Class book has his photograph. 
See Palmer's Necrology j p. 88. 



20 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



Gteorge Nioholt. 

Bom in Salem, 30 Jan. 1809; graduated at the 
Divinity School, 1831 ; preached at Meadville, Pa., 
Salem, Portsmouth, N. H. ; bookseller at Cam- 
bridge, 1833; editor of The Unitarian; later a 
professional proof-reader, becoming one of the 
proprietors of the University Press in 1842; d. 6 
July, 1882. 

He married Susan Farley Treadwell of Salem, 
7 Oct. 1843. Children : John W. T. Nichols, and 
six daughters, all married, Susan F. Nichols, Mary 
N. White, Harriet F. Lamb, Susan N. Carter, 
Lucy N. White, Elizabeth P. Hincks. 

Mr. Nichols acquired great reputation as a proof- 
reader, and the works of Bancroft, Prescott, Gra- 
hame, Hildreth, Ticknor, bear the impress of his 
critical care, amounting in some respects to the 
supervision of an editior. Two of the most con- 
spicuous instances of his long-continued scrupulous 
labor upon the writings of others, in eliminating 
errors, are the Boston editions of the writings of 
Edmund Burke and the writings of Charles Sumner 
— the last labor he had barely finished at his death. 

The Class book contains his photograph. 

John Greene Norwood. 

Bom 3 Dec. 1809; teacher in Boston; entered 
Harvard Divinity School, 1829 ; d. 25 May, 1832. 

Henrjr Onderdonk, Jr. 

Bom 11 June, 1804 ; entered Columbia College, 
1823 ; entered Harvard as Junior, 1826 ; remained 
a year; and graduated at Columbia, 1827; a 
teacher till 18Go ; made A.B. at Harvard, 1878 ; d. 
22 June, 1886. 

Married 28 Nov. 1828, Maria H. Onderdonk. 
Children : Adrian and Elizabeth. 



He published : 

Revolutionary incidents of Queens County. 
(New York, 1846.) 

Revolutionary incidents of Suffolk and Kings 
Counties ; battles of Lon^ Island ; British prisons 
and prison ships. (New York, 1849.) 

Queens County in olden times. (Jamaica, N. Y., 
1865, — second series.) 

The Annals of Hempstead, 1643 to 1832; with 
the rise and growth of the Society of Friends on 
Long Island and in New York, 1657 to 1826. 
(Hempstead, N. Y., 1878.) 

Induction of the Rev. William Vesey into 
Trinity Church, N. Y. (Jamaica, L. I., 1879.) 

Antiqidties of the Parish Church, Hempstead. 
(Hempstead, N. Y., 1880.) 

Antiquities of the Parish Church, Jamaica. 
(Jamaica, N. Y., 1880.) 



History of the turf in Queens County (1882). 

Prize history of Queens County Agricultural 
Society (1882). 

Documents and letters intended to illustrate the 
Revolutionary incidents of Queens County, N. Y. 
[Second series.] (Hempstead, L. I., 1884.) 

Mr. Onderdonk also contributed a genealogy of 
the Onderdonk family to Riker*s "Newtown"; a 
bibliography of Long Island in Gabriel Furman's 
*\Antiquitie8 of Long Island" (1876) ; a paper on 
ancient agriculture, etc., in the report for 1867 of 
the Queens County Agricultural Society ; one on 
the rise and growth of the Society of Friends on 
Long Island and in New York city in The Ameri- 
can Historical Record for 1872; a criticism on 
Thomas Jones's ** New York in the Revolutionary 
War" in The Magazine of American History, 
1880. He also gathered numerous newspaper 
articles, written by himself, and deposited them in 
bound volumes in the Astor, Boston Public, Har- 
vard College, and other libraries. 



William P 

Entered Sophomore; graduated 1830; d. 13 
Feb. 1832. 



HvB&plupey Pierce. 

In the Class during Sophomore year only. 

WiUiam PUllips. 

Born in 1808; d. in Cuba, 16 June, 1829. 

Oliver Presoott. 

Born in Westford, 26 Nov. 1806; admitted to 
tlie bar in New Bedford, 1832; Judge of Probate 
in Bristol County, 1835 ; Judge of Police Court in 
New Bedford, 1846; resigned both judgeships in 
1858; d. 11 June, 1890. 

He married Helen A. How land, 16 Oct. 1861. 
Children : Helen W. ; Oliver ; Mary Bobbins. 

A memorial pamphlet was issued after his death 
containing various testimonials. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Gharlea Plrootor. 

Bom in Rowley, to which town he retamed to 
study medicine; took M.D. at Bowdoin, 1831; 
practised at Rowley ; d. 12 March, 1877. 

He married, 1838, a dan. of Dr. Pond of Bangor, 
Me., and she died 1846; married, second, widow 
of David Dole of Newbury. Children : Charles ; 
Mary H. Johnson ; Cornelia P. Prescott. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



21 



Edward Spra^^ne Raad. 

Born at Newburyport. 15 March, 1809 ; entered 
Law School and took his LL.B. in 1831 ; one of 
the organizers of the Episcopal Theological School 
in Cambridge, and for a while the President; 
drowned with his wife, his son C. A. R., his son's 
wife, and their son, in the wreck of the steamer 
*' City of Columbus," near Gay Head, 18 Jan. 1884. 

He married, Sept. 1833, Elizabeth Arnold of 
Providence. Children : Edward S. ; Arnold A. ; 
Frederick Henry ; Charles Arthur. 

The Class book contains his photograph. 

Janftes Oook Rlohmond. 

Born in Providence, R. I., 18 March, 1808; 
entered Junior from Columbia College; passed 
several years in Grermany, Italy, and Greece; 
entered the Episcopal ministry, 1833; was a chap- 
lain during the Civil war in a Wisconsin regiment ; 
d. 20 July, 1866, by violence, in Poughkeepsie, 

N. y. 

He married, 4 June, 1835, Sarah, dau. of Henry 
Seaton of Santa Cruz. Children : Sarah Seaton ; 
Henry Seaton, d. young; Clarissa Andrews, m. 
E. C. Benedict; Catharine Seaton; Frances; 
WilUam. 

The Class library contains a scrap-book entitled 
*'The life-work of Rev. James C. Richmond, 
Presbyter; Class poet of 1828; evangelist; with 
an appendix containing letters from different indi- 
viduals relative to the compiling of this volume 
and to the life of Brother Richmond. By the 
Secretary of the Class of 1828. 1888." 

After his death was printed : 

Trinity Church Memorials. Rev. James Cook 
Richmond, etc. Address by Rev. Geo. F. Cush- 
man, D.D., with an extract from a speech by 
United States Senator Carpenter upon Mr. Rich- 
mond's death. (Pawtucket, 1886.) 



He published : 

Introduction and notes to George Potts and 
J. M. Wain Wright's '' No church without a bishop" 
(1844). 

Tbe conspiracy against the Bishop of New York 
in The Laugh of a Layman (1845). 

The country schoolmaster in love ; a life in New 
England. A college poem. (New York, 1845.) 

A mid-summer's day dream, or a little book of 
the vision of Shawmut. (Boston, 1847; Mil- 
waukee, 1859.) 

A visit to lona, by an American clergyman. 
(Glasgow, 1849.) [A sketch of Leigh Richmond's 
labors, etc.] 

The Rhode Island Cottage, or a gift for the 
children of sorrow : a narrative of facts. Fifth 
thousand. (New York, 1851.) 



Metacomet : a poem of the North A ncrican 
Indians. First American, from the London edition. 
(London and New York, 1851.) 

The Palm- Sunday sermon. Third edition. (Mil- 
waukee, 1859.) 

He was a frequent contributor to the Harvard 
Register during his college career, and the song of 
"The Rain Drop," printed in that magazine in 
Dec. 1827, excited great attention and much ad- 
miration ; being set to music it became a popular 
favorite. (R. C. W.) 

Samuel Rogers. 

Bom in Boston, 16 June, 1808; M.D. 1831; 
teacher in Brookline, 1838; in Roxbury, 1839; 
never married; d. 31 May, 1849. 

John Lewis Rnssell. 

Bom in Salem, 2 Dec. 1808 ; graduated at the 
Divinity School, 1831 ; devoted himself to botany, 
etc. , and was the first editor of the annual reports 
of the Mass. Horticultural Society ; Fellow of the 
American Academy; d. 7 June, 1873. 

He l^*ft a widow, but no children. 



He publL^hed : 

Discourse before the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society on its seventh anniversary, Sept. 17, 
1835. (Boston, 1835.) 

Report of the transactions of the Mass. Horti- 
cultural Society. (Boston, 1839.) 

Thanksgiving-day discourse in Hingham, Nov. 
24, 1842. 

Address before the Essex Agricultural Society. 
(Newburyport, 18G0; also in the Transactions of 
the Society.) 

Ferns. (Salem, 1868.) 

Mushrooms. (Salem, 1868; also in American 
Naturalist, Aug. 18G8.) 

A paper by F. W. Putnam in the Bulletin of the 
Essex Institute, xv. p. 86, refers to a ms. report 
by Mr. Russell ** On the presence of shells in great 
quantities near the seashore in Salem" which is 
preserved in the records of the Essex County 
Natural History Society. 

Thomas Philander Ryder. 

Born in Hallowell, Me., 19 Aug. 1806; became 
a teacher ; entered the Lunatic Hospital at South 
Boston, 1848; d. 21 Nov. 1852. 

He married Sarah P. Albree. 

See Palmer's Necrology, p. 20. 



He published : 

Address at Dorchester before tlie Norfolk Juve- 
nile Lyceum, May 10. (Dedham, 1831.) 



22 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



Jowathaii Sanndanon. 

Born in Hollis, N. H., 80 Dec. 1802; was bred 
to the law; became a teacher of music; d. in 
Philadelphia, 27 Feb. 1881 ; was never married. 

WUliaiii Sawyer. 

Bom in Charlestown, 15 Dec. 1807; admitted to 
the bar, 1833 ; lived in Charlestown and Waltham ; 
killed accidentally at a railroad crossing in Water- 
town, 24 May, 1852. 

His wife, Susan M., survived him. Children: 
Hannah Maria, m. Alonzo Conley ; Mary Caroline ; 
Georgina T., m. Benj. F. Strand; Julia F. ; 
WUUam. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

See Palmer's Necrology, p. 8. 

Francis Oaorce Shaw. 

Bom in Boston, 28 Oct. 1809; entered Sopho- 
more and left in Junior year to enter his father's 
counting-room ; retired from business, 1841 ; lived 
in Europe; removed to Staten Island, 1855; d. 7 
Nov. 1882. 

He married Sarah Blake Sturgis, 1835. ' Child- 
ren: Anna, married Oeorge William Curtis; 
Robert Gould (H. C. 1860), b. 10 Oct. 1837, m. 
Anna Kneeland Haggerty and was killed at Fort 
Wagner, 18 July, 1868; Susanna, m. Robert B. 
Mintum; Josephine, m. Chas. Russell Lowell, 
who was killed at Cedar Creek 19-20 Oct. 1864; 
Ellen, m. Francis Channing Barlow. 



He is the translator of : 

Briancourt's Organization of Labor (1847). 

George Sand's Consuelo (New York, 1846) and 
Devil's Pool (New York, 1847). 

Charles Pellarin's Life of Charles Fourier. 
(New York, 1848.) 

Zschokke's History of Switzerland (1856, 1860). 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Horatio Shipley. 

Bom at Pepperell, 17 Aug. 1804; admitted to 
the bar, 1838; lived in Boston and Pepperell; d. 
7 Dec. 1872. 

Lowls Smith. 

Born in Waltham, 27 May, 1803; teacher in 
that town 1830-1840; after that a farmer; d. 22 
Jan. 1880. 

He married Page of Boston, 1884 ; had two 

sons and two daughters, of whom Thomas P., a 
daughter who married J. O. Teel, and another, 
Abby I., survived him. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 



Edward Soloy. 

Bom in Charlestown, 23 Dec. 1807 ; became a 
broker in Charlestown, Boston, and New York; 
d. 14 Feb. 1882. 

John Apploton Swott. 

Born in Boston, 3 Dec. 1808; M.D. 1831 ; prac- 
tised in Boston and New York; professor in the 
medical department of the University in New 
York ; d. 18 Sept. 1854. 

Memoirs of him by B. W. McCready were pub- 
lished by the N. Y. Med. and Surgical Society; 
and by Dr. Austin Flint in his ** Eminent American 
Physicians and Surgeons" (Philadelphia, 1861). 

He married Miss Appleton, but had no issue. 



He published : 

A treatise on the diseases of the chest. Third 
edition. (New York, 1856.) [Copyright, 1852.] 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

William Gray Swott. 

Born in Salem; son of Col. Samuel Swett; 
graduated at the Divinity School, 1831 ; preached 
in Lexington and Lynn ; d. at Charlestown, 15 Feb. 
1848. 

He married Elizabeth Pliinney of Lexington; 
had one daughter, who married Col. N. P. 
Hallowell. 

After his death a volume of his sermons was 
published. 

John Gill Tappan. 

Remained through the Freshman year only ; d. 
29 Aug. 1883. 

He married Eliza Laurence Trask of Springfield. 
Children: John Eliot; Edward; Elizabeth Weld ; 
Mary Swift ; Frederick Herbert ; Walter ; Herbert. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

John Parker TarbelL 

Bom in Cambridge, 30 Aug. 1807; studied at 
Harvard Law School, 1829; practised law; lived 
in Cambridgeport, Pepperell, and Boston ; was rep- 
resentative in the Mass. General Court from Pep- 
perell, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1848; in the Mass. Senate, 
1842 ; living in Boston. 

He married Catharine Elizabeth Trull, 31 May, 
1838. Children : John Franksford (U. S. Navy) ; 
Katharine Amelia ; William Croswell (H. C. 1879) ; 
Arthur Parker. 

He published : 

An oration delivered before the democratic citi- 
zens of the north part of Middlesex County, at 
Groton, July 4, 1839. (Lowell, 1839.) 

The Class book contains a photograph. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



23 



Gharlea Joseph Taylor. 

Born in Boston, 31 Aug. 1808 ; entered Sopho- 
more; studied law, but did not practise long; 
never married; d. in Boston (Dorchester), 21 
Nov. 1872. 

Norton Thayer. 

Bom in Braintree, 1804 [Palmer says, 29 Sept. 
1802]; entered Sophomore from Yale; studied 
theology ; became a teacher in Dorchester, Boston, 
and New York ; d. in Boston, 14 Sept. 1870. 

He married Lucy Ann Wales of Randolph, 23 
Dec. 1840; his daughter Mary married Theodore 
6. Montague of Tennessee. 

See Palmer's Necrology^ ii. 70. 

Thomas Kemhlo Thomas. 

Bom at Boston, 28 Nov. 1809 ; entered Sopho- 
more ; M.D. 1832 ; at the Sandwich Islands, 1833- 
38; subsequently at Way land, Canton, and Rox- 
bury, Mass., and later in Maine, where he died, 
7 Nov. 1863, childless. 

John H. Trowhridce* 

Did not graduate ; M.D. 1835. 

Jamos S. Wadsworth. 

Bora SO Oct. 1807; was with the Class in*the 
Junior and Senior years, but did not graduate; 
killed in the battle of the Wilderness, 6 May, 18G4. 

He is commemorated in Lewis F. Allen's " Me- 
morial of James S. Wadsworth: an address at 
Rochester, Sept. 23, 1864." 

Children : Charles F. ; dau. m. John 6. Adair ; 
Craig N. ; dau. m. N. £. Rogers ; James W. ; dau. 
m. Arthur Post. 

The Class book contains a photograph. 

Wmian Nelson Wellford. 

Took degree of M.D. at University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1833 ; physician near Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
d. 6 July, 1872. 

Joseph P. Wheeler. 

Did not graduate. 

Benjamin Dnioh Whitney. 

Bom 10 Nov. 1807; became a merchant; lived 
in Boston, New York, and Washington; d. in 
Cambridge, 24 Feb. 1892. 

He married Elizabeth Williams of Northborough, 
20 Sept. 1885; she died 24 May, 1861; married, 
second, Charlotte £. Genella of Vicksburg, Tenn., 



5 Feb. 1863. Children: Benjamin; S. W. ; a 
daughter who married Professor Jeffiies Wyman ; 
and two other daughters. 
The Class book contains a photograph. 

John Whitney. 

Bom 16 Oct. 1807 ; left in Sophomore year ; d. 
24 May, 1861. 

He married Mary Baldwin Holt of Boston, 23 
Dec. 1828, who died 7 July, 1877. Children: 
John ; Mary Baldwin, m. George Lee Thurston of 
Lancaster, and second, Henry Stedman Nourse of 
Lancaster ; Benjamin Colt ; Susan Ruth ; Edward 
Mellen. 

Rohert Gharles Winthrep. 

Bom in Boston, 12 May, 1809 ; President of the 
Class ; studied law with Daniel Webster ; admitted 
to the bar, 1831 ; member of the Mass. House of 
Representatives, 1884-1840; Speaker, 1838-1840; 
Representative of Boston in the U. S. Congress, 
1840-1850; Speaker of the 80th Congress; suc- 
ceeded Webster in the U. S. Senate; LL.D. Bow- 
doin, 1849; Kenyon, 1851; Harvard, 1855; Cam- 
bridge, England, 1874 ; Overseer of the University 
and President of the Alumni Association; Presi- 
dent Mass. Historical Society, 1855-1885; Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees of the Peabody Fund 
for Southern Education ; Fellow of the American 
Acad, of Arts and Sciences, of the London Society 
of Antiquaries, etc., etc. ; living in Boston. 

He married first, Eliza Cabot, only child of 
Francis Blanchard, of Boston; second, Laura, 
daughter of John Derby, of Salem, and widow of 
Arnold F. Welles, of Boston; third, Adele, only 
daughter of Hon. Francis Granger, of Canandaigua, 
N. Y., and widow of John Eliot Thayer, of Boston. 
Children (by first marriage) : Robert Charles, John, 
Eliza Cabot. 

R. G. Parker's ''Aids to English Composition" 
contains, as an example of an English oration, 
Mr. Winthrop's Commencement oration (1828) on 
•♦Public Station." 

Among his numerous publications are the fol- 
lowing : — 

Speech in favor of compensation for the destruc- 
tion of the Ursuline Convent, delivered in the 
Mass. House of Representatives, March 12, 1835. 

The Testimony of Infidels, a speech delivered 
in the Mass. House of Representatives, Feb. 11, 
1836. 

Protection to Domestic Industry, a speech deliv- 
ered in the Mass. House of Representatives, Feb. 
15, 1837. 

Address to the Electors of Massachusetts, 1837. 



24 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



The Sub-Treasury system, a speech delirered in 
the Mass. House of Representatives, March 26, 
1888. 

Address to the People of Massachusetts, 1888. 

Free Schools and Free Groyemments, a lecture 
delivered before the Boston Lyceum, Dec. 20, 1888. 

The Pilgrim Fathers, an address delivered before 
the New England Society of New York, Dec. 28, 
1889. 

The Votes of Interested Members, a decision 
pronounced from the chair of the Mass. House of 
Representatives, Feb. 19, 1840. 

The Proceeds of the Public Lands, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
July 2, 1841. 

The National Revenue, a speech delivered in the 
U. S. House of Representatives, July 28, 1841. 

The Policy of Discriminating Duties, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
Dec. 80, 1841. 

The Imprisonment of Free Colored Seamen, a 
report made to the U. S. House of Representa- 
tives, Jan. 20, 1848. 

The Safe Keeping of the Public Moneys, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
Jan. 25, 1848. 

The Credit of Massachusetts Vindicated, a speech 
delivered at Faneuil Hall, Oct. 12, 1848. 

The Right of Petition, a speech delivered in the 
U. S. House of Representatives, Jan. 28, 1844. 

The Oregon question and the Treaty of Wash- 
ington, a speech delivered in the U. S. House of 
Representatives, March 18, 1844. 

The Annexation of Texas, a speech delivered in 
the U. S. House of Representatives, Jan. 6, 1845. 

Great Britain and the United States, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
Feb. 1, 1845. 

The Influence of Commerce, an address deliv- 
ered before the Mercantile Library Association of 
Boston, Oct. 15, 1845. 

Arbitration of the Oregon Question, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
Jan. 8, 1846. 

River and Harbor Improvements, a speech deliv- 
ered in the U. S. House of Representatives, March 
12, 1846. 

The Wants of the Government and the Wages 
of Labor, a speech delivered in the U. S. House of 
Representatives, June 26, 1846. 

The War with Mexico, a speech delivered in the 
U. S. House of Representatives, Jan. 8, 1847. 

The Conquest of Mexican Territory, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. House of Representatives, 
Feb. 22, 1847. 

The National Monument to Washington, an ad- 
dress on laying its corner-stone at Washington, 
July 4, 1848. 



The Bible, an address delivered before the 
Massachusetts Bible Society in Boston, May 28, 
1849. 

The Life and Services of James Bowdoin, an 
address delivered before the Maine Historical So- 
ciety, at Bowdoin College, Sept. 5, 1849. 

Personal Vindication, a speech delivered in the 
U. S. House of Representatives, Feb. 21, 1850. 

The Admission of California and the Adjust- 
ment of the Slavery Question, a speech delivered 
in the U. S. House of Representatives, May 8, 
1850. 

The Boundary of New Mexico and Texas, a 
speech delivered in the U. S. Senate, Aug. 14, 
1850. 

The Protest against the Admission of California, 
remarks in the U. S. Senate, Aug. 14, 1850. 

The Fugitive Slave Law, a speech delivered in 
the U. S. Senate, Aug. 19, 1850. 

Slavery in the District of Columbia, a speech 
delivered in the U. S. Senate, Sept. 10, 1850. 

The Valuation of Imports, a speech delivered in 
the U. S. Senate, Jan. 17, 1851. 

The Obligations and Responsibilities of Educated 
Men, an address delivered before the Alumni of 
Harvard University, July 22, 1852. 

American Agriculture, an address before the 
Bristol County Agricultural Society, at Taunton, 
Oct. 15, 1852. 

Archimedes and Franklin, a lecture delivered 
before the Mass. Charitable Mechanics Associa- 
tion, Nov. 29, 1858. 

Algernon Sidney, a lecture delivered before the 
Boston Mercantile Library Association, Dec. 21, 
1858. 

The Repeal of the Missouri Compromise, remarks 
made at Faneuil Hall, Feb. 28, 1854. 

The Historic Glories of the Empire State, a speech 
at the semi-centennial celebration of the New York 
Historical Society, Nov. 20, 1854. 

An Address at the laying of the corner-stone of 
the Boston Public Library, Sept. 17, 1855. 

The Fusion of Parties in Massachusetts, a letter 
to the Whig Executive Committee, Oct. 15, 1855. 

A Report to the Overseers of Harvard College on 
the office of Preacher to the University and the 
Plummer Professorship, 1855. 

An Address delivered at the unveiling of the 
statue of Benjamin Franklin, in Boston, Sept. 17, 
1856. 

The Presidential Question, a speech made in 
Faneuil Hall, Oct. 24, 1856. 

The Worthies of Connecticut, a speech delivered 
at the Festival of the Sons of Connecticut, in 
Boston, Jan. 14, 1857. 

Music in New England, an address at the open- 
ing of the first Musical Festival in Boston, May 21, 
1857. 



LIST OF MEMBEBS. 



25 



A Memorial addressed to the City Council of 
Boston on the Subject of a Central Charity Bureau, 
Oct, 8, 1867. 

An Address delivered at the dedication of the 
Boston Public Library, Jan. 1 , 1858. 

Christianity, neither sectarian nor sectional, the 
great remedy for social and political evils ; an ad- 
dress delivered before the Young Men's Christian 
Association of Boston, April 7, 1859. 

Luxury and the Fine Arts, an address delivered 
before the Young Men's Christian Association of 
Baltimore, May 2, 1859. 

Speech on the presentation of a standard to the 
Twenty-second regiment of Massachusetts volun- 
teers, on Boston Common, Oct. 8, 1861. 

Memoir of Hon. Nathan Appleton ; prepared for 
the Mass. Historical Society, 1861. 

Speech made on Boston Common at the mass 
meeting in aid of Recruiting, Aug. 27, 1862. 

Speech on the presentation of a standard to the 
Forty- third regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, 
on Boston Common, Nov. 5, 1862. 

Concordia, a speech delivered at the Triennial 
Festival of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, Oct. 14, 1863. 

The Nomination of McClellan, a speech delivered 
at the great Ratification Meeting in New York, 
Sept. 17, 1864. 

The Presidential Election of 1864, a speech de- 
livered at New London, Oct. 18, 1864. 

Speech made at the Jubilee of the American 
Bible Society, in New York, May 10, 1866. 

Massachusetts and its Early History, an intro- 
ductory lecture before the Lowell Institute of 
Boston, Jan. 5, 1869. 

Eulogy pronounced at the Funeral of George 
Peabody, at Peabody, Feb. 8, 1870. 

An Oration delivered at Plymouth on the Two 
Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Landing 
of the Pilgrims, Dec. 21, 1870. 

The Environs of Boston, an address at the dedi- 
cation of the Town Hall of Brookline, Feb. 22, 
1873. 

Sir Walter Raleigh, paper read at a meet- 
ing of the Mass. Historical Society, Sept. 10, 
1873. 

Speech at the Vice Chancellor's banquet in the 
Hall of St. Peter's College, Cambridge, England, 
June 15, 1874. 

Centennial Oration, delivered by invitation of 
the City government of Boston, July 4, 1876. 

Address delivered at the unveiling of the statue 
of Daniel Webster in the Central Park, New York, 
Nov. 26, 1876. 

Memoir of Hon. John H. Clifford, prepared for 
the Mass. Historical Society, 1877. 

The Semi-Centennial of the Class of 1828, re- 
marks at the Alumni dinner, June 26, 1878. 



Memoir of Henry Clay, prepared at the request 
of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 
1879. 

Remarks on retiring from the Presidency of the 
Boston Provident Association after twenty-five 
years service, with an explanatory note, Oct 8, 
1879. 

Address at the Centennial celebration of the 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, in Bos- 
ton, May 26, 1880. 

Remarks at the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of the First Church in Boston, Nov. 18, 
1880. 

The Puritans and the Church of England, a paper 
read before the Mass. Historical Society, Jan. 18, 
1881. 

Oration delivered on Bunker Hill at the unveil- 
ing of the statue of Col. William Prescott, June 17, 
1881. 

Oration on the Hundredth Anniversary of the 
Surrender of Lord Cornwallis, delivered at York- 
town, by invitation of Congress, Oct 19, 1881. 

Oration, by order of Congress, on the comple- 
tion of the national monument to Washington, 
Feb. 21, 1885. 

Four volumes of the collected Addresses and 
Speeches of Mr. Winthrop have been published by 
Messrs. Little, Brown & Co., of Boston, at differ- 
ent periods : the first in 1852 ; the second in 1867 ; 
the third (with an engraving of him) in 1879 ; the 
fourth (with a heliotype of the portrait of him in 
the Capitol at Wasliington) in 1886. They com- 
prise the greater part of the productions already 
cited, together with numerous others, including 
many much-admired tributes uttered by him from 
the chair of the Mass. Historical Society in com- 
memoration of distinguished contemporaries, on 
both sides of the Atlantic, with whom he has been 
closely associated. The same Society's volumes 
of Proceedings comprise many papers read or re- 
marks made by him ; while in the volumes of Pro- 
ceedings of the Peabody Education Fund, the 
Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and 
Ethnology, the Bunker Hill Monument Associa- 
tion, and the Reports of the Massachusetts Bible 
Society, are to be found other addresses made by 
him as President of those institutions. He is also 
the author of a small work entitled *< Washington, 
Bowdoin, and Franklin" (1876), and an elaborate 
Life, in two volumes, of his great ancestor, com- 
piled from family papers in his possession, and 
entitled *' Life and Letters of John Winthrop," the 
first volume of which appeared in 1868, the second 
in 1866, and which has since passed through another 
edition. 

A patriotic hymn written by Mr. Winthrop, and 
printed by him anonymously, obtained a wide cir- 



26 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



culation during the Ciyil War, and he has since 
privately printed an Ode to Queen Victoria on the 
occasion of her Juhilee, two sonnets coromemora- 
tire of the centennial of Washington's first inaugu- 
ration, and a metrical translation of the Dies Irae. 

The Class hook, etc. , contains photographs from 
life and from Huntingdon's portrait of him in the 
Capitol at Washington. 

Jowathaii liorliis Woart. 

Entered the Episcopal ministry ; lost with wife 
and child in steamer *' Pulaski," 14 June, 1838. 
He married, July, 1880, Elizabeth West. 



The Class library contains a copy of The ffdr- 
vard Register, 1827-28 (Cambridge, 1828). The 
advertisement says that the first number appeared 
in March, 1827, and continued for twelve months. 
It was first under the direction of three members 
of the Class of 1827 (C. C. Felton, S. M. E. Kittle, 
Seth Sweetser) ; but in August, 1827, these were 
succeeded by three of 1828 (T. B. Fox, Geo. S. 
Hillard, J. C. Richmond), with whom, later, six 
other members of the last-named Class were joined, 
forming the Polyglot Club. This Class copy has 
been annotated by various hands, particularly by 
Dr. Bowditch, and from these notes, as well as from 
memoranda in three other copies in the College 
Library (one of which belonged to Charles Sum- 
ner), the authorship of the various papers is cer- 
tainly or tentatively noted in the following list. 
Where the data differ, the alternative names are 
given. 

March^ 1827, — Introduction [not signed] . C. C. 
Felton. 

Uses of literary history [signed C. C.]. C. C. 
Felton. 

Miseries of the Spectacle family [C.]. James 
Freeman Clarke. 

Funeral rites [B. Y.]. Seth Sweetser (?). 

Life and writings of Ariosto [V.]. Henry R. 
Cleveland. 

The Oriental muse. Verse [F.]. C. C. Felton. 

Napoleon's departure to St. Helena. Verse [H.]. 
J. H. Warland. 

Harp of my country. Verse [K.]. S. M. E. 
Kittle, later called W. E. Rogers. 

Death of W. O. Prescott. B. R. Curtis. 

April, 1827, — Th^ writings of Irving [T. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 

The land of Nature [X.]. Marshall Tufts. 

The drama [N. R.]. Seth Sweetser. 

A vision of the universe, translated from Richter 
[H. H.]. F. H. Hedge. 



Literary success of female writers [C. C.]. C. C. 
Felton. 

The death of W. B. D. Verse [H. H.]. F. H. 
Hedge. 

Changes. Verse [J.]. Jos. W. Cross, James 
Freeman Clarke. 

A death-bed scene. Verse [K.]. S. M. E. 
Kittle. 

May, 1827. —Life and writings of Holty [C C.]. 
C. C. Felton. 

Imagination as affecting abstruse studies [S.]. 
Seth Sweetser, probably ; but it has been assigned 
to H. R. Cleveknd. 

Periodical publications [ W.H.] W.H.Brooks ( ?) . 

The presentiment [T. B.]. Thomas B. Fox. 

Madame Dacier, from the French [N. R.]. 
Seth Sweetser. 

Think of me. Verse [M. B.]. David H. 
Barlow. 

A fragment. Verse [E. H.]. Joseph W. Cross. 

Lines suggested by Volney's ** Ruins" [K.]. 
S. M. E. Kittle. 

The last wish. Verse [H. H.]. F. H. Hedge. 

June, 1827. — Effects of literature upon the 
people [C. C.]. C. C. Felton. 

Battle of Lexington [X.]. Marshall Tufts. 

Autobiography [P> Q*]- Edmund Quincy, G. C. 
Felton. 

Grenius of Sheridan [O. U.]. 

The orphan. Verse [K.]. S. M. E. Kittle. 

Hope. Verse [T.]. 

Niobe. Verse [L.]. John O. Sargent. 

The tears of a king [G.]. G. S. HUlard. 

The soldier's burial [O.j. John O. Sargent. 

July, 1827. — The morality of the ancient 
philosophers [M. E.]. Seth Sweetser, S. M. E. 
Kittle. 

Letter from a country schoolmaster [T. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 

Love of travelling [K.]. S. M. E. Kittle. 

Essay [not signed]. 

Notices of American poets [not signed]. John 
O. Sargent. 

John Osborn [not signed] . John O. Sargent. 

Writings of the author of **The Spy" [F. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 

Character of Cicero [not signed]. Edmund 
Quincy. 

Matters of the heart [not signed]. Josiah Q. 
Whitney. 

The fine arts [S.]. John Turner Sargent. 

Stanzas [M. P.]. 

Imitation of Goethe. Verse [S. G.]. 

August, 1827.— The day of graduating [T. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 
Proper persons [not signed]. Geo. Chapman. 



LIST OF MEMBERS. 



27 



Bemarlu upon the classicg [C.]. C. C. Emerson, 
Charles A. Farley. 

Letter from a country schoolmaster [M. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox, D. H. Barlow. 

Notices of American poets : Rev. John Adams, 
Mather Byles, Thomas Godfrey [not signed]. 
John O. Sargent, J. T. Sargent. 

Individual differences of character [A.]. Seth 
Sweetser. 

The diffusion of knowledge [M. A. C.]. J. H. 
Warland. 

I'll think of thee. Verse [S. C.]. J. H. War- 
land. 

The bridal night. Verse [M.]. H. B. McLel- 
lan(?). 

A reverie. Verse [P. Q.]. C. C. Felton. 

Lines [P. Q.]. C. C. Felton. 

Lines [not signed]. J.C.Richmond. 

Septemher, 1827^ — Day before Commence- 
ment: a dialogue [6.]. Charles A. Farley, 
George Bartlett. 

Progress of Commerce [W.]. George H. Whit- 
man. 

Eyening thoughts [G.]. Charles A. Farley. 

Vacation [C. C.]. C. C. Felton. 

Death of students [not signed]. Thomas B. 
Pox. 

Letter from a country schoolmaster [T. B.]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 

Comparison between the ancients and the moderns 
[M. E.]. 8. M.E. Kittle (?). 

The Etonian [not signed]. J. O. Sargent. 

Land of the Pilgrims. Verse [M. B.]. D. H. 
Barlow. 

The past. Verse [P. Q.]. C. C. Felton. 

Mathematical question [B.]. 

October t 1827 n — My early days [not signed]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 

Extracts from a raledictoiy poem [not signed]. 
F. H. Hedge. 

Conversation [E.]. C. C. Emerson. 

Evening meditations. Verse [A.D.]. E. S.Rand. 

Key to Vivian Gray [not signed]. John O. 
Sargent. 

Day of entering [not signed]. Thomas B. Fox. 

Cambridge lyrics. Verse [Q. H. F., Jr.], 
James Freeman Clarke. 

Historical sketch of Harvard College [not 
signed]. Thomas B. Fox, C. C. Felton, B. R. 
Curtis. 

Battle of the Delta. Verse [not signed]. J. C. 
Richmond. 

Recollections, contributed from a ms. by [L. A.]. 
E. S. Rand. 

Nbven^er, 1827, — The skeptic [not signed]. 
Thomas B. Fox. 



Extract from a valedictoiy poem [not signed]. 
F. H. Hedge. 

New England romance [not signed]. George S. 
HUlard. 

New England pastorals. Verse [not signed]. 
J. C. Richmond, F. H. Hedge. 

The College [not signed]. Thomas B. Fox. 

Moon-gazers in Saturn. Verse [not signed]. 
J. C. Richmond. 

Lyre of the West. Verse [not signed]. E. S. 
Rand. 

An old subject [not signed]. William G. Swett. 

A rainy Saturday [not signed]. Thomas B. Fox. 

Historical sketches of Harvard College [not 
signed]. George S. EUllard, R. B. Curtis. 

Vacation. Verse [not signed]. F. H. Hedge. 

December t 1827, — Journal of the Polyglot 
Club, No. 1 [not signed]. 

The epicurean (Moore's) [not signed]. Greorge 
S. Hillard. 

The skeptick's soliloquy. Verse [not signed]. 
F. H. Hedge. 

Commencement in olden time [not signed]. 
T. B. Fox. 

A new comer [not signed] . Robert C. Winthrop. 

I'll keep a country school. Verse [not signed]. 
J. C. Richmond. 

The man in the masque [not signed]. C. C. 
Emerson. 

Frusta exlicia [mV] [not signed] . C. F. Barnard. 

Jantiary, 1828, — Journal of the Polyglot Club, 
No. 2 [not signed]. R. C. Winthrop. 

American souvenirs [not signed]. T. B. Fox. 

The poetry of numbers [not signed]. George S. 
Hillard, W. G. Swett. 

Friendship [not signed]. C. C. Emerson. 

What! write a poem? Verse [not signed]. 
J. C. Richmond. 

Dress [not signed]. George Chapman. 

Notices of American poets, conclusion [not 
signed]. J. O. Sargent. 

Frusta exlicia [«ic] [not signed] . C. F. Barnard. 

Historical sketches of Harvard College [not 
signed]. B. R. Curtis, E. H. Hedge. 

February , 1828, — Journal of the Polyglot 
Club, No. 3 [not signed]. C. C. Emerson. 

Sketches by N. P. Willis, review [not signed.] 
C. C. Emerson. 

Private life of great men [not signed]. George 
S. Hillard. 

A confession [not signed]. W. G. Swett. 

Travel [not signed]. R. C. Winthrop. 

Departure of the fairies. Verse' [not signed]. 
J. C. Richmond. 

Cui bono [not signed]. C. F. Barnard (?). 

Life in college [not signed]. Thomas B. Fox. 

Concluding, address [not signed] . G. S. Hillard. 



28 



THE CLASS OF 1828. 



The dramatis personae of the Polyglot Club are 
giren thus : — 

Sylvanus Dathwood, George S. Hillaid. 
Dr. DemoeriiuSt C. C. Emerson. 
JerenUah OrimeSy E. H. Hedge. 
Seth JPtingUt C. F. Barnard. 
Quicksilver SmaUicUk, William G. Swett. 
Blank Etcetera, 8r., R. C. Winthrop. 
Oliver Martexiy J. C. Richmond. 
Solomon Pry, T. B. Fox. 
Trittram Siurdy, J. J. Gilchrist. 



The following notice appears in The Harvard 
Register, 1827-28, p. 82 : — 

" At a meeting of the members of the Harvard 
Washington Corps, the following gentlemen were 
chosen officers for the present year. R. C. Win- 
throp of Boston, Captain; Robert Gilmor of 
Baltimore, 1st Lieutenant; Joseph Dana of Gam- 
bridge, 2d Lieutenant; Patrick Grant of Boston, 
Ensign; John P. Tarbell of Cambridge, 1st C6m- 
mandant; James S. Wadsworth of Geneseo, N. Y., 
2d do,; Charles T. Murdoch of Havana, Cuba, 
3d do. ; Josiah D. Hedge of Cambridge, 4th do." 



tibtstf o{ i^arbam Qntwmt;. 



Bibliographical Contributions. 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR. 

LIBRARIAN. 



I^o. 47. 




NINTH LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS 

OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY AND ITS ' OFFICERS, 

WITH THE CHIEF PUBLICATIONS ON THE UNIVERSITY. 

1891-1892. 

Bt WILLIAM HOPKINS TILLINGHAST, 
Aisistaitl Librarian. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 

Issueti b£ tl)e 3.I&iaT]! oE ^sibatli tSnibnsitg. 

1893. 



Already issued or in preparation: 



VOL. I. 



I. Edward S. Holdbn. Index-Catalogue oI Booka and 
Memoirs on the Tranaits of Mercury. 

a. Justin Wxnsor. Shakespeare'a Poems : a Bibliography 
of the Earlier Editions. 

3. Charlbs Eliot Norton. Principal books relating to 

the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Pietns et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List of Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 

United States, available for Scientific Researches 
Involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. The 'Collection op Books and Autographs, be. 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor- 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. PL I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. George Lincoln Goodale. The Floras of different 

countries. 

10. Justin WiNSOR. HsUliwelliana : aBibllography of the 
Publications of James Orchard HalliwelLPhlUipps. 



II. Samuel H. Scxn>DER. The Entomological Libraries 
of the United States. 

IS. First List of the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1870-1880. 

13. Samuel H. Scudder. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinohast. Notes on the Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in tlie 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors la Geology 

and Paleontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann's Geographiache Mittiieilungen. 1855- 
18S1. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in the 

Royal Geographical Society's Publications. 1830- 

1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Gec^;raphy. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

sa William C Lane. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 1884-18^. 



VOL. II. 



ai. Second List of the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1885. 

sa. Justin Winsor. Calendar ofthe Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Third List ofthe Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1885- 
1886. 

94. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference IJsts, 
no. a. 1S85-1886. 

35. W. G. Fablow and William Trelbabe. List of 
Works on North American Fungi. 

a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 

97. Andrew McF. Davis. A few notes on the Records 

of Harvard College. 
aS. William H. Tillinghast. Fourth List of Publlca> 

tkms of Harvard University and its Officers. 1886- 

1887. 



S9. William C. Lane. InJex to Recent Reference Lists, 
no. 3. 1887. 

30. Facsimile of the autograph of Shelley*s poem ** To a 

Skylark," with notes. 

31. W. G. Farlow. Supplemental List of Works 00 

North American Fungi. 

3a. H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, 1781-1839. 

33. William H. Tillinghast. Fifth list of Publicntlons 

of Harvard University and its Officers. 1887-1888. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in tiie 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. George E. Woodbbrry. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lane. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frank Wbitenkampf. Bibliography of Hogartia. 



VOL, III. 



38. William H. Tillinghast. Sixth List of Publica.. 

tions of Harvard University and its Officera. 1888- 
18S9. 

39. Alfred C. Pottbr. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 1890. 

41. William H. Tillinghast. Seventh List of Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officera. 1889- 
1890. 

4a. William H. Tillinghast. Tlie Orators and Poets 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachuaetts. 



44 



45 



43. Charles Gross. A Classified List of Books relating 
to-British Municipal History. 

William H. Tillinghast. Eighth List of Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1890- 
1891. 

William C. Lane and Charles K. Bolton. Notes 
on Special Collections in American libraries. 

46. The Class of i8a8, with a list of the publications ol 

its members. 

47. William H. Tillinghast. Ninth list of Publications 

of Harvard University and its Officers. 1891-1893. 

48. Stephen B. Webks. A Bibliography of the Hiatorical 

Literature of North Carolina. ( In pr*$a,) 



A LIST OF THE PUBLICATIONS 

OF HARYARD UNIYERSITY AND ITS OFFICERS, 

WITH THE CHIEF PUBLICATIONS ON THE UNIVERSITY. 
From September 30, 1891, to September 30, 1892. 

*^* The list of publications of the officers of the University has been prepared from information 
received from the officers in response to a circular issued by the editor ; for the record of the publica- 
tions of the University, and for that of the articles relating to it, the editor is responsible. 



THE UNIVERSITY. 

The Harvard University catalogue, 1891-92. Cambridge. 1891. 8"*. pp. 494, 

map. 

Edited by D. C. Torrey. 

Much of the matter in the Catalogue is also printed for distribution in the ''Admission," " Elective," 
and ''Graduate" pamphlets, having the following titles: Selected theeis from the Harvard University 
ceUcUogu^t 1892-98, containing all necessary informeUion for persons intending to enter Harvard 
College* — Announeemeni of courses of instruction provided by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, for 
the academic year 1892-93. pp. 53. June, 1892. — Circular of the graduate school, 1891-92. March, 
1892. S"*. pp. 62. 

The Departments issue their own portions of the Catalogue separately, in some cases with additions : 
the 109th AnntuU caicUogue of the Medical School contains the examination papers of 1891 ; the 24th 
Annual announcement of the Dental School contains a complete list of graduates ; the 9th Annual 
announeemeni of the School of Veterinary Medicine contains the admission examination papers and a 
view of the Village Street hospital. 

Directory of the officers and students of Harvard University, October 17, 1891. 

Cambridge. 1891. 8"". pp. 42. 
Edited by D. C. Torrey. 

Annual reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College, 1890-91. Cam- 
bridge. 1892. 8**. pp. 222, 72. 

This report contains also the reports from the various departments and institutions of the University. 
The report of the Treasurer and those of several of the Departments are also issued separately. 

Harvard University calendar. Vol. xi. No. 375-411 ; Oct. 1891— June 17, 1892. 
The calendar is issued in term-time only. 

[Programme of the exercises at Commencement, 1892.] 4°. pp. xv. 

Contains, in Latin, the names of those who receive degrees and academic honors in all departments. 

Harvard University. A brief statement of what Harvard University is, how it may 
be entered, and how its degrees may be obtained. By Frank Bolles, Secretary of the 
University. Cambridge. Second annual edition. 1892. S°. pp. 56. 

Information for special students in Harvard College. June, 1892. 8°. pp. 10. 

Rules relating to college studies, 1892-93. 12^. pp. 15. [July, 1892.] 

