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Full text of "Royal purple"

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STUDENT LIFE 


16 


ACADEMICS & 
ORGANIZATIONS 


78 


SPORTS 


172 


LIVING GROUPS 


276 


INDEX 


468 



CLOSING 



492 



COVER AND TITLE PAGE: Photos by Andy Nelson. 
Vol. 77 April 1985-MarGh 1986 




Copyright© 1986, Student Publications, Inc. 

Kansas State University 

Manhattan, KS 66506 



Title Page 



RAY 




Spring 



H 



D 



G 



Changing Colors 

Transitions give a feeling of uncertainty 



The change was so slight, it 
was hardly noticed. Minute 
by minute, the sky was 
changing and the shadows 
were growing longer. It 's 
that time just before dawn 
when the earth is still and 
sleep engulfs the land, that 
you can feel the peace and 
serenity of Kansas. It's that 
time just before dawn when 



everything is a shade of gray 
that you can see things 
beginning to take shape and 
finally come together to form 
a complete picture. It 's that 
time just before dawn when 
you know everything will fall 
into place. 

K-State seemed to be lock- 
ed into that moment before 
dawn when everything is a 



shade of gray. The con- 
troversies, vacancies, stall- 
ings and openings were each 
just a shadow of the true 
character of the university. 

But the issues in gray did 
not overshadow the students. 
Warm, sunny Kansas spring 
days brought the students 
out for Derby Days and Spr- 
ing Fling. The enthusiasm 



generated by the participa- 
tion settled over the campus, 
adding to K-State 's finest 
quality — warm, friendly 
people. 

But just as quickly as 
warm spring weather can 
turn into a raging 
thunderstorm, so can the 
grays turn into a gorgeous 
sunrise on a beautiful day. 




The Chi Omegas cheer on a team 
member at the Sigma Chi Derby 
Days. The Chi team won the dance 
competition whiie the Alpha Delta Pi 
team won the overall competition. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Spring 



In an MaA to slow the opponents, a 
member of the Goodnow Hall bed 
racing team prepares to launch a 
water balloon during the annual Spr- 
ing Fling contest. (Photo by Chris 
Stewart) 








o 



Hacing In a concrete canoe turned 
out to be a sinking experience for 
Kerry Moore and Bob Fry, while 
participating in the annuai concrete 
canoe race sponsored by the Civli 
Engineering organization, Chi Epsi- 
ion. Contestants from Universities 
around Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and 
Missouri participated in the race for 
the fastest time around Tuttie Puddle. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



Members of Associated Student 
Chapter-American Institute of Ar- 
chitects Mike Repovlch and Chuck 
Phillips build a miniature "Great 
Wall of China" during the sand castle 
competition. The students were given 
the day to complete their original 
sand structures. (Photo by Jeff Tuttia) 



H 



O 



Backyard Playground 

Tuttle Creek is K-State 's diversion 




The name Tuttle Creek 
does not adequately describe 
Kansas ' largest reservoir 
and K-State 's backyard 
playground. Some univer- 
sities have ponds or- 
chestrated into the landscape 
of the campus complete with 
ducks, park benches and 
romantic bridges spanning 
small creeks. K-State ' 'just ' ' 
has access to 40 miles of 
boating, fishing, swimming 
and recreation areas. But 
then who says K-State does 
things in small ways? 



Taking advantage of a nice fall day, 
a skier glides across the rippled sur- 
face of Tuttle Creek Reservoir. 
Students used Tuttle and the surroun- 
ding area for many extracurricular ac- 
tivities such as hunting, fishing, 
swimming and sunbathing. {Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 



Tuttle Creek did not only 
provide recreation facilities, 
but it was used for 
classroom purposes from 
geography and geology to 
windsurfing and scuba div- 
ing classes. During the spr- 
ing, students fought the urge 
to blow off their studies for 
an afternoon of fun and fair 
weather at Tuttle. Summer 
school studying did not fare 
much better with Tuttle pro- 
viding a cool spot in the 
Kansas 90- to 100-degree 
weather. Surprisingly 



enough, winter also found 
students at Tuttle whether it 
was duck hunting or scuba 
diving under the ice. 

The sunrise shows Tuttle 
and Kansas at their best. As 
the sun sends its rosy fingers 
gliding across the smooth 
surface of the lake, the last 
of the gray shadows disap- 
pear. The beauty of 
K-State 's backyard 
playground awakens and of- 
fers students an opportunity 
to revel in the great out- 
doors. 




H 



D 



O 



G 



Naturally Kansas 

State showcases nature 's artistic flair 



While not blessed with 
awe-striking mountain 
ranges or breathtaking ca- 
nyons and valleys, Kansas 
possesses a natural beauty 
that is appreciated only by 
giving attention to its subtle 
qualities. 

One gains a sense of 



balance and stability viewing 
a field of waving wheat, ripe 
and ready to be harvested. 
The golden color of the 
grain serves as a signal that 
nature has completed its 
work and the wheat is ready 
for the hands of the farmer. 
After the harvest, nature 's 



cycle continues as the 
farmer bums the fields 
preparing for the coming 
planting season and yet 
another wheat crop. The 
amber glow from the burn- 
ing fields gives an eerie cast 
to the post-harvest skies. 
Because of its open coun- 



tryside and gently rolling 
hills, Kansas sunrises and 
sunsets are of noteworthy 
beauty. The dramatic chang- 
ing of colors fi-om vivid 
blues and vibrant oranges to 
peaceful purple hues shows 
nature 's artistic flair at its 
best. 




The fiery luminance of the setting 
sun signals the end of another day In 
the Flint Hills. (Pholo by John 
Sleezer) 



During the spring, the Kansas hills 
glow with fire from landowners burn- 
ing off dead grass left from the long 
winter. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Kansas) 




Kansas 




Campus Life I 



H 



D 




X 



Spring was popular for traveling 
evangelists to spread news of salva- 
tion to crowds. Bible Bob, as he was 
known to students, evoked many 
vocal rebuttals as he voiced his 
beliefs. (Photo by Jeff Tuttlo) 



Campus Life 



Campus Life 



An existence like none other 



For K-Staters, campus life 
provided an existence that 
was like none other. 
Students brought an energy 
and excitement to the 
University community that 
made it a world of its own. 

It was a world of books 
and studying, beer and par- 
tying, friends and fun. It 
was a time for learning, 
growing and planning. 

Time spent with other 
students provided K-Staters 
with the best moments of 
college. The socially minded 
student found the Union a 
convenient meeting spot. A 



typical scenario might have 
included bumping into a 
friend — literally — during 
the rush between 10:30 and 
11:30 classes, going to the 
Union to have a soft drink 
and discuss the latest news, 
and ' 'scoping ' ' others who 
were in the Union to eat, 
shop, study or socialize. 

But while campus life pro- 
vided a complement — not 
to mention a necessary 
break — to the ritual of 
classwork, students ' lives 
were not without controversy 
or concern. Not only major 
controversy, but small mat- 



ters, gained students' atten- 
tion. Issues such as propos- 
ed parking fees for the 
Chester E. Peters Recreation 
Complex, bomb threats to 
campus buildings and travel- 
ing preachers sparked stu- 
dent interest. 

Those experiences plus 
other ' 'collegiate ' ' activities 
— ordering delivery pizza, 
watching midnight movies 
and ' 'Late Night with David 
Letterman, " camping out for 
basketball tickets and party- 
ing in Aggieville — made 
life at K-State exciting for 
students. 




RAY 



10 




H 



D 



R 



In the Spotlight 

Events focus attention upon K-State 



While shades of gray and 
uncertainty may have sur- 
rounded many things at 
K-State — the proposed col- 
iseum, selection of a new 
University president, the 
future of K-State football — 
the Landon Lecture series 
colored K-State but one 
shade, impressive. 

Visits to K-State by 
Thomas P. ' 'Tip ' ' O 'Neill, 
speaker of the U. S. House of 



As part of the Landon Lecture series, 
Vice President George Busli spoite to 
a lialf-filled Ahearn Field House about 
"better International relations" and 
the upcoming meeting between 
President Reagan and Soviet General 
Secretary Gorbachev. After his 
speech, Bush traveled to Topelu to 
celebrate Alf Landon's 98th birthday. 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



Spealcer 



of the House of Represen- 
tatives, Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill, 
answers questions during a press 
conference held before the 69th Lan- 
don Lecture. O'Neill, who has been 
the Speaker of the House since 1977 
and a member of Congress for 34 
years, said he would retire at the end 
of his current term. (Photo by Chris 
Stewart) 



Representatives, and Vice 
President George Bush 
focused the national 
spotlight on the campus and 
gave students an opportunity 
to hear important, yet differ- 
ing, commentary on 
American and world politics. 

K-State hoped that im- 
pressive tint would carry 
over into the selection of a 
new University president. 
Duane Acker's resignation 



from the post in June 1985 
left K-Staters wondering who 
would lead the University 
and address the problems of 
declining enrollment, student 
retention and ever decreas- 
ing state allocations. While 
uncertainty shrouded this 
issue, K-Staters were certain 
to see this gray resolved. 

Nichols Hall had that im- 
pressive tint as the doors 
were opened on November 



9, 1985, for the dedication 
ceremonies. Since December 
13, 1968, when Nichols 
burned, it has stood silent 
and empty. During the '70s 
when the question came up 
whether to level the struc- 
ture or restore it, students 
rallied to renovate the hall. 
Nichols lives once more with 
the speech and computer 
scence departments filling 
the halls with activity. 




Focus 



11 



H 



D 







G 



R 



Y 



Good Times 

Spirit of fall brings life to campus 



It was a typical fall as far 
as Kansas is concerned. 
August was cool, September 
was cold, October was in 
between, and during 
November, snow flurries 
were in the air. But the 
weather did not dampen 
students ' spirit as they 
plunged into the fall 
season 's events with en- 
thusiasm. 

The firing of Jim Dickey 
as head football coach did 
not turn the tide of purple 



pride during the football 
season as expected. The 
'Cats were just another 
shade of gray. Students still 
kept a positive attitude (mix- 
ed with a bit of cynicism) 
toward homecoming ac- 
tivities with the attitude that 
it was a time for reunions 
with alumni and friends. The 
day was warm and sunny, 
and even though the 
Oklahoma Sooners carried 
the game, the student section 
was full of cheering fans. 



Other fall events were 
heralded with just as much 
anticipation. Students 
neglected studies for a wild- 
and-crazy night in Aggieville 
on Halloween. Costumes as 
outlandish as being a piece 
of gum on the bottom of a 
chair were paraded down 
Moro Street. As dawn crept 
closer and the gray shadows 
disappeared, the spooks 
were packed away for 
another year and another 
crowd of students. 





Shielding himulf from Intense heat, 
Willie the Wildcat roasts hot dogs for 
a post-Homecoming bonfire meal. On 
the cold and rainy night before 
Homecoming, the cheerleaders and 
band pepped up the fans at the bon- 
fire after marching past the residence 
halls where more students joined the 
growing line. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



12 



Fall Spirit 



H 



D 



O 



R 




nellvlng the past, "hippies" John 
and Debbie Sleezer gaze Into space 
on Halloween night In Agglevllle 
which was a favorite haunt of many 
students. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 



During the Homecoming parade, Chi 
Omegas Nanette Kukuk and Wendy 
Walburn wave to people along the 
parade route from their float. (Pliofo 
by Andy Nelson) 




iFall Spirit 



13 



H 



O 



Seniors' Final Exit 

Graduation: A day of mixed emotions 



For some, it is a joyous 

occasion. For others, it is a 
sad day. And still for others, 
it is the end of a long strug- 
gle. The approach of college 
graduation is rather ironic. 
Upon leaving high school it 
seems like a distant event. 
For underclassmen experien- 
cing a "mid-college choice- 
of-major crisis, ' ' that 
distance looms ever farther. 
Yet, for seniors approaching 



Graduation signaled the 
end of an era for many 
and the onset of job sear- 
ching for others. Cham 
Ferguson, a campus com- 
edian, was prepared for 
graduation with his good 
luck charms. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 



their exit from K-State, the 
elapsed time seems to have 
gone by in a blink of an eye. 

Whether seniors graduated 
in December or May, in five 
years or three, all had to 
perform the same duties to 
firui a job. Writing resumes, 
compiling portfolios and in- 
terviewing kept job seekers 
on their toes and demaruied 
planning arui forethought. 

Job availability concerned 



every graduate. Agriculture 
graduates faced a bleak 
farm economy, yet engineer- 
ing graduates profited from 
the demaruifor high- 
technology knowledge. 

While seniors dealt with 
their own unique problems, 
one thing they did not have 
to be concerned with was 
Kansas ' change in liquor 
laws. Maturity, bestowed by 
age, meant seniors were not 



affected by the increase in 
the state drinking age. 

But when the caps arui 
gowns were donned and 
everyone was lined up to 
receive a diploma, all the 
little things were forgotten. 
Like that moment just before 
dawn, the shadows arui 
shades of gray disappeared, 
arui the uncertainty vanish- 
ed, making way for another 
sunrise. 



14 




H 



A D 








Members of the 1985 
graduating class walk Into 
KSU Stadium to receive 
ttieir diplomas and hear 
their charge for the future. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 

During the spring 1985 
graduation ceremonies, 
one concern on seniors' 
minds was job availabili- 
ty. This ambitious 
graduate advertises her 
unemployment. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 





%0^' 




16 




StMeKt Ufe 



\ 




Blowing bubbles in the stands of Memorial Stadium, 
IMoliy Oiiara waits for ttie start of the Lambda Chi Alpha 
Chariot Race In the spring of 1985. (PAo/o by John 
Sleezer) 



Here's looidng at you kid. "71," a full grown ferret, 
takes a close look at Kathy Wolff during the Intermission 
of the Welcome Back Concert at Memorial Stadium. 
(Photo by Jeff Weatherly) 



K 



ansas State 
University, Exit 313. 

The eight-mile drive 
north of Interstate 70 
through the rolling Flint 
Hills leads to a com- 
munity that has been 
given a split personali- 
ty. Those who don't 
know Manhattan 
ridicule it for its slow 
pace and lack of activi- 
ty; those who are part 
of the community 
treasure it for its 
warmth of character 
and congenial people. 

(continued on page 18) 



Student Life Division 



17 



No Identity 

Crisis 

Here 



K-State's identity 
is engrained 
and founded in the 
Manhattan community, 



Nestled in the heart of the Kansas Hint 
Hills, Manhattan is home to K-State and 
those who are part of the University. 
Whether admitted or not, K-State is Manhat- 
tan, and Manhattan is K-State. It is a mar- 
riage that, while not always tranquil, has 
been beneficial to both communities. 

K-State has a definite hometown flavor, 
and most reviews of the University are likely 
to cite its friendly atmosphere as one of its 
strongest qualities — attributed greatly to the 
fact that nearly eight of 10 K-Staters are 
from small, rural towns. Many K-State 
students are also native Kansans. And 
because most have a sentimental attachment 
to the state, it's very likely you'll hear the 
famous line from the "Wizard of Oz" — 
"there's no place like home." 

Association with the "Wizard of Oz" is a 
stigma that Kansans are stuck with — many 
times begrudgingly so — and one that seems 
to roost quite effortlessly at K-State. An 
analysis of U.S. colleges and universities, 
"The Best Buys in College Education" by 
Edward B. Fiske, proved that to be true. 

"If Dorothy of the 'Wizard of Oz' had 



decided to go to college instead of flying off 
in a tornado," Fiske wrote, "she might well 
have gone to Kansas State University." 

Whether Dorothy would have become a 
K-Stater is academic, but the fact that just 
over 17,000 students each year do claim to 
be K-Staters attests to the strength of K-State 
as a major university. Other strengths are 
found in the wide variety of majors offered, 
strong cultural arts available through the 
McCain series, and the contemporary public 
affairs offerings of convocations and the 
Landon Lecture Series. 

K-Staters have a sense of pride — about 
themselves, dieir backgrounds and their 
University. But while K-Staters may be pro- 
ud of their University, that pride was not 
blind. The University had its share of pro- 
blems — declining enrollment, a tangled col- 
iseum project, troubled athletic programs — 
and K-Staters realized this. 

But just as K-Staters are ft-iendly, they are 
also fighters. The long and intricate history 
of Nichols Hall affirms this. Students watch- 
ed Nichols bum in December 1968 and 
fought through the '70s and early '80s to see 



the building restored to new life in 1985 
One thing K-Staters have not been knov 
for is being forerunners of trends a 
fashion. That is not to say that K-State is ii 
mune to trends. It is just that the attitude 
K-Staters generally reflects the cool and cc 
servative lifestyle of the state. It takes a 
longer for the new and innovative to tal 
root on this midwestem university campd 
That conservative attitude has a strong i 
feet on K-State. Being an individual is 
characteristic that is encouraged i 
respected at K-State. Ironically though 
sense of family and oneness is held 
K-Staters — past and present, firmly roo 
in this place fondly called home. 

— by Paul En^ 

Taking advantage of the calm waters of Tuttle Ci 
Reservoir, this student spends his afternoon windi 
Ing before the unpredictable Kansas weather turns 
cold. (Photo by Jeff Weatherly) 

Getting In some pre-concert tanning, Mike Schoen 
finds the top of West Stadium a comfortable spot to i 
before the welcome-back concert in August. (Pliot 
Mf Weatherty) 



18 





(Photo Illustration by Jeff Tuttle) 



20 



Coke 



This is an ugly story about 




vs. 



Coke 



® 



We have all, at some point in our lives, 
card stories that have warmed our hearts, 
nd by our exposure to them, prompted us to 
ursue greatness. This, I assure you, will 
ot be one of those stories. 
After a freshman year that included 
djustment to college life, initiation into a 
ratemity and an excellent grade point 
verage, I became a victim of college 
umout. 

Teachers had always told me "grades 
ren't as important as we tend to make 
lem." Yet even these philosophical giants 
3uld not deny that the 0.583 grade point 
verage I attained during the fall semester of 
ly sophomore year was considerably less 
lan adequate. 

My introduction to the real world was 

jmewhat abrupt, if not terrifying. This is 

1 ugly story — ugly, because it's true. 

Being a warehouse employee by day and a 

wrting goods sales clerk by night was not 

le type of career I had envisioned for 

lyself. Since the hours were long, and my 

)cial activities remained quite extensive, 

eep was a rare experience. 

I've never been an early riser, and 

ragging myself out of bed at five o'clock in 

le morning quickly became the single most 

ifficult activity of the day. 

My productivity never reached the level of 

ly conscious counterparts and my 

ipervisor, whose personality resembled 

tilla the Hun, made it clear that he would 

3t tolerate my sub-par performance. They 

ly necessity is the mother of invention. 

his being the case, I discovered Coke. 

Within weeks of my discovery, I 

jveloped a mild physical dependency that 

iickly grew into a major addiction. I would 



awake each morning during my 10 o'clock 
break to the taste of chocolate doughnuts and 
ice cold Coke. The burning, acid-like 
substance seemed to revive my senses, 
thrusting me into the flow of the day with a 
keen awareness of all things around me. 

My addiction grew as the months drug by. 
Soon I was stopping at the local Kwik-Shop 
on the way to work for my first "hit" of the 
day. I usually did 16 ounces of Coke before 
clocking in. The euphoric high that one 
experiences after slamming a cold Coke on 
an empty stomach is something only a true 
lover of heartburn can appreciate. . * 

It was a typical Monday as Mondays go. 
As usual, I was late for work and not being 
able to stop for my Coke left me in a sleepy 
haze, accompanied by a sour disposition. It 
would be another unproductive morning. 

As I sat down in the break room with my 
doughnuts and Coke, I noticed a look of 
discontent on several faces. I gathered from 
their conversation that the Coke was not 
quite right. I quickly gulped down part of 
mine. "My God," I thought to myself, 
"this tastes terrible." 

I discovered, through the excited 
conversation, that the substance I was 
drinking was "new" Coke. Once the initial 
shock subsided, a feeling of complete 
helplessness overcame me. There were 
many factors to consider in this momentus 
change of events. There was no burning in 
the throat as I drank it. Instead it went down 
smooth, almost pleasing to the pallet. It 
produced no gut-wrenching belches that 
seemed to rock the warehouse at its very 
foundation. Why, it was like drinking Pepsi! 
What a horrible thought. 

During the next several months, I slowly 



grew to accept my situation. I overcame the 
physical withdrawal slowly, occasionally 
experiencing flashbacks which faded with 
time. 

However, the psychological dependency 
was much more difficult to break. My work 
suffered, dropping to an all-time low level of 
productivity. My supervisor became my 
most feared enemy. His daily verbal assaults 
on my usefulness clearly showed his opinion 
of my work performance. Just when things 
were at their worst and termination was 
eminent, I was saved. 

Coca-Cola Classic had arrived, or 
returned, or whatever you wish to call it. 
Call it what you want, media hype, business 
blunder of the century or informed corporate 
decision, the fact remained that my Coke 
was back. 

Many months have passed since the 
resurrection of the real Coke — Coca-Cola 
Classic — and life has been much easier to 
handle. I awake whenever I desire by the 
mere push of a tab. My friends have noticed 
a significant improvement in my 
personality. Even my goals and ambitions 
are completely re-alligned. 

As for work? Well, I just couldn't 
continue at a job in which I was grossly 
overqualified. I am now back in school and I 
plan to be successfuU this time. 

It may seem trite to award the credit for 
such a dramatic resurrection of one's 
ambitions to a liquid that bums when you 
drink it, causes nauseatingly large belches 
and at- best creates raving lunatics out of 
already high-strung individuals. 

Say what you will about Coca-Cola, but I 
like it. It's the real thing for me. 

— Dan Hoss 



Coke 



21 





i-* .^ % % -, " ^ i* # ^ ' 





utrageous 

et 

rendy 



From lifestyles 
to clothing styles, 
K-State students 
are fashion conscious. 



Willie the Wildcat didn't let the times pass 
n by. Ever the trendsetter, Willie showed 

at the first football game wearing an 
trageous pair of purple-and-white polka 
t Jams and oversized Wayfarers. 
Fams — walking shorts made out of 
ightly patterned material with a drawstring 
list — were only one of many new trends 
hit K-State. Cheap imitations cropped up 
th the shorts being made out of gnarly cur- 
ns, leftover Rush Week materials from 
ars gone by and Uncle John's tie-dyed 
nts. 

Wayfarer sunglasses were worn while 
liking on campus and also in the 
issroom, so no one would suspect sleeping 
ring lectures. They also found their way 
o church on Sunday mornings (you know 
ly) and in Aggieville (for scoping pur- 
ses, oooh aaah). Other fashion trends to 
i'ade the campus included paisleys, plaids 
d large floral designs. 
Lori Waggoner, manager of Seifert's 
othing store, said, "You name 

everything but coats are paisley." 
Waggoner also said the mixing of dif- 
ent patterns was popular. Jeans woven 
th floral, plaid or paisley designs were 
xed and matched witfi oversized shirts and 
'eaters. 

Mb llluttnUoH by Andy Helwi) 



Trends were not limited to clothing. The 
Swatch watch, watches with a pattern on the 
face but no numbers, were worn by many 
students. Some even sported the Swatch 
Guard, a piece of plastic tied over the face of 
the Swatch to protect it from being scratched 
and to make tfie Swatch even more trendy. 

But, while being trendy. Swatches posed a 
problem when it came to reading them. 
Numbers were replaced with new-wave 
graphics and designs, making the Swatch 
face a road map that allowed itself to do 
anything but tell time. After six months with 
the watch, some students had mastered the 
art of determining when it was 3, 6, 9 and 12 
o'clock. But not many progressed beyond 
that stage. 

The hottest product to hit the market was 
hair-styling mousse (pronounced like the 
animal with the big horns, not the little ro- 
dent named Mickey). Mousse allowed 
students to achieve the perpetual ' 'wet look' ' 
as well as the ability to create a multitude of 
bizarre hairstyles. 

Some K-Staters adopted the David Letter- 
man style of life — late. They stayed out 
late, went to bed late, got up late, went to 
classes late, handed in assignments late, 
dropped and added classes late and finally — 
graduated late. 



Trends also affected students' eating 
habits as frozen yogurt became popular. 
Frozen yogurt shops catered to the fitness 
and health consciousness of students by giv- 
ing them an alternative to ice cream that had 
half the calories and less fat, but the same 
great taste. 

An alternative to drinking beer was the ad- 
dition of wine coolers to the liquor stores' 
arsenal. There were many brands of the 
wine and fruit juice mixtures, but the most 
popular was Bartles & Jaymes with their 
award-winning style of advertising. Wine 
coolers go with almost every kind of food, 
except candy com. 

But, some people's lifestyles were not af- 
fected by trends. For every student found in 
paisley -patterned Jams, sporting luminous 
Wayfarers and a glow-in-the-dark Swatch 
while eating frozen yogurt, there was 
another student in jeans and a sweatshirt 
with a beer in one hand and a yum-yum from 
Swannie's in the other. 

While some students were immune to 
trends, so were some K-State traditions. The 
Collegian continued to be a source of infor- 
mation, controversy, entertainment and ink- 
stained hands. Students still overdrew their 
checking accounts, sat in Union Lab 101 and 
put off doing the inevitable — studying. 



Trmdt 



Hollywood 

At 

Home 



VCRs provide 
convenient, simple, 
inexpensive fun 
for all. 



r^ 



A video cassette recorder sounds more 
like a term to know how to define for a 
test rather than a nifty little machine that 
has became a favorite entertainment tool 
for college students. 

What attracted college students to such 
a mode of entertainment? Although not 
intriguing because they were sneaky and 
sly or challenging because they were 
daring and dangerous, VCRs provided 
convenient, simple and inexpensive fun. 

"I enjoy watching a movie at home 
with my friends," said Eric Lietz, 
freshman in business administration. "A 
bunch of us can get together, see a couple 
of movies and eat pizza without ever 
leaving the house." 

Students like Lietz enjoyed VCRs 
because they were convenient. Other 
students found them inexpensive, an 
important aspect for most college 
students. 

Bart Meinert, freshman in business 
administration, owned his own video 
cassette recorder. He said, "(I rent tapes) 
two or three times a month; when I have 
some money . They are still a lot cheaper 
than seeing a movie (at a theater)." 

Most Manhattan video stores rented 
movies for $3 to $4 apiece. With a 
membership card to a video store and 
payment of a membership fee, costs for 
insurance and deposits could be avoided. 

The cost of a yearly renewable 
membership card was approximately $5 
and a lifetime card cost approximately 
$10. Without the card, a student had to 
pay a deposit of as much as $400. 



Often times, bargain hunting could 
make VCR entertainment even more 
accommodating to student budgets. 

"I have a bunch of coupons and can get 
movies for next to nothing," said Carey 
Sharpe, sophomore in graphic design and 
advertising. 

Video stores weren't the only places to 
rent VCRs. Dillons in Westloop opened 
its VCR counter in October. Convenience 
stores, open all night, also had VCRs to 
rent. 

Beth Dalton, graduate in speech and 
assistant director of Moore Hall, 
purchased a membership card for the 
hall. "The whole hall or just one floor 
can have a movie night and use the 
card," she said. 

VCRs provided a good alternative or 
complement to a night in Aggieville. 

"Instead of Aggieville, my friends and 
I decided to rent movies," said Pat 
McDonald, senior in chemical 
engineering. 

Sharpe said he and his friends had no 
specific time they rented movies. 

"We usually go out (to a bar) and then 
come back (home) and watch movies," 
he said. 

The students also found more uses for 
the VCR machine than renting and 
watching movies. Lynda Henson, senior 
in pre-professional elementary education, 
had a VCR her dad gave her when she 
went to college. 

"I tape my soap operas and watch them 
at night," she said. 

— Lori Bredow 



Looking forward to spen- 
ding the $1.50 on brew that 
they should have spent on 
tape insurance, senior in 
economic investment 
feasibiiity, Aaron Abass and 
close friend, Polyanna Zelez- 
nai(, sophomore in human 
sexual response, prepare for 
a cozy evening on the couch 
watching their favorite fliclc, 
"The Entire Football Team 
Meets the Insatiable College 
Coeds, Part XLVII." His 
favorite brew "Kewers" 
wasn't on sale at Mal-Wort so 
Aaron settled for a case of 
IHIIwaukee's finest. 

Trusting totally in Aaron's 
ability to properly hook up her 
new VCR to his ancient TV, 
Polyanna wonders If their last 
$1.50 would have been better 
spent on making sure they 
needn't come up with fifty or 
sixty bucks for a replacement 
tape after a slightly inebriated 
Aaron screws up the rented 
one. 



r^ 



,^ 



^^ 




24 



VCR 




,AAA,>^>*'"' 



©r^cfMJOSSL V*^ of- Q<xAj 



VCRs 



2S 



Pomps set 



PURPLE PRIDE 



For students involved in 
building Homecoming floats, 
time became a precious com- 
modity. Time usually spent stu- 
dying and sleeping was sacrific- 
ed for completion of the float. 

For the team of Lambda Chi 
Alpha and Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
that sacrifice was well rewarded 
as they placed first in the float 
competition sponsored by Blue 
Key senior honorary as part of 
Homecoming activities. 

For the team of Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity and Alpha Chi 
Omega sorority, about 250 
hours were spent working on 
their float from the initial design 
stage to the final judging, said 
Brad Alstatt, senior in computer 
science and Fiji Homecoming 
coordinator. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma and Tau 
Kappa Epsilon worked about 
seven hours a day on the float 
during the two weeks prior to 
Homecoming, said Kiley Crill, 
sophomore in business and Kap- 
pa Homecoming co- 
chairwoman. 

Before the float construction 
could begin, the design of the 
float had to be determined. 

The Lambda Chis and Tri Sigs 
added a new twist to the float 
design process as they used a 
computer to determine what 
materials were needed for con- 
struction. The dimensions of the 
float were fed into the computer, 
and it determined the amount of 
wood, chicken wire and tissue- 
paper pomps needed. 

"When we needed to make 



Afloat 



corrections we just punched into 
the computer the changes, and it 
made all the alterations for us," 
said Thad Blondefield, senior in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications and Lambda Chi 
Homecoming chairman. 

Float design was limited only 
by the Homecoming theme — 
Ride the Tide of Purple Pride — 
a $1 ,000 spending limit and each 
group's imagination. 

"The spending limits for this 
year's float were specified more 
clearly in the rules, which allow- 
ed only $1,000 total expenses to 
be spent on each float," said 
Clark Atkinson, senior in civil 
engineering and Blue Key presi- 
dent. Each float was also re- 



quired to represent the 
Homecoming theme in some 
way. 

The average amount spent by 
the groups was between $750 
and $950, said Keenan 
Beauchamp, senior in 
agricultural engineering and 
Blue Key float competition co- 
coordinator. The greatest con- 
struction expense was the tissue- 
paper pomps which averaged 
between $100 and $300 per 
float, he said. 

Although float building re- 
quired an investment of time, 
creativity and money, those who 
made the sacrifice found it to be 
worth-while. 

"All the time, effort and 



money were definitely worth it 
because the work we put intc 
(the float) built a lot of friend] 
ships, and it wasn't whether w(j 
won or lost, but the fun we hac 
doing it," said Steve Bowden 
junior in business administratioi 
and Sigma Chi Homecomin] 
chairman. 

—Jada Allerheilige, 

Last minute pomplng on the 
Homecoming float is taken care of t 
Lisa Sliipiey, a member of Aiplia ] 
DMa. (Photo by Jim DIetz) 

Lfting tlie car onto the roller coasti 
float so it can "Ride the Tide of PurpI 
Pride" are members of the team of Alpl 
XI Delta and Sigma Chi. (Photo by 
DIetz) 





FlMl Prtpwttion 



OU defeats 'Cats, but 

PURPLE PRIDE 

Prevails 



For a university with a bleak football 
history experiencing another losing season, 
Homecoming provided K-Staters the 
opportunity to display their dormant school 
spirit. For many people, both students and 
alumni. Homecoming was the peak 
experience they had in school spirit during 
the fall. 

The strong spirit during Homecoming 
surfaced on Friday of Homecoming week in 
the Union Courtyard for the finals of the 
spirit competition. Several hundred 
spectators and participants cheered the 
various teams vying for the overall spirit 
award. Cheers echoed from every comer of 
the Union when Kevin Knaus, senior in 
journalism and mass communications and 
master of ceremonies for the competition, 
announced the individual team winners. 

"The crowd was really enthusiastic," 
Knaus said. "Everybody really got into the 
activities and made my job a lot of fun." 

The overall winner of the spirit 
competition in the residence hall category 
was Putnam Hall. In the living group 
category the winners were Alpha Delta Pi 
and Phi Delta Theta. Individual team 
competition winners were Pi Beta Phi and 
Sigma Phi Epsilon in the body-building 
event. Winners of the yell-like-hell event 



were the team of Gamma Phi Beta, Delta 
Upsilon and Theta Xi. 

Those who came to the Homecoming 
football game against the University of 
Oklahoma did not get to see K-State 
victorious — the Sooners pounded the 'Cats, 
41-6 — but they did experience the 
exuberence of cheering fans involved in the 
excitement of the event on a stunningly clear 
fall afternoon. 

"Nobody will remember 10 years from 
now that Oklahoma beat us, but maybe some 
will remember a beautiful fall day and a 
wonderful Homecoming that was a very 
special event," said Lori Shellenberger, 
sophomore in history, political science and 
modem languages. 

Shellenberger and Terry Hallauer, junior 
in marketing, were named the new K-State 
Ambassadors during halftime. 

Centering attention on the spirit of the 
event was indicative of how most students 
and alumni remembered Homecoming. 

"We couldn't have cared less about who 
won the game — that's not what we 
celebrated Homecoming for. Homecoming 
was a time that really brought the University 
together. For once, everybody got 
involved," William Janner, Class of '79, 
said. 



"Homecoming is a great way to g 
everybody involved in school spiri 
especially since the football team is m 
doing well," Connie Ensley, sophomore 
marketing, said. 

"I like Homecoming because we seem 
be losing school spirit, and Homecomii 
brought us closer together. I think peop 
like the deep-seated, grass-roots feeling 
Homecoming. Most people had a tradition 
homecoming in high school, and it brin; 
back lots of memories," Sheila Farrt 
junior in pre-medicine, said. 

"It's great that a school this size can ha 
this great spirit," said Kim Willi 
sophomore in elementary educatio 
"Homecoming really brings out tl 
students' spirit." 

— J. Scott H4 

Hoping the rest of the mount holds up while attemptii 
to reach the final heights of the body buildi 
competition Is Alpha Chi Omega member, Krli 
Broadfoot. Karl Long and Ron Stiliwagon hold up Kri 
while Anne Wiley and Amy Wise sit on the shoulders 
Mike Querry and Tom Donateli. (Photo by Jim DIeti) 

Strong winds blow sparks and embers from t 
Homecoming bonfire in Memorial Stadium as membi 
of Blue Key attempt to keep the blaze under contr| 
(Photo by Jim DIetz) 



28 





>fomecoming 



2S 



.y^^^^^^Ti'id^ 




STRIVING FOR 



When Cindy Day returned to school in 1984 
after a seven-year layoff, she knew exactly what 
she wanted to achieve in school. This attitude 
was opposite of her ' 'first try" as a K-State stu- 
dent. 

When Day, junior in business, began her col- 
lege career, she was uncertain about her goals. 
She had considered the idea of "going into 
politics and being the first honest politician ' ' or 
becoming the ' 'greatest lawyer ever. ' ' 

But as time passed, she came to realize there 
were few good politicians and found moral ob- 
jeaions with the nature of being a lawyer. 

After two years in school, Day discovered she 
was not the student she had hoped to be. She 
spent her share of time in Aggieville and didn 't 
go to class regularly. Day fell in love, got mar- 
ried and quit school. . . 

• • • 

As an 18-year-old kid coming out of high 
school, Larry Parish decided he was going to 
join the service and be a Marine. It was not the 
most popular decision a high school senior 
could have made in 1967, but he was determin- 
ed to serve his country. 

By the time he was 20, he had pulled two 
tours of duty in Vietnam and was a squad 
leader. His responsibilities included ensuring 
that his men woke up alive in the morning or 
getting them to the hospital if they were wound- 
ed in a firefight. 

After 14 years in the Marines, Parish, junior 
in natural resource management, decided he 
wanted a job that was more than living or dying 
for his country. 

Parish came back to school. 

• • • 

Brad Blaker ran his own small business for 
18 years. He oversaw 14 employees and did 
nearly $750,000 worth of business annually. It 
was a solid business, and he was proud to be 
the boss. 

But Blaker, senior in information systems, 
decided it was not what he wanted to do, and he 
returned to school to pursue a new career. It 
was a decision that took "three or four years" 
to make, but he was doing what he wanted. . . 

Day, Parish and Blaker are examples of 
students who decided to return to school after 
being in the "real world. " They were part of an 
increasing number of people over 25 who pur- 
sued studies to help change their lives. 

Returning to school was often a difficult deci- 
sion for older students, but they were compelled 
to come back because they wanted more from 
themselves — and this time they knew exactly 
where they were going. 

• • • 



"I was retired and I got bored," said Linda 
Manns, senior in psychology. "I figured the 
best way to go back into the job market and be 
functional was to come back and receive my 
education." 

According to some estimates, one in three 
college students will be older students — those 
who are 25 or older — by 1990, said Ruth 
Hoeflin, director of K-State's FENIX program, 
a support system designed for students over 25 
who are re-entering school. In the fall 1985 
semester, K-State enrolled 1,537 older students 
in undergraduate programs, Hoeflin noted. 

CHder students returned to school for retrain- 
ing and had a goal set they knew was crucial to 
their future. 

"We have an aim, a goal, and we are going 

(continued on page 32) 

Lke many older students, Brad Blaker returned to school to 
pursue a new career. K-State enrolled over 1,500 older 
students — those over 25 years old — In the fall 1985 
semester. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Because she was bored, Unda Manns came out of retire- 
ment to return to school. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 





30 



SUCCESS 



Older students aim 
for greater achievement 
despite obstacles 




St 



^^^^^.^^r?''^^ 







SUCCESS 



to get that goal come hell or high 
water and the good Lord willing 
the creek don't rise," Parish 
said. "That goal is going to be 
met, and if it takes going in 
through the back door instead of 
the front door, we are going to 
get there." 

This determination resulted in 
an increased intensity level 
because the fear of failure was 
greater as a result of past ex-- 
perience and the knowledge of 
the consequences of failure. 

"It may not look like it on the 
surface, but we are much more 
intense because we do not really 
have that much more time," 
Blaker said. "We have already 
been out there. We have tried 
things; we've done things; 
we've failed; and we've suc- 
ceeded. But you don't have 
much time to think, T'm going 
to try this and I'm going to try 
this.' You have got to make this 
work. You have no choice," he 
said. 

But the older student faced 
more than the pressure to "make 
this work." Many older students 
had other jobs, spouses, or 
families to care for, and return- 
ing to school multiplied the de- 
mand on their time. Sometimes 
the student's family — especial- 
ly children — did not understand 

Unda Manns and Steve Kayara share a 
lunchtlme conversation while Deanna 
Amstein and Doug Head joke with each 
other. The bond among some older 
students is tight. "Older students tend to 
gravitate toward one another," Manns 
said. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



the reason for returning to 
school, thus increasing the 
pressure on the student. 

"My son is three-years-old 
and he doesn't understand (his 
being in school again)," Parish 
said. "All he knows is that Dad- 
dy has to study, and Daddy gets 
mad at him when he gets up on 
the table with his crayon and 
writes all over my book report 
or draws in my textbooks. He 
doesn't understand why I get 
mad." 

The re-adjustment to school 
life and studying was more 
smooth for some than others, 
Day said. The main problem^ 
was that some older students had 
not studied for an extensive 
period of time. 

"We have a lady in the group 
(Association of Adults Return- 
ing to School, of which Day was 
president) that hadn't studied for 
30 years," she said. 

Theories and procedures 
changed through the years and 
the older students had not had to 
be concerned with the changes 
— until returning to school. It 
was the technological changes 
that caused problems or surprise 
for older students. 

"One thing you work with in 
computer science is sets. I walk- 
ed into class and the teacher 



started talking about sets, and I 
had never been exposed to even 
the concepts of sets. So I go 
home and say 'what are sets?' At 
that time, my boy was in sixth 
grade and he said, 'what do you 
want to know about sets?' He 
opened his textbook and bang, 
there was all of set theory," 
Blaker said. 

A sense of camaraderie among 
older students helped to relieve 
the pressure of returning to 
school. 

"Everbody watches out for 
everyone else. If you've had a 
really bad day, there is always 



someone there to give you a hug 
if not in the physical sense, ther 
the mental sense," Day said. | 

"You see older peopkj 
gravitating toward each other} 
I'll go into a classroom and there: 
may be older students in it I dc 
not know. But by the second: 
week, I will know them. It's 
because we have something ir 
common," Manns said. 

One of the most common traits 
older students shared was that: 
they were paying for their own 
education, which also caused 
them to be more intense and ex- 
pect more from the University; 




32 




than some younger students, 
Manns said. 

"We place value judgments 
on education and we know 
which instructors are giving us 
the run around and which ones 
are giving us the value for our 
money," Manns said. "That's 
very important for us because 
this comes out of our pockets. 
We are here to get an education, 
and I think that is number one. I 
think when it comes out of your 
pocket, you get more serious." 

For many, like Day, the 
return to school was more suc- 
cessful in terms of grades the se- 
cond time around. 

"If someone looked at my 
transcript now, he would say 
'Oh my God.' On one side is A's 
and on the other is D's," she 
said. This was a direct reflection 
lOf her dedication and motivation 
of reaching her goal of being an 
jaccountant and getting her CPA, 
she said. 

— by Andy Nelson 

While studying in tlie Union, Dennis 
iVIatthews pores over a computer pro- 
gram. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

After 14 years in the IVIarine Corps, l^rry 
Parish decided to return to schooi. (Photo 
by Andy Nelson) 




Older Students 




./^^^^/^"^ 




LEARNING A 




During the international students 
costume party, DIna Haseeb assists Mrs. 
Hamarneh. Haseeb is a native of Iraq and 
Hamarneh's home country Is Jordan. 
(Photo by Jeff Wealtierly) 

Juanlta Guierrez, a native of Columbia, 
South America, tries on a traditional head 
dress of Saudia Arabian student All Fah- 
ed Mustafa. (Pfioto by Jeff Weatfierly) 



For most students, Manhattan, 
Kan., was only a hop, skip and a 
jump away from home. To 
others it was half a world away. 

Over 750 international 
students attended K-State in 
1985-86. These students came 
from all over the world, and 
many faced the challenge of ad- 
justing to a new lifestyle. 

Dina Haseeb, graduate in 
economics, was one of these 
students. She came to Manhattan 
in 1983 from Iraq because she 
decided it was no longer safe to 
remain there. Haseeb chose to 
attend K-State because a friend 
of hers was attending school 
here at the time. 

"It's very difficult to be a 
stranger in a foreign city," said 



Haseeb of her decision to atte' 
K-State. She then explained tl 
by knowing someone, it helpi 
to alleviate the homesickness. 

Upon arrival in Manhattcl 
many international studei| 
received guidance from the J 
ternational Student Center. T( 
center helped internatiori 
students find housing and seh' 
classes. \ 

According to Donna Davj 
International Student Cenij 
director, the center had an oriti 

I 

tation session at the beginning 
each semester for newcome 
The session helped internatioi 
students learn more abc 
K-State and the classes availal 
to them. It also provid 
students with names of peoij 



34 




NEW LIFE 



International students 
find adjusting to K-State 
challenging, yet enjoyable 



/ho could help with problems 
ley encountered adjusting to 
leir new home. 

"We want to establish a new 
upport group, a family for these 
tudents," said Davis of her of- 
ice's purpose. "We try really 
ard not to be just a paperwork 
ffice." 

Even though they dealt with 
lore than paperwork, it was 
irough the center that most of 
le forms were filled out which 
Uowed the international 
tudents to remain in the United 
tates. Many of these students 
ave their visa's renewed each 
ear and the center processed 
he proper forms when 
ecessary . 

One of the first concerns of in- 



ternational students upon arrival 
in Manhattan was housing, 
either temporary or permanent. 

Mazen Alkalili, graduate in 
engineering and former presi- 
dent of the Association of Arab 
Students, said many students 
chose to live in apartments 
because much of the food of- 
fered by the residence halls was 
too bland. Also, living in an 
apartment offered more freedom 
to the student, Alkalili said. This 
freedom helped make adjust- 
ment to a foreign place easier, 
he said. 

Language was another 
challenge that concerned many 
international students. When 
Haseeb first arrived in the 
United States, she decided that 



she was not going to speak 
Arabic. This helped her become 
more proficient in the English 
language, she said. 

Alkalili agreed that the 
language barrier posed a pro- 
blem. 

"The first month was the 
hardest," said Alkalili. "It was 
hard to get used to the language, 
and I felt isolated." 

In most foreign countries, 
students are exposed to English 
through courses taught as well as 
the barrage of American culture 
prevelant throughout the world, 
Alkalili explained. 

International students were re- 
quired to pass TOEFL (Test of 
English as a Foreign Language) 
with a score of 550 out of 700 




before being allowed to attend 
K-State. 

Life in an unfamiliar country 
was more than just a challenge to 
many international students, it 
was also an enjoyable ex- 
perience. The 17 international 
student organizations helped 
many of the students with this 
experience. 

Davis said during the summer 
the clubs obtained a list from her 
office of the students attending 
K-State from the same country 
(or region) as their group. The 
organization then sent the stu- 
dent a letter telling about K-State 
and a list of telephone numbers 
of people who could help them if 
they got stranded in any number 
of cities on the way to Manhat- 
tan. This really helped the new 
students know what to expect, 
Davis said. 

Alkalili said his experiences in 
the United States have helped 
him to become more fluent in 
English and allowed him to learn 
a lot about American culture. He 
also said, "To have a degree 
from the United States is the 
ultimate." 

— Becky Lucas 



-i^^-i^^ 




UA" 



UFE IN THE 



For most college students, 
home was an apartment, frater- 
nity or sorority house or 
residence hall. But for nine 
K-State students, home was a 
fire station. 

The fire station was the 
Manhattan Fire Department's 
new station at the comer of 
Denison and Kimball avenues 
built on land leased from the 
University. 

Six males and three females 
lived in the basement of the 
building, attended classes, com- 



pleted fire training and helped 
the department with everything 
from dispatch work to fighting 
fires. 

The student fire fighter pro- 
gram was started at the end of 
the 1985 spring semester. At 
that time, students were inter- 
viewed and chosen to participate 
in the program. The re- 
quirements were that each stu- 
dent had a 2.5 grade point 
average and be a K-State or 
Manhattan Christian College 
student enrolled in a minimum 



of 12 semester hours. 

At the beginning of the sum- 
mer, the students were put 
through a 120-hour training pro- 
gram. The program included 
class work, CPR training, first- 
aid and fire-fighting training. 

"The training was pretty in- 
tense," said Ginny Roth, junior 
in mathematics and student fire 
fighter. "There was a lot of 
physical training, but the 
classroom work was just as 
hard." 

After the training was com- 



pleted, the students were divide; 
into shifts to work off the truckl 
This meant they would actual)! 
go out on fire calls. Most of th 
students participated in a fii 
run. ! 

"I did not realize how muc! 
heat can come out of a bumirj 
house," said Ted Smitl; 
freshman in journalism and ma:i 
communications. "I was told f. 
ventilate the second floor of ; 
burning house and look for pec 
pie. As I broke the window ari 
stuck my head in the house tl; 



36 




F/RE LANE 



New program trains 
students to fight fires, 
run fire station 



lemperature was unbelievably 
lot. I really have a lot of respect 
jbr the fire fighters who walk in- 
to a burning house." 
t Just as important as the fire 
ighting was the dispatch work 
ae students did. The students 
fpent one of every nine days on a 
14-hour shift at the dispatch 
jesk. They were required to 
Inswer the phone and dispatch 
le fire calls as they came in. 
"You cannot screw up in here 
at the dispatch desk)," Roth 
iiid. "If you do, the problem 





gets bigger and bigger on down 
the line. It could be a matter of 
life or death if you send a truck 
to the wrong place." 

The students earned a yearly 
salary of $4,800 and were pro- 
vided a place to live. The living 
accommodations included two 
sleeping dorms — one for males 
and one for females — and a 
shared kitchen and study room. 
They all pitched in when it was 
time for cleaning. 

"You have to keep the place 
spotless," Smith said. "Have 
you ever seen a dirty fire sta- 
tion?" 

—Jeff Tuttle 

Living at the fire station has some addi- 
tional responsibilities for Mil(e Pember- 
ton and Andrew Leon as they clean and 
wax the floor. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 



Being on call means Tammara Tracy, 
Rebecca Savidge, Andew Leon and 
Stephen IVIayer have spare time to relax, 
study or just watch T.V. in the lounge that 
males and females share in the fire sta- 
tion. (Plioto by Jeff Tuttle) 



Every nine days, the student fire fighters 
have to do a 24-hour shift at the dispatch 
desk. Virginia Roth takes her turn 
answering the calls and dispatching the 
messages. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 





M 37 



M^^^i^ 




IN SEARCH OF 




The dins on the northeast edge of Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir provide a good place for Brian Fisher to 
practice his mountain climbing skills. Fisher put his 
climbing techniques to use during an expedition to 
Mount Ararat during the summer of 1985. (Photo by 
Jeff Weaffieriy) 



38 



Mount Ararat 



NOAH'S ARK 



Student travels 
to Turkey as part 
of religious expedition 





II an Fisher hiked over 20 mlies per day 
t<l uild endurance In preparation for his 
li to Mount Ararat in search of Noah's 
A (Photo by Jeff Weatlierty) 



loutit Ararat 



IVIountain ciimbing In search of Noah's Ktk 
required special equipment. Some of the 
equipment required Included snow shoes, 
hiidng boots and special rope. (Plioto by Jeff 
Weatherty) 



Many people question 
whether Noah's Ark still exists 
or ever existed. But for Brian 
Fisher, there is no doubt in his 
mind that it exists and where it is 
located. 

Fisher's belief is so strong that 
he and 20 other Americans 
traveled to Dogubayazit, 
Turkey, to Mount Ararat last 
summer in search of the ark. 

Fisher, junior in geography, 
became interested in finding the 
ark after meeting former 
astronaut Jim Irwin, leader of 
the expedition, at a gospel func- 
tion in Salina in fall of 1982. 

After the gospel function, 
Fisher kept in contact with Ir- 
win. In January 1984, Irwin 
contacted Fisher to ask him to be 
a part of the Summer 1985 ex- 
pedition. 

Fisher trained for the journey 
and worked up to walking and 
running over 20 miles per day. 
He soon became physically 
ready for the trip. Fisher under- 
went mental and spiritual train- 
ing as well because this was as 
important as the physical train- 
ing. 

"Belief in God is the most im- 
portant thing," Fisher said. It 
was this belief that gave him the 
faith to believe the ark exists. 

The 2 1 Americans met in New 
York where they were informed 
of terrorist activity around 
Mount Ararat. They were re- 
quired to sign a waiver to relieve 
the Turkish goverment and Ir- 
win of liability for their safety. 

"I did not know about the ter- 
rorists in that area, but I was not 
going to cancel the trip," Fisher 
said. 

When they arrived in Turkey, 
they were told that an expedition 
the week before had been cap- 
tured by Turkish Kurd Na- 
tionalists. The Kurds took the 
expedition down Mount Ararat 
and held a mock execution. No 



one was injured, but the Kurds 
asked for Irwin. 

"Somehow they must have 
known we were coming, but 
they were a week off," Fisher 
said. "They might have wanted 
Jim as some sort of a political 
prisoner." 

With these circumstances fac- 
ing the expedition, they were ad- 
vised not to travel the mountain, 
but instead to travel to the vest 
of Mount Ararat. 

Therefore, members of the 
group then climbed the Kupchek 
Mountains where they caught a 
glimpse of what looked like the 
shape of what used to be a large 
boat. The boat was on the side of 
a mountain in a mud slide. The 
group got within two miles of 
the object and could see it well 
with binoculars. 

"It is hard to say if it was the 
(Noah's) ark," Fisher said, "It 
is said that Constantine, 
Emperor of Rome, built an ark 
around 300 A. D." 

The boat Fisher and the ex- 
pedition saw seemed to have the 
same measurements as Noah's 
Ark. The Bible says the ark was 
approximately 450 feet long. 

After returning to the village 
between the Kupchek Mountains 
and Mount Ararat, the group 
was informed it could climb 
Mount Ararat with 30 Turkish 
soldiers. Fisher was unable to 
climb with the group because he 
had to return to K-State for the 
fall semester. 

"I really wish I could have 
gone with them, but I had to 
come back to school," Fisher 
said. 

After spending $3,000, two 
weeks in an area full of terrorists 
and traveling halfway around the 
world to see what might or 
might not be Noah's Ark, Fisher 
said, "I would do it again in a 
moment." 

—Jeff Tuttle 



39 



tan. 



'^ 




UyfmOi AMONG 



When Brad Gilmore's alarm 
went off, it was generally for 
one of two reasons. He was 
either getting up to go do mor- 
ning chores and go to school, 
or he was getting up in the mid- 
dle of the night to check for 
babies — baby lambs that is. 

Gilmore, a junior in animal 
science, lived in the sheep 
barn. 

It was, undoubtedly, a dif- 
ferent type of lifestyle — 
dominated by visitors, busy 
weekends and just plain hard 
work. 

Gilmore said he was just one 
of many students in animal 
sciences and industry who liv- 
ed and worked at the livestock 
barns, all located on the north 
side of campus. 

Living at the livestock barns 
required more than just doing 
the morning and afternoon 
chores. In Gilmore's case, he 
was expected to be on call at all 
times — day and night. 

Pulling on a pair of jeans over his long 
Johns, Gilmore prepares to do chores In 
the bitter cold. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 




40 



Whether it was delivering 
lambs in the middle of the 
night or delivering a group of 
ewes to Weber Hall first thing 
in the morning — it was his job 
to be there. 

Gilmore lived alone at the 
sheep unit where the living 
quarters are located under the 
same roof as the sheep pens. 

Inside, Gilmore's accom- 
modations have the same 
facilities as any normal apart- 
ment, with the exception of 
having to tolerate the older ap- 
pliances which came with the 
kitchen. 

"Generally, there are two 
guys living here. But I'm by 
myself so far this year," 
Gilmore said. "I like it better 
this way, if you want to know 
the truth, I can get more 
done." 

Gilmore was the fifth 

member of his family to have 

worked at the sheep barns and 

(continued on page 42) 

Wrapped In a blanket, Brad Gilmore 
keeps warm as he studies for exams In 
the living room of his barn apartment. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



wilmjj|Jp 









N. 






fci 



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r^ - 



V 







HE ANIMALS 



Student continues 

family tradition of working, 

living at livestock barns 




Gllmore is the fifth in his 
family to live at the sheep 
research unit and be a 
part of caring for K-State's 
floci(. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



41 



BARN LIVING 



the third to live there. His father started 
out the family tradition 25 years ago. His 
stay was short — only one semester — 
when he discovered school was not exact- 
ly what he wanted at the time, Gilmore 
said. 

Tom Gilmore, Brad's uncle, was next 
in line almost 20 years later. Then came 
brothers Brian and Brett, who are still 
very much involved with sheep today. 

Gilmore 's strong background in sheep 
can be traced to his home in Mound 
Ridge, where he and his father have a 
flock together, consisting of several dif- 
ferent breeds. 

'T've gotten together a flock of black 
sheep, personally, that I use for club 
lambs (lambs sold for showing carcass 
purposes)," Gilmore said. 

While at K-State, Gilmore devoted 
much of his time to his studies and work- 
ing toward his degree. 

He also devoted much of his efforts 
toward improving the purebred Suffolk 
sheep flock at the sheep unit — his 
favorite area of sheep management. 

"I prefer working with the purebreds 
more than the commercial flock (sheep 
not stressed for purebred use)," Gilmore 
said. "I want to help build the sheep 
quality up here. Hopefully, everyone will 
be able to say 'Hey those guys are doing a 
great job building up this program.' 
That's what I'd like to hear." 

Tom Rundel, a senior in animal 
sciences and industry, also worked out at 
the sheep unit filling in as "acting 
shepherd" for the unit until someone 
could be permanently hired. 

Rundel, the most experienced worker 
at the facility even though he had never 
lived there, specialized more with the 
commercial flock at the unit than the 
purebreds. 

"What Tom doesn't know about sheep, 
hopefully I do," Gilmore said. 

There were 12 students living at the 
various livestock units. The units students 
occupied included poultry, swine, beef 
research, purebred beef, sheep and horse. 

Gilmore has found special advantages 
to living in the barns as compared to other 
places. 

"I really enjoy it out here. If you tried 
to stick me in a dorm room, I'd be gone 
by now." 

— Rustin Hamilton 

rilling a syringe, Gilmore prepares a vaccination in 
the sheep unit's medicine storage room. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 

Uilmore administers a vaccination with the 
assistance of shepherd Tom Rundel. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 




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42 



Barn Livinl 



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After finishing his cliores, Gilmore reiaxes in tlie 
bed of the trailer at the end of the day. (Photo by An- 
dy Nelson) 

Steam rises from siiage as Giimore fiiis the bed of a 
trailer used for feeding the sheep. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



liarn Living 



DRINKING 



Sobering new liquor laws 
make Kansas students 
change their lifestyles 



Jim Gourley is looking forward to June 
13, 1988, when he turns 21 years old so he 
can legally consume 3.2 percent beer — 
again. 

The freshmen in fisheries and wildlife 
biology could legally drink 3.2 beer for 
three weeks before the new Kansas drinking 
law went into effect July 1. For Gourley, the 
new law was like taking candy away from a 
baby. 

The new law raised the legal minimum 
drinking age from 18 to 19. Those people 
bom before July 1, 1966, could purchase 3.2 
beer, but those born after that date had to 
wait until they reached age 21 to purchase 
alcoholic beverages. 

The law, affecting about 38,000 18-year- 
olds and about 150,000 Kansans in the next 
two years, came after passage of a 1984 
federal law and threats by the Reagan ad- 
ministration and the Department of 
Transportation to withhold federal highway 



fiinds from states refusing to raise the 
minimum drinking age to 21. 

Some opponents of the new drinking law 
argued that if 18-year-olds were old enough 
to vote or be drafted, they should be old 
enough to drink 3.2 percent beer. Gourley 
agreed. 

"We have every other right including get- 
ting drafted, so we ought to be able to 
drink," he said. "I knew they (the 
legislators) would change the law so I was 
prepared, but I still don't like it (the law)." 

The new Kansas law didn't make much 
difference for many 18 year olds because 
gaining access to a favorite bar was just 
another challenge for an adventuresome 
freshman on a Friday or Saturday night, 
local bar owners said. Some Aggieville bars 
allowed underage freshman to enter, but on- 
ly under the close scrutiny of floor-walkers 
who monitored the distribution of alcohol. 
(continued on page 46) 






*^^^. 



44 



•^id. 



Due to a change in the legal age at which one can pur- 
chase alcohol, local taverns distinguished customers 
under the age limit by using different identification 
systems. Brother's Tavern employee Darin Nitchke 
double-stamps the hands of under-age patrons and 
single-stamps legal drinkers while Steve Minshull 
checks their Identification. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 




;■ j:^ti^ -^j,: t. > 



Drinking 



A stamping system was adopted for the 
patrons of Mr. K's. Legal-age drinkers 
received one color of stamp and under age 
patrons received another color, as well as a 
stamp on both hands. 

"We catch 30 to 40 underage drinkers a 
night, and they are asked to leave," said 
Rusty Wilson, manager of Mr. K's. "They 
are going to get it (beer). They got it when 
they were 16; they'll get it now." 

Many bar owners believed the laws didn't 
accomplish anything. Teenagers have 
always had methods of obtaining beer if they 
wanted it, whether it be with a fake ID or 
having someone buy it for them, said Fred 
Lechner, former owner of Sports Fanattic. 
Lechner said the freshmen just go 
somewhere else to drink beer. 

"Losing that age group in Aggieville can't 
help. They spent a lot of dollars here and 
throughout the state," Lechner said. 

The only effect the new drinking age law 
will have is that the economy of Aggieville 
and the state will suffer, Lechner said. 

Business decreased for Charlie's, a bar 
located at the corner of Claflin and Denison 
avenues, since the drinking age law changed 
in July, said Charlie Busch, owner of the 
bar. He believed some of the business 
decrease was due to lower University enroll- 
ment, but most of it was due to the new law. 

To keep business flowing, Busch decreas- 
ed prices by 10 to 20 percent. 

"Our business has decreased even though 
the bar looks full," Busch said. "We are 
trying to keep the volume the same at the ex- 
pense of profit. When we came to this loca- 
tion, we thought it was a gold mine because 
it was right across from the dorms (Good- 
now and Marlatt residence halls), but now I 
don't know." 

Even though Manhattan's policy is to 
allow 18-year-olds access into bars until 8 
p.m., Busch keeps them out entirely. 

"If they are not 19, we just keep them all 
out because when they are in the bar it is 
hard to keep them from drinking. But I'm 
not saying 18-year-olds don't get in here but 
we do have doormen checking ID's," Busch 
said. 

Changes in the Manhattan ordinances, 
which took effect Aug. 20, allowed 18-year- 
olds to enter an establishment where cereal 
malt beverages were sold. However, no 
18-year-old could legally consume or 
dispense cereal malt beverages. After 8 
p.m., the 18-year-olds were required to 
leave the establishment, unless accompanied 
by a parent or guardian. This curfew didn't 
apply to 18-year-old employees. 



Bar owners had to watch for students with 
fake IDs, said Mike Larimore, owner of the 
Last Chance. 

Common fake IDs used by students in 
Manhattan were driver's licenses and a few 
military IDs, said Al Johnson, director of 
the Riley County Police Department. He 
said most of the IDs were loaned to friends, 
but when the police checked into the matter, 
most ID owners claimed the IDs were 
stolen. 

About the only precaution bar owners 
could take was to make patrons submit two 
types of identification, said Bill Kennedy, 
temporary Riley County attorney. He said 
doormen often asked patrons what their bir- 
thdate was to make sure the identification 
was real, Kennedy said. 

Gourley said he could obtain 3.2 beer 
before he turned 1 8 and he still could obtain 
it, if he chose to do so. 

"I could always get beer before I was 
legal so the new law doesn't make much of a 
difference," Gourley said. "I don't go out 
as much as I did. I just party around the 
dorm (Marlatt Hall)." 

Even though she could drink for 3 Vi mon- 
ths, Patty Tiemann, freshman in pre- 
physical therapy, said the new law did not 
change her lifestyle because she did not con- 
sume 3.2 much when she was of age to 
drink. 

Like Gourley, Tiemann said she felt a 
separation between freshmen and up- 
perclassmen. College is considered a time of 
independence and consuming beer has 
always been part of the college scene, she 
said. 

Tiemann never considered herself much 
of a partier so beer was never an item on her 
pricrity list. 

"I have more cravings for M&M's than 
for beer," she said. "It's just no big deal for 
me because I don't have time at college to 
waste partying. I knew I would have to 
buckle down and study so the law has not 
had a big effect on me." 

In 1985, freshman at K-State were the on- 
ly class unable to drink alcoholic beveages 
legally, by the fall semester of 1988 nearly 
75 percent of traditional-aged K-Staters will 
be unable to drink 3.2 beer. Of 17,570 
students on campus, 2,682 were new 
freshmen in 1985. A total of 3,727 freshmen 
were enrolled in the University. 

Upperclassmen have been careful about 
not giving freshmen 3.2 beer, said Steve 
Woolf, assistant director of Haymaker Hall 
and senior in secondary education. 

{continued on page 48) 




46 




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Taverns continue to be a place of 
socializing even after the change 
in legal drinlclng age. Manhattan 
city ordinances allowed under- 
age patrons to enter bars until 8 
p.m., lessening some of the im- 
pact the age change had on Ag- 
gieville. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Signs on convenience store 
coolers reflect the change in the 
legal drinking age and the need 
for proof of age to purchase 
alcohol. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Brad Hedrick serves Bill Conley 
a pitcher of beer. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



Drinking 




48 



"People have been very assertive because 
we stressed it (adhering to the drinking age 
law) at the beginning of the school year," 
Woolf said. "HGB (Hall Governing Board) 
stressed the upperclassmen's responsibilities 
too. HGB and the floor presidents know they 
are responsible if someone is served beer if 
they are underaged." 

Woolf said he would imagine some up- 
perclassmen have supplied freshmen with 
beer, but he could not remember any par- 
ticular instances. 

Residence hall rooms were not searched, 
said Kirk Rogg, staff assistant on the fourth 
floor of Haymaker Hall and junior in 
psychology. 

' 'It is really hard to detect if the freshmen 
are drinking because it is not our job to go 
look for them drinking," he said. "There 
are 40 freshmen out of 70 students on my 
floor and there are just a few staff people 
available to help control the freshmen drink- 
ing." 

Off-campus organizations found 
themselves the educational medium between 
the students and the new drinking law. 
Panhellenic Council attempted to educate 
sorority members about the legalities of the 
new law, said Sherri Hager, Panhellenic 
president and senior in journalism and mass 
communications. 

"During the summer, we (the council) 
educated the sorority members through 



newsletters telling the officers about the 
changes in the drinking law. We told them 
they can have parties and fun yet abide by 
the law." 

Because of the new drinking age, Sigma 
Phi Epsilon fraternity made the move to 
afternoon parties instead of evening parties, 
said Greg Pestinger, Sig Ep president and 
junior in business administration. 

"Drinking is not emphasized at these par- 
ties," Pestinger said. "Entertainment is pro- 
vided such as with frisbees. There is a star- 
ting and stopping time to the parties too. 
And in the afternoon the parties are not as 
wild." 

The University Alcohol and Cereal Malt 
Beverage policy was passed unanimously 
Sept. 13 by the Council for Student Affairs. 
The policy included general information 
about having alcohol on campus, guidelines 
governing the consumption and possession 
of alcoholic beverages by student organiza- 
tions, procedures for handling violations of 
the policy and matters relating to athletic 
facilities and athletic events. 

According to the policy, if violations oc- 
curred, appropriate action was to be taken 
by the campus group sponsoring the event at 
which the offense occurred. University ac- 
tion could be taken in addition to any pro- 
secution by the city, county or state, accor- 
ding to the policy. 

—Jeff Taylor, Jeri Heidrick 



Drinking 




Despite the rise In the drinking age, li- 
quor stores were unaffected by the new 
law. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



49 



End of an 
establishment 



w 



The back room of Mel's 
Tavern sat empty as the 
sunbeams of a late afternoon 
rested on the worn felt of the 
lone pool table. The regulars sat 
in the front room sipping their 
beers and playing cards, while 
the melancholy sound of Willie 
Nelson's, "Mammas Don't Let 
Your Babies Grow Up To Be 
Cowboys" drifted from the 
jukebox. 

There was a definite contrast 
in the events of the day from the 
atmosphere of so many after- 
noons past. There were no 
crowds of screaming, rowdy 
sorority or fraternity pledges on 
a walkout. No small groups of 
friends "TGIFing. 

Progress was putting a 
squeeze on the once-popular 
tavern. Due to the coming con- 
struction of Manhattan's 
downtown mall, Mel's was forc- 
ed to move and was two weeks 
from destruction. It seemed that 
the college crowd had left it for 
dead. 

There weren't many in the 
small group of young women 
who entered the tavern with 
festive smiles on their faces. The 
five of them took a booth in the 
back room and ordered a round 
of fishbowls. 

The visit was a sentimental 
one. The women, who were 
members of Chi Omega sorori- 
ty, had gathered to say goodbye 
to Mel's and a sister who would 
soon be leaving K-State. Shan- 
non Scott, junior in modem 
languages, was preparing to 
travel to France as part of an in- 
ternational studies program. 

As the group's members 

Gene Morgan, right, long-time patron of 
Mel's Tavern, enjoys the atmosphere of 
the downtown tavern. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 



reminisced about the walkouts 
and TGIFs they had experienced 
at Mel's, their laughter rose to 
excited heights and the once 
docile backroom came to life 
through the camaraderie that had 
made it a K-State tradition. 

According to Doug Long, 
owner and operator of Mel's, 
the tavern was first opened the 
week after the 1951 flood. 
Long, who had owned Mel's for 
12 years, said the tradition of the 
tavern was not limited to any 
particular group. 

"We cater to a wide range of 
people," Long said. "Our 
customers come in all shapes 
and sizes, from all walks of life. 
We have businessmen and 
students, as well as many of the 
regulars who have come here 
since it first opened." 

But just as the last few rays of 



I&-*! ■ 



<«. 







sunlight penetrated the window 
of the backroom, Mel's was sav- 
ed — for 90 days. 

Mel's Tavern was originally 
scheduled to close in December; 
however, due to an error by the 
city, the long-time establishment 
was given a stay of execution. 

"We were originally suppos- 
ed to close in December," Long 
said. "But they (the city) forgot 
to give us our 90-day notice." 

Long's plans for the future of 
Mel's were uncertain at best. At 
the top of the list was relocating. 
Long actively searched for a 
suitable location. Another option 
he considered was to move 
Mel's into one of his other 
establishments. The Dougout. 
Long said he would do that only 
if a more suitable location could 
not be found. 

— Dan Hoss 



^l^m^"■■»r 




I 



50 



Mel's Tavern! 





le backroom of Mel's provides a cozy place for a group of girls to 
; together. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Mel's customer enjoys a frosty fislibowl of beer. (Photo by Jeff 
flor) 



Downtown Redevelopment 



Construction Begins on Town Center Mali 



After 10 years of dreaming, planning 
and controversy, 1986 marked the 
beginning of construction for the 
Manhattan Town Center Mall. 

In the first step toward the mall, the 
city acquired businesses and land for 
the project. The mall was planned for 
an area bordered on the east by Tuttle 
Creek Boulevard, on the west by Third 
Street, by Leavenworth Street on the 
north and Pierre Street to the south. 

To fund the site acquisition and site 
clearance, the city obtained $9 million 
in temporary notes to be paid by an Ur- 
ban Development Action Grant. 

Although all properties east of Third 
Street were to be vacated by mid- 
January 1986, several businesses 
received extensions due to legal ac- 



tions contesting prices offered for ac- 
quisition. 

During condemnation and eminent 
domain actions by the city, several 
land and business owners filed appeals 
concerning "just compensation," re- 
jecting original offers by the city of 
Manhattan. 

During the appeals in Riley County 
District Court, three court-appointed 
appraisers returned with awards which 
were almost always higher than the ci- 
ty's original offers. 

Following acquisition and site 
preparation, the land was turned over 
to the project's co-developers. Forest 
City Rental Properties Inc. of Cleveland 
and JCP Realty, a subsidiary of the J.C. 
(continued on page 52) 



51 



Tradition malces 
way for progress 



For as long as Nina Miley could 
remember, nighttime trips to Swanson's 
Bakery — better known as Swannie's — had 
been a routine for K-State students. The 
"Yum- Yum" tradition was forced to a tem- 
porary end when the decision to build a 
downtown mall led Richard "Swannie" 
Swanson to close his doors in December 
1985. 

But the "Yum- Yum" tradition returned 
one month after Swannie's closing with a 
new "Swannie." Nina Miley became the 
new owner of Swanson's Bakery. 

"I always thought about going into cater- 
ing or something similar, so I went to look at 
Swanson's when I found out Swannie was 
leaving. After I looked at it, I thought it 
would be something I'd really like to do, 
could put all my energy into and be good at. 
So I purchased the business and we opened 
Jan. 14," Miley said. 

Miley said she had to negotiate with the ci- 
ty in order to reopen the bakery, because the 
building was going to be demolished to 
prepare for the mall construction. 

"There were many steps we had to go 
through to get things situated, but we went 



Manhattan Town Center Mall 

Penney Co. Inc., New York. The 
developers were responsible for obtaining 
funding for the $24 million structure. 

Two anchor stores, Dillard's, an 
Arkansas-based department store chain, 
and J.C. Penney Co. Inc., signed contracts 
to occupy mall locations. The J.C. Penney 
store will replace Its current Manhattan 
facility at Fourth and Houston streets. 

Despite delays, the city planned for a 
June 1986 groundbreaking ceremony, 
with the mall's grand opening scheduled 
for August 1987. 

The mall project also prompted con- 
struction of facilities for businesses 
displaced by the mall, including the Col- 
orado Center in the 300 block of Colorado 
Street and the Town East Shopping 
Center, along U.S. Highway 24 east of 
K-Mart and Food-4-Less. 

A new site for office space. Colony 
Square Office Complex, was to be located 
on the south side of the 500 block of 
Poyntz Avenue. 

— Tom Schultes 



through them one step at a time and the city 
decided to let me keep the bakery open until 
March 15. Then I will have to find a new 
location," Miley said. 

Miley said she had looked at a lot of 
buildings but the search was a complicated 
process because of poor locations and high 
rent for most buildings. 

"I thought about moving to Aggieville, 
but I talked to students about it and found 
they like to go someplace that's different in- 
stead of just walking across the street in Ag- 
gieville. The guys like to pack all the girls 
they can into the car and go someplace with 
them. It gives them an excuse to get close to 
them," Miley said jokingly. 

Miley said the central location of Swan- 
son's also brought in business from the 
downtown area, and she wanted to stay close 
to downtown after the mall construction 
began. 

"I have two completely different types of 
customers. During the day we sell cakes, 
rolls and pastries, while Yum-Yums (a 
special type of fried Danish roll Swannie 
created) are the big nighttime seller at our 
back door. There are two completely dif- 
ferent markets to serve." Miley said 

Miley said she wanted to continue the 
back door operation at night when she mov- 
ed to a new location to continue serving the 
two different clientele. 

The only change Miley implemented was 
the hours the back door was open. Instead of 
staying open all night, the closing time was 
changed to between 1 and 1 : 30 a.m., depen- 
ding on when the inventory sold out. 

"Swannie used to stay all night and 
operate a mixer so he could keep making 
doughnuts. He would stay open until 2 a.m. 
on weekends," Miley said. 

Miley said Swannie's wife helped with the 
daytime operation, an advantage she doesn't 
have. 

"There were two Swansons, but there is 
only one of me. So I have to set a schedule 
that I can live with, while at the same time 
get a sufficient amount of sleep," Miley 
said. 

When Swanson's relocates, Miley will 
add some new features. 

Bagels will be added to the menu and the 
new bakery will also include a coffee shop 
and a deli. 

"I want to arrange the bakery to allow 
people to sit down for pastries and coffee in 
the morning, and have the deli to serve 
lunch. I think these changes will be a real ad- 



ded attraction," Miley said. 

Miley said she wouldn't have purchasi 
the bakery, but the circumstances were rig 
and she couldn't pass up the opportunity. 

"Swannie wasn't going out of business 
anything like that. It was just the decision 
build the mall that closed him down, 
wouldn't have just gone out on my own ai 
done this without the background Swanson 
had," Miley said. 

Swannie moved to Texas and begi 
traveling as a troubleshooter repairii 
bakery equipment. 

"It's a perfect job for him. They both (tl 
Swansons) feel very positive about the 
move. They also want to help me mal 
Swanson's a successful business," Mile 
said. 

Swannie left advice with Miley on what 1 
thought was profitable and what he thoug 
could be eliminatated. 

"The students who come in are positi\ 
about the change of ownership," Miley sai 
"Of course they miss Swannie, but from tl 
way business has been going, I think 
Yum- Yum tradition will live on." 

— Jim Lundstro 




52 



Tish Tracey balances a tray while stepping on a lever 
raise the glazing rack. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Mike Hilliard points to his selection for Nina Mile 
new owner of Swanson's Bakery. Miley continued tii 
late-night hours of the bakery made popular by Swannli 



Swannie's 




Swannie's 



53 



Comedians 
On the 
Court 



Globetrotters and 
first woman teammate 
dazzle and 
entertain fans 



The sounds, colors, and more 
importantly, the laughter of the 
world-famous Harlem 

Globetrotters was brought to 
Aheam Field House on Feb. 11, 
where a near-capacity crowd 
witnessed a performance of the 
flashy basketball comedians. 

The Globetrotters brought 
their traveling road show to 
Manhattan and K-State where 
more than 7,200 fans, young and 
old, were entertained by some 
old-time Trotter gimmicks along 
with some new pranks and new 
faces. 

Gone were the likes of 
Meadowlark Lemon and Curly 
Neal, but the familiar charisma 
of the "Ambassadors of Good- 
will" remained. Sweet Lou 
Dunbar — the court jester of 
basketball — is now the main 
on-court comedian, but the per- 
son who the majority of the 
crowd came to see was the 
newest and first woman 
Globetrotter, Lynette Woodard. 

It was apparent from the 
outset, when she received a huge 
ovation as she was introduced, 
that the Wichita native was the 
crowd favorite. The night 
before, in her hometown, 
Woodard had received a five- 
minute standing ovation from a 
sell-out crowd in the Kansas 
Coliseum during player in- 
troductions. 

The Trotters added Woodard 
in an attempt to improve their 
popularity and get crowds back 
into the arenas. 

For Woodard, however, it 
was a dream come true. 

"This is the fulfillment of a 
lifelong dream for me," 
Woodard said. "The Globetrot- 
ters have always been special, 
but they were even more special 
to me. I used to practice all their 



moves and try to do all of their 
tricks when I was growing up. 
This is the opportunity of the 
century." 

The University of Kansas 
graduate, in her first return to 
K-State as a player — this time 
on a little more friendlier terms 
than in the past — seemed to fit 
into the Trotter scheme well, as 
she ran the famous "weave" of- 
fense just as it has been run a 
thousand times before, without 
missing a beat. 

To the tune of their familiar 
theme song, "Sweet Georgia 
Brown," the Globetrotters 
dazzled the spectators while per- 
forming the famous "magic cir- 
cle" before the game. 

Dunbar led the routine while 
constantly talking to both his 
teammates and opponents, never 
seeming to be concentrating on 
what he was doing, but in the 
end, he always seemed to make 
the right pass for another easy 
two points. 

The Trotters also did a great 
job of getting the crowd involv- 
ed in their pranks. But many of 
the individuals who got into the 
act probably wished they would 
not have been involved. 

For example, Shecky Stanley, 
senior in management, who after 
arriving late to the game, was 
spotted by Dunbar as she tried to 
find her seat. Sweet Lou quickly 
accused her of going to the 
restroom and had a little fun em- 
barrassing her in front of the 
large crowd. Stanley remained 
on the sidelines until halftime, 
too embarrassed to return to her 
seat. 

Then Dunbar captured atten- 

A young fan holds an autographed pen- 
nant after being taken out onto the court 
to participate in a part of the team's per- 
formance. (Photo by Jeff Tattle) 



tion at half-court with the purse 
of June Brabec of Washington, 
Kan. He went through the purse, 
pulling out her glasses, wallet 
and tissues. But after an unsuc- 
cessful attempt to hide her 
wallet, Dunbar returned the 
purse to Brabec, who then joined 
him on the court to dance to a 
tune by the Pointer Sisters. 
But after the game, it was 



back to the road, as the team had 
another game to play two nights 
later in Bethlehem, Pa., 
Lehigh University. The game ir 
Manhattan, which was spon- 
sored by the Union Programm- 
ing Council's Special Events' 
Committee, was only one of thei 
Globetrotters' 160 games to bci 
played in 180 days. 

— Daran Neuschafei 



54 






The Harlem Globetrotters ham it up 
along the baseline of the basketball court 
during their Ahearn Field House perfor- 
mance. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Globetrotter Harold Hubbard catches a 
ball on the back of his neck during a jug- 
gling routine. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



Harlem Globetrotters 



^T^' ^4&me- ■ 



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fir*-\. 



5 




Student Body presidential candidate Patty Hipsiier 
glances at candidate Kelli Carr as Carr answers a ques- 
tion while candidates (from left) Steven Johnson, Steve 
Cashman and Keith Petracek listen during a presidential 
debate sponsored by Putnam Hall and KSU Association 
of Residence Halls. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Congratulations are given to Steven Johnson by Kevin 
Graber and Jamie Wilson moments after Johnson 
received official notice at FarmHouse Fraternity he had 
been elected student body president. (Photo by Steve 
Rasmussen) 



'tM 



56 



Student Elections 



Elections 

No 
Party 



Steven Johnson 

uses serious campaign 

to get elected 

student body president 



For the 1986 student elections, the party 
vas over. 

In a year when there was no Party political 
)arty , no Steve Brown to throw a wrench in- 
student body candidate's plans and no new 
ssues to discuss, recruitment and retention 
)f students became the main rallying point. 

"All five of the candidates had strong 
)oints. There just wasn't any real hot issue 
>n which anyone made a big stand. The col- 
seum issue is dead, so it came down to 
ecruitment and retention," said Maribeth 
jottschalk, senior in journalism and mass 
ommunications and chairwoman of the 
lections committee. 

The two finalists for student body presi- 
lent, Steven Johnson, sophomore in 
gricultural economics, and Steve Cashman, 



junior in marketing, had similar campaigns 
and goals. 

Johnson defeated Cashman in the Feb. 19 
runoff election by garnering 1,134 of the 
1,988 ballots cast. 

Three other students threw their hats into 
the contest for student body president, but 
were eliminated as a result of the primary 
election. The other candidiates were Patti 
Hipsher, junior in political science; Kelli 
Carr, senior in journalism and mass com- 
munications; and Keith Petracek, junior in 
electrical engineering. 

Johnson said he realized there was a great 
deal involved in the position of student body 
president, and it was a tough task to get 
elected. 

"I talked to a lot of people before I decid- 




ed to run, and I felt that there was plenty of 
support for my cause," he said. 

In the primary election Feb. 11 and 12, 
Cashman led the voting with 852 votes. 
Johnson was second with 704 votes. 

"After the primary election, I realized 
that he (Cashman) was going to be a tough 
man to beat," Johnson said. 

Throughout his campaign, Johnson stress- 
ed that he was an excellent communicator. 
He said he had traveled across the United 
States speaking to administrators while 
representing various youth organizations. 

Cashman, on the other hand, used his ex- 
perience in student government and his ex- 
perience with the University administration 
as his chief campaign tools. 

"After the primary election, I got out to 
talk to every possible person that I could, 
and I think that made the difference," 
Johnson said. 

Following the election, Johnson set his 
sights on the problems before him and the 
administration. 

"Better recruitment and retention (of 
students) are my main goals. But, other 
things will be important, and I'll have to deal 
with them as they come up," Johnson said. 

In only its second year of existence, one 
campus political group. Students for Educa- 
tional Awareness (SEA), proved it was a 
force to be reckoned with. 

Catherine Sayler, who was involved in 
starting SEA, said the group changed after 
its first year. 

"Last year, we had this incredible energy, 
and we wanted to develop an image that 
would make us as successful as possible. 
This year, there was not quite the effort and 
we had better success," she said. 

— Dan Allen 

A tree near Seaton Hall provides a good spot for 
Francesca Royster to hang campaign posters. (Photo by 
Jim Dietz) 



57 



COLISEUM 



Despite many setbacks and 

delays, plans continue for 

K-State's multipurpose coliseum 




-^J '~iJV 



"sJ ^ 



58 



It has a name. It also has a site 
upon which to be built. But as of 
May 1986, the Fred Bramlage 
Coliseum was no more than a set 
of blueprints and a collection of 
ideas in the minds of many. 
, Plans to give K-State a new 
multipurpose coliseum have 
aeen in the works since the early 
'70s. But 15 years later, the 
iresolution of those plans was 
still uncertain as the University 
worked toward turning those 
Dlans into concrete and steel. 

As early as March 1971, 
University and athletic depart- 
-nent officials considered con- 
struction of a field house to 
eplace Aheam Field House, 
5uih in 1951 for $1.2 million. 
Driginally seating 14,000, 
enovation of Aheam in 1972 to 
i)ring the building within fire 
;odes reduced seating to 1 1 ,220. 

The movement to build a new 



athletic facility didn't gain 
momentum until March 1977 
when a study was made to deter- 
mine the feasibility of 
renovating Aheam. The study 
proposed increasing Aheam 's 
seating to 12,600 at a cost of $6 
million in 1985 dollars. Univer- 
sity officials did not recommend 
the renovation of Ahearn. 

Presenting a simple but expen- 
sive plan for success, student 
govemment leaders and Univer- 
sity officials put out a call in the 
early '80s for collection of 
millions toward construction of 
a coliseum. 

Funding for the project was 
discussed, and it was assumed 
students would donate $5.5 
million, alumni $6 million, the 
Kansas Legislature roughly $6 
million and the athletic depart- 
ment $2 million toward the con- 
stmction of a $20 million col- 



iseum. 

But the mg was pulled out 
from under K-State's feet as the 
University learned in June 1983 
that state money would not be 
available for the project. The 
Board of Regents said it would 
be inappropriate to request state 
funds in view of K-State's 
academic stmcture needs and 
declining state revenue projec- 
tions. 

Plans and funding projections 
for the coliseum were altered. 
The student contribution was 
raised to $7 million and alumni 
support was set at $7.1 million. 
With the athletic department 
contributing $2 million, the 
budget for the coliseum was set 
at $16.1 million. By 1986, each 
student was paying $20.75 per 
semester toward the coliseum. 

All seemed to be well for the 
proposed athletic facility. A site 



immediately south of KSU 
Stadium was selected for the col- 
iseum. 

The mechanism for collecting 
student monies was in place, and 
the KSU Foundation's fund- 
raising campaign netted more 
contributions than expected. A 
$1.75 million contribution from 
alumnus Fred Bramlage promp- 
ted the Regents to name the col- 
iseum after him. 

But mmblings from the stu- 
dent body were heard during the 
fall of 1984 and spring of 1985. 
Some student leaders expressed 
their concern that adequate 
studies had not been performed 
in planning the coliseum. 

The controversy prompted ac- 
tion by both supporters and op- 
ponents of the project. But the 
discussion was of little conse- 
quence as University officials 
(continued on page 60) 



P- 



rtiill'!!!' Ipl*' 



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Coliseum 



continued with plans for the pro- 
ject. 

The coliseum ground- 
breaking ceremony was set for 
August 1985, but no dirt was 
ever touched. Bids for the 
building came in at least $3.4 
million over projected costs. All 
the bids were rejected by the 
University, and coliseum ar- 
chitect Bill Livingston agreed in 
September 1985 to redesign the 
facility . 

Although the new design 
eliminated a $345,000 conces- 
sion and restroom facility at the 
north end of the coliseum, a 
$500,000 office structure for 
coaches and athletic ad- 
ministrators at the south end and 
2,500 seats — reducing seating 
to 13,500 — the design did not 
reduce the quality of the 
building, Livingston said. 

"As we began redesigning ef- 

Uoliseum architect Bill Livingston, of 
Gossen Livingston Associates, explains 
details of the Fred Bramlage Coliseum at 
an open forum in the K-State Union. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



forts — after the budget pro- 
blems surfaced — we made sure 
with this building that we are in 
no way sacrificing the multipur- 
pose ftmctions or quality of the 
building," he said. 

But even with the scaled-down 
plans, February 1986 cost 
estimates showed the coliseum 
still could not be built within 
budget. Faced with the possible 
shelving of the project, 
Bramlage promised additional 
money to keep the coliseum 
alive. 

A last-minute contribution of 
$640,000 from Bramlage effec- 
tively solved the severe budget 
problem and cleared way for ap- 
proval of the revised design by 
the Board of Regents. 

The total cost of the facility, 
including fees and landscaping, 
is expected to be $17.5 million. 

"Certainly (the contribution) 

Fred Bramlage, coliseum contributor, 
and Art Loub, executive director of the 
KSU Foundation, listen to architect Bill 
Livingston talk about the coliseum. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



is a vote of confidence in Kansas 
State University and illustrates 
the enthusiasm that Mr. 
Bramlage has for the 
University," Acker said. 

Two days after Bramlage an- 
nounced his $640,000 gift, the 
Regents unanimously accepted 
Livingston's preliminary 
redesign plans and authorized 



his firm to complete the project | 
Livingston said final plans! 
would be complete in Septembeij 
1986 and construction mighi 
begin in December, if new conj 
struction bids opened in the falj 
were within budget. The targC' 
date for the coliseum's comple' 
tion is October 1988. 

— 77m Carpente)\ 





60 



Coliseum 




Architect Bill Livingston answers a question 
about tlie Fred Bramlage Coliseum during the 
Board of Regents meeting Sept. 20 in Topeka. 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



Ahearn Field House, home to basketball teams 
since 1951, is considered by supporters of the 
Fred Bramlage Coliseum to be a small, outdated 
facility. Attendance at Wildcat home games this 
season averaged slightly more than 6,000 per 
game — the lowest in history. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 




Coliseum planning: 1972-1986 



June 1972: Remodeling in Ahearn 
Field House cuts seating from 14,000 
to its current level of 1 1 ,220. 

March 1977: A feasibility study 
conducted by the University Planning 
Office indicates renovation of Ahearn 
Field House is not feasible. 

February 1979:Students vote in 
second coliseum referendum 4,246 to 
1,332 to increase student fees to 
provide $2.5 million for a coliseum if 
progress is made in securing funds 
from alumni, City of Manhattan and 
Kansas Legislature. 

November 1 981 : student Senate 
votes to obligate students to $5.5 
million for the coliseum and impose a 
fee of $9.75 per semester in 1982 and 
$16.50 in 1983. 



June 1983: The KSU Foundation 
launches a $6 million coliseum fund- 
raising drive and the Board of Regents 
votes not to request $5 million to $6 
million from the Kansas Legislature for 
the coliseum because of the 
deteriorating fiscal condition of the 
state and extensive academic building 
needs at K-State. 

March 1984: The coliseum pro- 
gram committee revises the budget to 
correspond to the loss of state funds 
and sets the maximum cost at $16.1 
million with $7.1 million coming from 
alumni, $7 million from students and $2 
million from the athletic department. 
The Board of Regents votes to name 
the coliseum after Fred Bramlage of 
Junction City, contributer of at least 
$1.75 million. 



August 1985:Bids on the 16,000 
seat coliseum are opened and the 
lowest bid is $3.4 million above 
estimates. Student fees for the 
coliseum increase to $20.75. 

September 1985: The Board of 

Regents grants Livingston approval to 
redesign the coliseum and eliminate 
2,500 seats and office space. 

January 1986: The coliseum 
program committee rejects four 
redesigning sketches because none 
meets budget of quality requirements 
of the program document. The 
committee also rejects Livingston's 
idea of collecting $1 million to $2 
million extra for the coliseum. 
Livingston is to return Jan. 23 with 
detailed redesign cost estimates. 



Coliseum 



61 



Angela Wesley sings "We Shall Over- 
come" during a candlelight service in 
memory of the Rev. Martin Luther King 
Jr. in the All Faiths Chapel. (Photo by An- 
dy Nelson) 



62 




Honoring 

A 
Leader 



Beliefs and dreams 
of civil rights leader 
remembered on 
national holiday 



On Jan. 19, 1968, Martin 
uther King Jr. traveled to 

State to deliver an AU- 
Fniversity Convocation — just 
vo and one-half months before 
eing fatally shot in Memphis, 
enn. 

Eighteen years later. King's 
irthday was celebrated with a 
'eek of activities, marking the 
rst national holiday honoring 
le slain civil rights leader. 

"Celebrations today (com- 
lemorating King) are long 
verdue. I'm glad to see people 
ere at K-State have come out to 
ppreciate all (King) strived to 
0," said Derieth Sutton, 
jphomore in journalism and 
lass communications. 

Nearly 200 students, faculty 
id community members joined 
rms and sang ' 'We Shall Over- 
3me" while walking from 
/aters Hall to All Faiths 
'hapel. The walk across campus 
egan a ceremony held on the 
rst day of Martin Luther King 
/eek. 

During the walk, participants 
jmembered King's beliefs. 

"It's important that we 
'.member where we came from 
id how far we still have to go, " 



said Gregory Daniel, sophomore 
in psychology. 

"In midst of celebration, we 
must press on with a dream," 
said Dave Stewart, director of 
Campus Baptist Ministry and 



one of three speakers at the 
ceremony. 

"Martin Luther King was a 
dreamer, but not a starry-eyed 
dreamer," Stewart said. "His 
gift to us is a gift that has chang- 





ed our lives." 

Stewart asked everyone in 
every nation to "embrace the 
dream" King envisioned "so the 
dream will not only be pursued, 
but realized." 

Benjamin Hooks, national ex- 
ecutive director of the NAACP, 
spoke at an All-University Con- 
vocation which was also part of 
the campus's activities held to 
honor King. 

Hooks saw King as a dynamic 
man and said his speeches were 
transfigured by power and per- 
suasion of delivery. Hooks said 
King's beliefs live on. 

"You can kill the dreamer, 
but you can't kill the dream," 
Hooks said. 

Wayne Rohrer, professor of 
sociology; Henry Donaghy, pro- 
fessor of English; and Stacy 
Smith, graduate student in 
English, were participants in a 
forum sponsored by the College 
of Arts and Sciences honoring 
King. Rohrer and Donaghy cited 
their views of the civil rights 
movement of the 1960s, while 
Smith read various poems writ- 
ten as a tribute to King. 

Donaghy marched in King's 
funeral April 9, 1968. 

' 'This was the most emotional 
experience of my life," 
Donaghy said. 

— Angela O 'Hara 

The dream of civil rights leader Martin 
Luther King Jr. was brought home to 
K-State students and faculty on Jan. 19, 
1968, when King delivered an All- 
Unlverslty Convocation. (File Photo) 

The local ceremony In memory of Martin 
Luther King Jr., which attracted nearly 
200 people, marked the first official na- 
tional holiday honoring the slain civil 
rights leader. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



63 



Explosion Shocks 



The launching of space 
shuttles was becoming almost 
commonplace in the minds of 
Americans, but on the morn- 
ing of Jan. 28, 1986, the 
space shuttle Challenger ex- 
ploded 73 seconds after lif- 
toff. All seven astronauts 
aboard were killed. 



Among the shuttle crew 
was the first "common 
citizen" to fly in space — 
school teacher Christa 
McAuliffe, of Concord, 
N.H. 

McAuliffe, 37, had been 
selected from 11,146 teacher 
applicants to be the first to fly 



in the National Aeronautic 
and Space Administration' 
citizen-in-space program. 

The crew includeii 
McAuliffe and six NASi^} 
astronauts: commander Fran" 
cis R. Scobee, 46; pile 
Michael J. Smith, 40; Judit! 
Resnik, 36; Ronald E 



9 




A 



The U.S. Space Challanger explodes 73 seconds over Deanna Hattrup is transfixed on tlie teievision wliiie wat 

tlie Atiantic Ocean 18 miles away from the launch pad at ching a report on the space shuttle explosion Jan. 28, 1981 

Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fia. (NASA in the Union. The explosion killed all seven crew members 

photos via network news) (Photo by Greg Vogel) 



National Events 



N 



W 



B 



R 



World 



McNair, 35; Ellison S. 
Onizuka, 39; and Gregory B. 
Jarvis, 41. 

There was much controver- 
sy as to whether the space 
shuttle should have been 
launched due to Florida's ex- 
tremely cold weather condi- 
tions in the hours immediate- 
ly prior to the launch. 

More than 130 stunned 
television viewers in the 
K-State Union watched the 
Challenger explode. No one 
spoke above a whisper as 
they watched CBS news an- 
chor Dan Rather discuss the 
sequence of events that led to 
what was assumed to be an 
explosion of Challenger's 
main external fuel tank. 

Jun Betzen, sophomore in 
business administration, was 
watching the liftoff when it 
was first televised. He said 
the explosion was totally 
unexpected and shocked the 
viewers into what he called 
stunned silence. 

Investigators recovered 
several pieces of the shuttle 
from the bottom of the ocean 
which aided the investigation 
into the cause of the explo- 
sion. A commission was 
established by President 
Reagan to investigate the 
cause of the explosion and 
make recommendations for 
future shuttle missions. 



Tylenol 

Capsules 

Recalled 



Johnson & Johnson, the maker 
of Tylenol, announced Feb. 17 it 
would no longer produce over- 
the-counter medication in cap- 
sules. The announcement came 
nine days after cyanide- 
contaminated capsules killed a 
woman in New York City and 
more than three years after 
similarly poisoned capsules kill- 
ed seven people in Illinois. 

"We feel the company can no 
longer guarantee the safety of 
the capsule," said James E. 
Burke, chairman of Johnson &. 
Johnson. 

The announcement came as a 
team of investigators went to 
Pennsylvania to trace the path of 
the Tylenol capsules taken by a 
woman who died in suburban 
New York City on Feb. 8. 

Burke urged users of the cap- 
sules to switch to coated, oval- 
shaped tablets known as caplets, 
and said Johnson&Johnson 
would replace free any capsules 
consumers or stores had on 
hand. 

The decision was made to 
"protect the public, " he said. 
The replacement program was 
estimated to cost the company 
$150 million. 



Air disasters claim lives 



Numerous air disasters during 
1985 claimed many lives, shock- 
ed the world and left many ques- 
tioning air travel safety. 

A DC-8 charter full of U.S. 
soldiers returning from the Mid- 
idle East crashed and exploded in 
December 1985 near Gander In- 
ternational Airport in New- 
foundland, killing all 258 
aboard. 

Delta Airlines flight 191 



International Events 



crashed while landing at the 
Dallas-Fort Worth International 
Airport on Aug. 2, 1985. The 
crash was caused by a wind 
shear, and 136 people were kill- 
ed. 

An Air-India jumbo jet plung- 
ed into the North Atlantic on 
June 23, 1985, killing all 329 
people aboard. This was 
possibly history's third worst air 
disaster. 



Mexico City 
Earthquakes 
Devastating 



More than 4,600 people 
were killed in Mexico City 
when two major earth- 
quakes struck Sept. 19 and 
20. About 18,000 people 
were injured and 400,000 
were left homeless. The 
first quake measured 8.1 
on the Richter Scale, mak- 
ing it one of the country's 
most devastating earth- 
quakes. The second 
measured 7.5. 

Schools, hotels, 
hospitals and high rises 
were flattened, and gas 
and power lines touched 
off dozens of fires in the 
world's most populated 
capital and caused 
widespread damage for 
hundreds of miles. 



727 Hijacked 
by Moslems 



A Boeing 727 was hijacked by 
Shiite Moslem extremists June 
11, 1985, after taking off from 
Beirut for Amman, Jordan. 
After being forced to fly around 
the Mediterranean, the plane 
returned to Beirut. 

The plane carried 74 
passengers and crew members, 
39 of whom were Americans. 
One American passenger was 
killed. He was Robert Stethem, 
a 23-year-old Navy frogman 
from Waldorf, Md. 

The hijack was of special con- 
cern to Kansans as a Hutchinson 
family was held hostage. The 
Peel family was separated dur- 
ing the crisis when each member 
was released one by one. 

Freed after 17 days of captivi- 
ty, 39 Americans rode in a Red 
Cross convoy from Beirut to 
Damascus, beginning their 
journey home. 



Reagan treated for colon cancer 



Doctors informed President 
Reagan, the nation's oldest 
president serving his second 
term, he had colon cancer, but 
they believed surgeons removed 
all the malignant tissue before it 
spread. 

The president made a speedy 



recovery from his July 13, 1985, 
operation at Bethesda Naval 
Hospital. The doctors said there 
was "a greater than 50 percent 
chance that the president now 
has no cancer, no cancer cells in 
his body and is completely 
cured." 



Terrorists Overtake Achille Lauro 



For many, 1985 will be 
remembered as "The Year of 
the Terrorists." On Oct. 7, 
1985, news of Palestinian hi- 
jackers seizing the Achille Lauro 
oceanliner stunned the world. 
Two days later, the terrorists 
surrendered and the nightmare 
ended for more than 500 
hostages aboard the ship. 

Italian officials said the pirates 
killed one American in the inci- 
dent and threw him overboard. 
He was identified as Leon Kl- 
inghoffer, 69, of New York Ci- 



ty- 

The Foreign Ministry said the 
terrorists surrendered to 
representatives of the Palestine 
Liberation Organization. The 
PLO denied involvement in the 
hijacking and Yassar Arafat said 
the pirates were not PLO 
members. 

After they seized control of 
the ship on Oct. 7, 1985, the hi- 
jackers, heavily armed with 
guns and explosives, demanded 
the release of 50 Palestinians im- 
prisoned in Israel. 



65 



N 



W 



B 



R 



Kansas Day 
Marks 125th 
Anniversary 

Kansas celebrated its 125th 
birthday on Jan. 29, 1986, but 
all was not well. Gov. John 
Carlin and a group of dignitaries 
celebrated the state's birthday in 
the wake of the NASA space 
shuttle disaster which had occur- 
red the day before. 

Salina native Steve Hawley, 
an astronaut who had just return- 
ed from a mission on the space 
shuttle Columbia, and Joe 
Engle, a NASA astronaut from 
Chapman, were scheduled to 
participate in the festivities, but 
both went to Houston following 
Challenger's explosion. 

Carlin spoke to more than 
1,000 people at the Capitol. 
Carlin said citizens should seize 
the opportunity to celebrate the 
day Kansas entered the Union, 
"remember the spirit of op- 
timism that brought about the 
creation of the 34th state" and 
"commit ourselves to what we 
can become." 

Theater Complex 
Ends Monopoly 




Gov. John Carlin reviews a band along with a military escort 
during a parade observing the 125th anniversary of Kansas' 



statehood. A crowd of more than 1,000 gathered at the Capij 
to celebrate the state's anniversary. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



Students Die in Accidents 



A Manhattan movie monopoly 
came to an end Dec. 13, 1985, 
when the Litchfield Co. of 
Easley, S.C., opened an eight- 
screen theater complex located 
at Seth Childs and Farm Bureau 
roads. The opening of the Seth 
Childs Cinemas ended Com- 
monwealth Theatres' exclusive 
rights to movie patrons' dollars 
in the Manhattan area. 

Commonwealth Theatres did 
not take Litchfield's entrance in- 
to the Manhattan market lightly. 
Commonwealth constructed a 
new six-screen theater complex 
in the east central area of 
Westloop Shopping Center. 

The new theaters gave 
Manhattan 15 off-campus 
theaters. 



Several accidents involving 
students occurred during the 
year, leaving three students 
dead. 

Paul Schanzmeyer was 
critically burned in a flash fire 
Aug. 30 while using gasoline to 
strip paint from an apartment 
wall. He received first- and 
second-degree burns over 90 
percent of his body. 

The multi-story building at 
1010 Fremont, which contained 
six apartments, was destroyed. 
The insured value was listed as 
$85,000. 

Schanzmeyer died later from 
injuries sustained when a gas 
water heater or other appliance 
ignited the gasoline he was using 
to remove the paint. Officials 
reported the explosion caused a 



flash fire that rapidly spread 
through the building. Fire of- 
ficials said the blaze spread 
upstairs then through the 
upstairs ceiling. 

Michael A. Newton, graduate 
in physics, died Oct. 9 from 
head injuries suffered in a bicy- 
cle accident at the Jardine Ter- 
race recreation field. 

Newton, 24, was thrown from 
the bike after he veered off the 
sidewalk at high speed into the 
grass and hit a landscaped hill 
about 5 feet high. 

Newton was one of three 
Manhattan licensed racers with 
the United States Cycling 
Federation and was extremely 
active in cycling activities. 
Newton was not wearing a 
helmet at the time of the acci- 



66 



dent. j 

A 19-year-old student wsj 
killed in a one car accident oi 
Tuttle Creek Boulevard Oct. 2( 

Roger Y. Elkins, sophomor 
in environmental design, W8 
pronounced dead at the St. Mar 
Hospital. 

According to Traffic Sgi 
Larry Freeby of the Riley Cour 
ty Police Department, Biking 
was northbound on Tuttle Cree 
Boulevard near Marlatt Avenu 
when he lost control of his Dat 
sun 280ZX on the east side c 
the road. The vehicle struck 
tree and Elkins was thrown fror 
the vehicle. 

There were no passengers an^ 
no other vehicles involved 
Freeby did not know how fas 
the vehicle was traveling. 



State Events 



N 



W 



B 



R 



Miracle Campaign Halts Foreclosure 



In an effort to collect more 
then $150,000 in deliquent 
payments, the Christain Church 
Extension Foundation in Denver 
began foreclosure procedures 
against Manhattan Christian 
College on Oct. 10. 
! A loan had been granted to 
MCC in September 1981 by 
CCEF to assist the college with 

debt consolidation and debt 
reduction program MCC miss- 
ed the loan payment deadline for 



the first time in May 1984 and 
had not met a payment since 
then. 

MCC began a Miracle Cam- 
paign to raise funds to pay off 
the entire debt of $1.3 million 
owed to the Foundation plus 
more than $300,000 owed to 
creditors. Contributions totalled 
$1.28 million on the initial 
deadline of Dec. 20. The cam- 
paign was extended to Feb. 20. 

The fund-raising goal was met 



by Jan. 28 and foreclosure ac- 
tion was stopped. 

MCC was also involved in a 
property rezoning battle with the 
city of Manhattan. MCC won 
the battle at the Aug. 21 meeting 
of the Manhattan City Commis- 
sion. On a 4-1 vote, the commis- 
sion rezoned a tract of land bet- 
ween Laramie Street and Ander- 
son Avenue, along the east side 
of 16th Street. 

The rezoning, requested by 



Rhodes Scholar Will Study in England 



Virgil Wiebe, senior in 
Dolitical science, was one of 32 
American college students who 
will be traveling to Oxford 
University in England in 
Dctober 1986 for two years of 
tudy as a Rhodes Scholar. 

A great deal of time was 
nvested by Wiebe to win the 
scholarship. Wiebe began the 



scholarship application process 
by getting letters of 
recommendation from advisers 
and instructors. 

The most time consuming part 
of the entry was the 1 ,000 word 
essay. He had several professors 
read it and make suggestions. 
He then went back and rewrote 
it. 



"I must have changed it about 
a dozen times," Wiebe said. 

After dropping a couple of 
classes and spending endless 
nights working on the essay, the 
entry paid off. 

He plans to study political 
geography at Oxford and hopes 
to work in the United Nations 
when finished with his studies. 




This illustration shows an artist's rendering of the 
Public Plaza to be built at the Poyntz Avenue and Third 
Street mall entrance. 



MCC and Empire Development 
of Denver, allowed for construc- 
tion to begin on a 17,000- 
square-foot Student Service 
Center. Plans called for a food- 
service center, a minimum of 
1 ,000 square feet of office space 
and a maximum of six retail 
stores on the project's ground 
level. The second level was to 
contain 24 apartments for MCC 
students, with 12 single and 12 
two-bedroom apartments. 

New law 
requires cuts 

The Gramm-Rudman Act, 
which requires a balanced 
federal budget by 1991, was 
passed March 1, 1986. 

The nation's budget-balancing 
law will require cuts of 25 
percent to 50 percent in most 
domestic federal programs, with 
even larger cuts possible in 
certain law enforcement areas. 

The effects of the law would 
be different in each state. 

The uncertainty of what 
Kansas would need in finance 
and the actual impact of Gramm- 
Rudman made it difficult to 
assess the state's needs. 

Gov. John Carlin submitted a 
proposal to replace funds taken 
away by the federal legislation. 
The proposal called for 
increasing state sales tax rates 1 
cent on the dollar. 

Sen. Merrill Werts, 
R- Junction City, estimated that 
state sales tax rates would have 
to increase from 2.5 percent to 3 
percent. This proposal would go 
in effect if proposals to eliminate 
food items from sales tax were 
enacted. 

Werts said dropping food 
items from taxation would result 
in a loss of $80 million to $90 
million annually in state 
revenues. He said these losses 
would have to be added to any 
reductions from federal levels to 
determine tax increase 
percentages. 



Local Events 



67 



A Special 

Birthday 

Celebration 



Although Alf Landon 

couldn't travel to Manhattan 

for Vice President George 

Bush's lecture, the vice 

president made Landon 's 

98th birthday special by 

visiting Landon at his 

Topeka home. 



1 



bi/UMtc 




Landon Lectures 




'holo by Andy Nelson) 



i irri 

J^ he stars, in this case, are the hopes, 

the prayers of men and women everywhere for a 

world of peace, a world in which all can build 

futures of opportunity for themselves and their 

families. I believe that if we 're to reach those 

stars we must meet our difficulties squarely and 

honestly. " 
George Bush Sept. 9, 1985 




Vice President George 
Bush delivered the 70th 
Landon Lecture, focusing on 
the November 1985 summit 
meeting between President 
Reagan and Soviet General 
Secretary Mikhail 
Gorbachev. 

In addition to delivering 
the lecture, Bush joined 
Alfred M. Landon, for whom 
the lecture series is named, 
at his home in Topeka to 
celebrate Landon 's 98th 
birthday. 



(Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 



Landon Lectures 




In delivering the 69th 

London Lecture, U.S. Rep. 

Thomas ' 'Tip ' ' O 'Neill Jr. 

said the United States will 

prevail and flourish despite 

problems, both internal and 

international, facing the 

nation. 

O 'Neill, who was speaker 

of the House of 

Representatives from 1977 to 

1985 and a member of 

Congress for 34 years, said 

current attitudes that the 

problems of today are 

insurmountable are 

unrealistic. 



-£. he social progress of the past 

50 years has improved working 

conditions, provided health protection 

through Medicare and provided secure 

retirements through Social Security. Such 

achievements are rarely recognized 

today. ' ' 
Thomas P. **Tip" O'Neill 

April 22, 1985 



70 



Landon Lectures 




(Phoio by Jeff Tunle) 



J^ he world has been turned into one 

vast electronical theater with professional 

performances continuously underway. There 's 

often no error; no dispute is out of reach from 

American television range. More important, no 

performer is unaware of the extraordinary 

reach of television. " 

Tom Brokaw March 24, 1986 



The role of media in 
our lives was the topic 
of the 71st Landon 
Lecture given by Tom 
Brokaw, anchor of 
"NBC Nightly News. " 
Brokaw talked about 
how television has 
made our world a 
global community, and 
the effect it has on our 
lives. 

Before becoming an- 
chor of "NBC Nightly 
News, ' ' Brokaw was 
anchor of NBC News ' 
' 'Today ' ' program for 
more than five years. 
He joined the program 
in 1976. Prior to that, 
he served as NBC 
White House cor- 
respondent for three 
years. 



Landon Lectures 



71 



Ariel Dorfman 

Nov. 18, 1985 

Artistic and media censorship, made 
possible by a people's fear, conformity 
and ignorance of the past, is found in 
the United States as well as in nations 
under authoritarian control, said Ariel 
Dorfman, author and exile of Chile. 
Dorfman presented an All-University 
Convocation. 



Robert Burgess 

Oct. 31, 1985 

Acid rain, the phenomenon of the 
modern industrial age, is not as new as 
often thought, said Robert Burgess, 
chairman of the Department of 
Environmental and Forest Biology of 
the State University of New York- 
Syracuse. Burgess, who presented an 
All-University Convocation, also said 
current research was not adequate, 
and federal budget problems were 
hampering efforts to study the 
problem. 



^sAS sr^ 



Benjamin Hoolcs 

Jan. 19, 1986 

The first national holiday honoring 
slain civil rights leader, Martin Luther 
King Jr., was commemorated at 
K-State by an All-University 
Convocation featuring Benjamin 
Hooks. Hooks, national executive 
director of the NAACP, saw King as a 
dynamic man and said his speeches 
were transfigured by power and 
persuasion of delivery. Eighteen years 
ago on Jan. 19, 1968, Martin Luther 
King Jr. delivered an All-University 
Convocation. 



^1 



j^'9 1.'^ 



f^ 



ti- 



i»'M 



H 



ER: 



NVoQPf! 



72 



Lou Douglas 



Henry Cisneros 

Feb. 18, 1986 

Henry Cisneros, mayor of San 
Antonio, Texas, and the first Mexican- 
American to be elected mayor of a 
major U.S. city, addressed an All- 
University Convocation audience on 
tiow cities need to change to survive. 
Cisneros, who is president of the 
National League of Cities, said class 
distinctions may also be an insolvable 
problem if the gap v\/idens between the 
technologically literate and illiterate. 



40^ 



>4J 



\^'^'' 



DNS 



Frances Fox Piven 

March 4, 1986 

Frances Fox Piven, professor of 
political science at the Graduate 
School of the City University of New 
York, presented a Lou Douglas lecture 
addressing the clash between the 
marketplace and the nation's welfare 
system. 



George Reiter 

Feb. 25. 1986 

The 1986 Lou Douglas Lecture 
series was kicked off by George Reiter, 
professor of physics at the University 
of Houston, as he discussed the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, also 
known as Star Wars. In addition, he 
addressed the world war implications, 
technical information and scientific 
research methods of Star Wars. 



Convocations 



73 




"Side by Side by Son- ► 
dhelm," a musical revue 
saluting the popular 
American contemporary com- 
poser Stephen Sondheim, 
was performed by a five- 
member ensemble of the 
Missouri Repertory Theatre, 
Oct. 25, 1985, at McCain 
Auditorium. The ensemble 
performed 28 selections from 
such Sondheim hits as 
"Company," "A Little Night 
Music," "Follies," "A Fun- 
ny Thing Happened on the 
Way to the Forum," "West 
Side Story" and "Gypsy." 



During its first tour of 
North America since 1973, 
the Hungarian State Sym- 
phony Orchestra played to a 
nearly full McCain 
Auditorium Nov. 21, 1985. 
Founded in 1923, the or- 
chestra has toured Europe, 
North America and the 
Soviet Union. 



74 



McCain 





^ Comedian-actor Robert 
Klein spent the evening of 
Nov. 1, 1985, entertaining a 
mixture of campus and com- 
munity people at McCain 
Auditorium, joking with them 
for nearly two hours. He 
created an immediate rap- 
port with the audience early 
in his performance by com- 
menting that the sign of a 
great campus was a bad 
football team. 



M Cleo Laine, world- 
renowned vocalist, with con- 
ductor husband John 
Dankworth and the 
Dankworth Quartet, opened 
the Crystal Anniversary 
Season of McCain Auditorium 
Sept. 26, 1985. They per- 
formed a mixture of ballads, 
jazzed-up ballads and jazz 
numbers. 



75 



'ir*-**-/-*3s;' 



^0 

m V 



m 




▲ In the traditional Christmas 
spirit, the Tulsa Ballet 
Theatre performed "The Nut- 
cracker" on Dec. 12 and 13, 
1985, in McCain Auditorium. 
The Tulsa Ballet included 
members of the Manhattan 
community in the production 
by casting 72 local children 
to perform in the production 
as mice, angels, clowns, 
rabbits and soldiers. 



"Jazzing" up K-State was 
the intent of the Mitchell- 
Ruff Duo, who performed in 
McCain Auditorium Feb. 14, 
1986. The acclaimed jazz 
duo toured college campuses 
because they felt the best 
way for young musicians to 
improve was to listen to the 
jazz greats. The duo con- 
ducted an informal jazz 
workshop while at K-State. ^ 



^' 




76 







% 




'< Offering a repertoire that 
was rich in feats of balanc- 
ing and daring, as well as 
strength, were the Peking 
Acrobats on March 6, 1986. 
The acrobats, direct from the 
People's Republic of China, 
began a 20-week 100-city 
tour of the United States on 
Jan. 3. A tour of this 
magnitude was agreed to in 
a desire to reach out into the 
American community in 
order to promote friendship 
and goodwill between the 
people of the two nations. 



The Los Angeles Piano 
Quartet performed at All 
Faiths Chapel Feb. 22 as 
part of the McCain 
Auditorium chamber music 
series. Their program includ- 
ed Mozart's Piano Quartet in 
G minor, K. 478, Kodaly's 
Duo for Violin and Cello, Op. 
7 and Brahms' Piano Quarter 
in C minor. Op. 60. 





78 



A(^^(iM(^s md Or^miz^tioH/Q 



i Beta Phi Sheila Hayter and Kappa Delta 
enise Shannon sign the T-Shirt of Baron dur- 
ig the T-Shirt signing competition of Sigma 
hi Derby Days at the Sigma Chi fraternity 
ouse. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 

President Duane Acker resigned his post effective June 
1)0, 1986. The Acl(er years will be remembered as a time 
)f growth and development for the university. {Photo by 
\nily Nelson) 




D 



uring K-State's 
history, the late '70s 
and early '80s will be 
known as the "Acker 
years." For 11 years, 
from 1975 to 1986, 
Duane Acker served as 
K-State's president. 
The years were a time 
of growth, change and 
even disappointment. 

(continued on page 80) 



79 








Duane Ackil 




he Acker 
Years 

Acker's resignation announcement on June 30, 
1985 y made the 1985-86 academic year his last at 
K-State. In an interview with the Royal Purple, Acker 
reflected on his years at K-State and the state of the 
University as he prepared for his summer 1986 depar- 
ture. 



What effect did James McCain's legacy have 
on you as you assumed the presidency? He was 
here for 25 years. Did that play a role In the 
position you would assume? 

Yes it did. I was well acquainted with him. I 
think that because of the fact that he had a long 
tenure, there had been many good traditions 
established. 

It's been my observation over the years, that 
people with exceedingly long tenures are usual- 
ly followed by people who have an exceedingly 
short tenure. In the face of that rule, a short 
tenure of office might have been expected for 
me. 

What were some of the priorities you wanted 
to establish? 

There seemed to me a need to recognize that 
the University was facing an inevitable enroll- 
ment decline in the '80s. That was as clear as 
the KS sign on K-hill. The demographic 
population trends were evident. That meant 
there was a significant challenge to prepare the 
University for enrollment decline both in terms 
of accommodating it and trying to forestall or 
temper it. 

Also, the University needed to be able to live 
and feel good about itself in a time of decline. 

Nichols Hall will long be remembered as one of the gray 
areas that was resolved under Acker's administration. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



That takes a special depth of character in the 
University and a special depth of character 
within the community of Manhattan that sup- 
ports it. 

There were certainly other challenges in- 
cluding a number of very seriously needed 
capital improvements. K-State, among the 
Regents universities, had slipped behind during 
the depression years when there was a 
retiscence to accept federal W.P.A. funds for 
construction. We simply had not caught up, 
there was a special challenge to get additonal 
capital improvements. 

There was a third very clear challenge — to 
increase the ACT or academic ability level of 
our entering students. 

There was a fourth challenge and that was to 
increase the research volume especially in 
disciplines other than agriculture, because 
agriculture already had it at that time. 

An additional challenge was to increase 
private giving to the University. 

Do you thinl( you have attained those goals? 

Yes. We've been exceedingly fortunate. I 
suppose the one that has been most bothersome 
is the first one I mentioned, the ability to have 
the inevitable enrollment decline and not have a 
negative effect on the attitude of the University. 

This is most nebulous. It's the most non- 
quantitative thing, and it's difficult to assess. 
(continued on page 82) 



Duane Acker 



81 




But it's not the thing a person could say 
we've totally achieved. Not by any means. 

In terms of capital improvements, no 
question. Just look at the list of buildings 
that have been built. 

In terms of private giving, no question. 
It's far beyond what I could have expected. 

In terms of increasing the research activi- 
ty, far beyond what we expected. We more 
than doubled in the first five years. 

In terms of high-ability students, we've 
gone from about nine National Merit Semi- 
Finalists to 52 enrolled this fall. The ACT 
scores have gone up as well. 

Twenty years from now, how do you think 
people will remember "The Acker Years?" 

I suppose each person will rejnember dif- 
ferent things. 

An athletic enthusiast might remember the 
first bowl game. One who's been involved in 
the construction or a certain project might 
recall that having been achieved. 

Some might recall that we reached the 
peak of K-State's enrollment during that 
span. Enrollment was 19,982 in the fall of 
1981; we missed 20,000 students by 18. 

I would expect some might recall that we 
had the real breakthrough in private 
fundraising. 

If you could rethink or change a decision 
you made during your administration, what 
would that be? 

This is difficult to respond to because you 
always make a decision in a particular set- 
ting, time, place and circumstances. If you 
could go back and change those, then you 
might say, 'Yes, I'd go back and change the 
decision.' But to point to a specific one and 
say, 'No I'd do it differently given the cir- 
cumstances that existed,' I'd be very hard 
pressed to identify any. 

In terms of exphasis, I would have 
devoted more time, effort, publicity and 
briefing to the faculty, the alumni and the 
Manhattan community regarding the in- 
evitabilty of the enrollment trend and the 
demographic data. We did a lot of it, but we 
were asked by people to do less because they 
were fearful it would become a self-fulfilling 
prophesy in terms of economic activity in 
the region. But I suppose, were I to do it 
again, I would have helped prepare the 
University and its clientele and family for 
what we knew was coming. 

What changes have you seen in the student 
body during your time at K-State? 

There has been considerable change in the 
student body. In 1975, we had the remnants 
of the activists years of the late '60s and ear- 
ly '70s. It seemed to manifest itself in self- 
centeredness, putting "me" number one. 



This showed up in the tendency of the 
students to not become involved in student 
activities. 

As we moved into the '80s, we witnessed 
the recoil or the reaction to the late '60s and 
early '70s. We had a lot more conservatism. 
We had students who, because of the tight 
job market in some disciplines, were much 
more concerned about making impressions 
on employers. They were more concerned 
about having jobs and having something they 
could work toward. 

Another interesting feature exists. We 
have a student body which many would 
describe as more conservative than the facul- 
ty, because many of the faculty are the pro- 
duct of the '60s and '70s. 

What are the immediate challenges facing 
K-State and perhaps some challenges the 
University will be facing? 

The most significant challenge facing 
Kansas State, and in fact all of Kansas, is the 
dollars available to support the number of in- 
stitutions and the number of different cur- 
ricula we have. We have six state univer- 
sities, and there is a proposal that a seventh, 
Washburn University, be added to the state 
system. We also have additional proposi- 
tions for additional curricula. 

There is a limited revenue base in the state 
of Kansas, and if we are to maintain and 
enhance the quality of Kansas State Univer- 
sity, we must be very, very selective. Thus, 



the biggest challenge facing our Univers},! 
the Regent's system and the Board !if' 
Regents, is making selective decisions n 
what shall be continued and what ji-| 
vestments shall be made. ! ' 




What lessons could K-State learn from 
Nichols Hall and Bramlage Coliseum si 
tions? 

Both were complex. In the case of Nicl 
Hall, a decision at the time of the fire at 
what the future should be would h 
helped. Instead uncertainty develop 
festered and frustrated people for 10 y<| 
before it was really addressed. | 

A second lesson to be learned is i 
sometimes you need to take visible aci| 
that evokes a reaction in order to bi- 
things to a head and make it happen. We- 
that a decision had to be made. We madi 
knowing it was going to evoke a reacij 
whichever way we made the decision. 

But that reaction caused the resolutior 
the student march on Topeka, 
Legislature saying, 'We've got to 
something. ' It still took three years to geil 
the pieces together. I am thrilled i 
delighted to have achieved Nichl 
reconstruction. 

In the case of the coliseum, the lessor 
be learned there is that when you have tt 
or more major broad-based compone 
(the students, donors and the Legislatu 
and when you have to get all three of th 
together with money to achieve somethi 
the risks of the coalition of support not 
sisting is high. That happened in the cas( 
the coliseum. j 

We had student support and enthusial 
We had the support of the legislative lead 
ship and the regents to proceed. We hadi 
support of the donors and a»good feasibi; 
study. Then in June of 1983, the decis^ 
was made by the Board of Regents that | 
should not seek state money of any kil 
That lost us the legislative component. 

The second lesson is, the longer a pro 
with a broad-based coalition goes, the m 
risk there is of not of not being able to k 
it together. 

Now the student mood has changed. ' 
environment has changed. We've had th 
losing basketball seasons, whereas in the 
'70s we were going to post-season tc 
naments about every year in men's basi 
ball. That's the narrower window that 
particular group of students is look 
through. 



IT- 

)f 

1. 

r- 
le 
y; 
■n] 

'6' 



In an interview with tlie Royal Purple, President Dt le 
Acker reflects on his term and talks about the challeijis 
facing K-State. Acker's 11 year stint as president n s 
his term as the fourth longest in K-State history. (Ph is 
by Andy Nelson) 



82 



Duane Ackei 



How do you feel about the state of the 
university and the circumstances your suc- 
cessor will face? 

I think the successor will certainly face 
challenges. That would be true of any land 
grant university or any other state university 
at this time. 

We're faced with the Gramm-Rudman 
legislation or some constraint in federal ap- 
propriations which will significantly affect 
our federally-funded research. It will affect 
our extension service and our experiment 
station which receives a high proportion of 
federal funds. It will affect our student loan 
programs. This is a difficult and challenging 
time. 

I think there is another challenge that is in- 
creasingly evident. Enough universities have 
broadened their curricular structure so that 
more universities are competing for the 
specialized student. For example, during the 
enrollment growth of the '50s and '60s, 
former teachers' colleges started colleges of 
business, colleges of science and colleges of 
this and that. So now they are competing for 
the same student that had been the traditional 
K-State, land grant university student. 

What is one question, over the years, that 
mo one has ever asked you that you really 
wanted to talk about? 

; I suppose the topic I'd like to talk about 
inore is the caliber and quality of faculty and 
what they get done in all the categories: 
caching, research, extension and intema- 
;ional programs. 

I The faculty is the heart and soul of the 
iniversity, and every taxpayer should have 
ihis as a vital interest. Every parent should 
iiave it as a vital interest. Every user of 
•esearch information should have this as a 
|/ital interest. 

I But the questions usually revolve around 
iithletics and construction projects, while the 
faculty is really the heart of what we do at 
he University. 

— Ronda Corle and Paul Englis 




Jon Wefald was selected on March 22 
by the Board of Regents to be the 12th 
president of Kansas State University. 
Wefald was to succeed Duane Acker, who 
was to step down from office on June 30. 

The new president was chosen from a 
pool of nearly 150 applicants reviewed by 
a search committee established by the 
regents. The 15-member committee was 
comprised of three students, six alumni, 
three faculty and three University ad- 
ministrators. 



Search committee names 12th president 



The committee was charged with 
soliciting applications, screening and in- 
terviewing applicants and selecting 
semifinalists to be submitted to the 
regents. 

Preliminary activities of the committee 
included holding an open forum to get 
feedback from students, faculty and staff 
on the qualities they wanted in the new 
president. 

After reviewing applications and 
resumes, members of the committee in- 



terviewed candidates in Kansas City, 
Wichita, New Orleans and Orlando, Fla. 
The committee submitted three choices to 
the regents for final review. 

Although the committee attempted to 
maintain candidate confidentiality, the 
Wichita Eagle-Beacon published a list of 
nine candidates in early February. 

One candidate withdrew his name from 
the selection process, and others express- 
ed disappointment that the promise of 
confidentiality had not been maintained. 



Presidential Search 



83 




Dream Come 



When it counts, K-State students are 
there. 

While not the most trendy, innovative and 
outspoken students in the United States, at 
times when it matters, K-State students have 
come through. 

The strong and majestic walls of Nichols 
Hall are a tribute to that spirit, for without 
the effort of K-State students, those walls 
would be no more than a pile of stones. 

Nichols' claim to fame comes from a long 
history of controversy and student protest. 
Nichols' early history is typical for a 
building. 

In June 1909, the Kansas Board of 
Regents proposed the building of a new 
gymnasium-armory to be named after E.R. 
Nichols, university president from 



1899-1909. But Nichols Gymnasium's fate 
took a near-fatal twist when it was gutted by 
fire on a cold December evening in 1968. 

During the years following the fire, the 
75 -year-old building was the focal point of 
protest marches. Collegian editorials. Castle 
Crusade — a campus group dedicated to the 
preservation of Nichols — and committees 
set up to study the feasibility of renovation. 

Nichols was discovered burning at 11:15 
p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, 1968. A reportedly 
heated meeting between students and ad- 
ministrators had taken place the day before. 
The confrontation, concerning student 
rights, was cited as the impetus for the ar- 
son; however, no one was ever charged. 

The fire left the student-operated radio 
station, KSDB-FM, Extension Radio and 



Television — which operated KSAC, tl 
University's AM radio station — women 
physical education and the Department 
Music without a home. 

Following the fire, the four lampposts 
front of Nichols, given to the University 1 
the Class of 1913, were moved to tl 
pedestrian court north of Anderson Hall. 

Nichols' two swimming pools, the on 
things within the charred walls consider 
salvageable, were renovated in the summ 
of 1969. Swimming lessons were taught 
them until the completion of the Natatoriu 
in 1972, at which time Nichols was board( 
up. 

The issue of what to do with the reinforc» 
concrete walls covered by 2-foot-thi( 
pieces of limestone never died. Architectu 




1968 



The 57-year-old Nichols Hall went up in 
flames Dec. 13, 1968, and illuminated 
the sky for firefighters and onlookers. 
The cause of the fire was never 
determined. 



1975 



Nichols Gymnasium stood vacant since 
1972, when the two swimming pools, 
added to the building in 1915, were 
closed after the opening of the 
Natatorium. 



1985 



84 



Nichols Hall 



True 



tudents performed studies on renovation, 
jid a "Save thp Castle" petition was in- 
roduced to students in the early '70s. 

Concern about Nichols' future moved in 
vaves, but gained momentum in February 
976, when Castle Crusade was recognized 
s a campus organizaton by the University 
Activities Board. The organization worked 
D keep the issue of Nichols' preservation 
nd renovation in the news. 

Dan Gibson, 1976 graduate in architecture 
nd coordinator of Castle Crusade, said 
/hen the small group was founded, mostly 
rchitecture students were in it. 

"A lot of people considered (Nichols) an 
rchitectural symbol of an era. The detail, 
le style, the location — there was a good 

(continued on page 86) 







J./ IBB 11 
I 1 HI t 




Nearly 17 years after the interior of 
NIcliois Gymnasium was destoyed, the 
renovated structure was officiaily 
rededicated on Nov. 16, 1985. 




The dedication of Nichois Haii brought both together 
those who worked to save the building and those who 



knew the building in its early life. {Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



Nichols Hall 



85 




Dream 



I 



reason for keeping it. We really put our 
hearts into this," Gibson said. 

"The group tried to publicize the Nichols 
Gym situation," he said. "We didn't try to 
push for any use for the building. We just 
worked on raising awareness for it and rais- 
ing funds for it. We just tried to keep the 
issue alive." 

Interest in Nichols swelled again in April 
1979 when President Duane Acker announc- 
ed he would seek funds from the Kansas 
Legislature to raze the structure so the site 
could be used for other campus buildings. 

The announcement set off a protest which 
took place south of Anderson Hall. About 
800 student and faculty protestors filled 
Mid-Campus Drive and a portion of the 
Fairchild Hall lawn. 

Greg Musil, protest participant and stu- 
dent body president in 1979, said there were 
many reasons for preserving the ivy-covered 
walls. 

"It's a massive and impressive piece of 
history," Musil said. "Also, the best 



estimates we could get on short notice said 
that you could build within the walls for 
about the same price as it would take to con- 
struct an entirely new building. 

"K-State has a long history, but people 
won't remember that history unless it is 
preserved," he said. 

Funding for the Nichols renovation was 
granted by the Legislature in 1981 and con- 
struction began in the fall of 1983. Although 
the multi-year appropriation allotted nearly 
$6.2 million for the project, the final cost of 
the renovation was $5.58 million, said Vin- 
cent Cool, associate director of planning for 
University Facilities. 

The completion of Nichols' renovation 
and the beginning of the building's new life 
was officially recognized at a rededication 
ceremony November 16th. Participating in 
the ceremony were University ad- 
ministrators, representatives of the Board of 
Regents and others who were involved in the 
Nichols project. 

"This building is a symbol of excellence. 



It is a symbol of the excellence of K-State, 
Lawrence Jones, chairman of the Board c 
Regents, said at the ceremony. 

The restored building houses the Depar 
ment of Speech, the Department of Con 
puter Science and a collection of books an 
monographs from Farrell Library. 

The renovated Nichols includes a three 
story, oak-rich atrium making use of natun 
light provided by a sunroof. High-backe 
oak benches nestled into the east side of th 
atrium afford a retreat from the bright afteii 
noon sun. 

The building also houses Nichols Theatn 
The theater's stage, lighting and audi, 
equipment is used primarily for rehearsal 
and productions, but is also utilized fc 
classes in stage production, said Le 
Shelton, associate professor of speech. 

The basement of Nichols is being used b 
Farrell to house between four and five mik 
of adjustable shelving for storage of serial: 
monographs and documents. Cool said. 

— Jill Humme, 




86 



Nichols Hall 




The basement of Nichols Hall 
houses between four and five miles 
of adjustable-shelf storage space for 
serials, monographs and documents 
from Farrell Library. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 

nigh-backed oak benches offer 
students a place to relax away from 
the mainstream traffic of the Nichols 
Hall atrium. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 





The atrium of Nichols Hall is home to the K-State 
Players box office. Nichols houses the speech and 
theatre department as well as the computer science 
department. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Fire protection for computer equipment is provided by 
a halon gas system which releases the gas into a room 
and smothers the fire without damaging equipment. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Nichols Hall 



87 



Brighter Horizons 



Sutton faces the declining enrollment challenge 



The 1980s have not been kind to K-State 
enrollment numbers. Although enrollment 
increased between 1980-81, enrollment 
figures have taken a nose dive since then. 

But even with declining enrollment, 
recruiting new students is not a top priority. 
The University has turned its attention to re- 
taining students already on campus. 

"Retention is a major problem. We seem 
to be doing fairly well in recruitment if you 
look at the number of students enrolling," 
said William Sutton, vice president for 
educational and student services. 

The number of new students enrolling in 
the fall of 1985 was less than 100 different 
than the number of new students enrolling in 
fall of 1984, Sutton said. 

At the end of the 1985 spring semester, 
there were slightly more than 2,700 students 
who did not graduate and did not return to 
school in the fall, Sutton said. If one-fifth of 
those 2,700 students had returned, "we 
would have had no decline in enrollment," 
he said. 

The major problem in recent years is not 
in the number of students recruited, but that 
"we have not retained them well enough," 
Sutton said. 

One of the efforts to improve student 
retention has been investigating and improv- 
ing the academic advisement system. 

President Duane Acker appointed a com- 
mittee in the fall of 1985 to study the advise- 
ment of students without a declared major, 
Sutton said. The committee recommended a 
pre-professional program in which students 
without a declared major can decide what 
college and major they want, he said. 



Some of the recommended advising 
changes will require more money for them 
to be implemented. 

"It's not free; it costs something. But if 
you're committed to doing a better job (of 
retaining students), you may have to either 
put up some more funds, or you may have to 



shift some funds," Sutton said. 

The colleges are required to conduct ; 
exit interview with every student wl 
withdraws from the University to determii: 
why the student is leaving and if all tlj 
possibilities of keeping the student in scho 
have been explored, Sutton said. 



88 




Less than half of those who leave during 
the academic school year do so for academic 
reasons, he said. 

If a student goes through pre-enroUment 
procedures in the spring, but doesn't show 
up in the fall for registration, the only way 
the school can find out why is to contact the 
student by mail or telephone, he said. 

"We are making telephone calls to find 
out why they did not return," Sutton said. 
"We did a sample this past fall, calling 
about 25 percent (of the students). We hope 
to be able to increase the percentage of spot- 
checking. You get a pretty good feel of what 
the reasons are if you call at least 35 (per- 
cent) to 40 percent of them," he said. 

"Economic reasons lead the pack," Sut- 
ton said. "Personal reasons was second, and 
illness and health reasons came in third," he 
said. 

Personal reasons can include a lot of 
things, he said, including, "I just don't want 
to tell you." 

Sutton said if financial reasons are the 
cause for the student leaving school, the 
University works to make sure all possible 
avenues of financial aid have been explored. 

"We want to be sure that a student has 
thought about, or is made to think about, all 
the possible avenues (of solving the pro- 
blem). There are some students who just 
don't feel comfortable (asking for help). 
They (are) middle class, and they don't want 
to ask for help," he said. 

(continued on page 90) 

Vice President for Educational and Student Services 
William Sutton oversees the enrollment and retention 
policy of the University. (Photo by Jolin LeBarge) 



Recruitment 




ADVERTISING 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Greg Tholstrup, Mike McQueen, 
Joseph Tinker, Troy Woerpei. SECOND ROW: Scot 
Sandlin, Elton Mayfield, Joan Seitzer, Dan Smitfi, 
Glenn Zimmerman THIRD ROW: Bruce Dolsberry, 
Janell Berroth, Pam Besler, Nancy Case, Brenda 
Badostain. BACK ROW: Diana Greenlee, Judy 
Goldberg, Pam Voth, Annette Fankhauser, Dawn 
Szepi. 



AG AMBASSADORS 



FRONT ROW: Tim Ulrich, Bradley Swearingen, Phil 
Kirk, Roger McClellan, Greg Reno, Julie Koci. SE- 
COND ROW: Scott Shuey, Dale Pauly, Royce 
Schmidt, Gregg Doud, Christopher Gooding, Perry 
Palmer. THIRD ROW: Arthur Thomas, Kenneth 
Johnson, Cammy Theurer, Marie Boyer, Nancy 
Saathoff, David Holliday BACK ROW: Craig Adams, 
Susan Howard, Peggy Shandy, Rachel Vining, Van 
Dewey, Larry Butel, Elizabeth Wulf. 



AG AMBASSADORS 



FRONT ROW: Jerry Lehmann, Bryan Howell, Wally 
Brockhofl, Stan Dubbert, Garth Gardiner, Larry 
Erpelding SECOND ROW: Howard Woodbury, Scott 
Eilert, Daryl Yarrow. Debra Carlson, Brent Wolke. 
Daniel Morris THIRD ROW: Mary Sobba, Kim 
Buethe, Bryan Unruh, Timothy Buss, Daniel Bidder, 
Kevin Grow. BACK ROW: Teresa Hagedorn, Lana 
Hammer, Kelline Anderson, Julie Swanson, Vicki 
Fernkopf, Lori Tessendort, Shelley Arnold. 



AG COMMUNICATORS 
OF TOMORROW 



FRONT ROW: Julie Andsager, Rustin Hamilton, 
Todd Schultz, Kevin Chestnut. SECOND ROW: 
James Compton, Gisele McMlnimy, Alice Kunshek, 
Ranae Young, Janette Poole. BACK ROW: Becky 
Ohide, Rachel Vining, Dixie Gianville, Susan 
Howard, Barbara Fulk. 



AGC STUDENT 
CHAPTER 



FRONT ROW: Todd Korte, Greg Kone, Duane 
Frerker, Kevin Haetner. Kevin Plush, Merrill 
Blackman. SECOND ROW: Woody Barnes, Robert 
Green, Stuart Schmoker, Greg Key, Richard Kratzer, 
David Richard, Kevin Patterson. THIRD ROW: John 
Kennedy, Floyd Kaster, Michael Drury, Scott Jumdt, 
Mark Lorenz, Chris Hess, Scott Korte. FOURTH 
ROW: Keith McComb, Jeff Peuker, Doug Berwick, 
Bryant Combes, Doug Henning, Bradley Shaw, Joe 
Buchheit, J. R. Burton. BACK ROW: Stan Carlat, 
Jeffrey Combes, Eirene Tatham, Douglas Combes, 
Terry Horak, Paul Mattingly, Joel Pasley, Scott 
Lodico, Gregg Lynch, 



Horizons 



Recruiting efforts are being continued 
through media in the state. 

Sutton said the University will increase its 
campaign to "tell what we are about at Kan- 
sas State and what kinds of things we have to 
offer," through advertising in 47 Kansas 
newspapers, public service radio an- 
nouncements and a statewide telecast about 
K-State during the spring or summer of 
1986. 

Colorado is new recruiting ground for 
K-State as the University of Colorado and 
Colorado State University put caps on 
enrollment in their colleges of engineering, 
architecture and design, business ad- 
ministration, and the science portion of arts 



and sciences. 

In an attempt to attract students who could 
not enroll at those universities because of the 
limits, K-State launched a recruiting effort in 
the Denver area with the help of the admis- 
sions office and the K-State Alumni Associa- 
tion, Sutton said. 

"We think we had a good (recruiting) trip. 
We don't know the results because we just 
went in November. We are looking for 
beginning students (from Colorado) for this 
fall," he said. 

A coordinated recruiting effort — such as 
the Denver area project — can be beneficial 
to the University. 



Marilyn Trotter, director of New Student 
Programs, said the University is pooling its \ 
recruiting efforts to its advantage. 1 

"The University is pulling together, even 
better than it has in the past," she said, talk- 1 
ing about the efforts put forth by the colleges j 
and departments for recruitment and reten-| 
tion. ' 

"Dr. Sutton has formed a committee to 
deal with recruitment, retention and advising i 
that includes representatives from the entire 
University," Trotter said. 

As a result of the committee. Trotter said 
she believes people have a better understan- 



K-State enrollment figures have taken a roller 
coaster ride and the early '80s have been the 
downhill side of the ride. The University enjoyed 
steadily rising enrollments through the '60s and 
'70s. By 1970, the total head count at K-State was 
13,847. 

By 1980, K-State's enrollment was just below 
20,000. But the rise in enrollment peaked in 1981 
as the University came within 18 students of hav- 



ing 20,000 enrolled on campus. 

Since 1981, University enrollment has dropped 
at least 400 students each year, with the biggest 
drop being 1,027 students between 1982 and 
1983. 

By the fall of 1985, the campus head count had 
dropped to pre-1975 levels at 17,570. (Graph by 
Paul Englis) 




19,982 



19,497 



90 



Enrollment 



ding of what others in the University are do- 
ing to address the declining enrollment pro- 
blem. 

Trotter receives help from the colleges for 
activities sponsored by New Student Pro- 
grams. She said their response to helping 
with recruitment and retention activities has 
3een positive. 

Students have also shown an interest in 
ivanting to help solve the enrollment pro- 
blem. 

"The best recruiters we have are satisfied 
students. I think the more we can do to get 
hem involved in a structured way, so that 
he right hand knows what the left hand is 
Icing, the better off the University is going 
be," Trotter said. 

"I think the whole University is looking 
or a change in one of the things that Dr. 
Jutton was brought in to do, and that is to 
urn around the declining enrollments, if 
)ossible," she said. 

Unifying the University's recruitment ef- 
brts was a top priority for Sutton. 

"That takes a lot of time to coordinate," 
frotter said. "For example, if someone 
loesn't know that a representative from 
C-State has been in Topeka and they go the 
lext day, that doesn't look good." 

When Sutton came to K-State in the fall of 
985, he asked the colleges what they were 
oing to reverse the declining enrollment. 

He found each college had approached the 
roblem differently, and there was no coor- 
inated effort. 

"No one had seen a single listing of all the 
fforts being put forth," Trotter said. 

"People at K-State, for the most part, 
ave been enthusiastic about supporting 
itention and recruitment programs. They 
ike time. They write letters. They do 
lings," she said. 

Sutton set goals for University enrollment 
)r the 1986 and 1987 fall semesters. 

"The goal for 1986 is to keep enrollments 
t the fall 1985 level, without any decline," 
e said. "For 1987, I expect a 2.5 percent 
icrease and a slight increase again in 
988." 

