(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Seeds and plants imported"

Xr ,L¥65 














l'V 















U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 137. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Burma . 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 
TO MARCH 31, 1908: 



INVENTORY No. 14; Nos. 21732 to 22510. 



Issued January 9, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

19 09* 



6 



2S 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OE PLANT INDUSTRY. 

The scientific and technical publications <>f the 'Bureau of riant industry, which was 
organized July 1. 1901, an- Issued in a single si pies of bulletins, a list of which follows. 

Attention is directed t<> the fad that the publications in this Beries are not for general 
distribution. The Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington* 
D. C. is authorized by law to sell them ;il cost, and to hini all applications for these 
bulletins should i»c made, accompanied by a postal money order for the required amount 
or by cash. Numbers omitted from this list can no! be furnished. 

No. 1. The Relation of Lime and Magnesia to riant Growth. 1001. Price, 10 cents. 

2. Spermatogenesis and Fecundation of Zamia. 1901. Price; 20 cents. 

3. Macaroni Wheats. 1901. Price, -0 cents. 

4. Range Improvement in Arizona. 1901. 'Trice. 10 cents. 

6. A List of American Varieties of Peppers. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

7. The Algerian Durum Wheats. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

p. The North American Species of Spartiha. 1002. Price, 10 cents. 
Ki. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 1002. Price, 10 cents. 
11. Johnson Crass. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

12i Siock Ranges of Northwestern California. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
13. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 
15. Forage renditions on the Border of the Greal P.asin. 1902. Price. 15 cents. 
IT. Some Diseases of the Cowpea. 1002. Price, 10 cents. 
20.. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1002. Price, 15 cents. 
22. Injurious Effects of Premature Pollination. 1002. Price, 10 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

25. Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

29. The Effect of P.lack-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Price. 10 cents. 

33. North American;Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Trice, 15 cents. 

36. The- *■' Bluing " of the Western Yellow Tine, etc. 1903. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of the Spores in the Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans and of Phy- 

comyces Nitens. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. T903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price. 10 cents. 
41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

43. Japanese Bamboos. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

45. Physiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Plants. 1903. Price, 5 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1003. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Trice, 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice: Its Pses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents- 

54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 
50. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Price, 30 cents. 

57. Methods Used for Controlling Sand Dunes, 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

58. The Vitality and Germination of Seeds. 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

59. Tasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

62. Notes on* Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

63. Investigation of Rusts. 1904. Price. 10 cents. 

64. A Method of Destroying or Preventing the Growth of Algae and Certain Pathogenic 

Bacteria in Water Supplies. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

65. Reclamation of Cape Cod Sand Dunes. 1904. Price. 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Trice, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Trice, 10 cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Trice, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers, i 005. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Trice, 10 cents. 

74. Trickly Tear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Trice, 5 cents. 

137 

[Continued on page 3 of cover.] 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 137. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 
TO MARCH 31, 1908: 



INVENTORY No. 14; Nos. 21732 to 22510. 



LIBRARY 
NcV. YORK 
BOTANfCAL 

GARDEN 



Issued January 9, IDOL). 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

Physiologist and Pathologist, and Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 

Physiologist and Pathologist, and Assistant chief of Bureau, Albert F. Woods. 

Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Erwin F. Smith, Pathologist In Charge. 

Fruit Disease Investigations, Merton B. Waite, Pathologist In Charge. 

Laboratory of Forest Pathology, Haven Metcalf, Pathologist In Charge. 

Cotton unit Truck Diseases un<i riant Disease Survey, William A. Orton, Pathologist in 
Charge. 

Pathological Collections and Inspection war/:. Flora \v. Patterson, Mycologist in Charge. 

Plant Life History Investigations, Walter T. Bwingle, Physiologist in Charge. 

Cotton Breeding Investigations, Archibald l>. Shamol and Daniel N. Shoemaker. Physi- 
ologists in Char 

robaeco Investigations, Archibald I>. Shamel, Wightman W. Garner, and Ernest II. 
Mathewson, in Charge. 

Corn Investigations, Charles P. Hartley. Physiologist in Charge. 

Alkali ami Drought Resistant Plant Breeding Investigations, Thomas II. Kearney, Physi- 
ologist in Charge. 

Soil Bacteriology <ui<l Water Purification Investigations, Karl F. Kellerman, Physiolo- 
gist in Charge. 

Bionomic Investigations of Tropical and Subtropical Plants, Orator F. Cook, Bionomist 
in Charge. 

Drug dud Poisonous riant and Pea Culture Investigations, Rodney H. True, Physiologist 
in Charge. 

Physical Laboratory, Lyman J. Briggs, Physicist in Charge. 

Crop Technology and Fiber Plant Investigations, Nathan A. Cobb, Crop Technologist in 
Charge. 

Taxonomic and Range Investigations, Frederick V. Coville, Botanist in Charge. 

Farm Management, William J. Spillman, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Qrain Investigations , Mark Alfred Carleton, Cerealist in Charge. 

Arlington Experimental Farm and Horticultural Investigations, Lee C. Corbett, Horti- 
culturist in Charge. 

Vegetable Tenting Gardens, William W. Tracy, sr., Superintendent. 

Sugar-Beet Investigations, Charles O. Townsend, Pathologist in Charge. 

Western Agricultural Extension, Carl S. Scofleld, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Dry-Land Agriculture Investigations, E. Channing Chilcott, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Pomological Collections, Gustavus B. Brackett, Pomologist in Charge. 

Field Investigations in Pomology, William A. Taylor and G. Harold Powell, Pomologists 
in Charge. 

Experimental Gardens and Grounds, Edward M. Byrnes, Superintendent. 

Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Forage Crop Investigations, Charles V. Piper, Agrostologist in Charge. 

Seed Laboratory, Edgar Brown, Botanist in Charge. 

drain standardization, John D. Shanahan, Crop Technologist in Charge. 

Subtropical Garden, Miami, Via., P. J. Wester, in Charge. 

Plant Introduction Garden, Chico$ Cat., W. W. Tracy, jr., Assistant Botanist in Charge. 

South Texas Garden, Brownsville, Tex., Edward C. Green, Tomologist in Charge. 

Fannies' Cooperative Demonstration Work, Seaman A. Knapp, Special Agent in Charge. 

Seed Distribution (Directed by Chief of Bureau), Lisle Morrison, Assistant in Generai 
Charge. 

Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 

Chief Clerk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction. 

scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Frank X. Meyer and William I). Dills. Agricultural Explorers. 

Albert Mann. Expert in Charge of Special Barley Investigations. 

F. W. Clarke, special Agent in Charge of Matting-Rush Investigations. 

Frederic Chisolm, Expert. 

Walter Fischer, R. A. Young, and II. C, Skeels, Scientific Assistants. 

137 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. 0., October 5, 1908. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin Xo. 137 of the series of this Bureau, the ac- 
companying manuscript, entitled " Seeds and Plants Imported Dur- 
ing the Period from January 1 to March 31, 1908: Inventory 
No. 14; Nos. 21732 to 22510." • 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 
publication. 

Respectfully, B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 
Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretin-// of Agriculture. 



137 



CON T E N T S 



Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 11 

Index of common and scientific names 01 



137 



o 



B. P. I.— 415. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908: 
INVENTORY NO. U ; NOS. 21732 TO 22510. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

With this fourteenth inventory of seeds and plants imported from 
abroad is inaugurated a new departure. The volume of interesting 
matter pertaining to these new introductions has become so great 
and the desirability of getting out printed descriptions for the use 
of those handling them is so apparent that it has been decided to issue 
the inventory as soon as possible after each period of three months 
of introduction work. 

This plan, it is believed, will interest the friends of these new immi- 
grants and insure them better attention in the homes which are being 
created for them in America. 

Since January 1, 778 introductions have come in, i. e., at the rate 
of more than 8 a day, and among these it is worth while to call 
attention to certain ones which are of unusual interest. 

Mr. Frank N. Meyer has continued his explorations in northern 
China and this inventory contains 179 of his introductions. Among 
them are some remarkable wild chestnuts, wild walnuts, oaks, crab 
apples, and pears from the Chihli Province; seeds of the original 
chrysanthemum from which most of the cultivated forms are sup- 
posed to have originated; a collection of apples and pears from 
Pangshan; several elms of some promise; Pyrus betulaefolia, the 
species on which in China the native pears are grafted and which 
distinguishes itself as easily grown from cuttings; and the Fei-tao 
peach of Feitcheng, which is known all over North China as the 
finest peach in the Empire. It is a clingstone, and individual fruits 
in the dry region of the Shantung Province attain a weight of 1 
pound. Possibly this is the Chinese Cling already known in America, 
although such extraordinary fruits are not produced in this country, 
and this may be an entirely new and most valuable addition to the 
peaches of the United States. 

137 



SEEDS \M> PLANTS [MPOB I ED. 

Perhaps the most remarkable <>l' all of Mr. Meyer's finds are the 
Chinese dates, which, by the way, are not dates at all, I »ut delicious 
t*i- 1 1 i t — borne <>n deciduous trees (Zizypkus sativa) which will stand 
drought remarkably well. In the Shantung Province there appear 
to be as many kinds of these fruits as there are of plums in America. 
Large orchards of 1 1 1< ' plant- are grown there, and the specimens of 
fruits which Mr. Meyer has sent in encourage us to think that they 
n;a\ vie with the real date a- an orchard culture in the dry Wesl 
where they can be grown. Good judges of fruit have not hesitated 
to pronounce the samples sent in a- equal in delicacy to. though 
entirely different from, the finest dates. The Office of Plant Life 
History Investigations has the development of this new industry on 
it- programme for the coming year. 

An interesting dry-land naked oat. some new buckwheats, a new 
stock \'rv the peach (Amygddlus davidiana), new and most interest- 
ing sorghums, more forms of the Chinese hardy persimmon, a hoi-'' 
chestnut that i- evidently new to the country and may he a superior 
shade tree, new drought-resistant cherries, and one or perhaps two 
new yellow roses, for which the rose breeders are already clamoring, 
are others of Mr. Meyer's finds. 

Among the importations which have come in through our foreign 
correspondents^ the following may be especially emphasized: A ship- 
ment of cork-oak acorns from Spain; a collection of Rheums from 
Russia for the rhubarb breeders; seeds of the Chilgoza pine, a re- 
markable nut-bearing pine from Baluchistan; the Grano Marzuolo, a 
variety of dwarf wheat used in Italy for the plaiting industry; the 
Amov pomelo; the wild emmer, a remarkable new grain from 
Palestine: large collections of cowpeas and sorghums from the 
Orient; the Guayaquil pineapple from Ecuador ; the nut oak (Quercus 
cornea) from Hongkong; an African asparagus for the asparagus 
breeders; the wild licorice of Greece; a collection of taros from 
Hawaii: a collection of "215 varieties of tobacco, the most generous 
gift of the noted tobacco expert. Prof. Dr. O. Comes, of the Agricul- 
tural School of Portici, Italy (doubtless the largest collection of 
tobaccos ever gotten together) ; wild olives and pistaches from Balu- 
chistan; and a collection of Japanese radishes. 

Botanists will note that an attempt is made in this inventory to 
name each introduction and give the botanical authority for the 
name. Anyone familiar with such work will realize that it is not pos- 
sible to do this with absolute accuracy, as often only seeds or cuttings 
are at the disposal of the determining botanist. -Mr. W. F. Wight 
and, under his direction, Mr. H. C. Skeels have been given charge of 
this feature of the inventory, and with Miss Mary A. Austin responsi- 
ble for the preparation of the inventory cards it is believed that in the 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 9 

future these inventories of newly imported plants will not only be 
more accurate, but v\ill contain more useful information and will 
appear more promptly than in the past, and in this way become of 
much more value to the experimenters who are studying the new 
things as they come in. 

David Fairchild, 

Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 
Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. c 7 ., September 14, 1908. 

137 



INVENTORY. 



21732. Qtjercus suber L. , Cork oak. 

From Gibraltar. Spain. Procured by Hon. R. L. Sprague. American consul. 
Received December 30, 1907. 

" Seed imported for experiments in tbe introduction of the cork oak in the 
Southern States and California." (Fisher.) 

21733. Trifolium subrotundttm Steud. & Hochst. 

From Kisumu. British East Africa. Presented by Mr. Arthur B. Chilson. 
Received December 2(3, 1907. 

•'African clover. This grew 5.300 feet above sea level, 8 miles north of the 
equator, about 2<» miles northeast of Lake Victoria. I have never found it grow- 
ing lower than 4.000 feet above sea level. This is a very hardy variety of clover 
able to stand extremes of dry and wet weather. It sometimes grows to a 
height of 2 feet, but is usually much shorter. The blossom is red with often 
a slight mixture of white; smaller than the red-topped variety in America, but 
larger than the white clover." (Chilson.) 

"In Abyssinia cultivated as forage under the name of ' Mayad.' " (Oliver, 
D.. Flora of Tropical Africa, 1871, vol. 2, p. 59.) 

21734. Rosa hugonis Hemsl. 

From Paris. France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
January 3, 1908. 

21735. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Alma, Nebr. Purchased from Mr. Conrad Boehler. Received Janu- 
ary 6, 1908. 

' iri in in. Grown from S. P. I. No. 12991. Grown especially for the Depart- 
ment, under direction of Forage Crop Investigations, by Mr. Conrad Boehler. 

21736. Panicum obtusum H. B. K. 

From Roswell, N. Mex. Collected on special order by the Roswell Seetl 
Company. Received January 6, 1908. 

" A native grass especially abundant in low or moist soil. It should be tested 
under irrigation, as it promises to give several cuttings each season." (C. V. 
Piper. ) 

21737 to 21749. 

From Kew, England. Presented by Dr. David Pram, director, Royal 
Botanic Garden. Received December 31, 1907. 

Cuttings of the following: 

21737 to 21740. Rosa spp. Rose. 

21737. Helene. 21739. 1 na. 

21738. Electra. 21740. Austrian Copper Briar. 
137 11 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21737 to 21749— Continued. 

21741. Rosa spinosissima L. 

21742. Rosa sp. 

21743. Rosa sebicea Lindl. 

21744. RuBUS lasiostylus Focke. 

21745. Rubus Mil KoiMi vi. lis L. f. 

21746. Ribes cbuentum Greene. 
Seeds of the following: 

21747. Rosa soulieana Crepin. 

21748. Rubus cbataegifolius Bunge. 

21749. Ribes wolfii Rothr. 

21750. Albizzia adianthifolia (Schum.) (Mimosa adianthi- 

folia Schum.) 

From Thornwood Estate, M'lanje, British Central Africa. Received from 
Mr. Henry Brown, through Mr. C. J. Petherick, No. 4 Trafalgar Square, 
London, England, January 6, 1908. 

"A very fast growing, leguminous-tree; table-topped, feathery leaved, and very 
suitable for shade for coffee, cocoa, tea, and other productions which may grow 
in America. The tree yields an excellent timber very like satin wood in the 
grain." (Brown.) 

21751. Avena sterilis L. Oat. 

From the Province of Ispahan, Persia. Presented by Mr. John Tyler, 
American consular agent, Teheran, Persia. Received September, 1907. 

Porringe. " Seed of a wild oat they call Porringe. I should think the 
original of our 'porridge.' It is used the same as oatmeal." (Tyler.) 

21752. Cucumis sativus L. Cucumber. 

From Korea. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Company, Yokohama, 
Japan. Received January 2, 1908. 

" Said to be different from our variety." {Yokohama Nursery Company.) 

21753. Phoenix oiseleyana Griff. (Phoenix humilis 

Royle. ) Date. 

From Sibpur. Calcutta, India. Presented by Capt. A. T. Gage, superin- 
tendent, Royal Botanic Garden. Received October 3, 1907. 

"The Phoenix humilis above is the P. humilis of Royle (see Royle, Illust. 
Bot. Him.), and not P. humilis Cav. Ic, which is equivalent to Chamaerops 
humilis of the Mediterranean region." (IF. W. Smith.) 

21754 to 21757. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
January 3, 1908. 

21754. Yellow seeded. 

21755. Ogemaw. Extra early, brown seeded. 

21756. Black seeded. 

21757. Extra early, black seeded. 
137 



• JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 



21758 to 21767, Rheum spp. 



13 
Rhubarb. 



From St. Petersburg, Russia. Presented by Dr. A. Fischer von Waldheim, 
director, Imperial Botanic Garden. Received January 6, 1908. 

21758. Rheum rhaponticum L. 
Queen Victoria. 

21759. Rheum undulatum L. 

21760. Rheum rhaponticum L. 

21761. Rheum palmatum tanguticum Maxim. 

21762. Rheum palmatum L. 
Red flowered. 

21763. Rheum australe Don. 

21764. Rheum compactum L. 

21765. Rheum palmatum atropurpureum. 

21766. Rheum moorcroftiaxi m Royle. 

21767. Rheum acuminatum Hook. f. & Thomas. 

21768 and 21769. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa* 

From Bassorah, Persian Gulf. Purchased from Mr. H. P. Chalk, agent for 
the Hills Brothers Company, New York. Received January 7, 1908. 

Arabian alfalfa or Jet. 

21768. Seed from unirrigated plants. 

21769. Seed from irrigated plants. 

21770 to 21778. 

From French Guinea. Presented by M. Aug. Chevalier, 03 Rue de Buffon, 
Paris. France. Received January 10, 1908. 

21770. IPOMOEA BATATAS (L.) Poil\ 

21771. Ipomoea batatas (L.) Poir. 

21772. Ipomoea batatas (L.) Poir. 

21773. Ctusus sp. 

21774. Coleus sp. 

21775. Dioscorea bulbieera L. 

21776. Musa sp. Banana. 

21777. Xanthosoma sagittaefolium (L.) Schott. Yautia. 
White. 

21778. Xanthosoma sagittaefolium (L.) Schott. Yautia. 
Rose. 

21779. Citrus xobilis X vulgaris. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist. 



Sweet potato. 
Sweet potato. 
Sweet potato. 



Received January 9, 1908. 
" Fruit large, mediocre, colored. 

21780 to 21782. 



(Trabut.) 



From Ichang, Hupeh. China. Secured by Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the Arnold 
Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass., in cooperation with this Department. 
Received January, 1908. 



14 SEEDS AM. PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21780 to 21782 Continued. 
A collection of seeds, as follows: 

21780. Cannabis bath \ L. Hemp. 

"(No. 128, Dec. 8, 1907.) Seeds <»r a particularly robusl form of 

this well-known hemp. This form of cannabis is commonly cultivated 
in association with maize by peasants and farmers on the mountains 
north ;ind south of [chang :it altitudes between 3,000 and 5,000 feet. 

The plants v;iry from <'» to 1L» foot, and the lower pari of the stem is often 

4 inches in circumference. 

"This plant is cultivated exclusively for the oil which is expressed 
from the seeds after grinding and steaming in the ordinary Chinese way. 
This oil is used for illuminating purposes and is valued on accounl of its 
noncongealing in the coldest of weather. The stems are used for fuel, 
though ;i little fiber is occasionally used for making sundries for local use. 

•• It is the Tung ma (cold hemp) of these parts." ( Wilson.) 

21781. ACTINIDLA CHINENSIS Planch. Yang-taw. 

"(No. 347, Dec. 8, 1907.) A robust climber, 10 to 30 feet high; 
leaves and young shoots covered with bright crimson villous hairs. 
Flowers unisexual or hermaphrodite, buff-yellow to white, fragrant, 1 to 
1£ inches across, produced in great profusion. Fruits abundantly pro- 
duced, ovoid to globose, 1 to 24 inches long, 1 to li inches across, epicarp 
membranous, russet-brown, more or less clothed with villous hairs. Flesh 
green, of most excellent flavor, to my palate akin to that of the common 
gooseberry but tempered with a flavor peculiarly its own. 

"The plant is common in thickets and margins of woods from 3,000 to 
4,000 feet high in western Hupeh and Szechuam Also known from the 
Hushan Mountains in Kiangsi Province and from Fokien. 

"The plant is highly ornamental, either in foliage or in flower. The 
fruits are excellent for either dessert or making into preserves. 

" Introduced by me to the nurseries of Veitch & Sons, of Chelsea, Lon- 
don, and quite hardy in England. 

•"Local native name, Yang tao (straw r berry peach)," (Wilson.) 

21782. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver. Tu-chung. 

"(No. 383, Dec. 8, 1907.) Tree 25 to 40 feet by 1* to 4 feet. Culti- 
vated in western Hupeh and Szechuan at altitudes between 1.000 and 
4,500 feet. The tree is valued for its bark, which constitutes the native 
drug Tu-chung. The bark, leaves, and fruit contain silky, elastic fibers 
composed largely of a caoutchouc-like substance akin to balata. As a 
rubber-producing plant, however, the plant has little value. 

•' Eucommia was introduced from China into France by Vilmorin and 
into England by myself. In both countries it has proved quite hardy. 
In Algiers and parts of Tonking this tree has been experimentally planted 
by the French as a rubber-producing tree. 

"The medicine Tu-chung is valued as a tonic and mild aphrodisiac. 

"The customs' valuation here is: First quality, 30 taels per picul; 
second quality, 20 taels per picul ; third quality, 10 taels per picul." 
( Wilson. ) 

21783. Bat hinia picta (H. B. K.) DC. 

From Miami, Fla. Grown in 1907 at the Subtropical Laboratory and Gar- 
den from seed presented by Mr. J. C. Harvey, Sanborn, Vera Cruz, 
Mexico; distributed from Subtropical Laboratory and Garden. 

"An unarmed shrub with nearly orbicular leaves, about 3| inches long, and 
solitary terminal racemes, 2 to 3 inches long, of white flowers spotted with 
red." (W. F. Wight.) 

21784 to 21805. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Capt. A. T. Gage, superintend- 
ent, Royal Botanic Gardens. Received January 10, 1908. 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 



15 



21784 to 21805— Continued. 
A collection of seeds, as follows: 

21784. Cicer abietinum L. 

White seeded. 

21785. ClCEB ABIETINUM L. 

Clay seeded. 

21786. Cicer abietinum L. 
Phaseolus radiatus L. 
Phaseolus radiatus L. 
Phaseolus radiatus L. 
Phaseolus pilosus H. B. K. 
Vigna sesquipedalis ( L. ) W. F. Wight. 



21787. 
21788. 
21789. 
21790. 
21791. 

Lobia. 
21792. 



Chick-pea. 

Chick-pea. 

Chick-pea. 
Mung bean. 
Mung bean. 
Mung bean. 



Vigna catjang (Burm.) Walp. 
Red podded. 

21793. Vigna ungutculata (L. ) Walp. 
White. 

21794. Pisum sativum L. 
White. 

21795. Pisum sativum L. 

Lathybus Sp. 

Sesban bispinosa (Jacq. ) Steud. 
Jacq. ) 

Lagenabia vulgabis Ser. 

Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench. 

Cabica papaya L. 

Benincasa cebifeba Savi. 

Cucumis sativus L. 

( Iucumis melo L. 

Cucubbita pepo L. 



21796. 
21797. 



21798. 
21799. 
21800. 
21801. 
21802. 
21803. 
21804. 
21805. 



Catjang. 
Cowpea. 

Pea. 

Pea. 

(Aeschynomene pispinosa 

Gourd. 



ClTBULLUS VULGABIS Sclirad. 



21806. Raphanus sativus L. 



Papaw. 
Wax gourd. 
Cucumber. 
Muskmelon. 
Pumpkin. 
Apple-seeded watermelon. 

Radish. 



From Macassar, Celebes, Dutch East Indies. Presented by Mr. Wiebe P. 
de Jong, American consular agent. Received January C>, 190S. 



21807. Axdeopogox sorghum (L.) Brot. 



Sorghum. 



From Descanso, Cal. Presented by Mr. E. P. St. John. Received January 9, 
1908. 

"Roosevelt's Forty-Four. A 'sport' selected from a field of Amber sorghum 
in 1905. Is a heavy stooler ; lacks in sweetness, but has good fodder." (St. 
John.) 

21808 and 21809. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal. Presented by Mr. C. L. Legat, Conservator of 
Forests, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received January 14. 
1908. 



LO« 



IB SEEDS AND PLANTS I M PORTED. 

21808 and 21809 Continued. 

21808. BOLUSANTHUS 8PECI08US (BolllS) I In in is. 

•■ This is .-in exceptionally beautiful tree, probably the handsomest 
native species we bave. n should thrive well in any region where 
oranges gro^ .'" i /.' gat. i 

21809. 'I'i;m ii ii i \ i \i i i n \ Vnhl. 

I'ii-iii Lower Umzimkulu, Natal. Collected by .Miss Reld, September, 
L907. 

• - .\ fine shade t r» *« * for comparatively Crostless regions." {Legat.) 

21810. Citrus nobilis Lour. Tangerine. 

From Canton, Kwangtung, China. Presented by Dr. J. K. Huffaker, Brook- 
Qeld, Mo. Rec dved January 1<;, 1908. 

"Seeds of the 'Golden orange,' so called by the Americans, and 'Honey 
orange 1 by the Chinese. The peel is quite loose, and sections easily separated, 
tender, very rich, juicy, and sweet." (Huffaker.) 

21812. Cydonia japonica (Thunb.) Pers. Japanese quince. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
D. D. Received January L5, 1908. 

••Seeds of ;i very large native quince." (Farnham.) 

21813 to 21817. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Macassar, Celebes, Dutch East Indies. Presented by Mr. Wiebe I*. 
de Jong, American consular agent. Received January c>, 1908. 

21813. Cream. 21816. Clay. 

21814. Whippoorwill. 21817. Black. 

21815. Black-Eye. 

21818. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

From Paris. France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 

January IT, 190S. 

Ito San. Called by the French, Yellow Etampes. 

21819. Pintjs gekardiaxa Wall. Chilgoza pine. 

From Fort Sandeman, Baluchistan. Received from Lieut. Col. G. C. French, 
I. A., political agent in Zhoh, through Prof. E. P. Stebbing, imperial 
forest zoologist to the Government of India, Calcutta, India, January 14, 
1908. 

"The Chilgoza pine, which bears an edible seed, is a moderate-sized tree 
confined in its native habitat to the inner dry and arid valleys of the northwest- 
ern Himalayas, from Kunawar westward, and in Gharwal. It is found in 
isolated areas of not great extent, and generally at altitudes between 6,000 
and 12,000 feet. The trees are seen at their best at an elevation of about 
8,000 feet, where they reach a height of 70 to 85 feet, with a girth of 9 to 12 
feet. The species is quite hardy, as in a part of its range it often grows on 
what appears to be solid limestone rock, enduring high winds and severe win- 
ters with heavy snowfalls. The precipitation in the Chilgoza region is mostly 
in the form of snow and is only about 8 inches per annum. 

"The chief product of this tree is the edible seed, nearly an inch in length, 
contained in the cones. The seeds are very nutritious and agreeable in flavor; 
they form a staple food of the inhabitants of Kunawar. A full-sized cone 
yields over 100 seeds, and each tree produces 15 to 25 cones." (From letter of 
Consul-General Michael, March 21, 1907, and Forest Bulletin No. 7, 1906, by 
Mr. E. P. Stebbing, of India Forest Department.) 

"This tree is also common in northern Afghanistan." (W. F. W if/lit.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 17 

21820. Xiphagrostis condensates (Hack.) W. F. Wight. (Mis- 

CAXTHUS COXDEXSATUS Hack.) 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Com- 
pany. Received January 18, 1908. 

(For description see No. 10524.1 

21823. Lansium domestxcum Jack. Doekoe. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon. Received January 6, 1908. 

Philippine local name Lanzon; Java name Doekoe. " I have met it more or 
less widely throughout the archipelago, but, so far as I know, it only fruits 
abundantly and well in Laguna Province, Luzon, and in widely remote Jolo. 

"Fruits should become thoroughly mature before picking; those commonly 
found in the markets are picked when immature. I have sent ripe fruits from 
Manila to Yokohama (eleven days) and green ones to Honolulu (twenty-one 
days) successfully." (Lyon.) 



21824 and 21825. 

From Hokkaido, Japan. Presented by Mr. K. Hashimoto, Kuchchau Agri- 
cultural Society, Abutagun. Received January 14. 1908. 

21824. Phaseoltjs axgularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. (Dolichos an- 

gularis Willd. ) Adzuki bean. 

Red. "Used in making ari." {Hashimoto.) 

21825. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

Amherst (?). "Used in the manufacture of 'soy,' ' iniso,' ' tifu,' etc." 
(Hashimoto.) 

21826. Xaxthosoma sagittaefoeium (L.) Schott. Yautia. 

From Georgetown. British Guiana. Presented by Mr. Donald Mitchell, 
American vice and deputy consul, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received 
September 4, 1906. 

" The tubers of this variety were mingled with those of No. 19149, but when 
grown proved to be distinct from any other variety of yautia (?^ in the collec- 
tion." ^ (Barrett.) 

21827. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Chinook, Mont. Purchased from Mr. F. G. Cooper. Received Janu- 
ary 22, 1908. 

Grimm. 
21828 and 21829. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From the Sevier Valley, near Oasis. Utah. Purchased from Mr. A. F. Bliss. 
Deseret, Utah. Received January 22, 1908. 

21828. First crop. 21829. Second crop. 

21830 and 21831. Glycixe hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Hokkaido, Japan. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Company, 
Yokohama, Japan. Received January 24, 190S. 

21830. Butterball. Japanese name Akita. 

21831. Japanese name Rumoi. 
58392— Bull. 137—08 2 



18 SEEDS AM> PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21834 to 21836. Andropogon sorghi m (L.) Brot. Kafir. 

From Maiduguri, Bornu, Sudan, Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
agrostologisl ;ni<l botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture, Pre- 
toria, Transvaal. Received January 27, 1908. 

21834. Black-Hull. 21836. White Mat a Jew a. 

21835. Red Uatakwa. 

21837. Bambos a run din ace a Retz. Bamboo. 

Fr Sibpur, Calcutta. India. Presented by Capt. A. T. Gage, superin- 
tendent, Royal Botanic Garden, through Mr. W. W. Smith. Received 
January 28, 1908. 

(For description sec .\<>. 21317.) 

21838. Tin ri < i m AKSTivr.M L. Wheat. 

Prom Vomero, Naples, Italy. Presented by Dr. C. Sprenger. Received 
January 28, 1908. 

" The kind of grain which is used for the straw-plaiting industry of Italy is 
Triticum aestivum var. crimeron, called commonly in Italian Grano Mar: nolo. 

"There are two undervarieties known, the Santa Flora and the Scmone, 
which are cultivated on poor, thin land. The seed is planted in the month of 
November and also in February, and sown very thickly. We pull it up when 
the ear begins to be formed." (Angiolo Puccl.) 

"The straw used in the plaiting industry is that of a special kind of very 
dwarf wheat: it is sown in November (in Italy). The straw is dried and after- 
wards blanched with sulphur. This blanched straw is the material used in all 
industries of this kind." (Sprenger.) 

21860. Canarittm ltjzontcum (Blume) Gray. Pili nut. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. George A. Spooner, Pay Department, 
F. S. Army, Chicago, 111. Received January 25, 1008. 

" This nut is largely used in the Philippine Islands and East Indies for food. 
It is said that the flavor is finer when the meat is blanched and salted, after 
the manner in which salted almonds are prepared." (Ralph A. Gould.) 

21861. Dimorphotheca spectabilis Schlechter. 

From Barberton, Transvaal. Presented by Mr. George Thorncroft. Re- 
ceived January 18, 1908. 

" Habitat : Grows on stony hills, altitude 6,000 feet. Flowers in September, 
with the first shower of rain. (We get no rain here from the end of March 
until August.) It is the handsomest of all our daisies." (Thorncroft.) 

" The plant grows 30 to 45 centimeters high and has bright purple rays about 
2..~» centimeters long and a purple disk." {Schlechter.) 

21862 and 21863. Spergt la arvensis L. Spurry. 

From Paris. France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
January 30, 1908. 

21862. Corn or Common. 21863. Giant. 

21864. Dioscorea decaisneana Carr. Yam. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
January 30, 1908. 

21865. Coleus amboinicus Lour. • 

From Toco, Trinidad. Collected by Mr. (). \V. Barrett in October, 1907. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 19 

21867. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Juab Valley, near Nephi, Utah. Purchased from Mr. Oliver Wilson. 
Received February 6, 1908. 

Dry-Land. 

21868 and 21869. Axdropogox sorghum: (L.) Brot. Kafir. 

From Chillicothe, Tex. Grown by Mr. A. B. Conner, season of 1907. 

21868. Black-Hull. "Original selection made on farm of Mr. T. F. 
Moody, Canadian, Tex., in 1905, and grown in head-to-row plots at the 
Chillicothe Testing Station since that date." (Conner.) 

21869. Black-Hull. " Original selection made on farm of Mr. Xoblett, 
Chillicothe, Tex., in 1905, and grown in head-to-row plots at the Chilli- 
cothe Testing Station since that date." {Conner.) 

21870. Citrus decuman a (L.) Murr. Pomelo. 

From Amoy, China. Presented by Mr. W. H. Wallace, manager, Hongkong- 
Shanghai Bank. Received February 7, 1908. 

Amoy. " The Amoy pomelos are noted among Europeans and Americans along 
the coast of China for their excellent quality. According to Mr. Rea Haima, 
formerly of the consulate at Amoy, this variety is equal in quality to the best 
Florida-grown varieties with which he is familiar." (Fairchild.) 

21871 to 21874. 

From Zichron-.Tacob, Caiffa, Palestine. Presented by Mr. A. Aaronsohn. 
Received October 30, 1907. 

21871. Triticum dicoccum Schrank. Emmer. 
From above Medschoel escli-Schems. 

21872. Triticum dicoccum Schrank. Emmer. 

From vicinity of Rahle, between Raschaya and Katana. Altitude about 
1,500 meters. 

21873. Triticum monococcum aegilopioides Asch. & G. 
From Rahle. 

21874. Hordeum spontaneum C. Koch. 

From Mount Tabor. " Soil calcareous." (Aaronsohn.) 

21875 to 21932. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. F. N. Meyer, agri- 
cultural explorer for this Department, February 7, 1908. 

A miscellaneous collection of seeds and cuttings, as follows: 

21875. Castanea sativa Mill. Chestnut. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 833a, Nov. 24, 1907.) A wild 
chestnut found growing here and there in big groves on the rocky moun- 
tain slopes. The burrs containing the nuts are extraordinarily spiny. 
This chestnut may grow in regions where there is a slight rainfall and 
be utilized as a foresting tree. Chinese name San U tse shu." (Meyer.) 

21876. Quercus sp. 

From Shutseshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 835a, Nov. 18, 1907.) Acorns 
of a chestnut oak, probably Quercus chinensis. Called by the Chinese 
Siang tse shu. They utilize the acorns for tanning and dyeing purposes, 
and also fatten hogs with them. It is a handsome tree, with long, serrated 
leaves, which remain on the tree for the greater part of the winter. 
Stands drought very well, but seems sensitive to great cold. May be of 
use as a foresting tree in the semiarid regions of the southwestern United 
States." (Meyer.) 

137 



20 SEEDS A.NH PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21875 to 21932 Continued. 

21877. JUG] \\s i:m,i\ SINENSIS C. DC. Walnut. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 836a, Nov. 24, L907.) A wild 
walnut found growing here and there between bowlders. The nuts are 
qoI as swiri as the cultivated varieties, bul otherwise there is Little 
difference, except thai 1 1 n * wild trees are not of ms vigorous ;i growth 
as the cultivated ones." < Meyer.) 

21878. Malus baccata il,i Moench. Crab apple. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 837a, Dec. 2, L907.) A wild 
crab apple, the fruits of which are n<>t larger than green pens. An ex- 
cellent stock for all kinds of crab apples. Chinese oame San tin tse. 
Scions sent under NO. 183 (S. P. I. No. 21922)." (Meyer.) 

21879. Malus sp. Crab apple. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 838a, Dec. 10, 1007.) A cultivated 
crab apple. Chinese name Get tang. Scions sent under No. 195 (S. 1*. I. 
No. 21927)." i Meyer.) 

21880. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 839a, Dec. 2, 1907.) Seeds 
of a wild pear which grows here and there in big groves and assumes 
sometimes a large size, trunks 2 to 3 feet in diameter and 60 to 80 feet 
tall. May l»e utilized as grafting stock in northern regions. Scions 
sent under No. 184 (S. P. I. No. 21923)." (Meyer.). 

21881. Celtis sp. Hackberry. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 851a, Nov. 24, 1907.) Probably 
Celtis bungeana. A small tree with rather broad leaves, growing in rocky 
locations. Of use in gardens and parks in rather dry regions." (Meyer.) 

21882. Celtis sp. Hackberry. 

From near Yenmenkwan, Chihli, China. "(No. 852a, Nov. 30, 1907.) 
Probably Celtis bungeana. Apparently the same as the preceding num- 
ber (S. P. I. No. 21881)." (Meyer.) 

21883. ( Fndetermined.) 

From mountains of North China. "(No. 866a. Nov. 18 to Dec. 2, 1907.) 
A low shrub, 1 to li feet high, flowering in early summer, with beautiful 
rosy flowers in short racemes ; very floriferous. Grows in dry, rocky 
locations, covering sometimes whole mountain slopes. Well fitted for 
rockeries or as a bedding shrub in gardens in dry regions. Chinese name 
Fan li hua. Sent from Manchuria under No. 402a (S. P. I. No. 20127)." 
(Meyer.) 

21884. Lkspedeza sp. (?). 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 867a, Nov. 20, 1907.) Probably 
Lespedeza caraganae. A rare shrub, 4 to 5 feet tall, found growing in 
rocky and sandy locations. Seems to like some shade. May be of use 
in sandy, dry regions." (.Meyer.) 

21885. Lkspedeza sp. 

From near Malanyu, Chihli, China. "(No. 868a, Nov. 29, 1907.) 
Probably Lesyedeza jiincea. A shrub forming many straight shoots, 
growing in sandy and rocky locations in the full sun. In Tsingtau it is 
extensively used for sand binding and for underwood in the Yemen gov- 
ernment parks and nurseries. Sent also from eastern Siberia under No. 
564a (S. P. I. No. 20335)." (Meyer.) 

21886. Lespedeza sp. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 869a, Dec. 2, 1907.) Seeds 
of a leguminous, perennial herb found growing on very dry and rocky 
mountain slopes, having many slender, semierect stems which spring up 
in a tuft: very small, trifoliate leaves. May be of value on dry lands as 
sheep fodder, though the seed capsules are spiny when dry." (Meyer.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 21 

21875 to 21932— Continued. 

21887. Lespedeza sp. 

From near Jehol, .Chihli, China. "(No. 807a, Dec. 5, 1907.) Seeds of 
a leguminous, perennial herb found growing along very dry banks. Ap- 
parently a variety of No. 869a (S. P. I. No. 21886), but'having much 
heavier and creeping stems, due perhaps to the location ; otherwise the 
same remarks apply." (Meyer.) 

21888. (Undetermined.) 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 871a, Nov. 20, 1907.) An al- 
falfa-like plant. A leguminous, perennial herb growing in very dry and 
rocky places, throwing up a tuft of many slender, though very erect 
stems; small, trifoliate leaves and small racemes of very small, whitish 
flowers. Height 2* to 3 feet. May be of value on dry land as a food 
for cattle." (Meyer.) 

21889. Falcata japonica Oliver. 

From mountains near Santchako, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 872a, Dec. 1, 
1907.) Seeds of a Leguminosae of twining habit, similar to Xo. 617a 
(S. P. I. Xo. 20386). Of use as a fodder plant on land which is overrun 
with scrub, so as to give this bean support." (Meyer.) 

21890. Incarvillea sinensis Lam. 

From near Shinglungtang, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 874a, Dec. 4, 1907.) 
An herbaceous annual, bearing large, rose-red flowers in terminal ra- 
cemes ; finely pinnatified leaves. Crows from 2 to 4 feet tall, often seen 
along new railroad embankments in Shansi. The leaves and stems are 
used by the Chinese as medicine, applied externally, when they have cold 
or rheumatism in their legs or knee joints." (Meyer.) 

21891. (Undetermined.) 

From near Shinglungtang, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 879a, Dec. 5, 1907.) 
An herbaceous, annual Labiate with bluish flowers containing a volatile 
perfume, like menthol : may be useful for extraction of this perfume. 
The Chinese use the plant medicinally for colds in the head, and it does 
clear when snuffed up through the nostrils in case of a cold. Seems to 
come close to the North American Pyenanthemum linifolium in contain- 
ing so much menthol-like scent." (Meyer.) 

21892. Artemisia annua L. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 885a, Oct. 7, 1907.) A biennial 
herb used for grafting large-flowered chrysanthemums upon when it 
throws up its flowering stem in the second year. Chinese name Yu hou." 
(Meyer.) 

21893. Chrysanthemum stipulaceum Moench. (Chrysanthemum 

sinense Sabine, 1825.) (Anthemis stipulacea Moench, 1802.) 

Chrysanthemum. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(Xo. SS6a, Nov. 19, 1907.) Seeds of 
the original type of chrysanthemum, from which most of the cultivated 
ones have been derived ; flowers vary in color from pure white to purple. 
Deserves to be naturalized as a wild flower in rocky localities. Used 
medicinally by the Chinese (like tea, when suffering from a cold). 
Chinese name Hsu Uua" (Meyer.) 

21894. Chrysanthemum indicum L. Chrysanthemum. 
From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 887a, Nov. 19, 1907.) An origi- 
nal type of chrysanthemum, from which probably the yellow varieties of 
cultivated chrysanthemums have been derived. Always yellow, though 
there is a slight variation in its shading. Used as a medicine by the 
Chinese, like the preceding number (S. P. I. Xo. 21893)." (Meyer.) 

21895. Eragrostis sp. 

From Tungling, Chihli, China. "(Xo. SSSa, Nov. 29, 1907.) An uncom- 
mon, graceful grass growing from 2h to 3 feet tall; found along dry 
ditches." (Meyer.) 

137 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21875 to 21932 Continued. 

21896. AlM.M'IM I I.A WOMAIA Stelld. 

Prom Tungling, Chihli, China. "(No. 889a, Nov. 29, 1907.) A tall, 

course irr.-i^s. :; t<> 5 feel tall, found growing here and there in large 

masses; of ;i spread-out growth. -May lie of use as a fodder .u r rass." 
i .)h u< r. i 

21897. A.NDBOPOGON isciiai \t r \t L. 

From Tungling, Chihli, china. -(No. 890a, Nov. 20, 1007.) A medium 
tall grass growing here and there on level stretches in large quantities." 
i \l< yer.) 

21898. SPODIOPOGON simmers Trin. 

From Tungling, Chihli, China. "(No. 891a, Nov. 20, 1007.) A rare, 
\fiy tall grass, ('» to 7 feet high, growing in solitary clumps." {Meyer.) 

21899. Pennisetum compbessum R. Br. 

From near Yenmenkwan, Chihli, China. "(No. 892a, Nov. 30, 1007.) 
Seed (.f a rare grass growing in heavy flumps here and there along water 
courses." {Meyer.) 

21900. Pennisetum flaccidum Griseb. 

From near Lanshang, Chihli. China. "(No. 803a, Dec. 3, 1007.) A 
low grass, \l to 2 feet high, growing in vast quantities on sandy, level 
stretches." (Meyer.) 

21901. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. S04a, Nov. 21, 1007.) A strange 
bean used as a vegetable." (Meyer.) 

21902. Cucurbita pepo L. Pumpkin. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. S05a, Nov., 1007.) A large 
pumpkin, used as a vegetable when boiled; also baked in the oven entire 
and used then as a delicatesse." {Meyer.) 

21903. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 806a, Nov. 21, 1907.) Said to 
be a white-meated watermelon of very good taste." {Meyer.) 

21904. Citrus sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 897a, Dec. 24. 1007.) A large- 
fruited citrus, the fruits of which are sold as room perfumers. The meat 
is very bitter and sour and scarcely edible." {Meyer.) 

21905. Citrus limonum Risso. Lemon. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 898a, Dec. 24, 1007.) A large, 
very juicy lemon, not too sour ; the fruits are almost seedless and have a 
very thin rind. Purchased on the street." (Meyer.) 

21906. Celosia argentea L. Cockscomb. 

From Tsuichiaehuang, Shantung, China. "(No. 900a, Nov.. 1007.) A 
variety of cockscomb said to grow in a globular head ; very rare. Sent 
to me by Rev. A. C. Moule, of Taian, Shantung." {Meyer.) 

21907. Yitis sp. 

From Pangshan. Chihli, China. "(No. 153, Nov. 20, 1007.) A Yitis 
bearing large, deeply lobed leaves and small clusters of bluish white ber- 
ries. Crows in dry, rocky situations. May be of use as a cover plant 
for large rockeries or for planting on terraces, where the branches may 
hang down so as to create a better effect." ( Meyep.) 

21908. Amygdalus davidiana (Carr.) Dippel. Peach. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 154. Nov. 30, 1007.) A variety 
found growing in very dry and exposed places. Of use as a garden shrub 
in semiarid regions. Also an excellent stock for apparently all of the 
stone fruits." (Meyer.) 

137 



January l to march 31, 1908. 23 

21875 to 21932— Continued. 

21909. Berberis sp. Barberry. 

From Pangshan, Cliilili, China. "(No. 160, Nov. 20, 1907.) Probably 
Berberis chinensis. A low-growing barberry of a very spreading habit. 
Seems to be able to withstand drought extraordinarily well. Not highly 
ornamental, but may be of use for planting on very sterile and dry soils. 
The scarlet berries seem to remain a long time upon the shoots, and for 
this reason it may be found useful as a winter ornamental bush.*' 
{Meyer.) 

21910. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 161, Nov. 21. 1907.) A very 
rare, delicious persimmon called Siang sJti tse. Of medium size. 2 to .'! 
inches in diameter, flat, but not having a circular incision; of orange-red 
color: very thin skinned: has generally 3 to G seeds in its fruits: is of 
very sweet and fresh taste. Only one tree known to exist, that being 
near an old temple. Is not a shipper, but can be kept until February 
when handled carefully." (Meyer.) 

21911. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Pangshan. Chihli, China. "(No. 160, Nov. 23. 1907.) A round, 
hard pear of medium size. Has a high red blush and looks strikingly 
like an apple. Chinese name Hoik/ li. meaning red pear. Can be kept 
until early summer." (Meyer.) 

21912. Pyres chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Pangshan, Chihli. China. "(No. 167, Nov. 23, 1907.) A small 
pear of canary-yellow color: egg shaped with a long peduncle: hard 
meated, but very sweet and juicy; a good keeper. Chinese name .1//' li, 
meaning honey pear." {Meyer.) 

21913. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Pangshan. Chihli, China. "(No. 168, Nov. 23, 1907.) A hard, 
round, apple-shaped pear of a russet color: of rather coarse texture: a 
good keeper and shipper. May be good for cooking purposes. Chinese 
name Tang li." {Meyer.) 

21914. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 169, Nov. 23. 1907.) A hard 
but juicy pear of medium size, barrel shaped, and of a pale straw-yellow 
color. A very good keeper and shipper. Chinese name Ma li." (Meyer.) 

21915. AIalus sp. Crab apple. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 170, Nov. 23, 1907.) A sweet, 
white crab apple of flat shape, like the saucer peach ; a rare variety : 
does not keep well. Chinese name 8a Icua" {Meyer.) 

21916. AIalus sp. Crab apple. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 171, Nov. 23, 1907.) A sour, 
red crab apple of flat shape, like the saucer peach. A rare local variety 
and like the preceding number (S. P. I. No. 21915) does not keep well. 
Chinese name Ly tse." {Meyer.) 

21917. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 175, Nov. 23, 1907.) A very 
thrifty growing pear, said to be a variety of No. 169 (S. P. I. No. 21914). 
Not named, however. All of these pears look more like apples than like 
pears so far as habits and general looks are concerned. The bark on 
the tree is smooth and on the younger branches even shining so as to 
absorb a minimum of heat during the winter and spring. These retard- 
ing qualities may be of much value in breeding experiments." {Meyer.) 

21918. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Tungling, Chihli, China. "(No. 177, Nov. 29, 1907.) A very 
thrifty form of the wild pear, used everywhere in the north as a grafting 
stock for the cultivated varieties of pears."' {Meyer.) 

137 



^4 SEEDS AM' P I- A NTS [MPOBTED. 

21875to21932 Continued. 

21919. Rhododi ndron sp. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 180, Dec. 2, 1907.) Prob- 
ably Rhododendron micranthum. A small-leaved, semi-evergreen hush 
bearing small clusters <>f yellowish white flowers in early summer, is 
always found growing at elevations from 3,000 to 8,000 feet." (Meyer.) 

21920. CJLMUS sp. Elm. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 181, Qec. 2, L907.) An 
elm growing i«> i»«- .-i tall tree, bearing broad leaves. The trees when 
young have corky wings nil along their branches, which makes them look 
striking. Seems t<> thrive besl in somewhal moist soil.'" i Meyer.) 

21921. Crataegus pinnat \ Bunge. Hawthorn. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 182, I ><•<•. ^, 1907.) A very 
hardy hawthorn with glistening white twigs; may he of use as a fence 
plant in semiarid regions." {Meyer.) 

21922. Malts sp. Crab apple. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 183, Dec. 2, 1007.) The 
very hardy, small-fruited crab apple, upon which the Chinese grafl their 
improved forms of crab apples. Chinese name San I'm tse." (Meyer.) 

21923. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli. China. "(No. 184, Dee. 2, 1007.) The 
fruits of these wild pear trees become edible after the heavy frosts, but 
are not particularly fine; the wood, though, is much wanted for the 
manufacture of printing hlocks and for comb making. The trees might 
he .mown in parks as ornamental, hardy trees. Planted in a clump they 
are very effective." (Meyer.) 

21924. Prunus tomentosa Thimh. (?). Cherry- 

From near Laushang, Chihli, China. "(No. 186, Dec. 3, 1007.) The 
wild hush cherry. A very hardy shrub of dense, bushy habit. May be 
of use in parks and gardens - m semiarid regions. Can be propagated by 
budding on Amygdalus davidiana and by division, layering, and sowing. 
Chinese name Shan ping fan." (Meyer.) 

21925. Hydrangea sp. 

From near Tungying. Chihli, China. "(No. 187, Dec. 4, 1007.) A tall, 
bushy hydrangea, bearing many umbels of apparently white flowers. A 
rare shrub, found (only twice) in rocky locations along a water course." 
{Meyer.) 

21926. Rhododendron sp. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 180, Dec. 4, 1007.) A tall, 
bushy rhododendron, perfectly deciduous, bearing medium-sized clusters 
of lilac flowers in early summer. Of use as a shrub in rockeries. Grows 
apparently between 4,000 and 7,000 feet elevation." (Meyer.) 

21927. Malus sp. Crab apple. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 105, Dec. 10, 1007.) Chinese name 
Get tang. The fruits are as large as good-sized cherries, of dark red 
color with a bluish tinge. Of a very fresh, soui taste and make good 
preserves. Are grafted upon the wild crab apple. They seem to be able 
to withstand drought and extremes in temperature very well." (Meyer.) 

21928. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 106, Dec. 10, 1007.) A medium- 
sized pear of pale yellow color and of soft, melting meat. Can be kept 
quite a while when handled carefully. Is a rare local variety. Chinese 
name Pet soo IV (Meyer.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 25 

21875 to 21932— Continued. 

21929. Pyrus chinensis Lincll. Pear. 

From Jeliol, Chihli, China. "(No. 197, Dec. 10, 1907.) A remarkable 
pear, being flat apple-shaped, of green-yellowish color; hard until spring, 
when it becomes melting; has a peculiar sour taste. Makes excellent 
preserves for use with game or fowl. Chinese name Ta suan li, meaning 
large, sour pear." {Meyer.) 

21930. Pyrus sp. Pear. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 198, Dec. 10, 1907.) A medium- 
sized pear; hard, but juicy and sweet; dark canary-yellow colored. A 
good keeper. A rare local variety. Chinese name Ten li" (Meyer.) 

21931. Pyrus sp. Pear. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 199, Dec. 10, 1907.) A small-sized 
pear of apple shape ; has soft, melting meat with an agreeable tart flavor ; 
of yellow color, with rosy red blush. Not anything extra. Chinese 
name Guarr li." (Meyer.) 

21932. Ulmus davidiana Planch. Elm. 

From near Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 201, Dec. 11, 1907.) An elm 
growing to be a medium-sized tree with a round, spread-out head ; when 
young has two corky wings along its young branches ; is not a common 
tree at all. Grows in very dry and exposed localities. May be of use 
as a park and garden tree in the cold- wintered, semiarid regions of the 
United States." (Meyer.) 

21933. Dioscorea sp. Yam. 

From Manila. P. I. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, through Mr. O. W. 
Barrett. Received February 1], 1908. 

" It is entirely devoid of the gumminess so prized by the natives in snch 
yams as ' Name ' and ' Tugui.' " (Lyon.) 

"Raspberry. This is a variety native to the virgin forests of Luzon and is 
never seen in cultivation on account of the difficulty of keeping the roots through 
the long dry season." (Barrett.) 

21934. Vigna catjang (Burm.) Walp. Catjang. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by the Department 
of Agriculture. Received January 20, 1908. 

Upright. " This pea is the most upright of any of the varieties originally from 
India. This same pea was received in 1902, as Agros. No. 1488, from New 
South Wales, they having received it from India in 1901." {Nielsen.) 

21935. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Puno, Peru, near Lake Titicaca. Presented by Prof. Alberto L. 
Gadea, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received December, 1907. 

Andean. "(P. L. H. No. 3262.) Grown at an altitude of 12,540 feet, 1907 
crop." (Brand.) 

21936. Andropogox sorghum (L.) Brot. Sorgo. 

From Guymon, Okla. Presented by Mr. A. L. Johnson, through Mr. C. R. 
Ball, agronomist. Sorghum Investigations of the Bureau of Plant 
Industry. Received February 7, 1908. 

Gooseneck. (?) "Mexican Turfless. I have grown this variety one year in 
Texas and one year in Oklahoma ; it came originally from Mexico and was so 
named because of its Mexican origin and the fact that it does not turf or clod 
the ground as other varieties do. It is very leafy, an abundant stooler, and 
reaches a height of 4.5 feet under my conditions."' (Johnson.) 

1 Q7 



26 SEEDS AND plants IMPORTED. 

21937. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kafir. 

From Chillicothe, Tex. Grown by Mr. A. R. Conner, at the Chillicothe 
Testing Station, season of L907. 

Black-Hull. "(Agros. No. L700.) GrowD as a selection since L905 at Chilli- 
cothe, Tex., by Mr. A. B. Conner. Original *<>(h\ from Bomen, New South 
Wales. Australia, presented by Mr. G. Maurice McK£own, manager, Wagga 
Experiment Farm; received June 15, i ( .x».">. Numbered February 11, 1908, for 
convenience in keeping records." {Conner,) 

21938. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From near Excelsior, Minn. Received through Mr. A. B. Lyman, February 
6, 1908. 

Grimm. ( Jrop of 1907. 

21939 to 21941. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt 
Davy, government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department oC 
Agriculture. Received February 10, 1908. 

21939. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 
Havemann. 

21940. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kafir. 
Red. (No. 5.) 

21941. Axdropogon sorghum ( L. ) Brot. Sorghum. 
White dnrra. From the Kabyle Country, Algeria, April, 1907. 

21942. Astragalus sinicus L. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received February 10, 1908. 

Giant. 

21943. Cephalostachyum pergracile Munro. Bamboo. 

From Northern Circle, U. B., India. Presented by Mr. J. Copeland, Con- 
servator of Forests, through the Chief Conservator of Forests, Burma. 
Received February 15, 1908. 

(See No. 21236 for description.) 

21944. Vicia sativa L. Common vetch. 

From Pullman, Wash. Grown by Mr. W. M. Evans in 1907. Received 
December, 1908. 

" The above was grown from seed of C. V. P. No. 0449, which was originally 
picked out of rye from Fair Oaks, Cal." (Nielsen.) 

21945. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Sextorp, Nebr. Purchased from Mr. Lewis Brott. Received Feb- 
ruary 15, 1908. 

Dry-Land. "This seed was grown on the high plains of western Nebraska 
for about twelve years. This strain is promising on account of its drought and 
cold resisting qualities. Crop of 1907. No hay crop is taken off when it is 
desired to produce seed." (Brand.) 

21946 to 21955. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director of the De- 
partment of Agriculture. Received February 11, 1908. 

21946. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

" Zwarte kadelee" 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 27 

21946 to 21955— Continued. 

21947 to 21950. Dolichos lablab L. Hyacinth bean. 

21947. "Katj.'Ieda." 21949. "Katj: Ypit id jo." 

21948. "Katj: Ypit." 21950. "Katj: Ypit poetih." 
21951 to 21953. Stizolobium capitatum (Roxb.) Kuiitze. 

21951. Black-seeded variety. 21953. " Bengoek item." 

21952. "Bengoek poetih." 

21954. Stizolobium hirsutum (Wight & Am.) Kuntze. 

21955. Stizolobium capitatum (Roxb.) Kuntze. 

21956. Axaxas SATivrs Schult. f. Pineapple. 

From Quito, Ecuador. Presented by Hon. W. C. Fox, American minister. 
Received December 7, 1907. 

Guayaquil. (?) "This plant is undoubtedly the so-called Guayaquil variety, 
although its exact habitat is ' El Milagro,' about 30 miles inland from Guaya- 
quil. The Guayaquil is undoubtedly the finest pineapple I have ever tasted." 
{Fox.) 

21957. Phragmites karka (Retz.) Trin. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Capt. A. T. Gage, superin- 
tendent, Royal Botanic Garden. Received February 13, 1908. 

"A grass very similar to Phragmites com munis, but larger. Watt, Dictionary 
of Economic Products of India, vol. (>. p. 216, 1892, states that the stems are 
8 to 12 feet high and are used tor making baskets, chairs, hurdles, screens, and 
the tubes of ' hukahs.' Roxburgh, Flora of India, vol. 1, p, 348, 1832, states 
that the common Durma mats of Bengal are made of the stalks split open. 
Watt also says that according to Stewar a fiber is extracted from the upper 
part of the stems, and according to Atkinson the fiber of the flower stalks is 
manufactured into rope in the Kumaon Bhabar. Useful Plants of Japan, pub- 
lished by the Agricultural Society of Japan, 1895, p. 223, states that the grass 
is planted in water sides to protect mud from being washed away by waves, 
and that its young shoots are edible. Those produced in Udini village, of the 
Province of Setsu, are called Udono-yeshi and are very famous for their large 
and long stalks. 

•'Names in India: Hindu name, Narkul; Bengal name, Nal; Kumaon names. 
Karka. Xal, Khaila. Japanese names: Jositake, Joosk or Sinagosa, Josi, Yoshi, 
Ashi." (W. F. Wight.) 

21958. Panicum maximum Jacq. Guinea grass. 

From Santiago de las Vegas, Cuba. Presented by Prof. II. Benton, chief, 
Department of Agriculture, through M. C. V. Piper. Received February 
13, 1908. 

21959. Berberis vulgaris japoxica Kegel. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by Prof. C. S. Sargent, of the Arnold 
Arboretum. Received February IT, 1908. 

For experiments in the breeding of barberries. 

21960. Quercus cornea Lour. 

From Hongkong, China. Presented by Mr. S. T. Dunn, superintendent. 
Botanical and Forestry Department. Received February 20, 1908. 

(See No. 10633 for description.) 
137 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21961. Panic i m plantagineum Link. 

From Biloxi, Miss. Grown by Prof. S. M. Tracy, season of 1907. Received 
January, 1908. 

•• Seed from a single plant growing with No. 19158, Natal grass, at Biloxi, 
Miss, a very promising grass for thai locality." (Piper.) 

21962. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Mecca, Cal. Presented by Mr. E. Brauckman, through Mr. J. M. 
Westgate. Received February 20, 1908. 

" Seed from Arabian alfalfa. No. 12992, supposedly crossed with ordinary 
alfalfa which was grown alongside of it." (Westgate.) 

21963 and 21964. 

From Guatemala. Collected by Prof. TV. A. Kellerman, Ohio State Univer- 
sity. Columbus, Ohio. Presented through Dr. J. N. Rose, of the United 
States National Museum, Washington, D. C. Received February 20, 1908. 

21963. Dahlia imperialis Roezl. 

"(Kellerman's No. 7072; Rose's No. 08/17.) Plants of this species 
found growing 18 feet high." {Kellerman.) 

21964. Beaucarnea guatemalensis Rose. 

"(Kellerman's No. 7029; Rose's No. 08/1G.) Tree G to 12 meters high, 
with a thickened bulbous base abruptly tapering into a slender stem 5 to 
8 centimeters in diameter ; the swollen base covered with corky bark 6 
centimeters thick; upper part of stem smooth, with very thin bark; 
leaves numerous, slightly roughened on both surfaces, clustered at 
the top as in the common cultivated Beaucarneas, erect (?), broad at 
base (40 to 50 millimeters), 10 to 15 millimeters broad above the 
base and gradually tapering upward into a long filiform top 60 to 80 
centimeters long, the margin entire: the male inflorescence an open pani- 
cle, 60 to 90 centimeters long; female inflorescence not seen; fruit 15 
millimeters long, strongly three winged; wings thin, 4 to 5 millimeters 
broad. 

" Collected halfway up the side of the Sierra de las Minas, opposite 
El Rancho, Guatemala. April 10, 1905 (Kellerman's No. 4320). 

"This species belongs with B. inermis and B. pliabilis, but the fruit 
is broader winged than the former and the leaves are broader than in the 
latter." (Rose.) 

21965. Trichilia emetica Vahl. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agricul- 
ture. Received February 24, 1908. 

" This is one of our most ornamental evergreen shade trees, yielding an oil 
known as ' Maawa.' of which I understand there is some export from Portu- 
guese East Africa to Marseille." (Dary.) 

21966. Chayota edulis Jacq. Chayote. 

From St. Rose, La. Presented by Mr. Henrv McCall. .Received February 
24, 1908. 

"A large, smooth, light green and very prolific variety raised in Louisiana, but 
original source unknown. To be distributed to growers in the South with the 
object of encouraging its culture for the market." (Fiseher.) 

21967 to 22023. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. F. N. Meyer, agricul- 
tural explorer for this Department, at the Plant Introduction Garden, 
Chico, Cal., February 12, 1908. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 29 

2 1 967 to 22023— Continued. 
A collection of seeds, as follows: 

21967. Cabagana chamlagu Lam. (?). 

From Chinanfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 766a, Sept. 22, 1007.) A 
shrub growing to he 6 to 10 feet tall, hearing small pinnate leaves, quite 

spiny, said to he loaded with yellow flowers in spring. Chinese name 
Kuei tsi ching. Used as a hedge plant, and as such may be utilized in 
the more arid regions of the United States, as it stands drought remark- 
ably well." < Meyer. ) 

21968. CtLeditsia hetebophyixa Bunge. 

From Lungtung, Shantung. China. "(No. 707a, Sept. 2r>, 1007.) Chinese 
name San tsao ko. A very spiny shrub or small tree growing in dry. 
rocky localities. .May serve as a hedge plant in the southwestern regions 
Of the United States." (Meyer.) 

21969. Ajlbizzia sp. 

From near Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 70Sa, Sept., 1007.) Chinese 
name Pai finny shu. A small ornamental tree, with finely pinnated leaves 
and flowers with pale pink stamens. Not very common. When old makes 
the same impression as the yellow locust. Rohinia pseudacaeia." (Meyer.) 

21970. Pista( ia CHINENSIS linage. Pistache. 

From Shantung Province, China. "(No. 769a, Sept. 10, 1007.) Chinese 
name Huang lien tsun. A very ornamental, graceful-growing tree which 
will be appreciated in the mild-wintered regions of the I nited States. 
Grows to a great age. The Chinese express out of the seeds an oil for 
burning purposes." (Meyer.) 

21971. Counts macrophylla Wall. 

From Lungtung. Shantung, China. "(No. 770a, Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
medium-sized tree, loaded at time of collecting with soapy, dark green 
berries, which art' utilized by the Chinese for cil production, this oil 
being burned in lamps." (Meyer.) 

21972. Celtis sp. Hackberry. 

From Lungtung, Shantung. China. "(No. 771a, Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
small-leaved Celtis, growing in rocky situations. Attains only a small 
size when growing wild : if planted and cared for, however, seems to 
grow much larger." (Meyer.) 

21973. Koelreuteria rAXicrLATA Laxm. Varnish tree. 

From Lungtung. Shantung. China. "(No. 772a, Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
variety of the bladderpod tree with much larger leaves than the ordi- 
nary variety. The young dried shoots with foliage left on them are used 
by the Chinese as a green dye." (Meyer.) 

21974. Vibubnum sp. 

From Lungtung, Shantung, China. "(No. 773a. Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
rather large leaved Viburnum, bearing black berries in fall. Probably 
the same as Nos. 300a and 301a (S. P. I. N'os. 20115 and 20116). Of use 
as an ornamental park shrub." (Meyer.) 

21975. Viburnum sp. 

From near Taichingkong temple. Shantung. China. "(No. 774a, Aug. 
10, 1007.) A small-leaved Viburnum, bearing red berries. Apparently a 
very rare shrub : only one specimen seen in all the mountains. Of use 
as a small shrub in gardens and parks.'" (Meyer.) 

21976. Vitex incisa Lam. 

From Lungtung, Shantung, China. "(No. 775a, Sept. 25. 1007.) A 
sage which may prove to be a good plant for the arid Southwestern 
States. It is able to resist alkali remarkably well. The Chinese use 
it here and there for basketry manufacture, taking the annual shoots 

137 



30 SEEDS A.ND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21967 to 22023— Continued. 

t'<>v this purpose. 1 1 has pretty blue flowers and is diligently visited 
by all kinds of bees, and as such mighl be grown in gardens as a semi- 
ornamental shrub and as a honey plant. When left alone, grows 20 feet 
tall." (Meyer.) 

21977. Pteroceltis tatabinowii Maxim. 

From Tuyung, Shantung, China. "(No. 77<5a. Sept. 2.",, 1007.) A large 
tree having a scaly whitish hark and small leaves." [Meyer.) 

21978. Rhamnus sp. 

From Lungtung, Shantung, China. "(No. 777a. Sept. 2.". 1007.) A 
shrubby Rhamnus with very small leaves, bearing black Perries in fall. 
Branches, quite spiny. Of use as a hedu r e plant in rocky situations." 
(Meyer.) 

21979. Vitis sp. Grape. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 770a, Sept. 18, 1007.) Chinese 
name. Ya pu tao. Bought on the market in Boshan; has small black 
berries, rather sour; grows wild here and there in the mountains. A 
good wine can be made from the berries, but a good wine from a Chinese 
point of view. Can be utilized as a stock in rather arid regions." 
( Meyer. ) 

21980. Vitis sp. Grape. 

From Lungtung, Shantung, China. "(No. 780a, Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
rare wild grape bearing small clusters of black berries, which are quite 
sweet. Leaves deeply incised.*' ( Meyer.) 

21981. Vitis sp. Grape. 

From Lungtung, Shangtung, China. "(No. 781a, Sept. 25, 1007.) A 
wild grape, probably Vitis labrusca. A vigorous grower, overgrowing 
here and there whole trees and shrubs." (Meyer.) 

21982. Pyrus betueaefolia Bunge. 

From near Mongtehou, Chihli (?), China. "(No. 782a, Oct. 2, 1007.) 
A wild pear. Chinese name Tu li or Do li. Bears fruits not larger than 
irreen peas. Is used all over the country as a stock on which to graft 
pears: the Chinese claim it can be slipped very easily. Stands alkali 
remarkably well, and grows sometimes on pure sand. May be of value to 
the United States in the alkaline districts as a stock. Is also rather a 
nice shade tree, growing to a large size and flowering most profusely." 
(Meyer, i 

21983. Pyrus chixensis Lindl. Pear. 

From P>oshan, Shantung. China. "(No. 783a, Sept, 20, 1907.) Chinese 
name. Tang li. A wild pear bearing small, brown-colored fruits of an 
insipid taste. Has beautiful, large, glossy leaves. Probably has given 
blood to some of the Chinese varieties of pears." (Meyer.) 

21984. Cydonia sp. 

From Taichingkong temple, near Tsingtau, Shantung, China. "(No. 
784a, Aug. 12, 1007.) Chinese name, Hsau kua. A large quincelike tree 
with a smooth hark: bears hard, round, yellow fruits, smelling like 
quinces, yet not like them. Is far from being common." (Meyer.) 

21985. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Chinanfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 785a, Sept. 22, 1007.) Seeds 
from some very large pears. May prove to be new types." (Meyer.) 

21986. Crataegus sp. Hawthorn. 

From Boshan. Shantung, China. "(No. 786a, Sept. 20. 1007.) Chinese 
name San li huang. A yellow-fruited hawthorn, growing sparsely in the 
mountains and sold here on the market." < Meyer.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 31 

21967 to 22023— Continued. 

21987. Crataegus pinnatifida Bimge. Hawthorn. 

From Chingchowfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 787a, Aug. 22, 1007.) 
Chinese name Stawi li hong. A small-fruited form of the Chinese haw- 
thorn, much more sour than the larger varieties ; is used by Chinese and 
foreigners as a preserve ; is also a good substitute for cranberries and 
has the advantage that everybody can grow it in his own garden." 
{Meyer.) 

21988. AiiYGDALUS peksica L. Peach. 

From eastern China. "I No. 788a, June-Sept., 1007.) Peach stones col- 
lected in different parts of eastern China. Some good types may appear 
among them." {Meyer.) 

21989. Amygdalus pebsica L. Peach. 

From Feitcheng, Shantung, China. "(No. 780a. Sept. 1, 1007.) Some 
stones of the most famous peach of northern China, called the Fei tao. 
The fruits grow as heavy as 1 pound apiece and are pale yellowish 
colored, with a Blight blush; meat white, except near the stone, where 
it is slightly red: taste excellent, sweet, aromatic, and juicy. Is a cling- 
stone. Has extraordinary keeping and shipping qualities. The branches 
need propping up on account of the weight of the fruits. Prefers well- 
drained, light, deep loam of a decomposed rocky origin." (Meyer.) 

21990. Amygdalus pebsica L. Peach. 

From Kianchau, Shantung, China. "(No. 700a, Aug. 13, 1007.) A 
flat, juicy, white peach of fine taste. Chinese name Pad pien tao." 
{Meyer.) 

21991. Amygdalus pebsica L. Peach. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, china. "(No. 701a, June 27, 1007.) A 
flat, red-ineated peach, not very sweet in taste. Chinese name Hung pien 
tao." (Meyer.) 

21992. Amyi.dalus PEBSICA L. Peach. 

From near Chiningchou, Shantung. China. "(No. 702a, Sept. G, 1007.) 
A flat, pale-fleshed peach, juicy but somewhat insipid. Grows in rather 
sterile localities." {Meyer.) 

21993. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Shantung Province, China. "(No. 703a, Aug.-Sept., 1007.) 
Seeds collected at different points. Perhaps good varieties will appear 
among them." (Meyer.) 

21994. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Chingchowfu, Shantung, China. "(704a, Aug. 22, 1007.) A 
fine, flat variety of jujube. Quite rare. Chinese name Twen ku In ts-ao." 
(Meyer.) 

21995. Zizyphus lotus (L. ) Lam. 

From near Boshan, Shantung. China. "(No. 705a, Sept. 10, 1007.) A 
wild form of the ' jujube,' used for stock for the large-fruited varieties. 
Grows in the driest and most sterile locations. A very bad weed. Chinese 
name Suan tsao." (Meyer.) • 

21996. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Chinanfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 706a. Sept. 22, 1007.) A 
flat, brown-colored variety of the jujube. Very sweet. Chinese name 
Tun ku yu tsao." (Meyer.) 

21997. Pinus bungeana Zucc. Pine. 

From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 707a, May 11, 1007.) Chinese 
name Kuotse. Sold on the streets as delicacies. Said to come from 
northern Shansi." (Meyer.) 

137 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21967 to 22023— Continued. 

21998. Dolichos lablab L. Hyacinth bean. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. T08a, Sept. 18, 1907.) Chinese 
name Pai pien tau. Arc mostly eaten fresh; also are sliced like haricot 
beans and boiled. They will probably grow in the semiarid regions of the 
Southwestern Slates where the ordinary string beans fail. Mostly seen 
along the fields grown upon trellises." i Meyer.) 

21999. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 799a, Sept. 18, 1907.) A rare 
variety of soy I team sparsely grown near Boshan. Chinese name Ta he 
tau. i'sed by the higher classes as a vegetable in soups." {Meyer.) 

22000. Fhaseolus radiatus L. Mung- bean. 

From near Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. SOOa, Oct. 4, 1907.) Small 
yellow beans. Chinese name Huang Ui tou. A very rare variety, used 
for making bean vermicelli and for sprouting purposes." (Meyer.) 

22001. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Tchangtchou, Chihli, China. "(No. 801a, Oct. 2, 1907.) A 
rather short growing variety of alfalfa. Said to resist alkali and drought 
very well. Chinese name Mu su." (Meyer.) 

22002. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. S02a, May 6, 1907.) A hard, 
wet-land rice. Chinese name Ying ta mi. Grows in irrigated fields and 
is considered the very best rice of Shansi. Might be grown in the irri- 
gated valleys of the Rocky Mountain States." (Meyer.) 

22003. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. S03a, May 11, 1907.) Chinese 
name Hong mei. The best red wheat to be had on the market. Thrives 
very well on alkaline lands. Is mostly grown as a winter wheat, though 
also in a limited degree as a summer crop. Stands irrigation well." 
( Meyer. ) 

22004. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. S04a. May 11, 1907.) Chinese 
name Pai mei. The best white wheat for sale in Taiyuanfu. Grows 
well on strongly alkaline soils. Mostly grown as a winter wheat, though 
also as a summer crop. Is often irrigated when on high, dry land." 
( Meyer. ) 

22005. Avena nuda inermis (Kornicke) Asch. & Graeb. 

From Taiying, Shansi, China. "(No. 805a, Apr. IS, 1907.) Mountain 
oats. Chinese name Shi yu mei. Grows on sterile mountain sides and 
at high elevations. When ground up the meal is manufactured into ver- 
micelli, cakes, bread, and patties. Furnishes the ordinary food for the 
mountain people." (Meyer.) 

22006. Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn. 

From Lingchin, Shansi, China. "(No. 806a, Apr. 17, 1907.) Mountain 
buckwheat. A strange kind of buckwheat used as a summer crop on 
high, sterile lands. The grains are ground up and vermicelli and flat 
cakes are made from the flour. Chinese name Chou mei." (Meyer.) 

22007. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. S07a, May 11, 1907.) Gray- 
ish pea. Chinese name Wau ton. The peas are boiled in soups and used 
as a vegetable when sprouted; the young tops, too, are picked and serve 
as greens. Is able to thrive on strongly alkaline soils. May do well in 
the northern Rocky Mountain States." (Meyer.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 33 

21967 to 22023— Continued. 

22008. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 808a, May 11, 1907.) Dwarf 
red bean. Chinese name Hung tou. Grows on rather alkaline soils: used 
green as haricot beans and also boiled, when dry, in soups. In warm 
localities can be grown twice during the season. May do well in the 
northern Rocky Mountain States." (Meyer.) 

22009. Amygdalus davidiana (Carr.) Dippel. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 809a, Oct. 5 and 7, 1907.) Chi- 
nese name Shan tao shu. Sent under Nos. 728a and 9a (S. P. I. Nos. 
21227 and 18262) on former occasions. Very resistant to droughts and 
alkaline matter. The Chinese use this tree as grafting stock for their 
flowering peaches and prunes; also as a stock for small bush cherries 
(Ying tao) : even apricots are grafted on it. To be used as a stock for 
peaches, almonds, prunes, plums, etc." (Meyer.) 

22010. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Sorghum. 

From Chingshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 810a, Aug. 12, 1907.) Chi- 
nese name Chi tse ya tse. A very rare dwarf variety of sorghum, not 
growing higher than 3 feet and making dense heads. Grows on shallow, 
sterile soils and matures much earlier than the taller growing varieties. 
May do well in the semiarid regions of the western United States." 
(Meyer.) 

22011. Axdropogon sorghum ( L. ) Brot. Sorghum. 

From near Chufoo, Shantung, China. "(No. 811a, Sept. 7, 1907.) A 
red-stemmed variety used in the manufacture of mattings, of which 
pretty specimens may be seen once in a while." {Meyer.) 

22012. Andbopogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Sorghum. 

From near Chungdiin, Shantung, China. "(No. 812a, Sept. 29, 1907.) 
A very tall growing, loose-headed variety of sorghum. The thrashed-out 
heads are utilized in broom manufacture. Stands alkali well." (Meyer.) 

22013. Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. 

From Chinanfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 813a, Aug. 26, 1907.) Seeds 
of a dye plant. Chinese name* Tsi tsse. Used in giving the bean jelly 
and bean vermicelli a clear yellow color. Probably a southern plant." 
(Meyer.) 

22014. Iris ensata Thunb. 

From Taiying, Shansi, China. "(No. 814a, Apr. 18, 1907.) A very low- 
growing Iris ; can stand lots of cold, drought, and trampling over. 
Grows at high altitudes, 3,000 to 5,000 feet. Perhaps fit as a rockery 
plant." (Meyer.) 

22015. Iris ensata Thunb. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 815a, Apr. 25, 1907.) Prob- 
ably the same as No. 814a ( S. P. I. No. 22014), but growing at an eleva- 
tion of 8,000 feet above sea level." (Meyer.) 

22016. Lycium chinense Mill. Matrimony vine. 

From Lungtung, Shantung, China. "(No. 816a, Sept. 28, 1907.) A 
matrimony vine growing in rocky hedges. Bather large, vivid red berries. 
May be of use as an ornamental porch vine." (Meyer.) 

22017. Solanum sp. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 817a, Sept. 19, 1907.) A 
rather ornamental Solanum bearing blue flowers, followed by scarlet ber- 
ries. May be of use as a semiornamental vine." (Meyer.) 

22018. Asparagus sp. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 818a, Sept. 11), 1907.) A wild, 
rather ornamental asparagus." (Meyer.) 

58392— Bui. 137—08 3 



34 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

21967 to 22023— Continued. ] 

22019. Hemerocallis sp. 

From Lauslian, Shantung, China. "(No. 819a, Aug. r>, 1907.) The 
flower buds of I his fine, yellow, night-flowering lily are eaten by the 
Chinese, steamed like a vegetable, though very insipid." {Meyer.) 

22020. Capnoides sp. 

From Taishan, Shantung, China. "(No. 820a, Sept. 10, 11)07.) A 
yellow-flowering Capnoides growing at elevations from 3,000 to 5,000 feet. 
Quite ornamental when seen in its native haunts between rocks. May be 
of use as a rockery plant." {Meyer.) 

22021. Sesamum okientale L. Sesame. 

From near Laoliang, Shantung. China. "(No. 821a, Sept. 30, 1007.) 
Seeds from a large-growing variety of this useful oil plant. Could be 
grown in the semiarid regions of the southwestern United States as a tine 
oil producer." {Meyer.) 

22022. Akachis hypogjea L. Peanut. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 824a, Oct. 22, 1907.) A small 
variety of peanut, said by the Chinese to contain much more oil than 
the larger ones. Is used all through the land as an appetizer, after hav- 
ing been steamed with salt water and then kept in weak brine. Quite 
nice to eat in that way." {Meyer.) 

22023. Solanum melongena L. Eggplant. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. " (No. S25a, Nov. 5, 1907.) Golden egg- 
plant. Chinese nana 1 Chin clia. Is often grown as an ornamental pot 
plant by the Chinese, bearing fruits just about the size of a small egg, 
which when young are white colored, later on turning into a golden 
yellow. If not known will be appreciated as a novelty." {Meyer.) 

22024. Widdringtonia whytei Rendle. 

From Mlanji, Nyassaland, British Central Africa. Presented by Mr. Henry 
Brown, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received February 24, 1908. 

" Seed taken from cedar trees 100 feet high and 14 feet in circumference. 
The tree is a fast grower and makes a handsome avenue tree. It grows at ele- 
vations varying from 2,000 to 8,000 feet. The wood is scented and very oily, 
burning like a candle when dry. It is used here for furniture making, etc." 
{Brown.) 

22025. Dolichos lablab L. Hyacinth bean. 

From Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia. Grown during the season 
of 1907 under C. V. P. No. 0107. Received in autumn of 1907. 

"Original seed presented by J. M. Thorburn & Co., Xew York. 
•" An early variety, which matured before all others at Arlington Farm. 
Promising for growing with corn for hay or silage." {Piper.) 

22026. Panictjm maximum Jacq. Guinea grass. 

From Saharunpur, Northwest Province, British India. Presented by Mr. 
A. C. Hartless, superintendent, Government Botanic Gardens. Received 
February 25, 1908. 

22027. Tkiticum sp. Wheat. 

From lama, Peru. Presented by Mr. T. F. Sedgwick, director, Estacion 
Experimental. Received February 25, 1908. 

"Cardial. Seed of a large-kerneled wheat grown in the mountain districts 
of Peru." ( Sedgwick. ) 

"This is either a Polish wheat or one of the large-kerneled durums, a ques- 
tion which could be determined on seeing it growing in the field. It is some- 
thing that would be very interesting for some of our work in the interinountain 
districts; also for use in dry-land cereal work." {Cfirleton.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 35 

22029. Asparagus africanus Lam. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal. South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agri- 
culture. Received February 18, 1908. 

For the use of asparagus breeders. 

22031 and 22032. Stizolobium capitatum (Roxb.) Kuntze. 

From Australia.. Presented by Mr. J. H. Maiden, director. Botanic Car- 
dens, Sydney, New South Wales, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received 
February 21, 1908. 

22031. Black Mauritius bean. From Sydney. New South Wales. 

22032. Black Mauritius bean. From Kamerunga, Cairns, Queensland. 

22033. Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Licorice. 

From Patras, Greece. Presented by Hon. F. B. Wood, British consul. Re- 
ceived February 25, P. mis. 

"Licorice roots from the plants which grow wild in this country." (Wood.) 

22034. Lathyrus maritimus (L.) Bigel. Beach pea. 

From Woods Hole. Mass. Procured by Mr. A. J. Pieters, Hollister, Cal.. 
in October, 1903, and presented to the Department December 27, 1007. 

22035. Trifolium suaveolens Willd. Fragrant clover. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Purchased from Mr. Ernst Penary. Received 
February 29, 1908. 

•"An annual clover sparingly used as an ornamental, but which may prove 
to be useful when used after the manner of crimson clover. It is perfectly 
hardy as far north as Washington.'* i Piper.) 

22036 to 22049. Pisum arvense L. Canada field pea. 

From Brandon. Manitoba, Canada. Presented by Mr. James Murray, 
experimental farm, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received February 28, 1008. 



22036. 


Agnes. 


22037. 


Archer. 


22038. 


Arthur. 


22039. 


Chancellor. 


22040. 


Daniel O'Rourkc. 


22041. 


Gregory. 



22043. 


Nelson. 


22044. 


Paragon. 


22045. 


Picton. 


22046. 


Prince. 


22047. 


Prince Albert. 


22048. 


Victoria. 


22049. 


Wisconsin Blue. 



22042. Mackay. 
22050. Vigna i xGuicuLATA (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

Grown at Amarillo, Tex., by Mr. A. H. Leidigh, Grain Investigation Ex- 
periment Farm, season of 1007. 

Turney's Black-Eye. " Original seed procured from Mr. Turney, Channing, 
Tex., through Mr. Leidigh. spring of 1005." [Conner.) 

22051 to 22055. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

Grown at Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia, season of 1007. 

22051. Speckled Crowder. 

"(S. Fab. No. 51136.) Original seed procured from Mr. J. B. Bremie, 
Tazewell, S. C, through the Seed Laboratory, spring of 1007." (Nielsen.) 

137 



36 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

22051 to 22055— Continued. 

22052. Black i' mini, r. 

"is. Lab. No. 52460.) Original seed procured from Mr. Simeon Fippin, 
R. P. I >. So. I. Cookville, Teun., through the Seed Laboratory, spring oi 
1907." i Vielsen.) 

22053. Near Michigan Favorite. 

"is. Lab. No. 51580.) Original seed procured fr Mr. T. M. Marshall, 

R. I'. D. No. 1. Walnul Cove, N. C, through the Seed Laboratory, season 
of L907." i \ ielsi n, > 

22054. Volunteer. 

"Original seed grown by Mr. J. P. Hogan, Robinsonville, Miss. Pre- 
sented to the Department by Mr. Joseph Vanlx. Nashville, Tenn., who 

procured the seed April l<i, 1907. 

"Tins pea has beeu grown near the month of the Arkansas River in 
Arkansas and across the Mississippi River in Mississippi for at leasl 
forty years, having volunteered from year to year in all that time, it 
is apparently very prolific." {Nielsen.) 

22055. Volunteering Iron. 

"Originally planted on Arlington Experimental Farm for seed in 1904, 
and has volunteered from year to year, this seed being saved in the fall 
of j'.MtT. This is the only cowpea which has been known to volunteer at 
Arlington Farm, and may prove of value on that account." (Nielsen.) 

22058 and 22059. Hordeum spp. Barley. 

From Madison. Wis. Presented by Prof. R. A. Moore, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. Received March 2, 1908. 

22058. HORDEUM DISTICIIOX ERECTUM ScllUbl. 

/'limits. Grown from No. li)TT ( .>. 

22059. IIORDEUM DISTICHON NUTANS SchUbl. 

Prinsess. Grown from No. 19780. 

22060. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From the Esperanza district. Puebla, Mexico. Secured by Prof. H. Pittier, 
of the Bionomic Investigations, Bureau of Plant Industry. Received 
February, 1908. 

Drought-Resisting. "A variety cultivated on the high plateau between 

Mexico city and Orizaba, in a very dry climate, with little rain and subject to 
strongly marked extremes of temperature. An excellent type, producing me- 
dium-sized ears with very small coos. Should be well adapted for the semi- 
aiid districts of the Southwest." (Pittier.) 

22061 to 22075. 

From Ililo. Hawaii. Presented by Mr. L. C. Lyman, principal, Hilo Board 
ing School, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received March 4, 1908. 

The following rhizomes: 

22061 to 22065. Mrs a spp. 

22061. Eleele. 

22062. Manaiula or Malaiula. 

22063. Bolaoola or Kusai. 
22066 to 22075. Colocasia spp. 

22066. fin Kin hum u. 

22067. Makaua, 

137 





Banana. 


22064. 


Iholena. 


22065. 


Aeae or Striped. 




Taro. 


22068. 


Ohe. 


22069. 


(In ul n jut 1 Hi. 






JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 37 

22061 to 22075— Continued. 
22066 to 22075— Continued. 

22070. Pikokea. 22073. Ulauld uahi apele. 

22071. Man a melemele or 22074. Ahakea. 

Man a ulu. 

22072. Wehewa. 
22076. Tooxa ciliata Eoem. 



22075. Papa pueo. 



From Ventiniiglia, Italy. Presented by Mr. Alwin Berger, La Mortola. 
Received February 11, 1008. 

"A large, nearly evergreen tree of rapid growth, similar in habit to Ailanthus 
glandulosa. A good tree for avenues in California, etc." (Berger.) 

22077 to 22079. Pisum aryensi: L. Field pea. 

Grown at Pullman, Wash., season of 1007. 

22077. 

(C. V. I*. No. 0396.) Received as Pisum thebaicum from" Madrid 
Botanic Gardens. 

22078. 

(C. V. P. No. 0451.) Received as Pisum abyssinicum from Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Dublin, Ireland. 

22079. Peluschka. 

(C. V. P. No. 0450.) From Germany. 

22081. Chrysanthemum sp. 

From Yokohama. Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Gom- 
pany. Received March 3. 1908. 

" Seed specially gathered by Tanehan, the famous chrysanthemum show 
gardener at Dangozaka, Tokyo. The seed is sown about the spring equinoxes 
(Mar. 19) here. About 10 per cent is said to germinate." (8. Hda.) 

22082. Macadamia ternifolia F. Muell. 

From Sydney, New South Wales. Australia. Presented by Mr. J. H. Maiden, 
director of the Botanic Gardens. Received at the Plant Introduction 
Garden, Chico, Gal., April 10, 1007. 

(P. I. G. No. 5330. For description see S. P. I. No. 18382.) 

22083 to 22297. Xicotiana spp. Tobacco. 

From Portici, Italy. Presented by Dr. O. Gomes. Royal School of Agricul- 
ture. Received February, 190S. 

22083 to 22100. a Nicotiana rustica L. 

22083. Var. texana subcordata. 

22084. Var. Brasilia chloraxtha. 

22085. Var. Brasilia oblongifolia (Hungary). 

22086. Var. htjmilis bottjndifolia. 

22087. Var. rotuxdifolia. 

22088. Var. jamaicensis rotuxdifolia. 

a The nomenclature is that of Professor Comes as given in his pamphlet enti- 
tled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume 
La R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. 
This name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was 
taken from the label on the seed. 
137 



38 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

22083 to 22297— Continued. 

22083 to 22100 -Continued. 

22089. V;ll\ BRASILIA BOTUNDIFOLIA. 

22090. \';u\ SCABRA OVATIFOLIA. 

22091. Var. HUMILIS OVATIFOLIA. 

22092. Var. BRASILIA oblongifolia. 

Brazile selvaggis. 

22093. Var. jamaicensis o\ vtifolia. 

22094. Var. oblongifolia. 

22095. Var. asiatica botundifolia, 

22096. Var. asiatica ovatifolia. 

22097. Var. texana ovatifolia (Calcutta). 

22098. Var. TEXANA OVATIFOLIA SENEGALENSIS. 

22099. Var. btjmilis oblongifolia. 

22100. Var. BRASILIA OBLONGIFOLIA. 

22101. NlCOTIANA A LATA Link »S: Otto. 

22102. NlCOTIANA BIGELOVI1 ANGUSTIFOLIA. 

22103. NlCOTIANA GLUTINOSA L. 

22104. NlCOTIANA NOCTIFLORA ALBIFLORA. 

22105. NlCOTIANA QUADRIVALVIS Plirsll. 

22106. Nicotiana silvestris Speg. & Coines. 
22107 to 22297. Nicotiana tabacum L. 

22107. Var. CALYCIFLOBA. 

22108. Var. frtjticosa brasilensis macrophylla. 

Nepal. 

22109. " Var. fruticosa angustifolia. 

22110. Var. fruticosa brasilensis havanensis. 

Oarabooo. 

22111. Var. fruticosa brasilensis havanensis macrophylla. 

Persician. 

22112. Var. fruticosa brasilensis havanensis macrophylla. 
Pra vista. 

22113. Var. fruticosa brasilensis lancifolia havanensis ma- 

crophylla. 

Karchiaku. 

22114. Var. fruticosa brasilensis lancifolia havanensis ma- 
crophylla. 

AdaJcuvilatta. 
22115. Var. fruticosa brasilensis lancifolia. 

China. 
22116 to 22123. Var. lancifolia brasilensis havanensis. 
22116. Toolde. 



a The nomenclature is that of Professor Conies as given in his pamphlet enti- 
tled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume 
La It. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. 
This name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was 
taken from the label on the seed. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 39 

22083 to 22297— Continued. 
22107 to 22297— Continued. 

22116 to 22123— Continued. 

22117. White Burley. 

22118. Kuchivilatti. 

22119. Kent uck i/. 

22120. Gattaro. 

22121. Brasile beneventano. 

22122. (l Little Orinoco. 

22123. " Street Orinoco. 

22124 to 22129. Var. brasilensis havanensis. 

22124. a Arumakappal. 

22125. a Habana. 



22126. 


Bali id. 


22127. 


a Hani n a (Plata). 


22128. 


San Paolo < Brazil). 


22129. 


Isere. 


22130 to 22150. Var. bbasilensis havanensis macbophylla. 


22130. 


Maryland. 


22131. 


" A rand to riccia. 


22132. 


a Avanetto. 


22133. 


a Czetnek i Muscatell). 


22134. 


Goundi. 


22135. 


" Persia a. 


22136. 


" 1 1 a n gary. 


22137. 


BenirSehafom. 


22138. 


Granville. 


22139. 


Brazilian. 


22140. 


" Campetana (Carpane). 


22141. 


Conception. 


22142. 


Florida. 


22143. 


Uganda. 


22144. 


Bona cabot. 


22145. 


Adrianopolis, 


22146. 


a Lamia. 


22147. 


Capo Bona speranza. 


22148. 


Chebli. 


22149. 


Szeged in. 


22150. 


" Avanone. 


22151. Var. 


BBASILENSIS FRUTICOSA HAVANENSIS MACBOPHYLLA. 


Latakia. 




22152. Var. 


BBASILENSIS HAVANENSIS VIBGINICA. 



° The nomenclature is that of Professor Comes as given in his pamphlet en- 
titled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume La 
R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. This 
name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was taken 
from the label on the seed. 

137 






40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22083 to 22297 Continued. 
22107 to 22297 Continued. 

22153 to 22158. Var. VIBGINICA BAVANENSIS BRASILENSIS. 

22153. Hester. 

22154. " Virginia Bright. 

22155. Lacks. 

22156. Big Orinoco. 

22157. Prior. 

22158. White Orinoco. 

22159. Var. vibginica bbasilensis havanensis lancifolia. 
Famous. 

22160. Var. virginica bbasilensis havanensis macbophylla. 

II)) CO. 

22161 to 22166. Var. havanensis macbophylla. 

22161. II a num. 

22162. Kadoe (Java). 

22163. Bezoeki (Java). 

22164. Loemadjang. 

22165. Pekalongan (Java). 

22166. Honduras. 

22167. a Var. havanensis angtjstifolia bbasilensis macro- 
phylla. 

Shiraz (Persia). 

22168 to 22173. Var. macbophylla havanensis. 

22168. Kawala. 

22169. Cureo aromatico. 

22170. Ayasolulc. 

22171. X ant hi Yaka. 

22172. Varinas. 

22173. Venezuelan. 

22174. Var. macrophylla havanensis bbasilensis. 
Almyros. 

22175. Var. macrophylla havanensis bbasilensis. 
Karditza. 

22176. Var. macrophylla purpurea. 

22177. Saloniki. 22183. a Tcncdic taka. 

22178. Xcdcr Bctiurc. 22184. a Secco grande 

22179. Mirodatos. cicatrice. 

ooiorv t\ • i m t 22185. Chilcna grande 

22180. Domalcu Chodi- ,, rf , (T > 

, a j t a {L aia- 

a1CV " guay). 

22181. Portorico. 22186 Do ^ o(Drama ). 

22182. SchaufcUabaJc. 

"The nomenclature is that of Professor Comes as given in his pamphlet en- 
titled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume La 
R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. This 
name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was taken 
from the label on the seed. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 



41 



22083 to 22297— Continued. 

22107 to 22297— Continued. 



22187. 


Herceg o r i ii a 




Trebinje. 


22188. 


He-et-Vilainc. 


22189. 


Pas tie Calais. . 


22190. 


a Fried rick. 


22191. 


° Paraguay. 


22192. 


a Sumatra. 


22193. 


Rcmcdios. 


22194. 


Partidos. 


22195. 


a Over Betuwe. 


22196. 


Verpelet. 


22197. 


Neder Veluwe. 


22198. 


Spitzblattrige. 


22199. 


Spaza. 


22200. 


Sofades. 


22201. 


Chile na piccolo 




ii'Itd (Para- 




guay). 


22202. 


8 // in a t r a Deli 




(Java). 


22203. 


Cannella Villa- 




Rica (Para- 




guay)'. 


22204. 


Baffra. 


22205. 


Salento. 


22206. 


Ezeloor. 


22207. 


Argos. 


22208. 


Ma as en Vaal. 


22209. 


Sardegna riga- 




dio. 


22210. 


Tennessee Red. 


22211. 


Singapur. 


22212. 


Ecuador. 


22213. 


a Sarg. di Fer- 




sala. 


22214. 


Cannella d'lta. 


22215. 


Samsun. 


22216. 


Samsun. 


22217. 


a Manilla gcle. 


22218. 


° Over Veluwe. 


22219. 


Buhlerthaler. 


22220. 


Yedarit. 



22221. 


Arhij turkish. 


22222. 


Valikappal. 


22223. 


Katarumona. 


22224. 


Friedrichsthaler. 


22225. 


Herce g o v i n a 




L) ub u ski. 


22226. 


Appelterre. 


22227. 


Grammont. 


22228. 


Tuckahoe. 


22229. 


Dragon. 


22230. 


Haute Saone. 


22231. 


H e rce g o v i n a 




Stolach. 


22232. 


a Manilla groena. 


22233. 


Pumphala. 


22234. 


Brandley. 


22235. 


Granville Yellow. 


22236. 


Comstock. 


22237. 


Choice Ha ran a. 


22238. 


Taoac du Lot. 


22239. 


Taoac du Nord. 


22240. 


Big Orinoco. 


22241. 


Cuban Seed Leaf. 


22242. 


Yalarit. 


22243. 


Moro di Cori. 


22244. 


Evans. 


22245. 


Gooek. 


22246. 


Bonanza. 


22247. 


Xorthei rner. 


22248. 


Gold Finder. 


22249. 


Safran. 


22250. 


Blue Prior. 


22251. 


Pumpelly. 


22252. 


Tilly. 


22253. 


M i s s o u r i Seed 




Leaf. 


22254. 


Connecticut Seed 




Leaf. 


22255. 


Rliodus. 


22256. 


General Grant. 



a The nomenclature is that of Professor Comes as given in his pamphlet en- 
titled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume La 
R. Scuola Super iore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. This 
name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was taken 
from the label on the seed. 
3 37 



42 



SEEDS \XI> PLANTS IMPoPTKP. 



22083 to 22297 Continued. 

22107 to 22297— Continued. 



22257. 


Om Sucker. 


22258. 


Premium. 


22259. 


Kedirie < .lava ). 


22260. 


Deli Sumatra 




< s. Paolo, Bra- 




zil). 


22261. 


Bullion. 


22262. 


Missouri. 


22263. 


Cuba. 


22264. 


Doniaku. 


22265. 


Sizulok. 


22266. 


re a a syl vania 




Seal Leaf. 


22267. 


Sterling. 


22268. 


II a r a na Seed 




Leaf. 


22269. 


Lambeth. 


22270. 


Foglia grande di 




V ilia- R i c a 




(Paraguay). 


22271. 


Virginia Dienze. 


22272. 


Elsasser. 


22273. 


Nepal. 


22274. 


a Monikappal. 


22275. 


China (China). 


22276. 


a 8 ec c o n o <1 o 




corto. 



22277. Monnaikappal. 

22278. Yixlta Abajo. 

22279. Hoonan. 

22280. Pichai di Villa- 

Rica < Para- 
guay). 

22281. Florida Seal 

Leaf. 

22282. Deli. 

22283. Flanagan. 

22284. Oak Hill Yellow. 

22285. Conqueror, 

22286. Best Prior. 

22287. Havana (Cuba). 

22288. Oourg. 

22289. Clardy. 

22290. Big flu ran a. 

22291. Yd loir Mon- 

mouth. 

22292. Xanthi Kawala. 

22293. Secco Sardegna. 

22294. Karnukappal. 

22295. Climax. 

22296. Tabac del Lede. 

22297. Lot-et-Garonne. 



22298. (axavali sp. 



From Jaal, Luzon, P. I. Presented by Dr. H. M. Smith, Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Fisheries, Department of Commerce and Labor, Washington, 
D. C. Received March 3, IP' 



"A variety of bean which grows in hot, dry, sandy soil in various parts of 
Luzon, the vines attaining a length of 20 feet and having an abundance of 
large, succulent leaves." (Smith.) 

22299 to 22301. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

From Monmouth. 111. Presented by Mr. Samuel II. Weed, through Mr. C. 
V. Piper. Received February. 1908. 

22299. Dark red hulled. 

22300. Red hulled. 

22301. Yellow hulled. 

"A sweet or saccharine broom corn or broom sugar cane produced by hybridi- 
zation and selection for seven years." ( Weed.) 

a The nomenclature is that of Professor Comes as given in his pamphlet 
entitled Prospetto delle razze di tabacchi, which is an extract from the volume 
La R. Scuola Superiore di Agricoltura in Portici nel passato e nel presente. 
This name could not be found in the above-mentioned publication and it was 
taken from the label on the seed. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, IOCS. 48 

22302. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

From S 7 enice, Italv. Presented by Consorti Sullam. Received March 11, 
1908. 

•'Seeds of Spanish rice." (Sullam.) 

22303 to 22305. Hordeum spp. Barley. 

From Svalof, Sweden. Purchased from the Allmanna Svenska Utsadesak- 
tiebolaget. Received March 12, 1908. 

22303. Hordeum distichon erectum Schubl. 
Primus. 

22304. HOBDEUM DISTICHON NUTANS Schubl. 

Prinsess. 
22305. Hordeum distichon erectum Schubl. 

Sr tin lulls. 

22306. Avkxa sativa L. Oat. 

From Svalof, Sweden. Presented by the Allmanna Svenska Utsjidesak- 
tiebolaget Received March 12, 1908. 

Victory. " This is the variety wind) of all our new races has given the highest 
yield." (Allmanna Svenska Utsddesktiebolaget.) 

22308 to 22312. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society. Received March 11. PHIS. 

22308. Zea mays L. Corn. 

"A peculiar kind of corn. There are several colors but they are said 
to be all the same variety. The corn is much more glutinous than other 
varieties so. far as I know and may he found t<» he of seme use, perhaps 
as porridge." < Farnham. i 

22309. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

•• Seeds of a glutinous rice which we use for breakfast porridge and 

the like. I am told they sow it two weeks earlier than other rice, which 
would necessitate planting it about March 8. The Chinese hang this 
seed (paddy) in a bag in water — say in a tub — exposed to the son and 
air till it sprouts, and then sow it thick in the mud of a small pond, the 
mud having been fertilized with ashes and carefully prepared before 
the water is turned on. Here, a little more than covered with water, it 
is allowed to grow until from 4 to 6 inches tall. It is then taken up in 
small clusters and set out in the rice fields, the mud having been pre- 
pared and covered with water the same way. I suppose the Americans 
have as good or better methods." (Farnham.) 

22310. Phaseolus axgularis (Willd.) W.F.Wight. Adzuki bean. 
Red. 

22311. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 
Black. '•Similar to Nuttall but larger." (Neilsen.) 

22312. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 
Yellow. 

22313 to 22315. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director of the De- 
partment of Agriculture. Received February 11, 1908. 

22313. "Madaera." 

22314. "Menado." 

22315. " Favaansch." 

137 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22316. Operculina tuberosa (L.) Meissn. 

From Miami, Fla. Received through Mr. Ernsl A. Bessey, pathologist in 
charge of Subtropical Laboratory and Garden, March l 1. 1908. 

"Grown from S. P. l. No. L7835. This is a large ornamental vine belonging 
to the morning glory family. It is a vigorous grower, producing plants some- 
times ."'." I" 50 feel long. The sinus arc woody and often in two years reach a 
thickness of one's arm. The flowers are large, yellow in color, and borne with 
great profuseness, making the plant very ornamental at the flowering period, 
li Is grown to a limited extent around Miami and, if not already introduced 
there, may find favor in parts of California and other places where frost does 
doI occur. This ^'>'(\ was obtained from a vine at the Subtropical Laboratory 
and Garden.*' i B< ss* //.) 

22317 to 22322. Glycine iiispida (Moench) Maxim. 

Soy bean. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Purchased from Eaage & Schmidt. Received 
.March L6, L908. 

22317. Probably Butterball. 

22318. "Giant Yellow." Probably Amherst. 

22319. Brown. 

22320. Samarow. Like No. 17260. 

22321. Probably Cloud. 

22322. - Early Black from Podolia." Probably Buckshot. 

22323 and 22324. 

From Fort Sandeman, Baluchistan. Received from Lieut. Col. G. C. 
French. I. A., political agent in Zhob. through Prof. E. P. Stebbing, im- 
perial forest zoologist to the Government of India, Calcutta, India, March 
11, 1908. 

22323. Pistacia khinjuk Stocks. Pistache. 

22324. Olea feebuginea Royle. Olive. 

"Tree 30 to 50 feet high. The wood is hard and is highly prized for 
turning and for agricultural implements. It takes a high polish. An 
oil is extracted from the fruit." (Brandts, For. 11. Ind., p. :>07.) 

22325 to 22332. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

From Khartoum, Sudan, Africa. Presented by Mr. R. Hewison, agricul- 
tural inspector, agricultural and lands department, Sudan government, 
through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received March L6, L908. 

•• Representative durras, or .-it least not kafirs; some may prove not to belong 
to the durra group as we understand it." (C. R. Ball.) 

Seed of the following, with the localities in which they are commonly found. 
Varietal description, by Mr. C. R. Ball. 

22325. Kassabi. Singa and Wad Medani, Blue Nile. 
Probably identical with the " durra beda" of Egypt. 

22326. Eegari. Singa and Wad Medani, Blue Nile. 

22327. Mugud. Wad el Fahl, Flue Nile. 

22328. Feterita. All over the durra area in the Sudan. 
Seed is like No. 10517. 

22329. Fiki Mist<il,i. Singa. Flue Nile. 

22330. Wad Akar. Karkog, Blue Nile. 

22331. Nab el Tor. Blue Nile. 

22332. Homeizi Asfar. Singa. Blue Nile. 

Seed is like Agros. No. 14."r (> Hamaisee, from the Sudan. 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 45 

22333 to 22337. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

Grown at Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia, season of 1907. Received 
March 19, 1908. 

22333. Baud. 

"This variety was mixed with Brownie when received from Pingyang, 
Korea. This mixture was given S. P. I. No. 6414. The two varieties 
were grown together under these numbers. 9417, 17256, and Agros. No. 
1542, respectively. The two varieties were separated in the 1907 seed 
from Arlington Farm, and Baird given the above new number, Brownie 
remaining as No. 17256." (Nielsen.) 

22334. Flat black. 

" Received from Mr. H. B. Derr, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Champaign, 111. The original source of the seed is not known. It is quite 
similar in growth to Nuttall, but the seed is not the same shape, being 
flatter and larger." (Nielsen.) 

22335. Yellow. 

" Received from Mr. H. B. Derr, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Champaign. 111., where it was grown as Illinois Medium Yellow. It is 
very similar to Hollybrook, and perhaps is the same, but appears dif- 
ferent on account of having been grown farther north.'" (Nielsen.) 

22336. axel ph. 

" Received from Mr. H. B. Derr, Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Champaign, 111. Original seed was procured from the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, Wooster, Ohio." (Nielsen.) 

22337. Gael ph. 

" Received from Mr. H. B. Derr, Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Champaign, 111. Original seed was procured from the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, Fayetteville, Ark." (Nielsen.) 

22338. Capsicum annuttm L. Pepper. 

From Houston, Tex. Presented by Mr. J. Milton Howe, 204 Commercial 
National Bank Building. Received March 12, 1908. 

" Jalapa. This pepper has a medium-sized, heavy-fleshed pod and is prin- 
cipally used for pickling. In its pickled condition it is very much prized by 
both Mexicans and visiting Americans. At present, I am importing them di- 
rect (from Mexico) for my own use and the use of my immediate friends. They 
take so well that I feel confident that there is an opening for their introduction 
into this country. 

•• The pickling process is apparently a brine followed by packing in vinegar 
(Howe.) 



»> 



22341. Pueraria thunbergiaxa ( Sieb. & Zucc.) Benth. Kudzu. 

From New York, N. Y. Purchased from J. M. Thorburn & Co. Received 
March 20, 1908. 

" Kudzu is a large-leaved, very rapid growing, woody, leguminous vine, native 
to Japan. It succeeds well in every part of the United States where it has 
been tried, and where the summers are warm grows with great luxuriance. It 
is a most excellent vine for arbors or to produce a tropical effect by growing 
over low trees. In Japan a valuable fiber is made out of the stems, and from 
the large roots a fine quality of starch is extracted. 

"Kudzu also furnishes abundant and nutritious forage, and should be 
largely experimented with for this purpose. In Japan it is grown on rough, 
rocky land or steep hillsides that can not be cultivated. In tins country it 
should also be tested on lands too poor to be cultivated with profit. Kudzu 
being a legume will add nitrogen to the soil in addition to producing forage, 
and if at any future time it should be desirable to clear the land the starch 
crop of the roots will probably yield more than the cost. Kudzu may be used 

137 



46 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22341— Continued. 

either for pasturage or as green feed, though bay can be made of it. It will 
probably be besl used as pasture and i1 is desirable to have two such pastures 
to be browsed n Iternately. 

•• Directions for planting: The seed should be started in a seed bed and the 
plants transplanted after they arc well rooted. They should be planted 10 to 
•_>n feel apart. The first season they will produce stems <; to 12 feet long and 
by il ad of the second season should entirely cover the ground." (Piper.) 

(See also S. P. I. Xo. 9227.) 

22342 to 22348. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. .Meyer, ag- 
ricultural explorer, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
February 4. 1908. 

A collection of seeds, as follows; 

22342. Fagaba ailantiioides (S. & Z.) Engl. 

From Boshan, Shantung, China. "(No. 778a, Sept. 1!>. 1907.) A few 
seeds of this ornamental tree, which is worth planting more extensively. 
Very handsome when in flower or when loaded with its scarlet cap- 
sules."* ( Meyer.) 

22343. Amygdaltts persica L. Peach. 

From Ningpo, Chehkiang, China. "(No. S27a, July 3, 1007.) Bought 
at Ningpo for trial to see if new types appear among them." (Meyer.) 

22344. Amygdalvs armexi.ua (I,.) Dum. Apricot. 

From Ningpo, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 828a, July a, 1007.) A very 
large apricot, bought in Ningpo, said to come from Shantung." {Meyer.) 

22345. Prunus sp. Cherry. 

From Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 820a. May 20, 1007.) A very small 
fruited cherry, ohtainable for a couple of weeks on the market in Peking. 
Edible, but almost too small for us whites; may be an ornamental shrub. 
Chinese name Yue ye mei tdo, this name, however, may not he right." 
(Meyer.) 

22346. Rhus sp. 

From mountains near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 830a, May 27,1907.) 
A shrub, sometimes growing into a small tree; grows among the rocks 
and on dry places. Fit to cover dry mountain sides in the southwestern 
regions of the United States so as to prevent the washing down of the 
soil.** ( Meyer, i 

22347. Rehmannia glutinosa (Gaertn.) Fibosch. 

From Mingkien, Shansi. China. "(No. 831a, May 15, 1007.) A scrophu- 
lariaceous plaid growing on old walls and on dry hanks. Has rather 
large buff-purplish flowers. May he improved upon and become a garden 
plant for the arid regions of the United States."* (Meyer.) 

22348. Centatjrea sp. 

Prom mountains near Peking, Chihli, China. "( No. 832a, May 27, 1907. ) 
A very large flowered Centaurea of blue-purplish color. Perhaps fit as an 
ornamental plant in dry regions." (Meyer.) 

22349. Phragmites vulgaris longivalvis (Steud.) W. F.Wight. 
(Phragmites longivauvis Steud.) 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Com- 
pany. Received March IP. 190S. 

"Phragmites vulgaris longivalvis (Steud.) differs from the common form. 
Phragmites communis Trim, /'. vulgaris Lam., Arundo phragmites P.. Phrag- 
mites phragmiti 's Karst., in having the lower glume elongated, the panicle thus 
137 



JAM ai;y 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 47 

22349— Continued. 

appearing to have broader spikelets and resembling Arundo donax. From the 
herbarium specimens this form appears to be more robust than Phragmites vul- 
garis as it occurs in Japan, the stem being as thick as one's little finger. Fran- 
chet and Savatier place this as a variety of P. vulgaris, with the remark that it 
is scarcely worthy of this recognition. The species is cosmopolitan and some- 
what variable, and I think this form is scarcely more than a variety. It is to 
be noted, however, that the Japanese name for this is Yoshu-take, to distinguish 
it from Yoshi, the other form of P. vulgaris." (A. 8. Hitchcock, i 

22350 to 22378. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank X. Meyer, agri- 
cultural explorer, March 20, 1908. 

The following cuttings and seeds: 

22350. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Shifengtse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 208, 
Jan. 17, 1908.) A large, Hat. seedless persimmon. Apparently a variety 
of the one sent under Nos. lot and lor, iS. P. I. Xos. 16912 and 16921). 
As the trees were growing in a very well sbeltered valley this large- 
fruiting quality may be due to the location. Chinese name Ta slii tse." 
(Meyer.) 

22351. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Shifengtse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 211, 
Jan. 17. 190S.) Said to be a large peach of reddish color. Chinese name 
Ta tau." i l/r//< r.) 

22352. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Shifengtse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 212, 
Jan. 17, 1908.) Said to be medium sized, very Hat, and of reddish color. 
Chinese name Pien tan." (Meyer.) 

22353. Aescultjs chinensis Bunge. 

From Tanchetse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 213, 
Jan. 19, 1908.) The Chinese horse-chestnut, a beautiful new shade tree, 
quite rare here in China. Scions formerly sent under No. 81 (S. P. I. 
No. 17736). As the tree is more closely related to the Pavias than to the 
Aesculus it will probably thrive better when grafted upon stock of the 
first group. Chinese name So lo shu." (Meyer.) 

22354. Aesculus chinensis Bunge. 

From Tanchetse Temple, west of Peking. Chihli, China. "(No. 216, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) The same as No. 213 (S. P. I. No. 22353) but from a dif- 
ferent location. The same remarks apply to it. The largest specimens 
occur in the Tanchetse Temple, southwest of Peking, where the trunk of 
the biggest one measures 12^ feet in circumference.*' ( Meyer.) 

22355. Populus alba tomentosa (Carr.) Wesmael. 

From Hsiendjetse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 217. 
Jan. 21, 1908.) The large-leaved Chinese poplar as sent before under 
several numbers. These trees grow remarkably straight and tall. The 
Chinese prune the lower branches off, until there is often a clear trunk 
of 40 feet before the first branch is reached. May prove to be a very 
good street tree. Chinese name Pal yang shu." (Meyer.) 

22356. Syringa sp. 

From Changnantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 218, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) Blue lilac. A very floriferous variety of lilac, with small 
leaves; very drought resisting. Chinese name Lang ting hsien shu" 
(Meyer.) 

137 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22350 to 22378 Continued. 

22357. Sybinga sp. 

Prom Changnantse Temple, wesl of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 2l ( >. 
Jan. 21, L908.) A white-flowering variety of Mine, said to be very fine. 
Also, like the preceding (S. P. 1. No. 22356), very drought resistant. 
Chinese name Pai ting hsien shu." (Meyer.) 

22358. A.MYGDALUS PEBSICA L. Peach. 

From Poliping, wesl of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 221, Jan. 22, 
1908.) A rather large peach of whitish color and said to be very fine; 
realizes high prices in Peking and is far from being easily obtained. The 
trees grow slowly and do not attain large dimensions, 7 to 8 feet seems 
to be the maximum height; they seem to suffer much from scales. Chi- 
nese aame Mi tau, meaning honey peach. They grow on terraces in the 
mountains at 1,000 feel and more altitude." (Meyer.) 

22359. Amygdalus pebsica K Peach. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 222, Jan. 22, 190S. ) 
A peach said to he very large, of red meat, and not so sweet as the preced- 
ing uumber < S. P. I. No. 22358), growing in the same localities and appar- 
ently very little attacked by scales. A thrifty grower, though not becom- 
ing tall. Chinese name Hong tau, meaning red peach." (Meyer.) 

22360. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Poliping. west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 223. Jan. 23, 
1908.) A peach said to he almost like No. 221 (S. P. I. No. 22358), but 
of more thrifty growth and bearing much longer leaves, called as such 
Ta )<<■ tau, meaning long-leaved peach. Growing under the same condi- 
tions as No. 221 (S. P. I. No. 22358) and very little attacked by scales. 
The soil in these mountains is reddish decomposed granite and does not 
seem to he very fertile." (Meyer.) 

22361. Prunus sp. Cherry. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 228, Jan. 22, 
1908.) A tall-growing bush cherry, 10 to 15 feet high, bearing small cher- 
ries. Seems to he able to stand trying climatic conditions, such as 
drought and summer heat. Chinese name Ying taur." (Meyer.) 

22362. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 229, Jan. 22, 
1 '.ins. i a large, flat, seedless persimmon, apparently the same as No. 
104 (S. P. I. Nd. 16912). Chinese name Ta shi /.vc." (Meyer.) 

22363. Populus balsamifera suaveolexs ( Fisch. ) Wesin. Poplar. 

From Sidling, Chihli, China. "(No. 230, Jan. 25, 1908.) A remarkable 
variety of the small-leaved Chinese poplar; looks like the Lombardy 
poplar, but makes a more pleasing impression. Loves a sandy, moisture- 
retaining soil. Chinese name Tchau tien pai yang shu, which is prob- 
ably an erroneous name, as put yang means the Populus tomentosa." 
I Meyer.) 

22364. Ulmus maceocarpa Hance. ( ?) Elm. 

From Shiling, Chihli, China. "(No. 231. Jan. 25, 1908.) A shrubby 
elm. often having irregular, corky winu r s along its branches. Crows en 
very dry and rocky mountain slopes, growing from a couple of feet up 
to 20 or 30 feet high. Chinese name Shan yu shu. Seems to be very 
variable in its habitus." (Meyer.) 

22365. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 232, Jan. 
30. 1908.) A large, very flat persimmon of orange-red color: grows in 
great orchards in the mountain valleys. These fruits are flatter in shape 
and also sweeter in taste, than No s. 104 ami 105 ( S. P. I. Nos. 16912 and 
16921), but they seem to love a warmer, more sheltered location. They 
form a very large item in the providing of a livelihood for thousands of 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 49 

22350 to 22378— Continued. 

people. The total amount of money received from around Taidjatsoa 
village for persimmons last fall amounted to $10,000 (Mexican). Chinese 
name Ta mo pan shi tze." (Meyer.) 

22366. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 233, Jan. 
30, 190S.) A small, flat, seedless persimmon of orange-red color. While 
the very large variety ranges from 3 to 5 inches in diameter, this one 
varies between 2 and 3 inches ; for this reason not much planted. Chinese 
imme Shan mo pan shi tze. Like the large ones they also have the incision 
all around." < Meyer. ) 

22367. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 234, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A small-fruited, seedless persimmon, not quite flat, which 
bears, besides the circular incision, two incisions across, which vary 
greatly in different fruits. The tree grows to a very much larger size 
than the ordinary Mat-fruited ones. Apparently the same as sent under 
No. 97 (S. P. I. No. 16910). Chinese name locally for this variety is 
Lien lata shi tze, meaning lotus flower persimmon." (Meyer.) 

22368. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 235, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A small-fruited, yellow persimmon with seeds. A slow grower ; 
has whitish bark; is rare. Chinese name Xeu sien shi tic" (Meyer.) 

22369. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 236, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A small-fruited, oblong, scarlet-red persimmon with seeds. 
Chinese name Whoe shi tie s7m." (Meyer.) 

22370. Diospyros kaki L. f. Wild persimmon. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu. Chihli, China. "(No. 237, Jan. 
30. 190S.) A yellow-fruited variety of this tree upon which, in north- 
eastern China.' the Chinese graft all their improved varieties. The 
ordinary variety always has black fruits. Chinese name Huang yuang 
ts-ao." (Meyer.) 

22371. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 238, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A white apple. The trees grow spreading and are long lived. 
Probably the same as No. 227 (S. P. I. No. 22440). but there is much 
variation among these Chinese apples. Chinese name Pai piny knar 
( Meyer. ) 

22372. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 239, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A medium-sized red apple of sweet taste. The trees grow 
very spreading and are long lived. Chinese name Hong teny kuu." 
(Meyer.) 

22373. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu. Chihli, China. "(No. 243, Jan. 
30, 1908.) Said to be a white peach with a red tip and having juicy meat. 
Chinese name Pai tan hong tchor." (Meyer.) 

22374. Thuya orientalis L. 

From Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 251, Feb. 6, 1908.) A wonderful 
branch variation of the ordinary Thuya orientalis. The Chinese call 
this variation Fong Huang su, meaning the rising phoenix tree." (Meyer.) 

22375. Ulmus paryifolia Jacq. Elm. 

From Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 252. Feb. 6, 1908.) A tall, spread- 
ing elm, with many small branches bearing small leaves and flowering 
in fall. In the winter the bark peels off in curiously formed pieces. I 

58392— Bull. 137—08 £ 



50 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



22350 to 22378— Continued. 

have seen only two specimens in China during all my wanderings and 
these two grow in the grounds of the Temple of Heaven at Peking, from 
where these scions arc taken.*' i Meyer.) 

22376. Gleditsia sinensis Lam. 

From Lungtsuantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 
901a, Jan. IT. L908.) A Gleditsia bearing heavy, fleshy pods, which arc 
utilized by the Chinese as a substitute for soap; they slice them up and 
pour boiling water over them and use them to wash fine clothes and also 
their hair. The pods contain a very biting substance which makes one 
sneeze when it enters the nostrils, and when it gets in the eyes it is even 
quite painful; They burn well in the lire: test them for their chemical 
properties. The tree itself is medium sized and makes a nice, round 
head: well tit to he used as an ornamental tree in parks and gardens; 
it is a slow grower. There is great variation among the trees so far as 
size and shape of pods are concerned. They are apparently in a state of 
mutation. ( 'hinese name Tsau jo slut. Seeds sent formerly from differ- 
ent locations under Nos. 100a and 174a i S. P. I. Nos. 17889 and 18579). 

•' Immerse the seeds for half a minute in boiling water to insure a 
uniform germination, as otherwise they may remain dormant for a year 
or even longer." (Meyer.) 

22377. Gleditsia sp. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli. China. "(No. 902a, Jan. 
.'JO, 1908.) A tall, slender-stemmed locust, bearing small pods which are 
of no use to the people. It seems to be a very rare tree. Chinese name 
//>.') Ji tchoi. Give the seeds the same treatment as the preceding num- 
ber (S. P. I. No. 22376). " (Meyer.) 



22378. JUGLANS MANDSHUBICA Maxim. 



Walnut. 



From Tchitaitse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 910a, 
Jan. 16, 1908. ) A peculiar kind of a wild walnut, growing here and there 
in the mountains." (Meyer.) 

22379 to 22383. 

From Canton. Kwangtung, China. Presented by Dr. J. M. Swan, Cooks 
Hospital. Received March 20, li»0s. 

22379 to 22381. Glycine iiispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

22379. Yellow. 22381. Green mixed with 

22380. Black. 



yellow and a 
few brown. 



Cowpea. 
Adzuki bean. 



22382. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. 
Brown-Eye. 

22383. Phaseolus angulabis (Willd.) YV. F. Wight. 
Red. 

22384 to 22390. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by I >r. M. Treub, director. Botanic 
Gardens. Received March 20, 1908. 

22384. Xki'iiki.iim lappaceum L. 



22385. 
22386. 
22387. 
22388. 
22389. 
22390. 
137 



Lansitjm domestictjm Jack. 
Gabcinia i ds< a Pierre. 
Gabcinia lotjbeibi Pierre. 

GAB* IMA MANGOSTANA L. 

Gabcinia sizyghfolia Pierre. 

Gabcinia tinctobia DC. (Xantqochymtjs tinctorius 1 >c. I 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 51 

22391. Vigna cjngtltctjlata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon, through Mr. O. W. 
Barrett. Received March 23, 1908. 

Probably Iron. " Seed procured from the New Guinea-Venezuela variety. 
Early, prolific, and vigorous. Harvested ripe pods 48 days from planting." 
( Lyon.) 

22392. Ahgyeeia nervosa (Burm.) Boj. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon, through Mr. O. W. 
Barrett. Received March 23, 1908. 

"Original seed received from Mr. O. W. Barrett, under the name li><>m<>rn sp., 
from Brazil. 

• - A perennial growing to a length of 40 to 50 or more meters. Flowers a 
reddish violet color." {Lyon.) 

22393. Sesban gijandiflora (L.) Poir. 

From Rockhampton, Queensland. Australia. Presented by Mr. J. II. 
Maiden, director of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, New Sonth Wales. 
Received March 16, 1908. 

(For description see S. P. I. Nos. 3786 and 5209.) 

22394 to 22404. Raphanus satiyfs L. Radish. 

From Yokohama. Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Com- 
pany. Received March 16, 1908. 

The following seeds with Japanese varietal names: 



22394. 


Kameido 


22395. 


Hosane. 


22396. 


0-maru. 


22397. 


Nerima. 


22398. 


Ninengo. 



22400. 


Seigoin. 


22401. 


Natsu-daikon or Sum- 




ma- radish. 


22402. 


Owari-Miyajiu. 


22403. 


Kairyo-Miyajiu. 


22404. 


ToJci-maki. 



22399. Sakurajima. 

22405. SOLANTTM sp. 

From Ni<e. France. Presented by Dr. A. Robert sou-Proschowsky, through 
Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received March <>. 1908. 

"A very ornamental Solanum, a small tree covered with thousands of red 
fruits (possibly from Peru)." (Proschowsky.) 

22406 to 22410. 

From Hongkong. China. Presented by Mr. S. T. Dunn, Botanical and 
Forestry Department. Received March 26, 1908. 

22406. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 
Y'ellow. 

22407. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 
Black. • 

22408. Yigxa uxguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 
Brown-Eye. 

22409. Phaseolus radiates L. Mung- bean. 

22410. Phaseolus angulabis (Willd.) AY. F. Wight. Adzuki bean. 

Red. 

1:;7 



52 SEEDS AM> J" I. A NTS [MPORTED. 

22411 to 22415. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

From Naples, Italy. Purchased from Dammann & Co. Received March 25, 
1908. 

22411. Samarow. 

22412. Black. " Similar to Cloud." (Nielsen.) 

22413. Brown. 

22414. yellow. " Similar to Acme." {Nielsen.) 

22415. Gianl yellow. 

22416 to 22418. Medicago spp. 

From Berlin, Germany. Purchased from A. Metz & Co. Received March 
24, 1908. 

22416. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Piedmont. 

22417. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Provence. 

22418. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Frb. Alfalfa. 
Sand lucern. 

22419. Perilla frutescens (L.) Eritton. 

From Ichang, Hupeh, China. Secured by Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the Arnold 
Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass., in cooperation with this Department. 
Received March 21, 1008. 

'•( No. 7 , .>: , », Jan. 23, 1908.) Herb. 3 to 4 feet, cultivated in the mountains in 
the immediate neighborhood of Ichang, at altitude from 1,000 to 3.500 feet. 
From the seeds is expressed a sweet, culinary oil, much esteemed by the 
Chinese locally. The colloquial name is Tzu nni." (Wilson.) 

22420. Chaetochloa italica (L.) Scribn. Millet. 

From Mitchell. S. Dak. Purchased from the Dakota Improved Seed Com- 
pany. Received March 23, 1008. 

Kursk. " To be used in classification and varietal tests." ( Vinall.) 

22428. Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc. 

Grown at Arlington Farm. Virginia, season of 1007, under C. V. P. No. 0474. 
Received March. 1908. 

•' Original seed presented by the Botanic Gardens. Tokyo, Japan. A near 
relative to the soy bean, but a spreading or decumbent plant, abundantly pro- 
vided with large root nodules. Has considerable promise as a cover or green 
manure crop." I Piper.) 

22429. Ruscus aciileattjs L. Butcher's broom. 

From Vomcro. Naples. Italy. Presented by Dr. C. Sprenger. Received 
March 28, 1968. 

"An erect (liliaceous) shrub, with minute, bractlike lea\es and branches 
(phyllodia) simulating leathery, persistent, leaflike bodies. The fruits are red 
berries, one-half inch in diameter: the Mowers are small." (Bailey.) 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MAECH 31, 1908. 53 

22430. Chrysophyllum maglismontana Sond. Stem-vrugte. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, agrostologist 
and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received March 
27, 1908. 

"A handsome evergreen shrub or small tree. Requires a warm, temperate 
climate, but will stand light frost." (Davy.) 

