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SAN FRANCISCO 



HISTORY ROOM jfy 



m 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LI BR ARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



*m-^ y IVKiyC^JLU 




SAN FRANCISCO POLICE COMMISSIONERS 




J. Warnock Walsh 






Washington I. Kohnke 




Henry C. Maginn 




Deputy Chief James L. Quigli 



Chief Michael Mitchell 



Captain of Inspectors James English 



THEY HAVE GIVEN SAN FRANCISCO A GOOD POLICE ADMINISTRATION 



POLICE AND iPEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



■— «7 C*— «- ■ 



SACRAMENTO TAVERN 
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SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



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AND LUBRICATION 

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OPEN 24 HOURS 



RAMONA GARAGE 

C. R. Menzies, Manager 



606 J Street. - Dial 3-0098 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



LUX MARKET 



GROCERIES 



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SETZER FOREST 
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Manufacturers of 

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Ponderosa Pine Lumber 

Box Shooks 

Factory and Pattern Stock 

Pres-to-logs 

Timbers 



Mills and Factories at 

Greenville and Sacramento, Calif. 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



Featured in This Issue 




PAGE 


Mayor Robinson Has Good First Year . . . 


2 




5 


By Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball 




Chief Hicks Gives Sacramento Fine Service . 


6 


Sacramento P. D. Training Program .... 


7 


Jos. E. Rooney and Detective Bureau of 




Sacramento Police Department 


8 


Traffic Chief Bennett of SFPD 


9 


First Police Women for Sacramento P. D. . . 


10 


Capt. Charles of Sacramento P. D. Retires . 


11 


Sheriff Cox, Sacramento, Has More Deputies . 


12 


San Jose Police Dept. and the Five Day Week 


1? 


The Old Timers Fall 


14 


Richmond Has New Police Chief .... 


16 




17 


By Opie L. Warner 




Chief John J. Viarengo of Ukiah, Calif. . 


18 


Minimum Standards for Police Officers . . . 


19 


Editorial Page 




S. F. Grand Jury Praises Vice Controls . 


20 


Captain Alexander E. McDaniel 


21 


By Opie L. Warner 




Pistol Pointing 


22 


By J. ROSS DUNNIGAN 


Chief John P. Griffin of Willits 


26 


Sacramento's Tavern Ass'n. Does Good Work 


31 


Some are True — Some are False — 




Rate Yourself 


JO 





POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

Directory 



Page 1 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sen<ler. which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also he pleased to consider photographs of officers and of :nteres:ing 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020 - 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m., Hall of Justice 

Washington I. Kohnke, President 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John D. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quicley 

Dept. Sec'y.... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRicK....Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Edward Donahue 63 5 Washington Street 

Southern A. I. O'Brien Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission Joseph Walsh 3057 17th Street 

Northern Jack Eker 841 Ellis' Street 

G. G. Park Leo Tackney Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond George M. Healy 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside... .Michael Gaffey.... Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval John J. Wade 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero John Sullivan 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Bernard J. McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Edward R. Pootel 635 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Alexander McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk. ...Capt. Patrick J. Murray.. ..Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



When In Trouble Call SUttet 1-20-20 

When in Doubt 



Always At Your Service 



I533B9 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



FOSTERS . . . Lunch System 



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Wire or Manila Rope - Pipe - Valves - Fittings 

Bolts and Nuts - Hardware - Hand Tools 

Concrete Reinforcements 



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PHONE ORDWAY 3-3040 
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DEVINE 

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PAUL H. DEVINE, Principal 

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! San Francisco 



"Efficient 



Police 
Make a City of 
Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




™r peace officers* 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Mark Copyright) 



Vol. XXIV 



JANUARY 1949 



No. 6 



Mayor Robinson Has Good First Year 



Mayor Elmer E. Robinson has completed his first year 
as chief executive of the City of San Francisco. The first 
12 months of the administration of Mayor Robinson 
has been one filled with worthwhile accomplishments. 
Mayor Robinson has filled his commissions with competent 
and highly civic minded citizens of the city. He has ap- 




Mayor Elmer E. Robinson 

pointed able and tried men to important key posts. He 
has, by his long residence in San Francisco, having been 
born here, been able to approach the responsible position 
he now fills with a keen understanding of the metropolis' 
needs. His' long service on the Superior Court bench has 
indeed been very helpful. He has given a program for 
future improvements, including the all important matter 
of traffic, transportation, a second bay bridge, and other 
municipal requirements. Some will not be achieved during 
his first term, but he has planned them over a long 
term of years. 

During his first year the people have given him more 
money by voting multi-million dollar bond issues. 

But, particularly, we want to call attention to what he 
has done for law enforcement in San Francisco. 

He has appointed three men, noted for their successes 
in their respective business callings and for their active 
interest in the city's welfare. These men are Washington 
I Kohnke, J. Warnock Walsh and Henry C. Maginn. 



These three men selected Michael E. Mitchell to be the 
Chief of Police, James Quigley to be Assistant Chief of 
Police, James English to be Captain of Inspectors, and 
Edward Pootel to be Captain of Traffic, John Butler, 
Commission Secretary, Michael F. Fitzpatrick, Depart- 
ment Secretary and others who have proven their worth 
as heads of bureaus and departments. 

The Commission has given every encouragement to the 
rank and file of the Police Department, now numbering 
some 1500 men and women, in their sincere efforts to 
give the people of San Francisco the best in law enforce- 
ment. Racketeers and gangsters know this city is no 
place for them, as it has been for many years in the past. 
Organized gambling and prostitution have felt the weight 
of efforts of the police department and there is nothing 
that has happened in the past 12 months to lead them 
to believe they can move into San Francisco. There will 
be nothing in future months to change this happy 
condition. 

The fact that the military and navy high officials have 
given San Francisco a high place for lowering prostitution 
and for the low rate of venereal diseases is an important 
argument as to the efficient manner Chief Mitchell and 
his men have reduced this violation of the laws. 

Then it must be admitted the Crime Commission ap- 
pointed by Governor Warren has found no reason to 
swoop down on the city in its crusade against gambling 
and other forms of law breaking, including slot machines. 
All criminal activities are at a low lever in San Francisco. 

The Crime Commission don't by-pass any city or com- 
munity in its efforts to keep the bookmakers, slot machine 
interests and other forms of gambling from getting a 
foothold in any place in the state. 

Traffic has had a lot of attention from the Commission 
and the men over whom they lead. Strict law enforce- 
ment, where the fines, for violation of traffic laws, has 
poured into the city treasury more money than in any 
previous year, has done much to reduce accidents and 
deaths from traffic accidents. During 1948 there were 
eight deaths less than those of 1947. By opening im- 
portant thoroughfares into the city to one way traffic 
during rush morning and evening hours, and assessing 
heavy fines and towing fees for those who park on these 
streets during these rush hours, has speeded traffic to 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



and from the city and to and from outlying points within 
the metropolition limits. 

The Commissioners have looked well to the welfare of 
the members of the Police Department. They gave the 
go ahead signal for the amendments that provided better 
pensions to the men and women who make up our police 
force. They, through the far sightedness of Mayor Rob- 
inson, gave their full support to providing for a Chief 
of Inspectors and a Traffic Engineer, all of which was 
given a big affirmative vote of the people and have been 
given the necessary okeh by the state legislature. 

The present Commission has followed the procedure 
of rotating the position of president of the board as intro- 
duced by Attorney Walter McGovern who served on the 
Police Commission under the late Mayor Angelo Rossi. 
J. Warnock Walsh was the president during the first 
year of Mayor Robinson's administration and at the 
meeting on the first Wednesday of January Commissioner 
Kohnke was elected to the post, on motion by past Presi- 
dent Walsh. Commissioner Maginn will be the top man 
during 1950. 

During the past 35 years and more San Francisco has 
been highly favored by having outstanding men serve on 
its Police Commissions. It is indeed gratifying to know 
that Mayor Robinson has been able to get such competent 
men to serve in this highly exacting capacity. It means 
the city will continue to have the best in law enforce- 
ment, and as Commissioner Walsh said on stepping down 
as president this month: "We are united in the purpose 
of making our city a better place in which to live." 



LIEUT. W. W. WADMAN, U. C. CAMPUS 
POLICE TO FBI NATIONAL ACAMEDY 

Lieutenant William W. Wadman, 42, of the Univer- 
sity o!" California's Berkeley Campus Police Force, has 
been selected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation to 
attend the 40th session of the National Police Academy in 
Washington, beginning January 10. 

The U. C. officer has been granted a leave of absence 
to attend the 14- weeks course of intensive training in the 
latest methods of crime investigation and detection and 
will return to his duties on the Berkeley Campus when the 
course ends, University Comptroller James Corley an- 
nounced recently. 

According to F.B.I records in San Francisco, Lt. Wad- 
mar, is the first member of a campus police force appointed 
to the nitional academy from California. F.B.I, officials 
said he was probably the first campus officer to receive such 
an appointment from the Western United States. 

Born in New Zealand, the versatile lieutenant attended 
Wellington College there and excelled in music and cross- 
country running In addition ts winning a large collection 
of track medals he was awarded a music scholarship to 
Oxford University, England, and was graduated from 
Trinity College, Oxford, with a degree in music in 1921. 

Before he joined the University staff in 1934, he was on 
the Berkeley police department for five years and has also 
served as an Inspector for the Contra Costa District At- 



torney's office. He came to Berkeley from New Zealand 
in 1923 and before entering the police force, worked for 
a year on a ranch in Tehama County. 

Lieutenant and Mrse. Wadham are residents of Walnut 
Creek and have four children, one of whom is a U. C. 
graduate. 

In the twenty years since the founding of the National 
Police Academy, 177 police officers from California have 
been appointed to attend one of its sessions. 



TRAFFIC ACCIDENT COSTS 
OVER BILLION 

Traffic accidents during 1947 were responsible for an 
estimated $1,100,000,000 property damage, reports Na- 
tional Automobile Club. To the cost damaged property 
must be added an additional $1,550,000,000 to cover 
medical expenses chargeable against automobile accident 
claims and the value of services lost to the country both 
during the year and in later years, because of death or 
disablement. Estimated loss for deaths alone has been 
estimated at $530,000,000 by the National Safety Council. 

An increase in reportable property damage accidents 
is noted. Because property values and repair costs have 
soared since the war, many accidents that would have 
previously been considered negligible have become within 
necessary reporting range. 

Increased mileage rolled up by the automobiles today- 
shows a reflection in the number of deaths as the result 
of increased traffic volume. During 1925, for example, 
19 out of 100,000 persons were killed in motor vehicle 
accidents; however, in 1947, 22.5 out of every 100,000 
persons met their death in automobile accidents. Basing 
deaths on mileage records rather than population figures, 
however, there is an encouraging note. For example, if 
the 1925 record of 19 persons killed for every 100,000,000 
miles of travel was continued during 1947, National 
Automobile Club declares the result would have been 
the death in motor-vehicle accidents of about 50 individuals 
out of every 100,000 for the year. 

Alcohol still plays an important role in traffic deaths, 
for a survey of 23 states for 1947 indicates that about 
19 percent of drivers involved in fatal accidents had been 
drinking and almost 24 per cent of the adult pedestrians 
killed in motor vehicle accidents had been drinking. In 
one-quarter of the fatal accidents, a driver or a pedestrian 
was reported to have been drinking. 



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January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Law Enforcement a Profession 

Talk Given by Harry M. Kimball, Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation, San 
Francisco, at Graduation Exercises of the Fourth Class of the California Highway Patrol 
Academy, Sacramento, California, December 22. 



It gives me a great deal of pleasure to he here today to 
extend to you, the Fourth Class of the California Highway 
Patrol Academy, on behalf of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation a hand of welcome into the profession of 
law enforcement. I use the word profession advisedly 
because that is exactly what it is today. 

There are certain formal qualifications essential to be- 




Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball 

coming a member of the law enforcement profession. 
Beyond these, the measure of an individual's success may 
be summed up briefly — training and ability to cooperate. 

No amount of enthusiasm can compensate for "know 
how.''' The suspected thief may never be brought to 
justice because the well-meaning but untrained officer 
failed to recognize the value of a match case or a tool 
mark as evidence. The murderer being tried may win 
his freedom because an investigator, unaware of proper 
methods of preservation, has mishandled important evi- 
dentiary items. 

Today's criminal is adept in bending civilized man's 
achievements to his own purposes. The acetylene torch, 
electric drill, sub-machine gun, high-powered automobile, 
and airplane in the hands of the modern criminal must 
be countered by professional knowledge upon the part of 
the modern police officer. The factors involved in today's 
crimes differ from those of a generation ago. Law en- 
forcement, accordingly, must advance to meet the threat 
of the current rising tide of crime. 

The struggle of law enforcement to raise its standards 
and earn the right to the term "profession" has been a 
long, difficult and continuous one. 

The gains which have been made toward achieving the 



goal are the results, chiefly, of one factor. That factor 
is training. 

Only within recent years has the principle of intensive 
training for all officers been accepted as a necessity by 
the majority of law enforcement agencies. Police schools 
are today a part of every progressive department. The 
age of handing out a gun and a badge and assigning a 
beat is past. 

There was a time in the distant past when law enforce- 
ment was only the right of might. The strongest man in 
the community was usually elected or appointed to carry 
out the mandates of the people in the protection of society 
in its fundamental right to live free of oppression from 
the criminal, and to maintain its peaceful ways of living. 
All of these rights are still existent and are still fully 
guarded and fully protected not only by muscles, but by 
brains as well, and by close cooperation between the agen- 
cies and the individuals who today constitute the first- 
line guardians of law and order. 

You are now a part of that line. It will stand steadfast 
as long as you, and each of you, hold firm in your position. 
Police work today demands, among other things, emotional 
stability, instantaneous mental and physical reaction, and 
readiness to accept responsibility. To be effective, and 
to carry out the duties and accept the obligations which 
the processes of law enforcement casts upon us, we must 
work as one cooperative whole. What redounds to the 
success of one officer must, in the over-all picture con- 
tribute to the success of all of the members of our pro- 
fession and by the same token all that is derogatory to 
one officer must be derogatory to all members of our 
profession. Hold your place, hold it firmly, but above all 
hold it fairly and wisely with a view toward maintain- 
ing the respect and approbation of the public. We are 
all servants of the public, and we must at all times serve 
it well to the very best of our ability and yet always with 
astuteness and with dignity. 

We are living in difficult times. When the last great 
holocaust ceased, the individual citizen wished never to 
hear the word "war" again. That wish has not been 
granted. The atmosphere has again become electric with 
disturbances, doubt and fear. 

Only those with an ostrich-like mentality will proclaim 
that we in America have nothing to fear. We do have. 
More than anything, we have to fear the chaos and con- 
fusion which hysteria breeds. 

At this critical period of history, it is imperative that 
the members of our profession be aware of their tremen- 
dous individual responsibilities. Law enforcement officers 
are the balance wheel of a community. Their actions, 
more than of any other single group, are open to critical 
(Continued on page 73) 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1 949 



CHIEF HICKS GIVING SACRAMENTO FINE SERVICE 



Police Chief James V. Hicks of Sacramento has spent 
a busy 1 2 months this year building up a Police Depart- 
ment that will be a credit to his city and to the entire state. 

Two problems in particular have been a headache to the 
Chief, who jumped to the top job in the department from 
a patrolman's rank less than two years ago. 

They are gambling and a traffic situation that would be- 




Chief James V. Hicks 

come worse by the day if definite steps were not taken 
to combat it. 

When Hicks took over as Chief in March, 1947, he 
was told the policy of the city administration was to keep 
the lid on gambling. 

The criminal element did not believe in the edict, but 
month by month they have been learning that Hicks means 
what he says. Since he took over the reins in the depart- 
ment more bookmakers, who are responsible for the ma- 
jority of the complaints against gambling in the Capital 
City than any other element, have learned he means 
what he says. 

They know because since March, 1947, more book- 
makers have been thrown in jail than during any other 
comparable period in the city's history. 

And that isn't all. The kind of knowledge that pushed 
Hicks from the rank of lieutenant to a full colonel in 
the army during the war, has resulted in a new kind of 
prosecution of gambling cases in Sacramento. 

For example, last summer the bookmakers worked out 
a system they thought was pretty close to foolproof. They 
knew the men Hicks was sending to check on them and 
thought they were safe in their operations if they covered 
up when the local officers were around. 

But Hicks was not satisfied. So, quietly, he recruited 
a group of undercover men from out of town and went 



to work. And pretty soon some of the best known book- 
makers in town were facing a judge and some of their 
best customers were prepared to testify against them. 

The bad traffic situation in Sacramento also has received 
a shot in the arms from Hicks' methods. He has worked 
with City Manager Bartley W. Cavanaugh, the Sacra- 
mento Safety Council, the city council's advisory com- 
mittee on traffic safety and other local groups and the 
results are easy to see. 

On his recommendation, dangerous streets have been 
improved, needed ordinances have been enacted, motor- 
cycle officers are paid bonuses, and other improvements 
have been put into effect so the streets of the city are 
much safer than they ordinarily would be. 

Hicks is the kind of a Chief who is not satisfied until 
he is able to tell his men at first hand what things are 
about. For this reason he spent nearly three months last 
year studying the most advanced methods of police work 
at the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Acad- 
emy in Washington, D. C. 

He is insistent that the men who work under him have 
the best experience it is possible to give them, and has 
established a series of training courses for Sacramento 
policemen, based on FBI methods, which have received 
recognition throughout the state. 

I Continued on page 33 ) 



THYS COMPANY 

Edouard Thys, President 



MANUFACTURERS 



ENGINEERS 



STEEL FOUNDERS 



Route 2, Box 650 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, W49 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Sacramento P. D. Training Program 



Sacramento's training program for policemen has be- 
come recognised as one of the best in California. 

The people of Sacramento have come to know that 
when they call for an officer they get somebody who 
knows what things are all about — not just a fellow wear- 
ing a uniform. 

And during the last year more and more emphasis has 




Asst. Chief Fritz Kaminsky 

been placed on training newcomers in the right ways 
to do things. 

With the Sacramento department training is not just 
a matter of telling new men what the score is. Training 
here starts at the top. For this reason three members of 
the Department this year were sent to Washington, D. C. 
to the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National 
Academy. 

The three took their diplomas in stride, for they are 
hardly newcomers to police work: They are: Police Chief 
James V. Hicks, Chief of Detectives Joseph E. Rooney 
and Captain Kenneth C. Johnson. Johnson, under the 
direction of Assistant Chief Fritz Kaminsky, handles the 
department's training program. 

Kaminsky graduated from the FBI Academy in 1936 
— the second year of its existence. He is recognized as an 
authority on police training, and during the last year 
has been called on to help with training programs in 
various California cities. 

The Sacramento force has grown by 10 men this year, 
and it might seem from the outside that the training 
business is not so much of a problem. But for various 
reasons — retirement, deaths and offers of better jobs — 
there has been an unusually large turnover of men. 

One civil service list of eligibles has been exhausted 
completely and another list is being worked on. 



So Kaminsky and Johnson have been hard put to keep 
up with the needs of an adequate training program. 

But two full scale training courses, with all the trim- 
mings, have been put on this year, and another is being 




Capt. Kenneth C. Johnson 

planned for early in 1949, which will be the biggest of all 
time in Sacramento. 

"We try to do things in the most practical way possible," 
Assistant Chief Kaminsky said. "We don't go into a train- 
ing program with the idea that as old timers in the police 
business we are perfect and can't make mistakes. 

"Through the years we have found out the best way to 
show a young fellow what he should do is to tell him 
about the mistakes we, as old time policemen, have made. 
We try to explain what big blunders we have made and, 
by putting the human element into the thing, show the 
rookies what they should avoid. 

"We believe in teaching our men all of the scientific, 
modern angles of police work, and we do this to the 
fullest extent possible. 

"But you have to walk before you can run. And by 
the same token you have to be able to use your head 
before you can become a good policeman. So we do our 
level best to show our new men the hard headed, practical 
things they need to know to meet the situations they 
will meet every day." 

(Continued on page 35 ) 

T 



Gerald Clark 



Gene Huggins 



CENTRAL BOX CO. 

Telephone 5-4471 
P. O. Box 808 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Jos. E. Rooney and Detective Bureau of Sacramento P. D. 



The Detective Bureau of the Sacramento Police De- 
partment rang the bell this year. 

Under the able direction of Detective Chief Joseph E. 
Rooney, the plainclothes division rounded up the most 
troublesome lot of burglars, stick-up men and other as- 
sorted thugs seen in the Capital City in years. 




Chief of Detectives J. E. Rouni v 

The cold statistics will show at the end of the year that 
the damper has been put on major crimes and hundreds 
of thousands of dollars worth of stolen loot has been 
recovered. 

But behind the figures is another story. It is the story 
of how a hard hitting, hard working group of policemen 
broke the back of a crime wave before it really hit its 
peak. A great deal of credit goes to the men in uniform. 
And not to take an ounce of credit away from them, it 
still is true that the detectives took a leading part in 
the tight. 

In particular, the Sacramento department, after days, 
weeks and months of tracking down leads, rounded up 
three criminal gangs who were responsible for a big 
share of the crime in Sacramento. 

During the spring and early summer a safe cracking 
epidemic hit Sacramento. With a regularity that be- 
came alarming after a bit, merchants opened their places 
in the morning to find safes broken open. 

Rooney and the other officials of the department reali-cd 
they were not doing business with any amateurs. The 
safe jobs were being done by experts. The safes were 
cracked by men who knew their business and few clues 
were left behind. 

So a campaign was organized aimed at trapping the 
safe crackers in the act. Uniformed men and detectives 
were assigned to certain business places at night. The 
campaign paid off, thanks to a mountainous load of bore- 



some work and the sharp eyes of Sergeant Larry Trimble 
of the detective division. 

One night Trimble and his partner, Detective Bill 
Oakes, made a routine check of the Golden State Towel 
and Linen Service. Trimble checked the front of the 
place and noticed everything was as it should be. But 
when he looked in a back window he noticed immediately 
something was wrong. The place had a safe in the front 
room and another at the rear of a back room. There 
was no sign of anyone having broken into the building, 
but there was no safe in the back room. 

Trimble sent Oakes to watch the front of the place 
while he checked. Then he noticed a window had been 
pried open in an expert manner, leaving hardly a mark. 
There were two safe crackers in the building all right 
and pretty soon they were heard from. They dived out 
a window and ran for it. But Oakes was waiting and 
had called for patrol cars to help. 

As the burglars ran down the alley he fired, winging 
one of them in the arm. A patrol car pulled into the 
alley, blocking the way, and the pair were in custody. 

They were William Flowers and Robert Raymond 
Brown, a pair of burglars from southern California with 
records from here to there. 

{Continued on page 37) 



ASPHALT MATERIALS 
COMPANY 



Best of 
SERVICE 



1300 to 1400 A Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-0062 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



TRAFFIC CHIEF BENNETT of S. P. D. 



Strangers in Sacramento are learning not to run pedes- 
trians out of the crosswalks and not to use the streets for 
racetracks. 

The main reason is an Irishman named Patrick J. 
Bennett, who is Chief of the Police Department's Traffic 





Chief of Traffic P. J. Bennett 

Division. He and his crew of men have spent a weary, 
tiring year in facing a traffic situation that may not be 
impossible, but is the next thing to it. And they have 
gained ground. 

Bennett has faced a year of mixed victories and defeats, 
but at the end of it he will be able to smile with the 
thought that his long range program of making the streets 
safe has progressed. 

On the other hand, the traffic death record will be some- 
what worse than it was in 1947 — 21 persons have been 
killed so far in 1948 in Sacramento compared with 19 
for all of 1947. 

Yet, some of the people who know the situation wonder 
how it was ever possible, in this fast growing community 
which has as many cars per capita as just about any other 
place in the world, it was possible to keep the increase 
as low as it is. 

Sacramento's streets grew out of wagon tracks and 
during the last 10 years the town has grown as nobody 
ever expected it would. 

And to make a bad situation a lot worse, this year has 
seen the biggest turnover in personnel ever experienced 
by the traffic division. Some of the old timers quit for 
other reasons, but many of them went on to better paying 
jobs, with which Bennett could not compete. 

As a result he has lost 1 1 of his best men this year. 
Anybody who knows the traffic law enforcement business 
is aware of the fact it takes a special kind of fellow to 
make a good traffic officer. And with even the best men, 
it takes years of work before they can be considered 
really good. 



This means that in the face of the toughest problems a 
Traffic Chief in Sacramento ever has been confronted 
with, Bennett has had to work with many inexperienced 
men. They have been more than willing, and have done 
an excellent job considering the fact they were new at 
the business. But for their Chief it has been a trying 
year. After all, you can't send a new man out to chase 
speeders on a motorcycle in wet weather, when he never 
rode a bike until a few weeks or months ago. 

But despite all the handicaps, Bennett is proud of this 
year's record of the traffic division. And justly so. 

"We have begun a drive designed at selective enforce- 
men," he says. "This may sound like something technical 
that doesn't mean a lot, but to my mind it is one of the 
most important things in traffic law enforcement. 

"What we have done is this: We have studied the 
record of traffic accidents here carefully decided what 
caused most of them. And we are concentrating on 
those violations, to the exclusion of other violations when 
it is necessary. 

"For example, one of the things we have known for a 
long time, was that violation of the pedestrian's' right of 
way has been a main factor in traffic deaths. But when 
16 out of the 21 traffic deaths in Sacramento were caused 
bv motorists running into pedestrians the situation was 
absolutely appalling. 

(Continued on page 41 ) 



Bingham Construction Co. 



Telephone 6-6419 



6329 Eastern Avenue 



SACRAMENTO 17, CALIFORNIA 



Page W 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



First Police Women for Sacramento P. D. 

There is a new deal in the Juvenile Division of the Gessner's appointment as head of the juvenile division in 

Sacramento Police Department. 1947 caused some surprise, since it was the first time a 

For the first time in the history of the department patrolman had been advanced to a captaincy in some years. 

women policemen are on hand to take care of the problems But Frank, in a quiet, steady way, has proved himself 

that men blush, stammer and shy away from. to be a real factor in the cause of fighting juvenile delin- 

Many Sacramento policemen were a bit hesitant quency in Sacramento. One of his major accomplishments 






Mrs. Frances Strother Capt. Fran 

when, at the prodding of a lady mayor, the city council 
decided to hire two women police officers. The oldtimers 
greeted the idea — like many other new things — with a 
bit of skepticism. 

But in the months that followed their appointment 
Frances Strother and Dolora Sutter have demonstrated the 
fact that the idea was sound. 

They both work under Captain Frank H. Gessner of 
the juvenile department, and Frank says he does not know 
how he ever got along without them before they 
came along. 

'"There are a good many situations in which a juvenile 
officer finds himself when it is much better to have a 
woman officer along," Gessner says. 

"There are home problems, cases involving young girls, 
and many others that practically demand the services of a 
woman officer. I am proud of the work they have done 
so far and am sure they will prove of invaluable assistance 
to the Police Department in the future." 

Miss Strother was a registered nurse and Mrs. Sutter 
a housewife — the wife of a city fireman — before they drew 
top positions on the city's first civil service list for police- 
women and were named to their present jobs. 

Since their appointment they have proved themselves a 
re.il asset to the Police Department. 

The other phases of juvenile work in the Sacramento 
department are, perhaps, not so unusual, but the division 
is proving itself more and more an essential part of the 
work toward a better community. 



k Gessner Mrs. Dolora Sutter 

this year was in putting the infamous Herrera Gang out 
of business. 

Pete Herrera in a smaller community would have been 
called the town bully. He peddled marijuana to the school 
kids who were foolish enough to use it, headed a gang of 
young thugs who terrorised the youngsters in high school 
and generally made himself a Grade A nuisance in 
Sacramento. 

Many attempts had been made to stop his activities, 
and he was arrested numerous times. Most of the time 
he got off because he was himself a juvenile, and a bit 
(■Continued on page 43) 



STEWART'S MOTEL 

24 CABINS - SHOWER BATHS - KITCHENS 
GARAGES - SHADE TREES 

Phone and Mail Service 

For Reservations Dial 9-9922 

Located On Auburn Boulevard 
Route 7, Box 1100 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Capt. Charles of Sacramento P. D. Retires 



Hundreds of peace officers in northern California were 
shocked by the recent news that Captain Martin Charles 
of the Sacramento Police Department was retiring. 

The host of friends who have known Martin Charles 
so well could not believe he ever could get tired; for he 
was the fellow who thrived on assignments that meant 
working 24 hours a day. His close friends used to say 
that he was shirking according to the standards he set for 
himself — if he didn't work at least 1 6 hours a day. 

But the unceasing routine Martin set for himself — 
but never for the men who worked under him — has 
exacted its toll. He has applied for a pension — an action 
he was forced to take when his heart gave out. During 
the past couple of months he has been in a hospital or in 
bed at home, and his friends hope it will not be long 
before he is on his feet again. 

Charles is one of the best known officers in this section 
of the country. It is a rare veteran of the police business 
from Stockton to the Oregon line who has not come into 
contact with him, and, incidentally, who has not appreci- 
ated the energy, knowledge and ability he has put into 
his work. 

Early in 1921 Martin joined the Sacramento Police 
Department and during the 18-odd years that followed 
he worked in most of the important posts on the force. 

At first he did the usual routine jobs, in the squad cars 
and chasing drunks as a member of the city jail wagon 
crew. 

But it was not long before his ability was recognised 
and he found himself on a beat. And a short time later 
he was promoted to the detective bureau. During the 
years that followed he had charge of the detective divi- 



MOTHER LODE DAIRY 

Dale Clifton 
313 Washington Street 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



American Lumber & 
Mfg. Co., Inc. 

5 Tenth Avenue (Ninth Avenue Terminal) 

OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 

TWinoaks 3-9656 



sion's arson, major crime, and auto theft details. Still 
later he was a sergeant in charge of the juvenile division 
at night, then a sergeant in the detective bureau. And 
he wound up as a captain, second in command of the 
detective division. 

From the standpoint of difficult cases solved, Martin 
probably has the best record of any member of the Sacra- 
mento police force. 

He is the man who turned up the Duchess Spinelli 
gang to Sacramento from Nevada City when it was 
thought their only crimes were a car theft or two. But 
a smart bit of detective work by Charles and other mem- 
bers of the detective division showed them to be one of 
the most murderous gangs that California ever knew. 

When, later in the 1930's the merchants of Sacramento 
particularly, and the people of the city generally were 
afraid to sleep at night for fear of being burned out by a 
crazed arsonist, the high officials of the police department 
knew what to do. 

They assigned Charles to catch the culprit and put 22 
of the department's best men under him. After weeks of 
the kind of vigil that marked Charles' career, Edward 
Mattravas was captured and the people of Sacramento 
could- sleep at night. The people applauded a job that 

(Continued on page 45 ) 



Sacramento Box and 
Lumber Co. 



Manufacturers of 

WOODLEAF BRAND 
LUMBER and BOXES 



P. O. Box 1282 Telephone 6-3391 

65TH AND R STREETS 

SACRAMENTO 6, CALIFORNIA 



fage L2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Sheriff Cox, Sacramento, Has More Deputies 



Sheriff Don Cox of Sacramento County is looking for- 
ward to 1949 as the biggest and best of his 27 years in 
the law enforcement business. 

The sheriff's office has been growing steadily as Sacra- 
mento County grows, and last year Cox added another 
10 men to his staff for an all time high total of 60. The 



And speaking of fingerprinting and such, Cox has been 
an ardent advocate of universal fingerprinting for years 
and years. 

"'Universal fingerprinting is something that must be 
accomplished in the future, and the sooner the better," 
he said. "It is not only a very important thing from the 





i 





Chief Criminal Deputy 
T. Charles Wearns 



Sheriff Don Cox 



Identification Bureau Head 
J. E. McVeigh 



recruits are young, energetic fellows, most of them ex- 
servicemen, and Cox has himself a hard hitting, efficient 
force. 

"During 1949," he says, "I think we can easily do a 
better job of enforcing the laws in Sacramento County 
than we ever have done before. We have more men and 
new and better equipment. The deputies are working 
hard, and are doing a good job." 

And looking toward the future, the Sheriff visualises 
the day when two of his pet projects will be realised. 
First, he wants to operate two sub-stations of his office 
— one at the extreme north end of the county and one 
at the south end. This would speed up service a great 
deal and add to the efficiency of the department. Then 
he wants to set up a juvenile department in his office. 
The younger element among law breakers has been quite 
,>. problem and the present method of having any criminal 
deputy handle juvenile cases is a bit cumbersome. 

One of the main things Sheriff Cox accomplished last 
year was expanding and improving his identification 
bureau. For years this very important phase of the work 
was somewhat neglected due to a lack of manpower. 

Last year when the county board of supervisors in- 
creased the Sheriff's budget he added two men to his 
identification bureau <taff to work under the direction 
of J. E. McVeigh. More and more attention is being 
paid to this branch of the business in Sacramento. 



standpoint of law enforcement, it would be a great protec- 
tion to the public generally. For example, some years ago 
a boy about 1 5 years of age was found dead in a boxcar 
here. We tried everything we could think of but never 
have been able to identify him. Under universal finger- 
printing we could have identified him and let his parents 
know their boy had died. It would have been sad news, 
of course, but undoubtedly they have gone on all these 
years in anxiety, not knowing whether their son is 
alive or dead. 

"Another example is the matter of ex-servicemen who 
are stranded with their government checks and unable 
to cash them. We have worked out a system here with 
the County Service Officer. Albert G. Driggs, that has 
saved scores of them from a lot of trouble. We merely 
cheek their fingerprints against the prints on their army 
discharges. If they match we know positively that the 
man to whom the check was issued is the one we are doing 

/"Continued on page 48) 



Phone 658 



Residence 784 



C. B. MATHEWS 

AWNINGS • CANVAS GOODS • AUTO TRIMMING 
SAFETY GLASS • PLATE GLASS 



SONORA 



CA' imp*" 



January. 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 13 



SAN JOSE POLICE DEPT. AND THE FIVE-DAY WEEK 

Chief Raymond J. Blackmore winds up his second year of men during the busy hours of the day, and this the 
as head of the San Jose Police Department, and he may Chief points out is responsible for more men on the 
well feel proud of the manner his 1 10 officers are enforcing streets at these times, 
the laws of the famed and ancient garden city of the Santa 
Clara Valley. 

He has, with the assistance of Deputy Chief J. W. 




Chief Raymond J. Blackmore 

Carter, division heads and City Manager O W. Campbell, 
fashioned as tine a police organization as one would dis- 
cover in any other city in any other state. He has im- 
proved the splendid work the Police Department has 
enjoyed under its two last chiefs, who today are enjoying 
their pensions — C. N. Black and William C. Brown. 

It might be well to start here on the story of the 
progress made during the past 2 3 months, by reciting 
that one of the major concessions given to the men and 
women who are engaged in law enforcement in San Jose, 
is the five-day week, which is finding favor in many com- 
munities in California. 

On April 1 last year, answering a request from Chief 
Blackmore that the members be given a shorter work 
week, and promising there would be no added expense, as 
well as stating that he was sure the shorter week would 
result in better enforcement of the law. City Manager 
Campbell told him to go ahead and try it out. 

The Chief, getting this go ahead signal, put his plans 
into operation. He has adopted something entirely new 
in the working of the five day week. All members of the 
Department do a nine-hour shift, but during the slack 
time of the day or night he takes off one hour which he 
cm use any way he desires. 

For instance the men who report on at 9 a.m. report 
off at 6 p.m.; the men who report on at S p.m. work 
until 1 a.m.: those who work from midnight report off 
at 9 a.m. Each member takes off his hour when things 
are slack. But it will be observed there is no overlapping 




A^i^tant Chief J. M. Carter 

The Chief hasn't added a single man due to the short 
week, and it hasn't called for any added expense. 
^Continued on page 57 i 



! 



! 



Andre' J. Salabert Louis J. Nouque' 

City of Paris Cleaners 
and Dyers 

Telephone Columbia 347 

FRENCH DRY CLEANING 

419 N. Thirteenth Street 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



For the 'REST of Your Life 

Custom-Bmlt Mattresses and Box Springs 

United States Mattress and 
Upholstering Co. 

FLAMEPROOFING STERILIZING 

BAlIard 3650 - BAllard 3651 - BAllard 4707 
2307-09 Stevens Creek Road 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

THE OLD TIMERS FALL 



January, 1949 




Inspector Fred Bohr 

Now that illness has prevented Inspector Fred Bohr 
from continuing as head of the Hotel Detail of the Bureau 
of Inspectors, a post which he has filled with honor since 
1922, it is quite opportune to let him retell one of the 
many interesting police stories he gave to our police re- 
porters down through the years. 

In our state prisons the thousands of inmates plot and 
plan to commit bigger and more paying crimes on gain- 
ing their freedom — without a possibility of being caught, 
of course. 

Some few ambitious ex-convicts do achieve a modicum 
of success even for an extensive period before coming 
to the sad realization of the fact that crime does not pay 
— to the very end. But, we will let the Inspector tell the 
story of his "Oldtimer" in his own words: 

It was the same old story' of too many errors — with 
the next slip meaning a life term under the habitual 
criminal act. For him the next time the cops landed him 
meant, in the language of the underworld "The Glass" 
Key," which seals a convict's liberty forever. 

The veteran, Howard Elliot, pondered his life of crime 
and marked it as one of failure. Here he was, fifty-six 
years of age and the greater part of his life since he was 
fourteen had been spent in the prisons of the country. 

Now was the time to overcome the handicap of having 
the cops always at his heels. Therefore, like any ordinary 
business man who had found his business fading away 
because of his errors, he decided to remedy these mistakes, 
feeling he had enough brains and experience to beat the 
rap and the cops would not catch him again. 

Under this new specific mode of operation the balance 
of his life would be devoted to cheating the law with the 
Elliot System of Insurance as the method of remaining 
safe from the law. 

The policy holder under this system of insurance must 
bind himself by the following laws: Don't get caught 
pulling the job. Don't be seen in the neighborhood of the 
crime. Don't be caught with the goods in your possession 
— and finally, don't talk. 

After adopting the new policy he was free for the 
longest period in his long career; and he must have gained 
great confidence in himself and his new system. 



A man of about fifty, natty dressed, and a quiet and 
well informed individual, he posed as the Pacific Coast 
representative of an eastern shirt manufacturer. 

His luggage consisted of a brief case and a suitcase. 
The former contained order blanks, samples and letters 
to and from the sales manager of the firm. The other 
contained the clothes of an ordinary traveling man — - 
except that in the bottom of the grip were two master 
keys which would open all the doors in ninety-five per 
cent of the hotels in the country. 

He never concealed his identity nor did he advertise 
his presence in the hotel. He was always open to any 
questions by officers of the law. He boasted in a dignified 
manner of his success as a shirt salesman and gave his 
listeners to believe that crime does not pay. 

In his many visits here the police tried to be as careful 
as possible in their activities of investigation of him; but 
were very sure of him, because, with his visits a trail of 
four or five hotel jobs was always found. The police 
adopted a patient plan of waiting for him to trip 
himself up. 

The opportunity came one morning, at about 6 o'clock, 
when a room of a guest of one of the large commercial 
hotels was burglarized. 

I Continued on page 69 J 



E U R P A 
COFFEE SHOP 



AL and MARY MEDILL 



Open 24 Hours 

Excellent 
food 



311 Washington 

SONORA, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 869 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pag z 1 5 



You will find 

the gang O. K. 

in Jamestown's 

Favorite Rendezvous 

HAP COLLARD'S 
SMOKE CAFE 



JAMESTOWN, CALIFORNIA 



UNITED CONCRETE PIPE 
CORPORATION 



6615 Eastern Avenue 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



MONO INN 


Bud and Al Cavalieri, Props. 


• 


ITALIAN DINNERS 


Chicken, Steaks and Raviolis 


Mixed Drinks of All Kinds 


• 


Four Miles East of Sonora 


on Mono Highway 


Phone 9017 



George and Sue Stanley 



Phone 25451 



SUZY'S GROUND COW 

Featuring 

GROUND BEEFBURGERS 

JUMBO HOT DOGS • BEER 

BORDEN'S ICE CREAM 

ONE MILE EAST OF SONORA ON MONO HIGHWAY 



BITS • SPURS • CUSTOM SILVER 
RAWHIDE 

JEFF E. WANDEL 

Buy, Sell or Trade 

SADDLE AND LEATHER SHOP 

PACK OUTFITS • REPAIRING 



803 Stewart Street 



Phone 25211 



SONORA 



CAL1FORN' 



J. C. Garaventa 



J. W. Martin 



PALACE MEAT MARKET 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL BUTCHERS 
Phone 491 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



SINCLAIR GARAGE 

OFFICIAL AAA SERVICE 

BRAKE LINING - FENDER AND BODY WORK 

GENERAL REPAIRING 



Phone 9211 



SONORA 



CALIFOFT 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Richmond Has New Police Chief 



Last October Chief of Police L. E. Jones resigned Naturally the city had to have a new Chief of Police 

from the Richmond Police Department, and later the and in December held a competitive examination for 
City Manager granted his request, which was based on the post, 
ill health and the retirement board granted him his pen- 
sion. His stepping out date was on November 2. 




Chief Wyman W. Vernon 

Thus ended a most commendable police career starting 
in 1915 when L. E. Jones joined the Richmond Police 
Department. The city was then of less than 20,000 
population. He has seen it grow until it now has well 
over 100,000 people living within its limits. 

He has. likewise, seen the Department increase to over 
100 men, and he has had his part in formulating the 
members into a well organized unit for law enforcement. 

Before and through the war years Richmond was a 
big center for preparing the tools of war, and big ship 
yards brought thousands of people to the thriving city. 
Through it all Chief Jones and his men had an important 
part in preserving the peace, seeing that saboteurs and 
enemies of the country got no foothold in the community. 
He worked wholeheartedly with all branches of the war 
service and came through with high commendations from 
the he.ids of the diverse services. 

He was a policeman first and last, and he got his knowl- 
edge of the workings of a police officer by patrolling a 
beat, by investigations of crime and by study of the laws 
of the land and methods to thwart the crooks. And be- 
cause he had given his city good law enforcement he was 
highly respected by the peace officers of the state, and 
was active in the State Peace Officers' Association as 
well as the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association. 
Among these he will be sorely missed. While he is ailing 
badly it is the fervent prayers of his legion of friends 
in law enforcement and those outside that field that he 
may recover so that he may enjoy many more years dur- 
ing his retirement. 




Former Chief L. E. Jones 

Lieutenant Wyman W. Vernon, an able and honored 
member of Oakland Chief Robert Tracy's force placed 
first on the list of contestants. Acting Chief and Captain 
E. S. Phillips and Captain of Detective James Bengley of 
Richmond, placed second and third, respectively. 
I Continued on page 7 1 ) 



The X Roads Restaurant 



Don and Ruth Thompson 



AT THE CROSS ROADS 



ORINDA, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Orinda 5671 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

THE CANDID FRIEND 



Pag: 17 



B\ Opie L. Warner 



Poets are supposed to be educated people who put 
pleasant statements into rhyme, hut who are, at the same 
time, impractical, and, in the main, poor providers for 
themselves or their families. 

Poets — like children — often include in their lines naked 
truths that make even hard headed business men or con- 
firmed cynics do some sudden thinking. 

Bobbie Burns says: Oh that God the grace would 
gie us, to see ourselves as ithers see us. 

If I, as a good policeman, had been friendly with Mr. 
Burns, before he sent his lines to the press, I would most 
earnestly have requested him to make the concluding line 
read: "So see ourselves and our wife and children as 
ithers see us." Of course, I would explain to him that 
policemen, as a group, are absolutely aloof from that 
great group of our people known as The John Q. 
Citizen group. 

Today, with flippant newspaper comment, everyone a 
member of one or more lodges, clubs or organizations, a 
telephone in every home, and only machine gadget wash- 
ing, cooking or house work to do, our every move is 
common knowledge. 

A home is no longer a castle. We may not think so — 
but definitely we are on parade. And, if we are at all 
sensitive, this feeling of being on parade actually shapes 
our daily behavior. I will go further and say: to our 
constant annoyance, it cramps our style — and is the best 
aid to the real estate operators who offer cheap acreage 
in such places as: Forgotten Valley, Silent Glens, Secret 
Falls, and so on. 

Yes. John Doe Citizen and his little family have to 
bear the constant limelight. 

But what about our policemen? 

A policeman is the most on-parade individual in the 
world. As a good parader he has to keep constantly in 
step, halt and salute at the proper time, grimly move 
along to the point of disbanding — never to really relax 
until he is behind locked doors, alone, or with only 
proven friends. 

Newspapermen know what police work is. I have 
never heard a newspaper man say he would be willing 
to wear a police uniform for even one shift, in broad day- 
light, even if there were no arrests to be made, no traffic 
tags to be issued and neither sensible nor silly questions 
to be answered. 

The comings, goings, or doing of your neighbors pass 
without comment. Not so yours. Your anniversary and 
birthday parties are double checked. And, if you have 
growing boys or girls. Well, if they happen to be happy, 
healthy, regular youths, through the block grape-vine 
route, you will sooner or later hear they are not at all 
one hundred per cent models. Your good wife must 
behave properly in the neighborhood stores — and defi- 
nitely must not wear nicer things than her neighbors. 

Yes. Constant, proper behavior is hard work; and 



the words: "Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown" 
arc all too true, as policemen are concerned. 

But you must remember that a police officer holds an 
honorable and important place in his community. Not 
alone is he an outstanding citizen who pays his taxes 
and obeys the laws, he is a local soldier to protect the 
lives and the property of his neighbors — to old and young 
a pillar of peace and safety. 

To act his part on the pedestal on which he has been 
officially placed is a twenty-four-hour a day job. He 
has to be always marking time — on parade, as it were. 
But everything has its price; and that is the price for 
assuming his honored duties as a life work. 

Some twenty years ago I attended a rookie lecture to 
young police officers at the Hall of Justice. That lecture 
was a revelation to me. The speaker was the grizzled, 
(Continued on page 71 ) 



KAY'S CAFE 

ALL HOME COOKING 
BEER AND WINE 

DANCING SATURDAY NIGHTS 



PASADENA 



11 West Un'on Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CLYDE'S CORNER 

CLYDE MAYLEN. Prop. 
LOMITA (Los Angeles County). CALIFORNIA 

HILL'S GROCERY 

HIGHEST QUALITY AND OUICK SERVICE 
OUR MOTTO 



316 North J Street 



TULARE 



CALIFORNIA 



Flavorful 




Delicious 



"WINES 

Distributed by Sierra Wine and Liquor Co., Reno 

GRAND THEATRE 

1917 Del Paso Boulevard 
NORTH SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Blumenfeld Theatres 
LAKE TAHOE 

I .'c-nsed Real E'tate Rrok»r 

HIGHWAY AND LAKE TAHOE INCOME PROPERTIES 

HOUSEKEEPING COTTAGE RESERVATIONS 



CROCKERS 



BIJOU. CALIF 



Phon; 66J 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Chief John J. Viarengo of Ukiah, California 



Chief Viarengo was horn m Italy in 1912. He and 
his parents came to America when he was the ripe old 
age of nine years. The family settled in Albany, Calif., 
where John Completed his elementary schooling. The 




Chief John J. Viarengo 

next year he entered Berkeley high, where he remained 
until his graduation. 

He then opened his own gasoline station, which he 
operated until 1951. at which time he took the civil 
service examination for police work and passed with 
flying colors, gaining him an appointment as patrolman 
on the Albany Police Department under Chief S. C. 
Williams in June, 1925, at which time he was put in 
charge of the Identification Bureau of that city. John, as 
he is known, is responsible for many of the methods used 
both in Albany and Ukiah. 

In 1942 he entered a competitive examination for 
promotion, which again he passed with high honors, 
gaining him the rank of sergeant, holding this until 1946, 
at which time ill health forced him to take leave of ab- 
sence and retire to a ranch in Mendocino County not 
far from Ukiah. 

Hiving a family and not being able to support them 
on love and conversation, John was forced to obtain some 
sort of part time employment. At that time Joe Elledgc 
was Ukiah's Chief, so Joe says: "John, why don't you 
work part time for me as patrolman until you regain 
your health." This John did until Chief Joe Elledge 
retired. 

Officer Viarengo was then appointed Chief due to his 
experience and high civil service rating. After taking 
over his duties as Chief he saw the need of complete re- 
organization of the department. He installed a complete 
new filing system, including a separate fire for juvenile 
delinquency. 

Put the two-way radio in operation and many other 



things which makes Ukiah one of the most efficient police 
departments in the redwood empire. 

Chief Viarengo took police training at San Jose State 
summer school, he also has attended all schools of police 
training available and is also responsible for sending two 
of his men to the University of California summer school. 

The FBI has visited Ukiah, giving short courses in 
police work which the Chief demands his men attend, 
there is one more thing we shouldn't forget because it 
was through his efforts that the Junior Traffic Patrol 
was installed and is sponsored by the Ukiah Rotary Club, 
which is due lots of credit for the decrease in child de- 
linquency of this city. 

Chief Viarengo has hired two new men through com- 
petitive examinations and will need three more within 
the next year. 

The Chief has seven men besides himself and one 
matron. Their names are as follows: 

Sergeant W. C. Griffis. 

Matron and Secretary Nan Milne. 

Officer Robert Moore. 

Officer Ladd Thomas. 

Officer Hal Bishop. 

Officer Robert Amundsen. 

Officer Travis Simpson. 

Officer Joseph Weselsky. 

All his men are young husky ex-service men with one 
exception, this being Sergeant W. C. Griffis, who was 
retired after 20 years service with the Long Beach Police 
Department, and, believe it or not, he is still in his early 
fortys. (Continued on page 25 ) 

7-1 1 CLUB 

ROY and DARREL. Props. 

ON REDWOOD HIGHWAY 

SOUTH OF BUSINESS DISTRICT 

UKIAH (Mendocino County). CALIFORNIA 



Savings Bank of 
Mendocino County 

Ukiah, California 



Deposits Insured by 



Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Minimum Standards (or Police Officers 
Adopted by P.O.A.S.C 

Chief Zink of Palo Alto, Submits Final Report of Four Years of Work by His Committee 

(Continued from last issue) 



Pull-Up 

Description: 

The contest hangs on a horizontal bar with arms and 
legs fully extended using the upper grip (knuckles to the 
face). He raises his body by his arms until his chin can 




Chief Howard A. Zink 

be placed over the bar and lowers his body to a full hang. 
The exercise is repeated as many times as possible. 
Rules: 

a. Only one trial shall be allowed unless for some 
reason the instructor believes that the contestant has not 
had a fair opportunity. 

b. The contestant's performance shall be recorded as 
the number of pull-ups made after extension of the arms. 

c. The body must not swing during the execution of 
the movement. The knees must not be raised. 

d. No resting or change of grip is allowed. 

Standing Broad Jump 

Description : 

The contestant stands with the feet several inches apart 
and with toes just back of the take-off mark or front of 
the take-off board. The take-off is made from both feet, 
and the contestant jumps forward as far as possible, 
landing on both feet. 

Free swinging of the arms and bending the knees is 
permitted but the the feet must not leave the board of 
take-off line until the jump is made. 

Rules: 

a. Three fair trials (not including fouls) shall be 
allowed and the best of the three recorded. 

b. The contestant's performance is recorded in feet 
and inches to the nearest inch. 



c. The measurement of the jump is made from the 
nearest imprint (including any imprint by hands or body) 
made by the jumper in landing to the take-off or front 
edge of take-off board and at right angles to the take-off 
line or board. 

d. Violation of any points under "Description" con- 
stitutes a foul. 

Bar Vault 

Description : 

The contestant steps up to the bar, grasps it with the 
upper grip (that is, knuckles toward the face), body 
erect, eyes front, feet nearer than the shoulders to the 
vertical plane of the bar, arms and legs straight. With 
a spring from both feet and at the same time a strong pull 
of the arms, he swings his legs vigorously to one side and 
at the same instant straightens his arms (pushes upon 
them) so as to carry his body over the bar. Both arms 
should carry the body weight. 

To save time in the administration of this test, the bar 
may be raised three or four inches at a time. This three 
or four inch rise applies only at lower heights. 

Rules: 

a. After a reasonable warm-up, two trials shall be 
allowed at each height. 

b. The contestant's performance shall be recorded in 
feet and inches as the last height of the bar cleared. 

c. A vertical measurement shall be taken from the 
ground or floor to the top of the bar. 

d. No part of the body shall touch the bar except 
the hands. 

e. The vault may be one continuous movement from 
the time the feet leave the floor or ground until landing. 
No double jumping is permitted, that is, a jump in place 
before the actual take-off. It is permissible to raise the 
heels off the floor or ground and to bend the knees in 
preparing for a vault. 

f. The toes must not be on or over a line directly 
under the bar. 

(Continued on page 64 ) 



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Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



? s.in I r:tncr\cn 




(Copyright. 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco. California 

Phono MArket 1-7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

NOR! HERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA 

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Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POUCE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 a 



S. F. GRAND JURY PRAISES VICE CONTROLS 

The county grand jury termed San Francisco a "model" 
California community with respect to suppression of 
gambling and prostitution November 22 and commended 
the police department for effectively controlling criminal 
activities generally. 

A committee report adopted unanimously by the jury 
noted that slot machines are "almost nonexistent" within 
the city; that prostitution and book-making are at the 
irreducible minimum. 

The report also noted that 54,305 arrests were made 
during the first seven months of this year, compared to 
48,160 for the corresponding period in 1947, and recom- 
mended that the police department be brought to maxi- 
mum strength of 1,650 persons immediately. 

Four other specific recommendations urged appointment 
of a traffic director; a "chief" of police inspectors; con- 
struction of an eight-story police headquarters building 
adjacent to the present Hall of Justice; expansion of the 
police pistol range at Lake Merced to include all depart- 
mental training facilities. 

The same report included special commendation for the 
office of Coroner John J. Kingston. The report was sub- 
mitted by Arthur F. Domergue, Edwin J. Duggan and 
James M. Routson. 



MOST LICENSES LOST 
FOR DRUNK DRIVING 

With a total of 430,000 motorists ruled off the nation's 
streets and highways by suspension or revocation of their 
driver's licenses during 1947. drunken driving was the 
predominant cause of loss of driving privileges. 

For the nation, 40 per cent of the drivers banned from 
the road lost their permits as a result of convictions for 
driving while under the influence of liquor, according to 
figures of the American Association of Motor Vehicle 
Administrators. 

In California last year 24,478 supensions and revoca- 
tions out of a total of 32,448 were for drunk driving, or 
approximately 75 per cent of the total, the California 
State Automobile Association reports. In a number of 
other states the ratio of drunk driving suspensions ran as 
high as 60 or 70 per cent. 

In November, 1946, California's program to remove 
accident-prone drivers and persistent violators from the 
highways was renewed, following a lapse during the war 
years, and many Californians who lost their driving priv- 
ilege during 1947 were in that category. 

With more than 5 3,000,000 licensed drivers in the 
nation, of which 4,696,000 are in California, Motor Ve- 
hicle Administrators are increasing their efforts to elimi- 
nate operators who will not or cannot drive safely, not 
solely as a matter of punishment, but in the interests of 
public welfare and highway safety. 



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17th Street and Wisconsin 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



ELVIS CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 21 



CAPTAIN ALEXANDER E. McDANIEL 

By Opie L. Warner 



The present Supervising Captain of the San Franeiseo 
Police Department, Captain Alexander E. McDaniel, has 
been an active member of the department for the past 
thirty-seven years, having had the rank of non-commis- 
sioned or commissioned officer in the department for the 
past twenty-five years. 

As a patrolman he saw years of strenuous service in 




Supervising Capt. A. E. McDaniel 

the old Bush Street Station, the famous, or infamous, 
Barhary Coast being running at the time and the town 
as a whole being more or less wide open. 

On being transferred to the Inspectors Bureau in Sep- 
tember, 192 3, he made his bureau reputation as a worker 
who never called quits until an assignment was brought 
to a condition where "finis" could honestly be written to 
it. Inspector Jesse Ayers was his trusty partner on many 
tough assignments. 

He knew his California Codes, the Charter and the 
City Ordinances thoroughly. His coworkers in the bureau 
business office relied on him for hair line decisions — and 
he never failed them. 

Being at heart a thorough police officer he has been a 
constant student of laws, ordinances and every phase of 
police activity. Thus we find him a patrolman in 1923 

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and a lieutenant in 1929 — corporal, sergeant and lieuten- 
ant examinations being hurdled by him in six years. 

In 1926 the present Supervising Captain was one of 
only four corporals in the department who placed on a 
sergeants' eligible list, as a result of a severe test and a 
high passing rating set by the Civil Service Examiners. 

When appointed a lieutenant he was assigned to the 
Central Station and later to the Harbor Station. 

In 1942, on being appointed captain, he was placed in 
charge of the Southern Station, and, on a general transfer 
of all captains, he was placed in charge of the Mission 
Station. He was promoted to his present assignment as 
Supervising Captain of the Department on October 
16th, 1947. 

A first class police officer from the date of his appoint- 
ment he has always enjoyed the esteem of those who 
worked with him or under his supervision; and, on ac- 
count of his police knowledge, experience, and unvarying 
good judgment, the entire department feels he is ideally 
fitted for the executive position he now holds. 

The Captain's hobby is fishing. Whether handling a 
rod on local sloughs, along small streams or large ones, 
or up and down the coast from Monterey to Eureka, the 
Captain is a top-notch angler, who. with buoyant spirits, 
in rain or shine, with the "limit" or even an empty 
basket, is. at all times, an enjoyable pal — the grand type 
of the Southern Gentleman he is. 

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President and General Manager 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



January, 1949 



B\ J. ROSS DUNNIGAN 



S. F. Monthly Match 

Despite the fact it was cold as Alaska on Sunday, 
December 19th, there were 127 faithful gun slingers 
gracing the firing line and with shivers and shakes made 
the range echo with the sound of shots and fill up the 
joint with smoke. We're not kidding when we say it 
was cold, either. The thermometer must have been 
around 40 or so but it sure gave the boys one swell alibi 
for lousy scores. But despite the weather scores were 
steady and no one seemed to mind the cold at all — 
MUCH!! Karl Schaaugard, that shootin' S. F. police 
officer from the Potrero Station, was hot as a fire-cracker 
Sunday and blew the ten ring all to pieces to cop first 
place aggregate score for himself. Karl, as you probably 
know, used to be detailed at the range and just couldn't 
be working on match days at the recheck stand with its 
continual headaches, and trying to shoot. His scores were 
not where they should have been. Now he has been 
assigned to the Potrero station and he can concentrate 
more on his shooting on match days. Last Sunday shows 
what concentration will do for a guy. Adolph Buck was 
close behind and O'Dell took third place aggregate 
hardware. * * * 

Don't ask us how we know this, but just take our word 
its true. Many times people josh and joke about the old 
red flannels for cold weather, but it took Louisa Winger, 
one of our up and coming lady shooters, to really blossom 
out in one of those long-handled and very red under- 
things. Louisa claimed she was about 20 degrees warmer 
than the coldest person on the range. 
* * * 

Some enterprising guy could have made himself a nice 
piece of change on Sunday if he had a flock of ice-skates 
for rent to go skating on Lake Merced after the matches. 



Val's Inn and. Cocktail 
Lounge 

Best of Liquors, Beer, Wines 
and Food Served 

Hours: 7 A.M. 'til 2 A.M. 



On Highway 101 



8 Miles South of SAN JOSE 



Charley Woodall, the Oakland police officer, was so 

darn proud of that gold plated Life Membership card 

from the Elks that he completely forgot to do his usual 

good shooting. He claims to have brought in 2^0 members 

to that organisation and we bet his pistol practice went 

to pot in the meantime. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The first lady member of the famed Siesta Club was 
properly initiated Sunday and therein lies a story as to 
why it was not wholly her fault. Helen Lipod, the new 
member, was listening to Riegleman and her husband ex- 
pounding on something or other and was so overcome 
by the gas that she could hardly stagger out into the 
fresh air — by that time the damage was done and the 
Siesta Club had its first female member. 

Al Wollenberg, Jr., son of the S. F. jurist, was out 
for his first match and save for a slight touch of stage 
fright didn't do so badly. Al has been sneaking out to 
the range during the weekdays and practicing up on his 
trigger squeeze and was all set for the day. A good 
time was had by all, however. 

$ ♦ ♦ 

And why did Captain Jacobs, of the Highway Patrol, 



* 



Silver a 
State y| 
Kadiatof 



TUE place - 
515 EVANS 

AVEIVU& 




3 blocks eastr ( of Virginia Street 



* 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS 1 JOURNAL 



Page 23 



tell everyone he met about the cut he had on his trigger 

finger when his gun acted up on him? The shooting 

gentry knew he was all set for the big alibi but Cap fooled 

the boys and grabbed himself a few choice spots on the 

scoreboards — bum finger and all. 
* * * 

There is talk of taking up a collection at the range to 
purchase (wholesale) a large thermometer which will 
be placed right in the middle of the spectators gallery so 
there would be no controversy as to just what the tem- 
perature is at that particular moment. Maybe a rental 
stall for ear-muffs and heavy jackets would be a good 
idea, too. * * * 

Lt. Mary Pryor (yep — it's a her) is the Public Rela- 
tions Officer up at Camp Stoneman and was inveigled 
into coming to S .F. for her first pistol match. Mary, got 
her scope all set, her guns all loaded and ready for her 
first try. Bang goes her first shot. 'Scoping she saw it 
was a 9. Bang goes her second shop. 'Scoping she saw 



Lynn Fellows, of the Alameda Police Department, tells 
us most emphatically that there IS a Santa Claus. Listen, 
and perhaps you, too, will be a convert. On November 
19, 1947, just before starting for the S. F. matches some 
so-and-so stole his guns, scope and shooting box out of 
his car. What was said at the time we cannot state here 
so we leave it to your own imagination to supply the 
missing words. On November 19, 1948, he received all 
his guns back (the scope and box have not been recovered) 
through the pawn-shop detail. The guns had passed 
through about nine different owners in the year and with 
the judicious spending of a few bucks they will be as 
good as new. Now, do you still say there ain't no 
Santa Claus? * * * 

Jerry Kennedy, the golfing cop, was all atwitter on 
Sunday and all because it was so darn cold. Jerry placed 
second in the last police golf tournament and has been 
trying to do that in all the matches he has been shooting 
but no luck 'til Sunday when he took second place in 



SCORES 



.22 'hlational Match 

Master Frank Borneman 287 

Expert O L. Jarman 284 

Sharpshooter W. L. Fung 276 

Marksman 1st P. T. Menoher 270 

Marksman Ted Methot 273 



.18 Rational Match 
Adolph Buck 286 

Bob Fortini 279 

Jack Southern 268 

Lynn Freel 267 

Lloyd Suey 257 



Camp Perry Course 
Karl Schaugaard 295 

Mack Garr 291 

Jerry Kennedy 282 

C. F. Waterman 28 J 

Herb Williams 268 



Tyro Elvin Howard 



212 The 



Lee 



.22 Timed-Fire Match 

Master Karl Schaugaard 196 

Expert Art Treadwell 196 

Sharpshooter Charley Young 192 

Marksman 1st C. Waterman 189 

Marksman Herb Williams 183 

Tyro Tom Lee 146 



.45 Rational Match 
Frank Borneman 
Grif Thompson 
H B. Krupa 
Ed Preston 
Don Mowery 



156 Elvin Howard 242 

Aggregate Match 

280 Karl Schaugaard 1057 

281 Fred Peixotto 1034 
269 Frank Lipoid 1007 
269 P. Menoher 98S 
257 Ted Method 961 



another 9, and so on for the first string of 10, three 9's 
and an 8. The targets were lowered so she turns to the 
FBI gent, Gene Jones, and confides it was sure easy as 
she was only down 5 so far. Gene looked through his 
'scope, smiled to himself and naively whispered to Mary 
she had been scoping on his target. Mary, at least, has 
had her first lesson in shooting. 



Pink's Auto Service 



1st place — S. 
2nd place — S 
3rd place 



1st place— 
2nd place- 
3rd place- 



Tea'i Scores 

Class "A" 

F. Police Team 

F. Police Revolver Club 

-California Highway Patrol 

Class "B" 
Coast Guard League Gun Club 
-S. F. Revolver Club Team 4 .... 
-S. F. Police Reserve M.C. Unit 



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1148 

1030 
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750 



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Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



the .22 National. Nut satisfied he took first place in the 
Camp Perry match and now is going to go out and try 
to take first place in the next Police Department golf 
tournament. * * * 

Was wondering if Bill Dyal finally got that pup he 
was looking for to give to his little daughter on Christmas? 

* * * 

The coffee shop was over-popular Sunday and the Java 
flowed like water — only it wasn't water — it was Java. 
Either the gang would run out in search of the sunshine 
or to the refreshment booth for hot coffee, pie or what 
ever they thought would warm them up. Personally all 
that hot coffee stuff wasn't worth a dam because what 
we most needed was a good shot of bourbon — but that's 
barred on the range. So we drank coffee, too! 

* * * 

Colonel Longly kindly acted as official referee for the 
day and told us he didn't mind being the ref at the police 
range because things ran so smoothly there really much 
to do save, just look wise and in case of a beef just dis- 
appear out of view 'til it blew over. Smart cookie, is 

the Colonel. 

* * * 

Well, this about wraps up the 1948 pistol shooting 
season and a swell season it was, too. The Oakland crowd 
and the S. F. gang certainly must be commended for their 
efforts to keep the pistol shooters well and happy, so will 
be seeing you next season. Thanks for reading. 

* * * 

THE OAKLAND MATCHES 

It is said that a man doesn't have to be crazy to be a 
pistol shooter — but it helps a lot. We take exception to 
that and claim it isn't a true statement. It would be 
more to the point if it went this way "Any man who 
takes up pistol shooting IS CRAZY!" This was decisively 
proven on Sunday, December 5 th, when the registration 
was 130 — which means 130 nuts were hanging on the 
tree trying to shoot good scores in that wind and rain- 
storm. Of all the goofy birds we ever saw that bunch 
was about the last on the totem pole and to make matters 
worse we were among them. As we used to say in Rome 
in the time of Julius Caesar "omnia vincit amor" which 
literally translated means something about love conquers 
everything. Boy, oh boy, but these guys sure must love 



MARTIN'S 

HOLE IN THE WALL 

Where a Good Drink Can Be 
Had At All Times 

2048 Mission Street, Between 16th and 17th 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



to shoot -but then why go on, you readers know all 
about it anyhow. 

Just to prove our point we cite the sad case of Ken 
Kolb, the Highway Patrol gent. Ken came all the way 
down from Donner Summit to be at the matches and was 
bemoaning the fact that it was a darn site nicer up at 
the Summit than in Oakland. Captain Jacobs came from 
Woodland and as did many others from out of town 
but none would admit the climate in their own locale 

was worse than Oakland's. 

* * * 

The gang was so cold they started gathering up any 
piece of dry wood for a fire and commandeered a large 
garbage can for the stove. Many of those in a freezing 
mood decided to rip the shingles off the roof of the re- 
freshment shack and it was only on bended knees that 
Gibby Gibson, the Oakland Club prexy, finally convinced 
them it wasn't a gentlemanly thing to do. 

* * * 

Then there was the wind. Whoosh!!! The best way 
to sight in on the target was to aim for the edge of the 
paper, to the windward, and as it blew your sights across 
the bullseye, jerk the trigger and offer a prayer it stayed 
on the paper. In fact Clare Hess, of Sacramento, was 
bragging to his fellow sufferers that he got 3 out of the 

10 shots on the target. A record, indeed. 

* * * 

Then Officer Anderson of the Alameda Police, was all 
decked out with fancy Alaskan boots with pants stuffed 
(Continued on page 29) 



t 
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WHOLESALE 

DISTRIBUTORS 

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PHILCO 

COLEMAN 

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RENO, NEVADA 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2 J 



Chief Viarengo 

(Continued from page 18) 

Ukiah is the County seat of magnificent Mendocino 
County, situated 112 miles north of San Francisco in 
the heart of the famed redwood empire, on Highway U. S. 
101, on the Northwestern Pacific railroad. Here is the 
terminus of the Ukiah Tahoe Highway U. S. 20, and 
the MacDonald to the Sea Highway offers access to the 
coastal region. 

Ukiah is situated in the center of a valley 12 miles 
long and three miles wide drained by the famed Rus- 
sian River. 

The Ukiah Valley is famed for its luscious mountain 
Bartlett pears, hops, prunes and grapes. 

Its vineyards contribute largely to California's dry 
wines and famous champagne. 

It also produces great herds of cattle, sheep, hogs and 
is also known for its great poultry industry. These are 
just a few of the industries which make up this thriving 
community of 5000 population and also is one of the 
fastest growing northern California towns. 

We might also add the name Ukiah originates from 
the Indian name Yokayo, meaning deep valley. 

Law enforcement officials and travelers alike, we sug- 
gest you visit this thriving community and see it for 
yourself. 



V. E. Burgess, Mgr. 



Telephone 3079 



LEAVITT POWER TOOL CO. 

MALL CHAIN SAWS 
SALES AND SERVICE 

2 l /2 Miles East of Sonora on Mono H r ghway at Sullivans Creek 

BEERMAN AND JONES 

Contractors 



AL'S REDWOOD CLUB 

Al Greenberg, Prop. 

If you enjoy friendship stop in 
and say "Hello, Al!" 



WILLITS (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 




THRIFT SHOP 



112 EAST COMMERCIAL ROW RENO, NEVADA 



SAMOA CLUB 

Phone 272 

Mixed Drinks and Food 
as you like it 



SONORA 



CALIFORI- 



MODESTO ROD AND GUN CLUB 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN 

ALL PEACE OFFICERS 

714 H Street 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



H. D. ROBERTS 

JEWELRY and REPAIRING 
HEARING AIDS 

106 West Standley Street 

UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



110 W. Standley Street 

UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 
Greetings for 1949 

California Restaurant 

Chinese and American Dishes 

Ukiah's Most Popular Restaurant 
On Beautiful Redwood Highway 101 



116 So. State Street 

UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, J 949 



Chief JOHN P. GRIFFIN of WILLETS 



Wiilits is one of California's old pioneer towns, it 
lies 23 miles north of Ukiah on the beautiful Redwood 
Highway, U. S. 101. It is situated in a beautiful valley 




Chief John P. Griffin 

surrounded by beautiful hills and mountains whieh remain 
green the year around, as these mountains are dense with 



JOHN'S PLACE 

John Moreno, Prop. 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS 
On and Off Sale 

255 E. Commercial Street 

WILLITS, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 233 



PORTLOCK HARDWARE 

SPORTING GOODS 

PAINTS - ELECTRICAL AND 
PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

107 South State Street 

UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 

Phone 104 



fir and redwood, as well as many other kinds of plant life, 
which makes this a hunter's paradice. The beautiful 
streams which flow down the canyons are abundant with 
trout and are known throughout these United States by 
some of our greatest sportsmen. 

Wiilits is known for many things, among which are 
lumbering, cattle, sheep, its fine fruit, resorts, picnic 
grounds and motels. Also swimming and boating just a 
stone's throw from the main part of the city. 

Let's not forget the citizens as well as tourists are 
protected by an efficient, well-trained Police Department, 
headed by Chief of Police John P. Griffin who is an 
cx-G. I. from the coast artillery. He is young, husky 
and well-mannered, in other words, a gentleman. He 
was born in Des Moines, Iowa, March 25, 1922. When 
just a boy his folks moved to St. Louis, Mo., where John 
had his schooling. Shortly after his graduation he came 
to California and joined the United States Coast Artillery 
at Camp Callan, close to San Diego. From there he was 
sent to Pittsburg, Calif., Fort Lawton, Wash., Fort Ord, 
near Monterey, Fort Winfield Scott, at San Francisco, 
and from there to Camp Beale at Marysville, California, 
where he was discharged February 8, 1946. After a 
short period of relaxation from army life he came north 
to Wiilits, in July, 1946, and entered the Wiilits Police 
Department as a special officer, where he served until his 
appointment as Chief, May 1, 1948. 

The Chief is married to the former Mary Criger, of 
Santa Barbara County. They have a small boy, Patrick, 
2 years old, whose nickname is Ricky. 

The Chief has three men besides himself on his de- 
partment. 

Traffic Officer Willis R. Fenwick. formerly Los An- 
geles Police Department. 

Officer Joseph L. Busby, formerly Marine Corps. 

Officer James Muir, formerly U. S. Navy. 

Officer James Brady of the U. S. Marines. 

Busby, Muir and Brady, all saw service in South Pacific. 



f ► 



Pastime Recreation Center 

POOL - SHUFFLEBOARD 

BEER - Soft Drinks and 
Delicious Food 

Laytonville (Mendocino Co.), Calif. 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 



WILLIS R. FENWICK, TRAFFIC OFFICER 
WILLITS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Officer Willis R. Fenwick, who now serves under Chief 
John P. Griffin of the Willits Police Department, has 
had plenty of experience in police work. He served on 
the Los Angeles Police Department during the war under 




Officer Wm. R. Ff.nwick 

Chief C. B. Horrell and before that with the Sheriff's 
Department in Denver, Colo. 

He is married to a former New York State girl, whose 
name is Jessie. They have four grown children. 

This Journal wishes to honor such a grand gentleman, 
who has the courage and ability to carry on with the 
work which he choose many years ago. 

'7 




SAN MAJEO- SAN FRANCISCO 



RENOWNED 

for 

FOOD 

and 

SERVICE 



IDEAL CAFE 

BREAKFAST 

LUNCH 

DINNERS 

and 

SHORT ORDERS 

The Truck Drivers' Paradise 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Horn, Props. 
On Redwood Highway South of Town 



UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



Oscar's 

THE 

PRIDE 

F 

HUMBOLDT 

COUNTY 

JOE BICKFORD, Prop. 
439 Second Street 

Eureka, California 

(Humboldt County) 



~t «• 






Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



FOX YOUR TWAIN HARTE CABIN SEE 
'fa 




Phone SONORA 3226 



TWAIN HARTE, CALIFORNIA 



Nelson's Hand Made Candies 

PURE AS GOLD 

Columbia Candy Kitchen 

GOLD RUSH CANDY 

ALL TRAVELERS OF THE MOTHER LODE CALL 

AT OUR STORE - YOU ARE INVITED 

TO INSPECT OUR KICHEN 

O 

Satsified Customers in All Parts of the World 
Through Our Mail Order Department 

Phone Sonora 3116 P. O. Box 29S. Columbia 

COLUMBIA, Tuolumne County. CALIFORNIA 



CHAS. J. CUNNINGHAM 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 

CUNNINGHAM'S MARKET 
A Complete Food Market 



830 Yosemite Ave. 



Phone 3831 



CUNNINGHAM CONSTRUCTION 

General Contractors 

932 Yosemite Ave. Phone 3833 



■ i 



F. N. (Jack I Li CLI R 



H. S. (Ted) Kirkbride 



WHEN IN JAMESTOWN IT'S 

THE WILLOW 

TROPICAL COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Coffee Shop and Dining Room 

Featuring 

EXCELLENT STEAKS AND SEA FOODS 
Phone 271 

JAMESTOWN, CALIFORNIA 



UNITED LUMBER YARDS 
"CALIF." 

AL CORRIGAN. Manager 

Lumber - Roofing - Millwork 
Paint - Hardware 

ANYTHING FOR THE BUILDER 

Phone 3631 
Sierra Avenue 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

EARL HASTINGS 

OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 

in memory of his father, the late 

Chief R. L. Hastings 

OF WATSONVILLE 



Best Service in Town 

The Bank Club and 
Cocktail Lounge 

117 Main Street 
PORT CHICAGO, CALIFORNIA 



Rice Hull Ash 
(Greasweep) 



Phones: Warehouse, 4-043 3 
Residence, 5-4963 



BEAGLE PRODUCTS CO. 
of California 

C. A. BEAGLE 

2024 Sutterville Rd., Residence 
223 L Street, Warehouse 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Pistol Pointing 

( Continued from page 24) 
in 'em and all. They looked very snug but on closer 
proximity you could hear the water squish around inside 
with every step he took. 

* * * 

It is only fair at this point to let you know that despite 
the wind and rain Frank Borneman, up Vacaville way, 
kept his powder dry and romped off with the high ag- 
gregate score for the day. As Frank sez after the matches 
(quote) "It wus a tuff fight mother hut despite the wind, 
the rain, the jeering of the crowds and the mud I won, 
mother, I won!" (end quote). And we overheard Martin 
Harris come up with the one about the windage being good. 



Just to give you an illustration of what brotherly love 
is developed among the pistol shooters we give out with 
the following. Carl Spiken and Phil Landers, both of 
the Oakland Club, shooting in the same class were stand- 
ing side by side and somehow or other Phil accidentally 
shot a 9 on Carl's target. Phil asked Carl to reciprocate 
by placing a nine on his target and all would be even 
Stephen. Good ol' Carl took careful aim and laid a nice 
5 on Phil's target then calmly remarked "There, you 
:o-and-sc, that should put you out of the running for 
this match and I don't have to worry about your score." 
That gives you a splendid example of what sportsmanship 
is developed by pistol shooting. 



Scores 



OF. Short ~H.ationa\ 

Master Frank Borneman 

Expert Art Treadwell 

Sharpshooter Ted Stone 

Marksman 1st Bob Marlow 

Marksman 2nd Bill Fung 

Marksman 3rd R. Bramantc 

C.F. Western Police Matd 

Master Bill Dowling 

Expert Wesley Lim 

Sharpshooter Frank Lipoid 

Marksman 1st J. Pettygrove 

Marksman 2nd Walt Forrister 

Marksman 3rd S. Corneer 

Team Scores 

1st — Oakland Police and Fire Team No. 1 1133 

2nd — California Highway Patrol .1 129 

3rd— S.F. Police Revolver Club Gold Team 1129 

PANERO'S SERVICE 

James A. Panero. Jr. 

Union Oil Products 

317 Washington Street 





C.F. Camp Perry Course 


.22 J^ational Match 




274 


Marko Belovich 


289 


Bill Dowling 


282 


277 


C. Boomhower 


289 


Fred Peixotto 


279 


262 


O. Jarman 


284 


Ed Rosing 


282 


264 


R. L. Suey 


276 


Jerry Gallagher 


271 


247 


L. Suey 


263 


A. Janitzky 


262 


244 


S. Corneer 


2S0 


Paul Tegmeier 


247 


itch 


.45 Short 'HaUonai 




Aggregate Scores 




284 


Bill Dowling 


279 


Frank Borneman 


833 


288 


Sim Reinhard 


264 


Wesley Lim 


828 


277 


Wesley Lim 


255 


O. Jarman 


811 


274 


Frank Harris 


259 


R. L. Suey 


789 


270 


Lloyd Suey 


251 


Frank Rakow 


764 


253 


Art Coleman 


251 


Jim Lope 


692 



SULLIVAN CREEK DRIVE-IN 

AND SWIMMING POOL 

The Best in 
DINNERS - SANDWICHES - FOUNTAIN SPECIALTIES 



Route 2, Mono Highway 



Phone 9832 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



C. H. 



BURDEN UNDERTAKING CO. 

Established I85u 



SONORA 



CALIFOR 



SONORA 



CARRIE BURDEN WARNE, Mgr. 



CALIFORNIA 



Best Wishes From The 

FOREST CLUB 



Where All Sportsmen Meet 
Cocktails and Select Food 



239 North State Street 



UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



Cecille Hotel and Coffee 
Shop 

L. R. Kennedy, Prop. 



On Redwood Highway 101 
UKIAH (Mendocino Co.), CALIF. 



l_ 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



POP-' ARRINGTON 



TED" EATON 



THE BUCKHORN 

BEER AND WINE 
TASTY FOOD 



V, MILE NORTH Or DIXON 



Compl ments to the Officers of the Law for Their Efforts 
to Reduca Crime in This County 

A. W. SWEET 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTOR 



Dial 9-1497 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



112 West Bassattlaw Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL HOTEL AND BAR 

BEER • WINE • LIQUOR 
SPANISH DINNERS 



OUR DRINKS DELIGHTFUL ,„,,, > „ 
OUR DINNERS DELICIOUS "/ «"» 

REX CAFE 

BAR AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
TESS and JOE ARCHIMEDE 



SUTTER CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Dial 9-9327 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



2217 Del Paso Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



AL THE WOP 

BEER. WINE AND LIQUORS 
GOOD EATS 



SUBWAY AUTO WRECKERS 

HERMAN LAUSZUS. Proprietor 

We Buy. S?ll and Wreck All Makes of 
CARS AND TRUCKS 
TRUCK PARTS A SPECIALTY 



Phone 3321 



LOCKE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 9 0458 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



795 Del Paso Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



-UNITED GROCERS — 



PATTON'S CAFE 

BEER - LUNCHES AND SANDWICHES 

Dial 2-9939 816 South Avenue 

DEL PASO HEIGHTS CALIFORNIA 



FREEPORT MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - WINES 
BEER - ICE CREAM 



Phone Courtland 3682 
Ff'.EEPORT 



Routs 8, Box 1260 

CALIFORNIA 



BASSO PLACE 

SERVICE TAVERN 
MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

PERKINS. CALIF 



PONY EXPRESS CAFE 

BILL LAINE and STELLA HUGHES 

Phone 5 9759 On Folsom Blvd. 

PERKINS. CALIFORNIA 



FIFI CAFE 



WALNUT GROVE 



BEER, WINE AND MEALS AT ALL TIMES 
DROP IN AND GIVE US A TRY 

CALIFORNIA 



MAHAN'S PLACE 

ON AND OFF SALE 
WINE AND LIQUORS 



801 E. Street 



Phone 3-98S1 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



HAYASHI COMPANY 

RALPH T. SUGIM0T0 
SPECIALIZING IN FISH 



Phone W. G. 20S1 

WALNUT CROVE 



P. O. Box 366 



CALIFORNIA 



JOE FUENTES 



NICK GACANICH 



PIONEER AND REX CLUB 

JACKSON'S OLDEST AND MOST RELIABLE 

COCKTAILS - WINES - BEER AND GOOD FOOD 

Phone Jackson 33 



IACKSON 



CALIFORNIA 



ITALIAN DINNERS 

REMEMBER ME 



Phone San Bruno 1742 
"ll.LBRAE 



700 — I Camino Real 

CALIFORNIA 



MANUEL SAMAGAI0 



RALPH R. SILVA 



JEFFERSON BOULEVARD MARKET 

MEATS, GROCERIES, GAS, BEER AND WINE 

Phone 2-0997 
1EFFERSON BLV'D WEST SACRAMENTO 



SHERWOOD FOREST RESORT 

H. L. "Bris" BR1SBIN 

QUIET • SECLUDED 

Entrance 'n Center of Garberville 
Telephone 60 

NU-WAY LAUNDRY 

BEN B. MALONE. Owner 

SPEEDY SERVICE • QUALITY WORK 

Telephone 3-2637 1012 30th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 1 



Sacramento's Tavern Ass'n Does Good Work 



Sacramento law enforcement officers are becoming more 
and more familiar with — and appreciative of — the work 
of the Sacramento Tavern Association. 

This group, which represents more than 80 per cent 
of the 380-odd tavern owners in Sacramento County, 
works closely with the police, the sheriff's office and the 
board of equalization in helping to enforce the laws as far 
as the bars are concerned. 

Local officials have praised the tavern owners particu- 
larly for their work in combatting drunken driving. 
Through putting up posters, keeping a close eye on their 
customers who show signs of imbibing too much and in 
other ways, the bar people have been steadily and quietly 
aiding the cause of law enforcement since their organiza- 
tion was formed six years ago. 

The association holds membership in the Sacramento 
Safety Council, and through this tiein and its connections 
with other groups helps out with various civic programs. 



The auxiliary of the tavern group is one of the most 
active organizations in town in charity work. Recently 
the members pledged $3,'500 to a campaign for a building 
fund for the Fairhaven Home for unmarried mothers. 
Each year they actively support the cancer drive, supply 
toys to the children at the local orphanages, send under- 
privileged children to summer camps, handle the booths 
for the March of Dimes drive and help in the Red Cross 
campaigns. 

The current president of the association is Chauncey 
Prinzio. Emmet Regan is the vice president, and the 
following are members of the board of directors: Nick 
Cristofani, Earl Erwin, Ange Frasinetti, Bill Hately, E. J. 
Moak, Joe Orsi, George Tolle, Ernest Rudesuli, N. J. 
Relvas, Arthur Tisdel and Raymond Macchiavelli. 

Sue T. Sackett, the secretary-treasurer, is the only paid 
employee. Anthony J. Kennedy is attorney for the 
organization. 



SACRAMENTO 



SLOUGH HOUSE TAVERN 

DRINKS • MEALS 
ALSO GAS SERVICE STATION 

On ROAD TO JACKSON, CALIFORNIA 



We Serve Only 
THE BEST BRANDS 

NEW WM. TELL CAFE 

M. HORAT. Prop. 
HOT LUNCHES AND SANDWICHES 
Cigars - C-'garettes - Tobacco - Candy 

Phone 2-6506 



317 Jay Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HEATING • AIR COOLING SYSTEMS 
VENTILATING • KALAMEIN DOORS 

DUNPHY SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 

SHEET METAL WORK OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
Telephone 4-0443 214 27th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PHIL MOTT, Plumbing 

STEVE HOPKINS 

PLUMBING AND HEATING FIXTURES SOLD, 

INSTALLED AND REPAIRED 

WATER HEATERS 

Call Us For Prompt Service 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone Dial 2-2692 



613 Jay Street 



JALISCO GROCERY 

TIENDA MEXICANA 

Un Rincon de Mex'co en el Corazon 
de California 

Prop. JULIAN SALAZAB 



Telefonos 4-317S 



318 12th Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



PLANING MILL and STORAGE YARDS, WEST SACRAMENTO 

LANSBERG LUMBER CO., INC. 

HARRY LANSBERG. President 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 

PHONE 3-4980 TELETYPE SAC 22 P. 0. BOX 1685 

Office 1630 D Street SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



NEW ROMA FRENCH BAKERY 

Specializing in 

BIRTHDAY. WEDDING AND PARTY CAKES 

DELICIOUS DANISH PASTRIES 



1800 E Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



TILE ROOFS • ASBESTOS SIDING 
ALUMI SHIELD INSULATION 

BUSH ROOFING COMPANY 

1925 F Street Telephone 2-0377 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SOCIETY CLEANERS 

LEO F. KILLIAN 



WE CALL AND DELIVER 



NORTH SACRAMENTO HOTEL 

2326 Del Paso Blvd. 

Telephone 2 2348 20th and Eye Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



VARIETY STORE 
Phone 2-9895 

BRODERICK 



GEO. BEALE 

Phone 4-2882 
HARDWARE 



BRIDGEVIEW MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - FRUITS - LIQUORS 
MARKET 
Phone 3-3615 Phone 2 9252 330 Third Street 

CALIFORNIA BRODERICK CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Jam 



1949 



1 I 



Phone 2-8488 



H. L. Newland 



TENTH & L GARAGE 

PARKING and GAS 

OIL - WASHING 

STORAGE - GREASING 

In The Heart of The Downtown 
Shopping District 



i 

i 
i 



925 L Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



BRANDIS CONFECTIONERY 

LIGHT LUNCHES • SANDWICHES 
HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 



310 Wash : ngton Street 



CALIFOR" 



MACBETH & SONS— Furniture 

Phone 2110 Next to Post Office 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

GUARANTEED LUBRICATION 

WASHING - POLISHING 

TIRES - TUBES - ACCESSORIES 

CARSON SIGNAL SERVICE 

Phon- 525 Short and Washington Streets 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

BEER • LIQUORS • WINES 



PEARL'S 



AT TUOLUMNE JUNCTION 2 >~ MILES EAST OF 
SONORA. CALIFORNIA 



RANCHO VIEJO 
RESTAURANT 

Rall M. Leon. Prof. 

MEXICAN AND AMERICAN 
FOODS 



213 "L" Street 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Dial 2-9848 



GEORGE'S LIQUOR 
STORE 

WINE - BEER AND ALL 
KINDS OF LIQUORS 



115 North 12th 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 94'J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3.i 



Chief James V. Hicks 

(Continued from page 6) 

Through his efforts, too, the degree of cooperation 
between the police department and the district attorney's 
office, the city prosecutor's office, and other law enforce- 
ment agencies in Sacramento is better than it ever has 
been before. 

Sacramento people are getting used to the Hicks way of 
doing things, and they approve. 



WM. BELL 
Manager 



TOM and RAY HUTCHINS 
Mechanics 



BELL SUPER SERVICE 

SEASIDE SERVICE STATION 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 

Parking - Day, Week or Month 

Phone 3-1846 800 Capitol Avenue 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Sacramento Glass and Crockery Co. 

Established 1885 

WHOLESALE FOUNTAIN, BAR AND RESTAURANT SUPPLIES 
WALLACE CHINA 



Dial 2-061 



814 L Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



24-Hour Repair and Parts Service 

TURCUTTE AND CROSBY 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
BERRY GARAGE 

809 L Street Phone 4-1633 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

ED. BECKER "TILLIE" DEL MONTE 



CLUB DELTA 



2431 J Street 



Dial 3-9541 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



L. B. BROWN. Manager 



Phone 9-9978 



LOS ROBLES MOTOR LODGE 

AIR COOLED 



ELM CAFE 

PLATE LUNCHES 

THE BEST IN FOOD, BEER AND WINES 

fhone 5-9782 1713 29th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Steel Tapes Repaired • C'rcular Saws Sharpened 
Planer Blades and AH Types of Tools Ground 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

Every tooth in the saw ground exactly alike 

G. NOBILE, Hand Saw Grinding 



Phone 5-8715 



1210 30th Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



5G65 Stockton Blvd • 2205 16th St. • 2998 Freeport Blvd. • 3224 Riverside Blvd. 



FREE MOTH PROOFING 
HATS CLEANED 



SWANSON'S Cleaners and Hatters 

Main Plant and Office 
2900 J Street Dial 2-3649 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT CO. 

Distributors of 
MUND'S & PARKER WATER TUBE BOILERS 



Phone 6-4778 



1800 30th Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



STEWART HOTEL 

MINNIE HINKLE, Manager-Owner 

MODERN • STEAM HEAT • SHOWERS 
SPECIAL WEEKLY RATES 

1012 S'xth Street Telephone 3-7949 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

CALIFORNIA . ARIZONA NEVADA - NEW MEXICO - TEXAS 

WESTERN TRUCK LINES, Ltd. 

H. G. ANDERSON. Agent 

In The West — Ship Western 

811 "X" Street Phones 2-0292, 3-8221 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Highway U. S. 40 and 99E (Auburn Blvd.) 

Opposite Municipal Golf Course 

10 Minutes from Capitol Building 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PARKER PUMP CO. 

J. G. McGENNIS. Office Manager 
FARM PUMPING EQUIPMENT 

1811 Del Paso Blvd. Telephone 9-4383 

NORTH SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

YOUR SAFETY IS OUR BUSINESS 



METRO CLUB 

F. F. STILSON 

2955 35th Street Phone 5-9931 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



HASHISAKA BROS. GARAGE 

AUTO REPAIRING • BRAKE SERVICE • MOTOR TUNE-UP 
ENGINES CLEANED • TIRES AND BATTERIES 

Dial 4-1543 1314 5th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



MATT BELL, Safety Service 

WHEEL ALIGNING • BRAKES 



TOMMY'S HIDEOUT 

WE SERVE DR'NKS AND MEALS 
AND GIVE QUICK SERVICE 



1112 Eye Street Phone 3-1717 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-9997 



710V 2 L Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page i4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

. 



January, 1949 



PAGODA CAFE 



1118 Tenth Street 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-0880 



THE DORRIS LUMBER 
AND MOULDING CO. 



No Cover Charge 

HONG KING LUM 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN 
DISHES 

We Serve 
ALL KINDS OF DRINKS 

WEEKDAYS 

11 A. M. to 1 A. M. 

SATURDAYS 

11 A. M. to 2 A. M. 
Corner Third and Eye 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-1584 



1 *~ 



P. O. Box 2688 



SACRAMENTO 10, CALIFORNIA 



~* *■ 



We Serve Man-Sized Orders 

STEAKS - CHOPS 

CHICKEN - FISH - Etc. 

R0SEM0UNT GRILL 

FEATURING SPECIAL DINNERS 
on Sundays and Holidays 

Also Visit our 

BEAUTIFUL COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Air-Co nditioned 

Private Parking Lot 



3145 Folsom Blvd. 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



Assistant Chief Kaminsky 

(Continued from page 7 ) 

In addition to practical lessons in what to do and what 
not to do from Kaminsky, Johnson and other veterans of 
police service, the rookies get good advice from a variety 
of sources. 

District Attorney John Quincy Brown sends deputies to 
talk ahout the law as it applies to felony cases. Police 
court evidence is discussed by Anthony J. Scalora, the city 
prosecutor. The Federal Bureau of Investigation sends its 
best teachers, as does the State Division of Criminal Identi- 
fication and Investigation. Les Mills and Chief Patrick J. 
Bennett of the traffic division talk about traffic cases. 
Ralph Haley, the department's statistician, tells the new- 
comers how to make out reports. Other experts in various 
lines give advice, too. 

All told, Sacramento's training program is one of the 
best to be found anywhere. 



E. M. KEMP COMPANY 

Wholesale Distributors of 
RADIO AND ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 



CHAS. A. JOYNER, Res. Phone 9-4344 



e. s. Mckenzie 



11 IS R Street 



Telephone 3-4668 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BRIGHT SPOT MARKET NO. 2 

GROCERIES • MEAT • FISH • VEGETABLES 
SUNDRIES 

Phone 3-2S8S 430 N Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BRIGHT SPOT MARKET NO. 1 

GROCERIES • MEAT • FISH • VEGETABLES 
SUNDRIES 

Phone 3-2688 230 L Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

FENESTRA STEEL WINDOWS 

KINNEAR ROLLING DOORS 

WAGNER SHEET METAL 

METAL BUILDING PRODUCTS 
Phone 6-4726 1829 22nd Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Diesel Pump 8C Injector Service 

Specializing in 
CUMMINS FUEL PUMPS AND INJECTORS 

Also Precision Work on 
Lube Oil Pumps and Upper and Lower Assemblies 



SACRAMENTO 



Fhone 4-3383 



319 12th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BEER • LIQUORS • WINES 

MONTE CARLO 

JOHN & ETTORE 
Fifteenth and "S" Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



COLOSSEUM MACARONI COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE PASTES - SPAGHETTI 
MACARONI AND VERMICELLI 

Broadway • P. O. Box 434 • Phone 2-1473 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DISTRIBUTORS - ENGINEERS - CONTRACTORS 

J. N. BLAIR &. COMPANY, Inc. 

CHRYSLER AIRTEMP DIVISION 

Established 1899 

HEATING • VENTILATING • AIR CONDITIONING 
COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION 



Phones: 3-1914, 3-191S 

SACRAMENTO 



Man Office 217 No. 16th St. 

CALIFORNIA 



CAPITOL COFFEE CO. 

COFFEE ROASTED DAILY 
"Best to the Last Drop" 

TEAS AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS 

Phon; Main 9301 1114 Second Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



GREEN LANTERN CAFE 

BEER AND WINES 
LUNCHES • DINNERS 



Phone 3 9787 604 "Q" Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



TOM KARAMANOS 



Phone 62 F 3 



OLD ELK GROVE 

LIQUORS • WINE • BEER 
ON AND OFF SALE 

13 Miles South of Sacramento on U. S. 99 

ROUTE I. BOX 640 ELK GROVE. CALIFORNIA 



TIM'S LUNCH ROOM 

BEER AND COLD DRINKS 
MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

6:30 A.M. — 7:00 P.M. 

1731 Eleventh Street Phone 3-97S7 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



HOBBS BATTERY CO. 

BATTERIES FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

Dial 2-37 45 1220 C Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



JOE BELTRAMI'S 

BEER ON TAP 

500 Second Street Phone 2-9572 

BRODERICK CALIFORNIA 

WM. J. KERTH MAIN 737S-J 

AMERICAN ICE COMPANY 



1434 Del Paso Boulevard 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 





January, 1949 



Meef Me /If 

BETTY'S PLACE 

BEER - WINES 
HAMBURGERS 

"None Better" 



1831 Third Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-0542 

A. L. GILBERT COMPANY 

GRAIN - FEED - INSURANCE 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phon~ 3036 



Fred C. Haggle 



OAKDALE BUILDERS SUPPLY 



LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 
Best Grades — Competitive Prices 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



John P. Jericoff 



P. O. Box 632 



JERRY'S NORWALK SERVICE 

DUNLOP TIRES AND BATTERIES 

Corner F and Church Street Phone 7121 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



CITY IRON AND 
METAL CO. 



701-715 S Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Dial 3-8561 



C. A. Peterson 



E. V. Peterson 



C. R. Peterso 



PETERSON'S IRON WORKS 

BLACKSMITHING 
ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE WELDING 



Phone 8016 123 No. Sierra Avenue 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



FINE 
AUTOMOBILES 

CHARGIN'S AUTO MART 



1531 Kay Street 
Sacramento, California 

"THE BIG LOT" 

Phone 2-1006 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



Captain Rooney 

(Continued from page 8) 

At the insistence of the police, bail for each of them 
was set at $50,000. (For a while Flowers didn't have to 
worry about bail — he was in the hospital with a bullet 
wound.) 

When the cases got to court, attorneys for the pair 
succeeded in having the bail reduced to $10,000 each. 
Flowers, who faced a possible life term as an exconvict, 
forfeited his bond and has not been heard from. Brown 
stood trial and is now doing from five to life in San 
Quentin. 

The safe crackings in Sacramento stopped when 
Flowers and Brown were arrested. Rooney figures they 
were responsible for most of a series of about 25 
burglaries. 

The second criminal group to be rounded up was the 
Duarte Gang, whose members are blamed for a score of 
robberies, most of them in liquor stores. 

The capture of this gang was practically a one man 
job by Detective Ted R. Hosmann. 

There was a regular splurge of liquor store robberies 
early in the fall of 1948. Most of the jobs were staged 
by two dark skinned fellows in dirty clothes. Several 
of the victims had noticed one thing — one of the robbers 
had a peculiar tattoo on his right hand. 

Hossman and the other detectives checked on dozens 
of suspects with no results. Then Hossman happened 



T 



HARDWARE 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

PAINTS 

APPLIANCES 

CYCLERY 

MOWER SHARPENING 

AND REPAIRS 

& 

COLLEGE HARDWARE 
AND CYCLERY 

2760 21st Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 6-2042 



Meet Me At 



Delbert R. Schiffner 
President 



Cecil G. Schiffner 
Vice-Pres. 



Robert C. Schiffner 
Secy-Treas. 



GOLDEN TAVERN GRILL 

Where You Get The Best 

FOOD 

and 

DRINKS 

We Always Try to Please You 
MODERATE PRICES 



623 Kay Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-4345 



GRIZZLY CREEK 
SAWMILL 



PONDEROSA 

and 

DOUGLAS FIR LUMBER 



Office 

NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone 26-F-3 

Mill Located at 

NORTH COLUMBIA 
Telephone 6-F-3 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



to remember running into a Portuguese with a tattoo 
on his right hand some years back. The rest is history- 
He found his tattooed man, and this led to the roundup 
of the entire seven man membership of the Duarte Gang. 
And the clearing up of a whole series of holdups. 

And then one night not many weeks ago Patrolman 
R. S. McCullough, on his way home after a routine night 
of walking his beat, saw a Negro trying to shoot a dog. 
Mack likes dogs and he grabbed the Negro. 

He was suspicious and turned his gun toting charge 
over to the detectives. The prisoner talked, and six of 
his friends were rounded up. 

By the time the investigation was completed more 
than 2 burglaries and a kidnap-robbery were solved and 
thousands of dollars worth of loot recovered. 

These are just the high spots of a year of hard and 
efficient work by the men of the detective bureau. 

There are others who deserve a good deal of credit for 
this year's splendid record of the detective bureau. Among 
them are Captain Martin Charles, Sergeant John J. 
Gabrielli and Detectives Robert E. Doyle, Arnold 
Gamble, Jack Greenlaw, J. T. McGuire, Les White, 
Henri Warren, Glenn Ticknor, Bob Weiger, Vic Weber, 
Jim Lyons, Robert R. Rauschert and Otto Dahl. 

SIEFER & MILLER 



AUTOMOTIVE MACHINISTS 
Phone 9-0J91 110 Linden Ave. 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WEDDING CAKES 



BIRTHDAY CAKES 

HEINTZ BAKERY 

1206 J Street 

SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3-5323 



Groceries * Meats * Fruits 
and Vegetables 

Fountain Service 

FINEF00D MARKET 

2308 Del Paso Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO, CALFORNIA 

Phone 9-0183 



FOR 25 YEARS 

Sacramento's Largest Food 

Shopping Center 

Sacramento Public Market 

13 th 8C J Streets 
"USE OUR FREE PARKING LOT" 



Compliments of 



MISSION THEATER 



to the 



Sacramento Police Department 



BEALL TAXI CO. 

100% UNION 

PHONE 2-3818 

Day and Night Service 
FAST AND COURTEOUS SERVICE 

231 "K" Street 

Sacramento 14, California 




Harry Y. Yamasaki 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS and ESTIMATES 
GIVEN WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

Telephone Dial 3-5225 
1422 Fourth Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



Capital Freight Lines 

Phone 6-3895 

Complete Terminal Facilities 
State-Wide Trucking 

John F. Dougery. General Manager 

4850 Stockton Blvd. 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



._» *-- 



Louvre Club and Coffee 
Shop 

and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

George Shaun, Chef 

DeLuxe Dinners * 24-Hour Service 
JACKSON, CALIFORNIA 



Seebold's Parking Lot 



714 L Street 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



~* *•- 



Telephone 3-2321 - Night Phone 2-9051 

Capitol Bail Bond Agency 

R. A. RUMMELSBURG 

BONDS DAY AND NIGHT 



916*2 Sixth Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



La Veda Pool Hall 

BEER, WINE and RESTAURANT 

201 N. 12th Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



For 

VENETIAN BLINDS 

and 

WINDOW SHADES 

Call the Blind Man 
23677 

William A Rapp & Co. 

20th & G Sts. ■ SACRAMENTO 



Capital City Title Co. 

801 Jay Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
Dial 2-1851 



~* *■- 



Phone 7-4721 

SHERMANS 

Minit-Man Automatic Car Washer 

CARS WASHED 
IN TWO MINUTES 

S. S. "Jack" Sherman 

30th 8C X Sts. • SACRAMENTO 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, J 949 



Saramento Rubber Company 

"If It's Rubber, We Have It" 

721-723 J Street 

SACRAMENTO 14, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-0475 



JUAN ESTEYES 



P. ENRIQUEZ 



Interlocking Block Co. 

A. E. KlMMEL 

Mortarless Building Block 
Cement * Reinforcing Steel 

7700 14th Avenue 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5-4573 



Aztec Restaurant 

"A BIT OF OLD MEXICO" 

216 K Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 2-9542 



PRESTOLITE BATTERIES 
MARQUETTE HOME FREEZERS 

DODGE ■ PLYMOUTH 

BATTERY SERVICE 

Harold White Motors 

Phone Courtland 3247 

CLARKSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



-t r- 



Phnt Phone 5-8120 



Residenee Phone 6-8888 



Pettinato Roofing Company 

Manufacturers of 
BARTILE ROOFING 

INSULATION * ROOFING 

7660 14th Avenue 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



D. F. Bloom and Sons 

Automotive and Agricultural 
Equipment 

Manufacturing - Maintenance 



Jefferson Blvd. at Harmon 

West Sacramento, California 

Phone 2-1507 



Exchange Lumber Co. 

Wholesale Lumber Merchants 
P. O. Box 1715 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 6-3771 



Res. 4-0706 



Log Cabin Restaurant 

Excellent Food and Mixed Drinks 

Air Conditioned by Frigidaire 
701 J Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



Traffic Chief Bennett 

(Continued from page 9) 

"So the fellow who does not respect the pedestrian's 
rights in Sacramento had better be prepared to pay a stiff 
fine or spend some time in jail. 

"Another thing we have found in recent years is that 
excessive speeds on city streets has made accidents a lot 
worse than they might be. It used to be that when a 
couple of cars collided the cars were cracked up some- 
what and a person or two was hurt. But recently we have 
had more and more of the type of accident in which two 
cars hit each other and then careen off and cause other 
damage or other injuries. So we are nabbing the speeders 
more than ever before." 

The work Bennett — with the able assistance of Sergeant 
Walter Sked and others — has been doing has merited the 
heartfelt support of his superiors. City Manager Bartley 
W. Cavanaugh and Police Chief James V. Hicks are 
among his most enthusiastic supporters. 

For years Bennett has been trying to have certain 
arterials designated as one way streets, and this year sev- 
eral of his suggestions have been adopted. 

He also has been plugging for various other traffic 
safety programs which have met opposition from people 
with other things that traffic safety in mind, and has met 
with success this year. 

All told, it has been a highly successful year for the 
traffic division. 

Bigger problems may be in store, but Sacramento's 
traffic officers will find the way out when they show up. 



Phone 5-4367 



Owner, Ben Lew 



H STREET MARKET 

Complete Food Store and 
Soda Fountain 

Open 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. 
Corner 56th and H Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 3-9323 



Reasonable Rates 



Westgate Auto and Trailer 
Court 

Cross Tower Bridge — Follow Signs 

A Sanitary Auto Court with 75 Modern Apartments 
and Cottages — 100 Modern Trailer Spaces 

A Safe Place to Bring Your Family 
Store in Connection 

E. G. Schaffnit, Owner. Route 1, Box 1015 
WEST SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



FORTNER MOTORS 



SELECTED USED CARS 



1716 Kay Street 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2-6724 



Grand Rapids Furniture Co. 

Complete Home Furnishings 

7th and K 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Dial 2-5631 



Joe Morelli 



Tony Milicevich 



J & T CLUB 

DANCING 

Every Saturday Night 

33rd and Franklin 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 41 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Fair Oaks Feed, Fuel 
and Materials 

FAIR OAKS, CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 399 



Phone 247 



Texaco Gas * Firestone Accessories 
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 



RADIOS • FONOGRAFOS . DISCOS 

"La Hispano - America" 

N. M. Corona 

Libros * Revistas ' Tarjetas 

Diccionaris for estudiantes en 
Ingles y Espanol 

207 L Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



M. R. CARPENTER 

AIR CONDITIONING • PLUMBING 
HEATING • VENTILATING and 

SHEET METAL WORK 

OIL BURNERS • GAS BURNERS 

and FURNACES 



907 Front Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



ANDERSON BROS. 



Phone 2-8773 



P. O. Box 242 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



PALACE MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables - Meats 

A Market Where You Will 
Find What You Want 



816 jay Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2-8588 



The Funland Arcade 

100 AMUSEMENT GAMES 
Rifle Range - Miniature Trains 

1220 K Street 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Sacramento Wool and Pelts 



P. O. Box 1143 



Sacramento, California 






Loverde Market 

Groceries and Fresh Vegetables 
Grade A Meat 

Phone 5-9737 

We Give S & H Stamps 
GAS - OIL AND ICE 



y 2 



Mile East of Stockton Blvd. on Fruitvale Road 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



Captain Gessner 

(Continued from page 10) 

later the charges against him were dismissed because his 
thugs threatened the young witnesses who might have 
appeared against him, and frightened them off. Finally 
he turned 21 and was caught with a marijuana cigaret 
in his pocket. 

He pleaded guilty to a simple charge of having a mari- 
juana cigaret in his possession. But when the judge 
learned what the juvenile division knew about his activi- 
ties he gave Herrera a ticket to San Quentin, where he 
will remain for some time. 

Many other cases could be cited to show the work of 
Gessner and his men and women officers have done to 
make Sacramento a better place for young people. Frank 
does not cite them. He is content to work in his own 
quiet way with the local neighborhood councils, the youth 
guidance agencies and other groups which are doing 
their best to make Sacramento a better place for youngsters 
to live in. 



YUEN CHONG 8C CO. 

General Merchandise 
MEATS, POULTRY AND GROCERIES 



Phone Walnut Grove 3411 



LOCKE 



P. O. Box 46 

CALIFORNIA 



R. J. Walton, Prop. 



Phone 9-986? 



Riverdale Auto Camp 

MODERN COTTAGES 

Space for 60 Trailers 

FISHING - GROCERIES AND MEATS 
BATHING BEACH 

On U. S. Highway 40 and 99E 
North Bank American River 

441 Del Paso Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Wingo Furniture & Cabinet 
! Shop 

GENERAL FURNITURE WORK 

CABINET WORK 

Dial 9-5493 
3023 Ben Ali Avenue 

SACRAMENTO 15, CALIFORNIA 



L 



Colonial Building Supply Co. 

Ray H. Chapman, Manager 
Phone 5-0717 

4649 Stockton Blvd. 
SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Chuck Elliott Machinery Co. 

Contractor and Farm Equipment 
Welding and Repair 

Telephone 6-2421 
Route 4, Box 3345 

Two Miles South on Stockton Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



L. A. (Lou) Parell 



Dial ?-469f 



Parell & Fries 

Auto Reconstruction * Painting 
Frame Straightening * Wheel Aligning 



24-HOUR TOW SERVICE 
Ninth and X Streets 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



J L 



RED HEN CLUB 

Good Food ' Reasonable Prices 
Delicious Cocktails 

1117 and 1119 9th Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



'January, 1949 



J. R. REEVES 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

ROAD CONSTRUCTION 
Excavating - Grading - Paving 

Office Phone 9-2707 

16th at American River Bridge 

Mailing Address: P. O. Box 1072 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



H. Arons 



O. McKeown 



PALL MALL BAR 

Phone 3-9651 
1606 J Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 3-8918 



Night 9-3881 



California Boiler and 
Welding Works 

Dale Hancock, Owner 

NEW AND USED BOILERS - INSULATION 
By A. S. M. E. 

Representing: 
SPRINGFIELD BOILER MFRS. 
SAVERIGHT ENGINEERING 

Sixth and Broadway - SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



The Palm Iron and Bridge 
Works 



Phone 2-1051 
15th and S Streets 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



3-7941 



3-7941 



Safe Courteous Service 

UNION TAXI 

PROMPT 
TWO-WAY RADIO 

SERVICE 

100% UNION 

OFFICE AT GREYHOUND DEPOT 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



Residence Phone 6-1994 Business Phone 6-64^9 

Flood Equipment Company 

SALES AND SERVICE 

OLIVER - CLETRAC AND TOWNER 

Agricultural Tractors and Implements 

Industrial Tractors and Heavy Equipment 

Hercules Power Units 

Alhambra and Vee Streets 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



FEDERATED STORE 

1905 Del Paso Blvd. 

NORTH SACRAMENTO 



We Arc Easy on Your Budget 

"Shop Where There Is No 
Parking Problem" 



Ben C. Caplan Sam Freeman 

Phone 9-2858 

United Pipe & Machinery 
Company 

Mining Machinery, Rails, Contractors' Equipment, 
Shovels, Electric, Diesel and Gas Motors 

P. O. Box 498 (Zone 15) 
AUBURN BLVD., near Subway 

North Sacramento, California 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



Captain Charles 

( Continued from page 1 1 ) 
seemed like something out of Sherloek Holmes. The 
truth of the matter was that Martin had slept only in 
brief snatches for two solid months. 

A few years later a fellow named Hummel started a 
similar reign of terror, only to be grabbed by Charles 
and his crew at the time of night when most people are 
in their beds. 

During the war Charles cracked two of the biggest 
gangs of auto and tire thieves that ever operated in 
northern California. With cars impossible to get and tires 
as scarce as you can imagine, there was a ripe market, 
and the thieves did not neglect it. A dozen or so fellows 
are in San Quentin now, regretting the fact that Martin 
Charles was on the job at the same time they were. 

Up until the day his heart gave out Charles gave his 
best for the Sacramento Police Department. And his best 
was plenty good. 

THE DIAMOND MATCH COMPANY 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



WESTERN HOTEL 

WORKING MEN'S RATES 

BARBER SHOP • BEER PARLOR • CARD GAMES IN CONNECTION 

Phone 2-0353 215 Kay Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



PAUL MARCHI 



In Sacramento Since 1915 



MARCHI MUSIC CO. 

"EVERYTHING IN MUSIC" 
Telephone 2-9066 1208 J Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



2826 Q STREET 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Res. Phone 6-4716 



Res. 1032 43rd Street 



THASOS COFFEE SHOP 

MINNIE hUl. us Mar. and Owner 
WAFFLES • STEAKS • CHOPS 

FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS $1.00 

We Serve Good Food and Quick Service 

No Waiting • Coffee 5c Cup 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone 3-9885 



1018 Sixth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SANITARY COFFEE SHOP 

LOUIS POULOS 

WE SERVE THE BEST FOODS 
ALWAYS GOOD COFFEE 



SACRAMENTO 



Dial 3-9381 



1022 8th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



HARRY'S CAFE 

JOHN MORAITAS. Owner 
Under New Management 

SPECIALIZING IN GOOD FOOD 

Phone 3-9620 524 12th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Sacramento Junk and Machinery Co. 

WEINBERG BROS. 



Phone 6-0725 



2720 "R" Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



JUAN ESTEVES 



P. ENRIQUEZ 



AZTECA RESTAURANT 

"A BIT OF OLD MEXICO" 



216 K Street 



Telephone 2-9542 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



HANLEY'S Blacksmith and Spring Shop 

AUTOMOBILE AND TRUCK REPAIRING 

WE SPECIALIZE IN SPRING REPAIRING 

FRAME AND AXLE STRAIGHTENING 
ELECTRIC AND ACETYLENE WELDING 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone 2-330S 



1215 G Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OKSIE C. WORD SEBE T. WORD 

WORD RADIATOR 

RADIATORS CLEANED AND REPAIRED 
On Overhaul Don't Forget the Radiator 



1930 Capitol Ave. 



Dial 4-1421 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO DAIRY SUPPLY CO. 

A. L. REIGNIERD. Manager 

THE LARGEST DAIRY SUPPLY STORE 
IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



Dial 3-5277 1915 O Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BILL KAUFER 



GEO. SEEKS 



MOTOR CLINIC 

Specializing in 

CARBURETOR • TUNE-UP 
BRAKE SERVICE 

Phone 2-0323 1829 17th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



FRANK MALONEY, Builder 

Telephone 3-9075 1915 S Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SAFETY LOCKS ON ALL 000RS 



MODERATE PRICES 



COURT GARAGE 

WE NEVER CLOSE 

WASHING, POLISHING. GREASING, REPAIRING 

WE FIX FLATS 

MODERATE PRICES • PROMPT SERVICE 

We Honor Standard Oil Co. Credit Cards 



SACRAMENTO 



610 Eye Street 



Phone 2-9988 



CALIFORNIA 



LUCKY HOTEL 

BISHAN SINGH. Prop. 

STEAM HEAT 

HOT AND COLD WATER 

IN EVERY ROOM 

225 ' 2 L Street Dial 2-9750 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



LORD & BISHOP 
Contracting Engineers 

P. O. Box 812 
SACRAMENTO 4, CALIFORNIA 



JOHN KUCK TAVERN 

WE SERVE DRINKS AND MEALS 

AT 

1704 BROADWAY 



OWL CLEANERS 

BEECH J. SAUNDERS 



WE COMBINE YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 
WITH MODERN METHODS 



1625 Del Paso Blvd. 
NORTH SACRAMENTO 



Dial 9-3966 



CALIFORNIA 



WONDER FOOD MARKET 

Complete Line of 

GROCERIES • MEATS • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 
ALSO SODA FOUNTAIN 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



Phone 6-2640 



3924 Franklin Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



PASTIME POOL HALL 

CIGARETTES AND SOFT DRINKS 



ALHAMBRA BARBECUE 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
SANDWICHES - BARBECUE - LUNCHES 



Phone 2-9428 308 L Street Phone S-9738 1310 Alhambra Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



MUSCHETTO'S GROCERY 

FRUITS • VEGETABLES • GROCERIES 

WINE • BEER • LIQUORS 

ICE CREAM AND SODAS 



CLUB DANCELAND 

FINE LIQUORS - COCKTAILS 
GOOD FOOD AND SERVICE 



2100 Alhambra Blvd. 



Phone 3-3692 2630 Fifth Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



ELITE SERVICE STATION 

E. w. MILLER. Prop. 

DAY AND THEATRE PARKING 

WASHING - POLISHING - GREASING 

STORAGE - Weekly or Monthly 

WHILE YOU SHOP 



SEE ME AT 



BOB'S BAR-B-Q 



4001 Franklin Boulevard 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone Main 1-0468 



1031 L Street 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Frank Z. Ahl Sheet Metal Works 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 

AHL FURNACES 

Air Conditioning Equipment 

SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 



TRIANGLE PRODUCE CO. 



2116 P Street Telephone 3-3482 



WHOLESALE 



FRUIT AND PRODUCE 



2630 Fifth Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



PUMPS • MOTOR REWINDING • PRESSURE SYSTEMS 
MOTORS • ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

CALIFORNIA ENGINEERING CO. 



SPURGEON'S Cleaning and Dyeing 

WE DO GOOD WORK AND 
GIVE GOOD SERVICE 



Phone 3-5541 516 12th Street 3200 Folsom Boulevard 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BRADEN & GARLAND 

FRANK E. GARLANO. Owner-Mnr. 

AUTOMOBILE SEAT COVERS 
Wholesale - Retail 



BEER - WINE - MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

Shuffle Boards - Soft Drinks 

BEER • WINE • MEALS AT ALL TIMES 



Phone 2-2849 817 12th Street 

Phones 5-9S34 - 3905 Stockton Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



SAVE A LOT MARKET 

1600 F Street 



CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



JOE'S PLACE 

329 Twelfth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 47 



THE FRIENDLY CORNER wmTE pLAKE DQ NUJ SHOp 

WINES - LIQUORS - TOBACCOS 

AND SUNDRIES WHOLESALE :-: RETAIL 

Tel. 3-6250 200 "K" Street Phone 2-9339 315 16th Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

WILSON RENTS 

(-^rX-j-%7 /^r iip TA\/ET>lVr WHEELCHAIRS • HOSPITAL BEDS . INNER SPRING MATTRESSES 

K-\j/-ll LLUC 1 AVeKJM WALKERS • CRUTCHES . FRACTURE BEDS 

Owner. TONY KIOS ROLLAWAY BEDS . FOLDING CHAIRS. Etc. 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS 

give good servivce WILSON'S FURNITURE EXCHANGE 

Phone 9-9920 326 15th Street 

SACRAMFNTO PAI IFORNIA Phone 2-8276 1309 J Street 

MLKAMLINIU CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



HOY KEE CO. CAPITAL CITY CAFE 

*- ,v ' POOL HALL 

SODA FOUNTAIN • BEER . WINE BEERi WINE AND LIQU0R 

P. O. Box 25 Phone 2-9914 413 K Street 

LOCKE CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

RIVER BANK BARBER SHOP GEORGE'S POOL HALL 

SOFT DRINKS 

and POOL ROOM equipped with 

NEW BRUNSWICK POOL TABLES 

1213 Fourth Street 
WALNUT GROVE CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DOC'S PI ACF 

^ ^ f i./\^c WAKEFIELD and SONS HARDWARE 

ROOT BEER KING 
SODA FOUNTAIN AND MEALS Formerly Campbell and Boutwell 

5201 Folsom Blvd. 1214 Jay Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORN IA 

_ T _ SUTTON MOTOR SALES 

OLD PIONEER CLUB we sell the best and 



GOOD FOOD AND DRINKS 



JUNK THE REST 
Top Cash Paid for Good Used Cars 



231 12th Street Phone 2-0584 Phone Lot 2: Phone 

2-8494 SACRAMENTO, 4-4771 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA ,51s K Street CALIFORNIA 1716 K Street 



EARL'S PAINT SHOP 



FIRMESTEAD WASHER SERVICE 

W. J. FIRMSTEAD 



PAINTING SALES AND SERVICE 

With Porter & Sprague Co. HOME APPLIANCES 

723 12th Street Phone 3-6759 130B Jay Street Dia , 3 . s061 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

LENNARD and THOMAS 49'er CAFE AND COCKTAILS 

SADDLERY WE SERVE MEALS 

STEAKS AND CHICKENS 

Phone 2-6416 1307 Jay Street 

Dial 5-0076 Folsom Blvd. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

REMEMBER 

KAY'S POOL HALL RRAnnnrr»«! * « 

soft drinks BKADDOCK S for Shoes 

1214 Fourth Street 908 Jay Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, J 949 



Sheriff Don Cox 

( Continued from page 12) 

business with and Driggs guarantees his eheck at the bank. 

"I think the main opposition to universal fingerprinting 
comes from the unlawful element, and it will be pushed 
aside in the future. " 

The old hands who have been Cox's chief assistants for 
years are still with him. Harry Knoll is the Undersheriff 
and Charles Wearn is the Chief Criminal Deputy. 

One of the big events around the Sheriff's office recently 
was an attempted break that would have given 57 men 
an opportunity to get out of the county pail. Two of 
Cox's deputies — Tom Howard and Dickson Davey — were 
on their toes and discovered some prisoners in the big 
cell in the basement had sawed their way nearly through 
a cell bar and bent another so far a small man could 
have crowded out between the bars. The alertness of 
Howard and Davey stymied the attempt. 

Cox is especially proud of his aero squadron and his 
mounted posse. The squadron is made up of about 20 
Sacramento County airplane owners. They can be alerted 
within a few minutes to take to the sky in the event of 
an emergency. They are prepared to track down fleeing 
criminals or do disaster work. The posse is famous 
throughout northern California and has won numerous 
prizes. 

Another notch was figuratively added to the Sheriff's 
gun last year when he completed another year without 
having a single prisoner from Folsom escape, although 
he transferred hundreds of them, including some of the 
toughest in the West. It is Cox's proud boast that he has 
not lost a single Folsom prisoner in all the years he has 
been in office. 

Cox has been in the Sheriff's office for 27 years and 
has held the top job since 1932. And each election he is 
returned to office without serious opposition. 