— Bob Olson 



Enrollment 




AG ECON CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Kelline Anderson, Caroline Strnad, 
Cindy Ellis, Janell Haggard, Lisa Thomas, Lana 
Hammer, Michelle Benoit, Ann Schotte, Nancy 
Saathoff SECOND ROW: Brian Taphorn, Scott 
Weber. Edward Mohney, David Oswalt, Craig Shep- 
pard. James Sterns, Dwight Nelson. THIRD ROW: 
Rick Pyle, Jerald Meyer, Dan Lierz, Scott Gordon, 
Philip Kirk, George Held, Roger McClellan, Linii 
Boyd FOURTH ROW: Christopher Sluder, Debra 
Carlson, Russell Neis, Sydney Winter, Michael 
Baker, Tom Stark, Kevin Istas, David Harris, Joseph 
Koudele. BACK ROW: Theron Krizek, Curtis Glaser, 
Jeffery Bechard, Ted Grinter, Timothy Buss, Tim 
Rottinghaus, Raymond Muetin, Monte Thom 



AG ECON CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Robert Burton, Jon Heiman, Charles 
Hutchison, Ron Fleming, Tom Giefer, Erick Kadel, 
Bryan Schurle SECOND ROW: Jeff Bruna, Deron 
Lock, Thomas Oakley, Michael Berrey, Kent 
Frerichs, Randall Turner, Thomas Hauschel THIRD 
ROW: Scott Barlow, Gary Duerksen, Phil Burckhart, 
Rick Bryan, Galen Gengler, Bradley Bartel, Derek 
James, Maurice Baalman FOURTH ROW: Terry 
Pankratz, Mike Wetter, Rick Wiedmann, Lanny 
Bosse. Blake Jorgensen, Dan Ronnebaum, Roger 
Powers, Randy Richmeier, Gregg Conklin BACK 
ROW: Gary Olson, Douglas Haverkamp, Nancy 
Blankenship, Dave Rudicel, Steve Packebush, Alan 
Foster, Steve Tharman. Mike Sherbert, Lisa Hrabe 
William Graff. 




FRONT ROW: Richard Welton, Lance Lewis, Greg 
Reno, Terry Powelson, Mark Religa, Kevin Brad- 
shaw, Elmer Schmitz, Harry Field, John Parmley. 
SECOND ROW: Charles Pettijohn, Eddie Dewey, 
Michael Copple, Gerald Dreher, Ronald Brown, 
Steven Weatherman, David Key, Julie Dahl. THIRD 
ROW: Mark Hewitt, Bruce Millershaski, Glenn 
Newdigger, David Dreyer, Ken Moldenhauer, Steven 
Ruggles, James Hall, Donald Blome, Curtis Willems. 
BACK ROW: Kevin King, Kathy Holmes, James 
Kitch, Van Dewey, Roger White, Larry Smart, Ran- 
dall Snider, Tom Chestnut. 




FRONT ROW: Duane BIythe, Scott Claassen, Benton 
Gibbs, James Steichen. SECOND ROW: Loren Bern- 
dt, William Conley, Tim Rosenhagen, Mark Herz, 
David Persigehl THIRD ROW: Kurt Maurath, Kurt 
Kerschen, Doug Eubank, Royce Schmidt, Thomas 
Nichols. BACK ROW: Tony Wasinger, Andy Klamm, 
Neal McCormick, Marcy Stroik, Larry Butel. 



AG STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Maelyn Willers, Kelline Anderson, 
Dixie Glanville, Julie Swanson, Susan Howard. 
SECOND ROW: Keith Lynch, Todd Schultz, 
Humberto Trueba, Kevin Cool, Stacey Campbell, 
George Held, Julie Koci, Larry Erpelding. THIRD 
ROW: Doug Eubank, Mike Torrey, Howard 
Woodbury, Craig Guffey, Bryan Chadwell, Craig 
Wiens, Carey Avery. FOURTH ROW: Ken 
Moldenhauer, Debra Holthaus, Martin Crampton, 
Alice Clements, Royalee Rhoads, Royce Schmidt, 
Randall James. BACK ROW: Beth Hinshaw, Curt 
Claser. Jeff Bechard, Mary Sobba, Amy Reinhardt, 

inn Qrhnfto I^oIIm U/olnh DarhnI V/inInn 




A rose by any other name is still a rose, 
unless you are talking to Barbara Stowe 
about the College of Human Ecology. 

K-State's College of Home Economics 
had outgrown its name. But with the support 
of the Academic Affairs Committee of the 
Board of Regents, Stowe saw the name of 
the college changed to the College of Human 
Ecology . 

Stowe, dean of the college, said the col- 
lege found the "misunderstanding and 
limited perception of the meaning of home 
economics too often prevented graduates 
from being granted interviews for positions 
for which they were qualified." 

There was also a problem with granting 
agencies overlooking the college. The agen- 
cies refused to review research proposals 
submitted by home economics faculty. 

"They (the agencies) were prejudiced 
about the capabilities of professionals work- 
ing in a college of that name," Stowe said. 

Another issue the college had to consider 
was potential students not thinking of the 
college as a place to study preparatory cur- 
ricula such as pre-medicine or pre-law. 

"Human Ecology has been judged by ap- 
proximately 20 universities to be the alter- 
native descriptor of the field," Stowe said. 

Stowe said institutions that have changed 
their name to human ecology have found 
greatly increased communication with 
graduates' potential employers. 

"These colleges have increased research 

The College of Home Economics assumed the new 
name of the College of Human Ecology from the support 
of faculty, students and alumni. (Photo by John LeBarge) 



funding and increased enrollments, especial- 
ly of men. As institutions, they are viewed 
as a source of professionals," Stowe said. 

Stowe was surprised at the response she 
received when she suggested the name 
change. 

"In spring 1985, 1 addressed the faculty of 



the college on the issue of the name change 
At that meeting — somewhat to my surpris 
— a motion was made to proceed with th 
name change to Human Ecology," Stow 
said. I 

The motion was passed by a neaj 
unanimous vote. j 



.^i 



KssBraassa 



pssasBSBa 



p^p— ^ 



JUSTIN HALL 

COLLEGE 



OF 



HUMAN ECOLOGY 



92 



'..'-■■' ■ ■ . ^ 




... ■•#1 


a. <'- , , .^^■.. ^m^^smm^ 






Human Ecology > 

1 



Stowe said the proposal was then sent to 
he Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Com- 
nittee, which apporoved the proposal and 
jresented it to the full senate for review. The 
senate approved the change and sent it to the 
3oard of Regents. 

— Stephanie Haughton 




Human Ecology 




ALPHA EPSILON 



Agricultural Engineering 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Keenan Beauchamp, Marc Bokelman, 
Norman Entz. SECOND ROW: Walter Appel, Michael 
Strahm, Craig Good, Daniel Clarkson. BACK ROW: 
Bryan Price, Byron Finley, Larry Wagner, Gary 
Sweany, Allan Burk. 



ALPHA EPSILON 
DELTA 



Pre-Med Honorary 

FRONT HOW: Ron Hansen, Rex Crumpacker, Bob 
Patron, David Wilttong. BACK ROW: Ryan Thomas, 
Sheila Farrell, Kelly Yoxall, Laura Memming, Steve 
Graham. 



ALPHA GAMMA 
EPSILON 



Gerontology Club 

FRONT ROW: George Peters, Bill Holthaus, Shavun 
Bloom, Marilyn Legg. SECOND ROW: Constance 
Mermis, Debbie Paap, Vicki Lichtenauer. BACK 
ROW: Janette Hedrick, Shelly Peterson, Jamie Vin- 
cent, Kristi Duell. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



Professional 
Fraternity 



Business 



FRONT ROW: Jon Freund, John Hill, David Bond, 
Robert Siegfried, Jerry Stein, Chris Heidebrecht, 
David Wllderson, Kelly Dubbert. SECOND ROW: 
Patrick Cubbage, Randall Dooling, Kathy Jones, 
Donovan Neuteldt, Michael Yustick, Dean Wain- 
Wright, Steve Brown. THIRD ROW: Claudette Evans, 
Sarah Olsen, Connie Lundry, Scott Brack, Amy 
Ward, O^wn Seymour, Serena Staley. BACK ROW: 
Lori Rock, Karen Weiser, Barbara Rowe, Christie 
Bechtel, Susan Catlett, Julie Claric, Lisa O'Connell, 
Shirtey Bunk. 



ALPHA LAMBDA 
DELTA 



Freshman Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Amy Carter, Cathy Provost, Kim 
Galvin, Becky Kneil. BACK ROW: Michele Bollier, 
Kristine Claassen, Debbie Rohrer, Lori Aberie, Jill 
Eastman. 



93 




Thousands of students have passed 
through the doors of Justin Hall, home of the 
College of Human Ecology, since its dedica- 
tion in 1960. But just as the college was 
undergoing changes, so was its home. After 
completion of the first phase of renovation, 
Justin was rededicated Sept. 28, 1985. 



After nearly two years of planning, the 
first phase of renovation began in the spring 
of 1985 and was completed the following 
September. The second phase was projected 
to begin in July 1986. 

Jim Deegan, administrative officer of the 
College of Human Ecology, provided 



several reasons for the renovations. 

Justin was in need of private office spa 
for instructors, a costume and textiles 1; 
and storage area. 

The renovation also provided a co 
solidated and centralized educational med 
copy center and a computer resource roor 




94 



Justin Hall Renovati 



Phase I involved the majority of renova- 
tions. This included creating a media center, 
a resource room and an area to house the 
historic costume and textile collection. 

The renovations also provided additional 
office space, a new telephone system, new 
carpeting and it allowed for the improve- 
ment of the largest lecture hall in Justin. 

The cost for phase I of Justin's renovation 
was approximately $25,000. This amount 
did not include repairs to the roof and the ex- 
tension of the parking lot. The repairs were 
completed by University Facilities under a 
special contract. 

Phase II was to include the renovation of 
the elevator system, creation of additional 
storage space and several other minor 
restorations. 

Lack of available funds prohibited both 
phases from being completed at the same 
time. 

The media and copy center contained a 
variety of educational media materials, in 
addition to equipment to accommodate all 
the copy needs within the college. 

Improvements on the third floor created a 
computer lab, private offices and the Home 
Economics Extension complex. One of the 
largest additions on third floor was the tex- 
tiles laboratory and storage room. 

The lab and storage provided an area to 
study and store the growing historic 
costume, textiles and doll collections. The 
storage room was specially temperature and 
light controlled to house the delicate collec- 
tions. 

Despite all the changes and additions, only 
the equivalent of one classroom was lost. 

— Jola Murphy 

Tom Patterson works in one of the new rooms 
renovated in Justin Hall. The first phase of renovation 
was completed in September of 1985 for approximately 
$25,000. (Photo by John LeBarge) 



Justin Hall Renovation 




ALPHA NU SIGMA 



Nuclear Engineering 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Hermann Donnert, Darin George. Jeff 
Daniels. SECOND ROW: Gary Scronce, David Whlt- 
fill. Barry Shotts, Bruce Letellier. BACK ROW: Anne 
Wirth, Scott Bunkholder, Kevin Stroh, Leann 
Adams, Allen Moon. 



ALPHA PHI MU 



Industrial Engineering 

FRONT ROW: Hugh Gibson, Todd Postier, Brian 
Meier. SECOND ROW: Mary Jo Jaderborg, Deborah 
Sprick, Ingko Oetomo. Chew Han. BACK ROW: 
Denise Reeves, Jackie Middleton. Stephanie Kohler, 
Janice Blankenship, Jane Mann. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 



National Service 
Organization 

FRONT ROW: Michael Finnegan, Grover Sanchez, 
Craig Robson, Scott Jones, Bill Kossow, John 
Wilson. SECOND ROW: Richard Gau, Tom Garcia. 
Kathleen Gentry, Scott Brown, Bruce Eggers, David 
Johnson. THIRD ROW: Carrie Martin, Sumedha 
Labhsetwar, Kayla Lechtenberger. Sandra Randall, 
Megan Garner, Rose Borst. BACK ROW: Lisa 
BIythe, Diane Gleissner, Theresa Watson, Sheila 
Farrell, Theresa Plevka, Anne LeMaitre 



ALPHA TAU ALPHA 



Ag Education Honorary 

FRONT HOW: Lance Lewis, Elmer Schmitz, David 
Key, John Parmley. SECOND ROW: David Dreyer, 
Ken Moldenhauer, Gerald Dreher, Kevin Bradshaw, 
Charies Pettijohn. BACK ROW: Kevin King, Kathy 
Holmes, James Kitch, Randall Snider, Tom 
Chestnut, Glenn Newdigger. 



ALPHA ZETA 



Agriculture Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Stephen Ward, Randy Milne, Janell 
Haggard, Kelline Anderson, Evon Lynch, Sue Ann 
Collins. SECOND ROW: Jeff Williams, Steve Thien, 
Charies Lange, Merie Leonard, James Sterns, Carey 
Avery, Walter Schlatter. THIRD ROW: Royce 
Schmidt, Troy Smith, Thomas Nichols, Timothy 
Boss, Geoff Anderson, Paul Liebeno, Wendell 
Suelter. FOURTH ROW: Rachel Vining, E\\zabelh 
Wulf, Tracy Hucke, Kenby Clawson, Raymond 
Mueting, David Clawson, Lance Lewis, Dennis 
Cashier. BACK ROW: Kimberiy Hoch, James Dillon, 
Larry Butel, Curtis Glaser, Linda Edelman, Cindy 
Houck, David Seibold, Jerry Seifert. 



AMERICAN 

ASSOCIATION OF 

TEXTILE CHEMISTS 



FRONT ROW: Rebecca Pirkl-Hurd, Cherie Robbins, 
Barbara Reagan^ BACK ROW: Maureen Lien. Kay 
Garven, Diane Hodges, Lisa Paris, Lynn Feinberg. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY 
OF AG ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Brian Grimm, Stan Black, Troy Kolb, 
David Dornbusch, Daniel Clarkson, Allan Burk. SE- 
COND ROW: Walter Appel, Norman Entz. Michael 
Strahm. Clay Hardenbarger, Craig Good, Gerald 
Johnson, Marc Bokelman. THIRD ROW: Jeff 
Thompson, Daniel Klassen. Gary Sweany, Brian 
Eflin, Douglas Base, Pamela Meyer. BACK ROW: 
Bryan Price, Byron Finley, Larry Wagner, Roger 
Bradford, Paul Arnoldy, Jim Garrison, Bradley 
Briggs. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY 
OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Marc Matthews, Bill Ritzdorl, Paul 
Bundschuh, Todd Madison, Jim Fisher, Richard 
Klassen. SECOND ROW: John Nett, James Manges, 
Gary Turnqulst. Danny Hegwald, Imad Rital, 
Gregory Fief. THIRD ROW: David Jacobson, Kevin 
Honomichi, Mellnda Hamilton. Dana Geier, Phil 
Rosewicz, Robert Fry. BACK ROW: Bruce McEnroe 
Constance Turner, Lori Lynch, Cindy Wallis 
Kathleen Muvaney, Jeffrey Ruby, Jerry Pritchett. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY 

OF INTERIOR 

DESIGNERS 



FRONT ROW: Sarah Shields, Marcia Wanderlich. 
Susan Pekarek, Kay Fisher, Amy Treff, Laura 
Sanders. SECOND ROW: Randall Russ, Earl Ander- 
son, Judy Larson. Molly Morrow, Ann Gladbach, 
Timothy Knudsen, Fletcher Brokaw. THIRD ROW: 
Dianna Curtis, Cheryl Rude, Adrian Hopkins, Penny 
Omtvedt. Linda Tingelhoff. Kim Denver. Kris Chur- 
chman. FOURTH ROW: Kim Forslund. Sheryl Jenn- 
ings, Mary Johnson, Sandy Macy, Laura Tuttle, 
Tonya Ribbentrop, Angela Wagner BACK ROW: 
Julie Fredrickson, Krista Becker, Kimma Boyles, 
Leeann Carter. Chris Caldwell, Beth Martell, Julie 
Vacca, Colleen Kuckelman. 



AMERICAN SOCIETY 

OF MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Kathleen White, Amy Works, Mary 
Kuestersleffen, John Frick, Mark James. Glen Olber- 
ding, Robert Lee, Travis Barnes. SECOND ROW: 
Todd McKenzie, Mike Gross, Gary LeRock, Brad 
Carver. Richard Heitmeyer. Donald Smith. THIRD 
ROW: Michael Jones. David Bollman, Jim Erickson. 
Martin Wesemann, Jon Erickson, Mark Oberrieder, 
Carl Curry, Robin Roach. FOURTH ROW: Bruce 
Berggren, Brian Burtin, Brent Richler, Steve 

qc DeBauge, Alan Stevens. Keith Williams. Larry Willis. 

'" Richard Bailee. BACK ROW: David Cooper, Mark 
Meili, Todd Croy, Donald Looper, Thomas Bird, Kurt 
Balthazor, Tracy Schumacher, Steven Spillman. 








••' . 




m^ 






jgl^^Ugggi 




H^<i9Br-\yX^iSiM9K • 


EZaiffifiBB 


iTlililrnilfiiFt 

Summer Internships 




k 



The Real World 



i^XSMMsl 



For one summer, Joe Fangman changed 
from student to corporate engineer, ex- 
changing his Topsiders and baclcpack for a 
suit, tie and briefcase. 

Fangman, senior in mechanical engineer- 
ing, interned with Amoco Oil Co. in 
Chicago for three months. He said his in- 
ternship was valuable in teaching him about 
the engineering profession and also about 
himself. 

"I worked with another engineer and had 
a lot of freedom. In fact, I referred to him as 




my boss once and he got mad," Fangman 
said. 

Although responsible for complex pro- 
cedures such as designing and testing equip- 
ment and making recommendations, 
Fangman said it was comforting to know 
that college students could handle the 
pressures of the job world. 

He and many K-State students completed 
internships with large businesses and were 
relieved to find out college prepared students 
for the business world. 

"The biggest thing it (the internship) 
taught me was not to be so apprehensive of 
the working world," Fangman said. "We're 
all so sheltered at college and led to believe 
it's a rough world out there. But I learned 
business is really not bad. Sure, there were 
pressures, but none I couldn't handle. It's 
comforting to know that," he said. 

Mike Robbins, senior in journalism and 
mass 'communications, also had an intern- 
ship with a large "business" — the U.S. 
government. After having a summer intern- 
ship with U.S. Sen. Robert Dole in 1984, 
Robbins returned to Washington, D.C., last 
summer for a second internship in govern- 
ment work. 

"They call it Potomac Fever, and that's 
what I have," Robbins said. He worked for 
the Department of Transportation with 20 
other interns doing "gophering" and assign- 
ed projects. 

Robbins said the experience was designed 
to be educational so those he worked for also 
made it a learning experience. 

"As interns, we had the opportunity to see 
how government works and to see if it is a 
field we want to go in to. It is a first-hand ex- 
perience in something a lot of people don't 
understand," he said. 

Deeann Griffith, senior in marketing, 
agreed, after her internship for Rep. Bob 
Whittaker in the House of Representives. 
Although she was not interested in govern- 
ment work as a career, her experience in the 
internship made her more aware of politics. 

"It is a once in a lifetime experience to 
work in Washington, D.C., and it has made 
me watch political issues a lot more," she 
said. 

"If you want to converse in D.C., you 
have to know what is going on. Any time 
you're put with complete strangers, it's a 
good experience. That's going to help (me) 
with marketing," Griffith said. 

After only three years of studying Ger- 
man, Rob Schumann interned at a German 
mill, Wilhelm Werhahn Hansasamuhle. 

The Supreme Court Building and the nation's capital are 
two landmarks that become part of the "Potomac 
Fever" students catch while interning in Washington 
D.C. 



During his first day on the job, Schumann, 
senior in feed and milling science, wondered 
if the internship would be worth his time 
because of the language barrier he en- 
countered. 

"The first day I kept asking myself, 'Why 
am I doing this?'" he said. "I'd tell myself I 
could be somewhere in America doing a nor- 
mal job, but it (working in Germany) was 
the most educational experience of my life. 

"Everyday was different. Different situa- 
tions would arise and I learned from my 
mistakes," Schumann said. 

After the internship, Schumann realized 
he had learned more than only milling 
science. He said he learned about German 
culture along with learning more about 
himself. 

"It's good to see how someone else lives 
and how the other part of the world goes 
about doing things. Before I went to Ger- 
many, I didn't have that kind of cultural 
understanding," he said. 

Jerry Connet, senior in feed science and 
management, traveled to Winnepeg, 
Canada, for an internship with a mill. Feed 
Rite Limited. Unlike Schumann, Connet did 
not experience a language barrier but did 
gain the advantage of learning about a new 
culture. 

"I got called a "dumb Yankee" several 
times, but it was all in fun," Connet said. 
"Canadians are extremely friendly and will- 
ing to help in any way. I thought Kansas was 
friendly, but their whole culture is typically 
that way." 

Connet said working with management 
and learning first hand about the milling 
operations gave his K-State classes more 
meaning. 

"Everything I've been in school for final- 
ly made sense. Studying all the books and 
notes gets old, but knowing you'll use it 
made it worthwhile," he said. 

Cherie Robbins, senior in textile science, 
also found her internship with Collins and 
Aikman Corp., in Charlotte, N.C., gave an 
added dimension to her classes. Her intern- 
ship was not much different than class labs 
for textile science, but it helped to tie 
together questions about why textile in- 
dustries did certain testing, she said. 

The interns found their experiences to be 
valuable both for personal and professional 
growth. 

"The best thing (about an internship) is 
more the personal growth and not so much 
the professional growth, though that is im- 
portant too," Fangman said. 

-Kim Kidd 



Summer Internships 



97 



ARAB STUDENTS 
ORGANIZATION 



FRONT ROW: Anwan Dabbas. Mutaz Sajdi. Raouf 
Dabbas SECOND ROW: Hisham Hawari. Mazen 
Alkalill. Bassem Azzam-Ali, Ahmed Hudhud THIRD 
ROW: Dima Hamarneh. Rania Hamarneh. Khalil 
Jaber. Sawsan Abdul-Hadi. Aida Dabbas BACK 
ROW: Osama Barrawi, Mouna Jumean. Mustafa 
Mutwalll. Rama Farrai- 



ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY 



FRONT ROW: Michael Figurski, Randy Kinder, Brent 
Hill, Robert Fenton, Robert Trimmer, Dan George. 
Garrett Schmidt, Darren Dillon SECOND ROW: 
Denise Rowley, Eugene Dalgle, Renee Arnoldy, 
Douglas Miller, Dennis VanWey, Lance RIbordy, 
Curtis Coftman, Sam Brashear THIRD ROW: Adina 
Hall, Lori Baier, Patrick Weinberg, Kevin O'Rourke, 
Thomas Aaron, John Kennedy, John Braun BACK 
ROW: Jeanne Hackney, KImberly Cave. Gregory 
Ellison, Stettani Pteiter, William Grimm, Kiley Crill, 
Luis Montaner, Martha Murphy 



ART DEPARTMENT 
STUDENT COMMITTEE 



FRONT ROW: Melissa Porter, Jay Wilson, John 
Havel. Larry Elder SECOND ROW: Lisa 
Schwarzenholz, Stacy Trahoon. Elizabeth Watson 
BACK ROW: Susan Stegeman, Jeaneane Johnson, 
Jean Berry, Therese Harter, 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 
AMBASSADORS 



FRONT ROW: Brian Nelson, Joel Hermes, Stacy 
Clark, Mike Armstrong, David Bov»en, Shan Henry 
SECOND ROW: Yvene Guislain, Susan Baird, Loree 
Carpenter, Susan Brent, Jell Tudor, Leslye 
Schneider, Anne Hoover THIRD ROW: Angela 
Smith, Judi Walter, Susan Biggs, Judi Moritz, Robin 
Harnden, Myrna James, Carrie Mannell BACK 
ROW: Phyllis Coon, Andrea Booher, Lynn Bender, 
Sheila Farrell, Gretchen Wagner, Delisa Willcut, Lori 
Ryan 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 
COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: David Lamar, Michael Armstrong, 
Michael Morris. SECOND ROW: Jennifer Rutter, 
Caroline Tsen, Teresa Temme, Stacy Clark BACK 
ROW: Lynn Bender, Carrie Mannell, Judi Walter, 
Shannon Fuller, Ann Clifford 



98 




If John Sleezer were to write an essay tit 
ed "What I Did on my Summer Vacation, 
his story would be about riding in jeef 
across Africa, missing volunteers at checj 
points and using bush lamps for light. Ar! 
his vacation pictures would not be the usu, 
"ho-hum" snapshots of Uncle Harold arl 
Aunt Mary standing beside a fountain. 

Sleezer, a senior in journalism and ma.; 
communications, won the 1985 Colle[ 
Photographer of the Year contest, sponsorej 
by the National Press Photographej 
Association, and was offered a summij 
photography internship with Nation! 
Geographic magazine. 

"I would be telling a lie if I didn't say th 
working for National Geographic magazii 
was the highlight of my life so far," he sai 

Three weeks before his internship bega 
Sleezer was told to prepare for an assig 
ment about the 25th anniversary of the Peai 
Corps in Ghana, West Africa. The artic 
was to be published in fall of 1986. 

Having never been out of the Uniti 
States, Sleezer didn't have a passport or ti 
required immunizations to travel abroa 
Lafene Student Health Center administer 
the armful of shots required and the U. 
Postal Service handled his passport. 

He arrived in Ghana the first week of Ju 
and acquired press credentials from t 
Ghanaian government. Sleezer and a fre 
lance writer from Washington, D.C., ma 
ped out a 12-day upcountry trip that won 
take them to several Peace Corps sites. 

They soon discovered the trip was goi 
to be difficult. 

There was no reliable phone or telegra 
system in the country, which meant the 
was no way of contacting the voluntec 
before they arrived at each site. The ro 
conditions had deteriorated over the yea; 
which slowed their traveling considerabl) 

"What really helped was having a Pea 
Corps driver who we hired for the two mc 
ths we were in the country," Sleezer sa 
"He helped me learn several of the custoi 



John Sleezer k 



African Adventure 



Student photogmphm:iMtmms.j^ 



ind some of the Twi language which was 
spoken in much of the country . 

"On several occasions, he clued me in on 
cultural mistakes I was about to make — like 
lever eating or passing food with your left 
land, because that is the hand you wipe with 
after going to the bathroom," he said. 

What impressed Sleezer most about the 
rip was the Ghanaian people. 

"They are warm, friendly people, and 
ilways willing to help any way possible," he 
;aid. 

After making the first trip upcountry and 



missing several of the volunteers because of 
communications problems, it was obvious 
the story would take longer to complete. 

Sleezer asked for more time on the assign- 
ment, then made arrangements for a 30-day 
return trip upcountry. The writer returned to 
Washington, but Sleezer and the driver were 
allowed to search for the volunteers they had 
missed earlier. 

Upon returning to the United States, 
Sleezer experienced a case of reverse culture 
shock. 

"I had gotten used to the way things are in 




Ghana, and it was mindboggling to come 
back to the United States and re-experience 
our own cultural habits. 

"Since there was no running water in 
Ghana, it was an experience just to stand and 
watch water spew out of the shower head, or 
to walk into a dark room and flip the light 
switch on instead of lighting up a bush 
lamp," Sleezer said. 

"I realized that we take a lot of things for 
granted in the United States, and there are a 
lot of people who will never appreciate the 
conveniences we have or our lifestyle." 



As first-place winner of tlie 
1985 College Photographer of 
the Year contest, John 
Sleezer received a 
photography internship with 
National Geographic 
magazine. He spent the sum- 
mer on assignment in Ghana, 
West Africa. Sleezer 
photographs in Akrofufu, a 
village where in-country 
Peace Corps training tool< 
place. 



Profile 



99 



BETA ALPHA PSI 



Accounting 



FRONT ROW: Andrew Bulloch, Jay Schroeder, 
Scott Anderson, Steven Peters, Robert Salem. 
Jamie Snell, Michael Falk SECOND ROW: Joanne 
Rochel, Rhonda Mohr, Denise Shields, Dean Wain- 
wright, Craig Hopkins, Keith Parks, Jeffrey Gamble 
THIRD ROW: Patricia Anderson, Linda Moeder, 
Julie Clark, Lisa O'Connell, Kristi Wentzel, Coleen 
Bruna, Arthur Andersen BACK ROW: Terrie Galle, 
Celeste Furey, Gerise Van Hoet, Shelly Hautf, Tern 
Kempke. Laura Murphy, Nancy Cheray, Kyle 
Lichter 



BETA ALPHA PSI 



Accounting 



FRONT ROW: Paul Krueger, Kenneth Mercer, Mick 
Tranbarger, Sandy Funk, Mark Soxie, Ray Turner 
SECOND ROW: Diane Oleen, Angela Clemence, 
Roger Marrs, Donna Gillmore, Robert O'Connor, 
Christopher Vogel THIRD ROW: Julie Wohler, Don- 
na Olberding, Patricia Doud, Russell Rausch. Kristi 
Rice, Jackson Day BACK ROW: Charia Wagner, 
Johanna Lyie, Laurie Crosier, Debbie Nuessen, 
Vicky Bartlett, Kandy Schrag, Sandra Riemer, 



BETA GAMMA SIGMA 



Business Administration 

FRONT ROW: Richard Coleman. Dave Severson. 
Bob Salem, Clark Eschliman, Jamie Snell SECQND 
ROW: Coleen Bruna. Donna Gillmore. Kenneth 
Mercer, Jeffrey Gamble THIRD ROW: Cindy Cote, 
Rebecca Zimmer, Laurie Crosier, Lori Honeyman. 
Patricia Anderson BACK ROW: Kathy Smouse- 
Hulse, Russell Rausch, Lisa O'Connell, Charles 
Reinecke. 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



FRONT ROW: Tim Coppinger, Steve Harris, David 
Oliphant. Mark Religa, Kent Frerichs. Garth Gar- 
diner SECOND ROW: Marty Crampton. Mark 
Frisbie, Kevin Reding. Michele Keesecker, Brian 
Nines, Gregg Doud, THIRD ROW: Mark Brown, 
Carol Chandlee. Joyce Roux, Karen Appel, Janette 
Poole, Rodney Beam BACK ROW: Tammy Mercer, 
Evelyn Davis. Teresa Hagedorn, Janelle Larson, 
Becky Chide, Pamela Peckman. Susan Ohide, 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



FRONT ROW: Patrick Splichal, Jay Rezac, Mike Bar- 
rett, Kelly Schlick, Joe Carpenter. Scott Eilert SE- 
COND ROW: Peggy Shandy. Brenda Hiegen, Janet 
Herpich, Jodee Rogers, Lisa Thompson. Steve 
Gleason, Kevin SchulU, THIRD ROW: Susan Clary. 
Marcine Shaner, Julie Welsh, Karen Klamm, Alice 
Kunshek, Ranae '^^oung, BACK ROW: Mary 
McHenry, Caroline Strnad, Barbara Downey, Denise 
Laird, Karen Hollern, Gail Navinsky, Lisa Keller 



100 




When you saw it you were compellci to 
take a step closer. After a close examinat|[i, 
the definition and clarity in the piece bee; iie 
even more defined. The piece of art jas 
created with a technique called airbrushjg, 

Airbrushing became so popular withjts 
use in modern graphics, the K-State,n 
department found difficulty in meeting iie 
demand of those interested in the art. j 

Airbrushing was a technique developejin 
the 1890s where paint was funneled thro;;li 
a mechanical devise onto a panel. Mocm 
usage included commercial art, prints id 
computer graphics. 

David Harms, assistant professor of it, 
taught airbrushing in one of his technicjs 
classes. The department also offeretj a 
winter intersession course and a sumbr 
high school workshop on airbrushing. i 




Authentic Reproductions 



wmMMKmM'^iiMm9"mW'<mM.""iK'i'^€"ilKm£s 






"Airbrushing is really coming back into 
ogue," Harms said. 

The field grew so quickly that airbrushing 
id not have a chance to be developed and 
xpanded into all possible areas. Harms said 
irbrushing was definitely moving into the 
amputer field. 

"I would eventually like to see a class of- 
;red where airbrushing and computer 
raphics could come together," Harms said. 

There was no set prerequisite courses 
efore learning how to airbrush. However, 
[arms said a basic design or drawing class 
as good experience before attempting to 
rbrush. 

Many students outside of the graphics 
eld took the course simply for fun. 

The first exercise the students did was a 
;ries of exercise panels where they had a 




guideline of 16 or 17 elements that they had 
to include in the assignment. Harms said. 

Kim Janssen, a student of Harms, said she 
enjoyed airbrushing on certain projects. 

"There are certain projects where air- 
brushing is the ideal technique and, of 
course, there are times when it is not ap- 
plicable to use," Janssen said. For example, 
a landscape could be done in airbrush or 
watercolor, but the end result would be total- 
ly different. 

"The quality of work that comes from the 
beginning classes is really quite amazing," 
Harms said. 

Harms had definite goals for students to 
learn in his class. 

"I would like them to gain a better 
knowledge of compositional format, three- 
dimensional space and halation effects. By 
halation, I mean a variety of toning effects," 
he said. 

Airbrushing was time-consuming for 
beginners, but experience made the techni- 
que quicker. 

"You find shortcuts that help you lessen a 
lot of the routine of it," Van Crosby, senior 
in art, said. 

David Harms, instructor of art, assists Jonna Keller as 
she works on her project, a poster of Ronald Reagan. 
Mary Lynn Hake completes her poster of John Lennon. 
(Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 




mary Lynn Hake puts the finishing touches on a poster 
of John Lennon. (Plioto by Jeff A. Taylor) 

Harms said space in his class was limited 
to the 30 terminals and 50 airbrushes in the 
department. Harms hoped to increase the 
amount of equipment he had to enable him to 
teach airbrushing to anyone who was in- 
terested. 

— Darren McChesney 

Ivlike Linn fills his air brush with paint while working 
on his class project over intersession. (PIfoto by Jeff A. 
Taylor) 




101 




The U.S. Defense Department's Strategic 
Defense Initiative (SDI), better known as 
"Star Wars," was a controversial project 
and sparked debate between the Soviet 
Union and the United States. While the SDI 
was a global concern, it also sparked debate 
between two K-State professors. 

SDI is a project of the Department of 
Defense and is directed toward developing a 
space-based, weapons defense system. 
Utilizing high-power lasers, satellites and 
giant mirrors, the objective of the system is 
to seek and destroy missiles headed toward 
the United States. 

During the year, Hermann Donnert, pro- 
fessor of nuclear engineering, was a staunch 
advocate of the SDI while Alvin Compaan, 
professor of physics, was not. Donnert and 
Compaan, although remaining friends, had 
severely contrasting opinions of the SDI. 

Donnert, a naturalized American citizen 
since 1962, did research for the SDI, a pro- 
ject President Reagan gave his blessing to on 
March 23, 1983, during a nationally televis- 
ed speech. 

Donnert had a personal motivation to par- 
ticipate in the research. 

"I remember very distinctly when I 
became a U.S. citizen in 1962. I stood 
before a federal judge in Baltimore, Md., 
and I gave an oath which stipulated, among 
other things, that I would be willing to de- 



fend the United States against all enemies. 

"To me, participating in research directed 
toward the development of weapons is cer- 
tainly part of bearing arms — and I have no 
intention of aberrating that oath," Donnert 
said. 

Compaan opposed the SDI "because it 
(SDI) is being approached the wrong way." 

In October 1985, Compaan circulated a 
petition to the faculty of the science and 
engineering departments stating Star Wars 
was "ill-conceived and dangerous." 

The petition also stated, "We (the under- 
signed), pledge neither to solicit nor accept 
SDI funds and encourage others to join us in 
this refusal. We hope together to persuade 
Congress and the public not to support this 
deeply misguided and dangerous program." 

Although Congress pledged approximate- 
ly $25 million for SDI research and develop- 
ment during the next five years, Compaan 
said, "We must bear the distinction between 
classified (SDI) and unclassified research 
and its funding. 

"The government is throwing money at 
research that is not yet mature enough. In 
other words, we need to take care of the fun- 
damentals like developing lasers, perfecting 
high speed computers and developing a 
space-based power source," Compaan said. 

Money available from Congress for SDI 
research was another motivating factor for 



Donnert to become involved in the progra 

"The money that comes out of this p 
ticular project is as green as any otl 
money," Donnert said. He also recei\ 
assistance from the U.S. Air Force and 
Department of Energy. 

Donnert explained the differing opini( 
between himself and Compaan as a "c 
ference in political opinion. He (Compa; 
never took the oath I did." 

Compaan attributed the difference of o 
nion to his belief that SDI research v 
misguided. 

"As a scientist, I cannot do that kind 
work. I feel compelled to do research in •- 



vanced technology, but I also feel it is i 



portant to be able to speak out and critic 
the program if I feel it is misguided," Cc 
paan said. 

To those close to the SDI program thje 
was a realization the SDI may never je 
100 percent effective. 

"We won't know until it's done. We h(|p 
to achieve 99 percent effectiveness, in teijs 
of Soviet warheads destroyed, which mayle 
obtainable," Donnert said. j 

"I have a cynical thought that even if le 
system is only 70 or 80 percent effective, :e 
Soviets wouldn't know it," Donnert saic 

Compaan said the SDI would only escal e 
the arms race. 

"Soviet military planners see the SDI i\& 



102 



Star War 




situation where their missiles won't be able 
jto get through in the event the U.S. would 
Idecide to strike first. I think this situation 
i would encourage the Soviets to step up the 
j production of warheads, thus escalating the 
I arms race," Compaan said. 

Donnert concentrated his research on 
Ispace-based laser systems. Finding a source 



of power was a problem for Donnert. 

"It is pretty clear the system will need to 
be nuclear powered to get the juice out," 
Donnert said. 

Compann said the SDI was only a vision 
and "is believable to people that don't 
understand high technology." 

"The SDI is a dream of Reagan's — Ed- 



rlermann Donnert and Alvin Compaan have contrasting 
views. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

ward Teller made it that way," Compaan 
said. 

Teller is considered to be the "father" of 
the hydrogen bomb, Compaan said, and was 
one of President Reagan's defense advisers. 

-Jeff Stark 



Star Wars 



103 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



FRONT ROW; Mike Berrey, Mike Chumley, Braden 
Stalker, Charles Pettiiohn, Ronald Arends, Grant 
Johnson SECOND ROW: John Borgerding, Shad 
Marston, Pat Schwat), Jon Nikkei, Ricky Pfortmiller, 
Mark Borgerding THIRO ROW: David Sheperd, Tom 
Chestnut, Bart Meged, Kirk Dickinson, James 
Borgerding, James Woll BACK ROW: Stacy 
Fagerberg, Kimberly Rezac, Susan Reid, Jeffrey 
Thomas, Christopher Nikkei, James Pearson, 
Charles Hutchinson 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



FRONT ROW: Travis Brore, Terry Powelson. 
Howard Woodbury, Kevin Bennett, Nathan Lee, 
Thomas Krauss SECOND ROW: Julie Keesling, 
Denise Kill, Mindy Russell, Elise Williams, Scott 
Donaldson, Matt Zimmer THIRD ROW: Stacey Nan- 
ninga, Christine Strahm, Janette Wilson, Erick 
Kadel, Roger Hummel, Dale Lonker BACK ROW: 
Peggy McNetl, Carey Powelson, Cathy Haskin, Lori 
Tessendorf, Mary Jo Peterson, Steve Ward, Barb 
Dugan 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE 



FRONT ROW: Lareina Waldorf, Jan Remy, Mary 
Beth Clawson, Teresa Allaman, Kim O'Brien, Lorna 
Jewell, Maelyn Willers, Julie Schuler SECOND 
ROW: Clark Egbert, Charles Stark, Scott Weber, Ed 
Mohney, Oscar West, Timothy Tyson, Jack Riley, 
Ernest Minton THIRD ROW: Kim Weir, John Eric- 
son, Tyson Hughes, Kevin Istas, Maria Aelmore, 
Kenby Clawson, David Clawson, Todd Like 
FOURTH ROW: Chris O'Donnell, Mark Wulfkuhle, 
George Lorette, Carletta Wear, Jerry Seifert, Gam- 
my Theurer, Gary Dorrell, David McAfee, BACK 
ROW: Kathy Holmes, Randy Milne, Rhoda Rem, 
Kimberly Buethe, Melanie Mainquist, Angela Hylton, 
Mark Nelson, Julia Reynolds, Joan Schuler 



BLUE KEY 



FRONT ROW: David Mugler, George Wingert, Magd 
Azer, James Sterns SECOND ROW: Clark Atkinson 
Ron Wineinger, Kent Mayer. Keenan Beauchamp 
THIRD ROW: Joan SeiUer, Barry Shotts, Will Kirk 
Ken Heinz BACK ROW: Bob Larson, Alicia Schmidt 
Tami Barham, Elizabeth Wulf. 



BUSINESS COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: John Neuman, Robert Siegfried, 
Robert Copher, James Crutchfield, John Hill, Ken- 
neth Fox. SECOND ROW: Michael Delaney, Russ 
Pugh. Steve Cashman. Monte Griftin. Drew Hertel 
THIRD ROW: Deborah Fields. Rebecca Zimmer. 
Ctiristine Bechtel. Kristen Johnson, Mary Slagle. 
Terry Hallauer, BACK ROW: Lori Rock, Melissa Dut- 
ton, Gretchen Gritten, Kathy Kurtz. Krista Lindgren. 
Melissa Edwards, 



104 




The twanging of the dulcian and t 
shawm, musical instruments popular in t 
15th century, echoed through the halls 
McCain Auditorium as the K-State Cii 
legium Musicum gave life to Renaissanj 
music. I 

In 1976, Collegium Musicum wi 
organized and turned into a class by directj 
Sara Funkhouser, assistant professor j 
music. The group focused on music from t 
medieval and baroque periods. 

"The group's aim was to bring to lift 
period of music that had been forgottf 
There had been previous attempts by co 
munity members to form a Renaissar 
music group, but none had be 
successful," Funkhouser said. 

Renaissance music, dating from 1450 
1600 A.D., was recaptured by the C 
legium singers and instrumentalists w 
played replicas of the historial instrumen 

The dulcian and racket, forerunners of' 
bassoon, the shawm, forerunner of the ob( 
and various other instruments, combined 
form the complex sound of Renaissai 
music. 

"The instruments are not as loud as th( 
of today. Their purpose was not to be plaj 
in a concert hall, but rather, in a castle 
Funkhouser said. 




Martha Funderburgh, Katy Wilson and Glen Guhr c 
bine their musical talents to sing the comi 
Renaissance music. (Photo by John LaBarge) 



Collegium 



Renaissance Revival 



stcum g 



The historical instruments had many func- 
ons other than concerts. 
The shawm, brought to Europe by the 
rusaders from the Holy Land, was used for 
mces, tournaments and to lead the way to 
ittle. 

Members of the Collegium ensemble in- 
uded not only students, but also communi- 
members, professors from various depart- 
ents and university personnel. 
The diversity of the group provided a con- 
luity that was not always found in student 
isembles because many of Collegium's 
embers stayed with the group from year to 
',ar, Funkhouser said. 

Franc Hostetter, at 82, was the oldest 
ember of the group. A retired music 
acher and Manhattan resident, Hostetter 
as in her third year with Collegium. 
"Collegium is a big interest of people that 
ijoy being together and exploring early 
usic," Hostetter said. 
Kayla Hagman, sophomore in 
icrobiology and a member of the K-State 
xhestra, said she was always interested in 
iisic. Collegium provided her with the op- 
irtunity to perform works different from 
ose with which she is accustomed. 
The entire Collegium ensemble practiced 
ce a week and various smaller ensembles 




)mell KInderknecht plays the alto shawm as Susan 
dlacek plays the bass recorder. The two are part of 
I medieval and baroque music group, Collegium. 
m by John Thelander) 



Collegium 



met at other times. Collegium's large 
ensemble performed at the Renaissance 
Festival, a concert in Farrell Library, and 
participated in the opening of "A K-State 
Christmas." 

Collegium also made its television debut 
on the Governor's Christmas Special. The 
smaller ensembles of Collegium did area 



church and school tours and played for 
various community functions such as The St. 
Mary Hospital benefit. 

"Everyone has gotten better over the 
years. People are hearing a better 
performance so they know to expect a higher 
level," Funkhouser said. 

— Mindy Stubenhofer 




105 



\ 



The Trotter Era 



ftffg''W'nuftmjormerne(m 



The '70s and early '80s were a time of ex- 
pansion and growth for the College of 
Veterinary Medicine. The "Trotter Era," 
the years from 1971 to 1984 when Donald 
Trotter served as dean of the college, saw 
the college firmly establish itself as one of 
the nation's best veterinary medicine 
schools. 

Trotter was honored on Jan. 31 for his 
contributions to the college when the 
Veterinary Medicine Teaching Building of 
the three-building veterinary complex was 
dedicated and named Trotter Hall. 

K-State President Duane Acker gave 
much of the credit for construction of the 
complex to Trotter. 

"He was the key leader in the endeavor to 
construct the veterinary complex," Acker 
said. 

Trotter coordinated construction of the 
Veterinary Medicine Center during his 
tenure as dean. Construction of the complex 
began in 1972 and was completed in 1978. 
Acker said it was a tribute to Trotter that 
K-State veterinary medicine students have 
earned the highest federal accreditation 
score of the 26 veterinary colleges in the na- 
tion. 

"It's appropriate that the name Trotter is 
associated with the (veterinary medicine) 
teaching building," he added. 

Steven Dudley, junior in veterinary 
medicine and president of the student 
chapter of the American Veterinary Medical 
Association, praised Trotter's attitude in the 
development of the college as a center of ex- 
cellence. 

"Dedication is not an event, but a 
process," Dudley said. 

Dedication from veterinary medicine 
students and people like Trotter has provid- 
ed the veterinary college with quality and 
excellence, Dudley said. 

Bill Roy, member of the Kansas Board of Regents, con- 
gratulates Donald Trotter, former dean of the College of 
Veterinary Medicine, after the dedication of Trotter Hall. 
James Coffman, current dean, stands by to add his com- 
pliments. (Photo by John Thelander) 



Dudley said Trotter's ability to "blend 
goals with reality" exemplified the success 
of the college. 

Bill Roy, member of the Kansas Board of 
Regents, praised Trotter's persistance in his 
attempt to obtain government aid for the 
complex while Roy was a U.S. Represen- 
tative in the '70s. 

Roy jokingly said, "There were many 
bears (people) trying to get money out of the 
barrel (government funds) but he (Trotter) 
was the biggest bear." 

Of the $2.87 million price tag of Trotter 
Hall, Roy said $2.3 million came from a 
combination of state and matching federal 
funds. 

—Pat Hand 

Trotter Hall was dedicated on Jan. 31 to honor Donald 
Trotter. When Trotter served as dean of the College of 
Veterinary Medicine, he was a key leader in construc- 
ting the veterinary complex. Trotter stands with present 
dean, James CoWman. (Photo by John Thelander) 




106 





CAMPUS TOUR 
GUIDES 



FRONT ROW: Frances demons, Denise Shannon, 
Jack Taylor BACK ROW: Patty HIpsher, Rise Frank, 
Kristi Baranclk, Elizabeth Wulf, Carol Lenkner. 



Civil Engineering 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Jerry Dyck, Brian Holle, David Mur- 
dock, Mitchell Metzger SECOND ROW: Gregory 
Fief, Stan Meyers, Richard Klassen, Jeffrey 
NIehaus THIRD ROW: Kevin HonomlchI, Dana 
Geier, Matthew Willis, Tony Brake, Akbar Nosselr. 
BACK ROW: Lori Lynch, Kathleen Mulvaney, Philip 
NIgus, Philip Frazier, 



Junior Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Shelly Dicker, Darren Klllen, Kathy 
Jones, Paul Rust, Scott Scrogin, Craig Patterson. 
SECOND ROW: Karen Fischer, Kelly Welch, Mike 
Griffith, Steve Cashman, Ryan Thomas. THIRD 
ROW: Cindy Cote, Polly Collp, Matthev* Queen, 
Terry Hallauer, Scott Groth, John Hummer. BACK 
ROW: Rise Frank, Patty HIpsher, Laura Memming, 
Victoria LavezzI, Jeff Suttle. 



FRONT ROW: Joseph Smith, Jonathan Lively, 
Timothy Jackson, Don Ericson, Jim Gehm. SECOND 
ROW: Steve Wllderson, Chris White, Jeftery 
Schwiethale, Kevin Slaven, James Smith, Mike 
Schinkel. THIRD ROW: Nancy Neville, Andy Miller, 
Roslyn Miller, Rob McCune, Dan Walter. BACK 
ROW: Leigh Wheeler, Susan Gallagher, KItsy, 
Bosnak, Darcy Russell, Dave Mitchell, Clar1< Simp- 
son. 



COLLEGE 
REPUBLICANS 



FRONT ROW: Mike Aylward, Stan Bartley, Mark 
Fischer. Daran Neuschafer, Jim Sterns, James Crut- 
chfleld. SECOND ROW: Mark Jones. Bob Fenton, 
Phil Nordhus. Ray Hammariund, Michael Riley. 
THIRD ROW: Kurt Bush, Bruce Ney, Drew Hertel. 
Jetf McCarter. Eric Flolkoskl. Dan McCarthy. BACK 
ROW: Christy Everett. Daneale White. Dana Harms, 
Elizabeth Berg. Julie Frick, Amanda Stout. 



107 



SPRING COLLEGIAN 
STAFF 



FRONT ROW: Rich Harris, LeAnne Stowe, Vicki 
Reynolds, Jen Heidrich SECOND ROW: Jeff Tutfle, 
Lori Fairburn, Lillian Zier, David Svoboda, Patfy 
Reinert, Sarah Kessinger, THIRD ROW: Tim Fit- 
zgerald, Becky Ohide, Eric Rhodenbaugh. Tom 
Shultes. BACK ROW: Margaret May, Chris Stewart, 
Tim Carpenter, Jill Hummels 



COLLEGIAN 

ADVERTISING 

STAFF 



FRONT ROW: Donna Cope, Mark McDermet, 
Shelley Shaffer SECOND ROW: Jim Lundstrom, 
Joan Seitzer, Chris Stevenson. BACK ROW: Amy 

Wright, Rob Drake, Pattie Shippen, Lori Wong, 



COLLEGIATE FFA 



FRONT ROW: Curt Glaser, Brian Dierberger, Mary 
Sobba, Jim Meissen, SECOND ROW: Larry Tien, 
Deanna Loucks, Steve Tharman. BACK ROW: Paula 
George, Pamela Peckman, Joyce Roux, Becky 
Gnebat. 



COURT SCOPE 



FRONT ROW: David Krumm. Randy Brown, Jeffrey 
Buck BACK ROW: Lori Fife, Fayez Husseini, Jeff 
Compass, 



DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB 



FRONT ROW: John Shirley, Timothy Tyson, Jeffrey 
Ochampaugh, Scott Gordon, Leniel Harbers. SE- 
COND ROW: Randy Wyrick, Steve PreU. John 
Fisher. Julie Dahl. Curtis Steenbock. BACK ROW: 
Amy Ochampaugh, Kelline Anderson. Evon Lynch, 
Randy Milne. Elizabeth Altwegg 



108 




Somewhere on the K-State campus was 
perfectly climate-controlled area. That mz 
have been hard for some students to in 
agine, because dressing for class was ofte 
times a game of hit-and-miss. It was usual) 
hot or cold, but seldom anywhere in be 
ween. 

One room in Justin Hall was held at ( 
degrees Farenheit and 55 percent humidii 
— everyday. The room housed the Histor 
Costumes and Textiles Collection. 

The collection, began in the 1920s, he 
items dating to as early as the 1700s. 

Items collected included period and ethn 
garments, accessories, flat textiles, ethn 
textiles, patterns, photographs of clothin: 
Kansas dress and dress worn by K-Sta 
students while they were attending school 

"We have a very good collection < 
women's clothes. We also have a good cc 
lection of children's clothing and a 
building on the men's wear collection," sa 
Ann Cordy, curator of the collection ai 
assistant professor of textiles and interi 
design. 

The items in the collection were used \ 
students and faculty for classroom instru 
tion, exhibitions and research. 

"The collection is used for visual aids f 
students," Cordy said. 

Karia Peterson uses a wet vacuum on one of the th 
wedding gowns donated to the Historic Costumes < 
Textiles Collection in Justin Hall. (Photo by Jc 
Sleezer) 



1 

Historic Textiles jf 



Historical Clothing 



All items in the collection were donated. 
Donors were usually faculty members, 
students and alumni. 

"Some donations are made by the general 
public of Kansas and a few donations are 
even made by people out of state," Cordy 
said. 



The collection received most of its dona- 
tions after the 1950s. 

"We've done a lot with the collection 
within the last 10 years," she said. 

Along with the donation, a description and 
some historical information about the 
clothing item was provided. The college 




determined whether the clothing would 
strengthen the collection before it accepted 
the donation. 

The donor was given a "deed of gift" 
showing the item was property of K-State's 
collection. 

Each item was tagged with a number. The 
items were cleaned, stored, exhibited and 
repaired by the best museum procedures. 

"Since we moved into a new room last 
spring, we are beginning to publicize the 
collection. We have done radio talk shows 
and are getting quite a bit of publicity," 
Cordy said. 

The college is excited about the growth of 
the collection and continues to work to 
catalog the items on a computer. 

"We have thousands of items in the col- 
lection and will have an accurate count after 
they are cataloged into the computer," she 
said. 

Although K-State's collection is not as 
large as other clothing collections, it was 
still impressive. 

"K-State has one of the largest collections 
like this in the state," Cordy said. 
"Although our collection is smaller than 
some owned by other universities in the 
country, we still have a large and impressive 
collection." 

— Lori Bredow 



109 



DATA PROCESSING 
MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Galen Giebler, Todd Bechtel, Mike 
Sierra. Manin Heger. Robert Altland, SECOND 
ROW: David Rose, Steven Reedy. Monte Hall. Edwin 
Basham BACK ROW: Nancy Wernes. Tom 
Supawarnnapong. Steve Young, Charles Woolard. 
Craig Unruh, Arlan Hair. 



EDUCATION COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Wlllard Nelson. Kenny Thompson. 
Delton Graves. Scott Millard SECOND ROW: 
Kristine Claassen, Randy Warner. Diane Legleiter. 
Marcia Muller. Lisa Hale BACK ROW: Jean Elliot. 
Michelle Clittord. Shari Mosbarger. Jane Burke 



ENGINEERING 
AMBASSADORS 



FRONT ROW: Philip Bullinger. Todd Schemm. Don 
Posson, Daniel Clarkson. SECOND ROW: Bradley 
Briggs, Steven Weith, Barry Shotts. Clitton Ross. 
Dave Gruenbacher. THIRD ROW: Mardi Smith. Eric 
Dillinger, Dana Gruenbacher. Timothy Robben. 
BACK ROW: Jane Mann. Janelle Wiebe. Elizabeth 
WIckersham. Robin Roach, Mary Jaderbcrg. 



ENGINEERING 
STUDENT COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Hermann Donnert, Mark Meili, Miguel 
Chavez, Todd Schemm. David Raetzel, John Dollar, 
SECOND ROW: Eric Schon, Dennis Shields, Robert 
Copple. Todd Croy, Mark Verschelden. James Zinn 
THIRD ROW: Alexander lies, Jeffrey Streets, Perry 
White. Lav»rence Pickert. Walter Appel. Bruce 
Letellier BACK ROW: Julie Compton, Karlene 
Gieber, Sherri Stover. Hisham Hawari, Athena 
Wong. Michelle Ragiand. Heather Boss. 



ENVIRONMENTAL 

DESIGN STUDENTS 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Timothy Bickhaus. Randy Brown, 
Rick Eggleston, Cam Masterson SECOND ROW: 
Mitchel Hormel. Jeff Compass. David Krumm, Jef- 
frey Buck, Robin Frye THIRD ROW: Bill Sullivan, 
Russ Volmert. Bill Wilson. Neal Brockschmidt. Tim 
Bussard. Gary Harden. BACK ROW: Lori FIte. Mary 
Blogin. Fayez Husseine. Kenny Turner, Susan Bush, 
Jenni Thompson 



110 




With plans for a new chemistry ar 
biochemistry building to be built next 1 
King Hall, the aging greenhouses on tl 
building site had to find a new home. [ 

The result was 84 new greenhou;i 
modules connected to Throckmorton Haj 
known as the Throckmorton Greenhouii 
Complex. 

Tom Slagle, agricultural technician for tl 
greenhouses, said these units were us( 
mainly for plant experiments. Slagle sa 
many types of plants were grown and test* 
in the complex. 

Floral and vegetable plants were grown 
year. Wheat, alfalfa, milo, com and so 
beans were also frequently grown for testii 
and experimenting. 

"The faculty and graduate students do 
lot of testing and developing new varieties 
crops and plant life as well as testing for i 




Frank Kroeker pots plants in the horticulje 
greentiouse. (Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 

i 
Lights, used for growing plants, illuminate ii 



greenhouses as the sun sets on a winter day. (Pfiot 
Jeff A. Taylor) 



Ii 



Greenhouse: 



Transplanted Gardens 





t diseases," Slagle said, 
iach module, measuring 25 feet by 25 
t, contained a temperature and humidity 
itrol system. Slagle said there was also an 
ustment for daytime and nightime cool- 

ie said the control systems could be 



regulated to speed up the growth process of a 
crop. The dormant stage, that crops in a 
natural environment go through, was 
eliminated with the use of this controlled en- 
vironment. 

"More testing can be completed in a 
calendar year with the use of these controll- 



ed greenhouses," Slagle said. 

Few undergraduate students were involv- 
ed with the testing and experimenting of 
plants for research in the greenhouses but 
some undergraduate were able to observe 
research projects, Slagle said. 

"There isn't enough space in the complex 
to routinely hold many lecture classes, but 
when it's finally finished, it will be wonder- 
ful for everyone," he said. 

Slagle said the complex could be expanded 
in two years. This would increase the space 
needed for more lecture classes to be held in 
the complex and be used as a good teaching 
aid. 

The first greenhouses were built in 1981 
and then 32 modules were added in 
December 1985 bringing the total to 84. 

These modules are operated by state and 
university funds, Slagle said. 

The agronomy, entomology, horticulture 
and plant pathology departments are involv- 
ed in the greenhouse research. 

-Kelly Hodge 

Larry Patton, employee of the agronomy department, 
works with a wheat experiment in the Throcl(morton 
greenhouses. (Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 




111 



Thinking Like a Child 



At first look, it hardly seemed like a 
college-level class. The students had paint 
smeared on a table and more paint dripping 
from their hands. 

Mobiles of pumpkins and witches hung 
above their heads as they busily created 
fingerpaint prints. 

These students were not just fingerpain- 
ting for fun, but rather to learn about how to 
approach art with elementary -age students. 
The class was one of eight methods classes 
required for all elementary education ma- 
jors. The others included music, physical 
education or health, language arts, science, 
social science and teaching reading. 

The important aspects of these classes in- 
cluded, "learning what materials are need- 
ed, what is typically taught to kids at dif- 
ferent age levels and how decisions are 
made," said Mary Harris, head of the Col- 
lege of Education's Department of Cur- 
riculum and Instruction. 

Some of the classes encouraged group ac- 
tivities. 

"My number one consideration (in 
teaching this class) is that they (the college 
students) will no longer fear or hate art," 
said Margaretta Kren, Art for the Elemen- 
tary Teacher instructor. 

Kren described the art course as a cram 
course. During the semester, the students 
were presented with materials covering five 
different areas of art — painting, sculptur- 
ing, print making, crafts and drawing. 

Chris Loehr, senior in elementary educa- 
tion, said the projects they worked on in 
class, ' 'kind of remind you of the stuff Mom 

Oellon Graves spreads paint while Maria Unruh 
transfers the painted design to paper in the Art for the 
Elementary Teacher class. (Photo by Jim Dleb) 



used to hang on the refrigerator." 

"In elementary education, (education) 
students are required to learn both content 
and concept," Harris said. "In some of the 
methods courses, there is probably a higher 
amount of content taught." 

In Music for Elementary Teachers, 
students learned about musical instruments. 
During the course, the student was expected 
to learn how to play three simple tunes on 
the piano, autoharp and recorder. The stu- 
dent also had to prepare lesson plans and 
present them to the class. 

"The best part of the class," said Rhonda 
Young, junior in elementary education, 
"was teaching the lesson plan and seeing 
their (her classmates) reactions to the 
creativity in the lesson plan." 

"The emphasis in a methods course is 
typically on ways of teaching," Harris said. 
"Depending on which theory you follow, 
there are at least 15 ways to teach any con- 
tent. 

"Along the way, they (the students) need 
to try the activities," Harris said. 

In the Physical Education for Elementary 
Teachers class, the students gained practical 
experience. 

"I try to give them (the students) as much 
hands on (experience) as possible," said 
Joselle Edwards, Physical Education for the 
Elementary Teacher instructor. "Most of 
my students are sophomores and juniors. If 
they don't know if they want to teach by 
now, they will when they leave my class." 

During the physical education course, 
students learned about the elemtary age 



child, types of movement, how to write ap- 
propriate lesson plans and how to apply their 
knowledge through peer teaching and obser- 
vations. 

The students also had the chance to work 
with pre-schoolers during a field day in 
Aheam Field House. Edwards said the class 
prepared six stations for the children to visit. 
It was through this learning experience the 
students were able to take the information 
they had studied and adapt it to the children 
they were working with. 

Vicky Carvalho, Tenderluvs pre-school 
owner, said the chidren enjoyed visiting the 
University. She said it was a good ex- 
perience for the college students because, 
"it's a big thing to learn how to get down to 
children's level and play. This (the field day) 
also helps them make sure they are enjoying 
and having fun with what they are doing." 

It was through these methods classes the 
students learned about the children they 
were to teach and the ways in which they 
could be taught. Often times this required 
the student to remember what it was like to 
be a child again. 

As the art class worked on their finger- 
painting prints, Kren said, "Let's clean 
up." 

Cries of, "Oh Margo — one more — 
please," were heard from the students. 

And just as in a grade school classroom 
where the students would one day be 
teachers, Kren relented, "OK — one 



more. 



— Becky Lucas 



Elementary Education 



113 



114 




Memorial Stadium, built between 192 
and 1938, was constructed as a memori 
to K-State students who died in Wor 
War I. In the theme of the memoria 
several artists painted an S-foot-by-l 
foot mural in the breezeway of We 
Stadium depicting a war scene. 

The mural is a fresco; an art proce 
where paint is applied to damp plaste 
The fresco was a collectivist painting, 
group project. Eight students, includii 
two high school teachers, finished a twi 
week fresco workshop offered throuj 
the art department. 

"The group agreed on basic elemer 
and enhanced, enlarged and modified 
they went along," said Jerry Linton, i 
structor of art. 

"Murals have to do with architectu 
or purpose," he said. 

Names of K-State students killed in tl 
war are in the fresco and indicate that tl 
building is a war memorial. 

The fresco is roughly divided into foi 
horizontal sections. Each morning one < 
the students came early to soak wi! 
water the section on which they we 
working. Then they would trowl the i: 
tonaco (the surrounding surface that 
painted), transfer the drawing to the i 
tonaco, then paint. They began at 8:^j 
a.m. and would work until about 2:; 
p.m., when it got hot, Linton said. | 

Jeaneane Johnson puts some finishing touches oi 
World War I memorial fresco painting in I 
breezeway of West Stadium as part of a paintii 
class. (Photo by Scot Morrissey) 



Fresco Painting 



Painting 



; He described the steps of making a 
fesco. First, limestone is ground to 
jowder and fired in a kiln where it turns 
i) calcium oxide or quick lime. 
I The quick lime is then mixed with 
,ater, which causes it to boil. This is 
died slaking. Calcium oxide is the pro- 
itict of the boiling phase. It then turns to 
iilcium hydroxide or slake-lime putty. 
The putty must be aged for at least 
.ree months. Linton said the putty for 
.e war memorial fresco aged nine mon- 
,s. 

; The slake lime is then mixed with sand. 
jliis is done in layers. In the first layer, 
jilled the starch coat, the putty is mixed 
!ith more coarse sand, horse hair and 
[hite cement. The second coat is called 
,e brown coat. The final coat is the in- 
jnaco coat and is painted on with dry 
|gments mixed with water. 
{"After it dries, the surface has its own 
jialities, it's own look," Linton said. 
Different surface textures are available, 
jhen frescos dry too quickly they crack 
[d some work with this. 
I "There are two lost generations of 
jisco producers since the WPA (Works 
"ogress Administration) in the '30s. One 
jason was that the architecture since the 
Os does not include indoor decorative 
jjas such as murals," Linton said. 

—Jessica Gard 




Fresco Painting 



ETA KAPPA NU 



Electrical Engineering 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: David Jarrett, Mark Doljac, Alan 
Ferguson, Richard Gallagher. SECOND ROW: Daniel 
Meigs. David Briggs, David Rodenbaugh, Mari< 
Vaughn, James Heise. THIRD ROW: Barbara Muff- 
man, Jeff Mugler, Eric Nelson, Rick PieschI, George 
Nincehelser, Todd Moore. BACK ROW: Susan Hey, 
Janice Coleman, William Schnewels, Martin Els, 
Janet Smolar. 



FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Clark Rogers, William Homer, Brooks 
Rarden, Jon Freund, Brian Bauer, Todd Kirsch, All 
Fatemi. SECOND ROW: David Johnson, Rusty 
Clopine, Clark Eschliman, Kelly Dubbert, Kevin 
Scott, Randy Carigren, Tom Franzen, Kent Cable. 
THIRD ROW: Brenda Moore, Kathy Connor, Janice 
Taylor, Kenneth Mercer, Patrick Cubbage, Michael 
Smith, Dan Schwanzkopf. BACK ROW: Amy Ward, 
Shelly Hauff, Colleen Black, Terry Cyr, Jill Maska, 
Lisa O'Connell, Nancy Palmer, Gina Moore, 



FOOD SCIENCE CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Harold Roberts, Kim Payne, Nick 
Hart, Dick Bassette. SECOND ROW: Somjit Rerkrai, 
Renee Hart, Karen Blakeslee, Bernie Boiler. BACK 
ROW: Susan Todd, Kelly Karr, Beth Moore, Connie 
Hart. 



FORESTRY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Keith Lynch, Eric Hoch, Craig Adams. 
BACK ROW: Brian McNulty, Kevin Ricke, George 
Thurman, Barry Skolout. 



FACULTY SENATE 



FRONT ROW: Jerome Frieman, Al Davis, Stuart 
Swartz, Charles Reagan, Charles Thompson, Mary 
Rakovifsky, David Schafer. SECOND ROW: Charles 
Marr, Jim Grieg, George Ham, Gary Allee, Jim 
Koelliker, Fredric AppI, Bob Smith, Wayne Nafziger. 
THIRD ROW: Michael Finnegan, Marilyn Stryker. 
Kenneth Fox, David Donnelly, Ken Brooks, Marg 
Neely, Carol Ann Holcomb, Deanne Munson, Jan 
Wissman, David Cox. FOURTH ROW: Jan Flora, 
Barry Flinchbaugh, Cornelia Flora, Kerry Jones, 
Terry Astuto. Harlan Trennepohl, Jack Lambert, 
Walter Cash, Cheri Geiser, Deborah Madsen, An- 
thony Crawford, Veryl Switzer, Earl Nolting. BACK 
ROW: Mary Ellen Sutton, Susan Angle, Harriet Ot- 
tenhiemer, Eugene Friedman, Nancy Twiss, Page 
Twiss, Aruna Michie, Robert Helgesen, Darwin 
Liverance, George Strecker, Robert Linder, Richard 
Akins. 



116 




Picture in your mind an average farmij; 
operation. Did you envision a cattle feedlj, 
a farrowing house, a feed shed — and a co;- 
puter? 

If the computer was left out of this imaj, 
you may not have had a good picture of wit 
the average farm is becoming. 

To prepare animal science majors foiji 
farm future that included computers, Bji 
Brent, professor of animal sciences and i- 
dustry, taught Microcomputer Applicaticji 
in Animal Science. I 

Brent said it was essential to introdij; 
computers to animal science majors. In t: 
past, computer classes offered by the coj- 
puter science department filled up quickj, 
preventing some agriculture majors fnji 
getting the computer instruction they ne<j- 
ed. 

The first part of Brent's class introducjl 
students to the computer by using the wo; - 
processing program. The program served; 
an ice-breaker between the students al 
computers. | 

"It (the word-processing program) is fa:- 
ly easy to learn and gets students over ii: 
fear of computers," Brent said. j 

The course worked with computer spre'l 
sheets which allowed students to see {1 
aspects of the farming business. Brent sal. 
The spread sheet listed things such as (}• 
penses and capital stock which enabled li; 
student to determine a farm's net profit, i 

The spread sheet allowed the student p 
play "what if," changing variables to 5i! 
what a farm's net profit would be if certiji 
changes in the farming operation w(: 

I 
Hod Schwemmer demonstrates how computers Je 
used in modern farming methods. (Photo lllustratioi\}l 
John Thelander) 



Barn Computer: 



nade. 

The final part of the class was spent work- 
ng with application programs. Students 
Igured least-cost feed rations according to 
)eef cattle performance. 

"The real goal here is if we train kids 
ight, they will be able to work out of the 
;omputer manuals on their own," Brent 
;aid. 

The class spent a little time programming 
n BASIC language. The students used their 
knowledge of BASIC to program mailing 
ists. 

"Many purebred operators advertise by 
lirect mailing. A program like this would 
implify advertising," Brent said. 

Brent expected most of his students to 
etum to the farm following graduation. He 
loped his students would implement their 
omputer skills into their operations. 

The computer classroom, which was a 
emodeled storage room, contained five 
lladio Shack computers. Two sections of 10 
tudents each shared the room. 
I The programs used for the class were 
jommercial except for a few spread-sheet 
jTograms Brent wrote himself. 

"I have never taken a computer class. I 
'ought a computer for private business and 
jiught myself how to use it." 
I Brent predicted the class would not be of- 
'jred in three years because high school 
1 omputer instruction would make his class 
bsolete. 

; "High school students will graduate with 
'nough knowledge of computers that col- 
^■ges will only need to make computers 
vailable to them. I also think some college 
judents will have their own computers," 
jrent said. 

— Lori Bredow 




Barn Computers 



GAMMA THETA 
UPSILON 



International Geograptiy 
Honor Society 

FRONT ROW: Doug McKinney, Brian Fisher, Eugene 
Seagle, Duane Nellis SECOND ROW: Rob Vener, 
Jeff Nolle, Erik Peterson, Shawn McCune, Tod 
Meyn BACK ROW: Virgil Wiebe, Lon Siltman, Kara 
Brown, Lou Young, Eirene Tatham, Jerry Woolfolk. 



GOLDEN KEY 



FRONT ROW: Russell Rausch, Lance Lewis, Kelly 
Dubben, Scon Anderson, Vincent Berry, David 
Salava SECONO ROW: Julie Imthurn, Sherry 
Mooney. Everett Rosey, William Royster, Jerome 
Stem THIRD ROW: Lisa Hettwer, Diane Legleiter, 
Teresa Temme, Julie Reaser, Susan Baird, Tonie 
Rohrbaugh. BACK ROW: Ronald Rausch, Vera 
McMinimy, Gisele McMinimy, Susan Herring, Jeanie 
Brown, Sharon Chalker, Timothy Massey. 



GOLDEN KEY 



FRONT ROW: Barry Hoter, Andy Martin, Brent 
Lilley, Dan Costello, Louis Bastin, Kenneth Mercer, 
Paul Krueger SECOND ROW: Lisa Stover, Donna 
Olberding, Renae Slatt, Raphael Yunk, Steven 
Cashman, Khiem Dao, THIRD ROW: Julie Morin, 
Hari Paramesh, Victoria Lavezzi, Kelly Conyac, Ran- 
dy Warner, Rodney Driscoll BACK ROW: Janna 
Adkinson, Debbie Shaw, Barbara Rowe, Lora Jones, 
Stacy Mercer, Michelle Clifford, Stephanie Case 



GOLDEN KEY 
EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 



FRONT ROW: Kelly Dubbert. Lance Lewis, Russell 
Rausch. BACK ROW: Diane Legleiter, Sharon 
Chalker, Jeanie Brown. 



GRAIN SCIENCE AND 
INDUSTRY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Brad Johnson, Mark Davidson, Glen 
Fisher, Russell Godfrey. SECOND ROW: Martin 
Guthrie, Darin Duffin, Shawn Gouldie, Paul Liebeno, 
Darcy Mathes. THIRD ROW: Ed Ratherl, Shabad 
Abdul-Muttalib, Glenn Ninemire, Curt Thompson, 
Danny Claycamp. BACK ROW: Tim Steele, Anthony 
Olberding, Karen Wolters, Fred Gatschet, Juan 
Carlos Rodriguez. 



117 



Harnessing the Sun 




Lighting in the heiiodon enabies students to study 
shadows created at 9 a.m. (top), noon (center) and 3 
p.m. and aii other dayiight hours. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 

Woricing with a model, IVIarIc Panlcratz observes 
shadows simulated in the heiiodon during the summer. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



The domed-shaped helidon appears as 
though it is from outerspace. But the ar- 
chitectural design facility is very down to 
earth, providing a place for architecture and 
design students to test models in simulated 
sunlight. 

The helidon is a 36-foot-diameter 
hemisphere with mounted spotlights that 
simulate the positions of the sun during 
specific days throughout the year. 

"The helidon is used as a design facility 
by both students and practicing profes- 
sionals," said Keith Christensen, associate 
professor of architecture. 

"The helidon is simply a 'sun machine'," 
Christensen said. 

Models of buildings were used to see how 
the sun hit the building at different times of 
the day and year. 

The model was placed on a table, set at the 
same latitude as Manhattan, and the architect 
turned on different light switches depending 
on the time of day he needed. The helidon 
showed where the sun would shine on the 
building and where the shadows would oc- 
cur. 



"What we (the architects) are the mc 
concerned about is energy use; the secoi 
factor is comfort. Since solar energy h 
become an issue, people are concerned wi! 
their 'sun rights'," Christensen said. '"Si 
rights' are simply your right to the sun. ; 
neighboring office cannot construct I 
building that will block all the sun off yo 
property. 

"Because of high electric bills, natui 
daylight has become a concern,; 
Christensen said. ' 

The other reason for using the helidon w 
determining comfort. 

"If the sun blares through your office wi 
dow, you will not be comfortable. We wai 
to design your building so some light w 
come through your window but not ti 
much," Christensen said. i 

Lectures and demonstrations were givj 
to architecture and design classes inside t' 
helidon. The students were able to use t. 
helidon for determining the lighting on th^j 
projects. j 

"I found the helidon very useful. I woui 
use it to take photographs of how the sij 



118 




ghted my project," Brian Adams, senior in 
rchitecture, said. 

The students tested the lighting on blocks 
efore completing their final model. 

"It's almost like toys; you build blocks in 
ifferent shapes to see where the lighting is 
oing to fall. You can make the necessary 
hanges at this time," Doug Levey, senior 
1 architecture, said. 

Henry Wright, a distinguished visiting 
rofessor, developed the helidon and com- 
leted it in 1965. 

The helidon took two years to constuct and 
lore than $12,000 in funds. 

"The helidon is one of four developed in 
le United States, and is the largest in ex- 
itance," Christense said. 

Testing different projects in the helidon, 
le students realized how important the sun 
in be to a building structure. 

' "We are all aware of the sun but tend to 
ke it for granted. It is not until we look at it 
iid study it that we realize its true impor- 
nce," Christensen said. 
' —Jada Allerheiligen 




HOME ECONOMICS 
COLLEGE COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Angle Rowland. Ton! Binel, Mary Jo 
Lampe, Kent Bradley. SECOND ROW: Jill Heins, 
Elaine Wetter, Sharon Chalker, Laura Garrett, Terri 
Hoffman. BACK ROW: Marcia Nunderlich, Starrlene 
Esslinger, Kathy Jilka, Julie Byer, Candy Leonard. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 
INTEREST GROUP 



FRONT ROW: Julie Shertz, Elaine Wetter, Debbie 
Rumford, Jeannie Gross, Dianna Hunt. SECOND 
ROW: Rita Lesser, Lucinda Lehr, Sue Phillips, Anne 
Wiley, Karen Beck. BACK ROW: Julie Thatcher, 
Kristine Claassen, Shauna Murphey, Cheryl Gerdes, 
Helen Kane. Michelle Stuke. 



HORTICULTURAL 
THERAPY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Richard Mattson, Scott Dexter, 
Howard Campbell, Mark Leonard. SECOND ROW: 
Theresa Diver, Evelyn Campbell, Polly Pageler, Lin- 
da Bogner, Ranita Evans. BACK ROW: Colleen Nut- 
ter, Jann Smith, Barbara Renner, Maryetta Teaford. 



THE INSTITUTE OF 

ELECTRICAL AND 

ELECTRONICS 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Teresa Lewis, Gregory Loseke, 
Thomas Bloom, Martin Shorman, Mark Ummen, 
Franklin Johnson, Stephen Dyer. SECOND ROW: 
Paul Sigllnger, Craig Robson, Stephen Morey, 
Robert Wald, Rick Schmalzried, Marlin Queen. 
THIRD ROW: Kirk Duncan, John Blinne, Jeff 
Mugler, Scott Quinn, George Sutton, Michael Mejia. 
BACK ROW: Heather Boss, Joann Buchanan, 
Rogelio Bacaizo, Rodney Wise, Rodger Graham, 
Hisham Hawari, Martin Els. 



THE INSTITUTE OF 

ELECTRICAL AND 

ELECTRONICS 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Vaughn Schlegel, Lance Atwell, Barry 
Walker, James Heise, Grover Sanchez. Jason Kauf- 
man, William Hammersley. SECOND HOW: Merle 
Rhoads, John Ecklund, Shane Michael, Raymond 
Jones, Steven Yohe. BACK ROW: Loren Davis, Car- 
rie Helmke, Mark Augustine, Karen Fischer, Tim 
Kaufman, Edward Frankenberg. 



119 




Speech Unlimited, K-State's individual 
speaking events squad, enjoyed a successful 
year, winning several tournaments and plac- 
ing 10th at the national forensics tourna- 
ment. 

"Our (the coaches') goal is to get as many 
students qualified for nationals as possible," 
Lynne Ross, instructor of speech and direc- 
tor of forensics, said. 

During the 1984-85 season, 11 members 
of the squad qualified for the American 
Forensic National Individual Events Tourna- 



ment at Towson College, near Baltimore, 
Two K-Staters placed at the tournament. 
Shirley Turner, a 1985 graduate, placed fifth 
in dramatic interpretation. Angela O'Hara, 
senior in journalism and mass communica- 
tions, placed third in poetry interpretation. 
Ross said squad members could qualify 
for national competition by having an 
outstanding performance at three regular- 
season tournaments or by placing at the 
regional tournament. Most squad members 
qualified at the regional tournament. 




K-State was part of a six-state region I- 
eluding Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoni, 
Texas and Louisiana. A placing in the topj) 
percent of the competition qualified a sqiji 
member for nationals. ' 

The squad competed as a team at the - 
tional tournament. Following each rouij, 
teams were awarded points for tejo 
members' performances. K-State plactd 
10th the past two years. 

"If we can place in the top 10, 1 am thr 
ed," Ross said. 

Ross has been with the squad since its s 
in 1975. She said the squad was made po;|i- 
ble when the College of Arts and Scienjs 
Council funded a forensics squad sepai e 
from the debate team. Until then, die cy 



Jennifer Hays and Brad Atchison practice a dranli 
duo Interpretation from a play cutting. (Photo by jk/ 
Thelander) 




120 



Speed 



idividual speaking events in which 
^-Staters took part were part of debate tour- 
aments, Ross said. 

"There's always been debate, but it's just 
^n in the last 12 years that more emphasis 
is been placed on individual speaking 
/ents," Ross said. 

Ross said it was difficult to participate on 
)th the debate and forensics squads because 
)th required much travel time and prepara- 
3n time. 

The squad started with about 50 students, 
OSS said. As the year progressed, the less 
iccessful students became less active. The 
|uad had about 20 active members at the 
id of the season. 

—Becky Lucas 

ingela O'Hara practices a poetry interpretation before 
ilow teammates. (Photo by John Thelander) 




Speech 




INSTITUTE OF 
INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Lloyd Curtis, Mark Chalfant. Jon 
Cranmer, Todd Postier, Todd Schemm, Frank 
Tillman. SECOND ROW: Steven Weith, Bnan Meier. 
John Miller, Elaine Gillespie, Hugh Gibson, Mark 
Verschelden, David Gunther THIRD ROW: Rebecca 
Neelly, Rodney Oriscoll, Robert Clarke, Bob Pender, 
Eduardo Osorlo, Ingko Oetomo, John Wilson BACK 
ROW: Jane Mann, Ron! Johnson, Janice Blanken- 
ship, Fredlyn Brown, Denise Reeves, Karen Under, 
Janelle Wiebe. 



INTERFRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Paul Englis, Jeff Mace, Wesley Alex- 
ander, Bob Copher, Kent Cable, Greg Pestlnger SE- 
COND ROW: Brian Schwermann, Kevin Stein, 
William Petrle, Kevin Vondra, Keenan Beauchamp, 
Philip Bullinger. THIRD ROW: Dan Stock, Richard 
Harris, Greg Sharpe, Mike Porch, Mark Coble, Kevin 
Knaus, John Crovifl. BACK ROW: Gary Sepulveda, 
William Charlton, Mike Robbins, Mark Heimer, 
David Doerflinger, Bob Oltjen, Gary Arroyo 



INTERFRATERNITY 

AND PANHELLENIC 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Gary Arroyo, Mike Robbins, Kevin 
Knaus. SECOND ROW: Sherri Hager, Maribeth Gott- 
schalk, Frances demons. Tammy Rickerson. BACK 
ROW: Angela O'Hara, Dan Stock, Becky Davis. 



INTERNATIONAL 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Cheow Yeo, Cheng Teo, Kayed 
Palestine, John Spicer, Ingko Oetomo, Tim Olson, 
Volker Appel. SECOND ROW: Hong-Yau Chua. 
Hisham Hawari, Ahed Palestine, Carta Brown, Larry 
Paris, Kevin Lew. THIRD ROW: Leslie Allen, Wai- 
Choong Wong, Charles Reinecke, Shea Wickramas- 
ingha, Krishna Vaidya, Michelle Harris. BACK ROW: 
Chew Han, Annalena Bjornmalm, Juanita Gutierrez, 
Annette Powell, Kayoko Matsunaga, Jennifer 
Powell. Cristina Chang. 



KANSAS STATE 

ENGINEERING 

MAGAZINE 



FRONT ROW: Mike Gross, John Jasper, Randy 
Regehr, Dennis Shields. SECOND ROW: Barry 
Shotts, John Socolfsky, Scott Scrogin, Don Proven- 
cher, Richard Klassen. BACK ROW: Dan Malone, 
Athena Wong, Douglas Folk, Brent Richter, Tim 
Kaufman, John Ellenz. 



121 



Players perform in Nichols 



When Nichols Theater 
op)ened in the fall of 1985, it 
wasn't quite Broadway, but 
for the K-State Players it was 
a definite step up. 

Past Players productions 
had been performed in the 
Purple Masque Theater and 
McCain Auditorium. Both 
were inappropriate for some 
productions. 

The Purple Masque 
Theater, located in East 
Stadium, was small and in 
need of repair. McCain, 
although newer, was too 
large for some smaller pro- 
ductions. 

Nichols Theater was com- 
pleted with the renovation of 
Nichols Hall. The theater 



Harry S. Truman, portrayed by Har- 
ris Shore is lifted off tlie ground after 
a poiiticai victory. (Photo by Pete 
Obetz) 



seated approximately 250 
people and created an in- 
timate atmosphere for the au- 
dience. 



"It is very comfortable. 
The audience feels close to 
anything that happens on 
stage. It will heighten the ef- 




fect (of the action on the 
stage). It will show how good 
the students here really are," 
Lew Shelton, associate pro- | 
fessor of speech, said. 

The theater was flexible 
because it could have either a ! 
thrust-stage configuration, j 
with seating on three sides, or i 
theater-in-the-round . 

Being in a new building has 
been a boost for the entire ' 
speech department. 

"It has made us all more 
excited. We have terrific 
practice rooms and offices. It i 
has made a big difference in ; 
the morale," MacFarland I 
said. 

— Jada Allerheiligen 
and Paul Englis 



122 




Whistle-Stop campaigning used ex- 
tensiveiy by Harry S. Truman was 
portrayed in the play "The Bucic 
Stops Here." (Photo by Pete Obetz) 



Editor's Note: Information about 
plays was compiled from Collegian 
reviews. 



The Buck 
Stops Here 

Conceived by Richard A. 

Lippmann 

Bool( by Norman Fedder 

Directed by Kate 

Anderson 

Nov. 12-16, 1986 
Nichols Theater 

"The Buck Stops Here" is 
based on the life of President 
Harry S. Truman — the man 
who worked hard to be 
regarded by others as his own 
man. He fought for principle, 
whatever the consequences. 
The show depicted the 33rd 
president as somewhat of a 
good-natured nitwit at first, 
long on book-brains but short 
on social senses. 

Harris Shore played 
Truman. Truman's mother, 
Martha, was played by Terri 
Myers and his mother-in-law, 
Madge, was played by 
Kathleen Pfister. His wife, 
Bess, was played by Connie 
Ramos, while Tom Over- 
myer portrayed Charlie Ross, 
Truman's press secretary. 
Kelly Vance played Tom 
Pendergast. 

The play spans 60 years, 
focuses on Truman's per- 
sonal and political relation- 
ships and incorporates this in- 
to a script that includes song 
and dance. The play was per- 
formed with one set and no 
curtain. 



-State Players 



123 



King Berenger, portrayed by 
Douglas Dickey, reflects on his past 
in the play "Exit the King." Queen 
Marguerite, played by Kelli Wondra, 
stands by and listens. (Photo by Brad 
Fanshier) 




Josie Hogan, played by Marcia 
Sullivan, threatens T. Steadman 
Harder, played by David Higgins, dur- 
ing "Moon for the Misbegotten." 
(Photo by Brad Fanshier) 



Moon 

for the 

Misbegotten 

Play by Eugene O'Neill 

Directed by Charlotte 

MacFarland 

Oct. 10-12, 1985 
McCain Auditorium 

Unlike other Eugene 
O'Neill plays, "Moon for the 
Misbegotten" is a morality 
play that skillfully delivers a 
lesson of mercy, forgiveness 



and love. [ 

The play opens on a shanty | 
farm in rural Connecticut inl 
1923. Josie Hogan, played byi 
Marcia Sullivan, shoos off; 
her last brother, played by| 
Brad Atchison, so he can 
become somebody other than 
a slave to their drunken Irish 
father, played by Timothy, 
Smith. 

Josie and her father, along! 
with their landlord James 
Tyrone Jr., played by Craig 
Stout, pull each other in dif- 
ferent directions until the>l 
finally come to a sort o!| 
reconciliation. ; 



124 



K-State Player 




Glass 
Alley 



Play by John Crego 

Directed by David G. 

Burris 

Dec. 4-7, 1985 

Nichols Theater 

"Glass Alley" takes place 
in an alcohol rehabilitation 
center. The two-act play 
spans two days in the lives of 
six characters. 

The play is centered around 



its lead character, Owen, 
played by Brad Atchison. 
Other rehabilitation patients 
were David, played by 
Timothy Smith; Mary, 
played by Janet Harmon; and 
Speed, played by Paul 
Hopkins. Greta Spears por- 
trayed Dr. Jarvis and Craig 
Stout played Jack, the male 
nurse. 

The play's theme, "We 
junkies's got feelings too," 
follows through the story to 
the end, when the audience 
fX)nders the accusation that 
God is to blame for one's 
sorry lot in life. 

Brad Atchison portrays Owen, a 
character in a alcohol rehabilitation 
center. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 



Exit 
the King 

Play by Eugene lonesco 

Directed by Charles W. 

Edwards 

Sept. 26-28, 1985 
Purple Masque Theater 

"Exit the King" is about a 
king wrangling with the pro- 
spect of his death and 
employs absurdism in telling 
the story. 

The play opens with the an- 
nouncement that King 
Berenger, played by Douglas 
Dickey, is a dying man. In 
the two-hour production, the 
king denies, then accepts the 
falling of his kingdom and his 
life. 

Before the king can die, he 
must abdicate not only the 
throne of his kingdom but the 
throne of his soul as well. He 
must do this item by item, 
giving up the things he 
wanted most in life. 

Queen Marguerite, played 
by Kelli Wondra, cares for 
her dying husband. The 
queen is an odd mixture of 
sarcasm, realism and 
cynicism who acts as a mid- 
wife to death. In her caring 
for the king and escorting 
him to death, she shows him 
more compassion than she 
showed in his mortal life. 



K-State Players 




KANSAS STATE 
ROWING 



FRONT ROW: Lourdes Poey, Carla O'Hair, Rhonda 
Davis, Kim Cave, Nancy Wernes, Barbara Berry, 
Barbara Foote. SECOND ROW: Curt Drennen, Randy 
Burnett, Jotin Turner, Brad Jotinson, Vince Stadel, 
Jeff Laugtiman, Aaron Rice. THIRD ROW: Kattii 
Wtiite, Brecl< Barnhart, Josepti Merle, Damon 
Cauthon, Tom Butler, Kevin Kriss, Jetl Longley. 
FOURTH ROW: Cala Selby, Theresa Plevka, Mary 
SIvyer, Yvette Guislain, William Buek, Rodney 
Coker, Regina Connery. BACK ROW: Diane Kastens, 
Laurie Brenner, Rick Darnell, Jim Johnson, Michael 
Sudermann, Tim Kuechmann. 



KANSAS STATE 

STUDENT 
FOUNDATION 



FRONT ROW: Rusty Andrews, Scott Sawyer, Tim 
Balfour, Jim White. SECOND ROW: Drew Hertel, 
Joyce Little, Larry DeBarthe, Gerald Salts, BACK 
ROW: Kyle Hamilton, Michelle Nyhan, Brenda 
Sweat, Stephanie Berggren. 



KANSAS STATE 

STUDENT SPEECH 

AND HEARING 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: James Hart, Pamela Dolezal. Donna 
Sternsdorff, Lillian Larson. SECOND ROW: Toni 
Anderson, Michelle Nyhart, Kim Murray, Paula 
Relchenberger, Patty Anderson. THIRD ROW: Janet 
Golightley, Lynette Hodges, Jami Strong, Caroline 
Salva. BACK ROW: Marlene Jimenz, Sharon 
Rockwell, Judy Faurot, Mary Kathryn McGeary, 
Beth Dalton. 



KANSAS STATE 

ENGINEERING 

TECHNOLOGISTS 



FRONT ROW: Dean Friesen, LeRoy Maneth, David 
Delker. SECOND ROW: Perry White, James Coash, 
Steve Otler, Charles Eberth. BACK ROW: Brad 
Wagner, Ron May, Jeffrey Wilson, 



K-LAIRES 



FRONT ROW: Brent Reed, Timothy Henning, Gerald 
Johnson, David Fischer, Gregory Dietrich SECOND 
ROW: Darren Wainwright, Harvey Ward, Tim Zim- 
merman, Mary Kirkpatrick, Duane Belote, Chris Zim- 
merman. THIRD ROW: Jeanettee Mitchell, Tracy 
Austin. Naomi Regier, Karen Sharp, Janet Beichart, 
Ranlta Evans BACK ROW: Dawn Robertson, Susan 
Dahl, Barbara Rowe, Tarah Thomas, Karen Caudle, 
Peggy Shandy. 



126 




]^ 



I 



As Lee Greenwood's raspy voice finishf 
the last few notes of his hit song "I.O.U.. 
a girl whispered to the man sitting besi( 
her, "He's such a romantic, isn't he." 

Lee Greenwood is indeed a romantic. H 
songs, such as "I Believe" and "Fool 
Gold" and his unforgetable and person 
performance, was all it took to confirm thi 
Singing every note to studio perfectio 
despite the typically poor acoustics 
Aheam Field House, Greenwood show 
why he was named Country Music Associ 
tion's Male Vocalist of the Year. Gree 
wood held the crowd of nearly 3,000 spe 
bound for more than an hour and a half at t 
Union Program Council Special Eveil 
Committee event. 

As the 42-year-old Greenwood took t 
stage, he immediately began belting out t 
up-tempo song "Streamlining," the title c 
from his 1985-released album. He th 
swung into his first hit of the evenir 
"Somebody's Gonna Love You," and frc 
then on, the crowd was his. 

Known for singing in the audience, Gref 
wood didn't let the ladies down. After ; 
cepting a rose from a fan in the audien( 
Greenwood sang his hit "I Don't Mind 1 
Thorns If You're the Rose" to a few ecsta 
women in the center aisle. 

"The crowd was not as crazy as it is 
some concerts, but when Greenwood wi 
into the audience, the young ladies w. 
nuts," said Dave Rogowski, senior in 
chitectural engineering and student secui 
guard for the concert. 

Greenwood, a very lively and perso I 
showman, sang, danced, and flirted with 
audience throughout the evening. 



\ 



Lee Greenwooiij 



Singer Woos Audience 



'You've got to have it together as a per- 
j Tner or your career will have no momen- 
tn," Greenwood said. "I enjoy being on 
s;ge." 

'Greenwood was very friendly off stage. 
I signed autographs and visited with the 
sdent security guards. He looked right at 
},i when he talked to you and really made 
>i feel important," Janice Kiser, UPC pro- 
g,m adviser, said. 

jreenwood drew a different type of au- 



dience. 

"We chose Greenwood because he ap- 
peals to the country and western audience. 
But he also crosses over into the adult con- 
temporary area," Kiser said. 

After more than an hour of anticipation, 
the audience got the song they had been 
waiting for — the 1985 country song of the 
year, "God Bless the USA." 

By the time Greenwood hit the final 
chorus, the fans were on their feet giving the 




kind of ovation normally reserved for a 
World Series national anthem. 

"It ('God Bless the USA') was very mov- 
ing and inspirational. You could feel the 
vibrations coming from the audience," 
Kiser said. 

When an American flag unfolded in the 
background during the performance of this 
song, Greenwood proved he was not only 
"romantic," but also "patriotic." 

— Mindy Stubenhofer 




Lee Greenwood, country vocalist, walks Into the au- 
dience and greets fans while singing, "I Don't Mind the 
Thorns If You're the Rose." Earlier in the concert Green- 
wood received a rose from a fan; he accepted it with a 
kiss. (Photo by Jeff Weatlierly) 

Uountry Music Awards voted Lee Greenwood's song, 
"God Bless the USA," song of the year for 1985. Green- 
wood performed this number as the finale of his 
Parents' Day performance, bringing 3,000 applauding 
fans to their feet. (PItoto by Jeff Weattierly) 



127 



K-LAIRES 



FRONT ROW: Laura Staudenmaler, Barb McNelce, 
Anthony Stueve. Bart Hettenbct. SECOND ROW: 
Melissa Luthi. Deanna Loucks, Kimberly Bestwick, 
James Smart. Louis Bastin. BACK ROW: Lisa 
Thomas, Rodger Graham, Cheryl Gerdes, Sondra 
Broers. 




K-STATE JUDO CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Anwar Dabbas, Mark Goldberg, 
Bradie Janes, James Luginbill, Ike Wakabayashi, 
Martin Meger. BACK ROW: Regan Jones, Dan Mc- 
Carthy, Charles Fuhrman, Fred Nieberding, Jeff 
Peuker, Ernest Larry. 




nitTitffi 




i 



K-STATE SAILING 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW Charlie Kichler, Kevin Stephenson. SE- 
COND ROW: Rob Graham, Steve WInslow, Brenda 
Deters THIRD ROW: Theresa Roesner, Betty 
Koechner, Jeff Oaklief, Ron House, Brian 
Winzenried, John Thornton, 



KSU AMATEUR RADIO 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Myron Calhoun, Paul Barry, Phillip 
Fry, David Yoder. BACK ROW: Doris Grosh, Kenneth 
Samson, Vance Morgan, Joe Fritton, Robert 
Freeman. 



KSU HORSEMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Pete Gibbs, Ronald Smith, Todd 
Quenzer, Dennis Sigler. SECOND ROW: David 
Ollphant, Steve Harris. Bryan Chadwell, Teresa 
Pickett, Bruce Fedde. THIRD ROW: Teresa Hanson, 
Andrew Swyers, Daniel Ridder, Mark Albln. BACK 
ROW: Mindy Higdon, Melissa Luthi, Kathy Vink, 
Rhonda Rein, Janette Poole. 



128 




Most people know what green beans tasii 
like, but they don't know what gives tt 
vegetable its unique taste. 

For those interested in the "flav( 
makeup" of foods, the Sensory Analysi 
Center, with its nine well-trained panelist 
provided the answers. 

The Sensory Analysis Center w; 
established in 1983 by Jean Caul, professi 
emeritus of foods and nutrition. The centei 
which is run by the College of Humii 
Ecology, performed sensory studies for foci 
industry corporations. 

The center conducted tests and studies (; 
food aging, product development and cor 
paring flavor substitutes. 

The aging studies helped a company dete 
mine a product's shelf life. The studies rj 
quired that a product be studied over an e 
tended period of time. i 

After receiving a product from a cor 
pany, the panelists then tasted the produ 
daily and rated the quality of the differe 
taste notes. 

Taste notes are the different qualities th 
combine to give a food its distinct flavc 
Elizabeth Smith, manager of the centt 
said. 

"Notes are a piece of the flavor. Then 
the sweet-sour notes and the aromatic not( 
and all together they make the whc 
(flavor)," she said. 

She said that when doing a soybean stud 
some of the notes were labeled "beany 
"acidic" and "chalky." 

Product development studies were p( 
formed for companies wanting to emul 
the flavor of another company's produ 
The center "dissected" the tastes or note 

Once the center dissected the notes of 1 
product, it reported to the company 
flavor makeup of the original product. T 
company then used this information 
creating a new product. 

Identifying the content of flav 
substitutes was done when companies wi 
looking to change food or beverage f 
mulas. A company may have been approa< 
ed by a salesman saying he had a less exp< ■ 
sive method of creating the original formu 
The center tested the original product si 
compared it to the substitute. 

After the studies were completed, Smi 
sent the company a profile of the resu 
The information included the number 



f 



Taste Testers 



Testing for Tastes 



panel members, a reference for each taste 
note and the statistical data supporting the 
center's findings. 

Smith said each taste note was given a 
reference taste indicating a certain level on a 
scale of one to 10. For example, a soybean 
study used a lima bean extract for the 
"beany note" reference. The extract was 
made from dried lima beans, ground, mixed 
with 500 milliliters of water and strained. 

"It's a No. 10 beany taste, believe me!" 
Smith said. 

The center conducted some studies on 
ususual foods including an aging study on 



Tofu — a type of bean curd, Guatemalan 
commeal and even a study on the dehydra- 
tion of okra. 

At the mention of the dehydrated okra. 
Smith made a face and said, "You know, 
it's not all chocolate and cookies in this 
business. We have to take the good with the 
bad." 

To ensure the accuracy of the taste tests. 
Smith said the panelists drink a specially 
treated water between each test to eliminate 
and neutralize aftertastes. 

The water the panelists drink is triple- 
distilled, deionized water. 




"It is a very clear, pure water. There are 
no off taste notes in our water at all," Smith 
said. 

Smith said working in the center has 
changed the way she eats. 

"Working with sensory analysis is really 
fun. I've always enjoyed eating, and I enjoy 
it even more now. You know some people 
put pizza in their mouth and down the hatch 
it goes," she said. "When I put pizza in my 
mouth my mind goes 'ah, the oregano, ah, 
the tomatoes.' Instead of just tasting one 
thing, I taste all the notes when I eat." 

— Becky Lucas 




Elizabeth Smith, manager of the Sensory Analysis 
Center, blends soybeans to be sampled by the taste 
testing panelist. (Photo by Steve Rasmussen) 

Jeri Stonel(ing samples one of the mixtures of soybeans 
in the Sensory Analysis Center. (Photo by Steve 
Rasmussen) 



129 



KSU HORTICULTURE 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Dave Hensley, Mark Lasnie', Craig 
WIens, Basil Fri, Ed Hellman. SECOND ROW: Oara 
Keener. Mirk Hoskins, Jim Stambaugh, Dan 
Walker. Jerry Lehmann. THIRD ROW: John Lang, 
Kimberly Hoch. Kim Youngblood, Theresa Diver, 
KImberly Williams, Kevin Oelke. BACK ROW: Dianne 
Jennings, Cathy Haskin, Rose Weninger, Mary 
Robertson, Kari Krause. 



KSU PARACHUTE 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Michael Smith, Karen Klemm, Lynn 
Langemeier, Terry Fairchild. Bill DaHfes, Devin 
Ross, Timothy Bickhaus, J. R. Smith. SECOND 
ROW: Dan Scott, Rusty Robetorye, Darrell Eiland, 
Bruce Berggren, Brant Schindler, Steve Brown, 
Stefan Bird, Oliver Kaubisch. THIRD ROW: Todd 
Marten. David Peuster. Ray Cole. Clint Tate. Shelly 
Bothwell, Kevin HonomichI, Ron Hemmy. Robert 
Gregory. BACK ROW: Satish Singh, Tom Riehle, 
Greg Ellison, Joe Davis, Kyle Griffith, David Oonnert, 
Clint Grieve. 



KSU RACQUETBALL 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Mark Whitfield, Bob Salem, David 
Fischer. SECOND ROW: Thomas Leihy, Stan Gose, 
Steve Kummer, Bill Lowman. BACK ROW: Denise 
Reeves, Diana Greenlee, Leslie Gaffney, Pam 
Besler, Ann McElroy. 



KSU RIFLE CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Wayne Zeller, Ricky Bowman, 
Timothy Putnam, Gordon Sandercox. SECOND 
ROW: Andrew Vikman, Ray Cole. Charles Herring. 
BACK ROW: Anna Broeker, Lisa Richards, Steven 
Hood, Michael Seufent. 



KSU SOCCER CLUB 



FRONT HOW: Stuart Craig, Kelley Cronan, Clinton 
McKenzle. BACK ROW: Ed Bennett. John 
Szyhowski, Tom Thomas, Harold Rathburn. 



130 




For anyone desiring historical informati 
about K-State or access to a rare book , 
document, a trip to the fifth floor of Farr . 
Library was in order. 

The University Archives and Special Ci- 
lections provided library patrons with i 
wealth of information — both historic a I 
current — about the University and subjej; 
of interest to students and faculty. 

These two library departments were C(i- 
tained in the same room and had temperati ; 



and humidity controls separate from the r 
of the library. The separate controls wi 
necessary to preserve the rare books 
documents stored by the departments. 

' 'We have plans to physically separate 
two departments within the next 
years," said John Vander Velde, spec 
collections librarian. Although the t 
departments were both currently located 




University Archivist Antliony Crawford pores 
university records prior to cataioguing them. (Phot 
Andy Nelson) 

John Vander Veide dispiays the booic "Ho 
Ciiffortianus," an exampie of eariy botanicai iliustra 
from the IVIaclcenzie Linnaeana, an important spe 
coiiection at KSU Libraries. (Photo by Andy Nelson, 



Library Collection 



K-State Time Capsule 



'he same room, they were completely 
separate in organization and maintenance. 
' Vander Velde said Special Collections 
gathers, maintains and preserves books, col- 
ections of books and other materials con- 
fiidered rare. 

I "We don't want to give the impression all 
of our things are old. We have new books as 
veil," Vander Velde said. "We do, 
'lowever, have predominantly old books — a 



few from the 15th century, a lot from the 
16th to 19th centuries." 

Vander Velde said one of the most ex- 
citing collections was the Cookery Collec- 
tion which contained about 3,000 books. 
The collection contained cookbooks and 
related items concerning home economics 
and nutrition. Vander Velde said the collec- 
tion helped students interested in research on 
home economics and related subjects. 




"To a large measure. Special Collections 
receives books through donations by in- 
terested individuals and alumni," Vander 
Velde said. "We have been more aggressive 
to find potential donors." 

Vander Velde said since 1983, when the 
department was reorganized. Special Collec- 
tions has acquired more important collec- 
tions than the department did in the 
preceding 20 years. 

Vander Velde said students or faculty 
from Kansas that might be interested in trac- 
ing family lineage could do so with the 
department's numerous books and 
documents on Kansas history. He said 
Special Collections was working on retain- 
ing a collection of Sir Edmund Halley's first 
publications on his observations of Halley's 
comet. 

University Archives provided students 
with access to documents dating back to as 
early as 1 855 when settlers came to Manhat- 
tan and first established Bluemont Central 
College. 

University Archives was different from 
Special Collections in that it predominantly 
retained documents pertaining to the Univer- 
sity. 

"We collect personal papers and records 
of organizations and companies related to 
K-State," said Anthony Crawford, universi- 
ty archivist. Crawford said students and 
faculty used University Archives to do pro- 
jects and papers concerning the development 
of K-State. 

"The more a paper reveals or documents a 
policy of administrative purposes, the more 
important it is. They provide documentation 
of what transpired," Crawford said. He said 
these documents included files, memos, 
minutes of meetings, annual reports and 
documents showing the day-to-day operation 
of campus offices. 

Access to the materials in Special Collec- 
tions and University Archives is supervised 
at all times. Crawford said the departments' 
materials are of such importance that the 
library cannot afford to have patrons brows- 
ing through them unattended. These 
documents are stored in acid-free boxes and 
filed to help preserve them so future genera- 
tions may have them as valued research 
tools. 

— Marcia Sullivan 



131 



LATTER DAY SAINTS 

STUDENT 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Thomas Parish, Marcie Stamper, 
David Warren, Eari Anderson. SECOND ROW: Ed- 
ward Bagby, Shawn McCune, Thomas Nelson. 
BACK ROW: Kathy Kluber, Kimberly Clark, Becky 
Bruner, Amy Kracht. 



LUTHERAN YOUNG 
ADULTS 



FRONT ROW: Christina Rahn, Glena Griffin, Carol 
Tracy, Evelyn Holle, Jon Beam. SECONO ROW: 
Mike Huechteman, Paul Lammert, Mark Thowe, Earl 
Holle, Charia Wagner. BACK ROW: Paul Honlgs. 
Austin Burns, Mari< Sellmann, Roger Goerke, Joyce 
Meyer. 



MARKETING CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Daniel Allen, Scot Sandlin, John 
Wunder, Robert Yeagley, Robert Taylor, Russell 
Schrag. SECOND ROW: Debbie Thumann, Roger 
Derksen, Drew Hertel, Barry Brummett, Gregg 
Shields, Melissa Snider. THIRD ROW: Fernando 
Dolande, Chris Wolf, David Bryant, Teddi Blackim, 
Teresa Leighty, Curt Champlin. BACK ROW: Sheila 
Potter, Kathy Kurtz, Carolyn Axland, Melissa Ed- 
wards, Kathy Watts, Dana Weeks, Martha Wood. 



MICROBIOLOGY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: James Longabaugh, Jack Taylor, 
James Urban. SECOND ROW: Michelle Chappell, 
Tammy Clark, Robert Feiring, Everett Rosey. BACK 
HOW: Freddie Ramos, Kayla Magman, Twyala 
Poole. 



MORTAR BOARD 



FRONT ROW: Roy Christians. Manthri Svluatw, 
Brett Lambert, Larry Boyd, Brian Schwermann. SE- 
COND ROW: Patricia Doud, Caryl Ward, Kim KIdd, 
Kathleen Bechtel, Dave Severson. THIRD ROW: 
Sarah Varner, Donna Lembke, Becky Might, Peggy 
MacNaughton, Karen Eskilson. BACK ROW: Darcy 
Gilbert, Sara Porteous, Jill Broughton, Kim Letellier, 
-Karen LInder. 



132 




"h 



Two questions that demanded much i 
students' time and attention — and ofi 
worry — were, "What am I going to ma. 
in?" and "How long wUl it take me i 
graduate?" ^ 

For many, the answer to the second quj 
tion frequently came up, "More than fij 
years." j 

According to Stephen Hall, assist 
registrar, during the 1985-86 school ye, 
218 students were classified as fifth-y! 
students. j 

The reason many students took lonj| 
than the traditional four years to complj 
their college work was summed up in (| 
word by William Feyerharm, assistant to 
dean of the College of Arts and Scienc 
"Money." 

According to Feyerharm, students Wj 
forced to "weave jobs and educat; 



Returning to college after an absence of 43 
years, Mable T. Wilfong can't believe the chani 
that have taken place on campus since her yea 
a sophomore during the "Big Warl" (1942) Hei 
late lamented husband, Harry (God rest his sou 
graduated in 1941 and was already a corporal i 
the United States Army Air Corps. His miraculo 
and meteoric rise through the ranks was made 
possible through the education he received at 




Overtime Education 



>gether." The cause for this was rising 
Dsts in education, he said. 

Students changing their majors was 
lother cause for extending the college 
career." About one-half to two-thirds of 
-State students changed their major bet- 
een enrolling as freshmen and their junior 
2ar. 

"Now is the time at (age) 18 to 22 to do 
le switching (of career choices)," 
eyerharm said. "By the time you reach 35, 
's hell to make a switch in life." 

Lynda Henson, senior in elementary 
lucation, spent a fifth year at K-State after 
langing her major at the beginning of her 
)urlh year. Henson said she changed her 
lajor because after gaining experience in 
le field of speech pathology , she decided it 
as not for her. 

"In my case it (the change in major) is go- 



SU. Now Mable will get the old sheepskin 
erself, even though she is a few years past the 
) to 22 age bracicet. iViaybe her sweats, K-State 
liirt and bacicpaclc wili malce it easier to biend in 
|ith the crowd. When warmer weather comes to 
ie Hint Hiils, Mable can buy some "Jams" and a 
jawaiian shirt or two at The Jean Station in Ag- 
evilie. Maybe she'll even stop in for a cool one 
Kite's. It's Ladies Night Y'know. 



n Year Students 



ing to make me happier in the long run," 
Henson said. 

Feyerharm said some curricula were 
labeled four-year programs. However, with 
the number of hours required to obtain a 
degree, the program turned into more than a 
four-year program. 

In the College of Engineering, less than 
one-half of the students graduated in four 
years, John Dollar, assistant dean of the col- 
lege, said. 

Dollar said all of the majors offered by the 
college were four-year programs with the 
exception of architectural engineering, 
which was a five-year program. 

A student in electrical engineering was re- 
quired to complete 133 hours, Robert Gard- 
ner, senior in electrical engineering, said. 

"You have to take 17 to 18 hours a 
semester to graduate. And if you blow one 
(class), it's already too late," Gardner said. 

"The four-year curriculum is not typical 
anymore," Dollar said. 

Dollar cited students sitting out a semester 
as a reason it took them longer to get through 
school. 

"There is more 'stopping out' in this era 
than there used to be," said Dollar in refer- 
ral to the number of students who set out a 
semester to take a break, or earn money 
which would enable them to continue with 
school. 

Dollar said students were taking fewer 
hours in an effort to boost their grade point 
averages. He said they did this to get 
scholarships and other student financial 
assistance. 

— Becky Lucas 

Illustrations by Joe Cook 



Typifying the older student population of the 
'80s, fifth-year senior in generic engineering, 
Elmer Prettiwilly, shoulders his backpack, grabs 
the weighty tomes required for the 16 hours of dif- 
ficult classes he's taking — In-depth Study of 
Water 102, The Amoeba and How It Grew, History 
of the Moustache Comb, Music Appreciation, 
Billiards 204 and Bovine Diseases Through the 
Ages — and heads for the Union to scope out the 
chicks. Even though one is past the traditional stu- 
dent age of 18 to 22, one is never too old to look, 
is one? Elmer is happy that a miniscule portion of 
his reasonable fee payment of S625.50 Is being 
spent for a new coliseum. Why Ahearn Field 

House is even older than he is. After the bonds are retired, then Memorial Stadium can be 
remodeled, or better yet, blown up with a few well placed sticks of TNT. What a treat for the ceramics 
and painting students. 




133 



ili't'l 



NATIONAL 

AGRIMARKETING 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Larry Erpelding, James Titsworth, 
Wally Brockhoft.John Riley. SECOND ROW: Link 
Boyd, Kyle Hemmert, Dane Devlin, Kevin Kuhlman. 
THIRD ROW: Don Fate, Joseph Deneke, Stanley 
Dubbert, Terry Pankratz, Bradley Bartel. BACK 
ROW: David Huerter, Peggy McNett, Kelley Meyer, 
Mike KadeL 



NATIONAL SOCIETY 
OF BLACK ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Steven Jamison, Michael Noctinbi, 
David Jarrett, Karen Hummel. SECOND ROW: Si- 
meon Terry, Ericka Foley, Charles Herring, Jerry 
Heard, Michael Vase. BACK ROW: Michelle 
Ragimud, Robin Holt, Albert Calvin, Lee Barnes. 



NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF PROFFESSIONAL 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Rebecca Bromich, Michael Molting, 
Mark Verschelden. BACK ROW: Robert Wald, Den- 
nis Hagner, James Koelliker. 



NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF ARCHITECTURAL 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Tim Nelson, Lisa Wipplinger, Wendi 
Pherigo, Shelly Lichtenhan, Cecilia Lawson, Filza 
Hassan, Lisa Bergman. SECOND ROW: Joseph 
Cravrford, Randall Russell, Timothy Robben, Ken 
Henton, Tony Butterfield, Tim Lang, Charles Bissey. 
THIRD ROW: Mary Samarzija, Keith D«fis, David 
RogovKSki, Bruce Brown, Charles Jones, Don Pro- 
vencher, Dave Powell, Jeff Vandel. FOURTH ROW: 
Brad Kielhofner, David Ahlstedt, Michael Svoboda, 
Bill Forster, Bob Franz, Maria Stauth, John Talk 
Ington. BACK ROW: Dan Knight, Ron House 
Stewart Jeske, Carol Luebbering, Geoffrey Hose 
Mike Lorenz, Ryan Schroeder, Scott Schmoker 
Bruce Schater. 



NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF ARCHITECTURAL 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Joel Marquardt. Michael Hessman, 
Scott McDaniel, Sean Murray, Don Posson, Herb 
Gozinyah, Rob Bullock, Ben Schrader. SECOND 
ROW: Eric Wieters, Kevin Jensen, Jeff Schwiethale, 
Robert Maxwell, Vonn Mann, Scott Hofer, Dan 
Stoltz. THIRD ROW: Julie Thompson, Wendy Wltt- 
mer, Rebecca Bromich, Ronda Bradshaw, Raphael 
Yunk, Gary Relnheimer, Paul Miller. BACK ROW: 
Lynn Elledge, Kathy Sackett, Rosemary Seiwald, 
Audrey Janda, Stephanie Borland, Mary Hazell, 
134 Robin Holt, Tracey Whaley. 







Q 



f% e> f^ f^ 



(3 





Rehabilitation of Birdsi 



Mending Broken Feathers 




An injured wild bird usual- 
ly doesn't have much chance 
for survival. But with the 
help of Dr. Terry Campbell, 
instructor of laboratory 
medicine and groups of 
veterinary student volunteers, 
many wild birds got a second 
chance. 

Campbell and the student 



volunteers were sent wild 
birds of prey by the Prairie 
Raptor Project, a bird 
rehabilitation center near 
Salina, when they were in 
need of surgery or medical 
care. The majority of the 
birds brought in were owls, 
hawks and prairie falcons. 
Almost 90 percent had suf- 




Nuzback holds Scout with a sturdy 
hand. The project works on all types 
of Injured birds of prey. (Photo by Jeff 
Tuttle) 



fered a traumatic injury, such 
as a gunshot wound or being 
hit by a car, Campbell said. 

When a bird arrived, a 
volunteer group of about six 
veterinary students was 
assigned to its case. The 
group evaluated the bird's 
condition and determined the 
type of surgery needed. 

After discussing the case 
with Campbell, the group 
performed the surgery. The 
bird was then sent back to 
Prairie Raptor to heal in a 
natural environment. 

"The hospital is a very 
stressful situation for the 
birds," Campbell said. "We 
find the birds do much better 
if they can mend outside." 

In three to four weeks, the 
bird is sent back to K-State, 
to check on its recovery from 
surgery. Once it appeared 
that the bird was healed, it 
was put in a flight cage and 
reconditioned for flight and 
released back into the wild. 

"We do all the surgical 
work and Prairie Raptor does 
all the glory work," said 
Campbell. 

(continued on page 136) 

Denny Nuzback lets "Scout," an 
American bald eagle, out of his cage 
before Nuzback changes the bird's 
bandages on its feet. The eagle in- 
jured its foot when it got caught in a 
trap. (Plioto by Jeff Tuttle) 



Rehabilitation of Birds 



135 



The students got very attached to their pa- 
tients at times, even giving them names. 

"Putting a bird back together again and 
seeing it heal beautifully is really a great 
feeling," said Christine Kriszcziokaitis, 
senior in veterinary medicine. 

Not all the birds, however, were a joy to 
work with, Campbell said. 

"Occasionally, we'll get a vulture. Their 
defense mechanism is to vomit on you. Their 
smell is pretty powerful, too," he said. 

The combined facilities saw over 200 
birds last year, with about 130 being sent to 
K-State for surgical care. The success rate 
was about 30 percent, which is right around 
the national average, Campbell said. 

Birds that can't be rehabilitated, many 
whose wings have to be amputated, are plac- 
ed in zoos or nature centers. Plentiful birds. 




Nuzback changes the bandaging on Scout's feet. Ap- 
proximately 130 birds were sent to K-State last year for 
surgical care. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

Terry Campbell, head of the prarle raptor project at 
K-State, and Nuzbact( woric on the eagle's foot. (Pfioto by 
Jeff Tuttle) 



especially red-tailed hawks and great homed 
owls, are hard to place and often have to be 
euthanized. 

"We get some sad cases," Campbell said. 
"We have a beautiful eagle we've been 
working on for a long time. He's a perfectly 
healthy bird, but his foot was caught in a 
trap and he has no foot now. There's really 
not much we can do for him." 

Campbell said cases such as the eagle's 
case are frustrating, especially when they 
are caused by humans. 

—Trina Klotzbach 

Nuzbacic and Campbell worl( in the surgery room with 
the eagle. About 30 percent of the birds the project 
worits with are able to be rehabilitated. (Photo by Jeff 
Tuttle) 




136 




NATIONAL SOCIETY 

OF ARCHITECTURAL 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Tom Wilkinson, Mike Lee, Robert 
Cooper, Greg Edmonds, Barry Douglas, Larry 
Escalada, Damian Gerstner. SECOND ROW: Gregory 
Sutclitfe, Chuckle McKale. Greg Harris, Richard 
Dunn, Michael Buscher, Eric Rogers, Pat Daniels, 
Dan Bright. THIRD ROW: Renee Robison, Brad Gor- 
don, Michael Sweeney, Daryl Hays, Seth Smith, 
John DeWitt, Kevin Spanley. BACK ROW: Janice 
Pemberton, Lisa Sherwood, Russ Bailey, Pamela 
Dunlap, Kathi Robertson, Christina Rahn, Karen 
Demel, Sheila Becker 



NATURAL RESOURCE 
MANAGEMENT CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Chris Bailey, Ray Meng, Bill Dailey, R. 
J. Harms. SECOND ROW: David Criswell, Mark 
Houston, Ed Geeding, Ted Cable, Brad LIndsey. 
THIRD ROW: Kristi Bletscher, Rose Martin, Terry 
Bertels, Barry Skolout BACK ROW: Jacquelyn 
Hurst, Kerri Atwood, Jennifer Golbraith, Nancy 
Smith, Dawn Nily. 



NEWMAN MINISTRIES 
CLUB 



FRONT ROW: John Havel, Timothy Pottortf, Byron 
Nordhus, Albert Vitale, Robert Coffey. SECOND 
ROW: Lee Ann Schuite, Arthur Tighe, Billy Bear, 
John Paul, John Meier, Francisco Amunduray 
THIRD ROW: Caria Brown, Diane Meyer, Frances 
demons, Jon Pachta, Coleen Brown, Joe Richter. 
BACK ROW: Teresa Murray, Mary Carr, Ann Eilert, 
Cindy Cote, Elaine Flavin, Anita Specht. 



OMEGA CHI EPSILON 



FRONT ROW: Walter Walawender, Rodney Cundiff, 
Gregory Heinen, Michael Ekart. SECOND ROW: 
John Button, David Johnson, Michael Splichal. 
BACK ROW: Steve Girard, Eari Holle, Danny Odie. 
Darcie Bailey. 



OMICRON NU 



FRONT ROW: Lanene Meyer, Christ! Searts, Iris 
Hidalgo, Jung Rho, Jennifer Van Dyke. Felix 
Oblovah. SECOND ROW: Janette Copeland, Shiriey 
Marshall, Joe Glenn, Mary Molt, Jean Sego, Virgittla 
Moxley. THIRD ROW: Breon Krug, Christie Hampel, 
Boyd Hoik, Janice Schnackenberg, Karen Finegan, 
Howard Barnes, Roberta Kromm, FOURTH HOW: 
Brenda Albert, Susan Reed, Julie Imthurn, Margo 
Hanson, Kim Denver, Renee Barr, Rita Lesser. 
BACK ROW: Lisa Stahl. Marie Saraclna, Theresa 
Wiederholt, Sharon Chalker, Cherie Robbins, Rebec- 
ca Pirkl-Hurd, Britta Stolfus. 



137 



ORDER OF OMEGA 



Inter-Greek Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Kelly Welch, John Crawl, Jonathan 
Congleton, Thad Blondefleld, Keenan Beauchamp. 
SECOND ROW: LeAnne Forrer, Larry Butel, Becky 
Oavis, Tammy Rickerson, Kevin Knaus BACK 
ROW: Patricia Jones, Kelly Conyac, Sally Traeger. 
Angle Rowland, Peggy MacNaughton, Angela 
O'Hara. 



OUTDOOR 
RECREATION 
COMMinEE 



FRONT ROW: Daniel Klassen, Micol Kranz, Rick 
Kelthley, Bob Wald. SECOND ROW: Mark Despain, 
Shelley BItel. Clayton Camblln, Jill Daniels, Larry 
FInley. BACK ROW: Russ Bailey, Gloria Miller. Shelly 
Henderson, Janice Kiser, David Stewart, Julie 
Wohler. 



PANHELLENIC 
COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Betsy Williams, Diane Chamblin, 
Rene Ochs, Frances demons, Leslie AInsworth, 
Erin Mulcahy. SECOND ROW: Kim Moors, Angela 
O'Hara, Teresa Temme, Katie Good, Andria 
Mainline, Ann Jordan, Maribeth Gottschalk. THIRD 
ROW: Carmen Schmidt, Janet Gnagey, Mary 
Vanler, Michelle Jamison, Sherry Hagar, Tammy 
Rickerson, Stacey Kahn. BACK ROW: Jana 
Lessman, Lori Stevens, Anne Hoover, Leslie 
Stokes, Becky Davis, BobbI Wallace, Jill Gortiam. 



PHI ETA SIGMA 



Freshman Scholastic 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Renee Helmerman, Mary Bahr, 
Angela Harmison, Kiley Grill, Gretchen Gritten, Kayla 
Hagman, Robin Ooerste. SECOND ROW: Garrett 
Schmidt, Adam Peterson, TImm Reiher, James 
White, Lynn Taylor, John Seltzer, Kent Heady, 
Ralph Field. THIRD ROW: Michael Leverich, Tung 
Ly, John Ellenz, Todd Stritzke, Howard Woodbury, 
Michael Nichols, Ronald Leonard. FOURTH ROW: 
Janice Sandquist, Lana Hammer, Robin Hamden, 
Susan Griffin, Cristy Scales, Sandra McCoy, Susan 
Brent, Joy Cress. BACK ROW: Susan Biggs, Libby 
Turner, Brenda Sweat, Brenda Barker, Mamie Horn, 
Lori Haines. Jayne Fuller. 



PHI THETA KAPPA 



Community College 
Transfer Students 

FRONT ROW: Barbara Huffman, Daniel Meigs, Dan- 
ny CkJIe. SECOND ROW: Jennifer Sinclair, Floyd 
Price, Randy Wewer, Fred Wise. BACK ROW: Amy 
Treff, Bradley Wright, Elwood Kelllng. 



138 




SAMS was a buzz word that becami 
popular on campus as Students Agains 
Multiple Sclerosis began its national fund 
raising campaign to help fight multipl 
sclerosis. 

Sally Traeger, senior in marketing, wa 
chairwoman for the K-State SAMS cam: 



k 



paign. 

"SAMS is a major fund-raising projec 
that voluntarily involves universities acros 
the nation. These universities chose to pai 
ticipate in the campaign against multipl 
sclerosis in hopes of creating an annuf 
event that will continue to raise money unt 
a cure for the disease is discovered, Traege 
said. 

SAMS was founded on the belief, "1 
young adults knew about multiple sclerosis 
they would take it upon themselves to wip 
out the disease," Traeger said. 

Multiple sclerosis is a major neurologic; 
disease which predominately struck your 
adults between the ages of 18 and 34. Eac 
week, more than 200 new cases of multip 
sclerosis are diagnosed nationally, and thei 
is no known cause or cure for the disease 
disease. 

The SAMS campaign was designed i 
benefit both students and the fight again 
muhiple sclerosis. 

"The program was designed to fulfil 
students' needs by giving them a chance I 
build leadership skills and, at the same tim^ 
raise money to help find a cure for a disea: 
that strikes predominately individuals 
their own age group," Traeger said. 

SAMS sponsored an air band concert ; 
the group's largest fund-raising activity 

"The major fund-raising activity fi 
SAMS was the 'Rock Alike' competitio 
Contestants competed by dressing as tl 
rock star of their choice and doing a lip-syi 
impersonation of the star. 

"Contestants qualified to win the compel 
tion according to how many votes tin 
received. Votes were determined in cas 
one dollar equaled one vote," Traeger sait 

"Each contestant had a campaign manag 
that helped in raising money and gainii 
support for his or her candidate. Contestan 

Teresa Leighty plays with Sam, a black Labradi 
retriever puppy. As the mascot of Students Again 
Multiple Sclerosis, Sam will help promote the organiz 
tlon. (Photo by Jim DIetz) 



SAMS! 



United in Fight for Life 



'vere introduced and voting began at the 
'Kick-Off party where the contestants 
')egan collecting votes by receiving money 
'n ajar," she said. 

i Other fund-raising activities sponsored by 
'!AMS included the "Run for Hope" and a 



volleyball tournament. 

Participants in the "Run for Hope" paid 
an entry fee to run either a 10-kilometer or 
one-mile race. 

"Considering the weather, we had a great 
turn-out. Next year, the run will be schedul- 



ed at a different date in order to avoid cold 
weather," Traeger said. 

The volleyball tournament was co- 
sponsored by Delta Upsilon fraternity and 
Chi Omega sorority, she said. 

—Pennie Breneman 





Kelly Seago dresses as Pat Benatar for the SAMS 
"Rock Alike" competition. "Rock Alike" was the lip 
sync fund raiser for SAMS. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



139 




For students looking for a rewarding ex- 
perience, some found their search took them 
no farther than Manhattan. That experience 
was being a Big Brother or Big Sister for a 
child who needed a warm, dependable and 
stable relationship. 

"It (the Big Brother/Big Sister relation- 
ship) helps the children because it gives the 
kids an enriching experience , ' ' said Winnie 
Endicott, director of Manhattan Big 
Brothers/Big Sisters. 

A Big Brother or Big Sister spent a 



minimum of three hours a week with the 
child. But often more, the minimum amount 
of time was invested. Many times it was just 
getting together with the child and talking to 
them, but there were also many fun activities 
the two could do together. 

Some of the favorite activities included 
going to the zoo, shooting pool, swimming, 
playing basketball, going to the movies, the 
recreation center, basketball games or 
special events held at McCain Auditorium. 

Being in a college town helped the pro- 




Spending time together, John Peck watches on as 
Dennis Pollock, 11 years old, plays video games. (Photo 
by Steve Rasmussen) 

Pollock and his big brother, Peck, have a snowball fight 
outside the K-State Union. (Ptioto by Steve Rasmussen) 



gram schedule a variety of activities for tl 
children that normally could not have baj 
done on funds provided by the Bi 
Brother/Big Sister organization itself. i 

Many of the sororities and fratemiti| 
sponsored events for the children as part i; 
their philanthropy projects. Patricia Maloni 
Delta Delta Delta philanthropy chairm<i 
and senior in journalism and mass cor 
munications, said her sorority teamed wi 
Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity and sponoredj 
party for the children in Big Brothers/B 
Sisters. | 

"It helped fill a void for a lot of peopj 
who miss their little brothers and sisters, 
think everybody had a great time doing it, 
Malone said. 

The Tri-Deh and TKE project was part 
a year-long philanthropy coordinated Ij 
Greek Affairs. Each month, one fratemij 
and one sorority hosted a birthday party f 
the program's children. | 

Big Brothers/Big Sisters normally spo 
sored group acivities four times a year 
the sorority and fraternity activities we 
greatly appreciated, Endicott said. 

Though group activities helped, the on| 
on-one relationship of a big brother or sisti 
giving their companionship was what maif 
the program successful. 

"Anybody would find it satisfying aii 
enriching. I think it is one of the best thin 
I've done for myself," said John Pec 
senior in chemistry. 



'I 



140 




Big Brothersij 



.iftk 




• Peck joined the program after a friend 
tecommended the organization to him. 
I'eck's little brother, Dennis Pollock, was 10 

ears old and attended Woodrow Wilson 

ilementary School. 
I i Peck said being a big brother made 
f'ollock feel like someone did care for him 

nd Peck hoped he had made a difference in 

rdlock's life. 

j "I like to think I've helped. I've seen him 

(row a lot in the last couple of years," said 

leek. 

Monica Daniels, junior in public ad- 
• hinistration, also joined Big Brothers/Big 

isters at the suggestion of a friend. Daniels 

lid she had a hard time juggling school and 

nding time for her little sister. 

1 The satisfaction she got out of it, however, 
iade it all worth -it to her. Daniels hoped 
!at maybe her little sister "will look back 
fid find it a positive experience." 

Each applicant went through a screening 
iocess before being selected and matched 
|ith a child. This process helped ensure that 
je applicant was right for the program. 
jEndicott worked with another full-time 
Irson, Cia Verschelden, who helped her in 

2 matching process and organizing of ac- 
rities. 

Endicott said the program was great for 
li; children because it helped fill a void in 
linr life they might not have filled without a 
1 1 brother or big sister. 

—Kim Kinstow 




As John Peck plays pool at the "(-State Union while his 
little brother, Dennis Pollock tries to keep him from 
making a shot. (Photo by Steve Rasmussen) 



141 



PHI TAU SIGMA 



FRONT ROW: Joe Meyer, Michael Gross, Jeff 
Kysar, Scott Scrogin, Mike Basel, Rich Heitmeyer, 
Terry Beck. SECOND ROW: Kevin Jaderborg, Clin- 
ton Moyer, Brian Riedel, Frank Logback, Jon 
Erickson, Donald Smith, Gary LeRock. THIRD ROW: 
Dana Gruenbacher, Russell Goering, Dan Malone, 
Michael Jones, Tom Bird, Travis Barnes, Jack 
Wilson. BACK ROW: Ron Shim, Mardi Smith, Mary 
Kuestersteffen, Robin Roach, Amy Noeth, David Eb- 
berts, Jeff Arnote. 



PHYSICS CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Chris Sanderson, Chris Levels, Paul 
Works, Kent Heady, Roger Goerke. SECOND ROW: 
David Hare, Brian Weaver, Jon Preiser, Dallas 
Kingsbury, Paul Lammert. BACK ROW: Wanda Hen- 
ton, Penny Warren, Carol Tracy, Heather Haahr, 
Larry Weaver. 



PHI UPSILON 
OMICRON 



Home Economics 

FRONT ROW: Kent Bradley, Laura Garrett, Leslie 
Smith, Carol Gardner, Cheryl Holle, Earl Anderson. 
SECOND ROW: Kathy Jilka, Kendi Ames, Elaine Ed- 
wards, Elaine Wetter, Lisa Decker, Mary Gleason. 
THIRD ROW: Pamela Pearson, Debbie Resvtfik, 
Crystal Ward, Regina McGrath, Starrlene Esslilnger. 
BACK ROW: Brenda Harzman, Lanette Meyer, 
Wilma Schuh, Cheryl Gerdes, Joan Schiffler, Connie 
Roush. 



PHI UPSILON 
OMICRON 



Home Economics 

FRONT ROW: Ann Gladbach, Susan Reed. Julie 
Keesling, Kristy Rice, Breon Krug. SECOND ROW: 
Sandy Macy, Christine O'Donnell, Carmen Zwick, 
Julie Byer, Theresa Wiederholt, Rita Lesser, Angle 
Shoup. THIRD ROW: Patricia Thompson, Jerri 
Johnson, Joan Tremblay, Donna Linn, Kathleen 
Kluber, Lisa Fisher. BACK ROW: Nona Prescott, 
Leslie Bartee, Jalaine Deckinger, Jennifer Duncan, 
Shawna Murphey, Robin Honig, Janie Higgins. 



POULTRY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Paul Sanford, Donald Osterhaus. 
David Green, Kenneth Anderson. BACK ROW: 
Teresa Hagedorn, Diana Carlson, Brian Carlson, 
Nicholas Okpokho, Paul Wood. 



142 




■m 



The sport of fencing may bring to mi| 
images of battling swashbucklers a| 
clashing swords. But for the K-State Fenci 
Club members, the sport was a serious co; 
petition combining the physical grace 
ballet and mental dexterity of chess. 

"You really are in a mental chess gameij 
said Randy Hanes, sophomore in mechanic 
engineering and Fencing Club preside^ 
"You're thinking moves two or thi 
seconds away. Being graceful pays in feu 
ing. You're hiding from your opponent wlj 
you're body is doing so he can't see wl 
your next move will be." , 

"Fencing is traditionally a Europej^ 
dominated sport," Hanes said. "AmericJt 
don't like to watch sports they don't win 

During the 1984 Olympics, the entire f( 
cing competition received less televis 
time than Mary Lou Retton's winning vail^ 
Hanes said. 

Since the financial commitment to co 
pete in fencing can be large, those who ta 
up fencing are usually devoted to the spc 
he said. 

"With fencing, you're looking at a pers 
who has got to get a lot of equipme 
knickers, jacket, glove, weapon, mask," 
said. "It adds up." 

Hanes estimated he spent about $700 
his fencing equipment. 



' 



I 




Dave Jennings and Doug Varney, instructor of tiie i|M 
beginning fencing ciass, duei with sabres as Rijly j^ 
Hanes watches. (Photo by Brad Fanschier) 



Fencing Clulj 




The Fencing Club's 15 members met in 
i Douglass Annex on Yuma Street twice a 
;ek to practice and free fence. 
Hanes said free fencing was fencing on 
ur own honor. The club was limited to 
?it type of practicing in Manhattan because 
jy had no electrical equipment. 
"We're trying to get funding from SGA 
r next year," Hanes said. 
He said the club wanted to purchase an 
^trical scoring apparatus and also wanted 
host tournaments. 

Although the club was limited to free fenc- 
j in Manhattan, several members traveled 
Kansas City and Topeka to fence com- 
titively in tournaments using electrical 
jring devices, Hanes said. 
"I'm planning to go to the Modem Pen- 
hlon Training Center in San Antonio, 
xas," he said. Hanes also fenced in such 
ices as Dallas, St. Louis, and the Olympic 
aining Center in Colorado Springs. 
Hanes said the most exciting tournament 
has participated in was at the Olympic 
aining Center. 

'I had the No. 2 and the No. 6 nationally 
|ed fencers in my pool. I got to fence 
iinst them," he said. "The way they seed 
i, there is no way you can get away from 
Dd fencers at an event like that. I felt like I 
i well, but you can always do better until 




tate Fencing Club president Randy Hanes, dressed 
('Protective clothing, displays an epee, one of the 
* ions used in fencing. (Photo by Brad Fanschler) 



you wm. 

Hanes said a competitor fenced in pools 
with four to eight fencers facing everyone in 
the pool. Competitors fenced for five 
touches with the first fencer to contact his 
opponent five times won. 

There are three different weajwns with 
different rules and target areas. Epee is the 
easiest and the target area is the whole body . 
The foil target area is the upper body ex- 
cluding the arms and head. These two 
categories are usually judged electrically. 



Saber is judged manually and the target area 
is everything from the hips up. 

He continues to be excited to meet and 
watch other fencers. 

"We got to watch the best epee fencers in 
the United States plus ones from around the 
world." 

He said the Egyptian national champion 
was there as well as fencers from Brazil, 
Mexico, Canada and Great Britain. 

— Patti Hannan 



^fencing Club 




( I , 



143 



i 



Jack Carpenter 



"I asked my 

teacher if I 

had the talent 

to make it as 

a concert 

pianist, and 
she asked me 

if I was wiil- 
ing to practice 

six to eight 

hours a day 

for the rest of 

my life. I 

changed my 

major the next 

day." 



Tale of 

Two Lives 



By day he is the associate dean of 
arts and sciences; by night he is a 
jazz musician with a passion for his 
craft. Jack CaT)enter lives the life 
of a talented musician and universi- 
ty administrator. 

Carpenter, who played the 
clarinet, flute, saxophone and piano 
at Ric's Cafe and Bocker's II, has 
been playing the piano since he was 
9 years old. 

"My mother used to make me 
practice every day until she found 
out that it wouldn't work," 
Carpenter said. "She was wise 
because she told me to keep going 
to the lessons, and when I was 14, 1 
realized that I liked it a lot." 

At 16, Carpenter and a friend, 
Johnnie Guice, formed a band call- 
ed The Dixie Gents. On Saturday 
nights, they would rent the 
American Legion Hall for dances 
and charge for admission and set- 
ups. 

"By the age of 17, we were en- 
trepreneurs in the band business," 
Carpenter said. "Lots of people 
came because there's not a lot to do 
in those small towns in Louisiana." 

Carpenter attended Centenary 



College in Shreveport, La. 

"I went to college with one idea 
in mind. I was going to major in 
music," Carpenter said. "I asked 
my teacher if I had the talent to 
make it as a concert pianist, and she 
asked me if I was willing to practice 
six to eight hours a day for the rest 
of my life. 

"I changed my major the next 
day. Very few people make it to the 
top as a concert pianist because 
they don't want to give their lives to 
it. It's not something you can do 
just some of the time." 

Carpenter worked his way 
through college performing in 
several different bands he formed. 
He started a group with a piano 
player, Jim Reilly, in which 
Carpenter played baritone sax- 
ophone. They performed in cof- 
feehouses and night clubs. 

After college. Carpenter aban- 
doned his music to teach English at 
the University of Delaware and 
then moved to the State University 
of New York in Stoneybrook where 
he put together a "big band" with 
20 members, known as the Jazz 
Ensemble. 



Carpenter moved to Manhattan i 
1973 where he took a position as a 
instructor at the University. H 
again retired his music career unt 
some close friends opened 
restaurant and convinced him t 
perform again. 

"My friends, Ric and Mary Trit 
ble, opened up Ric's Cafe and the 
wanted a piano player," Carpente 
said. "So they coaxed me out c 
retirement and I said 'I'll play fc 
food, I won't play for money.' Fc 
a long time, they let me and m 
girlfriend eat there." 

After the Tribbles got out of th 
restaurant business, Carpente 
began working on occasion 
Bocker's II with drummer Ph 
Royster, professor of English. 

Shortly afterward, Carpente 
once again went into sem^ 
retirement from his musical pu: 
suit. 

Even while in retiremen 
Carpenter still spends approximate 
ly two hours a day practicing his u 
struments so that he is always cloi 
to being prepared for a perfoi 
mance. 

—Jeff Taylor and Jola MurpI 



Jack Carpenter 





Jack Carpenter's musical talents include 
being able to play a variety of 
instruments. Besides the flute, Carpenter 
plays the saxophone clarinet and piano. 
(Photo by Jeff Taylor} 

Jack Carpenter, associate dean of 
arts and sciences, is also an 
accomplished jazz musician. 
Carpenter began playing the piano as 
a child. (Plioto by Jeff Taylor) 



Profile 



145 



Never a Test but 
Always a Party 



Wayne Norvell 



"You have to 

be en- 
thusiastic, get 
yourseif men- 
taiiy prepared. 
You have to 
get realiy ex- 
cited." 



Approximately 350 students 
reclined in the velvet-padded chairs 
of Umberger Hall's Williams 
Auditorium, waiting for the day's 
lecture to begin. 

A man sauntered onto the stage, 
kicked the podium out of the way 
and began searching for his 
microphone. 

Finding it, he wiggled the 
microphone and a loud, crackling 
sound resulted. He looked at the 
ceiling as if looking for 
thunderclouds. 

He threw the cord down, arrang- 
ed the two portable chalk boards 
and meticulously erased a previous 
lecture's notes. He grabbed a piece 
of fresh chalk, put on his 
microphone and said to the class, 
"Are we ready?" 



And so, another day of Wayne 
Norvell's Marketing 400 class had 
begun. 

But Norvell's class wasn't like 
other lecture classes. He didn't give 
exams; he had "parties." He didn't 
use a syllabus; the class voted on 
"party" days. And he didn't use 
lecture notes. 

"Hell, I figure anybody can 
read," he said. "If you don't use 
notes, you can hold attention a lot 
better. It's harder work." 

And Norvell put energy into his 
classes. 

"You have to be enthusiastic, get 
yourself mentally prepared," he 
said. "You have to get really ex- 
cited." 

Norvell said he didn't think he 
was fooling anyone by calling his 



146 




exams parties. He just thought tl 
word "test" seemed too negativ( 

"I think it's kind of a humorof 
thing. It's certainly not intended 
fool anyone," he said. "The on!' 
thing I'm concerned with 
students' learning." 

Wayne Norvell wasn't just 
teacher, he was also an entertaine' 

It was evident by the way 
sauntered around the stage aii 
casually leaned against tl! 
chalkboard. And it was evident 
the stories he told. 

One of Norvell's story went: | 

"Someone comes up and sayj 
'I've got $5,000 from a granddadi 
who died 98 years ago. I want to il 
vest it. ' What do you say? You sa! 
'I don't know.' Or you may be' 
around the bush and say, mayi|i| 

IVIarketing professor Wayne Norvell lil 
tures to a class about the different types* 
research in marketing. (Photo by Bif 
Fanschier) 



' 



I 
I 
I 




Wayne Norvell 



is or that. But you don't give an answer. 
e deal in proverbial situations in the real 
jrld." 

Norvell believed in motivating his 
idents. He loved to talk about the man who 
ide big bucks on the Rubik's cube. He told 
the success of his former students who 
ve graduated and earned over $90,000 a 
ar. 

"It's to demonstrate what you can do if 
u work hard enough," Norvell said. "It's 
:echnique to get students to work hard." 
In one lecture, he told his class, if you 
mt to be a "fastbumer superstar," you 
ve got to be smart and work hard. 
"If you don't learn anything else in col- 
je, this may be important," Norvell said, 
t may make the difference between 
coming a corporate president or a 
inky." 

—Patti Hannan 

isanna Huang and Carolyn George listen with varying 
jrees of Interest to Norvell's lecture. (Photo by Brad 
\ischier) 




I'rofile 




PRE-PHYSICAL 
THERAPY CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Murray Thiessen, Dane Stark, Todd 
Smith, Steve Cole. BACK ROW: Julie Daiton, Christy 
Hunter, Deanne Gentry, Marlene Cailteux. 



PRE-VET CLUB 



FRONT ROW: William Cleland, Shannon Wessel, 
Layne Lunsway, William Bergln. SECOND ROW: 
Robert Reese, Alice Clements, Stan Perry, Jaime 
Lopez, Kirby Daetwiler. THIRD ROW: Randy Diver, 
Paula George, Janice Snadquist, Tracy Hucke, 
Steve Riley, Gary Bryant. BACK ROW: Deanna 
Despair, Annette Hoover, Teresa Kelly, Natalee 
Lindsay, Lisa Paul. Deborah Burns. 



