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BY 
THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS 

OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

AT LOS ANGELES 
FRANK SIMONS 

EDITOR 

TOM FREEAR 

MANAGER 





S U T H E R I 



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THE USUAL COMPLAINT ABOUT AN- 
NUALS IS THAT THEY ARE ALL THE 
SAME. THIS YEARS STAFF HAS MADE 
A CONCERTED EFFORT TO REMEDY 
THIS DEFECT AND AS A RESULT THE 
1940 SOUTHERN CAMPUS DIFFERS IN 
SEVERAL RESPECTS FROM ITS PRED- 
ECESSORS. NO EFFORT HAS BEEN 
MADE TO INCORPORATE A THEME 

INTO ITS MAKEUP THE THEME IS 

THE UNIVERSITY YEAR 1939-1940. ON 
THE OTHER HAND. NO EFFORT HAS 
BEEN SPARED TO COVER AS FULLY 
AS IS PRACTICABLE ALL UNIVERSITY 
EVENTS AND TO GIVE AS MANY INDI- 
VIDUALS REPRESENTATION ON ITS 
PAGES AS POSSIBLE. THE ADDITION 
OF SEVERAL NEW SECTIONS HAS 
AIDED THESE EFFORTS. A CHRONO- 
LOGICAL LIST OF IMPORTANT EVENTS, 
WHICH GIVES A SHORT BUT COM- 
PLETE HISTORY OF THE YEAR. HAS 
BEEN INCLUDED IN THE ADVERTISING 
SECTION. IT IS OUR HOPE THAT THIS 
VOLUME MEETS FULLY THE REQUIRE- 
MENTS OF THE ASSOCIATED STU- 
DENTS FOR A PICTORIAL RECORD OF 
THE YEAR'S ACHIEVEMENTS. AND 
THAT IT WILL BE REFERRED TO WHEN- 
EVER INFORMATION ABOUT THE YEAR 
IT MIRRORS IS DESIRED 

THE STAFF 





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i n our dynamic world. the man of science occupies a position of distinction. mankind looks 
' o him for the solution of its problems when these require clear. calm reasoning. too often. 

wo wever, we find that the scientist loses his perspective and becomes a machine instead of 

ft human being. it is to a man who has avoided this pitfall and has successfully coupled 

~ Scientific genius with rare understanding, who has chosen as an extra-curricular activity 
the building of a ranking graduate school. and who has not forgotten how to be a teacher. 
see3"hat we respectfully dedicate this. volume xxi. of the southern campus. 





THE SECTION OF THIS ANNUAL DEVOTED TO THE 
PICTURIZATION OF THE CHARM AND SERENITY OF THE 
WESTWOOD CAMPUS WOULD BE INCOMPLETE IF MENTION 
WERE NOT MADE OF THE OTHER MAJOR UNIT OF THE 
UNIVERSITY. LARGEST AND MOST VENERABLE OF THE 
SEVEN CAMPUSES. CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY IS HONORED 
AS AN ILLUSTRIOUS PARENT WHOSE PRECOCIOUS OFF. 
SPRING IS MORE AND MORE ASSERTING ITS INDEPENDENCE. 
THE BUILDING ABOVE IS CALIFORNIA HALL. BUILT IN 1905 
AND USED FIRST FOR CLASSROOMS. THEN FOR ADMINISTR A. 
TION. WITH THE COMPLETION OF A NEW ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING, CAL HALL WILL FURNISH CLASSROOMS FOR 
THE LAW SCHOOL. 




B[I!K[L[Y CUMPUS 




NESTLED ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE CAMPUS IS THE HEARST MINING BUILDING. 
HOME TO THE BERKELEY ENGINEERING STUDENTS THE BUILDING WAS GIVEN TO 
THE UNIVERSITY BY MRS. PHOEBE HEARST IN MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND. SENATOR 
GEORGE HEARST. AND CONSTRUCTION WAS BEGUN ON NOVEMBER 18. 1902. 



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f A C y IT Y 

DEAN MHVIN I. OnSIE 
DR. WILLUM CONGER MORGHN 






STUDENT 

JOSEPH PETER PIERANO 



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JOM FREEAR 
lESJDSGOO 



iOBERT^ELD 
ILLIANfeJ^HNKE 




BOOK I • ADMINISTRATION ■•• BOOK II • CLA 
SSES ••• BOOK Ml • ACTIVITIES ••• BOOK IV 

• UNIVERSITY WOMEN BOOK V • UNIVER 
SITY MEN ••• BOOK VI • ATHLETICS ••• BOO 
K VII • SOCIETY ••• BOOK VIM • COMMERC 
E BOOK I • ADMINISTRATION ••• BOOK 
II • CLASSES • BOOK III • ACTIVITIES -•• 
BOOK IV UNIVERSITY WOMEN ••• BOOK V 

• UNIVERSITY MEN BOOK VI • ATHLETI 
CS ••• BOOK VII • SOCIETY ••• BOOK VIM 

• COMMERCE •• BOOK I • A D M I N I ST R A T I O 
N ■•• BOOK II CLASSES •■ BOOK III AC 




m 



BOOK I 



ADMINISTRATION 



BOOK II 



CLASSES 



BOOK III 



ACTIVITIES 



BOOK IV UNIVERSITY WOMEN 



BOOK V 
BOOK VI 
BOOK VII 
BOOK VIII 



UNIVERSITY MEN 

ATHLETICS 

SOCIETY 

COMMERCE 



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300K Vi ATHLETICS 



BOOK VII SOCl ETY 



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BOOK V 



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UB-DIVISIOn • ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS • A. S. U. C. EXECUTIVES • FAC 
ITV • ALUMNI • ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS • A. S. U. C. EXECUTIVES • FAC 
LTY • ALUMNI • ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS • A. S. U. C. EXECUTIVES • FACUL 



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Robert Gordon Sproul, President of the University of California, is a true 
California man. He is a graduate of the campus at Berkeley, where he, like 
most students in their college careers, for reasons best known to himself, 
changed from one major to another. As an undergraduate, he was prominent 
in campus activities. He went in for the military, acted as drum major, was 
a sports announcer, ran the two-mile track, and held several student body 
offices. His presidency was preceded by his acting as Cashier and Assistant 
Comptroller of the University, Secretary of the Regents, Vice-President and 
Comptroller of the University. He is Informal in manner, and much sought 
after as a speaker. His speaking is characterized by an apparent phobia 
regarding the efficiency of the microphone. When he says, "All those within 
range of my voice . . .", it seems likely that he means it as a direct address 
to all his listeners in California. 





Earle Raymond Hedrick, Vice-President and 
Provost of the University of California, finds 
his primary interest in the growth of school 
spirit in the University, as the reader has prob- 
ably noticed if he has ever seen Mr. Hedrick 
and his hat at a football game. His second 
interest, and a more personal one, is in the 
culture of canna lilies. If you meet him, he 
will probably invite you to pick one from the 
bed at the back of the Library. And don't 
let the gardener stop you. Provost Hedrick 
has a large family of which he is justly proud. 
He was President of the American Mathe- 
matical Association in 1929 and in 1930, be- 
sides being the author of several books on that 
subject. He succeeded Dr. Ernest Carroll Moore 
as Provost of the University of California at 
Los Angeles in 1937. 





e \. 



GOV. OLSON 



Acting as Chairman of the Board of Regents of one of the largest Universities in the coun- 
try, Governor Culbert L. Olson more than adequately fills his position. Governor Olson has been 
one of the foremost proponents of advancing the prestige and rank of the University. Through 
his support of the self-help cooperative plan, he has enabled a greater number of people to 
avail themselves of the University facilities. Whenever the University participates in an athletic 
contest, he is there as an ardent rooter, sharing the distinction along with President Sproul of 
always being on the winning side in all California-U.C.L.A. contests. 




22 



R D 



F 



RE G [ n S 





Boards of Regents, seated clockwise: Harold Ellis, Head of University News Service; Stuart 
O'Melveny: Monroe Deutsch, Vice President, University at Berkeley; Joseph D. Hodgen; James 
Mills; Charles Adolph Ramm; Robert M. Underbill, Secretary-Treasurer of Regents; Culbett 
L. Olson, Governor of California; Robert Gordon Sproul, President of University; Mortimer 
~Fleishacker: Luther A. Nichols, Comptroller of University; John U. Calkins, Attorney for the 



Regents: James K. Moffett; Garrett McEnerney. 



23 



Aside from his deanly duties, Hurford E. Stone of 

the Under3raduate Division enjoys mountain life and 
gardening. Dean Stone also shows preference for 
red neckties and new cars. 




If he is ni 
books, nor h 
forming his c 
and Science. 



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ither traveling, playing tennis, writing 

king, Dean Watkins is sure to be per- 

ties as Dean of the College of Letters 



Dean Noble of the College of Business Adminis- 
tration keeps golf scores with Dean Watkins and 
writes books on The Principles of Accounting. 



E A N S OFTHE 



24 



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Dean of Women Helen M. Laughlin has been 
ractically everywhere, knows practically everyone, 
nd has done practically everythins- Needless to 

y, she is as popular as she is efficient. 




Interested In a "golden age of sound", Dean 
Knudsen of the Graduate Division does avocational 
research into acoustics and music. 



Acting Ai 
good fellow 
Horticulturist 
foreign d 



U N I V E R S IT 



s't. Dean of Agriculture Hodgson is a 

espite his imposing title of Subtropical 
He is fond of travel and his many 
ations. 



Dean Cozens of the College of Applied Arts 
has had his finger in our academic pie for the 
last twenty-five years. In addition to his official 
duties, Dean Cozens also teaches track and 
field classes 




The rapid increase in the size of the 
College of Education and its attendant 
high standards are fitting tributes to the 
ability of the late Marvin L. Darsie, Dean 
of Education. hHis untiring devotion to 
his v/ork will not soon be forgotten. 



u\u 



Dean Willianns heads the Summer Session for 
six weeks and then spends the other forty-six 
of the year in planning for the next session and 
attending the meetings of innumerable com- 
mittees. 



26 




ADMINinmiTION 




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Bill Aclcertnan dictates lo Marly Grim 



Ass't Graduate Mana3er Stunenegger 



Executive officers of Kerckhoff have 
their work and their whimsies. Affection- 
ately known as "Sturzy", A. J. Sturzen- 
egger has charge of all transportation, 
athletic storerooms, and equipment, while 
Ticket-Manager Harry Morris plays with 
model trains in his off-hours. Graduate 
Manager Ackerman coaches the tennis 
teams, Ben Person capably manages the 
Athletic News Bureau, and Joe Osher- 
enko controls Bruin publications — but 
shuns the personal publicity of Kerckhoff 
fame. Stepping into the jobs vacated by 
the resignations of C. M. McClure and 
Bob Rasmus, Mrs. Fern D. Kelly manages 
the Co-op with a domestic touch, while 
Ralph Stillwell handles book-business in 
the Student Store. 



A. S. U. C. 



E )( E C U T 



32 




ilph Stillwell, Book Store Mandger 



I V [ $ 



Publications' Joe Osherenko 




STUDENT G U ^ 




Seated: Mary Lee McClellan, Lucretia Tenney. Fred Koebig, Evelyn Vinton, Barbara Wight. Standing: Norm Padgett, Jim 
Stewart, Fred Bruderlin, Karl Gustafson, George Oliver, Dean Hurford E. Stone, Sandy Mock, Hank McCune 



The administrative and legislative body of the A.S.U.C.L.A. is composed of the Student 
Council, and was headed this year by Fred Koebig, student body president. The purpose of 
the organization is to form active policies which will benefit not only the present students of 
U.C.L.A., but also those future members of the University. Through the efforts of the Coun- 
cil such bodies as the Labor Board, the Peace Council, and the Cooperative Store have 
been formed. This year has seen the establishment of the first Associated Student weekly 
radio program, "The Bruin Speaks", under the direction of the Music and Service Board, 
and the inauguration of broadcast rallys on campus. A nation-wide Collegiate Peace Poll 
representing the opinions of a hundred thousand students of the United States was also 
authorized by the Student Council. And by the end of the fall semester the long-awaited 
paved parking lot was completed. Situated north of the Administration Building, the lot 
accommodates four hundred fifty cars. On all roads of student activity and welfare, the 
progressive wheels of our University are dependent upon the legislative power of the Student 
Council. 



34 



C I L 



Fred Kocbig and Mike MacBan, S.C. student body prexy. seem 
to be enjoying themselves as Dean Stone ponders and Barbara 
Wight just looks 



^ 




Johnny Jaclcson studies a momentous issue as 
Dean Stone seems to have stumped Karl Gustaf- 
son on something, to judge from the latter's 
expression 



Oh! happy day, joy reigneth supreme. Prexy 
Fred grins engagingly, Mary Lee McClellan 
dimples coyly, and George Oliver laughs during 
one of the lighter moments 



35 




-^* 



Seated: Martha Grim, Helen M. Laughlin, Lucretia Tenncy. Standing: Bill 
Ackcrman, Deming Maclise, Fred Koebig, John Jackson, Dick Jones. 



B H R D OF C I T R L 

As the Student Council formulates the policy of the Associated Students, so the Board of Control is final authority on all monetary 
matters. The unprecedented success of the last football season, and increased A.S.U.C. income should somewhat relieve the Board 
from its penny-pinching problems during the next year. Comptroller Maclise, Deans Stone and Laughlin, Alumni Secretary Jackson, and 
Graduate Manager Ackerman are permanent members of the Board by virtue of their offices. Student Body President Fred Koebig, 
Vice-President Lucretia Tenney, and O.C.B. Chairman Dick Jones served as student members for this past year. 




36 




Seated: Betty Billmgsley, Dicic Jones. Billie Thomas. 
Standing: Pauline Savage. Mason Flowers, Gay Pryor. 
Ben Sprecher, Bob Rubin, Dick Patton, LaDrue Willard- 
son. Wolfe Gilbert 



O. C. B. Chairman Jones keeps a 
few office hours and a large staff 
of secretaries 



R C O I Z H T I N S 
C U R L BOARD 

The O.C.B. is perhaps one of the most ambitious, if not 
the most effective of campus organizations. Chairman Dick 
Jones put a rather reactionary measure before the Student 
Council the fall semester. His proposal that unrecognized 
organizations be denied publicity in Bruin publications was 
passed by the Student Council. Aroused student opinion 
forced the Council to rescind its decision. Undaunted, the 
O.C.B. still maintained its duties, regulating organization 
recognition, social activities, and welfare functions for student 
transportation and mail. 



The Jones Girls, Billie Mae Thomas and Mary Alice Madden, add 
efHciency as well as pulchritude to Kerclchoff Halt 209 




IH[ FHOliy 




With the versatile interests of a 
Poll Sci instructor, Dr. J. A. C. 
Grant collects butterflies and writes 
essays on Constitutional Law. His 
academic activities are cryptically 
listed as I57B, 158, and 255A. 



Dr. Joseph Lockey of the History 
Departnnent, although hesitant to 
disclose the nature of his recent 
research work on the history of the 
Floridas, does not mind admitting 
that he enjoys a good game of 

golf. 



Dr. Franklin Rolfe of the English De- 
partment says he has no time for hobbies 
— his life is too disorganized. He is 
interested in whatever he is doing at the 
moment, and doesn't like things he can't 
understand, like "a rose is a rose . . ." 




Pictured with formality in "Who's 
Who", Dr. Henry Brush may be more in- 
formally encountered climbing mountains 
and fishing. Dr. Brush's scholastic interests 
are centered in Medieval French litera- 
ture and historical grammar. 



Mrs. Louise Sooy of the Art Depart 
ment finds release for her aesthetic inhibi 
tions in the trying on of new and "cxcit 
ing" hats. Seeking beauty as a part of 
one's everyday experience and emotions, 
she thrills to pastel pinks and mystery 
novels. 



THE FUUL 



Famous for his "Faculty Sparklers", 
Dr. Frank C. Davis of the Psychology 
Department is one of the university's 
most popular lecturers. Dr. Davis might 
be quoted, but would rather submit his 
theories to scientific publications. 




Internationally known as a philosopher, 
Dr. Bertrand Russell began lecturing on 
this campus last fall. By the end of the 
spring semester, his students had philo- 
sophically pulled themselves up by their 
boot-straps to a plane of at least partia 
comprehension. 



Augmenting both his experience and 
his salary, Dr. Frederick P. Woellner lec- 
tures to his education classes and speaks 
before women's clubs. Interested in the 
principles of business and education. 
Dr. Woellner practices what he preaches. 



42 




With humorous sketches and not-so 
humorous quizzes, Dr. William C. Putnam 
keeps his geology classes awake and 
alert. He is interested in coastlines, sail- 
ing-ships, and hiking, although the last is 
more or less of a "postman's holiday". 



Dr. Marvel Stockwell's course of lec- 
tures struggles valiantly with the weighty 
problems of public finance and taxation 
— or 'how to extract payment and influ- 
ence people". Such diplomatic theories 
as this one might account for the large 
enrollment in the Economics Deoartment 
the past year. 




ruui 



Dr. Robertson of the Chemistry Department is interested 
in this complicated apparatus and his theory of "world 
gardenins". There are bugs that bite above and below 
ground, claims Dr. Robertson. 




A tinker by trade, but a sailor by hobby, 
Mr. Adrian Keller may usually be found in the 
Hermitage of the Mechanical Arts building. 
Teaching his classes in photography and wood- 
hop, he works with his cameras and his vicious- 
ooking saws. 



Dr. Bennet M. Allen, head of the Zoology 
Department, is an enthusiastic zoologist and 
an ardent philatelist. Also interested in the 
welfare of tadpoles, Dr. Allen scientifically 
regulates the progress of both. 



I \ 





Infra-red light is usually associated with 
photography. However, its less well-known 
influence on molecular activities prompts the 
pet research of Dr. Joseph W. Ellis of the 
Physics Department. A research conducted 
into Dr. Ellis' own activities discloses a diver- 
sified interest in the science and rigors of 
golfing, ice-skating, and mountain-climbing. 



Dr. Arnold Schoenberg, internationally 
acclaimed for his modern-classical composi- 
tions, relaxes from his teaching in the Music 
Department by writing textbooks on musical 
theory. However, Dr. Schoenberg's creative 
genius is not limited to the field of phoneti- 
cal appreciation, for he numbers among his 
other talents and recreations the art of 
bookbinding and the more athletic abilities 
of ping-pong and tennis. 




IH[ FHOITY 




Miss Josephine Ketcilc advocates 
modern dance as a creative oppor- 
tunity for expression, and so emotes 
her own vibrant personality. Dis- 
proving the theory of the "pro- 
verbial" P.E. major, Miss Ketcik J 
would rather darn a sock than play __^ 
jumping center. 



Major Sustav Braun knows not only his military 
tactics, but also his social ones. He swings a 
wicked racquet, but his polished brass and his line 
with the ladies are pure gentlemanly strategy. A 
Social Butterfly in a masculine way, the Major is 
one of the most popular of faculty sponsors. 




46 



4 



/ 



Bill Spaulding claims that 
he plays only enough golf to 
keep up with his classes, and 
out of the sand -traps. He 
doesn't write University texts, 
but he does write University 
history. One of U.C.L.A.'s 
staunchest rooters, "Bill" picks 
the Bruins for the sports fore- 
casts. 



:¥ 



The dignified Captain Charlton E. Battle is 
just a sailor-boy at heart. When he is not 
indulging in a round of golf or a rubber of 
bridge, he can usually be found teaching his 
Naval R.O.T.C. classes or play- 
ing with his guns. 



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Miss Martha Davis cr 
Home Economics is one 
of the frivolously domestic type who knows all kinds 
of diet recipes, but loves to mix a batch of fudge. 



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And here we see Dr. S. F. 
Sherwood explaining the in- 
tricacies of a quadric surface 
by means of his favorite 
model. Those lines that look 
curved are actually straight. 
Dr. Sherwood is most con- 
vincing. 




nding her pet theories of time economy tc 
ers", Miss Myrta McClellan of the Geogra- 
partment believes that it is necessary to study 
d budget to get along in this academic world 
ours. 




Dr. Laurence BailifF t 



Modern Languase Forum on Soanish vers!'*''' 
t even b 



\-Ac■rU^r^ Hn-m<^;t r,' -r.- C''r...^'rz T 



Dr. Floyd Burtche^ 




49 



HUMII 



Alumni President and official speech-maker, 
Mr. Philip Davis acts as public relations 
ambassador. 




Ambitious Ann Sumner, Alumni Vice-President and member of the 
U.C.L.A. News Bureau, finds time to manage University Broadcasts. 



Deming G. Maclise, Assistant Comptroller, and Treasurer of the 
Alumni, works in coordination with David /ule, Chairman of the 
Finance Committee. 



52 




Genial John B. Jackson, Secretary, coordinates Alumni activities 
and edits the U.C.L.A. Magazine. 



HUMN 



A lawyer by profession and the President of the Alumni 
by election, M. Philip Davis divides his interests between 
his business and his alums. Active in campus work, 
Miss Ann Sumner, Vice-President, and Deming G. Maclisc, 
Treasurer, also share their executive abilities, hlowever. 
Miss Sunnner has been a member of the Alumni Council 
and numerous other alumni committees despite her activi- 
ties in conjunction with the University News Bureau, Exten- 
sion Division News, and University Broadcasts. And 
Mr. Maciise's position as Assistant Comptroller of the 
University makes him the ideal person to handle the 
alumni association's finances. In undergraduate days, he 
was a star hurdler at Berkeley, and he now assists Harry 
Trotter in coaching Bruin hurdlers as another side-track of 
his official duties. John B. Jackson, Secretary, is the only 
alumni officer who holds a full-time position. "Johnny" 
was editor of Southern Campus, a football letterman, and 
a track man in his college days, h^e now edits the alumni 
magazine, and since taking office last year, has changed 
the policy to boost both Alumni and student activities. 



53 




Scaled: Emily Patterson. Rowc Baldwin, M. Philip Davis. Mary Morrison. Standing: Colver Briggs, Fred KocBig,~Franlc~K7ingbcrg, Dcming 

Maclise, John Jackson, Walt Stickel, A. Gearhard Eger. — 




Del Hobbs, Alumni Homecoming 
Chairman, risks all for the sake of 
his alma mater and the Bruins 
A - Burstrng alumni show. Meat- 
cleaving magician Russell Swann 
holds the blade. 




Hashlns over "old days" at the Alumni buffet supper, J. L. Jones, Frank Balthis, 

and Fred Houser hail back to the halls of Kerckhoff for some sood old Co-op 

how and pow-wowl 





membership at a rapid rate. There has been a reawakening of 
nterest in football on the part of the Alumni this year, which fact 
is probably responsible for the ensuing increase. The Association 
publishes two magazines. One is a football supplement and is 
devoted to information about the team and to dressing room dope. 
It is printed on the evening following every game. The other is 
a monthly publication which reports spicy information concerning 
campus personalities and activities. The Alumni also have a 
scholarship program. Last June, four scholarships were given to 
incoming Freshmen, who were not, necessarily, football players. 
Next year the Alumni plan to double this number of scholarships. 
In conjunction with its other activities, the Association also 
sponsors several Regional clubs in outlying districts, such as Glen- 
dale, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura, etc., at which speakers 
from the University are present, and movies of the games are 
shown. There are two homecomings each year; one is in the spring 
and is academic in nature. The other is in the fall, and is devoted 
purely to social activities, such as the parade, the bonfire, and a 
large dance in the Gymnasium. The Alumni Association solicits 
gifts for the University and is in large part responsible for many 
of the donations which have been made us. 



U L U 



56 



iUBDIVISIONS • • SENIORS • JUNIORS • SOPHOMORES • FRESHMEN • SENIOR 

• SENIORS • JUNIORS • SOPHOMORES • FRESHMEN • SENIORS • JONIORS 
bPHOMORES • FRESHMEN • SENIORS • JUNIORS • SOPHOMORES • ERF?^H^1FN 



We, the Senior Class, have just been writing the 
final pages to our four volume book entitled "College. "- 
The first three books are connplete, but the fourth an^ 
last remains to be written, so with that old feeling <3 
sad farewells we take pen in hand and record the firi 
chapter of this, the last volume, which regards th e^glgg 
tions of the Senior Officers who served their office: 
well. The second chapter regards the successful even 
which President John Cole, Vice-President Sue V. 
Dyke, Secretary LaVerne Anderson, Treasurer Davi 
MacTavish and the council planned for us. The social 
season began with a big turkey dance in November, 
apropos to Thanksgiving. Tom, the turkey, was madi 
the center of attraction because the person at tl 
dance with the lucky number "Got the Bird," whi 
was none the worse for its extended flights througi 
Royce Aud. Smaller affairs like the picnics on Kerckhoff 
lawn and a few closed dances continued through the: 
winter, but events were really in the upswing in the 
spring. Everyone enjoyed the very exclusively-senior 
beach party. A few unsuspected ducklings and some 
very delectable sand-flavored food made the party al 
the more fun. But what we will probably remember 
longest was Senior Week in early June. Aside from the 
usual run of luncheons and dinner parties, there were 
farewell addresses that almost made us sorry we were 
finally graduating. Then came a Senior Prom that truly 
satisfied all of our anticipation — breakfast, orchestra, 
entertainment, — everything was perfect. Well, now only 
one thing remains to be written — Chapter III, the last 
in the book. It tells of gladness and sadness, the end 
of an old pursuit and the beginning of a new. This 
was graduation. The years have come and gone and 
'tis time that on this last page of the book we inscribe 
FINIS 




^ 




Thanks a million, Johnny, for the grand senior affairs 
you put over so well. 



One Thcta • charm - beauty -~ brains — effi- 
ciency — being Vice-President == Sue Van Dylce. 




The senior ofFiccrs and councilmen gathered for their usual Wednesday get-togethers, better Icnown as council meetings. Meeting was called to order by genial 
Johnny Cole (except when he had his tonsils out and couldn't tallc), social events listed by scintilating Sue Van Dyltc, nninutes read by lovely LaVerne Anderson, 
and the fines collected by dashing Dave MacTavish. Aside 'from the usual snnall talk and thinking up "Confucious say," the mceetings did have their serious sides, 
when lots of good things were planned for the senior class. Highlighted was the climax of four full years — the Senior Ball. Senior Week which came early in June, 
consisted of a series of breakfasts, luncheons, and dinners, informal dances, farewell addresses, and worrying about their final finals. 



Council minutes and all the senior class correspond- 
ence kept LaVerne good and busy. 



Dave MacTavish probably pinched Lincoln's face 
off the pennies the seniors' saved. 




HI 



COUHIL 




Row I: Charles Mclhorn, Jo Butler, Gladys Voyda, Jean Barnbrock, 
Barbara Spaulding, Allison Boswell, George Bliss, Betty Lee, Ellen 
Rogers, Ruth Nelson, Sue Van Dyke, Jane Nuttall, John Cole, 
Beverly Tucker, John Gaskill. Row II: Gerrie Griffith, Barbara Wether- 
bee, Helen Paesschke, Louise Parker, Evelyn Bluemle, Pete Yannasaki, 
Janice Lipking, Barbara Meigs, La Verne Anderson, Shirley Perron, 
Phyliss Hoffman, Jeanette Slavin, Rosennary Ropp, B'll Johnke, 
Norman Padgett, Forest Fleming, Bob Hartley, Julian Blodgett, Hap 
Eraser, Gale Stafford, Bud Harris, Harold Gilliam, Tom Stevens, Fred 
Flo, Kimball Moore, Dale Finley, Arnold Broyle, Herbert London, 
Jack Blaikie, David MacTavish. 




Ipana Toothpaste has asked for the copyrights on this little gem 



60 




Here is some real evidence of the Senior Council at 
work. Johnnie certainly got near-sighted if he's actually, 
reading those plans. 





By the time the Senior Picnic was over every- 
one had his swallows perfectly timed to "Oh 
Johnnie". 



Eleanor isn't running for the exercise; she was dragged into this 
exciting game of "Drop the handkerchief." Seniors are fre- 
quently seen indulging in such sophisticated games. 




The holder of the lucky ticket gets it! 



A toast to the guy who gets the bird! 



61 






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JONES • GEORGE BROWN • 
JOVCE TURNER • HELEN HANSEi . 

• EDITH GRIFFITH • LEIGH CROSBY 

• WILLIAM ACKERMAN • ZOE EMER- 
SON • WALTER WESTCOTT • JEROLD 
WEIL • GRANVILLE HULSE • FERN 
GARDNER • RALPH BORSUM • FRt. 
MOVER JORDAN • BURNETT HARALSON 

• PAUL FRAMPTON • FRANKLIN MINCK • 
ALVIN MONTGOMERY • ROBERT KERR 
JOSEPH GUION • IRENE PALMER • PAULINE 
DAVIS • WILBUR JOHNS • JOHN COHEE • 

AROLD WAKEMAN • DOROTHY FREELAND • 
LEO DELSASSO • MARY M. HUDSON • ALIO 
BRUCE RUSSELL • FERN BOUCK • THEREi 
SYLVIA LIVINGSTON -MARIAN WHITAKER • MAR 
ACE BRESSE • MARIAN PETTIT • DAVID FOLZ • 
HOLLINGSWORTH • FRED HOUSER • HELEN JACf 
ZELLA GOODWIN • EARLE GARDNER • DAVID RIDGfc 
EDMUNDS • NED MARR • ELIZABETH MASON • WIL 
JOHNSTON • BEN PERSON • RALPH BUNCHE • JOHN 
MAN • WILLIAM FORBES • IRENE PROBOSHASKY • 









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HAROLD KRAFT • DRL 
//AY • FRANK BALTHIS • WALD' 
L tM-A NEVILLE • LOUISE GIBSON • HELEiN 
CKSON • JOHN TERRY • GRISELDA KUHL- 
^ jAmtS LLOYD • ARTHUR WHITE • BARBARA BRINKER- 
HOFF • KENWOOD ROHRER • LAURA PAYNE • SCRIBNER BIRLENBACK • THOMAS CUNNINGHAM • FRANK CROSBY 
GERHARD EGER • JEANEE EMERSON • HANSENA FREDERICKSON • STANLEY GOULD • RUTH GOODER • WILLIAM 
HI -.r^^cr . CT^NLEY JEWELL • JOSEPH LONG • GEORGIE OLIVER • KENNETH PIPER • MABEL REED • MARIAN WALKER 
^ODROOF • DAVID YULE • ROBERT KEITH • JACK CLARK • EARL SWINGLE • CHARLOTTE McGLYNN • 
RKER • LAWRENCE HOUSTON • DON LEIFFER • MARSHALL SEWALL • WALTER BOGART • JOSEPh 
• CAR! RROWM . Aiinppp BROWN • MARGARET SOPER • LAURENCE MICHELMORE • LUCILLE KIRK 

E NICHOLS • SALLY SEDGWICK • LUCY GUILD • EDWARD HATHCOCK <■ 
• BEATRICE CASE • ETHEL TOBIN • VIRGIL CAZEL • WEBB HANSEN • FRED KUH 
- SCHLICKE • CARL SCHAEF'^ER • BETTY FRANZ • MARGARET BROWN • ALA 
: ADAM DTHY AYRES • MART Bl • ELSIE FRIEBERG • FRED HARRIS • RUTH LESLIE • 

• DEA; =^ • ALEX McRICHIE • iuaa /viONTERASTELLI • MAXINE OLSEN • HOWARD PLUA*- 

■ AN • V EL • JOHN TALBOT • LEONARD WELLENDORF • BIJOU BRINKHOP • HARRISON 

■ 30RD0N FILES • DURAND GRAYBILL • WANDA HAY 
PRf;nN c pwil k'ELLOGG • DON McNAMAPa • LJr-l^,lCD 



HOyR AWHDS 



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BEST DISTINGUISHED US CHEIFORIIillS" 



UISON FHISH BOSWELL 
M I E T N COHEN 
FREDERICK KURT KOEBIG 
U Y E LI Z U E T H EE E 



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VIRGNU EEE EIN DSEY 
M U Y EEE M c C LE E EU 
HEHY RUSSELL McCUNE 
GEORGE SCOTT MILLER 
HR^y CLIFTON PyCETT 
RICHHD KENNETH PRYNE 
FRHK STHTON SIMONS 
ROBERT RUPH STREETON 
LUCRETU PAULA TENNEY 
KENNETH STANLEY WASHINGTON 
VIRGINIA LEE WILKINSON 



"S • P.OBERT PAGE • BETTY PRETTYMA^' «» MADALYN 
<Y CLARK SHELDON • JOSE^ -OMAS • 

KNULU ANTOLA • FLORENCE BLACKman • WILLIAM 
BRADFORD • JOHN BURNSIDE • LEE COATS • KATHERINE 
=ABER • WILLIAM GRAY • MARTHA GRIM • WILLIAM 
HENSEY • EMILY MARR • MARION McCARTHY • ALICE 
McELHENY • JACK MORRISON • GENE NIELSON • ARN- 
3 PEEK • IRENE RAMBO • ROBERT SHELLABY • JACK 
JBALL • JEANEHA YERXA • JOHN OLSON • ALBERT 
HATCH • LOUIS BLAU • FRANCES BRADY • LLOYD 
"MIDGES • MARGARET DUGUID • JACK EAGAN • T'"-'.' 
_ '^ EDWARDS • BERNICE GARRETT • ANDREW h 
LTON • CHANDLER HARRIS • MAY H08ART • BEVERL) 
k'EIM • ROBERT McHARGUE • JOY MAE PARKE • BETSY 
EMBROKE • JUDITH RYKOFF • BETTY SEERY • ALICE 
-- • HOWARD YOUNG • FRANCINE BECHERAZ • 
_ MSON • STANLEY BROWN • HELENE COLESIE 
• FRANK DOOLEY • ARDELLE GRATIOT • MAURY 
GROSSMAN • KATHRYN HERTZOG • JEAN HODG- 
KINS • THOMAS LAMBERT • CHARLES LEINBACH • 
MARJORIE ALICE LENZ • VALLE • r 

McGILLAN • JACKSON ST, ., • FRANK 
SON • JEAN BARDEEN • SHIRLEY BRADY • Gl- 
CORNELIUS • GEORGE DICKERSON • PHYLLIS ED\" ' " • 
JUNE HALLBERG • GILBERT HARRISON • JACK HASTINGS • JC 
DElBERT HOBBS • JAMES LASH • KATHRYN MATTIOLI • ARTHUR ' • STA 

• ROBERT SCHROEDER • DORIS WARD • MARVIN BERENZWEIG • Mnp,-, ak^ nr.PtsOFF • ..A ELIZAi... 

DONVEL W. FERGUSON • GEORGETTE FOSTER • LEE FRANKC 'AN • MARY SUE HOWARD • 

JOHNSON • ELLA LYMAN • GE " ■ ARX • WILFRED MONROt • .-.c^c:. rL.N;.,'^ ■ ~ ' --. . 

OLL WELLING • DON BROWN • 'A BROWN • EVERETT CARTER • MARGARET C 

ARD HAYDEN • HAROLD N • VIRGINIA " MILTON KRAMER • F ^ANDiS • : 

^TPP • \V/II 1 I A ^/ Mi:\V7,\AiM» i OTIC • \/iPfZIK - n „'\: P ■."' A \n • P A! 2- » ,',' AP,- A ?P^ 

63 




EDWARD JOHN 
ABOITIZ, B.S. 


DORIS ELAINE 
ADAMS, B.E. 


LOUIS 
AIDELLS, B.S. 


ELIZABETH BURTON 
ALDERSON.A.B. 


JEAN 
ALEXANDER, A.B. 


ROBERT LAING 
ALEXANDER, A.B. 


Subtropical Horticullure 


Education 


Accounting 


English 




German 


Economics 


Cebu. Philippine Islands 
Alpha Gamma; Alpha Zeta; 
Asriculture Club; Soccer. 1, 


Redlands 
Ki-P'i; C.T.A. 


Minneapolis. Minn. 
Physical Education Assistance. 2. 


Los Angelas 
Phrateres; Kappa Phi 
versity Camp Counse 


Zeta; Uni- 

lor. 


Pasadena 


Santa Monica 
Beta Theta Pi; Blue C 




ELEANOR E. 




JACK EDWARD 


LA VERNE 






ROBERT THOMAS 




ROBERTA ARNOLD 


VIRGINIA LEE 


ANDERSON. B.E. 




ANDERSON. B.S. 


ANDERSON, B.S. 






ANDERSEN, B.S. 




ANDERSON. A.B. 


ANDERSON. A.B. 


Education 




Accounting 


Marketing 






Accounting 




French 


Geography 


St. Paul, Minn. 




Minneapolis. Minn. 


Huntington Park 






Los Angeles 




Long Beach 


Roscoc 


Phi Beta; Masonic Clu 


b; U.D.S.. 


Beta Theta Pi; Alpa Kappa Psi; 


Gamma Phi Beta; Sp 


urs 


; Gui- 


Alpha Gamma Omega; 


Alpha 


Theta Pi Alpha; Pi Delta Phi; 


Phrateres, 1. 2, 3, 4; Geogra- 


^, 5; Bruin; Hi Jinlis 


Commit- 


Ice Hockey, 3, 4. 


don; Class Council 1 , 


2, 


Secre- 


Kappa Psi; Crew. 1. 




Southern Campus. 1; A.W.5. 


phic Society. 1. 2, 3. 4; Mason c 


tec. A; Hello Day C 


ommittee. 




lary 4; W.A.A., 1, 2. 










Vocational Comm.. 1; Le Cercl*- 


Club. 1. 2. 3, 4. 


•4; Ki-Pri. 
















Francais. 





Kentucky Colonel Koebig, pride and prejudice 
of the Blue grass Betas, found it necessary to 
paddle down Hilgard peddling cigarettes. How- 
ever. Fred gained the admiration of the campus 
by being the nnost conscientious president in a 
long tinnc. 




b^5^^ 





DONALD PETER 
ARTH, B.S. 


BVRON HARRY 
ATKINSON. A.B. 




CLEON EVERAL 
ATWATER, B.E. 




STEWART BARTON 
AXTELL. A.B. 


Marketing 


English 




Music 




Zoology 


Redlands 


Burbank 




Hollywood 




San Diego 


y.M.C.A.; Swimming, 1. 


Sigma N u ; Sea 
Blade. 


3bard 


and Phi Mu Alpha; Band. 4; 
chestra, 4. 


Or- 


y.M.C.A.; Con g re g a t io n a 
Club; Masonic Club. 




JAMES CECIL 
BARTLETT. A.B. 




DONALD FRANCIS 
BAYLEV, A.B. 


MARGARET CLARE 
BEACH, A.B. 




NORTON GARDNER 
BEACH. B.S. 


History 




Economics 


English 




Marketing 


Huntington Beach 




Minneapolis, Minn. 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Masonic Club; y.M.C.A., 
national Relations Club* 
ley Club. 


Inter- 
Wcs- 


y.M.C.A. 


Alpha Delta Pi. Southern 
pus. 1. 


Cam- 


Kappa Alpha; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Blue C; Tennis. 4. 



64 




lELEANOR BELLE 
ALLEBRAND, A.B. 

History 

Slendale 
Alpha Phi: Bruin; V.W.C.A. 



BARBARA LOU 
ALLEN. A.B. 

History 

Hollywood 
Pi Beta Phi; Southern Campus. 
I; y.W.C.A.; Homecoming 
Committee. 4. 



ANNETTE 

ALTKORN. A.B. 
Psychology 
Los Angeics 



ARNOLD O. 

ANDERSON, A.B. 
Economics 
Santa Rosa 

Sigma Nu. 





Rudy Binder Is that rare jewel, a good man and 
an SAE, too. Wears an army uniform when he 
has to, studies geology when he has to, and 
acts normal the rest of the time. Strong and 
silent, a man's man. 



JAMES WILLIAM 


ELIZABETH KINNE 




ELEANOR 








ROBERT 


ANSWIN, A.B. 


APPLEMAN. A.B. 




ARGULA, B.E. 








ARNOLD. A.B. 


Eiglish 


Sociology 




Education 








English 


Los Angeles 


Los Ange'os 




Los Angeles 








Los Angeles 




Sigma Kappa; Phratercs 
Council. 


A.W.5. 


Spurs; Pfytanean; 
Alpha; Elementary 
Council. 2. 3; South 
1, 2, 3, 4. 


Alpha Chi 
Club; Class 
ern Campus. 


Pershing Rifles; Newman Club 
U.D.S.. 3, 4. 




DONALD EVERETT 
BAILEy, B.S. 
Accounting 

El Scgundo 
Alpha Kappa Psi, 



ZAN VILL 
BALLSUN, B.S. 

Business Administration 

Los Angeles 
Theta Chi; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Homecoming. 3. 4; Men's 
Week. 3. 4; Tennis. I; Track. I. 



FRANCIS JAMES 

BARKER. A.B. 
Geology 
Los Angeles 

Delta Chi; A.I.M.E. 



EDWARD JOSEPH MARTHA JANE 

BARNES, A.B. BARNES, A.B. 

Political Science English 

Los Angeles San Gabriel 

Circle C; Blue C; Track. I. 2, Delta Delta Delta. 

3; Cross Country. I. 2. 3, 4. 



JANE CRAIG 
BARRETT. A.B. 

English 

Los Angeles 
Christian Science Organization; 
Southern Campus. 1; X.W.CA., 
I. 




TEDDy LEE 
BEAR, A.B. 

Geology 

Santa Monica 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon; A.I. 
M.E.;PresidenfsCouncil;A.M.S. 
Council. 



HAROLD LUFKIN 
BEARD. A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 
y.M.C.A.; Campbell Club. 



ERNESTINE AUGUSTA 
BEASLEY, A.B. 

Sociology 

Smithville, Texas 
Delta Sigma Theta. 



WILLIAM EDWARD 
BEIFUSS. A.B. 

English 

Cleveland, Ohio 
UD.S.; Polo, 4. 



JOHN NANCE 
BELKNAP, B.S. 
Accounting 
Richmond. Va. 



HARRY WILLARD 

BELL. B.S. 
Marketing 
Beverly Hills 

Kappa Alpha. 



65 




KATHERINE TITUS 
BELL. A.B. 






ISABELL 
BENDER, A.B. 


Political Science 






Household Science 


Hollywood 






Los Angeles 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Alpha; International 
Club; Pilgiim Fellowsh 


Pi Si 
Rela 
ip- 


9ma 

ions 





LUCILE EVELYN 
BENDOWSKI, A.B. 

Art 

Los An3cles 



ELIZABETH 
BENN. B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 

Guidon; Class Council, 3; Gen- 
eral Elementary Club. 



DON LEROy 
BENNETT, B.S. 

Accounting 

Bellflower 
Alpha Tau Omesa; 



Track. 



DORIS LUCILE 
BERGER. B.E. 

Education 

Compton 
Ph rate res; Westminster 



CI. 




RUDY JOHN 
BINDER, A.B. 
Geology 

El Segundo 
Sisma Alpha Epsilon; Sigma 
Ganma Epsilon; Scabbard and 
Blade; Circle C; Rifle Team. 
2. 3, 4; Swimming, I. 



EDWARD JOHN 
BLACK, A.B. 
Economics 

Los Angeles 



VIRGINIA LEE 
BLACK. A.B. 
History 

Big Pine 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Guidon; 
Class Council, I, 2, 3, 4; Home- 
comins Queen, 2; Southern 
Campus. 



RAMONA ATWOOD 
BLAIR. A.B. 
Music 

Los Angeles 

Mu Phi Epsilon. 



ROSS MARQUAND 
BLAKELY, B.S. 

General Business 

Colton 
Track, 4, 5, 



EDITH S. 
BLAYNEY. B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 



For a Delta Gannma, Allison Boswell really gets 
around. Maybe it's because she's democratic. 
The last of the D. G. politicians, she lists enough 
activities for more people. What a typical co-ed 
should be like. 





VERA JEAN 
BOBSENE, B.S. 


RICHARD NEWTON 
BODINUS. B.S. 




ELEANOR PATRICIA 
BOHN.B.E. 






MURIEL MORSE 
BOHNING. A.B. 


Accounting 

Santa Monica 


Banking and Finance 

Alhambra 




Home Economics 

Los Angeles 






History 

Santa Monica 


Phi Chi Theta; Philia. 


Kappa Alpha; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Class Council, 1, 2; Soph 
Yell Leader. 


Alpha Sigma Alpha; 
Econ. Club; Campus Ca 
A Capclla Choir. 


Home 
ocrs, 3; 


Sigma Kappa; New 



Club. 




JOHN ROBERT 
BOULTON, A.B. 
Physics 

Van Nuys 


BETTy-GRAY 
BOWLING, B.E. 
Art 

Culver City 


DOROTHV ELIZABETH 
BOWMAN, B.E. 
Art 

Hollywood 


ESTHER M. 
BOWMAN, B.E 
Education 

Sacramento 




U.D.S., 3, 4; Philokalla, 3, 


4. 





66 




RUTH ALLERTON 
BLISS. A.B. 
( Philosophy 

Carpintcna 
[Chi Omesa; y.W.C.A.; 

teres. 



<P3 J^Vr 



JEAN RAE PAULA LOIS SIDNEV ALLEN 

. BERGLIND, A.B. BERMAN. A.B. BERNSTEIN. A.B. 

History French Zoolo3y 

I Huntington Park Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Phrateres. Phi Sisma Sigma; Alpha Chi Phi Beta Delta; Class Council 

Alpha; Daily Bruin, I, 2, 3. 4. 3; B Football, 4. 



GENE WALKER 
BILDERBACK. A.B. 
Zoology 

Inglewood 
Alpha Gamma Omesa; Crew, I . 





Five years of civilization haven't taken that 
Jav^ja drawl from Arnold Broyles. Pulls an oai 
once in a while, so he must be a Sigma Nu. 
Reputed to have a brain, which certainly makes 
him heterogeneous. 



JULIAN ROBERT 
BLODGETT, A.B. 
History 

Beverly Hills 
Delta Kappa Epsilon; Home- 
corn i n g Committee; Senior 
Council; A. M.S. Board; Inter- 
fraternity Council President. 



GERALD BARRON 
BLOOM, A.B. 
Bacteriology 

Los Angeles 
Crew, I. 



EVELVN BERNICE 
BLUEMLE, B.E. 

Education 

Huntington Park 
Sigma Kappa; Spurs; Class 
Council, 2, 3, 4. 




ELIZABETH ANNE 
BORCHARD. B.E. 
Education 

San ta Ana 
Theta Upsilon. 



LINNIEVERNEIL 
BORDERS. A.B. 
Political Science 

Kansas City, Kansas 
Alpha Kappa Alpha. 



LOUIS RUBIN 
BORSHEFSKY. A.B. 

Chemistry 

Chicago, lllmois 



JUDITH 
BORSTEIN. B.E. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 
Home Economics Club; Bruin, I. 



ALISON PARISH 
BOSWELL. A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 
Delta Gamma; Mortar Board; 
Prytanean; Spurs; Philia; Cali- 
fornia Club; y.W.C.A.; Religi- 
ous Conference; Class Council. 



RUTH MARY 
BOSWELL, B.E. 
Education 

Westwood 
Chi Omesa; Elementary Club; 
Hello Day. 




EDWARD LEWIS 
BRAOy, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 

Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Lambda 
Ups Ion; Phi Eta Sigma. 



EMOGENE DOROTHY 
BREDE, B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Omega; French Club. 



KATHRYN OTIS 
BREEDEN, A.B. 
English 

Hermosa Beach 

y.W.C.A. 



ANTHONY WAYNE 
BREWER, A.B. 

Political Science 

Lexington, Kentucky 



BETTY ANN 
BREYER, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



DEANE A. 
BRIGGS, A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Nu;'Scabbard and Blade; 
Class Council, i. 2, 3; Intcr- 
fratcrnity Council. 



67 



ELSIE 

BROCKSIEPER, B.E. 
Education 
Los Anseles 
Alpha Chi Omega. 



FLORENCE 
BRODSKV, A.B. 
Sociology 
Los Angeles 



CLAUDE CURRy 
BROOKS, B.S. 
Marketing 

Kansas City, Missouri 

Alpha Delta Sigma; Masonic 
Club; Campbell Club; V.M.- 
C.A.; Co-operative Housing 
Association. 



PHILIP E. 

BROTHERTON, A.B. 
Economics 

Los Angeles 



DOROTHY CHARLOTTE 
BROWER, B.E. 
Education 

Beverly Hills 



BEVERLY C. 
BROWN, A.B. 
Psychology 

Santa Monica 



Pi Beta Phi; Ki-Pri; Homecom- Mortar Board; y.W.C.A.; U- 



ing Committee: y.W.C.A.; A.5. 
U.C. Social Committee, 4. 



versitv Camp; Phrateres; St_ 
dent Counsellor. 




MIRIAM ALICE 
BROWN, A.B. 
French 

Los Angeles 
Alpha of Areta; 



NADINE MARIE 
BROWN, A.B. 

Psychology 

Kecne 



Le Cercle 



Francais; Glee Club. 3; Ten- 
nis. I. 



RUTH ELIZABETH 
BROWN, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 



SHIRLEY ELLEN 
BROWN. B.E. 
Art 

Monterey Park 
Delta Epsilon 



SHIRLEY THAIS 
BROWN. A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 
Areme; U.D.S.; Bruin, 



ARNOLD NASH 
BROYLES, B.S. 

Marketing 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Sigma Nu; Crew, I. 2. 3, 
Football, I; Class Council, 
Bruin Rowing Club. 



This is Dorothy Covert, who goes to college 
for no reason, spends hours in the Co-Op, 
speaks to Betas and Phi Delts. reads books be- 
fore finals, and dresses like a queen. She wears 
the Kappa key. of course. 





ALICE LOUISE 
BURNS. A.B. 
English 

Beverly Hills 

Pi Beta Phi; Newman Club; 
y.W.C.A.; Southern Campus, 
2; Dance Recital, 2, 4; A Ca- 
pella Choir, 3, 4; Staff & Mask. 



LUIS MORTON 
BURRIS. B.S. 
Marketing 

La Canada 
Phi Delta Theta; 
3; Coop. 3, 4; Si 



Labor Board. 
dimming. 2. 



JUSTIN 

BURSTON.B.E. 
Music 

San Diego 
Phi Mu Alpha; Orchestra, 1, 2. 
3. 4; Band, 4; Masonic Club. 



ELAYNEDIANTHA 
BUTTS. B.E. 
Music 

Los Angeles 
Phi Beta; A Capella Choir. 




HUGH AITKEN 
CAMPBELL. B.E. 

Music 

Los Angeles 
Phi Mu Alpha; 
Orchestra. 



Glee Club; 



MARGARET BEATRICE 
CAMPBELL, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Gamma Delta; PI Gamma 
Mu; y.W.C.A.; History Club; 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3. 



VIRGINIA ELOISE 
CAMPBELL. B.E. 

Education 

Huntington Park 
Phi Upsilon Pi; A Capella 
Choir. I. 



RUBY EVELYN 
CAPLAN, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 
W.A.A.; Physical Educat'cn 
Club; Dance Recital, I, 2. 3; 
Campus Capers. I. 



68 






•CORALIE LUISE 
BROWN, A.B. 




DOROTHy ETHEL 
BROWN, B.E. 






ELIZABETH LEONA 
BROWN, A.B. 


ELOUISEI. 
BROWN, B.E. 


Psychology 
i LosAnseles 
Alpha Chi Omega: 
Bruin, 1, 2, 3; Class Co 


Spurs: 
incil, 1. 


Art 

Hollywood 
Alpha Sigma Alpha: 


Philokalia. 


Zoology 
Los Angeles 


Education 
Bakersfield 
Chi Omega. 





This grinning gorilla is the mainstay of the SAE 
house. Favorite quotations: "I'm Carter Grail, 
you know". Good baseball player except for his 
big feet. Called "Porky", but we cant imagine 
why. 



GRACE MURIEL 

BRUBAKER, A.B. 
! History 
I Los Angeles 

Phi Beta: Class Council, 
y.MC.C.A. 



ELIZABETH JANE 
BRUMFIELD, A.B. 
English 

Bluffton, Indiana 



HELEN MAE 


CATHERINEJEAN 


BRVAN, B.E. 


BURLEIGH, B.E. 


Education 


Art 


Glendale 


Los Angeles 


Philia. 


Philokalia: Class Council, 1 




WILLIAM EDWARD 
SVERTS, JR., B.S. 

Business Administration 

Los Angeles 
Oelta Upsilon: Rally Commit- 
zz,\ Frosh Rally Reserves; Soph 
iervice: Scabbard and Blade- 
D.C.B.; Class Council, 2. 



EDMUND JACK 
CAFORIO, A.B. 
Political Science 



MARGARET JANE 


MARIAN HELEN 








REVNOLDS 


CALLIHAM, A.B. 


CAMERON, A.B. 








CAMP, A.B. 


English 


History 








Economics 


Redondo Beach 


San Pedro 








Mountain Viev/ 


Phi Omega Pi. 


Sigma Kappa: South 


ern 


Ca 


m- 


Theta Chi. 




pus, 3: Student Cou 


nsel 


or. 


2, 






3: Hi-Jinks, 3. 











DONALD N. 

CAMPBELL, B.E. 
Mechanic Arts 
Los Angeles 

Phi Delta Theta. 




WINIFRED 


FRED REESE 


LAWRENCE RUSSELL 


IGNACIO 


RUTH ELIZABETH 


ROSE ALICE 


:aridis, B.E. 


CARLIN, A.B. 


CARNEV, B.S. 


CARRANZA, A.B. 


CARTER, A.B. 


CASTLEN, A.B. 


Commerce 


Economics 


Marketing 


Spanish 


English 


Economics 


Hollywooa 


Sridley 


Wichita, Kansas 


Oxnard 


Pasadena 


Glendale 


igma Kappa; Alpha Chi Del 


Crew, 3, 4. 


Delta Sigma Phi; Beta Gamma 


Sigma Delta Pi; Pi Delta Phi. 




Kappa Kappa Gamma 


i; W.A.A. 




Sigma; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, 4. 


69 








M^a 






PATRICIA HESTON 


ROBERT WILLIAM 




VIRGINIA DOROTHY 


VIRGINIA ELLEN 




LAURAJULIA 






IRENEACARMELA 


CAVANAUGH. B.E. 


CHAMBERS. B.E. 




CHAMBERS, B.S. 


CHAMPNEY. A.B. 




CHAPMAN, A.B. 






CHAVES, A.B. 


Art 


Physical Education 




Accounting 


Economics 




History 






English 


Encino 


Inglewood 




Glendale 


Santa Monica 




Los Angeles 






Hollywood 


Pi Beta Phi; Delta Epsilon; Phi- 
loitalia: U.D.5.. 3. 4; y.W.C.A.; 
Dance Recital, 3. 4; Southern 
Campus. 1; Zcta Phi Eta. 


Kappa Alpha: Phi Epsilon 
pa; Football, 2; Rusby. 


Kap- 




Alpha Omicron Pi; Alpha Chi 
Delta; Phrateres; Spurs; Y.W.- 
C.A.; Southern Campus, 1; 
Bruin, 1. 


Pi Beta Phi; Class Counc 
2, 3, A; Vice-President, 2; 
tanean; Spurs; Guidon. 


1. 1, 
Pry- 






ELIZABETH RICHMOND 


LOIS BEE 


MARY ELIZABETH 


RICHARD JOHN 


PEGGY 




WENDELL HENNING 


CLARK, A.B. 


CLARK, B.E. 


CLARK, B.E. 


CLARK, JR., B.S. 


CLARKE, B.E. 




CLAUSON, B.S. 


English 


Art 


Home Economics 


Accounting 


Music 




Business Administration 


Los Angeles 


Eagle Rock 


Bakcrsflcld 


North Hollywood 


San Jose 




Fontana 


W.A.A. 


Delta Epsilon; Phrateres. 


Phrateres; Home Economics 
Club; W.A.A. , 2. 4. 


Circle C; Soccer. 


Chi Omega; Sigma 
Pi Delta Phi; Glee 


Alpha lota; 
Club, 1. 





She looks like a Tri-Delt, dresses like a Tri-Delt, 
talks like a Tri-Delt, and acts like a Tri-Dcit, so 
she must be Jean deGarmo. Dibbles in politics, 
dabbles in journalism, and toddles most every- 
where. 



^^^ 



_ ^*>^V>- i. 





BONNEY-ELLEN 
CLOUGH,A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 




DORIS ELNA 
COCHRAN, A.B 

English 

Monrovia 




EVELYN ALICE 
COHEN, A.B. 
Sociology 

Los Angeles 


RICHARD HENRY 
COHEN, B.S. 

Banking and Finance 

Los Angeles 


Kappa Alpha Theta; 
Campus, 3, 4; Bruin, 


Southern 
1. 


Phrateres; Wesley 


Foundation. 




Phi Beta Delta. 




JOSEPH EARL 


RICHARD LELAND 


ANTHONY 




FULVIA 


COLLINS, A.B. 


COLLINS, A.B. 


CONDOS, A.B. 




CONTINI,A.B. 


Psychology 


Zoology 


Chemistry 




French 


Chicago, Illinois 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 




New York, N. V 


Boxing, 3; Wrestling. 4. 


Lambda Chi Alpha. 


Track, 1; California 


Men. 





70 




URSULA A. 
CHAVEZ. A.B. 

Spanish 
Los Angeles 

iSigma Delta Pi; Y.W.C.A. Cab- 
inet. I; A.W.5. Committees; 
Spurs. 



MARGARET JEAN 
CHISHOLM. B.S. 

Commerce 

North Hollywood 
Sigma Kappa; Alpha Chi Delta; 
W.A.A.; Southern Campus, I, 
2. 3; Pan-Hellenic Council, 4. 



PHYLLIS RUTH 

CLAASSEN. B.E. 
Education 
Paso Robles 

Phi Upsilon Pi. 



WILLIAM T. 
CLAPHAM, B.S. 

Management, Industry 

Long Beach 
Geographical Society. 





A lamb among wolves is Phi Kap's Hap Eraser. 
How they ever got an artist is more than any- 
one knows, including Hap. who is still dazed. 
Seen around the Pi Phi house frequently, but 
says it doesn't mean a thing. 



MARGARET ELAINE 
CLAYVILLE, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Boise. Idaho 
Thcta Upsilon. 



DORIS 
CLEGG. B.E. 

Honnc Economics 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Delta Pi; Home Eco- 
nomics Club; A.S.U.C. Social 
Committee, 2; Y.W.C.A. 



DONALD MILTON 
CLELAND. B.E. 

Education 

Van Nuys 

Stevens Club; C.T.A.; 
Council, I- 



MARGARET ELIZABETH 
CLINTON, A.B. 

English 

Westminster 
Class Phratcfcs. 




LAVONNE CHRISTINE 
COLE, A.B. 

Spanish 

Los Angeles 
Delta Sigma Theta; Alpha 
Gamma Sigma. 



LEON 
COLEN. B.S. 

General Business 

Newark, New Jersey 


BEny LOUISE 
COLESTON, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 


MARGARET ELMA 
COLESTON, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeies 


HELMUTHWILHELM 
COLLBOHM.A.B. 

Physics 

Santa Monica 


MYLES ANTHONY 
COLLIGAN.A.B. 
Geology 
Los Angeles 


Sisma Alpha Mu. 






Physics Society: Band: Orches- 
tra. 


Sigma Gamma Epsilon 




CARMON 
COOK, A.B. 

Spanish 

Venice 

Sigma Delta Pi. 



ESTHER LOUISE 
COOKE, B.E. 

Art 
Brawiey 
Theta Phi Alpha: 
Dance Recital, I: 
Club, 3: Panhellenic 





FREDW. 


BURMA ROSE 


MARGARET KIMBRO 


MARGARET 




COOPS, B.S. 


COPE, B.E. 


CORBELL, A.B. 


COREY, A.B. 




Business Administration 


Education 


English 


History 




Fortana 


San Bernardino 


Waterman 


Riverside 


Philokalia: 




y.w.c.A. 


Areme: Phrateres: Stevens Club: 




Newman 






Dance Recital, 2: AW.5. Christ- 




Council. 






mas Drive, 2. 





71 



MARGARET 
CORNWELL. B.S. 

Business Administration 

Laguno Beach 
Thcta Upsilon. 



MARGARET ALIDA HAROLD GLENN 

CORUM, A.B. CORWIN, A.B. 
Spanish Chemistry 

Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Zcta Tau Alpha; Spurs; Chris- Alpha Chi Sigma. 

tian Science Orsanization. 



JOHN GERARD 






JAMES VIVIAN 


COTTER, A.B. 






COUCHE, A.B. 


English 






Chemistry 


Cairo, Illinois 






San Diego 


Newman Club; Staff 


and 


Mask; 




U.D.S., 3, 4. 









DOROTHV ANNE 
COVERT, A.B. 

English 
Los Angeles 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Spurs. 




PAUL ROWE 




WILLIAM MIRICE 


CRAWLEY, A.B. 




CRICKARD. B.S. 


Econonnics 




Marketing 


Beverly Hills 




Glendale 


Zcta Psi; Cifcic C; Water 
1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; 
fraternity Council, 4. 


Polo, 

Inter- 


Sigma Pi; Blue C; Te 



Tennis, 3, 4. 



MILDRED ALICE 
CRILLV, A.B. 
English 

Colton 
Pbrateres. 



JEAN MARGARET 
CROSE, A.B. 
Psychology 

Baldwm Park 

Phrateres. 



ROSEMARY LOUISE 
CROSS, B.E. 
Education 

Glendale 
Phrateres. 



MARY MARGARET 
CROZIER, B.E. 
Education 

South Pasadena 



A smooth gal is Alpha Chi's Rosemary Fleming. 
Claims the honor of Pan-hell presidency; usually 
speaks to friends. Not exactly a politician, she 
achieved her ends by more subtle methods. 









JEAN ELEANOR 
CURTISS, A.B. 
History 

San Mateo 


VINCENT ALEXANDER 
DAGORT, B.E. 

Music 

Honolulu, T.H. 


RALPH LYNTON 
DALTON, A.B. 

Political Science 

Beverly Hills 




ALSACE LORRAINE 
DANIELS, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 


Delta Gamma; X.W.C.A. 


Phi Mu Alpha; Band; Orches- 
tra. 


Alpha Sigma Phi; Class 
cil, 1, 2. 


Coun- 






BETTY BERNICE 






LOUISE EUGENIE 






NADINE ROBERTA 


WILLIAM EUGENE 


DAVIS, A.B. 






DAVIS, A.B. 






DAVIS, B.E. 


DAYWALT, B.E. 


French 






French 






Education 


Art 


Glendale 






Los Angeles 






San Pedro 


Van Nuys 


Kappa Phi Zeta; Phra 


cres; 


Le 


Pi Delta Phi; Sigma 


Dc 


Ita Pi. 


Phrateres Council. 


Delta Epsilon. 


Ccfcic Francais. 

















72 




MARJORIE FRANCES 


MARJORIE ELIZABETH 


CVNTHIA LOUISE 


CATHERINE JANE 


COWAN, A.B. 


CRAIG, A.B. 


CRANE, B.S. 


CRAVENS, A.B. 


Spanish 


History 


Marketing 


Bacteriology 


Los Angeles 


Santa Monica 


Glendaie 


Kingman, Arizona 


Sigma Delta Pi. 


Alpha Delta Pi; y.W.C.A.; 
Christian Science Organization; 
University Religious Conference. 


Swimming; V.W.C.A. 


Swimming; Phrateres. 





Thick necks and square heads adorn most Sigma 
Pi's and Don Hesse is no exception. Been around 
so long that no one notices him any more. 
Played at football, army, and politics, and 
loves to be called "Curly". 



JAMES ARTHUR 
CRUTCHFIELD, JR., A.B. 

Economics 

Lon3 Beach 
Kappa Alpha; Soccer. 4. 



EDWARD H. 
CULVER, B.S. 
Accounting 

Hollywood 



SALLy VIRGINIA 
CUNNINGHAM, A.B. 
Psychology 

Long Beach 

Phrateres; A Capella Choir 
3, 4. 



MARGARET LILA 
CURTIS, A.B. 

Psychology 

San Diego 

Alpha Gamma Delta; A.W.S. 
Freshman Teas Committee, 3, 
4; W.A.A. 




GLEN CHARLES 
DANKS. A.B. 

History 

Evanston, Wyo. 



RUTH ANN 
DANSON. A.B, 
French 

Los Angeles 
Pi Delta Phi. 



LEWIS LVNN 

DARLING, A.B. 
Political Science 

Los Angeles 



LINDA LUCILE 
DAVIES, A.B. 
French 

Los Angeles 



Bruin, 3. 4; International Rela- Sigma Delta Pi; Pi Delta Phi; 
tions Club. Le Cercle Francais. 



MILDRED ELINOR 
DAVIES. A.B. 
Economics 

Beverly Hills 

Alpha Delta Pi; Bruin, I; V.W.- Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 
C.A.. I, 2, 3. 



STEVEN NORMAN 
DAVIESS. A.B. 
Geology 

Pomona 




DOROTHY 


LENORAFAVE 


VIRGINIAJEANNE 


JEANNE REDIN 






KATHERINEGREV 


MARIE KATHERINE 


DEAN, A.B. 


DEBOER, B.E. 


DEBOLT, B.E. 


DEGARMO, A.B. 






DEMPSEY, B.E. 


DENNERLE, B.S. 


English 


Education 


Education 


History 






Education 


Public Health Nursing 


Westwood 


Los Angeles 


Arcadia 


Los Angeles 






Inglewood 


Santa Monica 


Sigma Kappa. 




Phrateres. 


Delta Delta Delta; 


Mortar 


Newman Club; Ki-Pri. 










Board; Alpha Chi Alpha 


Stu- 












dent Board Religious 


C 


3nfer- 












ence; Bruin, 1, 2, 3. 











73 



f'AJLINE VIRGINIA 
DEPUTY. B.E. 

Education 

Intijewood 
Philia: y.W.C.A. 



MARy JOSEPHINE 
DERRICK. A.B. 
French 

Los Angeles 



ROBERT ELLIS 
DESHON. B.S. 

Business Administration 

Los Angeles 

Phi Gamma Delta; Class Coun- 
cil. 2. 3; Inteffraternity Coun- 
cil. Pfcs., 4; Rally Committee; 
Blue Key. 



BARBARA WINDETT 
DONNELL, B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 

Alpha Phi; Philokalia; U.D.5.; 
y W.CA ,; A W.S. Hostess. 



JOSEPH H. 
DOWNEY, B.S. 

Management, Industry 

Van Nuys 

Sigma Pi; Manasement Club; 
Soccer, 3, 4. 



CLIFFORD BARNES 
DRAKE, A.B. 

Physics 

Los Angeles 

Sigma Nu; Scabbard and 
Blade; Homecoming, 2, 3, 4; 
Football, I. 




KENNETH E. 
DUSE, B.E. 
Music 

La Junta, Colorado 
Phi Mu Alpha; Orchestra, 
3. 4; Band, I, 2, 3, 4, 5. 



JANE ELIZABETH 
DUSTMAN, B.E. 
Education 

Glendale 

Pi Kappa Sigma; Philia; West- 
minster Club; Glee Club, 3, 4. 



ANDREW GERALD 
EBLI, A.B. 
Economics 

Glendale 



JAMES GILBERT 
EDINGER, A.B. 
Physics 

Monrovia 



WALTER COLLINS 
EDMISTEN, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 
Handball. 



RICHARD HARBIN 
EDWARDS, A.B. 
Mathematics 

Los Angeles 
Pi Mu Epsilon. 



Marge Lawson is in a dale most of the time, 
so she must be a Chi Omega. Says "Hel-lo" to 
the D.U.s and "Hullo" to the rest. A politician, 
which means little, and a member of Guidon, 
which means less. 




^r'^i^rrs".-. 'irj^ 





LOIS MAE 
ELLISON, A.B. 

English 
Tujunga 


LEWIS S. 

ELMENDORF, A.B. 
Psychology 

Beverly Hills 


ELIZABETH GALE 
EMERSON, A.B. 
Political Science 

Los Angeles 






SARA LOUISE 
EMERSON, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


Southern Campus, 1; Bru 


in, 2. Alpha Phi Omega. 


Delta Gamma; Relig 
fcrence; Freshman Ci 


ous 

jb. 


Con- 


Phrateres; Y.W.C.A 




JEANETTE HELEN 
EVANS, B.E. 
Education 

Montebello 


ELEANOR ISABEL 
EVERETT, A.B. 

Spanish 

Huntington Park 


PRISCILLAJOY 
EVERTS. A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


DONALD J. 
EWING. A.B. 

English 

Exeter 


Phrateres. 


A Capella Choir, 3; Debate, 3; 
Homecoming Queen. 4. 


Kappa Alpha Theta. 


Lambda Chi Alpha; U.D.S., 2. 
3. 4; Drama Board. 4; Newman 
Club; Kap and Bells. 



74 




NX/ILLIAM ELWOOD 
DREW. B.S. 

Banking and Finance 

San Jose 
Masonic Club; Wesley Club. 



SEYMOUR PHILIP 
DROVIS. B.S. 

Marketing 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Delta Signna; Circle C; 
California Men; Boxing, 2, 3, A; 
Bruin. 



VIRGINIA MARGARET 
DULITZ, B.E. 

Home Economics 

Westwood 



THOMAS LORENZO 
DUQUE. A.B. 

Political Science 
Los Angeles 



Phratefcs; Home Economics Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
Club. 





Chief engineer on the Kerckhoff gravy train was 
Harry Landis. Claimed that managing the Bruin 
kept his palms too greasy, which everyone be- 
lieved, so then he managed advertising, which 
was much easier than working. 



SPENCER PENROSE 
EDWARDS. JR.. A.B. 

Zoology 

La Canada 
Delta Chi; Lambda Sigma. In- 
terfraternity Council; Stevens 
Club; Rally Reserves; Minute 
Men. 



ALICE MAUDE 
EGGERS, B.E. 
Education 
Long Beach 

Westminster Club. 



JAMES WAGNER 
ELLIOTT. A.B. 
Zoology 

Montebello 
Glee Club, A. 



KATHERYN HORTENSE 

ELLIS. B.E. 
Education 

Pasadena 
Alpha Kappa Alpha. 





>.Ai> ^ 



HARRIET 
ENNIS, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


MARGARET HELEN 

ERICSON.B.E. 
Education 
Canoga Park 




CHARLES ROBERT 
ERNST, B.S. 

Marketing 

Oceansidc 


OLIVE BROWN 
ERSKINE, B.E. 
Education 

Vcncufd 


CLARINDA HELEN 
EVANS, A.B. 
Philosophy 

Los Angeles 


GEORGIA LEAH 
EVANS. A.B. 
English 

Rolla, Missour* 


PhMia; W.A.A. 


Alpha of Arcta; Pi 
Sisma. 


Kappa 


Delta Kappa Epsilon 










JANISJEAN 
FAGIN.B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 








VERNON A. 

FAGIN.B.E. 
Education 
Van Nuys 


CARL FREDERICK 

FALK, A.B. 
Chemistry 
Los Angeles 


Alpha Gamma Delta; W.AA.; 
Freshman Tea Committee; Con- 
sultation Committee. 