He was born in Spencer County, Indiana, and has 
been a Californian since 1911. In 1917 he enlisted in 
the navy and won his honorable discharge in 1921. He 
is one of the few officers in the state who could go out 
and practice law if he wanted to change jobs. Shortly 
after Cox entered the sheriff's office he enrolled at the 
McGeorge College of Law in Sacramento, and took his 
degree in 1926. Not long afterward he was admitted 
to practice. 

Sheriff Cox is third vice president of the Peace Officers' 
Association of the State of California. He was successful 
in getting the 1949 convention of the Association for 
Sacramento which will be held this fall. He and Chief 
James Hicks are making plans to have it rank as the best 
and attended by more Peace Officers of California than 
has ever been held during the 28 years life of the 
organization. 



A & A Auto Body and Paint Works 

AUTO PAINTING 
BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING 

Phones: Office 2-7901; Res. 6-0000 • 1926 Capitol Ave. 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



VIRGIL. Owner 



Established in 1 8SS 



STEEN'S CORNER 

BEER • WINE • LIQUOR 

Telephone 5-9SC2 35th and 4th Avenue 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



TRUCKEE 



PIONEER LUMBER CO. 



JACK SIMAS 
Manager 

Res. Phone 5-0964 



6438 Folsom Blvd. 
Phone 7-1574 



RICE GROWERS ASSOCIATION 
OF CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 953 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Route I. Box 2450 



Telephone 5-9809 



SERRA BROS. MARKET 

LUIS. CLARENCE and VERNON SERRA 
GROCERIES • MEATS » VEGETABLES 



3Sth Ave. and Franklin Blvd. 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



MENLO CLUB 

MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

STEAKS • CHICKENS 

4778 Franklin Blvd. 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Most Complete Line of 
LIQUORS AND WINES 

EL AGUILA CAFE 

OTILIA MENDEZ. Prop. 

ESPECIALIDAD EN APETITOS PARA FAMILIA 
AL ESTILO MEXICANO 



1203-1205 Third Street 



SACRAMENTO 



FAIR VIEW TAVERN 

WE SERVE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR, ALSO MEALS 

2900 Stockton Blvd., near Fair Grounds 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



GUS' RESTAURANT 

Always Open 



SOFT DRINKS 



1800 BROADWAY 



SACRAMENTO SACRAMENTO 



POOL HALL 

COFFEE • CIGARS • CIGARETTES 
312 L Street 



CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



Page 49 



I. R. WOOD 



R. L. WOOD DEAN HOTCHKISS 



CECIL DECKWA 



FAY PETTIGREW 



SACRAMENTO WRECKING 
& PLUMBING COMPANY 



SUTTER CASKET COMPANY 

CLOTH COVERED 
METAL CASKETS 



Dial 2-3441 417 12th Street Phone 2-6604 330 Twentieth Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Sporting Goods Headquarters 

LAUSON OUTBOARD MOTORS 

SACRAMENTO SPORTING GOODS 

'•WE GIVE CASH CHECKS" 
1312 Jay Street Dial 2-7298 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Mailing Address 
P. O. Box 1205 



Plant: 
6661 EASTERN AVE. 



UNION PLANING MILL 



Telephone 6-5723 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



CLUB BILLIARD 

POOL • BEER • SOFT DRINKS • CANDY 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 



2426 Del Paso Blvd. 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



EOUIPOISE CAFE 

RESTAURANT OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

CHARCOAL BROILER - POPULAR PRICES 
BEER, WINE AND LIQUORS 



SACRAMENTO 



Phone 2-4316 



415 Kay Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MCS. FRED W. DAWSON. Owner 



CLARENCE W. POPE, Manager 



Globe Transfer and Warehouse Co. 

PACKING - STORAGE - MOVING 

SHIPPING HOUSEHOLD GOODS, Etc. 

PROMPT SERVICE 

Phone 3-6576 Office: Front and N Streets 

Mail All Correspondence to P. 0. Box 385 

SACRAMENTO 2, CALIFORNIA 



FOTOS LINEN SERVICE 

COMPLETE LINEN RENTAL SERVICE 

Complete Laundry and Dry Cleaning Service . . . Family Bundles 
Special Shirt Finishing . . . Discount for Cash and Carry 

PROMPT, MODERN, COURTEOUS SERVICE 



SACRAMENTO 



Dial 5 2617 



2114 Alhambra Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



FORK LIFT SALES AND RENTALS 
VARIOUS TYPES OF OPERATION 
CLARK • VAUGHN • MacDONALD 



ROSS 



CONVERSE INDUSTRIES 

Stockton Blvd. and Fruitridge Road 



P. O. Box 549 



Dial 6-6479 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BRANCH OFFICE MAIN OFFICE and PLANT BRANCH OFFICE 
3256 J Street 18th and Broadway 14th and Eye Street 

Phone 3-2501 



Bell Hotel 



Golden West Hotel 



Dial 2-9506 Dial 2-9767 

601 ' 2 K Street 1024 4th Street 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 

QUICK SERVICE 

CHUNGKING LAUNDRY 

and Cleaning Works 



1124-1126 Second Street 

SACRAMENTO 



Phone 2-8546 

CALIFORNIA 



RESTAURANT 
PHONE 2-9601 



BAR 

PHONE 3-9811 



DAY AND NIGHT CAFE 

EXCELLENT FOOD 
THE BEST OF LIQUORS 



401-403 "J" Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



ELITE COFFEE SHOP 

TOM RENOS. Prop. 
We Serve only the Best Foods 

BREAKFASTS • LUNCHES • DINNERS • CHILI 
HAMBURGERS • HOT DOGS • ICE CREAM 



Dial 5-9682 



3408 Third Ave. 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



BOYLE BROS., Cleaners and Dyers 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA SACRAMENTO 



HOMESTEAD LUMBER CO. 

I. E. MORLEY 

30th and Que Streets 
Phone 5-3081 P. O. Box 469 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



JOHN ELLIS 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 
Authorized Nash Parts and Service 



Phone 2-2488 



1930 K Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK'S POOL HALL 

SOFT DRINKS • CANDY • ICE CREAM 



SACRAMENTO 



1211 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW EAGLE CAFE 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

MEALS AT RESTAURANT PRICES 

404 Kay Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



Page 50 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



1949 



Some Are True - Some Are False - RATE YOURSELF 



51. 



52. 



5 3. 



54. 



'>'). 



56. 



57. 



58. 



60. 



61. 



62. 



63. 



64. 



65. 



prisoner guilty 
condemnation: 



Rescue means most nearly: (1) a heroic act; (2) 
illegal escape of a prisoner; (3) a last minute pardon; 

(4) temporary release; (5) a stay of execution. 
Corpus means most nearly: (1) the complete sets of 
elements necessary to constitute a particular crime; 

(2) the name of a legal form; (3) tainted; (4) a 
body, not necessarily a human body; (5) the instru- 
ment used in a crime. 

A judgment of a court declaring a 
as charged is a: (1) sentence; (2) 

(3) verdict; (4) conviction. 

Corporal punishment means most nearly: (1) whip- 
ping or beating; (2) bread and water diet; (3) extra 
work at hard labor; (4) solitary confinement; (5) 
forfeiture of life. 

A trial is: (1) the hearing of a charge of action in 
court; (2) a judgment of a court; (3) a lawsuit; (4) 
a court case which requires a verdict by jury; (5) 
none of the foregoing. 
Expedient means: (1) completely and exactly state; 

(2) practical and efficient; (3) in abundance; (4) 
exactly alike; (5) not actually true. 

When an indictment is filed the defendant must 
immediately thereafter: (1) be held to answer; (2) 
be arraigned thereon; (3) plead thereto; (4) be per- 
sonally present; (5) be admitted to bail. 
Appeals from the Municipal Court usually go: (1) 
to the Appellate Court; (2) to the Supreme Court: 

(3) to the Federal District Court; (4) to the Superior 
Court; (5) back to the Municipal Court. 

An alienist is: (1) a foreigner; (2) a witness; (3) 
a psychiatrist; (4) a naturalized citizen; (5) one who 
betrays his country to a foreign power. 
If at the time of arrest for murder the suspect says 
"I killed him, but it was in order to protect myself," 
the accused is said to have made: (1) a confession; 
(2) an affidavit; (3) an admission; (4) a deposition; 

(5) statement. 

A writ to recover stolen property which has been 
sold to an innocent purchaser is called: (1) habeas 
corpus; (2) replevin; (3) subpoena; (4) demurrer, 
(5) writ of dues tecum. 

A writ requiring that a person in custody be brought 
before a judge to determine whether he is legally held 
is called: (1) a habeas corpus; (2) mandamus; (3) 
subpoena; (4) injunction; (5) attachment. 
A combination of two or more persons to accomplish 
a criminal or unlawful act is called: (1) a conspiracy: 
(2) a rout; (3) treason; (4) a riot; (5) sabotage. 
One who is liable to prosecution for the identical 
offense charged against the defendant on trial in the 
case in which the testimony is given is called: (1) an 
accomplice; (2) a prisoner; (3) a pensioner; (4) a 
repeater; (5) an accessory. 

Patrimony means most nearly: (1) one who would 
be head of the family. (2) one who kills his father; 



(3) an hereditary estate; (4) the head of the Greek 
Church; (5) one who kills either of his parents. 

66. Parricide means most nearly: (1) the murder of one's 
relatives; (2) the murder of one's father or mother; 
(3) the killing of an enemy; (4) the killing by means 
of explosives; (5) thp killing of a person by legal 
court order. 

68. Testimony taken in writing under oath, to be used 
in a trial, is called: (1) an affidavit; (2) a deposition- 
(3) an affirmation; (4) viva voce testimony; (5) a 
transcript of testimony 

Phone 2-6506 

NEW WM. TELL CAFE 

WE SERVE ONLY THE BEST BRANDS 

HOT LUNCHES AND SANDWICHES 

Cigars o Cigarettes « Tobacco • Candy 

3 17 JAY STREET SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 

BLEUEL'S TAVERN 



SACRAMENTO 



Stockton Blvd. at 35th 



CALIFORNIA 



FAIR VIEW TAVERN 8C CAFE 

ACROSS FROM STATE FAIR GROUNDS 



2900 Stockton Blvd. 



Telephone 5-9837 



FANCY CLEANERS 



V. E. SCHREFFLER 

CLEANERS OF FANCY GARMENTS 

3319 Folsoin Blvd. Dia! 5-6695 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

DEEP CHANNELL 

P. T. RAGHELLI 

U ALWAYS FIND ME WHERE THEY TREAT ME 

SQUARE AND THIS IS THE PLACE 

231 Jay Street Dial 2-9S50 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



VALLEJO CAFE 



N. & J.. Props. 

WINE - WHISKEY - BEER AND GOOD FOOD 

228 "K" Street Phone 3-9795 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



RED FRONT CAFE 

JOHN DANOIS. Prop. 
BEER WINES, LIQUORS AND LUNCHES 



327 Kay Street 



Phone 3-9565 



JACUZZI PUMP & SUPPLY, Inc. 

A. J. D.'VALLL. Manager 
PUMPS FOR EVERY PURPOSE 
540 North 16th Street 
SACRAMENTO 



Telsphone Sacramento 2-7386 

CALIFORNIA 



HERZOG'S GARAGE 

FRANK HERZ0G. Prop. 

REPAIRING - AUTOMOBILE, TRUCK and TRACTOR 

MOTOR TUNE-UP • WELDING & MACHINE WORK 

Phono Ctld. 2331 PARTS • TIRES COURTLAND, CALIF. 



DIXON CLEANERS 

CLEANING • PRESSING • REPAIRING 



DIXON 



Telephone 269 



CALIFORNIA 



THELMA ROPER VIOLA HAUG 

3 ACRES 

SERVING BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 

HOME-COOKED MEALS 

3 Mil-s East Perkins on Felsom Road. Telephone 5-9086 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page U 



69. The attempt to aid the prisoner to better himself, to 
educate himself, and to fit himself for society is known 
as the process of: (1) discrimination; (2) rehabilita 
tion; (3) corporal punishment; (4) physiotherapy. 

70. Emolument means most nearly: (1) to establish by 
law; (2) to take effect; (3) to give a right of title to-, 
(4) profit arising from office or employment; (5) 
to praise. 

(To be continued) 



MANUEL'S PLACE 

SIEMPRE SIRVELO 

MEJOR EN COMIDAS 

MEXICANOS 



1113 B Th'rd Street 



Dial 2-2773 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



SUN HOTEL 



DEANS 8c HOMER 

INSURANCE GENERAL AGENTS 



340 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CARUSO'S RESTAURANT 

U'hIm New Ownersh'p 

SPECIALIZING IN FINE ITALIAN FOODS 

NOIED FOR ITS FAMOUS PIZZA 

13S Taylor Street PR. 5-9867 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



THE POPPY BUFFET 

101 Sixth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



F. J. BURNS 



516 Townsend Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NEW COLUMBIAN HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



32 Sacramento Street 



CALIFORNIA 



INABE BROS. 

FISH • MEAT • GROCERIES • WINES 



WALNUT GROVE 



Fhone 3436 



CALIFORNIA 



NEW ATLAS CAFE 

ALL KINDS OF SANDWICHES, BEER, WHISKEY, WINE 

311 Kay Street Phone 2-9695 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

JONNY'S CAFE 

BEER - WINE AND ALSO SERVE FOOD 



SACRAMENTO 



We Serve You With a Smile 
Fhone 3-9479 630 Q Street 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN D0SD0RIAN. Owner 



TELEPHONE 3-6597 



HARRIS & JOHNNIE 

BRAKE REL'NING - FRONT WHEEL ALIGNING - AUTOMOBILE 

RECONSTRUCTION - BEAR FRAME STRAIGHTENING 
2019 O STREET SACRAMENTO 

Open 6 A.M. - 1 A.M. FRANK MILLAS, Prop. 

LUNCHETTE AND FOUNTAIN 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER 
1124 J Street Phone 3-4451 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO 



328 ',2 K Street 



Phone 4-2572 



CALIFORNIA 



TRI- STATE SERVICE • CALIFORNIA • OREGON • NEVADA 

PACIFIC RE-TINNING WORKS 

Reconditioning of 

DAIRY AND PETROLEUM INDUSTRY EQUIPMENT 

Phone Dial 5-8476 Vahan Kazanjian. Owner 

2809 S STREET SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 

CAPITAL POULTRY COMPANY 

Phone Main 4263 and 

PACIFIC FISH MARKET 

Phonp Main 426-1 

A Full Line of Live, Dressed Poultry, Eggs and Fresh Fish 

5 16-518 EYE STREET SACRAMENTO, CALIF 

MIDWAY AUTO WRECKERS 

CLARENCE MATHIAS 

USED CARS BOUGHT 

New Address: Rt. 7, Box 1074, Fhone 9-7222 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



LOUIS LERCR 



WALTER E. LISS 



MILLS STATION 



Route 2, Box 2876, U. S. Highway No. 50 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 

Oo:n II A.M. to I A.M. Open Saturdays 'til 3 A.M. 

DING HOW CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

SpBc'al Ch : nese Dishes to Take Home 

Phones: 6-2753, 5 9716 2721 Broadway 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



MALATESTA'S 

GROCER'ES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

RESTAURANT • GOOD FOOD 

Phone 37 

SUTTER CREEK CALIFORNIA 



CAPITAL GROCERY 



GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

BEER • WINES <• LIQUORS 

Phone 2-7981 431 Sixteenth Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



MITSUWA COMPANY 

JOBBERS • MANUFACTURERS AGENT 

IMPORT • EXPORT 

Telephone 2-3440 309 O Street 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



BLAKE SMITH 



KEN FARLEY 



TOP HAT POTATO CHIP CO. 



SACRAMENTO 



1616 No. C Street 



Phone 2-0S97 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 5-0536 



FREE DELIVERY 



INTERNATIONAL POULTRY MARKET 

Dealers in 

LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY AND EGGS 

Wholesale and Retail 

2616 BROADWAY SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 



F. B. HART 



Distributor 

CMC TRUCKS AND TRAILERS 

438-470 No. 16th. St. Phone 3-5743 

SACRAMENTO CALIFORNIA 



SACRAMENTO LOAN 8c JEWELRY CO. 

Monev to Loan on DIAMONDS. WATCHES. JEWELRY 

EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING UNREDEEMED PLEDGES FOR SALE 

WARDROBE TRUNKS OUR SPECIALTY 

531 Kay Street Phone 2-6384 



MAY FAIR RESTAURANT 



WE SERVE GOOD FOOD 



2101 P Strret 



Phone 3-9477 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



W. H. "BILL" BURGHER. Proprietor 



FREE DELIVERY 



WESTERN LIQUOR COMPANY 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS 



SACRAMENTO 



Dal 2-3514 



1612 K Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, J 949 



SONORA INN 

E. C. CRONWELL. JR., Manager 
404 Washington Street 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



EASTLACK'S Red and White Store 

MEAT - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 
DRUGS - FEEDS - HARDWARE 



Phone 3119 



COLUMBIA 



CALIFORNIA 



N. A. Reibi. 



Phone 893 



EL NIDO INN 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Mono Highway, One Mile East of 
SONORA. CALIFORNIA 



CARTER'S STRAWBERRY RESORT 

Dick and Mary 
EAT, DRINK, SKI and HAVE A GOOD TIME 
Sleeping 1 Bag Accommodations for 40 People 



Via Sonora-Mono Highway 



STRAWBERRY. CALIF. 



FLOWER BOWL BEAUTY SHOPPE 

ALICE SELESIA, Prop. 



K - PLASTIX 



580 Natoma Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DR. W. E. FRANCIS 

OPTOMETRIST 



109 Ellis Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



STOVES 

GERNHARDT - STROHMAIER CO. 

L. A. GERNHARDT 

REFRIGERATORS - WASHERS - IRONERS 
WATER HEATERS 

Mission Street at 18th Phone Mission 7-0236 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ENTERPRISE ENGINE & FOUNDRY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Jackson and Stewart Streets Phone 642 

SONORA CALIFORNIA ELLEN M. ASHLEY 



STAR CAFE 

AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

Phone GRaystone 4-9441 700 Post Street, Cor. Jones 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PAUL E. McCONNELL 
Manager 



GEORGE H. FORBES 

NO 

FURNITURE STORE 

RENT 

DISTINCTIVE HOME FURNISHINGS 



ASHLEY & McMULLEN 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

4200 Geary Boulevard SKyline 1-8403 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SONORA 



CALIFORN 1 ' 



REIDEL MOTOR SALES 

PONTIAC - CROSLEY CARS 

WHITE TRUCKS 

CADILLAC - PONTIAC - GOODYEAR TIRES 



Phone 649 



SONORA 



CALIFOR* 



V. E. Anderson Manufacturing Co. 

Incorporat d 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 

BOX SHOOK • CUT STOCK • CUSTOM MILLING 

Norman L. Hill, Division Manager 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



SCHROEDER'S CAFE 

111 Front Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MARK TWAIN HOTEL 



345 Taylor Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BONNIE LOVOTTI AL LOVOTTI 

CRUCIBLE BRASS FOUNDRY AL'S MARKET 

BRASS - BRONZE - ALUMINUM Formerly Freds Market 

_ . . „.. CASTINGS LIQUOR - BEER - WINE and DELICATESSEN 

.. . „, ,-r.T?, J}!™ VAIenc a 4-8704 22S5 Fo'som Street 800 McAllister Street Phone FI. 3-9702 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 53 



L. R. FOX Courtland 3431 

FINE ITALIAN FOOD 

COURTLAND MACHINE WORKS CARUSO'S 

MANUFACTURING - GENERAL REPAIRS Specializing in PIZZA 

FARM EQUIPMENT AND PARTS Made by the PIZZA KING 

P. O. Box 105 

Phone PRospect 5-9867 13S Taylor Street 

COURTLAND CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



WALNUT GROVE HOTEL OCEAN SHORE IRON WORKS 

LEO. J. SILVA, Prop. BOILER AND TANK MANUFACTURERS 

AND DEALERS 

Phone 23 5 1 

Phone UNderhll 1-4310 550 Eighth Street 
WALNUT GROVE CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Atkinson Mill 8C Lumber Co. 

NORTHWEST ENGINEERING CO. 

950 77th Avenue 

255 10th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA SAN FRANC ISCO CALIFORNIA 



Everything in Hardware 
RADIOS - CUTLERY - TOOLS . • . 

sportsmens supply station The Lowrie Paving Company, Inc. 

OLIVER HARDWARE 

Frank G. Oliver 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SONORA CALIFORNIA 



t c w/cct a, m K & N RESTAURANT 

J. 3. Wfcijl 0C K-,\J. MANUEL and FLORENCE L. ROLDAO 

a u „ i .-. .• BEER • FINE FOOD 

A Home Institution 

TIRES FUELS APPLIANCES ^ Miles North, 99 Highway and Waller Avenue 

Phone 3-7055 Route 3, Box 485 

STOCKTON CALIFORNIA 
SONORA CALIFORNIA 



NICELY ELECTRIC CO. FRIENDLY CAB COMPANY 

MATERIALS - CONTRACTING - FIXTURES 

2201 Bush Street 
Route 2, Mono Highway Phone 2-5912 
SONORA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HORSE SHOE CLUB MacDUCKSTON AND GIESCH 

"PAT" PATTON 

1133 Mariposa Street Phone HEmlock 1-1343 

SONORA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

H ' A«'c™?rrSr£ EN GUARANTEE INSURANCE CO. 

Traffic Officers are our Iriends 
May we mainta'n our friendship at all times. 

249 Pine Street 
Box 215 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



JOHNNY'S TRUCKING SERVICE MONARCH HOTEL 

J NEWLY FURNISHED • TWIN BEDS 

_ _ COURTESY SERVICE 

344 Drumm Street. GA. 1-6977 722 Golden Gate Avenue, near Civic Center 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE BARREL INN 

139 Ellis Street 



CALIFORNIA 



PARIS-LOUVRE 

FRENCH RESTAURANT 
808 Pacific Street 



TRI VALLEY PACKING ASSOCIATION 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



622 CLUB 

622 Green Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DEL MONICA HAT CO 

109 Geary Street 



DETTNER'S PRINTING HOUSE, INC. 

LITHOGRAPHERS • PRINTERS 
Telephone GArfield 1-2803 
835 Howard Street 
CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



BRADY AND DOWLING 



HOTEL CLEMENT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



2737 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



S24 Clement Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DOYLE'S TAVERN 

24th and Church Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



SKYSCRAPER TAVERN 

3336 24th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK SCHMIDT 



SUPERINTENDENT 
FRANKLIN HOSPITAL 



NATIONAL MANUFACTURING CO. 

1301 Powell Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA S AN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HALLINAN & MACKIN LUMBER CO. 



CHESTER'S CAFE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Monadonock Building 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



3138 Fillmore Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAMARKAND ICE CREAM 

893 Folsom Street 



Telephones: HEmlock 1-6494-95 Branch Store. 546 Valencia Street 

D. H. RHODES & CO. 

Manufacturers and Distributors of 
PAINT AND VARNISH PRODUCTS 

SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. 



CALIFORNIA 434 N| N™ STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



R. N. NASON PAINT CO. 

151 Potrero Street 



EMMA DOMB MANUFACTURING CO. 

APPAREL CENTER 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



ARCH CLUB 

826 Ninth Street 



POPIN'S HILLTOP MARKET 

BILL POPIN and MARTY PAVLOFF 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



898 Carolina Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



COLYEAR MOTOR SALES 

1250 Van Ness Ave. 



C AND C FOOD SHOP 

GROCERY - BAKERY - DAIRY PRODUCTS - QUALITY MEATS 
FISH AND FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



CALIFORNIA "2<> DE HARO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



NEW PISA RESTAURANT 

1268 Grant Avenue 



QUALITY PORK AND SAUSAGE CO. 

MArket 1-7432 



401 Divisadeo St 
CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



U. S. STUDIO 

1747 Buchanan Street 



VITTORI BROS 

GROCERY 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



3820 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DELTA TRUCK LINES 



PURITY STORES, LTD. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Kearny and Francisco Streets 

Phone SUtter 1-8350 Post Office Box 2309 

SAN FRANCISCO 26, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



STARLIGHT FURNITURE COMPANY 

FOR YOUR FURNITURE NEEDS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



2211 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BRANDENBURG 8C CO. 

'•EXECUTONE-' 

INTERCOMMUNICATING SYSTEMS 

404 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC MANUFACTURING CO. 

C. W. BARKER. Mir. 
M I L L W O R K 



16 Beale Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone GArfield 1-77SS 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTEL UTAH 

504 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MONSON BROTHERS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



475 Sixth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone DOuglas 2-5337 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



TOSCA CAFE 

242 Columbus Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



DI MAGGIO'S RESTAURANT 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 
LUNCH AND DINNERS DAILY 

Phone ORdway 3-2266 

BETTER LIGHT - BETTER SIGHT 
LIGHTING FIXTURES AND LAMPS 

INCANDESCENT SUPPLY CO. 



CHIOTRA'S GROCERY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



858 Rhode Island Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BIONDI'S BOCCI BALL 



SUtter 1-4800 

SAN FRANCISCO 



647 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



2901 San Bruno Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JU. 4-9938 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone ORdway 3-4884 M. J. POPE. Mgc 

HOTEL SHAWMUT 

ATTRACTIVE RATES TO PERMANENT GUESTS 

$1.50 WITH BATH 

516 O'Farrell Street, Corner of Jones 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CORY AND JOSLIN, INC. 

CONTRACTING ENGINEERS 



RIVA ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

EMANUEL STAGNARO 



180 Church Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



UN. 1-0796 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



509 Polk Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HOUSE OF JADE 

PHILIP KLEIN 

Importer and Manufacturer 
OF GOLD AND PLATINUM JEWELRY 
SET WITH GENUINE STONES ONLY 

5 19 GRANT AVT. DOuglas 2-4978 STN FRANCISCO 

JOHN and MARY 



SEARLES CORNER 



TOWER CAFE 



DOuglas 2-9893 



SAN FRANCISCO 



601 Hayes Street 



GOOD ITALIAN FOODS • BEST WINES AND LIQUORS 
BANQUET ACCOMMODATIONS 



CALIFORNIA I 525- I 529 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



RALPH MARINAI 



UNderhill 1-0285 



PETER PIALORST 



PALACE GARDENS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1175 Market Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN GATE POULTRY CO. 

Wholesale 
LIVE AND DRESSED POULTRY AND EGGS 

2254 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



STEMPEL QUALITY DOUGHNUTS 

320 Fell Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



KINGWELL BROS., INC. 

457 Minna Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ROBBINS HOTEL 

711 Post Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



R. MOHR AND SON 

883 Mission Street 



PACIFIC SHOE CO. 



CALIFORNIA 



451 Washington Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



IDEAL PAINT AND WALLPAPER CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

2200 Lombard Street Phone WEst 1-6331 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PALM HOTEL 

808 Kearny Street 



HOTEL REIMS 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



36 Columbus Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



UILLARD, INC. 

LIQUOR DISTRIBUTORS 



BEDINI BROS. 

Reconditioners of 

DRUMS - PAILS - CONTAINERS 

BOUGHT AND SOLD 



Telephone YUkon 6-0110 310 Townsend Street 

1212 Thomas Avenue Phone VAIencia 4-5154 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



GOOD WISHES TO SANTA CLARA 

COUNTY'S AND SAN JOSE'S CHIEF 

ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS 



Bruce Barton Pump Service 

940 South First Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Cook's Automotive Service 

AUTO ELECTRICIANS 

• 

Sixth and Santa Clara Streets 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Columbia 1988-J 

Andre's Trailer Court 

ANDRE'S GROCERY 



964 Moorysark Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

F. Osnick 

ANCHOR INN 

Italian Dinners . . . Cocktail Bar 

We Cater to Banquets and Private Parties 

Phone Dining Room Ballard 4132-W 

Phone Cocktail Bar Ballard 8537 

1121-1129 West San Carlos Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



"IT'S SUPERIOR" 

PIES - CAKES - DO-NUTS 

Wholesale - Retail 

SUPERIOR BAKING CO. 

Col. 2719 1082 Park 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Columbia 638 Res. Ballard 5804 

Tile Installation of All Kinds 

MALVINI TILE CO. 

J. Malvini - R. Malvini 

320 Race Street 

Opposite O'Connor Hospital 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Columbia 3856 



Three Star Upholstering Co. 

CUSTOM UPHOLSTERING 

At Commercial Prices 



RUGS - DRAPERY - FURNITURE 

Free Estimates Given 

401 East Santa Clara Street 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Ballard 8519 

Let ART and JOHNNY Mystify, Amuse and 
Confuse Your Friends at the 

DEL PASO CLUB 

COCKTAILS :-: GOOD FOOD 
Draft Beer . . . Shuffleboard 

13th and Washington Streets 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



San Jose Police Dept. 

(Continued from page 15) 

How has it worked in suppressing crime and making 
arrests. Well for last year the murders reported were 
tour, all cleared; manslaughter 9 reported, 8 arrests; rape 
6 committed and 5 cleared; robberies 35, nearly 50 per 
cent cleared; burglaries 341 and J3 cleared by arrests; 
assaults 26, with 22 cleared; petty thefts 1671 and 25 
per cent cleared; stolen automobiles, 270, 73 arrests. All 
cars but 4, reported stolen, were recovered. 

With this record the five-day week is now accepted 
as a method of giving the best of police service in 
San Jose. 

As further evidence of the efficiency of the short week, 
we quote the figures of the San Jose Police Department 
relative to arrests and citations. In 1947 there were 
58,869, and for 1948 the number jumped to 84,074. 
Criminal arrests were 6700 in 1947, and 7096 in 1948. 

Chief Blackmore has introduced another innovation in 
his department during the past year. He has adopted a 
system of daily activity reports, where each officer makes 
out a report of his activities, like serving warrants, making 
arrests for every law violation, the number of miles he 
travels each watch, investigations made, interviews, shake- 
downs, open doors and windows found; and many other 
things a police officer does. The name of the officer, the 
time he spent on each of his complaints, and other specified 
data are channeled to a clerk who makes a daily sheet 
which is totalled at the end of the month. The Chief can 
at any time see just what each of his men has done and 
accomplished. It isn't a very satisfying arrangment to the 



Ballard 8541 

You Haven't Seen San Jose Until You've Visited 

THE COLONIAL CLUB 

San Jose's Little "Finnocchio's" 

"Home of Unusual Floorshons" 

3 ONE-HOUR SHOWS NIGHTLY 
7-Day Week 

We Cater to Parties and Banquets 

DELUXE ITALIAN DINNERS 



California Concrete 
Products Co. 

CONCRETE PIPE 

1001 - 66TH AVENUE, OAKLAND, CALIF. 
Phone Trinidad 6288 

SOUTH FIRST STREET, SAN JOSE, CALIF. 
Phone Ballard 6700 



B & V TRACTOR CO. 

FOOD FARMING Means Less Work . . . More 
Income Per Acre 

W. W. Ventree, Sr., Owner 

Residence Phone: Columbia 4659-W 

Branches: 736 S. First Street, San Jose 
Columbia 8476 - 8477 

Pacheco Pass Hiway, Gilroy 



Columbia 8773 



Ballard 3285 



C. P. ALBANESE 

Concrete Construction 
TRANSIT MIXED SERVICE 

Excavating " Grading • Paving 

889 StocktonAvenue 
SAN JOSE 11, CALIFORNIA 



Columbia 2665-J 



Pickup and Delivery 



DEPENDABLE CLEANERS 

DRY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY SERVICE 
HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

Dyeing of All Kinds 

601 North Thirteenth Street 

Corner Jackson and 13th Street 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Columbia 2717 



24-Hour Service 



ART CLEANERS 

Dyeing - Repairing 

* 

398 East Santa Clara Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



*••, 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1 949 



loafer, but Chief Blackmore says he has no loafers and 
that his men like the new plan. 

While the Department has a traffic bureau of 32 men 
under the able direetion of Captain Mel Hornbeck, every 
member of the patrol cars and footmen do as much traffic 
law enforcement as they do other crimes. There are no 
specialists out in the field in San Jose. This month the 
Traffic Bureau has been given three new men, and a Ser- 
geant, who will handle the details of the Traffic Head- 
quarters, taking a lot of routine work off the shoulders 
of Captain Hornbeck. The new Sergeant is James Azzerlo. 

During the past year the death rate from automobile 
accidents equalled the low of 16 established during 1947. 
However, the accident rate and the number of injuries 
were greatly reduced, a splendid record in view of the 
increased population and the number of automobiles 
coming into and through San Jose. 

The Traffic Bureau keeps a day and night record of 
the location of accidents, and also record of all drivers 
cited for traffic law infractions. Those who get too many 
are referred to the Motor Vehicle Department to act on. 

The city now has 1927 meters, 27 over 1947. 

Another thing that has contributed largely to the fine 
crime record and apprehensions of violators is the adoption 
of three-way radio for all mobile units, motorcycles as 
well as automobiles. Of the former there are 16 and the 
latter 24, nine of the cars being newly purchased, all fur- 
nished with the latest tools of the police profession. We 
know of no other department in the state that has three- 
way radios for all their motorcycles. 



Phone Columbia 3430 

A. J. PETERS & SON 

MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS 

Plumbing, Heating and Utilities 
Industrial Piping 

P. O. BOX 632 

534 Stockton Avenue 
SAN JOSE 11, CALIFORNIA 



Ballard 5994 



Jim and Lou 



THE PAUPERS 

PORE-BOY SANDWICHES 

AND BEER 

■ 

17th and Berryessa Road 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Ballard 7754 



Everett Lorence 



L. & W. Manufacturing Co. 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

ENGINEERING - WELDING 

CONCRETE PIPE MACHINERY 

1500 Block, West San Carlos Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Columbia 8096 



San Jose Pipe & Tank Co. 



1500 Bloc, West San Carlos Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone: Ballard 2152 

Mission Creameries, Inc. 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

F. J. Rose, Secretary-Treasurer 

42 Race Street 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



THE HAWAIIAN SHACK 

740 Park Avenue 
SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

Proudly Presents 

PALAMA BEACH BOYS 

Friday and Saturday 

Our Appetizing Scoop Southern Fried Chicken 
Complete Dinner . . . #1.50 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



The Communications Bureau has been separated from 
the Police Department, though under the direct super- 
vision of Chief Blackmore. Supervisor of Communications 
Henry Kirby, pioneer in this great aid to law enforcement 
agencies services all departments of this city, fire, police, 
health and others of importance, and vocal alarms are 
piped into all headquarters as to men out on the streets 
of the city. 

Then, too, the Police Department Bureau of Identifi- 
cation has joined with the Sheriff in handling this im- 
portant work, and they service all the incorporated cities 
and towns of the county. The B. of I. is maintained in 
the City Hall under the direction of Superintendent 
Henry Jones, who has a personnel of eight, one of them 
from Sheriff Howard Hornbuckle's department. 

The Detective Bureau under Captain of Detectives 
Thomas Short, with 14 men has been responsible for clear- 
ing up the great majority of felonies. 

The Department is well pleased with the juvenile de- 
linquency record of the city, and this condition is credited 
to the work of Chief Juvenile Officer Donald S. DeMers 
and his seven assistants. Officer DeMers took the three- 
year course in Juvenile problems at USC. 

Last year during the months of February and March 
Chief Blackmore in cooperation with Sheriff Hornbuckle, 
District Attorney Menard and the FBI held a two 
months police course, and it was attended by Chiefs and 
officers of all the county's Police Departments. It was 
hailed as a huge success. 



MORENO'S 

PACKAGE LIQUOR 
ON AND OFF SALE 

Alex and Joe Moreno 



129 Castro Street 



MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF. 



Phone Yorkshire 7-9837 



Phone Columbia 2266-J 

(Be Careful and Shop at) 

Be -Wise Market 

Be Wise . . . Buy Wise 

A COMPLETE MARKET 

Groceries - Fresh Meats 

Bakery - Delicatessen 

Vegetables - Wine and Beer 

2398 West San Carlos Street 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



1 



Richmond - Chase 
Company 

Quality Packers of 

CANNED FRUITS 

ASPARAGUS 

DRIED FRUITS 

FRUIT NECTARS 



SAN JOSE - STOCKTON 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Chief Blackmore is working with other top police 
officials and the Sheriff on a plan to give a unified radio 
service throughout Santa Clara County: to get a teletype 
system installed connecting all police departments, and 
working out a road block system. This is to bring into 
closer coordination all the forces of the respective agencies. 

Also the Public Departments of the City Administra- 
tion are considering joining the National Safety Council. 

The Chief has had new headquarters provided for him 
in the City Hall, and has four rooms now in place of a 
small one room place he formerly had. 

In closing we will call to the attention of our readers 
another idea the Chief has brought forth. A committee 
headed by the Chief, at the end of each month, goes 
over the records of the Daily Activity Report and selects 
two outstanding members of the Department, based on 
their records for the month and for their interest in their 
work. The winners each month are given a $20 a month 
bonus raise. This is something that develops greater 
efforts of the personnel. 

PAUL NAVARRA 3C LEHMAN BROS. 



SAN JOSE 



1989 So. 1st Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GENERAL BOX DISTRIBUTORS 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK CASLANON 



MEALS - WINE - GOOD SERVICE 

75 North Market Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Compliments to the 
Peace Officers of California 

FOOD 

MACHINERY 

CORPORATION 



SAN JOSE 5, CALIFORNIA 



KAUFMANN MILLING 
COMPANY 

HAY 

GRAIN 

STRAW 

CONCENTRATES 



Berryessa Road 
P. O. Box 880 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 
BAllard 8414 



SAN JOSE MEAT 
COMPANY 

Featuring 

SHAMROCK BRAND 
BEEF 

Route 2, Box 635 - Berryessa Road 

SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Col. 1114 



January, 1949 
r .. ...... -. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



BEECH-NUT PACKING 
COMPANY 

SAN JOSE PLANT 
(Main Offices — Canajoharie, N. Y.) 



BEECH-NUT STRAINED 

and 
JUNIOR BABY FOODS 



Bus Phone: COL. 499 



Res. Phone: COL. I63I-R 



COMBS CAR CO 

R. W. "BOB" COMBS 
AUTOMOBILES AND TRUCKS 

1480 W. San Carlos 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



LUCE'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 
Short Orders and Complete Fountain Service 

TRY OUR SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN AND SEA FOOD 
IT'S DELICIOUS 



There Is Only One Place to See 


THE 


MOBILHOME 


Model Jtatne 


End of South Seventh at Phelan Ave. 


Phone Columbia 10474 


SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 






MIRACLE MANOR 

P. O. Box 101, Lake Tahoe, State Line, California 

U. S. Highway No. 50 

HOUSEKEEPING COTTAGES - BEACH PRIVILEGES 

WEEKLY, MONTHLY RATES 



Telephone Tallac 35-Y-22 



Wayne and Vaudine Sanders 
Home — 1282 Shasta Avenue 



SAN JOSE 11, CALIF. 
Columbia 1564-J 



M. TADENA 



P. SUTCIZA 



RIVER CAFE 

STEAK AND CHICKEN DINNERS 



LAFAYETTE (Contra Costa County), CALIFORNIA 



BRIGHTON TAVERN 

WE SERVE MEALS AND ALL KINDS OF DRINKS 

BRIGHTON. CALIFORNIA 



Phon; S45 I 



WALNUT GROVE. CALIFORNIA 



MOST POPULAR PLACE IN TOWN 

RITZ CAFE 

MANUEL 4 LOUIE SERVING YOU 



116 South J Street 



Phone 512 



CALIFORNIA 



1 



r 



Fireman's Fund Group 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 

Fireman's Fund Indemnity Company 

Home Fire & Marine Insurance Company 

Western National Insurance Company 

Western National Indemnity Company 



s a N» r jr. AJjic; I- s £. o • ,u, e ty y or k 



wmanm 



BO S TO. N •- -:A J L A N J:,A ;. 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Al. C. Kearney 



Telephone Ballard 225 1 



Kearney Pattern Works and Foundry 

ALUMINUM AND BRONZE CASTINGS 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 

ALUMINUM MATCH PLATES 

BRONZE BUSHINGS - BRONZE PLAQUES 



SAN JOSE 



40 South Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



W. W. "Bill" Nash 



Ballard 7616 - 7617 



NASH MANUFACTURING CO. 

Established 1913 

FARM AND FROZEN FOOD EQUIPMENT 
GENERAL REPAIRING - MACHINISTS - PUMPS 

S02-S12 West Santa Clara Street 
P. O. Box 638 SAN JOSE 4, CALIFORNIA 

San Jose Frame and Wheel Co. 

COMPLETE FRAME - AXLE - WHEEL AND BRAKE SERVICE 

BODY - FENDER WORK AND PAINTING 

Phone BAllard 6740-W 355 Stockton Ave. 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

Santa Clara 674 

SANTA CLARA BILLIARDS 

WE SERVE MEALS AT ALL TIMES 

BEER AND WINE - SODA FOUNTAIN 

861 Franklin Street 

SANTA CLARA CALIFORNIA 



COAST MOULDING CO. 

All Types MOULDINGS, LATHS, REDWOOD FENCES, LADDERS, 

ANYTHING MADE OF REDWOOD WE HAVE 

ONLY SAW MILL IN SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 



EL CORTEZ MOTOR INN 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy S. Curtis, Proprietors 

MODERN COTTAGES AND TRAILER CAMP WITH 
RADIANT HEATED SHOWER ROOMS 

On Monterey Blvd. (101), 2 miles South of City Limits 
Phone BAllard 8330 Rt. 4, Box 354 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



H. L. FERCUSON 

13 14 Fremont St. 

Phone Col. 4558-M 



P. M. MAT1CH. Manager 

Res. 244 Race Street 

BAllard 8506 



SAN JOSE CONCRETE PIPE CO. 

HIGH PRESSURE IRRIGATION PIPE 
CULVERT AND SEWER PIPE 

560 Stockton Avenue Telephone Columbia 862 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

PIZZA PALACE & GRILL 

Frank Gigliotti, Mgr. 

PIZZA WITH CHEESE, SAUSAGE 
SALAMI OR ANCHOVIES 
Hours 10 a. m. to 2 a. m. 



Phone Columbia 2912-R 
SAN JOSE 



1001 South First Street 

CALIFORNIA 



LUCKY CLUB 



4 7 Post Street 



MARGE'S PLACE 



220 Alma Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Columbia 95-78-J 

ED. E. HILL 

UNITED TRAILER PARK AND SALES 

MODERN CONVENIENCES - 75 SPACES - TRAILERS 

BOUGHT AND SOLD - WE FINANCE 

Monterey Highway SAN , OSE 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



REX CARD CLUB 



83 Post Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SMITH'S CORNER 

ON SALE and OFF SALE LIQUORS 

GOOD EATS 

Phone Ballard 3848-W 



MILPITAS 



CALIFORNIA 



REPAIRING RE-FINISHING 

NELSON FURNITURE MFG. CO. 

SPECIAL FURNITURE MADE TO ORDER 
ANTIQUES RESTORED 



Telephone Ballard 2878 



SAN |OSE 



1054 Park Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



LEVIN MACHINERY & SALVAGE CO. 

PIPE • STEEL • MACHINERY 

Telephone BAllard 3875 

1930 South First Street SAN JOSE. CALIFORNIA 



GARDNER-SMITH, Inc. 

Successor to Smith Mfg. Co. 

FOOD PROCESSING MACHINERY 

106 STOCKTON AVE. SAN JOSE, CALIF. 

WESTERN PUMP CO., Ltd. 

WESTERN TURBINE PUMPS 
522 West Santa Clara Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



BUCKLES-SMITH CO. 

Phones Columbia 2272-2047 

WHOLESALERS OF ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS 

240 SPENCER AVE. SAN JOSE 10, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



R. B. ROLL. Manager 

ROLLERLAND 

PUBLIC ROLLER SKATING :: EXCLUSIVE PRIVATE PARTIES 

PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTION 

San Jose Dance & Figure Club (Advanced) 

Rollerland Senior Skating Club (Ages IS and up) 

San Jose Safety Skating Club (Ages 6-14) 

Phone: Columbia 119 

1066 THE ALAMEDA SAN JOSE 10. CALIF. 



ROBIN CAFE 

WE SERVE MEALS AT ALL HOURS 

and 

LIQUORS - BEER - WINE - MIXED DRINKS 



1033 No. 13th Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN JOSE SHEET METAL WORKS 

ANY LINE OF SHEET METAL WORK 

VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING 

BASEMENT AND FLOOR FURNACES 

STAINLESS STEEL WORK 



Columbia 9027-W 



680 N. 13th Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



Bus., Ballard 6111 



Res.. Ballard 5868-M 



SAN JOSE 



BALISTRERI 8C SANSONE 

B. Sansone, Prop. 

AUTO WRECKERS - USED CARS 

NEW AND USED PARTS 

2000 South First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Rosendin Service Established in 1919 

ROSENDIN ELECTRIC WORKS 

WE BUY, SELL, EXCHANGE, REPAIR, RENT AND INSTALL 

ELECTRIC MOTORS AND GENERATORS 

Wiring In All Its Branches 



Phone Ballard 1034 

M. L. Rosendin 



1070 Park Avenue 

SAN JOSE 10. CALIF. 



F. C. Mosteller Phone Columbia 3041 

SAWS - KNIVES - FILES - GRINDING WHEELS 

ACME SAW SALES 

F. C. MOSTELLER SAW AND KNIFE SERVICE 

Agents (or R. Hoe & Co. 

I 1 1 STOCKTON AVE. SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

Residence Phone Residence — 

Columbia 259 I -W 347 San Augustine St. 

G. CORNO 

BLACKSMITH SHOP AND BOCCI GAME 

73-75 N. SAN PEDRO ST. SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

BERMUDES CAFE 

Tony and Cecelia, Proprietors 

FINE FOODS - BEER AND WINE 

Telephone Santa Clara lll-M 

300 GRANT STREET SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 

Mechanical Farm Equipment Distributors 



1702 S. 1st Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



JIM MALATO'S TAVERN 

FINEST WINES AND BEERS 

WHISKEY AND MIXED DRINKS 

Phone BAlIard 7939 

797 ALMADEN at Virginia SAN JOSE. CALIF. 



SAN JOSE 



ROBERT MOORE 

WE SERVE BEER AND WINE 
527 W. San Carlos Street 



EXPERT CLEANERS 

Plant: 724 So. First St., San Jose, Calif., Bal. 1130 



Branch No. 1 

59 West San Carlos Street 

Ballard 948 



Branch No. 2 

89 E. Santa Clara Street 

Columbia 1949-R 



Business Phone Col. 1877-J 



Res. Phone Bal. 4880-W 



W. A. Call Plumbing Company 

PLUMBING AND REPAIRING 
430 Willow Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



Leon Terry 



Ballard 8642 



JOE'S PLACE 

We Specialize In 
GOOD LIQUORS AND SANDWICHES 

BEER AND WINE 

55 1 W. JULIAN STREET SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



GAGLIARDI CONSTRUCTION CO. 

BUILDERS OF FINE HOMES 

REAL ESTATE -::- INSURANCE 

Columbia 2533 

35 1 PARK AVENUE SAN JOSE 18. CALIFORNIA 

for FINE LIQUOR 

and PRIME RIB from the Cart 

it's the 

PRIME RIB 

of San Jose 

AIR CONDITIONED 

Ballard 5452 1330 The Alameda 



THE CIRCUS 

167 E. Santa Clara Street 
MEAT JUNCTION 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



A. Pampalone B. Amori 

VALLEY AUTO WRECKERS 

NEW AND USED AUTO PARTS 
We Specialize in Late Model Wrecks 

Phone BAllard 506 or 507 
866 S. FIRST STREET SAN JOSE. CALIF. 



BONN CANDY CO. 

MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERY 

287 N. San Pedro Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



R. BARGETTS 

BEER - WINE - AND WE SERVE MEALS 

1085 So. 12th Street 

SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 

ROOFING - FELTS - WOOD - COAL 

WILLIAMS AND RUSSO 

Phone BAllard 1162 
BUILDING MATERIALS • BUILDING SPECIALTIES 

773 W. SAN CARLOS ST. SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 

MEET ME AT 

MARTY'S PLACE 

Phone BAllard 7333 
LUNCH WITH BEER 

852 PARK AVE. SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Chief Zink's Report 

(Continued from page 19,) 

g. The diameter of the bar shall not exceed 2^ 
inches. 

100 Yard Run 

Description : 

Contestant should take his mark using the customary 
crouching start. The starter will use the commands: "Get 
on your mark," 'Get Set," "Go." In place of the word 
"GO" accompanied by a downward sweep of the arm as 
a signal to the times, a gun may be fired. 
Sit Up 

Description : 

This event should be conducted on a floor or smooth 
plot of ground. The contestant taking the test sits on 
the floor or ground with feet held by a partner or by a 
fixed bar 6 inches above the floor level. His body and 
head must be erect, his knees straight, and his middle 
fingers touching behind his head with arms parallel to a 
plane projected through his shoulder blades. 

He then lowers his trunk backwards to a position about 
3 inches above the floor barely touching with his shoulders 
the thumb side of a second partner's hand held on the floor 
with palm at right angles to the floor. After touching the 
partner's hand, the contestant immediately raises his body 
to the vertical position and repeats the exercise as many 
times as possible. The rhythm is one complete movement 
(backward and upward) in six seconds. 

It is suggested that three boys work together, one taking 
the test one holding the feet, and the third holding his 
han don the floor or ground. The boy holding the feet 
counts the number of sit-ups, and the boy holding his hand 
on the floor watches for infractions of the rules. 

Rules: 

a. The arms and head must remain in the original 
position throughout the test. Any deviation from arm or 



UPTOWN MOTORS 



2345 Broadway 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



MASSAGE COLONICS 

AID TO HEALTH— Steam Baths 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 
2049 East 14th Street Phone LO. 8-0871 

SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 



WALTER STANTON 

USED CARS 
"I PAY TOP CASH- 
WHY TAKE LESS?" 



OAKLAND 



2805 Broadway 



TEmplebar 2-2400 



CALIFORNIA 



ROY'S SEA FOODS 



FRESH FiSH 



SHELL FISH 



DIRECT FROM FISHERMAN TO YOU 
FRESH KILLED POULTRY DAILY 



Phone LOckhaven 8-4414 
OAKLAND 



f524 Footh 11 B!vd. 

CAL1FORNI 5l 



GEO. CARPENTER 



V/ALTER TRUEB 



GEO. 8C WALT'S 

COCKTAILS-DINNERS 

Mix;rs: RAY MAYER - JIMMY MORHOUSE 



I hone Piedmont 5-9451 

OAKLAND 



5445 Coll g: Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL TIRE SERVICE 

RECAPPING AND RETREADING 
U. S. TIRE DISTRIBUTORS 



2400 E. 14th Street KEllog 3-0404 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



SUMMERBELL ROOF STRUCTURES 

OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

174S 13th Street Telephone TWinoaks 3-3622 

OAKLAND CALIFORNI \ 

JUD WHITEHEAD HEATER CO. 

4111 Broadway 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



MELVIN MOTORS 

OVER 25 YEARS ON BROADWAY 
2857 Broadway TWinoaks 3-5340 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



GATES AUTO BODY 

AUTO PAINTING 
5341 College Avenue Phone HUmboldt 3-7303 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



INSTALLATION 



REPAIR 



MILLS AND ANDERSON 

GAS APPLIANCE SERVICE 

217 Fifth Street TWinoaks 3-6120 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



PEABODY MOTORS 



HUmboldt 3-9450 3435 Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



head position or from the rhythm of one complete move- 
ment in six seconds nullifies the particular sit-up in 
question. 

b. No pause is permitted between the movements of 
raising and lowering the trunk. 

c. Failure to touch partner's hand nullifies that par- 
ticular sit-up. No momentary relaxation is permitted when 
touching the hand. 

c. The contestant's score shall be the number of per- 
fectly executed sit-ups he is able to do. 

Oral Interview 

The purpose of this interview is to evaluate those quali- 
ties that are apparent to a person meeting the candidate 
for the first time, in short, the personality of the indi- 
vidual. It is usually conducted by a board of three men 
selected for their experience in appraising men and one 
member should have a background of police experience. 
The board usually gives fifteen to twenty minutes to each 
interview, and there are forms that a candidate can be 
rated on, but the general impression is usually the measur- 
ing stick. 

It has been found that a far clearer impression can 
be formed where the board witnesses in advance of the 
formal interview the candidates while performing their 
agility test. 

Medical and Laboratory Tests 

These tests are given to determine if the candidate 
meets the medical requirements. To be sure that a 
thorough examination has been made it would be well 
to supply a form in which specific questions are to be 
answered. Such a form is available through the Inter- 
national Association of Chiefs of Police. 

Character Investigation 

This is the most important part of the examination. 



PAY LESS DRUG STORE 

You always SAVE at PAY LESS on Drugs, Sundries, Camera 
Supplies, Tobaccos, Liquors, Candies, Toiletries! 

It Will Pay You to Shop at PAY LESS — the world's 
largest self-service Drug Store! 



CLARENCE BULLWINKEL 

Authorized Dealer for 
FORD PRODUCTS 

Sales - Service - Used Cars 



OAKLAND 



€300 College Avenue 



OLympic 3-3113 

CALIFORNIA 



CULY TRANSPORTATION CO. 

MOTOR TRANSPORT SYSTEM 
HAROLD F. CULY. District Manager 

REFRIGERATED TRUCKS - INSURED CARRIERS 



1420 Easi 12th Street 

OAKLAND 



Phone KEllog 2-5775 

CALIFORNIA 



1901 TELEGRAPH AVE. 



CARLSON'S BAKER HOUSE SUPPLY 



41 1 Webster Street 



AL'S SUPER SERVICES 

AL LASCURETTES 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



Steam Cleaning 



Washing • Polishing 



Telephones: Piedmont 5-1642 and 5-8383 

1900 Webster Street 3838 West Strest 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



A. A. "TONY" MOSCHETTI 

TOP PRICES PAID FOX USED CARS 

WEST COAST MOTOR SALES 
RELIABLE USED CARS 



Phone KEllog 3-1036 

OAKLAND 



2505 Ea:t 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



VAN BUREN OIL COMPANY 

Distributor of 
RIO GRANDE PRODUCTS 



KEllog 2-3S47 



4314 East 14th Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND OAKLAND 



METROPOLITAN REALTY COMPANY 

CITY AND COUNTRY PROPERTY 
1300 Webster Street GLencourt 1-8417 

CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



DR. E. S. FREITAS 

VETERINARIAN 

MODERN VETERINARY HOSPITAL 
DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 

Phone KEllog 2-1711 
4231 E. 14th Street, Near High Street 



CALIFORNIA 



McCALL MOTOR SALES 



WALLY'S MOTOR SALES 

BUYS AND SELLS CLEAN USED CARS 



2546 E. 14th St. 



6225 E. 14th St. 



6608 East 14th Street 



Phone TR. 2-3053 



OAKLAND 



KEllog 4-8018 



Season's Greetings 
from 

GUS KROESEN 



450 12th Street 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Mother Lode Refrigeration Service 

FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT 

Complete line of Display Cases - Reach-Ins - Air Conditioners 

Water, Milk and Beverage Coolers - Home Freezers 

Commercial Refrigeration for 

Factories - Stores - Offices - Farms and Locker Plants 

202 Washington • Phone Sonora 2079 • SONORA, CALIF. 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



January, 1 949 



It should be assigned to a competent investigator and he 
should be given time and opportunity to do a thorough 
job. Writing to sponsors is a feeble effort. Personal in- 
terviews with those who know the candidate will give a 
clearer picture of his background. The investigator should 
determine how he got along in school, both with teachers 
and fellow students, his work habits, his amusements, his 
spending habits and what is his attitude toward women. 
All these present a picture of great value in making the 
final rating of the candidates. 

Probationary Peroid 

This is usually for a period of six months. Some de- 
partments prefer a longer time — as much as two years. 
One year would seem to give ample opportunity to deter- 
mine a candidate's potentialities. During this period, a 
close supervision should be exercised and some practical 
method of personnel evaluation used. 

The proof of the pudding is in the eating and if each 
step has been carefully followed there should be little 
waste in having to dismiss probationers. However, all 
systems are imperfect and when a man fails to perform, 
he should be rejected. Keeping on unqualified men will 
defeat our effort to secure high standards in police service. 

Phone 1387 Maria Hernandez, Prop. 

BLUE BIRD CAFE 

SOFT DRINKS - BEER - WINE AND 

MEXICAN DISHES 

46 EAST 2nd STREET PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



MEXICALI CLUB 

Paul and Neal Vargas, Proprietors 

FINE IMPORTED BEERS AND WINES 

The Friendly Place for Friendly Friends 

Phone 999 170 Black Diamond Street 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 



PETER REALTY COMPANY 

MULTIPLE LISTING MEMBER 
Established 26 Years 

FIRT INSURANCE 

EARLE E. PETER. Licensed Real Estate Broker 



Phone TRinidad 2-6500 



OAKLAND 



9916 East 14th St. 

CALIFORNIA 



Bus. TRinidad 2-7649 



Res. TRinidad 2-1745 



GEO. J. DUGGAN, JR. 

Established I9O0 

REALTOR 
INSURANCE • LOANS 



OAKLAND 



9410 East Fourteenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SIMPLE BOOKKEEPING SYSTEMS 
FOR SMALL BUSINESSES 



RELIANCE SALES COMPANY 

7303 East 14th treet Telephone LOckhaven 8-0845 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



FRED A. WELLS 



HALF MOON CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 



207 Black Diamond St. 



Phone 1065 



PITTSBURG 



INSURANCE 
3124 E. 14th Street ANdover 1-2411 

CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORN'A 



ROD WILLIAMS 



NATIONAL RESTAURANTS 



DE SOTO - PLYMOUTH DEALER 



232 East 14th Street 

SAN LEANDRO 



LOckhaven 8-8282 

CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



ROBAK'S LIQUOR STORE 

MRS. M. I. ROBAK 
FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 



9340 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND 



Phone LOckhaven 2-0933 

CAL1FOR* 



Specializing in SEA FOODS for Forty Years 
QUALITY STEAKS and CHOPS 

Eat Delicious Sea Food at the "SEA CAVE" - Banquet Rooms - Private Booths 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE IN CONNECTION 



SEA CAVE 



Sea Foods 



Telephone TEmplebar 2-9588 

441 Twelfth Street - Also Entrance at 1132 Broadwav 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



1431 Grove Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BAKER MORTUARY 

CHARLES BAKER. Deputy Coroner. Alameda County 

LADY ATTENDANT 

Call Day or Night 

BURIAL INSURANCE CARRIED 



Phone TEmplebar 2-8776 

OAKLAND 



1214 Eighth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



WALTER K. KNOX 

INSURANCE • REAL ESTATE 



8719 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND 

TR. 2-8660 



21222 East 14th Street 

H A Y W A R D 

LU. 1-8431 



M. R. MILARCH - D. M. MOORE 

Licensed Real Estate Brokers 



FORUM CLUB 



NOTARY • INSURANCE 



8825 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND 



Telephone: LOckhaven 9-4565 

CALIFORNIA EL CERR1TO 



1525 San Pablo Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL Page 67 



PFRC PAYNTFR . Tirp* 

lightning tire se£vke JAMES CLOCK MANUFACTURING CO. 

4291 Broadway Piedmont 5-4025 5307 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



WINSTON & ALBERT SALES CO. Q N BAKERY 

JOBBERS AND BROKERS " ULLI /\i-N rN DAAEKI 

1007 Clay Street TEmplebar 2-4950 2057 San Pablo Ave. TH. 3-031S 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



48TH A rSV? HE L cSVs? R ^ ST ° RE HIGHWAY MARKET 

PHONE FOR ICED BEER ,_„, „ , , _ . 

ANdover 1-0456 4724 East 14th Street „,„, ,„. 3301 San Leandro Street _,,,_„„. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORN' 



FORS SIJir^7 ERS BAY CITY PATTERN CO. 

SERVICE STATION 
5491 College Ave. Phone Piedmont 5-9376 _.^. ..,_. 1114 I4th Avenue 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



\KLAND CALir^ 



LEOGRANDE BROS. 
FARLEY'S PHARMACY james leogrande 

R W MEREDITH Wholesale Distributors of 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS „ r i RE | ^J,™" 11 " 3 ^5 l >R J ODU . CE 

KE log 3 028S 1843 Bridge Avenue 

5511 College Ave. OLympic 2-1454 OAKLAND CALIFORN' 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



PRUDEN RADIO AND SOUND CO. T ^oe^oLlves. p™LP S 

CUSTOM BUILT RADIOS BEER - WINES - SANDWICHES - SHORT ORDERS 

Sales and Service Phone KEIlog 3-2143 3830 East 14th Street 

5387 College Ave. Phone OLympic 2-9734 OAKLAND CALIFORN'A 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



FRUIT ORCHARD MARKET MELROSE DEPARTMENT STORE 

FRUiTS - VEGETABLES - GROCERIES - MEATS 

FREE DELIVERY 4578 E. 14th Street KEIlog 4-5977 

Piedmont 5-3537 4332 Broadway OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND CALIFORN'A 

NATHAN LEVIN 

3205 College Avenue 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



SANITARY LAUNDRY AND 
GOLDEN WEST CLEANERS 

3815 Broadway HUmboIdt 3-9828 

3205 College Avenue OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



HYGENIC DOG FOOD COMPANY 

1000 Murray Street THornwall 3-6024 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



STAR GROCERY 



3068 Claremont Avenue 
1000 Murray Street THornwall 3-6024 BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



AVENUE AUTO WRECKING FULLER 'f J^™^^™^ 

NEW AND USED PARTS :-: GLASS INSTALLED 9124 East ]4th Street. Cor. 92nd Avenue 

WE BUY, SELL OR EXCHANGE CARS Phone SWeetwood 8-1321 

3120 San Pablo Ave. HUmboIdt 3-0728 OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND CALT 



JOHN SCHAAP GEORGE BUDL0NG 

BOBS AUTO SERVICE 



Service Is Our Business 

LOFTIS SHELL SERVICE "rebuilders of fine engines 

TIRES - TUBES - ACCESSORIES CASH or TERMS 

5105 E. 14th Street Phone ANdover 1-9884 

TEmplebar 2-9383 369 Grand Avenue OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND CAL1FO" 



MARKET SPOT 

Complete One-S'op Market 
123 MacArthur Blvd. TWinoaks 3-3700 QUALITY MEATS - GROCERIES - FRESH FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

Fhone AN. 1-2010 4814 East 14th Street 

3105 Webster Street HIgate 4-4060 OAKLAND CA' '"" 



K & L DRUG CO. 

cArthur Blvd. TWinoak; 

Webster Street HIgate 4 .. 

OAKLAND CALIFO™'' 



C0DIGA BROTHERS Phone ANdov:r 1-0763 



\/t<-'c r t n i t r» d c MELROSE SAW WORKS 

V 1 ^ 3 . . . LiyUUKS LOCKSMITH AND KEY WORK 

VICTOR H. ROSEN Lawn Mowers and Tools Sharpened - Filing and Grinding 

"THE BEST IN BOTTLES" All Work Guaranteed at Reasonable Prices 

SWeetwood 8-9340 10323 East 14th Street 4430 East 14th Street OAKLAND. CALIF. 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC TANK & PIPE CO. NORMAL PHARMACY 

4625 Tidewater 1101 Broadway 

/ 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORN' 



Page 68 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



TEmblebar 2-7041 Res. TRinidad 2-2088 

RAY N. CANN 

437 Twenty-fifth Street 



LESLIE'S 

DISTINCTIVE MEN'S APPAREL 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



TWinoaks 3-9313 



357 19th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DeVILBISS • KELLOGG-CROWN — Spray Painting and Finishing 
Equipment - Air Compressors - Hose and Connections 

AIR EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO. 

SHERWIN WILLIAMS • PREMIER • TREASURE TONES 

AUTOMOTIVE o INDUSTRIAL • HOUSE PAINTS TEmplebar 2-1244 

3329 Broadway • TEmplebar 2- 1 880 - 2 - 1 88 1 • OAKLAND II OAKLAND 



A. L. B ABB 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 
488 25th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN PABLO AUTO WRECKING CO. 

Seymour Moskowitz, Owner 
SYSTEMATIZED WRECKING 
Largest Stock of New and Used Parts in the East Bay 
Telephone Piedmont 5-3101 3291 San Pablo Avenue GLencourt 1-7741 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



A . NEWMAN- Printing 

FOLDERS • BUSINESS STATIONERY • BROADSIDES 



4S8 25th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SHAMROCK CAFE 

GOOD FOOD 

Frank Relva, Prop. 
KEllog 2-9625 1910 East 14th Street 



OAKLAND 



TELEPHONE Residence Phone 

HIGATE 4-3051 GLencourt 1-1923 

SAM SORENSEN WELDING WORKS 

OXY-ACETYLENE AND ELECTRIC 
Portable Outfits - Blacksmithing 



CALIFORNIA 224-226 WEBSTER STREET 



OAKLAND. CALIF. 



BORGETTI GROCERY 



205 MacArthur Blvd., West 

OAKLAND 



HUmboldt 3-2633 

CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA 



BEN'S LUNCH 

1600 Webster Street 



CALIFORNIA 



JENSEN MACHINERY CO.. Inc. 

ENGINEERS AND MANUFACTURERS 



HUmboldt 3-4c00 



l. d. McClelland 

AUTO TRIMMING • UPHOLSTERING • AUTOMOBILE TOPS 



5305 HORTON STREET 



OAKLAND (8). CALIF. OAKLAND 



HIgate 4-7227 



435 East 12th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Fresh Eggs Daily Piedmont 5-2233 Free Delivery 

CASTELLO'S GROCERY 

CHOICE WINES AND BEER 

Imported and Domestic 

GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 

4738 WEST STREET OAKLAND 9, CALIF. OAKLAND 



LES AND FRENCHIE 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRING 

AUTO PAINTING 

4133 Broadway Piedmont 5-8511 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA MOTOR EXPRESS, Ltd 

1081 22nd Street 



OAKLAND 



Office Phone TE. 2-2990 

Bruehl's Metal Manufacturing Co. 

TOOLS - DIES - STAMPINGS 

Established in 1932 
525 MARKET STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

OAKLAND WELDING SUPPLY 

180 12th Street 



BROWN'S FLORIST NURSERY 

ROTOTILLER PLOWING - INSECTICIDES - FERTILIZERS 
PLANTS - TREES - SHRUBS 
14101 E. 14th Street LOckhaven 8-5032 

Res. Phone TW. 3-3975 SAN LEANDRO CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



DELUXE CLEANERS AND TAILORS 

ALTERATIONS • REWEAVING • DYEING 

TUXEDOS RENTED 

1535 23rd Avenue KEllog 2-5831 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



MR. KILPATRICK 



HARRY MILLER 

TAILOR 



OAKLAND 



TEmplebar 2-3704 



300 Thirteenth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



ANdover 1-1550. 1-1551 THOMAS AUGUST 

AUGUST MANUFACTURING CO. 

MACHINE SHOP • GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

14S6 Thirty-Sixth Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone CLencourt 1-0298 

WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

STEAM CLEANING 

Motor - Chassis 

'21 TENTH STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 



HENRY'S SUPER SERVICE 

FORD AND LINCOLN SPECIALIST 

Complete Automotive Service 

1812 Park Street, also around corner on Eagle Avenue 

Phone LA. 3-3442 ALAMEDA, CALIF. 



OVERLAND BUFFET 

LIQUOR, WINE AND BEER 
101 Broadway 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



JOS. ERDMANN 

wholesale 

EGG DEALER 

GLencourt 1-5721 377 Fifth Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



NELDAM'S DANISH BAKERY 



3421 Telegraph Avenue 



Season's Greetings from 
A FRIEND 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



The Old Timers Fall 

(Continued from page 14) 

The guest had a room without a bath, and this necessi- 
tated his using the public bath. As he left the bath he 
saw a man just leaving his room. The man was about 
fifty years old, 5 ft. 9 in. tall, 160 lbs; small, brown 
mustache, tan overcoat, and wore a grey cap and light 
leather gloves. 

The guest asked the intruder what he was doing in 
his room. The man did not answer but walked down 
the corridor towards the rear stairs. The guest followed. 
As the intruder reached the head of the stairs, he turned 
and pointed a pistol at the guest and continued down the 
stairs; and as he reached the second floor he disappeared 
down the hall. 

The victim ran down the hall just in time to see the 
intruder disappear through the door of the room at the 
end of the hall. He ran back to his room and summoned 
the room clerk who in turn called the police. 

Police Officers Mike McDonald and Frank Corby re- 
sponded and were shown the room the thief had entered. 
As they rapped on the door a man appeared in his night 
dress. He showed his wardrobe and his effects and de- 
clared he had not been out of his room since retiring the 
night before. A careful search of the room revealed no 
trace of any disguise or loot. The officers, however, were 
not convinced and took the intruder to the City Prison. 

After a hearing in the Municipal Court he was released 
for a supposed lack of evidence. To himself he was a hero, 
with his scheme working a one hundred per cent. He 
would tell those detectives in the Hall of Justice a 
thing or two. 

While orating on the unfairness of police in the busi- 
ness office of the Hall of Justice, after his release, fate 
played him a cruel trick. 

A young man came into the business office, told the 
man at the desk that he was a truck driver for the water 
company and presented a package which he had seen 
thrown from the fourth floor of a certain hotel window, 
stating the time. 

The package and its contents checked, the time and 
the place checked. Yes — to the consternation of the Old 
Timer, it was a case of "Check and double check." 

Then and there the Old Timer, who had forgotten one 
of his patent safety rules — the one about "talking" — was 
re-arrested, tried, found guilty and given life. 

He had made another error — his last. Boastfully he 
had hung around the scene of his recent court victory 
too long. As a stolid "loser" he made no comments, so 
we cannot record his thoughts on the day of his last 
defeat in his life battle against the law. 



RIGINATO MOTEL 



AND PAL'S CLUB 



1320 Bayshore Highway 



CAST PALO ALTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Residence OHinda 2184 

MELVIN L. NEWMAN 

PAINTING CONTRACTOR 
PAINTS - WALLPAPER 

Telephone Piedmont 5-6964 4172 Broadway 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



DOMNICK S SHOE REPAIR SHOP 

3228 E. 14th Street KEilog 4-4172 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

J. M. CAMPBELL CO. 

GEO. S. CAMPEELL. Owner 
PLUMBING AND SHEET METAL WORKS 

9327 E. 14th Street Phone TRinidad 2 4151 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



LOckhaven 8-7563 



Res. SWeetwood 8-I5I2J 



LOMAX REALTY 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE • NOTARY 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES • LOANS 

RENTALS 



J. L. (MAX) BRASHER 
Licensed R.ial Estate Broker 



8537 East 14th Street 
OAKLAND 3 CALIFOrN'A 



MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 



405 14th Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



ZERIKOTES Lake Merrltt Dining Room 

"The Most Beautiful Spot in Oakland" 

WE ALSO CATER TO PRIVATE 
PARTIES AND BANQUETS 

Telephone TWinoaks 3-2403 

1520 OAK STREET AT THE BOAT HOUSE 



GORDONS GROCERY 



1551 Alice Street TWinoaks 3-1715 



OAKLAND 



RIEDER TIRE CO. 

COMPLETE RECAPPING SERVICE 
FIRESTONE TIRES 

8400 East 14th Street LOckhaven 8-1936 

OAKLAND CALIFORN" 

TW. 3-2979 DIAMOND RINGS 

RALPH SINRAY, Jeweler 

MANUFACTURING - REMODELING - DESIGNING 
CALIFORNIA Repairs While You Wait 

346 - 13th STREET, near Hotel Menlo OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Ninth Street 
Shopping Center 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 

FOUNTAIN LUNCH and 

FURNITURE DEPARTMENT 

350 Ninth Street 
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



>---- 



Mira Vista Furniture Co. 

Complete Home Furnishings 

Appliances, Radios, Television 
Radios Expertly Repaired 

Open Every Thursday and 
Friday Night Til 9 P.M. 

Phone 8371 473 San Pablo Avenue 

RICHMOND. CALIFORNIA 



R. J. Perry, Owner Telephone 683 

Registered Flame-Retardant Applicator, Lie. A101 

Perry's C. 0. D. Cleaners 

CLEANING • DYEING 

Main Plant 
24th and MacDonald 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



BOSTON MARKET 

* 

Groceries - Meats - Fresh Vegetables 
Beer - Wine 

and our personal quick service 
4343 Cutting Blvd. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



Joe Sindicich 



Frank N. Davilla 



East Richmond Market 

Groceries - Beer - Wine - Bakery 

Meats - Delicatessen - Fruits - Vegetables 
McBryde and San Pablo Ave. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone Richmond 8984 



LAUNDERETTE 

Hours 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. Week Days 

Sunday 8 A.M. to 1 P.M. 

THE ONE-HALF HOUR LAUNDRY SERVICE 

Your entire week's wash done while you shop. Soft 

water used for all washing. Washed, rinsed and 

damp dried in 30 minutes. 

4215 Cutting Blvd., Cor. 43rd and Cutting Blvd. 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5658W 



BOB ROBERTS 
Chevron Service 

Atlas Tires and Batteries 
Accessories - Lubrication 

Phone Richmond 3803 
23rd and Rheem 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



Fresh Chickens - Turkeys - Squabs - Rabbits 

Flo and Joe's Poultry Mkt. 

Poultry Dressed on the Premises 

Tour Satisfaction Our Success 

Wholesale and Retail 

Phone Richmond 6757 
425 Eighth Street 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Richmond's New Police Chief 

I Continued from page 16) 

Lieutenant Vernon was appointed by City Manager 
Wayne Thompson as Chief. It is the understanding that 
Chief Vernon will serve but one year and at the end 
of that time the city manager will select a successor from 
the next two highest men. 

Chief Vernon joined the Oakland Police Department 
in 1932. He advanced to the rank of sergeant on Novem- 
ber 1, 1943, and was made at Lieutenant on February 
16, 1946. 

He has been a valued member at Captain Lester Devine 
of the Traffic Bureau. Chief Vernon will bring a lot of 
experience to the top job he now holds, for he is highly 
thought of by all the members of the Oakland Police 
Department. 



The Candid Friend 

( Continued from page 11) 

natural born actor, Sergeant Pat McGee. His talk was a 
masterpiece of homespun logic. Amongst the necessary 
musts in police work he stressed the art of being a per- 
fect listener on any and all occasions. As I remember 
it now, his discussion was a spellbinder by any rule of 
appraisement. 

But his final remarks to the graduating class I shall 
never forget. 

He said, with all that impressiveness that was his par- 
ticular gift: 

"Remember, at home, on your way to the station, while 
doing your eight-hour shift, and also on your way home, 
you are on parade. Behave as a good parader — and al- 
ways remember absolute poise is equal and first with 
absolute courage in a police officer." 



Just say... "GOUGH AT MARKET" 

and you're there 

Shop the easy way. Streetcars J, K, L, M, N, 6, 7 and 17 stop 
in front of our door. 

Get a fine Fleecedown mattress at our easy to reach manufactur- 
ing store. Airnex, experts in sleeping needs, will advise and help 
you select the mattress exactly suited to you. 
If you drive we have a large free parking lot adjoining our store. 
Mattresses shipped free of charge to any railroad point in the 
United States. 

AIRFLEX 

EDWARD McROSKEY MATTRESS CO. 

1687 MARKET STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



Opposite Cough Street 



Free Parking 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 

PLAYLAND 
at the BEACH 

Located at Ocean Beach near the historic 
Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks 

Home of Thrill - Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants 
Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! 

Owned and Operated by 

GEO. K. WHITNEY 



PETE'S AUTO SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

Telephones 
Office: Richmond 7391-W 
Home: Richmond 4440-W 



RICHMOND 



23rd St. and Nevin Ave. 



CALIFORNIA 



JOIN THE 

Christmas Treasure Club 

AND SAVE FOR A 
\Jl\\.evvy> K^/^vi$imas in 19^9 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Feb. 10, 186S • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. TRUST 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. • Seven Offices . . . Each a Complete Bank 



Page 72 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



Shop: Phone 523 



Res: Phone 659 



R. D. LEONARD 



GUARANTEED PLUMBING AND 
SHEET METAL WORK - HEATING REPAIRS 



CALIFORNIA 



"AN APEX PAINT FOR EVERY PURPOSE" 
Manufacturers -:- Jobbers 

APEX PAINT COMPANY 

1257 So. San Pablo Ave. 

RICHMOND 



Phone LA. 5-7336 

CALIFORNIA 



G & H SERVICE 



Glenn R. Armitage, Proprietor 

FRAME STRAIGHTENING - BRAKE WORK 

Phone 222J 68 Stockton Street 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

DEWEY'S BODY SHOPS 

SHOP NO. 1 — MONO ROAD Phone 3592 

SHOP NO. 2— MONO HIGHWAY Phone 9222 

BODY WORK AND PAINTING 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

GOOD HEALTH and a 

PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR to all 

from REXALL 

O. J. MOURON 

SONORA 

MARTIN JOHANSON 

CONCRETE PIPE - IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

AND DITCH LINING 

Columbia Highway Phone 2007 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 

THE LIVE OAK CAFE 

ZETOS & BROWN, Owners 

We Specialize in 

MOFFAT'S MANTECA FED BEEF 

Phone 4221 



Phon; Richmond 394-J Res. Phone Richmond 3113-J 

BLUMENFELDS 

Since 1917 

THE WORKING PEOPLES DEPARTMENT STORE 

Men's Union Made Work Clothes 

Womens' and Childrens' Wear 

701 MacDONALD AVE. RICHMOND, CALIF. 

TAMPICO CAFE 

MEXICAN FOOD SERVED 

BEER AND WINE 

312 MacDonald Avenue 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



JEN'S and BARB'S 

RICHMOND'S FINEST FOOD DEPOT 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

1528 MacDonald Avenue 
RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

THE DO-NUT KITCHEN 

KITCHEN FRESH POTATO RAISED DONUTS 
SPECIAL PRICES TO CLUBS 

347 - 6th Street, Corner Nevin Ave. 
Phone Rich. 2877 RICHMOND. CALIF. 

ALVARADO GARDENS 



995 San Pablo Avenue 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



ANDY'S DRIVE INN 

For M tkshakes - Hot Dog's - Hamburgers of Top Quality 

TRY OUR SPECIAL CHILI 

1234 F Street Phone 3261 

OAKDALE CAL1FORV.', 

Ph. LAndscape 51208 M. P. Rose 

THE FURNITURE SHOP 

UPHOLSTERING - REPAIRING - REFINISHING AND 

REMODELING - WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 

Antiques Bought, Sold and Exchanged 

1135 SO. SAN PABLO AVE. RICHMOND. CALIF. 



DOT AND DEAN'S 

HOME COOKED FOOD 

FRIED CHICKEN OUR SPECIALTY 

405 Cutting Blvd. 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



BEAUTY RIDGE LODGE 

BEER - SOFT DRINKS - SHORT ORDERS 
GAS - OIL - TOBACCOS 

LONGVALE (Mendocino County), CALIFORNIA 



Remember . . . BOOMER'S CAFE 

FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT AND DRINK 

LAYTONV1LLE (24 M:l-s North of WiUits), CALIFORNIA 

ROY'S AUTO SUPPLY 

ROY HADLEY. Prop. 

SPARK FLUGS - CARBURETORS - ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

GENERAL AUTO PARTS 

Phone 6433W 1039 23rd Street 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

WOODS' SERVICE STATION 

COMPLETE AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

ON ALL MAKES 

113 Macdonald Avenue 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



52 EAST SECOND ST. 



EL GALLO CAFE 

SPECIALIZING IN MEXICAN FOOD 
BEER AND WINE 



PITTSBURG. CALIF. 



TROTTIER'S SPUDNUT SHOP 

AMERICA'S FINEST FOOD CONFECTION 
SPECIAL RATES FOR PARTIES 



RICHMOND 



Phone 8913-W 



1010 Nevin Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



W. L. Smithso 



RICHMOND 



Phone Richmond 2739 



MIRA VISTA SERVICE 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 
Barrett and San Pablo Avenues 



CALIFORNIA 



MIRA VISTA MARKET 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES EVERY DAY 
CHOICE MEATS 



Phone Richmond 1670 

RICHMOND 



4610 Barrett Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



REICHERT'S FAMOUS GRILL 

FEATURING REICHERT'S FAMOUS FRIED CHICKEN 

Week Days 4:30 p.m. to Midnight; Weekends 12 noon to Midnight 

Phone 4-414W 729 San Pablo Ave. 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

Call and Deliver Cash and Carry 

VOGUE CLEANERS 

CLEANERS. DYERS AND HATTERS 

ALTERATIONS AND REPAIRS 

Telephone Rich. 7229-J 947 San Pablo Avenue 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

RICHMOND DRIVE IN 

VEGETABLE STAND 
Harry McClain, Prop. 



RICHMOND 



23rd and MacDonald Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND 



FROZEN FOOD LOCKERS 

Telephone Richmond 2667-J 

Gordon B. Poff 
325 Twentieth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CAFE OF FINE FOODS 

TRY OUR HOME FRIED CHICKEN 
AND OTHER FINE FOOD 

Hours 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
434 10th STREET RICHMOND, CALIF. 



January, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 73 



Law Enforcement a Profession 

( Continued from page 5 ) 

scrutiny. Their good judgment is seldom praised; their 
bad judgment is roundly censured. 

No one need be told of the imported isms, which, be- 
hind a smoke screen of ringing words and mouth-filling 
phrases, set flames of hatred and disunity to smoulder at 
the foundations of our democratic institutions. Such fires 
must be fed in order to burn. Instances of brutality, graft 
and injustices to minority groups on the part of law en- 
forcement officers are among the fuels which the forces 
of disunity seek, elaborate upon and utilize. Their policy 
includes deliberate goading of police to provoke "inci- 
dents'' which will make front page copy — with pictures. 
Their aim is to undermine public confidence in the repre- 
sentatives of law and order and to disappoint the effective- 
ness of the latter in time of emergency. Let us not play 
into their hands. 

It is a sworn duty of law enforcement officers to protect 
life and property and uphold the laws of society under 

Beede's Ben Franklin Store 



2002 Salvio Street 



CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 



"NOW OPEN" 

Elsie's and Eddie's 

NEW MIDWAY CAFE 

See the Spacious Cocktail Lounge 
With Its Rustic Atmosphere 

Join Eddie at the Solovox 

DANCING 

ON AND OFF SALE LIQUORS 
Clayton and Bailey Roads 

CLAYTON VALLEY 



ORINDA MOTORS 

A. W. "Al" Eberlin, Prop. 

Telephone Orinda 2013 

OFFICIAL 3 A STATION 
AUTO REPAIRS 



Opposite Golf Course 

Orinda, California 



ORINDA BEAUTY 
SHOPPE 

RALPH and OWEN 



Telephone Orinda 3061 
j Dykes Building, 41 Moraga Highway 

Orinda, California 



El Rey Theatre 
Ramona Theatre 

Elwood Laws, Prop. 

WALNUT CREEK 

AND 

Park Theatre 

LAFAYETTE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



the Constitution. Strict adherence to such duty, a calm 
and judicious attitude, coupled with appropriate restraint 
in keeping with proper enforcement, and a thorough 
understanding of the elements involved will circumvent 
the salesmen of disunity and aid m controlling possible 
manifestations of hysteria. 

In spite of the rapid increase in the more vicious types 
of crimes, law enforcement has been, and is, hampered 
by public apathy. It is within our power to do much to 
correct this existing situation. 

The officer of the law, through his contacts with the 
press and radio, wields an unusual influence on public 
opinion. His attitude is often reflected in those mediums 
of expression. If he has their respect and cooperation, 
he is in a position to dispel, to a large extent, both official 
and public laxity. Those people living within the area 
patrolled by a well-liked and competent law enforcement 
officer will not ignore his warnings. 

You have now finished nine weeks of basic instruction, 
and your formal training is completed. But your real 
training has only begun. This training will never cease 
as long as you are in this profession. Every time you are 
called upon to make an investigation, to make an arrest, 
or to make an inquiry, the circumstances of that particu- 
lar activity will contribute something — perhaps small — 
perhaps large — to your fund of knowledge, experience 
and to your further training. In order to be fully pre- 
pared to reap the benefit of this knowledge, it behooves 
you to keep yourself at all times in a position to take 
advantage of it. There are two very important things 
that must always be borne in mind in order that you can 
give fully of your ability to your job. One is to be 
mentally alert, and the other is to be physically fit. Stag- 



RAY'S SIGNAL SERVICE 

Ray Antonini, Prop. 

CAR WASHING - WAXING - LUBRICATION 

LEE TIRES AND TUBES - ACCESSORIES 

Phone 871 Stockton and Green Street 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 



FAY'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

ROAD SERVICE 

FOUNTAIN AND LUNCH 

Route No. 2 Phone 3870 



SONORA 



CALIFORNIA 



Mr. William 



Miss Stanya 



MODERN BEAUTY SALON 

ALL LINES OF BEAUTY CULTURE 

EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 

204 Washington Street Telephone 2169 

SONORA CALIFORNIA 



LEE SANG MEAT MARKET 



MODESTO 



FREE DELIVERY 
Phone 528 1004 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FONG'S MARKET 



353 E. 12th Street TE. 2-9433 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Dan and Toby Meet Me at Phone KEIlog 2-9899 

HERB'S PLACE 

COCKTAILS 
2331 East 14th Street • Closed Mondays 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



H. SHWARZ CO. 

HARDWARE AND IMPLEMENTS 
PAINTS OILS AND PLUMBING 



918 Main Street 



Phone 13 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



BARNETT'S MARKET 

FRUITS • VEGETABLES • MEATS 
AND FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



1616 Alhambra Ave. 



Phone 915 



MARTINEZ 



CALIFORNIA 



C. H. Whaley M. E. Pederson 

RICHMOND CAMERA CENTER 

Phone 6228-W 

EVERYTHING FOR THE CAMERA MAN 
PHOTO FINISHING • REPAIRING 

625 MacDonald Ave. and 29th and Potrero Ave. 
RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

Phone Orinda 2 15 1 

Wright's VILLAGE PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTIONS - COSMETICS - FOUNTAIN 
ORINDA VILLAGE 



77 ORINDA HIGHWAY 



ORINDA. CALIF. 



Phone Orinda 2885 



Jennie and Angela Reymander 



The Vill/iTo Kitchen 

DELICATESSEN 

SODA FOUNTAIN - LUNCHEONETTE 

37 ORINDA HIWAY ORINDA, CALIF. 



DO YOU WANT 



ONE MILE East of Walnut Creek. % to % acre in big walnut trees, 
where all street improvements are included for as low as $1 ,800, terms 

OR . . . 

y& to 5 acres nsar Orinda Crossroads with all improvements, live 
springs, big oak trees, level and view sites. We will build for you. 

FRED T. WOOD, Inc. • ORINDA CROSSROADS • ORINDA 6081 

Compliments 

ELLIOTT'S 

Since 1907 
DANVILLE. CALIFORNIA 

BRADLEY'S CASH MARKET 

GROCERIES - QUALITY MEATS - VEGETABLES 
At The Right Price 

Tel. Orinda 6811 ORINDA CROSSROADS 

CAIRO'S CAFE 

HOME COOKING • BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
SPECIALIZING STEAKS, CHICKEN and ITALIAN DINNERS 



WILLIAMS 



CALIFORNIA 



VILLAGE CLEANERS 

QUALITY CLEANING AND LAUNDRY SERVICE 

ALTERATIONS - DRESSMAKING 

Ernest and Lola Poll 

Phone Orinda 2543 101 Highway ORINDA, CALIF. 



January, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 75 



nation in any individual officer may, in a time of stress, 
jeopardise not only the individual in whom it is present 
but may well endanger a fellow officer or a group of 
fellow officers. When the chips are down and the prob- 
lem at hand demands the very best that we have in us, the 
whole unit will only be as strong as the weakest officer. 
Each officer must hold up his end of the engagement. The 
time to be prepared for this eventuality is now, and not 
when the tugs are tight and the load must be pulled. 

This profession that you have chosen, law enforcement, 
is not an easy one. It will demand from you all that you 
can give. There is no such thing as a routine case. To go 
out on an assignment with the idea that it will be merely 
routine is a mistake. There are a number of otherwise 
good officers who have been retired for physical dis- 
abilities received in the line of duty while working on a 
so-called routine case. 

Just a few weeks ago the newspapers carried a headline 
article telling of three officers who were shot and killed in 
answering a routine call. 

There are two sides to every case — yours — and the 
person or persons you are seeking to apprehend. You 
know your side because you are trained to know it, but 
don't let this knowledge lull you into a sense of false 
security. It is actually only one-half of the knowledge 
you need to properly handle the problem before you. 
The other half you must anticipate with all of the good 



OLD ADOBE HUT 

Finest Cocktail Lounge 
in Napa County 

Oscar and Marge, Owners 

2000 Vallejo Road 

NAPA, CALIFORNIA 



For Good Service Try 

Shorty's White Front Cafe 

E. G. Summers, Prop. 

COCKTAILS and TASTY FOODS 

975 First 

NAPA, CALIFORNIA 




ORINDA RESTAURANT 

AND FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

Breakfast, Lunch and Dinners 
Open 7 A.M., Close 1 1 P.M. 



Orinda (Contra Costa County), Calif. 



Joseph Kiezer - Wade P. Faffle 
Henry Trumpower, Owners 

BARREL CLUB 



1015 Fourth Street 
NAPA, CALIFORNIA 



Souza Brothers' Cafe 

and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

THE BEST OF FOOD AND DRINKS SERVED 



226 South Jay Street 



TULARE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



January, 1949 



judgment at your command based upon your training 
and experience. Each case should be approached with 
the attitude that it will be a dangerous assignment and 
be prepared accordingly. Be alert, be cautious, don't 
be routine. 

The people of the state of California will look upon 
you — members of the California Highway Patrol — not 
merely as police officers enforcing the statutes on the 
books, but as men upon whom they can depend to main- 
tain a positive equilibrium in times of emergency. They 
will look to you for guidance and counsel in matters 
having to do with the proper and steady conduct of their 
civic affairs. You will be entrusted with the charge of 
preventing and correcting the abuses of freedom by those 
who violate the social standards. 

We of the FBI have been most happy to have been 
associated in your training. We want you to know that 
our assistance and interest has not ended. We are ready 
to assist you in all matters of mutual interest wherever, 
whenever, and however the occasion may arise for with 
you we are in the vanguard of the law against crime. 



SFPD CAPTAINS CHANGE 

The first transfer of Captains of the San Francisco 
Police Department since Mayor Elmer E. Robinson took 
over as Mayor a year ago, took place the first Wednesday 
of January. The Captains of nine Police Districts were 
changed. As Chief Michael E. Mitchell and the Police 
Commissioners announced it was in line with their policy 
to rotate men of the higher ranks and that this plan would 
be continued during their term of office. 

The changes ordered January J, were: 

Capt. John M. Sullivan, from Potrero station to Park 
Station. 

Capt. Aloysius O'Brien, from Southern to Mission. 

Capt. Leo J. Tackney, from Park to Southern. 

Capt. Jack Eker, from Northern to Central. 

Capt. Edward Donahue, from Central to Northern. 

Capt. Joseph M. Walsh, from Mission to Richmond. 

Capt. George M. Healey, from Richmond to Potrero. 

Captain Michael Gaffey, from Ingleside to Taraval. 

Capt. Ralph Olstad, from juvenile bureau to Ingleside. 

Capt. John Wade, from Taraval to property clerk. 

Capt. Patrick J. Murray, from property clerk to ju- 
venile bureau. 



746 

Brannan 
Street 



San 
Francisco 




P.G.and E. adds 
404,000 new electrical 
horsepower in 
1948 

and \y 2 million more on the way 






NEW POWER 





^300,000,000 already in- 
vested. Most of the money 
for expansion conies from in- 
vested savings of thousands 
of people-many of them your 
friends and neighbors. They 
are the real P G. and E. builders. 



;<r Efe 




Still more generating plants, 

both steam and hydro, are 
being built to meet the grow- 
ing demand. In 1948 alone 
nearly 70,000 new customers 
were connected to our lines! 




148,000 stockholders, mostly 

Californians, have put their 
savings in P.G. and E., becom- 
ing partners in one great en- 
terprise. Few companies in 
the entire nation are more 
widely owned. 



*W8^H* 




It all adds Up to the biggest 
power-building program in 
America today. . .going full 
speed ahead for the factories, 
farms and homes of North- 
ern and Central California. 



J>.(J.a«cf 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

PJ 101 — 149 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



KEHM SIGNS 
CORPORATION 

ACME SIGNS 
of VALLEJO 

COMPLETE 

SIGN 

SERVICE 



Phone 3-5455 or 3-3084 

435 Capitol Street 

VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA 



-* *• 



INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT WAYS 



1168 Battery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



A NEW APPLIANCE 

that cleans by 
WASHING THE AIR 

Home economists who use and recommend Rexair 
have called it "the greatest advance in home cleaning 
methods in thirty years." Rexair cleans clean by 
washing dust from the air you breathe. 

Rexair's powerful suction picks up dirt from car- 
pets, furniture, walls and bare floors. This dust- 
laden air is carried completely through a water bath. 
Clean, water-washed air is discharged back into 
the room. 

There is no porous bag or screen on Rexair. No 
way for dust to escape after it has been trapped in 
Rexair's water bath. No layer of dust on the furni- 
ture such as follows old-fashioned methods of clean- 
ing. Rexair actually cleans clean! 

This is why so many allergists and other physicians 
prefer Rexair, for their homes and offices, and for 
their patients. Rexair, and only Rexair, uses a bath 
of pure water to trap and hold dust. 

REXAIR DIVISION 

138 Grand Avenue 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



The Most Alluring 
WOMEN'S 



SUITS 



Are Created in 



California By 



& 



L I L L I ANN 



973 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



.-» 



Sac. 562 P. L. & R. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 3172 



S'ohl, Nel» S 
270 Claremonf Blvd 
San Francisco, Cal 



—na 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
465 10th Street. San Francisco 3 



Telephone 898 

WctffOsi Wheel 

MOST UNIQUE SPOT 
IN THE SOUTHERN MINES 



Al Devoto, Proprietor 
S0N0RA, CALIFORNIA 



^.masHarket ms. 1 



-GROCERIES CUL MEATS - 

WABASH AVENUE &■ B STREETS 



EUREKA, CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Pluto courtesy of Call-Bulletin 



S. F. P. D. GOES IN FOR TELEVISION 



Bill Baldwin of Station KPIX conferring with Chief of Inspectors James English, Police Commentator, Inspector 
Edward Cumber, and Lieutenant Timothy Burke, of Missing Persons Bureau on programs broadcasted Thursday and 
Friday nights. On Friday programs missing persons are televised; on Thursdays the program is given over to wanted 
persons, including murderers, robbers, burglars and other major criminals. During the week bad checks and other 
common crimes are discussed. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Compliments To 

THE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS 

From the Producers of 

BASIC 

ONION AND GARLIC 

"A - The Producers of BASIC Onions and Garlic are Scientists, 
Workers and Management. 

-Jr Together they have created this California industry, 
Nationally recognized for the quality of its products 

"^ Together they have developed at Vacaville the largest and most 
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February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" fOURNAL 



Page I 



Featured in This Issue 

PAGE 

Two Top Ranks for S.F.P.D. Filled .... 3 

Lieut. Harry Reilly Dies 4 

Former Chief Riordan to Attorney General's 

Office 4 

? ? 1 Police Training Schools Conducted by FBI 

For California Officers Last Year ... 5 

History of Marin County Peace Officers' Assn. 7 

Tenth Annual Installation of Marin 

Peace Officers' Association 8 



Sausalito Police Have a Very Busy Day 

December 10, 1947 9 

Modesto Is Growing, So Is Its Police Dept. 10 
By Opie L. Warner 

Santa Cru; Has Assistant Police Chief ... 11 

Sheriff Hornbuckle of Santa Clara County 12 

Sheriff Hoskins of Nevada County . ... 13 

Northern California Police Communications 

Officers' Association 14 

Bay County Peace Officers' Association ... 15 

Alcoholic Clinic for Alameda County . 16 

SFPD Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 17 

San Francisco Bronco Busters 18 

By Jim Leonard 

Editorial Page 20 

News Officers for SFPD Association .... 2 1 

Pistol Pointing 22 

Bv J. Ross Dunnigan 

Northern Sacramento Police Dept. Gets Bigger 2 5 

Grass Valley — "Gateway to the Sierras" 26 

In Nevada City Crime Decreases 30 

Some Are True, Some Are False — 

Rate Yourself 50 



Directory 



The Editok is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editok 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
•vents. Letters should be addressed to the Edito*. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m.. Hall of Justice 

Washington I. Kohnke, President 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John D. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quigley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Edward R. Pootel 

Dept. Sec' y.... Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRicK....Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Jack Eker 635 Washington Street 

Southern Leo. J. TaCKNEY Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission A. I. O'Brien 3057 17th Street 

Northern Edward Donahue 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park J. M. Sullivan Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Jos. M. Walsh 451 Sixth Ave. 

Int.leside.... Daniel McKLEM....Balhoa Park. No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael Gaffey 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Geo. M. Hfaly 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Ralph Olstad 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors James L. English Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Alexander McDaniell Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk John Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



When In Trouble Qall SUtter L20-20 

When In Doubt 



Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



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"Efficient Police 

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Peace" 

(Established 1922) 




±5h peace officers* 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXIV 



FEBRUARY - MARCH, 1949 



No. 7 



Two New Top Ranks for S.F.P.D. Filled 



The San Francisco Police Department, through the 
suffrage of the voters of the city, took a forward advance- 
ment to improve the efficiency of its 1500 men and women 
engaged in law enforcement. As is well known the voters 
provided for two new top ranks in the police personnel. 




Chief of Inspectors James English 

That of Chief of Inspectors and the other Director of 
Traffic. 

With the passing of the charter amendment and its 
okeh by the state legislature Chief Michael E. Mitchell by 
February 15 th announced the two men to fill the newly 
created positions. 

First he announced the appointment of Captain of 
Inspectors James English as the first Chief of Inspectors 
and then Lieutenant Edward R. Pootel, who has been 
Captain of Traffic for the past year as Director of Traffic. 

Lieutenant Otto Meyer, who is now attending the FBI 
National Police Academy in Washington, D. C, has 
been appointed Administrative Assistant to the Chief of 
Inspectors, and will assume his new duties on his return 
from the national capitol. 

Captain Ralph E. Olstad was selected to take over the 
Captain of Traffic job. He has been in charge of the 
Ingleside Station since early January. Before his promo- 



tion to a captaincy he had spent several years in the 
Traffic Bureau and is well schooled in the problems of 
that police agency. 

Lieutenant Meyer has a long service in the Police De- 
partment and for the past five years or so he has had 




Director of Traffic E. R. Pootel 

charge of policing Hunters Point and in that capacity 
has acquired a fine record for the administration of polic- 
ing that great naval project. Prior to that assignment he 
was a valued member of the Pawnshop Detail. 

The selection of Captain English and Lieutenant Pootel 
for the new ranks, carrying a salary of $8,940 per year, 
was the unanimous approval of Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, 
Police Commissioners Washington I. Kohnke, J. Warnock 
Walsh and Henry C. Maginn. 

Captain McKlem received the top ranking office follow- 
ing the death of Captain McDaniell. Lieutenant Walter 
Ames is No. 1 on the captain's list, followed by Lieutenant 
August Steffen, with Lieutenant Meyer third. 

On April 1st Captain Patrick Murray, veteran member 
of the Department will take his pension and on the same 
date old timers Sergeant William Ludwig and John J. 
Feeney will retire. 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



LT. HARRY REILLY DIES 



Lieutenant Harry Reilly, who in 1945 took his pension 
after serving 37 years as a member of the San Francisco 
Police Department, answered his last roll call on the 
evening of January 25. It will be a long time before there 
will ever be another man who will equal his record for 
honesty, ability and a deep understanding of the youth 
of his native city. 

Born South of Market street 65 years ago, he joined the 
Police Department in 1908, and from the very first, when 
his assignment was in the Potrero hills, he displayed the 
understanding that lie so ably applied to the boys of the 
city, and which caused him to be appointed head of the 
Big Brother Bureau back in 1935 when it was formed 
by former Chief William J. Quinn. He held this post 
when he took his retirement, and during those years he 
went all out to do something for the boys who had strayed 
a little from the straight and narrow path. He organized 
boxing clubs, formed baseball teams, encouraged the lads 
who came to him in his official capacity, as well as those who 
were called to his attention during his off hours. He was 
never too busy but what he could get out and straighten 
some boy who was getting out of line. He will be sorely 
missed in this city by many a parent who so well knew 
what he has done to steer their errant sons on the 
right road. 

In his youth he was an outstanding boxer and had the 
reputation of being the hardest hitter of any man who 
ever entered the Police Department. He took pride in 
instructing his young charges in the art of self defense, 
for he always argued a "guy who can take care of him- 
self with his fists, is never looking for trouble." 

He saw to it that many a poor kid had a summer outing 
in the mountains or the seaside. At the time of his death 
he was night manager of the Press Club, and for years he 
has handled the details of their annual Christmas party 
for orphan children, and he was most active in organising 
baseball nines among the children of Chinatown. 

We know of no higher tribute that could be paid 
Lieutenant Reilly than the statement made by Deputy 
Chief Quiglcy when advised of the death of this kindly 
officer, which follows: 

"I worked as his first assistant on the Big Brother 
Bureau," Quigley said. "So I personally know of the 
hundreds upon hundreds of kids Harry steered into re- 
spectability. 

"Whenever he found a 'bad' boy, Harry looked into 
the youngster's background. When there was hunger, 
Harry bought food. When there was a need for clothing. 
Harry bought clothes. 

"The money came out of his own pocket. 

"He believed that delinquency could be circumvented 
by a healthy interest in sports. So he, himself, bought 
athletic equipment for his 'children' and coached them 
in boxing and baseball. 

"He was always for the down and outer and never 
minded being dragged out of bed to help some unfor- 



tunate kid. 

"Police records will show Harry's contribution to this 
city. He transformed potential criminals into fine men 
because he loved and helped them." 

"Harry Reilly spent most of his life looking for the 
good in youngsters," Quigley said. "And most of the 
time he found it. I guess no one would want a better 
epitaph than that." 

Surviving Lieutenant Reilly are his widow, Mrs. Jane 
Reilly; a daughter, Mrs. Edward R. Smith; a son, Harry 
R. Reilly, Jr., and a sister, Mrs. D. H. Schonfeld. 



PETER S. HINRICHS 

Retired Police Sergeant Peter S. Hinrichs died in Febru- 
ary at his home, 659 Forty-first avenue, after an illness 
of four years. He was 74. 

He was a former president of the Widows and Orphans 
Aid Association of the Police Department and of the 
Veteran Policemen's Association. He retired from active 
duty in 1934. 

Hinrichs joined the force in 1903 and spent most of 
his service in the Central and Southern districts. He 
was stabbed in the chest in 1932 in arresting a woman 
burglary suspect. 

Hinrichs is survived by his wife, Nellie, a brother in 
New York and a sister in Germany. He was born in 
Camden. N. J. 



FORMER CHIEF RIORDAN TO 
ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE 

Attorney General Fred N. Howser has announced the 
appointment of former Chief Michael Riordan as assist- 
ant Attorney General, who will work out of the San 
Francisco office. 

At the time he announced his new assistant, Howser 
stated he had appointed George Griffin, who some 20 
years ago was Chief of Police of Salinas, as chief investi- 
gator, filling the position made vacant by the resignation 
of Walter Lent;. 

Former Chief Riordan took up his new duties on March 
1st; Chief Griffin the first of February. Griffin is a veteran 
in the Attorney General's office, having been appointed 
by former Attorney General U. S. Webb and served 
under Governor Earl Warren when he held the office. 
Robert Kenney and Howser. He is an energetic official 
and has a high standing with the peace officers of this 
state, a reputation shared by the new Assistant Attorney 
General, Michael Riordan. 

In announcing the appointments Attorney General 
Howser said he was appointing "men of high caliber, 
ability and integrity." 

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February - March, I 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page J 



331 POLICE TRAINING SCHOOLS CONDUCTED BY FBI 
FOR CALIFORNIA OFFICERS LAST YEAR 



Practical and diversified police taraining courses were 
received by 11,177 California peace officers during 1948 
at 331 law enforcement schools conducted by the FBI in 
73 different cities, according to a report from Harry M. 
Kimball, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI's San Fran- 
cisco Division. These schools were sponsored by the 
FBI in cooperation with local, county and state law en- 




Chief Special Agent Harry M. Kimball 

torcement agencies as a part of the cooperative functions 
ot the Bureau. 

The schools included recruit training courses, in-service 
training courses, advanced in-service training courses, and 
specialized programs in crime prevention and juvenile 
control, defense tactics, fingerprinting, firearms, photog- 
raphy, police administration and organization, traffic con- 
trol, and miscellaneous other subjects. They were con- 
ducted in the following locations: 

Bakersfield, Bell Berkeley, Bishop, Blythe, Burbank, 
Chico, Coalinga, Dunsmuir, El Centra, El Segundo, Es- 
eondito, Fairfield, Fresno, Glendale, Glendora, Hanford, 
Hollister, Lakeport, Lodi, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Ma- 
dera, Martinez, Marysville, Merced, Modesto, Monterey, 
Napa, Oakland, Oceanside, Ontario, Pacific Grove, Pasa- 
dena, Piedmont, Placerville, Pomona, Porterville, Quincy, 
Redlands, Redondo Beach, Richmond, Riverside, Sacra- 
mento, Salinas, San Anselmo, San Bernardino, San Diego, 
San Fernando, San Francisco, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, 
San Mateo, San Rafael, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, Santa 
Cruz, Santa Maria, Santa Monica, Santa Rita, Santa 
Rosa, Sonora, South Pasadena, Stockton, Torrance, Tracy, 
Turlock, Ukiah, Ventura, Visalia, Walnut Creek, Wat- 
sonville, Woodland. 

The field police training schools which the FBI sponsors, 
said Kimball, are an extension of the police training car- 
ried on at Washington, D. O, by the FBI National 



Academy. Graduates of the Academy now number 1,913 
law enforcement officers who have been specifically trained 
as police instructions and police executives, and who, 
upon return to their communities, make available their 
services as instructors in local, county and state police 
training schools. One hundred and forty of these gradu- 
ates are from the state of California. Their services have 
been of increasing importance and they have been active 
in furnishing instruction in the local schools. They are 
supplemented by regular FBI Special Agents trained as 
police instructors, and by outstanding prosecutors, judges 
and other officials. 

Specialized teaching methods, including the use of films, 
slides, charts and other devices are adapted to the subject 
matter in each course. Particularly popular has been the 
practical case type of program included in the advanced 
in-service training courses developed by the FBI. It covers 
such important subjects as interrogation, collection and 
preservation of evidence, techniques and mechanics of 
arrest, court testimony, report writing and related matters 
in an actual investigation by the students of a hypothetical 
set of facts. 

Kimball pointed out that the FBI sponsored schools 
operated under local control. Each school is under the 
direct supervision of the local, county or state law enforce- 
ment executive responsible for the administration of his 
department, or acting upon the behalf of a zone or law 
enforcement association. The FBI furnishes the follow- 
ing services upon request: 

(1) Consultant services in the department of a 
curriculum for training. 

(2) Instructors services through FBI representatives 
who provide some of the training. 

(3) Visual aids, including motion pictures, lantern 
slides, charts and other devices. 

These services may be obtained without any cost what- 
soever, and California law enforcement agencies desirous 
of securing such assistance in the arrangement and pre- 
sentation of their police training programs for 1949 may 
do so by promptly communicating with the Special Agent 
in Charge of their nearest FBI Office, Los Angeles, San 
Diego or San Francisco or by notifying the next FBI 
Agent contacting their department. 

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Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February -March, 1949 




District Attorney A. E. Bagshaw 
First President 




Chief W. V. Nicholson 
Fourth President 



PAST PRESIDENTS 

OF MARIN PEACE 

OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Thomas Wensworth, seventh president, 
and Captain Emery Dawson, ninth pres- 
ident, are not shown here. Photographs 
were not available. 





H. J. Peters 
Second President 




Warden Clinton Duffy 
Fifth President 




Chief Donald Wood 
Third President 




Jas. M. Lewis 
Sixth President 




Chief Frank Kelly 

Fiahth Pr*ciVf*>Mf 



Chief J. McGowan 
m Tu.ii i/„ii„.. 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



History of Marin County Peace Officers* Association 



In the quaint jury room of the Marin County court 
house, on the date of November 24, 1939, a meeting 
was called for the object of proposing a Marin County 
Peace Officers' Association. The men in whose minds 
this thought germinated and who were the inspiration 




Judge John Flor 
Secretary-Treasurer for Eight "fears 



for the creation of the association were Chief Don Wood 
of San Anselmo, A. E. Bagshaw, District Attorney of 
Marin County and H. O. Peters, Special Agent for the 
Northwestern Pacific Railroad. The first meeting for the 
formative purpose was attended by thirteen individuals, 
namely A. G. Bagshaw, Judge John R. Flor, Chief Frank 
Kelly, Chief W. V. Nicholson, Sheriff Walter Sellmer, 
Chief Don Wood, Joe Bush, Jack Agnew, Vernon Dwelly, 
H. O. Peters, Sergeant Parsons, George Seaton and 
Arthur Fellows. 

At the first meeting the purposes of the association 
were outlined as follows: 

The purposes for which this Association is organized 
are to secure a closer official and personal relationship 
among Peace Officers of the County of Marin; to secure 
co-operation and co-ordination in all police matters; to 
elevate the standard of police institutions; to provide full 
tenure of office for those employed in the service; to 
co-operate with all persons chargeable with the enforce- 
ment of law so as to secure full protection of all law 
abiding citizens of the County of Marin and for the 
prevention and detection of crime and the identification 
and treatment of prisoners. 

A. E. Bagshaw was named temporary Chairman and 
the above named were all made charter members of the 
organization. 

The next meeting was held on December 11, 1939, and 
at that meeting there were thirty-six members present, 



By Judge John Flor, Municipal Judge of Lar\spur 

namely: W. V. Nicholson, Sergeant Parsons, Andrew 
Peri, J. Waddell, Chief Wood, G. Vickery, J. W. Lewis, 
Walter Lindman, Chief McGowan, Frank Moulton, Fred 
Nave, H. O. Peters, Harold Riede, Manuel Alberigi, 
George Seaton, Ed Blum, Arthur Fellows, Jack Agnew, 
Tony Quadros, Joe Bush, Joe Canet, Vernon Dwelly, 
H. Elliott, Judge Flor, H. Frasier, Harold Haley, Ben 
Hartwell, J. Hulce, Chief Kelly, Bert Krenzer, A. E. 
Bagshaw, R. J. Yates, Sam Serio, Chief Joseph Regoni, 
Sheriff Walter Sellmer and A. M. Dewey. 

After much discussion it was decided that all of the 
foregoing thirty-six members of the organization be made 
charter members. Officers were duly elected for the year 
1940. They were as follows: 
A. E. Bagshaw, President 
H. O. Peters, First Vice President 
James McGowan, Second Vice President 
Donald Wood, Secretary-Treasurer. 
The Association is now on its tenth year and since its 
birth it has now grown to a membership totaling IS 7. 
The organization is composed of every law enforcement 
officer in the County of Marin including the Judiciary, 
District Attorney and Staff, California Highway Patrol, 
Special Agents of Railroads, members of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, Warden of San Quentin and 
Deputy Warden and members of the Provost Marshal's 
Office at Hamilton Field. 

It has always been the unstinted efforts of the officers 
to promote programs which were instructive and educa- 
tional to its members. The program committee has brought 
before the Association many men of high repute in the 
field of law enforcement and the following men have 
appeared before the Association as guest speakers: Ignatius 
McCarthy, expert in use of tear gas and other nauseating 
gases; Phil Geaque, U. S. Secret Service, Treasury De- 
partment; Dr. David Schmidt, psychiatrist; H. O. Peters, 
firearms expert; Joseph Sheehan, State Board of Equaliza- 
tion; Walter R. Creighton, Narcotics Bureau; C. J. 
(Gerry) Campbell, Special Agent FBI, A. E. Bagshaw, 
(Continued on page 41 ) 



ROSS GENERAL 
HOSPITAL, Inc. 



Ross, California 



Page 8 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL February - March, 1949 

10th Annual Installation of Marin Peace Officers Assn 



It was a great party the Marin County Peace Officers 
put on at their monthly meeting of January 11. It 
marked the installation of officers for the tenth year of 
the Association's existence. 

Unlike former meetings it was open to the women 
folks of the members and that the fair ones liked it was 




President Thos. Cheetham 

evidenced on all sides at the dual scenes of the occasion. 
The ladies came decked out in their best clothes and they 
enjoyed every minute of the nearly five hours of the 
program. 

The festivities started with a cocktail party in the 
Woodmen of the World Hall in San Rafael, at 6 p.m. 
This was given by Deputy Coroner Thomas Keaton, 
and he went all out to provide the nearly 200 guests who 
gathered for the occasion with plenty of refreshments and 
hors d'oeuvres. It was close to 7 o'clock when the happy 
gathering was herded into automobiles for the trip to 
San Quentin, where Warden Clinton Duffy and his chief 
assistants acted as hosts for the rest of the evening. 

There have been many occasions where peace officers 
associations have been invited and entertained at San 
Quentin, but none ever equalled the thought that Warden 
Duffy put in the program of entertainment for the 200 
present. 

First they were taken on a tour of the prison, the 
women folks and all. They inspected the vast furniture 
plant, the new cell blocks, the hobby shop and even the 
prisoners present at various points entered into the spirit 
of the occasion, for they realized that Warden Duffy, a 
past president of the Marin County Association, holds 
this organization very dearly to his heart, and has had 
a great deal to do with its organization and great success 
since it was instituted. 

The Warden accompanied the guests on the tour and 
explained details of the various places visited. 



Then all were led to the officers mess quarters where 
they sat down to a sumptuous dinner, prepared and served 
by prisoners, and no hotel could outdo the service these 
state charges rendered the banqueters. 

With the dessert finished President Emory Dawson, of 
the CHP, called the meeting to order and presented 




Sheriff Walter Selmer 

Warden Duffy the San Quentin host and Tom Keaton 
the San Rafael host. Then he called on Secretary-Treas- 
urer Judge John Flor, of Larkspur who announced there 
would be no regular business presented to the meeting. 

Justice of the Peace N. Charles Brusatori of San 
Rafael was then presented and he acted, with but short 
notice, as installing officer. He first installed Judge Flor 
who has been secretary-treasurer for eight years. Judge 
Brusatori handled his task with appropriate humor and 
the proper amount of dignity. 

Then in turn he installed the other officers, as follows: 

President — Thomas Cheetham, executive secretary to 
the Warden. 

First Vice President — Chief James Doyle of Sausalito. 

Second Vice President — Arthur Fellows, San Rafael 
Police Department. 

President Cheetham in taking over his new duties 

thanked the members for the honor of serving them and 

paid tribute to junior president Captain Dawson, and 

pledged his efforts to carry on the program of the associa- 

( Continued on page 37) 

GEORGE'S DRY GOODS 



VACAVILLE 



FOR THE FAMILY 
520 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



February -March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Sausalito Police Had a Very Busy Day on December 10, 1947 



At 11:30 on the morning of December 10, 1947, the 
telephone rang in the office of the Sausalito Police De- 
partment. The caller stated that a man was on fire at 
35 3 Letho Street. Th location is the site of arks and 
boat houses, and had been responsible for several mis- 
cellaneous police calls in the past. 

On this particular call Sergeant Marchand was detailed 
to investigate, and upon arrival at the boat house owned 




Chief James F. Doyle 

by "Pete the Greek," saw the owner lying dead on the 
ground and his body afiire. Over the two-way radio Ser- 
geant Marchand called Chief James Doyle who was quick- 
ly on the spot of the crime. Realizing the seriousness of 
the occasion, when George Kosolos, a wizened old man 
of some 70 years of age, and the uncle of the man whose 
body had been burned, began shooting from his shack in 
an old ark in which he had barricaded himself, Chief 
Doyle radioed a call to the Marin Mutual Aid Agree- 
ment for assistance. 

Sausalito is one of the several cities and townships having 
a well planned Mutual Aid agreement, and its members 
have worked to make it perfect in its operation for aiding 
any peace officer in the county. 

In the matter of but a few minutes officers from the 
California Highway patrol, deputies from Sheriff Walter 
B. Sellmer's office, guards from San Quentin and members 
of Police Departments from other Marin County cities 
began pouring into Sausalito, armed and ready for any 
eventuality. 

Chief Doyle who knows the layout of all the arks and 
house boats on Sausalito's waterfront, took charge of the 
augmented force and placed the armed men at vantage 
points, and then started a battle that lasted for an hour 
and a half. 

The demented man, barricaded behind the doors of 
his house boat had a plentiful supply of ammunition arid 



was shooting recklessly at anything that caught his fancy. 
He sent one shot from within his temporary fortress that 
went across the street and the bullet crashed the plate 
glass window of a furniture store. Crowds gathered, news 
photographers and reporters converged on the scene and 
this congregation of civilians posed a hazard that threat- 
ened the killing of some innocent bystander. 

Chief Doyle with his men properly deployed ordered 
that the shooting from the ark be met with a return fire. 
Sergeant Kelly of the Sausalito Police Department sprayed 
the ark with machine gun bullets, Undersheriff Joe Wil- 
liams of Marin County, who did splendid work on this 
case, had his men open fire also. Guards from San Quentin 
began chopping their way through the roof of the house 
boat and into the holes they made, poured gas. Yet the 
cornered man kept on shooting. Highway Patrolmen 
began battering battering the front, and only door to the 
ark, while Chief Doyle, Sergeant Kelly and other San 
Quentin guards covered these men. 

With the few windows covered by officers, men on the 
roof, and the front door rammed open, the siegers waited 
for ten minutes when it was decided to rush into the place. 
With gas masks of the latest type Chief Doyle, Under- 
sheriff Williams. Highway Patrolman Allan Bragg and 
Sergeant Kelly started for the front door. They were met 
by a slug that ripped through the wall near the door. 
Highway Patrolman Bragg received a lacerated wound in 
I Continued on page 56) 

CROWN FOOD CENTER 

Jack Shea, Prop. 

GROCERIES • MEATS • FRESH FRUIT • VEGETABLES 

BEER • WINE • SOFT DRINKS 

One Stop Satisfies All Needs 



RICHMOND 



1096 San Pablo Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



GRANT'S COFFEE SHOP 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
and SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 5:30 A.M. to 7 : 30 P.M. 



2134 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 



WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



February - Ma^ch, 1949 



Modesto Is Growing, So Is Its P. D. 



By Opie L. Warner 



Modesto, that thriving, well kept and modern little city 
of the San Joaquin Valley, a hundred miles south of San 
Francisco, has grown in population as has most all other 
communities in California since 1940, but it is designed 
to have its population of some 25,000 contented people, 
doubled at an election the coming April. 

In the fringe area around the 3 1 i square miles of the 
city limits there are roughly 22,500 more satisfied people 




Chief Urban H. Pickering 

who have flocked to this desirable locality, and who have 
put up hundreds and hundreds of homes. It seems these 
people want to come into the incorporated limits of 
Modesto, and the plan calls for taking in two miles each 
way from the present city boundary. From the impression 
this writer obtained while in Modesto there is every like- 
lihood that the annexation will be voted by the people 
so vitally interested. 

If the election is in favor of the addition it will mean 
the population will be close to 50,000, and it will no 
doubt reach that number by the end of this year. 

This will mean additional work for all departments of 
the city government, but to the Police Department it will 
call for extra effort and extra personnel. If the annex- 
ation goes through, as it seems it will, further action will 
be taken to increase the Police Department at first by 
twenty men and it won't be long before the present 
strength of the force of 34 men will be doubled. 

At the April election the citizenry will vote for a new 
charter with a city manager in charge of the adminstra- 
tion of the municipal affairs. 

But you can rest assured the Police Department will 
be able to handle the new business the added territory 
and population will produce. Chief Urban H. Pickering, 
who took over the Chief'.-, job on March 7, 1945, with 
16 men, has developed one of the best bunch of law 



enforcement officers that any city, large or small, can 
not excel. 

Chief Pickering, who came to Modesto some 14 years 
ago, and joined the Police Department after a noted 
career as a professional ball player, having been with 
the Oakland Ball Club of the Coast League for six 
years as an outfielder, and later with the New York 
Giants and finally three years with the Boston Red Sox 
as a third baseman, took law enforcement seriously. 
So well did he perform every task assigned him, and so 
thoroughly did he master the fundamentals of his new 
callings, that he progressed rapidly from patrolman to 
sergeant then to captain. When Chief Elmer E. Arington 
suddenly passed away, Captain Pickering was selected as 
his successor. 

His administration of his responsible duties have thor- 
oughly justified this action by the city council. He has 
seen to it his men are gi\en the best tools of their pro- 
fession ; that they are properly trained for their duties ; 
that every modern means available to peace officers are 
furnished his men and his department ; and that coopera- 
tion with other agencies are as necessary as taking care 
of local needs. 

He has a force of young men, with the exception of 
one man none are over 40 years of age. He has followed 
a program of fitting new members for their work. Once 
a man passed the entrance examination and meets all 
physical requirements, he is put on six months probation. 
During that time he has no authority. He goes out on 
the streets with different men, who give him all the in- 
formation gained by their experience as police officers, 
/Continued on page 77) 



FARMER'S INN 

W. M. CAPEN, Prop. 
716 Ninth Street Phone 5617 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



WES CLAYTON 
SEASIDE SERVICE 

Lubrication and General 
Auto Repairs 

SPECIALISTS ON CHRYSLER PRODUCTS 

Phone 2884 
8th and "H" Streets 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



Santa Cruz Has Assistant Police Chief 



By Peter J. Heller, Santa Cruz Sentinel-7<[ews 



The man who, as a war-time lieutenant, captured the 
famous Remagen bridge across the Rhine river in Ger- 
many, was appointed Assistant Chief of Police of the 
City of Santa Cruz on February 1. 