22431. Kyllinga brevifolia Rottb. Sedge. 

Grown in the Department greenhouse, Washington, D. C, under C. V. P. 
No. 0569, season 1907-S : numbered, for convenience In distributing, 
March 28, 1908. 

"Original sod received from Mr. A. G. Sullivan, Birmingham, Ala., Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. It is a fine-leaved sedge of a very rich green color and a decided 
stoloniferous habit. It is claimed to be quite aggressive in the lawn of Mr. 
Sullivan and to take kindly to repeated mowings. To be developed as a lawn 
plant for the South." (YinaU.) 

22432 to 22459. 

From Peking, Ckihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, ag- 
ricultural explorer, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., March 
16, 1908. 

A collection of cuttings and seeds, as follows: 

22432. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Shifengtse Temple, west of Teking, Chihli, China. "(No. 209, 
Jan. 17, 1908.) A large variety of the so-called Peking pear: round like 
an apple, of very pale yellow color, and of melting flesh. Can be intro- 
duced into the Western World as it is. Formerly sent under No. 100 
(S. P. I. No. 16916). Chinese name Ta pai li." (Meyer.) 

22433. Prunus sp. Plum. 

From Shifengtse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 210, 
Jan. 17, 1908.) A large, red plum, said to be early and very .wod. 
Chinese name Ta hong li tse." (Meyer.) 

22434. Malus sp. Crab apple. 

From Hsiendjetse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 214, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) A fine flowering crab apple, of shrubby form, bearing 
masses of rose-colored flowers followed by edible scarlet crab apples. 
Chinese name Hai tang Icua." (Meyer.) 

22435. Malus sp. Crab apple. 

From Hsiendjetse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 215, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) A variety of the preceding, No. 214 (S. P. I. No. 22434) : 
said to be larger, with flowers of white color, followed by very small 
fruits." (Meyer.) 

22436. (Undetermined.) 

From Changnantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 220, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) Tree cuttings, probably a Rhus, but as no leaves could 
be found it may prove to be something different: the wood is very hard 
and brittle. The tree is said to be the only specimen around Peking, as 
a priest assured us." (Meyer.) 

22437. Amygdaltjs abmeniaca (L.) Dum. Apricot. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 224. Jan. 22, 
1908.) A large apricot, said to be white with a red tip. Chinese name 
Hai tschai ta pai sing." (Meyer.) 

22438. Pyrus chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. •■(No. 225, Jan. 22. 
1908.) A very good pear, nonmelting, but very juicy. The Chinese con- 
sider this one "of their best pears. A good keeper. Color light yellow, of 

137 



54 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

22432 to 22459 Continued. 

regular pear shape with ;i long peduncle. There are several distinct 
varieties of this pear and ye1 all :nv called Yar li. One form scut in 
inn;, under No. L19 (S. P. [. No. L6924)." I Meyer,) 

22439. I'vki s chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 226, Jan. 22, 
L908.) A hard-meated round pear of yellow color with :> red check, looks 
like an apple;-an extraordinary keeper, even when treated roughly. May 
be of use as a eooking pear. Chinese name Hong hsau li." < Meyer.) 

22440. Malus SYLVESTRis Mill. Apple. 

From Poliping, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 227. Jan. 22, 
1908.) A small white apple, called Pai ping kus, used in sweetmeats and 
preserves." i \i< y r.) 

22441. Pbtjnus sp. Flum. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 240, Jan. 30, 
liuis. i a large yellow plum, very bushy but growing very vigorously. 
Said to be good. Chinese name Huang li tse." (Meyer.) 

22442. Pybtjs chinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 241, Jan. 30, 
1908.) a large variety of the so-called Yar li. Sent also under Nos. 119 
and 225 (S. P. I. Nos'. 16924 and 22438). Chinese name of this variety 
Ta yar li." (Meyer.) 

22443. Praxis i sinensis Lindl. Pear. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 242, Jan. 30, 
1908.) A round apple-shaped pear of red color, hard meated but sweet; 
a good shipper; fit perhaps as a cooking- pear. Chinese name Hong ho li." 
( Meyer. ) 

22444. Amygdaltjs aemeniaca (L.) Dum. Apricot. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 244, Jan. 30, 
1908.) An apricot which is said to he half red and half yellow. Chinese 
name Hai tang hong sing." (Meyer.) 

22445. Amygbaltjs aemeniaca (L.) Dum. Apricot. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 245, Jan. 30, 
1908.) A large yellow apricot with edible sweet kernel. Chinese name 
Ta huang sing." < Mi yer.) 

22446. Amygdaltjs aemeniaca (L.) Dum. Apricot. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu. Chihli, China. "(No. 246, Jan. 30, 
1908.) A small red apricot of sweet taste and with edible sweet kernel. 
Chinese name Shau hong sing." (Meyer.) 

22447. Populus balsamifeba suaveolens (Fisch.) Wesm. Poplar. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 247, Jan. 30, 
1908.) An extraordinary slender form of Populus suaveolens. A beauti- 
ful tree when planted in a row along a water course with the western 
sky as background. Chinese name Pun )/<itio shu. For other remarks 
see Xo. 230 (S. P. I. No. 22363)." (Meyer.) 

22448. Moris alda L. Mulberry. 

From Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 248, Jan. 30, 
1908.) A wild form of the mulberry growing into medium-sized, well- 
formed trees. Apparently a distinct form. Chinese name Sang shu." 
• Meyer.) 

22449. PiOSA sp. Rose. 

From Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 249, Jan. 30, 1908.) Said to be 
a beautiful, yellow rambler rose, flowering with an abundance of flowers. 
Obtained from the garden of the American Presbyterian Mission in 
Pautingfu. who procured it from a Chinese nurseryman." (Meyer.) 
137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, ■ 1908. 55 

22432 to 22459— Continued.. 

22450. Sales sp. Willow. 

From near Pautingfu, Cliibli, China. "(No. 250, Jan. 30, 1908.) The 
ordinary willow which grows excellently everywhere on the dry lands in 
North China. Needs no water supply beyond a scanty summer rainfall." 
(Meyer. | 

22451. Morus ali;a L. Mulberry. 

From Peking. Chihli, China. "(No. 253, Feb. 10, 1908.) A tall-growing 
mulberry, bearing entire, oblong leaves. Grows here and there in Peking 
in gardens and is a good shade tree." (Meyer.) 

22452. Rosa xaxtiiixa Lindl. Rose. 

From Peking. Chihli, China. "(No. 254. Feb. 10. 1908.) A semidouble' 
yellow rose of very thrifty growth. Nonfragrant, but extraordinarily 
floriferous. Blooms but once a year. See Nos. 07 and 68 (S. P. I. No. 
17469) for other remarks." (Meyer.) 

22453. Rosa rttgosa Thunb. Rose. 

From Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 255, Feb. 10, 1908.) A double so- 
called Japanese rose, although it is a native of North China. This vari- 
ety grows only 2 to 4 feet high and 1 tears large magenta-colored flowers 
of very sweet odor. The petals of these roses are very much esteemed 
by the Chinese for flavoring their tea, perfuming their rooms, and to use 
in toilet waters. They are grown in large quantities for these pur- 
poses." (Meyer.) 

22454. Celtis sp. Hackberry. 

From Hsiling, Chihli, China. "(No. 904a, Jan. 25, 190S.) A small- 
leaved Celtis, growing into a small-sized ornamental tree. Can stand 
lots of drought. The galls of this tree are, like those of the following 
number (S. P. I. No. 22455), eaten by the Chinese after the insect has 
been taken out. They are said to taste like cucumbers." (Meyer.) 

22455. Celtis sp. Hackberry. 

From near Taidjatsoa, west of Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 905a, 
Jan. 31, 1908.) A tall Celtis, of use as a shade tree. Called in Chinese 
Shan huang lewa shu, which means wild cucumber tree, on account of 
the peculiar galls which infest this tree, which are eaten and taste like 
wild cucumbers, so they say." (Meyer.) 

22456. Pinus btjngeana Zucc. Pine. 

From Changnantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 906a, 
Jan. 21, 1908.) The most glorious of all pines. See notes to Nos. 137a 
and 139a (S. P. I. No. 17912). Chinese name Pai huorr sung shu." 
( Meyer. ) 

22457. Xaxthoceras soebifolia Bunge. 

From Changnantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 
907a, Jan. 23, 1908.) This beautiful flowering shrub, which sometimes 
grows into a small tree, is often found in the temple courts and is well 
worth planting. Seeds formerly sent under No. 11a ( S. P. I. No. 18264). 
Chinese name Mu kua Juki." (Meyer.) 

22458. Cercis chixexsis Bunge. 

From Changnantse Temple, west of Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 
908a, Jan. 23, 1908.) The Chinese red-bud. a very ornamental bush when 
in flower: blooms before the leaves are out. Leaves large, glossy green, 
and more or less heart shaped. Crows to be 10 to 12 feet high and 
stands droughts very well. Chinese name '/':< ching." I Meyer.) 

22459. Brassica oleracea L. Cabbage. 

From Taidjatsoa. west of Pautingfu. Chihli. China. "(No. 909a, Jan. 
30, 1908.) A very solid, oblong cabbage with the leaves overlapping 

137 



56 SE] DS \M» PLANTS [MPORTED. 

22432 to 22459 -Continued. 

each other, ;i rare thing with Chinese cabbage. Very much esteemed 
locally. Needs a rich, well-irrigated soil. Sow in .June, transplanl in 
early September. 2 feel aparl In each direction, lake up after the first 
frosl and store in cool, frostproof pit." (Meyer.) 

22460 and 22461. Cupressus spp. Cedar. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
March 27, 1908. 

22460. Cupressus bentham] knightiana (Perry) .Mast. 

22461. Cupressus benthami lindleyi (Klotzscb.) Mast. 

22463 and 22464. Stizolobium spp. 

From Saharunpur, Northwesl Province, British India. Presented by Mr. 
A. ( '. Hartless, superintendent, Government Botanic Gardens. Received 
.March 30, 1908. 

22463. Stizolobium niveum I lioxb.) Kuntze. 
(For description see No. 19181.) 

22464. Stizolobium capitatum (Koxb.) Kuntze. 

22465. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Guaranda, Ecuador. Presented by Father Luis Sodiro, through Mr. 
c. J. Brand. Received March, 1908. 

Morada or Guaranda. "This alfalfa is extensively grown in the Province 
of Bolivar at altitudes of 6,000 to 9,000 feet. Methods of cultivation, etc., are 
described in Bulletin No. 118, Bureau of Plant Industry."* {Brand:) 

22466. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Pima. Peru. Presented by Prof. George Vandergben, director of the 
Escuela Nacional de Agricultura, through Mr. C. J. Brand. Received 
March. 1908. 

MOnsefu. "This alfalfa is quite commonly cultivated in Peru; yields more 
cuttings and is more hairy, woody, and hollow stemmed than ordinary or 
Chilean alfalfa. - ' I Brand.) 

22467. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Oberschiipf in Baden, Germany. Secured from* Mr. Ludwig Keller, 
landwirth, through Mr. C. J. Brand. Received March, 1908. 

Alt Deutsche Frankische. "(V. L. H. No. 3321.) This alfalfa has been 
grown for some yens in south Germany on soils rich in shells and Jurassic 
lime. It is grown especially in the vineyard regions, where a specialty is made 
of seed production. For this purpose fields having a southern exposure are 
given preference. When grown between the rows of grapes it gives its highest 
yields. Practically nothing is known of injury from dodder where this strain 
is grown, which has led to a belief among some growers in Baden that it is 
in limine to dodder. This, however, is not the case. Sections where this Old 
German Frarikonian lucern is grown are little adapted, on account of climatic 
conditions, to seed production, and it is said that this strain is the only one 
which has given satisfactory results. The seed is generally sown broadcast 
under barley. After the first year many growers throw the lucern into rows 
by hoeing. This enables the lower heads on the plants to mature their seed, 
and also tends to give a more uniformly ripe product. 

"The first cutting is made when the lucern is about half grown (60 centi- 
meters high), in order that the second crop may have time to mature its seed 
by September. Hulling machinery is uncommon in south Germany, so that 
pods are thrashed from the straw and then stored in the granary until winter. 
This method permits a certain amount of after-ripening and also in a measure 

137 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1908. 57 

22467— Continued. 

protects the seed from rodents. Thrashing and screening are done in winter, 
when the seed is finally made ready for market and sold. Lncern seed grown 
in this way can not, of course, be sold at the same price as ordinary French, 
Italian, and Provence seed. 

"Alt Deutsche Frankische lncern is said to be hardier than the ordinary 
kinds and, on this account, to give greater yields. Fields of it are also said to 
endure longer than other kinds. While Provence lasts from six to eight years, 
Old German Frankonian gives good yields from ten to fifteen years. My cor- 
respondent states that the average yield is about 200 pounds per 120 square 
yards (2 zentner pro ar). The grower from whom this seed was secured lias 
a field 25 years old whose stand is so good that it is still profitable. He states 
that when the Provence alfalfa becomes yellow and loses its lower leaves, 
which occurs both from drought aud excessive moisture, Frankonian remains 
fresh and grows up again immediately after harvesting." (Brand.) 

22468 to 22486. Corylus avellaxa L. Filbert. 

From Nevada City, Cal. Purchased from Mrs. Felix Gillet, Barren Hill 
Nurseries. Received at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
March 18, 1908. 

The following plants, with descriptions by Mrs. Gillet : 

22468. Du Chilly Cobnut. 
Large and long, fine. 

22469. Col. Filbert. 

22470. Brunswick. 

22471. Bysance, 

A good grafting stock. 

22472. D' Alger. 

22473. Geante des Halles. 

22474. Xoce Lunghe. (Istria, 1901, Dept.) 
Finest of all. 

22475. Nottingham. 

22476. Aveline Grosse Ronde. (Belgium, 1898, Dept.) 

22477. Emperor. (Belgium, 1S98, Dept.) 

22478. Kentish Cob. 
Long, large. 

22479. Belgium. 1898, Dept. 

22480. Montebello. (Sicily, 1905, Dept.) 

22481. White Aveline. 
Thin shell, white pellicle. 

22482. Red Aveline. 
Thin shell, red pellicle. 

22483. Purple-Leafed Aveline. 
Very ornamental. 

22484. Grosse Blanche of England. 
Similar to Barcelona. 

22485. Daviana. 
Medium large, very pretty. 

22486. Barcelona. 

Large, round. 
137 



58 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOETED. 

22487. Bambos arundinacea Retz. Bamboo. 

Prom Saint Symphorieu, Belgium. Presented by Mr. Jean Houzeau de 
Lehaie. Received March 30, 1908. 

(For description see \<>. 21317.) 

22488. Cicer aimi.iimm L. Chick-per.. 

From Mexico City, Mexico. Purchased from Prof. Felix Foex, National 
School of Agriculture. Received April 1. 1908. 

(For description see Nos. 10974 and 11634.) 

22489 to 22492. 

From Guelph, Ontario. Canada. Presented by Prof. C. A. Zavitz, Agricul- 
tural College, through Mr. X. II. Vinall. Received April 1. 1 ( .m»s. 

22489. Chaetochloa itai.ica (L.) Scribn. Millet. 

California, 

22490. Panicum miliaceum L. Proso millet. 
Red French. 

22491. Chaetochloa italica (L.) Scribn. Millet. 
Holy Terror Gold Mine. 

22492. Panicum miliaceum L. Proso millet. 

Japanese Panicle. 

••The above are to be used in classification work and varietal tests." 
(Vinall.) 

22496 and 22497. 

From Lahore, Punjab. British India. Presented by Mr. \Y. R. Mustoe, 
superintendent, Government Historical Gardens. Received March 16, 
1908. 

22496. Beatjmontia gkandiflora (Roxb.) Wall. 

"A climbing, woody vino. Leaves opposite, short petioled, oblong, 6 to 8 
inches long, 2 to ."i inches wide, entire. Flowers greenish yellow, in axil- 
lary cymes. Corolla bell shaped, about 5 inches across, five lobed, margin 
wavy. * * :: Seed takes nearly one year to ripen." {Roxburgh.) 

" Nomen bengalense: Dhootura Luta." (Wall.) 

22497. BOMBAX MALABABICUM DC. 

44 One of the largest of the Indian trees, often 100 feet high. Leaves 
alternate, long petioled. digitate. Leaflets, 5 to 7, lanceolate, 6 to 12 
inches long, entire, smooth on both sides. Covered with large red flowers 
early in spring, before the leaves appear. 

" Salmuli, the Sanscrit name: Beng. Simul; Teling. Boorgha." (Box- 
burgh, Flora Indica, vol. 3, p. 167.) 

22498 to 22502. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. Presented by Dr. D. Duncan Main. 
through Mr. J. M. W. Farnham, Shanghai, China. Received March 20, 
1908. 

22498 to 22501. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

22498. Yellow. Similar to No. 18619. 

22499. Yellow. 

22500. Green. Similar to No. 17857. 

22501. Black. 

22502. Pisum abvense L. Field pea. 

Varietal descriptions of the above were made by Mr. II. T. Nielsen. 
137 



JANUARY 1 To MARCH 31, 1908. 59 

22503 to 22510. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from L. Boehmer & Co. Received 
March 31, 1908. 

The following seeds with Japanese names quoted; varietal descriptions l>v 

Mr. H. T. Nielsen : 

22503 to 22507. Glycine hispioa (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

22503. " Teppo Mame." 

Yellow, similar in appearance to Amherst, No. 1727.". 

22504. •• Kaze Mame" 
Green. 

22505. " Gogwatsu Mame" 

Yellow, similar to Haberlandt, No. 17271. 

22506. - Mam Mame." 
Yellow. 

22507. •■ Vieuri Lei." 

Green, similar to Yosho, No. 172»>2. 

22508 and 22509. Phaseolus angulabis (Willd.) \V. F. Wight. 

Adzuki bean. 

22508. Red. 

22509. "Shiro." 
Yellow. 

22510. Phaseolus badiatus L. Mung bean. 

•• Runda Mane ." 
137 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Abelmosehus esculent us, 21799. 
Ictinidia chinensis, 21781. 
Aeschynomene bispinosa, 21797. 
Aescvlus chinensis. 22353, 22354. 
Albizzia sp., 21969. 

adianthifolia, 21750. 
Alfalfa, Andean, 21935. 

Arabian, 21768, 21769. 
(China), 22001. 
Dry-Land, 21807, 21945. 
(Ecuador), 22465. 
(Germany), 22467. 
Grimm, 21735, 21827, 21938. 
(Guaranda), 22465. 
Jet, 21768, 21769. 
Monsefu, 22466. 
Morada, 22465. 
(Peru), 22466. 
sand lucern, 22418. 
(Utah), 21828, 21829. 21867. 
See also Medicago sativa and Medir 
cago sativa varia. 
Amygdalus armenlaca, 22344, 22347. 
22444 to 22446. 
davidiana, 21908, 22009. 
persica, 2198s to 21992, 
22343, 22351, 22352, 
22::r>s to 22360, 22:;::;. 
Ananas sativus, 21950, 
Andropogon ischaemum, 21897. 

sorghum, 21807, 21834 to 
21836, 21868, 21869, 
21936, 211)37, 21940, 
21941, 22010 to 22012, 
22299 to 22301, 22325 
to 22332. 
Anthemis stipulacea, 21893. 
Apple (China), 22371. 22372. 22440. 
Apricot (China), 22344, 22437, 22444 to 

22440. 
Arachis hypogaea, 22022. 
Argyrela nervosa, 22392. 
Artemisia annua, 21892. 
Arundinella anomala, 21896. 
Asparagus sp.. 2201 s. 

afrieanus, 22029. 
Astragalus sinicus, 21942. 
Arena nuda inermis, 22005. 
sativa, 22306. 
sterilis, 21751. 

Bamboo. See' Ba mhos arundinacea and 
Gephalostachyum pergracile. 

Sambos arundinacea, 21837, 22487. 

Banana (French Guinea), 21776. 
(Hawaii), 22061 to 22065. 

Barberry (China), 21909.^ 

See also Berberis vulgaris japonica. 

Barley. Primus, 22058, 22303. 

137 



Barley, Prinsess. 220.")!). 22304. 
Svauhals, 22305. 
See also Hordeum spp. 
Bauhinia picta, 21783. 
Bean, Adzuki. See Phaseolus angu- 
laris. 
Black Mauritius. 22031. 22032. 
(China), 21001. 22008. 
Hyacinth. See Dolichos lablab. 
Mung. See Phaseolus radiatus. 
See also Phaseolus spp. 
Beam-arm a guatemalensis, 21904. 
Beaumontia grandiflora, 22496. 
Benincasa cerifera, 21801. 
Berberis sp., 21900. 

vulgaris japonica, 21950. 
Hoi usant litis speciosus, 21808. 
Bombax malabaricum, 22407. 
Brassica oleracea, 22459. 
Butcher's broom. See Ruscus acu- 
1 eat us. 

Cabbage (China), 22459. 
Canarium luzonicum, 21860. 
Canavali sp., 22298. 
Cannabis sativa, 21780. 
Capnoides sp., 22020. 
Capsicum annuum, 22338. 
Caragana chamlagu, 21067. 
Cariea papaya, 21800. 
Castanea sativa, 21875. 
Catjang, Upright, 21934. 

See also Vigna catjang. 
Cedar (France), 22460. 22461. 
Celosia a roe n tea. 21906. 
Celt is sp., 21881, 21882, 21972. 22454, 

22455. 
Centaurea sp.. 2234s. 
Cephalostachyum pergracile, 21943. 
Cercis chinensis, 2245s. 
Chaetochloa italiea, 22420, 22489, 22401. 
Chayota edulis, 21966. 
Cherry (China). 21924. 22345. 22361. 
Chestnut (China ), 21875. 
Chick-pea. See Cicer arietinum. 
Chinese date. See Zizyphus sativa. 
Chrysanthemum sp., 22081. 

indicum, 21804. 
sinense, 21893. 
stipulaceum, 21S93. 

Chrysophyllum maglismontana, 224.10. 
deer arietinum, 217S4 to 21786, 224ss. 
Citrullus vulgaris, 21805, 21903. 
Citrus sp., 21904. 

decumana, 21870. 

Union um, 21905. 

nobilis, 21810. 

X vulgaris, 21779. 

61 



62 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Clover, Fragrant. Sec Tri folium 

sua r< oh ns. 
Cockscomb. See Celosia argentea. 
Coh us s|... 21773, 21774. 

amboinicus, 21865. 
Colocasia sp., 22066 to 22075. 
Corn i China I, 22308. 

(Java t. 22313 to 22315. 
i Mexico), 22060. 
Comus macrophylla, 21971. 
Corylus avellana, 22468 to 22486. 
( lowpea, Amherst, 21825. 
Black, 21817. 
Black Crowder, 22052. 
Black-Eye, 21815. 
Brown-Eye, 22382, 22408. 
Clay, 21816. 
Cream, 21813. 
(India >, 21793. 
(Philippines), 22391. 
Speckled Crowder, 22051. 
Turney's Black-Eye, 22050. 
Volunteer, 22054. 
Volunteering Iron, 22055. 
Whippoorwill, 21814. 
White, 21793. 
See also Vigna unguiculata. 
Crab apple (China), 21878,21879, 
21915, 21916, 21922, 21027, 22484, 
224:::.. 
Crataegus sp., 21986. 

pinnatifida, 21921, 21987. 
Cucumber (India), 21802. 

I Korea >. 21752. 
en cum is melo, 21803. 

sativus, 21752, 21802. 
Cucurbih! pepo, 21804, 211)02. 
Cupressus bt nthami knightiana, 22160. 

lindleyi, 22461. 
Cydonia sp., 21984. 

japonica, 21812. 

J ><i hi in imperialism 21963. 

Date, Chinese. See Zizyphus sativa. 

I [ndia), 21753. 
Dimorphotheca spectabilis, 21861. 
Dioscorea sp.. 21933. 

bulbifera, 21775. 
decaisneana, 21864. 
Diospyros kaki, 21910, 22350, 22862, 
22365 to 22370. 

I koe. See Lansium domesticum. 

Dolichos lablab, 21047 to 21950, 21998, 

22025. 
1 nirra. See Sorghum. 

Eggplant. See Solarium melongena. 
Elm (China), 21920, 21932, 22364, 

22:;7fi. 
Emmer. See Triticum dicoccum. 
Eragrostis sp.. 21895. 
Euoommia ulmoides, 21782. 

Fagara ailanthoides, 22842. 
Fagopyrum tataricum, 22006. 
Falcata japonica, 21889. 
Filbert. See Corylus avellana. 

137 



Garcinia fusca, 22386. 
loureiri, 22387. 
mangostana, 22388. 

si: tiff a fnl iii, 22389. 
liiiclorin. 22390. 
Gardenia jasminoides, 22013. 
<; lain sin sp.. 22377. 

heterophylla, 21968. 
sinensis. 22376. 
Glycine hispida, 21754 to 21757, 21818, 
21825, 21830, 21831, 21946, 
21999, 22311, 22312, 22:;i7 to 
22322, 22:;:;:; to 22337, 22379 
to 22381, 22400. 22407, 2241 1 
to 22415, 2240S to 22501, 
22503 to 22507. 
soja, 2212S. 
Glycyrrhiza glabra, 220:;:;. 
Gourd. See Lagenaria vulgaris. 
Grape (China ), 21979 to 21981. 
Grass, Guinea. See Panicum maxi- 
mum. 

Hackberry (China), 21881, 21882, 

21972, 22-154. 22155. 
Hawthorn (China), 21921, 21986, 

21987. 
Hemerocallis sp.. 22010. 
Hemp (China I, 21780. 
Hordeum distichon erectum, 22058, 

22303, 22805. 
nutans, 22059, 
22304. 
spontaneum, 21874. 
Hydrangea sp., 21025. 

Incarvillea sinensis. 21890. 
Ipomoea batatas, 21770 to 21772. 
Iris ens, it a. 22014, 22015. 

Japanese quince. See Cydonia ja- 
ponica. 
Juglans mandshurica, 2287s. 
regia sinensis. 21877. 
Jujube. Sec Chinese date. 

Kafir (Africa). 21834 to 21836. 

Black-Hull, 21834, 21868, 21860, 

21087. 
Red (Africa). 21040. 
Matakwa, 21835. 
White Matakwa, 21836. 
Koelreuteria paniculata, 21078. 
Kudzu. See Pueraria thunbergiana. 
Kyllinga brevifolia, 22431. 

Lagenaria vulgaris, 21 70s. 
Lansium domesticum, 21823, 22388. 
Lathyrus sp.. 21706. 

maritimus, 22034. 
Lemon (China), 21005. 
Lespedeza sp., 21884 to 21887. 
Licorice. See Glycyrrhiza glabra. 
Ljfcium chinense, 22016. 

Macadamia tern 1 folia. 22082. 
Mains sp., 21879, 21915, 21010. 21022. 
21027. 22484. 22485. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



63 



Malus baccata, 21878. 

sylvestris, 22&71, 22372, 22440. 

Matrimony vine. See Lycium chinense. 
Medicago sativa, 21768, 21769, 21828, 

21829, 21867, 21935, 
2104.1. 21962,22001, 
22416, 22417. 22465 
to 22467. 
varia, 217:;.". 21827, 
21938, 22418. 
Mover. F. N., seeds and plants secured, 
21875 to 21932, 21967 to 22023, 22342 
to 2234s. 22350 to 2237s. 22432 to 
22450. 
Millet. ]>roso. See Panicum miliaceum. 

See also Chaetochioa italica. 
Mimosa adianthifolia, 21750. 
31 isca n tit us con den s at us, 21 820. 
Morus alba, 2244s. 22451. 
Mulberry (China). 22448, 224."!. 
Musa sp., 21776. 22001 to 22065. 
Muskmelon. See Cucumis melo. 

Nephelium lappaceum, 22384. 
A icotiana alata, 22101. 

bigelovii angustifolia 22102. 

glutinosa, 22 m:;. 

noctifiora albiflora, 22104. 

quadrivalvis, 22105. 

rustica, 22083 to 22100. 

silvestris, 22106. 

tabacum, 22107 to 2221)7. 

Oak, Cork. See Quercus subi r. 
Oat (China >. 22005. 

(Persia >. 21 751 . 

Victory, 22306. 
Olea ferruginea, 22324. 
Olive. See Olea ferruginea. 
Opercnlina tuberosa, 22316. 
Oryza sativa,. 22002, 22302, 22309. 

Panicum maximum, 21958, 22020. 
miliaceum, 224110, 22402. 
obtusum, 21736. 
plantagineum, 21001. 
Papaw. See Carica papaya. 
Pea, beach. See Lathyrus maritimus. 
field. See Pisum arvense. 
garden. See Piston sativum. 
Peach (China). 2100s. 21988 to 21002. 
22343, 22351, 22352, 22358 to 22360, 
22373. 
Peanut (China). 22022. 
Pear (China). 21880, 21011 to 21014. 
21917, 2191S. 21023, 21928 to 21031. 
21983, 21985, 22432, 22438, 22430. 
22442, 22443. 
Pennisetum compressum, 21809. 

flaccidum, 21000. 
Pepper, Jalapa, 2233s. 
Perilla frutescens, 22410. 
Persimmon (China). 21010, 22350, 

22362, 22305 to 22370. 
Phaseolus angularis, 21824, 22310, 
22383, 2241 < ), 22508, 22100. 
pilosus, 21790. 

137 



Phaseolus radiatus, 217S7, to 21789 
22000, 22400, 22510. 
vulgaris, 21901, 22008. 
Phoenix it until is, 21 <."::. 
Ph vaginites karka, 21057. 

longivalvis, 22340. 
vulgaris longivalvis, 22349. 
Pili nut. See Canarium luzonicum. 
Pine, Chilgoza. See Pin us gerardiana. 

I China). 21007. 22450. 
Pineapple, Guayaquil, 21050. 
Pinus bungeana, 21007. 22450. 

gerardiana, 21810. 
Pistacia chinensis, 21070. 

khinjuk, 22323. 
Pisum arvense, 22007, 22036 to 22049, 
22077 to 22070. 22502. 
sativum. 21704. 21795. 
Plum (China). 22433, 22441. 
Pomelo, Amoy, 21870. 
Poplar (China), 22355. 22363. 22447. 
Populus alba tomentosa, 22355. 

balsamifera suaveolens, 22303, 
22447. 
Prunus sp., 22345, 22361, 22433, 22441. 

tomentosa. 21024. 
Pteroceltis tatarinowii, 21077. 
Pueraria thunbergiana, 22341. 
Pumpkin (China i. 21002. 
( India ) , 21804. 
Pyrus sp., 21030. 21031. 
betulaefolia, 21082. 
chinensis, 21880, 21911 to 21014, 
21017, 2101s. 21023, 2102s. 
21020. 21983, 21 Osr,. 22432. 
22438, 22430, 22442, 22443. 

Quercus sp., 21876. 

cornea, 21960. 
suber, 21732. 

Radish (Dutch Fast Indies). 21806. 

(Japan), 22304 to 22404. 
Pa pita mis sativus, 21806, 22304 to 

22404. 
Rehmannia glutinosa, 22347. 
Rhamnus sp.. 21078. 
Rheum acuminatum, 21767. 
australe, 21763. 
com pactum, 21764. 
moorcroftianum, 21766. 
pal mat tint. 21702. 

atropurpureum , 

21705. 
tanguticum, 21701. 
vhapontieum. 21758, 21700. 
undulatum, 21759. 
Rhododendron sp.. 21010. 21926. 
Rhubarb. See Rheum spp. 
Rhus sp., 22346. 
Ribes evuentum, 21746. 

wolfii, 21749. 
Rice (China 1.22002,22309. 

Spanish, 22302. 
Rosa sp.. 21737 to 21740, 21742. 22440. 
hugonis, 21734. 
rugosa, 22453. 



64 



SEEDS \M» PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Rosa n rici a, 217 13. 

80ulU ana, 217 IT. 

8pino8is8imn, L'lT 11 . 

xanthina, l'l' l. *.•_'. 
Rose (China ). 224 19, 22452, 22453. 

i England), 21737 to 21743, 21747. 
h'lihiis cratacgifoliti8, l' IT is. 
lasiostylus, 'J it 1 1. 
microphyllus, 21 T 15. 
Ruscus <iriii< atus, 22429. 

SaZto s|i.. 22450. 

Sedge, 22431. 

B( samum orientale, l:l!<>21. 

S\ sban bispinosa, 21T0T. 

grandiflora, 22303. 
Solatium sp., 22017, 22405. 
melongena, 22023. 
Sorghum (Africa i. 22325 to 22332. 

broom corn hybrids, 2229*9 to 

22:501. 
(China). 22010 to 22012. 
Roosevelt's Forty-Four, 21S0T. 
White durra, 21041. 
See also Durra, Kafir, Sorgo, and 
Andropogon sorghum. 
Sorgo, Gooseneck, 21036. 

Sec also Andropogon sorghum. 
Soy bean. Amherst, '21825. 
Baird, 22333. 
black. 21756, 22311. 22380, 

22407, 22412, 22501. 
brown, 22310. 22413. 
Butterball, 21830. 
(China). 210!)!). 22311. 22312. 
Extra Early Black, 21T5T. 
flat black, 22334. 
(Germany), 2231 T to 22322. 
giant yellow, 22415. 
given. 22381, 22500, 22504, 

22507. 
Guelph, 22336, 22337. 
I to San, 21818. 

(Japan). 21825, 21830, 21831. 
(Java). 21040. 
Ogemaw, 21T55. 
Samarow, 22320. 22411. 
yellow. 21T54, 22312, 22335, 
223T0. 22406, 22414. 22498, 
22400. 22503. 22505, 22506. 
See also Glycine hispida. 
Spergula arvensis, 21862, 21863. 
Spodiopogon sibiricus, 21898. 
Spurry, Corn or Common. 21862. 
Spurry, Giant, 21863. 
Stem-vrugte. Sec Chrysophyllum mag- 

lismontana. 
Stizolobium capitatum, 21951 to 21053. 
2105.-,. 22031, 22032, 
22401. 
hirsutum, 21054. 
nii-rum, 22463. 
Sweet potato (French Guinea), 21770 

to 21772. 
Syringa sp., 22356, 22357. 

137 



T 



Tangerine (China ), 21810. 
Taro i Hawaii i, 22000 to 22075. 
Thuya orientalis, 2237 1. 
Tobacco ( Italy 1. 22083 to 22207. 
Toona ciliata, 22076. 
Tricliilia emetica, 21809, 21965. 
Trifolium suaveolens, 22035. 

subrotundum, 21T33. 
Triticum sp., 22027. 

aestivum, 21838, 21939, 2200:;, 
22004. 

dicoccum, 21871, 21872. 

monococcum aegilopioides, 
21873. 
Tu-chung. Sec Eucommia ulmoides. 

minis sp., 21920. 

davidiana, 21032. 

macrocarpa, 22364. 

parvifolia, 22375. 
Undetermined, 21883, 21888, 21891, 
22436. 

Varnish tree. See Eoelreuteria pani- 

culata. 
Vetch, common. See Vicia sativa. 
Viburnum sp., 21974, 21075. 
Vicia sativa, 21944. 
Vigna catjang, 21792, 21934. 
sesquipedalis, 21791. 
unguiculata, 21793, 21813 to 
21817, 22050 to 22055, 22382, 
22391, 22408. 
Vitex incisa, 21976. 
Vitis sp., 21007, 21979 to 219S1. 

Walnut (China), 21877, 22378. 
Watermelon, apple-seeded, 21805. 

(China), 21903. 
Wax-gourd. See Benincasa cerifera. 
Wheat (China), 22003, 22004. 
Havemann, 21930. 
(Italy), 21838. 
(Peru), 22027. 
See also Triticum spp. 
Widdrihgtonia whytei, 22024. 
Willow (China), 22450. 
Wilson, E. H., seeds secured, 21780 to 
21782. 

Xanthoceras sorbifolia, 22457. 
Xanthochymus tinctorius, 22390. 
Xanthosoma sagittaefolium, 21777, 

21778, 21826. 
Xiphagrostis condensatus, 21820. 

Yarn. See Dioscorea spp. 
Yangtaw. See Actinidia chinensis. 

Yautia (British Guiana), 21826. 

(French Guiana), 21777, 21778. 

Zanthoxylum ailanthoides, 22342. 

Zea mails. 22000. 22308, 22313 to 22315. 

Zizyphus lotus. 21995. 

sativa, 21993, 21994, 21996. 



o 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 142. 

B. T. GALLOWAY. Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE .PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 
TO JUNE 30, 1908: 

INVENTORY No. 15; Nos. 22511 to 23322. 



Issued February 25, 1909. 



* 







WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

The scientific and technical publications of 1 1 1 # - I'.ureau of Plant Industry, which was 
organized July 1. 1001, arc issued in a single series of bulletins, a list of which follows. 
m Attention is directed t.. the fact that the publication! in this series are not for general 
distribution. The Superintendent of Document!, <;overnrnent Printing Office, Washington, 
I>. ('.. is authorized by law to sell them at cost, and to him all applications for these 
bulletins should be made, accompanied by a postal money order for the required amount 
or by cash. Numbers omitted from this list can not be furnished. 
NO 1 'I'll'' Relation of Lime and Magnesia to Plant Growth-, 1901. Price, 10 cents. 
2. Spermatogenesis and Fecundation of Zamia. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 

Macaroni Wheats. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 
4. Range Improvement in Arizona. 1901. Price, 10 cents. 

6. A List of American Varieties of Peppers.* 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

7. The Algerian* Durum Wheats. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

9. The North American Species of Spartina. 1902. l'rice, 10 cents. 

10. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

11. Johnson Grass. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

VI. Stock Ranges of Northwestern California. ,1902. Price, 15 cents. 

13. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

1.".. Forage <Y>nditions on the Border of the Great Basin. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

17. Some Diseases of the Cowpea. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

20. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

22. Injurious Effects of Premature Pollination. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price. 10 cents*. 

25. Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
29. The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. The " Bluing " of the Western Yellow Pine, etc. 1903. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of the Spores in the Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans and of Phy- 

comyces Nitens. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 
41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. l'rice, 10 cents. 

43. Japanese Bamboos. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

45. Physiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Plants. 1903. Price, 5 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice : Its Uses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

56. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Price. 30 cents. 

57. Methods Used for Controlling Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

58. The Vitality and Germination of Seeds. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

59. Pasture. Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

63. Investigations of Rusts. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

64. A Method of Destroying or Preventing the Growth of Alga? and Certain Pathogenic 

Bacteria in Water Supplies. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

65. Reclamation of Cape Cod Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 
09. American Varities of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70; The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Price, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Pear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 190."., Price, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Price, « cents. 

142 

[Continued on page 3 of cover.] 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 142. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURIXU THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 
TO JUNE 30, 1008: 

INVENTORY No. 15; Nos. 22511 to 23322. 



Issued February 25, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

PhyHologiat and Pathologist, and chief o) Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Physiologist and Pathologist, and Assistant Chief of Bureau, Albert F. Woods. 

oratory oj Plant Pathology, Erwln v. Smith, Pathologist in Charge. 
Fruit Disease Investigations, Merton B. Waite, Pathologist In Charge. 
Investigations in Forest Pathology, Haven Metcalf, Pathologist in Charge. 
Cotton mui Truck Diseases and riant Disease Survey, William A. Orton, Pathologist in 

Charge. 
Pathological Collections and Inspection Work, Flora W. Patterson. Mycologist In Charge. 
riant Life History Investigations, Walter T. Swingle, Physiologist in Charge. 
Cotton Breeding Investigations, Archibald D. Shamel and Daniel N. Shoemaker, Physiolo- 

[sts in Charge. 
1 icco Investigations, Archibald D. Shamel, Wigktman W. Garner, and Ernest II. 

Blathewson, in charge. 
n Investigations, Charles P. Hartley, Physiologist in Charge. 
Alkali and Drought Resistant riant Breeding Investigations, Thomas II. Kearney, 

Physiologist in Charge. 
Soil Bacteriology and Water Purification Investigations, Karl P. Kellerman, Physiologist 

in Charge. 
Bionomic Investigations of Tropical and Subtropical Plants, Orator F. Cook, Bionomist 

in Charge. 
Drug and Poisonous Plant and Tea Culture Investigations, Rodney II. True, Physiologist 

in Charge. 
Physical Laboratory, Lyman J. Briggs, Fhysicist in Charge. 
Agricultural Technology, Nathan A. Cobb, Crop Technologist in Charge. 
Taxonomic and Range Investigations, Frederick V. Coville, Botanist in Charge. 
Farm Management, William J. Spillman, Agriculturist in Charge. 
Grain Investigations, Mark Alfred Carleton, Cerealist in Charge. 

Arlington Experimental Farm and Horticultural Investigations, Lee C. Corbett, Horticul- 
turist in Charge. 
Vegetable Testing Gardens, William W. Tracy, sr., Superintendent. 
Sugar-Bcct Investigations, Charles O. Townsend, Pathologist in Charge. 
Western Agricultural Extension, Carl S. Scofield, Agriculturist in Charge. 
Dry-Land Agriculture Investigations, F. Channing Chilcott, Agriculturist in Charge. 
Pomological Collections, Gustavus B. Brackett, Pomologist in Charge. 
Field Investigations in Pomology, William A. Taylor and G. Harold Powell, Pomologists 

in Charge. 
Experimental Gardens and Grounds, Edward M. Byrnes, Superintendent. 
Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 
Forage Crop Investigations, Charles V. Piper, Agrostologist in Charge. 
Seed Laboratory, Edgar Brown, Botanist in Charge. 

Grain Standardisation, John D. Shanahan, Crop Technologist in Charge. 
Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla., P. J. Wester, in Charge. 

Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., W. W. Tracy, jr., Assistant Botanist in Charge. 
South Texas Garden, Brownsville, Tex., Edward C. Green, Pomologist in Charge. 
Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work, Seaman A. Knapp, Special Agent in Charge. 
Seed Distribution (Directed by Chief of Bureau), Lisle Morrison, Assistant in General 

Charge. 



Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction. 

scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Frank N. Meyer and William D. Hills, Agricultural Explorers. 

Albert Mann, Expert in Charge of Special Barley Investigations. , 

F. W. Clarke. Special Agent in Charge of Matting-Rush Investigations. 

Frederic Chisolm, Expert. 

Walter Fischer, R. A. Young, and H. C. Skeels, Scientific Assistants. 

142 



LI1 >Y 
C * AL 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. C, October 19, 1908. 

Sir : I have the honor to transmit herewith, and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin Xo. 142 of the series of this Bureau, the ac- 
companying manuscript, entitled " Seeds and Plants Imported Dur- 
ing the Period from April 1 to June 30, 1908: Inventory Xo. 15; 
Xos. 22511 to 23322." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 
publication. 

Respectfully, B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 
Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

142 3 



CON T E N T S 



Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 9 

Index of common and scientific names 77 

142 

5 



B. P. I.— 418. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908: 
INVENTORY NO. 15; NOS. 22511 TO 23322. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

This fifteenth inventory of seeds and plants imported by the Office 
of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction between the dates of April 
1 and June 30, 1908. inclusive, comprises 812 numbers, and among 
the more important are those which our agricultural explorer Mr. 
Frank N". Meyer secured personally in his exploration trips in north- 
ern and central China. While it is too soon to tell anything about 
the real value to the country of these new importations, it may be 
worth while to call especial attention to certain ones from which we 
expect more than others. Occasionally, it is the thing of which little 
is at first expected that turns out the most important, but as a rule 
the predictions of the explorer in the field have come true. 

Among the plants from Mr. Meyer are some especially interesting 
shade and ornamental trees, which he secured at great personal dis- 
comfort and risk from the almost barren mountains of the Wutai, 
where the climatic conditions are similar to much of the territory 
of the Northwestern States. The unusual difficulties of collecting 
seeds in these mountains will be appreciated when it is mentioned 
that of some species onty single trees are standing in absolutely barren 
wastes extending for scores of miles around. Although Mr. Meyer 
made two trips to this inhospitable region, it was quite impossible 
for him to be on hand when the seeds of single rare elms and spruces 
ripened and, as can well be believed, the wild rodents which were 
on the spot did not wait for him. Some of the things of which he 
obtained cuttings have been pronounced new by Professor Sargent, 
of the Arnold Arboretum, and it is to be regretted that more material 
from this region could not have been secured. 

Of items of interest from other parts of China, Mr. Meyer for- 
warded four distinct varieties of the Yang Mae, or strawberry tree 
(Myrica nagi) ; the evergreen chestnut {Castanopxis tibetana) ; VI- 
mus pumila, a promising dry-land elm from Manchuria for the 
Northwest; the remarkable white-barked pine (Pinus bungeana), 
which can hardly fail to attract the attention of our landscape gar- 
deners ; four species of lilac as yet undetermined ; five species of 
Chinese roses; a very unusual collection of twenty-nine forms of 

142 

7 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

bamboos, some of which are hardy enough to grow in the climate of 
Peking, which resembles that of Philadelphia; a wild oat from the 
dry elevated port ions of the Wutaishan, and soy beans, cowpeas, 
sorghums, cottons, and many other very valuable things from this 
great Klondike of new plant varieties, where almost every cultivator 
saves his own seeds and thus originates new strains. 

Special mention should be made of an unusual piece of introduc- 
tion work which Consul Magelssen, of Bagdad, carried out at our 
request, i. e., the securing and proper labeling of what may be con- 
sidered one of the most successfully landed collections of Arabian 
date-palm suckers. 

Through the increasingly large number of friends of plant intro- 
duction both abroad and at home a number of interesting things have 
been secured by correspondence: Cork acorns from southern Spain; 
a summer orange called the Natsu mikan, from Japan, which ripens 
in midsummer and is served on the tables of foreigners there just as 
the pomelo is in America ; a collection of Indian green-manure and 
fodder plants from Nimboli ; a broad-leaved variety of alfalfa from 
Elche, Spain ; a collection of taros from Cochin China ; a collection 
of rare sorghums from Entebbe, Uganda ; the sugar palm from the 
East Indies ; the white Alfonso mango from Bombay ; a unique collec- 
tion of wild and cultivated potatoes from the archipelago of Chiloe, in 
southern Chile, the home of the potato, and from the adjoining main- 
land, made by Mr. Jose D. Husbands ; and a collection of Guatemalan 
cacti and a Central American dahlia secured for us by the late Prof. 
W. A. Kellerman just before his unfortunate death in the Guatemalan 
forest. 

It should be repeated that the seeds and plants here listed are not 
necessarily for distribution, nor is it always possible to supply those 
who desire the various things listed here with what they want ; but it 
is the aim of the office to get anything that a plant breeder or plant 
experimenter wants, whether it appears in these inventories or not, 
provided it is not already on the market, in which case the applicant 
will be referred to the catalogues which advertise it. To introduce 
a plant and get it into the regular trade channels without in any way 
interfering with the legitimate business in plant novelties which the 
seedsmen and nurserymen of the country are so well carrying on is 
one of the objects of our work. 

The botanical determinations of the material are, as in the previous 
inventory, those of Messrs. W. F. Wight and H. C. Skeels, while the 
inventory has been prepared by Miss Mary A. Austin. 

David Fairchild, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 
Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington^ D. C, October 7, 1908. 

142 



INVENTORY. 



22511. Pueraria thunbergiana (S. & Z.) Benth. Kudzu. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from L. Boehmer & Co. Received 
April 4, 1908. 

See No. 22341 for description. 

22512. ROLLIXIA ORTHOPETALA A. DC. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Prof. C. F. Baker, Musen Goeldi, Caixa 
Postal No. 399, through Mr. (). W. Barrett. Received April 4, 1908. 

"The finest anonaceous fruit of tropical America." (Baker.) 

"Tree 30 to 40 feet high; leaves oblong, acuminate, acute at base; corolla 
1 inch in diameter, greenish yellow. Fruit size of an infant's head, greenish 
yellow : flesh white, sweet. Grows in flooded woods along the Amazon." 
( Ma >-t ins.) 

22513 to 22523. 

From Bridgetown, Barbados, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. John 
Ft. Bovell, superintendent. Agricultural Department, at the request of 
the Imperial Commissioner of Agriculture for the West Indies, through 
Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received April 4, 190S. 

22513. Milady. 22519. Gerennj Barbados. 

22514. Banana tannia. 22520. Leefman. 

22515. Red tac-u. 22521. Button tannia. 

22516. (Unknown.) 22522. Gray Jack. 

22517. Choice Marquis. 22523. White Leftman. 

22518. China eddo. 

"A collection of taros and yautias which are grown extensively as wet-land 
crops in Barbados. Procured for the collection of these plants in Florida." 
(Fairchild.) 

22524 to 22527. Juglaxs spp. Walnut. 

From Baumschulenweg, near Berlin, Germany. Purchased from Mr. L. 
Spath. Received March 28, 1908. 

Notes taken from Mr. L. Spath's catalogue for 1907-1908. 

22524. X JUGLANS INTERMEDIA PYRIFORMIS Carr. (J. NIGRA X REGIA?) 

A hybrid with large, multi-pinnate, light green leaves. 

22525. X JUGLANS INTERMEDIA VILMORIXIANA Carr. ( J. NIGRA X REGIA ? ^ 

A beautiful and imposing tree, perfectly hardy. 
142 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22524 to 22527 Continued. 

22526. JUGLANS i;i QIA L. 

./. regia f.ertilis Hort., •/. regia praeparturiens Hort. Bush walnut; very 
early bearing. 

22527. JUGLANS REGIA L. 

./. regia rubra Hort. Red-skinned walnut. 

22528. Vitis vinifera L. Grape. 

From Niles, Cal. Presented by the California Nursery Company. Received 
;ii the Plant introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., March, 190S. 
Sultanina Rosea. A seedless variety. (See No. 3921 for description.) 

22529. Panicum maximum Jacq. 

From Livingstone, Victoria Falls, northwestern Rhodesia. Presented by 
Mr. C. E. F. Allen, conservator. Received April 6, 1908. 

"A valued grass in this country for hay and pasture." (Allen.) 

22530. Landolphia capensis Oliv. 

From Pretoria. Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. 0. Burtt 
Davy, agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. 
Received April 6, 1908. 

"A small bush of the Magaliesberg. These fruits have an agreeable flavor 
and are used for jam and brandy and are eaten raw. The fruit is known as 
the "wild peach' or "wild apricot.' 

"This Landolphia is not likely to yield commercial rubber. The bush re- 
quires a warm, almost frostless situation." (Davy.) 

22531. Axox a cherimola Mill. Cherimoyer. 

From Island of Madeira. Presented by Mr. Charles O. L. Power. Re- 
ceived April 0. 1908. 

" These cuttings were taken from a tree which produces good-*sized, normal 
fruit of the smooth-skinned variety; it has no particular name here. 

'• It is the best tree as regards size and quality I have in my garden, but, as 
is the case with all cherimoyers here, both the size and quality vary very 
much from year to year." (Power.) 

22532. Hordeum polystichum trifurcatum (Schlect.) Asch. & 
Graebn. Barley. 

From Fort Collins, Colo. Secured from Prof. W. D. Olin, agronomist, 
Agricultural Experiment Station. Received April 8, 1908. 

Hull-less. "Grown from No. 12709. Adapted to high altitude." (Derr.) 

22533. Crataegus pixxatifida Bunge. Hawthorn. 

From Shantung Province, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society, Shanghai, Kiangsu, China.- Received March 
26, 1908. 

" The Chinese name for this fruit is San dzo, the first syllable of the word, 
San, means mountain and would point to its cultivation in mountainous regions. 
It is about the size of a crab apple and resembles the thorn apple, of which 
I presume it is a species. It makes an exceptionally nice jam. The fruit 
when ripe is washed and each one cut open to see that there is no decay or 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 11 

22533— Continued. 

worm, and the whole is boiled. It is then nibbed through a sieve to separate 
the skin, seeds, etc. The pulp is then slightly cooked with sufficient sugar. If 
much boiled it turns to jelly. The taste and flavor remind me of the New 
England boiled cider-apple sauce, in Pennsylvania called * apple butter.' I 
think it has a nice aromatic flavor, and if not cultivated in America I have 
sent you seeds enough to give it a speedy introduction." (Famham.) 

22534 and 22535. Glycine hispjda (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Weihsien, China. Presented by Mrs. C. W. Mateer. Received April 
4, 1908. 

22534. Yellow. '"This bean is used for making lamp and cooking oil 
and for flour to make cakes: also for bean curd (a mush curdled by 
caustic soda and eaten fried). All these are nourishing, but more 
esteemed by Chinese than foreigners. The refuse after expressing the 
oil forms a cake (round) 2 feet in diameter and 3 inches thick. This 
is exported for feeding animals (pounded fine) and enriching land." 
(Mateer.) 

22535. Black. Similar in appearance, to Cloud. 

22536 to 22540. 

From Chefoo, Shantung. China. Presented by Mr. Hunter Corbett, through 
Rev. J. M. W. Famham, of Shanghai, China. Received April 4, 1908. 

The following seeds, varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen: 

22536 to 22538. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

22536. Green. Similar to No. 1TS5T. 

22537. Green. Similar to No. 172G2, Yosho. 

•'Chinese names ■ S. P. I. No. 22530) ('Jung teo and Lull teo; 
(S. P. I. No. 22.~>.\57 ) Whong teo. These beans are used extensively 
for the manufacture of oil : the bean cake which remains after the 
oil has been pressed out is shipped south and extensively used as a 
fertilizer in vegetable gardens. Will grow well on level or high 
and hilly land. Is used by the people largely for food, being 
ground and made into a curd, also put in water and soaked until 
well sprouted and used as a vegetable. It is also boiled and eaten 
in the same manner as rice." (Corbett.) 

22538. Black. Similar in appearance to Cloud. 

"Chinese name Shao hih teo. Used chiefly for feeding animals." 
(Corbett.) 

22539. Vigxa unguiculata ( L. ) Walp. Cowpea. 
Whippoorwill. Similar to Nos. 17330, 17849, and 210S5. 

"Chinese name Hun;/ chiang teo. Planted in orchards and in ground 
overshadowed by trees, etc." ( Corbett.) 

22540. Pisum arvexse L. Field pea. 
" Chinese name Wan teo. Used extensively in the manufacture of 

vermicelli." (Corbett.) 

22541 to 22549. 

From Chelsea, S. W., London, England. Presented by James Veitch & Son. 
Received April 3, 1908. 

22541. Aconitum hemsleyanum E. Pritzel. 
142 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22541 to 22549— Continued. 

22542. At c.mum sp. ( V) 

22543. ASTILB] sp. (?) 

22544. Artemisia lactifloba Wall. 

22545. Bebbebis acuminata Franch. 

22546. Jasminum primulinum Hemsl. 

22547. Yrns arm ata Diels & Gilg. 
Var. Veitchii. 

22548. Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herd. 

22549. Lonicera tragophylla Hemsl. 

22550 to 22555. 

From Groningeii, Netherlands. Presented by Mr. J. W. Moll, director, 
Botanic Garden. Received April 8, 190S. 

22550. Arriiknatherum elatius (L.) Beau v. 

22551. Panicularia magellanica (Hook, f.) Kuntze. 

22552. Podophyllum emodj Wall. 

22553. Lathyrus montanus Bernh. 

22554. Lathyrus niger (L.) Bernh. 

22555. Lathyrus vernus (L.) Bernh. 

22556. Garcinia tinctoria (DC.) W. F. Wight. (Xantho- 

CHYMUS TINCTORIUS DC.) 
From Alas Besorki, Java. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon, Manila, P. I. 
Received April 7, 1908. 
"A robust grower." (Lyon.) 
" Introduced as a possible stock for the mangosteen." (Fairchild.) 

22557. Cynara scolymus L. Artichoke. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Purchased from Dr. L. Trabut. Received April 6, 
1908. 

Violet Provence. 
22558 and 22559. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Gunnison, L T tah. Purchased from Mr. W. H. Gribble, through Mr. 
C. J. Brand. Received April S, 1908. 

22558. Irrigated. 

" Grown at Centerfield, Utah, in the San Pitch Valley. This seed is 
grown from the first crop of the season." (Brand.) 

22559. Dry land. 

" Grown in the Sevier Valley, near Gunnison, Utah, in 1907." (Brand.) 

22560 to 22563. Juglans regia L. Persian walnut. 

From Troyes, France. Purchased from Baltet Freres. Received April 9, 
1908. 

22560. Chaoert. 22562. Mayette. 

22561. Franquette. 22563. Parisienne. 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 13 

22564 and 22565. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt 
Davy, government agrostologist and botanist, through Mr. C. V. Piper. 
Received April 10, 1908. 

22564. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 
" um-Vellivelli." 

22565. Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn. Ragi millet. 

" M poh or 

" Both of these have been grown in the low country and are from this season's 
crop just harvested." (Davy.) 

22566 and 22567. Citrus aurantium L. Orange. 

From Poona, Bombay, India. Presented by Mr. N. M. Bhagawat, acting 
superintendent, Empress Botanical Gardens. Received April 10, 1908. 

22566. Ladoo. (See No. 8441 for description.) 

22567. Suntra. (See No. S446 for description.) 

22568 and 22569. Vicia i aba L. Broad bean. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. Presented by Dr. D. Duncan Main and 
Rev. J. H. Judson. Received March 26 and April 6, 1908. 

22568. Small green. 

22569. Brownish green. Medium size. 

22571 to 22629. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agri- 
cultural explorer, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., February 
4, 1908. 
A collection of cuttings and seeds, as follows : 

22571. Deutzia sp. 

From Shutseshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 152, Nov. 18, 1907.) A low- 
growing Deutzia, found here and there in crevices of the rocks. May 
prove to be a valuable little shrub for gardens in semiarid regions." 
( Meyer.) 

22572. Fraxinus bungeana DC. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 155, Nov. 20, 1907.) An ash 
growing in rocky situations and on steep mountain sides. Attains, appar- 
ently, no great size. May be of use as a foresting plant in semiarid 
regions." (Meyer.) 

22573. ( Undetermined. ) 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 156, Nov. 20, 1907.) A low, 
very bushy shrub, found growing between bowlders. Looks very much 
like Syringa amurensis Rupr. Will be valuable as a garden shrub in 
semiarid regions." (Meyer.) 

22574. Spiraea sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 157, Nov. 20, 1907.) A Spiraea 
which may be of use as a garden shrub in semiarid regions, as it grows in 
crevices of rocks and in dry and sterile locations." (Meyer.) 

142 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS. IMPORTED. 

22571 to 22629— Continued. 

22575. SPIBA] a sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 158, Nov. 20, 1007.) A very 
]<»w growing Spiraea, with adiantum-like leaves. May be of use as an 
ornamental shrub for rockeries or for gardens in semiarid regions." 
( Meyer.) 

22576. PaUNTTS sp. Plum. 
Prom Pangshan, Ohihli, China. "(No. 162, Nov. 21, 1007.) A double 

red-flowered, bushy plum called Yu men tan. Said to be very fine look- 
ing in springtime. Propagated by being budded on to Amyydalus 
davidiana or by layering." {Meyer.) 

22577. Prunus sp. Plum. 
From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 163, Nov. 21, 1907.) A large- 
flowered, bushy plum, the flowers of which are said to have a blue color. 
Chinese name Tsu tsa lau hua. Probably a variety of No. 162 (S. P. I. 

No. 22576)." (Meyer.) 

22578. Catalpa bungei C. A. Meyer. 

From Pangshan, Chihli. China. "(No. 164, Nov. 21, 1907.) Chinese 
name Wii tung situ. A fine flowering tree; also of use for wind-breaks 
and for poles. Adapted to semiarid regions." (Meyer.) 

22579. (Undetermined.) Bamboo. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 165, Nov. 21, 1907.) An orna- 
mental bamboo of a very low 7 growing, bushy habit, 3 to 5 feet high. 

Loves a somewhat protected place — for instance, against a wall with 

southern or eastern exposure. Chinese name Tmu chu." (Meyer.) 

22580. Prunus armeniaca L. Apricot. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 172, Nov. 23, 1907.) A red, 
medium-sized apricot ; said to be very early. Chinese name Hung siing." 
( Meyer. ) 

22581. Cydonia sp. Quince. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 174, Nov. 23, 1907.) A small- 
fruited quince, the fruits of which are very fragrant and much in demand 
as room perfumers. Chinese name Pel mu hua. Apparently a variety 
of Cydonia japonica" (Meyer.) 

22582. Fraxinus sp. Ash. 

From Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 176, Nov. 29, 1907.) A shrubby 
ash, found in dry and sterile locations. Seems to be different from No. 
155 (S. P. I. No. 22572) ; otherwise, the same remarks apply to it." 
(Meyer.) 

22583. Euonymus sp. 

From Yenmenkwan, Chihli, China. "(No. 178, Nov. 30, 1907.) A 
shrubby, deciduous Euonymus, found growing in very dry situations ; 
may be of use as a garden shrub in semiarid regions."- (Meyer.) 

22584. Sambucus sp. Elder. 

From near Santchako, Chihli, China. "(No. 179, Dec. 1, 1907.) A 
thrifty species of elder, seen only a couple of times. Loves moist situa- 
tions." (Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 15 

22571 to 22629— Continued. 

22585. Berberis chinensis Poir. 

From Shinglnng, Chihli, China. "(No. 185, Dec. 2, 1907.) The same as 
No. 160 (S. P. I. No. 21909) but from a different locality; for remarks, 
see this number." (Meyer.) 

22586. Celastrus sp. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 188, Dec. 4, 1907.) A 
very vigorous species of Celastrus, found growing along rocky trails. 
May perhaps grow to a very great size ; will trail itself into trees or crawl 
over rocks." (Meyer.) 

22587. Diervilla sp. Weigela. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 190, Dec. 4, 1907.) A 
vigorous-growing Weigela, bearing small clusters of pale, rose-colored 
flowers in early summer. Grows in rocky crevices and on steep moun- 
tain sides and seems to be able to withstand drought very well. Of use 
as an ornamental shrub in gardens and parks." (Meyer.) 

22588. Philadelphia sp. 

From Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 191, Dec. 4, 1907.) A species of 
mock orange found growing in dry, rocky locations. May be useful as a 
garden shrub in dry regions." (Meyer.) 

22589. Deutzia sp. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 192, Dec. 4, 1907.) Found 
growing in rocky crevices. Seems to be of a very low growth, 2 to 3 feet. 
Probably of use as a small garden shrub in semiarid regions." (Meyer.) 

22590. Spiraea sp. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 200, Dec. 11, 1907.) A small, shrubby 
Spiraea found growing on dry, exposed mountain sides. Of use as a 
rockery shrub in small-sized gardens in dry regions." (Meyer.) 

22591. Sambucus racemosa L. (V) Elder. 
From near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 204, Dec. 15, 1907.) A low- 
growing elder ; stands cutting back to the ground every year. Loves to 
grow on high, dry banks along the fields. May be of use for bank- 
binding purposes in semiarid regions." (Meyer.) 

22592. Viburnum opulus L. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 205, Dec. 1, 1907.) A few 
cuttings of the snowball bushes, which were most heavily loaded with 
bunches of scarlet berries at time of collecting. Seemed to be a more 
floriferous type than the ordinary one." (Meyer.) 

22593. Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim.) Rupr. (?) 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 207, Dec. 4, 1907.) The 
small-fruited gooseberry bush. Seems to be a variety of much shorter 
growth than the ordinary type." (Meyer.) 

22594. Quercus sp. Oak. 
From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 834a, Dec. 2, 1907.) Acorns 

of an oak which bears rather broad leaves, deeply lobed. Probably 
Quercus mongoliea. Grows on dry, rocky mountain sides. May be, for 
this reason, of use as a foresting tree in semiarid climes. Chinese name 
Bo li shu." (Meyer.) 
142 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22571 to 22629— Continued. 

22595. Pybi b i bin] nsis Lindl. Pear. 
From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 840a, Dec. 0, 1907.) Obtained from 

Beveral varieties of cultivated pears, among which were strange types. 
Some desirable forms may spring up from these northern-grown varie- 
ties." i i/< yer.) 

22596. COBYLUS sp. Hazelnut. 

From near Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. " (No. S41a, Dec. 3, 1907.) 
A wild hazelnut growing .*> or 4 feet high and covering here and there 
whole mountain slopes and sloping valleys. Seems to be able to stand 
drought very well." {Meyer.) 

22597. Diospybos kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. " (No. 843a, Nov. 23, 1907.) The very 
fine persimmon called Siang shi tse, scions of which were sent under No. 
161 (S. P. I. No. 21910)." (Meyer.) 

22598. Diospykos kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 843a, Nov. 23, 1907.) A large 
variety of persimmon of flat shape, occasionally having seeds." (Meyer.) 

22599. Diospyros kaki L. f. Persimmon. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 844a, Nov. 20, 1907.) The ordi- 
nary wild persimmon, called by the Chinese Gai tsao, upon which they 
graft all their seedless persimmons." (Meyer.) 

22600. Pbunus sp. Plum. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 845a, Nov. 21, 1907.) A flower- 
ing plum, said to have double red flowers ; often cultivated in temple 
courts; called Yu mei tau. Several varieties will in all probability appear 
among the seedlings. Budwood previously sent under No. 162 (S. P. I. 
No. 22576." (Meyer.) 

22601. Vitis yinifera L. Grape. 

From Lungwa, Chihli, China. "(No. 846a, Dec. 1, 1907.) A wild vari- 
ety which bears heavy crops of rather large bunches of small, black 
grapes; edible. Chinese name Shan poo tau. Of use as a stock in cold 
regions." (Meyer. I 

22602. Acer sp. Maple. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 847a, Nov. 23, 1907.) An orna- 
mental maple, attaining a height of about 40 to 50 feet; able to grow in 
dry regions." (Meyer.) 

22603. Fraxinus bungeana DC. Ash. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 848a, Dec. 4, 1907.) A 
small ash tree growing on dry, rocky mountain slopes; well fit for cover- 
ing barren mountain or hillsides. Chinese name Eoo U sur shu." 
(Meyer.) 

22604. Fraxinus bungeana DC. Ash. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 849a, Nov. 20, 1907.) A small 
ash tree found on dry, rocky mountain slopes. Apparently the same as 
No. 848a (S. P. I. No. 22603). Scions of the tree from which this seed 
came were sent under No. 155 (S. P. I. No. 22572). Chinese name Koo H 
sur shu." (Meyer.) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 17 

22571 to 22629— Continued. 

22605. Juc.laxs mandshurica Maxim. Walnut. 
From near Laushang, Chihli, China. "(No. 850a, Dec. 3, 1907.) Appar- 
ently a small form of the Manchurian wild walnut." (Meyer.) 

22606. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Jehol, Chihli, China. "(No. 853a, Dec. 9, 1907.) To be used as a 
stock for improved varieties." (Meyer.) 

22607. Crataegus sp. Hawthorn. 

From Laushang, Chihli, China. "(No. 854a, Dec. 3, 1907.) Probably 
Crataegus pinnatiflda. May be utilized as stock for the large-fruited 
varieties. Chinese name of this wild one Khun It hong. The seeds may 
remain dormant for one year or more." (Meyer.) 

22608. Syringa amurensis Rupr. Lilac. 

From near Laushang, Chihli, China. "(No. 855a, Dec. 3, 1907.) The 
beautiful white-flowering Amur lilac, which is mostly found as a shrub, 
though it grows in favorable localities into a tree 40 feet tall with a 
trunk 2 feet in diameter. Stands droughts and sterile soils remarkably 
well. A good shrub for regions with dry. hot summers and cold winters." 
(Meyer.) 

22609. Grewia parviflora Bunge. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 856a, Nov. 20, 1907.) A shrub 
growing from 2 to 10 feet tall, bearing red berries which persist until 
long into the winter. Grows in dry and rocky locations; as such well 
fit for gardens in dry regions. Chinese name Niang nien tchun. The 
berries are edible, though not nice." (Meyer.) 

22610. Viburnum opulus L. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 857a, Dec. 1, 1907.) The 
branches from which these seeds were picked were sent under No. 2" (5 
(S. P. I. No. 22592). See this number for remarks." (Meyer.) 

22611. Deutzia sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 858a, Nov. 20, 1907.) A small 
shrub, found growing on exposed, rocky hill slopes : well fit for rockeries 
and for gardens in dry regions. Is probably the same species as the one 
sent under No. 152 (S. P. I. No. 22571)." (Meyer.) 

22612. Rhamnus sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 859a, Nov. 20, 1907.) A large- 
leaved, very shrubby Rhamnus, very spiny ; found growing between rocks 
and bowlders. May be of use as a hedge plant in dry situations." 
( Meyer. ) 

22613. Rhamnus sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 860a, Nov. 20, 1907.) A small- 
leaved, dwarfy Rhamnus, spiny; found growing between rocks. Fit as 
a rockery shrub or as a lining bush along pathways in small gardens." 
( Meyer. ) 

22614. Berberis chinexsis Poir. Barberry- 

From Shinglungshan. Chihli, China. "(No. 861a, Dec. 2, 1907.) A 
low, very spreading bush. Perhaps fit as a sand and bank binder in dry 
regions. Cuttings sent under Nos. 160 and 185 (S. P. I. Nos. 21909 and 
22585)." (Meyer.) 

61160— Bui. 142—09 2 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS tMPORTED. 

22571 to 22629 -Continued. 

22615. Rosa sp. 

From Dear Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 862a, Dec. •".. 1907.) 
A \vild rose of :i very spreading habit, having red-colored stems - to 3 
feet high, very spiny, and bearing many bunches of large scarlet berries. 
May i r use as a soil binder in rather dry regions." {Meyer.) 

22616. Celastrus a i: i ii i i. \ i is Thunb. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, china. "(No. 863a, Nov. 20, 1007.) A tall 
climber bearing yellow capsules which hurst open when ripe and show 
the scarlet seeds. Chinese name Van go <lau tse." {Meyer.) 

22617. Yn is sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. " (No. 804a, Nov. 24, 1007.) Kit for 
rockeries and along terraces. The same as No. 153 < S. 1'. 1. No. 21007)." 

i \h it< / . » 

22618. Albizzia sp. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 865a, Nov. 23, 1007.) See No. 
76Sa i S. P. I. No. 21969) for remarks about this tree. This species is quite 
distincl from Albizzia julibrissin, which is much more floriferous and of 
which the leaves, though much finer pinnated, are much smaller. Bunge 
seems to have called this oue Acacia macrophylla, which is declared a 
synonym of Acacia lebbeJc, which is, however, a totally different plant." 
(Meyer ) 

22619. Cassia sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 873a, Nov. 14, 1007.) A cassia, look- 
ing like Cassia mart/land tea, bearing long racemes of dark yellow flowers. 
Used Locally as a garden plant. A perennial herb well fit for gardens in 
dry regions." i Meyer.) 

22620. Clematis recta mandshurica (Rupr. ) Maxim. 

From Shinglungshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 875a, Dec. 2, 1007.) An 
herbaceous perennial, 2 to 3 feet high, hearing one to five erect stems, 
which terminate in a panicle of rather large, white flowers. Well fit to 
be improved, when it may become a cut-flower plant of the first order. 
Of use now as an ornamental garden perennial." (Meyer.) 

22621. Clematis sp. 

From near Yenmenkwan, Chihli, China. " (No. 876a, Nov. 30, 1007.) 
A creeping clematis running over hedges and stone piles. Seems to be 
very floriferous; makes woody stems." (Meyer.) 

22622. (Undetermined.) 

From Shutseshan, Chihli, China. "(No. 877a.) Seeds of a Valeri- 
anacea, being a perennial herbaceous herb bearing small yellow flowers; 
ornamental when in a mass. Fit for rockeries and dry situations." 
(Meyer.) 

22623. Salvia sp. 

From near Tungying, Chihli, China. "(No. 878a, Dec. 4, 1007.) A 
shrubby perennial, 3 to 4 feet high, very floriferous; found growing in 
very rocky locations. May be of use as a honey plant in semiarid 
regions." (Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 19 

22571 to 22629— Continued. - 

22624. Asparagus sp. 

From near Laushang, Chihli, China. "(No. 880a, Dec. 30, 1907.) 
Wild asparagus. A tall form, 3 to 4 feet high, growing between grass, 
having zigzag stems and bent-down branches. Of use as an ornamental 
garden plant." (Meyer.) 

22625. Asparagus sp. 

From near Laushang, Chihli; China. "(No. 881a, Dec. 3, 1907.) Wild 
asparagus. A small form 1 foot high; otherwise, apparently the same as 
No. 880a. (S. P. I. No. 22624)." (Meyer.) 

22626. Asparagus sp. 

From Shinglungshan. Chihli, China. "(No. 882a, Dec. 2, 1907.) Wild 
asparagus; found growing on the mountain tops under the shade of pine 
trees. Has straight stems." (Meyer.) 

22627. Lilium sp. 

From near Shinglungshan. Chihli. China. "(No. 883a, Dec. 1, 1907.) 
A small lily, 3 feet high, found growing between grass." (Meyer.) 

22628. (Undetermined.) 

From Shinglungshan. Chihli. China. "(No. 884a, Dec. 3, 1907.) A 
leguminous plant found growing between grasses." (Meyer.) 

22629. Cydoxia japonka tThunb.) Pers. Quince. 
From Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 899a, Dec. 24, 1907.) A small- 
fruited quince having a very spicy odor. The fruits are sold as room 
perfumers. Chinese name .1/// li." (Meyer.) 

22630. Castilla sp. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone. Panama. Presented by Mr. Henry F. Schultz, 
through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received April 17. 1908. 

"Seed from our best rubber-producing trees." (Schultz.) 
22631 and 22632. Gossypivm barbadense L. Cotton. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Purchased from Mr. George P. Foaden. Khedivial 
Agricultural Society. Received April 15, 1908. 

22631. Jdiinoriteh. (For description sec S. P. I. No. 3991.) 

22632. Mit Afifl. (For description sec No. 3992.) 

See also Bulletin No. 62 of the Bureau of Plant Industry for descriptions. 

22633 to 22635. 

From Sheklung, Kwongtung. China. Presented by Mr. A. J. Fisher, Ameri- 
can Presbyterian Mission. Received April 3, 1908. 

22633 and 22634. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

22633. Yellow. Similar in appearance to Acme, No. 14954. but 

seed is a trilie larger. 

22634. Black. Seed flatter than any other of the same size 

received from China. 

22635. Vigna unguiculata < L. ) Walp. Cowpea. 

Chinese Red. Apparently identical with No. 17328, which is the progeny 
of No. 6557. 

Varietal descriptions of the above were made by Mr. H. T. Nielsen. 

142 



20 SEEDS ami PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22637 to 22640. Pisum \i;\ i nse L. Canada field pea. 

Prom Guelph, Canada. Presented by Prof. 0. A. Zavltz, Ontario Agricul- 
tural College, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received April 16, L908. 

22637. Multipliers. 22639. White Scimitar. 

22638. Clamart. 22640. Canadian Beauty. 

22641 and 22642. 

Prom Paris, Prance. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux <v Co. Received 
April 8, 1908. 
22641. Bryonia dioica Jacq. 

"An herbaceous, climbing member of the pumpkin family, Interesting 
on account of tin* handsome foliage with development of remarkably long 
tendrils. The large perennial root, sliced and dried, appears on the drug 
market under the name of Bryonia, and is a very highly valued drug, 
especially in homeopathic medicine." (R. II. True.) 

22642. ECBALLIUM ELATEBITJM (L.) A. Rich. 

"An herbaceous, hairy annual, producing a trailing vine and character- 
istic cucurbitaceous inflorescence. The fruit on ripening undergoes a 
process of softening, which results finally in the splitting of the coating 
of the fruit and the squirting out of the seeds and soft pulp. Hence the 
name ' Squirting cucumber.' The drug elaterinm is obtained from the 
juice pressed from the nearly ripe fruit. This juice after straining 
deposits an opaque grayish sediment which forms the characteristic 
elaterium cakes seen in the commercial article." (R. II. True.) 

22643. Penniseti m americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

From Cape Town, South Africa. Presented by Dr. E. A. Nobbs, Department 
of Agriculture. Received April IT, 1008. 

" Seed of X'l/oiit, pronounced knee-out : is extensively grown in Bechuanalaml 
and all over Rhodesia ; is used as a native food and is also given to mules. It 
is similar in character to Kafir corn but finer and smaller, and I think may be 
of considerable value.'* i\nhh 

22644 to 22649. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. Presented by Mr. John L. Stuart. 
Received April 18, 1908. 

The following seeds, varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen : 

22644 to 22646. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

22644. Smoky yellow. Looks like it might possibly be a mixture. 

22645. Greenish yellow. Similar in appearance to Haberlandt, 

No. 17263. 

22646. " Yellow. Practically identical with No. 18619. 

22647. Vigna sesquipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. - 

Black. 

22648. Vigna sesqi cpedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 
Red. 

22649. Medicago denticulata Willd. Bur clover. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 21 

22650 to 22652. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society. Received April 15, 1908. 

The following plants : 

22650. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 
Shanghai. "These peaches are called the Honey peach, and I think 

are very fine." (Farnham.) 

22651. Citrus aubantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

Canton. " If you have not this variety in America, it would be a great 
boon to introduce it. 

"Mrs. Farnham and I have eaten oranges in many parts of the world, 
in southern Europe, taken fresh from the trees outside of Jafa, the 
famous Navel orange of California, and elsewhere, and are of the opinion 
that the Canton is far the most delicious. There is a very long season, 
from, say, December to April, and it seems to me that there must be 
slightly different varieties, resembling the varieties of apples that come 
on through the different seasons, though with far less difference.*' 
(Fa rnli a in. ) 

22652. Citrus aurantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

Swatow. "The Swatow oranges are much admired by some. They 
grow to a large size and are a deep orange color, with a soft skin that is 
easily removed even without a knife. The lobes easily fall apart; they 
are covered with a thin silky skin which incloses (he very sweet pulp 
and juice. You may like to call it the Sweet orange, or. as the Chinese 
say, Honey orange, or, better still, Swatow^ as that is, I understand, the 
only place where it is raised." (Farnham.) 

22653 and 22654. 

From Grahamstown, Cape Colony. South Africa. Presented by Dr. S. 
Schonland, Albany Museum. Received April 11, 1908. 

22653. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kafir. 
Red. 

22654. Paspalum dilatatum Poir. Large water grass. 

22655. Quercus suber L. Cork oak. 

From Barcelona, Spain. Presented by Mr. Peter Campbell, the Nairn 
Linoleum Company, Kearny, X. J. Received April 18, 1908. 

"These acorns were procured for the purpose of getting on hand a large 
stock of plants which can be used in experiments in establishing groves of cork 
oaks in this country as a possible commercial source of cork.*' (Fischer.) i S 
S. P. I. No. 21732 for other importation. ) 

22656. Eragrostis abyssinica (Jacq.) Schrad. Teff. 

From province of Harrar, Abyssinia, Africa. Presented by Mr. Robert I'. 
Skinner, American consul-general, Marseille. Franco. Received April 11, 
1908. 
"This seed was produced in the region <»f Harrar at an altitude of 1,800 
meters (5,905 feet). Teff is found throughout The province of Harrar at alti- 
tudes varying from 1,000 to 2,000 meters (3,280 feel to 6,56& feet ). and is sown 
in various kinds of soil." (Skinner.) (Sec Nos. 1 7< H >4 and 17095 for descrip- 
tion.) 
142 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22657 to 22661. 

From Bucharest, Roumania. Presented i>y Mr. Horace G. Knowles, Ameri- 
can minister. Received April 2, L908. 

22657 and 22658. CiTBUXLUS vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

22657. 

" Seed from ;t small, round, green, and thin-skinned melon about 
the size of an average grapefruit and as sweet as an orange. lis 
shape and size — just large enough for one person — and delicious 
flavor would make it immensely popular for serving at clubs, 
hotels, and restaurants." (Knowles.) 

22658. 

"Another variety of small melon." (Knowles.) 

22659 to 22661. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

" These yellow melon seeds are from the most delicious nmskmelons or 
cantaloupes I ever tasted, and the flavor is as far ahead of the Rockyford 
as the Rockyford is ahead of the Jersey cantaloupe. If these melons 
could be grown in the United States to the perfect state they attain here, 
they would make an invaluable addition to the fruits of our country." 
(Knowles.) 

22659. 

" Oblong, yellow melon. Thin skin, thick meat, and very sweet." 
(Knoivles.) 

22660. 

" Large, round, yellow melon. Firm meat and deliciously sweet. 
Was fully ripe October 1 and was grown in light soil with plenty 
of sun." (Knowles.) 
22661. 

"Another variety of round, sweet, yellow melon." (Knowles.) 

22662. Chayota edtjlis Jacq. Chayote. 

From New Orleans, La. Purchased from the J. Steckler Seed Company. 
Received April 22, 1908. 

" Fruits of a smooth variety of chayote secured for distribution in the South- 
ern States with the object of encouraging its culture for the market." (Fischer.) 

22663. Rubus sp. Raspberry. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society. Received April 21, 1908. 

" Plants I have found growing wild on the rocky and sandy mountain side, 
but in good soil, 2,000 feet above the sea." (Farnham.) 

22664 to 22669. 

. From Paris, France. Presented by Prof. Y. Costantin, director, Museum of 
Natural History, rue Buffon 61. Received April 24, 1908. 

22664. Andropogon halepensis (L.) Brot. 

22665. Panicum sp. (?) 

22666. Arrhexatherum elatius ttjberosus (Gilib.) Skeels. (Avena 

tuberosa Gilib.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 23 

22664 to 22669— Continued. 

22667. Anthephora hermaphrodita (L.) Kuntze. 

22668. Phleum panictjlatum Huds. 

22669. Phleum arenarium L. 

22670. Citrus aurantium L. Bigarade. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received April 24, 1908. 

Natsu mikan. ''The Natsu mikan, or 'summer orange,' is needed here as a 
successor of grapefruit at the season when there is nothing at all to take the 
place of that most refreshing fruit. Nothing equals the piercing, delicious 
acidity of Natsu mikan, which is decidedly a sour orange, not in the least like 
a lemon or a lime. Nothing is so refreshing on a hot summer morning as half 
of a Natsu mikan, and orangeade made of Natsu mikan is different from 
lemonade and much hetter. 

" I remember gratefully the plates heaped with peeled sections of Natsu 
mikan, with the accompanying plates of sugar, that are offered one at private 
houses and at monasteries on Japanese summer days. 

"It seems to me that the Natsu mikan is more often seen on fruit stands in 
Tokyo than formerly, and more often offered to the foreigner. The largest 
and finest, they say, come from Yamaguchi prefecture, at the foot of the Inland 
Sea. 

" It is a great improvement on the Chinese pomelo, which is so often dry and 
tasteless, and I shall be glad when we can have it throughout the summer in 
America." (Eliza R. Scidmore.) (See No. 9268 for previous introduction and 
further description.) 

22671 to 22696. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agri- 
cultural explorer, April 20, 1908. 

A collection of seeds and cuttings, as follows: 

22671. Abies sp. Fir. 

From Peisantse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 256, Feb. 21, 
1908.) A very tall growing fir, having small light green needles and 
light-colored, round, oblong cones. Found growing at 6,000 to 7,000 feet 
altitude. Chinese name Tchien shu." (Meyer.) 

22672. Abies sp. 

From Tchailingtse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 257, Feb. 
25, 1908.) A medium-tall fir, having large, curved needles with a bluish 
bloom on them, and bearing long, tapering cones of a chocolate-brown 
color. Collected at an altitude between 8,000 and 9,000 feet. Chinese 
name Tchien shu." (Meyer.) 

22673. Pinus sp. 

From Tchenghaitse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 25S, Feb. 
27, 1908.) A tall-growing pine, fit for forestry purposes. Chinese name 
Sung shu." (Meyer.) 

22674. Larix sp. Larch. 

From Tchailingtse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 259, Feb. 
25, 1908.) A larch of medium-sized height, growing on sterile mountain 
sides at very high elevations, 7,000 to 9,000 feet. Fit as a forestry tree 
142 



"24: SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOB II h. 

22671 to 22696 Continued. 

in cold-wintered regions, ns it grows on the northern exposed mountain 
slopes, where the snow does nol mell until way Into May. Chinese name 
Vsai shu." {Meyer.) 

22675. Sybinga villosa Vahl. (?) Lilac. 

From Nansantse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 2<'»'.>, Feb. 
26, t.»m;. i A lilac found growing ;ii high elevations, 7,000 to 8,000 feet. 
S;ii»i t<> boar large panicles of white flowers. Chinese name Sar shu." 
< Meyer.) 

22676. Crataegus sp. Hawthorn. 

From Tchenghaitse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 271, 
Feb. -7, 1908.) A hawthorn growing into a small tree having very large 
spines; oven the trunk is covered with branched spines. Chinese name 
Ling ching tse." (Meyer.) 

22677. Rhododendron sp. 

From Shanfengko, Shansi. Wutaishan region, China. "(No. 278, Feb. 
29, 1908.) A rhododendron of dense, shrubby growth, 4 to 5 feet high, 
growing on cliffs at about 5,000 feet altitude; apparently rare." 
(Meyer.) 

22678. Ulmus sp. Elm. 

From Yento, Shansi, China. "(No. 275, Mar. 1, 190S. ) A densely 
branched elm of shrubby growth, occasionally growing into a small tree; 
found growing on a sunny rocky mountain slope at about 4,000 feet alti- 
tude." ( Meyer. ) 

22679. Abies sp. Fir. 

From Talautse, Shansi, China. "(No. 277, Mar. 1, 1908.) A fir of a 
peculiar drooping appearance: found growing in an old temple court; 
only one specimen. Chinese name Tchien shu." (Meyer.) 

22680. Pinus sp. Pine. 

From Tongdjautchang, Shansi, China. "(No. 278, Mar. 2, 1008.) A 
pine of very dense foliage and growing into a stately tree of imposing 
appearance; rare." (Meyer.) 

22681. Rosa xanthina Lindl. Rose. 

From Tsintse. Shansi, China. "(No. 288, Mar. 9, 1908.) A wild yel- 
low rose growing in large masses on dry and sterile mountain slopes. 
Will in the future prove to be the best grafting stock for high-class roses 
in sterile and arid locations; is used by the Chinese as a stock for roses 
in pets. Chinese name Moo ro tse." (Meyer.) 

22682. Ulmus sp. Elm. 

From Tsintse. Shansi, China. "(No. 290, Mar. 9, 1908.) An elm of 
shrubby growth, which becomes a small tree when left alone; has small 
Prunns-like leaves, dense branches, ashy white bark, and very hard, 
tough weed, which is highly appreciated as construction material for cart 
wheels. Grows in dry, rocky situations. Very well fit, as a small tree, 
for reeky locations and Japanese gardens. Can easily be dwarfed. 
Probably a new species. Chinese name Ych yii shu." (Meyer.) 

22683. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Tsintse. Shansi, China. "(No. 293, Mar. 1, 1908.) A jujube 
(Chinese date) tree, bearing large, oblong fruits of shining red color, 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 25 

22671 to 22696— Continued. 

which are mainly used as a delicatesse, after having been soaked in weak 
Chinese spirits for a couple of months. They have a hard skin and are 
bad for the bowels. The trees can be planted close together (6 to S feet) 
and do not apparently attain great size. Chinese name IIu ping tsao> 
meaning bottle jujube. Is considered locally the best of the different 
varieties grown." {Meyer.) 

22684. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 
From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 294, Mar. 10, 190S.) A jujube 

(Chinese date) having medium-sized, red-colored, oblong fruits which taper 
toward the end. The trees grow to a large size, and when old have 
hardly any side branches on the main limbs. Chinese name Mu shiny 
hong tsao; might be called 'pointed jujube.'" {Meyer.) 

22685. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 295, Mar. 10, 1908.) A jujube 
(Chinese date) said to have red oblong fruits, which crack easily when 
falling down. Trees medium sized. Chinese name Tsui ling tsao, mean- 
ing 'fragile jujube.' Said to be a very poor keeper." {Meyer.) 

22686. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 296, Mar. 10, 1908.) A jujube 
(Chinese date) tree which grows very large and spreads out very much, 
bearing small fruits of oblong shape, red color, and of a melting, sweet 
taste; can not be kept long. Chinese name Lang tsao. Might be called 
' melting jujube.' " {Meyer.) 

22687. Syringa sp. Lilac. 

From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 297, Mar. 10, 1908.) A very 
floriferous lilac, growing often as a little tree ; found on dry mountain 
slopes. Chinese name 8hau ting lisien." {Meyer.) 

22688. Avena ntjda ixermis (Koern.) Asch. & Graeb. Oat. 

From Tchailingtse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi. China. "(No. 927a, 
Feb. 25, 1908.) A hull-less oat found growing at 8,000 to 9,000 feet 
elevation. May be of use in the elevated sections of the Rocky Mountain 
regions. Chinese name Yrjh ma." (Meyer.) 

22689. Hordeum distichox nudum L. Hull-less barley. 
From Tchailingtse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 928a, 

Feb. 25, 1908.) A hull-less barley found growing at 8,000 to 9,000 feet 
elevation. Is very rare in this region and might have been brought in 
from Mongolia by the Mongolian pilgrims, who visit the Wutaishan re- 
gion every year by the thousands. May be of great value in the short- 
summered section of the United States. Chinese name Tsao ma." 
{ Meyer. ) 

22690. Cannabis sativa L. Hemp. 

From Tongchor, Shansi, Kwohsien District, China. "I No. 932a, Mar. 4, 
1908.) Grown in mountain valleys: considered to be the best variety of 
hemp of the Shansi Province, and sold in all of the towns and cities for 
string and rope manufacture. Chinese name Shan ma tse." (Meyer.) 

22691. Pinus btjngeana Zucc. Pine. 
From Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 934a, Mar. 13, 1908.) Sold on 

the streets as a delicatesse, and said to come from the mountains of 
142 



26 SEKPS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22671 to 22696 Continued. 

northern Bonan. Chinese name Bung %%e. Apparently the same as 
No. 797a I 8. P. I. No. 21997)." I Meyer.*) 

22692. Rosa sp. Rose. 
From Nausantse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 935a, Feb. 

28, 1908.) A tall-growing, bushy, red-flowered rose; found In thickets 
on the mountain slopes. May be of use as a grafting stock for standard 
roses. Chinese name Yeh hong mae kwei hua." I Meyer.) 

22693. Rosa n win in a Lindl. Rose. 

From Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 936a, Mar. 0, 1908.) A wild 
yellow rose, called Moo ro !*<■ by the Chinese. For further remarks see 
No. 288 (S. P. I. No. 22681)." (Meyer.) 

22694. Beassica oleracea L. Cabbage. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 937a, Feb. 28, 1908.) A 
cabbage, flal like our own western cabbages, but growing on a high stem. 
Can be kept frozen hard throughout the winter, and, after having been 
washed with boiling water, can be served with oil and vinegar as an 
excellent salad, tasting quite sweet. Grows at 4,000 to 7,000 feet 
altitude. Fit for the northern and the alpine regions of the United 
States. Chinese name Whe tse pai tsai." (Meyer.) 

22695. COTOXEASTER INTEGERRIMA Medic. 

From Nausantse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 938a, Feb. 
26, 1908.) A shrub growing in shady locations on the mountain slopes; 
bears black berries ; height 3 to 10 feet, according to amount of light and 
exposure. Hard wooded. Chinese name Shan he tsao." (Meyer.) 

22696. Syringa sp. Lilac. 

From mountains near Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 944a, Mar. 10, 
1908.) A very floriferous lilac found on dry mountain slopes; grows 
often to be a little tree. Cuttings sent under No. 297 (S. P. I. No. 
226S7). Chinese name Slum tiny hsien." (Meyer.) 

22704 to 22714. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Pres?nted by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American 
consul. Received April 21, 1908. 

22704. Saguerus pinnatus Wurmb. 

22705. Oxcosperma sp. 

22706. Archoxtophoexix alexaxdrae (F. Muell.) Wend. & Drude. 

22707. Rhapis flabelliformis L'Herit. 

22708. Dypsis pinnatifroxs Mart. (?) 

22709. Sabal sp. 

22710. Caryota mitis Lour. (?) 

22711. . Licuala peltata Roxb. (?) 

22712. Areca oleracea Jacq. 

22713. Elaeis guixeexsis Jacq. 

22714. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

Yellow. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 27 

22715 to 22730. Vigna uxguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Clemson College, S. C. Presented by Prof. C. L. Newman. Received 
April, 1908. 

Professor Newman made the hybrids indicated in the following list. The 
selections were also made by him. Descriptive notes by Mr. H. T. Nielsen. 

22715. 

(Newman's No. 2.) Evidently a hybrid between Blackeye and Taylor; 
seed fully as large as Taylor. 

22716. Blackeye X Extra Early Blackeye. 

(Newman's No. 4.) Probably Blackeye X Black. Looks like Sport, 
No. 17427, and Watson's Hybrid, No. 17425. 

22717. California Blackeye X Taylor. 

(Newman's No. 9.) Looks like No. 22715, but seed is smaller. 

22718. Blackeye X Black Bunch. 

(Newman's No. 12.) Not distinguishable from No. 22716. 

22719. Blackeye X Black Bunch. 

(Newman's No. 10.) Apparently identical with Nos. 22716 and 22718. 

22720. Blackeye X Black. 

(Newman's No. 13.) Looks like Holstein, No. 17327. 

22721. Blackeye X Extra Early Blackeye. 

(Newman's No. 16.) Appears identical with Nos. 22716, 22718, and 
22719. 

22722. Red. 

(Newman's No. 26.) A selection from Clay. 

22723. Clay. 

(Newman's No. 27.) A selection from Clay. 

22724. Clay. 

(Newman's No. 28.) A self-seeding strain. 

22725. Holstein. 

(Newman's No. 43.) Seed exactly like No. 22720. 

22726. Taylor X Large White Spot. 
(Newman's No. 50.) Looks exactly like No. 22717. 

22727. Taylor X Browneye. 

(Newman's No. 51.) Has but very slight markings of the Taylor 
variety. 

22728. Warren's New Hybrid (?). 

(Newman's No. 53.) Probably a hybrid between Warren's Neiv Hybrid 
and one of the Lady varieties; is similar in appearance to Southdoum, 
No. 17339, but the seed is a little smaller. 

22729. Warren's Extra Early X Sugar Crowdcr. 

(Newman's No. 57.) This is probably the same as our No. 17422, which 
is also a hybrid between these two. 

22730. Whippoorwill X Lady. 

(Newman's No. 64.) Apparently identical with Guernsey, No. 17408. 
142 



28 SKIDS AND PLANTS [MPORTBD. 

22731 to 22737. 

Prom Nlmboli, Post Mangrul-Dastgir, Distrid Amraoti, Berars, India. 
Presented by Mr. Anant Sitaram Dbavale, tbrougb Mr. C. V. Piper. 
Received April 24, 1908. 
The following seeds : 

22731. ('a.ian [ndicum Spreng. 

•• Tur. A legume food crop. The dry fodder is generally fed to cattle." 
t Dhavah . I 

22732. [NDIGOFERA QLANDTJLOSA Wendl. 

" Divale. An extraordinary leguminous planl ; grows on good soil and 
shows the greatest number of root nodules. Used only for green manure." 
i Dhavah . | 

22733. Sesbah hisi'i.xosa (Jacq.) Steud. (Aeschynomene bispinosa 
Jacq.) 

•• Shevari. A legume forage crop; grown under irrigation; very nourish- 
ing to sheep and bullocks when fed in green stale"' (Dhavale.) 

22734. (Undetermined.) 

"Shevari. A legume forage crop ; grown under irrigation; very nourish- 
ing; is fed to bullocks in green stale.'* (Dhavale.) 

22735. Sesban aegyptiaca Pers. ( ?) 

"Savara. A legume forage crop: is fed t<> bullocks and sheep in green 
state. Grows wild." {Dim rale.) 

22736. Ciceb arietinum L. 

"Harbhara. A legume food crop; is fed to horses .in green state, and 
the seed also when dry. Horses love it most." {Dhavale.) 

22737. Psoralea cobylifolia I.. 

••lia nii-lii. A legume plant; is fed to buffaloes; very rarely bears root 
nodules." (Dhavale.) 

22738. Pisum sativum L. Pea. 

From Boston. Mass. Received through It. & J. Farquhar & Co., April 27, 

l«.i08. 

'"To he used for breeding purposes." I Young.) 

22739. ( V< tijbita pepo L. Squash. 

From Shanghai. Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society. Received April IT, 1908. 

"A fine winter squash (Chinese)." (Farnham.) 

22740 and 22741. Colocasia spp. Taro. 

From Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana. Presented by Dr. C. J. J. Van Hall, 
through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received April 28, 1908. „ 

The following tubers : 

22740. 

"Hindoe-taya. This has been imported by British Indian coolies." 
(Van Hall.) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 29 

22740 and 22741— Continued. 

22741. 

"Agoe-taya. (Agoe=swine.) Is a very coarse variety."' I Van Hall.) 

•• These two taya varieties are the only new ones I found in this colony." 
(Van Hall.) 

22742. Toluifera pereirae (Klotz) Baill. 

From San Salvador. Presented by Mr. Jose C. Zeledon, Botica Francesa, 
San Jose de Costa Rica. Received April 28, L908. 

"The tree from which the Peruvian balsam is obtained. Since the plant has 
so much economic importance commercially, it may prove interesting." 
(Zeledon.) 

22743. Citrulli s vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From Panama. Presented by Miss M. M. Childs, of the United States For- 
est Service. Received April 29, 1908. 

" This melon is of average size, lemon-yellow inside, and its flavor somewhat 
resembles the hickory nut. The rind is very hard and white. The pulp is much 
softer than the ordinary watermelon, and its juice is used to flavor ice cream. 
Considered very fine by Americans at Panama, and called by them Panamanian 
watermelon." ( Childs. ) 

22744. Caxaxga odorata (Lam.) Hook. f. & Thorns. Hang ilang. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. H. N. Whitford, chief, Division of 
Forest Investigations, Bureau of Forestry, Department of the Interior. 
Received April 21, 1908. 

"The ilang ilang grows here (Saigon. Cochin China) in some profusion, but 
it has not yet been cultivated to any considerable commercial extent, as it 
might be, for its rare perfume. It is a handsome tree, symmetrical and stately, 
reaching a height of 50 feet or more. It has a smooth, hard, grayish bark resem- 
bling that of the beech. It flowers in April and May, or perhaps even earlier. 
The long, strap-like, yellowish petals give out a rich, spicy fragrance, somewhat 
resembling that of cinnamon and very pronounced just after a rain. It grows 
very well in this hard, black soil of Cochin China, but I am unable to say just 
what soil it prefers.'" (Conner.) (For further description see S. P. I. Nos. 
3793, 3897, and 20908.) 

22745. Aralia racemosa L. Spikenard. 

From North Clarendon, Vt. Presented by Mr. James Barrett. Received 
April 29, 1908. 

•• Natural habitat is a partly shady place where it can have leaf mold to feed 
on." (Barrett.) (For further description see S. P. I. No. 21658.) 

22746 to 22753. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director. Department 
of Agriculture. Received April 27. 1908. 

Seed of each of the following: 

22746. Vigna si:s(»riPEDALrs (L.) W. F. Wight. 

•■ Speckled, reddish brown seeds, similar to No. 21oG2. but seeds are 
shorter." (Nielsen.) 

142 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22746 to 22753 Continued. 

22747. VlGNA BESQUIPEDALI8 (L.) W. F. Wight 

"Reddish brown seeds. lighter In color than No. 22746." (Nielsen.) 

22748. Clitobia hi 1 1 bopb vi i. a Lam. 
22749 to 22753. Clitobia ternatea L. 

22749. Fl. alba. 22752. Fl. coerulea. 

22750. Fl. atrocoerulea. 22753. Fl. violacea. 

22751. Fl. Bryni. 

22754. Poa eaquatoreensis Hack. (?) 

From Ecuador. Presented by Mr. L. Ordonez. 537 Harrison street, San 
Francisco, Cal., through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received April 20, 1908. 
"This is considered one of the best native grasses of Ecuador; grows very 
well on light soil with irrigation, but thrives also on dry land."' (Ordonez.) 

22755. Brassica rapa L. Turnip. 

From Helsingfors, Finland. Purchased from Mr. V. F. Sagulin. Received 
April 29, 1908. 
Petrowski. " We grew this turnip last season at the stations at Sitka, Ram- 
part, and Copper Valley, and at none of these places was this variety of turnip 
attacked by the pest (root maggot), although other varieties growing alongside 
were badly affected." (Prof. ('. C. Georgeson, Alaska Agricultural Experiment 
Station.) (For other introduction see No. 19554.) 

22756 and 22757. Brassica rapa L. Turnip. 

From Helsingfors, Finland. Presented by Mr. V. F. Sagulin. Received 
April 25, 19CS. 

22756. Flat Round Yellow Finnish. 

22757. Yellow Round Red-Top. 

22758 to 22761. 

From India. Presented by T. F. Main, esq., Deputy Director of Agriculture, 
Poona, Bombay, India. Received April 28, 1908. 

From Dharwar District : 

22758. Vigna catjang (Burm.) TValp. 
From Surat District : 

22759. Vigna catjang (Burm.) Walp. 

Similar in appearance to S. P. I. No. 21292. 

22760. Vigna catjang (Burm.) Walp. 

22761. Phaseolus aconitifolius Jacq. Moth bean. 

22762 and 22763. Olea europaea L. Olive. 

From Sfax, Tunis. Purchased from Chatel & Jacquemart. Received April 
29, 1908. 

Chemlali. Truncheons and seed. (See S. P. I. No. 13567 for description.) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 81 

22764. Andropogon sericeus R. Br. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agri- 
culture. Received May 1, 1908. 
" New South Wales Bluegrass. The seed is this year's crop grown in the 
Transvaal." (Davy.) 

22765 to 22770. Colocasia esctjlenta (L.) Schott. Taro. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director. Department 
of Agriculture, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received May 1, 1908. 

The following tubers. The nomenclature is mainly that of Hasskarl, Cat. PI. 
Hort. Bogor., 55. The Malay names are also quoted. 

22765. Variety polyrrhiza Hsskl., subvariety viridis. " Kimpoel idjoh." 

22766. Variety monorrhiza Hsskl., subvariety rubri-nervis. "Talus 

romah banteng." 

22767. Variety monorrhiza Hsskl., subvariety rubra. "Talus lampoeng- 

merah." 

22768. Variety monorrhiza Hsskl., subvariety rubra. "Talus bajabon." 

22769. Variety monorrhiza Hsskl., subvariety " Talus goenoeng tjisalak." 

22770. Variety monorrhiza Hsskl., subvariety " Talus kekes." 

22771. Mtjsa paradistaca L. Banana. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Presented by Dr. 
E. Andre, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received May 1, 1908. 
" This banana is of the small kind known here as Fig." (Andre.) 
"A small ornamental banana which has small fruits and numerous seeds." 
(Barrett.) 

22772 to 22774. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Presented by Dr. 
E. Andre. Received May 1, 1908. 

22772. Tounatea simplex (Vahl.) Tanb. 

"A small, smooth-barked tree, branching like an elm. Leaves short 
petioled, alternate, 3 inches long, smooth; veins on under surface yel- 
lowish. Flowers borne in three-flowered racemes, in axils of leaves, at 
the tips of the branches. Corolla 1A inches long, pale yellow. Wood hard 
and fine grained; used for lathe work." (H. Pittier.) 

22773. Gliricidia maculata H. B. & K. 

"An unarmed tree, with alternate, compound leaves. Flowers resem- 
bling those of black locust in size, but pink." (H. B. d- K.) 

22774. Cyxometka trinitensis Oliv. 

"A small tree of the senna family. Leaves alternate, compound, of two 
obliquely oblong leaflets, 3 to 4 inches long. Flowers in small, many- 
flowered, axillary, sessile clusters. Fruit a one-seeded, globular legume. 
1 to 2 inches in diameter." (Oliv.) 

22775 to 22778. 

From Asmara, Eritrea, North Africa. Presented by the director, Colonial 
Agricultural Experiment Station. Received April 29, 1908. 

22775. Juniperus procera Hochst. 
142 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22775 to 22778 Continued. 

"A handsome tree, growing l'."> to 1<> meters In central Africa, its native 
habitat, and its wood is useful in the manufacture <>f various small 
articles.' < Wight, i 

22776. < >\v 1 1 \ \\ i in i: \ ibyssinica (Rich.) Munro. 

22777. Acacia i.aiiai Steud. ».v Hochst. • 

22778. Albizzia am in i.i.MixTiCA (A. Rich.) Brongn. 

22779. ("mas sp. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist. 
Received April 27. 1908. 

" Zenboua. Large tree: spiny; large leaves with a short petiole, slightly 
winged. Fruit large, depressed, terminated by a flat protuberance. It has been 
propagated at El-Kantara, in the oasis, where it attains large dimensions. It is 
very nearly related to the ' Pomme de Adam' and the rough lemon of Florida. 
Resists gummosis at El-Kantara, near Biskra. Would constitute a good graft- 
ing stock for the oasis." {Trabut.) 

22781 to 22783. 

From Georgetown, British Guiana. Presented by Mr. A. W. Bartlett, gov- 
ernment botanist, Botanic Gardens, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received 
May 1, 1008. 

The following seeds: 

22781. SOPHORA TOMENTOSA L. 

A small tree, with large, odd-pinnate leaves. Flowers yellow, in stout 
racemes, about inches long. Distribution, tropical shores throughout 
the world. (Extract from H. Trimen, Handb. Fl. CojL) 

22782. Vinca rosea L. Madagascar periwinkle. 

" Tender, erect subshrub with oblong leaves. Flowers rosy or white, 
often with a pink eye ; produced all summer. Sometimes called Cape 
periwinkle and Old Maid." [Bailey, Cycl. Amcr. Ilort.) 

22783. Campomanesia cf.rasoides (Cambess.) A. Gray. 

•'A shrub with opposite, elliptical, petioled leaves, bearing white flowers 
in the axils. Fruit the size of a cherry. A native of Brazil." (Cam- 
besscdes. ) 

22784. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Alicante, Spain. Procured through the consular agent at Alicante, by 

Mr. R. L. Sprague, American consul, Gibraltar, Spain. Received May 4, 

1008. 

"Elche. This variety, called in Spanish the 'broad-leaved of Elche,' was 

called to my attention by Doctor Trabut, of Algiers. It is supposed by him to 

be a distinct strain of alfalfa which is grown quite generally near the town of 

Elche. Spain." (Fairchild.) 

22785 and 22786. 

From Belize, British Honduras. Presented by Mr. E. J. F. Campbell, super- 
intendent, Botanic Station. Received April 30, 1008. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 3$ 

22785 and 22786— Continued. 

22785. i Undetermined. ) 
•'Indigenous velvet bean." (Campbell.) 

22786. (Undetermined.) 

" Indigenous handsome blue-flowered legume." (Campbell.) 

22787. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Sorgo. 

From Hoxie, Kans. Presented by Mr. M. G. Blackman, through Mr. Carle- 
ton R. Ball. Received May 1, 1908. 

" Club Head. A sorgo or sweet sorghum not identical with any known 
variety: possibly a hybrid between Amber and Orange — at any rate related to 
Amber." (Ball.) 

22788 to 22790. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Tashkend, Turkestan. Purchased from Mr. H. W. Duerrschmidt. 
Received May 4, 1908. 

Turkestan. 

22788. From the district of Aulieata, severe winter, average summer. 

22789. From Tschimkent, average summer, not cold winter. 

22790. From Khiva, hot summer, mild winter. 

22791 to 22793. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. H. N. Whitford, chief, Division of 
Forest Investigations, Bureau of Forestry, Department of the Interior. 
Received May 4, 1908. 

22791. Chrysophyllum sp. (?) 

" This is a rare species, growing in the forests, with a fruit about the 
size of a Japanese persimmon. It has a slightly agreeable taste." (Whit- 
ford. ) 

22792. Sterculia foetida L. 

" Calumpang. An oil is made from these seeds." (Whitford.) (For 
further description see No. 17139.) 

22793. Pithecolobium acle (Blanco) Vidal. 

u Acle is one of our valuable timber trees. In quality it is the near- 
est wood we have to walnut." (Whitford.) 

22794 to 22796. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by Mr. J. E. Conner, American 
consul. Received May 4, 1908. 

22794. Irvingia oliveri Pierre. 

22795. Anona squamosa L. (For description see Xo. 9024.) 

22796. Anona reticulata L. (For description see No. 5210.) 

22797 to 22809. 

From Chihuahua, Mexico. Presented by Dr. Edward Palmer. Received 
May 2, 1908. 

61160— Bui. 142—09 3 



34 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22797 to 22809 Continued. 
The following seeds, with Mexican names: 

22797 to 22802. PHASEOLUS COCCINEUS L. Scarlet runner. 

" Frijol patol. There are six different colored beans under this name. 
Cultivation may reveal some new novelties and it may prove a fine orna- 
mental; it is much grown here to run over arbors. The green pods are 
eaten." < Palmer.) 

22797. White. 

22798. Black. 

22799. Lavender, mottled with black. 

22800. Mauve, mottled with lavender. 

22801. Mauve, mottled with black. 

22802. Black, mottled with mauve and gray. 

22803. Capsicum frutescens L. Pepper, 

" Chile </ iii pin. From the mountains. It is locally much used, especially 
in vinegar." (Palmer.) 
22804 to 22809. Capsicum annuum L. Pepper. 

22804. "Chile tapatio." Cultivated in Guadalajara, Jalisco, 

Mexico. 

22805. "Chile negro:' Cultivated in Julimez, Chihuahua, Mexico. 

22806. "Chile mirosoe." Cultivated in Aguascalientes, Mexico. 

22807. "Chile Colorado." Cultivated in Chihuahua City, Mexico. 

22808. "Chile bolito." Cultivated in Sta. Rosalia, Chihuahua, 

Mexico. 

22809. "Chile pasilla." Cultivated in. San Pablo and Meoqui, 

Chihuahua, Mexico. 

22810. Cucurbita pepo L. Pumpkin. 

From Jerusalem, Palestine. Presented by Mr. John E. Dinsmore, American 

Colony, through Mr. Thomas R. Wallace, American consul. Received 

April 29, 1908. 

"The Arabic name is Kusa. It is probably a variety of vegetable marrow 

and is prepared for food in several ways: It may be boiled, fried, stewed, 

baked, etc. The most common way of cooking it in the Orient is to scoop out 

the inside and to stuff it with rice, meat, and butter, which is highly seasoned, 

and then boil it until well done. 

" Plant the seeds in hills 2 inches deep, two or three in each hill, in a very 
light, well-worked loam. Until the plants appear above ground, care must be 
taken that the ground does not become caked, as otherwise the plants will be 
destroyed. In Palestine they grow without any rain whatsoever, but there are 
heavy dews." (Dinsmore.) 

22811 to 22818. 

From Saigon. Cochin China. Presented by Mr. J. E. Conner, American 
consul. Received May 6, 1908. 

The following tubers : 

22811. Calaoium bicolor (Ait.) Vent. 

22812. Amorphophallus campanulatus fRoxb.) Blume. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 35 

22811 to 22818— Continued. 

22813. Pinellia cochinchinense (Blniiie) W. F. Wight. (Arisaema 
cochinchinense Blunie.) 

22814. Colocasia indica ( Lour. ) Kunth. 

22815. Xanthosoma sagittaefolium (L.) Schott. 

22816. Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) Schott. 

22817. Arum sp. (?) 

22818. Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott. 

"As many as seven species of the Colocasia are found native in Cochin China, 
two of which are edible. Of these two, the Colocasia indica and the Colocasia 
esculenta, known to the natives as Khoia mon sen and Khoia mon sap, respec- 
tively, the latter, which is by far the best species for food as well as in yield, 
includes two additional varieties, known as Mon ding and Mon mink tia. 

" In addition to these edible species, there are as many as four ornamental 
varieties, and one, the Pinellia cochinchinense, is a medicinal herb ; all flourish 
in a wild state. 

" The cultivation of the edible species should begin in March or April. They 
require a marshy soil and are planted in ridges like sweet potatoes, about 30 
cm. apart, with about twice that space between the ridges. Young offshoots 
from the bottom of the plants are also used for plant propagation, and the time 
necessary to mature is six months. 

" The tubers are eaten boiled, the same as the sweet potato, and a kind of 
flour is also made from them. The price of a picul of 60 kilograms is 1 
piaster 80 — less than 7 cents per pound." (Conner.) 

22819. Dexdrocalamus strictus (Roxb.) Nees. Bamboo. 

From India. Presented by Mr. Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, Saint Symphorien, 
Belgium, through Lady Brandis, 21 Kaiserstrasse, Bonn, Germany. 
Received May 6, 1908. 

See S. P. I. Xo. 21548 for description. 

22820 to 22824. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

From Entebbe, Uganda. Presented by Mr. M. T. Da we, officer in charge. 
Botanical, Forestry, and Scientific Department, deceived April 6, 1908. 

Seed of the following sorghums ; varietal descriptions by Mr. Carleton R. Ball : 
22820. 

Apparently a sweet sorghum from discoloration of pith ; seed and 
glumes similar in shape and size to Sumac sorgo, but branches longer 
and spreading. Seeds remarkably small. 

22821. 

Similar to Xo. 22820; pith also discolored; head much longer; seeds 
larger. 

22822. 

Large head : long spreading branches ; glumes short, black, shining ; 
seeds flattened, somewhat pointed at tip, orange-red or paler to nearly 
dirty white. 

22823. 

Similar to Xo. 22822, but head and branches smaller ; seeds dirty white 
or with pinkish tinge. 
142 



36 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22820 to 22824 Continued. 

22824. 

Similar to No. 22823, bul branches heavier; head more compact; seeds 
nearly white. 
All excepl No. 22820 are closely related In general character, varying chiefly 

in color of seed :intl size of bead. The first differs by much smaller and 
blunter seeds. 

22825. [Jlmus pumila L. Elm. 

Prom Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank 
N. Meyer, agricultural explorer, May 0, 190S. 

"i No. 664, Mai-. 2<i. 1908.) Var. pendula. A new form of a weeping elm; said 
to be the only tree of its kind in existence. Growing on a grave at Fengtai. 
Well lit as a cemetery tree in the semiarid regions of the United States. Chinese 
name /,////.'/ tsao yu shu, meaning dragon's claw elm, on account of the rather 
gnarled branches." (Meyer.) 

22826. Citrus aurantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

From Kabylia, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist. 
Algiers, Algeria. Received May 11, 1908. 

"Garden orange. Matures last of April to May. Fruit very sweet." 
(Trabut.) 

22827. Cacara erosa (L.) Kuntze. 

From Porto Rico. Presented by Mr. William Allan, 136 W. 79th street, 
New York, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received May 11, 1908. 

" Beans found growing wild over our place in Porto Rico ; the pods are more 
the shape of cowpeas, but not over 4 inches long, and contain a brown bean. 
The plant is bushy, standing about 18 to 24 inches high. It does not run and 
seems to make only one growth per year ; it has a large, bulbous root, similar 
to a ruta-baga turnip, some of them I have seen plowed up measuring 6 to 8 
inches in diameter; very starchy when cut open." (Allan.) (For further 
description see S. P. I. No. 22971.) 

22828 to 22832. Dioscorea spp. Yam. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. W. W. Smith, officiating 
superintendent, Royal Botanic Garden, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. 
Received May 11. 1908. 
The following tubers, vernacular names in italic: 

22828. Dioscorea alata I.. 
Kham <i1n. 

22829. Dioscorea rubella Roxb. 
Guraniya alu. 

22830. Dioscorea purpurea Roxb. 
Rakto guraniya alu. 

22831. Dioscorea fasciculata Roxb. 
Susni alu. 

"The above are cultivated generally, and edible when cooked." {Smith.) 

22832. Dioscorea anguina Roxb. 

Kukur alu. 

"This variety is wild; not eaten." (Smith.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 37 

22833. Panicum maximum Jacq. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agri- 
culture. Received May 11, 1908. 

" Bush-Buffel grass, one of our best perennial pasture and hay grasses. In 
the 'Flora Capensis,' Stapf refers this to Panicum maximum, but cultivated 
side by side with the latter for several years at my experiment station it shows 
marked and constant differences; these may not prove to be other than va- 
rietal, but are sufficient for cultural purposes. Our Buff el grass is finer in 
texture than Guinea grass and is not so tropical in its requirements. It is 
found in very dry country at an altitude of about 2.500 to 2,600 feet; it is 
somewhat sensitive to frost, the tops dying but the roots not being killed in 
winter. It may prove a useful grass on light soils in the Southern States and 
is worth trial also in Arizona and southern California. This is the principal 
feed of stock which trek down to the ' Winter's veld ' in winter, and it is said 
to have great fattening properties even when dry. Seed does not ripen evenly." 
(Davy.) 

22834. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From near San Pedro, near Pacasmayo, Peru. Purchased in Peru by 
Wessel, Duval & Co., New York. N. Y. Secured from them by Mr. C. J. 
Brand. Received May 12, 1908. 

Andean. " This alfalfa was secured through the same firm as was the Peru- 
vian alfalfa, S. P. I. No. 9303, described in Bulletin 118, Bureau of Plant 
Industry." ( Brand.) 

" The parties in Peru who secured the seed state : ' The price to-day (June 9) 
is about 75 soles per 100 pounds Spanish, on board, Pacasmayo, packed in 
double bags. San Pedro seed is considered the best on the coast, but in our 
opinion that harvested in other parts of the province is just as good. 

"'Alfalfa is generally sown (when there is water) in the months of June to 
September (the winter months), when the pasture grows highest, for in the 
summer months the alfalfa does not flourish and remains small. In general, 
the alfalfa fields last for four or more years, being cut down every 45 days. 
Alfalfa is sown in all kinds of earth, except in that containing saltpeter, which 
kills the plant. (Loose, sandy soil with moist subsoil is the best.) 

" 'As to harvesting the seed, this is uncertain. Very often the alfalfa fields 
flower in the best way, but with one or two nights of low temperature, all the 
flowers fall off and consequently the harvest of seed is bad. It is not possible 
to state the quantity of seed which can be gathered in this province in one year, 
for this depends on the abundance of alfalfa and the number of fields which 
are left for seed. The older the alfalfa fields the better seed they yield. Dur- 
ing this year many of the fields which were left for seed have failed, for the 
reasons given above ; still we consider that about 2,000 quintals of seed will 
have been gathered/" (Wessel. Duval & Co.) 

22835 to 22860. Phoenix dactylifera L. Date. 

From the Persian Gulf region. Received through Mr. William C. Magelssen, 
American consul, Bagdad, Turkey, May 14, 1908. 

22835. Maktum (Asfar). 22838. Khastawi. 

22836. Maktum (Ahmar). 22839. Halaici. 

22837. Ascherasi. 22840. KhadrauL 
142 



as 



SEEDS ANIi PLANTS IMPORTED. 



22835 to 22860 Continued. 



22841. 


8tlk( ri. 


22851. 


22842. 


Shukker Modabel. 


22852. 


22843. 


Barban, 


22853. 


22844. 


Beneffshi. 


22854. 


22845. 


11 u ss< in /■:/'/' r ■ml i. 


22855. 


22846. 


Taberzi I 


22856. 


22847. 


Zehdi. 


22857. 


22848. 


MdUili. 


22858. 


22849. 


Jozi. 


22859. 


22850. 


Shukki /'. 


22860. 



SJiih.ri A sfar. 

Duggal (Omkom-el Almiar) 

Duggal (Sultani). 

Duggal (Shomaieh). 

It a ggal (Hilwa). 

A sch < nisi (Male). 

Khastawi I Mule). 

Bafban (Male). 

Zehdi (Male). 

Khadrawi (Male). 



22861 to 22873. 

From Peking, Cbilili, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agri- 
cultural explorer, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., May 4, 
1908. 

The following seeds and cuttings : 

22861. Populus sp. . Poplar. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 260, Feb. 27, 1908.) A white- 
barked poplar, standing apparently between P. alia tomentosa (Carr.) 
Wesm. and P. balsamifera suaveolens (Fisch.) Wesm. Growing at 5,000 
to 8,000 feet elevation. Fsed extensively for sand and stone binding, and 
planted at the mouth of ravines so as to prevent the mountain torrents 
carrying their debris into the cultivated lands of the valleys. Of use to us 
for the same purpose, and as a cheerful avenue tree for winter effects. 
Chinese name Ching yang shu, meaning green poplar, on account of the 
bark being very green as long as the tree is young." (Meyer.) 

22862. (Undetermined.) 

From Tchailingtse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi. China. "(No. 265, Feb. 
25, 1908.) A shrub resembling a Lonicera, but spiny on the young shoots 
and of a very open growth. Found in shady, sandy spots in a larch forest at 
about s,000 feet elevation. Chinese name Tcheng pee." {Meyer.) 

22863. Philadelphia sp. (?) 

From Tchailingtse Temple. Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 266, Feb. 
25, 1908. i A low shrub growing in open places in a larch forest at about 
8,000 feet elevation. Chinese name Lu too mo." (Meyer.) 

22864. Hydbangea sp. 

From Tchenghaitse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 267, 
Feb. 27, 1908.) Probably Hydrangea vestita pubescens Maxim.; found 
growing in dense shade, as the borders of a pine-tree plantation. Appar- 
ently the same as No. 187 (S. P. I. No. 21925). Chinese name Mar pa tse." 

( Meyer. ) 

22865. Viburnum sp. 

From Tchenghaitse Temple, Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 268, 
Feb. 27, 1908.) Found growing in thickets on mountain slopes at high 
altitudes." (Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 39 

22861 to 22873— Continued. 

22866. (Undetermined.) Sedge. 

From near Taichou, Shansi, China. "(No. 279, Mar. 2, 1908.) A sedge 
growing on strongly alkaline lands of a light sandy nature. Seems to be 
able to stand any amount of drought." (Meyer.) 

22867. Tamarix sp. 

From near Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 287. Mar. 9, 1908.) A 
Tamarix growing on sandy and strongly alkaline soils; might be utilized 
in the alkaline sections of the western United States. Mostly seen as a 
low shrub, but when left alone grows up into a small tree. The twigs 
are used for basket making and for fuel. Chinese name Shan cheng liu.'* 
(Meyer.) 

22868. Funkia sp. 

From Tsingyuenhsien, Shansi, China. "(No. 662. Mar. 12, 1908.) This 
plant is said to bear large, white, fragrant flowers. Has to be kept 
indoors in winter time. Chinese name Pai yu tchenff him." (Meyer.) 

22869. Paeonia albiflora Pall. Peony. 
From Bimoyen Temple, mountains west of Peking, Chihli, China. 

"(No. 663, Mar. 18, 1908.) A very fine, white, double-flowered, fragrant 
peony (herbaceous). Chinese name Pai shoo yoo hua" (Meyer.) 

22870. Glycyrrhiza glabra L. Licorice. 

From near Mapootoo, Hsintchan District, Shansi. China. "(No. 939a. 
Mar. 8, 1908.) Found growing along dry and exposed ridges." (Meyer.) 

22871. Euonymus sp. 

From near Tongehangdi, Kwohsien District, Shansi. China. "(No. 
940a, Mar. 5, 190S.) Seeds picked up from the ground in a loess gorge, 
where the small shrubs themselves were in unapproachable situations."" 
(Meyer.) 

22872. Euonymus sp. 

From Taiyuanfu. Shansi. China. "(No. 941a. Mar. 13, 1908.) A 
shrubby Euonymus, semideciduous, bearing many white capsules, out of 
which the scarlet seeds peep. Is grown sparsely by the Chinese as a pot 
plant for winter table decoration. Local name Shi yiie mae." (Meyer.) 

22873. Rhamnus sp. 

From mountains near Tsintse, Shansi, China. "(No. 942a, Mar. 9, 
1908.) A very dwarfy Rhamnus, found growing on dry, exposed moun- 
tain slopes. Well fit for rockery purposes." (Meyer.) 

22874 to 22885. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Tokyo, Japan. Purchased from the Tokyo Plant. Seed, and Imple- 
ment Company. Received May 14, 1908. 
The following seeds, varietal identifications and descriptions made by Mr. 
H. T. Nielsen: 

22874. Green. 

22875. Flat King. Same as Nos. 19982 and 17252. 

22876. Yellow. Similar in appearance to Edllybrook, No. 17209. 

22877. Okute. Apparently identical with No. 19986. 

22878. Butterball. Apparently identical with Nos. 19981 and 17273. 
142 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22874 to 22885— Continued. 

22879. Yellow. Evidently two varieties; mpst of the seed very similar 

in appearance to Acme, No. 14954. 

"22880. rellow. Quite closely resembling Holly brook. 

22881. Green. 

22882. Xellow. Apparently identical with No. 20892. 

22883. Buckshot. Apparently identical with No. 199X7. 

22884. Yellow, with a slight purple marking on many of the seeds. 

22885. Amherst. Apparently identical with Nos. 19983 and 17275. 

22886 to 22888. 

From Swatow, Kwangtung, China. Presented by Mr. William Ashmore, jr., 
through Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Chinese Tract Society, Shanghai, China. 
Received May 14, 1908. 

The following seeds, varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen: 

22886. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 
Black. 

22S87. Vigna sesquifedalis ( L. ) W. F. Wight. 

Red with one end and half of keel white. 

22888. Vigna catjang (Burm.) Walp. 

Similar in appearance to Chinese Red, Nos. 17328 and 22635, but seeds 
are smaller. 

22891 to 22895. 

From Bridgetown, Barbados. British West Indies. Presented by Mr. John 
R. Bovell, superintendent, Agricultural Department, at the request of the 
Imperial Commissioner of Agriculture for the West Indies. Received 
May 13, 1908. 

The following tubers : 

22891. Colocasia sp. Taro. 
Japanese taro. 

22892. Colocasia sp. Taro. 
Malanga (via) Cuba. 

22893. Colocasia sp. Taro. 
Trinidad Yellow. 

22894. Colocasia sp. 
Dasheen. 

22895. Xanthosoma sp. Yautia. 
Amarilla. 

For previous shipment and remarks, see Nos. 22513 to 22523. 

22896. (Undetermined.) 

From southern Brazil. Presented by Mr. H. Nehrling, Gotha, Fla., through 
Mr. R. A. Young. Received May 18, 1908. 

"A new root crop from southern Brazil, where it is called Mangarldas. The 
tubers look much like Caladium tubers, but the foliage differs from that genus. 
It is undoubtedly an aroid, but what it may be I do not know. It is cultivated 
largely in southern Brazil for its edible tubers. It is certainly no Xanthosoma, 
and it is no Colocasia:' (Nehrling.) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 41 

22897 to 22903. 

From Paotingfu, Chihli, China. Presented by Rev. J. W. Lowrie, D. D M 
through Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Chinese Tract Society, Shanghai, China. 
Received April 22, 1908. 

The following seeds. Chinese names in italic as given by Mr. Lowrie. De- 
scriptions of varieties by Mr. H. T. Nielsen. 

22897 to 22901. Glycine htspida i Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

22897. Da ching don. 

Green. Similar to No. 17857. 

22898. Hwang don. . 
Yellow. 

22899. "Hei don. Boiled as a fodder for mules and horses. Oil 

expressed from it, and refuse used as manure." 
(Lowrie.) 

Black. Similar to Cloud, No. 16790. 

22900. " Da wu don. Tends to vary after successive plantings." 

{Lowrie.) 

Black. Similar in appearance to Nuttall, Nos. 17253 and 19183, 
but has green cotyledons. 

22901. Hsiao bai Jici don. 
Smoky yellow. 

22902. Vigna sesquipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 

Tsai don. 
Red. 

22903. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 
Giang don. 

Mottled. Similar in appearance to Nos. 17339 and 18617. 

22904 to 22906. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, 
agricultural explorer, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
August. 1907. 

The following seeds : 

22904. Myrica nagi Thunb. 

From Dongsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 732a, June 25, 1907.) Large- 
fruited variety, called by foreigners the ' strawberry tree,' by the 
Chinese Yang mae. A small evergreen tree or large shrub, bearing round, 
wine red colored fruits which are very pleasing to the taste and can be 
eaten fresh, stewed, or preserved in spirits. The Chinese say the tree 
can not bear transplanting, so confine their roots by sowing them one or 
two seeds in each pot." (Meyer.) 