Rules relating to registration, enrollment, and studies for Freshmen in Harvard 
College, 1892-93. 12**. pp. 7. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Regulations for students of Harvard College. 1892. 8°. pp. 4. 

These regulations are issued for temporary use, pending a revision of all the regulations hy the 
Faculty. 

Opportunities provided for religious worship, instruction, and fellowship. 1892-93. 
12^ pp. 9. 

Circular of information for students in the Graduate School, the College, and the 
Scientific School, at the opening of the academic year, 1892-93. 8°. pp. 4. 

Committee on reception of students. List of rooms for rent [not including those in 
the College dormitories] . [1892.] 8°. pp.12. 

Harvai*d University. Circular of the Graduate School. 1891-92. March, 1892. 
12^. pp. 52. 

Harvard University. Medical School. Special announcement. Four-years course. 
8°. pp. 8, map, 

Descripci6n de la Universidad de Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Estados-Unidos 
de America ; y particularmente de la Escuela Cientifica de Lawrence, que forma parte de 
la Universidad. Con extractos del CatAlogo anual. Cambridge. 1892. 8°. pp. 104. 

Programme of the Semitic department, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 12. 

Instruction in Classical Philology and in Sanskrit, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 39. 

Programme of the department of English, 1892-93. 12*. pp. 15. 

German department, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 12. 

Programme of the French department, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 12. 

Description of the courses in Italian, Spanish, and Romance Philology, 1892-93. 12°. 
pp. 13. 

Programme of the Philosophical department, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 17. 
Courses in History, Government and Law, Economics. 1892-93. 12°. pp. 40. 
Programme of the Mathematical department, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 21. 
Programme of the department of Geology, 1892-93. 12°. pp. 13. 
Department of Geology, Course 8. Bulletin vii. Subjects for theses with leading 
references to the literature. Edition of 1892-93. 
EarUer Bulletins were type-written, or blank forms. 

Announcement of courses on education and instruction. 1892-93. 8°. pp. 8. 

Courses of instruction in the Harvard Divinity School. 1892-93. 12°. pp. 6. 

Programme of the Department of Civil Engineering of the Lawrence Scientific 
School. 1892-93. 12°. pp. 10. 

Information concerning the Zoological department. 1892-93. 12°. pp. 10. 

Announcements of summer courses in Anglo-Saxon, English, French, German, Field 
Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Geology, Physiology and Hygiene, Physical 
Training. 

Examinations for women. [Explanatory.] 1893. 1892. 12°. pp.16. 
Gives a list of successful candidates since 1881. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the admission examinations held 
at Cambridge, Quincy, Groton, Andover, Southborough, Worcester, Fall River, Exeter, 
Concord, New York, Albany, Buffalo, Philadelphia, Washington, Cincinnati, Cleveland, 
Chicago, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Denver, San Francisco, Portland (Or.), London (Eng.), 
Bonn (Germany), and Tokyo (Japan), June, 1892. Cambridge. 1892. 8°. pp. 24. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 5 



Harvard University examinations. Papers set for final examinations in Harvard 
College, June, 1892. Cambridge. 1892. 8°. 4 pams. 

Namely : Ancient languages (ffebrew^ Sanskrit, Greek, and Latin), pp. 62. — Modem languages 
(^English, German, French, Italian, and Spanish), pp. 76. — Philosophy, Political Economy, History, 
Roman Law, Fine Arts, and Miisie. pp. 40. — Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, 
and Geology, pp. 42. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the annual examinations in law 
held at Harvard University, June, 1892. Cambridge. 1892. 8°. pp. 47. 

Harvard University examinations. Papers used at the examination for women, 1892. 
Cambridge. 1892. 8°. pp. 24. 

Rank-lists for 1891-92. 12°. pp. 42. 

The schools examination board. Announcement. School and College^ Sept. 1892, 
i. 427, 428. 

Reports of the visiting committees of the Board of Overseers. 

z. Report on physical training, athletic sports, and sanitary conditions of all buildings. 13 Jan. 
1890. pp. 43-68. — xi. Report on government 23 June, 1890. pp. 55-67. — xii. Report on the 
Divinity School. 17 Dec. 1890. pp. 59-61. — xiii. Report on Semitic languages. 17 Dec. 1890. pp. 
63-68. — xiv. Report on the Botanic Garden. 25 March, 1891. pp. 71, 72. — xv. Report on the 
Jefferson Physical Laboratory. 6 May, 1891. p. (73). — xvi. Report on music. 1 June, 1891. 
p. (76). — xvii. Report on the Veterinary School. 21 October, 1891. pp. 77-81. — xviii. Report on 
Spanish. 13 April, 1892. pp. 83, 84. — xix. Report on Indo-Iranian languages. 13 April, 1892. 
pp. 86-87. — XX. Report on the Semitic languages. 13 April, 1892. pp. 89-91. — xxi. Report on the 
Divinity School. 11 May, 1892. pp. 93-96. — xxii. Report on English literature. 2 May, 1892. 
pp. 97, 98. — xiiii. Report on government. 11 May, 1892. pp. 99, 100. — xxiv. Report on German. 
21 May, 1892. pp. 101, \02.—%xy. Report on the Botanic Garden. 8 June, 1892. pp. 103-106.— 
xxvi. Report on the administration of the University Chapel. 8 June, 1892. pp. 107-110. — xxvii. Re- 
port on fine arts. May, 1892. pp. 111-116. 

Names and addresses of living bachelors and masters of arts and of the holders of 
honorary degrees of Harvard University. 1892. (Fourth year.) Cambridge. March 15, 
1892. 8^ pp. 122. 

Prepared by the Secretary of the University from material furnished by the class secretaries, the 
Editor of the Quinquennial Catalogue, the Librarian of the Law School, and numerous individual 
graduates. 

Scientific Serial Publications, etc. 

The Quarterly Journal of Economics. Vol. vi. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 8**. pp. 
xii. 510. 

Contents: — vi. i. (October, 1891.) The element of monopoly in prices. J. A. Hobson. — The 
Catholic Church and economics. John J. Keane. — The Kaweah experiment in cooperation. Wm. Carey 
Jones. — Relation of trades-unions to apprentices. Edward W. Bemis. 

vi. 2. (January, 1892. J Capital and interest. S. M. Macvane. — The evolution of wage statistics. 
Carroll D. Wright. — Comment on the ** Positive Theory of Capital." Hugo Bilgram. — The Prussian 
income-tax. Joseph A. Hill. — Social and economic legislation of the states in 1891. William B. Shaw. 

vi. 3. (April, 1892.) University settlements. Edward Cummlngs. — The fundamental error of 
"Kapital und Kapitalzins." Frederick B. Hawley. — The Bank of Venice. Charles F. Dunbar. — 
Appendix : The Banco del Giro of Venice. 

vi. 4. (July, 1892.) Dr. Boehm-Bawerk's theory of interest. Francis A. Walker. — Old age 
pensions in England. John Graham Brooks. — Cantillon's place in economics. Henry Higg^. 
Each number also contains notes on current topics, correspondence, and a bibliography. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. Edited by a committee of the classical 
instructors of Harvard University. Vol. iii. Boston : Ginn & Co. London : 6inn & Co. 
Leipsic: Otto Harrassowitz. 1892. 8°. pp. (6), 203. 

Contents : — The date of Cylon. John H. Wright. — Catullus and tlie Fhaselus of his fourth poem. 
Clement Lawrence Smith. — On the Homeric caesura and the close of the verse as related to the 
expression of thought. Thomas D. Seymour. — On the notion of virtue in the dialogues of Plato, with 
particular reference to those of the first period and to the third and fourth hooks of the Repuhlic. 
William A. Hammond. — Notes by J. B. Greenough, H. W. Haley, A. A. Howard, F. B. Tarbell, H. N. 
Fowler, M. H. Morgan. 

The editorial committee consisted of Professors William W. Good win, Jambs B. Grsenouoh, 
and Jomr Williams White. 

Studies and Notes in Philology and Literature. Published under the direction of the 
modern language departments of Harvard University. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1892. 8°. 
pp. (4), 128, plate 1. 

Contents: — The authorship of the English Romaunt of the Rose. Greorge Lyman Klttredge. — 
The origin of the English names of the letters of the alphabet. E. S. Sheldon. — Lok-Sounday. John 
M. Manley. — Henry Scogan. George Lyman Kittredge. — Etymological notes. E. S. Sheldon. — 
Mantegna*s triumph of Caesar in the second part of Faust. Euno Francke. 

Harvard Oriental Series. Edited, with the cooperation of various scholars, by Charles 
Rockwell Lanman. Vol. i. The Jataka-Mala or Bodhisattvavadana-Mala by Arya* 
^ura. Edited by Dr. Hendrik Kern. Boston and London : Ginn & Co. Leipsic : Otto 
Harrassowitz. 1891. 1. 8°. pp. xii. (2), 254. 

Cantillon. Essai sur le commerce. Reprinted for Harvard University. Inttodaction 
by H. H. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 12^ pp. vi. (4), 430, (6). 
Edited by Professor Charles F. Dunbar. 

Outlines and Guides for the Use of Students in certain Courses of Instruction. 

*^* The works recorded here have not the official character of university publications, but are prepared 

by instructors or students in the respectire courses. 

Outline of elementary meteorology. A synopsis of course " Geology 1 *' at Harvard 
College, 1892-93. By W. M. Davis. Cambridge. Wheeler. 1892. 12°. pp. 13. 

Subjects and methods in political and economic debates. Compiled by Albert 
Bushnell Hart. Published by the University. 1892. sq. 12**. pp. 22. 

A table of atomic weights, compiled from the most recent data and arranged in the 
order of value. By T. W. Richards. Published by the University, March, 1892. 12**. 
p. 1. 

ARNOLD ARBORETUM. 

Notes from the Arnold Arboretum. Garden and Forest, 1891-92, passim. 

ASTRONOMICAL OBSSRVATORY. 

Forty-sixth annual report of the Director of the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard 

College for the year ending October 31, 1891. By Edward C. Pickering. Cambridge. 

1891. 8^ pp. 11. 

The report includes a list of the scientific articles published by the officers of the Obsenratory during 
the year. It is also included in the annual report of the President. 

Bulletin of the New England Meteorological Society in cooperation with the Astro- 
nomical Observatory of Harvard College, No. 84-88 ; Oct. 1891— Feb. 1892. 4**. 

Superseded by the Bulletin of the New England Weather Service under the direction of the United 
States Department of Agriculture (No. 1, March, 1892). The permanent matter of each Bulletin ia 
still to be published later in the Annals of the Observatory. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



BOTANIC 6ARDSN. 

Notes from the Botanic Garden. Ch.rden and Forest^ 1891-92. 
Occasional notes concerning new or little-known plants, etc. 

LAW SCHOOL. 

The Harvard Law Review, v. 3-8 ; vi. 1, 2. October, 1891— May, 1892. 

This Review is published by students of the Law School, and not by the Law Faculty, but it fills the 
place of an official journal as a medium of publication. 

Besides the leading articles each number contains lecture notes from the Law School, summaries 
of recent cases, reviews, and titles of leading articles in exchanges. 

Contents: — v. 3. (October, 1891.) A brief survey of equity jurisprudence. VII. C. C. Lang- 
dell. — The prevention of unfair competition in business. Rowland Cox. — 4. (November, 1891.) A 
recent decision of the Supreme Court upon municipal bonds. Frank W. Hackett. — Judicial legislation : 
its legitimate function in the development of the common law. Ezra R. Thayer. — 5. (December, 
1891.) The validity of attachments made abroad by creditors of an insolvent debtor. Samuel Williston. 

— Gratuitous undertakings. Joseph H. Beale, Jr. — An unsettled point of evidence: how far can a 
witnesB-to-value detail otherwise inadmissable sales and appraisals on which he founds his opinion? 
Augustus P. Loring. — 6. (January, 1892.) The jury and its development. I. James B. Thayer. — 
Restrictions upon the use of land. Charles I. Giddings. — 7. (February, 1892.) The jury and its 
development. II. James B. Thayer. — The sugar bounties. Charles F. Chamberlayne. — 8. (March, 
1892.) The jury and its development. III. James B. Thayer. — The failure of the *' Tilden trust. 
J. B. Ames. 

vi. I. (April, 1892.) Glanvil revised. F. W. Maitland. — Some definitions and questions in juris- 
prudence. John C. Gray. — Donatis mortis causa of negotiable paper. Francis R. Jones. —^2. (May, 
1892.) Recent state constitutions. I. Amasa M. £atbn. — The Supreme Court and municipal bonds — 
another step. Frank W. Hackett. — Legislative control over contracts of employment : the weaver's 
fine bill. H. H. Darling. 

LIBRARY. 

Harvard University bulletin, no. 50-52. Vol. vi. 6-8. Oct. 1891 — May, 1892. 

Contents (besides the list of Accessions, the votes of the Corporation and the Overseers, and the 
Necrology^ : 50. List of books relating to British municipal history. Charles Gross, pp. 324-840. 

— 52. Notes on special collections in American libraries. I. W. C Lane and C. K. Bolton, pp. 488- 
458. 

Bibliographical contributions. Edited by Justin Winsor. In part republished from 
the Bulletin of Harvard University. The following numbers have been issued since 
Sept. 1891: — 

48. Charles Gross. A classified list of books relating to British municipal history. 1891. pp. 18. 

44. William Hopkins Tillinghast. Eighth list of the publications of Harvard University and its 
officers, with the chief publications on the University, 1890-91. 1892. pp. 36. 

45. William Coolidoe Lane and Charles Knowles Bolton. Notes on special collections in 
American libraries. 1892. pp. 82. 

46. [Justin Winsor.] The class of 1828, with a bibliography of the publications of its members. 
1892. pp. 28. 

Fourteenth report (1891) of Justin Winsor, librarian of Harvard University. 8°. 
pp. 17. 

Included in the annual report of the President, and also printed separately. 






MEDICAL SCHOOL. 

Bulletinof the Harvard Medical School Association. No. 1-3, Boston. 1891-92. 8°. 

Contents: — z. Report of the first annual meeting held in Boston, June 28, 1891. pp. 52. — 
2. Catalogue. 1892. pp. 70, plate 1. — 3. Report of the second annual meeting, held in Boston, 
June 28» 1892. pp. 82. 



8 OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



• MUSSUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY. 

Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. Vol. xlv. 2 ; 
xvii. 2. 4°. 

Contents: — xiv. 2. The Discoboli: Cyclopteridae, Liparopsidae, and Liparldidae. S. Garmao. 
pp. 96, plates 13. (April, 1892.) — xvii. a. Reports on an exploration off the west coasts of Mexico, 
Central and South America, and off the Galapagos Islands, in charge of Alexander Agassiz, by the U. S. 
Fish Commission steamer ''Albatross," during 1891, Lieut. Commander Z. L. Tanner, U. S. N., com- 
manding. I. Calomocrinus diomedae, a new stalked crinoid, with notes on the apical system .and the 
homologies of echinoderms. Alexander Agassiz. pp. 95^ plates S2, tinth text. (January, 1892). - 

Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoolog}^ at Harvard College. Vol. xxii. 1-4 
(complete), xxiii. 1-3. 8°. 

Contents : — xxii. i. Observations on budding in Paludicella and some other bryozoa. C. B. Daven- 
port, pp. 1-llit pldtes 12^ toith text. (December, 1891.) — 2. The gastrulation of Aurelia flavidula, 
P6r. & Les. Frank Smith, pp. 115-125, plates 2, icith text. (December, 1891.) — 3. Amitosis in the 
embryonal envelopes of the scorpion. H. P. Johnson, pp. 127-1^1^ plates 3, vnth text. (January, 
1892.) — 4. A fourth supplement to the fifth volume of the '* Terrestrial air-breathing moUusks of the 
United States and adjacent territories." W. G. Binney. pp. 163-204, plates 4, and cuts in the text. 
(Jan. 1892). 

xxiii. z. Reports on the dredging operations off the west coast of Central America to the Gala- 
pagos, to the west coast of Mexico, and in the Gulf of California, in charge of Alexander Agassiz, 
carried on by the U. S. Fish Commission steamer *' Albatross," Lieut. -Commander Z. L. Tanner. 
U. S. N., commanding. II. General sketch of the expedition of the "Albatross" from February to 
May, 1891. Alexander Agassiz. pp. 1-89, plates 22 (including diagrams, maps, and views). (February, 
1892.) — a.. The mesoderm in teleosts : especially its share in the formation of the pectoral fin. 
E. R. Boyer. pp. 91-133, plates 8, tinth text. (April, 1892.) — 3. On Nectonema agile, Verrill. 
Henry B. Ward. pp. 135-188, plates 8, with text. (June, 1892.) 

Annual report of the Curator [Alexander Agassiz] of the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology at Harvard College, to the President and Fellows of Harvard College, for 
1890-91. Cambridge. 1891. 8°. pp. 32. 

This pamphlet contains, beside the main report of the Curator, which is also included in the report 
of the President, special reports by ofiftcers of the Museum on the departments placed under their charge 
respectively, and lists of the publications of the Museum and its ofiicers. 

PSABODY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY. 

Archaeological and ethnological papers of the Peabodj Museum, Harvard University. 
Vol. i. 4. Cambridge. May, 1892. 8°. 

Report upon pile-structures in Naaraan's Creek, near Claymont, Delaware. Hilborne T. Cresson. 
pp. 24 (209-230) , illustr. 

SCIENTIFIC PAPERS FROM THE LABORATORIES AND SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE UNIVERSITY. 

*«* These papers represent work done in the laboratories or departments, but are not necessarily 
written by officers of the University, or issued as official publications of the University or the depart- 
ments. Papers by officers of the University are not mentioned, as a rule, unless they occur in a series 
having a general title. 

Contributions from the Astronomical Observatory. 

Professor Edward C. Pickering, Director. 

New variable stars in the southern sky. By M. Fleming. Astron, Nachrichten^ cxxx. 
125. 

Stars having peculiar spectra. By M. Fleming. Astron, and Astro-Physics, May, 
1892. 418. 

Astronomical expedition to Peru. By M. Fleming. Publications of the Astronomical 
Society of the Pacific. No. xxii. 58. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



Contributions from the Chemical Laboratory of Harvard College. 
Professor Josiah P. Cooke, Director. 

On the products obtained by the action of nitric acid apon bromtrinitrophenylmalonic 
ester. C. Loring Jackson and W. B. Bentley. [Reprint.] Am, Chem, Joum. xiv. 
331-363. 

Notes on tribrommononitrobenzol. C. Loring Jackson and W. B. Bentley. [Rejirint.] 
Ibid. xiv. 363-^66. 

Contributions from the Cryptogamic Laboratory of Harvard College. 
Under the direction of Professor William G. Fablow. 

xvii. Further additions to the North American species of Laboulbeniaceae. Roland 
Thaxter. Proc. Am. Acad, xxvii. 29-45. 

xviii. An examination of the species of the genus Doassansia Cornu. William A. 
Setchell. Annals of Botany^ April, 1892 ; vi. 1-48, plates. 

Notes on the fungus causing damping-off, and other allied forms. Thomas Watson 
Galloway. From Trans. Ma^s. Horticultural Soc, part i. 1891. pp. 10, plates 2. 

Contributions from the Gray Herbarium. 
Benjamin L. Robinson, CurcUor. 

The Portland catalogue of Maine plants. Merritt Lyndon Fernald. Proc. Portland 
Sac. Nat. Hist. 1892; ii. 41-72. 

New plants collected by W. G. Wright in Western Mexico. B. L. Robinson. 
Botanicai Chzette, Dec. 1891 ; xvi. 340. 

Contributions from the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology. 

Professor Frederic W. Putnam, Curator. 

Hae-thu-ska society of the Omaha tribe. Alice C. Fletcher. Joum. Am. Folk-lore, 
Apr.-nJune, 1892 ; v. 135-144. 

Papers from the Laboratory of Physical Geography of Harvard College. 
Under the direction of Professor William M. Davis. 

vi. The eye of the storm. Sydn^ M. Ballon. Reprinted from Am. Meteorol. Joum. 
vol. ix. nos. 2, 3. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1892. 8°. pp. 24. 

vii. Objections to Faye's theory of cyclones. Wm. C. Moore. Am. Meteorol. Joum., 
Aug. 1892; ix. 170-177. 

viii. The drainage of the Bernese Jura. August F. Foerste. With a supplementary 
note on the drainage of the Pennsylvania Appalachians, by W. M. Davis. Proc. Boston 
Soc. Nat. Hist., 1892 ; xxv. 392-420, plates 2. 

Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 

Under the direction of Professor Edward L. Mark. 

xxviii. Observations on budding in Paludicella and some other bryozoa. C. B. 
Davenport. Bull. Mus. Camp. Zobl., Dec. 1891 ; xxii. 1, pp. 1-114, j^toe* 12, with text. 

xxix. The gastrulation of Aurelia flavidula, P6r. & Les. Franic Smith. Ibid. Dec. 
1891 •,. xxii. 2, pp. 115-125, pMes 2, with text. 



lO OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 



xxx. Amitosis in the embryonal envelopes of the scorpion. H. P. Johnson. Zbid.y 
Jan. 1892 ; xxii. 3, pp. 127-161, plates 3, with text. 

xxxi. The mesoderm in teleosts ; especially its share in the formation of the pectoral 
fin. E. R. Boyer. J6td., April, 1892 ; xxiii. 2, pp. 91-133, plates 8, with text, 

xxxii. On Nectonema agile, Verrill. Henry B. Ward. Ibid., June, 1892; xxiii. 3, 
pp. 135-188, plates 8, with text, 

THE DUDLEIAN LECTURE. 

The Dudleian lecture for the year 1891. [The Roman Catholic Church.] Ephraim 
£merton. Andover Bev,, March, 1892; xvii. 238-259. 

PUBLICATIONS OF HOLDERS OF FELLOWSHIPS AT HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

Ausast Frederio Foerste. 

Parker Fellow. 

The drainage of the Bernese Jura. Proc. Boston Soc. Nat, Hist,, 1892 ; xxv. 392-418. 

Edward Everett Hale. 

Harris Fellow. 

Die chronologische anordnung der dichtungen Robert Herricks. Inaugural disserta- 
tion zur erlangung der philosophischen docturwtirde, etc. Halle. 1892. 8°. pp. 56. 

Artbur Henry Pierce. 

Morgam, Fellow. 

Experimental research upon the phenomena of attention. With James R. Angell. 
Am, Joum, Psychol,, Aug. 1892 ; iv. 528. 

COLLEGE PAPERS, etc. 

The Daily Crimson. Vol. xx., xxi. October 1, 1891— June 24, 1892. 

The Harvard Advocate. Vol. lii., liii. October 2, 1891— June 24, 1892. FortnighUy. 

The Harvard Lampoon. Second series. Vol. xxii., xxiii. October 9, 1891 — June 24, 
1892. Fortnightly, 

The Harvard Monthly. Vol. xiii., xiv. October, 1891^July, 1892. 

The Harvard Portfolio, 1891-92. An annual illustrated record of men and events of 
permanent interest to Harvard students. Vol. III. Cambridge. Published by students 
of Harvard University, pp. (12), places 29, with text. 

Edited by P. H. Horne and W. H. Wiggin, Jr. 

The Harvard Index for 1891-92. A university directory. Vol. xviii. Complete ath- 
letic, base-ball, foot-ball and boating records and lists of the officers and members of the 
college societies. Boston. 1891. 12°. pp. 307. 

Edited by W. H. Wiggin, Jr. 

CLASS REPORTS. 

1841. Proceedings at the fiftieth anniversary of the graduation of the Class of 1841, 

at Harvard University, June 23-24, 1891. Privately printed for the class. Boston. 

1892. 8^ pp. 101. 

Contains biographical sketches of the class. Prepared bj Samnel Foster McCleary. 

1853. Harvard College. Portraits of the Class of 1853, taken at graduation and in 
later life. Boston. Heliotype Printing Co. 1892. 8^ 
Presented to the class by U. H. Crocker. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. II 



1861. Fifth report of Harvard College Class of 1861. Printed for the use of the 
class. New York. 1892. 8°. pp. (6), 182, pZaic 1. 
J. £. Wright, class secretary. 

1867, Harvard College. Class of 1867. Secretary's report. No. IX. 1892. 
Boston. 1892. 8**. pp. 130, (3). 
Francis H. Lincoln, class secretarj. 

1871. Seventh report of the secretary of the Class of 1871 of Harvard College. 
Jnly, 1891. Printed for the use of the class. Boston. 1891. 8°. pp. 115. 
Albert M. Barnes, class secretary. 

1876. Harvard College. Class of 1875. Secretary's report. No. VI. 1875-1891. 
[Boston. 1891.] 8^ pp. 125. 
Warren A. Reed, class secretary. 

1878. Harvard College. Class of 1878. Secretary's report. No. III. 1892. 
Printed for the use of the class. Cambridge. 1892. 8''. pp. 220. 

Joseph C. Whitney, class secretary. 

1881. Fourth report [first decennial] of the secretary of the Class of 1881 of Harvard 
College. July, 1881 — January, 1892. Printed for the use of the class. Buffalo, N. Y. 
1892. 8**. pp. xiii. 218, plates 4. 

Charles R. Sanger, class secretary. 

" The University during the last four years, 1887-91." By William C. Lane. pp. 188-174. 

1889. Harvard College. Class of 1889. Secretary's report. No. H. 1892. 
Andover. 1892. 8^ pp. 112,ptoel. 
James H. Ropes, class secretary. 

1891. Harvard College. Class of 1891. Secretary's report. No. I. Cambridge. 

1892. 8**. pp. 143. 

H. A. Davis, class secretary. 

COLLSGS SOCISTIES. 

The new movement in humanity from liberty to unity. An oration delivered before 
the *. B. K. fraternity of Harvard University, June 30, 1892, by William Jewett Tucker. 
Boston, etc. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1892. 12^ pp. 24. 

Second annual report of the graduate treasurer [of the athletic associations of Harvard 
University] for the year ending September 30, 1891. Boston. 1891. 16°. pp. 19. 

William Hooper, graduate treasurer. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 

*«* For the parpose of completing the record, a few articles omitted from former lists are inserted here. 



IiTBUui Abbott. 

Preacher to the University. 

I. The evolution of Christianity. Boston. Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co. 1892. sm. 8"*. pp. vii. 
258. 



Ouraior of the Museum of Comparative Zodlogy, 

1. Reports on an exploration off the west coasts 

of Mexico, Central and South America, and 
off the Galapagos Islands, in charge of Alex- 
ander Agassiz, bj the U. S. Fish Commission 
steamer '< Albatross,*' during 1891, Lieut.- 
Commander Z. L. Tanner, U. S. N., com- 
manding. I. Calomocrinus diomedae, a new 
stalked crinoid, with notes on the apical 
system and the homologies of echinoderms. 
Mem. Mus. Comp. Zool. Jan. 1892 ; xtU. 2. 
pp. 95, plates, 

2. Reports on the dredging operations off the west 

coast of Central America to the Galapagos, 
to the west coast of Mexico, and in the Gulf 
of California, in charge of Alexander Agassiz, 
carried on by the U. S. Fish Commission 
steamer ** Albatross," Lieut. -Commander 
Z. L. Tanner, commanding. II. General 
sketch of the expeditions of the * * Albatross " 
from February to May, 1891. Bull. Mus. 
Comp. Zodl. Feb. 1892; xxiii. 2. pp. 91- 
183, plates. 

3. Report as Curator of the Museum of Compar- 

ative Zoology at Harvard College. 1890-91. 
Cambridge. 1891. S^. pp. 32. 

4. Edited the ** Memoirs" and the " Bulletin" of 

the Museum of Comparative Zodlogy. See 
Official publications: Museum of Compar- 
ative Zodlogy. 

Frodmeio l>eForeat A11«b. 

Professor of Classical Philology. 

I. Prometheus and the Caucasus. Am. Joum. 
Philol. April, 1892; xiii. 51-61. 



Bussey Professor of Law. 

I. The fiulure of the " Tilden trust." Harvard 
Law Rev. March, 1892; y. 389-402. 



WUllAm Juum Asbley, 

Professor of Economic History, 

X. [Review of] Lambert's *'Two thousand years 
of gild life. Polit. Sci. Quart. Sept. 1892 ; 
vu. 553, 654. 

2. [Review of] Creighton's " History of epi- 
demics in Britain." Ibid. pp. 565-567. 



Hearj Glay BAds«r. 

Curator of Maps. 

z. Thomas Hill. Spirit and Life, Jan. 1892; ii. 
98-108. 

a. Our card catalogue : what to do with it. 
Library Joum. May, 1892; xvii. 101-103. 

3. Our new liturgy. The Unitarian^ June, July, 

and August, 1892. 

4. Floundering among the maps. Library Joum. 

Sept. 1892 ; xvU. 375-377. 

Joseph Henry Beale* Jr. 

Assistant Professor of Law. 

z. Gratuitous undertakings. Harvard Load Rev, 
Dec. 1891 ; v. 222-231. 

Clarence Jolui Blake. 

Professor of Otology, 

1. Mastoid diseases. In Svstem of Diseases of 

the EoTi Nose^ and Tnroai. Philadelphia. 
Lippincott & Co. 1892. 

a. Middle ear operations : mastoid cases. Trans, 
Am. Otological Soe. 1892. 

Maylnie B6o]ier. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

z. On BesseVs functions of the second kind. 
Annals of Maihematics, Jan. 1892 ; vi. 85-90. 

2. [Review of] Pockels on the differential equa- 

tion A v + *•!* =0. Ibid. pp. 91, 92. 

3. On some applications of Bessel's functions 

with pure imaginary index. Ibid. May, 1892 ; 
vi. 137-160. 

4. Collineation as a mode of motion. BvUl. N. T. 

Math. Soe. July, 1892 ; i. 225-281. 

Lecture delirered 4 June, 1802, before the New York 
Mathematlciil Society. 

5. Various short contributions to the Annals of 

Mathematics, Bulletin of the N, Y. Math. 
Society, and The Nation. 

Frank Belles. 

Secretary of the University. 

X. Land of the lingering snow. Chronicles of a 
stroller in New England from January to 
June. New York and Boston. Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co. 1891. Ifi"*. pp. 234. 

2. Harvard University. A brief statement of 
what Harvard University is, how it may be 
entered and how its degrees may be obtained. 
Second annual edition [revised]. Published 
by the University. Feb. 1892. 8*. pp. 56. 



H 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



3. Names and addresses of living bachelors and 

masters of arts, etc. (Fourth year.) Cam- 
bridge. March, 1892. 8*". pp. 122. 

4. The equinoctial on the Ipswich dunes. Ailan- 

tic Monthly, Oct. 1891 ; Uzviu. 522-526. 

5.' Young sapsuckers in captivity. The Auk, 
April, 1892 ;ix. 109-119. 
Also separately. 

6. Ways of the owl. Pop, Set, Mo, July, 1892 ; 

xli. 318-^28. 

'With fire illustrations from photographs by Henry M. 
Spelman, Esq. Also separately. 

7. Hectoring a hawk. Sciencej 26 August, 1892 ; 

zx. 128, 124. 

8. Bird traits. New Eng. Mag, Sept. 1892 ; v. s. 

▼U. 98-96. 

9. Several unsigned editorial articles in the Boston 

Advertiser y fferald, JourncU, and Transcript, 
and in the New York Tribune, 

xo. Edited the "Harvard University Calendar," 
Oct. 1891— June, 1892; vol. xi. nos. 875-411. 

Edward HIAHiig Bradford. 

Instructor in Surgery and Orthopedics. 

z. Pistol-shot wounds of the head. With H. L. 
Smith, M.D. Trans, Am, Swrg, Assoc, vol. 
ix. 

a. Penetrating pistol-shot wounds of the skull. 
Boston Med, and Surg. Joum. 15 Oct. 1891 ; 
cxxv. 401-404, /o/c{tn^ tahle, 

3. Bullet wounds of the skull. Ibid. 8 Dec. 

1891 ; cxxv. 594. 

4. Congenital dislocation of hip. Trans. Am, 

Orthopedic Assoc, vol. iv. 

5. Lateral curvature. Ibid, 

6. Comparative value of the different methods of 

treatment of caries of the spine. Ibid, 

7. Incision of a false iliac aneurism. Boston Med, 

and Surg. Journ. 8 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 593, 
694. 

8. Record of progress in orthopedic surgery. 

With £. G. Brackett, M. D. Ibid, 24 Dec. 
1891; cxxv. 679-682. 

9. Three cases of the separation of the epiphysis 

at the head of the femur. Ibid, 8 March, 
1892;cxxvi. 212, 218. 

I«eBaron RvMell Briss** 

Professor of English, and Dean of Ha/rvard 

College. 

z. A few New England words. Dialect Notes, 
1892 ;iv. 209-211. 

a. Report of the Dean of Harvard College for 
1890-91. Annval Reports of the President, 
etc., 1890-91; pp. 78-84. 

Edward Ifaraball BwoVliiKliain. 

Instructor in Diseases of Children, 

1, Some uses of the stomach-tube. Boston Med, 
and Surg, Journ, 14 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 28-30. 

a. Reports on pediatrics. With Dr. T. M. Rotch. 
Internal, Med, Mag. July— Sept. 1892 ; i. 638, 
788, 853. 



H«rbart Iiealie Bvrrall. 

Instructor in Clinical Surgery, 

I, a. Recent progress in surgery. With H. W. 
Cushing. Boston Med. and Surg, Jbum. 
8, 15 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 378, 406;— 5, 26 May, 
23 June, 4 Aug. 1892; cxxvi. 448, 629, 680, 
cxxrii. 115. 

3. The management of gangrenous hernia. Ibid. 

3 March, 1892 ; cxxvi. 209-211. 

4. Is it expedient to have a physical examination 

of men before enlisting them in state troops? 
Ibid, 12 May, 1892 ; cxxvi. 469-471. 

A correction by Dr. Barrell. Ibid. 19 May, 1892: cxxv. 
611. 



Artbnr Traoy Cabot. • 

Clinical Instrtictor in Oenito-urinary Surgery, 

1. A contribution to the treatment of rupture of 
the bladder. Boston Med. and Surg. Jowm. 
15 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 396-400. 

a. Three cases of compound fracture of the 
patella in which the bones were united with 
good results. Ibid. 19 Nov. 1891 ; cxxv. 537, 
538. 

3. Two cases of cholecystotomy. Ihid. 28 April, 

1892 ; cxxvi. 418-420. 

4. The treatment of pelvic abscess. Ihid, 19 May, 

1892 ; cxxvi. 493, 494. 

5. Observations upon the anatomy and surgery 

of the ureter. Am. Joum. Med. Sciences, 
Jan. 1892. 

6. Remarks in the discussion on wound infection. 

Trans, Congress Am. Phys. and Surg. 1891 ;. 
vol. ii. 

7. A case of sacculated bladder, with autopsy. 

Boston Med, and Surg, Joufm, 25 Aug. 1892 ; 
cxxviL 191, 192, Ulustr, 

Montacue Chamberlain. 

Recorder. 

X. A popular handbook of the ornithology of the 
United States and Canada, based on Nuttall*8 
Manual. 2 vols. Boston. Little, Brown 
& Co. 1891. 8'*. pp. xlviU. 473, vii. 481, 
plates 2, cuts. 



Edward Chaimlm. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

z. Edited, with C. C. Smith and Robert C. Win- 
throp, Jr., " The Winthrop Papers," Part V. 
forming Vol. III. of the Sixth Series of the 
Collections of the Massachttsetts Historical 
Society, 

2. The genesis of the Massachusetts town. Proc. 
Mass, Hist, Soc, Jan. 1892 ; v, s. viL 242- 
263. 

Beprinted with papers on the same subject by C. F. Adams, 
A. C. Goodell, ana Mellen Chamberlain; also aepuately. 



PUBLICATIONS OP THE OFFICERS. 



15 



Frederlok Edward Clieaej. 

Instructor in Ophthalmology and Clinical 
Instrtictor in Opthalmoscopy. 

z. A case of retraction of the eye-ball. Medical 
Record, (N. Y.) 7 Nov. 1891. 

a. Ocnlar headache. Boston Med. and Surg. 

Joum, 7 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 10-12. 
Beprinted: Boston, Damrell and Upham. 18*. pp.7. 

3. Purulent ophthalmia neonatorum as a cause of 

blindness. Jbid. 14 April, 1892 ; czzvi. 862, 
868. 

4. The importance of correcting ocular defects in 

functional nervous disorders. With Dr. G. 
L. Walton. Ibid. 18 Aug. 1892; cxxvii. 
168-167. 



IVaBois James Crhild* 

Professor of English. 

z. The English and Scottish popular ballads. 
PartVIII. Boston. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
(Feb.) 1892. 4*». pp. (6), 266-626. 

Josiah Parsons Cooke. 

Erving Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy, 
and Director of the Chemical Laboratory. 

z. Report as director of the Chemical Laboratory. 
Annual Reports of the President, etc. 1890- 
91 ; pp. 166-168. 

2. The value and limitations of laboratory practice 

in a scheme of liberal education. Report of 
the Director of the Chemical Laboratory to 
the Visiting Committee of the Overseers. 
[1892]. 8* pp. 17. 

3. Biographical sketch of Professor Levering, 

with a list of his works. Memorial of Joseph 
Lovering. pp. 26-40. Boston. 1892. S"". 

This paoiphlet was edited by Professor Cooke for the 
American Academy of Arte and Sciences. Addrcj^n by Pro- 
fessor Cooke at the memorial meeting of the society, pp. 
10-16. See also Joseph Lovering. 

4. Professor Cooke edits the "Proceedings" of 

the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
and is an associate editor of the *■ * American 
Journal of Science." 



Edi^ard Cowles. 

CliniccU Instructor in Mental Diseases. 

z. Seventy-fourth annual report of the McLean 
Asylum for the Insane for the year 1891. 
Annual Report of Mass. Gen' I IIosp. for 
1891. Boston. L. Barta & Co. 8°. pp. 
37-61. 

2. The seminary method in asylum and hospital 

work. Am. Joum. Insanity, Jan. 1892; pp. 
366-372. 

3. Nursing, or training schools for nurses. Dic- 

tionary of Psychological Medicine, vol. ii. 
pp. 869-863. Ed. D. Hack Tuke, M.D., 
LL.D. Philadelphia. P. Blakiston, Son & 
Co. 1892. 



Edward Cnmmliigs* 

Instructor in Sociology. 

I. University settlements. Quart. Jov/m. Econo* 
mics, April, 1892 ; vi. 267-279. 

Samuel Silas Cnrry* 

Instrtictor in Elocution . 

I. The province of expression : a search for 
principles underlying adequate methods of 
developing dramatic and oratorical delivery. 
Boston. 1891. S*". pp. 461. 

Elbridse Oerry Cutler. 

Instructor in the Theory and Prcuiice of Physic. 

> 

I. Some cases of dilated stomach. Boston Med. 

and Surg. Joum. 8 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 685- 

688, illustr. 

Beprinted: Boston. Damrell & Upham. 1891. 18*. 
pp. 15. 

Cliarles Benedict Davenport. 

Instructor in Zoology. 

I. Observations on budding in Paludicella and 
some other bryozoa. Bull. Mus. Comp. 
Zo'ol. Dec. 1891; xxii. no. 1, pp. 1-114, 
plates 12. 

a. The germ-layers in bryozoan buds. Zoolo- 
gischer Anzeiger, 18 July, 1892 ; xv. 261-268. 

Francis Henry Davenport. 

Instructor in Gynaecology. 

1. Diseases of women. A manual of non-surgical 

gynaecology. Second edition. Philadelphia. 
Lea Brothers & Co. [May] 1892. 12*1 

2. 3. Recent progress in gynaecology. Boston 

Med. and Surg. Joum. 1 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 
362-364. — 14 April, 1892 ; cxxvi. 364-866. 

William Morris Davis. 

Professor of Physical Geography. 

I. Ferrel's contributions to meteorology. Am. 

Meteorol. Joum. 1891; viii. 348-369. 
a. The Catskill delta in the post-glacial Hudson 

estuary. Proc. Boston Soc. Nai. Hist. 

18 Nov. 1891 ; xxv. 818-834, illustr. 
Also separately. 

3. The lost volcanoes of Connecticut. Pop, Sci. 

Mo. Dec. 1891 ; xl. 221-235, illustr. 

4. The theories of artificial and natural rainfall. 

Am. Meteorol. Joum. March 1892; viii. 

495-602. 
Also separately. 

5. Mirage on a wall. Ibid. 625, 626. 

6. Meteorology in the schools. Ibid. 1892; ix. 

1-21. 

7. Note on the drainage of the Pennsylvania 

Appalachians, supplementary to Aug. F. 
Foerste's "Drainage of the Bernese Jura." 
Proc. Boston Soc. Nat. Hist. April, 1892; 
xxv. 418-420. 



i6 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



8, 9. The teaching of geography. I. The physical 
basis of descriptive geography. Educational 
i2«M*w, May , 1892 ; ui. 417-426. — II. What 
to avoid in teaching geography. Ibid, June, 
1892 ; iv. 6-16. 
Two lectures, of a series of three, delivered at Harvard 

Unirersity. 

xo. Note on winter thunder-storms. Am. Meteorol- 
Journ, August, 1892; ix. 164-170. 

IX-13. Biographical notices of William Ferrel* 
Fop. Set, Mo, March, 1892; Nation, 29 Oct- 
1891; Science, 13 Nov. 1891. 

Z4-X7. Four elementary essays : — The shore lines 
of Lake Bonneville, The cafion of the Colo- 
rado, The folds of the Appalachians, The 
mountains of Pennsylvania. GoldihwaHe*8 
Oeograph, Mag. Jan., March, April, May, 
1892. 

z8. Outline of elementary meteorology . A synopsis 
of course '* Geology 1" at Harvard College, 
1892-98. Cambridge. Wheeler. 1892. 12". 
pp. 18. 

19. Outline of a course in elementary descriptive 
and physical geography for grades IV. and 
y. in the Cambridge Grammar Schools. 
1892-93. 8*. pp. (4.) 

ao. Edited ** Papers from the Laboratory of Phys- 
ical Geography." See p. 9. 

az. Professor Davis is a contributing editor of the 
'* American Meteorological Journal." 



Frank Wintlirop I>raper* 

ProfeMor of Legal Medicine. 

z. Report on the progress of legal medicine. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 11 Feb. 1892; 
cxxvi. 142-144. 

a. Article on legal medicine in Sajous' Annual 
of the Univ. Med. Sciences, 1892; IV. Sect. 
J. 

3. The medical profession and the commonwealth. 
Medical Communications Mass. Med. Soc. 
1892. — Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 9,16 
June, 1892 ; cxxvi. 565-598. 
Also separately. 



diarlaa Framklin Dunbar. 

Professor of Political Economy, and Dean of the 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

I. The bank of Venice. Quart. Journ. Economics, 
April, 1892; vi. 308-335, 371-397. 

a. Edited the ** Quarterly Journal of Economics," 
vol. vi. 

3. Edited the reprint of Cantillon's ^' Essai siir la 
Commerce," published by Harvard Univer- 
sity. See p. 6. 



Thomas Dwlcht. 

Farkman Professor of Anatomy. 

I, a. Recent progress in anatomy. Boston Med. 
and Surg. Journ. 19 Nov. 1891; cxxv. 545. 
— 30 June, 1892; cxxvi. 654. 



3. Fossa praenasalis. Am. Jounh. Med. Sciences^ 

Feb. 1892 ; ciii. 156, illustr. 

Thid paper, without the illufitration.s, was reproduced in 
Gennan in the Archir/ilr Anthropologie, Aug. 1892, xxi. 247. 

4. [Review of] *' Regional anatomy in its relation 

to medicine and surgery." Vol. I. George 
B. McLellan, M.D. Ibid. Feb. 1892. 

5. Matter and form in biology. Am. Cath. Quart. 

July, 1892 ; xvii. 449. 

6. Fusion of hands. Mem. Boston Soc. Nat. 

Hist. Aug. 1892 ; iv. 473. 



Forest Greenwood Eddy. 

Instructor in Operative Dentistry. 

I. The use of gutta-percha as a root-canal fill- 
ing. Internal. Dental Journ. March, 1892, 
p. 195. 

Cluurles William Eliot. 

President of the University. 

X. Shortening and enriching the grammar school 
course. School and College, March, 1892; 
i. 153-164. 

Read before the Department of Superintendence of the 
National Education AH»ociatiou, at Brooklyn, N.Y., 16 Feb- 
ruary, 1892. 

a. Remarks at the dinner of the Harvard Medical 
School Alumni Association, 28 June, 1892. 
Bulletin of the Association, iii. 40-47. 

See also Joseph Lovbbino. 

John Wheelook Elliot. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery. 

I. Appendicitis; summary of cases. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 4 Aug. 1892; czzvii. 
111-118. 

Reprinted, with two otlier articlef) (nos. 2^3 in the eighth 
List), in a pamphlet entitled "Papers on appendicitis.'* 
Boston. 1892. 8*. pp.27. 