He is Donald F. Lynn, heretofore police captain, and 
well known throughout the State for his role in the gam- 
bling shake-down investigations last year which led to 



return to duty in Santa Cm;, was sent to attend the F.B.I. 
National Police Academy in Washington, D. C. He 
graduated with honors, and passed the civil service ex- 
amination for police captain when he got back to Santa 
Cruz. 

When the new position of assistant chief of police 
was created at the request of Chief Al Huntsman, all 






Asst. Chief Don Lynn 



Captain E. W. Geyer 



Captain Ben Krupp 



the dismissal of Sergeant Roland Rushton from the Los 
Angeles force. 

Twice, Lynn was offered well-paying positions with the 
office of Attorney General Fred N. Howser. Both times, 
he turned them down to continue his work in the city 
where he had grown up. His appointment by City Man- 
ager Neal D. Smith to the newly-created post of assistant 
chief rewarded his loyalty as well as his ability. 

Don Lynn was born in San Jose 34 years ago. He 
came to Santa Cruz as a boy of 12 to attend high school 
in this resort city. After graduation, he attended San 
Mateo Junior College and Santa Clara University. In 
June, 1936, he joined the Santa Cruz Police Department. 

When war came, Lynn enlisted in the army. He rose 
from the ranks and received a commission in the armored 
force. As reconnaissance platoon leader with Company 
B of the Ninth Armored Division's 14th Tank Battalion, 
Lynn earned the gratitude of thousands of G. I.'s who sub- 
sequently could cross the formidable barrier of the Rhine 
without getting wet. On March 28, 194i, Lynn's platoon 
came over a hill upon the little town of Remagen on the 
Rhine; and there, before them, was a giant bridge still 
intact, with German soldiers running across it. Lynn 
checked with his company commander by radio and then, 
with his small platoon, advanced and took the town and 
the western end of the bridge. A short while later, the 
infantry engineers completed the seizure. The event was 
of such major importance that General Eisenhower de- 
voted several pages to it in his recent book. 

Don was discharged on March 23, 1946, and upon 



three captains competed under civil service rules. A 
special examining board consisting of Highway Patrol 
Commissioner Clifford E. Peterson; Chief of Police How- 
ard A. Zink, Palo Alto; and Captain Walter J. Johnson, 
Berkeley, gave the oral examination and awarded Lynn the 
highest score. 

In his new position, Assistant Chief Lynn will be 
deputy and understudy for Chief Al Huntsman. Most 
of his former departmental functions will be assumed 
by Captain Ben Krupp who will be in direct charge of 
the uniformed and detective force, while Captain Elmer 
Geyer retains control of administration, identification, and 
records. The citizens of Santa Cruz welcome Lynn's ap- 
pointment as a further improvement of their well-func- 
tioning, active, and progressive police department. 



MAYFLOWER BAKERY 

Paul Fix 

Cakes and Pastries for 
All Occasions 

106 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

Lafayette, California 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



SHERIFF HORN BUCKLE OF SANTA CLARA CO. 

Makes Many Changes During His First Two Years 



Last January 6 Sheriff Howard Hornbuckle completed 
two years as chief law enforcement officer for Santa Clara 
County and its more than a quarter million population. 
Since he took over the responsible position he now occu- 
pies, he has doubled his force of officers. There were 33 
men and women working in the Sheriff's office when he 




Sheriff Howard Hornbuckle 

was inducted into the office. Today there are 66. 

Sheriff Hornbuckle has done more to improve law en- 
forcement in his rich and productive county in the first 
half of his first term than any of his predecessors have in 
a full four-year term. 

He has completely reorganized the men who serve un- 
der him. This reorganization is the result of his twelve or 
so years as a member of the San Jose Police Department, 
service which saw him rise to the top commissioned rank 
of Captain. During his membership in the county seat 
of Santa Clara County he went to the FBI National 
Police Academy and the training he obtained there has 
stood him in good stead in his arrangement of the various 
divisions of his force. 

He has done away with the title of Undersheriff, a 
position the late Thomas Graham held. Now it is desig- 
nated as Captain, and Floyd Stewart, with 1 3 years of 
service with the Berkeley Police Department, holding 
the job. 

Instead of chief deputies for each division the name 
has been changed to sergeants. There are seven of these. 

Sergeant Jack Gibbons is in charge of the Criminal 
Investigation Division. 

Sergeant Robert Thompson, in charge of the civil 
division. 



Sergeant John Perusina in charge of the night watch. 

Sergeant William Salt, administration. 

Sergeant James Fowler, relief. 

One of the much needed innovations he has introduced 
is opening two substations; one in Gilroy and one in 
Mountain view. 

There are assigned to each of these substations eight men 
with a sergeant in charge. 

Sergeant John Fortado heads the Gilroy substation and 
Sergeant Howard Harvey the Mountain View Station. 
Each substation has a stenographer who looks after the 
radio calls as well. 

The substations are open 24 hours a day and work in 
close harmony with the city police of the surrounding area. 

Sheriff Hornbuckle has joined with the San Jose Police 
Department in Bureau of Identification work and the 
handling of juvenile delinquency. Herbert Dallas is as- 
signed to the S.J.P.D. B. of I. 

Another forward step introduced by Sheriff Hornbuckle 
is the changing to three way radio for all 19 patrol cars, 
as well as for those of the smaller cities and the county 
Fire Department. Some 30 cars are serviced by the 
Sheriff's Station KTEH. 

He has established two booster stations, one on Mt. 
Hamilton and the other Loma Terito which are under the 
direction of Chief Radio Engineer Robert Mason who 
operates the radio setup in the new communications build- 
ing at the county fair grounds. 

He is now working, and getting ahead with his idea of 
installing teletype in all the cities from Gilroy to Los 
Gatos and Palo Alto. Only the Sheriff's office and the 
Police Departments of San Jose and Palo Alto now have 
teletype hook ups. When this feature is put in operation, 
it will, with the great contact from the inter county 
radio broadcasts, bring into action on a moment's notice 
over 300 police officers of Santa Clara County. This will 
be bad news to the gents who seek to live well and 
spin not. 

Since he took over two years ago Sheriff Hornbuckle 
has improved the county prison farm. Here on a 240 
acre ranch near Milpitas over a hundred men serving 
terms for misdemeanor offenses are doing productive 
work in operating the dairy and raising needed vegetables 
for the county jail and county hospital. They are also 
getting the benefits from some good hard work, out of 
doors, something a lot of them can blame their incarcera- 
tion to a lack of any inclination to toiling and sweating. 

It is the hope of the Sheriff that the county will soon 
get a new jail to replace the long antiquated one that 
now houses some 200 men and which is overcrowded 
and lacking in all things that a modern county jail now- 
adays requires. 

This project is awaiting the settlement of a civic 
('Continued on page 48 ) 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 3 



Sheriff Hoskins of Nevada County 



Nevada County, noted for a century of gold production 
and some farming and cattle raising, has drawn to its 
mountainous areas many desperate criminals during its 
hundred years of history. But you can put it down in your 
hooks that law enforcement has been as rugged as the 
quick firing bandits who have essayed big time robberies. 

Four sheriffs have lost their lives in the performance of 
their duties, but the men responsible for these heroic deaths 




Sheriff Richard W. Hoskins 

have enjoyed but shortlived liberties, most of them wound 
up on the cold slab of the county's morgue. 

One of these enforcement officers slain was Sheriff Wil- 
liam H. Pascoe, who was killed in June, 1893. The follow- 
ing story about the murder is from the Grass Valley 
Morning Union of July 1, 1893 . 

"Sheriff William H. Pascoe, Sheriff of Nevada County, 
was killed in line of duty, during a gun duel while tracking 
down a tramp killer, by the name of Frederickson. The 
latter was later killed by a posse of enraged citizens, it is 
believed. 

"Sheriff Pascoe was aged 52 years, a native of Cornwall, 
England, and was elected Sheriff in 1892. 

"He was a man in every sense of the word. He was 
loyal in the discharge of his duties, and ever true to his 
friends. No man could say aught against his name. Never 
did he knowingly do a man injury. His death will be de- 
plored by the whole people of this city and county, for 
his popularity was unbounded. 

"Those who knew him best loved him most." 

We recite this tribute to a worthy peace officer for he 
was an uncle of Nevada County's present Sheriff — Rich- 
ard W. Hoskins. 

Sheriff Hoskins took over the job as chief law enforce- 
ment officer of his native county in the Spring of 1947. 
From the beginning, after but a few weeks on the job, he 
displayed the same courage and appreciation of his duties, 
as that of his noted uncle. 

For, in May, 1947, three men held up a bank in Wheat- 
land, getting away with $15,000. In their getaway they 
shot Sheriff John Dower of Yuba County and one of his 



deputies. Sheriff Hoskins and his force were alerted and 
the Sheriff took up the chase. In two hours after the rob- 
bery he captured one of the bandits. The second day he 
shot and killed the second bandit who tried to shoot it out. 
The third day he captured the last of the trio of bank 
robbers All the money but 10 cents was recovered. 

Sheriff Hoskins kept up the chase for three days and 
nights, getting not one hour of sleep. The whole area of 
the tough hills of Nevada County, where the going is 
mighty rough in many spots, was completely boxed in by 
peace officers who were kept in close touch by two-way 
radio. 

Two months after this exciting episode the Sheriff was 
called upon again to run down two murderers. James W. 
McClain had been killed, in what has been termed the 
"kiss of death" crime. Sheriff Hoskins working fast got 
the clews of the perpetrators of the crime and arrested a 
married couple in Las Vegas, Nevada. He landed Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph Hardy in the Truckee city jail and later moved 
them to the county jail in Nevada City. The pair were 
convicted, the husband drawing a life sentence, and the 
wife sentenced to die in the gas chamber. She won an 
appeal and is awaiting a new trial. 

Sheriff Hoskins has well demonstrated his courage and 
ability as a peace officer. Since he took over the office he 
has made many improvements in his department, improve- 
ments that had never been in effect before. 

Principal of these is the installation of two-way radio. 
The Sheriff's station letters are KAPI, and it also serves 
the Sheriff and his deputies, Nevada City and Grass Val- 
( Continued on page 33) 



INTERNATIONAL MARKET 



1334 Peralta Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



MIDWAY BAR 

815 Washington Street 



CALIFORNIA 



r--« 



Compliments of 

OSCAR'S COCKTAILS 

... IN RICHMOND . . . 
YOUR FRIENDS WILL LIKE IT HERE 

Ten forty-seven Twenty-third Street 

Richmond, California 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Feb/' 



-March, 1949 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Sgt. Charles Simpson, President 
Bob Mason, Secretary A. R. Taggart, Treasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the Northern Cali- 
fornia Police Communication Officers 1 Association was 
held in Santa Cruz, California, on January 13, 1949. 
Our host was Walter Keller, Electrical Superintndent for 
the City of Santa Cruz. 

President Ray Meyers opened the meeting and wel- 
comed one of our distinguished members who has not 
been able to attend some of our meetings during the past 
few months. Art Sowles, Reno, Nevada, past President 
of the APCO. Art has attended our meetings for years 
in any type of weather and it was good to see him back. 

Captain McMurphy, perenial Chairman of the En- 
gineering and Frequency Committee reported on Fre- 
quency Clearances as follows: 

City of Willits, Police Department, 156.45 Mcs. This 
frequency is shared by Oakland and Merced County 
Sheriff's Office. 

Daly City Police Department, Requested clearance to 
shift frequency in the 30 Mc. band. This request was 
tabled for further study by the Engineering Committee. 

City of Fairfield, 37.02 Mcs. This will allow the City 
of Fairfield to participate in the co-ordinated communi- 
cations system developed in this area. 

City of Weed Police Department, 155.01 Mcs. 

Mac told about how his department has been testing 
VHF Receivers of various manufacturers. He obtained 
some interesting information which is available to all 

H. MOFFAT CO. 

BUYERS OF LIVESTOCK 

MANTECA DRESSED BEEF 

THIRD AND ARTHUR STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

RENO OFFICES 
206 N. Virginia Street Phone 6862 



GROCERIES 



BEER - WINE 



BAKERY 



EAST RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS - DELICATESSEN - FRUITS - VEGTABLES 



RICHMOND 



Joe Sindicich. Prop. Phone Rich 8984 
McBryde and San Pablo Ave. 



members. 

On motion by Geo. Burton, seconded by Walter Keller 
and unanimously approved by the members present, the 
above frequency clearances were granted by this Asso- 
ciation. 

MacMurphy suggested we re-activate our 70 Mc Point 
to Point Network and discuss same with the Bay Counties 
Peace Officers' Association. It seems the State has pro- 
posed a change in their present frequency which would 
leave many agencies in the position of replacing their 
present equipment. This subject was taken under study 
and will be discussed further at our next meeting. 

Art Sowle, Jim Lewis, and MacMurphy discussed Re- 
peater interference. 

Henry Bogardus, Radio Engineer, San Francisco, re- 
quested the Engineering Committee consider two fre- 
quencies in the 1 5 Mc band. One for Police and one 
for Fire. 

Sergeant A. J. Silva, CHP, discussed the possibilities of 
clearances for repeaters in the 70 MC band. 

Meeting recessed for lunch, which was held at the 
Riverside Hotel. 

Host Walt Keller introduced Mayor Sam McNeely of 
Santa Clara, who gave us a hearty welcome. Walt then 
introduced Captain Ben Krupp, Santa Cruz Police. 

Reports of other Committees followed : 
('Continued on page 60) 



Office Phone 4730 



Residence Phone 4506 



MARY E. SNEDEKER 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
INSURANCE 

Diablo Boulevard at Dewing Avenue 
LAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA 

JAMISON NURSERY SCHOOL 

Helen S. Jamison, Owner and Director 

(Licensed by State of California) 

PRE-SCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN (Ages 2 to 6) 

Full Year Program 8 to 5 by day, week or month 



Aln 



Orinda 2929 



CALIFORNIA LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



EMMA LEE'S NEEDLECRAFT 

Emma Lee Van Meter 
IN THE SUBURBAN SHOPS 

Phone Lafayette 2553 

Instructor JILL COAD 
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday — 11 to 4 



Phone LAfayette 4993 



DIAMOND K SUPPLY CO. 



LAFAYETTE 



Mount Diablo Boulevard 



LAFAYETTE FEED & FUEL 



CALIFORNIA 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



February ■ March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 5 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Constable Earl Dierking, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 



The meeting of the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation was hcd at San Quentin Prison on Thursday, 
January 27th, 1949. Warden DufFy invited the members 
of the Association who wished to make a tour of the 
Prison to get there early. Many members availed them- 




CONSTABLE EARL DlERKING 

selves of this offer and were conducted on a very inter- 
esting and instructive inspection. 

The members then all assembled in the dining hall and 
a very nice lunch was served. President, Chief W. A. 
Wisnom of Hillsborough, then called the meeting to order 
and introduced Warden Clinton Duffy, the host for the 
meeting. Warden Duffy then introduced his aides and 
the heads of the different departments in San Quentin. 

Chief Wisnom then introduced prominent members 
and guests of the Association who were in attendance 
at the meeting. 

At the conclusion of the introductions, Chief Wisnom 
proceeded with the business of the meeting. He called 
on John Greening who informed the membership that the 
Peace Officers Training School would be rigid from Feb- 
ruary 7th to March 5th at the Alameda Training Center 
and advised the membership of all the particulars regard- 
ing the registration of students. He also gave information 
regarding officers who were eligible to attend. 

The President then called upon Chief Harold A. Zink 
of Palo Alto, the Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the Association. Chief Zink advised of the work of 
the Constitution and By-Laws Committee and told of the 



reading of the new Constitution and By-Laws at the last 
meeting at the Santa Rita Branch of the Alameda County 
Jail. Chief Zink told how at the completion of the read- 
ing of same at the last meeting, he requested that mem- 
bers send in any criticism or changes they could suggest. 




Capt. Bernard J. McDonald 

As a result of these requests, the Executive Committee 
at its meeting made two changes, one of which dealt with 
the membership of the Executive Committee, setting forth 
that this Committee shall consist of the President, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer and nine members of the Association, 
one member being appointed from each of the nine Bay 
Counties. 

The other change was in regard to applications; upon 
receipt of an application, same shall be referred to a 
Membership Committee, which committee will report its 
findings at the next regular meeting and the applicant 
shall be voted upon on the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee. 

Chief Zink recommended to the Association that the 
new Constitution and By-Laws be accepted by the Asso- 
ciation as read and amended. 

A motion was then made, seconded and carried that 
the new Constitution and By-Laws be accepted by the 
Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association. 

Chief Zink then told the Association that the Executive 
(•Continued on page 76) 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februar\ ■ March, 1 949 



Alcoholic Clinic for Alameda County 

First of the Nation Being Established by Sheriff H. P. (Jack) Gleason Rounding Out Ten Years 
In Office as Another Step on His Broad Program of Rehabilitation of Men and Women 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Editor, Veteran Police Reporter, Author. 



Rounding out 10 years as Sheriff of Alameda County, 
H. P. (Jack) Gleason, peace officer, administrator, builder 
is again pointing the way for the nation in a big way. 

Several years ago Sheriff Gleason established the Santa 
Rita Prison Farm, as part of the Alameda County jail 
system. 

At that time Jack said "it was really undertaken as an 




Sheriff H. P. Gleason 

experiment in the rehabilitation of human beings, men 
and women, who had fallen afoul of the law but who 
had much good in them, that could, under proper environ- 
ment and treatment, bring them back to society, whole 
some and active." 

That experiment has, according to the records, done 
just that very thing. 

Santa Rita prison farm is not a prison farm in reality 
. . . it is a community of several hundred men and women 
who are marching back into freedom under the kindly, 
friendly tutelage of Sheriff Jack Gleason and his staff. 

The residents of Santa Rita have come from all walks 
of life, laborer, the hobo camps, the business world, the 
office world . . . and they're on their way out of the 
"pit into which they had fallen." 

Sheriff Gleason's latest contribution to his rehabilitation 
program centers in the recent establishment of an alcoholic 
clinic for cbronic drinkers, men and women. 

At this writing Sheriff Gleason is seeking, through the 
experts offices of medics, pychologists and psychiatrists, 
the best available talent to direct this new departure in 
handling the chronic drunks. 



Behind it is the reason as advanced by Sheriff Gleason 
to the board of supervisors, who promptly provided funds 
for the experiment. 

Said Jack Gleason: 

"Handling alcoholics and persons arrested for drunken- 
ness is one of the oldest police problems. 

"Such cases causes a greater drain on police resources 
than all other types of crime combined through the diver- 
sion of police activity and countless man hours necessi- 
tated for arrest, handling and detention of men and 
women arrested for intoxication. 

"Every peace agency has been hampered over the dec- 
ades in the handling of heavy drinkers by the lack of 
facilities and proper guidance from scientific sources. 
This has resulted in the general practice of treating all 
persons arrested for drunkenness in the same manner. 
This is all wrong. 

"Police departments and medical authorities have recog- 
nized that treating alcoholism on a mass scale is no solution 
to the problem. 

"Alcoholism is not a moral weakness, as many think, 
but a disease of the individual. It must be treated as such. 
Such cases are decidedly individual. 

"The problem requires psychiatric or medical treatment, 
applied to the individual. Alcohol affects every person in 
a different way. There is no set rule to guide police in 
treatment of alcoholics. That is a problem for men who 
know more about the human being than a peace officer, 
believe it or not. 

"Yes, alcoholism is an individual problem. Such treat- 
ment, while ideal for the alcoholic who has sufficient 
funds to seek private care of this nature, is impractical 
from a police standpoint. Most police departments have 
neither the funds, facilities nor personnel to give sufficient 
time and treatment to effect a cure." 

The board of supervisors of Alameda County, Harry 
Bartel. chairman, was prompt to act on Sheriff Gleason's 
suggestion for a real home for alcoholics where the weed- 
ing-out process could be successfully carried out. 

The supervisors voted $20,000 for the clinic's first year 
of operation. 

And this is significant: this clinical unit is the 
first of its kind to be established in the United 
States. Sheriff Gleason and Alameda County 
again lead the way: 

The clinic is supervised by Sheriff Gleason and Dr. G. 
Whitecotton, County Medical Director. 

Oakland's police judges, Berkeley's police judges, the 
township justices of the peace have united in support of 
the clinic's objectives, asserting that "just jail sentences 
/ Continued on page 64 ) 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 17 



SFPD Widows* and Orphans' Aid Ass'n 
Will Have Two-Night Show This Year 

Date Set for Added Show, the First in the Association's History, on May 6 and 7. Members of the 
Department Are Now Selling Tickets, Which Will Be as Always #1.00 Each. 





Capt. Leo Tackney 




Insp. Edward Murphy 



Lt. John P. Meehan 



Junior Past President Lieutenant John Meehan has selected Captain Leo Tackney of Southern Station 
as General Chairman of the Annual Concert and Ball. Association President Inspector Edward Mur- 
phy will have an important part in the program. Lieutenant Jerome Reidy is First Vice Chairman and 
Lieutenant Edward Farrell is Second Vice Chairman. Inspector Thomas Fitzpatrick is Secretary of 
the general committee. 



BEAUTY FACTORS 

BEAUTY SHOP EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 



2440 Grove Street 



OAKLAND 



HIgate 4-3427 



CALIFORNIA 



DeLUXE DINNERS 


AMERICAN and CHINESE 


Banquets and Parties Up to 200 


DANCING 


Lounge Around the Four-Way Fireplace at 


RAMBEAU'S 


HACIENDA 


First Stop on the Tunnel Strip in ORINDA 


Res. Phone Orinda 4211 



Tiny's Waffle Shop and Cocktail Lounge 

Ray Horgan, Mgr. 

Centrally Located Downtown Oakland at 

1762 BROADWAY 

Phone TEmplebar 2-4946 



DODGE "Job-Rated" TRUCKS 

DODGE PASSENGER CARS 

PLYMOUTH PASSENGER CARS 

MILLER- 
BLACKWOOD 



Mt. Diablo Blvd. at Golden Gate Way 

Lafayette, California 

Lafayette 4491 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Febc 



March, 1949 



SAN FRANCISCO BUNCO BUSTERS 

By Jim Leonard, Police Reporter for The Call-Bulletin 



A group of eight "consultants" hired by some 700,000 
San Franciscans operate from a small office on the fourth 
floor of the Hall of Justice. When a "client" presents 
details of a venture to one of these men for an analysis, 
he generally gets an answer like — "you've been swindled, 
mister." 

Bunco schemes come in all shapes and sizes, ranging 



Golden Gate Park to look at his newly acquired herd. 
Making plans to drive the sheep away, he met with some 
opposition — the sheep belonged to the city of San Fran- 
cisco, and would continue to graze their lives peacefully 
away in the pasture in the park. 

Bunco men find their victims in all circles. A group 
of San Francisco businessmen once jumped at the oppor- 




BUNCO AND PICKPOCKET DETAIL 
Seated, left to right — Inspectors Charles F. Keck. Louis H. Linss. Frank P. McCann, Charles L. Iredale. George Dyer. George Page, 
William E. Mudd. Standing — Auto Booster Detail, Jerome Smith. William Valentine, Frederick Kcyworth. Eugene Atkinson, 
William Osterloh. Edward Hall. 



from ten cents to thousands of dollars. Some, though 
ageless, will attract new victims; and others are being 
hatched in shyster brains at this moment. Californians 
are cheated of millions of dollars every year by somewhat 
psychopathic thieves who would show them the way to an 
easy fortune. Though many victims believe they are 
investing wisely in an opportune proposition, others are 
themselves out to make a quick piece of change. 

If it is true that a sucker is born every minute, there 
will be no end to the work to be done by the bunco 
detective. He will go a bit farther and suggest that many 
suckers are born each minute — and for good measure 
will add: "There is a bit of larceny in every man's veins." 

One time a man met another man at San Francisco's 
Ferry Building. Theirs was no ordinary conversation — 
they were dealing in sheep. Money was exchanged and 
one of the men walked away with visions of a great for- 
tune in a sheep ranch somewhere; he hurried out to 



tunity to buy some seed — grass seed which was "guaran- 
teed to grow grass three inches high, and no more." 

Inspector Charles L. Iredale heads the Bunco and Pick- 



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March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS 1 JOURNAL 



Page 19 



pocket Detail of the San Francisco Police Department's 
Bureau of Inspectors, and the scarcity of bunco rackets 
in the city indicates that he and his comrades do their 
work well — the mortality rate for swindlers is high in 
San Francisco. 

Inspector Iredale, a tall and erect man of fifty-four, 
is rounding out his twenty-seventh year as a San Fran- 
cisco police officer. Eighteen of those years were spent in 
the Bunco Detail. He is a New Englander by birth only — 
his parents, Alfred and Alice Iredale, brought him to San 
Francisco from Boston when he was only one year old. 
His father, associated with a large department store, reared 
his son and two daughters in a home in the South of 
Market district — which seemed to produce most of the 
men in the San Francisco Police Department. "Charlie" 
Iredale's sisters live in the city yet — Mrs. Marcia Reed, 
395 Hill Street, and Mrs. Florence Stilwell, 237 Chi- 
cago Way. 

Charlie Iredale was a good student at Mission Grammar 
School and again at Mission High School where he began 
developing into an outstanding baseball player. 

Iredale saw service with the U. S. Navy during World 
War I, and while stationed at Mare Island became a 
regular player on the Navy baseball squad. The war 
and baseball failed to occupy all of his time, however; 
because during liberty hours he conducted the successful 
courtship of a San Francisco girl. He married Ruby 
Stenersen in 1917 — she maintains the Iredale household at 
2440 Market Street, and still disapproves of the irregular 
hours of police work. 

Many Oregonians remember the Iredale who played 
baseball (second base) for the Portland Beavers under 
Manager Walter McCready. Many of Charlie's team- 
mates were later to become big name major league stars. 
His activity in athletics did not end when he was ap- 
pointed to the Police Department July 24, 1922 — he 
swam for the department's swimming team at the South 
End Rowing Club. Ten times he swam the channel of 
the Golden Gate — this affair was conducted annually by 
the San Francisco Chroriicle. 

Until 1930 Iredale was a member of the Homicide 
Detail, first under Lieutenant Charles W. Dullea (later 
Chief of the department and now a member of the Cali- 
fornia Adult Authority). Though it now seems incon- 
ceivable, Iredale and his partner, Allen McGinn, investi- 
gated all San Francisco automobile accidents — a radical 
extreme from the present day Accident Investigation 
Bureau with 25 radio equipped automobiles. Yet, in their 
spare time Iredale and McGinn took part in other homi- 
cide investigations. McGinn, now retired from the de- 
partment, is in charge of security at the Anglo-California 
Bank, Sansome and Market Streets. 

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IF YOU WANT THE BEST 
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As records of commendations in police personnel files 
indicate, Iredale's experience in the department has not 
been without accident. Stories of his participation in 
violent police action would fill a book — "August 13, 1925, 
capture of insane armed man," citation. "February 6, 
1926, arrest of auto theft suspect with heavy shoot- 
ing," etc. 

One of the more unpleasant experiences still proves to 
be the source of jokes — about the armed robber who chose 
the festive hours of New Year's eve to hold up a drug 
store at O'Farrell and Jones Streets. His end to the old 
year was to be a bad one, literally. 

Iredale and William McMahon (one of San Francisco's 
all time "greats" in the Police Department) responded to 
the holdup call, finding the druggist critically wounded 
by one of the bandit's bullets. They also found the bandit, 
who immediately opened fire on them from the "difficult" 
distance of about five feet. Miraculously, the slugs missed 
both the officers; and the robber turned and ran up the 
( Continued on page 69,) 



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Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

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by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 csg^p 



FORMER CHIEF QUINN IN 
INSURANCE BUSINESS 

A recent local news item was to the effect that former 
Chief of Police William J. Quinn had become a partner 
in the Jones-Quinn Insurance Company, with offices in 
the DeYoung Building. 

His partner is Edward F. Jones, well known in insur- 
ance circles, is Chairman, Executive Committee, San 
Francisco Accident and Health Underwriters Association. 

During his many years as Police Chief William Quinn 
was known both locally and nationally as one of the 
nation's outstanding police executives. 

In everything connected w-ith police administration 
former Chief Quinn was tireless and proved himself a 
man of vision. 

Thus we find San Francisco had its Police Big Brother 
organisation years before juvenile delinquency became 
the popular subject of debate we find it today. Similarly 
we find our San Francisco Police Department pioneering 
in the School Traffic Patrol movement and in the use of 
radio in patrol work. 

The commercial radio talks on crime and criminals so 
popular today were first given freely, as an educational 
feature, by our San Francisco Chief Quinn. So popular 
were these talks that they continued over a period of not 
months but years. 



Being a man of boundless energy the former chief was 
always to be found in Peace Officers' Associations, whether 
local, state or national, on committees calling for time 
and effort. 

At the Hall of Justice, as department chief clerk, under 
the late Chief Daniel J. O'Brien, and for a decade as head 
of the department, the former chief was known as a 
capable, courteous gentleman. 

During World War II he held the rank of Commander, 
U. S. Navy. 



SFPD TO HAVE GOOD BASEBALL TEAM 

Lieutenant John P. Meehan of the Big Brother Bureau 
of the San Francisco Police Department, has started a 
sixteen week circuit of a boys' league of baseball players. 
The first contests were held early in February, at the 
South Side and Potrero Hill diamonds. Over two hundred 
youthful players were on hand, running from 14 to 18 
years of age. The Police Department is furnishing the 
balls and bats for the juvenile league. 

At the same time it was announced that the Police team 
is undergoing an extensive improvement program. 

It is the hope of Chief Michael Mitchell and other top 
men of the Police Department that the team will be as 
good as the Los Angeles Police Department which has 
made a name for itself. 

The first nine organized since the war began made a 
good record last year, winning the Funston Night League 
championship. 

This team was managed by Officer Jack Gleeson and 
he had on his outfit Officers Roy Mort and George 
Hughes, former Coast League players. 

Another Coast League man, who is a prospective mem- 
ber of the police team is Dino Restelli of the S. F. Seals, 
who has taken the police examinations, and if he makes the 
list will enter police service after his ball playing days 
are over. 

We'll have a complete writeup of the new team in 
the next issue. 



POLICE EXAMINATIONS IN BURBANK 

The City of Burbank will soon hold an examination 
for the position of Lieutenant-Juvenile Bureau according 
to an announcement received recently from the Los An- 
geles County Civil Service Commission. 

This position beginning at $375 a month is open to 
men who have had four years' paid police officer experi- 
ence, including experience as a juvenile officer. 

The appointee to this position will be responsible for 
crime prevention and delinquency control programs, as 
well as supervision of all activities of the Juvenile Bureau 
for the City of Burbank. 

The examination will be given in Burbank by the Los 
Angeles County Civil Service Commission. 

Persons interest in this position may secure applications 
and full information from the office of the Director of 
Personnel, City Hall. Burbank, California. 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



NEW OFFICERS FOR S.F.P.D. ASS'N. 

On February 1 5 the members of the San Francisco 
Police Officers' Association elected the officers to serve for 
the coming year. They are: 

President — Sergeant James Erickson, Central Station. 

First Vice President — Sergeant Frank Schuler. 

Second Vice President — Officer Eligio Marelli. 

Secretary — Officer James Hegarty, reelected. 

Treasurer — Officer Paul Zgraggen. 

Sergeant-at-arms — Officer Robert A. Davis. 

During the past year, under the direction of Officer 



about better conditions for the public and for the men 
serving with the Police Department. 

Sergeant Erickson has proven his courage and his 
ability as a police officer for back in May last year through 
his fast thinking and high bravery got a band of kid- 
napers and robbers, though he was seriously shot in the 
abdomen, along with Patrolman Charles C. Fowlie, who 
was hit in the neck and shoulder by bullets from one 
of the bandit gang. 



SPORTS CLUB 




Sergeant James Erickson 

Evan James the Association made great progress in car- 
rying out the ideals upon which it was founded. 

The member ssponsored the first baseball meet between 
teams from the Police Department and the Fire Depart- 
ment, and over $12,000 was realised for taking care of 
needy children during the Christmas season. 

The association also pioneered and backed successfully 
the passage of the charter amendment that provided 
better pensions for the members of the Police Department 
which carried by a big majority vote at last November 
election. 

More members of the Department have joined the 
Association and under Sergeant Erickson it is an. assured 
fact that the organisation will continue to grow and bring 

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Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



PISTOL POINTING 



By J. ROSS DUNNIGAN 



The San Francisco Monthly Matches 

On the official summary sheets for the matches at the 
Lake Merced range it was noted that the weather forecast 
was indicated with the condition of the weather as "clear 
and cold." What a liar!! It was clear all right, but that 
"cold" stuff was a bit of understatement as it was freez- 
ing. Then, to quote again, "Wind direction north-east; 
Wind velocity 25 miles per hour." The guy who took 
those weather observations was near sighted, had high 
blood pressure and didn't know anything about weather 
at all. The wind blew right across the field and in the 
process swerved every arm in the place over to the right 
for a mess of nice 5's and 6's. And that estimate of 25 
miles an hour would prompt us to tell the guy to have 
his air recording machine oiled and greased and thorough- 
ly overhauled — if that wind was less than 40 miles an 
hour we'll — er — well we would if we were wrong! But 
in spite of the so called cold weather there were 185 
sturdy shooters braved the weather and were well satis- 
fied with the day's matches. Now that we can expect our 
cold spell to be with us for the next three or four months 
we have the germ of a bright idea in that we are gonna 
ask the range management for the exclusive rights to a 
hot toddy stand on the grounds. If that wouldn't make 



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us a small fortune then we'll drink 'em all ourselves — 
and what a swell task that would be. Hie! 

When we saw Capt. Gaylen, McCabe, Calhoun and 
Bourdeau, of the Fresno-Bakersfield Highway Patrol, Sun- 
day we knew that they were on a mission of publicity 
and good will for the inaugural shoot on the new Bakers- 
field 50 target range. This shoot will be sponsored by 
the California State Rifle ii Pistol Association and the 
gala affair will be held May 7th and 8th. The boys at 
Bakersfield are planning a swell shindig for the shooters 
with a barbecue and grand get-to-gether at the end of 
the matches. Some of the gang have hijacked a couple 
of prize steers and set them to browsing on the daisys 
and clover (?) so that they will be in good shape to fill 
the inner souls of the contestants. They are hoping for 
a big turnout and promise a lot of swell prises. 
* * * 

That shootin' gang from Sacramento, Borneman, Nar- 
vaez, Steed, Weaver, Pettygrew, Farrelle, Atkinson, and 
Valentine, just about cleaned up on all the rest of the 
various clubs shooting in the good old USA for that 
United States Revolver Club championship. Borneman 
took first place in the national rapid-fire aggregate and 
third place in the slow-fire grand aggregate and took a 



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February March, 194') 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2i 



place in all the other eight matches — in fact all the boys 
from up that way grabbed some kind of a medal. During 
January. February and March the U.S.R.A. is holding 
their indoor winter matches with teams from all over the 
country participating for first place. Later on in the year 
the outdoor matches will start so its just one grand round 
of shooting. Information can be obtained from the Secre- 
tary, Springfield, Mass. 

* * * 

The no alibi rule is in for some sort of an overhauling 
but to our way of thinking it ain't good. In the first 
place the .2 2 cartridges that are now being manufactured 
are having the boys up in arms as they claim talcum 
powder or something equally weak, is being used in- 
stead of gun powder with the inevitable results that a 
lot of 'em don't go off. So-o-o-o up comes some gents 
with the idea of cutting out the .22 matches or else 
establishing alibi's for factory loaded ammunition. Some 
ranges in the east are trying a new alibi scheme. Suppose 
you have gotten off two shots in the rapid-fire string and 
have a missfire losing the remaining three shots, then an 
alibi will be given you and you shoot the five shots on 
the same target, but here's the catch. You must take the 
five lowest of the seven shots on the target which some 
gents won't like. Anyhow, it might be tried in SF at a 
non-registered match and see how it works. 

Cine of the old time shooters, Carl Spiken of Oakland, 

gets a big laff out of the poor guys who get caught as 

members of the Siesta Club and has bragged that he has 

yet to get a membership — nor would he ever. Of course 

we never said a thing about his boating because we know 

that the law of averages would finally catch up with him 

and it did — thanks to Capt. Henry Jacobs of the Hiway 

Patrol. But the good captain was an unwitting helper. 

It seems that he and "Spike" were out in the back of the 

range trying to outsmart each other in a gun trade and 

both became so interested in the deal "Spike" missed the 

whole center-fire match. Nuff said. "Spike" gets his card. 
* * * 

Jack Ahern, Police Inspector of the SFPD, was enjoy- 
ing the shakes when some nice guy who had a bet on 
with him informed the hot-shot his kid just fell in the 
lake but not to. worry as he was pulled out, dried and 



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was playing again with the other kids. Just then Jack 
threw a 6 and followed it with a 7 and thus completely 
shot his score all to hell. Then during the Camp Perry 
match someone told Larry Kennedy, of the Olympic 
Club, that his kid was stranded out on the lake in a boat 
and couldn't get to shore. Poor Larry wasn't any good 

after that and threw 6's and 7's all the rest of the day. 

* * * 

Castor oil must have been the night-cap given to little 
Mike and Ann Boulton on Sunday — we bet. It seemed 
to us that every time we looked around these two young- 
sters (the family of Jane and Pete) were busily munching 

on doughnuts almost as big as they were. 

* * * 

And that new moustache (?) Charley Syme, one of 
the range officers is growing is really a honey but we 
fear that the cold spell must have set it back quite a bit. 
It hasn't grown much of late but Charley has high hopes 

of a lovely handlebar adornment in the spring. 

* * * 

We note that at the 77th Street Division's January 
matches, that's the Los Angeles police outfit, that 10 
out of 15 open medals were taken by Experts, including 
our pals Bruce Ketchum (ain't that a swell name for a 
police officer?) and Lew Gibbs of the Long Beach Police 
Department. What's the matter with the Masters? Off 
day—or day off? * * * 

We had a look at that target of Ken Kolks, the tall 
Highway Patrol boy from Soda Springs, and that double 
in the 9 ring at fifty yards was sure a diller and mighty 
close, too. The judges ruled that it was a double which 
gave Ken those extra points so badly needed by all shooters 
but it still wasn't enough to place him in the winners 

bracket. „ 

* * * 

That was sure a swell trophy that Gloria Norton won 
for her high aggregate scores for 1948. The Trophy was 
presented to the 1948 Pistol Champ of the police range 
by the Call-Bulletin and it turned out to be a woman! 
Were the boys burned? Can't say for sure but we notice 
that a lot more of 'em show up for practice more often 
than they used to. At the same time all the trophies and 
prizes were given out to the high aggregate scorers for 
the matches of July to December. 



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Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



SCORES 



.22 Rational Match 

Master Jack Ahern 293 

Expert Jack McCabe 287 

Sharpshooter Paul Nunriati 271 

Marksman 1st Don Mowery 269 



C. F. Jiational Match 
Henry Jacobs 288 

Bob Geiger 284 

Frank Lipoid 271 

Ray Fleetwood 261 



Marksman Bob McDermott 



246 Art Coleman 



250 



.22 Timed-Fire Match 

Master Gloria Norton 199 

Expert O. L. Jarman 198 

Sharpshooter Jack Gibson 191 



.45 Rational Match 
Ken Kolb 277 

Elliott Murphy 272 

Harry O'Dell 264 



Marksman 1st Ray Fleetwood 

Marksman Lloyd Suey 



176 Ed Preston 270 

176 Steve Bourdeau 272 



Camp Perry 


Match 


Elliott Murphy 




293 


Jack McCabe 




290 


Frank Lipoid 




283 


P. T. Menoher 




278 


Art Colemand 




267 


Aggregate 


Scores 




Jack Ahern 




1062 


Jack McCabe 




1051 


Frank Lipoid 




1012 


Don Mowery 




958 


L. Galven 




922 



Somehow or other we have the happy faculty of get- 
ting things all twisted and here we must tell you we forgot 
to tell you that Jack Ahern of the S. F. Police Depart- 
ment won this match with a score of 1063, Gloria Norton 
with a 105 9 and Bob Chow third with a 1053. Maybe 
Jack will repeat his wins of 1945 and 1946 during the 
coming year — anyhow he has the first match under his 
belt and only 9 more to go. 

We see by the local newssheets that Ed Klingerman 
was just elected sergeant-at-arms for the Association of 
San Francisco Police Reserves. 




Inspector John Ahern 

Team Scores 

Class A 

1st Place— S.F. Police Revolver Club Red Team 1157 

2nd Place— S.F. Police Team No. 1 1155 

3rd Place — California Highway Patrol 1138 

Class B 

1st Place — 4th Infantry Division, Fort Ord 1057 

2nd Place— S.F. Police Revolver Club Silver Team. ..1039 

3rd Place— Oakland Police Team No. 1 1037 

(Continued on page 62 ) 



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Walnut Creek, California 

(Contra Costa County) 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2* 



NORTH SACRAMENTO P. D. GETS BIGGER 



Chief W. F. (Bill) Wilson, who has been head of 
the North Sacramento Police Department going into his 
third year, has realized most of his hopes for putting his 
law enforcement agency into an up-to-date organization. 

Since he took over the management of the Police De- 
partment numerous changes have been introduced by 
Chief Wilson. Principal among these is the acquisition of 




Chief W. F. (Bill) Wilson 

new police headquarters. The small place on Del Paso 
Boulevard, which for years had been outgrown, has been 
replaced by a commodious building on a street running 
from the Boulevard. Then, too, he has had erected for 
his department a new city jail. It has two cells and 
larger accommodation for 15 or 20 misdemeanor prisoners. 

He now has the orders from the city council to install 
three-way radio to be used for the two police cars, the 
fire department and the Highway Patrol. This is quite 
a jump for Chief Wilson, for when he was made top 
man of the Department his force of five men had to 
depend on one way radio, channeled from the Sacra- 
mento Police Department. Then he and his officers con- 
ducted a money raising campaign and got enough money 
to install a two way radio station, now the city fathers, 
seeing what improvement two way radio did for their 
town, have made available funds for the more modern 
form of radio communication, that of from station to 
men, men to station and men to men. 

Chief Wilson has added two men to his force and in 
addition a matron, in the person of Loran Greenleaf. 
This gives him a personnel of eight. 

North Sacramento now has a private patrol system, and 
the project was fathered by Chief Wilson who maintains 
control over the appointment and work of the men 
seeking this work. 

Chief Wilson has been a member of the North Sacra- 
mento Police Department for nearly 12 years, five of 



which he was assistant Chief before being made Chief, 
has seen his city grow to its present estimated 5500, and 
with over 50,000 people living adjacent to the city limits. 
He has seen the establishment of a freeway around the 
town's outer edges, yet the automobile traffic on Del Paso 
Boulevard has not slackened too much. However, it has 
lessened accidents in the city limits, for in a year and a 
half there were no one killed in a traffic mishap. The 
lighting of the Boulevard with vapor lamps has had 
something to do with this fortunate condition. Then, too, 
strict law enforcement of traffic laws has had a lot to do 
with the reduction of accidents. 

The Chief points out through his records, which are 
a standard FBI system, that robberies and burglaries and 
assaults are less for the year of 1948 than they were for 
the preceding 12 months. They were all cleared by ar- 
rests and convictions. One murder was committed during 
last year and that was solved by the murdered commit- 
ting suicide. 

I here is no juvenile delinquency problem in North 
Sacramento. 

I he city is continuing its building boom, and there is 
a scarcity of lots for putting up more homes. The first 
armory of the State National Guard has been constructed 
near the city hall, and the Fire Department is in a fine 
building, housing the most modern equipment. 

\ ou will not find any police department working to 
carry out its responsibilities with more enthusiasm and 
ability than the members of Chief Wilson's' force. He 
gives particular credit to Assistant Chief Percy Gassoway, 
who has been a member of the Department for the past 
five years. 



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AUBURN BOULEVARD 



NO. SACRAMENTO. CALIF. 



Acme Pipe and Highway Machinery Co. 

J. S. STEINBERG 

PIPE AND MACHINERY OF ALL KINDS 

1501 East Camino Ave. Phone: 9-3076 



NORTH SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE DIAMOND MATCH COMPANY 

FRED N. BENTON Manager 
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 



Phone 6-4703 



2826 Q Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February - March, J 949 



GRASS VALLEY, "GATEWAY TO THE SIERRAS" 



The City of Grass Valley is called the "Gateway To several FBI Sch 



Inch included ringer printing and 



The Sierras" which is just above the fog and just helow 
the snow. It is noted for its excellent climate, set in the 
Pines fifty-five miles north of Sacramento. 

Grass Valley is noted for its mining. 

Gold quarts being discovered here in 1849. Some of 



lOOls, whic 
Investigation. 

The Police Department has a two-way radio equipped 
patrol car and a servi-car to patrol the parking meters. 

At the present time Chief Knuckey has a group of 
officers who are all well trained in law enforcement work. 




GRASS VALLEY POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Left to Right— Officer P. R. Keener, Assistant Chief Wm. H. Stnck. Officer L. A. Williams, Chief F. E. Kuclcey. Officer Win J. 
Sproul. R. L. Penrose, J. R. Davis and Traffic Officer Geo. F. De Soto. Officer H. R. Townsend is not in the picture. 



the great gold mines are the Idaho Maryland Mine and 
the Empire Star Mine. The Empire Star Mine has been 
in operation continuously since 1849. 

The City is also surrounded by saw mills, an industry 
that has helped Grass Valley considerably. 

The population of the City of Grass Valley is approxi- 
mately 9,000 inside the city limits and 3,000 people re- 
siding in the surrounding area. 

The Grass Valley Police Department was organized 
into a uniform department in 1 93 7. Since this time the 
department has grown from six to nine men, including 
the Chief. 

Chief F. E. Knuckey took over the executive position 
as Chief of Police in March, 1947. 

Chief Knuckey was born and raised in the City of 
Grass Valley, and has been a member of the Police De- 
partment since January, 1939. 

In 1942 the Chief left the department to go to work 
in a defense plant in the Bay Area. Here he worked 
until the end of World War II and then returned to the 
Grass Valley Police Department. 

Soon after his return he was appointed Assistant Chief 
of Police Ben Jenkins, holding this position until he was 
appointed Chief in 1947. Chief Knuckey has attended 



having attended schools in law enforcement at different 
times. 

Assistant Chief Wm. H. Stnck is in charge of the 
records in the department, having taken a course in finger 
printing he classifies and files the finger prints. 

The department has its own developing room, of which 
Officer Penrose is in charge. All pictures are taken by 
the department and developed. 

All officers are given a detail by the Chief of Police in 
order to keep things running smoothly in the department 
such as accident reports, keeping rearms clean, care qf 
patrol car, etc. 

The Grass Valley Police Department is made up of the 
following men : Chief Knuckey, Assistant Chief Strick, 
Patrolmen Wm. J. Sproul, J. R. Davis, R. F. Penrose, 
H. R. Townsend, L. A. Williams. P. R. Keener, and 
Traffic Officer Geo. F. DeSoto. 

MAURICE E. WITTING 

101 Brockington Court Phone S19-J 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

HUGHES INN 

AND CAFE 

BEER • WINE • MIXED DRINKS • GOOD FOOD 

Phone 770 H'lls Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



February- March, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 27 



P. 0. BOX 158 Phone II90-J 

C. W. BRIGGS - Distributor BEVARD & SON 

NORWALK GASOLINE • MOTOR OILS ROAD ROCK • BUILDING ROCK 

WHOLESALE TIRES • BATTERIES • HEATING OILS SAND AND GRAVEL 

Delivered by Metered Trucks TRANSIT MIX A SPECIALTY 

r „ Jts .... . 4, G3 S ' Auburn Street Phone 412 _ A , ,,._,_ Patrick's Court, North Church Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA GRASS VALLEy CALIFORNIA 



UNION ICE DELIVERY Hooper & Weaver Mortuary? Inc . 

Distributors for AMBULANCESERVICE 

COCA-COLA • ACME BEER • SEVEN-UP 



Office: 208 N. Auburn Street Phone 112 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

SIERRA FEED STORE 



Telephone 3S4 246 So. Church Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

CLUB CAFE 

BEER - WINE - COCKTAILS 



LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY FEEDS 202 w . Main ph(me 53 

ZALBRITE BRANDS EXCLUSIVELY 



Hills Flat Phone 490-J 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Markell Motors and Farm Supply 



CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



EMPIRE HOTEL 

JOHN MARIN 



BEER • WINES • LIQUORS 
GEORGE MARKELL. Owner HOME COOKED SPANISH DINNERS 



Telephone 1072 S3S Mill Street 



USED CARS • REPAIRING • TIRES • ACCESSORIES 

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES • J. I. CASE FARM EQUIPMENT 

Til. »<• «7 a, i j •> j GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 383-W Maryland Road 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA — 



BUD BRAUNLICH 



ELDRIDGE'S LITTLE PLUMBER Town Talk Grocery and Service Station 

BEER AND WINE 
GAS - ELECTRIC APPLIANCES 

PIPES AND FITTINGS Fhone Nevada City 420 Route 1, Box 48S 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



135 Colfax Avenue 
GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

MACHINERY CENTER 
AjHlOiNb LK^JUOK blUKb mining and sawmill equipment 

SALES - SERVICE - INSTALLATION 
LIQUORS • WINES • BEER 

MIXERS AND SODAS 

Grass Valley 828 

302-A Main Street Phone 482-W GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



CUSTOM PLANING - LUMBER - BUILDING MATERIALS 

WINDOWS AND FRAMES 

Compliments of 

JOHN F. FITZPATRICK MILLSCRAFT WOODWORK 

, ,, ,i, . »* ■ c. Star Route, Box 13-B Phone 60-J-ll 

11. West Ma.n Street GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Olympia Truck and Tractor Service 
N. F. THOMPSON 

Complete AUTO - TRUCK - TRACTOR REPAIRING 
PLUMBING AND HEATING LINE BORING - CYLINDER REBORING 

PROMPT SERVICE AND GUARANTEED WORK „, „, „ 

Phone 1310-W; Res. Phone 1227-J 

Nevada City Highway 
240 Mill Street Phone 652 GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL FOOD STORE 



SERVICE GARAGE leland kan 

FRANK LYSTRUP. Prop. "Your Complete Shopping Stop" 

TIRES AND TUBES - BATTERY SERVICE OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS 

Complete Automotive Service „.„ _ , Ct til , rt . 

Phone 782-W Pine and Spring Street 319 Broad Slreet Telephone 101 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Page 28 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL February March, J 949 



"Beautify Your Home" 

GRASS VALLEY RADIO SERVICE Imperial Upholstery and Refinishing Shop 

NOTHING TO SELL BUT SERVICE FANCY UPH OLSTERING A SPECIALTY 

FREE ESTIMATES 
135 So. Church Phone 1032 

313 E. Main Street Telephone 825 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA ^RASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY ROCK AND SAND TORE T? A ^ R fA R pRODu E cT V " UPS,, 

AT YOUR SERVICE 

117 E. Bank Street Telephone 1162-W 

136'/ 2 Bennett Street Phone G.V. 1366-J 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



TurcAX oadvptc KECKLER'S ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

^ ILE MCA 1 JVIAKJVE 1 5 LUBRICATION - WASHING - POLISHING 

STEAM CLEANING 

FOR SERVICE CALL GRASS VALLEY 721 
NEVADA CITY, CALIF. GRASS VALLEY, CALIF. 

Auburn and Bank Streets 
Phone 176 Phone 73-W GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



R O A R K ' S SIERRA MOTOR SERVICE 

•THE FAIR AND FRIENDLY STORE" DAL EB AUGH. Prop. 

NEW AND USED FURNITURE .im, DrPAin cwvtrr 

Miscellaneous Items Bought and Sold AUTO REPAIR SERVICE 

ANTIQUES 

_. ,__ , ,, „ i c. 403 Auburn Street Phone 254 

Phone 136 111 Bank Street 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Phone 79-J-3 Star Route. Box 30A 

MOUNTAINS^™ REAL VACATION CASEY'S RESTAURANT 



Lawton's Adobe Village Motel 



for 



just a little CHARCOAL BROILED STEAKS 

DIFFERENT 

202 Mill 



Two Miles West of CRASS VALLEY. CALIFORNIA ■ Highway 20 
Phone 1198-R WATT PARK 



LESLIE & ETNA ELLIOTT 



CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



HESLA ROOFING SERVICE 

ROY HELSA 



Breeders of WHEREVER YOU LOOK 

CHIN CHIN GIANT CHINCHILLAS YOU SEE A HELSA ROOF 



P. O. Box 784 
GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

A. ROSSI MARIO GENTILI 

CENTRAL MOTOR CO. 

DE SOTO - PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 372 Hills Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

SALES — FORD — SERVICE 



660 So. Auburn Street Phone 626 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

HOOVER BROS. 

MOBIL SERVICE 
Phone G.V. 1196-W 

Corner Alta Street and Ridge Road 
CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



HELBACH MOTORS GREENHORN ROCK AND SAND 

FORD'S OUT IN FRONT G B - V0LLMER 

AAA SERVICE ROCK, SAND AND GRAVEL 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 



Phone 400 Hills Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

PEASE'S BAKERY 

Phone N. C. 683-W 



P. O. Box 208 Telephone 15- J 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

DUFFY'S SUCCESS CAFE 

"THE BEST IN BAKERY PRODUCTS" TASTY F ° A gf E t ^TED DR ' NKS 

Wholesale and Retail 309 Broad Street Phone 280 

NEVADA CITY (Crass Valley Hwy). CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



February March, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 29 



ALVAH HOOPER LARRY MYERS INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE PHOTOS 

24-Hour Photo Finishing 

MYERS' GRASS VALLEY MORTUARY SIERRA PHOTO SERVICE 

CORONER'S OFFICE • AMBULANCE STRVICE PORTRAIT AND COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 

Specializing in Children's Photos 

150 So. Auburn Street Telephone 56 nl _ . , or - n» »« . *? u ■ c- 

K Phone 1185-W 214 E. Main Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



roPHDirvcAM ddac NEVADA CITY AIRPORT 

FREDRICKSON BROS. thomas r bowles 

STUDENT INSTRUCTION 
AIRPLANE FARM SERVICES 
Phone HUmboIdt 3-6421 1259 65th Street 

Selby Flat Phone 25-F-21 

EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY MEAT CO. T^^P^oh^S 

Your Hosts: GEN and FLORENCE GOOCH 
BEEF - PORK - VEAL - LAMB 

SCENIC BEAUTY and RESTFUL ATMOSPHERE 

"Among the Tall Pines" 

Country Road Phone 976 ^^ ukiah Hwy 2Q phone N£ ^^ 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



RICHARD M. KNEE JAMES E. McMAHAN 
. _ . _ _ __ T „_ *^*» . « ^-, « Electrician Radio Serviceman 

GRASS VALLEY FLORAL CO. 

On the Grass Vaiiey -Nevada City Highway NEVADA CITY RADIO ELECTRIC 

ROBERT D. KERR. Owner 

RADIOS - APPLIANCES - WIRING SUPPLIES 
"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

413 Broad Street Telephone 387-R 

Phone 1141-J P. O. Box 1021 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY FLYING SERVICE Gold Flat Truck and Tractor Service 

GILMORE FIELD 
STUDENT INSTRUCTION - AIR TAXI SERVICE Lower Grass Valley Road 

AIRCRAFT RENTAL - AERONCA AIRCRAFT 

SALES AND SERVICE Phone N.C. 784-W 

P.O. Box 1109 GEORGE ENDTER Phon e 1066 NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 

Hours: 9 A.M. to 7 P.M. Saturday: 10 to 12 

DR. A. E. MOTT, D. C. 
GLISAN'S FROZEN FOOD LOCKERS 

p n R„» ia7 CHIROPRACTIC HEALTH SERVICE 

r. u. box 14Z PHYSIOTHERAPY - X-RAY - COLON THERAPY 

URINE AND BLOOD ANALYSIS 

Telephone 690 Bank Street phone: ^^ Qty ?90W 432 g pjne street 
CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



HILE'S - WILLYS Sales and Service NEVADA CITY FEED AND FUEL 

POULTRY - DAIRY FEEDS AND SUPPLIES 
WILLYS JEEPS, CARS AND TRUCKS 

Distributors for 

Office Phone: 970 COORS AND BUFFALO BEERS 
Corner of Auburn and Whiting Streets 20 , £ Spring phon( , 562J 
GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 

George Brothers Automobile Company 5 - MILE HOUSE 

° MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL FAYNIK, Owners 

DODGE - PLYMOUTH - DODGE TRUCKS CABINS 

AUTOMOTIVE PARTS 

FINE FOODS • REFRESHMENTS • MODERN CABINS 
East Main 

HIGHWAY 20. EAST OF NEVADA CITY 
CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



McINTIRE & RUSSELL CHARLES' ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

MOTOR TUNE-UP - BRAKE SERVICE AUTO REPAIRING :-: GROCERIES 

GENERAL REPAIRS 

1 Mile North (Take Ukiah Highway) Phone 454 

NEVADA CITY HWY. N. C. Ph. 668 NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



Febr 



■March, J 949 



In Nevada City Crime Decreases 



Nevada City the county seat of Nevada County is a 
pioneer city and has always been the center of gold min- 
ing. Millions of dollars have been brought from ore veins 
under the rolling hills of the community. 

Nevada City has an estimated population of 4000, and 
during the summer months this number is greatly increased 




*£s 



Chief Solaros' Force of Grass Valley Police Department — Left to 
Right — Clyde Garwood, J. J. Jackson and Clarence Marty. 

for it is the center of a popular area for those who like 
the great outdoors. 

During its nearly a century of history it has had its 
share of crimes common to smaller towns and cities, but 
the records will show that the men charged with enforcing 
the laws have done their part in keeping crime down in 



Nevada City and apprehending those who committed 
them. Like all Police Departments, the men who serve this 
prosperous little municipality possess the courage that is 
so prevalent throughout California. In the past 20 years 
two men have paid with their lives in their work of pro- 
tecting the law abiding. 

Nevada City has never had a big department, and 
today it numbers but four men, with Max A. Solaro, 
Chief, and Officers J. J. Jackson, Clyde Garwood and 
Clarence Marty. All are veteran and experienced 
policemen. 

Chief Solaro was appointed to head the Police Depart- 
ment ten years ago, succeeding W. H. Robson, who had 
served for ten years. 

Violations of the law have been definitely on the de- 
crease in Nevada City, though Chief Solaro and his men 
have been mighty active in stopping traffic in narcotics. 

The department has two-way radio, which was installed 
soon after Chief Solaro took over. 

In 1947 traffic handling was simplified by the installa- 
tion of parking meters. 

The Department is also equipped with gas guns and 
other apparatus necessary for the enforcement of the law. 

The Police Department is located in the modern City 
Hall, erected in 1937, and the business of the agency is 
conducted in a manner that would do credit to Depart- 
ments of much larger cities. 

Chief Solaro says the reason crime is low in his city is 
that the people who make up the population, including 
merchants, organisations and private citizens generally 
work in the closest cooperation with the Police De- 
partment. 



LAFAYETTE PET SHOP 

PET SUPPLIES • FRESH HORSE MEAT 

Telephone Lafayette 2452 
144 Mt. Diablo Boulevard 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 






HOMER ALLEN, Drugs 

Phone 8 



102 Central Avenue 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Bill Kaufer 



GEO. SUHR 



MOTOR CLINIC 

Specializing in 

CARBURETOR • TUNE-UP 

BRAKE SERVICE 

Phone 2-0323 1829 17th Street 



SACRAMENTO 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN'S GRILL & OYSTER PARLOR 

GOOD STEAKS ON THE DINNER AND A LA CARTE 

. . . Served With a Sharp Steak Knife . . . 

Ask for One — Something New. 



W. J. and G. Kenneth Girard 
63 Ellis Etreet, Next to Flood Bldg. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



February- March, 1 949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 11 



TWIN CITY GRAVEL HOLMES FUNERAL HOME 

AGGREGATES - CRUSLED ROCK - EXCAVATING - SAND >■ PAUL ECRGEMANN. Owner 

GRAVEL - FILL - ROAD BUILDING 



PLANT 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 



24S Sacramento Street Telephone 203 



242'j NEVADA ST.. NEVADA CITY TOWN TALK. NEVADA CITY 

ELMER FISCHER. Proprietor Telephone . Nevada City 74 NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



FAMILY OR HOME 
McCALL PATTERNS WILLIAM HOME 

SAVEMORE VARIETY men s shop 

312 Broad Street Phone 512 Phone 146 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFOPvNI-' 



McCLISH'S ELECTRIC SERVICE „ iDDK nDIir cxr . D „ 

Licensed Electrical Contractor MAKKlj U-KUlj O 1 VJlvti 

Specializing in Charles P. ELLIUTT 

RESIDENTIAL, INDUSTRIAL AND 
COMMERCIAL WIRING 

Phone 100 

Phone 309 Box 592 .„...._, ,-i-rv <-ai i mDK ii, 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Nevada City Upholstering Shop FOOTE'S LIQUOR STORE 

CARL F00TE 

UPHOLSTERING SERVICE THE F1NEST LIQUORS - WINE - BEER 

nc ... v , vr .<; TOBACCOS - HORS D'OEUVRES 

ur all R.1INL.S SPORTSMAN'S HEADQUARTERS 

230' ', Commercial Phone 781-J 310 Broad Street Phone N.C. 574 or 338-J 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORN' - NEVADA CITY CAL 



FRANCIS 0. KUNTZ CHAS. BAKER 



Compliments 



OLD BREWERY INN j CARTOSCELLI DISTRIBUTING CO. 



COCKTAIL BAR 

STEAK - CHICKEN DINNERS 

DANCING FRIDAY - SATURDAY - SUNDAY 



Distributor of 



Hunting-Fishing Information REGAL PALE BEER 



107 Sacramento Street Phone 89 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



for 

NEVADA and SIERRA CO. 



GOLD CENTER CLUB U. S. N. JOHNSON 

BRET HARTE DAIRY 



COCKTAILS • BEER • DANCING NIGHTLY 
GRASS VALLEY-NEVADA CITY HIGHWAY. CALIFORNIA 

Phone Grass Valley 9 
H. STEINNOFF S. R. DAHL 



Nine Years of State Fair Medals 

Phone 77 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Headley's Garage and Service Station RAMSEY'S COCKTAIL BAR 



Official A. A. A. Towing Service 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRING 



VERNE and SC0TTY 



Phone N.C. 34 



Day Phone 271 Night Phone 707-J 

NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 

BERYL ROBINSON BROCK'S MOTEL 

RICHFIELD PRODUCTS NEW MODERN ROOMS • TILE BATHS 

WASHING • POLISHING • EXPERT LUBRICATION 

PHONE N.C. 485 FOR RESERVATIONS 

Phone 502 Post Office Box 293 

Nevada City Highway 
NEVADA CITY Sacramento Street ,...,t«„ m ,. NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



DON & BILL'S SERVICE 
TED'S MARKET tune-up and brake work 

UNION OIL PRODUCTS AND SERVICE 
Valley & Sacramento Sts. Phone 19 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



ALPHA HARDWARE CO. 

Stores at 
NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA 
GRASS VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 

KEYSTONE MARKET 

DAVE RICHARDS. Prop. 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL BUTCHERS 



NEW ERA CLUB 



FIRST CLASS POOL TABLES - CLUB ROOM 
AND HIGHEST GRADE LIQUORS SERVED 



t.2 1 H STREET 



MODESTO. CALIF. 



213 Commercial 



Phone 67 



NEVADA CITY 



CALIFORNIA 



BEER — the BEST — Plenty of it — and ICE COLD 

PARK CAFE 

WINE - BEER - LUNCHES - SANDWICHES 
CIGARS - CANDY - TOBACCO - CIGARETTES 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Pedretti, Props. 

734 Yosemite Avenue Phone 4121 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES - INCOME TAX SERVICE 

JOSEPH DAY & SON 

INSURANCE, All Kinds, including LIFE, REAL ESTATE AND 

Phone 286 108 North Pine Street 

NEVADA CITY CALIFORNIA 



>--». 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKDALE CAFE 

EVERY MEAL A PLEASANT MFMORY 
FULLY AIR CONDITIONED 



Telephone 4011 



OAKDALE 



CAL1FORN1/ 



LIVE OAK INN 

North Gate to Yosemite 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Timbrell, Managers 

Telephone 651 1 



First Class Work and 
SERVICE GUARANTEED 

Nevada City Home Laundry 

240 BOULDER STREET 
Phone 491 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



COSLET'S TRUCKING 



Phone 7281 



410 Th-'rd Avenue 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



Oren Martin 



Ray Wilkerson 



OAKDALE FARM SUPPLY 



GROCERIES 



HARDWARE 



Minneapolis Moline Agency - Earth Master Farm Implements 
FERTILIZER 



1607 F Street 

OAKDALE 



Phone 6131 



P. O. Box 722 

CALIFORNIA 



MEISSEN'S GARAGE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR 
Sixth and F Streets Phone 5011 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



THOMAS GROCERY 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 

FROZEN FOODS 

225 Colfax Ave. Phone 964 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



PARTRIDGE MOTORS 




NEW 
USED 



AND 
CARS 



205 So. Auburn Street 

GRASS VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 988 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 



33 



SHERIFF HOSKINS 

I Continued from page I 3 ) 

ley Police Departments and the Highway Patrol. 

The station was put into operation on March 1, 1948 
and up to December 1 of last year had logged 14,618 
calls — the breakdown as follows: 

Sheriff's Office, 6,188. 

Nevada City Police Department, 1,93V. 

Grass Valley Police Department, 2,605. 

Highway Patrol, 2,995. 

Sheriff Hoskins also has a volunteer ski patrol, out of 
Truckee, which is available to anyone who cares to call 
upon him. These skiers are equipped with toboggan skis, 
snow shoes, stretchers, first-aid kits, portable lights and pro- 
visions are about completed for walkie talkie. This service 
is indeed one that will do a great good in the heavy snow 
areas of the county and adjacent territory. 

He also has a mounted posse,, numbering 32 skilled 
horsemen recruits from Nevada City and vicinity. 

An air posse is now being formed and will be as valuable 
as many other such possess throughout California. 

During the present meeting of the legislature Sheriff 
Hoskins expects to be cut in on the state teletype system. 
Also he will join the statewide radio hookup that is being 
completed. 

The force of the Sheriff's office now has six men, includ- 



SLATER ELECTRIC 

CONTRACTING SUPPLIES 



GRASS VALLEY 



147 So. Auburn 



Phone 733-M 



CALIFORNIA 



O. K. POOL HALL 

GRICH and HARRIS 



Phone G.V. 397 
GRASS VALLEY 



213 West Main St. 



CALIFORNIA 



BROWN'S FUEL CO. 



WAYNE BROWN. Owner 

DISTRIBUTOR UNION OIL PRODUCTS 

149 Park Ave. Phone 476 

CRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 



HOME OWNED - HOME OPERATED 

Over 50 Years in the Same Location 

104 E. Main Street Phone 22 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



"DICK" HEATHER 



■PETE" HENRIKSEN 



PARK VIEW MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • NOTIONS 

Ophir St. by Memorial Park Phone 4S4 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

HOME OWNED 



Compliments of 

F. T. BASTIAN AND SONS 

KENDALL COURT 



GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



SHERMAN'S MARKET 

MEATS • VEGETABLES • FRUITS • GROCERIES 



GRASS VALLEY 



323 Alta Street 



Phone 79S 



CALIFORNIA 



CLIFF SHEPHERD'S PAINT STORE 

FEATURING A COMPLETE LINE OF 

DUNNE PAINTS 

116 E. Main Street Phone 455 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



FRED A. EMERY. Prop. 



Phone 973 



ALTA HILL GARAGE 



GENERAL REPAIRING 

Wheel Alignment • Steam Cleaning • WELDING 

WHEEL BALANCING 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

LOEWEN CABINET SHOP 

CABINETS MADE TO ORDER 

Screens, Cupboard Doors and Drawers, Etc. 

Builders Hardware, Sash and Doors 

Phone S90-R 387 Mill Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

ARCH'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

ARCH BROOKS. Prop. 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Phone 477 Hills Flat 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



NOB HILL GROCERY 

W. F. ARGALL 

Phone 617 110 High Street 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

GRASS VALLEY MACHINERY CO. 

TRUCK REPAIR • AUTOS • FARM EQUIPMENT 

WELDING AND MACHINE WORK 

Marysville Hwy. Phone 67-J-l 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



BILL PITMAN 

SHELL SERVICE 
Phone 824 Main and Bennett Streets 



CRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



GRASS VALLEY LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANERS 

111 Bennett Street Phone 108 

GRASS V ALLEY CALIFORNIA 

SIEMANN'S SAW SERVICE 

MALL CHAIN SAWS EXCLUSIVELY 

452 Mill Street Phones: 1162-J, 1255-R 
GRASS V ALLEY CALIFORNIA 

LEE'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINE 

134-A Walker Dr. Phone 71-J-l 

GRASS VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



W. D. VALDON 



421 So. Auburn Street 
GRASS VALLEY 



Phone 167 



CALIFORNIA 



JOE'S PLACE 

THE FINEST WINES AND LIQUORS 
OFF SALE - ON SALE 
Phone 1119 153 Mill Street 

GRASS VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIS F. LYNN, Construction 



LESLIE'S TAVERN 



Telephone BErkeley 7-6044 1040 Folger Avenue 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



Vacaville, California 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



ing Sheriff Hoskins. The others arc : 

Undersheriff Otis Hardt. 

Chief Deputy Arthur Pepper. 

Deputies Percy Watters, Floyd Ponds, John Blackburn 
and Foster Wilson. 

During the past 36 years the following have served as 
Sheriff of Nevada County. 

Henry Walker, eight years. 

John R. Martin, four years. 

Garfield Robinson, four years. 

George Carter, eight years. 

Carl Tobiassen, 12 years. 



Rough and Ready Hand 
Weavers 

HAND WOVEN FABRICS IN WOOL, 

LINEN, COTTON, SILK, RUGS 

LOOMS MADE TO ORDER 

Phone Grass Valley 79R1 
Rough and Ready, California 



GRIZZLY 

CREEK 
SAWMILL 



Nevada City, 
California 



THE HOB NOB 

THE BEST IN 
FOOD AND DRINKS 



311 Broad Street 



NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone N. C. 508 



RIDING 

FISHING 

HUNTING 

NATIONAL HOTEL AND 
COFFEE SHOP 

Floyd Le Febyre, Manager 



211 Broad Street 

NEVADA CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2 

"In The Historic Mother Lode Country" 



Februcirv - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



S N R A 
LUMBER 

COMPANY 

Phone 9659 



Call on us for 
Your Building Needs 



Mono Highway 
SONORA, CALIFORNIA 



MILLER & JACKSON 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



We Handle Only the Best Goods 

Make the Right Prices 

Right All Wrongs 

TRY US AND 
BE CONVINCED 

You Will Profit 
By Trading Here 



MILLER 8C JACKSON 
Courtland, California 



Herman Hubbs 



James D. Hadley 



SIERRA 
MOTOR SALES 

P N T I A C 

G.M. C. 

F R I G I D A I R E 



Phone 6771 

Fourth and F Streets 
OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 



« 
Telephone 7431 Home Phone 8061 


OAKDALE 


POULTRY 


COMPANY 


a 




D. PETRONI, Owner 


Sierra Avenue 8C G Street 


OAKDALE, CALIFORNIA 

.....---.----■.----.......-... -.-4 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



SAUSALITO 

SHIPBUILDING 

COMPANY 

Ernest Collins 

BARGES 

WORK BOATS 

FISH BOATS 

REPAIRS 



1702 Bridge way Blvd. 

Sausalito, California 

Sausalito 70 



Compliments 

of 

MARY BRAZIL 



M AI S N 
MARIN 

FRENCH-AMERICAN 
CUISINE 

E. R. Nusele, Mgr. 



Only 26 Miles North of 
San Francisco on 101 Highway 

Novato, California 

Telephone Novato 108-M 






T I 



Le CHATEAU 

Three Miles North of San Rafael 
On 101 Highway 

Southern Dinners 
Short Orders 

Music 
Mixed Drinks 

Phone San Rafael 845 

A place where the sportsman always receives a 

hearty welcome regardless of how he is dressed. 

Get the habit of stopping in on your way 

North or South 

"Cliff Cox Thanks You" 



Febi 



■March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



MARIN COUNTY PEACE OFFICERS 

( Continued from page 8) 

tion as the latter and other past presidents have produced 
during the ten years history of the organization. 

He thanked J. Mansfield Lewis, chief radio technician 
for the county, who had charge of the tenth annual meet- 
ing, and to all others who had contributed to the success 
of the occasion. Also for the work of the Association's 
members for their accomplishments for getting funds for 
fighting polio. Last year over $27,000 was raised by the 
Association during the March of Dimes campaign, which 
was handled by Chief Frank Kelly as chairman of the 
campaign committee. The chair reappointed Chief Kelly 
for the present year and included Sheriff Walter Sellmer 
and every Chief of Police in the county as committee 
members. 

Warden Duffy responded to a call for some remarks 
and he thanked all members for the cooperation extended 
in this affair, particularly to Thomas Cheetham, and his 
request for some recognition for the cooks and waiters 
who prepared the dinner, drew prolonged applause from 
every guest. 

With the speechmaking concluded a vaudeville show, 
in which the San Quentin Orchestra was a feature 
throughout, was put on the stage. This writer, who has 
been in the newspaper business for over 50 years, and 
who during his career has "covered" many shows of the 
old days, can truthfully say the acts shown on the night 



DEER PARK VILLA 

JOE AND ANTOINETTE GHIRINGHELLI 
One-half Mile from Fairfax 

Phone San Anselmo 3166 

Fairfax, California 

(Marin County) 



Phone S. R. 1412 



Res. Phone 5-W 



San Rafael Glass Works 

Anna Lamperti 
"GLASS FOR ALL PURPOSES" 

Window - Plate - Obscure - Mirror - Wire Glass 

Furniture Tops Made to Order 

Safety Automobile Glass 

Estimates Given Building Contractors- 
Ill 5 Third Street SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 



BORDEN'S 

DAIRY DELIVERY 

COMPANY 


6 


San Rafael, California 



TIBURON- 

BELVEDERE 

LAUNDRY 

Phone: Geneva 5-4545 

Belvedere, California 

(Marin County) 



-4 
-1 



Robert Espagnolle 



Phone 700 



SAUSALITO 

DRY CLEANING 

WORKS 

218 Caledonia Street 

Sausalito, California 



BLUE ROCK HOTEL 

LOUIES, ERNEST, LARRY BROUSSAL, Owners 
Famous for its 

Dinners - Banquets - Cocktails 



Phone Larkspur 400 
Larkspur, California 



>. ..... ■ 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



Febci 



■-March, 1949 



of January 11 by Warden Duffy's wards, excelled in 
many instances anything presented on the Old Orpheum 
of the vaudeville days long passed. 

A tumbling team that produced stunts no one has 
ever seen before, and with no mats to ease their falls. 

Soloist, quartets and choir gave numbers that would 
be tops on any program past or present. 

There was a Negro drummer in the orchestra who 
could match the drummer of any band or orchestra one 
might name, and, boy, could he give out with a song. 
The orchestra leader and master of ceremonies was equal 
to the best in or out of prison. 

And for comedians they had a couple of acts that 
would have been headliners in any vaudeville show of 
the yesteryear. 

There wasn't an act that the audience didn't call for 
more and if their desires could have been satiated it 
would have been well after noon the day following until 
the meeting would have been broken up. It was a show 
of that excellency, and made one wonder why vaudeville 
can't come back. 

They had a drunk character act and the guy that 
presented this feature excelled anything this writer has 
ever seen on any stage, and his patter was clean and 
mighty funny. 

Yes sir, we believe if Warden Duffy could take the 
show presented at the tenth annual installation meeting 



SUEY KEE 8C CO. 

GROCERIES, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, MEATS 
FISH AND POULTRY 



Phone M. V. 1144 

MILL VALLEY 



41-3 Throckmorton Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



Local and Long Distance Moving - Packing. Crating and Shipping 



ALLIED AGENCY 



DOWD'S Moving and Storage 

Pickup and Delivery Service of Household Goods 

Twice Weekly Between Marin and San Francisco 

FULLY INSURED 



Phone MV 203 



157 Throckmorton 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



THE BROTHERS 

LIQUOR STORE AND TAVERN 



6-8 Locust Ave. 



Phone 1578 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



PASTIME CLUB 



Tamalpais Junction Phone M. V. 396-J 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



Mill Valley Hand French Laundry 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Thiel, Proprietors 
ALL WEARING APPAREL HAND FINISHED 



TAMALPAIS MOTOR SALES 

FORD 
SELECT USED CARS 

Telephone M. V. 610-611 

East Blithedale & Sycamore Avenue 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 



2 A.M. CLUB 

Phone 82 
BILL - BRES - FRANCES GREYERBIEHL 

MILL VALLEY 



138 E. Blithedale Ave. 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



S. F. Elkins, Pres. 



Phone 259 



MILL VALLEY LUMBER CO. 

LUMBER • BUILDING MATERIALS • MILL WORK 
Celotex, Schumacher Wall Board, Pabco Shingles and Roofing 

DOORS - SASH - WINDOWS AND BUILT-IN 
FIXTURES CARRIED IN STOCK 



MILL VALLEY 



Mail or Phone Us Your Estimates 



CALIFORNIA 



BILL PEEBLES 

CALIFORNIA BUILDING SUPPLIES • HARDWARE • PLUMBING 
AND WIRING SUPPLIES • PAINTS 



TIBURON WYE MARKET 

GROCERIES - VEGETABLES - MEAT 

WINE - BEER 

LIQUOR OFF SALE 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



BENNETT'S BEN FRANKLIN STORE sausal.to 



Rt. 1, Box 82 Phone M. V. 1049W 

MILL VALLEY CALIFORNIA 

PARADISE CAFE 

MILL VALLEY. CALIFORNIA 



LINCOLN GARAGE 

STORAGE AND REPAIRS 
559 Bridgeway Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPLETE VARIETY MERCHANDISE 



MILL VALLEY 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN RAFAEL 



TACCHI BROS. 

Phone S. R. 36 
AUTO ELECTRIC SPECIALISTS 



CALIFORNIA 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



on the road he could bring vaudeville into its former 
popularity. 

If applause is the desired reward of all showpeople, 
and it is admitted it is, then the men who participated in 
the show for the Marin County Peace Officers, got the 
utmost in rewards from their delighted audience, who 
gave them a rousing round of applause as the curtain 
was finally lowered. 

It was a great meeting ond it's a cinch that any future 
installation without the wives, sisters, sweethearts or 
mothers being declared in, will produce a lot of lonesome 
men over across the north bay county. 

A history of the Association will be found on another 
page of this issue of the Police and Peace Officers' 
Journal. It is by Judge John Flor, who for eight years 
has been the spark plug of the organization, and who 
occupies a high place in the hearts of the peace officers 
of his county. 



RHYTHM CLUB 



JOE'S RESTAURANT 

WE SERVE GOOD FOOD 

I KNOW WE CAN FLEASE YOU 



SAN RAFAEL 



915 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



P. O. Box 302, M 11 Valley 
Mailing Address 



George R. Williams 
Res. rh. M.V. 2283J 



MARIN EQUIPMENT CO. 

TRACTORS • TRUCKS • TRAILERS 

GRADERS • SHOVELS • CARRY-ALLS 

BOUGHT • SOLD • REN 1 ED 



101 Highway - 1 Mile South 

SAN RAFAEL 



Phone 18S8M 

CALIFORNIA 



STAR LITE CLUB 



Phone San Rafael 6127 

101 HI-WAY, 1 '/, Miles North of 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 



REFRESHMENTS 



Phone 789 or 3102 
821 B Street 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN RAFAEL 



CLUB MODERNE 

SAN RAFAEL'S MOST SPACIOUS 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

804 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



LUCAS VALLEY DAIRY 

R. B. Grady, Mgr. 
A HOME-OWNED BUSINESS 
Phone S. R. 6340 

SAN RAFAEL 



F-mil Daubin 



33 Ida St., West End 

CALIFORNIA 



TRAVELERS INN 

Where excellence of meal service, accommodations for Special 

Parties, French and Italian Dinners May be found to suit the 

most particular. Choice Wines and Liquors. 



I. Daubin 



303 Third Street, Corner Tamalpais 

SAN RAFAEL 



Phone 282 

CALIFORNIA 



KNOT-INN 

KNOWN FOR ITS KNOTS 



DANCING 
MIXED DRINKS 



COCKTAILS 
ENTERTAINMENT 



SAN RAFAEL 



921 B Street 



Phone 1919 



CALIFORNIA 



San Rafael French Cleaning 
and Dyeing Works 

Telephone: San Rafael 1414 
Main Office and Plant: 1852 Fourth Street 
Branch: 919 Lincoln Avenue, San Rafael 



SAN RAFAEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Established 1880 



Telephone 777 



VAN DER MAELEN 

CLEANING AND DYEING WORKS 
QUALITY WORK • GOOD SERVICE 



SAN RAFAEL 



2138 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BILL 



JOE 



COSMOPOLITAN HOTEL 



Bottini Bros., Props. 

FINE WINES AND LIQUORS 
BEER ON TAP 

Phone 4-U-2-C 721 B Street 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



MARGE AND JIM'S 

Marge Stapleton, Proprietor 
San Rafael 1493 

COCKTAIL BAR AND 
AUTO COURT 



Harvey Morse 



Phone 3777 



HARVEY'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

CONTINENTAL SMORGASBORD 
LUNCHEON - DINNER 



Highway 102, 2 Miles North of SAN RAFAEL 



SAN RAFAEL 



1025 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



TAMALPAIS INN 

Ghiringhelli & Co., Props. 

FIRST CLASS MEALS SERVED 

Phones 1260 and 1067 Fourth St. and Tamalpais Ave. 

SAN RAFAEL CALIFORNIA 



HIDE AWAY 

Marion "Gam" Muscio 
Phone San Anselmo 2944 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 



CALEDONIA MARKET 



526-530 San Anselmo Avenue 



Phone 44 



45 Caledonia Street 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA SAUSAL1TO 



CALIFORNIA 



Office 4080 



Res. 5110 



A. VON ROTZ 

CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 
40 Greenfield Avenue 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA SAUSALITO 



HARRY'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
BEER AND WINE 

FREE DELIVERY 
Phone 42 108 2nd Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OSCAR'S COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

OSCAR SCHEIBE 

114 Greenfield Avenue Phone S. A. 2555 

SAN ANSELMO CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Anselmo 2667 



Owner Dick Hamilton 



THE HAMILTON HOUSE 

Opposite Firehouse Fairfax 
OPEN EVERY DAY • DINNERS 'TIL 



FAIRFAX 



12:00 MIDNIGHT 



CALIFORNIA 



GRANTS CREAMERY 
a * -* * 

FOUR STAR FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



TWO MILE INN 

Phone S. R. 4699 

WINES AND LIQUOR 

HOME COOKING 



574 San Anselmo Avenue 



SAN ANSELMO 



CALIFORNIA 



2 Miles North of SAN RAFAEL 
101 Redwood Highway 



ERNEST ONGARO 

PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 

Ernest Ongaro, Owner 

PLUMBING • HEATING • SHEET METAL 

AND HOME APPLIANCES 

243 San Anselmo Avenue Phone 4600 - 4601 

SAN ANSELMO CALIFORNIA 



Phone San Anselmo 6228 



FREE PARKING 



THE SAN ANSELMO HOTEL 

One block south and * 2 block west of the bus station 
in San Anselmo, California 

Single, Double and Triple Rooms * Innerspring Mattresses 
Tub and Shower Baths 



GOLDEN GATE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mr. and Mrs. B. St. Jovite 
CURTAINS - BLANKETS - SILKS 



SAUSALITO 



215 Second Street 



Phone 537 



CALIFORNIA 



Carl F. Casady 



Adrian McNeal 



DAY and NIGHT PLUMBERS 

AND APPLIANCES 

PHILCO RADIOS - REFRIGERATORS - DAY AND NIGHT 
HOYT GAS APPLIANCES 



SAUSALITO 



112 Caledonia Street 



Phone 729-J 



CALIFORNIA 



DE BORBA'S 



Phone 67M 



NOVATO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE MEADOWS 

Al Delucchi 

ITALIAN DINNERS 
WHISKIES • COCKTAILS • FIZZES 



Phone Ignacio 20 



IGNACIO 



CALIFORNIA 



LA BLANCHE LAUNDRY 

ALL PACKAGES C. O. D. UNLESS ARRANGEMENTS 
ARE MADE AT THE OFFICE 



Phone Sausalito 107 



109 Second Street 



SAUSALITO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAUSALITO FURNITURE STORE 

HOME FURNISHINGS 

STOVES • RUGS • LINOLEUM 

REFRIGERATORS 

1417 Bridgeway Telephone 458 

SAUSALITO CALIFORNIA 



ANCHOR CAFE 

Famous for 

CRAB CIOPPINO - SEA FOODS AND CHOICE STEAKS 

BAY VIEW DINING ROOM 

"BAY DECK" OVER THE WATER 

20 Min. from S. F., via Golden Gate Bridge 
Sam Vella . . Belvedere 106 
Sam Olsen . . Belvedere 72 
TIBURON CALIFORNIA 



LARKSPUR 



BOB'S TAVERN 

450 Magnolia Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



HISTORY OF MARIN P. O. A. 

(Continued from page 1 ) 

District Attorney, Marin County; John Plover, Chief 
Probation Officer, State of California; Warden Clinton 
Duffy; Frank Spence, U. S. Post Office Inspector; H. C. 
Van Pelt, FBI; Judge Guy Ciocca; Joe Bordanaro, Co- 
ordinator; Capt. H. Spomer; Red Giffen, Special Investi- 
gator, Attorney General's Office. 

Julian Thomas, International Law; N. Lapachet, FBI; 
James Purcell, attorney; Stuart Stimmel, Federal Security; 
Al Rhine, Indian rope expert; T. E. Day, Gas and Food 
Administration; James Bresnahan, FBI; Joe Farrell, Chief 
Narcotics Agent; Chief Donald Wood; Jess Hession, At- 
torney General's Office; Harold Haley, Deputy District 
Attorney; Earl Chapman, expert on retirement; Judge 
Matthew Brady; Opie Warner, Journalist; Walter Gor- 
don, Adult Authority; Lewis Grucker, Criminologist; 
Major Chester C. Bonner; Richard McGee, Chairman 
Adult Authority; Brig. General Victor Hanson; Chief 
Frank Kelley; Judge N. Charles Brusatori; Edmond "Pat" 
Brown, District Attorney, San Francisco. 

Col. Oscar Jensen; Leavitt Baker, Sheriff's Office; Allan 
Moore, Chief Parole Officer; John D. Sullivan, Special 
Agent, FBI; Samuel Gardiner, Attorney; Francis Wallace, 
National Safety Council; Col. Rush Linch, Provost Mar- 
shal; Judge Alden Ames; Lt F. J. Pope; R. Warner, 
FBI; A. E. Riedel, Berkeley Police Department; Harry 
Kimball, FBI Agent in Charge; Harold Riede, Deputy 
District Attorney; John Meehan, S. F. Police Department; 
Charles Fredericks, S. P. C. A. ; Stanley Hurdle, California 
Identification Bureau; Inspector Charles Iredale, S. F. 
Police Department; Roger Green, criminologist. 

It can be readily seen from the foregoing names that 
during the past nine years our Association has been hon- 
ored and privileged to have guest speakers who are highly 
respected and reputed in their respective fields of endeavor. 

The problems lectured upon and discussed by the mem- 
bers of the Association read like a curriculum of a police 
university. In the short time of our existence much time 
has been spent in preparing the law enforcement officer in 
the perfection of his occupation and his protection to the 
community has been our ideal. The following subjects and 
problems have been brought before our Association: 

Police Commission; Pin ball problem; Bicycle Ordi- 



ROY WILLIAMS 
CHEVROLET COMPANY 

Chevrolet Sales and Service 

719 Francisco Blvd. 

San Rafael, California 

Phone 4126 



Goheen Construction Co. 

Contracting Department 
Alterations, Additions and Repairs 

FREE ESTIMATES 

P. O. Box 46 Phone M.V. 1090 

Mill Valley, California 



Italian Foods a Specialty 

ESPOSTI'S 

Excellent Dinners - Lunches 

Fountain Service - Ice Cream - Candies 



127 Throckmorton Ave. 
Phone M.V. 775 



238 E. Blithedale 
Phone M.V. 2164M 



Mill Valley, California 



FRANK S. SOARES, JR. 



FRANK A. GARCtA 



McDonnell's Auto Court 

BAR AND COFFEE SHOP 

• 



101 Highway 
Four Miles North of San Rafael 



Phc 



S. R. 4595 



Compliments of 

THE GRIDDLE 
and Reno's Pago Pago 



801 Fourth Street 

San Rafael, California 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1949 



nance; Psychiatrist treatment of prisoners; Juvenile prob- 
lem; Narcotics Problem; Radio Communication and Tele- 
type; Law enforcement officers' place in National Defense; 
jurisdiction of civil law enforcement officers on federal 
property; Problems on probation; History of San Quentin 
Prison; Combating espionage and sabotage; Keeping rec 
ords and preparing uniform crime reports; Traffic schools. 

San Quentin Defense Plan; Efforts in convict trials; 

International Law; Enforcement of Registration Act; 
Evacuation of public from bombed areas; Adoption of 
ordinance for Proclamation #12 (dim out); Gambling 
problem; Repeling of social diseases; Civil liberties and 
law enforcement; Problems of gas and food rationing 
violations; Problems of bail; Pension plan for police of' 
ficers; Parole System. 

Adult Authority; California State Guards; National 
police school; Law enforcement and administration of 
justice; Black Hawk Division in Germany; Atomic bomb 
defense tactics in police work; Increased population and 
police problems: Traffic problem. 

Mutual aid plan; Military police and law enforcement; 
Wage standardization; Proper respect and decorum of 
law enforcement officers: Psychological implications of the 
sex offenders: California Identification Bureau; Problems 
of pound and stray animals. 

Lie detector and test in law enforcement; Intelligence 
system in war: Problems of human society; M. O. methods 
of reporting crimes; Problem of the 502 Retirement Plan; 
The bunco game; Preservation of material evidence; The 
Judiciary. 



HUST BROTHERS 

AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY 

Phone 3180 
"The Store of a Million Part*" 



4th and E Streets 



Marysville, California 



John C. Bayes Co., Inc. 

YOUR YUBA-SUTTER FORD DEALER 

There's a New FORD in Your Future 

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - REPAIRS 

420 E Street 

Marysville, California 
Telephone 2680 



PEPSI-COLA 

BOTTLING COMPANY 

Distributors for 

YUBA AND SUTTER COUNTIES 



Yuba City 



Marysville 



DRAGON SEED CAFE 

Phone 1601 

CHINESE AND 
AMERICAN DISHES 

219 D Street 
Marysville, California 



MARYSVILLE TRACTOR 
& EQUIPMENT CO. 

Distributors 

"Caterpillar" and John Deere 

TRACTORS FARM IMPLEMENTS 
EARTH MOVING EQUIPMENT 



Marysville, Calif. 



Robbins, Calif. 



B S S E N 

BROTHERS 

LAUNDRY 

'LAUNDRY AT ITS BEST" 

221 B Street 

Marysville, California 

Phone 496 



February ■ March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Puge 43 



Many other subjects have been brought before and 
discussed by the members of the Association. It can 
readily be observed from the above subjects and problems 
that the aim of the organisation has been accepted and 
it is our intention to keep constantly growing up to date. 
and in touch with the law enforcement profession and 
to afford the best type of protection for our citizens in 
crime detection and privileges. 

The officers of the corporation have been as follows: 

1940 
A. E. Bagshaw, President 
H. O. Peters, First Vice President 
James McGowan. Second Vice President 
Donald Wood, Secretary-Treasurer 

1941 
H. O. Peters. President 
Donald Wood, First Vice President 
W. V. Nicholson, Second Vice President 
Paul Helmore, Secretary-Treasurer 

1942 
Donald Wood. President 
W. V. Nicholson, First Vice President 
Clinton T. Duffy. Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1943 
W. V. Nicholson, President 
Clinton Duffy, First Vice President 
I. M. Lewis, Second Vice President 



'Les" Edwards 



Telephone 802 



Edward's Wheel and Brake 
Shop 

Our Specialty 
Wheel Aligning - Brakes 

Third and F Streets 

Marysville, California 



Triangle Refrigeration 



H. S. McNALLY, Sales Engineer 

Meat Cases - Walk in Boxes - Frozen Food 

Cabinets - Soda Fountains - Bottle Coolers 

Reach In Boxes - Ice Makers 

Bar Equipment 

314 G Street 

Marysville, California 

Phone 717 



Frank L. Cornwell & Son 



WELL DRILLING 



MOTOR WINDING 



PRESSURE SYSTEMS 



TURBINE PUMPS 



MARYSVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Hill-Mace Meat Company 



Wholesale Butchers 



DIXON, CALIFORNIA 



Quality Meats - Groceries Fancy and 
Staple at the Lowest Prices 

Walnut Grove Meat and 
Grocery Market 

H. J. Oda, Proprietor 
Telephone 2116 P. O. Box 344 

WALNUT GROVE, CALIF. 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



» COM* &yAC4M/CS "* 

G. B. Bailey Paint and Color Co. 



MARYSVILLE 
CALIFORNIA 



125 Fifth Street 
Phone 535M 



HOTEL MARYSVILLE 



WALLPAPER AND ARTIST'S SUPPLIES 



AND 
WESTERN HOTEL 

LOUIS M. ROSSI 



Phono 995 - 507 G Street 



State License No. 107013 



CROWTHER PLUMBING 

CHARLIE CROWTHER - CASSIE BELL CROWTHER. Owners 

PLUMBING, HEATING AND SHEET METAL WORK 

Air Conditioning • Heating Supplies • Automatic Controls 

Water Heaters • Plumbing Supplies • Gas Furnaces 

Repair & S?rvice Work Our Specialty 



THE BRUNSWICK 

GOODMAN & SCHNEIDER 

MARYSVILLE'S OLDEST 

RECREATION CENTER 



218 D Street 



Phone 900 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



DAILEY MUSIC COMPANY 

Introduction on 
PIANO - ACCORDION - BAND INSTRUMENTS - GUITAR 

SALES ON ALL INSTRUMENTS 
FRIENDLY CREDIT 



PARK GROCERY and MEAT MARKET 

Phone 2318-W 
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



212' 2 D Street Phone 3166 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA MARYSVILLE 



513 B Street, Across from Cortez Square 



CALIFORNIA 



Shop Phone 2721 



Res. Phone 2175-W 



L. L.BURG 

SHEET METAL WORKS 
211 Elm Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



YUBA GARDENS 



412 Third 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



R. P. BALL 

CHEVRON GAS STATION 
Specializing In Service 



Phone 309-J 



7th and E Streets 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPTON'S MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • VEGETABLES 
BEER • WINES • LIQUORS 

Open Every Day 8 A.M. 'til 9 P.M. 
Ninth and H Street 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



E. M. BARTH CO 



FORDS 
OUT IN FRONT 



MARYSVILLE 



525 F Street 



Phone 672 



CALIFORNIA 



RUBY'S RESTAURANT 

GEORGE KALOST0S 

PLAIN AMERICAN FOOD 

Gibson Lines Depot 



424 Fourth Street 



Phone 606 



DENNY WRIGHT 

PACKARD SALES AND SERVICE 

2301 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

WALNUT CREEK CALIFORNIA 

DUKE'S POLLY HILL SERVICE 

FRED ERICKS0N. Prop. 
(INDEPENDENT DEALER) 

GASOLINE - OILS - AUTO PARTS 
AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 



Telephone Walnut 4735 
WALNUT CREEK 



Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 



Fred Rodgers 



Phone 161 



4 9 CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS 
GOOD FOOD 



JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



VISIT 



PIONEER CAFE 

WHILE IN JAMESTOWN 
Virgil Beningfield, Prop. 



MARYSVILLE 



CALIFORNIA JAMESTOWN 



CALIFORNIA 



FOR QUALITY - PERSONAL SERVICE 

ABRAM MEN'S STORE 

KNOX HATS • HAMMONTON PARK SUITS 

WILSON BROS. FURNISHINGS 

Phone 3189 5th at D Street 

> ? ? ? J J 



BOB ELGAAEN 



Wholesale Distributor 

CANDY • TOBACCO • "BETTY LOU" POTATO CHIPS 

DELRICH OLEOMARGARINE 

Phone 2996 310 Eye Street 

MARYSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1944 
Clinton T. Duffy, President 
J. M. Lewis, First Vice President 
Thomas Wentworth, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1945 
J. M. Lewis, President 
Thomas Wentworth, First Vice President 
Frank Kelley, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1946 
Thomas Wentworth, President 
Frank Kelly, First Vice President 
Emery Dawson, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1947 
Frank Kelly, President 
Emery Dawson, First Vice President 
Thomas Cheetham, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1948 
Emery Dawson, President 
Thomas Cheetham, First Vice President 
James Doyle, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 

1949 
Thomas Cheetham, President 
James Doyle, First Vice President 
Arthur Fellows, Second Vice President 
John R. Flor, Secretary-Treasurer 



Phone 196 



"Ray" Schmutzler 



R. 8c J. BODY AND FENDER SHOP 

Authorized Weaver Safety Service 

WHEEL ALIGNING • WHEEL BALANCING 

Official Headlight Adjusting Station No. 1347 



Official Brake Adjusting Station No. 2380 



JACKSON 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIAMSON ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Claude Williamson 

393 Parker Avenue Phone 316-J 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKDALE ELECTRIC 

Bud Shiernbeck 
"WE SELL THE BEST 

and 
SERVICE THE REST" 



BRADLEY'S 



MARYSVILLE 



Phone 8 



CALIFORNIA 



Laughlin Heating and Ventilating Co. 

Phone 6871, if no answer S872 

AIR CONDITIONING - EVAPORATIVE COOLERS 

FLOOR, GAS AND OIL FURNACES 

SHEET METAL WORK 



OAKDALE 



G Street Next to Hgh School 



CALIFORNIA 



Theo. Phillips, Owner 



Phone 424". 



Phillips Cabinet Shop & Lumber Yard 

Third and D Street P. O. Box 1205 

OAKDALE CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4046 



Res. Phone 2471 



B I A N C H I ' S 

MEN'S, LADIES', CHILDREN'S - CLOTHING - SHOES 
713 F. Street 



OAKDALE 



CAI iro 



UNITED FILIP'NS GROCERY CO. 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
P. O. Box 834 



WALNUT CROVE 



CALIFORNIA 



M. P. METZLER 8c SON 

DRY GOODS AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
Phone 2352 



HOPLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



ROCK'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS - CIGARETTES 
MAGAZINES - FILMS - NOTIONS 

HOPLAND (Mendocino County), CALIFORNIA 

ANTIOCH MEN'S STORE 



Phone 645 740 Second Street 



OAKDALE 



134 No. Third Avenue 



Phone 8421 



CALIFORNIA 



HOMEMADE CANDY 
ALL HAND MADE AT 

MELLOR'S QUALITY CANDY 

Opp. Pioneer Bar, COLUMBIA, CALIFORNIA 
Phone Sonora 3142 



ANTIOCH 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Concord 8478 Joe B. Malta 

MALTA '^ PLACE 



IMPORTED WINES - BEERS 
SANDWICHES 



2375 Contra Costa Boulevard 
CONCORD CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1949 



Two-Way Radio System- It was largely through 
the Police Officers' Association and the hard and faithful 
work of Chief of Police Don Wood that the Supervisors 
of M;inn County were prevailed upon to set up a radio 
station in the County of Marin so that each police de- 
partment in the county could install police radio for the 
purpose of efficient police work. The success of the police 
radio system is so obvious that it needs no further com- 
ment. It might he mentioned that prior to the two-way 
radio the only communication available to the law enforce- 
ment officers in the Count of Marin was a teletype system 
located in the Sheriff's office and the messages which 
were placed on the teletype had to be delivered to the 
respective police departments by means of land wires, a 
very inadequate and antiquated method of communication. 
However, with the installation of the radio station, ef- 
ficiency was the result. 

J. Mansfield Lewis, chief radio man of Marin County. 
has been highly instrumental in bringing about the radio 
efficiency. 

Criminal Identification. Four law enforcement 
agencies in the County of Marin today have highly 
qualified men who have set up a complete system of 
records and a complete finer-print identification bureau, 
namely, the Sheriff's office at San Rafael, the Police De- 
partment in San Anselmo, the Police Department in San 
Rafael and the Police Department at Sausalito. 

Prison Break Plan and Preparedness. There has 
been worked out among the chief law-enforcement officers 
of Marin County a plan of operation to protect the people 
and capture the escapees in the event that there is a prison 
break. The area surrounding the prison has been mapped 
and the members of the various law enforcement depart- 
ments have a certain station to occupy upon the sounding 

SUNNYSIDE NURSERY 

Telephone San Anselmo 5686 

HOME OF DISTINCTIVE PLANTS. SPRAYS 

FERTILIZERS, GARDEN SUPPLIES 

130 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. SAN ANSELMO, CALIF. 



NORMANDY CAFE 

Mr. and Mrs. McNaughton & Sox, Prof's. 

GOOD FOOD -::- BEER 
AND SOFT DRINKS 



Hours 6 A.M. 'til 10 P.M. 



Dixon, California 

(Solano County) 



C H I C 
AUTO COURT 

Francis Woolley, Mgr. 



Phone 1621 
1717 Park Ave - Hi- way 99E 

Chico, California 



BLOCK 
SPORTSWEAR 

Made in California 
By 

H. and L. BLOCK 



1563 Mission Street 
San Francisco, California 






! t 



BILL AND KATHY'S 

COFFEE SHOP 

and 

FOUNTAIN 



Dunnigan Highway 99W 

Dunnigan, California 

(Yolo County) 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Pag. 47 



of a certain alarm, and in many drill practices it was 
found that the law-enforcement officers from the most 
remote parts of Marin County arrived at his station 
within six minutes after the sound of the alarm. This 
preparedness is evidence of the fact that the law-enforce- 
ment officers of Marin County are always on the alert, 
and it can be truly stated, "Eternal vigilance is the price 
of liberty," and law-enforcement efficiency. 

Retirement Fund. At the present time, under the 
leadership of Chief Don Wood, an attempt is being 
made to bring all of the Peace Officers of Marin County 
into a plan which will afford thi officers security for their 
old age or when they have retired after serving faithfully. 
At the present time practically all of the law enforce- 
ment departments have asked for an acturial survey and 
it is expected that within a short time there will be in 
Marin County a retirement plan to take care of all the 
police and other public servants. 

As a result of the alertness of the enforcement officers, 
coupled with the efficiency of the District Attorney's 
office, Marin County is one of the few counties in the 
state that has been clean and free from gangland crime. 
This tribute was paid to Marin County by the Attorney 
General of the State of California. 

Our Association has been looked upon by many brother 
associations with great envy and it behooves each and 
every member to be proud of our Association and to lend 
every effort to perpetuate the ideals of our Association. 

In conclusion, it is necessary that full and unstinted 
cooperation from every officer be maintained and that 
some members become active in the business of our 
Association. One man cannot do the job nor can your 
officers alone carry on the good work. As this is your 
Association it is up to you to unite in assisting the con- 
tinuance of our ideals. 



MADDEN & LEWIS CO. 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS 

MARINE WAYS • REPAIRING • OVERHAULING 

Machine Shop — Specializing in Repairs on Diesel and Gas Engines 

Telephone Sausalito 155 SAUSALITO. CALIFORNIA 



S M I T T Y ' S 

IS THE PLACE IN SAUSALITO 



PHONE 519 



214 CALEDONIA 



CAIN & JONASEN TIRE SERVICE 

• RECAPPING • 



20 Greenfield Ave. 

SAN ANSELMO 



Phone S. A. 5060 



CALIFORNIA 



SUN FAIR MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 



RICHMOND 



3700 Nevin Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



BARRETT AVENUE STORE 

MEATS - GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
1910 Barrett Avenue 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



LOG CABIN TAVERN 

Napa-Vallejo Highway — Highway 29 
NORTH OF VALLEJO. CALIFORNIA 



HERB'S PLACE 

CAFE and BAR 
STEAKS and CHOPS 

On Highway 99 
Phone 2484 

Arbuckle, California 

(Colusa County) 







BUD'S CASINO | 






R. 


F. CAMPER 






One 


of the Oldest 






Bars 


in Marysville 






FOOD 


AND DRINK 


224 

...... 


C 


Street 


Marysville 

i 



PAYLESS DRUG STORES 

HARRY S. HOOPER 
Phone 2973 

210 D Street 

Marysville, California 
Linda Corners, South Marysville 



EL LOBO CAFE 

The Best in Food 
and Cocktails 

JACK HARRA, Your Host 
Mt. Diablo 8C Main 

WALNUT CREEK, CALIF. 

Phone W. C. 2045 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1949 



SHERIFF HOWARD HORNBUCKLE 

(Continued from page 12) 

center and the State Department of Corrections is lending 
all assistance to the movement. 

Of course the Sheriff's office has an aero squadron. 
This is made up of 40 licensed pilots under command 
of Deputy Sheriff Elton Hicks. The later has been com' 
missioned to fly a county owned airplane for transporting 
prisoners from other cities. It works mighty successful. 
Recently a man was picked up in Reno, Nevada, for 
Santa Clara County. Deputy Hicks was told to take off 
with an extra deputy, and bring the prisoner back. He 
left the San Jose Airport at 1 p.m. got to Reno, made out 
the proper papers and started his return. He was back 
in San Jose by 5:30 p.m. the same day. 

Then, too, the office has a mounted posse of volunteer 
horsemen. This posse numbers 75 with Edward Mattioni 
president. The members of these two auxiliary volunteer 
additions to the force are sworn in as deputies, and given 
the same course of training as members of the salaried 
personnel receives. 

Sheriff Hornbuckle cites the assistance the aero squadron 
has rendered since its formation. It has located planes 
that have crashed in the mountains leading to Mt. Ham- 
ilton peak. 

Every member of the Sheriff's force has undergone 
training in all phases of law enforcement, and it is the 
pride of Sheriff Hornbuckle that most of his members 
are veterans of World War II and a great majority are 



PACIFIC REDWOOD 
CASKET CO. 



SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Santa Clara 29 

SANTA CLARA TILE 

Les. Hinz 



SANTA CLARA, CALIFORNIA 



ECHO MOTEL 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Eichhorn, Owners 



Highway 101 

Madrone, California 

Telephone: Morgan Hill 802 





VIC'S CLUB 


Min and Vic Straza, Prop.s-. 


ft 


321 Fourth Street 


Hollister, California 


Phone 969 



THE OPEN MARKET 

Quong Low and Henry Fong 

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables 
Groceries and Meats 

250 San Benito Street 

Hollister, California 
Phone 294 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



graduates of the San Jose College Police School, from 
which he attended and graduated in the early '30's. Here 
he was an outstanding tackle on the college football team. 

During his first two years in office he has seen the sal- 
aries of all his personnel raised. 

Today Deputies get a top salary of $300 per month, it 
was $250 when he took over. Sergeants have been raised 
from $270 per month to 350, Captain or undershenff 
from $305 to $420. The members also enjoy a 40 hour 
week, and with all these satisfying conditions each and 
everyone of them is exerting his best to give their Chief 
every aid to see that the people of Santa Clara get the 
best in law enforcement. 

While crime, such as robberies, burglaries, grand theft 
and assaults have increased since the war, it is not as 
much as the national percentage, and the registers of our 
state penal institutions have the names of most of those 
who have tried their hand at crime in the fertile Santa 
Clara valley. 

One of the important cases handled by Santa Clara's 
Sheriff's office and indicative of how thoroughly and suc- 
cessfully the members work on any crime committed in 
their jurisdiction was the case, early last year, of John H. 
Rickey, proprietor of Rickey's well known restaurant on 
El Camino Real south of Palo Alto. 

On the night of February 1, 1948, three men entered 
the home of Rickey's in Los Altos and tied up the family, 
and proceeded to torture the popular cafe man in an 
effort to get the combination to his office safe. They didn't 
get it but took some jewelry from Mrs. Rickey, and 
Rickey's wallet which was said to have contained $800. 

Working fast and with but slight clews the three men 
who perpetrated the robbery were rounded up. They 
were three youths, one of whom had worked in Rickey's 
restaurant. This man was Harley Huntley, who with his 
two companions confessed the crime. They were all 
charged with kidnaping, robbery, burglary, assault with a 
deadly weapon and grand theft. 

Huntley and the elder of the trio were convicted and 
sent to prison, the third one, a lad, was turned over to 
the juvenile authorities. 



BUZZ INN CAFE 

AND SERVICE STATION 

ASSOCIATED OIL PRODUCTS 
AND COMPLETE SERVICE 



COYOTE (Santa Clara County). CALIFORNIA 



UPTON'S DRIVE IN 

GOOD EATS 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
AND SHORl ORDERS 



MORCAN HILL 



Hours 7 A.M. 'til 10 P.M. 
On Highway 101 



CALIFORNIA 



TOM RYAN, Jeweler 

JEWELRY • SILVERWARE • WATCHES 
Watches and Clocks Repaired 



P. O. Box 572 



MORGAN HILL 



CALIFORNIA 



LORENE AND JACK KRAMER 
Greet You at 

THE PADDOCK 



PACHECO, CALIFORNIA 
HOME OF MIDGET AUTO RACING 



SANDELL HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE • PAINTS • SPORTING GOODS 
HOUSEHOLD AND GIFT DEPARTMENT 



141 North Monterey Street 



GILROY 



CALIFORNIA 



THE ARIZONA 

BEER • WINE • MEALS 
POOL ROOM 

65 North Market Street 



SAN JOSE 



CALIFORNIA 



CICHELE AND GOODER 

Imported and Domestic 
WINES AND LIQUORS 



403 San Benito Way 



HOLLISTER 



CALIFORNIA 



GENUINE MEXICAN DISHES 

PROGRESSO TAMALE PARLOR 

TAMALES • ENCHILADAS • CHILE CON CARNE 

Orders to Take Out • Open 11 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
A. Zuniga, Owner 



Phone 178 



320 San Benito Street 



HOLLISTER 



CALIFORNIA 



Dave Quinlan at the Hammond Organ 
Harvey Blanchard at the Piano 

CENTURY CLUB 

Irene Knox and Billy Knox, Jr. 
125 EAST TWELFTH STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 



5c, 10c, 25c— P A C E— 5c, 10c, 25c 

"HOME OWNED NEIGHBORHOOD VARIETY STORES" 

Nine 41st Ave. • Eleven 37th Ave. 

SOUTH SAN MATEO 

Compliments 

G. Ferreccio & Schemoni Co. 

RANCH 

Route 1, Box 278 

COLMA. CALIFORNIA 



KARL'S KLUB 

DROP IN WHEN YOU PASS BY 
NOVATO. CALIFORNIA 



Page SO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Febrmry ■ March, 1949 



Some Are True - Some Are False - RATE YOURSELF 



(Continued from last issue) 

71. Before a dying declaration is admissible, certain re- 
quirements must be met. The following are correct 
except one. Mark incorrect one: (1) It must be the 
declaration of a dying person; (2) it must be made 
under sense of impending death; (3) it is admissisble 
only in homicide cases where the death of the declar- 
ant is the issue and established by one witness and 
corroborative circumstances. 

72. A true copy of the testimony taken in a criminal 
action is called the: (1) verdict; (2) accusation; 
(3) certificate; (4) judgment; (5) transcript. 

73. Metes and bounds means most nearly: (1) mileage- 

(2) course of a river; (3) the limits within which a 
judge can give sentence; (4) the boundary lines of 
land; C>) a method of tying a prisoner by means 
of ropes. 

74. A person in a penal institution who, because of his 
conduct, is released under direction of an officer is 
said to be: (1) on probation; (2) pardoned; (3) 
paroled; (4) acquitted; (5) none of the foregoing. 

75. Challenge means most nearly: (1) an invitation to 
fight; (2) questioning the rights of another; (3) an 
objection taken by either party to one or more jurors 
who are about to try a case; (4) to accuse another 
of wrong doing; (5) a fight. 

76. A capital offense is: (1) one which has a life sentence 
or death penalty prescribed by law; (2) one involving 
a large amount of money; (3) one committed against 
the law of the United States; (4) one which an in- 
dictment has been returned by the grand jury. 

77. The wilfull giving of false testimony under oath in a 
judicial proceeding or court of justice is called: (1) 
extradition; (2) perjury; (3) bribery; (4) a con- 
fession; (5) an alibi. 

78. Change of venue in a criminal action means most 
nearly a change: (1) of place of trial from one 
county to another; (2) of jury in the same court; 

(3) in an order issued by a judge concerning the sen- 
tence; (4) in sentence because of additional evidence. 

79. Martial means most nearly: (1) that which has to 
do with ships; (2) pertaining to marriage; (3) per- 
taining to martial law. (4) pertaining to the human 
race; (5) pertaining to certain types of music. 

80. A judgment is: (1) a verdict by the jury; (2) a 
Coroner's verdict; (3) the payment by the defendant 
of money to the plaintiff; (4) instruction by the judge 
to the jury; (5) none of the foregoing. 

81. A garnishment is: (1) a satisfaction of judgment; 
(2) an attachment by the defendant on the property 
belonging to the defendant in the hands of the third 
person; (3) an attachment by the plaintiff on property 
belonging to the defendant, in the hands of the third 
person; (4) the taking of property by the plaintiff. 

82. A statement made by a witness under oath is: (1) 



proof; (2) evidence; (3) testimony; (4) hearsay evi- 
dence; (5) an affirmation. 

83. A judicial inquiry to determine the cause and manner 
of violent death is called: (1) an autopsy; (2) an 
inquity; (3) an investigation; (4) an inquest; (5) 
none of the foregoing. 

84. Inquest means most nearly: (1) trial by jury; (2) a 
medical examination; (3) investigation by a coroner's 
jury; (4) inquiry by a grand jury; (5) cross exam- 
ination. 

85. A writ requiring a person or corporation to refrain 
from a particular act is called: (1) prevention; (2) 
a writ of prohibition; (3) an injunction; (4) an arrest 
of judgment; (5) a restraining order. 

86. Tenure means most nearly: (1) an offer; (2) the 
purpose and effect of a document; (3) one who holds 
land at the will of the lessor; (4) the mode of holding 
property or office; (5) a part of the human body. 

87. Mandamus means most nearly : ( 1 ) a command issued 
from a superior court; (2) an order by the Chief of 
Police; (3) a command by the President of the United 
States; (4) a judicial opinion; (5) an order issued 
by the district attorney. 

88. The notice sent to the defendant citing him to appear 
before the court to answer an accusation is called the : 

(1) complaint; (2) warrant of arrest ; (3) summons; 
(4) arraignment; (5) subpoena. 

89. Scroll means most nearly: (1) an impression on wax; 

(2) a mark made with a pen, intended to take the 
place of a seal; (3) an architectural design; (4) a 
type of writing; (5) a roll of paper. 

Walther's Body and Fender Works 

FRAME STRAIGHTENING • AUTO PAINTING 
WHEEL ALIGNING 



1605 F Street 



Phone 7626 



OAKDALE 



CALIFORNIA 



Ebell 



B & E CLUB 



128 Central 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



A. T. Fugitt J. B. Minatta 

Rhodes Warehouse 8C Supply Co. 

BEAN RE-CLEANING AND STORAGE - SACKS AND TWINE 
INSECTICIDES - FERTILIZERS - SEEDS 

5 Miles South of Tracy on 
Highway 33 at W. P. R. R. 



Phone Tracy 196-W 



P. O. Box 217 



TRACY. CALIF. 



TRACY 



TONGS INN 

CHOP SUEY CAFE 

Chinese and American Dishes 

118 East 11th Street on Highway 



CALIFORNIA 



February -March, \ { )4 K ) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 11 



90. Litigant means most nearly: (1) the littlest person 
involved; (2) one who serves at religious services; 
(3) one engaged in a law suit; (4) one who has 
license to practice any art; (6) a person who has 
been injured and is being taken to a hospital against 
his will. 

91. A grand jury has been directed to investigate the 
activities of a large investment corporation. It finds 
evidence of fraud. The conclusion reached is best 
described as: (1) a decision; (2) a verdict; (3) a 
report; (4) an indictment; (5) a charge. 

92. Deponent means most nearly: (1) a witness; (2) 
claimant; (3) defendant; (4) one who testifies in 
writing; (5) counsel. 

93. The official action of the Grand Jury which brings a 
person to trial is known as: (1) indictment; (2) 
findings; (3) charges; (4) information; (?) verdict. 

94. The Dyer Act is an act governing the crime and 
penalty for the: (1) transporting women from one 
state to another for immoral purposes; (2) transport- 
ating of stolen automobiles from one state to another; 

(3) selling tobacco to minors; (4) peddling of 
narcotics. 

9^. A confession which has been obtained through the 
threat of personal injury is said to have been obtained 
by: (1) detention; (2) unlawful arrest; (3) duress; 

(4) illegal use of physical force. 



JAMES & HOPPE 

Ray and Georg? 

PLUMBING CONTRACTORS :: APPLIANCES 
65 E. 10th Street Phone 1414 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone, Tracy 36-R-ll P. O. Box 602 1735 S. McArthur 

Fairbanks Morse Presrure Systems - Dairy Work 

HEFLIN PLUMBING 

Ray L. Heflin, Prop. 



AIR CONDITIONING AND 
WATER WELL SERVICE 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Burgess Israel 



Robert Israel 



CARL'S FEED AND PAINT STORE 

PURINA CHOWS • HARDWARE 



SS W. 11th Street Phone 4S0 



TRACY- 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN KENLEY. Shell Service 



llth and B Street Phone 1197 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Established 1908 



Telephone 99 



JOSEPH BROWN 

MERCHANT PLUMBER 
127-129 East Seventh Street 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA TRACY 



UNION OIL STATION 

Olimpio Borges 
OILS - TIRES - BATTERIES - ACCESSORIES - LUBRICATION 



TRACY 



TRACY 



Phone 36-75, Grant Line 



CALIFORNIA 



RED AND WHITE 

D. Elissagary 



Phone 19J3 



CALIFORNIA 



ARTHUR ABRAM 

TAILORED SEAT COVERS 

AUTO TOPS AND UPHOLSTERY 

TRUCK AND TRACTOR CUSHIONS 



TRACY 



BERVERDOR, INC. 



48 W. llth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE COVERT 

CARLOT PRODUCE 
P. O. Box 731 



CALIFORNIA 



Installation Wh le You Wait 

TRACY GLASS SHOP 

AUTO GLASS • DOOR HANDLES • MIRRORS 
FURNITURE TOPS • PLATE GLASS • WINDOW GLAZING 

Telephone 299 W Coiner Sixth and B Streets 

TRACY CALIFORNIA 



Jackson Bros. Auto Body & Paint Works 

BAKE ENAMEL RE-FINISHING 



TRACY 



19 West 7th Street Phone 805-J 



llth and E Streets Phone 889-W 



CALIFORNIA TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 636 Laurent Etchemendy 

PASTIME POOL HALL 

LIQUORS AND MIXED DRINKS 
I CENTRAL AVENUE TRACY. CALIFORNIA TRACY 



WESTERN HOTEL 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February - March, 1 949 



96. The release of a convicted person, without prison sen- 
tence, on condition that he lead an orderly life for a 
stated period is known as: (1) parole; (2) pardon; 
(3) acquittal; (4) nolle prosequi; (">) probation. 

97. Probation is: (1) a method of releasing a defendant 
from jail; (2) excusing the commission of a crime; 
(3) suspending sentence on certain conditions; (4) 
a hearing to determine what sentence should be im- 
posed. 

98. That kind of evidence which, under every possible 
circumstance, affords the greatest certainty of proving 
the authenticity of a document is known as: (1) 
direct; (2) cumulative; (3) primary; (4) secondary; 
(^) prima facie. 

99. Additional evidence of a different character, to the 
same point, is called: (1) corroborative; (2) circum- 
stantial; (3) res gestae; (4) direct; (5) competent. 

1 00. A prison sentence which provides for a minimum 
sentence but has no maximum sentence is: (1) a 
misdemeanor; (2) no crime because no penalty is 
provided; (3) unconstitutional; (4) indeterminate; 
(?) faulty. 

PARKER AVE. MEAT MARKET 

Choice 
FRESH MEATS - SMOKED MEATS - FISH AND POULTRY 

Pat Henderson, Prop. 

S56 Parker Ave. Phone 989-J 



TRACY 



CALIFORNIA 



LEE SIMS 
BIG OAK 

Dining Room 
Cocktail Lounge 

DANCING 
SATURDAY NIGHT 



On Highway 101 

Six Miles North of Ukiah 

(Mendocino County, California) 



BILL OSTINFS 
Cigars - Drinks - Eats 



Ukiah, California 



"ANDY' S" 

HOTEL AND MOTEL 

Cocktail Lounge - Cafe - Fine Foods 
Dining and Dancing 

Comfortable New Accommodations 

1 Mile South of WILLITS, 101 Highway 
Phone 184 



EL RIO CLUB 
Cocktail Lounge 



and Cafe 



♦ ♦ 



Meridian, California 



CLUB CALPELLA 

Mario. Ben and Harry, Props. 

Nothing But the Best of 

Liquors, Beer and Wine Served 

Enjoy our Shuffleboard 

On Highway 101, 6 Miles North of Ukiah 

Calpella, California 

(Mendocino County) 






February- March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5i 



Members of Ukiah Police Department 

13 




You won't find more efficient law enforcement officers in this state than these members who enforce the laws up in the Redwood 
Empire. From left to right — Matron and Secretary Nan Milne. Officers Robert Moore. Ladd Thomas. Hal Bishop. Chief John Via- 
rengo. Sergeant W. C. Griffis. Officers Robert Amundsen. Travis Simpson and Joseph Weselshy. 