22905. Myrica nagi Thunb. 

From Dongsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 733a, June 25, 1907.) Medium- 
sized fruits. For further information see preceding number (S. P. I. 
No. 22904). Besides being a very agreeable fruit, the tree is also de- 
cidedly ornamental, especially when loaded with its carminic fruits. 
Loves, apparently, sheltered, well-drained locations." (Meyer.) 

142 



42 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22904 to 22906— Continued. 

22906. Mykk v \\..i Tlmnb. 

From Dohgsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 734a, June 2r>, 1907.) Small- 
fruited variety. For further remarks, see Nos. 732a and 733a (S. P. I. 
Nos. 22904 and 22905). The Chinese graft the large, sweet-fruited vari- 
eties upon the wild seedlings, but even among the seedlings there is a 
large variation in size of fruits and in productiveness." (Meyer.) 

For previous importations see S. P. I. Nos. 91G4 and 9314. 

22907. Carex triangularis Boeclder. Sedge. 

From Texas. Collected by Mr. F. W. Clarke, special agent in charge of 
matting-rush investigations. Received May, 1908. 

" This seed was collected from plants growing in ditches and marshy places 
along and back from the Victoria division of the S. P. R. R. between Wharton 
and El Campo, Tex. No seed was gathered from a stalk less than 3 feet tall, 
and most of the seed was secured from plants 3 feet 6 inches high and upwards. 
This Carex occurs in abundant quantities from Crowley, La., to Victoria, Tex., 
and I presume it covers the whole coast country, but it is probably most plentiful 
in the black, waxy rice belt of Texas." {Clarke.) (For previous introduction 
see S. P. I. No. 20990.) 

22908. Lens esculenta Moench. 

From Mexico. Secured by Mr. David Griffiths, assistant agriculturist, 
United States Department of Agriculture, on the market at Laredo, Tex. 
Received May 6, 1908. 

"Lanteja. A common leguminous plant grown in Mexico extensively and 
used in about the same way as the chick pea." (Griffiths.) 

22909. Picea obovata schrenkiana (Fisch. & Mey.) Masters. 

From St. Petersburg, Russia. Presented by Dr. A. Fischer von Waldheim, 
Imperial Botanic Gardens. Received March 27, 1908. 

Tall, pyramidal tree, with pendulous branchlets and dull green leaves. Native 
of central Asia. (Extract from Bailey.) 

22910. Xaxthosoma sp. Yautia. 

From Barbados, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. Valpierre Croney, 
9 East 97th street, New York, through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received 
May 11, 1908. 

Nut Eddo. 

22911 to 22913. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

From Tsungming Island. China. Obtained through Rev. J. Ware and pre- 
sented by Mr. S. P. Barchet, interpreter, American consulate, Shanghai, 
China. Received May 20, 1908. 

22911. Xowliang". 
Brown. 

22912. Kowliang. 
Black-Hull. 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 43 

22911 to 22913— Continued. 

22913. Sorgo. 
Chinese. 

"The white variety (S. P. I. No. 22912) is considered inferior to the red 
(S. P. I. No. 22911, Brown), though planted in the same way. It is planted in 
richly manured land, in rows 6 inches wide covered lightly with half an inch 
of earth. If plants come up too thick or crowded, the plants which should be 
removed are not pulled, but cut off with a sharp knife, so as not to disturb the 
roots of neighboring plants." (Barchet.) 

22914 and 22915. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, 
agricultural explorer, May 19, 1908. 

22914. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 667, Apr. 6, 1908.) Variety tor- 
tuosa. The Crooked or Dragon's Claw Chinese date. Cuttings of a very 
peculiar variety of the Chinese date, making a quaint and real Chinese 
impression. A rare plant, and very expensive in China. Chinese name 
Lung tsao tsao shu. Said to be very difficult to graft." {Meyer.) 

22915. Castanopsis tibetaxa Hance. Chestnut. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. •"(No. 959a, Apr. 14, 190S.) A very 
large leaved, evergreen chestnut, growing into a stately, ornamental 
tree bearing edible nuts. Very rare in China. Obtained through Bishop 
G. E. Moule, of Hangchow. These trees will grow in the localities where 
oranges thrive." (Meyer.) 

22916 to 22918. 

From Gyangze. Tibet. Procured from the British trade agent at Gyangze 
and presented by Dr. Robert T. Morris, 616 Madison avenue, New York, 
through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received May 19, 1908. 

22916. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

22917. Hordeum distichox xudum L. Barley. 

22918. Tisum arvexse L. Field pea. 

" I would not presume to venture any opinion about the value of these seeds, 
but they grow in very high mountain regions and must at least be hardy in 
trying climates." (Morris.) 

22919 to 22922. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

From Ingchung, via Fuchau, China. Presented by Mr. J. Willis Hawjey. 
Received May 22, 1908. 
The following seeds. Varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen : 

22919. Black. Very similar to No. 22886. 

22920. Yellowish green. 

22921. Yellow. Very similar to No. 22714. 

22922. Yellow. Seed resembles Mammoth very closely, but slightly 

smaller. 
142 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22923. S-nzoLOBii m sp. Velvet bean. 

From Pensacola, Fla. Presented by Mr. P. K. Yonge, through Prof. S. M. 
Tracy, Biloxi, Miss. Received May 23, L908. 

White. 

22924 and 22925. 

From Italy. Presented by Dr. Robert T. Morris, 616 Madison avenue, 
New York, through Mr. <>. W. Barrett. Received May 22, 1908. 

22924. Lagenabia vulgaris Ser. Gourd. 
" Zucctuni. Similar to Zucchette (S. P. I. No. 22925), but having 

smaller fruits." (Morris.) 

22925. Cucurbita pepo P. Pumpkin. 
"Zucchette. Climbing vine ; very long fruit; used like cucumber, sliced 

and in salads; also boiled like turnip, and may be stuffed with meat and 
boiled or fried." (Morris.) 

22926. ZiNziBEit officinale Rose. Ginger. 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Presented by Mr. W. Harris, superintendent, 
Department of Agriculture, Hope Gardens, at the request of Dr. R. H. 
True. Received May 29, 1908. 
Procured for Dr. R. H. Trne*s experiments at the Drug Plant Garden, Orange 
City, Fla. 

22927. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, 
Chinese Tract Society. Received May 27, 1908. 
Black. "Identical with Shanghai, No. 14952: cotyledons are green." (Niel- 
sen.) 

22928. Cucurbita maxima Duch. Venetian squash. 

From Milan. Italy. Purchased from Fratelli Ingegnoli. Received May 
28, 1908. 

•• Zucca marina. Sow in April in ground well manured and watered, making 
the holes distant from each other 50 centimeters; till each one with good soil 
mixed with manure in which place two or three seeds and press down the 
earth. When the plants have developed, leave the more robust ones. Nourish 
and water abundantly with water mixed with liquid manure. 

•• To have large fruit leave only two or three fruits on each plant and remove 
the superfluous branches." (Fratelli Ingegnoli.) 

22929 to 22933. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Mount Silinda, Melsetter District, Rhodesia. South Africa. Pre- 
sented by Rev. Columbus C. Fuller. Received May 18 and 23, 1908. 

The following seeds, descriptions of varieties by Mr. H. T. Nielsen : 

22929. Similar in appearance to Unknown, but has a slight purplish 

tinge. 

22930. Similar in appearance to Macassar, Nos. 21006 and 21299. 

22931. Similar in appearance to Xeiv Era. but seed is a trifle smaller. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 45 

22929 to 22933— Continued. 

22932. Black. Similar to our common black varieties, but seed a trifle 

smaller and many of tbem marked with small, gray specks. 

22933. Similar in appearance to Taylor, No. 17342, but not quite so 

large. 

"The smaller varieties are best for our rather poor soil." {Fuller.) 

22934. Dolichos lablab L. 

From Karlsruhe, Germany. Presented by Prof. L. (iraebener, director. 
Botanical (hardens. Received May 28. 1908. 

22935 and 22936. 

From Tekhoe. via Fuchau. Fuhkeiu, China. Presented by Miss Jessie 
Alice Marriott. Received June 1, 1908. 

22935. Vigna sksquipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 

22936. Pi sum arvense L. Field pea. 

22937. Ficus sp. 

From Mokanshan. Chehkiang, China. Received through Mr. Frank N. 
Meyer, agricultural explorer, June 2, 1908. 

"(No. 068, Apr. 22, 1908.) An ornamental creeping Ficus covering here and 
there rocks, bowlders, and tree trunks, of use as a covering vine in the mild, 
moist-wintered regions of the Tinted States. Closely allied to the well-known 
Ficus repens." (Meyer.) 

22938. Vigna inguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Mr. C. F. Baker, Museu Goeldi. Re- 
ceived June 1, 1908. 

"Feijao manteiga. One of the highest priced beans in the Para, market. 
Would make one of the very best soiling crops for this region." (Baker.) 

•• One of the Lady peas, probably Condi." < Nielsen.) 

22939. Citrus aurantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Mr. C. F. Baker, Museu Goeldi; Re- 
ceived June 1, 1908. 

"One of the largest, finest oranges grown at Para." {Baker.) 

22940. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Lima, Peru. Received from E. Sayan Palacios & Co., through Mr. 
C. J. Brand. May 20, 1908. 

" This is a distinct Peruvian type of alfalfa as distinguished from the 
Chilean.*' (Palacios.) 

" This will no doubt prove to be very similar to, if not identical with, S. P. I. 
No. 9303." (Brand.) 

22941. Saguerus pinnatus Wurmb. Sugar palm. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department 
of Agriculture. Received June 4, 1908. 
"In Java the Arenga saccharifera (Saguerus pinnatus) is not cultivated in 
regular plantations; it needs much room and light and may be planted at 
142 



46 SEEDS AM) PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22941— Continued. 

distances of 15 to 18 I'-h ; the planting boles have to be _: to 3 feet in breadth 
and in depth. At an altitude of 3,000 feet above sea level the tree is tit to be 
tapped at an age of aboul 16 years. It yields more at an altitude of 1,800 feet, 
where it fruits after L2 or 13 years. In the lowlands, too, it will succeed, but 
I can n«>t say when it fruits there. 

"The 'Hi a i<i j<i (green arenga) is considered to be the most productive va- 
riety of our country. In the high regions it produces during about four years, in 
lower parts during three years; the quantity of juice and sugar continue getting 
less as the tree grows older. At the first tapping — this means when the first 
male peduncle is tapped — the tree produces about 7 liters of juice per twenty- 
four hours during about two and one-half months. Of some trees a second 
peduncle may be tapped immediately after the first one; of others, only after 
some time (three months). An arenga tree may be tapped from three to ten 
times, with an average of six times. At the second and following tappings the 
arenga produces at every tapping for a period of about forty-five days about 5A 
liters of juice (per twenty-four hours) of a declining sugar content; about 3£ 
liters of juice of the first tapping give about 0.017 kilo of sugar: the following 
tappings give the same quantity of sugar to a production of 5£ liters of juice. 
The production of sugar of one tree during its whole lease of life may be stated 
at about 225 kilos, with a local value of 13 cents (about 5 American cents) per 
kilo, or in total about 30 Dutch guilders (12 American dollars). 

" The sugar is prepared by boiling the juice. This boiling takes much fuel, 
which fact gives no trouble in the interior of Java ; however, if wood had to be 
bought for the purpose — as it would be in towns of Java — the value of the 
sugar would not make good the expenses for fuel. Sugar, therefore, is not 
manufactured in and near the towns. 

"As to the method of tapping, I beg to refer to the work of A. Tschirch, 
Indische Heil und Nutzpflansen, Berlin, 1892, page 160. This book does not 
mention that the male peduncle has to be swung to and fro during some days, 
and afterwards beaten effectively before the inflorescence is cut off; further, 
that every day during the tapping a slice of the peduncle has to be cut off. 
Experiments made here some years ago by Professor Molisch have shown that 
without any doubt stimuli have a great effect on the flow of sugar-containing 
juice. 

"Taking the figures given above as a basis for calculation, an acre can be 
planted with 160 trees of A. saccharifera (8. pinnatus), which, produciug 500 
pounds of sugar per tree, will theoretically give a total production of 80,000 
pounds, equal to 35 tons per acre, at the end of from fifteen to twenty years, or 
an average of from 2 to 2| tons per year. 

" Personally, I am inclined to think the actual production will be consider- 
ably below these figures, one reason for this being that with such close planting 
the trees will not be able to develop fully; probably an average of about 100 
fully developed producing trees will be nearer the mark, but even then a pro- 
duction of over 1 ton per year will be obtained. 

" The great drawback is that, from the nature of the sugar palm, it will 
probably not be possible to grow catch crops after the third or fourth year; 
during the first twelve to sixteen years no profits are obtained ; then comes a 
big harvest during three or four years, after which the plantation is valueless, 
and it will entail considerable expense to again clear the land for other crops. 
Moreover, taking into consideration that most people, and especially tropical 
people, are not inclined to wait a dozen years or longer before they get any 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 47 

22941— Continued. 

return for their labor, I should not consider it advisable to make regular plan- 
tations of A. saccharifera (8. pinnatus). Quite a different matter is to plant 
the tree in village gardens along roads, alternating with the shade trees. In 
such locations, under which the labor of planting and cultivating is next to 
nothing, the people of Porto Rico can afford to wait for the returns, which will 
probably prove quite remunerative." (Treub.) 

22942 to 22944. 

From Uitenhage. Cape Colony, South Africa. Presented by Mr. H. Fairey, 
Public Park and Gardens. Received June 4, 190S. 

22942. Axdropogox sorghum (L.) Brot. Sorgo. 

"This sorgo has pyramidal spreading panicles similar to Amber, but 
with larger spikelets and seed." (Ball.) 

22943. Tenxisetum amebicanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

"This seed is from Rhodesia. South Africa, and is known as Myouti 
by the Mashona natives (pronounced something like Meout). The seed 
is much used. I am told, for poultry feeding, and an oil can also be 
extracted from it." (Fairey.) 

22944. ( Undetermined. I 

"A legume of no economic value so far as I know, but is useful for 
edgings to walks and beds in this country, but would not withstand 
your winters." (Fairey.) 

22945. Phaseolus sp. Bean. 

From Java. Presented by Mr. P. D. Mulder, Banda-Xeira, Molukken 
Islands, East Indies. Received June 4, 1908. 

" Kratok. The seeds when young are used by the natives for food. When 
the beans are older they are exported. In Java it is planted for making the 
bottom lands more fertile, and much profit is derived from it." (Mulder.) 

22946. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Mitchell, S. Dak. Grown by Prof. W. A. Wheeler. Received through 
Mr. C. J. Brand, June 3. 1908. 
"(P. L. H. No. 3332.) The so-called Baltic alfalfa, grown from South Dakota 
Agricultural Experiment Station Xo. 167. The original source of the seed is 
unknown, the parent seed having been purchased in 1896 from a seed dealer at 
Hartford, S. Dak. This is a very free seeding variety and is unusually hardy." 
(Brand.) 

22947. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Excelsior, Minn. Secured by Mr. C. J. Brand from Prof. W. A. 
Wheeler, Mitchell, S. Dak., and was probably grown by Mr. A. B. Lyman, 
of Excelsior, Minn., from whom Professor Wheeler purchased it. Re- 
ceived June 3, 1908. 
Grimm. (P. L. H. Xo. 3333.. 

142 



48 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22948. Medicago bativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Guaranda, Ecuador. Received from Mr. H. R. Dietrich, consul- 
general, Guayaquil, Ecuador, through Mr, C. J. Brand, June s, 1908. 
"(P. L. II. No. ."..".l'i;. ) A rapid-growing form of alfalfa from the Andean 
plateau, similar in many respects t<> the Peruvian alfalfa described in Bulletin 
No. 118, Bureau Of Plant Industry." (Brand.) 

22949. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Chile, South America. Presented by Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Lima- 
vida. Chile, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received June 3, 1908. 

"Wild alfalfa found in the foothills of the Cordillera, in a section of moist, 
virgin land, upon which the alfalfa appears as a weed when field crops are 
planted for the first time." (Husbands.) 

22955. Garcinia binucao (Blanco) Choisy. 

From Manila, P. I. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon. Received June 11, 1908. 

"This has the widest range of any species (of Garcinia) which I know; its 
fruiting season covers the longest time (March to July) ; it is fairly robust, 
sometimes 40 meters high, and is the most cosmopolitan of any species we have. 
I have seen it at sea level and up to 3,000 feet. This binucao, or camangis, or 
gatasan, et al. is found in rock fissures: in dry, gravelly, sterile washes; on the 
margins of swamps, and in rich, fat valley soils." (Lyon.) 

22956. A nona reticulata L. Custard apple. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Presented by Dr. 
E. Andre. Received June 10, 1908. 

22957. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. (Aegle marmelos 

(L.) Correa.) Bael tree. 

From Nyaunglebin, Burma, India. Presented by Rev. Henry W. Hale, Box 

30, R. F. D. No. 1. Savannah. Ga. Received June 8, 1908. 

"These seeds are from the very best bael fruit." (Hale.) 

"The bael tree of India ascends to an altitude of 4,000 feet. It grows to a 
height of 40 feet. The fruit has matured near Rockhampton, Australia (23° 
S. lat.) The plant is readily propagated from root cuttings and is otherwise 
of easy cultivation. The fruit is of medicinal, particularly antidysenteric, 
value. The root and the leaves are also used medicinally." (Extract from Von 
Mueller's Select Extra-Tropical Plants.) (For previous introduction see S. P. I. 
No. 19367.) 

22958 to 22960. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Mount Silinda, Malsetter District, Rhodesia, South Africa. Pre- 
sented by Rev. Columbus C. Fuller. Received June 13, 1908. 

The following seeds. Descriptions of varieties by Mr. H. T. Nielsen: 

22958. Black with gray specks. The seed has the same general ap- 

pearance as many of the hybrids between Black and Iron. 

22959. Red. Similar to Red Ripper, but seed is larger. 

22960. Clay. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1D08. 49 

22961. Phalaris coerulescens Desf. 

From Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Mr. R. W. 
Peacock, manager, Experimental Farm, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Re- 
ceived June 13, 190S. 

"This new fodder plant has been tried by Mr. J. Furphy, of Hill End, in the 
Moe District, West Gippsland, who says it supplies what has long been wanted — 
a winter feed for stock, as it resists the frosts and keeps growing right through 
the winter months. Mr. Furphy states that he obtained a few plants and trans- 
planted them at the end of April of last year, putting them out in drills 3 feet 
apart and 2 feet in the drills. By the end of June they had made a growth of 
2 feet, sending out shoots until, by the end of the season, as many as 167 stems 
had been produced by one plant, the highest averaging 7 feet, while some of 
the stronger stems obtained a height of 8£ feet, the clumps measuring 2 feet 
across. Although it was a severe winter, not a yellow leaf could be seen, ami 
the growth was continuous, with nice, succulent blades up to the flowering 
stems. The roots are fibrous, the foliage very dense, and color a bright green 
in the middle of winter. It seems to succeed in the colder districts where other 
plants do not thrive. Autumn planting is recommended, and Mr. Furphy 
favors giving the plants plenty of room. His plot yielded at the rate of 60 
bushels of seed and 8 tons of liny to the acre. He cut the crop at the end of 
January, this year, and in 45 days it had grown a second crop nearly 3 feet 
high, the weather meantime being very dry. As to the milk-producing quali- 
ties of the grass, judging by its succulent quality and the abundance of the 
crop, Mr. Furphy is convinced that it will prove a most valuable fodder for the 
dairy herd." {Journ. Dept. Agric. Western Australia, vol. 15, p. 652. 1907.) 

22962. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From about 50 miles south of Lan Chow, Kansu. China. Presented by 
Rev. David Ekvall, Tehtao, Kansu, China, through Mrs. Edward Q. 
Knight, Takoina Park. D. C. Received June 16, 1908. 

" The natives say this seed must be sown with something else to grow well." 
(Ekvall.) 

22963 to 22968. 

From Argentina, South America. Presented by Sehor Mario Estrada. 
Division of Agriculture. Buenos Aires. Received June 10. 1908. 

22963 to 22965. From province of Buenos Aires. 

22963. Ekagkostis sp. 22965. Rumex crisptjs L. 

22964. Eragrostis sp. 

22966. Axdropogox saccharoides Sw. 
From province of Santa Fe. 

22967. Briza sp. 

From province of Santa Fe. 

22968. Paxicum bebgi Arech. 
From province of Buenos Aires. 

22969. Gladiolus salmonetjs Baker. Gladiolus. 

From Merea, Durban, Natal. Presented by Dr. J. Medley Wood, director. 
Natal Botanic Gardens. Received June IS. 1908. 
" Corms of a handsome but not very common species." i Wood.) 
61160— Bui. 142—09 4 



50 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22970. Maxgifera lndica L. Mango. 

From Bombay Province, [ndia. Procured by Mr. Win. II. Michael, consul- 
general, Calcutta, [ndia. Received .June 19, 1908. 
WhiU llfonso. "The Advocate of India has this to say of the White 
Alfonso mango: ' \w have at this moment on the office table a specimen of 
mango which lias been senl to us, the like of which has never before been 
grown. 1 1 is ;i While Alfonso, perfect in shape, with a beautiful satin skin 
and ;i subtle aroma which faithfully indicates the delicate flavor of its golden 
pulp. It is a triumph in every respect, and with the smallest stone for its 
size. Vet ii is of gigantic weight and proportions. A good specimen of the 
Golden Alfonso, so far our best mango, does not weigh more than about 4 
ounces. The White Alfonso just fails to tip the beam at the weight of 2\ 
pounds. The White Alfonso, or gafeda Afoos, is grown about 20 miles out- 
side Bombay city, in the direction of Borivill, and although the fruit has 
reached gigantic size, this is the first occasion on which the trees have borne 
fruit. There is only a limited supply at present, but the new fruit seems 
destined to wrest the pride of place from the still glorious specimen, the Golden 
Alfonso. A peculiarity of the pulp is its pale rose colored hue. The few which 
have been offered to the public have found ready purchasers at 15 rupees, or 
$5 per dozen.'" (Michael.) 

22971. Cacara erosa (L.) Kuntze. Hicama. 

From Guadalajara, Mexico. Presented by Senor Luis Rosas, through Mr. 

r 

Frederic Chisolm. Received June 20, 1908. 

" The plant, which in both Guam and the Philippines bears its Mexican name, 
was probably brought (to Guam) from Mexico. It is now common in the 
woods, climbing among the bushes and trees and twining about everything 
with which it comes in contact. The young root is much like a turnip in 
shape and consistency, and is easily peeled like a turnip. It is usually eaten 
raw, and may be prepared with oil and vinegar in the form of a salad. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Edward Palmer it is extensively cultivated in Mexico, where 
the natives pinch off the blossoms and seed pods, giving as a reason that if 
the seeds are aHowed to mature the roots are not good. In Mexico the roots 
are much eaten raw. but are also pickled, boiled in soup, and cooked as a 
vegetable. As they come from the ground they are crisp, sweet, juicy, and of 
a nutty flavor. They are nourishing and at the same time quench the thirst, 
so that they are much liked by travelers. One way of preparing the raw roots 
is to cut them in thin slices and sprinkle sugar over them. They may also be 
boiled and prepared with batter in the form of fritters, and in Mexico they are 
often minced or grated, and with the addition of sugar, milk, eggs, and a 
few fig leaves for flavoring, made into puddings." (Safford's Useful Plants 
of Guam.) 

"The Jicama (Hicama) de agua is one of the most widely popular vegetables 
grown in Mexico, and when in season one rarely meets an Indian who is not 
munching a large specimen. For the table I have seen them peeled, thinly 
sliced, and served with sliced oranges, forming the dessert dish called ' pico de 
gallo ' — cock's bill. In the hot season the tubers are delightfully refreshing, 
whether eaten out of hand or sliced as a made dish. The plant cultivated is 
usually planted either in hills or on the ridge of ordinary rows, and should be 
given rather careful cultivation, the tips of the vines and all flower buds being 
pinched off in order to make the plant develop large tubers." {Chisolm.) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 51 

22972 and 22973. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Chile. Presented by Mr. Rea Hanna, American consul, Iquique. Re- 
ceived June 19, 190S. 

22972. 

From Pica, Tarapaca, Chile. " The man from whom I procured it says 
that the alfalfa from which it was obtained has been planted 12 years 
and produces from six to eight crops per year." (Hanna.) 

22973. 

From Matilla, Chile. " I do not know that there is any difference be- 
tween this and the above (S. P. I. No. 22972), except that it comes from 
another small oasis near Pica. Many of these fields have been planted 
for nearly 100 years without reseeding and give remarkable crops, and 
the plants may have acquired some new qualities of virility from the 
wonderful soil and atmosphere." (Hanna.) 

22974 to 23038. 

From China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agricultural ex- 
plorer, and brought by him to the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
June, 1908. 
The following plants : 

22974. Sophoka japonica L. 

From Fengtai, near Peking. Chihli, China. "(No. 331, Mar. 31, 1908.) 
The well-known Pagoda tree, of which there are two varieties in China, 
one with a whitish bark and the other with black. Both varieties are 
supposed to be among this lot, but it is not until after a few years that 
one is able to see the difference between the trees ; when young they all 
look alike. Chinese name Huai s^ll(.' , (Meyer.) 

22975. Ulmtts fumila L. Elm. 
From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 332, Mar. 31, 1908.) 

The Chinese elm, used all over northern China and Manchuria as an 
avenue, shade, and timber tree. Resists droughts, extremes of heat and 
cold, and neglect remarkably well; will be a good shade tree for the 
semiarid northern regions of the United States. The Chinese carts are 
mainly constructed from the wood of this tree. Chinese name Dja yii 
shu, meaning family elm tree." (Meyer.) 

22976. Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb) Lindl. Loquat. 
From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 333, Mar., 1907. and Apr., 

1908.) A loquat said to bear white or at least very pale yellow colored 
fruits, which have a very fine flavor. A rare variety. Chinese name Pai 
fei&aif." (Meyer.)' 

22977. Myrica nagi Thunb. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 334, Mar., 1907.) The so-called 
1 strawberry tree ' of central China ; produces nice edible fruits which 
can be preserved or used in pastries, fruit sirups, etc. Chinese name 
Yang mae." (Meyer.) 

22978. Viburnum macrocephalum Fortune. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu. China. "(No. 335, Apr. 26, 1908.) The 
giant Chinese snowball. A tall bush bearing enormous umbels of white 
flowers, sometimes over 1 foot in diameter. The plants are mostly used 
142 



5*2 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22974 to 23038 Continued. 

in gardens to cover up a corner or hide a wall, but they are also often 

grafted upon tbe wild form which h;>s single flowers, and grown then 

in ;i dwarfed state In tui>s or pots. Probably not hardy north. Chinese 
nanit' .1/// him sen chu." (Meyer.) 

22979. 1 1 ix coBNUTA Lindl. .v Paxt. (?) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 336, Apr. 26, 1908.) The Chi- 
nese holly. A very ornamental bush or small tree loaded in winter with 
scarlet berries. A slow grower, and probably not hardy north. Chinese 
name Ta Im tse." ( Meyer.) 

22980. Caesalpinia sp. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 337, Apr. 26, 1908.) A very 
rare shrub, only one specimen in Soochow. Not hardy north. Chinese 
name Pat chi mei." (Meyer.) 

22981. Caragana sp. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 338, Apr. 26, 190S.) A low- 
growing Caragana, bearing bronze-yellow flowers; is cultivated in pots 
as an ornamental plant and is far from being common. Probably not 
hardy north. Chinese name Fci chong." (Meyer.) 

22982. LOROPETALUM CHINENSE R. Bl\ 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 339, Apr. 26, 1908.) An orna- 
mental, evergreen shrub, sometimes growing into a small tree, bearing 
small, elliptical, dark green leaves, while in spring it is covered with 
masses of white, fringed flowers, which are delightfully fragrant; it is 
very rarely found cultivated, and wild specimens do not stand trans- 
planting readily. Chinese name Chuck mei." (Meyer.) 

22983. Azalea sp. Azalea. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 340, Apr. 26, 1908.) A rare 

variety of Azalea having wine purple colored, semidouble flowers 

(' hose-in-hose,' this variation is called). Chinese name Tsze ja tau.'" 
( Meyer. ) 

22984. Cydoxia sp. Quince. 

From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 341, Apr. 26, 1908.) A very 
small form of a quince. Chinese name ho hai tang." (Meyer.) 

22985. (Undetermined.) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 342, Apr. 26, 1908.) Zelkova 
or Ulmus. Often dwarfed by the Chinese and grown in all kinds of 
earthen vessels; also found wild in the mountains. Chinese name 
Yu shu." (Meyer.) 

22986. Elaeagnus pvngens Thunb. (?) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 343, Apr. 26, 1908.) A tall 
shrub or small tree with silvery leaves, flowering in early spring with 
masses of tiny, pale yellow colored flowers which emit a delightful per- 
fume and attract many honey-collecting insects. May serve for a hedge 
tree, as it is somewhat spiny and grows very dense. Probably not hardy 
north. Chinese name Tan kivan ton" (Meyer.) 

22987. (Undetermined.)/ 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 344, Apr. 26, 1908.) Small- 
leaved, evergreen shrub; grown rarely as a dwarfed tree in vessels. 
Chinese name Chuck mei tsang." (Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 53 

22974 to 23038— Continued. 

22988. Ligustbum sp. 

From Soocliow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 345, Apr. 26, 1908.) A dwarfy 
privet of spreading habit." (Meyer.) 

22989. Pbtjnus sp. Plum. 
From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 346, Apr. 26, 1908.) A red- 
flowered plum, much used for house and shop decoration during Chinese 
New Year; it is generally grafted upon Amygdalus davidiana (Carr.) 
Dipp., the remarkable hardy ' original ' peach. These plants are being 
forced by the thousands and sell for high prices. Chinese name Hong 
mei." (Meyer.) 

22990. Pbunus sp. Plum. 

From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 347, Apr. 26, 1908.) A white- 
flowered plum; for remarks see the preceding number (S. P. I. No. 
22989). Chinese name Lu mei/' (Meyer.) 

22991. Pbunus japonica Thunb. ( ?) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu. China. "(No. 348, Apr. 26, 1908.) A dwarfy 
shrub, bearing dense masses of small, double, white flowers on its slender 
branches. Apparently the white variety of No. 669 (S. P. I. No. 23007) ; 
as such see this number for remarks. Chinese name Sui li. Can be 
propagated by slips with a heel left to them." (Meyer.) 

22992. Ribes sp. Currant. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 349, Apr. 26, 190S.) A currant 
grown in pots and in tubs ; rarely seen. Apparently collected in the 
mountains. Chinese name Chi ehing." (Meyer.) 

22993. Spiraea sp. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 350, Apr. 26, 190S.) A bushy, 
white-flowered Spiraea. Fit to be grown as an ornamental garden shrub. 
Chinese name Yang teng." (Meyer.) 

22994. Daphne sp. (?) 

From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 351, Apr. 26, 190S.) An orna- 
mental, spring-flowering shrub. Chinese name Chi hsian." (Meyer.) 

22995. Euoxymus alatus (Thunb.) Rupr. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 352, Apr. 26, 1908.) A de- 
ciduous shrub, having characteristic four-winged, white-colored fruits 
hanging down in long peduncles, which contrast greatly with the bright 
scarlet hues of the leaves in autumn. Chinese name Pan s7<w." (Meyer.) 

22996. (Undetermined.) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 353, Apr. 26, 1908.) Ericace- 
ous shrub. A very rare shrub, having glossy, green, laurel-like leaves 
and bearing red, bent-down flowers. Not very hardy. Chinese name 
Yu kwei." (Meyer.) 

22997. Lespedeza sp. 

From Soochow. Kiangsu. China. "(No. 354, Apr. 26, 1908.) A low, 
shrubby Lespedeza, with large pinnate leaves and bearing graceful 
racemes of flowers, either purple or white, as there are two varieties. 
Can be used to advantage in small gardens and in rockeries: also as pot 
plants. Probably not quite hardy. Chinese name Lu chuen yuen." 
(Meyer.) 

142 



54 SKKDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22974 to 23038— Continued. 

22998. Carissa bispinosa (L.) Desf. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. ::">. Apr. 20, 1008.) A strange, 
beautiful, little plant ; very spiny, with very small, dark green, glossy 
leaves and bright red berries; very ornamental, and well fit for table 
decoration during the winter holidays. Wants cool, shady situations and 
is not hardy in the cold-wintered regions. Chinese name Shan hu tsi." 
i Meyer. \ 

22999. Hedeba sp. 

From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 356, Apr. 26, 1908.) A rare, 
variegated form of the Chinese yellow-berried ivy. Probably not hardy 
north. Chinese name Yu clinch." (Meyer.) 

23000. (Undetermined.) 

From Soochow. Kiangsu, China. "(No. 357, Apr. 20, 1008. ) A purple- 
flowered, terrestrial orchid, said to grow wild near Hangchow. An orna- 
mental plant for gardens in the southeastern United States. Chinese 
name Yo Jan." (Meyer.) 

23001. (Undetermined.) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 358, Apr. 28, 1008.) A red- 
flowering lily. Chinese name Yang pou an." (Meyer.) 

23002. (Undetermined.) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 350. Apr. 20, 1908.) A white- 
flowering lily. Chinese name Ouc sw." (Meyer.) 

23003. Acorus sp. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 300, Apr. 20, 1008.) A pigmy 
variety of a sweet flag; grown in small pots in saucers of standing 
water; fit to be grown in aquariums as a small, ornamental plant. Chi- 
nese name Chang pu." (Meyer.) 

23004. (Undetermined.) 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 301, June 27, 1007.) An 
epiphytic orchid, obtained from Bishop G. E. Moule, in whose garden it 
grows on a cryptomeria tree in the shade." (Meyer.) 

23005. (Undetermined.) 

From Ningpo, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 302, July 3. 1007.) An epi- 
phytic orchid, coming from the neighboring mountains and sold on the 
streets as medicine." (Meyer.) 

23006. Buddleia asiatica Lour. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 303, May 15, 1008.) A very 
ornamental plant for winter flowering in a moderately warm greenhouse; 
has beautiful white drooping racemes, and the potted plants can be used 
very advantageously in decorative work. It needs about the same cul- 
tural treatment as the Euphcjrbia pulcherrima Willd. — that is, it needs a 
rest in spring and to be kept dry ; after that the old plants can be cut 
back or young plants can be made from the young sprouts." (Meyer. ) 

23007. Prunus japonica Thunb. ( ?) 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang. China. "(No. 000, June 28, 1007.) A low 
shrub with elliptical, lanceolate leaves, covered in spring with masses of 
small, double, rosy flowers ; much used in forcing during the Chinese holi- 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 55 

22974 to 23038— Continued. 

- days (January and February) ; may also be used for planting out in beds 
or rockeries. Chinese name Bat loa." {Meyer.) 

23008. Viburnum tomentosum Tbunb. 

From Hangchow, Cbebkiang, China. "(No. 670, June 28, 1907.) A 
Chinese snowball bearing masses of short, white umbels in early sum- 
mer; somewhat stiff in appearance, but still very ornamental; often 
grown in pots when dwarfed, but mostly seen as a garden shrub growing 
as high as 12 feet. Chinese name Geli dyo tsu." {Meyer.) 

23009. Rubus rosaefolius Smith. 

From Hangchow. Chehkiang, China. , "(No. 671, June 28, 1907.) 
Flowering in early summer with great masses of large, white, double 
flowers. Often grown in pots or tubs; also seen in gardens, where it has 
been planted for covering up an old wall or an unsightly place. Spreads 
rapidly through the ground by means of its suckers. Chinese name Yang 
rhiny yen teung." (Meyer.) 

23010. Larix sp. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 672, June 28, 1907.) A 
pretty larch much grown as a pot plant when dwarfed ; if planted out, it 
grows into a medium-sized tree. Seems to be able to grow on sterile 
mountain sides and may be fit for forestation purposes in the southeastern 
United States. Chinese name Citing ■sung.'''' {Meyer.) 

23011. Lychnis fulgens Fisch. (?) 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 673. June 28, 1907.) An 
herbaceous perennial of a dwarfy habit, bearing brilliant scarlet flowers. 
Grown as an ornamental pot plant by the Chinese. Chinese name San 
dia Jau gang." {Meyer.) 

23012. BUXUS SEMPERVIRENS L. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 674. June 28, 1907.) Var. 
lanceolata. Mostly grown as a dwarf tree in vessels; also seen in gardens 
as a shrub or small tree, clipped or twisted in many grotesque shapes. 
Reaches a great age, several centuries. The wood is used in the manu- 
facture of fine combs and knife handles. Chinese name Kua tse huang 
yang." {Meyer.) 

23013. (Undetermined.) 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 675. June 28, 1907.) An 
evergreen shrub, probably growing into a small tree; bears greenish 
white, bell-shaped flowers; grown in pots when dwarfed; seen rarely as a 
garden shrub. Chinese name Mou li." (Meyer.) 

23014. Asparagus sp. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 676. June 28, 1907.) A 
very small, herbaceous asparagus, attaining a height of only :'» t<> 5 inches; 
is used as a lining along paths in small gardens: requires a shady situa- 
tion." {Meyer.) 

23015. Asparagus sp. 

From Soochow. Kiangsn. China. "(No. 677. Apr. 26. 1908.) A 
feathery, graceful, herbaceous asparagus: grown as an ornamental pot 
plant in shady situations. Chinese name Wen chu." (Meyer.) 
142 



56 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

22974 to 23038 Continued. 

23016. ASPARAGUS sp. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 678, May 12, 1908.) A plumy, 
herbaceous asparagus, used as an ornamental pot plant and as cut green in 
bouquets; requires a shady situation." I Meyer.) 

23017. Pints BUNG] w \ Zucc. Pine. 

Prom Taiyuanfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 679, Mar. L3, 1908.) The beau- 
tiful and striking white-barked pine tree, growing to be very old, perhaps 
up to twenty centuries. These trees are said to come from Honan. Chi- 
nese nam*' Pot kua sung shu." i Meyer.) 

23018. Pinus bungeana Zucc. Pine. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 680, Mar. 31, 1908.) 
These trees are said to come from central Shansi. For further remarks 
see preceding number (S. P. I. No. 23017)." {Meyer.) 

23019. Pints bungeana Zucc. Pine. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 681, Apr. 26, 1008.) These 
trees are called here Pai pu sung. For further remarks see Nos. 679 and 
680 (S. P. I. Nos. 23017 and 23018)/* (Meyer.) 

23020. Abies sp. Fir. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 682, June 1, 1908.) 
A rare, bluish fir, valued highly by the Chinese. Probably very hardy in 
the drier regions of the United States. Chinese name Lou han sung 
shu." {Meyer.) 

23021. Abies sp. Fir. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 683, Apr. 3, 1908.) The same as 
the preceding number tS. P. I. No. 23020) ; as such see remarks applying 
to it." {Meyer.) 

23022. Juniperus sp. Juniper. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 684, Mar. 31, 1908.) 

A very rare, ornamental variety of juniper of a deep bluish color; not 

hardy north, and in winter should be stored in a cool greenhouse. These 

specimens are grafted on to Thuya orientalis. Chinese name Tsui 6ai" 

{Meyer.) 

23023. Juniperus sp. Juniper. 
From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 685. Apr. 3, 1908.) A specimen 

of remarkable beauty, also grafted, apparently. Said to come from south- 
western Shantung. For further remarks see preceding number (S. P. I. 
No. 23022)." {Meyer.) 

23024. Ctjpbessus funebris Endl. (';) 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 086, Mar. 31, 1908.) 
A rare, drooping Thuya, grafted upon Thuya orientalis. Beloved by the 
Chinese on account of its queer, characteristic appearance. Not hardy : 
in winter should be put in a cool greenhouse. Chinese name Hsien bay." 
(Meyer.) 

23025. Juniperus chinensis fendula Franchet. 

From Fengtai. near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 687. Mar. 31, 1908.) 
A rare and graceful weeping juniper, grafted upon Thuya orientalis-. 
Not hardy, in winter should be kept in a cool greenhouse. Chinese 
name Ying lou sung." {Meyer,) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 57 

22974 to 23038— Continued. 

23026. Ephedra sp. 

From Taiyuenfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 688, Mar. 13, 1908.) The rare 
and strange horsetail plant. A hardy, evergreen garden shrub, for arid 
regions. These plants are said to come from Houau. Chinese name Ma 
ichou sung." (Meyer.) 

23027. Euonymus sp. 

From Taiyuenfu, Shansi, China. "(No. 689, Mar. 31, 1908.) A semi- 
evergreen Euonymus, loaded in winter with white capsules, out of which 
peep scarlet berries. Grown drawfed in pots and fit for table decora- 
tion during the winter holidays. This plant may not be quite hardy 
north, as the Chinese keep it in a frostproof cellar in winter. Chinese 
name Shi yuen mae." (Meyer.) 

23028. Citrus limonum Risso (?) Lemon. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 690, Mar. 31, 1908.) 
Ornamental lemon. This lemon is grown as a pot plant when dwarfed, 
and is very much appreciated by the Chinese higher classes as a decora- 
tive plant in winter. At that season a small plant often has a dozen 
large lemons hanging on its branches and sometimes sells for $10. 
Protect from frost. Can be slipped in sandy soil in flat pots. Chinese 
name Hsien yuang." (Meyer.) 

23029. Lonicera sp. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 691, Apr. 3, 1908.) A dwarf 
honeysuckle grown in pots as an ornamental plant. The flowers are re- 
markably fragrant in the evening. Seems to be semitender, as the 
Chinese keep them in pits in winter. Chinese name Ching yin hua." 
( Meyer. ) 

23030. Syringa oblata Lindl. (?) Lilac. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 692, Mar. 31, 1908.) 
A fragrant, ornamental, large, purple-flowered lilac, growing into a big 
bush or a small tree; very drought resistant. Chinese name Tse ling 
hsien. This variety and the following one (S. P. I. No. 23031) are often 
grafted in central China upon high-stemmed Ligustrum lucidum, making 
then a fine effect." (Meyer.) 

23031. Syringa oblata Lindl. (?) Lilac. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 693, Mar. 31, 1908. ) 
A medium-sized, white-flowering lilac. See preceding number (S. P. I. 
No. 23030) for remarks. Chinese name Pai ting hsien." (Meyer.) 

23032. Syringa sp. Lilac. 
From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli. China. "(No. 694, Mar. 31, 1908.) 

A small-leaved lilac, bearing many panicles of purple flowers, grafted 
upon a small-leaved privet. Used much in forcing; quite rare and expen- 
sive; not hardy. Chinese name Shau ting hsien." (Meyer.) 

23033. Syringa sp. Lilac. 
From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 695, Apr. 3. 1908.) A small- 
leaved lilac, the same species as the preceding number i S. P. I. No. 
23032), but apparently of slightly different colors. There are two white- 
flowering ones among them; otherwise the same remarks apply to it as 
to No. 694 (S. P. I. No. 23032). Keep them protected from heavy frosts. 

142 



58 -l i t)S \N D PLANTS I MPOETED. 

22974 to 23038 Continued. 

Has a future for ih<> western people as n very graceful, spring-flowering 
shrub of dwarfy habits." i \l< yer. i 

23034. Rosa xanthine Lindl. Rose. 

From Fengtal, near Peking, Chlhli, China. "(No. <*»'•»»'». Mar. 31, 1908.) 
A yellow rose, remarkably hardy, resisting droughl and extremes of dry 
heal and dry <-(.i«i to an unusual degree. For further remarks see Not. 
67, 68, and 254 (S. P. [. Nos. 17469 and 22452)." I Meyer.} 

23035. Rosa sp. Rose. 
From Tientsin, Chihli, china. "(No. 697, Apr. ::. 1908.) A red rose 

aid to be very floriferous, but the flowers are small. Hardy in the 
uncongenial climate of Tientsin, where it passes the winter unprotected 
in the open. Chinese name Ten hong shoo met kwei." {Meyer.) 

23036. Rosa sp. Rose. 
From Soochow, Kiangsu, china. "(No. 698, Apr. 26, 1908.) Small- 
leaved red rose; rare. Chinese name Bong si ya chi." {Meyer.) 

23037. Rosa sp. Rose. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 699, Apr. 2G, 1908.) Sniall- 

flowered white rose. Apparently a rambler. Chinese name Pat si ya 
rh\r {Meyer.) 

23038. Rosa sp. Rose. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 700, Apr. 26, 1908.) Small- 
flowered yellow rose. Apparently a rambler. Chinese name Hwang si 
ya cJii." < Meyer.) 

23039. Enterolobium cyclocarpdm (Jacq.) Griseb. 

From Gorgona, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. V. Allan Ruther- 
ford. Received June 3, 1908. 
"This tree grows 40 feet high, covering a radius of 20 to 30 feet, and forms 
a beautiful shade. It bears a pod about 5 to 6 inches and is good food for 
cattle. There are other peculiar features of the tree that make it valuable for 
shade; when 4 or 5 years old it is from 25 to 30 feet high. I think this tree 
would make a fine shade tree for the South and Southwestern States, where 
there is so much prairie land." {Rutherford.) (See No. 11592 for further 
description.) 

23040. Cacara erosa (L.) Kuntze. Hicama. 
From San Juan. P. R. Presented by Mr. Wm. Allan, through Mr. C. V. 

Piper. Received June 23, 1908. 
See No. 22971 for description. 

23041 to 23199. Sola mm tuberosum L. Potato. 

From Chile. South America. Procured by Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida 
via Molina, Chile, at the request of Prof. L. C. Corbett. Received June 
24. 19i is. 

The following tubers, descriptions of varieties by Mr. W. V. Shear: 
23041 to 23086. 

From the archipelago of Chiloe. " The archipelago of Chiloe is situ- 
ated in the southern part of Chile and is the indigenous home of potato 
tubers {Solanum tuberosum). It is from here that the Spanish obtained 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 



59 



23041 to 23199— Continued. 
23041 to 23086— Continued. 

the potatoes which they took to Spain early in the sixteenth century, and 
thereby gave to the civilized world the ' Irish ' potatoes of Chilean 
nativity. The flavors, size, forms, abundant production, and general ex- 
cellence of 'Chiloe potatoes' are well known and justly famous; un- 
equal ed and unapproached in any part of the world, they stand alone as 
the highest classed potatoes known. It is surprising that all these 
beauteous tubers still remain solely in their original birthplace. The 
Chilenos have been and are still indifferent to the class of potatoes they 
plant and eat. The remoteness of Chiloe and the want of kindred condi- 
tions to produce like results elsewhere may play a part in the fact that 
Chiloe potatoes are to be found only in Chiloe. Island intercommunica- 
tion is rare and extremely hazardous. Swift ocean currents run riot 
among them and there are also unknown rocks, exposing the voyager to 
perils of no ordinary character. Commerce is infrequent and deficient, 
as well as extremely limited, except in parts of the island of Chiloe itself. 
Rare and dangerous navigation is costly. Potatoes are the sole food of 
the inhabitants. They make bread of pounded raw potatoes mixed with 
a little grease. There are over 250 known wild varieties, so long culti- 
vated as to have become classes of potatoes in the island of Chiloe alone, 
without considering the archipelago of Guaitecas and Chonos and the 
hundreds of islands which form the grand archipelago of Chiloe. The 
following are different wild varieties of Solatium tuberosum, which have 
become fixed classes by long cultivation." (Husbands.) 

23041. Small, oblong, violet-colored tubers. 

23042. Medium-sized, yellowish, round to oblong, flattened tubers. 

23043. Medium-sized, long, cylindrical, white tubers. 

23044. Round to oblong violet tubers. 

23045. Small, roundish, uneven, deep-eyed, purple tubers. 

23046. Small, oblong, uneven, deep-eyed, violet tubers. 

23047. Medium-sized, round, deep-eyed, violet tubers. 

23048. Medium-sized, oblong, compressed, deep-eyed, mottled 

violet and cream tubers. 

23049. Large, roundish, smooth, white tubers, flattened on one 

side near stem end. 

23050. Medium-sized, oblong, white tubers. 

23051. Small, roundish, uneven, mottled violet tubers. 

23052. Medium-sized, uneven, compressed, deep-dyed, pinkish 

mottled, russet tubers. 

23053. Medium-sized, oblong, shallow-eyed, pink tubers. 

23054. Medium-sized, roundish flattened, pink tubers. 

23055. Long, cylindrical, white tubers. 

23056. Medium-sized, round to oblong, compressed, violet tubers. 

23057. Small to medium-sized, roundish oblong, somewhat flat- 

tened, yellow tubers. 

23058. Medium-sized, round, flattened, medium deep eyed, mot- 

tled purple and yellow tubers. 

23059. Medium-sized, round to oblong, uneven, white tubers. 
142 



60 



SKKDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



23041 to 23199— Continued. 

23041 to 23086— Continued. 

23060. Medium-sized, oblong, white tubers. 

23061. Medium-sized, round to oblong, lighl violet mottled tubers. 

23062. Round to oblong violet-mottled tubers. 

23063. Small, found to oblong, white tubers. 

23064. Small, round, deep-eyed, yellow tubers. 

23065. Medium-sized, round, yellow tubers. 

23066. Medium-sized, cylindrical, pink tubers. 

23067. Medium-sized, round, uneven, deep-eyed, yellow tulters. 

23068. Medium-sized, roundish flattened, violet tubers. 

23069. Large, round, flattened, shallow-eyed, yellow tubers. 

23070. Medium-sized, round to oblong, violet-mottled tubers. 

23071. Small, oblong, white tubers. 

23072. Small, round, white tubers. 

23073. Large, oblong, somewhat flattened, yellow tubers. 

23074. Medium-sized, oblong, white, violet-tinged tubers. 

23075. Small, round, yellow tubers. 

23076. Large, oblong, flattened, mottled violet and white, shallow- 

eyed tubers. 

23077. Medium-sized, round, uneven, deep-eyed, mottled violet 

and yellow tubers. 

23078. Medium-sized, round, uneven, deep-eyed, pink tubers 

23079. Medium-sized, uneven, white tubers. 

23080. Medium-sized, round, deep-eyed, pinkish yellow tubers. 

23081. Large, smooth, oblong, somewhat flattened, yellow tubers. 

Handsome. 

23082. Medium-sized, round to oblong, somewhat flattened, yel- 

lowish tubers. 

23083. Small, round, deep-eyed, yellow tubers. 

23084. Small, oblong, somewlfat flattened, yellow tubers. 

23085. Medium-sized, round to oblong, smooth, yellow tubers. 

23086. Round to oblong, deep-eyed, pink tubers. 

23087 to 23103. 

From archipelago of Chiloe. " Wild sorts annually resow their seeds, 
producing, by nature's care alone, limitless thousands of undomesticated 
tubers of every color and form, all of which are delicious eating. Among 
the islands there are new and distinct strains, whose tubers and plants 
have no similarity to known varieties. I gathered one. It had a snow- 
white skin with small, bright crimson eyes which were shaded with dark 
crimson. The flesh was sweet as sugar. The plant was upright, thick, 
and waxlike ; the leaves were like a three-leafed clover ; no one would 
have taken it for a potato plant. This, as well as many other kinds of 
wild potatoes, matures in the spring month of October, equivalent to 
May in the United States. All endure hard frosts, but the ground is 
never frozen. They remain in the wet about five months during the 
continuous rains of a Chilean winter, and seem to like it. In this collec- 
tion there are many potatoes having a like form and appearance; they 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 61 

23041 to 23199— Continued. 
23087 to 23103— Continued. 

are not duplicates, but are taken from different islands, or at a great 
distance upon the mainland, each under separate and different condi- 
tions of soil, plant food, moisture, etc. Tubers of medium to small size 
are included. Wild potatoes are especially fine baked. Seedlings are 
inclined to dissolve when boiled, more especially the black-skinned kinds, 
until after they have been cultivated a year or two. 

" This collection is totally unknown to any botanist in Chile or to anyone 
except in parts of the several localities where found. Even these people 
seemed surprised to learn they had so many kinds of potatoes growing 
unknown about them. Many thousands have been dug to make up this 
assortment. All wild seedlings show some difference, but generally not 
sufficient to be classed as new strains. It would be wise, however, to 
plant all that grow here but for the expense and difficulties of transporta- 
tion inland. Travel is confined to horseback. It is laborious and per- 
plexing to properly arrange and transport large quantities of such tubers 
in a condition fit to send to the United States. They resent the slightest 
bruise. I do not give the names of potatoes sent, as they have no sig- 
nificance, being local names from the Chilote Indian dialect. In other 
districts having other tribes the same tubers are called by other names 
having no general meaning; local appellations are omitted. The potatoes 
sent are but selections from many kinds in their native, indigenous, 
uncultivated state." (Husbands.) 

23087. Small, oblong, yellow, smooth tubers. 

23088. Small, oblong, deep-eyed, mottled violet and yellow tubers. 

23089. Small, round, violet-colored tubers. 

23090. Small, round, violet tubers. 

23091. Long, slender, cylindrical, violet tubers. 

23092. Small, round, uneven, purple tubers. 

23093. Medium-sized, oblong, pink, rather deep eyed tubers. 

Large enough for food. 

23094. Long, curved, cylindrical, numerous and deep eyed, violet 

and white tubers. 

23095. Small, round, yellow tubers. 

23096. Small, round, flattened, pink tubers. 

23097. Small, oblong-conical, pink tubers. 

23098. Small, round to oblong, mottled pink and yellow tubers. 

23099. Small, round, pinkish yellow tubers. 

23100. Small, roundish flattened, violet tubers. 

23101. Small, round, yellow tubers. 

23102. Small, oblong, pinkish yellow tubers. 

23103. Long, cylindrical, somewbat curved, deep purple tubers. 

23104 to 23114. 

From the mainland along the coast of the province of Valdivia. " In 
the mountainous southern province of Valdivia grow potatoes of other 
sorts, but still of rare excellence as to flavor, form, size, and yield. These 
are selected as samples representing the many kinds to be had there. 
Those along the coast are said to be of a richer flavor or sweeter taste 

142 



62 SEEDS \M> PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

23041 to 23199 Continued. 
23104 to 23114 < kratinued. 

than those of the Interior. To me, they are not unlike the Chilotes. How- 
ever, I have tested so many kinds lately that they all taste alike for the 
in ent Son C these are extra early; none very late. En (ins prov- 
ince their names are from the Mapocho [ndian dialect. The following are 
wild varieties which have become permanenl strains by long cultivation." 
( Husbands, i 

23104. Large, round, deep-eyed, yellowish white tubers. 

23105. Small, round, somewhal uneven, while tubers. 

23106. Medium-sized, round, somewhat uneven, yellow tubers. 

23107. Very long, rather uneven, cylindrical, pinkish yellow 

tubers. 

23108. Small, oblong, while tubers. 

23109. Medium-sized, dumb-bell shaped, violet-colored tubers. 

23110. Medium-sized, round, uneven, yellow tubers. 

23111. Medium-sized, round, uneven, white and violet tubers. 

23112. Large, oblong, violet-colored tubers. 

23113. Medium-sized, oblong, white tubers. 

23114. Long, curved, cylindrical, numerous-eyed tubers. 
23115 to 23120. 

From the interior of the province of Valdivia. "Potatoes grown in 
the interior of the province of Valdivia have no especial peculiarities to 
describe except that they are of extra good form and very productive. 
While said to be of less flavor and merit than those of the coast. I believe 
that they are equal in quality, but have different flavors. In the entire 
south of Chile, including Chiloe. potatoes having red, yellow, or white 
skins with yellow flesh are the sweetest; boiled, baked, or fried, they are 
delicious. The mimes are Mapocho. The following are wild varieties 
which have become established classes by long cultivation." (Husbands.) 

23115. Large, smooth, oblong, white tubers. 

23116. Medium-sized, oblong, white tubers, 

23117. Medium-sized, pink-colored tubers. 

23118. Compound, medium-sized, light violet colored tubers. 

23119. Large and small, oblong, flattened, smooth, white tubers. 

23120. Medium-sized, round, somewhat flattened, smooth, yellow 

tubers. 
23121 to 23134. 

From the province of Valdivia, both coastwise and from the interior. 
" In wild varieties of potatoes the black predominate, nearly all of which 
mature in the springtime. There are many kinds formed and new ones 
constantly being created by self-sown seeds. Like all wild Chile potatoes 
they are extra-fine eating. If planted they increase in size for 4 or 5 
consecutive years, at which time they reach perfection of size and fixed 
flavors, and may be considered as standard classes of potatoes. The fol- 
lowing are still different wild, uncultivated varieties." (Husbands.) 

23121. Very small, round, purple tubers. 

23122. Small, round, white tubers. 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 63 

23041 to 23199— Continued. 
23121 to 23134— Continued. 

23123. Small, uneven, violet-colored tubers. 

23124. Very small, round, pinkish yellow tubers. 

23125. Very small, round, violet-colored tubers. 

23126. Small, round, uneven, pink tubers. 

23127. Small, round, yellow tubers. 

23128. Small, round, uneven, mottled violet and yellow tubers. 

23129. Very small, round tubers; some white, some violet, and 

some purple with yellow eyes. 

23130. Small, round, mottled purple and yellow tubers. 

23131. Small, round, purple tubers. 

23132. Small, long, cylindrical, purple tubers. 

23133. Small, round, pinkish yellow tubers. 

23134. Small, compound, yellow tubers. 
23135 to 23160. 

From the far interior in the vicinity of the volcano Llima. " The fol- 
lowing are two-year-old seedlings; are a rare lot and all of superb 
quality. Some are extra-long keepers and do not sprout until planting 
time, when they are still hard and sound as when harvested. 

" These are all distinct varieties. Some have very little plant growth 
and are great yielders. They will continue to improve by planting. Many 
are regular in size. In this province potatoes bear names from the 
Pehuencha Indian dialect." (Husbands.) 

23135. Medium-sized, compound, violet-vellow tubers. 

23136. Small, round, violet tubers. 

23137. Small, round, white tubers. 

23138. Medium-sized, round to oblong, yellow, deep-eyed tubers. 

23139. Small, oblong, violet tubers. 

23140. Medium-sized, pinkish yellow, deep-eyed tubers. 

23141. Medium-sized, oblong, smooth, violet-colored tubers. 

23142. Small, round to oblong, smooth, yellow tubers. 

23143. Very small, round, violet-colored tubers. 

23144. Very small, round, smooth, violet-colored tubers. 

23145. Medium-sized, uneven, deep-eyed, yellow tubers. 

23146. Medium-sized, uneven, yellowish tubers. 

23147. Small, round, smooth, yellowish tubers. 

23148. Small, round, smooth, some yellowish and some violet- 

colored tubers. 

23149. Medium-sized, oblong, yellowish tubers. 

23150. Medium-sized, smooth, round, violet-colored tubers. 

23151. Medium-sized, round, smooth, medium deep eyed, violet- 

yellow tubers. 

23152. Medium-sized, oblong, smooth, many medium deep eyed, 

yellowish tubers. "A long keeper." 

23153. Small, round, mottled violet and yellow tubers. 
142 



64 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23041 to 23199— Continued. 
23135 to 23160— Continued. 

23154. Medium sized, oblong, flattened, violet tubers. 

23155. Medium-sized, small, oblong, smooth, shallow-eyed, netted- 

skinned, violet-tinged tubers. 

23156. Small, round, violet-tinged tubers. 

23157. Small, oblong, yellowish tubers. 

23158. Medium-sized, oblong, flattened, smooth, violet-colored 

tubers. 

23159. Medium-sized, round, somewhat uneven, yellowish tubers. 

23160. Medium-sized, oblong, numerous and deep-eyed, yellowish 

tubers. 
23161. 

From the far interior in the vicinity of the volcano Llima. "A potato 
from the United States which by being cultivated in Chile has completely 
changed its shape and flavor. These are sent as samples of what changes 
may be made by transplanting from a distant part to another having 
distinct and different conditions in climate, seasons, soil foods, etc. For 
example, from seaward to remote inland; plain to mountain; and vice 
versa." (Husbands.) 

Large, smooth, oblong, flattened, white tubers. 

23162. 

"A potato from Germany. Originally a round, black-skinned variety. 
Grown but one year in Chile: still, changes have already commenced." 
(Husbands.) 

Medium-sized, oblong, pale violet colored, smooth tubers. 

23163. 

"A potato from England, Nignum bonum. Long cultivated in Chile, 
it has completely changed by deterioration instead of the usual improve- 
ment. From among those taken from the hills, as planted and grown, 
are found ill-shaped, worthless sorts, suggesting that it has grown back 
to the worst wild varieties." (Husbands.) 

Small, white, round to oblong tubers. 

23164. 

"A southern Chilean potato of a very fine kind, but its irregular shape 
made it almost useless. Being from the mountainous interior, I removed 
it to a point far distant upon the seacoast and am making a good-shaped 
tuber of it." (Husbands.) 

Medium-sized, oblong, pointed, smooth, shallow-eyed, violet-pink tuber. 
23165. 

"A Chilean potato of unknown origin." (Husbands.) 

Very large, oblong, violet-colored tubers. 
23166. 

"Papas Blanco*, white potato. The class most generally cultivated in 
central Chile." (Husbands.) 

Medium-sized, oblong, white, numerous, and rather deep-eyed tubers. 
23167 to 23199. 

' Seeds are very scarce at the time potatoes should be gathered. All 
the following are worth sowing and the seedlings planted and replanted 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 65 

23041 to 23199— Continued. 

23167 to 23199— Continued. 

again before throwing them aside. Many a great roan was once a worth- 
less baby." (Husbands.) 

23167 to 23169. 

Seed of cultivated kinds. 
23170 and 23171. 

Seed from cultivated seedlings. 

23172 to 23194. 

Seed from wild varieties. 
23195 to 23198. 

Seed from Chiloe, wild varieties. 
23199. 

Seed of a wild variety. 

23201. Melixis mixutiflora Beauv. 

From Sao Paulo, Brazil. Presented by Dr. H. M. Lane, president, Mackenzie 
College, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received June 22, 1908. 

"This is known as Capim catingueiro, or melado, or gordura, one of the best 
forage grasses of this section. It grows well on poor ground and will stand long 
absence of rain. It also makes good hay." (Lane.) 

23202. Litchi chixexsis Sonner. Leitchee. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Procured by Mr. J. E. Higgins, horticulturist, 
Hawaii Experiment Station. Received June 25, 1908. 

"Seeds of the large-seeded variety." (Higgins.) (For description see Nos. 
10670 to 10673, 14888, and 16237 to 16243.) 

23203. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Turkestan. Purchased from Mr. H. W. Duerrschmidt, Tashkend, 
Turkestan. Received June 24, 1908. 

Turkestan. " Werny or Tschilik alfalfa, from the most northern alfalfa- 
producing part of Turkestan." (Duerrschmidt.) 

23204. Trigoxella foenum-graecum L. Fenugreek. 

From Tunis, Tunis. Presented by Mr. F. Foex, National School of Agri- 
culture, Mexico City, Mexico. Received June 15, 1908. 

See No. 7029 for description. 

23205. Glycixe hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Shanghai. Kiangsu, China. Presented by Dr. S. P. Barchet, inter- 
preter, American consulate. Received June 30, 1908. 

"Similar in appearance to Ebony, No. 17254." (Nielsen.) 

"An important bean for dry rice land. Chinese name Pu chi." (Barchet.) 

23206. Cucumis melo L. 

From Afghanistan. Presented by Mr. L. A. Ault, president, The Ault & 
Wiborg Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. Received June 29, 1908. 

" I ran across this melon in Peshawar, and taken altogether it is the most 
delicious fruit in the way of a melon that I have ever tasted." (Ault.) 

61160— Bui. 142—09 5 



66 SEEDS AM» PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

23207 to 23232. 

From China. Received through Mr. Prank x. Meyer, agricultural explorer, 
and broughl by him to the Plant introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., June, 
1908. Forwarded to Washington, I ». C, and received July <;. 1908. 
The following seeds: 

23207. GLYCIN] hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, china. "(No. 960a, Apr. 27, 1907. > A large, 
greenish soy bean, grown around Soochow on the rather low-lying lands. 
Used when slightly sprouted as a vegetable. Chinese name Tsin tou." 
( Meyer.) 

23208. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. " (No. 061a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A large, 
yellow soy bean, often purplish colored on one side. Considered locally 
a very good variety. Chinese name xiun chu tou. Grows on the ridges 
around inundated rice fields." {Meyer.) 

23209. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. " (No. 062a, Apr. 20, 1008.) The or- 
dinary variety of yellow soy bean as grown around Tangsi on the ridges 
and strips of land around and between inundated rice fields. Chinese 
name Huang tou." (Meyer.) 

23210. Phaseoltjs angulams (Willd.) W. F. Wight. (Dolichos an- 
gularis Willd.) 

From Tangsi. Chehkiang, China. "(No. 003a, Apr. 20, 1008.) Different 
varieties of small beans, grown by the Chinese on the higher lands in the 
neighborhood of Tangsi. Used as a vegetable when sprouted; also boiled 
in soups, and when pounded up with sugar it is used as a sweetmeat in 
cakes and pastry. Chinese name CM tou." (Meyer.) 

23211. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 064a, Apr. 20, 1008.) A very 
dark brown colored soy bean, grown near Tangsi ; said to be very pro- 
ductive. Chinese name Tsze pi tou." [Meyer.) 

23212. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 065a, Apr. 24, 1908.) An 
early-ripening, yellow soy beau, called the sixth month's bean, meaning 
ripening in the Chinese sixth month (our July). Chinese name Lu ya 
put mou tou." (Meyer.) 

23213. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 066a, Apr. 24, 1908.) A 
yellow soy bean called the seventh month's bean, meaning ripening in the 
Chinese seventh month (our August). Called in Chinese Chi ya pal mou 
tou." (Meyer.) 

23214. Vigxa sesqtjipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 067a, Apr. 20, 1908.) Chinese 
string beans, used as a green vegetable like the western kinds. Chinese 
name Chang Tciang tou." (Meyer.) 

23215. Dolichos lablab L. 

From Tangsi. Chehkiang, China. "(No. 068a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A white 
bean which is mostly grown for its green pods, which are sliced or broken 
and when boiled furnish an agreeable vegetable. The dried beans are 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 67 

23207 to 23232— Continued. 

also sparingly used in soups, but only by the better classes, as they are 
rather expensive. Chinese name Pai pien tou." (Meyer.) 

23216. Caxavali exsiforme (L.) DC. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 969a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A very 
rare edible bean, used mainly as a stomach-strengthening food, and for 
this reason only to be had in medicine shops. Said to be an erect 
grower (?). Chinese name Tan tou." {Meyer.) 

23217. Stizolobium sp. (?) 

From Mokanshan, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 970a, Apr. 22, 1908.) A 
wild climbing bean found in a thicket. The pods are covered with 
bristling hairs, which break off easily in one's skin, but do not cause any 
harm." {Meyer.) 

23218. Sapitjm sebiferum (L.) Roxb. Tallow tree. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 971a, Apr. 23, 1908.) The 
tallow tree, the seeds of which yield a valuable fatty substance. Grown 
extensively along the canals in the Chehkiang Province. The best varie- 
ties are top-grafted upon seedling stock." {Meyer.) 

23219. Fibmiana simplex (L.) W. F. Wight. (Hibiscus simplex L.) 

(Sterculia plataxifolia L. f. ) 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 972a, Apr. 27, 1908.) Seeds of 
a tree called in Chinese Wu tuny tsze; they are sold in one or two shops 
as a delicatesse, but are not very tasty. They may turn out to be the 
ordinary Firmiana simplex (L.) (Hibiscus simplex L.), which is a great 
favorite with the Chinese as a shade tree in temple gardens and in court- 
yards." (Meyer. ) 

23220. TlXUS KORAIENSIS S. & Z. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 973a, Apr. 27, 1908.) Sold as 
a delicatesse by a few shops, and as such they are not bad. Said to come 
from Shantung, but I suspect them to have been collected in eastern 
Siberia from Pinus mandshurica or an allied form. Chinese name Sung 
tsze." (Meyer.) 

23221. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 
From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 974a, Apr. 24, 190S.) Said 

to be a very fine variety of yellow-fleshed watermelon. Grown around 
Hangchow on rather low lands. Chinese name Huang si leua." (Meyer.) 

23222. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 
From Tangsi, Chehkiang. China. "(No. 975a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A water- 
melon with yellow flesh, said to be good; growing on low fields around 
Tangsi. Chinese name Huang lien Tcua." (Meyer.) 

23223. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 
From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 976a, Apr. 24. 1908.) Said 

to be a very fine white-fleshed watermelon. Grown around Hangchow on 
rather low lands. Chinese name Pai si Icua." (Meyer.) 

23224. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 
From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 977a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A white- 
fleshed watermelon, grown on low fields around Tangsi. Chinese name 
San pai tsa Icua:' (Meyer.) 

142 



68 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23207 to 23232— Continued. 

23225. Citbullxts VULGABIS Schradl Watermelon. 
Fr«»m Tangsl, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 978a, Apr. 20, 1908.) A red- 

meated watermelon, grown <>n lowlands around Tangsi. Chinese name 
Wit pi hong lien kua, 

"The region around Tangsl is famous for Its good watermelons. Test 
Xes. 975a, 977a, and 978a (S. P. I. Nos. 23222 23224, and 23225) on low- 
hinds in the South." I Meyer,) 

23226. Astragalus sin his I.. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 970a, Apr. 24, 1908.) A 
red-flowered leguminous plant; grows wild on lowlands; is also used as a 
fertilization crop on low-lying fields, being plowed under as a fertilizer 
for rice. The young leaves are much eaten as a vegetable. Chinese name 
Huang tsai." (Meyer.) 

23227. Astragalus sinicus L. 

From Hangchow, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 980a, Apr. 24, 1908.) A 
leguminous plant, said to bear red flowers, probably a form of No. 
979a (S. P. I. No. 23220) ; as such give it the same treatment. Chinese 
name Hong tsai, which is probably fictitious." (Meyer.) 

23228. Sesamum orientale L. Sesame. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 981a, Apr. 4, 1908.) White 
sesame seed for a trial in the semiarid Southwestern States. These 
seeds contain a fine, sw r eet oil, excellent for culinary purposes. The seeds 
themselves can be • used in the making of candies, taffies, and as a 
sprinkling on cakes. Chinese name Pax tse ma." (Meyer.) 

23229. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Tientsin, Chihli, China. "(No. 982a, Apr. 4, 1908.) A dark 

brown colored soy bean ; rare. Said to grow near Tientsin. Used for 

human food ; boiled in soups or as a vegetable when slightly sprouted. 
Chinese name Tse doll." (Meyer.) 

23230. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kowliang. 

Brown. 

From Chusan Islands, China. "(No. 983a, April, 1908.) A tall-grow- 
ing variety of sorghum, coming from the Chusan Islands, called Chang 
tsun. Obtained from Dr. S. P. Barchet at Shanghai, China." (Meyer.) 

23231. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kowliang. 

Brown. 

From Chusan Islands, China. "(No. 984a, April, 1908.) A dwarfy 
form of a sorghum, coming from the Chusan Islands, called Titan tsun. 
Obtained from Dr. S. P. Barchet at Shanghai, China." (Meyer.) 

23232. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 985a, May 11, 1908.) The 
Ba relict soy bean, growing on wet rice lands. Chinese name Ma Xiao ton. 
Obtained through Dr. S. P. Barchet, of Shanghai, who procured these 
soy beans from Chinhuafu, in the Chehkiang Province, central China." 
( Meyer. ) 

142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 69 

23233 to 23262. . Bamboo. 

From China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agricultural explorer, 
June, 190S, and brought by him from China to the Plant Introduction 
Garden, Chico, Cal. 

The following plants : 

23233. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 301, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo. Chinese name Mao tsoh. The largest and most common 
kind; attains a height of 100 feet and a diameter at its base of 6 to 8 
inches; grows only on mountain slopes, preferably in a rich red loam. 
Used in many, many ways ; for instance, in the manufacture of big lad- 
ders, water pipes, gutters, tiles on roofs, construction material for large 
sheds, etc." {Meyer.) 

23234. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 302, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo. Second in size of the timber bamboos ; grows in valleys 
and at the foot of mountains. Chinese name Tae tsoh. This is utilized 
in furniture manufacture and for poles and boat-hook handles." 
( Meyer. ) 

23235. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 303, autumn, 1907.) 
A timber bamboo, resembling very much the preceding one (S. P. I. No. 
23234). Grows on flat, level land and has a very open stand. Is used 
for tool handles, small light ladders, etc. Chinese name Tae tsoh and 
also Kang tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23236. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 304, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo, having long joints, but not a large-growing kind. Much 
used for basket manufacture when the stems have been split up in long, 
narrow, flexible strips. Chinese name Wang kon tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23237. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 305, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo, called the Stone bamboo, on account of the stems being 
very hard. Mostly used in the manufacture of fine bamboo furniture, 
it being a very strong kind. Chinese name Sah tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23238. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 306, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo. A variety called the Wooden bamboo, having solid 
stems. It is rather small but strong. Chinese name Moh tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23239. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 307, autumn, 1907.) 
A small but strong variety, called the Bitter bamboo. Chinese name 
Kow tsoh." (Meyer.) 
23240. Phyllostachys nigra (Lodd.) Munro. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 308, autumn, 1907.) 
Timber bamboo. A small but strong variety, growing on mountain 
slopes. Used for making walking canes, pipestems, and fancy articles. 
Chinese name Yu tsoh, meaning oil bamboo, on account of its shining 
stems." (Meyer.) 

142 



70 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23233 to 23262— Continued. 

23241. 

Prom vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, china. "<X<>. 309, autumn, 1907.) 
A bamboo growing od rich plains and producing edible shoots. Chinese 
name Mao tchin tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23242. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 310, autumn, 1007.) 
Vegetable bamboo. An edible bamboo growing on the plains, Chinese 

name Oo chin tSOh." (Metier.) 

23243. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, china. "(No. 311, autumn, 1907.) Vegetable 
bamboo. The ordinary edible bamboo grown in nearly every back yard 
in central China. Chinese name Pali l:oh poo chi." (Meyer.) 

23244. 

From Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 312, autumn, 1907.) Vegetable 
bamboo. Another common, edible bamboo, abounding on the plains. 
Chinese name Hua koli poo chfc" (Meyer.) 

23245. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 313, autumn, 1907.) 
Vegetable bamboo. A very early variety, producing edible sprouts. 
Chiuese name Tsao ri tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23246. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 314, autumn, 1907.) 
Ornamental bamboo, called the Purple bamboo, on account of having 
bronze reddish colored stems. Nice when in a clump. Chinese name 
Tsi tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23247. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 315, autumn, 1907.) 
Ornamental bamboo. The stems of this small, ornamental bamboo are 
used for pipestems and canes. Chinese name Mae loh tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23248. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 316, autumn, 1907.) 
Ornamental bamboo. The noted square bamboo, which is difficult to 
grow ; requires partial shade. The stems are used for canes and pipe- 
stems. Chinese name Fang tsoh.'" (Meyer.) 

23249. 

From vicinity of Tangsi, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 317, autumn, 1907.) 
Ornamental bamboo. A variety called the Honey bamboo. Chinese name 
Mih tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23250. 

From Tangsi. Chehkiang, China. "(No. 318, autumn, 1907.) A low- 
growing bamboo, the leaves of which are used for wrapping rice, flour, 
or millet dumplings, the same as the Mexicans use the hull leaves of the 
corncobs to boil their tamales in. Chinese name Tsong inah tsrjh." 1 
( Meyer. ) 

23251. 

From Ningpo, Chehkiang, China. "(No. 319, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Wu tsoh." (Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 71 

23233 to 23262— Continued. 

23252. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, China. "(No. 320, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Loong su tsok. A tall, yellow-stemmed variety." 

( Meyer. ) 

23253. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, China. "(No. 321, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Tsin tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23254. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. "(No. 322, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Huang ko tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23255. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. "(No. 323, autumn, 1907.) A bamboo 
from Ningpo, called Man tsoh." (Meyer.) 

23256. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. *"(No. 324, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Tan tsoh. A tall-growing, green-stemmed va- 
riety." (Meyer.) 

23257. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. "(No. 325, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Tszc tsoh. A tall, purple- stemmed variety." 
(Meyer.) 

23258. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. "(No. 32G, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo from Ningpo, called Mei lu tsoh. A variety having spotted sterns." 
( Meyer.) 

23259. 

From Ningpo, Cbebkiang, Cbina. "(No. 327, autumn, 1907.) A bam- 
boo fr<mi Ningpo, without name.'' (Meyer.) 

23260. 

From Hangchow. Cbebkiang, China. "(No. 328, June 28, 1907.) 
Square bamboo. Obtained from Dr. Duncan Main at Hangchow. For 
further remarks see No. 316 (S. P. I. No. 23248)." (Meyer.) 

23261. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chibli, China. "(No. 329, June 1, 1907, 
and Mar. 31, 1908.) The so-called Hardy bamboo, growing in gardens in 
and around Peking and Tientsin, where the climatic conditions are not 
what might be called favorable for the growth of bamboos. These plants 
may be trusted to be hardy as far north as Philadelphia, and can be 
' grown commercially farther south, perhaps, to supply flower stakes. 
Chinese name Chu tse." (Meyer.) 

23262. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. "(No. 330, Apr. 26, 190S.) A very 
dwarfy bamboo, grown in pots and other vessels as an ornamental plant 
where it rarely reaches over 1 foot in height; when planted out it seems 
to grow higher. Chinese name Feng pi chu." (Meyer.) 

142 



72 



SKKDS AND I'l.AN IS IMI'iHJTKD. 



23263. NOTHOFAGUS OBLIQUA (Mirk) Bl, 

From Santa [nes, Chile. Presented by Sefior Salvador Izquierdo. Re- 
eived June 29, L908. 

"The Roble of Chile, called Coy am i>y the original Inhabitants. It is a tall 
tree with a straighl stem, attaining '■'> t<» I feel diameter. The wood is heavy 
and durable, well adapted Cor posts, beams, girders, rafters, and joists, but not 

for flooring. One Of the few Chilean trees with deciduous foliage." (Doctor 
Philippi.) 



23267 to 23289. 

From Chile. South America. Presented by Mr. Jose D. Husbands, LimA- 
vida via Molina, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received June 24, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

23267. Zea mays L. Indian corn. 

23268. Xothofagus obliqua (Mirb.) Bl. " Chilean red oak." 
See No. 23263 for description. 

23269. Quillaja saponaria Mol. Quillai. 

"A colossal tree, fit not only for loamy but also sandy and peaty soil. 
The bark is rich in saponin, and therefore valuable for dressing wool and 
silk; also for various cleansing processes." (Von Mueller.) 

23270. Kageneckia oblonga Ruiz & Pav. Bollen. 

"This is allied to Quillaja saponaria, and provides tan bark locally." 
(Dr. J. A. de los Rios.) 

23271. Dbimys chilensis DC. Canelo. 

" This tree attains in river valleys a height of 60 feet. The wood is 
never attacked by insects. Bark used for medicinal purposes." (Extract 
from Von Mueller.) 

23272. Maytenus boaria Mol. 
See No. 3394 for description. 

23273. Crinodendron patagua Mol. 
See Xo. 3354 for description. 

23274. Rheum sp. (?) 

23275. Triticum polonicum L. (?) 

23276. Triticum polonicum L. (?) 

23277. Erodium moschatum (L.) L'Herit. 

23278. Melilotus indica (L.) All. 

23279. Melilotus indica (L.) All. 
23280 to 23284. Medicago arabica (L.) All. 

23285. (Undetermined.) 
Grass. 

23286. (Undetermined.) 
Grass. 

23287. Trifolium pratense L. 

23288. Trifolium sp. (?) 

23289. Trifolium pratense L. (?) 

"Wild pink clover." 
142 



Maiten. 



Patagua. 



Wheat. 

Wheat. 

Alfilerilla. 



Red clover. 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 73 

23290 to 23312. 

From China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agricultural ex- 
plorer, and brought by him to the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
June, 190S; forwarded to Washington, D. C, and received July 6, 1908. 

The following seeds : 

23290. Pistjm arvense L. Field pea. 
From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 921a, Feb. 26, 1908.) Peas 

used as a food, either sprouted or boiled as they are. Grow at 5,000 to 
6,000 feet elevation. Chinese name Wau doh." (Meyer.) 

23291. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 922a, Feb. 26, 1908.) Black 
soy bean, growing at 5,000 to 6,000 feet elevation. Are considered by the 
Chinese the best food for their hard-working mules and horses ; they 
must always be boiled before being fed to the animals; otherwise they 
may cause colic ; the Chinese also mix a liberal quantity of sorghum seed 
and chopped straw with these beans. Chinese name Gliae doh." (Meyer.) 

23292. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 923a, Feb. 26, 1908.) Yellow 
soy bean. Growing at 5,000 to 6,000 feet elevation. They are used all 
through northern China for making bean curd and bean vermicelli. 
Chinese name Huang doh.''' (Meyer.) 

23293. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 924a, Feb. 26, 1908.) Red 
beans, growing at 5,000 to 6,000 feet elevation ; they like a black, rich 
soil. Used as a vegetable when boiled. Chinese name Lien dolt.''' 
(Meyer.) 

23294. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 925a, Feb. 26, 1908.) A small 
horse bean, growing at 5,000 to 6,000 feet elevation. Mostly used as a 
delicatesse after having been roasted with oil and salt ; also eaten as a 
vegetable when slightly sprouted." (Meyer.) 

23295. Avena nuda inerxiis (Koern.) Asch. & Graeb. Naked oat. 

From Wutaishan, Shansi, China. "(No. 926a, Feb. 26, 1908.) These 
oats grow all through the higher mountain districts and form the staple 
food of the natives ; they require apparently a short season for maturing 
and seem to thrive in quite sterile locations. Chinese name Yoh ma." 
(Meyer.) 

23296. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Taichou, Shansi, China. "(No. 929a, Mar. 2, 1908.) Yellow soy 
beans, found growing on strongly alkaline lands. Chinese name Huang 
doh. For further remarks see No. 923a (S. P. I. No. 23292)." (Meyer.) 

23297. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Taichou, Shansi, China. "(No. 930a, Mar. 2. 1908.) Black soy 
bean. Grows on strongly alkaline lands. Chinese name Ghae doh. For 
further remarks concerning their uses see No. 922a (S. P. I. No. 23291)." 
(Meyer.) 

23298. Cannabis sativa L. Hemp. 
From Soolungko, Shansi, Kwohsien District, China. "(No. 931a, Mar. 

3, 1908.) Found growing in mountain valleys and considered a good 
hemp. Chinese name Shan ma tse." (Meyer.) 
142 



74 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23290 to 23312— Continued. 

23299. GLYCINE BISPIOA (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

Prom Tsintse, Shansi, south of Taiyuanfu, China. "(No. 933a, Mar. 
11'. L908.) Black and yellow. A rare local variety of a strange soy 
bean used as a vegetable when slightly sprouted, and after having been 
Bcalded for a few minutes In boiling water is eaten with a salt sauce; 
the skin must be removed before scalding. Chinese name Vang yen doh, 
meaning sheep's eye bean." {Meyer.) 

23300. Panicum mili.u ii.m L. 

From the plains of northern China. "(No. 043a, autumn, 1007.) 
Hulled drooping millet. Is eaten all over northern China as a high-class 
food. Foiled very often with Chinese dates; small, sticky, sweet cakes 
and simple wholesome candies are also prepared from this grain; tastes 
very good with milk and sugar as a breakfast or light evening food and 
may also serve as an infant's food. Chinese name Huang mi." (Meyer.) 

23301. Fhaseoli s angulams (Willd.) W. F. Wight. 

From Hupehko, Chihli, China. "(No. 047a. Dec. 13. 1007.) A large 
variety of a gray-blackish bean, which is able to grow on rather sandy 
and on alkaline lands. Is used as a vegetable when sprouted: also 
pounded up with sugar and used in small cakes as a stuffing. Chinese 
name Ghae shau doh." {Meyer.) 

23302. Phaseolus vulgaris L. 

From Hupehko, Chihli, China. "(No. 048a, Dec. 13, 1907.) A large, 
white bean, used as a vegetable boiled in soups. Growing on sandy and 
on alkaline lands. Chinese name Ta pai Jo/?." {Meyer.) 

23303. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Sliding, Chihli, China. "(No. 040a, Jan. 25, 1008.) Yellow soy 
bean. Chinese name Ta huang doh. For further remarks see No. 023a 
(S. P. I. No. 23292)." {Meyer.) 

23304. Phaseolus angularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 050a ? Feb. 8, 1008.) A small, red 
bean, which is used as a sweetmeat and as a stuffing in cakes. Chinese 
name Hong shau doh." {Meyer.) 

23305. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 051a, Feb. 8. 1008.) Large, light 
yellow soy bean. Fsed mostly as a vegetable when slightly germinated, 
and eaten with a salt sauce. Chinese name Ta huang doh.''' {Meyer.) 

23306. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 052a, Feb. 8. 1008.) Large, black 
soy bean, green inside. Comes from Manchuria and is used mostly like 
the preceding number (S. P. I. No. 23305.) Chinese name Ta ghae doh." 
{ Meyer. ) 

23307. Yigna ungtticulata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 
From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 033a, Feb. 8, 1008.) Mottled. A 

rather rare variety, used like No. 050a (S. P. I. No. 23304). Chinese 
name II ua cliiang doh." {Meyer.) 
142 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1908. 75 

23290 to 23312— Continued. 

23308. Phaseolus vtjlgakis L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 954a, Feb. 8, 1908.) Lemon- 
colored beans. A rare variety used as a vegetable in soups. Chinese 
name Huang yueng cloh." (Meyer.) 

23309. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 
From Pingkuhsien. Chihli, China. "(No. 955a, Nov. 7, 1907.) The 

ordinary short-fibered variety of cotton grown all over northern China. 
Chinese name Ta tse mien hua." (Meyer.) 

23310. Gossypium indicum Lam. Cotton. 

From Pingkuhsien, Chihli, China. "(No. 956a, Nov. 7, 1907.) A very 
good variety of cotton, being long fibered and silky. The city of Ping- 
kuhsien is famous throughout North China for the cotton cloth made 
from this variety. Chinese name Chan yung mien hua.'''' (Meyer.) 

23311. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Shiling, Chihli. China. "(No. 957a, Jan. 25, 1908.) Large, 
green soy bean. L T sed as a vegetable when slightly sprouted, after hav- 
ing been scalded in boiling water. Chinese name Ta ching dolt." 
( Meyer. ) 

23312. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Pautingfu, Chihli, China. "(No. 958a, Jan. 28, 1908.) A rare, 
local variety of soy bean, being small and of greenish yellow color. 
Chinese name Shan ching doh." (Meyer.) 

23313 to 23315. 

From Bangalore, British India. Presented by the superintendent of the 
Mysore Government Botanical Gardens. Received June 25. 1908. 

The following seeds : 

23313. Bauhinia monandra Kurz. (?) 

" Leaves round-ovate, truncate at base. Racemes short, terminal, 
pubescent. Petals 1-i inches, probably whitish." (./. G. Baker, in Fl. 
Brit. Ind.) 

23314. Manihot glaziovii Muell. Arg. Ceara rubber. 

" Ceara rubber has not been cultivated in the West Indies to any 
extent, but it is like cassava in its capability of growing in dry. sandy 
soil. It would probably yield more rubber if grown in districts where 
irrigation is possible." (Wm. Fawcett, in Bailey.) 

23315. Sapindus trifoliata L. Soapnut tree. 
"A stout tree, native of India. Leaves alternate, pinnate. Flowers 

dull white. Berries the size of a cherry, saponaceous. 

" This fruit is used in southern India as a substitute for soap. An oil 
is also extracted from the berries. The wood is yellow and hard and is 
used in house building and for combs, boxes, etc." (G. Watt, Diet. 
Econ. Prod. Ind.) 



76 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23316 to 23322. 

From Guatemala, South America. Collected by Dr. W. A. Kellerman. 
Received through Dr. J. N. Rose. U. S. National Herbarium, June 25, 1908. 

23316 to 23320. Cactus. 

The following cadi were introduced for investigation as to their pos- 
sible value for forage: 

23316. 

From El Rancho. " Old Man cactus. (No. 7061, Jan. 12, 1908.) 
Fruit red, depressed globular, smooth (no prickles), 1* inches in 
diameter." (Kellerman.) 

23317. 

From El Rancho. (Kellerman's No. 7055, Jan. 12, 1908.) 
23318. 

"Cuttings of S. P. I. No. 23317. Very spiny and prickly." 
(Young.) 
23319. 

From Los Amates. (Kellerman's No. 7107, Feb. 15, 1908.) 

23320. 

From Antigua. "(No. 7117.) A spineless cactus found climbing 
over stone fences." (Kellerman.) 

23321 and 23322. Dahlia sp. Dahlia. 

23321. 

From Volcano Agua. (Kellerman's No. 7099.) 

23322. 

(Kellerman's No. 7096.) 
142 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Abies sp., 22GT1, 22672, 22679, 23020, 

23021. 
Acacia lahai, 22777. 
Acer sp., 22602. 
Aconitum sp., 22542. 

hemsleyanum, 22541. 
Acorus sp., 23003. 
Actinidia kolomikta, 22593. 
Aegle marmelos, 22957. 
Aeschynomene bispinosa, 22733. 
Albizzia sp., 22618. 

anthelmintica, 22778. 
Alfalfa, Andean, 22834. 

(Chile), 22949, 22972, 22973. 

(China), 22962. 

(Ecuador), 22948. 

Elche, 22784. 

Grimm, 22947. 

(Pern), 22940. 

(South Dakota), 22946. 

Turkestan, 22788 to 22790, 

23203. 
(Utah) "dry land, 22559. 
irrigated, 22558. 
wild, 22949. 
See also Medicago sativa. 
Alfilerilla. See Erodium moschatum. 
Alocasia macrorrhiza, 22816. 
A m or pho phallus campanulatus, 22S12. 
Amygdalus persica, 22650. 
Andropogon hale pen sis, 22664. 

saccharoides, 22966. 
sericeus, 22764. 
sorghum, 22653, 22787, 
22820 to 22824, 22911 to 
22913, 22942, 23230, 
23231. 
Anona cherimola, 22531. 

reticulata, 22796, 22956. 
squamosa, 22795. 
Anthephora hermaphrodita, 22667. 
Apricot (China), 22580. 
Aralia racemosa, 22745. 
Archontophoenix alexandrae,' 22706. 
Areea oleracea, 22712. 
Arisaema cochinehinense, 22813. 
Arrhcnatherum elatius. 22550. 

tuberosus, 
22666. 
Artemisia lactiflora, 22544. 
Artichoke, Violet Provence, 22557. 
Arum sp., 22817. 
Ash. See Fraxinus sp. 

142 



A spa rag us sp., 22624 to 22626, 23014 

to 23016. 
Astilbe sp., 22543. 
Astragalus sinivus, 23226, 23227. 
Arena nuda inermis, 22688, 23295. 

tuberosa, 22666. 
Azalea sp., 22983. 

Bael tree. See Belou marmelos. 
Bamboo (China ) , 22579. 23233 to 23262. 

(India), 22819. 
Banana (Trinidad), 22771. 
Barberry. See Berberis spp. 
Barley, Hull-less, 22532, 22689. 

(Tibet), 22917. 
Bauhinia monandra, 23313. 
Bean, broad. See Vicia faba. 
(Java), 22945. 
moth. See Phaseolus aconiti- 

folius. 
scarlet runner. See Phaseolus 

coccineus. 
velvet. See Stizolobium sp., 
•22923. 
Belou marmelos, 22957 
Berberis acuminata, 22545. 

chinensis, 22585, 22614. 
Bigarade, Natsu-mikan, 22670. 
Bollen. See Kageneckia oblonga, 
Brassica oleracea, 22694. 

rapa, 22755 to 22757. 
Briza sp., 22967. 
Bryonia dioica, 22641. 
Buddleia asiatica, 23006. 
Buxus sempervirens, 23012. 

Cabbage (China), 22694. 
Cacara erosa, 22827, 22971, 23040. 
Cactus (Guatemala), 23316 to 23320. 
Cae sal pi tiia sp., 22980. 
Cajan indie um, 22731. 
Caladiuin bieolor, 22811. 
Campomanesia cerasoides, 227S3. 
Cananga odorata, 22744. 
Canavali ensiforme, 23216. 
Canelo. See Drimys chilensis. 
Cannabis sativa, 22690, 23298. 
Capsicum annuum, 22804 to 22809. 

frutescens, 22803. 
Caragana sp., 22981. 
Carex triangularis, 22907. 
Carissa bispinosa, 22998. 
Caryota mitis, 22710. 

77 



78 



SI'.I.DS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Cassia sp., 22019. 

Cast anopsia tibetana, 22 ( .)ir». 

Ca8tilla sp.. 22630. 

Catalpa bungei, 22578. 

Ceara rubber. See Uanihot glaziovii. 

Celastrus sp.. 22586. 

articulatus, 22616. 
Chayota edulis, 22662. 
Cherimoyer. Sec Anona cherimola. 
Chestnut. See Castanopsis tibetana. 
"Chilean red oak." Sec Vothofagus 

obliqua. 
Chinese date. Sec Zizyphus sativa. 
ChrysopJiyllum sp., 22791. 
Cicer arietinum, 22730. 
Citrullus nil, i, ins. 22657, 22658, 22743, 

23221 to 23225. 
Citrus sp., 22779. 

aurantium, 22566, 22567, 22670. 
sinensis, 22651, 22652, 
22826, 22939. 
limonum, 23028, 
Clematis sp,, 22021. 

/rrfi7 mandshurica, 22620. 
Clitoria heterophylla, 22748. 

ternatea, 22749 to 22753. 
Clover, bur. See Medicago denticulata. 

red. See Trifolium pratense. 
Colocasia sp.. 22740, 22741, 22891 to 
22894. 
esculenia, 22765 to 22770, 
. 22818. 
indica, 22S14. 
Corn, Indian, 23207. 
Corylus sp.. 22596. 
Cotoneaster integerrima, 22695. 
rotton (China), 23309, 23310. 
Jannovitch, 22031. 
Hit Afifi, 22032. 
Cowpea, black, 22932. 

Chinese Red, 22635. 

Clay, 22723, 22724, 22960. 

Holstein, 22725. 

(hvbrid), 22715 to 22721, 

22726 to 22730, 22958. 
Lady, 2293s. 
mottled, 22903, 23307. 
red. 22722, 22959. 
(Rhodesia), 22929 to 22933, 

2295S to 22900. 
Whippoorwill, 22539. 
Crataegus sp., 22007, 22676, 

pinnatifida, 22." 
Crinodendron patagua; 23273. 
Cucumis melo, 22659 to 22661, 23200 
Cueurbita maxima, 22928. 

pepo, 22739, 22810, 22925. 
Cupressus funebris, 23024. 
Currant. See Ribes sp. 
Custard apple, 22956. 
Cydonia sp., 22581, 22984. 
faponica, 22629. 
Cynara scolymus, 22557. 
Cynometra trinitensis, 22774. 

Dahlia sp., 23321. 23322. 
Daphne sp., 22994. 

142 



>533. 



Dasheen I Barbados), 22894. 
Date, Ascherasi, 22837, 22856. 
Barbnn. 22S13. 22X58. 
Beneffshi, 22944. 
Duggal ( Ililwa), 22855. 

( ( Mnkoni - el Alnnar), 
22sr,^. 

(Shomaieh), 22854. 
(Sultani), 22853. 
Halawi, 22839. 
Hussein Effendi, 22845. 
Jozi, 22849. 

Khadrawi, 22840, 22860. 
Khastawi, 22838, 22857. 
Maiah, 22848. 
Maktum (Almiar), 2283G. 

(A star), 22835. 
Shitwi Asfar, 22851. 
Shukker, 22850. 

Modabel, 22842. 
Sukeri, 22841. 
Taberzel, 22846. 
Zehdi, 22847, 22859. 
Dendrocalamus strictus, 22819. 
Dent : in sp., 22571, 22589, 22611. 
Diervilla sp., 22587. 
Dioscorea alata, 22828. 

anguina, 22832. 
fasciculata, 22831. 
purpurea, 22830. 
rubella, 22829. 
Diospyros kaki, 22597 to 22599. 
Dolichos angularis, 23210. 

lablab, 22934, 23215. 
Drimys chilensis, 23271. 
Dypsis pinnatifrons, 22708. 

Ecballium elaterium, 22642. 
Elaeagnus pungens, 22986. 
Elaeis guineensis, 22713. 
Elder. See Sambucus spp. 
Eh ii sine coracana, 22565. 
Elm. See Ulmus spp. 
Enterolobium cyelocarpum, 23039. 
Ephedra sp., 23020. 
Eragrostis sp., 22963, 22964. 

abyssinica, 22656. 
Eriobotrya japonica, 22976. 
Erodium moschatum, 23277. 
E lion nnt as sp., 22583, 22871, 22872, 
23027. 

alatus, 22995. 

Fenugreek. See Trigonella foenum- 

graecum. 
Fieus sp.. 22937. 
Filbert. See Corylus sp. 
Fir. See Abies sp. 
Finn in iin simplex, 23219. 
Fraxinus sp., 22582. 

bungeana, 22572, 22603, 
22004. 
Funic in sp., 22868. 

Garcia i<t binucao, 22955. 
tinctoria, 22556. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



79 



Ginger. See Zinziber officinalis. 

Gladiolus salmoneus, 22969. 

Gliricidia maculata, 22773. 

Glw-inr hispida, 22534 to 22538, 22633, 
22634, 22644 to 22646. 22714, 22874 
to 22885, 22886, 22897 to 22901, 
22919 to 22922. 22927. 23205. 23207 
to 23209, 23211 to 23213, 23229, 
23232, 23291, 23292, 23296, 23297, 
23209. 23303, 23305, 23306, 23311, 
23312. 

Glycyrrhiza glabra. 22870. 

Gossypium barbadi nsi . 22631, 22632. 
hirsutum, 23309. 
in <li<- u,n. 23310. 

Gourd (Italy), 22924. 

Grape (China), 22601. 

Sultanina Rosea, 22528. 

Grass, large water. See Paspalum di- 
lata turn. 

Grewia parviflora, 22609. 

Hawthorn. See Crataegus spp. 
Hazelnut. See Con/his sp. 
Hedera sp., 22999. 
Hemp. See Cannabis sativa. 
Hibiscus simpler, 23219 
Hieama. See Cacara erosa. 
Hordeum distichon nudum, 22689, 
22917. 
pol ys t ich u m t rifu rca t u in . 
22532. 
Hydrangea sp.. 22864. 

Hang ilang. See Cananga odorata. 
Her cornuta, 22979. 
Indigofera glandulosa, 22732. 
Irvingia oliveri, 22794. 

Jasminum primulinum, 22546. 
Juglans hyb.. 22524. 22525. 

mandshurica, 22605. 

regia, 22526, 22527. 22560 to 

22563. 

Jujube. See Chinese date. 
Juniperus sp.. 23022, 23023. 

ehinensis pendula, 23025. 

procera, 22775. 

Kafir. See Sorghum. 
Kageneckia oblonga, 23270. 
Kowliang. See Sorghum. 
Kudzu. See Pueraria thunbergiana. 

Lagenaria vulgaris, 22924. 
Landolphia capensis, 22530. 
Larch. See Ldrix sp. 
Larix sp., 22674, 23010. 
Lathyrus montanus, 22553. 

niger, 22554. 

vernus, 22555. 
Leitchee. See Litchi ehinensis. 
Lemon (China). 23028. 
Lens esculenta, 22908. 
Lespedeza sp.. 22997. 
Licorice (China), 22870. 

142 



Licuala peltata, 22711. 
Ligustrum sp.. 22988. 
Lilac. See Syringa spp. 
Lilittm sp.. 22627. 
Litchi ehinensis. 23202. 
Lonicera sp., 23<»29. 

maackii, 22548. 

tragophylla, 22549. 
Loquat (China). 22976. 
Loropetalum chinense, 22982. 
Lychnis fulgens, 23011. 

Maiten. See Maytenus boaria. 
Mangifera indica, 22970. 

Mango, White Alfonso. 22970. 
Manihot glaziovii, 23314. 
Maple. See Acer sp. 
Maytenus injuria. 23272. 
Medicago arabica, 23280 to 23284. 
denticulata, 22649. 
sativa, 22558, 22559, 227^4. 
22788 to 22790, 22834, 
2291(1. 22946, 22947, 22948, 
22949, 22962, 22972. 22973, 
23203. 
Melilotus indica, 2327s. 23279. 
Mel in is m in a f i flora. 23201. 
Meyer, Frank N.. seeds and plants se- 
cured. 22571 to 22629. 22671 to 
22696, 22825, 22861 to 22s73. 22004 
to 22! mm;. 22914, 22915. 22937. 22974 
t.» 23038, 23207 to 23262. 23290 to 
23312. 
Millet, Pearl. See Pennisetum ameri- 
canum. 
ragi. See Eleusine coracana. 
Musa paradisiaca, 22771. 
Musknielon (Roumania), 22659 to 

22661. 
Myrica nag!. 22904 to 22906. 22978. 

Nothofagus obliqua, 23263, 23268. 

Oak (China). 22594. 

Cork. See Quercus suber. 
Oat. naked (China), 22688. 23295. 
Olea europaea, 22762. 22763. 
Olive. Chemlali, 22762. 22763. 
Oncosperma sp., 22705. 
Orange (Brazil ). 22939. 

Canton. 22051. 

Ladoo. 22566. 

Natsu-mikan, 22670. 

Suntra. 22567. 

Swatow, 22652. 

sweet (Algeria), 22826. 
Oxytenanthera abyssinica, 22(76. 

Paeonia al bt flora. 22869. 
Palm, sugar. See Saguerus pinnatus. 
Panicularia magellanica, 22551. 
Panic urn sp., 22665. 

berai. 2296s. 

maximum, 22529, 22S33. 

mUiaceum, 23300. 



80 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Pa8palum dilatatum, 22654. 

Patagua. Sec Crinodendron patagua. 

Pea, field. See Pisum arvense. 

Peach ( Shanghai >, 22650. 

Pear (China >, 22595. 

Pennisetum americanum, 22564, 22643, 

22943. 
Peony. Sec Paeonia albiflora. 
Pepper (Mexico), 22803 to 22809. 
Periwinkle, Madagascar, 22782. 
Persimmon (China), 22597 to 22599. 
Phalaris coerulescens, 22961. 
Phaseolus sp., 22945. 

aconitifolius, 22761. 
annularis, 23210, 23301, 

23304. 
coccineus, 22797 to 22802. 
vvU/aris. 23203. 23302. 2330X. 
Philadelphus sp., 225SS, 22863. 
Phleum arenarium, 22669. 

paniculatum, 22668. 
Phoenix dactyl if era, 22835 to 22860. 
Phyllostachys nigra, 23240. 
i'/cra obovata schrenkiana, 22909. 
Pine. See Pinus spp. 
Pinellia cochinchinense, 22813. 
P«ws sp., 22673, 22680. 

bungeana, 22691, 23017 to 23019. 
koraiensis, 23220. 
Piswrc urrense, 22540, 22637 to 22640, 
22918, 22936, 23290. 
sat i rum, 22738. 
Pithecolobium aele, 22793. 
Plum (China), 22576, 22577, 22600, 

22989, 22990. 
Poa aequatoriensis, 22754. 
Podophyllum emodi, 22552. 
Poplar. See Popitlus sp. 
Populus sp., 22861. 
Potato (Chile), 23041 to 23199. 
Pn/ hhs sp.. 22576, 22577, 22600, 22989, 
22990. 
arm en iaca, 22580. 
japonica', 22991, 23007. 
Psoralea corylifolia, 22737. 
Pueraria thunbergiana, 22511. 
Pumpkin (Italy), 22925. 

(Palestine), 22810. 
Pyrus chinensis, 22595. 

Quercus sp., 22594. 

saber, 22655. 
Quillaja saponaria, 23269. 
Quince. See Cydonia spp. 

Raspberry (China), 22663. 

Rhamnus sp., 22612, 22613, 22873. 

Rhapis flubelliformis, 22707. 

Rheum sp., 23274. 

Rhododendron sp., 22677. 

tfi&es sp., 22992. 

Rollmia orthopetala, 22512. 

flosa sp., 22615, 22692, 23035 to 23038. 

xanthma, 22681, 22693, 23034. 
Rose. See Rosa spp. 
Rubber, Ceara. See Manihot glaziovii. 

142 



h'uhiis sp., 22663. 

rosaefoliua, 23009. 
Rwm< /• cri8pus, 22965. 

8a6c2 sp., 22709. 

8agueru8 pinnatus, 22704, 22941. 

(S'oZvia sp., 22623. 

8ambucu8 sp.. 22584. 

raciiiiosa, 22591. 
8apindus trifoliata, 23315. 
Sapium sebiferum, 23218. 
Sedge, 22907. 

(China), 22866. 
Se8amum oricnlalc 23228. 
Sesban aegyptiaca, 22735. 

bispino.su. 22733. 
Soapnut tree. See Sapindus trifoliata. 
Solarium tuberosum, 23041 to 23199. 
Sophora japonica, 22074. 

tomentosa, 22781. 
Sorgo. See Sorghum. 
Sorghum, Kafir Red, 22653. 

Kowliang, Black-Hull, 22912. 
Brow n , 2291J , 
23230, 23231. 
Sorgo (Cape Colony), 22942. 
Chinese, 22913. 
Club Head, 22787. 
unclassified (Uganda), 22820 
to 22824. 
Soy bean, Amherst, 22885. 
Barchet. 23232. 
black, 22535, 22538, 22634, 
22886, 22899, 22900, 
22919, 22927, 23205, 
23291, 23297, 23306. 
and yellow, 23299. 
brown, 23211, 23229. 
Buckshot, 22883. 
Butterball, 22878. 
Flat King, 22875. 
green, 22536, 22537, 22874, 

22881, 22897. 23207, 23311. 
greenish yellow, 22645, 23312. 
Okute, 22877. 

smoky yellow, 22644, 22901. 
yellow, 22534, 22633, 22646, 
22714, 22876, 22879, 22880, 

22882, 22884, 22898. 22921, 
22922, 23208, 23209. 23212, 
23213, 23292, 23296, 23303, 
23305. 

yellowish green, 22920. 
Spikenard. See Aralia racemosa. 
Spiraea sp., 22574, 22575, 22590, 22993. 
Squash (China), 22739. 

Venetian, 22928. 
Sterculia foetida, 22792. 

plutanifolia, 23219. 
mizolobium sp., 23217, 22923. 
Syringa sp., 22687, 22696, 23032, 23033. 

am ure ns is, 22608. 

oblata, 23030, 23031. 

villosa, 22675. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



81 



Tallow tree. See Septum sebiferum. 
Temerix sp., 22S67. 
Taro (Barbados), 22513 to 22523, 
22891 to 22893. 

(Dutch Guiana), 22740. 22741. 

(Java), 227G5 to 22770. 
Teff. Sec Eregrostis ebyssiniee. 
Toluifera pereiree, 22742. 
Tounetea simplex, 22772. 
Trifolium sp., 23288. 

pretense, 23287, 23289. 
Trigonelle foenum-greecum, 23204. 
Triticum eestivum, 22010. 

polonicum, 23275, 23276. 
Turnip (Finland), 22756, 22757. 

Petrowski, 227."..". 

Ulmus sp., 22678, 220S2. 

pumile, 22825, 22975. 
Undetermined, 22573, 22579, 22(522, 

22628, 22734, 227s;,. 22786, 22x<;2. 

22866, 22896, 22944, 22985, 22987, 

22996, 23000 to 23002, 23004, 23005, 

23013. 

Viburnum sp., 22865. 

mecrocephelum, 22978. 
Dpulus, 22592, 22010. 
tomentosum, 23008. 
r?e/« /a6a, 22568, 22569, 23294. 
r/<//w cetjeng, 22758 to 22700. 22888. 
sesquipedelis, 22047. 22648, 
22740. 22717. 22887, 22902, 
22935, 23214. 



R^wa unguiculete, 22539, 22635, 22715 
to 22730, 22903, 22929 to 
22033. 22938, 22958 to 22960, 
23307. 
1 ince rosea, 22782. 
l'///x sp., 22017. 

ermeta, 2lT>47. 
vinifere, 22r»2s. 22001. 

Walnut (China). 22605. 

(Germany), 22524 to 22527. 
Persian, 22r>00 to 22^03. 
Watermelon (China), 2:5221 to 23225. 
(Panama i. 2274:5. 
( Roumania ». 22657, 22or>x. 
Weigela I China ) . 22587. 
Wheat (Chile). 2:527:.. 23270. 
(Tibet), 22916. 



Xenthochymus tinctorius, 22556. 
Xenthosoma sp.. 22895, 22010. 

segittee folium, 22815. 



Yam (India i. 22S2S to 22x32. 

Yantia (Barbados), 22910, 22513 to 

22r>23. 22so;k 



Zea meys, 232(57. 
Zingiber officinale 2202(5. 
Zizyphus setive, 22606, 22683 to 22686, 
22014. 



oil 00— Hnl. 142—09- 



O 



-6 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO, 148. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908: 



INVENTORY No. 16; Nob. 23323 to 23744. 



Issued April 10, 1909. 




WASHINGTON-. 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1909. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

The scientific and technical publications of the Bureau of Plant Industry, which un- 
organized J u 1 \ 1. (0011, are Issued in a single series -if bulletins, a list of which follows. 

Attention i> directed i<> tin' fact thai tin- publications in this series are nol for general 
distribution. The Superintendent <>r Documents. Governmenl Printing Office, Washington, 
D. C.| is authorized by law t « > sell them at cost, and t<> him all applications for those bul 
letins .should he made, accompanied by a postal money order for the required amount or 
by cash. Numbers omitted from this list can not be furnished. 

No. 1. The Relation of Lime and Magnesia to riant Growth. 1901, Trice, 10 cents. 

2. Spermatogenesis ami Fecundation of Zamla. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 

::. Macaroni Wheats. 1901. i'riee. -JO eents. 

4. Range Improvement in Arizona. 1901. I'riee. in cents. 

o. a Lis] of American Varieties erf Peppers. 1902. i'riee. in cents. 

7. The Algerian Durum Wheats. 1902. Price. 15 cents. 

:•. The North American S]te< i< s of Spartina. 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

10. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 190:2. I'riee, 10 cents. 

11. Johnson Grass. 1902. i'riee. 10 cents. 

12. Stock Ranges of Northwestern California. 1902. i'riee. 10 cents. 
15. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

15. Forage Conditions on the Border of the Great Basin. T.)02. Trice. 15 cents. 

17. Some Diseases o'f the Cowpea. 1902. I'riee. 10 cents. 

20. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Trice, 15 cents. 

22. Injurious Effects of Tremature Pollination. 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. I'riee, 10 eents. 

25. Miscellaneous Tapers. 1903. Trice, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. I'riee, 15 cents. 

29. The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. I'riee, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Trice, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. I'riee, 15 cents. 

34. Silkworm Food 1'lants. 1903. Trice, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. The "Bluing" of the Western Yellow Tine, etc. 1903. I'riee, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of Spores in Sporangia of Rhizopns Nigricans, etc. 1903. Trice, 15 

cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Trice, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Trice, 10 cents. 
41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. Trice, 10 eents. 

43. Japanese Bamhoos. 1903. Trice, 10 cents. 

45. Thysiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Tlants. 1903. Trice, 5 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Trice, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Trice. 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. I'riee, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice : Its Uses and Tropagation. 1903. I'riee, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Tapers. 1905. Trice. 5 cents. 

54. Tersian Gulf Dates. 1903. I'riee, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. I'riee. 10 cents. 

56. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Trice, 30 cents. 

57. Methods T'sed for Controlling Sand Dunes. 1904. Trice. 10 cents. 

58. The Vitality and Germination of Seeds. 1904. I'riee, 10 cents. 

59. Tasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. I'riee, 10 cents. 

63. Investigations of Rusts. 1904. Trice. 10 cents. 

64. A Method of Destroying or Treventing the Growth of Algae and Certain Tathogenic 

Bacteria in Water Supplies. 1904. Trice. 5 cents. 
05. Reclamation of ("'ape God Sand Dunes. 1904. Trice, 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Trice, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. I'riee, 10 cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Trice. 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum W T heat. 1904. I'riee, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Trice, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. I'riee, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Tear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. I'riee, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Trice, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 1905. Trice, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Trice. 5 cents. 

78. Improving the Quality of Wheat. 1905. Trice, 10 cents. 

[Continued on page 3 of cover.] 
148 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 148. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908: 

NE 
BC 

INVENTORY No. 16; Nos. 23323 to 23744. '^ 



Issued April 10, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1909, 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

Physiologist <i>i<! Pathologist, and Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Calloway. 

Physiologist and Pathologist, <ni<i issistant chief of Bureau, AJberl P. Woods. 

Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Erwln v. Bmlth, Pathologist in Charge. 

Fruit Disease Investigations, Merton r>. Walte, Pathologist In Charge. 

Investigations in Forest Pathology, Haven Metcalf, Pathologist In Charge. 

Cotton and Truck Diseases and Plant Disease Survey, William a. Orton, Pathologist in 
Charge. 

Pathological Collections and Inspection Work, Flora w. Patterson. Mycologist in Charge. 

Plant Life History Investigations, Walter T. Swindle, Physiologist in Charge. 

Cotton Breeding Investigations, Archibald l>. Bhamel and Daniel N. Shoemaker, Physiolo- 
gists in Charge. 

Tobacco Investigations. Archibald i). Bhamel, Wlghtman w. Garner, and Ernest H. 
Bfathewson, in Charge. 

Corn Investigations, Charles P. Hartley. Physiologist in Charge. 

Alkali and Drought Resistant Plant Breeding Investigations, Thomas II. Kearney, Physi- 
ologist in Charge. 

Soil Bacteriology ami Water Purification Investigations, Karl F. Kellerman, Physiologist 
in Charge. 

Bionomic Investigations of Tropical and Subtropical Plants, Orator F. Cook, Bionomist 
in Charge. 

Drug and Poisonous Plant and Tea Culture Investigations, Rodney II. True, Physiologist 
in Charge. 

Physical Laboratory, Lyman J. Briggs, Physicist in Charge. 

Agricultural Technology, Nathan A. Cobb, Crop Technologist in Charge. 

Taxonomic and Range Investigations, Frederick V. Coville, Botanist in Charge. 

Farm Management, William J. Spillman, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Grain Investigations. Mark Alfred Carleton, Cerealist in Charge. 

Arlington Experimental Farm and Horticultural Investigations, Lee C. Corbett, Horticul- 
turist in Charge. 

Vegetable Testing Gardens, William W. Tracy, sr., Superintendent. 

Sugar-Beet Investigations, Charles O. Townsend, Pathologist in Charge. 

Western Agricultural Extension, Carl S. Scofield, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Dry-Land Agriculture Investigations, E. Channing Chilcott, Agriculturist in Charge. 

Pomological Collections, Gustavus B. Brackett, Pomologist in Charge. 

Field Investigations in Pomology, William A. Taylor and G. Harold Powell, Pomologists 
in Charge. 

Experimental Gardens and Grounds, Edward M. Byrnes, Superintendent. 

Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Forage Crop Investigations, Charles V. Piper, Agrostologist in Charge. 

Seed Laboratory, Edgar Brown, Botanist in Charge. 

Grain Standardization, John D. Shanahan, Crop Technologist in Charge. 

Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla., P. J. W 7 ester, in Charge. 

Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., W. W. Tracy, jr., Assistant Botanist in Charge. 

South Texas Garden, Broivnsville, Tex., Edward C. Green, Pomologist in Charge. 

Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work, Seaman A. Knapp, Special Agent in Charge. 

Seed Distribution (Directed by Chief of Bureau), Lisle Morrison, Assistant in General 
Charge. 



Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk. James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction. 

scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Frank N. Meyer and William D. Hills, Agricultural Explorers. 

Albert Mann, Expert in Charge of Special Barley Investigations. 

F. W. Clarke, Special Agent in Charge of Matting-Rush Investigations. 

Frederic Chisolm, Expert. 

Walter Fischer, R. A. Young, and H. C. Skeels, Scientific Assistants, 

148 

2 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washing on, D. C, January 15, 1909. 
Sir : I have the honor to transmit herewith and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin No. 148 of the series of this Bureau, the ac- 
companying manuscript, entitled " Seeds and Plants Imported Dur- 
ing the Period from July 1 to September 30, 1908 : Inventory No. 16 ; 
Nos. 23323 to 23744." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 
publication. 

Respectfully, B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 
Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

148 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

Introductory statement 5 

Inventory 7 

Index of common and scientific names 35 

148 

4 



B. P. I.— 443. 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908: 
INVENTORY XO. 16; NOS. 23323 TO 23744. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

This inventory of seeds and plants imported is the sixteenth in a 
series which was begun in 1898. It contains the introductions of only 
three months, and as the three months happened to fall at a time 
when our agricultural explorer Mr. Frank X. Meyer was in this 
country preparing for further explorations and Prof. N. E. Hansen 
was on his way to Central Asia or preparing there to collect the seeds 
of wild alfalfas on the steppes, the number of plants imported is 
small. It represents, therefore, only those things which have been 
secured by correspondence with our agents and friends in different 
parts of the world. 

Through a correspondent in Chile, Mr. Jose D. Husbands, an un- 
usual collection of seventy-two potato varieties was secured, among 
which are wild types from the archipelago of Chiloe and the adjoin- 
ing mainland of Chile. These, it is hoped, will prove of considerable 
value for the breeders of this important crop. The unusual interest 
in the Peruvian strains of alfalfa induced us to get, through Mr. T. F. 
Sedgwick, of Lima, a collection of ten reputed different strains, while 
Mr. M. Fraile, of this Bureau, brought from near his home in Villares 
de la Reina, Spain, plants of a wild form of alfalfa which is of espe- 
cial interest to the experts on this crop. The unusual activity of the 
office in the introduction of the timber bamboos of the world has 
brought in the rare and especially frost and drought resistant form 
Dendrocalamus strictus from India, and another, a tropical species, 
Chusquea bambusaeoides, which is said to seed regularly, from Rio 
de Janeiro, Brazil. Mr. W. S. Lyon, of Manila, has sent a remarkable 
ornamental squash that looks promising for greenhouse culture ; Mrs. 
L. E. M. Kelly has sent five varieties of the Chinese leitchee from 
the island of Hainan, the home of this new fruit, and through the 
kindness of Dr. John M. Swan, of Canton, a Wardian-case shipment 
of grafted leitchees was sent from Canton to the Hawaiian Islands. 
The seeds of a number of named varieties of Japanese chrysanthe- 
mums will interest the crysanthemum growers; the seed of a honey- 
scented collarette dahlia will attract the growers of this flower; the 
introduction of Viola calcarata may lead to an improvement in the 
148 . 5 



6 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

ordinary pansy, and plants of Rosa moyesi, a distinct Chinese form, 
may be of value for the rose breeders. Our unusual collection of 
bananas has been enriched by twelve varieties from Ceylon, and a 
new mango of some promise from Brazil has been added to the mango 
collection. 

It may be well to repeal what has been explained in previous in- 
ventories, that the appearance of a name and description in this bulle- 
tin does not indicate surely that the seeds or plants are available at 
once for the use of experimenters. The majority of this plant ma- 
terial has to be sent out as soon as possible after it arrives, much of 
it to experts at the State agricultural experiment stations who are 
waiting for it, and the rest to our propagating gardens, w T here it 
will be taken care of until the young plants are large enough to send 
out by mail to those particularly interested. An eligible list is kept 
and applications from private or official experimenters who feel that 
they are in a position to give any of the introductions a careful trial 
are welcomed. The more specific the application the more attention 
it will receive from this office, for the main object of the work is to 
encourage careful trials with the purpose of building up new plant 
industries. Whenever an experimenter thinks he sees a definite use 
for any one of the thousands of plants which are being imported it is 
the aim of the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction to put 
the living seeds or plants desired in his hands. As far as the limited 
facilities of the office permit, we will therefore agree to hunt up 
and get plant material of an experimental character, provided it is 
not listed in the seed or nursery catalogues of this country, and will 
place it in the hands of experimenters who can satisfy us of their 
ability to use it intelligently. 

As it is of great importance that a historical record be kept of the 
success or failure of the many introductions, it is especially requested 
that whenever an experimenter makes a success of the plants sent 
him, and particularly if he publishes anything about them, he will 
notify the office and publish the office number, which is invariably 
sent out with every plant or package of seed, or, if the number is lost, 
he will at least give the date when the seed was sent him, so that 
through the accurate records which are kept the source of the seeds 
can be traced. It should also be remembered that a report of failure, 
while negative evidence, is often of very considerable value. 

David Fairchild, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. 6'., January 15, 1909. 

148 



INVENTORY. 



28323. Phragmites vulgaris (Lam.) Hitchcock (Arundo vul- 
garis Lam.). 

From Gothenburg, Sweden. Procured by Hon. W. Henry Robertson, Ameri- 
can consul. Received July 6, IOCS. 

" These roots were procured for comparison with American-grown reeds in the 
study of the reed-lath matting industry proposed by Mr. Ivar Tidestrom." 
(FaircJiild.) 

23324. Carica papaya L. Papaw. 

From Miami, Fla. Received through Mr. P. J. Wester, Subtropical Labora- 
tory and Garden, July 6, 1008. 

"A variety of papaw with cucumber«-shaped fruits peculiarly well suited 
for packing. Grown at the Subtropical Laboratory under No. 516 from seed 
presented by Mr. Cephas Finder, Upper Matecumbie Key. Pulp is rather thin, 
but the flavor is excellent. The flower is perfect and the variety appears worth 
testing and, if possibe, improving on the thickness of the pulp." (Webster.) 

23325 to 23332. 

From Canton, Kwangtung, China. Presented by Dr. W. H. Dobson. Re- 
ceived July b\ 1908. 

The following seeds. Varietal descriptions by Mr. II. T. Nielsen. 

23325 to 23327. Glycine Hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

23325. Black. 

23326. Yellowish green. 

23327. Yellowish green, smaller seeded than No. 23326. 
23328. Vigna sesquipedalis ( L. ) W. F. Wight. 

23329 and 23330. Dolichos lablab L. Hyacinth or Bonavist bean. 

23329. White. 

23330. Red. 

23331. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

23332. Cajan indicum Spreng. 

23333. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

From northwestern Rhodesia. Presented by Mr. C. E. F. Allen, Con- 
servator of Forests. Livingstone, Victoria Falls, northwestern Rhodesia. 
Received July 8, 1908. 

Marfan. "The seeds are small, broadly obovate, somewhat flattened, flinty, 
pearly white with pale hulls, closely resembling some forms of Ampemby from 
Madagascar." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

70949— Bull. 148—09 2 7 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23334 and 23335. 

Prom Grand Rapids, Mich. Presented by Mr. V. A. Wallin, Wallin 
Leather Company, through Mr. Frederic Chlsolm. Received July 1 and 9, 
1908. 

Seeds of t Ik- following : 

23334. Caesalpinia bbevifolia (Clos) Baill. Algarobilla. 

Procured from an Importing firm In the United Slates. 

"A leguminous shrub <t small tree the pods of which are extraordi- 
narily rich In tannic acid, the content being ;is high as 67 to G8J per 
cent. Tanning with these pods Is accomplished in one-third of the time 
required for tanning leather from oak bark, and the pods are especially 
valuable as giving a bloom to the leather. They also furnish a yellow 
age." (Extract from von Mueller.) 

23335. Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd. Cascalote. 

From the south of Mexico. 

"A leguminous tree from the wet seashores of Central America. Each 
tree is said to produce annually 100 pounds of pods, the husks of which, 
commercially known as divi-divi. are regarded in India as the most 
powerful and quick-acting tanning material. The market price of the 
pods is from $40 to $65 per ton, and England imports about 4,000 tons 
annually. In India lac is also gathered from this tree." (Extract from 
von Mueller.) 

23336 to 23339. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Dr. S. P. Barchet, inter- 
preter, American Consulate. Received June 26 and July 7, 190S. 

The following seeds : 

23336 to 23338. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

23336. Barchet. Identical with No. 2079S. 

23337. R iceland. Identical with No. 20797. 

23338. Meyer Ci). Mottled brown. Probably identical with No. 
17852. 

23339. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

23340. Leucaexa glauca (L.) Benth. Necklace seed. 

From Ha yd en Bridge, England. Presented by Mr. Robert Dodd, Back 
Row. Received June 27, 1908. 

"These seeds are used for making necklaces." (Safford.) 

23343 and 23344. Dipterocarpus spp. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by Mr. J. E. Conner, American 
consul. Received July 9, 1908. 

23343. Dipterocarpus alatus Roxb. 

" This is one of the most beautiful trees for street planting and orna- 
mentation that can be found. It is tall, straight as an arrow, has no 
limbs near the ground, and is both graceful and majestic in appearance. 
It will grow within thirty years to a height of 100 feet or more, and at 
maturity attains a much greater height. An avenue of these trees gives 
the impression of an avenue of royal palms, for the trunks are straight 
and columnar and present a rather smooth, rounded surface of gray bark 
reaching far overhead to the beginning of .the fan-shaped periphery of 
limbs and leaves. It is a native of Cochin China only, but has been 
transplanted to Mexico. The soil is a black alluvial deposit, not too 
wet." (Conner.) 

23344, Dipterocarpus intricatus Dyer. 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 9 

23345 to 23347. 

From China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Chinese Tract Society, 
Shanghai, China. Received July 9, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

23345. Fragaria indica Andrews. Strawberry. 

From Mokanshan, China. " Seed of a wild strawberry. Tasteless." 
{Farnham.) 

23346. Rubus sp. Raspberry. 

" Wild red raspberry found growing 1,600 feet above sea level on the 
mountain not far from Hangchow. China. A pleasant acid, but not much 
of the raspberry flavor. Used for eating raw, as jam, and makes a good 
jelly. A true raspberry." {Farnham.) 

23347. Rubus sp. 

•'A wild red berry, resembling the blackberry except in color. Slightly 
acid." {Farnham. ) 

23348 to 23352. 

From China. Received through Mr. Frank X. Meyer, agricultural explorer, 
in the spring of 1907. 

The following plants and seeds : 

23348. Ophiopogon japonicus (L.) Ker. 

From Tanghsi, China. "(No. 232a, Mar. 1, 1906.) A grasslike plant 
which may be useful as an edge plant in shady places, as it grows in such 
locations; bears nice blue berries." {Meyer.) 

23349. Poa PRATENSIS L. 

From Kaiyuan, Manchuria. "(No. 595, Jan. 15, 1907.) A strange grass 
found growing on the city wall of Kaiyuan. Seems to be able to with- 
stand droughts and neglect remarkably well. Will probably be found to 
be a very valuable lawn grass." {Meyer.) 

23350. (Undetermined.) Sedge. 

From Kaiyuan, Manchuria. " (No. 596, Jan. 15, 1907.) A very slender 
leaved sedge found growing on the city wall of Kaiyuan, where it is sub- 
jected to great extremes in temperature and to much drought. Will prob- 
ably be found of great use in small gardens in the arid regions as a lawn 
sedge." {Meyer.) 

2335 1 . ( Undetermined. ) Sedge. 

From Kaiyuan, Manchuria. ''(No. 597, Jan. 15, 1907.) A medium slen- 
der leaved sedge found growing on the city wall of Kaiyuan. Will be 
found well fitted for a lawn sedge in the arid regions of the United 
States. It is probablv the same species as that sent from Peking in 
1905 under No. 70 (S. P. I. No. 17466)." {Meyer.) 

23352. (Undetermined.) Sedge. 

"A very coarse species of low-growing sedge found on the city wall of 
Kaiyuan. Seems to thrive better in the shady places than when fully 
exposed to the sun. For this reason it may be of use as a lawn sedge 
underneath trees. May also be fit as a fodder plant in dry, cold places." 
( Meyer. ) 

23353 and 23354. 