FRONT ROW: Robert Bayona, Robert Reves, Scott 
Gorson, William Stumnp, Jeff DeMInt, David Salava. 
SECOND ROW: kenny Moeller, Joe Carpenter, Ted 
Mika, Layne Holmes, Randy Mllford, Rocky Giltner. 
THIRD ROW: Julie Comett, Victor Collazo, Eugene 
Johnson, Darin Huck, Jerry Theis, Michael Steinle, 
Tiffany Shurtz. BACK ROW: Marcus Larson, Luis 
Montaner, Teresa Murray, Deborah Williams, San- 
dra Lancaster, Oebi Steen, Leslie Swan. 



PROFFESSIONALS IN 

HUMAN MOVEMENT 

HARMONY 



FRONT ROW: Brenda Wiggins, Frits Gabler, David 
Taphorn, Michael Wegner, Anthony Wilcox. SE- 
COND ROW: Pamella Buchanan, Mitch Schneider, 
Annette Kirkham, Sandra Hern, Debra Berry. THIRD 
ROW: Suzie Buchman, Jeff Brewer, Joan Schuler, 
Jeaney Dupras, Jill Daniels, Kathleen Bechtel. BACK 
ROW: Lorl Ryan, Kimberly Angell, Vicki Lichtenaur, 
Linda Olson, Janna Adkinson. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

STUDENTS SOCIETY 

OF AMERICA 



FRONT ROW:Mark McOermet, Thad Blondefield, 
Gary Born, Mike McQueen, Joseph Tinker, Steven 
Wilhite. SECOND ROW:Darin Russell, Scott 
Roberts, KA Gailliard, Robert Clasen, Elton Mayfield. 
THIRD ROW:Jesslca Gard. Jean Teller, Bob 
Schelbler, Caryl Ward, Kristle Crabtree. BACK 
ROW:Judl Walter, Malaura Daum, Stephanie 
Haughton, Janell Berroth, Colleen Wilson. -i^y 



Turning on 
the Spotlight 



While the K-State orchestra was 
Jt among the usual breakfast table 
•pics of conversation, if Adrian 
ryttan had his way, it would be. 
or the new conductor, making the 
chestra a household word was 
le of his top priorities. 
Bryttan took over the job of con- 
icting the orchestra in the fall of 
)85. Upon accepting the position, 
ryttan 's first challenges were in- 
easing the size and the visibility 
the orchestra. 

Bryttan increased the visibility of 
e orchestra by advertising heavily 
r the orchestra's first concert. 
"We ended up getting over a 
ousand people for that concert," 
7ttan said. 

It was the first time the balcony 
d ever been opened for an or- 
estra concert. 

The orchestra also played for the 

alsa Ballet's McCain performance 

"The Nutcracker" and the 

r. and Mrs. Tom Roberts, sixteen year 
nee instructor veterns, show off some 
ves to the crowd during the Union 
iroom Dance. (Photo by John LaBarge) 



K-State production of "Pirates of 
Penzance." 

"These kinds of things (the ballet 
and the musical) are very important 
in popularizing the orchestra," 
Bryttan said. 

The K-State orchestra did a 
variety of activities and perfor- 
mances. 

"The orchestra can do a lot of 
different things," he said. 

The orchestra displayed its ver- 
satility by sponsoring a ballroom 
dance in the K-State Union 
ballrooms. 

Although it was a first for the or- 
chestra, Bryttan had tried similar 
programs while he was at the 
University of Notre Dame. The 
ballroom dance was another one of 
Bryttan 's attempts at increasing 
visibility and popularizing the or- 
chestra. 

He expected the orchestra to keep 
broadening its horizons by travel- 
ing in the area. One specific trip 
Bryttan wanted to plan was to the 
Kansas City public schools. 

Bryttan had a special interest in 
attracting a younger audience. He 



wanted to stimulate an early interest 
and appreciation for orchestral 
music among children. 

On April 24, the orchestra held a 
children's concert to create some of 
this interest. 

"I wanted to create enthusiasm, 
and, in turn, a base for recruiting," 
he said. 

Bryttan said the orchestra 
students were very receptive to 
change because the result of their 
changes was a happy audience. 

"They (the orchestra students) 
enjoy seeing a happy audience. It is 
important for them to play for the 
audience," he said. 

The orchestra played a variety of 
music during the year. 

"It is important for the orchestra 
to get a balanced diet," Bryttan 
said. 

Bryttan came to K-State to see 
how far the orchestra program 
could be developed. 

"The K-State orchestra students 
work very hard and have a great 
deal of pride and togetherness," he 
said. 

—Jada Allerheiligen 




Adrian Bryttan 



"The K-State 

orchestra 

students work 

very hard and 

have a great 

deal of pride 

and 
togetherness." 



Adrian Bryttan 



149 



Mike Lin 



"I have a very 
strong Chinese 
culture and 
background. I 
always feel a 
student got to 
respect the 
teacher. But 
the teacher has 
to be open- 
minded and 
flexible enough 
to respect stu- 
dent's opinion. 
So it worl(s 
both ways." 



Tricks of 
the Trade 



His short stature, black hair, dark 
eyes and glasses are not extraor- 
dinary, and his accent is typical of 
most Chinese- Americans. 

But inside this 5-foot frame is the 
ego of four men with a classic "go- 
to-hell" attitude. Ironically, he is 
also a great teacher and a wise 
philosopher. 

Mike Lin, professor of landscape 
architecture, has taught many 
students and touched many people's 
lives. In his stilted English, laced 
with a Chinese accent, Lin con- 
tinues to teach his "tricks" and his 
philosophies to hundreds of 
students and professionals all over 
the world. Literally. 

Lin is a master of the delineation 
world of architecture and graphics. 
He teaches the presentation skills 
that let people express their 
creativity and their views of the 
world. It has been not so much 
what he taught but the way he 
taught it that has made his style uni- 
que. 

Anyone who has stepped into his 
office — which housed a comfor- 
table couch, large drafting table, 
bookshelves stuffed with books, 
marker sets, pencils and tools of the 
trade — might have seen just 
another instructor sitting behind the 
desk. But that's where they would 
be wrong. 

Bom in Taiwan, Lin's father and 
uncle were architects. The in- 
fluence of his father and uncle and 



his Chinese heritage followed Lin 
throughout his life. 

Lin showed one of his favorite 
films, "The Karate Kid," to his 
class because it represented some of 
his teaching ideas. 

Pulling a line from the film, Lin 
told his students, "Hey, let's make 
a deal. You do what I told you to 
do. Don't ask questions. I think that 
sometimes that's very important. 

' 'Why you argue with me when I 
have 15 years experience of what is 
right?" Lin asked his students. 
"You just follow exactly what I 
said. But I am also very open- 
minded person. If you can convince 
me that I am doing wrong, I am 
willing to change it." 

The relationships Lin built with 
his students was influenced by his 
cultural background. 

"I have a very strong Chinese 
culture and background. I always 
feel a student got to respect the 
teacher. But the teacher has to be 
open-minded and flexible enough to 
respect student's opinion. So it 
works both ways." 

Students would tell you that the 
first day of class was an eye- 
opening experience. Lin started his 
semester classes, intersession 
classes and seminars the same way. 
Everyone was given 12 minutes to 
letter his or her name, draw a 
miniature perspective, a shaded 
cube and a car. The objects may 
have differed, but the idea was the 



same. 

' 'I found this to be the best thing 
have ever done in my teaching ap 
proach," Lin said. "The best wa 
to teach is put them down wher 
they belong. A lot of people d 
drawings (in) say 30 hours so (they 
always look good. When you giv 
them 12 minutes, they are nc 
prepared. They never realized ho\ 
poor they are. 

"So you can see people smilin 
before 12 minutes; after 1 
minutes, they are panicked. Thj 
means you put them down into th 
poorest level so they, at the time 
are frustrated, willing to lister 
Then a semester later, it's muc 
easier to handle them when the 
know they are no good. 

"Then I also give them a post te; 
in the same 12 minutes. Then the 
suddenly realize that improvemei 
is more than 1(X) percent. You'r 
talking 1,(XX) percent. That give 
them confidence." 

Confidence was one thing Li^ 
was not lacking. He had confidenc 
in his drawing ability and hi 
teaching ability. But Lin did n( 
always have that drawing ability. 

"The reason I feel I enjo 
teaching this particular course 
because of the way I was educateti 
I shouldn't say I had too man 
lousy teachers, but that's how I'v; 
been trained, in a lot of wron 
directions. 

"I gradually realized this preset! 



Mike Lin 




tion skill is so important to the 
signer and a lot of people suffer 
cause of (not knowing) it, in- 
ading myself. I had to struggle 
d struggle. 

"Basically, I am a self-taught 
rson, and I used to not be able to 
aw and I don't have talent. This 
illy helped me be a better 
icher, because I go through the 
'el just like a beginner. I unders- 



Profile 



tand how they suffer. 

Lin said that he was excited for 
his students because it took him 
many years to perfect his "tricks" 
and he has simplified his techniques 
to a couple of steps that he can 
demonstrate in a few minutes. Lin 
considered this to be "a great shar- 
ing attitude." 

Sharing was the name of the 
(continued on page 152) 



Students gather around Professor Mike Lin 
as he critiques their assignments. Lin is very 
honest with his students and his critique 
sessions are part of his "sharing attitude." 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



151 



Mike Lin 



"If you work 
hard for the 
students, 
seems like you 
owe them your 
heart. Like be- 
ing blunt and 
straightforward. 
I'm very honest 
on what I say. 
If they are no 
good, they 
need to be 
told." 



152 



Tricks of the Trade 



game for Lin. For his students, Lin 
was willing to share his secrets and 
his philosophies. And there were 
many of those. 

"I teach a lot of philosophy dur- 
ing the class. I teach people shar- 
ing, and don't worry about the 
grades. I also sometimes tell them 
(students), if their teacher don't like 
the way they do it, tell them 
(teachers), go-to-hell. Why do you 
have to impress your teacher?" 

It was his straightforward, blunt 
way of saying things that gave Lin 
the appearance of having an ego the 
size of Seaton Hall. 

Phrases such as "your stuff 
smells from Kansas," "this no 
good," and "this guy looks like he 
is pissing on the bush," were toss- 
ed about in critique sessions as he 
reviewed each student's work. But 
Lin explained that he makes such 
comments "for the students." 

"If you work hard for the 
students, seems like you owe them 
your heart. Like being blunt and 
straightforward. I'm very honest on 
what I say. If they are no good, 
they need to be told. (I) tell them no 
hard feelings, nothing personal," 
he said. "I like you as a person, but 
if your drawing smells, hey, you 
need to be told. Then I tell them 
how to improve it. It's very impor- 
tant not to tell them the wrong in- 
formation. 

"I have the reputation in the 
country of being blunt, straightfor- 
ward, but a very welcome person." 

Lin's teachings were not just for 
the architect or graphic student. He 
stressed the idea that having a great 
attitude would help you achieve just 
about anything. Even if you are not 
the best poet, artist, athlete or 
whatever, if you have a great at- 
titude, it will pull you up. 

Whether it was teaching a new 
graphic technique or a philosophy 



to use every day, Lin's goal was to 
be a great teacher. "My goal being 
a good teacher is you teach students 
to excel the teacher's ability. That's 
called a good teacher." 

Lin had one final piece of advice 
for his students. "College is like a 
sewer. You get out exactly what 
you put in. So let's face it. This is 
your own life; this is your own 
future. Work hard for yourself, not 
for me." 

—Ronda Code 

Be loose, Lin tells his students as they start 
worl(ing on basic perspectives. Lin has every 
student start with a 12-niinute drawing to 
show them how little they know. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 

Lin's class is divided into two parts, a 
critique session and a demonstration period. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 





Mike LinI 




Psychology Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Daphne Ulveling, Jane Grant, Frances 
Clennons. SECOND ROW: Debbie Shaw, Laurel 
Schwarz, Randy Warner, Nozomu Sonda. BACK 
ROW: Vera McMinimy, Ross Livingston, Marilyn 
Horsch. 



RESTAURANT 
MANAGEMENT CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Boyd Hoik, Bart Johnson, Brent 
Smith, Charlie Partlow. SECOND ROW: Christine 
Hoik, Brian Boldt, Anthony Lehr, Anthony Smith, 
Susan Davis, THIRD ROW: Sharon Geist, Kathleen 
Finnesy, Kevin Deaver, Tammy Geise. BACK ROW: 
Sherri Magnett, Kathy Phillips, Lori Parks, Amy 
Foster, Karen Klamm. 



RETAIL 

FLORICULTURE 

CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Kent Kimmins, Bryan Goodman, 
Kirstin Fieldson. Basiz Fri. SECOND ROW: Susan 
Rehberg, Kendra Sprinkle, Debbie Rumford, Anita 
Schmidt, Laura Morrison. BACK ROW: Jean Nash, 
Rose Weninger, Karl Krause, Caroline Gullliams, 
Sheree Bower, Valerie Wiley. 



RODEO CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Stacy Bolinger, Stacie Stewart, 
Deyona Hays, Becky Zenor, Julie Pitts, Lori 
Sprenkle, Chris Hall, Melissa Foltz, Lea Willuweit 
SECOND ROW: Gary Gauby, Chip Treas, Brian 
Petersen, Mike Jackson, Jack Davis, Kevin 
Hebenstriet, Stan Bartley, Gary Heideman. THIRD 
ROW: Fred Kibler, Ryan Kile, Robert Snider, Jody 
Yohon, Paul Whitchair, John McDonald, Jimmy 
Nouck, Randy Diver FOURTH ROW: Brian Shiriey, 
Jason Wolfe. Debra Holthaus, Jeff Lake. Riy 
Wessel, Jeff Heersink, Tyson Hughes, Delayna 
Long, Julie Sander. BACK ROW: Neal Woollen. Kim 
Streff. Audrey Anderson. Tami Dyer. Joshline 
McLean. Diane Green, Christy Cobb, Rhonda 
Gravenstein. 



SIGMA DELTA CHI 



Society of Professional 
Journalists 

FRONT ROW: Paul Parsons. Tim Carpenter, Shelly 
Oicken. Todd Nighswonger. David Adams. SECOND 
ROW: Vicki Reynolds. John Sleezer. Margaret May. 
Patricia Meusburger. Jessica Card. BACK ROW: 
Susan Dawson. Laurie Falrburn, Patricia Relnert. 
Rebecca Wiley. Jeri Heidrick. 

153 



Richard LD. 
Morse 



"I would like 
to see shopp- 
ing for a sav- 
ings account as 
simple as com- 
paring gasoline 
prices or the 
unit prices of 
grocery items 
in the super- 
market." 



A Matter 
of Interest 



v.* 



You shouldn't have to be a finan- 
cial wizard to figure out which bank 
pays the highest interest rate on 
savings accounts, said Richard 
L.D. Morse, professor of family 
economics. 

Morse is the author of "Cents- 
ible Interest," a booklet explaining 
the concept of interest figured on 
the "cents per $100 per day" 
method. 

The booklet explained to con- 
sumers and financial institutions 
alike the simplicity of calculating 
interest earned on a daily basis as 
opposed to compounding interest 
annually or quarterly. 



Morse wrote booklets, published 
research papers and appeared 
before the White House Conference 
on "The Consumer and The Finan- 
cial Service Revolution" to explain 
"cents per day." 

Morse figured there were 7.8 
million ways to figure interest rates 
and said, "It shouldn't be that 
way." 

"I would like to see shopping for 
a savings account as simple as com- 
paring gasoline prices or the unit 
prices of grocery items in the 
supermarket," Morse said. 

Morse said some savers were 
knowledgeable but most were not 



because banks made interest rates 
so complicated. 

"Things are so complicated that 
even the banks can't tell you exact- 
ly what your interest will be on a 
given day," Morse said. 

Morse said if banks were confus- 
ed, consumers probably were also. 
He tested 2,300 people from 20 
states for their ability to correctly 
identify which savings account's in- 
terest rates paid more when ex-, 
pressed in conventional terms and 
in cents per $100 per day. 

"A total of 97 percent of those 
tested understood tiie cents per da> 
plan without any prioij 



154 




Richard LD. Morse 



Instruction," Morse said. 
, "By comparison, less than half of those 
'ested knew 8 percent compounded monthly 
»n a 360-day basis, (the equivalent of 2.22 
ents per day), was more than 8 percent 
ompounded daily on a 365-day basis, (the 
quivalent of 2.19 cents per day)," Morse 
iaid. 

i The Federal Reserve Board, when con- 

idering Morse's idea, (cents/$100/day), 

jvas concerned that advertising the amount 

|f interest earned per $100 per day might 

esult in greater confusion and not be of 

ignificant benefit to consumers. 

The Board also said it believed that 

lorse's approach "would impose additional 

urdens on depository institutions without 

ommensurate benefit to consumers." 

Morse said the Board was "buried in 

adition" making it resistant to change and 

idn't understand why there would be more 

onfusion with his approach. 

"Everyone knows what a penny is. 

veryone knows there are 24 hour in a day. 

Old savers expect interest on all their money 

very day. So it makes sense for banks to 

ay interest in cents per $100 of deposit each 

ay," Morse said. 

Morse emphasized that his proposal was 
3t concerned with large amounts of money. 
"Consumers are not being ripped off on a 
Tge scale. The confusion about interest 
ites is the biggest problem with the current 
stem and that is the issue the proposal 
ents/$100/day) addresses," Morse said. 

—Jeff Stark 



lichard L. Morse, professor of family economics, has 
'Itten a book titled the "Cents-ible Interest," explain- 
) how to simplify percentage rates and interest 
Jcuiation methods. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



Profile 




SIGMA DELTA PI 



Spanish Honorary 

FRONT ROW: John Spicer, Lilian Estrada-Batres, 
Doug Hembrey SECOND ROW: Sarah Kessinger, 
Elizabeth Watson, Rhonda Mace, Joan Seitzer. 
BACK ROW: Kathy Conradt, Renee Lewis, Tammera 
Sjogren. 



SIGMA LAMBDA CHI 



Building Construction 
Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Timothy Gasser, Scott Jundt, Doug 
Henning. SECOND ROW: Mary Nixon, Scon Gordon, 
Bryant Combes, Tim White. BACK ROW: Belinda 
Glenn, Mike Huechteman, Frank Kramer, Paul Mat- 
tingly, Quentin McArthur. 



SOCIETY FOR THE 

ADVANCEMENT OF 

MANAGEMENT 



FRONT HOW: Mark McMillln, Ron Rausch, Shannon 
Archer, Pamela Flickinger, Bethany Schultz, Sandy 
Espinoza, Jodie Gilley, Rhonda Augustine. SECOND 
ROW: Stan Isea, Kerry Mills, Timothy Putnam, Mar- 
ty Sterneker, Lynn Langemeier, Jeffrey Mouseley, 
John Shriwise, Steven Reedy, John Wunder. THIRD 
ROW: Kent Cook, Carl Gasper, Blake Jorgensen, 
Carl Bengtson, Chris Steineger, John Heier, Jerry 
Sanko, Matt Dykes. FOURTH ROW: Sheryl Esau, 
Glen Westervelt, Robert Dean, Michael Webb, Kelly 
McClain, Sherry Mooney, Sanford Tucker, Britt 
Gardner, Timothy Kness. BACK ROW: Becky 
Vanderlip, Deborah Bengtson, Eric de la Pena, Judi 
Moritz, Carolyn Dyer, Christy Clanton, Stacey Miller, 
Tammy Hattrup, Karia Wagner, Mark Melms. 



SOCIETY OF HISPANIC 

PROFESSORS OF 

ENGINEERING 



FRONT ROW: Eric Schott, Armando Corrales. 
Miguel Charez, Karen Hummel. SECOND ROW: Jose 
Villares, Pedro Vega, Greg Perez, Hector Cruz. 
THIRD ROW: Jose Layuno, Cecilia Jayo, Jose 
Castro, Rafael Fantauzzi, Manolito Taboro. BACK 
ROW: Arleen Baiges, Wanda Lopez, Nadina 
Carmenate, Gerardo Cosme. 



SOCIETY OF 

MANUFACTURING 

ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Cart Wilson, Jeff Kysar, Brent 
Ragsdale, Vince Guthrie, Al Wlllems. SECOND 
ROW: Jose Castro, Donald Thiel, Mark Oberrieder, 
Roger Metzler, Dale Meyer. THIRD ROW: John Ren- 
ner, Rodney Wise, Kittur Ganesh, Rajiv Hingorani. 
BACK HOW: Arleen Baiges, Ingko Getomo, Chew 
Han, Jeffrey Wilson, John Wilson, 

155 



$700,000 



bonus 



draws requests for 



allocations 



Amidst Gramm-Rudman and other pro- 
posed budget cuts, a $700,000 blessing was 
bestowed on K-State when student bonds for 
the Chester E. Peters Recreation Complex, 
Union Annex I & II and KSU Stadium were 
refinanced. 

Student input began when University of- 
ficials said they would allow Student Senate 
to allocate the money. At that point, students 
began writing letters, making appeals and 
discussing the options for disbursement of 
the $700,000. 

Student Senate started the allocation pro- 
cedure by soliciting written proposals. Short 
oral presentations followed. Final appeals 
were granted to causes considered to be 
good investments in the future of the Univer- 




sity, said Virgil Wiebe, senior in political 
science and arts and sciences senator. 

After five months of suggestions and 
debate. Senate made the final allocations on 
Feb. 13. 

The Holton Hall renovation project 
received $183,663 in the final allocation 
decision. Also receiving funding was a 
$150,000 elevator project for Anderson Hall 
to make the administration building accessi- 
ble to handicapped people. 

The Childcare Cooperative received 
$86,182 for expansion of its facility. Expan- 
sion will raise its capacity from 90 to 240 
children and will enable the cooperative to 
care for infants and children up to age 13. 

An $80,000 endowment was placed in an 




■■.^' 






(113 . 



interest-bearing account for the debate team 
The interest drawn will be used to offse 
travel expenses incurred by the team. | 

A similar account was established for thl 
agriculture judging teams. The teams wi]| 
use the interest from a $60,000 interest! 
bearing account to defray its travel and pracj 
tice expenses. ! 

KSDB-FM received $23,600 to enable th' 
station to serve a larger area. The static 
will increase its power and erect a large' 
antenna. 

The remaining $116,555 was to b 
allocated at a later time. It was placed in a' 
interest-bearing account. 

Proposals denied funding included a re' 
quest by the K-State Police Department for 



'■■ir\^ 



Si 






^;3U«ihi««; ^S»iC%««t^J 



f 




STEEL RING 



FRONT ROW: Mark Verschilden, Dawn Poff, Susan 
Hey, Mary Jo Jaderborg, Anne Wirth, Joseph Cahlll. 
BACK ROW: Ray Hightower, Craig Wallace, Michael 
Splichal, Todd Schemm, Don Posson, Brian Molle, 
Daniel Clarkson, Rodney Cundiff. Allan Burit, 
Lawrence Pickert, Barry ShoRo. 



SOCIETY OF WOMEN 
ENGINEERS 



FRONT ROW: Renee Roblson, Yvonne looss, Paula 
Downey, Amy Hurst, Janet Berry. SECOND ROW: 
Arieen Baiges, Robin Holt. Ann McElroy, Ericka 
Foley, Cheryl Bettenbrack, Darcie Bailey, Regina 
Hausfeld. THIRD ROW: Laura Berry. Lisa Eisele, 
Ellen Buhl, Lisa Yankovich, Joann Buchanan. BACK 
ROW: Thanh Dao, Lynn Elledge, Michelle Ragianis, 
Audrey Janda, Elizabeth Reth, Christy Cathcart. 



SOCIOLOGY AND 

STUDENT CRIMINAL 

JUSTICE 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Guy Muggins, Laurie Lunsford, Alan 
Rise, Alfred Schnur. SECOND ROW: Kenneth 
Blevins, Lori Smith, Mark Helmer. BACK ROW: 
Kathy Watts, Karen Cohen, Debbie Shaw, Amy 
Ward. 



SPURS 



FRONT ROW: Amy Hemphill, Jane Hanson, LIbby 
Turner, Mary Bahr, Candy Leonard, Rise Frank. SE- 
COND ROW: Mark Buyle, Daryl Yarrow, Kent 
Bradley, James Murtig, Stacey Campbell, Robert 
Avery. THIRD ROW: Michelle Benoit, Michael 
Nichols, Steven Read, Christopher Vering, Howard 
Woodbury, Pete Rosa. FOURTH ROW: Leslye 
Schneider, Kimberly Buethe, Beth Baricer, Susan 
Sommers, Steve Riley, David Pulford, David Sell. 
BACK ROW: Jada Allerheiligen, Kristin Kruckenberg, 
Mary Mitchell, Judy Wagner, George Bevins, Laura 
Garrett, Shari Elk, Lori Shellanberger. 



STAR RIDERS 



FRONT ROW: Chris Sanderson, Jimmy Jones, Jon 
Klimek. SECOND ROW: Peter Rahler, Robert 
Pinkney, Darren Guyton, Ike Wakabayashl. BACK 
ROW: Virginia Brockway, Sandra Siebert. Julian 
Siebert, Alicia Hamm. 



157 



I Renovation 



updates 



and 



expands 



Animal 



As the Weber Hall renovation project 
moved into full swing, the Department of 
Animal Sciences and Industry was faced 
with the task of relocating classrooms, mov- 
ing offices and juggling schedules. But the 
inconveniences the department faced were 
paled by the expectation of gaining 
revamped and expanded facilities. 

Plans for Weber's renovation began as 
early as the late 1960s. The plans started 
small and grew until, in 1981, the decision 
was made that the whole department would 
be renovated and a new meats lab would be 
built. 

K-State's enrollment peak in the fall of 



1981 moved the renovation plans closer to 
being implemented. The peak enrollment 
brought a shortage of facilities in the depart- 
ment, resulting in the cancellation of some 
classes. 

Also contributing to the need for the 
renovation were infractions of U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture standards for the meats 
lab and the lack of modem research 
facilities. 

A section of the meats lab was closed by 
the USD A in 1980 for not being in com- 
pliance with inspection laws. 

The department had known before the 
closing that the lab was not in compliance 



with the USDA meat inspection laws. 

"The USDA came in and said, 'Look,, 
you have known about these regulations foijt 
10 years and have not done anything aboui 
it. You have known about these things for 1! 
years and have not done anything about it. Ii 
has been 20 years, and we think you ought tc' 
do something about it,'" said Melvin Hunt 
chairman of the Weber renovation commit i 
tee and professor of animal sciences. 

The funding for the $6.7 million projeci 
was allocated by the Legislature from statt 
funds. A lobbying effort by the state': 
agriculture industries was important in gain 
ing the funding. 



158 




Sciences 



facilities 



The livestock, meat, dairy and poultry in- 
istries along with several other agriculture 
i-ganizations as well as individuals in the 
;riculture industry lobbied for the project 
'■ be funded. 

"These people helped disseminate the in- 
rmation that there was a need for Weber to 
! renovated. I think they played a major 
lie," Hunt said. 

There were two parts of the renovation in- 
uding the renovation of the existing 
liilding and an addition to the east end of 
I'eber. 

When the renovation is finished, there 
utally will be a decrease in the number of 
assrooms, but they will be the type of 
issrooms and research space needed by the 
partment. 

The renovated classrooms will be 
uperature controlled to allow students to 
5W livestock carcasses and demonstrations 
class. The facilities will allow hands-on 
iming instead of show-and-tell learning, 
ant said. 

New research laboratories designed for 
;at science, physiology and analytic ser- 
:es were planned for the new addition. 
"Animal science research is really 
thing more than a biological science of 
search techniques, procedures and equip- 
int. We needed modernization in that 
;a, and if we had not done this (renova- 
n), we would not of been competitive for 
iny research grants. In fact, that is partly 
lere we were really losing out, because we 
not have modem enough facilities," 
int said. 

During renovation, Weber had to be 
;ated. When students returned from spr- 
; break, all classes held in Weber were 
>ved to other locations on campus along 
th the animal sciences offices, 
fhe faculty, staff and graduate students 
re moved in functional groups to Moore 
11 and Call Hall. 

The renovation project was scheduled to 
finished by the fall of 1987. 

—Vicki Femkopf 

[ shovels break the earth at the ground-breaking 
imony In Weber Arena for the $7.2 million renova- 
of Weber Hall. The renovation began in the spring 

<| 986 and Is scheduled to be completed by fall 1987. 

( >fo by Steve Wllderson) 

iiA/eber Renovation 




STUDENT ALUMNI 
BOARD 



FRONT ROW: Jim Sterns, Steven Reed, John Hill, 
John Button, Kent Bradley. SECOND ROW: Will 
Kirl(, Vicki Lavezzi, Lisa Fisher, Steve Cashman. 
BACK ROW: Laura Garrett, Polly Colip, Maribeth 
Gottschalk, Terry Hallauer, Lori Shellenberger. 



STUDENT DIETETICS 
ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Susan Reed, Kelly Murray, Rebecca 
De Young. BACK ROW: Theresa Wiederhoit, Aman- 
da Johnson, Kama Peterson, Mary Gleason, Sharon 
Tye. 



STUDENT NATIONAL 

EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW: Cheri Eck, Lisa Brose. BACK ROW: 
Jane Burke, Ray Kurtz, Chris Capps. 



STUDENT SENATE 



FRONT ROW: Mark Jones, Michael Riley, George 
Held, James Crutchfield, Dennis Shields. SECONO 
ROW: Mark Galyardt, Jeff Vander Laan. Bruce Ney, 
David Dakin, Steve Cashman. THIRD ROW: Deborah 
Fields, Stephen LIgon, Lawrence Tsen, Sandi 
Schmidt, Susan Baird, Kelly Welch. BACK ROW: 
Becky Yeary, Krista LIndgren, Kerry Jones, Gret- 
chen Hagen, Rachel Vining. 



TAU ALPHA PI 



Engineering Tectinoiogy 
Society 

FRONT ROW: John Lindholm, Eric Krug, David 
Novotny, Fred Hoppe. SECOND ROW: Austin Bums, 
Steve Otter, Kraig Nunn, Dean Frieser^ David 
Raetzel. BACK ROW: Sandra Wahl, Bradley 
Schroeder, Jeff Behuniak, Mari( Knoch. 



159 



An eye on the future 



n 



Because of its mission as a land-grant 
university, research is an important part of 
K-State. More than $36 million in reasearch 
was fiinded in 1985, according to Robert 
Lowman, assistant dean for research of the 
graduate school. 

A survey of research conducted by Univer- 
sity faculty and students often showed 
answers to some of life's questions and pro- 
blems. Research projects included the 
development of a new pork product, im- 
provement of the NASA space glove, lower- 
ing blood cholesterol levels, development of 
the no-back chair and construction of an 
atomic collision facility. 

POR-CON 

Making a pork product that would 
eliminate waste in butchering was only one 
advantage of Por-Con. The product, a new 
blend of bacon and pork developed by Dell 
Allen, professor of animal sciences, also had 
the leanness of ground pork along with the 
flavor of bacon. 

"We (the meat lab) grind fresh pork and 
sell it. We also process bellies and make 
bacon. In processing the bacon, we always 
end up with bacon ends which are the ends 
of the bellies that won't make a nice slice of 
bacon. We end up selling them separately 
and have to sell them at a decreased price," 
Allen said. 

Allen and some of his colleagues were try- 
ing to find a way to use the smaller pieces of 
bacon. 

"Somehow we came up with the idea that 
some people like the flavor of bacon but 
some people don't like the fat content. Some 
people like the leanness of ground pork but 
if there is a complaint against it, it's that it is 
a very bland -flavored product," Allen said. 

Por-con had the flavor of bacon without 



the fat. 

"It just made sense somewhere along the 
line to combine those two items together — 
add the flavor of bacon to the ground pork 
and the leanness of the ground pork to the 
bacon. We played with it and came up with a 
combination that tasted good. 

"It has a much milder taste than bacon, 
but it's a totally different flavor than 
sausage. It's a nice change of pace," Allen 
said. 

The bacon is ground up with the pork and 
made into patties to sell at the meat lab. It is 
growing more popular as more people try it, 
Allen said. 

"So far, it's just for sale here (at the lab). 
We've talked to a couple of companies about 
Por-Con, and they've expressed some in- 
terest but haven't acted on it yet," Allen 
said. 

"It is USDA labeled and approved just 
like everything we have here (in the meat 
lab)," Allen said. 

"We just wanted to find a nice combina- 
tion, one that wasn't too fat and wasn't too 
dry. If you didn't put enough bacon in, it 
was too dry and if you put to much in it was 
too greasy or fat," said Robert Danler, 
animal sciences research assistant. 

SPACE GLOVE 

Students and faculty from three departments 
combined their talents and knowledge to im- 
prove the design of the space glove used by 
the NASA astronauts. The clothing and tex- 
tiles, mechanical engineering and industrial 
engineering departments each had two 
students and a faculty adviser working on 
the project sponsored by NASA. 

NASA funded a competition to improve 
the flexibility of the space glove, said Byron 
Jones, associate professor of mechanical 
engineering. 

Along with K-State, the University of 



Oklahoma, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and Worcester Polytechnic In- 
stitute participated in the competition. 

The problem with the glove is that when it 
is inflated, the astronaut can't pick things up 
very well. The glove, along with the suit, 
has to be inflated for the astronaut to go out- 
side the Space Shuttle. When the space suit 
is inflated it is only inflated to four pounds 
per square inch (psi). 

"When you start putting this low pressure 
suit on, you have to go through decompres- 
sion like a diver does. When he's under that 
great pressure in water, he has to come up 
slowly. If he comes up too fast, he gets 
nitrogen bubbling out in the blood. The same 
thing would happen to the astronaut if they 
just went out of the space shuttle (without 
decompression)," Jones said. 

NASA wanted to get the air pressure of 
the suit up to eight psi, which is about half of 
the earth's air pressure, Jones said. 

"At this level, the astronauts would not 
have to go through decompression because it 
is at least half of the earth's pressure," Jones 
said. 

The limiting factor of a higher pressure 
suit is that the astronaut can't move the 
glove. 

"If you took a standard leather glove and 
pressurize it to eight psi and put your hand in 
it, you'd have to be pretty strong to move it. 
It's just like a basketball — you can't push it 
in; it becomes rigid. It's the same way on a 
(space) glove," Jones said. 

The contest NASA sponsored was to 
redesign the glove to make the knuckle joint 
easier to bend under the higher amount of 
pressure. 

"You have to design the glove so that it 
can bend without great force when the 
astronaut bends his hand. If he has to really 
work hard to bend it, he really can't do 
anything useful out there," Jones said. 

(continued on page 162) 



Inventors 







^f 



/* 



^ 



^.^f 



"%. 








/ -« n , \ \ . '* 



t\ 




iJon Held, graduate In 
tmechanlcal engineering, was 
part of the K-State team that 
designed an Improved space 
<giove for NASA. {Photo by Andy 
iNBlson) 



vf ^ ^' 



An eye on the future 



The glove that NASA is now using has 
restraints on the finger joints to keep them 
from inflating when the suit is pressurized. 
This allows the astronauts to flex their 
fingers. However, these restraints don't 
work for the knuckle joint. 

"The basic design for the K-State glove is 
that we have a rigid restraint across the palm 
of the hand that keeps it from ballooning out. 
There is also a set of attachment points at the 
top of the hand that keeps it from inflating," 
Jones said. 

"We went through probably 20 different 
versions before we got the one we liked," 
Jones said. 

After about nine months of work, the 
students gave their final presentation to 
NASA. K-State won the competition and for 
winning, the group was sent, at NASA's ex- 
pense, to view the space shuttle launch in 
October. 

"It will probably be one to two years 
before you see our design in the glove 
because it's going to go through a tremen- 
dous amount of testing. Probably for every 
hour a glove gets used in space, it gets used 
at least a hundred hours on earth," Jones 
said. 

LOWERING BLOOD CHOLESTEROL 

In a research project funded by the 
American Heart Association, Carol 
Klopfenstein, assistant professor of grain 
science and industry, was working on a new 
way to lower blood cholesterol. 

"Right now, the only way to lower blood 
cholesterol is to drink a glass of material 
that's like drinking a glass of wet sand," 
Klopfenstein said. "Most people will drink 
it for a week or two and then say 'I can't 
drink another glass.' So it doesn't do them 
any good when they quit drinking it." 

The drink contains a fiber, beta-glucan, 
which is extracted from oats, barley, wheat 
and sorghum grains. Cereals with beta 
glucan are very thick and sticky but 
Klopfenstein has devised a way to separate 
the "wet sand" into a dry form. The dry 
form could then be baked into bread. 

"Right now we're in the mixing stage. 
We're trying to come up with bread recipes 
with this fiber in it," Klopfenstein said. 

Klopfenstein hoped that feeding the new 
recipes to rats would make their blood 
cholesterol level go down. 

If it works with the rats, "We want to put 
the fiber into daily sandwiches — it would 
make it a lot more pleasant than drinking 
it," Klopfenstein said. 

Lisa Evans works at a computer while sitting in a no- 
bacl( cliair. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



NO-BACK CHAIR 

The no-back chair, invented about seven 
years ago, has been the object of interest to 
David Brown, instructor in interior design. 
He has designed several models of the no- 
back chair. 

The no-back chair is designed to improve 
posture. People sit on the forward-slanting 
seat with their knees resting on a knee rest. 
The chair's design makes people sit up 
straighter with less strain on the lower back. 
Brown said. It also improves circulation to 
the legs, keeping them from "falling 
asleep." 



"Each (design) is a little moj 
sophisticated and solves problet 
discovered in previous chairs," Brown sai' 

The origind no-back chair had rockeii 
The next chair Brown designed had castei 
allowing the chair to roll, and a knee n! 
that pivoted. 

"I thought, 'I need to get it up on caste 
and I need to incorporate son! 
adjustability,' so the knee rest pivots ' 
depending on how you sit on it. It w 
always be where it needs to be," Brov^ 
said. 

In 1984, the Funiture Design n cla 
developed the Dr. Spine Chair which was 



162 




heaper version of Brown's chairs. It is on 
oasters, but it is fixed. There is no ad- 
astability. The students designed the chairs 
) be used in the computer rooms in Waters 
[aU. 

' "Some people are comfortable in it (the 
hair) and some aren't, and that rehashed in 
ly mind that it needed to be adjustable. If it 
/as going to be marketable it needed to fit 
iVerybody, not just a small group of 
icople," Brown said. 

The latest chair Brown built was for his 
,ecretary. It had casters but the seat also has 

mechanism that made it rock back and 
Drth — a combination of the original and the 
itest designs. 

iTOMIC ACCELORATOR 

I The K-State physics department received a 
5.1 million grant from the Department of 
,inergy to finance the building of a new 
:tomic accelerator. 

i The new accelerator will allow the physics 
epartment to study atomic collision 
hysics. This research may lead to the 
jevelopment of nonradioactive fusion 
(lergy, a potential source of large quantities 
f clean energy in the 21st century, said 
hander Bhalla, head of the physics depart- 
lent. 

"Normally this kind of money doesn't go 

Midwest states. The $5.1 million given to 

3 says a lot of the K-State faculty and staff. 

i^e felt pretty proud to win a grant on 

lerits," Bhalla said. 

K-State claims the only university ac- 
derator facility in the nation dedicated 
)lely to the study of atomic collision 
lysics. The addition will be added on to 
lacdonald Laboratory in the sub-basement 
Cardwell Hall. 

"The original construction (of Mac- 
onald Laboratory) cost $5(X),(XX) in 1969. 
he investment has generated more than $7 
illion in federal grants," Bhalla said. 
The atomic accelerator will be attached to 
e present six-million-volt Van de Graaf ac- 
:lerator. The money will also finance a new 
rogenic electron bombardment ion source 
-RYEBIS) to produce highly charged par- 
;les. 

There are only three CYREBIS generators 
the world, Bhalla said. They are located in 
e Soviet Union, France and Japan. 
The new system should be completed by 
jcember 1988. Once it is operating, 20 to 
' percent of its use will be for people out- 
le of K-State. 

"It will be a national (research) facility 
len it is finished," Bhalla said. 

—Karen Schuler 



ventors 




TAU BETA PI 



Engineering Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Casey O'Donnell. Stephen Morey, 
Franklin Johnson, Rodney Cundiff, Gregory Heinen, 
Michael El<art, Bret Busse. SECOND ROW: Dennis 
Shields, Larry Schmidt, Philip Bollinger, Darin 
George, Dave Krug, Michael Splichal. THIRD ROW: 
Travis Barnes, Daniel Mills, Hugh Gibson, Mark 
Meili, Todd Moore, Kevin Honomichl. BACK ROW: 
Lynn Elledge, Athena Wong, Raphael Yunk 
Stephanie Berland, Russell Goering, Jeff Streets 
Kevin Jensen. 



TAU BETA PI 



Engineering Honorary 

FRONT ROW: Stanley Unruh, Magdi Azure, Tom 
Kuestersteffen, Scott Scrogin, Jerry Dyck, Jeff 
Kysar, John Bonham. SECOND ROW: Boyd Lear, 
Mark Verschelden, Keenan Beauchamp, Richard A. 
Klassen, Richard E. Klaassen, Ron Smith, Mike 
Gross, Scott Quinn. THIRD ROW: Brian Meier, Scott 
Nichols, John Schriner, Dana Geier, Travis Jones, 
Gordon Hulpieu, Bruce Letellier. BACK ROW: 
Kimberlee Nelson, Deborah Sprick, Jacquelyn Mid- 
dleton, Janelie Wiebe, Mardi Smith, Rodney 
Driscoll. Lisa Wipplinger, Pete Townsend. 



TAU SIGMA DELTA 

Arciiitecture and Allied 
Arts 

FRONT ROW: Bill Jahnke, Bruce Snyder, Robert 
Coffey, Matthe«r Knox, David Johnson, Ed 
OeVilbiss. SECOND ROW: Louis Mellink, Robert 
McLaughlin, Dan Boatright, Douglas Levey, Latham 
Shinder, Craig Schultz. THIRD ROW: Julie Clark, 
Sue Price, Tony Rangel, Cary Gampher, David Sain, 
Michael Barnes. BACK ROW: Leslie Francis, Lisa 
Larkin, Janette Hruban. Victor Yue, Nancy Bertram, 
Ka Chun Leng, Hariod Havens. 



UNION GOVERNING 
BOARD 



FRONT ROW: Polly Colip, Christine O'Donnell, 
Sylvia Scott, Athena Wong, Roberta Flaherty. BACK 
ROW: Mark Buyle, Stewart Jeske, Stan Winter, 
Peter Rosa, John Hummer, John Uhlarik, Walt 
Smith, Don Foster, Jack Connaughton. 



UNION PROGRAM 
COUNCIL 



FRONT ROW: Stan Winter, Janice Kiser, Susan 
Bender, Sylvia Scott, Maryllyn Woodward. BACK 
ROW: Julie Stephens, Aaron Henton, Robert O'Con- 
nor. Jeff Dunst, Linda Moeder, Bob Wald, Susanne 
Vohs, Jeff Miller, DeAnn Collins. 



163 



Tit for Life' 



video 



series 



presents 




For the student who was interested in rad 
quetball but didn't know the first thing aboii 
it, or the athlete who wanted to start runnim 
but didn't want to reinjure a newly mende 
ankle, David Laurie had the answer. 

These were the kind of fitness situation 
Laurie, assistant professor of physic:- 
education, dance and leisure studie 
educated the Manhattan community aboi; 
with his video series, Fit for Life. 

Laurie had been doing the Fit for Li;i 
series for more than a year. The prograij 
began as a spin-off from a slide/lectd 
series on fitness by Laurie and his associa 
Charles Corbin, former head of the physic 
education department. 

People in the community saw some of tl[ 
articles Laurie had written on fitness ari 
wanted to see more. Manhattan Cable Chaij 
nel 6 then asked Laurie if he would do son' 
fitness programs for television. 

What began as one or two videos became 
year-long activity for Laurie. The statici 
liked the concept and asked Laurie to coi 
tinue the videos throughout the year. 

The videos were varied in their forma 
Laurie did programs on a variety of topii 



David Laurie, assisant professor of physical education, 
dance and leisure studies, interviews Dennis Oownes, 
Butch Lacy, Andy Ponte, Kim Kinslow, Raegan Crow and 
Chris Stevenson, members of the K-State cheerleading 
squad, for Laurie's "Fit for Life" video series. (Photo by 
Jim Dietz) 

Laurie interviews Kim Kinslow on how fitness relates to 
cheerleading. The video series was aimed at trying to 
teach people about the different aspects of fitness and 
how it related to their lives. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 




164 



P.E. Videos 



jcreation information 



eluding learning the basics of outdoor rac- 
letball, care of the back and how fitness 
lated to cheerleading. 
The videos were taped either on location 
■ in the studios (depending on the topic), 
id usually took an hour to complete the tap- 

g- 

Laurie did not follow a set schedule when 

ping a video. 

"Everybody thinks it is a big deal, but it is 
St one of those things where you get an 
ea and say, 'Well, let's do it,'" Laurie 
lid. 

Laurie had a lot of people ask to be in the 
deos — which surprised him — but, he 
iually chose people he knew or those who 
ould perform well in front of a camera. 
"The videos try to strive for a realistic 
cture of the topic I am presenting," Laurie 
id. 

"I'm not a showy -type person. I like to 
ow people what it is really like. I'm not 
le kind of guy who will invite you over and 
;an my house. I'll invite you over and say 
is is the way we live," Laurie said. 
Many people wrote into the station and 
ild Laurie they liked the realistic presenta- 
)n. This added uniqueness and credibility 
his program, he said. 
Topics Laurie planned to cover during the 
ar included hydrodynamics (exercise in 
Iter), treadmill, underwater weighing, car- 
ic rehabilitation, how to watch your child 
iy basketball, high school officiating and 
If-esteem. 

All the videos were aimed at teaching peo- 
5 about fitness and how it fit into their 
es. They were aired every Monday and 
3dnesday at 6 p.m. 

Laurie said he intended to continue pro- 
(cing recreation videos and liked the 
;ognition he received from doing them. 
'Just from doing them (the videos), it's 
.azing how many times I'll go into the 
re and people will stare at me," Laurie 
d. "It's different. They're fun to do." 

—Kim Kinslow 



P.E. Videos 




UPC ECLECTIC 
ENTERTAINMENT 



FRONT ROW: Susan Bender, Sandy Winter, Jen- 
nifer Bales, Jennifer Swail. BACK ROW: Jeff Miller, 
Thomas Patterson, Don Scott, Dave Legleiter. 



UPC FEATURE FILMS 



FRONT ROW: Brooks Rarden, Bradley Carver, Todd 
McKenzie, David Bonham. SECOND ROW: Jolin 
Nett, Edward Scfiweiger, Edward Hollander, Greg 
Opiand, Brent Smitfi. THIRD ROW: Dan Zerr, Mark 
Barbee, Janice Taylor, Roger Swibold, Jerold Dlller. 
BACK ROW: Cftarla Wagner, Mary HInshaw, Laura 
Garrett, Cathi Johnson. 



UPC ISSUES AND 
ANSWERS 



FRONT ROW: Carrie Martin, Mike Robbins, Jeff 
Lewis. SECOND ROW: Alan Parke, Susan Bender. 
BACK ROW: Karen Welser, Stephanie Mann, Linda 
Moeder. 



UPC KALEIDOSCOPE 



FRONT ROW: John Swan, Jeff Dunst, Tom Lally, 
Justin Palmer. SECOND ROW: Robert Feiring, 
Carolyn Boyd, Laker Bear, John Miller. BACK ROW: 
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UPC PROMOTION 



FRONT ROW: Jeff Dunst, Diane Meyer, Manthri 
Srinathy. BACK ROW: Chris Stevenson, Kathie Cor- 
maci, Cathy Gareis 



165 



Harvard 



hosts 



Men's 



Glee 



Club 



For many college students, spring break 
was a time to get out the bathing suit and 
head south for the beaches and sun. But 
south was not always the destination. 

After more than a year of fund raising, the 
K-State Men's Glee Club prepared for its 
spring break trip north to Harvard Universi- 
ty to sing with eight of the nation's best 
choruses. 

Two years ago, Men's Glee Club director 
Gerald Polich and club members Bert Frost 
and Tim Dalton traveled to Atlanta and met 
with the International Music Council. While 
there, Polich made arrangements for the 
K-State singing group to be a part of the 
entertainment at the Harvard International 
Music Council conference. 

Frost, men's glee president, said a lot of 
planning was done to make the trip suc- 
cessful. 

"We started planning in 1985 and have 
been trying to raise money all year long. 
We've had car washes, plane washes, a fun 



run, an auction and a pig roast," he said. 

By January, the group had raised more 
than $8,000 which made it possible to help 
members pay for their trip. The 10-day trip 
cost $530 per person. 

' 'We have raised enough money to pay the 
cost of the trip, but each individual will still 
have to pay for personal entertainment, food 
and things like that," Frost said. 

The chorus started practicing music for 
the Harvard trip a week before spring 
semester began and practiced four hours 
each day. 

"We are singing classical, spiritual and 
modern music so we have a wide variety of 
pieces," Frost said. 

Frost said the trip was not actually a com- 
petition, but more of a cultural experience. 

"We are not going there to compete to see 
who has the best chorus. Sure, we want to do 
well and sing our best, but it is also a chance 
to meet other groups and learn what other 
people are doing around the country," Frost 



said. 

Men's glee began the trip on March 6 an 
stopped first in Washington, D.C. While i 
Washington, the men had a special tour c 
the White House, arranged by a former gle 
club member who works there. They als 
sang at an alumni dinner at the Capitol. 

From there, the group flew to New Yor 
City and stayed at the Milford Plaza Hote 
The club performed for K-State alumrj 
before flying on to Boston. 

Eight other universities sang at the cor 
ference including: Ohio State Univer<!itj 
Cornell University, Amherst College, th 
University of California-Santa Barbara, th 
University of Wisconsin, the University 
Michigan, Harvard and one school froi 
Japan, Kwansei Gaukui. 

— Darren McChesne 

The K-State men's glee club performs from the balcoi 
of the Nichols Hall atrium during the dedication of tl 
building. (Photo by John Sleezer) 




166 



Mens Glee Club 




MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Eric Featherston, Jerold Oilier, Jerry 
Stein. Garrett Schmidt, Marl< Dalton, Gary Born, Jeff 
Mays, Garth Gardiner, Jeff Fetter, Randy Regehr, 
Ben Frost, Ted McFeeters. SECOND ROW: Lyie 
Paulson, Mike Alderson, Darren, Killen, Randall 
Penn, Scott Seyfert, Eric Stenzel, Todd Green, Joe 
Vader, Wes Gibson, Shaun Culley, Leiand Kriegh. 
THIRD ROW: Scott Gulick, Jeff Parrish, Darol 
Hayse, Scott Johnson, Brooks Rarden. Ed Nickel, 
Tim Henderson, Roger Brown, Keith Middleton, 
Mike Franklin, Bernie Boiler, Erick Dahl, Bob Stuart, 
Greg Bussing, Jeff Pearson. BACK ROW: Rustin 
Hamilton, Rod Cundiff, Kent Letourneau, Mike Ser- 
pan, Mark McDermet, Todd Schultz, Ron Bailey, 
Mark Baird, Matt Queen, Scott Sewell, Tim Ridder, 
Brian Wohler, Bob Scheibler, Steve Bowden, Gerald 
Polich. 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



FRONT ROW: Melanie Michals, Annje Callan, 
Heather Oneale, Marcie Stamper, Lorl Jones, Dean- 
na Rudland, Karla Schmidt, Missy Trompeter, Karen 
Vawter, Jill Duerkson. SECOND ROW: Tammy 
Claussen, Kelly Karr, Michele Bollier, Stephanie 
Bearnes, Sandra Hoover, Toni Bittle, Melanje 
Schurle, Karen James, Marsha Stezkorn, Denise 
Otte. THIRD ROW: Karin Tan, Leigh .Roberts, 
Tamara Bowen, Heidi Zinn, Daisy Clay, Brenda Kit- 
tle, Tina Morrow, Michelle Hoover, Alyson Schrem- 
mer, Carrie Helmke, Shannon Fuller, Gerald Polich. 
BACK ROW: Teresa Temme, Michele Mehlinger, 
Lesli Howerton, Laura Mason, Sarah Milloy, Vickie 
Thompson, Carrie Martin, Phoebe Harkins, Gena 
Unsderfer, Susan Barcus, Jena Calvert, Stephanie 
Deatrick, Mary Chism. 



ORCHESTRA 



FRONT ROW: Jeana Ernst, Elizabeth Feyerharm, 
Diane Rader, Julie Dunn, Pam Bissey, Karl Puljak, 
Vincent Pugh, Kaylene Buller, Carolee Wall, Denise 
Neil, Cathy Mowry, Les Harlow, John Nugent, Alan 
Grant, James Hawkins. SECOND ROW: Kristin Fen- 
sholt, Jerry Hull, Joe Komer, Graham Dorian, Nancy 
Calhoun, Kayla Hagman, Dawn Risius, Adrian Bryt- 
tan. Laurel MacAdam, Jane Mann, Kathi Clark, 
Catherine Gundlac'h, Eldon Smith, Karalee 
Kiger.BACK ROW: Cesar Ruiz, Janice Sandquist, 
Enrique Alcaraz, Todd Schultz, Paul Fibelkorn, 
Daniel Lindblom, Jerry Marcellus, Tracy Booth, 
Brad Persinger, Tim Gilbert, Dave Roth, Ed Geeding, 
Byron Jenson. 



COLLEGIATE 
CHORALE 



FRONT ROW: Anne Westgate, Lisa Altenbemd, 
Sharia Soukup, Kristin Schlender, Robin Mullen, 
Maria Stouffer, Janeen Santee, Kim Hickman, Crist! 
Nauert, Michele Pease, Angle Miller, DebbI Steen, 
Terri Maddix, Deborah Lockwood, Mamie Jordan. 
SECOND ROW: Eva Chatterjee, Bev Steele, Barb 
Dubrovin, Mariann Baker, Lisa Kough, Laura 
Frashier, Kym KIriakos, Shay Blanding, Shelly 
Bothwell, Marabeth Mugler, Karen Beck, Lisa Isaac- 
son, Mary Connell, Amy McAnarney. THIRD ROW: 
Lisa Paris, Jim Mears, Diane Penner, Jill Broughton, 
Oarrell Walker, Troy Huggins, Tony Surprenant, 
Chris Watson, Cliff Veatch, Chuck Laughlin, Jerry 
Major, Jim Dietz, Lisa Hadorn, Shelly Gillam. BACK 
ROW: Irving Lester, Ray Swearingen, Grant Smith, 
Eric Stenzel, Michael Dorsey, Paul Craig, Mark 
Mahan, Lance Jost, Dwight Tolar, Tom Annis, David 
Hill, Jeff Loucks, Judd Annis. 



' iMens Glee Club 



167 



Halley's Comet 



provides once 



in 



To many, 1986 will be remembered as the 
year of the comet. 

Halley's comet was viewed by Caesar, 
Napolean and appeared the year Mark 
Twain was bom and the year he died. 

Halley's was seen in early January 1986 as 
it passed Earth on its approach to the sun, 
and was later viewed at its best on March 21 
and April 10 as it traveled back to space. 

Ted Geisert, a lab educational technician 
in the physics department, described 
Halley's comet as a "dirty snowball" in or- 
bit. 

"As it gets closer to the sun, more radia- 
tion hits it causing stuff to evaporate. This is 
what causes the tail to form. That is why we 
view the tail at its best after it has been near 
the sun and is on its way back out into 
orbit," Geisert said. 

The comet, which takes 76 years to com- 
plete its orbit, was believed to be three to 
four miles in diameter with a tail estimated 
to be more than 900 miles long. 



The comet was best seen at 4 a.m. because 
there was no moon shining. The tail was able 
to be seen because sunlight reflected off it 
like a cloud. 

Viewing of the comet was best in areas 
south of the equator, and got progressively 
worse north of the equator. In Nebraska the 
view was poor because the comet was so 
near the horizon. 

Halley's last visit, in 1910, came in an era 
very different from 1986. 

Due to a lack of communication and 
technology, people were unaware of what 
the comet was. They feared it as something 
evil and very harmful. Some even stayed in 
their houses so they would not be harmed, 
Geisert said. 

In 1528, Ambroise Pare, an observer of 
the comet wrote, "It was so horrible, so 
frightful, that some died of fear. Others fell 
sick. This comet was the color of blood." 

The comet was described, by Nicetus, an 
ancient historian, as a twisting serpent in the 



heavens. 

837 A.D. was the year the comet came th 
closest to Earth when it came within 
million miles. The comet came within 3 
million miles of Earth in 1986. 

"It was said to have been a spectacula 
sight, for the tail stretched clear across th 
sky," Geisert said. 

Halley's comet was considered to be 
fairly large comet, but it was not certai 
since comets were never viewed up close ur 
til this year. ! 

Five countries sent satellites towar 
Halley's hoping to get pictures to better e>| 
plain the astronomical phenomenon. |i 

Comets are believed to consist c 
materials left-over from a previous sole 
system, Geisert said. 

"Way out in space, much farther tha 
Pluto, it is believed that there is an Oo 
cloud, named after the man that propose^ 
this theory in the early 1900s. In this thi 
cloud, there are these comets which an 



168 




lifetime 



experience 



i)elieved to be original pieces of the first 
iolar system," Geisert said. 

"Every so often, something will disturb 
tiis cloud, maybe a passing star, and this 
vill cause the sun's gravity to pull (an object 
!'Ut of the cloud). It will make a close ap- 
searance to the sun and then go out into 
pace and never appear again, ' ' Geisert said. 
1 Geisert said Halley's comet is a captured 
omet which is caught in an orbit of 76 
tears. 

Because the comet is something that is 
ikely to happen only once in a person's 
fetime, Geisert said it is a memorable 
v'ent. 

"People will ask you many years from 
_3w, 'Where were you when Halley's comet 
as seen?'" he said. 

—Patricia Malone 

alley's Comet made its journey across the sky and 
ered people a once in a lifetime opportunity to view it. 
)oto by Vic Winter Astronomical Society of Kansas 
Y) 





UPC SPECIAL 
EVENTS COMMITTEE 



FRONT ROW: Scott Thomas, Douglas Levey, Mike 
Paul. SECOND ROW: Greg Smith, Gary Armbrust. 
Tim McCany, Tim White, Stefan Bird. BACK ROW: 
Julie Stephens, Janice Kiser, Amy Brendecke, Diane 
Chamblin. 



UPC TRAVEL 



FRONT ROW:Steve Lawrence, Scott Scrogin, 
Teresa Schrock, Janice KIser. BACK ROW:Dana 

Weeks, Phil Howard, Kelli Carr. Susie Voks. 



VIETNAMESE 

STUDENT 
ASSOCIATION 



FRONT ROW:Hieu Tran, Tan Nguyen, Thang Phi, 
Huong Nguyen, Toan Phi, Hung Nguyen, Khiem 
Dao, Richard Harris SECOND ROW:Dan Duong, 
Tung Ly, Hieu Cao, Matt Tran, Mien Nguyen, Hoai 
Pham, Anh Luong THIRD ROWTuan Pham, Due 
Ngo, Kwanh Phan, Nhan Tran, Binh Hoang, Minh 
Ly, Khanh Tran. BACK ROW:Huyentram Hoang. 
Thanh Phi, Van Thu-Van, Thanh Dao, Lanh Cao, 
Hoang Tang, Thinh Pham. 



WHEAT STATE 
AGRONOMY CLUB 



FRONT ROW:Paul Schwab, Jeff Jensby, Dan 
Johnson, Merle Leonard, Mark Sellmann, Galen 
Harbers, Janet Costin, David Fischer, Richard 
Vanderlip. SECOND ROW:Kevin Hoops, Melvin 
Theno, Todd Kintigh, Mike Aylward, Mark Meyer, 
Royalee Rhoads, Mark Kolterman. THIRD 
ROW:Buck Sisson, Paul Dubois, Walter Schlatter, 
Brett Sowers. Ken Vanhaverbeke, Paul Stamy. Jeft 
Lavery. Robin Pitman. BACK ROW:Leslie Gaffney, 
Gary Headrick. Steve Davied, David Edwards, Scott 
Dorsch, Kevin Religa, Tim Lake, Ronald Hen- 
drickson, Kevin Vondra. 



WOMEN IN 
COMMUNICATIONS 



FRONT ROW:Judy Goldberg, Patricia Meusburger. 
SECOND ROW:Lanice Thomson, Lori Stevens, 
Becky Wiley, Colleen Wilson. BACK ROW:Tama 
Erickson, Leslie Stokes, Susan Pringle. 



169 




170 



Sports Division Page 



p, 



ressure. 
It is both external and internal. It is 
pushing, driving, needling. It is the 
force behind the desire to succeed and 
the fear of failing . 

For Jacque Stuckhoff, that pressure 

was very real as she entered her junior 

r.r:er„"ra;:erGV„:e.r;^^^^^^^^^^^^ season on the women's cross country 

SCJ UdCi . (continued on page 190) 



The frustration of a disappointing season shows during 
le closing minutes of the 'Cats' 21-14 ioss to the Iowa 
fate Cyclones. (Photo by Brad Fansfiier) 

I 

irm 

|ollege athletic career, Struckhoff has become a cross 
luntry Ail-American for two consecutive years. (Plioto 
W Andy Nelson) 



<^^^: 



171 




172 



Football 



BITTER REALITY 



For the school with the worst 
major college football program 
in NCAA history, losing is not 
iisappointing. It is reality. 

Winning teams at K-State are 
cnown as visitors. 

When conversation m the 
'land of purple" turns to foot- 
jail, the program is spoken of 
vith tongue-in-cheek. 

At the onset of every season, 
here is talk of progress and win- 
ling seasons. However, every 
rue K-State fan knows that it is 
ust that, talk. 

The plain truth is, K-State 
loesn't win football games, not 
egularly. They never have, at 
east, not as long as anyone still 
iving can remember. 

Since the NCAA began keep- 
ig statistics, K-State has lost a 
igher percentage of games than 
ny other Division I school in 
le country. 

The 1985 season began the 
ame as many others. Head 
oach Jim Dickey spoke of pro- 
odd Elder is rolled by Wichita State 
lebacker Derrick Westfield after cat- 
ling a pass during third quarter action. 
)e 'Cats were upset by the Shockers in 
eir season opener, 16-10. (Photo by 
^hn Sleezer) 



mising talent and winning pro- 
spects. However, it was not to 
be as the team lost its first two 
games to schools it should have 
beaten easily. However, what 
happened next was un- 
characteristic of usual K-State 
happenings. 

Fans were expecting a winner. 
And when Jim Dickey didn't 
give them one, he resigned two 
weeks into the season. 

Larry Travis, athletic direc- 
tor, immediately named assistant 
athletic director Lee Moon as in- 
terim coach to finish out the 
season. 

Moon, who came to Manhat- 
tan from Mississippi State where 
he served as an assistant football 
coach, assumed control of a pro- 
gram that was struggling to find 
a glimmer of success. The team 
was physically, mentally and 
emotionally shaken. Moon's 
biggest challenge was to make 
the team believe in itself, and 
win. 

North Texas State defensive end, Matt 
Tiemann jars the ball loose from K-State 
tight end, Kent Dean. The Eagles handed 
the 'Cats their fourth consecutive loss of 
the season, 22-10. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



m 



Moon said he believes 
leadership by example. 

"All I've lived on in the past 
is — enthusiasm is caught, not 
taught," Moon said. 

Moon said the decision to lead 
the limping 'Cats through the re- 
mainder of the season was not an 
easy one. 

"I've had to make two really 
hard decisions within the course 
of the year — one to get out of 
coaching and the other to get 
back into it," he said. 

"To be truthful, I was sick to 
my stomach after Larry offered 
me the job," he said. 

In his first game at the helm. 
Moon experienced the same bit- 
ter disappointment that plagued 
Dickey for seven years. The 
'Cats faced Texas Christian 
University on that day. 

The Homed Frogs entered the 
contest surrounded by con- 
troversy of their own after 
NCAA violations were 
(continued on page 1 74) 

Senior wide receiver Gerald Alphin 
holds his head during the closing 
minutes of the K-State-University of 
Colorado game in Boulder, Colo. (Photo 
by Andy Nelson) 





173 



BITTER REALITY 




discovered by TCU head coach 
Jim Wacker. 

K-State came out excited and 
out-played the nationally ranked 
Homed Frogs through the first 
half. Leading 16-7, the Wildcats 
went flat in the second half, 
allowing the 'Frogs to come 
back and take the game, 24-22. 
A last-minute rally fell short as 
the 'Cats dropped to 0-3 for the 
season. 

The 'Cats suffered three more 
defeats before providing Moon 
with a reason to smile. 

K-State claimed its only vic- 
tory of the season in a thriller 
over the University of Missouri, 
20-17. The come-from-behind 
win was especially pleasing for 
Moon, who saw his struggle to 
build confidence in his team 
finally pay off. 

"I told them it (the Missouri 
win) was going to happen," 

Interim head coach Lee Moon looks on in 
disgust as his 'Cats drop a 24-22 game to 
the Texas Christian Horned Frogs. (Photo 
by Brad Fanshier) 



Moon said after the win. 
thought we had more heart thai 
they did, and I thought we'( 
fight. 

"What has happened ti 
Missouri all year long is the; 
haven't been able to hold 
lead." 

K-State closed-out the seasoi 
in traditional fashion. The 'Cat 
were pounded by the alway 
tough University of Nebrask 
Comhuskers, 41-3, and droppei 
a "should-have-won" game t( 
Iowa State, 21-14. The Univer 
sity of Colorado Buffaloes pu 
the final nail in the 1985 cam 
paign's coffin with a 30-( 
shutout in Boulder. 

On Dec. 9, Travis announce* 
the hiring of Stan Parrish a 
football coach. At the press con 
ference, Parrish spoke o 
recruiting promising talent anc 
of winning prospects. . . 

—Dan Hos. ; 
Defensive end, Kevin Humphrey gets 
piece of Kansas quarterback Mik 
Norseth during the 'Cats 38-7 defea 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 




174 






M)> 



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ii- 



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X 



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Northern Iowa running back, Carl Boyd, 
dives as he is hit by linebacker, Tim 
MacDonald and free safety, Barton Hundley. 
The 'Cats lost the contest 10-6, prompting 
the resignation of head coach Jim Dickey. 
{PMo by Jeff Tattle) 





KSU OPP 


Wichita State 


10 


16 


Northern Iowa 


6 


10 


Texas Christian 


22 


24 


North Texas State 


10 


22 


Oklahoma 


6 


41 


Kansas 


7 


38 


Missouri 


20 


17 


Nebraska 


3 


41 


Oklahoma State 


3 


35 


Iowa State 


14 


21 


Colorado 





30 



Free safety. Barton Hundley grasps an Iowa 
State receiver during the first half against the 
Cyclones. The 'Cats dropped a 21-14 
decision. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



175 




/ 



# 





Jim Dickey finds iosing 
tradition of K-State football 
too mucli to overcome 

FIGHTING 

THE 
ODDS 



After a seven-year struggle to bring success to 
K-State football, head football coach Jim Dickey 
resigned Sept. 15, 1985. The resignation came a 
day after the Wildcats' second defeat of the 
season, a 10-6 loss to the University of Northern 
Iowa, a NCAA Division II school. 

Athletic Director Larry Travis 
announced Dickey's voluntary 
resignation at a Sunday press con- 
ference and ended widespread 
speculation surrounding Dickey's 
probable departure if the Wildcats 
did not have a winning season. 

"Jim Dickey has done a great job of bringing 
honesty and integrity to the program," Travis said 
in making the announcement. 

But Travis said there was a need for a new direc- 
tor for K-State football. Lee Moon, assistant 
athletic director for operations, was named interim 
coach to complete the 1985 season. 

Dickey was not at the news conference but gave 
his own statement later in the football office at 
KSU Stadium. He began the conference with his 
usual good humor, telling a bittersweet joke. 

"I have good news, and I have bad news," 
Dickey said. "The good news is that I will never 
lose a K-State football game again. But the bad 
news is that I will never have the chance to win 
one again." 




Dickey said if he believed he was holding back 
the team, then he should resign. 

"If I feel like our players were wading in mud, 
and I was that mud, then I was going to shed that 
from them," he said. 

The lack of fianding in the football program was 
a problem during his tenure, Dickey said. 

"There is very little margin for error at Kansas 
State," he said. "We operate on a very, very thin 
shoestring, and sometimes that shoestring has had 
some gaps in it." 

Player reaction to Travis' decision was mixed. 
Free safety Barton Hundley, one of two team cap- 
tains for the Wildcats, agreed with the change but 
indicated he was surprised at the timing of the 
move. 

"I thought if Coach Dickey was going to be 
released or if he was going to resign, it would be 
after the season. I didn't think it would be two 
games into the season," Hundley said. 

Other players said they didn't know if Dickey 
should have been the one to leave. 

"We know Coach Dickey is a good coach. We 
hate to lose him," tailback John Kendrick said. 
"He just coaches; we still have to go out and play 
the game." 

Dickey came to K-State in December 1977 from 
the University of North Carolina, where he was an 
assistant coach, and replaced Ellis Rainsberger as 
head coach. Dickey compiled a 25-53-2 record 
during his seven seasons and two games with the 
Wildcats. 

In 1981, Dickey gained national attention when 
he took a gamble and redshirted seven of his senior 
starters. Redshirting allows a player to retain a 
year of eligibility while practicing and training 
with the team but not playing in any games during 
the season. 

The gamble paid off in 1982 as the 'Cats posted 
a 6-4-1 record — the first winning season for 
K-State in 12 years. The record earned K-State an 
Independence Bowl berth, marking the first post- 
season play for the 'Cats in the history of the pro- 
gram. The 'Cats lost the Independence Bowl to the 
University of Wisconsin, 14-3. 

But despite the success of 1982, Dickey's 1983 
squad could only muster a 3-8 record. The '84 
team posted a 3-7-1 record and rumors began that 
Dickey would be fired. He was not. 

The 'Cats began the 1985 season with a 16-10 
loss to Wichita State University, a team they were 
picked to beat easily. K-State then faced the 
University of Northern Iowa, a Division II school. 
The Wildcats where heavily favored in the game 
but were defeated in the contest, 10-6. 

After seven years at one of the losingest football 
programs in the history of major college football, 
the losses piled one too high. Dickey would never 
again wear the purple and white of K-State. 

—Andy Nelson, Tom Perrin 

Jim Dickey announces liis resignation as the Wiidcats' head 
footbaii coach at a press conference. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 

Head Coach Jim Diclcey yeiis at his team from the sideiines 
during the Wiidcats cruciai 10-6 ioss to the University of 
Northern iowa. Diclcey resigned the next day. (Plioto By Jolin 
Sleezer) 



177 



Jim Dickey 



'Cats defeat MIzzou for season's 



LONE VICTORY 



Critics billed it as the "toilet bowl" 
and the "battle of the bottom." 

The showdown pitted two of the worst 
teams in college football as well as the 
Big Eight's worst against each other. 

However, the die-hard fans who at- 
tended the contest were treated to a 
thriller as the Wildcats claimed their only 
victory of the season over a frustrated 
University of Missouri squad. 

Missouri had every reason to be 
frustrated. They had let a 17-6 lead in the 
fourth quarter erode and with it went 
what apparently would have been their 
first victory of the season. 

K-State outplayed Missouri in the 
decisive fourth quarter by mounting a 
furious rally which produced two 
touchdowns, the game-winner coming in 
the closing minutes giving the 'Cats a 
20-17 win and making interim coach Lee 
Moon's prophesy a reality. 

"I told them it was going to happen," 
Moon said, "I thought we had more heart 
than they did, and I thought we would 
fight." 

Fight is exactly what K-State did. 

Missouri scored first, with a three-yard 
run from Darrell Wallace, who was the 
game's leading rusher with 224 yards on 
42 carries. With 6:41 remaining in the se- 
cond quarter, Mark Porter kicked a 
27-yard field goal to put K-State on the 
scoreboard and make the score 7-3. 

The two teams traded field goals to 
round out the first half scoring, leaving 
the Tigers holding a 10-6 lead at halftime. 

"If we could hold our poise, no matter 
what the score was, we could move the 
ball on them," Moon said. "And by the 
grace of God, a little good luck and some 
great concentration by (senior wide 
receiver) Gerald Alphin, we could do it. " 

K-State's comeback actually began in 
the scoreless third quarter. With Missouri 
moving the ball behind the running of 
Wallace, the Tigers seemed ready to 
score on two separate drives. It was not to 
be as the Wildcat defense, determined to 
keep K-State in the game, forced fumbles 
with their backs to the goal line on both 
occasions. 

Missouri widened the margin to 17-6 
on the first play of the fourth quarter on a 




three-yard scoring run by Wallace. 
However, the Tigers lacked the necessary 
ingredients to put the 'Cats away. 

"We have to be able to finish them 
off, ' ' Missouri Coach Woody Widenhof- 
fer said. "If you don't do that, then you 
let them off the hook and they have a 
chance to come back and beat you." 

With 6:16 remaining in the game, 
K-State quarterback Randy Welch hit 
Gerald Alphin on a 41 -yard touchdown 
pass to close the score to 17-12. The duo 
hooked up on the ensuing two-point con- 
version attempt to draw the 'Cats within 
three. 

The K-State defense held the Tigers on 
three plays and forced a Mizzou punt. 
After three penalties and several unsuc- 
cessful plays, K-State was faced with 
fourth and 19 on its own 41 -yard line. 

With 1:30 remaining in the game, 
Welch unloaded the ball 49 yards down 
the middle of the field. After playing hot 
potato with the Tiger defensive backfield, 
Alphin won the battle for the ball with 
Missouri defensive back Erik McMillen, 
hauling in the 'Cats' last gasp on the 
10-yard line. Welch then hit Todd Elder 
in the end zone to clinch the game for the 
'Cats. 

And so it ended. The "Battle of the 
Beatables" was over and K-State claimed 
its only victory of the season. 

—Jeff Tuttle 



Willie the Wildcat leaves his mark on the 
University of Missouri mascot, placing a taped "K" 
on his bacic. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

With the 20-17 triumph in the record books, the 
'Cats first victory of the season, the Wildcats 
celebrate on the sidelines. The game determined 
"bragging rights" to the cellar of the Big Eight 
Conference. (Ptioto by Jeff Tuttle) , 



/^ 


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wf 


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178 



Minou 





K-State wide receiver Gerald Alphin 
stretches to catch a pass In the midst 
of two IWizzou defenders. The 40-yard 
reception by Alphin set up the 
Wildcats' winning touchdown. (Photo 
by Jeff Tuttle) 

Athletic Director Larry Travis 
congratulates quarterback John 
Welch in the locker room after the 
game. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 



Mizzou 



179 



kL 



Defensive end sets 
goal of helping malce 
the team a 



WINNER 




K-State fans want a winner. 

For Kevin Humphrey, defen- 
sive end and Big Eight Con- 
ference newcomer of the year, 
being part of a winning football 
team is his main goal. 

"I want to see the team win as 
many games as it can. If the 
team comes together next year, 
we should win a lot," Hum- 
phrey said. 

Humphrey transferred from 
Dodge City Community College 
and was a second team all-Big 
Eight selection. In his first 
season as a Wildcat, he made 81 
tackles, 45 solo tackles and nine 
quarterback sacks. 

Humphrey said the success he 
had during his first season with 
the 'Cats could be attributed to 
playing the game with intensity. 

Many players believe they 



play certain roles on their team. 
However, Humphrey didn't see 
himself as a catalyst for other 
players. 

"I'm just another player out 
there like everyone else. I think 
at this level of ball, (the other 
players) most likely don't need 
one certain individual to get 
them pumped up. Everyone 
should be able to get themselves 
up," Humphrey said. 

Humphrey said the Wildcat 
football team will take on a dif- 
ferent personality next season 
because of the new coach. 

"The coach (Parrish) has 
made up his mind to throw the 
football on offense. He's going 
to go with passing and stay with 
passing. Defensively, he knows 
what he wants, and he is going 
to get it," Humphrey said. 



According to Humphrey, 
another stage of the game 
critical to the team's success will 
be recruiting top junior college 
transfers and getting a good of- 
fensive line to protect the 
quarterback. 

Humphrey said he learned 
many things after coming to 
K-State. 

"I've learned there are more 
politics at this level of ball. You 
really don't get to know your 
head coach; you get to know 
your individual coach," he said. 

Humphrey said the players 
who perform the best on the 
field are the ones who have a 
close relationship with their in- 
dividual coach. 

"If they (players) listen to 
their coach, and he coaches them 
well, the end results are usually 



Kevin Humphrey sacks Wichita Sti 
University quarterbacit Brian IMcDons 
for an 11 -yard ioss. (Photo by Jeff Tuttl^ 

positive. The positions we we 
weakest at this year were tl 
ones where the coaches and tl 
players didn't get along. Tl 
defensive end positions we 
probably the strongest on tl 
team because of goo 
coaching," he said. 

Humphrey said conflicts be 
ween the coaching staff and tl 
offensive players were tl 
primary reason for the team 
lack of success. 

"When Coach Dickey resigi 
ed, the team's problems weren 
really his fault. He was doir 
the best he could," Humphre 
said. 

—Butch La 



180 



Player Profile 



Biennial party gives life to rivalry 

ON THE HILL 



For what is supposed to be one of the more 
fiercely fought collegiate rivalries, there 
have been few truly good football games in 
the history of the KU-K-State series to sup- 
port the reputation. And true to the form of 
recent years, this year's game was a joke. 

Though the football matchup between the 
two schools had been substandard, the event 
provided a good reason to throw a party. For 
KU and K-State fans alike, the activities that 
take place on "the hill" at KU make for one 
of the larger parties thrown. 

The walk through the parking lot east of 
KU's Memorial Stadium proved to be most 
entertaining. Small groups of alumni were 
gathered around vans eating deli sandwiches 
and sipping cocktails. 

Rain had turned much of the hill south of 
the stadium into a treacherous mudslide. By 
1 o'clock most of the drier areas were taken 



by Jayhawk fans who had the foresight to ar- 
rive early enough to secure a safe spot from 
which to view the game. There was no pur- 
ple in sight when I arrived, making me 
thankful that I had worn a neutral white in- 
stead of the neon purple my friend had sug- 
gested. 

I immediately searched out a familiar face 
and found myself with a long lost pledge 
brother with whom I awaited the arrival of 
our fellow Wildcat fans. 

As the groups of people descending upon 
"the hill" increased in numbers, the bien- 
nial social event began to take on its tradi- 
tional party atmosphere. It is next to im- 
possible to view the game from the hill. But 
that fact was of little consequence as most 
people were intently "scoping" others on 
the hill when the opening kickoff began the 
annual intra-state rivalry on the gridiron. 



After a scoreless and boring first quarte 
the Jayhawks scored 17 points in the secor 
quarter. The 'Cats spent most of the fir 
half methodically backing up from one er' 
of the field to the other. 

Throughout the remainder of the gamij 
the hillside party was frequently interruptej 
by the howls and insults of KU fans as the 
Jayhawks continued to humiliate oi 
"Mildcats" in the stadium. 

When one foolish Wildcat fan, standin 
close by, dared to question the sexui 
preferences and bloodlines of the KU mal 
population in general, he was peppered wit 
beer cans and fistfuls of mud. I immediatel 
moved to another area. 

The beating we took on the field and th 
humiliation we were subjected to on "th 
hill," combined with the complete ai 
rogance of the Jayhawk clones, all served t 




A K-State fan hides her identity from KU fans on the hiil 
south of KU's Memorial Stadium but shows her purpie 
pride with a T-shirt. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Waving a KSU flag, fans prepare for the traditional 
intrastate battle between the Wildcats and the 
Jayhawks. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



182 




Ku tight end Sylvester Byrd eyes the goal line for the 
Jayhawks first touchdown despite the defensive effort of 
K-State safety Barton Hundley. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

remind me of just why it is we K-Staters are 
I taught from birth to dislike these people. 
I With this thought in mind, I was delighted 
I at the sight of a KU woman clad in a 
beautiful red cashmere sweater, slide tail 
|first and screaming down "the muddy hill." 
jl was sure the sweater was ruined, and at 
.that moment, I couldn't have been more 
ipleased. 

For myself and the few Wildcat fans who I 
jwas standing near, our pleasure at the young 
[lady's misfortune was short lived. Moments 
jlater our team did the unthinkable. They 
jscored a touchdown against what was surely 
Ithe worst defensive unit the Jayhawks could 
assemble. We were showered with insults. 

"Well it's about time," one KU fan said. 
"We've had our freshmen in there forever. " 

Other than that one victorious moment, it 
was an afternoon for K-State fans to forget. 

—Dan Hoss 





While fans on the hill cheered for the Wildcats, K-State 
Interim coach Lee Moon exhorted his troops to put out 
their top effort on the field. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



183 




Stan Parrlsh came to K-State from Marshall University when 
he had a 13-8-1 record In two seasons as head coach. (Photo A. 
Andy Nelson) 



184 



Stan Parrish 



lew coach brings 
trong optimism to 
estore purpie pride 

BIG 



PROMISES 



When Jim Dickey resigned as K-State's head 
football coach on Sept. 15, 1985, Athletic Director 
Larry Travis told the media the search was on for a 
replacement who had a solid head coaching 
background and a solid reputation as an offensive- 
minded coach. 

On Dec. 3, Travis told the media he had found 
the man he was looking for. Stan Parrish, then 
head football coach at Marshall University in Hun- 
tington, W. Va., was announced as the man 
Travis' had entrusted to turn the cellar-dwelling 
Wildcat football program around. 

Travis said the move to hire Parrish was a 
"quantum leap" in moving toward the ultimate 
goal of establishing a successful football program 
at K-State. 

Parrish came to K-State after directing Marshall 
to a 13-8-1 record in his two seasons as head coach 
at the NCAA Division I-AA school. His 1985 
Marshall team was ranked in the top 20 for seven 
weeks of the 10- week campaign. 

The 39-year-old Parrish, who was the West 
Virginia Collegiate Coach of the Year in 1984, 
said he took the position because he sensed a com- 




mitment on the part of K-State officials, and most 
notably Travis, to make the program a successful 
one. 

"If you don't have a commitment from the ad- 
ministration and directly from your immediate 
superior (in this case, Travis)... I don't thinkyou 
have a future or a foundation for a job," Parrish 
told the media at the news conference at which he 
was introduced. 

"I sensed from the staff and the few students I 
met, and from the people in the community, a 
sense of really wanting this program to go," he 
said. "And when you've been through all the los- 
ing you've been through and hope still springs 
eternal, I think that's the kind of program that I'm 
looking for." 

Before being hired at Marshall in 1984, Parrish 
was quarterback coach at Purdue University. 
Before going to Purdue, he compiled a 42-3-1 
record at Wabash (Ind.) College in five seasons at 
the helm. Wabash had a perfect 10-0 record in 
1982. 

Parrish said he doesn't consider his job at 
K-State to be one in which he'll have to start from 
ground zero. 

"I don't believe in using the term 'rebuild' — 
you'll never hear it," he said. "We didn't come 
here to rebuild. We came here to win, and we 
came here to win next fall." 

Parrish, who grew up in a small town in Ohio, 
was a coach's son who will freely admit today that 
he knows nothing but coaching. 

"I really don't know anything else. I often talk 
about getting out of coaching, but I'd be 
unemployed because I really don't think I can do 
anything else," Parrish said. 

The new head coach said the decision to come to 
K-State was a difficult one in some aspects. 

' 'It was a very difficult decision in the sense that 
we had a storybook two years in Huntington. 
Everything was good. In coaching, there aren't too 
many jobs like that," Parrish said. "We had a 
great relationship with the community and I've 
been very, very happy. To leave that is very dif- 
ficult — particularly when you leave the players in 
a program." 

But the opportunity to come to Manhattan and, 
put a winner on the field at K-State was enough to 
lure him to Kansas. 

"The excitement and opportunity of what was 
here far outweighs what I left. I don't think you 
can look back," Parrish said. 

Upon taking the job, Parrish immediately began 
implementing his three-point plan for upgrading 
the K-State program. His ideas were to improve 
the self-image of his players, to install an offense 
built around the passing game and to recruit on a 
national level. 

—David Svoboda 



K-State's new head football coach, Stan Parrish, acknowledges 
the press at a press conference In the K-State Union. (Photo by 
Jeff Tuttle) 



Stan Parrish 



185 




Gordon Bute began his burger giveaway in 1969 Bute Is recognized best by his tali purple chef's hat 
and returned in 1985 after a six-year layoff. (Photo he wears while grilling hamburgers In the KSU 
by Jeff Taylor) Stadium parlcing lot before home football games. 

(Pfioto by Jeff Taylor) 

186 




Recognizing a familiar face, Bute gets a liandshalce wliile 
giving away free liamburgers. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 

A fan enioys a Bute burger before a Wildcat football game. 
(Pfioto by Jeff Taylor) 




Gordon Bute asks K-State fans... 

ANYBODY HUNGRY? 



During the '70s, Gordon Bute was a 
miliar sight outside of KSU Stadium, 
ute's tall purple chef's hat, his cooking 
ove and the fresh aroma of grilled ham- 
irgers were popular with Wildcat football 
ns as they arrived for home football 
imes. 

After a six-year absence, Bute returned to 
SU Stadium during the 1985 football 
ason complete with hat, stove and plenty 
hot-grilled hamburgers for K-State foot- 
11 fans. 

Bute began his hamburger giveaway in 
'69. With buns and hamburger donated by 
;al businesses, Bute gave hamburgers to 
yone who stopped by his make-shift ham- 
rger stand on the west side of the stadium. 
As a person passed by, Bute wouldn't let 
n get far without having a burger. 
"Don't be shy," he said. "Anybody 
ngry?" 

Bute's hamburger stand was a place for 
n to renew old friendships. 
Mways looking for a familiar face, he'd 
ve when he recognized one. The smiles 



on the faces of those passing by were enough 
to keep up Bute's spirit. 

Bute continued to serve his burgers at 
every home football game until 1979 when 
he left Kansas. It was six years before Bute 
returned to the Manhattan area. He came 
back to be with his parents in Alma. 

"I went to Lake Tahoe to work. Now that 
my parents are aging as they are, I wanted to 
come back and stay with them," he said. 

Bute was active as a professional chef until 
last spring. He spent most of his career as a 
chef at the Alma Hotel. 

Several fans enjoying Bute's hamburgers 
attested to his reputation as a fine cook. 

"I live four blocks from Gordon (in 
Alma). The hotel used to attract people from 
miles around. I've seen what he's done for 
it," said Kelly Lister, freshman in restaurant 
management. 

Bute could easily be distinguished from 
the multitude of fans who walked across the 
stadium's gravel parking lot on their way to 
the ballgame. His tall purple chef's hat was 
his trademark since he began to take such an 



interest in the people of K-State. 

"The hat's been around for a long time," 
Bute said. 

The rest of his outfit included a purple 
shirt, white pants and purple hightop tennis 
shoes. Football fans were quick to note 
Bute's rosy cheeks, red moustache and fre- 
quent laugh. 

Although he did not receive a degree from 
K-State, he was very much a part of the 
K-State family. Bute said alumni support of 
the University is important and his ham- 
burgei: stand helped generate good feelings 
among alumni. 

"I do this because I am a K-State booster. 
I believe that if we can get the alumni involv- 
ed, it adds color and enthusiasm to the 
game," Bute said. 

He paused and stopped a man, handed him 
a hamburger, smiled and said, "Have a 
hamburger, and enjoy the game." 

Bute's most important gifts to K-State 
football and its fans were his support, friend- 
ship and loyalty. 

—Cheryl Coon 



187 




Anne Stadler keeps pace with an Iowa State Coach Steve Miller encourages the team 

runner during the Big Eight Cross Country prior to the Emporia State meet. (Photo by 

championship in Columbia, Mo. (Photo by Brad Fanshler) 
Peter Obetz) 



Miller gambles and wins 



Before the 1985 cross country season 
•egan, head coach Steve Miller took a 
hance. 

Due to concern for the future of his 
v'omen's cross country team, Miller decided 
D redshirt senior Betsy Silzer. The move 
leant that Miller would have to rely on 
everal young, inexperienced runners during 
le 1985 season. 

Tragedy struck soon after the season 
egan. Angie Berry and Jill Wempe went 
own with injuries and were not able finish 
le season. This left the team with only five 
anners for competition. Because five run- 
srs must complete a race for a team plac- 
»g, it was essential that Miller keep his 
juad healthy and competitive. 

Jacque Struckhoff led the team, finishing 
I the top ten of every race prior to the 
CAA national meet. However, Miller 
ited the performances of Nancy Hoffman 
id Lisa Wakem, who ran in the fourth and 
fth positions respectively, as the key to the 
Wildcats' success. 

"When you run with only five girls, the 
urth and fifth runners are absolutely 
itical. Without them, it doesn't matter 
hat your top runners do," Miller said. "I 
as very pleased with the way they (Hoff- 
an and Wakem) responded. They did a 
ally great job for us." 
The gamble paid off for Miller as he was 
ie to keep his squad healthy throughout the 
ason. 

Injuries were a big factor in our think- 
We knew that an injury during the 
ason would be disastrous. We knew we 
;re taking a gamble (in redshirting), but 
; felt it was the best decision," Miller 

icque Struckhoff leads a University of Missouri runner 
the Big Eight Cross Country Championship, 
uckhoff's second-place finish led the 'Cats to third 
ce In the championship. (Photo by Peter Obetz) 



Women's Cross Country 



said. "We have one of the finest teams in the 
country, but our reason for doing it was to 
make us even better in the future. Hindsight 
is always clearest, and as it turned out, we 
made the right decision." 

On the strength of Struckhoff 's 17th -place 
national finish, the team closed out the fall 




Lisa Wakem closes In on the finish line after running a 
muddy course at Emporia State University. (Plioto by 
Jolitt nelander) 



campaign in a tie with Washington State 
University for seventh place at the NCAA 
Championships. The Wildcats finished 
eighth at the 1984 national meet. 

Struckhoff placed second at the Big Eight 
Championships behind Oklahoma State 
University's premier runner, Christine 
McMiken, who placed third at the national 
meet. Struckhoff then placed third at the 5th 
District championships, where K-State edg- 
ed out third-ranked Nebraska by one point to 
qualify for the national meet. 

Miller hailed Struckhoff for her team 
leadership. 

"Jacque is the epitome of the work 
ethic," Miller said. "She not only knows 
the direct correlation between hard work and 
success, but she is also a 4.0 student who 
knows what it takes to succeed in the 
classroom." 

Struckhoff, K-State's first-ever Ail- 
American cross country runner, improved 
on her performance of 1984 by running a 
life-time best 16:53 (a K-State record) and 
garnered All-America honors for the second 
consecutive year. 

Struckhoff set her school record at the na- 
tional meet in Madison, Wis., under adverse 
conditions. The temperature was 33 degrees 
at race time, winds were blowing at 15 mph 
and snow blanketed the course. 

"She ran great," Miller said. "For her to 
run her life-time best under those conditions 
was a heck of a performance. She did a sen- 
sational job for us." 

Individually for the 'Cats at the national 
meet, Alysun Deckert finished 47th; Anne 
Stadler, 57th; Nancy Hoffman, 92nd and 
Lisa Wakem, 102nd. 

—Tony Carbajo 



189 



JOURNEY OF 



(continued from page 171) 

Struckhoff felt the pressure to succeed as a student- 
athlete, to meet her own expectations and the expectations 
of those around her. 

Struckhoff' s story is one of success as she became one of 
the nation's top cross country runners while maintaining an 
enviable academic record. Following is a journal of 
Struckhoff s 1985 season telling of her challenges, frustra- 
tions and triumphs. 

Saturday, Sept. 14, 1985. 

We are on the road to Lincoln, Neb. , for our first meet of 
the season. What's going to happen? Who knows. Everyone 
expects me to do well. I don 't really like that pressure. I 
don 't like how everyone ranks us as to who 's going to be 
No. 1, 2 and 3 on the team before the season even starts. No 
one can really say who's going to be No. 1. I feel like 
everyone has designated me to be first, and if I'm not, 
they 'II either laugh or be disappointed in me. It would be 
nice to be No. 1 , but you never know what 's going to hap- 
pen. God, please let this be a good race. Please give me 
strength, physically and mentally. 

Struckhoff finished fifth at Lincoln. However, teammate 
Alysun Deckert finished six-tenths of a second ahead of 
Struckhoff to capture fourth place. 

Saturday, Sept. 14, 1985 

Just got back from Lincoln. Things didn 't go as well as I 
wished they had. Coach (head coach Steve Miller) told me 
before the race that I had better ' 'take some people 's hopes 
away. " I think I gave them hope instead of taking it away. 
Now what are people going to say? "Ha! She didn't get 
first, "or "1 thought she was supposed to be so good — 
what happened?" Why did they have to write those pre- 
season articles about me? Now I feel like such a jerk. 

On Sept. 21 the women's cross country team finished 

first at the Missouri Invitational at Columbia, Mo. Jacque 

finished in sixth place to lead the Wildcats. But she was not 

happy with her performance. 

(continued on page 192) 





190 



Jacque Struckhoff 




CHAMPION 




rofile 



191 



JOURNEY OF A CHAMPION 



Thursday, Sept. 25, 1985 

It has been a few days since the Missouri 
meet so I've had some time to decide if I ran 
well I've decided that I did not. Coach 
Miller told us that Anne (Stadler) and Lisa 
(Wakem) were the only ones meeting his ex- 
pectations so far. Thinking about what I 
hadn 't been doing put me in the ' 'dumper. ' ' 
Sometimes I wonder if I'm a wimp or if I can 
really be great like Coach Miller says I can. 
Don 't other runners ever have doubts about 
themselves ? Do they ever think they won 't be 
able to do something? Do they ever have bad 
workouts? I want to be great, but I'm not 
emotionally strong enough yet. 

Struckhoff was described by Miller, dur- 
ing a pre-season interview, as having 
unlimited potential. 

"I've said from three years ago that I 
think she can be one of the best in the coun- 



try, and she is already that. I think if she 
stays away from injury, she can be one of 
the best in the world. I think she is a really, 
really talented girl," Miller added. 

A 4.0 student in pre-physical therapy and 
nutrition science, Struckhoff made many 
sacrifices in order to excel both in running 
and academics. A typical day for her began 
with a light run at 6:30 a.m. followed by 
breakfast. 

Then classes filled the morning and early 
afternoon. About an hour of study brought 
her to 3 p.m. and time for practice which 
lasted until 5:30. Dinner and an evening of 
studying closed out Struckhoff s day around 
11 p.m. 

With weekdays spent in classes and train- 
ing and weekends spent competing, any 
social life was out of the question for 
Struckhoff 



Wednesday, Oct. 9,1985 

The editorial in the Collegian today made 
athletes sound like jerks with no brains, 
whose only goal in college is in sports. I 
don't want to be treated like a 'dumb " 
athlete because we aren 't ' 'dumb. ' ' I want to 
prove that I can do both — and do well in 
both. Sometimes I don 't know if this is good 
for me. It leaves little time for social life. I 
would like to go out Saturday night, but I 
hive so much homework and we are going to 
Wisconsin next weekend. What's going to 
happen if I never get out and socialize with 
people? Am I going to end up being a lonely 
old maid? 

Struckhoff was consumed with thoughts of 
self doubt throughout the season. Her cons- 
tant battle to gain confidence in herself 
began to show signs of success. Entering the 
Big Eight Conference meet at Missouri, 





■:^',t4-r'>"?ti»?3!:?*..^r>','?s*%xs-:;>> 





/''^H^*.-:Vv5f' 



. ' V 



r',n-t:-n 






■-'4 2 ■•k^;;!^ 



During Christmas break, Jacque Struckhoff runs at i 
her family's farm outside of Grinnell In western i 
Kansas. 



Struckhoff decided she needed to finish se- 
cond in order to meet her goals. 

Monday, Nov. 4, 1985 

Finally, I did what I said I was going to 
do. I said I had to get second in the Big Eight 
meet and I did it. If I could just think like that 
every time out, I could get some things done. 

Struckhoff s entire season hinged on one 
race. In order to repeat as an All -American, 
she had to qualify for nationals. Many 
thought the prospect of K-State qualifying as 
a team was poor. Therefore, Struckhoff had 
to finish in the top three individually in order 
to go nationals in case the team did not 
qualify. The 5th District championship meet 
was the deciding race. 

Fnday, Nov. 15, 1985 

I wish I weren't so scared for this race 
tomorrow. I would run a lot better if I could 
just relax. I've got to be in the top three. I 



don 't care if I have to crawl across the line. 
If I'm not there I think I 'II just die. 

Struckhoff ran well at the district meet and 
placed third, pacing the team to a national- 
qualifying finish in the meet. 

Sunday, Nov. 17, 1985 

Thanks God! I know you lent us a hand in 
this one. One point! We couldn 't have done 
it without your help. I knew we could go as a 
team if we all ran well, but I still can't 
believe it actually happened. We were so ex- 
cited when coach told us. Its going to be so 
much fun at nationals. 

The Wildcats qualified as a team when 
they edged out Nebraska by one point. At 
the national meet, Struckhoff finished 17th 
individually, posting her second consecutive 
Ail-American season. The team finished 
seventh . 

Tragedy struck the team's celebration 



within hours after the race's completion. 
Struckhoff and the others were informed, 
while on their way home, that a plane carry- 
ing members of the Iowa State women's 
team crashed on landing, killing all aboard. 

Monday, Jan. 5, 1986 

Being home for Christmas vacation, away 
from school and the team, sometimes makes 
me wonder why I run. Maybe I worry about 
it too much. Maybe that 's why it doesn 't 
always seem so fun. But if I want to be good, 
I have to take it seriously. Otherwise, I 
would be just another average runner. I 
don 't want to be just average, and yet I don 't 
always like the pressures of what it takes not 
to be average. So what do I do? Just keep 
running! 

Story by Dan Hoss 

Journal by Jacque Stuckhoff 

Photos by Andy Nelson 



mmmm 




^»^m 



'f*-i 






Setbacks hinder harriers 



Injuries and illness combined 
to drown any hope the men's 
cross country team had of realiz- 
ing its potential. 

Before the season began, there 
was talk of a Big Eight cham- 
pionship and qualifying for the 
national meet. But neither 
scenario was to come true as the 
team battled to overcome its 
health problems during the 
season. 

Bryan Carroll, the Wildcats' 
senior All-American hopeful, 
was the first to be sidelined. 
After returning from a pre- 



season workout, Carroll noticed 
swelling in his foot. After spen- 
ding a week on crutches and 
undergoing altered workouts, 
Carroll received good news, of 
sorts. 

What was originally thought 
to be a broken bone turned out to 
be a type of staph infection. Car- 
roll was able to rehabilitate his 
foot and ran in the first meet at 
Nebraska, but he was not at 100 
percent. 

Ron Stahl, helped pick up the 
slack during the season as the 
up-and-coming sophomore took 



over as a team leader in 
Carroll's absense. Stahl paced 
the men at the Big Eight Cham- 
pionships placing eighth to lead 
the team to a third place finish. 
Midway through the season, 
Carroll regained the form that 
had earned him top billing on the 
squad. At the Wisconsin Burger 
King Invitational, an exclusive 
meet for national powers, Car- 
roll ran a strong race, finishing 
14th to lead the 'Cats. However, 
even as Carroll was running the 
best race of his senior season, 
adversity struck again. 



Team member Bryon Lope 
hyper-ventilated and was force! 
to drop out of the race. J 
frustrated Steve Miller, hea 
coach, believed the loss cj 
Lopez was a significant set-bac 
to the team. 

"I'm not one to say 'woull 
have' and 'could have,' but ha 
Bryon finished (the race) like h 
had (in other races), our tear 

Dryon Lopez, Bryan Carroll, Pat Hessltii 
Rob Hays and Mike Rogers lead the pac| 
at the Emporia State invitational. (Phot, 
by Brad Fanshier) \ 




194 



Men's Cross Country 




Ron Stahl holds Pat Hessini's ankle as 
he does stretching exercises prior to the 
Big Eight Cross Country Championship at 
Columbia, Mo. (Photo by Peter Obetz) 



Men's Cross Country 



195 



Harriers 



would have probably placed 
seventh in the meet and we 
would have probably been rank- 
ed in the Top 10," Miller said. 

The Team finished 1 1th at the 
meet. The next week K-State 
dropped from the national rank- 
ings, after holding the 15th spot 
for the first half of the season. 

Besides Carroll's pre-season 
foot injury and the loss of Lopez 
at Wisconsin, the team suffered 
from other problems that 
hindered its performance. Car- 
roll and Mike Rogers were 
stricken with bronchitis, yet still 
ran in the Big Eight Champion- 
ships. 

"Today was our first glimmer 
of hope," Miller said following 



the Big Eight Championships. 
"I'm proud of the way the men 
overcame adversity (with two 
runners suffering from bron- 
chitis) and rose to the occasion. 

"I think our men can be se- 
cond or even win the regional 
meet," a happy Miller said after 
the meet. "The kids ran great 
even though our No. 1 runner 
(Bryan Carroll) was our fifth 
man. We ran better today than 
we have all year. We're on our 
way to doing some great things. 
I'm really proud of them." 

Head Coach Steve Miller said 
the team was ready to make a 
run for the nationals in the 5th 
District meet, but couldn't put it 
all together. 



The momentum the squad 
gained at the Big Eight Cham- 
pionships was not quite enough 
to carry them to the national 
meet, as the team finished fourth 
at the district championsips. The 
'Cats ended their season in 
frustration as they failed, by two 
team placings, to qualify for the 
national meet. 

At the onset of the season. 
Miller felt the key to the 
Wildcats' success hinged on 
Carroll's performances. The 
senior runner had led the team 
throughout his career. Miller 
knew that if the team was to 
meet its goals, Carroll would 
have to run better than ever. 

"Bryan has been our No. 1 



runner for the last couple o 
years," Miller said. "Althougl 
he has run well, he has no 
reached his own expectations o 
mine." 

The frustration that Carrol 
experienced during his fina 
season was felt by the entin 
squad. Without a healthy Carrol 
to lead them, the men wen 
unable to realize their full poten 
tial and attain their goals. 

—Tony Carbajc 

IVIuddied and exhausted, Bryon Lope; 
and Mike Rogers hold a post-race discus 
sion foiiowing the team's domination o 
the Emporia State Invitational. The 'Cat; 
placed runners first, second, third 
seventh and 14th to easily win the meet 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



196 






Bryan Carroll, Mike Rogers and 
Bryon Lopez push each other towards 
the finish at the Emporia State Invita- 
tional. (Photo by John Thelander) 

The K-State men's cross country 
team sets the pace at the start of the 
Emporia State Invitational meet. The 
'Cats went on to claim the team title. 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



197 



Spikers post 20-win season 



If winning was the only standard by which 
a team's success was measured, the 1985 
volleyball squad enjoyed its greatest success 
ever. 

Three tournament titles and the first 
20-win season under head coach Scott 
Nelson combined to give the 'Cats their 
most successful season in the history of the 
program and a third -place conference finish. 

Nelson's squad opened the season by 
hosting the K-State Invitational. The 'Cats 
defeated Oral Roberts University in the 
finals to claim the tournament title for the 
first time since 1977. 

Following their opening conquest, the 
'Cats went on the road to compete in the 
Northwestern Invitational. K-State ended the 
tournament with a 1-2 mark. They defeated 
Northern Illinois in the opening round, then 
fell at the hands of Southern Illinois and na- 
tional power. Northwestern. 

"The rugged matches we played against 



the top teams in our schedule really prepared 
us for the Big Eight season," Nelson said. 
"We learned a lot about ourselves and our 
strengths and weaknesses." 

The 'Cats dropped their conference 
opener to the University of Oklahoma, a 
traditional Big Eight power. 

Nelson said a lack of intensity was the key 
to the disappointing loss. 

"We didn't maintain our composure as 
well as we could have against Oklahoma," 
Nelson added. "We learned a valuable 
lesson." 

K-State evened its conference record at 
1-1 with a win over the University of Kan- 
sas, before suffering two-straight losses to 
the University of Missouri and the nationally 
ranked University of Nebraska. 

The 'Cats rebounded from their losses by 
destroying Iowa State University in a three- 
game match. 

"We were very attentive in the Iowa State 



match," Nelson said. "We trailed in al^ 
three games, but we showed good concen- 
tration and came back to win all three." 

Two of the many goals set by Nelson anc 
his squad prior to the start of the season were 
to sweep two matches from two Big Eight 
opponents and to win three tournaments. 
With one tournament title and victories ovei 
Iowa State and Kansas under their belts, the 
Cats' began to realize their goals. 

Midway through the Big Eight season. 
K-State took a break from the conference 
race to take part in the Oral Roberts Invita- 
tional in Tulsa, Okla. 

The 'Cats lost in the opening round to the 
host Titans. After fighting through the 
loser's bracket, the squad found itself facing 

Renee Whitney and Helen Bundy successfully block a 
shot against the University of Oklahoma. The 'Cats drop- 
ped a 3-2 decision to the Sooners in their conference 
opener. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 




198 



Volleyball 




Mary Kinsey attempts a spike during a liome matcli 
against the University of Nebrasica. (Photo by Peter 
Obetz) 



Wichita State 


Won 3-0 


Montana State 


Won 3-2 


Drake 


Won 3-0 


Oral Roberts 


Won 3-2 


St. Louis 


Won 3-0 


Northern Illinois 


Won 3-2 


Southern Illinois 


Lost 3-1 


Northwestern 


Lost 3-1 


S.W. Missouri State 


Won 3-1 


Colorado State 


Lost 3-0 


Wyoming 


Lost 3-0 


Oklahoma 


Lost 3-2 


Kansas 


Won 3-2 


Missouri 


Lost 3-2 


Wichita State 


Won 3-1 


Tulsa 


Won 3-0 


Nebraska 


Lost 3-0 


Iowa State 


Won 3-0 


Wichita State 


Won 3-0 


Oklahoma 


Lost 3-1 


Oral Roberts 


Lost 3-0 


N.E. Louisiana 


Won 2-0 


West Texas State 


Won 2-0 


Texas Lutheran 


Won 2-0 


Oral Roberts 


Won 2-0 


Iowa State 


Won 3-0 


Nebraska 


Lost 3-1 


Missouri 


Won 3-0 


Tulsa 


Won 3-1 


Kansas 


Won 3-0 


Illinois-Chicago 


Won 3-1 


Iowa State 


Lost 3-1 



199 



Head volleyball coach Scott Nelson talks to his squad 
during a time-out. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



Spikers 



Oral Roberts again; this time for the tourna- 
ment championship. 

Refusing to be denied, K-State defeated 
the host team, claiming its second tourna- 
ment title of the season. 

K-State then took its newly gained 
momentum on the road to Iowa State to 
resume conference play. The 'Cats broke an 
11 -year drought by defeating the Cyclones 
in three games, giving them their first win in 
Ames. 

"We went there knowing we could beat 
them in three straight," Nelson said. "We 
went there with that in mind. We controlled 
the tempo and had good intensity throughout 
the match." 

The 'Cats then assured themselves of a 
third-place conference finish by defeating 
Missouri in three games. 

"We knew going into the Missouri match 
that we were looking directly at, and into, 
the face of our long- and short-term goals," 
Nelson said. "It was a win we needed 
badly." 

Nelson and his crew realized two of their 
goals at the Jayhawk Invitational by 
defeating the University of Kansas to claim 
their third tourney title and complete the 
sweep of their second conference opponent. 

K-State 's season came to an abrupt halt 
when Iowa State upset them in the first 
round of the Big Eight tournament. 

"The characteristic of this season was 
continued improvement throughout the 
year," Nelson said. "We played our most 
solid volleyball in the last month of the 
season." 

—Claudia Songster 




Donna Lee spikes the ball into the attempted block t 
University of Missouri opponents. (Plioto by Peter Obeb 



200 



Volleyball 




Donna Lee taps the ball over the 
outstretched arms of two Univer- 
sity of IVIissouri players as they 
attempt to block her shot. (Photo 
by John Thelander) 



Volleyball 



201 




Dedication, desire 
pay off to make 



Renee Wliitney 



A dedication to volleyball and a desire to 
be a top-notch player made Renee Whitney a 
strong force for the Wildcat's volleyball 
team. As a teenager, Whitney took the initial 
steps that led her to the forefront of K-State 
volleyball. 

Whitney, a Manhattan native, decided 
during her high school years to pursue a col- 
legiate scholarship in volleyball. 

"In high school, I participated in other ac- 
tivities, but it was during my sophomore 
year that I decided I wanted to earn a 
scholarship to play volleyball. I became very 
dedicated to working out, and I worked all 
year," Whitney said. "While the basketball 
team would be practicing at one end of the 
gym, I would be at the other end working on 
my setting." 

Whitney entertained offers from many 
schools, but chose to accept head coach 
Scott Nelson's offer to attend K-State. 

"I got some offers from other schools," 
she said. "I went to the University of 
Nebraska for a visit, but I just didn't think I 
would fit into the program there. So I made 
the decision to stay here and play for Coach 
Nelson." 

During her freshman season with the 
Wildcats, the team relied heavily on its 



defensive skills. However, Whitney said the 
team progressed significantly from that 
point. 

"During my freshman year, everything 
was really basic. We just concentrated on 
getting a good pass and then a good set. Now 
passing is one of our strengths, and we run a 
really quick offense," Whitney said. 
"When I first came here, our defense was 
our strength, because we weren't really 
strong in the other areas. Now our all- 
around game is much better." 

Whitney continued to improve her skills 
throughout her college career. Her efforts 
were rewarded by being selected as a first 
team all-Big Eight performer during her 
junior and senior seasons. She was named 
team co-captain for her senior year, during 
which she was also seleced as a Big Eight 
Conference player of the week in addition to 
being named to three all-tournament teams. 

In her final season with the 'Cats, Whitney 
led the team in games played, participating 
in all 11 4 contests. She also led the Wildcats 
in hitting percentage and in assists. 

Whitney's efforts on the court earned her 
recognition throughout the country. She was 
among the top two in the conference in both 
assists and hitting percentages, and her hit- 



Senior co-captain Renee Whitney leaps to biocic an 
opponent's spil(e. Whitney's hitting percentage piaced 
her fifth nationally. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 

ting percentage placed her fifth nationally. 

For the third time in her career at K-State, 
Whitney was named the team's Outstanding 
Player of the Year, a distinction she shared 
with team member Donna Lee in her final 
season. 

Whitney's athletic ambitions will not end 
with her college career. Her future plans in- 
clude try-outs with several professional 
teams in both California and Europe. 

"I am really looking at different 
possibilities and opportunities that I might 
have. There are teams in California that 
travel throughout the United States and there 
are several pro teams in Europe," Whitney 
said. "I know I have to start at the bottom, 
and I can't get discouraged if I don't make a 
team. All I know is that I am not ready to 
quit playing volleyball yet." 

—Claudia Sangster 

As a sophomore In high school, Renee Whitney 
decided to work toward gaining a collegiate scholarship 
in volleyball. As a graduate of K-State, she hopes her 
collegiate success In the sport can pay off In the 
professional ranks. (Pfioto by Jim DIetz) 



202 



Renee Whitney 













203 



A few bripht moments 



The K-State men's golf team failed to rise 
to the level of its Big Eight competition, ex- 
periencing a few bright moments in what 
was otherwise a disappointing year. 

Much to the delight of Coach Ray 




Wauthier, the team finished first in four of 
the nine tournaments in which it competed. 
However, in the five tournaments where the 
'Cats faced Big Eight opponents, the team 
managed no better than fifth place. 

Individual scores remained consistent 
throughout the year, leaving the level of 
competition as the only variable in the 
team's tournament finishes. 

Competition in the Big Eight was tough. 
The conference boasted two of the top pro- 
grams in the nation in the University of 
Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University, 
Wauthier said. 

"When we talk about Oklahoma and 
Oklahoma State, we are talking about two of 
the top teams in the nation, not just the Big 
Eight," he said. 

Youth may have played a factor in the 
team's inability to perform successfully 
against conference opponents. The loss of 
three team members to graduation in the spr- 
ing left the squad without experienced 
leaders, resulting in a mediocre year. 

"We were a very young team," said Jim 
Fiscella, senior in finance. "But I feel we 
played well for as young as we were. The 
younger guys shot consistent scores which 
really helped. They'll only get better as they 
gain experience." 

Money continued to be an obstacle for 
Wauthier. Working with the lowest budget 
in the Big Eight left him wihout the caliber 
of players needed to compete with the con- 
ference powers. 

"We rarely compete with Oklahoma and 
Oklahoma State except for the Big Eight 
tournament. We just don't have the budget 
to go to the tournaments they go to," 
Wauthier said. "They go all over the coun- 

Uurlng a practice round at the Manhattan Country Club, 
Kevin Byrne lines up a putt. (Photo by Jim DIetz) 



try, and we rarely get out of the state of Kan- 
sas. Since we don't play in the tournaments 
they do, we aren't able to attract the kind of 
golfers they have." 

— Kevin Peterson 




Denny Pickett follows through on a tee-shot at the 
Manhattan Country Club. (Photo by Jim DIetz) 



204 



Men's Golf 




ifore beginning tlieir practice rounds, Daran 
ischafer and Jacic Day log some putting practice. 
oto by Jim DIetz) 



'Men's Golf 



205 



Coach brings commitment 



1985 was a transitional year for the 
women's golf team. Rob Sedorcek assumed 
control of the program following the 
resignation of Lila Levin, bringing with him 
a commitment to making the golf team a 
respected competitor. 

The 22 year-old Sedorcek was faced with 
an enormous challenge with which to begin 
his coaching career. The young and inex- 
perienced golf program was the worst in the 
Big Eight. Sedorcek had the lowest budget in 
the conference with which to work and the 
team had finished dead last at the Big Eight 
Golf Tournament; the women placed 
seventh only because the University of Col- 
orado does not field a team. 

To make matters worse, Sedorcek was 
told not to recruit for the 1985-86 season. 
Sedorcek understood this to mean the 
recruiting had been completed. However, 
when he evaluated his squad at the start of 
the fall season, he realized there had been a 
mistake. 

"I really thought the recruiting had been 
done," Sedorcek said. "The perfect team 
would be eight to 10 players. That way you 
can keep the tournament players honest. If 
they don't play well, you put someone else 
in their place. When I got here we only had 
five girls. If I had known that, I would have 
recruited to get our numbers up." 

One of the first things Sedorcek did was 
emphasize his desire to compete well at the 
Big Eight Tournament, even at the cost of 
peforming inconsistently early in the season. 

"I told them (the team) that I don't want to 
finish last in anything but especially not at 
the Big Eight," Sedorcek said. "What we're 
really trying to emphasize is to peak at the 
Big Eight. I'll expect some inconsistent play 
early as long as we can come around and 
play well at the end." 

The team improved, both as a squad and 
as individuals, from the previous year. 

"We did improve over the past year," 
Sedorcek said. "Every one improved one to 
two strokes and as a team we improved by 
one stroke." 

Team member Anne Hegarty said the im- 
provement was due to Sedorcek 's ability to 
assist the golfers with their technique. 

"Sedorcek is more of a technical coach 
who really helps us with our swings," 

During the Big Eiglit Golf Cliampionship lield at the 
Manhattan Country Club, Paige Harrison follows through 
on a drive. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Hegarty said. "This year we've done better 
than we've ever done in the past. At 
Missouri, we had the best tournament in 
K-State women's golf history." 

The squad finished third at the Missouri 
Invitational marking the first time in the 
history of the women's program that they 
had finished higher than fourth in a tourna- 
ment. 

Committed to improvement, Sedorcek 
established his policy of improved competi- 
tion. 

"I'll only put them in tournaments that 
will challenge their skills," Sedorcek said. 
"It doesn't cost any more to play at 



Oklahoma than it does to play NAJy 
schools, so why not play the better compet 
tion? 

"The way you learn to play competitiv 
golf is to be put into a more competitiv 
situation than you were previously in, 
Sedorcek said. 

Sedorcek 's top priority was to giv 
K-State a respected golf squad. 

"I want to prove something to every on 
across the country," Sedorcek said. "I war 
to show that we can field a successful team i 
K-State. I want to make K-State known fc 
golf." 

— Kevin Peterso 



206 





/ hile preparing to putt during a practice round, Sliarry 
irclier eyes the cup. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



Women's Golf 



207 



Club claims tournament title 



Putting the pieces together at the right 
time is important for any team and the soccer 
club found they were able to do this as they 
posted a 9-5-2 record for the season. 

"We peaked at the right time," Harold 
Rathburn, graduate in biochemistry and 
president of the K-State Soccer Club, said. 
"We worked together as a team, especially 
at the Chartrand Tournament." 

In first round competition at the seventh 
annual Ed Chartrand Memorial Soccer tour- 
nament in Kansas City, the Wildcats 
defeated Central Missouri State University, 
2-0, and the University of Missouri-Kansas 
City, 1-0. K-State was beaten by Iowa State, 
2-1 , before beating Wichita State, 1-0, in the 
semi-final round. The team captured the 
tournament title with a 5-1 stomping of Iowa 
State in the championship game. 

Rathburn said the Chartrand tournament 
was always the highlight of the season. 

"We always work up to this 
(tournament)," he said. 

The strength of the Wildcat team was its 
defensive play, Rathburn said. The offense 
was good also, but probably not as "potent" 
as it could have been. 

While the K-State fielded a strong and 
talented squad, this did not always work to 
its advantage. The 'Cats had a tendency to 
become overconfident and Rathburn said 
this may have hurt the team after the Char- 
tarand tournament. 

The Wildcats won only two of their five 
games after the tournament. They lost to the 
University of Kansas, 1-0, and Wichita 

Losing sight of the bali, Rob Haaly coiildes with a 
University of Kansas soccer piayer during a game at the 
LP Washburn Recreation Area. The gamed ended in a 
1-1 tie. (Photo by Brad Fanshler) 



State, 3-2, in the KU mini-tournament in 
Lawrence. 

"Our overconfidence may have hurt us, 
but our team has a lot of depth and is a good 
team," he said. 

Rathburn said soccer is a fast-paced game 
and provides a lot of excitement for its spec- 
tators. 



"Soccer is always moving. There are no 
time outs or standing around waiting foi 
something to happen like in baseball," he 
said. "There is continuous action unlike 
football where something happens every twc 
minutes... it's more like basketball withoui 
the time outs." 

—Maribeth Gottschalh 



208 





Clinton McKenzie moves in to steai tlie baii from a 
UMKC player during the Chartrand soccer tournament 
played in Kansas City. The K-State club won the tourna- 
ment. (Photo by Brad Fanshier) 

An injury to Stuart Craig's arm is attended to by his 
wife during a soccer game against Wichita State. (Photo 
by John Thelander) 



Soccer 



209 



A regional success 



The University of Notre Dame is 
generally thought of as a major athletic 
power — regardless of the sport 
Fighting Irish athletes may be par- 
ticipating in. 

A victory over a Notre Dame squad in 
any sport — whether it be football, 
basketball or baseball — is an achieve- 
ment to be proud of. Just ask anyone 
who has ever stepped on to a field or 
court against the men or women from 
South Bend, Ind., and walked away vic- 
torious. 

K-State stepped neither on to the field 
nor on to the court in the Fall of 1985 
against Notre Dame, but they did post a 
major victory against a Fighting Irish 
team. And they did so in the water. 

K-State's men's crew team posted a 
victory over the Notre Dame team in 
October in Des Moines, Iowa, at the 
Head of Des Moines crew competition. 
The victory over the Fighting Irish 
lifted the eight-man varsity team to a 
championship in their division in the 
competition. 

Second-year coach Don Rose said the 
head-to-head win against Notre Dame 
was a big step in establishing K-State as 
a regional power in the water. 

' 'It was easily the biggest varsity win 
we've had in recent years," Rose said. 
"A win like this can really boost your 
program. 

"It really remains to be seen, 
however, whether or not this win 
established us as a national power. I 
think it establishes us in the region — 
shows other schools that we are coming 
back." 

K-State completed the three-mile race 
against Notre Dame in 17 minutes, 57 
seconds to edge the Fighting Irish team 
by just two seconds. 

The K-State team that defeated the 
Irish included Aaron Rice, Jeff Bushey, 
Joe Merlo, Brad Johnson, Kevin Kriss, 
Vince Stadel, bowman Jim Johnson, 
strokeman Tim Keechman and coxs- 
wain Jerry Ricke. 

Although the win over Notre Dame 
was nice. Rose was quick to downplay 
its significance because of the nature of 



the sport. The crew season is structured 
so that the team is basically in a practice 
stage in the fall and in a competition 
stage in the spring. 

"Fall is more a review for the varsity 
and a chance for the men to perfect their 
technique," Rose said. "Our varsity 
squad prior to a few years ago was 
negligent in the fall — and it showed in 
the spring." 

Rose said the lack of depth on the 
squad was both a drawback and a 
positive point. 

' 'We used to be three- and four-deep 



on the men's squad, but this seasi 
we've struggled to be two-deep," 
said. "But I think the small squad, a 
the fact that I'm able to work with t 
team members on a more individualiz 
basis, results in better training hab 
and better morale." 

Wins over regional powers and i 
creased team togetherness have led 
only one thing. Rose said. 

"After an absence of several yeai; 

there is finally a good feeling back in ti 

boathouse." I 

— David Svoboi 



I 




210 



Crew 




Coach Don Rose manuevers 
his boat through the waters of 
Tuttle Creek Resevoir to gain 
a better vantage point from 
which to oversee his team's 
worl(out. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

The men's crew team 
members giide across the 
water as they prepare to end 
the day's practice session. 
Coach Don Rose caiis out in- 
structions to the women's 
team in the baclcground. 
(Ptioto by Jeff Tuttle) 






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Crew 



211 



Coach builds winner 



Gary Vaught came to K-State a proven 
winner. As a head baseball coach Vaught 
had never experienced a losing season. 

Vaught came from Connors State Com- 
munity College in Warner, Okla., where his 
worst record was 63-20, to rebuild a stag- 
nant K-State baseball program. 

Although he did have his first losing 
season, Vaught laid the foundation for a 
winning program by leading the 'Cats to a 
fourth place finish in the Big Eight Con- 
ference. 

The spring season, which saw marked im- 
provement in the program, was highlighted 
by a 4-2 victory over national power 
Oklahoma State University, a team that had 
dominated the 'Cats for years. Despite 
finishing two games below .500 the 'Cats 
earned a Big Eight post-season tournament 
berth with their fourth place conference 
finish. 

After the spring, Vaught embarked upon a 



vigorous recruiting program intended to 
build a team nucleus. Jeff Turtle headed the 
list of recruits. The juco All-American step- 
ped in to take over the catching respon- 
sibilities and led the team in the fall season 
with an impressive .489 batting average. 

The team rolled through the fall '85 
season with a 17-1 record. The Wildcats 
amassed impressive stats during the fall 
season, their most successful fall season 
ever. 

As a team, the 'Cats batted .360 with 72 of 
their 196 hits going for extra bases. They 
also successfully stole 65 bases in 74 at- 
tempts. The team scored 188 runs in the 18 
games. 

The pitching for K-State was just as im- 
pressive allowing 65 runs in 139 innings 
with a team ERA of 2.78. The pitchers 
struck out 160 batters and gave up 117 hits. 

Pitching was the teams strength 
throughout the fall. As a staff, the 'Cats sur- 



rendered only 61 walks in 139 innings 
Vaught said the control of his pitching staj 
was a key to the success of the team. 

"You can't defense the walk," Vaugh 
said. "We've got pitchers that can go afte 
the batters." 

Experience is essential to the developmer 
of any successful program. The fall season 
to Vaught, is a time for the team to lear 
through playing time. 

"Learning from your mistakes is reall; 
better than being coached. There are jus 
somethings that you can't teach the kids,' 
he said. 

Vaught said a good attitude and hustle an 
important, but "winning is the botton 
line." 

"The fans at K-State want a winner 
hopefully we will give them one, and the; 
will support us. It's not any fun to play whei 
the stands are empty," he said. 

Doug Scheibi 




A University of Kansas player goes over the top of Brent 
Gibson as he tags out the KU runner at second base. The 
Wildcats finished fourth In the conference and advanced 
to the Big Eight post-season tournament. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 



Brant Gibson completes a double play during actio 
against Oklahoma State University. The Wildcats wer 
on to win the spring season contest. (Photo by Jet 
Taylor) 



212 



Baseball 




Wildcat third baseman Cliris Winters snags a 
liit by Morningside, Iowa College first baseman 
E.J. Staner in the first game of a double-header 
at Frank Myers Field. K-State defeated Morn- 
ingside, 11-1 and 19-10. (Photo by John Sleezer) 

Congratulations are in order for Tom Smith 
following a close victory during the spring 
season. Smith was named the Big Eight pitcher- 
of-the-year following the 1985 spring season. 
(Photo by Jeff Taylor) 






A 






214 



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Baseball 

i 





K-State shortstop Victor Suarez races after a 
ball hit by Marymount College catcher Doug 
Shaffer in the second game of a double-header. 
K-State defeated Marymount 11-6 in the first 
game and 9-6 in the second game. (Photo by 
John Sleezer) 

Coach Gary Vaught leaps in excitement after pit- 
cher Tom Smith completes a perfect inning 
against Oklahoma State University. The 'Cats 
went on to win the game 4-2. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



215 



They did what no other 
team in baseball history 
has ever done. After los- 
ing the first two games at 
home, they came back to win their 
first World Championship in the 
17-year history of the franchise. 
Yes. The Kansas City Royals were 
major league baseball's world 
champions for 1985 — but it wasn't 
easy. 

The "Comeback Kids" of 1985 
trailed the California Angels by 
eight games in late June, and it 
looked like a season which started 
with high expectations would end 
with the Royals watching post- 
season play at home. But somebody 
forgot to tell the Royals. 

It came down to a four-game 
series in early October. California 
entered Kansas City with a slim 
one-game lead over the Royals with 
just seven games to play for both 
teams. Three Angel wins and the 
season would be over for Kansas 
City. 

But the Royals prevailed, winn- 
ing three of the four games from 



A YEAR OF 
COMEBACKS 



,. 



California. That, combined with 
two Royals victories over the 
Oakland A's and a loss by Califor- 
nia to the Texas Rangers, put the 
American League Western Divi- 
sion Championship in the Royals' 
pockets for good. 

The Toronto Blue Jays were the 
next opponent with the American 
League pennant as the prize for the 
victor. The Blue Jays won the first 
two games in Toronto to take a 
seemingly commanding lead. Enter 
George Brett. The KC third 
baseman put on a power show in 
game three, hitting two homers and 
lifting the Royals to the win. 

Kansas City lost game four. 




Royals' second baseman Frank White 
eludes the Cardinals' Darrell Porter to com- 
plete a double play during the World Series. 
Porter was a star of the Royals first World 
Series team In 1980. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



George Brett acknowledges the cheers of 
the crowd after the second of his two home 
runs In Game Three of the American League 
Playoffs against the Toronto Blue Jays. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



however, and the Royals were one 
game from elimination. Not to 
worry though; Kansas City won the 
final three games of the series, in- 
cluding the last two in Toronto, to 
win the pennant. 

The "1-70 Series" between the 
Royals and the National League 
Champions, the St. Louis Car- 
dinals, was next. The Royals look- 
ed like they had left their bats at 
home after losing the first two 
games. 

Just when it looked like the 
Royals were dead again, another 
hero moved to the forefront — this 
time a pitcher. Bret Saberhagen, a 
21 -year-old right-hander, struck 



out eight batters and allowed or 
six singles in winning game three 
St. Louis, 6-1. But just when tl 
Royals had new life, the Cardim 
took it away again, winning gan 
four to take a commanding 3 
lead. 

Kansas City won game five, 6- 
behind the pitching of Dam 
Jackson, and the series moved ba< 
to Kansas City with the Roya 
needing consecutive home wins 
become World Champions. 

They got them, but game s 
wasn't easy. No one expected 
would be. Dane lorg's pinch-1 
single in the ninth inning lifted tl 
Royals to a 2-1 victory in game si: 
Fans watched the Cardinals take i 
early lead, only to cheer the Roya 
comeback one last time. 

There was no need for a conH 
eback in game seven. The Roya 
erupted early and often in postir 
an 11-0 whitewash of the Cardina 
in the season finale. The Kansas C 
ty Royals had their first basebs 
world championship. 

—David Svoboc 



216 




A jubilant George Brett celebrates the 
Royals' world championship with reserve 
outfielder Lynn Jones in the KG clubhouse 
following the Royals' 11-0 win in Game 
Seven of the Series. (Photo by John Sleezer) 




The World Series Most Valuable 
Player, Bret Saberhagen, Is 
covered In ticker tape during the 
parade honoring the Royals the 
day after they won their first 
world championship. Saberhagen 
was later named the American 
League Cy Young Award winner. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



217 




OuHlelder Chris Haller slides safely Into 
the Wichita State catcher and pops the 
ball loose In the spring season opener. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



218 



Sottball 





K-State catcher Annette Kirkham keeps 
a foot on third base as University of tMin- 
nesota third baseman Deb Lange topples 
over her during the second game of a 
double-header. Kirkham was safe on the 
play and later scored to help the Wildcats 
defeat Minnesota, 6-5. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



Errors plague team 



An error is an error and can 
make any coach wince. But as 
Softball coach Ralph Currie can 
tell you, an error made at the 
wrong time can be the difference 
between winning and losing. 

"We made errors at crucial 
times causing us to lose 11 or 12 
games by one or two runs," 
Currie said. 

Those errors combined with a 
lack of team unity led to a disap- 
pointing season for the Wildcat 
Softball team. The lack of team 
unity was caused by having too 
many players on the squad, Cur- 
rie said. 

"We had 18 players suiting up 
for each game and many of these 
players did not get a lot of play- 
ing time," he said. "When 
some of the girls didn't get the 
playing time they wanted, (their) 
spirits were low and the whole 



team was affected." 

In the past three or four 
seasons, the Softball team has 
finished as high as fourth in the 
Big Eight Conference, but the 
spring season saw K-State occu- 
pying the Big Eight cellar. 

Currie was quick to point out 
that he was not completely 
disappointed with the team's 
performance because of the level 
of competition in the Big Eight. 

"We played the best (teams) 
in the country," he said. 

Currie said the Big Eight was 
one of the top three softball con- 
ferences in the nation, and he an- 
ticipated five Big Eight teams in 
the Top 20 in the 1986 spring 
season. 

A restriction on Currie and the 
team was the lack of scholar- 
ships for recruiting. Currie was 
unable to obtain some of the 



country's top-notch players 
because of the shortage of 
scholarships. 

Currie only had four scholar- 
ships to offer and was required 
to fill the remainder of the squad 
with walk-ons. 

Money, however, was not an 
issue in Currie's mind. 

"Money just isn't an issue ex- 
cept when you compare it to 
what some others spend. And let 
me tell you, when we get 
Nebraska or Oklahoma on the 
field, it doesn't matter what they 
spend. It's still nine on nine. My 
girls have a lot of pride and 
that's when they really play 
some ball," Currie said. 

The Softball team gained a 
permanent field during the fall 
which Currie said was an advan- 
tage for the squad. Previously 
(continued on page 220) 




Softball 



219 



Errors 



the team practiced on one field 
and played its games on a dif- 
ferent field. Currie cited this as a 
problem because the team didn't 
have a stable home. 

"For four years, we played on 
any field I could borrow from 
the city (Manhattan). So when 
Dick Towers (former athletic 
director) said we could have 
some land for a field, why, we 
put one in. It's really been a 
bonus for us. We now have a 
place we can call home," Currie 
said. 

—Jada Allerheiligen 



K-State's Lori Folkerts slips into her 
wind up before letting go with a pitch in 
the game against the University of Min- 
nesota. (Photo by John Sleezer) 





K-State shortstop Rita McClure dives fo 
the ball as second baseman Jennits 
Chalk moves in to back her up during th 
second game of a double-header t 
defeat Allen County Community College 
2-1 and 9-0. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



220 



Softball 





Left fielder Leslie Taylor slides Into 
homeplate on her back as the Wichita State 
catcher waits for the throw from the out- 
field. (Photo by John Sleezer) 

Team spirit Is generated by Rita McClure, 
left, as she starts a team yell before the 
beginning of an Inning. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



221 




A quick transition between events in tlie 
triatlilon is important for a good finish in 
tlie race. Doug Sterbenz prepares for tlie 
bicycling portion of the race after com- 
pleting the swimming event. (Photo by 
Jeff Tuttle) 

Shawn Daly, who finished first in the 
boys age 14-19 category, mal(es his way 
out of Tuttle Puddle during the swimming 
portion of the race. (Plioto by John 
Sleezer) 






m 





M 



fv 



Carol KozlowskI cools off a cut on hi 
toe by pouring water over her foot aftt 
finishing the triathalon race. (Photo L 
John Sleezer) 



111 



Triathlon 




Grueling event is 
uitimate test of an 
individual's physical 



CONDITIONING 



The triathlon — an 
event consisting of 
swimming, bicycling 
and running by an in- 
dividual or a team — 
is considered by many as the 
ultimate sport requiring inten- 
sive training and endurance. 

But more important than the 
training is the transition between 
the three events. A slow transi- 
tion can be the difference bet- 
ween winning the race and com- 
ing in second. 

Perhaps nobody knows the 
importance of transitons in 
triathlons more than Topekan 
Chuck Kirmse. 

Kirmse, a student at Wasbum 
University of Topeka, entered 




the 1984 Little Apple Triathlon 
and lost a chance to win the race 
when a slow transition between 
the bicycle and running relays 
caused him to lose valuable 
time. He placed fourth. 

"We got a little screwed up in 
the transition area," Kirmse 
said. "I came into the bicycle 
corral and I was looking all over 
the place for my (running) 
shoes. I couldn't find them. 

"There were some friends 
who told me she (Kirmse 's 
girlfriend) had them up the road 
and I was supposed to keep bik- 
ing up the road. So I ran up the 
road barefooted." 

When Kirmse entered the 
1985 Little Apple Triathlon he 
made sure he knew where his 
shoes were. It paid off as the 
Topekan won the overall men's 
title. 

Kirmse's time of 58 minutes, 
17.63 seconds, outdistanced 
Russ Pugh, junior in business 
administration, who finished the 
race in 1:01:22. Doug Sterbenz, 
senior in mechanical engineer- 
ing, (1:01:27.47) and Jerome 
Nadel, graduate in psychology, 
(1:01:59.51) were third and 
fourth. 

Unlike Kirmse, Jerome Nadel 
had not trained specifically for 
the triathlon. As a competitive 
cyclist, Nadel saw the event as a 
different way to train for the 
cycling season. 

"I am a member of the Blue- 
mont Bicycle Club and some of 
the guys who were entering it 
(triathlon) came out to ride some 
time trials with us. I sort of 
became interested in entering 
myself after talking with those 
guys," Nadel said. 



The Bluemont Bicycle Club is 
a sanctioned member of the U.S. 
Cycling Federation, the sponsor 
of the U.S. Olympic Cycling 
Team. 

"The USCF rates its members 
on a number system. As you im- 
prove, you move up in the 
system. The Olympic racers, for 
example, are rated as ones," 
Nadel said. "I ride 150-200 
miles a week to train. I saw the 
triathlon as a fun way to train 
and since it was in the middle of 
the cycling season, it broke up 
the monotony of my usual 
routine. And as it turned out, it 
was a lot of fun." 

The overall winner for the 
women was Mary Ann Johnson, 
a 31 -year-old Topekan and 1976 
graduate of K-State. She finish- 
ed in 1:08:37.97. Carol 
Kozlowski was second in 
1:11:47.62, followed by Jeaney 
Dupras, senior in physical 
education, (1:12:02.57) and 
Barbara Heideman 

(1:12:47.62). 

Unlike Kirmse, Johnson had 
never entered a triathlon before 
the summer of 1985. But that 
didn't stop her from winning in 
just her third try. 

"I'm a runner by nature," 
said Johnson, who was surprised 
by the win. "I wasn't counting 
on this at all. I was shocked." 

Johnson expected to have 
trouble with the swimming por- 
tion of the event, but she said 
she tried to make up for it in the 
other two parts of the race. 

"I'm not a very good swim- 
mer, but I did push on the bike," 
she said. "I can always rely on 
my running." 

—Todd Nighswonger 



223 




224 



Rugby requires stamina and a love for 
hard-hitting action as the play Is Intense 
and often times rough. (Photo by John 
Thelander) 



Rugby 



Rugb y strong at K-State 



Rugby is a fast-paced sport that is at 
K-State in full force. 

The game, Rugby football, began in 
1832 at the Rugby School in Rugby, 
England. Rugby football became 
popular in England and was brought to 
the United States in the late 1970s. 
The game was played on the U.S. 
coasts until recently when it became 
popular as a team sport in the 
Midwest. 

Football in the United States got its 
beginning from Rugby. Rugby foot- 
ball has become a popular team sport 
and club at K-State since its introduc- 



tion here seven years ago, said David 
Todd, president of the Rugby club and 
junior in mechanical engineering. 

"Rugby is a young sport and is a 
sport that has not been in the United 
States very long. But it is growing 
very fast in the Midwest," Todd said. 

The club was a nonprofit organiza- 
tion and was composed mostly of peo- 
ple who wanted to play Rugby, 
although that was not a requirement to 
join. Ninety percent of the club 
members were college students and a 
$35 per semester membership fee was 



charged, he said. The membership fee 
was used to fund traveling expenses 
and other club activities. 

Rugby is a game with a lot of action, 
Todd said. He said the club catered to 
those who liked to play often but 
didn't have much extra time for prac- 
tice. 

The K-State Rugby team practiced 
about four hours each week and played 
games on Saturdays so as to not in- 
terfere with school, Brian Reidel, 
team captain, said. 

(continued on page 226) 



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Doug Scherlch, K-State rugby member, 
finds himself on the ground with the ball 
under the feet of fellow team members 
and opponents. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



Rugby 



225 



K-State Ru gby 



The club consisted of 40 
players and compiled a 14-7 
record for the season. 

K-State was a member of the 
Heart of America Union which 
had 22 teams, five of which 
where collegiate teams. Other 
universities fielding teams were 
the University of Kansas, Pitt- 
sburg State University, Central 



Missouri State University and 
Southern Missouri State Univer- 
sity. 

Todd said the K-State squad 
was ranked 15th nationally 
among collegiate teams and 
fourth in the region. He said the 
team was happy with the ranking 
it attained. 

The team made visible pro- 
gress throughout the season 



which pleased Todd. 

"The season was successful 
and I am happy about the strides 
we made as a team," he said. 
"We were working better 
together as a team by the time 
the end of the season. If we 
could have started out that way, 
there is no telling how well we 
would have done." 

—Jamie McPheter 



Rugger Mike Powers gets the ball pass 
ed ofl in time before being grabbed dur 
Ing a game at K-State. (Photo by Join 
Sleezer) 

K-State rugger Mike Allen found himsel 
dragging along an Emporia State 
defender during a game, at L.P 
Washburn Recreational Area intramura 
fields, in which K-State defeated Emporii 
State. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



226 




^mfmmm'^mmirr^'i^miifmmfmt'iimmmmmmmmf^ 




227 



Team becomes competitive 



Traditionally the K-State 
men's tennis team hasn't given 
much thought to being com- 
petitive on the Big Eight level. 

During Coach Steve Bietau's 
second season in charge of the 
Wildcat program, those thoughts 
were beginning to change. 

"We've got some people who 
have been in the program and 
some new people in the program 
who are playing the best tennis 
of their careers," Bietau said. 
"We've had some (individual) 
wins this fall not only over (Big 
Eight) conference schools, but 
over schools that are contenders 
for the (NCAA) 

championship." 

It had become a habit at 
K-State to play a short fall 



schedule, with most matches 
against weak opponents. That 
changed, however, as Bietau 
scheduled duals and tournaments 
against some of the toughest 
teams in the Midwest for the fall 
season. 

"In terms of scheduling, 
we've played the best teams 
around," Bietau said. "And 
we've had more success (in 
terms of winning matches) than 
we have had in years with 
weaker schedules. Our schedule 
was much weaker last fall than 
this fall. 

"It really makes a difference 
to know what we are going to 
compete against in the spring," 
Bietau said. "(The weak 
schedule is) like going up 



against BB guns in the fall and 
machine guns in the spring." 

With Bietau as K-State 's first 
full-time tennis coach in several 
years, and the improvements in 
the schedule, the Wildcat tennis 
program began to climb from 
the Big Eight cellar. While the 
climb was slow, the addition of 
talent like South African junior, 
Deon Botha, improved the pro- 
gram. 

Botha provided some of the 
season's top highlights, winning 
both No. 1 singles and doubles 
matches from University of 
Oklahoma opponents. Botha, 
who teamed up with Kris James, 
also advanced to the semi-final 
round in the doubles competition 
of the Intercollegiate Tennis 




Coaches Association regions 
tournament. With one more wir 
the team would have advance 
to national competition. Both 
and James defeated teams fror 
the University of Kansas an^ 
Wichita State University, bot 
traditional regional powers, a 
the ITCA meet. 

— Tom Perri, 



An effective backhand requires power. 
Darren Poiite exhibits his strength during 
a practice match. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 



228 




rowering through the ball, Shawn 
Walburn practices his forehand volley at 
the L. P. Washburn Recreation Area. 
(Photo by Jeff TuttlBf 

Number one singles player Deon Botha, 
returns a volley during a practice at the 
L.P. Wasburn Recreational Area tennis 
courts. Botha, a native of South Africa, 
held the number one singles position 
during his first semester at K-State. 
(Plioto by Jeff Taylor) 




Sabrlna Skulborstad drives a backhand 
volley towards her opponent during a 
match. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

K-State women's tennis player Lisa 
Crelghton returns a backhand during an 
afternoon practice at L.P. Washburn 
Recreational Center. (Pfioto by Joltn 
Sleezer) 




230 



Women's Tennis 



1 



A pro gram on the rise 



Scarce victories and failing to 
A'in a match in the Big Eight 
ournament made the 1985 
;eason a trying one for the 
vomen's tennis team. 

"We were disappointed 
)ecause we didn't do better in 
he conference tournament, and 
ve could have done better," 
iead Coach Steve Bietau said. 




"We were very, very close." 

The 1985 fall season, 
however, saw marked improve- 
ment in the program. Lena 
Svensson, Sigrid Ivarsson and 
Kristy Line — three new recruits 
— playing in the top three spots 
and the "positive attitude" of 
Bietau had the team believing it 
could win not only individual 
matches, but dual meets as well. 

"Steve is always sounding 
positive and he relays that to 
us," said Kristy Line, a 
freshman and the team's No. 3 
player. "I know my game has 
become much better since I got 
here." 

Bietau was pleased with the 
way the new players were able 
to help the team during the fall 
season. 

"We've got a lot more talent 
and a more competitive situa- 



tion," Bietau said. "When I ar- 
rived, the lower players were 
assured a spot if they could just 
show up for practice. Now, with 
the new girls, we have more and 
better players than ever before. " 

Svensson and Ivarsson, 
natives of Sweden and the 
Wildcats' No. 1 and No. 2 
players respectively, played a 
major role in the overall im- 
provement of the team. 

Bietau recruited Svensson, a 
junior, from Palm Beach Junior 
College Florida. However, 
Ivarsson, a freshman, came 
directly from Sweden to the 
K-State program and was more 
of an unknown quantity . 

"Where we were fortunate 
was that Sigrid Ivarsson turned 
out to be the'quality person and 
player that she is," Bietau said. 
"We just didn't know for sure. 




She's come here and really pro- 
ven herself." 

With the addition of talented 
players like Svensson and 
Ivarsson, Bietau viewed the 
future of K-State women's ten- 
nis with confidence. 

"We have the potential to put 
individual players in the finals of 
the conference tournament. We 
can win," Bietau said. "We 
have the potential for our first 
dual win here in quite a while." 
K-State was winless in the 1985 
Big Eight season, posting a 0-6 
conference record. 