W1LL1TS 



TRAVELERS HOTEL 

Phone 67 
ON HIGHWAY 101 



CALIFORNIA 



VISIT THE 

SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 

Merrill Williams, Prop. 

IN CENTER OF TOWN 

at 157 So. Main Street 

V1LL1TS (Mendocino County), CALIFORNIA 

HILL CREST MOTEL 

In the Oaks and Pines 
MODERN CABINS 
Friendly Associated Service 

On the Redwood Highway No. 101, Half Mile North 
of Calpella Between Ukiah and Willits 

Phone 29Y21 
CECIL HOPPER - Proprietors - DARREL HART 



JOHNS SHACK 

John and Elma Orio, Owners 

BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 
OUR FOOD CAN'T BE BEAT 

On Highway 101 6 M les North or Ukiah, California 
CALPELLA (Mendocino Countv). CALIFORNIA 



R. E. LEDFORD 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



Phone 246-J 



TALMAGE 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHNNIE'S FOOD STORE 

GROCERIES • MEATS 
FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 



So. State Street 



UKIAH 



CALIFORNIA 



SOUTHWORTH INN 

S Miles North of Ukiah 
ON 101 HIGHWAY 

MENDOCINO COUNTY. CALIFORNIA 





AUTHORIZED FORD DEALERS 




JOHN PHILIP SOUSA 




104 W. 11th Street Telephone Tracy 127 


TRACY 


CALIFORNIA 







JOE'S GOLDEN NUGGET 



Phone 639 



CALIFORNIA 



MODEL BAKERY 

M. J. ENZLER 
113 West Perkins Street Telephone 8 



CALIFORNIA 



Page U 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



1 



Compliments 
of 

THE 

T W N E 

CLUB 

Paul and Kay Dory 



Phone 222 



Willits, California 



i — 



r------ 


HOTEL 




RIO VISTA 




Gordon Stewart, Manager 




COFFEE SHOP 




TAVERN 


Pharmacy - Toggery - Club Rooms 




Banquet Service 




• 




Phone 28 Box 789 




Rio Vista, California 



Always A Friendly Welcome 

MIDWAY CAFE 

CHICKEN - STEAKS 
COCKTAILS 



GALT Y 

GALT, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2541 



THE ADOBE 

The Management has done its utmost to restore the 
historie Adobe, huilt by Don Salvio Pacheos, to its 
original condition for the comfort and enjoyment of 
all visitors. We serve the Finest of Foods available. 



Our Dinners Start at #2.00 
Lunches from 85c 

Our Beverages are of the Best 
and Our Patio Is Unique 

* 

Location 2030 Adobe Street 

Concord, California 

(Contra Costa County) 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page J)" 



THE STAGG 

A. Costa and I. J. Maranise, Props. 

Cocktails and Mixed Drinks 

Choice Wines, Beer, Liquors 

WHERE OLD TIMERS MEET 

15 West Sixth Street 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



"Fine Foods and Liquors" 

WEST SIDE MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 
LIQUORS 



Phone 601 
129 Central Avenue 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



TONY'S 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 

* 

Phone 709 
On The Highway 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



Shop at The 

DAYLITE MARKET 

Finest Meats - Quality Groceries 
Fresh Vegetables 



TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



-4 

— I 



TRACY GRILL 

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Andrews, Prorietors 
Breakfast - Luncheon - Dinner 

Also Fountain Service - Sandwiches 
EXCELLENT COFFEE and PASTRIES 



Phone 775 On Highway 50 

18 East Eleventh Street 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



Meet Me at The 

Horse Shoe Restaurant 

The Right Place to Eat 

Chrest Farakos, Prop. 

Phone 381 
35 East 11th Street 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



Sun Valley Creamery 

Wholesale and Retail 
The Finest in Dairy Products 

Phone Tracy 98 
42 West Tenth Street 

TRACY, CALIFORNIA 



THE DINER 


■----■» 


ALWAYS OPEN 




• 




On U. S. Highway 




TRACY, CALIFORNIA 





Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February -March, 1949 



CHIEF DOYLE 

(Continued from page 9) 
his face from flying splinters when this slug tore through 
the wall. 

Then Chief Doyle, Undersheriff Williams and Deputy 
Bridgett led the march in the front door after spraying 
the front room with machine gun bullets, each officer 
was very alert for any more gun fire but "Old George" 
had had enough. He was found crouching on the floor 
of the back room, more scared than hurt. 

Between his legs were two double-barrelled 12-gauge 
shot guns, which "Old George" had been using. He 
loaded his own shells by pouring hot lead in the casings 
making a slug about one and one-half inches long. 

The arrested man had several boxes of these slugs with 
which he battled the peace officers during the long battle. 
One of these slugs was removed from the body of the 
murdered man. 

"Old George," a small man of only five feet, was taken 
out of the ark, now a shambles, and conveyed to the 
Sausalito City Prison where he was searched. He had 
$2650 in cash in three wallets. 

The prisoner, who came to Sausalito from the Island 
of Crete, and who spoke no English, said he was aiming 
to return to his native country, and that his nephew 
owed him money and he was afraid he would be robbed 
of the other cash he had by the man whom he shot and 
killed and then set his body afire. He set forth his reasons 
for the crime on a board over one of the windows. It 
was in old time Greek and the officers had a hard time to 
get some one who could translate this message. 

In the superior court in San Rafael George Koslos was 
found insane and he was committed to a State Hospital. 
In court he testified in his native tongue "Good men die 
and go to heaven and others burn," so he shot Pete Hodgea 
and poured gasoline over his body and cremated him on 
the spot. 

Chief Doyle is mighty pleased that his long campaign 
to have his Police Department equipped with necessary 
and up-to-date riot equipment was won before this crime 
was committed. As it was he had nearly $1000 worth 
of gas guns, gas masks, riot guns, rifles and gas bombs 
available for the large number of peace officers who an- 
swered his call for assistance. These men who answered 
his call demonstrated most clearly how law enforcement 
agencies have banded together in California to render aid 
to any other officers who needs help. 

SOUTH SIDE GROCERY 

Pete Albano, Prop. 
GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 
WINE • BEER • TOBACCO AND CANDY 



Phone 425 



27 West Third Street 



TRACY 



FRANK M. WILLIAMS 

JEWELER 
VACAVILLE DIXON 

336 Merchant Street 221 Main Street 
Phone 2182 Phone 20 



VACAVILLE LIQUOR STORE 

Earle N. Austin 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - WINES - LIQUORS 
BEER - SOFT DRINKS 

355 Main Street Phone 2044 

VACAVILLE CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN WEST MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH GARDEN VEGETABLES 
BEER - WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



525 Main Street 



VACAVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



BUCKHORN TAVERN 

GOOD FOOD - DRINKS 
and COURTESY OUR MOTTO 



DIXON 



CALIFORNIA 



THE REX INN and AUTO COURT 

CABINS BEER - GOOD FOOD 

AND SOFT DRINKS 



Phone Fairfield 11R4 



FAIRFIELD 



CALIFORNIA 



TAYLOR AND PERDARIS 

Radios, Phonographs, Records, Electrical Appliances 
Refrigerators, Washing Machines, Ranges, Repair Service 



208 G Street 



Phone 776 



DAVIS 



CALIFORNIA 



MOM AND POP'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 
Open 6 A.M. 'til 11 P.M. 

98 Main Street 

PORT CHICAGO (Contra Costa County). CALIFORNIA 



I. G. A. STORE 

GROCERIES AND 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



Phone 33 



PORT CHICAGO 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO JUNK COMPANY 

Dealers in 

SCRAP IRON, METAL, SACKS, WOOL 

All Types of Government Surplus for Sale Including Pipe. Belting, 

Hardware, Anvils, Vises, Sleeping Bags, Hooks, Cable, Etc. 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



1425 Ninth Streret 



Phone 546 



CALIFORNIA 



Most Popular Place in Town 

THE BUCKHORN 

A. DOMINGUEZ, Prop. 

FINE LIQUORS, BEER and WINE - GOOD FOOD 

513 Main Street Phone 6782 

VACAVILLE CALIFORNIA 



February -March, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



MODESTO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 10) 
and he must attend training schools, in fact every member 
has to attend yearly a FBI school or one conducted by 
the State Peace Officers' Association, in various zones 
of the state. The recruit must learn how to handle the 
tools of his calling, how to take care of his side arms, 
fire it and perfect himself in marksmanship, and how 
to care for his automobile and the two way radio equip- 
ment of those cars. So when the new comer finishes his 
first six months he is able to give the best in law en- 
forcement. 

It is a pleasing condition to see the good fellowship 
that prevails among the members of the Modesto Police 
Department, they are all for one another, and no dis- 
harmony has arisen since Chief Pickering took over. 

The Department five sergeants, and three inspectors. 

The sergeants are : 

Robert Morton, John Smith. William Coulson, John 
Meier. 

The Inspectors are: 

Chief Inspector Elmer Horan, Harry Goman, Abra- 
ham Lamport. Other members follow: 

Fay Pittman, Joseph Woods, Harry Fleming, Anthony 
Adams, Peter DeMott, Lawrence Jones, Eric Larson, 
Leland Murphy, Don Russell, Gene Thompson, George 
Bruton, Berni Finch, John Shalberg, Rex Strand, Jack 
Lockridge, Ted Hanke, Allen Sims, Roy Livingston, 
Leon Livingston, Edward Maybee, Ferrell Parker, Nor- 
man Sturm, Ernest Ganzel, David Cole, Thomas Mc- 
Cumber. 

KNOX SEED COMPANY 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN" 

STOCKTON AND MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO MARKET 

M. E. Angelo, Prop. 
MODESTO'S FINEST FOOD MARKET 



Ninth and H Street 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



EL CAPITAL 



CALIFORNIA BUILDERS SUPPLY 



WHOLESALE ONLY 



OAKLAND 



SACRAMENTO 



FRESNO 



NEW CANTON GRILL 

CHOP SUEY 

EXCELLENT CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

WE PUT UP ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

1008 Tenth Street Phone 5582 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

"The Best for Less" 

LEE SANG MEAT MARKET 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

FRESH, SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

1004 H Street Phone 528 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



S 8c M TRIANGLE MARKET 



1105 Needham Avenue 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



PUBLIC MARKET 



911 Needham Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BRENT FOOD MARKET 

QUALITY SELECTION • SERVICE 

COMPLETE SELECTION OF MEATS AND POULTRY 

Cor. 12th and Needham Phone 302 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 

P & G HOME APPLIANCES 

WASHERS • IRONERS • HOME FREEZERS 

DUTCH OVEN GAS RANGES 

We Repair All Makes of Washers 

50S "H" Street Phone 1703W 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA POULTRY MARKET 

L. HAGARTY, Owner 
502 H Street Phone 1206 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



PECK'S Bait and Sport Shop 

RAY PECK, Prop 



725 Seventh Street 



Phone 3257W 



MODESTO 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



913 J Street 



Phone 5659 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



SING LEE LAUNDRY 

Phone Modesto 2074 
716 Seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



J. GREENBERG AND CO. 

PLUMBING • HARDWARE • ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 
PAINT • APPLIANCES 



MODESTO 



1326-32 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



HOTEL UNION 



702 y 2 Seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ECONOMY LAUNDRY 



MODESTO 



1424 Ninth Street 



Phone 253 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



FLOR DE MEXICO CAFE 

M. Fortado, Prop. 

MEXICAN DINNERS 

BEER AND WINES 

606 Seventh Street Phone 5622 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



ACME GLASS COMPANY 

Joseph A. Mengelt, Prop. 
710 G Street Phone 3226 



J. F. DICKINSON COMPANY 

RADIO • RECORDS • HOME APPLIANCES 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



716 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL DOLLAR STORE 



MODESTO 



WHERE YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE 
926 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA MODESTO 



ANDRE CLUB 



727 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Febraar\ ■ March, 1949 



.Mrs. Babe Rumsey is secretary to Chief Pickering and 
the following are matrons — Lucille Harrington, Helen 
Lewis and Wanda Disney 

There is but little of the bigger crimes happening in 
Modesto. In fact during 1948 the figure for robberies 
and burglaries were below that of 1947 and the jobs 
pulled have all been cleared up with arrests and con- 
victions. There hasn't been a murder in two years. Petty 
crimes keep the members of the department busy, but with 
no gambling, no prostitution the work of the force is 
made that much easier. 

Traffic, as in all busy centers, is something that keeps 
the members on their toes. The Planning Commission 
shows that there are 15,000 more cars coming into Mo- 
desto daily than four years ago. 

To handle this problem Chief Pickering has a traffic 
detail of eight men under Sergeant William Coulson, 
who has taken two courses in the Northewestern Course 
at the University of California, and two more men, 
Officers Sturm and Russell are attending the traffic school 
at the V. C. now in session. 

Chief Pickering follows a plan not common in this 
state regarding traffic. For every driver of a car involved 
in an accident, whether there is an injury, a death or 
even a dented fender has his men take a full report on 
age, sex, damage done and other data about the mishap. 
These are all kept in the police files. 

Last year there were 443 accidents, in which four 
deaths resulted and 99 people injured and in the reports 
on these over 400 accidents there is information whether 



MODESTO 



OWL RESTAURANT 

STEAKS AND CHOPS 
820 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



ALTA ROOMS 

Mrs. Leonard Stanton, Prop. 
822 > 2 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



McCARTS MARKET 

MEATS AND GROCERIES 
Fifth and K Street Phone 925 



CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO MATTRESS CO. 



MODESTO 



912 McHenry Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



MUNEZ-ROBBINS RADIO 

PHILCO-ZENITH DEALERS 
SALES - SERVICE 

626 H Street Phone 3890M 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



PERK'S 400 CLUB 



Sixth and H Streets Phone 5568 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



Rodsy Reels 



C. L. (Chuck) Buring 



MODESTO 



MODESTO ROD AND GUN CLUB 

714 H Street Phone 1682 

CALIFORNIA 



MODESTO 



PIGG'S FOOD MARKETS 

Phone 925 
Fifth and H Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA MEAT MARKET 



MODESTO 



916 H Street 



Phone 819 



CALIFORNIA 



SHOOB'S CAMERA SHOP 

THOMAS SHOOB 

Cameras • Projectors • Films • Motion Picture Equipment 

Photographic Supplies and Chemicals • Photo Finishing 

Enlarging • Copying • Fine Grain Developing 

1024 TENTH STREET MODESTO. CALIFORNIA 

SONOMA FRUIT MARKET 

Bob Williams, Owner and Mgr. 
PRODUCE • WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



MODESTO 



DANNY'S 

FINE FOOD - COCKTAILS 
Phone 5610 415 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Meat Dept. Phone 3668-J Grocery Phone 4037 

WORKING MAN'S MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES - BEER 

WINE - SOFT DRINKS - DRUGS AND NOTIONS 

533 CUTTING BLVD. RICHMOND. CALIFORNIA 



UNION CLUB 



MODESTO 



703 S. 99 Highway 



Phone 3788W 



CALIFORNIA 



MAJESTIC FURNITURE CO. 



MODESTO 



MODESTO 



725 Tenth Street and 922 H Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ARCH HOTEL 

CHARLES HARVEY. Prop. 

918 1 '- Eye Street Phone 4683W 

MODESTO CALIFORNIA 



CASAZZA BROTHERS 



DELICATESSEN 
311 H Street Phone 473W 



401 First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANCIS DANIELS Chevron Service 

ROAD SERVICE 

1st and J Streets Phone Benicia 493 

BEN1CIA CALIFORNIA 

BENICIA YELLOW CAB SERVICE 



Phone Benicia 100-W 



BENICIA 



826 First Street 

CALIFORNIA 



MANUEL'S PLACE 



714 First Street 



CALIFORNIA BENICIA 



CALIFORNIA 



BONA VIA AND BONA VIA 

LIQUORS AND CARDS 



MODESTO 



804 Ninth Street 



CALIFORNIA BENICIA 



PASTIME CAFE 

726 First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



February ■ March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 59 



the killed or injured were drivers or occupants of autos 
or pedestrians, whether the cars were forced off the road, 
collided headon or turned over. 

All members of the Police Department are on civil 
service, and on retirement with years of service as low 
as 55 years, get a pension of half their salaries, under 
the state plan. 

Chief Pickering is highly pleased by his force of reserve 
policemen. It numbers 50 men who go through the same 
basic training as men for the regular force and they give 
regular hours each week. In a squad of five there is 
assigned a regular member of the Modesto Police De- 
partment. Besides in assisting in patrol work they give 
great assistance to all celebrations, baseball and football 
games and are able to be assembled on call on very short 
notice. They are uniformed and carry the necessary 
equipment of a police officer. 

Mayor Carl W. Shannon, Police Commissioner Carl 
J. Stanley and the other councilmen, James Wilson, L. M. 
Morris and Floyd Benson give the utmost in cooperation 
to the Police Department, and they have seen that the 
members have all the necessary tools for law enforcement. 

The Police Department at the present time has out- 
grown its headquarters, and it is patent that with the 
annexation of the fringe area larger quarters will have 
to be provided for. 

Chief Pickering served last year as president of the 
Stanislaus County Peace Officers' Association. The pres- 
ent officers of the Association are: 

President — Chief Dan Kelsay, of Patterson. 

Vice President — Judge H. O. Carlson, of Turlock. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Sergeant Morton, of Modesto 
Police Department. 

The Association meets monthly, the date being the first 
Monday after the first of the month. 

NAPA GROCERY 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES - FRESH FISH and 

POULTRY - FRESH and CURED MEATS 

"Lowest Prices in Town" 

1343 MAIN STREET Phone 93 NAPA. CALIF. 

MARIE'S ICE CREAM PARLOR 

SANDWICHES and COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

We Make Our Own Ice Cream 

1100 Main Street 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 



GUARANTEE 
ROOFING COMPANY 

A California Corporation 
WE DO NOTHING BUT THE BEST WORK 

328 San Pablo Avenue 

El Cerrito, California 

Phone LAndscape 5-4141 



Tom Ciahos 



Bill Poulos 



B. AND T. MARKET 

Phone 17 
Corner 8th and "H" Streets 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Two Modern Markets to Serve You 

MELLIS BROS. 

Phone 1033 

WINES - MEATS - LIQUORS 
GROCERIES 

7th and Eye Streets 319 McHenry Avenue 

MODESTO, CALIFORNIA 



Most Popular Place in Town 

THE BUCKHORN 

Fine Liquors, Beer and Wine 
GOOD FOOD 



513 Main Street 

Vacaville, California 

Phone 6782 



—— _j 



CARL'S CLUB 

Carl Chlin - Chas. Thomas 
321 Panhandle Blvd. 

El Cerrito, California 

LAndscape 5-9731 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



NCPOC ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from page 14 I 

Director George Hippely, San Francisco Police, Chair- 
man of the Membership Committee gave his final report 
and was commended for an outstanding job performed 
in 1948. 

Tom Bayley : Inter-City, reported progress. 

George Burton: Procedure & Point to Point. Also 
reported no interference to T-V from Mt. Diablo Re- 
peater. Jim Lewis, Marin County, told of changes neces- 
sary on repeaters in his area to eliminate interference to 
T-V with the job successfully completed. 

Rox Pcnlon, commercial member chairman reported 
progress. Rox turned in a fine job for 1948. 

Reports from the commercial members followed: 

Pres. Coggelshall, Federal. 

Herb Watson and L. French. Link. 

Frank Manov and Bill Kellog, Motoroa. 

Rox Penson, Antenna Engineer. Spoke on towers in 
general and faults to look for in purchasing same. 

George Burton proposed a ladies night to be held in 
Martinez, next month. It was decided to postpone this 
affair until a later date. 

Ray Meyers and Frank Manov will be our hosts at 
Vallejo in February. 



GRAND MARKET 

(Richmond's Finest) 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH 

VEGETABLES - FRUIT 
BEER, WINE and SOFT DRINKS 

1100 Twenty-third Street 

Richmond, California 



7 



AVAILABLE? 

LOU'S 

CHOICE CUISINE 
WINES LIQUORS 

Never a Dull Moment 

701 A Street 
Phone 153 

ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA 



1 i 



i 

t 
i 



Lafayette Food Center 
Fountain 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinners 
and Short Orders 

Complete Fountain Service 

W. J. ROCHA, Prop. 



Lafayette (Contra Costa Co.), Calif. 

VOGUE 
Cocktail Lounge 

FINEST OF FOODS 



Fourth and O Street 
ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA 

(Contra Costa County) 



Everything for Your Pet Drink 

B AND L LIQUORS 

Imported and Domestic 

LIQUORS AND WINES 

Beer - Mixers - Tobaccos 
and Soft Drinks 



718 Third Street 

Antioch, California 

Phone 131-M— WE DELIVER 



L. 



February ■ March, 194*) 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 61 



A motion by Al Taggart and seconded by Geo. Burton 
to amend our Constitution and By-Laws to permit only 
properly licensed Engineers to be eligible to the offices 
of President, Vice President, and Secretary. After con- 
siderable discussion this subject was put to a vote and 
overwhelmingly defeated. 

The secretary was instructed to cast a unanimous 
ballot for the following officers for 1949: 

President, Charles Simpson, Monterey Police. 

Vice-President, Walter Keller, City of Santa Cruz. 

Secretary. Bob Mason, Santa Clara County. 

Treasurer, Al Taggart, Oakland Police. 

Motion by Jim Lewis, seconded by Tom Bayley, carried. 

The following are the newly elected Board of Directors 
for 1949: Tom Bayley, Geo. Burton, A. J. Silva, Ray 
Meyers, Henri Kirby. 

Our new President, Chas. Simpson, was presented the 
gavel by Ray Meyers, who thanked all members for the 
cxellent support given him during 1948. 

President Simpson praised Ray Meyers for his services 
to the Association during the past year and stated in his 
acceptance speech that "Communications with a purpose 
will be the keynote for 1949." 

President Simpson appointed his first and most im- 
portant committee. The Engineering and Frequency Com- 
mittee. No one needs any introduction to Captain Brower 
McMurphy, Alameda County Sheriff's Office, Chairman. 
Mac has certainly done an excellent job with the most 
serious and complex problem which affects every Safety 
Service in our jurisdiction. Radio Engineers George Bur- 
ton and Frank Manov will assist Mac in this important 
work. 

Meeting adjourned. 



JOE MANAS 

THE YOLO CLUB 
BEER • WINE • LUNCHES 



KITTY DRIVE-IN 

Miss Ann Brassfield 
your friendly and capable hostess 

CREAM TOPPED HOMOGENIZED SHAKES 

All Flavors and Delicious Sandwiches 

TRY OUR CHICKEN IN THE BASKET 
Corner Ninth and A Street 

ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA 



Tel. Antioch 1 18 Bernard Taillefer, Prop. 

Antioch French Laundry 

For Those Who Want The Best 
Our Aim Is To Please 

820 Second Street 

ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA 



YOLO 



Phon 



l-J-3 



Highway 99-W 



NEWSOM AND BECHTEL 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Phone OLymp:c 2-5572 5760 Shellmound Street 

EMERYVILLE CA1FORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



ZINKE'S SHOE REPAIRING 



2637 Mission Street 



1621 Telegraph Ave. 
Oakland, Calif. 



1 183 Market Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 

UOS K Street 
Sacramento, Calif. 



50 Geary Street 



296 S. 2nd Street 
San Jose, Calif. 



CRANE CO 



San Francisco, California 



QUESTION MARK Cocktail Lounge 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND BAR 



Phone UNderhill 1-9345 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1437 Haight Street 

CALIFORNIA 



ALBERT WRIGHT 



ACCURATE SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 



4062 Hollis Street 



EMERYVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL RITZ 



3872 San Pablo Avenue 



EMERYVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Berkeley Sheet Metal Works 

SHEET METAL JOBBING AND 
MANUFACTURING 



Phone THornwall 3-1852 

3045 Hollis Street, Between 67th and Folger St. 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



February - March, 1949 



The Oakland Matches 

The 1948 Pistol averages and 1949 classification book 
of the Western Revolver Association is just off the press 
and we glean a few interesting facts from its contents 
which we will pass on to you. As usual, the booklet is 
mimeographed and contains 26 pages of which 13 of them 
contain all the shooters who have been on the range dur- 
ing 1948 and their "49 classification. The other pages are 
general information about the W.S.R. scores, and winners 
of the various classes last year. During 1948 there were 



LIGHT 



is your best ally 

Accidents and crime go hand in hand with 
darkness. Well lighted streets and highways 
cut policing problems and dangers to the 
minimum. 

For your own protection, insist that lighting 
keeps pace with street and highway develop- 
ment. 

Call on Graybar Electric Company, Inc., or 
General Electric Supply Corporation for en- 
gineering assistance. 



m 



HUBBARD 

AND 



OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



MT. DIABLO PRINTING CO. 



2896 Mt. Diable Boulevard 



WALNUT CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



ARBUCKLE HOTEL 

Frank J. Basil, Prop. 

STEAM HEAT - AIR CONDITIONED 
COFFEE SHOP - DINING ROOM - COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

On Highway 99W 
ARBUCKLE (Colusa County). CALIFORNIA 



Nicholson Plumbing 8C Mfg. Company 

J. C. Nicholson 
SPECIALIZED IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT 



3 18 C STREET 



DAVIS. CALIFORNIA 



C. A. JORGENSON 

POULTRY • EGGS • FEEDS 
Phone 2446 



WALNUT CREEK 



CALIFORNIA 



CHARLES M. GINSEY 



AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER 



DIXON (Solano County). CALIFORNIA 



DIXON CREAMERY 

DELICIOUS FOOD 

and 

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

DIXON (Solano County). CALIFORNIA 



THE MILK FARM 

H. R. HENDERSON 

America's Most Unique 
Restaurant 

On U. S. Highway 40 



Dixon 



California 



February March, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 63 

11 competitions with an approximate 10% increase in Cap 'n Ball match, 12 shots at 25 yards, championship 

attendance at their range for 1948 over 1947 and the went to Bob Chow who fired this match for the first 

largest number of competitors in a single during '48 was time in 1948. 

170 shooters. Back in 1940 their big day was 232 cus- 

tomers. At the annual dinner and Board of Directors . RHOUA ROHLr S 

meeting the following members were elected to serve as beer _ SANDWICHES AND 

the Executive Committee for 1949: 

President Cliff Hatch S0FT DR,NKS 

1st Vice President Ray Felton antioch California 

2nd Vice President Phil Lander 

_ „ „- , , _,, GROWING WITH CALIFORNIA 

Executive Officer Vern Ihorp 

Secretary-Treasurer John (Cap) Strohm CRYSTAL POOL MARKET 

We must hand it to the Oakland boys for giving the „__ __,,, _ 

' & & JOE c i MA> p r0 p. 

bay area shooters a lot of opportunity to shoot and it 

seems that they want to change their matches to satisfy ° n Concord Highway, Two Miles North of 

the gun-slingers, handicap matches, police course matches, walnut creek. California 

cap and ball matches — anything to please the crowds. Of THE NUT BO\^L 

course this can be done on their range as they are not 

registered NRA matches so anything goes. The crowds, good food and friendly service 

we would judge, average around 140 shooters a Sunday breakfast • lunch • dinner 

and with 52 targets they get through in a hurry. The fountain service • candy • ice cream 

matches are well run, the medals are very nice and the 

, .... i tt 1532 MAIN STREET WALNUT CREEK. CALIF. 

weather — well let s not go into that in this article. Hats 

off to the Western Revolver Association and the Oakland FORRR AT RFAT TORQ 

Police and Fire Department Club. 

SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY 

Aggregate Scores for 1948 
Champion 13S0 Main Slreet 
Slow-fire: W. H. Dowling, San Jose Pistol Club walnut creek California 
Timed-fire: Jack Ahern, S. F. Police Department 

r> ■ i r /~i i i /~i it ■ tt- t-> i Phone: Homeland 6-9968 

Kapid-hre: Cap Jacobs, California Miway Patrol 

Center-fire: G. Elliott Murphy, SF Police Rev. Club tl > w;- n_ o^ j* 

,„ ,1 r^ r, , , J,, ■ r, ™ > 1 nompson s Wallpaper Studio 

.22 caliber: Doc Bilafor, SF Police Revolver Club r r r 

.45 caliber: Bob Show, SF Police Revolver Club. Phone 3296 

learns 

_ ™ „ 2061 Mt. Diablo Blvd. 

Class A 

c -o n l- r> i niLm Ji WALNUT CREEK CALIFORNIA 

ban Francisco Police Revolver Club (Red) 

Class "B" 
San Francisco Police Revolver Club (Blue) Y - K ' s PLACE 

Class "C" and beauty shop 

Camp Stoneman Pistol Club. walnut grove California 



TINY'S HUT 

Elmer Hansen, Prop. 
In Beautiful Walnut Creek 

(Contra Costa County) 



1716 Main Street 



WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Febr 



■March, 1949 



SHERIFF H. P. (JACK) GLEASON 

(Continued from page 16) 
never cures an alcoholic and that repeaters continually 
clog the court's calendar." 

Sharing the same faith in the success of the alcoholic 
clinic with Jack Gleason are District Attorney Frank 
Coakley, Probation Officerr Ollie F. Snedigar, Superior 
Judge A. T. Shine, in fact every official who has come in 
contact with the "drunkard." 

In explaining the program in more detail Sheriff 
Gleason points out: 

"There will be no guess work. A complete record will 
be kept of every person who enters the clinic and per' 
sonal follow-up contacts will be made both with the 
individual and his family. At the end of the year, we will 
know for certain whether rehabilitation has been effected 
or whether a case is hopeless. 

"We can then determine whether or not the social 
and financial benefits of the program are worth the cost 
and effort." 

The clinic's staff will consist of a medical psychiatrist 
as head of the unit, a psychiatric social worker, two gradu- 
ate nurses, a stenographer and two junior stenographers. 

As an advisory committee assisting Sheriff Gleason 



DAKOTA AUTO COURT 

BUNGALOWS AND RESTAURANT 



FAIRFIELD 



CALIFORNIA 



EXCHANGE LINEN SERVICE CO. 

A COMPLETE 
RENTAL LINEN SUPPLY SERVICE 

Phone TEmplebar 2-6377 2101 Union Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

LAKESIDE JUNK DEALERS 



MORRIE KANTOR 

Proprietor and General Manager 



Telephone HIgate 4-5466 



412 Madison Street 
Oakland 7, California 



THE ANCHOR 

University Avenue, at 10th Street 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



East Bay Sanitary Rag Works 

Manufacturers of 
DOMESTIC and SANITARY WIPING RAGS 



QUALITY 



SERVICE 



OAKLAND CASKET COMPANY 



Geo. Gradin, Proprietor 
Telephone GLencourt 1-0586 2514 Adeline Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



Phone TEmplebar 2-8139, if no answer call ANdover 1-5874 

2842 Adeline Street 

CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN IRON & BODY WORKS 

INDUSTRIAL STEEL PRODUCTS 



FRANK SPENCER COMPANY 

RESTAURANT and SEA FOOD MARKET 



1165 - 67th Street Telephone HUmboIdt 3-7831 Phone BErkeley 7-7745 1919 Fourth Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA Near University Avenue BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 



ASSOCIATED DRY CLEANERS 



McGRATH STEEL COMPANY 

REINFORCING STEEL • WIRE MESH 



OLympic 2-2110 1200 - 34th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



6655 Hollis Street Phone Piedmont 5-7262 

EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Oakland Overall Laundry, Inc. 



THE SPORTSMEN 



J. & L. INN 

Joe Peppers - Proprietors - Louis Miller 



3423 Harlan Street Telephone Piedmont 5-0772 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

S. KULCHAR 8C CO. 



Piedmont 5-2570 1 132 Stanford Ave. 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone: HUmboIdt 3-2368 



Res. Phone: KEIIog 2-6152 



Telephone GLencourt 1-1814 

FINE CABINET WORKS 

STORE AND BANK FIXTURES 

Mill and Office 

Eighth Avenue and East Tenth Street 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



BENNER-NAWMAN, Inc. 

Robert L. Nawman 



3421 Hollis Street 



CALIFORNIA 



February -March, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 6 J 



will be Harry Bartell, chairman of the board of super- 
visors, District Attorney Coakley, Dr. Whitecotton, Pro- 
bation Chief Snedigar, a superior court judge, a police 
court judge, a justice of the peace, an active member of 
Alcoholic Anonymous. 

Significant of the approach that Sheriff Gleason is 
making to the problem are these paragraphs from a paper Oakland California 

to be handed each of the "repeaters" found in the 



BUCK HORN 



LAkehurst 2-9948 



drunk tanks: 

"You have been granted two years probation condi 
tioned on good behavior and upon your serving the first errltt & Agrella 

180 days in the county jail at Santa Rita. 

"The imposition of the jail sentence does not necessarily 
mean you must serve the entire 180 days. 

"Such sentence depends entirely on your co-operation 
with the medical staff, the manner in which you respond 
to their administration and treatment." 

The Alameda County alcoholic clinic got under way 
on January 19th. 



ALOHA CLUB 



KEIlog 2-9280 952 Fruitvale Avenue 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



MYERS BARREL COMPANY 

DRUMS OF ALL SIZES 



Sheriff Gleason has started a new experiment in the 6S49 San Pabl ° Ave - phone °Lym P ic 2-6847 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



INSULATION PRODUCTS CO. 

B. J. Davenny, Manager 
Contractors 



WINSLOW ENGINEERING CO. 



INSULATION - WEATHERSTRIP OIL AND AIR PURIFYING EQUIPMENT SINCE 1923 

LICENSED AND INSURED AUTOMOTIVE - INDUSTRIAL - MARINE 

2S7 Fourth Street TEmplebar 2-2735 OLympic 2-0288 4069 Hollis Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 
— — OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ROLL RITE CORPORATION 

frank robertson PACIFIC GRAPHITE CO., Inc. 



801 Jefferson Street 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



STRATHFORD'S STATIONERY 



40th and Linden Street 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC OXYGEN COMPANY 



5254 College Avenue 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 220S Ma e nolia Street 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



GRAZER'S 

KEUo!r29388 SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 

CANDIES - TOBACCOS - MAGAZINES 

Fruitvale Avenue, Corner E. 27th Avenue 1284 2 2nd Street Phone Hlgate 4-0645 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ED'S PLACE 

BEER AND MIXED DRINKS 
KEIlog 2-9279 5517 Foothill Boulevard 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Sil Vario Phone TEmplebar 2-0558 

BANK CLUB 

DELICIOUS TURKEY, HAM AND 
CORNED BEEF SANDWICHES 



OAKLAND CALIFORNIA Corner of Seventh and Washington Streets 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Phone HIghgate 4-2479 Carl Bersch & Sons 

BAY CITY CABINET COMPANY J. W. HARVEY 

Since 1910 • Manufacturers of Distributor: WATK1NS PRODUCTS 

BANK, STORE AND OFFICE FIXTURES 
High Grade Cabinet and Church Work, Etc. Phone: THornwall 3-5975 2447 San Pablo Ave. 

1076 FIFTH STREET OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



February -March, 1949 



rehabilitation program which has been close to his heart 
for more than 10 years. 

Incidentally the Santa Rita Prison Farm sparkles with 
activity. The inmates are happy. They farm the land. 
They have wholesome living quarters. They have free 
movie shows and other entertainment features. They 
have social halls. 

Its normal alcoholic population is 100 while there are 
some 300 others within the grounds sentenced for all 
kinds of crimes. 

The farm's capacity is HOO, according to Sheriff 
Gleason. During World War II it was operated by the 
United States Navy as Camp Shoemaker. It is one of 
the most modern prison farms in the nation with broad 
streets and splendid barracks and auditorium and office 
buildings. 

R. Lea R. M. Moran 

LEA-MORAN MACHINE WORKS 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS 

Factory Repair Work and Marine Work Our Specialty 

Telephone OLympic 2-5060 6565 San Pablo Avenue 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Oakland Sheet Metal Supply Co., Inc. 

Phone HIgate 4-2075 2100 Poplar Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Joe Catera 



Peter Boscacci 



HALF MOON COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DINE AND DANCE 

TWinoaks 3-1523 14th & Cypress Streets 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

CASH SALE 

KEY PIPE AND SUPPLY COMPANY 

Wholesale PIPING • CASING • TUBING • CULVERT 

VALVES • FITTINGS • COUPLINGS • SUPPLIES 

1362 - 7th Street GLencourt 2-4141 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN DOOR & SASH COMPANY 

Fifth and Cypress Streets Telephone TEmplebar 2-8400 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

SAM CLAR COMPANY 

MACHINERY - REFRIGERATION - PIPE - STEEL 

AUCTIONEERS - APPRAISERS - LIQUIDATORS 

Facilities for Handling Any Type Merchandise 

495 Third Street Tel. TWinoaks 3-4696 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Res. Phone GL. 1-0084 



Bus. Phone HU. 3-5114 



PULVER MOTOR MART 

Vern Pulver 
NEW AND USED CARS 

3 736 BROADWAY OAKLAND. CALIF. 

JACK HILLIARD 

USED CARS BOUGHT AND SOLD 



Telephone TEplebar 2-7088 

OAKLAND 



3039 Broadway 

CALIFORNIA 



ED'S AUTO PARTS 

E. G. Swingle 

REBUILT PARTS EXCHANGE - NEW AND USED PARTS 

AUTOMOBILE GLASS INSTALLED 

752 High Street KEllog 2-1833 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

FRED R. BAMMANN 

HARDWARE 
PAINTS AND OILS 
4632 E. 14th St. KEllog 2-4944 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone KEllog 28024 Nick Christo 

New and Used Oak Barrels, Corks, Crocks 

J. 8C J. Liquor Store and Cider Shop 

THE DEPOT OF ALL WINES 
1204 FRU1TVALE AVE. OAKLAND. CALIF. 

BYRD'S GUN STORE 



8328 East 14th Street 



OAKLAND 



REBUILD AND REPAIR YOUR RIFLES 

FOR THE COMING SEASON NOW 

COMPLETE SUPPLIES 



E. L. PRICE PUMP CO. 



576 Fifth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



MILLER & WARNECKE 

ARCHITECTS 
Financial Center Building 



CALIFORNIA 



SIMPSON SCREEN COMPANY 

SCREENS - FANS - LOUVERS - VENTILATORS 

METAL SPECIALTIES 

1050 East Eighth St. TEmplebar 4-9565 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

JAMES H. SMITH 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

Repairing A Specialty 

SEWER CONTRACTING 

HIgate 4-1286 612 Alice Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



THE SAWDUST TRAIL RESTAURANT 



FULTON FOUNTAIN LUNCH 



OAKLAND 



OAKLAND 



OAKLAND 



601 Washington Street 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



4 CLUB 

400 29th Avenue 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



FRED C. SPINDLER 

MACHINE SHOP 



1528 Franklin Street 



CALIFORNIA 



RALPH D. VAN NEST 

5305 College Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



215 12th Street 



HIghgate 4-8078 



CALIFORNIA 



WADE ELECTRIC 

Member BUILDERS EXCHANGE OF OAKLAND 
CONTRACTING - COMMERCIAL & INDUSTRIAL 

5335 College Ave. OLympic 2-6865 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



WE BUILD THE BEST AND REPAIR THE REST 

G. PAOLETTI & CO. 

COMMERCIAL BODIES 
BUILT TO ORDER 



Telephone OLympic 2-1914 

4529 SHATTUCK AVENUE OAKLAND 9. CALIFORNIA 



RAY D. NICHOLS, Realtors 

Residence Phone SWeetwood 8-8353 
REAL ESTATE - LOANS - BUILDING 



9859 MacArthur Blvd. Phone LOckhaven 9-8484 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



February ■ March, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 61 



Associated Iron & Metal Co. 

Associated Smelting Corporation 

Philip Scheibner 



TEmplebar 2-4344 
2730 Peralta Street 

Oakland 7, California 



HOLLY MEAT 
PACKING COMPANY 



Phone TWinoaks 3-3377 
2736 Magnolia Street 

Oakland, California 



HERMAN GOELITZ 

'Manufacturing Confectioner 

CANDY CORN and 
SPECIALTIES 



Telephone OLympic 2-2168 
943 Sixty-First Street 

Oakland, California 



ATLAS IMPERIAL 
DIESEL ENGINE CO. 



1000 Nineteenth Avenue 
OAKLAND 6, CALIFORNIA 



-4 

"1 






L 



ASSOCIATED 
DRY CLEANERS 



1200 - 34th Street 

Oakland, California 

OLympic 2-2 I 10 



EL CURTOLA 

FINEST DINNERS 

Dine in Luxurious Comfort in our 

MODERN DINING ROOM 

Excellent Accommodations for 

Banquets and Wedding Parties 

512 Seventeenth Street GLencourt 1-2887 

Oakland, California 



DELTA CLUB 

M. C. Valine, Prop. 

Box 146 - Phone 21 16 
Isleton, California 



BLACKWELDER 
IRON WORKS 

E. F. Blackwelder, Manager 

• 

Box 808 

Rio Vista, California 

Telephone 136 



Page 68 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL February March, 1949 



MArket 1-9027 Bob Searle, Prop. 

Compliments of 

SEARLE'S CORNER „ . „„„,, T ^^^ ^ rt 

FOOD AND DRINKS CASWELL COFFEE CO. 

SERVED TO YOUR TASTE 

. ,, _ . _ , 642 Harrison Street SUtter 1-6654 

601 Hayes Street, Corner i.aguna 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



TRANSIT SMOKE SHOP 



WESTERN TRUCK LINES, Ltd. 

IN THE WEST — SHIP WESTERN 

75 Columbia Square Telephone MArket 1-8261 

85 First Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIFORNIA 



BUY AND SAVE AT 

ALFRED'S . STEPP IN Grocery and Market 

Alfred and Secondo FRESH MEATS • STAPLE GROCERIES 

GOOD FOOD • PALATABLE DRINKS FRUI I5.A ND ,.,Y E 9. E ,T, A . BLES 

BEER AND WINE 

886 Broadway Phone SUtter 1-7058 _ ,, _ _ ...... „ 

1199 De Haro Street Phone VAlencia 4-9705 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



THE MOTH & FLAME IT CLUB 

ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY 
Open Daily from 10 A.M. 
1400 California Street 

3489 20th Street, Near Mission 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phone OVerland 1-2328 D'ANGELO BROS. 

HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established 1879 ^j & IRV ING MARKET 

SALVAGE H AND^ A ERRICK s BARGES S£RVICE ^ QUAUTy # FISH AND p()ULTRY D£pT 

SAIL MAKERS • SHIP RIGGERS Jack D'Angelo, Prop. 

40 Spear Street Telephone EXbrook 2-0064 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANC | S CO 2 ' 01 ' rVing ^^ CALIFORNIA 



f^f~\TJ ]/" 'NJ' ROTTT F Capt. Jacobs Gus Borgiol 

THE NEWS ROOM 



PHIL, LES AND STUBBY 

"SOMETHING DIFFERENT" 

4007 24th Street VAlencia 4-3779 COCKTAILS AND FOOD 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 79 Fourth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

"MY BUSINESS IS NUTS" _ _ ______ v„^«. , ^ 

J. G. JOHNSON, Inc. 
LE ROY PRODUCTS Phone MUsion 7 " 6363 

TOP GRADE MEATS 

1329 Fulton Street Arthur Avenue and Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 






RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING COMMERCIAL LIGHTING 

MARS METAL COMPANY 

BOOKBINDER BROS. smelting and refining 

Complete Line of R.C.A. TELEVISION SETS Cable Addr « s: CASTO 

Also BENDIX WASHERS Telephone VAlencia 4-1325 

DISTINCTIVE LIGHTING FIXTURES 

1420 Irving Street SEabright 1-2348- 1-2349 Twenty-Third and Minnesota Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



LEO M. DUPUICH WIH. G. MURCHISON c. V. DAVIER LAkehurst 2-8515 

ENCINAL NURSERY ALAMEDA WHEEL & BRAKE SERVICE 

"FOR LANDSAKE" LANDSCAPE OFFICIAL BRAKE TESTING STATION NO. 141 

LAkehurst 2-8616 2057 Encinal Ave. 2217 Central Avenue 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



S. F. BUNCO BUSTERS 

(Continued from page 1 9) 
street, ignoring their commands to stop. Iredalc and 
McMahon fired five times, and the suspect dropped with 
five bullets in what the French call the "derriere" and the 
Greeks, the "gluteous maximus." Though things didn't 
quite sit right with the robber thereafter, he lived to be 
convicted and sent to prison. 

Inspector Morris Harris, now retired, and Inspector 
Iredale worked together as a team for several years, repre- 
senting a formidable two-man front against swindle 
merchants trying to make the harvest pay in San Fran- 
cisco. If Iredale measures up the "country's best" rating 
bestowed upon him by his fellow officers, then he learned 
the business from the man considered by many to have 
been the nation's best bunco detective. Harris and Iredale 
worked together smoothly, their combined talents made 
the flushing out of suspects a foregone conclusion. Harris 
never forgot a face, and Iredale was just as stubborn 
in remembering names. 

What are the qualifications of a good bunco detective, 
and how does he attain them? 

Asking the successful officers of Iredale's Bunco Detail 
questions like that won't produce textbook answers. In- 
stead, the reply is likely to deal with weather conditions 
at Kezar Stadium or the lowest temperature for the pre- 
ceding 24 hours. 

A bit of time spent in the detail or listening as an 

CASTELLI WINES & LIQUORS 

Mario Castelli 

CALL US FOR LIQUOR 

974 Geneva Avenue Phone JUniper 6-1309 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FRANK'S MOTORS 

GENERAL AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

Frank and Guido Pratali 

JUniper 5-1046 4420 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



A. Brooks. Manager Ph. MArket 1-9142 

AL'S SMOKE SHOP 

CIGARETTES - CANDY - TOBACCO - PIPES 
CIGARS and MAGAZINES - COCA COLA 

1005 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

TOMMY'S TAP ROOM 

1196 Geneva Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GIUSTO SERVICE STATION 

Phone JUniper 5-9809 4249 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MARTEX FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. D. Canerot, Prop. 
HOME OF THE DE LUXE FINISH WORK 

MM GENEVA AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



R. MOHR 8C SONS 



883 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



KENTUCKY BAR 

62 Third Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SEE YOUR FRIENDS IN 

THE MIRROR 

Manuel Perez - Leo Quilici 

PRospect 5-9740 65 Taylor Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

THE GOLDEN RULE CAFE 



765 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CLARK HOTEL 



217 Eddy Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BENEDETTI'S WINES 8C LIQUORS 



1589 Haight S:reet 
SAN FRANCISCO 



UNderh 11 1-0503 



CALIFORNIA 



THOMPSON AUTO PARTS 

New and Used Auto Parts and Accessories 

CARS WANTED FOR WRECKING 

Phone MA. 1-6696 50- 13th St., near Harrison Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



KAY'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

CHOP SUEY - FINIEST CHINESE AND AMERICAN DISHES 

LUNCHES - DINNERS 

2819 California Street Phone WAlnut 1-9697 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



VIRGINIA TAVERN 

THIS IS IT • RAY CIPOLLA 

HEmlock 1-9438 1098 Howard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PACIFIC BRASS FOUNDRY 

Robert L. Mainzer 

BRASS - BRONZE - ALUMINUM - EVERDUR AND MONEL 

CASTING - WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 

251 Second Street Phone YUkon 6-6745 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



GARTNER, Mechanical Engineering 

507 Howard Street Phone EXbroak 2-4862 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Greetings 

ALBERT PICCARD 

Financial Center Bldg. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC BUILDING 

703 Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HON YUEN CAFE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



850 Kearney Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



FRANK KARP 

JEWELER 

133 Kearney Street 



FLOWERS - Unlimited 

N. J. STEPAN0FF 
ORDER BY PHONE WITH CONFIDENCE 

Anything you need in flowers • We Ship Anywhere by Air Express 

LAkehurst 3-3735 2312 Santa Clara 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



TONY'S BODY AND FENDER WORKS 

BODY - FENDER - WELDING - TRIMMING 

PAINTING - GLASS INSTALLED 

651 Pacific Ave. Near Webster LAkehurst 3-1989 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



T *~ 



BANK 

of 

CANTON 

COMMERCIAL 

and 

SAVINGS 



555 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco, California 



♦ 



BASALT ROCK 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Readymix Concrete 

and 

Lightweight Concrete 
Building Blocks 



Phone GArfield 1-3758 

Sixth and Berry Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Larry Sollars 



March Sollars 



THE CURVE 



A L S A M 



DINNERS 

and 

DRINKS 



* 



Lafayette 9911 

Lafayette, California 



Contra Costa County 



Lafayette, California 



J L 



February ■ March, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 71 



inspector relates details of the solution of a case will pro- 
vide one with a working idea as to the qualifications of 
a good bunco investigator. The detail's men regard their 
task as the most pleasant in the department, because they 
satisfy the people they serve. The bunco victims who 
visit the detail see physical evidence of the work done 
in conduct of investigation on their individual complaints. 
The average complainant appears to tell his story, feeling 
as though crime didn't exist before he was fleeced; and 
as he prepares to elicit the facts he is pleased to learn 
that his interviewer is a good listener. After hearing half 
a dozen words, any man in the detail could finish the story 
— for the 9,996th time. When the story finally ends, the 
victim feels he has contributed more than his citizen's 
share to the cause of law and order. 

The complainant's morale is boosted further still before 
he leaves the detail. The Inspector who heard the story 
writes the case number on the back of his personal card, 
hands the card to the victim with instructions to seize the 
crook in the event their paths cross again — then hand the 
card to the nearest uniformed police officer and demand 
the suspect's arrest. More than once surprised policemen 
have been confronted by angry pedestrians dragging a 
prisoner with one hand and waving a Bunco Inspector's 
card in the other. 

Iredale's detail conducts its work with orderliness, ef- 
ficiency, and dispatch — the men schedule their time and 
keep appointments punctually. They always know where 
to find their boss, because he always knows where 
he will be. 

When asked which of his many investigations resulted 
in the greatest personal pleasure to him, Iredale thought 
for a while and then described the four-year search con- 
ducted by Inspector Morris Harris and himself for their 
candidate for the title of most heartless thief. The fugitive 
they sought had posed as a county doctor from San Fran- 
cisco Hospital in order to prey upon blind victims. Enter- 
ing their rooms ostensibly to conduct physical examinations 



LEMOS TRUCKING 
AND GRADING 

Road Construction 

Excavating - Trucking 

Rock and Soil 



Phone Lafayette 4696 

Lafayette, Calif. 



SIGNAL SERVICE STATION 



LAFAYETTE 



E. R. MARTIN, Prop. 



CALIFORNIA 



WRIGHT BROTHERS NURSERY 



LAFAYETTE 



PLANTS. SHRUBS. ETC. 



CALIFORNIA 



» 
1 

1 






4 
* 
t 
> 
* 

t 
1 
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t 
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1 
1 
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1 
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What is the Path of Gold? 

Peace of Mind is often based on Financial Security. 

Achieve that Security step by step in following 

the Path of Gold of The San Francisco Bank. 

Saving a little consistently will place you on the first 
step toward Financial Security. Regular Savings 
Bank Interest paid on all Path of Gold accounts. 

• 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Incorporated Ftb. 10, 1868 • Member Federal Depoiil Insurance Corp. TRUST 

526 CALIFORNIA ST. • Seven Offices . . . Each a Complete Bank 


t 
t 



Page 71 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



February -March, 1949 



EARLE C. ANTHONY, Inc. 

Since 1904 
California Distributors 

PACKARD MOTOR CARS 

Phone PRospect 5-0444 
901 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, California 



DINE AND DANCE AT 



VENUS CLUB 

Mrs. Alexandra, Prop. 
Greek'American Cuisine 

BANQUETS - PRIVATE PARTIES 

Telephone JOrdan 7-0061 
303 Third Street 

San Francisco 7, California 



BEDINI BROS. 

Reconditioners of 

DRUMS - PAILS - CONTAINERS 

Bought and Sold 

Phone VAlencia 4-5154 
1212 Thomas Avenue 

San Francisco 24, California 



Best Wishes 
from 

SECURITY WINES 
& SPIRITS, Inc. 

425 Second Street 

San Francisco, California 



T AM P AX 

of 

CALIFORNIA 

706 Pacific Building 
San Francisco, California 



THE COO COO CLUB 

FINEST OF DRINKS SERVED 

Motorola Television for 
Your Entertainment 

668 Haight Street 

San Francisco. California 

UNderhill 1-9167 



National Dollar Stores ! 


4 STORES IN SAN FRANCISCO < 


929 Market Street 


2610 


Mission Street j 


1637 Fillmore Street 


2106 
Other Stores at 


Chestnut Street j 


San Bernardino 


Los Angeles 


Fresno | 


Sacramento 


(3 Stores) 


Stockton ' 

Salinas 

Santa Cruz I 


Long Beach 


Richmond 


San Diego 


Watsonville 


San Jose 


Monterey 


Ventura j 


Bakersfield 


Santa Monica 


Calexico ; 


Chico 


Oakland 


San Leandro 1 


Santa Rosa 


Modesto 


Pomona * 


San Luis Obispo 


Vallejo 


Marysville I 




Pittsburg 


• 
.-------.---4 



TONY 



PETE 



BUCK 



ANGELO'S 

COCKTAILS 

Plenty of Parking Space 

Chicken and Steak Dinners 

Dinners Served Monday Through Saturday 
5:30 to 8:00 

199 De Haro Street, at 15th Street 
Phone MArket 1-9270 

San Francisco, California 



February - March, 1 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 73 



relative to their claims for welfare funds, he robbed them 
of their savings. If he had a conscience, it accompanied 
him to the state prison. 

Another of Iredale's characters played a unique and 
clever role — he caught his victims flat footed and with 
their pants down. Joseph "Dogface" Harris, pickpocket 
first class, spent his working hours in public rest rooms. 
When a prosperous appearing individual burst into the 
room and scurried for a booth, Dogface eased into posi- 
tion. Strolling by the booth after Mother Nature had 
rendered his intended prey helpless, Dogface tossed a 
penny or nickel into the booth for distraction. He then 
casually reached over the door, slipping the wallet from 
the pocket of the suit coat hanging on the peg. 

Iredale's six comrades in the Bunco Detail are all police 
veterans with careers as rugged as those of any men in 
any police department — long on luck as attested by the 
number of bullets they have dodged. All these men have 
received commendations from their superiors and the 
Police Commission for protecting life and property in San 
Francisco. Junior man in the detail, on the basis of time 
served in the police department, is Inspector Frank 
McCann, a tall, straight, well built man, just completing 
29 years as an officer. 

Inspector Frank P. McCann, native born San Fran- 
ciscan, entered the Police Department July 1, 1926, and 
during the ensuing years chalked up one of the most 
scorching careers in police history. His reward, in com- 
parison with services rendered, has been nominal — six 
commendations for meritorious service. There is, however, 



CALIFORNIA 

STEEL PRODUCTS 

COMPANY 



Manufacturers 

CALSTEEL PRODUCTS 



Barrett Avenue and "A" Street 

Richmond, California 



HAZELS 
DRIVE-IN 

Curb Service 

Phone Antioch 1120J 
* 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH 
DINNERS - SHORT ORDERS 

and the 

Most Delicious Sandwiches 

in the County 

Hours 9 A. M. 'til 1 A.M. 



On Highway 24 

Antioch, California 



FAMOUS 
STORE 

And Antioch' s 

MOST COMPLETE 

and Largest 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



Phone Antioch 560 
205 G Street 

Antioch, California 



Page 74 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Februarx -March, 1949 



no known method of measuring the gratitude of the 
people he has served. McCann, who now serves as In- 
spector Iredale's partner, has participated in several cap- 
ture made under fire. He was hardly more than a rookie 
patrolman when he came through his first violent episode 
with flying colors to be snatched into the "Detective 
Bureau." 

One of the detail's men who does all his resting at home 
is energetic Louis H. Linss, Jr., who became a police 
officer February 2, 1925. Inspector Linss has given San 
Franciscans more than his share of protection during his 
24 years in the department — the force's token of thanks 
has been citations for arrests under fire. 

Many San Franciscans remember Inspector Linss as the 
partner of Officer Ed Hansen when the two patrolmen 
gave their all for the cause of love by capturing a bandit 
who had regularly been terrorizing couples parked in the 
darkness of romantic Buena Vista Park's heights. In 
those days Linss and Hansen patrolled the vast reaches 
of the old Western Addition Station under Lieutenant 
Alexander McDaniell, who is now the department's super- 
vising captain. 

At Lieutenant McDaniell's order Linss and Hansen 
switched from their uniforms to civvies and joined the 
lineup of parking autos — waiting in the back seat of Linss 
auto. After a half hour's wait, a shadow suddenly ap- 
peared next to the left front door, and as the marauder 



em up! 



he shoved a gun into the of- 



ROBERTS & MINTON 
Chevron Gas Station 

ATLAS TIRES AND BATTERIES 
EXPERT LUBRICATION 



Phone Richmond 3803 



RICHMOND 



23rd and Rheem 

CALIFORNIA 



PAN-PACIFIC SCREW and 
BOLT COMPANY 

Phone LAndscape 5-2642 Richmond 3216 
201 Nevin Avenue 
RICHMOND 



VISTA DRIVE-IN MARKET 

A COMPLETE FOOD STORE 
DELIVERY SERVICE 

500 San Pablo Avenue Phone: 9398 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN LAUNDRY and 
DRY CLEANERES 

HOME OF PERSONALIZED SERVICE 

ONE DAY LAUNDRY AND 
DRY CLEANING 

Telephone Richmond 833 264 Fourth Street 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 

THE NUT CLUB 

MUSIC BY HOFFMAN TRIO 

DANCING NIGHTLY 

527 MacDonald Avenue 



RICHMOND 



growled, "Stick 
ficers' faces. 

The robber's answer was a blast from Hansen's revolver, 
and a nicked ear as the bullet whizzed by. As he turned 
to run, Linss landed on his back and flattened him to the 
ground. While he was subduing the man. Hansen put 
his gun and flashlight on two more dark figures running 
toward the scene. Thinking of possible accomplices, Han- 
sen ordered them, in strong terms, to lose speed. They 
were two indignant detective sergeants who grudgingly 
obeyed the order to call an ambulance, after the two 
patrolmen suggested a precaution for their future consid- 
eration. This advice is still good— when inspectors or 
other plainclothesmen are in the field, district stations 
should be familiar with their general location at all times. 
Inspector William E. Mudd and Inspector Iredale are 
the only "foreigners" in the detail— the other Inspectors 
are native born San Franciscans. Mudd never heard of 
such a dispute as the Civil War— but he is familiar with 



NICHOLL MARKET 

RICHMOND'S FINEST 
3431 MacDonald Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



THE HUB CAFE & BAR 

NOTHING BUT THE BEST IN 
FOOD AND LIQUORS SERVED 



619 MacDonald Avenue 
RICHMOND (Contra Costa County). CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND CLEANING WORKS 

IF YOU WANT THE BEST 
IN DRY CLEANING 

229 MacDonald Avenue Phone Rich. 621 

CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND 



Forest and Joe ol 

THE PINE INN 

Send Greetings 
TO ALL PEACE OFFICERS 

No. 19 Standard Avenue 



POINT RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Richmond 9464 



CALIFORNIA 



SHIP CAFE 

COCKTAILS • BEER • WINE 
CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 



539 Standard Avenue 



POINT RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



SUN FAIR MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD CENTER 
3700 Nevin Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



February ■ March, I'M') 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



Page 75 



the War Between the States. He was horn in Decatur, 
Alahama. Like all his comrades in the group, he has 
received meritorious service commendations for duty per- 
formed under fire. Inspector Mudd was once a hoseman 
for the San Francisco Fire Department; but since October 
31, 1921, when he entered the department, he has been 
hosing down crooks. 

Half of the detail's "two Georges" is congenial George 
H. Page, a veteran of nearly 30 years' duty in the depart- 
ment. Inspector Page became a police officer August 1, 
192 3; and as seems to be the style of his detail has been 
cited for his work. The Journal has had the pleasure of 
recounting many of the fearless deeds of courage which 
were performed as a Police Officer. 

The other "George" is Page's partner, George E. Dyer, 
who is also nearing the 30-year mark. Inspector Dyer 
joined the police force November 16, 1924, and because 
of his commendations for captures under fire is in style 
with the rest of the detail. 

Inspector Dyer has faced many dangers in the per- 
formance of his duties and has been able to come 
out on top. 

Another officer who has received recognition for his 
good work in the department is Inspector Charles F. 
Keck, the detail's clerk, who sits behind his desk and 
answers the many and diversified questions fired at him by 
the rest of the crew. Inspector Keck is a one time baseball 
player who entered the department on January 1, 1924. 
His inspector friends maintain seriously that several cigar 
manufacturers would go bankrupt it Keck stopped 
smoking. 

Several years ago. before he came to the Bunco Detail, 
Officer Keck responded to the scene of a reported stabbing, 
a Kearny Street tavern where he encountered and solved 
a problem that is not answered in the rules and regulations. 

Keck found the victim of the stabbing standing with 
her back to the bar. When he pressed for details, the 
young woman only mumbled something about a fight and 
a knife — she might have been cut but wasn't talking about 
it. Keek's repeated questions as to the location of her 
alleged wound brought nothing but perplexed silence. 
Acting on a pretty strong hunch and "in the line of duty," 
he swung the girl around, located the wound, called an 
ambulance, and advised the use of an air cushion for 
a few days. 

Personnel in the Boosting Detail include: Harry Mc- 
Crea, Jerry Smith, Joseph Donegan, Jack Tompkins, Ed 
Hall. Eugene Atkinson. Fred Keyworth, and William 
Valentine. 

Just as this account cannot truly and completely outline 
the contributions Charlie Iredale and his men have made 
to society, it cannot direct the proper amount of credit 
to the men who have previously served as bunco detectives. 
Typical of this group of officers is Inspector Michael A. 
Chrystal, veteran of 20 years as a San Francisco police- 
man. Mike Chrystal, who is now assigned as a leader in 
the Bureau's office crew, was born "not too long ago" 
in Doune. Scotland. 



HOPPEL'S CORNER 

Gas, Oil and Complete Service 

SILVESTER'S PRODUCE 

Fresh Fruits, Vegetables and Eggs 

704 San Pablo Ave. at Clinton 

Richmond, California 

Richmond 9192 



ATALIC HARDWARE 

Martin- J. Atalic 

Distributors of 
Ingersol-Rand Electric Impact Wrench - Thor 
Electrical Tools - Darra James Power Tools - Dutch 
Boy Paints - General Plumbing and Electrical Sup- 
plies - Starrett and Lufkin Tools - Garden and 

Shop Supplies. 

Phone 4614M 4920 McBryde Avenue 

Richmond, California 



McGUIRE & HESTER 
Contractors 



796 66th Avenue 



Oakland, Calif ornit 



RICHMOND 
PRODUCE COMPANY 

Incorporated 

Commission Merchants 
Wholesale Fruit, Produce 

394 17th Street 

Richmond, California 

Phone Richmond 1411 



Page 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



February ■ March, 1 949 



BAY COUNTIES PEACE OFFICERS 

( Continued from page I 5) 
Committee reeommended to the Association that the dues 
for the coming year be made $1.00. A motion was made, 
seconded and carried that the dues be made $1.00 as 
recommended. 

Chief Wisnom then called for the report of the Nomi- 
nating Committee and the chairman of this committee, 
John Greening, recommended the following to fill the 
offices of the Association for the year 1949: 

President — Constable Earl Dierking, Vallejo. 

Vice President — Chief Frank Kelly, San Rafael. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Captain Bernard J. McDonald, 
San Francisco. 

It was then moved, seconded and carried that the 
nominations be closed and that the secretary be instructed 
to cast a vote for each of the above and declare their 
election unanimous. 

Chief Wisnom then called upon Sheriff Daniel Murphy 
to induct the newly elected officers and the Sheriff com- 
pleted this ceremony with much impressiveness. 

The retiring President then thanked the membership of 
the Association for the support which was given him 
during his term of office and congratulated the new- 
president upon his election to the office. 

President Dierking thanked the Association for electing 
him and stated he would try to continue the good work 
done by his predecessors. 

The President then appointed the following to the 
Membership Committee: Chief Robert Tracy, Oakland, 
Chairman; Sheriff Daniel Murphy, San Francisco; Chief 
Robert O'Brien, San Mateo; Chief J. R. Blackmore, San 
Jose; Chief W. A. Gabriclson, Concord: Chief Frank 
Kelly, San Rafael: Chief R. E. Peters, Petaluma; Chief 
J. D. Holstrom, Berkeley; Chief Special Agent John 
Creighton. Standard Oil Co., San Francisco. 

Warden Duffy was again called upon and he gave a 
short talk of the work that is being carried on at the 
Prison. He told of the advantages of training and edu- 
cation that are available to the inmates should they desire 
to make use of them while they are at San Quentin. 

Entertainment was then provided by the San Quentin 
Band, several solo singers, a quartet singing old songs, a 
sleight of hand performer and an entertainer who gave 
a very fine comedy monologue. The program was con- 
cluded by the San Quentin Glee Club rendering some 
very excellent numbers. The President then thanked the 
Warden, and all who aided in making the luncheon and 
entertainment a huge success. As there were no invitations 
at the time for the holding of the next meeting, the meeting 
adjourned and the members will be notified of the date and 
place of the next meeting at a future date. 

FRED KINNER'S 

THE STEAK HOUSE 

Open 24 Hours Daily 
WHERE ALL TRUCKS STOP 

One-Fourth Mile North of Rodeo on Highway 40 
RODEO (Contra Costa County). CALIFORNIA 



CROWE RECREATION 
PARLOR 

POOL - SNOOKER - BILLIARDS 

Tobacco - Cigarettes - Beer 
and Soft Drinks 

612 Macdonald Avenue 

Richmond, California 

Telephone Richmond 3216 



THE SPOT CAFE 

COCKTAILS 
GOOD FOOD 

LIQUORS OF SELECT 
QUALITY 



Phone 9529 No. 1 Standard Ave. 

Point Richmond, California 

(Contra Costa County) 



TOWER MARKET AND 
GROCERY DEPARTMENT 

T. E. Green and W. W. Kaufman, Proprietors 



1050 Twenty-Third Street 

Richmond, California 

Phone Richmond 2992-W 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 




TO THE GUARDIANS OF 

THE PEOPLE AND OF 

THE PUBLIC PEACE 

Our appreciation of 
superior service 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 
OF CALIFORNIA 



How P. G. and E. ski patrols 
measure water in 
Sierra snow packs 

The frozen white Sierra holds the 
secret of how much water and hydro' 
electric power California will have in the 
rainless summer months ahead . . . and 
P. G. and E. snow surveyors know how 
to dig out the answer. They ski up to 
20 miles a day, "measuring" the snow 
every 50 feet. The findings are studied 
by our hydro'engineers, who can then 
determine — within 10% — exactly how 
much water will be available after the 
spring thaw. First step is to plunge a 
20-foot aluminum tube like this deep 
down into the snow pack. 




Weighing the sample 

comes next. The amount of 
water varies with the density 
of the snow . . . and heavy 
hard-packed snow stores up a 
greater volume of water than 
loosely-packed drifts, 




This giant reservoir saves 

the precious water as snow 
melts. And then it's released as 
needed, creating more power 
for California homes and hu 
nesses and more water for fai 
irrigation. 



For the record 

By 1951, 

Northern and 

Central California^ 

will use fwice ^'Jp, 

the power Jg^ 

it needed before 

the war. 

VI Day 

IP IrrMJl T ° meettnis 9 r0win 9 

' ^A&?Jl" demand, P. G. and E. 
' already has added 

nearly 500,000 new electrical 
horsepower. ..and we are building 
-^h. ,/^ii^. nearly 

[MMm [MM& 1,500,000 

at. «HL, more! 




V</or\ never 
PACIFIC 


stops on our power-building program 
GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

PJ - 243 



Sec. 562 P. L. & R. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 3172 



StoM, N»li s 
270Cfaremonti)vrf 
»«n Pranclieo, C«f 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
465 10th Street, San Francisco 3 





The Annual 
CONCERT and BALL 

of 

The Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 

of the 

San Francisco Police Department 

Will Be Held in the 

CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

ON THE EVENINGS OF MAY 6 AND 7 

This is the first time in the long history of this Association that the big event has been 
given two nights. 

There has been a heavy drain to meet death benefits the past year, and the 1949 Great 
Shows should receive the support of every law-abiding resident of San Francisco. 
A program of entertainment is being prepared for the coming show that promises to 
excel any offered during the 70 years' existence of the Association and purchasers of 
tickets will get more for their dollars admission than ever before. 



APRIL 

* IPAQ 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Sk/fM 

K X-RAY FITTING \ 

^ lit WUWM UMII, tAHTA «OtA\ 

Good Shoes For All 
The Family 



t.-. .-...-. ----------------------------- • 

• 1 


LONG'S 


Used Car Lot 


• 


GAS - OIL 


LUBRICATION 


• 


Phone 1156 


WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 

...----.-----------------...-------..--4 



I PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 


PLAYLAND 


atthe BEACH 


« Located at Ocean Beach near the historic I 


» Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks 


SS Home of Thrill - Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants > 


11 Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone ! 1 


>> Owned and Operated by | 


I GEO. K. WHITNEY j 



DIXON HARDWARE CO. 

HIGH GRADE HARDWARE 



Phone 3511 

425 Fourth Street 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



VENETIAN BLINDS 




(Toll) Call "Operator" for 



Ordway 3-0089 




CONTRACTING - WHOLESALE - RETAIL - REPAIR 

Free Estimates - F.H.A. 

Transparent Shades for Store Windows 
Cornices With Rods and Travers 

Theo. De Friese & Sons 

2046 FRANKLIN - SF 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 

PAGE 

Director John Engler and S.F. Police Academy 3 

Harry Gurtler, a popular officer with the kids 4 

Supervising Captain Walsh of S.F.P.D. . . 5 

S.F.P.D. Motorcycle Drill Team 6 

Three New Police Captains in the S.F.P.D. . 8 

Michael Riordan in New Job 9 

Preston to San Quentin — Courtesy of S.F.P.D. 10 

By Jim Leonard, Call-Bulletin Police Reporter 

Bart Sullivan, the Friendly Traffic Officer . . 11 
Spring Graduates from FBI National 

Police Academy 12 

Berkeley's Famous Lie Detector Solves 

Guam Murder Mystery 14 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 

Bay Counties Peace Officers Association . . If 

Monterey is Growing 16 

Chief Edward Walsh of S.F.F.D 17 

By Opie L. Warner 

1928 Class of S.F.P.D. Has First Celebration . 18 

New Officers of Peninsula P. O. Association 19 

Editorial Page - Don'ts for Storekeepers . . 20 

Donald Cameron New SFPU Commissioner 21 

Pistol Pointing 22 

By J. ROSS DUNNIGAN 

Women Peace Officers Association of 

California 26 

Oakland Police Vice Squad Under New Leader 28 

NCPCOA monthly meeting 30 

Biography of Thomas Cheetham 38 

Three Bad Men Break Jail — Are Back Again . 39 

The Candid Friend 47 

By Opie L. Warner 

Chief Brockman of Manteca 48 

Promotional Examination Problems .... 50 

Dion R. Holm, New City Attorney . . . . 52 

Weed, California, Has Young Police Chief . . 54 

Captain Francis J. McGuire Passes Away . . 62 
Captain Alexander E. McDaniel Dies 

After Brief Illness 62 

Death of Louie E. Steenberg 63 

Jackson's Police Department .... .76 



Directory 



The Editob is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this ia not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
"vents. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020 - 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m., Hall of Justice 

Washington I. Kohnke, President 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Qu.gley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Edward R. Pootel 

Dept. Sec'y.... Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick. ...Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Jack Eker 635 Washington Street 

Southern Leo. J. Tackney Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission A. I. O'Brien 3057 17th Street 

Northern Edward Donahue 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park J. M. Sullivan Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Jos. M. Walsh 45 1 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside.... Daniel McKlem .... Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael Gaffey 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Geo. M. Healy 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Barnard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Ralph Olstad 635 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Joseph M. Walsh Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Cllrk John Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



when in Trouble Call SUtter 1*20*20 

W IXCYI IXl DOXiOt Always At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Pacific Coast League 
Baseball for 1949 

AT SEAL'S STADIUM 

Sixteenth and Bryant Streets 

March 30, 31; April 1, 2. 3-3 

PORTLAND at SAN FRANCISCO 

April 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 1010 

SEATTLE at SAN FRANCISCO 

April 18, 19, 20. 21 

LOS ANGELES at SAN FRANCISCO 

April 22, 23, 24-24 

HOLLYWOOD at SAN FRANCISCO 

May 5, 6, 7, 8-8 

SAN FRANCISCO at OAKLAND 

Mav 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. 15-15 

SACRAMENTO at SAN FRANCISCO 

Miv 17. 18. 19, 20, 21, 22-22 

SAN DIEGO at SAN FRANCISCO 

June 1, 2, 3, 4, 5-5 

OAKLAND at SAN FRANCISCO 

June 21. 22, 23. 24, 25. 26-26 

PORTLAND at SAN FRANCISCO 

June 28. 29, 30; July 1, 2, 3-3, 4-4 

LOS ANGELES at SAN FRANCISCO 

July 13, 14, 15, 16, 17-17 

SEATTLE at SAN FRANCISCO 

Julv 19, 20. 21, 22, 23, 24-24 

SAN FRANCISCO at OAKLAND 

August 2, 3, 4, 5 , 6, 7-7 . 

SACRAMENTO at SAN FRANCISCO 

August 9, 10, 11. 12, 13, 14-14 

SAN DIEGO at SAN FRANCISCO 

August 30, 31; September 1 

HOLLYWOOD at SAN FRANCISCO 

September 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18-18 
HOLLYWOOD at SAN FRANCISCO 



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A Police News 

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VOL. XXIV 



APRIL, 1949 



NO. 8 



Director John Engler and S.F. Police Academy 



Like the San Francisco Police Department, the San 
Francisco Police Academy, at 36th Avenue and Fulton 
Street, and its twin unit, the Police Range on the shore 
line of Lake Merced, are a credit to our city. In addition 
to being of untold value in the matter of training of our 
San Francisco Police Department membership both units 




Director John Engler 

have been gladly availed of by municipal, state and fed- 
eral groups of the West Coast States; and the Police Range 
has played host on may occasions to civilian groups from 
around the Bay Area. The pistol range has grown in popu- 
larity and importance under Range Master Emil Dutil. 

The San Francisco Police Academy is in the very capable 
hands of Director John A. Engler, a personal friend of 
J. Edgar Hoover and his key men in this and other states. 
To the police executives of the Bay Counties and to the 
heads of the Los Angeles Police Department, and through- 
out the state generally Director Angler is known as a first 
class executive, thoroughly intimate with every phase of 
modern police routine. 

While attending the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
National Academy course of studies at Washington, D. 



C, tor police officials, he was chosen as class president 
and valedictorian. The director runs our Police Academy 
strictly along FBI lines : Intensive book work, lots of theory 
and demonstrations — but plenty of practice too. Due to 
the fact that the periods of training recruits, or giving 
''refresher courses" to the older members of the depart- 
ment, are necessarily limited as to time, the courses are 
so arranged that each day is filled to the last possible min- 
ute. Thus the Police Academy always presents the appear- 
ance of a place where time really is of essence. 

The San Francisco Police Academy is without anything 
to be desired, in the matter of appearance, structure, ap- 
purtenances and location; and the department was very 
lucky in securing it. 

On April 17, 1947, one of the new executive positions 
created in the San Francisco Police Department by the 
passage of Ordinance 12, was that of Director o'" Person- 
nel, which includes charge of the Police Academy for the 
training of police recruits, the conducting of courses fcr 
the regular members of the department, the investigation 
of all applicants as well as the fitness of men for the vari- 
ous department oreorganization as of that date some de- 
partment stations were closed, among which was the beau- 
tiful new station in Golden Gate Park at 36th Avenue and 
Fulton Street. 

For the future of the San Francisco Police Department 
the closing of that station was indeed a blessing in dis- 
guise. In the country today there is no such police acad- 
emy. Under ideal conditions, members of the department, 
whether they be recruits in training or older members 
taking "refresher courses" can there prepare to keep up 
to the minute in police "know how." 

Policing today is a profession and police schools are a 
major factor in every department worthy of the name. 

The law of might, and that old idea of learning by ex- 
perience while patroling a beat are something to forget, 
as far as police training goes. In modern police training 
the arts of attack and personal defense are stressed; and 
the matter of "experience" is taken care of through care- 
ful and minute training in every possible police exigency, 
each of the instructors being an expert in his line. Thvs. 
when a young man leaves the academy to patrol a beat he 
will h ive at least from five to ten years "experience" in 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



his system. As for the strong man part of his patrol duties 
he has been well prepared to more than hold his own no 
matter how tough the going is. 

In the San Francisco Police Academy Director Engler, 
in addition to seeing that each recruit successfully passes 
his routine tests, stresses the ethical side of police work, 
laying particular stress on fair dealing with fellow patrol- 
men and superior officers and the fact that departmental 
cooperation is the keynote and only sure road toward 
securing police success and the respect of the public. 

Director Engler is a very dynamic person, and at this 
very date — with his twenty years in the San Francisco 
Police Department — he is a capable and all-around athlete. 

As a young man, after having decided to drop baseball 
as a profession, he went into the brokerage firm of E. A. 
Pierce. When the brokerage business slowed up during the 
late twenties he decided to follow the footsteps of his 
brother George and become a member of the San Francisco 
Police Department, which he did on January 2, 1929. 

With his unusual enthusiasm, he worked so successfully 
on his beat he was transferred to the Bureau of Inspectors. 
As an Inspector his record was so outstanding it was no 
surprise to department members when Chief Charles W. 
Dullea appointed his department secretary on February 
16, 1940, a mere decade since he entered the department. 

The rapid rise through department ranks made by 
Director Engler is indeed an inspiration for any ambitious 
young man entering police work. 

The library at the Police Academy is equal to any police 
library in the country, containing rows of books on every 
phase of crime and criminology, police administration, re- 
porting, records, fingerprinting, identification and police 
science generally. 

"Practice makes perfect" is a pet motto of Director Eng- 
ler. Holdups, pickpocketing, burglaries, suicides, and even 
murders are committed in the academy. Arrests are made, 
actual searches carried out, fingerprints obtained — and 
the proper reports actually made and signed as in regular 
police work. The director maintains that while book knowl- 
edge and demonstrations are very much worth while there 
is nothing like actually taking a hand in the game. 

Hour after hour the recruits are put through grilling 
tests in locks, holds, and self-protection generally and the 
same goes for range practice where a definite average must 
be made. 

In the very near future the San Francisco Police De- 
partment will, for the first time in its history, boast a num- 
erical strength commensurate with that allowed in our 
City Charter, and Director Engler is anxiously counting 
the days until he can boast his recruit class numbers one 
hundred-odd. 

The new recruits are lucky indeed. The San Francisco 
Police Academy is a perfect training school. Its staff of 
instructors — selected from both within and without the 
department — is about perfect; and the school dean, Di- 
rector, John A. Engler, with his happy disposition, proved 
ability and boundless enthusiasm, is second to none. 



HARRY GURTLER A POPULAR 
OFFICER WITH THE KIDS 

It certainly is mighty nice to see the bouquets tossed 
at Officer Harry Gurtler, the veteran policeman who has 
served so long in the Central district. During recent 
weeks two well known and widely read columnists for 
San Francisco newspapers have given Smiling Harry a 
big plug. 

In his day Harry Gurtler has a record for jerking out 
of circulation crooks of every description, and he has 
made the papers on many an occasion. But rounding up 
evil doers was not the reason that Herb Caen of the 
Chronicle or Jack Rosenbaum of the J^ews gave him plugs. 

It was because of the popularity he enjoys by the mixed 
race schools up on Sansome street, above Chinatown. 
Here Officer Gurtler will be found during his watch at 
all recesses and at the opening and closing of the school 
hours. He knows all the kids, they all know him. Many 
of these kiddies would have no enjoyments because of the 
lack of finances in their families. But genial Harry fixes 
that up, as the two columnists point out. 

He not only gives them candy and ice cream, and he 
remembers them generously at Christmas time, but he sees 
that those whose folks have no money beyond the bare 
necessities of life, get a chance to visit the movies, and 
Harry pays the way into these shows with money from 
his own pockets. 

And as the two columnists stated the kiddies don't 
forget Harry. They remember him on St. Valentine's 
day, his birthday and on Christmas with appropriate cards 
they can't afford more, other than their heartfelt childish 
devotion to a good man and a good cop. 



SAN LEANDRO POLICE GET 
PAIR OF BANDITS 

Over in San Leandro, Chief A. J. Lamoureux's active 
police officers Sergeant Earl Kerrison and Officer Angelo 
Cannizzaro jerked a couple of brothers, who had taken 
it on the lam from Chino State Prison early in February. 
The lads gathered in by these alert officers were Wilbur 
Stuart, who was taken after an exchange of shots between 
the bandits and the officers. In the pocket of Wilbur an 
address was found of a friend. The policemen covered 
the address and in walked the second brother, Herbert 
Stuart. He gave up without a struggle. 

Herbert Stuart confessed that since his getaway from 
Chino he had pulled a $1200 job in an east Oakland bar, 
six safe jobs in Oakland and two in Oroville. 

Over $1150 in cash was found in an auto camp where 
the two were haying in during the brief spell of freedom. 

Another example of the futility of making the big 
house, making a break and expecting to remain at large 
during which one takes up thievery. 

Visit LARRY'S 

AND BE HAPPY AND 
CONTENT 

Railroad and Second Street 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



April, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Supervising Captain Walsh of S. F. P. D. 



On March 4, 1949, Captain Joseph M. Walsh was given 
his fifth promotion in the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, this last appointment making him an executive of- 
ficer in the Department. 

His appointment as Supervising Captain was hailed by 
commissioned and non-commissioned officers and by the 




Supervising Captain Jos. M. Walsh 

entire membership of the department as a wise and just 
move on the part of Police Commissioners Washington I. 
Kohnke, J. Warner Walsh and N. C. Maginn and Chief 
Michael Mitchell. 

Problems which come to the Supervising Captain are 
mainly those demanding the most serious consideration, 
hence good judgment and a thorough understanding of 
police administrative routine are expected of him. 

The newly appointed Supervising Captain is eminently 
fitted for his executive position, his record in the Depart- 
ment being that he is a first class police officer, and a man 
of known sober and solid judgment, in addition to being 
a chivalrous, soft spoken Irish gentleman. 

Captain Walsh, like all of our present and recent Police 
Department heads and commissioned officers, entered the 
Department understanding it was definitely a serious posi- 
tion and not, by any appraisement, just a steady sinecure. 

The new Supervising Captain and the serious minded 
recruits of his period have made, and are making, good 
police records and demonstrating the indisputable fact 
that there is always room on the top for a capable man. 



On June 30, 1925, our present Supervising Captain 
was listed on the departmental chronological records as: 
Patrolman Joseph M. Walsh. But striving always brings 
success. 

Due to his extremely successful handling of the police 
promotional examinations, set forth by the Civil Service 
Commission, we find Joseph M. Walsh never missing a pro- 
motion test in his upgrade climb in the Police Department. 

Always tops in promotion examinations the records in 
the case of Captain Walsh'c promotions have not been 
surpassed. His promotion records read as follows: 

Promoted to Corporal, July 1, 1925; to Sergeant, April 
1, 1927; to Lieutenant, April 7, 1931; and to Captain 
July 1, 1939. 

In the San Francisco Police Department, like many of 
the metropolitan departments, the positions higher than 
the rank of captain are appointive. The position of Super- 
vising Captain is one of such executive positions. 

To Captain Walsh the making of a decision on anything 
concerning police matters is always important. To him, 
nothing in the matter of police activity is trivial. 

Since his first day in the Department Joseph M. Walsh 
has been known as strictlya man of his word — that, in his 
case, "no" means exactly no; and "yes" means just yes. 

The Department, as a whole, is on the side of honest 
Captain Walsh — the man who scorns all too common 
breach of honesty, so-called double-crossing. 

The new Supervising Captain is a fine appearing man, 
and, though not at all looking the part of a superman, in 
his younger days in this city, when San Francisco boasted 
more than a dozen European, English, Canadian and Aus- 
tralian tug-of-war teams, the Irish unbeatable man "Joe" 
Walsh, was king — the Irish team always winning over 
mighty odds. 

Captain Wash is one of that fine type of men who never 
makes enemies. His recent appointment has unanimous 
departmental approval, and the wish of all his fellow 
officers is that he will long enjoy the honor the Police 
Commissioners and the Chief have seen fit to confer on 
him. 






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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 

S. F. P. D. Motorcycle Drill Team 



April, J 949 



The flame of civic pride burns so strongly within the 
breasts of some San Franciscans that they would leap from 
Golden Cate Bridge before admitting their city had ever 
borrowed from Los Angeles. It has happened, however. 

Two years ago, during a convention of the American 
Legion, a group of motorcycle officers from the Los Angeles 
Police Department amazed San Franciscans with an assort- 
ment of intricate drill patterns. Somewhere along the 



It should be pointed out that the idea of a drill team 
had been in the minds of the men in that detail for some 
time prior to the visit of their cousins from the south. 

Twenty-six motorcycle officers volunteered to serve in 
the drill team, offering to practice maneuvers on their own 
time. The squadron still consists of its 26 original volun- 
teers. Since its formation, the drill team has thrilled 
thousands of parade watchers with exhibitions of riding 




S.F.P.D. MOTORCYCLE DRILL TEAM 
5a:i Franc sco Police Motorcycle Drill Team: First row, 1. to r: Joseph Swcetman, George Waldmann, Fred Joseph, Charles Free- 
• 'in Pai Ruth. Richard Coyle. Second row: Thomas Guzzetti. George Paras, Vincent Desmond. Harvey Dexter: Kevin MacDonald. 
Thomas Tracy. Third row: Jack Mandino. Howard Eagle, Leslie Stoke*. Ray Wilson, Henry Coster. Paul Alioto. Fourth row: 
Milton Miskcl, Clifford Wa'ker, James Mahoney, Thomas Prevez ch. Walking down the center is Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, fol- 
lowed by Seargeam Fred C. Schuler. 



parade route sjmecne decided the San Francisco Police 
Department might just as well have such a group. 

A petition seeking creation of a drill team in the local 
department was presented to city officials, who agreed that 
San Francisco had policemen who were as adept to hand- 
ling the infernal machines as anyone else. Charles W. 
Dullea, then Chief of Police, approved the suggestion and 
called upon riders of the Motorcycle Detail for volunteers. 



skill unsurpassed by even the famous group representing 
the Mexico City Police Department. 

Participants in last autumn's Portola Festival parades 
went all out in their efforts to draw applause from the 
crowds lining the street. When the result was only apathy, 
the motorcycle police drew cheers. 

Directly in charge of the drill team is an affable veteran 
policeman — Sergeant Frederick C. Schuler, who recently 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



completed his eighteenth year of service in the S.F.P.D. 
Unspoken evidence of his ability to supervise the 26-man 
unit with impartial efficiency is the fact that the original 
volunteers are still with the group. 

This organization within the ranks of the Motorcycle 
Detail is "a democratic organization in which every man 
has his say in the conduct of the group," according to 
Sergeant Schuler. "The men are in it because they are in- 
terested; they want to be in it." 

What compensation do these officers receive for their 
participation? 

Nothing — beyond personal satisfaction and pleasure. 
Special uniforms, banners, streamers, lighting equipment 
for night exhibitions, and other "costume" paraphernalia 




SERGEANT FRED C. SCHULER 
The Chief and Police Commissioners said they wanted a motor- 
cycle drill team and told the Sergeant he was the man to get one 
organised. He has done a fine job, and many are the favorable 
comments from those who have witnessed the precision this 
Drill Team operates. 

could be used to good advantage by the group; but every- 
thing along that line must come from the pockets of the 
men. Uniform for the group is the regular motorcycle 
officer's togs — also paid for by the men themselves. 

Twice a week, according to Sergeant Schuler, the men 
and their machines meet for drill practice in the "Sunset 
Circle," located on Sunset Boulevard, near the Harding 
gold links. 

Responsible for the routines adopted by the team for 
its exhibitions is Patrolman Joseph T. Swetman. In the 
beginning all group formations were sketched on paper, 
studied, and then put to the dress rehearsal — practice 
and more practice has increased the efficiency to the point 
where — like dance teams — the men pick up new patterns 
quickly. 

Swetnam is an adroit dreamer-upper of ideas, Sergeant 
Schuler says; and exact precision is called for in following 
them through. There isn't much protection to a motorcycle 
rider in the event of a collision. Mishaps during the group's 
two-year history have been unbelieveably low — the casu- 



alty total to date is one skinned finger. 

Personnel of the drill team, in addition to Sergeant 
Schuler and Officer Swetnam, includes the following 
Police Officers. 

Vincent Desmond, Thomas Tracy, William Williams, 
Howard Eagle, Milton Miskel and Joseph O'Keffe. 

Paul Alioto, Richard Coyle, Thomas Guzzetti, James 
Mahoney, Daniel Ruth and Henry Stokes. 

George Waldmann, Ray Wilson, Henry Costes, Harvey 
Decter, Charles Freeland, and Frederick Joseph. 

Jack Medrano, Robert Mueller, Kevin McDonald, 
George Parar, Thomas Prevezich, and Clifford Walker. 

Sergeant Schuler, one of the most popular officers in 
the Department, was recently elected to the position of 
vice president of the San Francisco Police Officers Asso- 
ciation. At the same time Sergeant James Erickson of 
Central Station (leading figure in the capture of five mem- 
bers of the notorious Lake Street Gang on May 13, 1948) 
was named president of the group. 

Schular, a native born San Franciscan, is a man of about 
forty. He was sworn in as a police officer March 9, 1931, 
and became Sergeant September 15, 1943. The Sergeant 
is married and lives at 1237 Alemany Boulevard. He and 
Mrs. Schuler, beyond the usual "proud parent" stage, have 
two sons — the baseball playing Charles, 16, and "the little 
fella," Gerald, who is a rugged ten years of age. 

The Motorcycle Detail, a unit composed of some If 
men, is part of the Traffic Bureau which is headed by 
Director of Traffic, Captain Edward R. Pontel, and Cap- 
tain of Traffic Ralph Olstad. Directly in charge of the 
motorcycles is Lieutenant Cornelius Murphy. Headquar- 
ters for the detail is lacated with Southern Police Station 
at Fourth and Clara Streets. 

Most dangerous and one of the most unheralded jobs 
in the S.F.P.D. is that of the motorcycle officer. Accident 
(Continued on Page 41 ) 

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Page 8 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Three New Captains in S. F. P. D. 



April, J 949 



CAPTAIN RALPH E. OLSTAD 

Three new Captains are now functioning in the San 
Francisco Police Department. They are all young men, 
and have progressed up through the ranks to the highest 
commissioned office in less than 25 years as members of the 
Department, one making the grade in less than 15 years. 

Captain Ralph E. Olstad, is now Captain of the Traffic 
Bureau. He was appointed to a Captaincy on September 
1, last year. 

He was born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, coming to 



On September 8, 1934, three months and four days 
after he became a police officer he married Miss Freida 
Gralfs, then employed by the Board of Education. There 
are three children in the Olstad's family now, Marilyn, 
age 7, Ralph, age 6, and Robert, age 3. 
• • • 

CAPTAIN DANIEL P. McKLEM 

Another native San Franciscan who reached the top 
commissioned rank in the S. F. P. D. is Daniel P. McKlem. 
He was born in San Francisco on December 12, 1902, 






Capt. Ralph E. Olstad 



Capt. Daniel P. McKlem 



Capt. Walter S. Ames 



San Francisco in 1928, and took an engineering course in 
the Healds College. He decided law enforcement offered 
a good field, and so he took the examinations for patrol- 
man, finished way up on the list, and was appointed a 
police officer on June 4, 1934. From then on his promo- 
tions were rapid and we find him a Captain 14 years after 
he first pinned a star to his uniform. He was made a 
Sergeant on July 1, 1939, a Lieutenant on July 1, -945. 

With the exception of duty at the Ingleside station, to 
which he was assigned at the time he was made Traffic 
Captain, and a short stretch at the Juvenile Bureau all 
his years have been spent in traffic. 

In 1945 he attended the fall semester of the North- 
western University traffic school, and was Temporary 
Sergeant on July 1, 1939, a Lieutenant on July 1, 1945. 

He is well schooled in all matters pertaining to traffic, 
and has contributed a lot of ideas which today finds San 
Francisco making a record for reducing traffic deaths, and 
the regulating all forms of traffic on the streets of the 
city. He is probably the tallest man in the San Francisco 
Police Department, and has a very pleasing manner that 
serves him well in the difficult task he now has to perform. 
His record indicates he will be a valued aid to Director 
of Traffic Edward Pootel, with whom he has worked for 
many years. 



and went through the public schools, graduating from 
high school. After working as a bookkeeper he decided 
the Police Department offered a chance for a young man 
to make a living with opportunities for advancement. 
We therefore see him made a patrolman on July 1, 

1925. After getting his basic training he was assigned to 
the Chinatown Squad, under former Inspector John J. 
Manion. He went to that Oriental Detail on January 1, 

1926, and worked so satisfactory that he stayed there until 
March 2, 1930. He served a year in the Richmond Station, 
two years in the Western Addition. 

He took promotional examinations and was elevated to 
the rank of Corporal, on November 30, 1931, made a 
Sergeant on May 1, 1937, a Lieutenant on February 1, 
1944, and appointed a Captain on February 1, this year. 

Soon after being appointed a Lieutenant he was sent to 
the Mission Station on March 28, 1944 but on August 
29, 1944, Captain Bernard McDonald, then in charge of 
the Bureau of Inspectors, knowing the ability of Lieuten- 
ant McKlem as a police officer and an investigator, he hav- 
ing been assigned to the Bureau of Inspectors, on February 
14, 1938, and made an Inspector on December 16, 1943, 
had him brought back to the Inspectors Bureau to take 
charge of the Robbery Detail, following Lieutenant James 
Malloy's retirement. He served in that capacity until 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



last year, when he was sent to the FBI National Police 
Academy on July 1. Returning to the Police Department 
on October 1 he was assigned as an assistant to Captain 
of Inspectors James English, until he was promoted to a 
Captancy. He has been given charge of the big Ingleside 
District. 

During his over four years in charge of the Robbery 
Detail he and his force of Inspectors brought in many 
criminals and gangs of yeggs whose activities called for 
their attention. He is a thorough workman and asks none 
of the men under him to do a job that he would hesitate 
tackling. 

Captain McKlem married miss Gladys Russell, a native 
of this city, the day before he joined the Police Depart- 
ment, the wedding taking place on June 30, 1925. There 
are two children in the family now, Russell McKlem 21, 
and Miss Patricial McKlem 18. They, like Captain Mc- 
Klcm's legion of friends, undoubtedly take great pleasure 
at the success he has achieved as a member of the San 
Francisco Police Department. 

• • • 
CAPTAIN WALTER S. AMES 

The last of the three new captains invested with their 
new rank is Walter S. Ames. 

There are but few members of the San Francisco 
Police Department who has ever devoted more time and 
effort to gain better working conditions and better pay 
for the men who compose the Department. He had a 
prominent part in the organisation of the San Francisco 
Police Officers' Association, and was very active in charter 
amendments that during the past three years has raised 
the salaries of police officers of the city to its present 
desirable level. He, too, was a leader in the campaigns 
that resulted in the adoption of better pensions for local 
law enforcement officers, and particularly the charter 
amendment adopted by the voters last November that 
provided better protection to the widows of pensioned 
police officers. 

With Deputy Chief James Quigley he worked out the 
present system of promotional and entrance examinations 
whereby the custom of holding oral tests followed the 
written tests. Now all such civil service examinations are 
determined solely on the questions submitted for written 
answers. 

Captain Ames was born in San Francisco on January 

4, 1905. After getting his education in the public schools 
he took a course in law at the San Francisco Law School. 
He studied for three years but quit to take the examina- 
tions for entrance into the Police Department. He was 
successful and was appointed to the force on August 

5. 1929. 

Being of a studious nature he set out to advance by 
promotional examinations and made the eligible list on 
all he took, right up among the top successful ones. 

He advanced to the rank of Sergeant on September 12, 
1939, was made a Lieutenant on July 22, 1942, and on 
March 16, this year was promoted to a Captaincy. 

His first duty was on a three-wheeler for some years, 



and he served on radio patrol in the Northern district. 
He served most of his Sergeant years in the Southern 
district and for three years was a Lieutenant in the Central 
district. He is now assigned to Richmond station, taking 
the place of Captain Joseph Walsh who was elevated to 
Supervising Captain. 

Captain Ames was married to Grace Gardella, a local 
girl, in 1931. There are two children in the Ames family, 
Richard, 14 years of age, and Jerry, 11 years. 



MICHAEL RIORDAN IN NEW JOB 

On March 1, retired Chief of Police Michael Riordan 
was sworn in as chief law enforcement officer for Attorney 
General Fred N. Howser's department of the state govern- 
ment. He succeeds Chief Investigator Walter Lentz, who 
resigned last year. 

At the same time Attorney General Howser named 
George Griffin, Chief of Police of Salinas over 20 years 
ago, as chief special agent. Chief Griffin has served under 
former Attorney Generals U. S. Webb, Earl Warren, 
Robert Kenney and the present attorney general. 

In making the appointment Howser announced he had 
in mind the placing of the law enforcement divisions in 
a position of being beyond reproach. "The integrity and 
qualifications of his new appointees," he declared, "could 
not be questioned." 

Under Chief Riordan will be the State Bureau of 
Identification and Investigation, the Division of Narcotics 
and the special agents. His background of nearly 40 years 
as a member of the San Francisco Police Department, 
during which he progressed from patrolman through all 
the ranks of the Department to that of Deputy Chief 
under Chief Charles W. Dullea, and as Chief when Chief 
Dullea stepped out to take a job as a member of the Adult 
Authority board. 

He is an attorney-at-law, a profession he has been fol- 
lowing since he retired from the Police Department over 
a year ago, and he is noted for the care and intelligence 
he puts into any case coming under his care. 

San Francisco will be the headquarters of Chief Riordan. 



A Happy Easter 
Chauncey Tramutolo 



Phone: Office - 928 — Res. 1143 

R. O. SHELLING 

GRAIN AND FEED 

NORTH MAIN STREET PETALUMA. CALIF . 

Telephone 38 

PETALUMA MILLING COMPANY 

POULTRY FEEDS - HAY - GRAIN - DAIRY FEEDS 

242 MAIN STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. 



Telephone 1 74 1 

GENE'S RICHFIELD SERVICE 

GREASING AND WASHING 

Eugene Silveira 

CORNER EAST WASHINGTON AND WILSON 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Preston to San Quentin — Courtesy S.F.P.D. 



By Jim Leonard, Police Reporter of the Call -Bulletin 



During the summer of 1945 two 16-year-old boys were 
"reforming" at the Preston School of Industry at lone, 
California. They were not acquainted when they went 
in; but they were when they came out. 

George Abraham Jaber, 133 Hunter Alameda, had lots 
of reforming to do — on May 1 5 of that same year he con- 
fessed to Inspectors Al Corraso and Harry Husted, (re- 




Inspf.ctor Max Resnik 

tired) of the S.F.P.D's. Homicide Detail that he had mur- 
dered Lee Wing, a 60-year-old Chinese laundryman. 

Jack Colevris, an Italian boy who lived at 42 1 Union 
Street, San Francisco, served a short stint in Preston for 
stealing an automobile in San Francisco. He was sentenced 
January 13, 1945; but on June 7 Sacramento police sent 
him packing back to Preston for stealing an auto in their 
city. 

Then the two youths put their heads together and came 
up with another headache for the San Francisco police. 
When they left Preston, they decided they'd pick up two 
more pals in the bay city and go into the armed robbery 
business. Colevris would be the leader — that would be 
all right with Jaber who wasn't afraid of trouble. His 
great difficulty was in staying out of it. m 

In San Francisco they looked up David Andrew Gal- 
arza, 21, 1312 Powell Street, and Miguel Fortish Cecilio. 
19, 33 Avery Street, who readily agreed to cooperate in 
the project. They'd need an automobile for each job, so 
they would steal one (Colevris knew how) and ditch it 
when they were finished. They also needed a gun — this 
was a matter for Jaber. 

Young Jaber was known to handle his tasks with dis- 
patch and the most expedient means at his command; 
so one night when he went home to Alameda, he stopped 
in Oakland, threw a rock through the window of a hard 



ware store . . . walked away with a .22 calibre automatic 
pistol. 

During the months of September, October and No- 
vember of 1947 the four young hoodlums staged a total 
of 1 1 robberies — ten in San Francisco and one, for effect, 
across San Francisco Bay in Alameda. The San Francisco 
victims consisted of five garage operators, four grocers, 




Inspector Paddy Wafer 

and one gift shop proprietor. The boys victimised a liquor 
store clerk in Alameda. 

At this point two more names entered the story — Max 
Reznik and George P. "Paddy" Wafer. Inspectors of the 
Robbery Detail, assigned to investigate the case by Chief 
of Inspectors James L. English. Their police work proved 
to be psychological in nature — their suspects, though cap- 
able of planning their raids with adult foresight and 
shrewdness, were still in many respects typical gullible 
juveniles. With that thought in mind, Reznik and Wafer 
went after them. 

Procedure for the robberies was generally the same — 
first the stolen auto, Galarzo generally drove; either Jaber 
of Cecilio went ahead to insure a clear field for action. 
At the signal all but the driver would enter the business 
where Colevris held the gun and took command while his 
lieutenants picked up the loot wherever it was available. 

The boys went to work at 10:25 p.m. September 1. 
When they pulled into the Nob Hill Garage, 1320 Wash- 
ington Street, the attendant, Myron E. Greeny of 1350 
Washington Street came out to wait on them and walked 
into the muzzle of Colevris' gun. This was a poor start, 
financially; for the bandits left with only $18. 

It was over a month later when they tried again. On 
October 5 they hit another garage — 1625 Sacramento 
(Continued on Page 56) 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



Bart Sullivan The Friendly Traffic Officer 



B\ Opie L. Warner 



You seldom find a member of a metropolitan Police 
Department who has served for over a quarter of a cen- 
tury on one detail and at one fixed post. But the San 
Francisco Police Department has just such a police officer. 
He is Bartholomew Sullivan. 

Officer Sullivan has not only served over 25 years as 
a member of the Traffic Bureau, but he has served all his 
time since joining the Police Department in the Traffic 




Traffic Officer Barth Sullivan 
Bureau, with the exception of the first two months, after 
he pinned a star to his uniform coat. Not only that, he 
has served all this time as a "fixed post officer," at the 
busy intersections of Market Street, Montgomery and 
Post Streets, and looks after the other side of Market 
Street where Montgomery Street ends. 

The day before St. Patrick's noted natal date in 1923 
he was sworn in as a police officer by the late Chief Daniel 
J. O'Brien. Two months later he was assigned to the 
Traffic Bureau then under command of the late Captain 
Henry Gleeson. He was detailed to the above crossing and 
has been there ever since. 

He has during the 26 years he has been directing traffic 
at this post seen the tearing up of tracks of the old dinky 
trolley coming down Post Street thence out on Montgom- 
ery up Washington Street to Kearney. He has seen some 
of the city's biggest buildings arise on Montgomery Street, 
housing the offices of the city's economic, professional and 



financial leaders and their assistants. He has seen the 
building of the two noted bridges, the Golden Gate and 
the Bay Spans, and these have poured countless thousands 
of automobiles on the cross streets of Market Street where 
he has presided for so long, and so capably. He has seen 
Montgomery and New Montgomery made a one-way 
street to handle the heavy traffic flowing over these 
thoroughfares. 

During his long service a new generation has grown 
up and small boys and girls, when he took his place 26 
years ago, are now driving their cars along the streets 
he keeps open to the ever increasing onrush of autos, or 
are occupying offices in the big buildings in the business 
district. 

Why one day last year a middle aged couple approached 
Officer Sullivan as he stood at Montgomery and Market 
streets. The man said: "Twenty-five years ago my wife 
and I were in San Francisco on our honeymoon. We 
came from the East. There was a little confusion as we 
started across your Market Street, and you were the 
officer who so kindly straightened us out. We are here 
celebrating our silver wedding anniversary and wondered 
as we neared the city if the kind officer who had served 
us so nicely on our honeymoon, was still to be found 
on the job. We could never forget your kindly manner 
and we are delighted to find you here, and as we have 
noted still handling your job with a smile. You are a 
credit to the Police Department and your Irish ancestors." 

That's the way Bart Sullivan has always worked and 
the way he is working today. A kindly word, a kindly 
warning instead of a snarling "where do ya think you're 
going?" 

Just recently the following letter come into the Police 
Department : 

"I presume that during the course of the year you 
receive many letters as regards your men, so I don't sup- 
pose this one will create any comment, other than com- 
mending the officer in question. But I would feel remiss 
in my duty as a contented citizen if I did not report my 
observations of one of your officers. He is located at 
Market and Montgomery streets. He has a difficult prob- 
lem on his hands, but what impressed me so forcibly is 
his fine personality. He smiles to every one, and is so 
nice that it is a pleasure to bid him the time of day. I 
am not a young lady, so I don't want you to think this is 
a mash note. I asked him his name and he told me it was 
Bart Sullivan, so I hope he will be given some com- 
mendations. 

"Before I leave I wish to state that all traffic is regu- 
lated so well here and I love San Francisco so much. I 
hate to leave it, and return to my home. 

Mrs. J. C. J. 

Passadena, Calif. 
('Continued on Page 31) 



Page \2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



SPRING GRADUATES FROM FBI NATIONAL 

POLICE ACADEMY 



John Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, announced that 56 elected law enforcement 
officers, who comprised the 40th Session of the FBI Na- 
tional Academy, graduated at exercises held in the De- 
partment Auditorium in Washington, D. O, on April 
1, 1949. 

Graduates heard addresses by the Honorable Wayne 
Morse, Senator from Oregon, and S. Perry Brown, Na- 
tional Commander of the American Legion. 

Harry M. Kimball, Special Agent in Charge of the 
San Francisco Division of the FBI, stated that the following 
five officers from Northern California graduated April 1 : 

(1) Chief of Detectives Guy O. Wathern of the Palo 
Alto Police Department. Guy is a former athlete and ex- 
Marine. He was an all-conference guard on the Junior 
College football team at Bakersfield. Besides distinguish- 
ing himself as a student at the San Jose College Police 
School he set two swimming records and won letters for 
swimming and water polo. He joined the Palo Alto Police 
Department as a patrolman after his graduation from 
police school in 1941. He was on military leave for three 
years beginning in 1942, during which he served in the 
Marine Corps. He was Lieutenant of Marine Police and 
Traffic Control Officer on the island of Guam and was 




awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achieve- 
ment on Saipan and Tinian. He has progressed steadily 
since his return to the Palo Alto Police Department in 
1946, was functioning as an Inspector at the time he was 
invited by Director Hoover to attend FBI National Acad- 
emy, and was promoted to the position of Chief of Detec- 
tives while in attendance at the Academy in Washington, 







, 


Mj^L 








I 


JR 


1 


V 

f 1 * 




t 

i 




■ 





Detective John C. Gleason 

Police Department, Santa Cruz, Calif., shown firing from the left 

hand barrier during the course of training at the FBI ranges at 

Quantico, Virginia. Detective Gleason is a member of the fortieth 

session of the FBI National Academy. 



Chief of Detectives Guy O. Wathen 
Police Department, Palo Alto, is shown lecturing before his class- 
mates in the course of his training at the FBI National Academy. 
Department of Justice Building, Washington. D. C. 

D. C. He is an ex-Boy Scout and a De Molay, and is a 
member of the Chi Chi Sigma college police fraternity as 
well as the Phi Sigma Chi and Epsilon Mu. 

(2) Captain of Inspectors Otto Meyer of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department. Captain Meyer is a veteran 
officer with 25 years service, having risen steadily through 
the ranks from patrolman to corporal, sergeant, inspector 
and lieutenant, to his present position as assistant to Chief 
of Inspectors James L. English. He is a native of San Fran- 
cisco, had four years service in the U. S. Navy, and in 1945 
reorganized the special officers at the Hunters Point 
Housing District under the direct supervision of the San 
Francisco Police Department. He headed that unit for al- 
most four years under the Captains of the Potrero precinct 
station. Just prior to his departure from San Francisco to 
attend the Academy in Washington, D. O, he was guest 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 3 



of honor at a testimonial dinner at the Palace Hotel spon- 
sored by the San Francisco Housing Authority. 

He was a top flight golf player and won many cups on 
San Francisco golf links. 

(3) Captain Delbert R. Cole of the Petaluma Police 
Department. 'Del' is a native of Sonoma County and was 
an outstanding basketball and baseball player while attend- 
ing high school in Mendocino County. After working for 
a number of years in the lumber and dairy business and 
playing semi-pro baseball around Fresno, he became a 
Patrolman at the Petaluma Police Department in 1935. 
He served in that capacity until 1943, when he became 
Acting Chief of the Internal Security Unit of the War 
Relocation Authority at Tulelake. He returned to the 
police force at Petaluma in 1945 and was promoted to his 
present position on December 1, 1947. 

(4) Lieutenant William W. W adman, Jr., of the Uni- 
versity of California Police Department. 'Bill' is the first 
campus officer of a western university selected to attend the 
FBI National Academy, and he has quite an interesting 
background. He was born at Bayonne, N. J., and attended 




Captain of Inspectors Otto Meyer 
Police Department, San Francisco, shown preparing to fire ma- 
chine gun on the FBI ranges located at Quantico, Va. Captain 
Meyer is a member of the fortieth session of the FBI National 
Academy. 

high school and college at Wellington, New Zealand, 
where he was quite a cross-country runner. He won a schol- 
arship at Oxford University of London, England, and 
graduated with a degree in music. He served as a Criminal 
Investigator in the Contra Costa County District Attor- 
ney's Office and later as an Investigator on the Berkeley 
Police Department for about five years. He became Lieu- 
tenant of Police at the University of California in 1934 
where he has since been serving as assistant to Captain 
Welater Lee, the veteran campus Police Chief. 

(5) Detective John C. Gleason of the Santa Cruz Po- 
lice Department. 'Johnny' was born and reared in Santa 
Cruz, attended high school there, and enlisted in the Army 
in 1942. He had three years service overseas and was hon- 
orably discharged in 1945 as a Technical Sergeant from 
the 819th Bomber Squadron. He qualified as an "Expert" 




Lieutenant of Police William Wadman, Jr. 
University of California Police Department, Berkeley, examines 
the famous "Oscar" which is used in the training of officers at- 
tending the FBI National Academy, Washington, D. C. 

with the .45 calibre pistol and was awarded the Good Con- 
duct Medal, Purple Heart, and Distinguished Flying Cross. 
He became a Detective on the Santa Cruz Police Depart- 
ment in June of 1945. His proceeding at his own expense 
3,000 miles across the country by bus in six days without 
rest in indicative of his strong desire to progress in the 
police profession and provide better service and protection 
to the people of his community. 

The 56 officers came to Washington, D. O, from 34 
states and one officer came from Puerto Rico. 

Founded in 1935 the FBI National Academy was cre- 
ated for the purpose of training police administrators and 
police instructors. The entire course of the Acamedy fol- 
lows closely that given to new Special Agents of the FBI. 
It includes every possible subject which would give the 
(Continued on page 33 ) 




Captain of Police Delbert Richard Cole 

Petaluma. shown preparing to fire rifle on the FBI ranges located 

at Quantico. Va. Captain Cole is a member of the fortieth session 

of the FBI National Academy. 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Berkeley's Famous Lie Detector Solves Guam Murder Mystery 

"Perfect Crime" Succumbs to Man-Made Machine And Good Psychology on Part of 
Inspector Albert E. Riedel of Berkeley Police Department 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran Police Reporter, editor, writer. 



This is the story of the longest trip the famous Berkeley 
lie detector has ever made — 20,000 miles over land and 
water by air! 

It is the story of Police Inspector Albert E. Riedel who 
used psychology as well as the lie detector to clinch facts 
and bring to trial three men who had, from all outward 
appearances, committed "the perfect crime." 

It is the story of a murder mystery that in all annals of 
crime has no equal. 




Inspector Albert Riedel (Right) 
Demonstrating the lie detector. 

It is the story of a beautiful American girl, civilian 
employee of the United States Navy in far off Guam, a 
dot in the Pacific but a bastion of defense and offense 
should the United States of America ever become involved 
in another global war. 

It is the story of the rape and murder of Ruth Farns- 
worth, 27, of San Francisco, whose mutilated body was 
found within 150 feet of the little jade shop where she 
was employed in her off hours. 

It is the story of a jungle wilderness which sprang up 
almost overnight after the little brown men of Japan had 
ravished peaceful Guam in the early months of World 
War II and left, when the Americans arrived, a thriving 
jungle, so dense that even hundreds of army and navy 

Telephone 1435 

PETALUMA LIQUOR STORE 

PACKAGE LIQUORS - WINES - BEERS - SOFT DRINKS 

108 KENTUCKY STREET PETALUMA. CALIF. 

Phone 859J 

HENRY'S 

ALL POPULAR BRANDS OF BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
200 MAIN STREET PETALUMA. CALIF. 



personnel and the island police searched the nearby laby- 
rinth didn't find the body until days after the crime. 

But most of all it is the story of the splendid police 
work, combined with a keen knowledge of human nature, 
and the expert manipulation of the "question and answer 
box" known as the lie detector which Inspector Riedel 
carried and guarded across 10,000 miles of ocean and 
land and back. 

It is the story of the victim's dress discovered by an 
inexperienced navy man who turned up the wrong end 
of the seat of an army jeep. 

It is also the story of a young woman who was looking 
forward to her wedding day to a Top Sergeant in the 
U. S. Army, also stationed in Guam. 

Murder and Rape, Dec. 11, 1948 

It was on the night of December 1 1 that Ruth Farns- 
worth was beaten, dragged into the nearby jungle, raped 
and ravished and stripped of her clothing. She died 
within 24 hours but it was not until days later that her 
body was found within 150 feet of the jade shop in 
which she worked. 

There was not a single clue available to trace the 
criminals. 

After days of futile effort, after questioning hundreds 
of the members of the armed forces in Guam and the 
native population, Lieutenant Commander James Hackett, 
U. S. N., former Chicago police detective, sent for Berke- 
ley's lie detector and Inspector Riedel who has practically 
grown up with the lie detector, first inaugurated and 
developed under the former Chief August Villmer, re- 
tired, of Berkeley and professor of criminology at the 
University of California. 

Meanwhile Lieutenant Commander Hackett as deputy 
Guam Island police chief had gathered together a few 
hairpins, a bit of jewelry and the remnants of the clothing 
that Miss Farnsworth had worn when she was struck 
down and dragged into the jungle. 

Inspector Riedel on Wing 

Chief of Police John Holstrom delegated Riedel to the 
job. Within the matter of hours Riedel was aboard an 
army plane with the precious lie-detector close by. Brief 
stops at Honolulu, transfer to another air transport, two 
stops in the wild stretches of the South Pacific and then 
came Guam. Ten thousand miles of ocean and land cov- 
ered in 36 hours. Guam a paradise of Pacific isle beauty, 
along with the devastated pineapple and banana planta- 
tions, and the ruins of sturdy buildings, laid in dust by 
Japanese and American gun fire. 

"It was entering a new world to me," confesses In- 
( Continued on Page 64) 



April, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 15 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Constable Earl Dierking, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretarx-Treasurer 



The meeting of the Bay Counties Peace Officers' Asso- 
ciation was held at Fairfield-Suisun Airhasc on Thursday, 
March 31, 1949. 

The members assembled in the mess hall of the Officer's 
Club and a very nice luncheon was served. The President, 
Earl Dierking, Constable of Vallejo, then called the meet- 
ing to order and introduced Rex Clift, Chief of Police of 
Fairfield, who was host for the meeting. Chief Clift intro- 
duced the various officials of Fairfield and most of the 
ranking officers of the Fairfiel-Suisun Airbase. 

Constable Dierking then introduced the city officials 
of Vallejo, who were in attendance, as well as other 
prominent members and guests. 

Dr. Leo McMahon, who gave his affiliation as Chief 
of Police of Rome, Italy, was called upon and he enter- 
tained the members and guests with several stories in 
Italian dialect. 

The President then called on Brig. General Harold Q. 
Huglin, who, as speaker for the day, gave a very interest- 
ing talk on the work that is being carried on at the Fair- 
field-Suisun Airbase. General Huglin, in his talk, com- 
pared the airbase with a city in that both are communities 
supplying the members thereof with the necessary utilities 
such as gas, lights, heat, telephone, etc. The General stated 
that the work of the Air Force, like the work of the 
Peace Officers' Association, was for the preservation of 
peace, the Air Force in international affairs and the Peace 
Officers in national affairs. The General then described 



Frank E. Heard 



Guido Motroni 



MOTRONI LUMBER COMPANY 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS 

duPont Paints and Varnishes 

DUCO • DULUX 



WOODLAND 



103S Beamer Street 



Telephone 1900 



CALIFORNIA 



Office Phone 399-J 



Home Phone 1384-R 



WASHBURN BROTHERS 

CUSTOM BUILT FARM MACHINERY - GENERAL WELDING 
TRACTOR AND EQUIPMENT REPAIR 



303 East Street 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Tadlock's Radio-Electronics Service 

TWO-WAY POLICE RADIO SERVICE 



430 College St. 



Phone 1491-J 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



the various units of the Airbase, together with the duties 
performed, giving statistics as to the number of planes and 
personnel attached to each. He also made a very interest- 
ing statement to the effect that the MATS (Military 
Air Transport Service), of which the Fairfield-Suisun 
Airbase is a member, has flown two billion, one hundred 
fifty million passenger miles without the loss of or injury 
to a single passenger, which, in view of the fact that they 
fly over the longest stretches of water of any airline in 
any country, is a remarkable record. At the conclusion of 
his talk, General Huglin invited the members and guests 
present to inspect the base hospital and planes on the field. 

A motion was made, seconded, and carried that the 
reading of the minutes of the previous meeting be dis- 
pensed with. 

Chief J. D. Holstrom of Berkeley was called on and 
he gave a short talk on the coming convention of the ICP, 
which will be held in Dallas, Texas, this year. 

John Greening, Secretary of the State Peace Officers' 
Association, and Division Deputy in Sheriff H. D. (Jack) 
Gleason's Alameda Office, was called on to report on the 
radio situation. Mr. Greening stated that the FCC has 
made no decision on the relocation of frequencies, but 
that the decision should be made within the next week or 
ten days. He stated that it was possible that some law 
enforcement agencies might have to move from their 
present frequencies. 

As there were no committee reports, unfinished business, 
or new business, Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary- 
Treasurer, read the names of those who had filed applica- 
tions for membership at the last meeting. A motion was 
then made, seconded, and carried that the new applicants 
be accepted. 

The President then thanked the General and other 
officers of the airbase who had made the luncheon such 
a huge success. 

Don Wood, Chief of Police of San Anselmo, announced 
that Dr. L. L. Stanley had invited the Association to 
hold their next meeting at his estate in San Anselmo on 
May 26, 1949, which was accepted by the Association. 

There being no further business to discuss, the meeting 
then adjourned. 



CALVERT RECREATION CLUB 



PLAZA HOTEL BUILDING 
On The Plaza 



SUISUN (Solano County). CALIFORNIA 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



MONTEREY IS GROWING 



Monterey, California's historic city, where back in the 
1840's the first state government was established, and 
which harbored Father Junipero Serra and his band of 
Catholic followers in their trek from San Diego to North- 
ern California in establishing the Missions that played 
such an important part in the progress of the Golden 
State, is growing. It is not only growing in population 
as most others of the commonwealth cities have enjoyed 



Naturally this sudden growth affects the Police Depart- 
ment, for it is up to Chief Fred Moore to see that the 
newly annexed area is given the same fine protection as 
has been given by his force of officers for so many years. 

Already he has been given five additional men, and 
after July 1 he is slated to get three or four more. He 
now has a force of 2? men. 

He has also been allotted an additional patrol car, 




MONTEREY P. D. NEW RECRUITS GETTING THEIR TRAINING 

Five recruits of Monterey P. D. getting their training. In rear 1. to r: Chief Fred Moore, Lieutenant Clyde Klaumann and F.B.I. 

Special Agent Frank Mitchell. Man facing new men is a FBI special agent. 



during the war period and the years that followed it, but 
it is growing in area. 

Last summer an election brought about the annexation 
of a little over two square miles or territory into the 
limits of the city. This additional area extended on the 
west of the city limits to Pacific Grove and Carmel Hill 
and to Canyon Del Rey. 

This winter another section was annexed by the voters. 
This is on the northeast of the city, and extends half way 
to the Fort Ord Wye, and includes the Navy Line School 
and a lot of the Del Norte properties surrounding the 
old Del Monte Hotel, which has been taken over by the 
Navy. This new addition adds 2.3 square miles of area 
to Monterey. 

The more than four square miles of new territory has 
increased the population by about 3800 people. This 
brings the population of Monterey to an estimated 18,000 
or 19,000. 



equipped with three-way radio, giving him six of these 
vehicles, and another motorcycle, increasing the number 
to four. 

Chief Moore has for a long time been a follower of the 
theory that young men entering police service should be 
trained properly for the calling. He and every man who 
has served under him, has taken all courses available, in- 
tended to better fit them to meet the requirements of law 
enforcement. 

When, since the first of the year he was given five added 
men for his personnel, he felt they should get some basic 
training before they fared forth with a gun and a set of 
handcuffs. He arranged for a training course, and got 
some swell cooperation from Chief Special Agent Harry 
Kimball, for the FBI in the San Francisco district, and 
Frank Mitchell of the Monterey area, Police Judge Monty 
Hcllam and various police officers of Monterey and neigh- 
(Continued on Page 35 J 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page J 7 



1928 Class of S F P D Has First Celebration 



During the year 1928 over 300 young men were called 
into the San Francisco Police Department, of this number 
a big majority were sworn in, served their probationary 
period and were vested with all the duties of a regular 
police officer. 