Fencing, 2, A. 


Alpha Chi Sigma. 



RAGENE ALBERT 

FARRIS, B.E. 
Music 
Escondido 



Phi Mu Alpha 
4; Glee Club, 
tra, 2. 



Band 
3. 4: 



I. 2, 3. 
Orches- 



MARy MAHALA 
FAWLEV, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 
P.E. Club: W.A.A. ; Hockey; 
Dance Recital, I. 



GEORGE HAROLD 
FEISTER, A.B. 

Geology 

Los Angeles 
Signna Alpha Epsilon; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Sigma Gamma 
Epsilon; Circle C; Swimmins, 
I; Rifle Team, 3. 



75 




MARyJANE 
FERGUSON, B.E. 

Education 

Visalia 
Alpha Gamma Delta; A.W.S. 
Secretarial. 2. 3; Freshman Teas, 
I, 2; y.W.C.A. Hostess Com 
mittce, I, 2. 



SHI RLEV ELIZABETH 
FERRON, A.B. 

English 

Las Vegas, Nevada 
Delta Delta Delta: Phrateres. 



ELIZABETH ELSA 
FICHTNER, A.B. 
German 

Los Angeles 



BETTY ROWENA 
FICK, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Omega. 



JOHN HOWARD 
FIFE, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Sigma. 



MILDRED IRENE 
FILER, B.E. 
Art 

Santa Ana 
Delta Epsilon. 





<M<P^ 



ROSEMARY 
FLEMING. A.B. 






MARGARET ELAINE 
FLEMMING, B.E. 




FREDERICKTHORVALD 
FLO. B.S. 


BARBARA 
FOLEV. B.E. 






ROBERT ANSON 
FOOTE, A.B. 


M. MAXINE 
FORGEy, B.E. 


History 

Los Angeles 






Art 

Van Nuys 




Business Administration 

San Fernando 


Education 

Los Angeles 






English 
Long Beach 


Home Economics 

Wichita, Kansas 


Alpha Chi Omega; 
Vice-Pres.. 3. Pres. 
Counsellor, 4. 


Pa 
4; 


hellcnic, 
Student 


Kappa Delta; Phiiokalia; 
ern Campus. 


South- 


Delta Sigma Phi; Class Coun- 
cil, 4; Frosh Rally Reserves; 
Pledse Council, 1; House Man- 
agers' Association, 3. 


Gamma Phi Beta 
cial Committee, 
ing, 2. 3; Electi 
tee. 3. 


A.W.S. So- 
; Homecom- 
ons Commit- 




Home Economics Club 



The A.W.S. presidency should have gone to 
Mary Lee McClellan's head but it didn't. 
Healthy, athletic, a good guy and not hard 
to look at. The best Alpha Gam politician — in 
fact, the major part of the house. 





DOROTHV IRENE 
FOWLER, B.S. 
Nursing 

Long Beach 
Alpha Tau Delta; Phrateres. 



DONA RUTH 
FRAGNER, B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 
Delta Zeta: Phiiokalia. 



MARIANNE 
FRANCIS, B.S. 
Commerce 

Hollywood 
Delta Zeta; Alpha Chi 
Panhellenrc Council; 
Council 4; Elections 
Glee Club. I, 2. 



Delta; 

Class 

Board; 



QUIN PARKER 
FRAZIER, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 

Phi Kappa Psi; Class Council, 
2, 3, 4; Track, I, 2; Basket- 
ball, I. 




JACKTARO ROBERT LEE 

FURUMURA, B.S. GALLOWAV, B.S. 

Marketing Marketing 

Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Japanese Bruin Club; A. M.S. Beta Theta Pi; Tennis, I. 
Board. 



76 



LUCILLE ELEANOR 
GARVIN, B.E. 

Art 

Palms 

Kappa Delta; Phiiokalia; 
emc; Masonic Club. 



Ar- 



ALICE MARIE 
GAUTSCHI, A.B. 

English 

Van Nuys 

Kappa Delta; Spurs; Mortar 
Board; Prytanean; California 
Club; y.W.C.A.; A.W.S. Com- 
mittees. 




ELAINE BETTY 


RUTH SHIRLEY 


FISCHEL. A.B. 


FISCHEL. A.B. 


Political Science 


History 


Santa Monica 


Santa Monica 


3; Tennis, 3. 


Tennis, 1. 



OLGA HELEN 
FIT7PATRICK. A.B. 

Household Science 

Los Angeles 
Areme; Masonic Club. 



MARTHA ABUSDAL 
FLANNERy. A.B. 

Spanish 

Encino 
Delta Garrma; Guidon. 




EE ROBERT 


LILLIAN MARIE 


ALBERTA FRANCES 


DAVID R. 


ORGy. B.E. 


FORRESTER, B.E. 


FOSTER, A.B. 


FOUST, A.B. 


Mechanic Arts 


Education 


Economics 


Economics 


Lcs Ar-geles 


Lcs Angeles 


Hollywood 


Shelbyvillc, Kentucky 




Phratercs: Ki-Pri. 


Phi Beta; V.W.C.A. 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Artus 
Omicron Delta Gamma- Bruin 
1, 2, 3, A; Phi Eta Sigma. 




Hank McCunc must be the most hated man on 
campus, as he won the title of "Most pursued 
man" in a contest, and certainly no friends 
would do that to him. Conducts All-U sings, 
talks entirely too much, and is a Fiji. 




JOHN EDMOND 








MAX BERNARD 


FREDRICKS, B.S. 








FRIEDMAN, B.S 


Accounting 








Physics 


Santa Monica 








Maywood 


: Chi; Masonic 


Club: 


Base- 


Physics Club 


Manager, 2, 3. 











MORT 
FRISHMAN. B.S. 

Accounting 

Chicago, Illinois 
Rally Committee; California 
Men; Rugby: Cricket. 



FRANCES RUTH 
FUDGE, B.E. 

Art 

San Marino 
Kappa Delta; Philolcalia. 



MARIE ADELINE 

FUQUA, A.B. 
Psychology 
Los Angeles 

Delta Delta Delta; 

Francais. 



Le Ccrcle 



ROVENA HELEN 



FURNIVALL 
Art 
Los Ange 


B.E 
es 






Phi 
Car 
C.A 


Mu; Philokal 
npus. 3; Bruin, 
■ 1. 2, 3. 


a; 
2, 


Southerrr 
3; y.W.- 




30RIS EVELYN 

SEAR, B.S. 

General Business 
-:: A :cs 

Zri::: P-,; Homecoming, 3, 
-i-triern Campus, I; Bruin, 
^ A.S.U.C. Committees: 

• . J. -C.A. 



LA VONA CHARLOTTE 
GEBB, A.B. 

Mathematics 

Long Beac'i 
Phratercs. 



LOUIS ADAMS 
GIAMBONI, A.B. 

Physics 

Los Angeles 

Pi Mu Epsilon. 



JOSEPHINE ANITA 
GIAMPAOLO, A.B. 

Spanish 

Ga'AOod. New Jersey 



HARRIETTE MARTHA 
GIBBS, A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 



MARY ELIZABETH 
GIBSON, B.E. 
Education 

Ventura 
Wcstwooa Club. 



77 



ROMA WALSH 

GIBSON, B.E. 

Physical Education 
North Hollywood 

P.E. Club; W.A.A.. I, 2. 3. 

A.W.S. Council. 4. 



MARy LEONE 
GIEZENTANER, A.B. 

En3lish 

Los Angeles 



SALLV MARy 
GLASS, A.B. 

English 

Pasadena 
Kappa Phi Zeta; Dance Recital; 
Social Committee; Hi Jinks. 



VJCARREN MARVIN 
GLASSER, A.B. 
History 
Los Angeles 



MILNOR EARL 
GLEAVES, A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 

Chi Phi; Masonic Club; A. M.S. 
Board, I; International Rela- 
tions Club; Pershing Rifles. 



NORMAN WILLIAM 
GLICKMAN, A.B. 

Economics 

Venice 
Bruin, 4, 




HAZEL GERALDINE 
GOODNIGHT, B.S. 
Commerce 

Bellflower 




LEONARD VICTOR 
GORDON, A.B. 
Psychology 

Montreal, Canada 


ROSABEL GOSS 
GOSS, B.E. 

Home Economics 

Durand, Wisconsin 


OLIVER SPENCER 

GRANT, JR., A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 


ROBERT FREDERICK 
GREEN, A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 






HOWARD 
GREKEL, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 


Phi Chi Thcta; Phrateres; Dance 
Recital, 3, 4; Southern Campus. 
"2; Occupational Conference, 
-t, 5. 


Religious Conference; Masonic 
Club; Kap and Bells. 




Pi Kappa Delta. 


Kappa Alpha Psi; Track. 
Blue C; University Negro 


1, 
CI 


2; 

jb. 


Alpha Chi Sigma 



Michacia Robbins (Mickey to both her friends) 
Is interested in journalism, wastes her tinne on 
the Bruin, follows publications closely, reads 
newspapers. Can be found, when wanted, with 
a dull gleann in her eyes. 





JEANETTE 
GROMAN.B.E. 

Education 
Los Angeles 

Phi Sisma Sigma; Religious Pi Mu Epsilon; Orchestra, 2, 3, Home Economics Club. 
Conference, I. 4; Rifle Team. 3; Mathematics 

Club; Westminster Club; Ma- 
sonic Club. 



CALVIN EDWARD 
GROSS, A.B. 
Mathematics 

Santa Monica 



MARTHA FRANCES 
GROTH, B.E. 

Home Economics 

Monrovia 



SAM 
GRUDIN, B.S. 

General Business 

Beverly Hills 

Zeta Beta Tau; Basketball. I; 
Class Council, 4. 




BETTY O. 






VIVIA LOUISE 




MILTON REYNOLDS 


BETly LOU 


HADSELL, B.E. 






HAGEy, B.S. 




HALES, A.B. 


HALLER, A.B. 


Education 






Accounting 




Zoology 


Psychology 


Burbank 






Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Long Beach 


Helen Matthcwson 
minster Club. 


Club; 


West- 


Alpha Chi Delta; 


Philla. 




Alpha Gamma Delta: Pi Gamma 
Mu; Class Council, 2: A.5.U.C. 
Social Committee. 



78 




JOHN LEWIS 
GOFF. JR.. A.B. 
Zoolosy 

Valler, Montana 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Interfratcr- 
nrty Council; Scabbard and 
Stadc; Masonic Club; Band, 
I. 2. 



GEORGE 
GOLDMAN, A.B. 
Political Science 

Los Angeles 
Phi Beta Delta; Homecoming. 

1, 2, 3; Stunt Chairman, 3; 
Rally Committee. 2. 3; O.C.B., 

2, 3; Yeomen. 



PAUL LOUIS 
GOLDMANN, A.B. 

Geology 

Hollywood 
Sigma Nu; Sigma Gamma Ep- 
silon; Frosh Rally Reserves; 
Swimming. I. 



STANLEY 
GOODMAN, B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 
Tennis; A Capella Choir. 





Here s that well known smoothie, Sumner Hatch. 
Never having done anything worth while, we 
don't know why he should be well known, so 
maybe he isn't. Head of the Occupational Con- 
ference and guiding star of Alpha Kappa Psi. 



MARJORIEEVELyN 




GERRIEGERALDINE 




JOAN CATHERINE 


LORIN 


SRIFFIN. B.E. 




GRIFFITH, A.B. 




GRIMM, A.B. 


GRISET, B.S. 


Commerce 




Physical Education 




Enslish 


Marketing 


Los Angeles 




Santa Ana 




San Bernardino 


Santa Ana 


!cta Tau Alpha: Southern Cam- 
3U5, 1. 2. 3: Bruin. 1, 2, 3. 4; 
J.DS., 2. 3; Phllia; V.W.C.A.; 
4..W.S. Committees. 


Alpha Gamma Delta; 
Chi Alpha; Bruin, 3, 4, 5; 
post, 4; Phrateres; Class 
cil, 5; Dance Recital, 4 


Alpha 
Soal- 
Coun- 


Phi Mu; A.W.S. Social 


Hour. Alpha Kappa Ps 
Bible Club. 



University 








LOUISE 

GULDSTRAND, B.E. 
Education 
Los Angeles 




ARTHUR FREDERICK 
GUSTAFSON, A.B. 

Mathematics 

Los Angeles 


WILLIAM ERNEST 
GUVER, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Riverside 


FRANK JAY 
HAAS, A.B. 

Zoology 
Los Angeles 


Gamma Phi Beta; Br 
Homecoming, 2; Ch r 
Dance Committee. 2. 


uin, 1; 
stm as 


Pi Mu Epsilon. 


Baseball, 3, 4. 


Sigma Pi. 



BETiy 

HADDOCK, B.E. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 
Phrateres; Areme; Omicron Nu; 



A.W.S. 

Council. 



HARRIET FUSON 
HADLEy, A.B. 

French 

Redlands 
Sigma Kappa; Kappa Phi Zeta; 



Council; y.W.C.A. Le Cercle Francais; y.W.C.A. 




VIRGIL 
HAM, JR., B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 
A!o"a Kappa Psi; Beta Gamr 
S'3~a: y.M.C.A. Council I 
3; A. M.S. Council, 4. 



MALCOLM L. 


JANEKATHRyN 






KATHRINE MARIE 




SYLVIA 


FRANK SMITH 


HAND, B.S. 


HANKS, B.E. 






HARDMAN.B.E. 




HARRISON, A.B. 


HARRYMAN.A.B. 


Marketing 


Music 






Education 




Sociology 


Economics 


Burbank 


Los Angeles 






Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Wichita, Kansas 


Alpha Kappa Psi. 


Alpha Gamma Delta; 


Ph 


Beta; 


Spurs; y.W.C.A.; A.W.S. 


Coun- 




Zeta Psi. 




y.W.C.A.; Orthoped 


'c 


Com- 


cil; U.D.S., 1. 










littee. 















79 



CHARLES McKEV 
HART. B.S. 
Mdrketins 

Beverly Hills 
Delta Tau Delta; Cless Council, 
2. 3: Basketball. I. 2. 



ROBERT SWANSON 

HARVEY. B.S. 

Marketing 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Class Council, 3; Track. 1. 



JACK 

HASKIN. A.B. 

Geography 

Los Angeles 
Geographic Society; Band. 2. 



H.SUMNER 
HATCH, B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



ELIZABETH JOy 
HATFIELD, B.E. 

Home Econonnics 

Los Angeles 



HERMAN 
HAUPT, JR.. A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 
Chi Phi; I ntcf fraternity Co 
ell, 3. 




HELEN ALLEN 
HAY. A.B. 
History 

Fullcrton 
Alpha Phi; Guido 



CROSSAN 
HAYS. B.E. 

Physical Education 

La Canada 

Zeta Psi; Scabbard and Blade; 
Blue C; Blue Key; Class Coun- 
cil. 2. 3; Basketball, I, 2. 3. 4. 



HAROLD ALEX 
HAYUTIN. A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 

Phi Beta Delta; Rally Reserves; 
Homecoming. 2; A.S.UC So- 
cial Committee. I, 2; Wrestling 
I. 2; Football. 4. 



BUFORD PAHEN 
HELFERICH. A.B. 
Physics 

Los Angeles 

Industrial Physics Society; Band, 
3. 4; A Capella Choir. 3. 



MARIAN FRANCIS 
HENCK, B.E. 
Education 

San Bernardino 

Helen Matthewson Club; Stu- 
dent Teachers' Association; 
President's Council. 



ELSALIEBERG 
HENDRIKSEN, A.B. 
Gcrnnan 

Los Angeles 
Phi Omega Pi. 



Leslie Ann Martin once said something sensible, 
and has been admired ever since, though she 
never repeated. Knows most of the Alpha Phis, 
perhaps because she's an Alpha Phi. Activity 
gal and perennial student. 





DONNA FRANCES 
HIGHTOWER. B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 



CHARLOTTE 
HILDEBRAND. A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 

Gamma Phi Beta; Spurs; Class 
Council. I. 2, 3; A.W.S. Coun- 
cil, 3; Elections Committee. 



NATALIE 
HILL. A.B. 

History 
Beverly Hills 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



FLORENCE DOROTHEA PHVLLIS EILEEN 



HOFFMAN. B.S. 
Accounting 
South Bend, Ind. 



HOFMANN. B.E. 
Honie Economics 
Huntington Park 

Pi Beta Phi; Guidon; 
Council. 4. 



Cla 



URCELB. 
HOLLOWAy, A.B. 

History 

Balcersficld 
California Men. 



HIROSHI E. 

HISHIKI. B.S. 
Marketing 
Los Angeles 

Japanese Bruin Club. 




CLARENCE DAVID 

HONIG, A.B. 
Zoology 
Los Angeles 






Rally Committee; 
California Men; 
Electrons Board, 
Board, 4; Fencing 


Ci 
Bon 
4: 

1, 


rcle C 

fire, 4 

A.M. 5 

2, 3 4 



80 




BETTY PATRICIA 
,HAUSER. B.E. 

i ^^ 

I] Fontana 

iPhratercs; Philolcalia: Dance Re- 
jcital. I. 2, 3. 4; Hi-Jinks 4; 
jphratcres Council. 3, 4; South- 
jern Campus, i. 



MARY ELIZABETH 
HAWK. B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 



MARJORY E. 
HAWKINS. B.E. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 
Home Economics Club. 



VERA LEE 
HAWN. B.E. 

Physical Education 

Long Beach 

Theta Upsilon. Roger Williams 
Club. 





Sandy Mode's idealism suffered a cruel blow 
when he began to edit the Bruin. Says a lot 
when he says anything, which is sometimes, 
when. Belongs to Tau Delta Phi and forgets to 
comb his hair. 



EDITH MARIE 
HENGSTELER, A.B. 
History 

Fort NVayne, Indiana 


RAYMOND WALTER 
HERMANSON, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


MILDREDS. 
HESS. B.S. 

Public Health Nursing 

Pasadena 


DONALD L. 
HESSE, A.B. 
History 

Merced 


Alpha Omicron Pi; U-D.S.; 
W.A.A.: yW.C.A.: Southern 

Ca-TipLS. 


Thcta Chi; Brum, 1. 2. 


Alpha Tau. 


Sigma Pi; Scabbard and Blade 
Blue Key: Class Council, 2, 3 
Rugby, 2. 3. A; Football. 2. 3 
4; Campus Capers, 2; Blue C 




MILDRED GLADYS 
HITCHCOCK. B.E. 
Education 

Tcfrance 

'■1j: y.W.C.A.; Geographic 
-tv; Masonic Club; W.A.A.; 
■'■ -S. Committees. 



JANE ELIZABETH 
HIX. A.B. 

Latin 

Hollywood 

Delta Zeta: Classical Club. I. 
2, 3, 4; Homecoming. 4; Y.W.- 
C.A.; A.W.S. Freshman Teas I. 
2.3: Bruin. I. 2; Glee Club. 1,2. 



ROWLAND STANLEY 
HODGE, B.S. 

Banking and Finance 

Hunrington Park 




LOIS ANN 
HOEGERMAN.B.E. 
Physical Education 

Los Angeles 


JESSIE MAY 
HOENK, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Long Beach 


MARY JANE 

HOF, B.E. 

Home Economics 
St. Louis, Missouri 


Sigma Chi; Circle C: Ru 
Swimming. 


gby: 


y.W.C.A.: W.A.A. 




Pi Kappa Sigma; NX'estminstcr 
Club; Glee Club, 3. 




lAMES EDGAR 

HOOD. B.S. 

Banking and Finance 
Seattle, Washington 



GWENDOLYN 
HOPKINS, A.B. 

Geography 

Tujunga 
Geographic Society. 



CREIGHTON CLARK 
HORTON. A.B. 

Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Beta Theta Pi; Crew. I. 



MILLICENT ESTER 
HOSTRUP. A.B. 

English 
Santa Monica 



LEO ALBERT 
HOUGHTON. A.B. 

Zoology 
Eureka, Utan 



EIRWIN VANDERVEER 
HOWARD. A.B. 

Geology 

Hollywood 
Delta Tau Delta; Sigma Gam- 
ma Epsilon. 



81 



KATHARINE ELIZABETH 


BLENDINE 


HILDEGARDE 


ARTHUR JOHN 


BONNIE JEAN 


MARy ELLEN 


HOWARD, A.B. 


HOVST, B.E. 


HUBBELL, B.S. 


HUCKEH, A.B. 


HUDSON, B.E. 


HULETTE, A.B. 


English 


Education 


Public Health Nursing 


Economics 


Education 


Sociology 


Los Angeles 
Kappa Alpha Theta; y.W.C.A. 


Taft 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Momince, Illinois 
C.T.A. 


Los Angeles 
Alpha Omicron Pi; Spurs; V.W. 
C.A.; Philia; Southern Campus 
2; Stevens Club; Hostess Com 
mittec. 




MARION DOROTHY 


SAM JAMES 


JOHN WICKWIRE 


RAYMOND KLIEWER 


lACULLO, B.E. 


lANTORNO, A.B. 


INGHAM, A.B. 


INGOLD, B.S. 


Education 


History 


Psychology 


General Business 


Chicago, Illinois 


Long Beach 


Santa Monica 


Fontana 


Ki Pri. 




Alpha Phi Omega. 


Glee Club. 1. 



BARBARA RUTH JOAN T/ROLER 

INHOFE. B.E. IRMAS, A.B. 

Physical Education Sociology 

Redondo Beach Los An3eles 

>X/.A.A. Board, 2, 3. 4; P.E. Alpha Epsilon Phi. 
Club; Dance Gluts; Orchestra, 
2; Dance Recital, 3, 4. 



Exic Stevens must be a little off. because she 
works on the Bruin, Eats and sleeps at Hershey, 
and edits Women's Pages, which is a horrible 
waste of time. May be seen beaming around 
Kerclthoff most any time. 





ROBERT CLARKE 




MARY ESTHER 


FREDERICA 


ELMO RAY 


JAMES, A.B. 




JAMESON. B.E. 


JANKE, B.E. 


JENKINS, B.S. 


Mathematics 




Education 


Home Economics 


Accounting 


Van Nuys 




Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Santa Maria 


Phi Beta Kappa; Pi 
Ion; Phi Eta Sigma. 


Mu Epsi- 




y.W.C.A.; Philia; Newman 
Club; Home Economics Club; 
Bruin, 1; A.W.S, Hello Day 
Committee. 


Alpha Sigma Ph 
U.D.S., 2. 




JUNE ELIZABETH 






RAYMOND EVERETT 




RICHARD MARROW 


MARY ANITA 


JOHNSON, A.B. 






JOHNSON, A.B. 




JOHNSON, A.B. 


JONES, B.E. 


Psychology 






History 




Political Science 


Education 


Los Angeles 






Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Philia; \)C.A.A., 3; Phy 
ucation Club, 1; A 
Choir. 


ica 
Ca 


Ed- 

pella 


Blue C; Bruin Rowing 
Crew, 4. 


Club; 




Pi Lambda Theta 



82 




HARLEy JAMES 
HUMES, A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 



EILEEN MARY 
HUMPHREYS. A.B. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 



HALLIETTE HELEN 
HUNT. B.E. 

Education 

San Bernardino 



Blue C; Basketball, I, 2. 3, 4. Pi Kappa Sigma; Philia; Home Ki-Pn; C.T.A. 
Economics Club. 



JAMES CLINTON 
HUTCHISON, B.S. 

Accounting 

Covina 
Sigma Pi; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Blue C; Ball and Chain; Inter- 
fraternity Council. 4; Football 
Manager, I. 2, Senior. 3. 





The Delta Chis convinced Dick Pryne that they 
were a fraternity, but that was when he was 
more gullible. Staggers under the responsibility 
of editing the Bruin. How he ever got the job 
is a complete mystery. 



LORNA MAUREEN 




KATHLEEN FRANCES 


LEON 




EUGENE H. 


IRVIN, B.E. 




IRVING, B.S. 


JACOBS, B.S. 




JACGBSON.A.B. 


Home Economics 




General Business 


Marketing 




Psychology 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Lewistown, 


Montana 


Monrovia 


Phrateres; Areme; M 
^lub; Home Economics 


a son ic 

Club. 




Alpha Delta S 
4, 5; Blue C: 


9ma: Crew, 3, 
Masonic Club; 


Biurn, 1, 2, 3, 4; Goalpost. 4 



Rowing Club; Forty Club. 




HAROLD OLIVER 


WALTER JOHN 




PRISCILLAJO 




WILLIAM KEEN 


DOROTHY JEANNE 


FRANCES GIBBS 


iENSEN.A.B. 


JENSEN. A.B. 




JEPSON.B.E. 




JOHNKE, A.B. 


JOHNSON. A.B. 


JOHNSON. A.B. 


History 


Political Science 




Art 




Psychology 


History 


English 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 




Hempstead, New York 


Oxnard 


Sherman Oaks 




Theta Chi; Le Cercle F 


ancais; 


Phi Mu; y.W.C.A. 


Philokalia. 


Alpha Sigma Phi; Class Coun- 


Kappa Phi Zeta. 


Delta Gamma. 




Masonic Club; Californ 


a Men; 






cil, 4; Southern Campus, Pho- 








Bruin, 1. 








tographer, 3. 4; Student Coun- 
sellor, 4; Homecoming. 








I^ILMA ELLEN 


ROBERTA ROSE 






JOHN JOSEPH 


ROBERT ELLIOT 


MARCUS MARTIN 




NOBLE 


ONES, B.E. 


JORGENSEN, A.B. 






JOyCE, A.B. 


KAHN, A.B. 


KALB, B.S. 




KAPLAN. A.B. 


Commerce 


Psychology 






English 


History 


Accounting 




Sociology 


Long Beach 


Los Angeles 






Montebello 


New York, New York 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


vipha Chi Delta. 


Zeta Tau Alpha; Glee 
A Capella Choir, 3; 
Capers, 1. 


Club 
Cam 


2; 

DUS 




Tau Delta Phi; Bruin, 4; Track, 4. 


Beta Alpha Psi; Beta 
Sisma. 


Gamma 





83 



GILBERT T. 

KATZ, A.B. 

Zoolosy 

Los Angeles 
Zctd Beta Tdu. 



DOROTHY JUNE 
KATZMAN, A.B. 
History 

Los Angcies 



LOUIS 

KAUFMAN, B.S. 
Accounting 

Pucntc 
Zcta Beta Tau; Circle 



TAKASHI 
KAWAHARA. B.S. 

Marketing 

Los Angcks 
Japanese Bruin Club. 



HOWARD ARTHUR 
KAY. B.E. 
Music 

Glendale 



HENRy C. S. 
KEETON. A.B. 

History 
Los An3eles 

Delta Chi; Rally Committee; 
Election Board, 3; Class Coun- 
cil. 4; Rugby, 3; Interfraternity 
Council; B Football, 4. 




BRADLEY ARTHUR 



DEAN MADISON 



KENDIS, A.B. 
Economics 

Los Angeles 

Zcta Beta Tau; Blue C; Tennis, 

2. 3, 4. Captain, 5; Interfra- serves 

tcrnity Council. tee. 



KENNEDY. JR.. A.B. 
Prc-Medical 

Beverly Hills 

Delta Upsilon; Frosh Rally Re- 
Veomen; Rally Commit- 



MARJORIE 
KENYON. B.E. 
Education 

Santa Ana 

Cli' Omesa. 



RUTH ELEANOR 
KERN, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 
Delta Gamma. 



WILLIAM WALLACE 
KERRIGAN. JR., A.B. 
Economics 

Beverly Hills 

Pi Gamma Mu; Pi Sigma Al- 
pha; Omicron Delta Gamma; 
Ball and Chain; Circle C; 
Greek Drama. 3; Cross-Country. 



WILLIAM HACKETT 
KILDOW, A.B. 
Physics 

Santa Monica 



The A.W.S. couldn't get along without the 
charming and versatile Betty Haddock who flit- 
ted about like a busy bee. A capable person, 
she also was Arcmc president and a fly in every- 
one's ointment. 





ELAINE DRYFOOS 
KINGSBACHER, A.B. 
Psychology 

Pasadena 

Alpha Gamma Delta; Pre-Med- 
i c a I Association; U n i ta ri a n 
Club. 



PHILLIP BERNARD 
KINNEY. A.B. 
Geology 

Los Angcies 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 



DORIS ANNE 
KIRBY, A.B. 
Zoology 

Santa Monica 



LOUISE 

KISTNER. B.E. 
Education 

San Marino 

Gamma Phi Beta ; Southern 
Campus, 3; Ki-Pri Club. 




FRANCES JEANNETTE 
KOCH, A.B. 
History 

Atascadero 

Alpha Chi Alpha; Phra teres 
Spurs; Prytancan; Y.W.C.A. 
Southern Campus. I, 2, 3 
A.W.S. Council, 4. 



FREDERICK KURT 
KOEBIG, B.S. 

Banking and Finance 

Los Angeles 
Beta Theta Pi; Blue Key; Blue 
C; Ball and Chain; Crew, I, 2. 
3, Captain. 4; Class Council, 
I, 2, 3, 4, President, 2. 



MARIE ELIZABETH 
KOHN, B.E. 

Music 
Redding 
Theta Phi Alpha. 



EDNA 
KOPER. B.E. 

Commerce 
Los Angeles 

Dance Recital, I; 
cial Committee. 



A.W.S. So- 



84 




JULIA BELLE 

KEGLEY, A.B. 

History 

North Hollywood 


MIRIAM 
KELLEY, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


MAURICE KNOX McKEE 
KELLY, A.B. 
Geology 

El Segundo 


THELMA LUCILLE 
KEMMERER, B.E. 

Education 

San Bernardino 


Areme. 


Delta Gamma; y.W.C.A. 


Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 


Phratcres: Y.W.C.A.- 
Club. 



Masonic 





A gentleman and a scholar is Jim Stewart. Com- 
mutes continuously betewcn Hilgard Ave. and 
the Beta dive, which he thinks is a fraternity 
house. Grrns and cuts his hair quite often, as a 
politician should. 



STELLA ELLIS 
KILMER, A.B. 

Political Science 

Santa Monica 

Phllia; W.A.A., 2; A Capella 
Cho.r, 2. 4; Glee Club, I, 2, 3, 
4; A.W.S. Social Hour Com- 
mittee 



DOROTHY ADELL 
KING, A.B. 
Psychology 

Glendale 
Alpha of Areta. 



MAXINE ELEANOR 
KING, A.B. 

Bacteriolo3y 

Los Angeles 



KENNETH G. 
KINGREY, B.E. 
Art 

Santa Ana 

Delta Epsilon; Dance Re 
4, 5; U.D.S.. 4, 5. 



ital. 




WANDA ELAINE 
KLAUS, B.E. 






PAUL OSCAR 
KLEIN, B.S. 


ELIZABETH ANNE 
KLOCKSIEM.A.B. 




LOUIS EDWARD 
KNOWLES. A.B. 


LOYDEARL 
KNUTSON, A.B. 








A. ALAN 
KOCH. B.S. 




Music 
Pasadena 






Marketing 

Wa-.hb'jrn, North Dakota 


Economics 
Long Beach 




English 

Lon3 B.-ach 


English 

Beverly Hills 








Management. 
Santa Monica 


Industry 


Sigma Alpha lota; 
2, 3. 


Glee 


Club, 


Basketball, 3, 4. 


Alpha Chi Delta; Glee 


Club, 2. 


Alpha Gamma Omega. 


Delta Tau Delta; 
Phi; Scabbard and 
Council, 1, 4; B 
2, 3. 


Ka 
BIc 
ask 


ppa 
de; 

ctba 


Beta 
Class 
1. 1. 


Alpha Kappa Psi 
and Blade; Blue C; 
ing Club; Band. 1; 
4; Labor Boa'd, 4. 


Scabbard 
Bruin Row- 
Crew, 1, 3, 




MILDRED 
KORECHOFF, B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 
Pi Lambda Theta; C.T.A. 



MARY ELIZABETH 
KORSTAD, B.E. 

Art 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Kappa; Philokalia; South- 
ern Campus, 2, 3; /.W.C.A.; 
A.W.S. Hostess Committee. 



DONALD 

KOSKOFF, B.S. 
Accounting 
Los Angeles 



JESSIE YOSHIKO 
KOYAMA, B.E. 

Art 

Pasadena 
Chi Alpha Delta; Philokalia. 



KAROLYN LUCILLE 
KRUSE, B.E. 

Education 

Beverly Hills 
Alpha Phi. 



TAkEO 
KUBO, B.S. 
Marketing 

Los Angeles 



85 




FLORENCE GERTRUD 
KUHLEN.B.E. 
Music 

Los Angeles 

Sisma Kappa; Phi Beta; A Ca- 
pclla Choir; Phiiia. 



JOHN EMIL 
KULLI, B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 

Sigma Pi; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Bruin, 2. 3; Feature Editor, A. 



ARTHUR T. 
KVAAS. A.B. 
Physics 

Los Angeles 
y.M.C.A.; Physics Society. 



ROBERT CAIN REBA MAE 

LABBE. B.S. LADD, B.E. 
Management, Industry Education 

Los Angeles Oxnard 

A Capella Choir, I; Society Phi Upsilon Pi. 
for the Advancement of Man- 
agement. 



HARRy G. 
LANDIS, A.B. 
Sociology 

Los Angeles 

Alpha Delta Sigma; Bruin, I 
3; Business Manager, 4; 
Council, 4. 



2. 
Class 




VALERIE ANN 

LANIGAN.B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 
Philia; Phratercs; C.T.A., 



CHESTER IRWIN 
LAPPEN. A.B. 
Economics 

Des Moines, Iowa 
Basketball. I, 2. 



A little girl with big ideas got behind the desk 
in K.H. 209, flashed a dazzling smile, and broke 
the heart of many a social chairman and Kcrck- 
hoff Kowboy. Everyone seems to be an Alpha 
Phi, and Mary Alice Madden is no exception. 




HARRISON 
LATTA. A.B. 


KEITH W. 
LAURIT2EN. B.S. 


Chemistry 

Los Angeles 


Accounting 

Ogden, Utah 


Phi Kappa Sisma; Phi Eta Sis- 
ma; Phi Lambda Upsilon; Cir- 
cle C; Peishing Rifles; Wrest- 
lins. 2, 3. 4. 


Descrct Club. 



ANITA MAE 
LAUTZ, B.E. 
Education 

San Bernardino 
Westwood Club. 



ESTELLE HEWLETT 
LAWRENCE. B.E. 
Education 

Santa Monica 
Pi Kappa Sigma. 




MARy ELIZABETH 
LEE. B.E. 

Physical Education 

Santa Ana 

Phrateres Council. 4; A.W.S. 
Council. 5; Homecoming, 5; 
W.A.A.. 3, 4; P.E. Club. 3. 4, 
5; Student Counsellor, 5. 



PAUL MELVIN 
LEE. B.S. 

Accounting 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



BARBARA JANE 
LEEDS, A.B. 

Psychology 
South Pasadena 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; 
Council, 3. 



Class 



HAZEL MARGARET 
LEFLER. B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 
Phiiia; Eteri. 




MILDRED 
LINDROTH.B.E. 

Education 

Huntington Park 
Phrateres. 



JUNE MEREDITH 
LINDSAy. A.B. 

English 

Beverly Hills 

Delta Delta Delta; O.C, 
Class Council, 1 , 2. 



86 



B.. 2 



BONNEy BEATRICE 
LINSLEV. A.B. 
Sociology 

Upland 

Spurs; Prytanean; Mortar Board; Westwood Club; A Capella 
Helen Mathewson Club; Chair-Choir, 4. 
man Student Counsellors; Gui- 
don. 3. 4; Phrateres Coun., 2, 3. 



VIRGINIA LEE 

LINDSEy, A.B. 
English 
Manhattan Beach 




ANTOINETTE 


JOSEPH WILSON 


MARTHA AMY 






LUCILE 


LANDSBOROUGH, A.B. 


LANG, B.S. 


LANGSTAFF. B.E. 






LANHAM, A.B. 


Economics 


Management. Industry 


Music 






Psychology 


San Francisco 


Santa Monica 


Alhambra 






South Pasadena 


Kappa Alpha Thcta; Alpha Chi 


Delta Sisma Phi; Masonic 


Mu Phi Epsilon; A 


C£ 


pclla 


Helen Mathcwson Club; Pryta 


Delta. 


Club; Cross Country. 4; Ten- 
nis. 5. 


Choir, 4. 






nean; Pi Lambda Theta; Areme 
A.W.S. Council. 3; V.W.C.A 
Cabinet. 2. 3. 





Number one man among the non-orgs, Francis 
Scanncll made a strong bid for A.S.U.C. prcxy. 
Ovcrcallcd, he turned to a Bruin column for 
solace. Gets grades, talks a lot, writes a lot, 
has opinions. 



MARJORIE MARION 
LAWSON. A.B. 

Psychology 
Los Angeles 

"- i Omega: Guidon; Spurs; 
riass Council, Secretary, 3; 
; : _"-crn Campus. I ; A.W.S. 
' : - "" ittccs. 



LON LEO 
LAYMON. B.S. 

General Business 

Colton 



RHONA GEORGIA 
LEAKE. B.E. 
Education 

Eagle Rock 
Sigma Kappa; V.W.C.A. Fresh- 
man Club; W.A.A. 



THELMA OLIVE 
LEATON. B.E. 
Music 

Glendale 

A Capella Choir. 4; Glee Club 
4; Christian Science Organiza- 
tion. 




MARJORIE ELEANOR 
LEHR, B.S. 

Business Administration 

Pittsburgh, Penn. 
Alpha Delta Pi; O.C.B.. 3. 



ANSELMASPETH 
LEMON. B.E. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 
Home Economics Club. 3. 4. 



FLOVD ERNEST 
LENARDSON, A.B. 

English 

Glendale 



WILLIAM PARKER 
LENNON. A.B. 

Economics 

Glendale 

Alpha Tau Omega. 



LOIS MERLE 

LEVINE. A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Epsilon Phi; Spurs. 



JUDITH LOUISE 
LIKNAIT2. B.E. 

Education 

Venice 
Phrateres. Kr-Pri; Br 



2. 3. 




SAM 

LIPSON.B.S. 
Accounting 
Los Angeles 


MARY ELIZABETH 
LIVINGSTONE, A.B. 

English 

Los Angeles 




MILDRED PAINTER 
LOGAN. A.B. 
Sociology 

Los Angeles 


HERBERT 
LONDON. A.B. 

Economics 

Evanston, Illinois 




JOHNC. 

LOOMOS. B.S. 
Accounting 
Los Angeles 


ELIZABETH MARGARET 
LORD, B.E. 

Art 

Los Angeles 




Pi Beta Phi; Phi Beta; Dance 
Recital, 1; Campus Capers. 1. 


Gamma Phi Beta; W.A.A. . 
y.W.C.A.. 1. 


1, 2; Sisrna Alpha Epsilon; 
Omicron Delta Gamma* 
Council, 1. 


Artus 

Class 




Kappa Alpha Theta; Phllokalia 
U.D.S., 3. 4: Stevens Club 
Homecoming. 2; Zeta Phi Eta 



87 



ERMA JEAN 
LOWE, A.B. 
History 
Glendale 



RUTH VIRGINIA 
LOYAN, B.E. 
Commerce 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Delta. 



CLAUD WILBER 
LUNDV. A.B. 
Psychology 
Lancaster 
Basketball; Track. 



MILTON MVLES 

LURIE, A.B. 
Zoology 
Los Angeles 



DUNCAN KENNETH 
MACDONALD, A.B. 
Political Science 

Los Angeles 



DORIS ANN 
MACDOUGALL, A.B. 

History 

San Marino 

Chi Omega: Guidon; Caiifor- 
nia Club, Class Council, I, 2, 
3, 4; Panhellenic Council, 4. 




MARy ANN CATHERINE 
MAHON, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 


CORAGENE ELIZA 
MALLORy, B.E. 
Education 

Pomona 


BETH 


DONALD WILLIAM 
MANN, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Buena Park 


GERTRUDE 
MANN, A.B. 
Psychology 

Pasadena 


EDITH LUCILE 
MARCH, B.E. 
Music 

Los Angeles 








RITA MARIE 
MARKSMAN, B.E 
Education 

Los Angeles 


Delta Gamma; Newman Club. 


Delta Phi Upsilon; 
C.T.A. 


Kl-Pri 




Kappa Kappa Gamma. 


Masonic Club; Philia 
Choral Club, 2. 


Ph 


ate 


res; 





All politicians are not Gamma Phis but all 
Gamma Phis are politicians, so this must be 
Charlotte Hildebrand. An intellectual, she seems 
a little out of place. Adds a charming note to 
the usually sordid Bruin politics. 





ROBERT HASKELL 

MARTIN, B.S. 

Marketing 

Hermosa Beach 
Beta Theta Pi. 



SHIRLEYANNE 

MASON, B.E. 

Education 

Santa Fe Springs 

Phi Mu; Education Club; New 
man Club; Bruin, 3; y.W.C.A 
Hostess Committee, 3, 4; A.W. 
S. Secretarial Committee, 3, 4 



FLORA ARCA 
MATA, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 



LARRY BELL 
MATHES, A.B. 
Zoology 

Hollywood 




JACK REYNOLDS 
McANENY, A.B. 
Political Science 

Los Angeles 


GEORGIA ROSE 
McCANN.B.E. 
Education 
Los Angeles 


MARY LEE 
McCLELLAN, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 




KATHERINE JUNE 
McCLURE, B.S. 
Nursing 
Los Angeles 




Westgard Co-op. 


Alpha Gamma Delta; Alpha 
Chi Alpha; Prytancan; Mortar 
Board; Guidon; Southern Cam- 
pus, 1, 2, 3; A.W.S., Pies., 4. 





88 




.^w 



JEAN CONSTANCE 


DAVID BULMAN 


MARY ALICE 


EDITH LUCILLE 


MACLEAN, A.B. 


MACTAVISH, B.S. 


MADDEN, B.S. 


MADGE, A.B. 


History 


Accounting 


Marketing 


History 


Pasadena 


Glendale 


Glendale 


Venice 


Alpha Phi. 


Theta Xi; Class Council, 3, 


4; Alpha Phi; O.C.B., 1; C 


ampus Rel.gious Conferen 





Most of the football team for three seasons, 
Kenny Washington was U.C.L.A.'s finest ath- 
lete in many years. Usually quiet and unassum- 
ing, Kenny isn't averse to a little truclcin' when 
urged strongly. 



HAROLD EMMONS 
MARSH, JR., A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Sigma; Gym Team 
i, 4; Track, I; Band, 2, 3, 4- 
Orchestra. I, 2. 



CARMEN SAILBILyNN 

MARTIN, A.B. MARTIN, A.B. 

Spanish Political Science 

Inglewood Los Angeles 

y.W.C.A.; University Bible Theta Upsilon. 
Club; W.A.A.; German Club; 
Spanish Club; International 
Club. 



LESLIE ANNE 
MARTIN, B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 




Alpha Phi 
Campus, 4 
ing. 3; Elc 


■ Guidon; 

Brum, 1; H 
ction Board 


Southern 
omecom- 
3. 




WILLIAM SHOLEM 
MATLIN.B.S. 

Accounting 

Los Angeles 

Chairman, Open Forurr 



Cha 



man, 
I tee 



Cafe Advisory Commit- 



JEAN ELIZABETH 
MAHIS, B.E. 

Commerce 

Glendale 

Phi Chi Theta; Philia 
I, 2. 



KENDALL G. 
MAniS, B.S. 
Accounting 

Glendale 



MARy GENEVIEVE 
MAY, A.B. 

Home Economics 
Los Angeles 

Areme; Home Economics Club; 
Glee Club. 



LILLIAN 

MAYERS, B.E. 
Education 
Los Angeles 



EDITH BARBARA 
MAYFIELD, A.B. 

Political Science 

Glendale 
Philia Phrateres. 




MYRON 
McCLURE, A.B. 
Psychology 

Salinas 

y.M.C.A.; Anthropology 
ciety; Masonic Club. 



MARGARET LOUISE 
McCORD, B.E. 
Education 

San Diego 

Fhratcres; Ki-Pr 
Club. 



ETHEL-LOUISE 
McCRONE, A.B. 
Psychology 

Waterbury, Conn. 
Westminster Y.W.C.A.; Roger Wil 
Club; A.W.S. Council; 
ming. I. 3; Hockey, 
Southern Campus, 1. 



tiams A! 
Swim- 
I, 2: 



ARY-ALICE 

cCUNNIFF, 

Household 

Lcs Ang.:le 
pha Delta Pi. 



B.S. 
Scie 



MARY EVELYN 






PATSY ANN 


McDonald, B.E. 






McINTOSH, A.B. 


Art 

Los Angeles 






Spanish 

Van Nuys 


Areme: Masonic CI 
kalia; Philia. 


b; 


Philo- 


Pi Kappa Sigma; Glee Club 
4; A Capella Choir, t. 



89 



WILLIAM ARTHUR 




GEORGE T. 




WILLIAM HENRY 


BETTV LVLE 






ROBERTLEE 


ELIZABETH ELLEN 




McKINLEV, A.B. 




McMAHAN, A.B. 




McWETHY, A.B. 


MEIGS, A.B. 






MELDRUM, B.S. 


MELLUS, B.E. 




Political Science 




Economics 




History 


English 






Management, Industry 


Art 




Portland, Oreson 




Santa Monica 




Los Angeles 


Long Beach 






Chicago. Illinois 


Los Angeles 




Delta Sigma Phi; Alpha 


Delta 


Beta Theta Pi; Sea 


bbard and 


Beta Theta Pi. 


Gamma Phi Beta; 


Class 


Coun- 


Alpha Delta Sigma; Southern 


Kappa Kappa Gamma; 


N 


Sisma; Staff and Mask; 


Crew, 


Blade. 






cil, 4; Election Board, 


3: Stu- 


Campus, 2, 3; Associate Man- 


man Club; Ki-Pri. 




1. 3. 4; Boxing. I; Southern 








dent Counsellor, 3 


4. 




ager, 4; Publications; Home- 






Campus, 2, 3. 4, 5. 
















coming; Elections Board. 








ELMER ARNOLD 
MILLER, JR., A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 


LORNA BERTHA MURIEL 
MILLER, A.B. 

History 

Los Angeles 


RICHARD FRANCIS 
MILLER, A.B. 
Zoology 

Los Angeles 


BENJAMIN H. 
MILLIKEN, A.B. 
Economics 

Riverside 


HELEN GERTRUDE 
MILLMAN.B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 




JANE PATRICIA 
MILLS, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 






Masonic Club. 


Phi Kappa PsI. 


Sigma Delta Tau; Pi Lambda 
Theta; Ki-Pri; Masonic Club; 

Bruin, 1, 2. 


y.W.C.A.; Southern Campus 2 
Stevens Clubs; Philia; A.W.S 
Social Hour. 



Evelyn Vinton rose from the ranks of the 
y.W.C.A. to the esteemed position of Student 
Council member as chairman of the Labor Board. 
The poor girl's mind snapped under the strain, 
which explains why she acts like that. 





SANFORDJUDSON 
MOCK, B.S. 

Business Administration 

Beverly Hills 


ROBERT ALLAN 
MOFFITT, A.B. 
Chemistry 
Los Angeles 


GENE RICHARD 
MONCRIEFF, A.B. 
Political Science 

Beverly Hills 


BARBARA 
MONTGOMERY, B.E 

Education 

P.edlands 


Tau Delta Phi; Bruin, 1. 2, 3, 
Editor, 4; Student Board Re- 
ligious Conference. 


Alpha Chi Sigma. 




Phrateres. 




VIRGINIA ESTHER 

MORELAND, A.B. 

Philosophy 

Alhambra 


MELINA FLORENCE 
MORLEY, B.E. 
Music 

Alhambra 


GENEVA HAYES 
MORRIS, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 


BETTY 

MORRISON, B.E. 
Education 

Maricopa 


Bruin, 


Beta Phi Alpha; Phrateres. 




Delta Phi Upsllon; 
Dance Recital, 2. 



Ki - Pri; 



90 




WESLEY R.CHURCHILL 
MELYAN, A.B. 

Political Science 

Montclair, N. J. 

:" Club; German Club; 

::cnt's Council; Wesley 

^ _ z ; International Relations 



RICHARD W. 

MERTES. A.B. 

Chennistry 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Sigma; 
Upsilon. 



MARGARET CONSTANCE DOROTH/JOy 
METTE, B.E. MILLER. B.E. 

Art Education 

Los Angeies Los Angeles 

Phi Lambda Philokalia. Alpha Epsllon Phi. 





Pete Yamazaki got a brilliant idea, extorted 
money from everyone in Kerckhoff Hall, got in 
everybody's hair, and made a general nuisance 
of himself. But, when we look at the Cement C. 
we forgive him all. 



PEGGY DICKSON 
MILROy, A.B. 
History 

Los A"geles 


MILDRED ELEANOR 
MINGER, B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 


MONNIER M. 
MINOCK, B.E. 
Mechanic Arts 

Los Angeies 


ANNABEL LEVER 

MITCHELL, B.E. 

Education 

Somis 


Kappa Kappa Gamma. 




Wrcstlins; Rugby. 


Phrateres; Wesley Club; Glee 
Club, 1. 2; A Capella Choir. 
1. 2. 




ANNA GERTRUDE 

MOODY. A.B. 

History 

San Fernando 
Gamma Phi Beta. 



RUTH ISABELLE 
MOONE, B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 

Alpha Gamma Delta; Phi Beta; 
A Capella Choir. I. 2; Fresh- 
man Teas. 3; Wesley Club; 
WA.A., 3. 



BETTIE RUTH CLEMENTINE 

MOONEY. B.E. MOORE, A.B. 
Education Spanish 

Beverly Hills Los Angeles 

Alpha Omicron Pi; Southern Sigma Delta Pi. 
Campus. I. 2; Dance Recital. I. 



DONALD EDWIN 
MOORE, A.B. 






KIMBALL HAINES 
MOORE, B.S. 


English 
Los Angeles 






Managcnnent, Industry 
Los Angeles 


Phi Delta Kappa; Track 
A; Cross Country. 2. 4; 
1. 2. 


1. 2. 
Band, 


Delta Sisma Phi; Society for 
Advancement of Management; 
Class Council. 1. 2. 4; Glee 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Debate Squad. 




MURIEL MARY 
MORRISSEY, A.B. 

English 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Phrateres; Newman Club' 
Y.W.C.A. 



FRANK RICHARD 
MORROW, A.B. 

Zoology 

Columbus. Nebraska 



RUTH MARIE 

MOSES, B.E. 

Home Economics 
Beverly Hills 

Alpha Omicron Pi; 
Club. 



JANET MARY 

MOSHER, A.B. 

English 

Lomita 

Phrateres; A Capella Choii 
A.W.S. Hostess Committee, I 



LEE FORREST 

MOULTON, A.B. 
Political Science 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Wrestling, 4; Senior Manager, 

3, 4; Circle C; Ball and Chain; 

Cafe Advisory Committee, 2; 

Labor Board, 2; Calif. Men. 



GEORGE E. 
MOUNT, A.B. 
Psychology 

Cedar Falls, Iowa 



91 



PAULGERHARDT 
MUELLER, JR.. B.S. 

Applied Arts 

Los Anseles 
Theta Chi; Alpha Phi Omesa; 
Phi Delta Kappa: Ball and 
Chain: Blue C: Circle C: Track 
Ms<., 2. 3, 4: Rifle Tea, 2, 3, 4, 



DOROTHY BLANCHE 
MULCARE, A.B. 

Household Science 

Los Angeles 
Omicron Nu. 



AIDA 
MULIERI, B.E. 

Music 

Los Angeles 

Phi Beta; A Capella Choir, 2, 
3, 4; Orchestra, 3, 4. 



JEAN PORTIA 
MURNANE, A.B. 
Psychology 
Los Angeles 



COLLEEN 
MURPHV, B.E. 

Education 

Inglewood 
Kappa Delta; Orchestra, 3, 



PATSY LOU 
MURPHY, B.E. 

Education 

Inglewood 

Kappa Delta: Orchestra, t, 
3, 4; A.W.S. Social Hour, 
W.A.A., I, 2. 




MARTHA ALBERTINA 


NELLIE MAE 


JEANNE RENE 




FRANK CLARENCE 


JULIUS LEON 


FLORENCE ELEANOR 


NELSON, B.E. 


NELSON, B.E. 


NESBIT, B.E. 




NEWELL, A.B. 


NEWMAN, B.S. 


NICHOLS, A.B. 


Art 


Education 


Education 




History 


Accounting 


English 


South Gale 


Highland 


Pomona 




Long Beach 


Los Angeles 


Willowbrook 


■W.A.A.: Philia. 


Kappa Tau Delta; Ki- 
C.T.A.; Phrateres. 


Pri ; Pi Beta Phi; Ki-Pri 


y.w.c.A. 


Circle C; Golf, 4. 5. 




Phrateres, Council, 4. 



Peggy is the last of A. O. Pi's famous Smiths but 
we don't mean she is a relic. She behaved like 
^ sane person one day, but said it bored her 
so she went back to being normal again. Sur- 
prised she's graduating, as is everyone else. 



ail 

HI 
IIP 


■niii 
llWai 




1 


r 




CHARLES KELLER 
NORTON. B.S. 

Mana'^cment, Industry 

Beverly Hills 
Phi Kappa Sigma; Ball and 
Chain; Circle C; Scabbard and 
Blade; Water Polo, I; Swim- 
ming Manager, 2, 3, 4, 



KAZUKO 
NOZAWA, A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Chi Alpha Delta. 



JANE PRUGH 
NUTTALL, A.B. 

Philosophy 

Hollywood 
Alpha Phi; Spurs; Student 
Counsellor; Class Council, 2, 3, 
4; A.W.S. Council, 2, 3; Y.W.- 
CA., I, 2; Bruin, I; WAA, 



BARBARA 
NYE, A.B. 

Household Science 

Los Angeles 

Kappa Delta; Arenne; Philia; 
Elections Board, 4; A.W.S. 
Consultation Committee. I, 2. 




JEANNE ADRIENNE 
OSWALD, A.B. 

Education 

Fullerton 
Phrateres Council. 



JACQUELYN ELAINE 
OnER, A.B. 

History 

Beverly Hills 
Aremc; Masonic Club- A.W.S. 
Council, 3; Y.W.C.A., I. 



BLANCHE ELIZABETH 
OWENS, B.S. 

Physical Education 

Pueblo, Colo. 

W.A.A.; Physical Education 
Club. 



JOSEPH M. 
OYSTER, A.B. 

Zoology 

Coalinga 
Delta Chi; Phi Beta Kappa; Phi 
Eta Sigma; Rally Committee. 



92 




EVELVN ARLENE 

MYERS, B.E. 
Education 
I LosAnselcs 
I Phrateres. 



ICHIRO 

NAKAJIMA, B.S. 
Marlccting 
Los Angeles 



JOSEPH SUSUMU 
NAKAMURA, B.S. 

Marketing 

Los Angeles 

Beta Gamma Sigma: Japanese 
Bruin Club. 



JACK RUSSELL 

NELSON. A.B. 

Political Science 
Los Anscles 

Theta Delta Chi. 





This is Mdlzubin Ladrubica — er. Zubelin Rubadub 
— er-r — aw, shucks, nobody can spell Mladin 
Zarubica. Plays football, carries a pipe in his 
mouth, and goes to class for lack of something 
better to do. 



CHARLYNE RUTH 
NOLAN, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 

Alpha Chi Omega. 



WILLIAM EDWARD 
NORRINSTON, A.B, 

Astronomy 

No'th Hollywood 
Circle C: Soccer, 2. 



GRACE CORNELIA 
NORTH. A.B. 
History 

Riverside 
Chi Omesa. 



EARLENE 
NORTHROP. B.E. 
Education 

El Centre 




ROBERT WILLIAM 
OBLATH, A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 

Pi Sigma Alpha; Circle C; 
Fencing. 1 , 2, 3, Captain. 4; 
Skiing Manaaer, 3, 4. 



MISAO 

OKURA. A.B. 
Psychology 
Los Arpgeles 

Chi Alpha Delta. 



OLIVE EVELYN 
OLIN.B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 



BEny LEE 
OLMSTED. B.E. 

Education 

San Marine 
Delta Delta Delta; Dance Re- 
cital. I, 3: y.>X'.C.A.. l; A.W.S. 
Committees. 



ROBERT CHARLES 

ORTWIN. A.B. 

Political Science 

Shanghai, China 

Circle C; Southern Campus, 3; 
Golf, 2. 3, Captain. 4; Soccer, 
4; Cricket, 2. 3. 4, Captain, 3. 



ANN 
OSTENBERG,A.B. 

English 

Scottsbluff. Nebraska 
Delta Gamma. 




BETTY MARIE 
PAESCHKE. A.B. 

Psychology 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Alpha Xi Delta; Alpha Tau 
Dc ta; Class Council. 5; Elcc- 
' -'S Board, S; Consultation 
Cc — mittee; Homecoming. 5. 



CONSTANCE ELEANOR ROSA MARIA 



PARK, B.E. 
Education 

Montebello 

Phrateres; Masonic Club: ^-W.- 
C.A.; Stevens Club. 



PARRA. A.B. 

French 

Mexico, D.F. 
Sigma Delta Pi. 



JANICE NANNETTE 
PAYNE, A.B. 

English 

Los Angeies 
Sigma Kappa. 



JEANNEANNE 
PENNINGTON, A.B. 

Sociology 

Los Angeles 



JACQUELIN, 
PERRY. B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 
Physical Education Club; W.A.- 
A., I, 2, 3, 4. S: Philia. 



93 



MIRIAM LEILA 
PERSONS, A.B. 
French 

Beverly Hills 

Delta Delta Delta; 
y.W.C.A., I. 



JOHN EMMETT 

PETERS. A.B. 
Psychology 
Houston, Texas 
I; GlcE Club, 4. 



ROBERT THEODORE 
PETERSEN, A.B. 
English 

Santa Barbara 
Alpha Phi Omega. 



EDWIN ALAN 
PETTIT, B.S. 

General Business 

Los Angeles 



CARL A. 
PFEIFFER, A.B. 

Political Science 

Santa Monica 



SHIRLEV 
PFEIFFER, A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Phi Sigma Sigma; 
Panhellenic Council, 




WILTON HAMMOND 
PIERCE, A.B. 
Economics 

Hcrrviosa Beach 
Football, I. 



PRISCILLARAE SAM A. WILLIAM FRANK 

PIERCE, A.B. PILTZER, B.S. POLLOCK, A.B. 

English Marketing Zoology 

Hermosa Beach Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Alpha Omicron Pi; Philia; Le Sigma Alpha Mu- 145-lb. Bas- 
Cercle; Francais; Y.W.C.A.; ketbalL 
Panhellenic Council. 



RUTH FRANCES 
POTTLE, A.B, 
Enslish 

Los Angeles 
U.D.S.. 2. 3. 4; Zeta Phi Eta: 
Kap and Bells; Greek Drama, 2. 



HARRy DOUGLAS 
PRATT. A.B. 
French 

Los Angeles 

Theta Chi; X.MC.A. Cabinet, 
I. 2. 3. 4; Class Council. 3; 
Soccer, 3. 



G.L.G. (short for Good Looking Goldman) did 
himself with the best card stunts we have ever 
seen. At last he has convinced his brother Phi 
Beta Deltas that he is good for something, a 
fact long doubted. 





PATRICIA EDDINS 
PRINGLE. B.E. 
Education 

I. OS Ange'es 



RICHARD KENNETH 
PRVNE. A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 



DUANELEE 
PURVEAR, B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 



JOSEPH 
RABIN. B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 



Pi Lambda Theta; Phi Upsi- Delta Chi; /.MCA.; Bruin, I. Roger Williams Club; Student Boxmg, 3; Football, 4. 
Ion Pi. 2, 3. Editor. 4; Peace Councn, Board Religious Conference. 

3, Chairman. 4. 




EVA 

REED, B.E. 
Education 
Covina 








NINA JO 
REEVES, A.B. 

English 

San Bernardino 


BILLIE 
REID,B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 


GAVLORD AVERy 
REID, A.B. 
History 

Spripgville, Iowa 


Pi Kappa Sigma; Ki-Pri; 
teres; W.A.A.; y.W.CA. 


Phra- 


Phrateres. 


W.A.A.; Phrateres; P.E. Club. 





94 




ELVA LEE 
PFIRRMANN.B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 

Zcla Tau Alpha; Philia; 
■nentary Club; V.W.CA. 



BARBARA DAWN 
PHILLIPS, A.B. 

English 

Santa Ana 



WINIFRED MAE 

PHINNEy, B.E. 
Education 
Los Angeles 



Elc- 



MARGARET ELIZABETH 
PIERCE, A.B. 

History 

Pasadena 
Alpha Phi. 





With the editorship of the Southern Campus, 
Theta Chi, and a geology major Bill Simons was 
a very busy man during his fifth year. But he did 
nothing his first four years so it didn't hurt him. 



/IRGINIA ELSIE 
'RATT, B.E. 
,. Home Economics 

|| Los Angeles 

■Alpha Delta Pi; Home 
' omics Club. 



Eco- 



CHARLES STANLEY 
PRICE, B.S. 
Marketing 

Beverly Hills 

Zeta Psi; Scabbard and Blade; 
Basketball, 3; Alpha Eta Rho; 
Boxing, I. 



MICHAEL 
PRICE, B.E. 
Education 

Los An3eies 



JACK KIMBALL 
PRINCE, A.B. 
Geography 

L OS Angeles 
Geos'aphy Society. 




lANNY 

ABINOW1T7, A.B. 
History- Philosophy 

Los Angeles 
►innis, I, 2. 



MARGUERITE ELIZABETH 
RAISH, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 
Kappa Delta; Areme; Y.W.C.A. 



FRANK LESLIE 
RANDALL, B.S. 
Marketing 

Long Beach 
Phi Delta Theta. 



RICHARD CLARK 
RAVEN, B.S. 

Business Administration 

Los Angeles 
Theta Xi; Alpha Kappa Psi. 



MARGARET HANNAH 
RAY, A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 

Alpha Omicron Pi; Class Coun- 
cil, 3; Southern Campus, I ; 
Election Board. 3. 



RICHARD GALE 
RAYBURN. A.B. 

Mathematics 

San Fernando 

California Men; Masonic Club; 
Mathematics Club; Rifle Team, 
2. 3. 




EORGE ALBERT 
tINERTH. A.B. 

Geography 

Los Angeles 
lographic Society; Band, 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH 
RENAUD, A.B. 

French 

Los Angeles 



ROGER BRUCE 

RENNER. B.E. 
Music 
Los Angeles 

Phi Mu Alpha; Sinfoma. 



HELEN 
RESTO, A.B. 
English 

Santa Monica 
Philia; Orchestra, 4; Y.W.C.A.; 
Luther Club; Bible Club; 
W.A.A. 



95 



FRANCIS ARTHUR 
REYNOLDS, A.B. 
Geology 

Altadena 
Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 



BEHY MARCELLA 
RICHARDSON. B.E. 

Education 
Delano 
Phratcres. 



JULIA MILDRED 








RICHARD STANLEY 






IDABELLE 


RUTH JANET 






MARy ISABEL 




ELSIE MARIE 


RICHTER, B.E. 








RINGHEIM, A.B. 






RITCHIE, B.E. 


ROANE, A.B. 






ROBB, A.B. 




ROBERTS, B.E. 


Commerce 

Hollywood 








Psychology 

Beverly Hills 






Education 

Bellmgham, Wash. 


Sociology 

Puente 






English 

Los Angeles 




Physical Education 

Altadena 


Sigma Kappa; Alpha Chi Delta; 
Philla; A.W.S. Ttcasurer, 3; 
W.A.A.: y.W.C.A.; Freshman 
Club; Student Counsellor, 3, A. 


Phi Beta Kappa; Phi Eta 
Alpha Chi Sisma; Stu 
search Committee. 4. 


Sic 
dy 


ma; 
Re- 


Ki-Pri; Student Teachers' Asso- 
ciation; Campbell Club. 


Wcslwood Club; 
Choir. 


A 


Capella 


Philia; Kappa Phi 


Zeta. 


Helen Matthewson Club; N). 
A. A.; Women's P. E. Cl- 
Board; Dance Recital; Soutl-f- 
Campus. 




ELLEN ADELINE 




HELEN CHRISTINE 


ROSEMARy DEANE 


BEHYLOU 


ROGERS, B.E. 




ROHRS. B.E. 


ROPP, A.B. 


ROSE, B.E. 


Education 




Education 


History 


Education 


Los Angeles 




Orange 


Glendale 


Los Angeles 


Alpha Gamma Delta; 
Campus. 1, 2. 3. 
Council, 1, 2. 3. A 
Hostess Committee, 


Southern 
A; Class 
A.W.S. 
, 2, 3. 


Pi Kappa Sigma; Phrateres. 


Alpha Chi Omega; Class Coun- 
cil, A. 


Alpha Sigma Alpha 



CAROLYN JUNE 
ROSE, B.E. 
Education 

Santa Monica 



VIRGINIAANDERSON 
ROSE, B.E. 
Art 

West Hollywood 
Philckalia. 



Doris MacDougall went into seclusion after 
about three years of actlvity-lng. Then she blos- 
somed forth as a social flyer, entered contests, 
and stuck herself in the public eye. In spite of 
It all, she's a Chi Onnega. 





ROBERT 
ROSTINE, A.B. 
Economics 

Santa Monica 
Kappa Alpha. 



SANFORD 
ROTHMAN, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 



ARNOLD FREDRIC 
ROTHMEIER, B.E. 

Music 

Gardcna 
Phi Mu Alpha; Stnfonia; Band, 
2; Orchestra. 2. 



FRANCES 
ROTSKY, A.B. 
Chemistry 

Los Angeles 




MICHAEL ARTHUR 
RUGGIERO, B.E. 

Music 

Los Angeles 
Phi Mu Alpha; Orchestra, I, 2, 
3. 4; Band, I, 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club, I; Campus Capers. I; 
Newman Club; Italian Club. 



DAVID HYMEN 
RUJA, A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Prc-Med Club; Labor Board, 



MARGARET JANE 
RUSSELL, A.B. 

English 

Scuth Pasadena 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH 
RYLAND, A.B. 
English 

Whittier 



96 




EDITH JANET 
ROBINSON, A.B. 
Household Science 

Beverly Huis 




RUTH 

ROBINSON. A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 


DOROTHY DEANE 
ROBISON, A.B. 
English 

Burbank 


JOANNA 
ROCK, A.B. 

Household Science 

Wcodville. Texas 


Omega Pi; Omicron 


Nu. 


Descrct Club. 






Phi Mu: Spurs: y.W.C.A.: Bruin. 
1; Homecoming Dance. 3; A.- 
W.S. Social, 1. 2; Masonic 
Club. 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > ^^^^^B 


■ 




H 


^^^^^HLc-^ di^^^^^^^^^^M^^ 






IS[ 



The chairman of the Rally Committee is cer- 
tain to be thoroughly hated by the rooting 
section, but Fred McPherson weathered the 
storm bravely. The only reason for the D.U. 
house, and admits it freely. 



rVELYN 


MARVIN J. 




BETSy EILEEN 








CHARLES ALBERT 


ROSENBERG, A.B. 


ROSENBURG, 


A.B. 


ROSS, A.B. 








ROSS, B.S. 


History 
Lcs Angeles 


Psychology 

Los Angeles 




French 

Santa Monica 








Accounting 

Bakcrsfield 




Zcta Beta Tau. 




Phi Omega Pi; Pi 
Southern Campus, 
Ccfcle Francais. 


Delta 
1. 2; 


Phi: 
Lc 


Alpha Sigma Phi. 




JULES MAYNARD ROBERT FRANKLIN HERBERT BERNARD 

ROUSE, A.B. RUBEN, B.S. RUBIN, A.B. 

Economics Marketing Zoology 

Los Angeles Beverly Hills Lcs Angeles 

Thcta Xi. Blue C: Ball and Chain; O.C.B. Sigma Alpha Mu; tJ.D.S., 

Complaint Board Chairman; Jewish Council, President. 
Crew. Manager, 4. 



LILY LOUIS BERNARD 

RUBIN, B.E. RUBIN, A.B. 
Education Chemistry 

Los Angeles New York, N. Y. 

Pi Lambda Theta; Sigma Delta California Men; A. M.S. Board 

PI; Religious Conference, 2; Homecoming, 2. 4; Pre-Med 

W.A.A. Club; Masonic Club; U.D.S., I 
B Football: Cement C, 4. 



ROSE 

RUBIN, A.B. 
Spanish 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Delta Pi; Pi Delta Phi; 
Religious Conference. 2; W.- 
A.A. 




MUNEO 
SAKAUE, A.B. 
German 

Lcs Angeles 



CHICOCHIYEKO 
SAKAGUCHI,A.B. 

English 

Ncrch Hollywood 

U.D.S.. I; Tennis, I; 
Recital. 



RUTH AGNES 
SALLOT, B.E. 
Education 

Riverside 
Dance Phrdtercs. 



MARION LUCILE 
SALTMARSH, B.E. 
Art 

Lake Arrowhead 
Gamma Phi Beta; Delta Epsi- 
lon; Dance Recital. 2; U.D.S. 



GEORGE ERNEST 
SANDALL, B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Rally Committee. 2, 
ling, 2, 3. 



Circle C; 
3; Wrest- 



MAYLA CAROL 

SANDBECK, A.B. 

Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Phi; Bruin, I, 
Campus, I; Class 
y.W.C.A., I, 2; 
Committee, 2, 3. 



Southern 
ouncil. 4; 



Homecoming 



97 



STAN G. 
SANDEL, A.B. 
Economics 

Santa Monica 


VIRGINIA MAY 
SANDELL, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 


JOHN ROWLAND 
SANDERS, A.B. 
Physics 

Los Angeles 


JANYCEEARLEEN 
SAULS, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 


GLADYS FRANCES 
SAWYER, B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 


FRANCIS PATRICK 
SCANNELL, A.B. 

English 

New York City 






Physics Society. 


Alpha of Areta; Dance R 
-ital, 3. 


e- Pi Lambda Theta; Phi 
Pi. 


Upsilon hiandball: Bruin. 4 
Board; Student Board 



La bo 
Board; Religi 

ous Conference. 




MARY AGATHA 

SCHNEIDER, B.S. 

Accounting 

Los Angeles 

Phi Chi Theta. 



CECILIA 
SCHNIEROW, B.S. 

General Business 

Los Angeles 
Phi Sigma Sigma. 



DOUGLASS. 
SCHOBERG, A.B. 

Physics 

Los Angeles 
Physics Society; y.M.C.A. 



DORIS MARGARET 
SCHUBERT, B.E. 
Home Economics 

Santa Monica 



DOROTHY 
SCHUFELDT, B.E. 
Art 

Van Nuys 
Delta Epsllon. 



NORMAN WEST 
SCHULTZ, A.B. 

Geology 

Los Angeles 
Si 3 ma Gamma Epsilon. 