Presented by Miss Jane Lewis, 1721 West Genesee street, Syracuse. N. Y., 
through Mr. J. R. Robinson, of the Department of Agriculture. Received 
July 14, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following : 

23353. Bignonia unguis-cati L. 

From Canary Islands. " Seeds of a climber with a lovely yellow flower. 
They, I believe, will be slow in sprouting." {Lewis.) 

148 



10 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23353 and 23354— Continued. 

23354. (Jkkui i:\ .i ami mini Bolus. Barberton daisy. 

From Durban, South Africa. Procured from the curator of the Botanic 
Gardens. "The flowers are a beautiful shade of red." (Lewis.) 

23355 to 23363. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kafir. 

From Vereeniging, Transvaal, South Africa; original seed from Natal. 
Presented by Prof. J. Burtl Davy, agrostologisl and botanist, Transvaal 
Department of Agriculture. Received July 21, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following. Varietal descriptions by Mr. Carleton Jl. Ball. 

23355. White. Extra long heavy head; seed large, white, slightly 
flattened ; glumes greenish white. 

23356. White. Small head as in our domestic varieties; seeds and 
glumes very similar. 

23357. White kaflr form. Slender head; white kafir seed, but the 
greenish white glumes are longer than in a true white kafir. 

23358. Medium-sized head; spikelet rather small; glumes reddish to 
black, about as an orange sorgo; seeds varying from white tinged with 
red to orange. 

23359. Similar to No. 23358, but seeds averaging paler. 

23360. Medium kafir head; small orange seeds and greenish glumes 
tinged with red. 

23361. Similar to No. 23360, but glumes frequently a deep red. 

23362. Medium kafir head ; tinged red seeds and pale glumes. 

23363. Medium kafir head, but with deep reddish brown seeds and deep 
red glumes; strongly resembles a deep red Orange or Golman sorgo and 
may prove to be sweet. 

23364 to 23366. Litchi chinensis Sonner. Leitchee. 

From Canton, Kwangtung, China. Procured by Dr. John M. Swan, medical 
superintendent, the Medical Missionary Society's Hospital. Pveceived at 
the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station June 6, 1908. 

Trees of each of the following : 

23364. Kirai mi. "A delicious flavored and very popular leitchee. It 
comes in the fifth lunar month (July). Earliest variety." (Swan.) 

23365. Hak ip. " The black-leaf leitchee ; this is a favorite early sort, 
having a small seed, and is tender and very juicy. It ripens in the 
fifth lunar month (July), and we count it our best variety. The tree 
is grafted by the approach system." (Sivan.) 

23366. Xeu mm chi. "This' is the largest fruited and smallest 
seeded and sweetest leitchee in Canton, and is one of the best. It sells 
for 10 cents a caddy (about 4 cents a pound), double the price of the 
ordinary sorts. It ripens in the fifth and sixth lunar months (July 
and August)." (Swan.) 

" Leitchees like a rich, clayey soil and must not be allowed to suffer from 
drought." (Frank N. Meyer.) 

23367 to 23378. 

From Paramaribo, Surinam. Presented by Mr. J. R. Wigman, director of 
the Botanic Garden. Received July 24, 1908. 

Cuttings of each of the following : 

23367. Citrus limonum Risso. Lemon. 

From Saramacca district. 
148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 11 

23367 to 23378— Continued. 

23368. Citrus nobilis Lour. Mandarin. 
From Groningen Station. 

23369. Citrus aurantium L. Orange. 
From Voorburg estate. 

23370. Citrus aurantium L. Orange. 
From Groningen Station. 

23371. Citrus decuman a (L.) Murr. 

" CuracaoscJic alamoen." 

" We consider these trees just as good or in some respects even better than 
many well-known standard varieties." (Wigman.) 

23372 to 23378. Manihot spp. Cassava. 

23372. 

" Kankantrie tikie." 
23373. 

" Kaboegroeoeman." 
23374. 

" Boeroe tikie." 
23375. 

"Affie tikie." 
23376. 

" Pina jn'/ta." 
23377. 

" Ingi bitaivan." 
23378. 

- Bitar 

" The above yield the largest quantity of starch of any of the Surinam 
varieties." < Wigman. i 

23379 and 23380. Carica papaya L. Papaw. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. H. F. Schultz, through 
Mr. Frederic Chisolm. . Received July 21, 3 90S. 

Seed of each of the following : 

23379. "Superior variety; large fruit, solid yellow meat; spicy; obo- 
vate form; prolific bearer; mother tree at Ancon, Canal Zone." ,' 
(Schultz.) 

23380. " Very best variety, producing medium-sized to large fruit ; 
color of meat a golden yellow; flavor excellent, very aromatic; shape 
of fruit pyriform. Seed obtained from Culebra, Canal Zone." ( Soli ultz. ) 

23381 to 23386. 

From Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Presented by Dr. J. William Hart, 
director, Agricultural College, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received July 
23, 1903. 

23381. Melinis minutiflora Beau v. Molasses grass. 
" Catingueira soxa. This is the more valuable sort." (Hart.) 

23382. Andropogon halepexsis (L.) Brot. Johnson grass. 

"This stock does not spread by means of roots." (Hart.) 
148 



12 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23381 to 23386— Continued. 

23383 and 23384. " Seed of two coarse-growing forage grasses." {Hart.) 

23383. Panicum sp. 

" Capim milha branca de Itapira." 

23384. Panicum sp. 
•• Capim Quine." 

23385. Panicum maximum Jacq. Guinea grass. 

"Capim colonia. This is a rank grower and makes s quantity of bay 
that all classes of stock eal eagerly. In our alfalfa fleld it is the most 
persistent 'weed' that we have to contend with. Usually it is in flower 
every time the alfalfa is cut, and the combination bents timothy and 
clover." {Hart.) 

23386. Makanta abundinacka L. ( V) Arrowroot. 

" This is much superior to the common arrowroot we have heen grow- 
ing; is very large and easier to dig on account of its bnlhs being near 
the surface. It might be of some value where the common Bermuda 
arrowroot nourishes." {Hart.) 

23390. Tricholaena rosea Nees. 

From Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. Brazil. Presented by Dr. J. William Hart, 
director, Agricultural College, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received July 
27, 1908. 

"Favorite grass. A very fine hay grass. It does not grow in clumps like so 
many of our grasses, and may prove a good lawn grass for the South." (Hart.) 

23391 and 23392. 

From Spain. Received through Mr. M. Fraile, of this Department, July 28, 

1908. 

23391. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

" These roots of ' Mielga ' were only sent to show the size, and were 
taken from the roadside near the village of Villares de la Reina. This 
plant remains green through drought, while other small vegetation 
withers away." (Fraile.) 

" The name ' Mielga ' is never applied to the cultivated form of alfalfa, 
but only to the wild form. Some seedsmen also apply it to Medicago 
sativa varia. 

" The plants lack the upright habit of cultivated alfalfa, and are viewed 
very much as weeds are in this country. Frequently it is quite difficult 
to eradicate them from fields in which they have become established. 
The roots sometimes acquire a diameter of an inch or more." (Brand.) 

23392. Amygdalus communis L. Almond. 

"Cuttings of seedling hard-shelled almonds from along the railway 
track near Bobadilla. These trees were planted by the railroad company, 
and extend from Bobadilla 50 miles northward. They are now (1908) 
13 years old and are bearing fruit. This is the most colossal seedling 
orchard of these seedling hard-shelled almonds in the world, and the 
late-flowering varieties are worthy of being picked out and propagated." 
(Fairchild.) 

23393. Solanum jamesii Tori*. 

From Santa Fe, N. Mex. Presented by Mr. M. J. Nagle, through Mr. R. A. 
Oakley. Received July 18, 1908. 

See Nos. 10473 and 18342 for previous introductions. 

23395. Litchi chinensis Sonner. Leitchee. 

From Xodoa, island of Hainan, South China. Presented by Mrs. L. E. M. 
Kelly, Hoihow, island of Hainan, South China, via Hongkong. Received 
August 1, 1908. 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 13 

23395— Continued. 

" This shipment contains five different varieties of leitchees. The seeds were 
taken from selected fruits of the most delicious kinds and have been dried 
in the shade, as the Chinese say they will never grow if dried in the hot sun. 
In planting, the seeds must be barely covered with finely pulverized earth and 
watered freely." (Kelly.) 

23416. Pithecolobium dulce (Eoxb.) Benth. 

From Tamaulipas, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Clarence A. Miller, American 
consul at Matamoros. through Mr. E. C. Green, in charge of the South 
Texas Garden, Brownsville, Tex., at the request of Mr. Frederic Chisolm. 
Received August 3, 1908. 

" A plant used for tanning purposes. These seeds were secured from a 
small tree growing in the State of Tamaulipas, Mexico. The trees occur 
occasionally through the northern part of that State." (Green.) 

23417 to 23422. Axdropogon sorghu^i (L.) Brot. Sorghum. 

From Natal, South Africa. Presented by Miss Caroline E. Frost, Um- 
zumbe Mission Station. Received August 1, 1908. 

The following seeds. Varietal descriptions by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

23417. Kafir. 

" Ibele elimhlope. Tall, bears well, eaten by birds more than other 
kinds." (Frost.) 

Very slender head near BlacTchull kafir, but spikelets smaller and 
grain has pinkish tinge. 

23418. Kafir. 

" Ibele elifupi. A favorite variety among Zulus because it is short 
and easy to handle." (Frost.) 

A large heavy head near Red kafir, but glumes are greenish white 
and seeds pale red. 

23419. Sorgo (?). 

" Ihlosa. Tall; eaten by birds." (Frost.) 

A loose, open, medium-sized head with slender branches; rachis ex- 
tending only halfway through; glumes mostly shining black, and obovate 
seeds of a pinkish tinge. Pith discolored. 

23420. Sorg;o (?). 

" Njiba. Tall, rather bitter; larger seeds than other varieties; not 
eaten by birds." (Frost.) 

Short, oval head; rachis 1 inch long; branches- stout at crest; glumes 
short, mostly greenish white; obovate, pale red seeds; resembles our 
sumuc-mUo hybrid. 

23421. Kafir. 

"Apparently the same as the second variety (S. P. I. No. 2341S)." 
(Frost.) 

Small, slender head ; greenish glumes and large obovate pink seeds. 

23422. 

" Coolie corn. This grows larger and taller than any of the other vari- 
eties, eaten by birds." (Frost.) 

Probably not native to Natal, a form of Hackel's variety roxburghii, 
to which shallu belongs. Characterized by long, loose head; long slender 
branches; slender, acute, greenish to red glumes, spreading apart and 
becoming involute at maturity, completely exposing the flattened, oval, 
white seed, which shatters readily; strongly awned; almost identical 
with some mpembys. 

23423 and 23424. Phoenix spp. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Re- 
ceived July 27, 1908. 
148 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23423 and 23424— Continued. 

23423. Phoenix canariensis Cbabaud. (?) 

"This beautiful palm, considered by Prof. T\ Dammer, of Berlin, a 
distinct species il could not And out origin), produces fairly good dates 
and will. I think, interest Mi-. Swingle, who has asked me tor seed of my 

different Phoenix with eatable fruits for hybridization purposes." 
( Pro8chow8ky, ) 

23424. Piioimx kivi.ix ATA Jacq. (?) 

"Stem short: leaves 2-ranked. bright green, obliquely arcuate-recurved 
toward the apex: leaflets rigid, 12 inches long, 1 inch wide, lanceolate, 
acuminate, the lowest spinescent." (Bailey.) 

23425 to 23431. 

From Rio do Janeiro, South America. Presented by Dr. Wenceslao Bello, 
president of the National Society of Agriculture. Received July 31, 190s. 

The following plants: 

23425. Chusquea bambusaeoides (Raddi) Hackl. (?) 

" Taquantssu. A kind of bamboo bearing abundant seed and occurring 
in the neighborhood of Rio." (Bello.) 

23426. Mangifera indica L. Mango. 

"Itamaraca. A small yellow mango with thin skin, without fiber, and 
of very delicate flavor, bringing a high price on the market. Occurs in 
Pernambuco." (Bello.) 

23427. Platonia insignis Mart. 

" Bacopari. This fruit is slightly acid, has a white pulp, and is prob- 
ably a wild form." (Bello.) 

23428. Myrciaria edulis (Veil.) Skeels (Eugenia edulis Veil.). 

" CambucA. A very large tree with fruit the size of an apple, of yel- 
low color, much more delicate than the guava." (Bello.) 

23429 to 23431. Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) Berg. 

" Jabot icuba. Bears a small black fruit about the size of a plum, of a 
delicious flavor." (Bello.) 

23429. Var. coroa. 23431. Var. paulista. 

23430. Var. murta. 

23432 to 23435. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by Prof. C. S. Sargent, of the 
Arnold Arboretum. Received at the Subtropical Laboratory and Garden, 
Miami, Fla., August 4, 1908. 

The following plants: 

23432. Oroxylon flavum Rhed. 

A tree, with light brown bark. Flowers clear sulphur yellow, appear- 
ing in spring. 

" This species will probably be suited to the climate of the Southern 
States and of southern California, and will be a desirable ornamental 
tree on account of its large pinnate foliage and handsome yellow flowers." 
(Rhedcr.) 

23433. DORYANTHES PALMERI W. Hill. 

"An amaryllus-like herb. Flowers red, in an oblong, branched raceme, 
3 feet long, stem and bracts the same rich color as the flowers. A native 
of Queensland, Australia." (Bentham, Flora Australicnsis.) 

23434. SCHEFFLERA Sp. (?) , 

23435. Ficus pandurata Hance. 

"A low diffuse bush, with large broad leaves, from southern China." 
(Annals of Calcutta Botanic Gardens, 1887-88.) 

" It is of use as a greenhouse ornamental, and as such has been known 
to reach a height of 14 feet." (Young.) 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 15 

23436. Colchium autumnale L. Meadow saffron. 

From York, England. Purchased from J. Backhouse & Son (Limited) for 
Dr. R. H. True's experiments. Received August 11, 1908. 

••A low, perennial, bulbous plant, native in moist meadow lands in middle 
and southern Europe. The corins and seeds are used in preparing the extract 
and wine of colchicum and the alkaloid colchicun and its salts, employed in 
the treatment of gout. 

" Cultivated as an ornamental. Flowers in autumn. 

" This plant possesses very active properties, a small portion of the root or 
seeds taken internally being sufficient to cause poisoning." (True.) 

23437. Gladiolus spp. Gladiolus. 

From Pretoria, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy. Re- 
ceived August 7, 1908. 

" Corms of our native gladioli. There is more than one species represented 
in this collection." (Davy.) 

23438 to 23446. 

From Bagdad, Turkey. Procured by Mr. William C. Magelssen, American 
consul. Received August 11, 190S. . 

The following seeds : 
23438. Phoenix dactylifera L. Date. 

Ascherasi. 
23439 to 23446. Zizyphus jujuba (L.) Lam. " Nabuk." 

23439. Ascherasi. 23443. Khadrawi. 

23440. Khastawi. 23444. Zeytouni. 

23441. Zehdi. 23445. Jozi. 

23442. Beroen. 23446. Taoerzal. 

" The foliage of the Nabuk tree appears to be equally luxuriant on ah 
varieties, and there is no choice so far as their growth is concerned. The 
fruit differs slightly in taste and quality ; it is eaten by the poorer 
classes of Mohammedans and Jews. I am informed that the natives 
make it a practice to soak the seed in rose water before planting, claim- 
ing that this tends to increase the beauty of the tree and the flavor of 
the fruit. The Nabuk is certainly the finest shade tree grown in these 
parts, and I judge from the scant care given it that the tree must be an 
exceptionally hardy one." (Magelssen.) 

23449. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal. Presented by Mr. R. A. Davis, government 
horticulturist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received August 
13, 1908. 

" These seeds are from a natural variety, St. Helena, or Transvaal Yellow. 
always coming true. As a fruit, they are a good cling canner, but otherwise 
useless. As a stock, they are unequaled for wet, dry, rocky, or loamy soil ; will 
germinate and fruit in two years if thrown from a railway carriage window 
into a rocky crevice. I think it should be very useful in California." (Davis.) 

23450. Agathis australis (Lamb.) Steud. Kauri pine. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. D. Petrie. Received 
August 13, 1908. 

" This magnificent tree measures, under favorable circumstances, ISO feet in 
height and exceptionally 17 feet in diameter of stem, the estimated, but per- 
haps overrated, age of such a tree being 700 to 800 years. It furnishes an 
excellent, remarkably durable timber, straight grained, and much in use for 

70949— Bull. 148—09 3 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23450— Continued. 

masts, boats, Buperior furniture, casks, and rims of sieyes, and it is particularly 
sought for decks of ships, lasting for the latter purpose twice as long as the deal 
of many other pint's, it is also :i\;iii:ii>i<' for railway brake blocks and for 
carriages, and is regarded as one of the most durable among timbers of the 
Coniferse. * * * This tree yields, besides, the Kauri resin of commerce. 
* * * The varnish made of it is almost colorless." (Extract- from von 
Mueller.) 

23451. A.RISTOTELIA MACQUi L'Herit. " Maqui," 

From Santa Dies. Chile. Procured from Salvador [zquierdo. Received 
August is. L908. 

"Seed of the Chilean shrub which is so much used for giving color to pale 
wines. The color is extracted from the berries or seeds by trituration. mac< ra- 
tion, and. finally, decantation." (Izquierdo.) (See also No. 19113 for further 

description. ) 

23452. Rubus spectabilis Pursh. Salmon berry. 

Prom sitka. Alaska. Received through Prof. C. C. Ce<>r-eson, special 
agent in charge, Agricultural Experiment Station, August I s . L908. 

"The salmon berry of Oregon, California, and Now Mexico, closely allied 
to /.'. nutkanus, but the stem is nearly evergreen, and ramification persistent and 
prickly. Fruit large, red. yellow, or salmon colored, raspl>erry-like. Mr. L. 
Burbank records that the stems will reach a height of 20 feet and occasionally 
a foot in diameter. Fruit larger than any raspberry, but not so well tasted. 
Crop always abundant. Fruit ripe when other raspberries are only in bloom. 
[Prof. Meehan.] Requires moist, sandy land. Promising for hybridization." 
(Von Mueller.) 

23453. Voaxdzeia subteruanea (L.) Thouars. Woandsu. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. P.urtt 
Davy, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received August 7, 1008. 

"African groundnut, African ground pea, woandsu. and erroneously goober 
pea. 

" Native of Madagascar, Comoro Island, and various parts of Africa as far 
south as Natal. A plant very much resembling the peanut, but containing only 
one seed in each pod. These pods ripen under the ground in the same manner 
as peanuts. The plant is smaller, and in most cases not so prolific in seed as 
the best varieties of peanuts. These are used in about the same manner as 
peanuts both for human food and as feed for animals. In California the 
woandsu has yielded nearly as heavily as the best varieties of peanuts, but at 
most other places the yield has been less." (C V. Piper.) 

23455. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Beaufort, S. C. Purchased from Mr. A. P. Prioleau, through Mr. 
Frederic Chisolm, for stocks. Received August 20, 1008. 

" This fruit, commonly called jujube, is very pleasant eaten raw. and is largely 
used in the Southern States in making jujube paste and similar confectionery. 
The fruits are dried by the Chinese, and in that condition taste somewhat 
between a raisin and a dried date." (Chisolm.) 

23456. (Undetermined.) 

From Nodoa, island of Hainan, South China. Presented by Mrs. J. Frank- 
lin Kelly, Hoikow, island of Hainan, South China. Received August 
20, 1008. 

"Seed of the 'yellow-skin' (Iu Foe), a fruit the size of a large marble, 
yellow skin when ripe, with a tart, delicious flavor. It makes a nice, cooling 
drink and lovely jam, a little like gooseberry in flavor. It grows on a pretty, 
symmetrical tree." {Kelly.) 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 17 

23457. Pithecolobium dulce (Koxb.) Benth. Guamuchitl. 

From Ixtlan del Rio, Tepic, Mexico. Presented by Sr. Alfredo Lonergan, 
through Mr. Frederic Chisolm. Received August 11, 1908. 

"A thorny leguminous tree known in Mexico as guamuchitl, or huamuchitl ; 
the sweetish pulp of the pods is universally eaten by the natives, while the 
bark of the tree is used in tanning leather. Has succeeded at Miami, Fla." 
(Chisolm.) 

23458 to 23467. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Peru. Procured by Mr. T. F. Sedgwick from Antonio Cantelli Y Hno, 
Lima, Peru, for Mr. C. V. Piper. Received August 19, 1008. 

23458. Barranca. 23463. Monsefu. 

23459. Conchapilea. 23464. San Pedro. 

23460. Pueblo Nueva. 23465. Acos. 

23461. Gochahuiaico. 23466. Supe. 

23462. Omas. 23467. Sayan. 

23468 and 23469. 

From Salamanca, Spain. Secured by Mr. Manuel Fraile, of this Depart- 
ment. Received August 24, 1008. 

23468. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

Roots from plants growing beside road between Salamanca and Vil- 
lares de la Reina, Spain. (See No. 23391 for further remarks.) 

23469. Amygdalus communis L. Almond. 

Hard-shelled sweet variety. From a tree 30 years old growing in a 
garden in Villamayor, Salamanca, Spain. 

23471 to 23473. 

From Cochin China. Presented by Hon. Jacob E. Conner, consul. Re- 
ceived August 25, 1908. 

The following seeds : 

23471. Averrhoa bilimbi L. Cucumber tree. 

"Flowers red in larger racemes than A. carambola; fruit smaller than 
carambola, cucumber shaped, smooth, green rind, and acid pulp. Ex- 
tensively cultivated in South America." (L. II. Bailey.) 

23472. Phyllanthus acida (L.) Skeels (Averrhoa acida L.). 

Otaheite gooseberry. 

"Shrub, with ovate acute leaflets; flowers on separate branches be- 
low the foliage; fruit fleshy, edible. India and Madagascar. W. Harris, 
of Hope Gardens, Jamaica, West Indies, writes that the Otaheite goose- 
berry is an elegant shrub or small tree, often cultivated in gardens in the 
lowlands of Jamaica and the West Indies. The fruit is very acid and 
astringent; the root is an active purgative, and the seed is also cathartic. 
The fruit is occasionally pickled or made into preserves. Plants are 
raised from seeds." (L. II. Bailey.) 

23473. Averrhoa carambola L. 

From tree growing in Mr. Conner's garden. " The fruit is quite juicy, 
piquant, and agreeable. As the plant can stand slight frost it ought to 
succeed in southern Florida. The fruit is well worthy of introduction." 
(Conner.) 

148 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23474. Illipe latifolia (Roxb.) F. Muell, Mahwah. 

From Baroda, [ndia. Presented by M. a. Sltole, Director of Agriculture, 
Baroda State, [ndia, through Mr. < >. w. Barrett. Received August 20, 
L908. 

a tree, growing 50 Peel high, contenl with dry, stony ground, enduring 
slight Frost. Wood so tough as t<» be adapted for plows and various machin- 
ery [Dr. Schlich]. The succulent corolla affords a never-failing crop of 
nourishing saccharine food to the rural Inhabitants. Bach tree supplies 2 to ."> 
hundredweight; each hundredweight yields on distillation about .'! gallons of 
spirits; essential oil is also obtained from the corolla. The flowers are also 
used for feeding cattle; they will keep for a long time. The seeds yield oil of 
iiiirk consistence." (Von Mueller.) 

23475. Paspalum dilatatum Poir. Large water grass. 

From Coffs Harbor, New South Wales, Australia. Purchased from Mr. 
\Y. Seccombe, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received August 22, L908. 

23476. Dendrocalamus strictus (Roxb.) Nees. Bamboo. 

From British India. Presented by Mr. Jean Houzeau de Lehaie, Saint 
Symphorien, Belgium. Received August 20, 1908. 

"One of the most valuable bamboos; is not hurt by slight frosts and, it is 
said, is very drought resistant. Wood of the finest quality. 

"1 hope that this valuable species, designated by Sir I). Brandis as the most 
important for the Southwest of the United States, has now been introduced in 
sufficient quantity so that a distribution may be made for outdoor planting. I 
think that in order to be successful the young plants ought not to be planted 
outdoors until the spring of 1910, unless it is under exceptionally favorable 
conditions, and that in any case it will be necessary to irrigate or water them, 
to fertilize them, and to keep them covered with straw the first summer after 
they are planted out. It will of course be only the most vigorous and well 
rooted plants which will show all their power of resistance and all their good 
qualities." {De Lehaie.) (See Xos. 21548 and 22819 for previous importations.) 

23477. Vitis vinifera L. Grape. 

From Aberdeen, Cape Colony, South Africa. Presented by Mr. F. W. 
Eagle, at the request of Mr. R. A. Davis, government horticulturist, 
Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received August 29, 1908. 

Karroo Belle. " This grape is a really good table fruit, possessed of hardy 
qualities and largely resistant in this country to oid'nun ; it would be quite at 
home in the Santa Clara Valley, and also, I think, farther south, even in 
Fresno." (Davis.) 

" I have succeeded in rearing a cross between the vines White Crystal and 
Muscat Hambro, which I have named Karroo Belle. A magnificent grape, 
strong grower, enormous cropper, very large and most compact bunches (some 
cut this season weighed from 5 to 11 pounds), round and very large, almost 
stoneless berries, which are a dark brownish purple where well exposed to the 
sun, but where hanging in the shade are only slightly tinted, or even quite 
green if very much shaded, and always with a great deal of bloom. Carries 
exceptionally well, as proved by a box of grapes sent to Johannesburg con- 
taining eight varieties, among which were Hannepoot, Crystal Muscat Hambro, 
Uitenhage Blue, etc., all of which were useless except* Karroo Belle, bunches of 
which were perfect. As regards keeping qualities, we cut the first ripe bunch 
off the parent vine on January 15, and the last one on June 28, which were 
perfectly sound except a few berries stung by the bees through the bag, so 
that we have been cutting grapes from the one vine for nearly five and a half 
months." (Mr. Eagle, Aberdeen, Cape Colony, in the Transvaal Agricultural 
Journal, January, 11)01, p. Jfi2.) 

" This variety of grape has been planted largely in different districts of the 
Transvaal. The vine arrived with a flattering reputation, but has, unfortu- 
nately, proved in the majority of cases quite worthless, owing to the fact that 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 19 

23477— Continued. 

it bore no fruit. The writer in the course of bis journeys through the country 
has only found two of the kind which ever gave signs of a crop, one of which 
has been grown by Mr. J. G. Beverley, of Zeernst. This particular vine has at 
present (in its third year) 59 bunches of grapes well formed and set and in 
perfectly healthy condition. It would appear, therefore, that this grape, one 
of the few varieties originated in South Africa, will under certain circumstances 
do exceedinglv well." (Extract from the Transvaal Agricultural Journal, Janu- 
ary, 1907, p. Jtll.) 

23481. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Alfalfa. 

From Hamburg, Germany. Purchased from R. Lief man Sons, Successors, 
through Mr. I. L. Radwaner, 533 East 149th street, New York. Received 
August 31, 1908. 

Sand lucern. 

23482. Vicia villosa Roth. Hairy vetch. 

From Svalof, Sweden. Purchased from the Allmanna Svenska Utsadesak- 
tiebolaget, through Dr. Albert Mann, at the request of Mr. A. D. Shamel. 
Received July, 1908. 

To be used by Mr. A. D. Shamel, at Hockanum, Conn., as a cover crop in his 
tobacco experiments. 

23483. Dahlia sp. Dahlia. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Purchased from Mr. T. C. Schmidt. Received 
September 3, 190S. 

" Variety coronata. This Mexican sort is to be regarded as a forerunner of 
quite a new class and certainly worth consideration, especially as the flowers 
have a pleasant honey-like scent, which up to the present no other dahlia has. 
The habit and growth of the plants are somewhat different from the other 
known dahlia sorts, because they first nearly fully develop and then bring up 
the enormously long flower stems, so that the flowers are from 20 to 28 inches 
freely above the foliage. The whole plant reaches a height of about 41 feet, 
blooms abundantly, and one can easily cut flowers with stems 24 to 30 inches 
long, which makes this sort valuable for large bouquets, especially as the cut 
flowers keep in water several days. 

"The color of the flowers is a brilliant and bright scarlet, the form that of 
the single dahlias, only the separate leaves are bent somewhat inward, and be- 
sides that the flowers close in the evening, assuming thereby the form of a 
crown. The raising from seed is not at all difficult. By sowing in May the 
plants bloom in July and August." {Schmidt.) 

23485 and 23486. 

From Stockholm, Sweden. Presented by Dr. Veil Wittrock, director, Bo- 
tanic Garden. Received August, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following : 

23485. Vicia kokanica Reg. & Schmal. 

"A perennial species occurring in the mountains of Kokan near Woruch, 
Xaubid, and in the passes of Basmandinsk (Turkestan)." (O. Fcdts- 
chenko, in Fedtschenko's Journey in Turkestan, vol. S.) 

23486. Phleum pratense nodosum (L.) Halacsy. 
23487. Phalaris coertjlescens Desf. 

From Melbourne, Australia. Presented by Mr. Alfred Henry. Office of 
Titles, Queen street, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received August, 1908. 

See No. 22961 for description. 
148 



20 SKIDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23488. AM>i;ni'<><;<>\ iiai.i i i \sis (L.) Brot. Johnson grass. 

Prom Brazil. Presented by Mr. H. M. Lane, president, Mackenzie College, 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received August 24, £908. 

"This seed whs procured from ;i seedsman and is probably from one <»f the 
northern States of Brazil. Ii does not grow here (Sao Paulo)." {Lane,) 

23489 to 23493. 

From Cordoba, Spain. Received through Mr. Manuel Fraile, of this Depart- 
ment, September I. 1908. 

23489. Pi \i< \ granattjm L. Pomegranate. 
Sweet. 

23490. Punica gbanatum L. Pomegranate. 
Sour. 

23491. Amygdalus communis L. Almond. 

Sweet. 

23492. Amygdalus communis L. Almond. 

Bitter. 

"These almonds are said to flower in April and May. but as the region from 
which they come is a rather cool one they probably should not he regarded as 
late-llowering varieties." (Fraile.) 

23493. Crocus sativus L. Saffron. 

23494. Cucurbita pepo L. Squash. 

From Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon, Manila, P. I. 
Received August 20, 1008. 

" Calabaza. This plant was found growing on a house in a barrio of a small 
town on the shores of the Laguna de Bay, Luzon. The leaves are not unusual 
in shape, but the center of each is of the richest gold or orange yellow surrounded 
by a /one of the darkest and blackest of vegetable greens. The fruit from 
which these seeds were obtained was rather small, weighing only about 2 
pounds, with a major diameter 1 of 6^ inches and a minor of 4i inches. The 
fruit has all the sweetness, dryness, and chestnut-like flavor of the best strains 
of the Winter Hubbard squash. Externally the skin is smooth, the central 
zone being of a dark rich green, on each side of which is an orange-yellow cap. 
It looks more like a striking fancy gourd than a squash. The owner of the vine 
from which I obtained the single fruit claimed that no one else owned a similar 
plant, as he had always refused to sell mature fruits or seeds. From the 
appearance of the vine I believe that it is a shy bearer, which does not lessen 
the value of the plant as an ornamental of a very unusual character." {Lyon.) 

23495. Eucalyptus microtheca F. Muell. . Coolibah. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Procured from Mr. J. H. 
Maiden, director and government botanist, Botanic Gardens. Received 
September 8, 1008. 

" Widely dispersed over the most arid extratropical as well as tropical 
inland regions of Australia. The ' coolibah ' of the aborigines, according to 
the Rev. Dr. Woolls. The tree wants ferruginous-gravelly soil, perfectly 
drained. Withstands unscorched a frequent heat of 156° F. in Central Aus- 
tralia, yet was not affected by exceptionally severe frosts (18° F.) in the south 
of France when many other eucalypts suffered. The development of this 
species in southern France and Algeria has been marvelously quick. [Prof. 
Na'udin.] One of the best trees for desert tracts; in favorable places 150 feet 
high. Wood brown, sometimes very dark, hard, heavy, and elastic; it is pret- 
tily marked, hence used for cabinetwork, but more particularly for piles, bridges, 
and railway sleepers. [Rev. Dr. Woolls.] " (Von Mueller.) 

" This seed was introduced partly for raising trees for honey in California." 
( Young. ) 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 



21 



23496 to 23518. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Company 
Received August 14, 1908. 

The following seeds from the Jingpoo Chrysanthemum Garden. Japanese 
names quoted : 

23496 to 23502. Chrysanthemum stiptjlaceum (Moench) W F 
Wight. 



23496. 

23497. 

23498. 

23499. 

Pink. 

23500. 

Pink. 

23503. Aster sp 

Purple. 
23504 to 23518. 



" Shiro-mame." 
- Kangiku." 
Best pink. 
" Kyo-miyage." 

" Nure-garasu." 

(?) 



23501. 

Purple. 
23502. 

Purple. 



Hurasakirno-kuruimono." 



OritaJci-shiba" 



Wight. 



Chrysanthemum stipulaceum (Moench) 

Matsu-no-yuki." 

Gano-no-yuki." 



W 



23512. 

White. 
23513. 

White. 
23514. 

White. 
Bushi-no-kagami" 23515. 



Uji-no-sato." 



Hakuhoshu." 



Date-musume.' 



Okino-kazaS 



Fuki-no-yama? 



" Okina-no-tomo.' 



" Jitsugetsu." 
White and purple mixed. 
23516. Yellow. 



23517. ' 

Yellow. 

23518. ■ 

Yellow. 



Kin^kujiyaku" 



A zami." 



23504. " Hano-no-seki," 

Purple. 

23505. " Shukokin." 
Red. 

23506. 

Red. 
23507. 

Red. 
23508. ' 

Red. 
23509. 

White. 
23510. 

White. 
23511. 

White. 

23519 and 23520. Garcinia spp. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub. 
4, 1908. 

23519. Garcinia benthami Pierre. 

" This species is very widely distributed in all the provinces of lower 
Cochin China and Cambodge. 

" Branches opposite, tetragonal, very long. Leaves petiolate. The 
flowers are terminal at the summit of a short shoot more or less sur- 
rounded with bracts. They are solitary in the female plant. The petals 
are broader and thicker than the sepals and are yellowish. In the 
female flowers the stamens are completely lacking and the gynaeceum 
has the form of a pear. The fruit retains the form of the pistil. It con- 
tains 5 to 10 seeds having the form of a crescent. 

" The tree is 20 to 25 meters high, of pyramidal form. Trunk straight, 
45 to 50 centimeters thick, covered with a blackish bark, rough exteriorly, 
filled interiorly with a white juice, present in all parts of the plant and 
becoming black on exposure to light. 

148 



Received September 



22 SEEDS AND 1*1. AN is IMPORTED. 

23519 and 23520— Continued. 

••The wood of G. benthami Is reddish brown and very mucb esteemed. 
ii is used for the same purposes as Hi.it «•!' c. ferrea and differs from 
it very little, if we consider what Rumphius says about that of Q-. cele- 
bica I... we may regard it as established thai all the Garcinias with a 
white juice have reddish brown or honey-colored wood superior to that of 
the other species of Garcinia. This observation is Important for forest 
cultivation." {Extract from Pierre's Forest Flora of Cochin China.) 

23520. Gabcinla celebica L. 

■•This tree grows very quickly and without difficulty. The leaves have 

an acid flavor; the fruits remain acid a long time; their taste when 
they are perfectly ripe is somewhat like that of the cultivated mango- 
steens. An excellent jelly is made of them and a refreshing pectoral 
sirup which Lamarck s.iys is in daily use a1 Malic. Its fruits are used 
in dyeing, and their rind has astringent properties and serves to make 
Vinegar. A viscid, milky, yellowish juice runs from incisions made in 
the tree, which gives a species of gum. This mangosteen grows naturally 
in the Fast Indies and is also found in the island of Bourbon and in 
several of the Antilles. 

" It is not a very tall tree and has a large tufted top. The branches 
are glabrous, a little striate, slightly tetragonal, and covered with a 
grayish or dull red bark. The leaves are opposite, numerous, oval- 
lanceolate, pointed at the two ends, glabrous, green on both sides, much 
narrower and less thick than those of the cultivated mangosteen. The 
flowers are unisexual and borne on different plants. The female flowers 
are terminal, solitary, hardy pedunculated. The fruit is globular, of a 
yellowish red or saffron color, sometimes violet, crowned by the stigma ; it 
is a little bit larger than the ' pomme d'api,' which it resembles in form. 

" The yellow juice which comes from incisions in this mangosteen 
gives a kind of aromatic resin, sought after for medicinal purposes. The 
fruit furnishes a balsamic acid, and the bark tannin." (Extract from 
the Medical Flora of the Antilles, by Descourtilz.) 

" These two species of Garcinia were introduced for testing as stocks on 
which to grow the mangosteen, which is notably one of the weakest rooted 
plants of this genus." (Fairchild.) 

23522 to 23525. 

From Chungking, west China. Presented by Rev. J. F. Peat. Received 
August 24, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following. Varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen. 

23522. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 
Greenish yellow with dark hilum. 

23523. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 
Black. Similar in appearance to No. 19183. 

23524. Vigna sesqlipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 
Red. 

23525. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

23526. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 

From Caracas, Venezuela. Presented by Dr. E. Andre, Port of Spain, 
Trinidad, British West Indies. Received August 28, 1008. 

"A" curious variety." (Andre.) 

" Lint medium short staple length, drag very fine, of great strength. Prob- 
ably a tropical cotton adapted to only tropical regions." ( D. N. Shoemaker.) 

23527. Musa paradisiaca L. Banana. 

From Ambos, Camarines, P. I. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, 
Manila, P. I. Received September 8, 1908. 

" Seed of an edible species. The fruit is large and well flavored and the fari- 
naceous seeds are quite tender and eaten, not rejected, when the fruit is ripe. 
They do not harden until the fruit begins to decay. It is one of our many 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 23 

23527— Continued. 

varieties, and I can give yon no specific or even local name other than ' sagin,' 
but as sagin is Tagalog in general for banana, it does not amount to much." 
(Lyon.) 

23528. Ficus carica L. Fig. 

From Nodoa, island of Hainan, China. Presented by Mrs. J. F. Kelly, 
Hoihow, island of Hainan. Received September 8, 1908. 

Seeds of a Chinese fig. 

" Color when ripe dark red. Grows beside running water. Figs grow x on 
trunk of tree near base. Fruit is cool and delicious. Diameter as much as 
o| inches; outside pulp 1 inch thick and a large ball of white custard in the 
center surrounded by seeds." (Kelly.) 

23529 and 23530. Acacia spp. 

From Chico, Cal. Procured by Mr. W. W. Tracy, jr., in charge of Plant 
Introduction Garden. Received September 3, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following : 

23529. Acacia longifolia (Andr.) Willd. 

Seeds from tree on Mr. Bidwell's place at Chico, Cal. For trial at 
Brownsville, Tex. 

"A bushy Acacia useful in Australia for binding coast sands through 
the facility with which the lower branches throw down roots into the 
soil. The bark, while not so high in tannin as that of Acacia m&llissima, 
is used chiefly in tanning sheep skins." (Extract from von Mueller.) 

23530. Acacia mollissima Willd. 

Seed procured from trees thriving in the streets of Chico, Cal. To be 
tested in the open at Brownsville, Tex. 

" The black wattle of southeastern Australia and Tasmania. An 
Acacia thriving on the poorest soil and producing a bark so high in 
tannin as to render its cultivation very profitable, especially in Natal, 
where large plantations have been established on the rolling uplands; 
as a tan producer it is by far the most valuable of the Acacias, and the 
bark is especially valuable for tanning sole leather and heavy goods." 
(Extract from von Mueller.) 

23531 to 23534. Rubtjs spp. 

From Mokanshan, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Shanghai, 
China. Received September 5, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following: 

23531 and 23532. 

" These grow on the stem like the blackberry and have no core like 
the raspberry. They are both red, with a pleasant acid flavor, and might 
become fruitful and useful if cultivated in a proper location, or they 
may be useful in hybridizing experiments." (Farnham.) 

23533. 

" I found these growing wild and noticed that they resembled what 
I remember seeing in New England and heard called ' English black 
raspberry.' I transplanted some to the garden, but was told that they 
did not bear fruit. However. I persevered in cultivating them and they 
commenced bearing, and the berries have improved in size and quality 
until this year. Many of them were of good size and flavor." ( Farnh am. ) 

23534. 

"These seeds are from a bush I am cultivating that I found growing 
wild here on the mountain 2,000 feet above the sea. It resembles the 
raspberry in that the lobes of the berry are arranged around a core, or 
center, but the vine is more like the blackberry, though the leaves are 
very light on the under side, almost white, like the raspberry. The lobes 
are slightly acid and red. They are very few at present, but I hope will 
increase in number with cultivation." (Farnham.) 

148 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

23535. Indigofera glandulosa Wendl. Befri. 

Fn»in Baroda, India. Procured by Mr. William II. Michael, American 
consul-general, Calcutta, India, through Lieut. <'<>i. M. J. Meade, 0. I. EC, 
superintendent, Baroda Presidency. Received September I. L908. 

"The befrl plant is :m annual and belongs to the natural order Leguminosse. 
It generally grows In black Boil, and does nol require much water. Befri is 
contained In very small pods, which are gathered after the rainy season is over. 

"Befrl contains 21.13 per cenl of albuminoids, whereas their proportions in 
[ndian wheal and oatmeal are, respectively, 13.50 and L6 per cent. In other 
words, befrl Is 56 i»<t cent more nutritious than wheal and '■'<- per <<*i 1 1 more so 
than oatmeal, it is ground, mixed with Hour of bajrl or other loss nutritious 
grains or grass seeds, and made Into bread, bhedki, etc." (Shamsudin •/. sule- 
HHini. chief medical officer of Baroda State.) 

23536. Canarium luzonicum (Blume) Gray. Pili nut. 

Prom Tayabas Province, P. I. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Manila, 
P. I. Deceived September 8, 1908. 

•• I sent some of these nuts to a New York fruit seller some five years ago, 
and in his opinion they rivaled the famous Brazil nut (Bertholetia) as a des- 
sert nut. He. however, expressed an adverse opinion of their ever having any 
commercial value as dessert nuts, owing to the hard shell resisting any ordinary 
hand nutcracker. 

"In a lot I picked up in Tayabas I found two or three which, though far 
from having paper shells, were amenable to my heel on a board floor. I thought 
the matter worth looking up, and ascertained that they came from the neigh- 
borhood, and spent a few days collecting fruits from all the fruiting trees in 
the vicinity. Although 1 made no 'find,' I send on the fresh collected seeds for 
you to grow as stock in case I am able to secure later scions of the paper-shell 
variety." (Lyon.) (See No. 21860 for previous importation.) 

23542. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Paris, France. Presented by Mr. W. W. Keen, 1729 Chestnut street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. Received August 26, 1908. 

" Seed of melons now so abundant here (Paris). They are much larger than 
our cantaloupe and of quite as fine a flavor, if not even better. The interior is 
a beautiful reddish yellow." (Keen.) 

"This is probably one of the varieties of the large Persian melons which do 
not thrive in this region (Washington, D. C), but do much better in the hot, 
dry climate of Colorado and westward." (W. W. Tracy, sr.) 

23543. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

From Helsingfors, Finland. Presented by Mr. V. F. Sagulin. Received 
September 10, 1908. 
Finnish runner bean. 

23544 to 23547. 

From Ningyuenfu, Szechuan, via Chengtu, China. Presented by Rev. 
R. Wellwood, American Baptist Mission. Received September 10, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following. Varietal descriptions by Mr. H. T. Nielsen. 

23544 to 23546. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

23544. Large yellow with dark hiluin ; similar in appearance to 

Xos. 19986 and 22877. 

23545. Yellow with brown hilum; similar in appearance to No. 
17862. 

23546. Very small, black, smaller than any black-seeded soy bean 
we have had. 
23547. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 25 

23548. Psidium guajava L. Guava. 

From Bradentown, Fla. Presented by Mr. W. A. Berg, through Mr. Walter 
Fischer. Received September 16, 1908. 

" Seed of the largest and finest fruit that I have yet seen. Weight, from 7 to 
10 ounces ; color of outside skin, green : when ripe the flesh is cream colored ; 
fruit has a slight banana flavor and is late in ripening, coming in when others 
have gone. Flesh one-half inch thick. Seeds from 75 to 175 in number, 
bunched." (Berg.) 

23549. Arachis hypogea L. Peanut. 

From Cochin China. Presented by Mr. J. E. Conner, American consul, 
Saigon, Cochin China. Received August 28, 1908. 

" These are very small, very abundant as to the number of seeds, but about 
equal in weight to the yield of the Javanese peanut (about 1,700 pounds to the 
acre). Because of the smallness of the seed the officials at the Jardin Botanique 
hadn't any good words for it. I tried to discover whether they were bunched 
together more closely at the root of the plant, but without success. They are 
planted in rows, distanced 40 cm., the rows 50 cm. apart, in soil sandy, moist, 
and rich in nitrogen though poor in phosphoric acid, potassium, and lime." 
(Conner.) 

23551 to 23623. Solanum tuberosum L. Potato. 

From Chile. Procured from Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, through 
Mr. Alfred A. Winslow, American consul, Valparaiso, Chile. Received 
at the Mississippi Valley Plant Introduction Garden, Ames, Iowa, August, 
1908. 

The following tubers. Descriptive notes by Prof. S. A. Beach, Mississippi 
Valley Plant Introduction Garden. 

23551 to 23577. 

" Each of these is a wild variety or class of its own, sent as found grow- 
ing in the virgin bush on the hills, mountain sides, and lowlands on the 
island of the archipelagos de Chiloe and Guaitecas. They form the sole 
food of the Chilote Indians and other native inhabitants. These tubers 
grow abundantly in spots, often very deep in the ground or gravel. Many 
grow from self-sown, grown, and planted seedlings. These preserve their 
character and improve, increase in size, and also perfect their forms for 
five consecutive years, when they become established sorts. Thousands 
have to be dug to make small collections of new kinds. Often when a 
little tuber is found it must wait many days for its companion to be 
found far away. Generally all these improve with continued cultivation. 
They are all good eating, especially baked; some when boiled are inclined 
to dissolve, but with continued planting they outgrow this fault. A col- 
lection of seedlings is more effective to work on than sowing seeds, which 
grow in every direction but the desired, and frequently strike back to the 
worthless wild sorts." (Husbands.) 

23551. Dark purple, elongated, irregular. Flesh dark in center, 
with purple line about darker portion. 

23552. Red, elongated, irregular. 

23553. Purple, round, flattened, regular. 

23554. Purple, elongated, irregular. 

23555. Dark purple, round or elongated, irregular. Flesh yellow. 

23556. White, purple eyes and eyebrows, elongated. 

23557. White, round or elongated, irregular. 

23558. White, roundish but very irregular in shape, slightly 
flattened. 



23559. Pink, elongated, irregular. Flesh contains a distinct line 
about half way from center to circumference. 



148 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23551 to 23623 Continued. 
23551 to 23577 -Continued. 

23560. While, round. Flesh deep yellow. 

23561. Red, elongated, Irregular. 

23562. Red, oblong. Irregular. 

23563. Pink, elongated, regular. 

23564. Purple, round, one specimen knobby, regular. 

23565. White around eyes, balance purple, round, flattened, 
regular. 

23566. Purple, round, regular. 

23567. White, round, regular. 

23568. White, round, regular. 

23569. White, elongated, regular. 

23570. White, round, regular in size, irregular in shape. 

23571. Purple, elongated or round, irregular. 

23572. White, blotched with pink, round, irregular. 

23573. Dark, mottled with purple, round, irregular. 

23574. White, oblong, very irregular and knobby. 

23575. White, round, regular. 

23576. White, round, regular. Flesh deep yellow. 

23577. White, elongated, flattened. 

23578 to 23623. 

" The following represent varieties of good potatoes of wild origin 
from the archipelago before named. There are no duplicates; if they 
are alike, they came from distant parts and were grown under such 
distinct conditions as to location, soil, moisture, plant food, etc., as to 
entitle them to new classification. The smallest that were suitable for 
seed were collected for economy of space, which is very limited when 
collecting tours are made on horseback. There are all sorts — white, yel- 
low, pink, etc., fleshed. The yellow, and some white ones, are inclined 
to sweetness and are of extra fine flavor. If they retain their native 
merits when planted in such a distant home, you will get almost any 
result you seek. I have, how r ever, proved to my satisfaction that extreme 
changes in localities and conditions influence and alter flavor, size, and 
shape. Many improve, others deteriorate. The red-skinned classes sent 
are bad forms, but are very fine sorts to eat. Their names are of no 
value, as they are local Chilote Indian names ; often the same potato 
has a different name in every locality where grown. Some of these are 
seedlings of the second and third years' growth. These will improve in 
shape, size, and flavor by planting; at least they would do so if planted 
in Chile. Long cultivation has made the others standard sorts, which 
hold their own (in Chile) with indefinite continued sowing. It will be 
strange if some of these will not have an affinity with your conditions. 
Among these you will find some extra early, others late, mostly medium 
early ; some with a very small plant growth, others rank. While all 
the flowers are true Solanum, they are of many different sorts and colors. 
Some roots spread largely and yield on new growth also ; others stay in 
their proper places. Generally speaking, all are very productive and 
yield from 40 to 120 for one; 60 per plant would be a safe average. 
Another feature is their uniformity in size and shape. All these have 
grown dry in short summers; that is, w T ith natural earth moisture and 
the extra heavy marine dews. I do not believe such tubers have ever 
been tested so far inland as Iowa. That they will reproduce themselves 
I have little hope. In my opinion they will be much better or worse ; 
as likely to be one as the other. From experiments I have made in 
Chile, this is foretold. No one knows results, as no one has ever at- 
tempted such experiments as you will make, i. e., from seaward to such 
a far distance inland. I have gained better results from inland to sea- 
ward. If you were to send me potatoes from Iowa and ask me to plant 
148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 



27 



23551 to 23623— Continued. 

23578 to 23623— Continued. 

them in Chile and afterwards return the product, I do not believe you 
would recognize them in any particular. I write these things for in- 
formation, and not as instruction. Very many of these potatoes do 
not rot if left in the ground through a winter of five months' continued 
rain. They must be on an inclined surface for drainage of the rain." 
(Hnsbandx.) 

23578. Light purple, round, regular. 

23579. White, russeted, elongated, flattened. 

23580. Red, round, irregular. Flesh with indistinct red line 
about outside I inch from circumference. Flesh is streaked 
with red. 



148 



23581. White, russeted, slightly elongated and flattened. 

23582. Faint purple, coarsely russeted, round, regular. 

23583. White, dumb-bell shaped, irregular. 

23584. White, elongated, flattened, regular. 

23585. White, round, regular. 

23586. White, elongated, flattened. 

23587. Pink, elongated, flattened, irregular. Flesh deep yellow. 

23588. White or red. mottled with purple, round, irregular. 

23589. White, elongated, irregular 

23590. Dull red, elongated, flattened, regular. 

23591. Red, slightly flattened, and oblong. 

23592. Light red, round or elongated, irregular in shape and 
size. Mottled flesh. Much' like water core in apples. 

23593. White, round, irregular. Flesh contains yellow streaks. 

23594. Purple, round, irregular, knobby. 

23595. White, round or elongated, flattened, irregular. 

23596. White, blotched with purple, round, irregular. 

23597. Purple, slightly elongated, and flattened. 

23598. White, some specimens russeted, irregular, slightly elon- 
gated. Flesh deep yellow. 

23599. White, elongated, regular. 

23600. Round, white, regular. 

23601. Round, slightly flattened, irregular, white. Flesh yellow. 

23602. White, elongated, regular. 

23603. White, round, flattened, irregular. 

23604. Red ; several specimens round, the others oblong. 

23605. White, pink around eyes, slightly elongated. 

23606. White, elongated, irregular. 

23607. Dull purple, round or elongated, flattened, irregular. 

23608. White, elongated, regular. Flesh white. (Type A of Hus- 
bands.) White, round, irregular. Flesh deep yellow. (Type B 
of Husbands.) 

23609. White, round, flattened, regular. 

23610. White, round. 

23611. White, russeted in patches, elongated, flattened, regular. 

23612. Round. 

23613. Red, elongated, flattened, regular. • Flesh yellow. 



28 SEEDS AXD PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

23551 to 23623 Continued. 
23578 to 23623— Continued. 

23614. Purple with white a round eyes, round, Irregular. Flesh 
yellow, marked with r<'<i. 

23615. White elongated, irregular, uniform. 

23616. Red, round, Battened, regular. Flesh streaked with red. 

23617. While with pink eyes, elongated, Irregular. 

23618. Dull red, coarsely mottled in small patches, elongated, 
ami flattened. 

23619. Red. elongated, flattened, Irregular. Flesh, deep yellow. 

23620. White, elongated, irregular. 

23621. Dull red, elongated, irregular. 

23622. White, round or elongated, flattened, irregular. 

23623. Red, elongated, knobby, irregular. 

23625 to 23627. 

From Orenburg. Russia. Presented by Mr. W. S. Bogdan, agronomist. 
Received September 8, 1908. 

The following seeds : 

23625. Medicago falcata L. 23627. Glycyrrhiza glabra L. 

23626. Lathyrus tuberosus L. 

23631. Colchicum autumnale L. Colchicum. 

From Baumschulenweg, near Berlin, Germany. Purchased from Mr. L. 
Spiith. for Doctor True's experiments. Received September 17, 1908. 

See No. 23436 for description. 

23632 to 23643. Musa spp. Banana. 

From Ceylon. Procured by Dr. C. Drieberg, secretary, Ceylon Agricultural 
Society. Colombo, Ceylon, at the request of Mr. O. W. Barrett. Re- 
ceived September 4, 1908. 

The following suckers : 

23632. Hambanpuicalu. 23638. Kolikuttu. 

23633. Suramondan. 23639. Rata Hondarawala. 

23634. Sudu Puwalu. 23640. Maha Alumondan. 

23635. Marthawalu. 23641. Puspakedeli. 

23636. Kalu Rata Hondarawala. 23642. Dalena. 

23637. Suwadel. 23643. Alumondan. 

" S. P. I. Xos. 23632 to 23641 and 23643 are varieties indigenous to Ceylon, 
while S. P. I. No. 23(142 is a variety imported from Queensland some time since, 
but is by no means an improvement on the Ceylon varieties. Varieties S. P. I. 
Xos. 23637 and 23638 are generally considered the best." (Drieberg.) 

23644. Coelococcus amicarum (Wendl.) W. F. Wight. 

Caroline ivory-nut palm. 

From Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Gardens of 
Xagtajan, Manila, P. I. Received September 21, 1908. 

See No. 21044 for description. 

23645. YlOLA CALCARATA L. 

From Kew, England. Presented by Mr. David Prain, director, Royal 
Botanic Gardens. Received September 21, 190S. 

" Introduced for the purpose of hybridizing with the common pansy to pro- 
duce an improved pansy that will withstand hot summer weather." (Oliver.) 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 29 

23646 and 23647. Ceratonia siliqua L. Carob. 

From Lisbon, Portugal. Secured by Mr. Louis H. Ayrae, American consul- 
general. Received September 21, 1908. 

Cuttings of eacb of tbe following. Tbe name of tbe plantation, proprietor, 
and tbe average annual production of tbe tree from wbicb tbe grafts were cut 
are given. 

23646. From Chao das Donas, plantation of Antonio Jose da Motta ; 
yield 35 to 40 pounds per annum. 

23647. From Valle de Arrencada. plantation of Joaquin Traquino ; yield 
15 to 20 pounds per annum. 

Tbese cuttings were procured to take tbe place of similar ones received in 
1907 and listed under Nos. 20962 and 20963, but wbicb died. 

23650. Solantjm muricatum Ait. Pepino. 

From Teneriffe, Canary Islands. Presented by Mr. Solomon Berliner, 
American consul, tbrougb tbe Department of State. Received September 
21, 1908. 

" Cuttings of a fruit known here as ' pera melon,' or melon pear. Tbis fruit 
grows on bushes about 2 or 3 feet bigb and wben ripe is yellow and tbe sbape 
of a melon; in taste it is a blend between a cantaloupe and a pear." {Ber- 
liner.) (See No. 21546 for otber importations of above.) 

23656. Rosa moyesi Hort. Rose. 

From London. England. Purchased from James Veitcb & Sons. Received 
September 23, 1908. 

"A very distinct Chinese species of dense habit and with very spiny growths 
and leaves. The latter have in most cases nine or eleven pinnae and they are 
very deep green. The flowers are nearly 3 inches across, rounded, single, and 
made up of very thick, substantial petals. The color is deep, rich, rosy red, 
but the buds are of brighter hue. This new rose should prove of great value 
in the creation of a new race of garden roses." {James Veitch & Sons.) 

23658. Citrus trifoliata L. 

From Santa Ines, Chile. Purchased from Mr. S. Izquierdo, through Mr. 
W. T. Swingle. Received September 25, 1908. 

" I cultivated this species here and it is the stock which I use for grafting 
the citrus varieties producing fruits for the trade." (Izquierdo.) 

23659. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Lindsborg. Kans. Presented by Mr. Carl Wheeler, through Mr. 
J. M. Westgate. Received September 25, 1908. 

Hungarian. " Said to be a part of a heavy shipment from Hungary to South 
America, but which could not be marketed in South America owing to financial 
stringency; several carload lots were sold to Kansas seed houses under the 
name of Hungarian alfalfa. Said to be a very hardy variety. To be grown for 
comparison and identification." (Westgate.) 

23660. Phalaris coerulescexs Desf. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received 
September 25, 1908. 

See No. 22961 for description. 

23662 to 23710. Eriobotrya japoxica (Thunb.) Lindl. Loquat. 

Reciprocal loquat crosses, raised at tbe Department greenhouses by Mr. 

G. W. Oliver, plant propagator. Numbered for convenience in recording 

distribution September, 1908. 
148 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23662 to 23710— Continued. 
Plants of cadi of the following: 

23662 to 23683. 

Olivier X Tan*ka. 
23684 to 23710. 

Tanaka X Olivier. 

The above crosses were made between Olivier, S. P. I. No. 6457, an<l Tanaka, 
S. P. I. N<». 8890 

23711. ClTBULLUS VULGARIS Schnul. 

Prom Egypt. Presented by Mr. Hubert S. Smiley. Gallowhlll, Paisley, 
Scotland. Received September 23, 1908. 

" Seeds of the ' Boutique el Zeit," commonly known as the ' (inedible water- 
melon." This comes from south of the Bahr el Ghael and round the port of 
Rumhek. The natives grow it after the rains and extract the seeds and boil 
them. The result is an oily lilm on top of the water. This is removed and the 
process continued until an oil is procured which is said to be very good for 
lighting purposes. Perhaps this plant would be of service to people in out-of- 
the-way parts of your country. The melon is unedible." {Smiley.) 

23712. Festuca rubra dumentorum (L.) Hackel. 

Chewing's fescue. 

From Wellington, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. T. W. Kirk, biologist, 
Department of Agriculture, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received Sep- 
tember 28, 1908. 

23713. Eucalyptus microtheca F. Muell. 

From Australia. Presented by Mr. W. R. Guilfoyle, director, Botanic and 
Domain Gardens, Melbourne, who procured it from J. Staer & Co., seeds- 
men, etc., Wahroonga, New South Wales. Received September 29, 1908. 

See No. 23495 for description. 

23714 to 23733. 

From East Africa. Received through Mr. O. W. Barrett, Director of 
Agriculture, Lourenco Marquez, Portuguese East Africa, September 21, 
1908. 

The following seeds : 

23*7 14. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

" (No. 1.) 'A sweet sorghum' in cultivation by the M'chopes Kafirs 
of Zavala section of Inharrime district. Height, 2.5 to 3.5 meters. Crop 
(second) in July." {Barrett.) 

" Hackel's variety roxburghii. A 14-inch panicle, loose and open, with 
very slender branches. Type of the Madagascar ampembies. Glumes 
rather broad, reddish, hairy, becoming involute and gaping at maturity. 
Seeds broadly oval, pearly white." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

23715. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

" (No. 2.) A goose-neck variety in common cultivation by Kafirs in 
Gazaland. The best of about 6 more or less distinct sorts. Height, 3 
to 6 meters. Prefers heavy alluvial soil. Native name (usually) 
mapira." (Barrett.) 

" Fragments of the head of a white-seeded sorghum probably similar 
.to the preceding (S. P. I. No. 23715). Glumes shorter and firmer, but 
involute and gaping. Seeds nearly circular." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

23716. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

"(No. 3.) A straight blackhull variety in cultivation by natives of 
lower Zambezi Valley. Height 3 to 4 meters." (Barrett.) 

148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 31 

23714 to 23733— Continued. 

"Variety roxturghii Hackel. A 14-inch head, typical, branches ex- 
tremely slender, glumes narrowly ovate to lanceolate, acuminate, deep 
mahogany red, involute and gaping at maturity. Seeds white, oval, sub- 
acute, very similar to shallu." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

23717. Vernonia sp. (?) 

"(No. 4.) Rambling shrub common in Gaza and Inharrime districts. 
Flowers fragrant, numerous, of unstable colors (white to bluish or rose). 
Ornamental. Height 5 to 10 meters." (Barrett.) 

23718. Canavali obtusifolium (Lam.) DC. 

"(No. 5.) A wild vine in open 'bush' between Chai-Chai and Inham- 
bane. Length 4 to S meters." (Barrett.) 

23719. Canavali obtusifolium (Lam.) DC. 

"(No. 6.) A wild vine in ' bush ' and along river banks in lower Zam- 
bezi Valley. Length 4 to 10 meters." (Barrett.) 

23720. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

"(No. 7.) A 'Kafir bean' in cultivation in the province of Inhambane. 
Rare." (Barrett.) 

23721. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

"(No. 8.) A very common 'Kafir bean' in Portuguese East Africa. A 
smaller form is not so common. Sandy soil preferred. Yield in fair soil, 
5 bags (80 kilos each?) per hectare." (Barrett.) 

23722. Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn. Ragi millet. 

"(No. 9.) A common crop in the lower Zambezi Valley. Prefers heavy 
alluvial soil. Height 1£ to 2 feet. Local name naxenim; Ichuabo name 
meriiM." (Barrett.) 

23723. Astragalus prolixus Sieber. 

"(No. 10.) An erect, much-branched leguminous herb in open veld in 
lower Zambezi Valley. Height about 1 meter." (Barrett.) 

23724. Ixdigofera sp. (?) 

"(No. 11.) A wild woody herb of the open veld in the lower Zambezi 
Valley. Height 1 to H meters." (Barrett.) 

23725. Crotalaria podocarpa DC. 

"(No. 12.) A wild woody herb of the open veld in the lower Zambezi 
Valley. Height * to 1 meter." (Barrett.) 

23726. Indigofera hirsuta L. 

"(No. 13.) A woody herb of the open 'bush' and alluvial plains of 
Gaza and Inhambane. Height 1 meter." (Barrett.) 

23727. Indigofera sp. (?) 

"(No. 14.) A creeping leguminous herb in sandy soils in Limpopo 
Valley (Gaza). A possible cover crop in sandy regions." (Barrett.) 

23728. Gossypium sp. (?) Cotton. 
"(No. 16.) A dwarf wild cotton of the open veld in scattered districts of 

Portuguese East Africa. Height about * to 1 meter. Prolific." (Barrett.) 

23729. Spathodea sp. (?) 

' "(No. 17.) 'TUgain. A close-branched evergreen tree of the 'bush' in 
Gaza. Suitable for a wind belt. Flowers rather large, whitish." (Bar- 
rett. ) 

23730. Vigna sp. (?) 

"(No. 18.) A leguminous vine of the 'bush' and veld. Length, 4 to 
8 meters." (Barrett.) 

23731. Telfairea pedata (Smith) Hook. 

"(No. 19.) A gigantic cucurbit apparently wild in the 'bush' of 
Inhambane. Dioecious. Plants live two or three years and attain a 

148 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23714 to 33733— Continued. 

diameter at tin* base «»t* some i; inches (47 centimeters In circumference). 
Seeds numerous in large < i- to I s indies in diameter) fruit. Oil of good 
quality; kernels s.iid to contain <;<> per cent. Planted as a new oil crop." 
< Barrett.) 

23732. SoI'IIOKA TOMENTOSA L. 

"(No. -<».) A gray-leaved shrub <»r small tree growing in sand In the 
const region of the Mozambique Company's territory. Suitable for a 
wind hedge In Florida." (Barrett.) 

23733. MniNA sp. 

"(No. 21.) Seeds found on hank of Chinde River (the north mouth 
of the Zambezi)." (Barrett.) 

23734 to 23739. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. W. W. Smith, acting 
superintendent. Royal Botanic Garden. Received August 21, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

23734. Tamarindus indica L. Tamarind. 
Sweet. 

23735. Cajan indicum Spreng. 

" May help us where grown in cotton fields to enrich the soil ; better 
than cowpeas." (H. E. Van Deman.) 

23736 to 23739. Mangifera indica L. Mango. 

23736. CopaVbhog. (See No. 10640 for previous introduction.) 

23737. Khirsapati. 

23738. Malda. (See No. 9808 for previous introduction.) 

23739. Kissenbhog. . 

23740 to 23744. 

From Wellington, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. T. W. Kirk, biologist, 
Department of Agriculture. Received September 30, 1908. 

The following seeds. Native names in quotations. 

23740. Dysoxylum spectabile (Forst.) Hook. 

Kohekohe. " A handsome round-headed tree 25 to 50 feet high, 1 to 3 
feet in diameter; flowers waxy white. 

" Timber suitable for inlaying and furniture ; leaves bitter and tonic." 
(Extract from Cheeseman's Man. N. Zeal. Fl.) 

23741. Sophora tetraptera J. Mill. 

Kowhai. "A small tree with exceedingly hard and durable wood, 
which can be used for cog wheels and other select structures. Trunk 
exceptionally attaining a diameter of 3 feet. ' The wood differs much 
from that of 8. tomairo of the Easter Islands [Dr. Phiilippi]." (Von 
Mueller.) 

23742. Nageia excelsa (D. Don) Kuntze. (Podocarpus dacrydioides 
A. Rich.). 

White pine, or Kali i Lutes. " One of the tallest trees of the colony; said 
to occasionally attain the height of 150 feet. The w T ood is white or pale 
yellow, tough and compact, straight grained and easily worked, but 
unfortunately not durable when in contact with the ground or where 
regularly exposed to dampness. It is very suitable for inside work of 
all kinds." (T. F. Cheeseman, Fl. N. Zealand.) 

23743. Myrsine tjrvillei A. DC. 

" Te Paii" "This is a small closely branched tree, 10 to 20 feet high; 
bark red on the young branches. The leaves are alternate, oblong, nearly 
smooth, margins undulate. The flowers are crowded in fascicles on the 
148 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1908. 33 

23740 to 23744— Continued. 

branches below the leaves; small, whitish. The ovary has a large ses- 
sile-fringed stigma. The fruits are small, round, and black. 

" These characters seem to me to be of importance in an ornamental 
way, if the tree will stand our climate." (H. C. Skeels.) 

23744. Clianthtts puniceus (Don) Soland. 

" This is an old-fashioned greenhouse plant, grown sometimes to cover 
rafters or trellis work, but more frequently trained around sticks placed 
around the edge of the pot. Cultivated in eastern greenhouses, and a 
favorite Californian outdoor shrub. Blooms all winter in Golden Gate 
Park, San Francisco. .The flowers, not very unlike those of the common 
Erythrina, are freely produced in hanging clusters. Cuttings rooted in 
early spring may be grown into good-sized plants during the summer. 
Water should be given sparingly during the dull months. Pruning, re- 
potting, and tying the shoots should be done just before the growth be- 
gins. A sharp lookout should be kept for the red spider, frequent syr- 
ingings being the only remedy for this pest." (G. W. Oliver and W. if., 
in Encyc. of Amer. Hart.) 

148 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Aca&to longifolia, 23529. 
molissima, 23530. 
Agathis australis, 23450. 
Alfalfa, Hungarian, 23659. 

(Peru), 23458 to 23467. 
sand lucern, 23481. 
(Spain), 23391, 23468. 
Algarobilla. See Caesalpinia brevifo- 

lia. 
Almond (Spain), 23392, 23469. 

bitter, 23492. 
sweet, 23491. 
Amygdalus communis. 23392, 23469, 
23491, 23492. 
persica, 23449. 
Andropogon halepensis, 23382, 23488. 
sorghum, 23333, 23355 to 
23363, 23417 to 23422, 
23714 to 23716. 
Arachis hypogaea, 23549. 
Aristotelia macqui, 23451. 
Arrowroot (Brazil), 23386. 
Aster sp., 23503. 
Astragalus prolixus, 23723. 
Averrhoa bilimbi, 23471. 

carambola, 23473. 

Bamboo (British India), 23476. 

(Rio de Janeiro), 23425. 
Banana (Ceylon), 23632 to 23643. 

(Philippine Islands), 23527. 
Bean, Bonavist. See Dolichos lablab. 
Finnish runner, 23543. 
Hyacinth. See Dolichos lablab. 
Befri. See Indigofera glandulosa. 



B ig non ia ung u is-cati, 



23353. 



Caesalpinia brevifolia, 23334. 

coriaria, 23335. 
Cajan indicum, 23332, 23735. 
" Calabaza," 23494. 
Canarium luzonicum, 23536. 
Canavali obtusifolium, 23718, 23719. 
Carica papaya, 23324, 23379, 23380. 
Carob. See Ceratonia siliqua. 
Carolina ivory-nut palm. See Coelo- 

coccus amicarum. 
Cascalote. See Caesalpinia coriaria. 
Cassavr. See Manihot sp. 
Ceratonia siliqua, 23646, 23647. 
Chinese date. See Zizyphus sativa, 

148 



Chrysanthemum (Japan), 23496 to 

23502, 23504 to 
23518. 
stipulaceum, 23496 to 
23502, 23504 to 
23518. 
CJiusquea bambusaeoides, 23425. 
Citrullus vulgaris, 23711. 
Citrus aurantium, 23369, 23370. 
decumana, 23371. 
limonum, 23367. 
nobilis, 23368. 
trifoliata, 23658. 
Clianthus puniceus, 23744. 
Coelococcus amicarum, 23644. 
Colchicum autumnale, 23436, 23631. 
Coolibah. See Eucalyptus microtheca. 
Cotton (Africa), 23728. 

(Venezuela), 23526. 
Cowpea (Africa), 23720, 23721. 
Crocus sativus, 23493. 
Cucumber tree. See Averrhoa bilimbi. 
Cucumis melo, 23542. 
Cucurbit a pepo, 23494. 

Dahlia sp., 23483. 

Crown, 23483. 
Daisy, Barberton. See Gerbera jame- 

soni. 
Date, Ascherasi, 23438. 
Dendrocalamus strict us, 23476. 
Dipterocarpus alatus, 23343. 

intricatus, 23344. 
Dolichos lablab, 23329, 23330. 
Doryanthes palmcri, 23433. 
Dysoxylum spectabile, 23740. 

Eleusine coracana, 23722. 
Eriobotrya japonica, 23622 to 23710. 
Eucalyptus microtheca, 23495. 

Fescue, Chewing's. See Festuca rubra 

dumentorum. 
Festuca rubra dumentorum, 23712. 
Ficus carica, 23528. 

pandurata, 23435. 
Fig (China), 23528. 
Fragaria indica, 23345. 



Garcinia benthami; 23519, 
celebica, 23520. 
(Java), 23519, 



23520. 
35 



36 



SKKDS AND PLANTS I .M P( HITLT). 



<;< i hi ra jamesoni, 2335 I. 
Gladiolus sp., 23437. 
Glycine hispida, 23325 to 23327, 23336 
to 233J \8, 25 1522, 2 I52S 1, 23544 to 23546. 
Glycyrrhiza glabra, 23627. 
Go88ypium sp.. 23728. 

hirsutum, 23526. 
Grape, Karroo Belle, 23477. 
Grass, Guinea. Sec Panicum maxi- 
mum. 
Johnson. See .\n<h<>i><>tion hal- 

large water. See Paspalum <H- 

latatum. 
molasses. Sec Melinis minuti- 

flora. 
unidentified (Brazil), 23383, 
23384. 
Guamuchitl. Sec PithecoloMum dulce. 
Guava. See Psidium guajava. 

Illipe latifolia, 23474. 
Indigofera sp., 23724, 23727. 

glandulosa, 23535. 

hirsula, 23726. 

Jujube. See Zizyphus sativa. 

Kafir. See Sorghum. 
Kauri pine, 23450. 

Lathyrus tuberosus, 23626. 

Leitchee, Hak Ip, 23365. 

Kwai mi, 23364, 
Neu Mai Chi, 23366. 

Lemon (Surinam), 23367. 

Leucaena glauca, 23340. 

Licorice. See Glycyrrhiza glabra. 

Litchi chinensis, 23364 to 23366, 23395. 

Loquat. See Eriobotrya japoniea. 

Mahwah. See Illipe latifolia. 
Mandarin (Surinam), 23368. 
Mangifera indica, 23426, 23736 to 

23739. 
Mango, Gopalbhog, 23736. 
Itamaraca, 23426. 
Khirsapati, 23737. 
Kissenbhog, 23739. 
Malda, 23738. 
Manihot sp., 23372 to 23378. 
Maqui. See Aristotelia macqui. 
Maranta arundinacea, 23386. 
Meadow saffron. See Colchicum au- 

tumnale. 
Medicago falcata, 2362.". 

sativa, 23391, 23458 to 23467, 
23468,23659. 
varia, 23481. 
Melinis minutiflora, 23381. 
Meyer, F. N., seeds and plants secured, 

23348 to 23352. 
Millet, Ragi. See Eleusine coracana. 
Mucuna sp., 23733. 
Musa sp., 23632 to 23643. 
paradisiaca, 23527. 
Muskmelon, Persian, 23542. 

148 



Myrdarla cauliflora, 23429 to 23431. 

cdu I is, 23428. 
MyrHne urvillei, 2371.".. 

•• Nabuk." Sec Zizyphus jujuba. 
Wageia excelsa, 237 12. 

Necklace seed. Sec Ij iic(k nil ulauca, 

Ophiopogon japonicus, 23348. 
orange (Surinam), 23369, 23370. 
Oroxylon flavvm, 23132. 
Oryza sativa, 23: 139. 
Otaheite gooseberry. See Phyllanthus 
aciila. 

I 'a Hie um sp.. 23383, 23384. 
maximum, 23385. 
Papaw. See ('(trica papaya. 
Paspalum dilatatum, 23475. 
Pea, field. See Pisum arvense. 
Peach, St. Helena, or Transvaal Yel- 
low, 23449. 
Peanut (Cochin China), 23549. 
PepinO.. See Solatium m 11 tied I U til. 

Phalaris coerulescens, 23487, 23660. 
Phaseolus vulgaris, 23543. 
Phi cum prat case nodosum, 23486. 
Phoenix canariensis, 23423. 

dactylifera, 23438. 

reclinata, 23424. 
Phragmites vulgaris, 23323. 
Phyllanthus acida, 23472. 
Pili nut. See Canarium luzonicum. 
Pisum arvense, 23331, 23525, 23547. 
PithecoloMum dulce 23416, 23457. 
Platonia insignis, 23427. 
Poa pratensis, 23349. 
Pomegranate (Spain), sour, 23490. 

sweet, 23489. 
Pomelo (Surinam), 23371. 
Potato (Chile), 23551 to 23623. 
Psidium guajava, 23548. 
Punica granatum, 23489, 23490. 

Raspberry (China), 23346. 
Reed (Sweden), 23323. 
Rice (China), 23339. 
Rosa moyesi, 23656. 
Rubus sp., 23346, 23347, 23531 to 23534. 
spectabilis, 23452. 

Saffron. See Crocus sativus. 
Salmon berry. See Rubus spectabilis. 
Schefflera sp., 23434. 
Sedge (China), 23350 to 23352. 
Sola it um jdtiicsii, 23393. 

muricatum, 23650. 
tuberosum, 23551 to 23623. 
Sophora tomentosa, 23732. 
Sorghum, kafir, Blackhull, 23417. 
(Natal), 23421. 
Red, 23418. 
sorgo (Natal), 23419, 23420. 
undetermined (Africa >, U3714 

to 23716. 
(Natal), 23422. 
(R ho d esia), 
23333. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



37 



Soy bean, Rarchet, 23336. 

black, 23325, 23523, 23546. 

greenish yellow, 23522. 

Meyer, 23338. 

Riceland, 23337. 

yellow. 23544, 23545. 

yellowish green, 23326, 23327. 
Spathodea sp., 23729. 
Squash, " Calabaza," 23494. 
Strawberry (China), 23345. 

Tamarind (India), 23734. 
Tamarindus indica, 23734. 
Telfairea pedata, 23731. 
Tricholaena rosea, 23390. 

Undetermined, 23456. 
148 



Vernonia sp., 23717. 

Vetch, hairy. See Vicia villosa. 

Yicia kokanica, 23485. 

villosa, 23482. 
Vigna sp., 23730. 

sesquipedalus, 23328, 23524. 

unguiculata, 23720, 23721. 
Viola calcarata, 23645. 
Vitis vinifera, 23477. 
Voandzeia subterranea, 23453. 

Watermelon (Egypt), unedible, 23711. 
"Woandsu. See Voandzeia subterranea. 

Zizyphus jujuba, 23439 to 23446. 
satiua, 23455. 



o 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 153. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1908: 

INVENTORY No. 17; Nos. 23745 to 24429. 



Issued June 30 s 1909, 




WASHINGTON-- 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

The scientific and technical publications of th4 Bureatrof Plan! Industry, which was organized July 1, 
1001 oed In a single series of bulletins, a list ofwhlcjh follows. 

Attention Is directed to the facl thai the publications In this series afe not for general distribution. The 
Buperinteridenl of Documents, Government Printing < Office, Washington, F>. <'., is authorized by law to 
sell them it cost, and to bina all applications for theso bulletins should be made, accompanied by a postal 
money order for the requited amounl it i>\ cash. Numbers omitted from this list can not be furnished. 

No. 1. The Relation <>f Lime and Magnesia to Plant Growth. 1901. Price, lOcents. 
2. 'Spermatogenesis and Fecundation of Zamia. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 

3. Macaroni Wheats. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 

4. Range Improvement in Arizona. 1901. Price, 10 cents. 

6. A List of American Varieties of Peppers. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

7. The Algerian Durum Wheats. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

9. The North American Species of Spartina. 1902. Eaee, 10 cents. 

10. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

11. Johnson Grass. 1902. Price-, 10 cents. 

'12. Stock Ranges of Northwestern California. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

13. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

15. Forage Conditions on the Border of the Great Basin. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

17. Some Diseases of the Cowpea. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

20. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

22. Injurious Effects of Premature Pollination. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

25. Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
29. The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the'White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

34. Silkworm Food Plants. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. The "Bluing" of the Western Yellow Pine, etc. 1903. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of Spores in Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 
41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

43. Japanese Bamboos. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

45. Physiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Plants. 1903. Price, 5 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice: Its Uses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

56. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Price, 30 cents. 

57. Methods Used for Controlling Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

58. The Vitality and Germination of Seeds. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

59. Pasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

63. Investigations of Rusts. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

64. Method of Destroying the Growth of Algae, etc., in Water Supplies. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

65. Reclamation of Cape Cod Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Priee, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Price, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Pear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

78. Improving the Quality of Wheat. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

79. Variability of Wheat Varieties in Resistance to Toxic Salts. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

80. Agricultural Explorations in Algeria. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

153 [Continued on page 3 of cover.] 



. 



3* 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 153. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau . 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1908: 

INVENTORY No. 17; Nos. 23745 to 24429. 



LIB!: 

NEW \ .; \<. 
BOTA 
GAR- un- 



issued June 30, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



153 
2 



Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Assistant Chief of Bureau, Albert F. Woods. 
Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction. 
scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Frank X. Meyer and William D. Hills, Agricultural Explorers. 

Albert Mann, Expert in Charge of Special Barley Investigations. 

F. W. Clarke. Special Agent in Charge of Matting-Rush Investigations. 

Frederic Chisolm, Expert. 

Walter Fischer, R. A. Young, and II. C. Skeels. Scientific Assistants. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. C, April 14, 1909. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith and to recommend 
for publication as Bulletin Xo. 153 of the series of this Bureau, the 
accompanying manuscript, entitled "Seeds and Plants Imported 
During the Period from October 1 to December 31, 1908: Inventory 
Xo. 17: Xos. 23745 to 24429." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 
publication. 

Respectfully, B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 

Hon. James Wilson, 

. Secretary of Agriculture. 

153 3 



CONTEXTS 



Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 9 

Index of common and scientific nanie.< 55 

153 5 



B. P. I.— 467. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 
1908: INVENTORY NO. IT; NOS. 23745 TO 24429. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

It has been the custom for some time to mention in the introductory 
statement a few of the new arrivals which seem to be worthy the 
particular attention of the interested plant breeders and experi- 
menters throughout the country. This does not mean that they will 
in the end prove the most valuable, for often the promising introduc- 
tions are "dead failures," while those which come in like poor emi- 
grants with scarcely a letter of introduction frequently crop up later 
somewhere in the country as new and valuable cultivated plants. 

Those who are interested in the remarkable Chinese vegetables, 
whose possibilities have not at all been tested as they should be in 
this country, will find Mr. Meyer's collection, which he brought back 
personally from Peking, a most interesting one (No. 23932 and follow- 
ing). There can be little doubt that the Chinese restaurants which 
are scattered all over the country are creating a taste among Ameri- 
cans for these new vegetables, and the next step in their introduction 
will be their culture on a small scale to supply the growing demand of 
these restaurants. 

Mr. W. T. Swingle has called attention to the possibilities of the 
Indian bael fruit (No. 23745), both as a possible new fruit which is 
prized in India and as a dry-land stock for the orange, and living 
plants of it have been secured. 

Through Mr. Pink, a plant breeder of Queensland, a new raspberry 
has been secured which he claims has ahead v become a favorite in 
Australia (No. 23478). 

The Florida and California growers of the fruiting hedge plant 
Carissa will be interested in the newly secured species from Calcutta 
(No. 23750). 

A new green-manure legume from Sao Paulo, Brazil, is highly 
recommended by Professor Hart (No. 23751). 

A large collection of beans, cowpeas, squashes, field peas, and 
garbanzos and some remarkable hard-stemmed bamboos, which are 
quite different from the ordinary oriental bamboos, have been sent by 
Mr. Husbands (No. 23755 and following; No. 24211 and following; 
No. 24358 and following). 

83020— Bui. 153—09 2 7 



8 SEEDS AM) PLANTS IMPORTED. 

A number of additions to the strains or varieties of alfalfa have 
been made from Peru, Australia, Spain, and Chile. These are 
eagerly tried by the experts of the Department, who recognize the 
great possibilities which lie in any strain of this important plant 
which may fit into one of the many special conditions in the country. 

A collection of seed from grasses representing the best grazing 
species on the veldt of Rhodesia (No. l , :i , .)*_ ) <) and following) will be 
tested by the agrostologist of the Department. 

Mr. Meyers collection of Chinese hollyhocks, prince's-feathers, 
morning-glories, four-o'clocks, balsams, Chinese pinks, marigolds, 
garden asters, etc., may have something of decided interest in it for 
American florists (No. 23995 and following). 

A number of Syrian pomegranates from Sidon have come in for the 
experiments of the specialist of the Department, who is showing the 
possibilities of this fruit in America, which has so far been neglected 
by Americans. 

A wild gooseberry from an altitude of 10,000 feet, which is used as 
a hedge plant in the Szechuan Province of central China, and a wild 
strawberry of good flavor from the same locality have been secured 
by Mr. Wilson, of the Arnold Arboretum (Xos. 24156 and 24165). 

Two wild and possibly valuable dahlias from Mexico were sent in 
by Doctor Rose for the dahlia breeders (Nos. 24168 and 24169). 

The Bahia Navel orange has been reimported by Consul Demers 
direct from Bahia, scions being taken from trees that were grafted 
on the "Laranja da terra" which are said to yield better fruits than 
those grafted on the "Laranja tanga," two different stocks in use 
there. 

A distinct variety of the Para grass which has been so valuable in 
Texas has been secured from southern Brazil for trial in comparison 
with that already introduced (Xo. 24402). 

A collection of Stizolobium, or velvet beans, has been sent on 
request by Director Treub, of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Java, 
for the purpose of comparison with the recently introduced species 
from the Philippines which has proved so unusually promising. 

The inventory covers a period of three months, from October 1 to 
December 31, and includes 685 separate introductions. The prepara- 
tion of the manuscript has been in the hands of Miss Mary A. Austin, 
and the determinations of the material have been made by Messrs. 
W. F. Wight and H. C. Skeels, of the Office of Taxonomic and 

Range Investigations. 

David Fairchild, 

Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. C, April 3, 1909. 

153 



INVENTORY 



'23745. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight, 



Bael tree. 



From Savannah, Ga. Presented by Rev. Henry W. Hale. Received October 
6, 1908. 

See No. 22957 for description. 

23746. Bambos sexaxexsis Franch. et Sav. Bamboo. 

From Japan. Presented by the Yokohama Nursery Company, Yokohama, 
Japan. Received October 2, 1908. 

" Misuzudake. This is a dwarf variety of bamboo growing wild at high altitude 
in the province of Shinshiu." ( Yokohama Nursery Company.) 

23747. Maxgifera ixdica L. Mango. 

From Amritsar, Punjab, India. Procured from Mr. Theo. C. Mailer. Received 
October 8, 1908. 

Mailer. 

23748. Rubus rosaefolius 9 X ellipticus $ . Raspberry. 

From Wellington Point, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. 
James Pink. Received October 3, 1908. 

"Federal. This is a cross between a variety received from Japan under the name 
of Rubus flax a (-R. ellipticus Sm.), a strange growing plant, but useless commer- 
cially; this was the male parent, the mother parent being our native Rubus rosae- 
folius Sm. I crossed the plants in 1901. I did not think much of the product till 
the present season, when the variety has improved much by cultivation and has 
become a great favorite in the markets; in fact, it is the only Rubus grown for com- 
mercial purposes in Queensland. The fruit is larger than the English raspberry 



and of a bright crimson color. 



(Pin/:.) 



23749. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Lima, Peru. Presented by Senor Ignacio La Puente, through Mr. Charles 
J. Brand. Received July 10, 1908. 
"Senor La Puente states that this seed is from the latest crop, that it emanates 
from the Department of Supe, and that the variety is one greatly prized in the coast 
country of Peru. Kaerger in his paper 'Die Landwirthschaft in Peru' states that 
in the coastal region of Peru, alfalfa, strange to say, will not grow in the height of 
summer (January and February), even though it be given ample irrigation. The 
esteem in which this variety is held may bear some relation to this fact." (Brand.) 

23750. Carissa caraxdas L. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. W. W. Smith, acting super- 
intendent, Royal Botanic Garden. Received October 1, 1908. 
153 9 



10 SEEDS AND 1M.AN I S !M POM ED. 

23750 Continued. 

•• A dense, spiny Bhrub or sometimes a small tree, flowering from February to 
April (in India) and bearing a small fruit which is grape-green when young, chang- 
ing to white and pink as if approaches maturity, and black when fully ripe. The 
fruit ripens from July to Augusl . 

•• In India the fruit is made into pickle jusl before it is ripe, and is also employed 
tarts and puddings. For these purposes it is - u id to be superior to any other In- 
dian fruit. When ripe it makes a very good jelly equal l<> the red currant, for which 
purpose it is cultivated in the gardens owned by Europeans. The shrubs are also 
grown Eor hedges." I Watt, Dictionary of Economic Products of India, ? : 165. 1889.) 

"This oughl to be of value in southern California where the red currant does not- 
thrive." (W. F. Wight. 

23751. Stizolobii m sp. 

From Piracicaba, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Presented by Prof. J. William Hart, director, 
Agricultural College. Received September 14, 1908. 

"1 think this will prove one of our best legumes for green manuring." {Hart.) 
Grown from No. 21094. See this number for description. 

23752 and 23753. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Australia. Presented by Mr. Elwood Mead, The State River and Water 
Supply Commission, Treasury Gardens, Melbourne, Australia, who procured 
the seed from F. H. Brunning, Pty. Ltd., Melbourne, Australia, at the re- 
quest of Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received August, 1908. 

Seed of each of the following: 

23752. Hunter River or Tamworth. "This comes from the chief alfalfa-grow- 
ing district in Australia . " ( Mead. ) 

23753. Queensland. "This alfalfa was grown at Clifton on the Downs by a man 
who is well up in the saving of a good strain of broadleaf alfalfa." (Brun- 
ning.) 

23754. Edgeworthia gardxeri (Wall.) Meism. Mitsumata. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Procured from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received October 12, 1908. 
See Xo. 9162 for description. 

23755 to 23869. 

From Chile. Received from Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, October 
7, 1908. 

The following seeds and plants, descriptive notes by Mr. Husbands; native names 
quoted : 

23755 to 23759. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

23755. Extra fine. Grown dry in sandy soil, coast. 

23756. u Amidon" 1 (starch). Extra good. 

23757. "Coscorones Baya Pintado." Extra good class for any use. 
Good land. 

23758. "Bayas Chieo" (small bay). 

23759. " Mendez." Grown in black clay, irrigated. 

23760. Vigna uxguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

■" < 'orregiiela .' ' Very good and extra prolific at the tops or points 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 11 

24755 to 23869— Continued. ■ 

23761 to 23834. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

23761. Name unknown. Extra fine class. 

23762. " Coscorones Baya." Extra fine class. Prolific. 

23763. "Entremetido Chico" (small meddler). A commercial bean 
largely sown but not of the best quality. Stands droughts and 
grows in any soil. 

23764. "Blanco." Extra good for any purpose. 

23765. "Barroso" (muddy). Extra good clas-. 

23767. Extra early. 

23768. "Aparcido" (found). White pods. 

The above (S. P. I. Nos. 23755 to 23768) grown by irrigation. 
23769 to 23786. Grown dry about 10 miles from the sea. 

23769. "Rosilos de Reigo." Largely sown. 

23770. "Rosilos de Rule,:' Largely sown. 

23771. "Poratos Lacre" (red beans). Grown dry in poor sandy 
soil. 

23772. Grown in poor light soils. 

23773. White. Extra fine class; grown in poor soil. 

23774. Yellow. Grown dry on coast. 

23775. Extra good class; grown in poor soil. 

23776. Extra fine; grown in sandy soil. 

23777. "Bayas Chico" (small bay). Grown in poor soil. Seed 
mixed . 

23778. " Mantequilla" (butter). Extra superfine class. 

23779. Yellow and red. Grown in poor sandy soil. 

23780. "Burro Claro" (light-colored donkey). Extra good 
class; grown in poor soil. 

23781. Light yellow, medium size. Grown in poor soil. 

23782. Cream and black. Medium quality; grown in bad soil. 

23783. "Burro Oscuro" (dark donkey). Extra good class; 
grown in poor soil. 

23784. Light yellow. Grown dry on the coast. 

23785. Small, white, good; grown in bad soil. 

23786. "Amarillos Chico" (small yellow). Grown in poor soil. 
23787 to 23828. Stringless or garden beans grown by irrigation. 

23787. Mixed, grown in clay soil. 

23788. Round, yellow. 

23789 and 23790. (Xo description.) 
23791. Very good and productive. 
23792 to 23795. (Xo description.) 

23796. Brown. 

23797. Good class. 

23798 and 23799. (No description.) 
23800. "Palo" (stick). 
153 



L2 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23755 to 23869 Continued. 

23761 to 23834 Continued. 

23787 to 23828 Continued. 

23801. (. 1 sort. 

23802. "Siete Semanas" . (seven weeks). Good. 

23803. ( No description. 

23804. "Overos" Good. 

23805. Early and very proline. 

23806. Extra early and prolific. 

23807. Can b< grown dry in Loose, sandy soil. 

23808. Can be grown dry in loose, Bandy soil. 
23809 to 23811. (No description.) 
23812. A good class. 

23813 to 23815. (No description.) 
23816. Geese beans. 
23817 to 23819. (Xo description.) 
23820. Green color. Rare. 
23821 to 23827. (Xo description.) 

23828. An extra early bean; grows two crops per year when 
irrigated. 

23829 to 23834. Stringless or garden beans from the coast; grown 
dry. 

23829. "Trigo" (wheat). Extra superfine quality. Prolific. 

23830. Extra prolific. 

23831. "China Lejos Grande." Grown dry in any soil. 

23832. All sorts. Grown dry in any soil. 

23833. Grown in poor, sandy soil. 

23834. Xo name. 

23835 and 23836. Phaseolus coccixeus L. Scarlet runner bean. 

23835. Pink. 

23836. "Parjares." Said to be different from other white classes. 
Grown by marine dews only. 

These beans grow in any soil without losing their size or merit. The dif- 
ference between suitable good and bad land sowing is chiefly in the greater 
or lesser yield. 

23837 to 23840. Cucurbita sp. Squash. 

23837. Extra good class. 

23838. Extra good; sweet, fiberless, prolific, meat solid; small cavity 
for seeds. 

23839. A very good class. 

23840. Pinkish color, large, thick flesh, sweet, mealy, prolific, good. 

23841. Cucurbita maxima Duch. Squash. 

Extra good class. 

23842 to 23844. Cucurbita sp. Squash. 

23842. Black skinned: thick, sweet, fiberless flesh; extra good. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31. 1908, 13 

23755 to 23869— Continued. 

23842 to 23844— Continued. 

23843. Extra good class. 

The above (S. P. I. Xos. 23837 to 23843; grown by irrigation. 

23844. Not as good as watered sorts. 

23845. Cucurbita maxima Duch. Squash. 

Good class; sweet, thick, fiberless meat. 

The above (S. P. I. Xos. 23844 and 23845; grown dry near the coast. The 
squashes grown dry are of little merit when compared with the irrigated sorts. 

Note. — "These squashes listed as Cucurbita sp. are probably Cucurbita maxima 
Duch., but not determinable until grown. These seeds are very different from any 
squash seeds found heretofore." — (IT'. F. Wight.) 

23846 to 23851. Pisum arvexse L. Field pea. 

The following are common field peas grown dry in poor, sandy soil: 

23846. A large, extra sweet field pea; fall sown. 

23847. The most ordinary sort. 

23848. The most ordinary sort; seed mixed. 

23849. Ordinary white peas; grown in poor soil. 

23850. Common peas; grown in poor soil. 

23851. Grown in bad soil. 

23852 to 23855. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 

23852. "Garbanzos Chico" (small). Grown dry in red clay. 

23853. "Garbanzos Grande " (large) . Grown dry in loose soil near coast. 

23854. "Garbanzos Negro" (black). Grown dry in red clay, 

23855. "Garbanzos Grande" (large). Grown dry in clay soil. 

These peas (S. P. I. Xos. 23846 to 23855) are not samples of the many best 
classes that can be had elsewhere in Chile, but are samples of the common 
hardy sorts that grow dry on hills whose soil is so poor that no vegetation of any 
kind exists except a few stunted red oaks. These are sown broadcast upon 
the ground and plowed in. 

23856 and 23857. Lathyrus sativus L. Grass-pea. 

23856. "Chicharos Grande" (large). Grow dry in any soil. Grow 
larger or smaller according to the quality of the soil. 

23857. "Chicharos Chico''' (small). Grow dry in any soil. Always 
small no matter what class of soil. 

23858 and 23859. Lens esculexta Moench. Lentil. 

23858. " Lentejas Rosillos " (gray lentil) . Grown dry in bad soil. 

23859. Common lentils. Grown dry in bad soil. 

23860. Pisum sativum L. Pea. 
" Arvejones." A class of stringless peas. Both peas and pods are eaten. 

23861. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 

"Poda." Grain head has 8 rows. This is mixed with other classes having 
2, 4, and 6 rows of grain, respectively. The 4-rowed is called " Caballuna." 

23862. Hordeum sp. Barley. 

Common class grown in damp land; is discolored by the moisture of heavy 
dews. 
153 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23755 to 23869 Continued. 

23863. JuGLANS NIGRA L. Black walnut. 

Black walnuts long grown dry in < Ihile, but arc qoI oat i\ e of the country. 

23884. CHUSQUEA vai.ih\ i i:n - is 1',. \)^>*\■. Bamboo. 

Colihue or bamboo. Solid stem, grows about 20 to 25 feel high, slightly 
drooping, .-mall scant foliage, -lion joints, very tough, grows dry on any poor 
-oil. extra hardy. 

23865. Chusquea valdiviensis E. Desv. Bamboo. 
Colihue or bamboo. Solid Btem, grows straight from 25 to 30 led high, abun- 
dance of small, long-leaved foliage, a good industrial class, grows dry on any 
arid -oil. extra hardy. 

23866. Arundo donax I.. Giant reed. 

< 'olihue or bamboo. Hollow stem, grows erect, about 25 to 30 feet high ; roots 

ixtend on top of the ground. From top to bottom has a rank leaf growth, lik<- 

irn leaves, extending from two opposite .-ides; the second year it throws out 

brandies. A valuable commercial class, extra hardy, resists droughts. This 

was found growing on pure sand which dries to a powder eight months of the 

year. 

All of the above (S. P. I. Nos. 23864 to 23866) are from the Coast Cordilleras 
about 35 to 40 miles from the sea, are readily eaten by all animals; extra hardy. 

23867. Chusquea quila (Poir.) Kunth. Bamboo. 
Quila. A long-leaf-stem class about 20 feet long; grows drooping. 

23868. Chusquea quila (Poir.) Kunth. Bamboo. 

Quila. A drooping class whose short leaves grow in bunches close to the 
stem from each joint. When the leaves are eaten they quickly grow again and 
also sprout anew. A good forage class. From 10 to 20 feet long. 

23889. Chusquea quila (Poir.) Kunth. 

Quila. Similar to S. P. I. No. 23867 in leaf; plant somewhat dwarfed; 
grows from 6 to 12 feet long. 

All of the above (S. P. I. Nos. 23867 to 23869) are from the Coast Cordilleras 
about 40 miles from the sea, are extra hardy and grow dry in poorest arid soils. 

23870. Rubus paniculatus Smith. Raspberry. 

From Jaunsar District. ( Jhakrata U. P., India. Presented by Mr. H. G. Billson, 
Deputy Conservator of Forests, requested by Mr. David Fairchild at the sug- 
gestion of Mr. Henry M. Dumbleton, Victoria, British Columbia. Received 
October 13, 1908. 
''This 'blue raspberry' grows sparingly in the forests in the Jaunsar District. The 
bush is small and trailing; the fruit is about the size of a logan berry, but with a beau- 
tiful blue bloom, and is excellent eating." (Dumbleton.) 

'This raspberry is the l Kala Anchu.'' It grows best below 6,000 feet and likes 
damp, shady ravines." .(Billson.) 

23871. Medicago satiya L. Alfalfa. 

From Elche, Spain. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist, Algiers, 
Algeria, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received February 14, 1908. 
"This sample of alfalfa was grown at Elche, Spain, where Doctor Trabut personally 
collected it. Tt has unusually large leaves and Doctor Trabut regards it as being 
distinct from Algerian alfalfa." (Brand.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 15 

23872 to 23881. 

From Paris, France. Presented by Mr. E. Tisserand, Minister of Colonies, 
Jardin Colonial. Received October 4, 1908. 

The following plants : 

23872 to 23874. Musa paradisiaca L. Banana. 

23872. Chec Chwea (Cambodia). 

23873. Primitive (Colombia). 

23874. Gabon (Reunion). 

23875. Musa cavendishii Lamb. Banana. 

Sweet (New Caledonia). 
23876 and 23877. Colocasia esculexta (L.) Schott. 

23876. Green. 

23877. Violet. 

23878. Bombax macrocarpum (Cham. & Schlecht.i Schum. 

23879. Passiflora laurifolia L. 

23880. Passiflora sp. 
(Mexico.) 

23881. Amorphophallus bulbifer (Roxb.) Blume. 

23882. Garcixia cornea L. (?) 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received October 15, 1908. 

"The Garcinia cornea L. is a small tree, with horizontal branches; leaves, leathery, 
shining. Fruit the size of a small orange, bright red; seeds inclosed in a white, 
juicy, very acid aril." (Hooker, Flora of British India.) 

'"An evergreen tree; yields an inferior kind of gamboge; wood brown, heavy, of a 
coarse unequal fiber, hard, rather close grained." ( Watt, Economic Products of India.) 

'"Imported for use in solving the mangosteen problem." (Fairchild .) 

23894 and 23895. Rubus chamaemorus L. 

From Harrington Harbor, Canadian Labrador. Presented by Miss Edith Mavon, 
Deep Sea Mission Hospital. Received October 17, 1908. 
"Plants and fruits of what is locally called the Balce apple; it resembles a yellow 
raspberry in color and size, tastes of honey and bananas mixed, grows in moist 
ground on a plant 4 inches high; the flower is white. It is very hardy, for our 
winters are long and severe, the surface of the ground is still frozen (May 26) and 
there is snow in all the hollows and shady places." ( Mayon.) 

23896. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Lima, Peru. Presented by Senor Ignacio La Puente, through Mr. Charles 
J. Brand. Received September, 1908. 
"This seed probably originated in the vicinity of Supe, in the coastal plain region 
of Peru." (Brand.) 

23897. Cryptocarya rubra (Mol.) Skeels. (Peumus rubra Mol. 

Sagg. Chil. 185. 1782.) (Cryptocarya peumus Xees.) 

From Coronel, Chile. Presented by Mr. Teodoro Finger, Estacion Colico, 
through Mr. O. W. Barrett. Received October 20, 1908. 

83020— Bui. 153—09 2 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23897 -Continued. 

••A beautiful Chilean tree, persistent leaves, produces a -mall pink fruit of the 
Bize of a -mall olive; natives eal the fruil after boiling it. Very ornamental when 
fruits are ripe. Requires we\ Boil, can stand frost, grows besl in valley protected 
from wind, in forests." I Fingi r. I 

23899. CJvaria rufa (Dun.) Blume. 

From Pampanga, Philippine [slands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Gar- 
dens of Nagtajan, Manila. P. I. Received October 20, l!)08. 

Small evergreen fruil tree,from Bea level up to 2,000 feet, lat. 10.1° S.to 16° N. 
Fruit< oblong (5 cm. X 3 cm.) in grape-like clusters, H> t<> 30 berries. These are 
edible and fairly palatable, [ntense vermilion red, making tree in fruit very attrac- 
tive." (Lyon.) 

23900. Actixidia ARGUTA (S. & Z.) Planch. (?) 

From Marblehead, Mass. Received October 21, 1908. 

"From a 20-year-old vine on the place of Mr. Charles X. Parker, Marblehead, Mass. 
This vine has borne fruit regularly since it was 8 to 9 years old, and I saw fruit on it. 
There can be no doubt, therefore, that it is the female variety and a good bearer. The 
fruit is of delicate flavor." (Fairchild.) 

23901. Cecropia peltata L. 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Presented by Mr. W. Harris, superintendent, Public 
Gardens, Department of Agriculture, through Mr. P. J. Wester, Subtropical 
Garden, Miami, Fla. Received October 23, 1908. 

"A variety of the urticaceous quick-growing Cecropias with edible, not very w r ell- 
flavored fruits; available as a shade tree, abundant in the warmer valleys and rain- 
forests of Mexico. Introduced for testing at the Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla." 
I ( 'h.isolm.) 

23902. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Peru. Presented by Mr. T. F. Sedgwick, Lima, Peru, for Mr. C. V. Piper. 
Received October 6, 1908. 

San Pedro. 

23913. Pixus dexsiflora Sieb. & Zucc. Pine. 

From near Tungling, Chihli, China. Received through Mr. Frank X. Meyer, 
agricultural explorer, summer of 1908. 
"(No. 1172a, Nov. 29-08.) This pine grows all over northern China and seems to 
vary a great deal . " ( Meyer . ) 

23914. Nicotiana tomextosa Ruiz. & Pav. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Purchased from Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, at the re- 
quest of Mr. A. D. Shamel. Received October 26, 1908. 
"I know very little about this species, but it was purchased at Mr. George W. Oliver's 
suggestion in connection with our work in hybridizing tobacco.- It is a very large 
species, with large leaves and tall stem. At present it is mainly of scientific interest, 
but on account of its leaf size would probably be valuable as a parent for a composite 
cross in regions where the yield of tobacco is the main consideration." (/. B. Norton.) 
1 53 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 17 

23915. Carica papaya L. Papaw. 

From Singerton, near Hectorspruit, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by 
Prof. J. Burtt Davy, government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Received October 
26, 1908. 

"These seeds were procured at an altitude of 1,200 feet, subtropical climate and 
rather dry. The flavor was excellent, and though I can not say that it will prove 
superior to that of some grown in the States, it is worth trying.'' {Davy.) 

23916. Phaseolus luxatus L. 

From Rio Mucury, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Fred Birch, Casa do Correio, 
Theophilo Ottoni, Minas Geraes, Brazil. Received October 26, 1908. 

"We have become acquainted with a remarkable legume here. It is a vine which 
grows to a length of 40 to 50 feet or more, straggling over 3 or even 4 trees of the size 
of orange trees. It bears its pods of (we have heard) 'most delicious' beans for 3 
years in succession, and is very accommodating to a planter who is hard pressed for 
time, for the beans will remain good on the vine for a long time after they are ripe. 
Wherever the summer is hot enough, as in Florida, and there is no frost, it would 
thrive, I think. The only thing it wants is a fertile soil and trees to climb over. One 
plant will yield a large quantity of beans; on one I saw there were, I should think, 
100 pods. The beans are so good that one friend said ' Everyone is mad after them.' : 
{Birch.) 

23917. Carica sp. Wild papaw. 

From Upper Rio Mucury, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Fred Birch, Casa do Correio, 
Theophilo Ottoni, Minas Geraes, Brazil. Received October 26, 1908. 

"Seed of a tree called the 'wild mamau' i. e., wild papaw, as it (the fruit) greatly 
resembles a papaw in shape. The tree has a large, thick, quickly tapering trunk 
about 2 feet 6 inches in diameter at the base and a comparatively small head, so that 
one is quite a remarkable object in the landscape; naturally it only grows in rich forest 
soil and usually on a slope. Whenever the natives find a young one in the forests 
they always take it home and plant it near their door, as it is in great repute as a 
medicine tree. They firmly believe that there is no finer remedy for anaemia than 
its fruits. Do not forget that this fruit is a somewhat difficult one to eat. It has the 
strange effect of scratching the tongue and sides of throat so much as to draw blood. 
Whether this is due to minute spicules of flinty substance or a corrosive property of 
the juice I have not yet found out, but I found that when my mouth and throat had 
become hardened by eating 3 or 4 I could take them with impunity. The largest 
fruits are quite small compared to the cultivated papaw, being only 4 inches long and 
1£ inches in diameter, of a bright orange color, with tender skin and of luscious ap- 
pearance. The foliage is very ornamental, like horse-chestnut in miniature; it is 
quite striking and unlike every other forest tree here." (Birch.) 

23918 and 23919. 

From New York. Presented by Mr. George V. Xash, head gardener. New York 
Botanical Garden, Bronx Park, New JTork City, at the request of Mr. Frank 
N. Meyer. Received October 26, 1908. 
Seed of each of the following: 

23918. Berberis amurensis Rupr. 

" Stock secured from Biltmore Nursery in 1903." (Xash.) 
"A densely branched shrub 4 to 5 feet high, quite variable, as seen in the 
New York Botanic Garden. At the time of my visit, early in September, 
153 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23918 and 23919— Continued. 

L908, the bushes won- most heavily Loaded with bright scarlel berries, mak- 
ing them extremely ornamental. Mr. Nash said that, in his expectation, 
this particular variety may even replace B. thunbergii on accounl of Lta early 
and ornamental fruiting capacities." ]£eyer.) 

23919. I. n, i \i .-p. 

"This came to us ;t~ Ligustrum ma88aloungeanum. u i Nash.) 

"A remarkable privet, with rather Large Leaves, of dark green, glossy ap- 
pearance. Grows densely branched and Is of somewhat Eastigiate habit. 
May In' of use in hybridization work when attempts are being made to create 
a privet combining the hardiness of L. ibota with the Leaf characteristics of 

/. . >>i ii li'/o/ in in." M( • 

23920 to 23929. 

From South Africa. Presented by Mr. W. C. S. Paine, through Mr. W. 1 >. W'arne, 
Cecil Botel, Umtali, Rhodesia, South Africa. Receive d July 20, 19C8. 

Seed of each of the following: 

23920. Eragrostis sp. 

23921. Eragrostis sp. 

23922. Bambos (?). 

23923. Tristachya biseriata Stapf. 

23924. Tristachya rehmanni Hack. 

23925. Pogoxarthria falcata (Hack.) Rendle. 

23926. Panicum serratum (Thunb.) R. Br. 

23927. Themeda forskalii Hack. 

23928. Axdropogox rufus (Nees) Kunth. (?) 

23929. Axdropogon pleiarthrox Stapf. (?) 

" The above selection I made from veldt cattle favor, although I can not claim 
to state with any authority the specific value of the grasses. The soil is dioritic, 
a sandy loam, varying in color from pinkish red, deep red, and chocolate." {Paine.) 

23930 to 24113. 

From China. Brought by Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agricultural explorer, direct 
from China. Turned over to this office to be numbered for distribution Octo- 
ber, 1908. 

The following seed.-: 

23930. Astragalus sixicus L. 

"(No. 986a, May 31, 1908.) A few seeds of a most important leguminous 
plant, which is grown and plowed under for manure on low-lying rice fields. 
Sown in the autumn in rows or broadcast, plowed under in May or early June 
just before the rice has to be planted. According to the Chinese, is not fit 
as a cattle food. Collected on some bamboo boxes while en route to America 
aboard S. S. Ashtabula, the soil coming from near Hangchow, Chekiang, China." 
{Meyer.) 

23931. Medicago dexticulata Willd. Bur clover. 

"(No. 987a, May 28, 1908.) A yellow-flowered bur clover, grown by the 

Chinese on low-lying rice fields as a winter crop, to be plowed under in spring, 

serving as manure. Mostly sown in autumn in rows or broadcast after coming 

up by itself. The cattle feed eagerly upon this crop. Collected on some 

153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 19 

23930 to 24113— Continued. 

bamboo boxes aboard S. S. Ashtabula, while en route to America, the soil 
coming from near Hangchow, Chekiang, China." (Meyer.) 

23932. Lagexaria vulgaris Ser Gourd. 

From Chinanfu, Shantung, China. "(No. 988a, September, 1908.) A 
small-fruited ornamental gourd, out of which the Chinese manufacture little 
carved vessels for ornaments."' (Meyer.) 

23933. Cucurbita sp. 

From Spask, eastern Siberia. " (989a, Oct. 20, 1906.) An ornamental gourd, 
producing remarkable quaint fruits which vary in all ways. Given to me by 
a Russian farmer. ' ' ( Meyer.) 

23934. Cucurbita pepo L. Squash. 

From Pangshan, Chihli, China. " , (Xo. 990a, November, 1907.) A large 
turban-shaped gourd, one part of which is orange-yellow colored while the 
other part is green with orange stripes. Quite ornamental.*' (Meyer.) 

23935. Cucumis sativus L. Cucumber. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 991a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A Chinese cucum- 
ber called Huang kua; grown on trellises in the open ground." (Meyer.) 

23936. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. " No. 992a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A small musk- 
melon; grown on light sandy soil. Chinese name Hsien kua." Meyer.) 

23937. Luffa cylixdrica (L.) Roemer. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 993a, Mar. 25, 1908.) -A dishrag gourd, 
the tender young fruits of which are eaten by the Chinese. Chinese name Shi 
kua." (Meyer.) 

23938. Bexixcasa cerifera Savi. Gourd. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 994a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A gourd eaten by 
the Chinese. Chinese name Tung kua." (Meyer.) 

23939. Actixostemma sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 995a. Mar. 25, 1908.) A very rare cucur- 
bitaceous plant, called in Chinese Ly kua tze." ( Meyer.) 

23940 to 23945. Lagexaria vulgaris Ser. Gourd. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

.23940. "(No. 996a.) Chinese name Ya ng hu hi." 

23941. "(No. 997a.) 'Chinese name Yohhulu" 

23942. "(No. 998a.) Chinese name Ko ko hu hi." 

23943. "(No. 999a.) Chinese name Shoo yar yow hu lu" 

23944. "(No. 1000a.) Chinese name Ta yar yow hu lu." 

23945. "(No. 1001a.) Chinese name Ta pauw hu hi." 

"The above Lagenarias are grown by the Chinese on trellises in their gardens; 
the very young fruits are often eaten stewed as a vegetable; the old, well- 
ripened gourds are used as bottles for oil, wine, and water ; or when cut in two 
lengthwise are used for water dippers and for pans in which to keep things. 
The large round gourds serve the country Chinese for the same purpose as our 
drawers in cupboards do, viz, to keep things stored in; and lastly these Lage- 
naria seeds are often boiled with salt and sold as an appetizing delicatesse." 
(Meyer.) 
153 



>> 



>» 



> J 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23930 to 24113— Continued. 

23946 to 23952. Cuci kiuta pbpo L. 
From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, L908.) 

23946. "(No. 1002a. Chinese name San hua 

23947. "(No. L003a. Chinese name Nan hua. 

23948. "(No. L004a.) Chinese name Taunanhua." 

23949. "< No. 1005a. I < hinese name Tchoo ten hua 

23950. "i No. L006a. I Chinese name Ba loeng woo hua." 

23951. "(No. 1007a.) Chinese name Shi bin woohua." 

23952. "(No. 1008a.) Chinese name Ihi hu hua." 

"The above numbers include pumpkins and squashes and are used by the 
Chinese as vegetables, either stewed or boiled. The seeds too are roasted or 
boiled in salted water and then dried. The plants are mostly grown between 
corn, sorghum, and other tall-growing crops, sometimes even on rather alkaline 
soil." (Meyer.) 

23953 to 23956. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23953. "(No. 1009a.) Chinese name Lung tsao pian doh. Black 
colored." 

23954. "(No. 1010a.) Chinese name Tze pian doh. Black colored." 

23955. "(No. 1011a.) Chinese name Ching pian doh. Brown colored." 

23956. "(No. 1012a.) Chinese name Pai pian doh. White colored." 

"All the above hyacinth [bonavist] beans are grown by the Chinese against 
sorghum-stem fences and between sorghum and corn crops, in which case they 
use the stems of these last-named plants for their support. The pods when 
green and juicy are sliced and eaten boiled as a vegetable; the leaves when dry 
are boiled in soups and considered a rather expensive food." (Meyer.) 

23957. Phaseolus coccineus L. Scarlet runner bean. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1013a, Mar. 25, 1908.) The scarlet 
runner is grown sparsely in northern China against fences of sorghum stems and 
on poles, apparently for ornament, though the fresh pods are sliced and eaten 
boiled and the dry beans are sometimes cooked in soups. Chinese name Hua 

p ia n doh . ' ' ( Meyer . ) 

23958. Phaseolus Vulgaris L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. ' ' (No. 1014a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A form of garden 
bean, loving a rich garden soil, but being able to stand much alkali. The 
young pods are eaten boiled as a vegetable; the dry beans are cooked in 
soups. Chinese name Yueng pian doh." (Meyer.) 

23959. Vigna sesquipedalis (L.) W. F. "Wight. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1015a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A long string bean, 
the pods of which are eaten boiled as a vegetable. Has to be grown on stakes 
and is remarkably productive. Chinese name Chiang doh.'" (Meyer.) 

23960. Abrus praecatorius L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1016a, Mar. 25, 1908.) The paternoster 
bean; grown by the Chinese for medicine and for ornament, namely, they 
manufacture beads and bracelets of the seeds by stringing them on strong 
threads. Chinese name Yaehohua." (Meyer.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31. 1908. 21 

23930 to 24113— Continued. 

23961. Ricinus communis L. Castor oil bean. 

From Peking, Chikli, China. "(No. 1017a, Mar. 25, 1908.) The castor oil 
bean which is grown all over China, the oil being used for culinary purposes, 
viz, all the doughnuts and small cakes which the Chinese eat for breakfast are 
fried in it, and it seems to lose its peculiar medicinal properties after having 
been heated. Chinese name Ta ma tze." (Meyer.) 

23962. Coix lacryma-jobi L. Job's tears. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1018a, Mar. 25, 1908.) The well-known 
Job's tears, seeds of which are used for ornaments.' Chinese name Tsao choo 
tze. n (Meyer.) 

23963 and 23964. Brassica pekixexsis (Lour.) Skeels. (Sixapis pekix- 
ensis Lour.) (Brassica petsai Bailey.) Chinese cabbage. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23963. "(Xo. 1019a.) Chinese name Boo to pax tied." 

23964. "(Xo. 1020a.) Chinese name Shoo pai tsai" 

"Sow the cabbages at the end of July or early in August, transplant in early 
September in well-worked and heavily manured soil. Do not let them suffer 
from lack of water. Harvest after the first heavy frost and store away in a cool, 
frostproof cellar. Will do especially well in the irrigated sections of the L'nited 
States." (Meyer.) 

23965. Brassica juncea (L.) Cass. Chinese mustard. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1021a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Grown as an early 
vegetable for greens, being sown very early in spring in a well-worked, light, 
warm soil. Pulled up and sold in bunches; also picked for private use. Chi- 
nese name Yitiai." (Meyer.) 

23966. Brassica rapa L. Turnip. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 1022a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Probably a long, 
white spring turnip. As such, grow it in light, well- worked soil. Sow in rows 
as early as possible in a protected place. The turnips stewed with milk form a 
good dish in the early summer. Chinese name Pien lang." (Meyer.) 

23967. Pvaphaxus sativus L. Radish. 
From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1023a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A red variety. 

Sow in hills, distance H feet apart, in early August, on well-drained soil. Har- 
vest before heavy frost. Store in cellar for winter use. Eaten stewed like 
turnips. Chinese name Tung lung hong lou ba." (Meyer.) 
23968 and 23969. Raphaxus sativus L. Radish. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23968. "(No. 1024a.) Chinese name Tsui lou poo (green radish- 
turnip)." 

23969. "(No. 1025a.) Chinese name Hong swee lou poo (red radish- 
turnip)." 

"These peculiar roots are largely eaten by the Chinese as appetizers and 
really are very pleasing to the taste and promote digestion. Sow in early 
August in well-drained soil, in hills 1J feet apart in each direction. Harvest 
before a heavy frost and store in cool cellars for winter use. Always eaten raw 
and sliced lengthwise." (Meyer.) 
153 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

23930 to 24113 Continued. 

23970. Aim m ORAVEOLEN8 I.. Celery. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. " No. 1026a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A Chinese variety 
of celery, much used in soups and in various other dishes, although quite strong. 
May contain more of the active alkaloids than our own varieties and be of 
use in celery-salt manufacture. Chinese name Hit da£n mae hua." [ !></er.) 

23971. DAUCUS CAROTA I.. Carrot. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. loi'Ta, Mar. 25, 1908.) A <'hine>e carn.t. 
Sow in row.- in Bomewhal Bandy though rich Boil. Do not let them have any 
lack of water. Chinese name //" lou poo." {Meyer.) 

23972. CORIANDBUM SATIVUM I.. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1028a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A well-known 
herli. the young leaves of which are used by the Chinese to flavor their soups 
with. The seeds are also used in various kinds of candy. Chinese name 
Hsu it tsai." ( Meyer.) 

23973. Lactuca sativa L. Lettuce. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. -1029a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A Chinese lettuce 
which does not form a head, but the stems get to be quite fleshy and are stewed 
like asparagus. Quite tasty. Chinese name Sun tsai." (Meyer.) 

23974. Beta vulgaris L. Beet. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1030a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Probably a red 
beet root, the young leaves of which are eaten stewed and also the roots when 
about full grown. This is inferior to our own varieties. Chinese name Hong 
pai tsai.'" (Meyer.) 

23975. Capsicum annuum L. Pepper. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1031a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A Chihli pepper 
grown by the Chinese partly for ornament and partly for condiments. Chinese 
name Shi tze cheeow." (Meyer.) 

23976. Solanum meloxgena L. Eggplant. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1032a, Mar. 25, 1908.) An eggplant 
which may turn out to be more ornamental than useful. Chinese name Chieng 
yen chi." (Meyer.) 

23977 to 23983. Celosia argentea L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23977. "(No. 1033a.) Chinese name Hong gee kuan hua." 

23978. "(No. 1034a.) Chinese name Huang gee kuan hua." 

23979. "(No. 1035a.) Chinese name Huang shoo gee kuan hua " 

23980. "(No. 1036a.) Chinese name Tze shoo gee kuan hua." 

23981. "(No. 1037a.) Chinese name Hong shoo gee kuan hua." 

23982. "(No. 1038a.) Chinese name Pai shoo gee kuan hua." 

23983. "(No. 1039a.) Chinese name Kuan shang chiar kuan." 

"The above forms are grown by the Chinese as ornamental garden plants." 
( Meyer.) 

23984 to 23988. Amaranthus spp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23984. "(No. 1040a.) Chinese name Lo lie show." 

23985. "(No. 1041a.) Chinese name Hong doo chuang hua." 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 23 

23930 to 24113— Continued. 

23984 to 23988— Continued. 

23986. "(No. 1042a.) Chinese name Sen doo chuang hua." 

23987. " (No. 1043a.) Chinese name Tze doo chuang hua." 

23988. " (Xo. 1044a.) Chinese name Pai doo chuang hua." 

"The above plants are grown by the Chinese in their gardens as summer 
annuals . " ( Meyer . ) 

23989. Papaver somxiferum L. Poppy. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1045a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A poppy grown 
for its ornamental flowers in gardens in North China. Chinese name Hong 
yeen swee hua. ' ' ( Meyer.) 

23990 to 23992. Papaver rhoeas L. Poppy. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23990. "(Xo. 1046a.) Chinese name Hong yii mie ren hua." 

23991. " (No. 1047a.) Chinese name Pai yii mie ren hua." 

23992. " (Xo. 1048a.) Chinese name Ten yii mie ren hua." 

"These flowering poppies are grown by the Chinese as ornamental garden 
annuals. Sow early." (Meyer.) 

23993 and 23994. Cassia occidentalis L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25. 1908.) 

23993. "(No. 1049a.) Chinese name Huang uhee tze." 

23994. " (Xo. 1050a.) Chinese name Sing huang whee tze." 

" The above are grown by the Chinese as ornamental garden plants. " ( Meyer.) 
23995 to 23999. Polygonum orientale L. Prince 's-feather. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

23995. " (Xo. 1051a.) Chinese name Swee ping hua." 

23996. " (Xo. 1052a.) Chinese name Pai mow dan." 

23997. "(Xo. 1053a.) Chinese name Hong mow dan." 

23998. "(Xo. 1054a.) Chinese name Tze mow dan." 

23999. "(Xo. 1055a.) Chinese name Ten mow dan." 

"All the foregoing varieties of prince 's-feather are cultivated by the Chinese 
of Xorth China in their gardens as ornamental plants. The colors of the 
bracts range from pure white to dark red. Plants are able to stand alkali 
very well and may be of use in the Western States." (Meyer.) 

24000. Hibiscus sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(Xo. 1056a, Mar. 25, 1908.) An ornamental 
plant grown in gardens in Xorth China. Chinese name Huang tchu kuri hua." 
(Meyer.) 
24001 and 24002. Datura sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24001. " (Xo. 1057a.) Chinese name Tze la ba hua." 

24002. "(Xo. 1058a.) Chinese name Ta pai la ba hua." 

" Both of these are apparently Solanaceae and are grown by the Chinese of 
Xorth China as ornamental garden plants. They may prove to be novelties." 
(Meyer.) 

83020— Bui. 153—09 4 



24 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



23930 to 24113— Continued. 

24003 to 24008. Malva sp. 

Prom Peking, Chihli, china. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24003. "(No. L059a.) Chinese name Hong shoo show gee." 

24004. "(No. L060a. Chinese name Ten shoo show gee." 

24005. "(No. K)(iLa.) Chinese name Pai shi gee hoi tang. " 

24006. "iXd. 1062a.) (l)iin~<- name Lang shigee had tang." 

24007. "(No. 1063a.) Chinese name Hong shi ge< haitang." 

24008. " ( No. 1064a.) Chinese name Pai shi gee hai tan<j 

'The above are grown by the Chinese of North China as ornamental garden 
plants." M< tier.) 

24009 to 24016. Althaea rosea (L.) Cav. Hollyhock. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24009. " (No. 1065a.) Chinese name Huang ta show gee." 
"(No. 1066a.) Chinese name Lang ta show gee." 



24010. 
24011. 
24012. 
24013. 
24014. 
24015. 
24016. 



• Xo. 1067a. 
" (No. 1068a. 
" (No. 1069a. 

• Xo. 1070a. 
"(No. 1071a. 
"(No. 1072a. 



Chinese name lie ta show gee." 

Chinese name Sen ta show gee." 

Chinese name Pou ta show gee." 

Chinese name Tze ta show gee." 

Chinese name Hong ta shoiv gee." 

Chinese name Moo ho ta show gee." 

" The hollyhocks are favorite garden plants with the Chinese of North China, 
thriving well in the semiarid climate of northeast Asia. Among these preceding 
numbers there is one said to be black, No. 1067a (S. P. I. No. 24011), but in 
all probability the seeds will appear to be very much mixed, as with nearly 
all seeds to be had in China. There may be hardier and more disease-resistant 
varieties than those we possess at present among this lot." (Meyer.) 

24017 to 24019. Datura sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24017. " (No. 1073a.) Chinese name Hong ha hsien hua." 

24018. " (No. 1074a.) Chinese name Pai ba hsien hua." 

24019. •" (No. 1075a. ) Chinese name Lang ba hsien hua." 

" The above are grown as ornamental plants in North China." (Meyer.) 
24020 to 24029. Ipomoea purpurea (L.) Roth. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

Chinese name Hong la ba hua." 
Chinese name Huang la ba hua." 
Chinese name Tze la ba hua." 
Chinese name Pai la ba hua." 
Chinese name Sen la ba hua." 
Chinese name Lang la ba hua." 
Chinese name Hua la ba hua." 
Chinese name Luo ching la ba hua." 
Chinese name Noo ho la ba hua." 
Chinese name Shoo hong hua." 
153 



24020. 


•(Xo. 


1076a.) 


24021. 


'(No. 


1077a.) 


24022. 


'(No. 


1078a.) 


24023. 


'(No. 


1079a.) 


24024. 


'(No. 


1080a.) 


24025. 


•(No. 


1081a.) 


24026. 


"(No. 


1082a.) 


24027. 


'(No. 


1083a.) 


24028. 


"(No. 


1084a.) 


24029. 


•(Xo. 


1085a.) 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 



25 



23930 to 24113— Continued. 

2402Oto 24029— Continued. 

"The above are in all probability different varieties of Ipomoea purpurea; 
grown by the Chinese in North China as ornamental garden climbers against 
fences and walls. There are said to be all kinds of colors among these, but the 
seeds are probably very much mixed."* ( Meyer.) 

• 24030. Ipomoea sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1086a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A species of 
morning-glory grown in gardens in North China. Chinese name Lang chu ling 
tze." (Meyer.) 

24031. Ipomoea sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1087a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Chinese name 
Hu lu plan doh, which name may be fictitious, as pian doh is the name for 
Dolichos lablab. This Ipomoea is grown like the rest of the morning-glories as 
an ornamental garden vine." Meyer.) 