Twenty years after the appointment of so many new 
policemen, the records of the Department reveal that 
many of them have climbed to higher ranks in their 
chosen field of work. 

You will find from those same police records that the 
men who have served as guardians of the peace in San 
Francisco during the past two decades have contributed 
many brilliant pages to the history of the Police Depart' 
ment and these men are unexcelled by the classes of any 
other year for steady and efficient law enforcement efforts. 

It is eminently fitting that the large number of men who 
have served so faithfully for the past twenty years should 
have a get-to-gether affair, which would bring all those 
able to attend such a function, to celebrate "twenty years 
after." The boys of the 1928 classes are well scattered 
among the police districts, departments and bureaus, and 
many of them have had no opportunity of meeting up 
with guys who joined a generation ago. 

So on March 1, such a meeting was held. It was under 
the direction of a committee made up of Captain Jack 
Eker, of the Central station, Officers John Thomas, 
Thomas B. Tracy and Lieutenant Walter Sullivan. The 
affair was a dinner put on by Nicholas Finocchio, pro- 
prietor of the New Tivoli, 1438 Grant Avenue. 

There were 90 boys of the Class of '28 seated at the 
banquet tables. With choice New York cut steaks as the 
piece de resistance, the balance of the menu was in keep- 
ing with the main courses. 

Sergeant Frank Mascarelli, tagged the Police Depart- 
ment Eddy Peabody of the banjo, Officer Clayton 
Mitchell, on the piano, and Special Officer Johnson, with 
his French horn enlivened the occasion with a wide variety 
of musical numbers. This trio could do well in the 
best of cafes. 

Then when the meal was over Officer John Kane and 
his beautiful singing voice rendered several vocal numbers, 
as did Inspector Edward Van Dervort, an equally tal- 
ented singer. Sergeant John McCarthy, who is as good 
as the best of professional monologists contributed a 
humorous number, and then there was J. Montgomery, 
a Negro boy, who can sure throw his feet around, gave 
a swell exhibition of dancing. Peter H. Wong, sales 
supervisor for Acme Breweries, knocked them in the 
aisles, with his singing and wise-cracking. 

The ever efficient and witty Michael Lawless acted as 
master of ceremonies and as he always does, turning in 
a mighty entertaining job at introducing the speakers and 
presenting some of the boys who only wanted to 
take a bow. 

Among the speakers were Captain Eker, Deputy Chief 



Quigley, Commission Secretary John Butler, Lieutenant 
John P. Meehan. 

Among those who have gone to the top ranks in the 
Police Department from this group of officers besides 
Captain Eker, are the following: Deputy Chief James 
Quigley, Chief of Inspectors James English, Captain 
Walter Ames. The following Lieutenants were on hand 
for the celebration: John P. Meehan of the Juvenile Bu- 
reau, Thomas Collins, Edward Farrell, Edward Greene, 
Jerome Reidy, Michael J. Sullivan, Martin Spellman, 
August Steffens, Floyd Stuart, Theodore Terlau. 

Sergeants present were Harold Anderson, Eldon Bear- 
den, Anthony Bell, Louis Brune, Robert Corson, Ernest 
Carli, Henry Klein, Daniel J. Lynch, John D. Leahy, 
John J. McCarthy, Ernest Reinke, Romeo Simonetti, 
Clifford J. Smith, Henry Strong. Frank C. Schuler, Veston 
Williamson, and George Eggert. 

The following Inspectors participated in this first get- 
to-gether: Michael Crystal, Nicholas Crivello, Chinatown 
Squad;; Frank Gaddini, Edmond A. Maher, John E. 
Rosberg, Chinatown Squad William P. Stanton. 

There were two men, retired on pensions for injuries 
received in the discharge of their duties. They were 
officers Vincent Morris and William J. Nittler. They 
were given a warm welcome. 

In addition to the above named the following were also 
present: A. E. Birdsall, Fred Borchers, William Bard, 
Louis Cames, Frank Clothier, Jack Countryman, Robert 
Dickman, Edward Cassidy. A. Druin, Robert Davis, J. G. 
Donovan, Lemuel Etherington, Sam Evjenth, William 
Fitzgerald, Charles Haster, Sidney Hinson, L. W. John- 
son, Thomas J. Leahy, John H. Mindermann, William 
P. Kavanaugh, Charles McMenomy, Thomas T. Miller, 
Steve Malone, Eligio Morelli, Edward Oliva, John J. 
O'Connell, Luke Peterson, Henry Schutser, Thomas B. 
Tracy, Virgil Vandervort, Chester L. Welsh, Raymond 
Wertz, Philip York, John W. Thomas, Walter Coe, E. 
F. Kavanaugh and Opie L. Warner. 

Before the meeting adjourned a motion was made that 
the 1928 members hold a meeting annually, and the date 
was set as the Tuesday preceding Ash Wednesday each 
year. The motion was unanimously passed and plans are 
already under way for the next meeting, in 1950, and it 
is a mortal cinch that there will be a bigger turn out then 
than this year, for the boys can make arrangements to 
enable them to be present at that next session. 



MINT CAFE 

SERVING AMERICAN AND 
ITALIAN FOOD 

Hours 6 A.M. to 1 P.M. 
609 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Chief Edward Walsh of SF Fire Department 



Bv Opie L. Warner 



Back in 1909 a 14-year-old San Francisco horn youth 
got himself a job as office boy for the Chronicle, then 
published at Market and Kearny Streets. He held onto 
that job for three years, at the same time attending public- 
schools, graduating from Commercial High School in 
1913. This lad got a lot of experience during his years 
rushing copy for the Chronicle and attending to the 




Fire Chief Edward Walsh 

myriad of duties a hustling copy boy has to perform. 
This experience, with his school education and the back- 
ground of a good Irish family, has taken him far up the 
ladder of success. 

Today that former copy boy for one of San Francisco's 
leading newspapers is Chief of the San Francisco Fire 
Department, and as all residents of the city by the Golden 
Gate know he is Edward P. Walsh. 

Chief Walsh joined the Fire Department on January 
1, 1922. During World War I he served with the sixth 
engineers of the famed 91st Division and saw plenty of 
service over in Europe. He finished his stint in the 
Army in 1919. 

Fireman Walsh was not satisfied with lugging a fire 
hose, scampering up ladders or chopping through walls 
to get to the seat of a fire. He saw opportunity for those 
who would apply themselves to the hard task of studying, 
not only means of combatting fires but for promotional 
examination, which for the successful meant climbing 
to a higher rank. 

He did just that. He was a good fire fighter and a good 
one to master the details for advancement by periodic 
civil service tests. How well he succeeded is illustrated 
by the record of promotions he achieved during his over 
a quarter of a century as a member of the Fire Department. 

He was made a Lieutenant in August, 1927; a Captain 



in January, 1936; a Battalion Chief in December, 1937; 
Assistant Chief in December, 1943, and the highest rank 
on January 21, 1948, when the Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners, Max Sobel, Walter Leonetti and Robert H. 
Schaefer, appointed when Judge Elmer E. Robinson took 
over as Mayor of the City, selected him for the respon- 
sible position. 

When Chief Walsh joined the Department there were 
some 700 men engaged in protecting San Francisco from 
fires. Today there are 1610. 

In 1922 there was but a single division, toaay there 
are three; when Chief Walsh joined there were rut eight 
battalion districts, today there are 11, with 33 batalion 
chiefs to look after these districts. 

There are 10 assistant chiefs, and Frank P. Kelly is 
Chief of the Fire Prevention and Investigation division. 

A new office has been created since Chief Walsh as- 
sumed his present post, and that is Deputy Chief, and 
he selected A. J. Galli to be the first man to take over 
that rank. 

Chief Walsh's fire fighting force comprises the follow- 
ing: Forty-seven engine companies: 17 trucks, 14 tank 
wagons, two rescue squad trucks, four water towers, one 
air compressor, two fire boats, two searchlights. This equip- 
ment and the well trained personnel, which mans it, 
have kept San Francisco from having any out-of -control 
fires, and has given the city a record for efficient service 
that is second to no other metropolitan city, and the 
equipment has been rated by fire insurance companies as 
the best in the nation. 

The present Chief has served in every Division in the 
City, but served longest in Division No. 1 . 

While serving as a Battalion Chief in 1939, for District 
8, at Bush and Grant Avenue, he won the coveted Dennis 
Sullivan medal for meritorious work. This was gained 
for the forthright conduct of Chief Walsh at a three- 
alarm fire in a hotel fire at Sixth and Howard Streets, 
in which two persons lost their lives. He has received a 
number of other commendations for extraordinary duty 
at various fires. 

One of the things that Chief Walsh is justly proud of 
is the Fire Training College, operated under the direction 
of the Board of Education and San Francisco City College. 
The training is under direct supervision of J. H. Mc- 
Lendon. who has three Battalion Chiefs, three Lieutenants 
and four other officers as instructors. 

Each member takes a 15 months course, and the college 
handles 50 men a day, 25 in morning sessions and the 
same number during afternoon sessions. This book train- 
ing with the instructions the men get at the fire tower at 
11th and Division streets account for the high quality 
of efficiency that today marks the membership of the San 
Francisco Police Department. 

I Continued on Page 70) 



April, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page U 



New Officers of Peninsula P. O. Association 



Proceedings of March meeting of the Peninsula Police 
Officers' Association, presented by Officer Richard Ritten- 
iaeyer, Director of Publicity for the Association. 

The elected Officers of the Peninsula Police Officers' 
Association for this year who took over in January are: 

President, Sergeant Jack Price, Burlingame; First Vice, 




Sergeant Jack Price 

Donald Lowe, Patrolman, San Carlos; Second Vice, Carl 
Schwahn, Patrolman, Burlingame; Secretary, Captain 
John Hartnett, Burlingame; Treasurer, Lieutenant Leroy 
Hubbart, Aatherton; Sergeant at Arms, Edward Pence, 
Patrolman, San Mateo; Trustees, Captain Al Funke, Hills- 
borough, Sergeant Cliff Stafford, Redwood City, Ser- 
geant Roy Cunningham. San Bruno. 

Sergeant Price, the president for 1949 is one of the 
most active members of the Association, as well as being 
an outstanding officer of Chief R. C. Theuer's Burlingame 
Police Department. He has been a member of the police 
force for eleven years. 

He has been particularly active in public relations, mak- 
ing known the accomplishments of the Police Officers' 
Association as well as the accomplishments of the various 
law enforcement agencies of the county. 

One of the important matters that the Association has 
accepted is the system of the classication for meritorious 
awards, to members of the different Police Departments 
of the Peninsula. This classification is similar to the 
pattern used by the San Francisco Police Department. 

The last meeting was held at the Casino Club in Daly 
City on March 15 th with about 55 members present frpm 
all Departments on the Peninsula from Sunnyvale to Daly 
City. Special guests who attended that meeting included 
Mayor Paul Taylor, Police Commissioner Edward Mooney 
and Councilman Fred Bertetta, of Daly City. John Cog- 
will. San Mateo County juvenile director, and Lorn Beck- 



ley, juvenile home superintendent. Former Police Chief 
and present councilman, John J. Harper of Burlingame. 

Inspector Thomas Fitzpatrick of the San Francisco 
Police Department who gave the main address. He re- 
ported on the Widows and Orphans Association of that 
department and his talk was well received by the members 

Everyone was glad to receive the news that Lieutenan* 
Leroy Hubbard of Atherton was selected to attend the FBI 
Police Academy in Washington, D. C, from April Is: 
through the month of June. 

Lieutenant Lawrence Furio of Burlingame, chairman of 
the entertainment committee, has announced April 19th 
has been set as the date for our annual dinner dance to 
honor our wives and sweethearts. This will be held at the 
Green Hills Country Club in Millbrae this year. 

Several of our working committees are expected to make 
reports at one of our near future meetings. 

These include reports on our insurance plan, special 
awards for meritorious service and plans for the yearly 
dance next fall. 

At the dance mentioned before for our wives and sweet- 
hearts the awards for meritorious service and for Past 
President will be awarded for the year 1948. 

Plans are being made for the big annual dance this fall 
are being worked out to make it the biggest affair ever 
held. This is due to possibility we can get the new San 
Mateo Fiesta building just completed last last fall. If we 
get that it will be the first time we have had a building 
large enough to handle the anticipated crowd. Besides the 
annual dance we hope to entertain with some high class 
radio and stage acts. We hope to make it a really gala 
event. 

Sergeant Prince, our present President, is going all-out 
this year to make the Association the best in California. 
All meetings are well attended and besides the good dinners 
served each month, we transact all business pending. 

At our next meeting in April the entire force of Mill- 
brae, the Peninsula's newest city will be accepted as mem- 
bers. These include, Chief Walter Swope, Lieutenant Law- 
rence Pickett, and Patrolmen Howard Schroeder and 
George Albright. 

Other new members accepted in the Association this 
year are Ernie Lena and Pete Fena of Hillsborough; Cleve 
Price of Burlingame; Kenneth Wilson, Donald Pearman. 
Robert Condon, Steve Svendson and Claude Smith of San 
Mateo. 

The next meeting of the Association will be held in Red- 
wood City and will me a noon meeting. 



TODD'S CLUB 

E. Todd Ogden 
COCKTAILS • DANCING 

Telephone: Richmond 9435 
2068 San Pablo Avenue 



EL CERRITO 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



= San Francisco = 







(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 

An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

REVISTA DE POL1CIA _ 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

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SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 3D car Jgs 



DON'TS FOR STOREKEEPERS 

DON'T leave your store without trying both locks in the 
front door and satisfying yourself they are ef- 
fectively locked. 

DON'T leave your store without trying the windows 
and the rear door and seeing that they are se- 
curely locked. 

DON'T leave a door leading into alley-ways open after 
dark, or after there is no further need of its 
being open. 

DON'T leave any ladders or boxes outside, as they may 
be used by thieves to make an easy entry. 

DON'T forget that an open transom is an invitation 
to theives. 

DON'T leave your safe on what is commonly known 
as "The Sleeper" on in such a position that it 
may be esaily opened without tools or knowl- 
edge of the combination. 

DON'T leave your store without having a light burning 
directly over the safe. 

DON'T put your daily receipts in any hiding place while 
lights are burning, or under conditions where 
you may be observed from the outside. 

DON'T make up your cash while any person is in the 
store, for even an honest friend may give in- 



formation resulting in the disappearance of 
your receipts. 

DON'T tell your business or that of your firm, because 
visitors and even customers sometimes have 
ulterior motives. 

DON'T leave your store when closing with a light burn- 
ing close to the front and none in the rear, be- 
cause a prowler can work nicely when the rear 
of your store is in darkness. 

DON'T hesitate notifying the Police Department of any 
suspicious character or occurrence which may 
come to your notice. 



APRIL FIRST AND THE POLICE 
DEPARTMENT 

The pranksters use the Police Department pretty freely 
to play April Fool jokes on their friends and acquaintances. 

Some people want to know the price of rooms, and 
give the proper street address of police stations in vari- 
ous parts of the city; or give the street address of the Hall 
of Justice. When informed that their information about 
vacancies at the given address is just a joke the informa- 
tion to the party telephoning may sometimes provoke a 
hearty laugh, but generally the butt of the joke shows 
displeasure; and the variety of this displeasure runs all 
the way from a mild cuss word to the most unprintable 
outburst. Take two of last year's calls. 

"Police Department." "I would like to speak to Mr. 
Kopp." "I don't know him." "I was told to call this 
number, and ask for him; that he wanted to talk to me." 
"No such man in the department — what department?" 
"Oh, yeah, I get it — the Police Department. Excuse me 
for being so dumb." 

"Will you please call Mr. P. D. Sargent to the tele- 
phone and tell him I will call with the car in ten minutes 
and bring a friend along as he requested?" "So, you 
smart cop, you think P. D. Sargent means Police Depart- 
ment Sergeant and I am a sucker! Well, let me ! * " zz 
xx — --- ! ! !" (That good citizen will not be joked 
with. He was real angry.) 



NEW OFFICERS OF SANTA CLARA 
SHERIFF'S FORCE 

Deputy Sheriff Francis Gilleran is the new president of 
the Santa Clara Sheriff's Office Benefit Association, suc- 
ceeding Deputy Sheriff Goudy. 

Other new officers are Deputy Sheriff Dan Pasetta, vice- 
president; Sgt. Robert P. Thompson, secretary-treasurer. 
Matron Mae Smothers, Sgt. John Fortado and Deputy 
Sheriffs Charles Hambaugh and Francis Leyva, trustees. 

Joe Tamagni, Mgr. Mrs. E. Corfu, Prop. 

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Phone 2 5 

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246 MAIN STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Donald Cameron, New SFPU Commissioner 



On February 1 this year Donald A. Cameron, was ap- 
pointed a Public Utility Commissioner by Mayor Elmer 
E. Robinson. On March 1 a testimonial dinner for Cameron 
was held in the Gold Room of the Fairmont Hotel, and 
if anyone has an idea that Donald Cameron hasn't got a 
lot of friends, he should have looked in on the Gold Room 
that night. There were well over 600 people, men and 




Donald Cameron 

women from every walk of life in the City of San Fran- 
cisco, and they had a good time, the program of the eve- 
ning was pitched for that purpose. 

Every city department, the courts and other public 
officials were represented, headed by Mayor and Mrs. 
Robinson. At the table of honor were in addition to the 
Mayor and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Philip F. Landis, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam McKee, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Baron, Mr. 
and Mrs. Victor S. Swanson, Mr. and Mrs. James H. Tur- 
ner, and of course the guest of honor and his wife. 

Supervisor James L. Halley was toastmaster and the 
speaker of the evening, and he did a mighty fine job of 
both. 

Speechmaking was held at a minimum, and with a full 
orchestra, a good vaudeville show, a splended dinner 



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served, ending by dancing, everyone had a good time. 

Donald Cameron, who bas born, reared and got his edu- 
cation in San Francisco, has operated a successful real 
estate and insurance business for over 30 years, and has 
his offices at No. 1 Montgomery Street. 

He is a member of the Real Estate Association, of which 
he has served on the board of directors, and the San Fran- 
cisco Real Estate Board of which he is a past director. 

He is a member of the Civil League of Improvement 
Clubs, the Press Club, Kiwanis, Executive Association, of 
which he is now President; the Masons, and its fun loving 
Shriners, and is Vice President of the Past San Francisco 
Grand Jurors Association. Commissioner Cameron served 
on the grand jury of 1946, and was chairman of the police 
committee of than grand jury. There are numerous other 
associations of which he is a member, including the Bay 
County Peace Officers Association. He is vitally interested 
in law enforcement, and last year with Chief Michael E. 
Mitchell and Chief of Inspectors James English he attended 
the annual convention of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, in New York City. 

Mayor Robinson has appointed some mighty good men 
to assist him in administering the affairs of the city of San 
Francisco, and in the appointment of Donald Cameron he 
is maintaining his splendid record of selecting able and 
loyal citizens to take important positions with his official 
family. 

ECONOMY DRUG STORE 

EUGENE J. TOSCHI 



664 Fourth Street 



SANTA ROSA 



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JACK BLAKE 
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Santa Rosa 



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MARKET STREET at 8th 

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KARL C. WEBER 

President and General Manager 




Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



April, 1949 



By J. Ross Dunnigan 



San Francisco Matches 

The cold weather has subsided and the shooting is 
much better than that of a few months ago when the 
weather was so darn cold one just couldn't stand on the 
lines and shoot for more than a few minutes at a time. 
We, out here in sunny California, aren't used to that cold 
stuff and as a consequence think we are having a pretty 
rough time when the thermometer drops down to around 
50 degrees. However, we managed to survive the big 
freeze and on Sunday, February 20, about 150 of those 
survivors dressed in their Eskimo clothes enjoyed a day's 
shooting in comparative warmth. Some of the newcomers 
seemed to relish their shooting and didn't mind the cold 
at all. Among the newer shooters we saw Jim Ellis and 
Leander Keys of San Francisco, Charley Ferrario from 
Mill Valley, Jack Lacey from Alameda and Jim Lope, 
Jack Shaw and Dick Fuller arrived from Oakland. Ed 
Oliva from the SFPD and Armando Flocchini from the 
San Mateo Sheriff's office, put in an appearance after 
some weeks lay-off — as did Stuart Sims. 

* * # 

The boys from the Melrose Pistol Club are now out 
for blood as this was their second attempt as a team and 
they are coming along right well. One of their team 
members spells his name KRCH and we have had a heck 
of a time figuring how he would pronounce it, or sneeze, 
such a monicker so we got bold and asked the gent. It is 
pronounced like K-I-R-K — simple, isn't it? 

* * * 

Then Bill Markell, SFPD Motorcycle reservist, an- 
nounced to the multitude, by way of the cigars, that it 
was an 8 pound 3 ounce girl at his home Friday night. 
We hope that the baby is a lot healthier than those stogies 
he gave out. 

* * * 

Not to be outdone Inspector Jack Ahern of the San 
Francisco Police Department, and grand aggregate winner, 
shoots a 94 slow-fire in the same match and then comes 
back with a possible timed and rapid fire string for a 296 
— and that's no cheezy score either! 



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Room 901-902 



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Detective Service Bureau 

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ERWIN F. ROSS 

Chief Investigator 

ROBT. C. TREVERS 
Principal 



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Inspector Jack Ahern 

One of the best selling stunts we have seen at any of 
the matches was pulled on the gang at the matches Sunday 
by Elbe Reen. Ellis advertised an old broken down hand- 
gun, well worn and shot, for the small price of $775. 
The price tag included a few rounds of ammunition, a gun 
case for the cannon and a fairly well used automobile of 
a popular make. We didn't hear of any takers but thought 
it would be a good buy — especially as the car had a 

heater in it. 

* * * 

During the Camp Perry Match Highway Patrolman 
Jack McCabe, from Bakersfield, had his hammer bust 
right smack in two pieces. Naturally that took Jack out 
of the running but what we cannot understand is why 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



didn't he borrow some other guy's gun and finish out the 
match — maybe he would have won — maybe. 
* * * 

We had a gander at that target of Ken Kolb's in the 
.22 National match and looked all over the thing but 
all we could see were 9 shots on it. In fact, Ken being 
an honest Highway Patrolman, admitted himself he 
couldn't find but 9 but was sure one was a double. No 
one could find that double so Ken took the 9 shots with 
a gulp. Those closely bunched shots are kinda tough 
on a guy sometimes, especially when those extra points 
count. 




Bob Fortini, court reporter, has had young Al Wollen- 
berg in tow and teaching him the pistol shooting racket 
but completely forgot to tell the boy that under no cir- 
cumstances should he protest scores than give him more 
points than he actually shot. This lack of instruction on 
Bob's part has left us completely flabbergasted. 

* # # 

Usually when a guy squawks about the scores on the 
board he gets set down a few points but Bob Mahoney 
had it all figured out to the letter when he put in his 
protest. Bob was given fourth place in the Camp Perry 
Match so checked the three guys ahead of him and found 
he should have had first place. A hurried recheck by the 
range officials didn't give Bob that first place but he did 
get in the second spot which keeps up the range record of 
not giving you what you howl for — but Bob's satisfied. 

* * * 

Adolph Buck, San Francisco Police Revolver Club ace, 
shot a 99 slow fire in the .22 National match and then 
followed with a 98 timed-fire and a 99 rapid-fire score 
for a total of 296 — not a mean score for that course 



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Home of Fine Groceries 



Main Street, Suisun 



SUISUN, CALIFORNIA 



either. Ad se; he got a little careless during the match 
or else he would have had a good score. But no kidding, 
a 99 slow-fire at 50 yards is really laying them in. 

Scores 

.22 Rational Match 

Master Adolph Buck 296 

Expert Bob O'Toole 288 

Sharpshooter.. George Girot 281 

Marksman 1st H. Calhoun 262 

Marksman Will Carillon 259 

.22 Rapid-Fire Match 

Master Bob OToole 198 

Expert O. L. Jarman 196 

Sharpshooter "Gibby" Bibson 193 

Marksman 1st I. Krch 186 

Marksman Duane Harper 176 

C. F. Rational Match Camp Perry Match 

Doc Bilafer 286 Gloria Norton 298 



Doc Baix 
Ed Murray 
H. Calhoun 
Art Coleman 

.45 K[auona\ Matcl 
Grif Thompson 
Dave Menary 
Harry O'Dell 
Frank Harris 
lack Bourdreau 



283 
277 
266 
264 

i 

281 
271 
270 
270 
268 



Doc Baix 291 

Ed Murray 286 

Al Janitsky 274 

Leroy Galyn 267 

Grand Aggregate Match 



Jack Ahern 
Doc Baix 
Ed Murray 
H. Calhoun 
A. Coleman 



1061 

1051 

1017 

976 

930 



Team Scores 

Class "A" 

1st— S. F. Police Revolver Club, Red Team 1163 

2nd— S. F. Police Team No. 1 1155 

3rd — California Highway Patrol 1 140 

Class "B" 

1st— San Jose Pistol Club Team No. 2 1052 

2nd— Coast Artillery Rifle and Pistol Club 1035 

3rd — Coast Guard League 1008 



Oakland Matches 

The boys at the Oakland range were pleased no end 
on Sunday, March 6, as the number of competitors at 



I 
I 

! I 



HICKEY'S BRASS RAIL 



COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
MIXED DRINKS 



Phone 107 

Fairfield, California 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, J 949 



these matches was the largest at the range since before 
World War II. The total entries for all six matches was 
884 good, tried and true shooters with the actual indi- 
vidual registration of over 175. That was no mean crowd 
for any range to handle hut as they have 52 firing points 
it wasn't too difficult to manage the gang. Their first 
match was the handicap match and is in the experimental 
stage and after the April matches they will canvas the 
shooters to see if it is to be left as such or thrown out 
altogether. They advertised in their program for 1949 
that if the sun was not shining at 11 o'clock on any day 
on which a match was held they would give out two 
prizes to those who were on the lines shooting at that 
time — presumably drawing for the prizes. 

* * * 

No prize was given on Sunday but the gang from 
Oakland were sure down on their knees praying that the 
sun would just peek around the 1 1th hour and we wonder 
if they had those prizes on hand just in case. About 
10:30 Dick Thomas appeared with one of the biggest 
Spanish, or maybe Mexican, straw hats that we ever did 
gaze upon — and in order to cover up the bulk of Dick 
it had to be big! Dick said that he did it to help coax out 
the sun. Our idea was that it was a new place to catch 
the .45 shells in the last match and would keep the empty 
grabbers away from your own shells. The early a.m. was 
a bit nippy but Cap Strohm was on the job and made it 
hot for the boys. Cap, by the way, is well over his recent 
illness and was again on the job, assuring the boys every- 
thing was under control. 

* * * 

The high aggregate match went to that shootin' San 
Francisco cop, Jack Ahem, who finished with a 864 and 
was closely followed by Ad Buck with an 860 and that 
shootin' "T-man" Ralph Kline was in the third medal 
spot with 860 — and Creedmored by Buck. 

* * * 

Just couldn't figure out why Bert Williams had that 
pocket full of golf tees along because we know he wasn't 



^MlSs 



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DINING ROOMS 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

BAR 


SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 




Two Tons of Milk Fed Baby Beef 

gonna tee up his gun although Bert isn't any too tall and 

possibly could use the things to sit on. 
* * * 

After we saw our new shooter Cutright trip over that 
pipe the boys use to turn the targets we were of a mind 
to have Cliff Hatch either put an under pass there or a 
big sign warning the shooters to look where they are 
going. The pipe sticks up about two feet off the ground 
but every Sunday some dope manages to fall over the 
darn thing. 



PEPSI- 


■ ■ ■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■••, 

COLA 


Bottlin 


g Co. ; 


• 




SANTA ROSA, 


CALIFORNIA 
............... .....j 



BERGER'S 

Cigars - Magazines and Periodicals 
COMPLETE BAR SERVICE 

533 Fourth Street - Phone 4 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 25 



Just after the results of the third match was posted 

we heard a great scream which sent the chills up and 

down our spine. It proved to be just Dick Prichard, of 

San Francisco, unable to stifle that feeling of joy when 

he won his first medal. The guy was so dizzy for the 

rest of the day he should have had papa-in-law Lindauer 

take him home and give him a cold shower. 
# * # 

Those colored caps some of the Oakland Club members 
were wearing might have been alright for a bunch of kids 
to be sporting but for those old ducks they were a bit 
too gay. (Hope they don't read this and lay for us 
next month.) * * * 

Then Pete Menoher, of the Melrose Pistol Club, brings 
out his 'scope for the boys to see which wasn't very hard 
to do. They were about a 99 power set of binoculars 
mounted on a tripod that could be extended to a length 



of 20 feet. Pete had a swell time looking for his shots in 

the black and completely forgot those in the white. 

* * * 

Doc Chappel, of Sacramento, put in his appearance 
for his first shoot and had a bad case of butterflys in the 
belly during the matches. The good doctor sez he's going 
to stick with the game and see if he can't lick that jittery 
feeling. You know when a guy first starts shooting he is 
real nervous and by the time he has shot for a year or 

two — he's just about hysterical. 

* * * 

Fred Mahan, Alcatraz prison guard, was having a 
wonderful time in the .45 match with a fairly good score. 
Came that last string of five shots and Ered was already 
to let go the five in the customery 10 seconds but com- 
pletely forgot to unlatch the safety catch. No shots — 
and the loss of TO precious points. 



C. F. Short Rational Match 

Master Adolph Buck 289 

Expert C. Boomhower 284 

Sharpshooter J. Pettygrove 280 

Marksman 1st Don Mowery 274 

Marksman 2nd Bill Irving 263 

Marksman 3rd H. Cutright 25? 

C. F. Western Police 

Master Sim Reinhard 296 

Expert Ray Freeman 286 

Sharpshooter Jack Fink 285 

Marksman 1st C. Waterman 277 

Marksman 2nd Walter Forrister 271 

Marksman 3rd H. Cutright 257 



Scores 

Camp Perry Course 

Bob Chow 295 

Joe DeCola 288 

Carl Spiken 283 

Don Mowery 284 

Geo. Baldi 270 

Al Ebbesen 258 

.45 Short ~h{ational Course 

Ken Kolb 286 

C. Boomhower 277 

Joe DeCola 265 

W. P. Irving 265 

Don Mowery 237 

H. Cutright 221 



.22 J^ational Match 
Jack Ahern 292 

Lee Friend 282 

C. Barnett 279 

O. L. Freel 277 

H. Cutright 275 



Team Scores 

1st— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team #1 1171 

2nd — California Highway Patrol 1 149 

3rd— Oakland Pistol 6? Revolver Club Team #1 .1145 

4th— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team #2 1137 

ROY 8C MERT'S PLACE 

Roy M. Smith 

BEER • WINE • GROCERIES 

621 East Street 



H. I. Bobb 



W. Carillon 


25 5 


Aggregate 




Jack Ahern 


864 


C. Boomhower 


843 


L. Friend 


834 


Don Mowery 


835 


Bob Mahoney 


787 


H. Cutright 


785 


C. R. Christensen 



UNION STORAGE CO. 

Capacity 12,000 Tons 

GRAIN AND SEED STORAGE 

GRAIN AND SEED CLEANING AND CONDITIONING 



WOODLAND 



Telephone 394 



CALIFORNIA 



Thomas E. Ralston 



Edna M. Ralston 



RALSTON'S Upholstery and Drapery Shop 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



WOODLAND 



323 Second Street 



Phone 71-W 



CALIFORNIA 



Empire Electrical Shop 

Electrical Center of the 
Redwood Empire 



435 Fourth Street - Telephone 321 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



»— » 



Phone 2170 



24-Hour Service 



JAMES D. PORTER 

DE SOTO - PLYMOUTH Dealer 
Sales— MACK TRUCKS— Service 

Union Oil Products 



1075 Redwood Highway, South of Barham 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Women Police Officers Assoc, of Calif. 



The new officers of the Woman Peace Officers' Associa- 
tion of California have lined up a program for the year 
1949 that gives high promise of making its work some- 
thing that will not only increase the prestige of the 
Association, but be of greater benefit to all those charged 




Matron Edna M. Webb 
President 

with the enforcement of the laws, as well as for the un- 
fortunates who come under their care. 

The new officers of the Association are : 

President — Edna M. Webb, San Diego Police Dept. 

First Vice President — Cecelia Robinson, Alameda P. D. 

Second Vice President — Mabel Eiseman, Salinas P. D. 

Third Vice President — Irene Locker, Santa Monica P.D. 

Secretary-treasurer — Margaret E. Peacock, San Diego 
P. D. 

Chaplain — Renie Beasley, Maywood P. D. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Lucille M. Stroh, Torrance P. D. 

Parliamentarian — Fanchon G. Protchard, Los Angeles 
P. D. 

Librarian — Alice Wells, retired, Los Angeles P. D. 

The importance of women in law enforcement has be- 
come more generally recognized, and the number now 
engaged in that vocation is many times the number that 
pioneered the Women's Association some 25 years ago. 
No Police Department or sheriff's office can longer go 
without having some experienced woman to handle the 
many cases involving the gentler sex, particular where 
juvenile delinquency has developed, as it has today. 

The members of the Women's Peace Officers' Associa- 
tion are holding their present jobs as a result of being 
selected in most every case by civil service examinations, 
in which their ability to discharge their duties are fully 
developed. They have taken up the work in this com- 
paratively new field with a determination to master all 
the details of their new found responsibilities. 



The officers mentioned above are all experienced women 
peace officers, and the members of their respective com- 
mittees are likewise experienced peace officers. 

They realize that California is a big state in area as 
well as in population, and they have chartered a course 
that will bring the membership into closer and more 
up-to-date knowledge of the Association's aims and pur- 
poses. They feel that they miss a lot of effectiveness by 
only meeting once a year in annual convention, for years 
at the same time and place as the Peace Officers of the 
State of California. 

To correct this long between time meetings they have 
started a plan to hold regional meetings throughout the 
state. The first one was held on February 26, in the 
city of Oakland. 

The arrangement for the two-day session, which was 
attended by the officers of the state organization, was 
made by Northern California members of the Association. 
Among these were Mrs. Estelle Edmonds of the Alameda 
Sheriff's office; Hazel Alemada, Yuba P. D.; Johanna 




Matron Margaret E. Peacock 
Secretary-Treasurer 






Sullivan, Oakland P. D.; Cecilia Robinson, Alameda 
P. D.; Rose Milestenn, Vallejo P. D.; Mabel Eiseman, 
Salinas P. D. There was a good turn out of women 
police officers. 

Two outstanding special features marked this meeting. 

Inspector Albert Riedel, lie detector expert of the 
Berkeley P. D., gave one of his interesting talks on the 
work of the lie detector, and Mrs. Edmonds arranged a 
trip to the Alameda Sheriff Gleason's prison farm at 
S tnta Rita, where the guests had luncheon. They also 
had a special dinner at the Hotel Leamington where the 
sessions were held. 

Out of this meeting the following program was outlined 
and adopted: 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 2: 



First. More and better training for women in the field 
of police work. At the present police training schools 
are established for men entering police work and for those 
wishing to specialize in various fields of law enforcement 
— thus furthering and broadening their education. The 
women feel it is just as essential for women to increase 
their efficiency and wisdom in law enforcement work, 
though they may remain a minority. They hope to be 
permitted in these statewide training schools. 

Second. Establishment of rehabilitation centers tor girls. 
As a group they feel much can be done in assisting in the 
work of adjustment and rehabilitation of wayward girls 
and women, who frequent our jails. 

The Women's Association urges the need of girls farms 
and centers similar to those already established for boys 
in the state. 

Further regional meetings are scheduled and more ideas 
will be introduced and acted upon. 

The Association has an active member, though a re- 
tired police officer, Alice Wells, the first woman appointed 
a member of a police department, that was the Los An- 
geles Police Department, and she was the first president 
of the Association. 

I'LL MEET YOU AT THE 

KALICO KAT 

MIXED DRINKS • FINE FOODS 

Pitta & Arrayjo 

Phone TR!nidad 2-9750 

17"! East 14th Street OAKLAND 3. CALIFORNIA 

SEA CAVE 

SEA FOODS 

FREE PARKING AT 13th and 

FRANKLIN STREETS 

441 Twelfth Street Tclephona TEmplebar 2-9588 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



FRED SHAFFER AND SON 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 
701 Main Street 



'VOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



H. B. SCARBOROUGH 

Formerly McDonald's Meats, Inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

SUPPLYING HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 

GLencourt 1-0966 

493 NINTH STREET OAKLAND 7, CALIF. 

KE'.log 2-9706 

BABE'S PLAY HAVEN 

DINE-DANCE 

SPORTSMAN S HEADQUARTERS 

4325 East 14th Street OAKLAND I, CALIF 



SUISUN STEAM LAUNDRY 



SUISL'N 



J. ARIZA, Prop. 
Tcl3phone 314 



CALIFORNIA 



RAY'S CAFE 



SUISUN 



BREAKFAST • LUNCH » DINNERS 
SHORT ORDERS 

Man Street 

CALIFORNIA 



NEW CHINA CAFE 

Always a Friendly Welcome 
V'CTOSY BAH AND CLUB ROOMS 



Phone 109 



709 Man Street 



SUISUN 



CAL1FORNI \ 



HIGHWAY CAFE 

Always 

THE BEST O ¥ FOOD 

1-71 S-mpson Street 



CALIFORNIA 



COLOMBO CAFE 

Where All Men Are Equal 

BEER o W.NES • GROCERIES 

Phone Riverdale 157-Y-3 



CALIFORNIA 



VELMA MOSIER'S PLANTATION CAFE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DiNNER 
Hours 3 A.M. to 10 P.M. 

TRANQUILITY (Fr_sno County), CALIFORNIA 



ATHEN'S CAFE 



BSEAXFAST o LUNCH • DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

1043 G Street 

_ED_IIY CALIFORNIA 



STEVE'S COCKTAIL CORRAL 

Your Hos: S.EVE BRONiON In/ites You 
In a 1 leasant At.-no pherj 



HO E. TULARE ST. 



TULARE. CALIFORNIA 



JLARE 



R gard 3 from 

FOX TAVERN 

DRINKS AND GOOD FOOD 
101 East Tulare Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA AUTO WRECKING 

H C. Bjck Prop. 

AUTO CLASS CUT AND INSTALLED 

NEW AND UiED AUTO PARTS 

Phone 125. w 119 West Inyo Street 

TULARE CALIFORNIA 



MATT MACHADO'S PLACE 



A VARADO 



P. O. Box 73 



CALIFORNIA 



ARM SPR1NCS 



WAGNER BROS. SERVICE 

GAS ■> OIL • TIRES 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 
Hwy. 17 Phone 492 



CALIFORNIA 



AL'S LIQUOR STORE 

WHISKEY • WINE • BEER 

Alv.n Martin 

COMPLETE STOCX 

Centervi le 8-SS92 141 So. Main Street 

? 9 ? 1 7 



JOE'S CORNER 

WINES 
Phone 4435 



CALIFORNIA 



FRUITAS BROS. CITY MARKET 

M. L. Freilas, Prop 

GROCERIES • MEATS 

Phone 149 or 150 Cor. 16th & L Streets 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



MERCED DINETT 



BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

AND COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

1623 L Street 

MERCED CALIFORNIA 



TOP NOTCH COFFEE SHOP 

Owners: Leslie and Ethel Darville 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

BEST COFFEE IN TOWN 



SUISUN (Solano County). CA'.IFORNIA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



OAKLAND POLICE SQUAD 
UNDER NEW LEADER 

Chief Robert P. Tracy, who has formed a new vice 
squad for his Oakland Police Department, is going to see 
that the boys who follow the easy way to getting the 
dough by fleecing suckers, are going to find the paths to 
their dreams mighty rocky, indeed. 

With the appointment of Lieutenant Jack Brierly as 
head of the Vice Squad, Chief Tracy is calling on the 
San Francisco Police Department to instruct the members 
of Lieutenant Brierly's detail on the techniques of han- 
dling bookie, other gambling and vice cases. The Lieu- 
tenant and his chief assistant Sergeant Eric Gustavson have 
been getting information from the San Francisco Police 
Academy on obtaining evidence and investigation as well 
as presenting their cases in court. This information is 
passed on to the members of the squad, who with their 
knowledge gathered from their own experience will prove 
a potential weapon against the dice rollers, card dealers, 
racing bet taking and prostitution. 

Lieutenant Brierly was in charge of booking prisoners, 
and his place in that position has been filled by the ap- 
pointment of Sergeant W. Murray. Gustavson was for- 
merly with the Traffic Bureau. 

With Lieutenant Wyman Vernon, on leave of absence 
during which he is Chief of Police for Richmond, In- 
spector Harold B. Richardson has been transferred to the 
Traffic Bureau, with the rank of acting lieutenant. 



M AND M CLUB 

Martin & Milani, Props. 

HOTEL - RESTAURANT 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Phone 2241 
2214 Thornton Avenue 

Newark, California 



ROETHLIN'S CAFE 
and TRUCK SHOP 

Delicious Food - Cocktails -Beer 
Wine and Soft Drinks 



Phone Irvington 63 
225 San Jose Avenue 

Irvington, California 



WEST SIDE CAFE 

COCKTAILS 
BEER * WINE 

and 

SOFT DRINKS 

and the Most Delicious Food in the 
San Joaquin Valley 



San Joaquin (Fresno County), California 




EAST SIDE POOL HALL 



RAY SPEXCER 

POOL - SNOOKER 
Candy, Soft Drinks and Tobaccos 

708 L Street 
SANGER (Fresno County), CALIFORNIA 



Blue Diamond Market 

Eddie McKenna 

GROCERIES 
MEATS -VEGETABLES 

BEER - WINES 

1261 West Carson St. - Phone 619-W 

TORRANCE, CALIFORNIA 



W. R. Carithers & Sons, Inc. 

81st Year of Service 

YOUR SHOPPING CENTERS 

Santa Rosa: THE WHITE HOUSE 

Petaluma: CARITHERS 

Napa: CARITHERS 

Vallejo: CROWLEY'S 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



JUSTESEN'S 

DRY GOODS AND 
GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

Phone 4 11 14 G Street 

Reedley, California 






Meet Your Friends at The 

VALLEY CAFE 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

"John and Elmer" 

BEER, WINE and LIQUORS 
Home Like Meals 

1154 G Street 

Reedley, California 

Telephone 921 



Cecil and Mildred Berkeley Phone 69582 

I'll Meet You at . . . 

THE ROYAL 
GARDEN CAFE 

The Finest Negro Night Spot 
In the San Joaquin Valley 

Featuring 

SOUTHERN STYLE FOODS 

Drinks - Air-Cooled Club Room 

734 South P Street TULARE, CALIF. 



MONTY'S BAR-B-Q 
and Douglas Motor Inn 

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinners 

Complete Fountain and Tray Service 

Moderate Priced Cabins 

Open 6:30 A.M. to 2:30 A.M. 

Phone 1222 161 East 16th Street 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 



Happy Days are Here Again 

THE CANTEEN 

DINING and DANCING 
Where Good Friends Meet 

Highway 99 South 
TULARE (Tulare County), CALIFORNIA 



r -I 

9 9 CLUB 


Serving Fried Chicken, Steaks 
and Cocktails 


So. 99 Highway - Tulare, California 


and 


SUZA BROTHERS CAFE 


Liquors - Wines - Beer 


216 So. J Street Tulare, California 
.1 






RAY CORTEZ 



WHOLESALE PRODUCE 



Phone: 66966 
520 South O Street 

Tulare, California 



CENTERVILLE MARKET 

Groceries, Meats, Fresh Fruit 
and Vegetables 

Beer, Wine and Soft Drinks 

Phone 8-8689 
112 South Main Street 

Centerville, California 



fage 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Sgt. Charles Simpson, President 
Bob Mason, Secretary A. R. Taggart, Treasurer 



The regular monthly meeting of the N.C.P.C.O.A. was 
called to order by our President, Charles Simpson, at 
11:30 A.M. Our host was Ray Meyers, Communications 
Supt. for the City of Vallejo. 

President Simpson called upon our host to introduce 
his guests, J. H. Davis, Chief of Fire, City of Vallejo; 
George P. Thiessen, Captain, Sheriff's Office, Solano 
County; and Capt. Bocmhower, C.H.P., Solano County. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read and 
approved. Motioned by Meyers, seconded by Taggart. 

Under new business, President Simpson made his com- 
mittee appointments as follows: 

Operating 6? Procedure — Henri Kirby 

QPO/CW— Ray Meyers 

Interference — Merrill Le Bouef 

Membership — Al Taggart and Geo. Hippely 

Entertainment — Ralph Moore 

Guest Speakers — Henry Bogardus 

By Laws and Resolutions — 

Dealer Relations — F. I. Deetkin (G.E.) 

On the By-laws committee, Jim Lewis declined Chair- 
manship, Tom Bailey also declined. Al Taggart suggested 
Henri Kirby. 

President Simpson next called for a report of com- 
mittees. For the Frequency and Engineering Committee. 
Captain McMurphy presented requests from the fol- 
lowing : 

The City of Vacaville for 2 10-watt Land Station on 
2422 Kc. and 4 F.M. Link 20 UBX transmitters on 
37.02 Mc. 

The County of Santa Clara's request for the cities of 
Gilroy, Morgan Hill and the Southern County Sheriff's 
Office Sub-Station. The frequency as assigned was 156.210 
Mc since it will be a part of the County System. 

Capt. McMurphy also presented a letter from the 
Sonoma County Detective Service requesting a frequency 
on which they could operate a land station and (6) six 
mobile units in the Sonoma Valley area. 

After considerable discussion and a motion by E. W. 
Lindfeldt, of Sacramento Police, and seconded by Capt. 
McMurphy this request was referred to the Secretary. 

This request was referred to the Secretary with instruc- 
tions to advise them to contact their Sheriff's Office and 
work as a coordinated part of that system or to investi- 
gate the use of P.T.T. mobile telephone service. 

On Frequency and Engineering, Chief Wisnom, of 
Hillsborough Police asked that his request for a frequency 



(39.66 Mc.) which was tabled for study since our De- 
cember meeting be considered. 

The Frequency and Engineering Committee also pre- 
sented a request from the City of San Mateo for a fre- 
quency in the 152-162 Mc, this was tabled pending a 
meeting of those persons involved in the San Mateo 
County area, at the suggestion of Captain McMurphy. 

The above frequency requests were put to the members 
by President Simpson. It was moved by Walter Keller, 
and seconded by Tom Bailey that they be approved . . . 
carried by members present. 

The meeting was adjourned for lunch at 12:30 P.M. 

Our host Ray Meyers introduced his additional dis- 
tinguished dinner guests, these including: 

Capt. Headlee extending greeting on behalf of Sheriff 
Jack Thornton of Solano who was unable to attend. 

Chief of Police Stilt;, extending greetings on behalf of 
the city of Vallejo. 

An enjoyable dinner was had by all. 

The afternoon session was called to order at 2:55 P.M. 

President Simpson called for the correspondence to be 
read; this included the following: 

A letter from Capt. H. E. Haven, U.S.N., inviting 
us to hold our March meeting at the San Francisco Naval 
Shipyard. A motion was made by Jim Lewis that we 
accept this offer; seconded by J. J. Hartnett, carried by 
members. 

At this point President Simpson appointed the follow- 
ing members to the By-laws and Resolutions committee. 

Tom Bailey, Henry Bogardus. Al Taggart, Walter 
Keller, Jim Lewis. Bob Mason, Charles Simpson. 

On the subject of the By-laws committee, Walter Keller 
made a motion that this committee should study the pos- 
sibility of the Association representing the Fire Service 
also. This was seconded by M. Le Bouef. 

Treasurer Al Taggart also presented applications for 
membership from the following: 

Lewis Boss, for commercial membership (Philco). 

Chief Stilt:, as a regular. 

Guy Headlee, as a regular. 

Chief Don Wood reported on the training program at 
Santa Rita, and rendered a very choice technical bit of 
information. 

President Simpson read a copy of the 70 Mc. point to 
point resolution which was approved at our joint meeting 
with the Bay County Peace Officers' Association. A dis- 
cussion on this subject followed, ending by tabling for 
further action. 



. 



Apr 



•949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3 I 



OFFICER BART SULLIVAN 

(Continued from Page 1 1 ) 

Officer Sullivan is another ambassador of good will for 
the Police Department and for San Francisco. One won- 
ders how, after more than a quarter of a century with his 
difficult task of keeping automobiles flowing over the 
streets where he is detailed; answering untold questions 
— some foolish — some with merit; seeing that the aged, 
old ladies and men and careless youngsters get across the 
streets, and myriad of other duties that devolve on a 
traffic officer, how he can maintain his equanimity and 
do his watch with a smile day in and day out. But he 
does it and his is an example that could well be emulated 
by all public servants. It pays off in good will. 



Fred H. Hover, Prop 



Phone 399 



DINUBA CLEANERS 



QUALITY DRY CLEANING 
331 East Tulare St. 

DINUBA 



MOTHPROOF BAGS 
P. O. Box 128 

CALIFORNIA 



STERLINGS TAVERN 

Drinks to Satisfy a Queen 

Serving the Best in 
MIXED DRINKS 



S. Robinson, Prop. 

SUISUN, CALIFORNIA 



ACME CLUB 

Smitty and Elmer 

Serving Your Favorite Liquors 
BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 



419 San Benito Street 

HOLLISTER, CALIFORNIA 



BOB'S SERVICE 

FRESH MEATS - GROCERIES 
VEGETABLES - GAS - OIL 



Phone 263-] 

2003 Jensen Avenue 

SANGER, CALIFORNIA 



MOOSE'S CLUB 

Reedley's Finest 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

and 

CAFE 



1041 G Street 

REEDLEY, CALIFORNIA 



SAN JOAQUIN CAFE 

Matt and Jack 

COCKTAILS - BEER - WINE 

SOFT DRINKS 

and Delicious Home-Cooked Food 



SAN JOAQUIN, CALIFORNIA 

( Fresno County) 



i'agc 32 



JLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



TONYS CIGAR STORE 

MAGAZINES 
ON AND OFF SALES LIQUORS 



427 Fourth Street 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



KERMAN CLUB 

LIQUOR • BEER • WINE 

MIXED DRINKS 

AND GOOD FOOD SERVED 



KERMAN (Fresno County). CALIFORNIA 



VIRGIL CLARK 

AU.O PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

AUiO ELECTRIC SERVICE AND PARTS 

Telephone 1883 203 Santa Rosa Ave. 

Opp. Burbank Gardens 

iANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



RENO'S POOL HALL 
and COCKTAILS 

KERMAN (Fresno County). CALIFORNIA 



■>\M"A ROSA 



BRANCHES AT SANTA ROSA 

DEAL DALE 

G ocery s:ecial:ies distributor 

113 Fourth Strert Telephone 30S 



CALIFORNIA 



TULARE 



Dr. Pepper 
BOTTLING COMPANY 



South 99 Highway at Tugglevlll-? 



CALIFORNIA 



FENTON AND FORSYTH 



GOODYEAR TIRES 



NEILSEN'S CREAMERY 

AND DRIVE IN 

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

AND DELICIOUS FOOD 



Thrd and A S'.rejts Phone 2288 

WTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

Ed th Haz 1 Young • Mary Ward Batt • Wesley W. Daniel; 

NELTI FUNERAL SERVICE 

LADY ATTENDANT 

747 Fourth Street Telephone 21 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

If You Don't Care to Go Home Until Late 
.'u t Cell Up and Say You Are At — 

THE OFFICE 

Bubb!cs, Prop. 

"DRINKS THE WAY YOU LIKE THEM" 

S30 Third Street Phone 1491 

I \ ROSA CALIFOR* ' < 



STARLIGHT LAUNDRY 

Mr- and Mrs. John Filhes 
V/E SPECIALIZE IN BLANKETS AND CURTAINS 



147 South M Street 



20 KELLER STREET 
Phon- 210} 



PETALUMA. CALIF. 



D. Moretti, Prop 



Phone 118 



GENOVA MARKET 

DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED GROCERIES 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



CALIFORNIA 



MARVIN LANDPLANES* 

Set the Standard for Leveling Efficiency 
FIELD TESTED AND PROVEN SINCE 1936 



Manufactured at WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA 
By MARVIN LANDPLANE CO. 

•T.M. Ren. D. S. Tat. Off. 



NEW CHINA CAFE 

CHOP SUEY • CHOW MEIN 
AND ALL CHINESE DISHES 

714 L Street Phono Sanger S19 

SANGER (Fresno County), CALIFORNIA 

PESSANO'S GROCERY 

FRESH MEATS • FRUITS 
AND VEGETABLES 

Ventura and Academy Aves. Phone 39 Jl 

SANGER CALIFOR" 






CALIFORNIA NILES 



THE KATITANI CO. 

GROCERIES, VEGETABLES AND MEATS 

Phone 201 -R 1605 W. Front Street 

SELMA CALIFORNIA 



COLUMBIA TAVERN 

GOOD FOOD 
BEER • WINE • LIQUOR 



521 Man Street 



Phone 4885 



CALIFORNIA 



DELANO 



PAULDENS LIQUOR STORE 

Imported and Domestic 
WINES AND LIQUORS 

115 Main Street 

CALIFORNIA 



April. /949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 



FBI POLICE ACADEMY GRADUATES 

(Continued from Page 13 ) 
graduating officer all the information he needs to return 
to his community and establish training courses for his 
department. The basic course is 10 weeks in length and 
includes such matters as traffic control, police organiza- 
tion and administration, investigative techniques, firearms 
training, the operation of police laboratories and finger- 
print and identification matters. 

The last two weeks of the course, making a total of 12, 
arc devoted to specialized subjects which give each indi- 
vidual officer an opportunity to study particular fields 
which are most applicable to his department. With the 
graduation of the 40th Session the total number of officers 
who have attended the Academy has passed the 1,900 
mark. 

Invitations have been issued by Director Hoover to the 
following four Northern California officers to attend the 
41st Session of the FBI National Academy commencing 
April 11, 1949: 

Stockton — Sheriff Carlos A. Sousa, of San Joaquin 
County. 

Sonora — Sheriff Donald L. Vars, of Tuolumne County. 

Atherton — Captain Leroy A. Hubbard, Police Dept. 

Sacramento — Captain George H. Lofquist, Police Dept. 

Kimball pointed out that the graduation of these five 
officers from the FBI National Acamedy today brings to 
87 the total of local officers from Northern California who 
have received this specialized police training. Over a score 
of applications from Northern California local law en- 
forcement agencies are being considered by the FBI for in- 
vitations to the July, 1949, Session of the Academy, said 
Kimball, and several other applications have been received 
from Northern California officers for 1950 and subse- 
quent sessions of the Academy. 



NATIONAL MARKET 



MEATS 



Wholesale and Retail 
GROCERIES • VEGETABLES 



Phone 260 
142 East Tulare Street 

DINUBA (Tulare County). CALIFORNIA 



CURVE IN CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
GAS • OILS AND ALL AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

Open 24 Hours Daily 

Highway 99, South 



DELANO 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED CIGAR STORE 



1011 Main Street 



DELANO 



DELANO 



DELANO 



nrj ANO 



CAL1I O' 



A AND U MARKET 

GROCERIES • MEATS • FRESH 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

1108 Main Street 



CALIFORN' 



JERONIMO GALBAN 

I'LAY POOL AND ENJOY YOURSELF 



1001 Glenwood 



CALIFORNIA 



CLUB INN CAFE 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 
927 Fremont Street 



CALIFORNIA 



G AND M BILLIARDS 
and CLUB ROOM 



1005 Main Street 



CALIFO' 



OWL CLUB AND CAB CO. 



DINUBA 



THE CLUB 

Geo. Salwasser, Mgr. 

POOL AND SNOOKER 

GOOD FOOD 

ON AND OFF SALE LIQUORS 



13S North "L" Street 



Phone 424 



CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE'S COCKTAIL BAR 

BOTTLE GOODS, TOO 



120 East Tulare Street 



Phone 46S 



DINUBA 



CALIFORNIA 



1017 V. Main Street 



nr.' ANO 



CAL1FOR- 



LLOYD'S COCKTAIL BAR 

FINEST IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY 
914 Seventh Street 



WASCO 



CALIFOr" 



DINUBA 



KITTY'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

122 E. Tulare Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Paze 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 194', 



o Ei in 



Frank Marotto 



Columbia Bar and 
Liquor Store 

Telephone ^>68 

OFF SALE AND ON SALE LIQUORS 

600 Lighthouse Avenue 

NEW MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Central Grocery and 
Meat Market 

Phone 9829 

Friendly Service - Free Delivery 

663 Lighthouse Avenue 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



The First National Bank 
of Monterey 

A Bank of Service and Stability 

Member of F. D. I. C. and 
Federal Reserve System 

439 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



PALACE DRUG STORE 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

* 

401 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5547 



Town House Restaurant 
and Cocktail Lounge 

Telephone 9543 
332 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4i4S Vince and Pearl 

DO DROP INN 

MIXED DRINKS ' BEER 
WINE ■ LIQUORS 

Best Brands and Finest Flavors 
214 Lighthouse Avenue 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



BARRETO'S LA FONDA 

Famous Mexican Restaurant 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Phone 8775 

11 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. 

Comer Fremont and Abrego 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



CHINA IMPORTING CO. 

LINENS • JEWELRY 
ART GOODS 

The House of Quality 

Telephone 6601 

464 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



April. 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



MONTEREY POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from Page 16) 
boring cities. 

The men took a 12 -day course, divided into two four- 
hour periods each day. The first four hours each day 
was devoted to lectures and demonstrations. The second 
to patrolling beats with different officers, during which 
they patrolled all beats. They were schooled in first aid, 
in the use of firearms and self-defense, and FBI experts 
were on hand to give the instructions, and they were good. 

Under directions of Lieutenant Clyde Klaumann who 
had general supervision over the training program and 
handled the instructions in the use of the pistol in the 






Monterey Transfer 
and Storage 

Phone 7877 - 7477 

LOCAL and LONG DISTANCE HAULING 

Since 1918 

Agents for 

BEKINS VAN LINES 

Private Locked Rooms - Crating and Packing 

735 Del Monte Avenue 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Howard M. McCauly 

Auto Finance - Insurance - Used Cars 

Phone 5445 - 9444 

"Where Each Customer is an Individual, 
Not Just a Name in the Ledger." 

556 Munras Avenue 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 562? 



Res. Phone 3637 ! 



S. L. WEBER 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

PLUMBING AND HEATING SUPPLIES 
22 Years Dependable Service 

223 Salinas Street 

SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



TYNAN 

LUMBER 

COMPANY 



SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



RAMONA BAKE SHOP 



Phone 20204 

354 Main Street 
SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



3 hone 8769 



Frank Napoli, Prop. 



JOCKEY CLUB 

BEER - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

"Enjoy Yourself" 
137 Franklin Street 

MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA 

■ 




LEIDIG'S 

Finest Groceries and Beverages 



MONTEREY, 314 Del Monte Avenue and 
585 Lighthouse Avenue 

South Main and Romie Lane and 
516 E. Alisal Street 

SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Department pistol range at the hall park. 

The new officers started drawing their pay the first day 
the training course began. The starting pay in Monterey 
now is $236.50 per month and goes to a top of $266.50. 

The recruits were the top men on the city's eligible list. 
There are now only four on that list. 

In regards to the pistol range, which has been built by 
the city. Chief Moore has all his men keep up on their 
marksmanship, as well as being instructed by FBI special 
agents. Last fall all members, through arrangements made 
with the Army officials, went out to Fort Ord, where they 
were told how to handle every kind of a fire arm, from 
a .22 pistol to a machine gun. how to shoot, especially 
with side arms. They were instructed in slow fire, rapid 
fire, shooting from the hip and other means of getting 
a bad man who wants to shoot it out with a law abiding 
citizen. Chief Mcore is very grateful for the thorough 
manner the army experts went about teaching his men 
the art of marksmanship. 

Already this year, as they did last year, the police per- 
sonnel, have gathered at the pistol range at the Ball Park 
for regular practice, .in J through the past year they have 



MISSION NOVELTY COMPANY 



633 Abrego Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL KIMBALL 



PARADISE INN 

Phone 6033 
WiNES - BEER - LUNCHES - POOL TABLES 



MONTEREY 



228 Lighthouse Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



"IN THE CENTER OF MONTEREY" 

Casa Mundas Hotel and Cottages 

DINING AND DANCING - COCKTAILS 



Jack Doughetry, Manager 



\iDNTEKEY 



CALIFORNIA 



CADEMARTORFS RESTAURANT 

Telephone 3792 

FINE DINNERS AND CANTINA 
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays 

Monterey-Salnas H'ghway, Five Miles East of 
MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 



Phone 5885 



Walter Carter 



FLOR DE MONTEREY FLORISTS 

CUT FLOWERS - POTTED PLANTS 
FLORAL DESIGNS 

Professional B!dg., 217 Franklin Street 

MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 



LAURITSON AND DODA 

AMUSEMENT GAMES - CIGARETTE MACHINES 
WHOLESALE CANDY AND TOBACCO 



235 Alvarado Street 



Phone 5101 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



233 Salinas Street 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



MONTEREY GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 

Phone 4175 

Munras, Fremont and Abrego Streets 

M 'Nil 1 "> CALIFORNIA 

ED C. BROWN CO. 

Tel phone: Monterey 4196 - 4197 
CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH HEADQUARTERS 



Abrego at Fremont 



!r.'«EY 



CALIFORNIA 



THE WORK LUMBER CO. 



Phone: 3171 - 3172 






CALIFORNIA 



Hhone 4776 Harry Nile5 Mer 

OWL SNOOKER CLUB 

POOL - BEER - CIGARS 
16* ALVARADO STREET MONTEREY. CALIF. 



HOTEL COMINOS 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



AMERICAN MEAT MARKET 

Phone 6767 

GROCERIES - MEATS - POULTRY - FRUITS 

40 East Market Street 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



WATSON AND DOW 

ORDWAY PHARMACY 

A BETTER DRUG STORE 

Phone 3348 398 Alvarado Street 

MONTEREY CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3789 R. M. Sharpe 

UNITED AUTO SERVICE 

177 Webster Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



participated in matches with other peace officers and others 
who like to fire pistols at targets. 

One of the other forward steps that Chief Moore has 
taken during the past year is the formation of a radio 
hook-up of his neighboring peninsula Police Departments. 
He has had his radio engineer, Sergeant Charles Simpson, 
bring the Police Department of Carmel, Pacific Grove, 
and Monterey into a system that coordinates three-way 
radio from the Monterey station which is operated under 
the direction of Sergeant Simpson. All the three cities 
now work on the same frequency, and are able to converse 
from station to car, from car to station and from car to 
car. The Monterey fire department is also included in the 
new setup, served by remote control. Sergeant Simpson 
also monitors all Monterey Sheriff's cars working in the 
area as well as the Highway Patrol, which are serviced 
by the county station KQCO. 

The Monterey Police Department is already planning 
for the Centennial Celebration and state fair which starts 
August 29 and extends for eight days. The people who 
will flock to this great affair is expected to greatly exceed 
the big event of year before last when more than half a 
million people came into Monterey to celebrate, and left 
with no bad record. 

The Monterey Police Department now includes the 
following : 

Chief, Fred H. Moore; Captain, Albert Elasho; Lieu- 
tenants, Clyde Klaumann, Frank Marinello,; Sergeants, 
Howard Hawkins, Charles E. Simpson; Officers, Robert 
Trenner, Edwin Patrick, Joseph Duckworth, Harley Jen- 
kins, Lous Perkins, Emil Thues, Mike Overman, Harold 
Benadom, Thomas Collier, Frank DuBois, George Vande- 
caveye, Charles Swanner, Robert Breckenridge, Anthony 
Chiacchio, Bill Bartholomew, Eugene Sanderson. 

Mcdonald refrigeration co. 

Robert McDonald 

560 FREMONT STREET MONTEREY. CALIF. 

Phone 4164 B. V. McMenamin, Prop. 

One of Monterey's Historic Adobes with Modern Comforts 

MISSION INN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DINING ROOM 
456 TYLER STREET MONTEREY, CALIF. 

Phone 7963 

FRIENDLY INN CAFE 



WINE AND BEER 
794 LIGHTHOUSE AVE. 



HOME COOKED MEALS 

MONTEREY. CALIF. 



CATHERWOOD'S DRY CLEANERS 



251 E. Franklin Street 



MONTEREY 



CALIFORNIA 



CRACCHIOLO AND MICALIZIO 

POOL ROOM AND BARBER SHOP 
279 Alvarado Street 



J. J. NEWBERRY CO. 

5-10-25 Cent Stores 

DEPENDABLE MERCHANDISE 
AT A SAVING 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



SIESTA INN 



ENCHILADOS - TACOS - TOSTADOS - FRITOS 
BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



402 WASHINGTON STREET 



MONTEREY. CALIFORNIA 



telephone 8604 



I. Golde, Prop. 



FOX JEWELERS 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY 

243 MAIN STREET SALINAS. CALIF. 

Phone 5842 Gus and Gus 

VICTORY TAP ROOM 

"WHERE OLD FRIENDS MEET" 
126 MAIN STREET SALINAS. CALIF. 



Telephone 7471 



Walt Bisschop 



BISSCHOP'S BRASS RAIL 

The Bright Spot of Salinas 
VAT 69 - BAR SCOTCH - WHISKIES - ALES - WINE 

171 MAIN STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

Phone 3742 

CHINA HERB CO. 

SPECIAL HERBS PREPARED 

FOR EACH AILMENT 

Corner of John and Pajaro Streets 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 6498 



TACK'S MERCANTILE STORE 

OPEN EVENINGS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 



I 12 MAIN STREET 



SALINAS. CALIF 



RITE-WAY CLEANERS AND DYERS 

Phone 9554 413 South Main Street 

SALINAS CALIFORNIA 

EL CAMINO PRESS 

QUALITY PRINTING - LITHOGRAPHING 
Telephone 7693 336 Monterey Street 

SALINAS CALIFORNV 

BERRY'S FLOWERS 

FLOWERS WIRED - WORLDWIDE 
Phone 4S81 422 Salinas Street 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS GLASS SHOP 

H. E. SILVA 

Telephone 5968 225 SaLnas Street 

SALINAS CALIFORNIA 



SALINAS VALLEY ICE CO., Ltd. 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



MONTEREY 



Phone 5138 Elenita Dixson, Manager 

GOLDEN FAGLE CAFE 

SPANISH DISHES - ENCHILADAS - TAMALES - TACOS 
MEXICAN DISHES 

SALINAS. CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 40 MAIN STREET 



Phone 4579 



CAVE'S FUR SHOP 



THOMPSON PAINT CO. 



FINE FURS 

RESTYLING AND REPAIRING 

John and Kathryn Cave MONTEREY, CALIF. 



371 Main Street 



SALINAS 



CALIFORNIA 



Page i8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Apnl, 1949 



BIOGRAPHY OF THOMAS C. CHEETHAM 

New Marin County Peace Officers' 
Association President 
Born in San Francisco, California, April 23, 1906. the 
fourth of seven children. Attended San Francisco public 
schools; came to Marin County 21 years ago, engaged 
in the automotive parts business, worked part time as a 
deputy sheriff until appointed to the Police Department 




President Thuv Ohmtham 

as a police officer in the city of San Rafael, serving that 
department for five and one-half years. 

Came to San Quentin in 1938 as a guard, and has 
advanced to the present position of Executive Secretary 
to Warden Clinton T. Duffy, which position he has held 
tor the past eight years. 

Married in Sacramento in 1932: father of four boys, 
including 1 set of twins (Pete and Repeat) . Is well known 
in the Bay Area among law enforcement agencies, and has 
a host of friends throughout California. 

Member of Elks Lodge No. 1108. San Rafael. Past- 
President Tamalpais Parlor No. 64, Native Sons of the 
Golden West, and Vice-President of the International 
Foot Printers Association No 1. 



GRANBERG CORP. 

OLympic 3-8847 
1308 Sxty-seventh Street 



E T. YV1LLE 



CALIFORNIA 



PUBLIC CAFE 

GOOD, WHOLESOME AMERICAN FOOD 

838 Fir-t Street 
CENICIA (Solano County). CALIFORNIA 



Compliments of 

THE 615 CLUB 

IN BENICIA 

P'.ion- Benicia 529 
Raiph and Ph 1 Spinelli 



J. B. FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 
and COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



BENICIA 



Hours 9 A.M. 'til 2 A.M. 
828 First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BENICIA HOME SUPPLY 

Bob McDaniel - Fhone 19-J 
COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 



929 First Street 



CENICIA 



CALIFORNIA 



MRS. LEE'S DINNER 

ALL HOME COOKED FOOD 

Our Home Made Pies are the Kind Mother Tried to Make 
Our Draught Beer Served in Frosted Glasses 

WALNUT CREEK (On Conco rd Highway), CALIFORNIA 

Dave's Jewelry and Appliances 



FRANK'S PLACE 

Imported and Domestic 
NATIONAL LIQUOR PRODUCTS 
M xers and Cold Beer to Take Out 



2S7 EAST THIRD STREET 



PITTSBURG. CALiF. 



269 Railroad Avenue 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



BOEVERS ANIMAL HOSPITAL 

Telephone Lafayette 4722 



GOODIN GRAVEL CO. 



1122 - 3rd Street 



Phone I652-W 



"/OODLAND 



Mt. Diablo Blvd. at Stuart Street 



LAFAYETTE 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA 



ANDY'S AUTO SERVICE 

A. J. (Andy) Cassani 

Fender, Body and Reconstruction Work • Radiators Cleaned and 

Repaired • Acetylene Welding • Auto Painting 

LAkehurst 2-5215 2429 Lincoln Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 






April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



Three Bad Men Break Jail — Are Back Again 



When Olen and Robert Grimes, and Arthur Wilson, 
robbers, ex-convicts, kidnapers and the Grimes brothers, 
escaped lifers from the State Prison at Soledad, made 
an escape from the county jail in Salinas, following their 
capture after their Soledad prison getaway, in which they 




Deputy Sheriff Ernest Thiele 

He trailed the bandits day and night, not knowing whether they 

were armed or not. He got two of them in an isolated area. 

tied up the wife of Chief Thomas Wilbur of Greenfield, 
and stole the Chief's car, they didn't figure out the small 
chance they had in making a clean getaway. These three 
miserable and brutal crooks thought they could pit their 
one candle power brains against the combined efforts and 
intelligence of the peace officers of the state, and particu- 

Hhone 83 83 

VICTORY CAFE 

FINE EATS 
12 W. MARKET STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 



Phone 6643 



SALINAS 



5 2 6 CLUB 

526 E. Alisal 



Bill Harmon 



CALIFORNIA 



Johnson Radio & Electronic 

Radios - Refrigerators - Washing Machines 

Phonograph Records - Stoves - Ironers 

Table Appliances - Phonographs 

For Your Convenience 
Radio Service at Both Our Locations 

Phone 6459 

412 Main Street 207 Salinas Street 

SALINAS, CALIF SALINAS, CALIF 



larly the Salinas Valley area. 

How wrong they were is indicated by the fact that 
the trio was rounded up in less than four days after their 
escape. Through the efforts of Sheriffs John L. McCoy 
of Monterey county and Murray Hathaway of San Luis 
Obispo county and their force of deputies, and the Chiefs 
of Police of that section of the state, they were safely 
landed in the county jail at Salinas, and in a matter of 
two days they were on their way back to Folsom, where 
Judge H. G. Jorgensen sent them from now on. 

It is an item of interest to know that the capture of 
two of the escapes was made by Deputy Sheriff Ernest 
Thiele of the Monterey Sheriff's office. Deputy Thiele 
was formerly a member of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, and a few years ago left to go to Salinas, where 
he became a member of that city's Police Department, and 
last year he was made a deputy sheriff. 

The Grimes brothers and Wilson were captured in 
San Luis Obispo county, to which they fled after stealing 
an automobile and robbing a rancher in Monterey county. 



Phonj Piedmont 5-6600 



Res. OLympic 2-5152 



HARVEY BLAIR AND CO. 



PROPERTY MANAGERS 
REALTY INVESTMENTS 



3317 SAN PABLO AVE. 



EMERYVILLE. CALIF. 



Peter Strusis • Veterans World War 11 • Andy Strusl. 

CALIFORNIA MARKET 

MEATS - VEGETABLES - FRUITS - WINE 
Phone 34 260 Railroad Avenue 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 

NOVIO POOL HALL 



40 East Second Street 



PITTSBURG 



CALIFORNIA 



Phon- 8322 



HORSE SHOE INN 



MIXED DRINKS - BEER - WINES - LIQUORS 
44 W. MARKET STREET SALINAS, CALIF. 

Phone 844 7 

BUCKAROO CLUB 

MIXED DRINKS - LUNCH COUNTER - CLUB ROOM 

13 W. MARKET STREET SALINAS. CALIFORNIA 



The Mission Farms Co. 

CALIFORNIA 
VEGETABLES 



SALINAS, CALIFORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Apnl, 1949 



WATCH OUT FOR THIS FAST ONE 

The San Francisco Better Business Bureau issued a 
warning to the public today to beware of the -golden 
gimmick," the newest racket to he worked on housewives 
by door to door salesmen. This latest scheme which is 
sweeping the country, is for a salesman to pose as a field 
interviewer "making a radio survey" or "taking a poll. 
The Bureau cautioned that the chief purpose of the sales- 
man is to get into the home and then guilefully to switch 
into a cleverly disguised sales talk for hooks, pots and 
pans, silverware or some other commodity. The text of 
the announcement made by Muriel Tsvetkoff. General 
Manager of the Bureau, follows: 

'"Better Business Bureaus in various cities of the United 
States arc receiving complaints from housewives who have 
been victimized by the newest racket to sweep America. 
Trading upon the willingness of the public to give informa- 
tion to field interviewers for research organizations, a 
number of firms selling from door-to-door are coaching 
their salesmen to use a "sure fire" door opener known to 
high pressure salesmen as a "golden gimmick." Once 
inside the home the fake interviewer leads the housewife 
to believe that as an incentive to her to mail in her "votes" 
every week on her favorite "radio programs." the "spon- 
- rs" will give her an encyclopedia, or pots and pans, 
or what not, for sending in her vote — with a dollar each 
week. Thus the housewife is hoodwinked into believing 
that she is being rewarded for her cooperation when in 
reality she is tricked into making a purchase which may 
run over SIT 0.00. 

"Some of the fake pollsters claim to represent some 
well known national advertisers, such as Best Foods, Col- 
1 almolivcPeet, Coca-Cola, Lever Brothers, Camp- 
bell's Soup. Procter and Gamble, etc. Their variation of 
the deceptive survey approach is to lead the consumer to 
believe that as a reward for providing survey answers 
they will send her a premium at a bargain price. All the 
housewife has to do is to send in a box top each week — 
with her time payment. 

"In some cases, the information gathered by the sales- 
men may be compiled and published. This does not alter 
the fact that the salesman gets into the home in the guise 
of a researcher when his chief purpose is to sell books. 
pots and pans, silverware, or some other commodity. 

"National advertisers like Campbell's Soup, Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet, etc. do not send out door-to-door sales- 
men on box top offers. These prominent companies spend 
millions of dollars in advertising to tell the public of any 
box top offers that they may make. 

"Field interviewers for bona fide research organiz 
have nothing whatsoever to sell: they never ask house- 
wives to buy books, or anything eles: they never ask 
housewives to sign contracts to buy anything. They merit 
your tion. 

"To protect yourself from this racket, we suggest that 
when anyone rings your doorbell and says they are taking 
a poll nr making a survey, find out the real purpose of the 
call before admitting the visitor to your home. The true 



researcher will have nothing whatsoever to sell you. If 
any salesman represents that he has nothing to sell in 
order to get into your home, and later asks you to pay 
as much as a single penny for any commodity, report him, 
or her, to the Bureau, or to the Police Department." 

SNOW WHITE LAUNDRY 

H A. Goldfarb 
SPECIAL ATTENTION TO COMMERCIAL WORK 

123 Fourth Street Phone 113 

WTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 



MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT 

THE LIDO 

MIXED DRINKS • BEER AND WINE 
101 Fourth Street 



WTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



CHESTERS JEWELERS 

THE STORE OF LUCKY DIAMONDS 

NAME BRAND WATCHES 

WATCH REPAIRING 



502 Fourth Street 



Phone 375 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



L. M. BRITTON 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 
729 Fourth Street 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



"CATERPILLAR" 
TRACTORS 



JOHN DEERE 
IMPLEMENTS 



Berglund Tractor 8C Equipment Co. 

Specializing in 
FARM AND ROAD EQUIPMENT 



410 Thrd Street 



I hone 276 



S WTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



GREY'S AUTO SUPPLY 



EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTO 



727 Fourth Street 



Phone 3120 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



FOR A GOOD DRINK, 
MEET AT 

3 9 9 CLUB 



Opposite Post Office 



SANTA ROSA 



CALIFORNIA 



R. Duncan, Mgr. 

A-l ELECTRICAL SHOP 

Sales and Repairs 

APPLIANCES • VACUUM CLEANERS • ADMIRAL 

TELEVISION SALES AND SERVICE 

311 E Street 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 






April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 4 1 



S.F.P.D. MOTORCYCLE DRILL TEAM 

(Continued from Page 7) 
totals in this group are higher than in .ill other divisions 
of the Department combined. 

At the time the present issue of this magazine went to 
press eight officers were on the casualty list, casualty total 
in the detail generally averaging ten per cent. Insurance 
salesmen do NOT beat pathways to the doors of motor- 
cycle officers. 

It is common knowledge that a motorcycle is some- 
what akin to riding a cantankerous bronco — taking it 
from there, one can only imagine how an officer feels 
after eight hours on San Francisco's deteriorating streets. 
An 80-mile-an-hour chase out Mission Street on a rainy 
night is like sheer suicide, but it is not uncommon. 

For all their abrasions, contusions and sprains one 
would think bike riding police received adequate additional 
compensation — the extra hazard of this job costs the city 
^0 cents a day per man. That generous reward fails to 
cover the cost of repairs to torn uniforms. 

The men of the detail let others do the complaining, how- 
ever — they continue at their jobs. Their work in enforcing 
traffic regulations in San Francisco is largely responsible 
for the drastic reductions in accident figures . . . they 
helped made last February the best accident February 
on record. 

Because of their ability to reach the scenes of crimes 
faster than other police units, motorcycle policemen main- 
tain a high arrest record — and their arrests are usually 
made alone. 

'7 



On The "Must List" of People Who Know 

THE TOPAZ ROOM 

Henry Roppolo, Manager 

and the New Crystal Room 
and Dining Room 

The Most Beautiful Cocktail Lounge 
West of Chicago 

Building a Tradition for the Finest of 

Foods - The Choicest of Drinks, Served 

Amid Pleasant Surroundings 

216 Hinton Avenue 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



ANG ROSSI 



Sales and Service 

Indian Motorcycles and Bicycles 

REPAIRS AND PARTS FOR ALL MAKES 

OF MOTORCYCLES AND BICYCLES 



415 Davis Street - Phone 716 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



When Better Automobiles are Built 

Buick Will Build Them 

Niles Automobile Company 

BUICK DEALERS 



339 Main Streret, PETALUMA, CALIF. 
965 Redwood Highway South 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



There's a FORD in your future! 

BISHOP MOTORS 

We Are Easy to Deal With 

Ford's Out Front 



421 B Street - Phone 800 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 

The City Designed for Living 



Compliments of 

COURT MARKET 

One Stop Shopping Center 

Groceries - Meats - Produce - Beverages 

Fair Dealing, Prompt Service and Good Goods 
Is Our Motto 

542 Third Street - Phone 147 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



"A Complete Line of Store Fixtures" 

AL NICHOLSON 

Meat Choppers - Scales - Slicers - Meat Saws 

REACH-INS - WALK-INS - MEAT CASES 

DAIRY CASES - DELICATESSEN CASES 

FROZEN FOOD CABINETS 



Phone 3673 

911 Fifth Street 

Eureka, Calif. 



Phone 1116 

305 Sebastopol Avenue 

Santa Rosa, Calif. 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 

Hollister's Chief Roy McPhail 



April, 1949 



Hollister 1- the county sc.it of San Benito County. 
noted lor its wide variety of fruit and truck crops, as 
well as the production of beef, hogs, sheep, poultry, tur- 
deys and dairies. 

Fruit crops total close to $S,(l()(i,i)iiii a year in revenue. 




Chief Roy K. McPhail 

apricots from more than 5000 acres produces upward 
of $1,750,1 

General farm crops run around $7,300,000, the leading 
oi these are barley from which more than $1,000,000 
annually is harvested and beef with about $3,000,000 a 
year income. 

Truck crops go more than seven million and a half 
dollars per annum, and in this category sugar beets with 
$2,500, .ind lettuce nearly $3,000,000 heads the list. 

So from all these crops in excess of $20,000,000 are 
paid to the fanners who produce them, each year. 

Hollister. being the largest city in the county, naturally 
profits from this huge income and it is and has for years 
been recognized as a mighty prosperous community. There 
are an estimated 5000 people living within the incorporated 
limits and three or four thousand more living in unin- 
corporated areas adjacent to the city. 

The city of Hollister is a well policed area and it has 
a Police Department consisting of eight men. headed by 
Chief of Police Roy McPhail. 

Chief McPhail is a native of San Francisco, having 
been born in that city in 1912, but when he was four 
old his parent- moved to Hollister where he urew 
up. attended the public schools, and after graduating from 
high school entered the University of California getting 
his sheepskin in 1934. A year later he entered the service 
ot the FBI in V. n, D. S., during which he enrolled 

in the law school of Columbia College in the National 
Capitol, getting his degree in 1940. 

He continued his service with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and served as supervisor in the Washington 
office, and was with the Kansas City and the San Francisco 
offices of the FBI until the end of February, 194^, when 
he resigned to take up a more quiet and settled life. He 



returned to Hollister. where he lives with his mother. 

Soon after arriving in Hollister he joined the Police 
Department, and in 1946 was appointed a Lieutenant. So 
pleased were the people of Hollister to have a young 
man with the educational background and the experience 
in law enforcement gathered during years of service with 
the noted FBI that when, in July. 1947, Chief Fred A. 
Earle decided, after 32 years with the force, that it was 
time to step out. Lieutenant McPhail was selected for 
the position. 

He has made his Police Department up to date in every 
way, and has radio equipped patrol cars, uniform system 
of handling all police matters and he has insisted his men 
keep m touch with all the latest methods and training 
for law enforcement. 

The personnel of the Department under Chief McPhail 
consists of the following: 

Lieutenant O. M. Thompson, Traffic Officer Eddie 
Martin, Officers Fred Kemp, Willing King, Richard Galli, 
Leslie Barker and Radio Operator Frank Pierson. 

Chief McPhail has two children, a son, Joseph 8, and 
a daughter, Jerry 5. 

WEARTEX RUG COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

WEARTEX RUSH, BRAIDED and WOVEN COTTON RUGS 

Office and M Hi 

Tel. HIgate 4-4523 Cable "Weartex," Oakland" 

2 5 3 3 MAGNOLIA STREET OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 

REX CLUB 



170S Seven-.h Stre:t 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



The LA DUE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

A CORPORATION 



Advertisers Building 



OAKLAND 



324 Thirteenth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



KAY JEWELRY CO. 

130S Broadway 



CALIFORNIA 



HENRY A. PLEITNER CO. 

REAL ESTATE LOANS AND INSURANCE 
NOTARY PUBLIC 

Office: KEllog 2-S771 4021 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

PI PI RESTAURANT 

Specializing in . . . 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

A. L. Meucci 

1050 - 9Sth Avenue TRinidad 2-2257 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



RAMBLE INN 



8101 East 14th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



HARRY HALS BARGAIN STORE 

FURNITURE - LINOLEUM - MATTRESSES 
GAS STOVES - HOUSEHOLD GOODS - ETC 
"We SeM at Rock Bottom Prices" 
Telephone TR'nidad 2-1228 



7804 East 14th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 43 



SAN BENITO COUNTY 

San Benito County was created in 1874 from the inland 
portion of Monterey County, east of the Gahilan Moun- 
tains. The early history of San Benito County centers 
around Mission San Juan Bautista, founded in 1794. The 
seventh and largest mission to be built, it thrived until 
1835. It was restored in 1888. One of the most beautiful 
of the missions, its walls still show the original decorations 
painted by the Indians, and its long, arched corridors are 
still covered by the original tiles. The old chapel is now 
used as the parish church for the Town of San Juan. 

An incident which had far-reaching effect occurred in 
1846 when General John C. Fremont, having been or- 
dered by Mexican officials to leave the country, took 
possession of Gabilan Peak, built a fort there, and raised 
the United States Flag. General Castro forced Fremont 
to retreat to Sutter's Fort. The episode added to mount- 
ing antipathy and was a contributing cause of the Bear 
Flag Revolt. 

San Benito County lies about 100 miles south of San 
Francisco, and extends between two mountain ranges from 
northwest to southeast for about 70 miles, with an average 
width of 20 miles. Bounded on the west by the Gabilan 
Range of the Santa Cruz Mountains which separate it 
from Monterey County, and on the east by the western 
slope of the Mt. Hamilton Range, it has a total acreage 
of 893,440. Almost 85 per cent, or 733,094 acres, are 
privately owned, with 730,05 3 acres in farms. Pinnacles 
National Monument occupies 8,881 acres in the south- 
western part of the county. 



TROMBETTA 
D I ST. 

Exclusive 

Distibutor 

for 

Budweiser 
Acme 

Four Roses 
Hunter 
Paul Jones 
Mt. Vernon 



Santa Rosa 



Vallejo 



Chas. Fredrickson 



Glenn Fredrickson 



FREDRICKSON 
BROTHERS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



1259 - 65th Street 

Emeryville, California 



HUmboldt 3-6421 



Selma - Sacramento - Redding 

R A N S M E 
COMPANY 

Construction 

and 

Paving 
Drainage 

and 

Sewers 

Distributors of 

Bu. Gas and Pro. Gas 

Manufacturers of 

Foster Burners and Torches 

Phone OLympic 2-3600 

4030 Hollis Street 

EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



This county had a population of 11,392 in 1940, which 
has risen to an estimated 15,000 in 1948 a, gain of 14 per 
cent. Rate of growth has been slow, and population has 
little more than doubled since 1880. Two-thirds of its 
residents are rural, and about half live on farms. More 
than 80 per cent are native white. 

The total of individual net incomes to residents of this 
county showed an extraordinary increase from $7,143,000 
in 1939 to $17,705,000 in 1944, a gam of 148 per cent. 
The principal rise was in income to proprietors, reflecting 
mainly increased net farm incomes. 

Founding of Mission San Juan Bautista marked the 
beginning of San Benito County's agricultural activity. 

Orchards were planted, a vineyard and a few olive 
trees were set out, but the principal activity was cattle 
raising. Later more diversified agriculture developed. Re- 
sponse to war-time demand has brought a tremendous 
advance in agricultural production and value of products 
in recent years. 

San Benito County's most important contribution to 
the State's mineral products is quicksilver. 

Total value of mineral products in 1941 was $1,988,205; 
1942. $3,104,054; 1943. $3,528,462; and 1944, $1,985,039, 
derived chiefly from quicksilver. Other commercial min- 
eral resources include antimony, asbestos, asphalt, chrom- 
ite, dolomite, granite, gems, gypsum, lime and limestone, 
manganese, magnesite, mineral water, and tungsten. 

Hollister, founded in 1S68 and incorporated in 1872, 
was named for Colonel W. W. Hollister, one of the early 
ranchers in the area. It is the county seat, and serves as 
a trading center for a diversified farming area with a popu- 
lation of 8,000. Industrial activity is centered around can- 
neries for processing fruits and vegetables, hay and grain 
concerns, and headquarters for two nationally known 
garden seed companies. Bolado Park, the county play- 
ground, located a few miles south of Hollister, is the 
scene of the San Benito Annual Rodeo and Horse Show. 

San Juan, one of the oldest of California towns, still 
retains the atmosphere of early Spanish days. The old 
adobe building which served as home and headquarters 
for General Jose Castro, commander of the Mexican 
forces, and historic Pla;a Hotel, built in 1792 and opened 
as a hotel in 1856, are open to the public. Fruit orchards, 
seed farms, a large cement plant, and a granite quarry 
are principal economic activities. 



Compliments 

SPORTSMAN CLUB 



Willow Pass Road 

R. R. No. 2 

Pittsburg, California 



E. P. Thilgen Phone 98i 

THE REX CLUB 

SPORTSMAN'S CENTER 
Lunches * Liquors * Wines * Beer 

75 East Third Street 
PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



Ragusa's Sales and Service 



Lincoln 



Mercury 



J. V. Ragusa, Prop. 

Third and Cumberland Street 
PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



My Regards 

For a Job Well Done 

by Our Local Peace Officers 

CARLOS PIZZERIA 

261 Railroad Avenue 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 

(Contra Costa County) 



ARGENTINA CLUB 

AND RESTAURANT 

Fine Wines ' Beer ' Liquors 
Dancing Every Night 

303 Black Diamond Street 

Pittsburg, California 



April, 194'J 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 45 



FORMER CHIEF F. A. EARLE 
OF HOLLISTER 

For 32 years Fred A. Earle served the city of Holhster 
as head of its Police Department, first as city Marshal, 
with a force of two men and later as Chief of Police. 
Like. Chief McPhail who succeeded him, former Chief 
Earle was born in San Francisco, arriving in that city on 
December 2, 1875. 

For a number of years he was in the meat business in 
San Francisco, but longing to get out in the wide open 
spaces of the state he sold out his San Francisco business 
and went to Hollister where he opened up another butcher 
shop. He continued in this business for only two years 
when he joined the Police Department, and it wasn't long 
until he was selected to be the boss of the two-man force, 
with the title of City Marshal. This was in 1916. The 
title was changed to Chief of Police in 1917 and from 
then until 1947 he served as the chief law enforcement 
officer of his adopted city, and did a mighty good job of 
handling all crime matters and giving the people the best 
of law enforcement. 

But the people of Hollister were not contented to let 
its honorable ex-chief enjoy himself free from public 
worries, they made him first superintendent of streets and 
now he is the city tax collector. 

His 32 years' service as head of Hollister's Police De- 
partment rates him with former Chief William Stanford 
whom served in a like capacity for Vallejo for some 
35 years. 



Phone 71-J-2 



P.O. Box 723 



HINKY DINKS 

J. Lobato, Prop. 
The Place to Meet for Best 

WINES-LIQUORS 

On the Highway. Bella Vista 
Pittsburg, California 



Duplex Percolator Co. 

Sonoma Rock Spring Water 

A Full Line of Leading Brands 
Imported and Domestic Whiskies 



49 East Second Street 

Pittsburg, California 

Phone 408 



Phone 995 

Sales - STUDEBAKER - Service 

Lloyd Denham Motor Co. 

W. L. Denham, Prop. 

GENERAL REPAIRING 

426 Main Street 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 1014 

CONTINENTAL HOTEL 

REASONABLE RATES 
DINING ROOM 

Steam Heat - Hot and Cold Running 
Water in All Rooms 

Kentucky and Western 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



POEHLMANN HATCHERY 

Phone 976 620 Main Street 

Hatchers of 

Baby Chicks and Turkey Poults 

White Leghorns, New Hampshires, 
Red Rock Cross, Austra Whites 

SALT LAKE CITY BRANCH 
W. H. Warner, Manager 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



GHIRARDELLI BROS. 

Phones: Store 1436 - 1437 
Ranch 67-F-14 

Produce Dealers and Growers 

Wholesale and Retail 
424 E. Washington Street 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, J 949 



Bert Williams & Sons 

AUTO PARTS 
SUPPLIES 

AUTOMOTIVE 
MACHINE SHOP 

831 First Street 

Napa, California 

Phone 1975 



DE SOTO - PLYMOUTH 

Sales - Service 

24-Hour Service 

PIONEER GARAGE 

Harold Doughty 

Automobile Repair - All Types 
Body and Fender Shop 

718 Main Street 

Napa, California 

Phone Garage 2246 



Phone 4627 



Earl M. Creager, Prop. 



Lafayette Appliance & 
Electric Company 

Sales and Service 

Appliances - Radios - Refrigerators 
Philco, Admiral, Packard-Bell 

Contracting - Repairing - Supplies 

Lafayette, California 



Orchard Nursery & Supply 

The Convenient Garden Center 

Nursery Stock, Garden Supplies, ORNU Peat 

Moss, ORNU Lawn Seet, Top Soil, 

ORNU Soil Conditioner 



TUNNEL ROAD, Midway between 
Orinda and Lafayette 

Lafayette, California 

Phone Lafayette 4712 



H. SHWARTZ CO. 

HARDWARE 

and 

ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLIES 

918 Main Street 

Napa, California 

( Napa Count) ) 



SHORTY'S CAFE 

First Street 

Napa, California 



PETE'S CLUB 

COCKTAILS 

and 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Chicken in The Basket 
Also All Kinds Short Orders 

Four Miles North of Vallejo 
on Napa Highway 



AAA and ABC 
DRIVING SCHOOLS 

Learn to Drive Safely 
New Dual Controlled Cars 

Certified and Courteous Instructors 

217 BALBOA STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
BA. 1-3500 SK. 1-4114 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



THE CANDID FRIEND 



Bx Opie L. Warner 



Countless times I have heard the expression "good 
police officer," and, as applied to the particular officer 
named, I understood he was at least up to par. But, 
being prone to juggling definitions, as definitions go, I 
often failed in trying to imagine any one of my ac- 
quaintances as a medium officer, or as a very poor speci- 
men. I even failed in my many attempts to satisfy myself 
in defining a police officer. 

Right now I feel the first ten police officers I would 
meet around the Hall of Justice would he totally at a 
loss to write, in one sentence, even a fair definition of the 
words peace officer. 

In their day and age Cardinal Newman, Michael Angelo 
and Thomas Edison were men of world renown. But all 
three of them failed to define such common words as 
gentleman, perfection and genius — so we do not have 
to feel badly about it if we cannot tell, in a few simple 
words, what we are. 

Our own Thomas Edison discounts brains and stresses 
hard work in his definition. Michael Angelo states "trifles 
make perfection" — and the learned Cardinal Newman 
uses very many words in merely setting forth what a 
gentleman will or will not do. Perhaps the Cardinal's 
method of defining a gentleman is the best method to 
follow in setting forth our idea of police officer — and, 
we will say, a "good" police officer. 

In five minutes each one of us can make a mental check 
up, and honestly answer our self-imposed questions as 
to the quality of service we are capable of giving com- 
pared with the service we are actually giving in the per- 
formance of our sworn duties. 

If we merely look on our best as a "location" for our 
eight-hour watch period, or on our assignment as a nice 
job, and act accordingly, we know we are unfair to our 
fellow workers as well as to the taxpayers. The truth is 
always bitter; but, if our mental check is on the up and 
up, we will admit that we are unfair to ourselves, because 
we thoroughly realize that no man who fails to play fair 
with his team is ever really happy. Our check up will 
also place on a pedestal the fact that: Happiness is the 
aim of all human endeavors. It will also get us to thinking 
that we get only what we deserve; and that as we give 
we get. 

If we so desire there are many unwritten police duties 
we can pass up. But these omissions on the part of even 
a small percentage of our department place an unfair 
advantage on those who are unselfish in the performance 
of their departmental duties. 

Then, there are definite and daily duties such as the 
writing of reports, making arrests, giving court testimony, 
the issuance of warrants, subpoenas, traffic tags, and so on. 
Official and unofficial confusion and criticism result if we 
are careless in the performance of these duties. 

A general order is issued in the matter of the search 



tor a dangerous killer or a described gang of suspects. If 
we fail to add our fractional effort to that search it is 
quite possible we may be the next victim. 

Yes, a good officer, like a member of a good baseball 
team, has many things to do and to avoid — with this 
difference: the ball player is dropped for slips of either 
omission or commission, while the police officer in the 
selfish class continues on, an anchor and a drag on his 
superior officers, his fellow workers and the efficiency 
and reputation of his department. It is good that this 
class is a great minority. 

Are you a good police officer? 

That small voice of conscience is every ready to answer 
that question. Yes — your conscience tells you what you 
should be as a local soldier of security, what you should 
know of your duties and how you should perform them. 
If your honest answer to the "small voice within" is in 
the affirmtive you are definitely in the "good" police 
officer group. 

But it that same small voice stamps you as low grade 
ore there are two equally good things you can do: Seek 
another field of endeavor, or put your shoulder to the 
wheel and play with your team with everything you have. 



Moraga Valley Nursery 

Quality Nursery Stock 
Established 1935 

One Mile from Orinda Crossroads 

Orinda, California 

Phone Orinda 6596 



I 



BOIES & SOULE 

Choice Contra Costa 
County Properties 



Orinda Crossroads 

Orinda, California 

Phone Orinda 6511 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April. 1949 



CHIEF BROCKMAN OF MANTECA 

Manteca, a bustling little city of well over 2000 people, 
is on the main highway down the valley along route 99, 
and there pours through the main streets of the little city 
thousands of people travelling in automobiles. They con- 
verge here from the northern counties and from the bay 
area. It is a rich farming community with a variety of 
vegetables, fruits and grains. There is much cattle raising 
and these with other farm animals contribute to the 
wealth of Manteca. 

The people living in the little city are a law abiding 
class and they have for years maintained a high record 
for keeping crime in the community at a very low level. 

There is a police force of three men, headed by Chief 
T. W. Brockman. Chief Brockman has been head of the 
Police Department since October 1, 1931, when he was 
appointed to succeed Frank Roundtree, who had served in 
that capacity for five years. 

The other members of the Department are Officers 
Michael McAlary and Floyd Stokes. 

Chief Brockman has his police cars equipped with radio 
receiving sets, served by Sheriff Carlos Sousa radio station. 

There have been no robberies and mighty few burglaries 
since Chief Brockman became Chief of Police of Manteca. 
The only murder was one that occurred a few months 
after he took his present office. A school teacher was mur- 
dered and the murderer got away. But Chief Brockman 
never let up on his search for the killer. In 1940 he got 
his man. Tom Comas. Seems that Comas thought his 
crime would be forgotten, and he could come back to the 
scene of his brutal deed. He sneaked back, and was visiting 
a friend, well known to Brockman, who had catalogued 
all acquaintances of the wanted man. The Chief swooped 
down on Comas' friend's house and quickly fitted the 
fugitive to a set of handcffs. He is now a guest at one of 
our state penal institutions. 

BROWNS FRIGID FREEZE 

Let Us Help You With Your Meat Problems 
COMPLETE CUTTING AND CURING SERVICE 



West Yosemite 



Phone 97 



MANTECA 



CALIFORNIA 



PETE'S MARKET 

GROCERIES THAT ARE FRESH AND AT 
REASONABLE PRICES ALWAYS 



Manteca Auto Company 

Orrin W. Webb, Prop. 
DESOTO and PLYMOUTH 



Phone 28 P. O. Box 907 

118 South Main Street 

Manteca, California 



Phone 102 -J 



Res. 20-F-2: 



SWISS-AMERICAN INN 

Otto Bach, Prop. 

MEALS - SANDWICHES 
Wines - Liquors - Beer 

131 E. Yosemite Ave. 

Manteca, California 



BERGTHOLD MORTUARY 

Charles R. Bergthold 

Maple Ave. and Center Street Phone 15 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 



PURESTEST BRAND POULTRY AND DAIRY FEEDS 
GARDEN AND FIELD SEEDS 

MANTECA WAREHOUSE 

Wholesale and Retail 



Office Phone 34 



Warehouse Phone 23 



905 West Yosemite 



Phone 39 



MANTECA 



CALIFORNIA MANTECA 



CALIFORNIA 



CLARK'S JEWELRY STORE 

JEWELRY - WATCHES - DIAMONDS 
MUSICAL SUPPLIES 



GILROY 



169 No. Monterey Street 



CALIFORNIA 



EVAN'S AUTO UPHOLSTERY 

exclusively 
AUTOMOBILES, TRUCKS AND TRACTORS 
Phone 2413-W 



SANTA ROSA 



546 First Street 



MANTECA 



For a Superior Olive Oil Buy 

DIMOTAKIS BRAND 

Manufactured by the 
MANTECA OLIVE OIL CO. 

Phone 198-W 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Operators 
M. B. Watts 
L. K. Watts 



Office Phone 1464 

Residence Phones 

1647-J - 1740-J 



Shop Phone 84 



Res. Phone 272 



Wegger's Airplane Seeding 8C Dusting Co. 

YOLO FLIERS CLUB AIRPORT 



Branco's Tractor 8C Equipment Co. 

SPECIAL MACHINERY MADE TO ORDER 
J. I. CASE FARM MACHINES 



P. O. Box 491 



P. O. Box 351 



525 E. Yosemite Ave. 



WOODLAND 



CALIFORNIA MANTECA 



CALIFORNIA 



April, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



Manteca Sporting Goods 8C Worm Farm 

C. L. and F. L. Conover, Props. 

FRESH SARDINES 
TACKLE • GUNS • AMMUNITION 



401 No. Main St. 

MANTECA 



Hiway 99 



Phone 360-W 

CALIFORNIA 



JOAQUIN TIRE SERVICE 



137 North Main 



Phone 295 



MANTECA 



CALIFORNIA 



KINGEN 5, 10 & 15c STORE 

Mr. and Mrs. Les Smith 

STATIONERY • NOTIONS • DRY GOODS • HARDWARE 

HOUSEHOLD SUPPLIES • COSMETICS 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 



DOUGLAS SERVICE 

J. G. Livingston, Prop. 

For the Best 
GAS - OIL - LUBRICATION 



So. Lincoln Ave. at 99 Hwy. 



MANTECA 



Phone 308-RX 

CALIFORNIA 



WHITE'S TRANSPORTATION 

LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE 
TRUCKING 



MANTECA 



Route 2, Box 36 



CALIFORNIA 



WILLIFORD & COLVIN 

HARDWARE - PLUMBING - PAINTS - ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

FURNITURE - HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

Phone 341 840 W. Yosemite 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 



MANTECA 



O. C. COTRELL 



FEED AND EGGS 



CALIFORNIA 



JOHN PERRY, Auctioneer 

128 W. Yosemite Avenue Telephone 252 

P. O. Box 345 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 

TOM'S CHEVRON SERVICE 

GAS - OIL - TIRES - BATTERIES 

LUBRICATION, ETC. 

411 W. Yosemite Ave. Phone 328W 

MANTECA CALIFORNIA 

Compliments of 

T H R A N ' S 

FEED AND SEED STORE 



MANTECA 



311 W. Yosemite Ave. 



Phone 7 



CALIFORNIA 



OSCAR'S CAFE 

Santa Fe Station 
SPECIALIZING IN GRADE A MEATS 



MANTECA 



Phone 54 



128 So. Main Street 



Compliments 
of 

WINDSOR 
HOTEL 

ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR MEN 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 



335 First Street 

Richmond, California 



J U D S N 

PACIFIC-MURPHY 

CORPORATION 



Emeryville, 
California 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 50 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Promotion Examination Problems 



April, 1949 



A. A gas main explodes and causes one death and 
severe injuries to the occupants of an automobile at the 
location, which is an intersection on your beat. You are 
on the scene at the time. State chronologically, the first 
five steps you took in the performance of your duty. 
Ample space is allowed below for your written report. 
Ten minutes is the time limit for this problem. At the 
expiration of this time you will be given problem B of 
this examination. 

B. Name two nationally known systems for the identi- 
fication of criminals. Name at least one weak spot in each 
system. In the space below write your answer and be 
prepared to turn in your paper at the termination of 
ten minutes thereon. 

C. Name, in order of importance, the real functions 
of a police department. Write in only four such func- 
tions. Time allowed: Five minutes. 

D. Write, in the space below, three outstanding facts 
in connection with the value of the evidence of an ac- 
complice. Five minutes are allowed for this answer. 

E. What are the general designations of fingerprints. 
Exclude subdivisions. Five minutes allowed. 

G. Give an example of: 1. Murder; 2. Manslaughter. 
Time allowed, five minutes. 

H. Give an example of: 1. Assault; 2. Battery. Time 
allowed, five minutes. 

I. Give an example of: 1. Grand larceny; 2. Petty 
larceny. Time allowed, five minutes. 

J. Write in, in order of importance, the five out- 
standing duties of a sergeant in charge of a platoon. Al- 
lowed time — Ten minutes. 

Note: Problems A to J, inclusive, were on individual 
examination books. A time allowance of two questions 
per minute was given for the statements set forth herewith. 

1 . Where property is taken by extortion in one county 
and brought into another county, jurisdiction lies in 
either county. 

2. When a person dies in one county from an injury 
felloniously inflicted in another county, the offense 
amounting to murder or manslaughter, the jurisdic- 
tion is in the county where the injury was inflicted. 

3. A misdemeanor indictment must be found within a 
year after the commission of the offense. 

4. Resistance to Public Officers in the execution of legal 
processes may be punished as contempt of court. 

5. Every person is liable to punishment by the laws of 
this state for a public offense committed by him 
therein. 

6. A warrant of arrest may be executed by a private 
person in counties where there are no peace officers. 

7. A sentence of imprisonment in a state prison for any 
term suspends" all the civil rights of the person so 
sentenced during such imprisonment. 

8. No person charged with a felony can be convicted 
unless by a jury's verdict, accepted and recorded by 
the court. 



9. The maximum penalty for Attempt to Commit Mur- 
der and Attempt to Commit Robbery is the same. 

10. A person may be imprisoned in the State Prison upon 
a conviction of petit theft. 

11. A prisoner imprisoned in a State Prison is com- 
petent as a witness in a criminal action. 

12. Every public offense must be prosecuted by indict- 
ment or information. 

1 3 . Every person who has in his possession any auto- 
mobile from which the manufacturer's serial number 
has been removed is guilty of a misdemeanor. 

14. Every person, who, knowingly and wilfully delivers 
to another a letter unsubscribed concerning any of 
his infirmities, is guilty of a misdemeanor. 

1 5 . Committing extortion under color of official right is 
a misdemeanor unless otherwise prescribed by the 
Penal Code. 

16. It is a public offense to personate another, in his 
private or official capacity. 

17. Under the Penal Code, larceny, embezzlement and 
stealing may each be interpreted as "theft." 

18. The laws of this state give different definitions of 
the term "night time." 

19. The felonious stealing of a horse, cow, calf, sheep, 
lamb or goat is grand larceny. 

20. If one person wilfully disturbs the peace or quiet of 
another person by loud noise, the same is a mis- 
demeanor. 

21. It is a misdemeanor to buy mechanical tools from any 
person under the age of sixteen years. 

22. A person who enters a house with the intention -of 
resisting an officer may be charged with burglary. 

2 3. The owner of a vicious animal may be charged with 
a felony if a person dies from injuries received from 
such animal. 

24. Every person remaining present at a place of riot, 
except public officers and persons assisting them in 
attempting to disperse the rioters, is guilty of a 
misdemeanor. 

2 5 . Any thing which is indecent or offensive to the senses 

is a public nuisance. 

* * * 
Answers to Promotional Questions in this issue. 

The following numbered statements were correct: 
2, 4, 9, 10, 11. 15, 18, 21, 23. 

HALL'S UNFURNISHED FURNITURE 

(In the Nude) 

Herm. Schlichting, Prop. 

YOUR IDEAS MADE TO ORDER 

1623 Park Street LAkehurst 2-1933 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

Lakehurst 2-7122 F. OEN 

OAKLAND BRASS FOUNDRY 

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM CASTINGS 
2319 Clement Avenue, two blocks south of Park St. Bridge 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



Call Frank Wallin 



LAkehurst 2-7S7S 



ALAMEDA SHEET METAL WORKS 

Furnace Work •Thermostat Controls 

Gutters and Leaders • Kitchen Equipment 

and all Types of Sheet Metal Work 

1717 Park Street (rear) ALAMEDA. CALIF. 






April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page U 



EXCHANGE BANK 

Santa Rosa's HOME BANK 

Offering Every Banking Service to 
Sonoma County 

Branches at Cotati, California, and 
Windsor, California 

"A large percentage of the Dividends declared 
by tlrs Home Bank provides Scholarships for 
worthy bovs and girls at the SANTA ROSA 
TUNIOR' COLLEGE and Maintenance of 
Santa Rosa's Beautiful DOYLE PARK." 



Member of 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. 



B R I D W E L L 

REAL ESTATE 

Specializing in 

ORINDA & COUNTRY CLUB 

PROPERTIES 



DISTINCTIVE HOMES 

and 

BUILDING SITES 

Notary Public 

In Orinda Village - Orinda 2241 
Orinda Highway - Orinda 4791 



REST AND 
REFRESH YOURSELF 

at the 

OLD ADOBE HUT 

Built in 1831 
By the Early Spanish Dons 

One Mile South of Napa 



KLEINE'S RESTAURANT 

DELICIOUS FOOD 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



Phone 8-8980 or 8-8429 
142 South Main S'.reet 

CENTERVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



BEAR CAT CLUB 



Joe E. Dutra 



L 



Phone 88-991 
179 South Main 

Centerville, California 



Michaelson and Comapny 



1627 Barrett Ave. 



RI 6010 



Reliable Motor Company 

We Buy and Sell Used Cars of Quality 
429 23rd Street - RI 1130-1131 

Auto Credit Sales 



445 23rd Street 



RI 5646W 



RICHMOND (Contra Costa County), CALIF. 



Page 52 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



DION R. HOLM, NEW CITY ATTORNEY 

Last February City Attorney John J. OToole, veteran 
city official, who during his service to San Francisco has 
been its Chief law advisor for more than a quarter of a 
century, stepped out of the office he has filled with such 
ability, devotion and loyalty. 

Though his giving up the post he has held for so long, 
caused genuine regret throughout the city, it was realised 




City Attorney Dion R, Holm 

that his health was such that he was entitled to some case 
during his declining years, and with the pension voted by 
the people for the venerable public servant he will have 
this ease without any economic worries. 

Mayor Elmer E. Robinson immediately announced the 
appointment of Dion R. Holm, chief deputy ever since 
John OToole has been city attorney as the man to take 
the vacant and important job. 

This met with universal approval, for there has never 
been any public officer in San Francisco who has been 
more devoted to the work of the city attorney's office. He 
has prepared, presented and won every important litiga- 
tion that has arisen during the past generation, and his 
batting average of wins in the many cases is as near 1000 
per cent as anyone could get. 

The new city attorney was born in San Francisco 58 
years ago. He attended Santa Clara University and Hast- 
ings Law College after getting his school education. 

In 1917 he married his childhood sweetheart, Ramona 
Sagala. The couple have five sons and a daughter. 



HENRY'S SUPER SERVICE 



1812 Park Street 



ALAMEDA 



CALIFORNIA 



ALAMEDA PLUMBING & SUPPLY CO. 

GENERAL PLUMBING AND HEATING 

REPAIRING AND CONTRACTING 

Phone LAkehurst 2-7575 1717 Park Street 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



LAkehurst 3-3651 



LAkehurst 3-3652 



ESQUIRE CLEANERS, Inc. 

Specialists in Quality 

2420 Lincoln Avenue 

ALAMEDA, CALIFORNIA 



JOHN L. DAUM 

DACAR TIRES 
Tires - Batteries - Seat Covers 

Recapping - Budget Terms - Accessories 
1911 Park Street • LAkehurst 3-3955 

Alameda, California 



JOE A. NEVIS 

General Contract Hauling 

STEEL - LUMBER - GENERAL HAULING 

HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS AND 

SEMI-TRAILERS 

Industrial Road Tel. Pittsburg 400 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



Crockett and Pittsburg 
Home Laundry & Cleaners 

LINEN AND TOWEL SUPPLY 



695 Pomona Street 
CROCKETT - Phone 41 

7th and Cumberland 
PITTSBURG - Phone 188 



April, J 949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 51 



CHATEAU CAFE 

dark and Richards, Props. BOYDEN-HANSEN CO. 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNERS 
SHORT ORDERS • BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

Op;n 24 Hours Daily Except Monday „, .. 

2424 Bianding Avenue 

423 Texas Street ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

FAIRFIELD (Solano County). CALIFORNIA 



TRUCK INN 

FRIENDLY ASSOCIATED SERVICE 
Have Us Service Your Car Regularly 
2V 2 M \ss North on Highway No. 40 



HOME ICE CO. 



2520 Bianding Avenue 



Phone: 4 R 2 ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

FAIRFIELD CALIFORNIA 



Eugenia Andronis Frank Andronis 

AIRLINE CAFE LOOp LUM BER AND MILL CO. 

THE BEST FOOD IN TOWN 

Broadway and Bianding Avenue 

844 Texas Street .„__, .. . . ,„„.,., 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

FAIRFIELD CALIFORNIA 



Gregory Ballos Theodore Avdalas 

PALACE GRILL 



ALAMEDA BOX COMPANY 



FULL COURSE MEALS 

FINEST FOODS • BEER AND WINE 

Open 24 Hours a Day 

Foot of Bay Street 

829 Texas Street ai AiviprjA CALIFORNIA 

FAIRFIELD CALIFORNIA ALAMk.UA LALlrUKNlA 



CLEVERDON CO., Inc. 

Harry F C.everdon ALAMEDA CITY GARBAGE 

GRADING • PAVING 

Route 1, Box 1 2435 Bianding Avenue 

LAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



MODERN LAUNDRY CO. MILLER SALES DISTRIBUTORS 

Benjamin Miller, Res. LAkehurst 3-1570 
ALL WORK DONE BY UNION LABOR MAKERS OF QUALITY PAINT 

1926 Park Street Phone LA 2-5717 2329 Eagle at Park LAkehurst 3-8795 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

DINE DANCE 

ALAMEDA NURSERY CO. STEP INN CLUB 

Harry Ikeda (Peter Makris) 

Wholesale and Retail 
GROWERS OF BEDD.NO PLANTS AND SHRUBS -OB^mA^g™ 

2530 Bianding Ave. Phone: LAkehurst 2-0128 1313 Park Street Phone LA 2-9933 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

BEAN AND CAVANAUGH PARTY FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

Jose Totorica 
DE SOTO AND PLYMOUTH DEALERS 

POTATO CHIPS 

Telephone LAkehurst 3-5246 FRESH • TASTE • QUALITY 

1700 Park Street Phone LAkehurst 2-0396 2318 Clement Avenue 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 

PARISIAN LAUNDRY CLEMENT LAUNDRY 

ONE HUNDRED PER CENT UNION 

2319 Lincoln Avenue Telephone LAkehurst 3-0626 2412 Clcment Avenue 

ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA ALAMEDA CALIFORNIA 



Page 54 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Weed, California, Has Young Police Chief 



I would like to take this opportunity to tell you about 
one of the youngest chiefs of police in the State of Cali- 
fornia. That is Earl M. Pederson of Weed. California. 
A former Minot man, a marine corps veteran whose 
father and other relatives live in Minot. young Pederson 
for many years prior to enlisting in the Marines in Minot 




Chief Earl M. Pederson 

for war service had lived on the family farm at Norwich. 
He was in the service four years, two of which were spent 
in the South Pacific, and some time on the Military 
Police Force in Klamath Falls, Oregon. 

After his discharge he served on the Los Angeles Police 
Force, until moving with his family to Weed one year 
ago. Chief Pederson was an Officer at the University 
and Wilshire Stations in Los Angeles, and attended the 
Los Angeles Police School. On March 1, 1948, Chief 
Pederson took over the task of running the Weed Police 
Department. Known as the Weed Police District in 
Siskiyou County. Chief Pederson is 27 years old. 

When Chief Pederson took over this department there 
were no police files of any kind or records. Today we 
have a complete Police File up to date as any modern 
Police Department could be. This has all been accom- 
plished through Chief Pederson's hard work and knowl- 
edge of police routine. Chief Pederson has also had arrest 
reports, fingerprint cards, and all types of police reports 
printed up. 

Weed has one police car with a California Highway 
Patrol radio, tuned to Station KSCY in Yreka. Car 
equipped with traffic reporting kit, camera, first aid kit, 
and riot gas gun. 

There are two officers in Weed beside the Chief. Of- 
ficer C. A. Thompson, formerly a Los Angeles County 



deputy sheriff, and patrol special of San Francisco Police 
Department Southern Station. Officer Thompson at- 
tended the San Francisco Police Academy in February 
of 1945 and Officer (Colored) Theo. Lockett, who has 
been an officer here for the past 12 years. 

I might mention that we had a murder here on the 
14th day of October, 1948, and that through Chief of 
Police Pederson's investigation and the work of Sheriff 
Ben Richardson and Deputy Sheriff Throne West, the 
were able to clarify who had been at the scene of the 
murder. 

An officer's job in Weed consists of traffic, foot patrol- 
ing, radio car, fingerprinting, report making, investigating 
all types of crime, ballistics, court procedure, arrests, jail 
procedure, penal code, vehicle code, fire duties, and pub- 
lic relations. 

Weed is an unincorporated town and has a population 
of bOOO or more. Of these 6000 about 500 hundred are 
Negroes. Weed is a Lumber Town — Long Bell Lumber 
Company, and has many tourists due to its being at the 
foot of Mt. Shasta, on the north side. Weed has two main 
highways, U. S. 99 and U. S. 97, which meet at Weed. 

The voters decided that Weed should be an incorpo- 
rated city an at election held in November this year. 

The town of Weed has an elevation of 3500 above 
sea level. 



PACIFIC 

M E TA L S 

COMPANY, Ltd 



3100 Nineteenth Street 

Telephone Mission 7-1104 

SAN FRANCISCO 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 55 



GRACE 
LINE 



2 Pine Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



THE 
LEARNER 
COMPANY 



Alameda, California 



PEERLESS IRON 
WORKS, Inc. 



Fabricators 

and 

Erectors 

of 

Structural Steel 



LAkehurst 2-1073 
Foot of Everett Street 

Alameda, California 



J. H. BAXTER 
AND COM PANY 



Alameda, California 



Page 56 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



PRESTON TO SAN QUENTIN 

(Continued from Page 10) 
Street, and fled with $530. 

Two days later — October 7 — the gang was still burning 
from the $18 Nob Hill Garage robbery, so they returned 
at 11:15 p.m. on a retalitory raid. The attendant was 
again adequately terrorized, but the loud talking youths 
made their getaway only $17 richer. 

Next victim was a grocer — James Koniairs, 49 Guer- 
rero Street, proprietor of a store at 1198 Hyde Street. 
The robbers entered the store at 8:40 p.m., and ordered 
several customers into a rear room with the proprietor. 
A frightened young mother grabbed her small daughter 
and attempted to run from the store; but one of the youths 
grabbed her and roughly shoved her into the rear room. 
The loss on this occasion was $26^. 

Other robberies staged by the four young robbers were : 

October 27 at 8:20 p.m., grocery store at 508 Presidio 
Avenue, loss $150. 

Later that same evening Jaber suggested a job in the 
East Bay, so the boys stole an auto near the San Francisco 
Presidio, drove it to Oakland and ditched it. Stealing an- 
other, they drove on to Alameda and held up a liquor 
store. A total of $380 was taken from the cash register, 
and Colevris took a valuable ring from the clerk. 

November 8, Rainbow Grage, 3220 Sacramento Street, 
at 7:25 p.m.. Loss — $26 from cash register, $16.50 from 
wallet of Melford Metzger, attendant, and 1941 Buick 
used for escape auto. 

November 8, 9:05 p.m., Gern Garage, 1601 Franklin 
Street, loss $125. 

November 12, 6:25 p.m., gift shop at 2760 Baker Street, 
loss $35. 

November 12, 8 p.m., grocery store at 1096 Union 
Street, loss $227. 

Then came November 29 and was to be the quartets 
last job. At 6 p.m. the youths held up and robbed Levio 
Petrognani, 1895 Lombard Street, proprietor of a grocery 
store at 1677 Leavenworth Street. Their loot consisted of 
$130 in cash and a $27.60 government check. 

Wafer and Reznik were sympathetic with Petrognani 
over his $130 loss, but they were personally concerned 
with the $27.60. Contacting Grady Boatwright, supervisor 
agent of the San Francisco office of the U. S. Secret Serv- 
ice, the two inspectors asked his aid in watching for the 
stolen check. 



MILLS BROS., 


Tailors 


and Cleaners 




USED CLOTHES 


BOUGHT 


AND SOLD 


OAKLAND 


941 Twelfth Street 


TW 


noaks 3-7478 

CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN STATE RADIATOR WORKS 

Manufacturing, Cleaning and Repairing of Radiators and Gas Tanks. 

Authorized Harrison and National Heavy Duty Flat Tube Radiator 

Cores for Passenger, Truck and Tractor. 

Phones KEllog 4-5788- 4-5721. Pick-up and Delivery Service 

3529 EAST TWELFTH STREET . OAKLAND I, CALIF. 



BOB ROTELLI 



MIKE GUIDONI 



NATIONAL MEAT MARKET 



The Golden Pheasant 

San Francisco's Most 

Favorably Known 

Restaurant 



Powell Street at Geary 

San Francisco California 



Come In and Meet 

BOB LOWRY 

at 1686 Market Street 

For Quality 24-hour Service 
on Those Uniforms 

THRIFTY CLEANERS 

Phone UNderhill 1-2020 



Walter P. McCauley 



4933 - 17th Street 

San Francisco 



ALAMEDA 



1203 Park Street 



LAkehurst 2-5100 



IF IT'S CONTENTMENT 
YOU'RE SEEKING - - - 

Try Our Delicious LADY BORDEN'S ICE 
CREAM, Won't You? COME IN AFTER 
Bowling or the Theatre For Moments of Pure 
Eating Enjoyment at 

TOOT'S CREAMERY 

Merchants: You'll Like Our 75c 
Luncheon Hot Plate 

2141 POLK nr. VALLEJO 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 57 



The unpredictable Jaber had his head in the clouds when 
he cashed the federal check in a small Alameda grocery 
store. Glibly, he signed his own name to the check, and for 
good measure included his address. Following a telephone 
call from Boatwright, the irate grocer phoned young Jaber 
with the news that the check had bounced. Jaber hurried 
to the store, paid the $27.60 demanding a receipt. Mean- 
while Boatwright had placed another telephone call to his 
friends, Inspectors Wafer and Reznik. Last in the series 
of telephone conversations was the one between Reznik 
and his friends of the Alameda Police Department. 