A first class business woman, Julia Richter has 
done time in A.W.S. politics and in various mot- 
ley honoraries. She was also queen of Sigma 
Kappa and counselled poor gullible freshmen 
into joining it. 





MARGARET ANN 
SELBY, A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 


MEREDITH HORTON 
SHADE, A.B. 
Physics 

Riverside 


SUZANNE THERESE 
SHAFER, B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 




PATRICIA PEARL 
SHANNON, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 


Gamma Phi Beta; V.W.C.A., 3 
4; W.A.A., 2, 3. 


. Theta Xi. 


Kappa Alpha Theta; 
lia. 


Philoka- 


A Capclla Choir, 3. 4 




WILBUR BROWN 


SALLY 




KIKUOG. 


FRANK ROBERT 


SHERMAN, A.B. 


SHERWIN, B.E. 




SHIMODA, A.B. 


SHINEBERG, A.B. 


Geology 


Education 




Zoology 


Political Science 


Los Angeles 


Beverly Hills 




Pasadena 


Los Angeles 




Kappa Alpha Theta; 
lia. 


Philoka- 




California Men; Glee Club 
3, 4. 



98 




;OLOMON 
;CHALMAN. B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 



EARL CHARLES 
SCHERFF. JR.. B.S. 

General Business 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Nu; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Scabbard and Blade; Basket- 
ball, !; Homecoming Commit- 



WAVNETHOMAS 
SCHLACK. B.S. 

Business Administration 

Inglewood 
Alpha Gamma Omesa. 



MARJORIELOIS 
SCHMIDT. B.E. 
Education 

Orange 
Phrateres; Tennis, 3. 





Being president of the Delce house, Julian B!od- 
gett was also president of Intcrfraternity. In spite 
of being a Delce, he is usually conscious and has 
a serious side, to be judged by his long face 
at times. 



VILFRIELOIS 
CHULZ, A.B. 
English 

Pasadena 
vipha of Areta. 



GERDAF. 
SCHULZE, A.B. 
German 

Los Angeles 
Sfgma Delta Pi; German Club. 



IVAN JAMES 
SCOTT, B.E. 
Education 

Seal Beach 



BARBARA LEA 
SEELV, B.E. 

Art 

Highland 

Delta Epsilon; Philokalia, West- 
wood Club. 




;UGENE BERNARD 




EDWARD LLEWELLYN 




DON ST. JOHN 








SUE BENNETT 


iHAPIRO, A.B. 




SHARP, B.S. 




SHAW, B.S. 








SHELBy, B.E. 


Political Science 




Mechanic Arts 




Accounting 








Art 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 








Los Angeles 


)igma Alpha Mu; yeomen; 
y Committee; Interfrate 
2ouncrl; California Men, 
jcutive Board. 


Ral- 

rnity 

Ex- 


Phi Delta Kappa; Masonic 
4; German Club. 


Club 


Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Class Council. 1. 
Polo. 1. 2, 3; 5w 
2. 3. 4. 


Circle C; 
2; Water 
mming, 1, 


Alpha Chi Omega; Philokalia 
Dance Recital. 2. 3, 4; Pan 
hellenic Council, 4. 



MARy ELIZABETH 
SHELTON, A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 

Masonic Club. 3, 4; W.A A., 
3; y.W.C.A., 3; A.W.S. Con- 
sultation Committee. 3. 



JUNE 
SHEPPARD, B.E. 

Education 

Los Angeles 
Pi Lambda Theta; Phi Upsilon 
Pi; Helen Matthewson Club; 
y.W.C.A.; Roger Williams 
Club. 




WILLIAM A. 

5HUBIN, B.S. 

General Business 
I Los Angeles 
fCircle C; Football, 2, 

Tennis, I; Rugby, 3, 4. 



BRUCE NORMAN 
SHYER, A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 



FRANKLIN BRADLEY 
SIMMONS, JR., A.B. 

Spanish 

Pasadena 
Alpha Phi Omega; Track, 



FRANK STANTON 
SIMONS, A.B. 
Geology 

Santa Monica 
Theta Chi; Sigma Gamma Ep- 
silon; Blue Key; Crew, I; Band, 
I; Southern Campus, I, 2. 3, 4, 
Editor. 5. 



KATHRYN LOUISE 
SKIDMORE, B.E. 

Art 

Mexico, D.F. 
Alpha Phi; Philokalia; 
Club. 



JOHN ELMER 
SKRIFOARS, B.S. 
Accounting 
Maywood 
Stevens Alpha Kappa Psi; Staff and 
Mask; B Football. 4. 



99 



DOROTHEA VIVIAN 


MARGARET ANNE 


KATHLEEN JULIA 


JEANNETTE ELAINE 


OWEN ALWARD 


CHARLOTTE 


SLATE. A.B. 


SLATER, A.B. 


SLATTERy. A.B. 


SLAVIN, A.B. 


SLOANE, A.B. 


SLOANE. A.B. 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


History 


French 


Political Science 


French 


Des Moines, Iowa 


Los Angeles 


Montrose 


Pasadena 


South Pasadena 


Los Angeles 


Alpha Epsilon Phi. 




Philia. 


Alpha Phi; Southern Campus. 


Ph. Delta Theta. 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 



2; Class Council, 4; Homecom- 
ing Committee. 2, 3. 




PEGGY 
SMITH, B.E. 

Home Economics 

Glendale 

Alpha Omicron Pi; Southern 
Campus. I; Election Board, 2, 
3; Spurs. 



RODNEy PREGITZER 
SMITH. A.B. 

Geography 

Glendale 

Geographical Society; Y . 
C.A.- Westminster Club. 



MARY SELENA 
SMITHSON. A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 
Chi Omega; Southern Campus, 
■4; A.W.S. Social Committee, 
3; W.A.A., 3. 



JUDITH MARSHA 
SOKOL. A.B. 
Psychology 

Chicago, Illinois 



JOHN 
SOGY, A.B. 
Economics 

Fontana 
Kappa Alpha. 



BARBARA 
SPAULDING, A.B. 
Economics 

Los Angeles 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Class 
Council, 2. 3. 4; Cement C. 



No one would think that Lucretia Tenney was 
the driver of the mighty Alpha Chi political 
machine, but she was. Capitalized on the little 
girl for all it was worth, a novel approach to 
politics which seemed to pay dividends. 





ROBERT KELLER 

STALEY. JR.. A.B. 

Philosophy 

Hollywood 
Rusby, Manager, 2, 3; 
Club, 2; Class Council, 



Glee 



PAT 

STANLEY, B.E. 
Art 

Los Angeles 
Pi Beta Phi; Philokalia. 



NORMAN SAMELOW 
STANTON, B.S. 
Accountins 

Chicago, Illinois 

Zeta Beta Tau; Tennis. ^ 
ascr, 3, 



MXLA 
STAY, A.B. 
History 

Huntington Park 




EXIEJEAN 
STEVENS, A.B. 

History 

Upland 

Alpha Chi Alpha; B 
3. 4; A.W.S. Board; 
Board. 



uln, I, 2, 
Phrateres 



JAMES KISTLER 
STEWART, A.B. 
History 

Beverly Hills 

Beta Theta Pi; Blue Key; 
fornia Club; Baskcttia 
A.S.U.C. Exec. Council; 
dent Board Relisious Cor 



Cali- 

. 2: 

Stu- 



AGNES 
STIASNEV, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Banning 

Physical Education Club; 
A. A. 



DONALD RAY 
STIESS. A.B. 

English 

Los Anoelcs 



100 




LUCILLE LILLIE 
SLOTNIKOW, A.B. 
Spanish 

Covma 


NANCy ELIZABETH 
SMALLWOOD, A.B. 
Pyschology 

Los An3cl'-S 


MARGARET 
SMITH, A.B. 
History 

Los Anseles 


MURIEL IRENE 
SMITH, A.B. 

Political Science 

San Fernando 


■J Alpha Phi; Southern 
:;^s. 1; A.W.5. Social Com- 
Tittee, 1; Phratcres. 


Alpha of Areta. 


Pi Kappa Sisma. 







Boyd Harris was a bit bewildered when he was 
made manager of the Bruin, but he did a good 
job, no thanks to his Delta Sig fraternity brethren 
who were also bewildered, as usual. Very quiet 
for a newspaperman. 



VIRGINIA 


MINERVA LOUISE 


ODIETGALE 






KENNETH EARL 


SPENCER, A.B. 


SPURR, A.B. 


STAFFORD, B.S. 






STAGER, A.B. 


History 


English 


Marketing 






Zoology 


Lds Angeles 


Reseda 


Long Beach 






Los Angeles 


3 Kappa. 




Phi Delta Theta; 
cil, 4. 


Class 


Coun- 






SHIRLEY LILLIAN 


RUTH 


SIGNE MARGARET 


THOMAS MARQUIS 


JAMES CHARLES 




BETH ANNE 


STEIN, A.B. 


STEINBERG, B.E. 


STENEHJEM.B.E. 


STERLING, A.B. 


STERN, A.B. 




STEVENS, B.E. 


Economics 


Music 


Education 


Political Science 


Political Science 




Education 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Santa Monica 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 




Kap and Bells; U.D.S., 


1, 2, C.TA.: Ki-Pri. 




Phi Beta Delta: Class 


Council 


Southern Campus, 3, 4: W.A.A 




3, 4. 






2: Track, 1. 




3: A.S.U.C. Social Committee 
A.W.S. Social Committee 
Crew Queen Attendant, 3. 




DIANA 


HELEN IRENE 


MARJORIEEDMONIA 


STIMSON.B.E. 


STINCHFIELD, B.E. 


STOKELy.A.B. 


Education 


Education 


Sociology 


Los Angeles 


Riverside 


Los Angeles 


Kappa Kappa Gamma. 


Phrateres Council. 


Delta Sigma Theta. 



EARL REYNOLDS 




VIRGINIA LOUISE 


RICHARD DAVID 


STONE, A.B. 




STONE, A.B. 


STOWELL, A.B. 


Political Science 




History 


Geology 


Los Angeles 




Shaftcr 


Los Angeles 


Sisma Alpha Epsilon; 


Scabbard 


Alpha of Areta: History Club. 


Sigma Gamma Epsilon. 


and Blade: Fencing, 2 


Campus 






Capers. 









101 



JEAN ELIZABETH 
STRAHLE. B.E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 
Kappa Delta. 



CHRISTINE STEWART 
STRAIN, A.B. 
History 

Hollywood 
Phratcrcs; Southern Campus, 2, 
3; A.W.S. Council. 3. 4; Y.W.- 
C.A. Cabinet, 3. 



FRIEDA PHOEBE 

STAITMAN. A.B. 

Psychology 

Cincinnati. Ohio 
Dance Recital. 3. 



KENNETH EUGENE 
STREET, A.B. 
Physics 

Redondo Beach 

Masonic Club; Radio Club; 
Physics Society; Gym Team, 3. 



DOROTHY ELLEN 
STUCK, B.E. 
Education 

Ventura 

Pi Lambda Theta; Pi 
Mu; Dance Recital, 3. 



SAMUEL ENOCH 
STUMPF, B.S. 

Banking and Finance 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Roser Wil- 
liams Club; Debate Squad, i, 
Ofatory. 3. 




ELNA ELIZABETH 


TAKESHI 


NORMAN 


BONNIE BELLE 


SWANSON.B.E. 


TABATA, A.B. 


TABER, A.B. 


TAFT, A.B. 


Education 


Political Science 


Philosophy 


Art 


Whitticr 


South Pasadena 


Klamath Falls, Oregon 


Los Angeles 


Phratcres; Luther Club. 


Gym Team. 2. 


Blue C; Football, 1, 2, 3. 


Philokalia. 



Virginia Lee Lindsey has been the power behind 
student counselling for a long time, and is now 
eligible for pension. Cares for a Sigma Pi, which 
makes her unique, and adds charm and beauty 
to Phrateres. 




FRANK YASUSHI 


SHIGEJI 




TAKAHASHI, B.S. 


TAKEDA. B.S. 




Banking and Finance 


Accounting 




Los Angeles 


San Fernando 




Japanese Bruin Club. 


Beta Gamma Sigma; 
Bruin Club. 


J a pane 




LUCRETIA PAULA 
TENNEV, A.B. 
English 

Boston, Massachusetts 
Alpha Chi Omesa; Spurs; Pry- 
tanean; Mortar Board; Califor- 
nia Club; Vice-Pres. A.W.S. , 3; 
V.-Pres. A.S.U.C, ■4;O.C.B. 3,4. 



CARLTON FRED LUCILLE MAE MATILDA FAY 

THOMAS, B.S. THOMAS, A.B. THOMAS, A.B. 

Accounting Political Science Sociology 

Los Angeles Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Delta Upsilon; Alpha Kappa Theta Upsilon. Delta Sigma Theta. 
Psi; U.D.S., 4. 




BETTV 


ELEANOR GERTRUDE 




LUCILE KAY 


RICHARD 


THORSON,A.B. 


THORSON.A.B. 




TITUS. A.B. 


TOVAMA, A.B. 


English 


Household Science 




Political Science 


Economics 


Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 




Los Angeles 


Los Angeles 


Kappa Alpha Theta. 


Chi Omega; Home Economics 
Club; W.A.A.; 1, 2; A.W.S. 
Consultation Committee, 2; 
Soutlicrn Campus, 4. 







102 




RALPH WILLIAM 
STUPP, B.S. 


HENRy TADAKATSU 
SUGIURA. A.B. 


J.WILLIAM 
SUNDERMAN, 


B.S. 


SHIRLEyjEAN 
SUTHERLAND, B.E. 


Accounting 

Glcndale 


Bacterioloqy 

Torrance 


Accounting 

Los Angeles 




Education 

Long Beach 


Beta Alpha Psi. 


Circle C; Fencins. 1. 2. 3, A. 


Alpha Beta Psi. 




Kappa Alpha Thcta; C.T.A. 
Phrateres; Homecoming Com 
mittee, 1. 





The main reason for the predominance of Alpha 
Sig's mugs in the yearbook is photog Bill Johnke, 
so he's an Alpha Sig. He should be emulsified 
by now, just like his negatives, but his girl still 
loves him so he can't be. 



JEAN MARGARET 


MARIO N. 


TANNER, A.B. 


TARTAGLIA, B.E 


Psychology 


Music 


Inglewood 


Los Angeles 


UD.S., 1, 2: W.A.A., 1, 2 


3; 


Philia; y.W.C.A. 





MARy ESTHER 
TAYLOR. B.E. 
Education 
Bakersfield 
Phrateres; V.W.C.A. 



VANCE LEONIDAS 
TEAGUE, JR., A.B. 

English 

Los Angeles 
Water Polo, I; Swimming. I. 




TILLMAN BERTRAND 
THOMAS. A.B. 

Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Kappa Alpha Psi. 



BARBARA LUCILLE 
THOMPSON, A.B. 
Art 

Los Angeles 



DOROTHEA 

THOMPSON. A.B. 

Psychology 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Gamma Delta; Spurs; 
A.5.U.C. Social Committee. 3, 
4; Southern Campus, 2, 3; Bruin 
I; A.W.5. Social Committee. 



MARGARET ALICE 

THOMPSON. B.E. 
Physical Education 
Los Angeles 

Alpha Gamma Delta; Phi Beta; 
Dance Recital. 2. 3. 4; W.A.A., 
I, 2. 3. 4, Board, 3. 



MARIE VICTORIA 

THOMPSON. B.E. 
Education 
Santa Monica 

Pi Kappa Sisma. 



ROBERT JOHN 

THOMPSON. JR., A.B. 

Chemistry 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Chi Sisma; Bruin, 2. 




TALLMAN HARLOW 


LAVERLE ETHEL 


EDGAR PAUL 


BILLyE ANDREWS 


FUJI 


CLETyS V. 


TRASK, JR., A.B. 


TREZISE, B.E. 


TROEGER, A.B. 


TROWBRIDGE, A.B. 


TSUMAGARI.B.S. 


TUCKER, B.E. 


Geology 


Music 


Chemistry 


Political Science 


Psychology 


Commerce 


Pasadena 


Los Angeles 


Santa Monica 


Long Beach 


San Diego 


Long Beach 


Delta Sigma Phi; Sigma Gam- 
ma Epsilon; Circle C; Soccer, 
2, 3, 4: Masonic Club, 4; Presi- 
dent, 5. 


Mu Phi Epsilon. 




Alpha Phi. 


Chi Alpha Delta. 


Alpha Chi Deita 



103 



JEAN 


MARGARET 






JANE ELIZABETH 






TAD EDWARD 






MAHITO 


STEPHEN GABRIEL 


TURK, A.B. 


TURNER, B.E. 






TUHLE, B.E, 






TWOMBLY, A.B. 






UBA, A.B. 


VALENSI,A,B. 


Political Science 


Education 






Education 






Geology 






Zoology 


Zoology 


Van Nuys 


Roscoe 






Ventura 






Los Angeles 






Los Angeles 


Beverly Hills 


A Capclla Choir, 2, 3. 


Phrateres; Masonic 
C.A.; Gcosraphic 


Club: y.w.- 

Society. 


Delta Zeta; Philia; 
Foundation, 


W 


csley 


Delta Sigma Phi; S 
ma Epsiion. 


gma 


Gam- 








DOROTHY MARGARET 
VERNON. A.B. 
English 

North hJoMywood 
Arcme; Masonic Club; Philia; 
y.W.C.A.; W.A.A.: Wesley 
Foundation. 



VIOLANTE 
VIANI. A.B. 
History 

Los Angeles 



HARRY BERNARD 

VICKMAN. A.B. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 
Ph. Beta Delta. 



MARJORIE EVA 
VINCENT, A.B. 
English 

Los Angeles 



EVELYN ATWELL 
VINTON, A.B. 

Political Science 

Los Angeles 



BETH 

VOLLSTEDT. B.E. 
Honnc Economics 

Los Angeles 



Phrateres; Prytanean; Labor Alpha Delta P>: A.S.U.C. So- 

Board Chairman, 4; Student cial Committee; W.A.A., I ; 

Council, 4; y.W.C.A., 2, Cabi- Home Economics Club. 
net, 3. 4. 



That path between the Zetc house and the 
bookstore has been worn by Crossan Hays. 
Won't admit he's a Zete, but he's an athlete, 
which proves it. Finished his basketball eligibility 
last year, so we don't know why he's hanging 
around. Looks studious here, but it's just a pose. 





MILTON 

WALDMAN, A.B. 
Psychology 

Los Angeles 


MARGARET DOUBLER 
WALLACE, B,E. 
Education 

Los Angeles 


ARTHUR WELDON 
WALSH, A,B. 

Political Science 

Mina, Nevada 




CHARLES FRANCIS 
WARD, JR., B.S. 
Accounting 

Los Angeles 


Sigma Alpha Mu. 


Gamma Phi Beta; Class Coun- 
cil, 1, 2, 3, 4; W.A.A.: 
y.W.C.A. 


Alpha Tau Omega; C 
Class Council, 4; Base 
2; 145-Lb. Basketball, 3, 


rcle C; 
ball, 1, 
4, 


Alpha Kappa Psi; y.M.C.A 
Co-op Housing Association. 




KATHERINE 




LETA FRANCES 




RICHARD WHITSITT 


JANE LOUISE 


WAV, B,E. 




WEAVER, A.B. 




WEBBER, A.B. 


WEBER, BE. 


Education 




English 




English 


Education 


San Bernardino 




Glendale 




Los Angeles 


Santa Monica 


Sigma Kappa; Ki-Pri 


C.T.A. 


Alpha Phi; Spurs; Southern 
Campus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Homecom- 
ing Committee, 4; Y.W.C.A. 




Chi Omega; Southern Campus, 
2, 3, 4, 5; Bruin, 2, 3; A.W.S. 
Hello Day Committee; A.W.S. 
Christmas Dance Committee. 



104 




SUSAN MARION 
: VAN D/KE, A.B. 
History 
Los Angeles 
Kappa Alpha Thcta, 
: Board; Asathii; Spurs: Guidon; 
i Class Council, I, 2, 3. Vice- 
1 Prcs.. 4; Homecoming, 3. 4. 



ROBERT GREENE 

VAN METER. A.B. 
English 
Los Angeles 
Mortar Sphinx Club- 



MURIEL E. 

VAN PATTEN, A.B. 

Political Science 

Hollywood 
Philia; Elections Board, 4; 
Homecoming. Secretarial Com 
mittee. 4; Dance Recital. 3. 
A.W.S. Secretarial Committee. 



PAULINE GRACE 

VARNEY. B.E. 

Physical Education 

North Hollywood 
W.A.A.; Physical Education 
Club; A.W.S. Hi-Jinks Com- 
mittee. 




GLADYS 
VOVDA, A.B. 
English 

Van Nuys 

Kappa Delta; U.D.S.. I, 
Bruin. 4; Class Council. 
y.W.C.A.. I. 2; W.A.A., 
A.W.S. Council. 2. 



HUGH A. 


MARY JANE 






FRANCIS BROWN 


WAGNER, A.B. 


WAGNER, B.E. 






WAI, B.S. 


Zoology 


Education 






Economics 


Los Angeles 


Brawley 






Honolulu, T. H. 




Kappa Delta; Brum, 


3; H 


ome 


Blue C; Football. 3. 4; Track 


• 


coming, 3. 






3, 4; Rugby, 3, 4. 




Debonair Sam North usually tromps around with 
saber and spurs jangling to prove he's in the 
army. We don't know which came first. Sigma 
Nu or the army, but they're practically insep- 
arable and Sam is no exception. Looks like a 
gentleman, which sets him apart from the other 
brethren. 




JANET ELIZABETH 
WARD, A.B. 

Economics 
Los Angeles 
Delta Gamma; Guidon. 



BETH GWENDOLYN 
WATKINS, B.E. 

Art 

Los Angeles 
Sigma Kappa; Philokalia. 



MARY ELIZABETH 
WATKINS. B.E. 
Commerce 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Omicron Pi; Alpha Chi 
Delta; Areme. 



ETHEL GLADSTONE 
WATT. A.B. 

Spanish 
Long Beach 



CHARLES PRIESTLEY 
WAITERS. A.B. 
History 

Sacramento 

Sigma Pi; Wrestling. 2, 
Skiing. 2. 3, 4, Captain, 



3. 4: 



MARTHA LOIS 
WAUGH. A.B. 
French 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Kappa Alpha 




JOHNSHOUSE 




ANNA-MARIE 


EHAELISE 


DOROTHY EVELYN 


GRAEME PERRY 




SPENCER MORRILL 


WEBER, A.B. 




WEDEMEYER, A.B. 


WEDEMEYER. B.E. 


WEINER, A.B. 


WELCH, A.B. 




WERNER. A.B. 


Zoology 




English 


Education 


History 


Chemistry-Physics 




Political Science 


Lomita 




Long Beach 


Long Beach 


Balboa 


Hollywood 




Los Angeles 


Delta Sigma Phi; 


Masonic 






Phratcrcs Council. 


Alpha Chi Sigma; Radio 


Club; 


Circle C; Ball and Chain; Call 


Club; Basketball. 










Masonic Club; Band. 




fornia Men; Fencing. 1, 2. 3. 



105 



MILDRED MARIE 
WEST, B.E. 
Commerce 

Anaheim 

Alpha Chi Delta; Westwood 
Club. 



JANICE MAY 
WHALEN, B.E. 

Education 

Oxnard 
Pi Lambda Theta; 
Society. 



Gcosraphic 



CLELLAND A. 

WHARTON, B.S. 
Accountins 
San Diego 

Tennis, 5. 



BETTy 
WHIDDEN,B.E. 

Physical Education 

Van Nuys 
Phi Beta; Morlar Board: 
A. A.; Dance Recital, I, 2, 



W.- 
3, 4. 



HELEN ROSE 

WHITE, A.B. 

History 

Beverly Hills 

Gamma Phi Beta; Sigma Alpha 
lota. 



BEVERLY RUTH 
WHITED, B.E. 
Education 

Inglewood 

Kappa Delta; Campus Cap- 
ers, 4. 




ASCHER 
WILK. A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 
A.S.U.C. Peace Council; 
chestra. 



VIRGINIA LEE 
WILKINSON, B.E. 
Education 

Beverly Hills 

Delta Delta Delta; Pi Lambda 
Theta; Spurs; Prytanean; Mortar 
Board; A.W.S. Council; V.W,- 
C.A. 



HELEN DOLORES 
WILLEFORD, B.E. 

Education 
Downey 
Phratcrcs Council, 4. 



MARY MARTHA 
WU.LENBORG, B.E. 
Home Economics 

Los Angeles 



Bob Streeton pulls a mighty sweep on the crew, 
but we think this rowing stuff is a lot of ballona. 
Tried to be a politician, but ran into several 
serious snags, one being, of course, that he let 
the Phi Kap's rope him in. Parlts his number I2's 
there and eats like nothing human. 




BARBARA ELEANOR 
WILLIAMS, A.B. 
History 

Pasadena 
Kappa Alpha Theta; P. 
lenic Council, 4. 



DEAN D. 
WILLIAMS, A.B. 

Chemistry 

Sprague, Washington 
Theta Chi; Alpha Phi Omega: 
Circle C; CroSS-Country, > ; 
Rifle, I. 




HAROLD DUANE 




GERALDINEM. 




WINEGAR, B.E. 




WODARS, B.E. 




Education 




Art 




Los Angeles 




Taft 




A Capella Choir, 4; 


Glee 


Alpha Omicron Pi 


Philokal 


Club, 4. 




Dance Recital, 1; 
1, 2- 


Swimmi^ 




PETER TAMIO 
YAMAZAKI. A.B. 

Economics 

Los Angeles 
Japanese Bruin Club; Homc- 
comins Commrttee, Chairman 
Cement C. 



ELISABETH ANN 
YEOMAN, B.S. 

Home Economics 

Los Angeles 
Alpha Gamma Delta; Home 
Economics Club; y.W.C.A., I, 
2; A.W.S. Committees, 3, 4. 



106 




JOHN HERBERT 
WIESE. A.B. 

Geology 

Hollywood 
S g~a Gamma Epsilon. 



BARBARA AILEEN 
WIGHT. B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 
Aloha Gamma Delta; Phi Beta; 
W.A.A.. President. 4; Mortar 
Board; Dance RecitaL 



THELMA JOSEPHINE 
WILCOX, B.E. 
Education 

Glendale 
Pi Kappa Sigma. 





This is a typical picture of Clarence (ugh!) 
"Spike" Honig. As you can see, his mouth is 
open and he Is talking hke a loudspeaker. Put 
on a fine Men's Week when all men dressed 
like tramps. Honig didn't have to dress up. 



JOHNCOPELAND 




ROXANA VIRGINIA 




FRANCES AUDREY 


WILLIAMS. A.B. 




WILSON. B.E. 




WINDLER, B.E. 


Economics 




Commerce 




Commerce 


Los Angeles 




Corning 




Manhattan Beach 


P-,i Delta Thcta: Pi Kappa Dcl- 

*3- Fencing, 3. 4; Debate 

:-d. 3. 4; Forensics Board. 


Alpha Chi Delta; Phrateres; 
Philia; W.A.A.; Wesley Foun- 
dation. 


Phi Chi Theta. 




STELLA MAE 






RUTH ANITA 






HAROLD THOMAS 


MARY ALICE 


WOLD, B.E. 






WOLFORD, A.B. 






WOODALL A.B. 


WRIGHT, A.B. 


Education 






Sociology 






Zoology 


Zoology 


Montebello 






Los Angeles 






Long Beach 


Pasadena 


Pi Lambda Theta; 


Luther 


Club; 


Kappa Alpha Phi 


So 


jthern 




Phrateres. 



Geographic Society; German Campus. I; Bruin. I; Philia; 



GAIL BOYD 
WYATT, B.E. 

Physical Education 

Los Angeles 

Phi Epsilon Kappa; Blue 
Track, 3. 



MAY AYAKO 

YAMASAKI, A.B. 
Sociology 
Los Angeles 

Chi Alpha Delta; 

y.W.C.A. 



W.A.A.; 



CLb. 



A.W.S. Vocational Guidance, I. 








JOHN ALEXANDER 
YEOMAN, A.B. 

Physics 

Los Angeles 




BARBARA HAZEL 
YERBY, B.E. 

Education 

Bishop 


GERTRUDE 
YOUNG, B.E. 
Educatiori 
Honolulu, T.H 


Physics Society, 3, 4; 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 


Radio 


Gamma Phi Beta. 





^M^^ "^ 


w T 


L*"' 




9ik^ 


3j 


► ^ 






■»" 




^ ^^ 


w 


di 


'^A 


CLARA THERESA 
YOUNGER, A.B. 


JOHN J. 
ZABY, B.E. 






AVALYN LOUREE 
ZIMMERMAN, A.B. 


Zoclooy 

Burbank 


Mechanic 

Los Ange 


Arts 

es 




Economics 

Wichita, Kansas 




Blue C; Football, 2, 3, 4 


Base- 





ball, 2, 3, 4; Greek Drama, 3. 



107 




The happy smiles are signs of relief for having completed the plar^s for the Junior Prom. Treasure Patten was so startled by the sunlight that 
he forgot to open his eyes. The photographer, however, came to his ,r^5c,M?,^r)<i sinc^ thp^n he has been Icnpwrv as "^^^^ 





First row: Nichols, Barsky, Stewart, Clark, Park, O'Flaherty, Deulerman, Worth. Second row: Freear, Hall, Ration, Lewis, Jacobucci, Gil- 
more, M. Thomas, B. Thomas, Oliver, Gillette. Third row: W. Thomas, Forney, Walther, Pync, Vasilopolis, Froiseth, Yager, Fourth row: 
Sutton, Puthoff, Ward, Brown, A. Stewart, Mclnyk, Currran, Hurd, Morris. Fifth row: Deverc, Flowers, McCormick, Gannon, Reynolds, Eddy, 
Brcen, Kindel, Sprecher, Schrcck, Thorson. 




Twenty years from now, when you are reminiscing 
over your carefree days as a college junior, this is 
the picture you will recall when you read the old 
1940 Southern Campus. The first important event 
was welcoming into office the new class executives. 
You proudly presented as president a likeable fellow 
named Ray Gillette. Peggy Stewart, Kay Lewis, and 
Dick Patton were other luminaries. Not to be out- 
done by the lower classmen, juniors sponsored the 
new custom of "dirty cords Wednesday". The event 
of events was the colossal Junior Prom, where a few 
jitterbugs jittered and all paid homage to Terpsi- 
chore, ruler of the evening. Thus the fun, frolic, and 
festivities of the class of '41 became history. 
















<■>.•■. 







This treat was on President Bob Alshuicr. Treasurer Al Paquin advised ccono-ny; therefore, the community "coitc". The coke streamed away 
under forced draft as soon as this picture was snapped. Mary Magee and Mary Frances Ricltershauser drank down more than their share 
with all the speed of a Jackie Robinson 60-yard dash. 






Row I: Sinclair, Corrick, Thornburg, Gillespie, Magee, Rickershauser, Entriken, Perry, Spensky, Gibson, Morissey, Wadsworlh. Row II: Baschelis, 
Elam, Renfro, Wilkie, Codd, Black, Buff, Imon, Lyford, Kallejian, Jones, Coyle, Gold, Amiand, Webb. Row III: Simons, Veni. Lloyd, 
Gregg, Ballyntine, Holberton, Ross, Purkiss, Howard, Alshuler, Woodill, Paquin, Hill, Green, Morehart, Sale, McKee, Gelder, Rea. 
Row IV: Cerro, Neely, Johnson, McDaniels, Applefield, Yanamura, Wichman, Katiman, Fields, Moore, Frames, Hock, Files, Merrilt. 




Recipe for success: — Take a capable president 
like Bob Alshuler, a vice-president like Mary Frances 
Rickershauser; Mary Magee for secretary and Al 
Paquin for treasurer — mix them with a couple of 
thousand enthusiastic sophs — the result is a good 
class. For color throw in a victorious brawl (the 
frosh lost, 2-0); for spice add one large barn dance 
with plenty of straw and corny music. To keep things 
rolling, whip in a skating party. For a lasting flavor 
stir in a few pinches of tradition such as formal attire 
once a week, featuring red hair ribbons, T shirts, and 
blue jeans. For decoration, a blue and gold "C" 
guarded by the 42-ers. The finished product is one 
grand sophomore class. 




Spring Js here! And the thoughts of the Freshman officers lightly turn away from wmtcr-long problems. Here they are, left to right: Bctt^ 
Stacy, Secretary; Bob Hine, President; Pat Scott, Vice-President; and Max Dunn, Treasurer. They have really started the new class off with e 
bang, even taking advantage of the calendar by giving a Leap Year Dance for their constituents. They deserve a rest in the sun after the 
hard work. 




112 




Left to tight, (ini row: Hober, Zingley, Dunn, McManus, Lawhead, Scott, Urion, Stacy, Locke, Wurtz. Second row: Boyden, 
Harris, Hayes, Schwabacher, Paul, Thrift, Darbyshire, Derrah, Dreusike, Hulbert, Ware, Trueblood, Hull, Coburn. Third row: Sick- 
enger, Kittrelle, Rounsavelle, Dunn, Gilchrist, Doe, Edmislon, Daggett, Freutel, Hine, Williams, Gillette, Smith, Brubaker, Hutchins, 
Well, Johnston, McNicol, Van Dlssen, Farrar, Rydell, Collins, Dancer, Thomas, Morris. 




September 18, 1939. Flash! Two thousand fresh- 
men were born to U.C.L.A. Still sasping for their 
first breath, the youngsters began to break in their 
hitherto unused vocal chords. The result — head 
yeller, Bob Hine; Pat Scott to substitute if Bob's 
voice gave out; Betly Stacy, recorder; and Max 
Dunn, the lad who cried for dues. The babes got 
their first baths in the mud with the sophs as nurses. 
Undaunted, the kids adjusted their blue and gold 
bonnets and set to work, making fun, tradition, and 
history. Highlight on the fun list was the Leap Year 
dance, when the girls popped the question. Frosh 
Wednesday, the day for green hair ribbons and 
dinks, became tradition. Life began in 1940! 




A group of the bonfire vigilantes woke up long enough to see the birdie 




Behind the milce you see Stu (Bob Trout) Wilson. 1 'ear you 
talking McCune is busy calling for the next performer. 



It's true that some people on campus really enter into things 
but when they go Hawaiian for the Pajamerino, that's showing 
real spirit 



This is not a surrealist's idea of Ford car but it is an example 
of what goes on in the annual Soph-Frosh Brawls. The Sophs 

won. 



-U;L(XyC(Jj2^ 




, s cramming time once again and 
the glory of the house average 
must be maintained 



Up on the hills of Westwood the Big Blue C is taking shape 





As u;ual the women congregate in the corner to solve world problems 




Above: While the resl of the world gaped in amazement, 
ambitious Uclans photographed the eclipse 



Center: The road to Mandalay is forsaken for the dance floor 
which leads only in many circles 



Right: Finding themselves novices at horseback riding co-eds 
seek comfort in haystack at Tally's ranch 



hcUA/CxXjZy 





^^ 



;--^ 




m^ 






IDIVISIO^S 
CATIONS • 



• - PUBLICATIONS • FINE ARTS • HONORARIES • PUBLICATIONS 

HONORARIES • PUBLICATIONS • FINE ARTS • HONORARIES • PU 

FINE ARTS • HONORARIES • PURLICATIONS ■ FINE ARTS • HON 



PUBllCATIONi; BOilltD 




Left to risht, standing: Tom Freear, James Osgood. Boy d Harris, Bob Meldrum. Bruce Cassiday. Joe Osherenlto. 
Seated: Frank Simons, Diclt Pryne. 



The Publications Board, theoretically a policy-determinin3 body and a filler of positions 
on the Bruin and the Southern Campus, this year determined no policies and filled no posi- 
tions. With a fine disregard for the authority of the Board, the Student Council deter- 
mined policies and made Bruin appointments right and left. This left the Publications Board 
free to spend its meetings arguing over the difference between news and publicity, while 
its members variously slept, smiled, hurled insults and waved banners for the freedom of 



the press. 



U.C.L.A.'s first director of Pub- 
lications, Joe R. Osherenko, who 
rounds out ten years of service to 
the University, pictured with his 
assistant Alice Tildcn. 




122 




123 




FRANK S 1 M M 



• • 



EDITOR 




James Osgood 
Associate Editor 




The Southern Campus staff's routine: 

8- — Study hall for staff nnennbers. 

9 — Phone rings; no one to answer. 
10 — Study with color; open Bruins. 
I I — Books in office, owners in Co-op. 
12— Out to lunch till 2. 

2 — Relaxation after a sturdy academic day. 

3 — Stooges, telephones, cigarette butts. 

A — Coca Colas, typewriters, sales books. 

5 — The ambitious still work. Aw nuts.'*!? 




T 



F R E E A R 



ONAGER 




Senior Reservations 




ROBERT MELDRUM 



USOCUTE MUUER 




Barbara BcHin — Assistant Editoi 



Jean Traughbcr — Assistant Editor 



126 





^ 




HAP FRASER • ARTIST B I LL J H N K E • P H T G R A P H E R 




Gay Pryor — Publicity 



Lorraine HofFman — Office 



Joe Jacobucci — Statistician 



127 



Photographers, first row: Covey. Rosemont. 
Kincheloe. Second row: Fisher, Thompson, 
Johnke. 




Social Staff: Jack Gilchrist, Leonard Rocsl, Bclh Anne 
Stevens, Virginia Scolt, Bill Anderson. 



Activities Staff: Peggy McConville, Helen Jo McDaniel, 
Mary Frances Rickershauser, Ellen Grace Pope. 



128 




jniel, Georgie Randle, Steve Melnylt. Stand- 
in-; Peggy McConville. Robin Lyford, Jo Anne 
Hollister. 

: Staff, seated: Henry, Randle, Hoffman, Rucgt 
,. Standing: Ralliff, Barueh, McManus, War- 
-cgar. Anderson, Morse, Smith. 

~''--nijations StafF: first row: Paquin, Sutton, Macrae, 

-n, Garlinghouse, Mitchell. Second row: Wolf, 

- d. Tuchscherer, Bohlken, Kraemer, Whitledge. Third 

ow: Karl. Prescott, Partridge, Ridgley, Birsic, Smith, 

homas. 



Left to right: Hanford Files, Joe Howse, Helen Jo 
McDaniel. Bill Duddleson, Gordon Hewson. 



129 




SHFORO MH^ 



EDIIOR, 1st SEMESTER 




DAIIY 

Masthead mention goes to Bruin Big Shots: 

Editors Sandy Mock; Dick Pryne 

Managers .... Harry Landis; Boyd hiarris 

Asst. Ed Dick Pryne; Sandy Mock 

Managing Ed . Michela Robbins; Cassiday 
Adv. Ed. . . . Boyd hiarris; hiarry Landis 

Sports Milt Cohen 

Features .... Gene Jacobson; John Kulli 

Women's Page Serrie Griffith 

Men's Page . . E. Markowitz, N. Glickman 



Michaeta Robbins 
Managins Editor 



Bruce Cassiday 
Managing Editor 



130 





RICHHD PYR^E 



EDITOR, Znd SEMESTER 



BRUN 



As the cub learns his newspaper lingo — 
the social life of a Bruin butterfly is not 
necessarily that of a night editor; proof is 
not a good excuse for mamrna, nor are low 
bases scoundrels. Deadlines are not firing 
squads; galleys, butler's pantries; nor sliced 
stories, Co-op specials. Column rules are 
not the dictates of the press, and even a 
slug is not a snail in every walk of life. 




Gene jacobson 
Feature Editor 



John Kulli 
Feature Editor 



131 




HHRY lyois 



• ■ 



yUEK, 1st !;[^UHK 





v 1 



U\[\ 

The Bruin journalist is the man with tele- 
type jitters and typewriter phobia, hie is a 
diplomat with a good story, an apt lead, 
and an "in" with Sally White, hie visits art 
exhibits and lectures, interviews profs, and 
scoops the dirt and dope for the daily 
news. Attending classes when not "sitting 
on the desk," he also acquires a liberal edu- 
cation, together with a more profane use 
of the English language. 



Milt Cohen 
Sports Editor 



Paula Berman 
National Advertising 



132 




BO ID HARRIS 



Mi\UbtK, ^nd UiViUTER 



BRUli 



Headlines of the year — 'U.C.L.A. Voted 
Country Club Collese.' Freedom of the 
Press Threatened by O.C.B. Censorship.' 
'Minority Problems Attacked by Press.' 
'Bruins Skin Bears In hHomecoming Game.' 
'Suppression Of Civil Liberties Accused.' 
'100,000 Students Vote Against War In 
National Peace Poll.' 'Of Thee I Sing, Musi- 
cal Hit.' 'Moral Uprising Over Philoso- 
pher's Ethics.' — and — 'Student Elections 
Brings Record Vote.' 




Gerne Griffith 
Women's Page Editor 

133 



Ernie Markowitz 
Men's Page Editor 




BRUli 



Mtn's Pagi staff, left to right, standing: 
Norm Glickman. Bill Wilson, Joe Schrecter. 
Seated: Bill Duddleson. Betty Tremaine, 
Betty BIy. Lenny Safir. 



Business staff, left to right, standing: Joe Schechter, Betty BIy, Ray 
Seymour Knee. Sealed: Boyd Harris, Ernie Markowitr. 



134 




Women's Page staff, left to right, standing: Peggy Secor, Betty 

Tremalne, Camilla Johnson, Florence Rosenberg, Ann Hoffman, 

Virginia Grace, Tony Birsic, Marjoric Heyman. Seated: Harriettc 
Luke, Gcrrie Griffith. 



135 



A.':. 









Left to right, seated: Bruce Matchette, Fred Bruderlin, Caroline Entriken. 
Standing: Grant Shepard. Don Ewing, Jack Morrison. 



138 



l[ BOURCEOlii CEHIIHOMME 




Starting at the bottom of the picture and working 
clockwise, we find Betty Gray Bowling, Ruth Pottle, 
Mary Welch, Stuart Wilson, and Boice Richardson, 



Moliere's comedy, "Le Bourgeois Gentil- 
homme," was the traditional fall All-U play, 
and second in the series of Great Comedies 
presented on campus. Produced by the com- 
bined work of six departments, it was given 
in realistic 17th century style, the actors em- 
ploying the Comedy-Ballet technique. Mary 
Welsh and Fred Devenney played opposite 
each other in the title roles, with romantic 
leads portrayed by Ruth Pottle and Boice Rich- 
ardson, low comedy by Betty Gray Bowling 
and Stu Wilson. Beverly Gardiner and Bruce 
Matchette added suave sophistication to the 
four well-attended performances. 



Umpire Wilson dusts off home plate with an appraising glance as Betty Gray 
Bowling grimaces in excruciating agony. It's a quaint way these French have 
of playing baseball. 



139 



[ 



T H [ [ 




BcHer Buy Buick — And vote for Wintergreen! Jackie 
Cooper models the latest in 1940 chasses for "Of 
Thee I Sing" publicity 



The Senator from the South receives that feminine 
touch from flirt Diana Devereaux. Jealous Janes 
sniff disdainfully 



140 



s 



N 



i; 



"Of Thee I Sin3," the bissest musical com- 
dy presented at any Pacific coast college, 

-rossed both more money and large audiences 
lan any previous campus show. A 
on staff of more than 250 people played to 

: matinee crowd of 1,200 March 20th, and 
vo full houses the 22nd and 23rd — a success 

■ hich paved the way for future campus pro- 

■uctions. A political satire, "Of Thee I Sing," 
as a rather timely revival in the midst of both 
ampus and national campaigning for the 1940 




Running on a double ticket for Mr. and Mrs. President, John and Mar/ embrace for purely platonic and political reasons 



141 




Left to right, Front Row: Bob Diclterman, George Oliver, Louanne Nutt 
Martin Bordon. Back Row: John Williams, John Vrba 



BATE 
BAM 




Left to risht. Front Row: Kane, Swabaclter, Weinstein, Grodiins, Pius, Aschcim. 
Back Row: Borenstein, Levi.ne, Barker, Hirsch, Goldstein, Brooks 



Forensics students put in a 
good word or two for the Uni- 
versity during the past academic 
year. The season was opened 
by the Cal-U.C.LA. debate 
over C.B.S. during hlomecoming 
Week, and climaxed by an 
All-U Extemp contest in the 
spring. At long last the Asso- 
ciated Students had their say- 
so. Inter-collegiate competition 
was held with all representative 
West Coast colleges in debate, 
oratory, and extemporaneous 
speech. The Championship was 
lost to S.C. in the L.A.C.C. 
Tournament, but U.C.L.A. ran a 
close second, and won first 
laurels for panel discussion at 
the Stockton meet, most impor- 
tant event of the year. 



142 



SQUAD 
SQUAD 
SQUAD 
SQUAD 





SQUAD 
SQUAU 



Forensics Board, seated: Kaiser, Long, Oliver, Everett, Moeller. Standing: 
Glickman, Moore, Friedman, Vrba, Rudin, Williams, Dickerman, Bordon, Sko- 
lovsky, Irvin, McCune, Magce. 



It can always be said of Forensics Board chairman 
George Oliver that he means well. His perpetual 
grin proves that. 




James Murray, Coach 



Wesley Lewis, Coach 




Dtu. MC imiui; 



R 



L a 



1 i 



A N I S T 



Ninety members struck up the band for U.C.L.A. and 
the football season. Resardless of Saturday mornins re- 
hearsals, stunt and march practice, the boys turned out to 
cheer and watch the team fight on for victories. But the 
Santa Clara half-time stunt almost stole the glory when 
the band did a take-off on the team, the tuba player 
fainted, and a substitute was called in. Also sharing honors 
was fourteen year old mascot Jimmy Casebier, California 
state champion and Bruin drum major. The basketball and 
ice hockey seasons saw a smaller, more dispirited turn-out, 
both for the score boards and the band boys. Practice 
for the Spring Concert and the National Music Festival 
began early in the year; and what with All-U Sings and 
other campus affairs which required their turn-out, the 
boys did a pretty good job of tooting their horns for 
Leroy Allen, director of the band. 



The band, noted for rts smoothly executed marching maneuvers, was 
hampered at the Oregon game by the valiant efforts of the Spurs 
to form a duck in the middle of the field. The whole idea, which 
was the inspiration neither of the band nor of the Spurs, laid an 
egg, but the duck was not even recognizable. 




BAND 



"Through the tunnel at the west end of the Coliseum comes the Bruin Band!" Here they are, ladies 
and gentlemen, the men who made those words ring out 



145 




i;l[[ clubs 



The Men's and Women's Glee Clubs 
kept in good voice for the season's 
programs. Extending their repertoire 
for the Folk Festival, spring Glee Club 
contest at Occidental, spring concert, 
and the May Day Open hlouse, the 
combined Glees also participated in 
many other campus muslcales. Re- 
hearsal hours were offset by social 
hours, hay-rides and banquets. Perhaps 
it was the spirit of glee that prevailed 
when members went Christmas carol- 
ing in the University library and were 
promptly ejected. 




The Women's Glee Club, led by Stella Kilmer as president and Ray 
Moreman as director, has been unusually good this year because they 
have practiced singing with the Men's Glee Club on hayrides. 



146 




Since the band gets all the glory, few people knov/ that U.C.L.A. also possesses a fine orchestra, 
which is directed by Leroy Allen. Always highly competent, the group has been particularly well-rounded 
this year because of additions to the brass and wood-wind sections. Unusual is the fact that most of 
the musicians are soloists in their own right, as well as being capable ensemble players. 



hlighlighting a successful season for 
the A Cappella Choir was the Christmas 
Concert which attracted an enthusiastic 
audience in Royce Hall Auditorium. 
Under the direction of Ray Moreman, 
the group, besides its campus activities, 
assisted in the church services through- 
out Southern California. For singing at 
such occasions, the choir has received "" 
much favorable comment. 






Ethel Bartlctt and Rac Robertson combine their personal careers 
as man and wife with their musical careers as the outstanding 
artists in the two-piano field. 



On its first trip to the Pacific Coast, the Westminster Chorus of Westminster 
College sang before an appreciative audience in Royce Hall. The mixed chorus 
of forty singers, directed by Dr. John Finley Williamson, its founder, has been 



CONCERT 



U.C.L.A. coeds, practically over- 
whelmed by Nino Martini's slick 
good looks, were also impressed by 
his smooth tenor voice. 



December brought enchanting Bra- 
zilian soprano Bidu Sayao as a 
Christmas present for a large 
Roycc Hall audience. 





ims^ 



? ■Mi'^ 



'^1 « t 

1 «. % -^ 



b^i'P^-it 



J," 



» 




giving concerts for fifteen years and is widely acclaimed as one of the finest 
9roups of its kind in the world. Its repertoire included music both modern and 
classic, sacred and secular. 



Raya Garbousova, an artist of long year: of professional experi- 
ence, though she is not yet thirty, is considered one of the fine:t 
living virtuosos of the cello. 



S [ II 



[ S 




Angna Enters, a master in the field 
of dance- mimicry, fascinated her 
U.C.LA. audience with her vivid 
characterizations. 



Donald Dickson, first heard pub- 
licly seven years ago, sang in Roycc 
hall in March, coming directly from 
radio successes. 



i 



u 





Wt}->^^''-': 



.-.7r><.V^» 











Exie Stevens 
President 



AlPHA C 



Alpha Chi Alpha serves as the University's na- 
tional honorary journalism fraternity for women. Eli3i- 
ble for membership are women who work on the 
Daily Bruin or Southern Campus. Fol!owin3 up its 
purpose, the organization holds luncheon meetings 
at which speakers from the downtown newspapers 
appear. 



UPHA 




Left to right, first row, Actives: Eleanor Argula, Betty Bcal, Jeanne DeGarmo, Gerric Griffith, Claire Hanson, Frances Koch. Second row: Mary 
Lcc McClellan, Masie Ragan, Michela Robbins, Jody Sirdivan, Exic Stevens, Ann Thclmc. Third row: Jean Traughbcr. Pledges: Pauta Bcrnnan, 
Norcnc Brownson, Margaret Franic, Mary Jo Funlt. Helen Tyre. Not pictured: Actives: Frances Gold, Flora Lewis, Cecelia Myers. Pledges: Clair 
Cox, Helen Schneider. 

152 




Left to right, first row: Charlotte Bcrmcl, Winifred Caridis, Virginia Champney, Margaret Chisholm. Marianne Francis. Second row, Vivja Hagcy, 
Helen Icke, Wilma Jones, Elizabeth Kiocltsiem. Ruth Loyan, Viola Mettler. Third row: Charlotte Moeller. Julia Richter, Virginia Schmissrautcr. 
Cletys Tucltcr, Marie West, Roxanna Wilson. Not pictured: Margaret Carrigan, June Carrothers, Virginia Doe-r, Lorena Hickey, Rilla Knapp. 
Jane Laurent, Vaughn Shipley, Mary Watklns, Lucilc Weigman, Jo Anne Schnnissrauster. 



niPHii n 



D[IU 



Alpha Chi Delta is the professional economic or- 
ganization for women. The group is made up of 
majors in the departments of economics, commerce, 
and the College of Business Administration. Regular 
meetings and discussions are the major functions of 
this honorary. 



Wilma Jones 
President 




I S3 




Left to right, first row, ^Actives: Slen Corwin, Carl Falk. Howard Fife. Howard Grekel, John Hanson, WcHiam Hanson. Second row: Harold 
Marsh, Richard Mertes, Robert Moffit. John Roberts, Robert Thompson, Graeme Welch. Not pictured. Actives: Robert Brown, Harry Burford, 
Robert Carter. George Caylor, Edwin Duncan, Orrin Gilbert, Payson Gump. Pete Heussenstamm, Victor Kolb, William McMillan. Gordon 
Niclclin. John Piatt. David Shepherd, Frank Walker, Irving Webb. Pledge: David Hagmann. 



HIPHU CH 



m 





Alpha Chi Sigma, chemistry professional fra- 
ternity, is an organization that actually performs the 
functions for which it was originated. That is, it aids 
the advancement of chemistry. This is done in part 
by tutoring freshmen chemistry majors and the giv- 
ing of competitive examinations for prizes. Coming 
out from behind their cloud of H.,S once a year, 
the group gives a very successful dance. 



William Hanson 
President 



154 



The national women's professional education fra- 
ternity, Alpha Sigma Alpha, is composed of those 
women who plan to continue in the career of teach- 
ing in either elementary or secondary schools. All 
the organization's activities are directed toward the 
advancement of modern methods of education. 



UPHU 




Eleanor Bohn 
President 




kim 




Left to right, first row: Patricia Arndt, Eleanor Bohn, Dorothy Brown, Barbara Chldester, Jane Christensen. Second row: Lois Downey, Juanita 
Hemperley, Marian Lee Jones, Lois Lyie, Betty Lou Rose, Esther Zager. Not pictured, Actives: Loree Denton, Ruth Plues. Pledges: Jeanne 
Beswetherick, Edna Calvert, Jane Jackson, Francine Lonnbard, Gwendolyn Rittcr, Dolores Simms. 



155 




Alpha Kappa Psi, formed in 1905, is the oldest 
and larsest professional business fraternity in the 
U.S. One of the most active of the honoraries, A K 
Psi holds bi-monthly meetinss in which the problems 
of modern business are discussed, and solutions of 
them presented. Also desiring to have social events 
for its members, Alpha Kappa Psi holds a dance for 
the membership every semester. 



Sumner Hatch 
President 



upy yppn n 




Left to right, first row: Robert Anderson, Donald Bailey, Zan Ballsun. Second row: Harvey Gilmer, Loren Grisct, Virgil Ham, Malcolm Hand, 
Boyd Harris, Sumner Hatch, James Hutchinson. Third row: John Kuiti, Arl McCormiclc, Stephen Mclnylt, Donald Nelson, Samuel North, Donald 
Pratt, Richard Raven. Fourth row: Earl Schcrff. Donald Shaw, John SIcrifvars, Samuel Stumpf, Dicltinson Thatcher, Carl Thomas, Charles Ward. 
Not pictured. Actives: Al Beclt, Norton Beach, Richard Bodinus, Charles Brinton, Robert Brose, Leiand Dye, Douglas Harrison, Robert Harvey, 
Arthur Hauschild, Donald Marsh, Carl McBain, Carl Smith, William Sundcrman, Jack Tarr. 

156 




Left to right, first row: Ruth Andrews, Ruth Castlcberry, Elizabeth Clayson. Second row: Nancy Clayson, Mabel Connett, Margaret 
Corbell, Barbara Doss, Olga Fitipatriclt. Lucille Garrin, Nancy Garrison, Anne Gyle. Third row: Betty Haddock, Violet Hardies, Merle Harp, 
Lorna Irvjn, Julia Belle Kegley, Mary May, Lois Niemoeller, Barbara Nye. Fourth row: Sally O'Dell, Elaine Otter, Phyllis Roduncr, Ruth Souders, 
Virginia Stone, Dorothy Vernon, Betty Wells, Lenore Wilcox. Not pictured: Dorothy Amis, Marian Beardslcy, Constance Bell, Margaret Bradley, 
Mary Brown, Eleanor Campbell, Jean Clarke, Marian Cole, Peggy Crowl, Emeral Drummond, Margery Fabrey, Dorothy Fickcs, Frances Foster, 
Charlotte George, Marguerite Glaze. Pat Hoeland, Frances Jamison, Eunice Jones, Allean Kcaney, Dorothy Kanp, Margaret McLeod, Pat Manning, 
Mary Mcakcr, Mae Nye, Barbara Page, Charlote Parsons, Betty Raish, B. J. Robertson, Nclda Row, M. E. Springer, Betty Vellom, Mary Wat- 
kins, Mary Welch. 



A 



R 



[ 



M 



[ 



Areme is a group of fifty young women with 
Masonic affiliation. The purpose of the group is to 
foster better relationships between women on cam- 
pus who have connections in Masonry. The principal 
aims of Areme are social and philanthropic. The 
organization sponsors bi-monthly dances, two im- 
portant date dances, and several Sunday evening 
teas. 



Betty Haddock 
President 




157 




Left to right, first row: Helen Biclcfofd. Virginia Booher, Esther Brewster. Miriam Brown, Virginia Brown, Margaret Ericson, Geraldinc Fitzgerald, 
Second row: Marilaine Frey, Eloise Hunt, Dorothy King, Pauline Mann, Betlye O'Dell, Edith Phillips, Frances Rippeto, Earleen Sauls. Third 
row: Jeanne Schuiz, Wijfrie Schuiz, Nancy Smallwood, Pauline Smith, Ruth Spiller, Virginia Stone. Pledges: Mary Malloy, Betty Williams. Not 
pictured. Actives: Frances Carter, Claire Jennings. Pledges: Ruth Hobson, Lila Rostine. 



k^[]k UPHA 




A social sorority for women students of the Chris- 
tian faith, Areta Alpha is mainly concerned with the 
spreadin3 of friendship among Christian students. 
Meeting periodically, for lunches and dinners, the 
organization directs all its efforts toward the further- 
ance of its purpose. 



Virginia Stone 
President 



158 



Composed of prominent senior men who have 
rendered outstandin3 service to the University, Blue 
Key has its membership hmited to two men in each 
fraternity and ten non-organization men. This year, 
the major functions of Blue Key were the sponsoring 
of the A. M.S. dance at the end of Men's Week and 
the giving of the Freshmen orientation dinner. 



B L U [ 




Norman Padgett 
President 



K E Y 




Left to right, first row: Norton Beach. Rudy Binder, Dan Chapnnan, James Devere. Mason Flowers. Second row: Quin Fraiier, John Gaskill, Ray 
Gillette, John Goff, Fred Koebig, Jack Lamberson, Fred McPherson, A. J. Meyer. Third row: Norm Padgett, Dick Roshe, Frank Simons, Guerney 
Smith, Jim Stewart, Bob Streeton, Weldon Walsh, Dick Woods. Not pictured; George Bliss, Julian Blodgctt, Ned B:een, Spencer Edwards, 
Francis Farias, Fred Flo, John Frawley, Charles Hart, Crossan Hays, Bruce JoSnscn, Jim Mitchell, Ray Wilson. 



159 




^i^^si 



Composed of upper classmen who are actively 
interested in the field of advertising, Alpha Delta 
Sigma forms this campus' national professional ad- 
vertising fraternity. The group holds regular meetings 
at which men prominent in the field speak and hold 
discussion on important phases of advertising. 



Robert Meldrum 
Vice-President 



kim uuk SIC 





Left to right, first row, Actives: Claude Broolcs, Seymour Drovis, Tom Frccar. Second row: Leon Jacobs, Bob Meldrunn. Pledges: Lloyd Burstein, 
Ernie Marlcowiti, Joe Schrcchlcr. Not pictured, Actives: Seyniouf Knee, Harry Landis, Bill McKinlcy, Jack Van Geldcr. Pledges: Gay Pryor, 
Ray Rosecrans, Bob Vancott. 

160 




Left to right, first row: Alison Boswcll, Tom Frccar, Alice Marie Gautschi, Bob Hicks. Second row: ^red Koebig, Doris MacDougall, Jim Stewart, 
Bob Strecton, Billie Thomas. Not pictured: Peggy Stewart. 



CmiFOIiiill ClUB 



From the different campuses of the University of 
California two Juniors and two Seniors are appointed 
by President Sproul to membership in the California 
Club. The purpose of this sroup is to bring the 
different campuses closer together. During home- 
coming, the local members had a luncheon for the 
visiting members. This year they have been chiefly 
interested in bringing out a special edition of the 
Bruin, and in a song contest, the object being to 
get songs which may be used on all campuses of 
the University of California. 



Alison Boswcll 
President 




161 




Left to risht, first row: Louis Koontz. Paul Pearson, Charles Wright, Mort Prince, Paul Frampton. Second row: Frank Simmons, Howard Bromley, 
Ed Murphy, Dean Williams, Ted Adsit, Henry Yamamoto. Third row: Ed Sharp, Henry Shine, Bob Hummell, Phil Hutchins. 



AlPHU PH 



UH\ 




Alpha Phi Ome3a is an honorary fraternity on 
this campus for men who are former Boy Scouts. At 
the moment half of the members are active in Scout 
work. Principal activity for Alpha Phi Omega is par- 
ticipation in an annual Camporee which takes place 
at a Boy Scout camp the first week-end in May. 
Faculty members of this organization are Dr. Koontz, 
Dr. Bovard, Cece Hollingsworth, and Paul Frampton. 



Charles Wright 
President 



162 



Chosen by three criteria, scholarship, citizenship, 
and military ability, the members of Pershin3 Rifles 
compose the crack drill unit of the Army R.O.T.C. 
Besides representing U.C.L.A. in parades and cere- 
monies, the Pershing Rifles maintain a series of 
social events with dances for its members and a 
dance open to all the University public. 




nu\i 



Lee Claric 
Captain 



G u\m 




163 




Virginia Lee Lindsey 
President 



CH 



Chi Delta Phi is the National Literary Honorary 
for Women. Mennbership is restricted to Junior and 
Senior women. Requirements for membership are 
scholarship and recommendation by a professor in 
the English Department. Every year Chi Delta Phi 
produces a pre-Shakespearean play. This year it is 
producing "Cambises". The organization also pub- 
lishes a Miscellany which consists of original manu- 
scripts of members. The principal social activity 
is a faculty tea. 



D[IH PH 




Left to right, first row: Joyce Armitage. Margaret Clinton, Margaret Corbell. Second row: Helen Hill. Millicent Hostrup, Virginia Lee Lindsey. 
Betty Meigs, Audrey Nelson, Jean Reid. Third row: Michcia Robbins, Margaret Russell, Margaret Selby, Lucretia Tenney, Dorothy Vernon, Mar- 
jorie Vincent. Not pictured: Elizabeth Alderson, Lulu Artz, Ennily Ayoub, Alice Ball, Jean Condie. Doris Leavitt, Irene Loclchart. Lillian Most, 

JffAn Piirniic C^niro ^;4lrAoiirki Viraini^ ^rrtff Mxncf Ri*!)^ Tnwnconj-J 



jone Vincent. Not p , ^-.- ,.,»*, ^ , 

Jean Purpus, Chico Sakaguchi, Virginia Scott. Mane Belle Townsend 



164 




Left to right, first row: Lcc BJgler, Rudy Binder, George Carmack, Seymour Drovis, Ray Gillette, Spike Honig, Louis Kaufman. Second row: Har- 
rison Latta, Paul Mueller, Sam North, Charles Norton, Robert Oblath, Norman Padgett, Richard Rayburn. Third row: Matt Saari, Don Shaw, 
Vic Stancliff, Tall man Trask, Arthur Walsh. Spencer Werner, Dean Williams. Not pictured: Philip Acklcy, Harry Allen, William Ailing ton, 
George Ashton, Robert Banker, Robert Barnard, George Bliss, Don Carman, Frank Carroll, Jim Castruccio, Devcre Christensen, Richard Clark, 
John Drury, Henry Eddy, Keith Emberson, Warfield Garson, Bob Gay, Marshall Greener, Al Haulin, Jack Hayes, George Huston, Allan W. 
lanell. Bob Johnston, Marvin Katzman, Stanley L. Keller, William Kerrigan, William Keuline, Lawrence Tipton, Dave MacFarland, Samuel 
McCame, James McPhee, Frank Newell, William Norrington, Jerome Northrop, Charles Norton, Bob Ortwin, Jack Perkins, Merel Powers, Bill 
Rcardon, Buddy Rosenberg, Earl Stone, Bob Thomas, John Truex, Theodore Vasilopoulos, Bob Ward, Lew Weiner, Charles Walters. 



c 



R C I [ 



C 



Circle C is U.C.L.A.'s minor sports honorary. 
Composed of holders of letters in minor sports, the 
group has as its purpose the closer coordination of 
minor sports activities. 



Geor3e Carmack 

President 




165 




Left to right, first row: Mary Barrett, Kathryn Beck. Second row: Eunice Brockway, Nornna Lee Burk, Martha Glenn, Betty Morrison. Not pic- 
tured: Marian Bannister, Marie Fischer, Marjorie Kennedy, Betty Sherman. Pledge: Marjorie Stephens. 



D[LTll PH 





The upper fifteen per cent of kindergarten-primary 
majors are the only ones eligible for membership in 
Delta Phi Upsilon. This national fraternity for women 
bends all its energies toward the investigation of 
new teaching methods and the advancement of the 
proven ones. 



Betty Morrison 
President 



166 



Kap and Bells exists purely as an honorary for a 
snaall select group of men and women who have 
made outstanding contributions in the field of cam- 
pus dramatics. Members of this honorary serve in 
the capacity of technical advisors in the productions 
on campus. 




Ray MahafRe 
President 



KH \U U[[^ 




Left to right, first row: Larry Arnold. Second row: Mary Bcllcrue, Ray Mahaffie, Ruth Pottle, Ayleen Searl. Not pictured: George Breninger, Fred 
Bruderlin, Pat Elsey, Caroline Entricken, Beverly Gardner, Friti Kramer, Bruce Matchette, Susie McCullom, Sammy Rolph, Grant Shepherd, 
Stu Wilson. 

167 




Outstanding art majors with high scholastic aver- 
ages are eligible for membership in Delta Epsilon. 
This group, a national honorary, holds meetings 
twice monthly at which prominent members of the 
artistic professions speak in order to present their 
views on the various ramifications of the arts. 



Lois Clark 
President 



DFlU [pnio 




Left to right, first row: Jocelyn Bal!, Patricia Cavanaugh, Lois Clark, Esther Clewette, William Daywalt. Second row: Calvin Edmger. Lucia 
Kaiser, Kenneth Kingrcy, Pauline Parker, Dorothy Schufeldt, Barbara Scely. Not pictured: Clinton Adams. Constance Bcnkesser, Shirley Brown, 
Phillip Cady, Flora Clar, Fcra Gilman, Ruth Fiffc, Mildred Filer, Geraldine Forney, John Jones, Adalie Margulcs, Marguerite Meyers, Carvel 
Moore, Samuel Ralph, Doris Robbins, Albert Rubens. 



168 




Left to right, first row: LaVerne Anderson, Betty Bcnn, Betty Billingsley, Virginia Black. Second row: Kathleen Dewitt, Martha Flannery, Helen 
Hay, Phyllis Hofmann, Marjorie Lawson, Virginia Lee Lindsey. Third row: Doris MacDougall, Leslie Ann Martin, Mary Lee McClellan, Catherine 
Pyne, Bonnie Turner, Susan VanDyke. Not pictured: Laura Chapnnan, Betty Quandt, Janey Ward. 



G 



y 



D 







The promotion of better citizenship and greater 
loyalty to country is the guiding principle of Guidon, 
the women's auxiliary of Scabbard and Blade. 
Chosen by the present members, from women in the 
Junior and Senior classes, pledges are first approved 
by Scabbard and Blade before being notified. Chief 
activities of the organization are joint meetings and 
social affairs with its male counterpart. 



Doris MacDougall 
President 




169 




Left to right, first row: Actives: Mary Anne Allen. Marguerite Bangs, Norma Lu Burk. Second row: Stella Chapales, Dorothy Collins, Pauline 
Cook, Ellse Cooper, Hilda Fidler, Gwendolyn Griffen, Betty Hadsel, Elizabeth Harvey. Third row: Marian Henck, Luclle Lanham, Virginia Lee 
Llndsey, Jean Miller, Harriet Phillips, Lila Renner, Marie Roberts, Clara Scigel. Fourth row: June Sheppard, Alice Shook, Margaret Stansbury, Una 
Strayhorn, Marion Wells, Mildred Whittenberg. Pledges: Charlotte Schlichting, Georgina Tiffany. Not pictured, Active: Shirley Cecil. 

H[L[N mmmn club 




Helen Matthewson Club, an organization for 
women who are either wholly or partially self-sup- 
porting, was founded by Dean hlelen Laughlin in 
1927. By uniting into this cooperative honorary, the 
members are able to correlate their ideals and to 
use the group as a medium of social activity. 



Marian Henck 
President 



170 



Kappa Phi Zeta, Women's Professional Library 
Honorary Sorority, requires for membership an inter- 
est in librarianship as a profession and a C average 
at the time of initiation. This group has charge of 
the Library orientation tours which are given for the 
benefit of new students at the beginning of each 
semester. Trips to different libraries throughout the 
city are sponsored for the group as a whole. During 
the past semester Kappa Phi Zeta has had five book 
reviews given by faculty members. 



Jean Reid 
President 




KUPPH H 



lUk 




Left to right, first row. Actives: Elizabeth Alderson, Dorothy Casebeer, Frances Colt, Betty Davis. Sally Glass, Marion Goodman. Second row: 
Harriet Hadley, Dorothy Johnson, Jean Reid, Isabel Robb, Martha Seibcl, Mary Anna Selkirk. Third row: Jeannette Wilson. Pledges: Lorraine 
Hamud, Irene Shapard, Caroline Tupper, Clare Jeane Ward, Norma Waterhousc. Not pictured. Active: Elfrieda Angermayer. Pledges: Patricia 
Connor, Eva Hloiek, Lorna King, Edith Madge, Alberta Rose. 

171 




An organization with over a thousand members, 
the Masonic Club was launched in 1929 upon the 
completion of a beautiful clubhouse on the outskirts 
of the campus. The clubhouse was a gift from the 
Masons of California. Membership in the club is free 
for Masonically affiliated students. An activities card 
costing two dollars per year entitles the student to 
any activities within the club. Activities include the 
Wednesday afternoon dances to which affiliates and 
their friends are invited, exchange dinners between 
Areme and Men's club, bridge parties, carnivals, and 
Sunday evening socials, as well as formal and in- 
formal dances. 



Earle Brown 
President 



MHOnC CLUB 




Left to risht, first row: Ted Adsit, Ruth Andrews. Second row: John Bohn, Earl Browne, Mabel Connett, Barbara Doss, Frances Foster, Betty 
HaddocV. Third row: Vernon Harp, Walter Jensen, Elaine Otter, Helene Rodccker, Talltnan Trasic, Lenore Wilcox. Not pictured: George Bliss, 
Bill Coston, Charles Gordon, Treloar Ogen, Betty Vellom, Harry Williams. 



172 




Left to right, first row: Bevcriy Brown, Jeanne de Garmo, Alice Mane Gautscht, Virginia Lee LIndsey. Second row: Mary Lee McClellan, Michcia 
Robbins, Lucrctia Tenney, Susan Van Dyke, Betty Whidden. Not pictured: Kathcrlnc Barnian, Constance Benltcsser, Alison Boswcll, Barbara Wight, 
Virginia Lee Wilkinson. 



MORTH eOHD 



Formed this year, Mortar Board was brought to 
this campus by the formerly local senior women's 
honorary, Agathai. In thus becoming the seventy- 
first chapter of Mortar Board, Agathai has accepted 
the national's purpose of sponsoring high ideals of 
scholarship, leadership, and personality. 