Ephraim Emerton. 

Winn Professor of Ecclesiastical History. 

I. The Dudleian lecture for 1891 : The Roman 
Catholic Church. Andover Rev. March, 1892 ; 
xvii. 238-269. 

Harold Clarenoe Ernst. 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

1 . Edited the department of bacteriology in Sajous* 

Annual of the Univ. Med. Sciences, 1892. 

2. Tuberculin and tuberculosis. Trans. Assoc. 

Am. Phys. 

3. Acute diffuse peritonitis. Trans. N. Y. Med. 

Assoc. 1891. 

4. Intestinal antisepsis. Boston Med. and Surg, 

Journ. 18 Feb. 181>2; cxxvi. 157-159. 

5. Some of the recent advances in bacteriology. 

Ibid. 2 June, 1892; cxxvi. 541-543. 
Read before the Boston Society of Natural Ilistory. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



17 



duurlea GarroU ET«rett. 



Btissey Professor of Theology, Preacher to the 
University, and Dean of the Divinity Faculty. 

1. Ethics for young people. Boston. Ginn&Co. 

1892. 12''. pp. 184.' 

2. The person of Christ. Christian Reg. 19 Nov. 

1891; Ixx. no. 47. — The Unitarian, Dec. 
1891 ; vi. 667-663. 

3. Reverence for the Bible. Christian Reg. 

16 Dec. 1891 ; Ixz. no. 60. 

4. Harvard and the Church. Harvard Mo. Jan. 

1892; xiii. 133-138. 

5. The historic and the ideal Christ. The New 

World, March, 1892 ; i. 14-29. 

A portion of this article was reprinted in The Unitarian, 
June, 1892; yii. 260, 261, with the title: *<Will the world 
erer oat-grow the the teachings of Jesus "? 

6. "Throijigh liberty to unity." Christian Reg. 

7 July, 1892; Ixxi. no. 27. 

7. Report on the Harvard Divinity School, 

1890-91. Annual Reports of the President, 
etc., pp. 98-104. 

8. Professor Everett is chairman of the editorial 

board of "The New World: a quarterly 
review of religion, ethics, and theology." 
Boston. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1892. 



William Oilson Farlow. 

Professor of Cryptogamic Botany. 

X. Diseases of trees likely to follow mechanical 
injuries. Trans. Ma^s. Hortic. Soc. Dec. 
1891, pt. 1, pp. 140-164. 
Also separately. 

2. Karl Wilhelm von Naegeli. Proc. Am. Acad. 
xxvi, 376-381. 

3. Notes on collections of cryptogams from the 

higher mountains of New England. Proc. 
Boston Soe. Nat. Hist. xxv. 387-389. 

4. Edited "Contributions from the Cryptogamic 

Laboratory." See p. 9. 



Hio: 



FUlebro 



Professor of Operative Dentistry. 

X. The relations of tiie teeth and palate to vocal- 
ism. From Independent Practitioner, Nov. 
1888. 8". pp. 10. 

Bead at the union meetinyr of the Massachusetts and 
Connecticut Valley Dental Societies. Boston. July, 1888. 

2. Progress of dental surgery [and new operation 

for hare Up]. Trans. Maine Med. Assoc. 

1890. 
Also separately : Portland. 1890. 8". pp. 7, illuntr. 
Bead before the Maine Medical Association, June 10, 1800. 

3. Hypnotism as applied to dentistry. R«ad be- 

fore the Massachusetts Dental 8ociety, 
July, 1892. Published in Dental Review, 
Sept. 1892. 8<'. pp. 14. 

4. Vitality as a germicide. Tnternat. Dental 

Joum. Oct. 1891; xii. 678. 

Bead before the American Academy of Dental Science, 
Boston, 8 June, 1891. 



Theodore Willis Flsiier. 

Lecturer on MentcU Diseases. 

I . Fifty-third annual report of the Boston Lunatic 
Hospital for 1891. Boston. Rockwell & 
Churchill. 1892. 8° pp. 60. 

ReBtnald Hebor Tita. 

Shattuck Professor of PathalogiccU Anatomy, 

I. Intestinal perforation in typhoid fever; its 
prognosis and treatment. Trans. Assoc. Am, 
Phys. 1891; vi. 200. — Boston Med, and 
Surg. Joum. 1, 8 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 846, 366. 

2.. The pathology of pelvic inflammations. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 19 May, 1892 ; czzyi. 
491. 

3. The four years course at the Harvard Medical 
School. Ibid. 16 June, 1892; czxvi. 699, 
600. 

Jefferson Butler Ileteher. 

Instructor in English, 

I. Alexander Dumas fits. Harvard Mb, Oct. 
1891; xiii. 1-15. 

Kmio Fraaoko. 

Assistant Professor of German Literature. 

1. Zur Kritik von Falks Goetheerinnerungen. 

Vierteljahrschr. f. Liter aturgeseh, v. 120-124. 

2. Mantegna's '* Triumph of Caesar" in the 

second part of " Faust." \_Harva/rd'\ Studies 
and Notes in Philol. and Lit, 1892 ; i. 126- 
12S, plate 1. 

3. [Review of] '* Schiller: sein Leben und seine 
Werke. Dargestellt von J. Minor. II*' Bd." 
Modern Lang. Notes, Nov. 1891 ; vi. 414-418. 

'William Franoia Gaiunic* 

Instructor in Botany, 

1. The St. Croix of the northeastern boundary. 

Mag. Am. Hist. Oct. 1891, xxvii. 72; xxvi. 
261-266, Jan. 1892; xxvii. 72. 

2. The geographical distribution of plants. 

Trans. Mass, Hort. Soc. Dec. 1891; pt. 1, 
pp. 101-118. 
An address delivered before the society, 21 Feb. 1801. 

3. Local natural histories — a need. Bdueaiional 

Rev. Dec. 1891 ; v, 141, 142. 

4. The site of Fort La Tour. Trans, Roy, Soc. 

Canada, April, 1892 ; ix. sect. 2, pp. 61-76, 
maps. 

Samuel Ghunnan* 

Assistant in Herpetology and Ichthyology at the 
Museum of Comparative Zo'ology, 

I. The Discoboli (Cyclopteridae, Liparopsidae 
and Liparididae). Mem, Mus. Comp. Zool. 
April, 1892 ; xiv. No. 2, pp. 96, plaUs 18. 



i8 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



2. The reptiles of the Galapagos Islands. Bull. 

Essex Inst, 1892 ; xxiv. 78-87. 

3. The distribution of fishes. Science^ 1 April, 

1892; lix. 187. 

4. On Texan reptiles. BulL Essex Inst. 1892; 

xxiv. 98-109. 

5. Dr. D. H. Storer's work on the fishes. Proe. 

Bost, Nat. Hist. Soc. 1892; p. 264. — Science, 
27 May, 1892 ; xii. 296. 

6. Report on the lobster. RepH Mass. Comm. for 

Inland Fisheries and Game for 1891. 

7. The vesicles of Sayi. Science ^ 4 March, 1892; 

xix. 128. 

8. Reptiles collected bj Dr. Geo. Banr, near 

Guayaquil. Bull. Essex Inst. 1892; xxiv. 
88-95. 

9. Sistnirus and Crotalophorus. Science, 20 May, 

1892; xix. 485. 
10. Cophias and Bachia. Bull. Essex Inst. 1892 ; 

xxiy. 96, 97. 
XI. The reptilian rattle. Science^ 8 July, 1892; 

XX. 16. 

12. Report on reptiles and fishes. Annual Report 

of the Curator of the Museum of Comparative 
Zo'dlogy, 1891-92. 

13. Reviews etc. in The Nation. 

Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 also published separately. 

Georse Wanlitngton Gaj. 

Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

X. The treatment of gangrenous hernia. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 3 March, 1892 ; cxxvi. 
207-208. 

2. Three recent cases of oesophagotomy. Ibid. 

7 April, 1892; cxxvi. 382-334. 

3. Cases of cholecystotomy. Ibid. 28 April, 

1892; cxxvi. 421. 

4. A case of nephrolithotomy; removal of cal- 

culus weighing five ounces ; recovery. Ibid. 
11 Aug. 1892 ; cxxvii. 134-187. 

Georse Iiinooln Goodale. 

Fisher Professor of Natural History. 

z. Some of the possibilities of economic botany. 
Am. Journ. Sd. Oct. 1891; 8d series, xlii. 

272-308. 

President's address, delivered before the American Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science at Washington, D. C, 
Auff. 1891. 

The address was reprinted separately : New Haven. 1891. 
8*. pp. 72., and appeared in: Proc. 40th Meeting Am. 
A890C. Adv. Sci. 1892; pp. 1-38. — /%>«, g^i. Mo. Dec. 1891: 
xl. 207-220. — Nature (London), and in various botanical 
journals. 

Translations : Zukunftsfragen ueber nahrungs und nutz- 
pflanzen. Sonderabdruck aus der Pharmacoutischen Rund- 
schau. New York. 1891. 8°. pp.32. — Les plantes utiles 
del'avenir. Revue Scientijique^ 5 Dec. 1891, 2 Jan. 1892; 
xlviii., xLlx. 

2. The museums and gardens of the tropics and 

the islands of the South Seas. Five papers 
descriptive of a journey to Egypt, Ceylon, 
Australasia, Java, Straits Settlements, Cochin 
China, China and Japan. Am. Journ. Sci. 
1891; 8d series, xUi. 178, 260, 847, 434, 517. 
Also separately. 

3. Sundry critical notices and short botanical 

communications. Ibid. 

4. Professor Goodale is an associate editor of the 

*' Ajnerican Journal of Science." 



f» 



WUllAm WataoB Goodwin. 

Eliot Professor of Greek Literature. 

z. A Greek grammar. Revised and enlarged. 

Boston. Ginn & Co. 1892. le"". 

Thi.o, though published as a new edition of an older book, 
is, in many most important parts, a new work. 

2. English and American schoolboys. School and 

College, Feb. 1892 ; i. 98-106. 

3. Professor Goodwin is one of the editorial com- 

mittee in charge of ** Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology.' 
See also Joseph Loverino. 



Jolui Ghipmani Graj* 

Roy all Professor of Law. 

1. Select cases and other authoritiea on the law 

of property. Vol. VI, [and last]. Cam- 
bridge. Charles W. Sever. 1892. 8<». 

2. Some definitions and questions in jurispru- 

dence. Harvard La/w Rev. April, 1892 ; vi. 
21-36. 

3. The methods of legal education [at Harvard 

University]. Yale Law Journ. i. 159. 

Charles Montravillo Gvooa* 

Instructor in Obstetrics. 

I, 2. Semi-annual reports on recent progress in 
obstetrics. Boston Med. and Surg. Jotim. 
21 Jan., 1 Sept. 1892; cxxvi. 62, cxxvii. 215. 

3. A case of papilloma of the ovary and Fallopian 

tube. Ibid. 11 Feb. 1892; cxxvi. 142. 

4. The care of women in pregnancy. Ibid. 25 

Feb. 1892 ; cxxvi. 186. 
Also separately. 

5. Placenta praevia complicated with uraemia and 

impending eclampsia. Ibid. 2 June, 1892; 
cxxvi. 561. 

6. Reviews of obstetrical works. Ibid. 1891-92. 



Jolui Ome Greon. 

Clinical Professor of Otology. 

z . Remarks on the removal of the carious ossicles 
of the ear. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
22 June, 1892; cxxvi. 655. 

2. Supperative otitis media as a complication of 
the acute infectious diseases and its recogni- 
tion by the general practitioner. Intemat, 
Clinics. (Philadelphia). 

James Bradstreet Greenongh* 

Professor of Latin. 

1. Ante and post. Harvard Studies in Class. 

Philol. 1892; iii. 181-188. 

2. Professor Greenough is one of the editorial 

committee in charge of *^ Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology.' 



ft 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



19 



Cliarlos Ghross. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

I. [Review of] ** Oxford city documents." By J. 
£. Thorold Rogers. FoUt. Soi. Quart. 
March, 1892; vii. 176-179. 

a. [Review of] " Collectanea " of the Oxford His- 
torical Society. Jbid. 

3. Several reviews in The Naiion. 

Herman 'Wadsworth Halej. 

Instructor in Latin. 

I. Petroniana. Harvard Studies in Class. Philol, 
1892; iii. 183-185. 

Edwin Herbort Hall. 

Assistant Professor of Physics. 

1. A text book of physics, largely experimental, 

on the basis of the Harvard College *' De- 
scriptive list of elementary physical experi- 
ments." With J. Y. Bergen, Jr., A.M. New 
York. H. Holt & Co. 1891. 12'». pp. xviii. 
888. 

2. Teaching elementary physics. Educational 

Rev. Sept. 1892 ; iv. 166-163. 

One of two lectares delivered at the Jefferson Physical 
laboratory in 1892. 

Panl Henry Hanns. 

Assistant Professor of the History and Art of 

Teaching. 

z. The new department of pedagogy at Harvard 
University. Educational Rev. Oct. 1891 ; ii. 
252-264. 

a. How do concepts arise from percepts? Public 
School Joum. Jan. 1892 ; xi. 238. 

3. The permanent influence of Comenios. Edu- 

eational Rev. March, 1892 ; iii. 226-236. 

Embodied in a lecture delivered at Harvard College, 
8 March, 1892. 

4. Discussion of a paper on the education of the 

will. Am. Inst, of Instruction y 1891| pp. 219- 
228. 

IVanois Blsliop Harrington. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, 

X. A displaced appendix coeci giving rise to 
symptoms supposed to be due to an ovarian 
tumor. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
10 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 624. 

a. A case of tubal pregnancy with operation. 
Ibid. 14 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 32. 

Thaddens William Harris. 

Instructor in Geology. 

1. Mount Bob, Mount Ida, or Snake Hill. Am. 

Joum. Sci. March, 1892 ; xliii. 236. 

2. The religious aspect of evolution. New 

Jerusalem Mag. Aug. 1892 ; xvi. 473. 

3. Observations on the aurora of July 16, at 

Utica, N. Y. Am. Met. Joum. 1892, p. 35. 



Albart Bnahnall Hart. 

Assistant Professor of History. 

X. Epoch maps, illustrating American history. 
New York. Longmans, Green & Co. 1891. 
1. 16^. pp. (4), 14 maps. 

a. Report on grammar school instruction made by 

a special committee to the school committee 

of the city of Cambridge, June 2, 1892 [with 

Phebe M. Kendall and others]. Cambndge. 

W. H. Wheeler. 1892. 8». pp. 81. 

Two preliminarv reports were made, April 31 and May 10, 
and were printed in the Cambridge Tribune and Cambridge 
Preee, of April 23 and May 21, 1802, and in separate reprints. 

3. Federal constitution of the Swiss Confeder- 

ation of May 29, 1874. [Translation, re- 
printed in W. D. McCrackan '' Rise of the 
Swiss Republic.*' App. pp. 364-^94.] Bos- 
ton. Arena Company. 1892. 

4. [Edited] "Fugitive slaves (1619-1866). By 

Marion Gleason McDougall. Prepared under 

the direction of Albert Bushnell Hart." 

Boston. Ginn&Co. 1891. 8''. pp. viii., 150. 

Publications of the Society for the Collegiate Instruction 
of Women : Fay House Monographs, no. S. 

5. American history leaflets. Colonial and con- 

stitutional. Edited by Albert Bushnell Hart 
and Edward Channing. New York. J. W. 
Alden. 1892. 12''. 

Issued bi-monthly : — No. 1. The letter of Columbns to 
Luis de Sant Angel. — No. 2. The Osteud Manifesto, 1854. 
— No. 3. Extracts fVom the Sagas describing the voyages to 
Vinland. — No. 4. Extracts from official declarations of the 
United States, embodying the Monroe Doctrine, 1780-1891. 

6. The colonial town meeting. Chautauquaut 

Nov. 1891 ; xiv. 146-149. 

7. Why the South was defeated in the Civil War. 

New England Mag. Nov. 1891 ; n. 8. v. 263- 
376. 

8. [Review of] "A shorter history of the United 

States for schools." By Alexander Johnston. 
Educational Rev. Nov. 1891 ; ii. 396, 897. 

9. The colonial shire. Chautauquan^ Dec. 1891 ; 

xiv. 274-278. 

10. A cross-section through North Carolina. The 
Nation, 17 March, 1892; liv. 207, 208. 

zz. [Review of] "The genesis of the United 
States.** By Alexander Brown. Annals Am. 
Acad. Polit. and Soc. Sci. March, 1892; ii. 
106-110. 

la. [Review of] ** Canadian studies in compar- 
ative politics.** By John George Bourinot. 
Polit. Sd. Quart. March, 1892 ; vii. 179, 180. 

13. Confessions of a myth-maker. Letter to 7%« 
Nation, 31 March, 1892 ; liv. 245, 246. 

Z4. Address at the dedication of the English High 
School, Cambridge, 4 April, 1892. Cam- 
bridge Chronidcy 9 April, 1892. 

Z5. The exercise of the suffrage. Ibid. June, 
1892-^ vii. 307-829. 
Also separately. 

16. [Review of] ** A history of the people of the 

United States from the Revolution to the 
Civil War." By John Bach McMaster, vol. 
iii. Ibid. June, 1892 ; vii. 860-363. 

17. Address at the presentation of a testimonial to 

Miss Ireson, Sanders Theatre, 1 July, 1892. 
Cambridge Tribune, 9 July, 1892. 

18. 1 13 articles in Brockhaus* Konversations-lexi- 

kon. 14^ auflcbge. A-C. 



20 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



William Barker Hills. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

X. Recent progress in medical chemistry. Bos- 
ton Med. and Surg. Journ. 11, 25 Aug. 1892 ; 
cxxvii. 138, 195. 



Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Parkman Professor of Anatomy , Emeritus, 

I. James Rassell Lowell. 1819-1891. A poem. 
Atlantic Mo. Oct. 1891 ; Ixviii. 552. 



John Homans* 

Clinical Instructor in the Diagnosis and Treat- \ 
ment of Ovarian Tumors. 

1. A case of intestinal anastomosis by means of 

Senn*s plates for the relief of complete chronic 
obstruction caused by invagination of the 
ileum. Recovery. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ, 6 Nov. 1891; cxxv. 489, 490. 

2. Fibroid tumors of the uterus. Ihid. 9 June, 

1892; cxxvi. 585. — Medical News^ 11 June, 
\^^2. — Annals of Surgery , July, 1892. 
Also separately. 

3. Fatal haemorrhage from the femoral artery, 

caused by a sloughing inguinal abscess. Bos- 
ton Med, and Surg. Journ. 1892 ; cxxvii. 86. 

4. Two cases of relapsing appendicitis ; operation 

between the attacks. Cure. Jbid. 28 July, 
1892 ; cxxvii. 86. 

5. The surgical aspects of acute intestinal obstruc- 

tion. Jbid, 11 Aug. 1892; cxxvii. 131. 

6. An extraordinary case of twisting of the uterus 

as the pedicle of a large fibroid tumor of 
many years existence. Am. Journ. Obstetr. 
1892; XXV. no. 3. 
Also separately. 



Franklin Henry Hooper. 

Instructor in Laryngology. 

X. Report on laryngology and rhinology. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Journ. 22 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 
435-438. 

2, Multiple papilloma of the larynx in young 

children, and its treatment. Reprinted ftrom 
International Clinics^ Oct. 1891. 

3. Diseases of the thyroid gland. With J. Pay son 

Clark, M.D. Sajous* Annual, of the Univ. 
Med, Sciences, Philadelphia. 1892. 



Albert Andreir Hoirard. 

Tutor in Latin. 

X. Note on Livy I. 55. 1. Harvard Studies in 
Class, Philol, 1892; iii. 185, 186. 

2. [Review of] Kiepert's ** Atlas antiquus," Am. 
edition. Class, Rev. May, 1892; vi. 226. 



Oliver Whipple Himtingtoii« 

Instru^r in Mineralogy and Chemietry. 

X. Diamonds in meteorites. Science, 8 July, 
1892 ; XX. 16. 

Byron Satterlee Hvrllmt. 
Instructor in English. 

1, The preparatory work in English as seen by 

a Harvard examiner. The Academy^ Oct. 
1891; vi. 851-357. 

2. College requirements in English. Ibid, June, 

1892 ; vii. 257-264. 

Alpkens Hyatt. 

Assisia/nt in PcUaeoniology ai the Museum of 
Comparative Zodlogy. 

1. Remarks on the Pinnidae. Proc. Bosi. Soe. 

Nat, Hist. April, 1892 ; pp. 335-346. 

2. Report on the Museum of the Boston Sodety 

of Natural History. Ibid, JAay, 1892. 

3. Jura and trias at Taylorville, California. 

BM, OeoL Soc, of America, ill. 395-412. 

John George Jaok. 

Lecturer at the Arnold Arboretwn, 

1. Notes [botanical and horticultural] of a sum- 

mer journey in Europe. I-XV. Garden and 
Forest, 16 Dec. 1891 —18 May, 1892. 

2. Notes on shrubs. Jbid, 15 June — 24 Aug. 

1892. 

3-12. In Garden and Forest. — xSgx. (Vol. It.) 
3. A clematis borer (AcalthoS caudata). 
21 Oct.; p. 496. (fig. 77.)— 4. Late persist- 
ing leaves on trees. 2 Dec; p. 567. — 5. 
Deciduous shrubs with late persisting leaves. 
9 Dec; p. 580. — 6. Spiraea discolor, var. 
ariaef olia. 30 Dec ; p. 615. (fig. 98.) — X892. 
(Vol. V.) 7. The perforation of flowers. 20 
Jan. ; p. 29. (fig. 7.) — 8. Lespedega bicolor 
and L. Sieboldi. 9 March; p. 112. (figs. 18, 
19.) — 9. How some half-hardy shrubs sur- 
vived the winter. II May; p. 225. — xo. 
Notes on forsythias. 25 May; p. 249. — xx. 
A sequence of flowering cherries. I June ; 
p. 255. — X2. Notes on two troublesome 
borers. 7 Sept. ; p. 426. 

Aliraham Valentine WilUama Jaekaen, 

Lecturer on the Mazdean Religion. 

1. An A vesta grammar in comparison with Sans- 

krit. Part I. Phonology, inflection, word- 
formation, with an Introduction on the 
Avesta. Stuttgart and Boston. 1892. 8^. 
pp. xlviii, 272. 

2. Article on the letter A. IntemcU, Cyclopaedia, 

i. 1, 2. 

3. Article " Avesta." Ibid. ii. 

4. Where was Zoroaster's native place? Journ 

Am. Orient. Soe. 1892 ; zy. 221-282. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



21 



5. [Reyiew of] SkeatB* ** Principles of English 

etymology." Edue, Rev. Oct. 1891 ; ill. 294- 
296. 

6. [Reyiew of] Soames's '* Introduction to the 

study of phonetics." Ibid, June, 1892; iy. 
90-92. 



Haas Carl GHbtthar ▼«& Jac^Buum. 

Assistant Professor of German. 

X. Elements of German syntax with special refer- 
ence to prose composition. New York. 
Henry Holt & Co. Ti**. pp.170. 

2. Materials for German prose composition, with 

notes and yocabulary. New York. Henry 
Holt & Co. 12<*. pp. 288. 

'William Jamas • 

Professor of Psychology. 

I. Psychology. New York. Holt & Co. 1892. 

8«. pp. xiu. 478. 

Amerioui Science series : briefer course. '* In preparing 
the following abridgment of mj larger work * The principles 
of psycholoey' m^ chief aim lias been to make it more 
direcuj ayaQable for class-room use." Prince. 

a. Origin of right-handed-ness. Sdenee^ 14 Noy. 
1891 ; xvi. 275. 

3. What psychical research has accomplished. 

Forum, Aug. 1892; xiii. 727-742. 



Gaorga Xora&aii Kittradca* 

Assistant Professor of English. 

X. The authorship of the English Romaunt of the 
Rose. [^Harvard"] Studies and Notes in 
PhUol. and Lit. 1892 ; i. 1-65. 

a. Henry Scogan. Ibid. 1892; i. 109-117. 

3. Sidney's "Apology for poetry." [Review of 

Schuckburgh's edition.] Modern Lang. 
Notes, Dec. 1891 ; yi. 487-491. 

4, 5. [Reyiew of] Lounsbury's •' Studies in 

Chaucer." Atlantic Mo. April, 1892; Ixix. 
554-559. — The Nation, 17, 24 March, 1892 ; 
liv. 214, 281. 

6. Edited, with E. S. Sheldon, "Dialect Notes, 
published by the American Dialect Society. 



tt 



Pliilip Coombs Kiiapp* 

CliniceU Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous 

System. 

I. Hereditary and traumatic motor tabes. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 1 Oct. 1891 ; cxxa*. 
348-352. 

a. A contribution from brain surgery to the study 

of the localization of the sensory centres in 

the cerebral cortex. Ibid. 22 Oct. 1891 ; cxxv. 

480-433. 

Also reprint: Boston. 1892. Damrell & Upham. 16*. 
pp. 12. 

3. Astasia- abasia : with the report of a case of 
paroxysmal trepidant abasia associated with 
paralysis agitans. Joum. of Nervous and 
Mental Dis. Nov. 1891 ; xvi. 673-703. 
Also separately. 8*. pp. 81. 



4. Contribution to the study of chorea, with 

special reference to its connection with heart 
disease and rheumatism. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 24 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 672-674. 

5. Two cases of trephining for traumatic epi- 

lepsy. With Dr. A. Post Ibid. 7 Jan. 1892; 
cxxvi. 5-10. 
Reprint: Boston. Damrell & Upham. 1802. 16*. pp.20. 

6. Recent progress in the pathology of the ner- 

vous system. Ibid. 28 Jan., 4 Feb. 1892; 
cxxvi. 88, 114. 

7. A case of tumor of the cerebellum in which 

trephining was done for the relief of increased 
intra-cranial pressure. Joum. of Nervous 
and Mental Dis. Feb. 1892. 
Also separately. 8*. pp. 10. 

8. Provision for patients with chronic diseases in 

the city of Boston. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 21 April, 1892; cxxvi. 389, 390. 

9. Peripheral nervous diseases, muscular dystro- 

phies and general neuroses. Sajous* Annual 
of the Univ. Med. Sciences, 1892 ; u. C 1-72. 

10. Sudden death from affections of the nervous 

system. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 
23 June, 1892; cxxvi. 628-630. 
Also reprint: Damrell & Upham. Boston. 1892. 16*. 

11. The nervous and mental sequelae of influenza. 

Trans. Mass. Med. Soc. 1892 ; xv. 789-805. — 
Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 15 Sept. 1892 ; 
cxxvii. 253-257. 
Also separately. 8*. pp. 17. 
I a. Also editorials, book-reviews, notes, etc. in 
Boston Medical and Surgicai JourncU. 

Frederick Irvine Knislit. 

Clinical Professor of Laryngology. 

I. President's address before the American Cli- 
matological Association, at Washington. 
Trans, of the Assoc. 1891. 

a. Dr. Henry Ingersoll Bowditch. Boston Med. 

and Surg. Journ. 25 Aug. 1892 ; cxxvii. 177- 

181. 

Read at the memorial meeting of the section for clinical 
medicine of tlie Massachusetts &ledical Soc. 16 March, 1892. 

William Coolidce Immlb, 

Assistant Librarian. 

I. The university during the last four years, 

1887-91. Fourth report of the Secretary of 

the Class of 1881, pp. 133-174. 
a. Additions to the Dante collection in Harvard 

College Library, May 1, 1891— May 1, 1892. 

Eleventh ann. report Dante Soc. 1892; pp. 

55-72. 
3. Notes on special collections in American 

libraries. By W. C. Lane and C. K. Bolton. 

I. Harvard University Bulletin, May, 1892 ; 

vi. 438-458. 
Also (complete) as BibHofn*AphicHl Contribution, no. 45. 

Christopher Golnmbiu Langdell. 

Dane Professor of Law ; Dean of the Law Faculty. 

I. A brief survey of equity jurisdiction. VII. 
Creditor's bills. Harvard Law Rev. Oct. 
1891 ; V. 101-138. 



22 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



CharlM Roolnrell In 



ProfeBMor of SanskriU 

I. Harvard oriental series, edited, with the co- 
operation of various scholars, by Charles 
Rockwell Lanman. 

. Vol. i. The Jataka-Mali or BodhisattTavadina-Mala bj 
Azya-Ciira. Edited bj Dr. Hendrik Kern, Professor 
in the ' Uniyersitj of Leiden. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 
8* pp. xii. 254. 

a. Mortuary urns. Proc, Am. Oriental Soc, 
Boston, May, 1891, in the Journal of the 
Society, xv. pp. xcviii. — c. 

3, 4. Notices of Sir Monier Monier-Williams's 
^'Brahmanism and Hinduism." The New 
World, 1892 ; i. 354r-856. — The Nation, 7 
July, 1892 ; Iv. 17. 



Daniel David Lee« 

Ifutructor in Anaiomy ai the School of Veterina/ry 

Medicine. 

X. A fistulous opening from the mouth, resulting 
from a diseased tooth. Joum. Comp. Med. 
and Vet. Archives , Nov. 1891 ; xii. 606. 



* Joseph Loverlns* 

Hollis Professor of Mathematics and NcUttrcU 
Philosophy, Emeritus. 

I. American Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
Memorial of Joseph Lovering, late president 
of the Academy . Camhridge. John Wilson 
& Son. 8<*. pp. 40. 

Contents : — Addresses by Bcv. Dr. A. P. Peabodj, Presi- 
dent C. W. Eliot, Professor J. P. Cooke, Professor John 
Trowbridge: letters from lion. R. C. Winthrop, Professor 
W. W. Goodwin, Mr. Justin Winsor, Professor F. W. Put- 
nam ; biographical sketch by Professor Cooke ; bibliography. 



* James Riusell Lowell. 



Smith Professor of the French and Spanish Lan- 
guages and Literatures, and Professor of Belles 
Lettres, Emeritus, 

X. Latest literary essays and addresses. Edited by 
Cliarles Eliot Norton. Boston, etc. Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co. 1891. S"*. pp. (6), 184, 
portr. 

Contents : — Some letters of W. S. Landor. — Walton. — 
Milton*s **Areo|>agetica." — Shakespeare's "Richard III." 
— The stndy of^ modem languages. — The progress of the 
world. 

a. His ship. A poem. Harper's Mag. Dec. 1891 ; 
Ixxxiv. 141. 

3. The old English dramatists. Ibid. June, 1892 ; 

Ixxxv. 75-^4. 

4. Marlowe. Ihid. July, 1892 ; 195-203. 

5. Webster. Hid, Aug. 1892; 411-418. 

6. Chapman. IHd, Sept. 1892; 561-568. 
Nos. 3 to 6 were edited by Professor C. E. Norton. 

7. American ideas for English readers. With 

introduction by Henry Stone. Boston. J. G. 
Cupples & Co. 1892. sm. 8''. pp. xv. 94, 
portr. 

Reprints of newspaper reports of speeches made in Eng- 
land. The portrait is after the bust by William Ordway 
Partridge (taken from the clay). 



David Gerdon Iiyon. 

ffollis Professor of Divinity, and Curator of the 

Semitic Musettm. 

I. The inerrancy of the Scriptures. Essay read 
in Philadelphia, May 20, at the tenth annual 
session of the Baptist Congress. Published 
in the Proceedings of tlie Congress, pp. 69-77. 
New York. Baptist Congress Pub. Co. 

a. The choice of a profession. Baccalaureate ad- 
dress delivered June 8 at the semi-centennial 
celebration of Howard College, Ala. Pub- 
lished in the memorial Catalogue of the 
College, July, 1892, pp. 71-79. 



Silas M aroi&s MaeTs^ne. 

McLean Professor of Ancient and Modem History. 

I. Capital and interest. Quart, Joum. Economics, 
Jan. 1892 ; vi. 129-150. 



Frank Burr Mallory. 

Assistant in Pathological Anatomy. 

1. Sacro-coccygeal dimples, sinuses, and cysts. 
From the Am. Joum, Med, Sci, March, 1892. 
S^. pp. 15, illustr, 

Edirard lianrena Mark. 

Hersey Professor of Anatomy. 

I. Edited *' Contributions from the Zoological 
Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative 
Zoology," nos. xxviii.-xzxii. For the full 
list, see p. 9. 

a. Annual report to the Curator of the Museum 
of Comparative Zoology, incorporated in his 
Annual report to the President and Fellows 
of Harvard College for 1890-91. 

Arthur Rlohmond Marsh* 

Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature. 

X. On certain tendencies in literary studies. Hcm^- 
vard Mo. July, 1892 ; xiv. 177-188. 



Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

I. Remarks on the death of the late Dr. George 
Hinckley Lyman. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 31 March, 1892; cxxvi. 316, 317. 

a. Notes on typhoid from 676 cases admitted to 
the Boston City Hospital in 1890 and 1891. 
Ibid. 7, 14 April, 1892; cxxvi 329, 357. 
Reprinted : Dnmrell & (Jpham. Boston. 1892. 

3. Two cases of ulcerative endocarditis, with 

autopsies. Ibid, 22 Sept. 1892; cxxvii. 287. 

4. Pneumonia in the recent influenza epidemics. 

Med. Com,mu7iications Mass, Med, Soc. 1892 ; 
XV. no. 3, pp. 779-784. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



23 



Frmnols Miaot. 

Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of 

Physic, 

X. Movable kidneys. Intemat. clinics yOcX^ld^^l) 
p. 84. 



Samuel Jason Mixtar. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

X. Two cases of appendicitis, one associated with 
aterine fibroid, the other with pregnancy. 
Boston Med, and Surg. Jo urn. 81 Dec. 1891 ; 
cixv. 697. 

a. A new method of cutting and applying skin 
grafts in Thiersch's operation. Ibid, 31 Dec. 
1891 ; cxxv. 700, illustr, 

3. Retention cyst of the gall-bladder ; operation ; 

recovery. Ibid. 28 April, 1892; cxxvi. 420. 

4. Cancerous kidney removed by laparotomy; 

recovery. Ibid. 15 Sept. 1892 ; cxxvii. 262, 
263. 



Gharlas Harbart M oora. 

Assistant Professor of Design in the Fine Arts, 

I. The antecedents of Gothic architecture. Paper 
read before the twenty-fifth annual conven- 
tion of the American Institute of Architects. 
Boston, Mass., 29 Oct. 1891, and published 
in The Inland Architects, Nov. 1891 ; xviii. 
no. 4, and also in the Proceedings of the 
Convention. 

a. The modern art of painting in France. Atlan- 
tic Mo, Dec. 1891 ; Ixviii. 805. 

3. The new library building. The Harvard Mo, 
May, 1892 ; xiv. 126-128. 



Morris Hloky Marcs^n. 

Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin. 

I. An illustrated dictionary to Xenophon's Ana- 
basis, with groups of words etymologically 
related. By J. W. White and M. H. Morgan. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1892. sq. 12^. pp. viii. 
290. 

a. Sfci/vao), (TKi/vcd), (TKT/voa). A contribution to 
lexicography. Am. Jov/m. of PhUol, Apr. 
1892; xiii. 71-84. 

3. Notes: Lysias, xvi. 10. — Aeschylus, Ag. 412 
sq. (421 sq. Week.). Harvard Studies in 

Class. Philol. 1892 ; iii. 191-194. 

4. Translations from the Greek tragic writers and 

from Marcus Aurelius. BartletVs Familiar 
Quotationsy ninth ed. pp. 695-699, 749-766. 
Boston. 1891. 



Professor of Experimental, Psychology, 

I. Beitrage zur experimentellen Psychologic. 
Heft 4. Freiburg i.B. 1892. 8<l pp. (4), 
288. 



John C 



Assistant in Anatomy, 

X. A case of gastrostomy for malignant disease 
of the oesophagus. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum, 81 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 710. 

a. The epidemiology of influenza. Tra/ns, Am. 
Climaiological Assoc, 1891; viii. 192. — The 
Climatologist, (Philadelphia), 16 May, 1892; 
p. 231. 

3. A case of recurrent appendicitis; operation; 
recovery. Boston Med, and Surg. Joum. 
30 June, 1892 ; cxxvi. 658. 

Harbart Niohals. 

Instructor in Psychology. 

X. The origin of pleasure and pain. PhUos. Rev, 
July, Sept. 1892 ; i. 403-432, 518-584. 

Charloa Eliot Norton. 

Professor of the History of Art, 

I. Translation of the Divine Comedy of Dante 
Alighieri. Vol. II. Purgatory. Boston. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1892. W, pp. ix. 
(8) 216. 

a. The same. Vol. III. Paradise. Boston. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1892. 12*1 pp. 
xU. 215. 

3. Edited. Latest literary essays and addresses 
of James Russell Lowell. Boston. Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co. 1891. 8''. pp. (6), 184. 

For contents see Jamxs Russbll Lowbll. 

William Foss Oaftood. 

Instructor in MaihewMtics, 

X. The symbolic notation of Aronhold and 
Clebsch. Am, Joum, Math, July, 1892 ; xiv. 
251-261. 

a. The system of two simultaneous ternary quad- 
ratic forms. Ibid, July, 1892 ; xiv. 262-278. 

John Knoirloa Paina* 

Professor of Music. 

X. Shall we have endowed opera? Forum., June, 
1892 ; xiii. 507-518. 

Gaarga Harbart PalaMr. 

Alford Professor of Naiural Religion^ Moral 
Philosophy y and Oivil Polity. 

X. Barnes' Rural poems. Christian Union, 26 
Dec. 1891. 

a. The manliness of boyhood. Congregationalist, 
18 Feb. 1892. 

3. Doubts about university extension. Atlantic 
Mo, March, 1892 ; Ixix. 867-374. 

4. Philosophy in colleges. Independent f 4 Aug. 

1892. 

5. Several reviews in The Nation^ 1892. 



24 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



♦Andrew Preston Peabody. 

Prectcher to the University, and Plummet Professor 
of Christian Morals , Emeritus. 

I. Preaching. Boston. Damrell & Upham. 

1892. 8*» pp. 20. 
Reprinted from The ffomiUtic Review. 

a. Faith, virtue, knowledge. An address delivered 
at the eighty-ninth anniversary of Bradford 
Academy on Wednesday, June 8, 1892. 
[Boston]. 1892. 16*. pp. 18. 

Printed by request of the Trustees. 

3. A sermon preached in commemoration of the 

founders of Nahant Church, at the dedication 
of a tablet erected to their memory, July 22, 
1877. Second edition. Cambridge. John 
Wilson & Son. 1892. S"". pp. 50. diagr. 

4. Address delivered at the dedication of the 

Cambridge English High School building, 
April 4, 1892. n. p. 1892. 8". pp. 13. . 

5. Biblical and historical criticism. Mark xvi. 9- 

20, and John vii. 68 — viii. 11. Andover 
Reviewy June, 1892 ; xvii. 631-638. 
Also separately, pp. 8. 

6. [Notice of] »'The evolution of Christianity" by 

Lyman Abbott. The New World, Sept. 1892. 
See also Joseph Lotebino. 



Francis Greenwood Peabody. 

Plummer Professor of Christian Morals. 

X. A Philistine at Parsifal. Christian Union, 
19 Sept. 1891. 

2. Labor and life in London. Ihid. 3 Oct. 1891. 

3. The German labor colonies for tramps. 

Forum, Feb. 1892; xii. 751-761. 

4. German socialists in council. Nation, 12 Nov. 

1891; liii. 370,371. 

5. Ministers' work among working people. A 

German experiment. Christian Register, 
31 Dec. 1891. 

6. The drink question in Germany. Nation, 

3 March, 1892; liv. 167, 168. 

7. A case of good city government. Forum, 

March, 1892; xiii. 63-65. 



Benjamin Ossood Pelroe. 

Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural 

Philosophy. 

z. Various theorems and problems in the Educa- 
tional Times (London). 



mm Mills Peiroe. 



Perkins Professor of Astronomy and Mathematics, 
and Dean of the Graduate School. 

z. Report on the Graduate School. Annual 
Reports of the President, etc. 1890-91. pp. 
86-98. 



Edward Gharlee Piokerinc. 

Paine Professor of Practical Astronomy, and 
Director of the Astronomical Observaiory. 

z. Distribution of energy in stellar spectra. Re- 
printed in Astron, NaehHehien, czxviii. 877, 
and in Astronomy and Astro- Physics, Jan. 
1892, xi. 22. 

a. On the new star in Auriga. Astron. Naek- 
richten, cxxix. 111. 

3. The objective prism. Astronomy and Astro- 

physics, March, 1892, xi. 199. 

4. The new star in Auriga. Ibid. March 1892, 

xi. 228. 

5. A change in the spectrum of Nova Auriga. 

Ibid. April, 1892, xi. 330. 

6. Nova Aurigae. Ibid. May, 1892, xi. 417. 

7. A large southern telescope. 4^. pp. 2. 

A circular describing the advantages of establishing such 
an instrument at Arequipa, Peru. 

8. Forty-sixth annual report of the Director of 

the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard 
College. Cambridge. 1891. 9^ ppi'. 11. 

See also p. 8 for articles by assistants in Uie Observatoiv 
prepared under the direction of Professor Pickering and 
communicated by him. 



William Henry Piokerinc. 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy. 

I. Astronomical possibilities at considerable alti- 
tudes. Reprinted in Astron. NachriMen, 
cxxix. 97, and in The Observatory, xv. 283. 

a. An investigation of the systems of bright 
streaks visible upon the taW moon. Astron. 
Nachrichien, cxxx. 225. 

3. Are there at present active volcanoes upon the 

moon? The Observatory, xv. 260. 

4. The mountain station of the Harvard College 

Observatory. Astronomy and Astro-Physics, 
May, 1892 ; xi. 353. 

5. The Boyden station of the Harvard College 

Observatory. Ibid. May, 1892 ; xi. 867. 

6. Colors exhibited by the planet Mars. Ihid. 

June, Aug. 1892; xi. 449, 646. 

7. The earthquake for February 28, 1892. Ibid. 

June, 1892 ; xi. 470. 

8. The glacial period of the planet Mars. Knowl- 

edge, XV. 113. 



Charles Bnmliani Porter« 

Professor of Clinical Surgery* 

I. A case of diffuse fibroma with a tendency to 
intracanicular growth of both breasts ; opera- 
tion on each with an interval of three weeks. 
Recovery. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
3 March, 1892 ; cxxvl. 206-207, plaU 1. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICBRS. 



25 



JLhm&r Po«t« 

CUnical Inttructor in Syphiiis. 

I. Some contiderations upon late syphilis, and 
especially late hereditary syphilis, more par- 
ticularly in its surgical aspects. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 15, 22 Oct. 1891; 
cxxT. 893, 427. 

Bead before the Congress of American Fbysicians and 
Surgeons, Washington, & Sept. 1801. 

a. Two cases of trephining for traumatic epilepsy. 
With Dr. P. C. Enapp. Ibid. 7 Jan. 1892 ; 
czzri. 5-10. 
Beprint: Boston. Damrell & IJpham. 1892. 16*. pp.20. 

3. Two cases of compound fracture and disloca- 
tion at the ankle-joint. IHd. 7 April, 1892; 
czxri. 885* 



'William H«Bi7 Potter. 

CliniecU Lecturer in Operative Dentistry. 

I. Edited the Proceedings of the American 
Academy of Dental Science. Proceedings 
are published in the IntemcUioncU Dental 
Joum. 



IVederie Ward 

Peahody Professor of American Archaeology and 
Ethnology J and Curator of the Pedbody Mu- 
sewn of American Archaeology and Ethnology. 

I. Abstract of lecture upon the ancient earth- 
works of Ohio, before the Western Reserve 
Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 25, 
1887. Tract No. 76, in Vol. III. of Tracts 
of the Western Reserve Hist. Soc. 1892. 
pp. 177-184. 

a. Remarks on the Honduras expedition of the 
Peabody Museum and on the Department of 
Ethnology and Archaeology at the World's 
Columbian Exposition. Proc. Am. Antiq. 
Assoc. 21 Oct. 1891 ; vii. 294, 295. 

3. Report as permanent secretary of the Amer- 

ican Association for the advancement of 
Science. Proc. Am. Assoc. Adv. Sci. 1891 ; 
xl. 459. 

4. Edited the ** Proceedings of the American Asso- 

ciation for the Advancement of Science," vol. 
xl. 1891. 

5. Edited the ** Archaeological and Ethnological 

Papers of the Peabody Museum," vol. i. no. 4, 
1892. 
Tor contents see p. 8. 

6. Twenty-fifth report of the Peabody Museum. 

AnnucU Reports of the President t etc. 1890- 
1891. pp. 188-198. 
See also Joskpr Lovxanre. 



James 

Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous System. 

I. Notes on the experience of physicians in Bos- 
ton as regards the question of oophorectomy 
for nervous symptoms. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 17 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 644-648. 



a. Contribution to the study of chorea with 
special reference to its connection with heart 
disease and rheumatism. Ibid. 24 Dec. 
1891 ; cxxv. 674. 