24032. Iris ensata Thunb. (?) 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1088a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Apparently an 
Iris, grown as an ornamental plant in gardens in North China. Chinese name 
Shir yong chieng . " ( Meyer . ) 

24033 to 24044. Mirabilis jalapa L. Four-o'clock. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

Chinese name Luaun hong mu lee." 
Chinese name Luaun huang mu lee." 
Chinese name Luaun pai mu lee." 
Chinese name Luaun sen mu lee." 
Chinese name Luaun tze mu lee." 
Chinese name Luaun hua mu lee." 
Chinese name Huang mu lee hua." 
Chinese name Lang mu he hua." 
Chinese name Pai mu lee hua." 
Chinese name Sen mu lee hua." 
Chinese name Hong mu lee hua." 
Chinese name Tchung tze hu mu lee hua." 
"These twelve preceding numbers are varieties of the ordinary four-o'clock, 

which is a great favorite with the Chinese of North China. They are able to 

stand considerable alkali in the soil." (Meyer.) 

24045 to 24058. Impatiexs balsamixa L. Balsam. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

Chinese name Lang ting tung." 
rhinese name Sen ting to tung." 
Chinese name Hong ting to tung." 
Chinese name Tze ting to tung." 
Chinese name Pai ting to tung hua." 
Chinese name Suo ching ting to tung hua." 
Chinese name Hua pien ting to tung hua." 
Chinese name Moo ho ting to tung hua." 
Chinese name Hong lung tsao tung hsien hua." 
153 



24033. 


(< 


(No. 


1089a.) 


24034. 


• • 


(No. 


1090a.) 


24035. 


a 


(No. 


1091a.) 


24036. 


a 


(No. 


1092a.) 


24037. 


a 


(No. 


1093a.) 


24038. 


it 


(No. 


1094a.) 


24039. 


a 


(No. 


1095a.) 


24040. 


a 


(No. 


1096a.) 


24041. 


it 


(No. 


1097a.) 


24042. 


a 


(No. 


1098a.) 


24043. 


a 


(No. 


1099a.) 


24044. 


i i 


(No. 


1100a.) 



24045. 


"(No. 


1101a.) 


24046. 


"(No. 


1102a.) 


24047. 


"(No. 


1103a.) 


24048. 


"(No. 


1104a.) 


24049. 


"(No. 


1105a.) 


24050. 


"(No. 


1106a.) 


24051. 


"(No. 


1107a.) 


24052. 


"(No. 


1108a.) 


24053. 


"(No. 


1109a.) 



26 SKIT'S AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

23930 to 24113 -Continued. 

24045 to 24068— Continued. 

24054. "(No. LllOa.) Chinese name Hua lung teao tung hsien hua.' 1 

24055. "(No. Lllla.) Chinese name T.< lung teao tung hsien hua. n 

24056. "(No. L112a.) Chinese name Lang lung teao tung hsien hua." 

24057. "(No. L113a.) Chinese name l'<i lung isno tung hsien hua." 

24058. "(No. Illta.i Chinese name Lang hua pun lung teao lung 
hsien hua" 

•"All the preceding numbers are apparently varieties of the ordinary balsam, 
which is much grown by tin- Chinese as an ornamental summer annual, mostly 
in boxes and earthen vessels. There are some fine varieties among them, and 

..- a whole they may prove 1<> be somewhat hardier than our own strains." 
{Meyer.) 

24059 to 24062. (Undetermined.) 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24059. "(No. 1115a.) Chinese name Ta nai Jcong." 

24060. "(No. 1116a.) Chinese name Pai nai hong.'''' 

24061. "(No. 1117a.) Chinese name Hong sho yo." 

24062. "(No. 1118a.) Chinese name Sun luan moo:' 

"These four numbers represent apparently a Salvia or some closely allied 
genus of Menthaceae; they are grown by the Chinese as ornamental garden 
plants." (Meyer.) 

24063 to 24066. Diaxthus chixexsis L. Chinese pink. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24063. "(No. 1119a.) Chinese name Hong shir chow." 

24064. "(No. 1120a.) Chinese name Ten shir chow." 

24065. "(No. 1121a.) Chinese name Tze.shir chow:' 

24066. "(No. 1122a.) Chinese name Pai shir chow.". 

"The above are apparently different varieties of Chinese pinks, which are 
favorite plants in Chinese gardens." (Meyer.) 

24067 to 24069. (Undetermined.) 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24067. "(No. 1123a.) Chinese name Hong wan sho chii hua." 

24068. "(No. 1124a.) Chinese name Pai wan sho chii hua." 

24069. "(No. 1125a.) Chinese name Huang wan sho chii hua." 
"Grown ?.s an ornamental garden plant in North China." (Meyer.) 
"These seeds belong to a species of Asteracese." (H. C. Skeels.) 

24070. Helianthus sp. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1126a, Mar. 25, 1908.) Apparently a 
Helianthus or a closely allied composite. Grown as an ornamental garden 
plant in North China. Chinese name Hong mi lou sung." (Meyer.) 

24071 to 24073. Helianthus annuus L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24071. "(No. 1127a.) Chinese name Huang hwi hua." 

24072. "(No. 1128a.) Chinese name Cheeoo lien tung." 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, l l j08, 27 

23930 to 24113— Continued. 

24071 to 24073— Continued. 

24073. "(No. 1129a.) Chinese name Tsau yang hua." 

•These sunflower varieties are cultivated in China for their seeds, which 
are eaten as a delicatesse; for their leaves, which are fed to domestic ani- 
mals; and for their stalks, which are used for fuel." (Meyer.) 

24074 and 24075. CrysANthemum coronarium L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24074. "(No. 1130a.) Chinese name Hoow tze hang." 

24075. "(No. 1131a.) Chinese name Yae lie listen.'' 

"The above are grown by the Chinese in North China as ornamental garden 
plants." (Meyer.) 

24076 to 24078. Crassixa elegaxs (Jacq.) Kuntze. Zinnia. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24076. "(No. 1132a.) Chinese name Hong chung mae hua." 

24077. "(No. 1133a.) Chinese name Huang chung ye mae hua. " 

24078. "(No. 1134a.) Chinese name Pai mu sie mae hua." 

" The above are apparently varieties of Crassina elegans, which is grown 
sparsely as a garden plant in North China." (Meyer.) 

24079 to 24081. Calendula officinalis L. Marigold. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24079. "'(No. 1135a.) Chinese name Tenhsifan lien." 

24080. "(No. 1136a.) Chinese name Hong hsifan lien." 

24081. "(No. 1137a.) Chinese name Chung tsaen tze hua." 

"The above are varieties of the ordinary marigold, grown as an ornamental 
garden plant in North China." (Meyer.) 

24082 to 24085. Tagetes erecta L. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24082. "(No. 1138a.) Chinese name Hung chii hua." 

24083. "(No. 1139a.) Chinese name Hong chii hua." 

24084. "(No. 1140a.) Chinese name Hongfi Jung hua." 

24085. "(No. 1141a.) Chinese name Huang fu jung hua." 

"The above are apparently varieties of Tagetes erecta or a form closely allied 
to it. They are grown as ornamental garden annuals by the Chinese of North 
China." (Meyer.) 

24086. Lactuca sativa L. (?) 

From Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 1142a, Mar. 25, 1908.) A composite. 
Grown as an ornamental garden plant in North China. Chinese name Hong 
i wei hua." ( Meyer . ) 
24087 to 24109. Callistemma chixexsis (L.) Skeels. (Aster chixexsis 

L.) (Callistephus chixexsis Nees.) China aster. 

From Peking, Chihli, China. (Mar. 25, 1908.) 

24087. "(No. 1143a.) Chinese name Huang chiang hsi la hua." 

24088. "(No. 1144a.) Chinese name Lang chiang hsi la hua." 

24089. "(No. 1145a.) Chinese name Hwt i chiang hsi la hua." 

24090. "(No. 1146a.) Chinese name Hua chiang hsi la hua." 
153 



28 



EDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



23930 to 24113 Continued. 
24087 to 24109— Continued 
24091. "(No. 11 17a. 



24092. 
24093. 
24094. 
24095. 
24096. 
24097. 
24098. 
24099. 
24100. 
24101. 
24102. 
24103. 
24104. 
24105. 
24106. 
24107. 
24108. 
24109. 



No. 1 1 18a. 
No. II 19a. 

No. 1150a. 

No. I L51a. 
"(No: L152a. 
"(No. 1153a. 

No. 1154a. 
"(No. 1155a. 
" No. U56a. 
"(No. 1157a. 

Xo. 1158a. 
"(No. 1159a. 
"(No. 1160a. 
"(No. 1161a. 
"(No. 1162a. 
"(No. 1163a. 
"(No. 1164a. 
"(No. 1165a. 



Chinese name /- chiang hsi la hua.* 
Chinese name Nan hong chiang hsi la hua." 
Chinese name Moohojung tchuchianghsilahua." 
Chinese oame Huayungtchu chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Fen yungtchu chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Tze yung trim chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Hong yung tchu chiang hsi la." 
( hinese name Pai yung tchu chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Pai hua pien chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Tze hua pien chiang hsi la." 
Chinese name Chiang hsi chii." 
Chinese name Pai Jcwei choo chii." 
Chinese name Hong kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Huang kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Lang kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Fen kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Tze kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Hua kwei chow chii." 
Chinese name Moo ho kwei chow chii." 



"The above are apparently various forms and varieties of our ordinary garden 
aster, which is held in high esteem by the Chinese as a garden flower. There 
are said to be yellow-flowered varieties among this collection, but in general 
the seeds will be found to be very much mixed. 

"As the garden aster is a native of northern Asia there may be found some 
types among this lot that may be of value for breeding purposes or for rather 
uncongenial climates." {Meyer.) 

24110 to 24112. Panicum miliaceum L. Proso millet. 

From northern Korea. (September, 1906.) 

24110. "(No. 1168a.) A white-seeded drooping millet." 

24111. "(No. 1169a.) A red-seeded drooping millet." 

24112. "(No. 1170a.) A black-seeded drooping millet." 

r 

"Apparently rare forms of millet grown by the Koreans for food. These few 
seeds were picked by me, while passing a few fields near the upper regions of 
the Tumen River and I never came across them again later on." (Meyer.) 

24113. Panicum sp. 

From northern Korea. "(No. 1171a, September, 1906.) A millet grown on 
very low lying lands; used by the poor peasants, when ground up, as a gruel. 
Try it on low river bottoms as a late fodder crop; it stools out enormously on 
rich land . " ( Meyer.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 29 



24114. Arachis hypogea L. Peanut. 

From Marseille, France. Procured by Hon. Robert P. Skinner, American 
consul-general, at the request of Mr. W. R. Beattie and Mr. C. S. Scofield. 
Received October 27, 1908. 

Gambia. "Pods medium size to small, light in color, closely netted, indentations 
quite shallow, so that the exterior surface of pods is comparatively smooth; generally 
two, sometimes three, and occasionally one pea in a pod; shells thin and quite firm 
and strong; peas medium size, one-third larger than Spanish, crowded together in 
pod and almost completely filling cavity, color of pea rather dark brown, outer skin 
adhering very tightly; flesh of pea clear white color, germ considerably extended at 
end of pea and easily removed. 

"This pea will be exceptionally valuable for use in the manufacture of candy and 
other products where shelled nuts are required." (IF. R. Beattie.) 

"These peanuts were procured for testing in this country for their oil-yielding 
properties in comparison with the American varieties." (R. A. Young.) 

24115 to 24121. 

From Amani, German East Africa. Presented by Dr. A. Zimmerman, Biologic 
Agricultural Institute, at the request of Mr. C. V. Piper. Received October 
23, 1908. 
"The following seeds of legumes being tested here for their value as green fertilizing 
plants." {Zimmerman.) 

24115. Crotalaria sp. 

24116. Crotalaria sp. 

24117. Crotalaria sp. 

24118. Crotalaria hildebrandtii Vatke. 

24119. Crotalaria striata Schrank. 

24120. Dolichos (?). 

24121. Indigofera (?). 

24122 to 24127. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kafir. 

From Greytown, Natal, South Africa. Procured from Mr. T. Thresh, "Thorn- 
ton," Greytown, Natal, by Mr. E. Fitzgerald, Native Affairs Department, 
Pietermaritzburg, Natal, presented by Mr. A. E. LeRoy, Adams, M. S., Natal. 
Received October 6, 1908. 
Seed of the following. Descriptive notes by Mr. Carleton R. Ball; native names 
by Mr. LeRoy: 

24122. Mehlo ha kuka. Blackhull kafir, apparently typical. Small head, 7 
inches long; glumes, short, shiny black; seeds medium, white. 

24123. Sibuyana. Blackhull kafir type; -very compact glumes and seeds 
slightly larger than normal, the seeds are white with distinct brownish 
tinge, especially at tip. 

24124. SimuHywana. Blackhull kafir type; head compact, very similar to 
preceding (S. P. I. No. 24123), but seeds more deeply tinged with brown. 

24125. Ngabani omhlope. Kafir type of head, but seeds large; whitish or 
mostly pearly glumes two- thirds as long as seeds, these are greenish or, in the 
case of those at the base of the head, reddish brown. 

153 



30 SEEDS A.\H PLANTS EMPOHTED. 

24122 to 24127 -Continued. 

24126. Ngabani obomvu. /.'"/ kafir, apparently typical head, shorter and 
more slender than normal for the United Stat< 

24127. I ' Jiba. "The natives do n«>i like the taste of this, but raise it be- 
cause the birds do not (rouble it. Birds trouble all other kind- very 
greatly." I /.< Roy.) 

Related to Red kafir, bui with very Large seeds; flumes about two-thirds as 
long a- Beeds. 

24128 to 24130. Andropogon sorghum (\j.) Brot. Durra. 

From Egypt. Presented by Mr. lluberi S. Smiley, Gallowhill, Paisley, Scotland. 
Received September 23, 1908. 

Seed of the following. Descriptive notes by Mr. Carleton 11. Ball; native names by 
Mr. Smiley: 

24128. Bahr el Bugger. Typical durra Ahmar or brown-seeded durra; glumes 
shiny black; large seeds, pale and shiny red. 

24129. Ilamashi. "This is considered the best for bread making." (Smiley.) 

A form apparently intermediate between durra Ahmar and durra Beda the 
white form; the seeds are pale brown, head is otherwise identical with durra 
Ahmar. 

24130. Heygeri. Seeds white or brownish white; glumes shiny black 2nd 
naked. 

'These are typical Egyptian durras with very large and heavy ovate, extremely 
compact, pendant heads; the same or very similar varieties tested by me in the last 
few years always have immense stalks, 2 to 3 inches in diameter at the base, 8 to 13 
feet high, and having from 20 to more than 30 leaves; they are mostly very late and 
will therefore not mature in much of our dry plain region; they are not at all adapted 
to the more humid region, because the compact heads become moldy in wet weather 
and badly injured by worms." (Ball.) 

"This durra is sown as a rain crop in Berber, Atbara, Zeidab, and Shendi districts. 
Directly the rains are over, the natives go out to the borders of the desert and sow the 
grain on the poor, rocky soil. They then leave it, as it requires no cultivation, and 
it receives no more water than that left in the soil by the rains. A good crop would 
be about 6 ardebs per feddan. These sorghums are the principal foodstuffs of the 
natives." (Smiley.) 

24131. Garcinia sp. 

From Palawan, Philippine Islands. Procured by Mr. William S. Lyon, Gardens 
of Nagtajan, Manila, P. I. Received November 4, 1908. 

'This species is from sea level, extending from coast inland 3 to 5 kilometers only; 
is generally 14 to 15 meters, although sometimes larger, wide spreading and seemingly 
a robust grower. Fruit edible by natives, monkeys, and parrots, but I balked at much 
of it." (Lyon.) 

24132. Benzoin sp.(?) 

From Mokanshan, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Shanghai, 
China. Received November 4, 1908. 

"This shrub grows 8 or 10 feet tall. In September (here) the branches are covered 
thick with beautiful, very bright red berries; a bush here and there among the 
green shrubbery around a lawn would be pretty. Sow in the autumn, I suppose." 
(Farnham.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 31 

24134 and 24135. 

From Florida. Grown by Mr. P. J. Wester at the Subtropical Garden, Miami, 
Fla. Numbered for convenience in recording distribution November 9, 1908. 

24134. Chrysophyllum monopyrenum Swartz. 

"This belongs to the Sapotaceae and is a native of south Florida, where it 
grows to a small tree, attaining sometimes a height of about 18 feet. The leaves 
are leathery and dark green, shining above and satiny beneath, something 
similar to the star apple, with which many are familiar, only this is darker and 
more lustrous than that species, making it more ornamental. The fruit is of 
no value . " ( Wester . ) 

24135. Thespesia populxea (L.) Soland. 

"This is usually considered a native of the Old "World, which has long been 
naturalized to the West Indies and has probably drifted with the Gulf Stream 
to the shores of Florida, where it grows wild on the Keys and occasionally on the 
mainland. This plant will attain a height here of about 20 feet or more and 
about the same spread under favorable conditions." ( Wester.) 

1 ' These plants w T ill probably be of value in southern California as ornamentals and 
shade trees. Both stand slight frosts." (Wester.) 

24136. Crixodexdrox patagua Mol. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by the Arnold Arboretum. Received 
October 26, 1908. 

"A tree attaining a height of 30 feet; pyramidal shaped; pretty foliage; very ele- 
gant, lily-shaped, drooping, red flowers." (Dr. F. Franceschi.) 

24137 and 24138. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Elmer Stearns, 
botanist, School of Agriculture. Received November 2, 1908. 

Seed of the following: 

24137. "Blue corn, is regular Aztec corn, very much used for tortillas." 
(Stearns.) 

24138. "White corn, used same as above (S. P. I. No. 24137)." (Steams.) 

24140 to 24145. 

Collected near Simla, India, in the Himalayan foothills. Presented by Mr. 
Evarard Cotes, Greenwood Court, Simla, India, through Mr. Frank N. Meyer. 
Received November 10, 1908. 
Seeds of the following. Descriptive notes by Mr. Frank N. Meyer: 

24140. Prunus armexiaca L. Wild apricot. 

Resembles the cultivated ones very much. 
24141 to 24144. Amygdalus persica L\ Peach. 

24141. Probably an improved cultivated form. 

24142. Very small pits, probably the genuine wild type. 

24143. Small heart-shaped pits. 

24144. The pits :eem to resemble those of the Chinese Honey peach. 
24145. Pyrus sp. Pear. 

A wild variety. 
153 



SEEDS AM' PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24146. Ajsparagus filicinus giraldij C. II. Wright. 

From Florence, Italy. Presented by Mi'. Pasquale Banarini, director, Orto 
Botanico » I<1 R. Institute de Studi Superiori, via Romans l!t. Received 
November 13, L908 

■•The form known in gardens as variety Giraldii i- characterized by its large, broad, 
glossy, green phylloclades, usually borne in groups of five, and the solitary green 
flowers produced on verj Blender pedicels much longer than tin- phylloclades. The 
flower buds are brownish. This form has been collected in China in ili<- Province of 
Shensi by Pere Giraldi and in Szechwau and Bupeh by I>r. Aug. Benry. 

"The species is a very variable one, and three varieties of if are enumerated in 
Hooker's Flora of British India, vi. 315, bul the variety Giraldii has larger phylloclades 
than either of these." ( 'harles Henry Wright, in The Gardeners Chronicle, August 15, 
1906 

24147. Malpighia guadalajarensis (Wats.) Rose. 

From Ixtlan del Rio, Tepic, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Alfred Lonergan, through 
Mr. Frederic Chisolm. Received November 12, 1908. 

11 Manzanita or Manzana del Cerro (mountain apple). A low-growing tree, with 
small edible fruits of a taste resembling that of the apple. Grows wild on the ste?p, 
rough mountain sides in the eastern part of Tepic Territory and along the contiguous 
western border of the State of Jalisco, Mexico. The bark is used in tanning, and these 
fruits were imported to be planted at Brownsville, Tex., and Miami, Fla., to grow 
trees for this purpose." {Frederic Chisolm.) 

24148 to 24154. Punica granatum L. Pomegranate. 

From Sidon, Syria. Procured by Mr. G. "Bie Ravndal, American consul-general, 
Beirut, Syria, from Mohamed Effendi Dada, gardener. Received November 
13, 1908. 

The following cuttings: 

24148. Suneiny. . 24152. Mawardi. 

24149. Malissah. 24153. Mull el Bagel. 

24150. BintelBasha. 24154. Seify. 

24151. Zaffani. 

"Perhaps the most popular varieties of sweet pomegranates grown here are the 
Malissah (S. P. I. No. 24149) and the Bint el Basha (S. P. I. No. 24150). The Mawardi 
(S. P. I. No. 24152) is also rather sweet, but considered slightly inferior to the varieties 
already mentioned, so also the Mull el Bagel (S. P. I. No. 24153), the latter as well as 
the Zaffani (S. P. I. No. 24151) is somewhat tart, but not as acid as the Suneiny (S. P. I. 
No. 24148). The Seify (S. P. I. No. 24154) is well thought of in Syria. It is found in 
the Damascus region, as well as in the vicinity of Sidon. 

"When seeds are planted the trees will be wild and require grafting, while cuttings 
will produce trees of the variety of the cuttings. Pomegranates out here thrive on 
shade and water. Rats are very fond of the fruit and climb the trees for meals, leaving 
the shells of the fruit hanging quite empty." (Ravndal.) 

24155 to 24165. 

From Szechwan Province, China. Secured by Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the Arnold 
Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass., in cooperation with this Department. Re- 
ceived October and November, 1908. 

153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 33 

24155 to 24165— Continued. 
The following seeds: 

24155. Rubus xaxthocarpus Bur. & Franch. 

"(No. 806.) Subshrub 6 inches to 1 foot high; flowers white; fruits yellow, 
of good size and flavor. Common in abandoned cultivated areas and stony 
places generally in the valley of the Min River from 6.000 to 10,000 feet ; abun- 
dant around the town of Sungpan. Fruit ripe July to end of August, according 
to altitude." (Wilson.) 

24156. Ribes sp. 

"(No. 836.) Bush 6 to 12 feet; fruit green and very acid. The common 
gooseberry, abundantly employed as a hedge plant around Tatienlu; altitude 
8,000 to 10,000 feet." ( Wilson.) 

24157. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

"(No. 845.) A while awnless wheat; 3 to 4 feet high; ripening in May. A 
common crop on the Yangtze banks, Szechwan Province." I Wilson.) 

24158. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 

"(No. 846.) Ordinary six-rowed barley; 2 to 3 feet high; ripening in May; 
cultivated in the Yangtze Valley, Szechwan," (Wilson.) 

24159. Hordeum sp. Barley. 

"(No. 847.) A common six-rowed awned barley; ripe in May; abundantly 
cultivated on the banks of the Yangtze River, Szechwan." (Wilson.) 

24160. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

"(No. 848.) A red wheat; 3 to 4 feet high: ripe in May. A common crop in 
the Yangtze Valley, Szechwan." (Wilson.) 

24161. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 

"(No. 849.) A barley with purplish glumes, ripe in May; sparingly culti- 
vated in the department of "Weichon on the borders of the Chentu plain." 
( Wilson.) 

24162. Brassica juxcea (L.) Cass. Chinese rape. 

"(No. 851.) Large Chinese rape, Ta tsai yu; 4 to 6 feet high; abundantly 
cultivated throughout the Yangtze Valley and the Chentu plain." (Wilson.) 

24163. Brassica sp. 

"(No. 852.) Small Chinese rape, Hsas tsai yu; 2 to 3 feet high; not quite 
such a common crop as No. 851 (S. P. I. No. 24162^, but very generally culti- 
vated in Szechwan. For special use of these and all the Szechwanese economic 
plants, see Consul-General Hosie's report on the Province of Szechwan." 

(Wilson . 

24164. Triticum aestivum L. . Wheat. 

"(No. 853.) A red awnless wheat; 3 feet high, with stotit culms and ears; 
cultivated by the tribesfolk in western Szechwan and ripening in July or August, 
according to altitude. This wheat yields a very fine flour suitable for bread of 
all sorts." (Wilson.) 

' 24165. Fragaria moschata Duchesne. 

"(No. 908.) Wild strawberry. Fruit red and of very good flavor, size and 
shape variable, abundant around Tatienlu. 8,000 to 14,000 feet altitude." 
I Wilson.) 
153 



34 SEEDS AN!) PLANTS 131 l'< >KTKD. 

24166 and 24167. Melaleuca leucadendbon L. 

Presented by Dr. John Gifford, Cocoanul Grove, Fla., through Mr. P.J. Wester, 
in charge, Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla. Received November 17, 1908. 

24166. Seed from Australia. 

24167. Cuttings from a tree L8 feel tall growing near Cocoanut Grove, Flu. 

" The cajaput-tree of India, and Australia. Reaches a heighl of $0 feet. Can be 
grown on the edges of Bait-water swamps where no Eucalyptus will survive; the 
tree is believed to be valuable for subduing malarial vapors like Eucalyptus. The 
Lamellar bark is valuable for preserving fruit wrapped in it. The wood is hard, 
close grained, and almost imperishable underground. The leaves yield as much as 
2 per cenl of the well-known cajaput-oil, closely allied to that of Eucalyptus." 
i md from Von Mueller.) 

24168 and 24169. Dahlia spp. Dahlia. 

From Boca del Monte, Vera Cruz, Mexico. Presented by Dr. C. A. Purpus, of 
Zacuapan, Mexico, through Dr. J. N. Rose, associate curator, United States 
National Museum. Received November 19, 1908. 

Seed of the following: 

24168. (Rose No. 08.314.) Flower orange or yellow. 

24169. (Rose Xo. 08.315.) Flower purple; 6,000 to 7,000 feet altitude. 

24170. Maxgifera ixdica L. Mango. 

From Province of Imos, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. Donald Mac- 
Intyre, Moanalua Gardens, Honolulu, Hawaii. Received November 20, 1908. 

Pico. "A variety of merit. It comes true from seed and by that method has 
been reproduced in that country for generations." (Maclntyre.) 

24172, Axoxa squamosa L. Sugar-apple. 

From Antigua, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. A. S. Archer to Mr. 
P. J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla., who forwarded a 
small quantity to the Department November 9, 1908. 

Variety purpurea. 
24173 to 24192. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. R. A. Haden, B. D. Re- 
ceived November 14, 1908. 

The following seeds. Quoted descriptions by Mr. Haden; descriptions of varieties 
by Mr. H. T. Nielsen: 

24173 to 24175. Vicia faba L. Broad bean. 

"These are varieties of the same bean, grown from about latitude 30° to 33°. 
They are planted in the fall; it is said that planted in the spring they will 
not produce. Plant 2 to 3 seeds in a hill, space about 1 foot each way. Stalk 
bushy and about 3 feet to 4 feet 6 inches high; foliage and seed pods quite 
smooth; blooms light lilac, slightly fragrant; very prolific. Among earliest 
plants to bloom in spring and these green beans are the earliest to be had in 
the market. These are cooked in the same way as butter or lima beans; when 
dry they are also parched and eaten, and, too, they are soaked until tender, 
the skin peeled off, and cooked, they are very good thus prepared." 

24176. Solanum melongena L. Eggplant. 

"A white variety of eggplant, very fine. I send these because I have never 
seen the white eggplant at home." 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 35 

24173 to 24192— Continued. 

24177 to 24179. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

24177. "Dark green English pea. Planted in fall with rye (October 
and November here). Stalk 4 to 5 feet high, branching. Flowers 
small, purple. Considered very prolific." 

24178. "Large white English pea. Planted as above (S. P. I. No. 
24177); flowers white; stalks larger and more prolific; good." 

24179. "Small white. Remarks on the above (S. P. I. No. 24178) 
will apply to this." 

24180 to 24184. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

24180. "Plant bunchy." 

Looks like Nuttall, No. 17253, also like No. 19183. 

24181. "Large yellow soy bean, early." 

24182. "Green soy bean, early." 
Seed looks like Okute, No. 19986. 

24183. "Small light green variety, early." 

Seed similar to Haberlandt, Nos. 17263 and 19985, but is a little smaller. 

24184. "Large yellow variety, medium early." 
Seed looks like Haberlandt, No. 17271. 

24185 to 24192. Vigxa unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

24185. "Smallpox cowpea. This is a variety of what in Louisiana 
used to be known as the cowpea; however, I never saw any there as 
fine as these. Rank grower; long vines, tangled and in masses; prolific 
fruiter." 

Markings of seed like Whippoorwill, but shape different, having the 
most pronounced keel of any cowpea I have seen; shape somewhat like 
Unknown. 

24186. "Large brown. Ranks in all respects with the above (S. P. I. 
No. 24185) except that growth is not so rank." 

Shape similar to Unknown, but keel is longer and sharper and darker 
colored. 

24187. "Small brown. Very prolific; splendid fodder pea." 
Looks like an ordinary Clay, seed may be a trifle darker and smaller. 

24188. "Large black-eyed spotted pea. I have not seen this growing; 
it was a find and is said to be very good." 

Looks something like Holstein, but all the black except a few spots is 
around the hilum. 

24189. "Black. Rank grower extensively cultivated; weevil very 
bad in this." 

Looks like our ordinary Black. 

24190. "Black-Eye cowpea, large; not as extensively cultivated as 
other varieties in this collection." 

Looks just like our common Black-Eye. 

24191. "Black-Eye cowpea, small; good." 

Differs from our common Black-Eye only in having smaller seeds. 

24192. "Brown-Eye cowpea, small; good." 

Seed looks like our common Brown-Eye, but a little smaller; looks like 
Brown-Eye, No. 17855, from China. 
153 



36 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

24193. Qryza sativa L. Rice. 

From Chevy Chase, M<1. Grown by Mr. David Fairchild on hie place "In the 
Woods." Received November 23, L908. 

< rrown from dry-land rice No. L91 

"Planted June 5; it matured a crop of ripe grain. I only planted ;t few kernels 
;ni(l it received do irrigation whatever. One plant had 17 heads on it and though uot 
as tall as irrigated rice it looks like a proimsing thing to me. [ also planted the same 
variety in April and go1 a good Btand, somewhat hotter than the later planting, i. e., 
maturing earlier. 1 Burmisethal in such seasons as the lasl one (1908), May would be 
the besl time to sow this rice in Maryland.'' (Fairchild.) 

24194. -Carissa carandas L. 

Prom Peradeniya, (eylon. Presented by Mr. John C. Willis, director, Royal 
Botanic Gardens. Received November 21, 1908. 

See No. 23750 for description. 

24195. Schoenocaulox officinale (Schlecht.) Gray. Cebedilla. 

From Vera Cruz, Mexico. Presented by Mr. William W. Canada, American con- 
sul. Received November 10, 1908. 

" The party who procured some of this seed for us in 1905 informs us that it is poison- 
ous, containing Veratrum, and is therefore generally used in the form of a tincture 
for destroying body lice, etc., as also ticks on cattle. There are other varieties of 
the same species — the Zygadenus mexieanus and the Stenanthium frigidum, but these 
are considered as inferior. The plant is indigenous to the soil in some parts of the 
State of Vera Cruz. Cebadilla is a common commodity procurable of druggists in the 
United States." (Extract from letter of Consul Canada, September 18, 1905.) 

24196. Citrus xobilis Lour. (?) "Naartje." 

From Warm Baths, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Mr. C. A. Simmonds, 
at the request of Mr. R. A. Davis, government horticulturist, Transvaal De- 
partment of Agriculture, Pretoria. Received November 30, 1908. 

Groenskil. "The word l GroenskiV means green skin, and the fruit of this variety 
bears more resemblance to the Emperor mandarin perhaps than to most others. It 
hangs for a long time on the trees in good condition, and is the latest ripening variety 
we have. It is also more hardy than the 'Plat&kilV (S. P. I. No. 24326)." {Extract 
from letter of Mr. Davis, February IS, 1908.) See No. 21551 for further remarks. 

24197 to 24202. 

From Biloxi, Miss. Grown by Prof. S. M. Tracy, special agent, who procured 
the original seed from Prof. C. F. Baker, Experiment Station, Santiago de 
las Vegas, Cuba. Received November 30, 1908. 

Plants of the following; notes by Professor Tracy: 

24197. Calopogoxium coeruleum (Benth.) Hemsl. 

A slender vine, 10 to 15 feet, rooting freely, poor climber, nodules abundant, 
no flowers. 

24198. Calopogoxium orthocarpum Urb. 

A slender vine, 3 to 6 feet, rooting freely, poor climber, nodules abundant, 
no flowers. 

24199. Galactia texuiflora (Willd.) W. & A. 

A slender, vigorous climber, nodules abundant, no seed. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 37 

24197 to 24202— Continued. 

24200. Galactia striata (Jacq.) Urb. 

A slender, vigorous climber, nodules abundant, no seed. 

24201. Teramxus uxcixatus (L.) Swartz. 

A dense mass of slender vines climbing poorly, nodules fair, no bloom. 

24202. Bradburya plumieri (Turp.) Kuntze. 

A slender, thrifty climber, nodules few, no bloom. 

24203. Caxaxga odorata (Lam.) Hook. f. & Thorns. Hang ilang. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received December 11, 
1908. 

For description and other importations, see No. 22744. 

24204. Cucumis sp. 

From Ragaa, Bahr el Ghagel, Sudan, Africa. Presented by Mr. Hubert S. 
Smiley, Gallowhill, Paisley, Scotland. Received September 23, 1908. 

"Seed of the Koreish Battehh (inedible oil pumpkin) is sown by natives among 
their other crops, all of which depend on rain. The oil from this pumpkin is used 
for cooking and other purposes, as is the better known 'semsen' oil. It is also used 
by the military and other officials, with the addition of tobacco juice, to protect 
their mules from the bite of the tse-tse fly. The oil is prepared as follows: Seeds 
are extracted and roasted similarly to the coffee beans; after roasting the seeds are 
ground up on a stove; after grinding they are thrown into a pot with oil and boiled. 
The oil comes to the top and is skimmed off for use." (Smiley.) 

24205. Vicia leaven worthii Toit. & Gray. 

From Arizona. Presented by Mr. Vernon Bailey, Bureau of Biological Survey, 
United States Department of Agriculture. Received December 3, 1908. 

"These vetch seeds were collected September 23, 1908, at 8,500 feet altitude in 
the White Mountains of Arizona. The plant is abundant throughout Transition 
Zone, or from about 7,500 to 9,000 feet in the open yellow pine forest. It grows as 
a spreading bush 2 feet high and in many places covers the ground as an almost 
solid field of peas, loaded with fruit. 

"Our horses were very fond of it and ate both pods and plant eagerly. For a 
week they had no other grain and ate little else, but steadily gained in flesh. 

"Wild turkeys and grouse also feed on both its pods and leaves. It seems to be 
an unusually valuable forage plant." (Bailey.) 

24206 to 24310. 

From Chile. Received through Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, De- 
cember 4, 1908. 
The following seeds and plants; notes by Mr. Husbands: 

24206 and 24207. Greigia sphacelata (R. & P.) Regel. 

24206. "Very spiny." (R. A. Young.) 

24207. "Slightly spiny." (R. A. Young.) 

24208. Persea lingue (R. & P.) Nees. 

This is a very valuable industrial forest tree of large size, handsome, com- 
pact, evergreen, has glossy gray-blue-green leaves and is an extra quick grower; 
here it is not a delicate plant but grows quickly in any soil that is wet or very 
moist, also in water. The wood is light and tough like elm, but takes a very 
153 



38 SKIDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24206 to 24310 -Continued. 

24208 Continued. 

high finish. Its Lumber is highly esteemed and is Lasting if protected from 
the wet; used for furniture, bodies and poles of carts, ox yokes, etc. The 
wood i- the color of white ash, finished hae a yellowish tinge, takes any stain. 
It- bark ie solely used for tanning and ie largely exported to Europe. Every 
station south is filled to overflowing with thousands of bags of broken bark 
awaiting transportation. The forests are being stripped; in a very few years 
this tree will be very scarce It is an extra beautiful shade tree. Its leaves 
are poisonous to animals, especially sheep, who are very fond of them. Medic- 
inally it is a powerful astringent. 

24209. Juglans nigra L. Black walnut. 

The Bolivian black walnut is of Bolivian origin and is a notable, majestic 
forest tree with handsome hanging foliage; a quick grower of great industrial 
value. Its wood is exploited largely in Bolivia, is a hardwood beautifully 
veined in dark and light grains, taking a very high finish and useful for any 
purpose. I have seen treelets 8 months old that measured 1 inch in diameter 
3 feet from the ground, and 8 feet high. The fruit is large, abundant, and 
oily, but is not edible on account of its bitterness. These trees have been 
recently introduced into Chile and few are bearing any considerable quantity 
of fruit. 

24210. Medicago sativa L. « Alfalfa. 

From Huasco in the northern part of Chile. It is called by botanists Medicago 
sativa, notwithstanding it is a new and very valuable strain still unnamed. 
In past times both common central Chile alfalfa and "Alfalfa Peruano" were 
sown; this I believe to be a cross between the two which combines the merits 
of both and is said to be the most valuable seed known. 

2421 1 to 24225. Stringless beans grown by irrigation: 

24211 and 24212. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

24211. Fair quality only; prolific. 

24212. Very good class having large, good-flavored pods; pro- 
ductive. 

24213. Vigna sesquipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 

A curious bean, has pods from 12 to 18 inches long; "Monkey's tail." 

24214 to 24225. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

24214. "Alqueado." Very good and extra productive. 

24215. Cream-colored pods, good flavor, productive. 

24216. Extra superfine class, extra fine flavor, early, very 
prolific; a splendid bean to be eaten green. 

24217. Green-colored pods, very prolific, medium quality. 

24218. Early, good. 

24219. "Cholos." Extra good class; extra large pods of good 
flavor; prolific. 

24220. Early, good. 

24221. Very good class. 

24222. Cream-colored pod, extra early. 

24223. Very good and extra productive. 

24224. "Twrruco." Good, prolific. 

24225. Good class. Thin pod, good flavor, very prolific. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 39 

24206 to 24310— Continued. 

24226 to 24228. Phaseolus coccineus L. Scarlet runner bean. 

Beans of the Lima class used both for food and their flowers: 

24226. "PaHares." Extra good. 

24227. Flowers bright crimson. 

24228. Flowers pink and scarlet. 

24229 to 24261. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

24229 to 24231. Field beans grown dry in the poorest soil: 

24229. Grown dry but in better and more moist soil than the 
other samples (S. P. I. Nos. 24230 and 24231). 

24230. Grown on the coast. Yellow; prolific. 

24231. " Chinalya." Grown on the coast. 

24232 to 24261. Field beans. Names are unreliable; the same beans 
are known by different names in different sections; should there be 
duplicates, they are grown under such distinct conditions as to water, 
soil, etc., as to justify sending them: 

24232. Unknown. 

24233. Productive and extra fine. 

24234. Unknown. 

24235. Unknown. 

24236. " Trigo"' (wheat). Irrigated, extra fine, standard class. 

24237. "Porotos Blanco" (white beans). Excellent class; 
irrigated. 

24238. il Baya Grande." Productive, largely sown, extra good. 

24239. "Baya Grande Pintado." A very good and profitable 
bean; irrigated. 

24240. No data. I think it would grow dry. 

24241. No name. Irrigated ; extra fine table class like Mendes; 
there are two sorts in this lot. 

24242. A white class very similar to others sent. These are 
grown at a distance in distinct soil and conditions. Extra good. 

24243. " Mendes Blanco." A first-class table bean; irrigated. 

24244. Irrigated; grown in sticky black clay, extra fine table 
class. 

24245. " Manteca Claro" (light-colored lard). An extra fine 
class of standard table beans. 

24246. ' ' Coscorrones ." Extra superfine class, very productive 
in good soil; irrigated. 

24247. "Bayas Oscura " (dark bay). Largely sown for the work- 
ing class. 

24248. A valuable bean in every sense. 

24249. "Gentlemen." A standard class, extra good; irrigated. 

24250. "Burritos" (little donkey). Extra good; I think the 
same as "Burros Claro" (S. P. I. No. 24260). 

24251. Irrigated; extra fine table variety. 

24252. "Aparecido." Largest sown and best bean in Chile for 
laborers. Irrigated. 

153 



40 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24206 to 24310— Continued. 

24229 to 24261— Continued. 

24232 to 24261— Continued. 

24253. " Rosillo." Productive and very good. Irrigated. 

24254. A splendid variety for rich and poor. Swell to good size. 

24255. Extra early; yellow pods; noncreeper; productive and 
c\i ra good. 

24256. " Mendes." Irrigated. A fine table variety, extra good. 

24257. "Baya Chieha." Largely sown, profitable and good. 

24258. " Amarilla" (yellow). Extra fine and very productive; 
a good bean. 

24259. "Aparecido Pintado." The largest sown and one of the 
best beans for the laboring classes. 

24260. "Burros Claro." A first-class bean, white when cooked. 
Irrigated. I think these are the same as "Burritos" (S. P. I. 
No. 24250). 

24261. "White Coscorrones .' ' Extra superfine variety, pro- 
ductive in good soil. Irrigated. 

24262. Pisum arvexse L. Field pea. 

Exquisite flavor, sweet, medium late, prolific; white flower; extra fine 
variety. 

24263. Cynara scolymus L. Artichoke. 
' ' Chileno . ' ' Common sort . 

24264. Vicia faba L. Broad bean. 
Very large and early. 

24265. Cicer arietinum L. Chick-pea. 

"Garbanzas." Grown dry in poor soil. Sown the same as beans in rows or 
hills. 

24266. Lupinus sp. 

A papilionaceous legume which grows wild in the sands near the seacoast. 
Yellow flower. Might be made a food plant. 

24267. Lupixus sp. 

A papilionaceous legume which grows wild in the sands near the sea. Blue 
flower. Said to be used roasted as a substitute for coffee, but I think it is bad 
for this purpose. Might be made a food plant. 

24268 to 24278. Cucurbita sp. Squash. 

24268. Mottled skin, black and red variety; large size; very good. 

24269. Mottled skin, yellow and dark green; large size; very good. 

24270. Extra good variety; thick, mealy, sweet flesh; large and 
prolific. 

24271. Extra good class, medium size; prolific; meat very thick, 
mealy, and extra sweet. 

24272. Light drab color; large size and prolific; medium quality. 

24273. Oblong shape. 

24274. Yellow and drab color; medium thick and sweet flesh. 

24275. Flesh color and white; thick meat. 

24276. Blackish green with white stripes; thick, mealy, sweet flesh; 
prolific; extra good. 

153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 41 

24206 to 24310— Continued. 

24268 to 24278— Continued. 

24277. Thick, sweet flesh; productive; extra good. 

24278. White skin; thick, mealy, sweet meat; good. 

24279 and 24280. Cucurbita pepo L. Pumpkin. 

24279. A distinct class of good quality, about 20 inches long and from 
4 to 6 inches wide; prolific and a good keeper. 

24280. A distinct class; sweet but fibrous; grows large. 

24281 to 24293. Cucurbita sp. Squash. 

24281. A black-skinned variety having thick, mealy, sweet flesh; 
good. 

24282. Sweet, mealy, fiberless, and fleshy; good. 

24283. Greenish white tint; thick, mealy, sugar-sweet flesh, no fiber; 
extra good. 

24284 and 24285. (Xo description.) 

24286. Extra good class; medium size; thick, mealy, fiberless, extra 
sweet flesh; prolific. 

24287. Black skin, fine sort. 
24288 to 24291. (Xo description.) 

24292. A very good variety, called here tin colored; sweet, thick, 
fiberless flesh; large size; prolific; good keeper. 

24293. (Xo description.) 

24294 to 24301. Capsicum axxuum L. Pepper. 

Aji Chielno. Various sorts in daily use; noted for their extra fine flavor. 
Chile gave potatoes and red peppers to the world. 

Ground or pounded with stones and mixed with finely chopped onions washed 
in salt and water and afterwards squeezed dry and wet with vinegar, they form 
a delicious seasoning sauce. In cooking it is used as "color." Heat the fat or 
butter until it is hot enough to sputter when a drop of water is dropped into the 
same, put the pounded or coarsely ground peppers into the same, and leave 
about a quarter of a minute; then add a little cold water, the object being to 
extract the color and flavor of the peppers in the grease and not permit the fire 
to so cook the peppers as to spoil the color or make the fat bitter or of bad flavi >r 
from overcooking. This red grease is used in every kitchen to flavor all unsweet- 
ened foods. The degree of hotness is determined by the amount of grease 
employed. Anything fried or roasted is much improved by its use: meats, 
fowls, and vegetables (especially onions) fried first in "color" and afterwards 
made into soups, etc., are fine in flavor and attractive in appearance. 

24294. Small size, hot kind. 

24295. Common variety in daily use in every house. 

24296. Common variety in general daily use. 

24297. Pepper eaten green in soups, sauces, etc. 

24298. Common hot sort. 

24299. Medium hot, common variety. 

24300. " White Chile-no." Eaten green as a relish in soups, sauces, 
salads, pickles, etc., not nearly as hot as tabasco but better flavor. 

24301. u Goat Horns." Common variety in daily use. 

24302. Solaxum sp. 
153 



42 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24206 to 24310— Continued. 

24303 and 24304. Opuntla picus-indica (L. Mill. 

24303. Fruit of this is oblong and ripene in winter; the leaf is narrow 
and 2 i" 3 feel long. 

24304. Fruit of this ripene in midsummer; the leaves arc large and 
thick: the thorns arc very small. 

24305. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

\ i 1 plant recently found in Chile; unknown. 

••White durra with small, semicompact heads; glumes very pale and densely 
hairy, due probably to dry environment; seed- small, circular, and less flat- 
ned than in our domestic variety; florets awned: resembles somewhat the 
white durra of Syria." (Carleton A'. Ball.) 

24306. CucuRBiTAsp. 

Alcayota. vegetable marrow: used for making preserves. 

24307. Cannabis sativa L. Hemp. 

The < irdinary Chile sort ; about the year 1545 it was introduced by the Spanish 
and has been largely grown since. 

24308. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 

The common Chile sort ; grown on dry hills in the worst class of red clay soil; 
if this same seed is sown in better land it increases largely in weight and size 
and grows cleaner. This seed is sent as harvested and thrashed by mares. 

24309. Acacia cavenia (Mol.) Bert. 

" Espino de Chile/' An exceedingly valuable wild thorn tree, grows abun- 
dantly throughout central Chile, seeks the driest regions, and is generally used 
for fences, is impassable and durable if cut when the sap is down; when green, 
is flexible. It is used as a fence without posts, but more generally is woven 
between three wires, thus making a very cheap and effective fence. The wood 
is red streaked with black, extra hard, is used for cogs in mill wheels, and 
spokes of the heaviest carts, coaches, etc., are made from it. This wood 
makes the best, hottest, and most lasting charcoal, used exclusively for heating 
dwellings. Grows quickly in worst dry soil of any class; the long taproot 
reaches moisture at great depths in a few months. Sheep and goats are espe- 
cially fond of the new leaf growth and the seeds. The seeds are sown with the 
dung of these animals. They require a long soak. These trees, when cut, 
quickly sprout anew. Their natural shape is half round; when pruned, they 
grow round. It is a splendid shade tree. Leaves are very fine and beautiful. 
Every part of the branches blooms (the females only) early upon the naked tree 
before leafing, forming a dense mass of yellow flowers so deliciously fragrant 
that the fragrance is extracted by the Paris perfumers. 

24310. Cryptocarya rubra (Mol.) Skeels. 
Peumo with crimson fruit. 

24311. Citrus aubantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

From Brazil. Presented by Mr. Pierre Paul Demers, American consul, Bahia, 
Brazil. Received Decemberll, 1908. 

Bahia na\-el orange. " These scions were cut from very healthy orange trees, 
namely, the navel orange grafted upon the ' Laranja da terra. ' I have eaten an orange 
from one of these trees measuring 15 inches in circumference, and its flavor was deli- 
cious. About one-third of these scions came from that particular tree. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 43 

24311— Continued. 

■• According to planters here the scions grafted upon ' Laranja da terra ' give better 
results than those grafted upon the ; Laranja tanga.' For that reason the latter is not 
much used . 

"These scions come from practically the only regular orange grove in this city, 
located at Cabula, about 3 miles from this place. The soil upon which the trees grew 
contains 60 per cent, more or less, of reddish clay. Navel oranges retail here for 3 and 
4 cents each. They are not raised in sufficient quantities to supply the local demands, 
a fact which is^only attributable to the laziness of the natives." (Demers.) 

24312. Vitis vinifera L. Grape. 

From Beni Abbes, Africa. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, Mustapha, Algiers, 
Algeria. Received December 11, 1908. 

" Large late grape. Reproduces itself from seed." ( Trabut.) 

24313. Ilex paraguariexsis St. Hil. 

From Buenos Aires, Argentina. Presented by Hon. Carlos Thays. director, Gov- 
ernment Botanical Gardens. Received December 12, 1908. 

For description, see No. 3035. For previous introductions, see that number; also, 
Nos. 8953 and 19105. 

24314 to 24325. 

From De los Villares de la Reina, Salamanca, Spain. Procured by Mr. M. Fraile,* 
of this Department, at the request of Mr. Walter T. Swingle. Received Sep- 
tember 15, 1908. 

The following seeds, descriptive notes by Mr. Fraile: 

24314. Pisum sativum L. Pea. 
The common narrow-podded garden pea of Spain. 

24315. Vicia monanthos (L.) Desf. 

This is used for making a food concentrate for animals, being ground and 
mixed with coarser material, such as straw and the like. 

24316. Lathyrus sativus L. Grass-pea. 
" Muelas." Used both as a food and for feeding animals. 

24317. Avena sativa L. Oat. 
Common variety of oats in the vicinity from which this particular sample 

came, near the village of De los Villares de la Reina, in the Province of Sala- 
manca. 

24318. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 
In this particular vicinity this variety is used for feeding and n< >t for brewing. 

24319. Vicia ervilia (L.) Willd. Bitter vetch. 
An unknown variety. This vetch is ground like the algarroba (S. P. I. No. 

24315) and mixed with roughage as a feed for oxen. 

24320. Lens esculexta Moench. Lentil. 
ITsed as a food and for fattening pigs. 

24321. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 
One of the commonest articles of food anion? a lanre proportion of the popu- 
lation of Spain. 

24322. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 
This variety is prized for its greater endurance of untoward conditions than 

the preceding (S. P. I. Xo. 24321) and giving higher yields. 
153 



44 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24314 to 24325 Continued. 

24323. Tbiticum AE8TIVUM L. Wheat. 
Candeal (whit ■ summer). A commoD variety of bearded wheat used for 

bread making in Spain. 

24324. Tkmmim durum Deef. Durum wheat. 
Rubion (red). A hard, bearded wheat, Baid to be used to some extent in 

the making of macaroni and for fattening pigs. 

24325. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 
Uocho. A beardless variety of wheat grown in Spain. 

24326. (itrus nobilis Lour. (0 "Naartje." 

From Warm Baths, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Mr. C. A. Sim- 
monds, at the request of Mr. R. A. Davis, government horticulturist, Trans- 
vaal Department of Agriculture, Pretoria. Received December 14, 1908. 
Platskill. "The meaning of Platshill is flat or smooth skin and appears also to 
apply to the shape of the fruit. The skin of this variety adheres closely to the 
segments and there is never any of the puffiness which accompanies so many varie- 
ties of mandarins. Although so closely adhering, it can be easily removed with the 
thumb and finger, but it is not exactly what one would call a 'kid glove' orange." 
(Extract from letter of Mr. Davis, dated February 13, 1908.) See No. 21551 for further 
remarks. 

24327 to 24332. Oryz'a sativa L. Rice. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Received from Mr. F. G. Krauss, in charge of Rice 
Investigations, Hawaii Experiment Station, December 14, 1908. 
Seed of each of the following rices, descriptive notes by Mr. Krauss: 

24327. Sample of our old type Japan seed, No. 153, which has been care- 
fully selected for some years. 

24328. Variety No. 144, originally received through your Bureau as S. P. I. 
No. 12765. A very dwarf type of Japan seed; plant averaging less than 20 
inches in height, fine foliaged and stemmed, of spreading habit, heavy tiller- 
ing, 25 fruiting culms per plant; small seeded; matures in one hundred to 
one hundred and ten days from sowing. 

24329. Variety No. 161 (Omachi), 24 inches to 28 inches tall; slightly spread- 
ing and inclined to lodge in heavy weather. Yields well and produces a 
good kernel; one hundred and ten to one hundred and twenty days to ma- 
turity. Similar to No. 153 (S. P. I. No. 24327). 

24330. Variety No. 162 (Shimokaburi), 26 inches to 30 inches tall; of erect 
growth; tillers well and bears heavily; kernel not of highest type. 

24331. Variety No. 165. An opaque kernel type; 36 inches to 40 inches 
tall; inclined to lodge; yields well; a kernel suited to the manufacture of 
oriental cake flours; matures one hundred and twenty days. 

24332. Variety No. 163. Japan type, received by Hawaii station from Dr. 
G. Otsaka, Imperial Agricultural Experiment Station, Kumamoto, Japan, 
fall of 1907. Said to be "the most prevailing variety, in the southern pre- 
fectures," there called "Shinriki" or "Sinriki." 

Seed sown February 12, 1908; matured and was harvested June 25. Height 
25 inches to 28 inches; fine stemmed; well foliaged; tillers well; quite spread- 
ing, but not inclined to lodge. Yields prolifically a medium small kernel of 
excellent quality. Recommended for further trial. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 45 

24333. Tumion californicum (Torr.) Greene. 

California nutmeg. 

From San Francisco, Cal. Presented by Mr. Marsden Manson, Mechanics Bank 
Building:. Received November 21, 1908. 

'This is a rare and very beautiful ornamental tree, reaching a size of at least 3 
to 4 feet in diameter and 50 to 75 feet in height, with handsome dark olive-green 
leaves, somewhat like the leaves of the large fir. It requires a deep, moist, and 
well-drained loam, and is a fairly rapid grower after once starting. The nuts sprout 
quickest if planted in a paper or straw box and carefully hulled." (Manson.) 

24334. Ceratonia siliqua L. Carob tree. 

From Miami, Fla. Received from Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical 
Garden. Received December 14, 1908. 

Grown from Xo. 6342. See Xo. 3112 for description. 

24335 and 24336. 

From Marandellas, Rhodesia, South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. H. Finch 
through Mr. W. D. Warne, Umtali, Rhodesia. Received December 14, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

24335. Eleusixe coracaxa (L.) Gaertn. Ragi millet. 

24336. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

24337. Thespesia populxea (L.) Soland. 

From Miami, Fla. Received from Mr. P.J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical Gar- 
den, December 16, 1908. 

See Xo. 24135 for description. 

24338. Pintjs peuce Griseb. 

From Bulgaria. Presented by Prof. C. S. Sargent, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. Received December 17, 1908. 

"This is one of the best exotic pines for the Xorthern States." (Sargent.) 
24339 to 24347. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received 
December 15, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

24339. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

"Variety Roxburghii. The dark glumes are gaping and involute at matu- 
rity; seeds much as the following (S. P. I. Xo. 24340) but more flinty; awned." 
(Carleton R. Ball.) 

24340. Axdropogox sorghum (L.) Brot. 

"Probably variety Roxburghii. Seeds medium size, somewhat flattened, 
flinty." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

24341. Vigxa uxguiculata (L.) "\Valp. Cowpea. 

24342. Pisum arvexse L. Field pea. 

24343. Eleusixe coracaxa (L.) Gaertn. Ragi millet. 

24344. Sesamum oriextale L. Sesame. 

24345. Arachis hypogaea L. Peanut. 

24346. Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 

24347. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

153 



4C, SEEDS AXD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24348. Dios< obea sp. Yam. 
in Manila. Philippine [slands. Presented by Mr. W. S. Lyon. Received 

December 16, L908. 

•■ /,,,,,.. This ie Ear the besl yam in existence, in my opinion, which is based 
iijxm experience with two or three of the alleged best varieties of both the East and 
\\ .-i 1 1 n 1 • 

"Habitat: Thin wooded or brush lands, growing in pretty stiff clay. Ripens and 
stays dormant in the ground from October or November until the following May." 

inn.) 

24349. HlPPEASTRUM sp. 

From Caldera, Chile. Presented by Senor Enrique E. Gigoux. Received De- 
cember*^, 190s. 
"A yellMW-rlowered ornamental form." (P. L. Richer.) 

24350. I Umbos senanensis Franch. & Sav. Bamboo. 

From Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company, Yokohama, 
Japan, through Mr. William D. Hills, agricultural explorer. Received No. 
vember 27, 1908. 
"Seed produced in Shinshu and Hida provinces only." (Hills.) 

Suzu-Dake. "This bamboo also goes by the following names: Yama-Dake, Mi- 
Suzu, and Xo-Suzu, and in several of the provinces is often called Hei-Jiku-Chiku. 
It resembles Kuma-Zasa (B. reilchii or B. palmata, both of which go by this name) 
but is larger. The nodes are not prominent and the largest stems attain a growth of 
1 sun (inch) with a stature of 10 feet and more. The leaves are 5 or 6 sun in length 
with a width of about 1 sun, narrower than those of the sasa and tapering off at the tip. 
Seen from a distance the tree resembles Miscanthus sinensis (Xiphagrostis japonica 
(Thunb.) Coville). 

U B. senanensis grows wild on mountains and open uplands and resists the greatest 
extremes of cold. It spreads right into the deepest recesses and up to the highest 
summits of the mountains. In some places it grows and spreads over an extent of 
many square miles, being especially abundant at Suwa and Kiso, in the province of 
Shinano, and the hills of Nambu in the province of Rikuchiu. 

" In China this bamboo is said to be used for making arrows. It is tough and flexible, 
so that crooked stems can be easily straightened, but the slender culms of those found 
in the Kiso Mountains are perfectly straight and well formed. They are split in half 
and plaited into baskets of various shapes and into mats, forming one of the products 
of Shinano. Where this bamboo grows wild it hinders the development of trees and 
obstructs the path of the mountaineer; but it is very useful for binding together the 
crumbling sides of declivities and for thatching the cottages of the peasantry, in 
mountainous parts of the country. 

" Both in China and in the northern parts of Japan the young sprouts are pickled 
and eaten. Furthermore, the seeds of this plant and of the sasa furnish the poorer 
classes with food. 

"In 1843 all the bamboos around the town of Takayama, in Hida, for a distance of 
many miles seeded, and the population, young and old, assembled to harvest the crop 
at the rate of 5 or 6 to (equals one-half bushel) per diem — in all, some 250,000 koku 
(the koku equals 5 bushels, nearly). This bamboo seed resembles wheat somewhat, 
both in shape and taste, the common people calling it natural rice or bamboo corn. 
It is eaten either parched or ground, the flour being made into small dumplings and 
coarse vermicelli. Chemical analyses show that the composition is the same as that 
of wheat or rye." (Adapted from Satow's Cultivation of Bamboos in Japan.) (Walter 
Fischer.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 47 

24350— Continued. 

" Introduced especially for the purpose of testirg its stems in the manufacture of a 
matting woven for the purpose of taking the place of ordinary laths. If the stems 
are suitable for lath-matting purposes it may be possible to grow this bamboo profitably 
on steep hillsides in the South. Its use as a soil-binder is worthy of consideration, 
but the effect on the development of trees should be carefully considered before the 
plant is given a wide distribution." (David Fairchild.) 

24351. Aleurites moluccana (L.) Willd. Candle nut. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Received through Mr. J. E. Higgins, horticulturist, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, December 17, 1908. 

" Seeds procured for experiments in Cuba, Isle of Pines, and Porto Rico and for 
the expression of samples of candle-nut oil for analysis and comparison with the 
oils furnished by other species of the same genus. 

11 Aleurites moluccana (very generally known also under the synonym of A. triloba) 
is at home throughout Malaysia and Polynesia and has been naturalized on the trop- 
ical mainland of Asia, in Madagascar, and other tropical countries. It is abundant 
in the forests of Xew Guinea, Queensland, Samoa, Tahiti, New Caledonia, Fiji, 
and many of the Malayan Islands, extending to the Philippines. It is strictly an 
East Indian or Polynesian plant and may not originally have been native farther 
west than Java. The tree in its native haunts appears to prefer protected situations, 
being common in woods and especially in narrow valleys and gullies. It grows 
luxuriantly to an altitude of 3,000 feet, becoming gradually rarer to 4,000 feet, when 
it falls off altogether. It is a rapid grower and gross feeder, and propagates itself 
readily from seeds, which sprout in from 4 to 5 weeks. Its large, three-lobed leaves, 
silvery pubescent underneath and glossy above, make it admirably suited for shade 
and ornament in tropical countries, where it should be planted for its valuable seeds. 

"The fruits resemble in size, and somewhat in appearance, the black walnut, with 
a thick fleshy rind and one or two heart-shaped seeds about the size of a horse-chest- 
nut. The seeds or nuts are very thick shelled, containing but 33 per cent of kernel. 
The kernels yield approximately 60 per cent oil, making for the unshelled seeds 20 
per cent of oil. which, owing to the thickness of the shells, is lower than that for 
Aleurites fordii, although the percentage of oil in the kernel is higher than in the 
Chinese species. The raw kernels are purgative, but are said to lose this property 
when roasted; s.o, too, the half -ripe seeds are considered of delicate flavor when eaten 
with salt, while the ripe ones are unwholesome. The Pacific islanders roast or cook 
the nuts slightly, when the shells can be broken with a light tap. The kernels are 
then threaded on bamboo splinters or cocoanut-leaf ribs, bound in leaves or bark, 
and in this way beautifully bright burning, but sooty and disagreeably smelling 
torches are obtained — herein the origin of the name candle nut. 

"Candle-nut oil is known and sold under many names, which are used also to des- 
ignate the tree or nuts which produce it: In Hawaii, kukui; in Ceylon, kekune; in 
India, belgaum walnut; in Jamaica, Spanish or country walnut; in the Philippines, 
lumbang; in French colonies, bancoul or noix de Moluques or chandelles (candle). 
According to Louis Edgar Andes the oil compares favorably with linseed in the 
durability of products made from it, but with some advantage over the latter in the 
rapidity with which it dries. It can consequently be used industrially for the manu- 
facture of the same products. Its present price however — due principally, it seems, 
to the lack of cheap and efficient methods of shelling the nuts — does not allow it to 
compete with linseed.- Candle-nut oil is not imported into the United States, but 
small quantities of the kernels find their way from Australia, various parts of Poly- 
nesia and Malaysia and the Philippines to European ports, where the oil expressed 
from them is used principally for soap making." (Walter Fischer.) 



48 SEEDS AM' PLANTS [MPOBTED: 

24353 to 24364. 

From Chile. Received through Mr. Jose" 1>. Busbands, Limavida, Chile, 1 >ecem- 
ber 17. L908. 
The following seeds, with notes by Mr. Husbands: 

24353. Medic ago sattva L. Alfalfa. 

I mported from Switzerland. 
24354 to 24357. ( r< i rbita sp. Squash. 

24354. Extra large; good for fodder. 

24355. From Curico. A good table class. 

24356. From Curico. A good table class. 

24357. From Rancagua. A good table class. 

24358. Solanum tuberosum L. Potato. 

" Perhuenchas." ' Named from an Indian tribe of the same name. Grown 
without deterioration from the beginning of colonial days. 

24359. Passiflora quadrangularis L. 

• Pasionaria de Ecuador." Has an edible fruit; I think it has a blue flower. 
Grown in Chile. 

24360. Passiflora pinnatistipula Cav. 

''Pasionaria de Chile." The wild residence of this plant is in the provinces 
of Valparaiso and Aconcagua, near the sea. It belongs to the subgenus 
Tacsonia of Passiflora. 

24361 to 24364. Anona cherimola Mill. 

24361 and 24362. (Xo remarks.) 

24363. Somewhat small, with dark skin. 

24364. A large variety, about 5 inches by 4 inches; a splendid fruit. 

24365 and 24366. Malus spp. 

From Jamaica Plain, Mass. Presented by Mr. Jackson Dawson, Arnold Arbo- 
retum. Received December 19, 1908. 

Seeds of the following: 

24365. Malus sylvestris X baccata. 

24366. Malus baccata (L.) Moench. 

"These are extraordinary keepers, and, as most of our crab apples are not good keep- 
ers, these therefore may be used in experimental work." (Dawson, i 

To be used in breeding or as stocks in cooperative experiments with the Mississippi 
Valley Apple Breeders' Association. 

24367. Medic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Arabia. Purchased from Mr. H. P. Chalk, manager for the Hills Brothers 
Company, in Bussorah, Persian Gulf, through Mr. William C. Magelssen, Ameri- 
can consul, Bagdad, Turkey. Received December 5, 1908. 

Arabian alfalfa or Jet. (See No. 12992 for description.) This has proved of great 
promise in Arizona and California. 

24368. Panicum sulcatum Aubl. 

From Miami, Fla. Received through Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical 

Garden, December 5, 1908. 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 49 

24368— Continued. 

"This plant does exceedingly well here, and it has recently occurred to me that it 
would be a successful and cheap substitute for palms for decorative purposes in the 
North." (Wester.) 

"This is extensively grown in gardens in Mexico as an ornamental under the name 
of 'Hoja de vandera." " (Frederic Chisolm. I 

24369. Vigna rxoricuLATA (L.) Walpi Cowpea. 

From Biloxi, Miss. Procured by Prof. S. M. Tracy. Received November 25, 
1908. 

"A variety of cowpea, the vines of which were 50 feet long, and it was stated by 
the owner to grow 100 feet long. The plants were dead when I saw them, but the 
owner states that the plant is perennial. The pods are very large, measuring 10 inches 
in length and h inch in width, while the seeds closely resemble those of the ordinary 
Whip poorv: ill variety." ( Tracy.) 

24370 to 24401. 

From Russia. Received through Prof. X. E. Hansen, director. Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Brookings. S. Dak., December, 1908, while traveling as 
an agricultural explorer for this Department. 

The following seeds and cuttings: 

24370. Ribes nigrum L. 

24371. Ribes sp. 

"(No. 5.) A wild black currant- from near village Mali Ssusum, steamer 
landing place on the Obi River, a short distance north of Barnaul, Tomsk, 
western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24372. Ribes sp. 
(Stat. Baljatakaija.) 

24373. Ribes sp. 

24374. Ribes sp. 

"(No. 96.) A wild black currant from Taischet, between Krasnojarsk. 
central Siberia, and Irkutsk, on Fake Baikal, Siberian railway. For fruit 
breeding." (Hansen.) 

24375. Rubus sp. 

"(No. 1.) A red wild raspberry as found native at. Besentsug, near Samara, 
Volga River region, Russia. For fruit breeding." (Hansen.) 

24376. Rubus fruticosus L. 

"(No. 6.) A wild raspberry gathered near Gorodische, on Obi River, a few 
miles north of Barnaul, Tomsk, western Siberia. Fruit much gathered by 
peasants and sold at steamer landings." (Hansen.) 

24377. Rubus fruticosus L. 

"(Nos. 30 and 31.) A wild raspberry much gathered by peasants in western 
Siberia; this was procured at steamer landing Katschiskaya. For fruit breed- 
ing." (Hansen.) 

24378. Rubus sp. 

"(No. 34.) Wild red raspberry from station Tiaschet, between Krasnojarsk, 
central Siberia, and Irkutsk, on Lake Baikal, Siberian railway. For fruit 
breeding." (Hansen.) 
153 



50 SEEDS ANIi PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24370 to £4401 Continued. 

24379. Rl IM - ( HAM! A.MORUS I.. 

A wild red raspberry from vicinity of Irkutsk, near western 
Bhore of Lake Baikal, eastern Siberia. May prove useful in plant breeding." 
i Han - 

24380. I'i.i m s padi s L. 

\ wild cherry gathered by peasants and sold at .-trainer landing 
al Gorodische, od Obi River, a few miles north of Barnaul, Tomsk, western 
Sibei ia Hansi n. I 

24381. Prunus PADU8 I>. 
Bada.) 

24382. I'm m - padus L. 
Bada 

24383. Pri \i s padus L. 
Bada Baikal, i 

24384. Prunus domestica L. 

24385. Rosa sp. 

No. L9.) A wild rose as found between Ruchekowa and Koliwan, in 
northern Altai Mountain Range, southern Tomsk province, western Siberia." 
(Hansen.) 

24386. Rosa sp. 

"(No. 20. ) A wild rose as found between Ruchekowa and Koliwan, in north- 
ern Altai Mountain Range, southern Tomsk province, western Siberia." 
(Hansen . 

24387. Rosa sp. 

"(No. 47.) Wild rose from a sand desert, an arm of the Gobi desert, at station 
Charonte, Transbaikal region, a few miles over the Chinese border, on the 
Siberian railway." (Hansen.) 

24388. Rosa sp. 

" ' I No. 80.) A wild rose from the < >pen steppe at Belaglasowa, southern Tomsk 
province, western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24389. Malus sp. 

"(No. 36.) From village Lisinsk, jSemipalatinsk province, western Siberia. 
Probably a variety of the Siberian crab, Pyrus (Malus) baccata. See No. 44 
(S. P. I. Xo. 24390)." (Hansen.) 

24390. Malls sp. 

"(Xo. 44.) Same as No. 36 (S. P. I. No. 24389). Both from a lot sent to 
the experiment station, Omsk, Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24391. Pyrus sp. 

"(No. 45.) A small-fruited yellow pear sold by Chinese at fruit bazaar, 
station Manchuria, Siberian railway. Said to come from Harbin." (Hansen.) 

24392. Malus sp. 

"(Xo. 48.) Seeds of a medium-sized subacid apple, yellow with red blush; 
sold by Chinese at fruit bazaar, station Manchuria, Siberian railway. Said to 
be shipped from Harbin district." (Hansen.) 

24393. Malls sp. 

"(Xo. 49.) Same as No. 44 (S. P. I. No. 24390), but of a larger fruited va- 
riety." (Hansen.) 
153 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, L908. 51 

24370 to 24401— Continued. 

24394. Pyrus sp. 

24395. Crataegus sp. Hawthorn. 

"(No. 62.) Native hawthorn from Irkutsk, near Lake Baikal, eastern 
Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24396. Vactnnium sp. 

"(No. 46.) As gathered wild near Chita, Transbaikal region, and sold on 
fruit bazaar. The largest fruit of blueberry type I have ever seen, averaging 
three or four times larger than ordinary blueberries.'' (Hanst 

24397. Fragaria vesca L. 

"(No. 2.) Seeds of a wild strawberry from near Syrastan, on the Siberian 
railway, western Siberia, between Zlautoust and Chelabinsk. For fruit breed- 
ing." 

24398. Rubus sp. 

"(No. 97.) Wild raspberry from station Bogotol, between Taiga and Kras- 
noyarsk, central Siberia, on Siberian railway." ( Hanst n . 

24399. Fragaria vesca L. 
(St. Tajga.) 

24400. Paeonia sp. 

"(No. 93.) As found wild near Stretinsk, near beginning of the Amur 
River, Transbaikal region, eastern Siberia. Here it gets extremely fold in 
winter. Of interest to breeders of Preonias." (Hansen.) 

24401. Corylus sp. 

"(No. 70.) Probably C. heterophylla. The wild hazelnut from near Buch- 
edu, in the Chingan Mountains, on the Siberian railway, in western Manchu- 
ria, the farthest eastern point reached in my 1908 trip." (I Inns, n .) 

24402 and 24403. 

From Piracicaba, Brazil. Presented by Dr. J. W. Hart. Received February 28, 
1908. Numbered for convenience in distributing December, 1908. 

The following plants: 

24402. Panicum muticum Forsk. Para grass. 

Apparently distinct from the ordinary variety of Para grass grown in the 
United States. 

24403. Capriola dactylox (L.) Kuntze. Bermuda grass. 

This grass is grown in Brazil under the name of " Graminaz Jina." The va- 
riety is apparently distinct from the ordinary variety of Bermuda grass grown 
in the United States. 

24404. Copebnicia cerifera Mart. Carnauba palm or Brazil- 
ian wax palm. 

From Piracicaba, Brazil. Presented by Dr. J. W. Hart. Received December 
26, 1908. 

"This tree is not native to this section of Brazil and it may be possible that these 
seeds will give you hardier plants than those grown in the hotter portions of the coun- 
try." (Hart.) 

•'The stem of this plant furnishes starch; the sap. sugar; the leaves, a rope fiber; the 
pinnae are woven into mats, hats, baskets, and brooms; the inner part of the leaf 
stalks serves as a substitute for cork, and most important of all the young leaves are 



SEEDS AND PLANTS tMPORTED. 

24404 Continued. 

covered with a valuable wax harder than thai of bees and used for making candles, 
covering phonograph cylinders, etc. Each tree furnishes aboul l pounds of Max 
annually.'' (Adaptedfrom Von Mueller.) 

24405 to 24413. Eucalyptus spp. 

From Los Angeles, Cal. Purchased from Messrs. Johnson A: Musser. Received 

December 21, LQ08. 
-.1 of the following varieties to be tested in south Texas, Florida, and the Gulf 
Coast States on the recommendation of Messrs. Johnson & Musser: 

24405. Eucalyptus cornuta Labill. 

24406. Eucalyptus cladocalyx F. Muell. 

24407. Eucalyptus leucoxylon F. Muell. 

24408. Eucalyptus longifolia Link. 

24409. Eucalyptus polyanthemos Schauer. 

24410. Eucalyptus longirostris Muell. 

24411. Eucalyptus rudis Endl. 

24412. Eucalyptus siderophloia l>enth. 

24413. Eucalyptus viminalis Labill. 

24415. Eucalyptus alba Reinw. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received December 4 and 21, 1908. 

See No. 21394 for previous introduction and descriptive note. 

24416. Fragaria sp. Strawberry. 

From Shanghai, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Mr.. J. M. W. Farnham. Re- 
ceived at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., December 16, 1908. 

White. 
24417 and 24418. 

From China. Received through Mr. Frank N. Meyer, agricultural explorer, at 
the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 1907; numbered for convenience in 
recording distribution December, 1908. 

24417. Cixxamomum camphora (L.) Nees& Eberm. (?) 

From Hangchow, Chekiang, China. "(No. 736a, June 27, 1907.) 'A very 
ornamental evergreen tree, bearing leaves like the camphor tree, but darker 
green and producing blue-black berries on red petioles. The Chinese chop the 
leaves up very fine, let them steep in water with clay or soil, and obtain a very 
good, weather-resisting cement in that way. especially used in plastering over 
old coffins which are kept standing above the ground.'' (Meyer.) 

24418. Salix babylonica L. 

From Fengtai, near Peking, Chihli, China. "(No. 665a, Mar. 26, 1907.) A 
weeping willow growing on very dry places; used as a shade tree in the streets 
of Peking under trying climatic and other conditions; well worth giving a trial 
in the western regions of the United States. Chinese name Tsa yang liu 
(Meyer.) 
153 



>j 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1908. 53 

24419. Garcixia sp 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received December 30, 1908. 

Variety pyriformis. 

24420. Trifolium subterraneum L. 

From Auckland, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. A. B. Leckenby, Central 
Hotel, through Mr. C. V. Piper. Received December 21, 1908. 

•'Abundant and useful in New Zealand." (Leckenby.) 

24421. Axon a cherimola Mill. 

From Calabria, Valley of Messina, Italy. Presented by Mr. C. Sprenger, Vomero, 
Naples, Italy. Received December 3, 1908. 

Variety Calabrica. 

24422 to 24428. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received December 28, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

24422. Stizolobium sp. 24426. Mucuna sp. 

24423. Stizolobium sp. 24427. Mucuna sp. 

24424. Stizolobium sp. 24428. Mucuna sp. 

24425. Mucuna sp. 

24429. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Odessa, Russia. Presented by Mr. Alfred W. Smith, American vice and 
deputy consul. Received December 28, 1908. 

"This is a variety of sweet melon grown here and cultivated in several colors. It 
is known here as 'Kachanka' and sometimes also called ' Tsesarka,' on account of its 
spotted surface, resembling a guinea fowl's plumage." {Smith.) 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Ahrus praecatorius, 23960. 

Acacia cavenia, 24309. 

Actinidia arguta, 23900. 

Actinostemma sp., 23939. 

Aegle marmelos. See Belou marmelos. 

Aleurites moluccana, 24351. 

Alfalfa, Arabian, 24367. 

(Chile), 24210, 24353. 

Elche, 23871. 

Hunter River or Tamworth, 

23752. 
Peru), 23749, 23896, 23902. 

Queensland, 23753. 
Althaea rosea, 24009 to 24016. 
Amaranthus sp., 23984 to 23988. 
Amor pho phallus bulbifer, 23881. 
Amygdalus persica, 24141 to 24144. 
Andropofjon pleiarthron, 23929. 
rufus, 23928. 

sorghum, 24122 to 24130, 
24305, 24339, 24340. 
Anona cherimola, 24361 to 24364, 24421. 

squamosa, 24172. 
A pi ura graveolens, 23970. 
Apricot (India), 24140. 
Arachis hypogaea, 24114, 24345. 
Artichoke (Chile), 24263. 
Arundo donax, 23866. 
Asparagus Jilicinus giraldii, 24146. 
Aster, China, 24087 to 24109. 
Astragalus sinicus, 23930. 
Arena sativa, 24317. 

Bael. See Belou marmelos. 
Balsam. See Impatiens balsamina. 
Bamboo (Chile), 23864 to 23869. 
Misuzudake, 23746. 
Suzu-Dake, 24350. 
Bambos sp., 23922. 

senanensis, 23746, 24350. 
Banana (France), 23872 to 23875. 
Barley (Chile), 23861, 23862, 24308. 
(China), 24158, 24161. 
(Spain), 24318. 
153 



Bean (Africa), 24346. 

bonavist. See Dolichos lablab. 
broad, 24173 to 24175, 24264. 
castor oil. See Ricinus communis. 
(Chile^), 23755 to 23759, 23761 to 
23836, 24211, 24212, 24214 to 24225, 
24229 to 24261. 
(China), 23958. 

scarlet runner. See Phaseolus coc- 
cineus. 
Beet (China), 23974. 
Belou marmelos, 23745. 
Benincasa cerifera, 23938. 
Benzoin sp., 24132. 
Berberis amurensis, 23918. 
Beta vulgaris, 23974. 
Bombax macrocarpum, 23878. 
Bradburya plumieri, 24202. 
Brassica sp., 24163. 

juncea, 23965, 24162. 
pehinensis, 23963, 23964. 
rapa, 23966. 
Brazilian wax palm. See Copernicia ccri- 
fera. 

Tabbage. Chinese. See Brassica pehin- 
ensis. 

Calendula officinalis, 24079 to 24081. 

California nutmeg. See Tumion cali/or- 
nicum. 

Callistemma chinensis, 24087 to 24109. 

Calopogonium coeruleum, 24197. 

orlhocarpum, 24198. 

Cananga odorata, 24203. 

Candle nut. See Aleurites mohurana. 

Cannabis sativa, 24307. 

Capriola dactylon, 24403. 

Capsicum annuum, 23975, 24294 to 21301. 

Carica sp., 23917. 

papaya, 23915. 

Carissa carandas, 23750, 24194. 

Carnauba palm. See Copernicia cerifera. 

Carob. See Ceratonia siliqua. 

Carrot (China), 23971. 

55 



56 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



occidental™, : >94. 

I ebadilla. See Schoenocaulcm officinale. 

opia peltate, 23901. 
Celerj I bina . 
Celo jentea, 23977 to 

■iton in riliqua, 2 133 i. 
Cherry, mid. See Prunus padus. 
Chick-pea. See ( leer aru tinum. 
Chinese pink. See Dianthus chinensis. 

isanthemum coronarium, 24074, 24075. 
Chrysophyllum monopyn num. 2 1 L34. 
Chusquea quila, 23867 to 23869. 

valdiviensis, 23864, 23805. 
trietinum., 23852 to 23855, 24265, 
24321, 24322. 
Cinnamomum anaphora, 24417. 
I tni8 aurantium sinensis, 24311. 

nobilis, 24196, 24326. 
Clover, bur. See Medicago denticulate. 
Coir lachryma-jobi, 23962. 
Colocasia esculenta, 23876, 23877. 
Copernicia cerifera, 24404. 
Coriandrum sativum, 23972. 
Corn, blue, 24137. 

Mexico), 24137, 24138. 
white, 24138. 
Corylus sp., 24401. 
Cowpea (Africa), 24341. 
Black, 24189. 
Black-Eye, 24190, 24191. 
brown, 24186, 24187. 
Brown-Eye, 24192. 
(Chile), 23760. 
(China), 24185 to 24192. 
Crassina elegans, 24076 to 24078. 
Crataegus sp., 24395. 
Crinodendron patagua, 24136. 
Crotalaria sp., 24115 to 24117. 
hildebrandtii, 24118. 
striata, 24119. 
Cryptocarya rubra, 23897, 24310. 
Cucumber (China), 23935. 
Cucumis ^p., 24204. 

melo, 23936, 24429. 
sativus, 23935. 
Cucurbita sp., 23837 to 23840, 23842 to 
23844, 23933, 24268 to 24278, 
24281 to 24293, 24306, 24354 to 
24357. 
maxima, 23841, 23845. 
pepo, 23934, 23946 to 23952, 
24279, 24280. 
Currant (Siberia). See Ribes spp. 
Cynara scolymus, 24263. 
153 



Dahlia (Mexico . 21168, 24169. 

Dahlia Bp., 24168, 24169. 

Datura sp., 24001, 24002, 24017 to 24019, 

Daucus enrol a, 23971. 

Dianthus chinensis, 24063 to 24066. 

h'msiorca sp., 2-13 IV 

lhdichos sp., 21120. 

lablab, 23953 to 23956. 
Durra. See Sorghum. 

Edgeworthia gardneri, 23754. 
Eggplant (China;, 23976. 

white, 24176. 
Eleusine coracana, 24335, 24343. 
Eragrostissp., 23920, 23921. 
Eucalyptus alba, 24415. 

cladocalyx, 24406. 

cornuta, 24405. 

leucoxylon, 24407. 

longifolia, 24408. 

longirostris, 24410. 

polyanthemos, 24409. 

rudis, 24411. 

siderophloia, 24412. 

viminalis, 24413. 

Four o'clock. See Mirabilis jalapa. 
Fragaria sp., 24416. 

moschata, 24165. 

vesca, 24397, 24399. 

Galactia striata, 24200. 

tenuiflora, 24199. 
Garcinia sp., 24131, 24419. 

cornea, 23882. 
Glycine hispida, 24180 to 24184. 
Gourd (China), 23932, 23937, 23938, 

23940 to 23945. 
Grape (Africa), 24312. 
Gfass, Bermuda. See Capriola dactylon. 

Para. See Panicum muticum. 
Grass-pea. See Lathyrus sativus. 
Greigia sphacelata, 24206, 24207. 

Hansen, N. E., seeds and cuttings se- 
cured, 24370 to 24401. 
Helianthus sp . , 24070. 

annuus, 24071 to 24073. 
Hemp (Chile), 24307. 
Hibiscus sp., 24000. 
Ilippeastrum sp., 24349. 
Hollyhock. See Althaea rosea. 
Hordeum sp., 23862, 24159. 

vulgare, 23861, 24158, 24161, 
24308, 24318. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



57 



Husbands, Jose D., seeds and plants se- 
cured, 23755 to 23869, 24206 to 24310, 
24353 to 24364. 

Hang ilang. See Cananga odorata. 
Ilex paraguariensis, 24313. 
Impatiens balsamina, 24045 to 24058. 
Indigo/era sp., 24121. 
Ipomoea sp., 24030, 24031. 

purpurea, 24020 to 24029. 
Iris ensata, 24032. 

Job's tears. See Coix lacryma-jobi. 
Juglans nigra, 23863, 24209. 



Kafir. 



See Sorghum. 



Lactuca sativa, 23973, 24086. 
Lagenaria vulgaris, 23932, 23940 to 23945. 
Lalhyrus sativus, 23856, 23857, 24316. 
Lens esculenta, 23858, 23859, 24320. 
Lentil. See Lens esculenta. 
Lettuce (China), 23973, 24086. 
Ligustrum sp., 23919. 
Luff a cylindrica, 23937. 
Lupinus sp., 24266, 24267. 

Malpighia guadalajarensis, 24147. 
Malus sp., 24389, 24390, 24392, 24393. 
baccata, 24365. 
sylvestris X baccata, 24366. 
Malva sp., 24003 to 24008. 
Mangifera indica, 23747, 24170. 
Mango, Mailer, 23747. 

Pico, 24170. 
Medicago denticulata, 23931. 

sativa, 23749, 23752, 23753, 
23871, 23896, 23902, 24210, 
24353, 24367. 
Melaleuca leucadendron, 24166, 24167. 
Meyer, Frank N., seeds secured, 23913, 

23930 to 24113, 24417, 24418. 
Millet, pearl. See Pennisetum america- 
num. 
proso. See Panicum miliaceum . 
ragi. See Eleusine coracana. 
Mirabilis jalapa, 24033 to 24044. 
Mitsumata. See Edgeworthia gardneri. 
Morning-glory. See Ipomoea purpurea. 
Mucuna sp., 24425 to 24428. 
Musa cavendishii, 23875. 

paradisiaca, 23872 to 23874. 
Muskmelon (China), 23936. 
(Russia), 24429. 
Mustard, Chinese. See Brassica juncea. 
153 



"Naartje," Groenskil, 24196. 

Platskill, 24326. 
Nicotiana tomentosa, 23914. 

Oat (Spain), 24317. 

Opuntia ficus-indica, 24303, 24304. 

Orange, Bahia navel, 24311. 

Oryza sativa, 24193, 24327 to 24332, 24347. 

Paeonia sp., 24400. 
Panicum, sp., 24113. 

miliaceum, 24110 to 24112. 
muticum, 24402. 
serratum, 23926. 
sulcatum, 24368. 
Papaver rhoeas, 23990 to 23992. 

somniferum, 23989. 
Papaw (Transvaal), 23915. 

wild (Brazil), 23917. 
Passiflora sp., 23880. 

laurifolia, 23879. 
pinnatistipula, 24360. 
quadrangular is, 24359. 
Pea, chick. See Cicer arietinum. 
field. See Pisum arvense. 
garden. See Pisum sativum. 
grass. See Lathyrus sativus. 
Peach (India), 24141 to 24144. 
Peanut (Africa), 24345. 
Gambia, 24114. 
Pear (India), 24145. 
• See also Pyrus sp. 
Pennisetum americanum, 24336. 
Pepper (Chile), 24294 to 24301. 

(China), 23975. 
Per sea lingue, 24208. 

Phaseolus coccineus, 23957, 24226 to 24228. 
lunatus, 23916. 

vulgaris, 23755 to 23759, 23761 
to 23836, 23958, 24211, 24212, 
24214 to 24225, 24229 to 
24261, 24346. 
Pine (Bulgaria), 24338. 

(China), 23913. 
Pinus densijlora, 23913. 

pence, 24338. 
Pisum arvense, 23846 to 23851, 24177 to 
24179, 24262, 24342. 
sativum, 23860, 24314. 
Pogonarthria falcata, 23925. 
Polygonum orientate, 2399*5 to 23999. 
Pomegranate (Syria), 24148 to 24154. 
Poppy (China), 23989 to 23992. 
Potato (Chile), 24358. 



58 



SEEDS \M» PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Prince's-feather Bee Polygonum or 

talt . 
Prunut arrru niaca, 2 1 1 I". 
domestica, 2 138 1. 
padus, 24380 to 24383. 
Pumpkin (Chile . 24279, 24280. 
inedible oil, 24204. 
a grcmatum, 24148 to 24154. 
map., 24145, 24391, 24394. 

Radish I hina . 23967 to 23969. 
Rape (China), 24163. 

Chinese. See Brassicajuncea. 
Raphanus saliva, 23967 to 23969. 
Raspberry, blue, 23870. 

Federal, 23748. 
See also Rubus spp. 
Ribes&p., 24156, 24371 to 24374. 

nigrum, 24370. 
Rice (Africa), 24347. 
dry-land, 24193. 
(Hawaii), 24327 to 24332. 
Ricinus communis, 23961. 
Rosa sp., 24385 to 24388. 
Rose (Siberia), 24385 to 24388. 
Rubus sp., 24375, 24378, 24398. 

chamaemorus, 23894, 23895, 24379. 
fruticosus, 24376, 24377. 
paniculatus, 23870. 
rosaefolius X ellipticus, 23748. 
xanthocarpus, 24155. 

Salix babylonica, 24418. 
Schoenocaulon officinale, 24195. 
Sesamum orientate, 24344. 
Solarium sp., 24302. 

melongena, 23976, 24176. 
tuberosum, 24358. 
Sorghum, durra (Egypt), 24128 to 24130. 
white (Chile), 24305. 
kafir, Blackhull, 24122 to 24124. 
(Natal), 24122 to 24127. 
Red, 24126. 
undetermined (Transvaal. 
24339, 24340. 
e al^o Andropogon sorghum. 
y bean I China), 24180 to 24184. 
green, 241C2, 24183. 
yellow, 24181, 24184. 
S se also Glycine hispida. 
153 



Squash (Chile), 23837 to 23845, 24268 to 
24278, 24281 to 24293, 24354 to 
24357. 
(China), 23934. 
Stizolobium Bp., 23751, 24422 to 24424. 
Strawberry (China), 2416.".. 
(Siberia), 24397. 
white, 24416. 
Sugar-apple. See Anona squamosa. 

Tagetes erecta, 24082 to 24085. 
7V ramnus uncinatus, 24201. 
Themeda forsha Hi, 23927 . 
Thcspcsia populnca, 24135, 24337. 
Trifolium subterraneum, 24420. 
Tristachya biscriata, 23923. 
rehmanni, 23924. 
Triticumaestivum, 24157, 24160, 24164, 
24323, 24325. 
durum, 24334. 
Tumion californicum, 24333. 
Turnip (China), 23966. 

Undetermined, 24059 to 24062, 24067 to 

24069. 
Uvaria rufa, 23899. 

Vacinnium sp., 24396. 

Vetch, bitter. See Vicia ervilia. 

Vicia ervilia, 24319. 

faba, 24173 to 24175, 24264. 

leavenworthii, 24205. 

monanthos, 24315. 
Yigna sesquipedalus, 23959, 24213. 

unguiculata, 23760, 24185 to 24192, 
24341, 24369. 
Vitis vinifera, 24312. 

Walnut, black (Chile), 23863. 

Bolivian black, 24209. 
Wheat (China), 24157, 24159, 24160,24164. 
durum. See Triticum durum. 
(Spain), 24323 to 24325. 
Willow (China), 24418. 
Wilson, E. H., seeds secured, 24155 to 
24165. 

Yam (Philippine Islands), 24348. 

Zea mags, 24137, 24138. 
Zinnia. See Crassina elegans. 



o 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 162. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 
TO MARCH 31, 1909: 

INVENTORY No. 18; Nos. 24430 to 25191. 



Issued December 24, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

'III.' scientific and technical publications of the Bureau <>f Plant Industry, which was organized July 1, 
1901, are Issued h of bulletins; a list of which follows. 

Attention Is directed to the fact that tin' publications in this series are not for general distribution. The 
Superintendent <»f Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, is authorized by law 

;l them at cost, and to him all applications for those bulletins should be made, accompanied by a 

.! money order for the required amount or by cash. Numbers omitted from this list can not be 
furnished. 

1. The Relation of Lime and Magnesia to Plant Growth. 1901. Trice, 10 cents. 

j. Bpermal and fecundation of Zamia. 1901. rrice, 20 cents. 

Macaroni Wheats. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 

4. Range Improvement in Arizona. 1901. Price, 10 cents. 

ti. A List of American Varieties of Peppers. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

7. The Algerian Durum Wheats. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

9. The North American Species of Spartina. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

10. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

11. Johnson Grass. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

13. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 
17. Some Diseases of the Cowpea. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 
20. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
22. Injurious Effects of Premature Pollination. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

25. Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
29. The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price", 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the 'White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. The "Bluing" of the Western Yellow Pine, etc. 1903. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of Spores in Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 
41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

43. Japanese Bamboos. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

45. Physiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Plants. 1903. Price, 5 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice: Its L'ses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

53. The Date Palm. 1904. Price, 20 cents. 

54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

56. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Price, 30 cents. 

57. Methods Used for Controlling Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

59. Pasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

61. The Avocado in Florida. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

63. Investigation of Rusts. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

64. Method of Destroying Algse, etc., in Water Supplies. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

65. Reclamation of Cape Cod Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Price, io cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Price, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. '1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Pear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

79. Variability of Wheat Varieties in Resistance to Toxic Salts. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

80. Agricultural Explorations in Algeria. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

81. Evolution of Cellular Structures. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

82. Grass Lands of the South Alaska Coast. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

83. The Vitality of Buried Seeds. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

84. The Seeds of the Bluegrasses. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

162 [Continued on page 3 of cover.] 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 162. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 1 
TO MARCH 31, 1909: 

INVENTORY No. 18; Nos. 24430 to 25191. 



Issued December 24, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 

1909. 



• 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Assistant Chief of Bureau, Albert F. Woods. 
Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 
scientific staff. 

David F&irchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. II. Dorsett, Albert Mann, George W. Oliver, Walter Van Fleet, and Peter Bisset, Experts. 

Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer. 

H. V. Harlan, EL C. Skeels, and R. A. Young, Assistants. 

Edward Goucherand P. J. Wester, Assistant Propagators. 

162 



LIBR 

NE 

bota: • 

GAK 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 

Washington, D. C, September 11 , 1909. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith, and to recommend 
for publication as Bulletin No. 162 of the series of this Bureau, the 
accompanying manuscript, entitled " Seeds and Plants Imported 
during the Period from January 1 to March 31, 1909: Inventory 
No. 18; Nos. 24430 to 25191." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 

in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 

publication. 

Respectfully, 

B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bu rea u . 

Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

162 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 11 

Index of common and scientific names, etc 69 

162 5 



B. P. I.— 508. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM JANUARY I TO MARCH 31, 1909: 
INVENTORY NO. 18; NOS. 21130 TO 25191. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

The eighteenth inventory, including' 701 numbers, comprises the 
period between January 1 and March 31, 1909, and contains the col- 
lections of only one agricultural explorer, Prof. N. E. Hansen, of 
South Dakota, whose eight months 7 trip into central Asia was made 
primarily to secure sufficiently large quantities of the seed of three 
wild Medicagos to enable extensive experiments to be carried out in 
the Northwest in testing their hardiness. 

These three species, which Professor Hansen believes are going to 
prove valuable additions to the forage-crop resources of the North- 
west, are as follows: No. 24451, Medicago ruthenica, from Charonte, 
Mongolia, an arm of the Gobi Desert, where the temperature drops 
to the freezing point of mercury at times when there is little snow 
on the ground and where in summer the temperature goes above 
100° F. This species is a wild forage plant growing in the sandy 
region of eastern Siberia and may be of value either as a cultivated 
plant like alfalfa or, if allowed to run wild on the ranges, may become 
a valuable hardy forage legume. No. 24452, Medicago falcata , from 
Obb, in the Tomsk Province, a long-lived legume of the open steppes, 
is upright enough to be mown by a mowing machine; will withstand 
extremes of drought and cold, and is so promising in its own home 
as to have attracted the attention of the Russian agricultural experi- 
menters as worthy of domestication and also as being of distinct 
value as a wild pasture plant in western Siberia. Professor Hansen 
emphasizes its value for all regions in this country where the common 
alfalfa is often winterkilled, but does not maintain tha£ in regions 
where any of the true alfalfa strains can be grown successfully it is 
likely to prove superior. No. 24457, Medicago platycarpa, from 
Chylim, in the Tomsk Province, is a wild legume found in timber 
clearings and along the edges of forests of central Siberia. This is 
not a drought-resistant form, but perhaps rather a moist-region 
plant worthy of trial in northern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Owing 
to the immense value of any plant which may take the place of 
alfalfa in regions where this remarkable crop can not be grown, these 
new Siberian alfalfas are receiving the special attention of the forage- 

162 7 



8 SEEDS \Nh PLANTS IMPORTED. 

crop experts of the Department of Agriculture. They arc the most 
interesting of more than a hundred and seventy tilings brought by 
Professor Hansen From Siberia, though others worthy of mention 
here are a number of durum wheats; remarkable winter muskmelons 
(some of them weighing 30 to 40 pounds and capable of keeping all 
winter, promising possibilities for the Southwest) ; the Persian clover 
ahaftal or "Shabdar ,: (No. 24548), now being tried for the irrigated 
Southwest; and sand binders (Nos. 24555, 24556, 24557, 24558, and 
24559) used along the Transcaspian Railway. 

Numbers 24759 to 24761 represent the largest importation of 
bamboo plants ever brought into the country, comprising more than 
3,000 good-sized plants of the three timber species that are grown so 
extensively in Japan — two of them for timber and one also for its 
edible shoots. These were purchased by an agent from the Japanese 
farmers near Nagasaki and brought over by the courtesy of the War 
Department on an army transport. They have made a satisfactory 
start at Chico, Cab, and will be planted in the South and in California 
this autumn. An effort will be made to show what a wonderfully 
beautiful thing a bamboo grove is, and to bring this unique timber 
material near enough so that our experimenters can study the 
methods of its utilization in the fresh state. 

Of the introductions secured through correspondence, special atten- 
tion should be called to the following: 

Of interest to the fruit growers wdll be the three Javanese fruits — the 
Doekoe (No. 24431), the Ramboetan (No. 25163), and the Poelasan 
(No. 25164) — delicious East Indian fruits that seem to have not yet 
attracted attention in the West Indies; a South China relative of the 
orange (Atalantia bilocularis) for breeding purposes; the Indian bael 
fruit (No. 24450), which is prized for sherbets by Occidentals, but 
esteemed as highly as the orange by the East Indians, and its near rela- 
tive from the Philippines, Belou (jlutinosa (No. 24591), both of which 
Mr. Swingle suggests should be used in breeding new types of citrus 
fruits; the edible passion fruit of Mexico, a much neglected fruit possi- 
bility for the Southwest; Diospyros ebenaster, the Zapote Prieto of 
Mexico (No. 24600), a relative of the persimmon; a new fine-flavored 
mango, with fruit the size of an English walnut, from Tahiti; strains of 
the Chilean strawberry (Nos. 24654-24656) ; five varieties of Chilean 
anonas (Nos. 24661-24665); the Legrellei pomegranate (No. 24825) 
from Switzerland, an unusually hardy form wdiich matures its fruit in 
Paris; a collection of valuable pomegranates from- Bagdad, Arabia 
(Nos. 25001-25007); two southern China peaches from Canton (Nos. 
24915-24916) ; the cherry stock used by the Japanese and upon which 
they bench-graft all their ornamental flowering cherries and wdiich 
seems not to have been tried for a stock for our fruiting cherries (No. 

162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 9 

25087) ; and an interesting aromatic fruit from East Africa, the Kafir 
orange (No. 27170). 

To those working with cereals and forage crops the following will 
be of interest: The Japanese rice (No. 24441) which, according to the 
Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, promises to supersede 
other Japanese types in Hawaii; the Jowar Sholapuri, a new class 
of Indian durra (No. 24442) ; a collection of soy beans (Nos. 24672- 
24690) from India; the Old German Frankish lucern (No. 24767) 
from near the home of Wendlin Grimm, who originally introduced 
the remarkably hardy Grimm alfalfa into Minnesota; Chinese grains 
(Nos. 24845-24850) from an altitude of 11,000 feet in the Yangtze 
Valley; and an unusual collection of grains from the uplands of 
Abyssinia. 

To those interested in the rubber industry, a new East African 
rubber tree, producing rubber of the "Landolphia kirkii" type, from 
Mr. Barrett (No. 24637), and the famous virgin rubber tree of Colom- 
bia, South America (No. 24640), which yields rubber of the very 
highest quality and is capable of cultivation, will be worthy of notice. 

To those who are in search of new ornamentals and comfort plants, 

the Chinese pistache (No. 24659) from Shantung, a promising tree for 

dry regions, resembling somewhat the pepper tree (ScJiinus molle), 

and the sycamore fig of the north coast of Africa (No. 25094), one of 

the most beautiful shade trees of the region, are worthy of especial 

consideration; while the introduction of the "Kiat" tree of Abyssinia 

will interest those who do not realize that a million or so of people in 

Arabia and Abyssinia depend upon the narcotic in its leaves quite 

as much as Americans do on tobacco. 

David Fairchild, 

Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

IVashinqton, D. C, September 10, 1909. 

162 



INVENTORY. 



24430. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Arequipa, Peru. Purchased from Borger & Guzman, through Mr. C. V. 
Piper. Received January 2, 1909. 

Peruvian. 

24431 to 24433. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received January 5, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24431. Lansium domesticum Jack. Doekoe. 

"The doekoe is one of the most refreshing fruits of the Dutch East Indies, 
and is eaten in immense quantities both by the native Javanese and the Dutch. 
It is about the size of a French prune, of a straw color, and the leathery rind, 
which is easily peeled off, exposes a pulp of a peculiar, almost waxy, texture. 
The several segments*into which this pulp divides contain each a large seed, 
which is intensely bitter to the taste, so that care is always exercised in eating 
the fruit not to bite into the seed. The flavor is mildly subacid and decidedly 
refreshing. "While not to be ranked with the mangosteen, the doekoe, in my 
opinion, is worthy of serious consideration as a new fruit for shipping purposes." 
(David Fairchild.) 

Distribution. — Widely cultivated in India, and probably a native of the 
Malay Archipelago; also reported from the Philippines. 

24432. Garcinia tixctoria (DC.) W 7 . F. Wight. 

Distribution. — A native of the mountains of India, extending from the Hima- 
layas south to the Andaman Islands. 

24433. Atalantia bilocularis (Roxb.) Wall. (Llmonia bilocularis Roxb.) 

A small shrub, armed with solitary, long, sharp spines. The leaves are 
alternate, elliptical in outline, wavy margined, and firm and glossy. The 
small, pure white flowers are borne in axillary clusters. The black berries are 
about the size and shape of a pea and are succulent. 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern part of China and of the islands 
of Hainan and Formosa. 

24434. Panicum muticum Forsk. Para grass. 

From Tampico, Mexico, whence it was secured by Mr. John Kennedy, of Sarita, 
Tex., who presented the same to this Department. Numbered for convenience 
in recording distribution, January 5, 1909. 

"Distinct from ordinary strain of Para grass. More vigorous and recovers more 
quickly after cutting, and decidedly superior." (S. Af Tracy.) 

162 11 



12 SEEDS AM- PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24437. &SPAB \<.i 8 in him S Ilamil. 

From Nocera [nferiore, Italy. Presented by Mr. Willy Mi'illcr. Eleceived Jan- 
uary 5, !'• 
"This b] was originally collected by Buchanan-HamiltoD in Nepaul, hut has 

since been found in many Localities extending Erom Burma i<> the western Eimalaya, 
and thence northward to Mongolia. It is erecl in habit and attains a height of nearly 
et, having horizontally spreading branches. The Blender, flattened phyllocladee 
are about one-third of an inch long and are borne in clusters of about five. The 
h white flowers are Beated on slender pedicels about twice as long as the 
phylloclades." Gardener's Chronicle, August 15, 1908.) 

24438 to 24440. 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Received through Mr. William Harris, superintendent 
of public gardens, Department of Agriculture, Hope Gardens, January 5, 1909. 

24438. Zixziber officinale Rose. Ginger. 
Rhizomes. Procured for Dr. R. H. True's experiments at Orange City, Fla. 

24439. Persea gratissima Gaertn. f. Avocado. 
Seeds. 

24440. IXDIGOFERA AXIL L. 

' ' Seeds of a leguminous shrub reaching a height of several feet and distin- 
guished from the common indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) by having short, com- 
pressed, sickle-shaped pods and by its capability of being propagated by means 
of cuttings. Indigenous in Tropical America, and occurring from the Carolinas 
to Brazil. Formerly widely cultivated in both the eastern and the western hemi- 
spheres, and together with I. tinctoria an important source of indigo. Now, too, 
found in waste places from North Carolina to Florida and Louisiana. It is no 
longer cultivated commercially in the United States, since the introduction 
of substitutes has rendered indigo production unprofitable." (W. W. Stock- 
berger.) 

24441. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Presented by Mr. F. G. Krauss, in charge of rice inves- 
tigations, Hawaii Experiment Station. Received January 6, 1909. 

"Variety No. 164, 34 to 40 inches tall. A strong, erect grower, tillers well, and 
bears heavily a kernel of good quality. Mature in 120 days. One of the best Japan 
rices grown at the Hawaii station. We give preference to this variety, which promises 
to supersede other Japan types in Hawaii." (Krauss.) 

24442 to 24447. 

From Sholapur, India. Presented by M. A. Peacock, esq., treasurer, the Ameri- 
can Marathi Mission. Received December 26, 1908. 

The following seeds, native names, and notes by Mr. Peacock: 

24442 and 24443. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

24442. Jowar Sholapuri. Stalks often grow 10 feet tall; heads mam- 
moth. 

"White. This is a medium-sized head, rather compact, with a rather 
small, flattened, white seed inclosed in transversely wrinkled, mostly 
pale, glumes; florets awned. Apparently represents a group not hereto- 
fore introduced." (CarletonR. Ball.) 
162 



JANUAEY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 13 

24442 to 24447— Continued. 

24442 and 24443— Continued. 

24443. Jouar. Double variety. 

"White. A very small head, probably dwarfed by thick sowing and 
adverse conditions; ovate, compact, two seeds in each spikelet; seeds 
small, white; glumes pale; florets awned. Belongs to group 8 of India 
sorghums represented by S. P. I. Xo. 14603, etc." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

"The Jouar furnishes an excellent fodder in its stalks and the grain is 
highly nutritious. At certain times of the year it furnishes the chief 
grain for the food of India's millions in the Deccan." (Peacock.) 

24444 to 24447. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

24444. Common Country Bazra. 

"There seem to be several widely different strains included in this 
lot." (H. N. Vinall.) 

24445. Pure African Bazra. 

24446. Cross-breeding Common Country and African Bazra. 

2444 7 . Bearded Bazra . 

"The presence of numerous bristles probably accounts for the fact that 
it is less troubled by attacks from birds." (H. N. Vinall.) 

"The Bazra is more of a food grain and is scarcely ever fed to animals on 
account of its expense. Both these grains grow on the poorly cultivated 
semiarid plains of the Deccan." {Peacock.) 

24448 and 24449. Phaseolus coccixeus L. Scarlet runner bean. 

From Italy. Presented by Mr. Haven Metcalf, pathologist in charge, Laboratory 
of Forest Pathology, Department of Agriculture. Received December 24, 
1908. 

24448. "Obtained at the Tenute Consorti Sullam in Portotolle e Taglia Di Po, 
in the province of Rovigo, Italy. These beans were called by the grower, Dr. 
Angeio Sullam, ' Faggioli Elefanti di Prussia.' He has been growing them 
for some years on his plantation, which is largely devoted to rice, and where I 
saw these beans growing in rather sandy land, with a water table not more 
than 6 or 8 inches under the surface. According to Doctor Sullam, this bean 
grows readily on wet land, although it will not grow directly in water. It 
twines or runs and flowers freely and continuously. I ate the beans cooked 
in the form of salad and found them very palatable, with more the flavor of a 
white bean than our ordinary Lima or colored beans. It occurs to me that 
this may be valuable on wet land ; it is said not to grow well at all on dry land. 
As I did not see any growing on diy land, I cannot bear witness to this. 
Doctor Sullam originally obtained his seed from western Russia." (Metcalf.) 

24449. "Obtained near Ferrara. The beans were there being grown under 
the name of ' Faggioli Elefanti da Istria.' So far as I could see these were 
exactly the same bean as the first sample (S. P. I. No. 24448). The seed in 
this case was said to have been obtained from Istria." (Metcalf.) 

24450. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael tree. 

From Lahore, Punjab, India. Presented by Mr. W. R. Mustoe, superintendent, 
Archaeological Gardens. Received January 8, 1909. 

"Seed of the large-fruited variety of Aegle marmelos (Belou marmelos), known to 
Europeans as bael fruit. It has three vernacular names, i. e. , bill, bel, and bael. It is 
162 



14 SEEDS \.\l» PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24450 Continued. 

a handsome tree, with dark-green, shining Leaves which have a resinous odor; it is 
common in the greater pari of India, growing up to 4,000 feet; when cultivated is a 
middle ai i d tr< e of 35 feci, but when wild Lb a Bcrubby tree. 

■ The leaves, roots, hark, and frail arc used in nai Lve medicines and the last named 
in European medicines also, and from the flowers a scent water is distilled. 

• Ba< 1 i- cull ivated for its fruitsand asa sacred tree, being t houghi a lot of for worship 
of the god Shiva, and is one of the few woods prescribed by the Hindoo script ures for 
sacrificial fires. The wood is close grained, tough, and strong, but often splits in 
seasoning. 

"The leaves, bark, and roots are used as a febrifuge and the first mentioned is also 
lopped for cattle fodder. 

"The unripe fruit, either boiled or roasted, is used as a specific for diarrhea and 
dysentery. When ripe it is very much like an orange in shape, color, and size, but 
has a hard shell, which is sometimes made into snuffboxes; the pulp of the fruit is a 
laxative and when mixed with milk or soda water, or both, makes a healthy, cooling, 
and agreeable sherbet. To make this they take the pulp of the fruit out of the shell 
and put it into a little water, then pass it through a strainer, and put it into a glass of 
milk or soda water and sugar to taste. The pulp is also used to strengthen mortar for 
building purposes and the mucus with which the cells are rilled is used as a glue; also 
used with water paints to add to their strength and brilliancy. This fruit is greatly 
valued for eating by the natives, but can scarcely be looked upon as palatable to the 
white man except as a sherbet and for its medicinal properties. The tree comes true 
to seed and is not grafted. It might be tried in several districts, as it grows equally as 
well up here as in Calcutta, where the air is moist and hot all the year round, and here 
it is very dry and hot in the summer, with a temperature of 112° to 120° F. in the shade, 
and in the winter with sometimes 12 degrees of frost at night; but the bael always 
looks healthy and green, no matter what the weather is. It is leafless for about one 
month only, January or February, and its one year's fruit is ripe at about the same 
time that it is flowering for the next year's fruit. 

"This is really a valuable tree both from a decorative and economic point of view, 
and I do not consider it gets the attention in India that it should." (Mustoe.) For 
further description and previous importation, see No. 22957. 

Introduced at Mr. Walter T. Swingle's suggestion for use in breeding new types of 
citrus fruits. 

24451 to 24575. 

From northern and central Asia. Received through Prof. N. E. Hansen, of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, S. Dak., while traveling as an 
agricultural explorer for the Department of Agriculture, December 3, 1908. 

The following seeds: 

24451. Medicago ruthenica (L.) Trautv. 

"(No. 59.) From same source as No. 58 (S. P. I. No. 24456). This is a 
favorite wild forage for the stock kept by the Mongolian nomads of this region, 
should be tested in the driest, coldest parts of the Northwest, especially where 
the most extreme cold comes at times without snow on the ground. For a com- 
mon name Gobi Desert, Mongolian, or East Siberian alfalfa will do. " (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of stony and sandy regions of Siberia, extending east 
to the region of Lake Baikal, and into China. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 15 

24451 to 24575— Continued. 

24452 to 24456. Medicago falcata L. 

24452. "(No. 66.) The main lot of western Siberian alfalfa gathered 
growing wild on the open steppe, with the help of 200 peasants, a few 
miles from Obb, Tomsk Province, where the Obi River crosses the 
Siberian railway. One of the most characteristic and dominant plants 
of the open steppes in Tomsk Province, western Siberia. The falcate 
or sickle-shaped pods of this alfalfa give it the specific name falcata. 
A long-lived perennial, with strong, deep-growing taproots, holding its 
own with other native plants in dense sod and enduring pasturing. 
Highly regarded by the peasants as a pasture plant and for hay. 
Cattle, horses, and sheep are all fond of the plant. Worthy of thorough 
trial in all regions where the common alfalfa suffers from winterkilling. 
Where common alfalfa, which is native of a much milder climate 
than that of our Prairie Northwest, is perfectly hardy, I would sug- 
gest 'Let well enough alone.' However, it will be well to remember 
that this plant, while primarily intended for the severest regions, 
endures more pasturing than common alfalfa, and may be found valu- 
able to introduce into native pastures as a wild plant farther south. 
Plant breeders should be quick to isolate the elementary species in 
Medicago falcata and to remember that the many different lots of 
Medicago falcata gathered in my second and third trips to Siberia 
should be carefully kept separate. The most southern lots should go 
more into the Central West, the northern lots into the most northern sec- 
tions. The species varies in its native haunts and should be regarded 
as consisting of many elementary species, differing widely in important 
characteristics. The yellow flowers are attractive and much visited 
by bees." (Hansen.) 

24453. "• (Xo. 90.) As found wild on open steppe at Omsk, Akmolinsk 
Province, western Siberia. See No. 66 (S. P. I. No. 24452)." (Hansen.) 

24454. "(No. 86.) See No. 66 (S. P. I. No. 24452). This lot is from 
north of Irkutsk, near western shore of Lake Baikal, eastern Siberia, 
and extending to a hundred miles north, among the Buriats, a Mon- 
golian tribe. This region is moist er in climate than farther east on 
the open steppe, so may be found better adapted for regions like 
northern Maine, Minnesota, and Wisconsin." (Hansen.) 

24455. "(No. 28.) One of the three yellow-flowered Siberian alfalfas. 
This seed was gathered on the east bank of the Irtysh River about ten 
miles north of Semipalatinsk, in the province of the same name, western 
Siberia. Plants with stems 5 feet 8 inches long were found. Of erect 
habit . Both as growing in the wild pasture and as hay the plant is well 
liked by stock. The plant is also much visited by bees." (Hansen.) 

24456. "(No. 58.) Although but a small quantity of seed, this 
number should receive special attention, as it is from the farthest 
point east where I found this Siberian alfalfa. Seed gathered in 
almost pure sand at station Charonte, in an arm of the Desert Gobi, a 
few miles from Chinese territory on the Siberian railway. This is in 
the Mongolian part of Manchuria, Manchuria proper not beginning till 
after crossing the Chinese mountains. This region is marked by great 
extremes of heat and cold, and especially by the fact that often cold 
sufficient to freeze mercury is experienced with no snow on the ground." 
(Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Europe and Asia, extending from Sweden to 
'China. 

8805— Bui. 162—09 2 



] ( ; BE! DS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

24451 to 24575 Continued. 

I 157. Medicaoo platyoabpa (L.) Trautv. 

\ gtrong-growing perennial yellow-flowered alfalfa found wild in 
timber clearings and along edges of the forests in central Siberia. The name 
platycarpa refers to the large flal pod. This alfalfa Bhould be thoroughly tested 
in regions like Qorthern Wisconsin and Minnesota. Will endure extreme cold, 
bul probably not Bevere wind sweep as well as Medicago falcata and Medicago 
ruth, turn. This lol was gathered Dear Chylim, between Obb and Omsk, in 
Tomsk Province, western Siberia. All the throe Siberian alfalfas are yellow 
flowered." Hansen.) 

Distribution. - Found throughout Siberia; extending east as far as Lake Baikal. 
24458 to 24460. Trifolium lupinaster L. 

24458. "(No. 94.) As found native at Chita, Transbaikal region, on 
Siberian railway. See No. 68 (S. P. I. No. 24817)." (Hansen.) 

24459. "(No. 92.) As found native at Chita, Transbaikal region, on 
Siberian railway. See No. 68 (S. P. I. No. 24817)." (Hansen.) 

24460. "(No. 78.) This lot was gathered on the open steppe just north 
of the Altai Mountain range between Biisk and Beloglasowo, southern 
Tomsk Province, western Siberia. Worthy of introduction into the 
western ranges as a wild plant, and for trial as a cultivated clover 
wherever trouble is experienced from the winterkilling of the common 
red clover. See No. 68 (S. P. I. No. 24817)." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Asia, extending from central Russia through 
Siberia, Mongolia, and Manchuria; also in Japan. 

24461. Trifolium medium Huds. 

"(No. 69.) Mammoth red clover as found wild near Obb, Tomsk Province, 
at the intersection of the Siberian railway and the Obi River. All the Siberian 
clovers should receive careful attention, as they may be found especially 
adapted to our Prairie Northwest where trouble is experienced from the winter- 
killing of the common red clover." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of open woods and fields in northern and central 
Europe and across Asia to the region of Lake Baikal. 

24462. Vicia cracca L. 

"(No. 67.) A vetch gathered growing wild on the open steppe near Obb, 
Tomsk Province, western Siberia, where the Obi River crosses the Siberian 
railway. Common on the open steppes. Not cultivated here as yet, as the 
country is too thinly settled." (Hansen.) 

24463. Vicia cracca L. 

"(No. 88.) As found wild on open steppe at Omsk, Akmolinsk Province, 
western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24464. Vicia amoena Fisch. (?) 

"(No. 64.) A wild vetch gathered at village Verk-Tchitinskaya, 20 verste 
north of Chita, Transbaikal region, Siberian railway." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of central Siberia, extending frpm the Ural Mountains 
to the region of Lake Baikal. 

24465. Vicia tenuifolia Roth. 

"(No. 13.) A native vetch on open steppe at Beloglasowo, between Biisk 
and Smeinogorsk, southern Tomsk Province, western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Europe and Asia, extending from central Russia 
to Lake Baikal. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 17 

24451 to 24575— Continued. 

24466 to 24468. Agropyron imbricatum (Bieb.) R. & S. 

24466. "(No. 63.) A grass of very wide distribution in northern Asia 
and European Russia. Highly recommended as one of the best grasses 
in the Volga River region of eastern European Russia, where it was 
brought into culture by the experiment station at Waluiki near Rowno, 
south of Saratow. In my Russian trip in 1897 I saw the beginnings of 
this work by Mr. Bogdan, at that time director of the station. The 
present sample was gathered wild by myself and helper in the sand 
semidesert region at the station Manchuria, the first station in Chinese 
territory going east on the Siberian railway." (Hansen.) 

24467. "(No. 87.) See No. 63 (S. P. I. No. 24466). This lot was 
collected at Charonte, a few miles into Chinese territory, in the Mon- 
golian part of northwestern Manchuria, where an arm of the Gobi 
Desert is crossed by the Siberian railway." (Hansen.) 

24468. "(No. 91.) As found native at Chita, Transbaikal region, on 
Siberian railway. See No. 63 (S. P. I. No. 24466). A valuable grass 
on dry steppes." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Europe and Asia, being found from Russia to 
Spain and east to Siberia and Afghanistan. 

24469 and 24470. Elymus sibiricus L. 

24469. "(No. 12.) A common grass of dry steppes at Beloglasowo, 
between Biisk and Smeinogorsk, southern Tomsk Province, western 
Siberia. For further study as to value by agrostologists only; not for 
distribution." (Hansen.) 

24470. "(No. 82.) A native dry steppe grass gathered between Belo- 
glasowo and Smeinogorsk, north of Altai Mountain range, Tomsk 
Province, western Siberia. Sample for agrostologists only . ' ' (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Siberia, extending from the Ural Mountains to the 
region of Lake Baikal. 

24471 and 24472. Lathyrus pratensis L. 

24471. "(No. 14.) A wild pea common on the open steppes north 
of Altai Mountain range in the southern part of Tomsk Province. 
Seed gathered near Beloglasowo, between Biisk and Smeinogorsk. 
Its value as a field pea for regions like western Nebraska and Dakota 
should be tested." (Hansen.) 

24472. •(No. 89.) A wild field pea from open steppe at Omsk, 
Akmolinsk Province, western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Europe, Asia, and northern Africa, extending to 
the Pacific and from the Mediterranean to the Arctic Circle. 

24473. Elymus arenarius L. 

"(No. 26.) A coarse reed-like grass common in dry sand deserts, about 30 
miles south of Semipalatinsk, in the province of the same name, western 
Siberia. A tall plant of striking appearance, not eaten by stock, but may be 
useful as a sand binder in sections with great extremes of cold and heat." 
(Hansen.) 

Distribution. — Found on sandy shores throughout the Northern Hemisphere. 

24474. 

(No. 60.) A mixture of Elymus sp. and Koeleria cristata (L.) Pers., the lat- 
ter predominating. 
162 



1 S si EDS \M> PLANTS l.M POSTED. 

24451 to 24575 Continued. 

24475. Agropyron i ^.ninum (L.) Beauv. (?) 

No. 61. \ aative grass common in timber ;in<l timber clearings near 
Chita, Transbaikal region, eastern Siberia. Forage value undetermined. 
3ometimes railed •os/ni:/ bul this is applied properly to .1. pungens." 

Htiusi n . 

24476. Vicxa i m.im.a A. Braun. 

\ 65.) A aative Legume common in woods near Chita, Transbaikal re- 
gion, Siberian railway. Food value undetermined, but Orobus luteus L., its 
relal Lve, La eaten by stock and the young shoots used for food by 1 1n- Chinese." 

| 1 1(1 IIS, II.) 

Distribution. A native of Asia, occurring throughout Siberia, and in Man- 
churia and China; also found in Japan. 

24477. A vena sativa L. Oat. 

" (No. 79.) Oats from the dry Belagatch steppe near Semipalatinsk, in prov- 
ince of same name, western Siberia. A region of great extremes of heat, cold, 
and drought." (Hansen.) 

24478. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Kowliang. 

"(No. 85.) Variety 'Gaolan' from the Harbin district, bought in Chinese 
bazaar at Station Manchuria, the first station in Chinese territory going east on 
the Siberian railway. The favorite variety in northern Manchuria." (Hansen.) 

' ' Brown kowliang from Manchuria. One of the common forms of the region." 
(Carleton R. Ball.) 

24479. Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. 

"(No. 27.) Seed of wild licorice gathered on the banks of a tributary of the 
Irtysh River, about 30 miles south of Semipalatinsk, in province of same name, 
western Siberia. Its value for cultivation not determined, but the region 
where this seed was gathered is subject to great extremes of cold and heat." 
(Hansen.) 

24480. Lavatera thuringiaca L. 

"(No. 83.) A tall mallow-like dry-steppe flower collected between Biisk and 
Semipalatinsk, north of Altai Mountain range, Tomsk Province, western Siberia. 
Plant 4 to 6 feet in height, well branched; flowers mostly bright pink." 
(Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Europe and Asia, extending from central and 
southern Russia to the eastern part of Siberia. 

24481. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 81.) This lot is from the dry Belagatch steppe near Semipalatinsk, in 
province of same name, western Siberia." (Hansen.) 

24482. Trifolium lupinaster L. 

"(No. 84.) See Nos. 68 and 78 (S. P. I. Nos. 24817 and 24460). This 5-leaved 
clover, which ranges northward to the Arctic Circle in Siberia, is worthy of 
trial at the far north. The present lot is from Chailar, in northwestern Man- 
churia, on the Siberian railway." (Hansen.) See No. 24458 for distribution 
of this species. 

24483. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 117.) ' Ak-bugdai.' [Ah' means white, 'bugdaV wheat. A wheat from 
Tashkend, northern Turkestan. Very productive at Tashkend." (Hansen.) 

162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 19 

24451 to 24575— Continued. 

24484. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

"(No. 118.) ' Turbat,' meaning land or country wheat, from 20 miles north 
of Tashkend, Turkestan. Turbat is the name of a place." (Hansen.) 

24485. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 129.) ' Kara-bugdai,' meaning black wheat, from Tashkend, Turkes- 
tan. May be sown either as a winter wheat, from September to December, at 
Tashkend; oi as a spring wheat, in February or March, but not later. This 
is on northern border of cotton belt. Usually sown as a spring wheat." 
(Hansen.) 

24486. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

"(No. 131.) Native wheat from Old Chardchui, Turkestan, a very dry 
region." (Hansen.) 

24487. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 134.) l Sary-magis,' 1 a native wheat from Tashkend, Turkestan. 'Sary' 
means yellow. All the Turkestan wheats deserve special attention as a 
drought-resistant race." (Hansen.) 

24488. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 
"(No. 135.) l Caucasian ' wheat from Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24489. Triticum sp. Wheat. 

"(No. 137.) ' Kizyl-bugdai,' meaning red wheat, from Tashkend, Turkestan." 
(Hansen.) 

24490. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 138.) 'Ak-bugdai,' meaning white wheat, from Tashkend, Turkestan." 
(Hansen.) 

24491. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 139.) 'Sary-bugdai,' meaning yellow wheat, from Tashkend, Turkes- 
tan." (Hansen.) 

24492. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 140.) 'Kara Kiltschik' wheat from Tashkend, Turkestan. 'Kara' 
means black." (Hansen.) 

24493. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

"(No. 234.) Seed of native Turcoman 'Red Mountain' wheat, raised on dry 
land without irrigation at Askabad, Turkestan, and found especially valuable 
at the Askabad Experiment Station." (Hansen.) 

24494 to 24496. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

24494. "(No. 119.) Winter muskmelon. 'Ak-bek-shek,' meaning 
white melon. From Chardchui, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24495. "(No. 120.) 'Gulakcha,' a first early muskmelon from Chard- 
chui, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24496. "(No. 122.) Winter muskmelon. 'Kerkinsche, 1 from Chard- 
chui, Turkestan. Diameter 29 and 15 cm." (Hansen.) 

24497. Hordeum vt lgare L. Barley. 

"(No. 123.) Native winter barley from Bairamalee, near Merv, eastern Tur- 
kestan. Drought resistant." (Hansen.) 
162 



20 SEEDS \M> PLANTS [M PORTED. 

24451 to 24575 Continued. 

24498 to 24540. CUCUMIS mi.i<> L. Muskmelon. 

24498. ' Nfo.124.) Winter muskmelon. l Katschalinsl- ij .' I'mm ( 'liard- 
cliui. Turkestan " I Hansen.') 

24499. "(No. L26.) Winter muskmelon. 'Khanshy,' from Chard- 
cliui. Turkestan. Diameter 38 and 22 cm." (Hansen.) 

24500. "(No. 1-7.) Winter muskmelon, from Chardchui, Turkestan. 
1 >iameter 32 and 20 cm." < Hansen.) 

24501. "(No. 1-8.) Winter muskmelon, from Chardchui, Turkestan. 
Diameter 23 and 22 cm." I Hansen.) 

24502 to 24537. "(Nos. 150 to 185.) Native muskmelon- of Turkes- 
tan, mostly winter varieties. No. 1G7 (S. P. I. No. 24519) is the Largest 
lot of seed, from melons I bought in December, 11)08, in the bazaar at 
Chardchui, Turkestan. In my opinion it is worthy of a most earnest 
effort on the part of a melon specialist to get these winter muskmelons 
of Turkestan introduced into the driest and hottest regions of our 
Soul Invest and the driest parts of our cotton belt. Some of the melons 
weigh from 30 to 40 pounds, with thick white flesh, and are extremely 
sweet. In Turkestan the late varieties are hung in reed-grass nets or 
slings from the ceilings in the native houses of sun-baked clay, ready 
for use all winter as needed. They are one of the main staples of the 
native diet. The melons are also pickled somewhat like watermelon 
rinds in America, but much superior in quality. Much of the musk- 
melon seed I brought from my first trip to Turkestan in 1907, and some 
in the spring of 1908, was lost from being tested too far north, in response 
to the great demand for the seed. Some melons of this first importation 
have done well in the Southwest and have since appeared under other 
names, by which the credit of introduction is lost. With this fresh lot 
of seed it is hoped that the Turkestan muskmelons, the largest and best 
in the world, will receive a thorough trial in the hottest, driest regions 
of the Southwest. None of them should go north of the cotton belt, 
unless it be some of the smallest and earliest varieties. A long period 
of hot, dry weather is needed to bring out the quality. Some of the 
varieties endure long-distance transportation, so that in these melons 
appears an inviting field for southern enterprise. Some of the varieties 
may prove too sweet for our tastes. The breeder of melons may find 
them useful in hybridizing. Southern California, New Mexico, Ari- 
zona, and southern Texas should receive the seed at first; later the 
range may extend farther northeast as the seed becomes more abundant. 
I can not insist too strongly on the necessity of giving these melons a 
long, hot, dry season for their best development." (Hansen.) 

24538. "(No. 233.) Seed saved from three large, white muskmelons 
bought at Kagan or New Bokhara, Turkestan. Fruit oval, 12 to 15 
inches in long diameter, clear, bright yellow; flesh white, very sweet. 
See Nos. 150 to 185 (S. P. I. Nos. 24502 to 24537)." (Hansen.) 