Virginia Lee Lindsey 
Vice-President 




173 




Left to right, first row, Faculty member: Helen Dill. Members: Ramona Blair, Martha Langstaff, Margaret Moran. Second row: Helen Pifer, 
Ruth Plough, Clara Anna Rehor, Dorothy Simmons, LaVerle Tregis. Not pictured: Iris Timson. 



MU PHI [PSIION 




U.C.L.A.'s national music sorority, Mu Phi Epsilon, 
has as members only those music ma|ors selected 
from the upper fourth of their classes. Furtherance 
of music and its allied fields as well as the promo- 
tion of an interchan3e of ideas among students in 
other colleges of music are the chief purposes of the 
group. 



Ramona Blair 
President 



174 



Formed for the purpose of promotin3 an exchan3e 
of ideas among majors in general elementary and 
kindergarten primary education, Phi Upsilon Pi per- 
forms exactly that function on this campus. In this 
local professional education honorary, the members 
are pledged when they are high freshmen and must 
have a grade average of 1.5. 




Virginia Campbell 
President 



PH 



PSILOi P 




Left to right, first row, Actives: Virginia Campbell, Phyllis Classen, Dorothy Dodson, Martha Glenn. Second row: Celeste Jacobus, Pan Kjell 
gren, Reba Ladd, Gladys Sawyer, June Sheppard. Not pictured: Frances Bowles, Margaret Cosgrovc, Pat Pringle, Erna Reher, Norma Reid. 



175 




p 



Orsanized at Northwestern University in 1912, 
Phi Beta, a national professional fraternity of music, 
drama, and dance, is active in all its fields on this 
campus. Its membership is composed of women 
undergraduates who have proved that they have 
talents in the arts with which the group is concerned. 
Other than assisting in the University's artistic en- 
deavors. Phi Beta maintains a unity in social life 
through the giving of two formal dances in the year. 



Virginia Clapper 
President 



B [ T A 




Left to right, first row, Actives: Eleanor Anderson. Second row: Betty Jane Bcaltie, Grace Brubaker, Elayne Butts, Virginia Ann Clapper, Frances 
Foster, Helen Louise Hamilton, Jane Hanks, Shirley Hinie. Third row: Eleanor Kallejian, Mary Livingstone, Marguerite McLeod, Nancy Millar 
Ruth Moone, Betty Nixon, Kay Rinkel, Helene Rodccker. Fourth row: Peggy Thompson. Betty Whidden. Pledges: Dorothy Broughton, Elizabeth 
Crispin, Rosemary Laubender. Betty Rand. Beverly Riester, Bonnie Jean Rydell. Not pictured, Actives: Helen Crosier, Doris Hill, Kathcrine 
Jett, Barbara McClain, Marianne McKelvcy, Elhclyn Ziegler. Pledge: Bcltie Derrah. 



176 




Left to right, first row: Vera Bobsene, Virginia Chambers, Peggy Crawford, Grace Fox, Gcraldinc Goodnight, Annabel Johnson. Second row: 
Edith Johnson, Emily Marquardl, Jean Mattis, Janet Olin, Mary Schneider, Mona Seppi, Marjoric Simms, Dorothy Warne. Third row: Frances 
Windier. Pledges: Elizabeth Dinnis, Elizabeth Farrar, Ann Gillespie. Dorothea Harris, Margaret McCollIm. Elizabeth Scholten, Marjorie Wrlkc. 
Not pictured. Actives: Shirley Crag, Nancy Folks, Audrey Huntley, Genevieve Patterson. Janet Souther, Janet Tate, Jean Thurston, Audrey 
Windier. Pledges: Mary Caward, Emeral Drumnnond, Frances Miles. 



PH 



CH 



IHfU 



Phi Chi Theta, professional women's business 
fraternity, was established on campus two years 
ago. Its founding purpose was to promote higher 
business ethics and bring prominent authorities into 
the group for discussion. Annually Phi Chi Theta 
awards a national scholarship key to the most out- 
standing student in the college of business adminis- 
tration having completed junior certificate require- 
ments. 



Geraldine Goodnight 
President 




177 




Left to right, first row: Jocelyn Ball. Second row: Betty-Gray Bowling, Catherine Burleigh, Patricia Cavanaugh, Lois Clark, Jean Daniels, Bar- 
bara Donncll, Margaret Fleming, Dona Fragner, Frances Fudge. Third row: Rovena Furnival, Nancy Garrison, Lucille Garvin, Betty Hauscr, 
Priscilla Jepson, Lucia Kaiser, Mary Korstad, Betsy Lord, Leslie Ann Martin, Fourth row: Mary McDonnell, Margaret Mctte, Pauline Parker, 
Barbara Seeley, Sue Shafer, Kathryn Skidmore, Pat Stanley, Beth Watklns, Gerry Wodars. Not pictured: Lucille Anderson, Harriet Baucom, 
Dorothy Brown, Shirley Brown, Esther Cook, Lillian Cronin, Jane Eisner, Carolyn Fidler, Norma Hecht, Eleanor Jeans, Betsy Kelly, Rosalind 
Kolan, Jessie Kouama, Jean Law, Vita Legcre, Ruth Locke, Fredda McGce, Muriel Merrltt, Doris Robbins, Jean Rose, Sue Shelby, Carlotta 
Stoddart, Bonnie Taft, Barbara Thompson, Isabclle O'NeiL 



P H 



I U L 



A 




Made up of Junior and Senior art majors who 
intend to make art their hfe's work, Philokalla is a 
professional art club aimed at aidin3 its members 
in their chosen field. This purpose is attained 
through the use of professional and business meet- 
ings in which commercial and artistic problems are 
discussed and correlated to the art curriculum of 
the University. 



Betty Hauscr 
President 



178 



Scabbard and Blade is a national organization for 
R.O.T.C. cadet officers. Numbering on its rolls some 
of U.C.L.A.'s outstanding cadets, this year's activi- 
ties have proven unusually successful. Among them 
could be numbered the traditional Scabbard and 
Blade Formal, dinners held in conjunction with 
Guidon, and informal events for the members only. 




mum 



Lloyd Knutson 
President 




BII1D[ 









Left to risht, first row, Actives: Byron Atkinson, Rudy Binder, Dcane Briggs, James Dcvcre, Cliff Drake, George Feistcr. Second row: John Goff, 
Earle Hanson, Robert Harvey, Lloyd Knutson, Fred Koebig. Robert Larson, Jack McCann, Sam North, Charles Norton. Third row: Charles Price, 
Earl Scherff. Pledges' Lee Bigler, George Bliss, William Bycrts, George Carmack, Frank Carroll, Robert Doupc, Hap Fraser. Fourth row: Ray Gil- 
lette, Karl Gustafson, George Huston, George McMahon. Morgan McNcely, Earl Stone, John Strong, George Thorson, Richard Woods. Not pic- 
tured. Actives: John Blaikie, Carter Crall, Crossan Hays, Dick Jenson Fred Lcttice, Robert Maynard, Robert Maze, Norm Padgett, Dick Roshe. 
Pledges: Edward Breen. John Frawley, Richard Gillespie, Homer Graf, Ncal Lakenan, William Marsh, Jim Mitchell, William Rinehart. 

179 




Pi Delta Epsilon is U.C.L.A.'s national honorary 
journalistic fraternity. Composed of upper-classnnen 
actively ensaged in the field of college publica- 
tions, the organization has as its goal the better- 
ment of the publications with which it is concerned. 
Reorganizing after several inactive years, the fra- 
ternity has already started on its program by holding 
monthly meetings at which prominent journalists 
speak and present their views on the current prob- 
lems in journalism. 



Stephen Meinyk 
President 



P 



DiiTH [n\m 




Left to right, first row: Milt Cohen, Tom Frecar, Jack Gilchrist, Bill John kc, John Kulli. Second row: Bob Meldrunn, Steve Meinyk, Sandy Mock, 
Jimmy Osgood, Al Paquin, Dick Pryne. Not pictured: Dick Patton, Ray Rosecrans. 

180 




Left to right, f rst row: Helen E. brown, Peggy Clarke, Florence Lee Hall. Second row: Wanda Klaus, Dorothy Metro, Dilta Ncwlin, Peggy 
Sterett, Betty Walter, Helen White. Not pictured: Grace Ivanhoe, Beth Linthicum, Claudia Price. Pledges: Charlotte Anderson, Marianne 
Maslach, Marjorie Mason. 



SIC 




UPHU 



fllA 



Musical talent and a desire to follow music pro- 
fessionally are the requirements for membership in 
Si3ma Alpha lota. This national professional music 
fraternity for women is a medium for the exchange 
of ideas and the presentation of the members' work. 
Most of the group's energies throughout the year 
are devoted to the staging of its annual concert in 
Royce hiall. 



Helen Brown 
President 




IftI 




Left to right, first row: Evelyn Allen, Jane Dustman, Margaret Erickson, Mary Jane Hof. Second row: Eva Reed, Helen Rohrs, Margaret Smith, 
Margaret Stone, Marie Thompson, Dorothy Warne. Third row: Thclma Wilcox. Pledges: Margery Howe, Margaret Gauer, Clarice Jordon, Helen 
Stinchficid, Jcar» Weill. Not pictured: Betty Benson. 



P 



yppn siCMH 




A national education sorority, Pi Kappa Sigma 
chooses its members from the ranks of women who 
are enrolled in education courses. Besides its activi- 
ties in the educational line of endeavor, the or- 
ganization also goes in for social events and altruistic 
work. 



Mary Jane Hof 
President 



182 



To bring together upper-class geology majors is 
the purpose of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, professional 
geology fraternity. Outstanding activity is the 
annual spring banquet to which leading geologists 
of Southern California are invited. In addition to 
this contact with prominent men of the field, a 
guest speaker attends each monthly meeting. 



Teddy Bear 
President 




mm mm m\m 





'9^ Pi 



Left to right, first row; Teddy Bear, Myles Colligan, Frank Creasey, Steve Davies. Second row: George Feister, Paul Goldman. Van Howard, 
Maurice Kelly, Bernard Kinney, Frank Reynolds. Third row: Norman Schulti, Frank Simons, Richard Stowell, Tallman Trask, Tad Twombly, John 
Wiese. Not pictured: Robert Adams, Harold Billman, Tom Eakin, Erie Halliburton, Jack Kingston, Everett Pease, Parke Snavely, Tom Steven. 
Harold Sullwold, William Thomas. 

183 




After serving on the Frosh Rally Reserves and 
Yeoman, upperclassmen are eligible for membership 
in the Rally Committee. This most exclusive men's 
service organization has as its chief function the 
originating of complicated stunts in order to con- 
fuse the rooting section at football games. 



Fred McPherson 
Chairman 



RU 




COMMITTfE 







Left to right, first row: George Bliss. Second row: George Carmaclt. George Goldman, Clarence Honig, Joe Jacobucci. Henry Keeton. 
Dean Kennedy. Third row: Fred McPherson, Hal Nygren, Joe Oyster, Richard Preston, Gene Shapiro, John Vrba. Not pictured: Al Adel- 
man, Marvin Berlowitz, Otis Bowdoin, Bruce Cassiday, Richard Catterlin, Robert Dcshon, Dale Findley, Pierce Gannon, John Hamner, Robert 
Hannah, Douglas Harrison, Wallace Kindcl, Fred Koebig, Fred Leltice, Ray Magee, Robert Maynard, Sam North, Robert Park, Maury Shapiro, 
Milton Stein, Milton Stratford, Al Woodill, Richard Woods. 

I«4 




Left to right, First row: Archie Baker. Second row: William Bycrts, William Chapham. Donald Emcrman. Eugene Ericlcson, Robert Mcldrum, 
Henry Milledge. Third row: Charles Norton, William Petit, Robert Schneider, David Smith, Walter Wayman, Hubert Weiss. Not pictured: Eugene 
Broherg, Victor Colton, Elwood Henry, John Mitchell, Kimball Moore, Kenneth Patterson, Roy Potter, Robert Thomas. 

SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCE- 
MENT OE MANAGEMENT 



This organization, a student branch of the Society 
for the Advancement of Management, busies itself 
mainly with the carrying out of conferences in con- 
junction with downtown business men. Besides this 
function the members also undertake to carry out 
surveys and analyses for business concerns in this 
area. 



William Byerts 
President 




185 






■) 




Left to right, f^rst row: Dorothy Allison, Mary Anderson, Betty Beal. Barbara Black, Valerie Bonapart, June Breclt, Ann Briniser, Maryima Brown, 
Eleanor Campbell. Second row: Betty Carlisle, Lisa Chamberlain, Babs Coye, Carmcl Feldman, Margaret Frank, Susan Gibson, Margaret Jones, 
Dorothy Keating, Jean Launcr. Third row: Alva Lloyd, Robin Lyford, Jean Magee, Mary Magee, Jo Ann McCandlcss, Marjorie Middlemiss, Kassy 
Pricster, Masie Ragan, Dorothy Renfro. Fourth row: Mary F. Rickershauser, Barbara Ringheim, Ethel Sherman, Lyia Sherwood, Clara Siegel, Jean 
Sleight, Shirley Smith, Irene Spenslcy, Marcella Sutton. Fifth row: Jane Thornburgh, Ann Thieme, Rosalie Trop, Carolyn Tapper, Helen Tyre, 
Alice Wheaton, Marjorie Wilke, Rhea Wilkinson, Olive Zanella. Not pictured: Christy Backus, Frances Gold, Flora Lewis, Margaret Michel, Ann 
Pulliam, Constance Purkiss, Mae Landis. 



s 



p 



R 



S 




Spurs, the Sophomore women's service or3anIza- 
tion, has an exceptionally active list of functions. 
Members are chosen for Spurs from outstanding 
Freshmen, and from this technique has come the 
stamina as well as the life-blood of the organiza- 
tion. Besides selling all kinds of campus doodads to 
gullible males, the group keeps itself on the run by 
assisting in Freshman orientation, by helping the 
Yeoman prepare the rooting section for football 
games, and even by participating with the band in 
their half-time stunts. 



Alva Lloyd 
President 



186 



/ r" 



The University Dramatics Society, better known as 
U.D.S., has for its purpose the promotion of dra- 
matic interest on this campus. A person is eligible 
for pledging if he has been cast in a play, or has 
put in a certain number of hours in production work. 
The pledge is eligible for membership after having 
put injifty hours of pledge work. U.D.S. produces 
about ten play readings a semester. It cooperated 
in the all-U play, "Le Bourgeois Sentilhomme," and 
is responsible for the highly successful "Of Thee I 
Sing," presented on campus last March. 



Ayleen Searl 
Technical Direclo 




Left to risht, first row. Actives: Eleanor Anderson, Larry Arnold, Second row: Robert Arnold, William Beifuss, Mary Bellerue, Betty-Gray Bowling, 
Earlc Browne, Patricia Cavanaugh, John Cotter, Marcclle Fortier, JoAnnc Hollistcr. Third row: Irene Holsingcr, Eleanor Kallejian, Betty Jane 
Lissner, Elizabeth Lord, Rhoda Mace, Jean MacKcnzic, Barbara Mann, Nyda Ncutzman, Ruth Pottle. Fourth row: Peggy Rea, Helen Rodeckcr. 
Ayleen Searl, Natalie Street, Dorothy Tete, Mary Lou Thilo, Rosalee Trop, Ailecn Weber, Mary Welch. Fifth row: Ray MahafFic. Pledges: Mar- 
guerite Bangs, Barbara Doss, Dorothy Fleischmann, Betty Hauser, Jane Lloyd-Jones, Patricia Morrisscy, Harriet Phillips, Mary Franklin Thompson. 



187 




The Student Board of the Religious Conference, 
is one of the most beneficial groups at the Uni- 
versity. This statement is borne out by the fact 
that the Board is the guiding light of the University 
Camp, the Round Table discussions, and the well- 
known Trialogue Teams. With its members chosen 
by invitation, the Board is made up of outstanding 
campus leaders. 



James Stuart 
Chairman 







Left to right, first row: Bruce Cassiday, Jean deGarmo. Second row: Tom Frecar, Claire Hanson, Bob Hiclts, Jean McKcniic, Sandy Mock, Dan 
O'Flaherty. Third row: Frank Scannell, James Stewart, Bob Streeton. Barbara Tcschc, Helen Tyre, Sue VanDyke. Not pictured: Bob Hannah, 
John Hcssell, Farlan Myers, Peggy Stewart. Barbara White. Loretta Yager. 



188 




Left to right, first row: Mary Bcltcrue, Marcelle Fortier, Barbara Mann. Second row: Jean McKenzie, Nyda Neutzman, Ruth Pottle. Margaret 
Re a, Ayleen Searl, Dorothy Tete. Third row: Ailecn Weber. Pledges: Patricia Cavanaugh, Jane Lloyd -J ones, Betty Lord, Mary Lou Thiio, Mary 
Welch. Not pictured. Actives: Meri Ottis. Pledge: Gloria Dcvore. 



ZfU 



n 



[U 



Zeta Phi Eta, professional speech arts organiza- 
tion, was originated and continues for the purpose 
of stimulating speech endeavors and furthering de- 
velopment in this field. All members intend to 
continue professionally and at present are active 
in U.D.S. productions and other dramatic work in 
the University. Two activities sponsored by this 
group are the annual poetry reading festival and 
the children's theater play. 



Mary Bellerue 
President 




189 




Left to right, first row: Stew Axtell, James Bartlctt, Mary Beaumont, Wallce Bounds. Claude Brooks, Byron Brown, Lucille Burgess, Patricia Con- 
ner. Second row: Robert Corrado, James Crawford, Sally Cunningham, Lilly Fujioka, Betty Gclsin, Mary Gillespie, Esther Girveti, Helen Hall. 
Third row: Robert Hart, Aki Hirashiki, Fumiyo Kodani, Georgia McCann, Thomas Murray, Dave Norton, Gene Park, Robert Park. Fourth row: 
Virginia Lee Peck, Mary Rosio, William Schlosser, Natalie Street. Leonard Swanson, Bernice Tramontini, Evelyn Vinton, Irene Williams. Not pic- 
tured. Actives: Roy Barnes, Harold Billman, Carolyn Bryan, Richard Carhart. Anita Carter, Randolph Crews, Dixie Croft, Nancy Davidson. James 
Elliot, Jo Gaines. Alex Gordon. Galen Howell, Joanne Jenkins. Joseph Kern, Helen Kerr, Irene Lebedeff, Yuriko Maruyamo, Paul Nicison, Casper 
Rea, Bernard Rush, Angelina Simon, John Slevin, Mary Slevin, Gladys Strom. Bill Taylor, Thomas Urton. Pledges: Margaret Cosgrove. Arthur 

mmu mnum 




An unusual and beneficial or3anization is the 
Westgard Co-operative. Made up of 26 women stu- 
dents and 26 men students, the organization is co- 
operative in the sense that it does all buying of 
foodstuffs as a unit as well as having its members 
prepare and serve the meals. Socially, it is active 
having an annual formal dance and numerous im- 
promptu affairs. 



Bcrnicc Tramontini 
President 



190 



Westwood Club is an honorary living group for 
women. In selecting members, the rushing system 
is employed and girls are bid into the house, after 
which they go through a period of formal pledge- 
ship. Social activities include a Spring formal and 
an alumni benefit dance. Numerous other dances 
are held throughout the year. 




Barbara Seely 
President 



W[nilOOD CLUB 







•i I- 



id^^ 




Left to risht, first row: Mary Gibson. Marie GolUnds, Jo Anne Hollister, Irene Holsinger, Eleanor Hunt, Martha Langstaff, Anita Lautz, Margery 
Mac Lindgrcn. Second row: Bonncy Linsky, Audrey Nelson, Ruth Roane, Charlotte Rowen. Barbara Lea Seely, Vcrncttc Siccllengcr, Mary Franklin 
Thompson, Mary Alice Van Busktrk. Third row: Marie West, Lcnore Wilcox. Pledges: Barbara Bettin, Dorothy Bossardt, Dorothy Fleischmann, 
Miriam Laffler, Dorothy Park, Cornelia Patterson. Not pictured. Actives: Evelyn Dorrel. Peggy Kip, Eleanor Salmon, Betty Wilcox. Pledges: 
Roslyn Daic, Rosalie Whitledge. 

191 




Y 



[ 







Drawing its members from the ranks of the 
Frosh Rally Reserves, Yeomen thus becomes the 
Sophomore men's service organization. Supplement- 
ing the Rally Committee, the group assists them at 
football games and makes itself generally useful at 
other University events. 



Howell McDaniel 
President 



M 



[ 



I 




^^^gi^ 




Left to right, ftrst row: Bcrny Appleficld, Fred Bemis, Howard Culver, Travers Hilson, Bill Johnson, Walter Jones. Second row: Marvin Katsman. 
Jack Mahon, Paul Mascot, Howell McDaniel. Neil McNeil. Steve Melnylc. Third row: Al Paquin, Gene Parit, Charles Petty. Evans Slatter, Bob 
Wiley, Jim Zastro. Not pictured: Bob Alshuler, Sandy Canneron, Glenn Davis, Earle Dumont, Wade Errett, Lenord Goldglied, SItipp Gregg, 
Charlc . Harris, Bud Hill, Stacy Moore, Marty Morhar, Louie Theilan, La Drue Willardson, Hitoshi Vonemura, Otis Vost, Paul Zicglcr. 

192 





^^'^ 




Left to right, first row: Ethelin Bell. Second row: Beverly Brown, Norene Bronson, Lucille Burges, Lisa Chamberlain, Marjorie Craig, Betty Craw- 
ford. Isabel Darbyshire, Mary Delaney. Third row: Alice Marie Gautschi, Helen Gilchrist, Betty Haddock, iliua Imon, Marcelle Jabour, Betty 
Kimball, Jean Kjnkel, Sally Kusayanagi. Fourth row: Ethel McCarthy, Patricia Morrissey, Dorothy Renfro, Michela Robbins, Helen Shipley, Clara 
Siegel. Dolly Vaughn, Evelyn Vinton. Not pictured: Phyllis Marston, Joy Richards, Beatrice Trcnnontini. 



\ , 




c. 



A. 



Under the Y.W.C.A.'s principle of social justice, 
its cabinet operates to better the life of U.C.L.A. 
students. Under this heading comes the Y's freshman 
orientation program, the sponsoring of group discus- 
sions on public affairs, and the presentation of 
events in the Asilomar Conference. 



Alice Marie Gautschi 
President 




193 




nunc 



III LIT 




UIIILII 



w 





^1 



.^-v- 



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M ^ 



r^> 



BDIVISiONS • • WOMErS ORCyiZUIONS • QUEEH • WOMEN'S ORCUIZU 

IS • QUEENS • WOMErS ORGyiZATIONS • QUEENS • WOMEN'S ORGyiZATIO 

• QUEENS • WOMEN'S ORGHIZHIONS • QUEENS • WOMEN'S ORCyiZATIO' 




Left to right, seated: Grace Fox, Harriet Stacey, 
Mary Lee McClellan, Loretta Yager, Dolly Reeves. 
Standing: Dorothy Renfro, Betty hHaddock, Frances 
Koch, Patricia Hartley, Marjorie Hall, Exie Stevens, 
Christine Strain, Muriel Wolfson, Bee Brown, Dorothy 
Sackin. 



"Mother" McClellan of the Associated Women 
Students holds office hours from two to three "most 
every afternoon," presides at the weekly freshman 
teas, and requisitions ping pong balls and hot water 
bottles for the Women's Lounge. In spare moments 
Mary Lee attends to other odd jobs, classes, and 
her collection of maps. 



198 




4.074 strong, the A.W.S. keeps most of 
its freshman women busy with committee 
work and the earning of activity credits fo 
Spurs. Many other honoraries also tap from 
the ranks of the A.W.S. service groups, so 
that the spring activity banquet is an excit- 
ing event for the B.W.O.C.— Big Women 
On Campus. New committee heads and 
A.W.S. officers are also introduced at this 
time, and awards and certificates presented 
to outstanding workers in campus activities. 
Amazons all, the A.W.S. are still interested 
in the much discussed A. M.S. New ventures 
this year were the first and very popular 
A.W.S.-A.M.S. dances held after the Mon- 
day night Sings. Next year's stag line w 
form to the right. 



Dolly Reeves, P.E. major, guards the coffers 



199 




Truck on down! The K.D.s strut their stuff 
for the Hi-Jinlts judges. Swinging a "Hit 
Parade of Dance," they stepped high, wide 
and fancy for an honorable mention — regard- 
less of the seedy "gent" at left. 




Five night-caps — and we see quintuplets. The Alpha Gams celebrated winning first place. Fauntlcroy curtseys to the judges. 



H 



J I 



K S 



October 20th was a red-letter day for the women 
students as it marked the celebration of the annual 
Hi-Jinks. For women only! Two and a half thousand 
women — and e\^ht males — crowded into Royce for the 
bi3 show while vigilant Spurs policed entrances with 
brooms and dust mops. Catch of the evening was Bruin 
reporter, Bob Barsky. "The male must go through!" 
yelled the captive, and paid the price by escorting 
some forty Spurs to the women's gym for dancing, 
refreshments, and prize awards after the program. A 
Women's Week may precede next year's Hi-Jinks. 



Brinsmg them back alive, the A Chi Os did a 
graveyard sequence that unearthed a new low in 
talent, but took third place. George Washington 
and Napoleon rendered the Big Apple. 





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HTIVITIE!; 



The woman student at U.C.L.A. is aided 
throughout her entire school career by the efforts 
of the A.W.S. Council which explains the inner 
workings of the University to her. At the begin- 
ning of each semester an orientation luncheon 
for new students is given in order to acquaint 
them with the officers of the group and its func- 
tion on this campus. At Christmas time a produc- 
tion is given on Royce Hall stage, the proceeds 
of which are used to supply local needy families 
with the necessities for a successful holiday sea- 
son. Each year the women present their Hi-Jinks 
for women only. Short skits are presented; after- 
wards the whole troupe descends to the Women's 
Gymnasium for food, music and dancing. It is, 
of course, traditional - ;s to go 

to great effort to find v.riys o^ crasiin3 tne party 
without discovery. This rarely occurs. The Activi- 
ties Banquet is held in the Spring when v/omen 
who have been outstanding in service to the 
school are given public recognition. Thus the 
A.W.S. closes another successful year of activities. 





Top: The Spurs. Dean Laughlin, and Mrs. Russell enjoy refreshments 
while acting as sponsors 



Center: It is considered good manners to pay some attention to one's 
partner no matter how dull he may be 



Left: Santa Claus left cokes, cookies and Jacques Renard in this chimney 
for the tramps at the Christmas Dance 



201 




Ably heeding the campus Amazons and still managing not 
to appear the least bit Amaionish Is the record of Alpha 
Gam's WAA President Barbara Wight. 





Left to right, seated: Jacqueline Perry. Ruth Nelson, Mary Fawlcy, Barbara Wight, Mrs. Trussell, Koto Inui. Standing: Billie Sleiti, Martha Glenn, Barbara Hale, 
Shirley Peterson, Betty Whidden, Eunice Brockway, Jean Kunkel, Dolly Reeves, Marirma Brown, Virginia Bishop, Joyce Munson, Jessie Thompson, Barbara Inhofe. 



202 




Queen of the coffers was Jacquelin Pciry. As 
treasurer she handled the W.A.A. funds. Some 
fund, eh? 




Vice-President Mary Fawley had charge of ban- 
quets and special programs, and handled most 
of Barbara Wight's dirty work, as a vice-president 
should. 




• fl • fl • 



The Women's Athletic Association is a group of 
women which coordinates the athletic endeavors of 
the coed at the University. Each year the W.A.A. 
holds annual playdays for the benefit of local and 
visiting students from neighboring campuses. These 
afternoons of supervised games aid in the construc- 
tion of a well-rounded knowledge in the various 
fields of sport in addition to giving the Physical 
Education majors good opportunities in planning 
and carrying out group activities. Besides the actual 
athletic program, this body fosters contests among 
the different groups within the Department of Physi- 
cal Education. The Association recognizes the abili- 
ties and achievements of its members through the 
granting of awards for interest demonstrated and 
general all around ability in this field of work. In 
order even to become a member of the Association, 
the student must maintain a C average for her entire 
University career and demonstrate an active inter- 
est in the efforts of the group which is justly proud of 
its history and the records of its members. 




Koto Inui spent hours writing up minutes, which 
is very confusing. Ruth Nelson as corresponding 
secretary wrote all the letters, which she enjoyed 
doing because she liked to lick the stamps. 



Perhaps the women use a different set of signals 
because the smile on the bailer's face belies the 
fact that she seems to have three strikes againsi 
her already 




oii[rs 



spoRn 




Eunice Brockway, head of Women's Fen- 
cing, has shown the girls that it's really 
only a game and should not be talten too 
seriously 



204 






Mrs. Trussell demonstrates to an admiiing and less 
bitious audience how a basket ■■ ""H" thrown 



ambitious au 



Uh-h-h. That's not the way one snouia noio m 
mouth In order really to return the shot 




Archery enthusiasts really get a break 
— They don't have to dress 



/ 




\ 




■^Sl 





¥. 





ELEANOR EVERETT 



"She is a Queen" said the Homecoming Committee, when they dis- 
covered the gaiety and beauty which had been tucked away in the 
Spanish department in the person of Eleanor Everett. Experts agreed 
with them and Eleanor became U.C.L.A.'s co-ed number one. 



M L [ [ 



S [ A R I 



Delta Delta Delta 



The lovely face of Ayleen Searl is a familiar sisht to many people 
on campus because of her participation in U.D.S., Phrateres, and 
her affiliation with Tri Delt. Ayleen's charming informality and ready 
smile have contributed much to her popularity. 





B U B U ^ n C H L 8 



Delta Gam 



m a 



The campus has shown its recognition of Barbara Nichols' pulchritude 
by naming her Attendant to the hlomecoming Queen and favorite 
model of A.W.S. fashion shows. Glamorous Barbara is an outstanding 
asset to the Delta Gamma's front line. 



[ L I I N R V [ T T [ R 
kappa Kappa Gamma 



In September Ellinor Vetter, a transfer from Colorado Collese, was 
unheard of out Westwood way; however, her vivacious personality 
and sparkling beauty were not ignored for long, and Ellinor soon 
became hlomecoming Queen attendant and the Kappa date-girl. 





JEM B A T T E I I E 
H e r s h e y Hall 



Distinctive and refreshing Is lovely Jeanne Battelle, nugget of Hershey 
Hall. Although Jeanne is but a lower classman, she has gained recog- 
nition in the Art department, and she is credited with making 
Hershey's Tea Dances socially successful. 



m fl R Y S H R K L E Y 

Pi R e t a Phi 



Mary Shofkley's regal beauty enhances the Pi Phi house. After two 
years of concentrated work in extra-curricular activities, Mary turned 
her attention to academic and social life. Despite much publicity and 
acclaim, she remains reserved and completely charming. 





B ^ R B ^ R H 
Alpha 



H U I I 
P h i 



Barbara Hull, winner of a freshman scholarship, has proved that 
academic and non-academic activities can be mixed if industry and 
charm are present as catalysts. The Alpha Phis are proud of Barbara 
as a scholar, activity-girl, and social whirler. 



DOROTHY DODGE 



C h i 



mega 



Dorothy Dodse Is the charming Chi Omega who has taken practically 
every honor awarded at U.C.L.A. for feminine beauty. Because of 
her natural loveliness and friendly personality Bruins acclaimed Dottie 
as the most popular Crew Queen ever selected. 




iiMnr^^oiTV iini 



O I 



216 



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SUBDIVISION • • MErS ORCyiZATION • KINS • MErs ORcyiznioN 
KINS • MErS ORCyiZniON • kins • METS ORCyiZATION ■ KINS • 
MErS ORCyiZniON • kins • METS ORCyiZUION • KINS • MErs 



iM'HMI2ATIOI 



^J*"Hi 





Norm Padgett builds tradition for men's activities 



220 



A. M. S. 



Ably headed this year by Norm Padgett, the Associated 
Men Students has sprung from a five-year lethargy into an 
awareness of its duties. Of course, after the long period 
of stagnation, much groundwork had to be relaid. To this 
end, the Council, a group of men representative of the 
various student activities, has become a research group to 
untangle the problems of housing for men and the orienting 
of old, as well as new, students. Not only have these snarls 
been attacked, but also the A. M.S. has begun the task of 
being the service organization that it should. In this field, 
work has started on the compilation of places, orchestras and 
prices available for social events, the coordination of all 
activities of campus men, and the revival of interest in sports 
for non-organized men. Men's Week, as the traditional 
A. M.S. blowout, was a well run success with several real 
beards and a number of hairs that tried very hard to do 
things. With the firm foundation that such work has put 
down, the succeeding men should find the row much easier 
to hoe. 





The Athletic Board has charge of athletic awards, passes on the eligibility 
of the school's athletes, and makes up the schedules of several of the 
minor sports. 



221 




Starting out with no more than the usual cam- 
pus abnormalities, Men's Week built up to a 
stench. The reek of unwashed male bodies was 
nauseating, stubble grew into itchy undergrowth, 
and clothes stood by themselves when, and if, 
removed. Headed by Spike Honig, the period of 
reversion to tripe was successful and, for a change, 
entertaining. The infested fiesta began on Mon- 
day with an All-U Sing: Will Osborne and his 
orchestra played; Lionel Hampton literally whip- 
ped the xylophone, piano and drums; and Gaylord 
Carter really made the organ sit up and beg. 
After the Sing, the evening was just under way, 
for there was a dance in the Women's Gym (this 
was the first day so it was still possible to get 
close enough to the men to dance with them). 
Tuesday and Wednesday all was quiet; the Stag 
was called off. No fun without funds, it was said. 



And for a long while, all that was heard was the champing of 



Hospital Case History: "Dead on arrival" 





,^v 



/ 



/ - 



^^/^ 



Here is a wild group of U.C.L.A. men. They have just seen the most 
thrilling event ever staged at a Men's Do. They didn't get the point, 
but some of them have learned they are supposed to applaud v/hen 
an act is finished. 



M[il 




■7,' >- 



DO 



Thursday, however, it was a different story, for 
the men had a picnic on the lawn in front of 
Kerckhoff. It turned out to be a shannbles, but 
the bodies were carried away before they became 
too noticeable. Then came Friday, Tramp Day 
with the Men's Do that evening. During the day, 
Honig and his filthy crew heckled all those who 
didn't have beards and dirty clothes. Heckling 
isn't always fun, though. Especially when it is 
being done twenty-five feet beneath fifteen gal- 
ions of suddenly unleashed water. Everything was 
all under control by evening, however, and the 
Men's Do did. The program, replete with boxers, 
wrestlers, judo artists, rooters Joe E. Brown and 
Alan Hale, and pistol shots, proved extremely 
good. But the climax came when, after a feed 
of Co-op spaghetti and meat-balls, the partakers 
floated home over the roof-tops. 



Why, boys! What would Emily say? 



223 




The Pershing Rifles, U.C.L.A.'s cracic drill unit, has represented the school at parades and ceremonies as efficiently with the new strcannllncd drill as tl did under the old. 





Earl Hanson 
Cadet Colonel, 1st semester 



James Dcvere 
Cadet Colonel, 2nd semester 



224 



MILITAIiY 



The military unit at U.C.L.A. is composed of 
Infantry, Coast Artillery, and the newly formed 
Naval R.O.T.C. The army unit is trained by a 
staff of Regular Army officers headed by Col. 
Scverson, and the naval unit is under the direction 
of Captain Battle. The course of training is 
divided into the basic and the advanced course, 
each course comprising two years. Students of 
the army R.O.T.C. who have shown outstanding 
ability are selected for the advanced course, and 
become the cadet officers, and as such they are 
required to attend a summer training camp. In 
the Navy the fellows take a cruise to the Hawaiian 
Islands where they can enjoy all the activities that 
most of us get no closer to than pictures in a 
book. This year both units have adopted the 
army's new streamlined drill, which is simpler, but 
still sufficient to attain the required standard of 
efficiency. This efficiency of the units has become 
a tradition at U.C.L.A., both having received the 
highest rating possible for general excellency in 
1939 and 1940. 





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m^B' ^Jmlw I^Efll (^ ^ JHK fl^M ^^^A ^i£^ ^~^K^MB^ 


* — *.* 



Part of U.C.L.A.'s army changes direction at "Column Right .... MARCH" 




The Coast Artillery gets training on one of the Army's new 3" anti-aircraft guns 




In the short space of two years the Naval R.O.T.C. has grown so healthy that It can now put a whole battalion on the field 

225 



K H i 




C E R G E F E I U E R 
Sigma Hpha Epsilon 



George Feister is a geology major. This is enough for most people, 
as it means tramping all over southern California every weekend, but 
handsome George also succeeds in winning medals and waving ri 
wicked sabre in the R.O.T.C. and in captivating the Hilgard lassies. 



228 



R H Y 



fl G E E 



Phi Kappa Sigma 



An enviable ability to make friends with everybody has aided modest 
Ray Masee in making a name for himself. Formerly somewhat of a 
politician and activity man, Ray is spending his last year at U.C.L.A. 
as student, man-about-campus, and Phi Kap par excellence. 









229 




DAN OF L A H E R T Y 
Phi Delta T h e t a 



Sweetheart of the row and favorite son of the Phi Delt house is Danny 
O'Flaherty. This likeable son of Erin has also engaged in practically 
every activity for which men are eligible, including the Organizations 
Control Board, Homecoming, and class politics. 



230 



SCOTT ni I I I E R 
Kappa Alpha 



Minor sports and personable Scott Miller are almost synonymous. 
His untiring work to establish ice hockey has resulted in its be- 
coming the most important and only self-sustaining minor sport. 
He is also secretary of the Interfraternity Council. 




231 




P IE R C t (; ^ i\ i\ u 



Beta T h e t 



P i 



Tall and dark Pierce Gannon knows all the best places to go and the 
best people to be seen with, for which the Beta house points to him 
with pride. Rally comnnitteeman, class councilman, and politician, he 
is popular with both men and women of campus society. 



232 



G E R C E BLISS 



T h e t a 



C h i 



An all-around activity man, George Bliss has taken part in such 
diversified things as politics, track and cross country, advanced 
R.O.T.C., Rally Committee, Scabbard and Blade, and Blue Key. 
Friendly and agreeable, George has as many friends as any student 
in the University. 





JACK 
S i g 



B L M K I E 
ma Pi 



The army and the track team point to Jack Blaikie with pride, and 
with 3ood reason. A fine officer and athlete, Jack numbers among 
his accomplishments two major sports letters, Scabbard and Blade, 
positions on class councils, and a most infectious grin. 



H M L D G I L L U 



A journalist of some note, Hal Gilliam has written many sparkling 
articles for the Daily Bruin feature page. He has also proven him- 
self a fine leader, giving the California Men new life while serving as 
their president this year. Incidentally, he is an excellent student. 




236 




mm 







B DIVISION • - SPORTS PERSOHLITIES • FOOTBUL • BUkETBUl • BH 
ALL • CREW • TENNIS • TRACK • MINOR SPORTS • SPORTS PERSONALITIES 
fOOTBALL • BASKETBALL • BASEBALL • CREW • TENNIS • TBACK • MINOR SP 




mmm 





Bill Acker- 
^.'s outstand- 
Roo^ers exp 
s well-trained 




Rafalovich was chosen 
Ttballers. "Raf" completes three years' 
guarding on the first string. 



242 



.^.ncM 





illy Okiyer was I940's 

has maintained a 300 
mixture gyfiarcJTTfHx La- and sharp fiel 
ing besid^t^ne keystone sack. \ 




Hitoshi Yonemura 



244 




Left to Right; front row: Vrba; second row: Stein, Berlcowitz, Keeton, Goldman, McPherson, B. Park, Shapiro, jacobucci, 
Bowdoin, Preston; third row: Johnson, Voncmura, Hill, E. Park, Hilson, Slater, Paquin, Zieglcr, Dumont; fourth row: Bliss, Yost, 
Melnyk, Adclman, Catterlin. Oyster, Nygrcn. Hamncr, Harris; fifth row: Field, Moore, Hannah, Carnnacit, McDaniel, Kindcl. 

RALLY COMMITTEE 




Fred Mcpherson 
RaHy Committee Chairman 



245 



Jimmy Cascbicr 
Drum Major 



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Left to right, 1st row: Carroll. Cohen, Williams, Mitchell. 2nd row: Matheson, 
Rcuttgcrs, Simpson, Zaby, Shubin. 3rd row: Fcnenbocic, Overlin. Hale, Wai, 
Kinney, Hill, Cascales. 4th row: Sommers, Stead man, George, Bartlett, Irwin, 
Smith, Gaston, Hesse. 



Kenny Washington 
Left half 





Jackie Robinson 
Right half 



250 



Jack Sommers 
Left guard 



I'Jf 4, 





Left to right, 1st row: Washington, Francis, Kyzivat, Jones, Armstrong, Strode, 
Zarubica, Viger. 2nd row: Robinson, Toland, Hoeger, Whiteboolc, Lyman, DcFran- 
cisco. 3rd row: Mathews, Frawlcy, Dye, Gllmore, Alder, Macpherson, Cantor. 
4th row: Coach Richards, Coach Horrell. Coach Blewett. 




' / ^ 



Ned Mathews 
Quarterback 




Woody Strode 
Left end 



FOOTBML COilCH[S 



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Left to right, front row: Scott. Bopp, Levi, Wolfskill, Gair, Takimura. Back row: Saunders, Richmond, Davidson, Howland, 
Budroe. 

FOOTBUll MyU[liS 







253 




Opening the season with a style of play hitherto foreign 
to U.C.L.A. football teanns, the Bruin varsity proceeded to 
cut down the highly-touted footballers from Texas Christian 
University. The time-worn hidden ball play completely baf- 
fled the Texans and accounted for six points and victory for 
U.C.L.A. With gains made by each team only in the middle 
of the field, the first half ended without score. The Bruins 
opened the third quarter with a sustained drive to a touch- 
down. Bill Overlin and Kenny Washington took turns carrying 
the pigskin while the Horned Frogs chased after the elusive 
and deceptive Jackie Robinson. Texas Christian threatened 
in the final period but lost the ball on downs. On the next 
play the Texans won their two points on a safety. 



Showing plenty of speed and deception, the Bruin varsity 
chalked up its second victory of the season; its first confer- 
ence win. The one touchdown margin of victory does not 
adequately show the superior brand of football the local team 
displayed. The lone hlusky tally was the result of a fumble 
in the first quarter. In the second half, the northerners were 
helpless as the local boys bore down in a versatile offense. 
Jackie Robinson took a punt in the third quarter and ran it 
sixty-five yards down the field to the hlusky five-yard line. 
Kenny Washington carried the ball over from there and 
Robinson kicked a goal for the first seven points. The Bruins 
scored again after Gilmore intercepted a pass in the last 
minute of the fourth quarter. 





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256 




Joe Bruin and Dorothea chin up on the 
windshield wiper 



^ f / • 




ded by Bruin 

tform 




Stanford men arc amazed as a teammate plays a dirty choke on Robinson 



Bad punting and a fighting Stanford team connbined 
to give U.C.L.A. a bad day on the gridiron. Stanford 
excelled in statistics and very nearly came out ahead on 
the scoreboard. After the local shock troops had been 
pushed back in the first quarter, Horrell sent in the regu- 
lars. Robinson immediately rushed the ball fifty-two yards 
down the field to the Stanford thirty-six yard line. After 
losing the ball on downs, the Bruins came back in the 
second quarter to recover an Indian fumble. Five plays 
later the Bruins scored a touchdown with Overlin carrying 
the ball over on a ten yard run around end. In the third 
period two successive Brum punts that netted eight yards 
set up the second Indian score. With three and a half 
minutes left in the last quarter Robinson intercepted a 
Stanford pass and scampered to the enemy eight yard 
line. Cantor and Washington pushed the ball over from 
there. Robinson again saved the day by kicking the extra 
point. 



Wynne blocks as Gilmore gets 
off a short punt 







As a comeback from the previous week's Stanford showing, 
the Bruin Varsity easily overwhelmed a fighting Montana 
team. The regulars started the game for the first time this 
season and made two quick scores in the first quarter. Both 
touchdowns were made by Kenny Washington; the first 
followed a sixty-eight yard run. The second score was 
made from the six yard line. The reserves played the rest 
of the game, with the exception of a few minutes in the third 
quarter when the first string rushed in to make another score. 
Again Washington made the tally, this time on an eleven 
yard jaunt. The conversions were made by co-captain Frawley. 
Montana's touchdown was made in the waning moments of 
the fourth quarter when Hudacek plunged over from the 
one yard line. 




Oregon's Webfeet did the work but lost the game. The 
Ducks pushed and passed the Bruins dizzy only to have 
Robinson break up the ballgame with two rapier-like touch- 
down thrusts. Oregon made sixteen first downs; U.C.L.A., 
four. Jack Somnners' great defensive play stamped him as 
the best lineman on the field. The 220 pound guard began 
the scoring by booting an angling field goal for three points. 
Oregon opened the second period by driving sixty-three 
yards to their only score. Several plays later Washington 
stood on his own 25 and passed to Robinson on the Oregon 
23, who dodged two defensive backs and jogged across the 
goal. After Sommers and Frawley recovered two Oregon 
fumbles within the Bruin 10, Robinson took the ball on his 
7, and sped eighty-two yards to pay dirt. 



^ 



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noiv^N 




Eleanor Everett leads the well guarded proces- 
sion to her coronation as queen 




With the theme "The Babe sets a Bearskin", Home- 
coming in the 1939 style was a production to rival Holly- 
wood's best. Week-long activities to welcome home the 
Alumni, to entertain the student body, and to wear out 
the habitues of Kerckhoff Hall brought many a laugh plus 
a great loss of sleep. This year's affair was especially 
marked by the completion of the big C (which managed 
to stay blue until after the festivities anyway), and the 
breaking of a habit by the mighty Sophomores when they 
won the annual brawl from the Freshmen. Of course, the 
climax, after the coronation of a queen as Queen, came 
with the parade and bonfire which did not disappoint; 
for there were females in shorts, males in three-cornered 






They don't get around Kenny. Cal nnan gets nailed trying to circle Strode's end 



After a Bruin fumble gave California a one-touchdown 
lead in the first quarter, the local team came back to out- 
play completely the Golden Bears. The Bruins showed an 
ability to go places, even without Jackie Robinson, whose 
injured knee kept him on the sidelines. Ray Bartlett and 
Charlie Fenenbock alternated at right half. Kenny Wash- 
inston rambled 65 yards to give U.C.L.A. its first touch- 
down. A Washington to MacPherson pass accounted for 
the second tally. Another of Washington's passes, this 
time to Woody Strode, gave the Bruins their third touch- 
down for a convincing victory. The outstanding line play 
of the local boys stamped them as a different team from 
that which faced Stanford and Oregon. The Uclans out- 
scored, out-passed, out-charged, and even out-punted 
their northern brothers for a complete triumph. 



Frawley Icicks the extra point 
that ties the score 




There's Mimi 









be iine^ y-*wnt 




A rearin3, plunging Bronco came south to meet a slashing, 
clawing Bruin; honors were even, hlighlighting the bruising, 
scoreless battle were the three main futile scoring drives; two 
by Santa Clara and one by the Bruins. Santa Clara in the 
second quarter reached the Bruin two; and again in the third 
the Broncos got to the nine yard line, where a fourth down 
field goal try failed. With six minutes to play, the Blue and 
Gold really rolled when, sparked by Leo Cantor and "Klub- 
bing Kenny" Washington, it moved steam-roller fashion to 
the Bronco three. There, with five seconds left, a fifteen yard 
penalty set the Bruins back, and a twenty-eight yard place 
kick by Jack Sommers fell heartbreakingly short. Pleasant 
surprise was the continued improvement in Bruin line play. 
This game was the first of a series to be played with Santa 
Clara. 



\>^*r--- 




It took another of the Bruins' potent fourth quarter Blitz- 
kreis touchdowns to tie a ru33ed Oreson State crew. In the 
last seventy seconds, after clickins Bruin teamwork shoved the 
ball 82 yards in seven plays, Leo Cantor rocketed through the 
Oregon State right tackle to even the score. Frawley's con- 
version attempt was wide. First score came in the second 
period when Kenny Washington hurled a soft pass to Ned 
Mathews who packed it over. Frawley booted a perfect 
placement. The powerful Beavers surged back to hit pay 
dirt, and younce kicked the extra point. Soon afterward, 
Kisselburgh dove over center to score again for O.S.C. The 
last minute bombing attack followed a tight 15 minutes of 
football during which the year's first whipping for the locals 
seemed certain. But they pulled something out of nowhere 
and did it again. 




BRUINS 24-WA$HINI;T0N STATE 7 



Althoush U.C.L.A. crushln3ly outplayed Washinston 
State, the Bruins trailed 7-6 for half of the same. The 
local boys looked tough as they marched eighty-two 
yards and scored on a Washington-to-Strode aerial. 
Frawley muffed the attempted conversion. The Cougars 
surged right back and early in the second quarter they 
crossed the goal and converted. As playing time 
diminished in the fourth quarter, the Blue and Gold 
attack exploded into action. A sustained power-drive 
took the ball down to the Cougar twenty-five where 
Washington passed to Robinson for a score that put 
the Bruins in the lead. Robinson quickly scored again 
on a thirty-five yard run. In the last minute of play 
the local reserves scored a touchdown on their own. 



The Cougar running attack, dangerous at first, bogged down 
and then was snowed under in the final period 




U.C.L.A.'s invisible backfleld made the most of the foggy might 
when the Golddust Twins ran wild in the last quarter 




So, 







Nave didn't get through every time, but it took a lot of Bruin to stop him 



Battling for four scoreless quarters, the Bruins main- 
tained their undefeated record for the year, but were 
nosed out of the Rose Bowl bid by the conference vote 
for U.S.C. Repeated fumbling kept the Blue and Gold 
warriors from getting an offense under way in the first 
half. The Trojans very nearly scored in the first quarter 
when a running attack brought the ball down to the one 
yard line, but Lansdell fumbled there when he was hit by 
Mathews and Robinson, and Strode recovered in the end- 
zone for an automatic touchback. For Bruin rooters the 
game really began when the Bruin fourth-quarter rally 
produced five successive first downs. Paced by Kenny 
Washinston's passing and running, the ball was brought to 
the Trojan two yard line, hiere, two yards from victory 
and the Bowl, the advance was stopped and U.C.L.A. lost 
the ball. Rugged play on the part of sophomores and 
juniors on the squad heralded a great team for 1940. 



The Trojan beef trust had been 
laying for Robinson 






Is it over? 








Johnny Johnson 
Captain 




Left to right. 1st row: Ncwfield. Hcinti. Frccdman. Stupin. Russo, Gilchrist, Lescouhc. Clark, Rounscvelle. 2nd row: Hootcn. Norstrand, 
Nakaolta, House, Johnston, Meacher. Chartraw. Smith, Santana, Moore. 3rd row: Coach Oster, Lapinski, Chcrncss, Kalionzes. Burns. 
Browning, Sparlis, Pinney. 



272 



Hampered tremendously by a small squad and an 
avalanche of Injuries, Freddie Osier's 1939 Brubabes fin- 
ished a disastrous season without a victory and were forced 
to cancel the all-important S.C. game because they 
couldn't field a full team. The injury jinx started imme 
diately with the first game which the frosh lost to Santa 
Ana Junior College, 24-0. Six backs, including Leo 
Meacher and Glen Burns, were lost from the already inade 
quate squad. Oceanside Junior College tripped the pea 
greeners in the next game, 16-0, and removed for the 
season Lapinski, a valuable guard. The Berkeley frosh 
arrived and for the first half the Brubabes clicked; then the 
heat and the lack of reserves took their toll, the final score 
being 41-14 in favor of the northern brothers. Herb 
Weiner, outstanding end, was injured. The handful of 
yearlings left invaded the Stanford reservation and met a 
strong Papoose team that ran roughshod over them tc 
win 41-0. The City College and S.C. games were then 
cancelled, and the powers above began to think about 
material for next year. 



antana Is stopoed hard by Clark ^"d Johnston as 
hartraw sprawls out after missing him. 





A nice hole opens up for Johnston, while his inter- 
ference takes Sparlis and Stupin out. 



r;-<- 



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All together and dressed in their new blue and silver 
outfits, the 1940 varsity basketball team is pictured 
with their new coach, Wilbur Johns. Standing, left to 
right: Audry Richardson, Bob Null, Lloyd Anderson, 
John Colla, Paul Klein, Roger Hillis and Ray Bartlcti. 
Seated: Harley Humes. Clark George, Larry Gitller, 
Captain Alex Rafalovich, Bill Ward. Vic Millar and 
Ernie Handlesman. 



SQUAD 




Sandy Cameron 
Center 



276 




Senior Manager Bill Kugler is pictured with his assistant managers after 
completing a successful season. Managers, left to right, are: Joe Luters, 
Pete Dolby, Ear! Dorance, Gordon Hewson, Fred Martin and Dicit Harris. 



277 




'Raf qrabs the ball out of the air as Sandy 
Cameron and two Loyola men do their best 
to set it for themselves. In the background 
Jackie Robinson can be seen in the midst 
of the play. 



pi!mic[ 

Compared to other hoop seasons, the 1940 Bruin 
practice session was mediocre. Due to lack of or- 
ganized material, Westwood's new casaba mentor, 
Wilbur Johns, was forced to spend considerable 
time and strategy in forming suitable combinations 
to fit adequately his style of play. Inaugurating a 
system entirely different from that of past years, 
Johns had to experiment with his men and find the 
very best combination that would conform to his 
strategy — that is, making every man eligible for a 
breakaway. Three sophomores and one junior letter- 
men returned this year and were bolstered by up and 
coming freshmen in addition to several experienced 
junior college transfers. With their new coach, their 
new silver and blue uniforms and a new outlook on 
basketball, the Uclan cagers surprised everyone with 
their constant improvement. With one senior ap- 
pearing on the team roster, hopes are high for a 
strong squad next season. 



Although surrounded by opposing play- 
ers, Harlcy Humes retrieves the ball for a 
rebound shot during an exciting moment 
in the BruinSt. Marys tilt. 




Coach Wilbur Johns and his Bruin hoo 
opened their practice season with the top-ra 
San Diego State quintet at San Diego. D 
the opener, the Bruins recovered sufficiently to 
the Staters the following evening, 31-28. The 
week, back at home, a sharp Bruin team defeat 
the Bank of Americas, 39-38. Then, up in th 
region, the Johnsmen dropped a tilt to pov 
Santa Clara and split a double header with 
Jose State. The remaining pre-season games 
played in the Westwood gym. First, the 
dropped contests to two industrial teams com 
of ex-college stars — North American Aircraft 
Fox Studios. The final polish was applied In 
successive week-end double headers in whic 
Uclans paired with Loyola and Southern Ca 
and played host to California Aggies, New M 
State, and St. Mary's. The Bruins dropped co 
to New Mexico and Loyola and defeated the 
fornia Aggies and the St. Mary's five. 




Down on their knee^ go Jackie Robinson and 
a lively St. Marys forward while fighting for the 
ball. The Bruins defeated the Gaels during a 
double-header played in the Bruin gym. 



From the looks on their faces you would 
think they had seen a ghost, but it was 
the only way Johnnie Colla and Sandy 
Cameron could remove the basketball 
from the possession of an opposing player. 



Muscles tense, eyes steady and a . 
ready for a long shot, a Loyola man 
is just about ready to let go as Cap- 
tain Rafalovich and Jackie Robinson 
keep their eagle eye on him. 



U[ 




mm 



Big Bill Biggerstaff of the Bears senses oppo- 
sition near as Anderson and Cameron oi 
the Bruins move in to block his shot 



BiggerstafF and Ward go up in the air for a 
jump-off at the foul line as Referee Jim 
Tunney keeps his eagle eye on them. 




The important series between the California Bears and the Westwood Bruins occurred with both contending for the cellar posi- 
tion. The first evening at Berkeley the Bruins narrowly missed a win, but the second game resulted in the Bruins' first conference win 
in two and one-half years. The excitement of the first game was a little too much for the local hoopsters, and the Bears eked 
out a 39-36 victory. The following game reversed the action and the Uclans came through in the last half. This victory marked the 
beginning of a new spirit among the basketbailers. U.C.L.A. had a fighting team that was laying for the Berkeleyites when they 
came south. Again in the southern series, the Bruins played second fiddle to their foes in the first game, but in the game on the 
following night they came out fighting mad to blast the Bears 35-33. Robinson pushed through the winning basket. 

280 




Working for a tip-rn shot are Cameron and 
Rafalovich as two Stanford men block their 
attempts 



A fast bit of action under the Bruin basket 
during one of the exciting Stanford-Uclan 
tilts at Wcstwood 



The U.C.L. A. -Stanford series produced some of the most thrillin3 Bruin contests of the 1939-40 season. By virtue of their 42-31 
upset win over the Indians in the final game of the series, the Bruins broke a four-year jinx held over them by Stanford. The first two 
games played at Palo Alto resulted in two wins for the Redskins, but not until Jackie Robinson had put 23 points through the hoop 
to outscore Don Williams, Stanford ace, for high scoring honors of the evening as well as of the season. The Bruins lost the first game 
by some fifteen points, but the following night Coach Johns teamed up a combination that kept the Indians hustling until the final 
whistle in order to win the game. Stanford won the Northern series by scores of 53-38 and 40-36. A different light was shed on the 
subject in the Southern series played at Westwood gym, for the Bruin five played the type of basketball they were capable of 
playing. The Uclans measured their foes on Friday night losing a close game, 51-42, and then went on to upset them in an overtime 
thriller the next evening. 



281 




Westwood's hoop squad, although garnering wins 
over both Stanford and California, was treated 
rather roughly at various times in the season by the 
fourth team in the Southern Division. Southern 
California's Trojans, Conference champions, playeH 
the Bruins twice at the Shrine Auditorium and tw'ice 
in the Westwood gym, outplaying and outscoring 
the locals in all four games. Coach Barry's well-drilled 
team was just too fast for the Bruins in the initial 
game and emerged the victor by some eighteen 
points. As this was only the third conference game, 
it was a step in the right direction for the Bruins 
adding sharpness to the inexperienced team. Of the 
second game, also played on the Trojan "stage", 
little can be said other than the Bruins just had an 
off night. The Blue and Gold offense was not click- 
ing, and the defense was a sieve to the alert Trojan 
sharpshooters who took advantage of every break. 
In the second series by reason of their splendid 
teamwork and the security of their home court, the 
Bruins had the S.C. quintet gasping for air until 
the last five minutes when substitute forward 
Keith Lambert entered the game and sank 
basket after basket to put his team far 
enough ahead to break down the 
Uclan morale and bring lost confidence 
back to the Trojan regulars. The feature of the 
Westwood series, as well as of the first series, was 
the scoring battle between Robinson and Vaughn. 
The Bruin sharpshooter by outscoring Vaughn, in the 
the last series ended the season in the top spot of 
the conference scoring column as well as winning 
All Coast honors. Thus the Bruins accomplished more 
this year than they have in many seasons. With 
everyone returning but Captain Alex Rafalovich and 
many promising prospects in the offing, the 194 
basketballers should be on even terms with the best 
teams in the country. 



) 




Jackie Robinson get: high off the ground in order to sink c 
set up shot while a Trojan tries vainly to block the shot. Sandy 
Cameron and Bob Null watch. 



282 





L 



\l 



19 



mcron an 



d Se 



3uring one o 



the ga 



playe 



the two teams 
he U.C.L.A. gym. 





Under the fine coaching of Don Ashen, the Freshmen yearlings, after numerous setbacks, completed a very 
successful season climaxed by a startling win over the S.C. Trobabcs. Seated, left to right: Spencer 
Williams, Al Towne, Ralph Donnally, Roger Bozione (Captain), Nat McKevvitt, Homer Hocker, Bob King 
(Mgr.). Standing: Dave Sacks, Al Izmerian, Dick Horton, Tom Pollack, Warren Chambers, Kevork Tashjian, 
Coach Don Ashen. 



284 



Coach Don Ashen's yearling hoopsters, while not win- 
ning too many games during the season, accomplished 
what they set out to do, namely put an end to the S.C. 
Trobabes' long string of victories. A good deal of the 
team strength was lost by the middle of the season. The 
starting combination, Ray Chartraw, Bob Perry, John 
Fryer, Bill Arnot, and Ralph Donnelly was lost from the 
roster, due to either grades, injuries, or ineligibilities. In 
spite of these setbacks. Coach Ashen molded a group of 
second and third stringers into a well balanced team. The 
locals boasted victories over Glendale J.C., Loyola Frosh, 
Sacramento J.C., Santa Monica High, Santa Monica Har- 
bor Police, and Santa Monica J.C. Small, speedy Homer 
Hooker and consistent high point man Tom Pollock held 
the two forward spots most of the season; Dick Horton, 
stepping into the pivot position after Fryer was declared 
ineligible, was a standout on defense and the best tip-in 
artist on the team; Captain Roger Bozzone and Ralph 
Donnelly capably filled the important guard positions dur- 
ing the conference season. 




Izmerian, Sacks and Towne all plan to 
go after the ball in few seconds 




Roger Bonone and two Pasadena lads 
make a valiant attempt to outjump 
each other for possession of the 
casaba 







Left to right, kneeling: Sinclair, Colla, Hummes, Fredericks, Bell, Zampathas, Jaffec, Coach Schaeffer, Manager Edson. Standing: 
Robinson, Cohen, Hill, Hale, Park, Cameron, Hess, Johnson, BartLtt, George, Moore, Sur, Null. 



I Q 



\ D 




John Colla 
Pitcher 



John Moore 
Outfield 



286 







'v'^'»>^. 



Lynn Hale 
Outfield 




Varsity baseball managers, left to right: Jim Edson, Joe Hawks, John Sudduth, Senior Manager Lee Bigler. 



289 



^ 




Bruin catcher, Ray Bartlctt. lets a fly 
ball go as he sees he has no chance 
to get it 



DIA 
D 




OID 



Up one week and down the next, Coach Jim Schaeffer's varsity 
nine made a vahant attempt to stay abreast with the Conference 
baseball rivals and did manage to beat each team at least once. 
Rudy Hummes, Sophomore hurling sensation, stole the spotlight for 
individual play when he almost single-handedly won games for the 
Bruins with his superb pitching. When he was out of the lineup, the 
team fell to pieces. Jackie Robinson, in turning down track for base- 
ball, added his name to the records for consistent field play and base 
running. The squad was far from complete until basketball season was 
over, for five of the team's strongest players were tied up with basket- 
ball duties far into the baseball season. Such players as Bob Null, Ray 
Bartlett, Jackie Robinson, Clark George and John Colla were high- 
lights on the basketball floor as well as on the grass field. Captain 
Billy Guyer, Kirk Sinclair and Max Hess, all on the short side, were 
the leading hitters. 



290 





It's a hit and a Bruin bascballcr strides out from the home plate 
toward frrst base. 



Lynn Hale, outfielder, beats out a bingic, reaching first base before 
Jack Clcmmcnts, City College first baseman, can put his foot on 
the bag 



Johnny Colla rounds first base while stretching his hit into a two- 
bagger 



291 



C.IJJ. 



Bob Null takes a wicked cut at the ball during the Stanford 
leriei. From the empty appearance of the catcher's glove, he 
seems to have gotten at least a piece of it. 





^a-**,^. 




Note the tense expressions on the two players' faces during this early season game — and 
it's only a foul ball. The umpire appears to have a stomach ache. Johnny Moore watches 
calmly from a distance. 




292 




i; E M N 

Tne Brum baseba.lers made an aj:,j.ciou3 beginning \/itS an 8-1 
victory over Glcndale J.C., a decisive win over Pasadena J.C, 
defeated the City College Cubs 7-3 and finished by beating Glen- 
dale once again. In their fiist Conference gorr.e with California, the 
players and two hundred rabid Bruin rooters put an end to the contest 
./it.l a near riot. The umpire called the game no contest. T,'-.e Bears 
won the next game and went home as the winners of the se ics. Santa 
Clara v/as next up and lost a close one to the locals, 12-10. Before 
leaving for their northward jaunt, the Bruins split their series with the 
Stanford Indians. While in the Bay region, the Uclans managed to 
grab off only one victory — that over California. Rudy Hummes and 
his great hurling stopped the Indians and the Gaels of St. Marys on 
successive week-ends. St. Marys later slaughtered the Bruins 20-2. All 
in all the Bruins played a fairly consistent brand of baseball and were 
right in the running until the final game. 



Ray Bartlctt scores one for the 
Bruins. It could be on one of the 
several home runs he hit durin3 the 
season. 




Milt Cohen throws to Bob Null in an effort to catch a Bronco off first. 
Note the ball, a few feet away from Null. 



Catcher Ted Bell waits expectantly as a St. Mary's runner is waved In. 
The scoreboard looks none too reassurln3. 



293 





Art Reichle 
Coach 




NIcic Angeles 
Capiain 




Frosh baseball squad, left to right, first row: Burns, O'Neal, C -ndos, Angeles, Guyer, Halferly. Second row: Sacks, Kobyashi, 
Britton, Stupin, Riddle, Coach Reichle. Third row: Mgr. Hollm n. Roach, Eckberg, Ernst, Co-npton, Kahn. 



294 



Coach Art Reichle and his peagreen baseballers de- 
cided to call the whole thing off after the members 
dropped out for spring football practice. The Brubabes 
won four out of eight contests, being held to a deadlock 
by Fairfax High School. The Brubabes started off the 
season with a bang by winning their first three starts — 
Southwestern Business School, California Poly and Whittier 
Frosh. Loyola proved to be too much for the locals and 
walked away with two victories, 5-2 and 9-6. Several out- 
standing players were developed and throughout the 
season showed promise as future varsity material. Nick 
Angeles, Lynn Compton, Don Britton and Glen Burns, all 
top prep school material, stood out among their team- 
mates for their sterling play. With a turnout of only 
eighteen men, Coach Reichle moulded a powerful nine, 
not only in fielding technique but also in hitting power. 



Catcher Don Britton was always an obstacle to the 
opposing teams' scoring attennpts. 





Captain Angeles tries to beat out a throw, but as 
he loolcs very sad, he must have failed. 



^^ 





^jgp 



p 




pgj^ V^* l-^ra^4ij| a 1fc 



1 ' I 



Left to risht: Cullison, Milledge, Cable, Mihm, Jacobs, Johnston, Clark, Streeton, Quejada. 




Up at the catch, the first boat prepares for its workout. Stiff drills were in order throughout the short season 



298 



nnrr 



Varsity crew at U.C.L.A. increased its prestige this year by trimming the 

favored Oregon State crew and turning in creditable performances against 

Sacramento J.C. and California. Four men in the varsity boat rowed their last 

race for the Bruins against Cal: A. J. Meyer, five; Shelby Cullison, four; Bob 

Streeton, two; and Ignacio Quejada, bow. Up from last year's frosh were Bud 

Staley, seven, and Ccdric Scudder, six; Stroke Kingston Cable and three-man 

Homer Mihm have another year of eligibility. With a strong junior varsity to draw on, Coach Ben Wallis experimented 

all season to find his best eight man combination to race against Cal. In the finest physical condition any Uclan crew 

has ever known, the Varsity eight was known for having about the fastest start of any boat on the coast. 



Stroke Shelby Cullison strains somewhat in practice on Ballona Creek 




The varsity boat's victory over Oregon State called for a dunking of coxswain Leon Jacobs 





Left to right: Pease, Meyer, Mlllilcan, Fuller, Jacobs, Johnston, Stalcy. Lloyd-Morris, Files. 




The jayvcc was often stopped to receive instruc- 
tions from Coach Wallis in the launch 




Caught between strokes In recovery at Ballona Creek, the jayvee crew strams toward the 
final hne at bridge 



A junior varsity that often whipped the varsity in time trials gave Coach WaHis a strong 
squad to work with. The jayvee acquitted itself well in vanquishing the Compton J.C. varsity 
and pushing hard in the wake of the Oregon State and Cal shells. All j.v. nnen with the 
exception of Pease and Milledge will be rowing again next year. Individual connpetition for 
seats in the varsity shell was so strong throughout the season that Ben Wallis was kept busy 
playing checkers with the men in the two boats. 



The varsity eight, resting after its victory, allowed the Beavers to take their shell in first 




301 



The class of '43 put on the water the strongest freshman 
crew that the school has seen in four years. Ineligibilities 
kept the frosh from racing more than one shell during the 
season. First race on the schedule was with the second 
boat from Sacramento J.C. which finished little more than 
a deck's length ahead of the unseasoned frosh. The year- 
lings showed their mettle later in the season in winning 
by two lengths over the Compton J.C. varsity, rowing on 
the Compton course at Long Beach. Schooled in the fun- 
damentals of rowing by Pete Hall, the frosh oarsmen 
developed to the point where they rivaled the varsity in 
speed and effort, if not in form and power. The freshman 
boat averaged 169 pounds, with Captain Neal Dundas, 
a power plant at either five or six, tipping the scales at 
190. The two promising frosh coxswains are expected to 
replace the varsity and j.v. helmsmen who are graduating. 
Having displayed a great deal of spirit for their first expe- 
rience in the sport, the whole boatload of freshmen is 
expected to report next year. 



The Frosh had the hardest-working boat on the water, often 
rowing by themselves after the other crews had gone in 



FROSH BOAT 



The varsity, inspecting their shell with the coach, often had to 
wait around for the tide to conne in 





Crew managers, left to right: Simons, Harrison, senior manager 

Bill StuHi. and TInch. 



--*«*«•. 



t 




A 



C 





Varsity tennis squad, left to right, first row: Bright, 
Shamhart, Wharton, Prodan. Fox, Capt. Beach, Morgan. 
Second row: Coach Ackerman, Arcnsmeyer, Gordon, 
Stanford, Crickard, Galloway, Sugich, Sr. Mgr. Perdew. 



S Q 



A D 




J. D. Morgan 
6lh singles 



30i 




Tennis nnanagers, left to right, standing: Mayle, Lantz, Stanton, 
Hilson, Morton. Kneeling: Sr. Mgr. Perdew. 



307 



lillCQU[n[liS PlillCTIC[ 

1940 just wasn't U.C.L.A.'s year on the tennis courts. A spirited but inexperienced varsity found potent, star- 
studded squads from Berkeley, Palo Alto, and Figueroa Street to be in another class. The Bruins lost six out of six 
Coast Conference matches. Preparing for its disastrous conference season, U.C.L.A.'s racket-twirlers matched 
practice strokes with five other Southern California teams beginning in February. Coach Bill Ackerman's men in 

white outpointed Redlands University, 6-4: Cal Tech., 8-4; Pepper- 

A Ions stretch, a backhand drive, and a good follow through rated jj^g College, 4-2; while taken to the cleaners by U.C.L.A. alumni, 

Gordon a good shot. Of course J. D. Morgan's concentration helped 



the ball over the net 



l-l I; LA. Tennis Club, 0-9. 