The San Francisco inspectors didn't have long to wait 
for the return call from the Alemeda police who informed 
them that Jaber had been arrested at the home of his par- 
ents. First picking up the grocer Petrognani Wafer and 
Reznik drove to the Alameda headquarters. There the 
grocer quickly, and indignantly, selected George Jaber 
from a lineup of other men as one of the robbers who 
invaded his store. 

Inspectors Wafer and Reznik believed in wasting no 
time in continuing the investigation — Jaber was subjected 
to some skillful questioning (in the form of friendly con- 
versation) during the drive back to San Francisco. While 
the auto was still on the bay bridge, Jaber suddenly re- 
marked : 

"Okay, when we get back to your office, I'll give you the 
whole story." 

Minutes later in the Robery Detail Jaber was giving 
Reznik the information they wanted, most important be- 
ing the names of the other three suspects. 

Perhaps police officers find something regrettable about 
nearly every arrest they make. In this case Max Reznik 
and Paddy Wafer felt sympathy for Jaber's family. These 
people, the officers said, were refined and cultured parents 
who had undergone constant sacrifice in efforts to reha- 
bilitate their son. The term "problem child," however, 
was created primarily for youngsters like Jaber. 

The next name on their list was that of David Galarza, 
and minutes after Jaber signed his statement, Reznik and 



jj~ 



ACE HIGH CLUB 

Cocktails 

and 
Good Food 



150 Sixth Street 

San Francisco, California 



NICK KOBSEFF • GLEXX KERCH • WALT J ERICOFF 



THE BAND BOX 



I 



VAlencia 4-9731 

3326 MISSION STREET 

Near 24th Street 

Across Street from Sports Center 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SMITH'S SMOKE SHOP 

Cigars - Cigarettes - Tobaccos 
Magazines - Candies 



120 Market Street 

San Francisco, California 



HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

Motorcycles 

DUDLEY PERKINS CO. 

Sales and Service 

655 Ellis Street 
Phone PRospect 5-5323 

San Francisco 9, California 



^— 



Page 58 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



Wafer were calling at the boy's home. There they learned 
that he had gone to the late movie at a neighborhood thea- 
tre. At the theatre the officers decided the best method of 
flushing the second hoodlum was the simples method. They 
conversed with the theatre manager who then spoke on 
the microphone of the house public address system. 

"David Galarza, you are wanted in the lobby," the 
manager paged. 

In a matter of seconds the tall, skinny dark-haired youth 
hustled into the lobby — into a pair of handcuffs. He was 
half way to the Hall of Justice before his mouth closed. 

The next day Cecilio was in custody. He and Jaber 
subsequently pleaded to first degree robbery charges; and 
on June 10 Jaber drew his five-to-life sentence in San 
Quentin. July 2 Cecilio was committed to the California 
Youth Authority installation at Lancaster. Galarza, who 
pleaded not guilty and was convicted, preceded Jaber to 
San Quentin. 

The gang's leader, however, got the word and skipped 
San Francisco with another pal, William C. Lowry. This 
couple soon located in the state of Washington, drifted 
from Seattle to the small city of Aberdeen. There, police 
know every face in town, as Colevris and Lowry were 
to learn. 

In Aberdeen the boys heard that the madame in a cer- 
tain house of ill repute operated a thriving business, and 
usually kept a sizeable stack of money on the premises. 
Arming themselves with three pistols, they walked in on 
the madame and her girls to get little — of the cash. The 
girls were terrorized, but the madame was mad. The two 
boys were a bit too close for their britches, because when 
they left the madame still had her cash — but they made her 
promise "not to call the police, or we'll kill you." 

The boys left their arsenal in their hotel room, dropped 
down the street to a restaurant, and started eating. Aber- 
deen policemen walked in and out again, but the food was 
still on the table. 

Colevris and Lowry both drew 16 month sentences in 
Monroe Reformatory, Monroe, Washington. After serv- 
ing eleven months, Colevris was turned over to Inspector 
Reznik who returned him to San Francisco February 1. 

Before Superior Judge Preston Devine he pleaded not 
guilty to five charges of armed robbery, and at this time is 
in custody awaiting trial, in lieu of $20,000 bail. 



ALFRED'S 
RESTAURANT 



886 Broadway 
SAN FRANCISCO 



INDEPENDENT 
ELEVATOR CO., Inc. 

ELEVATOR CONTRACTORS 
Service - Repairs - Modernization 

471 Jessie Street 

YUkon 6-4963 - YUkon 6-4964 

San Francisco 3, California 






R U SS 
BUILDING 



235 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco 



When you buy a new Easter outfit for yourself 
why not Easterize your car as well. It's surprising 
what a New Paint Job and Seat Covers will do 
for your car's appearance. 

C & S Auto Reconstruction 

AUTO PAINTING - FENDER 
AND BODY REPAIR 

First Class Work - Rates Reasonable 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

445 Fillmore Street, between Oak and Page Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO HEmlock 1-7946 



Tel. UNderhill 1-2200 



HEmlock 1-6961 



EMIL J. WEBER 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Formerly 
WEBER AND CONROY, 30 Erie St., S. F. 

Industrial - Commercial - Residential 
No job too Large, and None too Small 

ELECTRICAL FIXTURES 
258 Dorland Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page J 9 



G. KLINKHAMMAR 
BUILDING COMPANY 

General Contractors 

see us for better 

HOMES 



514 Buena Tierra Drive 

Woodland, California 

Phone 326 



MOTHERS 

CAKES 

and 

COOKIES 



1148 East 18th Street 

Oakland 

335 Tehama Street 

San Francisco 



Compliments 
of 


LANGENDORF 

UNITED 

BAKERIES, Inc. 


* ' 


• 

San Francisco 
• ^_ 



-J *••— 



For GLAMOROUS 

•GIFTS 

• GOWNS 

• ROBES 

and 
things ORIENTAL 

216 GRANT AVENUE 
Between Geary and O'Farrell Streets 

Mail Orders Promptly Filled 



Page 60 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



H. MOFFAT 

COMPANY 

PACKERS 

• • • 

Livestock 
Growers-Dealers 

• • • 



San Francisco 



California 

Oregon 

Washington 

Idaho 

British Columbia 

LOS ANGELES- 
SEATTLE MOTOR 
EXPRESS, INC. 

EDWARD W. ELLIOTT 

District Manager 

3rd and Arthur Streets 

San Francisco, California 

Mission 7-4742 



RUPTURE 



H. B. SYKES, 
Founder 


Neglect 

Often 

PROVES 

FATAL 

• 

Don't Take 

CHANCES 

with your Life 


1 GUARANTEE THAT 
AFTER SIX MONTHS' 
TRIAL YOU WILL BE 
ENTIRELY SATISFIED 
OR 1 WILL REFUND 
HALF THE CHARGE. 

NO STRAPS-NO BELTS 
NO BUCKLES 






PRESENT THIS AD 

and a special 25 fc discount will be allowed 
to Police Officers and their families. Good 
only until June 30, 1949. 

SYKES RUPTURE SYSTEM 

419 Grant Bldg. - 1095 Market St. 
Phone HEmlock 1-6881 



IMMEDIATE 
STEEL 



Alloy Bars - Cold Finished Bars - Plates - Sheets 

Hot Rolled Bars - Structural Shapes 

Strips - Boiler Tubes 

Cold Drawn Seamless Mechanical Tubing 

Wire or Manila Rope - Pipe - Valves - Fittings 

Bolts and Nuts - Hardware - Hand Tools 

Concrete Reinforcements 



GILMORE STEEL AND 
SUPPLY CO., INC. 



840 Brannan Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



April, 194'. 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 61 



MIKE BETTEGA 




It's 

NEW! 
Pel-O- 
Cheef 



It's always in place. It's neat and attractive. Be ready for every occasion 
with these newly patented plastic base handkerchiefs. Obtain your set of 
three Pel-O-Cheefs and do away with the irksome task of folding your own. 
Made of fine linen and plastic which can be easily washed. Made in 3 
pointed folds; and in either assorted or solid colors, including white. 
Priced at 3 for §2.50 and postpaid anywhere in the U. S. A. 
Order from SOIK & CO., 1224 Ash by Avenue, Berkeley 2, California 

} 

Charles Blazek and 

and 

Charles J. Blake 



LICENSED REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES BROKERS 

Specializing in Sales and Exchange of 
County and Town Properties 

316 Santa Rosa Ave. - Phone 1844 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 



ATTILIO DALRI 



Special Notice to Police Officers 

The Best of 

LIQUORS 

and 

MIXED DRINKS 



5 



MILE 
HOUSE 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH 

AND SANDWICHES 

We have 

Television 

and 

Shuffleboard 

End 3rd Street and San Bruno Ave. 

San Francisco, California 

JUniper 5-9865 



BOB'S AUTO 
DRIVING SCHOOL 



Dual Controlled Cars 



1665 Market Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-7504 
Res. Phone JU 7-0642 



>---■ 



TRIPLE "A" 
MACHINE WORKS 



General Ship 
Repairs 



Pier 64 
YUkon 6-5836 

San Francisco, California 



Page 62 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 949 



CAPTAIN FRANCIS J. McGUIRE 
PASSES AWAY 

Captain Francis J. McGuire, who retired as a member 
of the San Francisco Police Department last October, 
passed away during the month of February. Thus an- 
other police officer who has contributed so well to the 
policing of the city has answered his last roll call. 

Captain McGuire, a native of Nebraska, and who 
became a member of the Police Department in December, 




Captain Francis J. McGuire 

1908, possessed all the qualifications of a good police 
officer. He was honest, fearless, and had a quiet way 
of conducting his efforts in all matters coming under his 
attention. He was kindly, where kindness was merited 
and no one ever heard him speak ill of his fellow man. 

His nearly 40 years as an officer of the law was one 
that shows a clear record. There are no charges of un- 
officerlike charges or reprimands from superior officers. 
He took seriously the grave duties of the service he had 
adopted as his life's work and he lived accordingly. 

You never heard anyone speak unkindly about him, 
and the news of his passing caused deep sorrow among 
his friends in the department, and that included all who 
knew him, as well as a legion of other outside the 
department. 

He was a studious officer and passed through all the 
ranks of the Department through civil examination, and 
reached the top rank on March 1, 1940. The first station 
he had charge of was the Richmond, and though he was 
assigned to other stations during the past eight years, he 
wound up his long and honorable service as a police officer 
in the command of the Richmond station. 

His funeral was held from Gantner, Felder and Kenny 
Chapel, 196^ Market Street, followed by a Requiem 
Mass at the Star of the Sea Catholic church, at which 
there were many of his sorrowing friends, gathered to 
pay their last sad respects. 

SWEET'S PLACE 

Thelma and Dewey, Proprietors 
DRAFT AND BOTTLED BEER - SOFT DRINKS 

18 THIRD STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. 



CAPTAIN ALEXANDER E. McDANIEL 
DIES AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS 

After thirty-six years of faithful police service Captain 
Alexander E. McDaniell was appointed to the executive 
position of Supervising Captain of the San Francisco 
Police Department on October 16, 1947. 

From the date of his appointment to the Department, 
Captain McDaniell had, for the thirty-odd years he had 
worn the uniform of a San Francisco police officer, been 
one hundred per cent officer and ever on the alert to bring 
honor and respect to the Department and its members. 
With his fine record in the Department his appointment as 
Supervising Captain was most agreeable to every rank in 
the entire department. Through his good judgment and 
his affable manner his executive efforts received unanimous 
Department applause. 

The Captain was always a robust man, fond of the great 
outdoors, and a lover of fishing and hunting. He appeared 




Captain Alexander E. McDaniel 

to have many pleasurable and active years ahead of him. 
Nobody worried recently when he spent a short time in 
a hospital — least of all the Captain himself who had de- 
cided on retiring from the Department on July 1 of this 
year. 

On February 14 he was down at the Hall of Justice, 
well, happy, and outlining to his Department pals his 
plans after July 1, 1949. At his home a few hours later 
the end came. 

Thus, this thorough going police officer virtually died 
wearing the uniform to which he always brought honor — 
a police officer, first, last and all the time, he smilingly 
parted briefly from his beloved fellow workers and died 
in the bosom of his family. 

Phone 1141 

INDEPENDENT ICE AND FUEL CO. 

FUEL AND ICE 
10 THIRD STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 63 



DEATH OF LOUIE S. STEENBERG 

By The Editor 

It's difficult to write of the death of a friend, one that 
for nearly ten years you have been closely associated with. 
This difficult task comes to this writer in the case of Louie 
S. Steenberg, who passed away on the evening of Feb- 
ruary 19. 

Lou Steenberg, as he was affectionately known to a 
legion of friends in this section of California, has been 
sorely ill for several months before his death, which follow- 
ed a little over a week of hospitalization. But none ever 
knew from his lips the sad state of his health. He was a 
kindly and thoughtful man. One who put friendship on a 
high plane and who would do nothing or say anything 
that would bring unhappiness to those who knew him. He 
exercised great fortitude in minimizing his ailment. 

Since back in 1940 we have shared offices at 465 Tenth 
Street. He was an operator of a duplicating service, the 
writer as editor of the Police and Peace Officers Journal. 
Never in those years we have been together has he ever 
given voice to a profane word, or an obscene sentence, 
nor did he ever tell a risque story. Yet he had a great 
sense of humor, and his greetings to one and all were 
kindly and wholesome. Never was he heard to say an un- 
kind thing about any man, on the contrary he would come 
to the defense, in a friendly way, of one who might be 
the cause of derogatory remarks. 

He was a great favorite with children, and it is a well 
established fact that there are two things that are never 
fooled by a man — children and dogs. Children liked him. 
He liked children. I know for I have a grandson, six years 
old who has idolized Lou Steenberg ever since he was three 
years of age, and is now old enough to realize he has lost 
a mighty good friend. 

Lou Steenberg was born in San Francisco, grew up in 
his native city, and got his education here. He was tor 
years a brakeman for the Southern Pacific Company, 
running out of San Jose. He has many friends among his 
former fellow workers, who dropped in and see him now 
and then through the years. 

Some years ago he went into the multigraphing business, 
and being on artist of ability, coupled with his thorough- 
ness, and his interest in the work given him, no matter how 
large or small, be built up a prosperous business. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hildur Steenberg, 
a sister, Mrs. Hazel Williams, and two sons Robert and 
William Steenberg. The latter two saw service in the air 
corps. Their father has seen them return from World War 
II, married and established in well paying careers. Robert 
is a commercial artist and Robert an engineer, associated 
with a big firm of builders. 

The funeral was held on March 22, from Gray's, Post 
and Divisadero Streets, and the large gathering who came 
to pay their last sad respects showed how widely he was 
known and respected. 

This world has lost a good man, but heaven is enriched 
by his coming. 



REIF AND BRODY 

POULTRY DEALERS 



Phone 1573 
715 Main Street 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



Kelly's Service Station 

Fred Kelly 

Washing - Lubrication - Batteries 
Gas - Oil - Accessories 

Third and I Street 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



"The Largest Hardware and Implement 
House in the North Bay Counties" 

A. F. TOMASINI 

HARDWARE COMPANY 

Retail 
120 Kentucky Street Telephone 694 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



CENTRAL CLUB 

Phone 1927 

John and Paul 

Drinks Made The Way 
You Like Them 



150 Kentucky Street 

PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA 



Page 64 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, J 949 



LIE DETECTOR 

(Continued from Page 14) 
spector Riedel, "but there was work to be done. My 
time was limited. 

After a short sleep Inspector Riedel and Deputy Chief 
of Police Hackett got together and started at the very 
beginning. 

Suspects Questioned 

Meanwhile a number of suspects were being held by 
the authorities. The "lie detector" went to work. 

Herman Dennis, 20, private U.S.A. was examined. 
Graph readings disclosed that Herman was lying and 
Riedel said: "Okey, boy, take it easy. Be seein 1 you a 
little later" and Herman was placed in confinement. He 
had, during the questioning, admitted knowing Miss 
Farnsworth. 

A quick trip to the camp occupied by Herman and a 
hundred and more of his fellows. Questioning of his 
comrades. 

Herman Dennis had been one of three army men who 
had been given permission to use an army transport jeep 
for a picnic jaunt on December 1 1 . One of the three 
was Herman's half-brother. Private Calvin Dennis. The 
other Sergeant Robert Burns. 



BAY CITIES SANDBLASTING CO. 

SANDBLASTING 

BUiLDINGS • BRIDGES • SHIPS • TANKS • AUTOMOBILES 

CASTINGS • LUMBER • GLASS • SIGNS 

4356 Clement Street ANdover 1-3535 

OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 



FRIEDKINS FOOD MART 

VEGETABLES • MEATS • GROCERIES 
1903 Foothill Blvd. KEIlog 4-8288 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone THornwall 3-5605 Branch Offices 

If no answer call GLencourt 17400 SAN JOSE - SANTA ROSA 



GILRAIN-KEEFE INC. 

GENERAL PAINTING CONTRACTORS 



3012 ADELINE STREET 



BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



Phone TWinoaks 3-9634 



Beck Refrigeration Engineering 

COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION SERVICE 
SALES • SERVICE • INSTALLATION 



2203 EIGHTH AVENUE 



OAKLAND 2. CALIF. 



Founded in 1907 



State Accredited 



SUPERIOR FRENCH LAUNDRY 



California College of Arts and Crafts 



Spencer Macky, President 



Telephone HIghgate 4-0645 1284 - 22nd Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA BROADWAY at COLLEGE AVENUE, OAKLAND 11, CALIFORNIA 



FOR FINE FURNITURE 



NEW AND USED BOTTLES OF ALL KINDS 
CORKS - KEGS - STERILIZED WIPING RAGS 



TRADEWAY STORES 



THINGS FOR THE HOME 



BAY CITY BOTTLE SUPPLY and 
SANITARY RAG COMPANY 



1230 San Pablo Ave. Phone Richmond 505 230 Castra Street TEmplebar 2-7843 

EL CERRITO CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



BERKELEY 



NORTHRUP, KING & CO 

WHOLESALE SEEDSMEN 
8th and Parker Street 



GENERAL GRINDING COMPANY 



PRECISION GRINDING 
METALIZING 



2917 East 12th Street Telephone ANdover 1-5557 

CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



HANSEN MOTOR TUNE-UP 

COMPLETE ENGINE OVERHAUL 

SPEEDOMETER - CARBURETOR - ELECTRICAL AND 

MOTOR TUNE-UP SPECIALISTS 



MILLER'S RENDEZVOUS 



Phone AShberry 3-9380 1939 Addison Street 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA SAN LEANDRO 



1166 E. 14th Street TRinidad 2-9948 



CALIFORNIA 



KIPPLEY & LEE 

TRUCK REPAIRING AND PARTS 



L. PIAZZA 

WHOLESALE FLORIST AND GROWER 



1800 East 12th Street KEIlog 2-8012 821 Jefferson Street TWinoaks 3-110O 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



\pril, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 65 



On Right Track and a Surprise 

"Things began to pop from then on," says Inspector 
Riedel. "Hackett and I went to examine the motor vehicle 
jsed by the three men on that fateful Saturday. We 
segan a minute search. Hackett, not familiar with the 
fact that the front seat of a jeep like this one opens in 
front, yanked up the back end . . . and there was the 
dress worn by Miss Farnsworth on the night of her rape 
md slaying. It had been stuffed under the seat. 

"Okeh, I went out to talk to Private Calvin Dennis.'" 

Psychology Helps 

It was in this interview that Inspector Riedel really 
cracked the case wide open. For several hours he chatted 
with Calvin Dennis. He told jokes. Calvin came back 
with more and had a bit of laughter in his voice. The 
two discussed crimes. Calvin readily admitted he knew 
Miss Farnsworth. Adroitly, Inspector Riedel led up to 
the crucial point and said : 

"Who put this dress in the jeep?" and Calvin, looking 
at the tattered garment said: "Why Sergeant Burns, he 



GRAZERS 

SODA FOUNTAIN • LIGHT LUNCHES 

TOBACCOS OF ALL KINDS • CANDY 

MAGAZINES • NEWSPAPERS 



2S89 Frultvale Ave. 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



KEllog 2-8130 
2-813 1 



Commercial Equipment Company 

MACHINERY - NEW AND USED 

2937 Ford Street 
OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 



PRODUCTION PATTERN SHOP 

WOOD AND METAL PATTERNS 

4244 East 12th Street 
OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 



THE CLUBHOUSE 



MI RANCHO 



Extend Best Wishes From 
HILLIARD ROSE and ROY FIELDS, Owners 



496 East 14th Street 

SAN LEANDRO 



Phone SWeetwood 8-9935 



THE LAPHAM CO. 



PLANS - INSURANCE - MORTGAGE LOANS 
BUILDERS - REALTORS 



OAKLAND 



4144 Coolldge Ave. 



KEllog 2-8255 



FORTY-NINER CAFE 

Frank Boulter, Prop. 



WINES • WHISKEY • BEER 
CHOICE HOME COOKED MEALS 



OAKLAND 



1686 Seventh Street 



Phone HIgate 4-9369 

CALIFORNIA 



MEXICAN GROCERIES • BAKERY • TORTILLA FACTORY 
MEXICAN RECORDS ON RADIO 

6:15-7:15 P.M. Daily • 8:30-9:30 A.M. Sundays 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



464 Seventh Street 



Phon; GLencourt 1-2393 

CALIFORNIA 



IDEAL CABINET & FIXTURE CO. 

Joaquin Perry, Owner 

BUILT IN FIXTURES • STORE FIXTURES 

When Thinking of Anything in Our Line 
Think of IDEAL First 



1010 38th Avenue 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



Phone KEllog 3-1432 

CALIFORNIA 



JOHNSON PROPELLER CO. 

RACING PROPELLERS OUR SPECIALTY 
Propeller Designing and Reprtching 



Chapman Co. Lancaster 

OAKLAND 



Phone KEllog 3-4110 

CALIFORNIA 



BUY U. S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



COAST IRON 8c METAL CO. 

Dealers of All Kinds 
SCRAP IRON AND METALS 



433 - 29th Avenue 



KEllog 2-3351 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



REID 8C CO., Lumber & Supplies 

WHOLESALE LUMBER DISTRIBUTORS 
AND MILL REPRESENTATIVES 



John R. Ober - Redman C. Staats - Hugo P. Correll 
Representing 

THOS. H, KUCHEL 

STATE CONTROLLER 



OAKLAND 



401 Tenth Avenue 



TWinoaks 3-6745 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



OAKLAND 



TIVOLI LUNCH 

lbukos 
C H E S 

Highgate 4-2687 



Nick C. Zambukos 
SANDWICHES 



468 Tenth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ED'S AUTO WORKS 

REBUILT PARTS EXCHANGE • NEW AND USED PARTS 
AUTOMOBILE GLASS INSTALLED 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



752 High Street 



KEllog 2-1833 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 66 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



done stuffed that dress behind the seat on which he was 
sittin'." 

"And I'll tell you now how many fellows were in on 
the job," calmly said Inspector Riedel. 

"You caint fool me mister, you just don't know," said 
Calvin Dennis, grinning. 

"Three," said Riedel. 

"Yeh, boss, you're right. There was just three of us. 
How you'd know?" 

"Never mind that, I know, but who hit her first, before 
you dragged her into the jungle?" 

"Why that ah Sergeant Burns he smacked her down 
and then we grabbed her and took her out in the bush. 
We had to hit her again because she was starting to 
scream." 

Three Face Death Penalty 

And thus by use of the infallible lie detector by a bit 
of psychology, the three men believed responsible for the 
slaying and rape of Ruth Farnsworth are in custody and 
face trial in Guam. 

Meanwhile, the man Ruth Farnsworth had loved and 
had promised to marry, one of the first to be questioned 
after her death, sits alone in a quonset hut on Guam! 

LEN 8C BUD COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



FONG WAN, Nationally Known Herbalist 

860 Stockton Street 576 - 10th Street 

San Francisco, Calif. Oakland, Calif. 
YU 2-5719 HI 4-3767 

Both offices closed Wednesdays. 



OAKLAND 



ART'S BUFFET 



4031 Broadway PI 5-28S4 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



B L U INN 

207 East 14th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



4822 Telegraph Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



SOUTH BERKELEY CREAMERY 

J. A. Sabatte, Prop. 

Office and Creamery 47th and San Pablo Ave. 

Phone OLympic 2-9924 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

CITY FRENCH LAUNDRY 

CURTAINS - LACECLOTHS - BLANKETS - DRAPES 

BATH MATS - CHENILLE SPREADS 

2801 Linden Street Phone GL 1-8583 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



BOB'S AUTO SERVICE 

GENERAL AUTO REPAIR • MOTOR REBUILDING 

Phone ANdover 1-9884 5105 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 

STORAGE • PARKING • OILING • GREASING 

CANTON GARAGE 

GUARANTEED AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRING 

All Repairing Under Personal Supervision of Billy Chu 

111 Sixth Street Telephon? TEmpIebar 2-6361 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



BOB INN 

EXCELLENT FOOD 
3320 Foothill Blvd. KEllog 3-10S0 



SERVICE PATTERN 8C FOUNDRY CO. 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



2870 Chapman Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WILSON AUTO LAUNDRY 

STEAM CLEANING • MOTOR • CHASSIS 

321 Tenth Street Phone GLencourt 1-0298 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



AL & TED'S RESTAURANT 



OAKLAND 



MANHATTAN CLUB 

3332 Grand Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED AUTO SUPPLY CO. 



OAKLAND 



3330 Foothill Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



2400 Broadway TE 2-4613 



CALIFORNIA 



BOORMAN LUMBER CO. 



GOLDEN WEST TAMALE CAFE 



OAKLAND 



9009 San Leandro Street 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



3869 Telegraph Ave. 



CALIFORNIA 



KRUGER & SONS 



Manufacturers of the Famous Silver Thread Brand Sauerkraut 

PICKLES - SYRUP - TOMATO PRODUCTS 

Telephone HUmboldt 3-9116 4053 Emery Street 

EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA 



MUELLER BROS. 

PACKERS - SAUSAGE MANUFACTURERS 
4537 - 4559 East 14th St. KEllog 2-7661 



INSURANCE SECURITIES, INC. 



OAKLAND 



2063 Franklin Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



WEST COAST SOAP CO. 

Office and Factory 

26th and Poplar Streets 

Phone HIgate 4-0445 

OAKLAND 7. CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND SCAVENGER CO. 

SPECIAL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 



Telephones TEmpIebar 2-3412 - 2-3413 

2601 Peralta Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ALAMEDA COUNTY-EAST BAY 
TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 

In business continuously since 1861 



14th and Franklin Streets TWinoaks 3-8100 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 67 



PACIFIC COAST 
SALAMI COMPANY 

TASTE RITE DRY SALAMI 

Ingredients: Pork, Beef, Salt, Wine, Sugar, Spices, 
Garlic, Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Nitrite 

994 MacArthur Boulevard 

! OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



APPAREL 

and 

SHOES 

for Women and Children 

The Fruitvale Toggery 



E. 14th at 38th Avenue 
Oakland - Fruitvale, California 



THE UTAH 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

General Contractors 



1 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco 



SOPAC SHIP 
MAINTENANCE CO. 



1168 Battery Street 
Phone SUtter 1-5890 

San Francisco 



T +" 



LEAVER 

FURNITURE 

COMPANY 



4105 Broadway 

HUmboldt 3-5991 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Eat Colonial Breads 
MODERN BAKING CO. 



Phone 1573 

All Wilson Street 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 



Cannery 

Workers 

Union 

Local 750 - A. F. of L. 



414 - 13 th Street - Oakland 






FRED D. ALEXANDER 

General Contractor 



350 - 15th Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



Page 68 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, 1949 



"C" KEN RHODES, INC. 924 BILLIARDS 

1625 Van Ness Ave. GRaystone 4-8958 924 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



JONES' TEXACO STATION ELECTROLUX CORPORATION 

TEXACO SERVICE 

California St. and Arguello Blvd. EV. 6-9665 417 Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Dr. Roy C. Skendle JOHN DeMARCO 23 CLUB 

DENTIST 

927 Taraval Street SEabright 1-4802 23 Visitacion Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA BRISBANE CALIFORNIA 



VARIETY SAUSAGE CO., Inc. B. K. DOBKOWITZ 

Manufacturers of ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTSMAN 
SAUSAGE, HAMS AND BACONS 

Phone Mission 7-8093 3030 - 20th Street t „ rD1 r;;^'"" 3 " 23 ' 5 425 Mo.terey Blvd. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

BOHEMIA ATOP TELEGRAPH HILL KING SUN SIGHT CO., IllC. 

THE SHADOWS PISTOL AND REVOLVER SPECIALISTS 

CUSTOM GUNSMITHING 



EASY TO FIND - DRIVE UP UNION AND TURN LEFT 
ON MONTGOMERY - PHONE EXbrook 2-9823 



SHOOTERS' SUPPLIES 



667 Howard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 5. CALIFORNIA 



PURITY STORES, Ltd. 



A. J. SILVESTRI 

PAINTING -::- DECORATING 

INSURED LICENSED CONTRACTOR 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA Phone PRos P 3ct 5-5547 1260 Broadway 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Compliments 

Steel Erectors Consolidated, Ltd. ALBERTSEN CRUISE-TOURS 



A. D. COUTTS, JR. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 8. CALIFORNIA 



Joseph Cronan, Jr. Florence Kiser 



D A V I T O N ' S NINTH AVENUE LIQUOR STORE 

YOUR GUARANTEE OF FINE DRY CLEANING 

Same day service for all civil service uniforms FREE DELIVERY 

at no extra cost. 

..-, i c. . nv„l, n J i n-741 I 400 Ninth Avenue MOntrose 4-9898 
447 Irving Street UVerland 1-U741 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN IA 

ANSEL W. ROBINSON PET SHOP TONG LEE LAUNDRY 

125 Maiden Lane Phone GArfield 1-0310 943 Howard Street DOuglas 2-7748 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



April, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 69 



CROWE GLASS CO. 



B. & R. CONSTRUCTION CO. 



675 Golden Gate Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
110 Market Street 



CALIFORNIA 



YOU'LL LIKE THE 

GOLDEN EAGLE HOTEL 



Bob Sechrist 



"Betty" Leney 



CARNIVAL CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
ENTERTAINMENT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



253 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA san FRANCISCO 



PRospcct 5-9535 177 Eddy Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SWETT & CRAWFORD 



D A I N I BROS 

Importers - Makers 

FINE PREIOD FURNITURE 

INTERIOR DESIGNERS 



100 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Pacic Ave. at Polk ORdway 3-4540 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



LIQUOR MART 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC LIQUORS 
Free Delivery Anywhere in San Francisco 



Bliss 8C Hurt, Trudell & Berger 
A ssociated A rchitects 



Phone GArfl:ld 1-2138 115 Post Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



717 Markst Street SUtter 1-1375 

SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATTHOWE 8C CO. 

PRINTERS 

ADVERTISING AND 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING 



Telephones: EXbrook 2-3504 and 2-3505 
344 - 346 Front Street 



Compliments of 

JACKSON HOTEL 

624 Fourth Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Res: JUniper 4-6762 



Office: DEIaware 3-5000 



McAVOY & O'HARA 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



THOMAS J. O'CONNOR 



LICENSED BROKER • REAL ESTATE 
AND INSURANCE 



4545 Geary Boulevard 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



4666 Mission at Ocean 



CALIFORNIA 



G. L. Revel 



M. H. Revel 



HOTEL FAIRFAX 



CIVIC CENTER HOTEL 



420 Eddy Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



20 Twelfth Street, Corner Market 
UNderhill 1-2373 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CORBETT'S LIQUORS 

R. J. Poltrone, Mgr. 



HOTEL TRAVELERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



San Jose & Santa Rosa Ave. 
16th Street & South Van Ness 



255 O'Farrell Street Telephone DOuglas 2-7917 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



A. M. GILBERT COMPANY 



KING WELL BROS., LTD. 



704 Market Street Phone EXbrook 2-012S 457 Minna Street Phone SUtter 1-0514 

| SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 70 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



FIRE CHIEF WALSH 

(Continued from Page 18) 

On August 1, 1920, Chief Walsh was married to Miss 
Julia Malloy, a native of Ireland. The couple has four 
children — Edward, Robert, Walter and Mary. 

Like our Police Chief Miichael E. Mitchell, Fire Chief 
Walsh has reached the pinnacle to which a man may aspire 
in the two respective branches of protecting the life and 
property of the people of San Francisco, the hard way, 
and their achievements should be an inspiration of every 
member of their departments, and the people of the city 
should be proud that they produced two home town boys 
who had the ambition, the ability, the character and the 
loyalty to take over the direction of the two most im- 
portant units of municipal government. 

VERSAILLES BAKERY 

Rolls 



ALAMEDA 



The Best Br?ad. Cakes, Pies, 
BAKED BY HECK 
1306 Versailles Ave. LA 2-0344 



CALIFORNIA 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



650 Bush Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Whitey - Tommy - Wayne 

BILLS CLUB 

COCKTAILS 

1455 Dvisadero St., Cor. Geary St. Phone JO 7-9662 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



KING HOTEL 

Phone DOuglas 2-9720 
44 Third Street, Just off Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Gro. Halverson 



SAN FRANCISCO AUTO COURT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Angelo Fanucchi 



Domenic Fontana 



GOLDEN GATE BOX FACTORY 

Shippers of Carload Lots 

Orange Boxes • Celery Crates • Apple Boxes • L. A. Lugs 

Lettuce Crates • AND FRUIT BOXES OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone DOuglas 2-5622 

615-617 Front Street, Between Jackson and Pacific • San Francisco 



F. R. Kelsey 



K E L - L A G 



E. J. Lagomars:no 



SHEET METAL CONTRACTING 

FURNACE INSTALL • HEATING • VENTILATING 

MArket 1-5492 616 - 20th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MINT CAFE 



KNOWN FOR QUALITY FOOD AT REASONABLE PRICES 

No. 1 No. 2 

35 SIXTH STREET 600 FRONT STREET 

YUkon 6-6048 SAN FRANCISCO GArfield 1-9973 



THE COZY 



MArk3t 1-9334 

SAN FRANCISCO 



NICK" RUBINO 

539 Valencia Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Mohr 8C Sons Division, American Optical Co. 

Wholesale, Manufacturing and Importing 

OPTICIANS 

Telephone GArfield 1-8515 Mohr Building - 883 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FRANK KARP 

Appraiser 
DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES 



133 Kearny Street, Room 201 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-8143 

CALIFORNIA 



GEORGE'S LIQUORS 



Bob Washburn SAN FRANCISCO 



THE LACE HOUSE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme J. P. Bourdet 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 

3036 24th Street Mission 7-4720 



CALIFORNIA 



Best Brands of 

LIQUOR • BEER • WINE • FREE DELIVERY 

750 Stanyan St. at Waller EVergreen 6-9682 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

LEE & LEE CAFE 

CHINESE AND AMERICAN FOOD 

425 Ellis Street GRaystone 4-5560 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



LOUIS FERRARI, JR. 

1400 Mills Tower 
SAN FRANCISCO 



BILTMORE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

34S9 Eighteenth Street (Bet. Mission & Valencia Sts.) 
Telephone MArket 1-1672 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



DR. S. R. ZACHARIAH 



SAN FRANCISCO 



3525 - 19th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Etchevers 

NICE SUNNY ROOMS 

FREE BATHS AND SHOWERS 

691 Broadway Phone GArfield 1-1815 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ROYAL PINE MARKET 

STAPLE GROCERIES • QUALITY MEATS 

BEER AND WINE • COURTESY SERVICE 

1018 Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DEL RAY HOTEL 

352 Taylor Street 



CALIFORNIA 



WOODLAND 



HARTWIG DAIRY PLANT 

Distributors of 

GOLDEN STATE DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Gale Longee, Prop. 

West Main Street Phone 416 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLAS HOTEL 

3377 - 26th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



THE PLANTATION 

LESLIE ARMSTRONG 



UNITED TEXTILE CO. 



1628 Post Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Telephone VAlencia 4-0063 
SAN FRANCISCO 



2450 Harrison Street 

CALIFORNIA 



April, i 949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 71 



HAHMAN DRUG CO. " LAVI C S "' P Mf^AVKH 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS , „?,f<?Z l?^\ 

LAVISH MacTAVISH, Inc. 

213 Exchange Avenue 1133 Mariposa Street HEmlock 1-1343 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

C i^ S B I a^as G p^o I p LL TIP TOP SERVICE STATION 

GOODEATS B. W. Roberts 
LIQUORS - WINES - BEERS - COCKTAILS 

430 Fourth Street Phone 169S 3"00 Miss'on Street Tel. Miss on 3-99S0 

SANTA ROSA , CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MITCHELL MOTOR COMPANY ^JS^^uESS ^SSS? 

SONOMA COUNTY FRUITS - VEGETABLES - WINES AND BEER 

STUDEBAKER DEALERS Phone: UNderhill 1-7936 - 1-7937 

Third and B Street Telephone 1201 2905 - 16th Street 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

A. "Tony" Camp glia Ralph L. Lewis p . a- pjpj irATCCCCM 

TI-TFt PT OW/PD CHOD diiu vj L/cuVjrv i cojcii 

* " E rLUWEK. OllV_/r HOME OF FINE DELICACIES 

IN THE BURBANK GARDENS Sandwiches and Salads Made for 

Authorized Florists Telegraph Delivery Shop BANQUETS AND PARTIES 

100 Santa Rosa Avenue Telephone 878 Hours 7:30 to 10:00 Daily 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 853 Divisadero Street JOrdan 7-8422 



WASSERMAN AND WELTZ ATT A<i FT FVATnR rn 

GENERAL INSURANCE AND rt x *-''*»■> DLE vrtl **"*• *-*-». 

REAL ESTATE , _ 

626 Fourth Street 417 6th Street 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



TOW SERVICE REASONABLE PRICES CUSTOM BUILT 

FISHER'S GARAGE PALACE UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

GENERAL RE B pSf G F "bIVILv SERVICE CHE3TZRFKLDS R|COVEKD ^WSETS MADE 

Third and A Streets Phone 221 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 5 »> Mission Street JUniper 4-2471 



SU. ERFLUOUS HAIR PERMANENT REMOVAL 



SANTA ROSA GARAGE 

Ray F. Duncan MARGARET C. RYAN 

GAS • OIL • LUBRICATION , fi y„ a „ 

DAY AND NIGHT STORAGE „ «. 1„. 

210 B Street Phone 42 166 Geary Street EXbrook 2-4542 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Norm & Harry 



SPORT CLUB 



MARS METAL COMPANY 



LOU BASSO Twenty-Third and M'nnesota Streets 

230 F th St VAIencia 4-1325 

SANTA ROSA ° Ur ree CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



r i rv r\ i ri n Phone SUtter 1-6522 Lawrence C. Su 1 van 

SADDLES 

COMPLETE RID NG EQUIPMENT W. C. TAIT COMPANY 

T ta ckjitu rmnirnv GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

L. D. SMITH SADDLERY 431 Market Street 

307 FT'RTH STREET SANTA ROSA, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

SHOP AND SAVE AT 

A R I F N F ' S GEORGE'S FRUIT MARKET 

DRESSES . SPORTSWEAR . COATS BEER, WINES AND LIQUORS 

525 Fourth Street Phone 2235 108" Valencia Street Phone VA 1-3996 

SAN .A ROSA CALIFORNIA ' N FRANCISCO CALIFO~ 



G E M E T T I ' S BILTMORE FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Since 1893 3469-71 Eighteenth Street, Between Mission and Valencia Streets 

516 Third Str Phone MArket 1-1672 

SANTA ROSA '" CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN" ' 



HARVEY M BERGLUND PEERLESS LAUNDRY 

nftKVCI M. DCRULUWU AND ZORIC DRY CLEANING 

Pump ng Equipment . Home . Irrigation • Industrial "The House of Cleanliness" 
Agricultural and Hydraulic Engineering 

oqq o^rt c j c*. til oco 444 Fifth Street - 1252 Howard Ave., San Francisco - EX 2-0510 
333 - 340 Second Street Telephone 358 

SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA Burlngame, Calif., Telephone 4-0746 

DORALEA BEAUTY SALON m c t c r» m r t t t r 

Nota Lee Spencer - Eleanor Edwards N C L » U 1>I ^ L, U D 

Telephone SEabright 1-2184 1321 Taraval Street 904 Valencia Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Open 5:30 A.M. 'til 2 A. M. RARPTTP'11 

1 0C LI DeACOIN RfcI>I AURAlN 1 SWEDISH MASSAGE • CABINET BATHS 

oor-.^r-.c. ..,„,-.. ~.»„.,r.„ COLONIC IRRIGATIONS • EXPERT MASSEUSES 
BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 

MAIN FLOOR 

112 Main Street ORdway 3-4447 693 Sutter Street 
SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Page 12 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, J 949 



GRAND CENTRAL 

EMERYVILLES FINEST FAMOUS FFATIJRFS CO 

COCKTAILS BY THE FINEST MIXOLOGIST rA\iVl\JVJ3 rCrtl VJ1VE3 y^\J. 

FOOD BY THE BEST CHEFS 
Your Host JOHN ZEGRAS Telephone Piedmont 5-9135 828 Mission Street 

3870 SAN PABLO AVE. EMERYVILLE. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Phone 1070 Gerald Harngan 



PETALUMA BUILDING MATERIALS Ba Cities Ice and Co i d Storage Co. 

SAND - GRAVEL - CEMENT - OYSER SHELL 7 & 

Public Scales - Twenty-Four Hour Service 715 Brannan Street HEmlock 1-4222 

74 1 THIRD STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1689 Under New Management 

RHYTHM CLUB HALE HOTEL 

CAFE AND BAR SERVICE phone su „ er ,.95,5 

Breakfast, Lunch and Dinners 935 Mission Street, One Block Below Market 

354 MAIN STREET PETALUMA. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1959-R Wholesale and Retail HEALTH FIRST 

JACK'S SERVICE STATION PURITY SPRING WATER CO. 

TIME AND CONOCO OIL PRODUCTS Qffice ^ Ktmy ..^ phone Exbrook ^^ 

849 MAIN STREET Accessor.es PE TALUMA, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1246 BOHEMIA ATOP TELEGRAPH HILL 

HUNT AND BEHRENS THE SHADOWS 

HAY - GRAIN - FEED AND POULTRY SUPPLIES EASY TO FIND . DRIVE UP UNION AND TURN LEFT 

3 BRIDGE STREET PETALUMA. CALIF. ON MONTGOMERY . PHONE EXbrook 2-9823 

^ ~~" -^ — ^— ^^^^^— ^ ^— ^ VISIT THF* RF"ST 

nrH nFN nATF GRTII When at Fisherman's Wharf 

Snecia^nl in POMPEI'S GROTTO 

specializing in 

CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS 340 JeffersoIlp Foot o( Jones Street Phone GR 4 . 99s3 

107 MAIN STREET PETALUMA, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CITY BOTTLING CO. LIBERTY FARMS CO. 

1705 Church Street 333 Kearny Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

HOTEL UTAH 

GOLDEN RULE CAFE W. Stark, Manager 

ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS 
765 Market Street Phone DOuglas 2-9849 504 Fourth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Give to The Red Cross 
T. A. Deasy 



FAIRWAY CAFE 

232 Sixth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



, .... , M ,,, n PACIFIC BUILDING 

Joe and Mike s Mew Valencia Cavern 

3411 24th Street Phone Mission 7-9822 San FranClSCO 



GALILEO HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone JOrdan 7-2848 Res: EVergreen 6-9153 

TEXAN PAINT & BODY SHOP L . Mended, Pr OP . 

C. J. Nelson, Owner ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS »2 SHOWER IN EVERY ROOM 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED ALL MODERN CONVENIECES • REASONABLE RATES 

Fender Work - Welding - Painting - Simonjzing 222 Columbus Avenue Phone EXbrook 2-0240 

3640 Sacramento Street SAN FRANCISCO 18, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



BUY U. S. SAVINGS BONDS PACIFIC TEA PACKING COMPANY 



1663 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



BINNS MACHINE 8c TOOL WORKS FERRARI BROS. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND WHOLESALE FLORIST 

MANUFACTURING 

202 University Street 

1072 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO 24. CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL DWAINE 

L. V. Ormerod. Owner R W> LAFERENTZ & CO. 



DOWNTOWN • FIREPROOF • SOUNDPROOF 
160 MODERN ROOMS 



220 Montgomery Street 



242 Turk Street ORdway 3-7642 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



April, 9 J 49 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 73 



PHOTOGRAPHIC HANDBOOK FOR 

POLICE DEPARTMENTS 

ANNOUNCED 

A handbook designed to aid police photographers in 
the many fields of police investigation where photography 
is of assistance has been announced by the Eastman 
Kodak Company. 

"Photography in Law Enforcement" is intended to 
serve both as an introduction to law-enforcement photog- 
raphy for the novice and as a reference book on specific 
photographic problems. Equipment, problems of exposure, 
and darkroom technique are discussed in the first three 
chapters. 

The remander of the book gives detailed information 
on such subjects as identification, fingerprints, automobile 
accidents, homicide, arson, burglary, and many other fields. 
Also included are recommendations for conducting 
drunken-driver test movies. In addition, the latest infor- 
mation on special types of photography — for example, 
infrared and ultraviolet photography, x-ray photography, 
spectrography, and color photography — is given. Ex- 
amples are cited in which photography played an impor- 
tant part in apprehending criminals. 

An extensive bibliography is listed in the back of the 
book for those who wish more information on particular 
phases of photographic investigation work. 

"Photography in Law Enforcement" is available at all 
photographic dealers at $2.75 per copy. 

BROEMMELLS PHARMACY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



384 Post Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MASKEY'S CANDIES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



52 Kearny Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAMARKAND ICE CREAM CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



893 Folsom Street 



CALIFORNIA 



EASY WASHING MACHINE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LANKERSHIM HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



55 - 5th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ST. JOHN APARTMENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1625 Polk Street 



CALIFORNIA 



GOLDEN GATE COAL CO. 

S. D. Stefan 

Business Phone UNderhill 1-3917, 1 to 5 P.M. 

Residence Phone Fillmore 6-7574, 7 to 10 A.M. 

425 DEHARO STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DR. L. P. PLAYER 

384 Post Street 



CALIFORNIA 



CHASE HOTEL 

1278 Market Street 
ELM HOTEL, 364 Eddy Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ST. FRANCIS DELICATESSEN 

GROCERIES • FROZEN FOODS 

Phone VAIencia 4-2286 1579 Sanchez Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



WAYNE R. MILLINGTON 



SAN FRANCISCO 



703 Market Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EDWARD CAMY 



381 Bush Street 



CALIFORNIA 



FRANK & LEFTY'S FANG CLUB 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE • HOT FOODS 



585 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



PRospect 5-9809 



CALIFORNIA 



MICKEY'S BILLIARD PARLOR 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - CANDY - MAGAZINES 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 
944 Columbus Avenue Phone TUxedo 5-9710 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

PARK GATE ASSOCIATED SERVICE 

Harry Pomin, Prop. 

AERO BATTERIES • FEDERAL TIRES 

WASHING • POLISHING • LUBRICATION 

SEabright 1-9842 19th Ave & Lincoln Way 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GEORGE'S FRUIT MARKET 

FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES • BEER AND WINES 

FROZEN FOODS • ICE CREAM 

2100 Markdt Street, Corner Church UN 1-1131 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



DOLORES CREAMERY 

Sam Cecilio, Proprietor 

501 Dolores Street 



HEmlock 1-9306 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phones: Juniper 5-2371 - 5-2372 



Louis J. Mazzera, Jr. 



G. MAZZERA CO. 



BUILDING MATERIALS 

ROCK - SAND - GRAVEL - CEMENT 

Office 4277 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ORTON MACHINE CO. 

Manufacturers of 

WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

ENDLESS BED SURFACES • CUTTER HEADS 

SPECIAL MACHINERY 

390 Fremont Street Phone SUtter 1-1631 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ROOS BROTHERS 



Stockton at Market Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CARUSO'S 

PIZZERIA AND RESTAURANT 

FINE ITALIAN FOOD 

HOME OF THE ROTARY BROILER 



136 Taylor Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone PRospect 5-9867 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 74 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL April, J 949 



G. Ottino & Son THornwal 3-4647 



OTTINO'S MARKET & DELICATESSEN BOND CLOTHES 

COMPLETE FOOD STORE 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC GROCERIES Post and Kearny Streets 

2082 SAN PABLO BERKELEY, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOHNNIES RESTAURANT COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

A C T E E N MARINA BOWL 

CHEMICAL SERVICE CO. "that cozy friendly bowling alley- 

2nd and Acid son St. TH 3 1632 1725 Fi.bert Street Phone GR 4 9937 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA ' \N FRANCISCO CALIFORN'/ 



JACK RANIS AUTO METAL WORKS 

A »V T PATTPPN CHOP RADIATOR, FENDER AND BODY REPAIRING 

/A «. l f /a i i crvi-N onv^r lacquer refinishing 

Phone ORdway 3 5124 - 3-5125 
845 Carlton Street AS 3-6226 1634 - 1644 Pine Street 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA S'\N FRANCISCO CALIFORN 



8ETOLET PUBLIC MARKET """"^ SVLUV C ™JJS"° RS 

Full Line of 
GROCERIES • MEAT • FRUIT • VEGETABLES 1 :23 Post Street. Between Buchanan and Laguna Street.; 

Berkeley 7-377o 1601 - 1603 Ashby Ave. Phone Fillmore 6-2421 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA "AN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'/ 



BERKELEY INN HOTEL ODEON 

Near Market, Opposite Post Office 
2501 Haste Street BE 7-6370 40 Seventh Street 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA TAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 



POSITIVELY PAYS THE HIGHEST PRICES FOR LAD ES AND COSMOPOLITAN MARKET 

GENTS SECOND HAND GOWNS, DRESSES AND SUITS PARAS BROS. 

We Carry a Full Line of New Furs 
1750 Geary S:reet, Bet. F llmore and Webster Streets 316-18 Third Street 

WEst 1-1552 SAN FRANCISCO, CAUF SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CompFments 

INDUSTRIAL INDEMNITY COMPANY E. J. LAND 

155 San;ome Street 745 Third Street 

:iAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ROT .SCHILD JEWELRY CO. 283 CAFE 

DIAMONDS - WATCHES - JEWELRY - PAYMENT PLAN Specializing in 

BRANCHES: NAPA - MONTEREY SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLI • BEERS AND WINES 

2571 M srio 1 Street Phone Mission 7-4423 FINE LIQUORS 

'.AN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 283 TH'RD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 



LANDrCA ^^ENaiNFERS^AND GARDENERS VENUS CAFETERIA 

C723 Geary Bou'evard MAIN NURSERY 

?t 31st Avenue 516 -42nd Ave. at Gea y 303 Third Street 

SKyline 1-8141 BAyview 1-2837 SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 



TOULOUSE LAUNDRY 

A FRENCH I AUNDI^Y WITH ALL LAUNDRY SERVICES 
S'moi Toulouse, Member Sunset Opi'mist Club 



ST. JAMES HOTEL 



821 Lincoln Way Phone MOntrose 4 1634 87 Third Street 

'AN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A ^N FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 



GARTNER PETE'S CLUB 

507 Howard Street Phone EXbrook 2-4862 198 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 5, CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 



SPIELLER'S APPAREL MFG. CO. W7 .„. T „ . * T 

„ , . . Wilham I. rorster and Sons, Inc. 

Manufacturers of •* ' 

GIRLS', BOY'S AND INFANTS COATS PLUMBING 

515 Howard Street Phone DOuglas 2 8459 Tel. HEmlock 1-6774 340 Harriett Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ADOLPH BLAICH, INC. ™ SPERRY AND HUTCHINSON CO. 

Phone HEmlock 1-2742 1446 Market Street 

543 Howard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORN'A 



LINCOLN SHRIMP COMPANY COOK'S PLUMBING 

Ralph L. Cook 
CALIFORNIA BAY SHR'MPS • PRAWNS • ABALONE 

SCALLOPS • OYSTERS • CLAWS . CRAB MEAT PLUMBING CONTRACTOR • JOBBING 

HOT WATER HEATERS AND GAS 
RANGES CONNECTED 
708-710 Commercial Street 

Telephones: YUkon 2-2398 - 2-2399 539 Head Street DElaware 3-6465 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



April, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 75 



RAINBOW SERVICE 
STATION 

GAS • OIL • ACCESSORIES 

TOBACCO • SANDWICHES 

BEER and SOFT DRINKS 

Hghway 12 - 4V 2 Miles South of Napa 
NAPA (Napa County). CALIFORNIA 



VIALES-B PHOTO STUDIO 

LODGES and CHAPTERS A SPECIALTY 

4723 G-ary Blvd. BAyview 1 2295 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



NAPA 



HELEN'S CAFE 

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 
AND SHORT ORDERS 

Hours 6 A.M. 't 1 3 A.M. 
828 Main Street 



PACIFIC CAN COMPANY 



CALIFORNIA 



290 Division Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



NAPA 



DEL'S CAFE 

HOME STYLE COOKING 

DRAUGHT BEER ON TAP 

CHILLED WINES 

1302 Main Street Phone 1280-J 



CALIFORNIA 



SAVE YOUR U. S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



ORCHARD NURSERY & SUPPLY 

ORNU LAWN SEED 

NURSERY STOCK • GARDEN SUPPLIES 

ORNU TEAT MOSS • ORNU SOIL CONDITIONER 

Tunnel Road Between Orlnda-Lafayette 

TAFAYETTE CALIFORNIA 

Lafayette 4712 



Open Every N ght 'lil 9:00 

SACRIFICE SALE 

Complete 10-Fiec? Living Room Group 

$93 75 FULL PRICE. E Z CREDIT TERMS 

OPEN 'TIL 9:00 P.M. 

REX FURNITURE COMPANY 

779 Miss on Stre:t, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



A. E. KLOPFER 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 
STEAM, HOT WATER HEATING 
COOLING - PIPING - REPAIRING 



MACNUSON CO, 



3419 E. 12;h Street ANdover 1-2501 ,61 Tehama Street GArfield 1-830S 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND CASKET COMPANY 

QUALITY • SERVICE 



BERLIN SHEET METAL CO. 



Phone TEmplebar 2-8139; If no answer call ANdover 1-5874 

2842 Add ne Street 61 Clara Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



YUkon 6-5311 



CALIFORNIA 



FINZEL PLUMBING COMPANY 



PROO & SON, Grocery 



YOU WILL ALWAYS FIND QUALITY 
Wash'ngton Ave. and Lewell.'ng Blvd. 



2025 MacArthur Blvd. Phone KEllog 4-4534 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA SAN LORENZO 



Phone SWe?t 8-9980 



CALIFORN'A 



STANDARD TRAILER CO. 



NEW MANILA CAFE 

GOOD FOOD • BEER 
AND SOFT DRINKS 



SAN LEANDRO 



415 San Leandro Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA AI.VARADO 



CALIFOTV 



THE LANTERN CAFE 

CHOP SUEY AND 
FINEST CHINESE DISHES 

Phone 417 268 Railroad Avenue 

PITTSBURG CALIFORNIA 



BENGOR CANDIES 

Phone LOckhaven 9-1922 10115 San Leandro Street 

OAKLAND 3. CALIFORNIA 



'age 76 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



April, 1949 



JACKSON'S POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Jackson, up in Amador county, is one of the pioneer 
mining towns of the state. Settled originally by the gold 
rush miners hack in the '50s, a lot of the precious metal 
was dug up in that area. Mining is still one of its chief 
money producing industries. But like other sections of 
the west, with mining decreasing with the wearing off 
of the first enthusiasm of the hordes that swoop down on 
newly discovered fields, the people have turned to other 
means of making a living. 

Today, Amador county, of which Jackson is the county 
seat, has a high place in lumbering, live stock raising and 
general farming, and these activities are productive of as 
much money as the famed mines of the county, in this 
Mother Lode area, produced in the years gone by. 

Jackson has a population of roundly 3000 people. It 
is a little mountain city with no serious crime problems, 
and when some crime does bob up Chief Richard Maggi 
and his two assistants, Deputy Chief James Fregular and 
Traffic Offices Milardovich are well able to handle the 
crime and the criminals who commit it. 

Chief Maggi has headed the Police Department since 
September 1, 1941, when he was appointed to succeed 
Earl J. Garbini. 

When he took over his responsible duties the Depart- 
ment numbered three men, and he has gotten along pretty 
well with the same number of officers ever since. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF 
PUBLIC SERVICE 

A quarter of a century of useful history was recorded 
February 28 by the National Automobile Club. To ap- 
prcciate the value of the Club, one has but to look about 
California. It has bolstered public safety activities, estab- 
lished local safety councils and given unstintingly of itself 
to become a potent influence in creating safe motoring 
conditions, thus reducing the tragic toll of dead and in- 
jured in highway accidents. It has consistently and ef- 
fectively opposed legislation that would unduly and un- 
fairly burden the motoring public — which, in California, 
means practically everybody. 

These facts are tangible evidence of the service this club 
has given California. It may well be said that California's 
present conspicuous position as a motorists' commonwealth 
is due in part to the organisation and sound leadership 
that National Automobile Club has contributed. 

Services of the Club have been given generously to all 
the people of California. The more than 140,000 members 
it had on its Twenty-Fifth Birthday represent but a 
portion of its beneficiaries. All motorists have profited 
by the Club's endeavors, and nearly all Californians arc 
motorists. 

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CALIFORNIA 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



j EASTE 

Our friends in the Lumber 


;r gree 

Industry wish to take this < 


TINGS 

ypportunity to extend Easter \ 


\ Greetings to 


the Officers of The State 


of California. 


ARROW MILL CO. 


MOORES LBR. CO. 


UKIAH PINE LBR. CO. 


Eureka, Calif. 


Hayfork, Calif. 


Ukiah, Calif. J 


, R. C. Shumate, Mgr. 


• • • 


• • • 


* • • • 


ZAMBONI LBR. CO. 


EDGERTON BROS. LBR. CO. ' 


; BRETZ LBR. CO. 


Round Mountain, Calif. 


Adin, Calif. * 


Clovis, Calif.- 


• • • 


• • • * 


J. E. Louie and Bob Bretz 


COVINGTON LBR. CO. 


S. C. LINEBAUGH : 


HUGHES BROS. LBR. CO. 
Foresthill, Calif. 


Minersville, Calif. 
Specializes in Fir Cutting 


White Pines, Calif. ** 

* * # * 


• • • 


• • • 


CRAG LBR. CO., Inc. 


PLACERVILLE LBR. CO. 

> Placerville, Calif. 


PLUMAS BOX CO., Inc. 
Twain, Calif. 


Smith River, Calif. J 

• • • i 


t • • • 


• • • 


FORWARD BROS. LBR. CO. J 


; NASH LOGGING CO. 

Philo, Calif. 


ADDISON 8C SONS LBR. CO. 
Eureka, Calif. 


Manton, Calif. 

• • • t 


4 • • • 


C. W., H. S., T. P. and L. B. Addison 


RALPH L. SMITH LBR. CO. J 


E. J. HJERTAGER 8C SON 
Yreka, Calif. 


• • • 

CAL-IDA LBR. CO. 


Canby, Alturas and 
Anderson, Calif. ' 


• • • 


Auburn 8C Downeyville, Calif. 


• • • ' 


ANDERSONIA LBR. CO. 
* Piercy, Calif. 


E. T. Fisher, Res. Mgr. 

• • • 


LOVENESS LOGGING CO. J 

Canby, Calif. > 


Sam Anderson, Gen. Mgr. 


L. H. JONES 


m • • i 


' • • • 


TIMBER PRODUCTS 


TOMLINSON BROS. LBR. CO. J 


I The McCLOUD RIVER 
J LUMBER CO. 
McCloud, Calif. 


Soulsbyville, Calif. 
Leonard S. Jones, Owner 

• ■ • • 


Exeter, Calif. J 

Walter R., Fred L., and J 
Robin A. Tomlinson t 

• • • i 


i • • • 

CRANE MILLS 
Paskenta, Calif. 


BRICELAND LBR. CO. 

Briceland, Calif. 

• • • 


SIMPSON LOGGING CO. J 
Day, Calif. ' 

• • • ' 


• • ■ 

BLAGEN LBR. CO. 
White Pines, Calif. 

( • • • 


WESTSIDE LBR. CO. 

Tuolumme, Calif. 

Fred Ellis, Pres. 


BERRY LBR. CO. J 

Pine Grove, Calif. ' 

Geo., Frank and Ben Berry > 


', INDEPENDENT 
REDWOOD CO. 
Booneville, Calif. 

• • • 


• • • 

WHITE PINE LBR. CO. 
Alturas, Calif. 

• • • 


• • • t 

SIMPSON LOGGING CO. \ 

Klamath, Calif. , 
F. C. Riley, Mgr. J 


SHASTA BOX CO. 


SIERRAVILLE LBR. CO. 


GOOCH LBR. CO. \ 


Redding, Calif. 


Sierraville, Calif. 


Day, Calif. < 



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Is top assistant to Chief of Inspectors James English. The next 

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Captain Meyer's fine record with the S.F.P.D. 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 



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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



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May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 

PAGE 

First Western Institute for Traffic 

Training at U. C 3 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 

Peninsula P. O. A. Hold Annual Dinner . . 5 

Highlights of Uniform Crime Reports for 1948 6 

F. B. I. for State Crime Commission .... 7 

Las Vegas Police Department and Its Chief . 8 

Sheriff Glen Jones, of Clarke County, Nevada 9 

Grady Boatwright Retires 11 

By Jim Leonard, Call-Bulletin 
Police Reporter 

Sebastopol and Its New Police Chief . . . . 12 

Newly Appointed Chief Warren of Benicia 1 3 

Richmond P. D. Takes on 1949 Look Under 
Expert Guidance of Wyman W. Vernon 14 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 

No. Cal. Police Communications Officers Assn. 1 5 

Chief Charles F. Peterson of Boulder City, Nev. 1 6 

Concord's Chief William A. Gabrielson ... 17 

That We Shall Never Forget, 

S. F. P. D.'s Honor Roll 18 

Reminder Don'ts ' 19 

Editorial Page — Mayor Robinson Asks for 

More Police for San Francisco . . . . 20 

Patrick J. O'Connell, Retired S. F. P. D. 

Detective Sergeant Passes Away . . .21 

Inspector John E. Dolan Taken by Death . . 21 

Pistol Pointing 22 

By J. Ross Dunnigan 

Chief G. E. West of Woodlake 24 

The Candid Friend 25 

By Opie L. Warner 

Some Are True — Some Are False 

RATE YOURSELF 31 



Directory 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
Tents. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m.. Hall of Justice 

Washington I. Kohnke, President 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quigley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Edward R. Pootel 

Dept. Sec' y... . Captain Michael F. FiTZPATRicK....Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Jack Eker 635 Washington Street 

Southern Leo. J. Tackney Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission A. I. O'Brien 3057 17th Street 

Northern Edward Donahue 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park J. M. Sullivan Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Jos. M. Walsh 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside.... Daniel McKlem.... Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael Gaffey 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Geo. M. Healy 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Barnard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Ralph Olstad 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Joseph M. Walsh Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk John Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Control.. ..Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



When in Trouble Call SUtter 1-20*20 

W tXCYl LYl LJOXlut Always At Your Service 



Page 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mdv, 1949 




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VOL. XXIV 



MAY, 1949 



NO. 9 



First Western Institute for Traffic Training Helps to Solve 

This Nation's Greatest Headache As 250 Peace 

Officers, Judges, Engineers Meet at U. of C. 



By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 
Veteran Police Reporter, Editor, Writer 
Yes sir, traffic control is today the nation's biggest 
headache! Motor vehicle travel in particular. 

It should be when in the decade between 1937-1947 
310,000 persons were killed, 11,000,000 (11 million) in- 




Donald Berry, Secretary, Western Institute for Traffic Training 
and Assistant Director of Institute of Transportation and Traffic 
Engineering, University of California (extreme left) checks on 
enrolees in class studying a bit of mechanism which determines a 
motorist's ability to drive safely at all times . . . others in photo 
unidentified. The first Western Institute for Traffic Training has 
recently come to a close at the University of California. 

jured at an estimated loss of more than 15 billion dollars. 

And it was against this background that the first West- 
ern Institute for Traffic Training was recently concluded 
on the University of California Campus, Berkeley. 

The conference has special significance not only to peace 
officers and highway patrol men, courts, district attorneys, 
traffic engineers, industry and business of every descrip- 
tion, but most of all to the 9,000,000 residents of Cali- 
fornia and several more millions in other far western 
states, taxpayers, mothers, fathers, children. All of these 
were represented at the traffic institute gathering in 
Berkeley. 

ADnroximatelv ?i0 nersnns intprpsfpH in traffic control 



in cutting down the auto accident death rate, in protecting 
motorist and pedestrian on the highways of the nation, 
took the four-day special course offered at the first West- 
ern Institute for Traffic Training. 

It is significant, too, that 50 judges and prosecutors took 
part in the conference. The nation's traffic courts handle 
more cases than any other judicial groups, another sig- 
nificant fact. 

Naturally the largest group of students came from the 
peace officer groups of the 1 1 western states. 

The subjects covered included operating problems 
arising from movement of traffic on street and highway 
systems. 

Traffic surveys and studies — including volume, speed, 
parking; use of traffic control devices; traffic rules and 
regulations and their application (one way streets, 
through streets) . 

In fact the gamut of what traffic officers, traffic judges, 
traffic engineers, prosecuting attorneys should know was 
thoroughly covered in the course. 

The Sponsors 

The institute was sponsored by these affiliates of the 
National Committee for Traffic Safety: International As- 
sociation of Chiefs of Police, American Association of 
Motor Vehicle Administration, American Association of 
State Highway Officials, American Automobile Associa- 
tion, Association of Casualty and Surety Companies, 
Automotive Safety Foundation, Institute of Traffic En- 
gineers, National Commission on Safety Education, Na- 
tional Advisory Committee for Motor Vehicle Fleet 
Supervisor Training, National Safety Council, North- 
western University Traffic Institute and many other 
groups, including the Institute of Transportation and 
Traffic Engineering and University Extension of Cali- 
fornia's own State University, Berkeley. 

Highlighting the conference were these classes: peace 
officer' training; accident records and their uses; chemical 
tests to determine intoxication; fleet supervisor training 
for motor vehicle accident prevention; pedestrian protec- 
tion; traffic engineering; seminar on public support pro- 
gram planning. 

CMffnrA F Pptprcnn P.alifnrnip Sfafp T-Ficrhwav P.1trnl 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



Commissioner, voiced the view of the University of Cali- 
fornia, the attending specialists and teaching experts when 
he said: 

"Regional traffic training institutes, such as this one for 
the 1 1 western states, hold promise of providing the 
answer for training on a decentralized basis. This confer- 
ence has brought expert training close to home. Many 
small police departments and other agencies cannot afford 
to spare the men or pay the cost of trips to institutes 
in the Midwest or East. Under this plan, however, most 
can participate. It will be noted that most of the enrollees 
in police training were from small communities. 
Enrollees From 11 Western States 

Enrollees in the various courses which comprised the 
curriculum came from all areas of California, Oregon, 
Washington, Nevada, and other of the 1 1 western states. 

A scattering of specialists in traffic control came from 
points as widely separated as Miami and Honolulu. 

Prof. Harmer E. Davis, director of the University of 
California Transportation and Traffic Engineering ex- 
pressed the hope that the institute will continue to be an 
annual event on the western edge of the continent. Plans 
are already under way to hold the 1950 institute on the 
campus of the University of Los Angeles. 

Needed: More Trained Experts 

Perhaps the most significant fact brought out at the 
conference was the lack of trained personnel to handle 
the multiple problems in traffic control, in prevention of 
accidents. 

This fact was ably disclosed by Norman Damon, vice- 
president of the Automotive Safety Foundation and chair- 
man of the National Committee for Traffic Training who 
asserted : 

"We must count our shortage of highway engineers in 
the thousands at a time when we are entering the largest 
road building program in our history. To meet that chal- 
lenge we need as a very minimum at least 250,000 
trained traffic management personnel within the next five 
years. 

"We need 250,000 trained teachers of driving in the 
high schools. We need at least 500 trained traffic analysts. 

"This is just a bare outline of the situation in one or two 
fields. For example, the Northwestern University Traffic 
Institute now trains some 60 men yearly in a four and one- 
half months course. This number barely equals the turn- 
over in police personnel in the job classifications repre- 
sented in the course. More and more specialized skills are 
being called for, some skills so new that they have only a 
five-year history. 

"And all these shortages are in addition to the need for 
thousands of high school driving teachers, traffic en- 
gineers, traffic safety information directors, and of course, 
trained highway patrol officers, and accident prevention 
experts who can step into a police department and lay out 
plans to keep the accident rate down. We have made only 
a start in traffic training. The problem is nationwide. We 
have made a good beginning here in California at this first 
Western Traffic Conference and Training Institute." 



Some Who Took the Course 

Indicative of the wide scope of the institute training 
courses were the men who eagerly, enthusiastically en- 
rolled. 

Here they are, the courses they took, their home ad- 
dress, their affiliations as wide and varied as the men 
themselves : 

The course directors at the first Western Institute for 
Traffic Training embraced these nationally famous authori- 
ties: 

David M. Baldwin, Acting Director, Traffic and Trans- 
portation Division, National Safety Council. 

Morris De Vol, in charge Pedestrian Protection Pro- 
gram, American Automobile Association. 

Fred W. Hurd, assistant professor, Bureau of Highway 
Traffic, Yale University. 

A. S. Levens, professor of engineering design, Univer- 
sity of California. 

Theodore Loveless, West Coast representative, Traffic 
Division, International Association of Chiefs of Police. 

Gerald O'Connell, director of training, Northwestern 
University Traffic Institute. 

Amos E. Neyhart, administrative head, Institute of Pub- 
lic Safety, The Pennsylvania State College, who conducted 
fleet course coordination. 

Paul H. Blaisdell, executive director, National Commit- 
tee for Traffic Safety, seminar director. 



GIVE 

TO THE 

RED CROSS 

it 

HELPS 

the 

HELPLESS 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 5 



Peninsula POA Hold Annual Dinner Dance 



The Peninsula Police Officers Association held their 
annual dinner dance for the members, with their wives 
and sweethearts as guests, on the evening of April 19, at 
the Green Hills Country Club in Millbrae. It turned out 
to be a huge success, attended by 145 member officers, each 
with his guest. All present agreed it was the best party of 
this event held in recent years. 

The highlight of the evening was the presentation of 
trophies to three member policeman for outstanding brav- 



severely wounded. Pickett was also a San Bruno officer at 
the time but has since moved to Millbrae. 

Given the award for outstanding bravery was Bedford, 
who was gravely wounded when he stopped two suspects 
wanted for a San Francisco holdup murder, while Cun- 
ningham and Pickett were awarded second grade trophies 
for stopping two who had just held up a cafe in San Bruno 
after a gun battle during which Cunningham was gravely 
wounded. Each man was presented besides his trophy, a 




PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION BRAVERY AWARDS 

Left to right: President Jack Price, Chief Walter Wisnom, of Hillsborough, Assistant District Attorney Louis De Matteis, (who 
made the awards) Lieutenant Lawrence Pickett, Millbrae; Sergeants James Bedford and Russell Cunningham, San Bruno. 



ery during the past year, 1948. This award will also be 
an annual affair each year from now on at this dinner. 
These were the first awards ever presented by the Asso- 
ciation. 

This year the following officers were honored : Sergeant 
James Bedford, San Bruno, first grade award; Sergeant 
Russell Cunningham, San Bruno, second grade award, and 
Lieutenant Lawrence Pickett, Millbrae, second grade 
award. 

Assistant District Attorney Louis De Matteis of San 
Mateo County made the presentations and in doing so 
explained that all three men acted with extreme courage 
under fire, and that two of them, Bedford and Cunning- 
ham gffggtgH ,hs ,-^hirP r»f rheir mlm-ifs rftgr being 



meritorious diploma and a gold maple leaf to be worn on 
the sleeve of his uniform. 

Officer Edward Miallard of San Bruno, Association 
Chaplain, gave the invocation. Chief Walter Wisnom of 
Hillsborough was the master of ceremonies and introduced 
Al Eichler of Burlingame who entertained with comedy 
songs, then Charles Brickley of Burlingame, with Irish 
songs and some swell magic acts.. Then the well-known 
Duncan Sisters of Topsy and Eva stage fame, now living 
in Burlingame, had the audience rolling in the aisles with 
their comedy skit. 

Each member and his wife were introduced to the mem- 
bers by Wisnom as were all the retired members present. 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



Highlights of Uniform Crime Reports for 1948 



In releasing the annual bulletin, Uniform Crime Re- 
ports, for 1948, J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, pointed out the following perti- 
nent facts: 

Estimated Crime and Crime Trends 




Director John Edgar Hoover 

1. A serious crime occurred every 18.7 seconds in 1948. 

2. An estimated 1,6S6,670 major crimes of felonious 
homicide, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, lar- 
ceny and auto theft occurred last year, a 1.3 per cent 
increase over 1947. Crime in rural areas was up 4.3 per 
cent over 1947 and the raise in urban areas amounted to 
0.3 per cent. 

3. Felonious killings average 36 a day, and there were 
2,672 miscellaneous larcenies, 1,032 burglaries, 463 auto- 
mobile thefts, 255 aggravated assaults or rapes and HO 
robberies during each 24 hours of 1948. 

4. Long-term crime trend data, based on reports from 
373 cities with populations in excess of 25,000, indicated 
that only negligent manslaughter and auto thefts have de- 
clined to points below the prewar average of 1938-1941. 
Aggravated assaults and rapes in the larger communities 
reached peaks in 1948 of 68.7 per cent and 49.9 per cent 
respectively over the 1938-1941 average. Other crimes 
committed in 1948 which still exceed this prewar level are: 
burglary, 16.7 per cent; murder, 14.1 per cent and robbery 
8.9 per cent. Larceny, while declining during the war 
years, is on the increase and in 1948 was 4.6 per cent in 
excess of the prewar averages. 

5. A total of 5.353 agencies contributed reports to the 
FBI in 1948. 

Crimes Against Property 

1. 93 per cent of stolen automobiles and 21 per cent 
of other stolen property was recovered during 1948 by 



2. The loot in the average holdup was in excess of $200 
and 65.2 per cent of such crimes were classed as highway 
robberies. 

3. Commercial establishments were involved in 25.7 per 
cent of the holdups and the balance of the robberies in pri- 
vate residences and other places. 

4. 377,640 burglaries occurred last year and, according 
to reports furnished by the larger cities, the property 
stolen during an average burglary was valued at $127. 

5. Two-thirds of the residence burglaries were com- 
mitted during the night while 89 per cent of the non- 
residence burglaries were committed after dark. 

6. In one-third of the 978,000 larceny cases either per- 
sonal property or auto accessories were stolen from parked 
automobiles. The average larceny amount to $64. 

Seasonal Trends in Crime 

1 . Crime has a tendency to fluctuate with the sea- 
sons. Murders, rapes and felonious assaults are more fre- 
quent in the summer months and these crimes reached 
high peaks in June and July, 1948. 

2. Crimes against property generally increase in the 
winter months. December was the peak month for rob- 
beries, and burglaries reached top heights in February and 
March, 1948. Automobile thefts were high in October and 
larcenies occurred more frequently in April. 

Arrest Data 

1. More persons were arrested and fingerprinted in 
1948 (759,698) than in any other year on record. The 
predominant age among arrested persons was 21. 

2. More than 41 per cent (312,264) of the arrest rec- 
ords examined in 1948 represent arrests for maor viola- 
tions. Persons charged with murder, robber)', assault, 
burglary, larceny and auto thefts numbered 212,823 con- 
stituting 28 per cent of the total arrest records examined. 

3. Of the total number of persons arrested, 58 per cent 
(440,872) had records of prior arrests. 

4. Of the 759,698 persons arrested, 557,125 were 
white; 191,921 were Negroes; 6,846 were Indians, 653 
Chinese; 309 Japanese and other totaled 2,844. 

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May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 7 



F. B. I. FOR STATE CRIME COMMISSION 



Vigorous support of Governor Earl Warren's recom- 
mendation for the continuation of the Commission on 
Organized Crime was urged today by Special Agent in 
Charge Harry M. Kimball of the San Francisco FBI office 
at a meeting of the Rotary Club at the Hotel Resetar in 
Watsonville. 

"Honest law enforcement has nothing to fear or con- 




Chief Special Agent Harry Kimball 

ceal," he stated. "The California State Peace Officers' As- 
sociation, the Sheriffs' Association, the District Attorneys' 
Association, and other progressive law enforcement groups 
and agencies throughout the state have welcomed and 
appreciate the excellent job the Crime Commission has 
done in focusing the penetrating spotlight of aroused 
public opinion upon the sinister menace of organized 
underworld gangs. The cold-blooded murder of "Bugsy" 
Siegel in Beverly Hills, the ruthless slaying of "Nick" De 
John in San Francisco, the attempted assassination of ex- 
gambling ship czar "Tony" Cornero Stralla in Southern 
California, the shotgun slaying of "Tom" Buffo at Lodi, 
the recent slaughters by the "Mickey" Cohen gang in Los 
Angeles, and the reported activities of New York mobster 
"Frankie" Costello in "muscling in" on California's lush 
racing wire-service rackets are spectacular indications of 
the infiltration of vicious hoodlums into the state. 

"We in law enforcement look with considerable anxiety 
upon these cases which give positive testimony of increased 
gang activities," Kimball declared, "because we have been 
through one period when powerful criminal syndicates 
reached such proportions that they became the number 
one threat to life, liberty, and property. Chicago had its 
Capone Gang; New York, its Murder, Inc.; and Kansas 
City, its Union Station Massacre. The murderous tentacles 
of organized mobsters and racketeers in California must 



be removed, if we are to avert the tragedy, misery, and 
unhappiness which resulted in those eastern and mid- 
western communities. 

"Governor Earl Warren is to be commended for his 
courageous and forthright leadership," said Kimball, "in 
demanding that the Crime Commission be permitted to 
complete its job, determine what laws require strengthen- 
ing, ascertain the extent of any unholy alliance between 
corrupt politicians and ruthless criminals, and propose 
constructive methods to assist law enforcement in ridding 
the state of its organized lawlessness. The sustained backing 
by a law-abiding citizenry is required, however, to prevent 
criminal minorities from making a mockery out of our 
democratic institutions." 



Mission 8-6216 



Mission 8-9919 



A-l SERVICE STATION 

CARS WASHED - POLISHED - STEAM CLEANED 

GASOLINE AND FETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

TIRES AND BATTERIES 



3548 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



EDDY-MASON FOOD STORE 

FEATURING GROCERIES, WINES AND LIQUORS 

FROZEN FOODS - DELICATESSEN 

FRESH ORANGE JUICE 



Phone PRospect 6-3978 132 Eddy Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ERNIE'S RESTAURANT 



A BIT OF OLD SAN FRANCISCO 



847 Montgomery Street EXbrook 2-9846 



INDEPENDENT ELEVATOR CO., INC. 

ELEVATOR CONTRACTORS 

SERVICE - REPAIRS - MODERNIZATION 

YUkon 6-4963 - 6-4964 471 Jessie Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



OLYMPIC HOTEL 

M. H. Lehr, Manager 
Eddy at Taylor 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

GRaystone 4-8100 

HOTEL WILTON— Long Beach 

Same Management 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



LAS VEGAS POLICE DEPARTMENT AND ITS CHIEF 



Chief Robert F. Malhurg of the Las Vegas Police De- 
partment was horn in 1901 in San Francisco, the son of 
one of the most courageous police officers of the S. F. P. D., 
now retired. The elder Malhurg, whose first name is also 
Robert, was a detective sergeant when he retired some 15 
years ago. He got his rank for the years of service he per- 




Chief Robert F. Malburg 

formed in keeping tabs on the subversive activities of the 
I.W.Ws of the roaring '20's and years before those 
times. He joined the I.WW.'s, was arrested, thrown in 
jails throughout the bay area, took the harsh treatment of 
arresting officers, but he got a lot of information that 
cramped the style of these lawless rovers. His information 
was funnelled to the late Chief D. A. White and his 
successor, the late Chief Daniel J. O'Brien. The dope he 
gave his superiors fortified the police to meet any outbreaks 
planned, and much help was given neighboring communi- 
ties. So thorough was Sergeant Malburg's work that he was 



called upon time and again by other agencies for advice 
and help. Only a few months ago agents of the F.B.I, from 
Washington, D. C, came to San Francisco seeking the 
address of Sergeant Malburg. They were given the address 
and they visited the retired officer in the Santa Cruz 
mountains. On returning they stated that he had given 
them the most valuable information regarding communists, 
who were formerly active with the Wobblies. These agents 
were highly pleased with their interview with the elder 
Malburg. He has kept records of his colorful dangerous 
work of those years of a quarter a century ago. 

It was but natural that the younger Robert would follow 
in the steps of his father in law enforcement work. So after 
graduating from the High School of Commerce in San 
Francisco he entered UCLA taking a police course. He 
graduated in 1922. He immediately joined the Los Angeles 
Police Department, and served as a patrolman until 1928. 

From 1928 to 1931 he was assigned as first aid officer at 
the L. A. Georgia Street Receiving Hospital and Sub-Sta- 
tion. Here he was promoted to a sergeancy and detailed to 
communications and from 1938 to 1941 was on the Auto 
Theft and Fugitive Detail and worked with the homicide 
bureau. From 1941 to 1943 he was an instructor for the 
L. A. P. D. Academy. He retired on pension after 20 years 
service in 1943 to join the Navy, where he spent two 
years. 

In 1946 he had a request from the U. S. War Depart- 
ment to go to Japan to make a survey of the Police De- 
partments throughout that defeated nation. He spent over 
a year on the Island, working from General Headquarters, 
and under former New York Police Superintendent Val- 
entine. His varied experience as a law enforcement officer 
was highly appreciated by the men, who with General 
MacArthur has done so much to put the Japanese nation 
on a democratic level. 

After completing this assignment he returned to the 
States and in 1947 was appointed Chief of Police for Los 
Vegas, Nevada, following the retirement of Acting Chief 
(Continued on page 26) 



Harry Reyner 



Gil Telford 



THE SUN ALWAYS SHINES 

IN BOULDER CITY 

ANY DAY IT DOESN'T WE WILL 

GIVE A FREE BEER 

RECREATION CENTER 



BOULDER CITY 



BOULDER CITY DRUG 

DRUGS - SUNDRIES 

AND 

COMPLETE FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



BOULDER CITY 



LOVELAND'S MARKET 

"BEST MEAT IN TOWN" 



Box 324 



NEVADA NORTH LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



OPEN 24 HOURS 
THE NEW LOOK AT THE MELODY INN 

MELODY INN 

GABE. Your Host 

FINEST LIOUORS 
GOOD FOOD 

Under New Management 
NEVADA ON THE BOULDER HIGHWAY WHITNEY. NEVADA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



SHERIFF GLEN JONES 

of Clarke County, Nevada, Whose County Seat is Las Vegas 



Clark County's chief law enforcement department is 
headed by nationally known Sheriff Glen Jones, who has 
held the responsible position for seven years. 

Sheriff Jones is a friend of all law-abiding citizens, 
whether they reside in Clark County or just come to that 
bustling little city of Las Vegas for a visit, and of the 




Sheiff Glen Jones of Clarke County, Nevada 

latter there are many thousands who check in at Las Vegas 
through the year, and who spread their visit to other por- 
tions of Clark County. These visitors are made up of 
movie stars, some of the country's greatest financiers and a 
lot of just plain folks. One may rub elbows with million- 
aires, cowboys and miners in any one of the many elabo- 
rate casinos and cocktail lounges, where entertainment 
keeps rolling on for 24 hours a day. Of course Las Vegas 
is the center and the largest place for all this well gov- 
erned merriment. 

Sheriff Jones is a native Nevadan, having been born 
in Overton, on July 15, 1910, 11 days after James Jeffries 
lost to Jack Johnson in Reno. 

He went through all the public schools, graduating 
from the Overton High School in 1929. Following this 
education stint he went into the grocery business in Las 
Vegas as a general clerk. He followed this vocation for five 
years. In October 1935 he joined the Las Vegas Police 
Department and thus began a career in law enforcement 
that took him to the high office of Sheriff of Clark County. 

Three years after becoming a police officer he was 
appointed undersheriff of the county, because of the fine 
manner he had mastered the details of law enforcement 
in his native state. He was elected Sheriff and took over the 
office on January 1, 1942, his majority at the November 
election was an overwhelming one. 

Clark County's Sheriff has over 8,000 square miles to 
patrol, and Sheriff Jones' department consists of 37 men 
to look after this activity. With a secretary the personnel 
comprises 39. 



C. D. Stewart is undersheriff, and he has been with the 
department for three years. He is a big man, towering over 
six feet and is able to meet any emergency growing out of 
a guy wanting to get tough, though he is scarcely any of 
this stuff in this peaceful county. 

The Sheriff has nine patrol cars, with two-way radios, 
the call letters of the system being KNER. The office also 
has a hook-up with the Boulder City Bureau of Reclama- 
tion's ranger station. 

There is also an active aerial patrol under the Sheriff, 
consisting of 45 experienced pilots and the same number 
of planes. The pride of Sheriff Jones auxiliary forces is the 
mounted patrol, made up of 46 skilled riders and mounted 
on beautiful horses with splendid trappings. 

On April 7 Sheriff Jones and his aerial patrol were hosts 
to similar patrols from eight western states — Arizona, 
Idaho, New Mexico, Colorado, Washington, California, 
Oregon and Utah — and they put on a wonderful show, 
demonstrating great air skill and showing how they assist 
peace officers in various demands, such as tracking fugi- 
tives, locating missing men on the vast waste lands of the 
western states and spotting crashed planes. 

The personnel of Sheriff Jones' department follows: 

Iolene Bell, Secretary; C. D. Stewart, Undersheriff; L. 
L. Payton, Captain, Criminal Investigation and Identifica- 
tion; Robert Owens, Captain, Night Operations; E. W. 
Cupit, Special Investigator; Walter E. Houck, Jailor, and 
S. H. Milligan, Chief Deputy at Henderson, Nevada. 

Deputy Sheriffs: Oscar Abbott, Delbert Allan, Iolene 
Bell, W. L. Bell, Dan Borax, Jo Brecheisen, Perle S. 
Brown, Lorin F. Bunker, Curtis C. Compton, J. R. Crou- 
ter, Cleo D. Grames, Ann Marie Gruber, E. D. Hickman, 
Jack Keate, A. H. Kennedy, Ralph J. Lamb, John V. 
Lytle, H. M. Moran, Aubrey G. Pagan, Gary W. Reese, 
James M. Rowan, Carl Shcpard, John G. Silveria, Richard 
Stevens, Robert E. Swift, R. D. Thompson, Roy Trahan, 
Ed H. Warren and E. B. Woodward. 

Glen, as he is known through the West, is married to 
his childhood sweetheart, the former Rebecca Gentry. The 
couple has one daughter, Patricia, who is married to the 
son of one of Nevada's oldest pioneer families, Emmett 
Sullivan. Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan live in Las Vegas, the city 
of a million lights. 

PONY EXPRESS CAFE 

Burlington Trailways Depot 

DELICIOUS FOOD 

UNDISPUTED LEADERS IN QUALITY 



24-Hour Service 



123 South First Street 



LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



VOLPI'S PLACE 



Victor Volpi, Prop. 

ENJOY YOUR MIXED DRINKS IN A 

PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE 

1591 San Pablo Ave. Telephone Richmond 1432 

EL CERRITO CALIFORNIA 






Page 10 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



Fifth Avenue Beauty Salon 

COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICE 

Bob Robertson, Manager 
Artistic Coiffures 



324 Clement Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone EVergreen 6-9816 



HARRY GREENBERO 



JOSEPH FERNANDEZ 



HOME MARKET 

Groceries - Liquor - Vegetables 
Delicatessen - Meats 

9 A.M. to 2 A.M., Sundays and Holidays Included 
1031 Post 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Kent's Chicken Shop 

Prepared Foods for Clubs, Banquets and Parties 
Wholesale and Retail 

Specializing in Chicken Turnovers with Chicken 
Gravy - Chicken Pies - A La King 

1426 Polk Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone ORdway 3-8323 



'Hey Podner, Try the Feminine Touch' 

For Expert Haircutting 
MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

CLUB BARBER SHOP 

Owned and Operated by Polk Gulch's only 
Lady Barber— DOROTHY NOSBUSCH 

1017 Larkin Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cheris Salon of Beauty 

Says: MiLady's Beauty is our business. Our staff is 
ready to help you be your loveliest self 



SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 
Hours 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

786 Sutter Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone OR. 3-2925 



EL R E Y 

Venetian Blind Manufacturers 
"THE KING OF BLINDS" 

1455-65 Bush Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Phone ORdway 3-6784 



•* *._„„ 



David J. Leney 



HEmlock 1-1221 



FINNISH STEAM BATHS 

SKILLED MASSAGE 
Barber Shop in Connection 

312 Valencia Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Ladies - Thursday Only - Lady Attendant 
Hours: 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 



Bus: JUniper 4-9767 



Res: JUniper 7-4607 



ANGELO & DAENO 

DAN BIAGI, Proprietor 
Custom Built 

Upholsterers and Home Furnishers 
Restaurant and Bar Jobbers 

Modernizing - Recovering - Draperies 

2798 San Bruno 
SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIFORNIA 



May. 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



GRADY BOATWRIGHT RETIRES 

By Jim Leonard, Police Reporter to the Call-Bulletin 



"'Your distinguished career with this Service has been 
marked with many difficult assignments which you have 
never failed to carry out successfully. You have always 
been a credit to the Service." 

Those words, addressed to an agent of the U. S. Secret 
Service, were part of the last official communication from 
U. E. Baughman, chief of that organisation, to a man 
known to most of the law enforcement officials in the 
nation. 

During his adventurous 2 5 'year career with the small, 
compact, and little heralded Secret Service he had worked 
in all the major cities in the United States — and many of 
the towns and villages. 

This man was given the important and nerve wracking 
assignment of helping protect three Presidents of the 
United States and their families. While associated with the 
three "first ladies," he came to regard one as a great and 
gracious lady. After a few months with another, he sailed 
into his chief's office and asked for a transfer. 

On the other hand, this man was exposed to murderous 
criminals . . . arranged rooms with views for some of them 
in the U. S. Penitentiary on Alcatraz Island. If they ob- 
served carefully, the could see the old Empire Hotel build- 
ing which houses the San Francisco office of the U. S. 
Secret Service on its twenty-third floor. 

If one planned a visit to Manchester, New Hampshire; 
Burnt Corn, Alabama; or Downieville, California; this 
man could suggest the best hotel, or he could tell you 
where to go in town for the best hamburger. 

This man is Grady L. Boatwright, retiring assistant 
supervising agent of the Secret Service's San Francisco 
office. Until his retirement on March 31 he had held that 
position under Supervising Agent William A. Merrill 
since September 28, 194^. 

Down in the deep South, George W. Boatwright and 
his wife, Jennie, were responsible for Grady. He was born 
in Augusta, Georgia, September 29, 1891. The Boat- 
wnghts lived in several southeastern cities, but Grady 
spent most of his boyhood in Savannah, Georgia — there he 
was graduated from high school. His father was a master 
mechanic for several large railroads covering the Atlantic 
seaboard and the Southeast. 

As a youth of seventeen, Boatwright enlisted in the U. 
S. Navy in 1908. Before coming west to California with a 
group of recruits, he was sent to the Navy's signal school 
in Newport, Rhode Island. One of his first ports of call 
was San Francisco. The young sailor served on what was 
then the world's most powerful and deadly warship — the 
battle cruiser U. S. S. California. 

His military service ended in September of 1911, when 
he was discharged from the Navy as a quartermaster. 
Back in Savannah he soon found a good job as clerk for 
that city's office of the Southern Express Company. Here 
his career began shaping up — he didn't want to be a ship- 



ping clerk all his life; he started nursing the notion of 
becoming a detective, and he became one. 

In Atlanta, Georgia, he joined Pinkerton's National De- 
tective Agency, and was soon transferred to Denver. After 
a while he was sent to the agency's Salt Lake City office 
where for five years he served as assistant superintendent. 
That ended the first lap of Boatwright 's career as a de- 
tective. 

He took a position as a special investigator for the 
Union Pacific Railroad, eventually becoming assistant to 
the chief of that department who had offices in Omaha, 
Nebraska. During this time he wondered what had hap- 
pened to his application for a commission in the U. S. 
Secret Service. 

The appointment came through on March 16, 1924, and 
he became a Secret Service agent. His first duty station was 
Salt Lake City. Following, came assignments out of offices 
at Spokane, Washington; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; St. 
Louis, Missouri; and Chicago. From the first he began to 
build a reputation as a thorough, efficient, and personable 
representative of the Secret Service. 

According to Boatwright, however, those words can be 
applied suitably to any man who makes the grade in the 
Secret Service. About 98 per cent of applications for posi- 
tions in the Service come from men already employed as 
law enforcement officials. Obtaining a commission is diffi- 
cult — successful candidates come from a select group of 
men, who then enter probationary periods. The organiza- 
tion is small and can afford to be discriminating in its 
selections. An established agent always turns out to be 
tops in ability, fellowship, and personality. 

In June of 1927 Boatwright received one of the most 
important assignments that can come to an agent of the 
Secret Service. He was assigned to the White House Detail 
and the protection of President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge. 
In November of 1928, after President Coolidge did not 
"choose to run," Herbert C. Hoover, Californian, was 
elected to the presidency. 

Grady Boatwright was sent immediately to Palo Alto 
to keep a protecting eye on the President-elect and his 
wife, Mrs. Lou Henry Hoover. He accompanied them 
on the history making good will trip to Latin and South 
American countries. 

The presidential party left Palo Alto in late November, 
taking the battleship U. S. S. Maryland out of San Pedro. 
It stopped at Santiago, Chile, after touching several 
Central American ports. From Santiago the party jour- 
neyed overland to Buenos Aires, Argentina, thence to 
Montevideo, Uruguay. Aboard the old battleship U. S. S. 
Utah the group returned to the east coast of the U. S., 
reaching Washington, D. C, in January, 1929. 

Following the inaugural on March 4, 1929, Boatwright 
took over the job of protecting Mrs. Hoover, a task that 
(Continued on page 41) 



Page 12 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



SEBASTOPOL AND ITS NEW POLICE CHIEF 



Sebastopol, situated less than 10 miles west of Santa 
Rosa, the county seat of Sonoma County, is the center 
of one of the richest agricultural areas on the North 
American continent. 

It is a town of over 3,000 people, living in the city 




Chief John A. Ellis 

limits of a little over a mile square. In a five-mile radius 
to the city limits are some 15,000 more contented and 
prosperous people. In this fringe area are many farms that 
produce a diversified array of crops, the principal of which 
is apples, and of this fruit there are 7,500 productive acres. 
Three million boxes of fresh apples, of which the cele- 
brated Gravenstein is the leading one, are produced an- 
nually. In addition 150,000,000 pounds of dried apples 
are processed. There are three-quarter million gallons of 
apple cider pressed per year from this popular fruit, and 
on of the largest apple brandy plants is located in 
Sebastopol. 

Every sort of berries is harvested each year and there 
are over 1,200 acres devoted to cherries, peaches, apricots, 



prunes grapes and hops that with the apples all contribute 
to the economy of the area to the extent of some $15,000,- 
000 a year. 




Sergt. Leo R. Honsa 

Dairying, sheep, cattle, poultry and egg production con- 
tribute their share to the above large income. 

For climate none will be found more equitable than 
that of Sebastopol, and the little city has the finest of 
homes, the best of public buildings, schools, churches and 
recreation centers. 

Nearby are lumber mills producing from redwoods and 
firs millions of feet of materials for home and business 
buildings. 

It is but a few miles to the Russian River resorts and 
through the town of Sebastopol pass thousands upon thou- 
sands of automobiles going to or from the many scenic 
sites on the famed river. 

Naturally, as all cities, large or small, Sebastopol has a 
police department. It is a modern department with head- 
(Continued on page 34) 





dtJktkh 



Officer J. R. Pilgrim 



Officer E. E. Major 



Officer T. C. Wilk 



Officer D. F. Almida 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 3 



Newly Appointed Chief Warren of Benicia 



Benicia, one of California's pioneer towns which has a Benicia has its own 100-watt radio station KGSN. 



history dating back to the days of '49 and the gold rush 
era, is policed by a seven-man department headed by Chief 
Vincent Warren, recently appointed to head the depart- 
ment. 

Chief Warren was born in Alameda County in 1914. 




Chief Vincent Warren 

He went to one of Berkeley's grammar schools. After his 
graduation the family moved to Grass Valley, where he 
entered high school, graduating in 1933. After gradua- 
tion he entered the Grass Valley law enforcement depart- 
ment as a special officer, and was also an amateur radio 
operator with the California Highway Patrol for a time. 
After leaving this assignment he entered the U. S. Forestry 
Department, retaining this position from 1935 until 1938. 
In May, 1942, Warren had made up his mind to become 
a law enforcement officer so he joined the Benicia Police 
Department as a patrolman. Being very studoius and 
efficient, Chief Davena appointed him to the post of Cap- 
tain July 1943. In 1948 Chief Davena retired from the 
Police Department to become head of Benicia's Fire De- 
partment, so again Captain Warren gained another pro- 
mation, this time to the Police Department's highest job, 
that of Chief. 

He was appointed in May of 1948, and he still holds 
the rank with highest honors. 

He has a contingent of seven men and one lady 
clerk who also acts as radio operator. 

As small as Benicia is, it can boast of a special volun- 
teer police force of 12 fully equipped and uniformed 
men who are trained and ready to go on call day or night, 
24 hours a day, 365 days a year, all without pay. 

Chief Warren is married to the former Rowena Evans 
of Douglas, Arizona. They have one child, a girl, Donna 
Jean, age 17 months, adored by all the boys in the Chief's 
department. 



There are three police cars with two-way radios, and also 
a stand-by station, KPWD, at the fire station; also four 
fire trucks which have two-way radios that cooperate 
fully with the police. 

The Police and Peace Officers' Journal wishes to 
give heartiest congratulatins and best wishes to Fire Chief 
Davena, wishing him continued sucess. He was a good 
Chief of Police. 

FONG'S MARKET 

COMPLETE FOOD STORE 
FREE DELIVERY 



OAKLAND 



TEmpIebar 2-9433 



353 East 12th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



LEONA'S BEAUTY STUDIO 

PERMANENT WAVES BY EXPERT OPERATORS 

LEONA TAMNEY 

EVENINGS BY APPOINTMENT 

8920 East 14th Street Phone TRinidad 2-7511 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ACME ROOFING CO. 



3429 San Pablo Ave. 



HU 3-3878 



W. L. MITCHENER 8C COMPANY 

REALTORS — ESTABLISHED 30 YEARS 
NIGHT CLUBS - COCKTAIL LOUNGES - LIQUOR STORES 



Phone TEmpIebar 2-6239 

OAKLAND 



612 Fourteenth Street 

CALIFORNIA 



S & E MANFUACTURING CO. 



PRODUCTION 



E. J. Shepardson 
MACHINE WORK 



• PRECISION 



Telephone HUmboIdt 3-3224 
OAKLAND 



3103 Adeline Street 

CALIFORNIA 



MASSAGE 



COLONICS 



AID TO HEALTH STEAM BATHS 



2049 East 14th St 
SAN LEANDRO 



FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Phone LO 8-0871 



CALIFORNIA 



UNION "76" GASOLINE Vincent Burke, Manager 

KEY AUTO SUPPLY 

FIRESTONE HOME AND AUTO SUPPLIES 

MOTOR PARTS AND SERVICE 

3637 San Pablo Avenue Phone Piedmont 5-1247 

EMERYVILLE CALIFORNIA 



DR. E. A. RODIER 

DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 



Hospital KE 2-9172 

3561 Foothill Blvd. 



Res. KE 4-5202 

OAKLAND I. CALIF. 



HlYGENIC DOG FOOD COMPANY 

THomwall 3-6024 

BERKELEY CALIFORNIA 



1000 Murray Street 



POLLY ANN BAKERY 

2057 San Pablo Ave. TH 3-0318 

BERKELEY 2. CALIFORNIA 



POTTED PLANTS - FERTILIZERS - TREES 
SHRUBS - SEEDS - BULBS - ROSES 

GERLETTI NURSERY 8C 
BEGONIA GARDEN 

PERENNIAL AND ANNUAL PLANTS 



Richmond 119-W 
EL CERR1TO 



1231 San Pablo Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



Richmond P. D. Takes on 1949 Look Under Expert Guidance of Chief 
Wyman W. Vernon, Rounding Out Job He Was Given Ten Months to Do! 



By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders 
Veteran Police Reporter, Editor, Author 
Richmond, California, which mushroomed into a metro- 
politan city almost over night during wartime shipbuilding 
and other industrial activities, bringing with its sudden 
growth crime and criminals and plenty of headaches to a 
police department that had been created in more peaceful 




Chief Wyman W. Vernon 

times to fit into a less strenuous community is now develop- 
ing a police department second to none in the West if not 
in the nation. 

The job is being done quietly, efficiently, without fan- 
fare but with a thoroughness that is astonishing the oldtime 
Richmond residents and the men in the Police Department 
itself. 

Directing this transformation of a Police Department 
originally created for a town but which is being geared to 
direct the police activities of a city of more than 100,000 is 
soft-spoken, cultured, sincere, likable, personable, but a 
dynamo of action, Chief of Police Wyman W. Vernon, 
42 years old. 

Chief Vernon, holding a permanent lieutenancy in the 
Oakland Police Department, named Chief of the Rich- 
mond department following an examination in which he 
topped twelve other well qualified candidates, is rounding 
out a 10-months' leave of absence from Oakland. 

That 10-month period comes to an end in September. 

Chief Vernon has already written a mighty chapter (or 
as he modestly says "directed the remodeling of the de- 
partment's set-up") in Richmond police history. 

At the end of the 10-month period a permanent Police 
Chief will be appointed. 



The modernizing of Richmond's Police Department 
under the guiding hand of Chief Vernon will readily come 
to a climax when the department moves into the three-story 
hall of justice in the new Civic Center where $6,000,000 is 
being spent for a city hall, an auditorium, library, a county 
building including superior courts. 

The new police headquarters will contain all modern 
equipment, a police shooting range, a gymnasium and other 
features which will give Richmond the finest police head- 
quarters in the West, bar none. 

The Civic Center occupying four square blocks is ex- 
pected to be completed in August this year. 

But back to the remodeling of Richmond's police depart- 
ment, a process that has been without friction or jealousy, 
which has been eagerly accepted by the members of the 
Police Department itself. 

Just a few of the changes brought about : 

Starting program to organize and train a police reserve 
unit. 

Daily conferences with all police division heads. 

Establishing census tract districts as a basis for police 
beat divisions. 

Replacing police officers at school crossings by school 
crossing guards according to a state-wide plan. 

Establishing a clearly defined chain of command in the 
organizational structure. 

Monthly dinner meeting of captains, lieutenants, ser- 
geants for friendly discussion of departmental problems 
and developing uniform police. 

Adoption of a standard police uniform for all personnel 
irrespective of assignment. 

Installation of a mechanical card tabulator, recording 
all written reports so that up to the minute statistics to 
time, place, type of crime are immediately available. 

The acquisition of an intoximeter which immediately 
identifies the person suspected of being under the influence 
of liquor. 

Forming a board of inquiry to advise the Chief of Police 
on major disciplinary problems within the department. 

Incidentally the Richmond Police Department is one of 
the first on the West Coast to install the intoximeter which 
tests the breath control by way of a balloon and a colored 
tube. Michigan state police and several other Eastern states 
have successfully used the device. 

Richmond covers 32 square miles of territory, industrial, 
business, residential, level and hill land — sprawled out 
against the Contra Costa County hills. The city's popula- 
tion is in excess of 106,000 which is larger than Berkeley 
where business and residential areas are most closely inter- 
woven. In working out plans for streamlining the Police 
(Continued on page 28) 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 5 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Sgt. Charles Simpson, President 



Bob Mason, Secretary 

March Meeting 

The regular monthly meeting of the NCPCOA was 
held at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, March 10, 
1949. Our host was Jack Barlich, Quarterman of the 
Electronics Shop. 

All members attending were met at the Navy Yard 
gate by our host and were transported to the Officers Club 
by bus. 

After an excellent lunch and refreshments, the meeting 
was called to order by President Simpson at 12:15 p.m. 

President Simpson introduced William Pengra, public 
relations representative for the San Francisco Naval Ship- 
yard, who in turn introduced our guest speaker, Bob 
Miller. 

Mr. Miller spoke on his experience and observations in 
connection with the "Bikini Atom Bomb Tests." 

All members present were greatly impressed by Mr. 
Miller's outstanding narration. 

Under committee reports, Captain McMurphy, of Fre- 
quency and Engineering presented requests from the fob 
lowing: The City of Carmel for 1 56.S7. The County of 
Santa Clara for additional units in the form of a county- 
wide fire system. This request was assigned 1 56.2 10 Mc. 

Captain McMurphy also reported on a meeting which 
was held in San Mateo County between the administrative 
heads of the cities of San Mateo, Burlingame, and Hills- 
borough. 

Chief Wisnom also presented a letter advising the asso- 
ciation of this meeting and requesting a frequency to be 
granted in the 30-40 Mc. band. The assigning of a fre- 
quency for use of these cities was tabled until Captain 
McMurphy makes a study of available frequencies. 

The above frequency requests were put to the mem- 
bers by President Simpson. It was moved by Ray Meyers 
and seconded by Tom Bailey that they be approved. Car- 
ried by members present. 

QPO reported some activity. 

Ray Meyers reported that Frank Manov was leaving 
this area for assignment in the Washington D. C. area with 
the Bureau of Ordinance. 

President Simpson appointed a legislative committee, 
Henry Bogardus and George Hippley. This committee was 
appointed with the purpose of working on the necessary 
legislative action so as to incorporate our association. 
Reports from Commercial members followed. 

F. L. Deetkin reported on T.V. interference, and of- 
fered to the members present the use of a G.E. T.V. re- 
ceiver for checking purposes. 

This was followed by a general discussion by Jim Lewis 
of Marin County and Captain McMurphy on the subject 



A. R. Taggart, Treasurer 
of H.V. interference caused by equipment operating in the 
72-76 Mc. band. 

Meeting adjourned at 2:30 p.m., whereupon all mem- 
bers present were taken on a very complete tour of the 
Navy Yard by our host and co-host. 

April Meeting 

The regular monthly meeting of the NCPCOA was 
held at "Vahl's" in the City of Alviso, April 14, 1949. 
Our host was the County of Santa Clara. 

Acting in the absence of President Simpson, Vice-Presi- 
dent Walt Keller called the business meeting to order at 
1 p.m. 

All members present were introduced, as were our hon- 
ored guests, E. B. Hughston, of the Beard of Supervisors' 
office, and Henry Lingua, Chief of the County Fire De- 
partment. 

Under committee reports, Chairman McMurphy of the 
Frequency and Engineering presented requests from the 
following : 

Contra Costa County for 37.43 Mc. 

Yolo County, as part of the City of Woodlands system 
for 1^ 5.81 Mc. 

City of Merced for 15 5.61 Mc. 

City of Mt. Shasta for 15 5.ni Mc. 

Del Norte County Sheriff's Office for 39,780 Mc. and 
1610 Kc. (Tabled for study at the request of the CHP 
since one of the frequencies involved is the State's mobile 
frequency.) 

Solano County for 155.49 Mc. and 158.79 Mc. 

Supporting this request of Solano County, Ray Meyers 
presented an oral argument stressing the need for two (2) 
frequencies in the 150-160 Mc. band, since the FCC was 
not licensing equipment in the 72-76 Mc. band for use as 
repeaters because of the possible T.V. interference. 

City of Weaverville for 154.65 Mc. for mobile, and 
156.33 Mc. for land. 

The above frequency requests were put to the members 
present by Acting President Keller. It was moved by 
Merrill Le Boeuf and seconded by Ralph Moore that they 
be approved. Carried. 

QPO reported some activity and asked for more. 

President Keller reported on our next meeting in Bak- 
ersfield, a joint meeting with the Southern California 
group, and advised all members to try and make this 
meeting, on the 27th and 28th of May. 

It was moved by Tom Bailey and seconded by Mc- 
Murphy that our next meeting be held in Bakersfield, and 
passed by members present. 

(Continued on page 30) 



Page 16 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

CHIEF CHARLES F. PETERSON 

U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, Boulder City, Nevada 



May, 1949 



Chief Ranger, Charles F. Peterson, in charge of pro- 
tecting the Hoover Dam, U. S. Bureau of Reclamation, 
Boulder City, Nevada, has a history of over 45 years in 
law enforcement. Born in Boulder, Colorado, on August 6, 
1881, he was taken by his family a year later to Big Horn, 
Wyoming, and after other changes finally settled in Bil- 
lings, Montana, where young Peterson got his schooling. 
In May of 1904 he entered police work, taking a job as 
an officer of the law with a mining company at Neder- 
lands, Montana. Three years later he resigned and joined 
the Denver Police Department. He served well in this post 
and was asked to become Chief of Police of Neddleton, 
Wyoming. Here in the rough and ready era of the West 
he made quite a name for himself as an officer of the 
law. 

He made another step in his progress up the ladder of 
success as a peace officer, and in 1910 he was appointed 
a deputy sheriff in Boulder, Colorado, arriving in 1918. 
During his term as a deputy sheriff he participated in 
bringing in many a hardened criminal. 



Tiring of law enforcement he quit his job to go to wor 
in the oil fields of Rock River, Wyoming. He lasted in this 
job for three weeks. Seems he went to the town of Rock 
River to get a supply of provisions and the town needing 
a new Chief of Police practically forced the job on Oil 
Worker Peterson. From then on he has been enforcing the 
laws of the land. In August 1921 he entered the service 
of the U. S. Government as a probation agent. He worked 
in many areas of his district and was promoted to field 
agent in charge in the district he had served so well. 

In 1930 there was another promotion in store for him. 
He was made a special agent and assigned to headquarters 
in Washington, D. C. He remained in this position until 
1933, serving under Captain W. D. Smith. 

In 193 3 he was transferred as a ranger patrolman at 
Boulder City, Nevada. So well did he perform his duties 
he was made Acting Chief Ranger, serving until 1939 in 
this capacity, when he was appointed Chief. He has seen 
the Hoover Dam become one of the great wonders of the 
(Continued on page $8) 



. 




BOULDER CITY RANGERS' ROLL CALL 

Pacing the rangers is Chief Ranger Charles F. Peterson. From left to right, Capt. M. J. Slattery, Patrolmen George Talley. Rowley 
^l^rfhHarolr^Umpsa^ohril^Wcikrai^ 



May, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Concord's Chief William A- Gabrielson 



Chief William A. Gabrielson was born in San Diego. 
He was reared there, got his schooling in that southern 
city and later attended special sessions at the University 
of California, at Berkeley. 

Following his course at U.C. he entered the employ of 




Chief Wm. A. Gabrielson 

the Hawaii Steamship Company, but in a short time left 
to join the San Diego Police Department. He was made a 
police officer on April 8, 1908, -and from then on he has 
climbed high in the profession of law enforcement. 

He was made secretary to the then Chief William 
Nealy, a position he held for a year and a half. So well did 
he grasp the details of his new calling that he was assigned 
to organize the identification and record bureau of the 
S. D. P. D. He had charge of this important unit of the 
department until 1917 when he was appointed assistant 
superintendent of the California State Bureau of Iden- 
tification and Investigation. 

On Dec. 18, 1918 he joined the Berkeley Police De- 
partment with the rank of Sergeant. The department then 
was under Chief August Vollmer, retired, and who now 
lives in Berkeley. 

His reputation as an expert of identification and police 
records were well known to Chief Vollmer, who put him 
in charge of the Bureau, handling those activities of the 
Department. He held this post until April 1932, when 
with the rank of Lieutenant he was loaned to the City 
of Monterey to reorganize and train the city's Police De- 
partment in identification and record methods. 

Finishing this assignment he went to Honolulu for the 
same purpose. He did such a splendid job he was ap- 
pointed Chief of Police of the island city late in 1932. He 
held this job until his retirement in June 1946, at the 
age of 60 years. 



He was then asked to go to Japan as police administrator 
to study police systems and make recommendations for 
organizing a complete new law enforcement agency. He 
was in Japan for over a year, and worked under direct 
orders of General Douglas MacArthur. He did a good job 
on this assignment. 

Completing it he returned to the United States for a 
well earned vacation. But law enforcement had taken 
such a hold on Chief Gabrielson that he could not 
adjust himself to a front porch rocking chair and in 
March last year he was offered and accepted the Chiefship 
of Concord, Contra Costa County. He is doing, as he has 
in his many other city jobs, good work in administering 
the laws in this small city. 

He has put the Concord Police Department on the same 
high plane that cities of much larger size could not excel. 

He has two-way radio patrol cars, served by Sheriff 
James N. Long's station KQCE at Martinez. 

Chief Gabrielson has the following men under his com- 
mand : 

Officers Charles Dalton, Frank Grammont, Tony Frei- 
tas, Leonard Haseup, Joseph Tomlin and Secretary Mil- 
dred Studt. 

Mrs. Gabrielson, who was Miss Beth Rader from Mt. 
Shasta County, who has been with him on his many special 
details is with him in Concord and they have become 
very popular with the people of this farming area. 



PAT'S PLACE 

BEER AND WINE 
Foothill and Padua Street 



CLAREMONT 



CALIFORNIA 



KIRK'S MOTOR COURT 

TRAILER SPACE AND CABINS 
Walking Distance from Downtown REDLANDS 



Phone MA 31 609 W. Colton Ave. 

REDLANDS CALIFORNIA 



KILROY'S CAFE 

CHILI - SANDWICHES - BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 
Meet Your Friends Here 

J. G. Mineck, Prop. 



Telephone 619-304 1117 East "A" Street 

ONTARIO CALIFORNIA 



BISH GALLOWAY GROCERIES 

COMPLETE FOOD MARKET 

MM 

Fourth and "I" Streets Phone 178 

COLTON CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL May, 1949 

^■■i^KHHHHi ^mtm mm wmmm mmwm ■■ mmmm m hhhhmm mtmmmmjmmaauummBmmtmam 

That We Shall Never Forget! 

Honor roll of those who have made the supreme sacrifice as members of the San 
Francisco Police Department. Each contributed his costly share to the grand tradi- 
tions of the department: 

Officer JOHN COOTS, June 12, 1878. Killed by John Runk. 

Officer JOHN NICHOLSON, February 16, 1884. Stabbed by unknown assassin. 

Officer EDGAR OSGOOD, December 13, 1886. Stabbed by unknown assassin. 

Officer ALEXANDER GRANT, September 11, 1891. Shot by Samuel of Posen. 

Lieutenant WILLIAM BURKE, March 23, 1898. Shot by Theo. Haines. 

Officer EUGENE ROBINSON, January 20, 1903. Shot by thugs. 

Officer MAX FENNER, April 18, 1906. Killed by falling walls. 

Officer JAMES S. COOK, August 26, 1936. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer GEORGE O'CONNELL, November 16, 1906. Shot by John Burns. 

Officer HARRY L. SAUER, May 7, 1907. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer EDWARD T. McCARTNEY, September 3, 1907. Shot by John Tansey. 

Officer WILLIAM H. HEINS, June 4, 1908. Shot by Young brothers. 

Officer WILLIAM O'SHAUGHNESSY, June 10, 1908. Beaten by C. Ritchie. 

Sergeant ANTONE NOLTING, January 9, 1909. Shot by Thos. Jordan. 

Officer CHARLES P. CASTOR, November 26, 1911. Shot by P. Prantikos. 

Officer THOMAS FINNELLY, November 26, 1911. Shot by P. Prantikos. 

Officer JOHN J. NOLAN, March 19, 1912. Killed by fall chasing thug. 

Officer CHARLES H. BATES, July 26, 1912. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer BYRON C. WOOD, May 4, 1913. Shot by W. Thompson. 

Officer EDWARD MALONEY, April 19, 1915. Shot by Felker and Walker. 

Officer PETER HAMMOND, September 12, 1915. Shot by George Nelson. 

Corporal FREDERICK COOK, November 24, 1915. Shot by Harry Wilson. 

Officer THOMAS DEASY, January 8, 1916. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer MARTIN JUDGE, December 12, 1916. Hit by street car. 

Officer WILLIAM F. SHEEHAN, June 25, 1917. Shot by Thos. Sheehan. 

Officer JOHN B. HURD, January 27, 1918. Killed by street car. 

Sergeant JOHN J. MORIARITY, May 26, 1919. Shot by V. Osakin. 

Detective Sergeant ANTONE SCHOEMBS, Nov. 19, 1919. Shot by bandits. 

Officer JAMES W. HORTON, September 19, 1920. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Detective Sergeant MILES JACKSON, December 5, 1920. Shot by gangsters. 

Detective LESTER DORMAN, December 5, 1920. Shot by gangsters. 

Officer THOMAS HANNA, January 15, 1921. Shot by unknown assassin. 

Officer THOMAS WALSH, July 4, 1922. Shot by auto bandits. 

Detective Sergeant TIMOTHY BAILY, Aug. 3, 1922. Shot by Walter Castor. 

Corporal THOMAS KELLY, June 4, 1923. Shot by John Paris. 

Officer JOSEPH CONROY, November 3, 1923. Killed by automobile. 

Sergeant MICHAEL J. BRADY, October 5, 1924. Shot by William Rhinehart. 

Officer GEORGE CAMPBELL, April 9, 1925. Shot by Felix Sloper. 

Officer BENJAMIN G. ROOT, April 1, 1926. Killed by unknown assassin. 

Officer JOHN J. DRISCOLL, June 28, 1927. Shot by bandits. 

Officer FREDERICK N. SPOONCER, Nov. 24, 192S. Killed by automobile. 

Officer JOHN MALCOLM, April 29, 1930. Shot by bandits. 

Officer CHARLES ROGERSON, November 23, 1930. Killed by automobile. 

Officer CHARLES W. KING, June 7. 1931. Killed by automobile. 

Officer ELMER C. THONEY, December 31, 1931. Killed by street car. 

Officer WILLIAM E. MANNING, January 2, 1932. Shot by George Rankin. 

Officer MERVYN A. REARDON, June 9, 1932. Shot by Glenn Johnson. 

Officer MICHAEL J. McDONALD, August 26, 1933. Shot by James Kirk. 

Officer JAMES H. MANN, February 26, 1934. Killed by James Jacobs. 

Officer EDWARD F. FLAGLER, February 8, 1937. Hit-run driver. 

Officer ALBERT W. ARGENS, February 21, 1937. Shot by Elliot Ambrose. 

Officer CORNELIUS BROSNAN, November 15, 1937. Killed by auto. 

Officer WALDEMAR L. JENTZSCH, Dec. 25, 1937. Killed chasing speeder. 

Officer WALTER SALISBURY, Jan. 1, 1939. Shot by George Dally. 

Officer VINCENT P. LYNCH. August 30, 1941. Killed by auto. 

Officer TIMOTHY RYAN, February 11, 1943 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page IS 



REMINDER DONTS 



Don't leave your house or apartment until you are sure 
that every door and window is securely fastened. 

Don't when you leave home, advise the fact by pulling 
down the window shades or by leaving a note in the letter 
box saying that you will be back at such and such a time, 
or suggesting that goods be left with the janitor. Sneak 
thieves profit by this information. 

Don't leave your key over the door or under the door 
mat. 

Don't think that an open window is safe from intrusion 
because it is not near a fire escape. Many flat thieves can 
gain entrance by means of a ladder or by sliding down a 
rope fastened to the roof. 

Don't fail to bolt your dumb waiter door. 

Don't rely on ordinary locks to secure your apartment. 

Don't fail to investigate when someone rings your bell 
and fails to come up to your apartment after you have 
pushed the button. You may have admitted a thief to the 
house. 

Don't leave a padlock on the outside of your door and 
thus announce your absence. 

Don't leave your home in total absence during the night 
time when you leave even for a short time. As a rule, no 
thief will enter a house that is lit up. 

Don't neglect to try your door when you go out, to see 
if it is really locked. Snap locks do not always work prop- 
erly and you may leave your home an easy prey to a thief. 

Don't overlook your rear doors and windows. Remem- 
ber, the police officer on the beat can watch the front doors 
and does not patrol back yards. 

Don't fail to have fasteners of an improved type put on 
your windows. If possible, have burglar alarms put on 
windows and doors. 

Don't fail to change your lock when your keys have 
been lost or stolen. 

Don't leave your skylight or roof doors unfastened. 

Don't fail to install a door chain on the inside of outer 
doors. This is an excellent protection for women folks. 

Don't fail to have your safe, cash register and valuable 
merchandise exposed to plain view of the policemen on the 
beat; and be sure to have your store partially lighted, at 
least. 

Don't think your money or valuables are safe when hid- 
den behind picture frames, under rugs, under dresser 
scarfts, in bric-a-brac or mattresses, or in other out-of-the- 
way places. These are about the first places a crook will 
search. 

Don't allow money to accumulate. Make deposits fre- 
quently and systematically. 

Don't let employees know the contents of your safe 
Even good employees talk too much and too often in the 
wrong places. 

Don't unnecessarily leave valuable merchandise in a 
front window or showcase at night. 

Don't place articles of value in basement storerooms. 
They may be stolen quite a while before you find out the 



fact. 

Don't fail to leave the cash drawer of your cash register 
open at night. Many (empty) cash registers which have 
been left locked have been broken open and destroyed by 
thieves in search of money. 

Don't leave your silverware exposed in your home 
where it can be observed from the street. Thieves are 
attracted by such displays. 

Don't leave your fan lights open after closing hours. 