Most important in Bietau 's 
eyes though was the improve- 
ment shown by the players on 
the team. 

"We have people constantly 
exceeding their goals and expec- 
tations," he said. 

— Tom Perrin 

K-State women's tennis player Lena 
Svensson, a native of Sweden, played 
number one singles for the Wildcats. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



Women's Tennis 



231 



When Steve Bietau arrived at 
K-State, women's tennis was 
noncompetitive. To remedy that 
probiem, he went in search of 

NEW 

BLOOD 




New blood was what tennis coach Steve 
Bietau wanted for his women's program, 
and new blood was exactly what he got. 

When he became the head coach for the 
men's and women's tennis teams in 1984, 
Bietau inherited programs that had finished 
at or near the bottom of the Big Eight Con- 
ference for several years. The teams' sixth 
place Big Eight finish in 1983 was the 
highest K-State had placed in the past eight 
years. 

The majority of the players from past 
K-State tennis teams had been from Kansas 
and Bietau saw a need to bring in players 
from outside the state. 

Not only did he recruit from beyond Kan- 
sas' boundaries, but he even went overseas. 
The result was Swedish natives Lena 
Svensson and Sigrid Ivarsson. 

Getting two Swedish tennis players to 
come to Kansas was not an easy task for 
Bietau. In addition to convincing the girls 
they would enjoy Kansas, he had to convince 
the two Swedes to play on a college 
women's tennis team that had enjoyed little 
success. 

Bietau originally made contact with 
Ivarsson, an 18-year-old freshman, by let- 



ter. She was the first of the two recruited by 
Bietau. 

"We wrote letters to each other about 
every other week," Ivarsson said. "It's im- 
portant that you get along with the coach and 
that the coach is good." 

Bietau, first saw the 21 -year-old Svensson 
play tennis as a freshman at Palm Beach 
Junior College in Lake Worth, Fla., when 
he was coaching at Hutchinson Community 
College. 

He kept her in mind and in May went to 
watch her at the national junior college ten- 
nis tournament. It was there that he signed 
Svensson to a letter of intent. 

"We were looking for two girls and I had 
gotten a commitment from Sigrid already," 
Bietau said, "and I liked the idea of having 
two (players) from the same country." 

With Ivarsson in the United States for the 
first time and Svensson unfamiliar with this 
part of the country, the two found having a 
fellow countryman on the team to be 
beneficial . 

"It was my first time in the United States, 
and I knew I would have problems with the 
language," said Ivarsson, who played 
number two singles for the Wildcats. "It's 



Sigrid Ivarsson follows through with a backhand volley 
The Swedish native played number two singles for thi 
'Cats as a freshman. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

always a help when there's another persoi 
from the same country . ' ' 

"I think both girls turned out as well o 
better than I expected," Bietau said. "Botl 
of these girls are our strongest players sine 
I've been here. So we're definitely steppin 
up the caliber of players here." 

' They both work very hard and are opeil 
to changes. It seems to be typical of SwedisI 
players," Bietau said. "Almost anytime so 
meone travels half way around the world t< 
play tennis, they are serious about it." 

While Bietau said he believed the two hai 
the capability to pull the women's team ou 
of the Big Eight last place, Svensson ani 
Ivarsson were modest about their talents 
tennis players. 

"Here you have to really work for you 
matches," said Svensson. "I know the Bij 
Eight is very tough and that it will be goo( 
competition." 

— Tudd Nighswonf^e 



232 



Players Profile 





Lena Svensson concentrates on the ball while returning 
a volley during a practice session at the L.P. Washburn 
Recreational area tennis courts. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

K-State's pair of Swedish tennis players occupied the 
top two spots on the squad and added competitiveness 
and strength to the team. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



233 



Injuries cripple team 



Injuries to key members of the men's track 
team contributed to a dismal showing at the 
Big Eight outdoor championships. 

"I was disappointed with how we fared," 
said head coach Steve Miller of his team's 
sixth place finish. "Overall, we had a good 
year but some key people were out." 

Sprinter Greg Washington, who excelled 
in both the 200- and 400-meter runs during 
the indoor season, was hindered throughout 
the outdoor season with a pulled left hamstr- 
ing and a pulled right groin. 

"I felt like I was going to pull something 
every time I ran," Washington said. 

Another standout shelved by injuried was 
All-American Kenny Harrison, who placed 
fifth nationally in the long jump and seventh 
in the triple jump during the indoor season. 

"It was kind of depressing," Harrison 
said. "I sprained my left ankle in the first 
meet of the outdoor season... that's part of 
long jumping. 

"Between Greg and I," Harrison said, 
"we could have meant around 40 or 50 
points (in the Big Eight meet)." 

K-States only bright moments came from 
Andy Gillam and Mike Rogers, both Big 
Eight outdoor champions. A load of scoring 
was delivered by the muscled Gillam and 
surprising Rogers. 

Gillam, a two-time All-American in the 
shot put, won the Big Eight crown with a 62 
foot 10 inch toss. 

Showing the strain invoived In throwing the javeiin, 
Don McKinnis exerts ali of his strength on the way to a 
second piece finish. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Gillam placed seventh in the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association outdoor cham- 
pionships in May at the University of Texas 
at Austin, heaving the shot 63 feet 5 inches 
in the finals. 

Ironically, in the preliminaries, gillam 
threw a lifetime best and K-State record of 
64 feet 7 3/4 inches. 

Rogers effort in the Big Eight meet pro- 
vided the team with its most outstanding per- 
formance of the outdoor season. The 
distance runner-turned -steeplechase 



specialist defied the experience factor anc 
bounded to first palace in the 3,000 metei 
event, one which he took up at the outset ol 
1985. 

Rogers won three out of the five 
steeplechase races he entered during the out 
door season with his third victory being a na- 
tional qualifying time of 8:59.6. 

Injuries and lack of balanced scoring con- 
tributed to the disappointing finish of what 
was otherwise a successful season. 

—Mack Mclure, 



234 






Clearing the last hurdle, Aaron 
Roberson leads his Wichita State and 
University of South Dakota opponents 
to the tape during a spring outdoor 
season meet at K-State. (Photo by 
Jeff Taylor) 

Jumping out to an early lead, Steve 
Smith sets the pace In the 
1,500-meter run. Smith went on to 
finish fifth in the race at the Big Eight 
Track and Field Championships. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



235 



Team effort brings success 



Although not a revenue sport, 
the women's track program has 
established itself as a major 
sport at K-State because of its re- 
cent successes. 

"It's a major sport," Darryl 
Anderson, assistant track coach, 
said, "based on its success." 

The 1985 women's outdoor 
season, which climaxed at the 
Big Eight Outdoor Track and 
Field Championships with a 
second-place finish behind 
perennial power Nebraska, pro- 
ved Anderson's statement to be 
true. 

"It would take all day to list 
our standouts," Anderson said. 

For starters, there was 
Michelle Maxey, Big Eight 
champion in the 200 meters with 
a time of 22.9 seconds. 

Maxey placed second in her 
speciality, the 400 meters, at the 
league meet and placed seventh 
at the national outdoor cham- 
pionships in Austin, Texas, with 
a time of 52.8 seconds. 

"By far, Michelle was our 
most improved athlete. She had 
an outstanding season," said 
head track coach Steve Miller. 

But Maxey wasn't the only 
K-State athlete to experience 
success. 

Donna King anchored 
K-State 's 400-meter relay team 



to the Big Eight outdoor crown. 
King, Maxey, Melody McNeely 
and Dana Brown produced a 
track record time of 45.13 
seconds to qualify for nationals. 

Although the sprinters were 
responsible for much of the 
team's points, K-State 's success 
was due to balanced scoring. 

High jumper Rita Graves 
became an All -American for the 
third straight year. She placed 
second in the Big Eight with a 
jump of 5-IOV2 and seventh in 
the national finals with a 6-foot 
jump. 

Jacque Struckhoff and Anne 
Stadler, both distance runners, 
contributed significantly to the 
team's success. Struckhoff plac- 
ed first in the 3,000 meters and 
third in the 5,000 meters at the 
Big Eight meet and followed 
with an 11th place finish at na- 
tionals in the 5,000 with a time 
of 16 minutes, 18.9 seconds. 
Stadler fared equally well by 
placing second in both the 800 
meters and 1,500 meters at the 
Big Eight meet. And, in the lat- 
ter event she placed 12th at na- 
tionals with a time of 4:27. 

K-State's other national 
qualifier. Pinkie Suggs, placed 
10th nationally in the shot put 
with a 48-10 effort. 

—Mack Mclure 

Oklahoma State's Christy McMlken 
leads Jacque Struckhoff during the 
5000 meter race at the Big Eight out- 
door championships. Struckhoff finish- 
ed third in the race. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



236 





■ inky Suggs heaves the shotput during 
the Big Eight outdoor championships 
held at K-State in spring 1985. Suggs 
went on to piece third in the competition 
with a put of 47-2 1/4. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 

Ahearn Field House provides a place for 
Rita Graves to practice high jumping in 
preparation for the spring outdoor track 
season. The pit Graves is landing on was 
purchased by K-State from the 1984 Sum- 
mer Olympic games. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 




Women's Track 



237 



Joe Dial begins his 
assuait on tlie 
American pole vault 
record, grasping tiie 
bar as he clears the 
height of 19-2 Vz and 
Is jubilant on his des- 
cent. (Photos by Andy 
Nelson and John 
Sleezer) 



238 




An American record and several in- 
spired team performances high- 
lighted the 1985 Big Eight Track and 
Field Championships at R.V. Chris- 
tian Track. K-State hosted the event, 
vhich rotates annually between conference 
chools. 

Joe Dial, an Oklahoma State University 
enior, established himself as the finest pole 
aulter in the nation with an American record 
f 19-2 '/2. Dial's performance set the tone for 
lie meet which was one of the most memorable 
n Big Eight history. 

After setting the American mark. Dial 
lected not to attempt an assualt on the world 
ecord, allowing him to end the meet on a 
ositive note. 

"It's not very often you can end a pole vault 
ompetition feeling good. You usually leave 
fter three misses. This way, I left on a great 
ote," Dial said. 

Joining Dial with an outstanding performance 
'as the Iowa State men's team. Nowhere was 
le camaraderie that built Iowa State into one of 
le nation's top teams more prevalent than the 
nish of the 10,000-meter run. 

The Cyclones premier distance runners, 
obes Ondieki and Raf Wyns, ended the race in 

photo-finish. What was unusual about the 
nish was the manner in which they broke the 
ipe. Foregoing the traditional final kick, the 
air joined hands in an attempt to tie for first. 

They were not sucessful as Ondieki was 



An American record and two 
teams' efforts led the list 
of performances that were 



OUTSTANDING 



awarded first and Wyns second, but their effort 
typified the kind of success that brought the 
Cyclones their third consecutive Big Eight title. 

Iowa State's victory was impressive as they 
easily outdistanced runner-up Missouri by 52 
points. Their team total of 161 points was the 
fourth highest in the history of the Big Eight 
Track and Field Championships. 

On the women's side of the track, Nebraska 
captured its sixth consecutive title. However, 
the real story was not the continued dominance 
of the meet by Nebraska but rather the 
challenge to the 'Husker dynasty by the K-State 
women. 

Led by the phenomenal performance of 
Michelle Maxey, the Wildcats came within 23 
points of becoming only the third team to cap- 
ture the Big Eight crown. 



With the inclusion of women in the Big Eight 
Track and Field Championships in 1974. only 
two teams have won the event. Iowa State own- 
ed the crown until 1980 when Nebraska won its 
first title. Nebraska has dominated the event 
since. 

However, K-State served notice that its was a 
team to be reckoned with. The bulk of K-State"s 
scoring was generated by the sprinting corps. 
Maxey led the way by finishing first in the 
200-meter, second in the 400-meter and runn- 
ing the second leg of the winning 400-meter 
relay team. 

Joining Maxey in the relay were Donna King, 
Melody McNeely and Dana Brown who also 
followed Maxey in the 200 with second-, third- 
and fifth-place finishes respectively. 

—Dan Hoss 




Big 8 Track 



239 



OUTSTANDING 



Grimacing as lie maices liis jump, Brian Tietjans, iowa 
State high jumper, ciears the bar at 6-1 IV2 to ciaim se- 
cond piace in the Big Eight championships. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 

Iowa State javelin thrower Mike Brennan watches the 
flight of his winning javelin throw. Brennan's 262-3 
throw edged out K-State's Don McKlnnis by three feet. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 

K-State sprinters Melody McNeely, Michelle Maxey and 
Dana Brown celebrate after the 200-meter dash. The 
K-State women placed first, second, third and fifth in the 
event. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 





240 



Big 8 Track 




■^1 



"W% 



New challenges await 

Steve Miller as he takes 

his coaching experience to the 



FRONT OFFICE 



When an ambitious, goal -oriented 
individual is given an exciting 
and challenging opportunity, he 
will usually jump at it. Steve 
Miller is such a man. When 
Larry Travis offered him the position as 
assistant athletic director in the spring of 
1985, he accepted. 

"I had coached for 25 years, and I felt I 
had done everything I could. I was looking 
for a challenge," Miller said. "I thought it 
(being assistant athletic director) would give 
me a good perspective of the whole pro- 
gram." 

After serving part time as assistant athletic 
director for a year, while still maintaining 
his coaching duties, Miller decided to leave 
coaching at the close of the 1986 outdoor 
track season to enter sports administration 
full time. 

In making his decision to give up 
coaching, Miller left behind a legacy of suc- 
cess. 

Since his arrival at K-State five years ago, 
Miller's teams have won and, in doing so, 
constructed one of the nation's top cross 
country and track and field programs. 

Miller led K-State to a Big Eight Cross 
Country championship in 1983 and 5th 
District cross country championships in 
1983 and 1984. Miller was named 5th 
District coach of the year in 1985. 

Miller was further honored by being nam- 
ed a finalist to coach the 1988 U.S. Olympic 
track team. 

"I did not get the appointment (to be an 
Olympic coach). They selected six coaches, 
and there are probably 5,000 coaches in 
America that will tell you the story they 
were seventh. But the truth is, I was 
seventh," Miller said. 

Miller still hopes to someday be an Olym- 
pic coach. 

"It's really the only unfulfilled dream I 
have in coaching," he said. 

Miller expressed some of the plans and 
ideas that he would like to see incorporated 
into K-State athletics: to reinstate a high 
energy, enthusiastic level of competition and 
for people to believe K-State can be suc- 
cessful. 

"I want to give the students, the com- 
munity and the state of Kansas more than 
words. We've got to give them a product, 
and you give them a product by winning 
more than you lose," he said. 

Besides being involved with sports. Miller 



has another side. In the past two years he has 
found time to give approximately 200 
speeches. His topics range from correct run- 
ning technique to motivational speeches in 
which he uses past experiences as examples 
to inspire his listeners to reach beyond their 
goals. 

"If I had to characterize my motivational 
speeches, I'd have to say they deal with 
struggle; they deal with people trying to be 
better than they ever thought possible. It 
does not mean you're going to be an Olym- 
pian, and it does not mean you're going to be 
the best in the world. It means you're going 
to be better than you ever thought possible," 
he said. 



Miller has been faced with setbacks a 
tragedies in his own life, all of which he 
has overcome. 

"I got seriously hurt playing footb: 
when I was younger, and I was told I 
never walk again. I saw the injury as an o 
portunity," he said. 

He also had two close family members d 
of cancer. Again he saw it as a chance 
grow — this time, emotionally. j 

"I've seen tragedy and heartache in n 
life, and I'm a product of the streets. I' 
seen these things and turned them to my a 
vantage. What all this means is that I love 
accomplish," he said. 

— Rob Dra 



242 





A national-qualifying performance in the 1000-yard run 
at the Big Eight Indoor Track Meet in Lincoln, Neb., 
earns Anne Stadler a hug and congratulations from head 
lracl( coach Steve Miller (Photo by Brad Fanshier) 



Steve Miller 



Steve Miller has worked to make the men's and 
women's track and cross country squads among the best 
in the Big Eight. Miller is now going to devote his energy 
and talents to full-time athletic administration. (Photo by 
Ctiris Stewart) 



243 



K-State's bowling teams' 
successful seasons show 
benefits of hard work and 



DEDICATION 



Dedication to their sport 
is a quality shared by 
all competitive athletes. 
The members of the 
K-State Bowling Club 
were no exception. 

Their dedication paid off as 
both the men's and women's 
squads had successful cam- 
paigns during the 1985-86 
season. 

The women's team enjoyed 
the lion's share of success 
throughout the season. Led by 
April Bitzer and team captain 
Traci Goebel, the squad placed 
second in the conference and 
third in the Mid-State Tourna- 
ment at the University of Kan- 
sas. The women also finished 
fourth in the Association of Col- 
lege Unions International tour- 
nament and captured the fifth 
spot in the season's final na- 
tional rankings. 



Bitzer placed fifth on the all- 
star team at the Mid-State Tour- 
nament, while Goebel bowled 
the fifth highest average and 
finished third in overall points 
won in the Kansas-Nebraska 
Bowling Conference. 

In addition to the ACUI and 
Kansas-Nebraska conferences, 
both the men's and women's 
teams were members of the 
American Bowling Congress 
and the collegiate division of the 
Young American Bowling 
Alliance. The women's team 
also belonged to the Women's 
International Bowling Congress. 

The men's team was paced by 
Bill Severn. Severn won the 
singles event in the ACUI tour- 
nament. He was also the first 
left-hander to bowl a 300 in the 
ACUI competition. 

According to Ryan Finney, 
men' team captain, the highlight 



of the club's season came when 
it hosted Wichita State Universi- 
ty in a head-to-head meet. Both 
WSU's men's and women's 
teams entered the meet ranked 
No. 1 nationally. The Wildcat 
bowlers upset the favored 
Shockers, 24-6. 

"We had always bowled well 
against them, but never enough 
to win totals," Fiimey said. 
"That was the highlight." 

The club was coached by 
Terri Eddy, K-State Union ad- 
ministrative officer, and John 
Garetson, Union clerk. The club 
was also funded by the Union. In 
addition to this, the bowling club 
sponsored a tournament to raise 
money. 

"We have a bowl-a-thon in 
the first semester and we get 
pledges," Finney said. "We 
usually raise about $1,000." 

According to Finney, the 



pledges come from students 
friends and family. Because c 
their Union funding, the club i 
not allowed to accept pledge 
from businesses. 

The bowling club competed i 
tournaments as far away as Si 
Louis and Springfield, Mo., an 
as near as Lawrence and En: 
poria. 

"We hold our own touma 
ment too," Finney said. "W 
have to hold one conferenc 
tournament during the year. ' 

With required practices 
league competition and toui 
naments, bowling can take a k 
of time and money. 

"It does (take a lot of time) 
you're a fanatic like we are, 
Severn said. "I practice all th 
time. We do get discounts (at th 
Union) but $2 here and $2 thei 
does add up." 

— Patti Hanna 




244 



Bowling Club 




Ryan Finney and Bill Severn chat with 
Mike Messmer as he attempts to study 
between frames. (Photo By Jeff Taylor) 

Kathy Parry Iceeps score while Brian 
Suter begins a new frame. The men's 
and women's bowling teams practice at 
the Union bowling lanes. (Photo By Jeff 
Taylor) 




While copeting for the K-State Bowling 
Club, Traci Goebel follows through on 
her delivery. The women's bowling team 
lad a successful season, garnering many 
lonors. (Photo By Jeff Taylor) 



Bowling Club 



245 



The TKEs and Gamma Phis 
approach intramurals with 
fun, enthusiasm and 



SUCCESS 



Encouraging members to 
participate in in- 
tramurals and making 
sure the "fun" of com- 
petition was not forgot- 
ten helped two greek houses — 
Gamma Phi Beta and Tau Kappa 
Epsilon — rise to the top of their 
respective intramural divisions. 
The Gaimna Phis dominated 
the women's division for the 
past two years, yet they ap- 
proached intramural competition 
no differently than other houses 
and groups. 

"We don't really do anything 
different than all of the other 
sororities do, except make sure 
we have someone to compete in 
every event," Leslye Schneider, 
intramural chairman, said. 

Because of the Gamma Phis' 
success in intramurals, they 
developed a reputation as an 
"athletic sorority." However, 
they were quick to admit that not 
all the women who competed 
were athletic. 

"We all try to help out with 
intramurals, even those of us 
who get exhausted running up 
the stairs," Angle Ford said. 

As is the case in most in- 
tramural programs, the Gamma 
Phis relied on certain individuals 
as leaders in participation. 

Kathy Bechtel was the most 
active Gamma Phi in in- 
tramurals. She played in all the 
team sports and also many of the 
individual events. 
"I've always enjoyed sports, 



and playing on the house teams 
is a lot of fun because you get to 
compete with the girls you live 
with," Bechtel said. 

The success the Gamma Phis 
enjoyed made it easy to get their 
members excited about in- 
tramurals. 

"Since the house has been so 
successful in intramurals, it is 
easier to keep the girls en- 
thusiastic," Schneider said. 
"I'll stand up in meeting and say 
that I need people for a certain 
event. Then if nobody wants to 
do it, we find someone that will 
go and have a good time with it 
anyway . ' ' 

The TKEs won three of the 
past five fraternity division in- 
tramural titles, establishing 
themselves as the house to beat. 

"It's all for fun," Scott 
Sandlin, TKE intramural chair- 
man, said. "We're not as 
serious as everyone thinks we 
are about intramurals." 

Sandlin said a high participa- 
tion rate in intramurals was the 
key to TKE's success. 

"The guys in the house are 
not required to participate in 
sports but they are strongly en- 
couraged to," Sandlin said. 
"Some don't participate in the 
bigger sports but they do in the 
minor sports such as badminton 
or table tennis." 

Their athletic success plays a 
part in their rush philosophy to a 
certain degree. Although the 
TKEs seek well-rounded in- 

Tammy Winters of Gamma Phi Beta 
releases a shot over Janet Connolly of 
Alpha Delta Pi during the League No. 2 
intramural championship game. The AD- 
Pis upset the Gamma Phis 29-27. (Photo 
By Brad Fanshier) 



dividuals, they do look at the 
rushees' activities and sports in- 
volvement. 

"The first thing we look at 
when rushing is grades," 
Sandlin claimed. "Then we look 



at high school activities, an 
sports do count into this. Bi 
generally we want a wel 
rounded person." 

— Jola Murphy am 
Darren McChesne 



246 





>teve Brown of Tau Kappa Epsilon 
ifends against a pass attempt by a Phi 
acica Jacica piayer. Tlie TKEs iost tlie 
ime for tlie aii-Universlty titie. (Photo 
^ Andy Nelson) 



Intramurals 



247 




John Miller signals for a pushing foul 
during play-off action. Miller is one of 
many students who serve as officials for 
intramural competition. (Photo By Jeff 
Taylor) 




John Miller points to a player who hf 
committed a foul. Students earn ext 
money by officiating intramural contest 
(PItoto By Jeff Taylor) 

Keeping score during a basketball gam 
is sometimes a duty of the intramural t 
ficials. Jeff Vulgamore keeps score du 
ing an intramural playoff game. (Phi 
By Jeff Taylor) 



248 



Intramural Officials 



students try their 
ands as intramural 
fficials and sports' 



'BAD GUYS" 



In any sport, officials are almost 
always seen as the "bad guys. " Of- 
ficials are often blamed for 
everything from bad calls and lost 
ball games to broken shoe strings. 
While most students' contact with officials 
vas limited to delivering complaints and in- 
ults, more than 200 students were given the 
)pportunity to see the "other side" of sports 
hrough the intramural officiating program 
it the Chester E. Peters Recreation Com- 
dex. 

Students officiated flag football, 
'oUeyball, basketball and softball games 
hroughout the year. 

Any full-time student was eligible to 
»ecome an intramural official. Fliers were 
listributed across campus to inform students 
ibout how they could become an intramural 
)fficial. 

Kenny Winkley, senior in industrial 
jngineering and director of intramural of- 
icials, said the convenience of the of- 
iciating job may have contributed to the 
)opularity of the program. A schedule of 



games was organized two to three weeks in 
advance, and the students signed up for the 
games they wanted to officiate. 

"It's a job that's convenient for college 
students. They can pick their own 
schedule," Winkley said. "They don't have 
to work a time they don't want, and they can 
substitute. It's different from working at a 
place like Hardee's where the schedule's 
pretty well set." 

Winkley, who completed his third year as 
director of the intramural officials program, 
said although the job took a lot of time, it 
was worth it. 

One drawback of the official's job, accor- 
ding to Winkley, was the occasional harass- 
ment the individual received from the 
crowd. 

"They (the students) yell names at the of- 
ficials that they would never use on anyone 
else. And what's worse, they're publicly 
criticizing them," he said. "Nobody goes 
out to do anything less than their best. 

"The way America treats referees really 
bothers me," he said. "Everybody thinks 




it's so easy, but it's tough to be in the right 
place at the right time. There's a method to 
it. It's a little different when you're out there 
with the whistle." 

Jamey Meeks, senior in mechanical 
engineering and an intramural official who 
also officiated at the high school and junior 
high levels, said the crowd could be a 
drawback of the job, but "you just have to 
try to block it out." 

"Everyone thinks he has a right to com- 
plain," he said. "At the intramural level it's 
worse because they think you don't know the 
rules. You've got to have confidence in 
yourself so you can concentrate on what 
you're doing." 

Being an official made Meeks respect 
other officials. 

"I never yell at the officials anymore," he 
said. "If they make a mistake, I can sym- 
pathize with them because I know they 
didn't mean to make that mistake. I know 
how tough it is to be the man on the spot. 
You've got to make a quick decision." 

"I got interested in officiating because I'm 
an athlete," said Jeaney Dupras, senior in 
exercise science. "I wanted to see the other 
side. It's real scary at first, but once you get 
your feet in, you learn to overcome your 
fears." 

If it was tough for males to officiate for 
other males, one would think that it was 
even tougher for a female to control an 
athletic contest. However, Dupras said the 
fact that she was a woman did not bother her 
when it came to officiating. 

"I don't catch a lot of flack from guys," 
she said. "When I started and the guys 
didn't know me, I guess I did (catch flack) a 
little, but now I'm a three-year veteran of- 
ficial. Most people know me." 

Dupras, who has also officiated at the high 
school level, said now that she's seen the 
other side, she has developed a great sense 
of respect for officials. 

"Everybody thinks it's so easy," she said. 
"They think you just go out and call a few 
fouls, but it's a lot more intricate than that. 
It's a tough job." 

— Angle Schumaker 



Intramural Officials 



249 



Larry Travis finds tiis 
first year at K-State filled 
with pressure, controversy and 



HARDWORK 



When Larry Travis was named 
K-State's athletic director, he 
promised K-State a top-notch 
athletic program. Travis also 
said hard work would be the key 
to improving K-State's athletic fortunes. 

What Travis didn't know was just how 
much work reaching that goal was going to 
be during his first year. 

Little did Travis know at the time that he 
would be indeed working seven days a week 
and well into the night on several occasions 
during that first year. Three resignations by 
K-State coaches gave Travis extra work. 

Travis' first six months as athletic direc- 
tor, after moving into the position ftill time 
on March 15, 1985, were rather tranquil — 
or at least much more quiet than the final 
months of 1985 and early months of 1986. 

The K-State football team opened its 1985 
campaign with a fizzle. Disappointing 
defeats to The Wichita State University and 
the University of Northern Iowa signaled 
trouble on the horizon. Travis — who took 
the job as athletic director knowing that his 
predecessor, Dick Towers, had been 
pressured to fire head football coach Jim 
Dickey — knew that a change had to be 
made. 

Dickey resigned the next day, Sept. 15. 

When questioned at a press conference 
following the naming of Assistant Athletic 
Director Lee Moon as interim head coach, 
Travis said he "probably" would have fired 
Dickey had he not resigned. 

Travis also said his search for new 

Larry Travis and head football coach Jim Dickey watch 
the Wildcat football team practice before the fall 1985 
season began. The season was not l(ind to Diclcey as he 
resigned two games into the young campaign. (Photo by 
Andy Nelson) 



energies and a new direction in football — 
and all sports for that matter — made the 
change a necessity. 

"We need a change in direction and a little 
bit of hope right now, and we feel this gives 
Lee a chance to interject new energies into 
our program," he told the media. 

Travis maintains to this day that he is not 
one that makes change just for the sake of 
making change. In the Dickey case, 
however, the handwriting was on the wall. 

"I think making changes just for the sake 
of being able to say 'I changed things' is 
foolish," he said. 

But change continued to surround the 
athletic program in the weeks following 
Dickey's resignation. 

On Dec. 2, Travis named Stan Parrish as 
the new Wildcat football coach. Travis said 
he thought hiring Parrish was a "quantum 
leap" in moving toward the ultimate goal of 
establishing a successful football program at 
K-State. Travis and his selection committee 
worked for just under three months in sear- 
ching the country for a replacement for 
Dickey. 

During the Christmas holiday, Travis ask- 



ed head track coach Steve Miller, who had 
previously been appointed assistant athletic 
director, to step down from his coaching 
duties to devote full time to athletic ad 
ministration. Miller did, effective July 1 
1986. Another coaching search was on. 

The biggest shocker of Travis' first year, 
however, came just after the 1986 spring 
semester began. 

Jack Hartman, K-State's basketball coach 
for 16 years, resigned Jan. 30, effective at 
the end of the season. Travis, needless to 
say, was shocked. 

"I don't know why Coach Hartman decid 
ed to resign," Travis said. "I sat there in 
shock." 

The shock wore off quickly, however, 
when Travis was met with the realization 
that yet another coaching hunt was on. It 
ended on March 17 with the hiring of Lon 
Kruger. And with the hiring of Kruger, 
Travis was able to relax again — for a while. 

Travis wouldn't want it any other way. 
And, as he's often said, there won't be much 
relaxing until "we return this department to 
national prominence in everything we do." 

— David Svoboda 




250 



Larry Travisf 




)ince coming to K-State in iViarcli 1985, Athietic 
irector Larry Travis has had to hire new footbaii, 
isicetbaii and tracit coaches. Travis came to K-State 
Dm Georgia Tech. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Larry Travis 



251 



Extra practice pays off 

as Wildcat clieerieaders qualify 

to represent K-State at 



NATIONALS 



The K-State cheerleaders were ac- 
customed to cheering for Wildcat 
athletes. It was their job. 
But the squad found themselves 
in the role of the competitor as they 
received an invitation to compete in the 
Universal Cheerleading Association Cham- 
pionships Jan. 1 1 in San Diego. The K-State 
cheerleaders were one of nine squads 
selected for the national competition and the 
only squad from the Big Eight. 




During a time out In Ahearn Fieldhouse Kathy Peirce 
cheers on the Wildcats. (Photo by Jim DIetz) 



In accordance with the rules of the com- 
petition, the squad submitted a videotape of 
three separate routines. Their taped perfor- 
mances consisted of a routine performed to 
the fight song, a cheer and a chant. There 
were no time limits put on the taped perfor- 
mances. However once the squad was 
selected as a finalist, it was required to com- 
bine the three separate routines into one con- 
tinuous performance which had to fit into a 
two and one-half minute time span. 

The squad began practicing for the com- 
petition in October by adding an extra prac- 
tice session each week on Sundays. The 
week prior to departing for San Diego the 
squad stepped up their practice sessions in 
preperation for the competition. 

"We practiced the routine that was per- 
formed at the competition a combined total 
of over 560 hours. During that last week we 
practiced three times a day for approximate- 
ly three hours per session," Butch Lacy 



said. 

"Praticing for nationals was more nerv' 
racking and tense than regular practice. Yoi 
know that when you do the routine yoi 
won't be doing it for screaming K-Stati 
fans, you'll be doing it for judges and fo 
television cameras," Kris Tulp said. 

"Practice was very intense. If someone 
had trouble they'd really concentrate on it,' 
Lacy said. 

Lacy said experience helped make thi 
squad better. 

"There are several reasons why the squa( 
did so well this season. We had all retuminj] 
guys from last year, and all the guys seeme<: 
to be a little stronger than last year from ali 
the practice. The girls on the squad wen 
very skilled tumblers and were very balanCj 
ed." Lacy said. 

Squads qualifying for the national com 
petition included the University of Soutl 
Carolina, North Carolina State University 



252 




the University of Kentucky, the University 
of Arkansas, Pennsylvania State University, 
Memphis State University, Ohio State 
'University, the University of Utah and 
'K-State. 

The K-State cheerleaders did not place in 
the San Diego competition. North Carolina 
State emerged as the 1986 champion. 

"Anyone could have won if they had hit 
their routine," Kim Kinslow said. "Several 
of the squads had problems with falls which 
hurt their performances. If they could have 
hit their routines well, any of them could 
have won, including ourselves." 

Tulp said all the squads at the competition 
'were very deserving. 

I "They represented their schools well. It 
J5howed in their performance. The 
(Cheerleaders there were some of the best in 
iJie world," Tulp said. 

— Rob Drake 





^H 




H 




^1 




i)-iill!^ ^t^H^^I 


1^- 

1 


m 




Barrett Bromlch hugs Willie the Wildcat at center court 
after learning that the cheerleading squad had qualified 
for the Universal Cheerleading Championships In San 
Diego. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



Following the Wildcats' basketball game with iowa 
State in Ahearn Field House, the K-State cheerleaders 
perform the routine they used at the Universal 
Cheerleading Championships. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



253 




254 



Jack Hartman 



Jack Hartman's 
retirement ends 
era as K-State 
says 



GOODBYE 

TO A 
LEGEND 



Jack Hartman. 

The name brings instant recognition and respect 
in athletic circles. Jack Hartman was the epitomy 
of a fine coach. He possessed all the qualities re- 
quired to attain legendary status; he had integrity, 

he was disciplin- 
ed, he had class 
and above all, he 
was successful. 

Hartman, a 
1950 graduate of 
Oklahoma State University, began his collegiate 
coaching career at Coffeyville Junior College 
where he met with immediate success, compiling a 
150^6 mark. His 1961-62 team, which went 32-0, 
became the first unbeaten junior college team to 
capture the national title. 

Hartman's next stop was at Southern Illinois- 
Carbondale. While at SIU, Hartman compiled a 
144-64 record in eight seasons. Hartman led his 
squads to NCAA college division tournament ber- 
ths on four occasions, where they finished second 
twice and fourth once. 

During his tenure with the Salukis, Hartman 
guided his teams to the NIT twice. His 1966-67 
squad captured the tournament title, posting a 24-2 
mark. The NIT title helped gain Hartman Sporting 
News Coach of the Year honors that season. 
Hartman's final destination was K-State. In 16 




Jack Hartman 



seasons as the Wildcat mentor, Hartman amassed 
statistics that were the envy of coaches throughout 
the country. Hartman's record at K-State ended at 
295-169, bringing his career mark in 24 seasons at 
the NCAA Division I level to 439-233. His overall 
collegiate coaching record was 589-279 in 31 
seasons including his seven-year stint at Cof- 
feyville. 

Hartman's Wildcat squads claimed three regular 
season Big Eight Conference championships and 
two post-season tournament titles. The 'Cats 
finished no lower than second on nine occasions 
while enjoying seven 20-win seasons. 

Hartman's program produced 14 all-Big Eight 
performers, five Conference Players of the Year 
and seven Newcomers of the Year. 

Hartman directed the Wildcats to NCAA post- 
season play seven times — 1972, 1973, 1975, 
1977, 1980, 1981 and 1982. In those seven ap- 
pearances K-State teams posted an overall 11-7 
record. In addition to the NCAA appearances, 
K-State also competed in the CCA tournament in 
1974 and the NIT in 1976. 

At the press conference in which he announced 
his retirement, effective at the close of the 1986 
season, Hartman noted that he had known for 
some time that he would resign but he could not 
decide on a good time to make the announcement. 

"This is a decision I think I made probably last 
year sometime. But when to announce it was the 
difficult part of it," Hartman said. "I came to the 
realization that there was no good time." 

After suffering a heart attack and undergoing 
quadruple by -pass surgery during the 1985 cam- 
paign, rumors circulated that 1986 would be Hart- 
man's last. However, Hartman said his health was 
not a factor in his decision and that he believed he 
was in good shape. 

"Other than a bad case of the flu last week, my 
health is fine," Hartman said. "I feel great." 

In his parting comments, Hartman said he was 
most proud of his reputation for running a "clean 
program." 

"I'm very, very proud that the places I've 
coached over the years have never, ever been 
questioned on the integrity of the program," Hart- 
man said. 

For years K-State basketball fans slept easy at 
night knowing that no matter who the Wildcats 
played, they had an edge; they had Jack Hartman. 
No longer can those fans look on with apathy, 
relying on the masterly coaching abilities of Jack 
Hartman to carry the Wildcats on to victory. 

Jack is gone. 

— Dan Hoss 

Sixteen years as the head coach of the Wildcat baslcetbail team 
came to an end as Jacic Hartman retired from coaching. Hartman 
fights bacic tears foliowing the announcement at a press con- 
ference in Ahearn Field House. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Jacl( Hartman yells instructions to his team during his last 
coaching appearance in Ahearn Field House. Hartman was 
presented with a golf cart for his use at the Manhattan Country 
Club and a personalized golf bag as gifts. Hartman was the win- 
ningest basl(etball coach in K-State history. (Photo by Jeff Tat- 
tle) 



255 



Former basketball player 
and assistant coach 
Lon Kruger Is 

COMING 

HOME 



When the 1986-87 basketball season opens, a 
familiar face will be on the K-State bench. Lon 
Kruger is coming home. 

After weeks of speculation and rumors about 
who would fill the vacancy left by Jack Hartman's 
resignation as head basketball coach, Athletic 
Director Larry Travis made official on March 17 
what most K-State fans had expected all along. 
Kruger, a former K-State player and assistant 
coach, was named to replace Hartman. 

Kruger, who played for Hartman from 1970 
through 1974 and later served as assistant coach 
under Hartman, left his head coaching position at 
Pan American University to return to K-State. 

"For many obvious reasons, I'm excited about 
returning to Kansas State University," Kruger 
said. "I grew up here, and I've been a Kansas 
State fan for all my life. Having played here and 
experienced the great mom.ents in terms of work- 
ing with some quality people throughout the state 
of Kansas and the University, I'm excited to 
return. 

"As important as anything else, my memories 
of Kansas State University are associated with the 
great fans Kansas State has." 

Once one of the most consistently successful 
basketball schools in the Big Eight Conference, 
K-State has suffered through four consecutive los- 
ing seasons in Big Eight play at the conclusion of 
Hartman's tenure. 

The Wildcats finished the 1985-86 season with a 
16-14 overall record, 4-10 in the Big Eight. 

Kruger said he hopes "to rekindle the pride and 
enthusiasm and the great support that we've had 
throughout the state of Kansas and nationally." 

Travis said Kruger's experience in building his 
own program at Pan American was a key in the 
final decision. 

"He (Kruger) took a program that had only won 
five games the year before he got there and built 
his own program. That was very important," 
Travis said. "I wanted someone who had ex- 



perience in doing that, and he did." 

Kruger compiled a 52-59 record in four seasons 
at Pan American, including a 20-8 finish in the 
1985-86 season. 

The announcement of Kruger's appointment 
came at an awkward time in the recruiting year, 
leaving Kruger with much to do in order to catch 
up with the other coaching staffs which had been 
courting the top prospects. However, Kruger did 
not feel it would be a problem for his staff. 

"The athletes are there. Our priority is getting 
young people that want to play at Kansas State 
University and have the desire and dedication, the 
fight and commitment to win," he said. "There 
are enough athletes out there now that even at this 
late date I think we can realize some success in 
recruiting." 

Taking over for Hartman, his former coach and 
boss, Kruger found himself following in the 
footsteps of the winningest coach in K-State 
basketball history. Hartman's overall record in 16 
years with the Wildcats was 295-169. 

"My feelings are very mixed (about replacing 
Hartman). He's been so great for the game of 
basketball, not only here but around the country. 
To lose someone of his stature and quality hurts 
the profession," Kruger said. 

'For selfish reasons, I'd like to have seen 
Coach Hartman coach stay for as long as possible. 
On the other hand, he's very happy, satisfied with 
his career and what he's done, and certainly he's 
coached as long as he wanted to." 

Kruger served as a graduate assistant to Hart- 
man for the 1977-78 season before being promoted 
to full-fime assistant for the 1978-79 season. He 
served as an assistant until taking the Pan 
American job for the 1982-83 season. Kruger was 
an assistant coach on the gold-medal-winning 
United States team in the 1983 Pan American 
Games at Caracas, Venezuela. Hartman was the 
head coach of that team. 

— Tom Perrin 




A former K-State basketball player an 
assistant coach, Lon Kruger was selecte 
to succeed Jack Hartman as head baske 
ball coach. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 

Kruger comes to K-State after serving : 
head basketball coach at Pan America 
University. Kruger's 1985-86 team finisi 
ed with a 20-8 record. (Photo by Ano 
Nelson) 



256 



Lon Kruger 




257 




258 



Men's Basketball 



(ball III 



A SAD FAREWELL 



Legendary K-State basketball 
;oach Jack Hartman probably 
ivould have preferred ending his 
caching career another way. 

"I'm totally disgusted," said 
tlartman after the Big Eight 
Conference ordered K-State to 
ibrfeit its four league wins dur- 
ng the 1985-86 campaign for 
asing an ineligible player, Nor- 
is Coleman. 

The forfeits dropped K-State 
Tom the seventh to the eighth 
seed in the Big Eight post-season 
ournament. The Wildcats' 
16-12 overall record, 4-10 in the 
3ig Eight, was dropped to 12-16 
ind 0-14. 

Hartman — who is the winn- 
ngest coach in K-State history 
vith a record of 291-172 — 
jihocked the team and the 
Jniversity by announcing his 
etirement on Jan. 30, midway 
hrough the season. 

If this had been a storybook, 
iartman's last basketball cam- 
laign at K-State would have 
een his 'Cats post a 20-win 
eason, win the Big Eight title 
ind progress into post-season 
play. 

But this was basketball, not a 



storybook, and Hartman and his 
'Cats took it on the chin. A 
season that began with hope and 
a 12-3 record, quickly dissolved 
into frustration and talk of what 
could have been. Truly, Hart- 
man's last season as the 
Wildcats' head coach was not 
befitting of his 16-year reign. 

The resignation, plus the con- 
troversy surrounding Coleman, 
who was ruled ineligible because 
of an inadequate high school 
grade point average, took its toll 
on K-State. Coleman was forced 
to sit out the final two K-State 
basketball games. 

"It was distracting," admitted 
freshman guard Benny Green, 
the team assist leader with 88. 
"Everybody was getting tired of 
hearing about it. It seemed like 
everything went for naught." 

Green announced after the 
season's conclusion that he was 
leaving K-State. 

But the 'Cats' season didn't 
begin on a negative note. 
K-State opened the season 
against host Chaminade in the 
Silversword Classic in Hawaii. 
Coleman made his presence 
known, scoring 31 points in a 



68-56 victory. 

K-State encountered 

powerhouse Michigan, then 
ranked No. 2 by The Associated 
Press, in the championship game 
and returned to Manhattan with 
an 80-58 setback. Coleman 
scored 21 points and Green 
came off the bench to score 15. 



In their home opener, the 
Wildcats delighted the Ahearn 
Field House crowd with their 
best offensive showing of the 
season, routing Southern Col- 
orado 95-57. 

K-State then buried defending 

Southwest Conference champion 

(continued on page 260) 





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K-State Assistant Coach Darryl Winston 
contemplates an official's call as Coach 
Jack Hartman looks away from the action 
during the 'Cats 83-80 loss to the 
Oklahoma Sooners. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 

K-State players gather arm-in-arm for a 
huddle at the free throw line. (Pholo by 
Jeff A. Taylor) 

Guard Joe Wright is squeezed between 
Jayhawk defenders Cedric Hunter and 
Danny Manning during the 'Cats 64-50 
loss in Ahearn. (Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 



Men's Basketball 



259 



A SAD FAREWELL 



Texas Tech, 80-57, as Coleman 
exploded for 28 points, and 
senior guard Joe Wright added 
25. 

Next up was the Indiana 
Hoosiers at Assembly Hall in 
Bloomington, Ind. K-State led 
39-32 at hafltime before falling, 
78-71. 

"We weren't awed by coming 
into this building and playing In- 
diana," Hartman said. 

K-State put together a six- 
game winning streak during the 
non-conference schedule, 
started by a pair of wins in the 
Far West Classic in Portland, 
Ore., during the Christmas 
holidays. 

The Wildcats captured fourth 
in the tournament with a 69-68 
overtime win over Tampa. Ben- 
ny Green clinched the victory 
when he hit a pair of free throws 
with 0:08 left on the game clock. 

Coleman and Wright supplied 
a great deal of K-State 's offen- 
sive punch throughout the 
season, a fact that worried Hart- 
man. Hartman tried to remedy 
the problem by shuffling the 
lineup in hopes of gaining a 



Scoreboard 






KSU 


Opp. 


Chaminade 


68 


56 


Michigan 


58 


80 


So. Colorado 


95 


57 


So. Olinois-Edwards 


83 


55 


Texas Tech 


80 


57 


Indiana 


71 


78 


Mississippi State 


63 


58 


No. niinois 


78 


58 


St. Josephs (ot) 


63 


65 


Tennessee Tech 


89 


61 


Tampa (ot) 


69 


68 


Marquette 


56 


55 


North Texas SUte 


57 


53 


Wichita State 


77 


60 


Abilene Christian 


91 


69 


Iowa State 


73 


77 


•Colorado (ot) 


77 


69 


Missouri 


70 


74 


Oklahoma 


80 


83 


Oklahoma SUte 


70 


86 


Kansas 


50 


64 


•Nebraska 


64 


54 


•Colorado 


79 


53 


Oklahoma 


77 


85 


Iowa State 


74 


84 


•Oklahoma State 


78 


73 


Kansas 


69 


84 


Missouri 


69 


84 


Nebraska 


60 


64 


Kansas 


51 


74 


• Games forfeited for 


purposes 


of post- 


season tournament seedings. 






more balanced scoring attack. 
But Hartman 's efforts were 
fruitless. 

In only three games during the 
season was there someone other 
than the Coleman-Wright duo to 
assume the scoring leadership. 
Coleman was the conference's 
second-leading scorer with 21.8 
points per game, while Wright 
finished seventh in the Big Eight 
with an 18.1 scoring average on 
53 percent shooting. Only Green 
and senior forward Ben Mitchell 
provided any consistent scoring 
for the 'Cats. 

One of K-State's more 
memorable wins came in a 
nailbiter with Marquette in 
Ahearn. Ben Mitchell hit a 
10-foot jump shot with seven 
seconds left to nip the Warriors, 
56-55. 

"We were looking for the shot 
from Joe or Norris," Mitchell 
said. "There wasn't much time 
left. They swung it to me. I 
didn't feel any defensive 
pressure. It felt good when it left 
my hands." 

Wright, who failed to score in 
(continued on page 262) 



K-State forward Norris Coleman grabs a 
rebound over Texas Tech forward Tobin 
Doda during the Wildcat's 80-57 victory 
in Ahearn. Coieman led both teams in 
scoring with 28 points. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



Lance Simmons drives to the basket and 
shoots over KU defender Chris Piper 
during the first round of the Big Eight 
Tournament at Kemper Arena. The 
Jayhawi(s beat the 'Cats and won the 
tournament. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Forward Ben Mitchell leaps to block the 
shot of KU center Greg Dreiling during 
the K-State-KU game at Lawrence. KU 
went on to win the second battle of the 
year between the intra-state rivalry 
84-69. (Photo by Jeff A.Taylor) 



Men's Basketball 




261 



A SAD FAREWELL 



double figures only once during 
the season, seemingly could do 
no wrong in K-State's 77-60 
thrashing of Wichita State. 

"Joe played a beautiful 
game," said Hartman after 
Wright scored a career-high 31 
points on 12 of 13 shooting and 
7 of 8 free throws. 

K-State took a 12-3 record in- 
to the Big Eight season, but ran 
into perhaps the stiffest con- 
ference opposition ever. Five 
conference teams, a Big Eight 
record, qualified for the NCAA 
post-season tournament. 

An indication of what was 
destined to unfold for K-State 
occurred when it opened the 
conference season with back-to- 
back losses at home for the first 
time in K-State basketball 
history. Four-point losses to 
Iowa State and Missouri sand- 
wiched a 77-69 overtime win for 
K-State over Colorado in 
Boulder. 



During the three-game span, 
Coleman scored 99 points and 
was named player of the week 
by both Sports Illustrated and 
The Sporting News. 

"Unfortunately, we didn't 
have an answer to Norris Col- 
eman," said Colorado Coach 
Tom Apke after Coleman scored 
a career-high 39 points against 
the Buffs. 

Despite his ineligibility during 
the final two games, Coleman 
was voted Big Eight Newcomer 
of the Year. Coleman scored 
less than 15 points on only six 
occasions. 

K-State 's narrow loss to 
Missouri, where Coleman 
scored 28 and Wright, 18, was 
the first of four straight losses. 
Included was a 64-50 loss to in- 
trastate rival Kansas at Ahearn. 
KU's Ail-American forward 
Danny Manning held Coleman 
to only eight points, his second 
lowest output of the season. 




University of Oldahoma forward Ron 
Roberts battles for a rebound with 
K-State forwards Norris Coleman (44) and 
Ben Mitchell (32) during first-half action 
in Ahearn Field House. Oklahoma 
escaped with an 83-80 victory over the 
Wildcats. (Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 



University of Nebraska guard Harvey 
Marshall pulls down a rebound while 
battling with forward Lance Simmons 
during the conference game in Ahearn 
Field House. (Pfioto by Andy Nelson) 



K-State 's last win of the 
season came over Oklahoma 
State, 78-73, as Coleman 
dominated with 30 points and 
Wright added 22. 

Hartman made his final 
coaching appearance in Ahearn 
on March 1 against Nebraska. 
Hartman was showered with 
gifts and applause from K-State 
fans before the game, but the 
Cornhuskers were not so 
gracious. Nebraska put a 
damper on Hartman 's farewell 



appearance by beating the 'Cat' i 
64-60. I 

Coleman's ineligibility and! 
knee injury to starting cent I 
Ron Meyer put a big hole in tl 
K-State lineup and left the 'Ca 
short-handed as they met tl i 
No. 2 Kansas Jayhawks in tl 
first round of the Big Eight pos 
season tournament. 

The 'Cats were pummeled t 

the 'Hawks 74-51, putting a bi 

ter end on a once-bright seasoi 

— Mack McClw 




262 



Men's Basketball 




After being charged with a 
foui, Ron IMeyer covers his 
face in disbeilef while a 
Raycom cameraman fiims his 
reaction. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



263 



Controversy about high 
school records overshadows 
Norris Coleman's outstanding 
performance that prompted 

SARGE 

FEVER 




Norris Coleman's premiere season with 
the K-State basketball team was one of 
surprises — both good and bad. 

Coleman established himself early as a 
team leader as his performance on the 
basketball court was stellar. Starting every 
game for the Wildcats, he was a shoo-in for 
Big Eight Newcomer-of-the-Year honors. 
But controversy about Coleman's past 
developed midway through the season and 
cast a shadow on K-State's star player. 

Reports aired on KOMU, a student-run 
television station at the University of 
Missouri in Columbia, Mo., questioned 
whether Coleman had attained the necessary 
2.0 grade point average while a student at 
Paxon High School in Jacksonville, Fla. 
National Collegiate Athletic Association 
rules require athletes who receive financial 
aid to have earned a 2.0 GPA in high school. 

KOMU reported that Coleman had less 
than a 2.0 GPA in three years of high school 
work. K-State officials defended Coleman's 
eligibility with records received by K-State's 
registrar and certified by Paxon High 
School. The records showed Coleman had 
above a 2.0 GPA in four years of high 
school. 

The controversy thickened when K-State 
and the NCAA tried to determine if 
Coleman's three-year or four-year transcript 
would be used to determine his eligibility. 
The NCAA opted to use Coleman's three- 
year transcript; thus, he was ruled ineligible 
for play. Coleman missed the final two 



games of the season. 

K-State appealed the decision and was to 
present its case to the NCAA in April. 
Because of the NCAA ruling, the Big Eight 
Conference forced K-State to forfeit its four 
conference victories. The forfeits dropped 
the 'Cats to the eighth seed in the Big Eight 
post-season tournament in March. 

Coleman admits his emergence as one of 
the Big Eight's brightest stars is a far cry 
from his days at Paxon High School. 

"In high school, I wasn't better than 
anybody else," he said. "There were no 
stars (on the team)." 

Coleman decided during his junior year 
that he would enter the Army after high 
school. 

"It was rewarding and maturing," 
Coleman said of his Army experience. "It 
shows you how life really is." 

Coleman said several factors during his 
Army stint helped him realize he could play 
college basketball. 

"I grew four inches (after high school) 
and got a lot stronger," he said. 

His new physique (6-foot-8-inches and 
210 pounds) allowed him to become a 
dominating post player for his Army team. 

Choosing K-State was not a difficult 
choice for Coleman because he knew he 
would have the chance to contribute 
immediately. 

"At my age, I couldn't afford to sit 
around (on the bench)," Coleman said. 
"That's what would have happened if I had 



Starting forward, Norris Coleman, averaged nearlyi 
points a game before being declared ineligible 
practice or participation in the remaining two games 
the season. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

gone to a better team." 

Coleman didn't spend much time on t 
K-State bench. He began the seas 
impressively, scoring 31 and 21 points in 1 
first two games. Coleman scored 30 poii 
or more in seven Wildcat basketball gam( 
He maintained his scoring output throughc 
the season, finishing with a 21.9-points-pt 
game average. 

Coleman's contributions to K-State c 
not go unnoticed. In addition to receiving t 
Big Eight Newcomer-of-the-Year awar 
Coleman was named to the All-Big Eig 
first team. 

He also won Big Eight and Spoi 
Illustrated player-of-the-week honors durii 
the season. 

"I knew all of this was within rea 
(statistics and achievements), except tl 
Sports Illustrated award kind of surprisi| 
me," he said. 

With his impressive statistics, Colem; 
broke several K-State freshman recor 
including both the single-game and singl 
season scoring records. 

"It feels nice to break records," he sai 

— Pat Hw 
Norris Coleman sits in the union with Michelle Ma) 
following the decision concerning his eligibility. (Pli' 
by Steve Rasmussen) 



264 



Norris Coleman i 




265 



Followers of the Lady Cats basket- 
ball team knew the 1985-86 
season had the potential to be a 
successful one. 
As Matilda Mossman began her 
second season as head coach, she 
felt good about her squad. She had a team 
that possessed both experience and 
quickness and gave promise of being one of 
the Big Eight's top teams. 

But that promise failed to materialize. The 
Lady Cats experienced some success, but 
could never build the momentum needed to 
realize their goals. Internal problems that 
started as rumbles, erupted into controversy 
and resulted in three Lady Cats quitting the 
squad. 

Much of the Lady Cats' problems were 
rooted in Mossman 's relationship with some 
of her players. 

Senior Cassandra Jones was dissatisfied 
with Mossman 's coaching style. 

"I was unhappy with everything. I didn't 
like her (Mossman 's) coaching style, and I 
couldn't relate to that," Jones said. 

Perhaps Jones' relationship with Mossman 
was destined to end negatively. When 
Mossman's predecessor, Lynn Hickey, left 
K-State in 1984 to be head women's 
basketball coach at Texas A«&M, Jones 
wanted to go with her. 

However, her fate was held by then 
athletic director Dick Towers. Towers 
decided not to grant Jones the release she 
requested so she could transfer without loss 
of eligibility. 

Sheila Hubert was faced with an equally 
frustrating situation. Recruited out of Butler 
County Community College by Hickey and 
her staff in the spring of 1984, she was 
shocked to learn of Hickey 's resignation. 
Hubert entertained thoughts of leaving 
K-State before she played a single game for 
the Lady Cats. 

Hubert's lack of knowledge of Mossman 
and her personality left her with 
reservations. However, the thought of 
sitting out a year at another school did not 
appeal to her, so she stayed at K-State. 

Cheryl Jackson came to K-State ready to 

Cassandra Jones, scrambling for the ball, was a pre- 
season All-Amerlcan selection by Street and Snnlth 
basketball magazine. Jones was one of three players to 
quit the team after the Jan. 25 KU game. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



LOSSES SLOW 

SEASON 



play. As a junior college transfer from 
Seward County Community College and the 
top prospect in Mossman's first K-State 
recruiting class, she expected to step in and 
contribute immediately. But as she saw it, 
she was not given that chance. 

"You don't recruit a junior college player 
to sit on the bench," Jackson said. "I was 
supposed to be her top recruit, and I wasn't 
getting a chance to play." 

The problems and frustrations 
experienced by the three apparently were not 
unique to them. The team was experiencing 
internal problems which affected each of its 
members. Those problems came to a head 
after the University of Kansas game. 

On Jan. 25, the Lady Cats dropped a 
three-point decision to KU in Aheam Field 
House. The team blew a 15-point lead with 
eight minutes to go. The loss was frustrating 



for the squad because it was a game theji 
should have won. 

Jackson said the team had discussed the! 
situation after the game. The idea to skipi 
practice the next day was brought up, anc 
several decided it was what should be done 
to show Mossman there was a problem. 

"Yes, we collaborated on missing 
practice," Jones said. "We thought it wouldj 
show her (Mossman) that there was a 
problem which needed to be worked out." 

' 'After the game we all talked about it (the 
loss). We were all pretty frustrated. Some of 
the girls talked about not showing up for 
practice in a joking manner, never 
seriously," team member Sue Leiding said. 
"None of us took them for real." 

Lady Cat guard Susan Green said she 
didn't give much thought to other's talk of 
quitting the team. 



266 




"Being a member of this team for the past 
three years, I don't know how many times 
I've heard that (talk of quitting)," Green 
said. "I really didn't think anything would 
come of it." 

On Jan. 26, five members of the team 
missed practice without an excuse. They 
were Theza Fitzpatrick, Sheila Hubert, 
Cheryl Jackson, Cassandra Jones and 
Carlisa Thomas. On Monday, all except 
Jones met with Mossman or her assistants. 
' By Wednesday, Fitzpatrick and Thomas 
had returned to the team and made the road 
trip to Oklahoma State. Jackson, Jones and 
Hubert had decided to leave the team for 
igood. 

! Mossman said she regretted the players' 
ideparture because of the negative effect it 
had on the rest of the team. The Lady Cats 
jiuddenly only had eight players, leaving 
i;hem short of the depth they needed to be 
pompetitive. 

; "I guess the thing that bothered me the 
iTiost was the way they (Hubert, Jackson and 
jfones) hurt their fellow team members by 
ijuitting," she said. Mossman declined to 
l;omment about the players' individual 
'easons for leaving the team. 

"They didn't walk out on her (Mossman) 
ihey walked out on us," Leiding said. "We 
iiU had our problems, but we worked them 
)ut without leaving. I was really hurt at first 
)ut we all got down and talked about it. We 
eally found out what the word 'team' 
neant." 

"I just couldn't take it anymore," Hubert 
aid. "I was in my senior year, and I felt I 
hould get out of that situation and 
oncentrate on graduating. When I decided 
D stay two years ago, it was a tough 
ecision. As it turned out, I made a 
listake." 

Green said everyone on the team had their 
wn reasons for their actions. 
"Everyone has to do what was best for 
lem," she said. "Maybe if they had stayed 
(their attitude) would have been a 
eteriment to the team." 
"I think the thing that I'm the most proud 
f is the way each of the girls who stayed 
ave 110 percent everytime they took the 
5urt," Mossman said. "They could have 
iven up and finished very poorly, but they 
orked hard and I think that will really help 
5 down the road." 

— Dan Hoss 



Special 




Head Coach Matilda Mossman intensely watches the 
players on the floor as her team plays for the last shot of 
the half. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



267 



EXPECTATIONS FADE 



Hopes for Matilda Mossman's 
1985-86 Lady Cats were high. 
At the start of the season, 
Mossman said she believed her 
women's basketball team had a 
chance at being a contender in 
the race for the Big Eight 
Conference title. 

"When the season began, we 
felt we had a legitimate shot at 
being one of the top two teams in 
the conference," Mossman said. 



"Possibly even a conference 
title." 

The team set several goals 
before the season began. Among 
them were to capture the Big 
Eight Conference 

championship, to win 20 games, 
to beat all top-20 teams they 
played and to earn a top-20 
ranking of their own. 

The Lady Cats were faced 
with a schedule which would test 




Lady Cats guard Theza FItzpatrick con- 
gratulates Tracey , Bleczinski after a 
second-half play in which Bleczinski was 
fouled while scoring In the Lady Cats 
83-65 win over Oklahoma State Universi- 
ty In Ahearn. (Photo by Chris Stewart) 



Heavy pressure is applied by a Universi- 
ty of Colorado defender as Tracey Blec- 
zinski puts up a shot during the Big Eight 
Tournament semifinals. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



their ability and give them an 
opportunity to meet their goals. 

The squad began its season by 
hosting the Converse Little 
Apple Classic. After advancing 
to the finals with a win over 
North Dakota State, the Lady 
Cats fell to Louisiana Tech, 
73-63, in a game Mossman said 
they could have won. 

"In the Louisiana Tech game 
we were right in it at the four- 
minute mark," Mossman said. 
"It was just a case of their 
experience and our inexperience 
that cost us the game down the 
stretch." 

After breezing by Wichita 
State in Ahearn Field House, the 
squad took to the road, 



competing in the University o 
Minnesota Dial Classic. Th( 
Lady Cats blew out Centra 
Michigan and the hos 
Minnesota Golden Gopher 
enroute to the tournament title. 

The Northern Illinoi 
Fastbreak Fest was not so kind 
as the Lady Cats dropped theii 
opening round game to th( 
University of Tennessee. Tht 
squad rebounded to claim thircji 
place in the tournament bj 
defeating Northern Illinois 
69-65. 

The team returned to thej 

friendly confines of Ahearn tc 

capture easy wins over Emporic 

State and Drake in preparatior 

(continued on page 270 



268 





imanda Holley finds herself surrounded 
' University of Kansas defenders after 
ling forced into a corner. (Photo byAn- 
' Nelson) 



Women's Basketball 



269 



EXPECTATIONS FADE 



for what Mossman said was the 
team's biggest game of the 
season. 

The Lady Cats played host to 
Louisiana State University on 
Dec. 16. The Tigers entered the 
contest ranked No. 13 and 
boasting an unblemished record. 

Despite shooting only 29 
percent from the field, the Lady 
Cats sent LSU home with their 
only non-conference loss of the 
season — a 50-48 setback. 

"The LSU game was without 
a doubt our biggest game," 
Mossman said. "We played a 
great defensive game. How 



often do you shoot 29 percent 
and still manage to beat a 
nationally ranked team? It was a 
total team effort." 

Following the win over LSU, 
the Lady Cats traveled to Las 
Vegas to play in the University 
of Nevada-Las Vegas Bud Light 
Tournament. The Lady Cats 
were blown out in their opening 
round game with Western 
Kentucky, an eventual NCAA 
final-four team. The 26-point 
loss was the worst defeat the 
team suffered. 

The Lady Cats didn't have 
much time to ponder their loss. 




as they faced UNLV in their 
second-round game. K-State 
defeated the Running Rebels on 
their home floor to claim third 
place in the tournament. 

The team closed out its non- 
conference schedule on the road 
at Oral Roberts. K-State entered 
the game sporting a 9-3 record 
and a No. 22 ranking. A win 
over the Titans would have 
nearly assured the Lady Cats of 
a top-20 ranking. 

The Lady Cats dropped a 
three-point decision to ORU, 
78-75. The loss, one that 
Mossman said should not have 
happened, cost K-State its 
opportunity to break into the top 
20. 

' 'We were 9-3 at that time and 
our losses had come to 
nationally ranked teams. Had we 
not lost at Oral Roberts, we 
probably would have broken 
into the top 20 that next week," 
Mossman said. 

The conference season began 
on a more positive note. K-State 
opened Big Eight play at home 
against Iowa State. Amanda 
Holley's last-second "Hail 
Mary" shot gave the Lady Cats 
a two-point overtime victory. 

A road victory over Colorado 
put the team on top of the Big 
Eight and in good shape for its 
early season showdown with 
Oklahoma in Manhattan. 

The Lady Cats lost the 
Oklahoma contest, 83-72. They 
fared no better when they hosted 
Kansas, losing 69-66. 

If back-to-back conference 
losses were not enough bad news 
for Mossman, rumblings of 
dissension signaled trouble for 

After driving ttie iane, forward Cariisa 
Tliomas pulis up to slioot a short jump 
sliot during the Big Eight Tournament in 
Kemper Arena. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 




270 



Louisiana Tech's Nora Lewis scrambie: 
for the baii against K-State's Cassandr: 
Jones in the Little Apple Classic title 
game. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 

the Lady Cats. 

On Jan. 26 five members of 
the squad failed to show up for 
practice. After the smoke had 
cleared, the squad was minus 
three players. 

Cassandra Jones, Sheila 
Hubert and Cheryl Jackson 
shocked the team when they 
decided to leave the squad 
midway through the season. 
Each cited lack of playing time 
as a major influence in their 
decision to quit. 

The departure of the three left 
the team with only eight players 
eligilible to play. The first 
inconvenience noticed by 
Mossman was that the squad 
could not have full scrimmages. 

Since NCAA regulations did 
not allow Mossman to bring in 
athletes to scrimmage against 
her team, she was forced to use 
her assistant coaches and team 
(continued on page 272, 



Women's Basketball 





Scoreboard 






KSU 


Opp. 


North DakoU State 


70 


59 


Louisiana Tech 


63 


73 


Wichita Sute 


76 


60 


Central Michigan 


82 


63 


Minnesota 


87 


50 


Tennessee 


56 


68 


No. Illinois 


69 


65 


Emporia State 


76 


47 


Drake 


76 


64 


Louisiana State 


50 


48 


Western Kentucky 


69 


95 


Nevada Las- Vegas 


66 


63 


Oral Rol>erts 


75 


78 


Iowa State 


78 


76 


Colorado 


67 


55 


Oklahoma 


72 


83 


Kansas 


66 


69 


Oklahoma SUte 


58 


60 


Missouri 


81 


65 


Nebraska 


70 


73 


Colorado 


69 


57 


Oklahoma 


77 


94 


Iowa State 


84 


73 


Oklahoma Sute 


83 


65 


Kansas 


70 


81 


Missouri 


57 


67 


Nebraska 


101 


63 


Kansas 


69 


65 


Colorado 


56 


57 



Forward Sue Leiding listens to htead 
coach Matilda IMossman tell her not to 
lean in on players while attempting to 
block their shots. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



271 



EXPECTATIONS FADE 




Susan Green looks for a teammate to 
pass tlie ball to while being pressured by 
a Wichita State defender. (Photo by Jeff 
A. Taylor) 

With her teammates hovering over her 
in concern, Susan Green checks an injury 
to her hand. (Plioto by Jeff A. Taylor) 



managers to fill the remaining 
spots needed for a full 
scrimmage. 

"From Jan. 26 on we could 
not have a full scrimmage," 
Mossman said. "We had to use 
assistant coaches and managers 
just to give them five people to 
practice against." 

Despite the loss of three key 
team members, the team did not 
fold its tent and call it a year. 
Having to rely on inexperienced 
players and sacrificing the 
luxury of a bench, the team 
managed to capture five 
victories during the remainder of 
the season. Included in those 
victories was an upset win at 
Kansas in the first round of the 
Big Eight post-season 
tournament. 

"I think the thing that I'm the 
proudest of is the way they 



didn't quit," Mossman saic 
"Every one of the girls wh 
stayed gave 110 percen 
every time they took the floor.' 
The squad finished the seaso 
16-13 despite shooting a mere 4 
percent from the field. Mossma; 
said a strong emphasis o: 
defense countered the team' 
poor shooting. 

"I've always been a defensiv 
coach," Mossman said. "Th 
majority of drills we run in th 
pre-season are defensive ones 
Defense definitely kept us in th 
games this year," she said 
"However, I don't intend 
continue this way. The girls w 
are recruiting for next year ar 
all shooters, we want peopl 
who can put the ball in th 
hole." 

— Dan Hos 



272 





K-State forward Sue Leiding reaches for 
file ball after it was tipped from her 
hands. Colorado's Gretchen DeWitte 
looks on from behind. The Lady Buffs 
beat K-State and advanced to the Big 
Eight post-season tournament finals. 
(Pholo by Andy Nelson) 

Larlisa Thomas runs onto the court with 
a smile during pre-game introductions. 
(Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 



Women's Basketball 



273 



student athlete 
realizes success through 

HARD 

WORK 



If you want to know about the basketball 
talent and ability of Amanda HoUey, don't 
ask her about it. 

She admitted she was highly competitive 
and liked to win. She also said basketball 
kept her more disciplined in school and buih 
character. But she did not brag about being 
the leading scorer on the team or brag about 
her ability and consistency. 

However, head women's basketball coach 
Matilda Mossman bragged about what was 
behind Holley's quiet and composed ex- 
terior. 

"Amanda is very coachable," Mossman 
said. "She is probably the most consistent 
player I have ever coached because she plays 
the same in practice as in games." 

Holley was not a player looking for glory 
on the court, but instead played the game 
because she was not a quitter. 

"It is a lot of hard work. There have been 
times I have wanted to punt it just because I 
have had so much schoolwork, and I never 
thought I would have time to finish 
everything," Holley said. 

Holley was a team player both on and off 
the court. Described as a genuine person by 
others, Holley was concerned for others and 
about what others thought of her. 

This caused some problems when Holley 
transferred from the University of Arkansas 
at the same time Mossman left Arkansas for 
K-State. Many thought her move to Manhat- 
tan was purely to follow in the tracks of the 
coach, but more was involved in her deci- 
sion to join K-State's roster. 

A native of Bethany, Okla., Holley never 
expected to play college basketball because 
Oklahoma schools did not recruit her heavily 
with her lack of experience playing ftill- 
court basketball in high school. 

In high school, she played on the defen- 
sive end on a six-man team. In six-man 



basketball, three players stay on one end of 
the floor and play defense while the other 
three players play offense on the other end of 
the floor. Holley said she only played of- 
fense to get the "trash" rebounds and never 
concentrated on shooting or moving toward 
the ball. 

When Mossman asked her to try out for 
the Arkansas team, she tryed it and was of- 
fered a scholarship. But Holley said after 
three years at Arkansas she was unhappy 
with the team and wanted to play for a more 
competitive school. 

Mossman accepted the head coaching job 
at K-State and it provided the opportunity 
Holley was waiting for — playing for a win- 
ning college team. She had to pay full out- 
of-state tuition and sit out a year of games 
because the athletic director at Arkansas 
would not grant her release from her 
scholarship, but Holley said the move was 
worth it. 

"Last year was tough not traveling with 
the team and not playing," Holley said. "I 
knew the people, but I didn't really feel a 
whole part of the team. This year I feel more 
a part of the team." 

Moving to K-State also meant gaining a 
better industrial engineering program, which 
Holley takes as seriously as playing basket- 
ball. The stereotype of a "dumb jock" ir- 
ritates Holley. 

"I can't stand it when people say instruc- 
tors give us a grade because we're athletes. I 
don't expect a teacher to give me something 
just because I'm an athlete. It (studying and 
playing) can get pretty hectic, but I work it 
out," she said. 

Success is just as hard for Holley to obtain 
as any other player, but Mossman said 
Holley's success is well deserved. 

When she was a junior at Arkansas, the 
Razorbacks played the University of Texas, 




After gathering in a rebound, Amanda Holley protect 
the ball while looking for an open teammate to pass tc 
(Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 

who always beat Arkansas by 20 to 3' 
points. At the end of the game, Arkansa 
was only behind by one and threw an in 
bounds pass to Holley for a last-second shot 
She shot a 15-footer and it bounced off th 
rim. 

"I told her after that game she would ge 
another chance to win a game on a las! 
second shot like that," Mossman said. 

In the K-State-Iowa State game, HoUe; 
got that chance. 

With two seconds remaining in overtimej 
the game was tied at 76-76. Teammate Sui 
Leidig pulled down a rebound and called 
time out with one second remaining. The las 
play after the time out went exactly as plann 
ed as a long pass was thrown to Holley anc 
she shot a perfect 35-footer, touchinjj 
nothing but net. K-State won the game 78-7(t 
with Holley as the heroine. 

"Good things happen to good people,' 
Mossman said. 

- Kim Kidil 



As an industrial engineering major, Amanda Hollev 
works as hard off the court as she does while on the 
court in a K-State uniform. (Pfioto by Jeff Taylor) 



274 



Amanda Holley 




Amanda Holley 



275 




276 



Living Groups Division 



Z/T^//^/ (^ro^pg 




w, 



here students 
live while attending 
K-State determines to a 
large extent the friends 
they make, the ac- 
tivities in which they 
participate and the 
memories they acquire. 

For 83 women, their 
K-State days took on a 
new dimension as they 
became part of the 
growing greek system. 

The greek system ex- 
panded for the second 

David Keefer, arranges balloons as Mark Galyardt Angle Maglll holds the roll book while Angle Pellman tlmC In thrCC yCarS aS 

hangs a sign on their 1200 Bluemont Ave. residence for signs it before the Alpha Gamma Deltas formal pledging. 

a back-to-school party. {Pholo by Jeff Tuttle) (Plioto by Jim DIetz) (continued on page 2 78) 



Living Groups Division 



277 



Mne 



ngie Magill, a chapter ad- 
viser to Alplia Gamma Delta, 
shows off her badge to newly 
pledged members Deanna Neat 
and Christine Ryan. (Photo by 
Jim Dietz) 



niter accepting an invitation to 
pledge Alpha Gamma Delta, 
Stephanie Warren has a pledge 
ribbon put on her by an area 
alumna. (Photo by Jim Diet- 





AGP 

Alpha Gams establish 
new chapter on campus 



Upha Gamma Delta sorority colonized at 
C-State on Sept. 10, 1985. 

During the first weeks of September, 
ome of the sorority's national officers came 
Manhattan to conduct an open rush, 
^ong the officers to come to K-State was 
jrand President LaVeme Flanagan. 

Flanagan said the Alpha Gams were in- 
erested in K-State because it had such a 
trong greek system. 

"We were invited to colonize, and were 
•leased," said Flanagan. She said the na- 
ional Alpha Gam office planned the col- 
•nization rush at K-State for eight to 10 
nonths. 

This planning preceded a hectic stay in 
ilanhattan before colonization was possible, 
'he first days of the Alpha Gams' open rush 
onsisted of an "open house" of sorts. 

They set up a slide show and an oral 
presentation in the Union to inform any in- 
jrested women about the Alpha Gam 
rganization. Women were then given the 
hance to sign up for conferences with the 
fficers to give the Alpha Gam represen- 
atives an opportunity to select those they 
lesired to rush. 

Two rush parties, given by Alpha Gams 



from William Jewel College and the Univer- 
sity of Kansas, followed the conferences. 
Bids were distributed following the parties 
and formal pledging followed for the 83 
women to form the new colony. 

The Alpha Gam national officers were 
pleased with the support of the K-State greek 
organization. 

"We feel that we have support of 
Panhellenic, Interfratemity Council, Barb 
(Robel) and Pat (Bosco)," Flanagan said. 
"We can't ask for any more than that. We 
appreciate it. We don't always get it." 

According to Robel, greek affairs adviser, 
the search for a new sorority to come on 
campus was started in the spring of 1985. 
Presentations were given by Zeta Tau Alpha 
and the Alpha Gams before the Panhellenic 
Council voted to extend an invitation to the 
Alpha Gams. 

The Alpha Gam national officers set up a 
time table to work toward colonization and 
eventually chartering, Robel said. 
Panhellenic helped with the leg work when it 
came to passing out brochures and posters 
advertising the colonization of the new 
sorority . 

Robel explained that the decision to work 



toward colonization of a new chapter came 
when the number of women participating in 
rush indicated that a new sorority could be 
accommodated without detracting from the 
already established sororities on campus. 

The Alpha Gams were assisted in their ad- 
justment period by their graduate counselor, 
Shelley Sutton, graduate student in jour- 
nalism and mass communications. 

Sutton, who was an Alpha Gam at Fort 
Hays State University, said she was excited 
when she was asked to work with the new 
colony. 

"The best thing about the experience," 
Sutton said, "was the opportunity to see it 
(the sorority) develop. We took a group of 
girls who didn't know each other and saw 
them develop into a chapter." 

Kim Prieb, senior in journalism and mass 
communications, was interested in the new 
sorority because she wanted to help with the 
ground work and was excited about being a 
charter member. 

On Jan. 25, 1986, the Alpha Gams were 
granted a charter from their national 
organization, making a total of 12 chartered 
sororities on campus. 

— Becky Lucas 



Alpha Gamma Delta 



279 



XJl 




cacia 



£ll 



Acacia, located at 2005 
Hunting, was founded 
at the University of 
Michigan on May 12, 
1904. The fraternity col- 
ors are old gold and 
black, the flower is the 
spring of acacia in 
bloom. Acacia has 47 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on Dec. 6, 1913. 



BERLAND, CHRIS Manhattan 

Engineenng FR 

BROCE, ANDREW Manhattan 

Marketing FR 

CLOPINE, RUSTY Berryton 

Finance SR 

CDNDIFF, RODNEY Clay Center, Neb. 

Chemtcal Engineering SR 

DAWES, DEREK Goodland IB '^ ' I 

Nuclear Engineering FR »% — m 

DIXON, TIM Louisburg ^^^ ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

FARMER, JOHN Russell ; 

Geology JR 

FRONCE, TODD Manhattan 

Physical Education JR 

GARDNER, ROBERT Wichita 

Electrical Engineering SR 

GISH, DAN Stockton ^-S* 

Electrical Engineering FR 

HALL, LOTT Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

HIGGINS, JIM Newton 

Industrial Engineering JR 

HILDRETH, MARK Li-nexa ■■K 

Marketing JR ^^HF 

HOENSCHEIDT, JAMES Kansas City, Kan. V*^ jtKlKk. 

Finance SR f ' ^^^^^ 

KRAMER, TOM Ulysses | ^^B^B 

Construction Science SR ^^^^^^^^B 

LACY, BUTCH Manhattan W^i "^W 

Landscape Design SR ^T , f 

LALLY, THOMAS Kansas City , Kan , \ -^ ' - 7 

Political Science JR \~ ' / 

I.OOPER, DONNIE Wichita Ml ^A. 

Mechanical Engineering SR ^_^^m ' ^^ 

f 

MARTIN. KEVIN Russell 

Biology FR 

McCOSH, ROBERT Dodge Cily 

History JR 

MULKEY,JOHN Beloit _ 

Marketing SR M I 

NELSON, BRADON Woodston »>* ^^ •J, 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR * ^ 

NELSON, BRIAN Woodston 

Pre-Law JR kt 

NELSON, SPENCER McPherson 

Business Administration SO 





280 



Acacia 




NICHOLS. MICHAEL Longford 

Agriculture Economics SO 

PALMQUIST, ERIC Goodland 

Genera] Engineering FR 

PARKE, DOUGLAS Prairie VUlage 

Civil Engineering.. JR 

PUCHOSIC, JOHN McPherson 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

ROEPKE, RICK TuUahoma, Tenn. 

Leisure Studies SR 

SCHLEGEL, MERLE AJamota 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SCHUSSLER. JAY Molten 

Marketing JR 

SEARS, MATTHEW Abilene 

Arts and Sciences.,.. FR 

SENN, MICHAEL Newton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

SHUPE, DAVID Holton 

Pre-Law JR 



ws 




f% 


U'^ 




11 



SHUPE, GLENN Lenexa 

Marketing JR 

SIECK, MIKE Edson 

Milling Science and Management FR 

TOTTEN, MARK Bunker Hill 

Pre-Medicine FR 




'CACIA GIRLS 



FRONT ROW: Stephanie Miller. Susan Brent, 
Shalene Davis, Traci Walker, Celia Roop, Kathy Haji- 
nian, Jamie Hofmann. SECOND ROW: Deann 
Kalberer, Penny Kramer, Michele Rooney, Kinra 
Rutter, Sarah Kobs, Joan Pate, Teresa Temme. 
THIRD ROW: Christie Barber, Rose Wenlnger, Jill 
Sinderson, Annette Maurer, Julie Ellis, Richelle 
Schoeberl, Lisa Gast. BACK ROW: Kim Gensch, 
Jennifer Duncan, Diane Gleissner, Jennifer Miller, 
Wendy Savitt, Jennifer Moss, Jill Conger 






Acacia 



281 




ANDERSON. KIM Wichita 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BAKER, KRISTEN Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing FR 

BEEBE, MARIE Kirkwood, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

BEHNER, CARRIE Lenexa 

Architecture SO 

BERRY. KIM Manhattan 

Early Childhood Education FR 

BICHLMEIER, KATHY Overland Park 

Management SR 

BORCHARD. MARCIE Wichita 

Secondary Education JR 

BRINKER. SANDY Abilene 

Apparel Design SO 

BROADFOOT. KRISTIN Olathe 

Physical Education FR 

BURFORD. DANA Stillwell 

Arts and Sciences FR 

CALOVICH, CATHY Shawnee Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

CHARTRAND. NANCY Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

CHRISMAN, KAYLA Topeka 

Architecture FR 

COLGAN, DIANE Mission 

Dietetics FR 

CONRADT. KATHY Marysville 

Finance JR 

DAY. EMILY Lincoln, Neb. 

Marketing FR 

FENSKE. SHEILA Mayetta 

Elementary Education JR 

FLYNN. RUTH Overland Park 

Biology JR 

FRANK. STEPHANIE Bennington 

Management SO 

FREEMAN, RHONDA Garden City 

Social Work SO 

GAINES, MICHELLE Topeka 

Accounting FR 

CAREY, GINNA Downs 

Home Economics Education SO 

GIBBS, DEBORAH Hiawatha 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

GLEISSNER, DIANE Mission 

Marketing SO 

GLENN. JENNY Wichita 

Marketing JR 

GRAFF, DEIDRE Marienthal 

OfHce Adminstratlon SR 

GROSKO. HEATHER Lenexa 

Marketing JR 

HAAKE. SUZANNE Clay Center 

Marketing FR 

HAGER, SHERRI Enid, Okla. 

Journalism and Mass Commimkations SR 

HARKINS. PHOEBE Colby 

Business Administration FR 



Chi Omega 



Alpha Chi Omega, 

located at 1835 Todd 

Road, was founded at 

DePauw University on 

Oct. 15, 1885. The 

sorority colors are 

scarlet red and olive 

green. The Alpha Chis 

received their charter at 

K-State on March 22, 

1947 and have 108 

members. The Alpha 

Chis flower is the red 

carnation. 





282 



Alpha Chi Omega 




HARNDEN, ROBIN Attica 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

HAUFF, SHELLY Garden City 

Accounting SR 

HEATON, KJUSTI Pratt 

Interior Design SO 

HEIMERMAN, RENEE Garden Plain 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HEY, SUSAN Jetmore 

Electrical Engineering SR 

HOOVER, ANNE Salina 

Pre-Pharmacy JR 

IRWIN, TERRI Beatrice, Neb. 

Fashion Marketing SR 

JOHNSON. JENNIFER Augusta 

Industrial Engineering PR 

KARGES, ANDREA Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

KEMPKE, TERRI Lyons 

Accounting SR 

KIMURA. LARISSA Leawood 

Marlceting JR 

KRAMER, PENNY Ulysses 

Elementary Education SR 

LEIGHTY, TERESA Beatrice, Neb. 

Marketing JR 

LEWIS. MICHELLE Topeka 

Architecture FR 

LOEFFLER, KATHLEEN WkUta 

Elementary Education SR 

LOHMEYER, KIMBERLY Salina 

Marketing SO 

MARTIN, CARRIE Manhattan 

Grain Science SO 

McN AGHTEN . CAROLYN Overland Park 

Social Work FR 

MICHEL. AMY Garden City 

Social Work SO 

MICKELSEN, VICKI WichiU 

Marketing SR 

MILLER, RENA Ottawa 

Secondary Education JR 

MORRIS, DEE Wichita 

Physical Education JR 

MOWRY, MICHELLE Council Giove 

Elementary Education JR 

MUMMA, TERESA Pratt 

Accounting FR 

NIGHTENGALE, LINDA Bums 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

OGLESBY, TONl Augusta 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

RANDALL, SANDRA Shawnee 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

REDELSHEIMER, KARLA Overland Park 

Radio and Television FR 

RINARD, LORI Shawnee 

Interior Design FR 

RIORDAN, PARRIS Lawrence 

Accounting SO 

RISSER, MICHELE Overland Park 

Finance SO 

ROWLAND, ANGIE Erie 

Marketing JR 

RYAN, HEIDI Topeka 

Nutritional Science FR 

SCHOEBERL. RICHELLE Salina 

Pre-Pharmacy FR 

SCHURLE, MELANIE Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

SEAGO, KELLY Liberal 

Chemistry FR 

SHERMAN, SHELLEY Lyona 

Accounting JR 

SHIELDS, MICHELLE Neodesha 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

STANLEY, DINA Bennington 

Physical Education JR 

STRONG, KERSTIN Overiand Park 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

STRONG, MELISSA Prairie Village 

Office Administration SR 

TENNANT, GAY ANN Dodge City 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. . . . SO 

TRENTMAN, CHERIE Fairview 

Secondary Education SO 

WAGGONER. DENA Manhattan 

Marketing FR 

WATTE, ELIZABETH Leawood 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

WAKEMAN, SHELLY Baldwin City 

Pre-Uw SO 

WARD, MARY Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

WASMUND, JULIE Manhattan 

Fashion Marketing JR 



Alpha Chi Omega 



283 



Alpha Chi Omega 



I he Alpha Chi Omegas and the 
Kappa Sigs teamed up to sing a 
Beach Boy's medley during All- 
University Sing. The competition 
was won by the team of the 
Kappa Alpha Thetas and Far- 
mHouse. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



WEBER, KONI Wichita 

Office Administration JR 

WHITLOCK, MARCY Hutchinson 

Accounting SO 

WILEY, ANNE Independence 

Apparel Design SO 

WILLIAMS, LISA Eureka 

Business Administration FR 



WISE, AMY Columbia, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

WOLTMAN, TAMRA Overiand Park 

Industrial Engineering SR 

WRIGHT. JOANNE Manhattan 

Biochemistry SO 

YEARY. BECKY WinHeld 

Elementarv Education SR 



YOUNG, JOANNE 
Accounting 

YOWELL. LENA 
Elementary Education 

ZWICK, CARMEN 
Interior Design 





284 



Alpha Chi Omega 



w 



m — 

A 



Ipha DeltaPi 




Alpha Delta Pi, located 
at 518 Sunset, was 
founded at Wesleyan 
Female College on May 
15, 1851. The sorority 
colors are blue and 
white, the ADPis flower 
is the violet. The ADPis 
have 113 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on Oct. 15, 
1915. 




SCHULTZ, DORIS Housemother 

ACKERMAN, LINDA Overiand Park 

Marketing SR 

ADKINSON, JANNA Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

PhysteaJ Education SR 

AXLAND, CAROLYN Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

BECKMAN, ANGELA Lx)s Alamos, N.M. 

General Engineenng FR 

BERRY, JULIE Topeka 

Architectural Engineering JR 

BESLER, PAMELA Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications. SO 

BESLER, PAT Topeka 

Physical Education SO 

BOEVE, ANGIE Hays 

Accounting FR 

CARLISLE, LAURIE Derby 

Business Administration JR 

CAVE. LAURIE Olathe 

Marketing JR 

CLEMENT. JACKIE Oakley 

Accounting SO 

COLIP, POLLY Norton 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

CONNOLLY. JANET Prairie Village 

Prc-Physical Therapy JR 

CRAMER. MARY Glasco 

History SO 

CROSIER, LAURIE Seneca 

Accounting SR 

DALTON, JULIE LeneM 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

DOWD. DEBBIE Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing SO 

DREIER. LOR] Newton 

Social Work FR 

DUMLER, JANELLE Dillon, Colo. 

Business Administration SR 

DUNCAN. DEBBIE AugusU 

Elementary Education JR 

DUTTON, MELISSA Derby 

Accounting SR 

FENTON, LORI Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration FR 

nSHER.-ELLIE Lake Quivira 

Elementary Education SO 

FLICK, JULIANN Winfield 

Apparel Design SO 

FOLGER. LISA Fredonia 

Labor Relations SO 

FORRER, LEANNE Ulysses 

Marketing SR 

FRANK, CINDY OtUwa 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

GORMAN, KAREN Kingman 

Interior Design SO 

GOTTSCH, JANICE Hutchinson 

Business Administration SR 



Alpha Delta PI 



285 



Alpha Delta Pi 



GRAEF. ROBIN Ft. Leavenworth 

Marketing JR 

HARRELSON. SHAWN Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

HEDRICK, JANETTE Shawnee 

Pre-Nursing JR 

HIGBEE, HELENE Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration SO 

HODGES, LYNETTE St. George 

Speech Pathcilt)gy and Audioiogy JR 

HUNTER, CHRISTINE Council Grove 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO 



INOMIRE. LORI Council Grove 

Journalism and Mass Communication SO 

ISAACSON, LISA Council Grove 

Music FR 

JARUS, AMY Ellsworth 

Accounting J R 

JORDAN, MICHELLE Salina 

Phvsics SR 

KALBERER, DEANN Wichita 

Elementary Education JR 

KING, LAURA Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 



KREHBIEL, CHRISTAN Pretty Prairie 

Marketing FR 

KRUSE, JOAN WichiU 

Elementary Education SR 

LAGOMARCINO, DEBBIE St. Ann, Mo. 

Interior Architecture JR 

LEHNER, JODI Cheney 

Political Science FR 

LONS, ANNETTE Overland Park 

Finance JR 

LUECK, CARMELA Junction City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 



LUGINBILL. LORI Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

MAYHEW, TRACY Pratt 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MCANARNEY, AMY Manhattan 

Accounting FR 

MCCOY, PATRICIA Fall River 

Physical Eiducation , FR 

MCLEMORE, JOANN Arkansas City 

Elementary Education JR 

MILLER, JENNIFER Fredonia 

General Home Eiconomics JR 



MONSON, LYNNETTE Lansing 

Accounting FR 

MULLIN, ROBIN Clay Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

MURPHY, MAUREEN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

NYBERG, ANN Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Special Eiducation JR 

O'CONNOR, KIM Overland Park 

Radio and Television JR 

OLSON. LIZ Arkansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communkations SR 



PERRY, RHONDA Hutchinson 

Marketing JR 

PHILLIPS, ERIN Bonner Springs 

Pre-Medicine FR 

POLING, TRACY Wichita 

Marketing JR 

RATHBUN, JILL Lindsborg 

Chemical Engineering FR 

REZAC, KAREN Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering FR 

ROBERTS, JENNIFER Ottawa 

SiKial Work JR 



ROBUCK, MARY Halstead 

Interior Design SO 

SCHAEFER, MARTHA Wichita 

Material Sciences Engineering JR 

SCHROEDER, LISA Grinnell 

Interior Design SO 

SCHULTZ, BETHANY Manhattan 

Management JR 

SCHWERMANN, SUSAN Shawnee Mission 

Early Child Education SO 

SEITZER, JOAN Overland Park 

JournalLsm and Mass Communications SR 



SETZER, KRISTY Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration JR 

SHEPHERD, MARY Wichita 

General Home Economics SR 

SKEIE, ERICA Garden City 

Physical Science Teaching FR 

SOUKUP,SHARLA Ellsworth 

Special Eiducation FR 

STEIN, JANICE Ulysses 

Pre-L,aw SO 

STEIN, SUSAN Ulysses 

Arts and Sciences JR 




286 



Alpha Delta Pi 




STUKE, MICHELLE Topeka 

Home Economics Education SR 

SULLIVAN, DANA Manhattan 

Education FR 

SULLIVAN, NEALA Leawood 

Accounting SR 

SWAIM, SARAH Dodge City 

Secondary Education SR 

TEUFEL. SHANNON Dodge City 

Elementary Education FR 

THORPE, laMBERLY Fort Scott 

Management JR 

TULP, KRISTINE Praine VUlage 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

VARNER, SARAH Batesville, Ind. 

Education SR 

VATH, AMY Manhattan 

Industnal Engineering SO 

WALL, MARY McPherson 

Modem Languages JR 

WELLS, LEE ANN Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering FR 

WENTZEL. KRISTI Manliattan 

Accounting SR 

WHITEBREAD, CRYSTAL Junction City 

Political Science JR 

WINANS, ELIZABETH Dodge City 

Pre-Medicine SO 

WINTERMAN, AMY JO Mission 

Arts and Sciences FR 

WISELEY, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Journ alism and Mass Communications JR 

WTTTMER, WENDY Topeka 

Architectural Engineering SO 

WOODS. MIANNE Leawood 

Finance JR 




Wa 



ralking in front of Justin 
Hall, Timi Poling uses a 
newspaper to keep dry from tlie 
thundershower. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 



287 



-TJl 




Ipha Gamma Delta 



Alpha Gamma Delta 
was founded at Syracuse 
University on May 30, 
1904. The sorority col- 
ors are red, buff and 
green. The Alpha Gams 
flowers are red and buff 
roses. The Alpha Gams 
have 83 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on Jan. 25, 
1986. 





ANDRES, NELDA Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

ARENSMAN, RANAE Manhattan 

Horticulture SR ^^^^Jt 

ARGANBRIGHT. KELLY Manhattan Wl^^^9 

Elementary Education JR mm •<|L, 

BENTEMAN. LINDA Clifton W^ ^^ 

Industnal Engineering JR 

BIEBERLY. LISA Dodge City 

Business Administration FR ,^ 

BORST, ROSE Manhattan 1 F -^ 

'"™"""^ '° ji^L.Jl^^^^m 

CAINE, VERONICA Manhattan 

Music SR 

CARR, KELLI Kansas City, Kan. 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

CLEVENGER-ALLEN. JANET Manhattan 

Psychology SO 

COLEMAN, LESLIE \ Overbrook 

Markcling FR 

COLLINS, STACEY Merriam 

Business Administration SO 

CORRALES, YOLANDA Holcomb ^^MBI I^H ^A " i 

Polilical Science JR il^^^H JKM .^^^^ ' 

COTTRELL, LISA Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

DINKEL. ALICIA Topeka 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

DUNCAN. KIMBER Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

DUNGEE, DEBORAH Ft, Leonardwood, Mo, ^ -g^ 

Information Systems SO 

ELLIOTT. KIM Chanute 

Elementary Eiducation JR 

ESPENLAUB. ANITA Chandler, Ind. 

Accounting JR 

FAUNCE. KIM Holt. Mo. 

Pre-Law FR 

GIEBLER. SUSAN Valley Center 

Accounting SO ^"^ ^J^T^*^ ,,^4 

GOETSCH, SUSAN Brewster ( * ^'i^^ 

Foods and Nutrition Science SR 

GOLWAY, JENNIFER Winfield jrw -^ »» 

Pre-School Education, Community Service FR 

HAINLINE, ANDRIA Cedar Point 

Electrical Engineering SR 

HANEFELD, LINDA Overland Parl< 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

H ANNA. JULIE Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

HANSEN. CLAIRE Manhattan 

Modem Languages SO 

HARMISON. ANGELA Ness City 

Accounting SO 

HARVEY, CRYSTAL Independence 

Chemistry SR 

HINMAN. GINA Independence 

Finance SO 

HOLLIS, DENISE Meriden ^^^^ . - .,^^^_ ^^_ 

Accounting ^^^^^^, ,^^^^^B .^^^^H^ 




288 



Alpha Gamma Delta 




HUNGATE, GINA Lamed 

Apparel Design SO 

HUPE. PENNY Wamego 

Marketing JR 

JENNINGS. KAREN McPherson 

Accounting JR 

JOHNSON, STEPHANIE Concordia 

Medical Technology JR 

KING, CARMADY Manhattan 

Computer Science FR 

LEATHERMAN, SHERYL Wichita 

Interior Design. FR 

LEE. JANET Manhattan 

Marketing FR 

LEE, KRIS Topeka 

Elementary Education FR 

LEWIS. RENEE Wathena 

Elementary Education JR 

LUEKER, BELINDA Junction City 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

MAGES. ANGELA Topeka 

Business Administration Fr 

MARIHUGH, SANDRA Esbon 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

MILLOY, SARAH Olathe 

Elementary Education SO 

MINCER. JENNIFER Rochester. N.Y. 

Horticulture JR 

MYERS, CHRISTI Emporia 

Psychology FR 

NEAL, DEANNA _ Leawood 

Secondary Education FR 

PARK,KELLI Solomon 

Fashion Marketing JR 

PELLMAN, ANGIE Leavenworth 

Home Economics FR 




A % 



PHENICIE, JILL Overland Park 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

PRIEB. KIM Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

REGINI. MICHELLE Enid, Okla. 

Fashion Marketing FR 

RIVARD, DAWN El Paso, Texas 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

ROBERTS, SARAH Sublette 

Pre-Phannacy SR 

ROLFS, SUSAN Randolph 

Business Administration SO 

ROLLHAUS, LISA Eureka, Mo. 

Architecture , JR 

RYAN, CHRISTINE Overland Park 

Pre-Law FR 

SALSBURY, TRACY Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SCHMIDT, CARJ^EN Newton 

Pre-Pharmacy JR 

SOLLIE, KIMBERLY Lenexa 

Interior Design SO 

STOVER, STEPHANIE Abilene 

Pre-Law Fr 

STREFF. KIM Topeka 

Marketing JR 

SUTTON, SHELLEY Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications GR 

TAWNEY, LISA Topeka 

Accounting SO 

TAYLOR. KAREN Lenexa 

Arts and Sciences FR 

TAYLOR. TAMARA Hoxie 

Nutritional Science SO 

TORNEDEN. CHRISTEL Pleasanlon 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

TRITSCH, MARY Hiawatha 

Radio-Television SR 

TURNER, CONSTANCE Shawnee 

Civil Engineering SR 

WARREN, STEPHANIE Eskridge 

Interior Design SR 

WHITE, DANEALE Manhattan 

Psychology SR 

WILLL\MS, ELISE Osage City 

Agriculture FR 

WYMAN, MICHELLE Mission 

Psychology FR 

ZIZZA, CLAIRE SatanU 

Foods and Nutrition Science SR 



Alpha Gamma Delta 



289 




Ipha Gamma Rho 



HABIGER, MARGARETTE Housemotber 

BOKELMAN, MARC Washington 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

BRADFORD, ROGER Moran 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

BREZGIEL, PETER Leavenworth 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BROOKS, STEVE Norton 

Finance FR 

CHADWELL, BRYAN Moundridge 

Agriculture Education SO 



CHRISLER, RANDALL Winfldd 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

CONLEY, DWIGHT Gypsum 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

DAHLSTEN, MARK Lindsborg 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

EFLIN, BRIAN Moran 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

FEYH, RICHARD Alma 

Agronomy SO 

FISHER, GLEN Harper 

Grain Science SO 



GARRISON, JIM Miltonvale 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

GOODING, CHRISTOPHER Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

GRINTER, TED Lawrence 

Agricultural Economics. SO 

HARRISON, REX Olathe 

Animal Science and Industry SR 

HEID. GEORGE St, George 

Agricultural Economics SR 

HOLZ, LARRY Belvue 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 



HULTMAN, BRET Red Oak, Iowa 

Animal Science FR 

HUMMEL, ROGER Hope 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

IMTHURN, DAN Maple HUl 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

JOHNSON, GRANT Smolan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

JOHNSON, KENNETH Assaria 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

KIRK, PHIL Clayton 

Agricultural Economics FR 



Alpha Gamma Rho, 
located at 1919 Piatt, 
was founded at the 
University of Illinois 
and Ohio State Univer- 
sity on April 4, 1908. 
The fraternity colors are 
dark green and gold 
and the AGRs flower is 
the pink rose. The 
AGRs received their 
charter at K-State on 
Feb. 12, 1927 and have 
75 members. 




UAx»4J roMMa M'PvsX / 




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^k^ 




kA.kij 






290 



Alpha Gamma Rho 




KIRK, WILL Clayton 

Agricultural Economics SR 

KRIZEK, THERON Dresden 

AgriculturaJ Economics FR 

LIGON, STEVE Ida 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

MARCUSON.KIRK Oberlin 

Gram Science SO 

MARKER, MIKE Dexter 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

MARSTON, SHAD Canton 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

MAYER, KENT MarysvlUe 

Milling Science and Management SR 

MCCLELLAN, ROGER Palco 

Agricultural Economics SO 

NIKKEL, CHRISTOPHER Canton 

Agricultural Economics FR 

^flKKEL, JON Newton 

Agricultural Economics JR 

OSWALT, DAVID Little River 

Agricultural Economics FR 

OTOTT, JEFF Washington 

Agriculture FR 

PEARSON, JIM Osage City 

Agronomy FR 

PETERSON, RANDY Cottonwood Falls 

Agnculiural Engineering JR 

PETOIE, WILLIAM McLouth 

Agricultural Economics SR 

POWERS. ROGER Garden City 

Agricultural Economics SR 

READ, DOUG Derby 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

READ, STEVE Derby 

Agncultural Economics.. SO 



RHO-MATES 



FRONT ROW: Elsie Haug, Dara Keener, Mary 
Rockers, Joy Koch, Lynette Hamilton, Jlllnda New. 
SECOND ROW: Robin Day, Joyce Dixon, Karin Tan, 
Margena George, Elizabeth Wulf, Mary Sobba, Tef- 
fani Mulrtiead. THIRD ROW: Sheila Hasselman, Sal- 
ly Hoffman, Terrie Gaile, Donna Rosenhagen, Mary 
Beth Clawson, Jennifer Welch. BACK ROW: Melissa 
Wells, Marsha Setzkorn, Cindy Greathouse, Amy Jo 
Relnhardt, Lisa Keller, Shari Stansbarger, Jennifer 
Dorsch. 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



291 



292 



Alpha Gamma Rho 



RJDDER, TOM Leoti 



nnary M 



ROPP, MARTIN Normal, HI. 

Animal Science SR 

ROSENHAGEN, TIM Cheney 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

SANICEY, HAL Sterling 

Agricultural Economics JR 

SHUEY, SCOTT Tecumseh, Neb. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine PR 



SLUDER. CHRISTOPHER Quenemo 

Agricultural Economics JR 

SMITH, JOHN Miltonvaie 

Milling Science and Management SR 

SMITH, RONALD Tonganoxie 

Agnculture Education FR 

STEENBOCK, CURTIS Longford 

Anima] Sciences and Industry SO 

STENSTROM. MARK While City 

Veterinary Medicine GR 

STOVER, SCOTT Beloit 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 



STRASSER, KEITH Scott City 

Agricultural Mechanization JR. 

STRJCKLER, DALE Colony 

Agnculture Education JR 

TORREY, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Agriculture EducatloD SR 

TUCKER. KENNY Auburn 

Agriculture Education FR 

WELCH, KELLY Moran 

Agricultural Economics JR 

WHEARTY, ROBERT Randolph 

Agriculture Education JR 



RHO-MATES 



FRONT ROW: Lorl Schumann, Lisa Goering, Sarah 
Schaake, Margarerte Habiger. SECOND ROW: Jen- 
nifer Swartz, Lori Schneider, Janet Berry, Stephanie 
Bearnes, Brenda Fasse. THIRD ROW: Kay Garvert, 
Leslye Schneider, Amy Wise, Cammy Theurer, 
Marie Boyer, Candy Kats. BACK ROW: Angela Goer- 
ing, Tammera Sjogren, Mary Foil, Robin Heberly. 
Robin Harnden. 




Alpha Gamma Rho i 






Ipha Kappa Lambda 




Alpha Kappa Lambda, 
located at 1919 Hunting, 
was founded at the 
University of California 
at Berkeley on April 17, 
1914. The fraternity col- 
ors are purple and gold 
and the AKLs flower is 
the yellow rose. The 
AKLs have 26 members 
and received their 
charter at K-State on 
March 4, 1930. 



BANES, BRYANT Junaion City 

Pre-Law iR 

^1^^ 1 DEVORE, THOMAS Topeka 

^I^^B^^ ^ Business Administration FR 

dMpiPHB DOERFLINGER, DAVID Overland Park 

^^^ ^B Business Administration JR 

•r? ■; V DUNNING, STEVEN Haistead 

~ ~ Electrical Engineering SR 

. HEADRICK, GARY Liberal 

Agronomy JR 

^ HEISE, DALE Manhattan 

^^^^^ Agricultural Engineering SR 

^^^^ HEISE, JAMES Scranton 

' Electrical Engineering SR 

KRATOCHVIL, TERRY Topeka 

Civil Engineering FR 

LESTER, IRVING Topeka 

Pre-Law FR 

_ LINDSTROM, ROBERT Topeka 

*'^~ Architecture FR 

MACKINNON, ROSS Manbattan 

Chemical Engineering SR 

MANN, DAVID Manhattan 

Civil Engineering FR 



W ^^ifll 



/r 



T 

-i^ 






■.^lUii i lfTifrir i ilie i 



-? 




Mteve Hill slam dunks a 
basketball while practicing his 
jamming technique on an 8-foot 
goal at the Jardine Terrace 
courts. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 



293 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 



PHILLIPS, JOSEPH Valley Falls 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology SO 

PHILLIPS, PETE VaUey Falls 

Engineering Technology SR 

PHILLIPS, WILLLWW Valley FaUs 

Industrial Engineering GR 

RAHJES, KENNETH Agra 

Agriculture Economics SO 




ROBUCK, RICHARD Halstead 

Agriculture JR 

SCHUESSLER, DENNIS Washington 

Computer Science FR 

WEICHOLD, GLEN Topeka 

Electrical Engineering FR 



UHLE SISTERS OF 
ATHENA 



FRONT ROW: Lisa Scott, Janet Phillips, Lorl 
Sherley, Judy Wagner. SECOND ROW: Sonja Brant, 
Ruth Mortensen, Kaye Fasse. Kristel Weber, Mary 
Baalmann, THIRD ROW: Brenda Harzman, Cheryl 
Coon, Chris O'Brien, Sondra Broers, Anne O'Con- 
nell. BACK ROW: Kimberly Drapal, Shannon Simon, 
Joan Sehlffler, Heidi ZInn, Tricia Heger. 




294 



Alpha Kappa Lambda 




Ipha TaiTOmega 



Alpha Tau Omega, 
located at 1632 McCain 
Lane, was founded at 
the Virginia Military In- 
stitute on Sept. 11, 
1865. The fraternity col- 
ors are azure and gold. 
The ATOs flower is the 
white tea rose. The 
ATOs received their 
charter at K-State on 
Oct. 22, 1920 and have 
90 members. 




BANCROFT, CHRISTOPHER Keamey, Neb. 

Accounting JR 

BAYOUTH. JOHN Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering SO 

BECK, DOUGLAS Coming 

Management SO 

BERGNER,BILL Pratt 

Business Administration SO 

BLANCHAT, JEFF Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

BLAZER, STEVE Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BRETZ, MATTHEW Hutchinson 

Pre-Law FR 

BUTLER, TOM Salina 

Accounting FR 

CABLE, KENT Manhattan 

Construction Science SR 

CATHERS, STEVE Manhattan 

Business Administration... FR 

CAUTHON, DAMON Derby 

Pre-Law SO 

CONGROVE, TIMOTHY Lawrence 

Agricultural Economics JR 

. CORMACI, MICHAEL Shawnee 

-IB Business Administration FR 

1 CROSS,PHIL Lenexa 

Accountii^ SR 

DIEDERICH, JOHN Manhattan 

Finance SO 

DIEHL, ROBERT SaUna 

Accounting SR 

ELICINS, ROGER Overiand Park 

Architecture and Design SO 

FANGMAN, JOSEPH Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

FEIRING, ROBERT Kansas City, Kan. 

Mkrobiology SR 

FOLEY, GREG Lawrence 

Agronomy FR 

FOX, BRET Stafford 

Animal Science and Industry JR 

FRANZEN, THOMAS Roeiand Park 

Finance SR 

GIBSON. WESTON Salina 

History Education JR 

GOERJNG, JIM Unexa 

General Engineering SO 

GRAHAM, THOMAS Prairie VUlage 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

HADDOCK, TODD Salina 

Business Administration SO 

HELLMER, JIM Roeiand Parle 

Engineenng Technology JR 

HENDERSON, TIMOTHY Almena 

Political Science JR 

HETTICH, ALLEN Wichita 

/'v Pre-Veterinarv Medicine FR 

' ^^^ HORTON, TROY Bumon 

^^^^k Agricultural Economics SO 



Alpha Tau Omega 



295 



Alpha Tau 

HUGHES, GEORGE Soldier 

Industrial Engineering SR 

HULL, TROY Hays 

General Engineering FR 

KASTER, DAVID Overland Park 

Architecture JR 

KISNER, BRANDON Manhattan 

Business Administration JR 

KRIZMAN, JACK Overiand Pari; 

Restaurant Management SR 

LAHMAN, RICH Sawyer 

Milling Science and Management FR 

LAUGHMAN, JEFF Salina 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

LONG, 1X)UGLAS St. John 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

LOPEZ, DANNY Salma 

Construction Science SO 

MARVEL, LARRY Wichita 

Industrial Engineering SO 

MCDANIEL, EMDNALD Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

MCKENZIE, PAUL Salina 

Construction Science SO 

MCKERNON, PATRICK Manhattan 

Political Science Education SR 

MESSING, KEVIN Overland Park 

Marketing JR 

MILLER, JEFF Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SR 

NICKEL, ED Moline 

Marketing SO 

OVERTON, RICHARD Syracuse 

Agriculture Economics JR 

PATTERSON, THOMAS Prairie Village 

Restaurant Management SR 



o 



mega 



SISTERS OF THE 
MALTESE CROSS 



FRONT ROW: Stephanie Jones, Julie Arvidson, Ann 
Gladbach, Debbie Brandt, Carolyn Wieth. SECOND 
ROW: Patricia Jones, Patti Neel, Dana Peterson, 
Josie Bernal. THIRD ROW: Chris Koetting, Kim Col- 
lins, Janet Tome, Lura Jo Atherly, Erin Montague. 
BACK ROW: Liz DiCintio, Patty McCoy, Nancy 
Matney, Mamie Patterson. 




Alpha Tau Omega 




Alpha Tau Omega fraternity 
member Tim Congrove polishes 
an airplane's windshield Nov. 2, 
1985, at the ATOs plane wash at 
Manhattan Municipal Airport. 
The ATOs raised $75 for the Big 
Lakes Development Center. 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



l4A^dL 



PERKINS, DANIEL Roeland Park 

Business Administration SO 

PETERSON, GREG Wichita 

Computer Science FR 

PIERCE, JEFF Salina 

Architectural Engineering SO 

REED, STEVEN Stockton 

Marketing SR 

RIBBLE, MICHAEL Salina 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

RICKE, JERRY Salina 

Radio and Television SO 

STUDER, TERRY Preston 

Electrical Engineering FR 

TAGGART, SCOTT Salina 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

TALLEY, BRAD Neodesha 

General Engineering FR 

TAYLOR, LYNN Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SO 

WALD, THEODORE Prairie Village 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

WINTER, STANLEY Colwich 

Agriculture Education SR 

WITT, CORBIN Hudson 

Elementary Education JR 

ZAREMBA, SCOTT Lawrence 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

ZWAHLEN, BRIAN Lenexa 

Management SO 



^Alpha Tau Omega 



297 




Xi Delta 



ANDERSON, ERICA Topeka 

Biology JR 

ANDERSON. KAREN Topeka 

Intenor Design FR 

ARCHIBALD, ROBIN Wichita 

Accounting JR 

AUBUCHON, LAUREL Pittsburg 

Elementary Education SO 

BIGLER,TIA Clay Center 

Recreation JR 

BLANCHAT. JULIE Olathe 

Marketing JR 

BLANTON.MARY Junction City 

Marketing JR 

BLASL TINA Wichita 

Marketing SO 

BOOS, JAMI Hays 

Accounting JR 

BRAUER,T1NA Haven 

Fashion Marketing FR 

BRONSON, CINDY Hays 

Marketing SO 

CARR, KAREN Wichita 

Radio and Television JR 

CASEY, KAREN Augusta 

History JR 

COLEN. JENNIFER Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

CONNOR, KATHY Overland Park 

Finance SR 

CONYAC. KELLY Stockton 

Finance JR 

CORRIGAN. JEANNE Wichita 

International Studies SO 

CUPIT, CAROL Wichita 

Elementary Education JR 

DAVIS, HEATHER Lake Quivera 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

DAVIS, JENNIFER Leawood 

Business Administration SO 

DOEBELE, CYNTHIA Manhattan 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

DONALDSON, CATHY Topeka 

Accounting SO 

DUNKLEE, KELLY Topeka 

Secondary Education FR 

EITEL, PAMELA Scott City 

Fashion Marketing FR 

FALLON, VERONICA Leawood 

Apparel and Design SR 

FRANK, KIM SUver Lake 

Secondary Education SO 

FUNK, TAMI Wakeeney 

Accounting FR 

GAGLIANO, RACHELE Unexa 

Marketing FR 

GANN, AMY WichiU 

Art JR 

GERMAN, STACIA Chanute 

Finance JR 



Alpha Xi Delta, located 
at 601 Fairchild Ter- 
race, was founded at 
Lombard College on 
April 17, 1893. The 
sorority colors are dou- 
ble blue and gold and 
their flower is the pink 
rose. The Alpha Xis 
have 98 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on June 1, 
1922. 




> Alpb&XiQglta ^ 



298 





W^ *^ ^m" ^^m ^w*^^ "n 
^M iHF ^J i 



GRANT, JANE Salina 

Psychology JR 

GRIFFITH, DEE ANN Augusta 

Marketing SR 

HAGGARD, JANELL Winfield 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HARWICK, KIRSTEN Hays 

Accounting JR 

HEFLEY.JOAN Topeka 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

HINDERER. VICK] Colwich 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HOOVER, RHONDA Garden CHy 

Secondary Education SR 

HOWELL, AMY Eureka 

Elementary Education FR 

HUND, ANGELA Paxico 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HUTINETT, SHEILA Chanute 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

DVNES, MEG Manhattan 

Secondary Education SR 

JOHNSON, CATHERINE Lindsborg 

Interior Design SO 

JOHNSON, LINDA Salina 

Agriculture Economics SR 

JONES, JENNIFER Topeka 

Radio and Television FR 

JORDEN, ANN Overland Park 

Marketing JR 

KAHN, STACEY Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

KARST, STACEY Topeka 

Interior Design JR 

KELLY, STEPHANIE Lenexa 

Psychology SO 

KESTER, JANA Sabetha 

Elementary Education FR 

KIDD, KIM Kansas City, Mo. 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

KLENDA, KRISTINE Wichita 

Business Administration SO 

KRIZM AN. ANDREA Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

LANG. JILL Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

LINDER, KAREN Annandale, N.J. 

Industrial Engineering SR 




Uuring a warm spell in 
January, Perl Parenteau throws 
a flying disc to a puppy in 
Manhattan's City Park. (Photo by 
Jim DIetz) 



I 



Alpha Xi Delta 



299 



Alpha XrDeita 



LOCKE, AMY Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Architecture FR 

MASKA, JILL Hays 

Accounting SR 

MOHAMED, JILAN Prairie VUlage 

Education SO 

MUELLER, LORI Manhattan 

Psychology FR 

NELSON, KRIS Lenexa 

Home Economics and Mass Communications.... SO 
NETT, LISA Shawnee 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 



NORRIS, LISA RusseU 

Marketing SR 

OBORG, SHELLEY Smolan 

Elementary Education SO 

OLSON, CAMl Topeka 

History FR 

PERRY, ANN Topeka 

Family Life and Human Development SO 

PETERSON, MARLA WichiU 

Accounting SR 

POTTER. SHEILA Prairie Village 

Marketing SR 



REIN, RHODA Wichita 

Animal Science and Management SO 

ROBBINS, CHERIE Medicine Bow, Wyo. 

Textile Science SR 

SACHSE, SUE Leavenworth 

Arts and Sciences SO 

SHIPLEY, LISA Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SHOEMAKE, KELLY Wichita 

Art SO 

STEPHENS, GINA Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 




WARNER, KIM Hays 

Engineering FR 

WEIGEL, MISSY Hutchinson 

Leisure Studies SR 

WENINGER, SHAWN Coiwich 

Medical Technology FR 



WILLCOTT, DEBBIE Leavenworth 

Business Administration FR 

ZIMMERMAN. JANELLE St, Louis, Mo. 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

ZIMMERMAN, KAREN Oakley 

Marketing SO 



300 



Alpha Xi Delta 




eta Sigma Psi 



^^**iz 




tzz^ 



Beta Sigma Psi, located 
at 1200 Centennial, was 
founded at the Universi- 
ty of Illinois on April 
17, 1925. The fraternity 
colors are cardinal and 
white and the Beta Sigs 
flower is the gold rose. 
The Beta Sigs have 49 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on March 4, 1951. 




ANNIS, JUDD Manhattan 

Microbiology SO 

BERGMAN, CHRISTOPHER Omaha, Neb. 

Medical Technology SO 

BULLINGER, PHILIP Canton 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BULLINGER. REED Canton 

Crop Protection SO 

DAVIS, LAUREL Pittsburg 

Electrical Engineering SR 

DRENNEN, CURT Wichita 

Chemistry FR 

EBERHART, STEVEN Raymond 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

FRIELING, KENT Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

GERHARDT, TIMOTHY Wichita 

Architecture FR 

GREEN, ANDREW Emporia 

Accounting FR 

HAAKE, DAVID St. Louis 

Architectural Engineering JR 

HARDENBURGER, CLAY Haddam 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

HOLLE, EARL WichiU 

Chemical Engineering SR 

HOLZRJCHTER, JAMES Wichita 

Architectural Engineering FR 

JACKSON. THOMAS Topeka 

Civil Engineering JR 

JOHNSON, EDWARD JR Leawood 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

JORNS, PHILIP Preston 

Physical Education GR 

JORNS, TIM Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

JUNDT, SCOTT Norfolk, Neb. 

Construction Science SR 

KLIEWER, MATT Derby 

Engineering FR 

LANGEMEDER, LVNN Manhattan 

Management SR 

LEHM ANN, DIRK Gaylord 

Accounting SO 

MAY, ROGER Oberlin 

Animal Science and Industry SO 

MEIER, JOE Beloit 

Agriculture Mechanization SO 

MELGREN, PAUL Springfield, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

MENG, RAY Watbena 

Natural Resources Management SR 

MUELLER, JOEL Florissant, Mo. 

Construction Science SR 

NIEMANN, DAVID Newton 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

NIGUS, PHILIP Manhattan 

Civil Engineering SR 

OLSON, GARY Salina 

Accounting JR 



Beta Sigma Psi 



301 



Beta Sisma P 



gma JTsi 



RHOADES, RONALD Ellinwood 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SASSE, MYRON Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics SR 

SCHROEDER, JAMES Empona 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

SKARDA.JOHN Papillion, Neb. 

Electrical Engineering FR 

TANGEDAL, MIKE WichiU 

Computer Science SR 

TERRILL, JOHN Gaylord 

Business Administration SO 

TEUSCHER, TODD St. Louis, Mo. 

Landscape Architecture JR 

THURLOW, SCOTT Wakefield 

Electrical Engineering FR 

WALSTEN, CLAYTON Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering JR 

WHITE, DAVID Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

WIRE, DAVID Smith Center 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine SO 

ZABEL, GREG Gaylord 

Business Administration SO 



LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
THE GOLDEN ROSE 



FHONT ROW: Debbie Doll, Shirley Bunk. Dianna 
Curtis, Lanlce Thomson, Jackie Wendt, Carolyn 
Yost. Janet Kedlger. Shelly Glllam. SECOND ROW: 
Pam Flicklnger. Crystal Walker. DeAnn Isern, Rachel 
Smith. Debra Andrews. Kathy Knop, Laura Logback. 
THIRD ROW: Beth Smith. Linda LuthI, Jeanne 
Hoover. Lorl Tessendorf. Janet Elliot. Stephanie Ar- 
cher. Mary Gomez. BACK ROW: Shannon Archer. 
Becky Howard. Brenda Burjes, Reglna Connery. 
Michelle Miller. Diane Muller. Daria Koons, Charlene 
Hess. 




302 



Beta Sigma Psi i 




eta Theta K 



Beta Theta Pi, located 
at 500 Sunset, was 
founded at Miami 
(Ohio) University on 
Aug. 8, 1839. The 
fraternity colors are 
pinlt and blue. The 
Betas flower is the deep 
pink rose. The Betas 
have 82 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on Sept. 4, 
1914. 




BECK, JOE Kansas City. Mo. 

Architecture JR 

BENSCHOTER. GIB Prairie Village 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology JR 

BLEDSOE, SCOTT Kansas City , Kan . 

Chemical Enginecnng JR 

BRADY, MATTHEW Lincoln, Neb. 

Architectural Engineering FR 

BUSSING, GREG Manhattan 

y Industrial Engineering SR 

^'^^ BUTTON, JOHN Newton 

^^^^^ Chemical Engineering SR 

CHANDLER, SCOTT Longboat Key, Fla. 

Marketing SR 

CLEM, CHAD Shawnee Mission 

Psychology FR 

COLE. STEVE Pretty Prairie 

Accounting SO 

CONYERS, JEFFREY Marion 

Electrical Engineenng SO 

COPHER, BOB Pndrie Village 

Marketing SR 

DANNATT. MARTIN Manhattan 

^^^„^ Business Administration SO 

m 

DASSOW, MATTHEW Hoisington 

Chemical Engineering FR 

DAVIS, CHRISTOPHER Ballwin, Mo. 

An FR 

DELLETT, NEAL Coundl Grove 

Industrial Engineering SR 

DOBRATZ, DAVE Beloit 

Pre-Medicine JR 

DUNLAP, RONALD Hutchinson 

Business Administration FR 

EDIGER, DAVID McHierson 

Electrical Engineering JR 

FUNK, LAYNE Overland Park 

Business Education SR 

GASKILL, BRENT Hugoton 

Business Administration FR 

HEATH, MATT Overland Park 

Civil Engineering FR 

HUMMER, HANS Wichita 

Bakery Science and Management SR 

HUMMER. JOHN Wichita 

Economics JR 

JEFFERS. JOHN Highland 

Pre-Law SO 

S JENKINS,BRADLY Olathe 

Sf Electrical Engineering SR 

^ JENKINS, TODD Olathe 

Accounting FR 

KADEL, MIKE Beloit 

Milling Science and Management JR 

KAUFMAN, JASON Moundridge 

Electrical Engineering JR 

^ KEITH, JOHN Buhler 

Management SR 

KRAMER, MICHAEL Hugoton 

Finance SR 



Beta Theta Pi 



303 



Beta Theta PT 



KRAUSS, THOMAS Phillipsburg 

Pre-Veierinary Medicine FR 

LOGBACK, FRANK Hill City 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

LOHMEIER. STEPHEN LakeQuivira 

Etecincal Engineering FR 

LONKER, DALE Medicine Lodge 

Animal Science SR 

LUNDY, WILLIAM Prairie Village 

Industrial Engineering SR 

LUSTIG. DAVID Prairie Village 

Restaurant Management SO 



LUTY. BROCK McPherson 

Chemical Engineering JR 

LUTY .JEFF McPherson 

Prc-Optomelry FR 

MANNING, JOHN Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

MARQUARDT, JOEL Topeka 

Architectural Engineering SO 

MARTIN. DAVID Leawood 

Marketing SO 

MASON, JIM Mt. Hope 

Engineering Technology SR 



MCINTIRE, MARK Overland Park 

Nuclear Engineering SO 

MERTZ, JONATHAN Manhattan 

Speech JR 

MILLER, CHRISTOPHER Baldwin 

Radio and Television SR 

MILLER, QUINN Baldwin 

Prc-Medicine JR 

MOSS, ROBERT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering GR 

OLDHAM . TOM Cottonwood Falls 

Electrical Engineering JR 



PEIRCE, KENNETH Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

PERRIN. TOM McPherson 

Political Science SO 

PHILLIPS, CLIFF Uawood 

Arts and Sciences FR 

PROFFITT. RACE Chase 

Electrical Engineering FR 

QUEEN. MATTHEW Wichita 

Prc-Medicine JR 

REGEHR, RANDY Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering SR 



ROYER, BILL Haven 

Agricultural Economics SR 

SALTS, GERALD Holton 

Architecture and Design SR 

SCHRAG. JEFF McPherson 

History FR 

SCROGIN. SCOTT Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

SERPAN, MICHAEL Danville, Calif. 

Marketing SR 

SEVERSON, DAVE Overland Park 

Marketing SR 



SHERMAN, SCOTT Overland Park 

Business Administration SR 

SHOTTS, BARRY Lenexa 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

SIGETICH. SHANE Olalhe 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

SKAGGS. DOUG Pratt 

Marketing FR 

SMITH. GRANT Garden City 

Geophysics FR 

.SMITH. SETH Mission Hii 

Nuclear Engineering FR 



SMITH. TODD Moundridge 

Prc-Phy sical Therapy JR 

SPANGLER, DOUGLAS Kansas City, Kan. 

Political Science SR 

STANDER. KARL Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

WEBSTER, ERIC Overland Park 

Accounting SR 

WHIITAKER. TOM Olalhe 

Construction Science JR 

WILBUR, ERIC Colorado Springs, Colo, 

Electrical Engineering JR 



WILLIAMS, GARY 

Pre-Medicine 

WOODBURY, HOWARD 

Animal Science 

WOOLLEY. PATRICK... 

Prc-Medicine 

WUNDER, JOHN 

Management 

ZIMMER, MATTHEW... 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 




h^rM 



. Hutchinson 

FR 

Quenemo 

SO 

Washington. Mo. 

FR 

Valley Falls 

JR 

Wichita 

FR 






304 





hi Omega 




Chi Omega, located at 
1516 McCain Lane, was 
founded at the Universi- 
ty of Arkansas on April 
5, 1895. The sorority 
colors are cardinal and 
straw and the Chi Os 
flower is the white car- 
nation. The Chi Os have 
106 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on Sept. 22, 
1915. 




AINSWORTH. LESLIE Colorado Spnngs. Colo 

Pre-Law FR 

ALEXANDER, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

ALLEN, JENNIFER Salina 

Business Administration FR 

ANDERSON, DOREEN Salina 

Accounting JR 

ARMSTRONG, JULIE Pittsburg 

Retail Floriculture FR 

BALLOU, MAURI Salina 

Elementary Education , , FR 

BENOrr, DEBORAH Mankato 

Fashion Marketing FR 

BEUTLER, KAREN Ness City 

Marketing FR 

BUSH, JILL Hiawatha 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

CALVERT, JENA Harper 

Industrial Engineering SO 

CARNEY, LAURA Prairie VUlage 

Marketing SR 

CONOYER, ASHLYN Deerfield, HI. 

Marketing JR 

CURRAN, DIANE St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

DECKINGER, JALAINE Wicliita 

Foods and Nutrition in Business SR 

DENVER. KIM Wichita 

Interior Design JR 

DOWNEY, BARBARA Midland, Mich. 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

EDWARDS, METISSA Dodge City 

Marketing SR 

FARRIS, SARA Atchison 

Physical Eiducation SO 

FIELDS, DEBBIE Caney 

Finance JR 

FINCHER, DANA Gardner 

Psychology SR 

FISCHER, KAY Manhattan 

Intenor Design JR 

FRANKENFELD, BETH Dodge City 

Social Work JR 

GANTZ. PAIGE Ness City 

Pre-Law FR 

GENTRY, KATHLEEN Overiand Park 

Accounting SO 

GILLAM, SHELLY Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

GINTER, TERl Leavenworth 

Psychology SO 

GORHAM, JILL Wichita 

Secondary Education JR 

GRANT, TINA Anica 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO 

GWIN, MARCIE Salina 

Elementary Education FR 

HAINES, LORl Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education SO 



Chi Omega 



305 



Chi Omega 

HALE, ANGELA Haven 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

HARTLEY. AMY Norton 

Elementary Education FR 

HAUN. JODI Lamed 

Health and Physical Education JR 

HEIMERMAN, ROCHELLE Garden Plam 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HICKMAN, KIM PhUlipsburg 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HIXSON, CAROL Wichita 

Fine Arts FR 

HOFFMAN, NANCY Westmoreland 

Industrial Engineering JR 

HOMMERTZHEIM, TANYA Garden Plam 

Early Childhood Education JR 

HUNGERFORD, LINDA Dodge City 

Leisure Studies SR 

JADERBORG, MARY Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering SR 

JOHNSON, JESSICA Tawanda 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

JONES, KIM Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

KEITHLEY, SUSAN Overland Park 

Interior Design SO 

KENNEDY, JILL Omaha, Neb. 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

KUBK, JAN Colby 

Art JR 

LECHTENBERGER, KAYLA Colby 

Arts and Sciences SO 

LEMBKE, DONNA Overland Park 

Elementary Education SR 

LEWIS, JENNIFER Olathe 

Elementary Education JR 

MANN, JANE Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering SR 

MATNEV, CHERJ Ottawa 

Fln&zice SR 

MEADOWsVj6BE™'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.".'..'.'.".'.'.'.'.'wichita 

Accounting SR 

MONTAGUE, ERIN Shawnee 

Pre-Nursing FR 

MULCAHY, ERIN Prairie VUlage 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MUNSON, ROCHELLE Salina 

Social Work SO 



I 



l/hi Omega flag football team 
members Ashlyn Conoyer, Jen- 
nifer Ruder and Susie Rictiter 
join their teammates in 
celebrating after defeating Gam- 
ma Phi Beta, 7-6, in semi-final 
action at the L.P. Washburn 
Recreation Area. The Chi Os lost 
the final game to the Scary 
Women, 18-0. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 




306 



Chi Omega i 




NELSON, BRENDA Minneapolis, Kan. 

Bakery Science and Management JR 

NELSON, NANETTE Lucas 

Arts and Sciences FR 

PETRY, AMY Centralia 

Agricultural Economics JR 

PREDIGER, GINNY Overland Park 

Interior Design SO 



RICHTER, SUZANNE Salina 

Pre-Pharmacy FR 

ROHRBACK, LIZ Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SANDERS, KATHLEEN Overland Park 

Fine Arts FR 

SCHARTZ, ANNE Great Bend 

Psychology FR 



SCHMALZRIED, JULIE Dighton 

Finance SR 

SCHREIBER, BARBARA Salina 

Gerontology SO 

SHIPPEN, TERRI Pretty Prairie 

Sociology JR 

SLAGLE, MARY Marrowville 

Marketing JR 



SMITH, ANGELA Bonner Springs 

Elementary Education SO 

SOUTHWELL, ALUSON Unexa 

Elementary Education JR 

SPRICK, DEBORAH Junction City 

Industrial Engineering SR 

STEPHENS, JULIE Overland Park 

Modem Languages JR 



STRAIT, AMY Salina 

Pre-Medicine FR 

STUKENHOLTZ, JANET Dodge City 

Elementary Education SR 

SWENGEL, JODI Kansas City, Kan. 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

TANGEDAL, CHRISTY Wichita 

Radio and Television FR 

TAYLOR, TANZA Dodge City 

Finance SR 

VOGEL, ELIZABETH Shawnee Mission 

Interior Design SO 

WAGNER, GRETCHEN Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

WARIS, JULIE St. Joseph, Mo. 

Interior Design JR 

WEIGEL, LEANN Salina 

f^-Nursing SO 

WEITH, CAROLYN Overland Park 

Engineering SO 

WILLSON, AUSE Prairie Village 

Secondary Education Hn 

ZIMMERMAN, MICHELLE Overland Park 

Radio and Television SO 



Chi Omega 



307 




Delta Delta 



Delta Delta Delta, 

located at 1834 

Laramie, was founded 

at Boston College on 

June 8, 1915. The 

sorority colors are 

silver, gold and blue 

and their flower is the 

pansy. The Tri-Delts 

received their charter at 

K-State on June 8, 1915 

and have 115 members. 




APPLEBEE, ANGIE McPherson 

Fine Arts JR 

ATHERLY. LURA Derby 

Elementary Eklucalion SO # 

BARKER. BETH Overland Park 

Dietetics SO 

BERLAND, STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering SR 

BERRY. BARBARA Shawnee Mission 

Journal ism and Mass Communications SO 

BIGGS. SUSAN Leavenworth 

Pre-Nursing SO 

BRANDT. ANITA McPherson 

Accountmg JR 

BRANDT. DEBBIE McPherson 

Actounting FR 

BRENT. SUSAN Springfield, Mo. 

Political Science SO 

BRONDELL, KARIN Manhattan 

Pre-Pharmacy FR 

BUNTEN. PATTY Wichita 

Special Education JR 

BURMEIER. LISA Wichita 

Business Administration SO 

CAWLEY. CAROLYN Shawnee 

Fine Arts FR ' 

CAWLEY. DEBBIE Shawnee 

Pre-Law JR 

CLARK. ANN Pittsburg 

Nutritional Science FR 

CLARK, LORI Derby 

History SR 

COMPTON. LAUREN Overland Park 

Interior Architecture JR 

DAWSON, JENNY Wichita 

Industrial Engineering SR 

DESCHNER. SUSAN Newton 

Radio-Television SO 

DICINTIO, LIZ Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

DOERSTE. ROBIN Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

DUNCAN, JENNIFER Lamed 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

EHI.Y, HEIDI Shawnee 

English Education SR 

FISCHER. KAREN Lamed 

Electrical Engineering JR 

FOWLER. ELIZABETH Wichita __«,. 

Business Administration FR ■Bp 

FRAGALE. CHRIS Overland Park ■p 

Accounting JR fP" 

FYFE. JILL Overland Park 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

CAST. LISA Clearwater 

Marketing SO 

GENSEMER, KENDRA Liberal 

Secondary Ekiucation FR 

GISH, LISA Merriam 

Elementary Education SR 




308 



Delta Delta Delta 




GITTEMEIER, LIESA Prairie Village 

Engineering FR 

GRIEBAT, BECKY Hiawatha 

Secondary Education FR 

HAJINIAN, KATHY Overiand Park 

Marketing SR 

HARTENSTEIN, GENA WkhiU 

Interior Architecture Design SR 

HIGGASON. JULIE Norton 

Business Administration FR 

HINMAN. JANA Concordia 

Elementary Education FR 

HOGAN.KRISTI Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

HOLT, HOLLY Denver. Colo. 

Psychology SO 

HOUSE, ELIZABETH Overland Park 

Elementary Eolucation FR 

JOHNSON, KIRSTEN Hays 

Arts and Sciences FR 

JOHNSON, MICHELLE Leavenworth 

Marketing SO 

KELLER. JONNA Easton 

Fine Arts JR 

KLEMM, KAREN Overland Park 

Mathematics JR 

KNADLE, KELLY Stanley 

Pre-Nursing JR 

KORB, KRISTY Stockton 

Correctional Administration 'JR 

KRUCKENBERG, KRISTI Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

LASSMAN, CHRISTY Pittsburg 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

LESSMAN, JANA Hays 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

LONGWELL, CARRIE Overland Park 

Art SO 

MALONE, PATRICIA Manhattan 

JoumaUsm and Mass Communicatfoiis SR 

MALONE, SHARON Manhattan 

Pre-Optometry SO 

MAPLES, SHANA Peabody 

Finance -IR 

MATNEY. NANCY Ottawa 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MCCREARY, TAMMY Easton 

Marketing FR 



■Ajrk Zoellner participates in 
the "Jump Rope for Heart" 
event sponsored by the 
American Heart Association. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



Delta Delta Delta 



309 



Delta Delta Delta 



i/ris Bulman, Tracy Merriman, 
Michelle ReginI and Ann Ise- 
mand wrap up In blankets to 
keep warm while watching the 
K-State Rugby team play at the 
L.P. Washburn Recreation Area. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 



MCKIE. ANGELA Norton 

Elementary Education JR 

MEISENHEIMER. LEANN Kingman 

Elementar>' Education JR 

MILLER, STEPHANIE Leawood 

Eletnentary Education JR 

MILLS, WENDY Olathe 

Elementary Education SR 

MONGIL, MARI Puerto Rico 

Architecture SO 

MORITZ, JUDI Overland Park 

Management SO 

NAVRAT. SUSAN Wichita 

Radio-Television SO 

NETHERLAND, JANET Ottawa 

Marketing PR 

OCONNOR, TRISH Shawnee Mission 

Elementary Education SR 

PONTIUS, CHRISTINE Hutchinson 

Poultry Science SO 

RANDALL, KRISTI Garden City 

Elementary Education SO 

REED, HILARY Topeka 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

RIESINGER, LAURIE Shaw^nee Mission 

Psychology FR 

ROSS, ALLISON Shawnee Mission 

Accounting JR 

RYAN, AMY McPherson 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SCHROEDER, ROCHELLE McPherson ,^BW?^-3^ '■*! 

Secondary Education FR 

SIMMONS, TRISH WinHeld 

Radio-Television SR 

SMITH, STACY Chanute '«'«|^A'% ^ / 

Business Administration SO 

' \ 

I ^H 

SOMMERS, SUSAN Robinson 

Apparel Design SO 

STEVENS, LORI Wichita fe, 1-,,.^. ^ 

Radio-Television JR 

STONE, NANCY Overland Park 

Marketing SO 

TARVESTAD, LISA Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SO 

TRENTMAN, CHERYL Overland Park ,^^^ 

Finance FR ^HI^D — - ^ 

TSEN, CAROLINE Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine JR 

TUMPES, AMY Boulder, Colo. 

Fine Arts SO 

WELDON, STEPHANIE Wichita .^K^^ "^ 

Business Administration FR .^^^^Bjl^^ 

WITHERS, DORl Arkansas City i^^Hl^n 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR ^B^'^H^nHA. 

WOLF, JUDITH Lenexa ■S^ - ^^V 

Marketing SO f^< "** ^^ 

ZIMMER. BECKY Shawnee V*- 'W 

Marlteting SR ^ — ^ 

ZINK, JANET Claflin \ .^ 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR ^^ ^>— ^ /^ 



310 




D 



elta Sigma Phi 




Delta Sigma Phi, located 
at 1100 Fremont, was 
founded at the College 
of the City of New York 
on Dec. 10, 1899. The 
fraternity colors are nile 
green and carnation 
white. The Delta Sigs 
flower is the white car- 
nation. The Delta Sigs 
have 54 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on Jan. 30, 1925. 




d^, ik 



ARMSTRONG. MICHAEL Manhattan 

Pre-Law SO 

BARDSHAR, BRADLEY Mt. Hope 

Electrical Engineering SR 

BARNHART, BRECK Wichita 

Architecture FR 

BAUMER, PHILLIP Washington, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

BECKER, ERIC Beloit 

Architecture SO 

BISHOP, CRAIG Salina 

History SR 

BLIESENER, DOUG Lansing, Mich. 

Architecture and Design SR 

CLARK, JEFF Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

CRAIN, RANDY Bartlesville, Okla. 

Electrical Engineering JR 

CROSS, JOHN Hutchinson 

Marketing SR 

DUEGAW, PATRICK Wichita 

Architecture and Design SO 

ELDER, STEPHEN Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

ELY, KEITH Hutchinson 

Business Administration SR 

ELY, KENT Hutchinson 

Marketing SO 

FAULKENDER, JEFF Manhattan 

Geology FR 

FUHRMAN,JOHN Belleville 

Engineering FR 

GOEVERT, CHRIS Wichita 

Architecture JR 

GRIER, DONALD Pratt 

Mathematics JR 

HELLER, DOUG St. Joseph, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

HICKLIN, TY Lawrence 

Business Administration SR 

HOLDCRAFT, JIM ManhaHan 

Architecture SR 

HORSCH. DANIEL Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

KAFF, KEVIN Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering SO 

LAUGHLIN, CHUCK Canton 

Education FR 

LAWSON, RICK Charleston, W. Va. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

LENNON, STEVE Manhattan 

Architecture FR 

MCKALE. CHAIiLES Oak Hill 

Architectural Engineering JR 

MERTZ, DAVID Manhattan 

Architecture GR 

MORJUSON. MARC Salina 

Nuclear Engineering SO 

MOWRY. JOHN Concordia 

Physics SO 



)elta Sigma Phi 



311 



OTT, DAVID Junction City 

Chemical Engineering SO 

ROBINSON, PAUL Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

SAWYER, SCOTT Fairway 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SCHULTZ, BRAD Colby 

Chemical Engineering JR 

SHERFEY, STEVEN Manhattan 

Accounting FR 

SIMMONS, RICK Derby 

Psychology FR 

SVOBODA, BRIAN Wichita 

Business Administration FR 

SVOBODA, DAVID WlchlU 

Journalism and Ma$s Communications SR 

TAYLOR, JACK Enid, Okla. 

Microbiology SO 

TEMPLE, CORTY Salina 

Theater FR 

VEATCH. CLIFFORD Manhattan 

Political Science FR 

VONDRA, KEVIN Geneseo 

Agronomy SR 

WHFTNEY, MICHAEL Kansas City, Kan. 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

WmmOW, RANDY Overland Park 

Psychology SR 

YinSG, MARC Valley Center 

Animal Sciences and Indnstry SR 

YUNG, WILLL«iM Valley Center 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 



Eyeing his next liand tiold, Tod 
Meyn scales the rocic walls of 
Memorial Stadium. (Photo by 
John LeBarge) 




312 



Delta Sigma Pi| 




elta Tau Delta 




Delta Tau Delta, located 
at 1001 Sunset, was 
founded at Bethany Col- 
lege in 1858. The frater- 
nity colors are purple, 
white and gold and the 
Delts flower is the iris. 
The Delts have 69 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on Feb. 19, 1910. 







ABERCROMBIE, CHAD Gteal Bend 

Business Administration SO 

ALBERT, JEFFREY Wakeeney 

Accounting SR 

ANDERSEN, GEOFF Leawood 

Agriculture Economics SR 

■4» fl ANDERSON, JASON Lilieral 

Accounting SR 

BARBOUR, DAVID Louisburg 

Constniction Science SO 

'^ BUSS, SCOTT Osbome 

hk '"^"""^ " 

-5 BONNETT, TODD Howard 

Marketing SO 

BOOMER, KENT Portis 

Electrical Engineering SR 

BOSWORTH, JOHN Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

BRUMMETT, BARRY HutcUoMO 

Marketing SR 

CAFFERTY, DARYL Junction City 

. Arts and Sciences SO 

J^k CARPENTER, KENT Manhattan 

^^^ Marketing SR 

CRONENWETT, KURT Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

DE LA PENA, ERIC Shawnee 

Business Administration JR 

DEBITEITO, RICHARD Kansas City, Mo. 

Business Administration FR 

ERTL, ALAN Manhattan 

Business Administration JR 

FAIRCHILD, MATT Manhattan 

J; Business Administration FR 

-^> FELLERS, CHRIS Olathe 

^ w Marketing SR 

FRICK, ROBERT Topeka 

Construction Science SR 

GALBRAITH, DAN Wichita 

Finance SO 

»j, GLASS, MARK Kansas City, Mo. 