In the far corner wc have Captain Norton Beach waiting for Bartell's 
ace. Hope this one is good because the first one was in the net 




Our own local courts were the scene of the matches when 
Stanford paid us a visit. Seavcrs and Brock arc two good reasons 
why we took such a beating 

In the same Stanford series U.C.L.A.'s Kristo Sugich and Tony 
Prodan were paired for one of the doubles matches. Sugich is 
poised for a ferocious forehand drive 




nyFORD 

ATCHES 



U.C.L.A.'s netmen took the severest setback in many a season 
when a barnstormins Stanford team blanked the local lads, 9-0. 
In a return engasement a week later in Palo Alto the Bruins did a 
little better in losing to the Indian power-house, 2-7. Sam Fox, 
playing at fifth singles out-fought Stanford Captain Dave Brock, 
6-4, 2-6, 6-1. The other win came in convincing fashion in the first 
doubles match when lanky, smooth-stroking Bob Stanford, and 
cool-headed Alex Gordon pulled an upset in taking Redskins Stan 
Owens and Bob Low, 6-1, 6-0. 



309 




e[l!K[lEY 



After winning three out of five practice matches, U.C.L.A.'s 
1940 crop of tennis talent opened its ill-fated conference campaign 
against a title-defending California squad. The Bruins were 
trounced in both matches: 7-2 on the Westwood courts, 8-1 in 
Berkeley. Number four singles man, scrappy Sam Fox, and number 
six singles, never-say-die J. D. Morgan, both won their loca 
matches. A first doubles combine of sophomore sensations, Bob 
Stanford and Alex Gordon, saved the Bruins from a blackout on 
the Berkeley courts, trouncing the Bear first tandem, 6-2, 9-7. 



Sophomore flash Alex Gordon gets off a backhand smash for his opponent to worry about. 







Coach Bill Aclerman calmly surveys the scene as Tony Prodan 
reaches for the ball. 



Kristo SugJch awaits the return of his high lob rather anxiously from 
the expression on his face. 



OUTHERN 
CAllFOnU 

in losing their last two matches the Westwood netrnen gave 
the conference champion Trojans a hotter time than the scores 
indicate. The fighting Ucians dropped the first match on the 
Westwood courts, 8-1, but forced four of the nine matches to 
three sets in addition to the lone win of a makeshift second doubles 
pair, Alex Gordon and J. D. Morgan, 6-4, 6-1. Bob Stanford was 
the hero of the second series with the cross-towners as he saved 
the Bruins from a blank by his win over George Toiey. In the other 
matches, Ackerman's boys were not able to give the undefeated 
Trojan champs much to worry about. 




Frosh tennis squad, left to right, first row: Mgr. Stanton. Mgr. Hilson. Taylor. Feigunbaum. Christoff, Laun. Sinshcimcr. 
Second row: Dunn, Levy, Frank, Ashton, Daggett, Elson, Coach Ackernnan. 



312 



A smooth-stroking, well-coordinated 1940 freshman ten- 
nis team had the winning punch the varsity couldn't find 
and breezed through the usual aggregation of nine South- 
ern California junior colleges and high schools with but 
one setback. Coach Ackerman's yearlings went on to polish 
off U.S.C.'s frosh in their only conference matches, 8-1 
and 9-0. Pacing the Brubabe outfit were some of the best 
prospective varsity material in the history of Westwood 
tennis. Number one singles spot was held down by Jean 
Feigunbaum, and number two by Captain Sidney White. 
Miio Frank and Angelo Christoff, a pair of steady lads, 
shared the number three and four singles assignments. 
Other first string men were Robert Laun, Conrad Kinstad, 
Max Dunn, Naoyki Takasugi, Harley Taylor, Arnold Schwab, 
and Harold Swynne. 





MIlo Frank, No. 3 singles, drives a hard forehand 
shot during a practice session 



Harold Gwynne prepares for a forehand drive 
down the right sideline 









'3- 




Left to right, seated: Miller, Sugita, Morhar, Carlberg, Dono- 
van, Edingcr, Steed, McBain, French, Wyatt, Molyncaux, Cerro, 
Schilling, Holcomb, Shaughncssy. Standing: Trainer Channbcrs, 
Assistant Coach Drake, Bennett, Honda, Rawls, Moore, 
Edwards, Pcrrin. Hoegcr, Bradley, Hastings, Hillett, Lewis, 
Blalcely, Shoaff, Lacefleld, Sinclair, Coach Trotter, Manager 
Jdcobucci. 



S Q 



no 





Bill Lacefield 
Broad Jump, Hurdles 



Clark Shaughnessy 
Javelin 




Varsity track managers, left to right: Roy Menashc, Irving Furst, 
George Myron, Senior Manager Joe Jacobucci, Russell Simpson, Roger 

Vandcgrift. 



317 




• li • ll • /l • 




Senor Bruin, due for one of the greatest track years in his history, 
got one setback after another until his record for 1940 looks little 
more than mediocre. Ineligibility, failure of second and third place 
strength to materialize, and the comparative failure of ranking men 
to come through proved too much of a barrier to success. Captain 
Carl McBain, potentially one of the greatest hurdlers on the coast, 
finally hit his stride in the Stanford meet, winning the lows in 23.7. 
Hal Sinclair, colored sprinter, gained confidence in himself rapidly, 
winning both dashes against California and the 220 against Stanford. 
The broadjumping trio of Schilling, Lacefield, and Turner brought that 

sparkle to Coach Trotter's eyes more than once. Bradley and Wyatt were outstanding in the middle distances. Hoeger in the shotput, 
Edinger in the pole vault, Schoaf in the high jump, and Shaughnessey with his javelin could always be counted on for points. 






Tfry:/^ 



'•■(♦-'.^i-:- 



318 



>=• . : '.. 



Tom Bradley and Gail Wyatt 
placed one-two or vice versa in 
the quarter mile in nearly every 
meet 






Jack Schilling usually made the longest leap oi the 
Bruin "kangaroo trio" of broadjumpcrs 



Hal Sinclair hit his best form this season, always placing well up in the sprints 



319 



e[liK[L[Y 



This baton entitles bearer to one free lap around 
the track 




Cal had it over the Bruins in distance races with U.C.L.A. shy on trained materia 




320 



M 



[ 



[ T 



im famous, 



Edinger's vaults didn't make hli 

but they always added points to the 

Uclan score 



The track season got under way with a victory against a weak 
Arizona team, with U.C.L.A. scoring 8 1 1/2 to Arizona's 491/2- Schilling 
and Turner tied in the broad junnp at 23' 8", and McBain won the low 
hurdle race in 23.7. Next came the Southern California Athletic 
Association. Tom Bradley ran a 49 second quarter and a relay team 
showed its potentialities in a fast win. The Bruins played host the next 
week to a mighty Golden Bear team, and despite Sinclair's double 
win, Edinger's vault of 13' 6", and Lacefield's first in the broad jump, 
the score sheet looked rather lopsided: U.C.L.A., 39; California, 92. 
Leaving the southland next, the Bruins met a strong Stanford con- 
tingent at Palo Alto and fared little better. Feature of the meet was 
the relay. The Stanford boys led all the way but were pushed to a 
new world's record of 3:10.5. 




Since high jumping was not U.C.L.A.'s long suit, the usual Bruin quota 
in the event was one place 




Captain Can McBaIn finally proved in competition this year that 
he was one of the best hurdlers on the coast 



321 



Frosh 40 Pasadena J.C. . . 82 

Frosh 69 Santa Mon. J.C. 62 

Frosh 44 Long Beach J.C. 87 

Frosh 85 Glendale J.C. . . 76 

Frosh 82 Inglewood H.S. . 3! 

Frosh 63 University H.S. . 40 





'P^^'i.^M^-'^'- 



^ 






>*; 









r 



Left to right, first row: Lockhart, Dcninneyer, Panovich, Maggard, Hosford, Newman, Chiojcc, Feldman, Boyd, Moody, Duke, Co-captain 
Kaiser, Painter. Second row: Coach Trotter, Assistant Trainer Goetsch, Silver, Brazier, Byrne, Izmirian, Diez, Miller, House, Co-captain 
Russo, Condos, Rounsavell, Johnson, Richardson, Trainer Mike Chambers, Frosh Coach Drake. 



322 



Displayins strength in several events the 1940 Bruin 
Frosh went through its season with four wins and three 
losses. Outstanding by virtue of his 49' 5" effort in the 
shot put as well as for his status of high-point man of the 
squad was big Mario Russo. Competing in both shot put 
and discus, Russo rarely missed winning both. Also out- 
standing was little Kenny Boyd, distance man whose year's 
efforts were high-lighted by a 1 :58.2 half mile in the Long 
Beach J.C. encounter. Duke and Kaiser were consistent 
point winners in the sprints, giving promise of materially 
strengthening the 1941 varsity in those events. Coach 
"Ducky" Drake was more than pleased with the work of 
Maggard who averaged better than 12' 6" in the pole 
vault. Diez, despite a leg injury which hampered him all 
season, turned in several creditable wins in the low hurdles. 
Miller, in the high hurdles, and Johnston in the discus, 
placed consistently. Outstanding meet of the year was the 
Inglewood hiigh fray which found the Frosh taking every 
first place but one. The yearlings will be a welcome addi- 
tion to next year's varsity. 



Duk. 




place for ihe frosh scantyclad lads 




A frosh high jumper goes up Into the oione as Jack 
Schilling, last year's ace, watches his form 



mil! SPORTS 



5 t «J Q i 




Lefl to risht, kneeling: Accvedo, Bliss, Morhar. Moore, Donovan, Williams. Standing: Drake, McFarland, Morden, Brown Carlberg 

Miller, Van De Water. 

CR n COUNTRY 




Intermingled with runners from L.A.C.C. and Long 
Beach J.C., the Bruins start a grueling race over the 
Westwood course 



A well-balanced team of harriers led by Lane Donovan and 
followed in close order by Don Morden, Leon Miller, Bill Carl- 
berg and Don Moore went throu3h a successful season with one 
loss and four victories. The loss came at the hands of the star- 
studded squad from Berkeley with a 56-17 score. Santa Monica 
J.C. bowed twice before the Bruins, first by a score of 46-17 
and the second by a wider margin. LaVcrne College was sub- 
dued by an overwhelming margin to account for the third vic- 
tory. The most convincing win of the season was the 17-43 score 
over Glendale J.C. 



326 





Left to right, seated: Shaw, Gordon, McKeniie, Crutch- 
field, Lyie, Ortwin, Abotii. Second row: Smith, Johnson, 
Hill, McRoskry, Gross, Clark, Lcrt, Manager Hanlin, 
Ramos. Third row: Hostler, Cornitius, Stone, Howard, 
Co-caplain Banker, Coach Stevenson, Co-captain Car- 
mack, Southmayd. Rawls. 



Two members of the Stanford team are pictured be- 
tween Abotiz (center of picture) and McKeniie on 
the local field as they follow the ball. 



s 







c 



c 



[ 



R 



Bruin soccer stock took a drop when the locals won only one 
game, that the opener against Los Angeles C.C. by a 4-1 score. 
The shin-kickers were defeated on the home field 3-1 by Cal, 
9-1 by the marauding Stanford Indians, and 3-1 by a revengeful 
City College team. The final home game ended in a 2-2 tie with 
San Mateo J.C. Away from home the local Bears were defeated 
by Cal 2-0, and by San Mateo 3-0. The L.A. Cubs won the 
deciding game of their series by a 2-1 score. Co-captain Car- 
mack, Haskins, Southmayd, and Clark shone on defense, Lyall 
and Banker on offense. 



327 



C E 



HOCKEY 



An undermanned, but never outfought, teann of puck- 
sters began a disastrous season by losing to Toronto and 
Gonzaga by scores of 2-0 and 4-0 respectively. Regular 
league play found the Bruins with a 4-3 victory over Loyola, 
along with 0-0 and 3-3 ties and a 1-5 defeat. L.A.A.C. 
proved a tougher foe by beating the locals. Even harder 
to take were the losses dealt by the Trojans, ultimate 
eague champs, who swept the series 4-2, 7-1, and 5-2. 
Santa Rosa J.C., northern champs, won a post-season 
game 5-1. Bright spot was picking Miller, McPhec, and 
Pechet as all-league. 




Captain Scotty Miller (6) and Bill Ewonus attempt to steal 
the puck from their University of Toronto foe. 






Left to right, front row: Dawson, McPhee, Bishop, 
Bartholomcow, Captain Miller, and Pechet. Sec- 
ond row: Assistant Coach Duncan, Hirschfield, 
Mellon, Perkins, Carroll, Christofferson, Coach 
Tafe, and Manager Smith. 



Intra-squad practice finds a struggle 'for the ball 
going on between Hart, Saunders, Assistant 
Coach Ashton, and Casson 




US - le. BHKETBHl 



Strange as it may seem, Southern California high schools were 
the only teams to defeat our lightweight basketball team. Santa 
Monica, Loyola, Taft and St. Helena were the high schools to 
win from their collegiate foes. The game with Santa Monica 
witnessed the scoring of 29 points of his team's 30 by Jack 
Saunders with the prepsters scoring 3 1 points to nullify his 
achievement. The 145 pounders made the season a success by 
defeating Pasadena J.C., Antelope Valley J.C., the All-Nations 
Club, and other strong teams. Cal was defeated 31-34 and 
46-50 in two games with the locals. 




Left to risht, kneeling: Casson, Anton, Captain Sied, Hart. Keller 
Wollcott. Standing: Harlsfleld, Cramer, Fried, Saunders, Meikle 
John, Miller, Lecbody. 






^ 



lV'v 



?l..|j: iLT*.»i>**>< 



Left to right, kneeling: Coach Don Parii, John Mitchell, Bill Reordon, Captain Paul Crawley, John Siegal, Doug Lawhead, Manager 
Frank Schiavani. Standing: Don Shaw, Gordon French, Bill Kuehne, Jim Hokom, Bob Orr, Devere Chrislensen, Verne Kelscy. 



A T E R 



P I 




A capacity audience witnessed this close game in the 
local pool. White-capped Trojan is seen passing the 
ball toward the Bruin goal. 



Untied and unbeaten! Such was the brilliant record set by 
UCLA's championship water polo team. Undefeated in practice 
games against the strongest competition in the Southland, the 
habit lasted throughout the league season. California was de- 
feated 8-5 and 7-2, with Stanford yielding 5-3 and 5-1. S.C.'s 
Trojans were submerged in two thrilling games 4-2 and 3-1. The 
brilliance of the team was shown when Christensen, Mitchell, 
Kelsey, Crawley, and Orr were picked on the first team of the 
all-coast septet, and Siesal on the second team, with Lawhead 
highly rated. 



330 




S K I 



Over the Slcl jump goes Muddy Walters to demonstrate 
U.C.L.A. strength and form 



TEAM 



Participatin3 in the Yosemite Intercollegiate Ski meet as 
well as meets held at Donner Pass and at Mount Baldy, the Ski 
Team, captained by Charles Melhorn, who was hampered by 
injuries early in the season, was disappointed in its champion- 
ship hopes. Lew Danielson, an outstanding Freshman from Mon- 
tana and number one man on the team has been chosen as 
captain for next year. Other strong hopes for the season were 
Charles "Muddy" Watters and Wolfgang Kessler. The team 
weakness lay in slalom and cross country. 



331 




I 



Seen in Intra-squad action arc. left to right: Vas 
Icpolous, Boulian, Peterson, and Austin. 



Left to nsht, first row: Frishman. Eiduson, Levitt 
Austin, Boulian, and Simmons. Second row: 
Coach Helt. Peterson, Schwartz. Vasilopolous 
Crandell, Epstein, and Magglplnto. 




H A 



D II A I L 



The Blue and Gold handball team came through with a com- 
paratively successful season by virtue of breaking out of the 
loss column for the first time in several seasons. Defeats this 
year were again numerous, including losses of 0-4 and 1-3 to 
the Hollywood Y. 0-4 and 1-3 to the L.A. Y., by the same 
scores to the Elks Club, and 1-3 to the Pasadena Athletic Club. 
Victory came at the expense of the San Diego Y and the 
Long Beach Y. Both teams were held to 2-2 ties as well as 
being defeated by 3-1 scores. In the only collegiate game the 
Bears defeated the Bruins 8-1. 



332 




Left to right, first row: Har.is, Domoto, Uematsu. Conrad, 
Captain Thomas, Ito, Urata, Endo. Second row: Drooz, Walker, 
Badger, Rosenberg, Porterfield, Minnock, Jones. Standing: 
Manager Moullon, Ward, Marriam, Micks, Lyman, Coach 
Briggs Hunt, Smyth, Cunningham, Sellars, Lalta, Manager 
Applefield. 

Tommy Iwamoto really lakes his opponent for a ndc in a Judo match. 



R [ S T I I 



C 



This year's grunt and groaners provoked more ■favorable 
expressions from tfieir fans. Leading off with U.C.LA.'s first 
victory over the L.A. Athletic Club, the Bruins went on to 
defeat Whittier, the 160th Infantry and other teams in practice 
matches. Cal was defeated 13-14 by virtue of the Bruin wins 
turned in by Thomas, Drooz, Latta, and Micks. Cal reversed the 
decision by winning the Conference meet with 29 points to 27 
for the Westwood team. One point victories were eked out 
over Fullerton J.C. and Sherman Institute in the Southern Cali- 
fornia A.A.U. and Intercollegiate meets. 



333 



m 



I 




C. Aubrey Smith, with cane, referees a game with the Hollywood Cricket Club. Boris Karloff is doing the bowling as Lou Kaufman 
waits for his turn at bat. 

CRICKET 



^cp\.<^f^^ aoJ, 








Left to right, sitting: Sockett, Slobodien, Thomas, Green, 
Grieff, Pcrluss. Standing: Kimmclsman, Kaus, Godkin, 
Hilson, Blunden, Frishman, Kaufman, Captain Ortwin, 
Bergh, Bigler, McCulloch, Bachelis, Lanti, Shatford, 
Keeton, Sommcrville. 



Captain Bob Ortwin and Sam McCulloch combined to lead 
the cricket team in winning over Venice 131-83, thus continuing 
with last year's unbeaten season. The highly touted hlollywood 
Club was bowled over 90-47 in a game featuring the skill of the 
Bruin bowlers Peter Kinnel, McCulloch, and Ortwin, and the 
fielding of Lee Bigler. A long series of victories was brought to 
an end when the Corinthian Cricket Club upset the team 
120-84. The Blue and Gold banner resumed its victory march 
when the L. A. Cricket Club could score only 90 points to 91 
for seven wickets for the Bruins. 

334 




i; 







Left to right, first row: Captain Bob Ortwin, Red Gar- 
son, Frank Newell. Don Hall, Biercc Bailey. Don 
Carman. Second row: Coach Don Park. Howard Culver. 
Everett Urbach, Everett Smith, Earl Hughes, Manager 
Miller Murphy 



Captain Bob Ortwin demonstrates the technique of 
driving as the members of the team look on with more 
or less appreciation 



I 



F 



Pomona Coilese offered the first competition of the 3olf 
season, and was handed a 1/2 to 8I/2 defeat as thanks for playing 
host to the Bruin team. Garson of U.C.L.A. turned in the best 
individual score with a 69 for a par 70 course. Santa Monica 
J.C. was the next victim, losing I to 8. Conference competition 
proved to be somewhat tougher, as witnessed by the Stanford 
score of 25I/2 to I/2 over the visiting Bruins. The Big Bear of 
the North was somewhat more lenient, being satisfied v/ith a 
201/2 '° '/2 victory. Though never lenient, the Trojans were not 
so impregnable, beating the locals 1 2 to 6. 



335 



s 



I M M I N G 



Paced by Bill Kuehne and Devere Christcnsen, the swimmin3 
team had little difficulty in submerging Compton J.C. 41-34 
and Pasadena J.C. 45-29. This same pair of natatore were unde- 
feated in the sprints throughout the season. Kuehne set new 
Bruin records in both the 50 and 100 yard dashes. The superior 
strength of the Texas Longhorns in the other events brought the 
invading Southerners a 46-28 triumph. A record-breaking relay 
team composed of Shaw, Glasband, Keuhne, and Christensen 
provided the margin of victory in the 41-34 win over Cal. 
Stanford defeated the Bruins 38-37. 




Texas Lonshorns talce off along with a pair of Bruins in the 
local pool. 







Left to right, front row: Steve Valensi, Gene 
Glasband, Don Shaw, Bill Kuehne. Second row: 
Coach Don Park, John Sicgal, Paul Francis, Devere 
Christensen, Captain Bob Orr. 




Range practice finds John Truex, Captain Phil 
Acktey, George Smith, and Morris Golden firing 
from the kneeling position. 



RIFLE 



TEAM 



Victories to the sharpshooting Westwood team came from 
ail corners of the nation. College teams from almost every state, 
as well as hiawaii, wired in their scores only to find their Bruin 
foes with more imposing totals. This unblemished record applied 
both to the Varsity and R.O.T.C. matches. Medals were awarded 
to the outstanding members with Howard Boblet receiving the 
gold medal. Truex and Smith were awarded silver medals, with 
bronze trophies going to Ackley, Golden, Stephens, Gleason, 
Rhine, Menard, Preston, Brown, Kirkland, Heaton, Michaelson, 
and Rayburn. 




Left to right, kneeling: Truex, Captain Ackley, Golden, Smith, 
Menard. Standing: Coach Thomas, Rayburn, Michaelson, Rhine, 
Hobart, Heaton, Manager Detrich. 




Henry Sugiura seems to have malicious thought In regards to Captain Bob Oblath's mid-scction as they pair off with epees. 

FENCING 




Left to right: Manager Werner. Emerman, Coach 
Murphy, Saari, Williams, Laughlin, Honig, Edmundson, 
Snyder (kneeling), Captain Oblath, Sugiura, Jarmie 
(kneeling), Snavely, Ramirez. Stove. 



U.C.L.A.'s feint-and-thrust artists used these same tactics 
to 30od advanta3e in winnin3 all their dual meets. Emerman 
won all his sabre bouts to lead his team to a 14-12 victory over 
L.A. City College. The Cubs later went down before the 
onslaught of Larry Laughlin and his cohorts. Laughlin won all his 
sabre and foil bouts to aid materially in the 13-10 win. Ably 
supported by Captain Bob Oblath and Don Emerman, this Bruin 
iron-man paved the way to two successive victories over S.C. 
In the Southern Division Championships, Cal and S.C. relegated 
the locals to third place. 



338 




Left to right, Icnecling; Phil Torres, Jack Van Gclder, 
Hal Tolin, Hector Anton. Standing: Coach Norman 
Duncan, Gil Woalwcber, Jack Christiansen, Seymour 
Drovis, Ed MacKevctt, Manager Frank Frias. 



San Jose State man ducks a left lead and prepares to 
counter with his own left 



B 







\ 



I 



C 



A short season ended with the Bruins two down and one up. 
The slugfest with Stanford ended 3-2 in favor of the locals. 
Torres, Van Gelder, and Woalwcber defeated their foes to bring 
about the season's only victory. Against the always potent Cal 
Aggies, Woalweber's draw and Swan's victory gave the team 
1 1/2 points to 51/2 ■for the husky farmers. The Golden Bears 
handed their brother maulers an overwhelming defeat. Hal Tolin 
provided the one victory of the 8-1 score. 



339 




Left to Ti^hi. first row: George Campbell, Harry French, 
Russell Bfdwcll, Oliver Gross. Second row: Delbert Haskell, 
Harry /arrow. Captain Bruce Conner. Third row: Bob Finlt. Bob 
Hudson, Rolland Dougherty, Bill Corwin. 



May the triangle be eternal — at least until the 
applause is forthcoming 




e Y M 



T E \ 



One of the hi3hlights of Bruin sports was the brilhant showing 
nnade by the gym team. Marred only by a 40-41 loss to 
L.A.C.C., the records show a series of easy victories over 
collegiate foes. The Trojans of S.C. were defeated in two 
encounters, 76-10 and 70-16. In the conference meet they won 
with I 16 points to 791/2 for Cal and 23I/2 for S.C. Next to bow 
before the mighty Bruins were the highly rated Aztecs of San 
Diego, who were outmuscled 75-5. Captain Bruce Connor, Bill 
Corwin, Harry Yarrow, Russell Bidwell, and John Campbell were 
standouts in every meet. 



340 



Howard Culver of the Betas ta 
to be a telling blow during on 
fraternity games. 




It loolts like a bit of an ovcrthi 
baseman valiantly tries to right 
wrong. 



•j-fifK*<('r£;ti*ri>-_<« ■■-- 



nUMURU SPORH 



Intramural competition gave the tongs ample cause to rally 
to the support of their organizations. Theta Delta Chi won the 
tong battle, but were defeated by the Blanks for the all- 
University crown. Phi Kappa Psi and the Butchers met to 
determine the school champs in basketball, with the non-orgs 
emerging victorious. Theta Delta Chi won its second crown 
in volleyball, and made the triumph complete by defeating the 
Physical Education Club. Phi Gamma Delta led the S.A.E.'s by 
a close margin to annex the track meet. Theta Xi bowled over 
Phi Kappa Sigma to win in bowling. 



341 



Francis Wai of the Economics team 
comes up from the rear in an attempt 
to take the ball away from Smith in 
a non-or3 game 



iTRHIIUliU 







This ball carrier seems to be off to a 
good gain as his fraternity foes close 
in on him 



Wally Kindell of Thcta Xi fraternity 
shows good form in winning the 100 
yard dash from Kaiser and Hill, who 
placed second and third 



342 



Believe it or not this is a version of 
intcrfratcrnity football, though the 
runner seems to be undecided about 
that fact 




Al Taft trails Dor Bcmctt in the in- 
terfraternity mile, in which Bennett 
finished second to Meadowcroft 




'■■■'- ■■%:, 



i;UBDIVISIOH • • RECREUION • SORORITIES • PHRUERES 
;; • RECREUION • SORORITIES • PHRHERES • FRUER^ITIES 
SORORITIES • PHRHERES • FRUERKITIES • RECREHION ■ 



FRUERKITI 
• RECREHiO 
SORORITIES 



i 



t 



JOE m 




Phi Delts Dan O'Flaherly and Jim Devere and Beta 
Orv Clarke are happy about something at the 
Junior Prom. Someone probably burned a hole in 
the table cloth. Note the adoring look Jim's getting. 

Oohl this is loo terrible to describe. What's the 
matter with Barbara Tesche? Don Brown looks 
solicitous, but it doesn't seem to help at all 

Tracy Moore looks sour, somebody looks sad, and 
Norton Beach looks surprised, while Dorothy Halliday 
dimples at Johnny Wardlaw. All this went on at 
the Junior Prom. 




JO CO FORM 



The annual Interfraternity Ball, held this year 
at the Beverly Wilshire hHotel, brought added 
prestige to U.C.L.A. when it was broadcast from 
coast to coast on a national hookup, with Hank 
McCune as master of ceremonies. The festivities 
went on in both the Florentine and Gold Rooms 
of the hotel. Those who arrived early danced 
to Ray Noble in the Florentine Room; those who 
got there after nine o'clock pushed into the Gold 
Room, and danced to a hill-billy orchestra, much 
to their disgust. A later formal affair, the Junior 
Prom, held on April 19, with theme based on 
UCLA's so-called "country club" reputation, fea- 
tured the music of Carl Ravazza. At this affair one 
of the famous country club "convertible coupes" 
was given away, a model T Ford. 



The moguls of the Interfraternity Ball, Carter Cra 
who was responsible for the dance, and Julian 
Blodgett, president of the Council, gab with one 
another while Dolly beams approvingly. 



Spilce Honig rests his weary head on a pretty 
shoulder at the Junior Prom. He's just pretending 
he's tired, we think. The others are too engrossed 
to notice. 



Bottom: Oblivious to everyone but herself, including 
Bill Anderson, her partner, Beth Anne struggles to 
retain modesty, but the odds seem to be against her 






Top: Look at the birdic! They did, and look at the results 
It couldn't have been that funny 



Other dancers are too polite to notice girl at far left — gad 
what agony 



Bottom; Pledge dance at the Alpha Gam House. At least one 
couple didn't notice the congestion 



Center: As usual the photographer is the most popular man 
at the dance, George Bliss agrees 




Time out from the dance. Nobody has any cigarettes, 
so Windsor isn't smoking 



Once in a while you gotta do some dancing. But when? and where? 
From time to time throughout the year the fraternities and sororities 
give informal dances, which are supplemented by other all-university 
dances such as Bruin jigs, Christmas dance, and the AWS-AMS dance. 
At certain times during the year, notably around elections, many of 
the organizations hold open houses, to create through the medium of 
entertainment and refreshment a favorable prejudice towards their 
candidates. 



YOU'VE GOT TO 

DO SOME umr 



351 




Top: Crossed sabres make an impressive setting for 
the charming honorary colonel, Helen Hay 



Center: Not to be outdone by the soldiers, the 
sailors also went social, at their annual Navy ba 



Bottom: Intermission time finds guests at the Navy 
ball making a reconnaissance of the situation 



CO SOCIAL 



Even the business-like Army and Navy 
men like to relax once in a while, and 
dancing seems to be a favorite way. Out- 
standing traditional affair has always been 
the Scabbard and Blade Formal, held this 
year at the Riviera Country Club. Feature 
of the evening was the tapping of new 
members of Scabbard and Blade and the 
introduction of Helen Hay as Honorary 
Colonel. The Navy unit also gave a ball, 
and this Navy dance bids fair to become a 
prominent event in University society. In 
April the Pershing Rifles and Conning 
Tower combined to give a very successful 
formal, also at the Riviera Club. 



Footballer Don MacPherson and A.M.S. prexy 
"Pudgy" Padgett look pretty in their newly-pressed 
uniforms. Rosemary Fleming doesn't loolc too happy 
— wonder why? 



Dick Pryne goes through the arch at Scabbard and 
Blade. The lack of uniforms is astounding. 



Bottom; Doesn't seem to be orders from the front. 
Everyone looks too happy 






Zan Ballsun waited at least five minutes for the 
photog to take this picture, with the above re- 
suits. Don't people look silly sometimes? 

Second childhood comes as seniors and juniors 
relax on the floor at the Frosh-Soph Barn Dance. 
Whoops! May Jo Funk is a soph, isn't she? 

From the looks of this, the Barn Dance was a 
howling success. Most everyone looks happy, a 
few pensive. What's the matter. Pris? 



Every year finds barn dances still the 
nnost popular features in the way of 
entertainment a la informal on campus. 
Smartly dressed coeds and dapper stags 
like to transform themselves every-so- 
often into hillbilly hayseeds and hicks. 
Some barn dances are held in the woods. 

(Beware coeds!) Others are held in just plain old barns with 
hay and stuff. Traditional barn dances find the Kappas at 
Whiting Woods, the Kappa Sigs in their own back yard, in 
their own barn, too, believe it or not, and the Theta Chis also 
have . . . but why go on? Common sense says that all the 
Greeks on campus ought to be thoroughly nauseated at the 
thought of them. But they aren't. 




l[T OUR 



354 





HAIR 




Sec the happy little morons, and notice the 
maniacal glee on everyone's face. Morris Parry 
seems to be doing a bit of Itnifing behind his 
pal's back. 



Monte Steadman looks lovely, but Mary Boyn- 
ton's eyes and the camera clicked at the same 
time, with disastrous results. There's Anderson 
again, looking really ugly. 



Left: The Kappa Sig barn dance was a real 
brawl. The photographer was very surprised when 
this picture came out all right. 



That glorious affair, the annual Frosh- 
Soph Barn Dance, was held this year at 
the Little Verdugo Club Barn (or some- 
thing like that). Music was furnished by 
a real 'risterkrat-hatin' Feather Merchant 
band, and intermission entertainment was 
due mainly to the valiant efforts of 
Jim Zastro, John Lindgren, and ex-yeller Johnny Vrba, whose 
attempts to win various and sundry prizes (including a lovely 
hot water bottle) were the source of much amusement and 
comment. The night was perfect, so only about half the farmers 
present were dancing at any one time, which was fortunate, 
because the place was really packed. This was strange, because 
nobody knew where the place was or how they ever got there. 



3S5 




THO$[ 
MONDAY Um 



Top: Ray Noble and Kay Kyscr, top-notch orchestra leaders, 
who appeared at the same sing, much to the delight and 
surprise of the 2000 students, get together to compare notes 



Left: After lying dormant for some time, Royce Hall Tonight 
was revived. This skit presented by Uclans proved as popular 
as most of the big name performers 



Right: The International Hot Club, Woody Strode. Bob Wai, 
and Lenny Safir. accompanies Martha Tllton. It was hard to 
decide whether Strode or Tilton was more popular 



356 




The audience is enjoying the 
Chce-chee-chcc girl's enjoying 
herself. The thought of appear- 
ing before a university audience 
holds no qualms for her 



The most popular on-campus social affairs are the a 
University Sings, which during the past season have played 
to full houses, and then some, with students banging on the 
doors for admittance during half the entertainment. Much 
credit is due Hank McCune, chairman of the music and service 
board, hiank is responsible for the appearance of such big-time 
names as Kay Kyser, Ray Noble, Glen Gray, Muzzy Marcelino, 
Will Osborne, Gaylord Carter, Lionel Hampton, and UCLA's 
own Pat Freiday. 



Wai stands out while his trio takes the spotlight 



357 




Top left: Frankly people, presents aren't 
that funny 

Top right: Well, the boys look comfort- 
able anyway 

Bottom: Hmmm. He didn't talk that long 
to me 



Semi-annually after formal pledging 
each sorority presents its pledges to 
the campus at a tea dance. Formals 
and corsages are in order for the 
pledge line; while one fraternity on 
campus dared to follow this custom, 
with the boys not wearing formal 

gowns. No, they wore dinner jackets, blue jeons, and vegetable 
corsages. Customarily, presents are held from four until six in 
the afternoon when students are more likely to be free from 
classes. This is open season for the boys, who shop around from 
house to house, and look over likely dating prospects for future 
reference. The girls who stand in the pledge lines usually describe 
them as painful, besides, the actives usually have the edge on 
them when it comes to the eligible males. 



THE BOYS lOOK [M OVEK 



358 




Top left: Snag that birdie, Tillle, but don't 
snap anything 

Top right: The Gene Purpus" swing it. In 
costume, too 



Those popular insects on a dance floor- 
jitterbugs 




\. L RECREAnS US 



There is only one prerequisite for the 
W.A.A. Recreationals: ener3y — enersy 
to play badminton, ping pong, volley- 
ball, box hockey, and pin bowling. Then, 
when a state of collapse is imminent, 
there is swimming and dancing. And, if 
it is still possible to laugh, nothing is 
more humorous than a 225 pound football guard swaying grace- 
fully in all directions and sections to the soothing music of a 
polka. In plain language, these things are a lot of fun. They 
provide a type of entertainment that is not available anywhere 
else, and the success of the program has resulted in their exten- 
sion throughout the year and even on into summer session. Not 
to be taken before an important quiz. 



359 



OORIW 



^,^:-^:. ■, r"> /•i<!wi*l#«i*$«t*i».-* 



■ft 






>, 




Left io risht, first row: Sue Shelby, Doris Clegg. Second row: Joan Irmas, Dorothea Thompson, Priscilla Pierce. Jane Nuttall, Virginia Kennedy. Doris Mac- 
Dougall. Jeanne de Garmo. Third row: Frances Johnson, Marianne Francis, Louise Guldstrand. Jane Cooper. Patsy Murphy, Rachel Williams. Joanna Rock. 
Fourth row: Betty Jane Curtis, Shirley Pfeiffer, Sally Grady, Evelyn Bluemle. Esther Cooke, Anne Borchard, Janet Barry. 



P A 



H [ L I [ 



C 




Rosemary Fleming 
President 



Panhellenic council members - presidents: 

Sue Shelby Alpha Chi Omesa 

Doris Cle33 Alpha Delta Pi 

Joan Irmas Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Dorothea Thompson . . . Alpha Gamma Delta 

Priscilla Pierce Alpha Omicron Pi 

Jane Nuttall Alpha Phi 

Virginia Kennedy Alpha Xi Delta 

Doris MacDougall Chi Omega 

Jean deGarmo Delta Delta Delta 

Frances Johnson Delta Gamma 

Marianne Francis Delta Zeta 

Louise Guldstrand Gamma Phi Beta 

Jane Cooper Kappa Alpha Theta 

Patsy Murphy Kappa Delta 

Rachel Williams .... Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Joanna Rock Phi Mu 

Betty Jane Curtis Phi Omega Pi 

Shirley Pfeiffer Phi Sigma Sigma 

Sally Grady Pi Beta Phi 

Evelyn Bluemle Sigma Kappa 

Esther Cooke Theta Phi Alpha 

Anne Borchard Theta Upsilon 

Janet Barry Zeta Tau Alpha 



362 



Panhellenic council members - representatives: 
Rosemary Flemin3 .... Alpha Chi Omega 

Louise Parker Alpha Delta Pi 

Geraldine Wolf Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Mary Lee McClellan . . . Alpha Gamma Delta 
Marrcele Von Dietz .... Alpha Omicron Pi 

Dorothy Lee Beldon Alpha Phi 

Virginia Kennedy Alpha Xi Delta 

Betty Bartlett Chi Omega 

Jean MacKenzie Delta Delta Delta 

Betty Rand Delta Gamma 

Barbara Wetherbee Delta Zeta 

Betty Meigs Gamma Phi Beta 

Jean Sutherland Kappa Alpha Theta 

Mary Walker Kappa Delta 

Ann Pulliam Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Frieda Liebscher Phi Mu 

Marcella LeGer Phi Omega Pi 

Dorothy Malinou Phi Sigma Sigma 

Jean Fulcher PI Beta Phi 

Janice Froiseth Sigma Kappa 

Marcella McCo.ry Theta Phi Alpha 

June Jellineck Theta Upsilon 

Janice Lipking Zeta Tau Alpha 




C 



i 



c 



Janice Lipking 
Vice-President 



I 




Left to right, first row: Rosemary Fleming, Louise Parser. Second row; Geialdine Wolf, Mary Lee McClelian, Marrcele Von Dietz, Dorothy Lee Beldon, 
Virginia Kennedy, Betty Bartlett, Jean MacKenzie. Third row: Betty Rand, Barbara Wetherbee, Betty Meigs, Jean Sutherland, Mary Walker, Ann Pulliam, 
Frieda Liebscher, Fourth row: Marcella Le Ger, Dorothy Malinou, Jeanne Fulcher, Janice Froiseth, Marcella McCorry, June Jellineck, Janice Lipking. 



363 




Founded 1885 

Active chapters 61 

Inactive chapter I 

Membership 17,518 

Alpha Chi Omega was organized on the campus 
of De Pauw University at Greencastle, Indiana, and 
the Alpha Psi chapter was established at U.C.L.A. 
in 1926. Founded originally as a music sorority, it 
has continued to aid in the field of creative art by 
maintaining the Star Studio at the MacDowell 
Colony in Peterboro, New Hampshire. This institu- 
tion affords the struggling writer, singer, or painter 
a quiet, secluded spot in which to study at almost 
no expense. Numbering many prominent women 
among its members, the sorority is especially proud 
of Dorothy Thompson, Gladys Swarthout, and Mrs. 
Edward MacDowell. Socially the local chapter has 
been very active and every fall holds its biggest 
dance in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood 
Roosevelt Hotel. 



Sue Shelby 
President 



nn\ CHI OMEU 





Left to right, first row, Seniors: Emogene Brede, Elsie Brockseiper, Coralie Brown, Kathleen DeWitt, Betty Pick, Rosemary Fleming. Second row: Lorraine 
Heddcrly, Charlyne Nolan, Rosemary Ropp, Sue Shelby, Lucretla Tenney. Juniors: Jane Althouse, Texanna Bates, Geraldine Frederick, Frances Jamison, 
Constance Milton, Margaret Moor. Third row: Sarah Ryan, hlarrict Stacy, Mary Tompkins. Bonnie Turner, Barbara White. Sophomores: Marjorie Beyer, 
Constance Curtis, Marie Dashiell, Eleanor Flynn, Betty Lou Jackson, Bette Ludwick. Fourth row: Ruth Mills, Miriam Otto, Margaret Rea, Ethel Sherman, 
Paulette Steinen, Betty Jean Stream, Prudence Thrift, Marian Wood. Freshmen: Barbara Boland, Jean Boyer, Katherine Crowell. Fifth row: Virginia 
Fretter, Margaret Gannon, Anne Hagerman, Mary Louise Hawley, Bertha Kelly, Elaine Lettice, Mary Jo McManus, Jean Patterson, Mary Paul, Marjorie 
Turner. Pledges: Joan Brooks. Sixth row: Patsy Butterfield, Betty Cary, Jean Davis, Dorothy Gaffney, Lenorc Murdock, Eleanor Owen, Arlene Patten. Gayle 
Rinck, Nancy Tyler, Bette Vandegrift, Ruth Weineke. Not pictured: Harriet Hessel, Helen Clark, Dorothy Keating. 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Joan Irmas. Lois Levine, Dorothy Miller, Dorthea Slate. Second row, Juniors: Shirlcc Elias, Lorraine Krasne, Edith Kunin, 
Annette Lippman, Adalie Margules, Pearl Robbm, May Rothenberg, Shirley Schreiber, Ruth Shapiro, Ruth Tanner, Hortense Weill. Third row: Geraldine 
Wolf, Muriel Wolfson, Shirley Wolin, Lila Zelltin. Sophomores: Betty Ann Carlisle, Sara Cooper. Elaine Cowan, Shirley Desser. Shirley Fihrcr, June Fried- 
man, Sylvia Friedman. Fourth row: Bertha Schneider, Rollie Schwartzman. Dorothy Skroopica, Eleanor Tyre, Minnette Winnick. Freshmen: Jacqueline Brin. 
Beverly Chapman, Joann Ferbstein, Louise Grossblatt. Jean Ann Rosenbaum. Francine Sprecker. Fifth row: Etta Sugarman. Charlotte Weisstein. Pledges: 
Ruth Adelman. Lillian Bennett, Paula Block, Marjorie Blum. Erna Lou Harris. Joyce Klein, Shirley Kroll, Hennie Leiie, Roma Rattner. Sixth row: June Riave. 
Doris Robbin, Bernice Robinson, Florence Robinson. Joann Rosenbaum. Audree Smolier. Elaine Stromberg, Natalie Taraday. Elaine Walters. Doris Weisel, 
Winifred Wolf. Not pictured: Beverly Broudy, Charlotte Horowitz. Elinor Karp. Florence Sessin. Emily Wallerstein, Rosalie Abell. Adele Goldenberg. 
Rita Leavitt. Jean Roddy, Paula Wurtzel, Inez Liftman. Helen Sichel. Judith Cohn, Natalie Hamburger. 



ALPHA EPS 

Founded 1909 

Active chapters 26 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 4,538 

To bind acquaintanceship was the main factor in 
the founding of Alpha Epsilon Phi at Barnard Col- 
lege. The local chapter, Phi, came to this campus 
in 1924, and has well lived up to the standards of 
the national in its philanthropic work. Main in this 
field were the formal ball held for the benefit of the 
Cripple Children's Ward of the Mt. Sinai hlospital 
and the complete Christmas party given to the Julia 
Ann Singer Day Nursery. The first of these affairs 
was attended by 500 couples and was held in the 
Fiesta Room of the Ambassador hHotel. The chapter, 
headed this year by Reba Biustein Cohen, has had 
a successful administration and feels amply repaid 
for its efforts. 



Joan Irmas 
President 




365 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Barbara Buckner, Margaret Campbell, Margaret Curtis, Jean Fagin, Jane Ferguson, Gerrie Griffith, Betty Lou Haller, Elaine 
Kingsbacher, Virginia Magec, Mary Lee McClellan. Second row: Ruth Moone, Betty Morris, Ellen Rogers, Dorothea Thompson, Peggy Thompson, Barbara 
Wight, Betty Yeoman. Juniors: Mina Buckner, Virginia Cavett, Betty Crawford, Lucille Hartley, Aidamae Huston. Third row: Harriette Luke, Ruth Shedd, 
Helen Jean Shipley, Alma Stewart, Dolly Vaughan, Betsy Lu Wells. Sophomores: Betty Brewer, Eunice Brockway, Claralec Brown, Helen Crosier, Patty 
Elam, Glendine Fulton. Fourth row: Jeanne King, Mary Magee. Mary Moore, Roberta Mortenson, Lola Munroe, Patricia O'Brien, Louise Pollock, Dorothy 
Renfro, Dorothy Schweikert. Freshmen: Marjorie Crawford, Sally Fluck, Elizabeth Hollman. Fifth row: Jane Smithwick, Leona Wallin. Pledges: Genevieve 
Abrams, Gerry Ames, Jean Bisbee, Leona Bradfeld, Evelyn Brewster, Dorothy Broughton, Pauline Campbell, Carmen Chase, Betty Doerr, Dolly Fischel. 
Sixth row: Jeanne Halsey, Ursula Kahle, Helen Lund, Marjorie Middlemiss, Marjorie Moone, Ellen Grace Pope, Carolyn Price, Georgie Randle, Susanne 
Shuman, Margaret Squire, Joan Tingley, Betty Jo Wakefield. Not pictured: Betty Kay Roche, Dorothy Argabrite, Helen Rising, Marjorie Vaughan, Jose- 
phine Gilbert, Virginia Sitterle. 

UPHA UMMA DELTA 

Founded 1904 

Active chapters 48 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 12,000 

It was at Syracuse University that Alpha Gamma 
Delta held its first meetin3 to organize the social 
sorority that established its Delta Epsilon chapter 
on this campus in 1925. Interested in several charities 
the house places the most emphasis on the mainte- 
nance of two summer camps for underprivileged 
children; one in Jackson, Michigan, and the other 
in Welland, Ontario. Several prominent women, 
Sarah hienderson hlay, Agnes Newton Keith, and 
P. Mabel Nelson, have belonged to and aided the 
Alpha Gams in this work. Socially minded' also, the 
local chapter always climaxes its social season with 
a well attended Rose Banquet. 




Dorothea Thompson 
President 



366 



Founded 1872 

Active chapters 37 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 12,500 

Founded at Syracuse University in 1872, Alpha 
Phi is by way of being one of the oldest sorori- 
ties in the U. S. Locally, the Beta Delta chapter 
was installed in 1924, and has since become a prom- 
inent factor in campus activities. Testifying to the 
standards of Alpha Phi national membership are 
women of such prominence as Anna Roosevelt 
Boettiger, and Frances Willard. Local chapter ac- 
tivities take in the social and altruistic lines of work: 
socially, two formal dances, a pair of pledge affairs, 
and a costume bail head the list; charitably, the 
largest benefit was a Fun House Party held to raise 
money for the needy children of Sawtelle. Other 
interests led to a Mothers' Day Breakfast and 
monthly Faculty Dinners. 



ALPHA 




Jane Nuttall 
President 



P H 






'* Ail ^^J^ ^^ 



l> e a ^ 






>f\0^«l 



V 1 im 








Left to right, first row, Seniors: Eleanor Allebrand, Jane Bowhay, Barbara Donnell, Olive Fisher, Helen Hay, Karolyn Kruse, Jean MacLean, Mary Alice 
Madden. Leslie Ann Martin, Jane Nuttall, Perlita Pcnberthy. Second row: Peggy Pierce, Mayla Sandbeck, Jeanette Slaven, Katheryn Skidmore, Barbara 
Tesche. Billye Trowbridse, Leta Frances NX/eaver. Juniors: Dorothy Belden. Shirley Cameron, Margaret CorrJgan, Roselyn Cuneo, Joy Dalrymple. Third 
row: Nancy Fawcett, Merlise Gunther, Pat Hillard, Alice Holt, Helen Malmgren, Jean Moir, Joyce Timmins, Kathryn Wilson. Sophomores: Jean Bradbury, 
Betty Clifford. Joan Covert, Doris Disque. Fourth row: Claire Gelder, Barbara Glaze, Ruth Anne Green. Betty Jane Lemon, Marjorie Proctor, Connie 
Purkiss. Mary Ryan, Sarah Shelnutt. Carolyn Webb. Freshmen: Mariellen Boone, Patty Dalrymple. Anne Paries. Fifth row: Jean Fisher, Margaret Hails, 
Barbara Hull. Betty Jane Isenour, Dorothy Jones, Geraldine Mahaney, Katherine Manley, Vivian Mirow, Nancy Nllon, Mary Ward. Pledges: Barbara Cham- 
bers. Marilyn Dennis. Sixth row: Sheila D'Nelly, Mildred Eason, Ann Gillespie, Audrey Hughes. Peggy Lawhead, Mary Alice Loye, Jane MacDonald. Mar- 
garet MacHaffie, Nova Lou Parker, Mary Richards, Dorothy Swegles, Lorraine Tarbox. Not pictured: Jane Carter, Phyllis Worth. 




Doris CIcgg 
President 



HP H A D 



Founded 1851 

Active chapters 58 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 15,000 

In Macon, Georgia, on the campus of Wesleyan 
Female College, Alpha Delta Pi became the first 
women's secret fraternity. Aid to needy students 
is the pet charity of the A D Pis with the Abigail 
Davis Student Loan Fund. The U.C.L.A. chapter 
appeared in 1925, and the standards of Alpha Delta 
Pi have been adhered to religiously. One of the 
reasons for the Alpha Chi chapter's loyalty to 
these principles has been in order to live up to the 
quality of the national's membership, for it Includes 
women such as Florence George, Dr. Sara Branham, 
Elizabeth Love, and Mrs. Walter D. Lamar. On the 
social side, the Alpha Chi chapter has had an 
active season. Entertained by the alumnae with a 
bridge tea at the Victor hHugo that included both 
the S.C. and U.C.L.A. chapters, the house has filled 
the rest of the time with two formal dances, several 
buffet suppers, and a goodly number of house 
dances. 

[ lU P 




Left to risht, first row, Seniors: Margaret Beach, Dons Clegg, Marjone Craig, Mildred Davies, Dorothy Fox, Marjorie Lehr, Mary-Alicc McCunniff. Second 
row: Virginia Pratt, Beth Vollsledt. Juniors: Cae Charlton, Virginia Hunt, Patricia Mahoney, Louise Parker, Betty Phillips. Sophomores: Reneta Behrcns, 
Robin Lyford. Third row: Marilyn Maclennan, Paulla Paris, Mildred Patridge, Nancy Philips, Marie Stirling, Dorothy Turner, Claire Ward, France Wilson. 
Freshman: Betsy McKinley. Fourth row, Pledges: Anne Baruch, Vivian Bemiss, Jeanne Biggar, Jean Branson, Margie Lee Brown, Pat Catlin, Frances Cec- 
carini, Virginia Ford, Nancy Garrison. Fifth row: Helen Gilchrist, Helen Louise Hannilton, Shirley Kiken, Jeanne Kramer, Jane Monroe, Sallie Norton, Alice 
Roe Palmer, Margaret Stevan, Mimi Thornton. Not pictured: Mary Louise Rathfon, Helen Gdynia, Muriel Goddard, Patty Kitto, Clare Michaud. 







Left to right, first row, Seniors: Bebe Hengsteler, Bettie Mooney, Ruth Moses, Priscilla Pierce, Margaret Ray, Peggy Smith. Mary Watkins. Gerrie Wodars. 
Juniors: Mary Cunningham. Second row: Marrccle von Dietz, Katherlne Key, Marian Mail. Faith Thompson. Sophomores: Jane Campion. Ruth Castle- 
berry, Barbara Coye. Jo Ann McCandless, Natalie McCrone. Third row: Virginia Rush. Freshmen: Fay Brininger. Mary Daze, Deliene Jensen, Norma Mar- 
shall, Barbara Snow, Betty Thatcher. Pledges: Jean Baumen, Virginia Grace. Fourth row: Jean hlerdman, Nancy Kumnicit, Berniel McKell, Jesse Officer, 
Betty Pollard. Patricia Rainey, Nancy Stanford. Virginia Towie, Betty Webster. Not pictured: Marian Beswick, Mary Fitzpatricic, Betty Husband, Constance 
Walker. Katherine Williams, Gloria Regal, Margaret Stanley. 

ALPHA OMinON P 



Founded 1894 

Active chapters 44 

Inactive chapters 6 

Membership 10,850 

In spreadin3 to over 44 campuses since its incep- 
tion at Barnard College, Alpha Omicron Pi came 
here with its Kappa Theta chapter in 1925. With 
such well-known feminine personalities as Mary Ellen 
Chase, Margaret Bourke-White, Margaret Tallichet, 
and hlelen Gahagan on its rolls the sorority can well 
be proud of its alumnae. Plus turning out these 
leaders, the house's charitable work among the back- 
woods communities of Kentucky has brought it much 
favorable attention. On this campus, the local chap- 
ter upholds the standards of the national in the 
altruistic field, and maintains an active social life 
as evidenced by its semi-annual formal dances, 
which, led by Priscilla Pierce, have been very suc- 
cessful this past year. 



Priscilla Plerct 
President 

369 





Left to right, first row, Graduates: Pauline Green, Marion Picton. Seniors: Mabel Jorgenson, Melvina Morley. Second row. Juniors: Janice Coffman, Dorothy 
Melendy. Sophomore: Dorothea Eiler. Freshmen: Margie Bacon. Betty Knight. 



nU PHI UP HA 




Founded 1909 

Active chapters 23 

Inactive chapters 10 

Membership 

The first meeting of the Beta Phi Alpha took place 
at U.C.B. on May 8, 1909. The ob|ect of that meet- 
ing was to found, from a small nucleus of chosen 
women, a group to meet a housing need at Berkeley. 
From that idea, the organization grew into a social 
sorority with the object of promoting scholarship, 
friendship, and a more rounded social life. On Beta 
Phi Alpha's membership list are to be found the 
names of such feminine leaders as Alice hlanson 
Jones, Anna Ratzberger, Violet E. Kearney, and 
Frances Klamp. Reorganizing locally this year, the 
house has not had a great deal of time for other 
activities, but has been able to extend the organiza- 
tion's aid to a Summer Camp Fund and to their 
own Mary Gordon Scholarship Fund. 



Melvina Morley 
President 



370 



Founded 1928 

Active chapters I 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 74 

Here on the University of California at Los 
Angeles' campus a sorority to fill a very definite 
need was formed. This organization, Chi Alpha 
Delta, is a house devoted exclusively to v/omen 
students of Japanese heritage. Fully as active as 
many a larger group, Chi Alpha Delta has aided 
in the University's altruistic v/ork plus assisting the 
Japanese Children's hlome and sponsoring a Stu- 
dent's Scholarship Fund. A well-filled social calendar 
completes the program; an Orientation Tea for all 
new Japanese women students, a pledge dance and 
dinner, formal initiation dances, and a Charter Day 
Dinner. 




Kazuko Nozawa 
President 



CH 



HPHA DELTA 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Jessie Koyama. Kazuko Nozawa. Misao Okura, Fuji Tsumagari, May Yamasaki, Chieko Vuzawa. Juniors: Mitsuru Imoto. 
Second row: Koto Inui, Edna Sakimoto. Sophomores: Aki Hirashiki, Ikua Imon, Tostiiko Oshima, Edna Suzuki. Pledges: Lilly Fujioka, Kiyoko Hosoura, Kay 
Kumai. Third row: Sally Kusayanagik. Yuriko Maruyama, Rose Sakemi, Chieko Shigekawa, Marie Shimidzu. Sumire Sujita, Mary Takahashi, Tcmi Taniguchi, 
Fiances Yamasaki. Not pictured: Mary Sawahata. Hatsuye Mizutani. 



371 




Beryl Corbin 
President 



HPHA 



X 



Founded 1893 

Active chapters 55 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 14,000 

Since the first assembling of founders at Lombard 
University in Galesburg, Illinois, Alpha Xi Delta 
has gathered to itself some 55 chapters. The 
U.C.L.A. chapter came into the fold in 1924. 
Actively engaging in aiding needy students, the 
organization supports several scholarship funds: The 
Founders' Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund and The 
Grace Ferris Memorial Scholarship Fund. Harriet 
Leula McCallum is one of the alumnae of whom the 
house is very proud, and Pat Frieday is the show- 
piece of the local chapter. Led this year by Beryl 
Corbin, the Alpha Xi Delta social season was high- 
lighted by the annual Rose Ball and the Founders' 
Day Banquet and Dance, both of which turned out 
to be well attended and well planned affairs. 



[ LTA 




'Sht, first row. Seniors: Kit F tzp^tnck, Betty Paeschlce. Juniors: Beryl Corbin, Anne Sylc. Second row: Dorothy Halliday, Virginia Kennedy, Mar- 
Saret Mary Mackenzie, Barbara Phoenix, Bonnie Willets, Margaret Wilton. Sophomores: Manrma Brown. Harriet Coston. Third row: Stanna Curtis. Vivian 
D'Aura, Carmel Feldman. Patricia Freiday, Jane Singletaiy. Freshmen: Elizabeth Bigler, Jean Morgan. Pledges: Dorothy Arnold. Fourth row: Hclene Dillon, 
Betty Lou Houghton, Evelyn Newhoff, Charlotte Parsons, Teressa Quilico, Helen Scuffins, Mary Springer. Patricia Ward. Not pictured: Betty Ryan. 

372 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Eleanor Cope. Dona Fragner, Marianne Francis, Jane Hix. Jane Tuttle. Juniors: Elizabeth Beard. Norene Brownson. Second 
row: Mona Seppi. Janet Tate. Betty Walter. Barbara Wetherbec. Sophomores: Margaret Doyle. Frances Holcomb, Dorothy Klimmer. Jane Price. Third row: 
Lois Puffer. Bette Ryan, Marian Seyster, Betty Warren. Freshmen: Boniface Bobb, Brownee Corbin, Sidney Elizabeth Long. Peggy Palmer. Fourth row: Irnna 
Delle Sperry. Pledges: Alice Huttenbach, Constance Kottmeier. Janet McGuire. Viola Mettler, Evelyn Miller. Vera Tillman. Mary Trent. 



DELTA 



Founded 1902 

Active chapters 41 

Inactive chapters 20 

Membership 10,400 

Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, served as the 
scene for the first meeting of Delta Zelta in 1902. 
On the sorority's rolls are the names of numerous 
prominent women: Dean Helen Laughlin, Gail Pat- 
rick, Leslie Ford, and Princess Martha of Norway. In 
1925 the local chapter, Alpha Chi, was initiated, 
and here has upheld the principles and ideals of the 
national in aiding the charitable work of the house. 
This work, the maintenance of an entire community 
at Vest, Kentucky, brings advantages for health and 
education to the underprivileged there. On a social 
scale, the organization has been very active with a 
Winter Formal at the Victor Hugo, a Rose Formal 
in the Spring, and various and assorted house dances. 



Z [ T A 




Marianne Francis 
President 



373 




I c* ^ ^ ^> 





% -I 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Ruth Bliss, Ruth Boswcll. Elouise Brown, Betty DeSerpa, Marjone Kenyon. Marjone Lawson. Second row: Doris MacDougall, 
Grace North, Mary Smithson, Lorna Spriggs, Eleanor Thorson, Beverly Tucker, Jane Weber. Juniors: Betty Bartlett, Bessie Barto, Cecilia Blair, Bee Brown. 
Third row: Kay Clements, Barbara Greenwood, Kay Lewis, Joann Rathff. Betty Rice, Jane Sheldon, Roberta Zolle. Sophomores: Dorothy Amiand, Dorothy 
Dodge. Josephine Jacks, Margaret Jones. Fourth row: Jean Launer, Bonnie Mitchell, Joyce Ruegg, Betty Scott. Suzanne Whitlock. Frcshnficn: Jeanne Burger, 
Larene Hamer, Martha Jane Henry, Frances Kramer, Dorothy Nickel, Marjorie Smith. Fifth row, Pledges: Carolyn Bohlken, Betty Jane Eaton. Eva Gates, 
Elva Jane Gilbert, Pat Hamby, Joan Lewis, Helen Ludman, Vergenc Myers, Phyllis Roduner, Jean Tuck, Virginia Ware. Not pictured: Shirley Ware, Peggy 
Dunlevie, Rosemary Stinton. 



C H 



OMEGA 




Founded 1895 

Active chapters 94 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 26,500 

The founders of Chi Omega on the University of 
Arkansas campus made their goal a sorority to show 
no geographical discrimination; the first to do so 
since the Civil War. Nationally, the house has on 
its rolls such leading women as Judge Georgia Bul- 
lock, Mabel Walker Willebrant, and Laura Krey. 
hiere Chi Omega initiated its Gamma Beta chapter 
in 1923 on petition of the local sorority, Phi Kappa 
Gamma. In keeping with the standards of philan- 
thropic work Chi Omega conducts the Toy Loan 
Library at the Assistance League in Los Angeles. 
This activity, coupled with the house's dances and 
other affairs, is the type of thing that enables the 
organization to maintain its prestige on campus. 

Doris MacDougall 
President 

374 



Founded 1874 

Active chapters 53 

Inactive chapters 14 

Membership 17,835 

Established at Oxford School, Mississippi, Delta 
Gamma is one of the first social sororities in the 
United States. This campus' Alpha Sigma chapter, 
since its inception in 1925, has aided the national in 
maintaining the Nursery School for Visually hHandi- 
capped Children. Noted among the members are 
Ruth Bryan Owen, Gracia Countryman, and Lois M. 
Rosenberry. Locally, the sorority is well known for 
its social activity. Notable in this line is the annual 
D.G.-Delt Ball, a formal dance put on jointly by 
Delta Gamma and Delta Tau Delta. Also heading 
the social calendar is their Christmas party and 
dance held every year at the chapter house and 
one of Los Angeles' better night spots. Capably 
leading Alpha Sigma chapter this year was Frances 
Johnson. 



DELTA 




Frances Johnson 
President 



G \ 



A 








Left to right, first row, Seniors: Ah; n Boswell, Jean Cjrtiss, Bettygale Emerson, Martha Flannery, Alice Gilbert, Ruth Haslcell, Frances Johnson, Miriam 
Kelly, Eleanor Kern, Mary Ann Mahon. Second row: Janet Ward. Juniors: Mary Lou Cletro, Ruth Jordan. Lois Miller, Florence Nelson. Barbara Nichols, 
Betty Nixon, Judy Saye, Sue Sistrom, Peggy Stewart. Sophomores: Bette Corriclc. Third row: Elizabeth Crispin, Shirley Entriken, Carolyn Johnson, Barbara 
Perry, Betty Rand, Elizabeth Slyfield, Irene Spensley, Jane Thornburg, Marion Widdicomb. Pledges: Patsy Lou Archibald, Martha Austin. Fourth row: Christy 
Brown, Dorothy Browne, Harriet Cass, Gale Chase, Barbara Collins, Betty Derrah, Dorothy Franklin, Mary Jane Hayward, Mary Henn, Eldean Hulbert, 
Barbara Johnson. Fifth row: Katherine Johnson, Beverly Craemer, Nancy Newton, Ann Ostenberg, Bette Parke, Betty Parker, Denise Rector, Patricia Urion, 
Barbara Warren, Patricia Weitzmann, Florence Williams. Not pictured: Klara Spinks, Patricia McCune, Margaret Bennett, Marianne Jesberg, Thomaslna 
Mix, Hattiebelle Root, Beryl Heisler, Anna Marie Svedrofsky, Elizabeth Wilson. 



375 




Founded 1888 

Active chapters 88 

Inactive chapters 

Mennbcrship 27,500 

The first chapter of Delta Delta Delta was or- 
ganized at Boston University, and the Theta Pi chap- 
ter vvas formed here in 1925. Maintenance of a 
scholarship fund for graduate study abroad is the 
national philanthropy while the U.C.L.A. chapter 
endeavors to make the burden of the patients in 
the Orthopedic hlospital lighter. Standing out on 
the membership lists of Tri-Delt are feminine person- 
alities such as Lila Bell Acheson, Mrs. hHenry Wal- 
lace, and Doris Bowden. One of the leaders in the 
social parade, Delta Delta Delta holds both a winter 
and a spring formal besides a higher than average 
number of informal affairs. The house, led this year 
by Jeanne de Garmo has been active in all campus 
political and scholastic fields. 



Jean dc Garmo 
President 



D[IU DELTA DELTA 








Left to right, first row. Seniors: Martha Barnes, Margaret Bussert. Second row: Jeanne deGarmo, Shirley Perron, Marie Fuqua, Florence Hall, June 
Lindsay, Betty Lee Olmsted, Miriam Persons, Virginia Lee Wilkinson. Juniors: Peggy Lou Bardwell, Jean Beavon, Mary Bellerue. Third row: Betty Billingsley. 
Dorothy Cushman, Carol Jean Howa:d, Betty Jean Kindig, Carol Kingsley, Dorothy Kowalski, Jean MacKenzie, Emy Jean Prouty, Virginia Reisner, 
Ayleen Searl, Dorothy Warne. Fourth row. Sophomores: Betty Jane Lissner, Alva Lloyd, Louanne Nuttal. Betty Jean Peck, Rhea Wilkinson. Adelaide 
Winans. Freshmen: Sallie Barnett. Janice Beavon, Carolyn Blackmore, Dorothy Cornell, Helen Eckes. Fifth row: Mary Ellen Haver, Gertrude Klamm, Jane 
Lloyd-Jones, Lucy Miller, Mary Kay Paup, Marie Whitmore. Pledges: Ho Bergling, Peggy Brown, Margaret Bushnell, Ruth Dean, Patricia Gibbs. Sixth row: 
Jean Harvey, Mabclou Hutton, Jean McAtee, Florence Macrae, Bernice Nelson, Betty Jane Reed, Betty Russell, Arline Saylin, Mary Welch, Jane Vatcher, 
Helen Zellner. Not pictured: Phyllis Connell, Madelyn McCallum, Virginia Bulpitt, Helen Currer, Virginia Stavely, Mildred Weiler, Harriet Whitmer. 

376 









Left to right, first row, Seniors: Susan Skaggs, LaVerne Anderson. Marie Beckler, Barbara Foley, Louise Guldstrand, Charlotte Hildebrand, Louise Kistner, 
Betty Meigs, Manon Saltmarsh, Peggy Selby. Second row: Barbara Yerby. Juniors: Annette Adams. Eleanor Banker. Ethelin Bell, Mary Blahnik. Mary 
Caward. Margaret Cheescman, Gerry Forney, Miriam Grant, Virginia Grondahl, Evelyn Olmstead. Third row: Bettye Quandt, Helen Weyman. Sopho* 
mores: Kathleen Curren, Jean DeSpain, Dorothy Fuller, Mary Jo Funk, Margaret Harper, Marie Johnson, Helene Leckman, Mary Frances Rickershauser. 
Dorothy Stewart. Fourth row: Betty Warren, Virginia Willoughby. Freshnnen: Harriet Bacon. Ann Barnet, Mary Ann Coburn, Jacqueline Goulcttc, Helen 
Rupert. Pledges: Eleanor Adams, Dorothy Anne Browne. Margaret Costello, Helen Douglas. Fourth row: Barbara Hitchcock, Frances Lane. Peggy McCon- 
ville, Betsy Morse, Anita Neeb. Betty Rhodes, Janet Souther, Jean Tulloch. Arvia Swan, Betty Jane Warfel. Jane Welcome. Not pictured: Doris Colgan, 
Marlene Arlt. 

UMMA Pill BETA 

Founded 1874 

Active chapters 46 

Inactive chapters 3 

Menabership 15,500 

Syracuse University was the scene of the first 
meeting of Gamma Phi Beta, and there the purposes 
of the sorority Vi'ere declared: scholarship, service, 
and social and cultural advancement. Leading the 
parade of Gamma Phi Beta v/omen are Aileen Hig- 
gins Sinclair, Margaret Wilson, Charlotte Kellogg, 
Gertrude Comfort Sinclair, and Maude Loveless. 
Since coming to this campus in 1924, the Alpha lota 
chapter has actively entered into all branches of 
university life. Especially well known are their social 
functions headed this year by Louise Gulstrand. On 
the list are such affairs as the Orchid Ball, a benefit 
for underprivileged children; the Crescent Dance, a 
celebration of the founding of the organization; and 
the Circus Dance, a party given by the pledges. 




Ethelin Bell 
President 



377 




0:^"^ 















Left to risht, first row, Seniors: Virsinia Black, Bonney Ellen Clough, Priscilla Joy Everts, Jane Henshaw, Katherine Howard, Betty Lord, Ruth Nelson, 
Suzanne Shafcr, Sally Sherwln, Barbara Spaulding. Second row: Jean Sutherlands, Betty Thorson, Susan Van Dyke, Barbara WillJanns. Juniors: Margaret 
Allen, Jocelyn Ball, Virginia Barnett, Tony Churchill, Jane Cooper, Mary Delaney, Nancy Folks, Third row: Marjorie Hall, Anne MacFarland, Anne 
Mossgrove, Lucille Otis, Barbara Shafer, Aleene Zacher. Sophomores: Rosennary Ball, Alice Bernard, Barbara Black, Susan Gibson, Sarabelle Goodwin. 
Fourth row: Ann Granger, Margaret Mary Howard, Joanna Prescott, Anne Reed, Jean Shaw, Pat Wirsching, Josephine Wyatt. Pledges: Joan Bartlett, 
Virginia Bekin, Virginia Boyden, Virginia Chapman. Fifth row: Jo Anne Clippener, Beverly Douglass, Ruth Dreusike, Katherine Ferguson, Barbara Gastil, 
Janet Hargrave, Ann Ellen Harris, Anita Hays, Marjorie Henshaw, Osceola Herron, Betty Howell. Sixth row: Thomasine Klipstein, Janet McNeely, Victoria 
Peay, Joan Riddcll, Phyllis Rowell, Mary Schnnidt, Patricia Silent, Aletha Smith, Dorsey Smith, Mary Jane Van Vranken, Winifred Williamson. Not pictured: 
Ellen Doody, Julia Dorn. Suzanne MacAdam, Mary Lou Thrapp. 

HA THETA 

Founded 1870 

Active chapters 65 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 25,000 

Betty Locke Harnilton founded Kappa Alpha 
Theta at De Pauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, 
as the first sorority among women to use Greek let- 
ters in its name. In a roll call of Kappa Alpha Theta, 
responses would be obtained from such leading fig- 
ures as Margaret Mitchell, Agnes de Mille, Irene 
Taylor Heineman, and hlelen Jacobs. The local chap- 
ter. Beta Xi, was organized In 1925 from the Sigma 
Alpha Kappa sorority. Philanthropically, the house 
annually takes some of the needy children from Saw- 
telle and gives them a merry Christmas of dinner 
and presents for all afterwards. Known as one of the 
most active of the social sororities, the Thetas throw 
their biggest dance every Spring in strictly formal 
attire. Besides this yearly ball, there is the Founders' 
Day Banquet attended by the combined Southern 
California chapters and a procession of exchange 
dinners, alumnae teas, and faculty dinners. 