3. On the relation of epilepsy to injury of the 
head. Ibid. 7 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 1-5. 

4. A case of quadrant-anopsia with right sensory 

and motor hemiplegia. Ibid. 4 Feb. 1892; 
cxxvi. 118. 

5. Pain in the sole of the foot on walking. Ibid. 

1 Sept. 1892; cxxvii. 214, 215. 



Geerge Andrew Reiaaer. 

Instructor in Semitic Languages. 

X. The construct case in Assyrian. Proc. Am. 
Orient. Soc. 1891 ; p. 121. 



Edward Reynolds. 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 

X. Practical midwifery : a handbook of treatment. 
New York. Wm. Wood & Co. 1892. 8*. 
pp. xiv. 421. 

a. A case of probable tubal pregnancy. Boston 
Med. and Surg. Joum. 14 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 
81, 82. 

3. Two cases of ruptured uterus treated expec- 

tantly. Ibid. 28 Jan. 1892; cxxvi. 80-82. 

4. Labor complicated by prolapsed tumors. Ibid. 

11 Feb. 1892; cxxvi. 138-135. 

5. On the value of electricity in minor gynecology. 

Ibid. 21 Apr. 1892; cxxvi. 381-385. 

6. The essentials to success in repair of the pelvic 

floor in primary and secondary operations. 
Ibid. 26 May, 1892 ; cxxvi. 525-528, illustr. 



Theodore William Riehards. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

1. A table of atomic weights, compiled from the 
most recent data and arranged in the order of 
value. Published by the University, March, 
1892. 12°. p. 1. 

a. Ueber Cupriammonium Acetobromid. Ber. d. 
deutsch. Chem. Gesell. xxv. p. 1492. 

3. Untersuchung iiber das Atomgewicht des Kup- 
fers. In das Deutsche iibertragen von Her- 
mann Moraht. Zeitsch. fur Anorgan. Chem. 
i. 150-210. 

The orifcinsl of this paper was noted in the eighth List. 
It has been reprinted in The Chemical Newe (London). 



Manrioe Howe Riehardson. 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

X. Tumor of caecum causing intussusception; 
operation on third day ; reduction of invagina- 
tion, enterotomy, and removal of tumor; 
death. Trans. Am. Surg. Assoc, x. 205. 

a. A case of retro-peritoneal cyst of congenital 
origin in a child of thirteen months ; removal ; 
recovery. Ibid. x. 211. 



26 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



3. A case of total obliteration of the oesophagus 

throughout the greater part of its course, of 
doub&l origin ; external oesophagotomy and 
attempts at dilatation ; death. Boston Med, 
and Surg, Jowrn, 21 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 58, 59. 

4. Cyst of pancreas treated by laparotomy and 

drainage; recovery. With J. G. Mumford. 
Hid. 28 Jan. 1892 ; czzvi. 86-88. 

5. A case of intestinal resection and suture for 

artificial anus following gangrenous hernia. 
Ibid, S March, 1892; czxyI. 211, 212. 

6. Two cases of appendicitis with abscess, suc- 

cessfully treated by rectal puncture. Ibid, 
17 March, 1892 ; czxTi. 261-268. 

7. Gall-bladder surgery. lUd, 28 April, 1892; 

cxxTi. 409-416, Ulusir. 

8. Large echinococcus cyst of the liver success- 

folly treated by laparotomy and drainage. 
Ihid, 28 April, 1892 ; czxvi. 422. 

9. Pancreatic cyst apparently cured by incision 

and drainage ; recurrence ; perforation of the 
stomach; death; autopsy. Ihid, 5 May, 
1892; cxxvi. 441,442. 

10. Remarks on the surgical treatment of appen- 
dicitis. Ihid, 4 Aug. 1892; czzvii. 105-111. 



John Rit«ihie, Jr. 

AsMiwtant in the Ohsti'vaiory, in charge of ike 
Dixtrihuiion of Astronomioial Intelligence, 

z. Composed, edited, and published Science Oh- 

server special circular no. 96. Boston. 8^. 

OontenU: — 1891. 96. Discovery of comet d 1891, Bar. 
nard; disco veiy and orbit of comet « 1891, Barnard (Mr- 
Campbell). 6 Oct. 

a. Science observer international circular no. 86. 

Berlin, Germany. 8^. 

OonUnU : — itgx. 36. Elements and ephemeris of comet 
e 1891, Barnard (Campbell). 7 Oct. 

3. The U. S. Naval Observatory. (Boston Sci- 

entific Society). Commonwealthj 2 April, 
1892. 

4. Also abstracts, reports, reviews, and editorials 

on scientific topics in the Commonwealthf 
Boston Evening Transcript, Boston Daily 
Advertiser, etc. 



B«njamin Idnoeln Robinim, 

Curator of Herharium, 

I. New plants collected by W. G. Wright in 
Western Mexico. Botanical Gazette, Dec. 
1891 ;xvi. 840. 

Abbott Itmwrenoe Rotch. 

Assistant in Meteorology. 

X. American Meteorological Journal. An illus- 
trated monthly devoted to scientific meteor- 
ology and allied branches of study. Edited 
by Mark W. Harrington, A. Lawrence Botch, 
and W. J. Herdman, M.D. Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Mr. Rotcb bas contributed reviews and notes to the Am. 
Met. Journal, besides the following articles : — 

a. Meteorology at the French Association. Nov. 
1891 ; viii, 301. 



3. New high-level meteorological observatories in 

France, viii. 316-326. 

4. The mountain meteorological stations of the 

United States. Jan. 1892 ; viii. 396-405. 

5. The international meteorological conference 

at Munich. 

6. Sur la mesure des hauteurs et des vitesses des 

nuages k Tobservatoire de Blue Hill (£tata 
Unis). Assoc. Franqaise pour VAvanc, des 
Sciences. Congris de Marseille, IS91. Notes 
et extraits, p. 346. 



Tbemas^M orgsA Rotoli. 

Assistant Professor of the Diseases of Children. 

I. Iconoclasm and original thought in the study 

of pediatrics. Archives of Pediatrics, Nov. 

1891 ; viii. 806. — Boston Med. and Surg, 

Journ, 1 Oct. 1891; cxxv. 342-344. 

The President's address before the American Pediatric 
Society, Washington, 2 Sept. 1891. 

a. Contribution to the study of chorea with 
special reference to its connection with heart 
disease and rheumatism. Boston Med, and 
Surg, Journ, 24 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 674, 675. 

3. Recent progress in diseases of children. Ihid. 

14 Jan. 1892 ; cxxvi. 33-36. 

4. Cases of atropine and opium poisoning in early 

life. Ibid. 10 March, 1892; cxxvi. 231, 232. 

5. A case of double movable kidney. Ibid. 

26 May, 1892 ; cxxvi. 522-526, illustr. 

6. Report on diseases of children. Ibid. 14 July, 

1892 : cxxvii. 42-45. 

7. Improved methods of modifying milk for infant 

feeding. Ibid. 21 July, 1892; cxxvii. 66-58. 

8. Reports on pediatrics. With Dr. E. M. Buck- 

ingham. Intemat. Med, Mag. July-Sept. 
1892 ; i. 638, 738, 853. 



Joaiah Royoe. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

I. The spirit of modern philosophy, an essay in 
the form of lectures. Boston. Houghton, 
Mifllin & Co. 1892. 8* pp. xvii. 519. 

a. The implications of self-consciousness. New 
World, June, 1892; i. 289-310. 

3. Report on recent literature of ethics and kin- 
dred topics in America. Intemat, Journ, of 
Ethics, April, July, 1892; u. 378-886, 614- 

618. 



Gttorge Saatayi 

Instructor in Philosophy. 

X. Five sonnets. Harvard Mo, Jan. 1892; xiii. 
163-156. 

a. At noon. A poem. Scrihner's Mag. Jan. 
1892 ; xi. 67. 

3. What is a Philistine? Harvard Mo, May, 
1892 ; xiv. 89-99. 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



27 



GliarleB Spragne Sarffent. 

Arnold Professor of Arboriculture. 

I. The silva of North America : a description of 
the trees which grow naturally in North 
America exclusive of Mexico. Illustrated 
with figures and analyses drawn from nature 
by Charles Edward Faxon, and engraved by 
Philibert and Eugene Picard. Vols, iii., iv. 
Anacardiaceae to Leguminoseae ; Rosaceae 
to Saxifragaceae. Boston. Houghton, Mif- 
flin & Co. 1892. 4*^. 2 V. Tab. 97-197. 

a. Garden and Forest. A journal of horticulture, 
landscape art, and forestry. Conducted by 
C. S. Sargent, New York. 1891-92. ft 
Ulustr. 

Published weekly. Professor Sargent has contributed, be- 
sides much unsized matter, the following signed articles : — 

189Z. (Vol. iv.) Notes on North American trees, xxix. 
7 Oct. 472. — New or little known plants: Rosa Wichuraiana, 
2 Dec. 670. — I/ypericum BuckUyi^ 9 Dec. b%l, — Viburnum 
tomentowum^ 16 Dec. 5ft3. 

1893. (Vol. v.) New or little known plants: Smiiax 
PMeudO'Chinat 3 Feb. 62.— CUmatU brevicaudaia, 28 
March, 138.— Viburnum cotinifolium^ 25 May, 243.— 
Aicyrum Oruxandreaet 1 June, 256. — JJypeHcum opacumt 
29 «fune, 804. — A Chinese peach, 14 Sept. 438. 

3. Report of the Director of the Arnold Abor- 
etum to the President of Harvard College. 
Reports of the President ^ etc., 1890-91. 



Dudley Allen Sargent. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Training y and 
Director of the Hemtnway Gymnasium. 

1. College athletics and heart disease. Does the 

practice of athletics tend to produce heart 
disease? Educational Rev. Dec. 1891; ii. 
458. 

2. Regulation and management of athletic sports. 

Read before the American Association for 
the Advancement of Physical Education. 
Philadelphia, Apr. 1892. 

3. Report on the physical development of John 

L. Sullivan. New York Herald ^ 21 Aug. 
• 1892. 



Charles lioeke Soudder. 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery. 

X. Seating of pupils in the public schools, — 
being an investigation into one of the etio- 
logical factors in the production of lateral 
spinal curvature. Printed as school document 
no. 9, by the School Committee of the City of 
Boston. Rockwell & Churchill. 1892. S*". 

2. The operative treatment of spastic paralysis. 

Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 81 March, 
1892 ; cxxvi. 806, 307. 

3. The management of compound dislocation of 

the ankle-joint. Ibid. 7 April, 1892 ; cxxvi. 
834, SS6y folding table. 



Arthnr Searle. 

Phillips Professor of Astronomy, 



I. The discovery of a new stellar system. 
lantie Mo. June, 1892 ; Ixix. 814-818. 



At' 



t* 



Natluuilel Soutbeaie Slaaler. 

Professor of Oeology. 

z. The story of our continent. A reader in the 
geography and geology of North America 
for the use of schools. Boston. Ginn & Co. 
1892. sm. 8**. pp. v. 290, illusir. 

a. The border state men of the civil war. At- 
lantic Mo. Feb. 1892 ; Ixix. 245-257. 

3. Sea and land. Scribner's Mag. May, 1892; 

xi. 611-627, illusir. 

4. Sea-beaches. Ibid. June, 1892; xi. 758-776, 

illusir. 

5. The depths of the sea. Ibid. July, 1892; xii. 

77-95, illustr. 

6. Icebergs. Ibid. Aug. 1892; xii. 181-200, 

illusir. 

7. The inundated lands of Massachusetts. Ma^s. 

Boa^-d o/ii^rtcu/^ure, 89th annual report, for 
1891. pp. 377-890. 

8. Introduction to R. A. F. Penrose's '* Nature 

and origin of deposits of phosphate of lime. 
Bull. U. S. Oeol. Survey. Washington. 
1888. 4''. pp. 140, iUusir. 



IVederiok Gheever Shattnok. 

Jadcson Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

X. Pericarditis with large haemorrhagic effusion 
in a patient with Graves disease; repeated 
puncture; double dry pleurisy; recovery. 
Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 5 Nov. 1891 ; 
cxxv. 491, 492, illustr. 

2. The diagnosis and symptoms of acute intestinal 

obstruction. Ibid. 11 Aug. 1892; cxxvii. 
129-181. 

3. Diseases of the blood vessels and of the blood. 

Harems System of Therapeutics, ii. '762. 
Philadelphia. Lea Bros. 1892. 

4. Pulsating empyaema. Transposition of the 

viscera ; a clinical lecture. Intemat. Clinics^ 
Jan. 1892, p. 87. 

5. Mitral insufficiency and the rationale of its 

treatment ; a clinical lecture. Intemai. Med. 
Mag. 1892 ; 1. 586. 



Edward Stevens Sheldon, 

Assistant Professor of Romcmce Philology. 

1. A few notes on Old French phonology. Mod. 

Lang. Notes, March, 1892 ; vii. 77, 78. 

2. The annual meeting of the [American Dialect] 

Society. Dialect Notes, 1892 ; iv. 220-227. 

3. The origin of the English names of the letters 

of the alphabet. \Ha/rva/rd} Studies and 
Notes in Philol. and Lit. 1892 ; i. 66-87. 

4. Etymological notes. Ibid. 1892; i. 118-124. 

5. Professor Sheldon is one of the editors of 

' * Dialect Notes." Published by the American 
Dialect Society. Part IV. Boston. 1892. 



28 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Daniel DabImhi Slade. 

Lecturer on Comparative Osteology. 

z. The first church at Chestnut Hill, Newton, 
Mass. Boston. 1892. S"". pp. 22. 

2. Letter of Rev. Jonathan Mayhew to Richard 

Clarke, 1765. N. E. Hist, and Gen, Reg. 
Jan. 1892 ; xlvi. 15-20. 

3. The study of birds. Masa. Ploughman^ 

March, 1892 ; 11. no. 28. 

4. [Edited] Autobiography of Major-General 

Daniel Denison. N. E. Hist, and Gen. Reg. 
April, 1892; xlvi. 127-138. 
Also separately. 

5. Osteological notes. Science^ 8 April, 22 July, 

1892 ; xix. 208, xx. 46. 

6. A green-house for amateurs. Garden and 

Forest J 18 May, 1892; v. 238. 



demeat liAwrenoe Smltli. 

Professor of Latin. 

X. Catullus and the Phaselus of his fourth poem. 
Harvard Studies in Cla^s. Philol. 1892 ; iii. 
75-89. 

Eead before the American Philological Society at Prince- 
on, "S. J., 7 July, 1891, and printed in abstract in their 
Tran»action»f 1801, xxii ; Proceeding»y xi, xii. 



Instructor in International Law. 

X. The Chilean imbroglio. Harvard Mo. Feb. 
1892 ; xiu. 175-184. 

2. [Review of] E. de Laveleye's ** Le Gouverne- 

ment dans la Democratic." Polit. Sci. Quart. 
June, 1892; vii. 363-366. 

3. Cabinet government in the United States. 

Annals Am. Acad. Pol. and Soc. Sci. July, 
1892 ; iii. 1-18. 
Also separately. 



Jtfjre Edmund Stanton. 

Instructor in Oral Anatomy ^ Physiology y and 

Bacteriology. 

I. Practical use of a small electrical power. 
Scientific American, 7 Nov. 1891 ; Ixv. 293. 

a. Stored electricity for dental and surgical pur- 
poses. Electricity, 25 May, 1892 ; ii. 225. 

3. An electrical dental engine. Ibid. 31 May, 

1892; ii. 241. 

A continaatiou of the prececding article. 

4. Primary and storage batteries for dental pur- 

poses. Intemat. Dentai Journ. Sept. 1892 ; 
xiu. 687. 



XVanolfl Ttwplupoy StMPsv* 



Professor of Agricultural Chemistry^ and Dean 
of the Bussey Institution. 

I. Agriculture in some of ItB reUtiona with chem- 
istry. [Newed.] New York, etc. Scribner's. 
1892. 2 vols. S^t pp. X. 651, vu. 590. 

a. Obituary notice of Cyrus Moors Warren. 
Proc. Am. Acad, xxvii. 

3. The compendious manual of quaUtative chemi- 
cal analysis of C. W. Eliot and F. H. Storer, 
as revised by W. R. Nichols. 16th ed., 
newly revised by Wm. B. Lindsay. New 
York. D. Van Nostrand Co. 1892. 12*1 
pp. vii. 204. 

* Charles Psmtt fltronc. 

Assistant in (gynaecology, 

I. Congenital malformation of the genital tract. 
Persistence of the sinus nro-genitalus as a 
common opening with the urethra. Trans. 
Am. Gynecol. Soc. Sept 1891 ; pp. 478-479. 

a. Laparotomy, with removal of cancer of the 
ovary. Boston Med. and Surg. Joum. 26 
Nov. 1891 ; cxxv. 664, 665. 

3. The relief of salpingitis by dilatation and 

drainage. Ibid. 17 March, 1892; czxvi. 
258-260. 

4. Cases of laparotomy presenting features of 

unusual interest. Ibid. 14 April, 1892; 
cxxvi. 359-862. 
Reprints of all thene papers have been published. 

FrM4rio C^aar de Siuniohrast* 

Assistant Professor of French. 

I. Notes on the teaching of French. Boston. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 1892. IT*, pp. (6), 40. 

a. La Mare au Diable, by George Sand ; edited 
and annotated. Boston. D. C. Heath & Co. 
1892. 12*. pp. viii. 117. • 

3. Le Roi des Montagues, by Edmond About; 

with biographical notice and explanatory 
notes. New York. W. R. Jenkins. 1892. 
12*. pp. ii. 308. 

4. Exercises in French composition, with intro- 

ductory notes. Cambridge. W. H. Wheeler. 

K. Reviews and notes in The Nation. 



Gharlee Hutoldna TafL 

Instructor in Operaiive Dentistry. 

X. Silica : its curative action in the treatment of 
alveolar abscess. Medical Advance, May, 
1892 ; xxviii. 848. — Intemat. Dentai Jisum. 
Sept. 1892 ; xiii. 658. 

Frank Bicelow TarbalL 

Instructor in Greek and LcUin. 

X. The decrees of the Demotianidai : a study of 
the Attic phratry. Papers Am. School CUiss. 
Studies at Athens, 1886-90; iv. 170-188. 



i 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



29 



a. Report on excavations near Stamata in Attika. 
With Charles Waldstein. lUd. 189-198. 

3. Inscriptions from Thisbe. With J. C. Rolfe. 

Ihid. 225-282. 

4. A new fragment of the preamble to Diocle- 

tian's edict '* De pretiis rerum yenalium. 
With J. C. Rolfe. Ihid, 232-244. 



f> 



5. Inscriptions from Plateia. With J. C. Rolfe* 

Ihid. 248-251. 

6. A ** mensa pondaria" from Assos. Am. Joum. 

Archaeol. Dec. 1891 ; vii. 440-448, illustr. 

7. [Review of] ** Scholia in Euripidium." Ed. 

Ednardus Schwartz. Vol. III. Class. Rev. 
March, 1892; vi. 119, 120. 

8. [Review of] ** The inscriptions of Cos." By 

W. R. Paton and £. L. Hicks. Class. Rev. 
June, 1892; vi. 277, 278. 

9. On the meaning of certain Greek verbs. Har- 

vard Studies in Class. PhiloL 1892 ; iii. 186- 
188. 



rrank William Tanaais. 

Professor of Political Economy. 

X. The silver situation in the United States 
[Baltimore.] American Econom ic Aseocia 
tion. 1892. 8*. pp. 118. folding chart. 

Publicatfonfl of the Am. Econ. Assoc., vii. 1. 

a. The tariff history of the United States. New, 
revised, and enlarged edition. New York. 
G. P. Putnam's Sons. 1892. 8*. pp. x. 344. 

3. The working of the silver act in the United 

Stotes. Econ. Joum. June, 1892 ; ii. 367-869. 

4. Various notes and memoranda in the Quarterly 

Journal of Economics. 



Rolaiid Thaztttr, 

Assistant Professor of Cryptogamie Botany. 

I. Further additions to the North American 
species of Laboulbeniaceae. Proc. Am. 
Acad, xxvii. 29-45. 

ContributioDs ttom the Cryptogamie Laboratory of Har- 
vard University, no. zvii. 



Jamea Bradlay Thayer, 



Joaeph Hemy Thayer. 

Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and 

Interpretation. 



I. 



z. 



a. 



Professor of Law. 

Select cases on evidence at the common law 
with notes. Cambridge. Charles W. Sever. 
1892. 8'» pp. xvu. 1229. 

A people without law. Atlantic Mo. Oct., 
Nov. 1891 ; Ixviii. 540-561, 676-687. 

Reprinted by tlie Boetou Indian Citizenship Committee, 
as '* Dooament no. 14." 

3. A letter on the reservation Indians. N. Y. 

Evening Post, 13 Oct. 1891. 

4. The jury and its development. Harvard Law 

Rev. Jan., Feb., March, 1892; v. 249-273, 
295-819, 857-388. 



[Review of) ♦* The writers of the New Testa- 
ment, their style and characteristics." By the 
late William Henry Simcox, M.A. Presby- 
terian and Reformed Rev. Oct. 1891; 676- 
679. 



'Wmiam HopUaa TflHnghaat. 

Assistant Librarian, and Editor of the Quin- 
quennial Catalogue. 

X. Eighth list of the publications of Harvard 
University and its officers, with the chief 
publications on the University. 1890-91. 
Cambridge. 1892. pp. 36. 

Bibliographical contributionfl of Uarrard College Library, 
no. 44. 

a, 3. Necrology of Harvard graduates in each 
number of the Harvard University Bulletin, 
Necrology for 1891-92, Boston Daily Adver- 
tiser, Post, Journal, etc. 29 June, 1892. 



Joaaph Torrey, Jr. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

X. Chemistry in the foundry. Am. Machinist ^ 

12, 19 May, 1892. 
Reprinted in Iron (London) for June, 1892. 

2. The overhead trolley. Ibid. 21 July, 1892. 

3. The technical school and the shop. Ibid. 11 

Aug. 1892. 

4. A review of steam engine fly wheel formulae. 

Ibid. 20 Oct., 3 Nov. 1892. 

5. Note on the determination of sulphur in slags. 

Am. Joum. Analytical and Applied Chem. 
Feb. 1892. 



Gharlea Wendell To 



nd. 



Assistant in Obstetrics. 

X. Contribution to the study of chorea with 
special reference to its connection with heart 
disease and rheumatism. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 24 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 696. 

a. Placenta praevia and uraemia in the same 
patient. Ibid. 2 June, 1892 ; czxvi. 550, 551. 

3. On the modification of labor due to extreme 
maceration of the foetus. Ibid. 8 Sept. 
1892 ; cxxvii. 238-240. 



Crawford Howell Toy. 

Hancock Professor of Hebrew and other Oriental 
Languages, and Dexter Lecturer on Biblical 
Literature. 

I. Abraham Kuenen. The New World, March, 
1892 ; i. 64r-88. 



30 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



John Trowbridce. 

Rumford Professor and Lecturer on the Applicor 
iton of Science to the Useful Arts^ and Director 
of the Jefferson Physical LaborcUory. 

z. The electrical boy, or the career of Greatman 
and Greatthings. Boston. Roberts Bros. 
1891. 12*». pp. 390. illustr, 

a. Damping of electrical oscillations on iron 
wires. Lon. Edin. and Dublin Philos. Mag, 
and Journ. of Sci. Dec. 1891 ; 5th series, 
xxxii. 504-612. 

Reprinted from /Voc. Am. Acad. 1891, see eighth List, p. 31. 

3. Niagara the motor for tlie World's Fair. 

Chauiauquan, Jan. 1892 ; xiv. 441-446. 

4. A phasemeter. Am. Journ. of Sd. March, 

1892 ; 3d series, xUU. 232-234. 

5. Telegraphing through the air without wires. 

Chautauquanj April, 1892 ; xv. 64-67. 

6. Wave propagation of magnetism. Lon. Edin. 

and Dublin Philos. Mag. and Journ. of Sci. 
April, 1892 ; 6th series, xxxiii. 374-378. 

• 7. Physical notes in American Journal of Science 
as joint editor. 1891-92. 
See also Josxph Lovxbino. 

Henzy Van Dyke. 

Preacher to the University, 

z. The oak of Geismar. Scribner*s Mag. Dec. 
1891 ; X. 681-687, illvstr. 

a. The Annunciation. Harper's Mag. Dec. 1891 ; 
Ixxxir. 2-13, illusir. 

Hemuui Trmnk Viokery, 

Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 

1. Unsuspected heart-disease. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Journ. 31 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 693, 694. 

a. Contributions to the study of chorea, with 
special reference to its connection with rheu- 
matism and heart-disease. With Dr. G. L. 
Walton. Am. Journ. Med. Sci. May, 1892 ; 
520-631. 

George liineoln Walton. 

Clinical Instructor in Diseases of the Nervous 
System, and Instructor in Neurology in the 
Dental School, 

I. The etiology of epilepsy with special reference 
to the connection between epilepsy and 
infantile convulsions. With Dr. F. C 
Carter. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 5 
Nov. 1891 ; cxxv. 

a. Removal of a neuroma ; followed by disappear- 
ance of anaesthesia of fourteen years sta,nd- 
ing. Journ. Nerv. and Ment. Disea^eSy Nov. 
1891 ; pp. 1-4. 

3. Dislocation of cervical vertebrae. Internal. 

Clinics, 1892; 2d series, ii. 207-217. 

4. Eye strain and headache. With Dr. C. F. 

Carter. Phil. Med. News, 19 March, 1892. 



5. Contributions to the study of chorea, with 

special reference to its connection with rheu- 
matism and heart disease. With Dr. H. F. 
Vickery. Am. Journ. Med. Sci. May, 1892; 
620-531. 

6. Cases illustrating the less common types of 

muscular disorder; coexisting peroneal and 
carpal atrophy; hereditary atrophy; Thom- 
sens disease; paramyotonia. With Dr. C. 
F. Carter. Iniernat. Med. Ma^. June, 1892 ; 
469-464, illusir. 

7. Metal turner's paralysis. With Dr. C. F. 

Carter. Am. Journ. of Med. Sd. July, 1892 ; 
61-63, illusir. 

8. The importance of correcting ocular defects 

in functional nervous disorders. With Dr. 
F. E. Cheney. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 18 Aug. 1892 ; cxxvii. 153-157. 

Engene Wambansh. 

Professor of Law. 

X . The best education for a lawyer. An address 
delivered on June 16, 1892, at the annual 
commencement exercises of the Law Depart- 
ment of the State University of Iowa. Pub- 
lished by the State University of Iowa, Iowa 
City, Sept. 1892. 8° pp. 14. 

Roliert DeConroy Ward. 

Assistant in Physical Geography and Meteorology. 

X. Another river-pirate. Science, 1 Jan. 1892; 
xix. 7-9, illusir. 

2. Dew. Goldihwaiie's Geograph. Mag. 1891- 

92; ui. 12, 13. 

3. Artificial rain. Ibid. iii. 282-285. 

4. Artificial rain ; a review of the subject to the 

close of 1889. Am. Met. Journ. March, 
1892 ; vui. 484-493. 

5. Thunderstorms in New England during the 

year 1886. Ibid. May, 1892; ix. 21-28. 

6. The first scientific balloon voyage. Ibid. June, 

1892 ; ix. 58-63. 

7. Thunderstorms in New England during the 

year 1887. Ibid. Sept. 1892 ; ix. 211-216. 

8. Edited "The American Meteorological Journal. 

An illustrated monthly devoted to scientific 
meteorology and allied branches of study. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891-92. Vol. ix. 



John Gollina Warren. 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 

I. [Articles in] An American text-book of sur- 
gery for practitioners and students. By 
W. W. Keen and J. W. White. Philadelphia. 
W. B. Saunders. 1892. 4'^. pp. 1209. 

a. Aseptic and antiseptic details in operative 
surgery. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 8 
Oct. 1891; cxxv. 367-370. 

3. Two cases of amputation at the hip-joint. 

Ibid. 19 Nov. 1891 ; cxxv. 538, 639. 

4. The operative treatment of goitre. Ibid. 

6 May, 1892 ; cxxvi. 433-437. 

AUo separately: Boston. Dami'eU & Upham. 1892. 
pp. 17. 



»» 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICEBS. 



31 



B«njamin Marvton 'Watson, Jr. 

Instructor in Horticulture. 

z. Notes on hardy bulbous plants; notes on 
shrubs and other hardy plants. Proc. Seventh 
Annual Convention of Society of Am. 
Florists, pp. 188-143. 

a. Propagation of plants — some general consid- 
erations. Read before Gardeners and Florists 
Club of Boston. Am, Florist ^ 11 Feb. 
1892 ; vii. 659. 

Francis Sedcwlok "Wataon. 

Clinical Instructor in Oenito-urina/ry Surgery^ 
and Assistant in Clinical Surgery, 

X. Clinical lectures on tumors of the bladder. 
Intemat, Clinics, Jan. April, July, 1892. 

These lectures were dcliyered to stadents of the fonrth 

J ear during the regular course of instruction in the Ilarrard 
ledical School, at the Boston City Hospital. 

2. A case suggesting the adYantage of repeated 

suprapubic aspirations of the bludder, as 
compared with catheterization for the relief 
of retention of urine due to prostatic hyper- 
thophy. Boston Med. and Surg. Journ. 
24 Dec. 1891 ; cxxv. 676. 

3. Operation for the radical cure of hydrocele 

and inguinal hernia. Ibid. 81 Dec. 1891; 
cxxv. 698. 

4. A case of division of tendons and nerves at the 

wrist. Ibid, 31 Dec. 1891; cxxv. 698, 699. 



Barrstt WendelL 

Assistant Professor of English, 

X. Cotton Mather, the Puritan priest. New York. 

Dodd, Mead & Co. [189L] 12* pp. vi. 

321. 
" Makers of America " series. 

a. Mr. Lowell as a teacher. Scrihner^s Mag. 
Nov. 1891 ; X. 646-649. 

3. The dean of Bourges. A poem. Ibid, Jan. 

1892; xi. 117-120. 

4. Some neglected characteristics of the New 

England Puritans. Ha/rvard Mo, April, 1892 ; 

xiv. 43-63. 

A paper read before the American Historical Association, 
at Washington, December, 1891. 

5. How he went to the devil. Two Tales, 1892. 



Oliirmr Clinton Wendell. 

Assistant in Observatory. 

1. Observations of comet 1891 V. Astron. Journ. 
xi. 66. 

a. Second series of observations of comet 1891 V. 
Ibid, xi 61. 

3. Orbit of comet 1891 IV. Astron. and Astro- 

physics , xi. 87. 

4. Ephemeris of comet 1891 IV for March. 

Ibid. xi. 261. 

5. On the possibility of seeing meteors from 

comet 1882 I. Ibid. xi. 846. 



6. Observations of comet a 1892. Astron. Joum. 

xi. 168. 

7. Orbit of comet a 1892. Astron. and Astro- 

physics, xi. 443. 

8. Observations of comets 1891 II and 1891 V. 

Astron. Nach. cxxx. 46 ; also Astron. Journ. 
xi. 191. 

9. Observations of comets a 1892 and c 1892. 

Astron. Joum, xi. 191. 

10. Second orbit of comet a 1892. Astron. and 

Astrophysics, xi. 636. 

11. Ephemeris of comet a 1892 for August. Ibid. 

xi. 626. 

12. Second series of observations of comet a 1892. 

Also observations of comet c 1892. Astron. 
Joum, xii. 94. 



darke WUto. 



Professor of Dermatology. 

I. Clinical aspects and etiological relations of 
cutaneous tuberculosis. Boston Med. and 
Surg. Joum. 12 Nov. 1891; cxxv. 609-616. 

a. Some dangers of infection incidental to pro- 
fessional life. Ibid. 4 Feb. 1892; cxxvi. 
106-108. 

3. Commemorative sketch of the life of Professor 

D. H. Storer, M.D. P9'oc. Boston Soc. Nat, 
Hist, 16 Dec. 1891. 

4. Remarks at dinner of the Harvard Medical 

School Alumni Association, June 28, 1892. 
BtUletin of the Association, iii. 64-72. 



John WllUama WUto. 

Professor of Oreek. 

I. The beginner's Greek book. Boston. Ginn 
& Co. 1892. 18*1 pp. XV. 428, 70. 

a. Key to the same. pp. iv. 48. 

3. A series of first lessons in Greek. Revised 

edition. Seventy-second thousand. Boston. 
Ginn & Co. 1892. 8®. pp. x. 286. 

4. An illustrated dictionary to Xenophon'8 Ana- 

basis with groups of words etymologically 
related. With Morris H. Morgan. Boston. 
Ginn & Co. 1891. sq. 12^. pp. viii. 290. 

5. 6. College series of Greek authors. Edited 

under the supervision of John Williams 
White and Thomas D. Seymour. 

5. Xenophnn. HcUcnica Books V.-VII. Edited on the 
basis of Biichftenscbiitz's edition by Charies £. Bennett. 
Boston. Ginn & Co. 1891. 8*. pp. iii. 234. 

6. Text edition of the same. pp. 128. 

7. Professor White is one of the editorial com- 
mittee in charge of the " Harvard Studies in 
Classical Philology." 



William Fiako WhitMj. 

Curator of the AnaiomiccU Museum. 

I. Fat embolism. Boston Med, and Surg. Joum. 
18 Feb. 1892 ; cxxvi. 159, 160. 



32 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE OFFICERS. 



Samuel Williston. 

Assistant Professor of Law. 

X. The validity of attachments made abroad by 
creditors of an insolvent debtor. Harvard 
Law Bev. Dec. 1891; v. 211-221. 



Kenelm Winaloiv. 

Assistant Professor of Therapeutics in the School 
of Veterinary Medicine. 

I. Nitrites; their therapeutic action and scope in 
medical practice. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 14 April, 1892 ; cxxvi. 358-357. 



Justin Winsor. 

Librarian of the University. 

X. Christopher Columbus, and how he received 
and imparted the spirit of discovery. Boston 
and New York. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
1891. Also London. Sampson Low & Co. 
1891. 8° pp. 674, illustr. 

Tlie fifth edition, revised, coutains additional notes. 

2. Charles Deane, LL.D., Vice President Massa- 

chusetts Historical Society. A memoir. 
Privately printed. Cambridge. 1891. 8**. 
pp. 47, portr. Also in Proc. Mass. Hist. 
Society, Nov. 1891; pp. 45-89. 

3. The results in Europe of Cartier's explorations, 

1542-1603. Cambridge. 1892. 8°. pp. 19. 
Also in Proc. Ma^s. Hist. Society , Feb. 1892 ; 
pp. 298-315. 

4. The pageant of Saint Lusson, Sault Ste. Marie, 

1671. A commencement address at the 
University of Michigan, June 30, 1892. 
Cambridge. John Wilson & Son. 1892. 8**. 
pp. 34. Also, official edition, Ann Arbor, 
1892 ; and in the Annual of the University of 
Michigan, 1892. 

5. Harvard College. The class of 1828 with a 

bibliography of the publications of its mem- 
bers. Cambridge. 1892. 8^. pp. 28. 

Bibliographical contributions of the Library of Harvard 
University, no. 46. 

6. [Review of] Henry Harrisse's ** Discovery of 

North America." Nation, 29 Sept., 6 Oct. 
1892. 

7. Edited Harvard University Bulletin, nos. 50, 

51, 52; Oct. 1891 — May, 1892. 

8. Edited Bibliographical Contributions of the 

Library of Harvard University, nos. 44-46. 
See p. 7. 

9. Fourteenth Report of the librarian of Harvard 

College, 1891-92. Included in the annual 
report of the President, and also issued 
separately. 
Sec also Joseph Lovebikq. 



John Eliot WoUr. 

Assistant Professor of Petrography, 

I. The geology of the Crazy Mountains, Montana. 
Bull. GeoL Soc. An^erica^ iii. 445-452. 

Edward Stioknoy Wood. 

Professor of Ohemisiry. 

I. Renal albuminuria not due to organic disease 
of the kidneys. Boston Med. and Surg. 
Joum. 12 May, 1892 ; cxxvi. 459-462. 

Also reprinted : Boston. Damrell & Upham. 1888. 18*. 
pp. 14. 

Jay Baolnu 'Woodwortli* 

Assistant in Geology. 

I. Note on the occurrence of erratic Cambrian 
fossils in the neocene gravels of the island 
of Martha's Vineyard. American Geologist, 
April, 1892 ; ix. 248-247, illusir. 

Charles Pomeroy Woroestor* 

Instructor in Dental Chemistry. 

I. Dr. Worcester was joint editor of the '* Report 
of Trustees of State Primary and Reform 
Schools," 1892. 

John Henry 'Wright. 

Professor of Greek. 

1. The date of Cylon. A study in early Athen- 

ian history. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1892. 
pp. 80. 

Reprinted from the Harvard Stadies in Classical Philol- 
ogy, 1892, iii. 1-74, with a special index. 

2. Did Philochorus quote the 'kOrfvalap iroKirela 

as Aristotle's? Am. Joum. Philol. Oct. 
1891 ; xii. 810-818. 

3. The gods in Greece. Atlantic Mo. Nov. 

1891 ; Ixviii. 701-706. 
A review of Louis Dyer's " Gods in Greece" 

4. [Review of] Paton and Hicks' *' The inscrip- 

tions of Cos." London. 1891. Am. Joum. 
Archaeol. Oct.— Dec. 1891; viL 460-464. 

5. Summaries of periodicals (Journal of Helle- 

nic Studies, X., xi; Reyue des Etudes 
Grecques, iii and iv) , and abstracts of book 
notices. Am. Joum. Archaeol. vii. 289- 
304, 361-63, 866-70, 466-60, 464-66, 468-70. 

6. Summaries of periodicals (Dissertationes phil- 

ologicae Halenses, xi. 1891; Acta seminarii 
philologici Erlangensis, v. 1891 ; Blatter fiir 
das Bayerische Gymnasialschulwesen, xxvii. 
1890). Class. Rev. 1892; vi. 70, 71, 186, 
137. 

7. Professor Wright is associate editor of the 

"Classical Review" (London and Boston), 
and was literary editor of the * ' American 
Journal of Archaeology," vol. vii. 



PUBLICATIONS EELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 

Being such as haYe come, incidentally, to the notice of the Editor. 



DESCRIPTIVS AND HISTORICAL. 

EUstorj of higher education in Massachusetts. 
By George Gary Bush. Washington. 1891. 
(Bureau of Education. Circular of Information. 
No. 6, 1891. Contributions to American educa- 
tional history. Edited by Herbert B. Adams, 
no. 18.) 

Harvard College, pp. 1-224, 9 plates^ 1 folding map. 

Harvard University. A brief statement of what 
Harvard University is, how it may be entered and 
how its degrees may be obtained. By Frank 
Bolles, Secretary of the University. Second 
annual ed. 1892. Cambridge. 8^. pp. 56. 

The exhibitions at Harvard College founded 
prior to 1800. By Andrew McFarland Davis. 
Reprinted from the N, E. Historical awd Gtneti- 
logiccU Register yfoTjn\y,lS92, Boston. D. Clapp 
& Son. 1892. 8*1 pp. 13. 

Picturesque Harvard. Copyright 1889 by A. E. 
Beckwith, H. U. 1891 and G. T. Voorhees, M. I. T. 

1890. oblong, 30 views. 

Harvard picturesque, oblong, 20 views. 

Harvard. Cambridge. Charles H. Thurston. 

1891. oblong, 32 views. 

Cambridge and vicinity. Newark, N. J. 1892. 
1. 8^. illustr. 

Harvard College, pp. 17-37. Text by George F. Bacon. 

Portraits of the Harvard Faculty. The college 
professors and instructors; the Law School and 
Divinity School professors; the preachers to the 
University ; and a group of eminent ex-professors. 
Compiled by £. A. Jackson, '92, and R. W. Hun- 
ter, '98. Boston. Art Publishing Co. 1892. 
sq. 16*. pp. (56.) 

Tributes to the memory of Rev. Thomas Hill, 
D.D. Bom January 7, 1818, died November 21, 
1891. Portland. 1892. 8*». pp. 65, poi-ir. 

Professor Royce's libel. A public appeal for 
redress to the Corporation and Overseers of Har- 
vard University. By Francis Ellingwood Abbot, 
Ph.D. Boston. Geo. H. Ellis. 1891. 8<'. pp. 48. 

Is not Harvard responsible for the conduct of 
her professors, as well as of her students? A 
public remonstrance addressed to the Board of 
Overseers of Harvard University. By Francis 
Ellingwood Abbot. Boston. Geo. H.Ellis. 1892. 
8^*. pp. 20. 

The Report of the Committee on Government to whicli 
was referred Dr. Abbot's Appeal is given in full on pp. 8, 4. 

Harvard Club of Rhode Island. Constitution 
and by-laws. List of officers and members. Record 
of annual meeting at Newport, July 21, 1891. 
Newport. 1892. 8*». 

The graduate. Nos. 1, 2. Boston. January, 
March, 1892. B". pp. (24.) 



In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Harvard 
memorial poems. New Eng. Mag. June, 1891 ; n. s. 
iv. 476-479, fa^-sims. — Reminiscences of college 
life at Harvard, 1830-33. By A. B. Livermore. 
Univ. Mag. Oct. 1891 ; v. 942-944. — Address before 
the Harvard Club at Seattle, Wash. 9. Oct. 1891. 
By J. Shippen. Seattle Post- Intelligencer, 11 Oct. 
1891 ; also Unitarian, Dec. 1891. — Harvard types. 
Boston Traveller, 1 Nov. 1891. — The poor man 
at Harvard. Noi-ih Am. Rev. Dec. 1891 ; cliii. 
766-768; also Boston Journal, 28 Nov. 1891.— 
The soldier's field. Boston Journal, 16 Dec. 1891. 
— Harvard and the church. By C. C. Everett. 
Harvard Mo. Jan. 1892; xiii. 133-188. —A. B.*s 
in Congress. Boston Advertiser, 2 Jan. 1892. — 
Morals of Harvard College under President Quincy 
and now. By T. W. H. Boston Advertiser, 
8 Jan. 1882. — Harvard, 1820. By A. B. Muzzey. 
Harvard Mo, Feb. 1892; xiii. 185-190. — The 
Jews at Harvard. By Isaac Adler. Jewish Tid- 
ings, 5 Feb. 1892; xi. 20. — President Eliot's 
annual report. Boston Herald, 8 Feb. 1892. — 
Another year at Harvard. Nation, 1 1 Feb. 1892 ; 
liv. 105. — The Dudleian lectures. School and 
College, March, 1892; i. 166-168. — The New 
York Harvard Club. Boston Transcript, 12 March, 
1892. — How the Americans write university his- 
tory. By J. M. 3- Daily Free Press, Aberdeen, 
Scotland, 24 March, 1892. — School, college, and 
library. By T. W. Higginson. Cosmopolitan^ 
May, 1892. — Another glimpse at Harvard Uni- 
versity : the class community. By J. M. B. Daily 
Free Press, Aberdeen, Scotland, 3 May, 1892. 



INSTRUCTION. 

In Periodicals and Newspapers. — Time and 
age in relation to the college curriculum. By 
E. B. Andrews. Educational Rev. Feb. 1891 ; 
i. 133-146. — The Harvard examinations. By 
Wm. Freeland. University Mag. Oct. 1891; v. 
946-948. — Harvard and the public schools. Acad- 
emy, Jan. 1892 ; vi. 684. — The present require- 
ments for admission to Harvard College. By 
James Jay Grvnough. Atlantic Mo. May, 1892 ; 
Ixix. 671-677. — The new department of peda- 
gogy at Harvard University. By Paul Han us. 
Educational Rev. Oct. 1891 ; ii. 262-254. 



UNDERGRADUATE AFFAIRS. 

The new Harvard song book, a collection of the 
latest college songs and glees, sung by the Harvard 
University Glee Club. Compiled by R. T. White- 
house, '91 and Frederick Bruegger, '92. Boston. 
Oliver Ditson Co. 1891. 8^ pp. 92 

The history of John the orange-man. By Henry 
Fielding. Boston. 1892. sq. 16''. pp. 62, 8 j^to^ej. 



34 



PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY. 



In Periodicals and New8pai>er8. — Harvard's 
bloody Monday. Boston Transcript, 6 Oct. 1891. 
— Foot-ball at Harvard. No. Am. Rev. Dec. 