Don't leave at the same time daily when going shop- 
ping. Good thieves "case" homes to learn the time and 
duration of the absences therefrom. 

Don't inform persons such as ice men, laundry men, 
etc., that you will not be at home during certain named 
hours, as they, at times, give such information to sneak 
thieves, flat thieves, etc. 

Don't leave your home for any considerable period 
without first notifying a friendly neighbor of your ab- 
sence. 

Don't leave your key with the janitor or hall boys no 
matter how much you trust them. 

Don't converse with persons claiming to be "line-up" 
men, from your rear window, without first seeing that 
your front door is locked, as he may have criminal con- 
federates stealing from your rooms. 

Don't leave your house on the receipt of a telephone 
message that you are wanted on the telephone of an 
adjacent premises, unless the person delivering such mes- 
sage is known to you. 



MOORE BROS. 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEER 
ON SALE - OFF SALE 



Phone 29 



125 South "F" Street 



EXETER 



CALIFORNIA 



LANE'S GROCERY 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH FRUIT - VEGETABLES 

ICE CREAM AND SOFT DRINKS 

Phone 1S3-R 304 West Pine Street 

EXETER (Tulare County), CALIFORNIA 



BEER - LIQUORS - WINES 

JOE'S 120 CLUB 

Joe Furtado, Prop. 

ONLY EXPERTS MIX OUR DRINKS 
OUR SPECIALTY IS SERVICE 

Phone 61-F-22 



ESCALON 



CALIFORNIA 



HUNTER & WORKS 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



7480 Mission Street 



JUniper 4-3865 



COLMA 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 




San Francisco; 



5 PEACE OFFICERS' 



(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

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IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 csSiip 



MAYOR ROBINSON ASKS FOR MORE 
POLICE FOR S.F. 

Mayor Elmer E. Robinson has taken an important step 
toward bringing the San Francisco Police Department's 
personnel as near, as it is possible at this time, to the num- 
ber provided by the city charter. 

In a special meeting of the Board of Supervisors last 
month he asked for an addition of 180 men to the De- 
partment. If his request is granted it will bring the number 
of men enforcing the laws in the city to 1,334. This will 
still leave the Department over 200 short of the maximum 
ratio of one to 500 citizens as provided in the charter. 

His message provides for the use of 103 patrolmen for 
traffic duty. Twenty of these would be for manning three- 
wheelers to check parking meter zones and 16 for "solo" 
motorcycles. Twelve men would be assigned to Central 
District, 15 to Mission, 15 to Southern, and 14 to Taraval. 

It also asked for two more Captains and 19 Sergeants. 

In his special message Mayor Robinson stated : 

"The efficiency of the Police Department is one of the 
greatest responsibilities of all city officials, because it bears 
so directly on the safety of every man, woman and child 
in San Francisco. 

"San Francisco is still trying to absorb a tremendously 
increasing population. 

"It is inevitable that an increase in population demands 

rorresnondincyncrcas^ir^polic^rcreonne^jequired for 



the prevention of crime and the apprehension of criminals 
and for dealing with a traffic situation greatly aggravated 
by that increased population. 

"The peculiar geographical location of San Francisco 
has made it the gateway to the Orient, creating a special 
police problem common to all great seaport cities. 

"Additionally, and perhaps of greater importance, is the 
fact that San Francisco's position as the business, financial 
shopping center of a great and populous metropolitan area 
daily draws a tremendous number of people to the city . . ." 

"The relatively few reductions I have made in the rank 
of patrolmen were made only after exhaustive review with 
the police commission and the Chief of Police," Robinson 
said. 

In the interests of public safety, including combating 
crime, preventing crime and the proper policing of traffic, 
I urge that this recommendation be concurred in by your 
honorable board." 



"STAY OUT OF TOWN" COURT RULINGS 

The Third District Court of Appeals has held that, in 
the case of suspended sentences in which the convicted 
person is ordered out of town for a certain period of 
time, the imposition of the stipulation regarding the stay- 
ing out of town is illegal. 

This decision arose out of a Stockton case. A man was 
found guilty in the Municipal Court of that city for driv- 
ing while drunk and ordered by the Municipal Court to 
stay out of Stockton for two years, after he had served 
three months of a sentence. After four months of his 
liberty he was rearrested on a charge of violating the con- 
ditions of his parole by remaining in Stockton. The Appel- 
late Court held that the Stockton authorities in so arresting 
the defendant had illegally revoked his parole, and ordered 
his release on a writ of habeas corpus. 

The decision, written by Justice Rolfe L. Thompson, 
and concurred in by Presiding Judge Annette A. Adams 
and Justice Paul J. Peek held: 

"The suspension of sentence was equivalent to an order 
granting probation. The condition contained in the judg- 
ment that it would be suspended in part if the defendant 
left Stockton and San Joaquin County and remained 
away for two years, is, in effect, an unlawful increase in 
punishment by banishment not provided by statute, there- 
fore void." 



ANOTHER BAD ACTOR— PICK HIM UP 

Local business men were warned today by the Better 
Business Bureau to be on the look-out for a salesman who 
collects cash deposits on neon signs then fails to deliver 
the merchandise. The salesman is described as a negro, 45 
years of age, 5 feet 5 inches tall, from 160 to 200 pounds. 

According to local police, this man has operated in other 
communities in a similar manner. 

SAVE YOUR 
U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 



Ma\. 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



PATRICK J. O'CONNELL, RETIRED SFPD 
DETECTIVE SERGEANT PASSES AWAY 

Patrick J. O'Connell, retired Detective Sergeant of the 
San Francisco Police Department died March 24, at the 
age of 86. 

Sergeant O'Connell was horn in Limerick, Ireland, and 
came to San Francisco while a youth, and joined the Police 
Department in 1894. He was made a Detective in 1905 
and took his pension in 1932. 

During his service as a police officer he was known 
for the thorough manner he approached each and every 
assignment. He had a keen sense of humor which he used 
to good effect in handling the hundreds of men and 
women he gathered into the toils of the law. He was not 
vindictive and would give many an unfortunate a cheery 
word and a hit of wholesome advice. He was a prime 
favorite with all the people with whom he associated, and 
all throughout his 86 years he never forgot how to smile. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Hannah O'Connell and 
five children: Inspector John O'Connell, and Wilfred, 
Josephine and Irene O'Connell, and Mrs. George Devan. 
The funeral cortege left after brief service at Gant- 
ner-Felder-Kenny, 1965 Market Street, for a requiem high 
mass at St. Emydius Church, on the morning of March 
27. There were a lot of people present to show their 
respects to this kindly and efficient officer of the law. 

Here is a story of "Pat" O'Connell, as he was affec- 
tionately known throughout the city, printed in the issue 
of the Police and Peace Officers' Journal back in 
January, 192 3, when it was known as "Douglas 2-0," and 
shows how well he understood human nature. 

"Detective Patrick O'Connell was taking a safecracker 
hack to St. Louis, Mo. As they sat in the station waiting 
for the train the prisoner asked Pat if he wouldn't re- 
move the handcuffs from his wrists. 

' 'I don't want people to know I am a prisoner,' was 
his excuse. 

"Pat complied, although he had been warned to be 
wary of his prisoner who had the reputation of being a 
'Roy Gardner type.' When the cuffs were removed, the 
prisoner asked Pat casually, 'Did you ever shoot a man 
since you have been a policeman?' 

" 'Sure,' answered Pat with a twinkle in his eyes. 'Six 
of them.' 

"The prisoner gasped: 'Did any of them die?' 

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ses 




" 'Five and the sixth was maimed for life,' answered 
Pat grimly, but still with a twinkle in his eye. 

"The prisoner gulped and his Adam's apple went up 
and down, and holding out his wrist, stuttered: 'P-u-put 
the c-cuffs b-back on, I ain't going to be tempted.' 

" 'I knew that's what he had in mind,' said Pat in 
recalling the incident, 'and three days after I handed him 
over to the St. Louis police and was on my way back here 
I read a newspaper dispatch where he had escaped from 
the county jail there." 



INSPECTOR JOHN E. DOLAN 
TAKEN BY DEATH 

Inspector John E. Dolan, retired, of the SFPD died 
April 17, at St. Joseph's Hospital. He was 79 years of age. 

The deceased Inspector, born in San Francisco, joined 
the Police Department in 1900, with the forming of the 
city charter. He served well, and from patrolman he was 
promoted to the old Detective Bureau, and in this im- 
portant unit of the Department he figured in many 
cases, bringing in top flight criminals as well as the run 
of the mill. In those days there were no specialized bureaus 
— each man took what cases were assigned to him and 
followed them through. Inspector Dolan followed all such 
cases through to a successful culmination. 

He was a quiet spoken, tall and well-built man, one who 
was not easily aroused to anger but when the occasion 
arose he was able to take care of himself. 

One of his many notable captures was his arrest of a 
couple of bandits who had held up the Boyle Heights Bank 
in Los Angeles. 

Inspector Dolan was a member of the Widows' and 
Orphans' Aid Association, the Native Sons, The Holy 
Name Society and the Police Veterans' Association, of 
which he was a past president. 

He is survived by four children: Sergeant John L. 
Dolan, assigned to Southern Station, William H. and M. 
Bernyce Dolan and Mrs. Irene Rogers. 

The funeral services were held on Tuesday morning, 
April 19, at Currivan Mortuary and with a high requiem 
mass at Holy name church, and there was a large concourse 
of friends present to pay their final respects to a brave and 
honest police officer. 



BABETTE'S 

SWEDISH MASSAGE • CABINET BATHS 
COLONIC IRRIGATIONS • EXPERT MASSEUSES 

MAIN FLOOR 

ORdway 3-4447 693 Sutter Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL 




WHITCOMB 

MARKET STREET at 8th 

500 Rooms from $3.50 
KARL C. WEBER 

President and General Manager 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



May, J 949 



By J. Ross Dunnigan 



THE SAN FRANCISCO MATCHES 

The official bulletin of March 20, 1949 should have had 
the score for the weather included as well as the shooters' 
scores. It would have gone somewhat along this vein. Wind 
0, velocity 0, clear and warm. And a swell day as one could 
wish for. The first day of spring sure sprung with a nicety 
that had all the shooters whistling and sitting out in back 
of the spectators' gallery soaking up all that nice sunshine. 
A great many of our regulars were absent either because 
they were marching in the St. Patrick's Day parades or 
were on their way south to the matches in Calexico. The 
day was one of those days when everyone seemed to want 
to help out the other fellow by putting a few shots on his 
target sometime during the match. It was the biggest "hit' 
the-other-guy's-target" days we have had on the range — it 
soon became a very bad habit and not relished by those 
who had a good score in the balance. Ralph Kline, the 
shooting T-man, sure had a swell start in the .22 National 
when he shot a 294 for first place — not a bad score either. 
Karl Schaugaard's 291 in the center-fire national wasn't to 
be sneezed at, either. And his 199 in the timed-fire match 
was also a lulu. The scores at the range are now getting so 
high it won't be long till there will only be about a 6-point 
difference in the scores of the Masters and the Tyros. And 
when the smoke of the day cleared away Inspector Jack 
Ahern of the S.F. Police Department had grabbed another 
tournament for himself with the high aggregate for the 
tournament. Also, at this time we definitely will not pub- 
lish another picture of Jack as he has had too much pub- 
licity by winning the tournaments all together too often. 
If'n you don't know what he looks like look in the last issue 

of the Journal, the issue before and so on ad infinitum. 
* * * 

As our editor, and boss, Opie Warner, is going east 
to drive out his new car this month we have to cut down 
space to save time so the boss can get away for his first 
vacation in 10 years — the lucky stiff! The Oakland matches 
for April were won by Bob Chow of San Francisco, but 
as we said before we ain't go no space to give out with all 
the dope on the matches. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION 
SHOOTER'S SUPPLIES 



Headquarters for 
Reloading Tools and Equipment — Gun Crank Tools and Specialties 
Bullets. Powder, Primers, Ideal & Pacific Tools, Gunsights, Hunting & 
Target Scopes. Match Equipment, Targets, Gun Cases, Gunstocks, Pistol 
Grips, Checkering Tools. Holsters, Blueing Kits, Gun Cleaning and mainte- 
nance supplies, Hobby Tools. 



Driver Equipment Company 

1152 Valencia Street. Phone Mission 7-3989 



A couple of old timers back on the lines after man 
months of absence were Lucille Spriggle of Vallejo and 
Herb Reid from Healdsburg. Herb did as well as could be 
expected but Lucille had difficulty in keeping her shots on 
her own target — much to the consternation of those shoot- 
ing beside her. Another real old timer was Cap Wadman 







from Marin County 
greaser he has patented 



Fred Kline 

who showed up with a sizer and 
for 35 bucks a copy. 



Bill Markell of our town, had shot nine lo's in the slow- 
fire string of the Camp Perry match and was wondering 
how he could get that target and if he would have time 
to get everybody's autograph as it would be his first pos- 
sible score in a match. Bill was so jittery on that last shot 
we thought he never would get it off, but he did and 

spoiled his chances by throwing a wide 9. 

* * 4 

The Seattle Police Team stopped off for the matches on 
their way to Calexico. Led by that tall gent Captain Day, 
the team was made up of E. Steele, Henry Kocshak and 
Herb Wamsley. Cap told us that the first ten shots would 
tell whether they continued to the Calexico matches or 

turn around and go home. They went South. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Krupa, the diminutive Navy officer, had a 
swell score in the center-fire national match and was all set 
for the top score when he had a nice misfire on the last shot 
of the time fire string and dropped 10 points and the 
match. We didn't hear what he said but from the looks on 
his face it wasn't very nice. We betcha! 

TRANSIT SMOKE SHOP 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Gordon Partee 

FINEST IN LIQUORS AND TOBACCOS 

85 First Street 



CALIFORNIA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



The ex-Navy CPO, Nels Hansen, decides he has not had 
enuf sleep since arriving home so just grabs off a few 
snatches of shut-eye, but grabbed too much as he missed 
the slow-fire string in the first match and wasn't allowed 
to finish the match because of his sleeping ability. Nels is 
now another member of our great fraternity 
* * * 

Sacramento sent down to our matches Doc George 
Chappell, C. H. Wyman and Jeff Iliff as the other guys 
who were on their way to the Calexico matches. It was the 
first time any of the trio were here and being new shooters 
were having a pretty bad go of it to keep out the butter- 
flies. 




Cliff Hatch 

Speaking of the Oakland matches we would like to give 
a short and very quick boost to Lieutenant Cliff Hatch of 
the Oakland Police Department for his untiring efforts for 
the Oakland Pistol and Rifle Club in assuming the re- 
sponsibilities of getting that gang of ornery shooters on 
the lines and keeping 'em happy. Cliff is kind of master 
of ceremonies, major-domo and general all-around chef de 
guerreand a smart job he does of it, too! We happen to 
have a picture of Cliff in action, stop-watch in hand ready 
to swing back the targets on the pistoleers and want to 
give you a good look at the hard-working so-and-so. 

* * * 

It was a beautiful day for ex-Navy Lieutenant Spriggle, 
especially in the Camp Perry match. A possible slow fire, 
a possible timed fire and a nice juicy 72 in the rapid fire 
string. What happened? Not the jitters but just a couple of 
#**?..**-**!! mis-fires! We saw the gent a couple of days 
after the match and he was still going around in a fog. 

Heartbreaking. 

* * * 

Mary Prior, lieutenant in charge of Personnel at Camp 
Stoneman has just received orders transferring her to a 
new post in Germany. Just when Mary was learning to 



shoot those .45 cannons without shaking all the meat off 
her frame with each shot. Maybe she can practice in the 
land of the Krauts and come back after her two-year hitch 
and really hit the target. 

* * * 

Plenty of new shooters to fill up the gap left by the 
regular customers. San Francisco had Bob Hill, Nello Laz- 
2ari, Bob Fenno, W. D. Paul and Ed Payne. Captain Tom 
Berndeen from Camp Stoneman, V. E. Clyde and F. E. 
McFarland from Alameda, Dan Dewey from Watsonville, 
Charley Donovan from Treasure Island and F. J. Gomes 
from Tiburon made up the newcomers — and welcome they 
are, to be sure. 

.22 Rational Match 

Master Ralph Kline 294 

Expert Dick Thomas 286 

Sharpshooter Dan Carrick 277 

Marksman I. L. Kirch 273 

Marksman Lloyd Suey 266 

C. F. Rational Match 

Master Karl Schaugaard 291 

Expert Jerry Monheim 284 

Sharpshooter Jerry Kennedy 269 

Marksman I. L. Krch 261 

Marksman Lloyd Suey 247 

Camp Perry Match 

Master Jack Ahern 299 

Expert Fred Peixotto 293 

Sharpshooter Jack Fink 285 

Marksman I. L. Krch 283 

Marksman Lloyd Suey 268 

C. F. Timed Fire Match 

Master Karl Schaugaard 199 

Expert H. B. Krupa 196 

Sharpshooter Jack Fink 191 

Marksman I. L. Krch 189 

Marksman Jack Gibbons 184 

.45 National Match 

Master Bob Chow 288 

Expert DaveMenary 272 

Sharpshooter Harry O'Dell 275 

Marksman C. F. Waterman 259 

Marksman Jerry Kennedy 258 

Aggregate Match 

Master Jack Ahern 1066 

Expert Jerry Monheim 1040 

Sharpshooter Jack Fink 999 

Marksman I. L. Krch 1006 

Marksman O. L. Freel 968 

Team Scores 
Class "A" 

1st— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team No. 1 1154 

2nd— S. F. Police Team No. 2 1151 

3rd— S. F. Police Team No. 1 1150 

Class "B" 

1st— S. F. Police Revolver Club No. 4 1054 

2nd— Pittsburgh Rifle and Pistol Club 1033 

3rd— S. F. Police Reserve Motor Unit 1099 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, J 949 



CHIEF G. E. WEST OF WOODLAKE 

Chief West was horn in the beautiful Ozark mountains 
of Missouri in 1907, the home of our President Truman. 

Chief West came to California and Woodlake in 1934, 
at which time he went to work on a ranch as foreman, 
where he spent several years. He was so popular with his 




Chief Gus E. West 

fellow man that he was asked several times to take the 
Chief's job. He finally accepted in 1941 and still retains the 
same position and respect which has always been given him 
in this small but thriving ranch country about 16 miles 
from Visalia in the beautiful foothils of the Sierra Nevada 
mountains. 

The Chief is married to his boyhood sweetheart also 
from Missouri, Mary Raef. They have one son 13 years 
old, William Gus West, better known as Bill, who is 
attending the local school. 

Woodlake's Police Department consists of thre men: 
Gus E. West, Chief, and Patrolmen Chlo Nelson and 
Harold Scott. They have only one car, and need another 
badly. Their radio call letters are KAZF No. 1 at the 
Visalia Sheriff's office. 



CACTUS COURT 

Wm. Fricke, Proprietor 
Phone 1592 



Box 25 7 
1905 North Main Street 



EAST OAKLAND GLASS CO. 

MIRRORS 
J. F. Kilner 



Phone ANdover 1-1676 

OAKLAND 



5014 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



H. F. WALKER CO. 

MAYONNAISE - SYRUP - HORSE RADISH - MUSTARD 

MEXICAN HOT - CATSUP - VINEGAR - SALAD OIL 

PICKLES - OLIVES - EXTRACTS - SPICES 

SALAD DRESSING - CHEESE 



186 Sevenlh Street TEmplebar 2-8144 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



BLANKENSHIP MOTORS, Inc. 



2744 East Twelfth Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



J. H. MACPHERSON 8c STAFF 

Formerly F. W. Laufer, Inc. 
OPTOMETRISTS - OPTICIANS 

Telephone HIghgate 4-4010 1438 San Pablo Avenue 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



R. L. (Bob) HUBBARD 

BRANCH SALES MANAGER 

Phone GLencourt 2-4588 1101 Grove Street 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

SUN ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

General Office: Phone Newcastle 6000 

6323 AVONDALE AVENUE CHICAGO 3 1. ILL. 



MEXICALI ROSE RESTAURANT 

"Milo," Manager 

GENUINE MEXICAN DISHES 
AND ATMOSPHERE 



OAKLAND 



Phone HIgate 4-9270 
Corner Clay and Seventh Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SWeetwood 8-5144 



Res. TRinidad 2-8671 



GEORGE E. HARRIS 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
14263 East 14th Street 



NORTH LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA SAN LEANDRO 



CALIFORNIA 



OASIS AUTO COURT 

AND TEXACO SERVICE STATION 



EAST RICHMOND MARKET 



Phone 730 
1800 North Main Street 



NORTH LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



999 San Pablo Avenue 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



LA DUE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

Advertisers Buildings - 324 Thirteenth Street 



New Macdonald Grocery and Meat Market 

B. MENEGHELLI 



OAKLAND 



3828 Macdonald Ave. 

CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



Phone Richmond 3158 

CALIFORNIA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

THE CANDID FRIEND 

By Opie L. Warner 



Page 25 



A few weeks from now, due to a provision in our city 
budget for the fiscal year 1948-49, about two hundred 
young men will sit in at our Police Academy for intensive 
training in the profession of policing. As a result of Civil 
Service examinations these recruits have been chosen as 
proper subjects for the arduous life work of preserving the 
peace in this great metropolis. 

Some of this group have just about cast their first vote. 
Some of them have had a couple of years as wage earners 
and know a little of the world-wide problem of making a 
living; and, due to the fact that the entrance age to the 
San Francisco Police Department is 35, it is more than 
possible some of them have tasted stinging setbacks in their 
attempts to keep pace with the exacting tempo of present- 
day competition. 

Thoroughly realizing police department exactions I can 
tell these hopeful young recruits that, individually and col- 
lectively, men in the three groups I have just mentioned 
will be disillusioned, as to their chosen life work, even 
before they graduate as peace officers — that seeing that 
they get their feet on the ground and come to a thorough 
realization of the civic responsibilities they have sworn to 
assume is one of the main objects sought by the Police 
Academy authorities. 

While at the Academy each day it will be a full day — so 
full that graduation day will be welcome indeed. 

During the days of instruction the veteran members of 
the staff will have an opportunity to discuss the various 
members of the class and prognosticate. As in the case of 
groups that have gone through the Police Academy for the 
past decade the instructors will have to admit their ap- 
praisements were, in the main, faulty; the apparent 
"naturals" were merely good actors — and, after a year or 
two, some of those who, to all appearances, were the ordi- 
nary run of the mill had proven themselves so persistently 
adept they had been drafted into the Inspectors Bureau. 
The same holds good in the matter of promotion examina- 
tions — the plodders of the police school seem to more than 



hold their own in climbing up the ladder of success. Defi- 
nitely, men are what they honestly want to be. Success 
comes only through strife. 

Graduation day out at the Police Academy always seems 
a too serious affair to the school staff. They feel they have 
done their level best to make a good police officer of each 
and every recruit — yes, worked as hard for them as if they 
were their own children. The thing that worries these fine 
men is : How many of the group will prove failures. 

After one class graduated I noticed one of San Fran- 
cisco's best police instructors standing away from the 
crowd. I approached him and, on seeing his eyes were 
dimmed, I inquired as to the cause. He merely answered: 
"They are fine lads; I hate to think of anything happening 
to them. I wish I had never heard or read those knowing 
words: 'What will the harvest be?' " 



Em^le Bouhaben 



Established 189S 



Union Pacific Linen 8C Towel Supply 

WE RENT TOWELS - LINENS - APRONS - GARMENTS 
(White or Colors) 



OAKLAND 



Phone Hlgate 4-3342 



830 - 28th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



BAKER MORTUARY 

Call Day or Night 

BURIAL INSURANCE CARRIED 
Charles Baker, Deputy Coroner, Alameda County 



Phone TEmplebar 2-8776 1214 Eighth Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Greetings from 



GUS KROESEN 



450 12th Street 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



JACK'S AUTO TAILORING 

Wallace Jack, Mgr. 
AUTOMOBILE UPHOLSTERING 



GOLDEN GRAPE 

L. D. Ferrell 

WINES - LIQUORS - BEER 
ITALIAN-AMERICAN DELICATESSEN 



OAKLAND 



4027 East 14th Street 



Phone KEllog 3-6131 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



3920 E. 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



DR. E. S. FREITAS 

VETERINARIAN 

DOG AND CAT SPECIALIST 

MODERN VETERINARY HOSPITAL 



COCHRAN AND CELLI 



CHEVROLET BLOCK 



Phone KEllog 2-1711 

4231 East Fourteenth Street, Near High Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Twelfth and Harrison Streets 
OAKLAND 



Hlgate 4-005S 

CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



LAS VEGAS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

(Continued from page 8 ) 

Luther Horner, since deceased. 

Since assuming charge of the Las Vegas Police Depart- 
ment he has applied his knowledge of police administra- 
tion, acquired by over a quarter of a century as a peace 
officer. He has 60 men and women in his department, who 
prior to his appointment as top man, had achieved a 
splendid record in suppressing crime and apprehending 
such criminals that sought to gain a little easy money by 
holdups, burglaries and other criminal offenses. He has 
done much to streamline the organisation of the force. 

We doubt if there is any city, metropolitan or small 
that can excel the Las Vegas Police Department in enforc- 
ing the laws of the land. 

Chief Malburg has a Detective Bureau of six men 
headed by Lieutenant B. J. Handlon. This unit of the De- 
partment has built up a fine reputation. Since 1944 there 
hasn't been a murder that has been unsolved. The recovery 
of stolen property is not equaled by any other Police De- 
partment in the country. The records show that 69 per 
cent of stolen property was recovered in Las Vegas during 
the year 1948. The nation's average is 22]/z per cent. 

The Record Bureau has been changed under Chief Mal- 
burg. Now all phases of the Department's functions are 
consolidated and all information about criminal activities, 
complaints, actions of the members of the Police Depart- 
ment on same and other matters having to do with law 
enforcement are readily accessible. 

Sergeant Ernest O. Haselett is in charge of the Bureau 
of Identification, and this branch of the Department is up 
to date in every detail. 

A lot of traffic, a great portion from outside points con- 
verge on Las Vegas each year. It is well regulated and 
getting a tag for the first time is an experience that few 
if any ever enjoy in any other place in these United States. 
Here is a sample of the ticket left on the car of a visitor 
to Las Vegas who has violated some traffic law : 

"Howdy Pardner! Welcome to Las Vegas! 

"You have (perhaps unknowingly) violated one of our 

DR. FOSTER H. KRUG 

CHIROPRACTOR • PHYSIOTHERAPIST 



Traffic Ordinances." (Here follows the name of the of- 
fender and the officer who puts the tag on the car.) 

"Traffic laws are for your protection and convenience. 
We will appreciate your cooperation. 

"If at any time we can help make your visit in Las Vegas 
a more pleasant one, please do not hesitate to ask our assist- 
ance. Thank you. 

Police Department." 

That the gesture of good will pays off is evidenced by the 
fact that in 1948 1,600,000 tourists visited Las Vegas and 
during that period only 591 auto accidents occurred. Of 
these three were fatal to its car occupants, and in 102 there 
were injuries to persons. 

The patrol and detective cars of the Department are all 
equipped with two-way radios from the Police Radio Sta- 
tion. 

The patrol force is well trained and appear on duty in 
snappy and well fitting uniforms. 

Las Vegas Police Department Personnel 

Robert F. Malburg, Chief of Police. 

Samuel W. Irick, George W. Allen, Jr., Lieutenants. 

Sergeants: Archie B. Wells, Charles De Vere Ross, 
Elmer E. Gardner, Roy E. MacKenrie. 

Assistant Jailer: Don Brenner. 

Detectives: James E. Reid, Jack Barlow, Bruce Woofter, 
Hiram Powell, William Paul Adams. 

Sergeant-Identification: Ernest O Haslett. 

Assistant-Identification Bureau: Robert F. Montgomery. 

Patrolmen: Jock Palace, Bob Cooper, Richard Galen 
Lee, Arthur R. Nicholls, Floyd E. Young, Joseph T. La 
Voie, Herman L. Moody, David J. Hoggard, James H. 
Pugh, Max Robert Hults, William G. Sweeney, Grant 
Lawson Lytle, Joseph H. Shepp, Harold D. Rowe, John E. 
Skelton, Paul E. Brown, Frank R. Conway, Wayne M. 
McDorman, Charles R. Spencer. Charles A. Virden, Rob- 
ert W. Church, A. C. "Mickey" Hunter, Lisle Bordwell, 



OPEN 24 HOURS 



John A. Katsaros. Proprietor 



IN LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, WE ATE AT 

SAM'S CAFE 

THE HOME OF SIZZLING STEAKS 
LAS VEGAS' FINEST DOWNTOWN RESTAURANT 



Office Phone 2942 
123 N. THIRD STREET 



Res. Phone 845-W 

LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 



320 East Fremont 



Telephone 1288 



LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



JIMMIE'S PLACE 

Jimmie and Joe Harris, Props. 

OVERTON'S BEER PARLOR 
DANCING AND BILLIARDS 



OVERTON (Clark County on Lake Meade). NEVADA 



HICKORY WOOD BAR-B-Q 



LAS VEGAS 



Phone 4318 



NEVADA 



CORK'n BOTTLE LIQUOR STORE 



508 Fremont Street 



Phone 2244 



LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA LAS VEGAS 



SHANGRI-LA CAFE 

ORIENTAL DISHES 
Every Order Freshly Prepared 

Phone 4266 216 Stewart Street 



NEVADA 



May, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



Ray K. Sheffer, Fred Powell, William Banks, Johnny T. 
Moran, Colby T. Petersen. 

Student Jailer: Charles A. Heintselman. 

Juvenile Officer: Bernard G. Morrow. 

School Guard: J. C. Thompson. 

Policewoman: Annabelle Plunkctt. 

Matron: Katharine Santongue. 

Maintenance Man: Paul J. Pritchard. 

Civilian Clerks: Marie Bradshaw, Teresa F. Trahan, 
Naydene Jennings, Muriel Mitchell, Alice A. Bright, 
Georgene M. Spain. 

Dispatchers: Hildreth Hannefield, Helen N. Gille, 
Afton Clark Jordon. 

"What Is a Police Department" is the title of an article 
by Chief Malburg which we will reprint in a near future 
edition of the Police and Peace Officers' Journal. 

SKY LARK CAFE 

MODERN RESTAURANT AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



VOGUE STUDIO 

PHOTOGRAPHS THAT LIVE 
Portra'ts of Distinction - Copying - Enlarging - Coloring 

_,_„.. 434 Macdonald Ave. Phone Richmond 57 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



SQUIRE CAFE 

Dixie Loder, Prop. 

BREAKFAST. LUNCH, DINNERS 

AND SHORT ORDERS 

WOODLAKE (Tulare County). CALIFORNIA 



ATWATER 



VANS PLACE 

WHERE YOU GET WHISKEY 
IN YOUR DRINKS 

On Highway 99 



CALIFORNIA 



Homestead Cafe and Pool Hall 

P. O. Box 151 

FARMERSVILLE CALIFORNIA 



LOS ANGELES 



5550 W. Imperial Highway 



CALIFORNIA 



THE RICE BOWL 

Orders Put up to take out. Visit the best place to dine. Now serving 
Merchants Lunch. Fried Shrimp - Chow Mein - Chinese style com- 
bination dinner - Chop Suey • American Dishes - Short Orders. 



Telephone 52 5 78 
SAN BERNARDINO 



608 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



KEIIog 3-4122 Jimmie Newby 

STUDIO MUSIC SHOP 

ALL INSTRUMENTS TALK IN A 
PROFESSIONAL MANNER 

3850 East 14th Street OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone HIgate 4-0871 Res. Phone OLympic 3-8429 

PAVLIGER LABORATORIES 

X-RAY 

^.„, ...^ Suite 327 Wakefield Building, 426 17th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



ONTARIO 



EVAN'S FRUIT STAND 

800 West "A" Street 



BOULDER LAUNDRY AND CLEANERS 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 128 

BOULDER CITY 



WE USE SOFT WATER 

1300 Wyoming Street 



NEVADA 



LO.VA LINDA 



CLIFF'S PLACE 

H. C. Bufford, Prop. 
BEER BY THE PITCHER 
Highway 99 and Waterman 



BOULDER CITY DRIVE IN 



BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNERS 
AND SHORT ORDERS 



CALIFORNIA BOULDER CITY 



FOOTHILL MARKET 

A. MARTINEZ. INC. 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE - GROCERIES - CIGARS 

TOBACCO - SOFT DRINKS, Etc. 

Phone Upland 316-172 680 E. Foothill 

UPLAND CALIFORNIA 

Compliments to All Peace Officers 



NEVADA 



VICTORY INN 



Mrs. Schroeder, Mr. Radi, Props. 
2502 Rendondo Beach Boulevard 

REDONDO BEACH 



WHITNEY BAR 

QUALITY DRINKS SERVED 
B. M. Reed, Owner 

WHITNEY (Clark County). NEVADA 

UVADA MOTEL 

MODERN. AIR-COOLED CABINS 
RATES: $3.00 and up 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 4292-W 

NORTH LAS VEGAS 



1937 North Main Street 



NEVADA 



Enjoy Shuffleboard With Us 

FRED'S CAFE 

DRAUGHT AND BOTTLE BEER - FINE FOODS 



PHIL'S MARKET 



GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES - FROZEN FOODS 
BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



LENNOX 



4445 W. Imperial Hwy. 



Phone Orchard 7-9961 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FERNANDO 



13803 Foothill Boulevard 



CALIFORNIA 



THACHER PANTRY 

BREAKFAST o LUNCH • DINNERS 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

6 A.M. to 8 P.M. Rose Lewis, Prop. 

Or. 101 Highway. CAMARILLO. CALIFORNIA 



HANDLEY'S HAPPY DAZE 

ENJOY OUR SHUFFLEBOARD AND TELEVISION 
BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 



INGLEWOOD 



10521 Prairie Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



ABRAHAM ORTIZ 



545 Meta Street 



OXNARD 



CALIFORNIA 



MAGGIE'S PANTRY 

SOUTH ON L. A. HIGHWAY 91 
Phone 3252 



LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



GEORGE'S CAFE & LIQUOR STORE 

George and Herman 
COCKTAILS AND MEXICAN FOOD 

Phone Torrey 632936 • Liquor Store Phone 63536 

14408 Pioneer Boulevard NORWALK. CALIFORNIA 



SILVER CLUB 

Phone 2180 

GOLDEN CAMEL BAR 

10c BEER 

Phone 737 
108 - 110 North First Street 



LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



CHIEF VERNON OF RICHMOND P. D. 

(Continued from page 14) 

Department activities Chief Vernon took into considera- 
tion the topographical situation of Richmond. The heats 
are so arranged that not a foot of Richmond is overlooked 
by the alert officers. 

Chief Vernon has been a member of the Oakland Police 
Department 15 years. To this he brings the practical in- 
instruction from Northwestern University and the Uni- 
versity of California. 

A native of Akron, Michigan, he has been a resident of 
the bay area since 1924. 

Before entering the University of California he attended 
and graduated from Berkeley High School. In university 
he was a member of the jay vee rowing crew but his light 
weight kept him from the varsity. However he did row at 
Poughkeepsie. 

After obtaining his degree of Bachelor of Science at 
U. C. in 1928, he took employment with the American 
Trust Company, then went to the Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph department. 

He joined Oakland's Police Department a few years 
later and has long ago determined to make police work his 
career. 

Chief Vernon's charming wife, Thonette, is also a Uni- 
versity of California graduate with the class of 1933. She 
is native born and the mother of three youngsters, Lynne, 
11, Susan, S, and Warren the pride of the household who 
has just passed the year and a half mark. 

The 116 men in the Richmond Police Department under 
Chief Vernon are captained by these officers: 

Captain of Inspectors George Bengley; Captain of Pa- 
trol Division Ernest Phipps; Captain of Traffic Division 
Earl Fitch; Captain of Records and Service Division 
Charles Brown, while Lieutenant Willard Smith heads the 
Juvenile Bureau. 

The Richmond Police Department is assuming sturdy 
growth under the guiding hand of Chief Vernon who 
says: 

"I'm working with a fine body of men. We have found 
much in common. We arc determined to give Richmond 
one of the finest Police Departments in the nation." 



Phone Richmond 3941-J 



S. Hodgeson, Mgr. 



SUNSET MOTEL 

Centrally Located For Shopping 

MODERN. CLEAN HOUSEKEEPING UNITS 

AND SLEEPING ROOMS 

PLEASANT SURROUNDINGS 



RICHMOND WELDERS 

Fred Gardella 

ALL KINDS OF WELDING SERVICE 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 



Phone Rich. 3058 1527 Barrett Avenue 

RICHMOND CALIFORNIA 



Formerly DR. R. H. WEHARA & STAFF 

OPTOMETRISTS 

RUSSELL H. WEHARA, O. D. 

ROGER M. MATOI, O. D. 



2132 Center Strest 



BERKELEY 



THornwa!l 3-10596 

CALIFORNIA 



BILL'S KEY SHOP 

Wm. Imboden, Prop. 

EXPERT LOCKSMITH 

Keys Made - Safe Combination Repairs - Locks Fitted 

Saw Filing - Lawn Mower Grinding - All Kinds of Auto Locks 



Phone Richmond 4997 

RICHMOND 



4th & Macdonald Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



ECONOMY MOTOR SALES 

Distributors of The 
"AUSTIN OF ENGLAND" 



Richmond 6180-W 



531 16th Street 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



Meat Dept. Phone 3668-J 



Grocery Phone 4037 



WORKING MAN'S MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 

DRUGS AND NOTIONS 



533 Cutting Blvd. 



RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



RICHMOND RECREATION CENTER 

Alex Daher, Prop. 

POOL - SNOOKER - BEER - SOFT DRINKS 
TOBACCO - CANDY, ETC. 



Phone Richmond 3898-W 

RICHMOND 



327 MacDonald Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



ANNEX MOBIL SERVICE 

GAS - OIL - ACCESSORIES 
AND COMPLETE LUBRICATION 



715 San Pablo Avenue 



EL CERR1TO 



CALIFORNIA 



1099 San Pablo Avenue on Highway 40 

RICHMOND CALlFORM\ 



SIMONI MOTOR SERVICE 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



RICHMOND 



Phone Richmond 167 



864 23rd Street 



CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



RICHMOND 



THE HUB CAFE 

Bill Luiz, Prop. 

COCKTAILS - MIXED DRINKS 

619 Macdonald Ave. Phone 1113 



MASTERCRAFT TILE 

and 
ROOFING COMPANY 

I - 20th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



NICHOLL MARKET 

3431 Macdonald Avenue 



CALIFORNIA RICHMOND 



CALIFORNIA 



May, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



EL RANCHO MARKET 

Rodriguez. Prop. 
GROCERIES - FRUITS - WINES - BEER 



Phone TR'nidad 2-9964 

OAKLAND 



9818 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



RAMBLE INN 

HOME COOKING - SANDWICHES 
QUICK LUNCHES 

8101 East Fourteenth Street 



Where Good Friends Meet 

THE MUG CAFE 

Sam and Adolph 

CHOICE WINES - BEERS - LIQUORS 

494 Seventh Street, Corner 7th and Washington 

HIgate 4-9809 OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA PLYWOOD, Inc. 

PLYWOOD -::- INSULATION 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



GLencourt 1-9688 



1403 Fifth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



T & H MARKET 

FRESH MEATS - FRESH VEGETABLES 
GROCERIES - BEER - WINE 

1651 Fourteenth Street 



Phone JUno 8-9939 



AI DeFab:a, Prop. 



CALIFORNIA 



AL'S SPAGHETTI SHACK 

One Mile North of M'l'brae 

SOFT DRINKS - BEER AND WINE 

SPECIALTY AL'S SPAGHETTI 

HOT DOGS - HAMBURGERS 



OAKLAND 



SWAN PHARMACY 

SPECIALISTS IN HERBS AND HERB 
REMEDIES FOR 50 YEARS 

547 Eighth Street 



NU BOX LUNCH 



549 Adeline Street 



CALIFORNIA OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



UNITED STATIONERS 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 

ARTISTS AND DRAFTING MATERIALS 

GREETING CARDS - GIFTS 

ANdover 1-6323 3525 East 14th Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



R. MARCUCCI 

GROCERIES - WINE - BEER 
3432 San Leandro Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Telehone KEUog 2-6878 



Established 1918 



E. W. BECKER 



JEWELRY AND WATCHES 

Authorized Watch Inspector Southern Pacific Lines 

Western Pacific Lines 

33 15 E. Fourteenth Street OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

RUTH'S PASTRY SHOP 

BIRTHDAY AND WEDDING CAKES 
OUR SPECIALTY 



SAN PABLO AUTO WRECKING CO. 

S. Moskowitz 

3285-91 San Pablo Ave. PI 5-3101 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



Atlas Heating and Ventilating Co., Ltd. 



Fhone KEl'og 3-2288 

OAKLAND 



3281 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



1451 32nd S' 



TW 3-1343 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



FRED A. WELLS 

INSURANCE 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 



Established in 1932 



825 Market Street 



ANdover 1-2411 



OAKLAND 



3124 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



C. F. Fr 



ANdover 1-2200 



DANA-FRANE MOTOR CO. 



DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CARS 

DODGE BROTHERS TRUCKS 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR CARS 

2901 East 14th Street OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 



INSURANCE 



FRANCES BEARDEN 



INCOME TAX 



REALTOR 
ANdover 1-1171 - Res. TR. 2-5688 

4428 East 14th Street OAKLAND I, CALIFORNIA 



Phone Andover 1-0763 



Codiga Brothers 



MELROSE SAW WORKS 

LOCKSMITH AND KEY WORKS 

Lawn Mowers and Tools Sharpened - Filing and Grinding 

All Work Guaranteed at Reasonable Prices 

4430 East 14th Street OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

MUELLER BROS. 

PACKERS - SAUSAGE MANUFACTURERS 



OAKLAND 



KEUog 2-7661 



4537 - 4559 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



EMERSON'S EAGLE PHARMACY 

"THE DRUG STORE OF FRIENDLY SERVICE" 



Phone KEilog 2-7202 

OAKLAND 



4701 East 14th Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Bruehl's Metal Manufacturing Co. 

STAMPINGS - TOOLS - DIES 

Office Phone TEmpIebar 2-2990 • Res. Phone TWinoaks 3-3975 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

ACETYLENE & E' ECTRIC RODS. SUPPLIES 
& EQUIPMENT - ARC WELDERS 

OAKLAND WELDING SUPPLY 

REPAIR SERVICE ON ALL MAKES OF EQUIPMENT 

I C Unruh, Prop - TW'noaks 3-2472 180 Twelfth Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

Bakers Storage 8C Moving Service, Inc. 

MOTOR VAN SERVICE • FURNITURE DEPARTMENT 

CALIFORNIA • OREGON • WASHINGTON • NEVADA 

Phone Piedmont 5 3503 3233 Market Street 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

EXCHANGE LINEN SERVICE CO. 

2101 Un'on Street TEmpIebar 2-6377 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

GORDON'S GROCERY 

1551 Alice St. TWinoaks 3-1715 

OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 

CASTELLO GROCERY 

CHOICE WINES AND BEER 

GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

4738 West Street Piedmont 5-2233 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



C. M. WALTER 



REFRIGERATION SPECIALISTS, Ltd. 



COMMERCIAL - HOUSEHOLD 

REFRIGERATION ENGINEERS 

SALES AND SERVICE 



Broadway Building 



OAKLAND 



CALIFORNIA 



OAKLAND 



KEilog 4-5140 Night Calls LO 8-1839 

2264 East Twelfth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Mav, 1949 



NO. CAL. POLICE COMMUNICATIONS 

I Continued from page 15) 

Reports from Commercial members followed: 

Bill Kellogg, for Motorola, Inc., reported on repeaters, 
and passed out some repeater information folders. 

French, Link Co., reported that Link Co. now has 4^0 
Mc. and 9^0 Mc. equipment. C. L. Davenport, for Frank 
Edwards Co., reported on High current generators. 

F. L. Deetkin, for General Electric Co., reports G.E. 
now also has some 9^0 Mc. equipment. 

Roy Penlon, reported for Aerial Engineers, and dis- 
cussed a problem concerning aluminum towers not being 
legal in San Francisco. 

Acting President Keller at this point reported for the 
By-Laws and Resolutions Committee, and presented a 
draft of the new Constitution and By-Laws which were 
read for all members present. 

A general discussion followed concerning some points 
that needed clarification, and were rewritten to the ap- 
proval of all. 

A motion was made that this draft of the By-Laws 
should be presented to the members present as an emer- 
gency measure and passed as such. Moved by J. M. Lewis, 
seconded by Ray Meyers, carried by members present. 

The meeting was then recessed at 2 :15 p.m. for refresh- 
ments, whereupon all members reassembled at 2:45 p.m. 
and held a general technical discussion concerning T.V. in- 
terference, 72-76 Mc. equipment, 960 Mc. equipment, and 
their general problems. 

HOTEL GRAYSTONE 



66 Geary Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-4885 - 86 



CALIFORNIA 



M. SCHUSSLER & CO. 



657 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-3228 



CALIFORNIA 



KUNST BROS. 

FACTORY FRESH PAINTS - WALL PAPER 

ATwater 2-7232-2-7233 419 Bayshore Blvd. 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DIAMOND FRENCH LAUNDRY CO. 

LACES AND LACE CURTAINS A SPECIALTY 

All Work Guaranteed First Class 

Phone WEst 1-7614 2872-78 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

CADILLAC - BUICK SPECIALIST 
Authorized CHEVRON Dealer 

MERWIN, HOLTZEN & FIORA 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE and RECONSTRUCTION 
Office Phone ORdway 3-3767 1946 Polk Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC EMPLOYERS INSURANCE CO. 

300 Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MATHEWS & LIVINGSTON 

MARINE INSURANCE AGENTS 



317 Montgomery Street 



DEBS DEPARTMENT STORE 

FOUR STORES FOR VALUES 



1641 Fillmore, near Post 
2032 M'ssion, near 17th 



2430 Mission, bet. 20th and 21st 
1318 Stockton, near Broadway 



WAlnut 1-8757 
SAN FRANCISCO 



KARL'S SHOE STORE 

1527 Fillmore Street 



CALIFORNIA 






VENETIAN BAKING CO. 



2200 Powell Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LAN WAH CAFE 

Open 11 A.M. to 2 A.M. 

CHOP SUEY - AMERICAN AND CHINESE DISHES 

2323 Mission Street, near 19th Street 

Phone Mission 7-93 18 SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

BINNS MACHINE & TOOL WORKS 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 
Office Phone HEmlock 1-3570 

Factory and Office 1072 Bryant Street and 87 McLea Court 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MILT MORRIS 

Auto Spring and Wheel Service - Brake Lining - Mufflers - Clutch 

Facing - Bearings - Clutches - Springs - Wheels - Cylinder 

Hon'ng - Drum Turcvng - Knee Action Parts 

Phone Fillmore 6-1224 701 Octavia Street, Comer Fulton 

SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIFORNIA 



SPICE ISLANDS CO. 



70 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LEXINGTON MARKET 

CALIFORNIA WINES - COLD BEER - GROCERIES - MEATS 
CHICKENS - VEGETABLES - FRUITS IN SEASON 



2791 Bush Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone WEst 1-9951 

CALIFORNIA 



O'NEILL'S MARKET 



Tom Tung, Prop. 
GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 

BEER AND WINES 

ATwater 2-8870 4622 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

GOLDEN GATE NURSERY 

LANDSCAPE ENGINEERS & GARDENERS 
Frank F. Mettam, Owner 
6726 GEARY BOULEVARD MAIN NURSERY 

at 31st Avenue 516 - 42nd Ave. at Geary 

SKyline 1-8141 BAyview 1-2837 



PAUL'S TAVERN 



Paul and Marie, Props. 

3346 Mission Street VAlencia 4-9775 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Matt Spoler Edward A. Rodgers 

COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

RECOVERING - REPAIRING - REFINISHING 

NEW FURNITURE MADE TO ORDER 

Fillmore 6-7793 2228 Lombard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



PIONEER PIPE CO. 



F. G. Lundberg 

RECONDITIONED AND NEW PIPE 

CASING. VALVES AND FITTINGS 

UNderhill 1-0800 634 Townsend Street 

s\\ FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



DeWALT HOTEL 



CENTER HOTEL 



201 Leavenworth St. 
OR 3-9110 



1130 Market St. 



MA 1-9274 



AUBURN HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



481 M^nna St. 
DO 2-9761 
SAN FRANCISCO 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



Some Are True - Some Are False - RATE YOURSELF 



1. Among other offenses the police courts have juris- 
diction of all cases of assault and battery. 

2. A complaint of any misdemeanor triable in a police 
court must be filed within a year after its commission. 

3. If a police judge is satisfied that a public offense is tri- 
able before him has been committed he must in all 
cases issue a warrant for the arrest of the accused. 

4. If a change of venue is granted the case must be trans- 
ferred to another justice of the same county. 

5. For all public offenses which are tried before it the 
court must decide questions of law. 

6. In a public proceedings in a police court the jury may 
not decide questions of law and fact. 

7. In a police court, after hearing all the evidence, the 
jury may decide upon their verdict without even leav- 
ing the courtroom. 

8. After the cause has been submitted to them the jury 
cannot be discharged until they have reached a ver- 
dict. 

9. A coroner's jury cannot consist of less than nine per- 
sons. 

10. No person selected to appear as a juror before the 
corner is subject to be challenged by any party. 

1 1 . There can be only one inquest upon a body. 

12. The verdict of a coroner's jury must always be in 
writing. 

13. A search warrant is an order in writing in the name 
of the people, signed by a magistrate and directed to 
a peace officer. 

14. To authorize police officers to break open an outer 
or inner door of a house to serve a search warrant, all 
that is necessary is to be refused admittance, after 
notice of his authority and purpose. 

1>. A search warrant, unless executed, is void after 10 
days. 

16. Part II of the Penal Code deals with crimes and pun- 
ishments. 

17. The rule of Common Law that penal statutes are to 
be strictly construed maintains in the application of 
the Penal Code. 

18. Words used in the Penal Code in the present tense 
imply the past as well as the present. 

19. Words which have acquired a peculiar meaning, 
which is also appropriate, in the law must be con- 
strued according to such peculiar and appropriate 
meaning. 

20. In the law the rule is absolute that the word "month" 
means a calendar month. 

21. The Penal Code deals with the impeachment of cer- 
tain officers. 

22. An act committed in violation of the law forbidding 
or commanding it, and to which is annexed upon con- 
viction the punishment of death, is known as a crime, 
but it may also be known as a public offense. 

23. Every crime which is not punishable in the state 
prison by death or by imprisonment is a misdemeanor. 



24. The minimum punishment for a felony is the same as 
the maximum punishment for a misdemeanor. 

25. The only way by which intent is manifest is by the 
circumstances connected with the offense. 

26. The only way a crime can be constituted is by the 
joint operation of act and intent. 

27. Among the facts the jury may take into consideration 
is the fact that the accused was intoxicated at the 
time he committed any crime charged. 

28. All persons, 14 years old or over, are capable of com- 
mitting crimes. 

29. Married women, under certain circumstances, are not 
capable of committing felonies. 

30. Persons who committed the act or made the omission 
charged are among the class who are criminally re- 
sponsible for the commission of the crime. 

GEORGE REHN 

PLUMBING • HEATING 

JOBBING PROMPTLY A 1 TENDED TO 

Phone MArket 1-1039- 1-1040 1919 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JACKSON MARKET 



1201 Jackson St. 



GR 4-4861 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GArfield 1-7297 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments 

ELVIS COMPANY 

78 Sacramento Street • Elvis Building 



EXbrook 2-4320 



CALIFORNIA 



PREMIER PAPER BOX CO. 

The HOME of HANDLE ATTACHED BOXES 

FOLDING BOXES OF ALL DESCRIPTION 

Telephone GRaystone 4-1878 - 1879 

677 North Point at Columbus Ave. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MacGREGOR - GOLDSMITH 

SPORTS EQUIPMENT 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

PHIL LYNCH SPORTING GOODS CO. 

Phone YUkon 6-69SO 623 Mission Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GUY'S SMOKE SHOP 

Guy R. Powell 

CIGARS • CIGARETTES • MAGAZINES 

CANDIES • SOFT DRINKS 

Graystone 4-9SS4 712 Polk Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

John S. Currie, Gen. Manager Established 1898 

UNITED VAN LINES, Inc., NATION WIDE MOVING 

PIERCE-RODOLPH 

STORAGE COMPANY, Ltd. 
WEst 1-0828 1450 Eddy Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL STATLER 

G. Ben Miller, Manager 
"IN THE HEART OF THE CITY" 



154 Ellis Street, near Powell 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SUtter 1-4530 

CAL1FORN1 



14th & VALENCIA GROCERY 

PHONE US FOR YOUR ORDER 



Phone MArket 1-0876 

SAN FRANCISCO 



304 Valencia Street 

CALIFORNIA 



Phone YUkon 2-3493 



Open 11:30 a.m. to 3 a.m. 



UNIVERSAL CAFE 

THE BRIGHTEST SPOT IN CHINATOWN 

824 Washington Street, San Francisco, California 

Between Stockton St. and Grant Avenue 

SPECIALIZING IN CHINESE DISHES ONLY 



Page 32 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



31. A person who commits burglary in another state and 
who comes into this state immediately after the com- 
mission of the act is liable to punishment under the 
laws of this state. 

32. Under the Penal Code there are only two groups of 
crime. 

33. All persons, who, after full knowledge that a crime 
has been committed, are accessories, if they conceal 
it from the magistrate. 

34. Unlawfully resisting a police officer is a misdemeanor. 

35. Extortion is a felony. 

36. In law, the rule is absolute that the word "month" 
means a calendar month, unless otherwise expressed. 

37. In the Penal Code the word "person" means only a 
natural person. 

38. If a signature to a sworn statement is made by a mark 
it is sufficient if one witness subscribe his signature 
thereto in order to serve its purpose. 

39. In law, words used in the masculine gender include 
the feminine and neuter. 

40. Civil damages cannot be recovered for acts punishable 
as crimes. 

41. The Civil Code deals with the impeachment of certain 

named public officers. 

42. Evidence obtained upon the examination of a person 
as a witness may not be used against him upon any 
proceedings founded upon a charge of perjury com- 
mitted in such examination. 

MODERN GROCERY 



163 Seventh Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HEmlock 1-2046 



CALIFORNIA 



SWEDISH MASSAGE PARLOR 

ELECTRIC CABINET BATHS 
Excellent Service • 11 A.M. to 7 P.M. 

698 14th St., at Market Phone UNderhill 1-5399 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Mission 7-4003 F. Bereis 

F. & G. PORK STORE, Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE SAUSAGES AND CORNED MEATS 

Wholesale and Retail 

2 7 70 Mission Street SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



NEW VICTORY COFFEE SHOP 



88 Seventh Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



COMPLIMENTS 
T. W. G. 



hhone UNderhill 1-9283 



EL CAMINO 



Mary E. Saulovich 



WHISKEY - BEER - WINE 

SANDWICHES - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

3192 - 16th Street, Near Guerrero 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOSEPH C. FLETCHER 

Factory Representative 
HIGH GRADE TOOLS 



1415 Folsom Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 1-2991 

CALIFORNIA 



THE MANGER RESTAURANT 

(Formerly Bonini's Manger) 
UNIQUE LUNCHEONS AND DINNERS 

Phone GA 1-9402 for Reservations • Closed on Sunday 

61 I WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Bob Taylor 



Fred Ford 



CHAS. & BILL'S PLACE 

BEER - WINE - LIQUORS - MERCHANTS LUNCH 






MA 1-9380 
SAN FRANCISCO 



1898 Folsom St.. at 15th St. 

CALIFORNIA 



LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST • TEACHER 



545 Sutter Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SUtter 1-4970 



CALIFORNIA 



THE SPORTSMAN'S CLUB 

WE SERVE THE BEST 



893 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DOuglas 2-9479 



CALIFORNIA 



WELCH AND COMPANY 



Maize & Hampl, Owners Elmo E. Maize, Manager 

HOTEL ST. CHARLES 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 

507 Bush Street 



Phone GA 1-9832 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Westwood Park French Laundry 

QUALITY DRY CLEANING SERVICE 
CURTAINS - DRAPES - HATS - TIES 



1031 Ocean Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone JUniper 5-3422 

CALIFORNIA 



FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE IN CALIFORNIA 

EMILIO J. MAIONCHI 

LIQUOR MART 



Phone GArfield 1-2138 
SAN FRANCISCO 



115 Post Street 

CALIFORNIA 



IDEAL PAINT AND WALLPAPER CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 
PAINTERS' and PAPERHANGERS - SUPPLIES 

Phone WEst 1-6331 
SAN FRANCISCO 



2200 Lombard St. (Cor. Steiner) 

CALIFORNIA 



Atlas Heating & Ventilating Co., Ltd. 

EVERYTHING IN HEATING 

DOuglas 2-0377 



557 Fourth Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



TESLUCK REAL ESTATE CO. 



2076 Sutter Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone WEst 1-1100 

CALIFORNIA 



GARRETT M. GOLDBERG PAINT CO. 



Manufacturers Since 1906 



1019 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone UNderhill 1-0192 

CALIFORNIA 



G A L L O S 

EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME 

SPECIAL PRIVILEGES GRANTED TO ALL 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES 



READYMIX CONCRETE CO., Ltd. 



JU 4-2316 
SAN FRANCISCO 



2155 Junipero Serra Blvd. 



18th and Carolina Streets 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3; 



43. Evidence obtained upon the examination of a person 
as a witness cannot be received against him in any 
criminal prosecution. 

44. An act committed in violation of the law forbidding 
or commanding it and to which is annexed upon con- 
viction, punishment of death is known as a public 
offense. 

15. To constitute an act or an omission in the case of a 
crime such act or omission must be in violation of law 
and must carry with it one or more of the penalties 
-described in the Penal Code. 

46. A crime or public offense is an act committed in vio- 
lation of a law forbidding or commanding it. 

47. Every crime which is not punishable by death or im- 
prisonment in the state prison is a misdemeanor. 

48. Every felony is punishable in the state prison. 

49. If a crime is not punishable in the state prison it is 
only a misdemeanor. 

50. If a person convicted of a felony is committed to a 
county jail, by the lawful discretion of the court, it 
shall be deemed a misdemeanor for all purposes after 
such judgment has been imposed. 

* * * 

Of the TRUE and FALSE questions in this issue the 
following numbered questions were TRUE : 

1 2 7 10 12 14 19 21 22 23 
29 32 34 36 44 45 47 48 49 50 



KOREAN'S VICTORY MARKET 

GROCERIES • FRUITS • VEGETABLES 



1030 San Fernando Road 

SAN FERNANDO 



Phone EM 1-2169 

CALIFORNIA 



COLONIAL UPHOLSTERING SHOP 

Makers of 
"FINE CUSTOM FURNITURE" 



Phone Fillmore 6-7793 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2228 Lombard Street 

CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA VULCAN MACARONI CO. 

EXbrook 2-0805 SUtter 1-5274 

445 Drumm Street at Pacific 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



BUON GUSTO 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT AND BAR 

555 Broadway, Corner Columbus Avenue 

Phone GArfield 1-9938 SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 



THE 49'ER CLUB 

Walter Zabel • Hugh Dunlap 



PRospect 5-9532 

SAN FRANCISCO 



914 Geary Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ZIEGLER'S 

JEWELERS • WATCHMAKERS 
Santa Fe R. R. Watch Inspectors 



210 Townsend Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone GArfield 1-2784 

CALIFORNIA 



DINO'S PHARMACY 

D. A. Rosselli, Ph. G. 
"SERVICE FOR THE SICK" 

Phone JUniper 7-2032 
4601 Mission Street, Cor. Brazil. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

JACK JOHNSON COMPANY 

ROOFING 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Our New Number is ATwater 2-4914 
3365 ARMY STREET SAN FRANCISSCO 



Phone DOuglas 2-1813 



Res. Burlingame 34335 



DAVID B. HILL SEED CO. 

DAVID B. HILL 



5 35 DAVIS STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO II, CALIF. 



LES' MOBILGAS STATION 

Les Matsumura 

WASHING - GREASING - POLISHING - REPAIRS 

Bush and Steiner Streets WAlnut 1-9702 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



George Lazeneo 



Mike Balovich 



John Balovich 



GOOD EATS RESTAURANT 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 
1180 Potrero Avenue 



CALIFORNIA 



INDUSTRIAL INDEMNITY CO. 



155 Sansome Street 



JAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SUtter 1-7411 • SALES AND SERVICE • William G. Swager, Mgr. 

Typewriters - Adding Machines - Bookkeeping - Calculating and 

National Cash Register Specialists 

TYPE-RITE OFFICE MACHINE CO. 

GENERAL REBUILDING FACTORY 

43 1 Bryant Street SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIF. 



CLAUDE'S BEAUTY SALON 



EVergreen 6-9574 
SAN FRANCISCO 



335 Clement Street 

CALIFORNIA 



GERNHARDT-STROHMAIER CO. 

Eighteenth and Mission Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



2604 Third Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHN'S SPOT 

ITALIAN DINNERS 

Phone VA 4-2668 



CALIFORNIA 



MODEL FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. J. C. Calonge 

Phone GRaystone 4-6909 1467 Pine Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



H. & M. GROCERY 

499 Douglass Street Mission 7-9279 



YCRE FRENCH BAKERY 

Fillmore 6-3535 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1923-25 Fillmore Street 

CALIFORNIA 



WESTERN STORES 

Sterling E. Downes, Manager 



GERVAIS TERRAZZO COMPANY 

TERRAZZO - FLOOR AND STEPS - STAIRS REPAIRED 
MODERNISTIC FLOOR DESIGNS 



154 Van Ness Ave. So. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



MAi-ket 1-0138- 1-0139 

CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNderhill 1-5241 Res. JUniper 6-0734 

1727 Mission Street 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



SEBASTOPOL POLICE 

(Continued from page 12) 
quarters in the attractive city hall, although it has out- 
grown its allotted space. 

There are six men making up the personnel of the 
S. P. D. The Chief is John A. Ellis, who was appointed on 
January 1, 1948, following the retirement of veteran and 
well-liked E. J. Foster. 

Chief Ellis has had nearly 20 years experience in law 
enforcement. He was born in Geyserville of a pioneer 
family. His four grandparents came to Geyserville from 
the East in 1850, and settled in the then wild country. 
His father, John A. Ellis, Sr., was born in Geyserville in 
1863, and was Justice of the Peace in the Cloverdale 
Township for 25 years, until his death a few years ago. 

Young Ellis got his education in the Geyserville dis- 
trict, but in 1928 he moved to Santa Rosa, and a year 
later was appointed a Deputy Sheriff of Sonoma County. 
He held this position until 1 942 when he resigned to join 
the Santa Rosa Police Department under Chief Melvin 
Flohr. He was still a Santa Rosa policeman when he was 
selected as Sebastopol's new chief in 1948. 

He has lost one man since taking over, that being 
Officer John C. Wilk who quit to go into business for 
himself. His place has been taken by Otto Zeigler. The De- 
partment is now made up of the Chief, Sergeant Leo R. 
Honsa, Officers Edward E. Major, John R. Pilgrim, Dalfe 
F. Almida, Ziegler and Dorothy Sperek, secretary, who has 
charge of the traffic fines department as well. 

No murders have occurred in Sebastopol for so long a 
time that no one can recall when the last one took place. 
There hasn't been a robbery in the town for years, and 
such burglaries that occur could well be classified as petty 
larceny. 

The great problem in Sebastopol is traffic, and Chief 
Ellis and his force of officers have done a magnificent job 
of controlling the great parade of cars that pass through 
the town, running at times bumper to bumper, especially 
during the summer vacation months. There hasn't been a 



Phone UNderhill 1-9283 



EL CAMINO 



Mary E. Saulovich 



Steve N. Habich, Manager 

WHISKEY - BEER - WINE - LIQUORS TO TAKE OUT 

SANDWICHES - CIGARS - CIGARETTES 

3 192 - 16th Street Near Guerrero Street SAN FRANCISCO 



NEW FORUM RESTAURANT 



BEER and GOOD SEATS 



Phone HE 1-9175 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2799 16th Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MARTIN AND FABRIS 

LUNCH • FOUNTAIN • CIGARS 



53S Golden Gate 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



ATTHOWE 8C CO. 

PRINTERS 
ADVERTISING AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING 
Telephone EXbrook 2-3504 - 3505 344 - 346 Front Street 
FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Ray Capaccioli 



oe Baeza 



VIRGINIA TAVERN 



Phone HEmlock 1-9438 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1098 Howard Street 

CALIFORNIA 



MICHAEL A. GORB 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER 



Telephone BAyview 1-3077 
SAN FRANCISCO 



5S45 Geary Blvd. 

CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC TEA PACKING CO. 

INDIVIDUAL TEA BAG PACKING 
COFFEE URN BAGS • FLANNEL FILTER PADS 

Phone HEmlock 1-1755 
1663 M'ssion Street San Francisco 3, California 

MICKEY'S BILLIARD PARLOR 

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - CANDY - MAGAZINES 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 



Phone TUxedo 5-9710 

SAN FRANCISCO 



944 Columbus Avenue 

CALIFORNIA 



TIP-TOP SERVICE STATION 



B. W. Roberts 



Phone Mission 8-9960 

SAN FRANCISCO 



3700 Mission Street 

CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL ELM 

REASONABLE RATES 

ATTRACTIVE HOME-LIKE • LARGE LOBBY 

DOWN TOWN LOCATION 

334 Eddy Street Phone ORdway 3-5636 

SAN FRANCISCO ' CALIFORNIA 

INDEPENDENT MEXICO CITY CAFE 

WE SPECIALIZE IN MEXICAN DISHES 
Opsn 11:30 A.M. to 8 P.M. Closed Mondays 



Phone BA. 1-5517 

SAN FRANCISCO 



P. A. G 



arcia. Prop. 



1792 Haight Street 

CALIFORNIA 



MOLONY'S PHARMACY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



William M. Herbank 
Sixteenth and Guerrero Street 



CALIFORNIA 



BAY VIEW WINE &. LIQUORS 

Joseph Tonna, Prop. 

BEST QUALITY AT LOW PRICES 

Phone Us — We Deliver 

ATwater 2-4724 4716 Third Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



KAY'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

CHOP SUEY - FINEST CHINESE AMERICAN DINNERS 
LUNCHES - DINNERS 



Phone WAlnut 1-9697 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2819 California Street 

CALIFORNIA 



LIQUOR MART 



FREE DELIVERY IN SAN FRANCISCO 

AND ANYWHERE IN CALIFORNIA 

Phone GArfield 1-2138 115 Post Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



M. Ryan 



MODERN GROCETERIA 



K. Magruire 



C ROCFRIES 

WE DELIVER — PHONE YOUR ORDER 

Phone Mission 8-5803 3789 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Pacific Vegetable Oil Corporation 



62 Townsend Street 



SCHLAGE LOCK CO. 



2201 Bayshore Blvd. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 





CALIFORNIA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 35 



traffic death in the town since Chief Ellis assumed charge 
of the Police Department, a remarkable record in any 
community. 

The little city has some 175 parking meters. 

The patrol car of the Department has two-way radio 
service by Sheriff Harry L. Patterson's station. 

The police are receiving a salary of $210 for the first 
year, at which time the wage is hiked to $240 per month. 
The night sergeant gets $260. 

Chief Ellis was married to Pauline Plack on February 
18, 1929. The couple has one child, a daughter. 



William J. Forster Sons, Ltd. 

PLUMBING 



HEmlock 1-5774 

SAN FRANCISCO 



1132 Howard Street 



CALIFORNIA 



DAN T. CASSIDY 

FABRICS - CURTAINS - DRAPERIES - SLIPCOVERS 
UPHOLSTERY - CUSTOM COVERED FURNITURE 



678 Mission Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DOuglas 2-2931 



CALIFORNIA 



R. & J. COFFEE SHOP 

Ruby and John 



2200 Bryant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



VAlencia 4-9992 



CALIFORNIA 



THEO. SCHMIDT 

CORSET AND SURGICAL APPLIANCE HOUSE 

ELASTIC STOCKINGS - ARCH SUPPORTS 

El : se Schmidt Farrell, Manager 

Phones GA 1-1504 - GA 1-3194 

057-959 Market St. (Bet. 5th & 6th) SAN FRANCISCO 

HOWARD'S CLOTHING 

FOR THE SMARTEST CLOTHES IN TOWN 
FEATURING EAGLE CLOTHES 



SAN FRANCISCO 



920 Market Street 



KAY'S FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

LUNCHES - DINNERS 



Phone WAlnut 1-9697 

SAN FRANCISCO 



2819 California Street 

CALIFORNIA 



CENTER SUPER SERVICE 

TEXACO PRODUCTS 

GAS - OIL - TIRES - LUBRICATION - ACCESSORIES 

Lee and Lee 

DOuglas 2-7042 Columbus and Jackson Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



Frank C. Jacobs 



Fred C. Hetzel 



HOFFMAN CIGAR STORE 



Polk at Sacramento St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



GRaystone 4-5589 

CALIFORNIA 



JACK AND MILT 

CIGAR & LIQUOR STORE 



1501 F llmo-e Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Telephone Fillmore 6-5302 

CALIFORNIA 



DAVIS FURNITURE CO. 



855 M'ssion Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-4091 



CALIFORNIA 



SERVICE FOOD CENTER 

MEATS - POULTRY - FISH - GROCERIES - FRUITS \ND 

VEGETABLES - WINE AND BEER 

FREE DELIVERY 

Phone ATwater 2-8300 2950 - 24th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

DANTE BILLIARD PARLOR 

P. Mike Ma'occo 

ITALIAN SPECIALTY and the FINEST. BEST 

SANDWICHES - WINES AND LIQUORS 

521 Broadway GArfield 1-9529 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



FELVIN, HOLTZEN & FLORA 



Polk and Pacific Streets 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



JENNIE'S PLACE 



1341 Evans Ave. 



VA 6-3080 



LANTERN FOOD PRODUCTS CO. 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



YUkon 6-2905 

SAN FRANCISCO 



245 Front Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Compliments of 

STERN & GRUPP 

Mills Building 



CALIFORNIA 



Quality and Cleanliness is Our Motto 

Evergood Pork 8C Delicatessen Store 

Rauscher & Sons. Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE SAUSAGE AND DELICACIES 

ATwater 2-1323 2449 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



F. J. LAND 

Authorized Watch Inspector for 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC CO. - WESTERN PACIFIC R. R. 



Phone EX. 2-4S98 

745 Third Street (Opp. Depot) 



Res. Orinda 3621 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Chas. Gren'nger 



Bob Greninger 



GRENINGER'S GARAGE 

AUTO RECONSTRUCTION - GENERAL REPAIRING - TOWING 

We Never Close - 24-Hour Service 

623 Valencia Street UNderhill 1-0306 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



THE YOUNG CHINA 

881 Clay Street YU 2-2651 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MISSION PRIDE MARKET 

GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES 

3901 Mission Street JUniper 5-7292 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



LE PAGE'S, INC. 

LE PAGE'S ADHESIVES and SIGNET PRODUCTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



489 Sixth Street 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ALBERT PICARD 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
405 Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MAURICE'S 

KIT CARSON 

Maurice Viguier, Proprietor 

DINNER - SUPPER 
Closed Sunday 



Geary at Mason in San Francisco 



SUtter 1-5236 



SABELLA AND LA TORRE 

Wholesale - Retail 

SHELLFISH OF ALL KINDS SHIPPED ANYWHERE IN THE U.S.A. 

COCKTAIL BAR - FISH DINNERS 

SEA FOODS 
"If it Swims We Have It" 

Telephone ORdway 3-6509 - ORdway 3-2824 

Stall 3, Fisherman's Wharf SAN FRANCISCO I I, CALIF. 



Page 16 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



PENINSULA POLICE ASSOCIATION 

(Continued from page 5 ) 

Vern Vincent and his orchestra furnished music for the 
dancing with both old and new tunes, and it was certainly 
a show to watch some of those police officers doing old and 
new dances; some very tired members the day after. Won- 
der how many citations were written that day? 

Members of the meritorious award committee who chose 
the winners were; Lieutenant Lawrence Furio of Bur- 
lingame; Captain Augie Terragno of South San Francisco; 
Sergeant Cole Stafford of Redwood City; Officer Everett 
Pence of San Mateo, and Officer Arthur Brittain of San 
Bruno. 

The April business meeting of the Association was held 
at the Three Owls Cafe in Redwood City, a noon meet- 
ing, on April 21. Guests included Judge Thorpe, Munici- 
pal Court, Redwood City; Assistant District Attorney De 
Matteis, and Frank Marlowe, Chief Investigator for the 
San Mateo County District Attorney's office. 

The May business meeting has been set for May 17 in 
South San Francisco at Oliver's Cafe — an evening meet- 
ing. Captain Terragno of that city has promised he will 
have an excellent array of speaking talent on hand, and 
President Jack Price has warned the members that they 
should come prepared to pass on a heavy load of business. 



Ralph L. Lewis Tony Campiglia 

THE FLOWER SHOP 

CUT FLOWERS AND FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS 

We Telegraph Flowers 

100 Santa Rosa Avenue In Burbank Gardens Santa Rosa 



Pho 



SANTA ROSA. CALIFORNIA 



THE 

R X I E 

CLUB 



Boulder Highway 



Las Vegas 

(Clark County) 

Nevada 



LAKE 
MEAD 
LODGE 

NO CLOSED SEASON 
OPEN ALL YEAR 

RATES: 

Single £4.00 

Double 5.00 

Twin Beds 5.50 

Recommended by Duncan Mines 
and Government Guides 

DINING ROOM AND 
COCKAIL LOUNGE 

BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 

(Clark County) 



Mixed Drinks 
Package Goods 

EVERETT'S THREE LITTLE PIGS 

BAR AND 
CASINO 

Everett and Tom to Serve You at the Bar 
Geo. Mace, "21" Dealer 

THE BEST DRAFT BEER IN TOWN 

Everett and Bobbe Krause, Owners 



On Boulder- Vegas Highway at Whitney, Nevada 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



JULIAN'S 

GREEN HUT CAFE 

"Best Food By A Dam Site" 

Phone 30 

BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 



LEE'S CAFE 



Your Favorite Brand of Liquor 



COLD BEER - FOOD 



YERMO, CALIFORNIA 



Walter Swartz 



Russell Farnsworth 



Boulder City Motors 

DODGE-PLYMOUTH AGENCY 

General Automotive Repairing 
Automotive Parts 

400 Nevada Highway 

BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 

Office Phone 38 

CENTRAL 
MARKET 

• 

''YOUR 

FOOD 
STORE'' 

• 
BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 



PURDY'S POOL HALL 

POOL - SNOOKER - BEER 

Soft Drinks and All Kinds 

Smokers' Supplies 

125 East Main Street 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



A & C CAFE 

AIR COOLED 
American and Chinese Dinners 

Cocktail Lounge - Reasonable Prices 

Quality Food - Parties 

Counter and Booth Service 

113 West Main Street 

BARSTOW, CALIFORNIA 



WINGS CAFE 

CHOP SUEY 

Finest Chinese and 
American Dishes 

6 Fremont Street 

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 

Phone 43 



EL PATIO MOTEL 
AND COURT 

FURNISHED KITCHENETTES 
Reasonable Rates 

1814 North Main Street 

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



BOULDER CITY, NEV., RANGERS 
('Continued from page 1 6) 

world, visited by thousands of people annually, and serv- 
ing a great empire with water and electricity. 

Chief Peterson has 1 5 men serving on the ranger patrol, 
who do all the policing of Hoover Dam and of the thriving 
and beautiful Boulder City. 

The Bureau of Reclamation Rangers is made up of the 
following: 

Chief Peterson. 

Captains— William Getts, Floyd L. Jenne, Earl B. Mer- 




Ranger Capt. William Getts 

ritt and Michael J. Slattery. 

Sergeants — Rodolphe LaVroix and Lester L. Weden. 

Rangers — Rowley C. Ellsworth, F. E. Holmes, Cor- 
nelius B. Kirby, Harold Lampasa, Thomas B. Lopas, Or- 
villc A. Martin. John P. McKay, Roy B. Patrick and John 
R. eWiler. 

The rangers have four patrol cars with two-way radio 
serviced by their own station KNDA; also a hook-up with 





rf. w 



i 




Ranger Sergt. Rudy La Croix 
In Charge of Radio. 

the Sheriff's office in Las Vegas. 

Chief Peterson has been married for nearly a half cen- 
tury to the former Hattie Claus, formerly of Golden, Colo- 
rado. They have one daughter, Mrs. McKay. 

Originally Boulder City had just one purpose: head- 
quarters and housing for the men building Hoover Dam. 
But the Boulder City folks were not content with that aim. 



So they went about developing facilities that makes it a 
most attractive place to live as well as to visit. These facili- 
ties include a National Park service museum, with trained 
naturalists to explain the plant and animal life of the 
district; a swimming beach, boating, harbor and dock, air- 
port with local and transcontinental service, a desert golf 
course, rifle range, and hiking trails. 

The people of Boulder City have provided hotel, auto 
court and cafe accommodations, shops, garages and filling 
stations, which go to make Boulder City a mecca for 
tourists, all accessible by splendid paved highways from all 
directions, east, west, north and south. 

Thousands upon thousands of people come to Boulder 
City to see the highest dam in the world, to enjoy the many 
sports on the waters of Lake Meade, the world's largest 
man-made lake, backing up the waters of the Colorado 
River for 118 miles, and giving the lake a shore line of 




Officer Perlie Movis 
U. S. River Control. Needles. California 
J50 miles. 

Fishing and boating are permitted the year round. Bass, 
trout, crappie, catfish and bluegills furnish prime sport for 
the anglers, and you will find the desert climate beneficial 
to your health. 



FOR THE BEST MEAL IN TOWN 

RAMSEY'S BOULDER CAFE 

RAY and MARY B. RAMSEY 
443 Nevada Highway 



BOULDER CITY 



NEVADA 



THE BOULDER BAKERY 

ALL KINDS BREAD 
AND PASTRIES 



BOULDER CITY 



1320 Wyoming Street 



NEVADA 



THE HUT CLUB 

CASINO AND BAR 

FINEST OF LIQUORS SERVED 

HOSPITALITY OUR MOTTO 

HENDERSON (Clark County), CALIFORNIA 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS- JOURNAL 



Page 39 



THE MANIX 

DEPARTMENT 

STORES 

Finest In City 

BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 



DESERT NURSERY 

Plants, Shrubbery, General Nursery 
Supplies and Renovating 

Phone 507 

Boulder City (Clark Co.), Nevada 



r" 



MISSION CLUB 

Serving Beer Wine 
and Soft Drinks 

Also Serving Best Food in Concord 
Where Old Friends Meet New. 

FINEST POOL AND SNOOKER TABLES 
2057 Concord Avenue 

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 



■L- 



JUDSON 

PACIFIC-MURPHY 
CORPORATION 



EMERYVILLE, CALIFORNIA 



L 



S H E R WI N 
WILLIAMS 
COMPANY 



Factory: 1450 Sherwin Ave. 
General Offices: 3423 Piedmont Ave. 

Oakland, California 



ONTARIO PLUMBING 
COMPANY 

Contracting and Gas Appliances 



Tel. Ontario 614-151 
228 North Euclid Avenue 

ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



TOWER MARKET 
Grocery Department 

T. E. Green - W. W. Kaufman, Owners 

Phone 2992-W 

1050 23rd Street 

RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



BEEDE'S BAKERY 

Wedding and Birthday Cakes 
All Kinds Fine Pastries 



43 EAST FIFTH STREET 

PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



JOHNSTON BROS. 

BEER - POOL 
TOBACCOS - CANDIES 

1423 Main Street 

WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 



Orinda Beauty Shoppe 

ORINDA, CALIFORNIA, and 

Walnut Beauty Shop 

WALNUT CREEK, CALIFORNIA 
Ralph and Owen 

Telephone Orinda 3061 

Dykes Building, 41 Moraga Highway 
ORINDA, CALIFORNIA 



CROWE RECREATION 
PARLOR 

POOL - SNOOKER - BILLIARDS 

TOBACCO - CIGARETTES - BEER 
AND SOFT DRINKS 



Tel. Rich. 3216 

RICHMOND 



612 Macdonald Ave. 

CALIFORNIA 



THE SPOT 

BAR AND 
LIQUOR STORE 



1 Standard Avenue 
POINT RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 9529 



Compliments of 

OSCAR'S 

Phone 8112 

COCKTAILS 
IN RICHMOND 

at 1047 Twenty-Third Street 



Oakland Office 

3211 Wood Street 

Pled. 5-2077 



San Francisco Office 

548 Seventh Street 

Phone UNderhill 1-5114 



Main Office: RICHMOND, CALIF. 
Phone Richmond 3011 

Johnson Truck Lines 

Walter J. Johnson, Manager 

Chico Phone 272-W - Marysville Phone 2519-W 
Oroville Phone 386J 



May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



AGENT BOATWRIGHT 

(Continued from page 1 1 ) 
was enjoyable and pleasant. He finds no shortage of adjec- 
tives in describing the woman, one of the nation's most 
gracious first ladies. 

As a Secret Service agent Boatwright became sort of a 
"business manager" for Mrs. Hoover, arranging details for 
all the numerous trips she made on behalf of the Girl 
Scouts of America. He kept constant watch over her 
throughout the Hoover administration — as a result of 
such close contact describes her as "quiet, refined, kind, 
generous." His sentiment was the same for the President. 

"I was very fond of both of them; and they were fond 
of me," Boatwright said. "No one could be nicer than 
they." 

As the Hoover administration ended, the first family 
tried hard to sell Boatwright the idea of joining them in 
California. He was tempted, but decided to remain with 
the Secret Service he liked so well. 

In August, 1931, Boatwright joined the ranks of men 
who went to West Virginia for their wives. He was mar- 
ried to Miss Mabel Hawkins of Sutton, West Virginia, in 
Washington, D. C. He has an abundance of good adjec- 
tives for her also. 



TAFT'S ] 


FINEST 


COCKTAIL 


LOUNGE 


AIR COOLED 


DINING 


ROOM 


STEAM 


HEAT 


THE 


HOTEL 


TAFT 


TAFT, CALIFORNIA 



OASIS CAFE 

AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Good Food and the 
Finest Liquors 

Courtesy Our Motto 

418 Center Street 

TAFT, CALIFORNIA 



To A 

Grand Police Force 

SHAMROCK 

COCKTAIL 

LOUNGE 

and 

CAFE 

Pat and Pete 
as usual 

418-420 Center 

TAFT, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 1072 



EL REY CAFE 
and BAR 

CHAS. SANSOME, Prop. 



* 

Phone 65 



332 North Street 

Taft, California 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



Then in March of 1933 the Franklin D. Roosevelts 
came to Washington, D. C, and Boatwright's experience 
in guarding Mrs. Hoover made him eligible for the same 
duties with Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt. When interviewed, 
Boatwright refused to give any on-the-record answers to 
questions about his impression of the Roosevelt family. It 
suffices to say that, though he is a Democrat, he approached 
his chief and insisted that he be given a transfer to "some- 
where out West." 

He became agent in charge of the Secret Service bureau 
in St. Paul, Minnesota, in June of 1933. Assignments 
following took him to Salt Lake City again in 1936; to 
Denver a year later; and to Chicago in 1943, where he 



Kamikawa Food Store 

GROCERIES - MEATS 
VEGETABLES - FRESH FISH 

503 - 7th Street 

FOWLER, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 3646 



ZANZIBAR COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

George Saconis, Prop. 

Phone 617 
1823 North Main Street 



NORTH LAS VEGAS 



NEVADA 



J and M CLUB 

Formerly Elmdale Tavern 

BEER - SANDWICHES AND 
SOFT DRINKS 

Enjoy Our Shuffleboard 

Phone Torrey 53191 
16438 Pioneer Boulevard 

NORWALK, CALIFORNIA 



CADET CLEANERS 

• 

WE CALL AND DELIVER 

* 

656 East "A" Street 

ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA 



405 Main Street 



Phone 373 



WOODLAND PRODUCE CO. 

G. Hing, Prop. 

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Wholesale and Retail 



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Phone SUtter 1-9515 b V Competent Nurses Day and Night. 

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May, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 43 



became assistant supervising agent. In 1944 he was trans- 
ferred again to Baltimore where he was made supervising 
agent. The next year he again asked to gp out west, 
this time to San Francisco; he arrived there September 28, 
194*1, holding down the post of assistant supervising 
agent until his retirement from the Service. 

Many difficult cases were handled by Grady Boat- 
wright during his service as an agent — his batting average 
was 1.000. Two cases are outstanding in his memory. 

During depression years counterfeiting became a serious 
and omnipresent problem, more so than at any time since, 
because many talented engravers and banking officials were 
out of work. 

Two Minnesota brothers, cashiers in separate banks, 
were among the unemployed when their means of liveli- 
hood folded. With the aid of a printer who was in similar 
straits they began turning out bogus bills in huge num- 
bers. Before their capture by Boatwright they had suc- 
ceeded in plastering most western states with the counter- 
feit currency. 

Two ex-convicts, an escaped convict serving life for 
murder in the Oregon State Penitentiary, and a fourth 
man tried their hand at counterfeiting in Minnesota after 
blazing a trail of crime throughout much of the West. 
They first attempted the armed robbery of a mail car on a 
Union Pacific train between Tacoma and Seattle. 

The train was in two sections, and they chose the first 
(and wrong) section. Then followed a series of burglaries 
in California . . . out of Denver they held up a Denver 
and Rio Grande passenger train, but were routed in a 
terrific gun battle with railroad agents. They perpetrated 
more burglaries in St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Duluth. 

After forcing an engraver to make counterfeiting plates 
for them, they broke into a St. Paul printing plant late on a 
Saturday night and before morning printed a quantity of 
spurious notes. Believing the gangsters would repeat the 
maneuver, Boatwright warned all St. Paul printers. Fi- 
nally the proprietor of an all-night establishment told 
Boatwright he had been contacted by the counterfeiters. 
Boatwright assumed the role of a printer's helper and con- 
cealed fellow agents in back rooms of the shop. When the 
crooks appeared to have their notes printed, they were 
covered by Boatwright's gun. 

Three of this gang are now serving long sentences in 
Alcatraz — when the Oregon murderer finishes his term he 
will be returned to that state to round out his life sen- 
tence. One of the group told his captor that he'd be remem- 
bered "when I got out." Boatwright laughed. 

"By that time I'll be so old you wouldn't recognize me 
anyway," he told the counterfeiter. 

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ALVARADO. CALIFORNIA 



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Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



May, 1949 



He tells of the future's plans for he and Mrs. Boatwright 
cautiously, fearing that his California friends will regard 
him as a traitor — hut they realize that he, of all people, is 
a citizen of the United States. 

Dealers in bogus U. S. currency would do well to avoid 
Florida's Gulf Coast henceforth — because somewhere 
along there will live a man who will never forget to give 
a bill more than a cursory glance. The Boatwrights intend 
to purchase a small home in that area. 

"I have worked in every state of the Union, all the 
big cities, and many of the villages and hamlets. I know 
the best hotels and where to go in a city to get a good meal. 
I'm tired of it now, however, and want to settle down and 
take life easy," Boatwright commented the day he retired. 

"We want a place somewhere on the Gulf Coast of 
Florida. St. Petersburg (80,000 population) is a little too 
large. We'd like a little cottage, maybe a garden to fuss 
around with — and I want a dog. We aren't making any 
plans — if the wife and I want to go for an outing on the 
beach or picknicking, we will do it." 

Grady L. Boatwright was indeed "a credit to the Serv- 
ice," and it must have been with regret that his chief 
marked his commission . . . "Retired — March 31, 1949." 
What occurred in his life between March 16, 1924, and 
March 31, 1949, is, naturally, completely known only to 
Boatwright — but it would make an exciting and moving 
story for others. 

His host of friends throughout the United States would 
agree that he served the U. S. Secret Service and his 
country well . . . and has earned and deserves the rest he 
seeks. 



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CALIFORNIA 



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POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



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WHERE ALL SPORTSMEN MEET 

LUNCHES - MIXED DRINKS 

INFORMATION ON HUNTING AND FISHING 

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Phone OLympic 2-3600 



Telephone Pittsburg 663 



Residence 433-W 



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Secretary - Treasurer 

BARTENDERS and CULINARY 

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Affiliated with American Federation of Labor 



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PITTSBURG, CALIFORNIA 



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SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT ANNUAL REVIEW BEFORE THE FIRE OF 1906 

We don't have any more of fhese yearly parades in which fhe members presented a splendid appear- 
one and throngs lined the streets over which the minions of the law passed. 



AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



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June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 1 



Featured in This Issue 



PAGE 

3 

7 



School Safety Patrol 

Captain of Inspectors Otto Meyers . 

By Opie L. 'Warner 
The Law and Jim Johnson 8 

By Jim Leonard 
Three Former Bay Area Chiefs Pass On . . 9 
Taking Stock (Address by Harry M. Kimball, 

FBI Chief Special Agent, at Annual Sheriff's 

Convention) 10 

Nate Pieper Has a New Job 11 

Combating Commercial Racketeers (Address by 

H. C. Vanpelt, FBI Assistant Chief Special 

Agent at Sheriff's Convention in Tosemite 

Par\) . 12 

Chief Lester S. Devine of Oakland . ... 13 
Peninsula Police Officers Ass'n May Meet . . 14 
Bay Counties Peace Officers' Association May 

Meeting 15 

Police Ordinance of San Francisco .... 16 
Former Naval Shore Patrol (12th District) 

Organize 18 

The Candid Friend 19 

By Opie L. Warner 
Editorial Page — California Cities Cited for 

Safety 20 

Annual S. F. Police Concert and Ball ... 21 
Pistol Pointing 22 

By J. Ross Dunmgan 
Russian River Resorts Open for Big Season . 24 

Russian River Well Policed 25 

Women Peace Officers' Association Quarterly 

Meeting ' . 26 

Northern California Police Communication 

Officers' Association 30 

Loren E. Spair, Chief of Police, Riverbank 40 

Captain Collins, of San Jose Police Department, 

Addresses Exchange Club 52 

Naval Reserves Figures'and Facts 60 



Directory 



The Editor is always pleased to consider articles suitable for publication. 
Contributions should preferably be typewritten, but where this is not pos- 
sible, copy should be clearly written. Contributions may be signed with a 
"nom de plume," but all articles must bear the name and address of the 
sender, which will be treated with the strictest confidence. The Editor 
will also be pleased to consider photographs of officers and of interesting 
events. Letters should be addressed to the Editor. 



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets 

Telephones SUtter 1-2020- 1-2030 

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD 



Mayor, Hon. Elmer E. Robinson 



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS 

Regular Meetings, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m., Hall of Justice 

Washington I. Kohnke, President 686 Sacramento St. 

J. Warnock Walsh 160 Montgomery St. 

Henry C. Maginn 315 Montgomery St. 

Sergeant John T. Butler, Secretary 
Room 104, Hall of Justice 



CHIEF OF POLICE Michael E. I. Mitchell 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE James L. Quigley 

Chief of Inspectors James English 

Director of Traffic Edward R. Pootel 

Dept. Sec'y....Captain Michael F. Fitzpatrick... .Hall of Justice 

District Captains 

Central Jack Eker 63V Washington Street 

Southern Leo. J. Tackney Fourth and Clara Streets 

Mission A. I. O'Brien 3057 17th Street 

Northern Edward Donahue 841 Ellis Street 

G. G. Park J. M. Sullivan Stanyan opp. Waller 

Richmond Jos. M. Walsh 451 Sixth Ave. 

Ingleside... .Daniel McKLEM....Balboa Park, No. San Jose Ave. 

Taraval Michael Gaffey 2348 24th Avenue 

Potrero Geo. M. Healy 2300 Third Street 

City Prison Barnard McDonald Hall of Justice 

Traffic Bureau Ralph Olstad 63 5 Washington St. 

Bur. Inspectors Otto Meyer Hall of Justice 

Supervising Captain 

of Districts Joseph M. Walsh Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Personnel Lt. John A. Engler Hall of Justice 

Director - Bureau of 

Special Services Lt. Alvin J. Nicolini Hall of Justice 

Director of 

Juvenile Bureau John Meehan 2745 Greenwich St. 

Director - Bureau of Criminal 

Information George Hippely Hall of Justice 

Property Clerk John Wade Hall of Justice 

Insp. of Schools Traffic Controi Insp. Byron Getchell 

Director of 

Criminology Francis X. Latulipe Hall of Justice 



wHeninTrouMe Call SUtter L20-20 

When In Doubt 



Alwavs At Your Service 



Page 2 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



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SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



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i San Francisco 



"Efficient Police 

Make a City of 

Peace" 

i Established 1922 i 




A Police News 

and Educational 

Magazine 

(Trade Maik Copyright) 



Vol. XXIV 



JUNE, 1949 



No. 10 



SCHOOL SAFETY PATROLS 
IN ANNUAL REVIEW 



San Francisco's junior finest, the 4,^00 School Safety- 
Patrol boys, and some girls, were accorded public tribute 
on Tuesday, May 24, at their annual parade and review 
in Kezar Stadium, Golden Gate Park. 

The colorful spectacle marked the twenty-sixth year 
of the School Patrols' traffic accident prevention work 
at San Francisco school crossings, now totalling 630; and 
the twenty-sixth year that no school child has been a 
traffic casualty at a crossing guarded by School Patrol boys. 

This is a record in which the San Francisco Police De- 
partment takes special pride, since the accident-prevention 
training of the School Safety Patrols has been under the 



jurisdiction of the Police Department since they were first 
organized in 1923. From the inception of the movement, 
Inspector Byron J. Getchell has been assigned to this work 
by the Police Department. He is now assisted by Officers 
Robert Gremminger and Matthew Duffy. Officer James 
Hanley has also been assigned to School Safety work, de- 
voting his time to the bicycle safety program. 

For this year's review, more than 5,000 spectators joined 
with public officials and representatives of safety organiza- 
tions to honor the School Safety Patrols. 

The program opened with introductory remarks by 
Edwin S. Moore, manager of the Public Safety Depart- 




^s^ifeK- 





Massed on the field at Kezar Stadium, facing the reviewing stand, San Francisco's twelve battalions of School Safety Patrols stand 
at attention during the opening ceremonies of their parade and review May 24. (Below) Color bearers front and center for the 
pledge of allegience. They are facing the more than 5,000 spectators that came to watch the twenty-sixth and largest annual review 
of the 4.500 School Safety Patrol boys, and some girls, representing 130 public, parochial and private schools. — Courtesy California 
State Automobile Association. 



Page 4 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 




(At top) Chief of Police Michael E. Mitchell greets Chief E. Raymond Cato, of the California Highway Patrol, at the annual parade 
and review of San Francisco's School Safety Patrols. Looking on are Rev. James N. Brown, Archdiocesan Superintendent of Schools; 
and Herbert C. Clish, San Francisco Superintendent of Schools, (Middle) Representing the Police Department's guidance of the 
School Safety Patrols are (left to right) : Captain Ralph Olstad, commanding the Traffic Bureau; Inspector Byron J. Getchell, who 
has supervised the organizing and training of the Safety Patrols for 26 years; and Captain Edward Pootel, Director of Traffic. 
(Lower) Speaker of the day at the School Patrols review was Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, at left, who with Joseph R. Knowland, 
center, chairman of the Public Safety Committee of the CSAA, greet a guest of honor, Assemblyman Charles Meyers, a former 
Safety Patrol Captain at Sacred Heart High School. — Courtesy California State Automobile Association. 



]une, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page J 



ment of the California State Automobile Associaation, 
who presented Joseph R. Knowland, head of the CSAA 
Public Safety Committee, as chairman of the day. 

Mr. Knowland introduced Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, 
speaker of the day, who paid a glowing tribute to the 
work of the School Safety Patrols in behalf of San 
Francisco. In the city's day-to-day war against traffic 
accidents, Mayor Robinson declared, the School Safety 
Patrols are in charge of an important sector. "You have 
done an amazingly fine job toward the protection of your 
schoolmates," Mayor Robinson said. "San Francisco is 
on the way toward making a record in cutting down its 
traffic accidents, and much of the credit goes to you. I 
want you to know that the people of San Francisco are 
proud of the splendid work you are doing." 

Following the brief opening ceremonies, the twelve 
battalions of School Safety Patrols, from 130 of the city's 
public and private schools, marched in orderly ranks past 
the reviewing stand where Mayor Robinson, Chief of 
Police Michael E. Mitchell, Colonel of the Patrol Regi- 
ment, and guests of honor were stationed to salute and 
receive the salutes of the marching Patrols. 

Completing the march around Kezar's track, the bat- 
talions returned to their original positions on the field, to 
await the award of merit ribbons. These awards, given 
for efficiency of individual Safety Patrol units during the 
school year, were furnished by the California State Auto- 
mobile Association, which is associated with the Police 
Department, the Board of Education and Parent-Teacher 
groups in sponsorship of the Safety Patrols. 

As the awards were announced by Chief Mitchell, in 
his capacity as commanding officer of the regiment, flag 
bearers of the winning schools stepped forward and the 
merit ribbons were pinned to the flags by R.O.T.C. officers, 
under the direction of Inspector Getchell. 

Such was the efficiency of the School Patrols during 
the year, that 96 schools were recognized in the awards, 



the awards ranging from first to sixth place. 

With presentation of the awards completed, the cere- 
mony concluded with the National Anthem, played by 
six selected Junior High School bands which also fur- 
nished music for the parade. 

Guests of honor in the reviewing stand, introduced by 
Mr. Knowland, included: Chief Mitchell, Washington 
I. Kohnke, president, and J. Warnock Walsh, member of 
the Police Commission; Adrien J. Falk, president, Board 
of Education; Herbert C. Clish, superintendent of schools; 
Rev. James N. Brown, superintendent of parochial schools; 
Captain Edward Pootel, director of traffic for the Police 
Department; Captain Ralph Olstad, commanding the 
Traffic Bureau; E. Raymond Cato, California Highway 
Patrol; Charles Meyers, member of the State Assembly 
and a former Safety Patrol Captain at Sacred Heart 
High School; Mrs. W. L. Houweling, president, and 
Mrs. E. M. Hood, fist vice-president, Second District, 
California Congress of Parents and Teachers; Mrs. Arthur 
Luchetti, president, Catholic Parent-Teachers Group; Fred 
D. Parr, Park Commissioner; and Julius L. Girod, Super- 
intendent of Parks. 

Oakland police officials and representatives of the Cali- 
fornia Highway Patrol were also among the guests of 
honor who were introduced. These included Lester Divine, 
Oakland Chief of Police, Robert Tracy, former Oakland 
Chief; Captain A. J. Bolger and Lieutenant H. B. Rich- 
ardson of the Traffic Division, Oakland Police Depart- 
ment; and California Highway Patrol Officers Captain 
Roland C. Wilkinson, Hayward; Inspector Fred Leber, 
Richmond; Inspector Elmer Steinmeyer, Oakland, and 
Captain Ray Franck, Oakland-San Francisco Bay Bridge. 

San Francisco pioneered in this outstanding traffic safety 
program, being among the first cities in the United States 
to organize School Safety Patrols. The first San Francisco 
School Patrols were organized in 1923 under the joint 
sponsorship of the Police Department, the School Depart- 




Flag bearers of schools whose Safety Patrol units were awarded honors for efficiency throughout the school year stand at attention 
at the annual parade and review as the merit ribbons are pinned to the school colors by high school R.O.T.C. officers. As names of 
the winning schools were announced by Chief of Police Michael E. Mitchell, colonel of the Patrol Regiment, the flag bearers came 
forward to receive the award. — Courtesy of California State Automobile Association. 



Page 6 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, 1949 




Bay Area members of the California Highway Patrol and East Bay Police officials were among guests in the reviewing stand at the 
annual parade and review of San Francisco's School Safety Patrols. Left to right, first row, are: .Chief of Police Lester Divine, Oak- 
land; Sergeant Vernon Dwelly. C.H.P., Marin County; Charles Gully Alameda P. D.; Captain Roland Wilkinson, C.H.P., Hay- 
ward. Standing, rear row: Inspector Fred A. Leber,, C.H.P., Richmond: Lieutenant H. B. Richardson and Lieutenant William Mc- 
Murry. Oakland Police Department; Captain J. R. Franck, OH. P., Bay Bridge: Inspector Elmer Steinmeyer, C.H.P.. Oakland; and 
Captain J. A. Bolger, Oakland Police Department, Traffic Division. — Courtesy California State Automobile Association. 



merit, the California State Automobile Association and 
the Parent-Teacher Association. This sponsorship has con- 
tinued throughout the years. 

Patrol members do not direct vehicular traffic. Patrols 
are stationed on the curb at designated intersections, and 
assemble the children in groups on the sidewalk until the 
crossing can be made safely. 

School patrol members are chosen for their qualities of 
leadership, scholarship and all-around citizenship. They 
assume responsibility for the safety of their schoolmates, 
and their duties require qualities of unselfishness since they 
are on duty regardless of weather conditions, and at times 
when other children are at play. 

Since establishment of the Safety Patrol movement in 
San Francisco, the movement has become nationwide and 
worldwide. 

In Northern and Central California, more than 800 
School Safety Patrols have been organized, with a total 
membership of more than 30,000. Outside of incorporated 
communities, the California Highway Patrol assists in the 
organization and supervision of Safety Patrol units. 

In San Francisco, each of the four sponsoring organiza- 
tions has assumed definite responsibilities with respect to 
the work of the School Safety Patrols. 

The Police Department has assigned Inspector Byron J. 
Getchell to the work of organizing and training Safety 
Patrol units. 

The Board of Education assigns teachers at the various 
schools to supervise the daily work of their respective 
units. 

The California State Automobile Association supplies 
the arm bands and white Sam Browne belts which the boys 
wear on duty; provides the merit ribbon awards for effi- 
ciency at the annual parade and review, and furnishes 
safety posters and text material for classroom instruction 
in traffic safety. 

The Parent-Teacher groups throughout the city super- 
vise the outfitting of the Safety Patrols and see to it that 



the equipment is maintained in good condition. 

Inspector Getchell estimates that in the past twenty-six 
years more than 70,000 boys have served in School Safety 
Patrols; many of these are now leaders in business and 
civic affairs of the community. 



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June. 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS - JOURNAL 



Page 7 



Captain Of Inspectors Otto Meyer of S.F.P.D. 



By Opie L. Warner 



Captain of Inspectors Otto Meyer's career as a police 
officer offers a splendid example of the opportunities ever 
present in the field of law enforcement, especially in the 
San Francisco Polic Department. Captain Meyer was horn 
in San Francisco on July 11, 1S9V He joined the Police 
Department on Octoher 1, 1924, and in less than 2^ years 




Captain of Inspectors Otto Meyer 

he has climhed to one of the top executive offices of the 
Department. 

• He is a quiet, soft-spoken, well set-up man. but under 
his fedora is a set of brains that has taken him successfully 
through all the ranks of the force. He was made a Cor- 
poral on November 30, 1931, Sergeant May 1, 1937; 
Inspector Feb. 13, 1937; Lieutenant June 1, 1944. and 
his present rank February 16 of this year. He was well 
up toward the top of the eligible list after each successive 
promotional examination. 

Quiet and soft-spoken as his nature is, he has what it 
takes when it comes to working on a criminal case. His 
record in the Department is one of many outstanding 
solutions of big crimes, and the bringing in of the crooks 
who committed those crimes. 

Some of the cases than won him fame and commenda- 
tions from • his superior officers, and two citations for 
meritorious conduct by the Police Commission, are well 
worth recalling. There were many others of lesser import, 
but in all of them Otto Meyer displayed the ability and 
efficiency that has contributed to his rapid climb to the 
place he now occupies. 

Back in 1929, shortly after he had been assigned to the 
Bureau of Inspectors, the then Captain of Inspectors 
Charles Dullea called Meyer and retired Inspector Robert 
Rauer into his office and told them they were to be the 
Northwest Mounted Police for San Francisco, and that 
they were, to eo out and get two youthful bandits who 



were burning up the town, and who had committed half 
a hundred armed robberies. He told them that they should 
not return to the Hall of Justice until they got their men. 

One week later Meyer and Rauer walked into the Hall 
of Justice with the two men, Robert Law and J. D. Brady, 
who from their youthfulness were dubbed the "Baby 
Bandits." They cleared up over 40 robberies and the Baby 
Bandits went to San Quentin. 

Then in 1929 with Rauer, Otto Meyer was put on the 
jewel rubbery of Harry Amols, a New York jewel broker 
who had been held up and taken for $310,000 in dia- 
monds. The two Inspectors, working with precision and 
effectiveness landed the two holdup men, John Schopin 
and Mike Marino. Thus they contributed two more grain 
sack weavers to San Quentin. 

He participated in the arrest of Sampsell and McNahk 
the so-called "Yacht Bandits," and for this he got .i 
meritorious conduct award. 

He was in on the arrest of William States, who fol- 
lowed a series of holdups by attempting to rob the Chil- 
dren's Hospital in 1930. There was shooting in this arrest. 
and Meyers got another meritorious conduct citation. 

Probably the biggest haul was made when he with Chief 
of Inspectors James English on the Pawnshop Detail took 
into custody Ralph Graham, the "Phantom Bandit of Bel 
Air," who had robbed prominent movie people and stars 
of over $ 1 ,000,000 worth of property over a period of five 
years. Mr. Graham moved to San Francisco to get rid of 
his loot. That was where English and Meyer came in. Thev 
snapped the 'cuffs on the would-be purveyor of stolen 
property just as he was trying to make a contact. Searched 
they found $70,000 worth of diamonds in Graham's 
pockets. The prisoner was turned over to the Los Angeles 
authorities and is now laying out the rest of his days in 
Folsom, being a three-time loser. 

During his service in the Inspectors" Bureau Captain 
Meyer was on the Robbery Detail for five years, under 
the late Inspector George McLoughlin and Retired Lieu- 
tenant James Malloy. 

He was on the Pawnshop Detail for ten years, first 
under the late Inspector Henry Powell, and finished his 
^Continued on page 33 I 



In the next issue of the Police and Peace Offi- 
cers' Journal will be republished an account of the 
capture of the Amols Jewelry robbers. 

The Sampsell referred to in the above story of 
Captain Meyer has been convicted of murdering a 
San Diego man in the holdup of a loan company 
office and is under sentence to die in the gas cham- 
ber at San Quentin. 



Page 8 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 




THE LAW AND JIM JOHNSON 

By Jim Leonard, Police Reporter {or the Call-Bulletin 

burglaries — and students attending the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation National Academy in Washington, D. C, 
are told to drop in for a visit with Jim Johnson when 
they are in San Francisco. 

Like eleven other members of his detail, Inspector John- 
son is a native-born San Franciscan — and like the great 
majority of his comrades in the SFPD, descended from a 
sturdy Irish ancestor who turned to America for the 
opportunity he was denied in Ireland. 

Following his arrival from Ireland, Inspector Johnson's 
grandfather, Patrick Johnson, became a tanner in Benicia, 
later moving to Santa Cruz County, where he died at the 
age of 93 years. One of his children was the inspector's 
father — James E. Johnson, for many years in the 'liquor 
business in San Francisco. "Jimmie" Johnson's mother, 
Julia, came directly from Ireland with her parents. 

"This will come as a surprise to a lot of people," In- 
spector Johnson said, referring to his completely Irish 
ancestry. '"They've always had me pegged as a Swede." 

He was born in "Irish Town," one of the city's resi- 
dential districts of 1890, at Fifth and Natoma Streets. 
Four of his five brothers and sisters are still living and 
located in San Francisco— they are Al, William, Joseph, 
and Doris. One of the sisters, Iola, is deceased. 

San Francisco was just beginning to flex its muscles 
when twelve-year-old Jimmie Johnson started pushing a 
bicycle through its streets for the Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. The youngster on the bike gained a 
familiarity with the city's maze of streets that was to help 
him considerably when he became a policeman. 

Stern fathers and mothers had a good tonic for juvenile 
delinquency then — the kids didn't have much time for 
mischief, serious or otherwise, because work was their 
contribution to the family. Nearly all the crime fell in 
adult circles, and policemen had rough, but effective, 
methods of fighting it. The hoodlums of the early 1900's 
were not followed into the gates of the city prison by 
a parade of lawyers carrying copies of the Bill of Rights 
in their hip pockets. So Jim Johnson minded his business 
— delivering messages. Messengers without bikes made $18 
a month, but Jim had a bike — and pocketed $20 a month. 

Then came a stint of delivering messages for the old 
Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Company, and a tour of 
duty with the Post Office Departments as special delivery 
messenger. 

As Johnson grew, his jobs kept pace with him — back 
with the telephone company as an installer's helper, up 
the ladder to installer and "trouble shooter" (maintenance 
man). 

Someone helped him up that ladder, however, and her 
name was "Genevieve." 

In 1907 when San Francisco was working hard to 
repair the devastation of the 1906 earthquake. Genevieve 
('Continued on page 35 ) 



Inspector James Johnson 

"Forcible entry into the dwelling house of another in 
the nighttime, with intent to commit a felony therein, or, 
as fixed by some statutes, such forcible entry into any of 
various buildings by night or day ..." 

That, according to N. Webster, is "burglary"; and any- 
one who does it is a "burglar." He gets his name from a 
late Latin word which denotes "a fortified place," namely 
"burgus." 

Present-day burglars, if there is any class among thieves, 
have drawn for themselves the ignoble distinction of being 
high-class criminals. Crime detection methods have 
through necessity been modernized with the passage of 
time. One of the principal moving factors in the haste 
to improve investigative technique has been the knowledge 
in law enforcement circles that burglars are also keeping 
up with the times. 

Though pessimistic war's end predictions of crime in- 
creases have failed to materialize, there has been no 
appreciable decline in some classifications of offenses. One 
of these has been burglaries; and law enforcement agencies 
have been hard put to provide solutions. Police depart- 
ments need expert leadership in their burglary squads to 
meet the increasingly difficult problem on convicting bur- 
glars — arrests would be easy were it not for that added 
element. 

The San Francisco Police Department is fortunate in 
having such leadership in the Burglary Detail of its Bu- 
reau of Inspectors. Thirty hard-working years as a detec- 
tive in that detail have paid off, and today its boss. 
Inspector James Patrick Johnson, has a reputation that is 
known throughout the country. 

Quite often smaller communities in northern and cen- 
tral California call upon Johnson for assistance in cracking 



June 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 9 



Three Former Bay Area Chiefs Pass On 

Three former Chiefs of Police of Bay Area cities have position in California, 
passed on to their final roll call since last April. He gave San Jose a good police administration, did not 

They are Retired Chief John N. Black, 78, of San Jose, hesitate to introduce any innovations that promised better 

who died April 5 from a heart illness; Retired Chief Wil- ) aw enforcement. He was a great believer in police train- 

liam V. Nicholson of Larkspur, who took his own life ing anc j was prominent in promoting courses in this en- 




Former Chief J. N. Black 

early this month, and Retired Chief John J. Harper, of 
Burlingame, who succumbed to a heart attack on June 20. 
Chief Black who took his pension in 1944, after serving 
nearly 28 years as head of the San Jose Police Department 
and over 3 5 years as a member, was one of the best known 
Police Chiefs in this state. At the time of his retirement 
he was the eldest in point of service to hold the top police 




i 












\ 


v^ 






v 


t;Mi~- 



Former Chief John J. Harper 

deavor at the San Jose State College. 

He was a member of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police; the State Peace Officers' Association and 
the Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association, of which he 
was a past president. 

His funeral was largely attended by members of the law 
enforcement agencies of Santa Clara County and promi- 
nent city and county officials and a legion of friends from 
the citizenry of the city he had served so well for so long. 

He is survived by his wife, Mary and a son John N., Jr. 

Chief Nicholson was the dean of Police Chiefs of Marin 
County when he stepped out of the office he had held for 
over a quarter of a century last year. He kept Larkspur 
free from crime, was a prime favorite with all the people 
and especially was he held in the highest regard by the 
boys and girls of the picturesque little city across the bay. 
(Continued on page 47 j 




It's 
NEW 

Pel-O- 


iH 




Cheef 








It's always in place. It's neat and attractive. Be ready for every occasion with 
these newly patented plastic base handkerchiefs. Obtain your set of three Pel-0- 
Cheefs and do away with the irksome task of folding your own. Made of fine linen 
and plastic which can be easily washed. Made in 3 pointed folds: and in either 
assorted or solid colors, including white. Priced at 3 for $2.50 an d postpaid 
anywhere in the U. S. A. 

Order from SOIK &. CO.. 1224 Ashby Avenue, Berkeley 2. California. 



Former Chief W. V. Nicholson 



Page JO 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



// 



TAKING STOCK 



// 



Talk Given by Harry M. Kimball, FBI, San Francisco, California, on Thursday, May 12, 1949, at California State 
Sheriff's Convention, Yosemite National Park, Yosemite. California, Held May 12 Through May 14, 1949. 



For the past ten years the turmoil of the world has called 
upon law enforcement to give of its best. To carry out the 
burdens, the duties, and the obligations which have been 
cast upon us, we have had to go forward with only the 
accomplishment of a necessary and vital task as a goal. 
Because of this all-consuming purpose, there has not always 




Chief Special Agent Harry Kimball 

been time to develop to logical conclusions all of the mat- 
ters which might influence both our conduct as officers and 
the conduct of our offices. The situation is still one which 
calls for constant vigilance, but at the same time we have 
reached a point where our ramparts are capable of with- 
standing today's attacks. Without for a moment relaxing 
our watchfulness, now is the time to take stock of the tools 
with which we must work, and to examine the plans upon 
which we are to depend to shape the future of law 
enforcement. 

What we can accomplish in the matter of taking stock 
depends entirely upon a frank discussion of the problems 
which most affect our profession. Probably more county 
law enforcement agencies are represented at this conven- 
tion than will be represented at any other meeting held in 
this State during the rest of the year. Hence, this is a 
golden opportunity to exchange ideas and to discuss 
frankly and constructively our needs and problems. It is 
with this thought in mind that I am going to present to 
you some of the thoughts that have arisen from a study 
of the law enforcement problem as a whole. 

The need for constant training in police work cannot 
be too highly stressed. Each individual department in the 
field of law enforcement should have definite plans for the 
conduct of schools, not only for new recruits, but for all 
members. We should each make an over-all survey of our 



respective departments and determine if any weaknesses 
exist in particular phases of our work. In doing this, we 
should not only look for the weaknesses which have been 
demonstrated by actual occurrences, but also look for the 
weaknesses which, though presently anticipatory, may at 
any time become real. 

Burglary and robbery are everyday occurrences. How- 
ever, this does not mean that each officer in a department 
handles such cases every day. As a matter of fact, be- 
cause of other assignments, many officers may not work on 
this type of case at all for many months at a time. Be- 
cause of this, some of the techniques any many valuable 
aids in the investigation of such eases are forgotten. Even 
if they are forgotten only momentarily, when needed in 
the investigation of a crime, the chance to put them into 
practice is lost, because of fast-moving events and con- 
stantly-changing conditions. For this one reason alone, it 
would be most wise to consider a training session during 
which all of the techniques and aids in solving these cases 
can be discussed and demonstrated. This would serve not 
only as an education for new members, but also as a very 
fine refresher course for the more experienced officers. I 
mention robbery and burglary only because they are among 
the most prevalent crimes. The same principle applies to 
all of the other matters coming within the purview of law 
enforcement. 

With reference to anticipatory matters, there is one 
which will most certainly involve each of us at some time 
during our careers in the field of law enforcement. This is 
the occasion of an appearance as a witness in court. There 
cannot be too much stress placed upon the vital importance 
of such an appearance. The most air-tight case can be lost 
by the personal conduct of an officer on the witness stand. 
This, of course, applies to all cases, and particularly to 
jury cases. In jury cases there exists the situation of twelve 
novices in both the matter of law enforcement and the 
legal profession attempting to determine the truth of just 
what happened. Their conclusions can be formulated only 
by what they are told by the witnesses, the most important 
of which is very apt to be the arresting and/or the investi- 
gating officer. A little time spent in moot court sessions 
will contribute greatly to the ability of an officer to give 
his testimony in a straightforward manner. Most of the 
difficulties which will confront an officer on the witness 
stand can be simulated; the time devoted to this activity 
will produce most satisfactory results. 

Another matter which most certainly deserves consider- 
ation and a periodical refresher course is the problem of 
organization after jail breaks. Although breaks seldom 
occur, methods of organization to recapture fleeing per- 
sons should be given their proper place in the curriculum 
of schools which are planned. 

(Continued on page 56) 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



Page 11 



NATE PIEPER HAS NEW JOB 



N. J. L. Pieper has been appointed Manager of Claims 
for National Surety and National Surety Marine Insur- 
ance Corporation according to an announcement made 
today by Ellis H. Carson, Executive Vice-President. 

Mr. Pieper has up to this point been president of Con- 
sultants, Inc., a public relations firm he established in San 
Francisco and Los Angeles in 1945, after resigning as 




N. J. L. Pieper 

agent in charge of the San Francisco division of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

Mr. Carson pointed out that the growth of the National 
Surety's operations country-wide in the surety, casualty 
and inland marine fields has made necessary the coordina- 
tion of all claim functions under an administrative head, 
which responsibility Mr. Pieper will assume. The position 
is a newly-created one designed to lighten the burdens of 
Vice-President Henry W. Nichols, who has heretofore 
exercised dual functions as general counsel and executive 
supervisor of the claim departments. 

In seeking a man for this position National Surety de- 
cided to look for someone with a background in the public 
relations field as well as other requisite qualifications. Mr. 
Pieper's training and previous experience very adequately 
fit him to discharge these responsibilities. He was born in 
St. Louis, Missouri, and educated in the public schools in 
that city. He was graduated from the Washington Univer- 
sity at St. Louis with LL.B. degree and was admitted to 
the Missouri Bar in 1930. For the following four years he 
engaged in the private practice of law, when he became 
a special agent in the F.B.I. At various times, he was 
assistant agent in charge of the Denver F.B.I, office, a 
supervisor and administrative assistant to J. Edgar Hoover 
at F.B.I, headquarters in Washington, and was special 
agent in charge of the Buffalo, N. Y., and San Francisco 
divisions. 



Having investigated and prepared many cases, both civil 
and criminal, for presentation in the federal courts, he is 
particularly familiar with bank robberies, embezzlements, 
jewelry thefts and security losses where these involve 
interstate transactions and federal prosecution. In civil 
cases, investigations handled included war risk insurance, 
court of claims cases and anti-trust proceedings. This 
background can be turned to good account by the Na- 
tional Surety in view of its large interests in the fidelity, 
robbery and blanket bond fields. 

In 1937, Mr. Hoover placed Mr. Pieper in charge of the 
important territory covered by the San Francisco field 
office of the F.B.I. In this position he was a personal rep- 
resentative of the director in the field and fully responsible 
for all aspects of the functioning of his division including 
recruiting and training programs for F.B.I, personnel. In 
addition to handling the investigative work usually asso- 
ciated with the F.B.I, he was responsible for public rela- 
tions, including press relations. It was his duty to make 
numerous speeches before a wide variety of audiences 
including radio and also to establish contacts and liaison 
with business, community and governmental leaders. This 
experience influenced him to enter private practice as a 
public relations consultant. 

Under Mr. J. Edgar Hoover, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation has come to be one of the most efficient and 
highly respected agencies of the federal government, which 
in performing the valuable functions which are its re- 
sponsibilities, has achieved widespread recognition from 
all segments of the public. Mr. Carson stated the National 
Surety Corporation therefore believes itself fortunate to 
have secured the services of a man who has had an out- 
standing career with the F.B.I., which form the point of 
view of an insurance company has been further aug- 
mented by the successful handling of an organization spe- 
cializing in public relations work. 

The corporation hopes by this appointment to give 
added emphasis to the public relations aspect of the han- 
dling and adjustment of claims, which is of vital impor- 
tance to individual companies as well as to the industry 
as a whole. 

Phone 252 M. DeMartini, Prop. 

COLOMBO HOTEL 

DINNERS - COCKTAILS 
Scotch and Straight Whiskies 

100 SOUTH MAIN ST. LODI. CALIF. 



HILL'S JEWELRY STORE 

SILVERWARE: 1847 Rogers Bros. Community; 

Wm. Rogers and Tudor Plate. 

Watches - Jewelry - Gifts for All Occasions - Clocks 



5 N. SACRAMENTO STREET 



LODI. CALIF. 



Phone 160 



ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT CO. 

DEPENDABLE ELECTRICAL SERVICE 



8 W. PINE STREET 



LODI. CALIF. 



Page 12 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL June, 1949 

Combating Commercial Racketeers 

Address of Assistant Special Agent in Charge H. C. Van Pelt of the San Francisco FBI Office at the Annua! Conven- 
tion of the California State Sheriff's Association at Yosemite Rational Par\, May 12, 13 and 14, 1949. 



I am particularly gratified for this opportunity to discuss 
the combatting of a very serious national menace — one of 
the chief problems confronting law enforcement agencies 
today — one which threatens business interests and com- 
mercial pirates and racketeers plying their trade of fraud 
and deception upon honest, sympathetic persons and legiti- 
mate business concerns. Their nefarious schemes, tricks, 
artifices, and devious methods are countless, and their illicit 
activities annually drain millions of dollars from the 
American public. The "bad check game" is truly a big 
business enterprise. 

"Paper-Hangers" at Work 

Not long ago, an affable stranger asked to be directed 
to the glove counter of a department store. He not only 
thanked the young lady at the information desk, but he 
gave her a good, five-cent candy bar. 

"Oh, it's just a sample," he said, as he walked away, "I 
work for the company that makes them." 

The same procedure was repeated at the glove counter 
as he purchased a pair of expensive gloves. By the time 
he had made a selection, his free candy bars and smooth 
flow of talk had attracted the attention of two of the sales 
clerks as well as the head of the department. Then he 
came to the climax of his act. 

"Oh, by the way," he casually asked, "I have a small 
check — a bonus check from my company — I won it in a 
contest — and I'd like to cash it, if you feel that you can 
trust me?" 