Barbara Williams 
President 



Founded 1913 

Active chapters .... 21 

Inactive chapters 5 

Membership 2,270 

In November of 1913 on the campus of Hunter 
College in New York, Phi Sigma Sigma was orga- 
nized for the purpose of furthering social and 
charitable activities. The national organization spon- 
sors, besides its fraternal duties, a great deal of 
charitable work. It contributes to the National Jew- 
ish Fund and the Student Refugee Fund in addition 
to assisting various local agencies in the East. At 
U.C.L.A., Phi Sigma Sigma was the first national 
sorority to establish a chapter. That was in 1921, 
and since that date the house has maintained the 
spirit of the founding principles. In this respect 
it has aided in the support of United Jewish Wel- 
fare Fund and the Julia Ann Singer Nursery. On the 
social side are affairs like the annual Charity Ball, 
the Patroness Teas, and Mothers' and Fathers' affairs. 



H 




Shirley Pfeiffcr 
President 



SKUA SIGim 









Left to right, first row, Seniors: Paula Berman, Mildred Blass. Jane Eisnei. Second row: Jeanette Groman, Shirley Pfeiffer, irma Rosenberg, Cecilia Schnie- 
row, Sylvia Silbert. Juniors: Florence Cohen. Ruth Farbstein, Janice Heiman. Esther Labowitz, Dorothy Malinow, Jeri Matyas. Third row: Lorraine Miller, 
Natalie Piatt, Joan Rosenfield, Dorothy Sackin. Sophomores: Dorothy Coon, Shirley Corenblum, Beinice Feinfeld, Muriel Freeman, Edythe Pecker, Ora 
Sauber, Esther Schaffer. Fourth row: Thelma Singer. Arlene Soloman. Rosalie Trop, Helen Tyre, Selma Wolfberg. Freshmen: Ruth Bretzfeldcr, Sylvia Drex- 
ler, Jewel Frisch, Bernice Gross, Faith Gitlin, Louise Hoffman. Fifth row: Gladys Robinson, Natalie Shostak, Goldine Spark, Evelyn Stark. Pledges: Anita 
Alpert, June Bondar, Helen Gotkin, Sylvia Greenberg, Rosalie Kaplan, Evelyn Lasher, Elizabeth Lein. Sixth Row: Marcia Malsman, Erma Martin, Bernice 
Meadows, Natalie Meyers, Louise Ann Pollack, Adelane Rich, Shirley Rosenbaum, Rae Rudin, Jeanne Samuels, Beatrice Wolf, Shirley Wolff. Not pic- 
tured: Muriel Panush, Shirley Glatt, Phyllis Nessclroth, Arlene Newman. 




Founded 1897 

Active chapters 68 

Inactive chapters 

Mennbership 17,157 

Kappa Delta was established at Virginia State 
Normal School in 1897 and locally in 1926 after 
granting a charter to a local sorority, Kappa Psi 
Zeta. Since its inception, the Kappa Delts have had 
not a few prominent women on their rolls; a fair 
cross-sample of whom would be Pearl Buck, Helen 
Claire, and Georgia O'Keefe. At U.C.L.A. the house 
has combined social activity with philanthropic work 
by the holding of benefits. Among these could be 
listed the annual Shamrock Shindig held in April and 
the KD Benefit Bridge put on every year by the S.C. 
and U.C.L.A. chapters in the Biltmore Bowl. Besides 
these affairs, there is the Senior Breakfast served the 
morning of the Baccalaureate Service. 



Palsy Murphy 
President 



K A P P A DELTA 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Margaret Fleming, Frances Fudge, Lucille Garvin. Second row: Alice Marie Gautschi, Colleen Murphy, Patsy Murphy, 
Barbara Nye, Betty Raisch, Janet Randall, Jean Strahle, Gladys Voyda, Mary Jane Wagner, Beverly Whited. Third row, Juniors: Jean Bradley, Dottie 
Dalton, Lill Hendrickson, Delores Kleven, Enid Lilly, Jean Litsey, Mae Nye, Peggy Secor, Mary Walker, Loretta Yager. Fourth row, Sophonnores: Lisa 
Chamberlain, Janet Griffith, Marguerite Maitral, Doris Mansfield, Katherine Priester. Freshman: Betty McKinney. Pledges: Lucille Adderholt, Betty Ander- 
son, Patty Lou Dunn, Marian Gills. Fifth row: Lois Jellineck, Virginia Love, Shirley Maester, Helen Mottram, Emilie Oas, Bette Jane Reber, Florence Sawyer, 
Irene Shanklin, Beth Stolp, Betty Tomberim, Not pictured: Betty Bittinger. Virginia Carrigan, Betsy Kelly, Ruth Reinecke, Virginia Wells, Rose Marie Hitchin. 



380 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Betty Ann Breyer, Rose Alice Castlen, Dorothy Covert. Natalie Hill. Second row: Jane Leeds, Gertrude Mann, Norma 
McLlellan, Betsy Melius, Peggy Milroy, Charlotte Sloane. Diana Stimson. Juniors: Margaret Adams. Mary Blenlciron, Susan Cranficld. Third row: Barbara 
Hamilton. Carmen Lepper. Mary McLaughhn, Catherme Pyne, Betty Richer, Ellinor Vetter, Rachel Williams, Odette Walsh, Margaret Young. Lorraine You- 
relL Sophomores, Fourth row: Donna Barnett, Priscilla Bradburn, Marjory Dudley. Valeric Hanrahan. Peggy Maltby, Barbara Jean Mauerhan, Ann Pulliam, 
Beatrice Standish, Alice Wheaton. Freshmen: Sheila Kerr. Fifth row: Molly Malcolmson, Jacqueline Trueblood. Pledges: Nancy Garlinghouse. Edith Huber, 
Dorothy Ledger, Helen Ledger, Beverly Joyce Nev/man, Virginia Newport, Ann Richards, Billie Thomas. Not pictured: Josephine Butler, Alberta Haber- 
felde. Ernestine Koslca, Natalie Sevier. Louise Wood. Louisa Shankland, Kathcrine Dennis, Susan Edwards, Mary Heinzelman, Carol Huseman, Isabel Luce. 
Patricia Wallace. 

KAPPA KAPPA UMMA 

Founded 1870 

Active chapters 73 '^ ' 

Inactive chapters ei^f 

Membership 29.410 ^ 

Formed in 1870 on the campus of Monmouth 
College in Illinois, Kappa Kappa Gamma has since 

spread to 73 campuses ail over the nation. Known feHHB^H|^^^^Bi^^^ ^ 

for the well-known personalities on its roll, the house 
boasts of such women as Alice Duer Miller, Dorothy 
Canfield Fisher, Virginia Gildersleeve, Helen Wills 
Moody, and Lou FHenry Hoover. This campus gained 

its chapter, Gamma Xi, on May 8, 1925. Entering ^^^F'"^"''VlHt- 

actively into all campus projects, the Kappas have 
put especial emphasis on aiding the University 
Camp, participation in intersorority athletics, and 
all social events. On their own, the house has a 
social season consisting in part of the pledge dances, 
the initiation dances, and the Kappa Open House 
every December at the Los Angeles Tennis Club. 

Josephine Butler 

Presldcnl ^^^^^^^^B i ...^xtjk 

381 





Left to right, first row, Seniors: Joan Gnm. Mildred Hitchcock, Priscilla Jepson. Second row: Shirleyanne Mason, Joanna Rock. Juniors: Catherine Albrccht, 
Dolores Bunts. Yvonne Hamilton. Irene Madaras, Barbara Ward, Third row, Sophomores: Muriel Black. Jean Bowers, Jean Breninger, Eleanor Campbell. 
Virginia Copeland, Winifred Fien, Hazel Henderson. Fourth row: Frieda Liebscher, Dorothy Withey. Freshman: M eta- Marie Amiot. Pledges: Rosalie 
Brown, Annabelle Frederick. Marilyn Moon, Charlotte Thorne. Not pictured: Dorothy Gllman, Jean Herring, Marjorie Smith. 



P 



H 



II 






1852 

64 





Founded 

Active chapters 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 14,000 

The origin of Phi Mu took place on the campus 
of Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia, but it was 
in 1904 that it adopted its present Greek letter 
name. Biggest event on the house's calendar in 1939 
was the absorption of Alpha Delta Theta, a former 
national sorority. As one of the oldest women's 
groups, Phi Mu naturally has a number of prominent 
members: May Merrill Miller, Judge Annabelle 
Matthews, and Mrs. Ogden Campbell. 1927 was 
the date for the establishment of the Eta Delta 
chapter on this campus, and since that time has 
entered into the national's support of the hlealth- 
mobile, a child hygiene truck operating in the state 
of Georgia. Socially awake, the U.C.L.A. chapter 
gives two formal dances each school year in addi- 
tion to a number of informal gatherings. 



Joanna Rock 
President 



362 



Founded 1910 

Active chapters 20 

Inactive chapters 8 

Membership 4,850 

Begun on the campus of the University of 
Nebraska in 1910, Phi Omega Pi has as its ideal the 
promotion of friendship among women students and 
to aid its members in social and intellectual advance- 
ment. The local chapter, since its inception in 
1925, has wholeheartedly entered to the organiza- 
tion's useful charity: the prevention of blindness 
among small children. Phi Omega Pi is proud of its 
exceptionally successful membership, for it claims 
such women as Olga Steig, Dr. Huberta M. Living- 
stone, and Dorothy Ayers Loudon. Leading the house 
through a well administered year, Betty Jane Curtis 
has been noted especially for the well run and 
attended Christmas and Spring formals. 



Betty Jane Curtis 
President 




P H 



M [ G A 



P 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Jane Calliham. Second row: Betty Jane Curtis, Theada Erilcson, Betsy Ross. Juniors: Doris Beaver. Helen Gorman, Betty 
Goulet, Marcella LeGer. Sophomore: Ann Bnningcr. Third row: Margaret Painter. Jean Stevens. Norma Waterhouse. Pledges: Elizabeth Farrar, Jean 
Fetherolf. Peggy Goulet. Jeanettc Jctlison, Barbara Jones. Fourth row: Jeanette Lake. Bobbie Lou Marlatt, Eleanor McAllister, Margaret McCollim, 
Cynthia Mills, Darlyne Mohr, Beverly Snyder. Helen Willey. Not pictured: Barbara Gailmard. 



383 




Sally Grady 
President 



P 



Founded 1867 

Active chapters 82 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 32,485 

At Monmouth College in 1867 Pi Beta Phi was 
founded, as one of the earliest women's college 
sororities. Pi Phi was also the first to establish alum- 
nae clubs of which it now has 188. Besides being 
the leader in this function, the house has a claim 
to being first in starting an altruistic social project. 
To be expected are prominent members — women like 
Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, Carrie Chapman Cott, and 
Mrs. J. F. Balfour. Pi Beta Phi appeared at U.C.L.A. 
in 1927 with its California Delta chapter. Since 
that date the chapter has entered into the national's 
charities: the support of the Pi Beta Phi Settlement 
School in Sattlenburg, Tennessee, and the mainte- 
nance of fellowship funds and student loan funds. 
Socially alive the Pi Phis are known for the quality 
of their winter and spring formals. 



BETA 



P H 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Barbara Allen, Dorothy Browcr, Alice Burns, Patricia Cavanaugh, Laura Chapman, Doris Gear, Elizabeth h-till, PhyHis hloff- 
man. Second row: Jean Nesbitt, Patricia Stanley. Juniors: Barbara Bassett. Janet French, Sally Grady, Patricia Jones, Barbara Mann, Ethel McCarthy, 
Ennma Puthoff, Ida Puthoff, Mary Shorkley. Third row: Dorothy Thornburg, Alice Williams. Sophomores: June Barber, Barbara Buff, Jean Fulchcr, Vivian 
htarth, Vangi hiaupt, Betty Jesse, Patricia Morrissey, Rosemary Pennington, Jean Sleight. Fourth row: Virginia Snure, Dorothy Stanley, Betty Upham. 
Freshnnen: Isabel Darbyshirc, Ann Kaiser, Ella Keane, Margaret King, Roberta Law, Patricia McCarthy, Mary McNeal, Marjorie Moffatt. Fifth row: Eliza- 
beth Scott, Eleanor Thomas. Pledges: Phyllis Creighton, Alice Grimes. Polly Hayv/ard. Louise Magill, Zoula Nunn, Jean Rouse, Sue Reynolds, Louanne Sprat- 
Icn, Betty Tremayne. Not pictured: Katherine Barman. Betty Bole, Degolia Earl, Carlotta Stoddard, Dolly Wilson, Patricia Hartley, Mary Elizabeth Perkins, 
Marianne Hays. Jean Morse, Betty Anne Boash, Patricia Cordner. 



384 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Elizabeth Appleman, Evelyn Bluemle. Second row: Muriel Bohnmg, Marian Cameron, Winifred Caridis, Margaret Chisholm, 
Jean Daniels. Dorotliy Dean. Harriet Hadley, Annabel Johnson, Mary Korstad. Florence Kuhlen. Rhona Leake. Third row: Janice Payne. Julia Richter, Beth 
Watlcins, Kathryn Way. Juniors: Nelda Bowen. Virginia Ann Clapper. Janice Froiseth, Thyra Naughton. Claire Newman, Dolly Reeves, Barbara Sheldon. 
Fourth row: Margaret league, Phyllis Ward, Lillian Westnnan, Sophomores: Velma Alden, Kathryn Baumgardt, Helen Briggs. Betsy Burns. Kathleen Denbigh, 
Marian Just. Marybelle Mclntyre. Freshmen: Gretchen Burns. Fifth row: Vivian Hemsath. Nancy Millar. Pledges: Dons Ayres. Marguerite Bass, Margo 
Craft, Margaret Duff, Eleanor Emtman, Bettie Jane Highland, Barbara Knuth, Elizabeth Schloten. Genevieve Sweeney. Not pictured: Eleanor Jones, Emily 
Scott, Lois Marie Zelsdorf. 



s 



D M A 



KAPPA 



Founded 1874 

Active chapters 42 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 10,335 

Colby College of Waterville, Maine, was the 
scene for the first meeting of Alpha Omicron Pi in 
1874. The founders of the sorority were the first five 
women ever to enroll in the college and for that 
reason banded together to form the bonds of fellow- 
ship that exist in the house until today. Establishing 
itself on this campus in 1925, the house initiated the 
Alpha Omicron chapter which was led for the past 
year by Margaret Chisholm. Carrying on the na- 
tional's altruistic enterprise, the Maine Seacoast 
Mission, the local chapter has inaugurated an annual 
benefit dance to raise funds for its support. Also 
entering into the school's philanthropies, it actively 
aids the University Camp Fund by another annual 
dance. Leading the alumnae parade are Anne Stone- 
breaker, Mildred Struble, and Jessie Locke Moffet. 




Evelyn Bluemle 
President 



385 




l\A 




u./. 



Left to 'ight, first row: Seniors: Anne Borchard, Marsaret Clayville, Margaret Cornwell, Vera Lee Hawn, Gail Martin, Lucille Thomas. Juniors: Marcy D 
Second row: Mary Nelle Graham. Sophomores: Shirley Bystrom. Mary Evans, Ruth Gates, June Jellineck, Annalu Larey, Marjorie Lowson, Peggy 
Teachout. Third row: Peggy Whyman. Freshmen: Harriette Field, Mary Gallagher, Margaret Phillips. Pledges: Marjorie Heer, Marjorie Needham, B 
Lou Plotkin. Peggy Sheldon. Not pictured: tJorma Hozelton, Betty McKnight, Dorothy Walter, Myrna Adams, Kay Howse, Fern Swan. 



avis. 
Lee 
etty 



T H [ T A U n I [ I 




Founded 1914 

Active chapters 26 

Inactive chapters 4 

Membership 4,163 

Theta Upsilon got its start at the University of 
California at Berkeley in 1914, and since that date 
a steady rate of growtii has brought it to the pres- 
ent strength of 26 active chapters. Omicron chap- 
ter, initiated in 1927, has followed the ideals of 
the national in that it brings together girls who have 
principles in common. The national organization in- 
dulges itself philanthropically in aiding the support 
of Berea College, an institution for the benefit of 
underprivileged children in Kentucky. In the social 
field, Theta Upsilon has had a good record with 
Winter and Spring formals at the Grove and an 
Oriental Dance in the house. The chapter holds an 
annual Fathers' Banquet and semi-annual Parents' 
Dinners. 



Anne Borchard 
President 



386 



Founded 1898 

Active chapters 64 

Inactive chapters 10 

Membership 12,500 

At Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Virginia, Zeta 
Tau Alpha was formed to fill a need for more sorori- 
ties on southern campuses. In spreading to other 
parts of the country, the house came to the U.C.L.A. 
campus with the Beta Upsilon chapter in 1926. Na- 
tionally, the sorority engages in the philanthropic 
enterprise of supporting the Children Health Center 
at Currin Valley, Virginia. A list of leading feminine 
personalities belonging to the organization would 
include such well known names as Faith Baldwin, 
Judge Ellen K. Raedy, Ellen Hall, and Marion McMil- 
lan. The local chapter has been an active social 
factor on campus and among its especially well 
known events are the traditional benefit dance, an 
affair held in conjunction with the S.C. chapter; the 
Mardi Gras Ball in the fall of each year; and the 
annual White Violet Formal Dance. 




Janet Barry 
President 



l[]\ UU UPH A 




Left to nghl, first row. Seniors: Aileen Walter, Margaret Corum, Jean Grey, Marjoile Griffin, Roberta Jorgensen, Janice Lipkins. Second row: tlva 
Pfirrman, Dorothy Torchla. Juniors: Janet Barry, Jane Duling, Mary Jean Galvin, Rhoda Mace, Olive Zanella. Sophonnore: Marjorie Jones. Third row: Mary 
Lauterwasser, Dona rita McCune Josephine Renzi. Freshmen: Irene Galvin, Margaret Hollingsworth, Ennmy Lou Johns. Pledges: Shirley Aseltme, Barbara 
Barry. Fourth row: Lila-Jeanne Begue, Oma Dear, Elsa Edwards, Camilla Johnson, Mary Ann Low, Emily Marquardt, Aloen Miller, Ruth Reeves. Not pic- 
tured: Beverly Ga'dner, Ruth Lawrence, Elaine Monkhouse, Catherine Russell. 



387 




Esther Cooke 
President 



THETA 



U 



Founded 1912 

Active chapters 24 

Inactive chapters 3 

Membership 22,515 

Theta Phi Alpha was organized on the campus of 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 
1912 for the purpose of providing a Catholic envir- 
onment for Catholic students at non-Catholic col- 
leges and universities. Prominent women are preval- 
ent on their rolls and a fair sample of them would 
be Anna Rose Kempel, Rose McKee Emerson, Dr. 
Ellen M. Geyer, and Dorothea Wagner. Here at 
U.C.L.A., Theta Phi Alpha absorbed the local soror- 
ity, Rho Mu Pi, in 1926 to become an active part 
of the campus life. Socially, the house, led by Esther 
Cooke, has especial pride in the success of its two 
semi-annual formal dances. 



HPHA 




Lefl to tighi, first row, Seniors: Rita Ahern, Patricia Anderson, Roberta Anderson. Second row: Esther Cooke, Marie Kahn. Juniors: Roberta Channbcrs, Mary 
McGrath, Virginia Pickett, Mereida Trenear. Third row, Sophomores: Vilma Jarabek, Marcella McCorry, Mary Jane Relliy. Freshman: Mary Jo Smith. 
Pledses: Marge Chapman, Betty Enlund. Not pictured: Beatrice Micheli. Leonore Nutt. 



388 




Left to right, first row: Constance Bell, Beverly Brown. Second row: Eleanor Cleland, Frances Corcoran, Betty Hauser, Marjorie Howe, Margaret Jones, 
Betty Lee, Mildred Lindroth. Third row: Margaret Lundall, Mary Jane Mendelsohn, Annabel Mitchell, Janet Mosher, Eleanor Nichols, Constance Parle, 
Polly Parker. Fourth row: Betty Rhodes, Virginia Schmissrauter, Exie Stevens, Helen Stinchfield, Betty Warnack, Helen Willeford, Loretta Yager. Not 
pictured: Jeanne Oswald, June Elliott, Louise McCord, Joanne Jenkins, Connie Renkesser, Roberta George, Ida Mae Carlston, Dorothy Weiner, Hazel 
McCarty, Irene Williams, Mimi Munter. 



PHUnHES 

Phrateres Cabinet is a coordinating body, which func- 
tions as a unifying group for the whole body of Phrateres 
as each individual dormitory has its own activities and 
programs. The cabinet plans activities for the group as a 
whole, and has about one activity a month. The member- 
ship of the cabinet is composed of the president of each 
dormitory, and the president of Philia. hlowever, the 
officers of the group are selected by every member of 
Phrateres from the group as a whole, in other words the 
actual officers of the Cabinet may not be holding any 
other offices in their respective houses but are chosen at 
large from the entire membership of 600 women. The 
activities planned by the Cabinet include a tea in Sep- 
tember to acquaint girls who are likely to become members. 
Later, there is a fireside party for new members from each 
dormitory. In November there is a barn dance, and in 
December a fashion tea at Bullock's Westwood. In February 
they have another tea, and in March two affairs: a fun 
house party and a formal dance at the Santa Monica 
Beach Club. And in May comes the installation banquet. 




Mary Elizabeth Lee 
President 




M^ 



Left to right, first row, Juniors: Elizabeth Farrar, Dorothy Halhday. Margaret Lundahl. Second row: Mar3aret McCollim. Sophomore: Margaret Watson. 
Freshmen: Mary Jane Mendelsohn, Esther Pines, Ruth Wienelce. Special: Elizabeth Nesbitt. Not pictured: Viola Akehurst, Lillian Hall, Mary Mayo, Eliza- 
beth Meyer, Maud Nelson. Marjorie Pirdy. Sally Shaw, Rachel Stafford, Naoma Troxell. Bobbie Friend. Margaret Heidenrich, Blendme Hoyst, Carolyn 
Rains. Margaret Ralston, Signe Stenehjem, Edith Sevan, Norma Dennis, Elizabeth Early, Ruth Fisher, LaRue Geiger, hielen Goldman, Christine Ham, 
Lois Laskcr, Margaret O'Conner. Volanda Pasquini. June Robertson, Virginia Smith, Mary Spoor, Betsy Suddarth, Barbara Symms. June Walling. Marjorie 
Webb, Doris Wcnitraub, Ruth Winninger, Phyllis Brand, Lee Harrell, Virginia Keaton, Kathleen Kidd, Alene Newman, Edythe Peclcer, Mary Thilo, Mary 
Berry, Jane Duclcering. Gloria Feld. Miriam Gelperin, Peggy McConnel, Polly McConnel, Patricia Phclan, Alice Wheeler, Blanche Connor, Elizabeth 
Stewart. 



BUI I HE R 



HHL 




Since its construction in 1929, Bannister Hall has 
served as the campus headquarters for some fifty 
women each year. Providin3 social entertainment as 
well as living facilities, the hall engages in the pres- 
entation of open houses, informal dances, and casual 
gatherings around the open fireplace. A sub-chapter 
of Phrateres, the group lives up to its motto, "Famous 
for Friendliness", and enters into all Phrateres events. 



Margaret Lundahl 
President 



390 



Westwood Hall, formerly Doheny, first appeared 
as a women's livins group in 1929 and was simulta- 
neously installed as a sub-chapter of Phrateres. As 
active as any more closely knit organization, the 
sub-chapter enters into all Phrateres events putting 
especial emphasis on the aid given to campus chari- 
ties. On the social side of the ledger was a com- 
plete set of events: winter and spring formal supper 
dances, a theatre party when the hall took over the 
Theatre Mart to see The Drunkard, and a long list 
of open houses, house dances, and teas. It has been 
said that the major problem of Westwood hiall is 
to get enough telephones in the building to accom- 
modate the 100 women that live there. 




Eleanor Cleland 
President 



WinWOOD HHL 




Left to light, first row. Seniors: Beverly Brown, Eleanor Cleland, Geraldine Goodnight, Elizabeth Klockseim, K' . iissey, EIna Swanson. Second row: 

Mary Alice Wright. Juniors: Flo Bergiing, Marjorie Davis, Martha Williams. Sophomore: Jean Ramsing. Freshman: Ruth Adelman. 



39! 




Douglass Hall appeared on the U.C.L.A. campus 
in the sanne year as the university, 1929. In the 
hall, many of the school's prominent graduates have 
been members of the Douglass sub-chapter of Phra- 
teies: women such as Use hluttner. Living in the hall 
now is Evelyn Boldrick, Southern California singles 
and doubles badminton champion. Entering into all- 
Phrateres social and charitable work, the hall also 
acts as a separate unit in such affairs. Among its 
most notable social events are the formal Christmas 
Tree Dinner and Party, the annual winter and spring 
formal dances, and the formal graduates' dinner. 
Besides these dances and parties, there are also 
various open houses and informal dances. In the 
ledger of aid to needy persons, Douglass contributed 
its part by holding a benefit for the University 
Camp. 



Betly Rhodes 
President 



D u n n s H UL 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Pearl Finn, Eleanor Nichols. Second row: Helen Rohrs, Marjoric Schmidt. Juniors: Margie Lee Brown. Janice Coffman, Betty 
Davis, Oma Louise Dear, Patricia Peterson, Betty Rhodes. Third row, Sophomore: Nclda Row. Freshnnen: Sallie Barnett, Marilyn Berkley, Evelyn Brewster, 
Dorothy Ann Brown, Miriam Burwell, Barbara Chambers, Irene Deck. Fourth row: Audrey Hughes, Rosemary Lawbender, Carrie Lee Patridge, Laura Lee 
Phelps, Nancy Prescott, Phyllis Roduner, Phyllis Root, Irene Shanklin. Not pictured: Elizabeth Deacon, Irma Hartman, Henny Johnson, Linette Card, Ruby 
Gentry, Anna Paiarola, Alberta Stokes, Wanda Todd, Elsie Tyler, Eula Wood, Evelyn Boldrick, Geraldine Bryson, Eva Cassirer, Marian Cole, Peggy Fogle, 
Paula Loeber, Elizabeth Stelnman, Betty Taylor. Dorothy Johnson, Louise Jones, Mildred Rohrs, Flora Gano, Barbara Hackett, Jane Jackson, Margaret 
Karl, Gladys Kendrick, Olga Lobastoff, Lillis Nerllng, Leslie Newton, Gerry Peck, Gwendolyn Ritter, Delores Simms, Mary Lou Young. 



392 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Marjorie Griffin, Mabel Jorgcnsen. Valerie Lanigan. Dorothy Melendy, Melina Morley. Juniors: Kitty Cooley, Margaret 
Rowe. Second row: Elizabeth Scholten, Betty Warnack, Wilma Wiles, Lorctta Vager. Sophomores: June Brecic, Nancy Garrison, Marjoriz Middlemiss, 
Barbara Perry, Lyia Sherwood. Third row: Caroline Tapper. Marjorle Wilkie. Freshmen: Evelyn Brewster, Rosalie Brown, Gretchen Burns, Margaret Costello, 
Virginia Grace, Margaret hlollingsworth, Delores Horrnfeld. Fourth row: Marilyn Moon, Maxme Movius, Florence McManus, Norrisa Paulson, Shirley 
Rosenbaum, Doris Schow, Peg Sheldon, Joan Tingley, Jean Warriner. 



P 



H 



I 



I 



I 



A 



Philia is a sub-chapter of Phrateres. Its purposes are 
to promote friendly relations among women on campus, 
and an opportunity to make more frequent contacts with 
their associates. Philia is a democratic organization, mem- 
bership being open to any woman who lives at home or 
in a sorority house and who wishes to be a member of 
Phrateres. Many and varied are the activities of this 
organization. They start out in February with an Orienta- 
tion tea to acquaint new women on campus with purposes 
and activities of Phrateres and its sub-chapters. This tea 
is followed by an Orientation dinner for those women 
■who are interested in Philia alone. Prospective members 
must then pass an examination in the history of the chap- 
ter, after which there is a formal initiation dinner. On 
April 10 Philia gave a fashion show and tea. Other affairs 
include a sport dance with buffet supper, a Mother's tea, 
a dinner with the Cal Men, and a picnic. 




Betty Warnack 
President 



393 




Marjorle Howe 
President 



M 



R A 



It was in September of 1931 that the largest stu- 
dent residence at the University, hlershey Hall, was 
founded. In the length of time that hlershey has 
been at U.C.L.A., it has made its presence known 
to every student interested in the affairs of the 
University. Its social events — bi-monthly tea dances, 
the two formals, the informals, and the open house 
— have made campus history. The University Camp 
has received Hershey's enthusiastic support, and the 
fHail's special events make campus life more enjoy- 
able for the 130 women who reside in it. Among 
the prominent alumnae of hlershey are such leaders 
as Ann Stewart Stockton, Mary Frances Hawkin, and 
Nancy McClish. 



H E I! 




Left to right, first row. Seniors: Virginia Anderson, Mary Elizabeth Clark, Frances Corcoran. Second row: Jane Dickman, LaVona Gcbb, Betty Hauser, 
Antoinette Lansborough, Betty Lee, Lois Lyie, Loris McConnell. Janet Mosher. Third row: Rosa Maria Parra, Exie Stevens, Billye Trowbridge. Juniors: 
Elizabeth Beard, Jean Bradley, Jane Christensen, Adrienne Ferrell, Margaret Gaucr. Fourth row: Merticee Gunther, Marjorie Howe, Kathcrine Nuffer, Pauline 
Parker, Frances Ridgley, Virginia Schmlssrauter, Billie Mac Thonnas, Esther Zegar. 



394 



Not pictured: Elizabeth Carbcc, Mildred Eason. Helen Fischer, 
Barbara Fleshcr, Geraldme Gidlcy, Geraldine Goecke. Barbara 
hialvcfson, Joy hiarris. Garland hlirsch. Dorothy Neilson. Sara 
Scofield. June Snow, Josephine Sully, Annell Sunderland, Mary 
Swift. Lois Tuchscherer, Jane Baxter, Eleanor Childers, Peggy 
Dahlstrom, Ellamae Eraser, Shirley hiinze, Virginia Keaton, 
Grace Luppsecu. Barbara McLaIn, Mary Murata, Sibyl Pass- 
man. Kathleen SIcelly, Anne Thieme. Ruth Wechtel, Georgette 
Willett, Patricia Aclcerman. hlefen Albert. Phyllis Arnim, Billie 
Beclcer, Mary Bennett. Barbara Bettin, Jean Beswethericic, 
Agnes Boland. Elizabeth Broclcmeier, Jean Condie, Marj'orie 
Coombs, Elizabeth Early. Charlotte Pal lis. Annette Foaner, 
Lovina Goulter, Virginia Hartman. Leola hletzler. Sheila 
Hughes, Juanlta Murdock, Carmen Penwarden. Lillian Regan. 
Gwen Ritter, Louise Wolff, Rosemary Zeigemeier. Evelyn Allen, 
Nadine Brown, Margaret Corey. Nadine Davis, Mary Drinker, 
Grace Ivanhoe. Frances Koch, Pauline Moffat, Ruth Sallott. 
Betty Stark, Virginia Stone. Christine Strain, EIna Woodbury, 
Lillian Shade. Louise Shade, Virginia Stavley, Ardeth Study. 
Sachi Tamaki, Helen Taylor. Barbara Tilson. Patricia Wheeling, 
Dorothy Wirth. Mary Zerbel. Margaret Telford. Norma Dennis, 
Evelyn Downing, Jeanette Thomson. Noreen VanVliet, Agnes 
Nader, Virginia Rcid, Jean Weill. Frances Corcoran, Isabelle 
O'Neil. Lucille Slotniicow. Nina Jo Reeves. 



S H E Y 




Jane Chrlstcnsen 
President 



HAIL 




Left to risht, first row: Sophomores: Jeanne Battelle, Betty Jane Seattle, Antoinette Birsic. Second row: Carolyn Bohlken, Rosemary Lajbender, JoAnn 
Schmissfauter. Vivian Spradlin, Marcella Sutton, Betty Tomson. Freshmen: Mary Arnold. Edna Calvert. Third row: Mary Coburn. Barbara Collins. Nancy 
Garlinghouse, Margaret Hollingsworth. Barbara Hull, Beverly Kraemer, Renee LeRoy, Florence Macrae. Fourth row: Marionlou Powers. Gloria Rosenblatt, 
Helen Rupert, Eleanor Thomas. Mary Frank Warren, Mary Elizabeth Ward. Elizabeth Williams, Bessie Mae Ferina. 



395 




In late 1929, Dean Laushlin, realizins the inade- 
quate housin3 facilities for women on the new 
campus, called on several persons to build halls for 
women. Responding to this suggestion, Dr. Neil 
Rudy had constructed in 1930 the hall which bears 
his name. In the ten years since its inception, Rudy 
Hall has had six presidents of all-Phrateres and other 
prominent women including Betty Haddock and 
Phyllis Culbert. Outstanding social events for the 
past year would be the two formal dances, an open 
house, and several date dances. To fill out the social 
program there are orientation parties and date din- 
ners. Each year at Christmas, the hall presents a 
family with its needs for a big dinner and supplies 
necessary for a complete week in addition to mak- 
ing annual contributions to the University Camp. 



Annabel Mitchell 
President 



RUDY 



HALL 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Thclma Kemmcrcr, Reba Ladd, Annabel Mitchcli, Nellie Mae Nelson, Eva Reed, Margaret Sm.;:.. Second row: Adna 
Elizabeth Swanson, Janice Whalen, Helen Willeford, Roxanna Wilson. Juniors: Barbara Craig, Juanita Hemperley. Third row: Barbara Knuth, Mary Ann 
Lowe, Melba Talnnage, Carolyn Wilson. Sophomores: Helen Crosier, Betty Freuhling. Not pictured: Betty Collins, Lucile Elder, Francis Evans, Ethel Geab- 
hard. Nornna Lopp, Lillis Nerling, Teddie Riley, Marjorie Ablutz, Virginia Bertch, Betty Cropsey, June Elliott, Lois Jenner, Francis Sarson, June Ward, 
Lupe Zarraga, Susan Armstrong, Jean Atchley, Coral Mae Bailiff, Marian Beach, Laura Bishop, Helen Bradford, Barbara Brown, Betty Craig, Charlotte 
Gcrogc, Verna Harvey, Doyetta Hutchinson, Eunice Jones, June Lehigh, Joan Mahn, Marianne McKelvey. Anita Nicolaus, Helen Pifer, Norma Reid, 
Carolyn Richardson, Irene Ross, Jean Schmid, Jean Stearns, Jessie Thompson, Nanette Walker, Nancy Wilson, Susan Baiter, Betty Balliett, Margaret Clin- 
ton, Millicent Crilly, Jean Crose, Betty Deacon, Georgia Evans, Irma Hartman, Edith Keim, Margaret McClintocIt, Jean Reed, Dorothy Weiner, Maxine 
Whisnant, Dorothy White, Beryl Langley, Beth Rogers, Sophie Stamer, Betty Stow. 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Elizabeth Agee, Jean Rae Berglind. Second row: Doris Cochran, Shirley Ferron. Ann Golay, Mildred Lindroth, Constance 
Parlt. Helen Stinchfield. Third row, Juniors: Joy Dalrynnple, Ann Hendricksen, Edna Louve, Doris Messenger. Sophomores: Mary Anderson, Patty Dalrymple. 
Not pictured: Virginia DeBolt, Jeanette Evans, Lillian Forrester, Dorothy Mall, Jean Beswetherick, Helen Cunninghann, Martha Cunningham, Elizabeth 
Dinnis, Jewel Gardner, Nan Hayden, Marjorie Mason, Agnes McKenna, Josephine McLellan, Betty Reed, Virginia Roberts, Virginia Bishop, Rosemary 
DeLiban, Virginia Dusch, Mary Greene, Wauneva Gunnct, Ruth Hermann, Barbara Hiatt, Janet Larson, Rosalie Lincoln, Margaret Matson, Fayma McDon- 
ald, Mary Chapman, Margaret Clarke, Rita Germain, Elsa Nord, Lorraine Pitman, Vera Wygod, Doris Reed. 




n [ 




ARMS 



In the fall of 1929, Winslow Arms was opened 
to help alleviate the need for more and better living 
quarters for women students. Named after its owner, 
Donald Winslow, the hall was installed as a sub- 
chapter of Alpha Chapter of Phrateres in the Fall of 
1930. On its roster have been such prominent women 
as Catherine Sackstefer and Ruth Healy. As well as 
supporting all the social events sponsored by Phra- 
teres, Winslow is, within itself, a social unit. A spring 
formal, an annual open house for parents, and a series 
of open houses are among the affairs. Other activities 
include financial aid to the support of the University 
Camp and assistance to orphaned French children 
via Madeleine Carroll. 



Mildred Lindroth 
President 




397 



FRUnilNITIES 





m,^ 




Left lo right, first row: Dale Foster, Bob Tally, Frank Wasson, William Fields. Second row: Louis Knox, Henry Keeton, Julian Blodgett, Larry Carney, 
Charles Hart. Fred McPherson, Scott Miller, Robert Maynard. Third row: Francis Farias, Henry Viclcerman, Robert Hoag, Richard Woods. Morgan 
McNeely, Harrison Latta, Carter Crall, Eugjne Shapiro. Fourth row: Deane Briggs, James Hutchinson, Warren Cowan, Mason Flowers, George Bliss, Wallace 
Kindel, Sam Grudin, Crossan Hays. 



imRFimnyiTY 





The Interfraternity Council coasted through an 
eventless year without doing anything spectacular. 
Workhorse Scotty Miller was invaluable to President 
Julian Blodgett, serving as secretary, treasurer, and 
all-around trouble shooter. The council sponsored the 
annual Interfraternity Dance at the Beverly-Wilshire 
hlotel, where about 500 couples danced where there 
was room for 50. The only matter of importance to 
come up during the year was the $150 yearly assess- 
ment to be levied against each house for the 
financing of an Interfraternity Advisor. Although a 
large number of houses voiced strong objections, 
the position, to be filled by Clyde Johnson, an 
alumnus of Phi Kappa Sigma, appears to have been 
settled. The patron saint of the council. Dean of 
Men Hurford Stone, was present at all meetings and 
showed a great interest in the welfare of the fra- 
ternity group on campus. 



Julian Blodgett 
President 



400 



Founded 1865 

Active chapters 95 

Inactive chapters 22 

Membership 37,500 

"No North, no South, no East, no West; but one 
great nation, heaven blest," was the timely motto of 

Alpha Tau Omega, founded in 1865 at the close U 

of the Civil War. With a flair for the picturesque, 
fifteen members of the local chapter were quaran- 
tined this year with scarlet fever. While thus jailed, 
the fifteen men made up a pool which was to go to 
the first one coming down with fever. But as nobody 

else was afflicted, the money taken in the pool was »; 

given to a kiddie's camp. On campus are Junior and 
Sophomore class treasurers, Dick Patton and Al 
Paquin. Famous national members list Dean Noble 
of U.C.L.A., and Governor Blanton Winship, Gov- 
ernor of Puerto Rico. This year, the A.T.O.s have 
had an Alumni Barn Dance, an exchange dance with 
the Delta Sigma Phi fraternity at S.C., and an annual 
basketball tournament with the A.T.O. chapter at 
Occidental. 




Alan Tarbell 
President 



OM[U 






itfiini 





Left to right, first row, Graduate: Ray Oldmg. Seniors: Donald Bennett, Daniel Chapman, William Lennon. Second row: Arthur Walsh, Frank Wasson. 
Juniors: John Dent, William Ewonus, Joseph Hawks, Harry Kirby, William Murphy, Richard Patton. Third row: Raborn Phillips, Jack Saunders, Alan Tarbell. 
Sophomores: Alan Elston, Paul Lane, Joe Luder, Tom McCarthy, Albert Paquin. Fourth row: Roland Partridge, Elbert Scninmann, John Sudduth, Robert 
Wolcott. Freshman: William Sanner. Pledges: Charles Coman, Lawrence Kollin, Robert Lewis. Not pictured: Richard Stevens, Merel Powers, Telfer Rey- 
nolds, Wayne Scott. 



40! 




Robert Andersen 
President 



Founded 1928 

Active chapters 2 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 114 

The Alpha chapter of Alpha Gamma Omesa was 
established on this campus in 1928. The or3anIza- 
tion now has a Beta chapter on the Berkeley campus 
and is making plans to go national in the near 
future. Alpha Gamma Omega was founded for the 
purpose of bringing together men Interested in 
Christian activities. All the members are active in 
church and young people's work in their respective 
Protestant groups. Alumni members include Louis 
Perry, teaching assistant in the Economics Depart- 
ment on campus; Percy Crawford, President of 
King's College, Philadelphia; and Burton Goddard, 
Professor of hiebrew at Harvard University. Promi- 
nent undergraduate members are Bob Orr, All-Coast 
water polo goalie; and Ralph Hill, varsity track. The 
Alpha Gamma Omegas have an annual Founder's 
Day Banquet, and the organization also sponsors an 
annual snow party. 



UPHA UMMA OII[U 




Left lo right, flrsl row, Seniors: Wilson Albright, Robert Anderson, Louis Knowles, Donald Nelson, Perry Schlack, Wayne Schlacic Second row, Juniors: 
Rodney Abernethy. Roger Davey, Dale Foster, Paul Hamlin, Ralph Hill, Ira Snnith, Frank Vanderhoof, Donn Yoder. Third row. Freshmen: Kenneth Boyd. 
Kermit Sryde, William Lantz, Roland Peterson. Pledges: Kenneth Arnestad, Richard Brazier, Delbert Hasitell, Carl Johnson. Not pictured: Don Austin, 
Robert Gales, Benjamin Gold, Louis Perry. Richard Griffin, Robert Orr, Dwight Pomeroy. 



402 





mj^ 




Left to risht, first row, Seniors: Milnor Gleaves, Herman Haupt, Trafford Workman. Juniors: Joe Blalcc. Second row: Earle Dorrance, Donald Hall. Louis 
Knox. O Neill Osbom, John Pennington, Robert Ward. Sophomores: Donald Arries, George Edwards. Third row: Wade Hill. Robert Orwig, Robert Wiley. 
Freshman: Gurney Smith. Pledges: Barry Grossman, Harold Gwynne, Roy Knox. George Reeynolds. Not pictured: James Barr, John Ellingston, Jim Ralcer, 
Robin Williams. Forrester Mashbir, Thomas Poiloclt. 



C 



H 



I 



P 



H 



Founded 1824 

Active chapters 35 

Inactive chapter 

Membership 14,550 

"We nearly shouted 'em down last time," say 
the Chi Phis, concerning the S.C.-U.C.L.A. grid test 
last December. All this took place at the combined 
Christmas formal that the local chapter has with 
S.C. every year, the night of the S.C.-U.C.L.A. 
game, when the respective houses rehash the game, 
play by play. The Chi Phis also go Tyrolean once 
a year at a buffet-supper dance at their house, 
complete with Strauss waltzes. Bavarian polkas, and 
strains of "O Du Schone." Active in student or- 
ganizations are the following Chi Phis: Bob Ward, 
President of the y.M.C.A.; Milnor Gleaves, Asso- 
ciated Men Students Board member; and Robin 
Williams, varsity guard. Outstanding alumni of Chi 
Phi include Hiram Johnson, Senator from California; 
and the Right Reverend Frederick R. Graves, Bishop 
of Shanghai. 




Joe BUke 
President 



403 



iS^ES 















&.^^^A^ 



Left to right, first row, Seniors: Ralph Daiton, William Johnke, Stanley Klausner, Frank Lindholm, Jim Mitchell, Robert Tally, Joe Viger. Second row. 
Juniors: Walter Allington, John Chapman, Charles Hughes, Leonard Roest. Eugene Winchester. Sophomores: William Anderson, Gordon Douglas. Monte 
Steadman, John Wardlaw. Third row, Pledges: Howard Bodger, Al Casarola, Robert Cowen, Roscoe Good, Harry Hanson, Harry Hosford, Earl Hughes, 
Brown Kincheloe, Bill Knoll. Fourth row: Stewart Laurenson, Homer Newman, Jack Palmer, Mickey Panorich, Ray Purpus, Nelson Rosemont, Walter 
Teubner Ed Tyler Belan Wagner. Not pictured: Lcnnis Ackerman, Charles Ross. Dick Hughes, Dennis Francis, Ted Kelly, Jim Thurmond. 

upy siCMH n 




Lennis Ackerman 
President 



Founded 1845 

Active chapters 40 

Inactive chapters 4 

Membership 15,000 

The first fraternity to build a house on campus, 
the local chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi was founded 
in 1926. At the fraternity now is an exchange stu- 
dent from the University of Florence, Fausto Ricci. 
From the local chapter, Jack Leggett is studying at 
the University of Rome. Prominent on campus are 
Bob Talley, concert pianist; Johnny Chapman, bari- 
tone: Joe Viger, quarterback; Monte Steadman, 
all-around athlete; and Jim Mitchell, awarded the 
trophy for the best scholarship and spirit on the 
football team. Distinguished alumni are Charles 
Kullman of the Metropolitan Opera; and George 
Marmaduke, governor of Missouri. Traditional tor 
Bruin Alpha Sigs is the Black and White Dance to 
which members and their dates come dressed only 
in black and white. More famed is their Beach- 
comber Dance where everyone is costumed as a 
character from the Laughton picture, The Beach- 
comber. 



404 



Founded 1839 

Active chapters 90 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 45,740 

Sarongs, grass skirts, and beachcombers spring 
up from all parts of the campus once a year when 
Beta Theta Pi gives its annual spring Tahitian Dance. 
Last year the Betas took part in a New Year's Eve 
Ball with the Phi Delts and the S.C. Sigma Chis: 
and they also participate in the Miami Triad, a 
dance which commemorates the founding of three 
fraternities at Miami University. Other social activi- 
ties of the Betas include golfing, flying (two mem- 
bers are licensed pilots), and indulging in inter- 
fraternity athletics. The Betas point with pride to 
on-campus members Fred Koebig, President of the 
A.S.U.C., and Jim Stewart, Chairman of the Religious 
Conference. Among distinguished alumni are the 
late Senator William Borah; Paul V. McNutt, Federal 
Security Administrator; and cartoonist Ding Darling. 




James Stewart 
President 



e E U T H E U 



P I 




SML 





Left to right, first row, Seniors: Robert Alexander, Stephen Donohue, William Field, Robert Galloway, Charles Hofton, Frederick Koebig, Ralph Marsden, 
Robert Martin. George McMahon. Second row: William McWethy, James Stewart. Juniors: Orville Clark, Joseph Gannon, Charles Shores, Terrell Shores. 
Sophomores: Thomas Bagget, Frederick Bemis, John Christiansen, Howard Culver. Third row: Howard Douglas, John Echternack, Robert Hummel, Wallace 
Jones, Edward Smyth, Thomas Soriero, Walter Switzcr, Donald Wells, James Zastro. Freshmen: Richard Daily. Fourth row: Clifford Dancer, Robert Hine, 
Norman Lyon, Robert Thomas, Alexander Vail. Pledges: Donald Brubaker, Warren Edwards, Bradford Hovey, Chuck Johnston, John McLeah. Not pictured: 
Jack Anderson, Melvin George, Jack Wadsworth, Russell Jacobs, Robert Older, Guy Freutel, James Van Scoyoc, Wells Morris. 



405 




Founded 1890 

Active chapters 34 

Inactive chapters 8 

Membership 12,350 

Four editors of collese dailies on the Pacific Coast 
are members of Delta Chi. On our own campus we 
have Delta Chi Dick Pryne, editor of the Daily 
Bruin. Originally, the organization started as a pro- 
fessional legal fraternity, and although the house 
has no professional restrictions, the large number of 
legal alumni Is notable. As alumni members, the 
house has Mayor Fletcher Bowron, and many of the 
superior court judges in Los Angeles. Members ot 
the local chapter include Phi Beta Kappa Joe 
Oyster; and Rally Committeemen, Henry Keaton, 
and Harold Nygren. At the moment the Delta Chis 
are parking their cars in the street because they tore 
up their garage to make a pine-panelled rumpus 
room. This past semester, the chapter entertained 
its national president. Dean M. Thompson of the 
University of Illinois. 



Joseph Oyster 
President 



DELTA 



C H 




Lift to risht, first row. Seniors: Francis Barter, Spencer Edwards, Henry Keeton, Joseph Oyster, Richard Prync. Juniors: Charles Braithwaite. Second row: 
Robert Leebody, Harold Nysren. Sophomores: Jack Booth, George Bush, Robert Howard. Leon Miller. Third row: John Peterson, Robert Pritchard. Fresh- 
man: James Power. Pledges; Gene Haddox, Eugene MacDonald, Charles Pidgeon. Not pictured: Robert Wright, David MacFarland, Uoyd Tevis, Robert 
Cline, Shannon McCrary, Robert Nichols. 



406 




Left to risht, first row, Seniors: Julian Blodgett, Charles Ernst. Juniors: Edward Breen, Franklyn Dana. David Duque. Second row: William Pctiz. Sophomores: 
Alexander Cameron, Edward Gair, John Hustler, Howard McCulloch, Albert Ralphs. Third row, Pledges: Stuart Cross. James Evans, Freeman Gossett, 
William Hodge, Douglas Laidlaw, James A. Stuart. Not pictured: Thomas Duque, Edward Gould, Robert Morton, Terry Holberton. Deveraux Johnston. 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILQN 



Founded 1844 

Active chapters 48 

Inactive chapters 10 

Membership 27,000 

Theta Rho, the local chapter of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, was founded in February, 1932, in con- 
formance with the established Deke policy of col- 
onization. The charter members were obtained from 
the chapters at Berkeley and Stanford. Now a very 
oromlnent house on campus, the Dekes number 
amon3 their members: Julian Blodgett, President of 
Interfraternity; Ned Breen, member of the Organiza- 
tions Control Board; Bob Morton, Senior Football 
Manager: and Sandy Cameron, Basketball. Among 
alumni members are Babe Horrell, Theodore Roose- 
velt, J. P. Morgan, and FHarold Janss. Social events 
include a Founder's Day Picnic at Point Magu, par- 
ticipation in the Four-Way Formal, as well as a 
traditional formal dance at Bel-Air. For a social 
event with a novel turn to its title, the Dekes have 
the "Last Supper," a stag affair, at the end of every 
Spring semester. 




Julian Blodgett 
President 



407 



msi^ 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Lawrence Carney, Fred Flo, Charles Folker. Boyd Harris, Joe Lang, Henry Milledge, Kimball Moore. Second row: Cy Trask, 
Tad Twombly. Juniors: William Coston, Lloyd Dunn, Harry Freeman, Donald Hardin, William Phillips, Wayne Rives, Ray Rosecrans, Andrew Smith. Third 
row: Barry Sugden, William Thomas, Norman Todd, Thomas Wright, Jack Wynns. Sophonnores: Phillip Anderson, John Bohn, Keith Cochrane, William 
Ramsdell, John Sevcrson. Fourth row, Freshmen: Waldo Perey, Frank Spearman, Donald Wall. Pledges: William Alberts, Bill Brown, Frank Cary, Dave 
Driscoll, Martin Fisher, Ralph Gabriel, James Gardner. Fifth row: Clarence Johnston, Jack Mendius, Zell Myers, William Pagen, Kenneth Rewick, William 
Schallert, Wesley Seapy, James Shirreffs, Robert Singleton, Jim Wood. Not piiclured: Thomas Crooks. 

DELTA SIOMA M 

Founded 1899 

, . . 6 Active chapters 46 

■''-^.^^El " 'A'^^'^^.^^VfSQl^ia^mm. . inactive chapters 5 

^^mfy J|HHi^BlBBMHHB*ifll» ' Membership 10,900 

Nationally founded in 1899, the local chapter of 

Delta Sigma Phi canne into existence in 1929. A 

traditional Delta Sigma Phi affair is their Carnation 

Ball given this year at the Beverly Wilshire. The 

Delta Sigs, because of their national informal ritual, 

are commonly known as sailors, so every year they 

*-*3l.^sa have a Sailor Dance at the house vv/hich is decorated 

with movie props to represent a ship, replete with 

ship's wheels and a gang plank over which the guests 

enter. The fraternity takes to the sea once a year 

after Spring finals, for a yacht trip to Catalina. They 

also make an annual snow trip to a camp in Big 

Pines between semesters. Among Delta Sig alums 

are three successful musicians: Jan Garber, Hal 

Kemp, and Ted Weems. On the Bruin campus are 

^ .JI^B^^t^'^^^'^^^H^H Bruce Johnson and Fred Flo, members of Blue Key; 

"^ — ' ""^^ *^^M anjj Business Manager of the Bruin, Boyd Harris. 

Lawrence Carney 
President 

408 




Founded 1850 

Active chapters 39 

Inactive chapters 16 

Membership I 1,960 

With enough crewmen in the house to make a 
full boatload, Phi Kappa Sigma also includes a 
varsity hockey star, Jim McPhee, among Its mem- 
bers. Claude Swanson and the DuPonts are among 
prominent alumni. Socially active, the Phi Kaps 
traditionally give date dinners before the night foot- 
ball games, as well as frequent date luncheons 
throughout the year. A Skull Dance at which the 
guests come costumed as someone from the past 
is an annual tradition of the Phi Kaps, as a skull is 
one of the emblems on their crest. Other Phi Kappa 
Sigma activities include a hiawaiian Dance, and a 
Founder's Day Banquet, as well as a Christmas Stag 
and an Alumni Stag, at which the feature of the 
day is a baseball game between alumni and actives. 
At Christmas, the Phi Kaps play Santa Claus to a 
group of underprivileged boys. 




PH 



Emmett Harvey 
President 



KAPPA SIGMA 




Left to right, first row, Gradaute: Burwell Palm. Seniors: Robert Barnard, Robert Brady, Robert Brosc, George Carmack. Second row: Robert Doupe. Dai; 
Findley. Harold Fraser, John Goff, Emmett Harvey. Harrison Latta, Carvel Moore, Charles Norton, Robert Streeton, Vic Stancliff. Third row. Juniors: Stanley 
Aylmer, Robert Burnette, Bruce Crane, Roy Doupe, Carl Ghormley, Luther Hiltner, Warren Hostler, Arl McCormick, Sophomores: Lee Clark, Hanford 
Files. Fourth row: Edward Hillie. Freshmen: Seibley Buffum, Lou Danielson, Max Dunn. Pledges: Ray Avery, Joe Axline, Howard Bullen, Phillip Dowds, 
Ralph Donnelly, Neal Dundas. Fifth row: William Goodrich, George Grey, Louis Heintz, James McPhee. Hugh Plumb. Jess Ranker, Jerome Roland. 
Harley Taylor, Lew Williams, Paul Wolvcn. Not pictured: John Inman, Roy Rhoades. 



409 




Charles Hart 
President 



Founded 1858 

Active chapters 75 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 31,000 

Originally organized for the purpose of bringing 
eight close friends together, Delta Tau Delta has 
considerably expanded since it was founded in 
1858. The U.C.L.A. chapter went national in 1926. 
Among prominent on-campus members we find Del 
Lyman, football; Vic Miller and Bill Kugler, senior 
basketball; Harley Merritt, varsity tennis; and 
Whitey Knutson, President of Scabbard and Blade. 
Prominent national members are Henry Wallace, 
Secretary of Agriculture; Nelson Johnson, Ambassa- 
dor to China; Irving J. Reuter, Governor of Colo- 
rado; and Pinky Tomlin, song writer and band 
leader. The outstanding social event hosted by the 
Delts is the Bowery Dance. On this occasion the 
house is turned into an extravagant bowery scene 
with the aid of studio props. The top formal event 
is the Delta Tau Delta-Delta Gamma Ball, held 
annually in the B'ltmore Blueroom. 



DIIIA UV DELTA 





Left to right, first row, Graduate: Kemper Campbell. Seniors: Robert Belsey, Kingston Cable. Whitney Collins, Charles Hart, Charles hloward, Van How- 
ard. Second row; Lloyd Knutson, Juniors: Lane Bardccn, Robert Douglass, William Kugler, Victor Millar, Jack Millikan. Sophomores: John Cain. Neil 
Casson, Richard Harris. Third row: Stuart McKenzie, Thomas Neely, Gordon Payne. Robert Winegardner, Richard Zacher. Freshmen: Richard Horton, 
James House, Richard Kitrelle. Jack Young. Fourth row. Pledges: Len Brown, Owen Davis, William Duddleson. Gordon Hewson, Frank Howard. Philip 
Hutchins, Raymond Johnson. Frank Klingberg. Gerald Sieck. Not pictured: Robert Gay, John Hessel, Robert Howell, Dell Lyman, Armand Ballantyne, 
Mathcw Mahana. Harley Merrit, William Veneman. Joseph Jones. Clark Tinch. 

410 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Irl Dowd. Dudley Field, Robert Maynard, Joe Pelt, Roy Wilson. Juniors: Jim Beckett, Bernard Boomer, Marion Cline. 
Second row: William Hogg, Pete Hollingsworth, John Miclcs, Bill Overlin, Gene Palm, Roger Vandegrift. Sophomores: Merrill Adams, Frank Durkee, Harry 
Hurd. Third row: Jerry McClellan, Stacy Moore, John Newman, Louis Thielen. Freshmen: Roy Baber, Larry Collins, Rex May, Ray Stone, Leonard Wilson. 
Fourth row, Pledges: Phillip Collins, William Cooper, John Geddes, William Gray, George McConnell, Kenneth Merz, Thomas Smith, Ted Wickman, Tom 
Wood. Not pictured: Erie Halliburton, Curtis Young. 



KAPPA 



S 



G M \ 



Founded 1869 

Active chapters 110 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 42,663 

The second largest yacht in the world carried a 
crowd of carefree Kappa Sigs out Santa Barbara 
way one weekend last term, then turned around and 
brought them back again. Outstanding social events 
were the Tri-chapter dance and the annual masquer- 
ade. The Kappa Sigma Mother's Club recently pre- 
sented the local house with a large pool table. 
Besides playing pool the boys amuse themselves 
by projecting amateur movies on a screen in their 
projection room. Every other Friday night finds 
the boys gathered in the house for an informal get- 
together. Prominent active members are Bill Overlin, 
Ed Law, and Bob Maynard. National alumni include 
Lowell Thomas, composer Hoagy Carmichael, Bill 
Spaulding, and the national Commander of the 
American Legion, Stephen Chadwick. 




Robert Maynard 
President 



411 








Left to right, first row, Seniors: William Bycrts, William Corbett, Bettis Heard, Dean Kennedy, Carl Thomas. Juniors: Howard Childers, Sidney Howard. 
Second row: Fred McPherson, Richard Moore, Leiand Teets, John Vrba. Sophomores: Victor Smith, Herbert Twitchel, Otis Yost. Third row, Freshmen: Jack 
McGill, David Poole. Pledges: Howard Barker, William Fratus, William Haney, Gene Parks, Norman Wilson. Not pictured: James Collins, J. W. Bill, 
William Burk, Frank Weir, Art Adair. 



DELTA 



U P S 



I I 




William Corbell 
President 



Founded 1834 

Active chapters 63 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 27,000 

As the only non-secret fraternity, the Delta Up- 
silons have beconne very prominent, and were one 
of the first national fraternities to establish them- 
selves on this campus. The D.U.s have become 
noted for their annual "Bad Taste" dance, to which 
everyone comes 3arbed in the worst clothes combi- 
nation possible. The D.U.s describe the decorations 
for the affair to be in "extremely poor taste." Promi- 
nent members on campus include Stan Reel, Cashier 
of the A.S.U.C.; Fred McPherson, Chairman of the 
Rally Committee; and Johnny Vrba, Head Yell 
Leader. Nationally prominent members are Charles 
Evans hlushes, John Erskine, and Charles G. Dawes. 
Currently, the D.U.s are occupied with plans for a 
new house on Gayley, and they describe their phi- 
lanthropy as "paying a $61 water bill for a neigh- 
boring fraternity." 



412 



Founded 1865 

Active chapters 67 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 29,000 

Kappa Alpha was established on the campus of 
Washington and Lee University in 1865, and was 
inspired by Robert E. Lee who had just been elected 
president of the university. It was originally a social 
engineering fraternity, but later professional restric- 
tions were removed. Among prominent alumni 
members we find Richard E. Byrd, J. Edgar Hoover, 
Randolph Scott, and Munro Leaf. The local Kappa 
Alpha's are represented in sports with Don McPher- 
son, co-captain of the football team, and Scott 
Miller, captain of the ice hockey team. The fra- 
ternity also has Norm Padgett, president of Men 
Students, and Earl hianson, cadet colonel of the 
R.O.T.C. Traditional for all chapters of Kappa 
Alpha are the Lee Banquet and the Dixie Ball. The 
first honors the birthday of Robert E. Lee, and it 
was at this banquet that Linda Darnell was made 
the official sweetheart of the fraternity. 




Scott Miller 
President 



KAPPA U P H A 




Left to right, first row, Graduates: Robert Frazcr, Andrew Horn, Richard Mjrdock. Seniors: Harry Bell, Grant Gard. Earl Hanson. Second row: Clifford 
Huntley. William Irvin, Scott Miller. Norman Padgett, Robert Rostine, John Sooy. Juniors: Donald MacPherson. Sophomores: Frank Johnson. Third row: 
Lee Packard. Freshman: Donald Waggoner. Pledges: Orton Duling, Al Gammon. Everett Hahn, John Ross, Schuyler Van Renssler. Jack Wykoff. Not pic- 
tured: Robert Forbes, Norton Beach, Richard Bodmus, Robert Chambers. James Crutchfield, Murray Sneddon, William Troxei, William Gray, Douglas 
Schwartz. James Bartholomew, Reginald Dawson, Marvin Goettsch, Salve M atheson, George Smith. 



413 




Francis Farias 
President 



Founded 1909 

Active chapters 106 

Inactive chapters 4 

Membership 27,000 

Last fall, amazed citizens of San Francisco saw 
a caravan of ten motor glides bearing an equal 
number of Lambda Chi Alphas invade their city for 
their national convention there. The hardy ten made 
the 500-mile trip in a record breaking 18 hours. The 
Lambda Chis social calendar has been travelled 
through at much the same rate. Social events in- 
cluded the following: Pledge dance; Pre-S.C. game 
dance; Parent's luncheon and football party at Santa 
Clara game, parents' dinner, alumni dinner, initiation 
banquet. Founder's Day banquet, and a Spring for- 
mal. Interested in scholarship. Lambda Chis main- 
tain an endowment fund to aid deserving students, 
and have won the interfraternity scholarship both 
semesters of the 1939 school year. Prominent 
Lambda Chis include Cecil Dye, and Don Ewing. 
Alumni members are Micky Cochran and Leroy 
Prinz. 



LAMIiDil CHI ALPHA 





Left to right, first row. Seniors: Francis Crandall, Donald Ewing, Francis Farias. Juniors: Wilbur Fredcll, Douglas Goff. Second row: Ciiarles Pinney, Victor 
Silvangi. Sophomores: John Allan, William Cox, Wilmar Dahle, Phillip Halloran, John Richmond. Third row: Alfred Shinn, Richard Whittle. Freshman: John 
White. Pledges: Wilbur Dettmar, Alfred Evcrs, Kenneth Price, Stevens Price. Not pictured: Henry Baron, Richard Collins, Cecil Dye, Jack First. 




414 




Left to eight, first row, Seniors: Robert Kahn. Second row: Sanford Mock. Juniors: Warren Cowan, Penrose Dcsser, Raymond Kopp, Mark Norton, Norman 
Sokolow. Third row, Sophomores: Marvin Gunter, Seymour Lindenbaum, Howard Weisberg. Freshman: Gerald Sills. Pledges: Daniel Brown. Jack Factor. 
Not pictured: Herbert Hollzer, David Klein, Malcolm Steinlauf Edwin Broffman, Gustave Lindenbaum, Allan Aaron, Meyer Katzen, Arnold Provisor, 



T A U 



DELTA 



P H 



Founded 1910 

Active chapters 23 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 12,125 

The first and most orisinal local fraternity present 
was that of Tau Delta Phi, at which the pledses 
were presented wearing ragged dress suits and carrot 
corsages. Social highlights for the fraternity included 
the ultra-formal pledge dance at Earl Carroll's, and 
the traditional Blue and White dance at the Victor 
Hugo — men wearing blue, their dates in white. In 
the way of informal affairs the Tau Delts feature a 
fall masquerade and a Hard Time dance. Musicales 
are an important feature of this fraternity which is 
noted for its large collection of recordings, both 
classical and popular; and at informal discussions 
every Sixth Sunday night members of the faculty 
are invited for bull sessions. Sandy Mock, Assistant 
Editor of the Bruin, is a Tau Delta Phi, and promi- 
nent alumni members include David Sarnoff, head 
of R.C.A.: and Irving Rapper, Warner Brothers 
director. 




Warren Cowan 
President 



415 



mjs^ 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Sidney Bernstein, Albert Levie, Maury Shaoiro, Harry Vickman, Jack Wain. Juniors: Albert Elmer, Jerry Levie. Second 
row: James Maas, Arnold Rudin, Ralph Stone. Sophomores: Bernard Applefield, Charles Harris, Benjamin Kimmelsman, Morris Pechet. Freshmen: Alex 
Fishman. Third row: John Freund, Donald Klipper, Robert Vickman. Pledges: Howard Bromberg, Harold Epstein, Daniel Gam, Joseph Gantman, Howard 
Helfman. Fourth row: Allan Hyman, Louis Kaplan, Marvin Katzman, Sheldon Korones, Bruce Miller, David Sacks, Charles Sockett, Norman Stern. Not 
pictured: Irving Levine, George Goldman, Benjamin Kvitky, Arthur Zoloth, Alvin Grecnwald, Joel Kane, Lester Shear, Seymour Radin, Phillip Zebker. 



P H 



n ""'".yvft;. 



B [U DELTA 




Harry Vickman 
President 



Founded 1903 

Active chapters 26 

Inactive chapters 7 

Mennbership 3,300 

Remove the Delta and add in its place Kappa, 
and you vv'on't be far wrong in determining the 
scholastic achievement of the enterprising gentle- 
men of Phi Beta Delta fraternity. The house has 
two members who have maintained straight A's 
during the past year. Prominent members are Milt 
Cohen, sports editor of the Bruin; Benny Kvitky, 
grid star; and George Goldman, stunt chairman. 
At their November Dance, life was a circus for the 
Phi Beta Deltas, who had their living room decorated 
as a tent and containing full carnival regalia. Spooky 
memories are all that remain of the New Year's Eve 
affair, which had for its motif elements of the super- 
natural. A series of Friday night Radio Dances 
and Stags provided the needed escape from the 
swirl of formality. Prominent alumni members of the 
fraternity are Louis B. Mayer, Rabbi Magnin, and 
the hlonorable Joseph A. Shapiro. 



416 



Founded 1848 

Active chapters 73 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 35,000 

The Phi Gamma Deltas, better known as the Fijis, 
are proud to announce that they are hvin3 in a new 
house this year. In the library of the house is a Fiji 
mural which was done by one of the boys, Edsar 
Twomey. Another affair in keepins with the Phi 
Gamma Delta nickname is the Fiji Island Dance, 
a grass skirt affair. Every other Friday night the fel- 
lows get together for informal bull sessions if some- 
body furnishes the refreshments. The house claims 
exclusive rights on a catalogue which is maintained 
for the private use of actives and pledges. This 
catalogue has most complete and up-to-date biogra- 
phies — past, present, and future possibilities — of the 
women on the row. National alumni include Alf 
Landon, Calvin Coolidge, Lloyd Douglas, and New- 
ton D. Baker. On campus are Hank McCune of 
All-U Sing fame; and Bill Mitchell, All-Coast Water 
Polo player. 

PHI U 




Richard Woods 
President 



MA DELTA 









Left to right, first row. Seniors: Robert Deshon. Henry McCune. James Morns, Walter Wayman, Richard Woods. Juniors: Dickson Brunnenkant, Robert 
Fordyce, Harvey Gailmger. Second row: Harvey Gilmer. Jannes Hcnsley. William McCall, William Reordan, Robert Scott, Alfred Woodill. Sophomores: 
Peter Dolbec, Richard Hcssc. Third row: Robert Kern, William Mitchell. Freshmen: John Cain, William Farrar, John Johnson, Arthur Kaiser, Leo Meacher. 
Walter Ranney. Pledges: Nicholas Angeles, Stephen Cavanaugh, Douglas Hudson, Everett Riddle, Thomas Rounsavell, Thomas Thompson, Richard Twohy, 
Arthur Weber. Not pictured: William Howe, Frederick Lettice, Fletcher White, James Hokom, James O'Brien. 



417 




Founded 1848 

Active chapters 106 

Inactive chapters 21 

Membership 50,043 

Phi Delta Theta lays claim to more Rhodes 
Scholars from the national organization than any 
other social fraternity. About scholarship, the Phi 
Delts have nothing more to say. However, when it 
comes to social events the local fraternity is right 
up among 'em. They participate in the Four-Way 
Formal, and in the Miami Triad, as well as have a 
Spring formal, and hHogwaliows after finals, which 
affairs are just what the name implies. Prominent 
members of the local fraternity are Jimmy Devere, 
member of the Organizations Control Board; Bob 
Hoag, editor of the Claw, and according to tTie 
Bruin last semester, the man of the month; also, the 
house has Bob Simpson, football player; and Gale 
Stafford, Senior Council member. Prominent alumni 
are Lou Gehrig, Harold Ickes, Justice James C. 
McReynolds, and Benjamin Harrison. 



Robert Hod3 
President 



u 



DELTA THLTA 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Luis Burris, Donald CampbeN, Bill Monltman, Frank Randall, Owen Sloan, Gale Stafford, Thomas Stevens, Robert Thomas. 

Second row: John Williams. Juniors: Warren Betlcher, James Devere, Haria n Eastman, Robert Graf, Robert Hoas, John Lane, Carl Randall, Richard 
Roshe, John Russell. Third row: Don Toland. Sophomores: Donald Fellows, Langdon Gregg, Randy Keim, Dwight McCallum, Bob Simpson, Bob Stanford, 
James West. Freshmen: Redmond Daggett. Hugh Geycr. Fourth row, Pledges: Clark Dalquist, Bill Drake, Howard Fitzpatrick, Bill Godfrey. Bob Overpeck, 
Bill Pratt, Dale Stafford, Donald Stalder, Jim Williams, Bob Wilson. Not pictured: Jerry Hawley, David Hill, Neal Lakenan, Eugene Alder. 



418 









Left to right, firs 
Robert Tavis. Jun 
Mackenzie, A. J. 
Sophomores: Adr 

Davidson, John Li 



i row, Seniors: Byron Atkinson, Deane Bnggs, Arnold Broyes, Cliff Drake, Robert Larson. Sam North, Earl Scherff, ^X'llliam Schmitz, 
ors: Arnolds Anderson. Second row: Angelo Antonini, Martin Barnes, Richard Gillespie, Bob hlicks. George Huston, Bill Jaccard, Murdo 
Meyer, Bob Park, George Partridge. Third row: Ben Sanford, John Southmayd, George Thorson, Harley Walther. Lawrence Walther. 
an Attwill, Lester Frame, Loran Kitch, George Mellin, Tracy Moore. Fourth row: Jack Ross, Joe Yungfleisch. Freshmen: Ken Bayless, Jack 
ndgren, Richard Meriweather. Pledges: Frank Bishop, William Christien. Bob Fogarty, Bill Ketfcler. 