24539. "(No. 230.) An oval, brownish yellow winter muskmelon 
with sweet, green flesh, 8 to 10 inches in length. Grown near Merv, 
Turkestan. In good condition December 17, 1908." (Hansen.) 

24540. "(No. 244.) Seed of winter muskmelon saved from melons 
bought at Chardchui, Turkestan, December, 1908." (Hansen.) 

162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 21 

24451 to 24575— Continued. 

24541. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 

" (No. 121.) Sample of Upland cotton originally from the United States, but 
cultivated at least fifteen years on northern limits of cotton belt in Turkestan, 
about 100 versts north of Tashkend." (Hansen.) 

24542. Gossypium herbaceum L. Cotton. 

" (No. 143.) Sample of the local native Bokhara cotton of Tashkend, Turkes- 
tan, on the northern limits of cotton culture. I took occasion to study the 
cotton industry while in Turkestan and found the opinion held by many that 
the introduction of American cotton seed in Turkestan was not an unmixed 
blessing. While American cotton is greatly superior to the native Bokhara 
type for the manufacturer, the American varieties were somewhat inferior in 
resistance to untimely frosts and were later in season. If this proves true, as 
a rule, it opens up an interesting field for cotton breeders in hybridizing the 
American and Turkestan cottons, if that is possible. For Turkestan it would 
help maintain culture where it is at present in a precarious condition, because 
of recent great failures from frosts on the northern limits of cotton culture; in 
America it might aid in the boll-weevil work and in forcing cotton culture a 
few miles farther north than at present." (Hansen.) 

24543. Gossypium indicum Lam. Cotton. 

"(No. 144.) " Malla hum 1 from Tashkend, Turkestan. 'Malla'' means 
yellow; 'hnza,' cotton. This is the native cotton used for 'Nah-mazh' or 
Mohammedan prayer rugs and other holy purposes; not generally sold, but is 
used mainly for presents. Every native Sart cotton grower raises a little for 
his own use. This native Turkestan may vary in some particular from the 
other nankeen or yellow cottons grown elsewhere." (Hansen.) 

24544. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 

"(No. 147.) Native 'Kara chigis' cotton from Tashkend, Turkestan. 'Kara' 
means black; 'chigis,'' seed. 'Somewhat like Peterkin, but at least two weeks 
earlier,' is the experience with it at the experiment station, Turkestan." 
(Hansen.) 

24545. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 

"(No. 149.) 'Tashkend Upland' cotton, originally from the United States, 
but grown for many years at Tashkend, Turkestan. The name has changed. 
Said to be an early cotton." (Hansen.) 

24546. Gossypium herbaceum L. Cotton % 

"(No. 187.) Native Bokhara cotton as raised at Tashkend, Turkestan. See 
No. 143 (S. P. I. No. 24542)." (Hansen.) 

24547. Gossypium herbaceum L. Cotton. 

"(No. 189.) Another sample of 'Malla huza,' the native yellow or holy 
cotton of central Asia, as grown at Tashkend, Turkestan. See No. 144 (S. P. I. 
No. 24543)." (Hansen.) 

24548 to 24550. Trifolium suaveolens Willd. Shaftal. 

24548. "(No. 125.) The main lot of Persian clover from Meshed, 
northeastern Persia, and grown one year at Tashkend, Turkestan. 
Shabdar is the Persian name; as grown in India it is called shaftal. 
An annual plant of extremely vigorous growth. In Persia and Afghan- 
istan it is cut two or three times during the season. Flowers small, 
bright pink, very fragrant, much visited by bees. Adapted for the 
dry part of the cotton belt and for the driest regions of our Southwest. 
This cultivated form is decidedly stronger in growth than that occurring 
wild farther west into Europe and northern Africa." (Hansen.) 
162 



22 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24451 to 24575 Continued. 

24548 to 24660 I ontinued. 

24549. "(No. L94.) From the original lol of Persian seed received at 
Tashkend, Turkestan, from Meshed, northeastern Persia. Sec No. 195 

- P. I. No. 24550)." • Hansen.) 

24550. "(No. L95.) Shabdar from Meshed, northeastern Persia, raised 
one year at experimental station, Golodnaya or Eunger steppe, Tur- 
kestan, between Tashkend and Samarkand." (Hansen.) 

"Previous importations of shaftal by the Bureau of Plant Industry (S. P. I. 
Nos. L9506 and L9507, received December LO, L906) an- yielding promising 
hay crops in the Southwest. The present numbers are of interest, as they 

.lend considerably the range from which seed has been secured. Meshed 
lies at an altitude of about 3,000 feet, while the upper Kuram valley, the center 
of si ed production for northwestern India, where this is the only clover grown, 

has an altitude of nearly 5,000 feet." (Charles J. Brand.) 

Distribution. — An annual clover, found in Persia, in the region of the Caspian 
Sea. and east to India. 

24551. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

No. 130.) A very early swamp, white rice, a Kirghiz Tartar variety, from 
Tashkend, Turkestan. Worthy of attention by rice breeders and may prove 
useful owing to its earliness." (Hansen.) 

24552. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 
Xo. 148.) Dry-land rice from Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24553. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

- Xo. 152.) ' Ak-zhu-gah-rah,' a native variety from Old Chardchui, Turke- 
stan. This is extensively cultivated as a cereal in the driest regions of Turke- 
stan, being better adapted to droughty conditions than maize." (Hansen.) 

iil Dzhugara,' the common white durra of Turkestan. Extensively grown for 
human food." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

24554. Axdropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 
"(Xo. 192.) A red-seeded variety grown by the Turcomen at Bairamalee, 

near Merv, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

"Brown durra. Never before introduced from Turkestan. A few seeds 
were found mixed in S. P. I. No. 18389, white durra, from Bassorah, Arabia. 
Similar forms are found along the northern edge of the Sahara. Very similar 
to our domestic brown durra." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

24555. Haloxylon ammodendron (C. A. Meyer) Bunge. 

"(No. 133.) One of the best native trees or arborescent shrubs of the sand des- 
erts of Turkestan. Now much used as a sand binder for the dunes which cause 
trouble along the Transcaspian railway. The green wood burns freely, is very 
heavy, and is gathered in immense quantities for fuel. This tree might prove 
a valuable addition to the native flora in the driest sand deserts of our South- 
west. The native name is Saxaul." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of central Asia, extending from the Ural to the Altai 
mountains and south into Persia. 

24556. Salsola arbuscula Pall. 

"(No. 145.) A native arborescent shrub, native of the sand deserts of the 
Transcaspian region east of the Caspian Sea in Turkestan. This lot is from 
Chardchui, where the Russian Government has made extensive experiments 
in planting sand binders to hold the drifting dunes along the line of the Trans- 
caspian railway. This species is one of the favorite plants for that purpose." 
(Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of central Asia, from the Ural to the Altai mountains. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 23 

24451 to 24575— Continued. 

24557. Calligoxum sp. 

"(No. 240.) An arborescent shrub, native of the sand deserts of Turkestan, 
now used as a sand binder along the Transcaspian railway. See Xos. 133, 145, 
241, and 242 (S. P. I. Xos. 24555, 24556, 24558, and 24559). Seed from Chard- 
chui." {Hansen.) 

24558. Calligoxum aphyllum (Pall.) Guerke. 

"(No. 241.) Another species used as a sand binder along the Transcaspian 
railway. Seed from near Chardchui. See Nos. 133, 240, and 242 (S. P. I. 
Nos. 24555, 24557, and 24559)." {Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of southern Russia, in the vicinity of the Caucasus 
Mountains and the Caspian Sea. 

24559. Calligoxum caput-medusae Schrenk. 

"(No. 242.) Used as a sand binder along the Transcaspian railway. Seed 
from near Chardchui. Nos. 240, 241, and 242 (S. P. I. Nos. 24557, 24558, and 
24559) are all native of the sand deserts of Turkestan. See Nos. 133, 240, and 
241 (S. P. I. Nos. 24555, 24557, and 24558)." {Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of the deserts in the region of the Altai Mountains 
in southern Russia. 

24560. Paxicum miliaceum L. Millet. 

"(No. 136.) 'Orenburg red millet,' grown at Tashkend, Turkestan. May 
prove to be the same as the Red Lump Orenburg millet I introduced from my 
1897 trip to Russia. Everything from Orenburg ought to be specially adapted 
to dry-farming conditions. " {Hansen.) 

24561. Paxicum miliaceum L. Millet. 

"(No. 188.) 'Chinese black milleV from Tashkend, Turkestan. Appears 
similar to the lot I obtained in Turkestan in 1897. Afterwards Mr. M. A. 
Carleton secured the Black Veronesh millet. 'Veronesh' appears a better spell- 
ing than 'Veronezh.' These large black-seeded millets produce heavily in 
South Dakota, even when sown late on new breaking, and are useful in stock 
feeding. The Kirghiz Tartars of northern Turkestan use these and other 
large-seeded native millets extensively as an important part of their daily diet. 
For their value in feeding steers, see South Dakota Agricultural Experiment 
Station Bulletin No. 97, by James W. Wilson and H. G. Skinner." {Hansen.) 

24562. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 

"(No. 141.) Chick-pea or 'Persian pea,' from the experiment station at 
Bairamalee, Turkestan. This is near Merv, a few miles from the Persian 
border, in ancient Turcomania. " {Hansen.) 

24563. Triticum durum Desf. Wheat. 

24564. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 

"(No. 232.) Native chick-pea as grown at Samarkand, Turkestan. " 
{Hansen.) 

24565. Cicer arietixum L. Chick-pea. 

"(No. 243.) Another lot of 'Persian peas' or Garok, the native name, as 
grown by the Turcomen in the dry region at Bairmalee, near Merv, Turkestan." 
{Hansen.) 

24566. Vigxa uxguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 
"(No. 190.)" Brown-Eye. 

24567. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

"(No. 142.) Turcestanica alfalfa as bought in the native bazaar at Baira- 
malee, near Merv, Turkestan. See No. 259 (S. P. I. No. 24811)." {Hansen.) 
162 



2 1 SEEDS \M' PLANTS l.M PORTED. 

24451 to 24575 Continued. 

24568 and 24569. Elaeagnus anointm <>i.ia L. Oleaster. 

24568. "(No. L46. A cultivated form with edible fruits fully an 
inch in Length, extensively grown in Turkestan. This sample is from 
« lhardchui. " Hansi n. 

24569. "(No. 238.) Seed of an edible-fruited form, fruit fully an 
bach l"iiu r . as grown in Transcaucasia. This Lot from bazaar al Tiflis, 
Transcaucasia." (Hansen. < 

Distribution. A native of southern Europe and western Asia, in the region 
of the Caspian Sea. Cultivated as an ornamental in the United States. 

24570. PHA8BOLUS radiatus L. Green gram. 
\"o. 186.) As grown by the Mohammedans on the northern limits of cotton 

culture near Tashkend, Turkestan. Used as a catch crop when too late for 
cotton. The peas are called Masch by the natives, and are used for food by 
them. A promising legume as a cover crop for the cotton belt, and in the dry 
parts of the Southwest." (Hansen.) 

24571. Allium sp. 

"(No. 191.) An ornamental native onion found in the mountains near 
Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24572. Punica granatum L. Pomegranate. 

"(No. 235.) Seed of a native variety grown by the native Sarts at Old 
Bokhara, Turkestan. " (Hansen.) 

24573. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 
"(No. 237.) A sweet fruit from Kutais Province, Transcaucasia, bought in 

fruit bazaar at Baku." (Hansen.) 

24574. Pistacia vera L. Pistache. 

"(No. 239.) Pistache nuts grown in southern Transcaucasia (Armenia) near 
Persian frontier. This lot is from bazaar at Tiflis, Transcaucasia." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of Asia; beginning to be cultivated in California. 

24575. Sesamum orientale L. Sesame. 

"(No. 245.) Seeds raised in the Golodnaya or Hunger steppe, Turkestan. 
The sesame oil is much liked for table use by the native Mohammedan Sarts. 
The first oil pressed out is used for the table and in cooking; the rest, with the 
seeds, is used for the manufacture of Khalvah, a favorite Russian and oriental 
candy. The merits of this sesame oil-cake confection should be investigated 
by manufacturers in the driest and hottest regions of the United States, as 
Khalvah is certainly a delicious candy, with its fine silk-thread consistency 
and rich nut flavor. Sesame oil alone will not probably win much favor here, 
with the abundant and cheap cotton-seed oil. Sesame is an. annual and 
extensively grown in oriental countries." (Hansen.) 

24576. Puxica granatum L. Pomegranate. 

From Chios, Turkey in Asia. Presented by Mr. N. J. Pantelides. Received 
January 12, 1909. 

Cuttings. 

' ' These pomegranates are not seedless, but the seed is so soft that it can be ground 
between the teeth without the least difficulty, especially if the fruit is left to ripen 
long enough on the tree, which needs to be copiously watered." (Extract from letter 
of Mr. Pantelides, dated December 24, 1903.) 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 25 

24585 and 24586. Vicia spp. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Purchased from Haage & Schmidt, at the request 
of Mr. C. V. Piper. Received January 13, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

24585. Vicia biennis L. (?) Woolly-pod vetch. 

"This vetch is in most respects very similar to hairy vetch, being nearly, if 
not quite, as hardy and maturing much earlier." (Piper.) 

24586. Vicia disperma DC. (?) Two-seeded vetch. 

"A slender-stemmed erect-growing vetch which has done remarkably well 
in most of the vetch-growing regions. The stems are very fine and the yield 
of hay therefore comparatively light, but there is reason to believe that it will 
maintain itself from year to year in pastures without reseeding." (Piper.) 

24587. Atalantia hixdsii (Champ.) Oliver. 

From Hongkong, China. Presented by Mr. S. T. Dunn, superintendent, Botanical 
and Forestry Department. Received January 14, 1909. 

Seeds of a shrub with compressed branchlets, ovate-elliptical leathery leaves, 1\ to 3 
inches long, bearing small flowers in axillary clusters, followed by small orange- 
colored fruits. For citrus breeding experiments. 

Distribution. — Found on the wooded hills in the vicinity of Hongkong, China. 

24588. Passiflora sp. 

From C. Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Elmer Stearns, botanist, 
School of Agriculture, through Mr. Frederic Chisolm. Received January 15, 
1909. 

Seeds. 

"Fruits about the size of a goose egg and orange-yellow when ripe." (Stearns.) 

24589. Elaeis melaxococca Gaertn. 

From Cartagena, Colombia, South America. Presented by Mr. Isaac A. Manning, 
United States consul. Received January 15, 1909. 

Seeds of a palm whose stem creeps along the ground and bears a tuft of large pinnate 
leaves with strong prickly stalks. The flowers are borne in a large head, consisting of 
numerous little branches bearing minute flowers. The fruits are bright red ; the seeds 
are black. 

Distribution. — A native of the primeval woods along the upper branches of the 
Amazon in the provinces of Para and Rio Negro, Brazil. 

24590. Cytisus proliferus Linn. f. Tagasaste. 

From Teneriffe, Canary Islands. Received from Mr. C. H. Hamilton, through 
Mr. J. B. Blandy, Funchal, Madeira, January 16, 1909. 

"Fodder shrub for light, dry soil; finally grows to 20 feet high, deep rooted, rather 
intolerant to frost and drought." (Dyer.) 

"Mr. Hardy, of Adelaide, recommends it as quickly growing for a wind-break. 
Requires to be periodically cut back, as it otherwise gets too hard for fodder. Very 
valuable also for apiarists, as flowering dining several months, and here during the cool 
season. In some places it was found that horses and cattle dislike this plant as nutri- 
ment. It grows quickly again when cut." ( Von Mueller.) For previous introduc- 
tions, see S. P. I. Nos. 2153, 4021, and 7696. 
162 



26 BEEDS \Nr> PLANTS tMPORTED. 

24591. Belotj qlottnosa (Blanco) Skeels. (Limonia glutinosa 

Blanco.) Ai.«;i.k DE< &NDRA Naves.) 

From Montalban, Luzon, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William 8. Lyon, 
who collected the seed in December, L908. Received January L8, L909. 

S< eds. 

■ \ tree, trunk armed with large spines; haves alternate, ternate; flowers axillary 
or terminal, whit Lsh. Frail oblong, 3 inches long, 2 inches thick, surface covered wit b 
protuberances and grooved; pulp glutinous, aromatic; juice sour. The wood is used 
for pillars in bouses and the fruit is made into glue. Nativenames, Tabog &nd Taboc." 
(Blanco, Flora de Filipinos, 1887.) 

•May be used as a possible stock for dry farming of citrus." {Lyon.) 

24592. Blighia sapida Konig. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. H. F. Schultz. Received 
January 18, 1909. 
"The 'Akee,' a beautiful African tree introduced into the West Indies. Valued in 
Jamaica as a richly flavored and wholesome food. The bright-yellow, fleshy arillus 
is t he part eaten. Should not be eaten if in the least decayed. The fruit is prepared 
in various ways, stewed in milk and afterwards browned in a frying pan with butter. 
It is also commonly eaten boiled and mixed with salt fish, onions, and tomatoes as a 
breakfast food." {Extract from Cook and Collins, ''Economic Plants of Porto Rico.") 

24593 to 24595. 

From Miami, Fla. Received through Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge of Subtropical 
Garden, January 16, 1909. 
The following seeds: 

24593. Thrinax floridana Sarg. 

''This is indigenous to southern Florida and the keys, with slender trunk, 
attaining a height of 25 or more feet, with crown of small diameter; the leaves 
are green above and silvery white beneath; the berries are produced in great 
abundance and are waxy white. This palm might make a very satisfactory 
subject for the conservatory, where, as far as I am aware, it has never been tried, 
and is worth introducing into southern California and Hawaii. I have no 
doubt it is indigenous to Porto Rico." {Wester.) 

24594. Coccothrinax garberi (Chapm.) Sarg. 

"This is a dwarf palm with rather slender stem ; leaves yellowish green, lus- 
trous above, silvery beneath; the berries are deep purple. This also might 
make a very attractive greenhouse subject, and is certainly worth introducing 
into southern California and Hawaii . " ( Wester. ) 

Distribution. — Found on dry coral ridges near the shore of Biscayne Bay, 
Florida. 

24595. Jacquemontia pentantha (Jacq.) G. Don. 

An attractive greenhouse climber for summer and autumn flowering, with 
rich violet-blue flowers. {Adapted from Bailey.) 
Distribution. — Florida keys and Tropical America. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 27 

24596. Medicago denticulata Willd. Bur clover. 

From Chico, Cal. Grown at the Plant Introduction Garden by Mr. Roland 
McKee from seed collected near Tanghsiang, Shansi, China, by Mr. Frank N. 
Meyer, agricultural explorer, April 30, 1907; received at the Plant Introduc- 
tion Garden June 15, 1907, under his number, 727a. Received at Washington, 
D. C, and numbered for convenience in recording distribution, January 14, 
1909. 

"A leguminous perennial, probably a bur clover, found growing between rocks. 
May be of use on dry sterile soils as a fodder plant. Only found in one locality and 
only a few plants to be found there." {Meyer.) 

24598. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Yuma, Ariz. Received through Mr. Charles J. Brand, January 19, 1909. 

"Seed of Andean alfalfa, propagated from the original importation No. 9303. In 
the production of this seed the method of planting transplanted crowns, which appears 
to be fairly common in South America, but which has not, so far as known, been used 
in this country, was employed. Within five months from time of transplanting the 
crowns, which were taken from a 3-year-old stand, mature seed was produced. 
Almost 75 pounds of seed were taken from about one-fourth of an acre, with the 
plants 3 feet apart each way. The general use of this method is suggested when it 
is desired to plow up old fields which have become unprofitable because of the thin- 
ness of the stand." {Brand.) 

24599. Pisum sativum L. Pea. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received Jan- 
uary 16, 1909. 

Tall Butter Sugar. — "A variety distinguished by fleshy and fiberless pods that can 
be used in the same way as string beans. An old variety in Europe, but rarely grown, 
thus far, in America." (IF. W. Tracy, sr.) 

24600. Diospyros ebenaster Retz. 

From Guadalajara, Mexico. Presented by Senor Luis Rosas, through Mr. Fred- 
eric Chisolm. Received January 21, 1909. 

"The Zapote Prieto of Mexico. A persimmon with large, delicious, and delicate 
fruits, the flesh of which looks curiously like axle grease. Properly a tropical tree, 
but capable of withstanding light frosts when it forms a low tree with bright, glossy 
green leaves, 15 to 25 feet high. In frostless regions it reaches a height of 60 to 70 
feet. Fruits too soft to stand long shipment. Should succeed in southern Florida 
and southern California." {Chisolm.) 

Distribution. — A native of the Philippine Islands and the Celebes. Cultivated in 
Mauritius, Calcutta, and Malacca. Occurs also in cultivated places in Tropical 
America: Orizaba, Vera Cruz, Cuernavaca, Lizaro, Miradon, and Cordova, in Mex- 
ico; Rio Janeiro in Brazil; and in Cuba. 

24601. Cajan indicum Spreng. 

From Huradura, Cuba. Presented by Prof. F. S. Earle, through Prof. S. M. 

Tracy, Biloxi, Miss. Received January 20, 1909. 
162 



k JS SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24602 and 24603. Medicago spp. 

I G rmany. Secured by Mr. <i. Schulze, civil engineer, Altenkirchen, 

Westerwald, Germany, and presented by Mr. Paul Schulze, Chicago, 111., 
through Mr. Charles J Brand. Received January 22, L909. 

of each oi the following: 

24602. Medicago sattv a L. Alfalfa. 
Pi From Bonn, Germany. (P. L. II. No. 3352.) 

24603. Medicago battva varia (Mart.) CJrb. Sand lucern. 
From Erfurt, Germany. (P. L. II. No. 3353.) 

24604. ( a.ian iniiktm Spreng. 

From Little River, Fla. Presented by Mr. E. J. Andrews, through Mr. P.J. 
Wester, in charge of Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla. Received January 22, 
1909. 

S. G. No. 1169.) This plant is similar in habit and appearance to the ordinary 
pigeon pea, except that the standard of the corolla is streaked with deep orange-red, 
while the ordinary species in cultivation here is pale lemon-yellow; it differs also in 
that the plant blooms early in the fall and the seed ripens by Christmas or a little 
later, while the ordinary pigeon pea is still in bloom and will not ripen its seed for a 
month more at least. The pigeon pea is useful in poultry yards, where the chickens 
crack the pods and eat the peas. This variety would be useful, as it ripens earlier 
than the ordinary variety, and would probably be of interest to the people in Hawaii, 
Porto Rico, and the Canal Zone. The seed from which Mr. Andrews's plants grew 
came from Nassau, Bahama." (Wester.) 

24605 to 24607. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

From Smyrna region, Turkey. Presented by Mr. H. Caramanian, Amasia, 
Turkey, at the request of Mr. M. A. Carleton. Received January 23, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

24605. ' 'Red black awned." 

24606. " Yellow Poussana" 

24607. " White Poussana:' 

24608. Rosa sp. Rose. 

From Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Presented by Senor Severo Hernandez, 
through Mr. Frederic Chisolm. Received January 26, 1909. 

"The 'rosa rellena' of the Mexicans, a healthy, strong-growing variety with flowers 
as large and perhaps better formed than those of the American Beauty, rather darker 
in color and not so fragrant." (Chisolm.) 

24609. Glycosmis pentaphylla (Retz.) Correa. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Botanic Garden. 
Received January 27, 1909. 

Variety dilatata. An unarmed shrub with evergreen compound leaves of one to five 
leaflets. The small, white, fragrant flowers are borne in panicles. The berries are 
white, globose, varying from the size of a pea to that of a cherry. 

Distribution. — Throughout tropical and subtropical Himalaya, ascending to 7,000 
feet in Sikkim; also in southern China, in the Philippines, and in northeastern Aus- 
tralia. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 29 

24610. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Trenton, Ky. Purchased from Mr. S. J. Leavell. Received January 6, 
1909. 

Trenton. "A brown-seeded variety picked out of Mammoth by Mr. Leavell in 1904, 
and in that year 12 plants produced 7 pounds of seed ; in 1905 these 7 pounds produced 
10 bushels; in 1906 Mr. Leavell reports that with exactly the same treatment it out- 
yielded Mammoth by 50 per cent. Seems like a promising variety." (H. T. Nielsen.) 

24612. Medicago falcata L. 

From Babb, Mont. Grown by Mr. C. L. Bristol and received from him January 
18, 1909. 

Grown from S. P. I. No. "20718. 

24613. SOLAXDRA GRAXDIFLORA Swartz. 

From Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Presented by Sefior Severo Hernandez, 
through Mr. Frederic Chisolm. Received January 26, 1909. 

"Cuttings of 'Guayacan' or 'Copa de oro,' an ornamental hard-wood climber, with 
smooth, bright-green leaves and very large gold-colored flowers. Very ornamental 
in every way, but not suited for outdoor cultivation except in frostless sections." 
(Chisolm.) 

Distribution. — A native of Jamaica and of Mexico, extending north to Cordova; 
also south through Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Colombia to Brazil. 

24614 to 24619. 

From Antigua, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. A. S. Archer, through 
Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge of Subtropical Garden. Received January 28, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

24614. Hydriastele wendlandiaxa (Muell. & Moore) Wendl. & Drude. 
(S. G. No. 1175.) Distribution. — A native of the northern coast of Australia. 

24615. Thrixax barbadexsis Lodd. 

(S. G. No. 1177.) Distribution. — A native palm of the island of Barbados in 
the British West Indies. 

24616. Caryota mitis Lout. 

(S. G. No. 1178.) Distribution. — A native palm of southeastern Asia, extend- 
ing from Burma and the island of Hainan southward through the Malay Archi- 
pelago. 

24617. Thrixax morrisii Wendl. 

(S. G. No. 1179.) Distribution. — A dwarf palm found in Anguilla Island in 
the British West Indies. 

24618. Thrixax radiata Lodd. 

(S. G. No. 1180.) Distribution. — A native palm on the island of Trinidad and 
also found in Cuba. 

24619. Abrus praecatorius L. 

(S. G. No. 1176.) "A cream-colored variety of this twining vine." (Archer.) 

Distribution. — A native of the Himalaya Mountains, ascending to 3,500 feet, 
and of Ceylon and Siam. Cultivated generally throughout the Tropics; used 
in the southern part of the United States for covering screens. 
162 



30 SEEDS \M> PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24620 to 24630. 

A collection of conifei ured for foreign exchange ai id for corporative hybrid- 

izing experimenta with Mr. J. W. Riggs, Waterloo. Kans. 
24620. Pint a murk lta D. Don. 

From Fruitvale, Cal. Purchased from Mr. F. A. Miller. Received 
January 28, L909. 

Distribution. — California coast region from Mendocino County southward, 

usually in widely ~< paratod localities, toTomalos Point, north of the Bay of San 
Francisco, and from Monterey to San Luis Obispo County; in Lower Calif ornia 

on ( Jedroe Island, ami on the const, between Knsenado and San Quintan. 

24621 to 24629. 

Received through the Forest Service, United States Department, of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C, January and February, L909. 

24621 to 24623. Collected in Crook National Forest, Arizona, at an 
altitude of approximately 6,000 feet. 

24621. JUNIPERUS PACHYPHLAEA Tori'. 

Distribution. — Dry, arid mountain slopes, usually at elevations of 
4,000 to 6,000 feet above the sea, from the Eagle and Limpio moun- 
tains in southwestern Texas, westward along the desert ranges of 
New Mexico and Arizona, south of the Colorado plateau, extending 
nortlrward to the lower slopes of many of the high mountains of 
northern Arizona and southward into Mexico. 

24622. Juniperus monosperma Sarg. 

Distribution. — Along the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains 
from the divide between the Platte and Arkansas rivers in Colorado 
to western Texas, southern New Mexico, and Arizona and south- 
ward into northern Mexico. 

24623. Pinus edulis Engelm. 

Distribution. — Eastern foothills of the outer ranges of the Rocky 
Mountains, from Colorado to western Texas, westward to the 
eastern border of Utah, southwestern Wyoming, northern and 
central Arizona, and over the mountains of northern Mexico. 

24624 and 24625. Collected in Chiricahua National Forest, Ari- 
zona. 

24624. Juniperus pachyphlaea Torr. 

From an elevation of 5,000 feet. See No. 24621 for distribution. 

24625. Cupressus arizonica Greene. 

From an elevation of 5,500 feet. 

Distribution. — Found on the mountains of central, eastern, and 
southern Arizona, often on the northern slopes forming almost 
pure forests of considerable extent at elevations of 5,000 to 6,000 
feet above the sea; also found on the mountains of northern 
Sonora and Chihuahua, in Mexico. 

24626. Pinus ponderosa Laws. 

Collected in Coconino National Forest, Arizona. * 

Distribution. — A large tree of the western part of North America, ex- 
tending from British Columbia to Lower California and northern Mexico 
and eastward as far as northwestern Nebraska and western Texas. 

102 



JANUARY 1 TO MAKCH 31, 1909. 31 

24620 to 24630— Continued. 

24621 to 24629— Continued. 

24627. Picea engelmanni (Parry) Engelm. 

From Gallinas Canon, Pecos National Forest, New Mexico. Altitude, 
approximately 7,800 feet. 

Distribution. — A native tree of the high mountain slopes of western 
North America, extending from Alberta and British Columbia to New 
Mexico and Arizona, from an elevation of 5,000 feet in the north to 
11,500 feet in the south. 

24628. Pseudotsuga taxifolia (Lamb.) Britt. 

Collected in Carson National Forest, New Mexico, at an altitude of 
approximately 7,500 feet. 

Distribution. — From about latitude 55° north in the Rocky Mountains 
and from the head of the Skeena River in the Coast Range southward 
through all the Rocky Mountain system to the mountains of western 
Texas, southern New Mexico, southern Arizona, and northern Mexico. 

24629. Picea engelmanni (Parry) Engelm. 

Collected in Alamo National Forest, New Mexico, at an altitude of 
approximately 9,000 feet. See No. 24627 for distribution. 

24630. Pinus caribaea Morelet. 

From Miami, Fla. Received through Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge of Subtropical 
Garden, January 4, 1909. 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern coast of North America, from 
South Carolina to the highlands of Central America, and of the Bahamas and 
the Isle of Pines. 

24631. Gourliea spinosa (Mol.) Skeels. (Lucuma spinosa MoL, 
1782.) (Gourliea chilensis Gay, 1846.) 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
January 28, 1909. 

Seed of the Chanal, a small tree 12 to 15 feet high, with long, thick, cylindrical 
branches, ending in spines. The leaves are compound, consisting of three pairs of 
small ovate leaflets. The flowers, borne in short, loose racemes, are orange-yellow, 
streaked with red. The fruit is about 1 inch in diameter, covered with a brownish 
skin and having a pulp resembling a jujube (Chinese date) in flavor. The wood is 
yellow, quite hard, and used considerably by cabinetmakers. 

Distribution. — This tree grows along hedges in the provinces of ( oquimbo, Copiapo, 
Tambo, and Guanta in Chile at an elevation of 1,500 to 5,000 feet. 

24635. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Boxberg, Baden, Germany. Secured from the Getreidelagerhaus, Box- 
berg, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received January 27, 1909. 
Alt-Deutsche Frankische lucern. "This seed was grown in the same region as 
No. 22467, under which number a detailed account is given. It is of special interest 
on account of the fact that it comes from within 15 or 20 miles of the original home 
of the well-known Grimm alfalfa of Minnesota." (Brand.) 

8805— Bui. 162—09 3 






32 SEEDS ami PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24636. Mangifera [NDICA L. Mango. 

From Papeete, Tahiti, South Sea [elands. Presented by Mr. Barbour Lathrop. 

Received January 30, L909. 

"Thifi i- a tiny, rich-flavored mango, very differenl from any I have ever seen, 

doI much larger than a very big English walnut. Their is only one tree on the island, 

and no one can tell me where it came from. The fruits from whirl) these Beeds were 

taken were aboul the size of a large plum and very delicate in taste." (Lathrop.) 

24637. Mascarenhasia elastica K. Schum. 

From Mozambique, Portuguese Easl Airica. Presented by Mr. (). W. Barrett, 
Director of Agriculture, Lourenco Marquez. Received February 1, 1909. 

No. 22.) Seed of a shrubby tree 20 to 30 feel high. Wild in hinterland of 
Mozambique Company's territory. Rubber of about same quality as Landolpkia 
hirkii. Mr. W. H. Johnson, the agronomist of the Mozambique < Jompany, thinks the 
Bpecies a rather valuable discovery. It grows with Landolphia hirlcii and the rubber 
exported through Beira probably consists of the two gums mixed." (Barrett.) 

Distribution. — A native of the woods of German East Africa, in the vicinity of Dar-es- 
Salaam and Mbaffu. 

24638. Ilex cornuta Lindl. and Paxt. 

From 75 or 100 miles northwest of Shanghai, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. 
Farnham, Chinese Tract Society, Shanghai, China. Received January 30, 1909. 

Distribution. — A native of China, being found at Shanghai and Chinkiang in the 
province of Kiangsu; at Ningpo and Kiangsi in the province of Chekiang; and at 
I r hang in the province of Hupeh. 

24639. Phaseolus semierectus L. 

Grown at Biloxi, Miss., in 1908, by Mr. S. M. Tracy, special agent. Received 
January, 1909. 

"Original seed from Cuba, where the plant is valued highly as a semivolunteer 
cover crop in orange groves. Flowers are in spikes which continue to grow indefinitely, 
so that ripe seed and fresh flowers occur on the same stem, which makes seed gathering 
slow work . " ( Tracy . ) 

24640. Sapium vertjm Hemsley. Virgin rubber. 

From Chaparral, Tolima, Colombia, South America. Purchased from Mr. Andres 
Rocha. Received February 2, 1909. 

" Caucho virgen (Tolima). Caucho bianco (Cauca). Seeds of the Tolima (virgin) 
rubber tree, once common in the forests of the upper valleys of the Magdalena basin 
in Colombia, but to-day scarcely seen in its wild state and seldom cultivated. It 
grows in a temperate, almost cold but equable climate, between 1,800 and 3,200 
meters of altitude, in such conditions of soil and general environment as to make the 
possibility of its acclimatization in Florida appear very doubtful. It might be tried 
with better prospects of success in the upper forest zone of the Philippine Islands, 
as well as in Hawaii and Porto Rico. "When cultivated in its own country it thrives 
splendidly. Trees 8 to 10 years old are expected to yield annually from 1 to 3 
kilograms of rubber of very high quality, second only to the best Para. One indi- 
vidual 14 years old seen at Tocota, near Cale, Colombia, measured 65 centimeters 
in diameter and 50 meters in height. The tree flowers for the first time when about 
3 years old. As far as is known, the only way of obtaining a full yield of the 
latex is to fell the trees, the average product being from 5 to 8 kilograms of raw rubber 
to each tree. This method is generally applied to the wild trees, which explains the 
rapid disappearance of the species." (H. Pittier.) See also S. P. I. Nos. 3820 and 3948. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 33 

24641 to 24643. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Taihoku, Formosa. Presented by Mr. I. Kawakami. Received January 21, 
1909. 

The following seeds : 

24641. (ream-yellow. 

24642. Black, small. 

24643. Black, very small. 

24644 to 24648. 

From Australia. Presented by Mr. B. Harrison, Burringbar, Tweed River, New 
South Wales, Australia. Received February, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following (quoted common names given by Mr. Harrison) : 

24644. Chloris ventricosa R. Br. 

"Australian grass." 

Distribution. — A native grass of the southeastern part of Australia, being 
found in Queensland and New South Wales. 

24645. Eragrostis lacunaria F. Muell. 

"Australian never-fail grass." 

Distribution. — A native grass of the southeastern part of Australia, being found 
in the valley of theBarcoo River in Queensland, in the valley of the Murray 
River, and in the vicinity of Lake Eyre, in South Australia. 

24646. Panicum muticum Forsk. 

"Giant Couch. Twenty tons per acre. North Queensland." 

Distribution. — A native grass of the northern part of Egypt, and cultivated or 
adventitious generally throughout the Tropics. 

24647. Paspalum quadrifarium Lam. (?) 

"Brazilian grass." 

Distribution. — A grass native of the southern part of South America, being 
found in the low valleys and along shores in southern Brazil, northern Argen- 
tina, and in Uruguay. 

24648. Sporobolus argutus (Xees) Kunth. 

' ' Brazilian mountain grass . ' ' 

Distribution. — A Brazilian grass found in the province of Piauhy and in the 
valley of the San Francisco River. 

24650 and 24651. Solanum spp. 

From Mayaguez, Porto Rico. Presented by Mr. D. W. May, special agent in 
charge, Agricultural Experiment Station. Received February 3, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

24650. Solanum maiimosum L. 

"Berengena de marimba." "A large-fruited wild species used as a stock on 
which to graft the cultivated varieties of eggplant. The handsome yellow 
fruits are reputed to be poisonous." (Frederic Chisolm.) 

Distribution. — A native of southern Mexico, extending from the region of 
Orizaba south through Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, and Guiana; also in the 
West Indies. 
162 



34 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24650 and 24651 Continued. 

24651. S.ti am m roRVUM Swartz. 

Berengt na CMnarrona." "A very small-fruited variety." (Frederic Chisolm.) 

Distribution. Throughout Central America, extending north to San Luis 

Potosi, Mexico, where it isjound at an elevation of 8,000 feet; also commonly 

found throughout India in the tropical region and in the Malay Archipelago, 

the Philippines, and in China. 

24652. Citrus aurantium sinensis L. Sweet orange. 

From Blida, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist, Mus- 
tapha-Alger, Algeria. Received February 5, 1909. 

Seeds: 

"White orange of Blida." (Revue horticole.) 

"Tall tree, dark green, spiny, fruits large and abundant, pale-lemon color, flesh 
very pale color, fine, very juicy. Rare variety of seedling at Blida, more robust 
than the white orange of Teneriffe. January to April." ( Trabut.) 

24653. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Canton, China. Presented by Mr. G. W. Groff. Received February 5, 1909. 
Scions. 
Ying tsui to. 

24654 to 24656. Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duchesne. Strawberry. 

From Chile. Received through Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, Febru- 
ary 5, 1909. 

The following seeds : 

24654. "Light-red class, prolific, hardy, acid sweet, good flavor, ripens 
quickly and becomes soft; bad shipper." (Husbands.) 

24655. "White class, mixed; fine flavor, extra firm flesh, very large size, 
extra prolific, early and quick ripener, hardy, good shipper, thrives in the 
worst soils (clays) with little moisture. Fine sort to work on as a base for 
selections." (Husbands.) 

24656. "White class, same fruit as S. P. I. No. 24655 with the exception that 
they are uniform in size and shape, fruit somewhat smaller, some of which 
have a pale-pink tint scattered at the top." (Husbands.) 

Distribution. — A native of the Pacific slope of America extending from Alaska 
to Patagonia; also found in the Sandwich Islands. 

24657. Stizolobium sp. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received February 8, 1909. 

24658. Andropogon barbinodis Lag. 

From Chico, Cal. Grown at the Plant Introduction Garden by Mr. Roland 
McKee from seed procured from the Wagga Experimental Farm, New South 
Wales, Australia, in 1904, under Agrostology No. 2293. Received February, 
1909. 

Distribution. — A native of the southwestern part of the United States, extending 
into Mexico. 

162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 35 

24659. Pistacia chinensis Bunge. Pistache. 

From Laotanchuang, Shantung, China. Collected by Mr. Henry S. Cousins, 
Taianfu, Shantung, China, forwarded through Mr. Ernest Vollmer, vice- 
consul, Tsingtau, China. Received February 8, 1909. 

"Description and habitat. — Pistacia chinensis (Chinese name ' Huang lien shu '). Seed 
of a deciduous, dioecious tree, growing 40 to 50 feet tall, with a trunk 4 to 5 feet in diam- 
eter, of spreading habit, bearing large, pinnated leaves which are of a wine-red when 
budding out, of a vivid, glossy green in summer, and changing into naming scarlet 
and yellow in the fall. The pistillate trees bear heavy bunches of small berries, 
which are green at first, turn into red later on, but assume a bluish green color when 
ripe. The seeds are not edible, but they yield an illuminating oil in small quantities. 
This wild Chinese pistache looks strikingly like a gigantic sumac, and will be appre- 
ciated as a new shade and ornamental tree, especially in the semiarid mild-wintered 
regions of the United States. I observed in China that the male trees were invari- 
ably larger than the females and were also handsomer trees. 

"Strong hopes are held that the Chinese pistache may supply a suitable stock for 
the Pistacia vera, which produces the celebrated pistache nuts of commerce and for 
which hardier, more easily handled stock is needed." (Meyer.) For fuller notes 
and photographs, see "Ornamental Horticulture in China," by Frank N. Meyer. 

"Until Mr. Meyer secured the Chinese pistache the only hardy stock available was 
the Pistacia terebinthus L. of southern Europe, of which it has proved impossible to 
secure any considerable quantities of seed. The Chinese species, however, bids 
fair to be superior to it in every respect, as it is hardier, grows more rapidly, and reaches 
a larger size. It is the hardiest known species of the pistache (see S. P. I. No. 10285), 
and Mr. Meyer's investigations have shown that it grows to very large size and is in 
fact the largest species of the section to which Pistacia terebinthus belongs. The 
latter is the stock upon which a large part of the high-priced Sicilian pistaches are 
grown, so it is highly probable that the Chinese pistache will prove satisfactory as a 
stock upon which to work the improved varieties of Pistacia vera. 

"Although this Chinese pistache was introduced into Europe from Central China 
some forty years ago and a plant of it is still growing in the Botanic Garden at Paris, 
it remained a botanical curiosity until Mr. Meyer secured scions and seed from north- 
ern China, where the winters are more rigorous than in any other part of the world 
where pistaches grow wild. 

"Large numbers of Chinese pistache seedlings have been grown at the Plant Intro- 
duction Garden, Chico, Cal., from seed secured by Mr. Meyer. The young plants 
have proved to be of remarkably rapid, growth, decidedly more rapid than any other 
stock tested as yet. " (Swingle.) For further remarks, see S. P. I. Nos. 10285, 17734, 
17735, 18272, 18273, 18605, 19391, and 21970. 

24661 to 24665. Anona cherimola Mill. 

From Chile. Received through Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, Feb- 
ruary 5, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24661. Lisa, or large smooth-skin class. 

24662 and 24663. "Puas, meaning graft. I am not aware why this variety 
is called Puas.^ (Husbands.) 

24664 and 24665. u De Concha, meaning shell. The fruit is so called on 
account of its having a rough surface; other varieties with rough, warted, 
uneven surfaces are also called ' Rugoso ' and ' Escamosa ' (scaly like an oyster 
shell)." (Husbands.) 

Distribution. — A native of America, extending from Chile north through Peru and 
Central America to the region of Orizaba, Mexico. Cultivated in Florida and in 
Italy and Algeria. 
162 



36 SEEDS \M' PLANTS CMPORTED. 

24667. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

I .in [phofen Bavaria, I rermany. Secured from the Saatzuchl Verein fur franki- 

be Luzerne in [phofen, Bavaria, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received 

I ■ bruar) B 190 

Mt-lhni ; . lucern. '(P. L. H. No. 3355.) This old-land race received 

ii- name from the circles of Franconia in northern Bavaria, where ii hae been grown 

many y< [n the vicinity of [phofen three to four cuttings of hay are secured each 

,-. The Be< d i- produced by the second crop." i Brand.) 

24668. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Germany. Secured by Berr Carl Bodenstein, Osterode am Hat/.. Ger- 
many, and presented l»y Mr. Paul Schulze, Chicago, HI., through Mr. Charles 
.1. Brand. Received January 30, 1909. 

!'. I.. II. No. 3356.) 

24671. Chayota edulis Jacq. Chayote. 

From Los Angeles, Cal. Presented by Mr. M. E. Cheney. Received February 
L5, L909. 
A small, smooth variety, secured for cooperative work with the State Experiment 
Station, Baton Rouge, La. 

Distribution. A native of tropical South America, Central America, and Mexico, 
where ii extends northward to the province of Chihuahua. Cultivated in California, 
and Florida and in southern Spain and Algeria. 

24672 to 24711. 

From India. Presented by J. Mollison, esq., M. R. A. C, Inspector-General of 
Agriculture in India, Nagpur, C. P. Received February 10, 1909. 

The following seeds (quoted notes by Mr. Mollison; descriptions of varieties by Mr. 
H. T. Nielsen): 

24672 to 24690. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

24672. ' ' Rymbai-ktung . From Khasi Hills, Assam." 
Similar to No. 18258a. 

24673. ''Bhatumsh (red). From Darjeeling, Assam." 

Light-chocolate color, looks like No. 17852c, which is a selection from 
Meyer, Xo. 17852. 

24674. "Bhatumsh (yellow). From Darjeeling, Assam." 
Straw-yellow with brown hilum. 

24675. "Bhatwas. From Safipur, Unao, U. P." 

Black, small seed about the same size as Cloud, but rather more dull 
in color. 

24676. "Bkatwas. From Hasangani, Unao, U. P." 
Black, looks like No. 24675, only seeds are shiny like Cloud. 

24677. "Bhatwas. From Ranjitpurwa, Unao, U. P." 
Black, just like No. 24676, only seeds are a trifle smaller. 

24678. " Chabeni khurti (spotted variety). From Hardupurwa, Teh- 
Bidhanna, Etawah, U. P." 

24679. " Chabeni khurti (black variety). From Bant, Teh, Sadar, 
Etawah, U. P." 

162 



JANUAEY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 37 

24672 to 24711— Continued. 

24672 to 24690— Continued. 

24680. " Chabeni Ichurti (black variety). From Atsu, Teh, Auraya, 
Etawah, U. P." 

24681. "Bhatwas (mixture of spotted and black). From Mainpuri, 
U. P." 

24682. "Kali Ichurti, Chabeni Ichurti, Khajwa. From Mainpuri, 
U. P." 

24683. "Chabeni Tchurti (black variety). From Kilerman, Teh, Sadar, 
Etawah, U. P." 

24684. "Chabeni Ichurti (black variety). From Amapur, Teh, Kasa- 
ganj, Etawah, U. P." 

24685. "Chabeni Ichurti (black variety). From Aliganj, Etawah, 
IT. P." 

24686. "Chabeni Tchurti Bhundadar (spotted variety). From Jalesar, 
Etawah, U. P." 

24687. " Khajwa or Tculthi. From United Provinces." 

24688. "Bhatwas. From Cawnpore, U. P." 

24689. "Bhatwas. From Nanbasta, Cawnpore, U. P." 

The preceding S. P. I. Nos. 24678 to 24689 are black, with small seed, 
about the size and shape of S. P. I. No. 20410. There is some slight 
variation in the size of the seed, but the entire lot might easily be taken 
for the same variety if judged by the seed only. 

24690. "Bharat Safed. From Dehra Dun, U. P." 
Similar to S. P. I. No. 22901. 

24691 and 24692. Dolichos biflorus L. 

Distribution. — A leguminous vine, native in India, from the Himalayas to 
Ceylon and Burma, occurring at elevations of 3,000 feet in Sikkim; also found 
generally throughout the Tropics of the Old World, being cultivated in some 
places. 

24693 to 2471 1. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

Japanese varieties of soy beans grown on Poona Farm, Bombay Presidency. 

24693. Straw-yellow, with rather an indistinct hilum, quite similar 
to Manhattan, S. P. I. No. 17277. 

24694. Straw-yellow, very similar to S. P. I. No. 24693; seeds may 
be a trifle larger. 

24695. Straw-yellow, seed very similar to Ito San, but the brown 
speck at end of hilum is very faint. 

24696. Just like above, S. P. I. No. 24695. 

24697. Similar to S. P. I. No. 20405. 

24698. Olive-yellow, very similar to No. 20893a. 

24699. Straw-yellow, seed about the size of S. P. I. No. 17269. 

24700. Pale straw-yellow, with a black hilum; seed about the size 
of Acme, S. P. I. No. 14954. 

24701. Dirty olive-yellow, with slate-colored hilum; seed about the 
size of Ito San but more globular. 

24702. Straw-yellow, with very faint hilum; similar to Butterball, 
S. P. I. No. 17273, but seed rather smaller and not so bright in color. 

162 



SEEDS \M' PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24672 to 24711 Continued. 

803 t ii< ontinued. 

: on Dai Dizen." 

How, ver) similar to Okute, S P. I. No. 19986. 

24 "< 04. "Qotha Dai Dizen." 
\,-,\ similar to S. P. I. No. 24700. 

24705. Lighl Bhade of chromium-green, similar in appearance to S. 
P l No. L7857, but the color is not quite the same. 

24706. r.huk. Apparently just like our Buckshot, S. P. I. No. 37251. 

24707. "Knni .\faru." 

Apparently just like Nuttall, S. P. I. No. 17253. 

24708. "Sirohaha." 

Apparently just like Butterball, S. P. I. No. 17273. 

24709. "Teppo." 

< "itron-ycllow, seeds about the size of Butterball. 

24710. ■Motonari:' 

Seed very similar to S. P. I. Nos. 24700 and 24704, but the hilum is 
russet in this case. 

24711. "Rohugatm." 

Citron-yellow, with very faint hilum, seed about the size and shape 
of Ma in moth. 

24712. Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (Lamb.) Spach. 

Yellow cedar. 

From Cholmondeley Sound, Prince of Wales Island. Collected by Ranger 
Babbitt and presented by Mr. W. A. Langille, forest supervisor, Ketchikan, 
Alaska. Received February 15, 1909. 

For use in foreign exchanges. 

Distribution. — A native tree of the northwestern part of North America, extending 
from southern Alaska southward through British Columbia and the Cascade Moun- 
tain- of Washington and Oregon to the valley of the Santiam River. 

24713 and 24714. 

From Harrar, Abyssinia. Presented by Mr. T. Gerolimato, through Mr. Hubert 
S. Smiley, Drumalis, Larne, County Antrim, Ireland. Received February 16, 
1909. 

Seeds of each of the following : 

24713. Rhamnus prinoides L'Herit. 

This plant is called Gheisho, not Geaho, and grows by preference on the hills; 
it reaches a height of 10 to 12feet. The leaves are never added to the tieff [m&de 
of the seeds of Eragrostis abyssinica], but only to the tedj (the hydromel), which 
consists of one part of honey and two parts of water; then the leaves of Gheisho 
are added to hasten the fermentation." (Gerolimato.) 

Distribution.^ — A shrub or small tree, native of Abyssinia in East Africa and 
also of extratropical South Africa, extending to the Cape of Good Hope. 
1 62 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 39 

24713 and 24714— Continued. 

24714. Catha edulis Forsk. 

"Kiat is a small tree, reaching the height of 10 to 15 feet; it grows in good 
red soil and by preference on hills in Arabia. There is only one kind, no 
varieties. The natives masticate the leaves of the tree; the new and tender 
leaves are of course preferred. It is a narcotic, and some say that it is also an 
aphrodisiac, like the hashish. The natives do not smoke it like opium. I am 
afraid the Kiat is propagated only by cuttings and not by seeds." (Gerolimato .) 

Distribution. — A native shrub of Abyssinia and Arabia, cultivated to a large 
extent for its leaves. 

24715 and 24716. Citrus spp. 

From Cochin China. Presented by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, United States consul, 
Saigon, Cochin China. Received February 16, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

24715. Citrus nobilis Lour. 

"Annamite. Cam-Sanh grows particularly well at Cai-be, near here (Saigon). 
The skin is green and almost as loose as the skin of a mandarin orange. I think 
it as good an orange as I ever ate — splendid, and about the size of a Florida 
orange." (Conner.) 

24716. Citrus aurantium L. Orange. 

"Cam- Mat is a tight-skinned fruit, yellowish green when ripe, very good to 
eat, but awkward to handle. On every account I would prefer the above 
(S. P. I. No. 24715)." (Conner.) 

24717 to 24741. Medicago spp. 

From Dahme, Mark Brandenburg, Germany. Secured by Oberlehrer C. von 

Stoeltzer, of the agricultural school at Dahme, and presented through Mr. Charles 

J. Brand. Received February 13, 1909. 

The following seeds of regional strains of alfalfa, with the German common names : 

24717 to 24736. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

24717. Bbhmische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3359.) 

24718. Mahrische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3360.) 

24719. Ungarische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3361.) 

24720. Provencer lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3362.) 

24721. Sud-Franzosische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3363.) 

24722. Nord-Franzosische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3364.) 

24723. Siidliche Russische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3365.) 

24724. Nordliche Russische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3366.) 

24725. Spanische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3367.) 

24726. Turkestanische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3368.) 

24727. Deutsche Luzerne aus Baden. (P. L. H. No. 3369.) 

24728. Deutsche Luzerne aus Baden. (P. L. H. No. 3370.) 

24729. Ungarische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3371.) 

24730. Sild-Russische lucern. Naturell. (P. L. H. No. 3372.) 

24731. Sild-Russische lucern. Gereinigt. (P. L. H. No. 3373.) 

24732. Russische Luzerne — Nor d- Russische. (P. L. H. No. 3374.) 
162 



Ji i SE1 DS \M' PLANTS 1 M PORTED. 

24717 to 24741 Continued. 

l 7 t.. otinued. 

.{. m i ,h, lucern. I P. L. II. No. 3375.) 

i p icern. i P. L, II. No. : » ► T * ; . i 

15. Ttalitntichi lucern. P. L. II. No. 3377.) 
24736. Spanisck lucern. (P. L. II. No. 3378.) 
;> 1 ; 37. \| i dii IGOS \ n\ \ \ m;i \ Marl i I'rh. Sand lucern. 

>,„,,*,/„ sand lucern. P. L. II. No. 3379.) 
24738 to 24740. AiBDICAGO SATTVA L. Alfalfa. 

24738. Turkestaniscfo lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3380.) 

24739. TurhestanUche lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3381.) 

24740. Nord-Italienische lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3382.) 

24741. Midicaco sativa v aria (Mart) Urb. Sand lucern. 

Bohmischi Band lucern. (P. L. H. No. 3383.) 

24742. Cajan ixdicum Spreng. 

From Biloxi, Miss. Grown by Prof. S. M. Tracy, special agent. Received 
February L6, 1909. 
"Purple seed. Original seed from Cuba. Not as early as S. P. I. No. 24G01." 
{Tracy.) 

24753 to 24755. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received February 19, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24753. Atalantia bilocularis (Roxb.) Wall. (Limoxia bilocularis 
Roxb.) 

For use in citrus breeding work. 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern part of China, extending to the 
islands of Hainan and Formosa. 

24754. Nephelium mutabile Blume. 

Distribution. — A native of the Malay Peninsula and of the islands of Java 
and Borneo. 

24755. Glycosmis pentaphylla (Retz.) Correa. 

Distribution. — Throughout tropical and subtropical Himalaya, ascending to 
7,000 feet in Sikkim; also in southern China, in the Philippines, and in 
northeastern Australia. 

24756. Quercus suber L. Cork oak. 

From Seville, Spain. Presented by Mr. Peter Campbell, president of the Nairn 
Linoleum Company, Kearney, N. J. Received February 19, 1909. 
Acorns for propagating young trees, to be used in acclimatization experiments. See 
S. P. I. No. 3039 for description. 

Distribution. — A native of the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, in Spain, France, 
Corsica, Sardinia, Italy, Sicily, and northern Africa. Cultivated in India and in 
California. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 41 

24757 and 24758. Medicago spp. 

From Bavaria, Germany. Presented by Mr. John S. Haas, with S. B. Bing Sons, 
Nuremberg, Germany, who procured the seed from Mr. George Liebermann, 
Nuremberg, Germany, at the request of Mr. J. M. Westgate. Received 
February 15 and 18, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

24757. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 

24758. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Provence. 

24759 to 24761. Phyllostachys spp. Bamboo. 

From Nagasaki, Japan. Purchased from Japanese bamboo growers by Mr. 
William D. Hills, agricultural explorer. Received at the Plant Introduction 
Garden, Chico, Cal., February 9, 1909. 

"This importation of the three most valuable Japanese timber bamboos was made 
for the planting, on a larger scale than any hitherto yet attempted, of experimental 
bamboo groves in Florida, Louisiana, and California, in order that the feasibility 
of growing them on a commercial scale might be definitely determined." ( W. Fischer. ) 

24759. Phyllostachys mitis (Lour.) Riviere. Moso. 

"This is the great edible bamboo of China and Japan and the largest of the 
hardy species, the culms attaining a maximum height of 70 to 80 feet and a 
diameter of 6 to 8 inches. It may readily be distinguished from the Madake, 
the next largest species, by the comparatively shorter internodes, the gentle 
curving of the culm just after it leaves the ground, and by the broad-based 
pseudophyll, which tapers to a point with the fringe of hairs on the sheath 
near its base." ( W. Fischer.) See No. 12178 for previous introduction. 

24760. Phyllostachys quilioi Riviere. Madake. 

"The great timber bamboo of China and Japan and the second largest in 
size, the culms attaining a maximum height of 60 or 70 feet and a diameter of 6 
inches. Besides the proportionately longer internodes and the habit of the 
culm in rising straight from the rhizome it is distinguished from the Moso by 
the wavy outline of the pseudophyll and by the more pronounced purple or 
reddish blotches on the sheath. This species is considered somewhat more 
hardy than P. mitis; the rhizome is more vigorously spreading, and the wood is 
harder. It is the most useful of the East Asiatic bamboos." (W. Fischer.) 
See No. 12180 for previous introduction. 

24761. Phyllostachys henonis Mitford. Hachiku. 

"Next in importance and smaller than the two preceding species, with a 
height of from 30 to 40 feet and a diameter of from 3 to 4 inches. The sheath 
has fine lines, forming purple markings but no blotches. The stem nodes are 
flatter than those of the Madake, the culms are thinner walled, and the sprouts 
are produced earlier." (W. Fischer.) See No. 12177 for previous introduction. 

24762. Sclerocarya caffra Sond. Morula. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, gov- 
ernment agrostologist and botanist, Department of Agriculture. Received 
March 1, 1909. 

Seed of a tree with compound, alternate, unequally pinnate leaves clustered at the 
ends of the branches. The flowers, borne in spicate racemes, are one-fourth inch in 
diameter, with recurved petals. The fruit is a two-seeded drupe, about the size of a 
small walnut, with an acid and resinous pulp. The thick, oily cotyledons are eaten in 
times of famine. 

Distribution. — A native of Africa, found near Lake Nyassa and other localities in the 
Zambezi Valley, in the Macalisberg Mountains, and in Cape Colony. 
162 



[•_> Bl l DS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24763. I NDIGOl i i: \ Bl BULATA Yalil. 

in Kingston, Jamaica. Presented by Mr. William Harris, superintendent 
of public gardens, Department of Agriculture, Eope Gardens. Received 
February 23, L909. 

ds. 

tribution. Found in both the Eas1 and Wesl Indies, in Mexico, and on the 
Florida keys; in Upper Guinea and Senegambia, in Africa; and on the plains of the 
western peninsula of India and in Ceylon. 

24766. Stizolobitjm sp. Florida velvet bean. 

From Biloxi, Miss. Grown by Prof. S. M. Tracy, special agent. Received 
February 25, 1909. 
White. A variety of the Florida velvet bean with white or nearly white seeds. 
Limited experience with ii indicates that it is more prolific than the ordinary velvet 
bean. Grown from S. P. I. No. 22923." (C. V. Piper.) 

24767. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

In >m Tauberbischofsheim, Baden, Germany. Secured from Landwirtschaftliches 
Lagerhaus fur das Frankenland, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received 
February 11, 1909. 

"Alt-Deutsche Frankische lucem. The chief area of production of this strain of 
alfalfa is the district known as the Taubergrund, in northern Baden and Wiirttemberg 
and western Bavaria. The Taubergrund includes practically the whole drainage 
basin of the Tauber, a short stream that rises in the heights of Franconia and empties 
into the Main near Wertheim. The seed is also produced to some extent in the 
Neckarthal of Baden and Wiirttemberg. 

"Tauberbischofsheim, the source of the present sample, is only about six miles dis- 
tant from Kulsheim, the original home of Wendelin Grimm, who brought the now 
well-known Grimm alfalfa to Minnesota in 1857. At the request of the writer, Mr. 
Ludwig Keller, of Oberschiipf, Baden, made some inquiries into the history of Old 
German Franconian alfalfa. The following, in free translation, is quoted from his 
report: 'This lucem was probably introduced into this country (Germany) at a very 
early time; it has adapted itself to the existing local conditions and has developed 
into a special strain of a certain constancy. Doubtless it is the same alfalfa that 
Farmer Grimm took with him to America. No other form is cultivated in our section 
on account of the superiority of this one.' (P. L. H. No. 3385.) " (Brand.) 

24768 and 24769. Garcinia spp. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received February 27, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

24768. Garcinia mangostana L. 

Distribution. — A small native tree of southern Tenasserim and the Malay 
Peninsula, in India, and of the Malay Archipelago. Cultivated in Ceylon and 
in the Madras Presidency and in Trinidad and Jamaica in the West Indies. 

24769. Garcinia cow a Roxb. (?) 

For experiments in grafting the mangosteen. 

Distribution. — A native tree of India, extending from the hills of eastern 
Bengal, through Assam and Burma, and to the Andaman Islands. 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 43 

24770. Chayota edulis Jacq. Chayote. 

From Mayaguez, P. R. Presented by Mr. D. W. May, Agricultural Experiment 
Station. Received February 27, 1909. 

A medium-sized, smooth, pale-green variety, almost white; practically spineless. 
Secured for the purpose of carrying on experiments in the South with a view to encour- 
aging its culture for the market. For distribution of this species see No. 24671. 

24771 to 24819. 

A collection of seeds and cuttings. Received through Prof. N. E. Hansen, of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, S. Dak., while traveling as an 
agricultural explorer for the Department of Agriculture, December 3, 1908. 

24771 to 24793. Vitis vinifera L. Grape. 

"(Nos. 196 to 218.) A collection of native table and raisin grapes of central 
Asia grown by the Mohammedans from time immemorial. In recent years the 
manufacture of wine has assumed large proportions, since the conquest of the 
natives. The best variety is probably the Maskah, Nos. 197, 199, 209, and 218 
(S. P. I. Xos. 24772, 24774, 24784, and 24793); it may prove to be the largest 
grape in cultivation. The last two or three years the Maskah has found its way 
to St. Petersburg markets, since the completion of the Orenburg-Tashkend 
Railway, where it caused a great sensation and sold for a much higher price 
than the largest grapes shipped from France, Germany, and the Crimea. All 
these vines should be tested as individuals till fruited, as the nomenclature is 
uncertain in these native vineyards." (Hansen.) 

24794. Populus sp. Poplar. 

"(No. 219.) Cuttings of a native poplar of upright habit like the Lombardy 
poplar. From Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24795. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 

"(No. 220.) Scions of Pyrus malus (Mains sylvestris) Namanganica, a red- 
fleshed apple, native of eastern Turkestan, adjoining the Pamir plateau." 
(Hansen.) 

24796. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 

"(No. 221.) Napoleon apple, a new French variety of delicious flavor. 
Scions obtained at Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24797. Prunus armeniaca L. Apricot. 
"(No. 219.) Scionsof native apricot from Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24798. Punica granatum L. Pomegranate. 

"(No. 223.) Tree of choice native variety grown at Tiflis, Transcaucasia." 
(Hansen.) 

24799. Punica granatum L. Pomegranate. 
"(No. 224.) Plant of a native variety grown at Tiflis, Transcaucasia." 

(Hansen.) 

24800. Elaeagnus angustlfolia L. Oleaster. 
"(No. 225.) A large-fruited variety from Tiflis, Transcaucasia." (Hansen.) 

24801. Ribes sp. Currant. 
"(No. 226.) Native currant from Tiflis, Transcaucasia.'.' (Hansen.) 

24802. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 
" (No. 227.) Native apple Schachalma, from Tiflis. Transcaucasia." (Hansen.) 

24803. Elaeagnus angustlfolia L. Oleaster. 
"(No. 228.) A large-fruited variety from Tiflis, Transcaucasia." (Hansen.) 

162 



II \Mi PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24771 to 24819 Continued. 

34804. Mori - OTGRA L. Black mulberry. 

\ choice-fruited aative variety from Tiflis, Transcaucasia." 

\ aative of aouthern Russia in the vicinity of the Caucasus 
Mountains and the Caspian Sea; also cultivated in warm climat< 

S05. MALUS 8YLVE8TRIS Mill. Apple. 

A native apple Paschalma, from Tiflis, Transcaucasia." (flan- 

:M80G. AMYGDAJ i - pbrsica L. Peach. 

No. 251.) Peculiar native, flat, small peach pits, from Tashkend, Turk' 
tan." I //"us, a. i 

24807. AmygdaIiI a iersica L. Peach. 
■■ No. 252. i Native peach pits from Tashkend, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24808. Amygdalus nana L. Russian almond. 
"(No. 253.) Variety Spinosissima. Native dwarf almond from Alatan Moun- 
tains, so versis from Tashkend, Turkestan. See No. 257 (S. P. I. No. 24809)." 

{1 III I IS, II.) 

24809. Amygdalus nana L. Russian almond. 
"(No. 257.) Variety Petronnikow. Dwarf native almond from Chingan 

Mountains, 90 versts from Tashkend, Turkestan. See No. 253 (S. P. I. No. 
24808)." (Hansen.) 

24810. Chaetochloa italica (L.) Scribn. Millet. 
"(No. 258.) Originally from Manchuria. Seed grown at experiment station 

in Golodnaya or Hunger steppe, Turkestan." (Hansen.) 

24811. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
"(No. 259.) The ' Turcestanicd' is a name given by the Russian agronomists 

to distinguish the alfalfa native of Turkestan from that obtained from other 
regions. The present sample is as grown in Golodnaya or Hunger steppe, Tur- 
kestan. Since I brought the first lot of Turkestan alfalfa to the United States 
in i he spring of 1908 an enormous export of alfalfa seed has sprung up in Turkes- 
tan, especially from the Khanate of Khiva. It was stated to me in Turkestan 
in December, 1908, that fully 200,000 pood go from Khiva each year (a Russian 
pood is 32 pounds avoirdupois); also that perhaps 100,000 pood go from the rest 
i if Turkestan. In Khiva the multitude of camels which eat the dry fodder left 
after the seed is removed makes it possible to raise the seed cheaper at Khiva. 
Mosl of the seed goes to South America, but a considerable and steadily increas- 
ing lot goes to North America, Some of the seed sold commercially does not 
come from Turkestan, but it is said comes from farther south. It is to be hoped 
that the alfalfa seed business will be better handled in the future and that each 
strain is correctly labeled." (Hansen.) 

24812. Axdropogox sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

"(No. 249.) ' Dshu-gah-rah,'' from Khokand region, Turkestan, raised in the 
Golodnaya or Hunger steppe, between Tashkend and Samarkand, Turkestan. 
Extensively used for stock feed and also for human food." (Hansen.) 

" 'Dzhugara,' similar to S. P. I. No. 24553. Base of some glumes black." 
(CarletonR. Ball.) 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 45 

24771 to 24819— Continued. 

24813. Phaseolus radiatus L. Mung bean. 

"(No. 250.) Green gram as grown at Tashkend, near northern limit of cot- 
ton culture in Turkestan. Promising for culinary use and as a cover or catch 
crop in very dry, hot regions. It is largely grown in Turkestan under condi- 
tions similar to those obtained in New Mexico and Arizona." (Hansen.) 

Both the green-seeded and black-seeded variety were in this lot. 

24814. Medicago arborea L. Tree alfalfa. 

"(No. 256.) Seed from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co., Paris, France, purchased 
February 2, 1909, the day before I took the steamer for America. Seed as 
grown in southern France. There appears to be a limited call for the seed in 
southern France, southern Italy, and northern Africa as a plant for very dry, 
stony places." (Hansen.) 

Distribution. — A native of southern Europe, being found in Italy and Greece. 

24815. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

"(No. 74.)" 

24816. Eragrostis abyssinica (Jacq.) Schrad. Teff. 

"(No. 231.) A white-seeded form of a grass from Abyssinia, deemed valu- 
able for dry regions. This sample was grown at the experiment station in 
Golodnaya or Hunger steppe, Turkestan." (Hansen.) See S. P. I, No. 24887 
for distribution of this species. 

24817. Trifolium lupinaster L. 

"(No. 68.) A native clover common on the open steppe over an immense 
area of Siberia, extending north to the Arctic Circle. For the severest sections 
only. This lot was gathered near Obb, western Siberia, where the Obi River 
crosses the Siberian railway. Leaflets 5, like a lupine, whence the name 
lupinaster.'" (Hansen.) 

24818. Trifolium lupinaster L. 

See S. P. I. No. 24458 for distribution of this species. 

24819. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

"(No. 77?.) Sample from Iresnoye village near Obb, Tomsk Province, at 
intersection of Obi River and Siberian railway, western Siberia. A good pro- 
ductive variety in this region." (Hansen.) 

24825. Punica granatum L. Pomegranate. 

From La Tour-de-Peilz, Vaud, Switzerland. Purchased from Mr. J. Brunner, 
at the request of Mr. O. F. Sillig, of this Department. Received March 9, 
1909. 
Plants and cuttings. 

Legrellei. "A type of pomegranate remarkable for its vigor and hardiness. Sup- 
posed to be the only variety with double flowers which will flower and sometimes 
ripen its fruits in a climate like that of central France and even near Paris, provided 
that it is planted in a favorable exposure. Petals salmon-red, lined with white, the 
tips sometimes spotted or striated with white." (Sillig.) 
162 



.}('» VXD PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24828 to 24833. GrossYPiUM babbadense L. Cotton. 

pi Presented l>> I Fletcher, esq., School of Agriculture, Ghizeh, 
l t the n t of Mr T II Kearney. Received February 27, L909. 

24828. Atkmun 24831. Sultani. 

I //. 24832. Jannovitch. 

10. ibba 24833. Nubari. 

Th< ttons were obtained for Mr. T. II. Kearney'e experimental work in the 

ith we 

24839 and 24840. Glycine iiisimda (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

iwn .ii the Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia, from Beed obtained from 
Dr - P. Barchet, Shanghai, China, in L906. 

■ 1 of the following: 

24839. Greenish. Grown in 1908 under temporary numbers 0578 and 0579, 

which proved to be identical. 

24840. Yellow. Grown in 1908 under temporary number 0580. 

24845 to 24851. 

Fnun China. Received through Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the Arnold Arboretum, 
Jamaica Plain, Mass., in cooperation with this Department, February 4, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24845. Triticum aesttvum L. Wheat. 

No. 1381.) The wheat commonly cultivated around Tatienlu, China, 
at altitudes between 8,000 and 11,000 feet." {Wilson.) 

24846 and 24847. Avena nuda L. Oat. 

"(Nos. 1382 and 1382a.) These are the oats cultivated in the neighborhood 

of Tatienlu, ( hina, at from 6,500 to 11,000 feet altitude." {Wilson.) 

24848. Hordeum vulgare himalayense Hitti-j. Barley. 

Distribution. — Cultivated in the mountains of the Chinese Empire, al ele- 
vations from 9,000 to 14,000 feet. 

24849. Hordeum vulgare violaceum Koern. Barley. 

"(Nos. 1379 and 1380.) These are barleys cultivated in the highlands west 
of Tatienlu, China. Xo. 1380 (S. P. I. No. 24849), a purple kind, is capable 
of cultivation at greater altitudes than any other cereal both in west and north- 
west Szechwan, China. Its belt is 11,000 to 13,000 feet." {Wilson.) 

Distribution. — Cultivated in the mountains of the Chinese Empire. Also 
reported as cultivated in Sweden. 

24850. Fagopyrum tataricum (L.) Gaertn. Buckwheat. 

No. 1383.) Ku ch'iao is the buckwheat commonly cultivated to the west 
and southeast of Tatienlu, China." ( Wilson.) 

Distribution. — Cultivated in the mountains of China, and in India and to 
some extent in Europe. 

24851. Rheum sp. Rhubarb. 

o. 1247.) This medicinal rhubarb is fairly common in the uplands to 
the west and southeast of Tatienlu, China, at altitudes between 10,000 and 
12.000 feet. It prefers moist, rocky ground. I have sent it that you may 
compare it with the rhubarb sent from Hupeh, China, last year (S. P. I. No. 
21319). Personally I consider the plants identical." {Wilson.) 
162 






JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 47 

24853 to 24855. 

From Hangchow, Chekiang, China. Presented by Rev. W. S. Sweet. Received 
March 5, 1909. 

The following seeds, notes by Mr. Sweet: 

24853. Cannabis sativa L. Hemp. 
"This is the Stewart hemp grown in Kentucky." 

24854. Corchorus capsularis L. Jute. 

24855. Sesamum orientale L. Sesame. 
"Used here on cakes for food." 

24856 to 24858. 

From Florence, Italy. Presented by the Comizio Agrario di Firenze, Sezione 
Consorzio Agrario per l'Acquisito di Materie Utili in Agricoltura, through 
Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received Februarv 27, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24856 and 24857. Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop. (Onobrychis sativa 

Lam.) Lupinella. 

24856. (P. L. H. No. 3389.) 

24857. (P. L. H. No. 3390.) 

" Lupinella sgusciata. " 

Distribution. — An herbaceous perennial, native to Europe and extending into 
Asia. Occasionally used in the southern part of the United States as a forage 
crop. 

24858. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

"Herba medica." (P. L. H. No. 3391.) 

24859. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bridgeport, Kans. Purchased from Mr. Carl Wheeler. Received March 
6, 1909. 

"Variegated alfalfa, grown in 1908 without irrigation, at Bridgeport, Kans., from a 
field seeded in 1891 and which since has suffered no deterioration in stand. The 
field also produced good crops of seed in 1905, 1906, and 1907." (/. M. Westgate.) 

24876. Alectryon excelsum Gaertn. Titoki. 

From Wellington, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. T. E. Donne, secretary, 
Department of Industries and Commerce. Received March 8, 1909. 

Seeds. 

"The titoki is a handsome evergreen tree, from 40 to 60 feet high, with a trunk 
sometimes 3 feet in diameter, but usually smaller. 

"The fruit is both singular and handsome; when ripe it is one-third inch long, 
and almost woody, with a flattened crest on the upper portion, terminating in a spur- 
like prominence on one side; when the seed is ripe the fruit vessel becomes rup- 
tured transversely, but not along any definite line. It is one celled, and contains a 
single pear-shaped, black seed, which is surrounded by a bright-scarlet, fleshy cup, 
termed an 'aril,' and has a^granulated surface; the fiery scarlet of the aril and the 
glossy jet-black seed form a pleasing contrast, which is harmonized by the deep- 
russet pubescence of the fruit vessel. 

"The flowers are produced during the months of November and December; the 
fruit requires a year to arrive at maturity, so that flowers and ripe fruit may be found 
on the tree at the same time. 

8805— Bui. 162—09 4 



48 SEEDS AM- PLANTS IMPORTED. 

24876 Continued. 

"Propert Uthough the titoki does not afford a durable timber under 

exp it is justly valued on accounl of its great strength, toughness, and elastic- 

ity, while it is straight in the grain, even, compact, and easily worked; ii is of light 
reddish color and destitute of figur 

■ Ii [e suitable \<<r purposes which demand greal strength and elasticity, but do 

not involve any great amount of exposure to the weather. Ii is highly valued for 

bullock yokes; with the exception of mangiao ii Lb perhaps the best of all New 

land timbers for that purpose; ii is excellent \<>r ax handle- and for the handles 

of carpenters' tools, for Bingletrees, for lighl framing for machinery, and for some 

purp of the cabinetmaker; bu1 is mosl highly esteemed by the wheelwright and 

ch builder, being used for light spokes, fellies, hubs, panels, and benl ware. It 

No suitable for the manufacture of the woodwork of many kinds of agricultural 

implements. 

"Distribution. Alectryon comprises only a single species, which is endemic in 
New Zealand. Ii i<- common in lowland woods or on their margins throughout the 
North [sland, and. crossing Cook Strait, finds its southern limit on Banks Peninsula, 
on the east coast, ami between Hokitika and Ross, on the west coast. 

"Although essentially a lowland plant, it ascends from the sea level to upward of 
2,000 feet." (" The Forest Flora of New Zealand;' by Thomas W. Kirk, F. L. S.) 

It may be of interesl to know that this was introduced from New Zealand to 
California at least thirty-five years ago, and there are trees bearing regularly at 
Berkeley and elsewhere in northern California; but it is such a slow grower that 
nobody ever paid much attention to it." (Extract from letter of Dr. F. Franceschi, 

April 14. 1909.) 

24878. Axdropogox sorghum (L.) Brot. Milo. 

From Liberal. Kans. Purchased from Mr. John L. Boles. Received March 8, 
1909. 

"Grown from G. I. Xo. 235, selected originally for earliness, dwarfness, uniformity, 
and productiveness." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

24879. Paxicum divaricatum L. (?) 

From Surinam, Dutch Guiana. Presented by Mr. J. R. "Wigman, director, 
Botanic Garden, Paramaribo, Surinam. Received March 9, 1909. 

24880 to 24911. 

From Abyssinia. Presented by Mr. Hubert S. Smiley, Drumalis, Lame, Antrim 
County. Ireland. Received March 2, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

24880. Hordeum distichon L. Barley. 
Two rowed, white. "Grown in January on any ground; irrigation necessary." 

24881. Hordeum sp. Barley. 
Two rowed, white. "Grown in June on any ground except black earth." 

24882. Hordeum sp. Barley. 
Two rowed, black. "Grown in June on high land." 

24883. Triticum sp. Wheat. 
Black. "Grown in June and August on high and low land." 

24884. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 
White. "Grown in July on the plateau." 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 



49 



Chick-pea. 



Flax. 



Field pea. 



Corn. 



Durra. 



24880 to 24911— Continued. 

24885. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 
Purple. "Grown in July on any ground." 

24886. Triticum sp. Wheat. 
"Grown in August on clay ground." 

24887 and 24888. Eragrostis abyssinica (Jacq.) Schrad. Teff. 

24887. Brown. 24888. White. 

Distribution. — A native of the northeastern part of Africa, being cultivated 
in the mountains of Abyssinia and also in India. 

24889 and 24890. Cicer arietinum L. 

24889. Brown. 24890. Black. 

24891 and 24892. Linum usitatisslmum L. 

24891. Brown. 24892. While 

24893 to 24895. Pisum arvense L. 

24893. Brown. 24895. White. 

24894. Black. 

24896. Zea mays L. 
"Grown on low ground." 

24897. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

"Grown in March on low ground." 

■ A durra with small red seeds, much resembling red kafir seeds; apparently 
identical with No. 12373. ' ' ( Carleton R. Ball. ) 

24898. Trigonella foenum-graecum L. Fenugreek. 
"Grown in July on any ground." 

24899. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 
'Brown-seeded variety; seems to be identical with No. 11067." (Carleton 

R. Ball.) 

24900. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 
"Grown in June on heavy brown ground." 

24901. Hordeum vulgare coeleste L. Barley. 
Six-rowed hull-less white and black seeded variety. 

24902. Guizotia abyssinica (L. f.) H. Cass. 

"A black pulse for making oil. Grown in July on clay ground." 
Distribution. — A native and cultivated herbaceous plant of tropical Africa; 
also cultivated in India. 

24903. Triticum monococcum L. Emmer. 
"Grown hi June on any ground." 

24904. Lens esculenta Moench. Lentil. 
Coriandrum sativum L. Coriander. 
Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bean. 



24905. 
24906. 
White. 
24907. 
24908. 



Pimpinella anisum L. 
Carthamus tinctorius L. 



Anise. 
Safflower. 



"For making oil. Grown in July." 



162 



50 SEEDS AM' PLANTS [MPORTED. 

24880 to 24911 -Continued. 

24909. Ni'.i i i \ BATH \ I. 

Distribution. A native of the southern pari of Europe and cultivated in the 
Mediterranean region and in [ndia. 

24910. A.NDROPOGON borghi M (L.) Brot. Durra. 
•• White. Probably identical with Borne of the Abyssinian Borghums imported 

and grown in L904." (Carleton R. Ball) 

24911. BoRDEl m Bp. Barley. 
Two-rowed black variety. "Grown in January in very cold country." 

24912 to 24914. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

From Berradura, Cuba. Presented by Mr. F. S. Earle. Received March 8, 1909. 
S< ede of the following: 

24912. White. 24914. Black. 

24913. Brown. 

24915 and 24916. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From about six miles out from Canton, China. Procured by Mr. G. W. Groff. 
Eleceived at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., February, 1909. 

Grafts of the following: 

24915. Hung wat to (red-stone peach). 

24916. Paak wat to (white-stone peach). 

"The Hung wat to is a new variety and so recognized by the Chinese. From what 
I can gather they believe the Paak wat to to be the best, but have some trees of the 
Hung wat to. The Hung wat to seems to blossom much quicker than the Paak wat 
to." {Groff.) 

24917. Corchorus CAPSULARIS L. 

From Shanghai, China. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham. Received 
March 9, 1909. 

24921. Kosa sp. Rose. 

From Battle Mountain, Nev. Presented by Mrs. W. C Hancock. Received 
March 12, 1909. 

"A small double rose, very floriferous, resembling the Chinese yellow rose; plant 
medium tall, bushy, very hardy." (Frank N. Meyer.) 

24922. Stizolobium sp. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by the Botanical Garden of Saigon, 
through Mr. Jacob E. Conner, United States consul. Received March 20, 1909. 

24923. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Heilbronn, Wiirttemberg, Germany. Purchased from Mr. Heinrich Becker, 
at the request of Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received March 12, 1909. 
Alt-Deutsche Frankische lucern. 

24924. Hibiscus sp. 

From Oporto, Portugal. Presented by Baron de Soutellinho, 115 Entre Quintas. 
Received March 11, 1909. 

"A pretty pink Hibiscus. It was a hybrid raised by me of Hibiscus coccineus Walt. 
X moscheutos L. The culture is the same as for H. coccineus Walt. It is a deciduous 
perennial." (Soutellinho.) 
102 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 51 

24925. Polygonum bistorta L. 

Front Berlin, Germany. Presented by Prof. Dr. A. Engler, Director of the Royal 
Botanic Garden. Received March 12, 1909. 
"The root of this species of Polygonum is reported to contain from 13.5 to 21 per cent 
of tannin. Introduced to test its availability as an agricultural crop for tannin pro- 
duction." (W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — Found throughout the temperate region of Europe and Asia, extend- 
ing into alpine and arctic regions. 

24926. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 

From Knoxville, Tenn. Received through Mr. S. M. Bain, special agent, March 
3, 1909. 
' • This seed is from plants which successfully resisted the attacks of Colletotrichum 
tri/olii Bain. This disease has materially affected the successful production of clover 
in Tennessee and elsewhere." (J. M. Westgate.) 

24927. Mangifera indica L. Mango. 

From Cavite, Luzon, P. I. Presented by Mr. Donald Maclntyre, Moanalua 
Gardens, Honolulu, Hawaii Territory. Received March 3, 1909. 

Caraboa. The same remarks apply to this as to No. 24170. 

Distribution— A large tree, native to the tropical region of India and cultivated 
generally in the Tropics. In America cultivated in the West Indies, in tropical 
Mexico, and in southern Florida and southern California. 

24928 to 24933. 

From Riedoschingen, Germany. Purchased from Mr. Conrad Boehler, Alma, 
Nebr., through Mr. J. M. Westgate. Received February 26, 1909. 

The following seeds (notes by Mr. Boehler): 

24928. Me dic ago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

Provence. This is one of the best and most productive fodder plants of 
Germany, lasting eight to ten years. 

24929. Trifolium pratexse L. Red clover. 
The standard legume hay crop of Germany. 

24930. Trifolium repens L. White clover. 
This clover, harvested while in bloom, produces the well-known calf hay. 

24931. Oxobrychis viciaefolia Scop. Sainfoin. 
Esparsette, or sainfoin, produces good, sweet hay. Lasts from six to eight 

years. 

24932. Vicla sativa L. Common vetch. 
Especially suitable for green manuring on poor soils. May be seeded alone 

or with oats for green fodder. 

24933. Medicago lupulina L. 

An excellent weed destroyer; produces a high yield, but a rather rough fodder. 
It can be cut but once. 

24935 and 24936. Stizolobium spp. 

From Ceylon. Presented by Mr. C. Drieberg, secretary, Ceylon Agricultural 
Society, Colombo, Ceylon. Received March 13, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

24935. Small, black. 

24936. Gray. 
162 



52 SEEDS AND PLAN l> IMPORTED. 

24938. Chatota i.di i. is Jacq. Chayote. 
m ] \ : , i. Presented by Mr. M. E. Cheney. Received March 15, 

L90 
A medium-sized, pear-shaped, white variety, secured for cooperative work with 
the State Experimenl Station, Baton Rouge, La. See No. 24671 for distribution of 

till— -]>«•.!. 

24939. I'll \-l nil - BEMIERECTTJS I,. 

,n Belize, British Eonduras. Presented by Mr. E. J. F. Campbell, superin- 
tendent, Botanic Station. Received February 24, L909. 
1639 for distribution of this Bpecies. 

24940. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

From Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Presented by Prof. C. A. Zavitz, Ontario 
Agricultural College. Received March 16, 1909. 
Early Brittain. An extremely promising variety, recently introduced into < Ontario. 

24956 to 24997. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

Grown <>n the government experimental farm at Amarillo, Tex., by Mr. John F. 
Ross, season of 1908. Received March, 1909. 

The following seeds : 

24956 to 24964. Milo. 

24956. (G. I. No. 223.) 24961. (G. I. No. 231.) 

24962. (G. I. No. 232.) * 

24963. (G. I. No. 234.) 

24964. (G.I. No. 331.) 

Selected since 1905 for dwarf stature, erect heads, productiveness, and other 
desirable characteristics by Messrs. A. H. Leidigh and Carleton R. Ball. 

24965 to 24970. Dwarf milo. 

24965. (G. I. No. 149A.) 24968. (G. I. No. 236.) 

24966. (G. I. No. 149B.) 24969. (G. I. No. 332A.) 

24967. (G. I. No. 149C.) 24970. (G. I. No. 332B.) 

Selected since 1905 for dwarf stature, erect heads, productiveness, and 
other desirable characteristics by Messrs. A. H. Leidigh and Carleton R. Ball. 

24971 to 24984. Blackhull kafir. 

24971. (G. I. No. 71.) 24978. (G. I. No. 335.) 

24972. (G. I. No. 204.) 24979. (G. I. No. 336.) 

24973. (G. I. No. 205.) 24980. (G. I. No. 337.) 

24974. (G. I. No. 206.) 24981. (G. I. No. 338.) 

24975. (G. I. No. 207.) 24982. (G. I. No. 339.) 

24976. (G. I. No. 210.) 24983. (G. I. No. 340.) 

24977. (G. I. No. 333.) 24984. (G. I. No. 341.) 

Selected since 1905 for dwarf stature, productiveness, and other desirable 
characteristics by Messrs A. H. Leidigh and Carleton R. Ball. 
162 



24957. 


(G. 


I. 


No. 


224.) 


24958. 


(G. 


I. 


No. 


227.) 


24959. 


(G. 


I. 


No. 


229.) 


24960. 


(G. 


I. 


No. 


230.) 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 53 

24956 to 24997— Continued. 

24985 to 24989. Red kafir. 

24985. (G. I. No. 34.) 24988. (G. I. Xo. 212.) 

24986. (G. I. No. 68.) 24989. (G. I. No. 215. 

24987. (G. I. No. 69.) 

Selected since 1905 for dwarf stature, productiveness, and other desirable 
characteristics by Messrs. A. H. Leidigh and Carleton R. Ball. 

24990 to 24995. Brown kowliang. 

24990. (G. I. No. 122.) Improved by selection for dwarf stature, 
productiveness, etc., from S. P. I. No. 17922 by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

24991. (G. I. No. 123.) Improved by selection for dwarf stature, 
productiveness, etc., from S. P. I. No. 17923 by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

24992. (G. I. No. 171A.) 24994. (G. I. No. 171C.) 

24993. (G. I. No. 171B.) 

Improved by selection for dwarf stature, productiveness, etc., from 
S. P. I. No. 18518 by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

24995. (G. I. No. 261.) Improved by selection for dwarf stature, pro- 
ductiveness, etc., from S. P. I. No. 20610 by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

24996 and 24997. White durra. 

24996. (G. I. No. 27.) Originally from Algeria, through France. 
Improved by Mr. Carleton R. Ball through selection for erect heads, 
seed-holding power, etc. 

24997. (G. I. No. 81.) Seed supposedly from Egypt; received from 
Austria. Improved by Mr. Carleton R. Ball through selection for 
erect heads, seed-holding power, etc. 

24998 and 24999. 

From Para, Brazil. Presented by Mr. George H. Pickerell, United States con- 
sul. Received February 23, 1909. 

The following seeds : 

24998. Virola surixamexsis (Rol.) Warb. 

Distribution. — A native of the Amazon Valley in Brazil, of Guiana, and of the 
West India Islands. 

24999. Sapixdus sapoxaria L. 

Distribution. — A small tree found on the Florida keys, in Jamaica, and in 
Brazil. Cultivated in southern Florida and southern California. 

25000. Cajax indicum Spreng. 

From Mexico. Presented by Mr. Elmer Stearns, botanist, School of Agriculture, 
C. Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Received March 17, 1909. 

" This plant grows to about 20 feet high here in Mexico in the warmer regions; it 
might do all right in southern California or the warmer belts farther north. ' ' (Stearns. ) 
162 



5 I SEEDS AND PLANTS l M PORTED. 

25001 to 25015. 

I rom Dear Bakuba, a distance of 9 hours from Bagdad, Turkey. Procured by 
Mr. William C. Magelssen, United States consul, Bagdad, Turkey, for Mr. T. H. 
Kearney's work in the Southwest. Received March L5, L909. 

The following cut! ing 

25001 to 25007. Pi m<\ qranatum l>. Pomegranate. 

25001. Selimi. "A vigorous and very beautiful tree; fruit very large 
the largest pomegranate of all), weighing sometimes as much as I kilo; 

the -kin is thin, sometimes bright red when ripe; crown small and 
short; ]>ul|> is melting, very thick, and of a very dark red. The needs 
:irc thin and small. The taste is agreeable, slightly acid; the flavor i- 
exquisite. The fruit is exquisite and of the very first quality; ripens 
in Oct.. her. li is highly esteemed in the trade and will keep for a 
year." (Kearney.) 

25002. Iliicliiri (indifferent). "Poor variety, blossoming much, hut 
knotting little. Fruit average sized; skin thin, light green, tinged 
with pink. Pulp white, very sour, containing large seeds. The fruits, 
which are sold by the weight, are used as a condiment in the kitchen." 
(Kearney.) 

25003. llilou Ahmar. 

25004. Bila Hah (seedless). "Obtained it is said by means of cut- 
lings, the marrow of which is removed with a needle. The shrub is 
rather stubby, and bears little fruit. Fruit of average size, with light- 
green skin, almost white; pulp rosy colored, sweet, but flavorless and 
not luscious. In this pulp instead of seeds there is a white albumen, 
soft, watery, and without kernel, so that the fruit may be eaten en- 
tirely. This variety is rare and little sought after." (Kearney.) 

25005. llilou Abiade (sweet white). " Common tree, very fruitful; 
fruit rather large, thin skinned and of a light-green color; seeds elon- 
gated, white and with a tinge of pink. Pulp is luscious and sweet. 
This variety is common, but rather good." (Kearney.) 

25006. Roman Eswed (black pomegranate). " Shrub w T ith a reddish 
stem, longer boughs, and larger leaves than other varieties. Fruit 
of average size, round with flattened crown; bark rather thin, of a 
very dark-violet color. Pulp melting and of an agreeable, sourish- 
sweet taste. Excellent variety." (Kearney.) 

25007. Gourtmi. "Very prolific tree; fruits small and growing in 
clusters at the end of the branches; the skin is thick, bright red and 
shiny. The seeds are rather large, with a sweet pulp. Indifferent 
variety." (Kearney.) 

25008 to 25015. Vitis vinifera L. Grape. 

25008. Erz Roumli. 25012. Ajmi. 

25009. Kurdi. 25013. Chaweesh. 

25010. Buhirzi. 25014. Chadeh Arabieh. 

25011. Kishmishi. 25015. Deis-al-A'anze. 

'The Deis-al-A'anze (S. P. I. No. 25015) is said to be a very good variety, 
the Buhirzi (S. P. I. Xo. 25010) is early ripening, and the Erz Roumli (S. P. I. 
Xo. 25008) very rich yielding." (Magelssen.) 
162 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 55 

25016 to 25021. 

From Khartum, Sudan. Presented by Mr. R. Hewison, Director of Agriculture 
and Lands, Sudan Government, at the request of Mr. C. V. Piper. Received 
March 16, 1909. 

The following seeds (native names quoted) : 

25016. Vigna ungutculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 
•• Masri." 

25017. Axdropogox halepensis (L.) Brot. Johnson grass. 

"Garawi." 

"A variety of Johnson grass without rootstocks. This is a thing I have been 
looking for for some time, and judging from its behavior at Chillicothe, Tex., 
I think we have something that is going to be of high value. It looks some- 
thing like Johnson grass, but is entirely devoid of rootstocks, and therefore 
could be easily eradicated." (C. V. Piper.) 

Distribution. — Apparently a native of southern Europe and Asia, but distrib- 
uted as a weed and by cultivation generally throughout warm countries, ex- 
tending north in the United States to southern Pennsylvania and Missouri. 

25018. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 
' ' Kashrangague.' ' 

25019. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

25020. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

"Dohhu." 

Distribution. — Cultivated generally throughout the Tropics; used in the 
Southern States for the seed and grown farther north for fodder. 

25021. Cajan indictjm Spreng. 

"Ads." 

Distribution. — Probably a native of India, ascending to 6,000 feet in the 
Himalayas, and cultivated generally in the Tropics. 

25022. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Oberschiipf, Baden, Germany. Secured from Mr. Ludwig Keller, Ober- 
schiipf, amt Boxberg, Baden, Germany, at the request of Mr. Charles J. 
Brand. Received March 11, 1909. 

Alt-Deutsche Frankische lucern. 

25068. Pelargonium odoratissimum (L.) Ait. Geranium. 

From Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, Government Botanist, Mustapha- 
Alger, Algeria. Received March 19, 1909. 

"Cuttings of oil geranium cultivated in Algeria. This variety does not seed." 
{Trabut.) 

This was procured for Dr. H. True's experiments in the production of rose gera- 
nium oil. 

Distribution. — A native of the Cape of Good Hope; cultivated in Spain and Algeria. 

25079. Medicago sativa L. • Alfalfa. 

From Grand Isle, Vt. Collected by Mr. X. Schmitz, summer of 1908. 

"Seed from a single plant of alfalfa. This individual plant was growing under 
very undrained-soil conditions and local testimony indicated that this and associated 
scattering plants had withstood the unfavorable conditions present for eighteen 
years." {J. M. Westgate.) 
162 



56 SEEDS \M» PLANTS tMPORTED. 

25080. \iim:iii cordata (Thunb.) Muell. Arg. 

Japan wood oil. 

Japan. Purchased from The Japan Seed and Planl Company 
Limited Received at Seattle, Wash., February 8, L909. Received a1 Wash- 

mii. D I M:.r. Ii 23, L909. 

"This shipment of Beede was imported for acclimatization experiments and for the 
raction of oil to be used in chemical and physical analyses for comparison with 
- P.I.N 25081. 

In Japan this Bpeci< - La mosl commonly known under the names abura-giri and 
yama-giri, meaning, respectively, oil-kiri and wild-kiri. kiii (giri) being the name for 
i imperialis, which it greatly resembles in its foliage. Ii is a tropical or 
semitropical plant and grown only in the provinces to the south of Tokyo (36° lat. \. 
It i- found also in Formosa, the coastal provinces of China as far inland as Ghekiang, 
the Isle of Hainan, and sparingly in farther India and Cochin China, being indigenous 
probably to Japan and Formosa only. 

"The seeds are very small compared with those of the other species of Aleurites, 
being aboul the size of large castor-oil seeds, which they very much resemble. The 
oil expressed from them, which serves chiefly as a drying oil, is comparable to the 
more abundant t'ung oil of China and to perilla oil, which is largely substituted for 
it in Japan, as it can be more cheaply grown. In Japan, as in China, the wood oil is 
grown on land not suited for general farming." (W. Fischer.) 

25081. Aleurites fordii Hemsl. China wood oil. 

From Hankow. China. Purchased through Hon. William Martin, consul-general. 

This shipment of seeds was imported for the purpose of continuing on a large scale 
some experiments commenced four years ago in the acclimatization of the tree which 
produces the t'ung oil or China wood oil of commerce. Of the few 1-year-old seedlings 
distributed by mail throughout the Southern and Pacific States, those sent to the 
Gulf have done so unusually well, growing so rapidly and some of them blossoming 
and fruiting the second year from transplanting, that it was thought advisable, now 
thai the section climatically best adapted to them has been discovered, to try larger 
plantations, not only to find out whether they would be a paying crop on cheap land 
in the South, but to determine the best treatment necessary to make them a commer- 
cial success. 

'The t'ung tree or Vung-shu, from the seeds of which China wood oil is obtained, 
is distributed widely throughout the provinces drained by the Yangtze, principally 
up the river and south of it, extending into the peninsula. Its product should not 
be confused with the true wood oil, or Gurjun balsam, which is an oleo-resin and which 
is ihe exudation from the trunks of several species of Dipterocarpus of Indo-China. 
The name "wood oil" for the Chinese product is really a misnomer and was applied 
by foreigners on account of the universal use of the oil as a covering for woodwork. 
To the Chinese the tree, seed, and oil are known, respectively, as Vung-shu, Vung-tze, 
and V ang-yii, the word t'ung being applied also quite generally to several other trees 
of similar aspect of foliage, such as the catalpa, Sterculia plantanifolia, and Paulownia 
imperialis. The trees are more restricted to the thin, dry soils of the hilly regions, 
where farming is unprofitable and where also the Chinese claim that they bear larger 
crops. They are* propagated by seeds which sprout in a shoit time and are placed 
where the trees are to stand permanently; also by hard-wood cuttings, which root 
readily. The tree should be tried in this country, not only for its valuable seeds, 
but as an ornament. It attains a height of from 20 to 40 feet, and its large, heart- 
shaped leaves, smooth, green bark, and striking panicles of white flowers slightly 
tinged with red, which appear with the leaves in the spring, make it a very desirable 
1G2 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 57 

25081— Continued. 

ornamental tree at all seasons of the year. The fruits, which ripen in September, 
are the size of large, unhulled black walnuts and contain 5 warty seeds the size of 
chestnuts and the general form of castor-oil seeds. 

"The seeds, which make up somewhat more than half by weight of the entire 
dried fruit, consist of 48 per cent shell and 52 per cent kernel, or 24 per cent oil cake 
and 28 per cent oil. During the past year the price of the oil in the United States 
was about 65 cents a gallon of 8 pounds, with linseed at 42 cents. 

"For centuries the Chinese have found innumerable uses for wood oil, chief of 
which may be mentioned the preservation of woodwork from moisture, the water- 
proofing of cloth, umbrellas, etc., and the making of oil papers and putty; from the 
oil cake, various calking compounds and fertilizer, and the best India inks from the 
soot obtained from its combustion. Americans are the only foreigners who have 
used wood oil to any great extent and then only during the last ten or twelve years. 
Their appreciation of its good qualities is shown by the steady demand, which has 
led several importing firms to establish branch houses in the chief exporting centers, 
Hankow and Hongkong, and by the steadily increasing importations, which grew to 
2,000,000 gallons in 1907. 

"The wood oil now imported is used almost exclusively in varnish making, but 
the manufacture of such products as linoleum, enamel paints, and high-grade elastic 
oilcloths has just commenced, while other uses have been suggested. It belongs to 
the class of drying oils typified by linseed, but it is much harder, quicker drying, 
and more impermeable to water, though less lightproof and elastic. Owing to certain 
physical disadvantages which it possesses, it can not replace linseed, but used in 
conjunction with it gives most excellent results, especially for outdoor use, where 
such qualities as it possesses are highly desirable." (W. Fischer.) 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern part of China, extending from Hong- 
kong north to the province of Hupeh. 

25082 and 25083. 

From China. Presented by Mr. D. MacGregor, Shanghai, through Mr. Frank 
X. Meyer. Received March 20, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25082. Astragalus sinicus L. 

From near Shanghai. "Used in the Chekiang Province as a leguminous 
green-manure crop on the low-lying rice fields." (Meyer.) 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern part of the Chinese Empire, and 
of Japan. 

25083. Arisaema sp. (?) 

From Mokanshan. "Fruit plum colored, aromatic, vinuous flavor; seeds in 
pulp; fruit the size of a plum." (MacGregor.) 

25087. Prunus pseudocerasus Lindl. Flowering cherry. 

From Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. Received 
March, 1909. 

"Seedling plants and seeds of the wild cherry of Japan upon which the Japanese 
bench-graft all their flowering cherries. I am informed by the Yokohama Nursery 
Company that this wild cherry, in contrast with the double-flowering and other Jap- 
anese ornamental varieties, can be reproduced very easily from cuttings, and that 
the scions of named varieties are grafted on pieces of the root and not budded, as is 
the custom in this country with the fruiting cherries. May this new stock not possibly 
162 



58 SEEDS \.\!» PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25087 Continued. 

asier i" cultivate than the Mazzard or Mahaleb Beedlinga which are now in use 
and the propagating wotV done in the winter on the bench instead of in the field? 
The difficulties in L r «n ing a .-tuck large enough to bud in regions where the leaf-blight 
Lb bad has suggested the trial of this Japanese wild cherry as a possible way out of 
this difficulty. r>\ recenl tests I have shown that this wild form strikes very easily 
in sand." I Fcrirchild 

25088. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Muskegon, Mich. Presented by Mr. ('. I). McLouth. Received Mutch 
L5, L909. 

Red Ripper (?). "My seed of this variety has been developed from a solitary plant 
fomid in a field of Whippoorwill cowpeas grown in 1905. This seed was purchased 
fi«.m a local dealer. It is by far the best variety I have grown in its earliness and 
abundant pod production." (McLouth.) 

25089. Belou glutinosa (Blanco) Skeels. 

In an Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Manila, P. I. 
Received March 22, 1909. 

Seed. See No. 24591 for description. 

Ihstrihu/ion. — A small tree, native of the Philippine Islands. 

25090 and 25091. 

From Strasburg, Germany. Presented by Mr. George Wintz, Benson, Minn., 
through Mr. J. M. Westgate. Received March 15, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25090. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 

25091. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

"This seed was received under the name Spitzeklee, which is said to be hardier 
than ordinary alfalfa." (Westgate.) 

25094. Ficus sycomorus L. 

From Cairo, Egypt. Presented by Mr. W. Lawrence Balls, botanist, Khedivial 
Agricultural Society. Received March 22, 1909. 

"This species of fig is grown largely along the north coast of Africa as a shade tree. 
Giant specimens are to be found in Alexandria and Cairo and at Biskra. The trees 
are beautiful shade trees, and make wonderful avenues in these dry climates where 
irrigation is practiced. The fruits are small, about the size of a pigeon's egg, and are 
sometimes eaten by the Algerian Arabs. They are, however, of no commercial 
importance. 

"As the plants are grown easily from cuttings and make very rapid growth this 
tree may be expected to thrive well in the practically frostless regions of California 
and Florida. I do not know how low temperatures it will stand, but probably not 
more than a temperature of 18° or 20° F. 

'Like many valuable things, it has its drawbacks. The Europeans in Egypt com- 
plain of a bad odor exhaled by the tree during the fruiting season." (Fairehild.) 

'This tree will probably not fruit in the absence of its peculiar fig insect, which is 
in this case not a Blastophaga at all but belongs to another genus. Probably this will 
solve the malodorus fruit problem. I fear you will find it rather tender." ( Walter T. 
Swingle.) 

Distribution. — A large tree found in Egypt and the adjacent countries of the north- 
eastern part of Africa. 

ir,2 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 3909. 59 

25095. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From the island of Raiatea, Society Islands. Presented by Mr. Julius D. Dreher, 
United States consul, Tahiti, Society Islands. Received March 15, 1909. 

"This melon was of a rich green color; its rind was thin and its pulp unusually 
red, tender, and sweet. It was eaten at the consulate and we regarded it as so good 
that I decided to send the seed to America for trial." (Dreher.) 

25096. Passiflora quadrangularis L. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. Henry F. Schultz, horti- 
culturist, Isthmian Canal Commission, Quartermaster's Department. Received 
March 24, 1909. 

"I doubt whether the fruit of this variety is as good as some of those in Mexico, but 
I must say that the seed was taken from one of the best fruits which I have sampled 
in Panama." (Schultz.) 

Distribution. — A native of Central America, being cultivated as well as found wild 
in Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Panama. 

25097 to 25101. 

Grown at Miami, Fla., by Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge of Subtropical Garden. 
Numbered for convenience in recording distribution, March 24, 1909. 

25097 and 25098. Original seed presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschow- 
sky, Nice, France. 

25097. SOLANUM MARGINATUM L. 

"(S. G. No. 1051.) A shrub attaining a height of from 3 to 5 feet; 
foliage white tomentose, prickly; flowers 1 inch or more in diameter, 
white with blue veins or ribs; fruit 1 inch or more across, prickly." 
(Wester.) 

Distribution. — A native of the upper part of the Nile Valley, especially 
in Abyssinia. 

25098. Melia azedarach L. 

"(S. G. No. 1052.) Indigenous to Jamaica. A low-growing tree with 
leaves deeply incised; flowers in axillary panicles; small, light lilac, fra- 
grant; in constant succession." (Wester.) 

25099. Ceratonia siliqua L. Carob. 

"(S. G. No. 900.) Original seed presented by Mr. J. F. Kraemer, Miami, 
Fla., who received it from a United States consul in Spain. This is said to be 
very superior to the ordinary varieties grown." (Wester.) 

Distribution.- — A tall tree, native in the region bordering on the Mediter- 
ranean Sea and cultivated generally in the Tropics. In the United States 
cultivated in southern Florida and southern California. 

25100. Galphimia nitida Hort. 

"(S. G. No. 941.) Original seed presented by Mr. S. K. Brown, Lemon 
City, Fla. A shrub 4 or more feet tall, quite compact in growth and pyram- 
idal in habit. The small, yellow, fragrant flowers are produced in great 
profusion. ' ' ( Wester.) 

25101. Ocotea catesbyana (Mich.) Sarg. Lancewood. 

"(S. G. No. 996.) Indigenous to south Florida and grown from seed collected 
in Brickell hammock, Miami, Fla. This is an evergreen, glabrous tree, attain- 
ing a height of from 20 to 30 feet; the leaves are narrowly elliptic lanceolate, 

162 



60 SEEDS AND PLANTS EMPOBTED. 

25097 to 25101 Continued. 

making a very dense crown. From the observations I have made of this tree 
in it- native habital 1 believe it is well worth introducing as a shade tree in all 
parte of the I Inited States where if would not be injured by Erosl . " | Wester.) 
Distribution. A native of southern Florida and the Bahamas. 

25104 to 25106. Chaetoohloa italica (L.) Scribn. Millet. 

From llaka. Chin Bills, Burma. Presented by Rev. 11. East, A. B. Mission. 
Received March L0, L909. 

eds of the following: 

25104. A yellow-seeded variety. 

"Chin name Fatao. Is considered as good as rice by the Chins, and it is a 
■<td food, rich in gluten. " (East.) 

25105. A black-seeded variety. 

"Chin name Yet(r)ing. Is also used as food, but is less valued than Fatao 
S. P. I. Xo. 25104) and Hlisen (S. P. I. No. 25106)." (East.) 

25106. A yellow-seeded variety. 

"(hin name Hlisen. Has a large grain; is a good food, but not as rich as 
Fatao (S. P. I. No. 25104). Both kinds have unusually large heads." (East.) 

"These three varieties need lots of water to grow." (East.) 

25107. Camoexsia maxima Welw. 

From Angola, West Africa. Presented by Mr. John Gossweiler, botanist in the 
M-rvice of the Portuguese Government of Angola, at the request of Mr. A. E. 
Evans, Director of Agriculture, Gold Coast, West Africa. Received March 24, 
1909. 

Seeds. 

'Probably the largest flowered and certainly one of the most delicately beautiful 
vines in the world is Camoensia maxima, which has recently flowered for the first time 
in the United States. Its pure white, fluted petals are margined with gold, changing 
to a darker tinge with age, and have a delicious fragrance when first opening. The 
individual flowers are sometimes 8 inches long, which we believe eclipses even 
(he largest flowered hybrid clematis. This magnificent vine adorns the tops of lofty 
trees on the outskirts of forests in tropical Africa. The clusters are pendulous and 
sometimes contain nearly a dozen flowers. Unlike the sweet pea, the petals are 
separate, not forming wings and a keel. The standard is fully 4 inches across. 

'The great drawback to the cultivation of this noble plant is that it will bloom only 
in hothouses of considerable size, and hitherto it has been extremely slow in coming 
into bloom. Plants were first distributed by Kew in 1873, but did not flower in culti- 
vation until 1882, when blooms appeared at Trinidad. However, Mr. George W. 
Oliver, propagator to the United States Department of Agriculture, who first bloomed 
the Camoensia here, thinks it 'very likely that this plant will flower oftener and 
more profusely in this country than in Europe, particularly in England, because of 
our higher summer temperature, which enables the plant to grow rapidly and ripen 
its wood . ' 

'The Camoensia is named after the Shakespeare of the Portuguese, the poet Camoens, 
author of 'Lusiade.'" (The Garden Magazine, May, 1908.) 

' I am informed by Doctor Andre, of Trinidad, that Camoensia is a wonderful suc- 
cess there. It ought to be extensively planted in Hawaii, Panama, Porto Rico, and 
the Philippines. ' ' ( Fair child. ) 

I distribution. — A tall-climbing vine, native of the woods of western tropical Africa, 
extending from Guinea through the Kongo region and into Portuguese West Africa. 
L62 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 61 

25110 to 25112. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. 

Sand lucern. 

From Zurich, Switzerland. Presented by Dr. G. Stebler, director, Schweizer- 
ische Samenuntersuchungs und Versuchsanstalt, Zurich, through Mr. Charles J. 
Brand. Received March 13, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25110. (P. L. H. No. 3412.) 25112. (P. L. H. No. 3414.) 

25111. (P. L. H. No. 3413.) 

"The samples of seed represented by these numbers were not grown in Switzerland, 
but were submitted by seedsmen to the seed control station for test." (Brand.) 

25114. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From the Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia. Received March 27, 1909. 

Peruvian. "Seed secured from crop of 1908 from transplanted crowns of Peruvian 
alfalfa. The original crowns were transplanted from a broadcasted stand in April, 
1906, to rows 39 inches apart for the purpose of increasing the production of seed." 
(Westgate.) 

25115. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 

From Bromberg, West Prussia, Germany. Purchased from Mr. Ludwig Keller, 
Oberschiipf, Baden, Germany, who secured the seed from Rudolph Zawadski, 
in Bromberg, at the request of Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received March 18, 
1909. 

25116 to 25118. 

From Pithoragarh, Kumaun District, India. Presented by Miss L. W. Sullivan. 
Received March 26, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following : 

25116 and 25117. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

25116. " Jamal. These seeds are first germinated by being placed in 
a basket set in a tub of water; when roots are about 1 inch long the seed- 
lings are sown thick in a swampy place; when about 8 or 10 inches high 
like grass the small plants are separated and transplanted into a swampy 
place. We put the seeds to soak in May and harvest the grain in Octo- 
ber." (Sullivan.) 

25117. "This, our staple food (rice in husk), grows in ordinary soil 
during our rainy season when the ground is never dry. We sow in 
March and harvest in September. The fields are weeded three times." 
(Sullivan.) 

25118. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

"Bhat dal." A small, black variety of soy bean. 

25119. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Vienna, Austria. Secured from Gebriider Boschan, successors to Wie- 
schnitzky & Clauser, Vienna, Austria, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received 
March 13, 1909. 

25120. Stizolobium sp. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. A. T. Gage, superintendent, 
Royal Botanic Garden. Received March 29, 1909. 

162 



62 SEEDS AM) PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25121 to 25126. 

Prom Brazil Presented by Mr. William Eope, The Kenesa^ . Washington, D. C, 
through Mi. W. W . Tracy, Br. Received March 25, L909. 

h of the followm 

25121 to 25123. ClTRULLUS VULGARIS Schrad. Watermelon. 

25121. Black seeded. 25123. Red seeded. 

25122. Blackseeded. 

25124 to 25126. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

25124. Long melon: yellow, wavy, smooth skin; yellow flesh; rind 1 
centimeter. 

25125. Long melon; yellow, wavy skin: while flesh; very Little rind. 

25126. Round melon; yellow, wavy skin: yellow flesh; rind 1 centi- 
meter. 

25127. Citrus trifoliata L. 

From Tsingtau, China. Received through Mr. Wilbur T. Gracey, United States 
consul, who procured the seed from Mr. Haas, head forester of the German Gov- 
ernment at Tsingtau, March 29, 1909. 
Procured for Mr. Walter T. Swingle's hybridization work. 

25130 and 25131. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Knoxville, Tenn. Grown at the Agricultural Experiment Station. Re- 
ceived through Prof. H. A. Morgan. March 29. 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following : 

25130. Early brown. 

25131. Medium yellow. 

25132 to 25149. 

From Soochow, Kiangsu, China. Presented by Rev. R. A. Haden, B. D. Re- 
ceived March 19, 1909. 

The following seeds (quoted descriptions by Mr. Haden): 

25132. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 
Black seeded. "Purple, flat bean; name from color of bloom, stalk, and 

leaves; all are purple. Eaten in green state, pod and all. Enormously pro- 
ductive in vine and leaf; not especially remarkable in the amount of fruit. 
Should be given plenty of room and vine supported." 

25133 to 25137. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

25133. Small yellow. "Tom Thumb soy. The smallest variety ; used 
only for bean sprouts." 

25134. Large yellow. "Mammoth yellow soy. This is the very 
largest of the yellow soys. Used especially for oil and bean curd." 

25135. Large green. "Tea green soy. Sutt variety. May be put to 
all the uses of the soy, but in practice they are only used to make 
parched Sutt beans, eaten as a relish." 

25136. Large reddish, brown. "Mammoth red soy. Used only for 
eating in the green state, but may be used for all the soy purposes. 
This is the largest of all the soys." 

25137. Looks like Meyer. "Mammoth mottled soy. Used especially 
for bean curd; said to give a special flavor to this; has also abundant 
oil qualities." 

102 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 63 

25132 to 25149— Continued. 

25138. Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc. 

"Horse-feed peas, a literal translation of the Chinese. It grows wild over a 
very large portion of China. In the north peas by the same name, but a differ- 
ent variety, are extensively cultivated. Long vines, climbing on anything in 
reach; fruited from bottom to top. I think this should receive special attention, 
for the following reasons: It will be a good nitrogen producer. It is extensively 
used in Chinese medicine, entering largely into prescriptions taken internally 
for eye trouble. It will make a better drink than anything except good coffee. 
Parch until brown the whole pea, grind, and treat as boiled coffee. This I 
have tried and am very fond of it as a drink." 

Distribution. — An annual vine, native and cultivated in the eastern part of 
Asia, extending from Amur and Manchuria through China and eastern India; 
. also in Japan. 

25139 to 25141. Phaseolus angularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. 

25139. Red. 25141. Mottled black. 

25140. Yellow. 

"The uses of the above are the same as cowpeas, but the foliage is more 
abundant." 

25142 and 25143. Phaseolus calcaratus Roxb. 

25142. Red. 

25143. Greenish yellow. 

"From the shape of the seed these are called 'Crab-eye.' They are also the 
'Lazy-man' peas, for the reason that they replant themselves. Growth rank: 
vine bunchy, not very long. Should be extra fine for renewing land and for 
fodder/ 1 

Distribution. — Native and cultivated in India and the Malay Archipelago, 
rising to an elevation of 5.000 feet in the Himalayas. 

25144 to 25147. Vigna unguiculata (L. i Walp. Cowpea. 

25144. Small red. 

25145. Large red. "Vine rank. long, prolific; used especially for 
gruel." 

25146. Reddish brown. 

25147. Large brown eye. 

25148 and 25149. Vigna sesquipedalis (L. ) W. F. Wight. 

25148. Reddish brown . 

25149. Marked red and white. 

25152 to 25160. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

Grown at the Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia, season of 1908. Numbered 
for convenience in recording distribution, March 30. 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25152 to 25155. Original seed presented by Dr. S. P. Barchet, Shanghai, 
China. 

25152. (Agros. No. 0525.) A variety with white seeds. This variety 
at the Arlington Experimental Farm was very vigorous and very pro- 
lific; flowers white. 
8805— Bui. 162—09 5 



f> 1 81 EDS \M» PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25152 to 25160 Continued. 

to 25155 Continued. 

25153. I \/i"- No.0522.) Very similar to No. 0525(8. P. I. No. 25152 
u hite, subglobo 

25154. (Agro8. No. 0523.) Flowers pale purple; pods longer and nar- 
rower than any < * 1 1 1 < * ** variety; .-reds large, dark purple, nearly black. 
A vigorous grower. 

25155. (Agros. No. 0524.) A very prolific variety, with pink Mowers 
and Large purple-black seeds. 

25156. | Agros. No. 0108.) Original seed obtained from J. M. Thorbuna & Co., 
New York. A variety with small white seeds and while Mowers. Very 
vigorous and prolific. One of the besl under conditions at the Arlington 
Experimental Farm. 

25157. (Agros. No. 0691.) Original seed obtained from Mr. A. W. Barlett, 
superintendent, Government Botanic Gardens, Georgetown, British Guiana. 
A variety with small, pure white seeds and white flowers. Very similar to 
Xo. 0108 (S. P. I. No. 25156). 

25158. (Agros. Xo. 01:25.) Original seed obtained from the island of Bar- 
bados Seeds and Mowers similar to the preceding (S. P. I. No. 25157). but 
plant not vigorous and leaves much affected with a spot disease. 

25159. (Agros. Xo. 0438A.) A variety grown at the Arlington Experimental 
Farm, of unknown origin. Seeds small, brownish purple; flowers pink. 
Xot vigorous nor prolific. 

25160. (Agros. No. 0438B.J Similar to the preceding (S. P. I. No. 25159), 
with small, spotted seeds. Likewise of unknown origin. 

25161. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

Grown at the Arlington Experimental Farm, Virginia, season of 1908, under 
Agros. Xo. 0824. Numbered for convenience in recording distribution, March 
31, 1909. 

Eda. (?) Original seed from the Indiana Agricultural Experimeul Station, where it 
was grown as Early Brown. 

'This turned out to be identical with Ito San in every particular except color of 
seed. It is a uniform light brown, while Ito San is yellow. Neither superior nor 
inferior to Ito San." (FT. T. Nielsen.) 

25163 to 25165. Ramboetan. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, Director of Agriculture. 
Received March 12 and 15, 1909. 

25163. Xephelium lappaceum L. 

■■ Atjeh mot jan." 

Distribution. — A large tree, native of the Malay Archipelago, several varie- 
ties being cultivated. 

25164. Nephelium mutabile Bl. 
" Pot lasan manis." 

Distribution. — A native of the Malay Archipelago and of the islands of Java 
and Borneo. 
1 62 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909. 65 

25163 to 25165 Continued. 

25165. Xephelium lappaceum L. 
" Atjeh Lcbak bocloes." 

Distribution. — A large tree, native of the Malay Archipelago, several varie- 
ties being cultivated. 
"The ramboetan, ox Atjeh, as the Dutch in Java call Nephelium lappaceum, is one 
of the showiest and one of the most delicately flavored of tropical fruits, superior to the 
Poelasan (N. mutabile). Although the mangosteen ranks first, in my mind, among all 
the tropical fruits of the world, there are many Dutch residents on the island of Java, 
where both of these fruits occur, who prefer the ramboetan to the mangosteen. I 
think even such a connoisseur as Doctor Treub would hesitate to decide which of 
these two fruits is the finest. The ripe fruits as sold on the markets in Java are about . 
the size of a Japanese plum, but furnished with numerous weak protuberances. In 
color they are a handsome wine-red. The outer sin 11. or coating, is thick and leath- 
ery, but can be easily broken by a sharp twist of the hands. The flesh inside is much 
like that of the leitchee, to which it is a near relative, except that in general there is 
more of it and it is more delicately flavored, and it is my impression that as a rule it 
is juicier. So far as my limited experience goes with different varieties of leitchee, 
this ramboetan surpasses them all in excellence. I do not think the trees are culti- 
vated in orchards, for very few orchards of any kind exist in Java. The trees are scat- 
tered through the kampongs, or Utile villages, -all over the island. So far as I know, 
the ramboetan is not a grafted fruit, but grown only from seed. Owing to its thick 
rind, the fruit of the ramboetan should be a good shipper, and if the plants can be 
grown on the Panama Canal Zone, in Porto Rico, or southern Florida they should 
make a decided sensation when they are first offered for sale on our markets.*' {Fair- 
child, i 

25166. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Peleka, Corfu Island. Presented by Mr. Carlo Spronger, Voinero. near 
Naples, Italy. Received March 30, 1909. 

"Seed of a splendid winter melon. Flesh white or greenish white; shell golden 
yellow. Very fine and never seen before." {Spn nger.) 

25167 and 25168. 

From Erfurt, Germany. Received from Mr. X. L. Chrestensen, Thuringer 
Central-Saatstelle, Erfurt, Germany, through Mr. Charles J. Brand, March 15, 
1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25167. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

Deutsche blaue. -'(P. L. H. No. 3417.) This strain of alfalfa is said to be 
very resistant to severe, snowless winters, and to endure a long series of years. 
It is produced on exposed, situations in Thuringia." (Brand. \ 

25168. Medicago sativa v aria (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 
Bbhmische. (P. L. H. No. 3418.) 

162 



66 BBEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25169 to 25171. 

i Portugut i Vfrica Presented by Mr. <>. W. Barrett, Director of 

Agriculture, Lourenco Marque? Received March 30, L909. 

The followii 

25169. A won * Jis Pers. 

\ amall tree, wild near Lourengo Marquez. Frail 2 to 4 inches 
long, yellowish -kin. bright yellow pulp. Edible. Shironga (Kafir) name 
\f oi \fazhopfa." {Barrett.) 

D > button. A 1"A Bhrub or Bmall tree, native to the tropical region of 
A fii tending from Guinea and the upper valley of the Nile Bouth to the 

Zambezi Valley. 

25170. Strychnos spinosa Lam. Kafir orange. 

No. 24.) A. tree 15 to 25 feel high, in bush veld from Zululand to Rhodesia. 
FVuil spherical, 2 to :'. inches in diameter, yellow when ripe, hard shelled. 
Edible. Flavor like 'cinnamon and pears.' Shironga (Kafir) name M'sdla." 
Barrett. Se< No. 9611 for the original importation and description. 

Distribution. A Bmall tree native to the tropical region and the southern 
pari of Africa and also in the Seychelle [slands and in Madagascar. 

25171. Vanguerla infausta Burch. 

No. l' : >. \ Bmall tree near Lourenco Marquez, in sandy soil. Fruit 
roundish, flattened distal. Edible: pulp dry, sweet. Shironga (Kafir) name 
Wpfilo." (Barrett 

Distribution.— A native of the southeastern part of Africa, being found in 
the vicinity of Johannesburg and of Natal, and in the eastern part of Cape 
■ lony. 

25172 to 25174. Medicago spp. 

From farm of Mr. Lewis Brott, Sextorp, Nebr. These three lots were grown in 
cultivated rows. 42 inches apart, for seed and were open to the possibilities 
of cross-pollination among themselves. The Turkestan alfalfa was separated 
from BrotVs Dry-Land alfalfa by 14 rows of sand lucern. Seed collected by 

Mr. J. M. West gate. August 15, 1908. 

Seeds of the following: 

25172. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

BrotVs Dry-Land. "From same stock as S. P. I. No. 19566, grown in row 
adjacent to row of sand lucern (S. P. I. No. 20457) and presumably cross- 
pollinated with the same." (Westgate.) 

25173. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 
"Grown from S. P. I. No. 20457 in row adjacent to BrotVs Dry-Land alfalfa." 

WestgaU 

25174. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Turkestan. "Grown from S. P. I. No. 18751 in row adjacent to sand lucern 

S. P. I. No. 20457)." (Westgate.) 

25175 and 25176. Medicago spp. 

From Berlin. Germany. Secured from J. & P. Wissinger, Samenhandlung, Berlin, 

Germany, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received March 24, 1909. 
L62 



JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 31, 1909, 67 

25175 and 25176— Continued. 

Seeds of the following: 

25175. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa, 

Alt-Deutsrhi Frdnkische lucern. "(P. L. H. No. 3420.) This alfalfa usually 
has a very large percentage of hard seed, in some samples as high as 63 per cent 
failing to germinate in the five-day germination test. On this point Wissinger 
says: 'We could bring the seed to greater germinating power by scratching, 
were it not for the fact that the hardness of shell is thought here to be a desirable 
quality under certain conditions. Indeed, it is believed that the longevity 
of a stand of Franconian lucern is due to its hard-shelled seeds, some of which 
often lie dormant for years, thereby constantly rejuvenating the stand with a 
fresh supply of young plants. The appearance of this seed, as furnished, is not 
first class. We would not, however, wish to do anything that would impair 
its originalit y . ' 

"The present sample was grown in Iphofen, Franconia." (Brand.) 

25176. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 

Bohemian. "(P. L. H. No. 3421.) This seed was grown on the right bank 
of the Elbe in Bohemia." (Brand.) 

25177. Trifolium suaveolens Willd. Shaftal. 

From Amritsar, Punjab, India. Secured from Mr. Philip Parker, experimental 
officer in the Indian Irrigation Secretariat, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Re- 
ceived April 1, 1909. 

''Shaftal, which is an annual plant, is the chief fodder crop in the valleys of the 
northwest frontier of India. It is always grown with irrigation and gives exceed- 
ingly good yields. 

"Experiments begun in 1907 with the seed previously presented by Mr. Parker 
(S. P. I. Nos. 19506 and 19507) have proceeded far enough to show considerable prom- 
ise for this clover, especially in our hot irrigated valleys." (Brand.) 

25178 and 25180. Medicago spp. 

From Vienna, Austria. Secured from Gebrtider Boschan, successors to Wie- 
schnitzky & Clauser, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received March 25, 
1909. 

The following seeds : 

25178. Medicago sativa varia (Mart.) Urb. Sand lucern. 
Bohmische. (P. L. H. No. 3428.) 

25179. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Ungarische. (P. L. H. No. 3429.) 

25180. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Mahrische. (P. L. H. No. 3430.) 

25181 to 25185. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bonn-Poppelsdorf, Germany. Presented by Prof. Dr. Th. Remy, di- 
rector, Institut fur Bodenlehre und Pflanzenbau der Koniglichen landwirt- 
schaftlichen Akademie, Bonn am Rhein, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Re- 
ceived March 25, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25181. Pfalzer. (P. L. H. No. 3422.) Original seed from Frankenthal, 
Rhein-Pfalz, Germany. 



162 



68 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25181 to 25185 Continued. 

I' I II. No. 3423.) Original Beed from Bitburg, in the 
Bifel, I'ni-i.i 
15183. I/' Fr&nktieht P. L. II. No. 3424.) Original seed from Lagerhaus 
fordae Frankenland, Tauberbischofsheim, Baden, Germany. 
:J5184. Provenzi P. I EL No. 3425.) Original seed grown near Trier, in 

the* Moselthal of Prussia. 
25185. Ungaruche. (P. I.. EL No. 3426.) Original seed grown a1 Csorvas, 
Koiniiai Bekes, Bungar) 

25186 to 25190. 