J Art FR 

V HAMMES, GREG RossviUe 

' Industrial Engineering JR 

HAYES, MICHAEL Shawnee 

Business Administration SO 

'. HERBIC, CLINTON Alma 

' V Secondary Educatton SR 

HISE, JAMES Prairie VUlage 

Management SO 

JAAX, TODD Garden Plain 

Feed Science and Management SR 

JACKSON, PAUL Overiand Park 

Pre-Optometry SR 

JURCZAK, JAMES...... Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

LAWLESS, PATRICK Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

LUSK, STEVE Shawnee 

Economics SO 



^Delta Tau Delta 



313 



Delta TauDelta 



MARTIN. DON Hugoton 

Agncultural Economics SO 

MCGEHEE, DWIGHT Hesston 

ElectncaJ Engineering SO 

MCGEHEE, SHAWN Hesston 

Business Administration FR 

MCGEHEE. STEVE Wichita 

Radio-Teievlsion FR 

MOORE. DOUGLAS Louisburg 

Constniction Science SO 

NAGLE, TIM Prairie Village 

Natural Resources and Management JR 

PHILBROOK, REX Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

POPKESS. MATT Sabetha 

Business Administration FR 

REBEL. BRAD Great Bend 

Finance SO 

REBEL, BRYAN Great Bend 

Business Administration SO 

RnTER. RALPH Memam 

Finance JR 

SEIBOLD. DAVID Overland Park 

Agncultural Economics JR 

SHIELDS, GREGG Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

STRAIN. TODD Junction City 

Eleclncal Engineering FR 

STURROCK. BRYAN Shawnee 

Management SO 

THOMPSON, SCOTT Manhattan 

Marketing JR 

TYLER. JIM Sabetha 

Feed Science and Management SO 

WALKER. STEVE Overland Park 

Biology SO 

WTTTMAN. JOHN AJlentown, Pa. 

Industrial Engineering SO 

WOODS. JEFFREY Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering SO 



DELT DARLINGS 



FRONT ROW: Cindy Miers, Pam Rogers, Stephanie 
Warren, Beth Jacobs, Nancy Fore, Kelly Schutly, 
Kiley Crill. SECOND ROW: Sandra Teasley, Kelley 
Carlson, Elaine Gillespie, Deb Ostmeyer, Terri 
Eldndge, Tiffany McMillan, Kristin Tan, Jeree Mar- 
mle. Shelly Herman, THIRD ROW: Jody Isch, Helen 
Bundy, Kim Elliott, Stacey Brown, Dana Jensen, 
Debra Kraemer, Shari Sommer, Suann Chayer, 
Kelley Cronan, FOURTH ROW: Sarah Roberts, Dana 
Turley, Lynette Lindholm, Nancy Chartrand, Nancy 
Griffin, Kendra Haul, Shannon Ryburn, Denise 
Johnson, Karen Waller, BACK ROW: Gina Ap- 
plegate, Jennifer Swail, Carolyn Kelly, Natalie 
Schindler, Dana Brummett, Cyd Kniffin, Janie 
Lauer, Tresa Garber, Patricia Albertson, 




314 



Delta Tau Delta 




elta Upsilon 



Delta Upsilon, located at 
1425 University Dr., 
was founded at Williams 
College on Nov. 4, 1834. 
The fraternity colors are 
old gold and sapphire 
blue and their flower is 
the sapphire blue rose. 
The DUs received their 
charter at K-State on 
April 22, 1958 and have 
73 members. 




ALSTATT, DAVID Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SO 

BECKER, STEVE Garden Plain 

Accounting JR 

BIRD. STEFAN Albert 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

BROCKSCHMIDT, NEAL Monett, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professional SO 

BROWN, DOUG Meriden 

Architecture SO 

BUGNER, DARRAN Garden Plain 

Management IR 

BULLOCK, JOHN Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BURNETT, RANDY Wichita 

Business Administration. FR 

BUTEL, LARRY Overbrook 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

CARMICHAEL, SCOTT Salina 

Psychology JR 

DOOLING, RANDALL Stilwell 

Marketing JR 

EBERLE, RUSSELL Salina 

Engineering Technology SR 

FOSTER, SAMUEL Wichita 

Associate of Science SO 

FRIEDRICH, WILLIAM Mulvane 

Accounting. FR 

GFELLER, RON Russell 

Accounting. . .....,.,,.. JR 

GRAY, JOHN Leanne 

Marketing JR 

GROSSENBACHER, DOUG Bern 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

HAMILTON, SCOTT Salina 

Marketing FR 

HARTTER, ERIC Bern 

Finance SO 

HARTTER, SCOTT Bern 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

HERTEL, DREW Olalhe 

Marketing SR 

HESS, GEORGE Hays 

Chemical Engineering FR 

JORDAN, BRIAN Bloomington, Minn. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

KETTLER, CRAIG Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

KRIEGH, LELAND Salina 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

LAWRENCE, STEVE Lake Quivira 

Journalism and Mass Communication JR 

LECHNER, MICHAEL St. Paul, Minn. 

Journalism and Mass Communication SO 

MARTIN, MICHAEL Belleville 

Industrial Engineering HR 

McMILLEN, DEVIN Dighton 

Pre-Medicine FR 

MICHEL, JEFFERV Russell 

Marketing •••• SR 



Delta Upsilon 



i^ 



315 



Delta Upsilon 



MORRIS, JOHN Salina 

Accounting JR 

NEELAND, MICHAEL Great Bend 

Biology SR 

PAULY, MARK Viola 

Dairy Food Science and Industry SR 

POSSON, DON Manliattan 

Architectural Engineering SR 

POTTORFF, MARK Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR 



RAPP.JEFF Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communication JR 

RICHARDSON, ERIC Argonia 

Pre-Uw SR 

RILEY. BRYAN Manhattan 

Economics JR 

SANDERS, THOMAS Wichita 

Architecture JR 

SCHMALZRIED, JEFF Dighton 

Accounting FR 



SHARPE, GREG Olathe 

Radio-Television SR 

SHARPE, MICHAEL Olathe 

Secondary Education FR 

SHUTTS. TODD Friend, Neb. 

Computer Science FR 

SMITH, BRIAN Garden Plain 

Pre-Law SR 

SMITH, DWATO£"""""""'.".!..".".'Leawood 

Radio-Television JR 



STANLEY, TODD Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SUTTLE, JEFF Salina 

Accounting JR 

SWART, RYAN Oakley 

Mechanical Engmeering SO 

TILLBERG, DAVID Salina 

Agricultural Iiconomics JR 



TRANBARGER, MICK Great Bend 

Accounting ; SR 

ULRICH, TIMOTHY Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

WALDEN, MICHAEL Garden Plam 

Marketing SO 

WIECHMAN, HENRY Overland Park 

Cheimcal Engineering FR 




SHE OU'S 



FRONT ROW: Christina Seetin, Becky Kneil, Annette 
Engrofi, Cheryl Tillberg, Mary Jo Lampe. SECOND 
ROW: Susie Welsh, Jacquelyn Middleton, Julie 
Dunn, Karen James, Carla Hipp, Missy Trompeter, 
THIRD ROW: Karen Cohen, Connie Baker, Kimberly 
Fouts, Kelly Smith, Aimee Reinhardt, Sarah Shutler, 
BACK ROW: Renee Heimerman, Joanne Wright, 
Lori Rocl(, Lisa Sleezer, Sheryl Bergeson, Jennifer 
Trompeter. 




316 



Delta Upsilon 



^A 




armHouse 




FarmHouse, located at 
1830 College Heights, 
was founded at the 
University of Missouri 
on April 15, 1905. The 
fraternity colors are 
green, gold and white. 
FarmHouse's flower is 
the talisman rose. Far- 
mHouse has 67 
members and received 
its charter at K-State on 
June 2, 1921. 




BAUER, MAE Housemother 

ATKINSON, CLARK Houston, Texas 

Civil Engineering SR 

AZER, MAGDI Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BAILEY, LAFE Morrill 

Business Administration SO 

BAILEY, RON Stafford 

Political Science JR 

BECHARD, JEFF Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BLOMQUIST, KEVIN Assaria 

Fisheries and WUdlife Biology SR 

BOYSEN, GENE Gardner 

Veterinary Medicine FR 

BRADLEY, KENT Uwrence 

Nutritional Science SO 

BROCKHOFF, WALLY Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics SO 

CAMPBELL, STACEY Atchison 

Agricultural Journalism SO 

CLINE, JAY Weskan 

Horilculture SR 

DENTON, DAVID Garland 

Prc-Lflw JR 

DiLLER, jER'6LD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"!!!'Hesston 

Finance JR 

DOWSE, BRAD Comstock, Neb. 

Animal Science and Industries FR 

DUBBERT, STANLEY Tipton 

Agricultural Economics SO 

ENGLIS, PAUL Arkansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

FERGUSON, DAVID McPherson 

Pre-Dentlstry SR 

FISCHER, SCOTT Wright 

Psychology SO 

FISHER, ABE McDonald 

Computer Science SO 

FIUSBIE, MARK Meridian, Idaho 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

GARDINER, GARTH Ashland 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

GRABER, KEVIN Pretty Prairie 

Fhiance SR 

GRUENBACHER, DANA Colwkh 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

GRUENBACHER, DON Colwich 

Engineering FR 

HENRY, ERIC Randolph 

Agricultural Economics FR 

HERBSTER, DAVE Morrill 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HILL, JOHN Fori Scott 

Marketing SR 

HINES, BRIAN Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

HOLLIDAY, DAVID Soldier 

Agriculture Education SO 



-armHouse 



317 



Farmri 



armnouse 



JAMES, DEREK Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics JR 

JOHNSON. STEVEN Assaria 

Agricultural Economics SO 

KARST, DOUG Bertrand, Neb. 

Agricultural Economics SR T^.ra». -m^ 

KEMP, TODD Pretty Prairie ^ttr- ip^y 

Business Administration GR 

LARSON. BOB Hiawatha 

Veterinary Medicine JR ,_ 

LLEWELYN, JOHN Leonarville ^ ' ^ ..^ 

Accounting FR tf^^B 

MAYER. DOUG Gypmim T 

Marketing SR i^b, 

MEYER, MARK Powhatton ^^HH^ 

Agronomy SR ^^^^^^^L 

MOORE. KENT luka V^^^^S 

Agricultural Economics FR BT^ ■ 

NEIS. RUSSELL Eudora W'JS^ *-T 

Agricultural Economics JR ? 

OCHAMPAUGH. JEFF Plainville 

Agricultural Economics JR 

PARCEL, DAN Coldwater 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

PATTERSON, CRAIG Wakefield 

Management JR 

PEARSON, JEFFREY Manhattan 

AgriciUtuiral Economics SR 

PHILLIPS, JOHN Wakeeney 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

RAGSDALE, BRENT Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SR ^ 4.' I 

RILEY, STEVE Manhattan \<ft 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

SCHRAG, DAVE Pretty Prairie A' ^^ 

Accounting FR ^^^ I^^M 



UHLE SISTERS OF THE 
THE PEARLS AND RUBIES 



FRONT ROW: Ronda Corle, Janell Hildebrand, Lee 
Ann Schultze, Kaytynn Irelan, Suzanne Pulliam, 
Sarah Phillips, Anne Wiley. SECOND HOW: Kimberly 
Buethe, Kathleen Flanagan, Amy Ochampaugh, 
Carole Sloan, Jennifer Nelson, Diane Beaman, Lori 
Novak. THIRD ROW: Kim Forslund, Lisa Fisher, 
Kandy Schrag, Deborah Fields, Jana Schuize, Jamie 
Lamb, Lena Yowell. BACK ROW: Janelle Larson, 
Sharon Hamm, Polly Pacey, Terry Cyr, Kay Honig, 
Vicki Fernkopf, Julie Bechard, Julie Graber. 




318 



FannHouse i 




D, 



raryl Yarrow studies by 
flashlight as he camps in line 
outside Ahearn Field House to 
purchase a block of men's 
basketball season tickets for 
FarmHouse Fraternity. The 
tickets were sold on a first-come 
first-served basis. (Photo by 
John Sleezer) 



WINGERT, HAROLD Ottawa 

Agricultural Economics SO 

WINTER. ROB Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

YARROW, DARYL Clay Center 

Agriculture Education SO 



SCHULTZ, KEVIN HavUaod 

Aninul Sctences and Industry SR 

SCHULTZ. TODD Haviland 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

SHAW, RICHARD McPherson 

Business Administration JR 

SHERBERT, MIKE Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics SR 

STEINLE, MICHAEL Valley Center 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

STINSON, TOM Correlius, Ore. 

Biology JR 

TENNAL, DOUG Sabetha 

Radio-Television JR 

WILLL\MS, TODD Girard 

Pre-Velerinary Medicine FR 

WILSON, JAMIE Osawatomie 

Agronomy SO 

WINGERT, GEORGE OtUwa 

Agricultural Economics SR 



FarmHouse 



319 




amma Phi Beta 



Gamma Phi Beta, 

located at 1807 Todd 

Rd., was founded at 

Syracuse University on 

Nov. 11, 1874. The 

sorority colors are 

brown and mode and 

the Gamma Phis flower 

is the pink carnation. 

The Gamma Phis 

received their charter at 

K-State on March 23, 

1957 and have 105 members. 




AMSTEIN, LORI Clifton 

Electrical Engineering PR 

AYLWARD. JAMIE Goddard 

Electrical Engineering PR 

BABSON, LEA ANN Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

BARHAM, TAMI Si. George 

Social Sciences SR 

BEACHEY, ROBES Lenexa 

Business Administration SR 

BECHTEL, KATHY Overland Paris 

Recreation SR 

BINKLEY, CINDY Topeka 

Early Childhood Education SO 

BOKELMAN, JILL Washington 

Pre-Demistry SO 

BOLEY, MICHELE Topeka 

Business Administration SO 

BORING, STEPHANIE Shawnee Mission 

Psychology SO 

BUCHANAN, KJUSTEN Overland Park 

Business Administration , SO 

CAMPBELL. AMY Maple Hill 

Arts and Sciences FR 

CARTER, AMY Hays F 

Business Administration SO 

CHAULK, JENNIFER Marysville 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. . . . SO 
CLARK, STACY Hays 

Prc-Optometry JR 

CONNELL, MARY Harper 

Arts and Sciences FR 

DANIELS, COLLEEN Wichita 

Elementary Education SR 

DAVIS, BECKY Overland Park 

Elementary Education. JR 

DORBIN, TRICIA Manhattan 

Finance FR 

DROUHARD. JILL Danville 

Elementary Education JR 

DURR, KATHY Dodge City 

Marketing SO 

ENSLEY, CONNIE Topeka 

Marketing SO 

EYER, KAREN Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

FAUBION, AMY Smith Center 

Elementary Education SR 

FINNELL, MARCIA Leavenworth f"' 

Marketing SO 

FORD, ANGELA Manh.Mtan 

Elementary Education JR 

FORD, MELINDA Overland Park 

Interior Design FR 

GILLIAM, KATHY Greenleaf 

Business Administration SO 

GLADBACH, ANN Roeland Park 

Interior Design JR 

HEGARTY. ANNE Leavenworth 

MarketUig SR 




320 



Gamma Phi Beta 




HEILMAN, LOW Council Grove 

Elementary Educatioi] SO 

HERL, MICHELLE Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

HERMAN, ANN Mission 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HETTWER, LISA Gwden City 

Elaneiitary Educatkm SR 

JAMES, KAREN Hoxie 

Pre-Law FR 

JAMES, MYRNA Hoxie 

Social Work JR 

JOHNSON, DENISE Wichitt 

Arts and Sciences FR 

JONES, BETHANY Lyons 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

KELLY, CAROLYN Lcawood 

Markctint SR 

KINSLER,JAN Spivey 

Elementary EducatioQ SO 

KIRKPATRICK. LYNELLE Bucklin 

Business Administratioa SO 

KRUG, ANDREA RusseU 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

LANSDOWN, LINDA WlchlU 

Fhumce SR 

LARKIN, USA Lawraice 

Architecture SR 

LARSEN, SARAH Fairfox, Va. 

Elementary Education JR 

LAUER, JANE Sabetha 

Elementary Education FR 

LAUER, TANYA Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

LEVIN, SUSAN Manhattan 

Marketing JR 

UCHTENHAN, DL\NE Junction City 

Pre-Pbarmacy FR 

LIEBERT, CAROLINE CoffcyvUk 

Markctiiig SR 

LINDHOLM, LYNETTE Uttle River 

Journalism and Mass Communic^ons JR 

UNE,KRISTY RusseU 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MACNAUGHTON, PEGGY OnuOu, Neb. 

BiniiNK AdminlMntioa SR 

MALLORY, BONNY Leawood 

Ekmentary Educatioii SR 

MARMIE, JEREE Great Bend 

Finance FR 

MARTIN, CINDY Uwrence 

Busiitess Administration SO 

MATTHEWS, MELISSA Williamsburg, Va. 

Early Childhood Education JR 

MAYFIELD, FRAN Winfield 

Accountiiig SO 

MCMILLEN, LISA Dighton 

Special Education SO 

MICHALS, MELANIE Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

MILLER, JUDY Great Bend 

Pre-Nursing JR 

MOONEY, SHERRY Peru 

Management JR 

MOSBARGER, SHARI Goodland 

Etementary EducatioD SR 

OLBERDING, JOYCE Shawnee Mission 

Art SO 

OSTMEYER, JILL Oaldn 

DietcUcs SR 

PARTRIDGE, JILL Wichita 

Finance FR 

PEREZ, CHRIS RoelandPark 

Social Sciences JR 

PFANNENSTIEL, USA Hays 

Architecture FR 

POETTGEN, DENISE. Overlaiid Park 

BmfaMH AdmlniatratloB SR 

PORTEOVS, SARA. Topeka 

Actaaatiog SR 

PORTER, KRIS Pratt 

Business Administration FR 

RASMUSSEN, ANN Lincota 

Elementary Education JR 

RICKERSON, TAMMY Fort Scott 

JoumallBii and Mass Cammunkatioiis SR 

SAVAL\NO, TAMMY Topeka 

Alts and Sciences FR 

SCHAAKE. SHEILA Uwrence 

Accountiiig SO 

SCHMIDT, AUCIA Lacygne 

Speech Pathology and AudMocy SR 

SCHMIDT, KAILA Lacygne 

Pre-Medicine FR 

SCHMITZ, KELLEY Topeka 

Speed! Pttbolagy and Audkihwy SR 



Gamma Phi Beta 



321 



Gamma Phi Beta 



SCHNEIDER. LESLYE Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine SO 

SCHUMANN. LORI Lawrence 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

SCOVILLE. JOY Manhattan 

Recreation JR 

SELLERS. STACY Lyons 

Health and Physical Education JR 

SHEEHAN. KATHY Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

SMITH, DARLA Topeka 

Special Education SR 

SODEN. HAWLEY Overland Park 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

STOUT. AMANDA Dodge City 

Political Science FR 

STOUT. REBECCA Dodge City 

Social Work JR 

TILLBERG, CHERYL Salina 

Finance FR 

TOMC. JANET Overland Park 

Marketing FR 

TRENTMAN. CONNIE Fairview 

Management FR 

TROUTFETTER, KATHY Overiand Parli 

Interior Arcliitecture SR 

VANIER. MARY Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

WALAHOSia. ANNETTE Overland Park 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

WARDELL, KRISTE Tecumseh 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

WESTHUES, SANDI Overland Park 

Foods and Nutrition SR 

WlLiaNSON. MELLANEY Mission 

Arts and Sciences SO 

WILLIS. KIMBERLY Shawnee 

Elementary Education SO 

WISELEY, JILL Overiand Park 

Interior Design SR 



322 




Signing a congratulations card 
to the Kansas City Royals, Jane 
Hanson, Cynthia Fries and Beth 
Frankenfeld celebrate with other 
Royals fans after the Royals won 
the World Series. (Pholo by 
John Thelander) 




appa Alpha Psi 




Kappa Alpha Psi, 
located at 315 N. 14th 
St., was founded at the 
University of Indiana in 
1911. The fraternity col- 
ors are crimson and 
cream. Kappa Alpha Psi 
received its charter at 
K-State in 1947. 




DAVIS, JOSHURA St. Louis, Mo. 

Marketing SR 

KITCHEN, RAYMOND Kansas City, Kan. 

Social Sciences SR 

ROBERSON. AARON Manhattan 

Sociology JR 

SCOTT, LEE St. Louis 

Computer Science SR 

WHYTE, WILLLVM Kansas City, Kan. 

Pre-Medlclne SR 



rlay Winton, a top collegiate 
rodeo clown, keeps a close eye 
on a bull at a rodeo in Weber 
Arena. (Photo by John 
Thelander) 



Kappa Alpha Psi 



323 




appa Alpha Theta 



Kappa Alpha Theta, 

located at 1517 McCain 

Lane, was founded at 

DePauw University on 

Jan. 27, 1870. The 

sorority colors are black 

and gold. The Thetas 

flower is the black and 

gold pansy. The Thetas 

received their charter at 

K-State on Jan. 27, 

1961 and have 107 

members. 




ROETH, INA Housemotber 

ANDERSON, USA Liberal 

Accounting FR 

ANTHONY, GINA Norton 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

BARKER, CASANDRA Manhattan 

Recreation jR 

BARNETT, AUCE Big ^ring, Texas 

Biology FR 

BARTLE, BETH Coffeyville 

Anfanal Science SR 

BLANCK, JANET Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

BLANDING. SHAY Beloit 

Music Education SO 

BLASER, NANCY WaterviUe 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BOARDMAN, MARCY El Dorado 

Accounting SO 

BOHN, DONNA Alma 

Accounting JR 

BOOK, SHERYL Overland Park 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

BROEKER, ANNA Leavenworth 

Business Administration FR 

BROMERT, KATE Otuwa 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BROMERT, LAUREN Ottawa 

Ekmentary EducatkHi SR 

BROOKOVER, KIM Scott Ciw 

Pie-Physical Therapy JR 

BROOKS, MARY ANN Frontenac 

Pre-Law FR 

BULLOCK, KATHY Springfield, Mo. 

Marketing JR 

CARPENTER, MEUSSA Bucklin 

Psychology FR 

CASTER, SHERRI Clark, S.C. 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

CHENOWETH, KJUSTI Overland Park 

Speech Pathology and Audiology JR 

CHISM.MARY Great Bend 

Music Education JR 

CHRISTENSEN, JERRILYNE Glasco 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 4 

CLEMONS, FRANCES El Dorado ' ' 

Psychokigy SR 

CLIFFORD, ANN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

CUFFORD, MOLLY Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

COTE. CINDY Minneapolis 

Accounting jr 

CRAWFORD, LAURA Stockton, Mo. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

CuSbVUNGS, CINDY Wichita 

Accounting SR 

DARNELlTjANISE """wVchita 

Speech Pathology and Audiology FR 




324 



Kappa Alpha Theta 




DOMANSKI, MICHELE Omaha, Neb. 

Architecture FR 

DUNN, JULIE Wichita 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

ELLISON, LISA Overland Park 

Accounting JR 

ELROD, LORI Overland Park 

Radio-Television JR 

FOLLIS, CATHY Prairie Village 

Biology SR 

FOX, DEBBIE St. Marys 

Physical Education SO 

FRASHIER, LAURA Prairie Village 

Interior Architecture SO 

FULLER, SHANNON McPherson 

Psychology JR 

GALEY, DEANNA Olathe 

Architectural Engineering SR 

GOOLDY, JANE Junction City 

Elementary Education SR 

GRAVES, BRITTANY Omaha, Neb. 

Architecture FR 

HAGEL, JULIE Overland Park 

Pre-Pharmacy JR 

HAGEN, BRIDGET Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

HAGEN, GRETCHEN Manhattan 

History SR 

HANNAWALT, DAWN Wichita 

Marketing FR 

HASSAN, FILZA Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering FR 

HELMKE, CARRIE Wichita 

Electrical Engineering JR 

HILL, KRIS McPherson 

Secondary Education FR 

HOFMANN, JILL Overland Park 

Marketing SO 

HORIGAN, JULIE El Dorado 

Engineering FR 

HULTGREN, JAYNE Overland Park 

Special Education FR 

IMTHURN, JULIE Maple Hill 

Foods and Nutrition Business JR 

JONES, JENNIFER Lenexa 

Business Administration JR 

KLINGLER, BECKY Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

KOCH, JOY Newton 

Accounting FR 

KRAINBILL, NIKI Bern 

Art FR 

LARSON, JUDY Overland Parli 

Interior Design SR 

LINENBERGER, ANNE Manhattan 

Fine Arts FR 

LINN, DONNA Fredonia 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

MASON, LAURA Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences SO 

MCMAHILL, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MEHLINGER, MICHELE Topeka 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

MIDDLETON, JACQUELYN. Leawood 

Industrial Engineering SR 

MOELLER, GISELA Shavraee 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

MOORS, KIM McPherson 

Accounting SO 

MYLES, STACY Lenexa 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

NAAF, JANEL Summerfield 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

NELSON, KIMBERLEE Kansas City, Kan. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

NORTH, LAURA Prairie VUlage 

Accounting '. JR 

OBRIEN,JAN McPherson 

Architectural Engineering SO 

OLSON, ESTHER McPherson 

Accounting SO 

PARKERSON, KIM NessClfv 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

PAYNE, CAMI Ft. Riley 

Business Education FR 

PEASE, MICHELE Manhattan 

Elementary Education SO 

PHILLIPS, KATHY Paola 

Restaurant Management SR 

POWERS, PAMELA Lenexa 

Business Administration FR 

RAINMAN, SAMANTHA Ullysses 

Arts and Sciences FR 

RIETCHECK, PATR1CL\ Wichita 

Business Administration SO 



Kappa Alpha Theta 



325 



iCappa Alpha Theta 

SCHLENDER, KRISTEN Manhattan 

Pre-Optometiy FR 

SCHUTTY, KELLY Mission 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

SEETIN. CHRISTINA Peny 

Fashion Marketing JR 

SHAFFER, CYNTHL\ Davenport, Iowa 

English JR 

SPARKS, SUZANNE Overland Park 

Family Life and Human Development JR 

STEGMAN, CATHY Great Bead 

Accountli^ SR 

STERLING, MEUNDA Garden City 

Management FR 

STEWART, JENNIFER Minneapolis 

Philosophy SR 

TAN, KARIN Emporia 

Marketing JR 

TAUSCHER, DEBBIE Hays 

Arts and Sciences FR 




TEDMAN, KELLY ANN Harper 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

TEMME, TERESA Lamed 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

THOMSON, SHERI Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine SO 

TODD, SUSAN Minneapolis 

Food Science SR 

VrrZTUM, KATHY Hays 

Secondary Education JR 

WALDECK, ELIZABETH Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering JR 



WALKER, TRACI Newton 

Marketing SO 

WHEELOCK, BRENDA Medicine Lodge 

Animal Science SO 

WILLCUT, DELISA Great Bend 

Psychology JR 




Uraig Robson builds a swimm- 
ing pooi in the front yard of 
Triangie fraternity. The pooi was 
buiit during Homecoming Week 
and was used for a post-game 
pooi party. (Photo by John 
LeBarge) 



326 





appa Delta 



r^, ^ 



^^^^^n^ 



Kappa Delta, located at 
1220 Centennial, was 
founded at Longwood 
College on Oct. 23, 
1897. The sorority col- 
ors are olive green and 
pearl white and the KDs 
flower is the white 
rose.The KDs have 90 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on Dec. 4, 1920. 




EVANS, PEGGY Housemotber 

ARTAN.TULIN San Rafael, Calif. 

Interior Architecture JR 

BAIRD, SUSAN Independence 

Journalism and Mass Conununications IR 

BAKER. MELISSA Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

BARENBERG, JACKIE Overland Park 

Foods and Nutrition SR 

BARTON, RENEE Wichita 

Elementary Education SO 

BAUMANN, MARY Burtton 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

BERGER, JOLENA Dodge City 

Journalism and Mass Commimications JR 

BITEL, SHELLEY Derby 

Acco tinting SR 

BITTEL, TONI Quinter 

Apparel and Textile Mariceting SR 

BOGGS, REBECCA Prairie Village 

English JR 

BOGNER. LINDA Galesburg 

Horticulture Therapy JR 

BORDEWICK, LEANN Seward 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

BOSSI, CAROL Arkansas City 

Industrial Engineering SO 

BOWEN, TAMARA Hutchinson 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

BRANDSBERG, ANNE Manhattan 

Pre-Law SO 

BURNETT, JULIE Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professional FR 

CAMPBELL, TRACY Topeka 

Political Science SO 

DAILEY, ELIZABETH Fresno, Calif. 

Family and Child Development JR 

DEAN, KIM Topeka 

Finance SR 

DIERKS, DAPHNE Leawood 

Business Administration FR 

ERICKSON, SARA Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

GARVERT, KAY PlainvUle 

Textile Science SO 

GIEBER, KARLENE Randolph, NJ. 

Engineering Technology SR 

GOERING, ANGELA Moundridge 

Radio-Television SO 

GREGORIEW. LISA Topeka 

Sociology FR 

GUICEISEN, KARYN Emporia 

Accounting SO 

HARRIS, TAMMY Marion 

Social Work SO 

HOLLE, EVELYN Wichita 

Finance SO 

HUFFORD, MARGARET Tonganoxie 

Businnes Administration FR 



appa Delta 



327 



Ka 



ppa 




Uhlldren from the Big Lakes 
Developmental Center Pre- 
school are entertained by Cindy 
Meers, Sheila Renard and other 
Kappa Delta sorority members at 
a Halloween party. (Photo by 
Jim Dietz) 



HUNTER, APRIL Kansas City, Kan. 

Electrical Engineering SR 

JONES, PATRICIA Topeka 

Secondary Education JR 

JONES, STEPHANIE Mission Hills 

Pre-Nursing JR 

JOYCE, JAN Morganville 

Accounting JR 

KRUZICH, USA NaperviUe, m. 

Accounting SO 

UNDER, DIANNE Lenexa 

CivU Engineering SR 

LUCAS, BECKY Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MABE, DEBBIE Kansas City, lian. 

Computer Science FR 

MACY, SANDY Dewey, Okla. 

Interior Design JR 

MCPHETER, JAMIE UutdUnson 

JoumaUsm and Mass Communications SR 

MEDLEY, DENISE Hillsboro 

Business Education JR 

MEERS, CINDY Wathena 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MEMMING. LAURA Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine JR 

MOORE, BRENDA Paraons 

Business Administration SR 

MOORE, GBSA Parsons 

Finance SR 

MOSIER, DEBORAH Salina 

Pre-Nursin g JR 

MOSS, JENNIFER Hutchinson 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

NAKONECZNY. WENDY Topeka 

Jounudism and Mass Communications FR 

OTTE, DENISE Galva 

Accounting JR 

PAGE, MARSHA Erie 

Social Work JR 

PATE, JOAN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

PATTERSON, MARNIE Topeka 

Interior Design JR 

RASDALL, LORI Kansas City, Kan. 

Finance JR 

RENARD, SHEILA Caney 

Accounting SO 




328 



Kappa Delta ii 




REPHLO, USA Overland Park 

Physics FR 

ROSE, LEIGH ANN Haviland 

Home Economics Education JR 

RUDE, CHERYL Wichita 

Interior Design SR 

SCALES. CRISTY Arkansas City 

Elementary Education SO 

SCHUCKMAN, TAMMY Great Bend 

Business Administration FR 

SETZKORN, MARSHA Manhattan 

Business Administration SR 



SHANNON, DENISE Overtand Paris 

Marlieting SR 

SJOGREN, TAMMERA Concordia 

Modem Languages JR 

SLATT, RENAE Hemdon 

CbenOstry Education SR 

SLEEZER, LISA Olathe 

Elem entary Education SO 

SMITH, JANET Surcasunna, N.J. 

Chemical Science JR 

SNOWDEN, SHELLI BeUevue, Neb. 

Management SR 



STEWART, KIM Manhattan 

Finance FR 

STOKES, LESLIE Ottawa 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

TAYLOR, AMY Winona 

Home Economics and Mass Communications.... JR 
THOMPSON, VICKIE Desoto 

Elementary Education SO 

VANHOET, CERISE Shawnee 

Accounting SR 



WATSON, KELLY Jefferson City, Mo. 

Fine Arts SR 

WELSH, SUSIE Topeka 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

WERTH, CARRIE Topeka 

Special Education FR 

WERTH, SHARON Topeka 

Marketing JR 

WEWERS, TAMELA Kansas City, Mo. 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. ... SO 



WILLEY, iOMBERLY CaldweU 

Ofllce Administration SR 

WILLIAMS, BETSY Wichita 

Accounting SO 

WOODRUFf , MICHELLE Salina 

Psychology SO 

YOUNG, RHONDA Cheney 

Elementary Education , JR 

YOUNGBLOOD, KIM Cedar Point 

Horticulture SR 




Uver 40 members of the Tau 
Beta Pi, engineering lionorary, 
tool( part in tlie annual tree trim- 
ming, cleaning and 
whitewashing of the concrete KS 
letters on K-Hill. (Photo by Jeff 
Weatfierly) 



Kappa Delta 



329 



>■■ 




appa Kappa Gammaj 



Kappa Kappa Gamma, 

located at 517 Fairchild 

Terrace, was founded at 

Momnouth College on 

Oct. 13, 1870. The 

sorority colors are dark 

blue and light blue. The 

Kappas flower is the 

fleurdelis. The Kappas 

received their charter at 

K-State on Oct. 23, 

1916 and have 113 

members. 



ALBERTSON , PATRICIA Bonner Springs 

Psychology FR 

ALLERHHEILIGEN, JADA Manhattan 

Radio-Television SO 

ALTENBERND, USA Lawrence JiV ' ,J^ ^' ' '^^ 

Finance FR ^^^^C» ** 

ARNOLD, SHANNON Sabetha ^^K. *^ Hl^l ttrfK'*^ is- 

Elementary Education SO 

AVERY, CAREY Manhattan /^■■R * ^^m % ' ■ M% 

Bakery Science and Management JR ai^^l^Kk .^^^H m. ^k,' 

BALES, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Chemisty JR 

t: 
BARANCnC, KRISTI RoelandPark ! 

Elementary Education JR 

BARKER, BRENDA Manhattan 

Ele ment ary Education SO 

BECHTEL, CHRISTIE Overland Park 

Accounting SR S'cr 

BERENDS, JAMIE Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Secondary Education FR 

BIGGS, ELAINE AUen 

Chemical Engineering FR 

BOLEY,JOANN GreatBend 

Marketing JR ^^^^^^^ fj^^^ ^^^^ / 

BORDERS, BRIDGET Prairie Village 

Psychology FR J^*'#Ba». 

BOWERSOCK, STEPHANIE Wichita jiP*^» 

Business Administration JR ^"* 

BROWNELL, STEPHANIE Hutchinson 

Early Childhood Education SO ^'WfS^ ^V ^McT -» 

BRUMMETT, DANA Hutchinson ^ "^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

CARLSON, DEBRA Dahner 

Agricultural Economics SO 

CHAMBLIN, DIANE Mission 

Civil Engineering SR 

CHATTERJEE, EVA Manhattan ..._.. ,^ 

Chemical Engineering FR Jtttift^ .^Wl^ 

COLLINS, Sli: Junction City ^^^^^ JOP^^^ 

Hotticlturt SR .^^^^^■K •^^' «j 

CONKLIN, SUSAN Hutcliinson 

Home Economics Education SR ^^^■Bk i^^^V H^^ I 

COOK, REBECCA Shawnee Mission ^^^P^r^B ^H J 

Arts and Sciences FR ^^^Mt M% JHf ^^^D *~ 

CRILL, KILEY Manhattan ^■■JP®I?J^^ I^H&« 

Business Administration SO 

CZUCHAJOWSKA, JOANNA Mahattan 

Chemistry jR 

DANIELS, KATHLEEN KaivesU "^ ^^. *'« «J" 

Industrial Engineering SR ^■■Jflfe tJKHI^ 

DAVELINE, DEBBIE Hutcliinson .J^^^^H JUP^^^H. 

Finance SR ^^V^B^ JH^ ^Vk 

EDWARDS. ANNE Lawrence .^^V' '"^i^k ^H ^m. 

Dietetics SO t^Kw "^^K ■P«»*~ "> ^B 

EUBANKS. MEGAN Paola ^K\ ^ft '^^B ^P 

Pre-Nursing FR Hv ^1 ^^fc~ - 1^ 

FANKHAUSER, DACL\ Madison j^B. " i^B ^V' 

Milling Science and Management FR ^^^^^ ^^ m ' '\ 

FORTNER, JANET Prairie Village jSIt ,^^ ^Wf ^^^ 

Accounting JR .^tf^^^^^^^^^k. ^^B^FL-^^^^^ 




330 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 




FOUNTAIN, JXJLIE Orerland Park 

Radlo-Televisioii SR 

FRANK, RISE Lenexa 

Accounting JR 

GARRETT, LAURA Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Consumer Affairs JR 

GLENNON, KAREN Overland Park 

Home Economics Education PR 

GOTTSCHALK, MARIBETH Hutchinson 

Materials Science Engineering SR 

GULUCKSON, CHIUSTINE Hutchinson 

Marketing JR 



HAMILTON, KYLE Salina 

Elementary Education JR 

HARMS, DANA HaysviUe 

Marketing SR 

HAYDEN, DEBORAH Condordia 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

HILL, NANCY Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences PR 

HITTLE, SHONA Winfield 

Pre-l^ysical Therapy PR 

ISCH, JODY Sabetha 

Marketing SO 



JERMIER, SARA Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Special Education SR 

JOHNSON, KRISTEN Overland Park 

Business Administration SR 

JONES, KATHY Pairway 

Business Administration JR 

JORDAN, MARNIE AbUene 

Arts and Sciences PR 

KNIPPIN, CYD Overland Park 

Business Administration PR 

KRAMER, JULI Hugoton 

Apparel and Textile Marketing PR 



KURTZ, KATHY Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

LABHSETWAR, SUMEDHA Junction City 

Biochemistry SR 

LARSON, JANELLE Hiawatha 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine PR 

LOHMEIER, LAUREL Lake Quivlra 

Secondary Education SR 

LONKER, JAMIE Medicine Lodge 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

MENGHINI, KATE Kansas CHy, Kan. 

Life Sciences Sr 



MILLER, HEATHER Sylvia 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

MILLER, LAURIE Hutchinson 

Psychology PR 

MILLS. STEPHANIE Hugoton 

Arts and Sciences PR 

MOSS, TIFFANY Salina 

Pre-Medicine PR 

MYERS, MICHELLE Leawood 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

NORTON. DUNE Manhattan 

Management SO 



OHARA, ANGELA Hugoton 

Joumailisni and Mass Conununkations SR 

OHARA, MOLLY Topeka 

BkKbemistry SR 

OMTVEDT, PENNY Uncoln, Neb. 

Interior Design SR 

PALMQUIST, TAMMY Concordia 

Journalism and Mass Communications PR 

PEIRCE, KATHY Hutchinson 

Psychology SO 

QUINN, LISA Overland Park 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 



RAMEL, JENNIFER Leawood 

Pre-Nursing JR 

REHG.JILL Leawood 

Special Education SO 

REEVHARDT, AMY Erie 

Agricultural Economics SR 

RIDEN, BECKY Overland Park 

Interior Architecture JR 

RINELLA, ANN Overland Park 

Interior Design PR 

ROACH, BRENDA Overland Park 

Psychology SO 



ROSS, ROSEANN Leawood 

Restaurant Management PR 

RUSSELL, LORI Eureka 

Milling Science SO 

SCHINDLER, NATALIE Overland Park 

Interior Design SO 

SCHMIDT, DL\NE : Salina 

Medical Technology PR 

SEDERQUIST, CARLEY Shawnee Mission 

Business Adiiiinistration SO 

SKAER, LAURA VirgU 

Elementary Education SO 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



331 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



I hree year old Tinoi Simeta 
looks on as Janelle Larson puts 
on the finishing touches to a 
cookie during the Kappa Kappa 
Gamma Christmas party for their 
alumnae's children. (Photo by 
Jeff Weatlierly) 



SMITH, KELLY SUlweU 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

SMTTH.MARDI Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

SPAETH, KRISTEN Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

STOLFUS, BRITTA Bonner Springs 

Apparel Design JR 

STRONG, JAMI Hatchinson 

Speech Pittiiology SR 

SW ANSON, SHELLI Prairie ViUage 

Special Education FR 

TEASLEY, SANDRA AbUene 

Business Administration SO 

THOMAS, HILARY Lakin 

Alts and Sciences FR 

THOMPSON, TRISHA Paradise 

Marketing FR 

THUROW, TRACY Hugoton 

Elementary Education SO 

VARNER. KENDRA Salina 

Interior Design FR 

WAGNER, SIffiLLEY Overland Park 

Special EducatkHi SR 

WALTER, JUDI Meade 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

WARD, AMY Overland Park 

Finance SR 

WATTERS, LISA Greenleaf 

Elementary Education JR 

WEBSTER. LAURA Overland Park 

Dietetics FR 

WICKERSHAM, ELIZABETH Newton 

Industrial Engineering JR 

WILLIAMS, LORI Wichita 

Accounting SR 

WINGATE, BETH Overland Park w' 

Modem Languages SR !^ 

WOERPEL, TRAO Haven ^ 

Bakery Science SO 

WOODS, JULIE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

WOODSON, LAUREL Manhattan 

Jounmlism and Mass Communications SO 

WULF, ELIZABETH Newton 

Bakery Science SR 

YUST, CONNIE Hutchlnaon 

Pre-Law Fit 




332 



Kappa Kappa Gammas 




appa Sigma 




Kappa Sigma, located at 
1930 College Heights, 
was founded at the 
University of Virginia 
on Dec. 10, 1869. The 
fraternity colors are 
scarlet, green and white 
and their flower is the 
lily of the valley. The 
Kappa Sigs have 64 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on June 5, 1919. 




ATZENWEILER, DAVID Mission HUIs 

Social Sciences SO 

BECK, BARRY Clay Center 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BEELER, MARK Overland Park 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

BELL, CHRIS Prairie VUlase 

Architecture SR 

BEVINS, GEORGE Olathe 

Electrical Engineering SO 

BISHOP, JAMES Salina 

Business Administration SR 

BROWN, MICHAEL Topeka 

Pre-Law SO 

BUSHEY, JEFF WkhHa 

Marketii^ SR 

CAMPBELL, DAN Hoxie 

Milling Science FR 

DALE, RICHARD Overland Park 

Architecture SR 

DAN AHER, ANTHONY Kansas City, Mo. 

Architecmre FR 

DAVIDSON, JOHN Fenton, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

DENNELER, CHARLES Colby 

Computer Science SR 

FIESER, JAMES Garden City 

Business Administration SO 

GREEN, TODD Overland Park 

Bushiess Administration SR 

HAM, PHILIP Manhattan 

Milling Science JR 

HEINRICHS, KYLE Garden Ci_g 

Architecture JR 

HOCKERSMrni, JUSTIN RuaseU 

RadkvTelevision SR 

JOHNS, JOEL Garden CiW 

Architecture SO 

KAECHMANN, TIM Lenexa 

Agronomy SR 

KUENZI, JOHN Bern 

Food Science JR 

KUNZ, KARL Garden Ci^ 

Business Administration...!'. SO 

KURTZ, JAMES BeDeviUe, HI. 

Architecture SR 

LEASURE, MONTY Lenexa 

Accounting SR 

MACE, JEFF St. Louis, Mo. 

Management SR 

MISAK, ROGER CaldweU 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

MURPHY, JOHN Washington, Iowa 

Agriculhiral Economics FR 

OLnnER, JAMES Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SR 

PLATT, JOHN Medkine Lodge 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

RETTIG, KENT Hanover 

Engineering JR 



Kappa Sigma 



333 



Ka 



ppa 



Sigma 

RIDDER, TIM Marienthal 

Pre-Optometry SO 

RYCHLEC, MARK Kansas City. Kan. 

Psychology SO 

STEELE, DOUG Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering IR 

STONE, STEVEN Olathe 

Civil Engineering SR 

TERWILLIGER. TODD Wichita 

Marketing SO 

TRYON, SCOTT Robinson 

Agricultural Economics SR 

WALICER, JOHN Lenexa 

Markeung FR 

WARD, STEPHEN Towanda 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine JR 

WARE, BRIAN Wichita 

Pre-Optometry SR 

WARRINER, TOBIN Shawnee 

Business Administration SO 



Une rainy afternoon, Dan 
Foster holds the umbrella over 
Brad Urban while surveying for 
a class. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



334 





ambda Chi Alpha 




Lambda Chi Alpha, 
located at 505 Denison, 
was founded at Boston 
College on March 22, 
1909. The fraternity col- 
ors are purple, green 
and gold. The Lambda 
Chis flower is the white 
rose. The Lambda Chis 
received their charter at 
K-State on April 5, 1924 
and have 75 members. 




r^/ 1>/ V k J^^ 







O'NEILL, ELIZABETH Housemother 

ADAMS, KEITH Tonganoxie 

Chemical Engineering FR 

ARROYO, GARY Mulvane 

Veterinary Medicine SO 

BAEHR, RUSSELL Kansas City, Mo. 

Architectural Engineeriiig SR 

BANNING, DAVID Garden City 

Civil Engineering SO 

BARENBERG, JOE Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BELFIELD, STEPHEN Mulberry 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BIGLER, TODD Clay Center 

Business Administration FR 

BLONDEFIELD, THAD Minneapolis 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

BRADEN, CHRIS Wamego 

Pre-Medicine SO 

BUCK, GREG Hutchinson 

Finance JR 

CASPER, DAVID Wamego 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

CHARLTON, BILL Norton 

Political Science SR 

CHARLTON, MARK Norton 

Secondary Education SR 

CHRISTIANS, ROY WIndom 

Pre-Medkhie SR 

CLANCY, STEPHEN Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

CULLENS, GERALD Goodland 

Computer Science FR 

DEAL, TIMOTHY Fort Monroe, Va. 

Architecture JR 

EVANS, JOHN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

FEY, DAVID Garden City 

Marketing SO 

GULICK, SCOTT Toronto 

Pre-Phamuicy JR 

HENSON, JIM Wakefield 

Fine Arts JR 

HOUSE, JEFFREY Sedan 

Business Administration FR 

JANDA, MARK Ellsworth 

Architectural Engineering SR 

JANDA, STEVEN EUsworth 

Industrial Engineering FR 

KERN, CHRISTOPHER St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

KETTLER, KEITH Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

KNADLE, KYLE Stanley 

Marketing FR 

KROPF, BRADLEY Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SO 

KUBK, RICHAKD Colby 

Computer Science SR 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



335 



Lambda C^hi 



KUBK, TIM Colby 

Chemical Science FR 

LEE, DAVID Pittsburg 

Electrical Engineering JR 

UPPE, DARREN Topeka 

Marketing FR 

MAGGARD, BRYAN Dexter 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

MAIN, STEPHEN Independence, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering FR 

MAY, ROB Dallas, Texas 

Business Administration SR 

MCFEETERS, MARSHALL Hays 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MCGINNESS, STEVE Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics SR 

NEY. KEVIN Russell 

Finance SO 

OXBURGER. DEWEY Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

PERKIER, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Management SR 

POOLE, WILLIAM Springfield, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

PRICE, KENNETH Overland Park 

Finance SR 

RARDEN, BROOKS Wright 

Finance JR 

ROBBINS, MIKE Derby 

Journalism and Mass Conununications SR 

ROBERTS, CHRIS Leawood 

Architectural Engineering FR 

SCHMIDT, KENNETH Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SEAMANS. BRYAN Manhattan 

Finance FR 



CRESCENTS 



FRONT ROW: Therese Meyer, Kathy Jones, Carolyn 
McNaghten, Amy Hurst, Serena Staley. SECOND 
ROW: Michele Pease, Mamie Horn, Michelle 
Houston, Kathy Watts, GIsela Moeller, Frances 
demons. THIRD ROW: Jaime Hultgren, Kim Hofer, 
Stacy Myles, Kate Bromert, Laura North. BACK 
ROW: Rise Frank, Mary Parks, Denlse Hammond, 
Anne Montgomery, Kerry Jones, Anne Edwards. 




336 



Lambda Chi Alpha 






1-"" * • "^-r' ' 

VAN THULLENAR, DAVID Roeland Park 

Modem Languages FR 

VRATIL, BRETT Lamed 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

WALDEN, GEOFFREY Kansas City, Kan. 

Psychology SO 

WEIGEL, COLIN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JfR 

WINTERMAN, KURT Mission 

Business Administration SO 

YOUNG, BRYAN '^''"iS' 

Architecture FR 

YOUNG, CHRIS Manbattan 

Bakery Sdence SR 

YOUNG, JASON Cheney 

Pre-Medicine SO 

YUTESLER, PAUL Olathe 

Business Administration SO 




SIEGFRIED, ROBERT Orerland Park 

Marketing SR 

SIMMONS, JOSEPH Leawood 

Business Administration SO 

SNEDEN, CURTIS Topeka 

Radto-Television SR 

STALEY, TIM Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

STARK, GARY Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

STAUFFER, DARIUS Overiand Park 

Marketing SR 

STEGMAN, ANTHONY Hugoton 

Pre-Medicine SO 

STOUT, CRAIG Derby 

Theater SR 

STROADE, STEPHEN LeonardviOe 

Marketing SR 

STUART, ROBERT Kansas City, Kan. 

Biology SO 

SWAFFORD. STEVE Pratt 

Jouraaliam and Mass Commiinh-aHons SR 

TSEN, LAWRENCE Manhattan 

Pre-Medkdne SR 




IVIembers of Lambda Chi 
Alpha fraternity and Sigma 
Sigma Sigma sorority buiid a 
pyramid of bodies during the 
Body Building competition In the 
Union Courtyard during 
Homecoming Week competition. 
(Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



337 




hi Delta Theta 



ADKINSON, KENTON.... Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Finflncc SO 

ALEXANDERrWESLEY.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. . . . . . . blathe 

Radio-Television SO 

AYLWARD, MICHAEL Salina 

Agrooomy SR 

BARKER, BRENT Hesston 

Finance JR 

BATSON, LANCE Hays 

Marketli^ SR 

BEUTLER, KEVIN Ness City 

Marketing JR 

BLOMQUIST, BRIAN Smolan 

Business Administration FR 

BURGESS, SCOTT Newton 

Pre-Lsw FR 

CARI^ONrWT£LWM.,..'.'...'...'.'..'.'..','6veriaiidPark 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

DENZEL, TOM Leawood 

Business Administration JR 

DINSMORE, STEVEN Leawood 

Pre-Law JR 

FOUSER, TODD Scott City 

Architecture SR 

GALYARDT, MARK Lawrence 

Industrial Engineering SR 

GATES, JIM Manhattan 

History JR 

GAUDREAU, STEVE Wichita 

Business Administration FR 

GELLENTHIEN, TOM Kingman 

Engineering FR 

JENNINGS, NORMAN Salina 

Industrial Engineering SO 

JOHNSON, BRIAN Manliattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KARPOWICH, STEPHEN Wichitt 

Busness Administration FR 

KITTNER, JOHN Blue Rapids 

Industrial Engineering FR 

KVASNICKA, BRAD Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

LANE, PAUL Overland Park 

Finance JR 

LOGHTY, STEPHEN Tecumseh 

Electrical Engineering FR 

MCDANIEL, SCOTT Dexter, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering SO 

MORENO, CHARLIE Wichita 

Architecture SO 

NAIL, HOWARD Salina 

Civil Engineering FR 

NEY, BRUCE RusseU 

Agricultural Journalism SR 

NOLTING, JEFF St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecmre SO 

ODDO, JEFF Leawood 

Construction Science SO 

OGDEN, BRAD Kansas City, Kan. 

Correctional Administration JR 



Phi Delta Theta, located 

at 508 Sunset, was 

founded at Miami 

(Ohio) University on 

Dec. 26, 1848. The 

fraternity colors are 

light blue and white and 

the Phi Delts flower is 

the white carnation. The 

Phi Delts have 59 

members and received 

their charter at K-State 

on Dec. 31, 1921. 





338 



Phi Delta Theta )l 




1 ' - ' «. • J 



PARRISH, DAVID St. Loob, Mo. 

Iirterior Architecture SR 

PARTRIDGE. THOMAS Wichita 

Business Administration SO 

PEIWER.RICK Newton 

Busi ness Adm inistration SO 

PETERS, STEVE Maohattan 

Accounting SR 

PLUMER, STEVEN Overland Park 

Landscape Architecture JR 

RAZOOK, CHRIS Hesston 

Industrial Engineering PR 

ROBERTS, RICK Hays 

Apparel Design FR 

SCHMID, STEVEN Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering SO 

STANLEY, CHAD Maniuttan 

Electiical Engineeriiig SR 

STEINCAMP, CHARLES Lenejta 

Geology SO 

STOCK, DAN Leavenwortli 

Martieting SR 

WILES, GARY Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering SO 

WILKERSON, GRANT Oxford 

Mccliaiiical Engineering SB 

WILLOW, THOMAS St. Louis, Mo. 

Interior Architecture JF 

WILSON, MICHAEL Columbia, Mo, 

Electrical Engineering If 

WOLTERING, JEFF Overland Pari 

Business Administration FF 




PhiDeltaTheta 



339 




hi Gamma Delta 



Phi Gamma Delta, 
located at 1614 Fair- 
child, was founded at 
Jefferson College on 
May 1, 1840. The 
fraternity color is royal 
purple and their flower 
is the purple clematis. 
The Fijis received their 
charter at K-State on 
Oct. 24, 1968 and have 
57 members. 




ADAMS, CLAY Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics JR 

ALSTATT,BRAD Overland Park 

Computer Science SR 

BALES, GREGORY Yates Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

BLANCK, ANTHONY Abilene 

Biology FR 

BLANKEN, ROBERT Clay Center 

Pre-Medkine SR ^ ^V 

BREMERMAN, SCOTT Salina ^^.^^'^ ^^ 

Arts and Sciences FR ^^iflifl ^^^^^ 

BROADFOOT, RICHARD Holton 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

COBLE, MARK Basehor 

Finance SR 

CONNER, CRAIG Lyons 

Engineering Technology SO 

DAUGHERTY, RICK Salina 

Arts and Sciences FR 

EDSALL, PATRICK Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering FR fc^ / 

ELLIS, DAVID Canton, S.D. A^'m.-^'r 

Chemical Engineering JR _^^^^^ ^^ 

1 

ENGLE, TIM Abilene 

Finance SO 

FENTON, BOB LasCruces, N.M. 

Physical Science SR 

GORDON, TODD Emporia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

HANLEY, PETE Omaha, Neb. 

Agricultural Economics SO 

HAUG, GREG Topeka 

Milling Science SO 

HEMMY, RONALD Salina 

Computer Science SR ^^^^ 

w 

HONEYMAN, MARSHALL Wichita 

Electrical Engineering JR 

IRELAND, ROBERT Valley Center 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

JENSEN, JAMES Kearney, Mo. 

Business Administration FR 

KUCKELMAN, TIM Topeka 

industrial Engineering SO - - 

LARSON, JAMES Manhattan k* ' 

Electrical Engineering JR J^ J 

LIPPOLDT, JEFF Towanda ^^^*-«mt^ i 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR ^^^^^K 

LONG, KARL Morgan Hill, Calif. 

Electrical Engineering SO 

MILLS, SEAN Salina 

Milling Science FR 

NIGHSWONGER, TODD Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR Vr3<k ''^ 

OWENS, RICK Shawnee Mission 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

QUERREY, MICHAEL St. Louis, Mo. \\- 

Architecture FR 

SEARS, GLENN Smith Center 

Finance SR 



340 





yxk^'ik 




WHITEHAIR. MARK AbUene 

Finance FR 

WIETHARN, RICK Clay Center 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

WILSON, ERIC Granite City, Dl. 

Pre-Dentistry JR 



SIMCOX, KELLY Manhattan 

Restaurant Management SR 

SMITH, BRENT Prairie ViUage 

Restaurant Management SR 

STANGLE, DARRELL Enterprise 

I^dio-Television SO 

STILLWAGON. RONALD Chapman 

Management SO 

TRENKLE, KENT Lincoln, Neb. 

Electrical Engineering JR 

TRIMMER, ROBERT Wichita 

Industrial Engineering JR 

VOGEL, CHRISTOPHER Hutchinson 

Accounting SR 

VOGEL, GREGORY Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

WENDELBURG, BRIAN Wichita 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

WHITEHAIR, CHRIS AbUene 

Feed Science JR 




FIJI UHLE SISTERS 



FRONT HOW: Sandy Maihugh, Tracy Seastrom, 
Lisa Stephenson, Jennifer Golway, Denise Shannon, 
Patricia Meusburger, Norma Lawrence. SECOND 
ROW: Kelly Murray, Stephanie Frank, Lea Ann Bat)- 
son, Debi Lodovood, Laura Wail<er, Mary Ward. 
THIRD ROW: Filza Hassan, Annie Linentierger, Mary 
Baumann, Vicky Dautel, Renee Barton, Renae Slatt, 
Jennifer Hays. BACK ROW: Ann Haney, Jenny 
Reed, Michele Killett, Amy Achenbach, Rima 
Hassan, Julie Mai, Carmela Lueck. 



Phi Gamma Delta 



341 



p 


. 


hi Kappa Tau 



BAGGERLY, TIM Orertand Park 

Musk SR 

BROWN, PATRICK Leavenworth 

Geography JR 

BROWN, STEPHEN Leavenworth 

Engiiiecriiig Technology SR ^ i 

CHANCE, JEFF Liberal ■/•— ^. fc 

Elcctrtcal En^neeriiig SR f^ f^ 

CHARLES, CRAIG Manhattan , . ^ 

PoUtkal Sctence SR *l ^ I* 

DELANEY, MICHAEL Kansas Ctty, Kan. >, ^' 

Marketing SR H^av 

- . ^ 1 /ft ■■ 

DUDEN, DEREK Overland Parle 

Social Work JR 

EGGERS, TODD Hutchinson «^ 

Engineering FR ^%Il 

FABINA, JOE Kansas City, Kan. \ 

Accounting SO j^ If 

GALLAGHER, PATRICK Leavenworth S . ' f 

Geography SR 

GOETZ, RANDY LeneM 

Construction Science SR 

GORE, DAVID Overiand Park 

Finance SR 

GRABER, CHARLES Hutchinson *^'' 

Engineering SO ^ .^ 

HENDERSON, WILLIAM Overland Park M jM||^^ 

JARVl . J AMK..." . .."/"/.". .""^^^^^^^ JUBm 

Engineering Technology JR B&^^^S 

JILia, PHaiP RoelandPark ▼'W^ Cf 

MUIlng Sctence SR 4 

KENNEDY, JOHN Wichita I ^■ 

Electrical Engineering JR fc 

LEROUX, GEORGE Lenexa TV^.^ 

Geology JR 



Phi Kappa Tau, located 
at 1606 Fairchild, was 
founded at Miami 
(Ohio) University on 
March 17, 1906. The 
fraternity colors are 
harvard red and old 
gold. The Phi Taus 
flower is the red carna- 
tion. The Phi Taus have 
44 members and receiv- 
ed their charter at 
K-State on May 20, 
1925. 




<■= ^f '■ I 










342 



Phi Kappa Tau I 





- - 1 

TUCKER, SANFORD Hutchinson 

Business Administration SR 

WILSON, CHIUS Buhler 

4 Geography JR 

\m WRIGHT, MARTIN Hutchinson 

—^ ftjjM Business Administration JR 




MEYERS, STAN Shawnee 

Civil Engineering SR 

MRAVUNAC, MICHAEL ICansas City, ICan. 

Accounting SO 

NELSON, MONTGOMERY McITierson 

Finance JR 

OLSON, JOHN Salina 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

OVERTON, GEOFFREY Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

PORCH, MICHAEL Overhind Pait 

Construction ScleiKe SR 

REYNOLDS, WALTER ICansas City, ICan. 

Architecture SO 

SMITH, ANTHONY Shawnee 

Restaurant Management SR 

STREIT, MICHAEL Salina 

Pre-Law SO 

SULLIVAN, SCOTT Manhattan 

Marketing JR 




LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
SHIELD 



FRONT ROW: Laura Birmingham, Tanda Greene, 
Stephanie Deatrick, Denlse Janous. BACK ROW: 
Laura Sargert, Stephanie Southard, Susan Dale, 
Heather Grosko, Diane Callewaert. 



Phi Kappa Tau 



343 



appa Theta 



KVHN, VELMA Housemother 

BIONDO, JOESPH Bethlehem, Pa. 

Architecture SR 

BLASING, BILL Herington 

Fbunce SR 

BOGNER, RICHARD Parsons 

Computer Science SR 

BONAR, WARREN Cherryvale 

Management SR 

BOWLES, CHARLES Council Grove 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

DAY, JACKSON Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

ERICKSON, JON Manhattan 

Radio-Television SR 

FIOLKOSKI, ALAN Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

FIOLKOSKI, ERIC Topelca 

Geophysics JR 

FISHER, RICKY CouncU Grove 

Engineering Technoiogy SR 

FUGINGER, ANTHONY Medkine Lodge 

Interior Design SR 

FOSTER, KENNETH Edna 

Marketing JR 

FOWLER, CURT Rockford, m. 

Elementary Education FR 

FRANKENBERG, EDWARD Topeka 

Electrical Engineering FR 

GOTTSCHALK, MARK Hays 

Veterinary Medicine JR 

GROSS, DARRIN Overland Park 

Marketing JR 

HALBERT, PHILIP Topelu 

Agricuhural Economics SR 

HAMMARLUND, RAY St. Marys, Kan. 

Agricultural Mecliaiiization SR 

HARTMAN, DAVID Manhattan 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

HASTERT, THOMAS Topeka 

Geophysics JR 

HAYDEN, FREDERICK Topeka 

Pre-Medidne SR 

HENSON, IVDTCH BaUwhi, Mo. 

Architecture and Design SR 

HORN, KYLE Shawnee 

Information Systems SR 

HOUDASHELT, RICHARD Ottawa 

Marketing FR 

HYMER, DAVID Salina 

Pre-Medicine JR 

KAHLER, KRAIG Meriden 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KNUDSEN, TIMOTHY Alma 

Interior Design SO 

LINDAHL, STEVE Weston, Mo. 

Milling Science JR 

MCCARTHY, DAN Topelia 

Pre-Law SR 



Phi Kappa Theta, 

located at 1965 College 

Heights, was founded at 

Ohio University on 

April 29, 1959. The 

fraternity colors are 

cardinal red, white and 

gold and the Phi Kaps 

flower is the red tea 

rose. The Phi Kaps 

received their charter at 

K-State on April 9, 1921 

and have 65 members. 



344 





MCKINLEY, WILLIAM Havensville 

Business Administration SO 

MEARES, MICHAEL Salina 

Arts and Sciences FR 

METZGER, MARK Council Grove 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

METZGER, MITCHELL CouocU Grove 

CIvU Engineering SR 

METZGER, MONTE CouncU Grove 

Management SR 

MEYERHOFF, KEVIN Linn 

Business Administration JR 

MUEHLEISEN, STEPHEN Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

OBERHELMAN, MICHAEL Riley 

Information Systems SO 

ORTIZ, RICHARD Htmtsville, Ala. 

Architecture SR 

PADEN, GERRY Topeka 

Marl(eting SR 

PEAVLER, BRUCE Shawnee 

Marketing SR 

PETERSON, KENT Manhattan 

Business Administration JR 

PICI4ETT, DENNY Dekalb, 111. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

PRICE, CHARLES Manhattan 

Agriculture FR 

PRIDE, MARK McPherson 

Pre-Law JR 

PRIDE, SHAWN McPherson 

Finance FR 

QUICK, PARRISH Manhattan 

Architecture and Design FR 

RELIGA, KEVIN BrookviUe 

Agronomy JR 



LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
APHELION ROSE 



FRONT ROW: Jola Murphy. Caroline Guilliams. Julie 
Burnett, Gina Squibb, Ana Caguin, Beth Dailey. 
SECOND ROW: Jennifer Steflens, Lisa Gregoriew, 
Kim Diehl, Karen Hetrick, Lori Useldinger, Jennifer 
Gammell, Kim George. THIRD ROW: Melissa Boa2, 
Tammie White, Kelly Hoggatt, Christine Ryan, Anita 
Espentaub, Sandy Bebermeyer, Linda Bogner, 
Debbie England. FOURTH ROW: Kristi Hull, Cindy 
Frickson, Michelle Mowry, Rena Miller, Kecia Heinz, 
Jana Fielder, Lori Heilman. BACK ROW: Kathy Gray, 
Alice Govert, Jacqueline Jones, Denise Hollis, 
Cynthia Fries, Michelle Loader, Tulin Artan, Mary 
Bogner. 



Phi Kappa Theta 



345 



RiFKappa Theta 



RHOADS, RANDALL Cailsbad, Calif. 

Architecture SR 

SCHNIEDERS, JOHN Onawa 

Pre-Medicine SO 

SEDORCEK, ROBERT Kansas Ctty, Kan. 

Recreation SR 

SEPULVEDA, GARY Topelta 

Marlieting SR 



SHEEHAN, PATRICK Topeka 

Chemistry FR 

SHERWOOD, BRIAN Overland Park 

Pre-Uw JR 

SMITH, BRIAN Kansas City. Kan. 

Nuclear Engineering JR 

SNYDER, KEN Dodge City 

Accounting SR 



STEERE, JOEL 

Business Administration 
STERBENZ, DOUG 

Mccliaiiical Engineering. 

SUTTON. LOUIS 
Management 




SWEANY, \aCHAEL St. Marys 

Information Systems SR 

THOMPSON, MARK Lincoln, Neb. 

Interior Design SO 

WILLCOXON, PHILIP Joplin, Mo. 

Arts and Sciences FR 



WRIGHT, RENSLOE Salina 

Computer Science JR 

YORK, DOUGLAS Cleveland, Mo. 

Construction Science SR 

ZALDO, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Architecture SO 



L#»ii 



Uuring the flag lowering 
ceremony on Veteran's Day, Bob 
Fenton, a K-State student, plays 
Taps. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



346 





i Beta Phi 




Pi Beta Phi, located at 
1819 Todd Road, was 
founded at Monmouth 
College on April 28, 
1867. The sorority col- 
ors are wine and silver 
blue and the Pi Phis 
flower is the wine car- 
nation. The Pi Phis have 
114 members and 
received their charter at 
K-State on June 3, 
1915. 




ANDREWS, REBECCA Phillipsburg 

Business Administration JR 

BACHMAN, JOHANNA Centralia 

Industrial Engineering SO 

BAHR, MARY Great Bend 

Pre-Nursing.... SO 

BEMIS.ANGIE Haven 

Accounting JR 

BENNET, KATIE Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

BOYD, BECKY Norton 

Art SO 

BROWN, HEATHER Hutchinson 

Recreation SO 

BROWN, LAURIE Salina 

Computer Science FR 

COLEMAN, ANNE Overland Park 

Recreation JR 

COPE, DONNA Leawood 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

EDWARDS, CECILY Hays 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

ELUS, JULIE Lenexa 

Interior Design FR 

ELWELL, AMY Buhler 

Elementary Education JR 

FRICK, JULIE Scott City 

Business Administration SO 

GARWICK, HEIDI Manhattan 

Psychology SO 

GENSCH, KIMBERLY Lenexa 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

GNAGEY, JANET Derby 

Accounting SO 

GOOD, KATHERINE Overland Park 

Engineering FR 

GRAHAM, AMY Bennington 

Early Childhood Education SO 

GWIN, BRENDA Beloit 

Finance SR 

HANNA, PATTI Unexa 

Mariieting SR 

HAYTER, SHEILA Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

HEIDEBRECHT, MELISSA McPhenson 

Business Administration SR 

HENSLEY, JEANA Dallas, Texas 

Management SR 

HERMAN, ROXANNE Garden City 

Marketing JR 

BIGHT, BECKY Goddard 

Life Sciences SR 

HOFERER, BETTIE Topeka 

Accounting JR 

HOFFHINES, STEFENI Salina 

Business Administration FR 

HOOGENAKKER, MELINDA Topeka 

Elementary Education SR 

HOOP, STEPHANIE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 



?\ Beta Phi 



347 




HOWE, KATY Scottsdale, Ariz. 

Business Administration SO 

HUG, TARRI Derby 

Accounting FR 

HUNTER, NATALIE Prairie ViUage 

Secondary Education JR 

JAMISON, MICHELLE Beloit 

Life Sciences JR 

JARBOE, RONDA Hutchinson 

Pre-Medicine FR 

JOHANSEN, MARY Hays 

Accounting SO 

JOHNSON, RONI Leavenworth 

Industrial Engineeriiig SR 

LAGBACK, LYDL\ HiU City 

Elementary Education JR 

LEONARD, CANDISE Hoyt 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. ... SO 
LEWIS, ASHLEY Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

UGHTCAP, MARILYN Hugoton 

Pre-Nursing JR 

UTTON, JUDY Topeka 

Finance FR 

LYNN, ROBIN Atchison 

Business Administration SO 

MARTINEZ, CHRISTI Wichita 

Accounting SR 

MCANARNEY. PAM Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences SO 

MCGRAW, MOLLY Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

MCPHAIL. MANDI Cimarron 

Secondary Education SO 

MCPHAIL, MARCI Cimarron 

Pre-Nursing SO 

MIES, JULIE Goddard 

Accounting JR 

MORRIS, ALYSON Kansas City, Mo. 

Fine Arts JR 

MORRISON, AMY Salina 

Business Administration FR 

MUNSON, STACY EUsworth 

Special Education FR 

NEEL, PATTI Windom 

Elementary Education FR 

NEUSTROM, LEE ANNE Prairie Village 

Interior Design JR 

NOLLER, CAROLYN Salina 

Business Administration SO 

OCHS, PAULA Dodge City 

Accounting FR 

O'CONNELL. lEANNETTE Merriam 

Apparel Design JR 

PARSONS, CARLA Shawnee 

Physical Education JR 

PFEIFLY, LORI Riley 

Interior Design SO 

PHILLIPS, POLLY Bonner Springs 

Interior Design jR 

PICKETT, TERESA Parker, Colo. 

Accounting SO 

PUTMAN, NANCY Leawood 

Political Science SR 

RANSOPHER, SANDRA Clyde 

Industrial Engineering FR 

RAVENBUSH, LAUREL Shawnee 

Arts and Sciences FR 

REISER, RENEE Great Bend 

Medical Technology FR 

ROHRER, DEBBIE Salina 

Elementary Education SO 

ROTTINGHAUS, KATHY Shawnee 

Interior Design SO 

ROUSE, SUSAN Hutchinson 

Radio-Television FR 

RULO, DEBORAH Unexa 

Journalism and Mass Commimications SO 

RUSSELL, JILL St. John 

Interior Design FR 

RUTLEDGE. LYNN Maple HiU 

Business Administration JR 

SANDERS, KATHLEEN St. Joseph, Mo. 

Philosophy FR 

SCHROEDER, DONITA Madison 

Accounting FR 

SIMS, SHERRY Overland Park 

Marketing SO 

SMITH, KIM Dodge City 

Business Administration SO 

SMITH, SHERRl St. Joseph 

Elementary Education FR 

STANSBARGER, SHARI Arkansas City 

Music SO 

STEEN, DEBI Ralston, Neb. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 



348 





STEVENSON, JULIE St. Joseph, Mo. 

Accounting FR 

STOVER, LISA Salina 

A ccoun ting JR 

STUTTERHEIM, ANDREA Norton 

Finance SO 

SVATY, REBECCA EUsworth 

Secondary Education FR 

SWAN, LESLIE Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

TETER, LAURIE Shawnee 

Recreation JR 

TINGELHOFF, JODY Garden City 

Dietetics SO 

TINKER, SALLY Wichita 

Psychology JR 

TURNER, LIBBY Great Bend 

Accounting SO 

VAN DAM, TIMIRIE Wichita 

Accounting , FR 

VARNEY, HEATHER Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

WARD, KRISTA Ottawa 

Elementary Education SR 

WILDEMAN, DDVNA Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

WILLMS, BEVERLY Great Bend 

Business Administration FR 

WOOLLEY, GINGER Overland Park 

Elementary Education FR 



Attempting to get a better tan 
before summer's end, Doug 
Brown lies in a wading pool. 
(Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



349 




rKappa Alpha 



Pi Kappa Alpha, located 

at 2021 College View, 

was founded at the 

University of Virginia 

on March 1, 1868. The 

fraternity colors are 

garnet and old gold. 

The Pikes flower is the 

lily of the valley. The 

Pikes have 117 members 

and received their 

charter at K-State on 

Feb. 8, 1911. 



ALLEN, BRET Unexa 

Marketing FR 

ALLEN, SCOTT Emporia 

Marketing .■ SO 

BANNON, MICHAEL Overland Park 

Political Science FR 

BARCLAY, BRUCE Overland Park 

Business Administration JR 

BETHEL, RONALD Wichita . 

Marketing SO V 

BIRD, MARSHALL Anthony y 

Animal Science FR ^L 

BLYTHE, DUANE White City ^^^^ 

Agricultiiral Mechanization SR 

BOGINA, MARK Unexa 

Geology SR 

BROWN, DARON Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SO 

BRUN.DELTON Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BUSH, KURT Hiawatha 

Accounting SO 

BUSH, SCOTT Hiawatha 

Marketing JR 

CARL, DAVID Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration SO t 

CARROLL, BRYAN Los Angeles, Calif. .^tflHk. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR .^i^H^^^^ 

CHAMPLIN, CURTIS Concordia ^^BHM 

Marketing JR ^^^wTB^H 

CHRISTIAN, TAD RossvlUe f,_ Wt 

Markethig SR ^^^ "^ r 

CLARK, MICHAEL El Dorado 

Geology SR i '4 

CLARK, TODD Lenexa 

Architecture FR 

CONLEY, BILL Manhattan 

Agricultural Mechanization SR 

COOK, BRUCE Merriam 

Accounting SR 

CORREDOR, CARLOS Overland Park 

Fine Arts SR 

DARNELL, JAMES Overland Park 

Architecture JR 

DENNIS, DAVID Olathe 

Finance SO 

DURAN.GREG Milford 

Landscape Architecture SO 

DUVALL, JOHN Wichita ^p~ 

Business Administration FR JKm 

DYKMANN, ROGER Wichita W 

Electrical Engineering SR ' 

EUBANK, DOUG Pratt 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

FITZGERALD, TIM Sallna 

Journalism and Mass Conununkatlons SR r\ i 

FRANKEN, LAURENCE Easlon "■' *' 

Food Science SO 

FRANKEN, WILLIAM Easton 

Accounting SO 













350 



Pi Kappa Alpha i! 



Jubilation runs higli for Bill 
Conley and his teammates at the 
Phi Delta Theta Score for Charity 
football game. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 




GEE, WILLIAM Manhanan 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

GOENS, MICHAEL Basehor 

Radio-Television JR 

HANRAHAN, PAT Kansas City, Mo. 

Business Administration SO 

HARVEY, JEFF Olathe 

Construction Science SO 

HEDRICK, JERRY Lees Summit, Mo. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

HINKEL, LARRY LoveUnd, Colo. 

Management SR 

HOOBER, MARK Marshalltown, Iowa 

Civil Engineering FR 

HOWARD, TREVOR Berryton 

Milling Science and Management SO 

JACKSON, BRETT Topeka 

Arts and Sciences SO 

JACKSON, CHRIS Lawrence 

Electrical Engineering JR 

JOHNSON, KURT McPherson 

Management JR 

JUDY, JEFF Unexa 

Psychology FR 

KNAUS, KEVIN Overland Park 

Joumallan and Mass Communkatioas SR 

KNIGHT, ADRIAN Kansas City, Kan. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

KOHL, DAVID Overland Park 

Industrial Engineering SR 

KOLBECK, KURT Merriam 

Marketing SR 

KOLBECK, PAUL Merriam 

Electrical Engineering JR 

KROENLEIN, JEFFEREY VacaviUe. Calif. 

Business Administration SO 

LAIRD, RONALD Olatha 

Milling Science and Management FR 

LAMER, DAVE Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

LEAHY, TIMOTHY Manhattan 

Secondary Educatian SR 

MAHAN, ROBIN RossvUle 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

MARCUM, BO Olalhe 

Secondary Education SO 

MARTIN, GREGORY EUia 

Finance SO 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



351 



PrKappa Alpha 



MELLSKE, ALLAN Unexa 

Interior Architecture SR 

MILLER. BRYAN Emporia 

Business Administration JR 

MILLER, SHAWN Tribune 

Mariteting SR 

MILLER, TODD Grantville 

Finance SO 

MILLER, TROY GrantviUe 

Industrial Engineering SO 

MORRIS, MICHAEL Salina 

Journalism and Mass Commimications JR 



MOUNT, WADE Ptairie Village 

Business Administration FR 

NEUSCHAFER, DARAN Salina 

Business Administration FR 

NOOT, DANIEL St. Louis, Mo. 

Balcery Science and Management SO 

OBETZ, PETER Leawood 

Pre-Law SR 

OWEN, RAYMOND Merriam 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

PAYNE, DAVID Olathe 

Animal Science FR 




^ikf'^ 




iilldilf^ Jk 



POYSER, WILLLAM Prairie ViUage 

Accounting SR 

REESE, ROBERT Culver 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

REICHLE, DEAN Leawood 

Mariietiiig SR 

REID, STEVE Goodland 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

RICHARDS, JEFF Kansas City, Kan. 

Marketing FR 



RILEY, MICHAEL Hiawatha 

Public Administration JR 

SCHIERLING, DAN Olathe 

Marlieting SR 

SCHMIDT, MIKE Wellington 

Electrical Engineering FR 

SHERWOOD, DAVID Wichita 

Management SO 

SKAGGS, BRAD Manhattan 

Architecture FR 



SMITH, DAN Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Conununicadons SR 

TEMPLIN, CRAIG Overland Park 

Correctional Administration SR 

WHTTAKER, SCOTT Overland Park 

Markethig SR 

WOODBURY, BOB Wichita 

Marketing JR 

WOODWARD JOEL Manhattan 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology FR 



iWC^^WifW-* 




^1^ Jl^ i^^ 

^ 0^ 0^ 




■M^\k^ 



LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
SHIELD-DIAMOND 



FRONT ROW: Stacey Meyers, Jill Bush, Terri Irwin, 
Jamie Reiserer, Judy Wolf, Kristina Reynolds, Kristi 
Hogan. SECOND ROW: Janet Netherland, Barbara 
Periolat. Claudia Sangster, Rene Ochs, Kristi 
Randall. Michelle Johnson. THIRD HOW: Laura 
Hackley, Susan Sommers, Stacy Snnith, Kelly 
Beaver, Paige Shank, Amy Tumpes, Lisa Shipley. 
FOURTH ROW: Donna Bott, Pamela Lutz, Diana 
Hebert, Beth House, Christina Doherty, Diana 
Renner, Becky Cook, Martha Wood. BACK ROW: 
Rachele Gagliano, Lisa Tarvestad. Lynn Harris, 
Shari Malone, Carrie Heinz, Lisa Short, Elaine 
Kostelac. 




352 



Pi Kappa Alpha 




rKappa EEi 




Pi Kappa Phi, located at 
1716 Fairchild, was 
founded at the College 
of Charleston on Dec. 
10, 1904. The fraternity 
colors are gold, white 
and royal blue and the 
Pi Kaps flower is the 
red rose. The Pi Kaps 
received their charter at 
K-State on April 15, 
1978 and have 49 
members. 




nLLSBURY, CLAUDENE Housemother 

BERRIDGE, ED Lenexa 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

BEYER. STEVEN Wichita 

Architecture SO 

BLINNE, JOHN Salina 

Electrical EnghMcring SR 

BORD, DAVH) Abilene 

Business Adminbtratkin SR 

BROWN, ROBERT Derby 

Architecture JR 

BURNET, TIM Anthony 

Agricultural Economics SO 

BUSHYHEAD, DALE Glenpool, Okla. 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CHATFKELD, CHRIS Michigan City, Ind. 

Arts and Sciences SO 

CRANE, BRIAN Unexa 

Pre-Veterinary JR 

CUCHY, KRIS Manhattan 

Medical Technology JR 

DARLING, KENDALL Abilene 

Soctal Work SR 

DUGGAN.TIM Hutchinson 

Marketing JR 

DYKES, PAUL Shawnee Mission 

Pre-Medicine FR 

FRANKLIN, MICHAEL Osawatomie 

Business Administration.. SO 

FROMM, KIRK Gravois MUls, Mo. 

Interior Architecture JR 

GILES, ROBB Overland Park 

Architecture , FR 

KING, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SO 



Pi Kappa Phi 



353 



PrKappa Rn 

KIRKHAM, SCOTT Wichita 

Computer Science SO 

LAWRENCE, THOMAS Overland Park 

Management JR 

UHNING, CRAIG Topeka 

Finance SO 

LIVELY, DWAYNE Salina 

English FR 

MARTIN, ANDY Hutchinson 

Chemical Science JR 

MAVRIDIS, GEORGE Manhattan 

Chemistry JR 

MEADOR, RICHARD MarysvUle 

Business Administration SO 

MILLER, GLEN WichiU 

Interior Architecture SR 

PALMER, TRYGVE Wichita 

Chemical Engineering FR 

PRUETT, KEN LitUeton, Colo. 

Construaion Science JR 




ROTTINGHAUS, DAN BaUeyville 

Business Administration SO 

SASENICK, MARK Roel'an'dPark 

Architecture pp 

SEUFERT. MICHAEL ^^i! fonganoxie 

Agricultural Engineering pR 

STEIN, JERRY Ulysses 

Pre-Law SR 

STEIN, KEVIN Wright 

Natural Science SR 

VAN METER, EL VIN Manhattan 

Construction Science JR 



WARY, JOSEPH Columbus 

Agriculture Education SR 

WILDERSON, DAVID Basehor 

Accoimtlns SR 

WINTER. SCOTT Andale 

Electrical Engineering FR 




M^\k 



UHLE SISTERS OF THE 
STAR AND LAMP 



FRONT ROW: Susan Link, Pamela Fenstermacher, 
Kim Stewart, Liza Rock. SECOND HOW: Susan 
Stein, Janice Stein, Brenda Rottinghaus, Jane 
Grant. Ann Sclirock. BACK ROW: Shannon Fuller, 
Larissa Kimura, Marylee Beaver, Jodi Lake. 



354 





igma Alpha Epsilon 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
located at 1015 Denison, 
was founded at the 
University of Alabama 
on March 9, 1856. The 
fraternity colors are 
royal purple and old 
gold and their flower is 
the violet. The SAEs 
received their charter at 
K-State on Jan. 24, 
1913 and have 90 




HEDMAN, EULA MAE Housemother 

ALLEN, ERIC Douglass 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BARNETT. PfflL OveriandPark 

Marketing JR 

BLEVINS, RICHARD Tulsa, Okla. 

Marketing JR 

BRANHAM, DAVID Oswego 

Civil Engineeriiig SR 

BROMICH, BARRETT Topeka 

Finance JR 

CATTOOR, RODNEY Imperial, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

CECIL, BRYAN Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

DALGLEISH, SCOTT Prairie VUlage 

Electrical Engineering Ml 

DEHAVEN.ERIC Prairie VUlage 

Architectural Engineering SO 

DEJMAL, DANIEL Mahaska 

Agricultural Engineering SO 

DESCH, BRIAN Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

DESCH, PAT Topeka 

Fashion Marketing FR 

DORLW^, GRAHAM Wichita 

Music Education FR 

ENGROFF,JEFF Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

KARRIS, MATHEW Atchison 

Marketing SR 

FISER, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Correctional Administration SR 

nSER, MKE Manhattan 

ArcMtecture Engineering SR 

GEBHART, ANDREW SaUna 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

GURWELL, MICHAEL Lcawood 

Electrical Engineering SR 

HARRISON, ERIC St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

HEADLEY, CLAYTON Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

HEIMER, MARK Merriam 

Political Science SR 

HEINZE, MARK Salina 

Marketing SR 

HOOVER, SCOTT Olathe 

Business Administration SO 

HOPE, BILL OveriandPark 

Marketing JR 

HUTCHESON, JEFF Topeka 

Industrial Engineering SO 

HUTCHISON, KEN WichiU 

Horticulture JR 

INNES, KELLY Manhattan 

Horticulture JR 

JACKSON, MATTHEW Manhattan 

Business Education SR 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



355 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



UHLE SISTERS OF 
MINERVA 



FRONT ROW: Tanya Lauer, Sue McMillan. SECOND 
ROW: Jan Schwartz, Sarah Swaim, Janet Connolly. 
BACK ROW: Dana Sullivan, Martha Schaeter. 



JACKSON, MKE Salina 

Accounting JR ^g' .^M^ 

JAMES, KKIS Tulsa, Okla. P" ^^^Hlk 

Geology SR J^l^^k 

JOHNSON, WILLIAM Oiathe ■PBi^^V 

Business Adnunistradoo FR WT ^**-W 

JONES, JOHN Hiawatha ^fT*^. ^ ~ 

Business Administration FR \ 

JONES, MARK Wright City, Mo. 

Mam^emeiit SR % iw 

KELLERMAN, PAT West Wood %,„ ^^^ 

Political Science FR ^^ ^^M 

KELPIN, DALE Topclca —^■—{^■■■i 

Social Work SO ■■HBMMl liWMI W^ 

KEMP, CHRISTOPHER St. Joseph. Mo. mi^srmi^^^^i'^'m w 

Architecture FR ^^^, .., ^. 

KOCOUR, VINCENT Atchison ?-' Jb^ ^^ 

Arts and Sciences FR HL>l '■^Vft 

LACY, MARK Shawnee Mission K»l ^ T; 

Engineering FR 

LASSMAN, MIKE Pittsburg 

Finance JR - —^ .^ 

UETZ, ERIC ^^^M W-- ^^^ ^^ 

Business Administration FR ^^^^TL-^^^^^Bk ^j^^k 

LIVINGSTON, BRIAN Manhattan "~ " 

Business Administration FR 

LOWE, JOHN Oiathe 

Business Administration FR 

MITCHELL, RANDALL Esther. Mo. 

Architecture Engineering FR VEaes "sr" 

MURRISON, MARK Honolulu, Hawau ^^^ ^ 

Pr«-Uw JR 

PASLEY,JOEL Kansas City, Kan. m v 

Construction Science FR 1^ / 4l ./la 

PAULSON, LYLE HutcUnsoii W"-^ k I ^™ 

Electrical Engineering SR ^ ^k ■ ^^^^ 

PEAK, STEPHEN Mission 1^ M, 

Electrical Engineering SO ' 

REYNOLDS, TODD Agenda 

Engineering FR 

ROBERTSON, TIM Manhattan 

Finance SO ^» „ > 

SCHULTZ, CRAIG Overland Park Wm^ W^i 

Ardtecture SR 

SERAFIN,JOHN St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

STERNS, JAMES Hiawatha ■>■ -^ \. 1 

Feed Science and Management SR ^.^J^f"^ Wt^^ ^.^^ 

" mkmk 




356 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon i 




STEVENSON, CHRIS St. Joseph, Mo. 

Marketing JR 

STOKES, JEFF Leawood 

Pre-Medicine JR 

SWAN, CHRIS Overland Park 

Finance JR 

THOMAS, EDWARD Louisburg 

Journalism and Mass Comrautiications FR 

THORP, JAMES Topeka 

Information Systems JR 



TILLER, RONALD Lenejia 

Agricultural Economics FR 

TRETTER, BOB St. Louis, Mo. 

Industrial Engineering JR 

TRTTSCH, DAVID Hiawatha 

Architecture FR 

VANDEM, DOUG Wichita 

Marketing JR 

WAGNER, DAVID Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 



WAGNER, KEVIN Atchison 

Computer Science FR 

WALDEN, MIKE Olathe 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

WENTZEL, MARK Manhattan 

Engineering FR 

WETTIG, EDWARD Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

WIGGIN, DAVID Overland Park 

Information Systems JR 



WILLL\MS, KENT Wichita 

Architecture SO 

WILLIAMS, RONNY Leavenworth 

Interior Design FR 

WILSON, MIKE Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

WTTTMAN, DAVID Topeka 

Computer Science FR 




Uraham Dorian, a member of 
the Sigma Alplia Epsilon frater- 
nity, plays liis violin to an au- 
dience In the K-State Union. 
(Photo by John Thelander) 



»igma Alpha Epsilon 



357 




igma 



Chi 



1 



Sigma Chi, located at 
1224 Fremont, was 
founded at Miami 
University on June 28, 
1855. The fraternity col- 
ors are blue and old 
gold. The Sigma Chis 
flower is the white rose. 
The Sigma Chis have 77 
members and received 
their charter at K-State 
on Dec. 3, 1949. 



AMREIN, JOHN Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

ANDERSON, JEFFREY Lawrence 

Accounting^ FR 

ARNGTE.JEFF Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engiiieeriiig SR 

ATZE>JWEILER, ANDY MIssioo Hills __,^ 

Social Sciences SR ^ 

BOWDEN, STEVE Leawood 

Management JR 

BOWMAN, ED Chesterfield, Mo. 

Feed Science and Management SR 

BRACICEN, SHAWN Paola 

Marketing JR 

BURKE, KEVIN Mnivane 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BURTON, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CARLAT, JEft' Pittsburg , ^ 

Me chan ical Engineering SR l ■' 

CHAFFEE, TEG Topeka I ^•♦-^ 

Agricultural Economics SR t*^ ** * 

COMPTON, DAVID Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CONNET, JERRY OtUwa 

Feed Science and Management SR 

CONNET. NOEL Ottawa 

Marketing SO 

CRAIG, TODD Garnett 

Industrial Engineering SR 

CRENSHAW, TODD Ottawa 

Music Education JR 

CROSS, MARK Wichita ^ ik 

Industrial Engineering FR 

DARGER, SCOTT Overland Park 

Engineering FR 

DEBAUGE, STEVE Prahie Village 

Mechanical Enghieering SR 

DIETZ, JIM Ottawa 

Medical Technology SO 

DOEDEN, KLAAS Mound Ctty 

Geology SR 

DONALDSON, DON Manhattan 

Electrical Enghieering SR 

DUNIT2;, CHRISTOPHER Overland Park ^ ^ -^ 

Architectural Engineering FR / ' / 

EWERT, KURT Grandview, Mo. A V 

Architecture FR ^^^^^ ^m. 

FORRER, CHRISTL^N Ulysses 

Business Administration FR 

GALLEGOS, GONZALO Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

GEORGE, BRAD WichiU 

Accounting SO 

GIFFIN, JEFFREY Hutchinson wkh ,«■ 

Psychology SO \ i ' 

GONTERMAN, BILL Leawood |>- A 

Accounting SO m*^ * / 

GREGORY, ROBERT Prairie Village AWL^ 

Ftaance .TsR ^M^^Ol^ 





'k.%iLi 



358 



Sigma Chi i 




^MtSi'"^ 



HANSON. ROBIN Wichita 

Acounting FR 

HILL, JAMES Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SO 

HUSER, VINCE Syracuse 

Architecture FR 

JACOBSON, SCOTT Wamego 

Business Administration FR 

JOHNSON, PHILLIP Hugolon 

Engineering FR 

KNEAVES. CHARLES Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

KUHLMANN, BRAD Wichita 

Psychology JR 

LANCE, CHARLES Salina 

Engineering FR 

LARSON, MARK Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

LILLY, KEVIN Derby 

Management SR 

LITTLE. GERALD Carbondale 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

LOGAN, KYLE Scott City 

Accounting JR 

LOOKHART, JEFF Manhattan 

Pre-Medicine SO 

McILVAINE, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Marketing JR 

McINTOSH, ANDREW Columbia, Mo. 

Marketing SR 

MOREY. MARK Paola 

Finance SO 

MOTT, KEVIN Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

PURDUM, STEVE Manhattan 

CivU Engineering SR 




Jim Hill and Kevin IMott shovel 
building-rock while helping land- 
scape the Sigma Chi house. 
(Photo by Jim Dietz) 



Sigma Chi 



359 



Si 



gma 



Xli 

REED, DAVID Stockton 

AgriciiUure Mechanization SR 

REIHER, TIMM Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SO 

RODE, JOHN Overland Parii 

Finance SR 

RYAN, MICHAEL Overiand Park 

Architecture FR 

SCHWERMANN, BRIAN Sliawnee Mission 

Finance SR 

SEITZER.JOHN Overland Park 

Finance SO 

SELL, DAVID Overland Park 

Business Administration SO ^^f» 

SMITH, SCOTT Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

SQUIRES, DARREN Derby 

Industrial Engineering SO 

TALGE, ANDREW Leawood 

Finance SR 

TRIPLETT, FRANK Salina 

Marketing SO 

VADER,™ Mission Hills 

Business Administration SO 

WAGNER, DAN Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

WATKINS, DAVID Shawnee Mission 

Marketing SR 

WELLS, GLENN Hutchinson 

Marketing SR 




wigma Chis Jerry Connet, 
Steve Bowden and Timm Reiher 
hang Christmas lights on the 
Sigma Chi house one warm fall 
afternoon. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 




igma 



NS 




Sigma Nu, located at 
513 Sunset, was founded 
at the Virginia Military 
Institute on Jan. 29, 
1869. The fraternity col- 
ors are black, white and 
gold and the Sigma Nus 
flower is the white rose. 
The Sigma Nus received 
their charter at K-State 
on Sept. 6, 1892 and 
have 59 members. 



f - - f %9^ ^ 





ALBRIGHT. CHRISTOPHER... Lakewood, Colo. 
History SR 

ALLAN, JAMES Overland Park 

JoumaJism and Mass Communicalions JR 

BARNES. WILUAM Sedan 

Construction Science SO 

BOOS, KIM Hays 

Marketing SR 

BRAUN. CHRIS Hays 

Dance SO 

CASHMAN, STEVE Hiawatha 

Marketing -IR 

CRUTCHFIELD. JAMES Manhattan 

Marketing ^^ 

GREEN, JEFF Dodge City 

Nuclear Engineering JR 

GREEN, KENT Dodge City 

Chemkal Engineering SR 

GROS, MARK Colwich 

Electrical Engineering FR 

HEARSON. TRACY CoffeyviUe 

Architecture SO 

HEIMAN, JEROD Wichita 

Agricultural Economics FR 

HOLMSTROM , STEVEN Overland Park 

Pre-Law SO 

KELLY. JOHN Manhattan 

Physcial Education JR 

KLINE, BRIAN Dodge City 

Geograplikal Physics SR 

LEGLEITER, ERIC Hays 

Marketing SO 

LEIKAM, MICHAEL Hays 

Computer Science JR 

LESSMAN, JEFFREY Hays 

Civil Engineering SO 

LETOURNEAU. ICENT Wichita 

Civil Engineering FR 

LOWE, TODD Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MCKINLEY, BRADY Holt, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering FR 

MEALY, GREGORY PraWe VlUage 

Mecliankal EngiDceiing SR 

MILLER. DAVID Overland Park 

Accounting f* 

O'DONNELL. PAT Valley Center 

Natural Resource and Management FR 



^Igma Nu 



361 



Sigma Nu 

ORTH, TEDDY Andale 

Physics SO 

PALMER, GREG Andover 

Management JR 

PFANTflENSTIEL, PAUL Hays 

Industriai Engineering SR 

REYNOLDS, CARL Jefferson City, Mo. '^ ^^■ 

Architecture FR 

RICHARDS, MICHAEL Wichita 

Home Economics SO ^ * 

RITENOUR, BRIAN Sunrise Beach, Mo. ^4 . 

Nuclear Engineering JS ifl^^ 




LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
WHITE ROSE 



FRONT ROW: Ashlyn Conoyer, Jodi Swengel, 
Mauria Stonestreet, Kim Anderson, Tracey Elliott, 
Sharlsse Horn. SECOND ROW: Jamie Aylward, 
Jennifer Leeds, Kathy Winklhofer, Nanette Nelson, 
Marcle Gwin, Jennifer Johnston. THIRD ROW: 
Bobbie Wallace, Elizabeth Walte, Lynette Svaty, 
Jennifer Nuff, Karin Brondeil, Nancy Stone. BACK 
ROW: Deanna Galey, Jana Lessman, Tristia 
Thompson, Lisa Groves, Robin Doerste, Jackie Hull, 
Jane Conway. 



SISE, MATTHEW Roeland Park 

Geography PR 

TAUSCHER, RANDY Hays 

Business Administration SO 

UNRUH, GARY Wichita 

Pre-Medicine SO 

WAGNER, TIMOTHY Kingman 

Finance JR 

WARD, ALAN Kingman 

Management JR 

WASINGER, JEROME Colwich 

Finance SO 

WHITEHEAD, DOUGLASS Jefferson City, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

WILDER, DOUG Wichita 

Psychology PR 





'^^WWSS^- 



^^4i^^i 



362 



Sigma Nu 



1 




igma Phi Epsilon 



Sigma Phi Epsilon, 
located at 1015 Sunset, 
was founded at Rich- 
mond College on Nov. 
1, 1901. The fraternity 
colors are purple and 
red and their flower is 
the red rose. The Sig 
Eps have 110 members 
and received their 
charter at K-State on 
Feb. 23, 1918. 




BMs-. - -m AUGUSTINE, MARK Salina 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BATMAN, SI&NNON Garden City 

Marketins SR 

BAUER, BRIAN Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

BORDEWICK, KELLY Seward 

Milling Sdencc and Management SR 

BRYAN, RICK Hiawatha 

Agricultural Economics SO 

COX, JEFFREY Newton 

Marketing JR 

CRYSTAL, GARY Mission 

Art SO 

DAHL, ERICK Shawnee 

Accounting SO 

DAVIDSON, MARK Shawnee MltBk» 

Milling Science and Management SR 

DIRKS, BRADLEY Hutchinson 

Finance SO 

FOLMER, KURT Colby 

Marketing JR 

W J^ ,^ GAUMER, DOUG Kingman 

fl^w ,^^& Itota^^ Finance SO 

J—i — r "-^^ GIERSCH, SCOTT Salina 

^H HF .^..^ Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

'^ P^ .JgPihb. GINTHER, DAMON Goodland 

' Finance SO 

GUTHRIE, BRYAN Shawnee 

Engineering Technology SO 

HALL. GREG McPherson 

Finance SO 

% V • » HALLAYER, TERRY Hiawatha 

k Marketing JR 

- JW^ HARRIS, DAVID Overland Park 

J^^Mt^^ Mechanical Engineering JR 

HEIDEBRECHT, JAMIE McPherson 

Finance FR 

HOSS. DAN Salina 

Journalism and Mass Conununications SO 

JONES, JEFF Overland Park 

Radio-Television FR 

JURY, SCOTT Leawood 

Accounting SR 

KAUFMAN, TIM El Dorado 

Electrical Engineering SO 

KEIRNS, GREG Goodland 

Finance SO 

KENNEDY, JOE Selden 

Marketing FR 

KNAPPEN, DAN Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

KOSTER, MAX Hoxie 

Business Administration SO 

LAW, DOUG Garden CltT 

Business Administration SR 

LOCK, DERON Kingman 

/ ^ Agricultural Economics JR 

^ LUSCER, JEFF Herrington 

^A^ Finance SO 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



363 



Sigma PEr~Esilon 

MCENTEE, DAN Overland Park ,™. 

Finance SR W' 

MILLS, SCOTT Herrington p, ^m^^ 

Agricudtural Economics JR ^^^^^Hk 

MILLNER.TODD BeUeviUe flMMA 

Finance JR ^m'-mr- ^H 

MULLEN, MARK Mission M. ^ m 

Mechanical Engineering SO wf^'- ' 

NETT, JOHN Shawnee 

Civil Engineering JR \ ' * 

NOLTING, MATT Manhanan 

Marketing FR 

OLTJEN,JAY Manhattan 

Pre-Dentistry SO 

OSWALT, JAMES Overland Park 

Agricultural EcoDomks SR 

PACKEBUSH, STEVE Paitridge 

Agicultural Economics JR 

PERJUER, DAN Manhattan 

Physics SO 

PrrrS, JEFF Salina 

Physics JR '% r - ' 

PRTTCHETT, JERRY Mission 

Civil Engineering SO 

REGIER, RANDY DodgeCity ^^— i>wr 

Pre-Dentistry SO 

REGIER, ROB DodgeCity 

Pre-Medicine SO ' Jj^Kl^ 

ROHR, TROY Cunningham JMPd.» 

Construction Science SR IMP "Wt 

RUDICEL, DAVID Kingman K,.„, || 

Agricultural Economics SO wWl r*» k* 

SCHEIBE, DOUG Shawnee 

Accounting SR 

SCHLAPP, ANDREW WkhiU 

Marketing SR 








A Hl^A '^Vi^^A 




Jlte^HliS ^k 




GOLDENHARTS 



FRONT ROW: Teri Ginter, Michelle Herl, Tammy 
Winters, Amanda Stout, Kristy Korb, Shelley Oborg. 
SECOND ROW: Chris Fragale, Stefeni Hoffhines, 
Cindy Mills, Myrna James, Margaret May, Allison 
Meyers, Teresa Schrock. THIRD ROW: Jana 
Tucker, Sarah Larsen, Michelle Shields, Lisa Nett, 
Nicci Cox, Nancy Beiden, Karin Snyder. BACK ROW: 
Cindy Cummings, Kim Cave, Beth Winans, Shelly 
Hauff, Rachelle Eagle, Marsha Herke, Angela Ford, 
Kirsten Harwick, 




364 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 








^f^^^wBlB f< ■■■k^M^lf^ JiflBLm H 



SCHNUR, AL Manhattan 

Applied Musk SR 

SCHROCK, JEFF Hutchinson 

Marlieting SR 

SCHROCK. LEE Oaldey 

Journalism and Mass Communications PR 

SIMS, BRETT Oaldey 

Industrial Engineering SO 

SOUCIE, MARK Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

STONNER, JOHN Lenexa 

Business Education SR 




SWANEY, TOM WichiU 

Biology FR 

TUBiNER, RAY Oakley 

Accounting SR 

UTECH, STEVE Herington 

Accounting SR 

WALL, ALAN Mcpherson 

Engineering FR 

WILTFONG, DAVID Norton 

Pre-Medicine )R 



D. 



'uring a wrestling match as 
part of a promotional event at a 
local club, the Sports Fanatic, 
Jerry Poole tries to hold up Vic- 
tor, a 710-pound Canadian 
brown bear. Victor defeated 
Poole in the three-minute 
match. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



Sigma Phi Epsllon 



365 




igma Sigma Sigma 



Sigma Sigma Sigma, 
located at 1545 Denison, 
was founded at 
Longwood College on 
April 20, 1898. The 
sorority colors are pur- 
ple and white. The Tri- 
Sigs flower is the purple 
violet. The Tri-Sigs 
received their charter at 
K-State on April 17, 
1982 and have 81 
members. 



TROSTLE, LENORE Housemother 

BEASLEY, JENNIFER Wichiu 

Elementary Education JR 

BERBERICH, CHRISTINE Osage City 

Psychology IR 

BIXLER, CHRISTINE Topeka V 

Mathematics SR 

BREESE, NOELLE Hillsboro 

Interior Design FR 

BURNS, KELLY Great Bend 

Marketing JR 

CASSETTY, SHANNON Salina 

Social Work JR 

DALY, JANAN Overland Park 

Fashion Marketfaig SR 

DARRELL, STACEY Olathe 

Agricultural Journalism JR 

DEVAULT. EDIE Hutchinson 

Elementary Education JR 

DITZLER, CHERYL Overland Park 

Computer Science SR 

FLOCK, LISA Overland Park 

Elementary Education SR 

HAEFLINGER, LYNNE Prairie Village 

Marketing JR 

HANSON. JANE Salina 

Elementary Education So 

HANSON, MARGO Salina 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

HEIER.KIM Oakley 

Pre-Medicine JR 

HEINRICH, AMY Oakley 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR. 

HIPP, CARLA Great Bend 

Accounting JR 

HOFFMAN. SUSAN Ellswoith 

Accounting JR 

HOGGATT, KELLY VirgU 

Accounting SR 

HORN, MARNIE Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

HOUSTON, MICHELLE Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering FR 

JONES, ICERRY Linwood 

Fashion Marketing JR 

KERR, SHANNON Overland Park 

Business Administration JR 

KESSLER, KIM Overland Park K^/ 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO ^F 

KISICKI, CAROL Omaha, Neb. m 

Accoimtlng SR m 

KLEMP, MELISSA Merriam 

Elementary Education FR 

KLOVER, KELLY Manhattan 

Home Economics and Mass Communications.... JR 
KNOP, KATHY Elllnwood 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. . . . SO 
KONNESKY, SHELLEY Dodge City 

Accounting SO 




366 



Sigma Sigma Sigm; 




LIGHTCAP. TRUDY Satanla 

Elementary Education JR 

LINGO, JANET Manhattan 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO 

LORD, PATTl Kansas City, Mo. 

Interior Design FR 

MACHER, MARTHA Mission 

Elenientarv Education JR 

MAGINNESS. NATALIE Fostoria 

Elementary Education SR 

MANN, STEPHANIE Sylvan Grove 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

MAY, MARGAJIET Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MCINTYRE, CASSIE Hays 

Fashion Marketing SO 

MCKEE, ROXANNE Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MURPHY, JOLA Madison 

Journalism and Mass CommiinlraHoiis SR 

OCHS, RENE Lawrence 

Accounting SO 

OGDEN, LORJ Overland Park 

Management JR 

OFFER, SHANNON Wichita 

Apparel Design SR 

PRICE, SUSAN Salina 

Education SR 

RATHBUN, HOLLY Lindsborg 

Apparel Design JR 

REEDER, KAREN Shawnee 

Finance SR 

REYNOLDS, KRISTINA Kansas City, Kan. 

Marketing JR 

RHODES, PAMI Shawnee 

Marketing SO 

ROTTINGHAUS, BRENDA BaileyviUe 

Journalism and Mass Comunlcation SR 

SARGERT, LAURA Overland Park 

Management FR 

SCHINDLER, DANA Goodland 

Finance JR 

SHANK, PAIGE Liberal 

Marketing 3K 

SHORT, LISA Salina 

Business Administration JR 

SIECK, KARMA Goodland 

Business Administration SO 

SPRAETZ, GINNY Prairie Village 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

SPRINGETT, KELLY Olathe 

Elementary Education JR 

STAHL, PAM St. Joseph. Mo. 

Finance JR 

STEFFENS, JENNIFER Wichita 

Special Education SR 

TEMPLIN, BETH StUweU 

Physical Education SR 

THOMAS, GAIL Topeka 

Marketing JR 

TRAVELUTE, JAMI Hanover 

Accounting JR 

TRIPLETT, REBECCA Salina 

Secondary Education JR 

TUCKER, JANA Shawnee 

Marketing JR 

WALLACE, BOBBI Kingman 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

WATTS, KATHLEEN Prairie Village 

Marketing JR 

WELSH, CONNIE Great Bend 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

WHITE, CARLA... Salina 

Accounting SR 

WHTTTEN, CINDY Overiand Park 

Apparel and Textile Management SR 

WOOD, MARTHA Solomon 

Marketing JR 

WOOTTON, KAREN Overland Park 

Marketing JR 



I Sigma Sigma Sigma 



367 




au Kappa Epsilor 



Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
located at 1515 N. 
Manhattan, was found- 
ed at Illinois Wesleyan 
University on Jan. 10, 
1899. The fraternity col- 
ors are cherry and gray. 
The TKEs flower is the 
red carnation. The 
TKEs have 72 members 
and received their 
charter at K-State on 
Jan. 31, 1931. 




COMFORT, SHEILA Housemother 

ARMBRUST, PAUL Manhattan 

Finance JR 

BESLER, SCOTT Topeka 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BLATCHFORD, ERIC Arkansas City 

Electrical Engineering FR 

BROWN, STEVE Dodge City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

BURNS, MARK Prairie VUlage 

Business Administration SO 

CREASON, CURT Overland Park 

Construction Science FR 

CREWS, DANIEL Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

DICKERSON, BRAD Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

EICICMANN, KEVIN MarysvUle 

Information Systems JR 

FROST, BERT Creve Couer, Mo. 

Marketing SR 

FULLER, JOHN Salina 

Chemical Engineering SO 

GINTHER, DAVID Salina 

Accoimtlng SR 

HALLAUER, VON Hiawatha 

Marketing FR 

HATCHER, NICK Liberal 

Finance JR 

HAYMAKER, ROGER Lamed 

Finance JR 

HAYMAKER, TOM Lamed 

Pre-Law FR 

HEMMER, THOMAS Salina 

Agricultural Economics FR 

HIGGASON, JAMES Norton 

Agricultural Economics SR 

HIGGASON, SCOTT Otis 

Finance SR 

HUMMELL, BRIAN Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

IRETON, MATT Salina 

Elearical Engineering SO 

JOHNSON, KELLY Manhattan 

Engineering FR 

JOHNSON, KIRK Salina 

Agricultural Economics SO 

KANEMASU, RICK Manhattan 

Elearical Engineering FR ^ 

KING, SCOTT Lamed 

Pre-Law FR 

KITT, LANCE Goddard 

Milling Science and Management FR 

KLOVER, RICHARD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

KLOVER, ROBIN Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

KNOSTMAN,JAMES Manhattan 

Pre-Optometry JR 








368 



Tau Kappa EpsilHl 




KNOWLES, MARTIN Salina 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

KNOX, DARREN Topeka 

Bustoess Administration SR 

KOCH, RANDY Marysville 

Business Administration SO 

KUNKEL, PETER Manhattan 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO 

LADENBURGER, BRAD Oaldey 

Accounting SO 

LIGHTCAP.JOHN Hugoton 

Arts and Sciences FR 

LILE. STEPHEN Leawood 

Pre-Medicine SO 

ULLEY. BRENT Silver Lake 

Accounting JR 

LOVELL, MIKE Arkansas City 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

LUBBERS, TROY Arkansas City 

Business Administration FR 

LUCK, BARRY Overland Park 

Marketing FR 

LUTZ, CRAIG Rossville 

Accounting JR 

LYMAN, KENT Olathe 

Milling Science and Management JR 

MABRY, BRYAN Dodge City 

Business Adm inistration JR 

MAYS, JEFFREY Manhattan 

Radio-Television SR 

MCCONNELL, CRAIG Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

MILLER, JAMES Olathe 

Architectural Engineering SO 

MORGAN, GREG Olathe 

Chemical Engineering FR 

MORRIS, JEFF Salina 

Marketing SO 

OLTJEN, ROB Hiawatlia 

Agiicuitural Economics SR 

ORSCHELN, RANDALL Olathe 

Engineering SO 

PALMER. PERRY Arkansas City 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

RAHN, STEVE Arkansas City 

Business Administration FR 

REEDY , CHRJSTROPHER Overiand Park 

Electrical Engineering SO 



DAUGHTERS OF DIANA 



FRONT ROW: Amy Hartley, Michele Boley, Fran 
Mayfield, Kathy Durr, Amy Elwell. SECOND ROW: 
Lisa Beethe. Beverly Willms, Amy McAnarney, Liz 
Rohrbaclt. THIRD ROW: Julie Higgason, Paulette 
Watson, Ann Iseman, Linda Huddleston, Tracey 
Shackelford. BACK ROW: Jill Partridge, Cindy 
Martin, Angela Padden, Diana Hammond. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



369 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

ROBERTSON, CHUCK Overiand Park 

Electrical Engbwering GR 

RUST, PAUL Manhattan 

Biology JR 

SANDLIN, SCOT Muskogee, Okla. 

Journalism and Mass Communicadons JR 

SIUDA, MATTHEW Overland Park 

Accounting JR 

SLA VEN, DANIEL Overland Park 

Millng Science and Management JR 

SLAVEN, JOE Overiand Parii 

Finance SR 

SODERBERG, TODD Salina 

Marketing SO 

STREETS, JEFFREY Fredonia 

Chemical Engineering SR 

SWANSON, BRUCE Overiand Park 

Meclianical Engineering SR 

THOMAS, BRADFORD Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

TORRINO. ERIK Omaha, Neb. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

TUMMONS, BKIAN Fairview 

Pre-Medicine JR 

UNGERER, KEITH Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

WASINGER, GREG Scott City 

Agricultural Economics SR 

WAUFLE, TODD Manhattan 

Finance SO 

WEIGEL, RON Salina 

Marketing SR 









^%hm 




whiseling away at a block of 
ice on the K-State Union ioading 
docl(, Kevin Deaver scuipts an 
ice basi(et to hold fruit for a 
Union dinner. (Photo by Steve 
Wllderson) 




*«*' 



370 





heta Xi 




Theta Xi, located at 
1803 Laramie, was 
founded at Renssalaer 
Polytechnical Institute 
on April 29, 1864. The 
fraternity colors are 
blue and white and their 
flower is the blue iris. 
The Theta Xis received 
their charter at K-State 
on Nov. 7, 1931 and 
have 52 members. 







^ 




RANDALL, NfARIE Housemother 

AVERY, ROBERT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineermg SO 

BEAUCHAMP, KEENAN Ottawa 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

BERGER, STEVE P)ttsbuj| 

Engineering Technology JR 

BUYLE, MARK Manhattan 

Pre-Law SO 

CHISAM, MICHAEL Assaria 

Milling Science and Management FR 

CUSTER, LANCE Kansas City, Kan. 

Bustness Education SR 

DANIELS, PAT Manhattan 

Afchitectural Engineering SO 

EILERT, IX)UG Beloit 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

ESAU, STEVE Concordia 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

FIELDS, OREN Caney 

Engineering FR 

FOX, TODD Stafford 

Accounting SR 

FRESHNOCK, JOHN Manhattan 

Architecture JR 

GISH, DOUG Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering FR 

GROTH, SCOTT Topeka 

Electrical Engineering JR 

GROTH, STEVE Topeka 

Chemical Engineering FR 

HOFER, BARRY Concordia 

Finance JR 

HOFER, SCOTT Condordia 

Architectural Engineering SO 

HURTIG, JAMES Erie 

Pre-Medicine SO 

JACKS, PAUL Kansas City, Kan. 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

KILLEN, DARREN Assaria 

Pre-Medicine JR 

KUMMER, STEVE Great Bend 

Accounting FR 

LONG, WILLIAM Beloit 

Electrical Engineering SO 

MALIR, RICK Wilson 

Agricultural Economics JR 



Theta Xi 



371 



T/heta Xi 



NORDHUS, MATT MaiysviUe 

Construction Science SO 

O'DONNELL, CASEY McCook, Neb. 

Industrial Engineering JR 

PHALEN, JAMES Kansas City, Kan. 

Elearica] Engineering FR 

PIESCHL, DAVID Minneapolis 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

PUGH.RUSS Manhattan 

Marlceting JR 

PULFORD, DAVID Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

QUINN, SCOTT Kansas City, Kan. 

Electrical Engineering SR 

ROSA, PETER Kansas City, Kan. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

RUSSELL, RCSTY St. Jolin 

Radio-Television SR 

SCHOEN, KIPP Downs 

Electrical Engineering FR 

SMALL, KEVIN OUthe 

Landscape Arciiitecture SR 

THOMAS, RYAN Lakin 

Pre-Medicine JR 

VERING, CHRISTOPHER MarysviUe 

Accounting SO 

WETZEL, DOUG Mentor 

Marketing FR 

YUNK, RAPHAEL Ellsworth 

Architectural Engineering JR 



LITTLE SISTERS OF THE 
UNICORN 



l=nONT ROW: Michelle Benolt, Deborah Benoit, 
Becci Wilbur, Jill Russell, Mellnda Hamilton. 
SECOND ROW: Marabeth Mugler, Loree Carpenter. 
Jana Hinman, Denlse Otte, Ronda Bradshaw. THIRD 
ROW: Kyle Hamilton, Caria Stouse, Susan Biggs, 
Jennifer Roberts, Cindy Cote, Joanne Rachel. BACK 
ROW: Lisa Tawney, Helene Higbee, Cathy Caudillo, 
Jan Kinsler, Hilary Thomas. 




372 



Theta I 




riangle 






# 



Triangle, located at 221 
N. Delaware, was 
founded at the Universi- 
ty of Illinois on April 
15, 1907. The fraternity 
colors are old rose and 
gray and their flower is 
the white chrysan- 
themum. Triangle 
received its charter at 
K-State on Sept. 7, 1964 
and has 38 members. 




ANNIS, THOMAS Oakley 

Electrical Engineering PR 

BAILEY, RU» Manhattan 

ArcUtectural Eagtoeering SR 

BOWERS. TODD OvertandPaik 

Electrical Engineering JR 

ELUSON, GREGORY Atchison 

Electrical Engineerin JR 

GRAHAM, BRYAN Bennington 

Mechanical Englneerii« SR 

HARRIS, RICHARD Manhattan 

Joumaltem and Mass Commiinlratlons SR 

HUMPHREY, JEFFREY Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

JOHNSON, DAVID Winslow, Ariz. 

Interior Architecture SR 

KINDER, RANDY Umgford 

Engineering SR 

KXASSEN, DANIEL Manhattan 

Agricukural Engineering SR 

KOHLER, JOSEPH Atchison 

Industrial Engineering GR 

KOHLER, STEVEN Atchison 

Chemical Engineering SO 

LUPPEN, DAVID MarysviUc 

Electrical Engfaieering SR 

MADISON, TODD Manhattan 

Civil Engineering SO 

MCLAIN, KEVIN Manhanan 

Civil Engineering JR 

MERCER, ROBERT Conway Springs 

Engineering FR 

PAGE, LEROY Olathe 

Chemical Engineering FR 

PEUKER, JEFiK Wathena 

Construction Science SR 

ROBSON, CRAJG Abilene 

Electrical Engineering JR 

SEVART, JEFT Topeka 

Mcdunical Enghieering SR 

SIPES, JERRY Mamer 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SPUCHAL, SaCIUEL Manhattan 

Chonical Enghieering SR 

STUBER, GREG Viola 

Engineering FR 

STUCKY, STEVE Wichita 

Chemical Engineering FR 

SWEENEY, MICHAEL Kansas City, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering PR 



riangle 



373 




Uoing over check out pro- 
cedures for Christmas Break 
with her "family" of girls is 
Sheryl Carnahan, staff assistant 
on Ford Nine. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 



B. 



veing a staff assistant means 
more than lending an ear. Dave 
Young finds the administrative 
part of the job tedious work. 
(Plioto by Jeff Taylor) 




374 



Staff Assistant 



Staff Assistants 

help Students adjust to life in residence halls 




unning a family of 
four or five is not un- 
common and some- 
thing that is in most 
students ' plans . But heading 
a family of 60 or 70 is out of 
the question, unless one is a 

residence hall staff assistant. 

Staff assistants were responsible, at least partially, for the students 
living on their floor. The staff assistants often referred to them as 
their "family." 

"A lot of the women on the floor think of their staff assistants as 
moms. I'm sometimes called 'mom'," said Kelli Nichols, senior in 
psychology and pre-law and staff assistant in Ford Hall. 

Staff assistants' jobs included many administrative duties in addi- 
tion to the personal commitment a staff assistant made. 

"The job is a lot more administrative than I thought it would be, 
but it has turned out like I thought," said Sheryl Carnahan, senior in 
social work and family life and human development and staff assis- 
tant in Ford Hall. 

Some staff assistants expected an enjoyable experience from their 
job in the residence hall. 

"I expected a lot of fun," said Dave Young, senior in mechanical 
engineering and exercise science and resident assistant in Goodnow 
Hall. Young found his job to be fun because he got to meet "all dif- 
ferent types of people." 

Young didn't consider being a staff assistant as a job. 

"I don't look at it as a job. I just kind of hang around and be a resi- 
dent and do things for them (the residents)," he said. 

For some, the administrative part of their job was more than they 
expected. 




Iheyl Carnahan, staff assistant on Ford Nine, talces 
time out to tall( to one of the residents on the floor 
before Christmas Breal(. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 



"I didn't expect what I got," said Jeff Clary, senior in computer 
science and staff assistant in Moore Hall. "I expected to be able to 
save the world and be 'Joe Staff and all of that. I didn't expect all 
the paperwork and hassle." 

Most staff assistants agreed that working with people was the most 
enjoyable aspect of the job. 

"I like working with people and this position gives me a chance to 
interact with other people," said Gary Arpin, senior in horticulture 
and staff assistant in Haymaker Hall. 

Many of the staff assistants were drawn to the job by people who 
were their staff assistants as freshmen. 

"When I was a freshman, I had a really good staff assistant. She 
impressed me and made this position appealing," Nichols said. 

Although staff assistants are paid, money is not what attracts 
students to the job. 

"I get a salary, but it doesn't compare to the personal satisfaction 
you get. I get a good feeling from helping people, especially those 
my own age," Clary said. 

— Lori Bredow 



Staff Assistants 



375 




Boyd Hall is a women' 

residence hall built ii 

1951. The hall house 

200 women and is nam 

ed for Mamie Boyd, 

prominent Kansas joui 

nalist and the fin 

woman to head th 

K-State Alumni Associs 

tioi 



ANDERSON, KAREN Overland Park |^^ 

Education FR F 

ANDERSON, TAMELA Barnes : 

Business Administration FR 

ANSTAETT, PAULA C«rbondal* 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

ARMBRUST, CHERI Scott City 

Elemewary Education JR 

ARNOLD, CHERYL VaUey Center 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

AUSTIN, TRACY Hepler 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

BAIRD, LISA Pratt 

Elementary Education FR 

BALDWIN, JULIE Moundridge 

Elementary Education jR 

BEAMAN, DIANE Whiting 

Pre-Nursing FR 

BECHARD, JULIE Clay Center 

Apparel Design FR 

BECKMAN,*JOANN Pratt 

Pre-Medicine FR 

BENNINGA, CARMAN Clay Center 

Music Education FR 

BINGHAM, CHERI Salina BP 

Information Systems FR P* 

BLAZEK, TAMMY Cuba ^ 

Accounting JR 

BLOOMGREN. KIRSTEN Mulvane 

Horticulture SO 

BOND, JENNIFER Wichita 

Arts and Sciences SO 

BOSWORTH, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Elementary Education FR 

BULLER, TRISHA Hutchinson 

Pre-Veterinary SR 

BUSENITZ, SUSAN Benton 

Dietetics SR 

CASEY, CHERI Minneapolis 

Arts and Sciences FR 

CAUDLE, KAREN Overland Park 

Marketing JR 

CHALK, JENNIFER Shawnee 

Horticulture SO 

COMBES. JANEL Lebo 

Interior Design FR 

COOK, CYNTHIA Overland Park 

Computer Science SO 

COX, MICHELLE Wichita 

Family Life and Human Development SO 

CRAIG, DIANNA Overland Park 

Art Education FR 

CROOK, TAMI Wichita 

Psychology FR 

CULVER, MARY Hays 

Accounting JR 

DAVIS, USA Shawnee 

Fashion Marketing SO 

ELKINS, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Marketing JR 




376 




FASSE, BRENDA Effingham 

Bakery Science and Management JR 

FEIL, MARY Cuba 

Secondary Education FR 

GALBREATH, EUZABETH Atchinson 

Home Economics SO 

GARCIA, MICHELE Topeka 

Physical Education SO 

GIBSON, MONICA Lenexa 

Accounting SO 

GIEFER, MARIA WeUington 

Mathematics Education SO 

GLENN, DENISE Lenexa 

Interior Design SO 

GRADWOHL, LAURA RoelandPark 

Accounting FR 

GREENE. AMY Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

GRIMM, DENISE Hutchinson 

Economics JR 

GUISLAIN, ANNE Prairie Village 

English SR 

HALL, NATALIE Freemont, Neb. 

Mathematics FR 

HAMILTON. LANA Overland Park 

Recreation SO 

HANCHETT. MICHELLE Phillipsburg 

Elementary Education SO 

HANZLICK. CHARLENE BeUeviUe 

Elementary Education JR 

HARRIS, BRENDA Hepler 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

HAYES. GINA Topeka 

Management JR 

HEFNER.SHERRI Shawnee 

Special Education JR 

HELMER, MARCI HUlsboro 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology FR 

HINKLE, WANDA Cuba 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HODGES, DIANE Lenexa 

Textile Chemistry FR 

HOFFMAN. LISA AbUene 

Engineering FR 

HOLT, JEANIE Granite City, 111, 

Early Childhood Education SO 

lOOSS, YVONNE Warrensburg. Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

ISEMAN. ANN Wichita 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. . . . FR 
KALIVODA, PAULA Cuba 

Finance FR 

KEATING. MARIA Topeka 

Social Work FR 

KELLY. KRISTEN Leavenworth 

Pre-Nursing FR 

KEY. JULIE Wichita 

Engineering FR 

KRATOCHVIL, LINDA Topeka 

Accounting SR 

LARSEN, KATHRYN Lacygn 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

LARSEN, SUSAN Lacygne 

Family and Child Development FR 

LAWSON, CECILIA BaUwin, Mo. 

Architcctiire SR 

UNDQUIST, TERI MUford 

Elementary Education SO 

LIPS, AMY Bartlett 

Marketing JR 

MARTINEK, LESA SUverLake 

Journalism Education FR 

MELEAN. VIRGINIA Wichita 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine SO 

MILES. DEBORAH Julesburg. Colo. 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

MILLER. ANGIE Onaga 

Pre-Veterinaiy Medicine FR 

MITCHELL. JEANETTE Lenexa 

Elementary Education JR 

MOFFETT. JANICE Peabody 

Social Work FR 

MUGLER, MARABETH Clay Center 

Fashion Marketing SO 

NELSON, LISA Salina 

Business Administration SO 

NITCHER. SANDY BeUeviUe 

Secondary Education JR 

PARK. SEUNGAE Leavenworth 

An SO 

PAYNE, KIM Goddard 

Food Science and Industry SR 

PORTER, PEGGY Basehor 

Office Administration SO 

POWELL, ANNETTE Topeka 

Computer Science SR 



foyd Hall 



377 



Boyd 



POWELL, JENNIFER Topeka 

Computer Science. SR 

PRICE, DAWN BeUeville 

Business Administration FR 

PRINZ, ANNE Overiand Park 

Arcbitecture SR 

REGINl, MICHELLE Lenexa 

Fashion Marketing FR 

REINECKER, CINDY Quinter 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

RHODES, CAROLYN VaUey Center 

Social Work JR 

RIEDL.TWILLA Scott City 

Apparel Design JR 

RIEMER, SANDY Bonner Springs 

Accounting SR 

ROBISON, RENEE Warrensburg, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

SCHMIDT, LAURA Salina 

Accounting SO 

SCHNEIDER, LORI Atchinson 

Elementary Education FR 

SHRINER, CHERYL Ellsworth 

Information Systems SO 

SLIFER, CINDY Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

STADLER, ANNE Prairie ViUage 

Education JR 

STEINBACH, REBECCA Ctay Center 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

STIPPICH, JULIE Wichita 

Computer Science FR 

TAYLOR, KAREN Lenexa 

Arts and Sciences FR 

THEIL, JODEE McPherson 

Secondary Education FR 

VANLANDINGHAM, AMY Tuscon,Ariz. 

Electrical Engineering SO 

WAGNER, RHONDA Leavenworth 

Accounting JR 



WASSON, CHERIE Lenexa 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

WEDEMAN, EUZABETH Overland Park 

Textile Chemistry SO 

WEEKS, KATHY Council Grove 

Business Administration FR 

WHALEY, TRACEY St. Loute, Mo. 

Agricuhiu^ Eogbieering SR 



WINKLHOFER, KATHY Roeland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

WOLTERS, KAREN Atchinson 

Grain Sctence SR 

YEARGIN, KRI^n Woodbridge, Va. 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

ZINN, HEIDI Topeka 

Early Childhood Education FR 




378 




lovia 



Ciovia 4-H House is a 
women's cooperative 
house built in 1966 and 
houses 60 women. 




MCDANIEL, KAREN Manhattan 

AduK and Occupational Education GR 

ANDERSON, KELLINE Leavenworth 

Agricultural Economics SR 

ARNOLD, SHELLEY Johnson 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

BLAKESLEE, KAREN Great Bend 

Food Science and Industry SR 

BORGSTADIER, ANGELA Ellsworth 

Home Economics Extension JR 

CARPENTER, LOREE Girard 

Mathematics SO 

CLEMENTS, ALICE Salina 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine JR 

CLEMENTS, DEENEEN Herington 

Fine Arts JR 

DAHL, SUSAN Hardy, Neb. 

Special Education FR 

DAHNKE, CYNTHIA Argusville, N.D. 

Architecture FR 

DEPOE, SUSANNA Kincaid 

Dietetics SR 

DILLMAN, LORETTA Emporia 

Textile Science FR 

DUVRAVIN, BARB Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

ELLIOTT, JANET Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

ELLIOTT, JEAN Hiawatha 

Elementary Education SR 

FOWLER, RHONDA Emporia 

Fashion Marketing SO 

FULK, BARBARA Fairview 

Agricultiu-al Journalism SR 

GEORGE, MARGENA Oswego 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

GEORGE, PAULA Redfleld 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

HAMMER, LANA Scandia 

Agicultural Economics SO 

HOOVER, ANNETTE Abilene 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

HOOVER, SANDRA Abilene 

Social Work SO 

HOWARD, SUSAN Eudora 

Agricultural Journalism SO 

HUNEYCUTT, TERESA Cherryvale 

Engineering FR 

KANE, HELEN Paola 

Home Economies Education SO 

KARR, KELLY Emporia 

Food Science SO 

KELLY, TERESA Osawatomie 

Secondary Education FR 

LOUCKS, DEANNA Pittsburg 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

MALONE, PAMELA Sublette 

Elementary Education SR 

PACEY, POLLY Oakhill 

Mathematics Education JR 



Clovia 



379 



Q 



ovia 



PECKMAN, PAMELA Paola 

Crop Production FR 

PHILLIPS, JANET Valley FaUs 

Computer Science SO 

PHILLIPS, SARAH Wakeeney 

Arts and Sciences SO 

PHILLIPS, SUE Wakeeney 

Home Economics Education SR 

POOLE, JANETTE Manhattan 

Agricultural Journalism JR 

ROBERTS, LEIGH Linwood 

Pre-Design Professional FR 



ROBERTSON, DAWN Gas 

Information Systems JR 

ROUX, JOYCE Moimdridge 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

RUPP, DAWN Moundridge 

Business Administration FR 

SANDQUIST, JANICE Wakeeney 

Pre-Vcterinary Medicine SO 

SCHULTE, LEE ANN Victoria 

Mathematics Education JR 

SMITH, RACHEL Dresden 

Arts and Sciences FR 




TESSENDORF, LORI CirclevUle 

Agricultural Economics SO 

UNGER, COLLEEN Oberlin 

Accounting FR 

VOTH, PATRICL\ Hesston 

Apparel Design SO 

WAGNER, CHARLA Kinsley 

Accounting SR 

WAGNER, JUDY Downs 

Social Work SO 



WAGNER, KARLA Kinsley 

Management JR 

WALKER, CRYSTAL Manhattan 

Modem Languages FR 

WESSEL,SHANNON Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

WHTTSON, JAYNE Altoona 

Fine Arts JR 

YOST, CAROLYN Downs 

Fashion Marketing SO 




M fenced pasture, on Kansas 
Highway 92 near Atchison, pro- 
vides a baclcdrop for two horses 
grazing in the pastures. (Photo 
by Jeff Taylor) 



380 



Clovll 




wards 



Edwards Hall is a co-ed 
residence hall built in 

11967 housing 200 
residents. The hall was 
an athletic residence 
hall until its renaming 
in 1978 when it began 
housing non-athletes as 
jwell. It is named for A. 
Thorton Edwards, 
jdirector of housing for 
37 years. 




AGAUJO, JAVIER SterUng 

Business Administration SR 

BADKE, BRADLEY Topelta 

Electrical Engineering SR 

BEAL, LORI Hutchinson 

Joumallsm and Mass Communications SR 

BEER, MARK Mansfield, Ohio 

History GR 

BJORNMALM, ANNA Vagnharad, Sweden 

Journalism and Mass Communications GR 

BRYANT, DAVID Fairway 

Marketing W 

CASTROP, CHRISTOPHER.... Kansas City, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

CHEESEBROUGH, ERIC Kansas City, Mo. 

Electrical Engineering SR 

CULP,STEVEN Topeka 

Computer Science GR 

ESCALADA, LAWRENCE Garden City 

Architectural Engineering IR 

GUTIERREZ, JUANTTA MeddUn, Colombia 

Radlo-Televlslon GR 

HAZZARD, ELIZABETH Gallatfai, Mo. 

Elementary Education SR 

HUNT, PAUL Chanute 

Engineering Teclmology SR 

JARRETT, DAVID Kansas City, Kan. 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KEENER, DAKA Lenexa 

Horticulture SR 

KORTE, TOM Garden City 

Computer Science JR 

LOVE, VALERIE Aurora, Colo. 

Bakery Science and Management JR 

MCCARTER, JEFF Manhattan 

Social Sciences SR 

MCDANIEL, ROSS Kansas City, Kan. 

Geology SR 

MEIER, JOE Hays 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology JR 

NEWKmK, KEVIN SterUng 

Engineering Technology SR 

NIELSEN, CATHERINE Overland Park 

Physfcal Education SR 

OHAIR, DAVID Akron, Ohio 

Marketing SR 

PANKRATZ, MICHAEL Lamed 

Electrical Engineering JR 



381 



Edwards 



witting on a dock at Tuttle 
Creek, Clirissie Ninci and Frank 
Logback enjoy a sunny fali after- 
noon. (Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 




PEARSON, HAROLD Manbattan 

MUUng SdCDCc and Management SR 

RIEDMILLER, MARCIA Augusta 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine JR 

SCHROEDER. BRADLEY Wichita 

Engineering Technology JR 

SEIBIERT, TODD Parsons 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SHINN, GLENDA McPherson 

Biology SO 



SPICER, ALAN Wlchha 

CIvU Englneerins SR 

STAMBAOGH. JIM Olathe 

Horticulture SR 

STAITTH, BRENT Dodge CItv 

Phyilcal Education GR 

WELLS, NATHANIEL Manhattan 

Engineering FR 

WHrtTILL. DAVID Kiowa 

Nuclear Engineering JR 

YANCEY, JOHN Kansas City, Mo. 

Architecture SR 




382 



Edwards Hal 



1 




ord 



ord Hall is a women's 
esidence hall built in 
967 and housing 650 
Komen. The hall was 
amed for Kenney L. 
!ord, long-time ex- 
cutive secretary of the 
L-State Alumni Associa- 
on. 




ALEXANDER, LADONNA Manhattan 

Fashion Marketing FR 

ALLEN, KAREN Shawnee 

Business Administration FR 

ALMQUIST, DIANE Lacrosse 

Milling Sdence and Maoacement SR 

ALTWEGG, ELIZABETH Junction City 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

ANDERSON, KIMBERLY Prarie ViUage 

Arts and Sciences FR 

ANDREWS, DEBRA Topeka 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

ANNAN, BEVERLY Onaga 

Alts and Sciences FR 

ANNAN, MARL\ Onaga 

Family and Child Development JR 

APPLEGATE, GINA St. Francis 

Family Marketing FR 

ARNHOLD, CHRISTINE Wakeeney 

Elementary Education SO 

BAICER,MARIANN Garden City 

Medical Technology SO 

BARTELLI, LISA Olathe 

Secondary Education FR 

BERGMAN, LISA Topeka 

Architectural Engmeering FR 

BERRY, JANET Lenora 

Engineering FR 

BLAZEK, SUE Munden 

Medical Technology FR 

BOLLIER, MICHELE Prarie Village 

Pre-Medicine SO 

BOSCH, ELISE Salina 

Biochemistry SO 

BOSCH, MARY Salina 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BRADSHAW, RONDA Topeka 

Architectural Engineering FR 

BREITENBUCHER, JILL Prarie Village 

Accounting SO 

BROOKS, KIM Culver 

Elementary Education FR 

BROSE. DENISE Valley Falls 

Computer Science SO 

BROWN, SHARON McPherson 

Medical Technology SO 

BROWN, STACEY Overland Park 

Interior Design FR 

BRUCE, SUSAN MUan 

Afqjarel and Textile Marketing JR 

BRUNING, STEPHANIE PhiUipsburg 

Secondary Education FR 

BURTON, PAMELA Summerfield 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

BUTLER, SUSAN Valentine, Neb. 

Interior Design JR 

BYER, JULIE. SUflbrd 

Apparel and Textile MarkctiBg SR 

CARNAHAN, SHERYL Wamcgo 

Sodal Work SR 



ord Hall 



383 



Ford 



CHURCHMAN, KRIS Roeland Park 

Interior Design SO 

CLAASSEN, KRISTINE Whitewater 

Home Economics Education SO 

CLAASSEN, MICHELLE Potwin 

Foods and Nutr. Bus.Community Nutr FR 

CLARK, KIMBERLY Salina 

Mathematics FR 

COGSWELL, JANELLE Topeka 

Pre-Dentistry FR 

CRAIG, CAROL Lorraine 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

CREIGHTON, LISA Manhattan 

Political Science JR 

CRESS, JOY Topeka 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine SO 

CUNNINGHAM, MARY Wichiu 

Biology SO 

DALLAM, KAREN Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

DECKERT, ALYSIN Salina 

Pre-Medicine SO 

DENK, CANDY Agenda 

Elementary Education SO 

DISQUE, JULIE Salina 

Management FR 

DOMVILLE, CHRISTINA Liberal 

Elementary Education JR 

DORSCH, JENNIFER Bird City 

Civil Engineering FR 

DUNLAP, MICHELLE Fort Riley 

History SO 

EDIGER, JANET Mcpherson 

Social Work SO 

EICHMAN, LORETTA Westmoreland 

Elementary Education FR 

ELLEDGE, LYNN St.Louis, Mo. 

Architectural Enghwering SR 

ELLIOTT, SHANNON Phillipsburg 

Arts and Sciences FR 

ESSUNGER, STARRLENE Mankato 

Apparel and Textile Marketliis SR 

EVANS, CLAUDETTE Olathe 

Accounting JR 

FISCHER, ELAINE Ottawa 

Medical Technology JR 

FISHER, LISA McDonald 

Home Economics ExtensloD SR 

FLEEKER, CHRISTINE Meriden 

Pre-Medicine SO 

FOSTER, MARY Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

FREDRICHSON, JULIE Lindsborg 

Interior Design FR 

FRENCH, KAMELA Sublette 

Pre-Veterinaiy Medicine FR 

GAMMELL, JENNIFER Lindsborg 

Physical Education SO 

GILNER, JOAN Overland Park 

Accountiiig SR 

GRIFFIN, NANCY Cottonwood FaUs 

Marketing SO 

HAMILTON, MELINDA Topeka 

Civil Engineering FR 

HANDLE, LISA Bums 

Radio-Television FR 

HANKINS, ANDREA Robinson 

Pre-Optometry FR 

HARMAN, JANET Kansas City, Kan. 

Theater JR 

HARTZLER, LAURIE Overland Park 

Psychology SO 

HAWKINS, LYDEE Great Bend 

Elementary Education So 

HENNE, KARLA Gypsum 

Business Administration FR 

HENRY, SHARl St. John 

Secondary Education SO 

HESS, CHARLENE McPherson 

Business Administration FR 

HINSHAW, BETH Hutchinson 

Agricultural Economics SO 

HOWERTON, LESLI Hays 

Accounting JR 

HUDDLESTON, LINDA Marysville 

Agricultural Journalism FR 

HUGGINS, BARBARA Beloit 

Leisure Studies FR 

HUMMELL, LORRAINE Unexa 

Elementary Education FR 

HUNTER, KRIS Tonganoxie 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

HUTCHINS, ANDREA Scott City 

Dietetics FR 

JACOBS, BETH Overland Park 

Marketing SO 




384 



Ford n 




I rying to keep warm, Jamie 
Aylward and Kelly Strayer cover 
their faces from the cold 
weather as they walk home from 
class. (Photo by John Sleezer) 




JAMES, DANA Ness City 

Accounting FR 

JOHANNINGMEIER, LYNN Springfield, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professional FR 

KATS, CANDACE Phillipsburg 

Business Administration FR 

KELLER, USA Ellis 

Agricultural Economics SO 

KING, JANICE Hutchinson 

Accounting JR 

KING, SHERRY Overland Park 

Sociology SO 

KINZEL, CATHERINE Odin 

Architecture FR 

LAHODNY, LEAH BeUeviUe 

Social Work FR 

LAMPE, MARY Kendall 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

LANE, JON Hdton 

Accounting SR 

LARKIN. SUSAN Shawnee 

Finance FR 

UCHTER, LINDA Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

LILLEY, JULIE Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences JR 

LINDSAY, NATALEE Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

LUNDRY, CONNIE Topeka 

Accounting SR 

MADDEX, TERI Paola 

Music Education FR 

MAJERUS, JOAN Junction City 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MASON, LEESA Norton 

Music FR 

MASTERS, KIM Herrington 

Business Administration FR 

MCCLURE.JILL Lenexa 

Accounting FR 

MCCOY, SANDI Ness City 

Psychology SO 

MCPEEK, ERIN BeUe Plalne 

Elementary Education SR 

MEYER, THERESE Goddard 

Psychology FR 

MILLER, KIMBERLY Phillipsburg 

Business Adminiaration FR 



Drd Hall 



385 



Ford 



MILLS, CYNTHIA Herington 

Business Administration FR 

MONROE, LISA Prairie VUlage 

Speech Pathology FR 

MULLER, DL\NE Hlinwood 

Accounting FR 

NEUSCHAFER, PAM Enterprise 

History SO 

NILY, DAWN Great Bend 

Natural Resources Management SO 

NOE, SUSAN Solomon 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine FR 

NORDWALL, JILL Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

OESTNAMM, LANETTA Arkansas City 

Accounting SO 

OLSEN, ANGELA Valrico, Fla. 

Pre-Medicine FR 

ONEALE, HEATHER Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

OTIS, DONNA Sallna 

Eariy ChildJiood Education SR 

PAAP, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Fine Arts JR 

PARKS, MARY Kansas City, Kan. 

Accountii^ SR 

PATTERSON, LEE Fairway 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

PRIEST, DL\NE Lenexa 

Psychology SO 

PURSLOW, AMY Atchison 

Business Administration FR 

QUINN, MARY Naples, Italy 

Special Education JR 

RAGES, REBECCA Geneseo 

Heme Economics Education SR 

RATZLAFF, JULIE Newton 

Elementary Education JR 

REED, JENNY Salina 

Elementary Education FR 

REED, LISA Hutchinson 

Psychology JR 

REED, SUSAN Torrance, Calif. 

Dietetics JR 

REISERER, JAMIE Eldorado 

Business Administration JR 

REYNOLDSON, AMY Phillipsburg 

Psychology FR 

REZAC, KIMBERLY Onaga 

Business Administration SO 

RIBBENTROP, TONYA Omaha, Neb. 

Interior Design FR 

RIBORDY, LORNA Salina 

Business Administration FR 

ROCKERS, MARY Gamett 

Radio-Television FR 

RUMFORD, DEBBIE Ottawa 

Home Economics Education SO 

SALSBURY, TRACY Topeka 

Architecture FR 

SAMARZUA, MARY Hays 

Architectural Engineering FR 

SANDERS, ANGELA MUtonvale 

Accounting SO 

SANFORD, STACY Junction City 

Business Administration SO 

SCHAFF, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Interior Design FR 

SCHAMLE, ROBERTA WellsviUe 

Accounting SO 

SCHUMAICER, ANGIE Topeka 

Secondary Education JR 

SHACKELFORD, TRACEY Rossville 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SHANNON, MARSHA Sauna 

Accounting FR 

SHERLEY, JANET Leavenworth 

Business Administration FR 

SHIELDS. SARAH Overland Park 

Interior Design JR 

SIDENER. JULIE Solomon 

Secondary Education JR 

SMITH, NANCY Great Bend 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology SO 

SMITH, STACY Hutchinson 

Philosophy FR 

SOMMER, SHARI Alma 

Arts and Sciences FR 

STONESTREET, MAURL«i Kansas City, Kan. 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

STRELTZER. TRACIE Prairie Village 

Arts and Sciences SO 

STUBENHOFER, MEUNDA Strong City 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

SUTTON, MARCIA Unexa 

Engineering FR 




386 



Ford Hall 








M 




Uhris Kinkaid is reflected in a 
puddle as she walks past tlie 
parking lot at Laramie and 12th 
streets. November rains kept the 
parking lot full of water for 
several weeks. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



SWARTZ, NANCY Lacrosse 

Agricultural Journalism FR 

TASKINEN, CHERYL Greenleaf 

Electrical Engineering FR 

THOMPSON, TERI Eldorado 

Arts and Sciences SO 

TURLEY, DANA Goodland 

Business Administration FR 

UNRUH, LISA Hillsboro 

Business Administration FR 

UNRUH, MARLA Newton 

Elementary Education JR 

VAN,THITHU-VAN Garden City 

Elementary Education SR 

WAICEM, LISA Scarborough 

Arts and Sciences FR 

WALDORF, LAREINA Arkansas City 

Agricultural Journalism FR 

WALROD, LEISA Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

WASHBURN, STEPHANIE Norton 

Business Administration FR 

WATSON, PAULETTE Overiand Park 

Engineering FR 

WENDT, JACKIE Herington 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

WHITE, LISA Goodland 

Life Sciences SR 

WILLETT, MICHELE Topeka 

Architecture FR 

WILLIAMS, KIMBERLY Great Bend 

Horticulture SO 

WINELAND, SHELLI Hutchinson 

Marketing FR 

YI, SEUNGBOK Leavenworth 

Art FR 



Ford Hall 



387 




oodnow 



Goodnow Hall is a co-ec 

residence hall housin; 

635 men and women 

The hall was built ii 

1960 and is named foi 

Isaac T. Goodnow, co 

founder of Bluemon 

Central College 



AELMORE, MARLA Shawnee 

Natural Resources Management SO 

AMEY, ZOEANN Alexandria, Va. 