SIGMA 



N U 



Founded 1869 

Active chapters 96 

Inactive chapters 16 

Membership 38,500 

Before the U.C.L.A. chapter of Sisma Nu went 
national in 1930, the local chapter was Alpha Delta 
Tau, and because of this the members were known 
as "awful damn tramps." In lieu of this, once a year, 
the Sigma Nus have a traditional Tramp Dance. In 
addition to this headline social event, there are 
Christmas and Spring Formals, as well as an exchange 
dance with the S.C. chapter of Sigma Nu. A Tudor 
English style house is being built by the local fra- 
ternity, groundbreaking for which took place in 
February with Provost Hedrick officiating. Founded 
on the campus of the Virginia Military Academy, 
the house is noted for its military background. This 
type of activity is encouraged, and a high per- 
centage of Sigma Nus are members of Scabbard 
and Blade. In keeping with this policy it seems nat- 
ural to find Major Norris, liead of the Coast Artillery 
at U.C.L.A. an alumnus. 




Deane Briggs 
President 



4.19 



SHL]^ 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: John Cole. Wilbur Jacobs. William McClellan. Second row: Moigan McNaely. James Morris. Juniors: John Beckler, Edward 
Canavan, Donald Carman, Quin Frazier. Srover Gauntt. George Grassmeuclc. Jack Lamberson. William Marsh. Third row: James Ruby, Clarlt Shaugh- 
nessy. Sophomores: Robert Alshuler, Lynn Compton. Sheldon Craddoclt. John Edmiston. Edward Fearon. Burritt Fosrer, John Howard. Donald James. 
Fourth row: John Perkins, John Power, Jack Simons. Freshmen: Paul Sims, William Tanner, Hurd Thornton, Lennis Wichman. Pledges: Charles Carey, 
Douglas Christensen, Robert Coates. Fifth row: Eugene Erickson, Eugene McConahy, Douglas Meadowcroft, Harrison Negley, William O'Brien, William 
O'Neill, Jack Quigg, John Reid, Joseph Seward, Hugh Walter. Not pictured: John Allen. Charles Bagby. Frank Gehrie. 



P H 



KAPPA 



P S 




Founded 1852 

Active chapters 52 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 27,000 

Phi Kappa Psi was founded in 1852 at Jefferson 
College. Both nationally and locally the fraternity 
attempts to maintain a balance among all classes of 
university life by taking an active interest in scholas- 
tic, political, and athletic activities. The fraternity 
is proud to name Woodrow Wilson among its prom- 
inent alumni. Outstanding members of the local 
chapter including John Cole, President of the Senior 
Class, and Bob Alshuler, President of the Sopho- 
more Class. Holding to a tradition, the new pledges 
were presented to the campus the year, which fact 
greatly surprised all the hiilgard lasses who thought 
they had a monopoly on this activity. Naturally they 
thought the whole idea was pretty chintzy. They 
also hold several dances during the year. 



Morgan McNecly 
President 



420 



Founded 1856 

Active chapters 113 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 50,388 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the largest national fra- 
ternity, tests itr, seaworthiness once a year when it has 
a ship theme masquerade. However, the tradition of 
the sea is violated somewhat on this occasion, for 
the boys pick up their dates in hay wagons. Once a 
year the S.A.E.'s literally take to the sea in the 
"Mariner," a 106-foot Gloucester schooner, for a 
trip to the Catalina Isthmus, which affair the boys 
describe as "pretty sharp." Members of S.A.E. in- 
clude Frank Carroll, on the Athletic Board and Stu- 
dent Council: Carter Crall, Vice-President of Inter- 
fraternity Council: and Tom Freear, Southern Cam- 
pus Manager. Prominent alumni are William Bank- 
head, Rudy Vallee (who incidentally came with his 
whole company to the S.A.E. Tri-Chapter Dance), 
and Bobby Jones. In the fall the S.A.E.'s will be liv- 
ing in a much publicized new house on Gayley. 




Carter Crall 
President 




Left to right, first row. Seniors: Rudy Binder. Frank Carroll, Carter Crall. Second row: George Feister. David Foust, Ralph Funk, James Frinell, Richard 
Fulmer, Robert Harvey, Richard Hougham, Herbert London. Earl Stone. John Strong. Third row: Dickenson Thatcher. Juniors: Tom Freear, Clarlt George, 
Robert Hannah, Joe Howse, James Lcighton, Gay Pryor, Tom Shumaker, James Stevens, Alfred Taft. Fourth row: La Drue Willardson. Sophomores: 
Rodger Applcgate, Harry L'Heureux, George Lowerre, Byron Morton, Robert Newcomb. Kirk Sinclair, Archie Slover. James Vitale, Bill Wilson. Fifth row, 
Freshmen: Elwy Jones, Burt Poore. Pledges: Eddie Almond, Ray Binder, Hugh Cupernell, Jack Gardner, Robert Knotts, Jack Lund, Harold Schydler, Frank 
Smith. Not pictured: Paul Jarvis, Mahlon Rinehart, Harold Thompson, Bill Divvcr, Bill Dyer, Ed Nolton. 



421 




Founded 1909 

Active chapters 35 

Inactive chapters 3 

Membership 5,600 

Formerly Sigma Chi Delta, Sigma Alpha Mu went 
national in 1926. Highlight social affair is an all 
day siege held at a local country club. Alumni and 
undergraduates compete in various sports with the 
winner of the baseball game receiving the tradi- 
tional trophy, an ancient and battered cocktail 
shaker. A dinner dance climaxes the evening. Promi- 
nent on campus are Al hHoffman, 145 pound former 
Golden Gloves champion; Al Adelman and Eugene 
Shapiro, Rally Committeemen; and hierbert Ruben, 
president of the Jewish Council. The house has had 
several bull sessions this year with faculty members 
Davis, in Psychology, and Hultzen of the English 
Department, present. Outstanding national members 
are hlarry Joe Brown, film producer; Professor T. 
Erin Levy, Secretary of the Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals and Professor of Law at Syracuse University. 



su 



Eugene Shapiro 
President 



A HPHA MU 




Left to right, first row, Graduates: William Newman, William Rosenfeld. Seniors: Leon Cohen, Sidney Eistcr. Second row: Irvng Grody, Sam Piltzer, 
Herbert Rubin, Gene Shapiro, Milton Waldman. Juniors: Kermitt Bartiett, Theodore Berlin, Leo Cogen. Third row: Simon Colen, Sid Gewirtz, Bernard 
Gross, Albert Hoffman, Leo Kaplan, Stanley Keller, Nathan Lozanov. Sophomores: Aaron Aaron. Fourth row: Henry Scott. Freshman: Jerome Goodkin. 
Pledges: Leon Berman, Howard Brown, William Frank, Robert Friedman, Leonard Goodman, Herbert Rubins. Not pictured: Arthur Aaron, Albert Adel- 
man, Ralph Scheinholtz, Jack Berman, Nathan Gewirtz, Joe Berman, Jack Goldstein, Jack Gruberman, William Levine, Leo Penn, Milton Torn. Marvin 
Wagner. 

422 




Left to right, first row, Seniors: Charles Bowen, Luther Fleming. Second row, Juniors: Bob Dittrick, Henry Eddy. Mason Flowers, Ray Gillette, Ridgway 
Sutton. Sophomores: Charles Adams, Wooten Bailey, Bruce Carpenter. Third row: Drydcn Davenport. Bob Gillette. Jack Hoch. Walter Jones. Bill Latham, 
Jack Sell. Freshmen: William Berger, Fred Martin. Fourth row: Duncan Moone, Spencer Williams. Pledges: Charles Adams, Jay Gould, Ted Elclof, John 
Gray. Nemo Leeman, Carter Ruby. Not pictured: Bierce Conant. 

THEU DELTA CH 



Founded 1847 

Active chapters 28 

Inactive chapters 12 

Membership 14,500 

Athletically inclined, Uclan Theta Delta Chis 
have captured three of the last seven trophies 
awarded for interfraternity football, volleyball, and 
3eneral athletic ability. Alexander Woolcott, "The 
Man Who Came to Dinner;" Frank Buck; and John 
Hay, Lincoln's Secretary of State, form part of an 
impressive list of former members. The fraternity 
is famous for its annual spring Barn Dance, given the 
last week in March, with the house transformed into 
a barn, complete with hayricks and a hiill Billy trio. 
Also, this year, a formal dinner dance was given at 
the Beverly hiills Hotel in honor of Burton King, head 
of the International House at Berkeley, and presi- 
dent of the national fraternity. Bruin Theta Delts 
include Ray Gillette, President of the Junior Class; 
Mason Flowers, Camp Fund Committee; Hank 
Eddie, water polo; and Dryden Davenport, varsity 
crew. 




Mason Flowers 
President 



423 




MiJ^ 





Left to right, first row, Seniors: James Bradshaw. William Cncliard. James Hutchison. John Kulli, Harold Mahn, Robert Thomas, Charles Watters, Seymour 
Watts. Second row, Juniors: George Breninger, James Gessner. Clement Jacomini, Robert King, Raymond Schreck, Robert Smart. Sophomores: Roy Billings, 
Stanley Cerro. Third row: Lane Donovan. Pledges: Richard Benner. Ross Bennett, William Bugky, Baker Conrad, Robert Fulkerson, Richard Gillaland, 
William Greenwald. Fourth row: Frank Haas, George Howland, Gene Lica, Roy Menashe, David Potts, Charles Sickenger, Donald Wheeler, Stagie Zam- 
pathos. Not pictured: Doyle Graves, Joseph Beeson, Donald Cox, John Greene, George Haas, Henry Jewett, Frederick Sanders, George Uman. 



s 



G M \ 



P I 




Founded 1897 

Active chapters 30 

Inactive chapters 6 

Membership 7,192 

The national chapter of Sigma Pi came into exist- 
ence on the campus of the University of Vincennes 
just before the outbreak of the Spanish-American 
War. The local chapter went national in 1924. 
Sigma Pi's are noted for their costume dances v/hich 
attract novelties in dress from the four corners of 
the campus. The most famous of these affairs is the 
"Nut Club Dance". Among prominent alumni mem- 
bers we find the late Marvin Darsie; Gene Krupa, 
band leader; and Donald Collins, Bruin team phy- 
sician. The fraternity is well represented on campus, 
having members on the freshman, sophomore, and 
junior councils. Prominent members of Sigma Pi are 
Robert Thomas, 135 pound Pacific Coast Wrestling 
Champion, and Charles "Muddy" Watters, ski team. 
Sigma Pi has held the senior football managership 
consecutively with one exception, since 1929. 



Clement Jacomini 
President 



424 



Founded 1856 

Active chapters 52 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 15,500 

Originally a local chapter of De Molay, the or- 
ganization became affiliated with the national chap- 
ter of Theta Chi. Outstanding members on this 
campus find two journalists, Bruce Cassiday, man- 
aging editor of the Brum; and Frank Simons, editor 
of the Southern Campus. As for social events the 
Theta Chis have the eternal Spring and Christmas 
formals, but be it not said that they do nothing 
original, for they had this past semester a Kid 
Party. For this party, the house was decked out as 
a nursery, complete with almost everything in the 
way of equipment. Along the wall hung diapers, 
and on each diaper there was a picture of a mem- 
ber of the house. Described as a big affair by every- 
one who attended was the Theta Chi barn dance 
given in February. Outstanding national alumni in- 
clude Governor T. Christiansen, and General \"/il- 
liam T. Sherman. 

T H [ T 




d^J% 





Georqe Bliss 
President 



A 



C H 




ggg^ 









Left to right, first row. Seniors: Zanviile Ballsun, Lcc Blgler, George Bliss, Reynolds Camp, John Fredricks, Walter Jensen, Bob McConville. Paul Mueller. 
Second row: Harry Pratt, Dicic Preston, Frank Simons. Juniors: John Butler, Edgar Holmson, Joseph Jacobucci, Howell McDaniel. Sophomores: Morris 
Parry. Third row: Earle Dumont, Bill Johnson, Francis Moritis, Charles Rowan, Gayle Windsor, Paul Ziegler. Freshman: Edward Brown. Pledges: William 
Brodck. Fourth row: Harry French, Richard Godber, Paul Hunter, Jack Meagher, Ken Oliphant, William Orr, William Schrouder, Wesley Williams. Not 
pictured: Charles Bliss, Wendell Catlin, John Winn. Barr King, James Vande Water, Bruce Cassiday, George Myron, John Zaumeyer. 

425 




Founded 1864 

Active chapters 34 

Inactive chapters 2 

Membership 10,637 

With John Gaskill, President of the Interfraternity 
hHouse Manasers' Association, a mennber of Theta 
Xi, it is only natural that the boys should have a 
very efficient system for arransing the finances of 
the house. Never say that the Theta Xis sign any 
contract without knowing the full significance of it. 
Among prominent on-campus members we find Wal- 
lace Kindell, Jack Schilling, Dave MacTavish and 
Bill Burke. Social activities for this house include — 
you guessed it, two formal dances each year, several 
sorority exchange dinners, and a big carnival dance, 
as well as several informal house dances. One of the 
first houses built on this campus, Theta Xi is situated 
on Gayley. The house is built around a large oak 
tree and overlooks the campus. Prominent national 
alumni are John J. Raskob, Claire L. Egtvedt, Robert 
E. Woodruff, and Norman M. Smith. 



I 



Wallace Kindell 
President 



[ 1 A 



\ I 




Left to rtsht, first row, Seniors: John Gashll. Richard Raven. Arthur Rush. Meredith Shade. Robert young. Second row, Juniors: Richard Catterlm, John 
Hamner, Wallace Kindell. Sophomores: Douglas Haig, William McKce. Ralph Wallace. Pledges: George Bishop. Howard Campbell. Third row: John 
Carey, Ray DeBrulcr, Frank Dwiggins, James Ellison, Carlos Elmer. Marshall Groener, Donald Holman, hiarland Mansfield. Fourth row: Donald McRcynolds, 
Richard Mlddleton, Lawrence O'Donncll. Malcolm Rhine, Andrew Scott, Robert Templeman, Wayne Thomas, David Vinson. Not pictured: Jack Gilchrist, 
Lawrence Jones, David MacTavish, Charles Mclhorn, James Osgood, Frank Mason, Jack Schilling, James Landon, Dan Sceisi, Raoul Vaell. 



426 







Left to right, first row, Seniors: Paul Crawley. John Frawley, Frank Harryman. Second row: Crossan Hays, Jack Pcrrin. Charles Price, William Richards. 
Juniors: James Cooper, James Lagomarsino. Stuart Russel. Jack Sommers. Third row: Ray Terry. Sophomores: William Brandt. Jack Freer. Pledges: Frank 
Buckley, Arthur Calkins, Marshal Cleland, George Cotton, John Emery. Fourth row: Herbert Evans, John Gilchrist, Miles Glidden, Richard Hunt. Frank 
Manning. Thomas McLaughlin, Allan Richardson, Victor Smith. Not pictured: Devere Christensen. 

I [ ] k PS 

Founded 1847 

Active chapters 31 ^^^^^^ M 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 11,000 

Zeta Psi was the first national fraternity on this 
campus. When it comes to stron3 orsanization, the 
house is noted for its philosophy of laissez-faire. 

Prominent members of Zeta Psi on this campus are ^^^^^^^^K'\ 

mostly active in athletics, as for instance, John 
Frawley, Co-Captain of the 1939 football team; 
Paul Crawley, captain of the championship water- 
polo team; Devere Christensen, outstanding swim- 
mer in school; and Jack Sommers, football guard. 
Socially active, the Zeta Psis are participants in the 
Four-Way formal, have monthly house dances called 
Hogwallows, numerous exchange breakfasts and 
dinners, suppressed costume dances, and snow trips. 
Prominent alumni are well represented in the fol- 
lowing: Joe E. Brown; Burt Bradner, Los Angeles at- 
torney; Red Grange, the "galloping ghost" from 
Illinois; and James Reynolds, President of the South- 
ern California Automobile Club. Paul Crawley 

President 

427 





Left to risht, first row, Graduate: Bradley Kendis. Seniors: Morris Bronstein, Sam Grudin, Jerry Karp, Gilbert Katz, Louis Kaufman. Marvin Rosenberg. 
Second row: Norman Stanton. Juniors: Lester Adelman, Armand Archard, Ivan Breetwor, Fred Gilbert, Wolfe Gilbert, Alvin Grossblatt, Joe Godowitz, 
Irvin Grccnbaum, Marvin Kalin. Third row: Ralph Kunin, Bates Metzenbaum, Bennett Sprecher. Sophomores: Robert Green, Martin Mohar, Robert Weil. 
Freshmen: Bayard Berman, Orlin Friedman. Joe Grosslight, Alfred Hyman. Fourth row: Lester Levitt. Robert Reinschreiber. Marvin Saltzman, Harold Snyder. 
Pledses: Julius Bell, Leon Cole, George Epstein, Robert Feldman, Arthur Gronsky, Harry Kaufman. Fifth row: Martin Lieberman, Joe Mitchell, Harold 
Nebenzahl, Jack Ofstrofsky, Edward Sanders, Dore Schwab. Myron Slobodien, Eugene Satan, Larry Udell, Bill Willner. Not pictured: Norman Reskin, 
Robert Birnkrant, Paul Simon. 



Z [ u n T A 



] \ u 




Sam Grudin 
President 



Founded 1898 

Active chapters 35 

Inactive chapters 

Membership 6,500 

The Venice Fun House is taken over bodily by a 
group of active Zeta Beta Taus for their annual 
pledse affair. Other Z.B.T. social activities include 
an initiation dance at Earl Carroll's, and a mammoth 
barn dance given jointly with their U.S.C. chapter. 
During the past year the Zeta Beta Taus have con- 
tributed funds to bring a refugee couple over from 
Germany. Among their national alumni, Zeta Beta 
Tau numbers such well-known figures as Supreme 
Court Justices Felix Frankfurter, and Benjamin 
Cardoza, as well as Henry Horner, Governor of the 
State of Illinois. On the Bruin campus, the Z.B.T.s 
have active members Wolfe Gilbert, Daily Bruin 
columnist and member of the Organization's Control 
Board; Sam Grudin, member of the Senior Council; 
and Sennet Sprecher, O.C.B. member and assistant 
homecoming chairman. 



428 




THEU 
S E R 



V E D 



Group-of-the-month for September was the Music and Service Board, the stellar 
membership of which is seen above. These two cute kiddies combined to put on 
a slam-bang radio show for the T.C.U. game and started the entertainment year 
off in fine style. Hank McCune is grimacing in a ghoulish manner (like a master 
of ceremonies) while Johnny Vrba may be trying to make a flea flee. Note the 
loving manner in which they clasp each other. In spite of their coyness, they 
really did a lot. 




-^ mtf 




Undoubtedly the outstanding person of March was this handsome devil. 
Dirty, unshaven, smelly, and ugly, Spike Honig guided the trembling feet 
of the school's men through the agony of another Men's Week with 
singular success, and had as many friends at the end as at the beginning, 
which doesn't prove anything. In spite of some very cute Interference by 
the football team, Honig conducted the Kangaroo Court with dignity 
befitting the bar (?). Men's Week was really swell, though. Spike. 



Editor's note: Because of lack of room in other parts 
of the book, reco3nition of the above groups and 
persons was deferred until this page. We feel that 
the work they did deserves special recognition any- 
way, so we here present several "Personalities of the 
Month" for your approval. 




In October Jim Devere began work on the annual Alumni Homecoming, 
thus receiving the title of personality of the month. Homecoming was a 
notable success, so he followed up this achievement by being chosen 
Colonel of the R.O.T.C, a natural stepping-stone to the office of Student 
Body President, into which he gracefully slid by a substantial margin on 
April 24. Best of luck with your new job, Jimmy. 




We understand the only time that the whole Elections Board got together at the 
same time was when this picture was taken. Nevertheless, Muriel Van Patten and 
her board handled Election Week in satisfactory manner and so receive our gon- 
fallon for April. The board Inaugurated the style of using nicknames, if desired, 
on the ballot, but it didn't do "The Lunatic" any good. Voting machines cut the 
group's work down to even less than before, which nobody yelled about. 



429 



COIIM[liC[ 



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32 




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SUBOIVISIOn • • ADVERTISEMENTS • lOEX • ADVERTISEMENTS • INDEX • 
ADVERTISEMENTS • INDEX • ADVERTISEMENTS • INDEX • ADVERTISEMENTS • 
INDEX • ADVERTISEMENTS • INDEX • ADVERTISEMENTS • INDEX • ADVERTIS 




15 — The first day enrollment of 8234 students broke previous 

records. 
8 — Even though the weather is perfect for the beach back to 

school we must go. 
9 — We got to the beach after all with the "most unusual heat 

wave" as a good excuse. 
20 — Dan Stone appoints Johnson as new assistant in charge of 

fraternity business. 

Parking lots have finally been approved. 
22 — Plans for the open-air theater have been O.K.'d. This year's 

graduation is the last to take place in the Hollywood Bowl. 
26 — President Sproul gives the freshmen the official welcome. 
28 — All the excitement for the T.C.U. game. A parade and 

radio show (which was broadcasted) created enthusiasm. 
29 — We are off to a great start for the football season. The 

result of the first night game was U.C.L.A., 6: T.C.U., 2. 



432 



M D [ K TO ADVERTISERS 




Adohr Milk Farms 444 

T. V. Allen-C. W. Ritter Co 445 

Allison Coffee Company 444 

American Dye Works 443 

Arden Farms, Inc 444 

Associated Students Co-op & Cafe 451 

Barbara Ann Bakin3 Co 437 

Beverly Hills Hotel 441 

Biltmore Hotel 435 

The Bru-Inn 444 

Bundy Quill & Press 447 

California Daily Bruin 449 

Campbell's Book Store 441 

College Stylist 444 

Robert Dale Company, Inc 437 

General Office Furniture Co 441 

Henderson Trade Bindery 450 

Hollywood Hospital 441 

Jeffries Banknote Co 437 

Peter Kadlec 441 

Martel-Howlett Studios 439 

Monarch Laundry Co., Inc 445 

The Music Shop 443 

Myer Seigel & Co 444 

Neithart's Market 443 

O'Melveny & Myers 444 

Potter's Hardware 441 

Rand McNally & Co 441 

Sawyer School of Business 445 

Tanner-Gray Line 441 

Underwood Elliot Fisher Co 445 

Union Oil Co 437 

U.C.L.A. Alumni Association 443 

University Camp 443 

Western Badge & Button Co 445 

Wright MacMahon Secretarial School 444 



433 




2 — McCune comes out of hibernation and presents the first 

All-U-Sin3. Surprise of the evenins was Ray Noble and 

his orchestra. 
4 — The Beer Barrel Polka came into its own at the first Wednes- 
day night recreational. 
5 — The council turns down the Book Exchange proposal. 
10 — y.W.C.A. gives an All-Association banquet. 

Plans are made by Al Handfuss for a U.C.L.A. international 

house. 
1 I — A new link is added to U.C.L.A. -Berkeley communications 

in the form of a two-way radio service. 

Editor Mock begins the Bruin National Peace Poll. 

U.D.S. Workshop presents "Golden Boy." 
12 — Days of searching for a homecoming theme produced a 

winner: "Babe gets a bearskin." 
13 — 2500 students take to the rails and the open road and 

follow the football team to Stanford. 
16 — The Bruin bear and the Stanford Indian fought it out to 

a 14-14 tie. 

Julian Blodgett conducts the first open forum on the book 

exchange problem. 
17 — Professor Reichenbach is the guest speaker at the first 

Philosophical Union. 
19 — A campus-wide initiative vote approved the book exchange 

unanimously. 
20 — hHooray for another successful hii-Jinks! 



21 — The Montana Grizzlies were squelched 20-6 by the tried 

and true Bruins. 
23 — The second All-U-Sing attracts the scholars from all the 

nooks and corners of the campus. 

The school is enriched by the valuable art collection of 

the late Willits J. Hole. 
27 — Nino Martini opens the Royce concert series. 

The Cement C is rounded out. Now the Trojans have a 

definite object to their nocturnal visits. 
28 — U.C.L.A. 16 — Oregon 6. Need we say more! 
30 — The sophs made the frosh eat the mud in the annual brawl. 

Another All-U-Sing. This time local talent is in the limelight, 
31— The National Peace Poll optimistically reports that 91.7% 

of the balloters are against war. 




434 




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435 



I — The big Homecoming week includes the Alumni revue in 

Royce that had them rolling in the aisles. 
3 — Connie Boswell and Bob Hope brighten up the informal 
dance in the men's gym. A bigger and better bonfire 
6 — Three cheers for the beating we gave Cal. We gave them 

7 points in exchange for 20. 
9 — U.D.S. gave an interesting reading of "Little Foxes". 
10 — The Phrateres took their blue jeans and straw hats out of 

cold storage and trucked out to their barn dance. 
I I — At long last — a vacation. Armistice Day. 
13 — Manchester Boddy gives "Views on the News". 

Dick Jones booms forth with his new brainstorm in the 
form of some unpopular constitutional amendments. 
15 — "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme" is the first major U.D.S. 
production. 



17— 
18- 

20- 

21- 
22- 

27— 



28— 



29- 



30- 



% 



The book exchange is sanctioned by the council. 
The army stages a fine Scabbard and Blade dance. 
-Santa Clara proved tougher than we had expected. There 
was a 0-0 tie-up. 

-The mermen got into the swim by capturing the coast 
Water Polo title. 

■The W.A.A. eats at the annual spread. 
-Once more the juniors make tradition with "Dirty pants 
Wednesday". 

Thanksgiving gives us the slip. 

U.C.L.A. is once again recipient of a football tie. Oregon 
State was lucky in holding us to 13-13. 

George Oliver wins the only place in the Stockton debate. 
The council appoints Mary Alice Madden to succeed 
Jones in the O.C.B. 

y.W.C.A. holds open house to inaugurate the newly built 
wing. 

U.D.S. gives a double feature. "The Romancers" and "The 
Beginning of the End". 

The proper beginning of Thanksgiving recess was the night 
football game that resulted in the Washington Cougars 
getting a 24-7 shellacking. 



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1 — The National Guard paid us a twenty-minute visit for 

recruitins purposes. 

Bidu Sayao in Royce Hall concert. 9- 

A — All-U-Sing with the football team entertaining. The "sweet 

music" was broadcast all up the coast. 
6 — Two grads put their heads together and wrote "See How I I- 

They Run". U.D.S. did a good job of it. I 2- 

The Wednesday night mixed recreational is the beginning 

of Christmas festivities. 

This afternoon there was a songfest as sort of a blessing 1 3- 

to the team before the big game. 
7 — The university's best friend, Joe Brown, was indeed loya! 

to pick drill field for the scene of his accident. 
8 — The A.W.S. had a Christmas backwards dance, but there 

was nothing backwards about their choosing handsome 14- 



McCune as the most popular campus male. 

Construction has really begun on the parking lots. 
-This is the historical day that we were two yards from 

the Rose Bowl. We'll never forget the scoreless tie of that 

great cross-town classic. 

-A Christmas serenade by the A Cappella Choir. 
-The Philosophical Union hears Dr. Davis on Determinism. 

A.W.S. and W.A.A. stage a pageant to swell the Xmas 

fund. 
-The physical education squad was the scene of the annual 

Christmas Festival. 

Hugh Cupernell becomes the man of the month by winning 

the Times' movie title contest. That $12,000 ain't hay. 

The Drake debaters took a 3-0 beating from the Bruins. 
-At long last — vacation! Nineteen glorious days of rest (?). 



CONGRATULATIONS 



It is with Pleasure we extend to the 
Senior Class and the Associated Students, 
Congratulations. 

As official Photographers, we have 
enjoyed serving you and are sorry to see 
you go. May we extend our best wishes 
for your future success. 



MARTEL-HOWLETT STUDIOS 

3227 West Sixth Street 
Los Angeles, California. DR. 2234 



439 



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3 — Back to school. Time to start worrying about finals. 

Marty Krug resigns to take up his new post with the Detroit 

Tigers. 

Council rejects amendment requiring a majority vote of 

the entire student body on initiative and referendum 

measures. 
4 — Pryne as new editor was the only one to survive the 

onslaught. 
9 — The woman's place may be in the home, but today is theii 

day to shine in the field of journalism. The gals turned 

editors for the day. 
10 — Pakstas lectures on the Baltic situation. 
12 — Ray Noble packed them in at the Beverly-Wilshire at the 

Interfraternity Ball. The dance was so successful that you 

were lucky if you actually got in to hear the orchestra. 
22 — Sure 'nuf. Finals have descended upon our heads. 
31 — Here's the end of the first semester. 



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12 — lime tor another resistration. 27 — 

I'l — The call of the books rings once more in our ears so there 

is nothing left to do but go back to our classes. 
15 — hlungerland: "A Survey of Art". 28 — 

Koebig, Tenney, MacClelland, and Padgett officially wel- 
come the new freshmen. 
20 — The result of the council meeting was the appointment of 

Frank Carroll to the chairmanship of the athletic board. 

New student representative on the Board of Control is 29 

Jim Devere. 
21 — Kenny Washington, the lad who done us proud on the 

football field, was guest of honor at the freshman stag 

dinner party. 



Today we honor George Washington. 

Tonight the girls take the boys to the "Leap Year Dance". 

More council appointments. Tom Freear's broad shoulders 

have been elected to bear the worries of the 1940 ffome- 

coming. Al Elmer has been added to the Labor Board. 

The camp committee selected "Barton Flats" as the new 

campsite. 

Once again Robinson saved the day and enabled the 

Bruins to take the basketball game from our brother Bears, 

Palmer shows grand pictures of undersea life. 

Student agitation on the Beecroft case is brought to an 

end by the Senate closing the matter. 

At the Men's Stag George Givot was booed right off the 

stage in favor of Mrs. Arturo Godoy. It only goes to prove 

that the men can't get along without the women even 

long enough to stage a stag. 

The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra came to school. 

Clarence hlonig is made responsible for all the grime and 

grit and beards and bugs of Men's Week. 

The Forensics Tourney begins on the L.A.C.C. campus. 

Russell received his appointment to the New York City 

College. Today is the start of all the fun. 



Maintain 
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... is the one who joins the Alumni Association of his Alma Mater. By 
so doing, he maintains contact with his University for life, receiving many 
advantages beneficial to himself, and at the same time makes possible an 
extensive program for the furtherance of the institution which has given 
him so much. 

For details write, phone or call at the office of 

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Room 308 Kerckhoff Hall 



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Dear Gang: 

The office is quiet tonight as the ad section goes 
to press. Tomorrow work on the 1940 Southern 
Campus will cease, our fun and worries will end and 
we will realize that finals are but two short weeks 
away. To all of you who have so loyally aided in 
the management of this book, I am deeply grateful. 

To Jo, loyal friend and willing worker, many thanks. 
To Gay, Frank, Leslie Ann, Bill, and Ed belongs the 
Ad section, it's swell. For many letters and odd jobs, 
orchids to Lorraine, Peggy and Georgie. Sally Nor- 
ton, for her art work on the "Friends" page, has 
earned my undying love. 

Tillie, patient creature, if I've worried you, I'm 
sorry. 

To Frank Stanton Simons, Jr., for your imperious 
interest in our section and for your most sincere 
cooperation, may you reap as you have so nobly 
sown. 



Best of luck to Tom and Steve next year. 



Bob. 



445 



I — Two artists for the price of one in the concert series tonight 

Raya Garbousova and Donald Dickson share honors. 13- 

Spring fashions take a bow in the annual Bruin-A.W.S. 

Fashion Show. I 8- 

A — It's All-U-Sing time again. 
5 — The Workshop gives an enjoyable reading of "The White 20- 

Steed". 
6 — Mary Alice Madden is elected by the council to succeed 

Dick Jones, as O.C.B. Chairman. 25- 

I 1 — Exhibition tennis drew a real turn out when Alice Marble 

and Welby Van Horn appeared in the men's gym. 

Compulsory R.O.T.C. remains a reality. 

All the good skates turned up at the sophomore skating 

party. 
12 — The first league baseball game vvith Cal was called off ir 



a near riot. 
-The council is in a rejecting mood again. This time the 

concert levy gets the gong. 
-Baseball: Broncos 5— U.C.L.A. I. 

Dorothy Dodge becomes Queen of the Crew. 
-"Of Thee I Sing" makes its debut. 

The crew started off with its best foot forward and gave 

the Beavers a trimming. 
-The Whiskers grow berserk, dirty cords become dirtier, and 

the males in general have a high old time. Yep, it's Men's 

Week. 

Count and Countess Thornrider present the chimes to the 

university. The chimes are rung for the first time to open 

the Charter Day exercises celebrating the 72nd anniversary 

of the school. President Conant of Harvard speaks. 



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WE FEEL HIGHLY HONORED TO HAVE HAD 
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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
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447 



1 — The San Jose Orchestra save a concert on campus. It was 7 — Peelins noses and sunburned backs are all that's left to 

good, no foolin". remember of a short, short vacation. 

Eight lucky students were announced as delegates to Japan. 10 — The Inimitable Myra Kinch brings her Interesting dance 

Professor Broeck from Berkeley addresses a Royce audience troupe to the Royce Hall stage. 



on "Frontiers of the Future". 
■4 — Spring vacation and the scene rapidly shifts to Balboa 



The council rejects the revision on proportionate repre- 
sentation on the student council. The U.D.S. budget was 
approved. That assured bigger and better productions. 
3 — Feathers fly when the Sophs and Frosh combined to have 
a fling. The Feather Merchants Ball, they called It. 

1 5 — The problem of what to be and what not to be was 
analyzed at the 5th annual Occupational Conference. 

19 — Tonight we're afraid to go to the Junior Prom for fear we'll 
get the door prize. 

20 — Annual Open hlouse. 




The results of the General Stu- 
dent Body Elections, held on April 
24th and 26th, are as follows: 

A.S.U.C. President 

James Devere 
A.S.U.C. Vice-President 

Billie Mae Thomas 
O.C.B. Chairman 

Mason Flowers 
Head Veil Leader 

Marvin Katzman 
A.M.S. President 

Bill Kuchnc 
A.W.S. President 

hiarriet Stacy 



A.W.S. Vice-President 

Dorothy Rcnfro 
A.W.S. Secretary 

Jean Launer 
A.W.S. Treasurer 

Connie Purkiss 
Senior Class President 

John Vrba 
Senior Vice-President 

See Brown 
Senior Secretary 

Dorothy Beldon 
Senior Treasurer 

Richard Preston 
Junior Class President 

Jerry McClellan 



Junior Vice-President 

Alva Lloyd 

Junior Secretary 

Mary Moore 

Junior Treasurer 

hlltoshi Yonemura 
Sophomore Class President 

Redmond Daggett 

Sophomore Vice-President 

Eleanor Thomas 

Sophomore Secretary 

Jo Anne Hollister 

Sophomore Treasurer 

Bill Farrer 




Hundreds of our Alumni keep in touch with the cultural 
aspects of their alma mater by subscribing to the California 
Daily Bruin. 

We invite the graduates of the class of 1940 to continue 
receiving the California Daily Bruin. The subscription price 
is only $4.00 a year. 



CaUfomiafelu Utum 



449 



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4 — Delt-DeeGee Ball attracts the smart set. 

8 — Cassady and Rosecrans named to head Bruin staff for next 
year. 

9 — Bruin Breakfast Club gets us up early again. 
10 — Success marked the presentation of the Dance Recital. 
17 — Janice Lipking installed as new president of Pan-Hel. It 

was a swell party. 
2A — Graduation parade marks the end of Army days. 
29 — Finals again. Kerckhoff termites invade library! 
30 — Memorial Day. 

?_SOUTHERN CAMPUS makes its debut. 



450 




Our Sincere Appreciation to The Class of 1940 

For their loyal patronage of the 
University Book Store 
and the Students' Cafe 

KERCKHOFF HALL 



45 1 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



The tumult and the shoutin3 has died, the captains and the 
kings have departed, and all that's left is a feeling of relief tinged 
with melancholia. The office is too clean, the typewriters are too 
quiet, there are no deadlines to meet, no staff to growl at, no 
service men on my neck. It's all rather unreal, after seven months 
of work and play. I guess everyone is glad that Volume XXI is 
finished. Jimmy Osgood's last piece of copy is in, though he never 
thought it would be. hie wrote and read copy for everything, and 
proved to be efficiency plus. Thanks a lot, Jim. And copy No. 545 
has gone down, so Steve Melnyk can relax again. hJis careful work 
on engraving copy was invaluable, so thanks, Steve. When I come 
to hlap Fraser, there is nothing I can say that the book doesn't 
say for me. The layouts, divisions, and cover are his work, and it 
was a one man job. Wihout good pictures, engraving can do but 
little, and Bill Johnke's pictures are superlative. 95% of the 
photography was his work. Bill believed that the easiest way to 
get a thing done is to do it yourself, and he did. Barbara Bettin 
took over the grind of organizations, organized a tremendous staff 
which pasted 4000 pictures, wrote 16,000 names, used up reams 
of paper and 2 gallons of paste. When we come to book editors, 
credit must be given to all, but I want to commend especially 



Betty Beal (no Jane, as she is a big girl now) for her hard, 
conscientious work. Ricky was amazing because she was in prac- 
tically every other activity on campus and still had time to edit 
the Activities Book. Hanford Files handled the sports like a 
veteran, and amassed quite a staff. Marge Frank was the general 
utility girl, editing the Classes Book and writing odds and ends, 
including the calendar. With some timely help from Virginia Scott 
and Jack Gilchrist, Beth Anne Stevens got the Social section out. 
Billie Thomas handled the Women's section with finesse and 
Russell Simpson, working on the book for the first time, did a fine 
job with minor sports. DeForest Fisher buried his nose in hypo and 
turned out dozens of good enlargements. I also wish to express 
my appreciation for their cooperation to John Morley of Carl 
Bundy's; to Al Butterworth of Star Engraving; to Joseph Fleischer 
of Henderson's Trade Binders; and to Tom Meek of Robert Dale 
Binders. Your work was excellent at all times. To the rest of the 
staff, however much or little you did, or however important or 
unimportant it was, thanks a million. I hope none of you will ever 
forget working on the book — I know I won't. Thanks to all of 
you again. 

Bill 



ACADEMIC STAFF 



ORGANIZATIONS STAFF 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 



Betly Beal 

Beverly Verier 

Lily Marie Johnson 



ACTIVITIES STAFF 

Mary Frances Riclcershauser 

Helen Jo McDanlel 

Pe3gy McConville 

Betty Beal 

Ellen Grace Pope 



ART STAFF 



Harold Eraser 
Jack Mahon 
Sally Norton 
Janet French 



CLASSES STAFF 



Editor 



Editor 



Artist 



Editor 



Editor 



Margaret Frank 
Emily Lehan 



copy STAFF 

James Osgood 
Ruth Bliss 
MimI Koumrian 
Josephine Jacks 
Helen Lund 
Jo Anne Hollister 
Jane Mary Ekiund 
Margery May Lindgren 



UNIVERSITV WOMEN STAFF 

Billie Thomas Editor 

Betty Beal 



Editor 
Photo Librarian 



Barbara Bettin 
Al Paquin 
Virginia Scott 
Marcella Sutton 
Tony Birsic 
Carolyn Bohlken 
Betty Crawford 
Mildred Eason 
Nancy Garlinghouse 
Margaret Karl 
Beverly Kraemcr 
Miriam Otto 
Carrie Lee Partridge 
Nancy Prescott 
Frances Ridgely 
Eleanor Thomas 
Phyllis Ward 
Mary Frank Warren 
Rosalie Whitledge 
Louise Wolf 
Bonnie Mitchell 
Florence Macrae 
Nancy Kumnick 
Lois Tuchschcrer 
Betty Berry 
Mary Brubaker 
Sally Marincovlch 
Peggy McConville 
Josephine Jacks 
Ann Hagerman 
Emily Lehan 



PHOTOMOUNTING STAFF 

Steve Melnyk Editor 

Marie Dashlell 

Jo Anne Hollister 

Robin Lyford 

Peggy McConville 

Helen Jo McDaniel 

Georgie Randle 

Eleanor Argula 



Bill Johnke 
Dc Forest Fisher 
Keith Covey 
Robert Hubbard 
Dorothea Thompson 
Herb Dallinger 
Frank Lindholm 
Nelson Rosemont 
Bob Pritchard 
Margaret Frank 
Betty Beal 
Jack Gilchrist 
Brown Kincheloe 
Forrest Mashbir 



Photographer 
Laboratory 



SOCIAL STAFF 



Beth Anne Stevens 
Jack Gilchrist 
Virginia Scott 
Phyllis James 
Emily Lehan 
Ruth Bliss 
Peggy McConville 
Harrison Negley 
Beatrice Wolf 
George Thorson 
Beverly Vencr 



Editor 



SPORTS STAFF 



Hanford Files 
Russell Simpson 
Gordon Hewson 
Bill Duddleson 
Joe Hov/se 
James Osgood 
Margaret Frank 
Harley Mcrritt 



Editor 
Minor Sports 



452 



M A M G [ R U L S T U r 



This is the end of our work — the 21st book is finished and sold 
and has become of a3e. The office is closed and yet we have not 
received the first completed copy of the 1940 Southern Campus. 
During this lull I want to thank the staff. Bob Meldrum, Mary Jo 
Funk, Alma Stewart, and Lorraine hlofmann worked brilliantly to 
produce a staff that planned wisely, moved fast, hit hard, and in 
its time, coasted with the rest. 

Alma Stewart managed a Sales Drive that had every book sold 
two weeks before they were off the presses and so made the best 
sales record in years. Bob Meldrum handled Organizations and 
ended up with a new high of organizations represented in the 
book and an appeased Inter-fraternity Council supporting his new 
policy. He then turned to Advertising to provide the best section 
In the Book's twenty-one years. Mary Jo Funk sold Senior Reserva- 
tions and amazed everyone with her all-time high of seniors repre- 
sented. Lorraine hlofmann with a closely organized staff kept office 



work turned out faster than it could be assigned. 

I especially liked Bob's trouble-shooting on unpleasant assign- 
ments; Mary Jo's devotion to "U.C.L.A.'s best activity"; Alma's 
strategy of winning her last sales battle; and Lorraine's search for 
more work for her staff. Of the many others without whose work 
the book could not have been completed, I can mention only a 
few: Joe Jacobucci, Anne Brown, Barbara Black, Betty Scott. 
Georgie Randle. and Peggy Jane Brown. 

Mr. Joe Osherenko deserves my best for giving advice and 
assistance without attempting to dictate decisions. Alice Tilden 
has acted wonderfully as the Southern Campus's sub-rosa Public 
Relations Director and Efficiency Expert. I hope Alice from her 
listening post hears my three cheers for her. 

For the Managerial Staff I want to tell Bill Simons that we have 
enjoyed working with his crew — we hope and know that the 1940 
Southern Campus is going to be the best in history. 

Tom 



SENIOR RESERVATIONS 

Betty Lou Jackson 
Eleanor Banker 
Dorothy Allison 
Dorothy Franklin 
Georgie Randle 
Mary Caward 
Gerry Forney 
Charles Adams 
Jean Boyer 
Beverly Davies 
Ellen Gardner 
Jeanne Halsey 
Jean Hamilton 
Marion Hartfield 
Martha Jane Henry 
Alice Holt 
Barbara Hull 
Joe Jacobucci 
Eleanor Kallejian 
Betty Knight 
Sheila Kerr 
Rosemary Laubender 
Geraldinc Mahancy 
Mary Jo McManus 
Gay Pryor 
Barbara Ringheim 
Peggy Secor 
Mary Smithson 
Eleanor Thorson 
Alice Tilden 
Mary Ward 
Virginia Ware 



OFFICE STAFF 



Lorraine Hofmann 
Dorothy Anderson 
Mary Jane Ballard 
Eleanor Banker 
Anne Baruch 
Helen Bradley 
Bee Brown 
Christie Brown 
Marleta Cane 
Mary Caward 
Barbara Cogar 
Dorothy Gaffney 
Jane Gardner 



Manager 



Dorothy Garner 
Elva Gilbert 
Molly Gordon 
Jean Halsey 
Pauline Harband 
Marian Hastficld 
Marianne Hays 
Martha Jane Henry 
Betty Lou Jackson 
Pat Jones 
Norma Marshall 
Matherine Mastopietro 
Mary Joe McManus 
Betsy Morse 
Beverly Newman 
Joann Ratliff 
Joyce Rucgg 
Twila Spencer 
Margaret Stevan 
Leona Wallin 
Mary Ward 
Carolyn Webb 

ADVERTISING STAFF 



Eddie Almond 




Frank Dana 




Jo Funk 




Leslie Ann Martin 




Bill McKinley 




Gay Pryor 




SALES STAFF 




Alma Stewart 


Manager 


Dorothy Allison 


Captain 


Barbara Black 


Captain 


Patty Elam 


Captain 


Kassy Preister 


Captain 


Patricia Archibald 




Anne Baruch 




Priscilla Bradburn 




Helen Bradley 




Evelyn Brewster 




Dorothy Broughton 




Anne Brown 




Peggy Jane Brown 




Barbara Chambers 




Margaret Craft 




Betty Jane Eaton 




Betty Enlund 





Virginia Ford 

Dorothy Gaffney 
Virginia Gr'cc 
Jean Hamilton 
Pauline Harband 
Mary Ellen Haver 
Martha Jane Henry 
Betty Jane Highland 
Jo Anne Hollister 
Pat Hunt 
Betty Lou Jackson 
Barbara Jones 
Margaret Jones 
Rosemary Laubender 
Elaine Lettice 
Mildred Lindroth 
Mary Alice Loye 
Helen Ludman 
Donarlta McCunc 
Helen Jo McDaniel 
Margaret McHaffic 
Mary Jo McManus 
Rhoda Mace 
Norma Marshall 
Nancy Miller 
Marilyn Moon 
Jean Morse 
Maxine Movius 
Evelyn Newhoff 
Sara Norton 
Barbara Nye 
Peggy Parlmcr 
Georgie Randle 
Denice Rector 
Phyllis Root 
Helen Rupert 
Betty Russell 
Betty Scott 
Peggy Secor 
Margaret Sheldon 
Irene Shanklin 
Lyia Sherwood 
Jane Smithwick 
Twyla Spencer 
Margaret Stevan 
Marcella Sutton 
Melba Talmadgc 
Natalie Tarada 
Mimi Thornton 
Mary Ward 
Olive Zanclla 
Roberta Zollc 



453 



D [ X 



Aaron, Aaron 422 

Abcrncthy. Rodney 402 

Aboitiz, Edward 64 

Abrams, Genevieve 366 

A CAPPELLA CHOIR 147 

Aclccrman. William 32. 241 

Adams. Annette 377 

Adams. Charles D 423 

Adams. Charles E 423 

Adams. Doris 64 

Adams. Eleanor 377 

Adams. Margaret 381 

Adams. Merrill 411 

Adderholt. Lucille 380 

Adelman. Lester 428 

Adelman. Ruth 365. 39! 

ADMINSTRATIVE OFFICERS. 18 

Agee. Elizabeth 397 

Ahern. Rita 388 

Aidells, Louis 64 

Albrecht, Catherine 382 

Albright. H. Wilson 402 

Alden, Velma 385 

Alderson. Elizabeth 64. 171 

Aiding. Ray 401 

Alexander. Jean 64 

Alexander, Robert 64. 405 

Allan, John 414 

Allebrand. Eleanor 65. 367 

Allen. Barbara 65. 384 

Allen. Bennct 44 

Allen. Evelyn 182 

Allen. Margaret 368 

Allen, Mary Ann 170 

Allington. Walter 404 

Allison. Dorothy 186 

Almond. Eddie 421 

Alperts, Anita 379 

Alperts. William 408 

ALPHA CHI ALPHA 152 

ALPHA CHI DELTA 153 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA 364 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA 154 

ALPHA DELTA PI 368 

ALPHA DELTA SIGMA 160 

ALPHA EPSILON PHI 365 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 366 

ALPHA GAMMA OMEGA . 402 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI 156 

ALPHA PHI 367 

ALPHA OMICRON PI 369 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 155 

ALPHA SIGMA PHI 404 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA 401 

ALPHA XI DELTA 372 

Alshuler. Robert I 10.420 

Althouse. Jane 364 

Altkorn. Annette 65 

ALUMNI 50 

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES .... 54. 55 

Ames. Gerry 366 

Amiot. Meta-Marie 382 

Amiand. Dorothy 374 

A.M.S. COUNCIL 220 

Anderson. Arnold 65. 419 

Anderson. Betty 380 

Anderson. Eleanor .... 64. 176. 187 
Anderson. La Verne. 59,64. 1691377 

Anderson. Lloyd 277 

Anderson. Mary |86, 397 

Anderson, Patricia 388 

Anderson, Philip 408 

Anderson. Robert .... 64. 156. 402 

Anderson. Roberta 64. 388 

Anderson. Virginia 64. 394 

Anderson. William 404 

Andrews. Ruth 170 

Andsil, Ted 170 

Angeles, Nicholas 417 

Angwin, James 65 



Antomrni. Angelo 419 

Applefield. Bernard 192.416 

Applcgatc. Rodger 421 

Appleman. Elizabeth 65. 385 

Archerd, Armand 428 

Archibald. Patsy Lou 375 

AREME 157 

ARETA ALPHA 158 

Argula. Eleanor 65. 152 

Armitage. Joyce 154 

Arms. Meri 368 

Arndt. Patricia 155 

Arnestad, Kenneth 402 

Arnold. Dorothy 372 

Arnold, Larry 167. 187 

Arnold, Mary 395 

Arnold, Robert 65 

Arries, Donald 403 

Arth, Donald 64 

Aseltine. Shirley 387 

A.S.U.C. EXECUTIVES 28 

Atkinson. Byron 64.179.419 

Altwill, Adrian 419 

Atwater, Cleon 64 

Austin. Martha 375 

Avery. Ray 429 

A.W.S. ACTIVITIES 201 

A.W.S. COUNCIL 198 

A.W.S. HI JINKS 200 

Axline. Joe 429 

Axtell, Stewart 64, 190 

Aylmer, Stanley 429 

Ayres. Doris 385 

B 

Baber, Roy 411 

Bacon, Harriet 377 

Bacon. Margie 370 

Bagby. Charles 420 

Baggot. Thomas 405 

Bailey, Donald 65. 156 

Bailey. Laurence 49 

Bailey. Wooten 423 

Baler. Archie 185 

Ball. Jocelyn 168, 178. 378 

Ball, Rosemary 378 

Ballsun. Zanville 65. 156.425 

BAND 145 

Bangs. Marguerite 170. 187 

Banker. Eleanor 377 

BANNISTER 390 

Barber. June 384 

Bardeen, Lane 410 

Bardwell. Peggy Lou 376 

Barker. Francis 65. 406 

Barker, Howard 412 

Barnard. Robert 429 

Barnes. Edward 65 

Barnes. Martha Jane 65, 376 

Barnes. Martin 419 

Barnett. Ann 377 

Barnett. Donna 383 

Barnett. Sallie 376. 392 

Barnett, Jane E 65 

Barnett. Virginia 378 

Barrett. Mary L 166 

Barry. Barbara 387 

Barry, Janet 362. 387 

Bartlett. Betty 363. 374 

Bartlett. James 64. 190 

Bartlett, Joan 378 

Bartlett. Kermit 422 

Barto. Bessie 374 

Baruch. Anne 368 

BASEBALL 286 

BASEBALL— C.I. B.A 292. 293 

BASEBALL— FROSH ... 294. 295 

BASEBALL MANAGERS 289 

BASEBALL— PRACTICE .290.291 

BASEBALL SQUAD 288 

BASKETBALL 274 



BASKETBALL— 145-LB 329 

BASKETBALL— CALIFORNIA, 280 
BASKETBALL— FROSH . . 284. 285 
BASKETBALL MANAGERS ... 277 
BASKETBALL— PRACTICE278. 279 
BASKETBALL— SO. CAL. 282. 283 

BASKETBALL— SQUAD 276 

BASKETBALL— STANFORD .. 281 

Bass, Marguerite 385 

Bassett, Barbara 384 

Bates. Texanna 364 

Battelle, Jeanne 212. 395 

Battle. Charlton 47 

Baumen. Jean 369 

Baumgardt. Katherine 385 

Bayless. Ken 419 

Bayley. Donald 64 

Beach, Margaret 64. 368 

Beach. Norton 64, 159,242 

Beal, Betty 152, 186 

Bear. Teddy Lee 65, 183 

Beard, Elizabeth 373. 394 

Beard. Harold L 65 

Beasley. Ernestine 65 

Beattie. Betty Jane 176. 395 

Beaumont, Mary 190 

Beaver, Doris 383 

Beavon, Janice 376 

Beavon, Jean 376 

Beck. Kathryn 166 

Beckett. Jim 411 

Beckler. John 420 

Beckler. Marie 377 

Bcgue, Lila-Jeanne 387 

Behrens. Reneta 368 

Beifus. William E 65. 187 

Bekins. Virginia 378 

Beldon. Dorothy Lee 363. 367 

Belknap. John 65 

Bell. Constance 389 

Bell. Ethlin 193.377 

Bell. Harry W 65.413 

Bell, Julius 428 

Bell, Katherine 66 

Bellerue, Mary . . 167, 187.189.376 

Belsey, Robert 410 

Bemis. Fred 192.405 

Bemiss, Vivian 368 

Bender. Isabell 66 

Bendowski. Lucile 66 

Benn. Elizabeth 66, 169 

Benner, Richard 424 

Bennett, Don 66,401 

Bennett. Lillian 365 

Bennett. Ross 426 

Berger. Don 66 

Berger. William 423 

Berglind, Jean Rae 67. 397 

Bergling, llo 376.391 

BERKELEY CAMPUS 8. 9 

Berkley. Marilyn 392 

Berlin, Theodore 422 

Bcrman, Bayard 428 

Bcrman. Leon 422 

Berman. Paula ... 67. 132. 152.399 

Bermel. Charlotte 153 

Bernard, Alice 378 

Bernstein. Sidney 67. 416 

Berry. Aubrey 27 

BETA PHI ALPHA 370 

BETA THETA PI 405 

Bettcher. Warren 418 

Bettin. Barbara 126, 191 

Beyer, Marjorie 364 

Bickford. Helen 158 

Biggar, Jeanne 368 

Bigler. Elizabeth 372 

Bigler. Lee 165. 179.425 

Bildcrback. Gene 67 

Billings, Roy 424 

Billingsley, Betty 169. 376 

Binder, Ray 421 



Binder. Rudy. 66. 159. 165. 179.421 

Birsic. Antoinette 395 

Bisbee. Jean 366 

Bishop. Frank 4|9 

Bishop. George 426 

Black, Barbara 186, 378 

Black, Edward 66 

Black. Muriel 382 

Black, Paula 365 

Black. Virginia 66. 169.378 

Blackmore. Carolyn 376 

Blahnik. Mary 377 

Blaikie. Jack 234 

Blair, Cecilia 374 

Blair. Ramona 66, 174 

Blake, Joe 403 

Blakely. Ross 66 

Blayney. Edith 66 

Blenkiron. Mary 381 

Blewett. Jim 252 

Bliss. George. 179,184,233,400,425 

Bliss, Ruth 67, 374 

Blodgett. Julian 67.400,407 

Bloom. Gerald B 67 

Bloss. Mildred 379 

BLUE KEY 159 

Bluemle. Evelyn 67, 362, 385 

Blum, Marjorie 365 

BOARD OF CONTROL 36 

Bobb, Boniface 373 

Bobsene, Vera Jean 66, 177 

Bodger, Howard 404 

Bodinus, Richard 66 

Bohlken, Carolyn 374, 395 

Bohn, Eleanor 66, 155, 170 

Bohn. John 408 

Bohning, Muriel 66, 385 

Boland, Barbara 364 

Bondar, June 379 

Boneparte, Valerie 186 

Booher, Virginia 158 

Boomer, Bernard 41 I 

Boone. Mariellen 367 

Booth. Jack 406 

Borchard. Anne 362, 386 

Borchard, Elizabeth 67 

Borders. Linnie 67 

Borshefsky. Louis 67 

Borstein, Judith 67 

Bossardt. Dorothy 191 

Boswell, Alison 67, 161, 375 

Boswell. Ruth 67. 374 

Boulton. John R 66 

Bounds. Wallee 190 

Bowen. Charles 423 

Bowen. Nelda 385 

Bowere. Jean 382 

Bowhay, Jane 367 

Bowling, Betty-Gray . . 66, 178, 187 

Bowman. Dorothy E 66 

Bowman. Esther 66 

BOXING 339 

Boyd, Kenneth 402 

Boyden. Virginia Lee 378 

Boyer, Jean 364 

Bradburn, Priscilla 381 

Bradbury, Jean 367 

Bradfield, Leona 366 

Bradley. Jean 380. 394 

Bradshaw. James 424 

Brady. Edward L 67 

Brady. Robert 429 

Braithwaithe. Charles 406 

Brandt. William 427 

Branson. Jean 368 

Braun. Gustav 46 

Brazier, Richard 402 

Breck. June 186, 393 

Brede. Dorothy. Emogene. 67. 364 

Brecden. Kathryn 67 

Breen, Edward 407 

Breetwor, Ivan 428 



454 



Breninger, Jean 382 

Bretzfeldcr, Ruth 379 

Brewer, Anthony W 67 

Brewer, Betty 366 

Brewster, Esther 158 

Brewster, Evelyn . . 366, 392, 393 

Breyer, Betty Ann 67, 381 

Brisgs, Deane ... 67, 179,400,419 

Briggs. Helen 385 

Brin, Jaquclinc 365 

Briningcr, Ann 186, 383 

Brininger, Fay 369 

Brockseiper, Elsie 68, 364 

Brockway, Eunice 166, 366 

Brodek, William 425 

Brodsky, Florence 68 

Brombcrg, Howard 416 

Bronstein, Morris 428 

Brooks, Claude C 68, 160, 190 

Brooks, Joan 364 

Brose, Robert 429 

Brotherton, Phillip 68 

Broughton, Dorothy 176,366 

Brower, Dorothy C 68, 384 

Brown, Bee 374 

Brown, Beverly 68, 173, 193,389,391 

Brown, Bill 408 

Brown, Byron 190 

Brown, Christy 375 

Brown, Coralie 69, 364, 366 

Brown, Dorothy 69, 155 

Brown, Dorothy Anne 392 

Brown, Edward 425 

Brown, Elizabeth 69 

Brown, Eloise 69, 374 

Brown, Helen E 181 

Brown, Howard 422 

Brown, Len 410 

Brown, Margie Lee 368, 392 

Brown, Miriam 68, 158 

Brown, Marirma 186, 372 

Brown, Nadinc 68 

Brown, Peggy 376 

Brown, Rosalie 382, 393 

Brown, Ruth Elizabeth 68 

Brown, Shirley E 68 

Brown, Shirley T 68 

Brown, Virginia 158 

Browne, Dorothy Anne. . . . 375, 377 

Browne, Earle I 70, I 87 

Brownson, Norene . . . 152, 193, 373 

Broyles, Arnold 68,419 

Brubaker, Donald 405 

Brubaker, Grace 69, 176 

Brumfield, Elizabeth J 69 

Brunnenkant, Dickson 417 

Brush, Henry 41 

Bryan, Helen M 69 

Buckley, Frank 427 

Buckncr, Barbara 366 

Buckner, Mina 366 

Buff, Barbara 384 

Buffum, Seibley 329 

Bufky, William 424 

Bullen, Howard 429 

Bunts, Dolores 382 

Burger, Jeanne 374 

Burgess, Lucille 190 

Burk, Norma Lee 166, 170 

Burleigh, Catherine 69, I 78 

Burnette, Robert 429 

Burns, Alice 68, 384 

Burns, Betsy 385 

Burns, Gretchen 385,393 

Burns, Luis M 68,418 

Burstein, Lloyd 160 

Burston, Justin 68 

Burtchelt, Floyd 48 

Burwell, Miriam Sue 392 

Bush, George 406 

Bushnell, Margaret 376 

Busscrt, Margaret 376 

Butter, John 425 

Butterfield, Patsy 364 

Butts, Elaine 68, 176 

Byerts, William 69. I 79, 1 84, I 85, 4 1 2 



Bystrom, Shirley 386 



c 

Cable, Kingston 410 

Caforio, Edmund J 69 

Cain, John 410,417 

CALIFORNIA CLUB 161 

Calkins, Arthur 427 

Calliham, Jane 383 

Callihan, Margaret J 69 

Calvert, Edna 395 

Cameron, Marian 69, 385 

Cameron, Sandy 276, 407 

Cameron, Shirley 367 

Camp, Reynolds 69, 425 

Campbell, Donald 69,418 

Campbell, Eleanor 186,382 

Campbell, Howard 426 

Campbell, Hugh 68 

Campbell, Margaret 68, 366 

Campbell, Pauline 366 

Campbell, Virginia E 68,175 

Campion, Jane 369 

Canavan, Edward 420 

Caplan, Ruby E 68 

CAPTAINS 242,243 

Carey, Charles 420 

Carey, John 426 

Caridis, Winifred .... 69, 153, 385 

Carlin, Fred 69 

Carlisle, Betty Ann 186, 365 

Carmack, George 165, 179, 184,429 

Carman, Donald 420 

Carney, Larry 69, 400, 408 

Carpenter, Bruce 423 

Carranza, Ignacio 69 

Carroll, Frank 179,421 

Carter, Ruth E 69 

Carsola, Al 404 

Cary, Betty 364 

Cary, Frank 408 

Casebcer, Dorothy 171 

Casebier, Jimmy 245 

Cass, Harriet 375 

Cassiday, Bruce 130, 188 

Casson, Neil 410 

Castleberry, Ruth I 57, 369 

Castlen, Rose Alice 69, 38! 

Catlin, Pat 368 

Catlerlin, Richard 426 

Cavanaugh, Patricia .. 70, 168, I 78 
187, 189, 384 

Cavanaugh, Stephen 417 

Cavett, Virginia 366 

Caward, Mary 377 

Ceccarini, Frances 368 

Cerro, Stanley 424 

Chamberlain, Lisa ... 186,193,380 

Chambers, Barbara 367, 392 

Chambers, Mike 252 

Chambers, Robert 70 

Chambers, Roberta 388 

Chambers, Virginia 70, 177 

Champney, Virginia 70, 153 

Chapman, Beverly 365 

Chapman, Daniel 159,401 

Chapman, John 404 

Chapman, Laura 70, 384 

Chapman, Marge 388 

Chapman, Virginia 378 

Chapates, Stella 170 

Charlton, Cae 368 

Chase, Carmen 366 

Chase, Gale 375 

Chaves, Irenea 70 

Chavez, Ursula 71 

Cheeseman, Margaret 377 

CHI ALPHA DELTA 373 

CHI DELTA PHI 164 

Chidester, Barbara 155 

Childers, Howard 412 

CHI OMEGA 374 

CHI PHI 403 

Chisholm, Margaret .. 71, 153,385 



Christensen, Douglas 420 

Christensen, Jane 155, 394 

Christian, William 419 

Christiansen, John 405 

Churchill, Tony 378 

CIRCLE C 165 

Claasen, Phyllis 71, 175 

Clapham, William 71, 185 

Clapper, Virginia Ann. . . . 176, 385 

Clark, Elizabeth R 70 

Clark, Lee 429 

Clark, Lois 70, 168, 178 

Clark, Mary 70, 394 

Clark, Orville 405 

Clark, R. J 70 

Clarke, Peggy 70, 18! 

Clauson, Wendell 70 

Clayson, Nancy 157 

Clayvllle, Margaret 71,386 

Clegg, Dons 71,362,368 

Cleland, Donald 7! 

Cleland, Eleanor 389, 391 

Cleland, Marshall 427 

Clements, Kay 374 

CIctro, Mary Lou 375 

Clewette, Esther 168 

Clifford, Betty 367 

Cline, Marion 41! 

Clinton, Margaret E 71, 164 

Clippener, Jo Anne 378 

Clough, Bonncy Ellen .... 70, 378 

Clayson, Elizabeth 157 

COACHES 240,241 

Coates, Robert 420 

Coburn, Mary Ann 377, 395 

Cochran, Doris 70, 397 

Cochran, Keith 408 

Coffman, Janice 370, 392 

Cogen, Leo 422 

Cohen, Evelyn 70 

Cohen, Florence 379 

Cohen, Milton 132, 180,289 

Cohen, Richard 70 

Cole, John 58,420 

Cole, Lavon C 71 

Cole, Leon 428 

Colen, Leon 71, 422 

Colen, Simon 422 

Coleston, Betty 71 

Coleston, Marjorie 71 

Colla, John 288 

Collbohm, H. W 7! 

Colllgan, Myles A 71, 183 

Collins, Barbara 375 

Collins, Dorothy 170 

Collins, Joseph 70 

Collins, Larry 411 

Collins, Phillip 411 

Collins, Richard 70 

Collins, Whitney 410 

Colt, Frances 171 

Colton, George 427 

Coman, Charles 401 

Compton, Lynn 420 

CONCERT SERIES 148, 149 

Condos, Anthony 70 

Conner, Patricia 190 

Connett, Mabel 157, 170 

Conrad, Baker 424 

Contini, Fulvia 70 

Cook, Carmon 7! 