1891. — Letter from William Lloyd Garrison on 
the A.K.E. society. Boston Herald, 24 Dec. 1891 ; 
Advertiser, Post, etc. 25 Dec. 1891. — Harvard 
and the A.K.E. Letter from Barrett Wendell. 
Bosion Heraid, 26 Dec. 1891. — A Harvard Over- 
seer on the ** Dickey " Club. Letter from Henry 
W. Putnam. Boston Transcript, 2 Jan. 1892. — 
A Harvard professor on the ** Dickey " question. 
Letter from A. S. Hill. Ibid. 4 Jan. 1892. — The 
A.K.E. society at Harvard. Harper's Weekly, 
9 Jan. 1892; xxxvi. 27, 44, 45, illustr. -- Editorial 
articles on the A.K.E. Boston Advertiser, 25, 26 
Dec. 1891 ; 2, 12 Jan. 1892 ; Herald, 25, 27 Dec. 
1891; Journal, 25 Dec. 1891, 14 Jan. 1892; Post, 
25, 26, 28 Dec. 1892, 13 Jan. 1892 ; Transcript, 
1 Jan. 1892. Numerous other articles on the 
A.K.E in the Boston papers, 25 Dec. 1891, 14 Jan. 

1892. — The Foxcroft Club. Bosion Sunday 
Olohe, 27 Dec. 1891. — Clubs and club life at 
Harvard. New Eng. Mag. March, 1892. — Har- 
vard oddities. Boston Journal,, 4 Feb. 1892. — 
Morals at Harvard. N. Y. Evening Post, 
8 Feb. 1892. — Harvard cranks. Boston Jour- 
nal, 23 March, 1892. — The training of the Harvard 
intercollegiate team of 1891. By John Corbin. 
Outing, May, 1892; xx. 141-148. — Dormitory 
life at Harvard. Boston Globe, 6 June, 1892. 



DEPARTMENTS. 

The Hunnewell library at the Arnold Arboretum. 
Boston Herald, 14 Dec. 1891, t7/MJ<r. — The 
Arnold Arboretum. Boston Traveller, 25 Jan. 
1892. — The Arnold Arboretum. N. Y. Sun, 
26 June, 1892. 

The new library building. By C. H. Moore. 
Harvard Mo, May, 1892; xiv. 126-128. 

Harvard College Observatory astronomical ex- 
pedition to Peru. By Mrs. M. Fleming. Publ. 
Astron. Soc. Pacific, iv. no. 22, 58-62. — The 
Peruvian station. Boston Transcript, 3 Sept. 
1892. 

The four years course at the Harvard Medical 
School. By R. H. Fitz. Bosion Med. and Surg. 
Journ. 16 June, 1892 ; cxxvi. 599-605. — Medical 
education and the four years course. Extracts 
from addresses at the annual dinner of the Harvard 
Medical School Alumni Assoc. Bosion Med. and 
Surg. Journ. 14 July, 1892; cxxvii. 33-39. 

The engineering schools of the United States: 
The Lawrence Scientific School. Engineering 
News, 28 April, 5, 19 May, 1892. 

Catalogo de los objetos etnol6gicos y arqueo- 
16gicos exhibidos por la expedici6n Hemenway. 
Madrid. 1892. 8*1 pp. 115. 

Exhibicidn del Museo Feabody, pp. 75, 76. 



Xibtat? of t>a^'ar^ innlvetBlts. 

Bibliographical Contributions 

EDITED BY JUSTIN WINSOR. 

LIBRARIAV. 

^STo. 48. 




A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

OK THK 

HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

BV 

STEPHEN B. WEEKS, Ph.D. 



CAMBRIDGE, MASS. : 

lesutti bg tljt UibTarg of l^artiarli ISnibneftE. 

1895. 



Already issued or in preparation: 



[Some of these Contributions arc out of print.] 



VOL. I. 



I. Bdwars S. Holden. Indez-Ottalogue oI Books and 
Memoirs on the Transits of Mercury. 

a. Justin WxNSOR. Shakespeare's Poems : a Bibliographj 
of the Earlier Editions. 

^ Cmarlks Eliot Norton. Principal books relating^ to 
the Life and Works of Michelangelo, with Notes. 

4. Justin Winsor. Piet-.is et Gratulatio. An Inquiry 

into the authorship of the several pieces. 

5. List of Apparatus in different Laboratories of the 

United States, available for Scientific Researches 
involving Accurate Measurements. 

6. Thb Collection op Books and Autographs, be. 

queathed to Harvard College Library, by the Honor- 
able Charles Sumner. 

7. William C. Lanb. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. Pt I. 

8. Calendar of the Arthur Lee Manuscripts in Harvard 

College Library. 

9. George Lincoln Goodale. The Floras of different 

countries. 

10. Justin Winsor. Halliwelliana: a Bibliography of the 
Publications of James Orchard HalliweU-Phillipps. 



II. Samuel H. Scudoer. The Sntomological Librartes 
of the United Sutes. 

is. First List op the Publications of Harrard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1870-1880. 

13. Samuel H. Scudder. A Bibliography of Fossil 

Insects. 

14. William H. Tillinorast. Notes on the Historical 

Hydrography of the Handkerchief Shoal in the 
Bahamas. 

15. J. D. Whitney. List of American Authors in Geology 

and Palaeontology. 

16. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Maps in 

Petermann's Geographische Mittbeilnngen. iS55~ 

18S1. 

17. Richard Bliss. Classified Index to the Miqis in the 

Royal Geographical Sode^s Publications. iS^o- 

1883. 

18. Justin Winsor. The Bibliography of Ptolemy's 

Geography. 

19. Justin Winsor. The Kohl Collection of Early Maps. 

so. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference 
Lists, no. I. 1884-188$. 






VOL. II. 



Si. Second List op the Publications of Harvard Uni- 
versity and its Officers. 1880-1885. 

as. Justin Winsor. Calendar of the Sparks Manuscripts 
in Harvard College Library. 

33. William H. Tillinohast. lliird List of the Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and iu Officers. i88i5* 
1886. 

S4« William C. Lane. Index to Recent Reference I^iats, 
no. a. iS^-1886. 

S5. W. G. Fablow and William Tbbleabe. Ust of 
Works on North American FungL 

a6. William C. Lane. The Carlyle Collection. 

37. Andrew McF. Davis. A few notea on the Records 

of Harvard College. 
s8. William H. Tillinohast. Fourth List of Publlca. 

tk»s of Harvard Univeraity and its Officers. 18S6- 

1887. 



•9. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference Usta, 
no. 3. 1SS7. 

30. Facsimile nf the autograph of Shelley*s poem **To a 

Skylark p** witli notea. 

31. W. G. Faklow. Supplemental List of Works on 

North American Fungi. 

3s. H. C. Badger. Mathematical Theses, i78»-iS39. 

33. William H. Tillinohast. Fifth list of Pubhcaiions 

of Harvard Univeraity and its Officers. 1887-1888. 

34. William C. Lane. The Dante Collections in the 

Harvard College and Boston Public Libraries. 

35. George E. Woodbbrry. Notes on the ms. of Shelley 

in the Harvard College Library. 

36. William C. Lanb. The Treat Collection on Ritu- 

alism and Doctrinal Theology. 

37. Frane Wettenkampp. Bibliography of Hogarth. 



VOL. III. 



38. William H. Tillinohast. Sixth List of Publications 

of Harvard University and its Officers. 1888-1889. 

39. Alprxd C. Potter. Bibliography of Beaumont and 

Fletcher. 

40. William C. Lanb. Index to Recent Reference Lists, 

no. 4. 1890. 

41. William H. Tillingh AST. Seventh List of Publica- 

tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1889- 
189a 
4a. William H. Tillinohast. The Orators and Poets 
of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Massachusetts. 

43. Charles Gross. A Classified Ust of Books relating 
to British Municipal History. 



44 



45 



William H. Tillinghast. Eighth List of Publica- 
tions of Harvard University and its Officers. 1890- 
1891. 

William C. Lane and Charles K. Bolton. Notes 
on Special Collections in American libraries. 
46. The Class of i8a8, with a list of the publications ol 
its members. 

William H. Tillinghast. Ninth list of Publications 
of Harvard University and its Officers. 1891-1899. 

Stephen B. Webks. A Bibliography of the Historical 
Literature of North Carolina. 

M. H. Morgan. A Bibliogniphy of Persius. 

Andrew McF. Davis. An Analysis of the Karly 
Records of Harvard College, 163V1750. 



47. 

48. 

49- 
SO* 



A BIBLIOGRAPHY 



OF THK 



HISTORICAL LrrERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Br 



STEPHEN B. WEEKS, Pii.D. (Johns Hoi-kins Univ.). 



\* The following list can be considered as nothing more than a preliminar)* catalogue to ser^-c as a basis for Aitnre 
work toward a Aill and complete Bibliography of the Historical Literature of North Carolina. The collections of the State 
In Raleigh, of the University at Chapel Hill, of Trinity College, and Wake Forest College, of the Johns Hopkins University, 
the Maryland Historical Society, and the Peabody Institute of Baltimore, have been examined, besides numerous private 
collections. The work, begun in 1887, has been done at odd moments and under difficulties, for complete sets of magazines, 
like the ybrth Cktroiina Unictrtlty Jiaga»ine, Our LMng and Our J>ead, Land H'e Love, and South Atlantic, which contain 
moch material on our hktory, are very rare and almost impossible to obtain. Tliere is, moreover, no large collection of the 
pamphlets and shorter papers on our history in existence. Some titles have been taken Arom book catalogues, but whenever 
possible the collation has been from the book itself. 



AdAir, James. The hiBtoiy of the American 
Indians ; particularly those nations adjoining to the 
Missisippi [«tV], East and West Florida, Georgia, 
Sonth and North Carolina, and Virginia : contain- 
ing an account ot their origin, language, manners, 
religious and civil customs, laws, form of govern- 
ment, punishments, conduct in war and domestic 
life, their habits, diet, agriculture, manufactures, 
diseases and method of cure, and other particulars, 
sufficient to render it a complete Indian system. 
With observations on former historians, the con- 
duct of our colony govi>rnors, superintendents, 
missionaries, &c. Also an appendix, containing a 
description of the Floridas and the Missisippi [«tV] 
lands, with their productions — The benefits of 
colonizing Georgiana, and civilizing the Indians — 
And the way to make all the colonies more valu- 
able to the mother country. With a new map of 
the country referred to in the history. By James 
Adair, Esquire, a trader with the Indians, ami 
resident in their country for forty years. London : 
Printed for Edward and Charles Dilly, in the 
Poultry. MDCCLXXV. 4". pp. 4C4. Map. 

A German edition appeared at Breslau, 1782, 8* ; in E. King's 
Antiquities of Mexico, vol. 8, London, 1848, f*. — Pillinu, 
Bibliography of the Iroquoian Languages. 

Adair points out various customs of the Indians having a 
striking resemblance to those of the Jews; and the grcnt 
object of his work appears to be to prove that the aborigines 
of America are descended from that race. Some dlstrtiKt 
seems to have fallen upon his statements, although he him> 
self says that his account i^ neither disfigured by fable nor 
prejudice. — Rich. 



I, Herbert Baxter (1850-), Ph.D., LL.D., 
Pfofessor of American and Institutional History, 
Johns Hopkins University, Editor. Contributions 
to Amerienn Kihicational History. See Smith, 
C. L. 

Editor, Jolms Hopkins University Studies 

in Historical nnd Political Science. See Webks, 
Stephen B. 

Review of Draper's ** King*s Mountain and 

its Heroes." The Nation, Dec. 1, 1861. 

AllMmArle Section of North Carolina, trav- 
ersed bv the Norfolk & Southern Railroad. . New 
York : John C. lUnkin. 1884. 8*1 pp. 81. Map, 

Prepared for North Carolina £xpo9irion of 1B84, by F. E. 
Vaughun. 

The Norfolk & Southern Railroad and its 

commercial tributaries, by Frank A. Heywood. 
Norfolk: Landmark. 1801. 8". pp. 64, Map, 
illustrations. 

Albemarle, The career of tlie Confederate 
ram. Century, 1888, xxxvi. 420-440. 

Ilcr construction and service, by her builder, Gilbert 
Elliott; ^the •'AllM-mftrlc" and the *• Sa«sarus," Edwanl 
Iloldcn; the d(>i<triictiun of the AlbemHrle, W. B. Cii^hing; 
note by captuin of the AlbcmHrle, A. F. Warloy ; iUuntratioHM 
and map*. 

Albert, The New Hotel, New Bern, N. C. 1887. 
8". pp. 32. Two illustrations. 

A hotel advertisement, but containin;; ttoine bits of lociil 
lii«tory. 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



AlbrlsHt, John 0. A sketch of the senior 
reserves of Alamance county. Our Living and 
Our Dead, 1874-76, i. 134-187. 

Alderman, Edwin Anderson. Address at the 
Guilford Battle Ground. Greensboro, N. C. : C. F. 
Thomas. 1893. B"*. pp. 10. 

Delirered 15 Oct. 1802, at the dedication of the monuineiit 
to the Maryland soldiers. 



% S. C. An historical* address de- 
livered at the dedication of Back Creek church, 
21 March, 1857. Salisbury : Herald office. 18.57. 
8". pp. 20. 

Amerloan £xp(Mitlon« Boston, Catalogue of 
the North Carolina exhibit at. Raleigh. 1884. 
8". pp. 63. 

Anderson, George Burgwyn, (1881-1862), 
Brig. Gen. C.S.A. See Gales, Seaton. 

Anderson, Micajah. His life, by himself. 
Written from dictation by Benj. Johnson, J. P. 
(colored) of Logsboro' Township, Edgecombe 
County. Tarborough. 1870. 8*1 

This is a perfectly natural, unadorned, and unconnected 
narrative of the religious experience and domestic troubles 
of an Edgecombe Kehukee Baptist of the more ignorant type. 

Anderson, Walker (d. 1857), LL,D,, Chief 
Justice of Florida, Oration on the life and char- 
acter of Joseph Caldwell. Raleigh. 1835. 8**, 
pp. 48. 

Delivered at Chapel Hill in 1835. 

Archdale, John, Governor of Carolina, A 
new description of that fertile and pleasant prov- 
ince of Carolina, with a brief account of its dis- 
covery, settling, and the government thereof to' 
this time, with several remarkable passages of 
divine providence, during my time. London. 
1707. 4'. pp. 40. 

It opens with a homily on divine providence, deals almost 
exclusively with South Carolina, and does not state expressly 
that the author visited North Carolina. Reprinted in Charles- 
ton, 18*22, and included in Carroll's OoUeciion*, New York, 
1836. 

and some of his descendants. See Wkeks, 



Stephen B. 

A[8]i], T.[homa8], Oent. Carolina; or a de- 
scription of the present state of that country and 
the natural excellences thereof. London. 1682. 

Ash was clerk on board the '* Richmond," which was sent 
out in 1680, with instructions to inquire iitto the state of the 
countr)', and returned in 1682. This, like the work of Samuel 
Wilson, puhli^hed the same year, is a glowing description of 
the soil, climate, and productions of Carolina. He consid- 
ers it a " rich jewel, which it has pleased God to add to tlie 
crown of his king." It is reprinted in Carroll's Hintorical 
Collfction»f vol. ii. 

Ashe Family of North Carolina. See 
Wheeler, John II. 



John (1720-1781), Revolutionary Gen- 
eral. Sketch of, in a letter from A. M. Hooper 
addressed to Hon. John B. Ashe. JV. C, Univ, 
mag., 1854, ill. 201-208. 

See a more extended memoir by A. M. Hooper and 6. J. 
McRee (chiefly by the former), Ibid. 866-876. Privately 
printed, 1854. 

Ashe, Samuel Acourt (1840-), Editor. The 

battle of Moore's Creek. Wilmington Journal, 

Feb. 1876. 
Centennial address, 1876. 

Oration on Sir Walter Raleigh. Proceed- 
ings North Carolina Press Association, 1884, S*, 
pp. 13-20. 

A chapter of North Carolina histoiy 

[proceedings at Brunswick, Feb. 1766]. Raleigh 
(N. C.) News and Observer, Dec. 16 and 17, 
1885. 

A chapter of North Carolina history re- 
vised. /&t<2. 31 Dec. 1886; reprinted. 8*. pp.10. 

Our own pirates — Blackbeard and Bonnet. 

Ibid. June, 1887. 

The adoption of the Federal Constitution. 

Ibid. 16 Aug. 1887. 

The seven years' strife over unequal rep- 
resentation. Ibid. 7 Sept. 1887. 

North Carolina's delay in adopting the 

constitution. Ibid. 11 Sept. 1887. 

—^ North Carolina's attitude as to the rafcifl- 
cation of the constitution. Fayetteville Observer, 
Nov. 1889. 

Delivered at the Fayetteville centennial, Xot. SI, 1889. 

The special tax bonds. 

The charge at Gettysburg. Reprinted 

from News and Observer. [Raleigh.] 8^. pp. 15. 

An historical review of North Carolina. 

Introduction to " Eminent and representative men of the 

Carol inas," ii. Madison, Wis. 1892. See Brant and 
Fuller. 

AabeTille, N. C. n. p. 1886. 121 pp. 56. 
Illustraied, 

A pamphlet intended to present the advantages, resources, 
possibilities, and attractions of AsheTllle. 

Album of scenery of, and surrounding sec- 
tions of country. New York : Adolph Wittemann. 
N. D. 24**. [Copyright 1887.] 

Auembly Sketeh Book. Session 1877. 
Raleigh. 1877. 8"*. pp. 45. 

Culled for this year " Legislative Recortl, vol. 1. no. 1,** of 
which no more were published. Gives titles of acts passed 
a< well as sketches. Prepared by R. A. Shotwelland Kai. 
II. Atkinson. 

Session 1879. Raleigh. 1879. 8*. pp. 162. 

Session 1883. Raleigh. 1883. 81 pp. 4. 

83. 

Session 1885. Raleigh. 1885. 81 pp. 48. 

Biographical slietches of legislators. Books for 1879, 1883, 

1885, prepared by J. S. Tomlinson. 

Session 1887. Raleigh. 1887. 81 pp. 48. 

Session 1893. Raleigh. 1898. 121 pp. 184, 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OP NORTH CAROLINA. 



L« George F. Sketch of Nicholas Mar- 
cellas Hentz. Journal EUsha MiteheU Seientifie 
Society f 1887, iv. pt. 1, pp. 13-16. 

Preliminarj catalogae of the birds of 

North Carolina, with notes on some of the species. 
Ibid, pt. 2, pp. 44-87. 

AtUnaon, Joseph M. Address before Histori- 
cal Society of North Carolina. If. C. Unin, mag., 
1856, T. 885-408. 

On early settlements In Xorth Carolina. 

AtUnMia, Thomas (1807-1881), />./>., LL.J),, 
Prot Epii, Bp. of X, C. Sermon commemoratiYe 
of ; portrait. See Lay, Henry C. 

Editorial on death of. South Atlantic, 

1880-^1, Ti. 497-606. 

ATerasborOf Battle of. Southern Historical 
Society Papers, Tii. ; Gen. William 6. Taliaferro's 
report of, pp. 31-34 ; Captain Graham Daves* cor- 
rection, 125-126; General Taliaferro's letter of 
explanation, 195. See McCluro, A. C. 

ATeiy* Alfonso Calhoun (1885-), LL.D., Jus- 
tice Supreme Ct., N. C. Sketcli of. See Smith's 
Western North Carolina. 

Sketch of Burke connty, N. C Smith's 

Western North Carolina^ pp. 82-121. 

First pnbliobed in Morganton Herald, June, July, Aug., 
1890. 

Atmt, Isaac Erwin (1828-1863), Col. C S. A. 
Sketch of. N. C. Univ. Mag., 1890-91, x. 89-93. 
See also Smith's Western Nor^h Carolina for same 
sketch. 

Atmt, Waightstill (1745-1821). Biographical 
sketch of, with illustrative mss. N. (7. Univ. mag,, 
1855, iv. 242-264. 

Atmt, William Waightstill (1816-1864), M. C. 
{Confederate). Address before literary societies 
of the University of North Carolina, June 4, 1861. 
Raleigh; W. W. Holden. 1861. S*. pp. 23. 

On progress and position of North Carolina^ 

ATmrjr* William Bailey, Capt. U. S. A. The 
marine artillery with the Burnside expedition, and 
the battle of Camden, N. C. Providence. 1880. 
sm. 4°. Personal Narratives of the Soldiers' and 
Sailors* Historical Society of Rhode Island, series 
2, no. 4. 

Badser, George Edmund (1795-1866), LL.J)., 
Sec. Navy, U. S. Senator. Sketch of, by William 
Eaton. Land We Lope, 1866, i. 385-338. 

Social reminiscences of. Ibid, 282-286. 

Discourse on the life and character of. 

See Graham, William A. 

Bailey, Christopher Thomas (1835-), D.D., 
Editor. North Carolina Baptist Almanac. Raleigh. 
1882, to date. 8**. 

Contains biographical sketches of Baptist ministers and 
laymen. 



BaUey, William H. (1831-), LL.D. Col. Ben- 
jamin Hill. N. C Univ. mag., 1889-90, ix. 41-62 ; 
corrections to, 143. 

State of religion in the province of North 

Carolina. Ibid. 169-188. 

Provincial reminiscences. Ibid, 1890-91, 

X. 31-43. 



I, Donald William (1841-1892). History 
of Edenton street Sunday school of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church South, Raleigh, N. C, with per- 
sonal sketches and notices of the introduction 
of the Sunday school work in Raleigh. Raleigh, 
N. C. : Edwards, Broughton & Co. 1881. 24'*. 
pp. 50. 



U George (1800-1891). History of the 
United States. 

The sections relating to the settlement and growth of 
North Carolina are very Aill and satisfactory. 



I, James. A centennial historical address, 
delivered before the Presbytery of Fayettevillc, at 
the Bluff Church, 18 October, 1868. Fayetteville : 
Presbyterian office. 1858. 8*1 pp. 24. 

Address on border warfare in North 

Carolina during the Revolution. Fayetteville. 
1859. 

Sketch of James C. Dobbin. N. C. Univ. 

mag., 1859-60, ix. 321-327. 



•, Daniel Moreau (1806-1873), M.C., 
Minister to Spain. Sketch of. Livingstones Bio- 
graphical mag. [e. 1850], i. 51, portrait. 



I9r^ Rufus (1821-), Brig. Gen. C. S. A. 
Cavalry sketches and the cavalry fight at Cham- 
berlain*s Run. Our Living and Our Dead, 1876, 
iii. 737-744; also in Land We Love, 1867-68, 
iv. 1-6. 

Early German settlements in eastern Ca- 
barrus county. Wheeler's Reminiscences and Me- 
moirs of North Carolina, xxxix.-xlviii. ; also in 
N. C. Univ. mag., 1883-84, iii. 276-289; also 
printed separately, 8<*, pp. 10. 



% John (1749-1831). Early history of John / 
Barr, written by himself, with a sketch of his char- 
acter by S. M. Andrews. Philadelphia : Presby- 
terian Board of Publication. 1852. 24°. pp. 80. 

Contains a few incidental pictares of society and culture 
in Bowaa county and adjoining sections, but is mo»tIy a 
history of the inner life. 



William (1739-1823). Sketch of 
John (1699-1777) and William Bartram. Popular 
Science Monthly, 1892, xl. 827-839. 

This article mentions a Journal of a trip made through the 
Carolinas in 1760 and sent to England in 17M. A portrait of 
William Bartram appeared In the number for Sept. 1892. 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



William. Travels through North 
4 South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida, 
the Cherokee coontrj, the eztensire territories of 
the Muscogulges, or Creek confederacy, and the 
country of the Chactaws ; containing an account 
of the soil and natural productions of those 
regions, together with observations on the manners 
of the Indians. Philadelphia : James & Johnson. 
MDCCXCI. 8*. pp. xxziy. 622. Copper-platea, 

English editions: London, 1792, 1794. 

Dublin, 1798. ' 

A German edition: William Bartraro's 

Reisen durch Nord- und Sud-Karolina, *** Aus dem 
Englischen. Mit erliiutemden anmerkungen ron 
E. A. W. Zimmermann, Hofrath und Professor in 
Braunschweig. Berlin. 1798. sm. 8®. pp. 409. 

A French edition : Voyage dans les parties 

Bud de TAm^rique septentrionale ; savoir: les 
Carolines septentrionale et m^ridionale, *** trad, 
de I'angl. par P. V. Benoist. Paris. An YII 
[1799]. 2 Tols. W, pp. 457, map, 486. 

Another edition : An IX [1801] Qf. Filling's Bibliography 
o/UU Iroquoian Langtuxg§$. 



U A. S. Housekeeping in North Caro- 
lina. Lipp\ncott*» magazine t 1881, zzyiii. 205. 



U John Spencer, A»B, Some phases of 
early plantation life in North Carolina. Triniiy 
(y. C) Archive, 1892-93, vi. 98-108. 

— — A North Carolina monastery. Mag» of 
Amer. ffist,, 1898, xxix. 131-185. 

Battle, Jeremiah. The county of Edgecombe 
in 1810. Reprinted in N. C. Uhi^, mag., 1860-61, 
z. 456-472 ; in Our Living and Our Dead, 1874-75, 
i. 145-158. 

Battle, Kemp Plummer (1831-), LL.D., Pru. 
Univ, of N, (7. and Prof of history there. History 
of Christ Church. Raleigh : Raleigh Daily Sentinel. 

- History of the counties of North Carolina. 
Not same as the '* IZames of the counties" below. 

Sketches of the early history of the city of 

Raleigh. Raleigh : Raleigh y^ews. 1877. 8*. pp. 71. 

Centennial address, Jnly 4, 1876, dellrered at request of 
board of aldermen. 

Address before alumni association of 

Unir. of North Carolina, Jan 26, 1881. Pto- 
ceedinge Alumni Association. Raleigh : Edwards, 
Broughton & Co. 1881. 8''. pp. 12-32. 

Benjamin Smith, soldier, statesman, phil- 
anthropist, y. C. Univ. mag., 1882, i. 3-5. 

Address on the history of the buildings of 

the University of North Carolina. Ibid. 1883-84, 
iii. 75-89. 

Reprinted, pp. 15; also in Wheeler's Reminitceneei, p. 844. 

Sketch of Senator Z. B. Vance. Ibid. 

l«8C-87, vi. 257-2G2, portrait. 



Battle, Kemp Plummer, LL. D. Hinton James, 
first student of the University. Ibid. 1887-^, 
vU. 1-6. 

George Horton, slave poet. Ibid. 229-2S2. 

Sketch of R. P. Dick. JV: C. Univ. mag., 

1888-39. viU. 166-175, portrait. 

''— The names of the counties of North Caro- 
lina and the history involved in them. Winston, 
N. C. : WUliam A. Blair. 1888. 12**. pp. 38. 

First published in the SchoolUacher (now The Southern 
Educator), for January, February, and March, 1387. 

Sketches of the history of the University 

of North Carolina. 1889. 8*. pp. 63. 

An address on the history of the Supreme 

Court [of N. C. ] . Raleigh : Edwards & Broughton. 
1889. 8®. pp. 76. 

Delirered in the hail of the Houss of ReprescntatiTes, 
February 4th, 1889, at the request of the members of the 
court and of the bar, in commemotation of tlie first occu> 
pancy by the court of the new sapreme court building, 
Marcli 6th, 1888. First printed a* an appendix to volume 
108 of the Reports of the Supremf Court of North Carolina, 
and reprinted. 

Reasons for North Cardinals delay in rati- 
fying the constitution. Fayetteville Observer, 
Nov. — , 1889. 

- Address on the life and services of Briga- 
dier General Jethro Supiner, at the battle ground 
of Guilford Court Housf, July 4th, 1891. Greens- 
horo : Reece & Elam. 1891. 8®. pp.51. 

The same article condensed in Jfagaaine qf Amerieam 
Bintory, Dec. 1891, xzvi. 415-438. 

Colonial Uymen in North Carolina. 

Cheshire's Church History in Norih Carolina, 
pp. 91-155. 

Battle, Richard Henry (1885-). Memoir of 
Rev. Charles Phillips, D.D., LL.D. JV. C. Univ. 
mag., 1890-91, x. \-^, portrait. 

BattU, William Horn (1802-1879), LL.D., 
Justice Supreme Ct. of N. C. Sketch of; portrait. 
Livingston's Biographical magazine [e. 1850], 
ii. 771-778 ; reprinted. 

Obituaries, funeral, and proceedings of 

the har in memory of. Raleigh, N. C. : Uszell k 
Wiley. 1879. 8«. pp. 82. PoHrait. 

Remarks by Hon. Joseph B. Batchelar 

and Chief Justice Merrimon at the presentation of 
the portrait of, to the Supreme Court of North 
Carolina. Raleigh: Edwurds & Broughton. 1892. 
8®. pp. 20. 

The hest sicetch of Judge Battle published. 

Address on the life and character of 

William Gaston. N. C. Univ. mag., 1844, i. 
49-59. 

Memoir of Leonard Henderson. Ibid. 

1859-60, iz. 198^202. 



HISTOBICAL LITERATUBB Or WOUTH CAROLINA. 



Battle, William Horn, LL,D, Memoir of 
Chief Jastice John Lonia Taylor. Ibid. 1859-60, 
iz. 885-B94. 

Jndge Haywood and hif early contempo- 
raries at the bar. Ihid. 1860-61, z. 204-216. 

-^— Judge Gaston as a literary man. Ihid. 
1860-61, z. 257-269. 

-— » Address before literary societies of Uni- 
Tenity of North Carolina, June 1, 1865. Raleigh : 
William B. Smith 4 Co. 1866. V, pp. 19. 

On eariy history of Unlyenity. 

'— A Report of the proceedings In the Habeas 
Corpus Cases, on the petition of Adolphns O. 
Moore and others, from the county of Alamance, 
and of John Kerr and others, from the county of 
Caswell, before the Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of North Carolina at chambers ; and in the 
cases of the same petitioners before the district 
judge of the United States, for the district of 
North Carolina, in the district court at Salisbury, 
and afterward at Raleigh ; and also. In the case of 
Lieut. Colonel Burgen, before the United States 
circuit judge, for the fourth circuit, at chambers, 
hi the district of North Carolina. Raleigh : Nich- 
ols k Gorman. 1870. 8*. pp. 142. 

Digest North Carolina Supreme Court 

decisions, toI. iii. 

Contains lists of supreme and superior court judges, 
attorneys general, and supreme court reporters, 1776-1860. 

Battia, William James (1870-), T%.D, A vin- 
dication of the settlers of North Carolina. iV. C. 
Univ, mag,, 1887-88, vii. 258-261. 

A commencement oration. 

Editor. Catalogueof the members of the 

Dialectic Society instituted in the University of 
North Carolina, June 8, 1795, together with his- 
torical slsetches. [Baltimore : Isaac Friedenwald.] 
1890. B^. 

Sketches, pp. 6-16. Catalogue, pp. 47-108. Engrarlng of 
society hall. 



L, Thomas Francis (1828-). Sec. SiaU, 
U. S. Address at the celebration of the Mecklen- 
burg Declaration of Independence ; reprinted firom 
Charlotte Daily Ohaerver. 1882. 8''. pp. 15. 
*' On the 20th, or on the 81st of May, 1776.'* 

Boaaltt7« W. F. The Forty-eighth North Caro- 
lina troops at Sharpsburg. Ow Living and Our 
Dead, 1874-75, i. 880. 



r, John D., Jr. Sketch of (}en. Robert 
Howe. [Wilmington, N. C. e. 1879.] 

B«iiadiet, David. General history of the 
Baptist denomination in America. 1848, 1850, etc. 
8» 

North Carolina, pp. 681-700; reprinted In (M. Bee. of 
N. O., 1887, V. 1168-119S. 



BaiUMtt, Daniel K. (1830~), Bapi. minister. 
Chronology of North Carolina, showing when the 
most remarkable events connected with her history 
took place, from the year 1584 to the present time, 
with explanatory notes. New York: James M. 
Edney. 1858. 12"*. pp. 144. 

Qives lists of the governors. Judges of the superior and 
supreme courts, speakers of the bouse of commons and of 
senate, attorneys general, secretaries of state, treasurers, 
comptrollers, senators and representatiTCS, with a list of the 
newspapers published in 1868. 

B«iia«tt, Rlsden Tyler (1840-). Biographical 
sketch of Atlas Jones Dargan. Wadesboro Intel' 
ligeneer, July 19, 26, Aug. 1, 1888. 

Biographical sketch of Brig. Oen. Junius 

Daniel. Southern Historical Society Papers, 
1890, xviii. 840-849; condensed in Raleigh News 
and Observer, May — , 1888. 



I, John (1756-1828). Retrospections 

of America, 1797-1811. New York : Harper 4 

Brothers. 1887. 12^". 

The Carolinas, chap. ix. pp. 20^-288 ; manners and customs ; 
amusing but not very reliable. 



L, G. D. (1827-), Luth. minister. 
History of the German settlements and of the 
Lutheran Church In North and South Carolina, 
from the earliest period of the colonization of the 
Dutch, German, and Swiss settlers to the close of 
the first half of tlie present century. Philadelphia : 
Lutheran Book Store. 1872. 12"*. pp. 557. 

The author is a German by birth and enters fUlly into the 
spirit of his work. It is based on original sources, and the 
search for materials was exhaustive. Every colony of Qer- 
nuins in the Carolinas was traced to its origin; missionary 
journals, found to hare been sent by the first ministers in 
North Carolina to Germany and published there, but no 
longer known to exist, were sought for and obtidned in 
Europe; church records. State records, minutes of sjnods 
and private journals were constantly used. 

The first twenty years of the history of 

St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Wilmlng* 
ton, N. C. Wilmington, N. C. : S. G. Hall. 1879. 
8*. pp. 72. 

Bathaay Oaataii»lal. See Johkstom, F. H. 



I, Joseph (1776-1844), Pastor of Baptist 

Church at Skewarkey. A concise history of the 

Kehukee Baptist Association, from its original rise 

to the present time. Printed and published by 

George Howard, office of the Tarborough (N. C.) 

Free Preaa. 1884. 12*1 pp. 297. 

This Is a continuation of the history of Elders Burkitt and 
Bead [q. v.] and part I. reproduces their work except the 
history of the churches. Part II. k a continuation to 1884, 
with a history of the churches then in the association. 



Oscar W. (1852-) \_pseudonym, 
David Dodge]. Free negroes of North Carolina. 
Atlantic Monthly, Jan. 1886, Ivii. 20. 

— Domestic economy in the Confederacy* 
Ibid. Aug. 1886, IviU. 229. 



8 



raSTORICAIi UTERATUBE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Blaokiudl, Oscar W. The care dwellers of 
the Confederacy. Ibid. Oct. 1891, Ixviii. 6U. 

Home scenes at the fall of the Confed- 
eracy. Ibid. May, 1892, Ixiz. 661. 

A word for winter in North Carolina. 

Outing, March, 1891 ; xvii. 452. 

The runaway negro. Kate Field's Washr 

ingion, Oct. 12, 1892. 

Blakel«7« Johnston (1781-1814), Ca^t. XJ. S. 
sloop of war '* Wasp." Biographical sketch of. 
See JoHKsoN, Joseph, M.D. 

Blome, Richard. The present state of His 
Majesties isles and territories in America, viz. : 
Jamaica, Barbadoes . . . New Jersey, Pensilvania, 
Carolina, Virginia, New England, Maryland, New 
York, &c., &c. With new maps of erery place. 
London. 1687. 

Carolina, pp. 160-182, map, which k reproduced in the 
Nar. and Orit. Hist. America, y. 841. lliere were later 
editions in 1688 and 1697. 

Description of the island of Jamaica, with 

the other isles and territories in America. London. 
1678. 

Has a " General map of Carolina." 

Blonnt, William (1749-1800), Gov. of Tenn. 
Account of life and services of; portrait. See 
Wright, Marcus J. 

Bond, W. R., Capi. C. S. A. PickeU or Fetti- 

grew? An historical essay. Weldon, N. C. : Hall 

& Sledge. [1888.] S^l pp. 40. 

Claims the honors of the assault the third day at GetQrs- 
bnrg for Pettifp-ew's North Carolinians against Pickett's 
Virginians. 

Bojle, E. Mountain slopes and rirer banks of 
North Carolina. Overland Monthly, May, 1883, 
N. 8., i. 536. 



J, Thomas (1810-1872), Gov. of JV. C. 
Sketch of ; portrait. See Cowpsb, Pulaski. 



I, Lawrence O'Bryan (1820-1862), Brig. 
Gen. C. S. A. Oration on the life of; portrait. 
See HuoHES, John. 

Brant and Fnller, Compilers. Cyclopaedia 
of eminent and representative men of the Carolinas 
of the nineteenth century. Madison, Wis. : Brant 
& Fuller. 1892. 4*». 

Vol. i. South Carolina. 

Vol. ii. North Carolina. Preliminary, pp. riii.; historical 
sketch by S. A. Ashe, pp. 17-37; biographical sketches, 
38-661; 464 tketches, W portraits. 

Willie thi9 book is largely of the ** pay and go in " type, 
there is much to recommend it. Many of the engravings are 
excellent, and it really covers the whole history of North 
Carolina. Many of the sketches of the earUer men are the 
work of Capt. 8. A. Ashe, who undertook the task largely 
because of the opportunity licre offered to preserve their 
memor}'. 



»w«r, Fisk P. (d. 1890). Memoir of Darid 
L. Swain. Nl E. Historic and Genealogical Reg- 
ister, Oct. 1870, xxiv. 849-358, portrait. Re- 
printed, pp. 8. 
Poor and unreliable. 

Bziekall, John, M.D. Sketch of. See Wsbks, 
Stephen B. 

The Natural History of North-Carolina. 

With an account of the trade, manners, and customs 
of the christian and Indian inhabitants. Illustrated 
with copper plates, whereon are curiously en- 
graved the map of the country, several strange 
beasts, birds, fishes, snakes, insects, trees, and 
plants, &c. Dublin : James Carson. 1787. 8®. 

Title, 1 1.; prefisce, iii.-vi; subscribers, vii.-zv.; Natural 
Histoxy, 1-408; republished with new title-page in 174S. 

"An almost exact verbal transcript of Lawson's History, 
without acknowledgement on the part of the author, or even 
a hint that It is not original. Periods and paragraphs are 
transposed ; parts are occasionally omitted, and words here 
and there interpolated ; but as a whole, a more daring piece 
of plagiarism was never executed."— Jabbd Spabkb in No. 
Am. Rev., xxiii. 388. 

Brooks, George W. (1821-1882), U. S. district 
judge. Sketch of. N. C. Univ. mag., 1882, i 67-71. 

Brooks, W. T. Address before alumni of Wake 
Forest College. Raleigh. 1861. 81 pp. 20. 
On the history of the college. 

Brown, Robert W. On the trade of Wilming- 
ton, August, 1848. Otir Living and Our Dead^ 
1874-76, i. 65-60. 

Bmoo, Edward C. Loungings in the footprints 
of the pioneers. Harper's Magazine, May, 1859, 
xviii. 741-763 ; May, 1860, xx. 721-736. 

Bryan, John Heritage (1798-1870), M. C. Me- 
moir of Frederick Nash. Nl C. Univ. mag., 
1869-60, iz. 267-262. 

Bryant, W. C. and Gay, S. H. History of the 
United States. 

On the Roanoke Colony, i. chap. 10; Airther growth and 
development treated in its proper place. 

Bnllard, Henry A. A discourse on the life, 
character, and writings of Hon. Fran9ois Xavier 
Martin. French's Historical Collections of Lou- 
isiana, part ii. pp. 17-40. Philadelphia. S^l 1850. 

Eulogy of Fran9ois Xavier Martin. West- 
em Law Jour., iv. 808. 

Bnrke, Thomas {c, 1747-1788), Gov. of N. C. 
Sketch of, with extracts from his letters. N. C. 
Univ. mug., 1856, iv. 146-168, 827. 

Bnrgwyn, William Hyslop Sumner (1846-), 
A.M., LL.B., M.D. The necessity of preserving 
the memorials of the past and of transnoitting to 
posterity a just and impartial history of North 
Carolina. N. C. Univ. mag., 1889-90, ix. 808-830; 
reprinted 1890. 8*'. pp. 30. 

A commencement oration at the Univezvity, delivered with 
the denign of raising an endowment for a chair of history. 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF KORTH CAROLINA. 



Liiyum Skidmore (1824-1887), 
/>./>., Editor, Centennial of Methodism in North 
Carolina. H4Ueigh : John Nichols. 1876. 8*. 
pp. xxi. 427. PoriraiU. 

The histoiy and Addressefl delivered at the flrat oenteimial 
■UMS meeting beld in Baleigh, March 21 to 26, 1876. 

Frincipal contenU : Hie pioneer preachers of North Caro- 
lina— their straggles and triamphs, by Rer. W. M. Robej, 
pp. 16-38; lame, bj W. C. Doub, 80-75; The introdnction 
and history of Methodi«m in Raleigh, N. C, by Rer. A. W. 
Mangom, pp. 7^199; Historical sketch of Greensboro Fe- 
male College, by Rey. Dr. T. M. Jones, pp. UO-178; Histori- 
cal sketch of Trinity College, by Rey. Dr. B. Craven, pp. 178- 
192; Historical sketch of Davenport Female College, by 
Rev. W. M. Robey, pp. 1B8-206; Ealogy on the life and 
labors of Rev. Peter Doub, D.D., by Rev. M. L. Wood, 
pp. 244-260; Points in North Carolina History, p. 866; 
Raleigh Christian Advocate and religions journalism, by 
Rev. Dr. J. B. Bobbitt, pp. 406-427. 



Bntel-Domont iras the author of Mhnoire$ aur la Lou- 
Manet 1768, &c. He was an ofRcer in the service of France 
and was employed twenty five years in Louisiana. A Span- 
ish tranriation, small 8*, appeared in Madrid, 1768. — Rich. 



Bnrldtt, Lemuel (175(V-1807), and 
Jesse, Bapi, nttnuters. History of the Kehukee 
Baptist association. Halifax (N. C.) : Abraham 
Hodge. 1808. 16"*. pp. 819. Republished, FhiU- 
delphia, 1850. 

S44 also Bioos, Joseph, and Hassbll, C. B., and 8., for 
history and continuation of tiiis work. 

I think thk is the earliest volume issued in the State on 
any part of her history. 

Bnrr, James Green (1817-). The Thalian 
association of Wilmington, N. C, with sketches 
of many of its members. Wilmington: J. A. 
Englehard. 1871. 8**. pp. 52. 

Sketch of St. James's parish, Wilmington, 

N. C. New York : B. J. Hale & Son. 1874. 12^. 

pp. 84. 

The ** Historical Notices" of Rev. R. B. Drane (v. o.). 
enlarged and brought down to date. 

The Hermitage. 1885. 81 pp.16. Re- 
printed as " The Hermitage, Burgwin's seat." 
Mag. Amer. Hist, Nov. 1886, xvi. 483-442. 

Bnrr, W. H. The Mecklenburg declaration, 
May 20, 1775. New York Sun, July 4, 1882 ; also 
June, 1887 ; also Truth Seeker, Aug. 20, 1892. 

Against authenticity. 

Biube«, Fabius Haywood. The services of 
the North Carolina Junior Reserves (civil war). 
Raleigh Newe and Observer, 20 May, 1890. 

Address before the Ladies Memorial Association of 
Raleigh, May, 1890. 

But«l«]>ii]iui]ii, George Marie. Histoire et 
commerce des colonies Angloises dans rAm^riqne 
septentrionale, on Ton trouve T^tat actael de leur 
productiones et des detuls curieux snr la constita- 
tion de leur gouvemment, principalement sur celui 
de la Nouville Angleterre, de la Caroline et de la 
Georgie. ALondres. (Paris.) 1755. 12^. pp. zziv. 
336. 

There were two editions at Paris and one at La Haye in 
1756. A part of it was translated as Ths Pr—ni State <if 
North America, and published in London. 



U Jarvis Barry (1792-1851) , />. D. Bio- 
graphical notice of, in his Parieh Sermons, pp. 17- 
83. New York : D. Appleton & Company. 1852. 
8*. pp. 694. Portrait, 



Jarvis, />./>., Epis. minister. The 
church in America, particularly in North Carolina, 
in its early history. American Church Review, 
reprinted, pp. 16. 

Byavni, Ernest Taylor, A,B, Seven years of 
unwritten history of North Carolina, 1669-1676. 
Trinity (M (7.) Archive, 1891-92, v. 814-819. 

Byrdf William. The Westover Manuscripts: 
containing the history of the dividing line betwixt 
Virginia and North Carolina; A journey to the 
land of Eden, a.d. 1788; and A progress to the 
mines. Written from 1728 to 1786, and now first 
published. Petersburg: Edmund and Julian C. 
Ruffin. 1841. 8*. pp. iv. 148. 

Dividing Ihie, 1-102; Land of Eden, 10&-122; Progress to 
the mines, 12&-14S. 

New edition. Richmond, Va. 1866. 

2 vols. 

Edition of 200 small and 40 large paper copies. Edited by 
and published at the expense of Thomas H. Wynne of 
Richmond. This edition was from the originals; the edition 
of 1841 being imperfect and incomplete. 