Arts and Sciences FR 

ANDREW, JANET Mllford 

Pre-Law SR 

ANTRIM, SUSAN Kingman 

Chemistry SO 

ATCHISON, JAMES Overland Park 

Accaunting SR 

ATWELL, LANCE Norton 

Electrical Engineering SR 

AYERS, USA Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

BEATTIE. ANNA Olney, Md. 

Early Childhood Education FR 

BELOTE, DUANE Pratt 

Veterinary Medicine JR 

BINGHAM, LYNN Salina 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BIRMINGHAM, LAURA Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

BLACK KIMBERLY Prairie VUlage 

Elementary Education JR 

BOAZ, MELISSA Richardson, Texas F" 

Pre-Dentistry FR 

HOUGHTON, KURTIS Topcka 

Elementary Education SR 

BOWERS, JEFFREY Kansas City, Mo. 

Computer Science SR 

BROWN, REBECCA Effingham 

Industrial Engineering FR 

BROZEK, RHONDA Cheney 

Accounting FR 

BUHL, ELLEN Grandview, mo. 

Electrical Engineering JR 

CAILTEUX, MARLENE Clyde B 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO I 

CALDER, KRISTI Shawnee 

Psychology JR i 

CAO, LANH Garden City 

Accounting JR 

CARTER, SCOTT Wichita 

Architectural Engineering SR 

CLAWSON, MARY BETH SatanU 

Arts and Sciences FR 

COINER, WILLIAM Olathe 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CORNEJO, MARY Whifleld p^ 

Leisure Studies SR ' 

CRITES, KRISTI Greensburg 

Elementary Education FR 

CROOK, SHARON Easton 

Mathematics JR 

CROWELL, ERIC Wichita 

Information Systems FR 

DAUTEL, VICKY Hope 

Ajmarel and Textile Marketing FR 

DAVIS, MARVETTE Kansas City, Kan. 

Interior Design FR 



388 





DAVIS, MICHELLE Salina 

Biology SR 

DAY, ROBIN e Dorado 

Business Administration JR 

DEMEL, KAREN Hoisington 

Architectural Engineering JR 

DEMEL, KELLY Hoisington 

Construction Science FR 

DDCON, JOYCE Leon 

Accounting SO 

DORNBUSCH, DAVID Bbmarck, N.D. 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

DORNBUSCH, MICHAEL Bismarck, N.D. 

Computer Science JR 

EASTMAN, JO-L Coffeyrille 

Nutritional Science SO 

EBBERTS, DAVID Eureka 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

EDWARDSON, AMY Great Bend 

Mathematics FR 

EKART, DONNA Manhattan 

Psychology SO 

ENG, GREGORY Chesterfield, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

ENGELKEN, BRIAN NaperviUe, HI. 

Architecture FR 

ENLOW, BRENDA Dodge City 

Marketing SR 

ESPINOZA, SANDY Shawnee 

Management JR 

FAIRCHILD, TERRY Leoti 

Engineering Technology JR 

FAUNCE, KIM Holt, Mo. 

Pre-Law FR 

FERRIN, BRIAN Bucklln 

Fine Arts SR 

FIRESTONE, DAVID loU 

Management JR 

FORSTER, WILLIAM St. Louis, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering FR 

FOSTER, ALAN Topeka 

Agricultural Economics JR 

FOX, DIANE BaUwtn, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

FREISE,JON Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering FR 

FRY, PHILLIP Hamilton 

Electrical Engineering JR 

GARDNER, SCOTT Hutchinson 

Nuclear Engineering SO 

GILLEY, JODIE BeUevue, Neb. 

Management SO 

GLIDEWELL, ANDRENA Emporia 

Biology SR 

GORMAN, ANTHONY Prairie Village 

Psychology JR 

GRABER, BRYAN Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology JR 

GRABER, JULIE Pretty Prairie 

Business Administration FR 

GRAHAM, RONALD Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

GRAHAM, STEVE Topeka 

Chemical Science JR 

GRIFFIN, JON AbUene 

Engineering SO 

GRISWELL, LISA Gypsum 

Elementary Education SR 

GRITTEN, GRETCHEN RepubUc 

Management SO 

HABIGER, JULIE Spearville 

Social Work FR 

HACHMEISTER, DIANE Lenore 

Accounting FR 

HALE, LISA Topeka 

English Education SR 

HAMILTON, LYNETTE Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

HANSEN, ROBERT Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering FR 

HAUB, STEPHANIE Topeka 

Chemical Engineering FR 

HAUSFELD, REGESA WicUU 

Industrial Engineering SR 

HAYS, JENNIFER Lindsborg 

Theater FR 

HEDRICH, ALAN Inman 

Secondary Education SR 

HEINZ, KECIA St. Helena, Calif. 

Interior Design SO 

HERDMAN, MICHELLE Kansas City. Kan. 

Accoimting FR 

HERDMAN, WENDY Tonganoxie 

English FR 

HERMAN, CYNTHIA Hugoton 

Elementary Education SO 



Goodnow Hall 



389 



Cjoodnow 



w,< 



Mllie the Wildcat takes Texas 
Christian University's mascot, 
the Horned Frog, for a ride on a 
three-wheeler during the 
K-State-TCU football game in 
KSU Stadium. (Photo by Jeff 
Weattieriy) 



HINKLE, KATHEWNE CMathe 

Fine Arts SO 

HONOMICHL, KEVIN Lamed 

Civil Engineering SR 

HCX)VER, JEANNIE St. George 

Social Work FR 

HORN, SHARISSE Wicliita 

Business Administration SO 

HOWARD, BRIAN Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

HOWELL, MARY Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

HUFFMAN, BARBARA Nickerson 

Electrical Engineering SR 

HULL, JACKIE Beloit 

Computer Science FR 

HURLBUT, ANDREA Pittsburg 

Modem Languages FR 

IRWIN, JOHN Overbrook 

Engineering Technology FR 

IVEY, BRIAN Hutchinson 

Finance SO 

IVY, SUZANNA Cheney 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

JACKSON, WARNETTA Kansas City, Kan. 

Dietetics FR 

JENIA,JOHN Spring Hill 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

JEWELL, LORNA Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

JOHNSON, FRANKLIN Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering SR 

JOHNSON, PAUL Hutchinson 

Computer Science SO 

JONES, JACQUELINE Herington 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

JOST, LANCE Pawnee Rock 

Arts and Sciences FR 

JUNGK, JEFF Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering FR 

KEANE. MARX Maryland Heights, Mo. 

Architecmre FR 

KINGSBURY, DALLAS AugusU 

Physics SR 

KIVETT, TODD Topeka 

Engineering FR 

KNIGHT, SCOTT Overland Park 

Construction Science SO 




390 



Goodnow Hall 




KONECK, JOHN Omaha, Neb. 

CIvU EDgineering SR 

KORTE, TODD Highland, Ul. 

Constniction Science FR 

KUHN, LEIGH ANN Sedgwick 

Chemical Engineering FR 

LANDERS, LISA Herington 

Pre-Medicine FR 

LENHART, KERRY Georgetown. HI. 

Fine Arts SR 

LEVERICH, MICHAEL Buckline 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

LOGBACK, LAURA Hillsboro 

Architecture and Design FR 

LUCKNER, ROBERT Olathe 

Information Systems SR 

LUTHI, LINDA Wakefield 

Speech Pathology and Audiology FR 

LUTHI, MELISSA Wichita 

History FR 

MADINGER, CHARLES Highland Parl(, HI. 

Construction Science SR 

MARTIN, GEORGE Hoisington 

Electrical Engineering SR 

MCKAIN, VALORIE Salina 

Secondary Education FR 

MCKAY, LISA Highland 

Elementary Education SR 

MCMURRAY, JIM Hutchinson 

Political Science JR 

MERMIS, CONSTANCE Gorham 

Life Sciences JR 

MESEKE, MICHAEL Leavenworth 

Engineering FR 

MEYER, KEITH Tampa 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

MEYER, PAMELA Tampa 

Agriculmral Engineering SO 

MEYERS, MICHAEL PlainvUle 

Electrical Engineering FR 

MIKA, TED Stilwell 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

MILES, PEGGY Lacrosse 

Computer Science SO 

MILLER, SHARON Topeka 

PubUc Admhiistration GR 

MINNICH, LISA Sebra 

Social Work FR 

MITCHELL, JAMES Piqua.Ohio 

Electrical Engineering JR 

MOREY, STEPHEN Paola 

Electrical Engineering JR 

MUNDAY, ANN Prairie Village 

lUdio-Television SO 

MUNSON, ROBERT BeUeville 

Management JR 

MURRELL, MARC Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology JR 

NEESE, TODD Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering JR 

NEWELL, LENORA Wichita 

Biochemistry FR 

NIEDFELDT, TRESA Paxico 

Accounting SR 

NORRIS, TIMOTHY Plainville 

Architectural Engineering FR 

NOVOTNY, CORBIN Russell 

Pre-Law FR 

NUTTER, COLLEEN Kirkland, Wash. 

Horticulnire Therapy JR 

OBERRIEDER, MARK Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

ORR, SANDRA White City 

Arts and Sciences FR 

POFF, DAWN Leavenworth 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

PORTER, ROGER Olathe 

Bu sine ss Administration JR 

POSTIER, TODD Wakeeney 

Industrial Engineering SR 

POWELL, DAVID Crestwood, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering FR 

PRICE, BRYAN Uncohi, Kan. 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

PRICE, TRAVIS Lincoln, Kan. 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

PROCTOR, SUZANNE Pratt 

Industrial Engineering FR 

RAHN, CHRISTINA Arkansas City 

Architectural Engineering SO 

RAY, CAROL Lincoln, Neb. 

Elementary Education JR 

REAMS, MARK Goddard 

Electrical Engineering SO 

REECE, KATHLEEN Lenena 

Industrial Engineerii^ SR 



oodnow Hall 



391 



Goodnow 



REICHLE, DAVID Atchison 

Electrical Engineering FR 

REILLY. STEVE Topelta 

Engineering Technology JR 

ROACH, SHERYL Olathe 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

ROETS, DEBBIE Manhattan 

Elementary Education FR 

ROGERS, JASON Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

ROSENHAGEN, DONNA Cheney 

Radio-Television FR 

ROWE, BARBARA Sharon 

Business Administration SR 

RUMPEL, LYNETTE Wakeeney 

Apparel and Textile Mariceting FR 

SANDERSON, CHRIS Emporia 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SAUNDERS, SIETSKB Terrytown, N.Y. 

Architecture FR 

SCHARTZ, KEVIN Larned 

Psychology SR 

SCHARTZ. PAMELA Lamed 

Elementary Education SO 

SCHEUFLER, SUE Sterling 

Engineering SO 

SCHMALZRIED, GERALD Topeka 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SCHMALZRIED, RICK Quinter 

Electrical Engineering JR 

SCHMIDT, ANITA WUUston, N.D. 

Retail Floriculture SR 

SCHNEITHORST, CRAIG Hutchinson 

Marketing SO 

SCHUENEMEYER, CONNIE Union, Mo. 

IMerlor Design SR 

SCHWABAUER, MIKE Overland Park 

Architecture FR 

SCHWARTZ, JAN Hutchinson 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

SCOTT, MICHAEL Leoti 

Radio-Television FR 

SCRTTCHFIBLD, JANELL Ellsworth 

Engineering Technology SO 

SEYFERT, SCOTT Salina 

Business Administration SO 

SHUMATE, DAREN Belolt 

Architectural Ei^ineering SR 

SINCLAIR, JENNIFER Neodesha 

Finance JR 

SLOAN, CAROLE Mullinville 

Business Administration FR 

SMITH, JAN Sauquolt, N.Y. 

Horticulture Therapy SR 

SMTTH, JEFF Inman 

Arch itectural Engineering FR 

SMITH, PHIL Hutchfaison 

Landscape Architecture SR 

SMITH, RITA Shorewood. III. 

Business Administration JR 

SOUTHARD, STEPHANIE Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

SPANLEY, KEVIN Glendale, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering SO 

SPIN AR, MARK Brookings, S.C. 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SPOKES, VIRGINIA St. Petersburgh, Fla. 

Physical Education SO 

STAINBROOK, JOANN Halstead 

Apparel and Textile Mariceting SR 

STEWART, CHRISTINE Washington 

Accounting FR 

STEWART, DAVID Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

STEWART, KIMBERLY Oswego 

Business Education FR 

STONEKING, PATSY Bonner Springs 

Psychology JR 

STOVER, STEPHANIE Abeline 

Pre-Law FR 

STRTTZKE, TODD Caney 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

STUMPFF, REBECCA Shawnee 

Accounting FR 

TANNEHILL, TRACY Wakefield 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology FTl 

TATHAM. EIRENE Olathe 

Construction Science JR 

THEIS, CRAIG Leavenworth 

Engineering Technology SR 

THOMPSON, JANET Burlingame 

Electrical Engineering FR 

TIEMANN, JACINDA Salhia 

Computer Science SR 

TIEMANN, PATRICIA Salina 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 



392 





lYIount Re-Sale" was one 
of 17 sand structures built at the 
Third Annual Sandcastle 
Charette by architecture 
students at the Broken Arrow 
Ranch on Tuttle Creek Reser- 
voir. The event was sponsored 
by the American Institute of Ar- 
chitecture Students. (Photo by 
John Sleezer) 



TRABUE, TAMARA JefTerson City, Mo. 

Architectural Engiiieeriiig SR 

TUNKS, BARRY Wichita 

Marketing FR 

USELDINGER, LORI Kansas City, Kan. 

Engineering SO 

VAN DOREN, JULIE Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

VAN LOENEN, JUDY Bogue 

Home Economics FR 

VANDORN, KIMBERLY Kansas City, Kan. 

Pre-Veterinaiy Medicine FR 

VELASQUE, BOBBY Abilene 

Electrical Engineering SR 

VENTERS, KENT Dodge City 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

VERA. NANCY Overland Park 

Fine Arts SO 

VERSCHELDEN, MARK SI. Marys 

Industrial Engineering ^ 

VOPATA, EDWARD Frankfort 

Computer Science SR 

VSETECKA, LANA Wakeeney 

Art SR 

WALTERS, FRED Topeka 

Fine Arts SO 

WANDERLICH, MARCIA Washington, Mo. 

Interior Design SR 

WAiyiEN, DAVID Wichita 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

WARREN, DEBRA Chetopa 

Finance FR 

WASKO, KURT Hanston 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

WEAVER, BRIAN Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering FR 

WEBB, ROBERT Mission 

Informatim Systems SR 

WEIR, KIM Olathe 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

WHISNER, BRL^N Kansas City, Kan. 

Information Systems FR 

WHITE, JAMES Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering SO 

WnCOFF, JENNIFER Hoxie 

Home Economics FR 

WDLLERS, MAELYN Stanton, Neb. 

Animal Science SR 



Goodnow Hall 



393 



Goodnow 



WILLIAMS, LISA Great Bend 

Elementary Education SR 

WILSON, PAULA Shawnee 

Industrial Engineering FR 

WINELAND, CANDI Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering JR 

WING, JEFF Altoona 

Civil Engineering FR 

WOHLER, JULIE Overland Park 

Accountiiig SR 

WOLF, CHRISTINE Kansas City, Kan. 

Marketing JR 

WONDERLICH, RANDALL Osborne 

Pre-Medicine FR 

WORKS, AMY Sedgwick 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

WORKS, PAUL Sedgwick 

Physics SR 

YOUNT, TIM Atwood 

Accounting JR 




ZERR. DEBBIE Salina 

Arts and Sciences FR 

ZIDEK. SUSAN Beattie 

Industrial Engineering FR 

ZIMMERMAN, MARK South Haven 

Chemical Engineering FR 



R, 



landy Bartel attempts to 
tackle Corey "Otis" McKee dur- 
ing a snow football game. 
(Photo by Jeff Tuttle) 




394 



Goodnow Hall' 




ay maker 



iaymaker Hall is a 
nen's residence hall 
•uilt in 1967 and hous- 
iig 650 men. The hall is 
tamed after H. Henley 
laymaker, professor of 
jplant pathology for 46 
ears. 








A Jl tti MLm 




^ l^l'OM 



^ihiA.4im ^ 



ALLEN, TOM Topeka 

Architectural Engineering SO 

ANDERSON, SCOTT Topeka 

Accounting SR 

ATHERTON, STEPHEN Emporia 

Pre-Law FR 

BAMMAN, MARC Kirkwood, Mo. 

Foods and Nutrition FR 

BARTEL, RANDY Overiand Park 

Architecture SO 

BASTES, LOUIS Selden 

Computer Science SR 

BERRY, VINCENT RossvUle 

Finance JR 

BRANDYBERRY, STEVE Hill City 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

BRUNGARDT, KIRK Galesburg 

Agricultural Economics JR 

BUFFUM, SEAN Burlington 

Electrical Engineering FR 

BURGETT, MARK Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

BURGETT, SCOTT Topeka 

Electrical Engineering FR 

BUSEY, COLIN Wichita 

Elementary Education FR 

CALDWELL, ALEC Lyons 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

CnCANEK, DARWIN EUsworth 

Natural Resources Management SR 

CLINE, CURTIS Shenandoah, Iowa 

Architecture SO 

CLUGSTON, BRIAN Columbus 

Feed Science Management SR 

COLE, RAY Oxford 

Computer Science FR 

COMPTON, JAMES Ottawa 

Agriculmral Journalism FR 

COOPER, DAVID Peabody 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

COOPER, ROBERT Warrensburg, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering JR 

COPPLE, ROBERT Winfield 

Industrial Engineering SO 

CORDER, JEFF Lenexa 

Chemical Engineering FR 

COWEN,BRL\N Topeka 

Computer Science FR 

DARNELL, RICK Olathe 

Computer Science SO 

DARNELL, ROBERT Uberal 

Mechanical Enghieering SR 

DARST, DEAN Arkansas City 

Business Administration FR 

DAVIDSON, RON McPherson 

Chemical Engineering FR 

DA VIES, JAMES Manhattan 

Business Administration FR 

DECKER, MARK Salina 

Business Administration FR 



laymaker Hall 



395 



Haymaker 

DEMINT, JEFF Wichita 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine JR 

DEYONG.DIRK Webster Groves, Mo. 

Political Science SO 

DICKEY, ANDY Haven 

Engineering FR 

EXDUD, GREGORY.,... Mankato 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

DRISCOLL, RODNEY Rossville 

Industrial Engineering JR 

DRISCOLL, CURT Rossville 

Agricultural Econoinics FR 

DUBOIS, CRAIG Burlingame 

Business Administration ,.,.. SO 

EIS, MARTIN McPherson 

Electrical Engineering SR 

ESHELBRENNER, DOUG Olathe 

Business Administration FR 

BSSLINGER, DARREN Mankato 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

FAILS, BRUCE Manhattan 

Computer Science SR 

FIBELKORN, PAUL Hugoton 

Music Education FR 

FILBY, MATT Wichita 

Fine Arts FR _ ^,4- 

FINNEY, RYAN Tyro f ^hB^ 

Secondary Education SO Jj^^^^^^k 

FLEMING, PAUL Formoso ■i^^^B 

Architecture FR «^ ^B 

FOSTER. STEVEN Shawnee W^l — "W 

Finance FR Y^ 

FOWLER. WES Emporia 1 C _ 

Horticulture SO I ^ ., f 

FRIESEN, KENLEE Buhler V ^ 

Biology SO jP— ""^ 

.^ ^ 
FROHARDT, MARK Shawnee 

Elearical Engineering FR 

GALE, WAYNE Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

GLADOW, DAVID Lyons 

Finance FR 

GORDON, SCOTT Americus 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine .' JR 

GRAFF, W1LLL\M Pratt 

Agricultural Economics SO 

GREEN, ROBERT Hutchinson 

Construction Science SO 

GREGG, BRIAN Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

GRIER, KURT Wichita 

Chemical Engineering JR 

GUNTHER, TREVOR Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

HALL, MONTE Liberal 

Computer Science SR 

HANSEN, WAYNE Salina 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HAULMARK, GARY Olathe 

Political Science FR 

HAVERKAMP, ROD Berryton ff 

Industrial Engineering FR 

HEIER, JOHN Grainfield 

Business Administration JR 

HELUS, RON Ellsworth ^, 

Marketing FR J 

HILL, BROCK Garden Plain M 

Finance SO ' 

HOCHMAN, KEVIN Genesee 

Electrical Engineering SO 

HOLCOMB, GREGG Overland Park 

Information Systems JR 

HOLMES, LAYNE Hugoton 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

HOPKINS,CRAlG Overland Park 

Accounting SR 

HORNBERGER, JASON Topeka 

Information Systems FR 

HOSKINS, MARK Hesston 

Landscape Design FR 

HULLMAN, DOUG Pratt A 

Veterinary Medicine SR lL~ 

ISCH, JEFF Gridley £^ ^^ 

Electrical Engineering FR ^^ f^. 

r''\ ^\^^ 

JANZEN,JEFFERY Newton T 

Electrical Engineering JR ^^^ 

JENNINGS, DARREN Valley Falls .^^Bl^ 

Correctional Administration FR ^^^^^^^K 

JENSEN, DALE Eureka MP^^^B 

Business Administration SO ^m^ ^m 

JULIAN, REX Johnson 7»«J*i^T; 

Agriculture FR * * 

KAHLE, KEVIN MIsskm 

Restaurant Management SR 

KEIMIG, SCOT Wichiu ^ "^ 

Mechanical Engineering FR ^^^B 




396 



Haymaker Ha 




KELLENBERGER, ART MorriU 

Management SO 

KEMPLAY, MATTHEW Beattie 

Business Administration JR 

KEY, DAVID Falnlew 

Agriculture EducUkm SR 

KHO, MENGKANG Malasia 

Pre-Design Professions FR 

KILLIAN, STEVE Wichita 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

KIRMER, DALE Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering FR 

KLAASSEN, JOHN Hillsboro 

Electrical Engineering SO 

KLAMM, ANDY Bonner Sprin« 

Agricultural Mechanization SR 

KLAUSMEYER, KELLY Garden Plain 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

KOGER.JIM Holton 

Business Administration SO 

KOHL. THOMAS Clay Center 

Electrical Engineering JR 

KOLB, MARSHALL Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

KOMER, JOE Merriam 

Electrical Engineering FR 

LADNER, TERRY Topeka 

Education FR 

LANCASTER, TRENT Ottawa 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

LA VERY, JEFF Shawnee 

Agronomy FR 

LEGLEITER, MIKE St. Marys 

Agronomy FR 

LEONARD, JEFF Shawnee 

Business Administration FR 

LINSCOTT, CURTIS Shawnee 

Accounting JR 

LOEFFLER, KEVIN Wichita 

Accounting FR 

LONGLEY, JEFFREY Leawood 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

LYON, CHUCK Topeka 

Management JR 

MAGANA, EDWARD Kansas City. Kan. 

Electrical Engineering FR 

MARTIN. TODD Hays 

Microbiology FR 



Uary Haulmark gets help with 
his daily grooming as Paul Zim- 
merman watches in amusement. 
The two presented a skit in the 
Union Little Theatre for Hay- 
Aide, a benefit to raise money 
for underprivileged families in 
the iVianhattan area. IVIore than 
$500 were raised in the 10-hour 
event which featured a variety of 
serious and comic talents. 
(Photo by Brad Fanshier) 



aymaker Hall 



397 



Haymaker 



MAXWELL, DOUGLAS Mansion 

Accounting FR 

MCCOY. KEVIN EUworth 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology SO 

METZ, DAN Wellington 

Agricultural Economics FR 

MILES, TIMOTHV Salina 

Civil Engineering SO 

MILLER, SCOTT Lebo 

Architecture and Design FR 

MILLERSHASKl, BRUCE IngaUs 

Agriculture Education SO 

MONTGOMERY, KEN Salina 

Electrical Engineering FR 

MYERS, ALAN Abilene 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

NORDHUS, DEAN Manhattan 

Agriculture SO 

NORMAN, LAN Africa 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

NOWLIN, BRYAN Salina 

Managemeat SR 

OLSEN, DOUG Clyde 

Engineering FR 

OSTERHAUS, DONALD Topeka 

Poultry Science SO 

PARKS, DAVID Topeka 

Agricultural Economics SO 

PARSONS, JEFFERY Manhattan 

Geology FR 

PA VLACKA, JAMES Andale 

Agricultural Economics SO 

PERCIVAL, BARRY McPherson 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

PERSIGEHL, DAVID Salina 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

PETRACEK. KEITH Wichita 

Electrical Engineering JR 

PHELPS, DARIN Miltonvale 

Electrical Engineering SO 

PHILLIPS, STEVE AbUene 

FinaiKe FR 

PIERCE, DAVID Shawnee 

Electrical Engiocering SR 

PITMAN, ROBIN Minneola 

AgroDomy SR 

PRIDDLE, JEFF Wichita 

Architectural Engineering SO 

PRIDDY, NELSON Santa Fe.N.M. 

Animal Science SO 

PULIAK, KARL ST. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

REASER, DOUG Topeka 

Construction Science SO 

REISER, ANDREW Omaha, Neb. 

Milling Science and Management FR 

REYNOSO, LESLIE Tecumeseh 

Engineering Technology SO 

RICH, MICHAEL D Ottawa 

Business Administration SO 

RICH, MICHAEL W Ashland 

Pre-Medicine FR 

RICHARDS, PHILIP McPherson 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

RICKS, MARK Topeka 

Arts and Sciences FR 

RIGNEY, JIM Salina 

Computer Science SO 

ROBBEN, DOUG Grinnell 

Agricultural Economics FR 

ROGOWSKI, DAVID Lenexa 

Architectural Engineering SR 

ROYSTER, BEN Overland Park 

Pre-Medicine SO 

RULE, ERIC Shawnee 

Business Administration FR 

RYAN, THOMAS New Cambria 

Agricultural Economics SO 

SALLEE, RICHARD Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SAUERESSIG, DAVID Pamona 

Recreation JR 

SAYLER,JOHN Lawrence 

Industriid Engineering SO 

SCHINKEL, MICHAEL Leawood 

Geography SR 

SCHLEIMER. HAROLD Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SO 

SCHULTZ, DREW Wichiu 

Arts and Sciences FR 

SCHUMANN, ROB Prairie VlUage 

Feed Science and Management SR 

SEXTON, WENDALL Manhattan 

Theater SO 

SHORMAN, REX Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 








398 



Haymaker Ha 



r\ JH A 



SDLVA, CHRISTOPHER Shawnee 

Management SR 

SKWARLO.STAN Shawnee 

Milli ng Science and Management FR 

SMITH, JIM Topeka 

Management SO 



SMITH, MARC Eurika 

Marketing FR 

SPACHEK, JEFF Lincolnville 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

SPIEGEL, STEVE Formoso 

Agricultural Economics SO 

^^ H STEINBACH, FRED Qay Center 

a 5 Engineering FR 
STENZEL, ERIC McPherson 
Mechanical Engineering FR 
SUTCLIFFE, BRAD Wichita 
Electrical Engineering FR 




i^iiJtW:.. 



Bm^ 




iii m oKji^iA. «^ All 




SWEARINGEN, RAYMOND WatervUle 

Arts and Sciences FR 

THARMAN, STEVE Atchison 

Agricultural Economics SR 

THEIS, GERALD Leavenworth 

Agronomy SO 

THENO, MELVKM Basebor 

Agronomy SR 

THOMPSON, SCOTT Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

TITSWORTH, JAMES Scott City 

Agricultural Ecomonics JR 

TUCKER, BRYAN Overland Park 

Geography SO 

TUCKER, CHARLES Elkhart 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

UNRUH, BRYAN Dodge City 

Horticulture FR 

VIKMAN, ANDREW AxteU, Neb. 

Geology SR 

VOTH, VERN Whitewater 

Agronomy SR 

WEATHERMAN, STEVEN Colony 

Agriculture Education JR 

WEHRLY, MATTHEW Lenexa 

Computer Science JR 

WEIDLER, BRYAN Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

WEISHAAR, MARTIN Nortonville 

Pre-Vetertoary Medicine SR 

WELLS, JEFFREY Strafford, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering JR 

WILKENS, BRENT Bird City 

Engineering FR 

WILLIAMS, BRAD McPherson 

Pre-Forestry FR 

WILHAMS,THOMAS Elkhart 

Natural Resources Management SO 

WINKLER, GREG Topeka 

Accounting SO 

WITT, MICHAEL Wamego 

Management SR 

WRAY,JOHN Ottawa 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

ZIELSDORF, MARK Topeka 

Architectural Structures FR 

ZUEL, REX Osawatomie 

Engineering FR 



Haymaker Hall 



399 




arlatt 



Marlatt Hall is a men's 
residence hall built in 
1964. Housing 635 meni 
the hall was named for 
Washington Marlatt, 
one of the founders of 
Bluemont Central Col- 
lege. 



ADEE, ERIC Minneapolis 

Crop Protection SR 

ARMENT, DARIUN Athol 

Architecture FR 

ARNOLD, RANDALL Topeka 

Chemical Engineering JR 

BABAOGLU, METIN Turkey )p». j^ 

Agronomy SR 

BAREISS, DAVID Overland Park 

Milling Science and Management JR 

BASE, DOUGLAS Sedgwick 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

BECICER, RICHARD Salina 

Electrical Engineering FR 

BERNDT, LESLIE Salina j^^K^ 

Electrical Engineering SR ^^^^^^ 

BESINGER, MARK Cummlngs J^^^^B 

Mariieting SR SBPHHh 

BIEHL, WILLL«iM Leneia BteT '.^ WL 

Electrical Engineering I^ ^P>« "^ H 

BOGNER, TERRY Van Buren, Ark. ~ ^ 

Feed Science Management SO 

BOWERS, G. PHILLIP StUweU 

Elearical Engineering SO ^^ \ ^' J^^ 

^W 

BRIGHT, DANIEL North Tonawanda, NY. " -mm. F 

Architectural Engineering Hi 

BROWN, BRIAN Olathe ..^■^ 

Architecture FR J^^^H^ 

BROWN, KEVIN Caldwell a^^^i^ 

Computer Science SR V ■ 

BROWN, ROGER Goff f«-*. -^ W 

Sockriogy Education SR f •- f 

BURKHOLDER, LYLE Hutchinson 

Agricultural Engineering FR /i — ' 

BDRTIN, BRIAN Eureka J^ ,,, 

Mechanical Engineering SR ^IHHv' 1 ^B 

BUTTRON, BRAD Kansas City, Mo. ^^Bk » 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CAMPBELL, MnCE McPherson 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

CASSIDA, JOHN Rantoul 

Accounting FR 

CATER, PAUL Topeka 

Civil Endneerlng SR 

COMFORT, LAWRENCE Manhattan ^ " k 

Civil Engineering SR \ ' ' " 

CONNER, DONALD Rock Hill, Mo. V ^ 

Architecture JR ^^ -^ 

CRETEN, JIMMY Tonganoxie 

Mechani cal E ngineering SO 

DA VIED, STEVE Pittsburg 

Agronomy SR 

EDMONDS, MATT Topeka 

Business Administration SO 

EDWARDS, LLOYD Wtehita 

CompuUr Science SR ^VPlk *^ 

ESHBAUGH, JEFFREY Fort Scott 

Electrical Engineering SO 

FERGUSON, ALAN Fredonla If 

Electrical Engineering SR 




400 



Marlatt HaN 




FISHER, RICH Kansas City, Mo. 

Sociology SO 

FREDRICKSON, KENNETH Topeka 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

FULLMER, CHRIS Shields 

Mathematics FR 

GARNER, JAMES St. John 

Physical Education FR 

GEWECKE, JAMES Russell 

Marketing FR 

GLOVER, BRADLEY Peabody 

Business Administration FR 

GLOVER, MARK Peabody 

Marlietiiig SR 

GOERTZEN, SCOTT Salina 

Accounting FR 

GOODMAN, CHARLES Ness City 

CIvU Engineering SR 

GORDON, BRAD Pratt 

Ardiitectural Engineeri^ SR 

GRAY, TRAY Salina 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

GREENLEE, WAYNE BeUePlaine 

Music Education JR 

HALL, ROD Leavenworth 

Electrical Engineering FR 

HARVICK.BRAD Eldorado, Okla. 

Physics Education JR 

HAWKINS, JAMES Derby 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

HAYS, ROBERT. Topeka 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

HEADY, KENT Erie 

Physics SO 

HEMAN, LANCE Sarcoxie, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

HEMEYER,GARY StUweU 

Architectural Engineering SO 

HENDRICICSON, STEPIffiN Kansas City, Kan. 

Engineering FR 

HENRY, KENDALL Ricton Park, HI. 

Geography FR 

HOLLOWAY, MICHAEL Bonner Springs 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO 

HOLMES, PAUL UdaU 

Agriculture JR 

HUGHES, JEFF Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering FR 

JASPER, JOHN PaoU 

Chemical Engineering SO 

JENSEN, JOHN Everest 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

JOHNSON, FRJ^ERICK Kansas City, Kan. 

Pre-Medidne SR 

JOHNSON, TIMOTHY St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

JOHNSON, TROY CaldweU 

Secondary Education SO 

JOHNSTON, VINCE RoelandPark 

Chemical Engineering FR 

JUST, WAYNE Wichita 

Electrical Engineering FR 

KELSO, MICHAEL Overland Parli 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KENNEDY, WARREN Kansas City, Kan. 

Chemical Engineering FR 

KENYON.PAUL JonctlonCi^ 

Educatiott Business SR 

KILMER, RON Hesston 

Electrical Engineering JR 

KINZEL, STUART Great Bend 

Engineering FR 

KNESS, TIMOTHY Osage Ctg 

Management SR 

KYSAR, JEFF Bogue 

Mechainical Enginering JR 

LANE, DAVID Hoisington 

Architectural Engineering JR 

LANGE, CHARLES Garfield 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

LANTZ, STUART Platte City, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

LEININGER, PHILIP HavUand 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

LIES, DEAN Andale 

Engineering Technology JR 

LOPEZ, ESTELL Hugoton 

Electrical Engineering SO 

LOVELL, BILL Melvem 

Architecture JR 

MANETH.LEROY Ohnitz 

Engineering Technology JR 

MATTHEWS, MARC Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Civil Engineering JR 

MCINTYRE, JOHN Plainville 

Industrial Engineering FR 



flarlatt Hall 



401 



Marlatt 



MCLAURY, JAMES Merrtam 

Finance SR 

McMAHON, TROY Paola 

Chemical Engineering SR 

MCMILLAN, DAVID Randall 

Electrical Engineering FR 

NEUMAYER, CHAD El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

NICHOLS, THOMAS Lecompton 

Agricultural Mechanization SR 

NOLL, MICHAEL Omaha, Neb. 

Architecture FR 

OLDHAM, ICENT Topeka 

Elertrical Engineering FR 

OLSON, ALAN Wichita 

Marketing JR 

OSBORNE, TOM Wichita 

Architecture SO 

PANKRATZ, DAVID Lamed 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

PAUL, BRL\N Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

PERKINS, TODD Colby 

Btisiness Administration JR 

PETERS, ANDREW Lamar, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

PHELPS, JAY AbUene 

Fine Arts SO 

PHILUPS, CHAD Wakeeney 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

POUCH, SHANE Ellsworth 

Construction Science SO 

PREDIGER, JIM Dorrance 

Pre-Optometry FR 

PROSE, JEFFREY Ramey, Pa. 

Electrical Engineering FR 

RAHUA, MARK Kansas City, Kan. 

Electrical Engineering JR 

REIMERS, PETER Gardner 

Crop Protection SR 

RELIGA, MARK Manhattan 

Agriculture Education SR 

RENFRO, MIKE Hesston 

Electrical Engineering SO 

REPHLO, DANIEL Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

ROBERTS, TERRILL Great Bend 

Finance FR 



Uwight Call cuts the heads off 
of the early summac handed to 
him by Brian Myers as they 
separate the heads for seed and 
the stems for feed. (Photo by 
Jim Dietz) 




402 



Marian Hr 







VANCE, KELLY Leavenworth 

History JR 

VEACH, LLOYD Wichita 

Computer Science SO 

VELASQUEZ, CHRISTIAN Carbondale 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

WEHBE, HASSAN SAMI Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

WHITE, RODNEY Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering JR 

WILLIAMS, KEITH Kansas City, Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

WRIGHT, JOHN Osage City 

Pre-Medicine FR 

WYRICK, JEFF HaysvUle 

Physical Education SR 



RODRIGUEZ, JUAN Mexico 

Milling Science and Management SO 

ROHRBAUGH, MARK Manhattan 

Radio-Television FR 

RUBY, JEFFREY Hillsdale 

Civil Engineering SO 

SANDERSON, MKE Salt Lake City, Utah 

Electrical Engineeriiig SR 

SCHMIDT, GARRETT Lakeville, Minn 

Physics SO 

SCHMIDT, RON Grover, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

SCHNEIDER, WAYNE Albert 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

SELLMANN, MARK Randolph, NJ. 

Agronomy SR 

SEWELL, MARK MerrillviUe, Ind. 

Indu^rial Engineering GR 

SHIPLEY, WILUAM Merriam 

Construction Science JR 

SIMMONS, THOMAS Garden City 

Physical Education JR 

SIMMS, MICHAEL Bonner Springs 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

SLYTER, KENNETH Augusta 

Electrical Engineering JR 

SMITH, TROY Udall 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

SPACHEK, DAVID Manhattan 

Psychology SR 

STEGMAN, DALE Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering SO 

STEGMAN, LAWRENCE Ashland 

Chemical Engineering FR 

TAYLOR, WARD Winona 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

THOMPSON, J. ERIE Overland Park 

Civil Engineering JR 

TUCKER, JEFF SaUna 

Industrial Engineering SR 

TURNER, JOHN McPherson 

Arts and Sciences FR 

TURNQUIST, GARY Manhattan 

Civil Engineering SO 

UNLUSOY, BULENT Turkey 

Electrical Engineering JR 

UNRUH, VANCE Kansas City, Kan. 

Mechanical Engineering JR 



!ybH#w 



^att Haii 



403 



24 HOURS 



Receptionists watch activity of 
students from dinner rush to 
the wee hours of the morning 



Working at the hub of activity 
and center of information in 
the residence halls, hall recep- 
tionists provided a host of ser- 
vices for students. 

"The receptionists are the resource people of 
the hall," said Craig Hopkins, senior in accoun- 
ting and head receptionist in Haymaker Hall. 

Hall receptionists performed a variety of ac- 
tivities including answering the phone, taking 
messages, opening doors, checking out equipment 
and — one of the more interesting tasks — answer- 
ing questions. 

Hopkins said people asked them where buildings 
were on campus, where the good restaurants were 
and when and where meetings were. 

"Guys will even call the front desk when there 
is a fire alarm, just to ask what's going on," he 
said. 

Some people expected receptionists to know 
everyone in the building. 

"Guys will walk in and ask what 'Mary's phone 
number is.' They don't even know her last name 
or what floor she lives on and they expect us to 
know who 'Mary' is," said Maria Unruh, junior 
in elementary education and Ford Hall recep- 
tionist. 

The primary duty of the receptionists was to 
answer the phone and take messages. 

"Sometimes this can be a real pain when it gets 
really busy," said Julie Lilley, junior in life 
sciences and Ford Hall receptionist. 

"The busiest time is from 4 to 6 p.m. during 
supper time. People call to find out the menu and 
leave messages about meetings for that night," 
Lilley said. "One freshman called on Veteran's 
Day and asked if Derby (Food Center) was still 
serving food." 

Receptionists were in a good position to keep 
track of hall happenings. 

"During the day, I watch people coming 
through the door and I can tell what time it is 
without even looking at the clock," Lilley said. 
"In the evenings, I can always tell what nights 
there are functions, where they are and what the 
theme is. Sometimes I get some good ideas for my 
own parties." 



The receptionists worked shifts so the reception 
desk was always manned. 

"Receptionists work 24 hours a day," Unruh 
said. "I haven't fallen asleep yet during the 'dead- 
shift' although I have seen people come close," 
she said. 

Hopkins said the receptionists were the "wat- 
chdogs" for the hall. 

"They can't fall asleep. One guy turned his back 
to check out equipment and the telephone disap- 
peared. Another time someone stole all the floor 
numbers off the bulletin board in the front lobby," 
Hopkins said. "You can imagine what would hap- 
pen if someone fell asleep. If I found one of my 
receptionists sleeping, they would be dismissed." 

To keep themselves awake, most receptionists 
studied in the wee hours of the morning. 

"You can get a lot of studying done," Hopkins 
said. 

Yet, there were other things receptionists did to 
stay awake. They listened to the stereo, cleaned 
the lobby (just for fun of course), played cards and 
read the log book. 

The log book was used to write messages from 
one receptionist to another. According to Hopkins, 
the Haymaker log book was considered sacred and 
could only be seen by Haymaker receptionists. 

"We even put a guy on trial through the log 
book, because he showed someone the contents," 
Hopkins said. "When someone gets a date, it goes 
in the log book. That's how a lot of rumors get 
started." 

One night the receptionists decided to play a 
game, Hopkins said. The receptionist on the mid- 
night to 2 a.m. shift counted the women that came 
into Haymaker Hall with their boyfriends. The 
receptionists working the morning shift counted 
the women who left. Then they tried to figure out 
where the women were that never left. 

Lilley said work schedules were set around the 
receptionists' class schedules so there weren't any 
conflicts. 

According to Hopkins, Unruh and Lilley, being 
a receptionist was a pretty good job. 

"You don't have to go outside (the hall) because 
your job is just downstairs," Unruh said. 

— Leslie Stokes 




ratching television helps Ter- 
ril Mettling spend the early 
hours working the receptionist's 
desk at Marlatt Hall. (Photo by 
Jeff Tuttle) 



Otu 



ludying between phone calls, 
Lisa Richards works as a recep- 
tionist at Moore Hall. (Ptioto by 
Jeff Tuttle) 



404 



ReceptionistHJ 




receptionists 



405 







oore 



AGEE, CARRIE Overland Park 

Elementary Education SO 

AHMED, FERZAN England 

Electrical Engineering FR 

AMMEL, DAWN Lenexa 

English Education JR 

ANDERSON, BRIAN Overland Park 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

ARNOLD, RENEE Tipton 

Electrical Engineering FR 

ATHANASIUS, LUCY New York, N.Y. 

Public Administration FR 

AUMILLER, TERRI Liberal 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

BAGBEY, EDWARD Rawlins, Wyo. 

Horticulture Therapy SR 

BAILEY, BARRY Inman 

Engineering SO 

BAJRACHARYA, ROSHAN Nepal 

Natural Resources Management FR 

BARNES, VIOLA Littleton, Colo. 

Management FR 

BEETHE, LISA Marysville 

Accounting FR 

BLASIAR, DAVID ST. Louis, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

BLETSCHER, KRISTI Troy 

Natural Resources Management SR 

BLOGDM, MARY Kansas City, Mo. 

Prc-Design Professional SO 

BLOOM, JOHN Vernon HUls, lU. 

Engineering Technology SR 

BRADLEY, SCOTT Derby 

Psychology Education FR 

CAMERLINCK, BRYAN Lionardville 

Business Administration FR 

CARLSON, PAM Highland 

Home Economics JR 

CARSON, TROY Coffeyville 

Business Administration FR 

CHALKER, BRAD Parsons 

Electrical Engineering JR 

CONNERY, REGINA Steriing 

Psychology FR 

COOK, GEORGIA Ft. Riley 

Business Administration SO 

CORPUS, CRUZ ELIA Garden City 

Accounting JR 

CORRALES, YOLANDA Holcomb 

Political Science JR 

CUMMINS, DIANE Chapman 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

CUMMINS, RHONDA Harper 

Psychology FR 

DALTON, BETH Mission 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

DAUB, SHEILA St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SO 

DAVIS, CHARITY Overland Park 

Secondary Education JR 



Moore Hall is a co-c| 

residence hall built 

1965 and housing 65 

residents. The hall wil 

named for Hel« 

Moore, dean of wome 

for 17 year! 



406 




Moore Hali 



.L 




DAVIS, RHONDA Hutchinson 

Interior Design FR 

DAYMUDE, MARC Junction City 

Pre-Medklne SR 

DESNOUSSE, OLIVU New York, N.Y. 

Administration FR 

EHRHARDT, DOUGLAS Kansas City, Kan. 

Engineering Technology SO 

EISELE, SONYA Salina 

Secondary Education SO 

FLEMING, DEBRA Uroy 

Biology FR 

GALBRAITH, JENNIFER Stanley 

Natural Resources Management SR 

GAMBLE, DON Haysville 

Secondary Education SO 

GEORGE, DEEANN Natoma 

Accounting. FR 

GIRRENS, TAMARA Newton 

Art SR 

GOTTSCHALK, BILL Manhattan 

Computer Science SR 

GREGG, ANN Alma 

Animal Science SO 

GRIFnTH, SCOTT Poplar Buff, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

HARDAN, DARRYL Topeka 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HAUT, KENDRA LakeQuivira 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HAYS, PATRICK Osawatomie 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology FR 

HELLER, ANDRE AltaVista 

Business Administration FR 

HENN, WILLL\M El Dorado 

Engineering Technology JR 

HESS, CHRISTINE Ottawa 

Fashion Marketing FR 

HIGGINS, KAYLA McCracken 

Leisure Studies JR 

HIGHTOWER, RUSS Overland Park 

Natural Resources Management JR 

HILL, GEORGE Leavenworth 

Computer Science JR 

HILUARD, MICHAEL Leonardville 

Engineering FR 

HOLT, ROBIN Kansas City, Mo 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

HUNDLEY, JODY Garden City 

Physical Sciences SO 

HUTCHCRAFT, CHRISTINA Solomon 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HUTCHCRAFT, DOROTHY Solomon 

History Education JR 

IRVIN, CAROLYN Greensburg 

Dietetics and Instituitional Maiugement SO 

JAMISON, LEIGH ANN Luray 

Family and Child Development JR 

lANNE, MICHEL Oorham 

Mechanical Engineering JR 



lYIlke Craft helps Cindy 
Brookhart scrape the Ice off the 
rear windshield of her car In the 
Union parking lot. (Photo by Jeff 
Tutlle) 



iVf 



oore 



Uhristi Myers awaits the next 
routine during band and flag 
corps practice at the band prac 
tice field. (Photo by Andy 
Nelson) 



JIMENEZ, MARLENE VaUey Center 

Speech Pathology and AudMogy SR 

JOHNSON, JAMES Emmett 

Engineering Technology JR 

JOHNSON, LAURA Lenexa 

Elementary Education SO 

JONES, CHARLES Cottonwood Falls 

Architectural Engineering PR 

KATLIN, NANCY Mission 

Early Childhood Education PR 

KATZER, RONALD Gamett 

Computer Science FR 

KING, WILLIAM Zion, 111. 

Computer Science JR 

KLEINSORGE, ARLEN Manhattan 

Agriculture FR 

KLOTZ, JEFFREY Sterling 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

KNEIL, BECKY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

KOHLER, STEPHANIE Atchison 

Industrial Engineering SR 

KRIEGER, JANE Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

KRIEGER, JUDY Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

KRUMM, DAVID Hillsboro. Mo. 

Architecture SO 

KRUPER, MAGGIE Mission Hills 

Family and Child Development FR 

KUSEK, SUSAN Prairie Village 

Marketing. FR 

LARSON, ERICK Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering JR 

LINN, TERRI Leavenworth 

Elementary Education JR 

LOCKHART, GRANT Overland Park 

Computer Science FR 

LOEFFLER, KAREN Newton 

Foods and Nutrition SR 

LOSEKE, BRENDA Hutchinson 

Elemtary Education SR 

MAI, KARIN Salina 

Computer Science SO 

MCCOY, BEVERLY Olathe 

Dietetics and Instituitional Management JR 

MCCOY, BRADLEY Copeland 

Elementary Education JR 




408 



Moore Hall 




MCDAVrrr, ANDY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

MCGEE, LINDA Ashland 

Business Administration FR 

MCMILLAN, SUE Beloit 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

MCMILLEN, DIANE Canton 

Apparel Design FR 

MCMINIMY, GISELE Ashland 

Agrkultural JounuUsm SR 

MCMINIMY, KENDALL Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MCMINIMY, VERA Ashland 

Philosophy IR 

MILLER, GLORIA Basefaor 

Recreation SR 

MONGE, MANUEL Puerto Rico 

Modem Languages JR 

MORGAN, SHANNON Juneau, Alaska 

Business Administration FR 

MORTON, GREG Derby 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MURPHY, LAURA Desoto 

Accounting SR 

NELSON, CHAD Bennington 

Electrical Engineering SR 

NEUFELD, CRAIG Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

NEUFELD, JUDITH Overbid Park 

Elementary Education SO 

NICHOLSON, REBECCA Prairie VUlage 

Business Administration FR 

OBORNY, JEANNETTE Marion 

Agricultural EcoDomics SR 

OETINGER, DOUGLAS Hesston 

Marketing SO 

OLIVER, MARCL\ Claremont, Calif. 

Arts and Sciences FR 

OPAT, JOHN Salina 

Business Administration SO 

OSADCHUK, WALTER Midland, Texas 

Landscape Architecture FR 

OSBORN, COURTNEY Anthony 

Accounting FR 

OYLER, CLINTON Libeial 

Pittance JR 

PASCHAL, MEREDITH Luray 

Music Education JR 

PETERSON, ADAM Haysville, Ky. 

Chemical Engineering SO 

PHERIGO, WENDI Strong City 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

PHILLIPS, LAURA Liberal 

Accounting FR 

QUEEN, MARK Dodge City 

Marketing JR 

RATHBUN, LORI Ellsworth 

Consumer AflUrs SR 

RAY, AMBER Leavenworth 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

REECE, KRISHNA Lyons 

Engineering FR 

REED, LINDA Derty 

Arts and Sciences FR 

RENNER, BARBARA Howells, Neb. 

Horticulture Therapy SR 

RICH, EUZABETH Leavenworth 

Physical Education JR 

RICHARDS, REGINALD KirkvUle, NY. 

Microbiology SO 

RIFFEL, KAREN Wichita 

Life Sciences FR 

ROMAN, JAMES Wichita 

Business Administration FR 

ROSENFELDER, STEVE Tuscon, Ariz. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

ROUSE, HOLLY Topeka 

Secondary Education SO 

ROYSTER, WILLLAM Overiand Park 

Accounting SR 

RYBURN, SHANNON Olathe 

Journalism Education FR 

SAYLES, FRANK Ozawkie 

Agricultural Economics FR 

SCHOENBEIN, MICHAEL St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

SCHOLLE, TIFFANY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicbie SR 

SHELL, DONNA Valley FaUs 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

SHELL, STAQE Valley Falls 

Elementary Education FR 

SHEIKH, SHEILSH Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

SOULE, REBECCA Eureka 

Interior Design FR 



Moore Hall 



409 



M 



oore 



STOCKMAN, JEFFREY Overland Park JIPP^ 

Architecture FR W^ jfll^k. 

STRNAD. CAROLINE Munden f ,^^^^^ 

Agricultural Economics JR HfllBHi^B 

STROH, KEVIN Dkkinson, N.D. ^T^^W- 

Nuclear Engineeriiig GR ^»rr '««f 

SWEANY, GARY '^'"'^f^ * 

Agriciiltural Engineering SR ^ t 

TANKSLEY, TORRES Fort Worth, Texas 

Business Administration FR 

THIESSEN, MURRAY Hesston 

Pre-Physical Therapy SO ^ ^ i 

TRACY, CAROL Manhattan *MH^' 

Nuclear Engineering FR ^^ ' 

TRAYLOR, SHAD Lamed | 

Architecture JR , 

VAWTER, KAREN Frankfort 

Secondary Education SO 

VOTH, MICHAEL Hesston . B 

Electrical Engineering SO < 

-r V ; , !■ ^ ^ 

VOTH, PAMELA Oak Park, HI. 

JaamaUsm and Mass Communications SR 

WARD, DERRIE Topeka 

Business Administration JR 

WARRINGTON, GABRIELLE Kansas Ctty, Kan. 

Elementary Education SR 

WASHINGTON. PAM Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting FR ^- 

WASYLK, DAVE Enterprise ?«f-«^ J^ 

Business Adminstration FR h ^'\ 

WEAVER, LINDA Fulton, N.Y. 

Management FR a 

WHITE. JANICE Wichita fl ^ 

Family and Child Development SO '•t 

WHITE, KATHLEEN Overland Park # 

Mechanical Engineering FR f ^ 

WHITE, STEPHEN Wichita \ 

Natural Resources Management JR 

WILKINSON, LISA Lyndon 

Arts and Sciences FR 




WILUAMS, LORAINE Wichita 

Elementary Education JR 

WINGER, KELLY Overland Park 

Arts and Sciences FR 

WORTHINGTON, SUZANNE Mound City 

Marketing JR 



YOUNG, RANAE Gamett r 

Agricultural Journalism SR 

YOUNT, BRL«iN Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Architecture FR 

ZAVALA, KAREN Lenexa 

Marketing JR 



tL^dLik. 



410 



Moore Hall 




utnam 



Putnam Hall is a co-ed 
residence hali built in 
1953 and housing 100 
men and women. The 
hall was named for 
Laurel Irene Putnam, a 
Kansas farmer and sup- 
porter of the University. 




MALOY, DANIEL OUthe 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

PESMARK, DAN Topeka 

Biochemistry FR 

QUAINTANCE, SCOTT Gardner 

Fine Arts FR 

SACKHOFF, DEB Hunter 

Elementary Education JR 

SEIFERT, JERRY Ozawkie 

Animal Science JR 

VANDERVEEN, DEB Wkhtta 

Secondary Education SR 

WEDDLE, KERRI Bloom 

Secondary Education JR 

WEST, CAROLYN Shawnee Mission 

Family and Child Development JR 

WIEBE, VIRGIL Garden City 

Political Science SR 



BOLT, MARILYN Goodland 

Extension Education OR 

BRUNS, GREGORY Wilmene, 111. 

Architectural Engineering JR 

COMBS, TIMOTHY Wichita 

Chemical Engineering FR 

DANIELS, MONICA OUthe 

Political Science JR 

DEVINE, JOHN KIrkwod, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

HAAHR. HEATHER Topelta 

Mathematics FR 

HICKEY, COLIN Hutchinson 

Political Science JR 

KELSEY, TRENTON Wichita 

Chemical Engineering FR 

KOHLHASE, MARK Overland Parle 

Microbiology SO 

LEU, KATHERINE Wichita 

Political Science Education SO 

UOHTNER, IRMA Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

LO, KHBS MIN Indonesia 

BusiDcss Administration GR 



Putnam Hall 



411 




mith 






Smith House is a mer 

scholarship house whi( 

houses 45 men. It 

named for a brother 

Laurel Irene Putna 

who established the Pu 

nam Scholarship ai] 

gave the Universi] 

funds to buy the hoi 



BACALZO, RCXjELIO Topeka 

Electrical Eneineering SO 

BLACK, CHARLES Leavenworth ^U|^^ 

Computer Science FR jH^^^^^^k 

BRIGGS, ARLEN Independence jl^^^HIHI 

Finance SR ^^HHH 

BROOKS, ROBERT Wilson ^^E^^B 

Chemical Engineering FR VMHImV^V 

BUTTERnELD, CHARLES El Dorado W, 7 

Chemical Engineering SO "* .,™ , f 

CAUDILL, JOHN Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine JR . 

Mm 

DAVIDSON, CHET Scott City JHHH 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

DOLEZAL, VERNON Kanopolis 

Business Administration FR 

DUFFIN, DARIN Spring Hill 

Feed Science and Management JR j 

ELTZE, MIKE Hays f :; 

Electrical Engineering SO 

GLANTZ, WAYNE Hays 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

GRAVES, J. DELTON Manhattan 

Special Education JR 

GUTHRIE, MARTIN Jetmore 

Grain Science FR 

HANSEN, RODNEY Colby 

Finance SR 

HOLK, BOYD Lindsborg 

Restaurant Management JR 

HUDLIN,JEFF Kansas City, Kan. 

Engineering Technology SO 

LEE, ROBERT Nickerson . i/' 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

LOEHR, CHRIS Salina , ,^ . 

Elementary Education SR ■ 




ifc^ lit 






\ 



•> 



j^-j 



412 



Smith Housil 




MCLAREN, BRUCE Pittsburg 

Electrical Engineering FR 

MYERS, RICHARD Atchison 

Modem Languages JR 

NUGENT, JOHN Hays 

Business Administration FR 

PETERSON, ERIK Undsborg 

Geoerapliy SR 

PTACEK, FRANK WUson 

Agricultural Eogiiieering SR 

REICHARD, DARYL Williamsburg 

Agricultural Engineering SO 

RICE, TIM Neodesha 

Engineering SO 

ROACH, ROBERT Great Bend 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SELBY, WILLIAM Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

SHERMAN, WESLEY Manhattan 

Elementary Education SO 

SHIELDS, DENNIS Lindsborg 

Agricultural Engineering JR 

SIEK, TERRY Ransom 

Pre-Medicine FR 

STAFFORD, JAMES Independence 

Electrical Engineering SR 

STECKLEIN, CHRIS Hays 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

STRANATHAN, BRETT Wichita 

Electrical Engineering FR 



Uky diver Bob Gregory arches 
in the air and waits for his 
parachute to unfold after dropp- 
ing off of an airplane's wing 
strut. "It just happened before 
you knew what was going on," 
Gregory said of his first jump. 
"By the time you got there (on 
the wing) you were just there. 
You kind of felt obligated." 
(Photo by Peter Obetz) 



413 




murthwaite 



Smurthwaite is a 

women's scholastic 

cooperative house built 

in 1961 and housing 64 

women. 



BAUSCH, KARIN Mayetta 

Management SR 

BEAUDOIN, RENEE Lakewood, Colo. 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

BECK, KAREN Greensburg 

Home Economics Education JR 

BERGGREN, STEPHANIE Clay Center 

Elementary Education SO *'-#w-x-' 

BRIGDEN, MARY Healy ^«Cr > 

Elemenlary Education SR 

BROWN, CARLA Haddam 

Elementary Education SR 

CLAY, DAISY Onaga f 

Pre-Law FR »,jaL 

DIPIAZZO, DENISE Godfrey, lU, J^SH^ 

Architecture and Design SO ^KK^^^^L 

ELLIS. CINDY Florence ^^Mi|^Hk 

Agriculniral Economics SO l^^B^^^^^^Ht 

EWERT, SYLVIA Newton ^K» '«^K 

Pre-Nursing SO «^ '■L 

GOEDECKE, SUSAN El Dorado ^ , jMm 

Biology FR m " ^P 

HETTINGER, BARBARA Enterprise. Ala. ^ 

Accounting JR ' 

HILDEBRAND, JANELL Stafford t 

Pre-Nursing JR 

HINDERLITER, LYNETTE Emporia 

Apparel Design JR 

HOLK, CHRISTINE Lindsborg 

Restaurant Management SO ^K^k <i^> 

HOOVER. MICHELLE OsageCity ^Tf^* "^ 

Business Administration JR 

KENWORTHY. AMY Mulvane 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

KITTLE, BRENDA Satanta 

Accounting JR 




414 



Smurthwaitf 




KUNSHEK, ALICE Girard 

Agriculture SR 

MORROW, TINA Wichita 

Accounting SO 

MURRAY, KIMBERLY Atchison 

Speech Pathology and Audiology GR 

NEWTON, AMY Pittsburgli, Pa. 

Horticulture Therapy SO 

NYHART, MICHELLE Agra 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SR 

PEIRANO, BARB WUson 

Chemical Science JR 



PETERSON, KARNA Lindsborg 

Dietetics SO 

SANTEE, JANEEN Pretty Prairie 

Special Education FR 

SIMS, JILL Peabody 

Elementary Education JR 

SINCLAIR. ELLEN Osawatomie 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

SINCLAIR, JULIE Oswatomie 

Political Science JR 

SPAAR, LAURA Holton 

Business Administration JR 



THATCHER, JULIE Clay Center 

Home Economics Education SO 

TREIBER, JANET Clay Center 

Secondary Education SO 

VARNER, DEBRA Towanda 

Eariy Childhood Education SR 

WEINGARTNER, MICHON Goddard 

Leisure Swdies JR 

WORTHEN, TASHIA Manhattan 

Accounting FR 




Walking in front of tlie Interna- 
tional Student Center, Rutli 
Kasadha uses her broken um- 
brella as a protection from the 
rain shower. (Photo by Jeff Tut- 
tie) 



Smurthwalte 



415 




West Hall is a wome 

residence hall buill 

1962. Housing '. 

women, the hall is na 

ed for Bessie B. W( 

former head of insti 

tional manageme 



ABLES, LEXmA St. Marys 

Agricultural Economics SO 

ARCHER, STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Fine Arts FR 

ARNOLD, DEENA Helton 

Accounting FR 

AUSTIN, JULIE Overland Park 

Early Childhood Education SO 

BARRY, LORI Brea, Calif. 

Marketing JR 

BEARNES, STEPHANIE Culver 

Chemistry SO 

BEBERMEYER, SANDRA AbUene 

Family and Childhood Development SO 

BEIGHTEL, GAIL Bolton 

Agricultural Economics FR 

BERRY, LAURA Derby 

Chemical Engineering SO 

BESTWICK, KIMBERLY Morrill 

History JR 

BOWSER, ELIZABETH Mayetta 

Finance JR 

BROERS, SONDRA Otuwa 

Arts and Sciences FR 

BRUNELL. ERIN Aurora 

Business Adminstration FR 

BRUNGARDT, PAMELA Erie 

Flmuice SR 

BURIES, BRENDA Chapman 

Business Administration JR 

CALDWELL, JOAN Ingalls 

Fine Arts SO 

CALLAHAN, LINDA Unexa 

Civil Engineering SR 

CHANDLER, KARLA Ahnena 

Dietetics JR 

CHENG, SHOCKING Bronx, NY. 

Computer Science SO 

CLARK, GELANE Barnard 

Elementary Education JR 

COHEN, KAREN Hays 

Correctional Administration SO 

COOPER, ELIZABETH Warrensburg, Mo. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing FR 

DAVIDSON, TAMMY McPherson 

Accounting JR 

DAVIS, SHALENE Hesston 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

DAY, NANCY Dodge Ci^ 

Apparel Design SO 

IXJWNEY, PAULA Shawnee 

Electrical Engineering SO 

DUGAN, ICARLA Wichita 

Marketing FR 

ENGLAND, DEBBIE Paola 

Accounting FR 

ENGLER, CHARLENE lieerfield 

Arts and Sciences FR 

FARR, HEATHER Topeka 

Eletnentary Education FR 




416 



West Hall 




FAULKNER, DANIEL Hutchinson 

Soil Conservation JR 

FENSTERMACHER, PAMELA MarysviUe 

Marketing FR 

FLANDERS, KIMBERLY Lorraine 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

FREY.DANA Topeka 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

FRIESS, KELLY Goddard 

Accounting FR 

GALLAGHER, LEANNE Manhattan 

Engineering FR 

GALVIN, KIM Overland Park 

Family and Child Development SO 

GERDES. CHERYL Leavenworth 

Home Economics Education JR 

GLENN, BELINDA Garden City 

Correctional Administratioa SR 

GRAHAM, DANIELLE Lyons 

Marketing JR 

HAMMEKE, LOREEN Claflin 

Apparel Design SO 

HARRELSON, SHAWN Topeka 

Business Administration FR 

HETTINGER, LINDA Enterprise, Ala. 

Secondary Education FR 

HOFFMAN, NANCY Overland Park 

Business Administration FR 

HOLLERN, KAREN Columbus 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

HOWARD, GAYLE Caney 

Accounting SO 

HOWARD, REBECCA Chapman 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

HUSSEIN, TAMMY Manhattan 

Physical Sciences SO 

INTFEN, JUDITH Atchison 

Early Childhood Education JR 

JACKSON, LORl Glade 

Psychology SO 

JOHANNSEN, SUSAN Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

JOHNSON, DANA Fort Leavenworth 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

JOHNSON, DEBBY Bird City 

Marketing FR 

JOHNSON, SUSAN Lawrence 

Dietetics SO 

KEEVER, JILL Topeka 

Political Science FR 

KHODES, LUBA Overland Park 

Architecmre FR 

KIGER, KARALEE Newton 

Music Education SO 

KILL, DENISE Paola 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

KINSEY, MOLLY Mankato 

Mathmatics Education SO 

KLOZENBUCHER, MARIAN Greenleaf 

Music Education JR 

KYSAR, MARSHA Bogue 

Elementary Education FR 

LAGRANGE, KATHYE New York. N.Y. 

Elementary Education JR 

LARSON, KIM Overland Park 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

LAWRENCE, DEBBIE Pratt 

Accounting JR 

LEEBHAM, JUDY Quinter 

Fashion Marketing JR 

LEMON, PAULA Topeka 

Marketing JR 

LICHTENAUER, VICTORU Shawnee 

Leisure Studies SR 

LINK, SUSAN MarysviUe 

Journalism and Mass Communications FR 

LOADER. MICHELLE Enterprise 

Accounting SO 

LUNDEEN, LEANN Fowler 

Accounting FR 

MACE, RHONDA Junction City 

Modem Languages JR 

MAINQUIST, MELANIE Courtland 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

MCCOY, JENNIFER Dunwoody, Ga. 

Arts and Sciences FR 

MEEHAN, BEVERLY AbUene 

Finance FR 

MEIS, KAREN Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

MERCER, TAMMY Galena 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

MITCHELL, SHERRY Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting FR 

MONTGOMERY, MICHELLE Wkhtta 

Civil Engineering SR 



West Hall 



417 



w 



est 



MUNOZ, DAWNA Kanopolis 

Elementary Education FR 

MURPHY, MARTHA Bushton 

Electrical Engineeiing FR 

MURRAY, KELLY Atchison 

Dietetics SR 

NADING, JENNIFER Concordia ^M. «>^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

NEYER, EUN MorrowviUe 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO w 

OBRIEN, CHRIS Liberal ^A: 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

OBRIEN, KIM Hepler 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO ^mrvxr- ^g^ij^ "« 

ODONNELL, CHRISTINE Valley Center jflHHjk 

Restaurant Management FR jHBHI^ 

OSTENBERG. GENA Salina JV 1% 

Pre-Nursing FR ■ ■ 

PACHECO, MARTTERE Puerto Rico If ^ ^W 

Biology JR *. J 

PAGE,KELLY Shawnee % - > fc- 

Bakery Science and Management JR m |w 

PAGE, SUZANNE Erie S, -'J^ 

Accountiiig SR ^^m Mm 

PARIS, LISA Dighton r ^ m, 

Textile Science SO 

PAUL, LISA Hays 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 

PLYMIRE, ARLENE Beloit 

Business Administration JR 

PRATHER, JENNIFER Ashland 

Associate of Science SO 

RAGLAND, MICHELLE Overland Park 

Civil Engineering FR 

REINHARDT, CINDY Great Bend 

Accounting JR 

REMY, JAN Burdjck 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

REYNOLDS, VICKI WlnlWd 

JournaUsm and Mass Conimunicatloiis SR 

ROONEY, MICHELE Lenexa 

Business Administration JR 

SANDERS, JAMEA Colby 

Music Education JR 

SCHNEIDER, KELLI Wakceney 

Elementary Education SR 

SCHROCK, TERESA Hutchinson 

Journalism Education JR 



Lori Jackson applies make-up 
to give lierseif the appearance 
of a cheetah. The makeup ap- 
plication was pail of an assign- 
ment for a Techniques of 
Makeup class. The class teaches 
students how to apply makeup 
for stage productions. (Photo by 
John LeBarge) 




418 



West Hal 



I 




SCHROEDER, JOYCE Wkhtta 

Early Childhood Education SR 

SCOTT, LISA Liberal 

Elementary Education JR 

SCOTT, PAMELA Topeka 

Social Work FR 

SHAW, CHRISTINA Topeka 

Social Work SO 

SHAW, shelly!!!!!!!!!.!!.! Broken AiTow.OUa. 

English Education SR 

SHOW, ANGIE Hutchinson 

Apparei and Textile Marketing SR 



SMITH, ELIZABETH Squoquoit, N.Y. 

Elementary Education SR 

SMITH, RONI Vassar 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

SMITH. SUZIE Miltonvale 

Physical Sciences FR 

SPECHT, ANITA Ida 

Chemistry JR 

SPENCER, JUUE Neuwaka 

Accounting JR 

STOCKWELL, KIMBERLY Dodge City 

Anthropology JR 



STRUCKOFF, JACQUE GrinneU 

Pre-Physical Therapy JR 

STRUCKOFF, CHRISTINE GrinneU 

Psychology FR 

STUART, FRANCES Topeka 

Business Administration SO 

THEURER, CAMMY WeUington 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

THOMPSON, JENNIFER Lake Quivira 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 

THOMPSON, PATRICL\ Overiand Park 

Accounting JR 



THORNTON, MARY Concoidia 

Arts and Sciences FR 

TOLLEFSON, BECKY Shawnee 

Elementary Education FR 

TREFF, AMY Mission 

Interior Design JR 

URBANEK, DENISE Marion 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

VENABLE, CHRIS Hutchinson 

Pre-I-aw JR 

VISSER, SHARON Goff 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 



VOSS, RENE Densmore 

Apparei and Textile Marketing SO 

VOSS, ROYALYN Densmore 

Home Economics Education JR 

WALKER, KIMBERLY Lansing 

Music Education JR 

WHITE, TARA Salina 

Special Education FR 

WILEY, REBECCA Wellington 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 



WILEY, VALERIE WeUington 

Retail Floriculture FR 

WRIGHT, MARY Junction City 

Elementary Education JR 

YOUNG, JUSmNA Oxford 

Business Administration FR 

ZAVALA, GINA Unexa 

Special Education FR 

ZIMMETT, MARY Syracuse 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine FR 



West Hall 



419 



Be 



(eth Klassen plays with 
1-year-old Stephanie 
while her husband 
Sheldon studies for his 
business management 
class. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor} 




420 



Married Studl 



Living at Jardine 



"Hard to Beat" 



^ ontrary to the negative image 
k^ some people had of Jardine 
Terrace Apartments — the 
University operated housing 
for married students or single 
students with families — 
ildon and Beth Klassen found the apart- 
tits "hard to beat." 

'You're almost embarrassed to say (that 
1 live in Jardine)," Beth Klassen said, 
ause of the negative reaction she and her 
band got from people, 
leth said she and Sheldon wanted to try 
er types of living arrangements before 
ving to Jardine, but she said they came to 
; Jardine better. 

heldon, senior in management and ex- 
tive mayor of Jardine, said he and his 
e moved from a Manhattan mobile home 
k because Jardine was closer to the cam- 
and the Chester L. Peters Recreation 
Iter, where he works. Living at Jardine 
» afforded the Klassens the opportunity to 
5t people and make new friends, many of 
)m are married. 

errie Galle, senior in accounting, said 

and her husband Randy were friends 

more married couples than single 

lents because they had more in common. 

irdine parents were "all in the same 

and Beth said they "compared 

;s" on problems they encountered as 

lents and parents. 

'ne fallacy single students had about mar- 
students was that being married was a 
St to class performance, Sheldon said. 
It doesn't work that way (for me)," he 
"The more time I have, the more 
gs I want to do with my family." 
fter she got off work, Beth said she had 



the evenings free to watch television or play 
with their 10-month -old daughter Stephanie, 
and that could distract Sheldon when he was 
trying to work. 

Limited space was another problem, Ter- 
rie said. The Jardine apartments didn't have 
a den or separate study room, so she studied 
in the bedroom or at the kitchen table. 

"It's really easy to say, T will do that 
(homework) later,'" Terrie said, if Randy 
was home in the evenings. 

Noise at times was a problem, Sheldon 
said, but there weren't many formal com- 
plaints this year. 

Most people either dealt with the problem 
themselves by talking to the person who 
created the disturbance or simply by ignor- 
ing it, Terrie said. 

Cultural differences created problems bet- 
ween American families and foreign 
families living at Jardine, Sheldon said. 

The Jardine Mayor's Council tried to 



compensate for any difficulties foreigners 
had with American customs by explaining 
the customs to them, he said. The October 
and December issues of the monthly 
newsletter sent by the Department of Hous- 
ing to Jardine residents contained an ex- 
planation of Halloween and Christmas. 

"It's kind of hard for them to 
understand," Terrie said. "Even at our (all- 
Jardine) Halloween party, we had trouble." 
The foreigners didn't know what a spook 
house or wiener roast was, she said. 

"You just have to give a little extra 
thought when you're planning things," Ter- 
rie said. "You have to go a little extra 
step." 

The Mayor's Council sponsored social 
and educational events to give residents an 
opportunity to meet each other. Sheldon said 
about 850 Jardine residents attended the car- 
nival sponsored in the spring of 1985. 

— Susan D. Baird 





Leaving the Jardine 
Terrace area early in the 
morning, Sheldon 
Klassen walks toward 
campus. (Photo by Jeff 
Taylor) 

Uheldon Klassen takes 
time during a typically 
busy day being a stu- 
dent, husband and father 
to spend some time with 
his daughter Stephanie. 
(Plioto by Jeff Taylor) 



421 




ampus 



ABERNATHY, GENE Wichita 

Finance SO 

ABUHASSKA, BASSAM Manhattan 

Engineering Technology SR 

ACHENBACH, AMY Manhattan 

Medical Technology JR 

ADAMS, CRAIG Overland Park 

Plant Pathology SO 

ADAMS, DAMEL CaldweU 

Scconday Eduction SR 



ADAMS, LEANN Dcerfield 

Nodcar Engbieering SR 

ADAMS, RHONDA Chiy Center 

Elementary Education SR 

ADELEICE, OLUSOLA Nigeria 

Agrknitnral Economics GR 

ADELHARDT, STAN Nashville 

Agronomy SR 

AGE, DAVID Manhattan 

Architecture SR 



AHERN, JAMES Salina 

History GR 

AKERS, SHARLA McPherson 

Elementary Education SR 

AL-GHAMDI, MOHAMMED Saudi ArabU 

Education GR 

ALBRECHT, LINDA Uncolnviile 

Marlieting SR 

ALBUS, WERNER West ( 

Business Administration 



t Germain 




ALDERSON, JANA Niciierson 

Apparel and Textile Marlieting SR 

ALDERSON, MIKE Clay Center 

Management SO 

ALEXANDER, DAVID Bunton 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

ALEYASIN, ALI Manhattan 

Civil Engineering PR 

ALLEN, GREGORY Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

ALLISON, DAVID Juncuon City 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology SO 



ALTMAN, JOLEEN Saifau 

Mathematics Education GR 

ALTON, JEFF Olathe 

Radio-Television SO 

AMOS, BRIGID Manhattan 

Agronomy GR 

AMTHAUER, BECKY Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

AMTHAUER, VERLE Manhattan 

Agronomy GR 

ANDERSON. EARL Wichita 

Interior Design SR 



ANDERSON. GREG Lindsborg 

Secondary Education JR 

ANDERSON, JULIA Great Bend 

Music Education SR 

ANDERSON, LISA Sedan 

Fine Arts SR 

ANDERSON, PATRICL\ L St. George 

Accounting ^ 

ANDERSON, PATRICL\S Manhattan 

Speech Pathology and Audiology JR 

ANDERSON, TODD White CiU 

Geophysics SR 



ANDERSON, TONI Norcattu- 

Speech Pathology and Audiology GR 

ANDERSON, TRACY Lencvta 

Architecture SR 

ANGELL, KIMBERLY Plataa 

Physical Sciences Education SR 

ANGELO, KATHY BufTalo, N.Y. 

Landscape ArcUtecture SR 

ANH, VU NGOC Manhattan 

Electrical Engbieering SR 

ANLHCER. MARVIN Gridley 

Mechanical Engineering SO 




^ ^Jp rW^ ^i %, ^1 




422 



Off Campuil 




11^ t^ 



ANLIKER, WAYNE GrkUey 

Chemical Engineering SR 

ANNAN, WILLIAM Onaga 

Business Education SR 

ANSCHUTZ, JEFF Manhattan 

Education Admlni^ration GR 

ANTHOLZ, MARY McDonald 

Accountiiig SR 

AWEL, KAREN Wellington 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

APPEL, WALTER Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

ARBOGAST, DAVID Excelsior Springs, Mo. 

Interior Architecture SR 

ARCHER, SHANNON Almena 

Management SR 

ARNDT, CINDY Emporia 

Accoimting SR 

ARNOLDY, JILL Tipton 

Business Administration SO 

ARNOLDY, PAUL Tipton 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

ARON, KENNETH Chapman 

Electrical Engineering SO 

ASHFORD, JEFF Topeka 

Physical Education SR 

ATWOOD, KERRI El Dorado 

Pre-Design Professions SR 

AUFDEMOERGE, JOE HutcUnson 

Marketing SR 

AUGUSTINE, CLAIR Hays 

Accounting JR 

AW AD, AWED Palestine 

Electrical Engineerim SR 

AYDOGAN, HURRTYfT Turkey 

Industrial Engineering GR 

AYDOGAN. SERDAR Turkey 

Industrial Engineering SO 

AZAIN, MAURICE Manhattan 

Social Sciences SR 

AZZAM-ALI, BASSEM Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SR 

BAALMAN, LAURIE GrinneU 

Fine Arts SR 

BAALMAN, MAURICE GrinneU 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BAALMANN. MARY Halslead 

Accounting JR 

BAERG, DAVID Manhattan 

Business Adtnininstration SO 

BAIER, LORI Hope 

Mathematks Education SR 

BAIGES, ARLEEN Puerto Rko 

Industrial Engineering SR 

BAILEY, CHRISTOPHER Fredonia 

Natural Sciences Management JR 

BAILEY, DARCIE Neosho Rapids 

Chemical Engineering JR 

BAILEY, SCOTT Netawaka 

Business Administration JR 

BAIR, CONSTANCE Seneca 

Marketing JR 

BAKER, MICHAEL Marienthal 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BALDRIDGE. STEVE BellevUle 

Management FR 

BALDWIN, CAROL Radium 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

BALTHAZOR, KURT Clyde 

Mechankal Engineering SR 

BALTHROP, TED ''*»'>^ 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BANMAN, MICHAEL Willowick, Ohio 

Foods and Nutrition Science SR 

BANNISTER, JAIMIE Manhattan 

Office Administratkin SR 

BANNISTER, JAY Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BANTA, MARK Coffeyville 

Life Sciences JR 

BARKER, JULIE Silver Lake 

Elementary Education JR 

BARNES, MICHAEL St. Joseph, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

BARNES, TRAVIS Towner, Colo. 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BARRETT, MIKE Kansas City, Kan. 

Ani mal S ciences and Industry • SR 

BARRETT, SCOTT Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

BARRIER, CARLA El Dorado 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

BARROWS, TODD Ness City 

Animal Sciences and Industi^ SR 

BARRY, PAUL Seward, Neb. 

Agricultural Engineering GR 



Hf Campus 



423 



tjffV^ampus 

BARTEL, BRADLEY HUlsboro 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BARTELLI. CINDY Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

BARTLEY, STANLEY Wamego 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BASEL, MICHAEL Williamsburg 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BATES, BRYAN Manhattan 

Agricultural Education SR 

BAYLES, KEN Manhattan 

Medical Technology SR 

BEAM, RODNEY Esbon 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BEARD, DEBORAH Leawood 

Fashion Marketing SO 

BEAT, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Biolosy SR 

BECKER, kwCTA!"!""""!"!l"".'".'",""..Topeka 

Interior Design JR 

BEGGS, BRUCE Chapman 

Journalism and Mass Communication SR 

BEGUELIN, SCOTT Manhattan 

Crop Protection SR 

BEHRENS, GEORGE Palmyra, Mo 

Building Construction JR 

BENDER, LYNN Shawnee 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

BENEKE. BETH Lost Springs 

Fine Arts SR 

BENNETT, EDWIN Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BENNETT, JOHN Chicago, 111. 

Civil Engineering SO 

BENTZ, JEANNETTE Lincolnville 

Accounting SR 

BERGER, BRETT Halstead 

Accounting JR 

BERGES, RUTH Wamego 

Elementary Education FR 

BERGESON, SHERYL Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

BERGGREN BRUCE Manhattan 

Mechanical Eiq[ineering SR 

BERGMAN, CINDY Chanute 

Marlteting FR 

BERGMAN, LORI Chanute 

Apparel andTextile Marketing JR 



l\an 



ansas State University 
facilities employee Jim Schoen 
paints the trim on the second 
floor windows at the Hollis 
House, 1408 Denison Ave, on 
October 31. Schoen shows his 
Halloween spirit by wearing 
bunny ears and whiskers to 
work. (Photo by Jeff Tattle) 




424 



Off Campu 




1^^ ^ 



BERNARD, REBECCA Bonner Springs 

Elementary Education SO 

BERREY, MICHAEL Chetopa 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BERROTH, JANELL Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

BERRY, DEBRA Minneapolis 

Pbysicai Education SR 

BERTRAM, NANCY Topeka 

Interior Architecture SR 

BETZEN, ANN lola 

Restaurant Management SR 

BIAYS, ELISABETH Ellinwood 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

BICKHAUS, TIMOTHY Macon, Mo. 

Pre-Design Professions SR 

BIDWELL, SUSAN Great Bend 

Interior Design JR 

BIEBERLY, TERRY Liberal 

Secondary Education JR 

BILLINGER, RANDALL Solomon 

Gerontology SR 

BIRD, THOMAS Albert 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

BISPING, TODD Linn 

Engineering FR 

BLACK, KIM Chapman 

Elementary Education SR 

BLACK, SCOTT Belleville 

Marketing JR 

BLAKEMAN, ANNETTE Paola 

Elementary Education JR 

BLANKENSHIP, JANICE Mission 

Industrial Engineering SR 

BLETSCHER, LESLIE Wakefield 

Home Economics Education JR 

BLOCHLINGER, KEBERA Concordia 

Social Work SR 

BLOME, DONALD Cherryraie 

Agriculture Education SR 

BLOUNT, KIM Cottonwood Falls 

Speech Education SR 

BLUBAUGH, RANDY Vtola 

Management SR 

BLYTHE, LISA Newton 

Biology SR 

BLYTHE, SUSAN White City 

Elementary Education SO 

BOBART, KIM Topeka 

Early Childhood Education SR 

BOGART, WAYNE Oberlln 

Engineering Technology SR 

SOGER, GAYLON Jetmore 

Agriculture Education SR 

BOGNER, MARY Haven 

Business Administration SO 

BOHNENBLUST, LARAE Riley 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

BOHNERT, JULIE Shawnee 

Feed Science and Management SR 

BOLINGER, STACY Cheney 

Elementary Education SR 

BOLLER, BERNIE Manhattan 

Food Science JR 

BOLLER, TERI Norton 

Elementary Education JR 

BOLLINGER, CAROLLYNN Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

BOLLINGER, EADYE Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

BOLTE, BEN LincoUi 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BONDANK, JOE Leawood 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BONHAM, DAVID SaUna 

Accounting SR 

BOOHER, ANDREA Goodland 

Psychology SO 

BOOTH, TRACY Tecumseh 

Applied Musk SR 

BORGEN, JULIE Manhattan 

OfUce Administration SR 

BORGEN, STEVEN Manhattan 

Management JR 

BORGERDING, JAMES Marysville 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BORGSTADTER, DARIN Ellsworth 

Pre-Dentistry FR 

BORN, GARY Overland Park 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

BOSNAK, KIRSTEN St. Iwell 

Education SR 

BOTHWELL, SHELLY Superior, Neb. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

BOTT, DONNA Palmer 

Elementary Education JR 



i-A' ' . ^ 



If Campus 



425 



Ore 



ampus 



BOYD, ARNOLD AbUene 

Busioess Admlnistratioa SR 

BOYD, KRISTEN BeUevue, Neb. 

Horticulture SR 

BOYD, LINK Oakley 

Agricultural Economics SR 

BOYD, PAUL Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

BOYD, TODD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

BRACK, SCOTT Great Bend 

Businos Administration SR 



BRADLEY, DARREN Bern 

Fine Arts SR 

BRANDES, ROBERT Wichita 

Finance SR 

BRANT, SONJA Isabel 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

BRAUN, DENISE Courtlend 

Office Administration SR 

BREDOW, LORI Dover 

Agricultural Journalism SO 

BRESSLER, REID Elkhart 

Agricultural Economics JR 



BRIGGS, ANDREW Minneapolis 

Industrial Engineering SO 

BRIGGS. BRADLEY Minneapolis 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

BRIGGS, LORI Beloit 

Business Education JR 

BRINKER, BRIAN Topelia 

Natural Resources Management SR 

BROBST, BRYCE Beloit 

Agronomy SR 

BROOKS, MARY Hays 

Secondary Education Administration SR 



BROOKS, SUSAN Shawnee 

Accounting SR 

BROSA, MELINDA Topeka 

Health and Physical Education SR 

BROSE, JEFFREY Valley Falls 

Veterinary Medicine SR 

BROSE, LISA Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

BROTEMARKLE MARY Columbia, Mo. 

Mathematics SR 

BROWN, BRUCE Cuba, ICan. 

Architectural Engineering JR 



BROWN, COLEEN Haddam 

Elementary Education SR 

BROWN, DANA Kansas City, Kan. 

Electrical Engineering JR 

BROWN, FREDLYN Shawnee 

Industrial Engineering JR 

BROWN, JEANBE Manhattan 

Secondary Education SR 

BROWN, KENNETH Satanta 

Mathematks Education SR 

BROWN, VALERIE Newton 

Business Administration SO 



BROWNING, CINDY Emporia 

Animal Science and Industry SR 

BRUEGGER, PAUL HutcUnson 

Health and Physical Education SR 

BRUMMETT, JULIE Manhattan 

Secondary Education Administration JR 

BRUNA, COLEEN Hanover 

Accounting SR 

BRUNA, JEFF Hanover 

Agricultural Economics SO 

BRUNGARDT, CARL Galesburg 

Finance SR 



BRYANT, GARY Ensign 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

BUCHANAN, ALAN Wamego 

Agriculture Education JR 

BUETHE, KIMBERLY Lincolnville 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

BUGLER, JOHN Mission 

Mechanical Engineering — JR 

BUNK, SHIRLEY Inman 

Accounting JR 

BUNNEL, THOMAS Welda 

Business Administration GR 



BURCKHART, PHIL Hesston 

Agricultural Economics JR 

BURGHART, STEVE Wright 

Electrical Engineering SR 

BURK, ALLAN McDonald 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

BURKE, JANE RoeUnd Park 

Elementary Education SR 

BURRELL, TOM Wichita 

Accounting SR 

BURTON, JAMES Belton, Mo. 

Construction Science SR 









feiiyfe 




426 



Off Campu 




P% f^ ^ 1: 




BURTON, KRISTVNE Manhattiui 

Fine Arts SR 

BURTON, SHERYL Dfssoto 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

BURTON, WILLIAM ManbMan 

Enghieeriiig Technology SR 

BUSCH, MARK Cimmarron 

Microbiology JR 

BUSCH, TOM Granite City, M. 

Microbiology GR 

BUSCHER, MICHALE Festus, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering GR 

BUTLER, BRIAN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

BUTLER, ROSS Kansas City, Kan. 

Secondary Education JR 

BUTLER, TERESA Junction City 

Marketing JR 

BUTTERFIELD, ANTHONY Beloit 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

BUYLE, SUZANNE Manhattan 

Secondary Education SR 

CAGUBM, ANA St. Peters, Mo. 

Interior Architecture SR 

CAIN, LISA Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

CALDWELL, DUNA Manhattan 

Soda! Sciences SR 

CALDWELL, WENDY Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

CALLAZO, VICTOR Puerto Rico 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

CAMBLIN, CLAYTON Topeka 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology SR 

CAMP, FRANCES McPherson 

Accounting FR 

CAMPBELL, DONNIE Lyons 

Secondary Education SR 

CAMPBELL, STACEY Camp Springs, Md. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology FR 

CANELOS, ANDREA Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

CARLAT, STAN Manhattan 

Construction Science SR 

CARLSON, CAROLYN Manhattan 

Natural Resources Management JR 

CARLSON, CATHIE Brooklyn Center, Minn. 

Elementary Education JR 

CARLSON, CONNIE Topeka 

Horticulture SR 

CARPENTER, DAN SaUna 

Mechank^ Engineering SR 

CAHKNTER, JOSEPH Garden Plain 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

CARR, DANA Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SR 

CARRICK, BRAD Topdu 

Electrical Engineering SR 

CARRIKER, CONNIE Manhattan 

Fine Arts SR 

CARSON, KELLY Manhattan 

Social Sciences SR 

CARTER, LEEANN Newton 

Interior Design JR 

CARTER, SHONA Garden CI5 

Life Sciences SR 

CARUTHERS, JILL Wichita 

Apparel and Textile Marketii^ SR 

CARVER, BRADLEY Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

CASEY, CATHY Minneapolis 

Physical Education JR 

CASEY, MICHAEL Minneapolis 

Marketfaig SR 

CASHIER, DEBORAH Holton 

English Education JR 

CASHIER, DENNIS Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics SR 

CASTEEL, ANGIE Goddard 

Biology JR 

CASTRO, JOSE Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering JR 

CAUDILLO, CATHY Wichiu 

Interior Disign JR 

CAVLOVIC, MICHAEL Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration SO 

CEARLEY, MICHAEL Sublette 

Finance SR 

CEDERBERG, KARA Luray 

Elementary Education SR 

CHALKER, SHARON Herington 

Pre-Law SR 

CHANDLEE, CAROL Shawnee 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

CHAPPELL, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR 



If Campus 



427 



t3ffC 



ampus 





CHARLAND, LORI Junction City 

Elementary Education SR 

CHARTIER, ICAREN Qyde 

Physical Education JR 

CHENOWETH, AMY Clearwater 

Family and Child Development JR 

CHENOWETH, CLAY Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics SR "^^m ^^K i 

CHENOWETH, SHELLY Newton ■l^B " MKi ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

CHERAY, NANCY Overland Parli 

Accounting SR 

CHISHOLM, GARY Wicliita 

Mathematics SR 

CHOW, CATHY Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

CHCA, HONG-YAU Manhattan 

Computer Science GR _ _. 

CHUMLEY, MICHAEL Piper >*% ^ 

Animal Science and Industry SR _^ 

CLARK, CURT Anthony «*5w 

Agronomy SR ^\ J ^S MF 

CLARK, ELDON Minneapolis, Kan. ^^^M ^^T ^ _^£^ X 

"'*"■ '" ^<^ ^o^ -iU 

CLARK.JAMES Manhattan ^■ 

Agricultural Mechanization JR .^Hi^. 

CLARK, JULIE Manhattan ,J|HI^^ 

Accounting SR ^^^^^ 

CLARK, TAMMY Manhattan M » 

Microbiology SR ▼ *^ -i. W 

CLARKE, MEUNDA Manhattan f ^ T 

SodalWorli SR 

CLARKE, ROBERT Titenue, FU. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

CLARY, LORI Highland V 

Restaurant Management SR 

CLASEN, ROBERT Topelu 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

CLAUSSEN, TAMMY Gypsum 

Computer Science SO 

CLAWSON, DAVID SatanU ^ 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR tm -^ „^ n 1H<ef 

CLAWSON, KENBY Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR I , 

CLAXTON, MARK Overland Park ' - 

Marketing JR A -^B JPt 

CLELAND, ROSS Baldwin ^^ J -v s 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine JR ^B^idl \V^^^ "^•>. ^J> 

CLYMER, MELODY Broomfleld, Colo. 

Computer Science SR 

COATS, JOAN Manhattan 

Elementary Education FR 

COEN, JOLYNN Ottawa 

Elementary Education JR ^m^ ^v i-**^^ .Mtm^ --%mpt 

COFFELT, SCOTT Topeka *■■ ^ KHP^ ^ WL* 

B usine ss Administration JR 

COFFEY, ROBERT Manhattan 

Landscape Architecture SR 

COFFIN, CHRISTOPHER WichiU — ^— . ^^^ -i 

Mechanical Enghieerii^ SR flHu^ J WBH ,^\ 

COLLINS, DEANN Overbrook 

Marketiw SR 

COMFORT, JULIE Minneapolis 

English Education SR 

COMMERFORD, SUSAN SaUna 

Chemistry Education SR 

COMPTON, LISA Fredonia 

PsvchcrfoiEV SR 

CONANT, QUEOTIN.. "...V..V. 7... v.. V...... Cimarron i ' ^ J 

Agricultural Economics JR \ »^ 

CONNOLLY, WILLIAM Manhattan _^^V ^^^ 

Industrial Engineering SR j^^B ^ Jj^^H 

CONRARDY, CAROL Kingman ~~^ 

Pre-Nursing JR 

CONVERSE, KEVIN Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

CO^JWAY, KEVIN Beloit 

Architectural Engineering JR 

COOK, JOSEPH Manhattan 

FbieArts GR ^Mt ^ ,^-- 

COOK.KENT JunctionCity "" 

Management JR ''^Bl ~ / 

COOK. RANDY Manhattan -^^ - ^'^ 

Geography SO 

^SSkS:^::::::::::::;::;::::::;::::;::.^'-!!!^ W ^.-.M ^ 

COON, PHYLLIS Norwich T ,^^^H|ik 1 

Fine Arts JR 

COOPER, HELEN Manhattan 

Public Administration GR 

COOPER, MAX Peabody 

Phvslcs SR 

CORDELL,\icKiE...................Coundl Grove |^K aJ^^B ■ " »• 

Enghieering Technology SR ' ^^B fllHI v^ V 

CORLE, RONDA Arkansas City ^V^ ^^^H \> ■ 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR tRH^^ '^ s? / 





428 





I he setting sun silhouettes 
Darren Bouclthout as he takes 
advantage of the nice weather 
one mid-October afternoon. 
Bouckhout got in one last ski 
run of the season at Tuttle Creek 
Reservoir. (Pholo by Peter 
Obetz) 



CORLISS, LUANNE Wichita 

Psychology SR 

CORY, KELLY Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences IR 

COSTELLO, DAN Tampa 

Accounting JR 

COX.BIUAN Fredonia 

Pre-Dentistry JR 

COX, KENNETH Dodge Cily 

Accounting SR 

COX, RUSSELL Lenexa 

Radio and Television JR 

COX, STEVEN Wichita 

Architecture SR 

CRABTREE, KRISTIE Manhattan 

Joumalism and Mass Conununications SR 

CRAIG, NEIL Independence 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

CRAIG, PAUL Lorraine 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

CRATHORNE, SCOTT Hutchinson 

Feed Science and Management SR 

CRAWFORD, JOSEPH Florissant, Mo. 

Architecturai Engineering SR 

CROFT, MARK Wichita 

Management SR 

CROSS, MARCIA Manhattan 

Secondary Education SR 

CROY, TODD Junction City 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

CRUMPACKER, REX Salina 

Leisure Studies SR 

CUBBAGE, PATRICK Bums 

Finance SR 

CUDNIK, JACQUELINE Overland Park 

Chemical Engineering SO 

CUNNINGHAM, JIM Topeka 

Radio-Television SR 

CURRAN, PENNY Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

CURRY, CARL Liberal 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

CURTIS, KATHY Hudson 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

CYPHERT, THERESA Lenexa 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

CYR, TERRY Clyde 

Finance SR 



Off Campus 



429 



OffC 



-'! 



ampus 



DAETWILER, KIRBY Wichita mm-., __ -m 

Pre-Veterinaiy Medicine FR f .^MMMb. % 

DAHL, DERRICK Topeka 

Agricultural Economics SO 

DAIGLE, EUGENE Manhattan 

Secondary Education JR W "Slf 

DALE, SUSAN Manhattan * 

Dance SO 

DAM, PATTY MarysvUle 

Nulritioiul Science SR 

DANIELS, JILL Salina _ 

Physical Education JR r'-'H^- X- 

few '^X 

DANIELS, PEGGY Valley Center |f 

Secondary Education SR 

DARFLER, NATALIE Overland Park 

Computer Science JR 

DAIM, MALAURA Derby 

Jounialian and Mass Communications SR 

DAVIDSON, ROBERT Webber 

Secondary Education SR 

DAVIES, JENNIFER Olathe 

Fine Arts SO 

DAVIS, EVELYN Auburn 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR ^^ < i 

DAVIS, JACK Ramoul P 

Animal Science SO .^mtm^^ 

DAVIS, PAUL MarysviUe ^^^^. 

English Education SR JHPH^^^ 

DAWSON-RAMOSKA, AUDREY Manhattan mm ^^B 

SodalWork SR »-. . ■ 

DAWSON, SUSAN Glenview, HI. ■■ -^ W 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

DEAN, CRYSTAL Mankato 

Elementary Education JR 

DEATRICK, STEPHANIE Hutchinson 

Music SO 

DEAVER, MARVIN Clay Center 

Marketing SR 

DEBARTHE, LARRY Independence 

Interior Architecture SR 

DECOU, MARK Hutchinson 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

DEGEER, MARY Medicine Lodge 

ThfiAter SO 

DEMUra, LORETTA...................... SpeairvlUe "^ 

Fashion Marketing SR 

DEPENBUSCH, ROGER Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR ' ^ '. 

DERCHER, SHARRY Olathe W _, 

Special Education SR j|hyM^ 

DERKSEN, ROGER Newton J^^^Hk 

Accounting JR J^^^^^^K 

DERRICK, LAURA Kahoka, Mo. V^^HI 

Architecture and Design SR ^^ .J^H 

DETTKE, DONALD MarysvUle T«S| "»»• IF 

Computer Science JR . i 

DETTMER, TAMMY WatervUle ,, JS 

History SO A k 

DEVLIN, DANE Smith Center ^B .-»' jW 

Agricultural Eonomics SR W^ J^^ 

DEWEY, EDDIE Betolt W 

Agriculture Education SR F ijuk 

DEYOUNG, REBECCA Phoenix, Ariz. l ^ jB 

Dietetics and Institutional Management SR j^tfK^ 

DICK, JAMES Lenexa jMi a 

Construction Science JR K>~i. .< 

DICKERSON, MARCIA Olathe ^<r- ^ 

Elementary Education SR 

DILL, JEANETTE Phillipsburg \j0tt- *^ 

Life Sciences JR 

DILLE, RUSSELL Manhattan 

Agronomy SR 

DILLINGER, ERIC Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

DILLON, DARREN PhUlipsburg 

Engineering Technology SO 

DILLON, JAMES Hope 

Agricultural Economics JR 

DINKEL, MICHAEL Topeka 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

DIRKS, SHERI Tampa ' ,. 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR J^ ^^ 

DISBERGER, RUSSELL Colby .,,^1^ ^^.i. 

Finance JR h|^BL ^ST^^H 

DODDS, SUSAN Onaga F "^g^ 

Elementary Education JR 

DOE, JUDY Manhattan 

Computer Science JR 

DOB, KWEE YIN Malaysia 

Extension Education GR 

DOLANDE, FERNANDO Panama 

Marketing SR 

DOLEZAL, PAM Ellsworth 

Speech PatholoKy and Audiology GR 

DOUAC, MARK. Lenexa 

Electrical Engineering SR 



430 





ijflB^ ^^Aj^ ^m^^ 





DOMANN, SUSAN El Dorado 

Marketing JR 

DOME, MARION Manhattan 

Engineering Technology SR 

DONNERT, DAVID Manhattan 

Engineering FR 

DORN, JAMES Manhattan 

Management SR 

DORRELL, GARY Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

DORSCH, SCOTT Bird City 

Agronomy JR 



DORSCH, SHAWN Enterprise 

Englisli JR 

DOU), PATRICIA MhineapoUs, Kan. 

Accounting SR 

DOWDING, LEESA Topeica 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

DOWNES, DENNIS Council Grove 

Architectural Engineering SR 

DOWNEY, JULIA Shawnee 

Secondary Education SR 

DOYEN, AMY Concordia 

Grain Science SR 



DRAPAL, KIMBERLY Wkhtta 

Landscape Design SR 

DREYER, DAVID BurUngame 

Agriculture Education SR 

DRUMMOND, JOSEPH Leawood 

Labor Relations SR 

DRURY, MICHAEL Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Construction Science SR 

DUBBERT, KELLY Cawker City 

Finance SR 

DUDEK, MICHAEL Strcamwood, 111. 

Architecture SR 



DUELL, ALAN EUb 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

DUELL, KRISn Goodland 

Geology SR 

DUFF. ANGUS Prairie Village 

Mechanical Engineering ¥9. 

DUGAN.BARB Soldier 

Extension Education JR 

DUGGAN, DIANE Salina 

Pre-Denistry SO 

DULAC. MICHELLE Derby 

Pre-Nursing SO 



DUMLER, RUSSELL Lakln 

Information Systems SR 

DUNBAR, DIANA Geuda Springs 

Finance JR 

DUNLAP, MIKE Edson 

Agricultural Economics SR 

DUNN, RICHARD Manhattan 

Architectural En^eering SR 

DUNN, ROBERT Manhattan 

Interior ArcUtecture SR 

DUNZ, DEBORAH Manhattan 

Biochemistry SO 



DURAR, ABDULRAZAG ALI Manhattan 

Agronomy GR 

DURFLINGER, DENNIS BelleviUe 

Finance JR 

DURST, ICRIS Moundridge 

Fine Arts JR 

DUTTON, TANYA Manhattan 

Physical Science SR 

DUVALL, JOHN Wichiu 

Business Administration Pre-Professional FR 

DYER, CAROLYN Pomona 

Business Administration JR 



DYER, TAMI Manhattan 

Pre-Forestry JR 

EAGER, TERESA Raytown, Mo. 

Accounting JR 

EASTERDAY, BONNIE Atwood 

Elementary Education SR 

EBERTH, CHARLES Basehor 

Engineering Technology JR 

ECK, SHARI Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SO 

EDIGER, JAMES McPberson 

Modem Languages SR 



EDMONDS, JOHN Junction City 

Business Administration SR 

EDWARDS, ELAINE Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

EDWARDS, ERIC Emporia 

Radio-Televiston SR 

EGGLESTON, RICK Mulvane 

Pre-Dcsign Professional SR 

EGIDY, DEBORAH Greeley 

Accounting JR 

EHRLICH, DAVID Wilson 

Computer Science JR 



ff Campus 



431 



OirC 



ampus 



EHRLICH, MONTY WUson 

Radio-Television JR 

EILAND, DARRELL EUinwood 

Computer Science JR 

EILERT, ANN Belolt 

Elementary Education SR 

EKART, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Chemical Engineering SR 

ELAM, BRUNA Garden City | . , » 

Accounting JR 1 ^ 

ELBRADER, REGINA Burlington ' 

Fine Arts JR 1 

ELDER, LARRY Seneca ' 

Fine Arts SR 

ELGIN, CARY Burlingame jlMHI^ 

Agriculture Economics SR ^^^^^^^k 

ELLENZ.JOHN Tipton M ■ 

Mechanical Engineering SO W _ W 

ELLIOTT, DAATD Ida ? ^ '•»"f 

Chemical Engineering SR 

ELLIOTT, GAYL AbUene •< <* S^t 

Social Sciences SR 

ELLIOTT, RYAN Glasco 

Electrical Engineering SO 

ELLIOTT, TRACEY Derby --'■ 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

ELLIS, THOMAS Shawnee 

Electronics JR 

ELWOOD, DEE Columbia, S.C. 

Education SO 

EMIG, STACEY AbUene mr 

Office Administration SO 

ENGEL.JOHN Shawnee 

Computer Science JR , 

ENGLE, KENNETH HutcUnson * 

Management SR 

ENLOW, PAULA Manhattan 

niysical Education JR 

ENTZ, NORMAN Peabody 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

EPPS, JACK Overland Parli 

Business Administration GR 

ERDMAN, DAVID Maize l^'.««* 

Marketing SO 

ERICKSON, CINDY Manhattn 

Eariy Childbood Education SR 

ERICKSON, JOHN Fort Scott 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR ^ 

ERNST, TOM Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management FR 

ESAU, SUSAN Manhattan 

Family Life and Human Development JR 

ESCHUMAN, CLARK Minneapolis 

Finance SR 

ESKILSON, KAREN Wichita 

Informatioa Systems SR 

ESSLINGER, MARK Bern 

Engineering Technology SR 

EVANS, KEVIN Garden City 

Pre-Law JR 

EVANS, RANFTA Ottawa 

Horticulture Therapy SR 

EVERIST, ROB Santa Maria, Calif. 

Engineering Technology JR 

FAGERBERG, STACY Olsburg 

Elementary Education JR 

FALK, NANCY Topeka 

Elementary Education JR 

FANGMAN, JOE Frankfort 

Electrical Engineering JR 

FANKHAUSER, ANiftTTE Garden City 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

FARRELL, SHEILA Manhattan m 

Pre-Medicine JR f 

FAUNCB, TROY Holt, Mo. ' 

Management JR 

FELDIUUSEN, SCOTT Frankfort 

Music Education SR 

FELDKAMP, KATHY Axtell •'**' "»» 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR ^i -■ 

FELTS, CHRISTOPHER Wichiu \ , - J 

Electrical Engineering SO ^ -* ' ri 

FERGUSON, ROBERT Junction City 

Social Work SR k 

FERGUSON, ROGER Shawnee ~ 1 

Horticulture JR 

FERNKOPF, VICKI Circleville 

Food Science SO 

FERRELL, TRACI Springfield, Mo. 

Landscape Architecture SR 

FERRIN, GREGG BuckUn 

Electrical Engineering SR 

FEY, ELIZABETH Garden CHy \ - 

Elementary Educatioo SR \~~ J 

FEYH, MARC Manhattan JtV^-- k 

Architectural Engineering SR ,,^^^ MJ^te 



432 





FIEF, GREGORY Glasco 

Civil Engineering SR 

FffiGENSCHUH, RONALD Sidney, Neb. 

A rchitecture JR 

FIELDSON, KIRSTIN Saiina 

Socia] Sdences SR 

FIELDSON, TOM Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

FINLEY, DAVID Onaga 

Engineering Teclinology JR 

FINLEY, LARRY St. Francis 

Accounting SR 

FBVNESY, KATHLEEN RusseU 

Restaurant Management SR 

FISCELLA, JAMES Manhattan 

Finance SR 

FISCHER, DAVID Ottawa 

Agronom}' SR 

FISCHER, MARK Wright 

Business Administration SR 

FISHER, PAMELA St. John 

Accountin g SO 

FIX, CHRISTIE St. Louis, Mo. 

Marketing SR 

FLANAGAN, KATHY Junction City 

Feed Science and Management SR 

FLEMING. ESTHER Manhattan 

Botany JR 

FLEMING, REX Leroy 

Civil Engineering JR 

FLEMING, RONNIE Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics SR 

FLEMING. STEVEN Copeland 

Marlceting JR 

FLICKINGER, PAM Pretty Prairie 

Oflke Admlni^ration SR 

FLOWERS, CAROLYN Junction City 

Social Work JR 

FLUGHOFT, LORI Htm 

Leisure Studies ^ 

FOLK, DOUGLAS Holton 

Electrical Engineering SO 

FOLKERTS, LORI Great Bend 

Business Administration SR 

FOOTE, BARBARA Sea Girt, N.J. 

Family Life and Human Development JR 

FORD, NORMAN MUford 

Radio-Television JR 

FORET, IRENE Shawnee Mission 

Foods and Nutrition Science JR 

FORGY, MARY ANN Bennhigton 

Humanities SR 

FORREST, KIMBERLY Lamed 

Accounting SO 

FORSLUND, KIM Kansas City, Mo. 

Interior Design JR 

FORST, DONNA Wamego 

Family Life and Human Development JR 

FOSTER, ANNE Oiathe 

Industrial Engineering SR 

FOSTER, MATTHEW Manhattan 

Construction Science SO 

FOTH, CARLA Topeka 

Psychology SR 

FOUNTAIN, DAWN Sterling 

Music Education JR 

FOWLER, GEORGE Cbnarron 

Agricultural Economics SR 

FOWLER, GREG Manhattan 

Veterinary Medldne SR 

FOX, WILLL\M Manhattan 

Finance JR 

FRAIN, JERRY Clearwater 

Computer Science SO 

FRANCIS, CHRISTOPHER Liberal 

Biochemistray SO 

FRANCKA, TAMMY Strong City 

Dance SO 

FRANZ, KIMBERLY Manhattan 

Botany SR 

FRASER, JULIE Clay Center 

Elementary Education JR 

FREEBY, DIANE Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

FREED, ROBERT Manhattan 

Feed Sdence and Management SR 

FRENCH, ALLEN Topelca 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

FRERKER, DUANE Highland 

Coostniction Science SR 

FRICK, JOHN St. George 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

FRICK, PAM Topefca 

Special Education SR 

FRIES, CYNTHIA Meriden 

Management JR 



433 



OrC 



ampus 



FRirSCH. BECKY BellevUle W 

Chem ical Engineering SO 

FRirrON, JOE Topeka 

Electrical EngJnecring SR Jif^ Vl 

FUHRMAN, CHARLES Manhattan 

Animal Sctences and Industry •■ SR 

FULLER, JAYNE ICansas City, Kan. 

Political Science SO , 

FUNK, SANDV HiUsboro 'l " ' J 

Aocotintii^ SR \ x -^l V 

FURRY, MARK Manhattan \ ' \ / ^ 

HorticiiKure SR , , J ^'- */* 

^1 
FUTRELL, SHARON Chesapeake, Va. 

Accounting SO ^nv^' ^t^mn^^ ^^HB ^■■BSSKBIHHKHiflHIl^ ■BHEP ^^|a|«^^ 

GABEL,URSULA Hays |F j|^Bk«i IV^^^HnV IV^ ^H|^ 

Computer Science JR P ^^^^^^^K ^^^^^H^ ^HP*^I^^ 

GABRIEL, DAVID Topeka ^ J^HP^^B ''M^^^^k. V^ « 

Fisheries and WUdlife Biology SR ^^^ lOB JV^^I^^B, f^ ^v S 

GAFFNEY, LESLIE St. Louis, Mo. WmF9 ?^W «■« ^iii^^B '^ " 

Plant PatlMlogy SR 

GAFFNEY, MOtE Overland Park 

Interior Arcliitecture SR w-- —jm ■ w^ ^^m / 

GALLAGHER, MICHELLE Concordia 1 ^ ^^ ^H( - t^W ^ 

Accounting JR \ 4% '*^BB^ ' ^^^ ^^^^k 

mtLf9 

GALLE, TERRIE Moundridge 

Accounting SR 

GAMBLE, JEFFREY Wk:hita 

Accounting SR ^mHPIIBtt. i.^' 

GAMPHER, GARY Jefferson City, Mo. ^^wSlC^mt iff 

Architecture SR 3^- "tB ■ ^ 

GANESH, KrrrUR Manhattan M " ■" W ~ 

Industrial Engineering GR 

GARD, JESSICA SaUna * , . / ^ 

Journalism and Mass Commnnlfations SR Tt ' ^^^H f^^ 

GAREIS, CATHY Manhattan ^^^ - "^^^ ^^A ' ' ^^^ i^H 

"^ " l^jiflA <iBi¥C 

GARINGER, LINDA St. George 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

GARY, ANDREA Bennington ,imi f ,. ,^ 'iji^Bk 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine FR if f «, t' »s# ,.^# w»ip-^ 

GAYLORD, JEFFREY Port Charlotte, Fb. M '# '^ ^ M 

Health and Physkal Education SR Jf^ ^ ^% I * ▼ ,» «a.->W 

GEIER,CARLA Manhattan «' »^ 'i ^ ^W J r« 

Mathematics SR 

GEIER, DANA Wichita m ' g i " ' ? k" ^' 'i 

Civil Engineering JR WW 1 ^' ^^ M^ 

GEISE,TAMARA Overland Park * fc^ A -^ ^^•'-■wiffW^ 

Restaurant Management SO fX ' .^^H^l .^i^k d^^^^^ jA ^^^1 

GELY,GILDA Puerto Rko 

Pre-Veterinary Medfefaie SR 

GENGLER, GALEN Bclolt 

Agricultural Economics SR 

GEORGE, DEE ANNA Whiting 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

GERMAN, CHRISTINE Beloit ^^^^<«^ 

Arts and Sciences SO 

GERSTNER, DAMIAN Wamego 

Architectural Engineering SO ,^^Ek> £Mi( %.^^ — 

GIANAKON, THOMAS Hutchinson ..^Hll IBt^ ^ll^^' 

Nuclear Engineering JR jtl^^m l^^F^ ^s"^ 

GIBSON, BRENT Edmond, Okla. ^ ' — 

Fhiance SR 

GIBSON, PAUL Manhattan 

Engineering Technology SO 

GIEFER, TOM Parsons i 

Agricultural Economics JR |«a^^ „ „ ^-^•• ^ ^ -«. « 

GlER, DONNA MarysviUe '**? ""^ l!(i »-»«■. -»- ■ '!-;»•,'». 

Computer Science JR ; ' 

GILBERT, TIMOTHY NewStrawn ^', J. 4 -- - /* <i^^ ■ 

Music Education SR \ Jl __<# # 

GILLEN, MARK Garden City M^t^^ L vVC^ 

Business Administration JR i^Bk. M ^^ 

^ ^^^ .y^^m- .-mm 4^ 

GILLESPIE, ELAINE Wichtta — F - 

Industrial Engineering SR f^m 

GILLESPIE, JONATHON Manhattan W 

Pre-Denistry SR if ^ 

GILLMORE, DONNA Gypsum 

Accounting SR 

GITHAIGA, KABURA East Africa 

JounuUIsm and Mass Commnniratioiis SR 

GLANVILLE, DIXIE Cottonwood Falls Wk Hb VZ^* 

Agricultural Journalism SR "m JHT < ^ ^ — 

GLASER, CURTIS Peabody # 'V^ A. 

Agricultural Economks SR ^^V Wi^\A ■^r'y 

^^^^ 'm\ '^/ 

GLEASON, MARY Wkhlta HF 

Dietetics SR f^ 

GLEASON, STEVE Maple HIU ' 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

GLESSNER, JUDY Onaga 

Elementary Educathm SR 

GLICK, KEVIN Manhattan 

Animal Science and Industry SR 

GLICK, PAMELA Densmorv 

Accounting SR 

GODBY, SUSAN KendaUvillc, Ind. 

Ari Education SR 




434 



Off Camp 








GOODARD, DAVE Overbrook 

Computer Science SR 

GOEBEL, TRACI Mission 

Pre-Phannacy SO 

GOERING, RUSSELL Pretty PnUrie 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

GOERKE, RHONDA Wichila 

Interior Design SR 

C50LDBERG, JUDY Lenexa 

International Studies JR 

GOLDBERGER.JOEL Manhattan 

Mechanical En^eering SR 

GOLDEN, RANDY Dodge City 

Finance SR 

GOLLADAY, SUSAN Beloit 

Accounting SO 

GOMEZ, RAYMOND Halstead 

Architectural Engineering JR 

GOOCH, DAN Ballwin, Mo. 

Marlieting SR 

GOOD, CRAIG Parsons 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

GOODMAN, BRYAN Sabetha 

RetaD Floriculture SR 

GOODWYN, MIKE Wicliita 

Fine Aits SO 

GORAISH, MURTADA Sudan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

GOULDIE, SHAWN Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management SR 

GRABER, GAYl-E Hutcliinson 

Apparel and Textile Marlceting SO 

GRABER, KENTON SaUna 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

GRABER, SANDI Salina 

Foods and Nutrition JR 

GRAHAM, DAVID Florissant, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

GRANGER, RAINA Hutcliinson 

Tlieater SO 

GRANT, JULIE Manhattan 

Business Administration SR 

GRANT, ROBERT MUtonvale 

Mathamatics SR 

GRAVENSTEEM, RHONDA Olathe 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

GRAY, JOHN Coiorado Springs, Colo. 

Marlceung SO 

GRAY, KATHY El Dorado 

Early Childhood Education SR 

GREEN, DL\NE Melvem 

Agricultural Economics SR 

GREEN, JOLENE Atwood 

Home Economics SR 

GREEN, LORI Abilene 

Fasliion Marlceting FTt 

GREEN, LYNDON Manhattan 

Milling Science and Management JR 

GREENE, TANDA Syracuse 

Accounting SR 

GREENLEE, DL\NE Salina 

Elementary Education JR 

GREER, DAVID Shawnee 

Architecture SR 

GREER, RAYMOND IngaUs 

Biology JR 

GRIDLEY, BRAD Minneapolis, Kan. 

Business Administration JR 

GRIEVE, CLINTON Osborne 

EnghMerlng Technology SR 

GRIFFIN, JILL Alton 

Elementary Education FR 

GROSS, JEANNIE Junction City 

Home Economics SR 

GROSSHART, LONA Pieasanton 

Architecture SO 

GRUENBACHER, DAVE Colwkh 

Electrical Enghieering SR 

GUDENKAUF, DEBBIE Onaga 

Business Administration JR 

GUENTHER, CARLA P«»hi 

Bualiie gB Administration '. SR 

GUFFEY, CRAIG Lawrence 

Agriculture Education SR 

GUFFEY, PAULA Lawrence 

Interior Design JR 

GUGLIEMINO, MARU Spring HUl 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

GUISLAIN, YVETTE Prarie Village 

Physical Education SO 

GUNTHER, DAVID Topeka 

Industrial Engineering SR 

GUNTHER, STACEY Manhattan 

Psychology JR 

GUNYA, JOSEPH Mission 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 



f Campus 



435 



OirC 



ampus 



GUTHRIE, VINCE Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering JR 

HABERER. KERI RusseU 

Agricultural Economics SO 

HABERER. RUDY Luray 

Accounting JR 

HACHENBERGER, SUSAN Kingman 

Architecture and Design JR 

HACHINSKY, KATHRYN Kansas City, Kan. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SO 

HACKEROTT, JOHN Alton 

Accounting SR 



HADJIPANAYIS, PARASKEVI Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education SO 

HADLER, TOMMY PerryviUe, Mo. 

Architecture JR 

HAGEDORN. TERESA Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

HAGEMEISTER, BRIAN Juncuon City 

Secondary Education SO 

HAKE, MARY LYNNE Tipton 

Fine Arts JR 

HALDEMAN, TEENA Abilene 

Fashion Marketing SO 



HALE, MIKE Manhattan 

Radio-Television SR 

HALL, JERRY Manhattan 

Biochemi^ry SR 

HALLER, CHRIS Shawnee 

Physical Education SR 

HALLOWELL, SHAWN Manhattan 

Management JR 

HAMBURGH, ROBERT Junction City 

Psychology SR 

HAMILTON, RUSTIN Cofreyville 

Agricuhiu-al Jounmlism SR 



HAMM, SHARON Tampa 

Dietetics SO 

HAMMERS, BRET Clearwater 

Geophysics JR 

HAMMERSLY, WILLIAM Wichita 

Electrical Engfaieering SR 

HAMMERS, DEB Seneca 

Business Administration SO 

HAMMOND, DANA Salina 

Elementary Education SO 

HAMMOND, DENISE Clay Center 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 



HAMMOND, SCOTT Woodland Hills, Calif. 

Computer Science SR 

HANAUER, STEVEN Prahie VUliage 

Milling Science and Management SR 

HANNAN, PATTI Haviland 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

HANNERS, SCOTT Jackson, Mo. 

Finance JR 

HANSEN, RON Colby 

Pre-Optometry SR 

HANSEN, LARRY Lindsborg 

Arts and Sciences FR 



HANSON, YVONNE Norton 

Apparel Design SR 

HAPNER, THOMAS Manhattan 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HARBERS, GALEN Almena 

Agronomy JR 

HARDESTY, JENNIFER Topeka 

Ele menta ry Education SO 

HARGITT, MARTHA Manhattan 

Pre-Optometry JR 

HARMS, CHAD Maple Hill 

Computer Science JR 



HARMS. R.J Geneseo 

Nawral Resources Management JR 

HARRIS, DAVID Wichita 

Agricidtural Economics SR 

HARRIS, GREGG Warrensburg, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering SR 

HARRIS, MICHELLE Salina 

Modem Languages JR 

HARRIS, PECXjIE Roosevelt, N.Y. 

Arts and Sciences SO 

HARRISON, PAIGE Eureka 

Business Education SR 



HARSHBERGER, GARY Mhineola 

Electrical Engineering SR 

HART, CARL Oskaloosa 

Milling Science and Management JR 

HART, CHRISTINA Leawood 

Business Administration SO 

HART, SHELLY Hutchinson 

Social Work JR 

HARTER, STAN Bern 

Fisheries and WUdlife Blolog SR 

HARTMAN, DIANE Shawnee 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 




436 



Off Campus 



I 




warl Abrahamson launches a 
friend's Triby Kite, a tri-level 
l(ite popular in California, and 
gets tangled in its long tail as it 
ascends in the afternoon sky at 
the L.P. Washburn Recreation 
Area. (Photo by Andy Nelson) 



HARWOOD, CHRISSY Chanute 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

HASKIN, CATHY Frankfort 

Horticulture JR 

MASSED, JOHN Spring HiU 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

HASSELMAN, SHIELA Chapman 

Business Administration SO 

HASSOUNEH, KHALED Wichita 

CivU En^eering SR 

HATCHETT, SABRA Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

HATTRUP, DEANNA Kinsley 

Pre-Prof^onal Elementary Education SR 

HATTRUP, TAMMY Khisley 

Management SR 

HAVEL, MONTE Cuba, Kan. 

Accounting JR 

HAVENS, HAROLD Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

HAVENS, KELLY McPherson 

Elementary Education SR 

UAVERKAMP, DLVNE Baileyville 

Finance SR 

HAVERKAMP, JANET BaUeyviUe 

Elementery Education SR 

HAVERKAMP, JUSTIN Seneca 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

HAWARI, mSHAM Jordan 

Electrical Engbicering SR 

HAYDEN, CHRISTA WichiU 

Agricultural Economics SR 

HAYES, DEBORAH Wamego 

Bidogy SR 

HAYNES, JOSEPHINE St. Louis, Mo. 

Interior Design JR 

HEARN, KELLY Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering FR 

HEATHMAN, GARY Manhattan 

Engineering Technology JR 

HEDRICK, NANCY Manhattan 

Biolray JR 

HEETER, LESLIE Mission 

finance SR 

HEFLIN, RUTH Pratt 

English SR 

HEFTY, KEITH Valley Falls 

Electrical Engineering SR 



ff Campus 



437 



OfrC 



ampus 



HEIDRICK, JERI Sallna 

JournaUsiii and Mass Communicatioiis SR 

HEIER, MICHAEL Griimen 

MlUing Science and Management SR 

HEIMAN.JON Garden City 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HEJ&TEN, GREG Tonganoxle 

Chemical Engineerbig SR 

HEBSITZ. RICK Uneai 

Radio-Television SO 

HEITMEYER, RICH Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

HELFFRICH, MEUSSA Manhattan 

Landscape Architecture SR 

HEMMEN, DAN Colwich 

Finance SO 

HEMMERT, KYLE Oakley 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

HEMPHILL, AMY Manhattan 

Music Education SR 

HENDRICICSON, ANN Topeka ^ 

Engineering Education SO tj« 

HEIWRICKSON, RONALD Clifton 

Agronomy SR 

HENISEY. LAURI Independence 

Physical Education JR 

HENKLE, CRAIG Manhattan 

Management SR 

HENNING.MCK Kingman 

Business Administration JR 

HENRY, MARK NortonvUle 

Civil Engineering SO 

HENTON, AARON South Haven 

Computer Science SR 

HENTON, KEN McCook, Neb. 

Architectural Enghieering SR 

HERB, MICHAEL Eureka 

Computer Science SO 

HERBEL, DELAYNE Tampa 

Agriculwre Education SO 

HERD, CHAD Pnrtectkm 

Landscape Arhcitecture JR 

HERMAN, KRISHNA Uncotai 

Office Administration SR 

HERN, SANDRA Manhattan 

Physical Education SR 

HERRINGTON, TODD Silver Lake 

Ffaiance SR 

HERVEY, MELISSA Sabetha 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

HESKAMP, CAROLYN Spearville 

Math Education SR 

HESKAMP, JEFF Spearville 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HESS DAVID Scott City 

Architecture SR 

HESTERMAN, TERRY Meade 

Management SR 

HETTENBACH, BART Manhattan 

Biology JR 

HEYCOCK, STACY Topeka 

Social Work SR 

mCKEL, GREG EDinwood 

Social Work SR 

HIGDON. MINDY Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

HIGGINS, DAVID Goddard 

Radio-Television JR 

HIGGINS, MATTHEW Leawood 

Electrical Engineering FR 

HIGGWE, TONYE Manhattan 

Hortkulture SR 

HIGHT,nLL MaiysvUle 

Elementary Education SR 

HILL, BRENT Garden Plain 

Electrical Engineering JR 

HILL, RICHARD St. George 

Hortkuhire SR 

HILTON, ERIC Hutchinson 

Electrica l Eng ineerirtg JR 

mNDERLITER, RU^ELL Emporia 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

HINKEN, MATTHEW Manhattan 

Radio-Televiskm SR 

HINKLE, CARTER Olathe W 

Interior Design SR f 

HINKLE, CHERYL Cuba, Kan. ' 

Elementary Education JR 

HINKLE, MELISSA Wamrao 

Early Childhood Devetopment SR 

HINSHAW. MARY HutcUnson 

Apparel and Textile Marketbut SR 

HOBBS, KARA McPhersoo 

Elementary Education SR 

HOBBS, KIM Turon 

Accounting SO 




438 



Off Campus! 




HOCH.KIM Dwight 

Horticulture JR 

HODGE, KELLY HoHon 

JoumaUsm and Mass Commimlrations SR 

HODGES, MICHELLE Cassoday 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

HOGSON, JEFFREY St. Louis, Mo. 

Landscape Arcliitecture SR 

HOFFMAN, SALLY Chapman 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

HOGEN, JOHN HiUsboro 

Mecliaiiical Engineering SR 

HOLLE, BRENDA Branan 

Accountli^ SR 

HOLLE, CHERYL Oberiin 

Apparel and Textile Marlieting SR 

HOLLEY, AMANDA Betliany, Olda. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

HOLLIDAY, lSf Liberty 

Agricultural Engineering FR 

HOLMES, JOSEPH Topeka 

Electrical Engineering JR 

HOLMES, KATHY Canby, Ore. 

Agronomy SR 

HONEYMAN, LORI Seneca 

Management SR 

HONIG, ROBIN OnaiM 

Health SR 

HONOMICHL, ANGELA Lamed 

Accounting JR 

HOOBLER, DEBBIE St. Marys 

Feed Science and Management SO 

HOOPLER, J. L Manhattan 

Computer Science SR 

HOOPER, MARCU Manhattan 

Social Worli SR 

HOPKINS, ADRIAN Overland Park 

Interior Design SR 

HORNUNG, BART Prairie Village 

Management SR 

HORSCH, ANTHONY Colwich 

Feed Science and Management JR 

HORTON.LUANN Lebo 

Industrial Engineering SO 

HORTON, MYRA Plevno 

Home Economics Extention SR 

HOUCK, JIMMY...: Bushong 

Arts and Sciences FR 

HOUSE, RONALD Kansas City, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering SR 

HOWE, SHERRY Riley 

Music FR 

HOWELL, KIMBERLY Goddard 

Health and Physical Education SR 

HOYT, MICHELLE Manhattan 

Social Sciences SR 

HRABE. LISA Plainville 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HUAMAN, ANTONIO Manhattan 

Medical Technology SR 

HIJBBARD, KATHLEEN Liberty, Mo. 

Lanscape ArcUtecture SR 

HUBER, CHRIS Shawnee 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

HUBER, LINDA Topelia 

Chemistry Education SR 

HUCKE, PAULA Cherryvale 

Office Administration SR 

HUGHBANKS, LINDA Anthony 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

HUGHBANKS, JANELL Anthony 

Fine Arts JR 

HUGHES, DAVID Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

HUGHES, TYSON WeUington 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HUMMELS, JILL Manhi^an 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR. 

HUNT, DIANNA South Haven 

Home Economics Education SR 

HUNT, TERRY St. Louis, Mo. 

Interior Architecture Design SR 

HUNTER, BARRY Parsom 

Industrial Engineering SR 

HURTIG, HEATHER Delphos 

Ftae Arts SR 

HUSER, TROY Syracuse 

PoUtical Science SR 

HUTCHCRAFT, SHERRY Sabetha 

Elementary Education SR 

HUTCHCRAFT, VIRGIL Soloman 

Science Education JR 

HUTCHISON, CHARLES Burlingame 

Agricultural Economics JR 

HUTSON, JEFFREY Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 



Campus 



439 



wff Campus 

HUTTON. DONALD Oakley 

Electrical Engineering JR 

HWANG, JEAN Manhattan 

Dance SR 

HYLTON, ANGELA Topeka 

Animal Sciences and Indusrty SR 

HYLTON, PAMELA Topeka 

History JR 

IMEL, HELEN Overland Park 

Social Work SO 

IRAOLA, IVDGUEL Lalcewood, Colo. 

Landscape Architecture SR 

KSK, CLARENCE Ingails i^' 

Agricultural Mechaniztlon SR 

IRWIN, JANET MarysvUle 

Computer Science JR 

ISTAS, KEVIN Lecompton 

Agricultural Economics.. SR 

JACKMAN, VELMA Lawrence 

Biological Sctence Education SR 

JACKSON, DUANE Manhattan 

Microbiology SR 

JACKSON, SUSAN Pndrie Village 

Accounting SR 

JACKSON, WANDA Enterprise 

Consumer Affairs JR 

JACOBSON, JOEL Manhattan 

Interior Architecmre JR 

JACOBSON, DAVID Rossville 

Civil Engineering SR 

JACOBSON, LORI Lancaster 

Business Education SR 

JAKOFCICH, FRANK Kansas City, Mo. 

Secondary Education SR 

JAMES, RANDALL Lecompton 

Horticulture SR 

JANDA, AUDREY WUson 

Architectural Engineering SO 

JANDA, KENNETH WUson 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

JARDINE, CHRISTOPHER WIchiU 

Pre-Nursing SR 

JEFFREY, JENNIFER Burr Oak, Okla. 

Home Economics SR 

JENNINGS, SHERYL Wichita 

Interior Design SR 

JENSBY, JEFF BeUeville 

Agronomy SR 



I he corner of Anderson and 
Manhattan avenues provides a 
good place for Sean Murray and 
Jeff Heit to be at the heart of 
campus action as they lounge 
on the roof of their porch. 
{Photo by John Sleezer) 




440 



Off Campus! 







JENSEN, KEVIN Mankato 

Architectural Engineering SR 

JESKE, STEWART Kansas City, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

JESTER, AUCU Salina 

Architecture SR 

JILKA, KATHRYN Sallna 

Foods and Nutrition SR 

JINGE, t>OOSHIMA Nigeria 

Secondary Education SO 

JOERLING, WILLIAM St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

JOHNSON, BRAD Olathe 

Milling Science and Management SO 

JOHNSON, DANIEL Hutchinson 

Electrical Engineering SR 

JOHNSON, EUGENE McLouth 

Pre-Veterinaiy Medicine SO 

JOHNSON, GERALD Eureka 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

JOHNSON, JAYME Beloit 

Business Administration JR 

JOHNSON, JERRI McPherson 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

JOHNSON, JODI Wamwo 

Journalism and Mass Commiinlralions SR 

JOHNSON, KEVIN Concordia 

Music Education JR 

JOHNSON, LOIS Leavenworth 

Dietetics SR 

JOHNSONrM/iiY!!."""""""".'.'"""!"rWilifield 

Interior Design JR 

JOHNSON, RANDY Lindsborg 

Arcliitecture SO 

JONES, BRYAN Herington 

Secondary Education JR 

JONES, CYNTHU Lyons 

Journalism and Mass Communicatioos SR 

JONES, J. L Liberal 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

JONES, JANSY Home 

Dietetics JR 

JONES, LORA Liberal 

Accounting SR 

JONES, SCOTT Sterling 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

JONES, TINA Clearwater 

Finance SO 

JOSSERAND, LARILEE Johnson 

Marketing JR 

JOSSERAND, STEVEN Johnson 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

JOYCE, MATTHEW Manhattan 

Finance FR 

JUDGE, ROBERT Manhattan 

Computer Science SR 

JUNK, MARTHA Manhattan 

Business Administration SR 

JUSTICE, EVA Sallna 

Social Work SR 

KADEL, ERICK Betolt 

Agricultural Economics SR 

KAEBERLE, CARLA Ames, Iowa 

Agricultural Economics SR 

KAEMMER, ROBERT Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering JR 

KAHLER, MARK Manhattan 

Physical Education JR 

KAISER, MICHAEL AbUene 

Feed Science and Management JR 

KANDT, VICTORL\ Lindsborg 

Education SR 

KANE, JOHN Eudora 

Physical Education SO 

KANE, KATHERINE Eudora 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

KAPPELMANN, KIMBERLY Topeka 

Engineering Technology SO 

KARAM, ANTOINE Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

KAUFHOLZ, LAURA Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing FR 

KAUFMAN, GEOFFREY Inman 

Secondary Education JR 

KAUFMAN, TOM Durham 

Agricultural Engineering JR 

KEARNEY, PATRICIA Merriam 

Nuclear Engineering SR 

KEAST, DUANE Lamed 

Agricultural Mechanization SR 

KEATING, CHRISTINE Manhattan 

Physical Education FR 

KEAY, EUZABETH Kansas City, Kan. 

Elementary Education SO 

KEEHN, MICHAEL Wetmore 

Biology SR 



441 



OrC 



ampus 



KEEN, CINDY Hutchinson 

Marketing SR 

ICEENEY, MIKE Girard 

Geography SO 

KEESECKER, MICHELE Washington 

Elementary Education SO 

KEESLING, JULIE Perry 

Home Economics SR 

KEETON, VICTOR Topeka 

Industrial Engineering SR 

KEUM, DAVID St. Louis, Mo. 

ArcliJtecture SR 

KEIL, RUTH Manhattan 

Business Administration JR 

KEIM, ROBERT Littleton, Colo. 

Industrial Engineering JR 

KELLEY, ELIZABETH Manhattan 

Fine Arts SR 

KELLING, DAVID Ltaidsiiofg 

Cbemkal Enghieering SR 

KELLING, SCOTT Undsimrg 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KELLY, KAREN Gardner 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

KELSO, JANE Coffeyville 

Early Childhood Education JR 

KEMNTTZ, ELAINE Westmoreland 

Business Administration SO 

KENNEDY, LORI Frankfort 

P re-Nu rsing SO 

KEPFIELD, SAM Lamed 

History SR 

KERNS, SUSAN Hiawatha 

Management JR 

KERR, RONALD ManhMtan 

Architectural Engineering SR 

KERSTING, CHERYL Offerle 

Arts and Sciences SO 

KERSTING, DAVID Dwby 

Radio-TeleTlsion SR 

KESSINGER, SARAH Marysville 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

KETCHUM, ROBERT Chicago, lU. 

Music Education SO 

KEY, GREG Manhattan 

Construction Science JR 

KIEHLHOFNER, BRAD Scott City, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering SR 

KIMBROUGH, DENEEN Clay Center 

Fine Arts JR 

KING, KEVIN Cheiryvale 

Agriculture Education SR 

KING, VERNELLE Manhattan 

Fine Arts JR 

KINGERY, SCOTT Manhattan 

Dietetics JR 

KIPP, SCOTT Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SO 

KIRK, BRETT^T. Topeka 

Agronomy SR 

KIRKHAM. ANNETTE Manhattan 

Physkral Education SR 

KISTLER, KAREN Udall 

Social Work SO 

KITCH, JAMES Conway Sprims 

Agricultural Education SR 

KrmE, MARSHA Satanla 

Dietetks SR 

KIVETT, CHRISTINE Fort Scott 

Bakery Science SR 

KJELLIN, DOUG Marion 

Business Administration JR 

KLASSEN, RICHARD Manhattan 

Civil Engineering JR 

KLATASKE, DARYL Clay Center 

Engineering Technology SO 

KLEINSCHMIDT, KELLI LincohiviUe 

Social Work SR 

KLENDA, PATRICIA Lincolnville 

Interior Design SO 

KLINT, KIMBERLY Whiting 

Marketing SR 

KLUG, ALAN Hoisington 

Accounting SR 

KNAPPEN.JEFF Overland Park W' 

Fuiance SR ^ 

KNEISLER, MARK Colwich 

Computer Science FR 

KNETTER. CHRIS Kansas City, Kan. 

Agricultural Mechanization SO 

KNIGHT, DANIEL Salina 

Archite ctural Enghieering SR 

KNITTER, SANDY Clay Center 

Secondary Education SR 

KNOEFEL, RONALD AbbyviUe 

Marketing SR 








% f^ ll^l f^^ ^-^ ^^ 








fn^ -I f ^#• *^f 




442 



Off Campus 




(W v^ ^^ 



KNOTT, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

KNOX, MATTOEW Shawnee 

Archhecture SR 

KNOX, WHITNEY Shawnee 

Management SR 

KNUTSON, TAMMIE Wamego 

Biology FR 

KOBS, STEVE Liberal 

Architecture SO 

KOCA, CAROLYN Topeka 

Physical Education SR 

KOCI, JULIE Topeka 

Agriculture Education SR 

KOEGER, MICHELE Manhattan 

Elementary Education SR 

KOEHN, JAYLEN Cimarron 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KOEPSEL, MARK CUy Center 

Secondary Education SR 

KOKER, WILLIAM Derby 

Elearical Engineering FR 

KOLB, ROBERT Leavenworth 

Mechanical Engineerii^ SR 

KOLENDA, CATHY Kansas City, Kan. 

Restaurant Management SO 

KOLSKY, LYNETTE BeUeville 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

KONVALIN, WADE Webber 

Leisure Studies SR 

KORTE, GREG Highland, HI. 

Construction Science JR 

KOSSOW, WILLIAM Oketo 

Pre-Medlcine SR 

KRACHT,AMY Marysville 

Accounting SO 

KRAEMER, DEBRA Benson, Ariz. 

Social Work SR 

KRAMER, FRANK Tongaooxie 

Construction Science SR 

KRASE, DAVID MUton 

Business Administration JR 

KRATZER. RICHARD Colby 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KRAUSE, KARI Loveland, Colo. 

Horticulture SR 

KRIEGH, ERIC Minneapolis 

Business Administration SO 

KRUEGER, PAUL St. Frauds 

Accounting SR 

KRUG, BREON LaCross 

Home Economics, Liberal Acts SR 

KRUG, DAVID Holsington 

Arhitcctural Engineering SR 

KRUG, ERIC WichiU 

Electrical Engineering SR 

KUBICKEL, STEVE Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration SR 

KUESTERSTEFFEN, TOM Hesston 

Electrical Engineering JR 

KUHLMAN, KEVIN Belleville 

Agricultural Economics JR 

KUHN, LUGINA Manhattan 

Pre-Physical Therapy FR 

KUZILA, ANN MARGARET... Kansas City, Kan. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SR 

LABARGE, MONIQUE Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

LACKEY, RAELYNN Topeka 

Office Administration SR 

LAFFERTY, KATHY Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

LAGERBOM, CHARLES Lyons 

History SR 

LAIRD, DENISE Kansas City, Kan. 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

LAKE, JODI Abilene 

Elementary Education SO 

LAMB, JAMIE Macksville 

Elementary Education JR 

LANE, CIPtoY Pratt 

Natural Resources Management SR 

LANGENKAMP, AMY Manhattan 

Pre-Professional Elementary Education SR 

LANG, JAMES Shawnee 

Geology JR 

LANKTORD, ALAN Perryville, Mo. 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

LA^PA, PATRICU Omaha, Neb. 

Restaurant Manasemcnt SR 

LAPOINTE, LYNN. Old Town, Matoe 

Landscape Architecture SR 

LARKIN, BRENDA Parsons 

Ftae Arts SR 

LARSON, PAMELA MaiUiattan 

Marketing SR 



)ff Campus 

L 



443 



B. 



leating the September heat, 
Kevin Swann takes a late after- 
noon nap in his hammock with 
his dog Brutus in front of his 
house at 810 {Manhattan Ave. 
(Photo by Jim Dielz) 



LARUE, BETH Chanute 

Chemistry SR 

LASK, JOHN Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

LAUDICK, GREG SpeorvUie 

Joumalism and Mass Commnnlrartoiis SR 

LAUGHLIN, BRENDA FaU River 

Industrial Engineering SO 

LAUGHLIN, STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Elementary Education JR 

LAW, CHRIS Garden City 

Animal Sdences and Industry SR 

LEAR, BOYD Garden City 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

LEBBIN, SCOTT Scott City 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

LEE, KAY Almena 

Accounting JR 

LEE, MYUNG Korea 

Food Science and Industry FR 

LEGLETTER, DIANE St. Marys 

Elementary Education SR 

LEHMANN, LEN Topeka 

Radio-Television SR 

LEHR, ANTHONY Manhattan 

Finance SR 

LEHR, LUCINDA Manhattan 

Home Economics Education JR 

LEIGHTON, CINDY Overland Park 

Anthropology SR 

LEIHY, THOMAS Topeka 

Marketing FR 

LEITCH, DEBORAH Manhattan 

Life Sciences JR 

LEIVIAN, KEVIN Wichita 

Architecture JR 

LEMAITRE, ANNE St. Louis, Mo. 

Architectural Structures SO 

LEMOBVE, KELLY Atchison 

Psyclxriogy SR 

LENICNER, CAROL Medicine Lodge 

Consumer Affairs JR 

LEONARD, MERLE Junction City 

Agronomy JR 

LESHOVSKY, DAVID Prairie Village 

Business Administration SR 

LESSER, CHRISTOPHER Topeka 

Secondary Education SR 




Off Campus I 




LESSER, RITA Lecompton 

Home Economics Education SR 

LESZLER. CARMILITA Clifton 

Medical Technology JR 

LETOURNEAU, SUSIE Overland Park 

Business Administration JR 

LEVEY, DOUGLAS Rochester, N.Y. 

Archltectm^ SR 

LEW, KEVIN Malaysia 

Pre-Design Professional SO 

LEWIS, JANEEN McPherson 

Architecture JR 

LEWIS, LANCE Winfleld 

Agriculture Education GR 

LEWIS, RENEE WichiU 

Modem Languages SR 

UCHTENHAN, JOSEPH Junction City 

Chemical Science SR 

LILLY, DLVNA Lenexa 

OfBce Administration SR 

LIM, KOK Malaysia 

Bushiess Administration GR 

UNDER, NANCY Green 

Secondary Education JR 

LINDQUIST, JUDY Waterville 

Elementary Education JR 

LINDQUIST. TOM Manhattan 

Natural Resources Management SR 

LINGG, JEAN Manhattan 

Bakery Sdence and Management SR 

LINTZ, DINA Meriden 

App arel and Textile Marketing SR 

UTTLE, JOYCE Carbondale 

StAtistics SR 

UVINGSTON, BOB./..!..!/.!!.!".!!.. LMvenworth 

Construction Science SR 

LLOYD, TOM McPherson 

History JR 

LODICO, SCOTT Springfield, Mo. 