Prom Pisa, Italy. Presented by Prof. G. E. Rasetti, director, Cattedra Am- 
bulante di Agricultura per La Provincia <li Pisa, Italy, through Mr. Charles J. 
Brand. Eteceived March 31, L909. 

The following seede 

25186 and 25187. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

25186. (P. L. II. No. 3431.) Grown near Setif, Algeria. 

25187. (P. L. II . Xo. 3432.) Ilerba medica. The form commonly 
grows in Italy. This sample was produced near Pisa, Italy. 

25188 to 25190. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 

25188. (P. L. II. No. 343:5.) "Professor Rasetti states that this va- 
riety is known BsSpadone, and that it was produced at Santhia, in the 
province of Novara, Italy." (Brand.) 

25189. (P. L. H. No. 3434.) This is the form commonly cultivated 
in Italy. Gathered near Pisa, Italy. 

25190. (P. L. H. No. 3435.) This variety is known as Vische, and is 
cultivated in Vische, in the province of Novara. 

25191. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Chico, Cal. Seed collected by Mr. Roland McKee at the Plant Intro- 
duction Garden, July 13, 1908. Numbered for convenience in recording 
distribution. March, 1909. 

" This seed was collected from a single plant grown from S. P. I. No. 19508. Mother 
plant possessed flowers borne in compound racemes. The flowers were open to the 
visits of insects and were presumably cross-pollinated with pollen from the numer- 
ous other lots of alfalfa in the alfalfa nursery." (/. M. Westgate.) 

Tin's plant was noticed by me on May 1, 1908, while walking over the grounds 
of the Plant Introduction Garden at Chico, Cal., with Mr. Roland McKee. The 
plain was noticeable even from a distance because of the profusion of its flowers. 
Upon examination this was found to be due to the fact that the flower clusters were 
much branched instead of being simple as usual. 

"As the plant seemed healthy and vigorous in spite of its profusion of flowers, it 
seemed desirable to direct attention to it with a view to obtaining a new variety— 
perhaps able to produce a better quality of hay and also more seed than the ordinary 
plants of the parent strain." (W. T. Swingle.) 

162 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES, ETC. 



Abrus praecatorius, 24619. 
Agropyron caninum, 24475. 

imbricatum, 24466 to 24468. 
Alectryon excel sum, 24876. 
Aleurites cordata, 25080. 

fordii, 25081. 
Alfalfa, Andean, 24598. 

(Austria), 25119, 25179, 25180. 
Brott's Dry-Land, 25172. 
(Germany), 24635, 24667, 24668, 
24717 to 24741, 24767, 24923, 
25022, 25091, 25167, 25175, 
25181 to 25185. 
(Italy), 24858, 25186, 25187. 
(Kansas), 24859. 

lucern, sand, 24603, 24737, 24757, 
25110 to 25112, 25115, 25168, 
25173, 25176, 25178. 
Peruvian, 24430, 25114. 
Provence, 24602, 24758, 24928. 
Spitzeklee, 25091. 
tree. See Medicago arborea. 
Turkestan, 24567, 24811, 25174. 
See also Medicago sativa and Medicago 
sativa varia. 
Allium sp., 24571. 
Almond (Turkestan), 24808, 24809. 
Amygdalus nana, 24808, 24809. 

persica, 24653, 24806, 24807, 
24915, 24916. 
Andropogon barbinodis, 24658. 
halepensis, 25017. 
sorghum, 24442, 24443, 24478, 
24553, 24554, 24812, 24878, 
24897, 24899, 24910, 24956 
to 24997. 
Anis. See Pimpinella anisum. 
Anona cherimola, 24661 to 24665. 

senegalens'is, 25169. 
Apple (Russia), 24802, 24805. 

(Turkestan), 24795, 24796. 
Apricot (Turkestan), 24797. 
Arisaema sp., 25083. 
Asparagus filicinus, 24437 . 
Astragalus sinicus, 25082. 
162 



Atalantia bilocularis, 24433, 24753. 

hindsii, 24587. 
Avena nuda, 24846, 24847. 
sativa, 24477, 24815. 
Avocado (Jamaica), 24439. 

Bael. See Belou marmelos. 
Bamboo, Hachiku, 24761. 
Madake, 24760. 
Moso, 24759. 
Barley (Abyssinia), 24880 to 24882, 24901, 
24911. 
(China), 24848, 24849. 
(Turkestan), 24497. 
Bean, bonavist. See Dolichos lablab. 
Florida velvet, 24766. 
horse, 24900. 

mun?. See Phaseolus radiatus. 
scarlet runner. See Phaseolus coc- 
cineus. 
Belou glutinosa, 24591, 25089. 

marmelos, 24450. 
Blighia sapida, 24592. 
Buckwheat (China), 24850. 

Cajan indicum, 24601, 24604, 24742, 25000, 

25021. 
Calligonum sp., 24557. 

aphyllum, 24558. 
caput-medusae, 24559 . 
Camoensia maxima, 25107. 
Cannabis saliva, 24853. 
Carob. See Ceratonia siliqu a. 
Carthamus tinctorius, 24908. 
Caryota milis, 24616. 
Catha edulis, 24714. 
Cedar, yellow. See Chamaecyparis noot- 

katensis. 
Ceratonia siliqua, 25099. 
Chaetocholoa italica, 24810, 25104 to 25106. 
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, 24712. 
Chayota edulis, 24671, 24770, 24938. 
Cherry, flowering. See Prunus pseudo- 

cerasus. 
Chick-pea. See Cicer arietinuni . 

69 



To 



SEl DS VND PLANTS l.MI'oi; I ED. 






Chinese date 

■ 1 1 
rietinum, 
248 

25121 to 25123. 

fin in, 2 1716 
aim nsis, 
nobil 

trifoliate, 2512* 
Clover, bur. See Wedicago denticulate. 
red, See / 'folium i>r<itt m 
shaftal. See Trifoliumsuaveolens. 
white. See Trifolium repens. 
hrinax garberi, 2 1595. 
chorus cap8ularis, 2 1854, 24917. 
iandrum sativum, 2 1905. 
ii (Abyssinia, 24896. 
Cotton, Abbasi, 24830. 
Ashmuni, 24828. 
Jannovitch, 21832. 
Mil Afifi, 24829. 
Nubari, 24833. 
Sultani, 24831. 
(Turkestan), 24541 to 24547. 
Cowpea, brown eye, 24566, 25147. 
red, 25144, 25145. 

Ripper, 25088. 
reddish brown, 251-40. 
See also Vigna unguiculata . 
Cucumis melo, 24494 to 24496, 24498 to 

2 1540, 25124 to 25126, 25166. 
Cupressus arizonica, 24625. 
Currant (Russia), 24801. 
Cytisus proliferus, 24590. 

Diospyros ebenaster, 24600. 

1 toekoe. See Lansium domesticum. 

Dolichos biflorus, 24691 to 24692. 

lablab, 24912 to 24914, 25018, 
25132, 25152 to 25160. 
Durra. See Sorghum. 

Elaeagnus angustifolia, 24568, 24569. 24800» 
24803. 

E/aeis melanococca, 24589. 
EJymus arenarius, 24473. 

sibiricus, 24469, 24470. 
Emmer (Abyssinia I, 24903. 
Eragrostis abyssinica, 24816, 24887, 24888. 
lacunaria, 24645. 

Fagopyrum tataricum, 24850. 

Fenugreek. See Trigonella foenum- 

graecum. 
Ficus sycomorus, 25094. 
162 



Id pea. See Pisum an < nse. 
Flax (Abyssinia), 24891, 24892. 
Fragaria chiloensis, 24654 to 24656. 

Galphimia nitida, 25 loo. 
Qarcinia cowa, 2 1769. 

mangostena, 2 1768. 

tinctoria, 2 1 132. 
Geranium, rose. Sec Pelargonium odora- 

fissiiiiii in . 

Ginger. Sec Zinziber officinah . 
Glycint hUpida, 2 Kilo. 2464] to 24643, 
24672 to 24690, 24693 to 24711, 
24839, 24840, 251 IS, 25130, 
25131,' 25133 to 25137, 25161. 
soja, 25138. 
(ilycosmis penlaphylla, 24609, 24755. 
Glycyrrhiza uralensis, 24479. 
Gossypium barbadense, 24828 to 24833. 

hirsutum, 24541, 24542, 24544 

to 24547. 
indicum, 24543. 
Gourliea spinosa, 24631. 
Grape, Ajmi, 25012. 

Buhirzi, 25010. 

(Central Asia), 24771 to 24793. 

( hadeh Arabieh, 25014. 

Chaweesh, 25013. 

Deis-al-A'anze, 25015. 

Erz Roumli, 25008. 

Kishmishi, 25011. 

Kurdi, 25009. 

Maskah, 24772,^ 24774, 24784, 

24793. 
(Turkey), 25008 to 25015. 
Grass, Johnson. See Andropogon hale- 
pensis. 
Para. See Panicum muticum. 
Guizotia abyssinica, 24902. 

Haloxylon ammodendron, 24555. 
Hansen, Prof. N. E., seeds and cuttings 
secured, 24451 to 24575, 24771 to 24819. 
Hemp (China), 24853. 
Hibiscus sp., 24924. 
Hordeumsp., 24881, 24882, 24911. 
distichon, 24880'. 
vulgare, 24497. 

coeleste, 24901. 
himalayense, 24848. 
violaceum, 24849. 
Husbands, Jose D., seeds secured, 24654 
to 24656, 24661 to 24665, 24771 to 24819. 
Uydriastele ivendlandiana, 24614. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES, ETC. 



71 



Ilex cornuta, 24638. 
Indigo/era anil, 24440. 

subulata, 24763. 

Jacquemontia pentantha, 24595. 
Juniperus monosperma, 24622. 

pachyphlaea, 24621, 24624. 
Jute. See Corchorus capsular is. 

Kafir (Kafir corn). See Sorghum. 

orange. See Slrychnos spinosa. 
Kowliang. See Sorghum. 

Lancewood. See Ocotea catesbyana. 
Lansium domesticum, 24431. 
Lathyrus pralensis, 24471, 24472. 
Lavatera thuringiaca, 24480. 
Lens esculenla, 24904. 
Lentil. See Lens esculenla. 
Linum usitalissimum, 24891, 24892. 
Lupinella. See Onobrychis viciaefolia. 

Malus sylvestris, 24795, 24796, 24802, 

24805. 
Mangifera indica, 24636, 24927. 
Mango, Caraboa, 24927. 
(Tahiti), 24636. 
Mascarenhasia elastica, 24637. 
Medicago arbor ea, 24814. 

denticulata, 24596. 
falcata, 24452 to 24456, 24612. 
lupulina, 24933. 
platycarpa, 24457. 
ruthenica, 24451. 
saliva, 24430, 24567, 24598, 
24602, 24635, 24667, 
24668, 24717 to 24736, 
24738 to 24740, 24758, 
24767, 24811, 24858, 
24859, 24923, 24928, 
25019, 25022, 25079, 
25091, 25114, 25119, 

25167, 25172, 25174, 
25175, 25179, 25187, 
25191. 

varia, 24603, 24737, 24757, 
25110 to 25112, 25115, 

25168, 25173, 25176, 
25178. 

Melia azedarach, 25098. 
Meyer, Frank N., seed secured, 24596. 
Millet (Burma), 25104 to 25106. 
(India), 24444 to 24447. 
162 



Millet pearl. See Pennisetum america- 
num. 
(Turkestan), 24560, 24561. 
Morula. See Sclerocarya caffra. 
Moras nigra, 24804. 
Mulberry, black (Russia), 24804. 
Muskmelon (Brazil), 25124 to 25126. 
(Corfu Island), 25166. 
(Turkestan), 24494 to 24496, 
24498 to 24540. 

Nephelium lappaceum, 25163, 25165. 

mutabilr. 24754, 25164. 
Nigella saliva, 24909. 

Oak, cork. See Quercus suber. 
Oat (China), 24846, 24847. 

(Siberia), 24477. 
Ocotea catesbyana, 25101. 
Oil, wood (China), 25081. 
(Japan), 25080. 
Oleaster. See Elaeagnus angustifolia. 
Onobrychis viciaefolia, 24856. 24857, 24931. 
Orange (Blida), 24652. 

(Cochin China), 24715. 24716. 
Kafir. See Strychnos spinosa. 
Oryza sativa, 24441, 24551, 24552, 25116, 
25117. 

Panicum divaricatum, 24879. 

miliaceum, 24560, 24561. 
muticum, 24434, 24646. 
Paspalum quadrifarium, 24647. 
Passiflora sp., 24588. 

quadrangularis, 25096. 
Pea, field. See Pisum arvense. 
Tall Butter Sugar, 24599. 
j Peach (China), 24653, 24915, 24916. 
Hung wat to, 24915. 
Paak wat to, 24916. 
(Turkestan), 24806, 24807. 
Ying tsui to, 24653. 
Pelargonium odoratissimum, 25068. 
Pennisetum americanum, 24444 to 24447. 

25020. 
Persea gratissima, 24439. 
Persimmon (Mexico), 24600. 
Phaseolus angularis, 25139 to 25141. 
calcaratus, 25142, 25143. 
coccineus, 24448, 24449. 
radiatus, 24570, 24813. 
semierectus, 24639, 24939. 
vulgaris, 24906. 



VI 



SEEDS \M» PLAN is [MPOB DED. 



PkylloMtachys h> mm is, 2 i . 6 1 

mil is. 24' 

quilioi, *__' 17" 

,/ , /;</, liminiii. 2 IC27, 2 16 
I'tin jtim lln tiiiisiiiii, 2 1907. 
mrilxitii. 2 1630. 
,././//.*. 24623. 
muricata, 2 m.l'h. 
pondt /".si/. 2 1626. 
•</./'// </-///» nm, 2 1659. 

u< /•</. 2 157 I. 
tin art*nw, 24893 to 24895, 24940. 
siititu in . 2 1599. 
Polygonum bistorta, 2 1925. 
Pomegranate, Bila Bab. 25004. 
Gourtmi, 25007. 
Hachiri. 25002. 
Bilou Abiade, 25005. 
Hilou Ahmar, 25003. 
Legrellei, 24825. 
Roman Eswed, 2500(5. 
(Russia), 24798, 24799. 
"seedless." 24576. 
Selimi, 25001. 
(Turkestan), 24572. 
(Turkey), 24576, 25001 to 
25007. 
Populus sp.. 24794. 
I'm a us arrru niaca, 21797. 

pst udo-cerasus, 25087. 
/',■ udotsuga taxifolia, 24628. 
Punica granatum, 24572, 24576, 24798, 
24799, 24825, 25001 to 25007. 

Qui reus suber, 24756. 

Elamboetan, 25163 to 25165. 

Rhamnus prinoides, 24713. 

Rh wm Bp., 24851. 

Rhubarb, medicinal (China), 24851. 

Ribes sp., 21 S01. 

Rice I Eawaii), 24441. 

(India), 25116, 25117. 

(Turk. >lan i. 24551, 24552. 
Rosa sp., 21608, 24921. 
Rosa rellena. See Rosa sp. 
Rose, yellow, 24921. 
Rubber, virgin, 24640. 

Sal I lower. See Carthamus tinctorius. 
Sainfoin. See Onobrychis viciaefolia. 
Sahola arbuscula, 24556. 
Sapindus saponaria, 24999. 
Sapium verum, 24640. 

162 



Sclerocarya caffra, 24762. 
Sesamum orientate, 24575, 24855. 
Solandra grandijlora, 24613. 
Solatium iii(imim>.sii in, 24650. 
marginatum, 25097. 
torvum, 2 165] . 
Sorghum, durra, brown, 24554, 24899. 
D/lui-ara. 24812. 
red, 24897. 

white, 24442, 24443, 
2455:;, 24910, 24996, 
24997. 
kafir, blackhull, 24971 to 24984. 

red, 21985 to 24989. 
kowliang, brown, 24478, 24990 

to 24995. 
milo, 24878. 24956 to 24964. 
dwarf, 24965 to 24970. 
Soy bean, black, 24642, 24643, 24675 to 
24689, 24706, 25118. 
brown, 24673, 25130, 25136. 
Eda. 25161. 

green. 24705, 24839, 25135. 
(India,. 24672 to 24690, 25118. 
mottled, 25137. 
Trenton, 24610. 

yellow, 24641, 24674, 24693 to 
24704, 24709, 24711, 24840, 
25131, 25133, 25134. 
Sporobolus argutus, 24648. 
Stizolobimn sp., 24657, 24766, 24922, 

24935, 24936, 25120. 
Strawberry (Chile), 24654 to 24656. 
Strychnos spinosa, 25170. 

Tagasaste. See Cytisus proliferus. 

Teff. See Eragrostis abyssinica. 
Thrinax barbadensis, 24615. 
floridana, 24593. 
morrisii, 24617. 
radiata, 24618. 
Titoki. See Alectryon excelsum. 
Trifolium lupinaster, 24458 to 24460, 24482 
24817, 24818. 
medium, 24461. 
pratense, 24926, 24929, 25066, 

25090, 25188 to 25190. 
repens, 24930, 25067. 
suaveolem, 24548 to 24550, 25177 . 
Trigonella foenum-graecum , 24898 . 
Tritimm sp., 24489, 24883, 24886. 

aestivum, 24605 to 24607, 24484, 
24486, 24819, 24845, 24884, 
24885. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES, ETC. 



73 



Tritieum durum, 24649, 24481, 24483, 
24485, 24487, 24488, 24490, 
to 24493, 24563. 
monococcum, 24903. 

Vangueria infausta, 25171. 

Velvet bean. See Bean, Florida velvet. 

Vetch, common. See Vicia saliva. 

two-seeded. See Vicia dis per ma. 
woolly-pod. See Vicia biennis. 
Vicia amoena, 24464. 

biennis, 24585. 

cracca, 24462, 24463. 

dispcrina, 24586. 

faba, 24900. 

sativa, 24932. 

tenuifolia, 24465. 

unijuga, 24476. 
Vigna sescjui pedal is, 25148, 25149. 
162 



Vigna unguiculata, 24566, 2501<>. 25088, 

25144 to 25147. 
Virola surinamensis, 24998. 
Vitis vinifera, 21771 to 247!)3. 25008 to 
25015. 

Watermelon (Brazil), 25121 to 251:_'o. 
(Society Islands), 250'. 15. 
Wheat (Abyssinia), 24883 to 248H<i. 

(China), 24845. 

(Siberia), 24481, 24819. 

(Turkestan), 24483 to 24493, L'45ti3. 

(Turkey), 24605 to 24607. 
Wilson, E. H.. seeds secured, 24S45 to 

24851. 
Wood oil. See Aleuritesfordii. 

Zea mays, 24896. 
Zinziber officinale, 24438. 
Zizyphus sativa. 24573. 



o 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 168. 

* B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 
TO JUNE 30, 1909: 

INVENTORY No. 19;Nos. 25192 to 25717. 



Issued December 29, 1909. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

Th. tlpublh »f the Bureau of Plant Industry, whieh was orgaiilsed July 1, 

i.ullctii of which follows. 

tie publications in this i not forgeneral distribution. The 

Buperinti ' Printing Office, Washington, D. C.,- Is authorised by law to 

i ail applications for the <• bulletins Bhoulo be made, accompanied by a ]■ 
num. i amount, or bj Numbers omitted from this list can not be furnished. 

n of Lime and N i to Plant Growth. 1901. Price, lo cents. 

1 Fecundation of Zamia. 1901. 1 'rice, 20 cents. 
3. M;i. I'.HH. Price, 20 < el 

rovementln Arizona. 1901. Price. 10 cents. 
if American Varieties of Peppers. 1902. I 'rice, io cents. 
:. i •.. U erf in Durum w Price, 15 cents. 

tionof Fungi I i for Distribution, 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

ericanS] irtina. 1902. Trice, 10 cents. 

10. ! ution, etc. 1902. Trice, 10 cents, 

li. Johnson i 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

Improvement in Central Texas. 1002. Price, 10 cents. 
it. The Decay of Timber and Methods of Preventing It. 1902. Price, 65 cents, 
15. Forage Conditions on the Border of the Great Basin. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

17. Borne Di eases of the Cowpea. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

18. Observations on the Mosaic Disease of Tobacco. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
Kentucky Bluegrass Seed. 1902. Price, 10 cent >. 

Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
Injurious EtTects of Premature Pollination. 1902. Price, 1 cen t s . 

23. Berseem: The Great Forage and Soiling Crop of Nile Valley. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 
Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 
Spanish Almonds. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

28. The Mango in Porto Rico. ' 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern States. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. The " Bluing" of the Western Yellow Pine, etc. 1904. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of Spores in Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from S,eed. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

41. The Commercial Grading of Corn. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

42. Three New Plant Introductions from Japan. 1903. Price 10 cents. 

43. Japanese Bamboos. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

44. The Bitter-Rot of Apples. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

45. Physiological Role of Mineral Nutrients in Plants. 1903. Price, 5 cents. 

46. Propagation of Tropical Fruit Trees and Other Plants. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

49. The Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice: Its Uses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

53. The Date Palm. 1904. Price, 20 cents. 

54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

55. The Dry-Rot of Potatoes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

56. Nomenclature of the Apple. 1905. Price, 30 cents. 

57. Methods Used for Controlling Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

58. The Vitality and Germination of Seeds. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

59. Pasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

61. The Avocado in Florida. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

63. Investigations of Rusts. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

64. Method of Destroying Algae 1 ; etc. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

65. Reclamation of Cape Cod Sand Dunes. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

66. Seeds and Plants Imported. Inventory No. 10. 1905. Price, 20 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Price, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Pear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

79. Variability of Wheat Varieties in Resistance to Toxic Salts. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

80. Agricultural Explorations in Algeria. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

81. Evolution of Cellular Structures. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

82. Grass Lands of the South Alaska Coast. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

83. The Vitality of Buried Seeds. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

84. The Seeds of the Bluegrasses. 1905. Price. 5 cents. 

85. Principles of Mushroom Growing and Mushroom Spawn Making. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

86. Agriculture without Irrigation in the Sahara Desert. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

87. Disease Resistance of Potatoes. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

88. Weevil-Resisting Adaptations of the Cotton Plant. 1906. Price, 10 cents. 

[Continued on page 3 of cover.] 
168 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 168. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 
TO JUNE 30, 1909: 

INVENTORY No. 19; Nos. 25192 to 25717. 



Issued December 29, 1909. 



LfBp 

NEW \ 
BG7 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1909. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Assistant Chief of Bureau, Albert F. Woods. 
Editor. J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk. James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 
scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett, Albert Mann, George W. Oliver, Walter Van Fleet, and Peter Bisset, Experts. 

Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer. 

H. V. Harlan, H. C. Skeels, and R. A. Young Assistants. 

Edward Goucher and P. J. Wester, Assistant Propagators. 

168 
2 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



IU. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. C, October 1, 1909. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin No. 168 of the series of this Bureau the accom- 
panying manuscript, entitled " Seeds and Plants Imported during the 
Period from April 1 to June 30, 1909: Inventory No. 19; Nos. 25192 
to 25717." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to pub- 
lication. 

Respectfully, B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 
Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

168 3 



CONTEXTS. 



Page. 

Introductory statement . 7 

Inventory 9 

Index of common and scientific names 43 

168 5 



B. P. I.— 518. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909: 
INVENTORY NO. 19; NOS. 25192 TO 25717. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

The material listed in this nineteenth inventory of seeds and plants 
imported was secured almost entirely through friends and correspond- 
ents abroad and by the efforts of coworkers in this country. No agri- 
cultural explorers were in the field during the time covered, although 
three varieties of alfalfa and one of clover secured by Professor 
Hansen in central Asia are included here, having arrived too late for 
the last inventory, and as this inventory goes to press Mr. Frank N. 
Meyer is on his way to Chinese Turkestan, where he goes in search of 
hardy fruits, forage crops, and grains. 

The following are some of the more important items in this in- 
ventory : 

A collection of named German and other European varieties of 
alfalfa (Nos. 25193, 25191, 25257, and 25264 and following numbers) 
has been secured for the work in Plant Life History Investigations. 

Following the example of Louisiana and Hawaii, it is hoped that 
some valuable work can be done for the newly opened region in 
southern Texas with a fine collection of sugar-cane hybrids recently 
received at the South Texas Garden from the Harvard Botanic Station 
in Cuba (Nos. 25225 to 25212). 

A remarkable eucalvpt hybrid (No. 25216) which comes true from 
seed, an acquisition from Algeria, should be of value to growers of 
these trees in California. 

A clover and three varieties of alfalfa, previously mentioned (No. 
25276 and following numbers), were secured through Prof. N. E. 
Hansen on his central Asian journey, but arrived too late to be 
grouped with the forage crops described in the last inventor}'. 

The specialists in cereals of the Department of Agriculture and the 
state experiment stations making oat trials will undoubtedly find some 
good material in the collections from Spain, Italy, and Koumania (No. 
25317 and following numbers, No. 25351 and following numbers, and 
No. 25580 and following numbers). 

168 7 



8 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

Africa, the reputed home of the Borghum, has again contributed its 
quota for experiments in the Southwest in seventeen varieties from 
Togo (No. 25328 and following numbers). 

A wild red raspberry (No. 25466) from the Philippines is considered 
a possibility for breeding a desirable form for the South or for our 
tropical poss< ssions. 

Mr. Husbands, of Limavida, Chile, has again sent the Department 
a collection of forest and ornamental trees and shrubs, together with 
forage crops and muskmelons adapted to the Pacific .slope (No. 25470 
and following numbers; No. 25611 and following numbers). 

Another collection of muskmelons (No. 25538 and following num- 
bers), consisting of extra-choice winter varieties adapted to California 
conditions, has been received from the American vice-consul at Valen- 
cia. Spain. 

A curious rubber plant (No. 25547), only recently described, has been 
secured from Angola. West Africa. It is a slow-growing desert type in 
which the rubber is stored up in turnip-shaped underground roots. It 
will be used for trials in methods of rapid propagation and selection. 

Nine varieties of rice from Trinidad (No. 25596 and following 
numbers) may prove valuable for the work of the Hawaii Agricultural 
Experiment Station. 

Manchuria has contributed ten more varieties of soy beans (No. 
25649 and following numbers) secured through the American consul 
at Newchwang. 

Collections of cereals, legumes, and sorghums from Abyssinia (No. 
25666 and following numbers) and tropical legumes from Bomba} 7 , 
India (No. 25704 and following numbers), have added materially to 
the list of plants available for trial in the South. 

This nineteenth inventory contains 526 separate introductions, cov- 
ering the quarter beginning April 1 and ending June 30, 1909. The 
material included was determined by Messrs. W. F. Wight and H. C. 
Skeels, while the manuscript was prepared by Miss Mary A. Austin. 

David Fairchlld, 
Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. C, September 7, 1909. 

168 



INVENTORY 



25192. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Tulare, Cal. Grown by Mr. J. T. Bearss, of the agricultural substation. 
Presented by Director E. J. Wickson, through Mr. J. M. Westgate. Received 
April 1, 1909. 

"This was grown from S. P. I. No. 1151, which was secured in Kopal, Siberia. 
It is considered to be the best variety of Turkestan alfalfa tested by the California 
experiment station. It has variegated flowers, as do commercial sand lucern, Grimm 
alfalfa, and several other hardy valuable strains." ( Westgate.) 

25193. aIedicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bargen, Baden, Germany. Secured from Mr. Adam Joos, Bargen, near 
Sinsheim, Baden, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received April 1, 1909. 

Alt-Deutsche Frdnkische luzerne. "This seed was grown in the valley of the Elsenz, 
a tributary of the Neckar. It is the practice in this section to leave either the first 
or second growth for the seed. When the first is left, harvesting is done in August. 
Mr. Joos states that old stands serve better for seed-producing purposes than young. 
Concerning the old German variety he says: 'This variety of clover is at home with 
us; it has already been cultivated for centuries.' " (Brand.) 

25194. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bavaria, Germany. Secured from Gutsbesitzer Heil, Tiickelhausen, near 
AViirzburg, Bavaria, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received April 1, 1909. 
Alt-Deutsche FrdnMsche luzerne. "(P. L. H. No. 3437.) In the section from which 
this seed was procured, lucern left for seed is cut with the scythe, bound by hand 
into small bundles, and shocked. The second cutting is always used for seed pro- 
duction." (Brand.) 

25195. Actinidia arguta (S. & Z.) Planch. 

From Taracol, Unsan, Korea. Presented by Mr. J. D. Hubbard, metallurgist 
for the Oriental Consolidated Mining Company. Received April 1, 1909. 

"Seeds of the Korean ' tara,' or wild fig. In its wild state here the tara plant is 
a wonderfully tough and wiry vine that will climb up trees sometimes to a height of 
30 feet. The fruit has a green skin and is the size of a date when ripe. The flavor 
is different from any fruit I ever tasted, and I come from California, the ' land of 
fruit.' I do not think the vines bear the first year, but after that profusely." 
(Hubbard. ) 

25196. Citrus nobilis x auraxtitjm. Orange. 

From Algiers, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, botanist to the Govern- 
ment of Algeria, through Mr. Walter T. Swingle. Received April 5, 1909. 

Clementine. Budsticks procured for grafting purposes. 

"This new variety of tangerine orange is said to be very mild and to be a very 
bright red color. It was found in North Africa by Doctor Trabut and is considered 
by him to be a very promising novelty." (Swingle. ) 

11676— Bull. 168—09 2 9 



K) SEEDS AND I' I. A NTS tMPORTED. 

25197. Stebolobn M sp. 

,,,, Homestead, Fla. Presented by Mr! Thomas Brewer, through Mr. P. J. 

Wester, in charge, Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla. Received April 2, 1909. 

"I have originated a white velvel bean which has taken me four years to perfecl 

from one lone w hite bean, and I think there is a great future for it, as this variety is 

1 to eal cooked like lima beans, and four times as prolific. The beans seem to be 

more domesticated and a better strain than the old dog tick velvet beans, and I 

think will take their place entirely when introduced." Brewer.) Similar to 

S. P [. No. 2471 

25198 to 25203. Mamiiot spp. Cassava. 

From Brazil. Presented by Mr. William Hope, Washington, D. ('., through 
Mr. W. W. Tracy, -r. Received March 24, L909. Numbered April 5, 1909. 

25198. Mecadena. 25201. Puereca. 

25199. Miguel Preto. 25202. Taresa. 

25200. Picuhy. 25203. Bahiana. 

25204 to 25219. 

From Bremen, Germany. Presented by l>r. George Bitter, director, Botanical 
Garden. Received March 26, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25204. Chloris submutica II. B. K. 

Distribution. — A native grass of Mexico, extending north as far as San Luis 
Potosi. 

25205. Erodium semenovii Reg. & Herd. 

Distribution. — An annual plant, found in the valley of the Volga River and 
on the borders of the Caspian Sea in southeastern Russia. 

25206 and 25207. Festuca elatior L. 

25208 and 25209. Festuca elatior arundinacea (Schreb) Celak. 

25210 and 25211. Festuca spectabilis Jan. 

Distribution. — A native of the mountainous regions of central Europe, extend- 
ing from the Tyrol into Croatia and Dalmatia. 

25212. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 
Brown. 

25213. Melilotus messanensis (L. ) All. 

Distribution.— An annual plant, found in the countries bordering on the 
Mediterranean Sea. 

25214. Melilotus suaveolens Ledeb. (?) 

25215. Melilotus wolgica Poir. 

Distribution. — A native of the southern part of Russia. 

25216. Melilotus sp. 

25217. Phalaris minor Retz. 

Distribution. — A native of the countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea, 
and cultivated or introduced in central Europe. 

25218. Phaseolus vulgaris L. 

25219. Phleum paniculatum Huds. 

Distribution. — An annual grass, native of the countries of southern Europe f 
and extending east to Persia and Afghanistan. 

168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. H 

25221. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Rocky Ford, Colo. Grown by Mr. P. K. Blinn in 1907. Received 
through Mr. J. M. Westgate, fall of 1908. 

Guaranda. " Grown from No. 14972. Seventeen ounces of seed was secured from 
50 individual plants, 6 months old, grown in cultivated rows 20 inches apart with 
the plants 20 inches apart in the rows." ( Westgate.) 

25222 and 25223. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Chillicothe, Tex. Grown by Mr. A. B. Conner, season of 1908. Received 
through Mr. J. M. Westgate, fall of 1908. 

25222. " Grown from No. 12549. This alfalfa while not quite so hardy as 
ordinary western-grown alfalfa produces excellent yields of. hay and seed 
in places where it does not winterkill." ( Westgate. ) 

25223. Guaranda. "Grown from No. 14972. The heaviest seeding strain 
of any under test in the alfalfa nursery at Chillicothe." ( Westgate.) 

25224. Hippeastrum vittatum (L'Her.) Herbert. 

From Washington, D. C. Transferred to the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant 
Introduction by Mr. E. M. Byrnes, superintendent of Gardens and Grounds, 
United States Department of Agriculture, April 1, 1909. 

"Two-year-old hybrids, the result of crosses made by Mr. Byrnes in the spring of 
1907 between a few unnamed varieties of different shades of color and markings. 
The bulbs are regarded by Mr. Byrnes as exceptionally large sized for their age and 
those which have bloomed so far as a decided improvement over the parents." 

( W. Fischer. ) 

25225 to 25242. Saccharum officixarum L. Sugar cane. 

From Central Soledad, Cienfuegos, Cuba. Presented by Mr. Robert M. Grey, 
Harvard Botanical Experiment Station. Received at the South Texas Gar- 
den, Brownsville, Tex., February 18, 1909. Numbered April 7, 1909. 

Descriptive notes on the following by Mr. E. C. Green: 

25225. Barbados So. 109 9 X Ribbon $. 

(Harvard No. 1.) (S. T. G. No. 2005.) Dark cream to brown; average 
length of joints 3 inches; average length of canes 4 feet 3 inches, diameter 
1 inch. 

25226. Barbados No. 109 9 X Ribbon $ . 

(Harvard No. 5.) (S. T. G. No. 2006.) Dark cream to brown; average 
length of joints 3| inches; average length of canes 3 feet 6 inches, diameter 1^ 
inches. 

25227. Barbados No. 109 9 X Ribbon $ . 

(Harvard No. 12.) (S. T. G. No. 2007.) Dark cream to brown; average 
length of joints 3£ inches; average length of canes 4 feet, diameter \\ inches. 

25228. Demarara No. 95 9 X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 15.) (S. T. G. No. 2008.) Yellow to dark green; average 
length of joints 2| inches; length of canes 4 feet, diameter 1 inch. 

25229. Demarara No. 95 9 X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 16.) (S. T. G. No. 2009.) Dark red; very stout; average 
length of joints 4 inches; average length of canes 4 feet 6 inches, diameter 1|- 
inches. 

168 



[2 \Nl' PLANTS i.Ml'Mi; I 1.1). 

25225 to 25242 ( ontinued. 

">2;*<>. ' llina. 

Harvard So L7.) S. T. G. No. 2010.) Dark red; very stout; prominent 
,,, .-Mi of joi inches; average length of canes 2 feet 6 

inches, diameter l i inch< 

25231. Harvard No. 208 Ribbon. 

Harvard No. 22. 8. T. G. No. 2011. ) Dark red; stout; joints 3 J inch 
canes av< feet in length, diameter I | inch 

25232. Ja a No. 5] • Java No. 51. 

(Harvard No.36. I (S.T.G. No. 2012.) Yellow to dark brown tinted with 
green; joints 3| inches long; average length of canes 5 feel 6 inches, diameter 
1 inch. 

25233. Java No. 51 X Java No. 51. 

1 [arvard No. 45. ) f S. T. I r. No. 2021. ) Red with yellow; joints 3$ inches 
Long; prominent nodes; canes 4 feet long, diameter 1 inch. 

25234. Barbados No. 109 9 X Ribbon g. 

( 1 [arvard No. 48. ) (S. T. G. No. 2022. ) Yellow; very stout; joints 3$ inches 
long; canes 2 feet long, diameter \h inches. 

25235. Caledonia Queen Y, Crystallina. 

Harvard No. 73.) (S. T. G. No. 2015.) Dark red; exceptionally stout; 
joints .'!j inches long; length of canes 4 feet 3 inches, diameter 1£ inches. 

25236. Barbados No. 109 X Crystallina. 

Harvard No. 75.) (S. T. G. No. 2016.) Light green with yellow tints; 
joints al inches long; canes 4 feet long, stocky, diameter f inch. 

25237. Barbados No. 109 X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 76.) (S. T. G. No. 2017.) Light green with yellow tints; 
joints 2\ inches long; canes 2 feet long, stocky, diameter If inches. 

25238. Barbados No. 109 X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 77.) (S. T. G. No. 2018.) Light green with yellow tints; 
joints 4 inches long; canes 2J feet long, diameter 1 inch. 

25239. Crystallina X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 198.) (S. T. G. No. 2019.) Dark red; joints 6 inches long; 
canes 5 feet long, diameter 1 inch. 

25240. Crystallina X Crystalline 

I [arvard No. 208.) (S. T. G. No. 2020. ) Yellow with green stripes; joints 
5 inches long; canes average 5 feet 3 inches. 

25241. Java No. 51 X Java No. 51. 

(Harvard No. 37.) (S. T. G. No. 2013.) Dark red tinged with yellow; 
joints 6 inches long and very stout; length of canes 4 feet, diameter 1J inches. 

25242. Barbados No. 109 X Crystallina. 

(Harvard No. 39.) (S. T. G. No. 2014.) Dark red; joints 5 inches long, 
stout; canes 4 feet long, diameter 1 \ inches. 

25243. Tbiticum aesttvum L. Wheat. 

From Seoul, Korea. Presented by Mr. Thomas Sammons, American consul- 
general. Received April 7, 1909. 

'The Korean variety of wheat, although very poor, grows well." {Summons.) 
168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 13 

25244. Medicago satita L. Alfalfa. 

From Alma, Xebr. Grown in the summer of 1908 by Mr. Conrad Boehler. 
Received through Mr. J. M. Westgate, April 7, 1909. 

Grimm. "A field of ordinary alfalfa was in bloom alongside of the field from 
which this seed was obtained, and some cross-pollination may have taken place." 
( Westgate. ) 

25245. Anacardium occidentale L. Cashew. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. H. F. Schultz. Received 
April 8, 1909. 

A yellow-fruited variety. See No. 5205 for description. 

Distribution. — A small tree, native of Tropical America, extending from Brazil north 
to Mexico and the West Indies. Cultivated and naturalized in India and other 
tropical countries. 

25246. Eucalyptus trabuti Vilmorin. 

From Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, government botanist, Mustapha- 
Alger, Algeria. Received April 7, 1909. 

"A hybrid of E. botryoides X rostrata. Tree very vigorous, wood very good, growth 
rapid, stem straight and high. Comes true to seed." {Trabut.) 

25247 to 25250. Ipomoea spp. 

From Miami, Fla. Procured from Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical 
Garden. Received April 8, 1909. 

Seed of each of the following. Procured for experiments being made by Prof. H. J. 
Webber, Cornell University, Ithaca, X. Y. 

25247. Ipomoea sinuata Ortega. 

Distribution. — A native of the sandy shores from Georgia to Texas, and ex- 
tending south through Central America into Brazil; also in the West Indies. 

25248. Ipomoea jalapa (L. ) Pursh. 

Distribution. — A native of America, being found on the sandy shores along 
the coast from South Carolina to Florida and in Mexico and the West Indies. 

25249. Ipomoea setosa Ker. 

Distribution. — A native of Brazil, and also found in Jamaica, probably 
introduced. 

25250. Ipomoea sp. 

" Found growing on wet land in the neighborhood." {Wester.) 

25252. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From a highland valley near Cuzco, Peru (11,500 feet). Presented by Mrs. 
Harriet Chalmers Adams, Washington, D. C. February, 1909. 

" Red corn of the Quichuas." {Adams. ) 

25253. Pelargonium odoratissimum (L.) Ait. Rose geranium. 

From Valencia, Spain. Presented by Mr. J. L. Byrne, American vice and 
deputy consul, at the request of Mr. R. M. Bartleman, American consul, 
Madrid, Spain. Received April, 1909. 

"There is only one variety of the rose geranium cultivated in this region for its 
perfume. Judging from inquiries occasional! y received at this consulate from Ameri- 

1G8 



11 BE! DS \M> PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25253 Continued. 

c-:m horticulturists and perfumers, it would appear thai an impression prevails in 
the United States thai thi anium employed in the famous essence manufac- 

tory near this cit) ie a Bpecial variety peculiar to the district. Such, however, is 
n,,t th< . but the plants raised in the vicinity of Valencia have been distin- 

guished from time immemorial by the intensity of their fragrance and the quantity of 
utial «'i! they yield, qualities which undoubtedly depend t<» some extent on local 
climatic and soil conditions, as the same geranium transplanted t<> other European 
countries, and even to other regions of Spain itself, loses considerably in this respect. 
The plants used in the purfume distillery are grown close to the sea on soil bo ex- 
tremely Ughl and sandy thai in some places it looks like a continuation of the sea- 
Bhore." ( Byrru . i 

25254. Stizolobium sp. 

Prom Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received April, 1909. 

This is widely cultivated in Hokkaido. The Useful Plants of Japan has to say: 
'Murium capitata Wight et Arn., Jap. Osharahu-mame, Hassho-mame; an annual legu- 
minous climber cultivated in common dry land. The young soft grains are eaten 
boiled and have a taste of Viciafaba L., but this bean contains a poisonous ingredi- 
ent in a slight quantity; so it is advisable to eat moderately.' " ( Ypkohama Nursery 
( 'ompany.) 

Note. — The above seed was sent in as Mucuna capitata; hence the description. 

25255. Phaseolus angularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. 

< rrown at Arlington Farm, Virginia, season of 1908. Received in the fall of 1908. 

"Grown from Agros. No. 0516. This seed was received from the Tokyo Botanical 
Garden in 1907. The seed is a pale-straw color or nearly white, much lighter than 
any other variety yet obtained." (C. V. Piper.) 

25256. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received April 
10, 1909. 

Stringless. Mottled reddish brown. 

25257. Mbdicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bargen, Baden, Germany. Secured from Mr. Adam Joos, Bargen, near 
Sinsheim, Baden, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received April 12, 1909. 

Pfalzer Inzerne. "This seed was grown in the Bavarian Rhine Palatinate. (P. L. H. 
No. 3438.)" {Brand.) 

25258. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

From Sebenico, Dalmatia, Austria. Presented by Mr. Carlo Ruggeri. Received 
April 7. L909. 

25259 and 25260. 

From Palestine. Presented by Mr. E. F. Beaumont, Jerusalem, Palestine. 
Received April 10, 1909. 

25259. A vena sativa L. Oat. 
From Plain of Sharon, near Jaffa. 

25260. Hordecm sp. Barley. 
From mountain countrv around Jerusalem. 

16S 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 15 

25261 and 25262. Stizolobii jm spp. 

From Saig< >n, Cochin China. Presented by the director of the Botanical Garden, 
through Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American consul. Received April 12, 1909. 

25261. Florida velvet bean. 

25262. 

Black seeded. 

25263. Stizolobium sp. 

From Calcutta, India. Presented by Mr. William H. Michael, consul-general, 
who procured them from the Reporter of Economic Products to the Govern- 
ment of India. Received April 13, 1909. 

"These were collected from wild plants in the neighborhood of Calcutta, but the 
Mucuna (Stizolobium) can not be said to be cultivated here." (Michael.) 

25264 to 25266. 

From province of Saxony, Germany. Secured from Mr. Ludwig Pfoh, Ober- 
^ Inspector des Ritterguts, Zdschen, near Merseburg, Germany, through Mr. 
Charles J. Brand. Received April 12, 1909. 

25264. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Alt-Deutsche Frarikische luzerne. 

25265. Medicago sativa varia (Mart) Urb. Sand lucern. 

25266. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 

This sample of German red clover was grown from seed originally produced 
in Wiirttemberg. 

25267 and 25268. Medicago spp. 

From Berlin, Germany. Secured from Metz & Co., Steglitz, near Berlin, Ger- 
many, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received April 13, 1909. 

25267. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 
Grown in Germany. (P. L. H. No. 3454. ) 

25268. Medicago sativa varia (Mart) Urb. Sand lucern. 

Bohemian. 

25269 and 25270. Medicago sativa L. . Alfalfa. 

From Bucharest, Roumania. Secured from the Ministry of Agriculture, Indus- 
try, Commerce, & Domains of Roumania, through Mr. E. W. Jenkins, Dover, 
Del. Received April 12, 1909. 

"Both of these samples of seed were grown on the model farms conducted by the 
experiment station for the selection and breeding of cereals of the Roumanian 
Government/' (C. J. Brand.) 

25269. Was grown on the model farm "Studina," at Frasinet. 

25270. Was grown on the model farm "Laza," which is located at Vasluiu. 

25274. Litchi chinensis Sonner. Leitchee. 

From Fuchau, China. Received through Mr. Samuel L. Gracey, American 
consul, at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., March 30, 1909. 

For previous introductions, see No. 23202, etc. 

Distribution. — Native and cultivated in the southeastern part of China; also culti- 
vated in India. A few plants of the species are reported as growing in the West 
Indies. 

168 



If, \M» PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25276. Ti:u OUT M 81 w EOl I NS Willd. 

in. Procured by Prof. N. E. Hansen, of the Agricul- 
tural i rimenl Station, Brookings, S. Dak., in 1 0<»s, while traveling as an 
expl< Department of Agriculture. Received April L2, 

25277 to 25279. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

in Turkestan. Procured from Mr. II. W. Durrschmidt, Tashkent, Turkestan, 
1>\ Pro]'. V E. Hansen, of tin- Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, 
8. Dak., in L908, while traveling as an agricultural explorer for the Depart- 
menl of Agriculture. Received February 23, L909. 

25277. Aulieata. 

25278. Khiva. Polished by machine. 

25279. Vernoe. 

Vote. \ previous shipment of alfalfa (No. 23203), received under the name 
I '. noi , <>r Tschilik, is presumably the same variety ami from the same location 
as tin- above. 
•'The Aulieata is from Aulieata, Semireehensk, north of Tashkent. The Vernoe 
is from Vernoe. Semirechensk, 600 versts northeast of Tashkent." (Hansen.) 

52280. Pisum aiiv knse L. Field pea. 

From Nephi, Utah. Presented by Mr. F. D. Farrell, assistant agronomist, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Logan, Utah. Received April 19, 1909. 

were grown in 1908, from seed obtained from Colorado. Variety not 
known. Best yielding variety in 1908." (Farrell.) 

25281. Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd. Divi-divi. 

From Rio Hacha, Colombia. Presented by Sr. Jose Bolivar Nunez. Received 

April 17, 1909. 
e No. 23335 for description. 

Distribution. — A tree found in the southern part of Mexico, in the vicinity of 
Tehauntepec, and in Venezuela and the islands of Jamaica, Trinidad, and Haiti. 

25309. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received April 21, 1909. 

•• Tenshin blood peach." 
25315. Zinzibeb officinale Rose. Ginger. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Prof. A. T. <iage, superintendent, 
Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta. Received April 23, 1909. 

Procured for Dr. R. H. True's experiment-. 

25316. PlNTJS GERABDIANA Wall. 

From Fort Sandeman, Baluchistan. Procured from Lieut. Col. G. C. Trench, 
I. A., political agent in Zhob. Received April 22, 1909. 

See Xo. 21819 for description. 
168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 17 

25316— Continued. 

Distribution. — A large tree, native to the dry interior valleys of the Himalaya Moun- 
tains in the northern part of India and Afghanistan, rising to an elevation of 12,000 
feet. 

25317 and 25318. Avexa sativa L. Oat. 

From Madrid, Spain. Presented by Mr. R. M. Bartleman, American consul. 
Received April 22, 1909. 

Seed of the following: 

25317. " Spanish oats, first quality." 

25318. "Spanish oats, second quality." 

25319. Ayexa sativa L. Oat. 

From Toscana, Italy. Presented by Mr. Willy Midler, Hortus Xucerensis, 
Xocera Inferiore, Italy. Received April 16, 1909. 

"First quality oats." 

25320 to 25323. Avexa sativa L. Oat. 

From Spain. Presented by Don Emillano Lopez, Murcia, Spain. Received 
April 15, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25320. Hungria. 25322. Lioscoln. 

25321. Kirsche. 25323. Gigante. 

25324 to 25326. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

From Valencia, Spain. Presented by Escuela Pratica de Agricultura, at the re- 
quest of Hon. Charles S. Winans, American consul. Received April 22, 1909. 

25327. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Hamburg, Germany. Secured from R. Liefman Sons, Successors, through 
Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received April, 24, 1909. 

Alt-Deutsche Frankische luzerne. 
25328 to 25344. 

From the district Sansane-Mangu, in the northern part of Togo, German West 
Africa. Presented by Doctor Meyer, Governor of Togo. Received April 
7, 1909. 

The following seeds collected December 28, 1908. Quoted notes by the collector; 
descriptions of varieties by Mr. Carleton R. Ball. 

25328 to 25342. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. 

25328. "Native name Aparhu fofoL Grown on the lighter sandy 
soils of the grass steppe. An early variety, ripening in 4 months; 2 
or 3 meters high." Variety ovulifer Hack., form I, with black 
glumes and white seeds. Almost identical with S. P. I. Xo. 18180. 

25329. " Native name Aparhu (rot). On light sandy soils. An early 
variety, growing 2 or 3 meters high." Variety ovulifer Hack., form 
II, with black glumes and reddish brown seeds. Equivalent to S. P. 
I. Xo. 18198. 

11676— Bull. 168—09 3 



1 s \M> r \> UPOB I El 

25328 to 25344 Continued. 

38 to itinued. 

25; idyiba (rol , Lighter sandy soils containing 

bh 2 to 3 in- tt i ~ high. \ late variety, ripening in 6 months. 

Used forflourand beer." Variety ovulifer Hack., form VI. (Jinnies 
dark reddish brown. Equivalen! to S. P. I. No. L81 

25331. "Native name Adyiba (weiss). From same soil as preceding 
r. I. No. 25330 , and same description applies to it." Variety 

Hack., form I, with black glumes and Beeds white with a 

Blight ycllowi- je. 

25332. ''Native name Banambo. Light sandy soils. Differs from 
preceding in color of seeds. More commonly used for flour making. 
Ripens in <l months." Variety ovulifei Hack., form [, with black 
glumes and seeds white with a slight yellowish tinge. 

25333. ''Native name Tyertiyenyark. Light clay and sandy soils; 3 
meters high. An early variety used for flour. Kij»ens in 5 months 
Same as No. 25330; equivalent to S. P. I. No. 1M90. 

25334. ''Native name Soch (Sopienge). Light clay and sandy soils. 
Grows 2 to :; meters high. An early variety, ripening in 4 months. 
[Jsed for flour because of the very white seed coats." Variety 
elegans Kcke. White seeded. 

25335. "Native name Somong. Soils as in Togo No. 6 (S. P. I. No. 

25333). (irows 2 to '■'> meters high. Early ripening sort with white 
seeds like Togo No. 7 (S. P. I. No. 25334)." Variety elegant Kcke. 
A red-seeded form equivalent to S. P. I. No. 18196. 

25336. ''Native name Langpategu. Soils as in No. 6 (S. P. I. No. 

25333). Heads shorter and more compact than in the preceding 
forms; white hulled. An early variety used for making beer and 
flour. The most prized variety of the Moba people." Represents 
the variety intermedius B. & P. Remarkable for its bluish gray seed; 
somewhat like a New Era cowpea in color. 

25337. "Native name Pebate. Grows 3 to 4 meters high. A late 
ripening variety, requiring 6 months to mature." Variety elegans 
Kcke., having shorter, blunter, and more compressed glumes. 

25338. "Native name Tanyou (lila)." Variety intermedius B. & P. 
Very similar to S. P. I. No.' 25336. 

25339. " Native name Nyumbayone bimle (Doppelfrucht). Originally 
from Haut Senegal, Guinea. In this variety the black glumes con- 
tain always 2 kidney-shaped white seeds." Belongs apparently to 
variety elegans Kcke., but differs from all other forms in having 2 
seeds to each spikelet, a condition which occurs in a number of varie- 
ties from India. 

25340. "Native name Beninga (Pferdef utter). With specially hard- 
hulled seeds. Used for horse feed." Probably variety bicolor Kcke. 
Seeds pure white, equaled in length by the jet-black shining glumes, 
a form not previously reported from Togoland. - 

25341. "Native name EKpeto (gelb). Grows 3 to 4 meters high. A 
late ripening sort, requiring 7 months. The meal has a somewhat 
bitter taste." Belongs to variety Jcerstingianus, subvariety sulftireus 
B. & P. Remarkable for its sulphur-yellow seed. Equivalent to 
S. P. I. No. 18147. 

168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 19 

25328 to 25344— Continued. 

25328 to 25342— Continued. 

25342. "Native name Sotemondi. From light sandy soils; 3 meters 
high; a late ripening variety. The leaves contain a coloring matter 
used for cloth and leather; otherwise used only for chicken feed." 
Variety colorans Pilger. Seeds of this variety are used for producing 
a red color or by the addition of the leaves of certain trees they may 
be used for producing a black color. Equivalent to S. P. I. No. 18165. 

25343 and 25344. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

25343. "Native name Nyepe" (weiss). Grown on the lighter sandy 
soils; 1.5 meters high." 

25344. "Native name Nyepi (diinkel). Grown on the lighter sandy 
soils; 1 to 1.5 meters high." 

25347. Mucuna atropurpurea (Roxb.) DC. 

From Peradeniya, Ceylon. Presented by Dr. John C. Willis, director, Royal 
Botanic Garden. Received April 23, 1909. 

Distribution. — A woody climber, native of the plains of India and Ceylon. 

25350. Chalcas paniculatus L. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Botanic Gardens. 
Received April 30, 1909. 

" The wood is close grained, hard, white, and has been used for wood engraving." 
(Brandts, Forest Flora of India. ) 

Distribution. — A tree or shrub, native of southeastern Asia, where it rises to an 
elevation of 4,500 feet in the Himalaya Mountains, and of the Malay Archipelago 
and Australia. Cultivated in gardens as an ornamental in its native countries and 
in southern Florida and California; also used as a greenhouse plant. 

25351 to 25371. 

From Madrid, Spain. Presented by Dr. Luis Atrido y Ramos, director, Botanic 
Gardens. Received April 13, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25351. Avena ncda L. 

25352. Avena planicdlmis Schrad. 

Distribution. — A native of the meadows in the mountainous parts of southern 
Furope and Asia Minor. 
25353 to 25360. Avena sativa L. 
25361 to 25363. Avena stekilis L. 

Distribution. — A native of the Mediterranean region, found as a weed in 
cultivated fields. 

25364. Avena strigosa Schreb. 

Distribution. — A native of Europe and western Asia, cultivated and occur- 
ring as a weed in cultivated fields. 

25365 to 25367. Avena sp. 

25368. Deschampsia alpina (L.) R. & S 

Distribution. — A native of northern Europe, being found mostly along 
streams and on lake shores. 

1(38 



20 SEEDS ami PLANTS IMPOR1 ID. 

25351 to 25371 Continued. 

25369 to 25371. Deb BAMF81 \ tTBOPUBPUBEA i Wahlenb.) Scheele. 

Distribution. A native of arctic regions, extending from Alaska to Labra- 
dor, and in northern Europe and Siberia. 

25389 and 25390. A\ in \ 8ATIVA L. Oat. 

- \ ill.-. Spain. Presented by Mr. R. L. Sprague, American consul, 
Gibraltar, Spain. Received April 30, L909. 

25435. Leoythis usitata Miers. (?) Sapucaia nut. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Presented by Dr. E. 
Andre. Received May I, L909. 

Phia is the species which produces the well-known sapucaia nuts of commerce; 
it abounds in the island of Caripe and other parts of the province of Para (Brazil)." 
(/. Miers, Transactions, Linnsean Society, vol. SO, p. 208.) 

25436. Tumboa bainesii Hook. f. 

From German Southwest Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, government 
agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture, Pretoria, 
Transvaal, South Africa. Received May 1, 1909. 

\ peculiar and rare monotypic plant of the deserts of German Southwest Africa. 
The short stem produces at its swollen apex, besides the cotyledons, in its entire life- 
time only a single pair of yard-long ribbonlike leaves between which are borne the 
conelike inflorescences. The plant represents in its development (like Gnetum, see 

19093) a transition stage between the lower gymnosperms, like the pines, and 
the angiosperms, or flowering plants." (W.Fischer.) 

Distribution. — A native of the stony desert plains in the vicinity of Mossamedes 
and Cape Negro in Portuguese West Africa, and in Damara-land in German West 
Africa. 

Note. — This plant is the Wehvitschia miriabilis of the botanical text-books and is as 
yet not generally known to the general reader under the above Latin name. 

25437 to 25440. 

From China. Procured from Mr. H. J. Openshaw, Yachow, Szechwan Province, 
via Chungking, West China. Received March 3, 1909. 
The following seeds; Chinese names given by Mr. Openshaw. 

25437 and 25438. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

25437. Huang dou. Looks like Acme. 

25438. Lu dou. Very similar to Guelph. 

25439. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 
Wan dou. 

25440. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 
Behp'iai don. White. 

25464. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Yokohama, Japan. Purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
Received May 5, 1909. 

Makuwa-uri. 

168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 21 

25464— Continued. 

" This is produced much in the village Makuwa, in the province of Mino, whence 
the name is derived. The male and female flowers are grown separately on the 
same vine. The fruits ripen in midsummer. They are oval shaped, about 5 inches 
long, and of a yellow color, with longitudinal stripes. They are eaten 1 or 2 days 
after having been collected, and are very sweet and delicious. There are several 
varieties of different colors and forms." {Yokohama Nursery Company.) 

25465. Melilotus indica (L.) All. Melilot. 

From King Island. Presented by Mr. Henry S. Baker, American consul, 
Hobart, Tasmania. Received April 20, 1909. 

This yellow-flowered melilot, which has made for itself such an enviable reputa- 
tion in the improvement of the soil of King Island, was introduced there supposedly 
from the mattresses left on the shore by sailors or washed up on the beach from 
wrecks of vessels along the coast. 

Mr. Henry D. Baker, American consul, Hobart, Tasmania, has furnished the 
following information about its usefulness on King Island: 

Melilot has in the last few years transformed the island, which seemed 
absolutely barren or given up to worthless vegetation, including chiefly bracken 
fern and ti-tree scrub, Tussock grasses and rushes, into what is now the most profit- 
able grazing and fattening area in Australasia. It has grown even on raw white 
sand near the seashore, and in the course of 5 or 6 years has transformed the soil 
into rich, dark-brown, almost black loam, and made it capable of growing good 
crops of oats, lucern, etc. Land which half a dozen years ago was worth only a 
little over one dollar an acre now has an assessed valuation, where melilot is thriv- 
ing, of about 35 dollars an acre. 

Not until there had been severe fires over the island did the growth of melilot 
become luxuriant or have its usefulness recognized. The seed, encased in a hard 
shell, appears to germinate more quickly when this shell has been cracked open by 
fire. Farmers, in securing a stand of melilot on new ground, sow the seed in the 
scrub and bracken ferns late in the fall or winter and then burn off the brush. 
This burning of the brush adds potash to the soil and covers the seed, and also im- 
proves the germination, as stated previously. If a rain follows the fire, the seed 
usually germinates quickly and an excellent growth is secured. 

This melilot is strictly an annual and dies off each year, the practice being to burn 
the old stems in January and February. This burning clears the soil of rubbish, and 
the stand of melilot becomes more perfect each season. 

Melilot, in the latter part of November, was on the average about 3 feet high. 
Cut for hay about the middle of December, it makes splendid feed and all stock like 
it in this form. The estimated average yield of melilot in dry hay is 2\ tons per 
acre. Melilot-fed horses are of great size and strength, and have great endurance. 

Mr. Baker suggests that melilot might possibly be introduced to advantage on the 
sandy wastes along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States, where the 
climatic conditions are not unlike those of King Island, which is intercepted by the 
fortieth degree of south latitude and normally has a good rainfall. 

It would be a mistake to consider melilot better than alfalfa or other useful home 
fodders, its advantage being in its ability to redeem poor land. On very fertile soil 
in New South Wales and Victoria it has proved a rather baneful weed. 

25466. Rubus sp. Raspberry. 

From Bataan Mountains, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. 
Lyon, Gardens of Nagtajan, Manila, Philippine Islands. Received May 7, 1909. 
168 



si .! DS \M' PLANTS rMPORTED. 

25466 Continued. 

•■ v rather promising and prolific wild red raspberry. Ii was in fully ripe fruit 
March I and found at 3,700 feel altitude on dry, rocky, sterile ridges, should prove 
hardy. \ little dry (nol offensively so) and quite as showy as the besl garden 
l ihbert I ever recall seeing " I /.<<<* 

25467. SOLANI M ZUOOAGNIANUM Dtinal. 

Grown at .Miami. Ida., by Mr. P. .1. Wester, in charge, Subtropical Garden. 
Numbered for convenience in recording distribution, Mays, 1909. 

An herbaceous plant, growing about 2 feet high, with smooth, ovate, wavy- 
margined leaves on long petioles. The flowers are white, borne in clusters of 1 to 3 
or more, on short, drooping stems. The fruit is round, about ■_• inch in diameter, 
roughened and furrowed, becoming red when ripe. 

25468. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

Prom Madison, Wis. Purchased from the L. L. Olds Seed Company. Received 
May 8, 1909. 

Wisconsin Black. " This variety has proved to be one of the earliest growing in 
Wisconsin, but gives a relatively poor yield of seed and forage. \Vhile the records 
are somewhat incomplete, it is almost certainly the direct descendent of S. P. I. 
No. 5039." (C V. Piper.) 

25469. Okyza sativa L. Rice. 

From Canton, China. Presented by Mr. Leo Bergholz, American consul- 
general, at the request of Mr. Amos P. Wilder, American consul-general, 
Hongkong, China. Received May 8, 1909. 

Szemiu. " This is absolutely the best rice grown within this province." {Bergholz. ) 

25470 to 25504. 

From Chile. Received through Mr. Jose D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile, April 
27, 1909. 

Seed of each of the following. Quoted notes by Mr. Husbands. 

25470. Lapageria rosea R. & P. 

' ' Coigue. A comestible fruitand handsome evergreen vine, very like Copigue; 
strange flowers, medicinal; thrives in the shade on damp soil." 

Distribution. — An evergreen vine, found climbing over trees and shrubs in 
the woods about Concepcion and in the valley -of the Rio Itata, in Chile. 

25471. Acaena sp. 
"CadiOo." 

25472. Rumex romassa Remy. 

" A pest plant that will grow dry anywhere; the leaves are eaten like spinach; 
animals eat the leaves of this class from the south of Puerto Montt. Might 
serve to start vegetation in some barren place. Medicinal." 

Distribution. — An herbaceous plant, found growing around the villages and 
along the roadsides in the provinces of Chiloe' and Valdfvia, in Chile. 

25473. Greigia landbecki (Lechl. ) Philippi. 

" Chupones from Chiloe." 

Distribution. — A native of the mountainous coast of Chile, in the province of 
Valdivia. 

168 



A Mill I. 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 23 

25470 to 25504— Continued. 

25474. Salix humboldtiana Willd. 

"Wild willow; grows in the sand near rivers. Medicinal." 

Distribution. — A native of Central and South America, extending from 
southern Mexico through Colombia to Chile and Brazil. 

25475. ( Undetermined. ) 

"Forest trees from near Puerto Montt." 

25476. Greigia sphacelata (R. & P.) Regel. 

" Chupones from Valdivia." 

Distribution. — A native of damp, shady places in the vicinity of Concepcion, 
Chile. 

25477. Gunnera chilexsis Lam. 

" Pang ue, from Puerto Montt. Comestible by man and beast; ornamental; 
medicinal; needs very damp or wet soil or water." 

Distribution. — A large-leaved herbaceous perennial found in shallow water 
and swamps in Chile. 

25478. Sophora macrocarpa Smith. 

"Mayn. A treelet with large bunches of beautiful yellow flowers." 

Distribution. — A shrub or small tree, with racemes of yellow flowers, native 
of Chile. 

25479. Sophora tetrapteka J. Mill. 

u Pelu. One of the finest flowering forest trees; wood extra valuable; yellow 
flowers." 

Distribution. — A shrub or small tree, native of New Zealand, Lord Howe 
Island, Juan Fernandez, and Chile. Several varieties are in cultivation. - 

25480. Physalis sp. 

" Capuchinos. A wild, comestible hooded tomato; round; yellow; f to f 
inch in diameter; a smooth ball. Perennial." 

25481. Galega officinalis L. 

"Plant like alfalfa. Two plants found growing in a sand island of the river 
Mata Quita. The habits, growth, and flowers are like alfalfa; stems hollow 
and when cut plant grows again quickly; seed pods different. Has a large 
dense leaf growth. Cattle eat this, but not horses. I should like to know 
what would come of crossing this with alfalfa." 

25482. (Undetermined.) 

25483 and 25484. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

25483. "A wild sort from the cordillera; a single plant found in the 
midst of the woods. The same as cultivated sorts. Flowers very 
dark; might be so from the wood shade." 

25484. "Same as above (S. P. I. No. 25483); another plant in a dis- 
tant part." 

25485 and 25486. Trifolium hybridum L. Alsike clover. 

25485. "Crimson wild sort; beautiful." 

25486. "White wild sort," 

25487. Trifolium pratexse L. Red clover. 

"Pink, large, cone-shaped flowers; wild." 

168 



♦J 1 BE] DS \.\ D PL VNTS I \l PORTED. 

25470 to 25504 Continued. 

25488. Undetermined. ^.ste/acere.) 

\ perennial plant; whitish leaves; pink flowers; might serve as a Fodder 
plan i. Cattle and mules eat it; grows dry in pure sand aear vast river beds." 

25489. Crinodbndron patagua Molina. 

Patagua. A beautiful, evergreen shade tree; drooping, white, bell-shaped 
flowers; tree formed like a weeping \\ illow. Needs damp soil, beside running 
water, Bwamps, etc. Lumber lasts long dry. Bad for fuel wood." 

Distribution.— A medium-sized tree, growing in the low, swampy woods in 
the vicinity of Puchacayand Itata, and in the province of Maule, in Chile. 

25490. Eucryphia CORDIPOLIA Cav. 

•■ Ulmo is a hardy giant Chilean forest tree, known from Chile t<> Victoria as 
til in": farther smith to Valdivia, Chiloe, and in the far south it is called muermo. 
The wo«»d is hard, fine, and extra durable in water; is largely used for piles 
driven in the sea, in naval construction, furniture, the industries, etc. Its 
planks and knees are better than live oak for shipbuilding. The bark and 
scraped wood contain a great quantity of tannin and are largely used for tan- 
ning. The wood shavings are used anywhere that tannic acid is required 
instead of the acid itself. In combination with Huge ( Persea lingue) the ulmo 
has Bpecial merits for tanning. 

"As a tree ulmo is one of the largest and is extremely handsome; its dark, 
evergreen, lustrous leaves are so whitened underneath as to be very orna- 
mental. When in flower it is gloriously beautiful. The shape of its white 
flowers is similar to that of the apple or quince, about 2 inches in diameter. 
The entire tree is actually covered w r ith immense grand bunches of these flow- 
ers, forming an ideal fairy tree of snow, whose bloom is deliciously and in- 
comparably fragrant. 

"The ulmo is not particular as to soil, but, like linge, needs those that are 
very damp or wet; in fact, they always grow together as comrades, linge en- 
hancing the beauteous bloom of the ulmo upon its superbly dark evergreen 
leaves. ' ' 

Distribution. — A tall, white-flowered tree, native of the region around San 
Carlos, in Chile. 

25491 and 25492. Embothrium coccineum Forst. 

25491. From Puerto Montt. 

25492. From Chiloe. 

" Ciruelillu. A beautiful flowering tree; blossoms red." 
Distribution. — A native of the southern part of Chile. 
25493. Weinmannia trichosperma Cav. 
Tenia. 
Distribution. — A small tree, found in the region of San Carlos, in Chile. 

25494 to 25503. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

"All sweet; thick flesh; good size; grown dry on low lands where corn and 
watermelons dried up on account of the unusual drought. Melons grown 
with much less moisture than watermelons and have no diseases like the 
latter. Every number is a different kind." 

25504. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

L68 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1900. 25 

25505. Maxgifera indica L. Mango. 

From Miami, Fla. Received from Mr. P. J. Wester, in charge, Subtropical 

Garden, May 24, 1909. 

Gopalbhog. "The plant from which this inarch was taken was sent to the garden 
in 1906 by Mr. E. N. Reasoner, of the Royal Palm Nurseries, Oneco, Fla., who 
imported it from India in 1904." ( Wester. ) 

25506. Citrus decuman a (L.) Murr. Pomelo. 

From Amoy, China. Presented by Mr. Julean H. Arnold, American consul. 
Received at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal. April 10, 1909. 

Amoy. See No. 21870 for previous introduction and note. 

25507. Manihot dichotoma Ule. 

From Bahia, Brazil. Presented by Mr. Stevenson, agent of the Royal Mail 
Company. Received May 25, 1909. 

Manitoba de Jequie. 

"The Manitoba de Jequie differs from the Manihot glaziovii (Muell.) Arg. in hav- 
ing 3 to 5 lobed leaves, and longer seeds. The tree composes about half of the forest 
on many of the slopes of the mountains in its native region, and furnishes four to 
five hundred tons of rubber each year. The plant has only been known since 1901, 
and the cultivated plantations are just ready to be tapped for the first time." ( Ule, 
Trojjenpflanzer, vol. 11, p. 863. ) 

Distribution. — A tree, native of the mountainous region between the Rio Para- 
guassu and the Rio de Contas, in the eastern part of the province of Bahia, in 
Brazil. 

25508. Schoenocaulon officinale (Schlecht.) Gray. Sebadilla. 

From New York, N. Y. Presented by Lanman & Kemp, at the request of Dr. 
L. O. Howard, entomologist. Received May 20, 1909. 

See No. 24195 for description. 

Distribution. — A native of southern Mexico, in the vicinity of Zimapan, Orizaba, 
and Vera Cruz, and also of Guatemala and Venezuela. 

25509. Citrus decumana (L.) Murr. Pomelo. 

From Daunt, Cal. Presented by Mr. A. W. Patton, at the request of Mr. Carl 
Purdy, Ukiah, Cal. Received May 27, 1909. 

"This fruit is undoubtedly fine, but the tree has little or no history. It was put 
out by Mr. A. M. Coburn 10 or 12 years ago. He got the trees from Los Angeles. 
The only reason we can give for the fruit being extra good is the climatic conditions 
which prevail here in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains." (Patton.) 

25510. Astragalus sp. 

From Mongolia. Presented by Mr. W. W. Rockhill, American minister, 
Peking, China, who procured it from Monseigneur Bermyn, Bishop of West 
Mongolia. Received May 5, 1909. 

White flowered. 

25511. Euphorbia antisiphylitica Zucc. Candelillo. 

From Saltillo, Mexico. Presented by Mr. J. R. Silliman. Received May 12, 
1909. 

168 



26 ^ND PLANTS rMPORTED. 

25511 Continued. 

•• \ wild euphorbiaceous Mexican planl which La of great interest because the dry 

stems yield, it is claimed, from .'! to 5 per cenl of a fine hard wax which seems suited 

ing phonograph cylinders and similar uses. Grows in the dry semidesert 

ions of north-central Mexico, Low^r California, and southwest Texas." Frederit 

-ill in. ) 

l> ■ ibvHon. A native of the Bandy and Btony slopes in the Rio < rrande Valley, in 
l as and Mexico. 

25512. Vigna i nguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From New Orleans, La. Purchased from the J. Steckler Seed Company. 
Received April 29, L909. 

Steckler's Improved Louisiana Wild. "This variety, which is really a mixture of 
varieties, is naturalized in parts of Louisiana, where it volunteers from year to year. 
It has been grown at Arlington Farm, Virginia, for the past 3 years, ami prove- to 
!»<• a tall, upright, quite leafy, late variety. Too late for this latitude, but would 
probably he a valuable variety for Florida, where latenes9 is desired." | C. I'. J'i/„ r.) 

25513. (ierbeka jamesom Bolus. Barberton daisy. 

From Cape Town, South Africa. Presented by Mr. H. J. Chalwin, superin- 
tendent, Public Gardens. Received May 1, 1909. 

" This has a beautiful flower, orange-red in color." {Chalwin.) 

Distribution. — A native of the Transvaal region of South Africa, especially in the 
vicinity of Barberton. 

25514. Mtjcuna gigantea (Willd.) DC. 

From Richmond River, New South Wales, Australia. Presented to Mr. J. H. 
Maiden, director and government botanist, Botanic Gardens, Sydney. Re- 
ceived May 12, 1909. 

" This is a tall tree-climbing tropical plant, extending over East India and the 
Malayan and South Pacific Islands. In New South Wales it only occurs in the 
northern districts." (Maiden.) 

25515. Cyphomandra betacea (Cav.) Sendt. Tree tomato. 

From Kingston, Jamaica. Presented by Mr. W. Harris, superintendent, Hope 
Botanic Gardens. Received May 13, 1909. 

See No. 12758 for description. 

Distribution. — Native and cultivated in Central and South America, extending 
south to the vicinity of Buenos Aires. Also cultivated in the West Indies, in the 
Mediterranean region, and other countries. 

25516 and 25517. 

From Gobindapur, India. Presented by Mr. A. C. Roy, secretary, Comilla Vic- 
toria College. Received April 19, 1909. 
Seed of each of the following: 

25516. Phaseolus radiatus L. 
Black. 

25517. Lathyrds sativus L. 

168 



APRTL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 27 

25518 and 25519. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

From Maritime Alps, i. e., near Tenda, Italy. Presented by Mr. Alwin Berger, 
La Mortola, Ventimiglia, Italy. Received May 6, 1909. 

Seed of each of the following: 

25518. (Marked Xo. 1.) 

25519. (Marked No. 2.) 

25520 and 25521. Olea verrucosa (R. & S.) Link. Wild olive. 

From Wellington, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. Presented by Mr. Charles 
P. Lounsbury, government entomologist, Cape of Good Hope, Department of 
Agriculture, Cape Town, South Africa. Received May 18, 1909. 

25520. Cuttings. 

25521. Seeds. 

See Nos. 9124 and 9559 for previous introductions. 

Distribution. — A tree, native of the southern part of Africa, extending from the 
Cape of Good Hope to the Transvaal region. 

25522. Lolium multiflorum Lam. Rye -grass. 

From "Westerlee, Groningen, Holland. Presented by Hommo Ten Have. Re- 
ceived May 19, 1909. 

Western Wolths. "This new grass was produced by selection from ordinary rye- 
grass in the county of Westerwolde, Holland, near the German frontier. In appear- 
ance the seed can not be distinguished from Italian rye-grass, but Western Wolths 
grass is strictly an annual plant and far surpasses Italian rye-grass in the rapidity of 
its growth and the weight of herbage. On good soils, when top-dressed with nitrate 
of soda, it may be cut 5 or 6 times during the summer. It will thrive on almost all 
soils, but best results are obtained on heavy loam, clay, or land of a somewhat 
damp character." {Extract from circular issued by Hommo Ten Have, wholesale seed 
merchant, Westerlee, Groningen, Holland. ) 

25523. Phaseolus calcaratus Roxb. 

Grown at Arlington Farm, Virginia, season of 1908, under temporary No. 0513. 
Received fall of 1908. 
"A small red-seeded variety, obtained from the Tokyo Botanic Garden, Tokyo, 
Japan, in 1906." (C. V. Piper.) 

25524 and 25525. Cynara scolymus L. Artichoke. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received May 
12 and 13, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

25524. Green Provence. 25525. Perpetual. 

25527. BUCHANANIA LATIFOLIA Roxb. 

From Kavali, Nellore District, India. Presented by Rev. E. Bullard. Received 

May 17, 1909. 

"This is called in the Lelugu language sara tree. The fruit is gathered and the 

pulp being removed the seed is cracked and the inside kernels are eaten as we eat 

nuts. It is very rich and is considered to be very nice and is eaten roasted a little 

and, if desired, with honey or salt; it is very wholesome, but should be eaten in small 

168 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED, 

25527 Continued. 

quantities only al a time, Bay nol more than a handful of the fruil al a time. The 
outside part <>t' the fruit La also eaten. The inner part of the Beed is sold at the rate 
of about 20cents a quart measure full. Thetreegrowe about as high ae a -mall 
orange tree." B 

tree belonging to the Anacardiacese, to which the pistache nul and cashew 
nut also belong, tts characteristic bark make- this tree conspicuous wherever it is 
found. ( »n dry hills like the Siwalik Range it is very useful in covering the ground, 
and it is equally al home on newly formed Landslips as on gentle slopes with fairly 

good soil. The w I is of | r quality. Brandie .-ays the l>ark is used for tanning. 

It gives a gum copiously in large irregular pieces; this gum is only partially soluble 
in water aboul 10 per cent insoluble), but what is soluble gives a good mucilage, and 
it has been reported as likely to be useful for cheap manufacturing purposes and 
valued at 20s. per cwt." I Extract from Gamble's Manual of Indian Timbers.) 

Distribution. — Found in the hot, dry parts of India, from Kumaon and Oudh, 
through centra] India, and into Burma and Tenasserim, in the eastern peninsula. 

25528 to 25530. 

Prom Paraguay, South America. Presented by Mr. Thomas Ruffin Gwynn, 
Capilla Horqueta, I >epartamento de V. Conception. Received May 19, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25528. Rollixia emarginata Schlecht. (?) 

"Chirimouia (araticuy). It is a large fruit, aromatic to the utmost; seed 
full of oil." ( Gwynn. ) 

Distribution. — A native of southern Brazil and the northern parts of Argen- 
tina and Paraguay. 

25529. Ilex pabaguariensis St. Hil. 

"Yerba (cad). The tea of this country. To procure plants from this seed 
it will be necessary to put it in hot water of about 90° F. for 26 hours, then 
plant in a hotbed, the seed being buried about ? inch under a soft mold, con- 
stantly watered every day. When large enough to harvest, you cut all the 
limbs and twigs, scorch well, and dry twigs and leaves over a hot fire, after 
which twigs and leaves are ground fine and used as tea, being put in a small 
gourd with hot water poured on, and a tube perforated at the bottom to suck 
up the same. ' ' ( Gwynn. ) 

Distribution. — A native of Paraguay and cultivated in Argentina and Brazil. 

25530. Bombax sp. 

"Vegetable silk (paina), used here for pillows and mattresses, though some 
fine hammocks and shawls have been woven out of it. This plant opens its 
pod in July and August here, representing October and November with us." 
( Gwynn. ) 

25532. Gladiolus sp. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Mr. F. T. Nicholson, 
secretary, Transvaal Agricultural Union. Received May 21, 1909. 

25533 and 25534. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. H. F. Schultz. Received 
May 27, 1909. 

168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 29 

25533 and 25534— Continued. 

The following seeds: 

25533. Pritchardia pacifica Seem. & Wendl. 

A spineless fan palm, remarkable for its fibrous, fluffy leafstalks. 
Distribution. — A native of the Fiji and the Samoa Islands. 

25534. Carludovica sp. 

25535 and 25536. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 

From India. Presented by Mr. A. Howard, Imperial Department of Agriculture, 
Pusa, Bengal. Received April 30, 1909. 

Seed of each of the following: 

25535. A variety from Madhaipore, near Dalsing Serai. 

25536. A small variety from Dalsing Serai, Tirhoot, which is considered to 
have a good flavor. 

See Nos. 22957 and 24450 for general descriptive notes. 

Distribution. — A small tree, native of India, being found on dry hills from Jhelum 
to Assam and south to Travancor. 

25537. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Mitchell, S. Dak. Presented by Prof. W. A. Wheeler. Received May 
29, 1909. 

Baltic. "Grown from S. D. No. 167. This strain, which was originally secured 
near Baltic, S. Dak., has proved extremely hardy and drought resistant; it possesses 
the same variegated flowers that are to be observed in the Grimm alfalfa and the 
commercial sand lucern." (J. 31. Westgate.) 

25538 to 25540. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Spain. Presented by J. Lapoulide & Co., Madrid, at the request of Hon. 
Maddin Summers, American vice-consul. Received May 20, 1909. 

"Three varieties, as follows: From Anover, large and sweet. From Valencia, 
early and very productive. From Villaconejo, valuable for its keeping qualities." 
( Lapoulide & Co. ) 

"I frankly believe that the introduction of these muskmelons in the United States 
is a most important matter. The fact is I know of no plant that can equal this one 
in intrinsic value to the farmer. To say that a successful cultivation of it may mean 
millions is very little. It means hundreds of millions in time and will be a boon to 
our farmers entirely unexpected. 

"It has been a mania of mine for years, but I have had difficulty in getting some 
one interested in the matter. In my humble opinion if we can introduce this 
product, my work as consul here will be well crowned, as the results will be 
incalculable. 

"I do not know if you exactly appreciate the magnificence of this fruit. Our 
cantaloupes and other classes of melons are common as compared with a first-class 
Spanish 'melon.' During the month of January and February I had a large lot 
hanging in my cellars suspended by hemp coverings. Several very prominent New 
York club men, who were very particular about their menus ami criticised the Hotel 
de la Paix and the Hotel de Paris for their food, dined with us. It appears that 
their great complaint came from the fact that in Spain, a country famous for its 
fruits, they could find nothing that warranted this "fama.' 
168 



30 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOB CED. 

25538 to 25540 Continued. 

-•I thru put Beveral melons on ice — imagine in February —and they were served. 
At first they hesitated, and could uot believe that a green looking melon, at that 
time of the year, could be eaten. They tried it, and asked that others be put on 
ms they had never tasted so delicious a fruit in their lives. They took with them a 
e quantity and asked me the address of a dealer to have a lot sent to them 
in New York. The next day they unite me a letter and asked if they could come 
to tea and if I would have some more of these melons on ice. 

"This fad will show you really what they are. These melons can easily be kept 
until March by paying great attention to the dryness of the cellars where they are 
kept. The yield per acre is very large and the great question is to obtain pure 
seeds. There are, however, planters who pay great attention to the matter and 
grow on their estates only the pure melon. In Guadalajara there are some and in 
Valencia there are the best. 

"They are never hung in the sun to ripen. They are picked just before ripening, 
covered with a jute net, and hung up in a dark, dry place. When they are to be 
eaten they are taken out, hung in the sun for a short time, and when soft at the 
ends are ready for use." (Extract from letter of Hon. Maddin Summers, April 20, 
190'K ) 

25541 and 25542. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Prof. A. T. Gage, superintendent, 
Royal Botanic Garden. Received June 2, 1909. 

Seed of each of the following: 

25541. Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb. 

"A handsome tree, native in southern Asia, the fruits of which, collected 
when full grown but still unripe, and dried in the sun, form the Beleric 
myrobalans of commerce. These fruits contain about 12 per cent of tannin, 
but as a tanning material are inferior to the fruits of the following species." 
(jr. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A large tree, found throughout India, and in Ceylon and 
the Malay Archipelago. 

25542. Terminalia chebula Retz. 

"A large deciduous tree, occurring chiefly on the mountains of India. The 
fruits, known as Chebulic myrobalans, are extensively used in tanning, over 
20,000,000 pounds being imported into the United States in 1908 for that pur- 
pose. These fruits yield from 30 to 40 per cent tannin, which occurs chiefly 
in the pulp surrounding the kernel. The tree is occasionally cultivated up to 
5,000 feet in the Himalayas. Seedlings grown at Chattanooga, Tenn., were 
cut down by frost." ( TV. W. Stockberger. 

Distribution. — A tall [tree, native of India, extending from Kumaon to Ben- 
gal, and in Ceylon and the Malay Archipelago. 

25543. Acacia catechu (L.) Willd. 

From Saharanpur, United Provinces, India. Presented by Prof. A. T. Gage, 
superintendent, Royal Botanic Garden, Sibpur, Calcufta. Received June 
2, 1909. 

"A leguminous tree, native of India and East Africa, naturalized in Jamaica, 
where it is common in dry locations. It is said to bear some frost and may prove 
hardy in favorable localities in the southern United States. The extract from the 
168 



APEIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 31 

25543— Continued. 

bark and wood forms the drug catechu, and the dyeing and tanning agent (Mitch." 
( W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A medium-sized tree, native of India, being found in the Himalayas 
from the Punjab to Sikkim, and in Burma. 

25544 to 25546. 

From Alger-Mustapha, Algiers, North Africa. Purchased from Eossier Freres 
et Soeur. Received May 29, 1909. 

Plants of each of the following: 

25544. Citrus bebgamia liisso. 

"This is the bergamot, grown commercially in some parts of southern Italy 
for the essential oil which is expressed from the peel of the fruit. This has 
been imported for the citrus-breeding experiments of the Office of Crop 
Physiology and Breeding Investigations." ( W. T. Swingle.) 

25545. Citrus nobilis Lour. 
Clementine. See No. 25196 for description. 

25546. Claucena lansium (Lour.) Skeels. (Cookia punctata Sonnerat. ; 
Quinaria lansium Lour.; Claucena wampi Oliver.) 

"This is the well-known wampee which is cultivated for its fruits in 
southern China. These fruits are said to be of a very agreeable though some- 
what aromatic flavor and are about the size of a loquat, though the tree is 
probably not so hardy. These plants were imported for the breeding experi- 
ments of the Office of Crop Physiology and Breeding Investigations." ( W. T. 
Swingle. ) 

25547. Raphionacme utilis Brown & Stapf. Ecanda rubber. 

From Ochileso, Africa. Presented by Mr. T. W. Woodside, A. B. C. F. M., 
Benguella, Angola (via Lisbon). Received June 1, 1909. 

"A rubber-producing member of the milkweed family, recently described as a 
new species. (Kew Bulletin, 1908, p. 215.) The genus already includes about 20 
species distributed through the subtropical desert regions of the southern part of 
Africa. The plant may be described as a perennial herb or very low shrub. There 
is a large, fleshy, flattened, turnip-shaped, perennial root, said to attain a diameter 
of 5 or 6 inches, though the present supply does not contain roots larger than 4 
inches. The other parts of the plant are annual, except for a short stem or crown 
which produces a succession of short branches, but apparently only one at a time. 
Temporary roots appear to be sent out from any part of the permanent root. 

"The structure and habits of growth indicate that the plant behaves in nature as 
an extreme desert type able to survive with very little water and requiring several 
years to reach maturity. More favorable conditions might hasten development, but 
might also have an adverse effect on the amount of rubber produced. The propor- 
tion of rubber extracted from the fresh roots falls below 1 per cent, too little to jus- 
tify any assurance of commercial value. But if simple methods of propagation can 
be learned we may expect to secure strains that contain larger amounts of rubber, 
through selection and breeding. It is first necessary to ascertain whether the plant 
can be grown and multiplied in the United States, either from seeds or from cuttings. 

"The roots should not be buried too deeply, only enough to bring the stem end 
to the surface of the ground. Soil of a loose, open texture may be preferable, though 
we have no detailed information regarding the natural conditions." ( 0. F. Cook. ) 

168 



EEDS \M» PLANTS IMP0R1 ED. 

25547 Continued. 

•■ l ;imi t.»i<i that tli" keeping qualities of the bulb rubber are uol good. I «!«> aot 
think that the P >rtuguese are very competent to decide thai matter. The plant 
pod full of seeds, bo that if it proves of value Beeds could i>«- had in quan- 
tity." ■ I 
/* —An herbaceous perennial, found in the vicinity of Lake Nyassa, in 

I Africa, 

25561. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

eived through Prof. N. E. Hansen, of the Agricultural Experimenl Station, 
Brookin Dak., while traveling as an agricultural explorer for the Depart- 

ment of Agriculture in L908. Numbered for convenience in keeping records, 
June 9, L909. 

No. 248.) Plants of native alfalfa as grown by the Arabs in the oases of the 
it of Sahara. These 1 received at Biskra, Algiers, January, 1909." ( Hansen.) 

25580 to 25591. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

From Bucharest, Roumania. Presented by Hon. Horace (J. Knowles, envoy 

extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary, American Legation. Received 
May 22, 1909. 
The following seeds: 

25580. Duppau. 25586. Probstei. 

25581. Anderbeck. 25587. Besseller No. 1. 

25582. Mezdeag. 25588. Leutewitz. 

25583. Bucium. 25589. Comun. 

25584. Besseller No. 2. 25590. Besseller No. 3. 

25585. Ligovo. 25591. Romdnesi selection. 

25592 and 25593. 

From Sianfu, Shensi, China. Presented by Mr. D. C. Sowers, of the Carnegie 

Institute, Washington, D. C. Received March 31, 1909. 

Seed of the following: 

25592. Brassica rapa L. Turnip. 
Large flat green. 

25593. Raphanus sativus L. Radish 
Red. 

25594 and 25595. Cuourbita pepo L. Squash. 

From Japan. Presented by Mr. J. R. Lawrence, Raynham, Mass. Received 
June 5, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25594. Chirimen. 

25595. Rikusa. 

25596 to 25604. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad. Purchased from Mr. F. Evans, acting superin- 
tendent, botanical department, Department of Agriculture. Received June 8, 
1909. 
168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 33 



The followin 


)U1 — V^Ulltj 

g varieties : 


25596. 


Mutmuria. 


25597. 


Mutmuria. 


No. 25596)." 


25598. 


Mutmuria. 


25599. 


Mutmuria. 


25600. 


Jovira. 


25601. 


Jarahur. 


25602. 


Jarahan. 


25603. 


Sahandeya. 


25604. 


Joy ia. 



"Possibly different variety from the above (S. P. I. 

".Second variety, large grain." 
"Third variety, small grain." 



25605 to 25607. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Mitchell, S. Dak. Presented by Prof. W. A. Wheeler. Received June 
7, 1909. 
Seed of the following; descriptive notes by Mr. J. M. Westgate. 

25605. Grimm. Grown from S. D. No. 162. This special lot proved the 
hardiest of the 2 lots of Grimm alfalfa under test. 

25606. Turkestan. Grown from S. D. No. 164. In all the tests made at 
Brookings and Highmore, S. Dak., this has appeared to be almost if not 
quite perfectly hardy. The best of all the Turkestan alfalfas tested under 
South Dakota conditions. 

25607. Turkestan. Grown under S. D. No. 240, originally from S. P. I. 
No. 991. Hardy but not a prolific seeder. 

25608. Nageia elata (R. Br.) Muell. 

From Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Presented by Prof. J. H. Maiden, 
director, Botanic Gardens. Received June 7, 1909. 
Distribution. — A large tree, native of southeastern Australia, occurring in Queens- 
land and New South Wales. 

25609. Caesalpinia sappan L. 

From Sibpur, Calcutta, India. Presented by Prof. A. T. Gage, superintendent, 
Royal Botanic Garden. Received June 8, 1909. 
"A shrubby leguminous tree bearing showy yellow flowers. Adapted to poor dry 
lands. ' From its quasi-deciduous character would doubtless endure pretty low tem- 
peratures ' (W. S. Lyon). May prove hardy in the Southern States. The wood, 
known to commerce as sappan wood, yields a red dye; the bark is used for tanning 
in India and China. As an ornamental it makes a fine hedge." ( W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A native of India and the Malay Archipelago. 

25610. Ipomoea sp. 

From Belize, British Honduras. Presented by Mr. E. J. F. Campbell, superin- 
tendent, Botanical Station. Received June 9, 1909. 
"Tubers of an indigenous plant. The tubers are eaten by the natives raw and 
saladlike. It is known by the name of ecama." 

168 



•; | \\h PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25611 to 25618. 

, ;,. i; <1 through Mr. Jose" 1». Husbands, Limavida, Chile, June 

Is; quoted descriptions by Mr. Husbands. 

5611. Gevuina a\ si i .an v Mol. 
" From the cordilleras of central Chile. Will not grow north of latitude 

Distribv ■ \n evergreen tree, native of the Andes of Chile; cultivated 

sparingly in < !alifornia. 

25612. JUBAEA CHILENSIS (Mol. ) Baill. 

"Palm of Chile, large tree with very large bunches of nuts." 
Distribution. — The native palm of Chile, found in the provinces of Quillota 
and Maule. 

25613. Phragmites vulgaris (Lam.) P>. S. P. 

"A tall, wide-leaved, reedlike wild grass, used for thatching houses. Eaten 
by horned cattle. Ornamental." 
25614 to 25617. Persea gratissima Gaertn. f. Avocado. 

•■ Paltos, Chile classes, of excellent quality, somewhat smaller than those of 
Peru." 

25618. Cucumis melo dudaim (L. ) Naudin. 

■ Fragrant melon; color yellow with red stripes; eatable; is about the &ize 
of an orange; plant like other melons but smaller. Crossed with other melons 
might give something new." 

Distribution. — Found in Persia, Egypt, and Algeria, and cultivated in other 
countries. 

25619 and 25620. Citrus spp. 

From Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. Ernest G. E. Scriven, 
undersecretary, Department of Agriculture and Stock. Received June 10, 1909. 

25619. Citrus australis (Cunn. ) Planch. 

Distribution. — A small tree, native of the southeastern part of Queensland, 

Australia. 

25620. Citrus australasica Muell. 

e S. P. I. No. 21306 for previous introduction and description. 

Distribution. — A shrub, native of the southeastern part of Queensland and 
the northeastern part of New South Wales, in Australia. 

25621. A vena satin a L. Oat. 

From Amasia, Turkey in Asia. Presented by H. Caramanian & Co. Received 
June 11, 1909. 

Soulou Ova. 

25622 to 25630. 

The following material received at the Upper Mississippi Valley Plant Introduc- 
tion Garden, Ames, Iowa. Numbered for convenience in recording distribu- 
tion, June 11. 1909. 

■ 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 35 

25622 to 25630— Continued. 

25622. Pyrus sp. Pear. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 464, 1906.) Seeds were secured from Mr. W. S. 
Ament, Peking, China. In his letter Mr. Ament states that the fruit came 
from a long distance, mostly from the mountain regions." (S. A. Beach.) 

25623. Pyrus sp. Pear. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 89, 1907.) Seed received from Mr. H. P. Perkins, 
Poatingfu, China. In his letter of January 14, 1907, Mr. Perkins says: 'I 
inclose seeds of the only pear that grows in this region. It is far from being 
an A-l pear but it is large and keeps well into the spring.' " (S. A. Beach.) 

25624. Sorbus sp. Mountain ash. 

" (Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 407, 1909. ) Native to Alaska. Scions received from 
Prof. C. C. Georgeson, of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Sitka, 
Alaska." (S. A. Beach.) 

25625. Cydonia sp. Quince. 

" (Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 518, 1906.) Seed received from Mr..Paul D. Bergen, 
Shantung, China." (S. A. Beach.) 

25626. Malus sp. Apple. 

" (Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 519, 1906.) Seed received from Mr. Paul D. Bergen, 
Shantung, China." (S. A. Beach.) 

25627. Malus sp. Apple. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 461, 1906.) Seed received from Mr. W. S. Ament, 
Peking, China. In his letter Mr. Ament states that the fruit came from a long 
distance, mostly from the mountain regions." (S. A. Beach.) 

25628. Malus sp. Apple. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 432, 1906.) Seed received from Mr. H. P. Perkins, 
Poatingfu, China." (S. A. Beach.) 

25629. Malus sylvestris Mill. Apple. 

Evaline. "This variety originated in Wisconsin, not in northern Iowa, as 
erroneously stated by Hansen. a It was one of a lot of seedlings grown from 
seed brought to Fremont, Waupaca County, Wis., largely from Canada. It 
was introduced by Mr. William A. Springer, of that place. In 1877 Mr. 
Springer stated that 'it originated many years ago,' & and gave the following 
description of it: 'Original tree on high, level, dark loam soil. Tree quite 
upright, but spreading with age. Fruit quite large, with yellowish green 
color; quality excellent. Season, February to March.' 

"It is distinct from the Evelyn, which originated with Mr. A. B. Lyman, 
Excelsior, Minn., from seed of the Wealthy, and which is a dark-red apple or 
yellow, striped with red. It is also distinct from a red apple which is being 
disseminated by Mr. A. D. Barnes, Waupaca, Wis., under the name of Evelyn. 

" There is a tree of Evaline standing in an orchard which was planted on 
the grounds of the Iowa Agricultural College about 1877. Haas stock was 
planted and top-worked about 1878 with scions of the Evaline. This tree is 
hardy, healthy, and productive. The fruit is above medium to rather large, 
greenish or yellowish, often with a faint blush, with a good degree of uniformity 
in size and appearance; flavor subacid; texture and quality superior to that of 

a "A Study of Northwestern Apples," Bulletin 76, South Dakota Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, 1902, p. 49. 

b Iowa Horticultural Society, Report, 1877, pp. 81-83. 
168 



BE] DS \M> PLANTS [MPOB CED. 

25622 to 25630 Continued. 

Wort) ' ■ sU rn Greening. It bears some resemblance to apples of the Fatl Pippin 
type, ls grown al Ames it keeps in ordinary storage till midwinter or later. 
Mr. W. T. Macoun, horticulturist of the Central Experimental Farm, Ot- 
tawa, Canada, to whom samples of the frail were submitted, wrote Novem- 
ber 13, L908: 'I have bested and described the Evaline apple. I consider it to 
be better than Northwestern Oreeningin quality. As you say, it approaches 
very close to the Fall Pippin.' Col. G. B. Brackett, United states pomologist, 
from specimens which were sent him, describes the flesh as yellow ish, medium 
line, breaking, juicy, subacid, pleasant flavored, good to very good in quality. 
'■( >n account of the uniformity of the fruit in size, appearance, and quality, 
and because of the hardiness of the variety in tree and fruit-bud, it appears 
worthy of more extended trial in central and northern tow*a as an early winter 
or mitlw inter apple for the home orchard. On the college grounds the variety 
has made a record for hardiness and frnit-bud, having yielded pretty good 
crops during the seasons of 1907 and 1908 when many other varieties in the 
station orchards yielded little or no fruit because their blossom-buds or blos- 
soms were killed by the late freezes." (S. A. Beach in the Report of the Iowa 
Horticultural Society, 1909.) 

25630. Mali's diversifolia (Bong. ) Roem. Crab apple. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 406, 1909. ) Crab apple, native to Alaska. Received 
from Prof. C. C. Georgeson, of the Alaska Experiment Station, Sitka, Alaska. 
In his letter of April 13, 1909, Professor Georgeson remarks: 'So far as I know 
there are no wild crab apples in the interior, the species Pyrus rivularis {Malm 
diversifolia) is confined in Alaska entirely to the coast region of southeastern 
Alaska.' " (S. A. Beach.) 

25631. Semele androgtna (L.) Kunth. 

From Funchal, Madeira. Presented by Mr. Alaricus Delmard, Monte Palace 
Hotel. Received June 12 and 14, 1909. 

Franceschi (Santa Barbara) says that it looks like a gigantic smilax and has dark- 
green tropical foliage which is likely to be mistaken for some of the Indian climbing 
palms. 

Distribution. — An evergreen, climbing vine, native of the Canary Islands, and 
cultivated as a greenhouse ornamental. 

25632 to 25637. 

From Eritrea, Africa. Presented by Prof. T. Batorate, director, Colonial Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, Asmara. Received June 1, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25632. Barbeya oleoides Schweinf. 

Distribution. — A small tree, native of the middle and higher mountainous 
regions of the northern part of Abyssinia, and the province of Yemen, in 
Arabia. 

25633. Carissa edulis Vahl. 

Distribution. — A tall shrub, found throughout tropical Africa, from Guinea 
and Nubia, south to Damara-land and the valley of the Zambezi; also in 
tropical Arabia. 

25634. Diospyros senegalensis Perrott. 
168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 37 

25632 to 25637— Continued. 

Distribution. — A shrub or tree, from 6 to 40 feet high, native of Guinea and 
Abyssinia and south to Mozambique, in Africa, and of Yemen, in Arabia. 
The wood, which is much used by the natives, is white and compact, or black 
in the center, like ebony. 

25635. Millettia ferruginea (Hochst.) Baker. 

Distribution. — A large tree, found in Abyssinia. The powdered seeds l .: 3 
thrown into the water to stupify fish, and the tree also furnishes a poison for 
arrowheads. 

25636 and 25637. Hyphaexe thebaica (L.) Mart. 

25636. From Assab. 25637. From Argodat. 

Distribution. — A palm, native of the valley of the Gambia River in upper 
Guinea, and of Nubia, Abyssinia, Somaliland, and British East Africa in the 
Nile Valley; also native of extratropical Egypt and Arabia. 

25639 and 25640. 

From Perth, western Australia. Presented by Mr. P. L. Richardson, acting 
inspector-general of forests, Department of Woods and Forests. Received 
June 3, 1909. 

Seed of the following: 

25639. Xanthorrhoea preissii Endl. 

"This grass-tree, which forms a conspicuous feature of the Australian land- 
scape, is among those strange members of the rush family that have a decided 
trunk, or caudex. This species often has a trunk attaining a height of 15 feet, 
surmounted by a dense, symmetrical crown of foliage, composed of a multi- 
tude of brittle, linear leaves which spread or curve gracefully in all directions. 
From the center of this tuft of leaves arises a solitary, scepter-like flower 
stalk, terminating in a dense cylindrical spike of numerous, closely packed 
greenish flowers. This picturesque desert plant is well worth trial in the 
warmer and more arid regions of the United States." {Extract from Bailey's 
Cyclopedia of American Horticulture.) 

Distribution. — A native of western Australia, found from St. Stirling Range 
to the Vasse and Swan rivers. 

25640. Nuytsia floribuxda (Labill.) R. Br. 

A terrestrial tree belonging to the mistletoe family, often 35 feet in height, 
with spreading branches. The leaves are linear and thick, about 3 inches 
long, or reduced to small scales on the new shoots. The flowers are orange- 
yellow, in showy racemes, crowded at the ends of the branches. The fruit is 
a nut J inch long with 3 broad thick wings. 

Distribution.— It is a native of western Australia, extending from King 
George's Sound to the Swan and Murchison rivers. 



l » v 



25641. Eleocharis tuberosa (Roxb.) Schultes. 

' < Water chestnut." 

From China. Procured by Mr. G. P. Rixford, of this Department, in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., from a Chinese importer. Received June 16, 1909. 
" The corms or tuberous rhizomes of the above plant are a great favorite with the 
Chinese. They are mostly eaten raw, but are also sliced and shredded in soups and 

168. 



38 SEEDS \M> PLANTS tMPORI ED. 

25641 Continued. 

in meat and fish dishee. Foreigners in China grate them and serve them boiled aa 
a winter vegetable, in which state they resemble Bweel corn very much in looks and 

taste. 
"The plants need a hot summer to mature and are grown on a muck or clayey soil 

with several inches of standing water on top, very much in the same manner as 

wet-land rice." ( Frank N. Mey< r.) 

1 > 8tribution. A native of China, and extensively cultivated there tor its tubers. 

25642 to 25645. Yin a faba L. Horse bean. 

From Malaga, Spain. Presented by Mr. Charles M. Caughy, American consul. 
Received June 17, 1909. 
Beeds of the following: 

25642. Morada. 25644. Mazagana. 

25643. Cochinera (pig). 25645. Tarragona. 

"These beans are soaked for 12 hours and planted in land which is thoroughly 
irrigated. No further attention is paid to them until the stalks are about 2 feet high. 
They all occupy about the same time in ripening and in parts of the district there 
are 3 plantings a year, viz, September, December, and March. 

" It is impossible to say anything as to their ability to resist frost, as that is not 
experienced here. 

"The stalks are fed to stock without any preparation whatsoever except to cut 
them in short lengths, and have such little value that they are given to those who 
are willing to take them away." ( Caughy. ) 

25646 to 25648. 

From Yachow, China. Procured by Air. H. J. Openshaw. Received June 16, 
1909. 

The following seeds: 

25646 and 25647. Phaseolus vulgaris L. 

25646. Mottled red. 25647. Black. 

25648. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

Black. 

25649 to 25658. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Newchw 7 ang, China. Presented by Mr. Fred. D. Fisher, American con- 
sul. Received June 18, 1909. 

The following seeds. Quoted notes by Mr. Fisher; descriptions of varieties by Mr. 
C. V. Piper. 

25649 to 25651. "Pai-mei (white eyebrow), from the white scar on the 
saddle or point of attachment to the pod." These three numbers consist 
wholly, or mostly, of Ito San. 

25649. (Locality unknown. ) 

25650. From Mukden. 

25651. From Kw r angning. 

25652. " Chin-huang (golden yellow), from the golden color and more 
rounded shape of the bean." Subglobose yellow seeds with brown hilum. 
168 



APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 39 

25649 to 25658— Continued. 

25653. "Hei-chi (black belly), from the dark-brown scar on the saddle." 
Yellow subglobose seeds with black hiluin. 

25654. " Ch'ing-tou. Epidermis green with inside yellow." Yellowish 
green subglobose seeds. Apparently identical with the Morse variety, Xo. 
19186. 

25655. " Ch'ing-tou. Both epidermis and inside green." Subglobose green 
seeds with black hilum and green embryo. Apparently the Guelph variety. 

25656. " Wu-tou. u Small black seeds with yellow embryos. Apparently 
two varieties mixed. 

25657. " Hsiao- vm-tou (small black bean) ; the bean is somewhat smaller than 
the following (S. P. I. Xo. 25658), with a black epidermis and yellow inside." 
Small black seeds with yellow embryos. 

25658. " Ta-wu-tou (large black bean), where the epidermis is black and 
the inside green." Medium-sized, subglobose seeds, black with green 
embryos. Apparently identical with Fairchild variety, No. 19184. 

25659. Mangifera indica L. Mango. 

From province of Baliwag, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. Donald Mac- 
Intyre, Moanalua Gardens, Honolulu, Hawaii. Received June 19, 1909. 

Caraboa. "The fruit of this is a little smaller than the one from Cavile (S. P. I. 
Xo. 24927). ' ' {Maclntyre. ) 

25660. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From Alajuela, Costa Rica. Presented by Mr. Jerome B. Clark, care of Cox & 
Co., Hacienda "El Brazil." Received May 15, 1909. 

White. 

25665. Secale cereale L. Rye. 

From the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia. Presented by Mr. J. A. Rosen, 
American Agricultural Bureau of the Government Zemstvo of Ekaterinoslav, 
Russia, 428 Andrus Building, Minneapolis, Minn. Received March 23, 1909. 

Petkoff Winter. "This rye is frequently sown in the early part of July, is cut for 
soiling purposes in September (may also be pastured, but this is not advisable), and 
produces a crop of grain the following season. If raised for the grain only, it is sown 
late in September; in this case it usually yields heavier." (Rosen. ) 

25666 to 25683. 

From Abyssinia. Presented by Mr. Hubert S. Smiley, Drumalis, Larne, Antrim 
County, Ireland. Received June 14, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25666 to 25670. Triticum sp. Wheat. 

25668. "Grown on clay ground in any part of the country." 

25670. " White, grown in the hot country." 

25671 and 25672. Hordeum sp. Barley. 

25671. " Grown on high ground." 

25672. " Black. Grown on red earth in the cold part of the country 
16S 



i > 



40 SEEDS AND 1 MA NTS IMPORTED. 

25666 to 25683 Continued. 

25673 and 25674. HoRDBi \i VULGARE L. Barley. 

25674. White. 

25675 to 25677. ANDROPOGON SORGHUM I L. i Brot. Durra. 

25675. "Common red-seeded durra of Abyssinia, [dentical with 
No. 24897." i CarleUm R. Ball.) 

25676. "The common flinty-seeded durra of Abyssinia; Beed yellow- 
ish, often tinged with brown; very similar to No. 24899, Seed \««>r 
and mixed." I ( 'arleton II. Hall.) 

25677. "Same an the above but seed of better quality. This variety 
has proved enormously heavy and late, as grown in the United 
States." (Carleton R. Ball.) 

25678 and 25679. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

25678. Brown. 25679. Greenish brown. 

25680. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 

25681. Sesamum orientale L. Sesame. 
Brown. 

25682. Brassica sp. 

25683. Phaseolis vulgaris L. Bean. 
White. 

25684 to 25686. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received June 24, 1909. 
The following seeds: 

25684. Canarium commune L. 

See No. 20808 for description. 

Distribution. — A native of the Malay Archipelago, and cultivated in India. 

25685. MucuNAsp. 25686. Mucdna sp. (?) 

25688 and 25689. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 

From Saharanpur, India. Presented by Mr. W. R. Mustoe, superintendent, 
Government Archaeological Gardens, Lahore, Punjab, India. Received June 
28, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25688. Oblong variety. 25689. Small variety. 

For further description, see No. 24450. 

25690 and 25691. Pithecolobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth. 

From Chinapas, Chihuahua, Mexico. Presented by Mr. Elmer Stearns, botanist, 
School of Agriculture, C. Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Received June 24, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25690. Fruit white. 25691. Fruit red or reddish. 

See No. 23457 for description. 

Distribution. — A native of Mexico, Nicaragua, and Colombia; cultivated in India 
and other tropical countries. 
168 



ArRIL 1 TO JUNE 30, 1909. 41 

25692. Carica papata L. Papaw. 

From Gonda, United Provinces, India. Presented by Rev. N. L. Rocky. Re- 
ceived June 28, 1909. 

"Papita or papaya seed grown in latitute 27° V north, longitude 81° 51' east. 
Fruit was about 4 pounds each; tree 16 months old. This seed came from fruit 
grown in Gonda, the seed of which I obtained originally in Bangalore. I have had 
trees live and bear for 6 years and continue to freely grow. I see no reason why this 
luscious fruit should not grow and thrive all along the Gulf and in the islands." 
(Rocky.) 

25694. Pithecolobium DULCE (Roxb.) Benth. Guamuchitl. 

From Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Purchased from Senor Hernandez, Street 
of the Giant 83|. Received June 28, 1909. 

See No. 23457 for description, and Nos. 25690 and 25691 for distribution of this 
species. 

25699 to 25701. 

The following material received at the Upper Mississippi Valley Plant Introduc- 
tion Garden, Ames, Iowa. Numbered for convenience in recording distri- 
bution, June 30, 1909. 

25699. Cydonia sp. Quince. 

" (Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 518, 1906.) Seed received from Mr. Paul D. Bergen, 
Shantung, China. In his letter of October 2, 1906, Mr. Bergen says: 'The 
quince is the regular Shantung species, very good for jelly.' " (S. A. Beach.) 

25700. Malls sp. Apple. 

" (Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 519, 1906. ) Seed received from Mr. Paul D. Bergen, 
Shantung, China. In his letter of October 2, 1906, Mr. Bergen says: 'These 
apples are native to this district, and are a small, dark-red, sourish variety. 
Our climate here is milder considerably than that of Iowa. The country is 
here so completely cultivated that there is small place for wild fruits of any 
kind. The Chinese are considerably skilled also in the art of grafting, so that 
their fruits are very much modified from the ancestral stock.' " (S. A. Beach.) 

25701. Malus sp. Apple. 

"(Iowa Expt. Sta. No. 432, 1906.) Seed received from Mr. H. P. Perkins, 
Poatingfu, China, October 12, 1906. In his letter of September 5, 1906, Mr. 
Perkins says: 'These are seeds saved from our breakfast apples, which were 
of 2 or 3 varieties, none of them equal to our best United States summer apples, 
and I fear they will not answer your purpose, as the winters here are probably 
far less cold than are yours. This place is near Shanhaikuan, which is the 
place where the great wall reaches the sea. The fruit region is some 40 miles 
north (Changli). There are hills there, but I imagine the fruit is grown not 
very far up the hillsides. We are on a sea bay which usually does not freeze 
over in the winter. We call all this part of China North China, but nothing 
inside the great wall is really very far north.' " (S. A. Beach.) 

25702 and 25703. Oryza satita L. Rice. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American 
consul, at the request of consul-general Wilder, of Hongkong, China. Received 
June 28, 1909. 

168 



4'J EDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25702 and 25703 Continued. 

ed of each of the following: 

25702. "The nearest we can come to identifying the rice described as Sune- 
i'iu is a rice known t<> the merchants locally as Sun teim, the translation of 
which is 'long kernel.' This rice is said to come from Anam." (Wilder.) 

"The Baixau, as it is known here, is sometimes called 'Siamese garden 

rice,' and it commands the highest price in the market. A Chinese rice 

specialist here told me that it is knowji also as Sun tsim, which Mr. Wilder 

Bays corresponds to the Sunejin. At any rate, it is a fine rice to introduce." 

mm r. ) 

25703. "The nearest we can come to the variety Patma is Pat nor, the trans- 
lation of which is 'soft.' This rice is said to come from Tonkin." ( Wilder.) 

"This variety is called locally Nep, or 'alcohol rice,' is very dark colored, 
and is the one I suppose which corresponds to Patma and Mr. Wilder called 
Pat nor. 1 ' (Conner.) 

25704 to 25716. 

From Poona, Bombay, India. Presented by Mr. M. A. Peacock, Pennellville, 
N. Y. Received June 24, 1909. 

The following seeds: 

25704. Dolichos biflorus L. 

25705. Phaseolus max L. 
Black. 

25706. Phaseolus radiatus L. 
Green and brown mixed. 

25707. Phaseolus aconitifolius Jacq. 
Brown. 

25708. Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Traub. 

25709. Cajan indicum Spreng. 
Mauve. 

25710. Lens esculent a Moench. Lentil. 

25711. Pisum arvense L. Field pea. 
Mottled green. 

25712. Lathyrus sativus L. 

25713. Cicer arietinum L. Chick-pea. 

25714. Vigna unguiculata (L. ) Walp. Cowpea. 
Mixed brown and cream colored seed. 

25715. Stizolobium sp. 
Mottled gray and brown. 

25716. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 
Yellow. 

25717. Schinopsis balansae Engl. 

From Chaco, Argentina. Presented by Sr. Ing. D. Carlos D. Cirola, University 
of Agriculture, Santa Fe, Buenos Aires. Keceived June 19, 1909. 

"A tree belonging to the family Anacardiacere. Native in Paraguay, where, accord- 
ing to Engler, it grows on river banks in impervious clay soil. Said to occur also in 
eastern and southern Argentine. Known locally as quebracho Colorado, and forms one 
of the sources of the quebracho extract used in tanning." ( W. W. Stockberger. ) 
168 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Acacia catechu, 25543. 
Acaena sp., 25471. 
Actinidia arguta, 25195. 
Alfalfa, Aulieata, 25277. 
Baltic, 25537. 
(Chile), 25483, 25484. 
(Germany), 25193, 25194, 25257, 

25264, 25267, 25327. 
Grimm, 25244, 25605. 
Guaranda, 25221, 25223. 
Khiva, 25278. 
(Roumania), 25269, 25270. 
(Sahara), 25561. 
sand lucern, 25265, 25268. 
Turkestan, 25192, 25277 to 25279, 

25606, 25607. 
Vernoe, 25279. 
Amygdalus persica, 25309. 
Anacardium occidentale, 25245. 
Andropogon sorghum, 25328 to 25342, 25675 

to 25677. 
Apple (China), 25626 to 25628, 25700, 
25701. 
Evaline, 25629. 
Artichoke, Green Provence, 25524. 

Perpetual, 25525. 
Ash, mountain (Alaska), 25624. 
Astragalus sp., 25510. 
A vena sp., 25365 to 25367. 
nuda, 25351. 
planiculmis, 25352. 
saiiva, 25258, 25259, 25317 to 25326, 
25353 to 25360, 25389, 25390, 
25518, 25519, 25580 to 25591, 
25621. 
sterilis, 25361 to 25363. 
slrigosa, 25364. 
Avocado (Chile), 25614 to 25617. 

Bael. See Belou marmelos. 

Barbeya oleoides, 25632. 

Barley (Abyssinia) , 25671 to 25674. 

(Palestine), 25260. 
Bean, Bonavist. See Dolichos lablab. 

horse, 25642 to 25645, 25678, 25679. 
Belou marmelos, 25535, 25536, 25688, 25689. 
168 



Bomhax sp., 25530. 
Brassica sp., 25682. 

rapa, 25592. 
Buchanania latifolia, 25527. 

Caesalpinia coriaria, 25281. 
sappan, 25609. 
Cajan indicum, 25709. 
Canarium commune, 25684. 
Candelillo. See Euphorbia antisiphylitica. 
Carica papaya, 25692. 
Carissa edulis, 25633. 
Carludovica sp., 25534. 
Cashew. See Anacardium occidentale. 
Cassava (Brazil), 25198 to 25203. 
Chalcas paniculatus, 25350. 
"Chestnut, water." See Eleocharis tube- 

rosa. 
Chick-pea. See Cicer arielinum. 
Chloris submutica, 25204. 
Cicer arietinum, 25713. 
Citrullus vulgaris, 25504. 
Citrus australasica, 25620. 
australis, 25619. 
bergamia, 25544. 
decumana, 25506, 25509. 
nobilis, 25545. 

Xaurantium, 25196. 
Claucena lansium, 25546. 
Clover, alsike. See Trifolium hybridum. 

red. See Trifolium pratense. 
Corn (Costa Rica), 25660. 

(Peru), 25252. 
Cowpea, Improved Louisiana Wild, 25512. 

See also Vigna unguiculata. 
Crab apple (Alaska), 25630. 
Crinodendron patagua, 25489. 
Cucumis melo, 25464, 25494 to 25503, 25538 
to 25540. 
dudaim, 25618. 
Cucurbita pepo, 25594, 25595. 
Cyamopsis tetragonoloba , 25708. 
Cydonia sp., 25625, 25699. 
Cynara scolymus, 25524, 25525. 
Cyphomandra betacea, 25515. 

43 



44 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Daisy, Barberton. B< i jamesoni. 

I > ichampsia alpiiia, 25368. 

atropurpurea, 25369 to 25371. 
/- . 2 »634. 

Divi-divi. See Caesalpinia coriaria, 
Dolichos bifloru8 t 25704. 

laMab, 25256, 25440, 25648. 

\charis tubi rosa, 25641. 
Embothrium coccineum y 25491, 25492. 

Hum 8t in, ii<" ii, 25205. 
Eucalyptus trabvti, 25246. 
Eucryphia cordifolia, 25490. 
Euphorbia antisiphylitica, 25511. 

Festuca elaiior, 25206, 25207. 

arundinacea, 25208, 25209. 
spectabilis, 25210, 25211. 

Galega officinalis, 25481. 

( uranium, rose. See Pelargonium odora- 

tissimum. 

Gerbera jamesoni, 25513. 

G( vuina avellana, 25611. 

Ginger (India), 25315. 

Gladiolus sp., 25532. 

Glycine hispida, 25212, 25437, 25438, 

25468, 25649 to 25658, 25716. 
Grass, rye, "Western Wolths, 25522. 
Greigia landbecki, 25473. 
sphacelata, 25476. 
Guamuchitl. See Pithecolobium dulce. 
Gunnera chUensis, 25477. 

Hippeatfrum viltatum, 25224. 
Ilnrdeum sp., 25260, 25671, 25672. 

vulgare, 25673, 25674. 
Hyphaene thebaica, 25636, 25637. 

Ilex paraguariensis, 25529. 
Ipomoea sp., 25250, 25610. 

jalapa, 25248. 

setosa, 25249. 

sinuata, 25247. 

Jubaea chilensis, 25612. 

Lapageria rosea, 25470. 
Lathyrus sativus, 25517, 25712. 
Lecythis usitata, 25435. 
Leitchee. See Litchi chinensis. 
Lens esculenta, 25710. 
Litchi chinensis, 25274. 
Lolium multiflorum, 25522. 

168 



MaiuaBp., 25626 to 25628, 25700,25701. 
diversifolictf 25630. 
qjlvestri*, 25629. 
Mangifera indica, 25505, 25059. 
Mango, Caraboa, 25659. 

< .n|>all>lio;_ r , 25505. 
Manihotsp., 25198 to 25203. 

dichotoma, 25507. 
Medicago sativa, 25192 to 25194, 25221 to 

25223, 25244, 25257, 
25264, 25267, 25269, 
25270, 25277 to 2527<», 
25327, 25483, 254S4, 
25537, 25561, 2?605 to 
25607. 
i aria, 25265, 25268. 
Melilot (King Island), 25465. 
Melilotussp., 25216. 

indica, 25465. 
messanensis, 25213. 
suaveolens, 25214. 
wolgica, 25215. 
Melon, fragrant (Chile), 25618. 
Millet, pearl. See Pennisetum ameri- 
canum. 
(Togo), 25343, 25344. 
Millettia ferruginea, 25635. 
Mucuna sp., 25685, 25686. 

atropurpurea, 25347. 
gigantea, 25514. 
Muskmelon (Chile), 25494 to 25503. 
Makuwa-uri, 25464. 
Spanish winter, 25538 to 
25540. 

Nageia elata, 25608. 
Nuytsia floribunda, 25640. 

Oat (Austria), 25258. 

(Italy), 25319,25518,25519. 

(Palestine), 25259. 

(Eoumania), 25580 to 25591. 

(Spain), 25317, 25318, 25320 to 25326, 
25351 to 25367, 25389, 25390. 

(Turkey in Asia), 25621. 
Olea verrucosa, 25520, 25521. 
Olive, wild (South Africa), 25520, 25521. 
Orange, Clementine, 25196. 
Oryza sativa, 25469, 25596 to 25604, 25702, 
25703. 

Papaw (India), 25692. 

Pea, chick. See Cicer arietinum. 



INDEX OF COMMON AND SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



45 



Pea, field. See Pimm arvense. 
Peach, Tenshin blood, 25309. 
Pear (China), 25622, 25623. 
Pelargonium odoratissimum, 25253. 
Penniselum americanum, 25343, 25344. 
Persea gratissima, 25614 to 25617. 
Phalaris minor, 25217. 
Phaseolus aconitifolius, 25707. 

angularis, 25255. 

calcaratus, 25523. 

max, 25705. 

radiatus, 25516, 25706. 

vulgaris, 25218, 25646, 25647, 
25683. 
Phleum panicidatum, 25219. 
Phragmites vulgaris, 25613. 
Physalis sp., 25480. 
Pinus gerardiana, 25316. 
Pisam arvense, 25280, 25439, 25680, 25711. 
Piihecolobium duke, 25690, 25691, 25694. 
Pomelo, Amoy, 25506. 

See also Citrus decumana. 
Pritchardia pacifica, 25533. 
Pyrus sp., 25622, 25623. 

Quebracho Colorado. See Schinopsis bal- 

ansae. 
Quince (China), 25625, 25699. 

Radish (China), 25593. 
Raphanus sativus, 25593. 
Raphionacme uiilis, 25547. 
Raspberry (Philippine Islands), 25466. 
Rice, Baixau, 25702. 

(Cochin China), 25702, 25703. 

Jarahan, 25602. 

Jarahur, 25601. 

Joviva, 25600. 

Joyia, 25604. 

Mutmuria, 25596 to 25599. 

Nep, 25703. 

Sahandeya, 25603. 

Szemiu, 25469. 

(Trinidad) , 25596 to 25604. 
See also Oryza sativa. 
Rollinia emarginata, 25528. 
Rubber, Ecanda, 25547. 

Manicoba de Jequie, 25507. 
(Ochilesco), 25547. 
Rubus sp., 25466. 
Rumex romassa, 25472. 
Rye, Petkoff Winter, 25665. 

Saccharum officinarum, 25225 to 25242. 
Salix humboldtiana, 25474. 
Sapucaia nut. See Lecythis usitata. 
168 



Schinopsis balansae, 25717. 
Schoenocaulon officinale, 25508. 
Sebadilla. See Schoenocaulon officinale. 
Secale cereale, 25665. 
Semele androgyna, 25631. 
Sesamum orientale, 25681. 
Silk, vegetable. See Bombax sp. 
Solanum zuccagnianum, 25467. 
Sophora macrocarpa, 25478. 

tetraptera, 25479. 
Morbus sp., 25624. 

Sorghum, durra, red (Abyssinia), 25675. 

yellowish (Abyssinia), 
25676, 25677. 
(Togo), 25328 to 25342. 
See also Andropogon sorghum. 
Soy bean, brown, 25212. 

(China), 25437, 25438, 25649 to 

25658. 
Wisconsin Black, 25468. 
yellow, 25716. 
See also Glycine hispida. 
Squash (Japan), 25594, 25595. 
Stizolobium sp., 25197, 25254, 25261 to 

25263, 25715. 
Sugar cane (Cuba), 25225 to 25242. 

Terminalia bellerica, 25541. 
chebula, 25542. 
Tree tomato. See Cyphomandra betacea. 
Trifolium hybridum, 25485, 25486. 
pratense, 25266, 25487. 
' suaveolens, 25276. 
Triticum sp., 25666 to 25670. 

aestivum, 25243. 
Tumboa bainesii, 25436. 
Turnip (China), 25592. 

Undetermined, 25475, 25482, 25488. 

Vegetable silk. See Bombax sp. 
Viciafaba, 25642 to 25645, 25678, 25679. 
Vigna unguiculata, 25512, 25714. 

" Water chestnut." See Eleocharis tube- 

rosa. 
Watermelon (Chile), 25504. 
Weinmannia trichosperma, 25493. 
Wheat (Abyssinia), 25666 to 25670. 

(Korea), 25243. 

(Palestine), 25260. 

Xanthorrhoea preissii, 25639. 

Zea mays, 25252, 25660. 
Zinziber officinale, 25315. 



o 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 176. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909: 

INVENTORY No. 20; Nos. 25718 to 26047. 



Issued April 23, 1910. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1910. 



BULLETINS OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 

The scientific and technical publications of the Bureau of plant Industry, which was organized July 1, 
1901, arc Issued in a sin bulletins, a lisl Of which follows. 

At 'cut ion is directed to the fact thai the publications in this aeries arc not (or general distribution. Tl e 
irlntendenf of Documents, Govenhnenl Printing Office, Washington, D. C, Is authorized by law bo 
Ball them at cost, and to him all applications for these bulletins should be made, accompanied bj a po bal 
money order for the required amount or by cash. Numbers omitted from this list can not be furnished. 

Spermatogenesis and Fecundation of Zamia. 1901. Price, 20 cents. 
3. Macaroni Wheats. 1901. Price* 20 cents. 

improvement in Arizona. 1901. Price, 10 cents. 

8. A Collection of Fungi Prepared for Distribution. 1902. Price, L0 cents, 
I'he North American species of Spartina. 1902. Trice, R> cents. 

10. Records of Seed Distribution, etc. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

11. Johnson Grass. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

13. Range Improvement in Central Texas. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

14. The Decay of Timber and Methods of Preventing It. 1902. Price, 55 cents. 

15. Forage Conditions on the Border of the Great Basin. 1902. Price. 15 cents. 
17. Some Diseases of the Cowpea. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

20. Manufacture of Semolina and Macaroni. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

22. Injurious Effects of Premature Pollination. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

23. Berseem: The Great Forage and Soiling Crop of Nile Valley. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 

24. Unfermented Grape Must. 1902. Price, 10 cents. 

25. Miscellaneous Papers. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

27. Letters on • -Agriculture in the West Indies, Spain, etc. 1902. Price, 15 cents. 
29. The Effect of Black-Rot on Turnips. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

31. Cultivated Forage Crops of the Northwestern states. 1902. T'rii e, 10 cents. 

32. A Disease of the White Ash. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

33. North American Species of Leptochloa. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

35. Recent Foreign Explorations. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

36. rhe •' Bluing" of Western Yellow Pine, etc. 1903. Price, 30 cents. 

37. Formation of Spores in Sporangia of Rhizopus Nigricans, etc. 1903. Price; 15. cents*, 

38. Forage Conditions in Eastern Washington, etc. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

39. The Propagation of the Easter Lily from Seed. 1903. Price, lOcenls. 

41. The Commercial Grading of Com." 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

42. Three New Plant Introductions from Japan. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

47. The Description of Wheat Varieties. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

48. The Apple in Cold Storage. 1903. Price, 15 cents. 

49. Culture of the Central American Rubber Tree. 1903. Price, 25 cents. 

50. Wild Rice: Its Uses and Propagation. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

51. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 
54. Persian Gulf Dates. 1903. Price, 10 cents. 