The check looked genuine enough. It was printed neat- 
ly on safety paper and bore the name of the candy com- 
pany and the names of several of its well-known products. 
Just a few minutes later, the customer walked out with a 
$7.10 pair of gloves and $78 in change from his $81.50 
"bonus" check. 

In rapid succession, he visited several other department 
and jewelry stores in the same city, making small purchases 
and tendering in payment "bonus" checks from the candy 
company. In each instance, he pocketed sizeable sums of 
cash in change. 

The conversational stranger was a fake. He had no 
connection whatsoever with the candy company, and the 
business houses where he made purchases were added to 
his already long list of victims. By the time worthless 
checks were returned marked "no such account," the 
affable customer with the free candy bars was operating 
in another community. He continued his racket until he 
was caught by the FBI. 

There was likewise the "woman in black." As she tear- 
fully ordered a $2') floral wreath from an unsuspecting 
florist, she mournfully advised him that it was for "her 
dear, departed sister" who had just "passed on" leaving 
three small children, and an injured husband "hopelessly 



bed-ridden, in a veterans hospital several hundred miles 
away." She tendered a $100 cashier's check in payment, 
and, with a sad expression, departed with the $75 in cash. 
The delivery address for the floral wreath turned out to be 
that of a vacant lot. The $100 cashier's check "bounced," 
and now it is the florist who has the sad expression! 

These two "slickers" — the affable stranger with the free 
candy bars, and the woman in black — "paper-hangers," as 
they are called in the underworld, are but isolated exam- 
ples of a small army of fakes and frauds whose numbers 
have materially increased under recent wartime conditions 
and the subsequent post-war reconversion period. They 
are on the move constantly. Some have been to California, 
and others will follow. Their methods of operation vary 
widely, but they all have the same objective: to get the 
other fellow's money! 

They are experts in psychology and have the personality 
to sell themselves to their intended victims. They employ 
every artifice and device to ensure an appearance of good 
faith and often assume a rather stupid character to disarm 
the object of their fraudulent intentions. 

"Paper-hangers" are very fond of "all-day suckers," and 
the bigger the "sucker" the better for the crook. Many 
of these fakers don't need penmanship skill, because they 
frequently are not required by their gullible victims to 
imitate the original signatures of the drawees or payees of 
their worthless checks. There have been instances wherein 
photostatic copies of checks have been cashed, juveniles 
cashing "old-age" pension checks, and checks made out to 
women endorsed by men under the very noses of store- 
keepers who cashed them without question! 

The "horse and buggy" method still in use by the major- 
ity of present day merchants is a sad state of affairs. The 
so-called "careful" merchant is usually the most gullible, 
as he depends upon his supposed powers of being able to 
detect a "hot" check passer, by sizing him up. Experience 
has taught that it is usually the fellow who is "too smart" 
to get stuck with a "hot" check, that is generally the "fall- 

guy." 

If asked, "What does the check passer look like? Would 
I recognize him?" the general answer would be "No." The 
professional fraudulent check passer is not easily recog- 
nized. He is neither rich nor poor, worker nor business- 
man, and not necessarily farmer, doctor, banker, or soldier. 
He may appear today in overalls, tomorrow wearing a bus- 
iness suit, and next week in officer's uniform. 

He is clever. He has polished the winning facets of his 
personality until he may be termed a confidence man. 
Actually he is one, for to obtain "quick" money, he must 
first establish a temporary sense of security in his victim. 
No, the chances are that he would not be recognized, for 
he has mastered the fundamentals of his business, found 
(Continued on page 50) 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 13 



Chief Lester S. Divine of Oakland 

Moves to Make His Police Department Best in the United States 

By B. S. (Sandy) Sanders, Veteran PoUce Reporter, Editor, Author. 



This is the story of Oakland's new Chief of Police Lester 
J. Divine. 

This is a success story, of a lad from South Dakota . . . 
for the record, a spot on the map known as Camp Cooke. 

It is the story of perseverence, patience, tact, experience, 
honesty, loyalty, wisdom and understanding, that promises 
to set a new and far-reaching pattern in police administra- 
tion. 

And out of this story Oakland promises to emerge as a 




Chief Lester Divine 

metropolitan city with the finest police department in the 
nation. 

With only a few weeks in office as Police Chief, Lester J. 
Devine has already made drastic changes, has taken a short 
cut to make every division in his command more effective, 
more efficient. 

Three Major Moves 

Three major divisions — traffic, Criminal and personnel 
record departments have been merged into one "super" 
records division. 

A second major change that Chief Divine has made is 
establishing a new division- — the juvenile and crime pre- 
vention division. 

This latter step Devine points out was taken not only 
as an effort to curtail juvenile delinquency where crime 
starts, but also is the first step in seeking an enlarged 
Oakland police personnel. 

This latter step promises to come before the taxpayers 
and voters in a charter amendment which will set a ratio 
of policemen to population at one officer to every six 
hundred citizens. 

"The present ratio is one policeman to every 800 per- 
sons," says Divine. "That ratio was sufficient years ago, 



but modern practice in forward looking cities require the 
lesser ratio." 

"Traffic problems have increased tremendously in mod- 
ern days and so have the problems of juvenile delin- 
quency," continued the Chief. 

Definite Program 

So, Oakland's new Police Chief has launched a very 
definite program to put more efficiency into the depart- 
ment which he heads. The move has met with a hearty 
approval of the city manager and municipal administra- 
tion. Business and professional groups, service clubs, 
women's organizations, fraternal groups, likewise are giv- 
ing Chief Devine whole-hearted support. 

The streamlining of the department by Chief Divine 
has been carefully planned and thought out . . . every 
move is directed to giving the city better and more effect- 
ive police protection, reducing crime, cutting down auto 
accidents, curbing juvenile delinquency. 

In making the overall department changes Chief De- 
vine says: 

"These changes in administration will clear up lines of 
authority. They will and do involve a switching of work 
assignments so that allied police endeavors will be under 
one head. I want to establish clear-cut lines of authority 
and responsibility. Responsibility has been complicated in 
the past by several officials sharing authority over aspects 
of the same program." 

F. B. I. Assistance 

Another major plan announced by Divine is the fact 
that he is calling in the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and International Association of Police Chiefs as advisors 
to the Department. These outstanding peace officer groups 
will from time to time send their finest authorities and 
speakers to Oakland to present talks before the admini- 
strative officers as well as the uniform rank at large. 

In this way, Chief Divine points out "we shall have the 
assistance of the police brains of the United States and 
it will make for higher morale in Oakland's Police De- 
partment." 

New Division Heads 

In the newly established "super" records division, Chief 
Devine has assigned veteran Captain Jesse Jackson to head 
this division. Captain Jackson was formerly head of per- 
sonnel and training. To make this division more effective 
Lieutenant Hubert L. Kline has been transferred from the 
Inspectors Division as executive officer under Captain 
Jackson. 

Lieutenant Thomas Rogers has been placed in charge of 
the newly created Juvenile and Crime Prevention Divi- 
sion. Rogers has an outstanding record in police work. 
(Continued on page 17) 



Page 14 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



]une, 1949 



Peninsula Police Officers Ass'n Meet for May 



Following is a report of the May meeting of the Penin- 
sula Police Officers' Association as submitted by Richard 
(Dick) Rittenmeyer, public relations committee chairman: 

The Peninsula Police Officers' Association held their 
regular monthly meeting at Oliver's Cafe in South San 
Francisco on Tuesday evening, May 17th, with 58 mem- 
bers answering the roll call. 

After every one had enjoyed the swell dinner served, 
thanks to Captain Augie Terrango of South San Fran- 
cisco Police Department, the host, who was in charge of 
arrangements, the business meeting was called to order by 
Sergeant Jack Price of Burlingame, President. 

A lively business session followed with the Widows' and 
Orphans' insurance fund coming in for general discussion. 
The widows and orphans being the prime purpose of our 
organisation, there is strong sentiment to raise this aid if 
finances can be raised. 

Many plans were presented from the floor and finally 
a committee appointed to sift out the better ones and re- 
port back at the next meeting. Also up for discussion was 
next Fall's Policemen's Ball sponsored by the Association 
every year. Lieutenant Lawrence Furio of Burlingame was 
elected chairman of this committee, and he in turn called 
on all members to participate by working on separate com- 
mittees and really get out and work to give our friends 
who attend the biggest dance in its history. Chief prob- 
lem confronting this committee is an auditorium large 
enough to handle the crowd. 

The President then called on a number of guests and 
speakers who had attended by special invitation of Ser- 
geant Adolph Fernande; of San Bruno. Inspector Thomas 
Fitspatrick of the San Francisco Police Department was 
first and gave a very interesting talk on subversive activi- 
ties and the work confronting police officers to stamp out 
these criminals. Inspector FfUpatrick talks with authority 
on this subject as he heads that Bureau in his department. 
This is the second time he has addressed our Association 
in the past few months, attesting to the fact our members 
appreciate his efforts and enjoy his talks. We hope he 
returns soon again. 

Inspector Joseph Curtin of the State Narcotics Division 
gave an infesting speech about the investigations and work 
of the men in that department in suprcssing the dope 
racket, and the assistance from local police officers. His 
talk was also well received as attested by the applause. 

Inspector Edward Simpson of San Francisco discussed 
general police work and the close harmony represented by 
all departments in the Bay Area. He called on the mem- 
bers to improve this arrangement even closer than it has 
been, citing the possible improvement it will make for 
every one concerned. 

Last but not the least was a talk from our old friend 
Jerry Campbell, Resident Agent for the F. B. I. in San 
Mateo County. Jerry just let go and greeted and cracked 
at all his friends in attendance, it seems as though Jerry 
knows every police officer in the country by their first 



names, and has a good story to tell about each one. Come 
again Jerry. 

President Price then thanked each speaker personally 
for his appearance and invited them all to come again. 
Also each member was thanked and requested to attend 
and put forth more effort to get an even larger attend- 
ance at the next meeting in June, when more old and new 
business will be up for discussion. He told them of his 
efforts to bring our business methods up to the modern 
scale and requested each one to give him all the assistance 
possible towards this end, then thanked the elected officers 
for the fine work they have done towards bringing this 
about. 

Dick Rittenmeyer. 



The following are the new officers of the Peninsula 
Police Officers' Association, who are now engaged in a 
program that is aimed at further improving the interests 
of its members: 

President, Sergt. Jack Price, Burlingame. 

First Vice Pres., Officer Don Lowe, San Carlos. 

Second Vice Pres., Officer C. Schwann, Burlingame. 

Secretary, Capt. J. Hartnett, Burlingame. 

Treasurer, Lieut. L. Hubbard, Atherton. 

Trustee, Sergt. R. Cunningham, San Bruno. 

Sergeant-at-Arms, Officer E. Pence, San Mateo. 



REYNOLDS 
MARKET 



GROCERIES ' MEATS 
BEER and WINE 



FRESH FRUIT AND 
VEGETABLES 



Waterman at Fifth 

San Bernardino, California 

Phone 820-289 



June, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page I J 



BAY COUNTIES' 



Peace Officers' Association 



MEETINGS EVERY MONTH 



Constable Earl Dierking, President 



Captain Bernard McDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 






The meeting was called to order by President Earl 
Dierking of Vallejo and luncheon was served to those 
who were in attendance, outdoors under the trees. 

President Dierking thanked the hosts, Chief Don 
Woods of San Anselmo and Dr. Leo L. Stanley for their 
kindness in inviting the Association to hold their meeting 
at this beautiful farm. 

The President then called upon Chief Don Woods of 
San Anselmo, who introduced officials and prominent 




James A. Johnston 
Of Federal Bureau of Paroles 

guests of Marin County and also members of the Asso- 
ciation from Marin County who were present. 

The President then introduced other prominent mem- 
bers and guests in attendance. 

Harry C. Van Pelt, Assistant Chief Special Agent in 
Charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, was called 
upon and he announced that the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation Associates were holding a convention in San 
Jose on June 9, 10, 11, and he extended an invitation to 
all peace officers in this area to attend the convention. 

Dr. Leo McMahon was then called upon and told sev- 
eral of his very excellent character stories in his own 
inimitable way. These stories were enjoyed very much by 
the members. 

The minutes of the previous meeting were read by the 
Secretary and it was moved, seconded and carried that 
they be approved as read. 

A communication was received from Brigadier General 
Harold Huglin of the Fairfield Suisun Air Force Base, 



advising that he has been transferred to Hawaii and 
regrets that he no longer will have the opportunity to 
attend the meetings. 

A telegram had been sent by the Association to J. Edgar 
Hoover, on May 10, 1949, congratulating him on the 
occasion of his 25 th Anniversary as Director of the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation. A letter was received from 
Director Hoover thanking the Association for their 
thoughtfulness in remembering him upon this occasion. 

Robert P. Tracy, who retired as Chief of Police of 
Oakland on May 1st, 1949, sent in his resignation as 
Chairman of the Membership Committee of the Associa- 
tion. Chief Tracy thanked the membership of the Asso- 
ciation for their cooperation during the past years and 
stated that he would keep up his attendance. 

Chief Lester J. Devine of Oakland was in attendance 
at this meeting and was introduced to the members. 

President Dierking then appointed Chief Robert P. 
O'Brien of San Mateo, Chairman of the Membership 
Committee and Captain Hugo Radbruch of the District 
Attorney's Office of Oakland to the Committee. 

Chief Wisnom of Hillsborough then invited the Asso- 
ciation to hold their next meeting at Coyote Point, where 
the annual barbecue will be put on. He stated that the 
date of the meeting would probably be either the last 
Thursday in July or the first Thursday in August. His 
invitation was accepted. 

Ray Meyers of the Vallejo Police Department was then 
called upon and gave a short report on the Communica- 
tions situation and stated that the police radios would 
probably lose a few frequencies in the 30 to 40 mega- 
cycle range. 

President Dierking then called upon Warden Clinton 
Duffy to introduce the speaker. Warden Duffy intro- 
duced James A. Johnston, retired Warden of Alcatraz 
Prison and a member of the Federal Bureau of Paroles. 

Warden Johnston thanked all for being allowed to 
address the meeting and stated that at a meeting of this 
kind he always liked to feel that he was talking with 
peace officers and not to them. He stated that in order 
to know about criminal offenders you had to live over 
a long period of time with them and that he had had this 
opportunity. During this time he just kept trying to find 
out what makes each one do the things they do. He found 
that one cause for crime is the very early. age which 
offenders drop out of school. Sometimes you read stories 
about educated men going to prison. These stories give a 
picture quite contrary' to the facts. College bred men have 
(Continued on page 49 ) 



Page 16 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL June, 1949 

POLICE ORDINANCES OF S. F. 



Today, due to the fact that a few years ago City 
Attorney John J. OToole had all the city ordinances seg- 
regated under proper headings and numbered accordingly, 
San Francisco has a streamlined set of ordinances that any 
citizen can handle. 

We will take Police Ordinances, for example, and we 
find them grouped under 19 headings or Articles, with the 
ordinance numbers running from No. 1 to the fifteen hun- 
dreds, and with headings corresponding with the various 
groupings, such as: Public nuisances, disorderly conduct, 
games of chance, minors, et cetera. 

The wording of many of our city ordinances is highly 
technical, and some of them are quite lengthy, thus making 
the promotional unit "city ordinances" very difficult in- 
deed. With a view of saving the members of the depart- 
ment both time and trouble in mastering police ordinances 
The Police and Peace Officers' Journal will pub- 
lish, in each issue, a group of ordinances, set forth in con- 
cise, simple language. 

PUBLIC NUISANCES 

Sec. 1. Ark, Boat, Vessel: Dumping, Ectc. Prohibited. 
UNLAWFUL: 

(1) On the shorelines of San Francisco. 

(2) On the submerged streets of San Francisco. 

(3) On any portion of San Francisco, inside of the 
boundary of the State of California's property on 
the "waterfront" of the City and County of San 
Francisco — To dump or discard any boat, vessel, 
barge, ark, or any floating structure. 

Sec. 6. Banana Peels, Etc. : Deposit on Sidewalks Pro- 
hibited. 
UNLAWFUL: 

(1) On any sidewalk. 

(2) On the floor of any public building. 

(3) In any street railway car. 

(4) In any public conveyance — To throw or deposit: 
1. Any banana or orange peel. 2. Other rubbish. 

Note: Janitors of public buildings and conductors of 
street cars shall call attention to violations of Ord. 6, above, 
and take the names of such persons as persist in violating 



same. Officials of public buildings and street railway cars 
and other conveyances shall see that "Notices" on Sec. 6 
are posted. 

Sec. 12. Carpets, Rugs, Etc. 

They may be beaten, swept or cleaned qp sidewalks or 
streets only between 12 o'clock midnight, and 8 o'clock 
a.m. 

Sec. 17. Sidewalks, Washing Of. 

Sidewalks and streets may be washed only between 8 
o'clock p.m. and 6 o'clock a.m. 

Sec. 2 3. Unsightly persons. 

Such persons are forbidden to appear on public streets 
or highways, or in public places — or to expose their in- 
juries or deformities to public view. 

Sec. 28. Kite Flying. 

The Chief of Police gives a permit when such flying is 
done in that district bounded by : Divisadero — Castro and 
Army Streets — and the waters of the Bay from Army 
Street to Divisadero Street. 



YOU CAN NOW BUY U. S. SAVINGS 
BONDS TO £10,000 A YEAR 

Under revised Treasury Department regulations, indi- 
viduals may purchase United States Savings Bonds to a 
limit of $10,000 maturity value, or $7,500 issue price, dur- 
ing any calendar year. 

This limit applies to Savings Bonds originally issued 
during the year to and held by any one person individu- 
ally, or to him with another as co-owner. However, bonds 
issued to co-owners may, for the purpose of computing 
the limit, be applied to the holdings of either or appor- 
tioned between them. 

The change, which increased the former $5,000 yearly 
limit at maturity value, was pointed out by W. W. 
Crocker, Chairman of the Northern California volunteer 
Savings Bonds committee, now engaged in the nation-wide 
"Opportunity Drive" to increase the sale of bonds. 

MITCHELL'S CORNER 

J. C. Worley, Prop. 

BEER • GAS • GROCERIES 

Phone 4-5045 Sierra Blvd. and Farmersville Rd. 

V1SAL1A CALIFORNIA 



REITZ FURNITURE CO. 

Adolph Reitz 
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS 



611 W. Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



E. H. MAAS 



INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL CHEMICALS 

DETERGENTS - DISINFECTANTS - INSECTICIDES - DEODORANT 

FLOOR FINISHES - WEED KILLERS 



304 S. Conyer St. Phone 2-0457 



VISALIA 



Huth's West Visalia Nursery 

ROY R. HUTH 

Phone 4-4210 Route 4, Box 63 

Second Avenue West and West Sierra Boulevard 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



BOB'S NEWS AND LIQUOR 

BOB FULGHAM, Prop. 

Phone 2-0678 
213 E. Main (Across from Grand Theater) 



CALIFORNIA VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 17 



CHIEF LESTER DIVINE 

( Continued from page 1 3 ) 
embracing traffic and juvenile as well as general assign- 
ments. 

As a result of thees changes Lieutenant Leo E. Wells 
has been assigned to the Inspectors Division from the Iden- 
tification bureau. Wells another experienced officer with 
many years of service in the Department. The Identifica- 
tion Bureau has been turned over to Sergeant Arthur J. 
McQuillan. In telling of this drastic step of putting a 
sergeant in charge of a department Chief Divine paid this 
tribute: 

"Sergeant McQuillan has made an outstanding record in 
the 'eye' bureau. He has earned the elevated post." 
Who Is Chief Devine 

Now to Chief Divine's career. 

He came to California with his parents in 1916, gradu- 
ated from grade and high school, won his letters in foot- 
hall, basketball and baseball. 

Before signing up with the Oakland Police Department 
as a patrolman in July, 1928, Devine had worked several 
years on San Francisco and Oakland newspapers as an ad- 
vertising man and did a good job, too. 

As a patrolman he covered "beats" in the Northern, 
Eastern and Central divisions. In 1936 he was assigned to 
the traffic Division, recently reorganized under the late 
Captain Ira Redy and became an outstanding investigator 
in the department — so good that he was extended a fellow- 
ship at Northwestern University's famous traffic school 
but because of more important duties he declined. Mean- 
time he had become a sergeant. 

In 1938 Sergeant Divine, using his newspaper experi- 
ence and recognising the need of educating the motoring 
public and the pedestrian on traffic hazards, pioneered a 
traffic radio program over KLX station, which attracted 
nation-wide attention. 

As Traffic Chief 

Came 1940 and Sergeant Devine was again offered a 
scholarship at Northwestern. This time he accepted and 
took the famous traffic police training course under the 
Kemp Foundation. 

Shortly after he had finished this course he was appoint- 
ed Lieutenant of Police and during the illness of the late 
Captain Reedy, took over the direction of the traffic divi- 
sion. On February 15, 1946, he became a Captain and 
was placed as Chief of the Traffic Division. 

Under Captain Divine Oakland's traffic death toll 
steadily dropped and year after year the city was awarded 
medals and gained national renown. City, state and other 
awards came to the traffic division during the three years 
Devine headed the department. 

Home Life 

Chief Divine is married. With his wife, Zula A., whom 
he married after 10 days' courtship, and a daughter, Doro- 
thy Jean, Chief Devine owns a modest home at 11 15 TOth 
Avenue, Oakland. 

To smile comes just natural to Chief Divine. He is 
courteous and kind and generous in praise for work well 
done. The officers in the department like him and admire 



him. The public knows him as an honest, sincere, forward 
looking police chief and administrator. He is 47 years old. 
So watch Oakland's Police Department go places under 
Devine! 

FRENCHY'S BRAKE SHOP 

BRAKE SYSTEMS REBUILT - REPAIRED 

Cars — D. L'Heureux Trucks — I. W. Kegler 

Shop Phone 4-6203 — Res. Phone 4-6084 — 803 East Main Street 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

GONZALES MARKET 

MEATS - GROCERIES - BEER AND WINE 
355 North Williams Phone 4-5519 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



OLEN CECIL NURSERY 



Route 1, Box 198 



Telephone Visalia 4-4962 



Sales Yard: Sierra Boulevard East at Mitchell Corner 

MSALIA CALIFORNIA 

FRANK'S FOOD MARKET 

Open Sundays 

GAS AND OIL - FRESH MEATS - GROCERIES - VEGETABLES 

201 East Houston Ave. Phone 4-3691 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

Under New Management 



JIM'S CAFE 



Open 8:30 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. 

Steaks - Chops - Chicken - Homemade Pies and Cakes 

Merchants Lunch 50c 

12 1 N. Court VISALIA, CALIF. 



J. J. (Phil) PHILIPPE 

REAL ESTATE • INSURANCE 

Agents for Nucleus Building & Loan Assn. 
Associate — John W. Morgan — Phone 4-6556 



600 W. Mineral King Ave. Phone 4-4576 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



FARM EQUIPMENT CO. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND FARMERS' HARDWARE 



Phone 4-4612 



805 E. Main Street 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



L. C. CLARK, General Contractor 

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING 



422 Park Ave. 



Phone 4-5603 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



PETE SWEENEY AUTO SALES 

Packard Agency 



301 S. Court St. Telephone 4-3669 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



S. and L. RADIATOR SERVICE 

RADIATORS CLEANED - REPAIRED - RECORED 
NEW AND USED RADIATORS 

Telephone 2-0740 

1012 East Acequia Street (At the end of Acequia Street) 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



Page 18 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



Former Naval Shore Patrol 12th District Organize 



June 14th, 1949 was a mighty interesting day for former 
members of the 12th Naval District Shore Patrol of World 
War II. For it was the first gathering these men who did 
so much for the security of the City of San Francisco and 
the conduct of the navy personnel, had ever held. 

The meeting was held at Gino's Cafe, Front and Clay 
Streets, which is owned by former Police Inspector George 




Paul Devine 

Former Lieutena.it Commander, Honorary President of 

"The Market Street Commandos." 



here and other bases throughout the world. 

Engler, Lieutenant Commander Paul H. Devine, who is 
now operating a successful National Detective Agency, 
and Police Judge John J. Fahey of South San Francisco, 
who also held a rank in the Shore Patrol, spearheaded the 
organisation of the occasion. 

Judge Fahey was chairman of the evening, and there 
were 76 members present to partake of a swell feed, hear 
some good addresses and participate in the formation of a 
permanent organisation. 

It was voted to hold two meetings a year and the name 
of the new body has been designated as "The Market 
Street Commandos." 

The officers elected for the first year are: 

President — John Fahey. 

Honorary President — Paul Devine. 

Secretary — H. P. Wright. 

The speakers of the evening, who gave out some inter- 
esting tales were: John Fahey, Father Jerome Sullivan, 
S. J., Lieutenant Commander of the Chaplain Corps; Paul 
Devine, Dr. Sherman Leland, Commander Medical Corps, 
retired, Lieutenant Jack Ellis, U.S.N., assistant legal officer 
12th Naval District and Lloyd Minehan, California High- 
way Patrol. 

ADOBE CAFE 

SHUFFLEBOARD— CLUB ROOM 



Engler and who served with distinction in the navy as a 
Lieutenant Commander, assigned to Shore Patrol work, 



1VANHOE 



Third Door East of Post Office 



CALIFORNIA 



Berges Pest Control Service 

FRED BERGES, Owner-Manager 

State Licensed Operator 

Guaranteed Control of 
Ants, Roaches, Moths, Rats, Mice, Silverfish, Spiders, Flies 



VISALIA 



P.O. Box 1444 



Telephone 2-0774 



CALIFORNIA 



Agricultural Pest Control, Inc. 

ORCHARD SPRAYING - CROP DUSTING 



1212 N. Conyer Street 



Dial 4-7630 



CALIFORNIA 



ARCH'S TEXACO SERVICE 

F. A. ARCHULETA 
S. & H. GREEN STAMPS - MARFAK LUBRICATION 



519 West Main Street 



Phone 4-4291 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



ESSENMACHER MOTOR SALES 

Chrysler - Plymouth 
Diamond T Trucks 



VISALIA 



601 E. Mineral King Phone 4-7414 



CALIFORNIA 



R. S. CARTER 

FLOOR SANDING • COMPLETE FLOOR WORK 
WAXERS FOR RENT 



VISALIA HARDWARE COMPANY 

GROVER C. HENRY 

General Hardware 



1208 North Divisadero Street 



VISALIA 



Phone 4-6298 

CALIFORNIA 



PAUL NOE 



SUN BATTERY DISTRIBUTOR 

BATTERIES FOR AUTOMOBILES, TRUCKS AND TRACTORS 

Phone 4-7282 203 S. 2nd Ave. West 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



209 West Main Street 



Telephone 9 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



PARKER & TOOTLE MARKET 

Groceries, Fresh Meats and Vegetables 

Quality Merchandise at Reasonable Prices 

P.O. Box 961 Phone 4-3214 

Corner Ben Maddox Way and Houston 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

THE CANDID FRIEND 



Page 19 



By Opie L. Warner 



Hundreds of years ago the job of food tester was one 
of the most important in the households of the reigning 
kings and princes. Rifles or machine guns in the hands of 
either paid or volunteer killers were not then available — 
and the king or the big chief was eternally surrounded by 
formidable guards. But, poison that mixed beautifully with 
vvine or food was always available and every once in a 
Awhile some powerful ruler died in agony right at the ban- 
4uet table — hence the necessity of the food tester. In those 
lough and ready days 90 per cent of the people absolutely 
disbelieved in what, in our life, under the practice of the 
Golden Rule, is called "trust." 

We hear and we read of the simple life of man before 
vvhat we call civilisation came; how he had not to worry 
about the one thousand and one things we worry about, 
and how there were no such things as work or time clocks 
or bosses. The people who lecture on the happy Adam and 
Eve days always put before us the ease and leisure side; 
and the ones who write books on primeval life always omit 
the necessary chapter on the dangers that lurked behind 
every rock, in every cave, and behind every tree. 

We may not like to admit it, but even the most wealthy 
uf us is absolutely dependent — as absolutely as a babe in 
arms — on not one, but, in the main, on tens of thousands 
jf our fellow beings for the comforts we daily enjoy. 

Our most precious possession — our life — we, not once, 
out perhaps hundreds of times daily and weekly, place at 
the disposal of people we have never even seen. We 
^almly go to sleep in ships, trains and airplanes and, like 
little children, we rely on the individual whose duty it is 
to carry his human freight safely. 

When we consider the confidence or trust we so con- 
stantly and so unconsciously place in others we must come 
to realise what a heavy responsibility we owe to each other. 
We also must come to realise that the man who lacks sta- 
bility or that grand, God-like quality of trust, or reliability, 
or inegrity — or whatever we term it — does not belong in 
our modern civilisation and is even a detriment to any 
group to which he happens to belong. 



Phone: Reedley 310 

Bravo Wines 
Chateau Bravo Wines 

PRODUCT OF 

CELLA VINEYARDS 

Reedley, California 
P O. Box 1087, Fresno 



Our inner self — our conscience — is the only genuine 
appraiser of how much trust can be placed in us; and 
even in how much trust we can place in our individual 
selves. The small voice within tells us if we play fair with 
our brother officers and with our superior officers. Through 
constant contact with that small voice we know whether 
we are worthy of membership in the army of peace of 
which we are sworn members. 

Here in San Francisco, we, as police officers, stand be- 
tween the people and the ever present enemies of their 
lives and property — between the good citisens and the 
thug, and the thief, and the reckless killers and maimers 
in their thousands of automobiles. We have sworn to do 
our duty by the good citisens of our grand city and 
county. Individually and collectively the good citisens rely 
on us — under the tenets of the Golden Rule calmly relying 
on our stability under even the direst circumstances. Are 
these good people leaning on a broken reed? 



HERB WELCH 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTOR 
Route 4, Box 686 Phone 4-6258 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



W. M. LYLES CO. - Contractors 

MACHINE TRENCHING 
PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION 



VISALIA 



AVENAL 



FRESNO 



GEORGE C. GODFREY 



RALPH A. GODFREY 



GODFREY BROTHERS 

CONTRACTORS 
ALL TYPES CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 



808 Goshen Ave. 



VISALIA 



Telephone 4-6330, 4-3398 

CALIFORNIA 



ARCHULETA'S 

EXCLUSIVE HAND MADE DRAPES AND SLIP COVERS 
HOME AND COMMERCIAL AWNINGS 



216 E. Oak Street 



Phone 2-0351 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



RALPH B. WILLIAMS 

Ford Tractors and Equipment — Tractor Work of All Kinds 
Tractor and Equipment Rental 



910 East Main Street 



Phone 4-4521 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 20 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, J 949 



= S.m Hr^ncisco 




(Copyright, 1931, 2-0 Publishing Co.) 
Founded 1922 

Business Office: 465 Tenth Street 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-7110 



An Official Police News and Educational Magazine Devoted 
to the Interests of 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 
BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
PENINSULA POLICE OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA POLICE COMMUNICA- 
TION OFFICERS' ASSOCIATION 

Published Monthly by 

San Francisco Police and Peace Officers' Journal 

S. F. Police Short Wave Radio Call KGPD 

OUR FOREIGN EXCHANGES 

THE GARDA REVIEW 2 Crow St., Dublin, Ireland 

ALERTA, A. V. JUAREZ Desp. 6, Mexico, D. F. 

RE VISTA DE POLICIA _ 

Rioja, 666, Buenos Aires, Republic of Argentine, S. A. 

CONSTABULARY GAZETTE Belfast, Ireland 

POLICE NEWS New South Wales 

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Make All Checks Payable to San Francisco Police Journal 

OPIE L. WARNER Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS — $3 a year, payable in advance; 25c 
a number. In Canada, $4 a year. Remittance must be made 
by Post Office or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, 
or by Postage Stamps of 2-cent denomination, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to S. F. POLICE 
JOURNAL through agents unknown to you personally, or 
who cannot present proper credentials on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 30 <-afigij> 



CALIFORNIA CITIES CITED 
FOR SAFETY 

Berkeley, Burlingame, Redwood City and Beverly Hills 
won recognition as safe Califarnia cities for pedestrians 
during 1948 in the tenth annual nationwide Pedestrian 
Protection Contest conducted by the American Automo- 
bile Association which announced the results recently. 

Berkeley, for the second time, took top place among 
cities of its population group, tying with Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia. Berkeley was also a first place winner in the 194^ 
nationwide contest. 

The contest was conducted in this state by the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association, the Automobile Club 
of Southern California and the State Department of 
Motor Vehicles. 

Contesting cities were judged both as to the type of 
pedestrian protection program conducetd durnig the year, 
and for the improvement in the safety record for persons 
afoot. 

The first place award to Berkeley consists of a mahog- 
any-mounted sculptured glass plaque. Burlingame, Red- 
wood City and Beverly Hills will each receive a special 
certificate testifying to the excellence of their pedestrian 
protction programs. 

In the 1948 contest, all states and 1,484 cities were en- 
tered. The grand award for contestants among the states 
went to Massachusetts, while Washington, D. O, and 



Peru, Indiana, received the grand award among cities. 
The contest is held annually to honor states and cities 
making the most effective efforts to cut down pedestrian 
accidents. 

BOULEVARD AND BYWAY 

This matter of courtesy is quite an institution. While 
most of us aren't willing to go as far as Sir Walter Raleigh 
and throw our coats down in the mud for the queen to 
step on, we do pretty well with our little acts of chivalry, 
our little bits of "graceful and considerate behavior to- 
ward others." When we walk down the street we usually 
tip our hats to the ladies or see that we are walking on the 
inside of the sidewalk away from the street. When we 
come to a line at a counter or outside a theater, we usually 
show good grace in the way we take our place and wait 
patiently. When we move through a revolving door we 
are usually more than careful to see that we don't harm 
someone in the other wings. 

All this is very helpful, points out the National Auto- 
mobile Club, and no doubt makes it easier for us to get 
along with our fellows, saves a lot of wear and tear on the 
nerves, and from time to time probably saves us some cuts 
and bruises. But the experts would like to know what 
happens to all this fine courtesy when the average citizen 
gets behind the wheel of a car. What strange alchemy 
changes likable Dr. Jekyll into the hideous Mr. Hyde 1 
When the man who is so courteous in the drawing room, 
the office, or on the sidewalk, gets behind the wheel of a 
car he suddenly becomes a social boor. He's no longer 
content with taking his place in the line, but must be out 
in front at any expense. When he comes to the revolving 
door of an intersection, he doesn't give much thought to 
the other man but will steal his right of way. clip his tail 
feathers, or blast him with the horn or vocal cords it he 
doesn't get out of the way quickly enough. 

This type of driving cannot but contribute to the tragic 
toll of injured and dead on our streets and highways. And 
that toll is quite considerable. About every thirty seconds 
someone somewhere in the United States is being injured 
in a triffic accident. About every five minutes someone is 
being left with some form of permanent impairment. And 
about every fifteen minutes someone is being killed. While 
driving on this Independence Day week end, we might do 
well to brush off our courtesy and take it along with us on 
that trip. Being courteous can't kill you, but being dis- 
courteous can. 



KASDORF 8C SON 

Call Phil Kasdorf 

PLASTERING CONTRACTORS 

Phone 4-6419 716 Roosevelt Ave. 



V1SAL1A 



CALIFORNIA 



VISAL1A 



K. (Cap) SCHLAICH, Jr. 

PLASTERING 
Phone 4-6366 1414 S. Court Street 



CALIFORNIA 



YISAL1A 



GONG'S MEAT MARKET 

Wholesale — Retail 

QUALITY MEATS and GROCERIES 

Free Delivery 

Phone 4-7293 205 East Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



. 



]une, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 21 



Annual S. F. Police Concert And Ball 



The San Francisco Police Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association's seventy-first annual concert, entertainment 
and grand ball is a thing of the past, and breaking a prece- 
dent established through the years, the gala event was put 
on in the Civic Auditorium on two nights. May 6 and 7. 
It also established a record for ticket sales. 

The members of the Department disposed of 115,000 




Captain Leo Tackney 
General Chairman of Annual Ball. 

tickets, and the great auditorium was filled to capacity no 
both nights. 

Captain Deo J. Tackney, general chairman, and his 
committees overlooked nothing to make this year's event 
the outstanding one of the Association's long history. They 
were put to their best efforts to replace the large sum of 
money paid out to widows and orphans of police officer 
members who died during the year 1948. There were 2^ 
of them, and this put a heavy drain on the Association's 
treasury. As is well recognised, the annual show and ball 
is the main means of getting money to pay the death bene- 
fits to the close survivors of members who have passed on. 

The death roll of the last year follows, and it included 

Forrestville 2199 

S K I P P Y ' S 

FINE FOOD AT HACIENDA 

Complete Dinners For Parties Our Specialty 

Visit Our Cocktail Lounge 

ON THE RUSSIAN RIVER 

PATRONIZE 

SHUMATE'S PHARMACY 

Stores Conveniently Located Throughout San Francisco 

Look for your nearest Shumate Store 

SPECIAL PRICES TO MEMBERS S. F. P. D. 




men who through long and honorable service have con-. 
tnbuted some bright pages of history to the San Francisco 
Police Department. Most of them were retired on pen- 
sions they justly earned: 

William L. Bowman, Mansfield F. Joy, John J. Cannon, 
Louis H. Nye, Chas. M. Grush, John C. Van, Wm. E. 
Lawless, James B. Collett, John Alpers, Hugh P. Mullen, 
James T. Keeley, John D. Long, Peter J. Hughes, William 
P. Griffin, Farnk H. McConnell, Charles N. Phipps, 
Edward D. Hippely, James Doran, Richard J. Schoh, 
Matthew H. Granfield, Arthur B. Riehl, John Sonnason, 
Myron Andrus, Michael E. Desmond, John J. Callaghan. 

Captain Tackney 's committees were headed by the fol- 
lowing: 

Committee on Arrangements — All the top-rank officers, 
and 102 members of the rank and file. They, with junior 
past president Lieutenant John P. Meehan worked day 
and night to see that everything went off smoothly. Their 
untiring efforts were well rewarded, for the show was 
tops in every way. 

Reception Committee — Supervising Captain Joseph 
Walsh, chairman, assisted by Director George Hippely and 
George Wall as vice-chairman. 

Floor Committee — Headed by Arthur Barrett, chair- 
man, and Inspector Herman Wobcke as vice-chairman, 
and 2 1 assistants. 

Veterans Committee — Sergeant Henry Smith, retired, 
chairman, with 2 3 other retired members. 

The concert started at 7:00 p.m., and some fine num- 
bers were present by Musical Director Jack Seltenrich. 

The Golden Centennial Revue began at 8:00 a.m., and 
it was under the direction of Armand Girard, noted San 
Francisco singer, as master of ceremonies, and Jack Selten- 
rich, as musical director. They presented a program of 
outstanding vaudeville numbers from Larry Allen's 
agency. On the program was Officer John Kane who dedi- 
cated his number to his father Officer Anthony Kane, 
who is taking his pension after 35 years service in the 
S.F.P.D. 

Following this feature of the program Chief Michael E. 
Mitchell introduced Mayor Elmer E. Robinson, Governor 
Earl Warren, Police Commissioners Washington I. 
Kohnke, Henry C. Maginn and J. Warnock Walsh, and 
City Administrator Thomas Brooks. Lieutenant Meehan 
was presented with the gifts bestowed on retiring presi- 
dents for the splendid work they have performed for 
the Association. All responded with short talks. 

At 9:45 the grand march was started, led by Governor 
and Mrs. Warren, Mayor and Mrs. Robinson, and Chief 
and Mrs. Mitchell, and the rest of the first night was given 
over to dancing through the small hours of the morning. 

The second performance on Saturday night was the 
same as that of the first night, except for presentation of 
distinguished guests, and the gifts to Lieutenant Meehan 
and the grand march. 



Page 22 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

PISTOL POINTING 



June, 1949 



By J. Ross Dunnigan 



Due to the short space of time between the Pacific States 
Matches and the time the Journal goes to press it is 
rather difficult to get the tabulations in on time so we will 
give with the dope in our next issue. 

Sunday, June 5th, 1949 dawned a bright, cheerful, 
sunny day so we hied over the bridge to the Oakland 
matches and, though we hate to admit it, it was almost a 
perfect day with no wind and just the right amount of 
sunshine to make the blood tingle and the aim true. How- 
ever, some of the softies couldn't take it and spent most of 
the time in the shade afforded by the awning over the 
porch of the refreshment booth. The booth, by the way, 
darn near ran out of all cold drinkable stuff. The visibility 
was very good and everybody was hugging the shade of 
anything that would cast a shadow and our most recent 
guess is that the sun lotion and sunburn remedies sure got 
a workout the following week. There was a goodly crowd 
of around 165 shooters who came out to soak up the sun- 
shine and garner a few medals — at least everybody got 
well sunshined on. Cap Strohm announced there would 
be no "No Sunshine" awards but he kinda fudged a bit 
and called it at 11:55. We vigorously protested this five 
minute grace he was seeking but Cap sez that the official 

time was "NOW!" So "Now" it was! 

# * * 

We cannot forgive Carl Reigleman for adding in his 
competitors number to his score in the .22 National 
Match — and his competitor number is 94! We took the 
little man by the ear and marched him up to the good 
Captain who listened to our complaint and then very 
wryly remarked that it was allowable for Carl to do that 
as it wouldn't harm the other scores a bit and it might 
possibly help Carl get over that 114 point mark he has 
been shooting for all these years. Now whadda yuh know 
about that? # * * 

And then we saw Ed Rosing back in the fold again 
again after losing battle with the N.R.A. over classification 
cards. However, Ed is just as happy as though the N.R.A. 
didn't exist as he sez he gets plenty of shooting without 

thdr aid - * * * 

Sometime spend a few moments and take a good gan- 
der at Earl Rumctsch, of the Oakland Police Department 
when he stands up at the line with eye closed, chin in, 
stomach out and his left hand reaching inside his pants 
and grabbing holt of his undies. Whether Earl feels they 
will fall down and spoil his shooting or whether its just 
a habit we don't got no idea — but is was funny. 

* * * 

Boy, oh boy, were we surprised when we saw Don 
Mowery, the Alcatraz guard on the lines Sunday. We had 
just paid him a visit in the hospital the previous Wednes- 
day night where his doctor told us he was in a critical 



condition and lo, and goldurn, there he was as big as life 
— a bit wobbly and shaky — but there he was! It seems he 
wangled an afternoon pass to go home for a few hours 
and headed for the matches. We suggested to him to have 
his doctors examine his head during the course of their 
observations. 



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Then there was the matter of Sun Yee Lee running 
around the lot with a clinical thermometer in his mouth. 
He tell the guys that he has been under the care of his 
doctor and must take his temperature twice a day. That's 
not news to us as we have stated many times that any guy 
who takes up pistol shooting will eventually wind up under 
the care of a doc — or a psychiatrist. 
* * * 

And some day we're gonna go over to Oakland and 
find that the water tank atop that scaffolding in the horse 
corrals will no longer be there. As it is now it rests at a 
very precarious angle and we momentarily expect those 
Oakland winds to blow it over into the next county but 
for oh, these many years it hasn't shown any signs of 
"faw" down and go boom! 



We can readily understand why whiskers went out of 
style just after '49 because if what we saw at the range 
Sunday was any criterion of what those guys wore it's no 
wonder. The Alameda Police Department team was all 



£etwe&H itcu tvdii 

RARE JADES 
PRECIOUS GEMt 




Seen in an 
Atmosphere of 
Oriental Beauty 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 23 



decked out with the goofiest batch of chin spinach one could 
care to witness. In fact Officers Stone and Kene were al- 
most on the verge of shaving when they found out how 

they were scaring the children. 

$ $ $ 

Here we have Charley Waterman, the San Mateo 
shutter-hug, caught dead to rights with his first medal win 
— and is he happy? Charley has it all figured out right to 




Charley Waterman 

the penny just how much that medal cost him. Transpor- 
tation to and from matches, ammunition, gasoline, etc, etc., 
comes to the nice figure of $228.34 but that glorious feel- 
ing of that first medal more than offsets the cost. 
* * * 

Two other first medal winners were Clara DiBie, also 
from San Mateo, who was so excited about it she tripped 
over a water bucket on the way to pick up her medal and 
skinned her knee while Earl Dinsmoor merely accepted his 
as though it were an everyday occurrence — although we 
did catch him out back of the refreshment booth having 
his picture snapped with the medal pinned on his shirt. 
Scores 
C. F. 'Hational Match 

Master Bob Chow 285 

Expert Ted Berdeen 285 



PLAY AND RELAX at . . . 


PLAYLAND 


atthe BEACH 


Located at Ocean Beach near the historic « 


Cliff House and famed Seal Rocks U 


>{ Home of Thrill - Provoking Rides . . . Unique Restaurants >? 


|< Fronting the Blue Pacific . . . Oceans of Fun for Everyone! <( 


Owned and Operated by )/ 


|| GEO. K. WHITNEY 1 



Sharpshooter Ted Stone 275 

Marksman 1st Mil Harris 268 

Marksman 2nd R. Wight 253 

Marksman 3rd F. McFarland 260 

C. F. Camp Perry Match 

Master Marko Belovich 295 

Expert Bob OToole 293 

Sharpshooter Bill Martens 277 

Marksman 1st Chas. Woodall 280 

Marksman 2nd R. J. Fuller 274 

Marksman 3rd F. McFarland 260 

.22 Short Rational Match 

Master Bob Chow 294 

Expert Ted Berdeen 287 

Sharpshooter R. Fleetwood 27^ 

Marksman 1st F. McFarland 276 

Marksman 2nd R. Wight 270 

Marksman 3rd Earl Dinsmoor 258 

.22 Western Police Match 

Master Bob Chow 294 

Expert Wesley Lim 293 

Sharpshooter Clayton Kober 286 

Marksman 1st F. McFarland 282 

Marksman 2nd T. B. Daily 268 

Marksman 3rd C. Donovan 270 

.45 K[ational Match 

Master Bob Chow =. 284 

Expert Leroy Carter 274 

Sharpshooter Frank Gold 267 

Marksman 1st W. P. Irving 258 

Marksman 2nd Randy McDermott 240 

Marksman 3rd F. McFarland 238 

Aggregate Match 

Master .'. Bob Chow 870 

Expert T. Berdeen 860 

Sharpshooter Don Mowery 805 

Marksman 1st M. Harris 802 

Marksman 2nd R. Wight 793 

Marksman 3rd F. McFarland 796 

Teams 

1st— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team No. 1 1151 

2nd— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team No. 3 1126 

3rd— S. F. Police Revolver Club Team No. 2 1120 

4th — Coast Guard League Team No. 1 1119 



Telephone UNderhill 1-2200 - HEmlock 1-6961 

EMIL J. WEBER 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Industrial - Commercial - Residential 
No Job Too Large, and None Too Small 

ELECTRICAL FIXTURES 

258 DORLAND STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 24 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, J 949 



Russian River Resorts Open for Big Season 



Russian River and Lake County vacation resorts are all 
set for three months of entertaining and caring for the 
legion of men, women and children who are hitting the 
roads for the many attractive sports in the two Redwood 
Empire counties. 

All the resorts, the pioneers and the newer ones have 
gone all out to put their places in tip top shape. Many 
of the larger ones have added to their business districts, 
and new buildings for summer tenants have been erected 
during the past twelve months. Especially has Guerne- 
ville shown a great upsurge in its stores. 

All the vacation spots around Clear Lake, Upper Lake, 

TORR'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

JACQUES LAFITTE, III 
Phone Monte Rio 37 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 122 



JOE RICH'S TACKLE SHOP 

FISHING TACKLE - MADE TO ORDER 
TACKLE REPAIRS - BAIT - ALL TYPES 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



GREETINGS TO ALL PEACE OFFICERS 



Blue Lake, Lakeport, Middletown, such as Harbin's, Ho- 
berg's, Siegler Springs, Adams Springs, Skaggs Springs 
and many others are well booked up for the season, and 
they are bending every effort to give the visitors who are 
thronging their way to these various outing havens the best 
(Continued on page 42) 



Phone 109 



PLATT'S GROCERY 

STAPLE GROCERIES - LUNCH MEATS - BEER 
FROZEN FOODS - ICE CREAM - BAKERY GOODS 

ONE BLOCK NORTH OF MONTE RIO BRIDGE 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 71 W 



RICHARD KOHLER 

BUILDING AND PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

HARDWARE - HOME, APPLIANCES 

CROSLEY REFRIGERATORS . . . RADIO REPAIR 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 49-J 



AL HARRIS GARAGE 

AUTO REPAIRING - WELDING 
GAS - OIL - LUBRICATION - TIRES - BATTERIES 

"We Want One More Customer" 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 53-W 



Charles Benham 



"BARTLETT'S" 
SHOPPING HEADQUARTERS 

AND THE NEW RIO THEATRE 

MONTE RIO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 5 4W Harry Burke 

BURKE'S GARAGE 

WILLYS SALES AND SERVICE 
CHEVRON PRODUCTS 



MONTE RIO 



Phone 26 



LEE O. TORR, JR 

Licensed Broker 



EGBERT'S COTTAGES 

On Russian River 
DAY OR WEEKLY RATES • MODERN WITH HEAT 



REAL ESTATE 
P. O. BUILDING 



INSURANCE 

MONTE RIO, CALIF. 



P. O. BOX 187 



MONTE RIO, CALIFORNIA 



Phone 60 



Canoeing, Riding, Swimming 



Ludwig Apartments and Annex 

ACCOMMODATIONS BY DAY AND WEEK 

WITH HOMELIKE ATMOSPHERE 

"On Russian River" 



CALIFORNIA MONTE RIO 



Wm. H. Eichhorn 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone Monte Rio 63 



Tom Singer, Prop. 



THE PINK ELEPHANT 

THE LIVELIEST SPOT IN MONTE RIO . . . THE PLACE TO 
MEET YOUR FRIENDS 

Etta Rotchford - Jim Stone 
MONTE RIO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 32 



TOM SINGER GARAGE 

MACHINE WORK - MOTOR REBUILDING 

BODY AND FENDER WORK - PAINTING 

AUTO REPAIRING 



Towing Day or Night 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



NOONAN'S MARKET 

MEATS, GROCERIES, LIQUORS 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 

Russian River Well Policed 



Page 25 



At the many resorts on the Russian River up around 
Guerneville, Monte Rio and Rio Nido a lot of people from 
around the Bay Area, together with thousands more from 
the rest of the state and adjacent states, go for their sum- 
mer vacations. 

There are many attractions for this beautiful part of 
California, and the easy accessibility to the various resorts 
make it an ideal place to spend a weekend, two weeks or 
three months. The river offers good swimming, good fish- 
ing, and in some parts good boating. The tree covered 
areas offer fine camping sites and in season game abounds. 

It is remarkable how well order is maintained. You 
don't hear much of any crimes being committed, and the 
visitor who gets out of bounds is quickly taken care of and 
the swiftness of this procedure discourages others from 
following the loud mouth and thoughtless newcomer. 

True during the off seasons some houses are broken into, 
and the younger set now and then get out of line by taking 
too much of the spirits that cheer. These, too, are well 
handled. 



There is a reason for all this law and order in the Rus- 
sian River area. It is the Russian River patrol consisting 
of four men. 

This patrol is made up of men who know the territory 
and know how far vacationists can go in their various 
activities. The patrol has been in existence ever since 
Guerneville was a booming logging camp. 

The four men now constituting the patrol consists of 
Peter Bever, Tex Nickell, William Moore and Frank 
Adams. 

The first two alternate every other day as Chief of the 
Patrol. Chief Nickell is the oldest in service on the staff, 
(Continued on page 44) 



^CS«Si€ 



GUERNEWOOD GROCERY 



W. B. Noble and Son 



GUERNEWOOD PARK 



CALIFORNIA 



SPORTSMEN'S CAFE 

HOME COOKED MEALS 
Billie Hamilton, Mgr. — Formerly of Billie's Korner Kitchen 

GUERNEWOOD PARK CALIF. 

Phone 170 



Memories That Linger 

RIO NIDO 
Russian River 



A. L. Hicks 



YOO-HOO ICE CO. 

ICE - WOOD - BEER 
We Deliver Anywhere 



A. L. HICKS 

COMPLETE BAR SERVICE 
GAS :-: OIL 



RIO NIDO ROAD 



GUERNEVILLE, CALIFORNIA FORESTVILLE 



Phone 4161 



FORRESTVILLE BAKERY 

Specializing in 
WEDDING AND BIRTHDAY CAKES 
Home of the Potato Glazed Do-Nuts 



CALIFORNIA 



FORRESTVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2912 or 2652 



Phone 3846 

SPEER'S CORNER 

GROCERY STORE - SERVICE STATION 
BAR SERVICE 

Howard P. Speer and Lillian A. Speer 

ONE MILE NORTH OF FORESTVILLE. CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2911 J. Cortese, J. G. Grande 



BART RUSH 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



BENELLFS GENERAL STORE 

MEATS — GROCERIES — FEEDS AND COAL 



FORRESTVILLE 



Phone 2451 



CALIFORNIA 



FORESTV1LLIE 



CALIFORNIA 



Call Again Phone Forestville 24 11 



Cha 



nd I 



ris Newcomt 



OCCIDENTAL 



IN OCCIDENTAL IT'S 

"FIORIS" 

EXCELLING IN ITALIAN DINNERS 
Codktails - Mixed Drinks 

Geo. and Raymond Fiori 



CALIFORNIA 



FRESH MEATS AT PRICES YOU CAN MEET 

RIVER FOOD CENTER 

GROCERIES - FRESH MEATS - FRUIT AND VEGETABLES 



FORESTVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 26 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



Women Peace Officers Association Quarterly Meeting 



The members of the Women Peace Officers' Association 
of California are really carrying out their present program 
in a manner that is hound to reflect much constructive 
achievements. Instead of only once a year get together the 
women peace officers are holding quarterly regional meet- 



classes being conducted by the training division of the San 
Diego State College. 

The guest speaker at this meeting was Dr. David Milne, 
professor of Sociology at the San Diego State College. He 
was formerly with the California Youth Authority. His 




Banqueters at quarterly meeting of the Women Peace Officers' Association in San Diego last month. From left to right, standing: 
Grant G. Webb, husband of President Edna M. Webb, who is at left; guest speaker Dr. David Milne, S. D. State College; honored 
guest Alice Stebbins Wells, LAPD (retired), and the Association's first president; Secretary-Treasurer Margaret Peacock and her 
husband Leonard Peacock. 



ings. At these meetings much of interest to the feminine 
law enforcement officers are brought up, discussed and 
plans for presenting them to the annual convention, which 
this year will be held in conjuction with the State Peace 
Officers' Association in Sacramento in September. 

The second quarterly meeting held since the Santa 
Monica convention last year was held in San Diego on 
May 2 1 . The business meeting was preceded by a dinner 
at Sheng Haw Low's Chinese Cafe, during which a splen- 
did program of entertainment was presented for the en- 
joyment of the forty members and guests. 

The program included numbers by partially blind 14 
year old soprano Alice Couchman and the Postal Carriers' 
Kitchenette Band. 

It was decided by vote at this meeting that the Women's 
Association resume their own programs at the joint con- 
vention, and have their own speakers. Also that the Asso- 
ciation will revive the annual luncheon at the convention 
for all peace officers. 

A committee was appointed to seek the affiliation and 
support of other women's clubs, especially the Federation 
of Women's Clubs. 

At this quarterly meeting it was announced by a letter 
from John P. Pepper, supervisor of peace officers' training, 
State Department of Education that through the efforts 
of the Women's Association, women engaged in police 
work will be permitted to enter Police Training Schools 
and it was urged that all young women engaged in this 
necessary work make every effort to attend these schools. 
Several members of the association residing in the San 
Diego area are at present attending police psychology 



topic was: "The Role of Women Police Officers in the 
Control of Juvenile Delinquency." It was a very interest- 
ing and instructive address, and thoroughly enjoyed by all 
in attendance. 



IVANHOE LOCKER PLANT 

COMPLETE LOCKER PLANT SERVICE FOR OUR LOCKERS AND 
YOUR HOME FREEZER— MEATS AT WHOLESALE FOR BOTH 



Elm Street 



IVANHOE 



CALIFORNIA 



BRIGHT SPOT CAFE 



DELICIOUS FOOD, BEER, WINE AND SOFT DRINKS 



PALM CITY (San Diego County) 



CALIFORNIA 



WE DELIVER 



B. AND L. LIQUORS 

Imported and Domestic 
LIQUORS AND WINES 



ANTIOCH 



■18 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



M & C CLUB 



P. O. Box 864 
Highway 80 and Sunset Blvd. 
SEELEY (Imperial County) 



CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 27 



Final plans for the annual convention will be concluded 
at the next quarterly meeting, schedule for Los Angeles 
later in the summer. At this meeting nomination of offi- 
cers for the coming year will be presented. 

At the San Diego meet there were five state officers 
present as well as six other executive board members, a 
good turnout when it is considered that these officers are 
scattered throughout the great area of California. 

Six new members were elected to membership and the 
Women's Association is growing in numbers as well as in 
its planned program for bettering law enforcement. 

Matron Edna M. Webb, SDPD presided at the quar- 
terly meeting and was assisted by her fellow worker, Sec- 
retary Margaret E. Peacock. 



MELOLAND STORE 

FRESH MEATS, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
Gasoline and Oil 



ROUTE I 



EL CENTRO. CALIF. 



R. A. (Red) HARTER 

LIQUORS 

"We Do Our Best" 

THE BEST BRANDS AND FINEST FLAVORS 



Phone 110 



110 East Sixth Street 



CORONA 



CALIFORNIA 



TOM TOM CLUB 
DINE-DANCE 



Oxnard, California 



"BLONDIE" 

FOUR CORNERS CAFE 

Food Never to Forget and 
All Truckers Remember 

Open Twenty-Four Hours Daily 
Intersection Highways 99 and 80 

El Centro, California 



SOUTH GATE CAFE 

Rae ane Ralph Riddell, Props. 

Specializing in 

Steaks, Fried Chicken 

and Sea Food 



Be Sure to Visit Our Cocktail Lounge 

Highway 99, Brawley, California 




CLUB 99 

CARD ROOM - BEER and WINE 

Excellent Spanish and 
American Food 

Heber (Imperial County) California 



RAINBOW INN 

COCKTAILS - DELICIOUS FOOD 
Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner 

Enjoy Our ShufHeboard 

Six Miles Toward Border from El Centro 
on Highway 99 

Heber, California 



S0N0RA CAFE 

BEER, WINES AND 
GOOD FOOD 

Heber, California 



Page 28 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



ORINDA MOTORS 

A. W. "AT Eberlin, Prop. 
Telephone Orinda 2013 

Official 3A Station 
AUTO REPAIRS 



Opposite Golf Course 
Orinda, California 



LIGHTFOOT'S 
MEAT MARKET 

Phone Main 52 

QUALITY MEATS, POULTRY and 
ALL KINDS LUNCH MEATS 

Corner Orange and Colton 

Redlands, California 



THE MERMAID 

Featuring 

CHARCOAL BROILED STEAKS 

COCKTAILS 

11 Pier Avenue 

Hermosa Beach, California 

Frontier 25871 



Phone 54156 



BILL & LOU'S 
PALMS CAFE 

COCKTAIL BAR 
GOOD FOODS 

644 THIRD STREET 
San Bernardino, California 



Phone 541-93, Cafe Phone 541-31, Cocktail Lounge 

100% AMERICAN 

George Junior Cafe and 
Cocktail Lounge 

Air-Conditioned Cafe . . . Open 24 Hours Every 
Day . . . The finest charcoal broiler in California . . . 
Outstanding throughout the West . . . Serving the 
best of drinks always . . . Our specialty is cocktails 
as you like them. 

372 HIGHLAND AVENUE 
San Bernardino, California 



A Phone Call Will Bring It 
PHONE 1189-W 

LO-COST 
LIQUOR STORE 

HOUSE OF LIQUORS" 

Frank Lucido and Sal Russo, Props. 

1024 TENTH STREET 
Antioch, California 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 29 



Phone 1936-J 



Res. 1986- J 



BENTZ PLUMBING and 
HEATING CO. 

RADIANT HEATING 

Free Estimates 

616 South Garfield 
LODI, CALIFORNIA 



CARSON'S LIQUOR STORE 



Imported and Domestic Liquors 

Beer, Wine, Soft Drinks 
Mixes and Tobacco 



9131 GARDEN GROVE BOULEVARD 
Garden Grove, California 



TRinidad 2-7676 

McGUIRE & HESTER 

CONTRACTORS 

796 SIXTY-SIXTH AVENUE 
Oakland, California 



JIMS OCEAN VIEW CAFE 



FISH, SHRIMP, BAR-B-Q BEEF 

Short Orders, Beer, Wine 
and Soft Drinks 



165 So. EI Paso 
Redondo Beach, California 



Phone Beacon 6047 

The Shamrock Cafe 
and Liquor Store 

The Finest Cocktail Lounge 

in 

Costa Mesa, California 



Best Wishes to All Peace Officers From 

ARLINGTON CAFE 

Breakfasts, Lunch, Dinners and 
Short Orders 



9488 MAGNOLIA AVENUE 
Arlington, California 



""I 



Phone 3-1432 

Hardeman Liquor Store 

Imported and Domestic 

LIQUOR, WINE AND CHAMPAGNE 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Also 
Select Line of Cigars and Cigarettes 

346 "D" STREET 
San Bernardino, California 



•---4 



THE VILLAGE 

Cocktails, Beer, Wine 
and Delicious Food 

Meet and Greet Your Friends Here 

672i/o THIRD STREET 
San Bernardino, California 



Page 30 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 




NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

POLICE COMMUNICATION OFFICERS 

ASSOCIATION 

Sgt. Charles Simpson, President 



Bob Mason, Secretary 

Meeting of June 9, 1949 

The regular monthly meeting of the Associated Public 
Communications Officers was held at Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia on June 9, 1949. Our host being Stewart Naschke, 
of the California State Division of Communication, acting 
in "Stews" absence was our co-host, E. W. Lindfeldt, of 
the City of Sacramento Police Department. 

The business session of the meeting was called to order 
by President Simpson with 33 members and guests in at- 
tendance. 

President Simpson called for introduction of guests, 
those being: Commander T. W. Rodgers of Mare Island 
and "Radio Dixon," and Rudy Poucher of the Norman B. 
Nule Company. 

Commander Rodgers spoke briefly of the Navy's new 
radio station known as "Radio Nixon." The Commander 
offered all hands an inspection trip to "Radio Nixon" upon 
completion of the regular meeting. 

Under new business President Simpson reported on the 
meeting held by the California State Communications Ad- 
visory Board prior to its sending of Engineer E. H. McKee 
to Washington, D. C. 

The various points which were to be discussed covered 
mostly points of clarification with regards to Part 10 of 
the new F.C.C. Rules and Regulations, 10.10?, 10.161, 
and 10.53. 

Brower McMurphy reported on the new policy of fre- 
quency assignments whereby they would be assigned on a 
60 K.C. basis — adjacent channels instead of alternate chan- 
nels as in the past. This will be the policy of the Frequency 
and Engineering Committee as it assigns frequencies set 
up under the new F.C.C. allocation plan. 

The meeting was recessed for lunch at 12 :20 P. M. 

The afternoon session opened by calling for the next 
meeting place. Stockton was offered and accepted, moved 
by Ray Meyers and seconded by Moore. 

Reports from Commercial members followed: 

Bill Kellogg, Motorola Inc. No comment. 

C. R. Parmenter, Alpar Mfg. Co. 

I. J. Dunlap, Alpar Mfg. Co. 

Mr. Parmenter showed samples of the towers which his 
company manufactures and cited the advantages of his 
towers. 

F. L. Deetkin, G. E. Company, reported on General 
Electric's new 20 and 40 K.C. operating equipment. 

Bob Kranhold. Motorola. 

Rex Penlon, Antenna and Tower Engineering, reported 



A. R. Taggart, Treasurer 

on the tower manufactured by the Alpar Mfg. Company. 

Rudy Poucher, Norman B. Nule Co. Mr. Poucher 
was new in attendance and expressed his pleasure of being 
welcome to attend our meetings. 

Lloyd French, Link Co., reported progress. 

The report from the Frequency and Engineering Com- 
muittee fellowed and included requests from the following. 

The cities of Monterey, Carmel and Pacific Grove for 
a re-assignment due to the new F.C.C. frequency plan. 
Frequency recommended — 158.850 MC. 

The City of Piedmont for 158.73 MC. 

The City of Benicia for 39.34 MC. 

The Atherton Police Department as part of San Mateo 
County's Communication System. 

The City of Daly City for 39.5 MC. 

The City of Roseville for 156.09 MC. 

The City of San Pablo for a frequency in the 152-162 
MC band. Continued for study. 



Compliments to All Law 
Enforcement Officers 



BUSINESS MEN'S CLUB 
OF CORONA 



13410 MAGNOLIA STREET 

CORONA, CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 31 



The above frequency clearances were presented to the 
members present and were passed. Motion by Ray Mey- 
ers, seconded by Ralph Moore. 

Under frequency and engineering, im Lewis of Marin 
County requested a frequency for Marin, Lake, Napa, 
Sonoma and Mendocino Counties. The frequency request- 
ed being 39.75 MC. The request by Marin County was 
made as a motion by Jim Lewis and seconded by J. K. 
Maybee. Passed by the members present over the "No" 
vote of Bud Hossack representing the California Highway 
Patrol. 

Under new business: 

Rex Penlon spoke on the F.C.C. regulations regarding 
towers. All members were advised to study the new regu- 
lations carefully. 

No further new business, whereupon the Board of Di- 
rectors held a special meeting to approve two new mem- 
bers: Duncan and Parmenter. 

R. A. Mason, Secretary. 



The regular monthly meeting of the NCPCOA was 
held at "VAHL's" in the city of Alviso, April 14, 1949. 
Our host being the County of Santa Clara. 

Acting in the absence of President Simpson, Vice Presi- 
dent Walt Keller called the business meeting to order at 
1 P. M. 

All members present were introduced, as were our hon- 
ored guests, E. B. Hughston, of the Board of Supervisor's 
office, and Chief Henry Lingua, Chief of the County Fire 
Department. 

Under committee reports, Chairman McMurphy of the 
Frequency and Engineering presented requests from the 
following : 

Contra Costa County for 37.34 MC. 

Polo County, as part of the Ctiy of Woodlands system 
for 155.85 MC. 

City of Merced for 155.61 MC. 

City of Mt. Shasta for 155.01 MC. 

Del Norte County Sheriff's Office for 39.780 MC and 
1610 KC. (Tabled for study at the request of the CHP 
since one of the frequencies involved is the State's mobile- 
frequency.) 

Solano County for 155.49 MC and 158.79 MC. 

Supporting this request of Solano County, Ray Meyers 
presented an oral agreement stressing the need for two (2) 
frequencies in the 150-160 MC band, since the FCC was 
not licensing equipment in the 72-76 MC band for use as 
repeaters because of the possible TV interference. 

City of Weaverville for 154.65 MC for mobile, and 
156.33 MC for land. 

The above frequency requests were put to the members 
present by acting President Keller. It was moved by 
Merrill Le Boeuf and seconded by Ralph Moore that they 
approved. Carried by members present. 

QPO reported some activity and asked for more. 

President Keller reported on our next meeting in Bak- 
ersfield, a joint meeting with the Southern California 
group, and advised all members to try and make this meet- 
ing, on the 27th and 28th of May. 



Phone 82 

RAMONA LIQUOR STORE 

Herbert and Charlotte Leatham, Props. 
Open All Legal Hours Seven Days a Week 

LIQUORS - WINES - BEERS 

Hunting and Fishing Supplies 
Everything for the Sportsman 

Temecula, California 



CHARLIE'S PLACE 

Union Bar 

IT'S NEW & IT'S THE BEST 
Brawley's Finest Cocktail Lounge 

917 EAST MAIN 
Brawley, California 






DUCK POND 

BEER - WINE - SOFT DRINKS 
SHORT ORDERS 

Sandwiches and Tobacco 

13627 MAGNOLIA STREET 
Corona, California 



CLUB 99 

WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 

Our Specialty . . . Chicken, Steaks and Fried 

Shrimp. Our Cocktails are made of the finest 

liquors. 

On Highway 99 Between 
Colton and Redlands, California 



Page 3: 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



It was moved by Tom Bailey and seconded by McMur- 
phy that our next meeting be held in Bakersfield, passed 
by members present. 

Reports from Commercial members followed: 

Bill Kellogg, for Motorola Inc., reported on repeaters, 
and passed out some repeater information folders. 

French, Link Co. reported the Link Co. now has 450 
MC and 950 MC equipment. G. L. Davenport, for Frank 
Edwards Co., reported on high current generators. 

F. L. Deetkin, for General Electric Co. reports G. E. 
now also has some 950 MC equipment. 

Roy Penlon reported for Aerial Engineers, and dis- 
cussed a problem concerning aluminum towers not being 
iegal in San Francisco. 

Acting President Keller at this point reported for the 
by-law and resolutions committee, and presented a draft of 
the new Constitution and By-laws which were read for all 
members present. 

A general discussion followed concerning some points 
that needed clarification, and were rewritten to the ap- 
proval of all. 

A motion was made that this draft of the by-laws should 
be presented to the members present as an emergency 
measure and passed as such — moved by J. M. Lewis, sec- 
onded by Ray Meyers, carried by members present. 

It was moved by Ray Meyers, that the constitution and 
by-laws as presented be accepted, seconded by Hank Bo- 
gardus, carried by members present. 

The meeting was then recessed at 2:15 P. M. for re- 
freshments, whereupon all members reassembled at 2:4^ 
P. M. and held a general technical discussion concerning 
TV interference, 72-76 MC equipment, 960 MC equip- 
ment, and their general problems. 



Clarence Campbell 



Jim Hughes 



JIM'S PLACE 

ICE COLD BEER, POOL AND BILLIARDS 
SANDWICHES 



Phone 452 615 Main Street 



CORONA 



CALIFORNIA 



MAVA ICE CREAM 



1111 West Sixth Street 

CORONA (Riverside County) 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 735 



Wagon Wheel Cafe & Motel 

Clem and Dorothy Hereer 
Where the Trucks Stop 

West Sixth at Highway 71 



CORONA 



CALIFORNIA 



NATIONAL MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEATS, FRESH VEGETABLES AND FRUITS 

130 S. Hawthorne Blvd. Phone OSborne 6-4954 

HAWTHORNE CALIFORNIA 



CAFE ROSEMEAD 

Ethel, Walt and Elsie, Props. 
SERVING ONLY THE BEST 



1533 East Valley Blvd. 



ROSEMEAD 



CALIFORNIA 



RESEDA 



Greetings to All Peace Officers 

RESEDA POOL HALL 

BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 
7146 Reseda Blvd. 



CALIFORNIA 



DUTCH'S CAFE 

DINE AND DANCE 



1921 Redondo Beach Blvd. 

REDONDO BEACH 



Phone 2-6257 

CALIFORNIA 



MUSCOY HARDWARE 

Babe and Midge Wyatt, Props. 



DON'S LIQUORS 



BOX 375 



1918 West Highland Avenue 



SAN BERNARDINO 



CALIFORNIA 



THOUSAND OAKS 



CALIFORNIA 



COLTON 



SAM'S CAFE 

ONLY THE BEST FOODS SERVED 
AT OUR LUNCH ROOM 

QUALITY FOODS • CHILI & BEANS 

153 West "I" Street Phone 372 



CALIFORNIA 



ONTARIO 



TIGER CAFE 

SHRIMP, FISH AND CHIPS 
BEER AND SOFT DRINKS 

609 East "A" Street 



CALIFORNIA 



McCULLEY'S MARKET 

Phone Highland 302W 
GROCERIES - MEATS - VEGETABLES - FEED 

BEER AND WINE 

EAST HIGHLANDS (San Bernardino County) CALIFORNIA 



SHANGHAI CAFE 

Serving Chinese and American Dishes 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

Phone 451 126 W. 5th Street 

HOLTVILLE, CALIF. 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 33 



CAPTAIN OF INSPECTORS OTTO MEYER 

(Continued from page 7) 

term under the present boss, Lieutenant Sam Miller. 

When he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant he 
was assigned to the supervision of the Hunters Point 
Housing projects. He was in charge of the policing of 
that new-made city within the City of San Francisco for 
five years. When he went to take over the job he had 
18 men; when he gave it up to go to Washington, D. O, 
to take the course in the F.B.I. Police Academy, he had 
30 men on his police force. 

This assignment was a tough one, for here were brought 
from every section of the United States men, women and 
children of every nationality, color and creed. Many of 
them had never lived in a well-regulated community. Some 
of them had never had any neighbors closer than five or 
ten miles away. Yet they were thrown into the Hunters 
Point area to participate in the defense work necessary 
to carry on the war and prepare the nation for any future 
eventualities. With this great heterogonous population 
there was bound to be a lot of them who had scant respect 
for law and order, but under Lieutenant Meyer they were 
shown the better way to get along. He applied no harsh 
rules, he didn't get tough with the newcomers. By patient 
plans he won their respect and their respect for the men 
working with him. We doubt if any area in the United 
States with 40,000 people living in it, as there is and has 
been at Hunters Point, can match the record of that sec- 
tion for fine observance of the law of the land. This record 
is due to the untiring efforts, understanding and good 
public relations as promoted by Lieutenant Meyer and 
his detail of experienced San Francisco Police Officers. 

So highly did the Housing Authority think of his ad- 
ministration of the project for the last five years, that 
high officials in Washington, D. O, called personally on 
Otto Meyer while he was attending the F.B.I. Police 
Academy to thank him personally for his outstanding 
work. It might well be stated here that during the same 
sessions in the Police School Captain Meyer had another 
caller, Harry Amols, the New York jeweler who was 
robbed back in 1929 of over $300,00 worth of jewels, as 
recounted above. 

Director John Edgar Hoover of the F.B.I, gave the 
Captain a citation for his efficient attention to the training 
program and for his ever willingness to learn more of his 
chosen profession. 

Captain Meyer is good at golf, and was champion of 
the police players during 1925-26-27. During the 1920's 
he was a leading pitcher for the Police baseball nine and 
was hurler for the champion six-team league of the Police 
Department. This team went on barnstorming tours and 
always brought home the bacon. 

In 1916 Otto Meyer married Miss Amelia Rasmussen 
and the couple has three daughters, Mrs. Bernice Gustaf- 
son, Mrs. Rowena Armstrong and Miss Elsie Meyer, who 
is a mathematics teacher in the Lincoln High School. 



CAMARILLO LIQUOR STORE 

LIQUORS • BEER • WINE • SOFT DRINKS 

CAMARILLO CALIFORNIA 

MOON CAFE 

LOIS MORRIS, Prop. 

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinners • Short Orders 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

ANAHEIM CALIFORNIA 

HIGHLAND ORANGE CAFE 

Beer, Soft Drinks and Good Home-Cooked Food 
HIGHLAND (San Bernardino County) CALIFORNIA 

JOE'S PLACE 

LOMITA. CALIFORNIA 
(Los Angeles County) 
Compliments 

CAMARILLO CAFE 

OPEN 24 HOURS DAILY 



CAMARILLO 



CALIFORNIA 



DEL LINGO HOTEL 

CAL1PATRIA, CALIF. 



GEORGE'S MARKET 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH MEATS 
VEGETABLES AND GROCERIES 



158 MAIN STREET 



BRAWLEY, CALIF. 



DICK'S ADOBE 

BRAWLEY'S FINEST COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

DELICIOUS FOODS COOKED BY EXPERTS 

538 E Street 

BRAWLEY CALIFORNIA 

PENNY'S CAFE 8t LIQUOR STORE 

On Highway 101 
In the Heart of 

LEUCADIA, CALIF. 

Baby Chicks - Pullets - Cockerels - Custom Hatching 
Member: International Baby Chick Assn. 

SUNSHINE HATCHERIES 

CAPACITY — 150,000 EGGS 
Telephone Whittier 62-270 2482 Rosemead Blvd. 

RIVERA CALIFORNIA 

NEW YORK CAFE 

BEER AND WINES 

Sandwiches of All Kinds • Spaghetti and Meat Balls 

Jim and Marie, Props. 

109 E. VALLEY BLVD. BLOOMINGTON, CALIF. 



THE PASTIME CLUB 



127 EAST "A" STREET 



ONTARIO 



CALIFORNIA 



THE NEW MT. VERNON HOTEL 

SAN BERNARDINO'S FINEST 

Air-Cooled, Air-Heated - Coffee Shop in Connection 

2140 Mt. Vernon Ave. — On Highways 66, 39S and 91 

SAN BERNARDINO CALIFORNIA 

R. Keyser A. Schapiro 

KEYSER'S SUPER MARKET 

FREE DELIVERY 
VEGETABLES - MEATS - GROCERIES 
Phone 5-6138 338 Highland Ave. 

SAN BERNARDINO CALIFORNIA 



STACKS BEER PARLOR 

17317 BELLFLOWER BLVD. 



BELLFLOWER 



CALIFORNIA 



Page 34 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



]une, 1949 



Phone WAlnut 1-5 142 



F. L. Cartwright - E. L. Goodrich 
CALL 

FRED'S 

For MOVING AND HAULING 

Van and Pickup Service 

1214 FULTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

MONARCH HOTEL 

NEWLY FURNISHED -::- TWIN BEDS 
COURTESY SERVICE 

722 Golden Gate Avenue, near Civic Center 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MArket 1-7432 

QUALITY PORK AND SAUSAGE CO. 



401 D1VISADERO STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone GArfield 1-3670 

Banquet Room - Cocktail Lounge 

REX RESTAURANT 

TASTEFUL, WELL PREPARED ITALIAN DINNERS 

40 1 BROADWAY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



DAMES 8C MOORE 



417 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



RITEWAY EXCHANGE 

Paul Sanders 

STARTERS • GENERATORS • FUEL PUMPS 

FORD CARBURETORS AND FORD DISTRIBUTORS 

Phone HEmlock 1-5322 455 Golden Gate Ave. 

SAN FRANCISCO 2 CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOTEL ST. JULIEN 

I. C. LUCHETTA 
1304 Stockton Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ALLEN'S LITTLE COFFEE SHOP 



41 California Street 
SAN FRANCISCO I I 



GArfield 1-3065 



CALIFORNIA 



WEBBERS SHOPPE 

CHILDREN'S WEAR 

Holeproof Hosiery - Warner's Corsets - Dry Goods - Millinery 

Nations and Ladies Wearing Apparel 

68 West Portal Ave. Telephone MOntrose 1-5969 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

E. CLEMENS HORST CO. 

Growers — PACIFIC COAST HOPS — Dealers 
235 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 4 



CALIFORNIA 



ATTHOWE 8C CO. 

PRINTERS 



DEBS DEPT. STORES 



2430 MISSION — 1641 FILLMORE 
2062 MISSION — 1318 STOCKTON 



344 FRONT STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GENE 



EMIL 



GALATOIRE'S 



(GENE'S PUFFET) 

CHOICE WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS 

4744 Third St. (Cor. Oakdale Ave.) Phone Mission 8-9932 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SOLARI AND RIGHETTI BROS. 

DEALERS IN WINES AND LIQUORS 



Phone Mission 5904 
SAN FRANCISCO 24 



4404 Third Street 



CALIFORNIA 



ALLIED LIQUORS 



1399 Fillmore Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



WAlnut 1-8502 



THOMSON'S 

R. D. THOMSON 

CAMERAS • SUPPLIES 

Telephone ORdway 3-2745 1350 Polk Street 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



Bay and River Navigation Company 

PIER ONE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 



PARIS HOTEL 

PETE JARIS 
348 3RD STREET 



CALIFORNIA 



John S. Currie, Gen. Mgr. Established 1898 

Pierce-Rodolph Storage Company, Ltd. 

UNITED VAN LINES, Inc. • Nation Wide Moving 



1450 Eddy Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



WEst 1-0828 



CALIFORNIA 



Wholesale Linens, Dry Goods, Blankets, Carpets, Curtains, Draperies 
Hotel, Hospital and Steamship Furnishings" 

STANLEY ROSENTHAL 8C CO. 



283 Ellis Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone TUxedo 5-1363 

CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BARRETT 8C HILP 

CONTRACTORS 

(Since 1912) 

918 Harrison Street 



CALIFORNIA 



HOT MEALS 
103 SOUTH SCHOOL STREET 



KAREN'S FOUNTAIN 

SALADS 



LOD1, CALIF. 



NORTHWEST ENGINEERING CO. 



GEORGE M. PHILPOTT CO. 

1060 BRYANT STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

AL CASSETTANA - Liquors 

JUniper 5-9646 Al Cassettana, Prop. 

LIQUOR - WINES - CIGARETTES - CIGARS - CANDY 
4712 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



TOWER CAFE 



1525 GRANT AVENUE 



SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-9796 

L'EMPORIO LUCCHESE 

GENTS' AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS 

Agents for: Borsalino - Stetson - Crofut Knapp Felt Hats 

Florsheim Shoes - Jantzen Sweaters and Swimming Trunks 

1325 STOCKTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



EDDY-FRANKLIN LIQUOR STORE 



CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 



25 5 TENTH STREET 



898% Eddy Street 
SAN FRANCISCO SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone PRospect 5-9725 

CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 3? 



S. F. BURGLARY DETAIL 

(Continued from page 8) 
arrived in the city with her parents from Portland, 
Oregon. Apparently Johnson wasn't long in spotting the 
new face in town. From this point the progress of the 
story becomes obvious, and he was persistent then also. 
They were married May 16, 1914. After occupying a 
home on Guerrero Street for a short time they lived at 
117-A Highland Avenue for ten years. Then the John- 
sons built their present home at 1454 Nineteenth Avenue. 

Inspector Johnson's service in the San Francisco Police 
Department began July 1, 1918, and his first assignment 
as a Patrolman was to the old Company "C" (Harbor 
Station). His first commanding officer there was Detective 
Sergeant George Richards, who later retired as a police 
lieutenant. He alternated for a time between Harbor Sta- 
tion and the Chinatown Detail, serving in the latter 
under Detective Sergeant Harry Walsh, now retired and 
living in Fairfax, California. 

November 13, 1922, Johnson was in a group of four 
men who were the first assigned to office duty in the 
Detective Bureau. Two of that group — Otto Fredericksen 
and Ed Jones — are now retired. The other man and John- 
son are still together — and like Johnson, Inspector James 
Hayes of the Burglary Detail gives a special meaning 
to the word "veterans." 

The office crew at that time was split into two watches 
— one under Corporal Bernard McDonald, now captain 
in charge of the city prison. Prior to that assignment, 
McDonald held the post of Captain of Inspectors under 



PACIFIC 

NATIONAL 

BANK 




San Francisco 



BEAUTY 

PARLOR 

QUEEN 

We Make Your Eyes Bigger, We Make 
Your Mouth Smaller 

Your Eyebrows Thinner, Your 
Pompadour Taller, 

We Make You Beautiful, That's 
The Truth — 

But Lady, This Isn't 

The Fountain of Youth. 

Duke Tevis Beauty Salon 

958 Geary (near Polk) 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

PRospect 5-2372 



r~~- 



Freed, Teller & Freed 

Blenders and Roasters of "Fancy" High Grade 

Coffees and Teas for Fifty Years ... in San 

Francisco. 

We also serve many of the leading restaurants in 
San Francisco. 

Theer is no substitute for Fresh Coffee . . . We 
grind it while you wait. 

We also carry a complete line of spices and food 
flavorings. 

1326 Polk Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Page 36 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, I'M'J 



Chief of Police Charles W. Dullea. The other office crew 
watch was under supervision of Corporal Emmett Hogan, 
who later became a sergeant, and is now deceased. 

Corporal, Sergeant, Detective-Sergeant, Inspector John- 
son came to the Burglary Detail when it was headed by 
Inspector Richard Tatham (since retired and deceased) . 
He worked in a team with Inspector Richard O. Hughes; 
and these two men developed an investigative routine that 
is still the talk of the department. 

Ask Johnson or any other detective the broad question : 
what are the qualifications of a good burglary detective? 
You will receive a broad answer, filled with generalizations 
— hard work, perseverance, care, knowledge of new de- 
tection methods, preservation of evidence, etc. The answer 
furnishes the qualifications for any profession. 

Were it possible to give Johnson the same type of 
spectroscopic examination given evidence gathered by the 
men of his detail in the FBI's Washington laboratory, 
you would find some qualities of the good burglary in- 
vestigator. They would include intuitiveness, discernment, 
ingenuity, and perhaps a smattering of clairvoyance. These 
are the items, when augmented by experience, that tell 
an inspector whether or not to believe a suspect's story, 
when to search a house for stolen property, or how to 
develop a set of contacts. 

The SFPD is fortunate that Johnson doesn't have a 
corner on ability to investigate burglaries, for the men of 
his detail are well represented on the list of intangible 
qualifications that make a detective. 

When Johnson came into the Burglary Detail its per- 
sonnel consisted of the following teams : 

James Gregson (deceased) and Joseph Lippi (now in 
the Bureau of Missing Persons) ; Earl Rooney (retired for 
disability) and Jack Palmer (deceased) ; Irvin Findlay 
(now in the Federal Detail) and James Mitchell (now 

Phone Mission 7-0236 

STOVES 

GERNHARDT STROHMAIER CO. 

REFRIGERATORS— WASHERS — IRONERS 
WATER HEATERS 



MISSION STREET AT 1 8TH 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Phone ORdway 3-3012 

HUNKEN'S MARKET 

FRE3H MEATS - GROCERIES - FRUITS - VEGETABLES 
Wines - Liquors 



1183 O'FARRELL STREET 
At Cough Street 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



VISALIA APPLIANCE CO. 

BUTANE GAS AND EQUIPMENT 



VISALIA 



115 South Court Street 



UNITED PACIFIC INSURANCE CO. 

Home Office: TACOMA, WASHINGTON 



206 SANSOME STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SCHIRMER STEVEDORING CO., Ltd. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



WALTERS 
Furnace and Sheet Metal Co. 

COAL, GAS AND WARM AIR FURNACES 
JUniper 7-1307 1300 Ocean Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



YUKON HOTEL 



237 3rd Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORM,' 



LEOPARD CAFE 

"Cocktails Served in a Relaxing Atmosphere" 

140 Front Street Phone EXbrook 2-3349 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



CRESCENT PACIFIC OIL CO. 



2065 3rd Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



NORTHAM WARREN CORP. 

CUTEX NAIL POLISH - ODORONO DEODORANT 
813 Folsom Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



CALIFORNIA 



D'ANGELO BROS. 

22nd & IRVING MARKET 

SERVICE AND QUALITY 
FISH AND POULTRY DEPT. 

2lt)l Irving Street OVerland 1-2328 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



C. J. HENDRY CO. 

27 MAIN STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SIDNEY MIRON 



Positively Pays the Highest Prices for Ladies and Gents 

SECOND-HAND GOWNS, DRESSES AND SUITS 

We Carry a Full Line of New Furs 

WEst 1-1552 — 1750 Geary Street (Bet. Fillmore and Webster) 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 37 



in the Shopping Detail) ; Hughes and Johnson. When 
Hughes retired in 1945, Inspector Johnson was placed in 
charge of the detail by Chief Charles W. Dullea. 

Thirteen officers are presently assigned to the detail, 
nearly all of whom have many years' police experience 
behind them. The teams are: 

James M. R. Hayes, 56, and Herman Wohcke, 5 5. In- 
spector Hayes, born in San Francisco, was appointed to 
the Police Department January 17, 1921, and entered the 
Detective Bureau from Mission Station on November 13, 
1922. Inspector Wobcke, also a native-born San Fran- 
ciscan, entered the Department November 9, 1925, and 
has been a member of the Bureau of Inspectors for 17 
years, being transferred from Potrero Station. These two 
men have given San Franciscans more than their share 
of police protection during the 51 years they have served 
as police officers. 

John R. ("Ray") Hunt, 52, and Roy W. Soper, 46— 
Another San Franciscan, Inspector Hunt was appointed on 
October 1, 1924, and has been in the Inspectors' Bureau 
since March 3, 1932. His partner, Roy Soper, is a native 
of Mitchell, South Dakota, and entered the department 
July 1, 1936. 

Melvin L. ("Mel") Jorgensen, 32, and Edward P. 
Barden, 41 — Both men are San Francisco born. Jorgensen 
became a Police Officer on July 13, 1942, and Inspector- 
Sergeant Barden was appointed July 18, 1935. 

Bartholomew C. ("Bart") Lally, 56, and John P. 
Curtin, 38 — Two more San Francisco native sons. Lally, 
one of the Bureau's old-timers, was appointed October 1, 
1924. Curtin joined the Department April 27, 1936. 

Edward J. McKevitt, Jr., 38, and Daniel E. Shelley, 
28 — Both San Francisco born. McKevitt was appointed 
July 1, 1941, and Shelley on December 1, 1942. 

John F. Merrill, 40, and Thomas L. Brodmerkle, 45 — 

for your home . . . 

there's no place like 

W. & J. SLOANE 



BUY U . S 
S A V T N G S 
B O ND S 



W. R. AMES COMPANY 



150 Hooper Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PRESIDENT ROOM 

AL — CHICK 

EVERY DAY IS A HOLIDAY 

EVERY NIGHT IS A CELEBRATION 

TELEVISION AT ITS BEST 

939 Geary Street Telephone GRaystone 4-9950 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



SWETT 8C CRAWFORD 

INSURANCE GENERAL AGENTS 
100 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



MARSHALL-ADAMS 
PRINTING CORPORATION 

PRINTERS AND STATIONERS 

523 Sansome Street GArfield 1-6520 

SAN FRANCSICO 26 CALIFORNIA 



UNION ASBESTOS 8c RUBBER CO. 

55 New Montgomery Street YUkon 2-2296 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

ELECTROLUX 
CORPORATION 



417 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PARROTT & COMPANY 



231 Sansome Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HIRSCHFELD SALES CO. 

Coin Machines 



QUALITY FURNITURE CO. 

APPLIANCES AND COMPLETE HOME FURNISHINGS 



KLondike 2-3100 477 Fulton Street 



2225 Mission Street ATwater 2-8436 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO 10 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ARTHUR A. HYMAN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
300 Montgomery Street 



CALIFORNIA 



AIR TAXI 

MORE PLACES - CHEAPER - FASTER 

SEabright 8-9500 
SAN FRANCISCO BAY AIRPORT 



Page 38 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS" JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



The details "safe burglary" men. Merrill, native San 
Franciscan, was appointed August 17, 1936; and Brod- 
merkle, a New Yorker, became a policeman January 27, 
1936. 

Gus Alexander Despotakis, 28, a native of Port An- 
geles, Washington, entered the SFPD December 31, 1945, 
and serves as clerk for the detail. 

Working out of the detail's office and under the juris- 
diction of Inspector Johnson are Emmett M. Cottrell, 45, 
and William J. Merrick, 53, of the Waterfront Detail — 
they are the Waterfront Detail. Cottrell, who was 
appointed to the department February 5, 1934, is the only 
Irishman in the detail who was born in (County Cork) 
Ireland. 

Merrick, a native son, entered the department August 
31, 192S. On leave of absence during World War II, 
he was skipper of a merchant marine vessel. 

Inspector Johnson will talk long and volubly about these 
men of his detail, but about himself "there isn't much to 
say." A check of department records knd a few questions 
about the Hall of Justice tell a different story, however. 

There is a matter of four citations for meritorious serv- 
ice — all won by participating in hazardous duties. "Some 
assignments are hazardous," Johnson concedes, "but that 
is true in other professions also." 

Small compensation have been his policeman's salary 
and commendations compared with the amount and 
quality of service he has given the people of his city during 
his 30 years as an officer. 

A. M. GILBERT 8C CO. 

Wholesale 

DIAMONDS • RINGS • MOUNTINGS • JEWELRY 

704 Market Street 

SAN FRANC ISCO 2 CALIFORNIA 

HYSTER COMPANY 

LIFT TRUCKS • SADDLE TRUCKS 

KARRY KRANES 

233 9th Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 3 CALIFORNIA 

W. C. TAIT CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



461 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SUtter 1-6S22 



CALIFORNIA 



LELAND J. LAZARUS 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

TOULOUSE LAUNDRY 



821-829 Lincoln Way 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MOntrose 1634-1635 

CALIFORNIA 



SPICE ISLANDS CO. 



70 Pine Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

40 Spear Street EXbroOk 2-0064 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



205 Granada Ave 

SAN FRANCISCO 12 



LLOYD SUNDBERG 

CONTRACTOR — HOME BUILDER 
JUniper 7-8697 



CALIFORNIA 



RED MILL 

Owner — Lou De Marchi Bartender — Jimmie Walsh 

COCKTAILS — TELEVISION 

4316 Judah Street SEabright 1-9851 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

JOPINA GUEST HOUSE 

Home-like, in old building. Within walking distance to town. 

Cable car stops at door. Telephone service. 

1114 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



MANILA CAFE 

604 JACKSON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GORB JEWELRY 



5645 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



LAN FORTUNA GROCERY 



3001 20TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



RELIANCE GROCERY 

1919 McAllister street 
san francisco california 

DOUGHERTY'S TAVERN 

952 FILLMORE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



THE SKYSCRAPER 



3336 24TH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BOSTON ROOM 

BEER AND WINE 
919 Kearny Street 



CALIFORNIA 



RIO LINDA GROCERY 

FRESH VEGETABLES - COLD MEATS 

WINE AND BEER 

SUtter 1-0406 218 Fourth Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Mission 7-5904 

SOLARI AND RIGHETTI BROS. 

Dealers in 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

4404 THIRD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

JAKE and EDDIE 

BAY VIEW INN 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Phone Mission 7-3654 4636 3rd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

VEGETABLE PLANTS 

CROCKETT NURSERY 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
GEORGE CROCKETT 



IVANHOE 



P.O. Box 140 Visalia 4-5945 



CALIFORNIA 



June, J 949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 39 



CAPTAIN MARTIN CHARLES' 
THANK YOU LETTER 

The following is a belated publication of a letter re- 
ceived last April from former Captain of Detectives 
Martin Charles of the Sacramento Police Department, and 
who retired because of ill health late last year: 

To the Editor of the Police Journal : 

May I take this means of expressing my gratitude for 
the splendid article you published in the January issue of 
the Police Journal, relative to my retirement from the 
Sacramento Police Department. 

While I have tried hard to be a good copper, it is pleas- 
ant indeed to read such an article and feel that my brother 
peace officers in Northern California have had such a 
pleasant time working with me. 

Truly if I have made a reputation as a "dick" it is 
through the splendid cooperation given me by all offices 
and departments, both city and county and state that I 
made good. 

The doctors insist that I take it easy for awhile, but I 
won't say goodbye to my friends. Just "so long and see 
you all later." 

In the meanwhile best of luck to all of you. 
Sincerely, 
Martin Charles, 
Captain of Detectives (retired) 
Sacramento, California. 



Phone 4-4557 

W U N D E R 
CAFE & BAR 

LIQUORS 
On or Off Sale 

ft 

DRINKS 
Reasonably Priced 



FINE FOOD 

Served at all hours 

ft 
Visalia, California 



ESTRADA'S SPANISH KITCHEN 

Hours 

WEEKDAYS 5:00-10:00 P.M. 

SATURDAYS 4:30-11:00 P.M. — SUNDAYS 4:00-10:00 P.M. 



414 W. Main 



Phone 2-0523 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



VAN DUSEN'S CLEANERS 

FIRST IN QUALITY — FIRST IN SERVICE 
CALL AND DELIVERY — DRIVE-IN SERVICE 



Phone 4-5419 220 N. Encina 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



P. H. THURBER 

LIVESTOCK BUYER 
Phone 4-5475 1220 Highland 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



STERLING SMITH 

Contrator and Builder 

Phone 20585 520 W. Myrtle 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



URIAH 

PINE LUMBER 

COMPANY 



UKIAH, CALIFORNIA 



Page 40 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



LOREN E. SPAIR Chief of Police Riverbank 



Chief Loren E. Spair was born in Joplin, Missouri, 
September 17 1908, on a small farrm just outside the 
city. He had all his schooling in the Joplin public schools 
where he graduated from high school. 

With his family, he came to California in 1935, and 




Chief Loren E. Spair 

settled in Stanislaus County around Modesto. Loren 
entered police work as assistant Chief in 1945 with the 
Riverbank Police Department. 

In early 1946 he was appointed Chief, because of his 
efficiency, and he has remained until this writing, and 
there is no doubt in the minds of his many friends that 
many years from now he will still be an efficient law 
enforcement official with a more responsible position. But 
let's add the one he now holds is very responsible due 
to the migration of vegetable and fruit workers. 

VISALIA DISPOSAL & TRUCKING CO. 

J. J. Simon and Sons 

ROCK, SAND, DECOMPOSED GRANITE, OIL SAND 

FERTILIZER AND DIRT 

Phone 4-S373 120S N. Willis Street 

VISALIA CALIFO RNIA 

SEE THE MIRACLE 

Pfaff Sewing Machine 
AIRPORT FURNITURE WHSE. 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



AIRPLANE VAPOR SPRAY CO. 

SEQUOIA FIELD 



The Chief has only 3 men besides himself to maintain 
law and order, the department's roster being as follows: 

Chief Loren E. Spair. 

Asst. Chief Melvin Langford, ex-veteran. 

Partolman Arthur Venhaus. 

Patrolman Wilbur Capp. 

Riverbank has a population of 3000. It also has large 
railroad shops, round house, and can boast of the world's 
largest tomato cannery. 

There is also a large dehydration plant which manu- 
factures large quantities of stock food. 

Riverbank's almond and walnut groves are known 
throughout the country. 

Riverbank is located on the main highway to the high 
Sierras and the Yosemite National Park. 

Compliments 

CROSINA OLIVE OIL CO. 



1401 Kaweah Ave. 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



MIDDLETON'S 

READY MIXED CONCRETE, ROCK AND SAND 

1100 E. Center Phone 4561 

VISiALIA 

1032 River Road 124S-W 

PORTERVILLE 

MORTARLESS INTERLOCKING CONCRETE BLOCK 

RAMBAC BROS. 

CONCRETE PRODUCTS 
Frank Rembac 

Phone 4-4917 P.O. Box 709 

6th Avenue East and Mineral King 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



HIPWELL'S MARKET 

GROCERIES, MEATS AND VEGETABLES 

400 East Tulare Ave. (Opposite Visalia Canning Co.) 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



KNUDSEN MILK PRODUCTS CO. 

Phone 4-6727 
GOSHEN AVE. 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OLIVE COMPANY 

Early California Brand 

RIPE • GREEN RIPE 

STUFFED GREEN 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 41 



W. C. TAIT CO. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

461 Market Street 

San Francisco, California 

SUtter 1-6522 



RUSS 
BUILDING 

235 Montgomery St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Bus: J Uniper 4-9767 



Res: JUniper 7-4607 



Modernizing - Recovering - Draperies 

ANGELO & DAENO 

Dax Biagi, Proprietor 

CUSTOM BUILT 

Upholsterers and Home Furnishers 

Restaurant and Bar Jobbers 

2798 San Bruno 
San Francisco 24, California 



Phone 1481 

Modern Vending Service 

Frank Cursetti - Tom Malloy 

Specialists in Music and Coin 
Operated Amusement Games 

1123 FIRST STREET 
Napa, California 



Our Specialty: 
Home Made Pies, Chicken Pies and Roasts 

"FIRST IN QUALITY" 

HANDY DELICATESSEN 

LUISE GOEHNER - ALEX ANTONE 

Wines and Liquors 

Phone OVerland 1-3761 
1815 Irving Street, Near 19th Avenue 

San Francisco, California 



VAleneia 4-9918 



Private Booths for Ladies 



EL CHARRO 

Spanish Dishes and Mexican Foods 

Tortillas - Tamales - Chorizo 

Efficient Service for Clubs and Dinners 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fred Esparza, Prop. 
2950 - 25th Street, Corner Bryant Street 

San Francisco, California 



All Garments Perm Aseptized Against 
Germs ■ Odors ■ Moths 

4-Mile Cleaning Plant 

AND BRANCHES 

Store 1 and Plant 2200 Lane Street 

Sotre 2 1299 - 18th Street 

Store 3 3373 Mission Street 

Store 4 1320 Irving Street 

San Francisco, California 



Arizona - New Mexico - Texas - Eastern Points 

Western Truck Lines, Ltd. 

Common Carriers Interstate 

75 Columbia Square 

San Francisco, California 

Phone MArket 1-8261 



Page 42 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



RUSSIAN RIVER SET FOR BIG SEASON 

(Continued from page 24 I 
of service, meals, housing and entertainment. Every facil- 
ity has been provided for all the visitors, be they grownups 
or children. 

The same thing holds for the many places on the Rus- 
sian River, Monte Rio, Rio Nido, Guerneville, Occidental, 
Rio Dell, Guernewood, Forestville and numerous other re- 
sorts that fringe the celebrated north coast river. 

These well established spots have many natural attrac- 
tions to offer for the vacationists. A big and safe river 
with fresh water fishing, redwoods, pines, and other forest 
trees with their companions of many wild flowers, with 
trails and roadways making them easily reached from any 
camp selected by the hiker or careful driver. 

This writer knows of no place in this great country 
where one can find more fine scenery, more mountains cov- 
ered with a great variety of trees and greenery, more cour- 
teous treatment by the proprietors of the many well man- 
aged camping places and hotels, or more good fishing and 
hunting in season, than can be found in the area referred 
to above. 

Every one having something to offer to make the vaca- 
tionist's stay one to be remembered with kindly recollec- 
tions, seems to dedicate his efforts to see that each and 
everyone has the best time of his life, whether they stay a 
day or a month. 

Yes, sir, Lake, Mendocino and Sonoma county resorts 
are going to have a big year this centennial year, and there 
are many programs planned to carry out the spirit of the 
year 1949. 

Phone Monte Rio 72 

DON STANDIFIRD 

SPRAY AND BRUSH PAINTING 

PAPER HANGING AND DECORATING 

FURNITURE REFINISHING 



Telephone 5 I Jos. Lindebar. Manager 

IDLE HOUR RESORT 

ON RIVER SHORE 

Modern Housekeeping Cottages 

Boating - Swimming - Open All Year 

MONTE RIO CALIFORNIA 



Occidental 25 11 



PETE AND PAT'S 

ITALIAN DINNERS :-: COCKTAIL BAR 
Home Made Raviolis 



OCCIDENTAL 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 2391 

PETE BUONACCORSI GARAGE 

GAS - OIL - LUBRICATION - BATTERIES 
GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS - WELDING 

Day and Nite Towing - National Auto Club 

OCCIDENTAL CALIFORNIA 

Phone Monte Rio 83 



ALBERT'S RESORT 

CABINS - SADDLE HORSES - BOATING - FISHING - HIKING 
GOLF - CAMPING - SWIMMING 

Gail and Dorothy Loomis, Owners and Managers 
BOX 345 MONTE RIO. CALIF. 

Phone 344W 



JIMMY AND BETTY BRITT'S 

FUN - FOOD - MIXED DRINKS 

Between Guerneville and Rio Nido 
ON NEW RIO NIDO HIGHWAY GUERNEVILLE. CALIF. 

Phone I 12 



RIVER HARDWARE CO. 

HARDWARE - PAINTS - HOME APPLIANCES 
PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTING 



BOX 364 



MONTE RIO. CALIF. 



Val and Edith Graham, Props. 



TRIANGLE LUNCH 



Featuring 
BAR - B - Q SANDWICHES :-: 



HAM AND EGGS 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA 



Phone 87-J 



GUERNEVILLE 



CALIFORNIA 



RALPH A. BELDEN 

REALTOR 

Guernewood, Russian River and Sonoma County Properties 

Jos. L. "Red" Kerr, Sales Mgr. 
Res. Phone: Guerneville 56 Guernewood Park: Guerneville 57 

520 FIFTH STREET - Telephone 4848 
SANTA ROSA CALIFORNIA 

Phone 2 36-J W. B. Deboi 



WILLIAMSON'S DRIVE INN 

MODERN HEATED CABINS 

Summer and Winter 

Specialty . . . Home Cooked Meals and Pastry 

MONTE RIO CALIFORNIA 

Phone 79 - J 



DEBOI'S RESORT 



On the Russian River 

MODERN HOUSEKEEPING CABINS - ROOMS 

TENTS - CAMPGROUNDS 

GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Telephone 3 3 7Y2 



MOLLER'S PLACE 

CL.EAN CABINS :-: REASONABLE RATES 
One Block From Beach 



HATCHER'S STORE 



FURNITURE • BOATS • FISHING TACKLE 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 



MONTE RIO 



CALIFORNIA MONTE HIGHWAY 



GUERNEVILLE, CALIF. 



June, J 949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 41 



Phone 159 Paul and Bert Mitchell Phone 174 

THE BANK CLUB RAY M. GREENE 

ATTORNEY-AT-LAW 
BRIGHTEST SPOT IN GUERNEVILLE 

Mixed Drinks Our Specialty (Justice of the Peace Redwood Township) 

GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA P.O. BOX 107 GUERNEVILLE. CALIF. 



Phone Guemeville 62 Phone 91 

RIPKEN'S RESORT P. A. BUTTNER 

ITALIAN AND STEAK DINNERS GUERNEVILLE FOOD CENTER . . . MEAT MARKET 

Cocktails and Mixed Drinks :-: Cabins 

MEATS - FISH - POULTRY 
MAIN HIGHWAY BETWEEN GUERNEVILLE 

AND MONTE RIO GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phone Guemeville 4 7 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



REDWOOD LAWN RESORT 

HOUSEKEEPING COTTAGES :-: ROOMS :-: TENT CABINS LITTLE STORK CLUB 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Williams COMPLETELY REMODELED FOR YOUR VACATION 

CINNABAR AND MINES ROAD GUERNEVILLE. CALIF. GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Phone 40 Hill Grunberg 

RIVER BAKERY AND MARKET UIIKrADArc 

HILLS GARAGE 

T .. . n , GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS 

Tanhpani and Coleman 

Gas - Oil - Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Day and Nite Towing 

GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Telephone 63 Shop Phone 253W Res. Phone 3I8W 

MANUEL'S HOTEL J. R. BARTZ 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE AND DINING ROOM PLUMBING :-: HEATING 

On the Famous Russian River REPAIR WORK 

GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA P. O. BOX 457 GUERNEVILLE. CALIFORNIA 

Phone 233-J 

WALKER'S GROCERY MURPHY'S RANCH 



MEATS - VEGETABLES - GROCERIES 
At Your Convenience 

GUERNEVILLE CALIFORNIA 

Phone Guemeville 208 



CUERNEVILLE (Sonoma County) CALIFORNIA 



Phone 60 



GENELLY'S LUTTRELL'S MARKET 

VACATION BEACH RESORT 

ROUTE I. BOX 75 GUERNEVILLE. CALIF. GUERNEVILLE (RUSSIAN RIVER) CALIFORNIA 



Phone Guemeville 318-J 

Guernewood Park 
FOOD MARKET 



GORI TAVERN 

ITALIAN DINNERS 



. . . Featuring . . . 
ALL THE BEST BRANDS OF GROCERIES BAR AND COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 
Liquors - Wines - Beer 
CUERNEWOOD PARK CALIFORNIA ON THE RUSSIAN RIVER GUERNEVILLE. CALIF. 



BOB'S MARKET SILK SON & CO. 

BOB WARMAN 

MEATS VARIETY STORE 

LEE ORR 
GROCERIES Bob Aldridge 

MONTE RIO CALIFORNIA FORRESTVILLE CALIFORNIA 



Page 44 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, J 949 



RUSSIAN RIVER WELL POLICED 

(Continued from page 25 ) 
having served for 2 1 years, and he has loads of friends 
along the River as well as others from all over California. 

Chief Bever has nine years service as a police officer, 
having started out at Rio Nido. 

The newest man is Officer Adams, a Guerneville boy 
who is well known by all residents in the area and has a lot 
of friends. 

The River Patrol Officers with enforcement officials of 
the Board of Education have teamed up to clamp down on 
minor age drinking and hoodlumism resulting from this 
illegal act. They have the full support of Justice of the 
Peace Greene of Redwood Township of which Guerneville 
is a part. Judge Green has assured the River Patrol he 
will deal most severely with any one found guilty of van- 
dalism or house breaking in his township. 

Telephone Guerneville 250 

STEELHEAD RESORT 

At Guernewood Park on the Russian River 

HOUSEKEEPING CABINS - TENT CABINS 
AND CAMPGROUNDS 



BOX 7 1 



GUERNEWOOD 



SONOMA COUNTY 



CALIFORNIA 
—V 



Your Visit to 

JIMMY BRITT'S 

one of 

RUSSIAN RIVER'S NEWEST AND 

MOST INTIMATE COCKTAIL LOUNGES 

will be 

EXCITING! 

Jimmy and Betty Will Greet You 
Located between Guerneville and Rio Nido 



*■----• — • — --- .....--.- 

Phone 2521 Res. 2361 


PANIZZERA 


MARKET 


C. V. Panizzera 8C Sons 


The Best In Food Lines 


LIVESTOCK DEALERS 


OCCIDENTAL CALIFORNIA 
I. 1 



i i 



INCOMPARABLE" 



©uIA^ACtFKr! @MI®III!$ 



Oakland - San Francisco - Berkeley, Calif. 






M. Friedman Paint Co., Inc. 

Distributors of 

MORWEAR PAINTS 

Last Longer 

Oakland - Alameda - Berkeley 

Fruitvale - Sacramento - San Jose 

San Mateo - Palo Alto 



Frederickson & Watson 
Construction Company 

General - Engineering Contractors 

873 81st Avenue 

Oakland 3, California 

SWeetwood 8-1264 






Compliments 



GAINES DRUG 

18625 Pioneer Blvd. 
Artesia, California 

Phone TOrrey 5-1543 



June, 1949 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL Page 45 



ANTHONY'S HANNAH TRUCKING SERVICE 

E. H. 

PROMPT, DEPENDABLE, COURTEOUS 
WATCH REPAIRING - JEWELRY MANUFACTURING SERVICE FOR GROWER AND SHIPPER 

24-HOUR SERVICE 
Phone 4-3257 

119 E. Main Street (Hyde Theater Building) Dial Visalia: ° ffice 4 " 3973 or Res ' 4 - 6900 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA iv ANH OE P.O. BOX 145 CALIFORNIA 

MODEL DEPARTMENT STORE BELL LUMBER COMPANY 

DRY GOODS - LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S READY-TO-WEAR LUMBER, MILLWORK, CEMENT, PLASTER 

FANCY GOODS - NOTIONS - MILLINERY PA,NT ' R 0°™G, BUILDING HARDWARE 

WALLBOARD, SASH AND DOORS 



116-120 South Court Street phone visaHa 4 _ 72g4 



VISALIA CALIFORNIA IVANHOE 



CALIFORNIA 



"Service Since 1922" 

C F. reLANDer MORWEAR PAINT STORE 

REAL ESTATE BROKER MORWEAR PAINTS • IMPERIAL WASHABLE WALLPAPER 

BUSINESS LOCATIONS • INCOME PROPERTY 
HOMES • RANCHES 

215 South Locust Street Phone 4-5636 

Phones: Office 448 — Residence 1223-W 

106 North Court Street VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



KARL'S NURSERY 

SPECIALIZING IN GARDEN PLANTS 
MEXICAN POTTERY - NOVELTY GOURDS 
SEEDS - FERTILIZER - GARDEN SUPPLIES 



Mooney Blvd. Phone Visalia 4-9571 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



The Automobile Supply Co., Inc. 



TULARE HANFORD PORTERVILLE 



CONNOR'S SERVICE LANGDON ELECTRIC SHOP 

GROCERIES • MEATS • BEER • SODAS ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES - MOTOR REPAIRING 

QAS . 0IL CONDE MILKING MACHINE AND SUPPLIES 



Ivanhoe Highway Route 5, Box 366 



DELCO AND SUNLIGHT DISTRIBUTOR 



410 E. Main Street Phone 2-0490 



VISALIA CALIFORNIA VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



SPARROW'S COPLEY'S PASTRY SHOPS 

OF VISALIA 

G & I FOOD CENTER AND FOOD MART 



INTERIORS 
No Decorating Job Too Large or Too Small for SPARROW'S 



FINE CAKES AND PASTRIES FOR EVERY OCCASION 



LEWALLEN'S ELECTRIC 



120 W. Main Street 

Telephone 2-0684 301 West Main VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

A ^^^A^ L*K1 V E IfN GENERAL ELECTRIC - THERMADOR 

Remember INDUSTRIAL AND RESIDENTIAL WIRING 

APPLIANCES - LIGHTING FIXTURES 
At the Sign of THE BIG V — Drive In 

„ 1<!A ,, A Mooney Boulevard 120 S. Church Street Telephone 4-7604 

V1SAL1A CALIFORNIA VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



VISALIA MOTOR LODGE CHAMBERS DRY CLEANERS 

J. L. CHAMBERS— W. H. CHAMBERS 



J. F. (Fred) Gowdy — J. (John) F. Gowdy, Jr 



OFFICE— 103 E. Center St. Phone 4-7608 



Phone 4-3585 Highway 198 PLANT— 1 19 S. Willits Street Phone 4-3424 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA VISALIA CALIFORNIA 



"ON THE WAY TO SEQUOIA" 



JM S IEJ1S ^cV»Io^ ARTS MJH MARKET 

WHniFSAirnNiY R0DS AND GUNS FOR RENTAL 

WHULtSALt UINLY GROCERIES - FRUIT - VEGETABLES - FISHING TACKLE 

612 W. Houston Phone 2-0206 Open Every Day 8:00 Till 8:00 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA Phone 4-4081 VISALIA. CALIF. 



Page 46 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



ERNEST V. GRANER LYMAN B. KING 

NAPA SPORT SHOP 

GUNS - AMMUNITION - FISHING TACKLE 

CHOICE WINES - FINE LIQUORS 

Telephone 773 1102 Pearl Street 

CALIFORNIA 



NAPA 



BOB MONTE 



THE GEM 



Phone 581 



NAPA 



MAX and MARY, Props. 

VICHY SPRINGS CAFE 

WINE AND BEER 
2001 Monticello Road 



BLUE RIBBON TAVERN 

PHIL HOFFMAN, Prop. 
930 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



PAT'S FOOD MARKET 

PAT SGUEGLIA 

MEATS - GROCERIES - BEER - WINES 

1300 N. Court Street (Cor. Houston Ave.) - Telephone 4-4129 

VISAL1A CALIFORNIA 

Holbrook Office Equipment Co. 

Authorized Sales & Service Agent — Remington-Rand Typewriters, 

Adding Machines, Printing Calculators, Bookkeeping Machines, 

F. & E. Check Writers, Office Supplies 

Telephone 4-6292 — P.O. Box 1047 — 115 N. Garden Street 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

IRA D. MILLER 

Super Service — 23 Years on the Lincoln Oval 

NORWALK PRODUCTS • PENNZOIL OILS AND GREASES 

Phone 4-3678 101 N. E. Third St. 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

VISALIA LUMBER CO. 

E. G. Noble, President — R. E. Noble, Manager 

COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDING SUPPLIES, HARDWARE, 

PAINTS AND PLUMBING 

204 N. Ben Maddox Way 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

WHITMORE TOP SHOP 

UPHOLSTERY OF ALL KINDS - UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 

TAILOR-MADE SEAT COVERS 

TRAILERS AND CEMENT MIXERS FOR RENT 

Phone 4-7113 

VISALIA CALIFORNIA 

New Location 

MAIN ITALIAN DINNERS 

FULL COURSE - REASONABLY PRICED 
217 S. Johnson St. Telephone 4-3480 



NAPA 



LOMBARDO HOTEL 

ROOM AND BOARD 
819 1st Street 



CALIFORNIA 



MAGGETTI'S PHARMACY 



NAPA 



A GOOD DRUG STORE 
Phone 24 2nd and Brown Streets 



CALIFORNIA 



J. H. BOMAN 

UNITED MARKET 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



NAPA 



THE HAGUE 

WM. HAGUE, Prop. 
JEWELRY — WATCH REPAIRING 
Phone 407-W 838 Main Street 



CALIFORNIA 



TREADWAY FUNERAL CHAPEL 

Lady Attendant 

Telephone 66 623 Coombs Street 

NAPA CALIFORNIA 

JACK F. BELL, Prop. 

JACK'S CLUB AND LIQUOR STORE 

"Where Good Fellows Meet" 
LIQUOR • WINES • BEER 
Phone 1871 2046 Vallejo Road 



VISALIA 



CALIFORNIA 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



PHONE 30 



HOME OWNED 



LAKESIDE DAIRY 

"The Milk That Tastes Like Cream" 
751 Soscol Avd. 



Anne Lippi, Prop., Res. Phone 2430 

SHORT'S FLOWER SHOP 

Geno Gattavara, Mgr. 
Phone 236 



NAPA 



CALIFORNIA 



12 10 FIRST STREET 



NAPA. CALIF. 



BAA//C\ 



PROFIT BY IMPROVED METHODS 

Write for Information * 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS Inc. Feb. 10, 1868 • Member F.D.I.C. TRUST 

526 California Street and 405 Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Seven Offices . . . Each a Complete Bank 



June, 1949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 47 



BAY AREA POLICE CHIEFS PASS ON 

( Continued from page 9) 
He knew them all and they knew him, and as they grew 
up to manhood or womanhood his kindly admonitions, his 
fatherly advice was something that made them all law 
abiding citizens. 

He was fourth vice president of the' Marin County 
Peace Officers' Association and was interested in forming 
that organisation and helped to make it the potent associa- 
tion it is today. He was also a member of the Bay County 
Peace Officers' Association. 

He leaves a wife who has been a great help to him dur- 
ing his long term as chief, and the funeral of Chief Nichol- 
son was one of the largest attended ones in the history of 
Marin County. Every peace officer able to get off duty 
attended the final rites. 

Chief Harper, who was 69 years of age at the time of 
his sudden death, has had a long and honorable career as 
a peace officer. 

He was up until the early '20's a member of the San 
Francisco Police Department, serving a term on the China- 
town squad and when he was retired for injuries received 
in a strike battle years before, he was in the Bureau of 
Identification. He went to Burlingame in 1924 to regain 
his health and was, spending some time in the claims de- 
partment for the Market Street Railway, as an attorney, 
having passed the bar examination for a lawyers license. 
Shortly after arriving in Burlingame he was made Chief of 
Police and served with distinction until four years ago. 



JACK'S PLACE 

(Morris and Howard, Owners) 

BEER ' WINE ' FOOD 
SHUFFLEBOARD 



Port Chicago, California 



Phone Antioch 560 

FAMOUS STORE 

And Antioch' s 

MOST COMPLETE 

And Largest 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

205 "G" STREET 
Antioch, California 



Phone 2-0173 

Gorman School of Dancing 

Wilma Gorman 

TAP - BALLET - TOE 

444 South Church 

Visalia, California 






Phone 4-5578 

STEINBACH MARKET 

115 NORTH LOCUST STREET 
Visalia, California 



Tel. Antioch 118 



Bernard Taillefer, Prop. 



Antioch French Laundry 

For Those Who Want The Best 

Our Aim Is To Please 

820 SECOND STREET 
Antioch, California 



VOGUE 

Cocktail Lounge 
FINEST OF FOODS 



FOURTH AND O STREETS 

Antioch, California 

(Contra Costa County) 



Page 48 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



June, 1949 



He had 21 years service when he took his pension on 
reaching the retirement age. 

Chief Harper was favorably known throughout the 
United States. He was an active member of the Interna- 
tional Association of Chiefs of Police, and served on its 
advisory board, and was called on by former President 
Herbert Hoover to give help to the Federal Crime Solution 
Commission. He was a member and past president of the 
State Peace Officers' Association, and never missed a meet- 
ing until his retirement. He also was a member of the Bay 
Counties' Peace Officers' Association, and sat in at the 
first meeting of peace officers that formed the organization 
some 20 years ago. He was for a number of years secre- 
tary-treasurer for the Association. He was also a charter 
member of the Peninsula Peace Officers' Association, and 
a past president. 

He leaves a widow, Irma, a daughter, Evelyn Harper, of 
Burlingame, and a son, John, of Sonoma. 

His funeral from the First Baptist Church at Burlingame 
under the auspices of the Peninsula Police Officers" Asso- 
ciation, was a big one. All peace officers from San Mateo 
County, many from Santa Clara and San Francisco coun- 
ties, attended the final obsequies. 

At the time of his death Chief Harper was a member of 
the city council of Burlingame and was scheduled to be- 
come Mayor next month. 

Three good men have gone to their final rest. They lived 
right, they served the people of their respective communi- 
ties with loyalty, honesty and efficiency. 



QUALITY 
GUERNSEYS 

Produce 

QUALITY MILK 

HAPPYHOLME MILK and CREAM 

at Your Grocers or Delivered 

to Your Home 



HAPPYHOLME 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

LODI AND STOCKTON 

Phones 



236 



6-6709 



GREETINGS 
TO THE PEACE OFFICERS 



MIRABEL 

GRAVEL 

CO, 

Simon Camgros & Sons 



626 THIRD STREET 
SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 505, Forrestville 



Larry and Marge Sollars 

THE CURVE 

SIZZLING STEAKS 

SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN 

FINEST OF DRINKS 

Phone Lafayette 9911 
Lafayette, California 



June.. 2949 



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL 



Page 49 



BAY COUNTIES' PEACE OFFICERS' ASSN. 

(Continued from page 1?) 
been sent to prison, hut these occasions are very rare. Of 
the men in prison, you find about one-third of them did not 
get past the fourth grade in school and about half never 
got through elementary school. Many of them are intelli- 
gent enough but they are not educated. When, as a 
youth, he does not get his education at home and in 
schools, he gets it in a form of education that is detri- 
mental. A survey at Alcatras disclosed a very high I. Q. 
among the prisoners. A large percentage of the men had 
more than average intelligence, but dropped out of school 
early. They became educated by gangs instead of the 
accepted ways. From this we come to feel that men with 
high intelligence, without the proper education, become 
very dangerous. Next to the home, the school