Construction Science SR 

LOECHLER, DAWN Overland Park 

Elementary Educatton SR 

LOEWEN, KELLY Ingalls 

Appa rel and Textile Marketing JR 

LOFTUS, JAMES Florissant, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

LOGAN, CYNTHIA Mankato 

Psychology SR 

LOHR, GORDON Goodland 

Computer Science PR 

LOPEZ, KIMBERLY Gladstone, Mo. 

Marketfaig SR 

LORE, TOM El Dorado 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

LORENZ, MICHAEL Atchison 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

LORSON, JOHN Hope 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

LOVITT, LORA Ransom 

Special Education JR 

LUFT, LORI Bison 

Musk Educatkm SR 

LUGINBILL, CARLA Burrton 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

LUNSFORD, CINDY Easton 

Marketing SR 

LYNCH, EVON BloomviUe, Ohk> 

Dah7 Production SR 

LYON, KRISTI Prairie ViUage 

Business Administration TR 

LYON, STEPHEN Topeka 

Engineering FR 

MACHIN, MARCLA RUey 

Eariy Chlldhoad Educatioa SR 

MACHIN, MATT Riley 

Business Administration SO 

MACKEY, BRIAN Maize 

Computer Science FR 

MACKINNON, REBECCA Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

MADISON, ANITA Everest 

English Education SR 

MAGES, CATHY SpearvUle 

Pre-Medicine JR 

MAJOR, JERRY Mentor 

Arts and Sciences SO 

MALDONADO, CLAUDL\ Wichita 

Industrial Engineering FR 

MALDONADO, KEVIN Stafford 

Accounting SR 

MALINOWSKI, JEROME Kansas City, Kan. 

Finance SR 

MANGES, JAMES Manhattan 

CIvU Engineering SR 

MANNELL, CARRIE Topeka 

Arts and Sciences JR 



f Campus 

L 



445 



OffC 



ampus 



MANNELL, MATTHEW Topeka 

Electrical Engineering JR 

MANSFIELD, DENISE Manhattan 

Pre-Nursing SO 

MAKBUT, KENNETH Great Bend 

Leisure Studies SR 

MARKLEY, ANGELA Wichita 

Agricultural Journalism SO 

MARNELL, ALLISON Ingalls 

Social Work JR 

MAHTELL, ELIZABETH Topeka 

Interior Design SR 

MARTEN, TODD Manhattan 

Business Administration GR 

MARTIN, BECKY Atchison 

Joumalbm and Mass Communications SR 

MARTIN, JEFF Manhattan 

Farm Mechanics ...■. SR 

MARTIN. JOHN Tonganoxie 

Industrial Engineering SO 

MARTIN, KAREN Columbus, Kan. 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

MARTIN, ROSE Overland Park 

Natural Resources Management SR 

MARTIN, SCOTT Clay Center 

Agricultural Economics SR 

MARXEN, JAMES Hiawatha 

Business Administration JR 

MASnJONlS, MATT Topeka 

Architecture SR 

MASON, ROBERT Manhattan 

Marketing JR 

MASSEY, TIMOTHY Topeka 

Computer Science SR 

MATSUNAGA, KAYOKO Japan 

Modem Languages Education SR 

MATTAN, KIRSTEN Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

MATTHIAS, JANET Horton 

Secondary Education SR 

MATTINGLY, PAUL Louisville, Ky. 

Construction Science SR 

MAUPIN, MARK Dodge City 

Accounting JR 

MAURATH, KURT Oakley 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

MAURER, MARK St. Charles, Mo. 

Landscape Architecture SR 

MAURICE, ARTHUR Barre, Vt. 

Electrical Enghieering SR 

MAY, EUZABETH Manhattan 

Elementary Education SO 

MA YFIELD, ELTON Caney 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

MCCALISTER, MARK WichlU 

Physkal Education SR 

MCCARTHY, DONALD Ogden 

Education GR 

MCCLELLAND, KENNETH Hutchinson 

Accounting SO 

MCCLINTOCK, STACY Louisburg 

Elementary Education SO 

MCCOMB, KEITH Austin, Texas 

Construction Science JR 

MCCOOLE, SHAWN Atchison 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

MCCOY, BRIAN Copeland 

Accounting SR 

MCDERMET, MARK Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

MCDONALD, JOHN Concordia 

Chemical Enghieering SR 

MCELROY, ANN Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SO 

MCGEARY IVIARY Roeland Park 

Speech Pathology and Audiology SR 

MCGHEHEY, JEFF Topeka 

Accounting SR 

MCGHEHEY, STEVE Topeka 

Construction Science SR 

MCGOUGH, DAWN Plainville 

Art SO 

MCGRATH, REGINA Greenleaf 

Social Work SR 

MCHENRY, BRENDA Clyde 

Pre-Nursing JR 

MCHENRY, MARY Derby 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

MCINTEER, JANET Manhattan 

Consumer Affairs SR 

MCKENZIE, CLINTON Overland Park 

Marketing SR 

MCKENZIE, MEGAN Atchison 

Biology SO 

MCKENZIE, TODD Vh^ 

Mechanical Engineering SR 




446 



Off Campusi 




MCKJNZIE, PAUL Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

MCKNIGHT, ROGER Anthony 

Agricultural Journalism JR 

MCMANAMAN, CHRIS Manhattan 

Bakery Science and Management FR 

MCMURRAY, GWYN Stanley 

Elementary Education JR 

MCNAUL, BRENT McPherson 

Chemical Engineering JR 

MCNETT, PEGGY PIqua 

Agricultural Economics SR 

MCQUEEN, MIKE Hutchinson 

Jounuiiism and Mass Communications SR 

MEADE, AMY Plainville 

Business Administration SO 

MEEKS, JAMES Kinsley 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

MEGED, BART Roundup, Moot. 

Ani mal Sc iences and Industry SR 

MEHAFFEY, PATRICIA El Dorado 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

MEHL, STEPHEN Goddard 

Business Administration JR 

MEHNER, KEITH St. Genevieve, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

MEHTA, HEMANT India 

Electrical Ei«ineering GR 

MEIER, BRIAN Hanover 

Industrial Engineering SR 

MEIER. JOHN Hanover 

Electncal Engineering JR 

MEIER, STEVEN Scott City 

Landscape ArdiHecture SR 

MEIGS, DANIEL Hutchinson 

ElectricaJ Engjncering GR 

MEILI, MARK Beveriy 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

MEIS. KRISTOPHER Salina 

Accounting SO 

MEITLER, ALAN Greendale, WU. 

Agricultural EcoiHHnics SR 

MELLV, ICEVIN Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics GR 

MELLRENG, JOY Topeka 

Elementary Education SR 

MERCER. KENNETH Atchison 

Fhiance SR 




mgi 



n horticulturist witti University 
Facilities ground maintenance, 
Robert Hortung, finds liimself 
enveloped by fog as he prunes a 
tree near KSU Stadium. (Photo 
by Jeff Taylor) 



Off Campus 



447 



OfrC 



ampus 



MERCER. STACY Atchison 

Accounting JR 

MEREDITH, DOUG Topeka 

Computer Science JR 

MERLO, JOE Leawood 

Marketing JR 

MESSICK, BRYAN Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professional FR 

METTENBURG, DAVID Princeton, Kan. 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

MEUSBURGER, PATRICU... Kansas City, Kan. 

Radio-TeleTision SR 

MEYER, ALAN Seneca 

Accounting JR 

MEYER. CHRISTY Sabetha 

Business Administration SO 

MEYER. DANEEN Manhattan 

Elementary Education JR 

MEYER, DIANE Weir 

Fine Arts JR j 

MEYER, JOSEPH Goddard \ ' f 

Mechanical Engineering SR V f 

MEYER, KATHLEEN Linn 

Elementary Education SR »/, ?* '4^ 

MEYER, KELLEY Wichita 

Agricultural JoumaUsm SR 

MEYERS, ALLISON Cunningham 

Family and Child Development SO 

MEYERS, STACEY Shawnee 4. 

Elementary Education JR 

MEYN, TOD Hanover 

Geography SR 

MICHAEL, SHANE Maple Hill 

Electrical Engineering SR 

MICHAEUS, CHRISTINE Manhattan 

Dietetks SR 

MIDDLETON, KEITH I'dall 

Computer Science SR 

MIGNANO, MARY Manhattan 

Engineering FR .€' 

MILFORD, RANDY Wright 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

MILLER, BRAD Riley 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

MILLER, JOHN Lisle, 111. 

Industrial Engineering SR | 

MILLER, KATHERINE Enterprise 

Elementary Education SO 

MILLER, LOIS Overland Parit 

Horticuhure SR 

MILLER, PHILIP Manhattan 

Electrical Enghieering SR 

MILLER, RHONDA Lenexa 

Architecture SR 

MILLER, TAMARA Wichita 

Interior Design SR 

MILLER, TIM Chapman 

History SR 

MILLESON, BRENT McPherson 

Business Administration FR 

MILLS, DANIEL Topeka ^^^ 

Mechanical Engineering SR .^^B^ 

MILNE, RANDY Creigbton, Neb. .^^HHb 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR T^^^^^^^m 

MINNIS, NATALIE Stafford ■ ■ 

Business Administration SO W"* *>■ W 

MFTCHELL, JOY Coffeyville ^ 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

MOEDER, LINDA Great Bend 

Accounting SR # y 

MOELLER, KENNETH Hardy, Neb. ||||||j-J 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR Hll^. 

MOHR, RHONDA Great Bend 

Accounting SR 

MOLDENHAUER, KENNETH Mound Valley 

Agriculture Education SR ' /--- 

MONTGOMERY, ROBERT Goddard 

Electrical Engineering SR %„ ^ 

MOON, ALLEN Junction City ' 

Nuclear Engineering GR 

MOORE, BENJAMIN Manhattan 

Mamwement SR 

MOORE, BETH Johnson ^#\ v 

Food Sciences and Industry SR WMW 

MOORE, CHERYL Oak Bluffs, Mass. 

Business Administration FR 

MOORE, KEVIN Anthony 

Computer Science JR 

MOORE, TODD Mankato 

Electrical Engineering SR ^M''*' *• 

MORENEO, CARLOS Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

MORGAN, JERRY Mexico, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

MORGAN, STANLEY Oberlin 

Business Administration SO 



448 





MORIN, JULIE Manhattan 

Finance JR 

MORTTZ, JENIFER Hatcbinson 

SecoDdary EducatioD SR 

MORRIS, JACK Jimctioa City 

Modem Languages GR 

MORRIS, KATHY McPherson 

Elementar}' Educatioii SR 

MOSHER, JAYE Perry 

Business Administration JR 

MOSS, KAREN Manhattan 

Interior Design SO 

MOUSLEY, JEFF WinfleM 

Management SR 

MRAVUNAC, CATHERINE... Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SR 

MUETING, RAYMOND AxteU 

Agricultural Ecooomics SR 

MUGLER, MARLIN Clay Center 

Secondary Educatioa SR 

MUIR, SCOTT Des Plaines, Dl. 

Marketing SR 

MULLERTMARCIA Minneapolis 

Secondary Education SR 

MULVANEY. KATHLEEN El Dorado 

Civil Engineering SR 

MUNDS, GREGORY Hutchinson 

Education SO 

MUNK, CONNIE Salina 

Finance SR 

MUNSHI, BISWAjrr India 

CIvU Eiigineering GR 

MUNSON, SIERRA Ellsworth 

Architectural Enrineering GR 

Ml^PHEY, SHAUNA Coldwater 

Home Economics Education SR 

MURPHY, PHILLIP Saint Benedict 

Radio-Televisioa SR 

MURRAY, MARK Coffeyville 

Secondary Education JR 

MURRISON, ERIN Lawrence 

Elementary Education SR 

NANNINGA, STACEY AxteU 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

NASH, LISA Lenexa 

Modem Languages SR 

NAUERT, CHERIE Lamed 

Business Administration SR 




I aking advantage of the last 
few days in the summer sun, 
Kent Hayes and David Rauch get 
a jump on the semester's 
studies at the IVIanhattan City 
Pool. (Photo by Jeff Weatlierly) 



ff Campus 
L 



449 



OifC 



ampus 



NAUERT, CRISTI Lamed 

Business Administration JR 

NAVINSKY, GAIL Easton 

Animal Sciences and Industry SO 

NCUBE, BEATRICE Zimbabwe 

Home Economics Educatioa GR 

NEAL, SUSAN CaldweU 

Secondary Education SR 

^fEIL, DENaSE Parsons 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

NEKES.LISA Belle Plaine 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

NELSON, JCATHLEEN Manhattan 

Elementary Education FR 

NELSON, ICENT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SO 

NELSON, MARK Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

NELSON, TODD Kiowa 

Finance JR 

NEUER, PHIL Topeka 

Restaurant Management JR 

NEUFELDT, DONOVAN Inman 

Marketing SR 

NEUMAN.JOHN Salina 

Finance JR 

NEWKIRK, STEPHEN Alva, Okla. 

Construction Science JR 

NEWTON, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Radio-Television SR 

NEWTON, SHERRI Manhattan 

Agriculture Education SR 

NIBIOCK, DONALD HoJtie 

Milling Science and Management JR 

NICHOLS, JUUE Osborne 

Marketing SR 

NIEBERDING, MARY MarysviUe 

Elementary Education SR 

NIEHAUS, JEFFREY Manhattan 

Civil Engineering SR 

NIEMAN, CHARLES Hanover 

Finance SR 

NKRAVAN, NAVID Manhattan 

Computer Science GR 

NKRAVAN, SHAHLA Manhattan 

Adult Education GR 

NISSEN, TAMMY Wetmore 

Chemkal Engfaieering SR 

NOLAN, KEVIN Kansas Ctty, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

NORDHUS, BYRON Vermillion 

Agriculture Educath>n SR 

NORMAN, CINDY Richardson, Texas 

Computer Science SR 

NORTON, VICKY Arnold 

Social Work JR 

NOVOTNY, DAVID Chase 

Engineering Technology SR 

NUESSEN, DEBORAH Eureka 

Accounting SR 

NUSE, DERALD CaldweU 

Agricultural Economics JR 

OAKLEAF, TIM Chapman 

Engineering FR 

OBAM>0,JOSE SaUna 

Psychology SR 

OBORNY, nM Manhattan 

Computer Science JR 

O'BRIEN, SUSAN Overland Park 

Education JR 

OCANDO, BRENDA Hyattsville, Md. 

Landscape Archhectm^ GR 

OCHOA, JANIE Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

O'CONNELL, ANNE Overland Park 

Accounting SO 

O'CONNELL, LISA Rodand Park 

Accounting SR 

O'CONNOR, ROBERT Leawood 

Accounting SR 

O'DONNELL, LARRY Easton 

Accounting SR 

OEHM, HM Marysville 

Family and Child Development SO 

OETOMO, INGKO Indonesia 

Industrial Engineering SR 

OGUNRINOLA, OLUYEMI Nigeria 

Food Science GR 

OHLDE, BECKY Green 

Agricultural Journalism SR 

OKARO, CHRISTY Nigeria 

AduK Education GR 

OLBERDING, DONNA AxteU 

Accounting SR 

OLBERDING, MARTIN Overland Park 

Chemistry SR 





^ tiH^^ 



All -'j^ 



^JM 



450 



Off Campus 




OLBERDING, RON Shawnee Mission 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

OLDPHANT, DAVID Offeric 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

OLIPHANT, DEBRA Offerle 

Interior Design JR 

OLSEN, DONALD Prairie Village 

Marketing SR 

OLSON, ROBERT Junction City 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

OLSON, STEVEN Lindsborg 

Engineering SO 

O'MEARA, LYNN Alexandria, Va. 

Management SO 

OMELIA, BARRY Wichita 

Engiiieering Technoiogy SR 

O'REILLY, JOE Wichita 

Mechanical Eogliieeriiig GR 

ORTOLF, DENISe Olathe 

Science Education SR 

OSNER, MICHAEL Kingman 

Agriciiltural Economics SR 

OSORIO, EOUARDO Miami Lakes, Fla. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

OSTBY, NEIL Lcawood 

Architecture SR 

OSTERHAUS, WADE Manhattan 

Computer Sdence SR 

OWEN, STEPHEN Topeka 

Information Systems SR 

PACHTA, JAN Munden 

Veterinary Medicine JR 

PAGELER, POLLY Wamego 

Horticulture Therapy ffi 

PAKKEBIER, KURT Prairie View 

Physical Education SO 

PALMATEER, STEVEN Manhattan 

Engineering Technology SO 

PALMER, JUSTIN Ulysses 

Philosophy SR 

PARAMESH. HARl Lamed 

Biology JR 

PARIZADEH, DARYOOSH Manhattan 

Pre-Dentbtry SR 

PARKS. LORI Hoisington 

Restaurant Management JR 

PARR. LEROY Onaga 

Physics Education SO 

PARRISH, JEFFREY Minneapolis 

Construction Science JR 

PARROTT. SUSAN Junction City 

Pre-Nursing SO 

PATRON, ROBERTO El Dorado 

Pre-Medicine JR 

PATRON, ROMEO El Dorado 

Pre-Medicine PR 

PATTERSON, ERIC Manhattan 

Crop Protectioa SR 

PATTY, SHERRI Towanda 

Elementary Education SR 

PAULIE. KENNETH St. Paul, Kan. 

Pre-Law JR 

PAULSEN, DAWN Stafford 

Associate of Arts SR 

PAULSEN, SHERYL Olathe 

Accounting SR 

PAYNE. MARY Manhattan 

Social Sciences JR 

PEARCE, MIKE Dodge City 

Accounting SR 

PEASE. BEN Hutchinson 

Pre-Medicine JR 

PEKARER. SUSAN Reserve 

Interior Design JR 

PENDERGAST. ROBERT Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

PENDLETON, SCOTT Lawrence 

Speech Education SR 

PENN, RANDALL Lewistown, Mo. 

Architecture and Design SR 

PENNER, DIANA Newton 

Pre-Law SR 

PENNING, LAURA Atchison 

Elementary Education SR 

PERJCO. CARL Manhattan 

Elementary Education JR 

PETER. RHONDA Randolph 

Elementary Education FR 

PETER, TAMI Randolpli 

Accounthig SR 

PETERSON, CINDY Manhattan 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

PETERSON, MARY JO Greeley 

Dietetics and Institutional Management JR 

PETTIFORD. CELLO Chicago, Ul. 

Engineering Technology JR 



ft Campus 



451 



\m 



AJtt Campus 

PETTUOHN, CHARLES Blue Mound 

Agrkuiture Education SR 

PETTUOHN, KIMBERLY Solomon 

Interior Design FR 

PFEIFER, TIMOTHY Victoria 

Electrical Engineering SR 

PFLUMM, GAROT Shawnee 

Finance JR 

PHILLn^, CRAIG Manhattan 

Agricultural Engineerii^ SR 

PICKERT, LAWRENCE Overland Park 

Engineering Technology SR 

PffiRSON, JOY Topeka 

Business Administration SO 

PIERSON, JULIE Manhattan 

Management SR 

PITTS, JULIE DeSoto 

Animal Science SO 

PLATTNER, ANGELA Sabetha 

Marketing JR 

PLATZ, LES Wamrao 

Marketing SR 

PLOWMAN, KAREN Manhattan 

Social Work SR 

PLUIMER, GREGORY Kansas City, Kan. 

Bakery Science and Management JR 

POLING, TIMI Wichita 

Radio-Television SR 

POPP, MICHAEL SedaUa, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

PORTER, MELISSA Garden Plain 

Fine Arts SR 

POSS, DOUG Richmond 

Feed Science and Management JR 

POSTON, MICHAEL Rose HUl 

Animal Science and Industry JR 

POTTOROFF, TIMOTHY Douglass 

Industrial Engineering SO 

POWELL. ANITA Concordia 

Secondary Education FR 

POWELL, JEFFREY Manhattan 

Interior Design FR 

POWELSON, CAREY Jola 

Elementary Education SO 

POWELSON, TERRY Richmond 

Agronomy JR 

PRESCOTT. NONA Lamed 

Dietetics JR 




Janice Mitchell and Alicia 
Stein cheer on the men's 
baseball team during the spring 
season. (Photo by Jeff Taylor) 







.^"""^X 






^^ 




«m 


^|^^HKfl|^|i 


. '-'-x 


' jHI 


HHH 


V'^ 


^^^^^Hl^HHi 


^^ 




452 



Off Camp 




PRETZ, STEVE Osawatomie 

Animal Sdence and Industry SR 

PROFFITT, JERRY Sterling 

Math Education SO 

PROVOST, CATHY Burlingame 

Management SO 

PRUITT, MKE Manhattan 

Agriculture JR 

PUJOL, STEPHANIE Manhattan 

Business Administration SO 

PULLIAM, SUZANNE Freeport 

Accounting SR 

PULS, ERIN Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

PURKEYPfij;, TIMOTHY Eurelia 

CIvU Engineering SR 

PUTNAM, TIMOTHY Rodi Island, Dl. 

Managoncnt SR 

PYLE, KENNETH Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SR 

QUEEN, BARRY Paola 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

QUELCH, ANDREW Wakefield 

Business Administration JR 

QUENZER, TODD Brewster 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

QUINT, RODNEY Garden City 

Computer Science SR 

RACHEL, JOANNE AxteU 

Accounting SR 

RADER, MKE Kensington 

Natural Resources Management SR 

RAINWATER, RONALD Hiawallia 

Agricultural Economics SR 

RALEIGH, ANNETTE Agenda 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

RANGEL, LAURA Wichita 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

RANGEL, MARTIN WicUta 

Architecture SR 

RANKIN, DONALD Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 

RANKIN, JAN Manhattan 

Interior Design JR 

RAUSCH, RONALD Viola 

Accoimting JR 

RAUSCH, RUSSELL Viola 

Accounting SR 

REASER, JULIE Topeka 

English Education SR 

REDING, KEVIN Mayetta 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

REEDER, DAVE Shawnee 

Physkal Education SR 

REEDY, ROBERT Clyde 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

REEDY, STEVE Qyde 

Information Systems SR 

REES, BRIAN Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

REEVES, DENISE Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

REGEHR, DARWIN Newton 

Marketing JR 

REGIER, MARK Buhler 

Interior Architecture SR 

REGIER, RANDY Dodge City 

Pre-Dentistry SO 

REGNIER, DOUGLAS Bennington 

Veterinary Medidne SR 

REICHART, JOHN OveriandPark 

Physkal Education SR 

RED), DAVID Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

REID, ROBERT Enterprise 

Engineering Technology JR 

REID, SUSAN Kansas City, Kan. 

Radio-Television SO 

REIDA, SANDRA Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

REINECKE, CHARLES Overland Park 

Correctional Admtaiistration SR 

REINERT, PATRICIA Atwood 

Journalism and Mass Communlcatioass SR 

REINHARDT. AIMEE RusseU 

Family Life and Hiunan Development JR 

RENO, GREG Cheney 

Agriculture Education SO 

RENO, MIKE Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

REYNOLDS, JULU Wilton, N.H. 

Animal Sdenccs and Industry SR 

REZAC, DAVID Emmett 

Architecture SO 

REZAC, JAY Onaga 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 



Campus 



453 



OfF€ 



ampus 



RHO, JXJNG Manhattan 

Family and Child Devetopment GR 

RHO, KWANG... Manhattan 

Grain Science GR 

RHOADS, MERLE Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 

RHOADS, ROYALEE Superior. Neb. 

Agronomy JR 

RHOTEN, DAVID Wichita 

Interior Architecture Design SR 

RIAT, DAVID Belvue 

Music Education SO 

RIBORDY, LANCE Salina 

Management JR 

RICE, KRISn Atchison 

Accounting SR 

RICE, KRICTINE Whilleld 

Social Work SR 

RICE, MELISSA Manhattan f <-» 

Elementary Education SR 

RICH, ASHLEY Ashland J; 

Pre-Nursing JR * ' 

RICH, MICHAEL Richmond, Va. 

Meclianical Engineering SR 

I 

RICHARD, DAVID El Dorado 

Construction Science SR 

RICHMEIER, RANDY Garden City 

Agricultural Economics JR 

RICHTER, BRENT Pratt 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

RICKFORD, SHEREE Manhattan 

Fashion Marketing JR 

RICKLEY, JAY Qay Center 

Business Administration SO ^ 

RICKSTREW, JACQUIE St. George ^ W 

Home Economics Educatitm SR ^^m B^^ 

pi r. !■ 

RIDDER, DANIEL WichiU j I 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

RIEDEL, JO ANN SaUna 

Sodal Work SR 

RIES, TIMOTHY Stamford, Conn. 

Marketing JR •mgmL m^~ 

RISIUS, DAWN Olathe ^*^ *** 

Pre-Dentistry SO 

RITTGERS, ALAN Garden City 

Geophysks SR 

ROARK, STEVEN Jefferson City, Mo. <*Hf*-«*^ jt 

Interior Architecture Design SR .,-yl^m- f 

ROBBEN, CARLA OaUey 

Elementary Education SR 

ROBERTS, SHELLY Buhler m 

Social Work SO M,.. 

ROBERTSON, KATHI Winchester * . r 

Agricultural Engineering JR 

ROBERTSON, RYAN Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering JR 

ROBINSON, GARY Atchison 

Computer Science JR 

ROCHFORD, CATHY Topeka 

Pre-Medicine SO 

ROCK, LORl Salina 

Accounting JR 

RODGERS, LARRY Salina 

Accounting SR 

RODLUND, DEANNA Leawood 

History SR 

ROEHL, MARY Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

ROEMER, DENNIS Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 

ROENIGK, DON Roeland Park 

Elementary Education SR 

ROGALSKY, DENNIS Hutchinson 

Chemical Engineering JR .^^■■^ ^gKtt^ -t .^ ^^ .»«.- _^Hik 

ROGERS. JODEE Emporia ilHlBk ^^^^BL-S jM|B^ 'jHIk .^^Hl^ 

Elementary Education JR MT^nHPI ^^^H^^H^I m^^^^^^ >^^Hi^ i^^^^^^^B 

ROGGENKAMP, ANN Onaga f «^ ■T^B"^ flP^B Ht^^ ■P^^m 

Business Administration SR i.^_ _ ■ ^ . ^V ^HI l"^^^ W- -^B T ..^^Wk 

ROHRER, TIMOTHY Shawnee Mission »«^ -». ^ ?«h^ «» ^ i^* '"ML ^ * "^ F ^19% ^ IP 

Construction Science SR , . , , ^P ^H> ■ ^ 1 M 

ROLF. KAREN Pratt , - - ^. M Wk , . JH , '' \t V - W 

Electrical Engineering SO jJ a^. ^ -^Wk W^' k \ W 

RONGONE. MICHAEL Manhattan _«, -^ / , ^^^ -" -IV^ A. V .y ~^' '-^ yk - • 

Architectural Engineering SO W'flL- ' '< . ., ^^^^^.^ v.^Bk^ . M ." .■ r •' .^ \ ' .■ ^..ttMBX 

ROSCOVIUS, SANDRA Wamego 

Dance FR 

ROSE. DAVID Olathe , 

Information Systems SR 4 » 

ROSENCRANS, CARRIE Kansas City, Mo. 

Political Science SR 

ROSENOW.LISA Green ^fS» 4C.1 

l^^-Veterinary Medicine SR "^ 

ROSENOW, TAWNY Green i <j;:r:> 

Interior Architecture SR w 

ROSEY. EVERETT Paola ^W- 

Microbiology SR 




454 



Off Campw 



u 




ROSS, CHRISTOPHER Osage City 

Pre-Design Professional SO 

ROSS, DEVIN Hoisington 

Nuclear Engineering JR 

ROSS, SUSAN Manhanan 

Business Administration SO 

ROTTINGHAUS, TIM BaUeyvUle 

Agricultural Economics SR 

RUDA, KENNETH Atwood 

Music SO 

RUES, TONY Lewis 

History SR 

RUPP, PAUL Topeka 

Mectianical Engineering SR 

RUSSELL, ANNA Manliattan 

Industrial Engineering SR 

RUSSELL, DARIN Courtland 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

RUT AN, MICHELE Medicine Lodge 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

RYALS, CLAUDINE Junction City 

Psychology SR 

RYAN, JANE New Cambria 

Elementary Education SR 

RYAN, LORI Topeka 

Physical Education SR 

RYSER, KER] Ames 

Business Administration JR 

SAATHOFF, NANCY Marysville 

Agricultural Economics SR 

SACHSE, CAROLYN Leavenworth 

Foods and Nutrition-Business SR 

SALAVA, DAVID Burlington 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

SALEM, BOB Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

SANBORN, CHAD Arlcansas City 

Journalism and Mass Communications PR 

SANCHEZ, LUIS Topeka 

Biology SR 

SANDENSFIELD, DAN Olathe 

Life Sciences SR 

SANDERCOX, GORboN.'.".",'..'.'..'.'.^' Uaveiiworth 

Business Administratton SR 

SANDERS, FARRELL Miltonvale 

Undeclared GR 

SANTSCHI, LISA Festus, Mo. 

Interior Architecture SR 

SARVER, SHERRY Manhattan 

Finance JR 

SASSER, SANDRA Olathe 

Accounting SR 

SAUBER, KEITH Ellinwood 

Engineering Technology JR 

SAUER. SUSAN Manhattan 

Secondary Education JR 

SCARBROUGH, JAMES CUfton 

Crop Protection SR 

SCARLETT, CRAIG Topeka 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SCHAAKE, SARAH Lawerence 

Agriculture Economics SR 

SCHAEFER, JON Horton 

Computer Science SR 

SCHAFFLER, JOAN Wichita 

Early Childhood Education JR 

SCHALANSKY, MARY Kirwin 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

SCHAMBERGER, SHARON Hoxie 

Economics FR 

SCHARNHORST, ANGIE Olathe 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

SCHAUF, MARILYN Garden Plain 

Elementary Education SR 

SCHEIBLER, BOB Bennington 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

SCHEIBMEIR, BRIAN Pratt 

Electrical Engineering SO 

SCHEMM, TODD Estes Park, Colo. 

Industrial Engineering SR 

SCHERTZ, JULIE Winona 

Home Economics Education JR 

SCHILD, CRYSTAL Lawerence 

Elementary Educatkin SR 

SCHILLING, MARCL\ Goodland 

Elementary Education SR 

SCHINSTOCK, LEZLIE Kinsley 

Food Science SO 

SCHLENDER, SCOTT Manhattan 

Modem Languages FR 

SCHLICK, KELLY Hoxie 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

SCHMAR, THOMAS Manhattan 

Veterinary Medicine SR 

SCHMIDT, ERIC Manhattan 

Architecture SO 



Iff Campus 



455 



OrC 



ampus 



SCHMIDT, JOAN Great Bend 

Radio-Television SR 

SCHMIDT, LINDA Atchison 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

SCHMIDT, ROYCE Peal>ody 

Agriculture Mechanization SR Wf~S^ 5m 

SCHMIEDELER, MARTY Prairie VUlage ^ •>- v 

Management SR 

SCHMIEDELER, NICK Prairie Village 

Business Administration SO 

SCHMm, BAERBEL.. Bielefeld, West Germany 

Business Administration GR 

r ~2 

SCHMITT, BRETT Scott City ^ >— i- <: 

Leisure Studies SR 

SCHMnr, GERHARD West Germany 

Foods and Nutrition Science GR 

SCHMITZ, JAMBS Alma 

Business Administration JR 

SCHMOKBR, STUART Oswego ' . 

Construction Science JR <f* "S* 

SCHNEIDER, CATHERINE Atchison 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

SCHNIEDERS, JAMES Ottawa 

Civil Engineering FR 

SCHNIEDERS, JOE Manliattan 

Architecture ■"* 

SCHOTTE, ANN MarysviUe 

Agricultural Economics SR 

SCHRADER, BEN Council Grove 

Social Science Education SO 

SCHRADER, MARLA Madison 

Management SR _ f 

SCHRAG, RANDY Pretty Prairie - 

Accounting .......SR '^^^ 

SCHRAUDNER, KIM Gardner A SM 

M-^eting SR ^^^ jg 

SCHROCK, ANN Hutchinson ^^ttlk. 

Accounting SR J^^^Hh 

SCHROEDER, BRENT Newton ^^^I^Hk 

Engineering Technology JR ^^^^^^^^B 

SCHROEDER, RICK McPherson »_ ^H 

Pre-Optometry SR W -^ ®~ W 

SCHULER,JOAN Chapman ^ ^ 

Physical Education SR * , . / 

SCHULER, JULIE Chapman . 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR X , 

SCHULER, KAREN Easton ^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

r 

SCHULTZE, KEVIN St. Francis 

Engineering Technology JR 

SCHUMACHER, TODD Manenthsd 

Animal Science SO 

SCHUMACHER, TRACY Marient^ 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SCHWAB, PAT <^»P*'^ 

Anhnal Sdence ■ •■• SR 

SCHWARZ, LAUREL Home 

Physical Sdence Educatkm SR 

SCHWEIGER, EDWARD St. Loob, Mo. , ; » a % 

'^-"""^^ "* ii-Wl •'^■ 

SCHWEFTZER, BRAD ^e"**™ -g«». 

Agricultural Economics SR JhIHHL 

SCHWEMMER, ROD Manhattan ^HmKlk 

AgrkoHural Economics SR JP * - Wk 

SCHWEMMER, SHERRI Ellsworth V ■ 

FhieArts :-SK ~ " -^ W 

SCHWIETHALE, JEFF Wichita ^ 

Architectural Engineering IR "" T 

SCHWIND AM ANN, ANGELA MarysviUe V 

Math Education SO ^^^ ^^^ 

SCHWULST, LANCE Manhattan |^^H ^^H 

Apparel Design SO ^^^^ ^ ^^^^ 

SCOGGINS, LORI Junction City ^^^a^ 

Elementary Education ''R ^^^^H^ 

SCOTT, DANIEL Manhattan ^^^^^M 

Special Education IR ^^^ ^^B 

SCOTT,JANE OverlandPark V ^M 

Accounting JR W/'^^ •'^~^^r 

SCOTT, JOYCE Manhattan T%--, -J'^ 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR ■ -<J*''> 1 

SCRIVNER, PAUL Winchester "P^ -- Mu 

Electrical Engineering SO >^^iMf tm 

SCRONCE, GARY Greensburg ^P' * 

Nuclear Engineering GR ' 

SEAMAN, STEVEN Manhattan ^^f^^ 

Computer Science SR JtKfU^Ktlk. 

SEARS, KEVIN Eureka ^V ^"W* 

Biology SO ■* ^ 

SEASTROM, TRACY Abilene W -fSf" <(!S| 

Animal Science JR f 

SECHLER, SPENCER Anthony 

Marketing JR 

SEELE, MICHAEL St. Marys 

Arts and Sciences ;^-{^ _^^^ «liifc^^^^ 

SEGERSON, MICHAEL Topeka MH ^^B| 

Electrical Engineering JR ^^H /^/ ^^^^H 




456 



Off Campi 




SEILER, GERALD Colwkh 

Landscape Architecture SR 

SELBY, CALA Olathe 

Leisure Studies JR 

SETZKORN, KENTON Offerle 

Animal Science FR 

SEVERANCE, FRED Beloit 

Agrkutture Education SR 

SEYBERT, RUSS Manliattan 

Chemical Engineering SR 

SEYBOLD, JOHN Jetmore 

Business Administration SR 

SEYMOUR, DAWN Lindsborg 

Marlceting JR 

SHAI=ER, LORNE I-eavenworth 

Social Sciences JR 

SHAFFSTALL, KEVIN Salina 

Radio-Television SR 

SHANDY, PEGGY Melford 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

SHANER, MARCINE Leijo 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

SHARP, KAREN Leonardville 

Home Economics Education SR 

SHAW, BRADLEY Shawnee 

Construction Science ^ SR 

SHAW, DEBORAH Topelta 

Correctional Administration SR 

SHAW, DREANALEE Manhattan 

Management SR 

SHEPHERD, DAVID Burlingame 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

SHEPPARD, CRAIG Piper 

Agricultural Economics JR 

SHERLEY, LORI Manhattan 

Home Economics and Mass Communications. . . . SO 

SHIELDS, DENISE Lindsborg 

Accounting GR 

SHIELDS, PAUL Oberlin 

Feed Science and Management JR 

SHIPPEN, PATTIE Pretty Prairie 

Journalism and Mass Communicationss SO 

SHERACK, VONCEILE Solomon 

Speech SO 

SHOPE, SARA Prairie Village 

Elementary Education SR 

SHORTER, JANET Ulysses 

Business Administration SR 



he unknown football fan and 
his unknown puppet cheer on 
the 'Cats during a football game 
at KSU Stadium. The 'Cats' 
season gave K-State fans plenty 
of reason to seek anonymity as 
they ended the campaign with a 
1-10 record. (Photo by Jeff 
Weattierly) 



Off Campus 



457 



OfrC 



ampus 



SHORTER, PAULLA Arkansas City 

Interior Design SR 

SHORTT, RUSSELL Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

SHURTZ, TIFFANY Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

SIEBERT, MARIANNE Topeka 

Business Administration SO 

SIEBERT, RON Winfield 

Architecture JR 

SIERRA, MICHAEL San Antonio, Texas 

Computer Science SR 

SIGLINGER, PAUL PhUUpsburg 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SILVA, MICHELLE Wichita 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

SIMMONS, LENIOR Kansas City, Kan. 

Political Science SR 

SIMMONS, ROBERT Erie 

Psychology SR 

SIMON, SHANNON Clearwater 

Accounting SO 

SIMON, TIM Studley 

Agricultural Mechanization JR 

SIMONS, JOE VaUey Center 

Architecture JR 

SIMPSON, CHAD Effingham 

Business Administration SO 

SIMS, JAY Silver Lake 

Electrical Engineering JR 

SIMS, RICK Kansas City, Kan. 

Business Administration JR 

SINKER, TAMI Highland 

Animal Science SR 

SIU, BECKY Jefferson City, Mo. 

Secondary Edncatiott SR 

SrXBURY, GLENN Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SKAGGS, CLINTON Greensbiu^ 

Btology SR 

SIGDMORE, CHERYL Stanton, Ky. 

Elementary Education JR 

SKIDMORE, MARK Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

SKOCH, MARCIA BaileyvUle 

Physical Education SO 

SKOLOUT, BARRY Arwood 

Natural Resources Management SR 

SLOAN, MARCIA MuliinviUe 

Landscape Architecture SR 

SLOAN, NANETTE Salina 

Social Work JR 

SMADING, DANIEL Independence, Kan. 

Mechanical Engbieering SR 

SMILEY, SCOTT Wichita 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SMISCHNY, JANIS Ellsworth 

Journalism and Mass Connniuikations SR 

SMITH, ANGIE Fredonia 

Elementary Education SR 

SMITH, BETH Overiand Park 

Interior Design SR 

SMITH. CHARLETON Paola 

Secondary Education SO 

SMITH, CRAIG Topeka 

Fhiance SR 

SMITH, DONALD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SMTTH, ERIC Wichita 

Engineering Technology SR 

SMITH, J. F AugusU 

Landscape Architecture FR 

SMITH, JAMES Onaga 

Management SR 

SMITH, KENNETH St. George 

PoUtical Science SR 

SMITH, LON Overland Park 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SMITH, LORI Manhattan 

Correcttoiul Administration SR 

SMITH, SHERYL Arvada, Colo. 

Family and Child Development JR 

SMOLAR, JANET WelUngton 

Electrical Engineering SR 

SNELL, NANCY Ft. Riley 

Elementary Educatton SR 

SNIDER, ROBERT Eureka 

Animal Science JR 

SNOOK, KEN Manhattan 

Fine Arts SO 

SOBBA, MARY Gamett 

Agricultural ixonomics SO 

SONNTAG, DREW AUentown, Pa. 

Landscape Architecture SR 

SOULE. REX Arkansas City 

Architecture JR 



















^ ^ s 




■p^""^"^ 



/,! 




f-i-* ^n 





\ 



458 



Off Campui 




^t^ /M 



SPAFFORD, DAVID Belleville 

Secondary Education SO 

SPAIN, DARRELL WaterviUe 

Radio-Television SR 

SPAULDEMG, RICHARD Spring Hill 

Computer Science SR 

SPEER, KATHY El Dorado 

Elementary Education SR 

SPILLMAN, STEVEN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

SPRINGER, iOMBERLY Westmoreland 

Accounting SR 

ST. JOHN, BRYCE Prairie VUlage 

Engineering Technology SO 

STADEL, VINCE Manhattan 

Natural Resources Management SR 

STALEY, SERENA Overland Park 

Management SR 

STALKER. BRADEN Satanta 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

STAMBAUGH, CRAIG Wamego 

Accounting SR 

STARBUCK, LORIN Manhattan 

Computer Science SR 

STARK, THOMAS Kiowa 

AgricuHural Economics SR 

STAUTH, MARLA Dodge City 

Agricultural Engineering SR 

STEELE, TIMOTHY Shawnee 

Milling Science and Management JR 

STEGEMAN, SUSAN Overland Park 

Fine Arts JR 

STEPHENSON. LISA Kansas City, Kan. 

Accounting SO 

STEWART, DEBORAH Overland Park 

Business Administration SO 

STEWART, MARY Manhattan 

Mathematics JR 

STIGGE, LINDA Manhattan 

Fashion Markethig JR 

STELLWAGON, RICHARD Chapman 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

STOCKLI-TRIGO, DIONISIA Switzerland 

Plant Pathology GR 

STOCKMAN, RAYMOND Raytown, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

STONE, JILL Manhattan 

Apparel and Textile Marketing JR 

STOREY, DEE Manhattan 

Management SR 

STRAHM, CHRISTINE Sabeiha 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

STRAHM, GREGORY Hiawatha 

Psychology Education SR 

STRECKER, DAVID Dodge City 

Feed Science and Management JR 

STRNAD, ELIZABETH Scandia 

Elementary Education JR 

STRODA, TIMOTHY Hope 

AgricuHural Journalism SR 

STRUNK, JERRY Frankfort 

Electrical Engineering JR 

STUART, JIP.I Manhattan 

Physkal Science Education GR 

STUBENHOFER, MELISSA Strong City 

Elementary Education SR 

STUCKER, CATHERINE Lancaster 

Bakery Science and Management SO 

STUCKY, MAHLON Penalosa 

Marketing SR 

STUEVE, MARY Hiawatha 

Accounting JR 

STURGEON, CARLA Fairway 

Management SR 

SUELTER, WENDELL Lincoln, Kan. 

Animal Sciences and industry JR 

SUMP,GINA Randolph 

Elementary Education FR 

SUNDERLAND, JANET Halstead 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology JR 

SUTCUFFE, GREGORY Manhattan 

Architectural Engineering JR 

SUTER, BRUN Kansas City, Kan. 

Marketing SO 

SUTHER, DAN Blaine 

Agriculture SO 

SUTTON, GEORGE Atwood 

Eiementaiy Educathn SR 

SVOBODA. MICHAEL Pratt 

Architectural EngifMering SR 

SWAIL, JENNIFER Overland Park 

Marketing JR 

SWAN, JOHN Baldwin 

Restaurant Management JR 

SW ANSON, JANELL Council Grove 

Early Childhood Education JR 



Mf Campus 



459 



«*'•" -J, 



OffC 



ampus 



<m-S:jK 






Uuring a Union sponsored Out- 
door Awareness Day, George 
Mavridis imitates Sammy, a boa 
constrictor from the Sunset Zoo. 
(Photo by John Sleezer) 




SW ANSON, JtfUE Ariumsas Ctty 

Animal Sdences and Industry SR 

SWEAT, DEANNA Jamestown 

Home Economics Education SR 

SWEET, BRAD Manliattan 

Computer Science SR 

SWEET, SHELLEY Manliattan 

Elementary Education SR 

SWINNEY, STEVE Raytown, Mo. 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

TALBOTT, KRISTI Halstead 

Elementary Education JR 



TAPHORN, BRL\N MarysvlUe 

Agriculture Economics SR 

TAYLOR, DEBORAH Pleasant Garden, N.C. 

English GR 

TAYLOR, GLENN San Diego, Calif. 

Psychology SR 

TAVlOR, JANICE BeUeville 

Marketing SR 

TAYLOR, JEFF Hutchinson 

Joiu-nalism and Mass Communications SR 

TAYLOR, KEVAN MUtonvale 

Agricultural Economics SR 



TAYLOR, ROBERT Topeka 

Engineering Technology PR 

TAYLOR, RUSSELL Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering FR 

TAYLOR, SCOTT Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

TAYLOR, TERESA Manhattan 

Biology SR 

TEETER, JANET ,. Rossville 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

TELLER, JEAN Hays 

Journalism and Mass Communications GR 



TEO, CHENG HONG Sabah East, Malaysta 

Agricultural Economics SR 

THEIS, JOSEPH Leavenworth 

Feed Science and Management SR 

THIEL, DONALD Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

THIESSEN, DAVID Inman 

Engineering Technology SO 

THOM, MONTE Isabel 

Agricultural Economics SR 

THOMANN, DEBBIE Shawnee 

Marketing SR 



460 







lilfel 



1 












f^% w% i^% l*'-^ ^^ 





THOMAS, ANDY Topeka 

Family Life and Human Development JR 

THOMAS, BETH Baxter Springs 

Chemical Science SR 

THOMAS, DAVID Mission 

Arts and Sciences FR 

THOMAS, JEFFREY Admire 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

THOMAS, MARVIN Tinton Falls, NJ. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SR 

THOMAS, SCOTT Pittsburg. Kan. 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

THOMAS, TARAH CouncU Grove 

Home Economics Extension SR 

THOMASON, JENNIFER Lynn Haven, Fla. 

Modem Languages SO 

THOMPSON, CRAIG Great Bend 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

THOMPSON, JEFF Courtland 

Agricultural Engineering SO 

THOMPSON, JULIE Topeka 

Architectural Engineering JR 

THOMPSON. USA Soldier 

Dietetics SO 

THOMPSON, TIM Manhattan 

Architecture SR 

THOMSON, LANICE Wichita 

Radio-Television GR 

THORNTON, JOHN Concordia 

Biology SO 

THORP, TODD Leawood 

Business Admifiistration JR 

TIFFANY, MARY Manhattan 

Accoimting SR 

TILLEY, DENNIS Manhattan 

Agricultural Economics JR 

TINICER, JOSEPH Manhattan 

Journalism and Mass Communications JR 

TOROK, DOUG Overland Park 

Management JR 

TORREY, LORI Manhattan 

Leisure Studies JR 

TOTTEN, DIANE Marysville 

Medical Technology JR 

TOWNLEY, BRIAN Manhattan 

Crop Protection SR 

TRAHOON, STACY Topeka 

Art JR 

TRAPP, SCOTT Van Alstyne, Texas 

Feed Science and Management SR 

TRAYLOR, ANN Springfield, Mo. 

History Education SR 

TRENDEL, SHERRI Yates Center 

Recreation SR 

TRUE, DARREN Downs 

Arts and Sciences SO 

TRUITT, SONDRA Manhattan 

Social Work SR 

TUCKER, MELANIE Salina 

Microbiology JR 

TULLOCH, THOMAS Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Architecture SO 

TURNER, TAMERA Salina 

Journalism and Mass Communications SO 

TURNER, TERESA McPherson 

Animal Science SR 

TUTTLE, CRAIG GrlnneU 

Agronomy SR 

TYLER. CURTIS Copeland 

Physical Education JR 

TYREE, INGRID Topeka 

Marketing JR 

TYSON, TIMOTHY Parker 

Animal Sciences and Industry JR 

UMIDON, KEVIN St. Louis, Mo. 

Architecture SR 

UMMEN, MARK Great Bend 

Electrical Engineering SR 

UMSCHEID, KENNETH Manhattan 

Accounting SR 

UNDERWOOD, TODD Holcamb 

Leisure Studies SR 

UNRUH, CRAIG Bucklhi 

Computer Science SR 

UNTERREINER, JERRY Grandview. Mo. 

Architecture and Design SR 

UPSON. RON Manhattan 

Geography JR 

URICK, SCOTT Manhattan 

Social Work SR 

VAN SWAAY, J. M Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineerii^ SR 

VANDEEST, RAY Wichita 

Economics SR 

VANDER LANN, JEFF Lenexa 

Electrical Enghieering SR 



Off Campus 



461 



Off Campus 



VANDERSLICE, KAREN Manhattan W^ 

Family Life and Human Development SR 

VANDEVEER, MONTE Sharon 

Agricultural Economics SR 

VANHOET, PHILLIP Shawnee 

Accounting JR 

VANLEEUWEN, ANNETTE St. Paul 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR 

VANMETER, ANGELA Lamed 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SO 

VANN, SHELLY Fort Scott 

Psychology FR 

VARGO, RICH Kanapolls 

Fisheries and Wildlife Biology FR 

VASKO. JOSEPH Stilwell 

Mechanical Engineering FR 

VEATCH, BRADLEY Hutchinson 

Engineering Technology SR 

VERKLER, TAMARA Kansas City, Kan. ^ 

Business Administration SR i ^ »»* A 

VESPE, FRANK Manhattan V *^ f 

Secondary Education SR m ' 

VEST, KRISTl Shawnee ^fm*^' 

Interior Design JR \ 

^\ 

VEVERKA, KJM Lincoln 

Elementary Education JR 

VINING, RACHEL Richmond 

Agricultural Journalism SR 

VOGT. JENI Mission 

Elementary Education SR 

VOHS, SUSANNE Prahie VlUage 

Elementary Education SR 

VOLKMAN, ERICH Woodbtoe 

Engineering Technology SR ^ ,JHR Kit » 

VOLZ, GERALD Topeka #-^ar \ V | 

Finance SO WKm i4 

VON LEHE, TROY Lyons 

Management SO 

VOPATA, CHARLES Marysville 

Electrical Engineering JR 

VOTH, DANNY Fredonia 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

WAGGLE, KIMBERLY Topeka 

Architectural Engineering JR '"a^ 

WAGNER, ANGELA Atchison '% 

Interior Design SR * 

WAGNER, KEVIN PhilUpsburg 

Marketing SR 

WAGNER, MARK Ness City 

Mechanical Engineering SR 

WAHL, LYNN Blaine 

Computer Science SR 

WAHL, SANDRA [Manhattan 

Engineering Technology SR 

WAINWRIGKT, DEAN Alia Vista 

Accounting GR 

WATT, DARRELL Manhattan 

History Education SR 

WATT, LINDA FrankTori 

Marketing SR 

WALD, ROBERT Prairie ViUage 

Electrical Engineering SR 

WALKER, BARRY Manhattan 

Electrical Engineering JR 

WALKER, DOWELL Sharon Springs 

Agricultural Engineering JR 

WALKER, HUGH Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering SR i 1^ -^ 

WALKER, STEVE Moline / 

Agricultural Economks SR ^ .jpF 

WALKUP, RJCKY Manhattan j feA JT i 

Arts and Sciences FR I Ji^^, '^R 1 

WALL, CAROLEE Wichita ^^ 

Anthropology JR /MB* 

WALTER, KEVIN Cawker City / 'WB ' 

Accounting SO 

WARD, BRYAN Pratt j' k-, 

Architectural Engineering SR Jr«?*> 'fe W 

WARD, CRYSTAL Byers ~ 

Apparel and Textile Marketing SR ^ | 

WARNER, RANDALL Mclvem ft " / 

Psychology SR \ f 

WARREN, MARIE Manhattan ;,' \ J 

Business Administration FR C,- '\ 

WARREN, STEPHANIE Topeka 

Foods and Nutrition-Business JR , ■»»,. , 

WASSENBERG. KAREN Seneca ^ 

Business Administration SO Jfck^ 

WATSON, ANDREW Overland Park Jt^ 

Civil Engineering SR W '» 

WATSON, ALAN Overland Park - 

Forestry Ornamental Horticulture SO 1 ^ 

WATTS, PHILLIP Manhattan ' ' / 

Electrical Engineering SR A ^ 

WAUGH.DEAN Wellington _,^0m Si^ 

Feed Science and Management SR WSmk IHh^^ 




462 



Off Campui 




WEATHERS, JEAN Salina 

Recreation JR 

WEBB, MICHAEL Napervflle, HI. 

Management SR 

WEEKS, DANA Holsington 

Marketing SR 

WEGNER^CHAEL Manhattan 

Physical Edncatian SR 

WEINER, PATRICK Humboldt 

Nuclear Engineering FR 

WEINGAR'TOER, MICHELLE Goddard 

Accounting SR 

WEISER, KAREN Great Bend 

Accounting SR 

WETTH, STEVEN Overiand Parli 

Industriai Engineering SR 

WELLER, EUNICE Topeiu 

Secondary Education SR 

WELLS, BOB Great Bold 

Chonhitry Education SR 

WELTON, DELINDA Kansas City, Kan. 

Secondary Education SR 

WENGER, JODIE Oberlln 

Social Worii SR 

WENTZEL, SCOTT Manhattan 

Electricai Engineering SR 

WERNER, JOHN Oswego 

Mechanical Engineering SO 

WERNES, NANCY Overland Park 

Information Systems SR 

WERTH, MICHAEL Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

WESEMAIW, MARTIN Leawood 

Mechanical Engineerii^ SR 

WESLEY, GAYLA Mhmeapolis 

Elementary Education SR 

WESLEY, JIM Concordia 

Engineering Technology JR 

WEST, OSCAR Shawnee Mission 

Animal Sciences and Industry FR 

WESTERVELT, GLEN Manhattan 

Management SR 

WETTER, ELAINE Salina 

Home Economics Education SR 

WETTER, MIKE Norton 

Agricultural Economics JR 

WEWER, RANDY Leoti 

Math Education SR 



'"""■Will. 







M, 



leredith Paschal investigates 
a tarantula from Sunset Zoo on 
display in front of the Union. 
The display was part of an effort 
by the zoo to generate interest 
in the zoo and obtain volunteer 
workers. (Photo by Jim Dietz) 



Off Campus 



463 



L 



OirC 



ampus 



WHEELER, BRIAN Manhattan 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

WHEELER, JOLENE Maple HIU 

Marlseting SR 

WHITE, TAMI Salina 

Elementary Education JR 

WHITE. TAMMIE Newton 

Fine Arts SO 

WICKSTRUM, GAREN Manhattan 

Marketing SO 

WICKSTRUM, VALERIE Manhattan 

Marketing SR 

WIECHMAN, KIM Barnes 

Pp^l^^ ^ gU 

WIEDERHOLT.TTtlEREs'AV".^^^^^^^^^^^ 
ClotUng Ret., Fashion Des., Textiles SR 

WIEST, PAMELA Manhattan 

Accounting SO 

WILBER, MATTHEW BelleviUe 

Agronomy SO 

WILKINSON, DOUGLAS Manhattan 

Pre-Law JR 

WILKINSON, TOM Arnold, Mo. 

Architectural Engineering JR 

WILL, RAY Halstead 

Finance SO 

WILLL\MS, DANIEL McPherson 

Recreation SO 

WILLIAMS, JEFFREY Sedan 

Agricultural Economics SR 

WILLIAMS, NANCY Overiand Park 

Secondary Educatkm SR 

WILLIS, CATHY Topeka 

Elementary Education SR 

WILLUWEIT, LEA Wall, S.D. 

Animal Science SR 

WILSON. CHRISTINA Hutchinson 

Early Childhood Education JR 

WILSON, COLLEEN Topeka 

Journalism and Mass Communications SR 

WILSON, DARREL MarysviUe 

Natural Resources Management SR 

WILSON, JAY Dodge City 

Fine Arts SR 

WILSON, JEFFREY Solonron 

Engineering Technology SR 

WILSON, JOHN A Manhattan 

Industrial Engineering JR 

WILSON, JOHN R Sterling 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

WILSON, LORI Hutchinson 

Interior Design JR 

WILSON, RODNEY Goodland 

Math Education SO 

WILSON, THOMAS Wichita 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine SO 

WINKLER, CHANTHAPHEN Manhattan 

Mechanical Engineering JR 

WINKLEY, KENNY Hutchinson 

Industrial Engineering SR 

WINICLHOFER, FRANZ RoelandPark 

Chemistry JR 

WINNE, TIMOTHY Overland Park 

Engineering Technology JR 

WINSINGER, RANDALL Topeka 

Computer Science JR 

WINSOR, DANIEL Wamego 

Engineering Technology JR 

WINTER, SYDNEY Marienthal 

Agricultural Economics JR 

WINTER, TRENTON Clifton 

Anioial Sciences and Industry SO 

WINTZ, CYNTHIA Overland Park 

Fashion Marketing SO 

WIPPLINGER, LISA Enterprise 

Architectural Engineering SR 

WISE, RODNEY Shawnee Mission 

Electrical Engineering SO 

WISEMILLER, BRYCE Sabetha 

Chemical Engineering JR 

WOELLHOF, BRAD Wakefield 

History SO 

WOELLHOF, SHERRY Wakefield 

Engineering FR 

WOLFE, CARLA Frankfort 

Accounting JR 

WOLFE, PAULA Kingman 

Family and Child Development JR 

WOLFF, KATHY St. Louis, Mo. 

Marketing SR 

WOLGAST, ERIC AJta Vista 

Secondary Education SR 

WOLKE, BRENT Conway Springs 

Animal Science SR 

WONG, WAI CHOONG Manhattan 

Pre-Design Professional SO 



464 





WOODMANSEE, DAVID Grwrt Bend 

Architecture SR 

WOODYARD, VONDA. Muiliattaa 

Natural Resources Management SR 

WOOLF, STEVE ClafUn 

Speech Education SR 



WOOLSEY, MICHAEL Cuba, ICan. 

Secoodary Education SO 

WOOLSONCROFT, GREG Centralia 

Agricultural EcoDomics JR 

WORLEY, ESTHER Dunhtp 

Chemical Engineerii^ SR 




r 






Wr" '^'^^^B 




*^1 





WRENN, JILL Oldahoma City. OUa. 

Architecture SR 

WRIGHT, BRADLEY Hutchhuon 

Chemicai Engfaieering SR 

WRIGHT, KEITH Augusta 

Bussincss Administration GR 

WULFKUHLE, MARK Berryton 

Animal Sciences and Industry SR 

WY ANT, DONALD Junction Cig 

Architecture SO 

XU, DEIIN LINDA Manhattan 

Modem Laimuages GR 

YAGER, PAN&LA Lfaicoln, Kan. 

Office Administration SR 

YAKSHAW, ANNIE Andale 

Dietetics SO 

YAO, HUADE Shanghai, China 

Physics GR 

YORK, CHUCK Halstead 

Electrical Engineering JR 

YOST, ALLISON TitusviUe, Fte. 

Elementary Education SR 

YOUNG, LOUDEAN Manhattan 

Geography GR 

YOXALL, KELLY Stockton 

Life Sciences JR 

YUE, VICTOR Central Hong Kong 

Architecture SR 

YUSTICK, MICHAEL Topeka 

Accounting SR 

ZABOKRTSKY, LORI Barnes 

Apparel and Textile Marketbig SR 

ZIER, LILLIAN Uocohi. Kan. 

Agricultural Journalism SR 

ZIMMERMAN, BRAD Manhattan 

Accounting JR 

ZIMMERMUN, CHRIS Wellingtan 

Food Science and Industry SR 

ZIMMERMAN, TIM Wellington 

Electrical Engineering SO 

ZIMMERMAN, TINA Riley 

Accounting JR 

ZBMK, GREG Leoti 

Ani mal Sciences and Industry SR 

ZntNSTEIN, JULIE Emporia 

Fisherks and WUdUfe Bioiogy SR 

ZRUBEK, DEBBIE Cnnnini^uun 

Industrial Enghieerlng SR 

ZUK, LAURA Kansas City, Kan. 

Social Work SR 



Off Campus 



465 



<^ 



Aaron, Thomas 

Abdul-Hadi . Sawsan 

Abdul. Mulialib 

Abercrombie, Chad 

Aberle, Lori 

Abernaihy , Gene 

Abies, Letitia 

Abrahamson , Carl 

Abuhassira, Bassam 

Achenbach, Amy 341, 

Acker, Duane 79, 80, 81 , 82, 83, 

Ackerman, Linda 

Advertising Club 

Adams , Brian 

Adams ,Clay 

Adams, Craig 89, 115, 

Adams, Daniel 

Adams , Keith 

Adams, Leann 95, 

Adams , Rhonda 

Adee .Eric 

Adeleke, Olusola 

Adelhardt , Stan 

Adkinson, Janna 117, 147, 

Adkinson, Kenton 

Aelmore, Maria 104, 

Ag Ambassadors 

Ag Communicators of Tomorrow... 

AGC Student Center 

Ag Econ Club 

Ag Education Club 

Ag Mechanization Club 

Ag Student Council 

Age David 

Agee . Carrie 

Ahem . James 

Ahmed , Ferzan 

Ainswonh, Leslie 138, 

Akers, Sharla 

Akins, Richard 

Al-Ghamdi, Mohammed 

Albert , Jeffrey 

Albertson, Patricia 314, 

Albin , Mark 

Albrecht, Linda 

Albright , Christoph 

Albus , Werner 

Alderson , Jana 

Alderson , Mike 

Alexander, David 

Alexander, LaDonna 

Alexander, Michelle 

Alexander, Wesley 121, 

Aleyasin, Ali 

Alkalili, Mazen 

Allaman , Teresa 



.98 
117 
313 
.93 
422 
416 
437 
422 
422 
106 
285 
.89 
119 
340 
422 
422 
335 
422 
422 
400 
422 
422 
285 
338 
388 
.89 
.89 
.89 
.91 
.91 
.91 
.91 
422 
406 
422 
406 
305 
422 
115 
422 
313 
330 
128 
422 
361 
422 
422 
422 
422 
383 
305 
338 
422 
.98 
104 



Allan. James 361 

Allen. Dell 160 

Allen, Bret 350 

Allen, Eric 355 

Allen, Daniel 132 

Allen, Gary 115 

Allen, Gregory 422 

Allen, Jennifer 305 

Allen, Karen 383 

Allen, Uslie 121 

Allen, Scott 350 

Allen, Tom 395 

Allerheiligen, Jada 157, 330 

Allison, David 422 

Almquist, Diane.... 383 

Alpha Epsilon 93 

Alpha Epsilon Delta 93 

Alpha Gamma Epsilon 93 

Alpha Lambda Delta 93 

Alpha Kappa Psi 93 

Alpha Nu Sigma 95 

Alpha Phi Omega 95 

Alpha Phi Mu 95 

Alpha Tau Alpha 95 

Alpha Zeta 95 

Alphin. Gerald 173 

Alstatt, Brad 340 

Alstatt, David 315 

Altenbernd. Lisa 330 

AUIand. Robert 110 

Altman, Joleen 422 

Alton. Jeffery 422 

Altwegg. Elizabeth 108, 383 

American Assoc, of Textile Chemists 96 

American See. of Ag Engineers % 

American Soc. of Civil Engineers.... 96 
American Soc. of Interior Designers. 96 
American Soc. of Interior Designers. 96 
American Soc. of Mechanical 

Engineers 96 

Ames. Kendis 142 

Amey, Zoe Ann 388 

Ammel, Dawn 406 

Amos, Brigid 422 

Amrein. John 358 

Amstein, Lori 320 

Amthatier. Becky 422 

Amthauer. Verle 422 

Andersen. Arthur 100 

Andersen. Geoff 313 

Anderson. Andy 422 

Anderson, Brian 406 

Anderson, Doreen 305 

Anderson, Earl 96, 132, 142,422 

Anderson, Erica 298 

Anderson, Gregory 422 

Anderson, Jason 313 

Anderson, Jeffrey 358 

Anderson, Julia 422 

Anderson, Karen C 297 

Anderson, Karen 1 376 

Anderson, Kelline 91,95, 108,379 

Anderson, Kenneth 142 

Anderson, Kimberly J 282, 362 

Anderson, Kimberly L 383 

Anderson, Lisa M 324 

Anderson. Lisa R 422 

Anderson. Patricia L 100, 126,422 

Anderson, Patricia S 422 

Anderson, Scott 100, 117,395 

Anderson, Tamela 376 

Anderson, Todd 422 

Anderson, Toni 126, 422 



Anderson, Tracy 422 

Andres, Nelda 288 

Andrew. Janet 388 

Andrews. Debra 302. 383 

Andrews. Rebecca 347 

Andrews. Rusty 126 

Andsager. Julie 89 

Angell. Kimberly 147. 422 

Angelo. Kalhy 422 

Angle, Susan 115 

Anliker, Marvin 422 

Anliker. Wayne 423 

Annan. Beverly 383 

Annan, Maria 383 

Annan. William 423 

Annis. Judd 301 

Annis. Thomas 373 

Anschuiz. Jeffrey 423 

Anstaett, Paula 376 

Antholz , Mary 423 

Anthony, Gina 324 

Antrim, Susan 388 

Appel, Karen 100,423 

Appel, Volker 121 

Appel. Waller 93,96, 110,423 

Appl, Fredric 1 15 

Applebee, Angela 308 

Applegate, Gina ".. 314, 383 

Arab Atudents Organization 98 

Arbogast, David 423 

Archer. Shannon 155, 302,423 

Archer, Stephanie 302. 416 

Archibald, Robin 298 

Arends. Ronald 104 

Arensman, Ranae 288 

Arganbright. Kelly 288 

Armbrust. Arthur 368 

Armbrusl. Cheri 376 

Armbrust, Gary 169 

Arment, Darrin 400 

Armstrong, Julie 305 

Armstrong. Michael 98. 31 1 

Amdt, Cynthia 423 

Amhold. Christine 383 

Arnold Air Society 98 

Arnold. Cheryl 376 

Arnold. Deena 416 

Arnold. Randall 400 

Arnold. Shannon 330 

Arnold, Shelley 89, 379 

Arnoldy, Jill 423 

Amoldy,Paul 96,423 

Arnoldy, Renee 98, 406 

Amote,Jeff 142,358 

Aron, Kenneth 423 

Arroyo, Gary 121,335 

Art Department Student Committee. 98 

Anan.Tulin 327. 345 

Arts and Sciences Ambas.sadors 98 

Arts and Sciences Council 98 

Arvidson. Julie 296 

Ashford. Howard 423 

Astute. Terry 1 15 

Atchison. Bradley 120, 125 

Atchison. James 388 

Athanasius. Lucy 406 

Atherly. Lura 296. 308 

Athenon. Stephen 395 

Atkinson. Clark 104, 317 

Atwell, Lance 388 

Alwood, Kerri 423 

Atzenweiler, David 333 

Alzenweiler, John 358 



Aubuchon. Laurel 298 

Aufdemberge. Joe 423 

Augustine, Clair 423 

Augustine. Mark 363 

Augustine. Rhonda 155 

Aumiller, Terri 406 

Austin. Julie 416 

Austin. Tracy 126. 376 

Avery, Carey 91. 95. 330 

Avery. Robert 371. 157 

Awad. Ahed 423 

Axland. Carolyn 132. 285 

Aydogan. Hurriyet 423 

Aydogan. Serdar 423 

Ayers. Lisa 388 

Aylward. Jamie 320,362.385 

Aylward. Michael 107, 169, 338 

Azain, Maurice 423 

Azer, Magdi 104, 163,317 

Azzam-Ali, Bassam 98, 423 



JB 



Baalman, Laurie 423 

Baalman, Maurice 91, 423 

Babaoglu, Metin 400 

Babson, Lea 320, 341 

Bacalzo. Rogel io 412 

Bachman. Johanna 347 

Badostain. Brenda 89 

Baehr. Russell 335 

Baerg. David 423 

Bagby, Edward 132. 406 

Baggeriy. Timothy 342 

Bahr. Mary 138, 157. 347 

Baier. Uri 98. 423 

Baiges. Arleen 155, 157,423 

Bailey, Barry 406 

Bailey, Christopher 423 

Bailey, Darcie 157.423 

Bailey, Lafe 317 

Bailey, Ronald 317 

Bailey, Russell 138, 373 

Bailey, Scott 423 

Bair, Constance 423 

Baird, Lisa 376 

Baidr, Susan 98, 117, 159,327 

Bajracharya, Roshan 406 

Baker, Connie 316 

Baker, Kristen 282 

Baker, Mariann 383 

Baker, Melissa 327 

Baker, Michael 91,423 

Baldridge, Steven 423 

Baldwin, Carol 423 

Baldwin, Julie 376 

Bales, Gregory 340 

Bales, Jennifer 165, 330 




5 

1- 

3 : 

•A 



2i. 

I 



Balfour. Tim 
Ballou. Mauri 

Balthazor. Kurt 9(1 

Balthrop. Ted ^01 

Bamman. Marc 

Bancroft. Christopher 

Banes, Bryant Hi,! 

Banman. Michael 
Banning. David.. 
Bannister. Jaimie. 
Bannister. Jay — 

Banrton. Michael llO 

Banla. Mark I '3 

Barancik. Kristi 10l|.0 

Barbee, Mark 

Barber, Kristie — 
Barbour, David.... 
Barclay. Bruce... 
Bardshar. Bradley 

Bareiss, David 

Barenberg. Jackie. 

Barenberg. Jo 

Barham. Tamara 104i 

Barker. Brenda 138 

Barker. Brent 

Barker. Cassandra 

Barker. Elizabeth 157 

Barker. Julie 

Barlow . James 

Barnes. Michael 163 

Barnes. Travis 96, 142, 163i 

Barnes, Viola 

Barnes, William 

Barnes, Woody 
Barnen, Alice.. 
Barnett. Philip. 

Barnhart. Breck 126 

Barrawi. Osama 

Barrett. Mike 100 

Barrett. Scott. 
Barrier. Carla 

Barrows. Todd p 

Barry. Lori 

Barry. Paul 128(3 

Banee, Leslie |2|,; 

Banel. Bradley 91 

Bartelli. Lisa 

Bartle. Beth 

Bartlett .Vicky 

Banley. Stanley 107 

Barton. Renee 327 

Base. Douglas 96 

Basel. Michael 142 

Basham. Edwin 

Bassette .Dick 

Bastin. Louis 117. 128 

Bates .Bryan 

Batman. Dennis 3 

Batres-Estrada. Lilian 

Batson. Lance 

Bauer. Brian 115 

Bauer. Mae 

Baumann. Mary 327 

Baumer. Phillip. 
Bausch. Karin... 
Bayles. Kenneth 
Bayona. Robert. 
Bayouth. John... 
Beachey. Robin. 

Beam. Jon 

Beam. Rodney 100 

Beaman, Diane 318- 

Bear. Laker 

Beard. Deborah 

Bearnes. Stephanie 292 ^ 

Beasley .Jennifer l6 ■ 

Beat .Michael [4 

Beattie .Anna 

Beauchamp. Keenan...93, 104, 121 
163, .371 

Beaudoin , Renee 

Beaver, Kelly 

Beaver. Mary 

Bebermeyer. Sandra 345, 

Bechard. Jeffery 91 

Bechard. Julie 318 

Bechtel. Chne 93. 104 

Bechtel. Kathleen A 132.246(0 

Bechtel. Kathleen Ann [' 

Bechtel. Todd |3 

Beck. Barry... 
Beck. Douglas 
Beck. Joseph.. 

Beck. Karen 

Beck. Terry 

Becker. Eric 

Becker. Krista 96. 

Becker. Steve 

Beckman . Angela 

Beckman. Jo Ann 

Beebe. Marie 

Beeler. Mark 

Beethe. Lisa 3691 

Beggs. Bruce 

Beguelin. Scott... 
Behner. Carrie... 
Behrens. George. 
Behuniak. Jeffrey 
Beighart. Janet... 



..5 



IVIontgomery Street, like m: 
other Manhattan streets, v 
cluttered with tree brand 
and leaves blown down i 
winds that were clocked at 
mph. The winds were caused 
a mid-summer storm that i 
the city. {PMo by Hurrij 
Aydogan) f 



466 



Indexi 



: 



ightel, Gail 416 

Iden, Nancy 364 

Ifield, Stephen 335 

II, Christopher 333 

lote. Duane 126, 388 

mis, Angela 347 

nder, Lynn...: 98, 424 

iider, Susan 163, 165 

neke, Beth 424 

ngtson, Carl 155 

ngtson, Deborah 155 

linen, Edwin 140, 424 

inert, John 424 

inert, Katherine 347 

inert, Kevin 104 

ininga. Carmen 376 

loit, Deborah 305, 372 

loit, Michelle 91, 157, 372 

ischoter, Gib 303 

iteman, Linda 288 

itz, Jeanette 424 

berich, Christine 366 

ends, Jamie 330 

g, Elizabeth 107 

ger, Brert 424 

ger, Jo 327 

ger, Steve 371 

ges, Ruth 424 

geson, Sheryl 316, 424 

ggren, Bruce 96, 130, 424 

ggren, Stephanie 126.414 

gin, William 147 

gman, Christopher 310 

gman, Cindy 424 

gman. Lisa 383 

gman. Lori 424 

gner. Bill 295 

land. Christopher 280 

land, Stephanie 163, 308 

nal, Josie 296 

Hard, Rebecca 425 

ndt, Leslie 400 

idt, Loren 91 

>ey, Michael 91, 104,425 

•idge, Edgar 353 

oth, Janell 89. 147,425 

:7, Barbara 126, 308 

7. Debra 147,425 

■y. Janet 157,292,383 

y, Jean 98 

y. Julie 285 

>. Kim 282 

y. Laura 157. 416 

y. Vincent 117, 395 

ram. Nancy 163,425 

vick, Douglas 89 

nger. Mark 400 

er, Pamela 89, 130,285 

;r, Patricia 285 

i:r, Scort 368 

wick, Kimberly 128,416 

i Alpha Psi 100 

Gamma Sigma 100 

el, Ronald 350 

■nbrack, Cheryl 157 

=n, Ann 425 

ler, Karen 305 

!er. Kevin 338 

as. George 157. 333 

r, Steven 353 

la. Chander 163 

., Elisabeth 425 

meier. Kathryn 282 

laus, Timothy 110. 130,425 

ell, Susan 425 

. William 400 

>. Elaine 33O 

.. Susan 98, 138, 308, 372 

r.Todd 335 

'■ Tia 298 

ger, Randall 425 

lam, Chen 376 

lam.Lynn 388 

ey. Cynthia 320 

lo, Joseph 344 

Thomas 96, 142,425 

ingham, Lauta 343, 388 

p. Craig 311 

P.James 333 

ig.Toss 425 

Shelley 138,327 

• Toni 327 

. Christine 366 

malm, Annalena 121 

, Charles 412 

. Colleen 115 

, Kim 425 

, Kimberly 388 

Scott 425 

Stanley 96 

m, Teddi 132 

nan. Merrill 89 

nan. Annette 425 

•lee, Karen 115.379 

lat, Jeffrey 295 

lat. Julie 298 

;. Anthony 340 

■ , Janet 324 

ng. Shay 324 

■n, Robert 340 

nship, Janice 95, 121, 425 

■nship, Nancy 91 

n. Mary 298 

Tina 298 

. David 406 

!. William 344 

lord, Eric 368 

.Sue 376,383 

. Steve 295 

e, Scott 303 

ler, Kristi 406 

ler, Leslie 425 

i, Kenneth 157 



Blevins, Richard 355 

Bliesener, Douglas 311 

Blinne. John 353 

Bliss, Scott 313 

Blochlinger, Kebera 425 

Block and Bridle 100, 104 

Blogin, Mary 110.406 

Blome, Don 91.425 

Blomquist. Brian 338 

Blomquist. Kevin 317 

Blondefield. Thad 138, 147, 335 

Bloom, John 406 

Bloom. Shawn 93 

Bloomgren. Kirsten 376 

Blount. Kimberly 425 

Blubaugh, Randall. , 425 

Blue Key 104 

Blythe. Duane 91. 350 

BIythe, Lisa 95.425 

Blythe. Susan 425 

Boardman. Marcy 324 

Boatrighl. Danny 163 

Boaz, Melissa 345. 388 

Boeve. Angela 285 

Bogart, Kimberly 425 

Bogart, Wayne 425 

r. Gaylon 425 

. Rebecca 327 

Bogina. Mark 350 

Bogner, Linda 327, 345 

Bogner, Mary 345, 425 

Bogner, Richard 344 

Bogner, Terry 400 

Bohn, Donna 324 

Bohnenblust, Larae 425 

Bohnert, Julie 425 

Bokelman, Jill 320 

Bokelman, Marc 93. 96. 290 

Boley , Jo Ann 330 

Boley. Michele 320. 369 

Bolinger. Stacy 425 

Boiler. Bemie 115,425 

Boiler, Teri 425 

Bollier, Michele 93, 383 

Bollinger, Carollynn 425 

Bollinger, Eadye 425 

Bollman David 96 

Boh, Marilyn 41 1 

Bolte, Ben 425 

Bonar, Warren 344 

Bond, David 93 

Bond, Jennifer 376 

Bondank, Joe 425 

Bonham, David 165, 425 

Bonham, Jonh 163 

Bonnen, Todd 313 

Booher, Andrea 98, 425 

Book, Sheryl 324 

Boomer, Kent 313 

Boos. Jami 298 

Boos. Kim 361 

Booth. Tracy 425 

Borchard, Marcie 282 

Bord, David 353 

Borders. Bridget 330 

Bordewick, Kelly 363 

Bordewick. Leann 327 

Borgen. Julie 425 

Borgen. Steven 425 

Borgerding, James 104, 425 

Borgerding, John 104 

Borgerding, Mark 104 

Borgstadter, Angela 379 

Borgstadter, Darin 425 

Boring, Stephanie 320 

Bom. Gary 147. 425 

Borst.Rose 95.288 

Bosch. Elise 3g3 

Bosch. Mary 383 

Bosnak. Kirsten 107.425 

Boss. Heather no 

Boss. Timothy 95 

Bosse. Lanny 91 

Bossi. Carol 327 

Bosworth. Deborah 376 

Bosworth. John 3|3 

Bothwell. Shelly 130. 425 

Bort. Donna 352. 425 

Bouckhout. Darren '. 429 

Boughton. Kunis 388 

Bowden. Steven 358. 360 

Bowen. Steve 98 

Bowen. Tamara 327 

Bowers. Phillip 400 

Bowers. Jeffrey 388 

Bowers. Todd 373 

Bowersock. Stephanie 330 

Bowles, Charles 344 

Bowman, Edward 358 

Bowman, Ricky 130 

Bowser, Elizabeth 416 

Boyd, Arnold 426 

Boyd. Becky 347 

Boyd, Carolyn 165 

Boyd, Kristen 426 

Boyd, Larry 132 

Boyd, Link 91^ 426 

Boyd, Paul ' 426 

Boyd, Todd 426 

Boyer. Marie 89. 292 

Boyles, Kimma 96 

Boysen, Gene 317 

Brack, Scott 93,426 

Bracken, Shawn ' 358 

Braden, Chris 335 

Bradford, Roger 96. 290 

Bradley . Darren ' 426 

Bradley. Kent 142, 157. 159. 317 

Bradley. Scott 406 

Bradshaw. Kevin 91, 95 

Bradshaw. Ronda 372,383 

Brady, John 303 

Brake, Tony 107 



Bramlage, Fred 60, 61 

Brandes, Robert 426 

Brandesberg, Anne 327 

Btandt, Anita 308 

Brandt, Debbie 296 

Brandyberry , Steve 395 

Branham, David 355 

Brant Sonja 294, 426 

Brashear, Samuel 98 

Brauer, Tina 298 

Braun, Chris 361 

Braun, Denise 426 

Braun, John 98 

Bredow, Lori 426 

Breese, Noelle 366 

Breitenbucher, Jill 383 

Bremermen, Scott 340 

Brendecke, Amy 169 

Brenner, Laurie 126 

Brent. Ben 116 

Brent. Susan 98, 138,281,308 

Bressler. Reid 426 

Bretz. Matthew 295 

Brewer. Jeffrey 147 

Brezgiel. Peter 290 

Brigden. Mary 414 

Bnggs. Andrew 426 

Briggs, Arlen 412 

Bnggs, Brad 96, 110,426 

Briggs, David 115 

Briggs, Lori 426 

Bright, Daniel 400 

Bnnker, Brian 426 

Brmker, Sandra 282 

Broadfoot, Kristin 282 

Broadfool, Richard 340 

Brobst, Bryce 426 

Broce. Winston 280 

Brockhoff. Wallace 89. 317 

Brockschmidt. Neal 110. 315 

Brockway. Virginia 157 

Blocker. Anna 130. 324 

Broers. Sondra 128.294,416 

Brokaw, Fletcher 96 

Bremen, Katherine 324,336 

Bromen, Lauren 324 

Bromich, Barren 253,355 

Brondell, Karin 308, 362 

Bronson, Cmdy 298 

Brookhan, Cynthia 407 

Brookover, Kimberly 324 

Brooks, Kenneth 115 

Brooke, Kim 383 

Brooks, Mary 426 

Brooks, Robert 412 

Brooks, Steve 290 

Brooks, Susan 426 

Brore, Travis 104 

Brosa, Melinda 426 

Brose, Denise 383 

Brose, Jeffrey 426 

Brose, Lisa 159, 426 

Brotemarkle. Mary 426 

Broughton. Jill 132 

Brown, Brian 400 

Brown, Bruce 426 

Brown. Caria 121.412 

Brown, Coleen 426 

Brown, Dana 426 

Brown, Daron 350 

Brown, David 162 

Brown, Doug 315, 349 

Brown, Fredlyn 121, 426 

Brown, Heather 347 

Brown, Jeanie 117, 426 

Brown, Kenneth 426 

Brown, Kevin 400 

Brown, Laurie 347 

Brown, Mark 100 

Brown, Michael 333 

Brown, Patrick 342 

Brown, Randy 108, 110 

Brown, Rebecca 388 

Brown, Robert 353 

Brown, Roger 400 

Brown, Ronald 91 

Brown, Scott 95 

Brown, Sharon 383 

Brown, Stacey 314, 383 

Brown, Stephen 342 

Brown, Steve 130, 247, 368 

Brown, Steven 93 

Brown, Valerie 426 

Brownell, Stephanie 330 

Browning, Cynthia 426 

Brozek, Rhonda 388 

Bruce, Susan 383 

Bruegger, Paul 426 

Brummen, Barry 132, 313 

Brummett, Dana 314, 330 

Brummett, Julie 426 

Brun, Delton 350 

Bruna, Coleen 100,426 

Bruna, Jeff 91, 426 

Brunell, Erin 4I6 

Bruner, Becky 132 

Brungardt, Cari 426 

Brungardt, Kirk 395 

Brungardt, Pamela 416 

Bruning, Stephanie 383 

Bruns. Gregory 411 

Bryan. Rick 91, 363 

Bryant. David 132 

Bryant. Gary 147, 426 

Bryttan, Adrian 148, 149 

Buchanan, Alan 426 

Buchanan, Joann 157 

Buchanan, Kristen 320 

Buchanan, Pamela 147 

Buchheit, Joseph 89 

Buchman, Susan 147 

Buck, Greg 335 

Buck, Jeffrey 108, 110 



Buck, William 126 

Buethe, Kimberly. 89, 104. 157.318,426 

Buffum, Sean 395 

Bugler, John 426 

Bugner, Darran 315 

Buhl, Ellen 157, 388. 

Buller, Patricia 376 

Bullinger, Philip 110, 121, 163,301 

Bullinger, Reed 301 

Bulloch. Andy 100 

Bullock, John 315 

Bullock, Kathy 324 

Bulman, Cristine 310 

Bundschuh, Bill 96 

Bundy. Helen 198. 314 

Bunk, Shirley 93, 302.426 

Bunkholder. Scott 95 

Bunnel. Thomas 426 

Bunien. Patricia 308 

Burckhart. Phil 91. 426 

Burford. Dana 282 

Burgess. Robert 72 

Burgess. Scott 338 

Burgen. Mark 395 

Burgett. Scott 395 

Burghart. Steve 426 

Burjes. Brenda 302, 416 

Burk, Allan 93,96. 157.426 

Burke. Jane 110. 159.426 

Burke. Kevin 358 

Burkholder. Lyie 400 

Burmeier. Lisa 308 

Burnet. Timothy 353 

Burnett. Julie 327. 345 

Burnett, Randy 126. 315 

Bums. Austin 132. 159 

Bums. Deborah 147 

Bums. Kelly 366 

Bums, Mark 368 

Burrell, Tom 426 

Bunin. Brian 96,400 

Burton, Douglas 358 

Burton, James 91, 426 

Burton, Kristyne 427 

Burton. Pamela 383 

Burton. Robert 89 

Burton. Sheryl 427 

Burton. William 427 

Busch. Mark 427 

Busch. Thomas 427 

Buscher, Michael 427 

Busenitz, Susan 376 

Busey. Colin 395 

Bush, George 68, 69 

Bush. Jill 305.352 

Bush. Kurt 107. 350 

Bush. Scott 350 

Bush. Susan 110 

Bushey, Jeff 333 

Bushyhead. Dale 353 

Business Council 104 

Buss. Timothy 91 

Bussard, Tim 89, 110 

Busse, Bret 163 

Bussing, Greg 303 

Butel, Larry 91.95, 138.315 

Butler. Brian 427 

Butler, Ross 427 

Butler, Susan 383 

Buller, Teresa 427 

Butler, Tom 126, 295 

Butterfield, Anthony 427 

Butterfield. Charies 412 

Button, John 159. 303 

Buttron, Bradley ' 400 

Buyle, Mark 157, 163, 371 

Buyle, Suzanne 427 

Byer, Julie 142, 383 

Byme, Kevin 204 



C 



Cable, Kent 115, 121,295 

Cafferty. Daryl 313 

Caguin, Ana Katrina 345,427 

Cahill, Joseph 157 

Cailteux, Marlene 147, 388 

Cain, Lisa 427 

Caine, Veronica 288 

Calder, Kristi 388 

Caldwell, Alec 395 

Caldwell, Christina 96 

Caldwell, Diana 427 

Caldwell, Joan 416 

Caldwell, Wendy 427 

Calhoun, Myron 128 

Call, Dwight 402 

Callahan, Linda 416 

Callewaert, Diane 343 

Calovich, Catherine 282 

Calvert, Jena 305 

Camblin, Clayton 138,247 

Camerlinck, Bryan 406 

Camp, Frances 427 

Campbell, Amy 320 

Campbell, Daniel 333 

Campbell, Donald 427 

Campbell, Mike 400 

Campbell, Stacey Alan 91, 157,317 

Campbell , Stacey Leann 427 



Campbell, Terry 135, 136 

Campus Tour Gniides 107 

Canelos, Andrea 427 

Cao, HieuTrong 169 

Cao, Lanh Thuy 169, 388 

Capps, Christine 159 

Cari, David 350 

Carlat.Jeff 358 

Carlat, Stan 89. 427 

Carlgren. Randy 115 

Carlin, Joiui 66 

Cariisle, Laurie 285 

Carison, Bill 338 

Carlson, Brian 142 

Carison, Carolyn 427 

Carlson, Cathie 427 

Carlson, Connie 427 

Carison, Deborah 330 

Carison, Debra 89,91 

Carlson, Diana 142 

Carison, Kelley 314 

Carlson, Pamela 406 

Carmenate, Nadina 155 

Carmichael, Scott 315 

Camahan, Sheryl 383 

Camey, Laura 305 

Carpenter, Daniel 427 

Carpenter, Jacli 144, 145 

Carpenter, Joseph 100, 147,427 

Carpenter, Kent 313 

Carpenter, Loree 98, 372,379 

Carpenter. Melissa 324 

Carpenter. Timothy 108 

Carr. Dana 427 

Carr, Karen 298 

Carr, Kelli 56, 169, 288 

Carrick. Bradley 427 

Carriker. Connie 427 

Can-oil. Bryan 194, 196, 197.350 

Carson. Kelly 427 

Carson. Troy 406 

Carter. Amy 93. 320 

Carter, Leeann 96, 427 

Carter. Shona 427 

Carter. Scott 388 

Caruthers. Jill 427 

Carvacho, Vicky 113 

Carver. Brad 96. 165,427 

Case. Nancy 89 

Case. Stephanie 117 

Casey. Cathy 427 

Casey, Cherie 376 

Casey, Karen 298 

Casey, Michael 427 

Cash, Walter 115 

Cahier. Deborah 427 

Cashier, Dennis 95. 427 

Cashman. Steve.. 56. 104, 107, 117, 159, 
361 

Casper, David 335 

Cassetty, Shannon 366 

Cassida, John 400 

Castell, Angela 427 

Caster, SHerri 324 

Castro, Jose 155, 427 

Cater, Paul 400 

Cathcart, Christine 157 

Gathers, Steve 295 

Catlett, Susan 93 

Cattoor, Rodney 355 

Caudill, John 412 

Caudillo, Cathy 372,427 

Caudle, Karen 126,376 

Cauthon, Damon 126, 295 

Cave, Kimberiy 98, 126, 364 

Cave, Laurie 185 

Cavlovic, Michael 427 

Cawley, Carolyn 308 

Cawley, Deborah 308 

Cearley , Michael 427 

Cecil, Bryan 355 

Cederberg, Kara 427 

Chadwell, Bryan 91, 128, 290 

Chaffee, Teg 358 

Chalfant, Mark 121 

Chalk, Jennifer 376 

Chalker, Bradley 406 

Chalker, Sharon 117,427 

Chamblin, Diane 138, 169, 330 

Champlin, Curtis 132. 350 

Chance. Jeffery 342 

Chandlee. Carol 100. 427 

Chandler. Karia 4 16 

Chandler. Scon 303 

Chang, Christina 121 

Chappell, Michelle 132,427 

Charez, Miguel 155 

Charland, Lori 428 

Charles, Craig 342 

Charlton, Mark 335 

Charlton, William 121, 335 

Chartier, Karen 428 

Chanrand, Nancy 282, 314 

Chatfield. Christopher 353 

Chatterjee. Eva 330 

Chaulk. Jennifer 320 

Chavez. Miguel no 

Chayer, Suann 314 

Cheng, Shu Ching 416 

Chenoweth, Amy 428 

ChenoweUi, Clay 428 

Chenoweth, Kristin 324 

Chenoweth, Shelly 428 

Cheray, Nancy 100,428 

Chestnut. Kevin 89 

Chestnut, Thomas 91, 95, 104 

Chi Epsilon 107 

Chimes 107 

Chisam, Michael 371 

Chisholm, Gary 428 

Chism, Mary 324 

Chow, Cathy 428 

Chrisler, Randall 290 



idex 



467 



Chrisman, Kayla 282 

Chrislensen, Jerri 324 

Christensen, Keith 118 

Christain Campus Ministry 107 

Christian, Tad 350 

Christians. Roy 132, 335 

Chua, Hong Yau 121,428 

Chumley, Michael 104,428 

Churchman. Kristine 96, 384 

Cikanek, Darwin 395 

Cisneros, Henry 73 

Claassen, Kristine 93, 110, 384 

Claassen. Michelle 384 

Claassen. Scott 91 

Clancy, Stephen 335 

Clanton, Christy 155 

Clark, Anna Marie 308 

Clark, Curt 428 

Clark, Eldon 428 

Clark, Gelane 416 

Clark, James 428 

Clark, Jeff 311 

Clark, Julie 100, 163,428 

Clark. Julie Margene 93 

Clark. Kimberly 132, 384 

Clark, Michael 350 

Clark, Stacy 98,320 

Clark, Tammy 132, 428 

Clark, Todd 350 

Clarke, Melinda 428 

Clarke, Robert 121,428 

Clarkson, Daniel 93,96, 110, 157 

Clary, Lori 428 

Clary, Susan 100 

Clasen, Robert 147, 428 

Claser, Curt 91 

Claussen, Tammy 428 

Clawson, David 95, 104,428 

Clawson, Kenby 95, 104,428 

Clawson, Mary Beth 104, 291, 388 

Claxton, Mark 428 

Clay, Daisy 414 

Claycamp, Danny 117 

Cleland, Ross 147, 428 

Clem, Chad 303 

Clemence, Angela 100 

Clement, Jackie 285 

Clements, Alice 91, 147, 379 

Clements, Deeneen 379 

Clemons, Frances.... 107, 121, 138,324, 
336 

Clevenger-Allen, Janet 288 

Clifford, Ann Margaret 98, 324 

Clifford, Michelle 110, 117 

Clifford, Molly 324 

Cline, Curtis 395 

Cline, Jay 317 

Clopine, Russell 115, 280 

Clugston, Brian 395 

Clymer, Melody 428 

Coash, James 126 

Coats, Joan 428 

Coble, Mark 121,340 

Coen, Jolynn 428 

CoffeU, Scott 428 

Coffey, Robert 163,428 

Coffin, Christopher 428 

Coffman, Curtis 98 

Coffman, James 106 

Cogswell, Janelle 384 

Cohen, Karen 157,316,416 

Coiner, William 388 

Coker, Rodney 126 

Cole, Ray 130, 395 

Cole, Steven 147, 303 

Coleman. Anne 347 

Coleman. Janice 100, 115 

Coleman, Leslie 288 

Colen, Jennifer 298 

Colgan, Diane 282 

Colip, Polly 107, 159, 163, 285 

Collazo, Viaor 147, 428 

College Republicans 107 

Collegian Advertising Staff. 108 

Collegiate FFA 108 

Collegiate Chorale 167 

Collins, Deann 163, 428 

Collins, Kimberly 296 

Collins, Stacey 288 

Collins, Sue 95, 330 

Combes, Bryant 89, 155 

Cobes, Douglas 89 

Combes, Janel 376 

Combes, Jeffrey 89 

Combs, Timothy 411 

Comfort, Julie 428 

Comfort, Lawrence 400 

Comfort, Sheila 368 

Commerford, Susan 428 

Compaan, Alvin 102, 103 

Compass, Jeffrey 108, 110 

Compton. David 358 

Compton. James 89, 395 

Compton, Lauren 308 

Compton, Lisa 428 

Conam, Quenlin 428 

Conger, Jill 281 

Conglelon, Jonathan 138 

Congrove, Tim 295, 297 

Conklin, Gregg 91 

Conklin, Susan 330 

Conley, Dwight 290 

Conley, Bill 91, 3561351 

Connaughton, Jack 163 

Connell, Mary 320 

Conner, Craig 340 

Conner, Donald 400 

Connery, Regina 302,406 

Connet, Gerald 97. 358 

Connet, Noel 358, 360 

Connolly, Janet 246, 285, 355 

Connolly, William 428 

Connor, Kathryn 115,298 I 



Conoyer, Ashlyn 305, 306, 362 

Conradt. Katherine 155, 282 

Conrardy, Carol 428 

Converse, Kevin 428 

Conway, Jane 362 

Conway, Kevin 428 

Conyac, Kelly 117, 138,298 

Congers, Jeffrey 303 

Cook, Bruce 350 

Cook. Cynthia 379 

Cook, Georgia 406 

Cook, Joe 428 

Cook, Kent 155,428 

Cook. Randy 428 

Cook. Rebecca 352. 330 

Cool. Kevin 91 

Cool, Linda 428 

Coon, Cheryl 294 

Coon, Phyllis 98,428 

Cooper, David 96, 395 

Cooper, Elizabeth 416 

Cooper, Helen 428 

Cooper, Max 428 

Cooper, Robert 395 

Cope, Donna 108, 347 

Copher, Bob 104, 121, 303 

Coppmger, Timothy 100 

Copple, Michael 91 

Copple, Bob 110, 395 

Cordell, Vickie 428 

Corder, Jeffrey 395 

Cordy, Ann 109 

Corle, Ronda 318,428,491 

Corliss, Luanne 429 

Cormaci, Kathie 165 

Cormaci, Michael 295 

Comejo, Mary 388 

Comett, Julie 147 

Corpus, Cruzelia 406 

Corrales, Armando 155 

Corrales, Yolanda 288, 406 

Corredor, Carlos 350 

Corrigan, Jeanne 298 

Cory, Kelly 429 

Cosme, Gerardo 155 

Costello, Daniel 117,429 

Costin, Janet 169 

Cote, Cynthia 100, 107,324,372 

Cottrell, Lisa 288 

Court Scope 108 

Cowen, Brian 395 

Cox. Brian 429 

Cox, David 115 

Cox, Jeff 363 

Cox, Kenneth 429 

Cox, Michelle 376 

Cox, Nicci 364 

Cox, Russell 429 

Cox, Steven 429 

Crabtree, Kristie 147,429 

Craft. Michael 407 

Craig. Carol 384 

Craig. Dianna 376 

Craig. Neil 429 

Craig. Paul 429 

Craig. Stuart 130 

Craig, Todd 358 

Grain, Randy 311 

Cramer, Mary 285 

Cramplon, Manin 91, 100 

Crane, Brian 353 

Cranmer, Jon 121 

Crathome. Scott 429 

Crawford, Anthony 115, 130, 131 

Crawford, Joseph 429 

Crawford, Laura 324 

Creason, Curt 368 

Creighlon, Lisa 384 

Crenshaw, Todd 358 

Cress, Joy 138,384 

Creten, Jimmy 400 

Crews, Daniel 368 

Crill, KUey 98, 139, 314, 330 

Crites, Kristi 388 

Croft, Mark 429 

Cronan, Kelley 140, 314 

Cronenwett, Kurt 313 

Crook, Sharon 388 

Crook, Tami 376 

Crosby, Van 101 

Crosier, Laurie 100, 285 

Cross, John 311 

Cross, Marcia 429 

Cross, Mark 358 

Cross, Phil 295 

Crowell, Eric 388 

Growl, John 121, 138 

Croy,Todd 96; 110,429 

Crumpacker, Rex 93, 429 

Crutchfield, James.... 104. 107, 159,361 

Cruz, Hector 155 

I Crystal, Gary 363 

Cubbage, Patrick 93. 115,429 

Cuchy, Carl 353 

Cudnik. Jacqueline 429 

Cullens. Gerald 335 

Culver, Mary 376 

Cummings, Cindy 324, 364 

Cummins, Diane 406 

Cummins, Rhonda 406 

Cundiff, Rodney 157,163,280 

Cunningham, Jim 429 

Cunningham, Mary 384 

Cupit, Carol 298 

Curran, Diane 305 

Curran, Penny 429 

Curry, Cari 96, 429 

Curtis, Dianna 96, 302 

Curtis, Kathy 429 

Curtis, Lloyd 121 

Custer, Lance 371 

Cyphert, Theresa 429 

Cyr. Terry 318,429 



2> 



Dabbas, Aida Hashim 98 

Dabbas, Anwar Hashim 98, 128 

Dabbas, Raouf Hashim 98 

Daetwiler, Kirby 147, 430 

Dahl, Derrick 430 

Dahl, Erick : 363 

Dahl, Julie 91, 108 

Dahl, Susan 126,379 

Dahlsten, Mark 290 

Dahnke, Cynthia 379 

Daigle, Eugene 98 

Daigle, Tamara 430 

Dailey, Beth 327, 345 

Dakin, David 159 

Dale, Richard 333 

Dale, Susan 343,430 

Dalgleish, Scott 355 

Dallam, Karen 384 

Dalton, Beth 126,406 

Dalton, Julie 147,285 

Daly, Lesley 366 

Dam, Patty 430 

Danaher, Anthony 333 

Daniel, Gregory 63 

Daniels, Colleen 320 

Daniels, Jeffrey 95 

Daniels, Jill 138, 147,430 

Daniels, Kathleen 330 

Daniels, Monica 411 

Daniels, Patrick 371 

Daniels, Peggy 430 

Danler, Robert 160 

Dannan, Martin 303 

Dao, Khiem 117, 169 

Dao, Thanh Teresa 157, 169 

Darfler, Natalie 430 

Darger, Scon 358 

Darling, Kendall 353 

Darnell. James 350 

Darnell, Janise 324 

Darnell, Rick 126, 395 

Danell, Robert 395 

Darrell, Stacey 366 

Darst, Dean 395 

Dassow, Matthew 303 

Data Processing Management Associa- 
tion 110 

Daub, Sheila 406 

Daum, Malaura 147, 430 

Dautel, Vicky 341, 388 

Daveline, Deborah 330 

Davidson, Chet 412 

Davidson, John 333 

Davidson, Mark 117, 363 

Davidson, Robert 430 

Davidson, Ronald 395 

Davidson, Tammy 416 

Davied, Steven 169, 400 

Davies, James 395 

Davies, Jennifer 430 

Davis, Alan 115 

Davis, Becky 121, 138 

Davis, Charity 406 

Davis, Christopher 303 

Davis, Evelyn 100, 430 

Davis, Heather 298 

Davis, Jack 430 

Davis, Jennifer 298 

Davis, Joe 130 

Davis, Joshura 323 

Davis, Laurel 301 

Davis, Lisa 376 

Davis. Marvette 388 

Davis, Michelle 389 

Davis, Paul 430 

Davis, Rebecca 320 

Davis, Rhonda 126, 407 

Davis, Shalene 281,416 

Dawes, Bill 130 

Dawes, Derek 280 

Dawson-Ramoska, Audrey 430 

Dawson, Jennifer 308 

Dawson, Susan 430 

Day, Emily 282 

Day, Jackson 100,205, 344 

Day, Nancy 416 

Day, Robin 291, 389 

Daymude, Marc 407 

Deal, Timothy 335 

Dean, Crystal 430 

Dean, Kenton 173 

Dean, Kimberiy 327 

Dean, Robert 155 

Deatrick, Stephanie 343, 430 

Deaver, Kevin 370 

Deaver, Marvin 430 

Debarthe, Larry 126,430 

Debauge, Steve 96, 358 

Debiteno, Richard 313 

Decker, Lisa 142 

Decker, Mark 395 

Deckert, Alysun 384 

Deckinger, Jalaine 142, 305 

Decou, Mark 430 

Degeer, Mary 430 

Dehaven, Eric 355 

Dejmal, Daniel 355 



Delaney, Michael 104, 342 

Delapena, Eric 155, 313 

Delker, David 126 

Dellen, Neal 303 

Demel, Karen 389 

Demel, Kelly 389 

Demint, Jeffrey 147, 396 

Demuth, Loretta 430 

Denk, Candy 384 

Denneler, Charles 333 

Dermis, David 350 

Denton, David 317 

Denver, Kimberiy 96, 305 

Denzel, Thomas 338 

Depenbusch, Roger 430 

Depoe, Susanna 379 

Dercher, Sharry 207, 430 

Derksen, Roger 132,430 

Derrick, Laura 430 

Desch, Brian 355 

Desch, Patrick 355 

Deschner, Susan 308 

Desnousse, Olivia 407 

Despain, Deana 147 

Despain, Mark 138 

Deters, Brenda 128 

Dertke, Donald 430 

Dettmer, Tammy 430 

Devault, Edie 366 

Devilbiss, Ed 163 

Devine, John 411 

Devlin, Dane 430 

Devore, Thomas 293 

Dewey, Eddie 91, 430 

Dewey, Van 91 

Deyong, Dirk 396 

Deyoung, Rebecca 159,430 

Dicintio, Liz 296, 308 

Dick, James 430 

Dicken. Shelly 107 

Dickerson, Bradley 368 

Dickerson, Marcia 430 

Dickey, Douglas 124 

Dickey, Andy 396 

Dickey, Jim 173, 250 

Dickinson, Kirk 104 

Diederich, John 295 

Diehl, Kimberly 345 

Diehl, Robert 295 

Dierberger, Brian 108 

Dierks, Daphne 327 

Dietrich, Gregory 126 

Dieu, Jim 358 

Dill, Jeanette 430 

Dille, Russell 430 

Diller, Jerold 165, 317 

Dillinger, Eric 110, 430 

Dillman, Loretta 379 

Dillon, Darren 98,430 

Dillon, James 95, 430 

Dinkel, Alicia 288 

Dinkel, Michael 430 

Dinsmore, Steven 338 

Dipiazzo, Denise 414 

Dirks, Bradley 363 

Dirks, Sheri 430 

Disberger, Russell 430 

Disque, Julie 384 

Ditzler, Cheryl 366 

Diver, Randal 147 

Diver, Theresa 130 

Dixon, Joyce 291, 389 

Dixon, Timothy 280 

Dobratz, David 303 

Dodds, Susan 430 

Doe, Judy 430 

Doebele, Cynthia 298 

Doeden,Klaas 358 

Doerflinger, David 121, 293 

Doerste, Robin 138,308,362 

Doh, Kwee 430 

Doheriy, Christina 352 

Dolande, Fernando 132, 430 

Dolezal, Pam 126,430 

Dolezal, Vernon 412 

Doljac, Mark 115,430 

Doll. Debora 302 

Dollar. John 110. 133 

Dolsberry, Bruce 89 

Domann. Susan 431 

Domanski. Michele 325 

Dome. Marion 431 

Domville. Christina 384 

Donaghy. Henry 63 

Donaldson. Catherine 298 

Donaldson. Donald 358 

Donaldson, Scott 104 

Donnelly, David 115 

Donnert, David 130, 431 

Donnert, Hennann 95, 102, 103. 110 

Dooling, Randall 93. 315 

Dorbin. Tricia 320 

Dorfman. Ariel 72 

Dorian. Graham 355, 357 

Dom. James 431 

Dorabusch. David 96. 389 

Dombusch. Michael 389 

Dorrell. Gary 104. 431 

Dorsch. Jennifer 291, 384 

Dorsch, Scon 169,431 

Dorsch, Shawn 431 

Doud, Gregory 89, 100, 3% 

Doud, Patricia 100, 132,431 

Dougherty, Rick 340 

Dowd, Deborah 285 

Dowding, Leesa 431 

Downes, Dennis 164, 431 

Downey, Barbara 100, 305 

Downey, Julia 431 

Downey, Paula 157,416 

Dowse, Bradlee 317 

Doyen , Amy 431 

Drapal, Kimberly 294,431 



Dreher, Gerald 

Dreier, Lori 

Drennen, Curt 1 

Dreyer, David 91, 

Driscoll. Rodney 117, 121, 1 

Drouhard, Jill 

Drummond, Joseph 

Drury, Michael L 

Drury . Michael P 

Dubbert, Kelly 93, 115, 1 

Dwbbert, Stanley 

Dubois, Craig 

Dubois, Paul 

Dudek, Michael 

Duden, Derek 

Dudley, Steven 

Duegaw, Patrick 

Duell, Alan 

Duell, Kristi 

Duerkson, Gary 

Duff, Angus 

Duffin, Darin 1 

Dugan, Barb 1 

Dugan, Karla 

Duggan, Diane 

Duggan, Tim 

Dulac , Michelle 

Dumler . Janelle 

Dumler. Russell 

Dunbar. Diana 

Duncan. Deborah 

Duncan, Jennifer 142,2 

Duncan, Kimber 

Dungee, Deborah 

Dunitz, Christopher 

Dunklee, Kelly 

Dunlap, Michelle 

Dunlap, Mike 

Dunlap, Ronald 

Dunn, Julie 3 

Dunn, Richard 

Dunn, Robert 

Dunning , Steven 

Dunst, Jeffrey 1 

Dunz, Deborah 

Duong, Dan 

Dupras, Jeaney 1 

Duran, Gregory 

Durar, Abdulrazag 

Durflinger, Dennis '4 

Durr, Kathleen 3 3 

Durst, Kris A 

Dutton, Melissa 

Dunon, Tanya 

Duvall , John 

Duvall, Johns 

Duvravin, Barb 



Dyck, Jerry 

Dyer, Carolyn 1'4 

Dyer, Tami 4 

Dykes, Matthew 1 

Dykes, Paul 3 

Dykmann, Roger [i 



£ 



Eager, Teresa 

Eagle , Rachelle 

Easterday, Bonnie 

Eastman, Jill 

Ebbens. David 1 

Eberhan , Steven 

Eberle , Russell 

Eberth, Charles 1 

Eck, Cheryl 

Eck,Shari 

Edelman, Linda 

Ediger, David 

Ediger, James 

Ediger, Janet 

Edmonds, John 

Edmonds, Man 

Edsall, Patrick 

Education Council 

Edwards, Anne 3 

Edwards, Cecily 

Edwards, David 

Edwards, Elaine I 

Edwards, Eric 

Edwards, Joselle 

Edwards. Lloyd 

Edwards. Melissa 104. I 

Edwardson, Amy 

Eflin, Brian 

Egbert. Clark....: 

Eggers. Bruce 

Eggers. Todd 

Egglesion. Richard 1 

Egidy. Deborah 

Ehly. Heidi 

Ehrhardt, Douglas 

Ehriich, David 

Ehrlich , Monty 

Eichman, Loretta 

Eickmann, Kevin 

Eiland. Darrell 1 

Eilert. Ann 

Eilert. Douglas 



468 



lnd« 




a Scott 89, 100 

iilanin 115,396 

ii , Lisa 157 

i , Sonya 407 

5 Pamela 298 

i Donna 389 

i Michael 163,432 

il Briana 432 

i ler, Regina 432 

•I Larry 98,432 

!l Stephen 311 

a Todd 173 

3 ge. Terri 314 

il Gary 432 

a hari 157 

a , Michelle 376 

ai, Roger 66,295 

a, e, Lynn 157, 163,384 

a .John 121, 138,432 

El .David 432 

Eli.Gayl 432 

El„Janet 302,379 

El, Jean 110,379 

El ,Kim 288,314 

El. Ryan 432 

El .Shannon 384 

a.Tracey 362,432 

ElCindy 91,414 

a;Oavid 340 

Hilulie 281,347 

EIIITiomas 432 

B' I. Gregory 98, 130, 373 

Eh. Lisa 325 

El Lori 325 

ElliMichael 41 

fl' .Amy 347,369 

I': Dee 432 

I eith 311 

fi.ent 31 

h Stacey 432 

Ed iregory 389 

En. John 432 

E» en.Bnan 389 

El Bering Ambassodors 110 

Earring Student Council 110 

En d. Debbie 345,416 

En Kenneth 432 

En Tim 340 

En . Charlene 416 

En Paul 121, 317 

f" f. Annette 316 

En f. Jeffrey 355 

En Brenda 389 

n Paula 432 

" , Connie 320 

-" orman 93,96,432 

i n mental Design Students Associa- 

110 

•' lack 432 

'' 1, David 432 

' Robert 313 

': m, Cindy 432 

" in. James 96 

''I in. Jon C 96, 142 

''^ .n. JonE 344 

fri m, John 432 

aim, Sara 327 

«| in, Tama 169 

im i. Donald 107 

iw .John 10* 

11 Tom 432 

"ling, l^rry 91 

nil Ian 313 



Esau, Sheryi 155 

Esau. Steven 371 

Esau. Susan 432 

Eschilman. Clark 100, 115,432 

Eshbaugh, Jeffrey 400 

Eshelbrenner. Doug 396 

Eskilson, Karen 132, 432 

Espenlaub, Anita 288, 345 

Espinoza, Sandy 155, 389 

Esshnger, Darren 3% 

Esslinger. Mark 432 

Esslinger, Starrlene 142. 384 

Eta Kappa Nu 115 

Eubank. Doug 91, 350 

Eubanks, Megan 330 

Evans, Claudette 93, 384 

Evans, John 335 

Evans, Kevin 432 

Evans, Lisa 162 

Evans, Peggy 327 

Evans, Ranita 126, 432 

Everett, Christina 107 

Everisl, Rob 432 

Ewert, Kurt 358 

Ewert, Sylvia 414 

Eyer, Karen 320 



9 



rabina, Joseph 342 

Faculty Senate 115 

Fagerberg, Stacy 104,432 

Fails, Bruce 396 

Fairbum, Laurie 108 

Fairchild. Matthew 130, 313 

Fairchild, Terry 389 

Falk, Michael 100 

Falk, Nancy 432 

Fallon, Veronica 298 

Fangman, Joe 97,432 

Fangman, Joseph 295 

Fankhauser, Annette 89, 432 

Fankhauser, Dacia 330 

Fantauzzi, Rafael 155 

Farmer, John 280 

Farr, Heather 416 

Farrai, Rania 98 

Farrell, Sheila 93,95,98 

Farris, Mathew 355 

Farris, Sara 305 

Fasse, Brenda 292, 377 

Fasse, Kaye 294 

Fatemi, Ali 115 

Faubion, Amy 320 

Faulkender, Jeff 311 

Faulkner, Daniel 417 

Faunce, Kimberly 288, 389 

Faunce, Troy 432 



Faurot, Judy 126 

Fedde, Bruce 128 

Fell, Mary 377 

Feinberg. Lynn 96 

Feiring, Robert 132, 165, 295 

Feldhausen, Scott 432 

Feldkamp, Kathy 432 

Fellers, Chris 313 

Felts, Chnstopher 432 

Fenske, Sheila 282 

Fensiermacher, Pamela 354,417 

Fenton, Ixiri 285 

Fenton, Robert 98, 107, 340, 346 

Ferguson. Alan 115, 400 

Ferguson, David 317 

Ferguson, Robert 432 

Ferguson, Rocky 432 

Fernkopf. Vicki 89, 318, 432 

Ferrell. Traci 432 

Ferrin. Brian 389 

Ferrin, Gregg 432 

Fey, David 335 

Fey, Elizabeth 432 

Feyerharm, William 132 

Feyh, Marc 432 

Feyh, Richard 290 

Fibelkom, Paul 396 

Fief, Gregory 96, 107,433 

Fiegenschuh, Ronald 433 

Field, Harry 91 

Field, Ralph 138 

Fielder . Jana 345 

Fields, Deborah 104, 159, 305, 318 

Fields, Oren 371 

Fieldson, Kristin 433 

Fieldson , Tom 433 

Fieser, James 333 

Figurski. Michael 98 

Filby, Matthew 396 

Fincher, Dana 305 

Finley, Byron 93, % 

Finley , David 433 

Finley, Larry 138,433 

Firmegan, Michael 95, 115 

Finnell, Marcia 320 

Finnesy, Kathleen 433 

Finney, Ryan 244, 245, 396 

Fiolkoski, Alan 344 

Fiolkoski, Eric 107, 344 

Firestone, David 389 

Fiscella, James 204,433 

Fischer, David 126, 130, 169,433 

Fischer, Elaine 384 

Fischer, Karen 107, 308 

Fischer, Kay 305 

Fischer, Mark 107,433 

Fischer, Scott 317 

Fiser, Douglas 355 

Fiser, Mike 355 

Fisher, Abe 317 

Fisher, Brian 117 

Fisher, Eleanor 285 

Fisher, Glen 117,290 

Fisher, James 96 

Fisher, John 108 

Fisher, Kay 96 

Fisher, Lisa 142, 159, 318, 384 

Fisher, Pamela 433 

Fisher, Richard 401 

Fisher, Ricky 344 

Fite, Lori 108, 110 

Fitzgerald, Timothy 108, 350 

Fix, Christie 433 



Flaheny. Roberta 163 

Flanagan, Kathy 318,433 

Flanders, Kimberly 417 

Heeker, Chnstine 384 

Fleming, Debra 407 

Fleming, Esther 433 

Fleming, Paul 396 

Fleming, Rex 433 

Fleming, Ronnie 91, 433 

Fleming, Steven 433 

Flick. Juliann 285 

Flickinger, Pam 155, 302, 433 

Fliginger, Anthony 344 

Flinchbaugh, Barry 115 

Flook, Lisa 366 

Flora, Cornelia 115 

Flora, Jan 115 

Flowers, Carolyn 433 

Flughoft, Lori 433 

Flynn, Ruth 282 

Foil, Mary 292 

Foley, Ericka 157 

Foley, Greg 295 

Folger, Lisa 285 

Folk, Douglas 121,433 

Folkerts, Lori 433 

Follis, Catherine 325 

Folmer, Kurt 363 

Food Science Club 115 

Foote, Barbara 126,433 

Ford, Angela 246, 320, 364 

Ford, Melinda 320 

Ford, Norman 433 

Fore, Nancy 314 

Forestry Club 115 

Foret, Irene 433 

Forgy, Mary 433 

Forrer. Chris 358 

Forrer, Leanne 138, 285 

Forrest, Kimberly 433 

Forslund, Kim 96,318,433 

Forsl, Donna 433 

Forster, William 389 

Fortner, Janet 330 

Foster, Alan 91, 389 

Foster, Anne 433 

Foster, Daniel 163, 334 

Foster, Kenneth 344 

Foster, Mary 384 

Foster, Matthew 433 

Foster, Samuel 315 

Foster, Steven 3% 

Foth, Carla 433 

Fountain, Dawn 433 

Fountain, Julie 331 

Fouser, Todd 338 

Fonts, Kim 316 

Fowler, Curt 344 

Fowler, Elizabeth 308 

Fowler, George 433 

Fowler, Greg 433 

Fowler, Wes 396 

Fowler, Rhonda 379 

Fox, Bret 295 

Fox, Debbie 325 

Fox, Diane 389 

Fox, Kenneth 104, 115 

Fox, Todd 371 

Fox, William 433 

Fragale, Christine 308, 364 

Frain, Jerry 432 

Francis, Christopher 433 

Francis, Leslie 163, 



Dill Kiesau, Fort Riley, spent 
his day off suntanning on top of 
his car at Pillsbury Crossing. 
(Photo by Scot Monissey) 



Francka, Tammy 433 

Frank, Cindy 285 

Frank, Kimberly 298 

Frank, Rise 107, 157, 331, 336 

Frank, Stephanie 282, 341 

Franken, Laurence 350 

Franken, William 350 

Frankenberg, Edward 344 

Frankenfeld, Beth 305, 322 

Franklin, Michael 353 

Franz, Kimberly 433 

Franzen, Thomas 115, 295 

Eraser, Julie 433 

Frashier, L^ura 325 

Frazier, Phil 107 

Fredrickson, Julie 96, 384 

Fredrickson, Ken 401 

Freeby , Diane 433 

Freed, Robert 433 

Freeman, Rhonda 282 

Freeman, Robert 128 

Freise,Jon 142,389 

French, Allen 433 

French, Kamela 384 

Freichs, Kent 91, 100 

Frerker, Duane 89,433 

Freshnock, John 371 

Freund, Jon 93, 115 

Frey, Dana 417 

Fn, Basil 130 

Frick, John 96, 433 

Fnck, Julie 107,347 

Frick, Pam 433 

Frickson, Cindy 345 

Friedman, Eugene 115 

Friedrich, William 315 

Frieling, Kent 301 

Frieman, Jerome 115 

Fries, Cynthia 322,345.433 

Friesen, Dean 126, 159 

Friesen, Kenlee 396 

Fness, Kelly 417 

Frisbie, Mark 100, 317 

Fritsch. Becky 434 

Fritton, Joseph 128,434 

Frohardt, Mark 396 

Fromm, Kirk 353 

Fronce, Todd 280 

Frost, Bert 166, 368 

Fry, Phillip 128, 389 

Fry,Roben 96 

Frye, Robin 110 

Fuhrman, Charles 128,434 

Fuhrman, John 311 

Fulk, Barbara 89, 379 

Fuller, Jane 138 

Fuller, Jayne 434 

Fuller,John 368 

Fuller, Shannon 98, 325, 354 

Fullmer, Christopher 401 

Funderburgh, Martha 104 

Funk, Layne 303 

Funk, Sandy 100,434 

Funk, Tami 298 

Funkhouser, Sara 104, 105 

Furey, Celeste 100 

Furry, Mark 434 

Futrell, Sharon 434 

Fyfe, Jill 308 




Gabel, Ursula 434 

Gabler, FriU 147 

Gabriel, David 434 

Gaffney, Leslie 130, 169,434 

Gaffney, Michael 434 

Gagliano, Rachele 298, 352 

Gailliard, Kenneth 147 

Gaines, Michelle 282 

Galbraith, Dan 313 

Galbraith, Jennifer 407 

Galbreath, Elizabeth 377 

Gale, Wayne 396 

Galey, Deanna 325, 362 

Gallagher, Leanne 417 

Gallagher, Michelle 434 

Gallagher, Richard 115 

Gallagher, Patrick 342 

Gallagher, Susan 107 

Galle, Terrie 100, 291, 434 

Gallegos, Gonzalo 358 

Galvin, Kimberly 93, 417 

Galyardt, Mark 159, 338 

Gamble, Don 407 

Gamble. Jeffrey 100,434 



r 



469 




Gamma Theta Upsilon 117 

Gammcll. Jennifer 345, 384 

Gampher. Gary 163. 434 

Ganesh, Kittur 155, 434 

Gann, Amy 298 

Gantz, Paige 305 

Garber, Tresa 314 

Garcia, Michelle 377 

Garcia, Thomas 95 

Gard, Jessica 147, 434 

Gardiner, Ganh 89, 100, 317 

Gardner, Britt 155 

Gardner, Carol 142 

Gardner, Robert 133, 280 

Gardner, Scott 389 

Gareis, Cathy 165, 434 

Garey, Ginna 282 

Garinger, Linda 434 

Gamer, James 401 

Gamer, Megan 95 

Garrett, Laura... 142. 157, 159, 165, 331 

Garrison, James 96, 290 

Garvert.Kay 96.292.327 

Garwick. Heidi 347 

Gary. Andrea 434 

Gaskill. Brent 303 

Gasper, Carl 155 



Gasser, Timothy 155 

Gast, Lisa 281, 308 

Gates, James 338 

Gatschet, Fred 117 

Gau, Richard 95 

Gaudreau, Steve 338 

Gaumer, Douglas 363 

Gaylord, Jeffrey 434 

Gebhart, Andrew 355 

Gee, William 351 

Geier, Carla 434 

Geier, Dana 96. 107. 163.434 

Geise. Tamara 434 

Geiser. Cheri 115 

Geisert.Ted 168. 169 

Gellenthien. Tom 338 

Gely, Gilda 434 

Gengler, Galen 91,434 

Gensch, Kimberly 281, 347 

Gensemer, Kendra 308 

Gentry, Deanne 147 

Gentry, Kathleen 95, 305 

George. Brad 358 

George, Carolyn 147 

George, Daniel 98 

George, Darin 95, 163 

George, Dee 434 



George, Dee Anna 434 

George. Deeann 407 

George. Kim 345 

George. Margena 291. 379 

George. Paula 108. 147. 379 

Gerdes. Cheryl 128. 142.417 

Gerhardt, Timothy 301 

German, Christine 434 

German, Stacia 298 

Gertsner, Damian 434 

Gewecke, James 401 

Gfeller, Ron 315 

Gianakon. Thomas 434 

Gibbs. Glenn 91 

Gibbs. Pete 128 

Gibson. Brent 434 

Gibson, Dan 86 

Gibson. Hugh 95. 121. 163 

Gibson. Monica 377 

Gibson. Paul 434 

Gibson. Weston 295 

Gieber. Karlene 1 10. 327 

Giebler. Galen 110 

Giebler. Susan 288 

Giefer. Maria 377 

Giefer. Thomas 91.434 

Gier. Donna 434 



With little regard for personal 
comfort, a loyal K-State fan 
braves the cold and rain in KSU 
Stadium to watch the 'Cats go 
down to defeat at the hands of 
North Texas State, 22-10. 
(Photo by Jeff A. Taylor) 



Giersch, Scott 363 

Giffm. Jeffrey 358 

Gilben. Darcy 132 

Gard. Jessica 147. 434 

Gardiner. Garth 89, 100. 317 

Gardner, Britt 155 

Gardner, Carol 142 

Gardner, Robert 133, 280 

Gardner, Scott 389 

Gareis, Cathy 165, 434 

Garey, Ginna 282 

Garinger, Linda 434 

Gamer, James 401 

Gamer, Megan 95 

Garrett, Laura... 142, 157, 159, 165, 331 

Garrison. James 96, 290 

Garvert.Kay 96.292,327 

Garwick, Heidi 347 

Gary , Andrea 434 

Gaskill, Brent 303 

Gasper, Carl 155 

Gasser, Timothy 155 

Gast, Lisa 281, 308 

Gales, James 338 

Gatschet, Fred 117 

Gau. Richard 95 

Gaudreau. Steve 338 

Gaumer. Douglas 363 

Gaylord. Jeffrey 434 

Gebhart. Andrew 355 

Gee, William 351 

Geier, Carla 434 

Geier, Dana 96, 107, 163,434 

Geise, Tamara 434 

Geiser, Cheri 115 

Geisert.Ted 168. 169 

Gellenthien. Tom 338 

Gely. Gilda 434 

Gengler, Galen 91, 434 

Gensch, Kimberly 281, 347 

Gensemer, Kendra 308 

Gentry, Deanne 147 

Gentry, Kathleen 95, 305 

George, Brad 358 

George, Carolyn 147 

George, Daniel 98 

George, Darin 95, 163 

George, Dee 434 

George, Deeann 407 

George, Kim 345 

George, Margena 291, 379 

George, Paula 108, 147,379 

Gerdes, Cheryl 128, 142, 417 

Gerhardt, Timothy 301 

German, Christine 434 

German, Stacia 298 

Gertsner, Damian 434 

Gewecke, James 401 

Gfeller, Ron 315 

Gianakon, Thomas 434 

Gibbs, Glenn 91 

Gibbs, Pete 128 

Gibson, Brent 434 

Gibson. Dan 86 

Gibson. Hugh 95, 121, 163 

Gibson, Monica 377 

Gibson, Paul 434 

Gibson, Weston 295 

Gieber, Karlene 110. 327 

Giebler, Galen 110 

Giebler, Susan 288 

Giefer, Maria 377 

Giefer. Thomas 91. 434 

Gier. Donna 434 

Giersch. Scott 363 

Giffin. Jeffrey 358 

Gilbert. Darcy 132 

Gilbert. Timothy 434 

Giles. Robert 353 

Gillam. Shelly 302. 305 

Gillen.Mark 434 

Gillespie. Elaine 121.314.434 

Gillespie. Jonathon 434 

Gilley. Jodie 155. 389 

Gilliam. Kathy 320 

Gillmore. Donna 100.434 

Gilner. Joan 384 

Giltner. Rocky 147 

Ginler. Teri 305,364 

Ginther, Damon 363 

Ginther, David 368 

Girrens, Tamara 407 

Gish, Dan 280 

Gish. Lisa 308 

Gitaiga, Kabura 434 

Gittemeier, Liesa 309 

Gladbach, Ann 96. 142, 296, 320 

Gladow, David 396 

Glantz, Wayne 412 

Glanville, Dixie 91, 434 

Glaser, Curtis 91,95, 108,434 

Glass, Mark 313 

Gleason, Mary 142, 159,434 

Gleason, Steven 100,434 

Gleissner, Diane 95. 281. 282 

Glenn. Belinda 155,417 

Glenn. Denise 377 



Glenn. Jennifer 3 

Glennon. Karen i) 

Glessner. Judy 4 



Click. Kevin 

Click. Pamela 

Glidewell, Andrena 

Glover, Bradley 

Glover, Mark 

Gnagey, Janet 13f 

Godby, Susan 5 

Goddard, David ^ 

Godfrey, Russell ; I 

Goebel, Traci 245 l< 

Goedecke , Susan. 

Goens, Michael 

Goering, Angela 292 

Goering , James 

Goering, Lisa 163 

Goering, Russell 

Goerke, Rhonda 

Goerke. Roger 132 

Goertzen. Scott 

Goetsch. Susan |li 

Goetz. Randy .3 

Goevert. Chris 1 

Goldberg. Judy 89, 165 i< 

Goldberg, Mark {;{ 

Goldberger . Joel 

Golden Key 

Golden Key Executive 

Golden , Randy 

Golightley , Janet 

Golladay , Susan 

Golway, Jennifer 288 

Gomez, Mary 

Gomez. Raymond 

Gonterman. William 

Gooch. Daniel 

Good. Craig 93.9e;.5 

Good. Katherine 13Ei.1 

Gooding. Chris 89 t 

Goodman. Bryan iS 

Goodman . Charles fll 

Goodwyn. Michael I -J 

Gooldy. Jane 5 

Goraish. Murtada * 

II 

« 
■2 
15 
S 
5 
7 

S 
7 



Gordon. Bradley 

Gordon, Scott A 108 

Gordon, Scott C 91 

Gordon, Todd 

Gore, David 

Gorham, Jill 138 

Gorman, Anthony 

Gorman, Karen 

Gorson, Scott 

Gose, Stan 

Gottsch , Janice 

Gottschalk, Bill 

Gonschalk, Maribeth.. 57, 121, 138, 
331 

Gottschalk, Mark 

Gouldie, Shawn 117 

Govert .Alice 

Graber, Bryan 

Graber , Charles 

Graber, Gayle 

Graber, Julie 318 

Graber, Kenton 

Graber, Kevin 56 

Graber, Sandra 

Gradwohl, Laura 

Graef , Robin 

Graff,Deidre [2 

Graff, William 91 6 

Graham, Amy 7 

Graham, Bryan i3 

Graham, Danielle [7 

Graham, David 5 

Graham, Rob 

Graham, Rodger 

Graham, Ronald 

Graham, Steven 93 

Graham, Thomas 5 

Grain Science and Industry Club.. 7 

Granger, Raina '5 

Grant, Jane 299 1 4 

Grant, Julie j5 

Grant, Tina ;5 

Gravenstein, Rhonda 5 

Graves, Brittany i 

Graves, Delton 110. 112, 113 2 

Gray. John A 5 

Gray. John S 5 

Gray, Kaihy 345 5 

Gray, Tray [1 

Greathouse, Cindy [1 

Green, Andrew V- 

Green, David P 

Green, Diane p 

Green, Jeff '' 

Green, Jolene ^ 

Green, Kent ' 

Green, Lori ,5 

Green, Lyndon i^ 

Green, Robert 89/5 

Green, Todd l' 

Greene, Amy ' 



Greene, Tanda 343 

Greenlee, Diana 89, 130 5 

Greenlee, Wayne [ 

Greer, David ^ 

Greer, Raymond ^ 

Jregg, Ann ' 

Gregg, Brian ' 

Gregoriew, Lisa 327. ,i 

Gregory, Robert 130,358 ji 

Gridley, Brad j> 

Griebai, Rebecca 108,1' 

Grieg, Jim f 

Grier, Donald 1 

Grier, Kurt 

Grieve, Clinton 130, 

Griffin. Glenda 



i- 



470 



Index^ 



riffin, Ji!l 435 

riffin, Jon 389 

riffin, Monte 104 

riffin, Nancy 314, 384 

riffin, Susan 138 

riffith, Deeann 97.299 

riffith, Kyle 130 

riffith, Michael 107 

riffith. Scott 407 

■rimm, Brian 96. 98 

rimm, Denise 377 

rimer, Ted 91. 290 

riswell, Lisa 389 

ritten, Gretchen 104. 138,389 

res, Mark 361 

rosh. Dons 128 

■osko. Heather 282, 343 

■OSS, Damn 344 

■oss, Jeannie 435 

•OSS, Michael %. 121. 142. 163 

ossenbacher. ISouglas 315 

osshan. Lena 435 

oth. Scon 107. 371 

oth, Stephan 371 

eves. Lisa 362 

ow. Kevin 89 

uenbacher. Dana 110. 142. 317 

uenbacher. Dave 110.435 

uenbacher. Don 317 

idenkauf. Debra 434 

enther. Caria 435 

ffey. Craig 91,435 

ffey, Paula 435 

glieimino. Maria 435 

hr, Glenn 104 

illiams. Caroline 345 

islain, Anne 377 

islam, Yvette 98, 126.435 

Ixisen, Karyn 327 

lick, Roscoe 335 

llickson, Christine 331 

nther, David 121. 435 

rither. Stacey 435 

rither. Trevor 396 

aya, Joseph 435 

rwell, Michael 355 

hrie. Bryan 363 

Jirie, Manin 117.412 

hrie. Vincent 155.436 

ierrez. Juanita 121. 381 

/ton. Darren 157 

|in. Brenda 347 

in. Marcie 305. 362 



^ 



1 ir. Heather 142, 411 

l,,e, David 301 

I ;e. Suzanne 282 

l,:rer, Keri 436 

I :rer. Rudy 436 

I'ger. Julie 389 

I ger, Margarene 290, 292 

Kienberger, Susan 436 

l.unsky, Kathryn 436 

fiimeister, Diane 389 

>ieron, John 435 

hley, Laura 352 

1- ney. Jeanne 98 

f ock, Todd 295 

!• ipanayis, Paraskevi 436 

K :r. Tommy 436 

!■ inger, Lynne 366 

I- ler. Kevin 89 

Hr, Sherry 138 

^ dom, Teresa 89, 100, 142, 436 

^ I, Julie 325 

k meister. Brian 436 

k 1. Bridget 325 

k.n, Gretchen 159.325 

Blr.Sherri 121.282 

H.ard. Janell 91.95.299 

H lan. Kayla 132. 138 

Hjs, Lorraine 138. 305 

H|ine. Andria 138. 288 

Hian. Kathryn 281. 309 

Hi Mary 101,436 

H n, Philip 344 

Nman. Teena 436 

f Angela 306 

H Lisa 110.389 

H Michael 436 

N Adina 98 

jj Greg 363 

N: lames 91 

Merry 436 

J'Lott 280 

"Monte 110. 3% 

Hi^atalie 377 

N'Rod 401 

[j er. Terry 104, 107, 159 

J|er, Von 368 

J, er, Terry 363 

™|. Chris 436 

J 'ell. Shawn 436 

j! George 115 

Ji Philip 333 

J neh. Dima 98 

"rneh. Rama 98 



Hambrugh. Robert 436 

Hamilton, Kyle 126. 331. 372 

Hamilton. Lana 377 

Hamilton. Lynette 291. 389 

Hamilton. Melinda 96. 372. 384 

Hamilton, Rustin 89, 436 

Hamilton, Scon 315 

Hamm, Alicia 157 

Hamm, Sharon 318,436 

Hammarlund. Raymond 107. 344 

Hammeke, Loreen 417 

Hammer. Lana 89. 91. 138. 379 

Hammers. William 436 

Hammersley. William 436 

Hammes, Deborah 4436 

Hammes. Greg 313 

Hammond. Denise 336.436 

Hammond. Diana 369.436 

Hammond, Scon 436 

Han, Chew 95. 121. 155 

Hanauer. Steven 436 

Hanchen. Michelle 377 

Handle. Lisa 384 

Hanefeld. Linda 288 

Hanes. Randy 142. 143 

Haney. Ann 341 

Hankins. Andrea 384 

Hanley. Pete 340 

Hanna. Julie 288 

Hanna. Pani 347 

Hannan. Pani 436 

Hannawalt. Dawn 325 

Hanners. Scon 436 

Hanrahan. Patrick 351 

Hansen. Claire 288 

Hansen, Roben 389 

Hansen, Rodney 412 

Hansen, Ron 436 

Hansen, Ronald 93, 436 

Hansen, Wayne 396 

Hanson, Jane 157. 222. 366 

Hanson, Margo 366 

Hanson, Robin 359 

Hanson, Teresa 128 

Hanzlick, Charlene 377 

Hapner, Thomas 436 

Harbers, Galen 169,436 

Harbers, Leniel 108 

Hardan, Darryl 407 

Harden, Gary 1 10 

Hardenbarger, Clay 96 

Hardenburger, Charles 301 

Hardesty, Jennifer 436 

Hare, David 142 

Hargin, Martha 436 

Harkins, Phoebe 282 

Harman, Janet 384 

Harmison, Angela 138, 288 

Harms, Chad 436 

Harms, Dana 107, 331 

Harms, David 100, 101 

Harms, Rolf 436 

Hamden. Robin 98, 138. 283. 292 

Harrelson. Shawn 286, 436 

Harris, Brenda 377 

Harris, David K 436 

Harris. David W 91, 363 

Harris. Gregory 436 

Harris, Lynn 352 

Harris, Mary 101, 113 

Hams, Michelle 121, 436 

Harris, Peggie 436 

Hams, Richard 108, 121, 169, 373 

Harris, Steve 100, 128 

Harris, Tammy 327 

Harrison, Eric 355 

Harrison, Paige 206, 436 

Harrison, Rex 290 

Harshberger, Gary 436 

Han, Carl 436 

Hart, Christina 436 

han, Connie 115 

Hart, Nick 115 

Hart, James 126 

Hart, Renee 115 

Hart, Shelly 436 

Hanensiein, Gena 309 

Haner, Stanley 436 

Haner, Therese 98 

Hartley, Amy 306, 369 

Hartman. David 344 

Hanman. Diane 436 

Hartman. Jack 255 

Hartter. Eric 315 

Hartter. Scon 315 

Haruler. Laurie 384 

Harvey. Crystal 288 

Harvey. Jeffrey 351 

Harvick. Brad 401 

Harwick. Kirsten 299. 364 

Harwood. Chrissy 437 

Harzman, Brenda 142, 294 

Haskin, Cathy 104. 130.437 

Hassan. Filza 325. 341 

Hassan, Rima 341 

Hassed, John 437 

Hasselman, Sheila 291,437 

Hassouneh. Khaled 437 

Hastert. Thomas 344 

Hatcher. Nick 368 

Hatchett. Sabra 437 

Hattrup, Deanna 437 

Hartrtip. Tammy 155.437 

Haub. Stephanie 389 

Hauff. Shelly 100, 115,283.364 

Haug. Elsie 291 

Haug. Gregory 340 

Haughton. Stephanie 147 

Haulmark. Gary 396. 397 

Haun, Jodi 306 

Hauschel. Thomas 91 

Hausfeld, Regina 157, 389 

Haul. Kendra 314,407 



Havel, John 98 

Havel, Monte 437 

Havens. Harold 163.437 

Havens, Kelly 437 

Haverkamp, Diane 437 

Haverkamp, Douglas 91 

Haverkamp, Janet 437 

Haverkamp, Justin 437 

Haverkamp, Rod 396 

Hawari, Hisham 98, 110, 121,437 

Hawkins, James 401 

Hawkins, Lydee 384 

Hayden, Christa 437 

Hayden, Deborah 331 

Hayden, Frederick 344 

Hayes, Deborah 437 

Hayes, Gina 377 

Hayes, Michael 313 

Haymaker. Thomas 368 

Haynes. Josephine 437 

Hays. Jennifer 120. 341. 389 

Hays. Patrick 407 

Hays. Robert 194, 401 

Hayter, Sheila 79, 347 

Hazzard, Elizabeth 381 

Headley, Clayton 355 

Headrick, Gary 169, 293 

Heady, Kent 138, 142,401 

Heam, Kelly 437 

Hearson, Tracy 361 

Heath, Matthew 303 

Heathman, Gary 437 

Heaton, Kristi 283 

Heberiy, Robin 292 

Heben, Diana 352 

Hedrich, Alan 389 

Hedrick, Janelte 93, 286 

Hedrick, Nancy 437 

Heeter, Leslie 437 

Hefley, Joan 299 

Heflin, Ruth 437 

Hefner, Sherri 377 

Hefty, Keith 437 

Hegarty, Anne 206, 320 

Heger, Manin 110, 128 

Heger, Patricia 294 

Hegwald, Danny 96 

Held, George 91, 159,290 

Heidebrecht, Christopher 93 

Heidebrecht, John 363 

Heidebrecht, Melissa 347 

Heidrick, Jeri 108, 438 

Heier. John 155. 396 

Heier. Kim 366 

Heier, Michael 438 

Heilman, Lori 321. 345 

Heiman. Jerod 361 

Heiman. Jon 91, 438 

Heimer, Mark 121, 157,355 

Heimerman, Renee 138, 283. 316 

Heimerman. Rochell 306 

Heinen. Gregory 163.438 

Heinetz. Rick 438 

Heinrich. Amy 366 

Heinrichs, Kyle 333 

Heinz, Carrie 352 

Heinz, Kecia 345, 389 

Heinz, Ken 104 

Heinze, Mark 355 

Heise. Dale 293 

Heise. James 115. 293 

Heit. Jeff 440 

Heitmeyer. Richard 96, 142. 438 

Held. Jon 161 

Helffrich. Melissa 438 

Helgesen. Robert 115 

Heller. Andre 407 

Heller. Douglas 311 

Hellmer. Marci 377 

Helmke. Carrie 325 

Helus. Ron 396 

Heman, Lance 401 

Hembrey, Douglas 155 

Hemeyer, Gary 401 

Hemmen. Daniel 438 

Hemmer. Thomas 368 

Hemmen, Kyle 438 

Hemmy, Ron 130, 340 

Hemphill, Amy 157, 438 

Henderson, Shelly 138 

Henderson, Timothy 295 

Henderson, William 342 

Hendrickson, Ann 438 

Hendnckson, Ronald 169,438 

Hendrickson, Stephen 401 

Henisey ,Lauri 438 

Henkel, Craig 437 

Henn, William 407 

Henne, Karia 384 

Henning, Doug 89, 155 

Henning, Jack 438 

Henning, Timothy 126 

Henry, Eric 317 

Henry, Kendall 401 

Henry, Mark 438 

Henry, Shari 98, 384 

Hensley, Dave 130 

Hensley, Jeana 347 

Henson, James 335 

Henson, Lynda 133 

Henson, Mitchell 344 

Henton, Aaron 163, 165,438 

Henton, Ken 438 

Henton, Wanda 142 

Herb, Michael 438 

Herbel, Delayne 438 

Herbic, Clinton 313 

Herbster, David 317 

Herd, Chadley 438 

Herdman, Michelle 389 

Herdman, Wendy 389 

Herke, Marsha 364 

Herl, Michelle 321, 364 



Herman, Ann 321 

Herman, Cynthia 389 

Herman, Kristina 438 

Herman, Shelly 314 

Herman, Roxanne 347 

Hermes, Joel 98 

Hern, Sandra 147,438 

Herpich. Janet 100 

Herring. Charles 130. 