59. Pasture, Meadow, and Forage Crops in Nebraska. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

60. A Soft Rot of the Calla Lily. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

61. The Avocado in Florida. 1904. Price, 5 cents. 

62. Notes on Egyptian Agriculture. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

67. Range Investigations in Arizona. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

68. North American Species of Agrostis. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

69. American Varieties of Lettuce. 1904. Price, 15 cents. 

70. The Commercial Status of Durum Wheat. 1904. Price, 10 cents. 

71. Soil Inoculation for Legumes. 1905. Price, 15 cents. 

72. Miscellaneous Papers. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

73. The Development of Single-Germ Beet Seed. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

74. Prickly Pear and Other Cacti as Food for Stock. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

75. Range Management in the State of Washington. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

76. Copper as an Algicide and Disinfectant in Water Supplies. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

77. The Avocado, a Salad Fruit from the Tropics. 1905. Price. 5 cents. 

79. Variability of Wheat Varieties in Resistance to Toxic Salts. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

80. Agricultural Explorations in Algeria. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

81. Evolution of Cellular Structures. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

82. Grass Lands of the South Alaska Coast. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

83. The Vitality of Buried Seeds. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

84. The Seeds of the Bluegrasses. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

85. Principles of Mushroom Growing and Mushroom Spawn Making. 1905. Price, 10 cents. 

86. Agriculture without Irrigation in the Sahara Desert. 1905. Price, 5 cents. 

88. Weevil-Resisting Adaptations of the Cotton Plant. 1906. Price, 10 cents. 

89. Wild Medicinal Plants of the United States. 1906. Price, 5 cents. 

90. Miscellaneous Papers. 1906. Price, 5 cents. 

91. Varieties of Tobacco Seed Distributed, etc. 1906. Price, 5 cents. 

94. Farm Practice with Forage Crops in Western Oregon, etc. 1906. Price, 10 cents. 

95. A New Type of Red Clover. 1906. Price, 10 cents. 

96. Tobacco Breeding. 1907. Price, 15 cents. 

97. Seeds and Plants Imported. Inventory No. 11. 1907. Price, 15 cents. 

98. Soy Bean Varieties. 1907. Price, 15 cents. 

[Continued on page 3 of cover.] 
176 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 176. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 

DURING THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1 
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909: 



INVENTORY No. 20; Nos. 25718 to 26047. 



LJBR 
NEW YORK 
BOX, I 



Issued April 23, 1910. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 

1910, 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Assistant Chief of Bureau, G. Harold Powell. 
Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Clerk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 
scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett, Albert Mann. George W. Oliver, Walter Van Fleet, and Peter Bisset, Experts. 

Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer. 

H. V. Harlan, H. C. Skeels, and R. A. Young, Assistants. 

Edward Goucher and P. J. Wester, Assistant Propagators, 

17G 
2 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. C, December 24, 1909. 

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith, and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin No. 176 of the series of this Bureau, the 
accompanying manuscript, entitled "Seeds and Plants Imported 
during the Period from July 1 to September 30, 1909: Inventory 
No. 20; Nos. 25718 to 26047." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 

in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 

publication. 

Respectfully, 

B. T. Galloway, 

Chief of Bureau. 

Hon. James Wilson, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

176 3 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 9 

Publication of new names 31 

Index of common and scientific names 33 

170 5 



B. P. I.— 541. 

SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909: 
INVENTORY NO. 20; NOS. 257 18 TO 26047. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

This inventory, covering the first quarter of the fiscal year from July 
1 to September 30, 1909, contains 329 introductions. The first quar- 
ter has always been light, so far as the number of introductions is 
concerned. This quarter's introductions have been unusually so, 
owing to the fact that no explorers were in the field and changes in the 
office force interfered with regular correspondence; further, to the 
fact that only those introductions deemed of special interest are 
being included, those considered of minor importance being recorded 
in the office files only. 

Of unusual interest in this invent ory might be mentioned the 
following introductions: 

Numbers 25858 and 25859 cover the seeds of the rattan palms 
which supply the valuable material for the manufacture of cane- 
seated chairs, street-car seats, baskets, etc., and whose cultivation 
as a tropical crop seems to have been given very little attention. 
The ability of these climbing palms to thrive in dense jungles is be- 
lieved to be worthy the attention of tropical planters in the Western 
Hemisphere. 

An importation of seeds of the ^Queensland nut,' Macadamia 
ternifolia (Xo. 25845), calls attention to the possibilities of cultivating 
this plant in parts of California and southern Florida. Trees are 
now growing in southern California which have borne nuts for the 
past two seasons. The Macadamia is being cultivated in Queens- 
land and New South Wales, and, according to our information, the nuts 
are verv well liked in Svdnev, where they retail for as much as a 
shilling a pound. 

In order to aid in the experiments with the horse bean, Vicia faba, 
which are being carried on by the Office of Forage-Crop Investiga- 
tions, a collection of this important winter legume, adapted to the 
mild winters of the Southwestern States, has been gathered together 
from India, Egypt, Holland, Hungary, China, Kashmir, and Spain, 
and it is hoped that more definite information can be secured regard- 
ing the adaptability of this crop to our southwestern country. 

The "Monketaan' stock melon (No. 25934) comes to us recom- 
mended by Mr. Lounsbury and Mr. Thornton, of the Department of 

176 7 



8 \M» PLANTS [MPORTED. 

Agricull ure of Cape Colony, as a plant worthy of being given unusual 
a 1 1 cm! ion. According to their statements, this melon, which is of the 
nature of a watermelon, is quite distinct From the well-known Tsama 
melon, which errows on the wesl side of the Kalihari desert. This 

■ 

is found on the east side of the doc:! and is remarkable for the lii<di 
yield of melons to the acre. As many as 150 tons have been pro- 
duced to the acre, 75 tons being not at all unusual. 

The interest in new varieties of mangos lias become general enough 
in Florida to warrant our calling particular attention to the "Pahu- 
tan' mango (No. Jo!) 10), introduced by Mr. William S. Lyon from 
the Philippines. Although not as Large a fruit or as small seeded as 
some of the East Indian mangos, it fruits early and is enormously 
prolific (which some of the East Indian varieties are not). Accord- 
ing to Mr. Lyon its sweetness and juiciness are unapproached by any 
other of the many Filipino mangos he has eaten. Its thick skin will 
probably make it a good shipper. 

The oriental Myrica nagi has been introduced under No. 25908. 
This extremely interesting fruit plant, whose dark wine-colored fruits 
are exceedingly ornamental, has not been given the attention which it 
deserves. There seem to be a number of varieties of this fruit, and, 
although it is a slow-grow T ing tree and late coming into bearing, it is 
deserving of a trial in California and northern Florida. 

The great value of a variety of cherry which is hardier in fruit bud 
than other cherries is conceded by the horticulturists of the North 
western States. Those who are breeding or experimenting with 
cherries will therefore be interested in the introduction of Prunus 
tomentosa (No. 25880), which has been especially recommended by 
Professor Macoun, of the Experimental Farm at Ottawa, Canada. 
Trees of this species have been placed in the Upper Mississippi Valley 
Plant Introduction Garden at Ames, Iowa, for further trial and 
propagation. 

Of especial interest and problematic value is a collection of peach, 
apricot, and cherry seeds from the Himalayas (Nos. 25894 to 25896). 
The Indian bael fruit (Nos. 25879, 25889, 25890, and 25912) is one 
which may prove valuable for making sherbets and for the flavoring 
of soft drinks. A collection of varieties of tropical corn, representing 
some of the best work done by the Harvard Experiment Station in 
Cuba; a collection of oats from Algeria, Palestine, Sweden, and Tur- 
key for the oat breeders; and a wild olive, Olea foveolata (No. 25846), 
from the East London district of Cape Colony, are also worthy of 
special mention. 

David Fairchild, 

* 

Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. C, December %4, 1909. 

176 



INVENTORY. 



25718 to 25722. 

From Cartago, Costa Rica. Presented by Mr. C. Werckle. Received July 2, 1909. 
Seeds of the following; descriptive notes by Mr. Werckle. 

25718. Anacardium occidentale L. Cashew. 

"These seeds are from the best and largest varieties I could find; red, yellow, 
and tawn color, the latter are the best. They are from the large grove of Don 
Rafael Yglesias, in the Cazalar." 

25719. CUCURBITA MOSCHATA Duch. 

"Pipian. Most prolific pumpkin of the Pacific coast. Full; white fleshed." 

25720. Carica papaya L. Papaw. 
"Good, very large variety." 

25721. Carica peltata Hook. & Arn. 

"Suara. Fruit very small, globular, full (no cavity), sweet, and fragrant. 
For crossing. Eaten with the seeds as Granadilla. Ovary full, on account of 
formation of cellular tissue on the funiculus the funiculi of the center of the 
placenta are very long. Pulp soft, skin very thin." 

Distribution. — A native of Central America, found on the coast of Nicaragua 
and Costa Rica. 

25722. Carica papaya £ X peltata $ 

"Small, sweet, fragrant fruits, not full or solid as the Suara." 

25723 and 25724. 

From Baroda, India. Presented by Mr. B. F. Cavanagh, superintendent, State 
Gardens. Received July 3, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25723. Terminally bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb. 
See S. P. I. Xo. 25541 for description. 

25724. Phyllanthus emblica L. 

"A small deciduous tree of the family Euphorbiacese, found in China, Japan, 
India, and elsewhere. The unripe fruit, formerly official in medicine, is 
known commercially as emblic myrobalans and with the leaves and bark ia 
used in tanning. The leaves have been found to contain 18 per cent tannin 
and the bark 12.6 per cent. Introduced for trial in the Southern States." 
(W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A large tree, native of tropical India, China, and the Malay 
Archipelago. 

25725 to 25728. 

From Baroda, India. Presented by Mr. B. F. Cavanagh, superintendent, State 
Gardens. Received July 6, 1909. 

21522— Bui. 176—10 2 9 



10 SEEDS A.\h PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25725 to 25728 Continued. 
Seede of the following 

25725. STIZOLOBIUM Bp 

25726 to 25728. DoLICHOS LABLAB L. Bonavist bean. 

25726. Black. 25728. Small red. 

25727. Large red. 

25729. Phaseolus lunatus L. 

From Antigua, Leeward Mauds, Wesl Indies. Presented by Mr. S. Jackson, 
curator, Government Botanic Station. Received July 3, 1909. 

■• Barbuda bean" 
25730 and 25731. Avexa spp. Oat. 

From Jerusalem, Palestine. Presented by Mr. E. F. Beaumont. Received 
July 6, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

25730. Avena sterilis L. 

25731. A VEX a sativa L. 
Grown from Jaffa seed. 

25732. Stizolobium sp. 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman. Received July 10, 1909. 
Black seeded. 

25733. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Bridgeport, Kans. Grown on the farm of Mr. Carl Wheeler. Numbered 
for convenience in recording distribution, July 12, 1909. 

"A plant selected for leafiness and seed production from same field which produced 
S. P. I. No. 19508. Grown at the Department greenhouse under Agros. No. 20." 
(/. M. Westgate.) 

25736. Zea mays L. Corn. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, gov- 
ernment agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. 
Received July 16, 1909. 

" Hickory King. A strain now being developed in South Africa." (Davy.) 

25738. Saccharum officixarum L. Sugar cane. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received July 2, 1909. 

"Arrows of one of our best varieties of sugar cane (G. Z. No. 247). Rather a large 
percentage of these seeds do not germinate." ( Treub.) 

25740. Paxicum palmaefolium Koen. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. 
Received July 19, 1909. 

'I do not consider this one of our best grasses, but it is a useful sort in shady places, 
in comparatively warm districts, and in forest glades." (Davy.) 

Distribution.— A native of tropical Africa, and extending to the Cape. 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 11 

25742 to 25752. 

From Bavaria, Germany. Presented by G. & S. Heil, Tiickelhausen, near 
Wiirzburg, Bavaria, through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received June, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

25742 and 25743. Hordeum distichon nutans Schubl. Barley. 

25742. HeiVs Banna No. 4- 

25743. HeiV 8 Hanna No. 2. 

25744 and 25745. Hordeum distichon L. Barley. 

25744. Original Franconian No. 1. 

25745. HeiVs Improved Franconian. 

25746 and 25747. Hordeum distichon nutans Schubl. Barley 

25746. HeiVs Hanna No. 1. 

25747. HeiVs Hanna No. 3. 

25748. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

Rimpau's Red Schlanstetter Summer. 
25749 and 25750. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

25749. Sraldfs Ligoivo. 

25750. Beseler No. 2. 

25751. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 
German. 

25752. Beta vulgaris L. Sugar beet. 

Remlingen. 

25753. Stizolobium sp. 

From Calcutta, India. Procured by Mr. William H. Michael, American consul- 
general, who purchased the seed from Mr. S. P. Chatterjee, seedsman. 
Received July 23, 1909. 

Mottled brown and black. 

25754. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From Tamsui (Daitotei), Formosa, Japan. Presented by Mr. Carl F. Deichman, 
American consul. Received July 26, 1909. 

"Seeds of a watermelon growing in the island of Formosa, which has a fairly good 
flavor and I believe with proper cultivation could be much improved in quality. 
The meat of the melon is a very pretty shade of yellow, from lemon to light-orange 
color, and the size averages about 12 inches in diameter. It would, no doubt, be 
quite acceptable in the larger restaurants of New York, where there is always a demand 
for something out of the ordinary. It is not rare here." (Deichman.) 

25755 to 25757. Stizolobium spp. 

From Reduit, Mauritius. Presented by Dr. P. Boname, director, Agricultural 
Station. Received July 26, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25755. Black. 

"This is the most extensively cultivated and seems to be the most 
vigorous." (Boname.) 

25756. Greenish yellow. 

25757. Yellowish, mottled with brown. 
176 



12 SEEDS ami PLANTS tMPOBTED. 

25758 to 25774. Xi:a mays L. Corn. 

From Ecuador. Presented by Mr. If. R. Dietrich, American consul-general, 
Guayaquil, Ecuador. Received July 10, 1909. 
Seede of the following; descriptive notes by Mr. Dietrich. 

25758. "MaizamarillogruesodeChillo (thick, yellow Chillo maize). Grown 
near Quito, Ecuador, at an elevation of about 8,500 feet, in rich, blaek, loamy 
soil. | )«.(•< well with moderate moisture and is considered to produce better 
than any other variety grown in Ecuador." 

25759. "Maiz bianco (white maize). Grown near Quito, Ecuador. Not 
quite as productive as some other varieties. It is claimed a good grade of 
meal may be made from it." 

25760. "Maiz morocho bianco (white 'twin' maize). Grown on the hacienda 
'Montezerin,' parish of Guayllabamba, near Quito, Ecuador. Elevation, 
7,500 feet; moderately warm climate; sandy loam soil, very moist on account 
of heavy rains. Produces fairly well." 

25761. "Maiz morocho grueso de Chillo, bianco (thick 'twin' Chillo maize, 
white). Grown near Quito, Ecuador. Large, white, and hard; grown at an 
elevation of 8,500 feet. Rich, black soil; moderate rainfall; produces well." 

25762. "Maiz morocho bianco is a type of the hard maize and is distinctive 
by the better quality of its chemical composition. It acquires greater pro- 
portions than other kinds and is as productive as the best varieties grown in 
Ecuador, but is somewhat slow in its growth and more dependent upon the 
conditions of the soil than other varieties. From this, it is claimed, comes 
the variety belonging to the hotter climates. This variety is grown in a 
different locality in Ecuador than numbers 25760, 25761, and 25763." 

25763. "Maiz morocho amarillo is a type of the hard maize and is distinctive 
by the better quality of its chemical composition. It acquires greater pro- 
portions than other kinds and is as productive as the best varieties grown in 
Ecuador, but is somewhat slow in its growth and more dependent upon the 
conditions of the soil than other varieties. From this, it is claimed, comes 
the variety belonging to the hotter climates. This variety is grown in a 
different locality in Ecuador than numbers 25760 to 25762." 

25764. "Maiz amarillo (yellow maize). Grown at Tumbaco, east of Quito, 
Ecuador, at an elevation of 8,000 feet. Soil, sandy loam; average rainfall; 
produces well. " 

25765. "Maiz amarillo (yellow maize). Grown on the hacienda Tina, parish 
of Conocoto, near Quito, Ecuador, at an elevation of 9,000 feet, in black soil. 
Does well with moderate rainfall. " 

25766. "Maiz delgado amarillo (thin, yellow maize). From parish of 
Quinche, near Quito, Ecuador. Grows in mixed or black sandy soil at an 
elevation of about 8,000 feet when abundant rain falls. " 

25767. "Maiz delgado pintado (thin, painted maize). From parish Pomasqui, 
near Quito, Ecuador. Elevation 8,000 feet; sandy soil; average rainfall; 
produces well. " 

25768. "Maiz del indio (the Indian's maize). Grown on the table-lands 
in the interior of Ecuador. " 

25769. "Maiz Cangil. Grown on the table-lands in the interior of Ecuador. " 

25770. "Maiz amarillo de Chillo (yellow Chillo maize). Grown on the table- 
lands in the interior of Ecuador. " 

176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 13 

25758 to 25774— Continued. 

25771. "Maiz negro (black maize). Grown on the table-lands in the interior 
of Ecuador. " 

25772. "Maiz amarillo comun (common yellow maize). Grown on the table- 
lands in the interior of Ecuador. " 

25773. "Maiz Chulpi. Grown on the table-lands in the interior of Ecuador. " 

25774. "Mixed corn grown on the low land near Guayaquil. Used for all 
purposes for which corn may be used. " 

25775. Jatropha sp. 

From Vera Cruz, Mexico. Presented by Mr. William W. Canada, American con- 
sul. Received July 23, 1909. 

"This seed came from a tree that grows wild in the lowlands of this district, is very 
abundant, and apparently also very rich in oil. The local name is Duraznillo, and its 
commercial value, if any, is unknown here. " {Canada.) 

25776. Lawsonia inermis L. 

From Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Presented by Mr. H. F. Schultz, horticul- 
turist. Received July 23, 1909. 

"This plant has proved very valuable here as an ornamental and flowering shrub. 
The individually small and rather insignificant yellow flowers form a compact, and 
yet graceful, panicle and are produced in great masses between the small fine foliage. 
The plant often produces flowers the first year and abundantly after that. The fra- 
grance is very strong, somewhat resembling that of Cestrum nocturnum, and, like the 
latter, is exhaled even more strongly in the evenings, from which characteristic it has 
obtained its local name Dama del noche. 

"Although I do not know whether this plant has ever been used for the manufacture 
of perfume I should think that it would be suitable for that purpose in frost-free 
regions of the United States." (Schultz.) 

"Known as henna, is a shrub long cultivated in the Orient, especially in Egypt and 
Arabia, where it is used for a variety of purposes. The flowers serve as a perfumery 
material by virtue of a volatile oil which they contain, having an odor said to closely 
resemble that of the tea rose. Besides their use in applications to wounds, sores, etc., 
the leaves are used in some regions to color the finger nails red. The root is astrin- 
gent." (R. H. True.) 

Distribution. — Probably a native of the northern part of Africa and western Asia; 
generally cultivated throughout the warmer parts of Asia and Africa. 

25777. Zizyphus jujuba (L.) Lam. 

From Paris, France. Purchased from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co. Received July 
27, 1909. 

Procured as a stock for Zizyphus saliva, Chinese date. See S. P. I. Nos. 23439 to 
23446 for description. 

25778 to 25781. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Agriculture. Received July 19, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25778. Black. 25780. Yellow. 

25779. Yellow. 25781. Brown. 
176 



14 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25782 and 25783. Ai.iu/./ia spp. 

From Buitenzorg, Java. Presented by Dr. M. Treub, director, Department of 
Sericulture, [leceived July 24, L909. 

Beds of the following: 

25782. Aihiz/ia sin-ri.ATA Boiv. 

\ large, deciduous, East-growing tree, whose wood is used for manufacturing 
cart wheels, wooden bells, cabinetwork, and furniture, as well as for fuel; the 
branches arc used for fodder, and the trunk yields a gUUX, which is used for sizing 
paper. It is a native of India and the Malay Archipelago, and widely distrib- 
uted in tropical and subtropical Asia. 

25783. Albizzia moluccana Miq. 

A tree with large compound leaves, and bearing flowers in small globular 
heads. The stamens are long and form an ornamental ball around the head of 
the flowers. The pods are long and strap shaped. It is a native of the Molucca 
Islands. 

25784. Avena sterilis L. Oat. 

From Mustapha-Alger, Algeria. Presented by Dr. L. Trabut, Government 
Botanic Gardens. Received July 26, 1909. 
''Variety sub-sativa. A cultivated oat developed by utilizing the spontaneous 
mutations of Avena sterilis.'" ( Trabut.) 

25785 to 25788. 

From Amani, Hafen Tanga, German East Africa. Presented by Dr. A. Zimmer- 
mann, Royal Agricultural Institute. Received July 24, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25785 to 25787. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

25785. Reddish brown. 

25786. Brown, speckled with black. 

25787. Mottled brown. 

25788. Pennisetum americanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

25797 and 25798. 

From Buenos Aires, Argentina. Presented by Dr. Carlos Thays, director, Botan- 
ical Garden. Received July 19, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25797. Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco Schlecht. Quebracho-bianco. 
"An evergreen tree of the family Apocynaceae, native of Argentina. The 

leaves are said to contain 27 per cent tannin. The bark, variously estimated 
as containing from 2 to 11 per cent tannin, has been used in leather making. 
The bark contains also 6 alkaloids, one of which, aspidiospermine, is regarded 
as of most importance as a drug." ( W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A large tree, native of the valley of La Plata River in 
Argentina. 

25798. Schinus huigan Molina. 

"This tree, of the family Anacardiacete, is a native of South America, and is 
closely related to the 'pepper tree' cultivated in California. It has been said 
to yield 19 to 20 per cent tannin, and according t*> Siewert the leaves are used 
in South America as a tanning material." (W. W. Stockberger.) 

Distribution. — A native of South America, being found in Brazil, Argentina, 
Uruguay, Chile, and Peru. 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 15 

25799 to 25802. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American con- 
sul. Received July 30, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25799. Cananga odorata (Lam.) Hook. f. & Thorn. Hang ilang. 

See S. P. I. Xo. 22744 for description. 

Distribution. — A native of Java and the Philippine Islands, and cultivated 
in India and other tropical countries. 

25800. Crinum asiaticum L. 

"I consider this one of the most ornamental plants I know for a lawn or a 
large jardiniere." (Conner.) 

Distribution. — Native and cultivated throughout tropical India and Ceylon. 

25801. Dipterocarpus dyeri Pierre . 

"Dau song nang." 

Distribution. — A large tree of the valley of the Donnai River, in the region 
around Saigon, Cochin China. 

25802. Dipterocarpus punctulatus Pierre. 
"Daudor 

Distribution. — Same as No. 25801. 

25803. Caesalpixia nuga (L.) Ait. 

From Luzon, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Manila, 
P.I. Received July 30, 1909. 

"A very attractive and sweet-scented, flowered, scandent shrub." (Lyon.) See 
S. P. I. No. 20944 for previous introduction and description. 

Distribution. — A native of the southern part of Asia, and extending through the 
Malay Archipelago and Polynesian Islands to Australia. 

25804 to 25807. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Mitchell, S. Dak. Presented by Prof. W. A. Wheeler, through Mr. Charles J. 
Brand. Received July 31, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25804. "''South Dakota No. 162.) Grimm alfalfa, crop of 1908. Originally 
grown at Kulsheim, near Tauberbischofsheim, Baden, Germany. (See S. P. 
I. No. 24767.) Brought to Carver County, Minn., in 1857, and grown there 
since 1858. Present sample grown at Mitchell, S. Dak., in 1908, from seed 
secured in Carver County, Minn., in 1904, and grown at Highmore, S. Dak., 
1905 to 1906. Highmore seed taken to Mitchell, S. Dak., in 1907, where it 
has since been grown. The 1907 crop of this same strain, grown at Mitchell, 
S. Dak., is under experiment under P. L. H. Nos. 3329 and 3331." (Brand.) 

25805. "(South Dakota No. 164.) Acclimatized Turkestan alfalfa, crop of 
1908. Originally imported from Tashkent, Turkestan, in 1898, under S. P. I. 
No. 991. Grown at Brookings, S. Dak., from 1898 to 1904. Brookings seed 
taken to Highmore, S. Dak., and grown there from 1905 to 1906. Highmore 
seed taken to Mitchell, S. Dak., and grown there since 1907. The 1907 crop 
of this number is under experiment under P. L. H. No. 3330." (Brand.) 

176 



16 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25804 to 25807— Continued. 

25806. "(South Dakota No. L67.) Of unknown origin. Purchased from a 
• .1 dealer at Bartford, S. Dak., in 1894, and grown near Baltic, S. Dak., 

from L894 to 1904. Baltic seed grown al Bighmore, S. Dak., from 1904 to 1906. 
Bighmore Beed grown at Mitchell, S. Dak., from 1907 to the present time. 
Seed of the L906 crop is under experiment under S. P. I. No. 19969 and 
P. L. II. No. 3251. The 1907 seed is under experiment under S. P. I. No. 
229 Hi and P. L. B. No. 3332. The present sample and S. P. I. No. 25537 are 
of the 1908 crop. (The so-called Baltic alfalfa.)" (Brand.) 

25807. "(South Dakota No. 240.) Acclimatized Turkestan alfalfa, crop of 
1908. This sample was grown from the same parent seed as No. 25805, South 
Dakota No. 164. This strain of Turkestan presents one of the most striking 
examples of acclimatization yet encountered. Seed of the original importa- 
tion, S. P. I. No. 991, was grown at Highmore, S. Dak., from 1899 until 1906. 
Highmore seed was taken to Mitchell, S. Dak., in 1901, where it has since 
been grown. The present sample and S. P. I. No. 25607 are of the 1908 seed 
crop, grown at Mitchell. The 1906 seed crop, grown at Highmore, is under 
experiment under P. L. H. No. 3252." (Brand.) 

25816. Tacca pinnatifida Forst. 

From Quilimane, Zambesia, Portuguese East Africa. Presented by Mr. O. W. 
Barrett, Director of Agriculture, Lourenco Marquez, Mozambique, Portuguese 
East Africa. Received July 31, 1909. 

"Semicultivated plant having 3 to 5 Amorphophallus-like leaves from a cluster of 
smooth, thin-skinned, roundish corms and a corymbose cluster of greenish flowers on 
the summit of a naked, yellowish, erect stipe (some 3 to 4 feet high, about twice height 
of leaves). Corms edible. The natives use it in a variety of ways — like potatoes and 
dry it in the form of a coarse flour. Habitat, gardens (and vicinity) of natives in 
Zambesia district. Native name, T tide." (Barrett.) 

Distribution. — Widely distributed in Africa, India, Australia, and the Pacific 
islands. 

25817. Barosma crenulata (L.) Hook. Buchu. 

From Cape Town, South Africa. Presented by Mr. Charles P. Lounsbury, govern- 
ment entomologist, Department of Agriculture. Received August 2, 1909. 

" Buchu succeeds best if sown in time and treated in the same way as nursery trans- 
plants. It naturally grows in amongst large rocks, so that the roots go into the ground 
at the side of the rocks or large stones; this keeps the roots cool, and the ground holds 
moisture longer. Buchu stands here at 1,500 to 4,000 feet elevation." (Lounsbury.) 

"This is a shrub about 3 feet high bearing short-petioled, opposite leaves, which 
vary in form from narrowly oval to lanceolate, with crenate margins and with the 
surface marked by pellucid oil glands. The leaves form a drug, official in many 
lands, in America under the name of buchu leaves, valued for their diaphoretic, diuretic, 
and tonic properties. They contain from 1 to 2 per cent of a volatile oil. The plant 
occurs uncultivated in the vicinity of Cape Town, South Africa." (R. II. True.) 

25822 to 25831. Gourd. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Hon. Dulany Hunter, consul-general. Re- 
ceived August 3, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

25822 to 25824. Lagenaria vulgaris Ser. 

25822. Ornamental, spiral shaped, climbing. 

25823. Ornamental, bottle shaped, climbing. 

25824. Bottle shaped. 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 17 

25822 to 25831— Continued. 

25825. Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roemer. 

Ornamental, sponge, climbing. 
25826 to 25830. Lagenaria vulgaris Ser. 

25826. Ornamental, stick shaped, grim. 

25827. Ornamental, pointed end, climbing. 

25828. Ornamental, siphon shaped, climbing. 

25829. Ornamental, climbing. From Corsica, Bachouela. 

25830. Ornamental. 

25831. Cucurbita pepo L. 

"The ' Festival des Gougourdcns ' is held here in the spring, and these seeds are from 
gourds which are exhibited thero. The nurseryman states that the seeds should be 
planted in a flowerpot and not transferred until the plant is about to throw out a few 
leaves; that the soil should be well manured, but not too abundantly, as in that case 
the gourd does not become sufficiently dry to be used for holding liquids. When the 
plants are large enough they are tied to trellis work so they car 1 be exposed to the sun. 
They need comparatively little water, and the fruit should be protected from heavy 
dews by being kept covered at night. The seeds are planted in the spring, and the 
fruit, which dries on the plant, is ready to bo gathered by the end of September or 
early in October. The peasants at Cimiez produce pipes and other articles of odd 
shapes by wrapping parts of the gourd before it has ripened with soft pieces of cloth, 
and are thus enabled to bend them into the form they wish to produce. In this way 
the covered parts do not develop freely, and, remaining soft, can be bent into the 
desired shape." (Hunter.) 

25841 to 25844. Allium cepa L. Onion. 

From Teneriffe, Canary Islands. Presented by Mr. Solomon Berliner, American 
consul. Received August 5, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25841. Bermuda Red. 25843. Bermuda White. 

25842. Wildpret's Golden. 25844. Crystal- Wax. 

25845. Macadamia ternifolia F. Muell. 

From Wellington Point, Queensland, Australia. Presented by Mr. J. Pink. 
Received August 2, 1909. 

For description, see S. P. I. No. 18382. 

Distribution. — A small tree, native of the eastern part of Australia, being found in 
the valleys of the rivers in the southeastern part of Queensland, and in New South 
Wales. 

25846. Olea foveolata E. Meyer. 

From East London district, Cape Colony, South Africa. Presented by Mr. 
Charles P. Lounsbury, government entomologist, Department cf Agriculture, 
who procured the seeds from Mr. Henry G. Flanagan, F. L. S., of "Prospect," 
Komgha district, for whom they were collected by a Mr. Oliver. Received 
August 9, 1909. 

"The district where these seeds were collected has a warm, temperate climate with 
about 30 inches of rainfall, chiefly in the summer months." (Lounsbury.) 

Distribution. — A tall shrub, native of the woods of the southern part of Africa. 

21522— Bui. 176—10 3 



18 SEEDS \M> PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25847. Protea grandiflora Thunb. 

Prom Grahams town, Cape Colony, South Africa. Presented by Mr. J. Medley 
Wood, director, Botanic Gardens. Received July 31, L909. 

\ Bnrub "i" Bmall tree, :'> t<> 10 feel high, with oblong, sessile, shining leaves, and 
large, white flower heads, which resemble a globe artichoke in appearance. 

25848. Schleichera trijuga Willd. Kussum. 

Prom Dhamtari, Raipur, India. Presented by A. E. Lowrie, esq., Deputy Con- 
servator of Forests. Received August 12, 19(H). 

"This seed ought t<> he sown in fairly rich sandy loam, in hoxes, to begin with. 
When the young plains are about 9 inches high they should he planted out in a well- 
drained sandy soil."' (Lowrie.) 

■ This Indian tree, known as the lac tree or Ceylon oak, is one of the sources of shel- 
lac. The wingless female of the lac insect (Tachardia lacca Kerr) with its piercing 
mouth parts punctures the bark of the young, tender twigs, from which the shell ic 
flows down the stems and hardens. The seeds yield a fatty oil, the so-called 'Macassar' 
oil. which contains free hydrocyanic acid, as well as the glycerides of oleic, palmitic, 
and arachidic acids. The wood, which is much used, is hard and durable and takes 
a polish. The sapwood is white, the heartw r ood is reddish brown. "' (R. IF. True.) 

Distribution. — A large tree, native throughout central and southern India, and 
extending through the Malay Archipelago to the Philippines. 

25849 to 25856. Avexa sativa L. Oat. 

From Madrid, Spain. Presented by Mr. A. Ramirez, El Hogar Espaiiol. Re- 
ceived August 13, 190!). 

Seeds of the following: 

25849. Open, white, panicle. 

25850. Large, white. 

25851. Common. 

25852. Large, white, panicle. 

25853. Black, open, panicle. 

25854. Black. 

25855. Black oat with pendent panicle. 

25856. Yellow. 

25857. Vigxa unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Venice, Italy. Presented by Dr. Angelo Sullam, of Portotolle, Taglia di 
Po, Italy, through Mr. Haven Metcalf. Received August 14, 1909. 
Black-Eye. 

25858 to 25860. 

From the Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Manila. Re- 
ceived August 16, 1909. 

Plants of the following: 

25858 and 25859. Calamus sp. 

25858. From Batanes Islands. 

25859. From Palawan Island. 
"Palasan". 

"All the good rattans I know are strictly equatorial and not to be thought of 
in any of our occidental possessions other than the Canal Zone. I have crossed 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 19 

25858 to 25860— Continued. 
25858 and 25859— Continued, 
the Isthmus twice. The yellow clay still impresses my memory with its sticki- 
ness and with its similarity to the yellow clays of Mount Canlaon (Negros), where 
I think perhaps I have seen the most riotous growth of Palasan — our best rat- 
tan. As I remember it. the rainfall on the Isthmus is probably about 2,400 to 
2,500 mm. (94 to 98 inches). If it is less than 2,000 mm. (about 79 inches), I 
think rattans would not do much, although at Perak the precipitation is less 
and they raise some good, long-jointed Junes. 

"For environment the rattan want jungle and plenty of it. My remem- 
brance of the zone is that the nills were unbroken jungle. Calamus must have 
a thick mass of medium-sized vegetation to scramble over. 

"There is a single feature of Calamus culture which differentiates it posi- 
tively from every other sylvan product with which I am acquainted. It is 
(if there be any such thing) an exception to the law of selection. All are fit 
to survive, under conditions where all other species except those fortuitously 
well placed would succumb. No amount of crowding or shading seems to 
choke off a young rattan. Its progress is tedious under adverse conditions, 
but it struggles up till it gets light and then nothing but the bolo or cutlass 
can hold it back. In planting practice, this gives it a supreme advantage over 
most plants. Further, it eliminates the bugbear and expense of jungle clear- 
ing, a matter which is to be heavily reckoned. I am not prepared to give a 
thesis on rattan culture, but close observation of its behavior in our smooth 
bamboo (cana boho), which makes a thicket impervious to any animal except 
a wild pig and which is voracious enough to choke out every other kind of 
vegetable life except Calamus, inspires me with exceptional credulity to 
believe it can be grown more nearly as a purely spontaneous crop than any 
economic product known, not excepting common timber trees. 

"I am not advocating complete neglect; removal of a fallen limb or a rank 
herbaceous weed, or an occasional slash with a bolo, would probably accelerate 
growth, but it is not an essential factor to success. The best commercial rat- 
tans, both Calamus and Damonorpas, are spiny as hedgehogs and immune 
from the raids of even deer. Best of all, they are renascent from the butt, 
and the same land and same planting may be cut over in six or seven years for 
a second time. There are two very serious drawbacks to a very general adop- 
tion of rattan planting for profit. One, their shy fruiting habits and conse- 
quent scarcity of seed; the other, slow development. 

"The fruits are eaten by birds, and seeds can only be obtained where they 
are concealed from the birds. All the species, I fancy, are, as seeds, of fugitive 
vitality. This is not only my own limited experience, but is evidently that 
of European seedsmen—those who are specialists in palm seeds, and who rarely 
offer them for sale. As most of the species until they reach the sprawling age 
are remarkably ornamental, far more so than most palms, I can only explain 
their absence from catalogues of tropical ornamentals upon these grounds. 

"I can give you no idea of the time required to yield a crop. I only know 
that the crop is slow, very slow. The renewal crop is rapid. I have seen canes 
on cut-over lands which had been stripped four years before. I think in five 
or six years at most, and on poor lands, a second crop can be depended upon. 
A seedling crop, perhaps, in 10 years." (Lyon.) 

25860. Livistona whitfordii Beccari. 

"This is far more compact, bushy, and ornamental than Livistona rotundi- 
folia." (Lyon.) 

Distribution. — A native of the province of Tayabas in the island of Luzon. 
17G 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS EMPORTED. 

25861. Ma n<. 1 1 i i; \ ENDICA L. Mango. 

Prom Trinidad, BritiahWesI [ndies. Presented by Mr. !•'. Evans, acting superin- 
tendent, Botanic Gardens. Received August is. L909. 

dp. 
.1 , . See S. I". I. No. 21515 for previous introduction and description. 

25862. Citrus nobilis Lour. 

From Saigon, Cochin China. Presented by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American 
consul. Received Augusl 11. !!><•!>. 

ds. 

"A very fine, Hal, green-skinned mandarin orange, a little Larger than the ordinary 
onee of this type. The flesh is quite reddish in color, and the flavor is a combination 
of thai of the ordinary flat and the round loose-skin oranges." Conner.) 

25863 to 25866. 

From Nairobi, British East Africa. Presented by Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Akeley, 
Chicago, 111., through Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received August 17, 1909. 

Seeds of the following economic plants, grown by the Wakamba tribe of natives: 

25863. Pennisetu.m a.mericanum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 
Cat-tail millet, called by the Wakamba tribe Mwee. 

25864. Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn. Ragi millet. 
Wimbi. 

25865. Cajan indicum Spreng. 

A species of bean. Mr. Akeley states that this is a bean of rapid growth which 
the natives use for wood. 

25866. Zea mays L. Corn. 
A variety of Indian corn grown by the Wakamba tribe. 

25867. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From Merw, Russian Turkestan. Presented by Capt. M. L. Cummins, Sixteenth 
Infantry, U. S. Army, Fort Crook, Nebr. Received August 13, 1909. 

'The melon is orange colored and not reddish inside, and in my opinion was the 
best I have ever eaten. The seeds came from a melon I had in Merw in the south- 
central part of Turkestan." (Cummins.) 

25868 to 25869. 

From Lourenco Marquez, Portuguese East Africa. Presented by Mr. 0. W. 
Barrett, Director of Agriculture. Received August 14, 1909. 

25868. (Undetermined.) 

"(No. 29, June 28, 1909.) From Nhamacurra, Quilimane, Portuguese East 
Africa. Native name (Chizena) 'Mucuipile.' A forest plant growing in sandy 
soil. Rhizome (attaining a weight of several pounds), irregular in shape; 
starch content moderate. Height 2 to 4 feet." (Barrett.) 

25869. Gladiolus sp. 

"(No. 28, June 28, 1909.) From Nhamacurra, Quilimane, Portuguese East 
Africa. Native name (Chizena) 'Tumbanimasa.' A plant of the low moist 
lands of the Zambezi Valley. Flower pale yellow, medium size, opening 
nearly downward. Bulb, pale-brown coat, yellow inside. Height 2 to 3 
feet." (Barrett.) 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 21 

25870. Stizolobium sp. 

From Barbados, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. Francis Watts, Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture, through Mr. John R. Bovell, superintendent. Received 
August 4, 1909. 

" Bengal bean." 

25871. Trifolium pratense L. Red clover. 

From Huntsville, Ala. Purchased from Mr. Clarendon Davis. Received 
August 6, 1909. 

"Seed of red clover, which has proved disease resistant at Huntsville, where red 
clover usually suffers severely. This strain was developed from surviving plants." 
(/. M. Westgate.) 

25874. Passiflora editlis Sims. Passion fruit. 

From Sydney, Australia. Presented by Van Dyk & Lindsay, importers, 209 
Washington street, New York, X. Y. Received August 20, 1909. 
See S. P. I. No. 12899 for description. 
Distribution. — A native of Brazil, and cultivated in other tropical countries. 

25876. Piiaseolus lunatus L. 

Presented by Mr. O. W. Barrett, Director of Agriculture, Lourenco Marquez, 
Portuguese East Africa. Received August 21, 1909. 

"(No. 30, July 24, 1909.) A slender-stem, climbing, bean-like plant received from 
Mr. Henry Brown, of Mlanje, Nyasaland, and stated by him to have been brought 
from the Kongo basin. Grown at Lourenco Marquez. Flowers in short racemes, 
whitish." (Barrett.) 

25879. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 

From Lahore, Punjab, India. Presented by Mr. W. R. Mustoe, superintendent, 
Government Archaeological Gardens. Received July 31, 1909. 

See S. P. I. No. 24450 for description. 

25880. Prunus tomentosa Thunb. 

From Ottawa, Canada. Presented by Mr. W. T. Macoun, horticulturist, Central 
Experimental Farm. Received at the Upper Mississippi Plant Introduction 
Garden, Ames, Iowa, July 29, 1909. 

"(Ames Ac. No. 458, 1909.) 'This cherry appears to be hardier in fruit bud than 
any other cherry we have at the Experimental Farm, and as it makes good preserves 
and is fair eating I think it quite an acquisition.' (Macoun.) For more complete 
description, see Annual Report, W. T. Macoun, horticulturist, Central Experimental 
Farm, Ottawa, Canada. 1908 : 106." (S. A. Beach.) 

Distribution. — A shrub or small tree, occurring in the northwestern part of India, 
northern China, Manchuria, and Japan. 

25884 to 25887. 

From Cochin China. Secured by Mr. Xavier Salomon, chief, Botanical Garden, 
Saigon, and presented by Mr. Jacob E. Conner, American consul. Received 
August 24, 1909. 
17G 



22 SKIDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25884 to 25887 Continued. ] 

Plants of the follow ing: 

25884 to 25886. From Cape St. Jacques. 

25884. ClNNAMOMl \l LOUREIRH Xees. 

"This Bpecies is supposed to ho one of the most valuable sources of 
some of i he besl cinnamon thai comics to our market." (II. II. True.) 

Distribution. A native of the mountains of Cochin China and of Japan. 

25885. Atai.antia sp. 

25886. Tetracronia cymosa Pierre. 

Distribution. — A shrub or small tree, native of the mountains in the 
vicinity of Binh Dinh, French Indo-China. 

25887. Garcinia mangostana L. Mangosteen. 

From Saigon. "This delicious fruit is about the size of a mandarin orange, 
round and slightly flattened at each end, with a smooth, thick rind, rich red- 
purple in color, with here and there a bright, hardened drop of the yellow juice 
which marks some injury to the rind when it was young. As these mangosteens 
are sold in the Dutch East Indies — heaped up on fruit baskets or made up into 
long, regular bunches, with thin strips of braided bamboo — they are as strik- 
ingly handsome as anything of the kind could well be, but it is only when the 
fruit is opened that its real beauty is seen. The rind is thick and tough, and 
in order to get at the pulp inside it requires a circular cut with a sharp knife 
to lift the top half off like a cap, exposing the white segments, five, six, or seven 
in number, lying loose in the cup. The cut surface of the rind is of a most 
delicate pink color and is studded with small yellow points formed by the drops of 
exuding juice. As you lift out of this cup, one by one, the delicate segments, 
which are the size and shape of those of a mandarin orange, the light-pink sides 
of the cup and the veins of white and yellow embedded in it are visible. The 
separate segments are between snow-white and ivory in color and are covered 
with a delicate network of fibers, and the side of each segment where it presses 
against its neighbor is translucent and slightly tinged with pale green. As one 
poises the dainty bit of snowy fruit on his fork and looks at the empty pink 
cup from which it has been taken, he hardly knows whether the delicate flavor 
or the beautiful coloring of the fruit pleases him the more, and he invariably 
stops to admire the rapidly deepening color of the cut rind as it changes on 
exposure to the air from light pink to deep brown. The texture of the man- 
gosteen pulp much resembles that of a well-ripened plum, only it is so delicate 
that it melts in your mouth like a bit of ice cream. The flavor is quite inde- 
scribably delicious and resembles nothing you know of, and yet reminds you, 
with a long after- taste, of all sorts of creams and ices. There is nothing to mar 
the perfection of this fruit, unless it be that the juice from the rind forms an 
indelible stain on a white napkin. Even the seeds are often partly or wholly 
lacking, and, when present, are generally so thin and small that they are really 
no trouble to get rid of. Where cheap and abundant, as in Java, one eats these 
fruits by the half peck, and is never tired of them. They produce no feeling 
of satiety, such as the banana and the mango do, for there is little substance to 
the delicate pulp." (David Fairchild.) 

25888 to 25890. 

From India. Presented by Mrs. Effie Pyle Fisher, Igatpuri, through Miss 
Audrey Goss. Received August 25, 1909. 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 23 

25888 to 25890— Continued. 

Seeds of the following: 

25888. Feronia elephantum Correa. 

"This is the wood -apple of India and Ceylon, a deciduous tree with pinnate 
leaves, bearing a fruit about the size of an orange, but with a very thick, woody 
rind. 

"The pulp of the fruit is acid and aromatic and is sometimes eaten by the 
natives of India; it is also used to prepare a jelly much resembling that made 
from black currants, but this jelly is said to have a very astringent taste. 

"This plant is allied to the bael fruit of India, Belou marmelos, and is being 
grown to hybridize with that species, and also for trial as a stock upon which 
to graft it." ( W. T. Swingle.) 

Distribution.— A medium-sized tree, found in the sub-Himalayan forests, 
from the Ravi eastward, and throughout the greater part of the plains of India, 
being more frequent in the moist tracts of Bombay, Madras, Bengal, and Burma 
than in northern India. 

25889. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 
Both of the above are from the state gardens, Baroda. 

25890. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 
From Mr. George Hodson, florist and seedsman, Bangalore. 

See S. P. I. No. 24450 for description of Belou marmelos. 

25891 to 25893. £ 

From Ootacamund, India. Presented by Rev. G. N. Thomssen, American Bap- 
tist Telugu Mission, Bapatia, South India. Received August 20, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25891. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Ait.) Wight. 

The Downy myrtle, or Hill gooseberry, is a handsome evergreen shrub, with 
broad glossy leaves, pink flowers larger than those of a peach and lasting for 
several weeks, and dark-purple berries about the size of a cherry and tasting 
like a raspberry. The fruits are eaten raw, and used for making jam and jelly. 
(Adapted from Bailey.) 

Distribution. — An evergreen shrub, native of the southeastern part of Asia, 
extending from India through China, the Malay Archipelago, and the Philip- 
pines to Japan. 

25892. Physalis peruviana L. 

From plants of ten years' select cultivation of the South African Cape goose- 
berry in India. 

Distribution. — A native of Peru and cultivated throughout the Tropics. 

25893. (Unidentified.) 

White straw flowers growing wild on the Nilgiris. 

25894 to 25897. 

From Simla, India. Presented by Mr. E. Cotes, Indian News Agency, through 
Mr. Frank N. Meyer. Received August 27, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25894. Amygdalus persica L. Peach. 

25895. Prunus armeniaca L. Apricot. 
176 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25894 to 25897— Continued. 

25896. Prunus puddum Roxb. Cherry. 

Distribution. — A tree, native of the northern part of India, extending from 
the Indus to Sikkim, usually at an elevation of between 2,500 and 7,000 feet. 

25897. PTRUS sp. Pear. 
"These seeds were collected from wild Himalayan fruit trees, growing at an eleva- 
tion of 7,000 feet about Simla." (Cotes.) 

25898 to 25901. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

From United Provinces, India. Presented by Mr. T. F. Main, Deputy Director 
of Agriculture, Poona, Bombay Presidency. Received August 27, 1909. 

"The three last numbers seem to be of one variety collected from different villages, 
while the first is quite different." (Main.) 

25902 and 25903. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

From Egypt. Presented by Mr. George P. Foaden, secretary, Khedivial Agri- 
cultural Society, Cairo. Received August 28, 1909. 

Seeds of the following; notes by Mr. Foaden. 

25902. Saidi. Planted in Upper Egypt under basin irrigation. 

25903. Beheri. Planted in Lower Egypt under canal irrigation. 

These are the same variety, but recognized by the cultivators as being cultivated 
under two different systems of irrigation. 

25904 to 25907. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

From Friesland Province, Holland. Presented by Dr. M. Greshoff, Koloniaal 
Museum, Haarlem, Holland. Received August 6, 1909. 

25908. Myrica nagi Thunb. 

From Tangsi, China. Procured by Rev. Alexander Kennedy, at the request of 
Mr. Frank N. Meyer. Received August 21, 1909. 

See S. P. I. Nos. 22977 and 22904 to 22906 for descriptions. 

"These seeds are for stocks; better varieties are to be grafted on to them later. The 
plants are exceedingly hard to transplant. The trees thrive wherever the loquat 
does." (Meyer.) 

25909. Mimusops kauki L. " Adam's- apple.' ' 

From Lawang, Java. Presented by Mr. M. Buysman, Hortus tenggerensis. 
Received August 26, 1909. 

A large tree, native of India, the Malay Archipelago, and Australia. The fruit 
resembles Zizyphus jujuba in flavor, and is edible. The wood is red, fine grained, 
and easy to work. 

25910. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Entebbe, Uganda, British East Africa. Presented by the Botanical, For- 
estry, and Scientific Department. Received August 26, 1909. 

Brown. There seem to be several varieties in this lot. 

25911 and 25912. 

From Lai Bagh, Bangalore, India. Presented by Mr. G. A. Gammie, Imperial 
Cotton Specialist, Kirkee, India, at the request of Mr. J. Mollison, Inspector- 
General of Agriculture in India. Received August 30, 1909. 
170 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 25 

25911 and 25912— Continued. 

Seeds of the following: 

25911. Feronia elephantum Correa. Wood-apple. 
See No. 25888 for description. 

25912. Belou marmelos (L.) W. F. Wight. Bael. 

"The bael fruit is highly prized by natives of this country and is an article of 
food with them, especially in Upper India. A very nice cooling drink is made 
from its pulp in the hot season, also a nice jam is prepared out of it. The unripe 
and the ripe fruit and its rind, root, leaves, and flowers are used medicinally. 
Sherbet made from the ripe fruit is very valuable in cholera and bowel com- 
plaints." (Gammie.) 

25913 to 25920. 

From Hangchow, China. Presented by Rev. W. S. Sweet, Wayland Academy, 
Baptist Missionary Union, Eastern China Mission. Received August 2, 1909. 

Seeds of the following; notes by Mr. Sweet. 

25913 and 25914. Vicia faba L. Broad bean. 

25913. Green. 25914. Brown. 

Vine 2 feet long. Used as human and animal food and also for firewood. 
Ripe from April to May. 

25915. Dolichos lablab L. Bonavist bean. 

White. Known as the crested bean; vine 4 to 6 feet; used as human food and 
for firewood; ripe in September. 

25916. Phaseolus angularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. Adzuki bean. 
Red. Used for food; vine small and fine, 6 inches high; ripe in September. 

25917. Pisum sativum L. 

Tall vine; ripe from May to June; used for forage. 

25918. Vigna sesquipedalis (L.) W. F. Wight. 
Black. Tall vine. 

25919 and 25920. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

25919. Yellow. Vine 1 foot high; ripe from November to December. 
The cheese made from this bean forms a large element of food here; if 
adapted to American taste a profitable business could be established 
in the States. 

25920. Black. Ripe from June to August; used the same as No. 
25919. 

25921 to 25925. 

From Leh, Ladakh, Kashmir, British India. Presented by Mr. Rassul Galwan. 
Received August 27, 1909. 

Seeds of the following; notes by Mr. Galwan. 

25921. Triticum aestivum L. Wheat. 

Before this seed is sown the field is put under water till the ground is wet a 
half foot deep. Then wait ten to twenty days, till the ground is fairly dry and 
the seed can be sown. The ground must be neither too wet nor too dry. Before 
the seed is sown manure is spread about one-half inch thick over the ground. 
The first water is given when the wheat is about 2 inches high, the ground 
being soaked about one-half foot deep. After it becomes dry again a second 
watering is given. It is better to wait a little too long than to water too quickly. 
176 



26 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25921 to 25925 Continued. 

Up to the third watering care must be used, after (hat the wheat is strong and 
water can be given at any time it is dry. The more water given the better the 
crop. 

25922. Bordeum sp. Hull-less barley. 

The method of Bowing this is the same as for wheat, the only difference being 
that this can be sown late, as it ripens in two to three months. Flour is made 
from it, but the bread is not as good as the bread made from wheat flour. Most 
people use it, therefore, as Suttoo, which is made as follows: First, wash the 
barley in cold water, after waiting one day put in the sunshine and let dry. 
Then fry in an iron pot until brown, then take to a mill and have it ground into 
flour, which is eaten with Ladaki tea; some eat it with water, some mix it 
with butter, sugar, and tea, for there is no need to cook it again. If hot things 
can not be had, it can be eaten with cold water. 

25923. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 
Brownish black. 

25924. Lathyrus sativus L. 

This is sown with wheat. It can be sown in places a little cold, and there is 
no need to use any manure. The sowing methods are the same as those used in 
sowing wheat. The seed is sown about the 10th of May and ripens in about 
three months. At the sowing time the seed needs more moisture than wheat 
or it will not grow well. 

25925. Pisum arvexse L. Field pea. 

This is sown in hot places, and does best in sandy soil. It is sown here about 
the 20th or the 25th of April, and ripens in about three months. The method 
of sowing is the same as that of wheat, except that no manure is put on the field. 
If manured the plants grow very large but without beans. The stalks are good 
to feed to animals. Before sowing, the ground should be wetter than when 
wheat is sown or the beans will not do well. 

25926 and 25927. 

From Igatpuri, India. Presented by Mrs. Effie Pyle Fisher, through Miss Audrey 
Goss. Received August 31, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

25926. Feronia Elephantum Correa. 
See No. 25888 for description. 

25927. Anona reticulata L. Custard-apple. 
See S. P. I. No. 5210 for description. 

25928. Colchicum sp. 

From Alpine heights of Geovje Dagh, above Hassanbeyli, Amanus Mountains. 
Presented by Mrs. F. A. Shepard, Aintab, Turkey. Received August 19, 1909. 

"A wild colchicum having large, pink, very showy blossoms in September. Fruit 
ripens in May." (Shepard.) 

25929 to 25931. Cucumis melo L. Muskmelon. 

From Columbia, Mo. Presented by Mr. G. C. Broadhead. Received August 21, 
1909. 
176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 27 

25929 to 25931— Continued. 

Seeds of the following: 

25929. 1903 crop. 25931. 1909 crop. 

25930. 1908 crop. 

"Between 1825 and 1835 the Rev. Albert Holladay, of Virginia, was Presbyterian 
missionary to Persia. He brought to Ameiica seeds of a cantaloupe. My father 
raised this melon in Virginia, and in 1836 brought seed to St. Charles County, Mo., 
where he raised it until his death in 1853. Relatives and friends have since raised it. 
I have for thirty years, also my brother William, living at Clayton, St. Louis County. 
The melon raised in Virginia and in Missouri for ten or twenty years was smaller and 
sweeter than that raised since. It seems the first was not much ove* 1 4 inches in 
diameter and good to the outer rind. The melon now is as much as 6 inches in diam- 
eter and has at least a one-half of an inch of rind. When ripe it pulls off easily and 
generally has a red gum at stem where it breaks. A good melon of this kind is still 
better than most others and we call it the 'Persian cantaloupe. ' (Broadhead.) 

25932. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Aintab, Turkey. Presented by Mrs. F. A. Shepard. Received Septem- 
ber 3, 1909. 

"This seed was collected in the arid regions about Aintab, about 3,500 feet above 
the sea and 100 miles inland. There is scarcely any rain for five months in the year. 
The plant is not planted for pasturage, but grows upon wild lands, where sheep and 
goats browse." (Shepard.) 

25934. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

From Robertson, Cape Colony, South Africa. Presented by Mr. Charles P. 
Lounsbury, government entomologist, Cape of Good Hope, Department of 
Agriculture, Cape Town, who procured the seeds from Mr. E. A. Visser, manager 
of the Experiment Station at Robertson. Received September 4, 1909. 

Monketaan. 

"Mr. Visser says this plant yielded melons at the rate of 75 tons an acre on the station 
grounds without any special care, and that the melons keep well and are excellent 
stock food. They weigh about 30 pounds each and have a firm, sweetish, somewhat 
tough pulp. The rind is mottled pale and dark green like common watermelons, as a 
rule, but is sometimes whitish in this strain. The seeds do not separate readily and 
no one seems to be trying to save more than he needs for himself, so there is little 
chance of buying a supply unless it is ordered a year ahead. Mr. Jack, who was 
director in the department here and is now farming, is trying in vain to get seed for 
100 acres, which at least indicates that the merits of the crop appeal to him. Mr. 
Thornton, our agriculturist, tells me the plant has long grown to the west of Kuruman 
on the east side of the Kalihari desert. (The small Tsama melon sent to the United 
States grows on the west side.) He thinks it was probably cultivated there by natives 
in bygone days, but now it grows wild. Some years ago he got down seeds and had 
them planted near Graaff Reinet. Farmers of the district soon appreciated the value 
of the melon and took to its cultivation as a stock food. It is said on good authority 
to have yielded as high as 150 tons an acre around there, the ground becoming almost 
obscured by the fruits. The strain introduced to the Robertson station is from Graaff 
Reinet way, not direct from the desert, and Thornton thinks there is a possibility that 
it is not quite true to type; but if it is not, it is an improvement on the original he 
thinks. 
176 



28 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

25934— Continued. 

•'.It seems in mi' thai this or other of the Smith African melons should be more worth 
cultivating in arid pari- of the West than the thornless prickly pear. Of course the 
m. -Inns want water, l>nt much of whal they gel they store away for months." 
[ Lountbury. I 

"( toe of our experimenters of the Monketaan melon has just reported that the return 
per acre of unions amounted to 103 tons, and it was found that on an average there 
were two melons to every square yard of land. This melon, according to the analysis 
we have already had made, is high in feeding value and promises to take a leading 
pari in Borne of our stock districts." {Extract from letter of Mr. R. \V. Thornton, 
govern in< hi agriculturist, Cape Town Department of Agriculture, August 24, 1909.) 

25935. Vicia villosa Roth. Hairy vetch. 

Prom Moscow, Russia. Purchased from Immer & Son, through Prof. N. E. 
Hansen, Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, S. Dak., while traveling 
as an agricultural explorer for this Department. Received September 7, 1909. 

25936. Rosa sp. Rose. 

From Ogden, Utah. Presented by Miss Pearle Cramer, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Forest Service. Received September 7, 1909. 

Yellow. ''This rose, so far as I have been able to ascertain, is native only to Utah 
where it grows in great profusion." (Cramer.) 

25937. Oryza sativa L. Rice. 

From Tsangsheng, Kwangtung Province, near Canton, China. Presented by Mr. 
Stuart J. Fuller, American vice consul-general-in-charge, Hongkong, for whom 
it was procured by Mr. Leo Bergholz, American consul-general at Canton. 
Received September 9, 1909. 

"Szemiu, the translation of which means 'Best quality refined.' The Chinese rice 
merchant states that the exportation of this rice in any quantity or in samples is for- 
bidden by the Chinese Government." (Amos P. Wilder, American consul-general, 
Hongkong, China.) 

25938 to 25940. Mangifera ixdica L. Mango. 

From Philippine Islands. Procured by Mr. William S. Lyon, Gardens of Nagta- 
jan, Manila, P. I. Received September 8, 1909. 

Seeds of the following standard varieties: 

25938. Carabao. 

See S. P. I. Nos. 24927 and 25659 for previous introductions. 

25939. Pico. 

See S. P. I. No. 24170 for previous introduction. 

25940. Pahutan. "From my viewpoint this is the best, not horticulturally, 
other than being a vigorous grower, early fruiter, and enormously prolific. 
Its very serious defects — small size, scanty flesh, and excessively large seed — 
are from my point of view fully offset by a smoothness, sweetness, juiciness, 
and flavor unapproached by any other. I have eaten the famous Alphonso 
mango in Calcutta and do not consider it ace high with pahutan. Pahutan 
further has a very thick rind. This, while still further diminishing its scanty 
flesh, probably adds to its shipping qualities." (Lyon.) 

176 



JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1909. 29 

25941. Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels. 

Acacia elephantina Burch., Trav., vol. 2, p. 236. 1824. 

Acacia elephantorrhiza (Burch.) D. C, Prod., vol. 2, p. 457. 1825. 

Elephantorrhiza burchellii Benth., Hook Journ. Bot., vol. 4, p. 344. 1842. 

Although Burchell is given as the authority in De Candolle's Prodromus for the spe- 
cific name elephantorrhiza, the name he really used and under which he gave an excel- 
lent botanical diagnosis is that here recognized. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
director, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. Received September 10, 1909. 

Seeds. 

"All grazing animals, wild and domestic, are exceeding fond of this plant. It 
has long, succulent roots and an underground stem. It does not shoot until rather 
late in the summer, seldom before December, and its stems are killed again by the 
first frosts of May. The seed-pods are still green when the frost comes, and the seeds 
not ripe, but they are so well protected by the strong, leatherlike pod, that the 
frost can not hurt them, and they ripen in the pod long after the stem that bore them 
has been killed by the frost. The roots are used for tanning leather." (Mrs. Barber, 
in Harvey, Flora Capensis, vol. 2, p. 277.) 

Distribution. — South Africa. Common in grassy places between the Klipplaat and 
Zwartkey rivers in Cape Colony. It occurs also in the Cradock and Queenstown dis- 
tricts in Cape Colony, and is reported from the "Zooloo Country." Originally 
described from near ''Klaawater" in the southern part of Orange River Colony. 

25942. Berberis saxguixea Franch. 

From Nancy, France. Purchased from V. Lemoine & Sons. Received Sep- 
tember 14, 1909. 

"This is a little-known species from China and appears to be closely allied to 
Berberis nepalensis. The blooms are said to be deeper orange-red than any other 
species. These plants are imported for hybridizing purposes." (IF. Van Fleet.) 

Distribution. — A native of dry stream beds in the province of Szechwan, China. 

25950 to 25953. Vicia faba L. 

From Valencia, Spain. Presented by Mr. Charles S. Winans, American consul. 
Received September 8, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25950 to 25952. Broad bean. 

25950. Caliente. Light brown. 

25951. Panesca. Purplish brown. 

25952. Murciana. Dark purple. 

25953. Horse bean. 

Favon. Purplish black. 

25956 and 25957. 

From Amanus Mountains, Turkey in Asia. Presented by Mrs. F. D. Shepard, 
Adana. Received September 9, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

25956. Avena sativa L. Oat. 

25957. Vicia ervilia (L.) Willd. Bitter vetch. 
176 



30 SEEDS AM» PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

25959 to 25962. 7a \ mays 1,. Corn. 

From Central Soledad, Cienfuegos, Cuba. Presented by Mr. Robert M. Grey, 
Harvard Botanical Experimenl Station. Received September 21, 1909. 

8, edfl of the following; notes by Mr. Grey. 

25959. Harvard selected flint. This is our surest cropper, I xst keeper, and, 
being free from Burface Btarch, less subject to attack from weevil- and ants. 

25960. Selected white flint Cuban. This is used as a sweet or table corn, is 
earl) . and a Bmall-cob variety. 

25961. Hybrid purple cob (Cuban dent X Cuban flint). 

25962. Cuban dent. 

These two last are the varieties commonly cultivated here and are very 
productive. 
The above have been under selection for six years. The husk of all closes tight at 
the apex, a great prevention and safeguard against insects. 

25963. Vicia faba L. Horse bean. 

Prom Magyarovar, Hungary. Presented by The Plant Culture Experiment 
Station, requested from Prof. A. Cserhati. Received September 22, 1909. 
''These seeds are planted in the spring and mature in about one hundred days. 
The plants grow from 35 to 40 centimeters high. The beans are ground up and make 
a very nutritive food for stock. The fodder is of hardly any value." (Gydrfds.) 

25964. Gossypium hirsutum L. Cotton. 

From Nyasaland Protectorate, British Central Africa. Presented by Mr. 

J. Stewart J. McCall, Director of Agriculture, Zomba. Received September 

27, 1909. 

"Seed of Upland cotton which received the first prize at the recent show at Blantyre. 

I think you will consider it a very high-class hirsutum cotton, and it is very gratifying 

as we received 6d. to 7d. per pound for it at the Manchester market." (McCall.) 

25965. Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. Cowpea. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. 
Received September 10, 1909. 
"Kafir bean." This lot apparently contains several different varieties. 

26047. Garcinia mangostana L. Mangosteen. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, British West Indies. Presented by Mr. F. Evans, 
botanical department, Department of Agriculture. Received fall of 1909. 

Seeds. See No. 25887 for description. 

"The mangosteen will be an unusually good shipper, as tropical fruits go. The 
small crate of fruits from which these seeds were taken, shipped by Mr. Evans on the 
28th of September, was delayed for more than a week in New York and reached 
Washington on the 19th of October. Even after holding these fruits for five days after 
arrival in Washington — i. e., twenty-six days from the time they were picked — they 
were still in an edible condition, although naturally they had lost a good deal of their 
delicacy and the pulp had begun to adhere to the thick rind. One remarkable feature 
about these fruits lies in the fact that as they decay the rind hardens until it becomes 
almost as hard as a rock. I believe it may not be necessary to crate these in shipment 
on this account. A single rotten fruit may not infect others, as in the case of mangos 
or other soft-skinned fruits; in fact, as tropical fruits go, it seems to be an ideal 
shipper." (David Fairchild.) 
176 



PUBLICATION OF NEW NAMES. 

It has been thought desirable to call attention to the new names 
which it is occasionally found necessary to publish in the inventory 
by giving a list of such names as they occur. This list will therefore 
appear in future issues on the page of the inventory preceding the 
index. 

The following name is published in this issue: 

25941. Elephantorrhiza elephaxtixa (Burch.) Skeels. 

The names given below have been published in preceding issues 
of the inventorv: 

mJ 

21750. Albizzia adiaxthifolia (Schum.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory Xo. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 12. 

21797. Sesbax bispixosa (Jacq.) Steud. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 15. 

21820. Xiphagrostis coxdexsatus (Hack.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 17. 

The correct name for the above is Miscanthus condensatus Hack.; the genus Xipha- 
grostis [Contributions from the U. S. National Herbarium, vol. 9, 1905, pp. 399-400] 
having been based on a misconception of the type of Miscanthus as established by 
Andersson in 1856. That author indicated in a note that he did not consider the first 
species, M. capensis, as typical of the genus, and the second species, M. japonicus, 
should accordingly be recognized as the type. The usual application of the generic 
name Miscanthus therefore remains unchanged. 

21824. Phaseolus axgularis (Willd.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 17. 

21893. Chrysanthemum stipulaceum (Moench) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 21. 

22349. Phragmites vulgaris loxgivalvis (Steud.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, IT. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 46. 

22390. Garcixia tixctoria (DC.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin 137 (Inventory No. 14), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p. 50. 

176 31 



32 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

22813. Pinellla cochinchinense (Blume) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin L42 (Inventor) No. 15), Bureau of Plant Industry, (J. S. I ><-j)t . of Agri- 
culture, 1909, p 3 

22957. Beloi marmelos (L.) W. F\ Wight. 

Bulletin L42 (Inventory No. L5), Bureau of riant Industry, l'. S. Dept. of Agri- 
culture, L909, p. 18 

23219. FlRMIANA SIMPLEX (L.) W. F. Wight. 

Bulletin L42 (Inventory No. L5), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, L909, p. 67. 

23428. Myrciaria edulis (Veil.) Skeels. 

Bulletin L48 (Inventory No. Mi), Bureau of Planl Industry, Y. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, L909, p. 14. 

23472. Phyllanthus acida (L.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 14S (Inventory No. 10), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, 1909, p. 17. 

23897. Cryptocarya rubra (Mol.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 153 (Inventory No. 17), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agrieul- 
ture, 1909, p. 15. 

23963. Brassica pekinensis (Lour.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 153 (Inventory No. 17), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, 1909, p. 21. 

24087. Callistemma chinensis (L.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 153 (Inventory No. 17), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, 1909, p. 27. 

24591. Belou glutinosa (Blanco) Skeels. 

Bulletin 162 (Inventory No. 18), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, 1909, p. 26. 

24631. Gourliea spinosa (Mol.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 162 (Inventory No. 18), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agricul- 
ture, 1909, p. 31. 

25546. Claucena lansium (Lour.) Skeels. 

Bulletin 168 (Inventory No. 19), Bureau of Plant Industry, U. S. Dept. of Agrir ll- 
ture, 1909, p. 31. 
176 



INDEX OF COMMON AXD SCIENTIFIC NAMES. 



Adam's-apple. See Mimusopskauki. 
Albizzia moluccana, 25783. 

stipulata, 25782. 
Alfalfa, Baltic, 25806. 

Grimm, 25804. 

(Kansas), 25733. 

Turkestan, 25805, 25807. 

(Turkey), 25932. 
Allium' cepa, 25841 to 25844. 
Amygdalus persica, 25894. 
Anacardium occidentale, 25718. 
Anona reticulata, 25927. 
Apricot (India), 25895. 
Aspidosperma quebracho-bianco, 25797. 
Atalantia sp., 25885. 

Avena sativa, 25731, 25749, 25750, 25849 to 
25856, 25956. 
sterilis, 25730, 25784. 

Bael. See Belou marmelos. 
Barley, Franconian, 25744. 

Improved, 25745. 
Hanna, 25742, 25743, 25746, 25747. 
hull-less (Kashmir), 25922. 
Barosma crenulata, 25817. 
Bean, Adzuki. See Phaseolus angularis. 
"Barbuda," 25729. 
bonavist. See Dolichos lablab. 
broad, 25913, 25914, 25950 to 25952. 
horse, 25898 to 25907, 25923, 25953, 
25963. 
Beet, sugar, Remlingen, 25752. 
Belou marmelos, 25879, 25889, 25890, 

25912. 
Beta vulgaris, 25752. 
Buchu. See Barosma crenulata. 

Caesalpinia nuga, 25803. 
Cajan indicum, 25865. 
Calamus sp., 25858, 25859. 
Cananga odorata, 25799. 
Cape gooseberry. See Physalis peruviana. 
Carica papaya, 25720. 
peltata, 25721. 
Cashew. See Anacardium occidentale. 
Cherry (Canada), 25880. 
(India), 25896. 
17§ 



Cinnamomum loureirii, 25884. 
Cinnamon (Cochin China), 25884. 
Citrullus vulgaris, 25754, 25867, 25934. 
Citrus nobilis, 25862. 
Clover, red (disease resistant), 25871. 
German, 25751. 
See also Trifolium pratense. 
Colchicum sp., 25928. 
Corn (Africa), 25736, 25866. 
(Costa Rica), 25660. 
(Cuba), 25959 to 25962. 
(Ecuador), 25758 to 25774. 
Hickory King, 25736. 
Cotton (Nyasaland), 25964. 
Cowpea (Africa), 25785 to 25788, 25965. 
Black-Eye, 25857. 
brown, 25910. 
See also Vigna unguiculata. 
Crinum asiaticum, 25800. 
Cucumis melo, 25929 to 25931. 
Cucurbita moschata, 25719. 

pepo, 25831. 
Custard-apple. See Anona reticulata. 

Dipterocarpus dyeri, 25801. 

punctulatus, 25802. 
Dolichos lablab, 25726 to 25728, 25915. 
Downy myrtle. See Rhodomyrtus tomen- 

tosa. 
"Duraznillo." See Jatropha sp. 

Elephantorrhiza elephantina, 25941. 
Eleusine coracana, 25864. 

Feronia elephantum, 25888, 25911, 25926. 
Field pea. See Pisum spp. 

Garcinia mangostana, 25887, 26047. 

Gladiolus sp., 25869. 

Glycine hispida, 25778 to 25781, 25919, 

25920. 
Gourd (France), 25822 to 25831. 

Hill gooseberry. See Rhodomyrtus tomen- 

tosa. 
Hordeum sp., 25922. 

distichon, 25744, 25745. 

nutans, 25742, 25743, 
25746, 25747. 

33 



34 



SEEDS \M' PLANTS IMPORTED. 



Ilang ilang. Bee Cananga odorata. 
Jatropha >p . 257 

Ku--um. S< e Schleicher a trijuga. 

Lagenaria vulgaris, 25822 to 25824, 25826 

to 25830. 
Lathyrus sativus, 25924. 
Lawsonia inermis, 25776. 

/ , isioiui irliitfonfii, 25860. 
Luffa cylindriiu. 25S25. 

Macadamia ternifolia, 25845. 
Mandarin (('..chin China), 25862. 
Mangifera Indira, 25861, 25938 to 25940. 
Man-". Carabao, 25938. 
Julie, 25861. 
Pahutan, 25940. 
Pico, 25939. 
Mangostcen (Cochin China), 25887. 

(Trinidad), 26047. 
Medicago saliva, 25733, 25804 to 25807, 

25932. 
Millet, pearl. See Pennisetum ameri- 
canum. 
ragi. See Eleusine coracana. 
Mimusops kauki, 25909. 
Muskmelon, Persian, 25929 to 25931. 
Myrica nagi, 25908. 

Oat (Algeria), 25784. 

Beseler No. 2, 25750. 
(Palestine), 25730, 25731. 
(Spain), 25849 to 25856. 
Svalofs Ligowo, 25749. 
(Turkey), 25956. 
Olea foveolata, 25846. 
Onion, Bermuda Red, 25841. 
White, 25843, 
(Canary Islands), 25841 to 25844. 
< rystal-Wax, 25844. 
Wildpret's Golden, 25842. 
Oryza sativa, 25937. 

Panicum palmaefolium, 25740. 

Papaw (Costa Rica), 25720 to 25722. 

Passiflora edulis, 25874. 

Passion fruit. See Passiflora edulis. 

Pea, field. See Pisum spp. 

Peach (India), 25894. 

Pear (India), 25897. 

Pennisetum americanum, 25788, 25863. 

Phaseolus angularis, 25916. 

lunatus, 25729, 25876. 
176 



Phyllanthus emblica, 25724. 
Physalis perurinria, 25892. 
f'isiim urn use, 25925. 
sn/inim, 25917. 
Protect grandi flora, 25847. 
/'run us aniieniaea, 25895. 

/mddiini, 25S96. 

tomentnsa. 25880. 
Pyrus sp., 25897. 



Quebracho-bianco. 

quebracho- b lanco . 



See Aspidosperma 



Rattan (Batanes Islands), 25858. 

Palasan, 25859. 
Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, 25891. 
Rice, Szemiu, 25937. 
Rosa sp., 25936. 
Rose, yellow, 25936. 

Saccharum officinarum, 25738. 
Schinus huigan, 25798. 
Schleichera trijuga, 25848. 
Soy bean, black, 25778, 25920. 

brown, 25781. 

(Java), 25778 to 25781. 

yellow, 25779, 25780, 25919.' 
Stizolobium sp., 25725, 25732, 25753, 

25755 to 25757, 25870. 
Sugar cane (Java), 25738. 

Tacca pinnatifida, 25816. 
Terminalia bellerica, 25723. 
Tetracronia cymosa, 25886. 
Trifolium pratense, 25751, 25871. 
Triticum aestivum, 25748, 25921. 

Undetermined, 25868, 25893. 

Vetch, bitter. See Vicia ervilia. 
hairy. See Vicia villosa. 
Vicia ervilia, 25957. 

/aba, 25898 to 25907, 259] J, 25914, 

25923, 25950 to 25953, 2,963. 
villosa, 25872, 25875, 25935. 
Vigna sesquipedalis, 25918. 

unguiculata, 25785 to 25787, 25857, 
25910, 25965. 

Watermelon (Formosa), 25754. 
Monketaan, 25934. 
(Turkestan), 25867. 
Wheat (Kashmir), 25921. 

Rimpau's Red Schlanstetter Sum- 
mer, 25748. 

Zea ways, 25736, 25758 to 25774, 25866, 

25959 to 25962. 
Zizyphus jujuba, 25777, 



O 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 205. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1900: 

INVENTORY No. 21; Nos. 26048 to 26470. 



Issued March 17, 1911. 




WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1911. 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY— BULLETIN NO. 205. 

B. T. GALLOWAY, Chief of Bureau. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED 



DURING THE PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1909: 



INVENTORY No. 21; Xos. 26048 to 26470. 



Issued March 17, 1911 




UBR ,;y 

NEW 

- 

PA* 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1911. 



BUREAU OF PLANT INDUSTRY. 



Chief of Bureau, Beverly T. Galloway. 
Assistant Chief of Bureau, William A. Taylor. 
Editor, J. E. Rockwell. 
Chief Ckrk, James E. Jones. 



Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 
scientific staff. 

David Fairchild, Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

P. H. Dorsett and Peter Bisset, Expert Plant Introducers. 
George W. Oliver, Expert Propagator. 
Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer. 
H. C. Skeels and R. A. Young, Scientific Assistants. 
Stephen C. Stuntz, Botanical Assistant. 

Henry F. Schultz, Agent, in Charge of Subtropical Introductions. 

E. C. Green, Pomologist, in Charge of South Texas Plant Introduction Garden, Brownsville, Tex. 
Robert L. Beagles, Agent, Acting in Charge of Plant Introduction Garden Chico, Cal. 
Edward Simmonds, Gardener, in Charge of Subtropical Plant Introducti n Garden, Miami, Fla. 
John M. Rankin, Expert, in Charge of Yarrow Plant Introduction Gc, den, Rockville, Md. 
Edward Goucher, John H. Allison, W. H. F. Gomme, and Roy F. Mann, Experts. 
205 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, 

Office of the Chief, 
Washington, D. C, October 31, 1910. 
Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith and to recommend for 
publication as Bulletin No. 205 of the series of this Bureau the accom- 
panying manuscript, entitled "Seeds and Plants Imported During 
the Period from October 1 to December 31, 1909: Inventory No. 21; 
Nos. 26048 to 26470." 

This manuscript has been submitted by the Agricultural Explorer 
in Charge of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction with a view to 
publication. 

Respectfully, G. H. Powell, 

Acting Chief of Bureau. 
Hon. James Wilson,' 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

205 

3 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

Introductory statement 7 

Inventory 11 

Publication of a new name 49 

Index of common and scientific names 5] 

5 



B. P. I.— 62.5. 



SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED DURING THE 
PERIOD FROM OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 
31, 1909: INVENTORY NO. 21; NOS. 26048 TO 
26470. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT. 

Although our agricultural explorer Mr. Frank N. Meyer has been 
in the field during the period covered by this inventory, the material 
received from him which is herein recorded is but a small part of the 
work performed by him. He has been investigating the prevalence 
of the crown-gall disease of the apple in France for the purpose of 
ascertaining whether the French have resistant stocks; making studies 
in the English, -French, German, and Russian arboreta for the purpose 
of familiarizing himself with the important plants and plant cultures 
of Chinese Turkestan, which region it is expected he will explore this 
summer; and he has been unexpectedly delayed for six weeks in St. 
Petersburg. This office is negotiating by correspondence for the 
valuable material he has reported in the different arboreta. 

To the fruit growers the question of better stock plants is of great 
importance and is being emphasized more strongly now than ever 
before. To such as are working on the problem, the introduction 
from Palestine, through Mr. Aaron Aaronsohn, of a large red-fruited 
variety of haw, Crataegus azarolus (Nos. 26116 and 26354), will be 
interesting. It has been used successfully both in Tunis and Pales- 
tine and is considered by Mr. Aaronsohn to be an ideal stock for 
dwarf early pears in our arid irrigated regions of the Southwest, 
where the question of growing early pears is attracting attention. A 
species of Photinia (No. 26133) from western China is sent in by Mr. 
Meyer, who suggests its use as a possible stock for the loquat. 

The possibility of using the Chinese brambles for the production 
of new types of raspberries has been pointed out as promising. 
For those interested in this field, nine species of Rubus from the 
Yangtze Valley (Nos. 26270 to 26278), collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson, 
of the Arnold Arboretum, are likely to prove of very considerable 
interest. 

205 



8 SEEDS A.ND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

The problem of growing in this country the large-fruited English 
gooseberry has proved difficult to solve because of the gooseberrv 
mildew to which all English gooseberry varieties seem subject. 
Those interested in this fruit will be glad to test Dr. W. Van Fleet's 
three new hybrids between Ribes missouriense, R. cynosbati, and 
E, rotU7idifoliu7)t crossed by R. reclinatum. These represent twelve 
years of careful work in selection from hundreds of seedlings from 
various crosses, and preliminary tests have shown them remarkably 
resistant to the gooseberry mildew. (Nos. 26138 to 26140.) 

h\ ijoa sellowiana (Nos. 26120 and 26121) is a new fruit from Uru- 
guay which is attracting some attention in California and Florida, 
since it is said to wit list and more cold than the guava and to have 
a unique flavor of its own which is especially relished by many. An 
acid-fruited species of Psidium laurifolium- (No. 26413), from Trini- 
dad, will interest those who believe in the future of the guava and its 
jelly-making qualities, since it is said to jelly much quicker than the 
common West Indian varieties and, quite distinct from them, to have 
an agreeable acidity. 

To the Florida and California fruit growers who are watching the 
possibilities of the anonas, the introduction of eight large-fruited, 
smooth-skinned varieties from Chile wall be of interest. (Nos. 26148 
to 26155.) 

The loganberry is already well known in the United States and those 
who realize its value will doubtless wish to test the lowberry (No. 
26197) and Low's Phenomenal raspberry-loganberry hybrid (No. 
26198), w r hich are said to be new r vols of the loganbeny. 

Those who are experimenting with forage plants will be interested 
in a new importation of shaftal, Trifolium suaveolens, from Tashkend 
(No. 26135), a clover which is being given a thorough trial in the irri- 
gated regions of the Southwest. Although normally an annual, this 
species behaves as a perennial if regularly cut for hay. The Wallaby 
grass, Danthonia semiannularis, from New Zealand (No. 26119), is 
recommended especially for heavy clay soils or gumbo lands subject 
to drought; and ray-grass, Lolium strictum (No. 26200), coming from 
the dry regions along the Mediterranean, is recommended by the vet- 
eran experimenter, Doctor Trabut, of Mustapha, Algiers, as being an 
excellent forage grass, an annual worthy of cultivation in the South- 
west; while the New Zealand rice-grass, Microlaena stipoides (No. 
26118), may find a use in America for pasture or lawn purposes. 

Potato breeders have already shown an interest in the introduction 
of a few tubers of a species of Solanum thought to be a wild hybrid of 
Solarium tuberosum (No. 26122), which has been used by Mr. Paton, 
of Scotland, to originate what he believes are varieties practically 
immune to the potato blight, Phytophthora infestans. Interesting 

205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 9 

varieties have also been introduced from Bogota, Colombia (Nos. 
26126 to 26129). 

The Arracacia of South America forms a staple food of the Vene- 
zuelans, who know it under the name of apio. It is cultivated in 
high altitudes and requires a long season in which to mature. It 
deserves a thorough trial in the South to determine where it will suc- 
ceed. (Xo. 26204.) 

The destructive fungous disease of the chestnut, which threatens to 
destroy the native chestnut trees of the Atlantic coast region, makes 
the production of a chestnut-chinquapin hybrid of unusual interest, 
since its resistance to this bark disease may furnish a way out of a 
situation which seriously threatens the chestnut industry. Doctor 
Van Fleet's hybrids (Nos. 26230 to 26235) have so far shown a high 
degree of immunity to the disease. 

The interest in the Japanese flowering cherry trees, which have been 
found to succeed well in the United States, makes it worth while to 
call attention to seven Chinese flowering cherry trees from the Yangtze 
Valley, collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the Arnold Arboretum. 
(Nos. 26246 to 26252.) 

For many years attempts have been made to introduce the cliff- 
grown tea and the teas from the Dragon Pool, of the Kienningfu and 
Wuishan districts of China, but without success. Through the kind 
assistance of Mr. Rockhill, ambassador to Russia, formerly American' 
ambassador to China, and the hearty cooperation of the American 
consul and vice-consul at Foochow, fourteen varieties of these spe- 
cially noted teas have been introduced and are being propagated. 

As heretofore, the work of identification and nomenclature, as 

well as that on the geographical distribution, has been done by Mr. 

H. C. Skeels under the supervision of Mr. W. F. Wight, of the Office 

of Taxonomic and Range Investigations, and the manuscript has 

been prepared by Miss Mary A. Austin. 

David Fairchild, 

Agricultural Explorer in Charge. 

Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction, 

Washington, D. C, March 7, 1910. 

65739°— Bui. 205—11 2 



INVENTORY. 



26048 and 26049. Prunus spp. 

From the Himalayas. Presented by Mr. E. Shearer, Assistant Inspector-General 
of Agriculture in India, Nagpur, Central Provinces, India. Received October 
2, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: * 

26048. Prunus armeniaca L. Apricot. 

"Shari. A nursery of shari plants is prepared in January each year. The 
soil is first dug, properly cleaned, and manured; ditches are then made about 
4 inches deep and the seeds are put in and covered with earth. These seeds 
germinate in the following March. 

"These plants are then transplanted where desired in January next, i. e., 
after one year. They are planted in pits dug deep enough and are watered 
every second or third day until they take root in the ground. Shari plants 
when grafted with aru (peach) give a better variety of shari fruit." (Shearer.) 

26049. Prunus sp. Plum. 

u Alo»cha. The season and process of sowing this seed are the same as that of 
shari (apricot) (S. P. I. No. 26048). 

"Jamun (wild cherry) and aru (peach) when grafted on aloocha plants pro- 
duce fine varieties of jamun and aru, respectively." (Shearer.) 

26050. Aleurites trisperma Blanco. Banucalag. 

From Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. Elmer D. Merrill, Bureau of Science, 
Manila. Received October 2, 1909. 

"As there are probably no live specimens of this species in America to-day, these 
seeds were procured to grow plants for trial in the tropical possessions of the United 
States. A portion of them will also be used for the expression of a sample of oil to 
be tested in the Bureau of Chemistry of the United States Department of Agriculture 
in Washington in comparison with oils derived from other species of Aleurites. 

"This species, which yields a valuable drying oil, is found in the Philippines; so 
far as known, it is restricted to these islands and is comparatively rare but quite gen- 
erally distributed. This plant is botanically known as Aleurites trisperma Blanco, 
but carries also the synonym Aleurites saponaria Blanco. It is known locally as 
'banucalag,' 'lumbang banucalag,' ' lumbang banucalad,' 'baguilumban,' 'calumban,' 
or ' lumbang gubat, ' besides having a variety of other names in the different provinces. 
It is much mixed and confused with the true lumbang (Aleurites moluccana), espe- 
cially when information in regard to it is sought. 

" Aleurites trisperma belongs to the same section of Aleurites as the Chinese and 
Japanese species; this may readily be seen by comparing the seeds and foliage of 
these three plants. The seeds resemble those of Aleurites fordii, while the leaves 
resemble those of Aleurites cordata. The seeds are somewhat larger, however, than 
those of the China wood-oil tree, besides being thicker shelled and of a distinct brick- 
red color." (W. Fischer.) 

205 

11 



12 SEEDS A.ND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

26051 to 26054. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soy bean. 

From Nanking, China. Presented by Dr. F. B. Whitmore. Received September 
13, 1909. Numbered October 4, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

26051. Yellow. 26053. Green. 

26052. Yellowish green. 26054. Black. 

26055 to 26061. Saccharum officinarum L. Sugar cane. 

Presented by Mr. Edward W. Knox, general manager of the Colonial Sugar Refin- 
ing Company (Limited), Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Received 
October 4, 1909. 
Seeds of each of the following; notes by Mr. Knox: 

26055. Striped Singapore. " Standard variety, medium thickness, medium 
quality. Very similar to Rose Bamboo, but striped amber and red." 

26056. Rose Bamboo. "Standard variety, medium tonnage and sweetness, 
medium thickness, straw-rose color." 

"These are at present most grown in the drier districts of Fiji, being of very 
fair weight and sweetness. According to Mr. J. Clark (one of our officers who 
recently paid a visit to Demerara and Barbados) Striped Singapore is the 
striped variant of the cane called White Transparent in the West Indies; Rose 
Bamboo is an allied cane which is very nearly identical with White Transparent, 
the latter being called Yellow Singapore in Fiji. The obvious difference 
between Rose Bamboo and Yellow Singapore is that the latter is somewhat 
thicker in the stalk and arrows very freely, while the former rarely flowers." 

26057. Badila. "Best variety in Fiji and Queensland. Very heavy and 
very sweet, thick, purple." 

26058. Mohona. "Early maturing, successful variety in New South Wales, 
but dies off early in the season in tropical Queensland and Fiji; rather thin, 
purple; white bloom." 

"These have been obtained from New Guinea. Badila is a dark-purple 
cane of stout build, giving heavy and sweet crops under favorable conditions, 
but being a slow grower at the start. Mohona is of a lighter purple color, of 
medium size and yield, attaining high sweetness when comparatively young, 
readily going back in quality in the Tropics, but much more enduring in semi- 
tropical districts. It supplies very fertile seeds." 

26059. HQ. 10. "Fairly sweet variety, fair tonnage, seedling raised from 
Mohona by Mr. J. Clark at Hambledon, Queensland. Thin, olive-green." 

26060. HQ. 50. "Seedling raised from Mohona; rather thin, purple; white 
bloom; good cropper; good quality; raised at Hambledon, Queensland." 
"These are both sweet and have given fair crops so far when tried on small 

areas only." 

26061. Couve 87. "This is a thick, purple Mauritius seedling, giving a 
heavy crop, which is somewhat discounted by shortcomings as regards 
quality. Seed from this variety is more fertile than that from any other 
known by us." 

26062 to 26065. Musa textilis Nee. Manila hemp. 

From Davao, Mindanao, Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. M. M. Saleeby, 
in charge of fiber plants, Bureau of Agriculture, Manila, through Mr. Lyster 
H. Dewey. Received October 4, 1909. 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 13 

26062 to 26065— Continued. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

26062. Tanguyon (also spelled Tangouan and Tongongon). 

26063. Libuton. 

26064. Puteean. 

26065. Arupan. 

"Mr. Saleeby, who is making a careful study of abaca (Manila hemp), writes that 
although abaca seedlings are often found in the fields in well-shaded moist places, 
he has never found good plants growing directly from the seeds. He suggests trying 
to grow plants from root cuttings or suckers from the seedlings that we may secure. 
He also states that he finds seedlings only in soil well drained yet constantly moist 
and constantly shaded. I would suggest that these seeds be grown with a view to 
sending the young plants to Porto Rico." (Dewey.) 

26067. Beta vulgaris L. .Beet. 

From Sicily. Presented by Dr. Carl Sprenger, Hortus Botanicus Vomerensis, 
Vomero, Naples, Italy. Received October 5, 1909. 
Seed collected in a wild state. 

26068. Apium graveolens L. Celery. 

From France. Presented by Mrs. E. M. Sheridan, 2300 G street NW., Washing- 
ton, D. C, who procured the seed from Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co., Paris, France. 
Received October 5 3 1909. 

Improved Paris celeri-rave (Falaise) . "The taste of this is similar to the meat of the 
large artichoke and only requires boiling and a dressing of drawn butter gravy after 
it is cut in slices or small chunks." (Sheridan.) 

"Sow in February or March in a bed under glass; set out in well-manured ground at 
a distance of 30 to 40 centimeters (12 to 16 inches). Harvest in August and September. 

"Plant in nursery beds in April or May; set out in May or June. Gather in October 
or November and keep during the winter. 

"A variety obtained by Mr. Falaise and distinguished from the common celeri-rave 
by a much greater development of the root. Foliage tolerably high with slender 
petioles, dark green, strongly tinted with red; the leaves themselves are large, tolerably 
serrate, of a dark and shining green, especially on the upper part of the stalk. It is the 
race most liked by the Parisian market gardeners; it is an improvement on Large 
Smooth Paris celeri-rave, which it has replaced and which was itself a good selection 
from Common celeri-rave." (Vilmorin-Andrieux & Co.) 

26069. Aralia cordata Thunb. Udo. 

From New York, N. Y. Purchased from J. M. Thorbum & Co. Received 
October 7, 1909. 

• Kan. See Bureau of Plant Industry Bulletin 42 for description; also S. P. I. No. 
9166. 

26070 to 26077. Medic ago spp. 

From Chico, Cal. Grown at the Plant Introduction Garden by Mr. Roland 
McKee. Received September 22, 1909. 
Seeds of the following; descriptive notes by Mr. McKee: 
26070. Medicago hispida confinis (Koch) Burnat. 

"This is a selection from S. P. I. No. 16771 made at Chico, Cal., in 1906. It 
is a prickleless form of bur clover and well adapted for pasturage, especially for 
sheep. It should be tested throughout the southern and southwestern United 
States. It has been grown for the increase of seed." 
205 



14 SEEDS VXD PLANTS IMPOBTED. 

26070 to 26077— Continued. 

Distribution. The British Islands, France, Spain and Portugal, Italy, and 
the Balkan Peninsula. 

26071. Medicago hispida nigra (L.) Burnat. 

"Seed in the bur was received at the Plant I ntroduetion Garden, Chico, Cal., 
in December, l!><> : >. from the University of California. 1 1 perhaps will succeed 
wherever .)/. hispida drnticuUda or M. arabica does well. In California it is 
perhaps a Little more aggressive than M. hispida. Of value for pasturage and 
soil improvement." 

"Distribution. — The European countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea, 
including Spain, southern France, and Italy; also in the Balkan Peninsula, 
Asia Minor, Syria, Palestine, and northern Africa. 

26072. Mkdicago hispida nigra (L.) Burnat. 
Same as No. 26071. 

26073. Medicago hispida Gaertn. 

"Seed in the bur was received at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
in December, 1905, from the University of California. Of value for pasturage 
and soil improvement wherever common bur clover is adapted." 

Distribution. — The Mediterranean region. 

26074. Medicago hispida Gaertn. 
Same as No. 26073. 

26075. Medicago hispida terebellum (Willd.) Urban. 

"Seed in the bur received at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., in 
December, 1905, from the University of California. This is practically a prickle- 
less form of bur clover and needs to be tested extensively in the West and South 
for pasturage and soil improvement." 

Distribution.— The countries along the Mediterranean, from Spain to Pales- 
tine and Egypt. 

26076. Medicago muricata (L.) All. 

"This is a selection made from seed which was received at the Plant Intro- 
duction Garden, Chico, Cal., in December, 1905, from the University of Cali- 
fornia. It is a form of bur clover having a large but very hard bur. Should be 
tested in sections adapted to bur clovers." 

Distribution. — The province of Riviera, southern France, and in Dalmatia, 
Croatia, and Herzegovina, southern Austria. 

26077. Medicago sCutellata (L.) Miller. 

"Seed in the bur was received at the Plant Introduction Garden, Chico, Cal., 
in December, 1905, from the University of California. This is a form of bur 
clover having a very large papery pod, making it especially desirable for pastur- 
age. It should be tested in particular in the warmer sections of the South." 

Distribution. — The Mediterranean region. 

26078. Capriola incompleta (Nees) Skeels. 

Cynodon incompletus Nees, Linnsea 7: 301. 1832. 

The genus Capriola was established by Adanson in 1763, while Cynodon 
was not published until 1805, forty-two years later. Dactilon was pro- 
posed for the same genus by Villars in 1787 and Fibichia by Koeler in 
1802. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, 
government agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture. 
Received October 14, 1909. 
"This is closely related to common Bermuda grass." (C. V. Piper.) (Roots.) 

205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 15 

26078— Continued. 

Distribution. — This species occurs in South Africa and was originally described 
from "Gaaup," in the district of Beaufort, Cape Colony. It has since been found in 
various localities from the vicinity of Ly den burg, Transvaal Colony, southward, 
and westward to the banks of Orange River in Little Namaqualand. In the central 
region of Cape Colony it is found at elevations of 3,000 feet. 

26109. Zizyphus sativa Gaertn. Chinese date. 

From Chekiang Province, China. Presented by Mr. J. H. Judson, Hangchow, 
China. Received April 21, 1908. Numbered October 6, 1909. 

"I can not say whether these plants are of a named variety or not. The Chinese 
have three kinds on the market, which they call red, black, and honey dates." 
(Judson.) 

26110 and 26111. 

From Beirut, Syria. Presented by Mr. A. E. Day, professor of natural science, 
The Syrian Protestant College. Received October 8, 1909. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

26110. CUCTJRBITA PEPO L. 

"Kusa." See No. 22810 for description. 

26111. Cucumis sativus L. Cucumber. 

"We eat freely of this cucumber, and it is a common sight to see a Syrian 
child one or two years old chewing away at one; it does not seem to hurt them." 
(Day.) 



26112. Diospyros discolor Willd. Mabola fruit. 

From Philippine Islands. Presented by Mr. William S. Lyon, Gardens of Nagta- 
jan, Manila. Received October 11, 1909. 

"A small tree, native of the Philippine Islands, introduced into India and culti- 
vated in gardens, especially in Vizagapatam. The fruit is like a large quince and 
in some places is called mangosteen; its proper name should be the Mabola fruit. 
It is agreeable and has a pink-colored fleshy rind." (Extract from Watt, Dictionary 
of Economic Products of India, vol. 3, p. 138.) 

See No. 19216 for previous introduction and description. 

26115. Mucuna GIGANTEA (Willd.) DC. 

From Buntal, at the mouth of Sarawak River, Sarawak, Borneo. Presented 
by Mr. J. C. Moulton, curator, Sarawak museum. Received October 12, 1909. 

Black. See No. 25514 for distribution. 

26116. Crataegus azarolus L. 

From Zichron- Jacob, near Haifa, Palestine. Presented by Miss Rifka Aaron- 
eohn, through Mr. A. Aaronsohn. Received October 4, 1909. 

"Arabian name za'arur. This species is very abundant throughout the Orient, 
where a great many varieties and forms of it are found. It grows wild on the slopes of 
dry, arid hills, preferably amongst calcareous rocks. It is a shrub with spiny branches 
from 1.5 to 4 or 5 meters in height, with a diameter of 10 to 30 centimeters. It is 
rather a slow grower. 

"In the spring it bears dense corymbs of white flowers which are pleasantly fra- 
grant. The size of the fruits varies in different varieties. Some have fruits as large 
205 



16 BE! DS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

26116— Continued. 

as J inch in diameter. The acid flesh has a delicate flavor, but there is not enough 
of it to give the fruita a commercial value. Fruits are occasionally found, however, 
that are practically without seeds and it might be possible to fix this character by 
selection. As ii is the Eruil is "ften sold in the oriental markets. 

"I particularly recommend this Crataegus as a stock for pears. It is good for dry 
localises at any altitude. It is found as low as 200 meters below the level of the 
Mediterranean in the valley of the Jordan and as high as 1,800 meters above sea level 
in the deserl near Petra. It ought, therefore, to thrive in southern California as 
well as on the plateaus of Colorado. 

"My personal experience has shown that a top graft 6 inches or a foot above the 
ground is the best for this stock. It is best suited for the early varieties of pears. 

■■ I recommend this as a stock, therefore, in high, arid situations where water is 
scarce or costly. It is an ideal stock for dwarf early pears. At Indio, Cal., for 
instance, it ought to yield prime fruit with very little irrigation. 

"Palestine (where my father has had trees grafted in this way for 18 years) is not 
the only region in which Crataegus azarolus has been used as a stock for the pear. 
Mr. Dumont has used it for the same purpose near Tunis. 

"I speak of pears because I have had personal experience with this fruit. But I 
can see no reason why it would not do as well as a stock for dwarf early apples." 
(A. Aaronsohn.) 

Distribution. — A native of southern Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, 
being found in Spain, Italy, Crete, Caucasia, Asia Minor, Syria, Palestine, Arabia; 
Persia, and Algeria. 

26117. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

From Indian Head, Saskatchewan, Canada. Presented by Mr. Angus Mackay, 
superintendent, Dominion Experimental Farm for Saskatchewan, through 
Mr. Charles J. Brand. Received October 18, 1909. 

Grimm. — "Grown at Indian Head from S. P. I. No. 12991; seeded in comparison 
with eight other strains in the spring of 1905. No. 12991 was produced in Minnesota 
in 1904 and was secured from Mr. A. B. Lyman, Excelsior, Minn. In the Indian 
Head experiments it has proven from the first (1905 to 1909) to be the best of the 
nine strains under test." (Brand.) 

26118 and 26119. 

From Wellington, New Zealand. Presented by Mr. T. W. Kirk, Biologist, 
Department of Agriculture. Received October 18, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

26118. Microlaena stipoides (Labill.) R. Br. New Zealand rice-grass. 

A native grass, much relished by all kinds of stock; the herbage is of a rich 
green color, and is produced in great abundance. 

Distribution. — A native of New Zealand and Australia, where it is widely 
distributed and used for a lawn and pasture grass. 

26119. Danthonia semiannularis (Labill.) R. Br. Wallaby grass. 
A grass which does well on any of the poorer classes of gumbo land, also on 

heavy clay soils. It stands drought with impunity, and throws up a good 
quantity of feed, which is eaten by all classes of stock. 
See No. 21024 for previous introduction. 

Distribution. — New Zealand, Tasmania, and the temperate parts of Australia. 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 17 

26120 and 26121. Feijoa sellowiana Berg. 

From Los Angeles, Cal. Presented by Mr. H. Hehre. Received October 11, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

26120. "These fruits were raised from a plant imported by me from Europe a 
number of years ago and which has been bearing regular crops for five or six 
years." {Hehre.) 

26121. "These fruits are from a plant originated by me from seed imported 
from Europe; it has not been named. Ripens later than the preceding 
variety." {Hehre.) 

' ' Feijoa sellowiana is worthy to be mentioned under promising new fruits and 
deserves the widest distribution. The plant stands more cold than the guava, 
is beautiful in bloom, and is evergreen. The fruit is green and when ripe has 
a tinge of yellow. As it blooms for a period of about two months, so does the 
fruit ripen successively for two months; therefore there are all sizes of fruit on 
the plant at the same time, which grow at the leaf axil on new wood." {Hehre.) 

Distribution. —Found in the province of Rio Grande do Sul, in the southeast- 
ern part of Brazil, and in the vicinity of Montevideo, Uruguay; cultivated in 
southern Europe. 

26122. Solanum sp. Potato. 

From Castle Kennedy, Scotland. Presented by Rev. J. Aikman Paton, Soulseat. 
Received October 19, 1909. 

"Tubers of Solanum etuberosum (so called; I think it is a wild hybrid of S. tubero- 
sum, simply), which I used as the parent of my ' Immune ' strain. A certain proportion 
of the 'selfed ' seedlings of it and its hybrids are immune to Phytophthora infestans even 
here." {Paton.) 

26123. Citrus bergamia Risso. Bergamot orange. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
October 20, 1909. 

Variety mellarosa plena. (Cuttings.) 

26124. Trifolium subrotundum Steud. & Hochst. 

From 70 miles east of Lake Victoria Nyanza, British East Africa, at about 7,500 
feet altitude. Presented by Mr. E. Blackbun, Salem, Ohio. Received Octo- 
ber 19, 1909. 

Distribution. — A native of Abyssinia, where it is cultivated as forage, under the 
name of Mayad; also native of Upper and Lower Guinea. 

26125. Mangifera indica L. Mango. 

From Port of Spain, Trinidad, B. W. I. Presented by Mr. F. Evans, Department 
of Agriculture. Received October 19, 1909. 
Julie. "This plant is grafted upon the common mango, Mangifera indica.'' {Evans.) 
See No. 21515 for description. 

26126 to 26129. Solanum spp. Potato. 

From Bogota, Colombia. Presented by Mr. Eugene Betts, American vice and 
deputy consul-general. Received October 18, 1909. 

'Tubers of the following; quoted notes received with the shipment: 

26126. "Papas Tocanas. Produced on high, broken ground, mountain sides, 

high and very cold." 
65739°— Bui. 205—11 3 



18 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

26126 to 26129 Continued. 

26127. "Pdpat Array anas, criallas Colorado*. Produced on the mountain tops 
ami on high table Lands." 

26128. "Pdpat Paramuruu. Produced od the mountain slopes above the 
Savannah of Bogota." 

26129. "Pdpas Amapald. Produced on the Savannah of Bogota." 

26130. Medicaoo sativa L. Alfalfa. 

Prom Talas, Caesarea, Turkey. Presented by Dr. Wm. S. Dodd, through Mr. 
Charles J. Brand. Received October 10, 1909. 

'• In his Letter transmitting this seed Doctor Dodd states: 'I am not sure whether the 
iucern for which you ask is the plant that we cultivate here for horse feed or not, but 
I send some of that. Yonja is the Turkish name.' Only a small package of this seed 
was received, and it should be reserved for experiments in the Southwest." (Brand.) 

26132 and 26133. 

From Mr. Frank N. Meyer, Agricultural Explorer. Received October 13, 1909. 
Seeds of the following: 

26132. Prunus sp. 

From China. Obtained at the M. L. de Vilmorin Arboretum, Les Barres, 
Xogent sur Vernisson, France. 

26133. Photixia villosa (Thunb.) DC. 

From Western China. Obtained at the M. L. de Vilmorin Arboretum, Les 
Barres, Xogent sur Vernisson, France. "This plant has a rather dwarfy habit, 
is apparently evergreen in a climate not too cold, and may serve as a stock for 
loquats, besides being also ornamental. The plant will probably not be hardy 
in Washington, D. C." (Meyer.) 

Distribution. — A native of the southeastern provinces of the Chinese Empire 
and of Formosa, and widely distributed in Japan. 

26134. Allium cepa L. Onion. 

From Denia, Spain. Procured from Senor Don Luis Tono, American consular 
agent, through Mr. Robert Frazer, jr., American consul, Valencia, Spain. 
Received October 20, 1909. 

"Seed of the onion that is commercially grown on an extensive scale in Denia. 
These onions come upon the American market in a peculiar type of package and are 
the large yellow or straw-colored onions which are sold under the name of Spanish 
onions. The closest American representative of this type is the Prizetaker, which I 
understand is an American sport from this variety. It is probably the largest of the 
onions which are grown extensively for market, has the thinnest skin, is the mildest 
in flavor, and altogether is the best onion produced in the world. From imported seed 
we have succeeded in producing some very fine specimens in parts of Texas, and we 
hope that from this small beginning a very considerable industry will be built up. 
The probabilities are that we shall always need to import the seed direct from Spain 
in order to maintain the high quality in the American-grown product. " (L. C. Corbet t.) 

26135. Trifolium suaveolens Willd. Shaftal, or schabdar. 

From Tashkend, Turkestan. Purchased from Dr. Richard Schroder, director 
Chief Agricultural Experiment Station, at the suggestion of Prof. N. E. Hansen, 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Brookings, S. Dak. Received October 23, 
1909. 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 19 



26135— Continued. 

The following notes were taken from a letter written by Doctor Schroder to Pro- 
fessor Hansen; clause in brackets is by Professor Hansen: . 

"In Persia the schabdar seed is usually sown in the fall, not too late. It endures 
the winter quite well. By sowing in the fall it develops in the spring so quickly that 
the first cutting is ready before the first cutting of alfalfa. According to information 
obtained in Persia the schabdar endures several years. This lot is of a new variety 
which endures from five to seven years. The fact that this plant is perennial comes 
in conflict with botanical statements [that it is an annual]. 

"In Persia the fresh shoots of the schabdar are also used for salad. The flowers are 
visited by bees." 

26136. Gossypium barbadexse L. Cotton. 

From Nyassaland Protectorate, British Central Africa. Presented by Mr. J. 
Stewart J. McCall, director of agriculture, Zomba. Received October 23, 1909. 

" Egyptian (Abbasi). Our Egyptian is not nearly so good as our Upland cotton 
(S. P. I. No. 25964)." (McCall.) 

26137. Fragaria sp. Strawberry. 

From Germany. Presented by Rev. J. M. W. Farnham, Chinese Tract Society, 
Shanghai, China. Received September 13, 1909 

White fruited. (Seed.) 

26138 to 26140. Ribes hybrids. Gooseberry. 

From Little Silver, N. J. Presented by Dr. W. Van Fleet. Received October 
22, 1909. 

Plants of the following; quoted notes by Doctor Van Fleet: 

26138. Ribes missouriexse X reclinatum. 

''Third generation. (R. gracile (R. missouriense) X Red IVarrington X Tri- 
umph X Keepsake.) Six-year-old plant, very vigorous, 6 feet high, disease- 
resistant foliage, productive, berries dark reddish-purple when ripe, smooth, 
thin skinned, larger than Houghton, excellent quality, seeds small." 

26139. Ribes cynosbati X reclinatum. 

"Second generation. (R . cynosbati X Triumph X Whitesmith.) Fair grower; 
rather spreading; good, disease-resistant foliage; berries large, dark red when 
ripe, few soft spines, very firm, agreeable flavor, small seeds; excellent for 
jelly." 

26140. Ribes rotundlfolium X reclinatum. 

"Third generation. (R. rotundifolium X Houghton X Triumph X Keepsake.) 
Healthy, upright grower ; disease-resistant foliage; berries rather small, smooth, 
bright red when ripe, brisk, pleasant quality, exceedingly productive." 

"These hybrids are final selections from hundreds of seedlings, representing 12 
years of arduous work." 

Note. — "Houghton is supposed to be R. oxycanthoides X grossularia (reclinatum)." 

26141 and 26142. 

From Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Mr. F. T. Nicholson, sec- 
retary, Transvaal Agricultural Union. Received October 25, 1909. 

26141. ViciafabaL. Horse bean. 
Light brown seeded. (Seed.) 

26142. Gladiolus sp. (Bulbs.) 
205 



20 SEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

26143 and 26144. 

Prom the Himalayas, [ndia. Presented by J. Mollison, esq., Inspector-General of 
Agriculture in India. Received October 26, 1909. 

Seeds of tin- following: 

26143. Malus BYLVE8TRIS Mill. Crab apple. 
"Pala (Palu) is generally propagated by cuttingB. When grown from seeds, 

the method of raising the plants is as follows: In the month of January, the plat 
to be sown is dug about one-half foot deep and is manured. Then the seeds are 
Bown and germinate in the following summer. 

"In January next (i. e., a year after), the plants are transplanted, where 
desired, in pits dug for that purpose. Pala is only grafted on seb (apple). It 
is also grafted with nashpati (pears), but the pears produced are sour." 
(Mollison.) 

26144. Prunus padus L. 

" Jamu. The process of cultivating jamu is the same as that of pala (S. P. I. 
No. 26143). 

"This plant is grafted with aloocha (plum) (S. P. I. No. 26049) and yields 
aloocha fruit. If it is grafted on aloocha plant, jamu fruits will be produced." 
(Mollison.) 

26145 and 26146. Andropogon sorghum (L.) Brot. Durra. 

From Igatpuri, India. Presented by Mrs. Effie Pyle Fisher, through Miss Aud- 
rey Goss. Received August 31, 1909. 

Seeds of the following; notes by Mr. Carleton R. Ball: 

26145. "Apparently very similar to No. 9856, Dagdi durra, which we are 
selecting for grain production, and which now gives considerable promise of 
value for the Southwest." 

26146. "A white durra with black hulls, probably a late sort." 

26147. Citrus aurantium sinensis L. Orange. 

From Mount Gravatt, Brisbane, Australia. Presented by Mr. John Williams. 
Received October 28, 1909. 

" Usher's Favorite. It ripens in October here, and is a splendid keeper; quality, 
flavor, and all things considered, I believe it to be really first class." ( Williams.) 

(Plants.) 

26148 to 26155. Axona cherimola Mill. Cherimoyer. 

From Santa Inez, Chile. Presented by Mr. Salvador Izquierdo. Received 
October 26, 1909. 

"Nos. 26148, 26152, 26153, 26154, and 26155 are different cherimolas with very 
large fruits, of the form 'ananas.' No. 26149 is a very large cherimolia with smooth 
skin. Nos. 26150 and 26151 are large-fruited cherimolias, smooth skin, form 'concha.' " 
(Izquierdo.) (Cuttings.) 

26156 to 26160. 

From Foochow, China. Presented by Mr. Samuel L. Gracey, American consul. 
Received October 25, 1909. 

Seeds of the following: 

26156 to 26158. Citrullus vulgaris Schrad. Watermelon. 

26156. "White or Shanghai melon, very popular in this district." 
(Gracey.) 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 21 

26156 to 26160— Continued. 

26156 to 26158— Continued. 

26157. Yellow. 26158. Red. 

26159 and 26160. Glycine hispida (Moench) Maxim. Soybean. 

26159. Yellow seeded. 26160. Green seeded. 

26161. Medicago satiya L. Alfalfa. 

From different oases in the region of Ourlana and Tougourt, Algeria. Purchased 
fromM. Colombo, pere, Biskra, Algeria, at the request of Mr. Walter T. Swingle. 
Received October 29, 1909. 

26162 to 26178. 

Presented to Mr. P. J. Wester, Subtropical Garden, Miami, Fla., and turned over 
by him to this office for distribution, October, 1909. 

Seeds (unless otherwise noted) were received of the following; notes by Mr. Wester: 

26162 to 26174. Presented by Mr. J. M. Doctor, acting superintendent, 
Victoria Gardens, Bombay, India. 

26162. Acacia arabica (Lam.) Willd. 

"The gum arabic. An evergreen shade tree with dense and spreading 
crown, attaining a height of 60 feet; valuable for its gum, bark, and 
timber; the pods are a favorite food for sheep and goats. The tree thrives 
on a great variety of soils and is resistant to droughts." 

Distribution. — Widely distributed, being found in India, Ceylon, 
Egypt, Arabia, tropical Africa, and Xatal. 

26163. Acacia sp. 

26164. Barrixgtoxia asiatica (L.) Kurz. 

"An ornamental, lecythidaceous, evergreen shrub, attaining a height 
of 6 to 8 feet; cultivated as an ornamental on account of its shinin° r 
foliage and large, handsome purple and white flowers produced on an 
erect thyrse." 

Distribution . — Found along the shores of southern India, and of Australia, 
and on the islands between. 

26165. Bauhixia acumixata L. 

"A leguminous ornamental shrub, 6 to 8 feet tall, native of Malabar, 
bearing white flowers." 

Distribution. — India, especially in the northwestern part, and extend- 
ing to Ceylon, China, and the Malayan Islands. 

26166. Thespesia lampas (Cav.) Dalz. and Gibs. 

Distribution. — The tropical Himalayas of India, from Kumaon east- 
ward, and in Bengal, Burma, and Ceylon; also found in Java and in 
eastern tropical Africa. 

26167. Butea moxosperma (Lam.) Taub. 

"Leguminous, native of India. An ornamental shade tree with dense 
foliage, attaining a height of 40 to 50 feet. The flowers are very showy, 
crimson, 2 inches long." 

Distribution. — Found throughout the plains of India, from the Hima- 
layas to Ceylon and Burma. 
205 



22 BEEDS AND PLANTS IMPORTED. 

26162 to 26178 Continued. 
26162 to 26174 Continued. 

26168. Cassia l\ rici lata L. 

" A shrub or small tree, native oi 1 ndia, the bark of which yields tannin. 
In young plants the bark has been found to contain 11.92 tannin and 22.35 
• ctract; in old plants the corresponding figures arc 20.12 and 29. In 
India the leaves are used as a substitute for tea and eaten as a vegetable in 
times of Eamine. This is also cultivated for its ornamental value. The 
yellow flowers appear in June and July." 

Distribution. -Wild in the western and central part of India and in 
I eylon; often cultivated in the Tropics. 

26169. Cassia glauca Lam. 

A tall leguminous tree." 

Distribution. — From the Himalayas, in India, through Ceylon and the 
Polynesian Islands to Australia. 

26170. Cassia grandis L. f. 

"A tree attaining a height of 45 to 55 feet furnishes a very handsome 
fine-grained wood. A dense shade tree, flowers very handsome, appear- 
ing in April." 

Distribution. — The northern part of South America, from Panama, 
through Colombia and Guiana, to Brazil; also found in the West Indies. 

26171. Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd. 

See Nos. 23335 and 25281 for previous introductions. 

26172. Pithecolobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth. 

"A tree of very rapid growth, deserving wider distribution." See 
No. 23457 for description. 

26173. Ficus benghalensis L. Banyan tree. 

"In tropical India and Africa this tree attains a height of 70 to 100 feet. 
The aerial roots descending from the branches form accessory trunks, thus 
extending the growth of the tree from the main stem. The leaves are 
eaten by cattle. In India the fruits are eaten in time of famine. The wood, 
if carefully cut and seasoned, can be made into furniture and is sometimes 
employed in making boxes and door panels. The Hindoos regard the tree 
as sacred. The one tree in southern Florida that has come to my attention 
does so exceedingly well that the species deserves wider distribution." 

Distribution. — Found wild in the lower Himalayan forests and on the 
Deccan hills; cultivated throughout India on the plains. 

26174. Ficus cannonii (Bull.) N. E. Brown. 

"An ornamental-leaved greenhouse plant from the Society Islands. 
With the exception of the cultivated fig all species of Ficus introduced to 
southern Florida, as far as they have come to my attention, do so exceed- 
ingly well that I have thought it well worth while to introduce all species 
that are cultivated in other parts of the world in the hope of finding a 
suitable stock for the fig, which does not do well on its own roots here, 
largely on account of root-knot." 

26175 to 26178. Presented by Mr. A. S. Archer, Antigua^ British West Indies. 

26175. Thryalis glauca (Cav.) Kuntz. 

"An ornamental shrub bearing yellow flowers, Malpighiaceae." 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 23 

26162 to 26178— Continued. 

26175 to 26178— Continued. 

Distribution. — Mexico and Central America, from Sierra Madre and 
Zacatecas, south to Nicaragua. 

26176. Haematoxylum campechiaxum L. Logwood. 

"Leguminous. The tree furnishes the logwood of commerce and the 
wood may be utilized in turning. The honey produced from the flowers 
of this species is said to be the finest in the world. The tree attains a 
height of 30 to 45 feet." 

Distribution. — Central America, from Tehuantepec and Yucatan to 
Nicaragua and Colombia; also West Indies. 

26177. BOUSSIXGAULTIA BASELLOIDES H. B. K. 

"A rapid-growing half-hardy ornamental climber. The flowers on 
opening are white and fragrant, turning black before withering. Easily 
propagated from tubers growing on the stem." 

Distribution. — Southern Mexico and South America, from Gonacatepec 
south to southern Brazil. 

26178. Cedrela odorata L. 

' ' Indigenous to the West Indies ; attains a height of 80 feet . The wood is 
light, of pleasant odor, and easily worked, preferentially chosen in its native 
country for cigar boxes and a variety of other articles; also furniture." 

26179 to 26182. 

From Tripoli, in Barbary, North Africa. Presented by Mr. William Coffin, 
American consul. Received October 28 and November 1, 1909. 

Seeds of the following; descriptive notes by Mr. Coffin: 

26179. Hordeum vulgare L. Barley. 
Dry land. 

26180. Pexxisetum americaxum (L.) Schum. Pearl millet. 

"Kassab. The Arabs think very highly of this grain as a food and use the 
grass as fodder for their stock." 

26181. Medicago sativa L. Alfalfa. 

"Safsafa or Susfa. Sometimes they get eight crops of this in the eight months 
of the year it grows. I have seen at least five, and I think six, crops harvested 
from fields just back of my house. They irrigate about every four days." 

26182. Citrus auraxtium sixexsis L. Orange. 
Blood flesh. (Plants.) 

26183. Stizolobium sp. 

From Sibpur, near Calcutta, India. Presented by Maj. A. T. Gage, director^ 
Royal Botanic Garden. Received November 2, 1909. 

Black seeded. 

26184. Funtumia elastic a (Preuss) Stapf. 

Presented by Mr. Gilbert Christy, F. L. S., care of Thomas Christy & Co., 
4, 10, and 12 Old Swan lane, Upper Thames street, E. C, London, England. 
Received December 2, 1909. 

' ' Seeds of a very large forest tree. I suggest that you have them planted in one of the 
Cuban stations. It would be necessary to shade the growing seedlings in the summer, 
otherwise they would be likely to dry off." (Christy.) 
205 



24 SEEDS AND PLANTS [MPOBTED. 

26184 Continued. 

Distribution.- Along the wesl coasl of Africa from the Gold Coast in Ashanti through 
La&os and lower Nigeria to the valley of Mungo River; usually in forests and along 

stream-. 

26185. Stizolobitjm Bp. 

From Tehwa, via Foochow, China. Presented by Miss . F < - - i e A. Marriott. 
Received I >ecember 3, L909. 

"This species has pods about intermediate in character between the I. yon bean, No. 
L9979, and the Yokohama, X»». 25251. To judge from its behavior in tho greenhouse, 
it is about intermediate in time of maturity between these two species. The flowers 
are white as in the Lyon bean; very similar to the Japanese variety." (C. V. Piper.) 

26186 and 26187. 

From Nice, France. Presented by Dr. A. Robertson Proschowsky. Received 
November 2, L909. 

26186. FURCRAEA BEDINGHOUSI K. Koch. 

"This plant is said (like most Furcraea, I suppose; to produce good fiber-. 
This species is hardier than any other Furcraea I cultivate or know, and has once 
resisted from 5 to 7 degrees below zero Centigrade, without suffering the least. 
A few seeds were also produced on the 6-meter-high flower stalk." (Pro- 
8chowsky.) 

Distribution. — On the slopes of Acusca Mountain, south of the city of Mexico, 
at an elevation of about 12,000 feet. (Bulbs.) 

26187. Maytexus boaria Molina. 

See No. 3394 for description. 

Distribution. — Dry lowlands along the coast of Chili and southward into 
Patagonia. (Seeds.) 

26188. Kaempferia sp. "Sherungulu." 

From Transvaal, South Africa. Presented by Prof. J. Burtt Davy, government 
agrostologist and botanist, Transvaal Department of Agriculture, Pretoria. 
Received November 5, 1909. 

"This plant grows in tropical and subtropical Transvaal and the tubers or rhizomes 
are dried and sent up from the Low Country, for sale to natives working on the Wit- 
watersrand, by whom they are supposed to have medicinal or other virtues. 

"It has been suggested that owing to the remarkable fragrance of the tubers, they 
might possibly be of use in the perfume trade for scenting tooth powders, soaps, etc. 

"The flowers are distinctly ornamental." {Davy.) (Tubers.) 

26189. Chrysanthemum hybridum Hort. Shasta daisy. 

From Rosedale, Santa Cruz, California. Presented by Mr. George J. Streator. 
Received November 4, 1909. 

"Streator's strain of the so-called Shasta daisy. Seed from the finest semidouble, 
quilled, fimbriated, or fringed forms." (Streator.) 

26193 to 26195. 

From Mexico. Procured by Dr. David Griffiths, Agriculturist, of this Depart- 
ment. Received November 5, 1909. 
205 



OCTOBER 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1909. 25 

26193 to 26195— Continued. 

Seeds of each of the following: 

26193 and 26194. Cicer arietinum L. Chick-pea. 

26193. Small seeded. 26194. Large seeded. 

26195. Physalis ixocarpa Brot. Husk tomato. 

"This big blue husk tomato is often 4 centimeters in diameter, as found upon 
the markets of Oaxaca and Mexico City especially." 

Distribution. — Found wild in California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, 
Mexico, and Cuba; cultivated, and often escaped, as far north as Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Dakota, Oregon, and Washington. 

26196. Saccharum officinarum L. Sugar cane. 

From Honolulu, Hawaii. Presented by Mr. Harold L. Lyon, Experiment Station 
of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association. Received November 2, 1909. 

Lahina. "This cane has proved itself to be the best money maker that Hawaii ever 
6aw. Under irrigation it is a splendid cane if the conditions are suited. Unfortu- 
nately it is a cane that is very subject to disease. In those parts of Hawaii where it can 
still be used, namely, those parts where the sky is nearly cloudless the year around 
and the rainfall very slight, it still does better than any other cane. If any attempt to 
introduce this cane to other places from Hawaii is made, great care should be exercised 
to select cuttings free from disease." (N.A. Cobb, letter of May 22 , 1909.) (Cuttings.) 

26197 and 26198. Rubus spp. 

From Enfield, England. Purchased from Messrs. Stuart Low & Co., Royal 
Nurseries, Bush Hill Park, at the request of Mr. Walter T. Swingle. Received 
November 4, 1909. 

Plants of the following: 

26197. 

" Lowberry. This is said to be as large as the loganberry and to be as strong a 
grower, and to be 'altogether the most valuable novelty in the fruit way pro- 
duced for some years.' " (Swingle.) 

26198. 

"Low's Phenomenal. A raspberry-loganberry hybrid, 'possessing all the 
flavor of the raspberry, and combining the free fruiting qualities of this now 
famous berry . ' " ( Swing le . ) 

26199. (Undetermined.) 

From Standerton, Transvaal. Presented by Mr. O. W. Barrett, director of agri- 
culture, Lourenco Marquez, Portuguese East Africa. Received November 8, 
1909. 
' ' Seeds of a striking asclepiad . This vine is probably native to the locality. Foliage 
not seen. Stems, thickish, green. Fruits (follicles) about 4 inches long, opening to 
about 3 inches wide. Ornamental and ought to make a good trellis or porch vine for 
the Southern States and California." (Barrett.) 

28200. Lolium strictum Presl. 

From Sfax, Tunis. Presented by Doctor Trabut, Algiers, Algeria. Received 
November 8, 1909. 
"Seed of ray-grass, native name maudjour. Excellent forage; grows in arid regions; 
annual; interesting to cultivate in the steppes." (Trabut.) 

65739°— Bui. 205—11 4 



26 SEEDS A.\D PLANTS [MPORTED. 

26200 Continued. 

Distribution. The countries bordering od the Mediterranean Sea and the Canary 
[alands. 

26201 and 26202. 

Prom 30 miles north of Eangchow, China, Presented by Rev. J. M. \V. Parnham, 
Presbyterian Mission, Shanghai, China. Received November 2, L909. 

Seeds of the following: 

26201. CUCUMIS MELO I.. Muskmelon. 
Golden. 

26202. SlLENBep. Wild pink. 
•■ Pound "ii the mountain here." (Farnham.) 

26203 to 26206. 

Presented by Mr. II. F. Schultz, Ancon, Canal Zone, Panama. Received 
November 9, 1909. 

26203. A NONA SQUAMOSA L. 

From David, Chiriqui, Panama. ''Seed from a tree bearing large and very 
superior fruits of fine flavor." (Schultz.) 

26204. Arracacia sp. "Aracache." 

From Boquete, Chiriqui, Panama. "Tubers of a plant found growing in the 
neighborhood of Boquete in a cultivated and semicultivated state. The tubers 
grow to a size of 6 to 15 inches in length and about 6 to 8 inches in diameter, 
weighing from 2 to 10 pounds. The foliage resembles somewhat that of celery, 
and it grows to a height of about 10 to 18 inches above the ground. The taste of 
the root resembles a cross between a potato, celery, and asparagus, and it is 
eaten like potatoes, roasted, baked, or fried, as well as cut up in soups. I have 
found it growing at an altitude of 3,000 to 5,000 feet above sea level, and the 
inhabitants claim that it will not grow on the lower levels. I think, however, 
that it will do well in the Gulf States and that it will prove valuable, as I know 
that it is a well-flavored vegetable." (Schultz.) 

See S. P. I. No. 3511 for previous introduction. 

26205. Byrsoxima cotixifolia H. B. K. 

From Chiriqui, Panama. "Seeds of a fruit called 'Nance' which is used by 
the inhabitants as the main ingredient for a cooling and very pleasing drink. 
This tree is found growing at all altitudes from sea level up to about 4,000 feet 
and above. I do not think that it is a very valuable tree. It may possibly 
succeed in southern California." (Schultz.) 

Distribution. — Along the Pacific coast of Mexico, from the province of Tepic 
to Chiapas. 

26206. Parmextiera cereifera Seem. 

From Bugaba, Panama. "Seed of an ornamental tree with peculiarly shaped 
candle-like