"The manuscripts offer abundant internal evidence that 
they were written merely for the amusement of the author 
and for the perusal of his family and friends, and not with 
any view to their being printed." —Prefiice to ed. of 1841. 

'* Many ingenious flings abound in this memoir by Byrd, 
which is so AiU of adulation of the people of his own State 
and of depreciation of * poor pensive Carolina.' . . . Byrd 
seemed to imagine that the sun only rose to shine, on Virginia, 
and that the whole country frt>m Cape Cod to Cape Sable 
belonged to her; that she was the great planet around which 
all the other colonies moved as humble satellites."— J. H. 
Whssueb in Men and TImee qf early Albemarle. 

" Col. Byrd was plainly dominated by a spirit of rollicking, 
coarse, vulgar humor, that spared neither friend nor foe. 
That he was willing, however, to do ftiU Justice, even at the 
expense of Virginia, fai matters of serious substantial import, 
is manifest."— Col. W. L. Sauvdsbs in Jlorth Carolina 
under Proprietary Oovemment, 46. 

**C** L«tt«n, The. Greensboro, N. C. : The 
North State. 1878. ST. pp. 54. 

A series of letters signed "C" published in The North 
State, a republican newspaper of Qreensboro, dealing with 
politics and democratic politicians. 

OaldwoU, Charles (d. 1858), M.D. Autobi- 
ography of. Philadelphia : Lippincott, Grambo & 
Co. 1855. 8*. pp. 454. Portrait. 

Prefkee, notes, and appendix* by Harriot W. Warner; 
early life spent in North Carolina. 

— Education in North Carolina before 1800. 
Am, Jour. EdueaHon, 1866, xvi. 109. 



lO 



HISTORICAL lilTSRATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



OaldwoU, David (1725-1824), D.D. See 
Caruthers, Eli W. 

Dr. Caldwell wm born in Penntylranla. He wm gntdu- 
'ated at Princeton in 1761 and came to North Carolina in 
1704. He waa a pastor for oearlj six^ jears, and daring 
much of this time was actlvelj engaged in teaching. For 
many year* ** his log cabin serred North Carolina as an 
Academy, a college, and a theological seminary.'* 

GaldwoU, Joseph (1778-1885), />./>., Fteet. 
Vniv. of North Carolina. Autobiography of; 
portrait of bast. N. C, Untv. fnag,, 1859-60, ix. 
1-25, 65-98 ; reprinted, 1859. 8^. pp. 68. 

— — Oration on the life and character of. See 
Anderson, Walker. 

The late President Caldwell, y, C. Univ. 

mag., 1844, i. 97-105. 

Dr. Caldwell and our Unirerslty. Hid. 

1859-60, ix. 895-407. 

- Sketch of. See Spencer, Mrs. C. P. 

The Numbers of Carleton, addressed to 

the people of North Carolina. New York. 1828. 
8« 

On the importance of rail roads and intrnml Improvements 
in North Carolina. 



John D. Homer & Grares's school. 
Our Living and Our Dead, 1874-75, i. 497-501. 

- Memoir of Edmund Strudwick, M.D. 
iV. C. Medical Journal, — 1880; reprinted. 8*. 
pp. 8. 

Sketch of Thomas L. Clingman. N. C. 

Univ. mag., 1888-89, yiii. 249-257. 

North Carolina, 1780^1. Thid. 1889-90, 

ix. 265-282. 

A reyiew of Judge Schenck's book of that title. 

A Wide-Awake Rip Van Wmkle. Ibid. 

1890-91, X. 75-89. 

Old Map of North CaroUna. Ibid. 158- 

157. 

The map was published between 1766 and 1706. 

The late Paul C. Cameron. Ibid. 183- 

206, portrait. 

The poets of North Carolina. The Ly- 
ceum (Asheville), Nov. 1890. 

- Hand Book of North Carolina. 
See Appbndzx. 



Paul Carrington (1808-1891). 
Sketch of ; portrait. See Spencer, Mrs. C. P. 

The late Hon. Paul C. Cameron ; portrait. 

See Cameron, John D. 

Historical address at dedication of Memo- 
rial HaU, U. N. C. (q. r.). Raleigh. 1885. 8«. 
pp. 80. 

G«atvell, Edward. Oration before the Wil- 
mington Light Infantry, on their twenty-fourth 
annirersary, May 20, 1877. Wilmington, N. C. : 
S. G. Hall. 1877. 8^ pp. 26. 



Gaiitw»ll« Edward. I. Early times in the 
Carolinas. South Atlantic, Feb. 1878, pp. 257-270 ; 
reprinted. 

II. The Moore and Barnwell expeditions, 

1711 and 1712. Ibid. June, 1879, pp. 157-169. 

Furt Barnwell by moonlight. Ibid. Dec. 

1878, 176-180. 

Insurrection and conquest of the Tusca- 

roras, 1711-12. Magazine of Weetem History, 
June, 1889, x. 152-168. 

Attributes the rerolt to Gary aud the Qnaketd. 

0«p« Tmmr «ad TadUn VmUmy Railway. 

Descriptive gazette of. Raleigh: Edwards, 

Broughton & Co^ 1884. 8*". pp. 85. Map, 

illuttration*. 

Intended for the information of inyestors in its securities, 
and contains much reUitire to the economic condition of the 
Stale. 

The Cape Fear and Tadkin Valley Rail- 
way (from Mt. Airy, at the base of the Blue Ridge, 
to Wilmington, N. C). Its origin, construction, 
connections, and extensions. Embracing desciip- 
tire and statistical notices of cities, towns, villages, 
and stations ; industries, agricultural, manufactur- 
ing, and mineral resources ; scenery of the route ; 
trans-montane extension, &c. Philadelphia : Allen, 
Lane & Scott. 1889. 8^ pp. 119. Map of C. F. 
& Y. v. and its connections. 

Of value for the illustrations of scenery, buildings, etc. 

Garawan« Geo. W., Bapt. minister. Sketch 
of. See Sparrow, Thomas. 

Oarlia, William P., Brev. Maj. Oen. U. S. A. 
The battle of Bentonsville, in vol. iii., Sketches of 
War History, 1861-1865, prepared for the Ohio 
Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States. 

Caralina, in 1710. X. C. Univ. mag., 1855, 

iv. 289-805. 

A letter ttom a Swiss gentleman in South Carolina to a 
friend in Bern. It is not found in Carroll's OollecHoru. It 
was printed in London, 1710, pp. 88, sm. 4*; also 1732, 8*; 
and possibly in 1718 (c/. Bxch, p. 17). 

- Surrender of seven-eighths of, from Lord 

Carteret to His Majesty, n. p. 1774. 4'1 pp.22. 

Mentioned in Thomas's History of Printing in America, 
U. 812. See also the act of surrender in Ool. Bee. of N. C, 
iii. 32-47. 

The History of the New World, called 

America, and of the first remarkable voyages of 
several Englishmen to divers places therein. With 
a view of Newfoundland, New England, New York, 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia, 
Carolina, Georgia, &c., &c., with the customs, re- 
ligion, and manners of the INDIANS. Dublin. 
N. D. \c. 1776.] pp. 158. 

A scarce little volume, apparently undescribed bj Sabia 
((y. Sahin 821M); "illustrated with maps and figures of 
strange Animala." 



HISTORICAL LITEBATURB OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



II 



GmfoUiuu Eniflish settlements in. Mag, Amer. 
But,, Jan. 1888, ix. 60-61. 

Carolinas duriDg the Rerolntion. So, 

Lit. Mess., xi. 144, 281. 

Cftrolinas and Georgia, Catholicity in. 

MotUht xzxri. 845. By A. G. Knight. 



% John Wesl^ (1814-1889). Sketch of. 
See Win STOif , Oeorge T. 

OmrroHf R. B. Historical Collections of Sonth 
Carolina. New York. 1836. 8^ 2 toIb. 

These Tolomet could hare been called, and with better 
proprie^t "Historical CoUectiont of the Carollnat and 
Georgia." They contidn many rare and Talnable pamphlete 
and other docnmenU relating to the history of these States 
from their first discorery and settlement to 1778. Vol. i. has 
a map of the CaroIInas arcnrately copied from the map 
of James Cook, London, 1771» and Henry Monson, 1776. 
(These were both, as well as others of this period perhaps, 
made from that of Wimble in 1788, and were ont of date and 
incorrect. Dnnbibin's was made from actual surreys in 
1764.) 



I, Eli W. (-1865), A.M., D.D. A 

Sketch of the life and character of the Rey. Darid 

Caldwell, D.D. Near sixty years pastor of the 

churches of Baffaio and Alamance. Including two 

of his sermons ; some account of the Regulation, 

together with the Rerolutionary transactions and 

incidents in which he was concerned ; and a reiy 

brief notice of the ecclesiastical and moral oondi- 

tion of North Carolina while in its colonial state. 

Greensboro, N. C. : Swaim & Sherwood. 1842. 

V. pp. 804. p 

This rolume contains much rare and raloable material for 
the M>cial life of the colony. 

Rerolutionary Incidents : and sketches of 



character, chiefly in the *< Old North State.** Phila- 
delphia: Hayes & Zell. W. First series, 1854, 
pp. 431. Second series, 1856, pp. 448. 

The first volume k deyoted to the earlier days of the Rero* 
lution and its causes. The Tory movement in North Caro. 
liua and its origin is treated AiUy; much attention is given 
to the battle of Moore*B creek and to the career of Col. David 
Fanning. Vol. ii. contains an account of the British invasion 
of 1781; a defence of the conduct of the North Carolina 
militia at Guilford Court House ; miscellaneous Incidents and 
personal sketches, with a map showing the routes of Com- 
wrallis and Greene, and a plan of the battle of Guilford Court 
House. The volumes do not purport to be grave history, 
or to treat the more important events ftilly, but are made up 
of '* incidents " gathered flrom the mouths of the people, tales, 
legends, and romances of the olden times, and are of much 
vsJue for social life. Reviewed in N, O, Unit, mag., 18M, 
lU. 476. 

These volumes are labeled on back : " The Old North State 
in 1776." 



GaaweU, Richard (1724-1789), Oov. of N. C, 
Outline of the life of, with a selection of letters. 
N. C. Univ. mag.y 1865, iv. 68-84. 

Sketch of. See Hubbard, F. M. 

Sketch of. See Oldham, Edward A. 



OatMby, Mark (1679-1749). The Natural His- 
tory of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands, 
with figures colored after the life. London. 1781. 
r. 2 vols. ^OpUUes. 

This important work was begun this year and continued 
in numbers or parts until 1748, when the appendix complet- 
ing the work was finished; second edition in 1754; thbnd in 
1771 ; text In English and French. The edition of 1771 was 
revised by Mr. Edwards, and a Linnean index of animals 
and plates was added, f*. 2 vols. 220 colored plates. 
Catesby's plates were etched by himself from his own draw* 
ings and colored under his inspection. The second and third 
editions are considered inferior to the first In respect to the 
beauty of the plates. 

Catesby spent the years 1710-1710 travelling in America. 
He came out again in 1722 and remained until 1726. A 
German edition of the history appeared at Nllremberg, 
1756. 



U H. M. Report on the North Carolina 
coal fields to the department of agriculture. 
Raleigh : P. M. Hale. 1885. S% pp. 66. Map. 



George. Political Annals of the 
present United Colonies, from their settlement to 
the peace of 1768. London. 1780. 

The chapter relathig to the CaroIInas (XVIII. of book L) 
was reprinted in Carroll's OolUction; II. 27S. For book II. 
see OoUectiont of New York Hist. Society for I860. 

It was unfortunate for the State that Chalmers was the first 
to examine the public offices in London for information con- 
cerning North Carolina ; because his work has been standard 
authority with all later historians of Carolina, while hla 
** general accuracy as to matters of fact k by no means 
perfect,'* and bis '* bitter prejudice as a loyalist render his 
conclusions utterly unreliable."— Col. W. L. Sacitdbbs hi 
Preface to Cbl. iUc. y. C, I. ill. 

" Chalmers' account in all cases of the kind must be re- 
ceived with great hesitancy. The coloring is always wrong ; 
the fiu^ts usually perverted. He writes like a lawyer and 
disappointed politician, not like a calm inquirer. His state- 
ments are copied by Qrahame, obscured by Martin, and, 
strange to say, exaggerated by Williamson."— Bancboft. 

For Chalmers' suppressed InirodtteUon to tA4 hUtorya/ 
the Colanif (1782), see Narrative and Crlt. Hitt. America, 
V. 858. 

Ckarlotto. Sketches of. Charlotte: Hirst 
Printing Company. 1888. V". pp.46. UluMirations. 

Ghartors utd Gonatltiitioas. North Caro- 
lina in Cheirtere and Constitutions of the United 
Statei, compiled by Ben. Perley Poore. ii. 
1879*1451. 

Oontente : — Raleigh's Charter ; Charters of 1668 and 1666 ; 
Fundamental Constitutions, 1609; Mecklenberg Resolutions, 
1775; Constitution of 1776, with amendments (Constitution 
of 1886) ; Ordinance Prohibiting SUvery, 1866 ; Constitutions 
ofl868 and 1876 [1875]. 



u Philip S., Lieut. Col. U, S. A. Service 
with battery F, first R. I. light artillery, in North 
Carolina. PereoruU Niarraiives of the Soldiers* 
and Sailors* Historical Society of Rhode Island, 
Ser. 8, no. 7, 1884. 



12 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



i« An enquiry into the origin of the, 

in a letter to a member of Parliament. Oxford. 

1762. dl\ pp.27. 

A mighty learned attempt to ptore the Cherokees to b« 
the descendants of Meshek, a son of Japhet. — Bicb. 
Sse RoTCK, C. C. 
8€4 Tboxas, Cyms. 



U Joseph Blonnt, Jr.» />./>• St. 
Thomas' Church, Bath. Perry's Amer, Ep%», 
Churchy i. 687. 

The Early Conyentions: Held at Taw- 
borough, Anno Domini, 1790, 1798, and 1794. The 
first eifort to organize the church in North Caro- 
lina. Collected from original sources and now first 
published. With introduction and brief notes. 
Raleigh : Spirit of the Age. 1882. 8«. pp. 29. 

In 8keich€9 qf Church HUtory in North Oaroiina, inflra, 
PP.4U-4S8. 

Fragments of North Carolina colonial 

church history. 8*. 

L pp. 14, Public libraries; U. pp. 18, The first settlers of 
North Carolina not religious reftigees. Beprint«d from the 
CfturcA MeatengtTt March, 1886. 

Sermon preached at the centennial of the 

Fayetteville conyention of 1789. N. C, Univ, 
mag., 1891-92, zi. 162-174. 

White Haven Parish. 8*. pp.11. 5ee also 

SkeUhei of Church ffisiory, infra, pp. 869-878. 

Robert Johnston Miller. 8**. pp. 12-89. 

See Ihid. pp. 878-400. 

The diocesan convention and the Lutheran 

synod. Ihid. pp. 400-410. 

The church in the province of North 

Carolina. Sketches of Chur^ Bigtory, infra, 
pp. 43-90 ; reprinted. 

Decay and revival, 1800-1880. Ibid. 

pp. 243-278 ; reprinted. 

Ediior, Sketches of church history in 

North Carolina. Wilmington, N. C. : William L. 

DeRossett, Jr. 1892. 8^. pp. zv. 456. 

A series of addresses and papers prepared for the Joint 
centennial convention at Tarborongh, May, 1890. Besides 
those by the editor mentioned above, there was one on Colo- 
nial laymen of the Church of England in North Carolina, by 
Kemp P. Battle, pp. 01-155, with an appendix giving a caU- 
loipie of the books presented by Edward Moseley to the 
S. P. 6. in 1723; Colonial parishes and church schools (with 
note by editor), pp. 181-179; The conventions of 1790, *03, 
and 'M, and tlie bishop elect, by W. S. Pettigrew, pp. 181- 
241 ; The first three bishops— Raycnscroft, Ives, and Atkin- 
son, by Bkhop A. A. Watson, pp. 279-205; The educational 
and missionary work in North Carolina firom 1881, by Jarvis 
Buxton, D.D., pp. 807-320; The work of the church in hos- 
pitals, homes, sisterhoods, and orphanages, by Rev. T. M. 
X. George, pp. 821-330; The church in North Carolina: its 
present condition and prospects, by M. M. Marshall, D.D., 
pp.841-85e. 



GkristU, Daniel Harvey (1888-1868), Col. 23d 
North Carolina troops, (7. S. A. Sketch of. Our 
Living and Our Dead, 1874-75, i. 825-829. 

OiTa W*r. The War of the Rebellion: A 
compilation of the Official Becorda of the Union 
and Confederate Armies. 

A serial publication of the United States Govenunent 
(Washington, 1880-}, containing much on the histoty of the 
ciTil war in North Carolina. 

The secession of North Carolina, Jan. 0— May 90, IMl, 
Tol. I. chap. V. pp. 474-488. 

Operations in North Carolina and southeantem Viiginia, 
Aug. 1, 1861— Jan. 11. 1802, toI. It. chap. xiii. pp. 666-7S1. 

Operations in North Carolina, Jan. 11— Aug. 90, 1888, 
voU ix. chap. XX. pp. 72-480. 

Operations in North Carolina and southeastern Vliginia, 
Aug. 90, 1862— June 8, 1863, vol. xviii. chap. xxz. pp. 1-1907. 

Operations in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Maryland, Pennsylvania, and department of the east, Jane 
8— Aug. 8, 1868, vol. zxvii. (serial no. 48) chap, zxxix. 
pt. 1, Reports, pp. 1-1164; pL 2 (serial no. 44), Reports, 
1-1118; pt. 8 (serial no. 45), correspondence, pp. 1-1942. 
This includes the Gettysburg Campaign. 

Operations in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Maryland, and Pennsylrania, Aug. 4— Dec. 31, 1868, voL 
zxix. (serial no. 48), chap. xli. pt. 1, Reports, pp. 1-llM; 
pt. 2 (serial no. 40), pp. 1-1074. 

Operations in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Jan. 1— April 80. 1864. vol. 
xxxiii. (serial no. 60) chap. xlv. pp. 1-1525. Contains expe* 
ditlon against New Bern, N. C. 

Operations In southeastern Virginia and In North CfcTnllna, 
May 1— June 12. 1804, vol. xxxvi. (serial no. 67) chap. zlvUi. 
pp. 1-1228; pt. 2 (serial no. 68), reports, Union and Conibd 
erate correspondence, pp. 1-086. 

— ;- 4llxpo86 de la situation politique et militairo 
anx £tat8-Unis, Proteitation des habitant! de la 
Caroline du Nord centre la continnation de la 
guerre. Paris. 1868. 8®. pp. 82. Map. — Sabih. 

An account of the sufferings of Friends 

of North Carolina Yearly Meeting in support of 
their testimony against war, from 1861 to 65. 
Peace Association of Friends in America, ir. p. 
1868. 8^. pp. 28. 

Second edition. 

dark, Walter (1846-), Juetice Supreme Court, 
N. C. Sketch of. JV. C. Univ. mag., 1891-92, 
xi. 265-267, portrait. 



r, Charles Comwallis, Editor. Auto- 
biography of a Carolina loyalist. In Military 
Biography, pp. 323-841. New York. 12^ 
Tliis book was originally issued in London, In 1874. 



Address on the life and services of Oen. 

William R. Davie. Greensboro : Reece A Elam. 
[1892.] 8". pp. 36. Portrait. 

Reprinted in Mtig. Amer. ffiet., Dec. 1892, xxrili. 416-«80, 
portrait 

Delivered at the celebration on the battle-Held of Onllford 
Court House, July 4, 1892. 

Reriew of, by John Manning, IT. C. Univ. Mag., 1892-08, 
xil. 96-105. 



Career of Oen. James Hogun, one of 



North Carolina's Revolutionary officers. Mag. 
Amer. Mist., Oct. 1892, zxviii. 284-287. 



HISTORICAL LITEBATDIUS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



13 



darkt Walter. The supreme court of North 
Carolina. The Green Bag (Boston), Oct, Nov., 
Dec., 1892, iv. 457-474, 521-640, 669^91. 

With portraits of all members of the conxt except Thomss 
Ruffin (associate) and Armistead Barwell. See also sepa- 
rate sketch of Chief Jastice Menimoa in Dec. number, 606- 
607. 

dAvke* James Freeman. Sketch of Susan T. 
Dimock, in his Memorial and Biographical 
Sketehee. Boston. 1878. l&*. 

Claaaomt A. W. R^snm^ of convention of 
1788. Mag. Amer. Hist, Apr. 1886, xv. 852-865. 

01aT»lMid« James M. Biographical sketch of 
Charles Manly, late governor of North Carolina. 
Raleigh : Southern Weekly Post. 1853. 9\ pp.11. 

GUauitoIoKjr of North Carolina, from records 
of 1820 to 1892. Raleigh : Edwards & Broughton. 
1892. 8<*. pp. 184. 

Pablifthed by N. C. Agricultural Experiment Station. 

GUnsiiiAn, Thomas Lanier (18 12-), LL.D.^ 
U. S. Senator, Brip. Oen, C. S. A, Sketch of. 
See Camsrok, J. D. 

Topography of Black Mountain. Our 

Living and Our Dead, 1874-75, i. 254-256. 

—^ Clingman's brigade at Cold Harbor, Ihid. 
1875, ii. 291-292. 

Selections from the speeches and writings 

of. Raleigh : John Nichols. ia77. S*". 

Gobb, Collier. Map of North Carolina. 1880. 
Tliird edition. 1881. 

North Carolina in colonial days. 

A series of articles contributed to T%€ SchoolUacKer 
(Winston, N. C.) in 188T. 

— - The physical history of the North Caro- 
lina coast. OoldihwaHe*» Geographical mag., 
Jan.— Feb. 1898, r. 71-72, 

Gobb, Needham Bryan. Poetical ^ography of 
North Carolina. Cambridge : The Riverside Press. 
1887. 12^. 68 leaves, printed on one side only. 
Portrait, illuairations. 

'*The following rhymes on the counties, rivers, creeks, 
sounds, bays, and mountains of North Carolina were prepared 
by the author to aid his own pupils in memorizing the geog- 
raphy of their native State. They were written out on the 
black-board, a few lines at a time, and the whole school re* 
quired to repeat them in concert. After this, different parts 
were parcelled out to each pupil . . . and on Friday after- 
noons tlie whole wa« rehearsed in the presence of visitors."— 
Pre/are. 

CocUa of Horth Caroliaa* Swann*s Revisal. 
Newborn : James Davis. 1751. f". 

- Swann*s Revisal. Newbem : James Davis. 
1762. f». 

Davis's Revisal. Newbem : James Davis. 

1764. 4«. 

A revision of laws. 17fi3-l764. 



CMoa of Hortb Coroliaa. Davis's Revisal. 
Newbem : James Davis. 1765. 4*. 2 vols, in 1. 

Davis's Revisal. Newbern : James Davis. 

1778. f. 

Iredell's Revisal. Edenton: Hodge & 

Wills. 1791. r. 

For liistory and collations of the eighteenth century revi- 
sions tee my Preee in North Carolina in the eighieenUi 
century, pp. 10-M, 6S-54, 60, 60, 61, 63, 60, 71. I am now 
convinced that Uiere were no rerisions printed in 1777 and 
1780, as I state on pp. 63, 60. 

Martin's Revisal. Newbem: Martin A 

Ogden. 1804. 4^*. 2 vols, in 1. 

Revision by Potter, Taylor, and Yancey, 

Raleigh: J. Qales. 1821. 8^. 2 vols. 

Taylor's Revisal. Raleigh: J. Gales k 

Son. 1827. V, 

Of laws passed 1821-1825. 

Revision by Nash, Iredell, and Battle, 

Raleigh : Turner & Hughes. 1887. 8*. 2 vols. 

- Moore's Revision. Boston: Little, Brown 
& Co. 1855. 8^ 

Battle's Revisal. 1873. 8*. 

Revision by Manning, Henderson, and 

Dortch. New York: Banks & Brothers. 1888. 
8*. 2 vols. 

For proceedings of general assemblies and for bibliogra- 
phies of other collections of laws, see Oolonial Becordt nf 
North Carolina, Weeks's bibliography of the eighteenth 
century press in his Preee in North Carolina in the Eigh- 
teenth Centurg, and J. C. Birdsong's Catalogue of boote in 
North Carolina State library. 

Colo, J. R. Sketches of the 22d regiment of 
North Carolina State troops. Our Living and 
Our Dead, 1874-75, i. 805-818. 

For first two years of the war. 

Colonial Rooords of North Carolina. Indexes 

to documents relative to North Carolina during the 

oolonial existence of said State ; now on file in the 

offices of the Board of Trade and State Paper 

offices in London ; transmitted in 1827. Raleigh : 

T. Loring. 1848. 8*. pp. 120. 

Published by kgisUtars of 1842-48, under direction of John 
H. Wheeler, public treasurer. The same sheets, witli a new 
cover, served as an appendix to N C. Ukie, mag,, 1844, vol. 1. 

The I Colonial Records | of | North Caro- 
lina I Published under supervision of the Tms- 1 
tees of the Public Libraries, by Order | of the 
General Assembly | Collected and Edited | by | 
William L. Saunders | Secretary of State | 
Vol. I-[— X] 1662 to 1712 | Raleigh | P. M. Hale, 
Printer to the State | 1886. 4". 

Vol. I., 1602 [1622]-in3; title, 1 leaf; editor's prefisce. 
pp. ili-vili; prefiitory notes by editor, iz-zxxiv; colonhU 
records, 1-002. Baleigh. 1886. 

Vol. ii., 1718-1728; prefiOory notes, pp. iii-xlx; colonial 
records, 1-028. Raleigh. 1886. 

YoL lii., 1728-1784; preiktory notes, pp. Hl-xviii; colonial 
VMOids, 1-04S. Baleigh. 1886. 



14 



HISTORICAL LITBRATURS OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Vol. It., 1T84-170S; prefiitory notes, pp. iii-zxil; colonUl 
recordii, 1-U48. Baleigh. 18M. 

Vol. T., ITSO-ITW; prefiUoiy notes, pp. iil-lxi; colonial 
rwwrds, 1-1228. BiUeigh. 1887. 

Vol. yi., 1760-1786; prefittoty notes, pp. iii-zxrr; colonial 
records, 1-1S22. Raleigh. 1888. 

VoL rii., 1766-1788 ; prefifttory notes, pp. iil-xxxiy ; colonial 
records, 1-1009. Raleigh. 1890. 

Vol. vUi., 1780-1771; prefittory notes, pp. iii-zlrili; colo- 
nial records, 1-798. Raleigh. 1890. 

Vol. iz., 1771-1776; prelktory notes, pp. iii-zlrii; colonial 
records, 1-1286. Raleigh. 1890. 

Vol. z., 1776-1770; preflitory notes, pp. lii-xli; colonial 
records, 1-1041. Raleigh. 1800. 

Not nntil the publication of these records has it been pes- 
rible to write an accarate acconnt of any particular phase in 
the historical derelopment of North Carolina, for the original 
records in the office of the Secretary of State in Raleigh were 
remarkably incomplete, and of the first fifty years almost 
nothing remained. 

Tliis was due rery largely to the lack of towns and of 
suitable buildings where such records might be preserved. 
Thk lack of nmUria hittoriea has been long felt, and as 
early as 1827 the GoTeraor was instructed by the Legislature 
to procure firom the British Government copies of all papers 
relating to the colonial history of the Bute. Correspondence 
was begun, and in that year minister Gallstiu forwarded to 
Gov. Burton a list of sudi papers as related to North Carolina. 
This list was printed in 1848 [se« $upra]. Other efibrts were 
made in 1840, 1866, 1867, 1869, and 1801, to farther the work, 
but nothing was accomplished. In 1881 the Legislature di* 
rected the Trustees of the Libraries to print what colonial 
documents were then in the State. The gaps in these records 
were found to be so many and so great that the Trustees 
determined to ask the State for aid toward making the records 
more complete. This aid was given by the Legislature of 
1888. Col. Samuel McDowell Tate of the House, and Hon. 
James L. Robinson of the Senate, being especially instru- 
mental in securing its adoption. 

The work of compiling and editing devolved on the Hon. 
William L. Saunders, LL.D., the accomplished Secretaiy of 
State, who brought to it a tireless energy, a love that knows 
no bounds, and a devotion unsurpassed. " How he has per- 
formed tiie task thus assigned to him it is not for him to 
determine. He can only say, that for near seven [eleven] 
years he has devoted himself to it, and that he has done the 
very best he could, without reward, or the hope of reward 
fand this when sufiTering untold agonies from rheumatism, a 
part of the proof being read while lying on his back and 
unable to turn from side to side], and solely because of the 
love he bears to North Carolina and her people.'* — Pre/ace 
to vol. i. p. vii. 

Mr. W. Noel Sainsbury, of the British Record office, was 
employed to search the British urchives. His work was 
thoroughly done, and there are perhaps few papers in Eng- 
land relating to North Carolina of which copies have not 
been secured. Unfortunately the work does not seem to 
have been so thoroughly done on this side of the Atlantic. 
A supplementary volume containing omitted documents is 
much needed, ^e preiktory notes by the editor form a run- 
ning political history of the colony. Of editing, in the ezact 
sense, there is none. There is very pressing need for an 
accurate and AiU index. 

Coltoa, Henry £. Sketch of Hillsboro, N. C. 
Southern Literary Meseenger, Sept. 1856, xxiii. 161. 

The scenery of the mountains of western 

North Carolina and north western South Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C: W. L. Pomeroy. Philadelphia: 
Hayes & Zell. 1859. 12"*. pp. 111. lUustraied. 



Coljav, A. S. Biographical sketch of John 
Haywood (9. v. ) , for the new edition of his Oiffil 
and Political HiMory of Tenneteee. Nashville. 
1891. 



Lorial Addrecsea at New 

Bern, N. C, 11 May, 1885. Richmond, Va. 1886. 
8*. pp. 32. Illustration of Confederate monument 
in New Bern. 

Oantentt : — Historical sketch of Ladies' memorial associs- 
tion of New Bern, by L. C. Vass, 6-7; Sketch of J. J. Petti, 
grew, by H. C. Graham, 9-36. 

Tot other Confederate memorial addresses, •«« Bbnkbtt. 
Risden T.; Bubbbe, Fabius H.; Cowlbs, William H. H.; 
Coz, William R.; Huqhbs, John; Loin>ON, H. A. ; Stbd- 
MAX, Charles M. 

Confadsrate 8oldi«ni in general assembly of 
North Carolina, 1875. Our Living and Ovr 
Dead, 1875, ii. 180*188. 

GmutltiitiOBs of Horth CaroUiia. See Char- 
ters and Constitutions ; Conventions. 

OaiTwatioBs of Horth GaroUaa. — Conven- 
tion of 1788. Proceedings and debates of the 
convention of North Carolina, convened at HiUs- 
borough^ on Monday, the 21st day of July, 1788, 
for the purpose of deliberating and determining on 
the constitution recommended by the general con- 
TenUon at Philadelphia, the 17th day of September, 
1787. To which is prefixed the said constitution. 
Edenton : Printed by Hodge & Willis, printers to 
the State. M, DCC, LXXXIX. 8<'. pp. 280. 

Reported by David Robertson, of Petersburg, Va. ; lOOU 
copies printed at the expense of W. R. Davie and James 
Iredell. As far as practicable the speeches were submitted 
to their authors for correction. Tliey will be found in the 
first ed. of Elliot's J>4bat€9. 

Second edition, iv, l-2fi2. 

Journal of convention of North Carolina. 

Hillsborough : Robert Ferguson. [1788.] sm. 8*^ 

ConventiM of 1789. Journal of the convention 

of the State of North Carolina. At a convention 

begun and held at FayetieffilUj on the third Monday 

of November, one thousand seven hundred and 

eighty-nine, agreeable to the resolutions of the 

last general assembly, bearing date the seventeenth 

of November, one thousand seven hundred and 

eighty-eight. . . . [Colophon] Edenton : Printed by 

Hodge & Wills, Printers to the State, sm. 4"*. 

pp. 16. 

This couTention adopted the Federal Constitution. There 
is a copy of this very rare pamphlet, together with the origi- 
nal minutes, in the office of the Secretary of State. It was 
reprinted in fUll by the State Chronicle of Raleigh, Nov. 15, 
1889.— Webxs* bibliography of eighteenth century press in 
North Carolina, no. 81. 

Con/vewtion of 1822. Propoeed. Debates on 
the conyention question. Raleigh : J. Gales & Son. 

1822. 8*. pp. 78. 



HISTOBICAI. LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



IS 



ConverUion of 1835. Debate in the legislature 
of North Carolina on a proposed appropriation for 
re-boilding the capitol and on the conyention qnes- 
tion. Dec. 1881, Jan. 1882. Raleigh. 1882. 8". 
pp. 126. 

Debate on convention question, Jan. 14, 

1882. 8**. pp. 78. 

—^ Address to the freemen of North Carolina 
on amending the State constitution. Raleigh. 
1888. 8*. pp. 18. 

Proceedings of a meeting of the members 

of the legislature held in Raleigh, Jan. 11, 1884, 
with an address to the people of North Carolina on 
the subject of amending the State constitution. 
Raleigh. 1884. 8^ pp. 20. 

Address of the Wake county committee. 

[Raleigh.] 1884. 8^". pp.4. 

Statement of the number of Yotes on the 

conrention question, given in April, 1885, and 
Aug. , 1888. Raleigh : J. Gales & Son. 1885. 8*. 
pp. 4. 

Journal of the convention called by the 

freeman of North Carolina to amend the constitu- 
tion of the State. Raleigh : J. Gales & Son. 1885. 
8^1 pp. 106. 

Convention met In Raleigh, 4 June, 1836, and a4]oamed 
11 July. 

Proceedings and debates of the convention 

of North Carolina called to amend the constitution 
of the State. Raleigh : Joseph Gales & Son. 1886. 
8*'. pp. 425, 6. 

The convention act, the amendments, and vote on the con- 
ttltution as amended, are added. 

Convention of 1861, Propoied, The western 
address to the people of North Carolina on consti- 
tutional reform. [Raleigh. 1851.] 8^. pp.16. 

Speech of William B. Shepherd on the 

bill to ascertain the sense of the people on calling 
a convention. 8®. pp. 5. 

Delivered In Senate, session 185<Mtl. 

See Wiley, C. H. 

Convention of 1861. Journal of the convention 
of the people of North Carolina, held the 20th day 
of May, 1861. Raleigh: John W. Syme. 8^ 
pp. 198. 

Second Session, Nov. and Dec. 1861. 

Raleigh : John W. Syme. 1862. 8*1 pp. 86. 

Third Session, Jan. and Feb. 1862. 

Raleigh: John W. Syme. 1862. S**. pp. 119. 

Fourth Session, April and May, 1862. 

Raleigh : John W. Syme. 1862. 8<>. pp. 109, 
indexes, 

■ 

Tills was the secession convention, and the JoamHln of tlie 
four sessions are usually bound in one volume. 

Convention of 1865. Journal of the convention 
of the State of North Carolina. Raleigh : Cannon 
& Holden. 1865. 8*. pp. 94, iii. 



Convention of 1865. Adjourned Session of 1866. 
Raleigh : Cannon & Holden. 1866. 8*. pp. 192, 
111. 

Executive Documents of . Raleigh: Can- 
non & Holden. 1865. 8''. 

Ckmtentt : — Message of provisional Governor Holden to 
convention, pp. 108 ; Treasurer's report to same, pp. 11 ; Re- 
port of superintendent of insane asylum, pp. 12; of deaf and 
dumb and the blind, pp. 8 ; Constitution of North Carolina, 
pp. 1-88; Ordinances and resolutions, 38-78. 

Convention of 1868. Journal of the constitu- 
tional convention of the State of North Carolina, 
at its session 1868. Raleigh : Joseph W. Holden. 
1868. 8'*. pp.489. 

Convention of 1875. Journal of convention, and 
amendments to the constitution. 

Amendments to the constitution of North 

Carolina, proposed by the constitutional conven- 
tion of 1875, and the constitution as it will read as 
proposed to be amended. Raleigh: Josiah Turner. 
1875. 8«. pp. 70. 

Cooke, William D . , ^ . if. , Compiler. Revolu- 
tionary History of North Carolina. See Grahjlm, 
Hawks, SwAiir. 

Goopor, Susan Fenimore, Editor. William 

West Skiles ; a sketch of missionary life at Valle 

Crucis in western North Carolina, 1842-1862. 

New Tork: James Pott & Co. 1890. ITf". pp.141. 

A memoir prepared in compliance with the expressed wish 
of Bishop Atkinson from material fUmlshed by a number of 
prominent clergymen who were the contemporaries of Mr. 
Skiles In the diocese of North Carolina. 

Cotton, Edward R. Life of the Hon. Nathaniel 
Macon, of North Carolina ; in which there is dis- 
played sinking instances of virtue, enterprise, 
courage, generosity, and patriotism. His public 
life : Illustrating the blessings of political union, — 
the miseries of faction, — and the mischiefs of 
despotic power in any government. His private 
life : Furnishing lessons upon the science of social 
happiness and religious freedom, of greater value, 
perhaps, than are to be found in the biography of 
any other character, either ancient or modern, 
** having lived and died without an enemy.** Bal- 
tiuiore : Lucas & Deaver. 1840. 12*1 pp. 272. 

Perhaps the poorest biography ever written. 

Cowoa, Robert H. (1824-1872). Oration com- 
memorative of the life and character of Edward 
B.Dudley. [Wilmington (?). 1856 (?)] 8*. pp.16. 



Thomas A. (<i. 1868), SSd N. C, regi- 
ment. Sketch of. Our Living and Our Deiid^ 
1875, iii. 86-^8. 

Cowloa, William H. H. Address on the life 

and services of Gen. James B. Ck)rdon. Raleigh : 

Edwards, Broughton & Co. 1887. 8°. pp. 20. 

Delivered In Raleigh, 10 May, 188T, before Ladies' memorial 
association. 



i6 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROUNA. 



% Falaski, Compiler. See GfttiCBS, Maj. 
Qen. Bryan, Extracts of letters of. 

Sketch of Gov. Thomas Bragg, N. C, 

Univ. mag,, 1890-91, x. 123-144; portrait; re- 
printed, with an account of the joint discussion 
between Bragg and John A. Gilmer, at Murphej, 
Cherokee county, in 1856. [Raleigh. 1891.] 8«. 
pp. 88. 

Gox, WiUiam Ruffin (1842-). Address on the 
life and character of Maj. Gen. Stephen D. 
Ramseur. Raleigh: E. M. Ussell. 1891. S^, 
pp. 64 ; portrait ; also in So. Hist. Soc. Papers, 
1890 ; xviii. 217. 

Delirered before Ladies' memorial aMocIatioQ of Raleigh, 
10 May, 1891. 

Oftse, Daniel, M.D. Biographical notice of, 
with an account of the final settlement of his 
claims in Carolana, by G. D. -Scull, Oxford, Eng. 
Penn. Mag. of History, rii. 817-888; see also 
p. 481. 

A description of the English prorince of 

Carolana by the Spaniards called Florida and by 
the French La Louisiane, &c., &c., with a large 
and accurate map of Carolana and of the River 
Meschacebe [Miss.]. London. 1741. pp. 122. 

First published in 1722; republished, with new title, in 
1726, 1727, and 1741. In 1741 it appeared as part ill. of ** A 
Collection of Voyages and Trarels,'* issued by Daniel Coxe. 

Reprinted in St. Louis. 1840. 8*. pp.00. Map. 

Reprinted in B. F. French's ffUtorical OolUcthns of Lou- 
iaUma, 11. 221-270. Philadelphia. ISfiO. 8*. A part of tlie 
map ii reproduced in the Jfar. and Orit, ffitt. Amerieat 
T.70. 

A crude performance, drawn up from rarious journals and 
voyages, to impress the public with the great Importance of 
the region described, and to make them Jealous of its occu> 
pation by the French. — Rich. 

" Carolana and Carolina are two distinct though border- 
ing provinces, the east of Carolana joining to the west of 
Carolina. The former was granted by patent unto Sir 
Robert Heath in the beginning of the reign of King Charles I* 
. . . This province of Carolana is extended north and south 
from the rlrcr St. Matheo, lying according to the patent in 
31 degrves (though by later and more accurate observations 
it is found to lie exactly in 30 degrees and 10 minutes) unto 
the riycr Passo Magno, which is in 30 degrees of nortliem 
latitude ; and longitude ttom the western or Atlantick Ocean 
unto New Mexico, now in possession of the Spaniards. . . . 
It comprehends within its bounds the greatest part of Uie 
province of Carolina.'* 

{JraJm^ D. Irvin (1849-). Presby. min. A his- 
torical sketch of New Hope Church, in Orange 
county, North Carolina. Reidsville : S. W. Paisley. 
1886. 8*. pp. 47. 

Revised edition, n. p. 1891. 8». pp.64. 

f?ralghim^, James Oeddes (1828-), />./>. Ge- 
nealogical memoir of the descendants of Rev. 
Thomas and Margaret Craighead, 1658-1876. Phil- 
adelphia. 1876. 12*'. pp. 173. 



Braxton (1822-1882), D.D., LL.D. 
Kaomi Wise; or the wrongs of a beautiful girl. 
New edition. 1884. 8^. pp. 17. 

The story of a tragedy enacted In Randolph countj. North 
Carolina, towards the close of the eighteenth century. 



Richard Benbury (1818-), Editor. 
Child's History of North Carolina. J\r. C. Univ. 
mag., 1856, v. 77-80, 171-177, 220-221, 278, 304- 
305. 

Early history of the Albemarle region. 

Ibid. 1857-58, rii. 70-76. 

An evening with William Oaston. Ibid. 

1858-59, viU. 97-104. 

The Revolutionary era in North Caroliiuu 

Ibid. 1859-60, ix. 26-34. 

Grandfather's tales of North Carolina his- 
tory. Ibid. 1889-90, ix. 108-113, 195-197, 214- 
218; 1890-91, x. 98-102, 157-160. 



S William Francis. Ancestry of the 
children of James William White, M.D., with 
accounts of the families of White and Newby 
[in K. C.]. PhlUdelphia. 1888. 

An account of the deneendants of Henry White (<f. 1606), 
of James City county, Ya., who took up land in Carolina, 
and whose son Henry White (1635-1712) lived on Little river 
in Pasquotank county. It includes not only the White fkmlly, 
hut their connections in other fiunilies. 

Groom* H. B. Catalogue of plants growing 
around New Bern. 1887. 

This edition Is a revision of an earlier publication made in 
connection with Dr. H. Loomis, c. 1883. 

Onrtfts, Moses Ashley (1808-1872), M.A., D.J}., 

F.A.A.S. Sketch of the botanical work of, by 

Thomas F. Wood. Raleigh : Edwards, Broughton 

& Co. 1885. 8^ pp. 81. 

Beprinted, but without portrait, from Journal Elieka 
MitchtU Scientific Socitty, 1884-85, »-31. 

Enumeration of plants growing sponta- 
neously around Wilmington, North Carolina, with 
remarks on some new and obscure species. Boston 
Journal of NaiuraX History, vol. i. no. 2, commu- 
nicated Sept. 8, 1834. 

Reprint, with many additions and emendations, the result 
of ftirther research. Reprint with ms. additions and index 
by Dr. James F. McRee. 

An account of some new and rare plants 

of North Carolina. [Silliman^s'] Amer. Journal 
of Science, 1843, xliv. 80. 

Dated HiUsboio, N. C, Nov. 1, 1842. 

New and rare plants, chiefly of the Caro- 

Unas. Ibid. 1849, K.s. vu. 406. 

A commentary on the natural 'history of 

Hawks's History of North Carolina. N. C. Univ. 
mag., 1859-60, ix. 407-419. 

**Thls paper demonstrated the thorough knowledi^e Dr. 
Curtis had obtained of the botany of the old travelers and 
explorers. Dr. Hawks had drawn with too flree a hand the 



HISTORICAL LITERATUBE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



17 



woDilers of our truly wonderful forests sod fields* and bad 
been led away, quite unconsciously, by tbe florid accounts of 
Hariotand Amadas and Barlowc and Lawson. The analysis 
which Dr. Curtis made left but little of the fabuloas state- 
ments of tbe early chroniclers disprored, and proved Dr. 
Hawks to haye been slightly informed about natural history. 
The paper is an almost complete key to Lawson's Ilistory, 
so fkr as the natural history items are concerned, although it 
is not a continuous narrative." — Dr. T. F. Wood in sketch 
above. 



Edible fungi of North Carolina. Oar' 



deners^ Chronicle^ London, Oct. 9, 1869. 

See also Geological Surveys of North 

Carolina. 