Herring. Susan 117 

Herrington. Todd 438 

Henel, Drew 104. 107, 126, 132, 315 

Hervey, Melissa 438 

Herz, Mark 91 

Heskamp, Carolyn 438 

Heskamp, Jeffrey 438 

Hess, Charlene 302, 384 

Hess, Chris 89 

Hess, Christine 407 

Hess, David 438 

Hess, George 315 

Hessini, Pat 194, 195 

Hesterman , Terry 438 

Hetrick, Karen 345 

Hettenbach, Bart 128.438 

Heninger, Barbara 414 

Heninger, Linda 417 

Henwer, Lisa 117, 321 

Hewin, Mark 91 

Hey, Susan 115, 157, 283 

Heycock. Stacy 438 

Hickel. Gregory 438 

Hickey. Colin 411 

Hicklin, Wallace 311 

Hickman, Kim 306 

Hiegen, Brenda 100 

Higbee, Helene 286, 372 

Higdon, Melinda 128, 438 

Higgason, James 368 

Higgason, Julie 309, 369 

Higgason, Scon 368 

Higgins, David 124,438 

Higgins, James 280 

Higgins, Janie 142 

Higgins, Kayala 407 

Higgins, Matthew 438 

Higgwe,Tony 438 

Hight, Becky 132, 347 

Hightower. Russ 407 

Hightower. Ray 157 

Hildebrand. Janell 318. 414 

Hill. Brent 98.438 

Hill. Brock 396 

Hill. George 407 

Hill. James 359 

Hill. John 93. 104, 159, 317 

Hill, Kris 325 

Hill, Nancy 331 

Hill, Richard 438 

Hill, Steve 293 

Hilliard, Michael 52, 53,407 

Hilton, Eric 438 

Hinderer, Vicki 299 

Hinderiiter, Lynnerte 414 

Hinderliter, Russell 438 

Hines, Brian 100, 317 

Hingorani, Rajiv 155 

Hinkel, Larry 351 

Hinkin, Matthew 438 

Hinkle, Caner 438 

Hinkle, Cheryl 438 

Hinkle, Katherine 390 

Hinkle, Melissa 438 

Hinkle, Wanda 377 

Hinman, Gina 388 

Hinman, Jana 309, 372 

Hinshaw, Beth 91, 384 

Hinshaw, Mary 165, 438 

Hipp, CarIa 316, 366 

Hipsher, Pany 56, 107 

Hise, James 313 

Hittle, Shona 331 

Hoang, Binh 169 

Hoang, Huyentram 169 

Hobbs, Kara 438 

Hobbs, Kim 438 

Hoch, Eric 115 

Hoch, Kimberiy 95, 130,439 

Hochman, Kevin 396 

Hockersmith, Justin 333 

Hodge, Kelly 439 

Hodges, Diane 96, 377 

Hodges, Lynene 126, 286 

Hodges, Michelle 439 

Hodgson, Jeffery 439 

Hoenscheidt, James 280 

Hofer, Barry 117, 371 

Hofer, Kimberiy 336 

Hofer, Scon 371 

Hoferer, Benie 347 

Hoffhines, Stefeni 347, 364 

Hoffman, Lisa 377 

Hoffman, Nancy 417 

Hoffman, Sally 291, 366, 439 

Hofmann, Jamie 281 

Hofmann, Jill 325 

Hogan, Kristi 309, 352 

Hogen, John 439 

Hoggan, Kelly 345, 366 

Holcomb. Carol 115 

Hoik. Boyd 412 

Hoik. Christine 414 

Hollander. Edward 165 

Holle, Brenda 439 

Holle, Brian 107, 157 

Holle. Cheryl 142, 439 

Holle, Earl 132,301 

Holle, Evelyn 132, 327 

Hollem, Karen 100,417 

Holley. Amanda 274, 275,439 

Holliday, David 89, 317 

Holliday, Leif 439 

Hollis, Denise 288, 345 



Holloway, Michael 401 

Holmes, Joseph 439 

Holmes, Kathy 91, 95 

Holmes, Kaye 104,439 

Holmes, Layne 147, 396 

Holmes, Paul 401 

Holmstrom, Steven 361 

Holt, Holly 309 

Holt, Jeanie 377 

Holt, Robin 157,407 

Holthaus, Debra 91 

Holthaus, Bill 93 

Holz, Larry 290 

Holzrichter, James 301 

Home Ec. College Council 119 

Home Ec. Education Interest Group.... 
119 

Hommertzheim. Tanya 306 

Honeyman. Lori 100.439 

Honeyman. Marshall 340 

Honig, Kay 318 

Honig. Robin 142,439 

Honigs, Paul 132 

Honomichl , Angela 439 

HonomichI, Kevin 96, 107, 130, 163, 390 

Hoober, Mark 351 

Hoobler, Debbie 439 

Hood, Steven 130 

Hoogenakker, Melinda 347 

Hooks, Benjamin 63, 72 

Hoop, Stephanie 347 

Hooper, J. L 439 

Hooper, Marcia 439 

Hoops, Kevin 169 

Hoover, Anne 98, 138, 283 

Hoover, Annene 147, 379 

Hoover. Jeanne 302 

Hoover. Jeannie 390 

Hoover. Michelle 414 

Hoover. Rhonda 299 

Hoover. Sandra 379 

Hoover. Scon 355 

Hope. William 355 

Hopkins. Adrian 96. 439 

Hopkins, Craig 100, 396 

Hoppe, Fred 159 

Horak, Terry 89 

Horigan. Julie 325 

Hormel, Mitchel 110 

Horn. Kyle 344 

Horn, Mamie 138. 336. 366 

Horn. Sharisse 362. 390 

Homberger. Jason 396 

Homer. William 115 

Homung, Bart 439 

Horsch. Anthony 439 

Horsch. Daniel 311 

Horticulture Therapy Club 119 

Honon. Luann 439 

Honon. Myra 439 

Honon. Troy 295 

Honung. Robert 447 

Hoskms, Mark 130. 396 

Hoss. Dan 363 

Hosstetter. Franc 105 

Houck. Cindy 95 

Houck. Jimmy 439 

Houdasheli. Richard 344 

House. Elizabeth 309, 352 

House, Ronald 128, 439 

Houston, Michelle 336, 366 

Howard. Brikan 390 

Howard . Gayle 417 

Howard. Phillip 169 

Howard. Rebecca 302, 417 

Howard. Susan 91, 379 

Howard. Trevor 351 

Howe, Sherry 439 

Howell. Amy 299 

Howell. Bryan 89 

Howell. Kimberiy 439 

Howell. Mary 390 

Howenon. Lesli 384 

Hoyt. Michelle 439 

Hrabe. Lisa 91, 439 

Hruban, Janette 163 

Huaman , Antonio 439 

Huang, Suzanna 147 

Hubbard, Kathleen 439 

Huber, Christian 439 

Huber, Linda 439 

Huck, Darin 147 

Hucke, Paula 439 

Huddleston, Linda 369,384 

Hudhud, Ahmed 98 

Hudlin, Jeffrey 412 

Huechieman, Michael 132, 155 

Huffman, Barbara 115, 138,390 

Hufford, Margaret 327 

Huggins, Barbara 384 

Huggins, Guy 157 

Hughbanks, Linda 439 

Hughbanks, Janell 439 

Hughes, David 439 

Hughes, George 296 

Hughes, Jeffery 401 

Hughes, Tyson 104, 439 

Hull, Jackie 362. 390 

Hull. Kristi 345 

Hull. Troy 2% 

Hullman, Doug 396 

Hulpieu. Gordon 163 

Hultgren. Jayne 325,336 

Hultman. Bret 290 

Hummel. Karen 155 

Hummel. Roger 104,290 

Hummell, Brian 368 

Hummell. Lorraine 384 

Hummels, Jill 108. 439 

Hummer, Hans 303 

Hummer, John 107, 163,303 

Humphrey, Kevin 174, 373 

Hund, Angela 299 



4dex 



J 



471 




Hundley. Barton 175 

Hundley, Jody 407 

Huneycutt, Teresa 379 

Hungate, Jason 289 

Hungerford, Linda 306 

Hunt, Dianna 439 

Hum, Melvin 158, 159 

Hum, Paul 381 

Hum, Terry 439 

Hunter, April 328 

Hunter, Barry 439 

Hunter, Christine 147, 286 

Hunter, James 3 

Hunter, Kris 384 

Hupe, Penny 289 

Hurlbut, Andrea 390 

Hurst, Amy 157, 336 

Hurtig, James 157, 371 

Huser, Troy 439 

Huser, Vince 359 

Hussein, Fayez 108, 110 

Hussein , Tammy 417 

Hutchcraft, Christina 407 

Hutchcraft, Dorothy 407 

Hutchcraft, Sherry 439 

Hutchcraft, Virgil 439 

Hutcheson, Jeffery 355 

Hutchins, Andrea 384 

Hutchison, Charles 91, 104, 439 

Hutchison, Ken 355 

Hutinett, Sheila 299 

Hutson, Jeffrey 439 

Hutton, Donald 440 

Hwang, Jean 440 

Hylton, Angela 104,440 

Hylton, Pamela 440 

Hymer, David 344 



J7 



lies, Alexander 1 10 

Imel, Helen 440 

Imthum, Dan 290 

Imthum, Julie 117, 325 

Ingmire, Lori 286 

Innes, Kelly 355 

Innes, Meg 299 

Institute of Industrial Engineers.... 121 

Interfraternity Council 121 

Interfraternity &. Panhellenic Exec. 

Council 121 

International Club 121 

Intfen, Judith 417 

looss, Yvonne 157, 377 

Iraola, Miguel 440 

Irelan, Kaylynn 318 

Ireland, Robert 340 

Ireton, Matthew 368 

Irsik, Clarence 440 

Irvin, Carolyn 407 

Irwin, Janet 440 

Irwin John 390 

Irwin, Terri 283, 352 

Isaacson, Lisa 286 

Isch, Jeffrey 396 

Isch, Jody 314,331 

Isea, Stan 155 

Iseman, Ann 369, 377 

Isem, Deann 302 

Istas, Kevin 91, 104, 440 

Ivey, Brian 390 

Ivy, Suzanna 390 




Jaax, Todd 313 

Jaber, Khalil 98 

Jackman, Velma 440 

Jacks, Paul 371 

Jackson, Brett 351 

Jackson, Christopher 35 1 

Jackson, Duane 440 

Jackson, James 313 

Jackson, Lori 417, 418 

Jackson, Matthew 355 

Jackson, Michael.. 356 

Jackson, Susan 440 

Jackson, Thomas 301 

Jackson, Timothy 107 

Jackson, Wanda 440 

Jackson, Wametta 390 

Jacobs, Beth 314, 384 

Jacobsen, Joel 440 



Jacobson, David 96,440 

Jacobson, Lori 440 

Jacobson, Scott 359 

Jaderborg, Kevin 142 

Jaderborg, Mary Jo 95, 110, 157,306 

Jahnke, Bill 163 

Jakofcich, Joseph 440 

James, Bradley? 128 

James, Dana 385 

James, Derek 91, 318 

James, Karen 316, 321 

James, Kris 356 

James, Mark 96 

James, Myma 98, 321, 364 

James, Randy 91,440 

Jamison, Leigh 407 

Jamison, Michelle 138 

Janda, Audrey 157,440 

Janda, Kenneth 440 

Janda, Mark 335 

Janda, Steven 335 

Janne, Michel 407 

Janous, Denise 343 

Janssen, Kim 101 

Janzen, Jeffery 396 

Jardine, Christopher 440 

Jarren, David 115. 381 

Jarus, Amy 286 

Jarvi, James 342 

Jasper, John 121,401 

Jayo, Cecilia 1 55 

Jeffers, John 303 

Jeffery, Jennifer 440 

Jenia, John 390 

Jenkins, Bradly 303 

Jenkins, Richard 303 

Jennings, David 142 

Jennings, Dianne 130 

Jennings, Karen 289 

Jennings, Darren 396 

Jennings, Norman 338 

Jennings, Sheryl 96,440 

Jensby, Jeffrey 169,440 

Jensen, Dale 396 

Jensen, Dana 314 

Jensen, James 340 

Jensen, John 401 

Jensen, Kevin 163, 441 

Jermeier, Sara 33 1 

Jeske, Stewart 163, 441 

Jester, Alicia 441 

Jewell, Loma 104, 390 

Jilka, Kathryn 142, 441 

Jilka, Philip 342 

Jimenez, Marlene 126,408 

Jinge, Dooshima 441 

Joeriing, William 441 

Johanningmeier, Lynn 385 

Johannsen, Susan 417 

Johns, Joel 333 

Johnson, Amanda 159 

Johnson, Brad 117, 126,441 

Johnson, Brian 338 

Johnson, Catherine 165, 299 

Johnson, Dana 417 

Johnson, Daniel 169,441 

Johnson, David 95, 115, 163,373 

Johnson, Debby 417 

Johnson, Denise 314, 321 

Johnson, Edward 301 

Johnson, Eugene 147,441 

Johnson, Franklin 163,390 

Johnson, Frederick 401 

Johnson, Gerald 96, 126,441 

Johnson, Grant 104,290 

Johnson, James 126. 408 

Johnson, Jayme 441 

Johnson, Jeaneane 98, 114 

Johnson, Jennifer 283 

Johnson, Jerri 142, 441 

Johnson, Jessica 306 

Johnson, Jodi 44 1 

Johnson, Kelly 368 

Johnson, Kenneth 89, 290 

Johnson, Kevin 44 1 

Johnson, Kirk 368 

Johnson, Kirsten 309 

Johnson, Kristen 104, 331 

Johnson, Kurt 351 

Johnson, Laura 408 

Johnson, Linda 299 

Johnson, Lois 441 

Johnson, Mary 96,441 

Johnson, Michelle 309, 352 

Johnson, Paul 390 

Johnson, Phillip 359 

Johnson, Randy 441 

Johnson, Stephanie 289 

Johnson, Steven 56, 57, 318 

Johnson, Susan 417 

Johnson, Timothy 401 

Johnson, Troy 401 

Johnson, Veronica 121 

Johnson, William 356 

Johnston, Jennifer 362 

Johnston, Vincent 401 

Jones, Bethany 321 

Jones, Bryan 441 

Jones, Byron 160 

Jones, Charles 408 

Jones, Cynthia 441 

Jones, J.L 441 

Jones, Jacqueline 345, 390 

Jones, Jansy 441 

Jones, Jeffrey 363 

Jones, Jennifer Leah 325 

Jones, Jennifer Leigh 299 

Jones, Jimmy 157 

Jones, Katherine 93, 107, 336, 331 

Jones, Kerry 115, 159, 336, 366 

Jones, Kim 306 

Jones, Lawrence 86 

Jones, Lora 441 



Jones, Mark 107, 159, 356 

Jones, Michael A 96 

Jones, Michael D 142 

Jones, Patricia 138, 296, 328 

Jones, David 128 

Jones, Scott 95, 441 

Jones, Stephanie 296, 328 

Jones, Tina 441 

Jones, Travis 163 

Jordan, Brian 315 

Jordan, Mamie 331 

Jordan, Michelle 286 

Jorden, Ann 138, 299 

Jorgensen, Blake 91, 155 

Joms, Philip 301 

Joms, Tim 301 

Josserand, Larilee 441 

Josserand, Steven 441 

lost. Lance 390 

Joyce, Janet 328 

Joyce, Matthew 441 

Judge. Robert 441 

Judy. Jeff 351 

Julian, Rex 396 

Jumdt, Scott 89 

Jumean, Mouna 98 

Jundt, Scott 155, 301 

Jungk, Jeffery 390 

Junk, Martha 441 

Jurczak, James 313 

Jury, Scott 363 

Just, Wayne 401 

Justice, Eva 441 



3{ 



K-Laires 128 

K-State Judo Club 128 

K-State SaiUng Club 128 

Kadel, Erick 91, 104,441 

Kadel, Michael 303 

Kaeberle, Caria 441 

Kaemmer, Robert 441 

Kaff, Kevin 311 

Kahle, Kevin 396 

Kahler, James 344 

Kahler, Mark 441 

Kahn, Stacey 138, 299 

Kaiser, Michael 441 

Kalberer, Deann 281,286 

Kalivoda, Paula 377 

Kandt, Vicki 441 

Kane, Helen 379 

Kane, John 441 

Kane, Katherine 441 

Kanemasu, Richard 368 

Kansas State Engineering Magazine 

121 

Kansas State Rowing 126 

Kansas State Student Foundation... 126 
Kansas State Speech and Hearing 

Assoc 126 

Kansas State Engineering Technologists 
126 

Kappelmann, Kimberly 441 

Karam, Antoine 441 

Karim, Manjur 283 

Karpowich, Stephen 338 

Karr, Kelly 115, 379 

Karst, Doug 318 

Karst, Stacey 299 

Kasadha, Ruth 415 

Kastens, Diane 126 

Kaster, David 296 

Kaster, Floyd 89 

Katlin, Nancy 408 

Kats, Candace 292,385 

Katzer, Ronald 408 

Kaubisch, Oliver 130 

Kaufholz, Laura 441 

Kaufman, Jason 303 

Kaufman, Timothy 121, 363 

Kaufman, Tom 441 

Keane, Mark 390 

Kearney, Patricia 441 

Keast, Duane 441 

Keating, Christine 441 

Keating, Maria 377 

Keay, Elizabeth 441 

Kediger, Janet 302 

Keehn, Michael 441 

Keen. Cynthia 442 

Keener. Dara 130,291,381 

Keeney, Michael 442 

Keesecker, Michele 100,442 

Keesling, Julie 104, 142, 442 

Keeton, Victor 442 

Keever, Jill 417 

Kehm, David 442 

KeU, Ruth 442 

Keim, Robert 442 

Keimig, Scot 396 

Keims. Gregory 363 

Keith. John 303 

Keithley. Rickey 138 

Keithley. Susan 306 

Kellenberger. Art 397 

Keller. Jonna 101. 309 

Keller. Lisa 100.291,385 



Kellerman, Pat 356 

Kelley, Elizabeth 442 

Kelling, David 442 

Kelling, Elwood 138 

KeUing, Scott 442 

Kelly. Carolyn 321, 314 

Kelly, John 361 

KeUy, Daren 442 

KeUy, Kristin 377 

Kelly, Stephanie 299 

Kelly, Teresa 147, 379 

Kelpin, Dale 356 

Kelsey, Trenton 411 

Kelso, Jane 442 

Kelso, Michael 401 

KemniU, Elaine 442 

Kemp, Christopher 356 

Kemp, Todd 318 

Kempke, Terri 100, 283 

Kemplay, Matthew 397 

Kennedy, Jill 306 

Kennedy, John Mark 98, 342 

Kennedy , John Timothy 89 

Kennedy, Joseph 363 

Kennedy, Lori 442 

Kennedy, Warren 401 

Kenworthy, Amy 414 

Kenyon, Paul 401 

Kepfield, Sam 442 

Kern, Christopher 335 

Kerns, Susan 442 

Kerr, Ronald 442 

Kert, Shannon 366 

Kerschen, Kurt 91 

Kersting, Cheryl 442 

Kersting, David 442 

Kessinger, Sarah 108, 155,442 

Kessler, Kimberly 366 

Kester. Jana 299 

Ketchum, Robert 442 

Ketder, Craig 315 

Kttler. Keith 335 

Key. David 91. 95. 397 

Key. Gregory 89,442 

Key, Julie 377 

Kho, Meng Kang 397 

Khodos, Luba 417 

Kichler, Charles 128 

Kidd, Kim 132,299 

Kiehlhoftier, Brad 442 

Kiger, Karalee 417 

KUI, Denise 104.417 

Killen. Darren 107, 371 

Killet. Michelle 341 

Killian, STeven 397 

Kilmer. Ron 401 

Kimbrough . Deneen 442 

Kimura. Larissa 283. 354 

Kinder. Randy 98, 373 

Kinderknecht, Cornel 105 

King, Carmady 289 

King, Douglas 353 

King, Janice 385 

King, Kevin 91, 95, 442 

King. Laura 286 

King. Scott 368 

King. Sherry 385 

King, Vemelle 442 

King, William 408 

Kinger, Scott 442 

Kingsbury, Dallas 142, 390 

Kinkaid, Christie 387 

Kinsey, Mary 199 

Kinsey, Molly 417 

Kinsler, Jan 321 

Kinslow, Kimberly 164, 253 

Kintigh, Todd 169 

Kinzel, Catherine 385 

Kinzel, Stuart 401 

Kipp, Scott 442 

Kirk, Brett 442 

Kirk, Philip 89,91,290 

Kirk, William 104, 159, 291 

Kirkham, Annette 147, 442 

Kirkham, Scott 354 

Kirkpatrick, Lynelle 321 

Kirkpatrick, Mary 126 

Kimier, Dale 397 

Kirsch, Todd 115 

Kiser, Janice 127, 138, 163, 169 

Kisicki, Carol 366 

Kisner. Brandon 296 

Kistler, Karen 442 

Kitch, James 91, 95, 442 

Kitchen, Raymond 323 

Kin, Lance 368 

Kittle, Brenda 414 

Kittle, Marsha 442 

Kittner, John 338 

Kivett, Christine 442 

Kiven, Todd 390 

Kjellin, Douglas 442 

K-Laires 126 

Klaassen, John 397 

Klamm, Andrew 91, 397 

Klamm, Karen 100 

Klassen, Daniel 96, 138, 373 

Klassen, Richard 96, 121, 163,442 

Klassen. Richard E 107, 163 

Klataske, Daryl 442 

Klausmeyer, Kelly 397 

Klehi, Robert 75 

Kleinschmidt. Kelli 442 

Kleinsorge . Arlen 408 

Klemm. Karen 130, 309 

Klemp, Melissa 366 

Klenda, Kristine 299 

Klenda, Pau-icia 442 

Kliewer. Matt 301 

Klimek. Son 157 

Kline. Brian 361 

Klingler. Rebecca 325 

Klim, Kimberly 442 



Klopfenstein, Carol 

Klotz.Jeff 

Klover.Kelly 

Klover. Richard 

Klover . Robin 

Klozenbucher . Marian 

Kluber, Kathleen 132 

Klug, Alan 

Knadle, Kelly 

Knadle, Kyle 

Knappen, Daniel 

Knappen, Jeffrey 

Knaus, Kevin 138, 121. 

Kneaves . Charles 

Kneil. Becky 93,316, 

Kneisler , Mark 

Kness, Timothy 155, 

Knetter. Chris 

Kniffm, Cyd 314, 

Knight, Adrian 

Knight, Daniel 

Knight, Scott 

Knitter, Sandy 

Knoch, Mark 

Knoefel, Ronald 

Knop, Kathryn 302, 

Knostman, James 

Knowles, Martin 

Knox, Darren 

Knox, Matthew 163, 

Knudsen, Timothy 96, 

Knutson, Tammie 

Kobs, Sarah 

Kobs, Steven 

Koca, Carolyn 

Koch, Joy 291, 

Koch. Randy 

Koci. Julie 91, 

Kocour . Vincent 

Koechner. Betty 

Koeger. Michelle 

Koehn. Jaylen 

Koellker. Jim 

Koepsel. Mark 

Koetting. Chris 

Koger, James 

Kohl, David 

Kohl, Thomas 

Kohler , Joseph 

Kohler, Stephanie 95, 

Kohler. Steven 

Kohlhase. Mark 

Koker. William 

Kolb, Marshall 

Kolb, Robert 

Kolb, Troy 

Kolbeck, Paul 

Kolenda, Cathy 

Kolsky, Lynette 

Kolterman, Mark 

Komer , Joseph 

Koneck, John 

Konnesky, Shelley 

Konvalin, Wade 

Koons, Darla 

Korb, Kristy 309, 

Korte, Greg 89, 

Korte, Tom 

Kossow, William 95, 

Kostelac, Elaine 

Koster, Max 

Koudele, Joseph 

Kracht, Amy 132, 

Kraemer, Debra 314, 

Krainbill, Niki 

Kramer, Frank 155, 

Kramer, Juli 

Kramer, Michael 

Kramer, Penny 281, 

Kramer, Tom 

Kranz, Micol 

Krase, David 

Kratochvil, Linda 

Kratochvil , Terry 

Kratzer, Richard 89, 

Krause,Kari 130, 

Krauss, Thomas 104, 

Krehbiel, Christan 

Kren, Margaretta 

Krieger, Jane 

Krieger, Judy 

Kriegh, Eric 

Kriegh, Leland 

Kriss, Kevin 

Kriszcziokaitis, Christine 

Krizek, Theron 91. 

Krizman, Andrea 

Krizman, Jack 

Kroeker , Franklin 

Kroenlein, Jeffrey 

Kroph, Brad 

Kruckenberg, Kristin 157, 

Krueger, Paul 100, 117, 

Krug, Andrea 

Krug, Breon 142, 

Knig, David 163, 

Knig, Eric 159, 

Kruger , Lon 

Krumm, David 108, 

Kruper, Maggie 

Kruse, David 

Krase. Joan 

Kruzich, Lisa 

KSU Horticulture Club 

KSU Parachute Club 

KSU Racquetball Club 

KSU Rine Club 

KSU Soccer Club 

KSU Amateur Radio Club 

KSU Horsemen's Association 

Kubickei, Steve 

Kubik, Richard 

Kubik, Timothy 



16.1 

40 

36 

36 I 

361 

41 

14 

441 

30 

331 

36 i 

44;; 

35 

35 

40i 

44J 

40l 

44t 

33 k 

35 

44, 

39 

44 

15 

44: 

36 

36 

361 

361 

441 

341 

44i 

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44f 

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2t 
3< 
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4 
4^ 
3! 
¥ 



472 



Index i ijg 



celman, Colleen 96 

;elman, Timothy 340 

:hmann, Tim 126 

izi, John 333 

tersteffen, Mary 96, 142 

tersteffen, Tom 163,443 

man, Kevin 443 

mann. Bradley 359 

1, Leight 391 

1, Lugina 443 

1, Velma 344 

mer, Steven 130, 371 

;el, Peter 369 

,hek, Alice 89, 100, 415 

:, Karl 333 

I.James 104,333 

L, Kathy 132, 331 

'., Ray 159 

k, Susan 408 

la, Ann-Margaret 443 

nicka. Brad 338 

r, Jeffrey 142, 152, 163,401 

r, Marsha 417 



X 



I'Setwar, Sumedha 95, 331 

ley, Raelynn 443 

1, Butch 164,252,280 

t.Mark 356 

I nburger . Brad 369 

ler, Terry 397 

I rty. Kathy 443 

1 rbom, Charles 443 

t rmarcino, Debbie 286 

L uige, Kathey 417 

Lian, Richard 296 

Ldny, Leah...' 385 

L:,Cleo 75 

L ,Denisey 100,443 

L s Ronald 351 

L, Jodi 354,443 

L , Thomas 165, 280 

Liir, David 98 

Li, Jamie 318, 433 

Lien, Brett 132 

Liiert, Jack 115 

Lr, David 351 

L,nen, Paul 132, 142 

L;r, David 351 

Le, Mary 316, 385 

Ljister, Sandra 147 

L|ister, Trent 397 

L':, Charles 359 

L!:rs, Lisa 391 

L on, Alf 68, 69 

L. Cindy 443 

L' David 401 

LI Jon 385 

L; Paul 338 

L| James 443 

L| Jill 299 



Lange, Charles 95,401 

Langemeier, Lynn 130, 155, 301 

Langenkamp, Amy 443 

Lankford, Alan 443 

Lansdown, Linda 321 

Lanspa, Patricia 443 

Lantz, Stuart 401 

Lapointe, Lynn 443 

Larkin, Lisa 163, 321 

Larkin, Susan 385 

Larry, Ernest 128 

Larsen, Kathryn 377 

Larsen, Sarah 321, 364 

Larsen, Susan 377 

Larson, Erick 408 

Larson, James 340 

Larson, Janelle 100, 318, 322, 331 

Larson, Judy 96, 325 

Larson, Kimberly 417 

Larson, Marcus 147 

Larson, Mark 359 

Larson, Pamela 443 

Larson, Robert 164, 318 

Larue, Beth 444 

Lask, John 444 

Lasnier, Mark 130 

Lassman, Christy 309 

Lassman, Michael 356 

Latter Day Saints Student Association.. 
132 

Laudick, Gregory 444 

Lauer, Jane 314, 321 

Lauer, Tanya 321, 355 

Laughlin. Brenda 444 

Laughlin, Chuck 311 

Laughlin, Stephanie 444 

Laughman , Jeffrey 1 26, 296 

Laurie, David 164, 165 

Lavery, Jeffrey 169, 397 

Lavezzi, Victoria 107, 117, 159 

Law, Brian 363 

Law, Chris 444 

Lawless. Patrick 313 

Lawrence. Debra 417 

Lawrence, Norma 336 

Lawrence, Steve 169, 315 

Lawrence, Thomas 354 

Lawson, Cecilia 377 

Lawson, Richard 311 

Layuno, Jose 155 

Leahy, Timothy 351 

Lear, Boyd 163, 444 

Leasure. Monty 333 

Leatherman, Sheryl 289 

Lebbin, Scott 444 

Lechner, Michael 315 

Lechtenberger, Kayla 95, 306 

Lee, David 336 

Lee, Donna 200, 201, 202 

Lee, Janet 289 

Lee, Kay 444 

Lee, Kristine 289 

Lee, Myung 444 

Lee, Nathanial 104 

Lee, Roben 96, 412 

Leeds, Jennifer 362 

Legg, Marilyn 93 

Legleiter, David 165,444 

Legleiier, Diane 110, 117 

Legleiter, Eric 361 

Legleiter. Mike 397 

Lehmann. Dirk 301 

Lehmann, Jerald 89. 130 

Lehmann, Lenny 444 

Lehner, Jodi 286 

Lehr, Anthony 444 



Lehr, Lucinda 444 

Leighton, Cynthia 444 

Leighty, Stephen 338 

Leighty, Teresa 132, 138,283 

Leihy, Thomas 130, 444 

Leikam, Michael 361 

Leininger, Philip 401 

Leitch, Deborah 444 

Leivian, Kevin 444 

Lemaitre , Anne 95 , 444 

Lembke, Donna 132, 306 

Lemoine, Kelly 444 

Lemon, Paul 417 

Leng, Ka 163 

Lenhart. Kerry 391 

Lenkner, Carol 107,444 

Lennon, Steven 311 

Leonard, Candy 157 

Leonard, Jeff 397 

Leonard, Merle 95, 169, 444 

Leonard, Ronald 138 

Lerock. Gary 96, 142 

Leroux, George 342 

Leshovsky, David 444 

Lesser, Christopher 444 

Lesser. Rita 142.445 

Lessman, Jane 138, 309, 362 

Lessman. Jeffrey 361 

Lester. Irving 293 

Leszler, Carmilita 445 

Letellier. Bruce 95. 163 

Letelier. Kimberly 132 

Letourneau. Kent 361 

Letoumeau. Susie 445 

Leu. Katherine 411 

Uverich, Michael 138, 391 

Uvey. Douglas 119. 163. 169.445 

Levin, Susan 321 

Uw, Kevin 121.445 

Lewis. Chris 142 

Lewis, Janeen 445 

Lewis, Jeffrey 165 

Lewis, Jennifer 306 

Uwis, Lance 91.95, 117,445 

Lewis, Michelle 283 

Lewis, Renee F 289 

Lewis. Renee P 155, 445 

Lichlenauer. Victoria 93. 147. 417 

Lichienhan. Diane 321 

Lichcenhan, Joseph 445 

Lichter. Kyle 100 

Lichter. Linda 385 

Liebeno, Paul 95, 117 

Liebert, Caroline 321 

Lien, Maureen 96 

Liening, Craig 354 

Lierz, Daniel 91 

Lies. Dean 401 

Lietz. Eric 356 

Lightcap. John 369 

Lightcap. Trudy 367 

Lightner, Irma 411 

Ligon, Stephen 159, 291 

Like. Todd 104 

Lile. Stephen 369 

Lilley. Brent 117.369 

Lilley. Julie 385 

Lilly. Diana 445 

Lilly, Kevin 359 

Lim.Kok 445 

Lin. Mike 150, 151, 152 

Linn, Mike 101 

Lindahl, Steve 344 

Linenberger, Annie 341 

Linder, Dianne 328 

Under. Karen 121. 132. 299 



Linder. Nancy 445 

Linder. Robert 115 

Lindgren. Krista 104. 159 

Lindholm, John 159 

Lindholm, Lynette 314, 321 

Lindquist, Judy 445 

Lindquist, Teri 377 

Lindsay, Naialee 147, 385 

Lindstrom, Robert 293 

Line. Kristy 321 

Linenberger. Annie 325 

Lingg. Janet 367 

Lingg. Jean 447 

Link. Susan 354.417 

Linn, Donna 142, 325 

Linn,Terri 408 

Linscott, Curtis 397 

Linton, Jerry 114 

Lintz, Dina 445 

Lippe. Darren 336 

Lippoldt, Jeff 340 

Lips, Amy 377 

Little, Gerald 359 

Linle, Joyce 126, 445 

Lively. Dwayne 354 

Lively, John 107 

Liverance. Darwin 115 

Livingston. Bill 60. 61 

Livingston. Brian 356 

Livingston. Robert 445 

Llewelyn. John 318 

Lloyd. Thomas 445 

Lo, Khin 411 

Loader. Michelle 345. 417 

Lock, Deron 91, 363 

Locke, Amy 300 

Lockhart, Grant 408 

Lockwood, Deborah 341 

Lodico, Scott 89. 445 

Loechler. Dawn 445 

Loeffler, Karen 408 

Loeffler. Kathleen 283 

Loefner, Kevin 397 

Loehr, Christopher 113, 442 

Loewen, Kelly 445 

Loftus. James 445 

Logan. Cynthia 445 

Logan. Kyle 359 

Ugback. Frank 142,304.382 

Logback. Laura 302. 391 

Lohmeier. Laurel 331 

Lohmeier. Stephen 304 

Lohmeyer, Kimberly 283 

' Lohr. Gordon 445 

Long. Douglas 50. 296 

Long. Karl 340 

Long. William 371 

Longabaugh. James 132 

Longley. Jeffrey 126. 397 

Longwell. Carrie 309 

Lonker. Dale 104. 30* 

Lonker, Jamie 331 

Lons. Annette 286 

Lookhan. Jeff 359 

Looper. Donnie 96. 280 

Lopez. Bryon 194. 196. 197 

Lopez. Danny 296 

Lopez. Estell 401 

Lopez, Jaime 147 

Lopez, Kimberly 445 

Lopez , Wanda 1 55 

Lord. Patricia 367 

Lore. Tom 445 

Lorenz. Mark 89 

Lorenz. Michael 445 

Lorette. George 104 




Lorson. John 445 

Loseke, Brenda 408 

Loub, An 60 

Loucks, Deanna 108, 129, 379 

Love, Valerie 381 

Lovell, Bill 401 

Lovell, Michel 369 

Lovitt, Lora 445 

Lowe, Todd 361 

Lowman, William 130 

Lubbers. Troy 369 

Lucas, Rebecca 328 

Luck. Barry 369 

Luckner, Roben 391 

Lueck, Carmela 286. 341 

Lueker. Belinda 289 

Lueker. Jeffrey 363 

Luft, Lon 445 

Luginbill . Caria 445 

Luginbill. James 128 

Luginbill. Lori 286 

Lundeen. Leann 417 

Lundry. Connie 93. 285 

Lundstrom. James 108 

Lundy. William 304 

Lunsford. Cynthia 445 

Lunsford. Laurie 157 

Lunsway. Layne 147 

Luong, Anh 169 

Luppen, David 373 

Lusk, Steven 313 

Lustig. David 304 

Lutheran Young Adults 132 

Luthi. Linda 302. 391 

Luthi. Melissa 128. 391 

Luty. Brock 304 

Luty. Jeffrey 304 

Lutz. Craig 369 

Lutz. Pamela 352 

Ly, Minh 169 

Ly.Tung 138, 169 

Lyie. Johanna 100 

Lyman, Kent 369 

Lynch. Evon 95. 108,445 

Lynch. Gregg 89 

Lynch, Lori 96. 107 

Lyon. Chuck 397 

Lyon. Christina 445 

Lyon, Stephen 445 



^ 



Mabe. Debra 328 

Mabry. Bryan 369 

Macdonald. Tim 175 

Mace, Jeffrey 121, 333 

Mace, Rhonda 155,417 

Maclarland, Charlotte 122 

Macher, Martha 367 

Machin, Marcia 445 

Mackey, Brian 445 

Mackinnon. Rebecca 445 

Mackinnon. Ross 293 

Macnaughlon. Peggy 132. 138,321 

Macy, Sandy 96, 142, 328 

Maddex, Teri 385 

Madinger, Charles 391 

Madison. Anita 445 

Madison. Todd 96, 373 

Madistin, Deborah 115 

Magana, Eidward 397 

Mages, Angela 289 

Mages. Cathy 445 

Maggard. Bryan 336 

Maginness. Natalie 367 

Mahan. Robin 351 

Mai. Julie 341 

Mai. Karin 408 

Maihugh. Sandy 341 

Main, Stephen 336 

Mainquist. Melanie 104.417 

Majerus. Joan 385 

Major. Jerry 445 

Maldonado, Claudia 445 

Maldonado, Kevin 445 

Malinowski. Jerome 445 

Malir. Richard 371 

Mallory. Bonny 321 

Malone. Daniel 121. 142 

Malone. Pamela 379 

Malone. Patricia 309 

Malone. Shari 352 

Malone. Sharon 309 

Maloy, Daniel 411 

Maneth, Leroy 126,401 



Roxanne Bartush performs 
during a dress rehearsal for 
Winter Dance '85. (Photo by 
John Sleezer) 



473 



J 




K-State's cheerleaders react 
after learning they had qualified 
as one of nine college 
cheerleading squads to 
compete in San Diego at the 
national cheerleading 
championships. (Photo by John 
Sleezer) 



Manges. James 96. 445 

Mann. David 293 

Mann. Jane 95. 110. 121.306 

Mann. Stephanie 165, 367 

Mannell. Came 98. 445 

Mannell. Matthew 446 

Manning. John 304 

Mansfield. Denise 446 

Maples. Shana 309 

Marbui. Kenneth 446 

Marcum. Bo 351 

Marcuson. Kirk 291 

Manhugh. Sandra 289 

Marker. Mike 291 

Marketing Club 132 

Markley. Angela 446 

Marmie, Jeree 314. 321 

Mamell. Allison 446 

Marquardt. Joel 304 

Mart, Charles 115 

Marrs. Roger 100 

Marsion. Shad 104. 291 

ManelL Elizabeth %. 446 

Manen. Todd 147. 446 

Martin. Andrew 117. 354 

Martin . Becky 445 

Manin. Carrie 95. 165. 283 

Martin, Cynthia 321. 369 

Martin, David 304 

Marun. Don 314 

Manin. George 391 

Martin, Gregory 351 

Martin. Jeff 446 

Martin. John 446 

Manin. Karen 446 

Martin. Kevin 280 

Manin. Michael 315 

Martin. Scott 446 

Manin. Rose 446 

Manin. Todd 397 

Maninck. Lesa 377 

Marvel. Larry 296 ^ 

Marxen, James 446 



Masilionis, Matthew 446 

Ma.ska. Jill 115,300 

Mason. James 304 

Mason, Laura 325 

Mason, Lesa 385 

Mason, Roben 446 

Massey, Timothy 117, 446 

Masters, Kim 385 

Masterson. Cameron 1 10 

Mathes, Darcv 117 

Mainey, Cheryl 306 

Matney, Nancy 2%, 309 

Matsunga. Kayoko 121, 446 

Mattan, Kirsten 446 

Matthews. Marc 96,401 

Matthews. Melissa 321 

Matthias. Janet 446 

Maningly. Paul 89, 155,446 

Maupin, Mark 446 

Maurath, Kun 91,446 

Maurer, Mark 446 

Maurice, Anhur 446 

Mavndis, George 354, 460 

Maxwell, Douglas 398 

Ma\, Elizabeth 446 

May. Margaret 108,364.367 

Mav. Roben 336 

May, Roger 301 

May, Ron 126 

Mayer. Douglas 318 

Mayer. Kent 104,291 

Mavfield, Elton 89, 147,446 

Mayfield, Fran 321, 369 

Mayhew, Tracy 286 

Mays. Jeff 369 

McAfee. David 104 

McAnarney. Amy 286, 369 

McAnhur, Quentm 155 

McCalisier, Mark 446 

McCaner, Jeffrey 107, 381 

McCanhy, Daniel 107, 128, 344 

McCarthy, Donald 446 

McCam. Timothy 169 

McClain. Kcllv 155 

McClellan. Roger 89.91.291 

McClelland, Kenneth 446 

McClintock, Stacy 446 

McClurc, Jill 385 

McComb, Keith 89,446 

McConnell. Craig 369 

McCoole . Shawn 446 

McCormick, Neal 91 

McCosh. Roben 280 

McCoy, Beverly 408 

McCoy, Bradley 408 

McCoy. Brian 446 

McCoy , Jennifer 417 

McCoy, Kevin 398 

McCoy, Patricia 286, 2% 



McCoy, Sandra 138. 385 

McCreary , Tamara 309 

McCune, Roben 107 

McCune, Shawn 117, 132 

McDaniel, Donald 296 

McDaniel, Karen 379 

McDaniel, Ross 381 

McDaniel, Scott 338 

McDavin, Andy 409 

McDermet, Mark 108, 147,446 

McDonald, John 446 

McElroy, Ann 130, 157, 446 

McEntee, Daniel 364 

McFeeters, Marshall 336 

McGeary , Mary 1 26, 446 

McGee, Linda 409 

McGehee, Dwight 314 

McGehee, Shawn 314 

McGehee, Steve 314 

McGheney, Stephen 446 

McGinness, Steve 336 

McGough, Dawn 446 

McGrath, Regina 142, 446 

McHenry, Brenda 446 

McHenry, Mary 100,446 

Mcllvaine. Douglas 359 

Mclnteer, Janet 446 

Mclntire, Mark 304 

Mcintosh, Andrew ; 359 

Mclntyre, Cassandra 367 

Mclntyre, John 401 

McKain, Valorie 391 

Mc Kale, Charles 311 

McKee, Corey 394 

McKee, Roxanne 367 

McKenzie, Clinton 130,446 

McKenzie, Megan 446 

McKenzie, Paul 2% 

McKenzie, Todd 96, 165,446 

McKeman, Patrick 296 

McKie, Angela 310 

McKinley, Bill 345 

McKinley, Brady 361 

McKinney, Douglas 117 

McKinzie, Paul 447 

McKnight, Roger 447 

McLain, Kevin 373 

McLaren, Bnjce 413 

McLaughlin, Robert 163 

McLaury , James 402 

McLemore. Joann 286 

McMahill. Jennifer 325 

McMahon , Troy 402 

McManaman, Christopher 447 

McMillan, David 402 

McMillan, Tiffany 314 

McMiUen. Devtn 315 

McMillen, Diana 409 

McMillen. Lisa 321 



McMillin, Mark 155 

McMinimy, Gisele 89, 117,409 

McMinimy, Kendall 409 

McMinimy, Vera 1 17,409 

McMurray , Gwyn 447 

McMuiray , James 39 1 

McNaghten, arolyn 283, 336 

McNaul, Brent 447 

McNeice, Barbara 132 

McNen, Peggy 104,447 

McNultv, Brian 115 

McPeek, Enn 385 

McPheter, Jamie 328 

McQueen, Michael 89, 147,447 

Meade, Amy 447 

Meador, Richard 354 

Meadows, Jo 396 

Mealy, Gregory 361 

Meares, Michael 345 

Medley, Denise 328 

Meehan. Beverly 417 

Meeks. James 249,447 

Meers, Cynthia 328 

Meged, Ban 104,447 

Mehaffey , Patricia 447 

Mehl, Stephen 447 

Mehlingcr, Michele 325 

Mehncr .Keith 447 

Mehta. Hemant 447 

Meier. Bnan 95, 121, 163.447 

Meier, Joe 381 

Meier, John 447 

Meier, Joseph 301 

Meier, Steven 447 

Meigs, Daniel 115, 138,447 

MeUi. Mark 96, 110, 163,447 

Meilink, Loius 163 

Meis, Karen 417 

Meis, Knstopher 447 

Meisenheimer, Leann 310 

Meitler, Alan 447 

Melean, Virginia 377 

Melgren, Paul 301 

Meha, Kevin 447 

Mellring, Joy 447 

MeUske, Allan 352 

Melms, Mark 155 

Memmings. Laura 93. 107, 328 

Meng, Ray 301 

Menghini, Kate 331 

Men\ Gle« Club 167 

Mercer, Kenneth 100. 115. 117,448 

Mercer, Roben 373 

Mercer, Stacy 117, 448 

Mercer, Tammy 100, 417 

Meredith, Doug 448 

Merlo, Joe 126,448 

Mermis, Constance 93, 391 

Merriman, Tracy 310 



Mertz, David 

Mertz, Jonathan 

Meseke, Michael 

Messick, Bryan 

Messmer, Michael 

Mettenburg, David 

Metz, Dan 

Metzger, Mark 

Meuger, Mitchell 107, 

Metzger , Monte 

Metzler, Roger 

Meusberger, Patricia 169, 341. 

Meyer, Alan 

Meyer, Chnstine 

Meyer, Dale 

Meyer, Daneen 

Meyer, Diane 165, 

Meyer , Jerald 

Meyer, Joseph 142. 

Meyer, Joyce 

Meyer, Kathleen 

Meyer, Keith 

Meyer, Kelley 

Meyer, Lanette 

Meyer, Mark 96. 

Meyer, Pamela 96. 

Meyer, Therese 336, 

Meyerhoff , Kevin 

Meyers, Allison 364. 

Meyers, Michael 

Meyers, Stacey 352, 

Meyers, Stan 107, 

Meyn, Tod 117,312. 

Michael , Shane 

Michals, Melanie 

Michel, Amy 

Michel, Jeffery 

Michie. Aruna 

Mickelsen, Vicki 

Microbiology Club 

Middleton, Jacquelyn.. 95, 163. 316. 

Middleton, Keith 

Miers, Cynthia 

Mignano, Mary 

Mika, Ted 147, 

Miles, Deborah 

Miles, Peggy 

Miles, Tim 

Miley, Nina 52 

Milford, Randy 147 

Millard, Scott 

Miller, Andy 

Miller, Angle 

Miller, Brad 

Miller, Bryan 

Miller, Christopher 

Miller, David 

Miller, Douglas 

Miller, Glen 



474 



Index 



iller, Gloria 138.409 

iller. Heather 331 

iller. James 369 

iller, Jeffrey 163, 165,296 

iller. Jennifer 281. 286 

iller, John K 121, 165 

iller.JohnR 248,448 

iller. Judy 321 

iller. Katherine 448 

iller. Kimberly 385 

iller. Laurie 331 

iller. Lois 448 

iller. Michelle 302 

iller, Philip 448 

iller. Quinn 304 

iller. Rena 245, 283 

iller. Rhonda 448 

iller. Roslyn 107 

iller. Scon 397 

iller. Sharon 391 

iller. Shawn 352 

Jler, Stacey 155 

iller, Stephanie 281, 310 

I'.er, Steve 194, 242, 243 

Her, Tamara 448 

Her, Timothy 448 

Her, Todd 352 

Her. Troy 352 

Uershaski, Bruce 91, 398 

Ueson, Brent 448 

lloy, Sarah 289 

lis. Cynthia 386 

lis, Daniel 163.448 

lis, Jean 340 

ills. Kerry 155 

lis, Scott 364 

lis, Stephanie 331 

lis, Wendy 310 

Ine, Randy 95, 104, 108.448 

Iner. Todd 364 

ncer. Jennifer 289 

raiich. Lisa 391 

nnis. Natalie 448 

nton. Ernest 104 

iak. Roger 333 

chell. David 107 

chell. James 391 

chell. Janice 452 

chell. Jeanettee 126, 377 

cheH. Joy 448 

chell. Mary 157 

chell. Randall 356 

chell. Sherry 417 

js. Cmdy 364 

eder, Linda 107, 163, 165,448 

eller, Gisela 325, 336 

eller. Kenneth 448 

ffett. Janice 377 

hamed. Jilan 300 

hney. Edward 91, 104 

hr, Rhonda 107,448 

Idenhauer, Kenneth 93,95,448 

nge, Manuel 409 

.ngil, Maria 310 

nroe. Lisa 386 

jnson. Lynnette 286 

intague. Erin 2%. 306 

ataner. Luis 98, 147 

ntgomery. Anne 336 

ntgomery. Ken 398 

ntgomery. Michelle 417 

Intgomery. Robert 448 

Dn. Allen 95.448 

on, Lee 173, 174 

Ijney, Sherry 117, 155,321 

,)re, Benjamin 448 

ire, Beth 115,448 

!)re. Brenda 115,328 

!)re, Cheryl 448 

i)re, Douglas 314 

,)re,Gina 115,328 

!)re, Kent 318 

ire, Kevin 448 

ire, Todd 115, 163,448 

irs, Kim 138, 325 

eno, Carlos 448 

ey, Mark 359 

lley, Stephen 163, 391 

l|gan. Gene 50 

ligan. Gregory 369 

llgan. Jerry 448 

1| gan. Shannon 409 

ligan, Stanley 448 

Ijgan, Vance 128 

I, eno, Charlie 338 

l|in. Julie 117,449 

Ijiu. Jenifer 449 

I itz.Judi 98, 155,310 

I ris. Daniel 89 

I ris. Dee 283 

ris. Jack 449 

is. John 316 

ris. Kathryn 449 

■is. Michael 98.352 

■ison. Marc 31 1 

f'ow. Molly 96 

fiow. Tina 415 

t'e. Richard 155 

• tar Board 132 

Ijensen. Ruth 294 

^ on, Gregory 409 

» larger. Shari 110, 321 

ler, Jaye 449 

er. Deborah 328 

.Jennifer 281, 328 

.Karen 449 

, Roben 304 

M. Tiffany 331 

'\ man, Matilda 274 

>• Kevin 359 

It. Wade 352 

ley. Jeffrey 155.449 

ry. John 311 



Mowry, Michelle 283. 345 

Moyer. Clinton 142 

Mravunac. Catherine 449 

Mravunac. Michael 343 

Muehleisen. Stephen 345 

Mueller. Joel 301 

Mueller. Lori 300 

Mueting. Raymond 91. 95.449 

Mugler, David 104 

Mugler. Marabeth 115,372,377 

Mugler, Marlin 449 

Muir, Scott 449 

Muirhead, Teffani 291 

Mulcahy, Erin 138, 306 

Mulkey. John 280 

Mullen. Mark 364 

Muller. Diane 302, 386 

Muller, Marcia 110.449 

Mullin. Robin 286 

Mulvaney. Kathleen 96. 107.449 

Mumma. Teresa 283 

Munday. Ann 391 

Munds. Gregory 449 

Munoz. Dawna 418 

Munshi, Biswajit 449 

Munson. Robert 391 

Munson. Rochelle 306 

Munson. Sierra 449 

Murdock. David 107 

Murphey. Shauna 142.449 

Murphy. John 333 

Murphy. Jola 345. 367 

Murphy. Laura 100.409 

Murphy. Martha 98,418 

Murphy. Maureen 286 

Murphy. Phillip 449 

Murray. Kelly 159,341.418 

Murray. Kimberly 126. 415 

Murray. Mark 449 

Murray. Sean 440 

Murray. Teresa 147 

Murrell. Marc 391 

Murrison. Erin 449 

Murrison. Mark 356 

Musil. Greg 86 

Mutwalli. Mustafa 98 

Myers. Alan 398 

Myers. Brian 402 

Myers. Christine 289.408 

Myers. Michelle 331 

Myers, Richard 413 

Myles, Stacy 325, 336 



JV 



Naaf,Janel 325 

Nading, Jennifer 418 

Nafziger. Wayne 115 

Nagle. Tim 314 

NaH. Howard 338 

Nakoneczny. Wendy 328 

Nanninga. Stacey 104. 449 

Nash. Lisa 449 

Nath. Ranan 165 

National Agrimarketing Assoc 134 

Natl. See. of Black Engineers 134 

Natl See. of Professional Engineers. 134 
Nat. Soc. of Architectural Engineers.... 
134, 137 
Nat. Resource Management Club... 137 

Nauert. Cherie 449 

Nauert. Cristi 450 

Navinsky. Gail 100. 450 

Navrai. Susan 207. 310 

Ncube. Beatrice 450 

Neal. Deanna 289 

Neal. Susan 450 

Neel. Patricia 2% 

Neeland, Michael 316 

Neelly. Rebecca 121 

Neese. Todd 391 

Neil. Denise 450 

Neil.RusseM 91.318 

Neises. Lisa 450 

Nellis, Duane 117 

Nelson, Bradon 280 

Nelson, Brenda 307 

Nelson, Brian 98, 280 

Nelson, Chad 409 

Nelson. Dwight 91 

Nelson, Eric 115 

Nelson, Jennifer 318 

Nelson, Kathleen 450 

Nelson. Kent 450 

Nelson, Kimberlee 163, 325 

Nelson, Kris 300 

Nelson. Lisa 377 

Nelson. Mark 104.450 

Nelson, Montgomery 343 

Nelson, Nanene 307, 362 

Nelson. Scott 198.200.202 

Nelson. Spencer 280 

Nelson. Thomas 132 

Nelson, Todd 450 

Nelson, Williard 110 

Nelssen, Jim 108 

Netherland, Janet 310, 352 

Nett, John 96. 165. 365 



Nett. Lisa 300. 364 

Neuer. Phil 450 

Neufeld. Craig 409 

Neufeld. Judith 409 

Neufeldt, Don 93. 450 

Neuman. John 104.450 

Neumayer . Chad 402 

Neuschafer. Daran 107, 205, 352 

Neuschafer. Pamela 386 

Neville. Nancy 107 

New. Jilinda 291 

Newdigger. Glenn 91. 95 

Newell. Lenora: 391 

Newkirk. Kevin 38 1 

Newkirk, Stephen 450 

Newman Ministries Club 137 

Newton. Amy 415 

Newton. Douglas 450 

Newton. Michael 66 

Newton. Sherri 450 

Ney. Brace 107, 159, 338 

Ney, Kevin 336 

Ngo, Due 169 

Nguyen. Hien 169 

Nguyen. Hung 169 

Nguyen. Huong 169 

Nguyen. Tan 169 

Niblock. Don 450 

Nichols. Julie 450 

Nichols. Michael 138. 157. 281 

Nichols, Scott 163 

Nichols, Thomas 91,95,402 

Nicholson, Rebecca 409 

Nickel, Edward 296 

Nieberding, Frederick 128 

Nieberding. Mary 450 

Niedfeldt. Tresa 391 

Niehaus. Jeff 107.450 

Nielsen. Catherine 381 

Nieman. Charles 450 

Niemann. David 301 

Nighswonger. James 340 

Nightengale. Linda 283 

Nigus. Philip 107.301 

Nikkei. Christopher 104. 291 

Nikravan. Navid 450 

Nikravan, Shahia 450 

Nily. Dawn 386 

Nincehelser. George 115 

Ninci. Christina 382 

Ninemire. Glenn 1 17 

Nissen. Tammy 450 

Nitcher. Sandy 377 

Nison. Mary 155 

Noe, Susan 386 

Noeth. Amy 142 

Nolan. Kevin 450 

Noll. Michael 402 

Nolte, Jeffrey 117 

Nolting, Earl 115 

Noliing, Jeffrey 338 

Nolting, Mah 364 

Nool. Daniel 352 

Nordhus, Byron 450 

Nordhus, Dean 398 

Nordhus, Malt 372 

Nordhus. Philip 107 

Nordwall.Jill 386 

Norman, Cynthia 450 

Norman Ian 398 

Norris. Lisa 300 

Norris. Timothy 391 

North. Laura 325. 336 

Northern, Paula 165 

Norton, Diane 331 

Norton. Vicky 450 

Norvell. Wayne 146. 147 

Novak. Lori 318 

Novoiny . Corbin 39 1 

Novotny. David 159.450 

Nowlin. Bryan 398 

Nuessen, Deborah 100,450 

Nuff. Jennifer 362 

Nugent. John 413 

Nunn. Kraig 159 

Nuse. Derald 450 

Nuner. Colleen 391 

Nuzback, Dennis 135, 136 

Nyberg, Ann 286 

Nyhart, Michelle 126, 415 



o 



O'NeUI, Thomas "Tip" 71 

Oakleaf , Tim 450 

Oakley, Thomas 91 

Oaklief, Jeff 128 

Obando, Jose 450 

Oberhelman, Michael 345 

Oberrieder, Mark 96. 155,391 

Obeu, Peter 352 

Oborg, Shelley 364 

Oborg, Michelle 300 

Obomy, Jeannette 409 

Obomy, Jim 450 

Obrien, Chris 294, 418 

Obrien, Jan 325 

Obrien, Kim 104,418 



Obrien. Susan 450 

Ocando. Brenda 450 

Ochampaugh. Amy 108.318 

Ochampaugh. Jeff 108.318 

Ochoa. Janie 450 

Oehs. Rene 138. 352. 367 

Oconnell, Anne 294.450 

Oconnell. Lisa 93. 115. 166.450 

Oconnor. Kimberly 286 

Oconnor, Patricia 310 

Oconnor, Roben 100, 163,450 

Oddo. Jeffrey 338 

Odle, Danny 138 

Odonnell. Casey 163. 372 

Odonnell, Christine... 104. 142. 163.418 

Odonnell, Larry 450 

Odonnell. Patrick 361 

Oehm. Jim 107.450 

Oelke, Kevin 130 

Oestmann, Lanetta 386 

Oetinger. Douglas 409 

Oetome. Ingko 95. 121, 155,450 

Ogden, Brad 338 

Ogden, Lori 367 

Oglesby. Toni 283 

Ogunrinola. Oluyemi 450 

Ohair. Caria 126 

Ohair. David 381 

Ohara, Angela 121. 132. 138. 331 

Ohara, Molly 331 

Ohide, Becky 89. 100. 108,450 

Ohide. Susan 100 

Okaro. Christy 450 

Okptikho, Nicholas 142 

Olberding, Anthony 1 17 

Olberding, Donna 100, 117,450 

Olberding, Glen 96 

Olberding, Joyce 321 

Olberding, Martin 450 

Olberding, Ronald 451 

Oldham. Kent 402 

Oldham, Tom 304 

Ohphant. David 100. 128.451 

Ol iphant . Debra 45 1 

Oliver, James 333 

Oliver, Marcia 409 

Olsen. Allan 402 

Olsen, Angela 386 

Olsen, Donald 451 

Olsen, Doug 398 

Olsen, Sarah 93 

Olson. Cami 300 

Olson, Liza 286 

Olson, Esther 325 

Olson, Gary 91,301 

Olson, John 343 

Olson. Linda 147 

Olson. Robert 451 

Olson. Timothy 121 

Olljen. Jay 364 

Olljen. Roben 121. 369 

Omeara .Lynn 45 1 

Omega Chi Epsilon 137 

Omelia. Barry 451 

Omicron Nu 137 

Omtvedl. Penny 96. 331 

Oneale. Heather 386 

Oneill. Elazabeth 335 

Opal. John 409 

Opfer. Shannon 367 

Opiand. Greg 165 

Orchestra 167 

Order of Omega 138 

Oreilly. Joseph 451 

Orourke, Kevin 98 

Orr. Sandra 391 

Orschein, Randall 369 

Onh. Ted 362 

Oniz, Richard 345 

Onolf. Denise 451 

Osadchuk, Walter 409 

Osbom, Counney 409 

Osborne. Thomas 402 

Osner. Michael 451 

Osorio. Eduardo 121.451 

Ostby. Neil 451 

Oslenberg, Gena 418 

Oslerhaus. Dondald 142.398 

Osterhaus. Wade 451 

Ostmeyer, Deb 314 

Osimeyer. Jill 321 

Oswalt. David 91. 291 

Oswah, James 364 

Otis, Donna 386 

OtotI,Jeff 291 

Ott, David 312 

One, Denise 328, 372 

Otierheimer. Harriet 115 

Otter. Steve 126. 159 

Outdoor Rec. Committee 138 

Ovenon. Geoffrey 343 

Ovenon. Richard 2% 

Owen, Raymond 352 

Owen, Stephen 451 

Owens, Ricky 340 

Oxburger, Dewey 336 

Oyler, Clinton 409 



IP 



Paap, Deborah 93. 386 

Pacey. Polly 318, 379 

Pacheco, Maritere 418 

Pachta, Jon 451 

Packebush, Steve 91, 364 

Padden, Angela 369 

Paden. Gerry 345 

Page, Kelly 418 

Page. Leroy 373 

Page, Marsha 328 

Page. Suzanne 418 

Pageler. Polly 451 

Pakkebier. Kun 451 

Palestine. Kaved 121 

alestine. Ahed 121 

Palmaieer, Steven 451 

Palmer. Gregory 362 

Palmer. Nancy 115 

Palmer. Perry 89.369 

Palmer. Justin 165. 451 

Palmer. Trygve 354 

Palmquisi. Eric 281 

Palmquist. Tammy 331 

Panhellenic Council 138 

Pankratz, David 402 

Pankratz, Mark 118 

Pankrau, Michael 381 

Pankratz, Terry 91 

Paramesh, Hari 117, 451 

Parcel, Daniel 318 

Parenteau, Peri 299 

Paris, Lisa %,4I8 

Parish, Lawrence 121 

Parish, Thomas 132 

Parizadeh, Daryoosh 45 1 

Park, Kelli 289 

Park, Seungae 377 

Parke, Allan 165 

Parke, Douglas 281 

Parkerson, Kim 325 

Parks. David 398 

Parks. Keith 107 

Parks. Lori 45 1 

Parks. Mary 336. 386 

Parmley. John 91.95 

Parr. Leroy 451 

Parrish, David 339 

Parrish. Jeffrey 451 

Parrish, Stan 174 

Parrott, Susan 451 

Parry, Kathleen 245 

Parsons, Carla 348 

Parsons. Jeffery 398 

Panridge. Jill 321,369 

Panndge. Thomas 339 

Paschal. Meredith 409,463 

Pasley. Joel 89. 356 

Paie. Joan 281.328 

Patron, Roberto 93,451 

Patron, Romeo 451 

Patterson, Craig 107, 318 

Patterson, Eric 451 

Patterson, Kevin 89 

Patterson, Lee 386 

Patterson, Mamie 296, 328 

Patterson, Thomas 95. 165, 2% 

Panon. Larry Ill 

Pally. Sherri 451 

Paul. Brian 402 

Paul, James 169 

Paul, Lisa 147,418 

Pauhe, Kenneth 451 

Paulsen, Dawn 451 

Paulsen, Sheryl 451 

Paulson, Lyle 356 

Pauly, Dale 89 

Pauly, Mark 316 

Pavlacka, James 398 

Payne, Cami 325 

Payne, David 352 

Payne. Kimberii 115. 377 

Payne. Mary 451 

Peak. Stephen 356 

Pearce. Mike 451 

Pearson, Harold 382 

Pearson. James 104.291 

Pearson. Jeffrey 318 

Pearson. Pamela 142 

Pease, Ben 451 

Pease, Michele 325, 336 

Peavler, Samuel 345 

Peck, John 140, 141 

Peckman. Pamela 100. 108. 380 

Peirano. Barbara 415 

Peirce. Katherine 252. 331 

Peirce. Kenneth 304 

Pekarek, Susan 96.451 

Pellman. Angle 289 

Pender. Bob 121 

Pendergast, Roben 451 

Pendleton. Scott 451 

Penn, Randall 451 

Penner. Diana 45 1 

Penner, Rick 339 

Penning. Laura 451 

Percival. Barry 398 

Perez. Chris 321 

Perez. Gregory 155 

Perico. Carl 451 

Periolat. Barbara 352 

Perkins. Daniel 297 

Perkins. Todd 402 

Perrier. Daniel 364 

Perrier. Michael 336 

Perrin. Tom 304 

Perry. Ann 300 

Perry. Rhonda 286 

Perry. Stan 147 

Persigehl. David 91, 398 

Pesmark. Dan 411 

Pestlnger. Gregory 121 

Peter. Rhonda 451 

Peter, Tamara 45 1 



Index 



475 



Peters, Andrew 402 

Peters. George 93 

Peters. Steve 339 

Peters, Steven 107 

Peterson, Adam 138,409 

Peterson, Cindy 451 

Peterson, Dana 296 

Peterson. Erik 117.413 

Peterson, Gregory 297 

Peterson. Karla 108 

Peterson. Kama 159,415 

Peterson. Kent 345 

Peterson. Marlette 300 

Peterson, Mary 104, 451 

Peterson, Randal 291 

Peterson, Shelly 93 

Petracek, Keith 56, 398 

Petne, William 121,291 

Petry, Amy 307 

Pettiford. Cello 451 

Petlijohn. Charles 91, 95, 104, 452 

Pettijohn, Kimberly 452 

Peuker, Jeff 89, 128, 373 

Peuster, David 130 

Pfannenstiel, Lisa 321 

Pfannenstiel, Paul 362 

Pfeifer. Steffani 98 

Pfeifer, Timothy 452 

Pfeiney, Lori 348 

Pflumm, Garot 452 

Pfortmiller, Ricky 104 

Phalen. James 372 

Pham, Hoai 169 

Pham, Thinh 169 

Pham,Tuan 169 

Phan, Khanh 169 

Phelps, Darin 398 

Phelps, Jay 402 

Phenicie. Jill 289 

Pherigo. Wendi 409 

Phi EU Sigma 138 

Phi, Thang 169 

Phi, Thanh 169 

Phi TheU Kappa 138 

Phi, Toan 169 

Philbrook, Rex 314 

Phillips, Chad 402 

Phillips, Clifton 304 

Phillips, Craig 452 

Phillips, Erin 286 

Phillips, Janet 294, 380 

Phillips. John 318 

Phillips. Joseph 294 

Phillips, Kathy 325 

Phillips, Laura 409 

Phillips, Pete 294 

Phillips, Polly 318, 380 

Phillips, Steve 398 

Phillips, Sue 380 

Phillips, William 294 

Phi Tau Sigma 142 

Phi Upsilon Omicron 142 

Physics Club 142 

Picket. Lawrence 110, 157,452 

Pickett. Dennis 204, 345 

Pickett, Teresa 128, 348 

Pierce, David 398 

Pierce, Jeff 297 

Pierson, Joy 452 

Pierson, Julie 452 

Pieschl, David 372 

PieschI, Rick 115 

Pillsbury, Claudene 353 

Pinkney, Robert 157 

Pirkl-Hurd, Rebecca 96 

Pitman, Robin 169, 398 

Pitts, Jeffrey 364 

Pins, Julie 452 

Piven, Francis 73 

Piatt, John 333 

Plattner, Angela 452 

Platz, Les 452 

Plevka, Theresa 95, 126 

Plowman, Karen 452 

Pluimer, Gregory 452 

Plumer, Steven 339 

Plush, Kevin 89 

Plymire. Arlene 418 

Poettgen, Denise 321 

Poey, Lourdes 126 

Poff, Dawn 157, 391 

Poling, Timi 287,452 

Poling, Tracy 286 

Pollock, Dennis 140, 141 

Pontius, Christine 310 

Poole, Janene 89, 100, 128, 310 

Poole, Jerry 365 

Poole, Twyala 132 

Poole, William 336 

Popkess, Matt 314 

Popp, Michael 452 

Porch, Michael 121, 343 

Porteous, Sara 132, 321 

Porter, Kris 321 

Porter, Melissa 98,452 

Porter. Peggy 377 

Porter. Roger 391 

Poss. Douglas 452 

Posson. Donald 110, 157. 316 

Postier, Todd 95, 121, 391 

Poston, Michael 452 

Potter, Sheila 132, 300 

Potlorff, Mark 316 

Pottorff, Timothy 452 

Pouch, Shane 402 

Poultry Club 142 

Powell, Aniu 452 

Powell, Annette 121, 377 

Powell, David 391 

Powell, Jeffrey 452 

Powell, Jennifer 121, 378 

Powelson. Carey 104, 452 

Powelson, Terry 91, 104,452 



Powers, Pamela 325 

Powers. Roger 91.291 

Poyser. William 352 

Prather. Jennifer 418 

Pre-Physical Therapy Club 147 

Veterinary Club 147 

Prediger. James 402 

Prediger. Ginny 307 

Prescott. Nona 142,452 

Preniwilly, Elmer 133 

Preu, Steven 108,453 

Price. Bryan 93.96,391 

Price. Charles 345 

Price. Dawn 378 

Price. Floyd 138 

Price. Kenneth 336 

Price. Sue 163 

Price. Susan 367 

Pnce. Travis 391 

Priddle, Jeffrey 398 

Priddy, Nelson 398 

Pride. Mark 345 

Pnde. Shawn 345 

Prieb. Kimberly 289 

Priest. Diane 386 

Pringle. Susan 169 

Prinz, Anne 378 

Pritchen, Jerry 96, 364 

Proctor, Suzanne 391 

Professionals in Human Movement 

Harmony 147 

Proffitt , Jerry 453 

Proffin, Race 304 

Prose, Jeffrey 402 

Provencher, Donat 121 

Provost, Cathy 193, 453 

Pruett, Ken 354 

Prtiitt. Mike 453 

Psi Chi 153 

Placek, Frank 413 

PR Students Society of America 147 

Puchosic, John 281 

Pugh, Russell 104, 372 

Pujol. Stephanie 453 

Pulford. David 157. 372 

Puljak.Karl 398 

Pulliam. Suzanne 318, 453 

Puis, Erin 453 

Purdum, Steve 359 

Purkeypile, Timothy 453 

Purslow, Amy 386 

Putman, Nancv 348 

Putnam, Timothy 130. 155,453 

Pyle, Kenneth 453 

Pyle, Rick 91 



Q 



Quaimance, Dennis 411 

Queen, Barry 453 

Queen, Mark 409 

Queen, Matthew 107, 304 

Quelch, Andrew 453 

Quenzer,Todd 128,453 

Querrey, Michael 340 

Quick, Parrish 345 

Quinn, Lisa 331 

Quinn, Mary 386 

Quinn, Scon 163, 372 

Quint. Rodney 453 



^ 



Rachel. Joanne 372. 453 

Rader. Mike 453 

Raeuel. David 110. 159 

Rages, Rebecca 386 

Ragland, Michelle 110, 157,418 

Ragsdale, Brent 155, 318 

Rahija, Mark 402 

Rahjes, Kenneth 294 

Rahler, Peter 157 

Rahn, Christina 132, 391 

Rahn, Steve 369 

Rainman, Samantha 325 

Rainwater, Ronald 453 

Rakowsky, Mary 115 

Raleigh, Annette 453 

Ramel, Jennifer 331 

Ramos, Freddie 132 

Randall, Kristi 310, 352 

Randall, Marie 371 

Randall, Sandra 95, 283 

Rangel, Laura 453 



Rangel, Martin 163,453 

Rankm, Donald 453 

Rankin, Jan 453 

Ransopher, Sandra 348 

Rapp, Jeffrey 316 

Rarden, Brooks 115, 165,336 

Rasdall, Lori 328 

Rasmussen, Ann 321 

Rathbun, Holly 367 

Rathbun, Jill 286 

Rathbun, Lori 409 

Rathbum, Harold 130 

Rathert, Eidward 117 

Ratzlaff, Julie 386 

Raudenbush, Laurel 348 

Rausch, Ronald 117, 155,453 

Rausch, Russell 100, 117,453 

Ray, Amber 409 

Ray, Carol 391 

Razook, Chris 339 

Read, Douglas 291 

Read, Steven 157, 291 

Reagan, Charles 115 

Reams, Mark 391 

Reaser, Douglas 398 

Reaser, Julie 117,453 

Rebel, Brad 314 

Rebel, Bryan 314 

Redelsheimer, Duane 283 

Reding, Kevin 100,453 

Reece, Kathleen 391 

Reece, Kristina 409 

Reed, Brent 126 

Reed, David 360 

Reed, Hilary 310 

Reed, Jenny 341, 386 

Reed, Linda 409 

Reed, Lisa 386 

Reed, Steven 159, 297 

Reed, Susan 142, 159, 386 

Reeder, Dave 453 

Reeder, Karen 367 

Reedy, Christopher 369 

Reedy, Robert 453 

Reedy, Steven 110, 155,453 

Rees, Brian 453 

Reese, Robert 352 

Reeves, Denise 95, 121, 130, 453 

Regehr, Darwin 453 

Regehr, Randall 121, 304 

Regier, Mark 453 

Regier, Randy 364,453 

Regier, Naomi 126 

Regier, Rob 364 

Regmi, Michelle 289, 310, 378 

Regnier, Douglas 453 

Rehg. Jill 331 

Reiber, Andrew 398 

Reichard, Daryl 413 

Reichart, John 453 

Reichenberger. Paula 126 

Reichle. David 392 

Reichle. Dean 352 

Reid. David 453 

Reid. Robert 453 

Reid. Steve 352 

Reid. Susan 104,453 

Reida, Sandra 453 

Reiher, Timm 138, 360 

Reilly, Steve 392 

Reimers, Peter 402 

Rein. Rhoda 104. 128, 300 

Reinecke, Charles 100, 121,453 

Reinecker, Cindy 378 

Reinert, Patricia 108, 453 

Reinhardt, Aimee 316,453 

Reinhardt, Amy 91, 291, 331 

Reinhardt, Cindy 418 

Reiser, Renee 348 

Reiserer, Jamie 352. 386 

Reiter. George 73 

Religa, Kevm 169, 345 

Religa, Mark 91, 100, 402 

Remy, Jan 104,418 

Renard, Sheila 328 

Renfro, Mike 402 

Renner, Barbara 409 

Renner, Diana 352 

Renner, John 155 

Reno. Greg 91.453 

Reno. Michael 453 

Rephio, Daniel 402 

Rephlo, Lisa 329 

Rerkrai, Somjit 1 15 

Restaurant Management Cliig 153 

Reswik, Deborah 142 

Retail FloricuKure Club 153 

Renig, Kent 33 

Reves, Robert 147 

Reynolds, Carl 362 

Reynolds, Julia 104,453 

Reynolds, Kristina 352, 367 

Reynolds, Todd 356 

Reynolds, Vicki 108,418 

Reynolds, Walter 343 

Reynoldson, Amy 346 

Reynoso, Leslie 398 

Rezac, David 453 

Rezac, Jay 100,453 

Rezac, Karen 286 

Rezac, Kimberly 104, 386 

Rho, Jung 454 

Rho, Kwang 454 

Rhoades, Ronald 302 

Rhoads, Merle 454 

Rhoads, Randall 346 

Rhoads, Royalee 91, 169,454 

Rhodenbaugh, Eric 108 

Rhodes, Carolyn 378 

Rhodes, Pami 367 

Rhoten, David 454 

Riat, David 454 

Ribbentrop, Tonya 96, 386 



Ribble, Mike 297 

Ribordy, Lance 98,454 

Ribordy, Loma 386 

Rice, Aaron 126 

Rice, Knsti 100,454 

Rice, Kristine 142,454 

Rice, Melissa 454 

Rice, Timothy 413 

Rich, Ashely 454 

Rich, Elizabeth 409 

Rich, Michael D 398 

Rich, Michael W 398 

Rich, Michael Walter 454 

Richard, David 89,454 

Richards, Jeff 352 

Richards, Lisa 130 

Richards, Michael 362 

Richards, Phillip 398 

Richards, Reginald 409 

Richardson, Eric 316 

Richmeier, Randy 91,454 

Richter, Brent 96, 121, 454 

Richter, Suzanne 306, 307 

Ricke, Jerry 297 

Rickerson, Tammy.... 100, 121, 138,321 

Rickford, Sheree 454 

Rickley, Jay 454 

Ricks, Mark 398 

Rickslrew, Jacquie 454 

Ridder, Daniel 89, 128,454 

Ridder, Tim 334 

Ridder, Tom 292 

Riden, Becky 331 

Riedel, Brian 142 

Riedel , Joann 454 

Riedl, Twilla 378 

Riedmiller, Marcia 382 

Riehle, Thomas 130 

Riemer, Sandra 100, 378 

Ries, Timothy 454 

Riesinger, Laurie 310 

Rietcheck, Patricia 325 

Rifai, Imad 96 

Riffel, Karen 409 

Rigney , Jim 398 

Riley, Bryan 316 

Riley, Jack 104 

Riley, Michael 107, 159, 352 

Riley, Steve 147, 157, 318 

Rinard, Lori 283 

Rinella, Ann 331 

Riordan, Parris 283 

Rise, Alan 157 

Risius. Dawn 454 

Risser, Michele 283 

Ritenour, David 362 

Ritter, Ralph 314 

Ringers, Alan 454 

Ritzdorf, Bill 96 

Rivard, Dawn 289 

Roach, Brenda 331 

Roach, Robin 96, 110, 142 

Roach, Sheryl 392 

Roark, Roben 413 

Roark, Steven 454 

Robben,Carla 454 

Robben, Douglas 398 

Robben, Tim 110 

Robbins, Cherie 96, 97, 300 

Robbins, Michael 97, 121, 165, 336 

Roberson, Aaron 323 

Roberts, Christopher 336 

Roberts, Harold 115 

Roberts, Jennifer 286 

Roberts, Leigh 380 

Roberts, Rick 339 

Roberts, Sarah 289, 314 

Roberts, Scon 147 

Roberts, Shelly 454 

Roberts, Terrill 402 

Robens,Tom 149 

Robertson, Charles 370 

Robertson, Dawn 126, 380 

Robertson, Kathi 454 

Robertson, Mary 130 

Robertson, Ryan 454 

Robertson, Timothy 356 

Robetorye, Rustin 130 

Robinson, Gary 454 

Robinson, Paul 312 

Robison, Renee 157, 378 

Robson, Craig 95,326,373 

Robuck, Mary 286 

Robuck, Richard 294 

Rochel, Joanne 107 

Rochford, Catherine 454 

Rock, Liza 354 

Rock, Lori 93. 104, 316,454 

Rockers, Mary 291, 386 

Rockwell, Sharon 126 

Rode, John 360 

Rodenbaugh, David 115 

Rodeo Club 153 

Rodgers. Larry 454 

Rodlund, Deanna 454 

Rodriguez, Juan 117, 403 

Roehl, Mary 454 

Roemer, Dennis 454 

Roenigk, Donald 454 

Roepke, Rick 281 

Roesner, Theresa 128 

Roeth, Ina 324 

Roets, Debbie 392 

Rogalsky, Dennis 454 

Rogers, Clark 115 

Rogers, Deborah 392 

Rogers, Jodee 100,454 

Rogers, Mike 194, 196, 197 

Rogers, Pam 314 

Roggenkamp, Ann 454 

Rogowski, David 126, 398 

Rohr, Troy 364 

Rohrback, Liz 307. 369 



Rohrbauch , Mark 4 

Rohrbaugh, Tonie 1 

Rohrer, Deborah 93,3' 

Rohrer . Timothy [4 

Rolf. Karen 4; 

Rolfs, Susan 21 

Rollhaus, Lisa 21 

Roman, James 4t 

Rongone, Michael 4; 

Ronnebaum, Daniel 1 

Rooney, Michele 281 

Roop, Celia 

Ropp, Martin 

Rosa, Peter 157, 163, 

Roscovius, Sandra 

Rose, David HO, 

Rosencrans, Carrie 

Rosenfelder, Stephen 

Rosenhagen, Donna 291, 

Rosenhagen, Tim 91, 

Rosenow, Lisa 

Rosenow, Tawny 

Rosewicz, Phillip 

Rosey, Everen 117, 132, 

Ross, Allison 

Ross, Christopher 

Ross, Clifton 

Ross, Devin 130, 

Ross, Lynne 

Ross, Roseann 

Ross, Susan 

Rottinghaus, Brenda 354 

Roninghaus, Dan 

Rottinghaus , Katherine 

Rottinghaus, Tim 91, 

Rouse, Holly 

Rouse .Susan 

Roush. Connie 

Roux, Joyce 100, 108 

Rowe, Barbara 93, 177, 126 

Rowland, Angie 132, 

Rowley. Denise 

Royer, Bill 1( 

Royster, Benjamin 3f 

Royster, Francesca I 

Royster, William 117, 4( 

Ruby, Jeff 96, 4( 

Ruda, Kenneth 4.' 

Rude, Cheryl 96, 3; 

Ruder, Jennifer 3C 

Rudicel, David 91, 3( 

Rues, Tony V. 

Ruggles, Steven < 

Rule, Eric 3< 

Rulo, Deborah 3^ 

Rumford, Deborah 31 

Rumpel, Lynette 3' 

Rupp, Dawn 31 

Rupp, Paul 4; 

Russ, Randall ! 

Russell, Anna 4f 

Russell, Darcy IC 

Russell, Darin 147,4.' 

Russell. Jill 348,3' 

Russell , Lori y. 

Russell, Mindy 1( 

Russell, Rusty 3' 

Rust, Paul 107,3: 

Rutan, Michele 4! 

Rutledge, Lynn 34 

Rutter, Jennifer < 

Runer, Kinra 2i 

Ryals, Claudine 4; 

Ryan, Amy 31 

Ryan, Christine 289, V' 

Ryan, Heidi 2i 

Ryan, Jane 4; 

Ryan, Lori 98, 147, 4;i 

Ryan, Michael 36 

Ryan, Thomas 3'. 

Rybum, Shaiuion 314, 4( 

Rychlec, Mark 3: 

Ryser, Keri 4! 



^ 



Saathoff, Nancy 91,4.' 

Sachse, Carolyn 4; 

Sachse, Sue 3( 

Sackhoff, Debra 41 

Sain, David 1< 

Sajdi, Mutaz '■■ 

Salava, David 117, 147,4: 

Salem, Robert 100, 107, 130,4! 

Sallee, Richard 96, 3' 

Salsbury, Daniel 31 

Salsbury, Tracy 21 

Salts. Gerald 126, 3( 

Salva, Caroline I- 

Samarzija, Mary 31 

Sanborn, Chad 4.' 

Sanchez, Grover ! 

Sanchez, Luis 4.' 

Sandensfleld, Dan 4! 

Sandercox , Gordon 1 30, 4? 

Sanders, Angela 38 

Sanders, Farrell 4^ 

Sanders , Jamea 41 

Sanders, Kathleen 3C 



476 



Index I 



Sanders, Kathleen M 348 

Janders, Laura 96 

Sanders, nhomas 316 

Sanderson, Chris 142, 157,392 

Sanderson, Michael 403 

iandlin, William 89, 132, 246, 370 

iandquist, Janice 138, 147,380 

ianford, Stacy 147, 386 

Jangster, Claudia 352 

>ankey,Hal 292 

Sanko, Gerald 155 

jantee, Janeen 415 

iantschi, Lisa 455 

Jargen, Laura 343, 367 

iarver. Sherry 455 

iasenick, Mark 354 

iasse, Myron 302 

iasser, Sandra 455 

^uber, Keith 455 

Jauer, Susan 455 

iaueressig, David 398 

iaunders, Sietske 392 

iavaiano. Tammy 321 

lavitt, Wendy 281 

ifwyer, Scott 126, 312 

layler, Catherine 57 

ayler, John 398 

layles, Frank 409 

;cales, Cristy 138, 329 

icarbrough, James 455 

<arlett, Craig 455 

xhaake, Sarah 291,455 

thaake. Sheila 321 

chaefer, Jon 455 

thaefer, Martha 286, 355 

chafer, David 115 

chaff, Jennifer 386 

chaffler, Joan 455 

ichalansky, Mary 455 

iChamberger, Sharon 455 

chamle, Roberta : 386 

chanzmeyer, Paul 66 

chamhorst, Angela 455 

chartz, Anne 307 

chartz, Kevin 392 

chartz, Pamela 392 

chauf , Marilyn 455 

cheibe, Douglas 364 

cheibler, Robert 147,455 

cheibmeir, Brian 455 

chemm,Todd 110, 121, 157,455 

chertz, Julie 455 

cheufler. Sue 392 

chieriing, Dan 352 

chiffler, Joan 142, 294 

:hild. Crystal 455 

chilling, Marcia 455 

chindler. Brant 130 

chindler, Dana 367 

:hindler, Natalie 314, 331 

:hinkel, Michael 107, 398 

;hinstock, Lezlie 455 

;hlapp, Andrew 364 

;hlatter, Walter 95, 169 

,;hlegel. Merle 281 

|:hleimer, Harold 398 

:hlender, Krisien 326 

;:hlender. Scon 455 

;hlick, Kelly 100,455 

:hmalzried, Gerald 392 

ihmalzried, Jeff 316 

;hmalzried, Julie 307 

l;hmalzried. Rick 392 

;hmar, Thomas 455 

':hmid, Steven 339 

"hmidt, Alicia 104. 321 

:hmidt, Anita 392 

]:hmidt. Carmen 138, 289 

|:hmidt, Diane 331 



Schmidt, Eric 455 

Schmidt, Garrett 98. 138.403 

Schmidt, Joan 456 

Schmidt, Kaila 321 

Schmidt, Kenneth 336 

Schmidt, Larry 163 

Schmidt, Laura 378 

Schmidt, Linda 456 

Schmidt, Mike 352 

Schmidt, Ronald 403 

Schmidt, Royce 91,95,456 

Schmidt, Sandra 159 

Schmiedeler, Nick 456 

Schmiedeler, Marty 456 

Schmitt, Baerbel 456 

Schmitt. Brett 456 

Schmitt, Gerhard 456 

Schmitz, Elmer 91, 95 

Schmitz , James 456 

Schmitz, Kelley 321 

Schmoker, Stuan 89,456 

Schneider. Catherine 456 

Schneider. Kelli 418 

Schneider. Leslye 98. 157. 246, 292, 322 

Schneider, Lori 292, 378 

Schneider, Mitch 147 

Schneider, Wayne 403 

Schneithorst, Craig 392 

Schneweis, William 115 

Schnieders, James 456 

Schnieders, John 346 

Schnieders, Joseph 456 

Schnur. Al 157,365 

Schoeberi. Richelle 281. 283 

Schoen , Jim 424 

Schoen, Kipp 372 

Schoenbein, Michael 409 

Scholle. Tiffany 409 

Schon, Eric 110. 155 

Schone. Ann 91.456 

Schrader, Ben 456 

Schrader. Maria 456 

Schrag. Dave 318 

Schrag, Jeffrey 304 

Schrag, Kandy 100,318,456 

Schrag, Russell 132 

Schraudner, Kimberly 456 

Schreiber, Barbara 307 

Schriner, John 163 

Schrock, Ann 354, 456 

Schrock, Jeff 365 

Schrock, Lee 365 

Schrock, Teresa 169, 364, 418 

Schroeder, Bradley 159. 382 

Schroeder, Brent 456 

Schroeder, Donita 348 

Schroeder, James 302 

Schroder, Jay 100 

Schroeder, Joyce 419 

Schroeder, Lisa 286 

Schroeder, Rick 456 

Schroeder, Rochelle 310 

Schuckman. Tammy 329 

Schuenemeyer, Connie 392 

Schuessler. Dennis 294 

Schuh, Wilma 142 

Schuler,Joan 104, 147,456 

Schuler, Julie 1(M,456 

Schuler, Karen 456 

Schulie, Lee 380 

Schultes, Thomas 108 

Schultz, Bethany 155, 286 

Schultz, Brad 312 

Schultz, Craig 163, 356 

Schultz, Doris 285 

Schultz, Drew 398 

Schultz. Kevin 100. 319 

Schultz. Todd 91, 319 

Schultze. Kevin 456 



Schultze. Lee 31i 

Schulze. Jana 318 

Schumacher. Todd 456 

Schumacher. Tracy 96. 456 

Schumaker. Angela 386 

Schumann. Lori 291, 322 

Schumann. Rob 97. 398 

Schurle, Bryan 91 

Schurie, Melanie 283 

Schussler, Jay 281 

Schutty. Kelly 314, 326 

Schwab. Patrick 104, 456 

Schwab, Paul 169 

Schwabauer, Michael 392 

Schwaru, Jan 355, 392 

Schwarukopf, Dan 115 

Schwarz, Laurel 456 

Schwarzenholz, Lisa 98 

Schweiger, Edward 96, 456 

Schweiuer, Brad 456 

Schwemmer, Rodney 116, 456 

Schwemmer, Sherri 456 

Schwermann, Brian 121, 138, 360 

Schwermann, Susan 286 

Schwiethale, Jeffery 107, 456 

Schwindamann, Angela 456 

Schwulst, Lance 456 

Scoggins. Lori 456 

Scott, Daniel 130, 456 

Scott, Donald 165 

Scon, Jane 456 

Scott, Joyce 456 

Scon, Kevin 115 

Scon, Lee 323 

Scon, Lisa 292. 419 

Scon, Michael 392 

Scon, Pamela 419 

Scon. Sylvia 163 

Scoville. Joy 322 

Scntchfield. Janell 392 

Scrivner. Paul 456 

Scrogm, Scon... 107, 121, 142. 163, 169. 
304 

Scronce, Gary 95. 456 

Seagle, Eugene 1 17 

Seago, Kelly 139. 283 

Seaman, Steven 456 

Seamans, Bryan 336 

Sears, Glenn 340 

Sears, Manhew 281 

Sears. Kevin 456 

Seastrom, Tracy 341, 456 

Sechler, Spencer 456 

Sederquist, Carley 331 

Sedlacek, Susan 105 

Sedorcek, Robert 206, 346 

Seele, Michael 456 

Seetin. Christina 316. 326 

Segerson. Michael 456 

Seiben. Todd 382 

Seibold. David 95. 314 

Seifen. Jerry 95, 104,411 

Seller, Gerald 457 

Seitzer, Joan 89, 104, 108.286 

Seitzer. John 138. 155. 360 

Selby,Cala 126,457 

Selby, William 413 

Sell, David 157,360 

Sellers, Stacy 322 

Sellmann, Mark 132. 169.403 

Senn, Michael 281 

Sepulveda, Gary 121, 346 

Serafm, John 356 

Serpan, Michael 304 

Setzer. Kristy 286 

Setzkom. Kenton 457 

Setzkom. Marsha 291. 329 

Seufert. Michael 130, 354 

Sevan, Jeff 373 



Severance, Frederick 457 

Severn, Bill 244, 245 

Severson, David 100, 132. 304 

Sewell. Mark 403 

Sexton. Wendall 398 

Seyben. Russell 457 

Seybold. John 457 

Seyfert. Scon 392 

Seymour. Dawn 93, 457 

Shackelford. Tracey 369, 386 

Shafer, Lome 457 

Shaffer, Cynthia 326 

Shaffer, Shelley 108 

Shaffstall. Kevin 457 

Shandy, Peggy 89, 100, 126,457 

Shaner, Marcine 100, 457 

Shank. Kathleen 367 

Shank. Paige 352 

Shannon. Denise 79. 107.329. 341 

Shannon. Marsha 386 

Sharp, Karen 126,457 

Sharpe, Gregory 121, 316 

Sharpe. Michael 316 

Shaw. Bradley 89.457 

Shaw. Christina 419 

Shaw. Deborah 117. 157.457 

Shaw. Dreanalee 457 

Shaw. Richard 319 

Shaw. Shelly 419 

Sheehan, Kathy 322 

Sheehan. Patrick 346 

Shell. Donna 409 

Shell. Stacie 409 

Shellenberger, Lori 157. 159. 339 

Shepherd, David 104,457 

Shepherd, Mary 286 

Sheppard, Craig 91,457 

Sherbert, Michael 91, 319 

Sherfey, Steven 312 

Sheriey, Janet 386 

Sherley, Lori 294.457 

Sherman. Scon 304 

Sherman. Shelley 283 

Sherman. Wesley 413 

Sherwood. Brian 346 

Sherwood. David 352 

Shields. Denise 107, 457 

Shields, EJennis.. 110, 121.159. 163.413 

Shields. Gregg 132. 314 

Shields. Michelle 283. 364 

Shields. Paul 457 

Shields, Sarah 96, 386 

Shim, Ron 142 

Shinder, Latham 163 

Shinn, Glenda 382 

Shipley. Lisa 300. 352 

Shipley. William 403 

Shippen. Panic 108. 457 

Shippen. Terri 307 

Shirack. Vonceilc 457 

Shiriey. John 108 

Shoemake, Kelly 300 

Shope. Sara 457 

Shore. Harris 122 

Shorman. Rex 398 

Short. Lisa 352. 367 

Shorter. Janet 457 

Shorter. Paulla 458 

Shortt. Russell 458 

Shono, Barry 157 

Shons. Barry 95. 104. 110. 121.304 

Shoup. Angie 142. 419 

Shriner. Cheryl 378 

Shriwise. John 155 

Shuey. Scon 89. 292 

Shumate. Daren 392 

Shupe. David 281 

Shupe. Glenn 281 

Shuru, Tiffany 147.458 




Shuller. Sara 316 

Shuns, Todd 316 

Siddiqui. Sheikh 409 

Sidener. Julie 386 

Siebert, Julian 157 

Siebert. Marianne 458 

Siebert. Sandra 157 

Sleek. Karma 367 

Sieck. Mike 281 

Siegfned. Robert 93. 104.337 

Siek, Terry 413 

Sierra. Michael 110.458 

Sigetich. Shane 304 

Sigler. Dennis 128 

Siglinger. Paul 458 

Sigma DelU Chi 153 

Sigma DelU Pi ISS 

Sigma Lambda Chi 155 

Soc. for Advancement of Management. 

155 

Soc. of Hispanic Professors of 

Engineering 155 

Soc. of Manufacturing Engineers... 155 

Siltman. Lori 117 

Silva. Michelle 458 

Silva. Christopher 399 

Simcox. Kelly 341 

Simeta. Tinoi 332 

Simmons. Joseph 337 

Simmons, Lenior 458 

Simmons, Trish 310 

Simmons. Rick 312 

Simmons. Robert 458 

Simmons. Thomas 403 

Simon. Shannon 294. 458 

Simon. Tim 458 

Simons. Joe 458 

Simpson. Chad 458 

Simpson. Clark 107 

Sims. Brett 365 

Sims, Jay 458 

Sims, Jill 415 

Sims, Rick 458 

Sims, Sherry 348 

Sinclair, Ellen 415 

Sinclair, Jennifer 138, 392 

Sinclair, Julie 415 

Sinderson, Jill 281 

Sinker, Tami 458 

Sipes, Jerry 373 

Sise, Manhew 362 

Sisson, Buck 169 

Siu, Becky 458 

Siuda, Manhew 370 

Sivyer, Mary 126 

Sixbury, Glenn 458 

Sjogren, Tarrunera 155, 292. 329 

Skaer. Laura 331 

Skaggs, Brad 352 

Skaggs. Clinton 458 

Skaggs. Douglas 304 

Skarda. John 302 

Skeie. Erica 286 

Skidmore. Cheryl 458 

Skidmore. Mark 458 

Skoch. Marcia 458 

Skolout. Barry 115. 458 

Skwarlo. Stan 399 

Slagle. Mary 104. 307 

Slagle. Tom 110, 111 

Slan, Renae 117, 329, 341 

Slaven, Daniel 370 

Slaven, Joseph 370 

Slaven, Kevin 107 

Sleezer, John 98, 99 

Sleezer, Lisa 316, 329 

Slifer, Cynthia 378 

Sloan, Carole 318,392 

Sloan. Marcia 458 

Sloan. Nanette 458 

Sluder. Christopher 91. 292 

Slyter. Kenneth 403 

Smading. Daniel 458 

Small. Kevin 372 

Smart. James 132 

Smart. Larry 91 

Smiley. Scott 458 

Smischny. Janis 458 

Smith. Angela 307 

Smith. Angie 98.458 

Smith. Anthony 343 

Smith. Beth A 458 

Smith. Beth J 302 

Smith. Bob 115 

Smith. Brent 346 

Smith. Brian 316 

Smith. Charleton 458 

Smith. Craig 458 

Smith. Dan 89. 352 

Smith. Daria 322 

Smith. Donald 142.458 

Smith. DonaldT 96 

Smith, Dwayne 316 

Smith, Elizabeth 129 

Smith. Elizabeth C 419 

Smith. Eric 458 

Smith. Grant 304 

Smith. Gregory 169 

Stuffing her mouth with 
another taco is Sherri Rathbun 
during the taco eating contest 
sponsored by Taco Beil. The 
competition was heid between 
aii living groups and the win- 
ners got VCRs for their living 
groups. (Photo by Jeff A. 
Taylor) 



Index 



477 



Smith, J. F 458 

Smith. James 107. 458 

Smith. Janet 329 

Smith, Jann 392 

Smith, Jeffrey 130 

Smith, Jeffrey W 392 

Smith, Jim 399 

Smith. John 292 

Smith. Joseph 107 

Smith, Kelly 316. 332 

Smith. Kenneth 458 

Smith. Kimberly 348 

Smith. Lon 458 

Smith. Lori 157. 458 

Smith. Marc 399 

Smith. Mardi 110, 142. 163 

Smith. Martha 332 

Smith. Michael 130 

Smith. Nancy 386 

Smith. Phillip 392 

Smith. Rachel 302.380 

Smith. Rita 392 

Smith. Ronald 128,163,292 

Smith, Roni 419 

Smith, Scott 360 

Smith, Seth 304 



Smith, Sherri 348 

Smith. Sheryl 458 

Smith. Stacy 352. 386 

Smith. Stacy 310 

Smith, Todd 147, 304 

Smith, Troy 95,403 

Smith, Walt 163 

Smolar. Janet 115,458 

Smouse, Kathy 100 

Sneden. Curtis 337 

Snell. Jamie 100 

Snell, Nancy 458 

Snider. Melissa 132 

Snider. Randall 91. 95 

Snider. Robert 458 

Snook, Kenneth 458 

Snowden, Shelli 329 

Snyder, Bruce 163 

Snyder, Karin 364 

Snyder, Ken 346 

Sobba, Mary 91, 108,291,458 

Society of Women Engineers 152 

Sociology and Student Criminal Justice 

Ass 157 

Soden, Hawley 322 

Soderberg, Todd 370 



Sollie, Kimberly 289 

Sommer, Shari 314, 386 

Sommers, Susan 157, 310, 352 

Sonntag, Drew 458 

Soucie, Mark 365 

Soukup, Sharla 286 

Soule. Rebecca 409 

Soule, Rex 458 

Southard. Stephanie 343, 392 

Southwell, Allison 307 

Sowers, Brett 169 

Soxie, Mark 100 

Spaar, Laura 415 

Spachek. David 403 

Spachek, Jeffrey 399 

Spaeth, Kristen 332 

Spafford, David 459 

Spain. Darrell 459 

Spangler. Doug 304 

Spanley. Kevin 392 

Sparks. Suzanne 326 

Spaulding. Richard 459 

Specht. Anita 419 

Speer.Kathy 459 

Spencer. Julie 419 

Spicer. Alan 382 







^- 



-"^K )/ 



V ■*. 







7 ; 









J 



■V* -' 



••«?=' 



/ 



Spicer. John 155 

Spicer. Paula ' 121 

Spiegel. Steve 399 

Spillman. Steven 96. 459 

Spinar, Mark 392 

Splichal. Michael 157, 163. 373 

Splichal. Patrick 100 

Spokes. Virginia 392 

Spraetz. Ginny 367 

Spnck. Deborah 95, 163, 307 

Spiing Collegian SufT 108 

Springer. Kimberly 459 

Springett. Kelly 367 

Spurs 157 

Squires, Darren 360 

St John,Bryce 459 

Stadel, Vince 126,459 

Stadler, Anne 243, 378 

Stafford. James 413 

Stahl. Pamela 367 

Stahl. Ron 194. 195 

Stainbrook, Joann 392 

Staley, Serena 93, 336, 459 

Staley. Tim 337 

Stalker. Braden 104, 459 

Stambaugh. Craig 459 

Stambaugh. James 130. 382 

Stamper. Marcie 132 

Stamy. Paul 169 

Slander. Karl 304 

Stangle. Darrell 341 

Stanley. Dina 283 

Stanley. Jalyn 339 

Stanley, Shecky 54 

Stanley, Todd 316 

Stansbarger, Shari 291, 348 

Star Riders 157 

Starbuck. Lorin 459 

Stark, Charles 104 

Stark, Dane 147 

Stark, Gary 337 

Stark, Thomas 91,459 

Staudenmaier, Laura 132 

Stauffer, Darns 337 

Stauth, Brent 382 

Stauthe, Maria 459 

Siecklein, Chris 413 

Steel Ring 157 

Steele, Douglas 334 

Steele, Timothy 117,459 

Steen. Debora 147, 348 

Steenbock, Curtis 108,292 

Steere. Joel 346 

Steffens. Jennifer 345, 367 

Stegeman. Susan 98, 459 

Stegman. Kevin 337 

Stegman. Cathy 326 

Stegman . Dale 403 

Stegman. Lawrence 403 

Steichen. James 91 

Stein. Alicia 452 

Stein. Janice 286, 354 

Stein. Jerome 93, 117. 354 

Stein, Susan 286, 354 

Strinbach, Fred 399 

Steincamp, Charles 339 

Steineger, Chris 155 

Steinle, Mike 147, 319 

Stenstrom, Mark 292 

Stenzel, Eric 399 

Stephens, Gina 300 

Stephens, Julie 163, 169,307 

Stephenson, Kevin 128 

Stephenson, Lisa 341,459 

Sterbenz, Douglas 346 

Steriing, Melinda 326 

Stemeker, Marty 155 

Stems, James 91, 95, 104, 107, 159,339, 
356 

Stemsdorff, Donna 126 

Stevens, Alan 96 

Stevens, Lori 138, 169, 310 

Stevenson. Christian 108, 165,357 

Stevenson, Julie 349 

Stewart, Christine 392 

Stewart, David 63, 138, 392 

Stewart, Deborah 459 

Stewart, Chris 108 

Stewart, Jennifer 326 

Stewart, Kimberly 354, 392 

Stewart, Kimberly S 329 

Stewart, Mary 459 

Stigge, Linda 459 

Stillwagon, Richard 459 

Stillwagon, Ronald 341 

Stinson. Thomas 319 

Stippich. Julie 378 

Stock. Dan 121,339 

Stockli-Trigo, Dionisia 459 

Stockman, Jeffrey 410 

Stockman, Raymond 459 

Stockwell, Kimberly 419 

Stokes, Jeffrey 357 

Stokes, Leslie 138, 169, 329 

Slolfus, Brina 332 

Stone, Jill 459 

Stone, Nancy 310, 362 

Pattie Klenda and Connie 
Carriker sign a sheet thanl(ing 
Jacl( Hartman for his 16 years of 
coaching the men's basltetbail 
team. Hartman, who resigned 
Jan. 30, coached his last game 
in Ahearn Field House against 
the Universtiy of Nebraska. 
(PholQ by Andy Nelson) 



Stone, Steven 

Sloneking, Patsy ; 

Stonestreet, Mauria 362, [ 

Stonner, Edward ; 

Storey, Dee < 

Stouse, Carla ; 

Stout, Amanda 107, 322,; 

Stout, Craig ; 

Stout, Rebecca ; 

Stover, Lisa 117,; 

Stover, Scott ; 

Stover^ Sherri ] 

Stover, Stephanie ; 

Stowe, Barbara 92, 

Stowe, Leanne l 

Strahm, Christine 104,4 

Strahm, Gregory 4 

Strahm, Michael 93, 

Strain, Todd ; 

Strait, Amy 3 

Siranathan, Brett A 

Strasser, Keith 2 

Strayer, Kelly 3 

Strecker, David 4 

Strecker, George l 

Streets, Jeffrey 110, 163,3 

Streff, Kimberiy 2 

Streit. Michael 3 

Streltzer, Tracie 3 

Strickler, Dale 2 

Stritzke, Todd 138,3 

Stmad, Caroline 91, 100,4 

Strnad, Elizabeth 4 

Stroade, Stephen 3 

Stroda, Timothy 4 

Stroh, Kevin 95,4 

Stroik, Marcella 

Strong, Jami 126,3 

Strong, Kirsten 2 

Strong, Melissa 2 

Struckhoff, Christine 4 

StruckJioff, Jacque 4 

Strunk, Jim 4 

Stryker, Marilyn 1 

Stuart , Frances 4 

Stuart. Jim 4 

Stuart. Robert 3 

Stubenhofer. Melinda 3 

Stubenhofer. Melissa 4 

Stuber. Gregory 3 

Stucker. Catherine 4 

Stucky. Mahlon 4 

Stucky. Steven 3 

Student Alumni Board 1 

Student Dietetics Association 1 

Student National Educ. Assoc I 

Student Senate 1 

Stueve. Anthony 1 

Stueve. Mary 4 

Stuke. Michelle 2 

Stukenholtz. Janet J 

Slump. William 1 

Stumpff. Rebecca 3 

Sturgeon. Carla 4 

Sturrock. Bryan 3 

Stutterheim. Andrea 3 

Suderman. Michael 1 

Suelter. Wendall 95.4 

Sullivan. Dana 287, 3 

Sullivan. Marcia 1 

Sullivan. Neala 2 

Sullivan. Scott 3 

Sullivan. William 1 

Sump. Gina 4 

Sunderland, Janet 4 

Supawamnapong, Sathapom 1 

Sutcliffe. Brad 3' 

Sutcliffe. Gregory 4 

Suter, Brian 245, 4. 

Suther, Dan 4. 

Suttle, Jeffrey 107,3 

Sutton, Derieth i 

Sutton, George 4. 

Sutton, Louis 3* 

Sutton, Marcia 31 

Sutton, Mary 1 

Sutton. Shelly 2I| 

Sutton, William 88, 89. ', 

Svaty. Lynelte 3i 

Svaty. Becky 3* 

Sviuatw. Manthri \. 

Svoboda. Brian 3 

Svoboda. David 108,3 

Svoboda. Michael 4; 

Swafford. Steve 3; 

Swail. Jennifer 165. 314,4: 

Swaim, Sarah 287, 3.' 

Swan, Chris 3^ 

Swan, John 165, 4! 

Swan, Leslie 147, 3^ 

Swaney, Thomas 3t 

Swann, Kevin 4^ 

Swanson, Bruce 3; 

Swanson, Janell 4.' 

Swanson, Julie 91, 4< 

Swanson, Shelli 3;] 

Swart, Ryan 31 

Swartz. Jennifer 2! 

Swartz. Nancy 3f 

Swartz. Stuart li 

Sweany. Gary 93,96,41 

Sweany. Michael 34 

Swearingen. Bradley 

Swearingen. Raymond 3^ 

Sweat. Brenda 126, 1; 

Sweat, Deanna 4< 

Sweeney. Michael 3' 

Sweet, Brad 4( 

Sweet, Shelley *6 

Swengel. Jodi 307, 36 

Swibold, Roger 16 

Swinney , Steve 46 

Switzer, Veryl 11 



478 



Index 



yers. Andrew 128 

;!pi. Dawn 89 

i/howski, John 130 



'J 



ftard, Mandlito 155 

!gan. Scott 297 

bott, Kristi 460 

ge, Andrew 360 

ley, Bradley 297 

1, Kristin 300, 314 

ig, Hoang 169 

igedal. Michael 302 

iksley, Torres 410 

.nehill, Tracy 392 

■horn, Brian 91, 460 

■horn, David 147 

■vestad, Lisa 310, 352 

■kinen, Cheryl 387 

';, Clinton 130 

lam. Eirene 89, 117,392 

1 Alpha Pi 163 

1 Beta Pi 163 

I Sigma Delta 163 

scher. Debbie 226 

scher, Randall 362 

TOy,Lisa 289,372 

lor, Amv 329 

lor, Deborah 460 

lor, Glenn 460 

loe,Jack 107, 132,312 

ior, Janice 115, 165,460 

lor, Jeff Alan 460 

'ior, Karen 378 

or, KarenM 289 

' :or, Kevan 460 

lor, Lynn 138,297 

lor, Roben 132,460 

l|or, Russell 460 

l;or, Scott 460 

1 or, Tamara 289 

1 or, Tanza 307 

I'Or, Teresa 460 

lor, Teresa 460 

lor, Ward 403 

1 ley, Sandra 314,332 

Inan, Kelly 326 

ller, Janet 460 

1 me, Teresa.. 98, 117, 138,281,326 

Iple, Robert 312 

llplin. Beth 367 

Iplin, Craig 352 

Tial,Doug 319 

T'lant, Gay 283 

Tl Cheng 121,460 

T II, John 302 

I illiger, Todd 334 

I,;ndorf, Lori 89, 104, 302, 380 

I , Laurie 349 

T ;l. Shannon 287 

T:her, Todd 302 

T -nan, Steve 91, 108, 399 

T'-her, Julie 415 

rjnst. of Electrical and Electronics 

E (leers 119 

T.I, Craig 392 

Tl, Gerald 147.399 

T|, Joe 460 

ri;3, Melvin 169, 399 

ri er, Cammy 89, 104, 292, 419 

H , Donald 155,460 

HL Jodee 378 

n .Steve 95 

n , sen , David 460 

H'sen, Murray 147,410 

riiirup, Gregory 89 

tl;, Monte 91,460 

n ann, Debbie 460 

n!as. Andy 461 

Itias. Arthur 89 

n as. Beth 461 

Il]as. Brad 370 

I>'as, David 461 

Itjas, Edward 357 

If'as, Gail 367 

nilas. Hilary 332.372 

ftjas, Jeffrey 104,461 

ill is, Lisa 91, 128 

ill as. Marvin 461 

ill, is. Ryan 93. 107.372 

lli'is. Scott 169.461 

llijis. Tom 130 

ili IS. Tamara 461 

Ililis. Tarah 126 

ili'ison. Jennifer 461 

ilij)Son. Charles 115 

V'son. Craig 461 

li'ison. Curt 117 

ii ison, Janet 392 

niPSon,Jeff 96.461 

ison, Jennifer 110, 419 

II 'Son, Eric 403 

tl ison, Julie 461 

son, Kenneth 110 



Thompson, Lisa 100, 461 

Thompson, Mark 346 

Thompson, Patricia 142,419 

Thompson, Scott 399 

Thompson, Scott H 314 

Thompson, Teri 387 

Thompson, Trisha 332, 362 

Thompson. Vickie 329 

Thomson. I^anice 169. 302. 461 

Thomson. Sheri 326 

Thornton. John 128. 461 

Thornton. Mary 419 

Thorp. James 357 

Thorp. Todd 461 

Thorpe. Kimberly 287 

Thowe, Mark 132 

Thuman, Debbie 132 

Thurlow, Scott 302 

Thurman, George 115 

Thurow, Tracy 332 

Thu-Van, Van 169 

Tiemann, Jacinda 392 

Tiemann, Patricia 392 

Tien, Larry 108 

Tiffany, Mary 461 

Tillberg, Cheryl 316, 322 

Tillberg, David 316 

Tiller, Ronald 357 

Tilley, Dennis 461 

Tillman, Frank 121 

Tingelhoff, Linda 96 

Tinker, Joseph 89, 147,461 

Tinker, Sally 349 

Titsworth . James 399 

Todd, Susan 115, 326 

Tollefson, Becky 419 

Tome, Janet 296, 322 

Tomeden, Christel 289 

Torok, Douglas 461 

Torrey, Lori 461 

Torrey. Michael 91. 292 

Torring. Erik 370 

Totien. Diane 461 

Totten. Mark 281 

Townley. Brian 461 

Townsend. Pete 163 

Trabue, Tamara 393 

Tracey. Tish 52 

Tracy. Carol 132. 142,410 

Traegcr, Sally 138, 139 

Trahoon, Stacy 98, 461 

Tran, Hieu 169 

Tran, Maihew 169 

Tran, Nhan 169 

Tran, Khanh 169 

Tranbarger, Mick 100, 316 

Trapp. Scott 461 

Travelule, Jami 367 

Travis, Larry 173, 174, 250, 251 

Traylor, Ann 461 

Traylor, Shad 410 

Treff, Amy 96, 138,419 

Treiber, Janet 415 

Tremblay, Joan 142 

Trendel, Sherri 461 

Trenkle, Kent 341 

Trennepohl, Harlan 115 

Trentman, Cherrie 283 

Tremman, Cheryl 310 

Trentman, Connie 322 

Tretler, Robert 357 

Trimmer, Robert 98, 341 

Tripleit, Frank 360 

Triplett, Rebecca 367 

Tritsch, David 357 

Tritsch, Mary 289 

Trompeter, Jennifer 316 

Trompeter, Melissa 316 

Troslle, Lenore 366 

Trotter, Donald 106 

Trotter, Marilyn 90, 91 

Troutfetter, Kathy 322 

True, Darren 461 

Trueba, Humbeno 91 

Tniitt, Sondra 461 

Tryon, Craig 334 

Tsen, Caroline 98, 310 

Isen, 1-awrence 159, 337 

Tucker, Bryan 399 

Tucker, Charles 399 

Tucker, Jana 364, 367 

Tucker, Jeffrey 403 

Tucker, Kenneth 292 

Tucker, Melanie 46 1 

Tucker, Sanford 155, 343 

Tudor, Jeffrey 98 

Tulloch, Thomas 46 1 

Tulp, Kristine 252, 287 

Tummons, Brian 370 

Tumpes, Amy 310. 352 

Tunks. Barry 393 

Turley. Dana 314. 387 

Turner, Constance 96, 289 

Turner, John 126, 403 

Turner, Kenneth 110 

Turner. Libby 138. 157.349 

Turner. Randall 91 

Turner. Ray 100. 365 

Turner. Tamera 461 

Turner. Teresa 461 

Turnquist. Gary 96.403 

Tuttle. Craig 461 

Tuttle. Jeffrey 108 

Tuttle. Laura 96 

Twiss. Nancy 115 

Tye. Sharon 159 

Tyler. Curtis 461 

Tyler. James 314 

Tyree. Ingrid 461 

Tyson. Timothy 104, 108,461 



U. 



Uhlarik. John 163 

Ulrich. Kathryn 300 

Ulrich. Timothy 89, 316 

Umidon. Kevin 461 

Ummen. Mark 461 

Umscheid. Kenneth 461 

Underwotxl. Todd 461 

Unger, Colleen 380 

Unperer. Keith 370 

Union Governing Board 163 

Union Program Council 163 

UPC Electric Entertainment 165 

UPC Feature Films 165 

UPC Issues & Answers 165 

UPC Kaleidoscope 165 

UPC Promotion 165 

UPC Special Events Committee 169 

UPC Travel 169 

Unlusoy, Bulent 403 

Unruh. Craig 110.461 

Unruh. Gary 362 

Unruh, Bryan 89, 399 

Unruh. Lisa 387 

Unruh, Maria 113, 387 

Unruh, Stanley 163 

Unruh, Vance 403 

Unterreiner, Jerry 461 

Upson, Ron 461 

Uratil, Brett 337 

Urban, James 132 

Urban, Brad 334 

Urbanek, Denise 419 

Unck.Scon 461 

Useldinger, Lori 345, 393 

Utech, Steve 365 



^ 



Vacca, Julie 96 

Vader, James 360 

Vaidya, Krishna 121 

Van Dam, Timirie 349 

Van Doren, Julie 393 

Van Dom, Kimberly 393 

Van HtKJI, Gcrise 100 

Van Loenen, Judy 393 

Van Meter, Elvin 354 

Van Swaay , J . M 46 1 

Van, VanThi 387 

Vance, Kelly 403 

Vandeest , Roy 46 1 

Vandem, Doug 357 

Vander Laan, Jeffrey 159, 461 

Vander Velde, John 130, 131 

Vanderlip, Rebecca 155 

Vanderlip, Richard 169 

Vanderslice, Karen 462 

Vanderveen, Deborah 41 1 

Vandeveer, Monte 462 

Vanhaverbeke, Ken 169 

Vanhoet, Gerise 329 

Vanhoet, Phillip 462 

Vanier, Mary 138,322 

Vanlandingham, Amy 378 

Vanleeuwen, Annette 462 

Vanmeter, Angela 462 

Vann. Shelly 462 

Vanthullenar. David 337 

Vanwey. Dennis 98 

Vargo. Rich 462 

Vamer, Debra 415 

Vamer. Kendra 332 

Vamer. Sarah 132. 287 

Vamey. Doug 142 

Vamey. Heather 349 

Vera. Nancy 393 

Vering. Christopher 157. 372 

Verkler, Tamera 462 

Verschelden, Mark.. 110, 121, 157. 163. 
393 

Vespe. Frank 462 

Vest. Kristi 462 

Veverka. Kim 462 

Vietnamese Student Association 169 

Vikman. Andrew 130. 399 

Villares. Jose 155 

Vincent. Jamie 93 

Vining. Rachel 91,95, 159,462 

Vink, Kathleen 128 

Visser, Sharon 419 

Vitztum, Kathy 326 

Vogel, Christopher 100,341 



Vogel, Elizebeth 307 

Vogel, Gregory 341 

Vogt, Jeni 462 

Vohs, Susaime 163, 462 

Voks, Susie 169 

Volkman, Erich 462 

Volmert, Russell 110 

Volz, Gerald 462 

Von L^he, Troy 462 

Vondra, Kevm 121, 169.312 

Vopata, Charles 462 

Vopata, Edward 393 

Voss, Rene 419 

Voss, Royalyn 419 

Voth, Danny 462 

Voth, Michael 410 

Voth. Pamela 89,410 

Voth, Patricia 380 

Voth, Vem 399 

Vsetecka, Lana 393 

Vulgamore, Jeffrey 248 



^ 



Waggle, Kimberly 462 

Waggoner, Dena 283 

Wagner, Angela 96, 462 

Wagner, Bradley 1 26 

Wagner, Charia 100. 132. 165, 380 

Wagner. Daniel 360 

Wagner, David 357 

Wagner, Gretchen 98, .t07 

Wagner, Judy 157, 294, 380 

Wagner, Karia 155, 380 

Wagner, Kevin L 462 

Wagner, Kevin M 357 

Wagner, Larry 93, % 

Wagner, Mark 462 

Wagner, Rhonda 378 

Wagner, Shelley 332 

Wagner, Tim 362 

Wahl. Lynn 462 

Wahl, Sandra 159,462 

Wainwright, Darren 126 

Wainwright, Dean 93, 100, 462 

Wait, Darrell 462 

Wail, Linda 462 

Waite, Elizibeth 283, 362 

Wakabayshi, Ike 128, 157 

Wakem, Lisa 387 

Wakeman, Shelley 283 

Walahoski, Annette 322 

Wald, Robert 138. 163,462 

Wald, Theodore 297 

Waldeck. Elizabeth 326 

Walden. Geoffrey 337 

Walden. Michael 316 

Walden. Mike 357 

Waldorf, Lareina 1(M. 387 

Walker, Barry 462 

Walker, Crystal 302, 380 

Walker, Daniel 130 

Walker, Dowell 462 

Walker, Hugh 462 

Walker, John 334 

Walker, Kimberly 419 

Walker, Laura 34 1 

Walker, Steve R 462 

Walker, Steve V 314 

Walker, Tract 281, 326 

Walkup, Ricky 462 

Wall, Alan 365 

Wall, Carolee 462 

Wall, Mary 287 

Wallace, Bobbi 138, 362, 367 

Wallace, Craig 157 

Waller, Karen 314 

Wallis, Cindy 96 

Walrod, Leisa 387 

Walsten, Clayton 302 

Walter, Daniel 107 

Walter, Judith 98. 147. 332 

Walter. Kevin 462 

Walters. Fred 393 

Wanderlich. Marcia 96. 393 

Ward. Amy 93. 115. 157,332 

Ward. Alan 362 

Ward. Bryan 462 

Ward. Caryl 132, 147, 300 

Ward, Crystal 142, 462 

Ward, Derrie 410 

Ward, Harvey 126 

Ward, Krista 349 

Ward, Mary 283, 341 

Ward. Stephen 95, ICM, 334 

Warden, Kriste 322 

Ware, Brian 334 

Waris, Julie 307 

Warner, Kimberly 300 

Warner, Randall 110, 117.462 

Warren, David 132, 393 

Warren, Debra 393 

Warren, Marie 462 

Warren, Penny 142 

Warren, Stephanie 289,314 

Warriner, Tobin 334 



Warrington, Gabrielle 410 

Wary, Joseph 354 

Washburn, Stephanie 387 

Washington, Pamela 410 

Wasinger, Gregory 370 

Wasinger, Jerome 362 

Wasinger. Tonv 91 

Wasko, Kurt,..'. 393 

V^'asmund, Julie 283 

Wassenberg , Karen 462 

Wasson. Cherie 378 

Wasylk, Dave 410 

Watkins, David 360 

Watson, Andrew 462 

Watson, Alan 462 

Watson, Elizabeth 98, 155 

Watson, Kellie 165. 329 

Watson, Paulette 369. 387 

Watson. Theresa 95 

Walters. Lisa 332 

Watts. Kathleen 132. 157. 336. 367 

Watts. Phillip 462 

Waufle. Todd 370 

Waugh. Dean 462 

Wauthier, Ray 204 

Wear, Carletta 104 

Weatherman, Steven 91. 399 

Weathers, Jean 463 

Weaver. Brian 142. 393 

Weaver. Larry 142 

Weaver, Linda 410 

Webb, Michael 155, 463 

Webb, Robert 393 

Weber, Koni 284 

Weber, Kristel 294 

Weber, Scon 91, 104 

Webster, Eric 304 

Webster, Laura 332 

Weddle, Kerri 411 

Wedeman, Elizabeth 378 

Weeks, Dana 132, 169,463 

Weeks, Kathy 378 

Wegner, Michael 147,463 

Wehbe, Hassan 403 

Wehrly, Manhew 399 

Weichold, Glen 294 

Weidler, Bryan 399 

Weigel, Colin 337 

Weigel, Leann 307 

Weigel, Missy 300 

Weigel, Ronald 370 

Weinberg, Patrick 98 

Werner. Patrick 463 

Weingartner, Michelle 463 

Weingartner, Michon 415 

Weir, Kimberly 1(M, 393 

Weiser. Karen 93, 165,463 

Weishaar, Manin 399 

Weith, Carolyn 307 

Weith, Steven 110, 121,463 

Welch, Jennifer 291 

Welch, Kelly 91, 107, 138, 159,292 

Weldon, Stephanie 310 

Weller, Eunice 463 

Wells, Bob 463 

Wells, Glenn 360 

Wells, Jeffrey 399 

Wells, Lee Ann 287 

Wells, Melissa 291 

Wells, Nathaniel 382 

Welsh, Connie 367 

Welsh, Julie 100 

Welsh, Susan 316,329 

Wchon, Delinda 463 

Wcllon, Richard 91 

Wendelburg, Brian 341 

Wendl, Jaqueline 302, 387 

Wenger, JixJie 463 

Weninger. Rose 130,281 

Weninger, Shawn 300 

Wentzel, Kristi 100.287 

Wenizel, Mark 357 

Wenizel. Scott 463 

Werner. John 463 

Wemes. Nancy 110. 126.463 

Wenh, Carrie 329 

Werth, Michael 463 

Wenh, Sharon 329 

Wesemann, Manin %, 463 

Wesley, Angela 62 

Wesley, Gayla 463 

Wesley, Jim 463 

Wessel, Shannon 147, 380 

West, Carolyn 411 

West, Oscar 104, 463 

Wesiervelt. Glen 155.463 

Westhues. Sandra 322 

Wetter. Elaine 142.463 

Wetter. Mike 91.463 

Wettig. Edward 357 

Wetzel. Douglas 372 

Wewer. Randy 138.463 

Wewers, Tamela 329 

Whaley, Tracey 378 

Wheany, Roben 292 

Wheat State Agronomy Club 169 

Wheeler, Brian 464 

Wheeler, Jolene 464 

Wheelock, Brenda 326 

Whisner, Brian 393 

Whitaker, Scott 352 

White, Caria 367 

White, Christopher 107 

White, Daneale 107,289 

While, David 302 

White, James 126, 138,393 

White, Janice 410 

White, Kathi 126 

White, Kathleen 96,410 

White, Lisa 387 

White, Perry 110, 126 



idex 



479 



White. Rodney 403 

While. Roger 91 

While. Slephan 410 

White. Tami 464 

White, Tammie 345,464 

White, Tara 419 

White. Tim 155, 169 

Whiiebread, Ci^stal 287 

Whitehair, Chris 341 

Whitehair, Mark 341 

Whitehead, William 362 

Whitfield. Mark 130 

Whitfill. David 95, 382 

Whitlock, Marcy 284 

Whitney, Michael 312 

Whitney, Renee 198,202 

Whitson. Jayne 380 

Whittaker. Thomas 304 

Whitten, Cynthia 367 

Whyte. William 323 



Wickersham. Elizabeth 110, 332 

Wickramasingha. Dharshini 121 

Wickslrum. Garen 464 

Wicksirum. Valene 464 

Wiebe. Janelle 110, 121, 163 

Wiebe, Virgil 67, 117,411 

Wiechman, Henry 316 

Wiechman, Kim 464 

Wiederholt, Theresa 142, 159,464 

Wiedman, Rick 91 

Wiens, Craig 91, 130 

Wiest, Pamela 464 

Wietham, Rick 341 

Wieth. Carolyn 296 

Wiggin. David 357 

Wiggins. Brenda 147 

Wikoff, Jennifer 393 

Wilber. Matthew 464 

Wilbur. Rebecca 372 

Wilcox. Anthony 147 



Wildeman, Diana 349 

Wilder.Doug 362 

Wilderson, David 93, 354 

Wilderson, Steve 107 

Wiles, Gary 339 

Wiley, Anne 284,318 

Wiley, Rebecca 169, 419 

Wiley, Valerie 419 

Wilfong, Mable 132 

Wilhite, Steven 147 

Wilkens, Brent 399 

Wilkerson, Gram 339 

Wilkinson, Douglas 464 

Wilkinson, Lisa 410 

Wilkinson, Mellaney 322 

Wilkinson, Tom 464 

Will, Ray 464 

Willcott, Deborah 300 

Willcoxon, Phillip 346 

Willcul, Delisa 98, 326 



Willems, Al 155 

Willems, Curtis 91 

Willers. Maelyn 91, 104, 393 

Willett, Michele 387 

Willey. Kimberly 329 

Williams. Betsy 138. 329 

Williams. Brad 399 

Williams. Daniel 464 

Williams. Deborah 147 

Williams. Elise 104, 289 

Williams. Gary 304 

Williams, Todd 319 

Williams. Jeffrey 95.464 

Williams. Keith D 403 

Williams. Keith J 96 

Williams. Kent 357 

Williams, Kimberly 130. 387 

Williams. Lisa A 394 

Williams, Lisa K 284 

Williams, Loraine 410 




lliams, Lon 

Iliams, Nancy 

lliams , Ronny 

lliams, Thomas 

Ills, Cathy 

His, Kimberly 

Mis, Larry 

His, Matthew 

Ilms, Beverly 349, 

How , Thomas 

Hson , Alise 

Iluweit, Lea 

Ison, Carl 

Ison, Chris 

Ison , Christina 

Ison, Colleen 147, 169, 

:lson , Darrel 

Ison, Eric 

Ison, Jamie 56, 

Ison, Janette 

Ison, Jay 98, 

Ison, Jeffrey 126, 155, 

Ison, John A 121, 155, 

Ison, JohnR 95 

Ison, Kathleen 

Ison, Lori 

Ison, Michael 

Ison, Mike 

Ison, Paula 

Ison, Rodney 

Ison , Thomas 

Ison, William 

Itfong, David 93, 

nans, Elizabeth 287, 

neinger , Ronald 

neland , Candice 

neland , Shelli 



Wuig,Jeff.. 

"' ngate, Frances 

nger , Kelly 

ngert, George 104, 

ngert , Harold 

nkler, Chanthaphen 

nkler, Greg 

nkley, Kenny 249, 

nklhofer , Franz 

nklhofer, Kathy 362, 

nne , TimoHiy 

insinger, Randall 

nslow , Stephen 

,nsor , Daniel 

mer, Rob 

nter, Sandra 

inter, Scott 

nter, Stanley 163, 

nter, Sydney 91, 

nter, Trenton 

nterman. Amy 

nterman , Kurt 

mers. Tammy 246, 

nion , Ray 

ntz , Cynthia 

nzenried , Brian 

pplinger, Lisa 163, 

re, Andrew 

rth, Anne 95, 

se. Amy 284, 

se. Fred 

se. Rodney 155. 

seley . Jennifer 

seley, Jill 

semHIer, Bryce 

ssman, Jan 

ithers, Dori 

throw. Randy 

itt, Corbin 

n, Michael 

ittman, David 

ttman , John 

ttmer, Wendy 

Woellhof, Bradley 

Woellhof, Sherry 

Woerpel , Traci 

Woerpel , Troy 

Wohler, Julie 100, 138, 

Wolf, Christine 132, 

Wolf, James 

Wolf, Judith 310, 

Wolfe, Carta 

Wolfe. Paula 

Wolff. Kathy 

Wolgast, Eric 

Wolke, Brent 89, 

Woltering , Jeff 

Wolters, Karen 117, 

Woltman, Tamra 

Women's Glee Club 

Women In Conuniinications 

Wonderlich. Randall 

Wondra. Kelli 

Wong, Athena 110, 121, 

Wong, Lori 

Wong, Wai 121, 

Wood, Martha 132, 352, 

Wood, Paul 

Woodbury, Howard... 91, 104, 138 
304 

Woodbury, Robert 

Woodmansee, David 

Woodruff, Michelle 

Woods, Jeffrey 



332 
464 
357 
399 
464 
322 
.96 
107 
369 
339 
307 
464 
155 
343 
464 
464 
464 
341 
319 
104 
4M 
464 
464 
464 
104 
464 
339 
357 
394 
464 
464 
110 
365 
364 
104 
394 
387 
394 
332 
410 
319 
319 
464 
399 
464 
464 
378 
464 
464 
128 
464 
319 
165 
354 
297 
464 
464 
287 
337 
364 
323 
464 
128 
464 
302 
157 
292 
138 
464 
287 
322 
464 
115 
310 
312 
297 
399 
357 
314 
287 
464 
464 
332 
.89 
394 
394 
104 
352 
464 
464 
464 
464 
464 
339 
378 
284 
167 
169 
394 
124 
163 
108 
464 
367 
142 
157. 

352 
465 
329 
314 



High temperatures brought 
many people to the City Park 
Pooi to seek refuge from the 
summer heat. (Photo by Scot 
Morrissey) 



480 



Index 




Woods, Julie 332 

Woods, Mianne 287 

Woodson, Laurel 332 

Woodward, Joel 352 

Woodward, Maryilyn 163 

Woodyard, Vonda 465 

Woolard, Charles 110 

Woolf, Steve 465 

Woolfolk, Jerry 117 

Woolley, Ginger 349 

Woolley, Patrick 304 

Woolsey, Michael 464 

Woolsoncroft, Greg 464 

Wootton, Karen 367 

Works, Amy 96, 394 

Works, Paul 142, 394 

Worley, Esther 464 

Worthen, Tashia 415 

Worthington, Suzanne 410 

Wray, John 399 

Wrenn, Mary 464 

Wright, Amy 108 

Wright, Bradley 138, 464 

Wright, Joanne 284, 316 

Wright, Louis 403 

Wright, Keith 464 

Wright, Martin 343 

Wright, Mary 419 

Wright, Rensloe 346 

Wulf, Elizabeth... 89, 95, 104, 107, 291, 
332 

Wulfkuhle, Mark 104,464 

Wunder, John 132, 155,304 

Wyant, Donald 464 

Wyman, Michelle 289 

Wyrick, Jeffrey 403 



D( 



Xia,Dejin 465 




Yager, Pamela 465 

Yakshaw, Annie 465 

Yancey, John 382 

Yankovich, Lisa 157 

Yao, Huade 465 

Yarrow, Daryl 89, 157, 319 

Yeagley, Robert 132 

Yeargin, Kristi 378 

Yeary, Becky 159,284 

Yeo, Cheow 121 

Yi, Seung 387 

Yoder, David 128 

York, Chuck 465 

York, Douglas 346 

Yost, Allison 465 

Yost, Carolyn 302, 380 

Young, Bryan 337 

Young, Chris 337 

Young, Jason 337 

Young, Joanne 284 

Young, Justina 419 

Young, Loudean 117,465 



Davi Ottenheimer, son of 
Martin and Harriet Ottenheimer, 
both instructors of social 
anthropology and social work, 
climbs the stairs leading to his 
family's residence at the Royal 
Towers apartments, 1700 
Manhattan Ave. (Photo by Chris 
Stewart) 



Young, Ranae 89, 100, 410 

Young, Rhonda 113,329 

Young, Vernon 110 

Youngblood, Kim 130, 329 

Yount, Brian 410 

Yount, Timotfiy 394 

Yowell, Lena 284,318 

Yoxall, Kelly 93, 465 

Yue, Victor 163, 465 

Yung, Marc 312 

Yung, William 312 

Yunk, Raphael 117, 163,372 

Yust, Connie 332 

Yustick, Michael 93,465 

Yutesler, Paul 337 



2 



ZabeLGreg 302 

Zabokrtsky, Lori 465 

Zaremba, Scott 297 

Zavala, Gina 419 

Zavala, Karen 410 

Zeller, Wayne 130 

Zerr, Daniel 165 

Zerr, Debra 394 

Zidek, Susan 394 

Zielsdorf, Mark 399 

Zier, Lillian 108, 465 

Zimmer, Mathew 104, 304 

Zimmer, Becky 100, 104, 310 

Zimmerman, Brad 465 

Zimmerman, Chris 126,465 

Zimmerman, Glenn 89 

Zimmerman, Janelle 300 

Zimmerman, Karen 300 

Zimmerman, Mark 394 

Zimmerman, Michelle 307 

Zimmerman, Paul 397 

Zimmerman, Tim 126, 465 

Zimmerman, Tina 465 

Zink.Greg 465 

Zink, Janet 310 

Zinn, Heidi 294,378 

Zinn, James 110 

Zimstein, Julie 465 

Zizza, Claire 289 

Zoellner, Kirk 309 

Zrubek, Debbie 465 

Zuel, Rex 399 

Zuk, Laura 465 

Zwahlen, Brian 297 

Zwick, Carmen 142, 284 



481 



hoto Gallery 



Kansas State University 's Student 

Publications, Inc. , has long been 

known and respected for excellence 

in newspaper and yearbook quality. 

A large part of that excellence is 

due to a tradition that was started 

many years ago. 

That tradition is the reputation 

K-State photographers earn and 

their peers respect. Photographer 

alumni can be found in many parts 

of the United States including the 

White House and large metropolitan 

newsrooms including The Denver 

Post, The Kansas City Star and The 

Philadelphia Inquirer. Today, that 

tradition lives on with the continual 

award-winning photography entries 

from Kansas State University. 

Each photographer shot an 

average of 15,000 images during 

the year with only a small fraction 

appearing in print. To showcase the 

photographer 's work, this photo 

gallery highlights a single frame 

from each of their portfolios. 




482 




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Brorf Fanshier photographed 
riders in the 250cc Novice 
class crashing to the ground 
amid a cloud of dust. They 
became tangled in the first 
turn of a race near Chap- 
man, Kan. Fanshier is a 
junior in journalism and 
mass communications. 



Chris Stewart captured Mat 
McClain, Des Moines, Iowa, 
as he does down with his 
horse in the saddle bronc 
competition at the Jaycee 's 
Rodeo in Kansas City. The 
photo won third place in the 
action sports picture 
category in the 43rd POY 
(Pictures of the Year) Con- 
test. Stewart is a senior in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications and interned for 
The Kansas City Star. 



Photo Gallery 



483 




Jejf Tattle photographed Ed- 
win Danforth, 87, of 
Sedalia, Mo. , while he was 
mowing his hilly yard. Dan- 
forth finds mowing no pro- 
blem for a man of his age 
and does the chore once a 
week. Tuttle is a junior in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications and spent his 
summer interning with The 
Sedalia Democrat. 



484 



Photo Gallery 




Ti 



hoto Gallery 



Jim Dietz caught Cindy 
Johnson, 10, letting her 
mind wander during the 
Chinese language class for 
children taught on Wednes- 
day afternoons at the 
K-State International Student 
Center. Dietz is a junior in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications. 



John LaBarge captures an 
extraordinary moment 
between Cindy Spencer and 
her parrot. Spencer was 
showing her pet off during a 
magic performance at Cloud 
County Community College 
in Concordia, Kan. LaBarge 
is a sophomore in 
journalism and mass 
communications. 




Photo Gallery 



485 



hoto Gallery 



Pro wrestling is a 
melodrama unique to 
the American sports 
world, with good battl- 
ing evil in a dramatic 
spectacle. Andy Nelson 
photographed "The 
Spoiler " as he leaps 
onto ' 'Mad Dog ' ' 
Vachon after climbing 
the ropes. Nelson is a 
junior in journalism 
and mass communica- 
tions. 




486 



Photo Gallery 





Two wheelchair basketball 
players strain for the open- 
ing tip-off during an exhibi- 
tion basketball game at Fort 
Hays State University. Steve 
Rasmussen, a sophomore in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications, was a January 
transfer student from Fort 
Hays University. 



Alpha Xi Delta 's Stacia Ger- 
man breaks away from Pi 
Beta Phi 's Kala Taylor as 
she reaches for German 's 
flag during a game of flag 
football. John Thelander 
captured the football action 
at L. P. Washburn Recrea- 
tion Area. Thelander is a 
junior in journalism and 
mass communications. 



Photo Gallery 



487 



hoto Gallery 



Jeff A. Taylor photographed 
Ricky Hamilton, a migrant 
farmer, huddled under a 
blanket to keep warm as 
watermelon sales were slow. 
The August afternoon was 
unusually cool for Kansas 
City, Mo. Taylor is a senior 
in journalism and mass 
communications and spent 
his summer as an intern for 
the Kansas City Star. 







* 








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John Sleezer photographed 
this woman as she was 
battling the winds in 
Philadelphia. The umbrella 
was little protection against 
the summer storm. Sleezer 
graduated in December with 
a bachelor's degree in 
journalism and mass 
communications. Sleezer was 
the first place winner of the 
1985 College Photographer 
of the Year contest and won 
the National Geographic 
internship as the prize. 



488 



Photo Gallery 




Andy Nelson stopped to 
photograph the lightning as 
it strikes behind the grain 
elevator in Limon, Colo. 
Nelson was on his way to 
Denver where he interned 
with The Denver Post for the 
summer. He is a junior in 
journalism and mass com- 
munications. 



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Photo Gallery 



489 



1986 Staff 

Editor Ronda Corle 

Associate Editor Karen Schuler 

Picture Editor Andy Nelson 

Copy Editor Paul Englis 

Student Life Editor Vicki Fernkopf 

Sports Editor Dan Hoss 

Academics/Organizations Jada 

Allerheiligen 

Housing/Index Becky Lucas 

Staff Assistants Lori Bredow 

Mindy Stubenhofer 

Photography Editors Jeff Tuttle 

Chris Stewart 

Staff Artist Joe Cook 

Student Publications 

Production Coordinator.... Connie Nelson 

Adviser Dr. David Adams 

Photography Staff 

FRONT ROW: Andy Nelson, Pete Obetz, Chris Stewart, Jeff A. 
Taylor. SECOND ROW: Scot Morrissey, Brad Fanshier, John 
Sleezer, Jeff Tuttle, Jim Dietz, John Thelander, Steve Wilderson, 
John Labarge . Jeff Weatherly. (Photo by John Sleezer) 



Colophon 



Kansas State University's 77th volume of the Royal Purple was printed by Josten's Printing and Publishing 
Co., Topeka, Kan., using offset lithography from camera-ready mounting boards. The press run was 6,750 
copies. All copy was set and composed by the Royal Purple staff using the Mycro-Tek Electronic Text 
Management System. 

The cover is a lithography No. 470 with No. 317 purple applied. The photograph was taken by Andy Nelson, 
picture editor. Gold foil No. 380 is used for the name under the laminated cover. 

Endsheets are a 10 percent black with a shadowleaf and varnish of the logo. The opening section has a 10 
percent black background with a flat varnish applied to the background. 

Photographs were taken and printed by staff photographers. Four-color photographs were taken by staff 
photographers and printed at Custom Color Co. in Kansas City, Mo. Living group portraits were taken by 
Yearbook Associates, Millers Falls, Mass. Organization group pictures were taken by K-State Photographic 
Services. 

Body copy and headlines in opening, closing, academics and organizations and housing are CG Times. 
Cutlines and sports and student life headlines are Triumvirate Bold Condensed and Regular. Other headines in 
student life are Rockwell. Demian Bold was used for the division pages, title page, logo and cover. 

The Royal Purple was distributed to students on campus during the first week of May. The book was offered 
to full-time students for $10, including sales tax, plus $3.50 for the sitting fee. The price of the book to the 
general public is $12.50. 

The Royal Purple business office is Student Publications, Inc., Kedzie Hall 103, Kansas State University, 
Manhattan, Kan. 66506. 



Royal Purple Staff 

FRONT ROW: Dan Hoss, Becky Lucas, Mindy Stubenhofer. 
SECOND ROW: Vicki Fernkopf, Karen Schuler, Lori Bredow,| 
Jada Allerheiligen. BACK ROW: Paul Englis, Ronda Corle, Andy| 
Nelson. 



490 













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491 




492 



Closing I 



s 


HAD 


E S 


F 


GRAY 
1 






Out of the Gray 

Time brings future into focus 




Individua 


I objects are not 


throughout the United States 


never seemed to end, having 


new head basketball coach. 


distinguishable in that hour 


seeking the next leader who 


begun with the firing of Jim 


Parrish and Kruger 's youth 


before dawn comes to greet 


would guide K-State through 


Dickey after the second foot- 


and enthusiasm gave Wildcat 


the new day. But as the sun 


troubled times of declining 


ball game of the season. In- 


fans reason to expect a 


rises, shapes take form and 


enrollment, economic cut- 


terim coach Lee Moon com- 


brighter future. 


soon everything shines 


backs and uncertainty about 


pleted the 1985 football 


The turnover in coaches 


brightly. 


the future of agriculture. 


season, and Stan Parrish 


was just half the story. The 


The controversies and 


On March 22, 1986, a 


was named as the successor 


NCAA ruled N orris "Sarge" 


challenges that K-Staters 


new chapter in the Universi- 


of Dickey. The Jan. 30 


Coleman, freshman star 


faced during the year may 


ty 's history unfolded as Jon 


resignation of Jack Hartman 


basketball player, was in- 


have been shrouded in gray, 


Wefald was named the 12th 


as head basketball coach 


eligible to play due to a pro- 


but the results were a 


president of K-State and suc- 


meant another change for 


blem with his high school 


brighter juture for the 


cessor to Duane Acker. With 


Wildcats. Fans gave the 


grade point average. The 


University and its people. 


the promise of his strong 


winningest K-State coach a 


"Sarge Fever" that had 


While President Duane 


leadership, the future looked 


royal goodbye. Within 


taken the campus by storm 


Acker was ending his last 


brighter and clearer. 


weeks, Lon Kruger, former 


was held in check as fans 


year in office, a search com- 


The controversies surroun- 


K-State player and assistant 


hoped the decision could be 


mittee conducted interviews 


ding the athletic department 


coach, was named as the 


reversed. 

(continued on page 494) 






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University of Kansas head 




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baslcetbail coacli Larry Brown is 


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greeted by K-State head coach Jacic 


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Hartman prior to Hartman's finai 


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coaching appearance against the 


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intrastate-rivai Jayhawl(s in Ahearn 


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Field House. The Jayhawl(s went on 


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^1^ 3f ^**^^St 


W ■ m 


to beat the Wildcats, 64-50. (Photo by 


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Jeff A. Taylor.) 

Jon Wefald, named by the Board of 


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1 Regents as the 12th president of the 


m 






'University, comes to K-State after 


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serving as chancellor of the state 


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university system In Minnesota. 










(Plioto by Andy Nelson) 










:Closing 


1 




1 











493 



H 



D 



O 



R 



Clearly Visible 

Students are the key to success 



Just as surely as disap- 
pointments clouded the days, 
other challenges were ad- 
dressed and decisions made. 
The Fred Bramlage Col- 
iseum project remained ' 'in 
the gray ' ' when it became 
embroiled in controversies 
involving funding and loca- 
tion. A sized-down version 
of the coliseum emerged 



after considerable debate 
and budget cutting. But even 
that version appeared to re- 
quire more money to build 
than the committee could 
muster. However, the revis- 
ed coliseum plans gained 
Board of Regents approval 
when Bramlage pledged an 
additional $640,000 to the 
project. 



Through it all, the K-State 
students were there. The stu- 
dent elections seriously ad- 
dressed many problems con- 
cerning everyone involved 
with the University. Steven 
Johnson, the 1986 Student 
Body President, pledged his 
support on recruitment and 
retention and worked on 
opening communication 



channels from administrators 
to the students. 

Making decisions and 
looking to the future gave 
K-State that bright gleam of 
accomplishment. With goals 
in mind and able leaders at 
the helm, K-State' future 
was no longer an uncertain 
shade of gray. 




Tracy Salsbury splashes Leslie 
Coleman and Sandy Kremer after the 
trio ran into the icy water on the east 



side of Tuttle Creek Reservoir during 
an unusually warm February day. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



H 



D 







Y 




Tony Smith practices liis guitar on 
tlie front lawn of his residence at 
Fairchild Terrace on February 25, 
1986. The unusually warm February 
weather brought everyone outdoors 
to enjoy the early Kansas spring. 
(Photo by Chris Stewart) 

Greg Jennings leaps through the air 
while practicing dance moves on the 
rock wall near IVIanhattan Avenue. 
(Photo by Andy Nelson) 



495 




496 



A full moon rises over the old dairy 
barn of tlie plant science complex on 
the north side of campus. (Photo by 
Chris Stewart) 



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