Onrtla, W. A. Sketches of Co. A, second regi- 
ment North Carolina cavalry, May 1, 1861, to 
Jan. 1, 1862. Our Living and Our Deadi 1876, 
ii. 86-44. 



r, William F. An oration on the occasion 
of laying the corner stone of the monument to the 
memory of Louis D. Wilson. Raleigh : William 
W. Holden. 1860. ir, pp. 12. 
Delivered at Tarborougli, May 22, 1850. 

Duilel, Junius (1828-1864), ^rt>. Gen. C.S.A, 
Sketch of. Land We Love, 1808, v. 97-106. 

Sketch of. See Bennett, Risden T. 

Daniels, Josephus (1862-). Randolph A. Shot^ 
well, a patriot. (Raleigh, N. C.) State Chron- 
icle, July 14, 1887. 

Sketch of Adolphus Williamson Mangum. 

y. C. Univ. mag., 1891-92, xi. 1-22. 

Darsaa, Atlas Jones (1814-1883). Sketch of. 
See Bennett, Risden T. 

Datm, Edward Graham '(1838-), A.B. Mary- 
land and North Carolina, 1780-1781. Baltimore: 
Maryland Historical Society. [Friedenwald Co. 

1893.] 8*". pp. 100. niueiraiione. 

Address delivered Oct. 15, 1802, at tlie Guilford Battle 
Ground on the occasion of unveiling the monument to tlie 
soldiers of the Maryland line. 

Raleigh's new fort in Virginia, 1686, Mag. 

ofAmer. I/isi., May-June, 1893, xzix., pp. 469-470, 
reprinted; also same article in National mag., 
July-Aug., 1893, xviii., pp. 147-167. Illustrated. 

Prof. Daves ha^i formed a plan to purchase and preserve 
the ruins of the fort. 

Davtts, Graham (1836-), Maj. 0. S. A. A 
sketch of the military career of Captain John 
Daves of the North Carolina Continental line, . . . 
with some facts of local and family history. Balti- 
more : Friedenwald Co. 1892. 8^. pp. 16. 
Portrait. 

The Society of the Cincinnati in North 

Carolina. N. C Univ. mag., 1892-93, xii. 1-7. 

Town and county resolutions of 1774. 

Mag. ofAmer. Hist, July-Aug., 1893, xxx. 88-90. 



DawicUoiit A. T. Reminiscences of North 
Carolina. The Lyceum (Asheville), Jan. 1891. 

DavldMniOolIes** Sketch of. South Atlantic, 
March, 1878, pp. 381-391. 
See aUo Smith's ffittory qf Education in N. 0. 

The semi-centennial catalogue of David- 
son College, Davidson, N. C. (1837-1887). Ra- 
leigh : E. M. Uzzell. 1891. 8<'. pp. iv. 2, 194. 

Edited by W. A. Withers, A.M. (class of *83),wiUi the 
assistance of J. U. Hill, A.M. ('54), W. W. Moore, D.D. 
(•78), W. a Lacy, D.D. ('59), H. L. Smith, A.M. ('81). 

Semi-centennial addresses, historical and 

commemorative. Raleigh : £. M. Uzzell. 1888. 
12^1 pp. vii. 166. 

Delivered at the annual commencement, June 18, 1887. 

Gmtente: Semi-centenary address, by A. Leaser, pp. 
1-34; Historical sketch, by Jctliro Rumple, D.D., pp. 25-70; 
Admini«tration of R. II. Morrison, D.D., by J. G. Ramsay, 
pp. 71-107; Administration of Samuel Williamson, D.D., by 
A. White, pp. 100-119; Administration of Drury Lacy, by 
Rev. R. Z. Johnston, pp. 121-130; Administration of J. L. 
Kirkpatrick, D.D., by Prof. J. R. Blake, pp. 131-189; Ad- 
minirtration of G. Wilson McPhail, D.D., LL.D., by W. A. 
Milner,'pp. 141-146; Administration of Prof. J. R. Blake, 
chairman, by Col. Alex. R. Banks, pp. 147-155; Administra- 
tion of A. D. Hepburn, D.D., LL.D., by £. C. Smith, 
pp. 157-165. 

Dawl«, WUliam Richardson (1766-1820). Life 
of. See Hi/BBARD, F. M. 

Oration of A. D. Jones on. JV. C. Univ. 

mag., 1887-88, vii. 41-46. 

See eUio Clark, Walter. 

Davla, George (1820-), LL.D., Attorney Oene- 
reU, C. S. Address before the literary societies of 
the University of North Carolina. Raleigh. 1866. 

8^. pp. 86. 
On the early times and men of the lower Cape Fear. 

— 7- A study in colonial history : A lecture 
delivered before the Historical Society of Wil- 
mington, Kov. 26, 1879. Wilmington. 1879. 8^. 

pp. 84. 

An examination of the work of Hawks with reference to 
the ** Gary Rebellion," and the career of John Porter and 
Edward Moseley, in which the harsh Judgment of the 
historian is well answered. 

An episode in Cape Fear history. South 

Atlantic^ Jan. 1879, pp. 246-269. 
Reprinted in Spnint's Stetchee cf Oapt Fear hittory. 

Dawla, Joseph John (1828-1892), LL.D., Justice 

Supreme Ct., N. C. A vindication of North 

Carolina. Wake Forest Student, 1890-1891, x. 

1-12; reprinted. 

Address delivered before the alumni association of Wake 
Forest College, June 10, 1890. 



r« North Carolina institution 
for the instruction of. See Feet, Henry P. 



Blind, Institution for the 
education of. Early history of. Our Living and 
Our Dead, 1874-76, i. 267-261. 



i8 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Ptelaraftoa «f ladUpcndMKoe. Papers on 
the nttUlcation of, by North Caroliuu Historital 
Magaxintt Not. 1868, 2d ser., It. 250-258. 

XMtom^ Daniel. Party-tyranny , or an occasional 

bill in miniature; as now practised in Carolina. 

Humbly offered to the consideration of both 

Houses of Parliament. London. 1706. sm. 4". 

pp. 2, 80. 

Reprinted in OoL Bee, ^ N, 0,, ii. 801*eS3, sltbonirh 
rslstinff iolelj to Sooth Cftrolins. Bsld to hsre been tlie 
work of DeFoe. 

]>• GrAflsmreldtt Christopher, Baron and 
Landgrave of Carolina. The narratlTe of. JV. C. 
Colonial Record», i. 905-990. 

His scconnt of the eitsbliehment of his colony of Swiat at 
KewBern,N.C. 

The originnl MS. it in the public Ubrsry of Yrerdon, 
Switserisnd; tnaelsted by A. DuFour kuU now^ first 
pnblished. 

A f cneslo^ of the De Grsffenreidt fiunily In Snrope and 
AflMrics is now being prepiued by Miss Clare De GnUfen- 
leidt of Wsthington, D. C, s descendsnt of the Biupon. 

TMkmt James Allison, LL.D., Compiler. His- 
tovy of the North Carolina Chowan Baptist Associa- 
tion, 1806-1881. Raleigh: Edwards, Broughton 
ft Co. 1882. 12^. lip. 111. 



% John Watts. The battle of King*B 
Mountain. Series in Military Oageite (New 
York), 1861-62. 

King's Mountain, the Oriskany of the 

Soulb, a harbinger of assured triumph. HieioriccU 
Mmga»ine, Mar. 1869, 2d seri, y. 189-197. 

The affair at King's Mountain. Mag. of 

Amer. Hiri., Dec. 1880, v. 400-424. 

The affkir at King's Mountain, 7th October, 

1780. New York and Chicago: A. S. Barnes & 
Co. 1880. 4"*. pp. 43. 

Beprinled from the Mag, of Amer, HUA. 

The battle or affair of King's Mountain, 

Saturday, 7th October, 1780. Being the address 
deliyered at the annual meeting of the New York 
Historical Society, on the evening of Tuesday, 4Ui 
Jamuiry, 1881. New York. 1881. ^. pp. 8. 



William L. Wilmington, North 
Carolina, its present and future. February, 1872. 
Owr Lining and Our Dead, 1874-75, i. 159->160, 
281-288. 



L, Robert I. History of Grassy Creek 
Baptist Church, from its foundation to 1880, with 
biographical sketches of its pastors and ministers. 
Raleigh : Edwards, Broughton & Co. 1880. 12*'. 
pp. 150. 

De^« J. Warren S., Contributor. King's Moun- 
tidn, reprint from a rare tract in possession of the 
Shelby family of Kentucky. Mag\ of Amer. Mist. , 
Not. 1880, t. 851-869. 



IMak* Robert Paine. Sketch of ; portrait. See 
Battle, K. P. 

Discourse upon the life and character of 

Thomas Ruifin. Greensboro: Reece & Elam, 

1889. 8"*. pp. 22. 

Dellrercd before bur and citizens uf Uuilford coanQ-, 
27 Aug., 18S9. 

DlokMB, James Henderiion (1806-1862), M.D. 
Memoir of, by Thomas F. Wood, M.D. X. C. Med. 
Journal, Sept. 1891, xxviii. 188-152, |7or/rai/. 

A sketch of the topography and of the 

diseases which have prcTailed in the town of 
Wilmington, North Carolina, during the decade 
embraced by the years 1841 and 1850. Trans- 
actions Medical Society of North Carolina^ Wil- 
mington, May 1852, pp. 10. 

- Report on the^ topography and diseases of 
North Carolina, delivered before the American 
Medical Association, 1860. 

Dillas^, Richard, M.D. The historip tea-party 
of Edenton, 1774. Ma^. of Amer. Hist., Aug. 
1892, xxviii. 81-88. 

An incident in N. C. connected wltii taxation; portrait of 
Mrs. Barker, president of tlie party. 

Declaration of Independence by a colo- 
nial church. rhid. Dec. 1892, xxviii. 401-410, 
illustrated. 

By the vestry of St. Paul's ciiurch, Edenton, 19 Jane, 1776. 

Wmoek, Susan T., M.D. Sketch of. See 
Clarke, James Freeman. 

IHuiud Swamp CsbaI. Exhibition of, etc. 
1825. Perkins's Check List. 

IMx, Dorothea L. Memorial soliciting a State 
hospital for the protection and cure of the insane. 
Raleigh : Seaton Gales. 8^. pp. 48. 

Submitted to the Gen. Ass. of N. C, Nov. 1848. 

D«bbla, James Cochran (1814-1857), See. 
Xavy. Sketch of; portrait. See Banks, James. 

DoolcMrj* Claudius. Governor Johnston's ad- 
ministration. JV. C. Univ. mag.f ieS7-88, vii. 
205-214. 

A criticism of the traditional view. He sliows tliat the 
colony grew in spite of, rather than because of, Gov. John- 
ston's worlc. 

l>odc*t David, pseudonym. See Blacknall, 
0, W. 

I>«iiCl*e« John, Preshy. mtn., compiler and 
au^or. The history of Steele Creek Church, 
Mecklenburg, N. C. Columbia, S. C. : Presby- 
terian Publishing House. 1872. 12^. pp. 81. 



L» Jerome ( 1864-) . Sketches of prominent 
living North Carolinians. Raleigh, N. C. : Edwards 
& Broughton. 1888. 12°. pp. 820. 

Edition 1000 copies; contains 147 sketches, but all the 
subjects are not prominent men. 



mSTORICAL LITBRATURB OF NORTH CAROLtNA. 



19 



Dojl«« J<^m Andrew. The English in America. 
3 vols. London and New Tork. 1882-87. 8*. 

Vol. i. reUtM to the Soathern coloniei; rolf. IL and iU. to 
those of New Sof^aod. 



Bohert B., BptM, mtn. Historical 
notices of St. James's parish, Wilmington. Phila- 
deiphU. 1848. 12*. pp. 86. 

Sermon on life and character of Thomas 

H. Wright, M. D. WUmington. 1861. 12*. 



U Robert B., Jr., JEpis, min. St. Paul's 
parish, Edenton. Perry's ui«ter. Spit, Churckt 
1. 688. 

— •— Colonial parishes and church schools. 
Sketches of Chwreh Hittory in N. (7.» pp. 161-179. 



% Lyman Copeland (1815-1891), LL.D. 
Biographical sketch of, by Renben Gold Thwaites. 
Proceedings Thirty^Ninth Annutd Meeting Wis^ 
consin Siaie Historical Society, 1891, pp. 74-95. 

King's Mountain and its heroes : History 

of the battle of King's Mountain, October 7th, 
1780, and the eyents which led to it. Cincinnati : 
Peter 6. Thomson. 1881. 8<l pp.612. P^rtraiU, 
maps, 9,nd plans. 

BcTiewed in The Nation, December 1, 1881, by Prof. 
Herbert B. Adams, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Unirenlty. 

*' WInsor and others have criticised it as ponseitlng the 
Ikolts which hare erer been conipicnoaa in Dr. Dnq>er'a 
treatment of hit material : a deeire to be encyelopBdie, and a 
laclc of proper historical perspectire. Bat eren with these 
fhults, King*a Mountain is, as a bnllcy storehoQie of informa« 
tion obtained at first hand regarding tlie RerolutioBary war 
in the Sonth, a permanently raluable eontribuUon to American 
historical literature."— R. G. THwarrBS in sketch abors. 

The Mecklenburg Declaration : Its origin, 

history, and actors. With a bibliography of its 
literature, and explanatory documents, fl pp. 474. 

Left finished in MS. by Dr. Draper at his death, Aug. 88, 
1891, and as yet nnpublisbed. 

Draytmst John. Memoirs of the American 
Revolution, from its commencement to the year 
1776, inclusive, as relating to the State of South 
Carolina, and occasionally to the states of Korth 
Carolina and Georgia. Charleston, S. C. : A. £. 
Miller. 8"*. vol. i., pp. xxvii. 480; vol. ii. 899. 

From materials coliected by his father, William Henry 
Drayton. 



William (d. 1677), First governor 
of North Carolina, 1664-1667. Sketch of. See 
Wbbks, Stephen B. 

Ihidley* Guilford. Military services of, in the 
Revolution. So. Lit. Mess., May and June, 1845, 
xi., pp. 281-287, 370-875. 

Dnss^'t Shepherd Monroe. Balsam groves of 
the Grandfather Mountain. Banner Elk [N. C] : 
Shepherd M. Dugger [Presses of J. B. Lippincott 
Company]. 1892. 12^1 pp. 187. Illustrations. 

A tale of the western North Carolina mountains, " associat- 
ing the quaint and uncultured pioneer mountaineers with the 



refined and learned of the city," with inlbnaatlott rSlaltag to 
the section, its hotels, height of ssoantaiBS, etc. —the whole a 
Jumble of rhetoric and bathos. 

IhoMMitt N., editor. North Carolina as a plaeo 
for investment, manufactories, mining, stock rais- 
ing, fruit and farming. What northern residents 
in North Carolina say of it as a place to live in ; 
resum^ of material resources, etc. Raleigh. 1879. 
B^. pp. 88. 

DwjrekiBAkt Evert A. Memoir of Francis L. 
Hawks. New York. 1871. 8*. 

Eftrllt R. Edward. North Carolina and its 
fisheries. The Fisheries and Fishing Industries 
of the United States, f ii., 1887, part xii. 499-518. 

Jjmtnkt William. Memoir of Hon. John Hall. 
y. C. Univ. mag., 1859-60, ix. 449-455, porira4i. 

EAwArds, John ElUs (1814-1891), D.D. The 
personal history of the Virginia conference. Vir' 
ginia Chnferenes Annual. Richmond. 188S. 8*. 
pp. 125-141. 

Until 1886 North Carolina was included in the Yirginia 
conference ; this address deals largely with early Methodists 
and Methodism in North Carolina. 



Morgan (1721-1795). History «f 

North Carolina Baptists. 

Preserved in MS. from which extracts were pvbllslied by 
J. C. Birdsonff in Btblieal Recorder, 1880. 



Weldon Nathaniel (1788-1878). 

Memoir of Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. 

Raleigh : Raleigh Register, 1862. 8^. pp. 22. 

Probably the only distinctively historical paper published 
in North Carolina during the war. 

Esglsatmi, £4^*1^ • The beginning of a nation. 
Century Magazine, Nov. 1882, xxv. 61-88. 

— — The aborigines and the colonies. Aid' 
May 1888. xxvi. 96-114. 

For these articles Mr. Eggleston photographed a part of 
the Grenville collection of the original drawings, from which 
De Bry's engravings of North Carolina Indians were saade. 
The Grenville collection is larger than the Sloane coUectloBt 
which has been supposed hitherto to represent the origiaahi 
of De Bry. The pieces of the Grenville collection are also 
immensely superior in technical quality, and Mr. Eggiestoo 
argues in 7%€ KaiUm tot April 33, 1881, that the Grenville 
collection contains the original drawhugs used by De B17, 
and not the Sloane collection ; that they *' are John White's 
originals, which were used with some changes by De Bry, 
and that the Sloane pictures are not original, but early sad 
rather clumsy copies." 

EliUBf Harper J. Condensed history of the 
hattle of King*s Mountain. [1880.] 8^ pp. 82. 

Advertisements on every other page; sketch prepared by 
W. R. Capps. 

A sketch of the hattle of Guilford Court 

House. Greensboro. 1887. 8*. pp. 86. 

An advertising scheme also. 

laila, John W. (1820-1861), Gov. of N. C. 
Speech delivered before the Democratic 8tat« 
convention in Raleigh, March 9, 1860. Ralel^ : 
Standard office. 1860. V*. pp. 15. 



20 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



J. W. Report on the exploration of 
a prehifltoric mound in Madison county, N. C. 
Mtpofi Peabody Museum (Cambridgei Mass.), 
1884, iii. 861. 

ErwlBt Joseph J. Memoir o.. See Pxabsov, 
W. S. 



^ Col. David. The narratiye of Col. 
David Fanning (a Tory in the ReTolutionary war 
with Great Britain) : giving an account of his 
adventures in North Carolina, from 1775 to 1788> 
as written by himself. With an introduction and 
explanatory notes. New York: Reprinted for 
Joseph Sabin. 1885. 4^50 copies; 8«, 200 copies, 
pp. zxvi., 86. 
Sabin'B Beprints, second series, No. 1. 
. A second title page is as abore, but after notes ** Rich- 
mond, Ya. Printed for prirate distribution only, 1861. In 
the first year of the Independence of the Confederate States 
of America." It was edited by and published at the expense 
qf Thomas H. Wynne of Richmond, and is announced as 
** Historical DocumenU relating to the Old North State, 
No. 1," with introduction by John H. Wheeler. There 
were no other issues. 

F«r«be«, L. R. A brief history of the slave 
life of Rev. L. R. Ferebee, and the battles of life 
and four years of his ministerial life. Written 
from memory to 1882. Raleigh: Edwards, 
Broughton & Co. 1882. 8*. pp. 24. 

liaUjr, James B. (1781-1857), Meth. mtn. 
Autobiography of: or Pioneer life in the West. 
Edited by W. P. Strickland, D.D. Cincinnati: 
Methodist Book Concern. 1857. 12®. pp. 455, 
8. PtHTtraiti and 5 plaies. 

Bom in North Carolina; died in Ohio. 

. FlsbAr, F. C. Mountain region of North 
Carolina. Appletoh't Joumal, March, 1887, xvii. 
198-204, illuttraied. 

' Flake, John. Maryland, Virginia, and the far 
south in the colonial period, ffarpef's Magazine, 
Feb. 1888, Izvi., 414-425. 

Dr. Smith is mild in his censure when he remarks (ffittory 
of Education in North Carolina, p. 16) concerning this 
paper that Prof. Flske " shows an ignorance of his subject 
which is inexcusable." See replj of D. B. Goodloe in 
Wheeler's ReminiMceneei* 

Foote, William Henry (-1869), Presby, min. 

Sketches of North Carolina. New York. 1846. 

8^. pp. xxxii., 557. 

Deals almost entirely with the Presbyterian Church in 
North Carolina. It is one of tlie most valuable and accurate 
books dealing with the history of the State in existence. A 
note at the end says that material for a second volume was 
ready, but it was never published. 

Foroe« Manning F., Brev. Maj. Oen, U, S. A. 
Marching across Carolina. Sketches of War Mis' 
tof-y, 1861-1865, prepared for Ohio Commandery 
of the MUita/ry Order of the Loyal Legion of the 
U, 8,t vol. I. 



Fort TUkmr. Naval battles of, by Kit Kelvin. 
Misiorieal Magazine, 8d ser., Dec. 1878, ii. 868- 
872. 

Union ilde. 

— — Accounts of. Our Living and Our Dead, 
1874-75, i. 318-825. 

Reunion of survivors of. Ibid, Mar. 

1876, iv. 100-107. 

See TowLE, G. F. 

Defence and fall of. Southern Mistorieai 

Society Papers, 1882, x. 846^68. 

Letter of Gen. Bragg and Col. Lamb's reply. 

Fowl«r, Joseph S. Sketch of John H. Wheeler. 
Wheeler's Reminiscences. 4*1 pp. i.-x. 

IVaaUbt Oowatj* Sketch of the history and 
resources of. Franklinton, N. C. : Franklint4m 
Weekly, 1884. 8<'. pp. 10. 

Prepared for State exposition of 1884 by Wm. F. Green, 
Joe. J. JHvis, and Arthur Arrington. 



L, The State of. Land We Love, 1868, 
V. 18-22, 109-116, 216-229. 

FtmuI OomadaaloBst. Report of Thomas 

Bragg, S. F. Phillips, and W. L. Scott. 

Charges of corruption and fraud in the issue of railroad 
bonds, 1800-70; known as the Bragg Commission. 

Report of W. M. Shipp, J. B. Batchelor, 

and James 6. Martin. Raleigh : James H. Moore. 

1872. 8*». pp. 577. 

Charges of corruption and fraud under act of aaiembly of 
1871-72; known as the Shipp Commission. 

Fraj, John J., Tecuher. Life and sendees of. 
M, 0. Teacher, June 1886, pp. 416-425, poriraii. 

Fuller, Edwin Wiley (1847-1876), Poe/. Mem- 
oir of, in his Angel in the Cloud. New York. 
1878. 1881. ^^A,~xrv,, portrait. 

G«l«« Christopher, Chief Justice of N. C. 
Sketch of; portrait. See Hatwood, M. D. 

OmlM, Seaton (d. 1878.) Sketch of George 
Burgwyn Anderson. Land We Love, 1867, iii. 
93-100; reprinted in Our Living and Our Dead, 
1875, iii. 827-885, portrait. 

- Sketch of Gov. Jonathan Worth, n. i>. , 
K. P.[c. 1870.] 8'». 

GalM, Weston R. {d. 1848). Tribute to. 
N. p., K. D. [<;. 1849.] 8<'. pp. 28. 

CkMtOB, William (1778-1844), LL.D., Justice 
Supreme Ct., N. C. Memoir of; portrait. See 
Manlt, M. £. 

Judge (raston as a literary man. See 

Battle, W. H. 

An eyening with. See Creect, R. B. 

Sketch of; portrait Reprinted from 

national Portraits. 8^. pp. 8. 

- Life and character of. See Stramob, 
Robert. 



HISTORICAL LITSRATURB OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



21 



Ghwtom, William, LL,D. Set Philups, S. F. 

Letter of. H, C. Univ. mag,, 1887-<88, 

vii. 61-63. 

Explains how he, while a Cttbollc, can hold office vader the 
82d clause of the N. C. constitution of 1770. See also his 
speech on this clause in the Debates of the conrentioa of 
1885, pp. 364-S06. 



I, of the Blount family. Wheeler*t 
ReminxBceneety Ivii.-1xi. 

of Barring r family. Ihid, Ixii. 

of Hanrey family. See Hubbard, F. M. 

of Haywood family. Wheeler** RtminiU- 

cenees, Iziii.-lxT. 

of Phifer family. 7Wd. Ixri.-lxxiy. 

of White and Newby ikmiliet. See 

CmSAGAB. W. F. 

0«nt]&« Frederick Angustns (ci. 1898). Mineral 
resources of N. C. Practical JfUgazine, ill. 452. 

Minerals of North Carolina. Washing- 
ton: Government Printing Office. 1891. ri 
pp. 119. 

See aUo Geological Barreys of N. C. 

Gvoloffioal 8«rr»3ra of North Carolina. L 
Olmsted-Mitchell Survey, 1824-1828. 
A geological and mineralogical surrey. 

Report on, pt. i., by Denison Olmsted. 

Raleigh. 1824. 12». pp.41. 

pt. ii., by D. Olmsted. Raleigh. 

1825. 12«. pp. 58. 

the geology of N. C., pt. iii., by 

Elisha Mitchell. Raleigh. 1827. 8''. pp.48. 

Report, pp. 8-27 ; a paper on gold mines of X. C, by C. E, 
Bothe, reprinted from [Silliman's] Anur. Journal of Science 
lor 18S6, is added, pp. 28-43. 

Report of Professor Mitchell, 1829. 12*. 

pp. 8. 

Bdition of each, 1600 copies. 

Tliis surrey is of interest chiefly as being the earliest of the 
American State surreys. It is little more than a rouirh 
ireoiogical reconnaissance of the State, during which 'special 
attention was given to minerals of economic importance. It 
was proposed by Prof. Olmsted in a letter to the State 
board of internal improvements of N. C, 1 Dec, 1821. 

II. Emmons Survey, 1852-1864. 

A geological, mineralogical, botanical, and agrienltural 
surrey. Its general purpose was the investigatioa of the 
geology, natural history, and natural resources of the State. 
Its particulHr object, the development of the mineral, mining, 
and agricultural interests. 

Report of Prof. Emmons on. Raleigh. 

1852. 8*. pp. 181, errata 1. 

Edition, 6000 copies. 

- Report on the progress and present state 
of. Raleigh. 1855. 12^ pp. 20. 

Geological report of the midland counties 

of North Carolina. New York : G. P. Putnam & 
Co.; Raleigh: Henry D. Turner. 1856. 8^. pp. 

xz., 852» engravings. 

Edition, 1000 copies. 



Gkolocieal swrrvy* of North Carolina. II. 
National foundry — Deep River, N. C. Raleigh: 
Holden & Wilson. 1857. 8«. pp. 14. 

A special report on the advantages of the valley of Deep 
River as a site for the establishment of a national foundry. 

Agriculture of the eastern counties; to- 
gether with description of the fossils of the marl 
beds. Raleigh : Henry D. Turner. 1858. 8*". 
pp. zri., 815, engravinge. 

Edition, 9000 copies. 

Agriculture of North Carolina, part ii. : 

Containing a statement of the principles of the 
science upon which the practice of agriculture as 
an art is founded. Raleigh: W. W. Holden. 
1860. ^. pp. 112. 

The swamp lands of North Carolina. 

Raleigh : W. W. Holden. 1860. 8«. pp. 95. 

Thin is part ii. of the surrey; all the above by Prof. 
Ebenezer Emmons. 

The woody plants of North Carolina by 

M. A. Curtis, D.D. Raleigh: W. W. Holden. 
1860. 8*. pp. 124. 

This is called part 111., botany. Contains a catalogue of 
tlte plants of the State, witli descriptions and history of the 
trees, shrubs, and woody vines ; reprinted entire in Hale's 
Woode and Tind>er» cfN. C, pp. 11-190; reviewed by C. L. 
Hunter in N. Q. Univ. mag., 1800-01, z. 112-114. 

Agriculture, geological and descriptive 

sketches of lower North Carolina, and the ad- 
jacent lands. By Edmund Ruffln of Virginia. 
Raleigh : Institution for the Deaf & Dumb & the 
BUnd. 1861. 8«. pp. 296. 

- Report on the natural resources of that 
part of North Carolina west of the Blue Ridge. 
Raleigh. 12<'. pp. 8. 

Leg. 0OC. 25, app. B, session 1800-01. 

- Report of progress on survey. Raleigh. 

pp. 6. 
Leg. doe. 20| session 1800-01. 

— -^ Catalogue of the indigenous and natural- 
ized plante of the State, by M. A. Curtis, D. D. 
Raleigh : Institution for the Deaf & Dumb & the 
Blind. 1867. 8«. pp. 168. 

Fart iii. Botany. 

III. Kerr Surrey, 1864- 

A geological, mineralogical, botanical, sad agrienltiml 
survey. 

Report of progress. Raleigh. 1867. 8*". 

pp. 59. 
Edition, 8640 copies. 

Ihid. 1869, pp. 67. 

Appendix to, 1878. Raleigh. 1878. 

8*. pp. 24. 
Edition, 6000 copies. 

A brief abstract of report of 1873 and a 

general description of the State, geographical, 
geological, climatic, and agricultural. 

- Report of progress. 8*. pp. 4. 
Pub. doc. No. 16, session 1872-78. 



22 



HISTORICAL LITERATUBE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Gkolocieal mwrwf of North Carolina. III. 
Report of, yoI. i. ; physical geography, r^sum^, 
economical geology. Raleigh. 1876. 8®. pp. xriii. 
815, 120, platei 8, geologiccU map. 

Edition, 1000 copies. 

— Report of State Geologist on the expendi* 
turea of the Geological Surrey. 8^. pp. 17. 

Pab. doc. 21, session 1870-77. 

— — Report of State Geologist concerning the 
establishment of a department of agriculture, etc. 
%^ pp. 12. 

Pnb. doc. 88, session 1870-77. 

— — Fhysiographical description of North Caro- 
lina. Raleigh. 1879 and 1882. 8''. pp. 32. 

All the above by Prof. W. C. Kerr. 

— Minerals and mineral localities of North 
Carolina, by F. A. Genth and W. C. Kerr. 
Raleigh. 1881. V". pp. 122. 

Edition, 6000 copies. 

Another edition. Raleigh. 1886. 8^. 

pp. 128. 

This composes ehapt. i. yoI. ii. Geology of K. C. 5m 
GaxTB, F. A. 

Map of North Carolina, by W. C. Kerr. 

assisted by Capt. William Cain, C.E. New York. 

1882. 
Scale, 10 miles to the Inch. 

— Ores of North Carolina. Raleigh: Jos- 
ephus Daniels. 1888. 8^. pp. 237. Mining and 
geologiccU mop, eut$. 

Chapter ii. toL ii. Owlogy cf IT.C. (pp. 128-860); the 
work of Dr. Kerr, finished by George B, Hanna. 

Edition, 8000 copies. 

Prof. J. A. Holmes, the present State Geologist, tells me 
tliat no more reports relating to the Kerr surrey will be 
published. 

GibMA* William. Proposals by Walter Gibson, 
merchant in Glasgow, to such persons as are de- 
sirous to transport themselves to America, in a 
ship belonging to him, bound for the Bermudas, 
CAROLINA, New Providence, and the Caribby 
Islands, and ready to set sail out of the rirer of 
Clyd, against the 20 of February in this year 
1684. 8<» 

An ezcessiyely rare, if not nnique, broadside, probably 
printed at Glasgow, and apparently unknown to Sabin and 
other Aderican bibliographers. The text refers only to 
Carolfaaa, and details the cost of transportation and mode of 
land tenure, Ac. Henrt Stetbhs's Catalogue, No. 26. 

Oilobrist, Robert C, Maj. C. 8. A. The 
Confederate defense of Morris Island, Charleston 
harbor. From Charleston Year Book. 1884. B^. 
pp. 55. Map of Morris and part of Folly islands 
and plan of fort Wagner. 

Defense made by troops of S. C, 6a. and N. C. 

OXbnmt^ John A. Sketch of. LiTingston's 
Biographical Magazine, i, 843 ; portrait 

CMlaaore,James Roberts [Edmund Kirke]. The 
rear guard of the Revolution. New York: 
D. Appleton & Co. 



Gllmor«, James Roberts [Edmund Eirke]. 
John Sevier as a commonwealth builder. D. Apple- 
ton & Co. 1887. 12^. 

A sequel to The rear guard of the RevoltMon. 

** Mr. Gilmore writes rery well and Is an enthusiast in his 
admiration of John Scrier. . . Hin two books, above men- 
tioned, excite an interest eqnal to that produced hj, perhaps, 
any historicul romances since Sir Walter Scott's. . . Tlilr, 
however, will be accomplished laryrely at the expense of the 
intelligence, honesQr, and character of the f^ovcmors, legifi- 
lators, and people of North Carolina." . . Mr. Gilmore's 
'* xeal in defense of Sevier has prompted him wilAilly or ig. 
norantly to libel the people of North Carolina. He certainly 
does slander them shameftilly."— Col. A. M. Wadoeli., in 
JfeiDi and Obeerver. 

€Md Mines of North Carolina. Description 
and values of the mining properties of the North 
Carolina Gold Mining and Bullion Co. [New 
York?] [1890.] 8*». pp. 16. 

Contains valuable historical items relating to North Caro- 
lina mines and minerals. 

GiNidloe, Daniel R. Letter of, to Charles 
Sumner, on the situation of affairs in North Caro- 
lina. [Raleigh (?). 1868.] 8*. pp. 16. 

, Series of articles on the Mecklenburg 

Declaration in Raleigh Sentinal, June 18, to 
Sept. 6, 1878. 

Mr. G. is *' noted as the first North Carolfaiian, since the 
unknown gladiator of 1830 and Prof. Phillips in the N. C. 
Unit, mag. of 1853, who has ventured to dispute the authen- 
tidty of tlie 20th of May Resolyes." — L. C. Drapkr. 

These articles were replied to by Maj. Clement Dowd in 
the Charlotte Democrat under the name '* Hornet," and by 
John H. Wheeler. Mr. Goodloe was sustained by " His> 
toricus." 

Mr. Goodloe also argues against the 20th 

May Declaration in New York Herald extra. May 
20, 1875 and in National Republican, Washington, 
May 20, 1875. 

North Carolina in the colonial period. 

Wheeler's Reminieceneee, pp. xi.-xzxvii. 

In answer to John Fiske's Mar)fland, Virginia^ and thm 
far aouth in the colonial Period, [q. v.] 

Gordma, James B. {d, 1864). Brig. Gen. 
C. S. A. Life of. See CoveLES, Wm. H. H. 



Gorauua, William R., C. S. A. Sketch of. 
Our Living and Our Dead, 1875, ii. 18-24. 

GnJuuB, James A. Historical sketch of 
Twenty-seventh Regiment, North Carolina In- 
fantry. Our Living and Our Dead, 1874-75, 
i. 97-122 ; 1875, ii. 409. 

Address before Orange Guards, 1 Oct. 

1878. y. C. Educational Journal. 



Joseph (1759-1886), Maj. Gen. 
Closing scenes of the Revolution in North Caro- 
lina. N. C. Univ. mag., 1852, i. 182-195. 

Reminiscences of the Revolution. Ibid. 

1854, iii. 404-410. 

Corrections to various misstatements concerning the Brit- 
ish invasion of N. C, 1780-81. 



mSTOftlCAL LITERATURE 09 NORTH CAROLINA. 



23 



L, Joseph, Maj, Gen, His declaration 
of Revolutionary serrices, with letters and memo- 
rial of Jndge Mnrphey. Ihid, 1854, iii. 488-450. 

Revolutionary history of North Carolina. 

British invasion of 1780-81. Ihid. 1855, iv. 827- 
858 (name of author misprinted here as Samuel 
Joseph Graham); 1856, v. 1-16, 49-66, 97-110, 
with map of King*s Mountain, 145-168, 193-205. 

Grahuft, WUliam Alexander (1804-1875), 
LL.D.i OovemoTt U. S, Senator ^ Sec, Navy^ Can* 
didaiefor Vtce^Presideni, C.S. Senaior, 

Memorial address on life of; portrait. 

See McGbhbb, Montford. 

Message of. Raleigh. 1846. 



In regard to N. C. bi»tory. 
British invasion 



of North Carolina, 



1780-81, in Cookers Revolutionary N. (7., pp. 147- 

209, 235-236; also in JV. (7. Univ. mag,, 1853, 

a. 97-127. 
Delivered before N. Y. Historical Society, in Jan., 1858. 

Speech of, on the amendment of the State 

constitution. 8*1 pp. 29. 

Delirered in Senate, Dec. 12, 1854. 

Memoir of Archibald D. Murphey. N. C. 

Univ. mag., 1860-61, x. 1-12, portrait. 

Discourse on life and character of 

George E. Badger. Raleigh : Nichols, Gorman & 
Neathery. 1866. S"". pp. 84. 

Delirered at request of bar of Wake County in Baleigb, 
July 19, 1866. 

Memorial oration on life of Thomas 

Ruffin. Raleigh: Nichols & Gorman. 1871. 8^. 

pp. 34. Portrait. 

Delivered before State agricultural society, at annual fair 
in Raleigh, Oct. 21, 1871. 

Address on the Mecklenburg Declaration 

of Independence of 20th May, 1775. New York : 
E. J. Hale & Son. 1875. 16*". pp. 167. 

Delirered at Charlotte, 4th Feb., 1875. A learned, ex- 
haustive, and eloquent defense of the declaration of May 20. 
Some original documents, including those published by the 
legislature in 1831, and the autographs of the signers are 
added. 

OraiiTilU Graya. The, C. S. A. Sketch of. 
Our Living and Our DeadjlS7o, iii 181-182. 

GraTeSf Calvin. Sketch of. Livingston's Bio- 
graphical Magazine^ i. 187, portrait. 

OraTM, Ralph Henry (1851-1889). Sketch 
of ; portrait. See Winston, George T. 

Oraj, Asa (1810-1888). Notes on a botanical 
excursion to the mountains of North Carolina, &c. 
Amer. Jour. Science^ April, 1842, zlii. 1-49. 

Green, Wharton Jackson, C. S.A,, M. C. Sketch 
of Gen. Bryan Grimes. N. C. Univ. mag.t 
1888-89, viii. 195-209. portrait. 

Sketch of Gen. Thomas Jefferson Green 

((2. 1868). Ibid. 1891-92, xi. 217-228. 

Sketch of Gen. Robert Ransom. New 

Bern (JVl (7.) Journal, May 12 and 19, 1892. 



GreeiMt George Washington. Life of Maj. 
Gen. Nathanael Greene. 8 vols. New York. 
1867-71. 8*. Portrait, and map. 



Nathanael (1742-1786), Maj. Gen, 
American Army. Sketches of the life and cor- 
respondence of. See Johnson, William. 

Greeaaboro, Album of. n. p., v. d. [c. 1891]. 
8"*. pp. 48. 

Grej, Robert, Colonel. Observations on the 
[Revolutionary] war in Carolina. JV. C. Univ. 
mag., 1858-59, viU. 145-160. 

Chrifla, Martin I. J. North Carolina not an 
enemy of our faith. American Caiholie BtMtorical 
ReeearckeB, July, 1890, vii. 129-182. 

Grisslbj, Hugh Blair. The Virginia Conven- 
tion of 1776 : A discourse delivered [at] William 
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va., July 8d, 
1855. Richmond, Va. 1855. %\ 

Pp. 20-30 argue against the authenticity of the Meeklen- 
burg Declaration of May 90, 1776. 

Address before the Pennsylvania Histori- 
cal Society, on the Mecklenburg Declaration of 
Independence. 

Delivered Jnlj 9, 1857, and designed as an answer to Dr. 
Hawks. He presents an elaborate and powerftil argnmeati 
deduced firom the statements of the aged men, as pointing 
to the Resolyes of the 81st as die ones they heard. The So- 
dety solicited it for publication, but It has remained in 



U Bryan (1828-1880), Maj. Gen. Q. S, A. 
life of. See Lohdoit, H. A., and Green, W. J. 

Extracts of Letters of Major-Oeneral 

Bryan Grimes to his wife, written while in active 
service in the army of northern Virginia. To- 
gether with some personal recollections of the 
war, written by him after its close, etc. Com- 
piled from original manuscripts, by' Pulaski 
Cowper, of Raleigh, N. C. Raleigh, N. C. : 

Alfred Williams & Co. 1888. ^, pp. 138. 
New edition, 1884. pp. 184. 



L, W. L., Minister. History of Metho- 
dism in Davie county. N. p. [1890.] l(y*, pp.58. 
Reprinted from Raleigh ChrUtian Advocate. 

Groaaonp, Ben S., and ZeisUvt W. B. The 

heart of the AUeghanies, or western North Caro- 
lina, comprising its topography, history, resources, 
people, narratives, incidents and pictures of travel, 
adventures in hunting and fishing, and legends of 
its wilderness. Raleigh : Alfred Williams & Co. ; 
Cleveland, O. : William W. WillUms. [1888.] 
8^. pp. 874. Mapt illu»traiion$. 

Gold* Book of northwestern North Carolina, 
containing historical sketches of the Moravians in 
North Carolina, a description of the country and 
iU industrial pursuits. Salem, N.C. : L. V. & £. T. 
Blum. 1878. long \^, pp. 109. 



H 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



GhiiiU to Capitalists and Emisramts* A. 

Being a statistical and descripdre account of the 
several counties of the State. Raleigh, K. C. : 
Nichols & Gonnan. 1869. 8*. pp. 186. Map. 

Published by K. C. htnd company. Cootaina letters flrom 
proninent citizens bn relation to soil, climate, pradvctioDa, 
minerala, etc., and an account of the swamp lands. 

HaUvyt, Richard (155S-1616), Editor. Col- 
lection of Voyages. 1698-1600. 

This collection contains nearly all the original material on 
the history of the first attempts of the English to Ax settle- 
ments in America. He prints : 

(1) The leUcrs patents granted by the Qaeen*8 Hi^es^ to 
M. Walter Baleigh, 1584 (ili., p. 248, uq.). 

(2) The first yoyage made to the coasts of America by 
M. FhUip Amadas and M. Arthur Barlowe, 1564 (Ui. S46). 
This narratiTe, as the context shows, was the work of 
Barlowe. 

(3) The yoyage made by Sir Bichard QranyUto ftw Sir 
Walter Balei^ to Virginia, 1684 (iiL 261). 

(4) An acconnt of the particularities of the employments 
ot the Englishmen left in Virginia by Richard Oranrille 
under the charge of Master Ralph Lane, General of the 
same (hi. 256). 

(6) The third voyage made by a ship sent in the year 1686 
to the relief of the colony phmted in VhrginU (iii. 266). 

(6.) A brief and true report of the new fi>and land of 
Virginia : by Thomas Hariot (iU. 266). This edition of the 
** Brief and True Report " is abridged. 

(7) The fourth voyage made to Virginia, with three ships 
in 1587, wherein wastransported the second colony (IiL 280). 

(8) The fifth Toyage of M. John White, into the West 
Indies, and parts of America called Virginia, 1600 (1601) 
(iiL 288). 

A new edition of Hakli^ was pubhshed in London, 1800- 
1812, 6 Yols., 4». Vols, i., iL, Ui., and a part of iv. are 
exactly reprinted firom the edition of 1606-1600. The re. 
flBBinder of the fourth and the whole of the fifth are ocenpied 
by reprints of various publicationa of Hakluyt and of otiien 
of his time. 

These documents will all be found in the new edition of 
Hakluyt, recently issued by E. ft 6. Ch>ldsmid of Edbibuxgh 
in 16 voU., and in their edition of l%s wiyagtt ofilu Mnglith 
notfoA io America, extraeUd/rom t^e otmpUU eoiUciUm €/ 
ffakluyVtvoyag—. 4 vols. Bdinbuxgh. 188»-1800. 8*. ii. 
pp. 276-688. 

Be9ldes the above, voL iL of The voyage* of the Vngttth 
nation to America contains John de Verraaano's report to 
Francis I., written at Dieppe, 8 July, 1624, giTing an account 
of his discoveries off the North Carolina coast. This was 
probably the first time that white men landed on this coast. 

The papers in regard to the settlement of Raleigh on 
Roanoke Island have been reprinted in America by Dr. 
Hawks, History of Iforth Carolina L, and by Increase N*. 
Tkrbox, Str Walter Raleigh^e Colony in America, 



U Edward Everett, Editor. Four letters of 
Sir Ralph Lane from Virginia. Archaeologia 
Americana^ 1860, iv. 
Sketch of Sir Ralph Lane. Ihid. 

Ha1«, Peter Mallett (1828-1887), Editor. The 

woods and timbers of North Carolina. Raleigh : 

P. M. Hale ; New York : £. J. Hale & Son. 1888. 

IT. pp. 272. 

A compilation from the botanical and geological reports of 
Drs. Curtis, Emmons, and Kerr, with information from the 
census bureau and a<»cumtp rpport* from rounH«»«. 



Part i. is a reprint entire of Dr. Curtis's Woody pUmt9 ^ 
N.C. (Raleigh. 1860.) 

** The forest wealth of N. C, it is believed, exceeds that of 
any other Stite." —iVo^ac«. 

In the coal and iron counties of North 

Carolina. Raleigh: P. M. Hale; New York: S. 
J. Hale & Son. 1883. 12*. pp. 425. Map. 

A compilation firom the geological reports of Drs. !?■"— >^*— 
and Kerr, Col. Laldley's and Admiral Wilkes' reporu to tlw 
war and navy departments, and from the census reports, 
supplemented by accurate sketches of the fiity counties. 

Hall« James, /)./>., Presby. min. Centennial 
addresses on life and character of. Covington, 
Tenn. : Tipton Record. 1885. B^. pp. 24 (i 
paged). 

Contains also sketches of his descendants who are preaehi 
Called on corer *' Bethany centennial addresses." 

A narrative of most extraordinary work 

of religion in North Carolina. Philadelphia. 
1802. 8*. 

Sabik, No. 20,784. Beprinted in Foote*s SJbetdkee qf 
J/brth Carolina. 

HaU, John (1767-1838), Judge, Memoir of; 
portrait. See Eaton, William. 



Wade. Night attack of 1st and 2d 
N. C. cavahT* upon Kilpatrick*8 division. Our 
Living and Our Dead, 1875, U. 166-170. 

The battle of Bentonsville. Century , 

Oct. 1887, xxxiv. 939-945. 



If John J. , Contributor. Two leaves of 
Revolutionary history. Accounts of the battles of 
King's Mountain and Musgrove's Mills. Amerieam 
Reviewt Dec. 1848, ii. 577-583. 

Taken down firom conversations with Gov. Shelby, by 
M. D. Hardhi. 

Kaiiot, Thomas. A brief e and true! re- | port 
of the new found land of Virs^nia. London. 
1588. 4''. 28 leaves. 

This edition is of great rarity. There are copies in the 
Harvard College and Lenox libraries, another in the Bridah 
Museum, and a fourth in the Bodleian, Oxibrd. 

In 1690 De Bry published Hariot*8 narrative with a map 
and twenty.three plates from the drawings of John White, 
and to secure more profit had the text printed in English, 
Latin, French, and German, thus offering four editions to 
the public. This was the only part of his collection of 
"Voyages" that appeared in English. It was alter the 
publication of this work that De Bry conceived the idea of 
his collections, and Hariot's narrative forms the first part of 
his " Great Voyages.*' Hariot is perhaps best known firom 
De Bry's English and Latin editions. 

The English edition : 

A briefe and true report | of the new foundland of VIr- 
ginia, I of the commodities and of the nature and man- 1 ners 
of the naturall inhabitants. Discouered by | the English 
Colony there seated by Sir Richard | Greinuile Knight In the 
yeere 1585. Which Rema- 1 ined Vndcr the gouemement of 
twelue mouethes, | At the speciall charge and direction of 
the Honou- 1 rable Sir Walter Baleigfa ICniglit, lord War- 
den I of the stannerics Who therein hatli beene ^uoured | 
and authorised by her Maiesde | and her letters patents : | 
This fore booke Is made in English | By Thomas Hariot ser. 
iiunt to the abouenamed | Sir Walter, a member of the 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



25 



Ckilony, and tliere | imployed in discouering. | Cnm GratU 
et Priylleffio Ca)«. Miit» special* | Francoforti ad Mo€- 
ntm I Typi9 loannU Wechelif Mvmtibtt vera TheodoH | Dt 
£rif anno CIJ 13 XC. | Venalet rtperivntvr in qffldna 
Siginntndi Feirabtndii \ [Colophon :] At Franck/ort, | 
inprinUd by Ihon We- \ chel, at Theodora dt Bry, owne \ 
coa$t and ehardgtt. \ MDXC. | Folio. 

TIic Englisli nariot of Dc Brj was reprinted in Kcw York, 
1871, by the photo-lithographic procesft. Folio, edition, 125 
copies. 

Also reproduced in 1888 at Manchester, Eng., for the 
Ilolbcin Society, fi'oui a copy belonging to the Earl of 
Crawford and Balcarres. 

AI«o rcpnxlnced by Bernard Quaritoh. London. 18B8. 
sm. 4*. 8*. pp.111. Jfri;) and 23 p/a/««. 

The Latin version : 

Admiranda narratio | Fida tamen, de Commodis et | Inco. 
larrm Ritibrs Virginian, nvpcr ( admodum ab Anglis, qvi k 
Dn. Bichardo | Greinvilo Eqvestris Ordinis Viro e6 in | Colo- 
niam Anno. M. D. LXXXV. dedvcti sunt | inventae, SvmtTi 
faciente Du. VValtero | Raleigh Eqrestrit Onliuii Virn 
Fodinarv | stanni prosfccto ex Avctoritate | Sercuissiiua) 
BeginiB Anglin. | Anglico scripta Sennone | k Tlioma llariot, 
eirsdcm Waltori Domesti- 1 co, in earn Coloniam misso vt 
Regionissi- 1 trmdiUgenterobserrarct | Nuncaytemprimvm 
Latio donata k j C. C. A. | Crm Cf ratia et Pnrilegio Ctos. 
Masii' spec" | ad Qradriennivni | Frtmco/ttriif &c., as abore. 



Cornelius (172B-1781), Rev. patriot. 
Sketch of. N. C, Univ. mag., 1855, iv. 134-188. 

Life and letters of. See Swaim, I). L. 

H«rrell, Eugene G., and Keathary, John B., 
Compilers. The North Carolina Speaker. Raleigh: 
Alfred Williams & Co. 1887. 12<*. pp. 200. 

Contains **u«w, original, attractive, and patriotic recita- 
tions and declamations" by sixty-nine native authors; selec. 
tious rearranged and adapted. 



I, Thomas C. Wartime expedients. 
N. C. Teacher. 



u William S. Flistorical sketch of Poplar 
Tent church. Charlotte, N. C. 1873. 8^. pp. 17. 

Read before Concord Presbytery, April 82, 1872; noticed 
in ffitt. Mag., July 1873. 

. Account of Granville county, 



N. C, in his sermons. 1821. — Perkins's Check 
List. 



U Cushing Biggs (1808-1880) and 
Sylvester. History of the church of God, from 
the creation to a.d. 1885; including especially the 
history of the Kehukee Primitive Baptist Associa- 
tion. Middletown, N. Y. : Gilbert Beebe's Sons. 
[1886.] 81 pp. xxiv. 1008. 

Church of tiod, pp. 2a-«60; Kehukee PrimitlTd Baptist 
AflM>ciation, 661-020; life of C. B. Uassell, pp. 027-038, 
portrait. 

It was the intention of the early members of the Kehukee 
Baptist Association [so called Arom a meeting bouse on 
Kehukee creek in Halifax county, N. C, where the associa- 
tion was organized in 1765] to have its history written and 
published at the end of each generation. The first history 
was written by Elders Lemuel Bnrkitt and Jesse Read 
[q. v.], and published in 1803. The second by Joseph Biggs 
[q. v] in 1834. In 1876 C. B. Hassell was appointed to pre- 



pare the thhrd edition, and also a history of the church from 
the creation. He had prepared nearly all the Kehukee and 
special Primitive Baptist history and the history of the 
church firom 4004 b.c. to 850 ▲.D. at his death, April 11, 1880. 
nu son was appointed to complete the work. He revised 
his father's manoacripts and brought the histoiy down fh>m 
▲.D. 850 to 1885. — Pre/ace. 

Tlie sections relating to the Kehukee Association, which 
alone concern N. C, are cast in the form of annals, and con- 
sist largely of indigested materiahi, with much relative to 
doctrine. 

Hawks, Francis Lister (1798-1866), />./>., 

LL.D.i Ptot. Epis. minister. Editor, Author. 

Memorial volume to. New York. 1867. 8*. 

pp. 71. 

Contains a sketch of his life by N. 8. Richardson, D.D.; 
a commemorative address by William F. Morgan, D.D., 
resolutions, Ac. 

Memoir of, by Evert A. Duyckinck. 

New York. 1871. 8t pp. 166. 

The early history of the Southern States. 

Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Georgia. 
Illustrated hy tales, sketches, anecdotes, and ad- 
ventures with necessary engravings. By Lambert 
Lilly, schoolmaster. Philadelphia : Key, Mickle & 
Biddle. 1832. V". 

Another edition. Boston: William D. 

Ticknor. 1841. 16**. pp. 192. 

Mecklenburg Declaration of Independ- 
ence, yew York Review, 1836, vol. i. no. 1, 
pp. 5-58. 

This article takes the form of a review of Prof. George 
Tucker's Life of Thomas Jefferson (3 vols., Phil., 1837, 8*). 

Tucker liad undertaken to defend Jefferson against J. Sea- 
well Jones [q. v.J. Dr. Hawks stoutly contends for the 
authenticity of the 20tli of May Declaration, and handles the 
memory of Jefferson roughly. He attacks his religious 
character, and charges him with plagiarizing several well- 
known phra.«cs from the Mecklenburg Resolves of May 20. 
Prof. Tucker defends Jefferson from the charge of plagiar- 
ism in " Defence of the Character of Thomas Jefferson against 
a writer in the New York lUview. Bj a Yirgmian." (New 
York. 1838. 8*. pp.46.) Tht Southern Literary Messen- 
ger for April, 1838, has a spirited article entitled "The New 
York Review of Mr. JeiTerson Reviewed," and m the num- 
ber for August Dr. Cyras L. Hunter replies to the writer 
and defends the Declaration of the 90tli of May. 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. N.C. Univ. mag., 1853, ii. 401-426, 
and reprinted in Cookers Revolutionary North 
Carolina, pp. 43-08, with autographs of signers. 

Delivered before New York Historical Society, 16 Dec, 
1868. See report in N. Y. Ikiily Times, 17 Dec, 1862. 

Battle of Alamance and War of Regula- 
tion, in Cooke*s Revolutionary North Carolina, 
pp. 13-41. 

Favorable view. 

Hints on the internal improvements of 

N. C. : respectfully addressed to his countrymen, 
by a North Carolinian. New York : John F. Trow. 
1854. 8*. pp. 50. Maps 2. 

Said to be the work of Dr. Hawks. 



26 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



vwkMf Francis Lister, D.D., LL.D. Address 
at Charlotte, N.C., 20th May, 1857, on the Meck- 
lenburg Declaration of Independence. The prin- 
cipal parts published in Charlotte Democrait copied 
Carolina Watehman (Salisbury), May 26, If. C. 
Whig, Charlotte, May 26, Raleigh Rtgiwter (semi- 
weekly), May 27. 
Contends for authenticity of 20Ch May. 

History of North Carolina : with maps and 

illustrations. Vol. i., embracing the period be- 
tween the first voyage to the colony in 1584, to 
the last in 1591. Fayetteyille, N. C. : E. J. Hale & 
Son. 1857. 8*. pp. 254. Map$ 3, iUuttraiionM 8 ; 
second edition, 1858 ; third, 1859. Vol. ii., 1668- 
1729. FayetteTille. 1858. pp. 591. Maps 5, 
illu$irations 2. 

Sabin, PietUmary of Bookt delating to America, says 
that the Ihird Toloma of this work wan printed and shipped 
south about 1801. I Imto never seen a copy, nor have I 
ever found any other mention of It. 

Dr. Hawks reprints in his first volume the narratives given 
by Uaklnyt [q. v.]. In the second he has reprinted many 
original papers that have more recently appeared in the 
Colonial Recordt Cif North Oarolina. 

Dr. Hawks possessed the broadest scliularsMp and the 
highest literary attainments of any one who has written on 
tlie histojry of N. C; but lie is at times bigoted and a 
partisan. Tlie second volume deals largely with social phe- 
nomena as the following contents wUl show : i. Ezplors^on 
and Settlemento; iL The Law and its Administration; Hi. 
Agriculture and ManuiitMStures; iv. Navigation and Trade; 
V. Religion and Learning; vi. Civil and Military History; 
vii. Manners and Customs. 

"In regard to the richness and value of his materials, 
Dr. Hawlcs has vastly the adyantage of his predecessors, 
wliile in historical Judgment and in skill as a writer he lias 
no very formidable competitors among them."— F. M. Hub. 
BABO in his elaborate review in North American Review, 
July, 1800, xcl. pp. 40.71. 

'* This work is largely documentary, but it U prepared 
with the well known skiU of one of the most eloquent writers 
and orators of his day, as well as one of the foremost of 
antiquarians."— C. K. AoAXS in his Manual of ffittorieal 
Literature. 

"In dealing with this subject of our early history, he 
[Dr. Hawks] would have done well to follow tlie lead of the 
great northern historian [Bancroft], instead of that of the 
English and Virginia Tories. But no carefkil reader of 
Dr. Hawks can fall to see that his patriotic feelings as a 
North Carolinian are In this regard orerbome by his rerer- 
cnce for the Church of EngUuid."— D. R. Goodlob In 
Wheeler's BenUniecencee, p. zx. 

Commentary on the natural history of 

Hawks's History of N. C. See Curtis, M. A. 



John (c. 1758-1826). Judge Hay- 
wood and his early contemporaries at the bar. 
See Battlb, W. H. 

Biographical sketch of. See Coltar, A.S. 

The natural and aboriginal history of 

Tennessee, up to the first settlements therein by 
the white people, in the year 1768. Nashville: 
George Wilson. 1828. 9^. pp. viii., 390, liv. 

The civil and political history of the State 

of Tennessee, from Its earliest settlement up to the 



year 1796, including the boundaries of the State. 
Knoxville, Tenn. : Printed for the author by 
Heiskell & Brown. 1823. 8«. pp. 4, 504. 

*' This work, only less rare than the Aboriginal History of 
Tennessee by the same author, contains a large portion of 
the material relating to the border warfare witli the Indians, 
narrated in his otiter work. The speculative and anti- 
quarian portions and descriptions of mouuds arc omitted In 
this volume, but the story of Indian conflicts and massacres 
is narrated with greater detail and minuteness, filling much 
the larger portion of the work. The story of the formation 
of the State of Franklin, and the civil war which ensued. Is a 
chapter of American history but little known, and scarcely 
exceeded In interest by any other." — Fibld. 

Reprinted by So. Meth. Pub. House, Nashville. 1891. 

Hajwoodf Marshall DeLancey. Sketch of 
Christopher Qale. Portrait. N. C. Univ. mag., 
1892-93, zii. 

Mr. Haywood has in preparation a genealogical history of 
the Haywood liunlly. 

Haywood* R. B. Memoir of Dr. William O. 
Hill. [Raleigh (?) c. 1877]. 8«. pp. 7. 

Hoaordf Ebenezer. Historical Collection of 
State Papers, 2 vols. Charter to Raleigh, i. 33. 

Holpor, Hinton A. (*<Guy Cyril"). Western 
North Carolina, nature's trundle-bed of recupera- 
tion for tourist and health-seekers. New York: 
South Publishing Co. [1886.] le^l pp. 80. 
UlustraUons, map. 

HoadoraoB* Leonard (1772-1838), Chief 
Justice. Memoir of; portrait i^ee Battle, W. H. 

N. C. Univ. 

L, John Franklin (1843-). History of 
North Carolina. 

A serial in 20 chapters In N. 0. Educational Journal, Jan. 
1884— Dec. 1885. Covers the period from earliest explora- 
tions to the death of Gov. Dobbs (1766). 

Historical sketch of Trinity College. 

Raleigh (N. C.) Register, 26 Mar., 1884. 

Honrjr, Robert (1765-1863). Narrative of the 
battle of Cowan *B Ford. See Schbnck, D., 
Editor. 



., Fhilo. Sketch of. 
nuig., 1856, v. 452-459. 



r, William Wirt, LL.D. Raleigh's settle- 
ments at Roanoke and Ouiana. Nar. and Crit. 
Hist. Amer., iii., chap. iv. 

Hoati, Nicholas Marcellus (1797-1856). Sketch 
of, with bibliography. See Atkinsok, George F. 

Horo of 76, A night with a. y. C. Univ. mag. , 
1855, iv. 198-199, 353-360. 

Howmt« Alexander, M.D. Historical account 
of the rise and progress of South Carolina and 
(Georgia. 2 vols. London. 1779. 8^. pp. xiv. 

347, ix. 309. 

Devoted particolarly to Sooth Carolina and Georgia, bnt 
contains much relating to North Carolina. 

Reprinted in Carroll's OolUcHonn with notes of correction. 

Dr. Hewat lived for several jears In Cliarle>ton, and while 
there collected original papers and detaohed use. for oae. 



HISTORICAL LITBRATURB OF NORTH CAROUNA. 



27 



L, Frank A. The Korfolk and Sovth- 
ern nulroad and iu commercial tributaries. Nor- 
folk : The Landmark. 1891. 8*. pp. 64. lUu*- 
traiiofUt ^BMtp of eastern N. C, 

HiddMi, William Earl. Addendum to the 
minerals and mineral localities of N. C. (#ee 
Geology of N. C). Journal of Eliska MiU^ll 
Seientific Society, 1889, ri. 46-79, cuU. 

HIU, Benjamin. Sketch of. See Bailkt, 
W. H. 

Hlllt Whitmill. Life and letters of. See 
SwAur, D. L. 

Hill, William, of Cape Fear, Sketch of. See 
HooPBB, A. M. 

Hill, William 6., M.D. Memoir of. See 
Hatwood, R. B. 

HUtm, WiUUm. A | Relation | of | A Dis- 
covery lately made on the Coast of | Florida, | 
(From Lat. 81 to 83 Deg. 46 Min. North Lat. | 
By William Hilton Commander, and | Commis- 
sioner with Capt Anthony Long, | and Peter 
Fabian, in the Ship Adventure, which | set Sayl 
from Spikes Bay, Aug 10, 1668, and was | set 
forth by Several Gentlemen and mer- | chants of 
the Island of Barbadoes | , etc. London, J. (7. 
for Simon Miller, 1664. em. 4*1 pp. 4, 84. 

Perh»ps the earliest publlcmtlon relating to the Carolinaa. 

Extremely rare. A copy in ** mssia-red levant mor. extra 
top frilt (Bedford), uncut,** brought $lift at the Brinley sale 
In 1880. 

Reprinted in y. (7. Ooloniai Record; 1. 



U James W., Col. C, S, A. Sketch of. 
Owr Living and Our Dead, 1875, ii. 84-86. 

Historical Soelotj «f Kortk OarollBA. 

First report of. Hillsborough: Dennis Heartt. 
1846. 8*. pp. 6. 

Proceedings in reorganization of. Our 

Lining and Our Dead, 1875, iii. 61--65. 

An account of. iV. C. Univ, mag., 1854, 

iii. 818-322. 

An account of. Souihem Literary ifsf- 

senger, zxii. 68. 

Hoke, W. J. What Lincoln county did in the 
late [civil] war. Our Living and Our Dead, 
1874-75, i. 429-434. 

Sketch of d8th N. C. regiment Ibid. 

1874-76,1. 545-551. — Correction to, 1875, iii. 180. 

HoldoB, William Woods (1818-1892), Lawyer, 
Editor, Reconstruction governor. Address deliyer- 
ed before the State Educational Association of 
North Carolina at Warrenton, July 1, 1857. Ra- 
leigh : Holden & Wilson. 1857. 8<*. pp. 82. 

Rolatae to educational history of the State. 



HoldoB, William Woods. Impeachment trial 
of, before senate of North Carolina. 8 yoIs, 
Raleigh: Sentinel. 1871. i. pp. 1-1088, appen^ 
dix 88; ii. pp. 1089-2270, appendix 10; iii. pp. 
2271-2666, appendix 108, index xi. 

Impeached Dec. 1870, of high crimes and misdemeaoors 
while goTemor. The trial began 23 Dec, 1870, and ended 
22 Mar., 1871. He wan found guilty on six out of eight 
counts, was deposed from office, and forever disqualified 
from holding any office of profit or trust in North Carolina. 

Answers to the articles of Impeachment 

[Raleigh?] [1870?] 8«. pp. 46. 

Address on the history of Journalism in 

N. C. y, C, Educational Journal. Second ed., 
Raleigh: Newe and Observer. [c. 1882.] 8*. 
pp. 28. 

DeliTered at ninth meeting N. C. Press Association ia 
Winston, June 81, 1881. 



i« Joseph Austin, B.S., State Geologist. 
Notes on the Indian burial mounds of eastern N. C. 
Wilmington (N. C.) Weekly Star, 26 Oct., 1888. 
Reprinted in Journal Elisha Miichell ScienHJU 
Society, IQSSSA. pp. 78-79. Reprinted. 8*. pp.6. 

Sketch of Washington C. Kerr; portrait 

and bibUography. Ibid. 1887, pt 2, 1-24; re- 
printed. 

Temperature and rainfall at yarions 

stations in N. C. Ibid. 1888, y. 81-41. 

^— Historical notes concerning the N. C. 
geological surveys. Ibid. 1889, ri. 6-18. 

Abstract of a more elaborate paper prepared for U. 8. 
geological survey. 

See also Geological Surveys of North 

Carolina. 

Prof. Holmes has in preparation a complete Ubliogfaplif 
of the geology of North Carolina. 



Johann Baptist. Virginia, MaiylandU 
et Carolina in America Septentrional!, represen- 
tatae a J. B. Homano. Norimbergae. 4726. [Map.] 



Archibald Maclaine (177&-1868). 
Sketch of. N. C. Univ. mag., 1866, iv. 67-^. 

^— Compiler. Abridgment of the memoirs 
of Msj. Gen. Robert Howe. Ibid. 1868, ii. 209- 
222, 806-819, 868-864, 467-467; 1864, iii. 97-110, 
14&-161 ; 1866, iv. 826-828. See Howe, Robert. 

William HiU of Cape Fear. Ibid. 1868, 

u. 187-197. 

Sketch of Gen. John Ashe. Ibid. 1864, 

iii. 201-209, 866-377. 



% John DeBerniere (-1886), A.M. 
Sketch of. See SpENCsa, Mrs. C. P. 



% William (1782-1876), LL.D. A 
lecture on the imperfections of our primary 
schools and the best method of correcting them. 
Newbem : John I. Pasteur. 1882. 8*. pp. 28. 

DeliTered before N.C. Institute of Education at Chapel 
HUl, 20 June, 1882. 



28 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OP KORTH CAROLINA. 



% William, LL,D* Sketch of Edward 
Jones. N, C. Univ, mag,, 1856, t. 887-360. 

Fifty years since. Ibid, 1869-60, ix. 

577-^11. Reprinted, Raleigh: Holden & Wilson. 
1859. S% pp. 50. Second edition, Chapel Hill : 
John B. Neathery. 1861. B^. pp. 84. 

Address before alumni association of Uniy. of N. C, 18M. 



u Robert. A Brief Description | of | The 
Province | of | Carolina | On the Coasts of Flor- 
eda. I And | more particularly of a New-Planta- 
tion I begun by the English at Cape Feare, | on that 
River now by them called Charles-River, | the 
29th of May, 1664. | etc. . . . | Together with | 
a most accurate map of the whole Province. | Lon£ 
don, for Robert Home. 1666. sm. 4^. pp. 10. 
Map, 

Generally ftscribed to R. Home. Temanx-Compans says 
it is *• the first printed description of Carolina/' but Hilton 
[q. v.] was two 3'ears earlier. 

Reprinted in Carroll, it ^18. 

A fine copy of the original edition broogbt $82.M at the 
Brinley sale in 1880. 

Ludewig says the map is *' most (in-) accnrate." Some 
copies have an additional map, ** Carolina described." 



E, David, M.D.t LL,D, A biographical 
memoir of Hugh Williamson, M.D., LL.D., &c. 
New York : C. S. Van Winkle. 1820. • pp. 91. 

Noticed in If, A, Review (xi. pp. 81-88) by Sdward Erer. 
ett, with reference to the anecdote of the Ikmous letters of 
Hutchinson and Oliver. 



U Robert (c. 1732-1785), Maj, Gen, Rev, 
Army. Abridgment of the memoirs of. Com- 
piled by A. M. Hooper. N. C, Univ. mag,, 1853- 
1855, ii.-iv. 

Otmtente : — Battle of Moore's Creek and defeat of British 
at SuUiran's IsUnd, 1853, ii. 200-222, 805-819; comparison 
between Lee and Howe, 858-361; death of Gen. Moore 
and the appointment of Howe to the command of the 
Sonthem department, 457-467 ; retreat of Qen. Howe Arom 
Savannah, 1854, iU. 97-110, 14&-161; additional fltcts, 1865, 
iy. 826-328. • 

Sketch of. See Bbllamt, John D., Jr. 



u William Wirt. Life of F. X. Martin. 
New Orleans : James Graham. 1882. 8^. pp. 35. 
Edition, 1000 copies. Prefixed to second edition of BdUutin's 
Hlitory Hi/ LouUiana. 

Hubbard, F6rdyce Mitchell (1809-1888). Life 
of William Richardson Davie in Sparks*s Library 
of American Biography, xxv. (n. s. zv.). Bos- 
ton. 1848. 12"*. pp. 1-135. 

Address before Historical Society of 

Univ. of N.C. y,C, Univ. mag., 1852, i. 843- 
353. 

On the histories and historians of N.C; incorporated in 
liis review of Dr. Hawks's history. 

Genealogy of Harvey family of N.C. 

Ibid, 185C, V. 88-90 ; also in H, E, Hist, and 
Oeneal, Reg,^ Oct. 1858, xii. 813-316. 

Life and times of Richard Caswell. N.C, 

Univ. mag,, 1857-58, vU. 1-22. 



Hvbbard* Fordyce Mitchell. Who commanded 
at Moore*s Creek? Ibid, 1857-o8, vu. 137-152. 
In fltvor of Caswell. 

Successor to C, H, Wiley [q. v.]. North 

Carolina readers, 8 numbers. New York : A. S. 
Barnes & Barr. [Various dates.] 

Review of Hawks's History of North 

Carolina. North American Review, July, 1860, 
xd. 40-71. 

Includes a review of the work done in N. C. historj up to 
that date. 

Hubbard, Oliver P. An extraordinaiy Indian 
town in North Carolina. Mag, of Amsr, Biat., 
Oct., 1887, xviU. 339-341. 

An examination of statements made bj Brickell. 

HncbMif John. Life of Lawrence O'Bryan 
Branch. 1884. 8'! pp. 14. Bortrait, 

Hunpbreys, John T. Description of a pre- 
historic mound in Burke county. Smithsonian 
Report, 1879, p. 446. 

Hunt, Nathan (1758-1853), Quaker minister. 

Memorial of. Greensborough, N.C: Patriot, 

1854. 8^. 

Printed as an appendix to the minutes of the Yearly Heet> 
ing for 1864. 



r, Cyrus L., M,D, [List of plants 
found in and about Lincoln County, N.C, c 
1835.] 
Mentioned in Wood's sketch of M. A. Curtis. 

The Mecklenburg Declaration of Inde- 
pendence again considered; with remarks upon 
the Resolves of May 31st, 1775. So, Lit, Messen- 
ger, Aug. and Nov. 1839, iv. 481-486, 748-751. 

Dr. Hunter contends that these latter resolres, emanating 
Arom the committee of public safety, supplement tlie Dec- 
laration bj the people on 20th May. 

Notices of the rarer minerals and new 

localities in western North Carolina. Amer. Jour- 
nal of Science, 1853, Ixr. 373^78. 

Sketches of western North Carolina, his- 
torical and biographical. Raleigh: The Raleigh 
News, 1877. 8«. pp. xiii., 357. 

Deals principally with the Revolutionary history of Meck- 
lenburg, Rowan, Lincoln, and adjoining counties in North 
Carolina and South Carolina. It is somewhat fragmentary; 
a part consists of scattered facts and incidents gathered from 
tradition and recollection; a part from state and county 
archives, much of it hitherto unpublished. 

The botany of North Carolina, i^oic^ 

Atlantic, Dec, 1878, pp. 97-107. 



Ltohina, Thomas (b. 1730) Capt, eoth Regt,, 
foot, A topographical description of Virginia, 
Pennsylvania, Maryland, and North Carolina, com- 
prehending the rivers Ohio, Kenhawa, Sioto, Chero- 
kee, Wabash, Illinois, Missisippi, &c. The climate, 
soil and produce, whether animal, vegetable or 
mineral; the mountains, creeks, roads, distances, 
latitudes, &c., and of eveiy part, laid down in the 



mSTOBICAL LITERATUItB OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



29 



annexed map. With an appendix containing Pat- 
rick Kennedy's Journal up the Illinois river. 
London: MDCCLXXVIII. 8' pp.67. Map, 

tablet 2. 

Describes the country west of All^hauies and *' npon the 
riren Ohio and Misslslppi," done fi'om his owu surveys 
in the French and Indian war and in later reconnoitering 
tours, 1764-1776. It concerns North Carolina rery little ex- 
cept in name. An edition appeared at Boston : 1787. sm. 8*. 
pp. 30. PlatiM 2; tablf. Reprinted in third edition of 
Iuilay*s Wiettem Territoriet, pt. viii., pp. 485-511. 

Description topographique de la Vir- 

ginie, de la Fensylvanie, du Maryland et de 

la Caroline Septehtrionale, &c. Paris. 1781. 81 

pp. 68, with supplement. 

Hjaeiatli, S. A ruined State. [North Caro- 
lina in 1869.] Overland Monthly, July, 1869, iii. 
9>U. 



I, M. £. A preliminary list of additions 
to Curtis's Catalogue of indigenous and natural- 
ized plants of North Carolina — flowering plants. 
Journal of Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 1884- 
80, pp. 72-76. 

w-^Ai^'m "War «f 1T76. Historical sketch of. 
.V. a Univ. mag,, 1852, i. 132-187. 

Iredell, James (1750-1799), Justice Supreme 
Court, U. S. Life and correspondence of, 
edited by Griffith J. McRee. New York: D. 
Appleton and Company. 1857. 81 Vol. i., 
pp. viii. 570; ii., pp. vii. 605. Portrait, coat 0/ 

arms. 

There is a tradition that the name Iredell was originally 
Ireton, and that the family were collateral descendants of 
Henry Ireton, the 8on-in>law of Oliver Cromwell. The story 
of Judge Iredell's life is told in his letters and those of his 
IHends, including all the men who were prominent in Rerolu- 
tionary times in North Carolina. Many of tlie Judge's own 
letters were written in the press of business ; but they hare 
an elegance and vivacity not always found in such produc- 
tions. Tlie book is the best and almost only authority for 
the social, political, and intellectual life of N. C, 1776-1800. 

Tlie printing of these volumes was paid for by James C. 
Johnston of Edeuton. 

Sketch of. N. C. Univ. mag., 1857-58, 

vii. 380-886; 1858-59, viii. 302-309. 

Based on McRee. 

Iwej, F. H. Address on life of W. M. Wingate, 

D.D., late president of Wake Forest College. 

Raleigh : Edwards, Broughton & Co. 1879. S"*. 

pp. 20. 
Delivered at Wake Forest College, June 13, 1870. 



I, James, Meth. min. Experience, 
labours, and sufferings of. n.p. 1842. 16^. 

A member of the S. C. Conference, which then indaded a 
large part of N. C. 

Jehns, John. Wilmington, N. C, during the 
blockade [civil war]. Harper's Magazine, Sept. 
1866, xxziii. 497-508. 



Bradley T., Brig. Oen. C. S. A. 
Letter on N. C. history to New York Tribune, 
copied in Our Living and Our Dead, 1875, 
ii. 424-429 
On Mecklenburg Declaration, etc. 

Jehmson* Joseph, M.D. Sketch of Johnston 
BUkeley. JV. C. Univ. mag., 1854, ui. 1-17, 48. 

Jehnaeiit Walter R. Report on the Coal Lands 
of the Deep River Mining & Transportation Com- 
pany, in Chatham and Moore counties, N. C, with 
analyses of the minerals. Albany : Weed, Parsons 
& Co. 1851. V*. pp. 21. Maps 5. 

The Report of the Directors is added, and paged 25-90. 



L, William (d. 1834), Justice Supreme 
Court, {/. S. Sketches of the life and corre- 
spondence of Nathanael Greene, major-general of 
the armies of the United States in the War of the 
Revolution. Charleston: A. E. Miller. 1822. 
4*1 Vol. i., pp. xi. 515, portrait; vol. ii. pp. 
476. 

Compiled chiefly firom original materials; deals with the 
British invasion of 1780-81 ; for its value with reference to 
North Carolina, see Schenck, David. 



Robert Z., Presby. minister. 
Sketches of Providence church in Mecklenburg 
county, N. C. N. C. Presbyterian. 1871-72. 

The administration of Drury Lacy, D.D., 

third president of Davidson College. Lincoln 
Courier, July 1, 1887; also in Semi- Centenary 
addresses of Davidson College, pp. 121-131. 

Historical sketch of Little Britain Presby- 
terian church, Rutherford county, N. C. [Lin- 
colnton:] Lincoln Courier. 1889. 8^. pp. 10. 

Historical sketch of Goshen Presbyterian 

church, Gaston county, N. C. Shelby: C. P. 
Roberts. 1889. 8''. pp. 9. 

Jotms, Edward (1762-1841), Lawyer. Sketch 
of. See Hooper, William. 

Jotms, Hugh. The Present State of Virginia 
. . . From whence is inferred a Short View of 
Maryland and North Carolina, etc. London, for 
J. CUrke. 1724. 8*. pp. 4, viU. 152. 

*' One of the scarcest works relating to Virginia, published 
in this ceatary.'*— Rich. 

Reprinted for Joseph Sabhi, New York, 1865, 8*. Fifty 
copies on large paper* 

Jones* Johnstone, Lawyer. The Carolina Mili- 
tary Institute. Our Living and Our Dead, 
1874-75, i. 625-628. 

Evidences of the Mecklenburg Declara- 
tion. Ibid. 1875, iii. 187-199,836-^45, 474-481, 

604-611, 720-728. 
In ikvor of declaration of May 20. 

- Report of the centennial celebration of. 
Ibid. 1875, iii. 49-61. 

- Compiler. See Rostar of N. C. troops in 
war with Mexico. 



30 



HISTORICAL LITERATURB OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



Jotms* Joseph Seawell (e, 1808-1855), of 
ShoccOi y. C. A defence of the Revolutionaiy 
history of Forth Carolina from the aspersions of 
Mr. Jefferson. Boston : Charles Bowen ; Raleigh : 
Turner & Hughes. 1834. B"". pp. xii. 848. 

Contents : —1. Hi8tor7 of the Berolution in North Carolina 
to the national Declaration of Independence. 11. The Meck- 
lenburg Declaration of Independence on the 20th of May, 
1776. IIL The character of Wm. Hooper; appendix. 

Jones writes with a reckless rigor and intensity. He 
grows eloquent over his work at times; but freqaently mU- 
takes abuse of the opposite Tiew for sober history. 

— Memorials of North Carolina. New 
York. 1888. 8*. pp. 87. 

"The bitterness of controversy has, at least* the good 
effect of signalizing events; and many a hurried student will 
perhaps pause to pbserve In what great matter it is that the 
skepticism of an Irving or a Jefferson is deemed vicious and 
reprehensible." ^ Preface. 

Discusses: Ralei^'s colony; the Mecklenburg Declara- 
tlon; Flora McDonald. 



Louise Coffin. In the hackwoods of 
North Carolina. Lippincotti Magtuine, Dec. 
1879, xxiv. 747-756. 

— In the highlands of North Carolina. 
Ibid, Oct. 1888, zzzu. 878-886. 



Washington Carnthers (1827-1885), 
Pk.D.t Tetuher, OeologUt, Sketch of, portrait, 
and bibliography. See Holmes, Joseph A. 

Our mineral wealth. South Atlantict 

Oct., 1878, pp. 484-495. 

The mica veins of North Carolina. Trans, 

Amer, Itut, Mining JSngineers^ 1880, viii. 457-462. 

— ^ The gold gravels of North Carolina. 
Ibid, 1880, viii., pp. 462-466. 

Origin of some new points in the topog- 
raphy of North Carolina. Amer, Journal of 
Seieneey 1881, 8d ser. zzi. 216-219. 

Some peculiarities in the occurrence of 

gold in North Carolina. Trans, Amer, Inst. 
Mining EngineerB^ 1882, z., p. 475. 

Geology of Hatteras and the neighboring 

coast (abstract). Bull, Phil. Soc., Washington, 
1888, T., pp. 28-80. 

Report on the swamp lands [of North 

Carolina]. Raleigh. 1888. pp. 28. 

A report to Gov. Worth in 1886. 
^— North Carolina, in Encyclopaedia BrOan- 
nicat 9th edition, vol. xvii 1884. 

Report on the cotton production of North 

Carolina, with a discussion of the general agri- 
cultural features of the State. Tenth U, S, Census 
Report^ Ti., pt. ii. 1884, pp. 88. 

Distribution and character of eocene de- 
posits in eastern North Carolina. Journal of 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 1884-85, pp. 
79-84. 

Brief reports on operations of the survey 

to Board of Agriculture. Mo, BuUetinf N.C. 



Dept. Agric, Dec, 1880; Jan. 1881 (misprinted 
1880); July, 1881; Jan.. Feb., Mar., Apr. and 
June, 1882. 

Mineral wealth of N. C. Ibid. Feb., 1881 

(misprinte«1 1880). 

Water-power and other manufacturing 

facilities of N. C. Ibid. Mar.. 1881. 

Chart and instructions for silk growers 

in N.C. /6tV2. Apr., 1881. 

History of silk culture in North Carolina. 

Ibid. May, 1881, June, 1882. 

For other papers see Geological Survey 

of N. C, Kerr Survey. 

KiiUUr, Frederick. Biographical notice of, by 
John Ward Dean. y. E. Hist.-Oeneaiog. Reg,, 
April, 1887, xli. 129-140, portrait. 

Beaufort, past and present. Continental 

Monthly, Apr., 1862. 

Roanoke Island. Ibid. May, 1862. 

- Historical sketch of the Indians who in- 
habited the eastern part of North Carolina. Mist. 
Mag., June, 1857, 1st ser., i. 161-169. 

Eztracu from a paper read before the X.E. HiRt.. 
Genealog. 8oc.. May 6, 1867. 



h E. Among the mountains of western 
North Carolina. Seribner's Monthly, March, 1874, 
vii. 518-544, illustr. 



U J- T.. M. D, Dismal Swamp of N.C. 

N, C. Univ. mag., 1878, i. 55-61, from Baltimore 

Herald. 

The £ncy, JSrit, puts this swamp on the icettem fMe of 
North America I 



U William Rufus (1786-1858), M.C., Sena- 
tor, Vice-President. Eulogy on life and character 
of. See Strange, Robert 

Obituary addresses on occasion of the 

death of. Washington : Robert Armstrong. 1854. 
8*. pp. 68. Portrait, 

Delivered Dec. 8 and 9, 1858, by Mr. Hunter of Va^ Mr. 
ETcrett of Mass., Mr. Cass of Mich., Mr. Doaglass of 111.. 
Mr. Clayton of Del.. Mr. Harris of Ala., Mr. Chandler of 
Pa., Mr. Latham of Cal., Mr. TViylor of O., Mr. A»he of 
N. C, Mr. Benton of Mo., Mr. Pliilips of Ala.. Mr. Atty. 
Gen. Cashing, Mr. Chief Jnstice Taney. 



% Theodore Bryant (1828-), LL.D., 
Editor. Contributions to the history of North 
Carolina published in Our Living and Our Dead, 
while editor of that journal : 

North Carolina at Gettysburg, 

1874-75, i. 198-197. 

North Carolina in 76, 1874-75, 

i. 484-442. 

On Gen. Wm. D. Pender and Pen- 
der county, 1875, ii. 176-179. 

- Number of troops furnished by 

North Carolina [in ciril war], 1875, ii. 481-434. 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OV NORTH CAROLINA. 



3« 



r, Theodore Bryant (1828-), LL,D., 
Editor, Contributions to the history of North 
Carolina published in Our Living and Our Dead^ 
while editor of that journal {coniinued). 

May 16, 1771 [battle of Almanace], 

1875, U. 484-440. 

May, 1771 : A retrospectiTe glance, 

1875, iU., pp. 89-48. 

Erents in North Carolina in 1765- 

66, 1875, iU. 170-180. 

The grioTances of the people — an 

ancient document [Regulators], 1875, iii. 814-821. 

Death of Hon. Wm. A. Graham, 

1875, iU. 892-396. 

Another witness — Gettysburg, 

1875, iii. 457-468. 

Some of the causes that led to the 

Regulation war, 1875, iii. 629-685. 

North Carolina generals, 1875, 

iii. 749-752. 

— — Oration on the life and character of ReT. 
Thomas G. Lowe. Weldon, N. C. : Harrell's 
Printing House. 1882. 8''. pp. 25. 



Celebration of the battle 

of King's Mountain, October, 1855, and the address 

of the Hon. John S. Preston [q. t.], together with 

the proceedings of the meetings and accompanying 

documents. Yorkyille, S. C. : Miller & Melton. 

1855. 8®. pp. 108. 
Preston's address, pp. Sd-TS. •^ 

Mr. Bancroft at King's Mountain. So, 

Lit. Meiienger, March, 1856, pp. 161-165. 

— Proposed centennial of the battle of. 

Yorkyille, S. C. : The Enquirer. [1880]. 8*. 

pp. 48. 
Contains Lathan's [q. v.] address and other papers. 



F. J. Description of a prehistoric 
mound in Montgomery county, N. C. Smithsonian 
Report, 1874, pp. 880-890. 



U George F. Precious stones in the U. 8. 
Barper^M Magazine, Dec, 1887, Ixxvi. 97-106. 
Contains accounts and lllnstrations of N.C. gems. 

Kn Kl«z. Testimony taken by the joint se- 
lect committee to inquire into the contUtion of 
affairs in the late insurrectionary states. — North 
Carolina. Washington: Goremment Printing 
Office. 1872. 8^ pp. xTi. 592. 

Proclamations by the goyemor of North 

Carolina, together with the opinion of the Chief 
Justice and the reply of the Governor. Raleigh : 
1870. S^, pp. 86. 

^— See also Battlb, W. H. 

— See also Holdbh, W. W., Impeachment 
trial of. 



Laboiilaje, Edouard. Histoire des £tats-Unis 
depuis les premiers essais de colonisation Jusqu'i 
I'adoption de la constitution f£d6rale. 8 toIs. 
Paris. 1870. ir. 

Les deaz Carolines, i., pp. 828-S88. 

One of the best short accoants of the colony to be foiuul 
in a general history of the U. S. The Fundamental CoBStl> 
tations of Locke are clearlj analysed and ftilly discnssed. 

IrfUdlcgr, T. T. S. Report on Deep Rirer 
timber and minerals. 
Ordered printed by U. S. H. of R., June 10, 1866. 

XiMul «f ihm Shy. Album of scenery on the 
Western North Carolina railroad. New York: 
Adolph Wittemann. 

XiMul We Xaore. A magaiine demoted to 
literature, military, history, and agriculture. Ed- 
ited by Gen. D. H. Hill at Charlotte, N. C. 

Contains a number of articles relating to North Carolina. 
Vol. i. May-Oct., 1886; U. Not., 1886-AprU, 1887; iU. May- 
Oct.,1887; W.NoT., 1887-April. 1888; t. May-Oct, 1888; 
Ti. Not., 1888-April, 1880. It was tlicn consolidated with 
The Kew KcUeUe Magaeine of Baltimore. 



F, James H. How Stonewall Jackson waa 
kUled. Our Living and Our Dead, 1875, iSL 
88-86. 
Work of the 18th N. C. 

Defense of Fort Gregg. Sou;ihem iKf- 

torical Society Papers, Jan., 1877, iii. 19-38. 5«t 
also reply to Gen. Harris, Mar., 1881, iz. 102-107. 

Letter, with official report on the battle 

of Gettysburg. lUd, Jan.-Feb., 1878, t. 88-46. 

History of Lane's Nortli Carolina brigade, 

JUd. Not., 1879-June, 1882, vu. 518; riU. 1, 67, 
97, 145, 198, 241, 396, 489; iz. 29, 71, 124, 241* 
858,489; z. 57, 206, 241. 



u John R. The battle of Gettysburg and 
the part taken therein by the 26th N. C. regiment. 
Chatham (N. C.) Record, Aug. 14, 1890. 



M Ralph (c. 1580-1604), Governor of 
Roanoke, 1585. Sketch of. See Halb, Edward 
Everett, in Arehaeologiea Americana, 1860, It. 
817-844. See also pp. 1-88. 

Sketch of. See Wbbks, Stephen B. 

Letters of. Ihid, pp. 8-18. 

Four letters sent home from the new fort in Virginia, and 
not found in Hakluyt. 

- Reports of his ezpediUon to and settle- 
ment on Roanoke Island, N. C, 1585. ^Sfee Hak- 
LUTT, Richard. 



U Charles. Letters from the Alleghany 
mountains. New York : G. P. Putnam. 1849. 

12«. pp. 188. 
Originally publtobed In the itatUmal TnUUigeneer, 

Lathaw, Robert, Minister. Historical sketch 
of the battle of King's Mountain. Yorkrille, 8. C. : 
The Enquirer. 8*. pp. 18. 



32 



HISTORICAL LITERATURE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



L, John {d. 1711), Jlittorian. Sketch 
of. See Weeks, Stephen B. 

— A New Voyage to Carolina; Containing 
the Exact Description and NeUural Hittory of 
that Country: Togeth