Cook, Pauline 170 

Cooke, Esther 71,362, 388 

Cooley, Kitty 393 

Coon, Dorothy 379,383 

Cooper, Elise 170 

Cooper, James 427 

Cooper, Jane 362, 378 

Cooper, Sara 365 

Cooper, William 411 

Coops, Fred 71 

Cope, Burma R 71 

Cope, Eleanor 373 

Copeland, Virginia 382 

Corbell, Margaret ... 71, 157, 164 
Corbett, William 412 



Corbin, Beryl 372 

Corbin, Brownee 373 

Corcoran, Frances 389, 394 

Corenblum, Shirley 379 

Corey, Margaret 71 

Cornell, Dorothy 376 

Cornwell, Margaret 72,386 

Corrado, Robert 190 

Corrick, Bette 375 

Corrigan, Margaret 367 

Corum, Margaret 72,387 

Corwin, Glenn 72, 154 

Costello, Margaret 377, 393 

Coston, Harriet 372 

Coston. William 408 

Cotler, John 72, 187 

Couche, James 72 

Covert, Dorothy 72, 381 

Covert, Jean 367 

Cowan, Elaine 365 

Cowan, Marjorie 73 

Cowen, Robert 404 

Cowan, Warren 400, 415 

Cox, William 414 

Coye, Barbara 186, 369 

Cozens, Dean Frederick 26 

Craddock, Sheldon 420 

Craig, Barbara 396 

Craig, Marjorie 73, 193, 386 

Crall, Carter 400,421 

Crandall, Francis 414 

Crane, Bruce 429 

Crane, Cynthia 73 

Cranfield, Susan 381 

Cravens, Catherine 73 

Crawford, Betty 193, 366 

Crawford, James 190 

Crawford, Marjorie 177, 366 

Crawley, Paul 72,427 

Creasy, Frank 183,384 

CREW 296 

CREW— FROSH 302, 303 

CREW— JAyVEE 300, 301 

CREW— VARSITV 298 

Cricard, William 72,424 

CRICKET 334 

Crilly. Mildred 72 

Crispin, Elizabeth 176,375 

Croft, Margo 385 

Crose, Jean 72 

Crosier, Helen 366, 396 

Cross, Rosemary 72 

Cross, Stuart 407 

CROSS COUNTRy 326 

Crossman, Banett 403 

Crowell, Katherlne 364 

Crozier, Mary M 72 

Crutchfield, J. A 73 

Culver, Edward 73 

Cuneo, Roselyn 367 

Cunningham, Mary 369 

Cunningham, Sally 73, 190 

Cupernell, Hugh 421 

Curran, Kathleen 377 

Curtis, Betty Jane 362, 383 

Curtis, Constance 364 

Curtis, Margaret 73, 366 

Curtis, Stanna 372 

Curtiss, Jean E 72,375 

Cushman, Dorothy 376 



D 

Daggett, Redmond 418 

Dagort, Vincent 72 

Dahle, Wllmar 414 

DAILy BRUIN 130 

DAILy BRUIN STAFF. . . . 134, 135 

Daily. Richard 405 

Dalquist, Clark 418 

Dalrymple, Joy 367,397 

Dalrymple, Patty 367, 397 

Dalton. Dottle 380 

Dalton. Ralph 72.404 

Dana, Franklyn 407 



455 



Dancer, Clifford 405 

Daniels, Alsace 72 

Daniels, Jean 178,385 

Danielson, Lou 429 

Danks, Glen 73 

Darbyshiie, Isabel 193.384 

Darling, Lewis 73 

Danah, Betty 375 

Darsic, Dean Marvin L 26 

Das, Amilic 380 

Dashiell, Marie 364 

D'Aura, Vivian 372 

Davenport, Dryden 423 

Davcy, Roger 402 

Davidson, Jack 419 

Davies, Linda 73 

Davies, Mildred 73,368 

Daviess, Steve 73, 183 

Davis, Betty 39, 72, 171 

Davis, Frank 42 

Davis, Jean 364 

Davis, Louise 72 

Davis, Marcy 386 

Davis, Marjoric 391 

Davis, Martha 47 

Davis, M. Philip 52 

Davis, Nadine 72 

Davis, Owen 410 

Dawson, Ruth 73 

Daze, Mary Jane 369 

Dean, Dorothy 73, 385 

Dcane, Ruth 376 

DEANS 24, 25, 26 

Dear, Oma Louise 387, 392 

DEBATE SQUAD 143 

De Boer, Lenora 73 

De Bolt, Virginia 73 

De Bruler, Ray 426 

Deck, Irene 392 

de Garmo, Jeanne. . . 73, 152, 173 
183, 362, 376 

Delaney, Mary 193, 378 

DELTA CHI 406 

DELTA DELTA DELTA 376 

DELTA EPSILON 168 

DELTA GAMMA 375 

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON 407 

DELTA PHI UPSILON 166 

DELTA SIGMA PHI 408 

DELTA TAU DELTA 410 

DELTA UPSILON 412 

DELTA ZETA 373 

Dcmpscy, Katherine 73 

Denbigh, Kathleen 385 

Dennerle, Marie 73 

Dennis, Marilyn 367 

Dent, John 401 

Deputy, Pauline 74 

Derrick, Mary J 74 

De Serpa, Betty 374 

Deshon, Robert 74,417 

De Spain, Jean 377 

Dcsser, Penrose 415 

Dettmar, Wilbur 414 

Devere, James . . 159, 179, 224, 418 

De Witt, Kathleen 169,364 

Dickman, Jane 394 

Dill, Helen 174 

Dillon, Helene 372 

Dinnis, Elizabeth 177 

Disque, Doris 367 

Dittrick, Bob 423 

Dodge, Dorothy 215, 374 

Dodson, Dorothy 175 

Doerr, Betty 366 

Dolbee, Peter 417 

Donnell, Barbara .... 74, 178, 367 

Donnelly, Ralph 429 

Donohue, Stephen 405 

Donovan, Lane 424 

Dorrance, Earle 403 

Doss, Barbara 157, 170, 187 

Douglas, Gordon 404 

Douglas, Helen 377 

Douglas, Howard 405 

Douglass, Beverly 378 



DOUGLASS HALL 392 

Douglass, Robert 410 

Doupe, Robert 179,429 

Doupe, Roy 429 

Dowd, Irl 411 

Dowds, Phillip 429 

Downey, Joseph 74 

Downey, Lois . 155 

Doyle, Margaret 373 

Drake, Bill 418 

Drake, Clifford 74, 179,419 

DRAMA BOARD 138 

Dresser, Shirley 365 

Dreusike, Ruth 378 

Drew, William 75 

Drexler, Sylvia 379 

Driscoll, Dave 408 

Drovis, Seymour .... 75, 160, 165 

Duddleson, William 410 

Dudley, Marjorie . 381 

Duff, Margaret 385 

Duling, Jane 387 

Duling, Orten 413 

Dulitz, Virginia 75 

Dumont, Earle 425 

Dundas, Neal 429 

Dunn, Lloyd 408 

Dunn, Max 112,429 

Dunn, Patty Lou 380 

Duque, David 404 

Duquc, Thomas 75 

Durkee, Frank 411 

Duse, Kenneth 74 

Dustman, Jane 74, I 82 

Dwiggins, Frank 426 



E 

Easau, Mildred 367 

Eastman, Harlan 418 

Eaton, Betly Jane 374 

Ebli, Andrew G 74 

Ecternach, John 405 

Eckes, Helen 376 

Eddy, Henry 423 

Edlnger, Calvin 168 

Edinger, James G 74 

Edmlslon, John 420 

Edmiston, Walter 74 

EDUCATION BUILDING ... 15 

Edwards, Elsa 387 

Edwards, George 403 

Edwards, Hiram 27 

Edwards, Richard 74 

Edwards, Spencer 75, 406 

Edwards, Warren 405 

Eggers, Alice 75 

Eiler, Dorothea 370 

Eisner, Jane 379 

Ekiof , Ted 423 

Elam, Patty 366 

Ellas, Shirlee 365 

Elliot, Jame: 75 

Ellis, Joseph 45 

Ellis, Kathryn 75 

Ellison, James 426 

Ellison, Lois 74 

Elmendorf, Lewis 74 

Elmer, Albert 416 

Elmer, Carlos 426 

Elster, Sidney 422 

Elston, Alan 401 

Emcrman, Donald 185 

Emerson, Elizabeth 74, 375 

Emerson, Sara L 74 

Emery, John 427 

Emtman, Eleanor 385 

Enlund, Betty 388 

Ennis, Harriet 75 

Entriken, Shirley 375 

Epstein, George 428 

Epstein, Harold 416 



Erickson, Eugene 185, 420 

Ericson, Margaret . 75, 158, 182 

Erlkson, Theada 383 

Ernst, Charles 75,407 

Erskinc, Olive 75 

Evans, Clarinda H 75 

Evans, Georgia 75 

Evans, Herbert 427 

Evans, James 407 

Evans, Jeanette 74 

Evans, Mary Evelyn 386 

Everett, Eleanor 74,208 

Evers, Alf.ed 414 

Everts, Priscilla Joy 74, 378 

Ewing, Donald 74, 414 

Ewonus, William 401 



F 

Factor, Jack 415 

Fagin, Jean J 75, 366 

Fagin, Vernon 75 

Falk, Carl 75, 154 

Farbstein, Ruth 379 

Farias, Francis 400, 414 

Faries, Anne 367 

Farrar, Elizabeth . 177, 383,390 

Farrar, William 417 

Farris, Ragene 75 

Fawcett, Nancy 367 

Fawley, Mary 75 

Fearon, Edward 420 

Felnfeld, Bernice 379 

Feister, George 75, I 79, I 83 

228,421 

Feldman, Carmel 186, 372 

Feldman, Robert 428 

Fellows, Donald 418 

FENCING 338 

Ferbstein, Joan 365 

Ferguson, Jane 366 

Ferguson, Katherine 378 

Ferguson, M. Jane 76 

Fering, Bessie Mae 395 

Ferrell, Adrienne 394 

Ferron, Shirley 76, 376, 397 

Fetherwolf, Jean 383 

Fichtner, Elizabeth 76 

Fick, Betty 76, 364 

Fidler, Hilda Caroline 170 

Field, Dudley 41 | 

Field, Harriett; 386 

Field, William 400, 405 

Fien, Winifred 382 

Fife, John Howard 76, 1 54 

Filer, Mildred 76 

Files, Hanford 300, 429 

Findley, Dale 429 

FINE ARTS 136 

Finn, Pearl 392 

Fischel, Dolly 366 

Fischel, Elaine 77 

Fischel, Ruth 77 

Fisher, Jean 367 

Fisher, Martin 408 

Fisher, Olive 367 

Fishman, Alex 416 

Fitzgerald, Geraldlne 158 

Fltzpatrlck, Howard 418 

Fitzpatrick, Kit 372 

Fltzpatrlck, Olga 77, 157 

Flannery, Martha ... 77, 169, 375 
Fleischmann, Dorothy .... 187, 199 

Fleming, Luther 423 

Fleming, Rosemary . . 76, 363, 364 
Flemming, Margaret . 76, 178,380 

Flo, Fred 76, 408 

Flowers, Mason 159,400,423 

Fluck, Sally 366 

Flynn, Eleanor 364 

Fogarty, Bob 419 

Foley, Barbara 76, 377 

Folker. Charles 408 



Folks, Nancy 378 

FOOTBALL 246 

FOOTBALL— CALIF 264, 265 

FOOTBALL— FROSH .272,273 
FOOTBALL MANAGERS ... 252 
FOOTBALL— MONTANA .260 

FOOTBALL— OREGON 261 

FOOTBALL— ORE, STATE ... 267 
FOOTBALL— SANTA CLARA. 266 
FOOTBALL— S. CAL. 269, 270, 271 

FOOTBALL SQUAD 250 

FOOTBALL— STANFORD 256,257 
258,259 
FOOTBALL— TEX.CHRISTIAN 254 
FOOTBALL— WASHINGTON. 255 
FOOTBALL— WASH. STATE . 268 

Foote, Robert 76 

Ford, Virginia 368 

Fordyce, Robert 417 

Foreman, Mildred 27 

FORENSICS BOARD 142 

FOREWORD 4 

Forgey, Maxine 76 

Forgy, Lee 77 

Forney, Jerry 377 

Forrester, Llllla.i 77 

Fortier, Marcelle 187, 189 

Fosler, Alberta 77 

Foster, Berrit 420 

Foster, Dale 400, 402 

Foster, Frances 170, 176 

Foust, David 77,421 

Fowler, Dorothy 76 

Fox, Dorothy 368 

Fox, Grace 177 

Fragner, Dona 76, 178,373 

Frame, Lester 419 

Francis, Marianne . 76, 1 53, 362, 373 

Frank, Margaret 152, 186 

Frank, William 422 

Franklin, Dorothy 375 

Eraser, Harold 127, 179,429 

Fratus, William 412 

Frawley, John 242,427 

Frazer, Robert 413 

Frazier, Quln 76, 159,420 

Fredell, E. Wilbur 414 

Frederick, Anabelle 382 

Frederick, Geraldlne 364 

Fredericks, John 77,425 

Freear, Tom 125, 160, 161 

180, 188,421 

Freeman, Harry 408 

Freeman, Muriel 379 

Freer, Jack 427 

Freiday, Patricia 372 

French, Harry 425 

French, Janet 384 

FRESHMAN COUNCIL 113 

FRESHMAN OFFICERS 112 

Fretter, Virginia 364 

Freud, Ralph 138 

Freuhllng, Betty 396 

Freund, John 416 

Frey, Marilane 158 

Friedman, June 365 

Friedman, Max 77 

Friedman, Orlan 428 

Friedman, Robert 422 

Friedman, Sylvia 365 

Frinnell, James 42 I 

Frisch, Jewel 379 

Frishman, Mort 77 

Frolseth, Janice 363, 385 

Fudge, Frances 77, 178, 380 

Fujiaka, Lilly 190, 373 

Fulcher, Jeanne 363, 384 

Fulkerson, Robert 424 

Fuller, Dorothy 377 

Fulmer, Richard 42 I 

Fulton, Glcndine 366 

Funk, Mary Jo 125, 152, 377 

Funk, Ralph 421 

Fuqua, Marie 77, 376 

Furnival, Rovena 77, 178 

Furumura, Jack 76 



456 



Gabriel. Ralph 408 

Sair, Edward 407 

Gaffncy, Dorothy 364 

Gallagher. Margaret 386 

Gallinger. Harvey 417 

Galloway, Robert 76, 405 

Galvin, Irene 387 

Galvin. Mary 387 

Gam. Daniel 416 

GAMMA PHI BETA 377 

Gannon. Margaret 364 

Gannon. Pierce 232, 405 

Gantman. Joseph 416 

Gard. Brant 413 

Gardiner. Jack 421 

Gardner. James 408 

Garlinghouse, Nancy .... 381, 395 
Garrison, Nancy. 157, 178,368,393 
Garvin, Lucille. 76, 157, 178, 380 

Gaskill, John 159,426 

Gastil, Barbara 378 

Gates, Eva 374 

Gates, Ruth 386 

Gauer, Margaret 182, 394 

Gauntt, Grover 420 

Gautschi, Alice 76, 161, 173 

193.380 

Gear. Doris 77, 384 

Gebb. LaVona 77,394 

Geddes, John 411 

Gelder, Claire 367 

Gelsin, Betty 190 

George, Clark 421 

Gessncr, James 424 

Gewirtz, Sid 422 

Geyer, Hugh 418 

Ghormley, Carl 429 

G 
G 

bbs, Harriette 77 

bbs, Patricia 376 

bson, Mary 77, 19! 

bson, Roma 78 

bson, Susan 186, 378 

ccntaner, Mary 78 

Ibert, Alice 375 

Ibert, Elva 374 

Ibert, Wolfe 428 

Ibert, Fred 428 

Ichrist, Helen 193, 368 

:hrisb, John 180,427 

aland, Richard 424 

espie, Ann 177, 367 

espie, Mary 190 

espie, Richard 419 

llette, Ray .108,159, 165,179,423 

lette, Robert 423 

liam, Harold 235 

Is, Marian 380 

mer, Harvey 156, 417 



amboni, Louis 77 

ampaolo, Josephine 77 



78 



242 
190 
379 
171 
78 
367 



Imore, Dale . . 

'irveti, Esther . . 

'itlin. Faith 

Glass, Sally .... 
Glasser, Warren 
Glaze, Barbara . 

Gleaves, Milnor 78,403 

GLEE CLUB— MENS 146 

GLEE CLUB— WOMEN'S .146 

Glenn, Martha 166, 175 

Glickman, Norman 78 

Glidden, Miles 427 

Godber, Richard 425 

Godfrey, William 418 

Godowitz, Joe 428 

Goff, Douglass 414 

Goff, John 79, 159, 179,429 

Golay, Ann 397 

Goldman, George 79,184 

Goldman, Paul 79, 183 

GOLF 335 

Gollands, Marie 191 

Good, Roscoe 404 

Goodkin, Jerome 422 



Goodman, Leonard 422 

Goodman, Marion 171 

Goodman, Stanley 79 

Goodnight, Hazel ... 78, 171,391 

Goodrich, William 429 

Goodwin, John 27 

Goodwin, Sarabelle 378 

Gordon, Leonard 78 

Gorman, Helen 303 

Goss, Rosabel 78 

Gossett, Edward 407 

Gotkin, Helen 379 

Gould, Jay 423 

Goulel, Betty 383 

Goulet, Peggy 383 

Goulette, Jacqueline 377 

Grace, Virginia 369, 393 

Grady, Sally 362, 364 

Graf, Robert 418 

Graham, Mary 386 

Gramman, Al 413 

Granger, Ann 378 

Grant, J. A. C 40 

Grant. Miriam 377 

Grant, Olive 78 

Grassmueck, George 420 

Gray. George 429 

Gray. John 411 

Green. Pauline 370 

Green. Robert 78. 428 

Green, Ruth 367 

Greenbaum, Irwin 428 

Grcenberg. Sylvia 379 

Greenwald. William 424 

Greenwood, Barbara 374 

Gregg, Langdon 418 

Grekel, Howard 78, 154 

Grey, Jean 387 

Griffen, Gwendolyn 170 

Griffin, Marjorie. 79, 178, 387, 393 
Griffith, Gerrie . 79, 133, 152,366 

Griffith, Janet 380 

Grim, Joan 79, 382 

Grim, Martha 32 

Grimes, Alice 384 

Griset, Loren 79, 156 

Grody, Irving 422 

Groener, Marshall 426 

Groman, Jeanette 78, 379 

Grondahl, Virginia 377 

Gronsky, Arthur 428 

Gross, Bernard 422 

Gross, Bernice 379 

Gross, Calvin 78 

Grossblatt, Alvin 428 

Grossblatt, Louise 365 

Grosslight, Joseph 428 

Grolh, Martha 78 

Grudln, Sam 78, 400, 428 

Gryde, Kermit 402 

GUIDON 169 

Guldstrand, Louise .. 79,362,377 

Gunter, Marvin 415 

Gunther, Mertice 367. 394 

Gustafson, Arthur 79 

Gustafson, Karl 179,221 

Guyer, William 79,243 

Gwynne, Harold 403 

Gyle, Ann 157, 372 

GYM TEAM 340 



H 

Haas, Frank 79,424 

Haddock, Bebty. 79, 157, 170, 193 

Haddox, Gene 406 

Hadley, Harriel 79, 171, 385 

Hadsell, Betty 78, 170 

Hagerman, Anne 364 

Hagey, Vivia 78, 153 

Hahn, Everett 413 

Haig, Douglas 426 

Hails, Margaret 367 

Hale, Lynn 289 



Hales, Milton 78 

Hall, Donald 403 

Hall, Florence 181, 376 

Hall, Helen 190 

Hall, Marjorie 378 

Haller, Betty Lou 78,366 

Halliday, Dorothy 372, 390 

Halloran, Phillip 414 

Halsey, Jeanne 366 

Ham, Virgil 79, 156 

Hamby, Pal 374 

Hamer, Lorene 374 

Hamilton, Barbara 381 

Hamilton, Helen Louise.. 176,368 

Hamilton, Yvonne 382 

Hamlin, Paul 402 

Hamner, John 426 

Hamud, Lorraine 171 

Hand, Malcolm 79, 156 

HANDBALL 332 

Haney, William 412 

Hanks. Jane 79, 176 

Hannah. Robert 421 

Hanrahan, Valerie 381 

Hansen, Harry 404 

Hanson, Claire 152, 188 

Hanson, Earl 179,224,413 

Hanson, John 154 

Hanson, Williar i 154 

Hard, Harry 4| | 

Hardies, Violet 157 

Hardin, Donald 408 

Hardman, Kalherine 79 

Hargrave, Janet 378 

Harp, Merle 157 

Harp, Vernon 170 

Harper, Margaret 377 

Harris, Ann Ellen 378 

Harris, Boyd 133, 156, 408 

Harris, Charles 416 

Harris, Dorothea 177 

Harris, Erna Lou 365 

Harris, Richard 410 

Harrison, Sylvia 79 

Harryman, Frank 79, 427 

Hart, Charles 80,400,410 

Hart, Robert 190 

Harth, Vivian 384 

Hartley, Lucille 366 

Harvey, Elizabeth 170 

Harvey, Emmett 429 

Harvey, Jean 376 

Harvey, Robert 80, I 79, 42 1 

Haskell, Delbert 402 

Haskell, Ruth 375 

Haskin, Jack 80 

Hatch, Sumner 80, 1 56 

Hatfield, Elizabeth 80 

Haupt, Herman 80, 403 

Haupt, VangI 384 

Hauser, Betty . 8 I , I 78, 1 87, 389, 394 

Haver. Mary Ellen 376 

Hawk. Mary 81 

Hawkins. Mary 81 

Hawks, Joseph 401 

Hawley. Mary Louise 364 

Hawn, Vera L 81.386 

Hay. Helen 80. 169.367 

Hays. Anita 378 

Hays. Crossan 80. 400. 427 

Hayutin, Harold BU 

Hayward, Mary Jane 375 

Hayward, Polly 384 

Heard, Bctlis 412 

Hedderly, Lorraine 364 

Hcdrick, Provost Earle R 21 

Hcer, Marjorie 386 

Helferich, Buford 80 

Heiman, Janice 379 

Helntz, Louis 429 

HELEN MATTHEWSON CLUB 170 

Helfman, Howard 416 

Hemperly, Juanita 155, 396 

Hemsoth, Vivian 385 

Henck, Marian 80, 170 

Henderson, Hazel 382 



Hendrlcksen, Ann 397 

Hendrickson, Elsa 80 

Hendrickson, Lill 380 

Hengsteler, Edith 81,369 

Henn, Mary Margaret 375 

Henry, Martha Jane 374 

Henshaw, Jane 378 

Henshaw, Marjorie 378 

Hensley, James 417 

Hermanson, Ray 81 

Herring, Jean 382 

Herrnfeld, Dolores 393 

Hcrron, Osceola 378 

HERSHEV HALL 394, 395 

Hess, Mildred 81 

Hesse, Don 81 

Hesse, Richard 417 

Hewson, Gordon 410 

Hicks, Bob 161, 188.419 

Highland, Bettie Jane 385 

Hightower, Donna 80 

Hildebrand, Charlotte ... 80, 377 

Hill. Elizabeth 384 

Hill. Helen 164 

Hill. Merton 27 

Hill, Natalie 80. 381 

Hill. Ralph 402 

Hill. Wade 403 

Hillard, Pat 367 

Hillle. Edward 429 

Hilson. Travers 192 

Hiltner, Luther 429 

Hine, Robert I 12,405 

Hinge, Shirley 176 

Hirashiki, Aki 190, 373 

Hishiki, Hirashi 80 

Hitchcock, Barbara 377 

Hitchcock, Mildred 81,382 

Hix, Jane Elizabeth 81, 373 

Hoag, Robert 400,418 

Hoch, Jack 423 

Hodge, Rowland 81 

Hodge, William 407 

Hodgson, Dean Robert 25 

Hoegerman, Lois 81 

Hoenk, Jessie 81 

Hof, Mary Jane 81, 182 

Hoffleit, Herbert 49 

Hoffman, Albert 422 

Hoffman, Florence 80 

Hoffman, Louise 379 

Hofman, Phyllis ... 80, 169, 384 

Hofmann, Lorraine 127 

Hogg, William 411 

Hogst, Barbara 82 

Holcomb, Frances 373 

Hollingsworth, Cece 252 

Hollingsworth, Margaret 387 

393,395 

Hollingsworth, Pete 411 

Hollisler. Jo Anne 187, 191 

Hollman. Elizabeth 366 

Holloway. Urcel 80 

Holman. David 426 

Holmson. Edgar 425 

Holsinger. Irene 187. 191 

Holt. Alice 367 

HOMECOMING 262.263 

Honig. Clarence ... 80,165,184 

HONORARIES 150 

HONOR AWARDS 63 

Hood, James 81 

Hopkins. Gwendolyn 81 

Horn. Andrew 413 

Horrell. Edwin 240 

Horton. Charles 405 

Horton. Crelghton 8! 

Horton. Richard 410 

Hosford, Harvey 404 

Hosoura, Klyoko 373 

Hostler, Warren 429 

Hostrup, Millicent 81, 164 

Hougham, Richard 421 

Houghton, Betty Lou 372 

Houghton, Leo 81 

House, James 410 



457 



Hovey, Bradford 405 

Howard, Carol Jean 376 

Howard, Charles 410 

Howard, Eirwin 81, 183,410 

Howard, Frank 410 

Howard, John 420 

Howard, Kathcrine 82, 378 

Howard, Margaret Mary 378 

Howard, Robert 406 

Howard, Sidney 412 

Howe, Margery 182, 389, 394 

Howell, Betty 378 

Howland, George 424 

Howse, Joe 42 1 

Hubbel, Hildegard 82 

Hubcr, Edith 381 

Huckctt, Arbhur 82 

Hudman, Jean 369 

Hudson, Bonnie 82 

Hudson, Douglas 417 

Hughes, Audrey 367, 392 

Hughes, Chase 404 

Hughes, Earl 404 

Hulbcrt, Eldean 375 

Hulctte, Mary 82 

Hull, Barbara 214, 367, 395 

Hulton, Mabellu 376 

Humes, Harley 83 

Hummel, Robert 405 

Humphreys, Eileen 83 

Hunt, Eleanor 191 

Hunt. Eloise 158 

Hunt, Halliette 83 

Hunt, Richard 427 

Hunt, Virginia 368 

Hunter, Paul 425 

Huntley, Clifford 413 

Hustler, John 407 

Huston, Aidamae 366 

Huston, George 179,419 

Hutchins, Philip 410 

Hutchinson, James 83, 156, 400, 424 

Huttenbach, Alice 373 

Hyman, Alfred 416,428 



I 

laculla, Marion 82 

lantorno, Sam 82 

ICE HOCKEY 328 

Icke, Helen 153 

Imon, Ikua 193,373 

imoto, Mitsuru 373 

Ingold, Ray 82 

Ingram, John . . . . i 82 

Inhofe, Barbara 82 

IN MEMORIAM 10, II 

INTERFRATERNITy COUNCIL 400 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS 34! 

342, 343 

Inui, Koto 373 

Irmas, Joan 82, 362, 365 

Irvin, Bill 413 

Irvin, Lorna 83, 1 57 

Irving, Kathleen 83 

Izenour, Betty Jane 367 



J 

Jabour, Marcelle 193 

Jaccard, Bill 419 

Jacks, Josephine 374 

Jackson, Betty Lou 364 

Jackson, John B 53 

Jacobs, Leon 83 

Jacobs, Tom 160 

Jacobs, Wilbur 420 

Jacobson, Eugene 83, 131 

JacobuccI, Joseph . . 127,184,425 

Jacobus, Celeste 175 

Jacomini, Clement 253, 424 

James, Donald 420 

James, Robert 82 



Jameson, Mary 82 

Jamison, Frances 364 

Jankc, Frederica 82 

Jarabek, Vilma 388 

Jellineck, June 363, 386 

Jellincck, Lois 380 

JellJson, Jcanetle 383 

Jenkins, Elmo 82 

Jensen, Deliene 369 

Jensen, Harold 83 

Jensen, Walter 83, 170,425 

Jepson, Priscilla 83, 178, 382 

Jesse, Betty 384 

Johnke, Bill 83, 127, 180,404 

Johns, Emmy Lou 387 

Johns, Wilbur 241 

Johnson, Annabel 177, 385 

Johnson, Barbara 375 

Johnson, Bill 192,425 

Johnson, Cammilla 387 

Johnson, Carl 402 

Johnson, Carolyn 375 

Johnson, Charles 405 

Johnson, Dorothy 83, 171 

Johnson, Edith 177 

Johnson, Frances .... 83, 362, 375 

Johnson, Frank 413 

Johnson, John 272, 417 

Johnson, June 82 

Johnson, Katherine 375 

Johnson, Marie 377 

Johnson, Raymond 82, 410 

Johnson, Richard 82 

Johnston, Clarence 408 

Jones, Barbara 383 

Jones, Dorothy 367 

Jones, Elwy 42 I 

Jones, Margaret 186,374,389 

Jones, Marian Lee 155 

Jones, Marjorie 387 

Jones, Mary A 82 

Jones, Patricia 384 

Jones, Richard 37 

Jones, Wallace 405 

Jones, Walter 192,423 

Jones, Wilma 83, 153 

Jordan, Clarice 182 

Jordan, Ruth 375 

Jorgenson, Mabel 370, 393 

Jorgenson, Roberta 83, 387 

Joyce, John 83 

JUNIOR COUNCIL 109 

JUNIOR OFFICERS 108 

Just, Marian 385 



K 

Kahl, Marcus M 83 

Kahle, Ursula 366 

Kahn, Mane 388 

Kahn, Robert 83,415 

Kaiser, Arthur 417 

Kaiser, Lucia 168, 178 

Kalin, Marvin 428 

Kallejian, Eleanor 176, 187 

KAP AND BELLS 167 

Kaplan, Leo 422 

Kaplan, Louis 416 

Kaplan, Noble 83 

Kaplan, Rosalie 379 

KAPPA ALPHA 413 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA 378 

KAPPA DELTA 380 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA . 381 

KAPPA PHI ZETA 171 

KAPPA SIGMA 41! 

Karp, Jerry 428 

Katz, Gilbert 84, 428 

Katzman, Dorothy 84 

Katzman, Marvin . .. 192,294,416 

Kaufman, Louis 84,165,428 

Kaufman, Martin 428 

Kawahara, Takahashi 84 

Kay, Howard 84 



Kayser, Ann 384 

Keane, Ella 384 

Keating, Dorothy 186 

Keeton, Henry .. 84,184,400,406 

Kegley, Julia Belle 185, 157 

Keim, Randy 418 

Keller, Adrian 44 

Keller, Stanley 422 

Kelley, Fern 33 

Kelley, Miriam 85 

Kelly, Bertha 364 

Kelly, Maurice 85, 183 

Kelly, Miriam 375 

Kemmerer, Thelma 85, 396 

Kendis, Bradley 84,428 

Kennedy, Dean 84, 184,412 

Kennedy, Virginia .. . 362,363, 372 

Kenyon, Marjorie 84, 374 

KERCKHOFF HALL 2, 3 

Kern, Eleanor 375 

Kern, Robert 417 

Kern, Ruth E 84 

Kerr, Sheila 381 

Kerrigan, William 84 

Ketcik, Josephine 46 

Kettler, Bill 419 

Key, Katherine 369 

Kiken, Shirley 368 

Kildow, Nina 84 

Kilmer, Stella 85 

Kimball, Betty 193 

Kimmelsman, Benjamin ...... 416 

Kincheloe, Brown 404 

Klndel, Wallace 400,426 

Kindig, Betty Jean 376 

King, Dorothy 85, 158 

King, Jeanne 366 

King, Margaret 384 

King, Maxine 85 

King, Robert 424 

Kingrey, Kenneth 85, 168 

KINGS 226 

Kingsbacher, Elaine 84, 366 

Kingsley, Carel 376 

Kinney, Bernard 183 

Kinney, Phillip 84 

Kirby, Doris 84 

Klrby, Harry 401 

Kistner, Louise 84, 377 

Kitch, Loran 419 

KItrelle, Richard 410 

Kjellgren, Pan 175 

Klaus, Wanda 85, 181 

Klausner, Stanley 404 

Klein, Joyce - 365 

Klein, Paul 85 

Kleven, Delores 380 

Klimmer, Dorothy 373 

Klingberg, Frank 410 

Kllpper, Donald 416 

Klipstcin, Thomasine 378 

Klocksiem, Elizabeth . 85, 153,291 

Knight, Betty 370 

Knolly, Bill 404 

Knotts, Robert 421 

Knowles, Louis 85,402 

Knox, Louis 400, 403 

Knox, Roy 403 

Knudsen, Dean Vern 5, 25 

Knuth, Barbara 385, 396 

Knutson, Loyd 85, 179,410 

Koch, A. Alan 85 

Koch, Frances 84, 152 

Kodani, Fumiyo 190 

Koebig, Fred 30,64,84, 159 

161, 179,405 

Kohn, Marie 84 

Kollln, Lawrence 401 

Koper, Edna 84 

Kopp, Raymond 415 

Korechoff, Mildred 85 

Koroncs, Sheldon 416 

Korstad, Marjorie 178, 385 

Korsted, Mary E 85 

Koskoff, Donald 85 

Kottmeier, Constance 373 



Kowalski, Dorothy 376 

Koyama, Jessie 85, 373 

Kraemer, Beverly 375, 395 

Kramer, Frances 374 

Kramer, Jeanne 368 

Kramer, Mary Jean 158 

Krasne, Lorraine 365 

Kroll, Shirley 365 

Kruse, Karolyn 85, 367 

Kubo, Takeo 85 

Kuglar, William 410 

Kuhlen, Florence 86, 385 

Kulli, John .. 86, 131, 156, 180,424 

Kumai, Kay 373 

Kumnlck, Nancy 369 

Kunin, Edith 365 

Kunin, Ralph 428 

Kunkel, Jean 193 

Kusayanagi, Sally 193, 373 

Kvaas, Arthur 86 



L 

Labbe, Robert 86 

Labowltz, Esther 379 

Ladd, Reba 86, 175, 396 

Lafler, Miriam 191 

Lagomarsino, James 427 

Laidlaw, Douglas 407 

Lake, Jeannette 383 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 414 

Lamberson, Jack 159, 420 

Landis, Harry 86, I 32 

Landsborough, Antoinette . . . 394 

Lane, Frances 377 

Lane, John 418 

Lane, Paul 401 

Lang, Joseph 87,408 

Langstaff, Martha ... 87, 174, 191 

Lanham, Lucille 87, 170 

Lanigan, Valerie 86, 393 

Lantz, William 402 

Lappen, Chester 86 

Larey, Anna Lu 386 

Larson, Robert 179,419 

Lasher, Evelyn 379 

Latham, Bill 423 

Latta, Harrison .. 86, 165,400,429 
Laubender, Rosemary I 76, 392, 395 

Laughlin, Dean Helen M 25 

Launer, Jean 186, 374 

Laurenson, Stewart 404 

Lauritzen, Keith 86 

Lauterwasser, Margaret 387 

Lautz, Anita 86, 191 

Law, Roberta 384 

Lawhead, Peggy 367 

Lawrence, Estelle 86 

Lawson, Marjorie. 87, 169, 374, 386 

Layman, Lon Leo 87 

Leake, Rhona 87, 385 

Leaton, Thelma 87 

LE BOURGEOIS GENTIL- 

HOMME 139 

Leckman, Helene 377 

Ledger, Dorothy 381 

Ledger, Helen 381 

Lee, Betty 389, 394 

Lee, Marjorie 86 

Lee, Paul 86 

Leebody, Robert 406 

Leeds, Barbara 86 

Leeds, Jane 381 

Leeds, Joe 401 

Leeman, Nemo 423 

Lefler, Hazel 86 

LeGer, Marcella 363,383 

Lehr, Marjorie 87, 368 

Leighton, James 421 

Lein, Elizabeth 379 

Leindahl, Margaret 390 

Leiie, Hennle 365 

Lemon, Anselma 87 

Lemon, Betty Jane 367 



458 



Lenardson, Floyd 87 

Lennon. William 87,401 

Lepper, Carmen 381 

I.eRoy, Renee 395 

Lettice, Elaine 364 

Letticc, Frederick 417 

Levic. Albert 416 

Levic. Jerrie 416 

Lcvine. Loise 87. 365 

Levitt, Lester 428 

Lewis, Joan 374 

Lewis, Kay 108, 374 

Lewis, Robert 401 

Lewis, Wesley 143 

L'Heureux, Harry 421 

Lica, Jane 424 

Lleberman, Martin 428 

Liebscher, Freida 363, 382 

Liknaitz, Judrlh 87 

Lilly, Enid 380 

Lindenbaum, Seymour 415 

Lindgren, Margery Mac 191 

Lindholm, Frank 404 

Lindroth, Mildred .. . 86,389,397 

Lindsay, June 86, 376 

Lindsey, Virginia Lee. 86, 164, 169 
170, 173 

Linsley, Bonney 86 

Linsky, Bonney 191 

Lipking, Janice 363, 387 

Lippman, Annette 365 

Lipson, Sam 87 

Llssner, Betty Jane 187, 376 

Litsey, Jean 380 

Livingstone, Mary E 87, 176 

Lloyd, Alva 186, 376 

Lloyd-Jones, Jane ... 187, 189, 376 

Lockey, Joseph 40 

Logan, Mildred 87 

London, Herbert 87,421 

Long, Sidney 373 

Loomos, John 87 

Lord, Elizabeth . . 87, 178, 187, 378 

Louve, Edna 397 

Love, Virginia 380 

Low, Mary Ann 387, 396 

Lowe, Erma Jean 88 

LOWER DIVISION DEBATE . . 142 

Lowerre, George 42 I 

Loyan, Ruth V 88, 153 

Loye, Mary Alice 367 

Lozanov,. Nathan 422 

Ludman, Helen 374 

Ludwick, Bettc 364 

Luke. Harriette 366 

Lund, Helen 366 

Lund, Jack 42! 

Lundall, Margaret 389 

Lundy, Lloyd 88 

Lurie, Milton 88 

Lyford, Robin 186, 368 

Lyie, Lois 155,394 

Lyon, Norman 405 



M 

Maas, James 416 

MacDonald, Duncan 88 

MacDonald, Eugene 406 

MacDonald, Jane 367 

MacDougall, Doris . . 88,161,169 

Mace, Rhoda 187, 387 

MacFarland, Anne 378 

362,374 

MacHaffie, Margaret 367 

MacKenzIe, Jean .... 187, 188,189 

363,376 
MacKenzic, Margaret Mary . . 372 

MacKenzie, Murdo 419 

MacLean, Jean 89, 367 

MacLennan, Marilyn 368 

Maclise, Deming 27, 52 

MacPherson, Don 251,413 

Macrae, Florence 376, 395 



MacTavish, David 59 

l/lacTavish, Don 89 

/^adaras, Irene 382 

Madden, Mary Alice . . 89, 367 

Madge, Edith 89 

Maeser, Shirley 380 

Magee, Mary 110, 186,366 

Magee, Ray 229 

Magee, Virginia 366 

Magill, Louise 384 

Mahaffie, Ray 167, 187 

Mahn, Harold 424 

Mahon, Jack 192 

Mahon, Margaret 88 

Mahon, Mary Ann 375 

Mahoncy, Gcraldinc 367 

Mahoney, Patricia 368 

Mail, Marian 369 

Maitral, Marguerite 380 

Malcomson, Molly 381 

Malinow, Dorothy 363, 379 

Mallory, Coragene 88 

Malloy, Mary 158 

Malmgren, Helen 367 

Malsman, Marcia 379 

Maltby, Peggy 381 

Manley, Katherine 367 

Mann, Barbara 187, 189, 384 

Mann, Donald 88 

Mann, Gertrude 88, 381 

Mann, Pauline 158 

Manning, Frank 427 

Mansfield, Doris 380 

Mansfield, Harland 426 

March, Edith 88 

Margules, Adalie 365 

Markowitz, Ernest 133, 160 

Marksman, Rita 88 

Marlalt, Bobbie Lou 383 

Marquardt, Emily 177, 387 

Marsden, Ralph 405 

Marsh, Harold 89, 154 

Marsh, William 420 

Marshall, Norma 369 

Martin, Carmen 89 

Martin, Erma 379 

Martin, Fred 423 

Martin, Gail 89, 386 

Martin, Leslie Ann 89, r69, 178, 367 

Martin, Robert 88, 405 

Maruyamo, Uriko 373 

Mascot, Paul 192 

MASONIC AFFILIATE 

COUNCIL 170 

Mata, Flora 88 

Mathes, Larry 88 

Mathews, Ned 251 

Matlin, William 89 

Mattis, Jean 177 

Mattis, Kendall 89 

Matyas, Jeri 379 

Mauerhan, Barbara Jean 38! 

May, Margaret 89 

May, Mary 157 

May, Rex 411 

Mayers, Lillian 89 

Mayfleld, Edith 89 

Maynard, Robert 400, 4! I 

McAllister, Eleanor 383 

McAneny, Jack 88 

McAtee, Jean 376 

McBain, Carl 243 

McCall, William 417 

McCallum, Dwight 418 

McCandless, Joanne .... 186, 369 

McCann, Georgia 88, 190 

McCann, Jack 179 

McCarthy, Ethel 193, 384 

McCarthy, Pat 384 

McCarthy, Tom 40! 

McClellan, Jerry 411 

McClellan, Mary Lee 88, 152. 169 
173, 198,363,366 

McClellan, Myrta 48 

McClellan, William 420 

McClure, Katherine 88 



McClure, Myron 89 

McCollim, Margaret 177,390 

McConahy, Eugene 420 

McConnel, Louis 394 

McConnell, George 411 

McConville, Bob 425 

McConville, Peggy 377 

McCord, Margaret 89 

McCormick, Arl 429 

McCormick, Ed 156 

McCorry, Marcella 363, 388 

McCrone, Ethel 89 

McCrone, Natalie 369 

McCulloch, Howard 407 

McCunc, Donarita 387 

McCune, Henry 417 

McCunniff, Mary A 89, 369 

McDaniel, Howell 192,425 

McDonald, Mary 89 

McDonnell, Marjorie 178 

McGill, Jack 412 

McGrath, Mary 388 

McGuire, Janet 373 

Mcintosh, Patsy 89 

Mclntyre, Marybelle 383 

McKee, William 426 

McKell, Bernice 369 

McKenzie, Stuart 410 

McKinley, Betsy 368 

McKinley, William 90 

McKinney, Beth 380 

McKinnon, Dr. Donald 27 

McLaughlin, Mary 381 

McLaughlin, Thomas 427 

McLeah, John 405 

McLellan, Norma 381 

McLeod, Marguerite 176 

McMahon, George . . 90,179,405 

McManus, Florence 393 

McManus, George 144 

McManus, Mary Jo 364 

McNeal, Mary 384 

McNeely, Janet 378 

McNeely, Morgan . . 179,400,420 

McNeill, Nell 192 

McPhee, James 429 

McPherson, Fred 159,184,245 

400,412 

McReynolds, Donald 426 

McWelhy, William 90,405 

Meacher, Leo 417 

Meadowcraft, Douglas 420 

Meadows, Bernice 379 

Meagher, Jack 425 

Meigs, Betty ... 90, 164, 363, 377 
Meldrum, Robert... 90,136,160 

180, 185 

Melindy, Dorothy 370, 393 

Mellin, George 419 

Melius, Elizabeth 90,381 

Melnyk, Stephen 125, 156, 180, 192 

Melyan, Wesley 91 

Menashe, Ray 424 

Mendelsohn, Mary Jane. . 389, 390 

Mendius, Jack 408 

MENS ATHLETIC BOARD. .221 
MENS ORGANIZATIONS ... 218 

MENS DO 223 

MEN'S WEEK 222 

Mertes, Richard 91, 154 

Meriwether, Richard 419 

Merz, Kenneth 411 

Messencer, Doris 397 

Metro, Dorothy 181 

Mette, Margaret 91, 178 

Mettzer, Viola 153, 373 

Metzenbaum, Bates 428 

Meyer, A. J 159,419 

Meyers, Natalie 379 

Micks, John 411 

Middlemiss, Marjorie. 186,366,393 

Middleton, Richard 426 

MILITARY 224,225 

Millar, Nancy 176,385 

Millar, Victor 410 

Milledge, Henry 185,408 



Miller, Alvin 387 

Miller, Bruce 416 

Miller, Dorothy 91,365 

Miller, Elmer 90 

Miller, Evelyn 373 

Miller, Jean 170,406 

Miller, Lois 375 

Miller, Lorna 90 

Miller, Lorraine 379 

Miller, Lucy 376 

Miller, Richard 90 

Miller, Scott 231,400,413 

Millikan, Jack 4! 

Milliken, Benjamin 90 

Millman, Helen 90 

Mills, Cynthia 383 

Mills, Jane 90 

Mills, Ruth 364 

Milroy, Peggy 91,381 

Milton, Constance 364 

Minger, Mildred 91 

Minock, Monnier 91 

MINOR SPORTS 324 

Mirow, Vivian 367 

Mitchell, Annabel . . 91,389,396 

Mitchell, Bonnie 374 

Mitchell, Jim 404 

Mitchell, Joe 428 

Mitchell, William 417 

Mock, Sanford 90, 1 30, 180 

188,415 

Moeller, Charlotte 153 

Moffat, Marjorie 384 

Moffitt, Robert 90, 154 

Mohr, Darlyne 383 

Moir, Jean 367 

Moncrieff, Gene 90 

Monkman, Bill 418 

Monroe, Lola 366 

Monong, Patsy 92 

Monroe, Jane 368 

Montgomery, Barbara 90 

Moody, Anna 90 

Moon, Marilyn 382, 393 

Moone, Duncan 423 

Moone, Marjorie 366 

Moone, Ruth 90, 177,366 

Mooney, Bettie 91, 369 

Moor, Martaret 364 

Moore, Carvel 429 

Moore, Clementine 91 

Moore, Donald 91 

Moore, Johnny 288 

Moore, Kimball 91,408 

Moore, Mary 366 

Moore, Richard 412 

Moore, Stacy 411 

Moore, Tracy 419 

Moran, Margaret 174 

Moreland, Virginia 90 

Morgan, Jean 372 

Morhar, Martin 428 

Moritis, Francis 425 

Morlay, Melina F 90, 370, 393 

Morris, Betty 366 

Morris, Geneva 90 

Morris, Harry 33 

Morris, James 417, 420 

Morrison, Betty 90, 166 

Morrissey, Muriel 91,391 

Morrissey, Patricia . . . 187, 193, 384 

Morrow, Frank 91 

Morse, Betsy 377 

MORTAR BOARD 173 

Mortinson, Roberta 366 

Morton, Byron 421 

Morton, Dave 190 

Moses, Ruth 91,369 

Mosgrove, Anne 378 

Mosher, Janet 91,389,394 

Mottram, Helen 380 

Moulton, Lee Forest 91 

Mount, George 91 

Movias, Maxine 393 

MU PHI EPSILON 174 

Mueller, Paul 92, 165,425 



459 



Mulcare, Dorolhy 92 

Mullcri, Aida 92 

Murdock, Lcnore 364 

Mufdock, Richard 413 

Murnane, Jean 92 

Murphy, Colleen 92, 380 

Murphy, Palsy 302, 380 

Murphy, William 401 

Murray, James 143 

Murray, Thomas 190 

Mycr, Evelyn 93 

Myers, Vergene 374 

Myers. Zcll 408 



N 



Nakajima, Ichiro 93 

Nakamura, JoscpS 93 

NAVAL R.O.T.C 225 

Ncbcnzahl, Harold 428 

Nccb, Anita 377 

Needham, Marjorie 386 

Necly, Thomas 410 

Ncglcy, Harrison 420 

Nelson, Audrey 164, 191 

Nelson, Bernice 376 

Nelson, Donald 156,402 

Nehon, Florence 375 

Nelson, Jack 93 

Nelson, Martha 92 

Nelson. Nellie 92,396 

Nelson, Ruth 378 

Nesbit, Jeanne 92, 384 

NesbiH, Elizabeth 390 

Neuiiman, Nyda 187, 189 

Newcomb, Robert 421 

Newell, Frank 92 

Newhoff, Evely.) 372 

Newlin, Dika 18! 

Newman, Beverly Jane 381 

Newman, Claire • 385 

Newman, Homer 404 

Newman, John 411 

Newman, Juliu: 92 

Newman, William 422 

Newport, Virginia 381 

Newton, Nancy 375 

Nichols, Barbara 210,375 

Nichols, Florence Eleanor. 92,389 

392 

Nickel, Dorothy 374 

Niemoeller, Lois 157 

Nilan, Nancy 367 

Nixon, Betty 176,375 

Noble, Dean Howard 24 

Nolan, Charlyne 93, 364 

Norrington, William 93 

North, Grace 93,374 

North. Sam 156, 165,179,419 

Northrup, Earle.ic 93 

Norton, Charles .... 92, 165, 179 
185,429 

Norton, Mark 415 

Norton, Sallie 363 

Noughton, Thyra 385 

Nozowa, Kazuko 92, 373 

Nuffer, Katherinc 394 

Null, Robert 277 

Nunn, Zoula 384 

Nuttal, Louannc 376 

Nuttall, Jane 92, 362, 367 

Nygrcn, Harold 184,406 



O 

Oblath, Robe.l 73, 165 

O'Brien, Patricia 366 

OBrien, Willian 420 

ODell, Bettye 158 

ODell, Sadie 157 

O'Donnel, Lawrence 426 

Officer, Jessie 369 

OFIaherty, Da.i 188,230 



Ofslrafsky, Jack 428 

OF THEE I SING 140, 14! 

Okura, Misao 93,373 

Olin, Janet 177 

Olin, Olive 93 

Oliphant, Ken 425 

Oliver, George 143 

Olmstead, Evelyn 377 

Olmsted, Betty 93, 376 

OI:on. Governor Culbert L. . . . 22 

O Ncill, William 420 

D Nelly, Sheila 367 

ORCHESTRA 147 

ORGANIZATIONS CON- 
TROL BOARD 37 

Orr, William 425 

Ortwin, Robert 93 

Orwig, Robert 403 

Osborn, O'Neil 403 

Osgood, James 124. 180 

Oshercnko, Joe 33, 122 

Oshima, Tashiko 373 

Oslenberg, Ann 93, 375 

Oswald, Jean 92 

Otis, Lucille 378 

Otter, Elaine 92, 157, 170 

Otto, Miriam 364 

Overlln, William 411 

Overpack, Bob 418 

Owen, Eleanor 364 

Owens, Blanche 92 

Oyster, Joseph 92, 184, 406 



P 

Packard, Lee 413 

Padgett, Norman 159, 165,220,413 

Paeschke, Betty 93, 372 

Pagen, William 428 

Painter, Margaret 383 

Palm, Bruwell 429 

Palm, Gene 411 

Palmer, Alice Roe 368 

Palmer, Jack 404 

Palmer, Peggy 373 

PAN-HELLENIC 

COUNCIL 362, 363 

Panorich, Micky 404 

Paquin, Albert . . 110, 180, 192,401 

Paris, Paulla 368 

Park, Bob 419 

Park, Constance 93,389,397 

Park, Dorothy 191 

Park, Gene 190, 192,412 

Park, Robe.t 190 

Parke, Bettc 375 

Parker, Betty 375 

Parker, Louise 363, 368 

Parker, Pauline.. 168, 178,389,394 

Parra, Rosa Maria 93. 394 

Parry, Morris 425 

Parsons, Charlotte 372 

Partridge, Carrie Lez 392 

Partridge, George 419 

Partridge, Mildred 368 

Partridge, Roland 401 

Patten, Arlene 364 

Patterson, Carnelia 191 

Pattisson, Jean 364 

Patton, Richard 108,401 

Paul, Mary Kay 364, 376 

Payne, Gordon 410 

Payne, Janice 93, 385 

Peay, Viclo.-ia 378 

Pechet, Morris 416 

Peck, Betty Jean 376 

Peck. Virginia Lee 190 

Pecker, Edythe 379 

Pelt, Joe 411 

Penberthy, Pearlita 367 

Pennington, Jake 403 

Pennington, Jeanne 93 

Pennington, Rosemary 384 

Percy, Waldo 403 



Perkins, John 420 

Perrin, Jack 427 

Perry, Barbara 375, 393 

Perry, Jacqueline 93 

Pc.-son, Ben 33 

PERSHING RIFLES 224 

Persons, Miriam 94, 376 

Peters, John 94 

Peterson, John A 496 

Peterson, Patricia 392 

Peterson, Rober; 94 

Peterson, Roland 402 

Petit, William 185,407 

Pettit, Edwin A 94 

Petty, Charles 192 

Pfeiffer, Carl 94 

Pfeiffer, Shirley 362.379 

Pfirrmann. Elva 94, 387 

Fhelps, Laura Lee 392 

PHI BETA 176 

PHI BETA DELTA 416 

PHI CHI THETA 177 

PHI DELTA THETA 418 

PHI GAMMA DELTA 417 

PHI KAPPA PSI 420 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA 429 

PHILIA 393 

Phillips, Barbara 95 

Phillips, Betty 368 

Phillips, Edith 158 

Phillips, Harriet 170, 187 

Phillips, Margare; 386 

Phillips, Nancy 368 

Phillips, Raborn 401 

PhiILp:, William 408 

PHILOKALIA 178 

PHI MU 382 

Phinney, Winifred 95 

PHI OMEGA PI 383 

PHI SIGMA SIGMA 379 

PHI UPSILON PI 175 

Phoenix, Barbara 372 

PHRATERES CABINET 389 

PI BETA PHI 384 

Fickelt, Virginio 388 

Piclon, Marion 370 

PI DELTA EPSILON 180 

Pidgeon, Charles 406 

Pierce, Milton 94 

Pierce, Peggy 95, 367 

Pierce, Priscilla 94, 362, 369 

Plfer, Helen 174 

PI KAPPA SIGMA 182 

Piltzer, Sam 94,422 

Finer, Esther 390 

Pinney, Charles 414 

Piatt, Natalie 379 

Plotkin, Betty Lou 386 

Plough, Ruth 174 

Plumb, Hugh 429 

Pollack, William 94 

Pollard, Betty 369 

Pollock, Loui-c 366,379 

Poole, David 412 

Poore, Burl 421 

Pope, Ellen Grace 366 

Pottle, Ruth .... 94, 167, 187, 189 

Potts, David 424 

Poulson, Norrissc 393 

Power, Jame' 406 

Power, John 420 

Powers, Marionlou 395 

Pratt, Bill 418 

Pratt, David 156 

Pratt, Harry 94,425 

Pratt, Virginia 95, 360 

Prescolt, Joanna 378 

Prescott, Nancy 392 

P.-eston. Richard 184,425 

Price, Carolyn 366 

Price, Charles Stanley 95, 1 V9, 427 

Price, Jane 373 

Price, Kenneth 414 

Price, Michael 95 

Price, Stevens 414 



Priester, Katherine 1 86, 380 

Prince, Jack 95 

Pringle, Pat 94 

Pntchard, Robert 406 

Proctor, Marjorie 367 

Prouty, Emmy Jean 376 

Pryne, Richard . . 94, I I 1 , 180,406 

Pryor, Gay 127,421 

PUBLICATIONS 120, 121 

Puffer, Lois 373 

Pulliam, Ann 363, 38! 

Purkiss, Connie 367 

Purpus, Ray 404 

Puryear, Duanc 94 

Puihoff, Emma 384 

Puthoff, Ida 384 

Putnam, William 43 

Pyne, Catherine 169,381 



Q 

Quandt. Bettyc 377 

QUEENS 206 

Ouigg, Jack 420 

Quilico, Teresa 372 



R 

Rabin, Joseph 94 

Rabinowitz, Danny 95 

Rafalovltch, Alex 242 

Ragan, Masie 152, 186 

Rainey, Patricia 369 

Raish, Marguerite 95,380 

RALLV COMMITTEE ... 184,245 

Ralphs, Albert 407 

Ramsdell, William 408 

Ramsing, Jean 391 

Rand, Betty 176,363,375 

Randall, Carl 448 

Randall, Frank 95,418 

Randall, Janet 380 

Randle, Georgic 366 

Ranker, Jess 429 

Ranney, Walter 417 

Ratliff, Joan 374 

Rattner, Roma 365 

Raven, Richard 95, 156,426 

Ray, Margaret 95, 369 

Rayburn, Richard 95, 165 

Rea, Margaret 187, 189,364 

Reber, Bettie Ja;ic 380 

RECREATION 346 

Rector, Deni:e 375 

Reed, Anne 378 

Reed, Betty Jane 376 

Reed, Eva 94, 182, 396 

Reeves, Doll/ 199,203, 385 

Reeves, Nina Jo 94 

Reeves, Ruth 387 

REGENTS, BOARD OF 23 

Rehor, Clara Ann 174 

Reid,Billie 94 

Reid, Gaylord 94 

Reld, Jean 164, 171 

Reid, John Wllllai-i 470 

Reilly, Mary Jane 388 

Reinerth, George 95 

Reinschrciber, Robert 428 

Relsner, Virginia 376 

Renaud, Dorothy 95 

Rcnfro, Dorothy 186, 193, 366 

Renncr, Lila 170 

Renner, Roge.' 95 

Renzie, Josephine 387 

Reordan, William 417 

Rcsto, Helen 95 

Rewick, Kenneth 403 

Reynolds, FrancI: 95, 133 

Reynolds, George 403 

Reynolds, Sue 384 

Rhine, Malcolm 426 



460 



Rhodes, Betty 377, 389, 392 

Riavc, June 365 

Rice, Betty 374 

Rich, Adelane 379 

Richards, Ann 381 

Richards, Ray 252 

Richards, William 427 

Richardson, Allan 427 

Richardson, Betty 95 

Richer, Betty 38! 

Richmond, John 414 

Richter, Julia 96, 153,385 

Rickershauser, Mary Francis... 110 

186, 377 

Riddell. Joan 378 

Riddle, Everett 417 

Ridgley, Frances 394 

Riester, Beverly 1 76 

RIFLE TEAM 337 

Rinck, Gayle 364 

Ringheim, Barbara 186 

Ringheim, Richard 96 

Rinkel, Kay 176 

RIppeto, Francis 1 58 

Ritchie, Idabelle 96 

Rives, Wayne 408 

Roane, Ruth 96, 191 

Robb, Isabel 171 

Robb, Mary 96 

Robbin, Doris 365 

Robbins, Michela . . . 130, 152, 164 

173, 193 

Robbins, Peral 365 

Roberts, Elsie 96 

Roberts, John 154 

Roberts, Marie 170 

Robertson, G. Ross 44 

Robinson, Bernicc 365 

Robinson, Dorothy 97 

Robinson, Edith 97 

Robinson, Florence 365 

Robinson, Gladys 379 

Robinson, Jack 250, 276 

Robinson, Ruth 97 

Rock, Joanna 9/, 362, 382 

Rodecker, Helene . . . 170,176, 187 
Roduner, Phyllis .... 157,374,392 

Roest, Leonard 404 

Rogers, Ellen 96, 366 

Rohrs, Helen 96, 182, 392 

Roland, Jerome 427 

Rolfe, Franklin 41 

Ronnsavell, Thomas 417 

Root, Phyllis 392 

Ropp, Rosemary 96, 364 

Rose, Betty Lou 96, 155 

Rose, Carolyn 96 

Rose, Virginia 96 

Rosecrans, Ray 488 

Roscmont, Nelson 404 

Rosenbaum, Jean Ann 365 

RoEcnbaum, Joann 365 

Rosenbaum, Shirley 379, 393 

Rosenberg, Evelyn 97 

Rosenberg, Irma 379 

Rosenblatt, Gloria 395 

Rosenburg, Marvin 97, 428 

Rosenfcid, William 422 

Rosenfield, Joan 379 

Roshe, Richard 159,418 

Rosio, Mary 190 

Ross, Betsy 97, 383 

Ross, Charles 97 

Ross. John 413,419 

Rostine, Robert 96,413 

Rothenberg, May 365 

Rothman, Sanford 96 

Rothmeicr, Arnold 96 

Rotsky, Frances 96 

Rouse, Jean 384 

Rouse, Jules 97 

Rov*, Nelda 392 

Rowan, Charles 425 

Rowe, Margaret 393 

Rowell, Phyllis 378 

Rowen, Charlotte 191 



ROYCE HALL 12 

Ruben, Robert 97 

Rubens, Hergert 422 

Rubin, Herbert 97,422 

Rubin, Lily 97 

Rubin, Louis 97 

Rubin, Rose 97 

Ruby, Carter 423 

Ruby, James 420 

Rudin, Arnold 416 

Rudin, Rae 379 

RUDy 396 

Ruegg, Joyce 374 

Ruggicro, Michael 96 

Ruja, David 96 

Rupert, Helen 377,395 

Rush, Arthur 426 

Rush, Virginia 369 

Russell, Bertrand 42 

Russell, Betty 376 

Russell, John 418 

Russell, Margaret 96,164 

Russell, Sluart 244,427 

Ryan, Bette 373 

Ryan, Mary 367 

Ryan, Sarah 364 

Rydell, Bonnie Jean 176 

Ryland, Dorothy 96 



s 

Sackin, Dorothy 379 

Sacks, David 416 

SakaguchI, Chico 97 

Sakaue, Muneo 97 

Sakimi, Rose 373 

Sakimoto, Edna 373 

Sallot, Ruth 97 

Saltmarsh, Marian 97, 377 

Saltzman, Marvin 428 

Samuels, Jeanne 379 

Sandall, George 97 

Sandbeck, Mayla 97, 367 

Sandel, Stan 98 

Sandcil, Virginia 98 

Sanders, Edward 428 

Sanders, John 98 

Sanford, Ben 419 

Sanner, William 401 

Satan, Eugene 428 

Saubcr, O.a 379 

Sauls, Earleen 158 

Sauls, Janice 98 

Saunders, Jack 165,40! 

Sauri, Matt 165 

Sawyer, Florence 380 

Sawyer, Gladys 78, 175 

Saye, Judy 375 

Saylin, Arline 376 

SCABBARD AND BLADE ... 179 

Scannell, Francis 98, 188 

SchaeHcr, Jim 240 

Schaffer, Esther 379 

Schallert, William 428 

Schalmann, Solomon 97 

Scherff, Earl ... 99, 156, 179,419 

Schinmann, Elbert 401 

Schlack, Perry 402 

Schlack, Wayne 99,402 

SchlichUng, Charlotte 170 

Schlosser, William 190 

Schloten, Elizabeth .. 177,385,393 

Schmidt, Marjorie 99, 392 

Schmidt, Mary 378 

Schmissrautcr, Joan 153, 395 

Schmissrauter, Virginia 153, 389, 394 

Schmiti, William 422 

Schneider, Bertha 365 

Schneider, Mary 98, 177 

Schneider, Robert 185 

Schnierow, Cecilia 98, 379 

Schoberg, Douglas 98 

Schoenberg, Arnold 45 

Schow, Doris 393 



Schrcchler, Joe 163 

Schreck, Raymond 424 

Schreiber, Shirley 365 

Schrouder, William 425 

Schubert, Doris 98 

Schufeldt, Dorothy 98,168 

Schultz, Norman 9"5, 183 

Schuiz, Jeanne 158 

Schuiz, Wilfrie V9, 158 

Schuize, Gerda 99 

Schwab, Dore 423 

Schwartzman, Rollie 365 

Schwcikert, Dorothy 366 

Schydler, Harold 42 1 

Scott, Andrew 426 

Scott, Betty 374 

Scott, Elizabeth 384 

Scott, Henry 422 

Scott, Ivan 99 

Scott, Patricia 112 

Scolt, Robert 417 

Scuffins, Helen 372 

Seapy, Wesley 408 

Searl,Ayleen 167, 187, 189,209,376 

Secor, Peggy 380 

Seely, Barbara ... 99, 168, 178, 191 

Seibel, Martha 171 

Selgel, Clara 170 

Selby, Margaret 98, 164, 377 

Selkirk, Mary Anna 171 

Sell, Jack 423 

SENIOR ACTIVITIES .... 60, 61 

SENIOR COUNCIL 60 

SENIOR OFFICERS 59 

Seppi, Mona 177, 373 

Seward, Joseph 420 

Seyster, Marian 373 

Shade, Meredith 98,426 

Shafer, Barbara 378 

Shafer, Suzanne 98, 178,378 

Shanklin, Irene 380,392 

Shannon, Pat 98 

Shapard, Irene 171 

Shapiro, Eugene 99,184,400 

416,422 

Shapiro, Ruth 365 

Sharp, Edward 99 

Shaughnessy, Clark 420 

Shaw, Donald 99, 156, 165 

Shaw, Jean 378 

Shedd, Ruth 366 

Shelby, Sue 99,362,364 

Sheldon, Barbara 385 

Sheldon, Jane 374 

Sheldon, Margaret 386 

Shelnutt, Sarah 367 

Shclton, Mary 99 

Shcppard, June 99, 170, 175 

Sherman, Ethel 1 86, 364 

Sherman, Wilbur 98 

Sherwin, Sally 98.378 

Sherwood, George 48 

Sherwood, Lyia 1 86. 393 

Shigckawa. Chicko 373 

Shimidzu. Marie 373 

Shimoda. KIkuo 98 

Shincberg, Frank 98 

Shinn, Alfred 414 

Shipley, Helen 193,366 

Shirreffs, James 408 

Shook, Alice 170 

Shores, Charles 405 

Shores, Terrell 405 

Shorkley, Mary 213,384 

Shostak, Natalie 379 

Showman, Harry 27 

Shubin, William 99 

Shumakcr, Tom 421 

Shuman, Susanne 366 

Shyer, Bruce 99 

Sickenger, Charles 424 

Sieck, Gerald 410 

Siegcl, Clara 186, 193 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON .... 42 I 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 181 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON ...183 



SIGMA KAPPA 385 

SIGMA ALPHA MU 422 

SIGMA NU 419 

SIGMA PI 424 

Silbert, Sylvia 379 

Silent, Patricia 378 

Sills, Gerald 415 

Silvheni, Victor 414 

Simmons, Dorothy 174 

Simmons, Franklin 99 

Simms, Marjorie 177 

Simons, F,ank99, 124, 159, 183.425 

Simons, Jack 420 

Simpson, Bob 418 

Sinclair. Kirk 2?9. 421 

Singer. Thelma 379 

SIngletary, Jane 372 

Singleton, Robert 408 

Sirdevan, Joanne 152 

Sistrom, Suzanne 375 

Skaggs, Susan 377 

Skellenger, Vernette 191 

Skldmore, Kathryn... 99,178,367 

SKI TEAM 331 

Skrifvars, John 99, 156 

Skroopka, Dorothy 365 

Slate, Dorothea 100, 365 

Slater, Evans 192 

Slater, Margaret 100 

Slattery, Kathleen 100 

Slavin, Jeanette 100,367 

Sleight, Jean 186,384 

Sloan, Owen 100,244,418 

Sloane, Charlotte 100, 381 

Slobodien, Myron 428 

Slotnikow, Lucile 10! 

Slover, Archie 421 

Slyfleld, Elizabeth 375 

Smallwood, Nancy 101, 158 

Smart, Robert 424 

Smith, Aletha 378 

Smith, Andrew 408 

Smith, David 185 

Smith, Dorsey 378 

Smith, Frank 402,421 

Smith, Guerney 159,403 

Smith, Margaret .... 101, 182,396 

Smith, Marjorie 374, 382 

Smith, Mary Jo 388 

Smith, Muriel 101 

Smith, Pauline 158 

Smith, Peggy 100, 369 

Smith, Rodney 100 

Smith, Shirley 186 

Smith, Thomas 411 

Smith, Victor 412,427 

Smithson, Margaret 100 

Smithson, Mary 374 

Smithwick, Jane 366 

Smollcr, Audree 365 

Smyth, Edward 405 

Snider, Beverly 383 

Snow, Barbara 369 

Snure, Virginia 384 

Snyder, Harold 428 

SOCIETV FOR THE AD- 
VANCEMENT OF 

MANAGEMENT 185 

Sockett, Charles 416 

Sokol, Judy 100 

Sokolow, Norman 415 

Solomon, Arlene 379 

Sommers, Jack 250, 427 

Sooy, John 100,413 

Sooy, Louise 41 

SOPHOMORE COUNCIL ... Ill 
SOPHOMORE OFFICERS ... 110 

Soiicro, Thomas 405 

Souders, Ruth 157 

Souther, Janet 377 

SOUTHERN CAMPUS 124 

SOUTHERN CAMPUS 

STAFF 13, 128, 129 

Southmayd, JoSn 419 

Sparck, Goldlne 379 

Spaulding, Barbara 100,378 



461 



Spaulding, William 47 

Spearman, Frank 408 

Spencer, Virginia 101 

Spensely, Irene 186, 375 

Spcrry, Irma Dell 373 

Spiller, Ruth 158 

Spindt, Herman 27 

SPORTS PERSONALITIES , ... 238 

Spradlin, Vivian 395 

SpraHen, Louanne 384 

Sprechcr, Bennett 428 

Sprecher, Francine 365 

Spriggs, Lorna 374 

Springer, Marietta 372 

Sproul, President RobertGofdon 20 

Spurr, Minerva 101 

SPURS 186 

Squire, Margaret 366 

Stacy, Betty 112 

Stacy, Harriet 199, 364 

Stafford, Dale 418 

Stafford, Gale 101,418 

Stager, Kenneth 101 

Staldcr, Donald 418 

Stalcy, Robert 100 

Stancliff, Vic 429 

Standish, Beatrice 381 

Stanford, Bob 4|g 

Stanford, Nancy 369 

Stanley, Dorothy 384 

Stanley, Pat 100, 178, 384 

Stanley, Virginia 376 

Stansbury, Margaret 170 

Stanton, Norman 100, 428 

Stark, Evelyn 379 

Stay, Myla 100 

Steadman, Monte 404 

Stein, Norman 416 

Stein, Shirley I0l 

Steinberg, Ruth 101 

Steincn, Paulette 364 

Stenchjem, Signe 10! 

Sterctt, Margaret 181 

Sterling, Thomas 10! 

Stern, James I0| 

Stcvan, Margaret 368 

Stevens, Beth Anne 101 

Stevens, Exie 100, 152, 389, 394 

Stevens, James 42| 

Stevens, Jean 383 

Stevens, Thomas 418 

Stewart, Alma 125, 366 

Stewart, Dorothy 377 

Stewart, James 100, 159, 16! 

188,405,407 

Stewart, Peggy 108, 375 

Stlasncy, Agnes 100 

Sticss, Donald 100 

Stillwell, Ralph '' 33 

Stimson, Diana 101, 38! 

Stinchfield, Helen 101, 182, 389^ 397 

Stirling, Marie 368 

Stockwell, Marvel 43 

Stokely, Marjorie 101 

Stolp, Beth 380 

Stone, Dean Hurford 24 

Stone, Earl 101, 179,421 

Stone, Margaret 182 

Stone, Ralph 416 

Stone. Ray 41 I 

Stone, Virginia 101, 157, 158 

Stonebraker, Anne 52 

Stowell, Richard 101, 183 

Strahle, Jean 102, 380 

Strain, Christine 102 

Straitman, Frieda 102 

Strayhorn, Una 170 

Stream, Betty Jean 364 

Street, Kenneth 102 

Street, Natalie 190 

Strecton, Bob 188,243,429 

Strecton, Jack 159 

Strode. Woodrow 25! 

Stromberg, Elaine 365 

Strong, John 179,421 

Stuck, Dorothy 102 



STUDENT COUNCIL ... 34, 35 

Stumpf, Donald 102 

Stumpf, Samuel 103, 156 

Stunenegger, A. J 32 

Sudduth, John 40! 

Sugarman, Etta 365 

Sugden, Barry 408 

Sugiura, Henry 103 

Sunderman, J. W 103 

Sutherland, Bus 252 

Sutherland, Shirley Jean . . 103, 363 

378 

Sutton, Marcella 186, 395 

Sutton, Ridgeway 423 

Suzita, Sumire 37! 

Suzuki, Edna 373 

Swan, Arvia 377 

Swanson, Elva Elizabeth.. 102.391 

396 

Swanson, Leonard 190 

Sweeney, Genevieve 385 

Swcgles, Dorothy 367 

SWIMMING 336 

Switzcr, Walter 405 



T 

Tabata, Takeshi 102 

Tabcr, Norman 102 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 14 

Taft, Alfred 421 

Taft, Bonnie 102 

Takahashi, Frank 102 

Takahashi, Mary 373 

Takcda, Shigeji 102 

Tally, Robert 400, 404 

Talmagc, Melna 396 

Tamberlin, Belty 380 

Taniguchi, Tomi 373 

Tanner, Jean 103 

Tanner, Ruth 365 

Tanner, William 420 

Taraday, Natalie 365 

Tarbell, Alan 40! 

Tarbox, Lorraine 367 

Tartaglia, Marie 103 

Tate, Janet 373 

TAU DELTA PHI 415 

Tavis, Robert 419 

Taylor, Harley 429 

Taylor, Mary 103 

Teachout, Peggy Lee 386 

Teague, Margaret 385 

Teague, Vance 103 

Teets, J. Leiand 412 

Tcmpleman, Robert 426 

Tenney, Lucretia .... 31, 102, 164 
173,364 

TENNIS 304 

TENNIS— CALIFORNIA 310 

TENNIS— FROSH 312,313 

TENNIS— MANAGERS 307 

TENNIS— PRACTICE 308 

TENNIS— SO. CALIFORNIA .31! 

TENNIS SQUAD 306 

TENNIS— STANFORD 309 

Terry, Ray 427 

Tesche, Barbara 188, 367 

Tete, Dorothy 187, 189 

Teubncr, Waller 404 

Thatcher, Betty 369 

Thatcher, Dickinson I 56, 42 I 

Theime, Ann 152, 186 

THETACHI 425 

THETA DELTA CHI 423 

THETAPHI ALPHA 388 

THETA UPSILON 386 

THETA XI 426 

Thielen, Louis 411 

Thilo, Mary Lou 187, 189 

Thomas, Billie 161,381,394 

Thomas, Carl M 102, 156,412 

Thomas, Eleanor 384, 395 

Thomas, Lucille 102, 386 

Thomas, Matilda 102 



Thomas, Robert .... 403,418,424 

Thomas, Tillman 103 

Thomas, Wayne 426 

Thomas, William 408 

Thompson, Barbara 103 

Thompson, Dorothea. 103,362,366 

Thompson, Faith 369 

Thompson, Margaret. 103, 176, 366 

Thompson, Marie 103, 182 

Thompson, Mary 187, 191 

Thompson, Robert 103, 154 

Thompson, Thomas 417 

Thornburg, Dorothy 384 

Thornburgh, Jane 186, 375 

Thome, Charlotte 382 

Thornton, Hurd 420 

Thornton, John 187 

Thornton, Mimi 368 

Thorson, Betty 102, 378 

Thorson, Eleanor 102, 374 

Thorson, George 179, 419 

Thrift, Prudence 364 

Tilden, Alice 122 

Tillman, Vera 373 

Timmins, Joyce 367 

Tingley, Joan 366, 393 

Titcomb, Dr. Lillian 27 

Tittany, Georgina 170 

Titus, Lucille 102 

Todd, Norman 458 

Toland, Don 418 

Tompkins, Mary 364 

Tomson, Betty 395 

Torchia, Dorothy 387 

Towie, Virginia 369 

Toyama, Richard 102 

TRACK 314 

TRACK— CALIFORNIA .320,321 

TRACK— FROSH 322, 323 

TRACK— MANAGERS 317 

TRACK— S.C.A.A 318,319 

TRACK SOUAD 316 

Tramontini, Bernice 190 

Trask, Tallman .. 165, 170, 183,408 

Traughbcr, Jean 126, 152 

Tremayne, Betty 384 

Trent, Mary 373 

Trenear, Merelda 388 

Treyise, La Verle 103, 174 

Troeger , Edgar 103 

Trop, Rosalie 186, 187, 379 

Trotter, Harry 241 

Trowbridge, Billye . . . 103, 367, 394 

Trueblood, Jacquelnie 381 

Tsumagari, Fuji 103, 373 

Tuck, Jean 374 

Tucker, Beverly 374 

Tucker, Cletys 103, 153 

Tulloch, Jean 377 

Tupper, Caroline 171, 186, 393 

Turk, Jean 104 

Turner, Bonnie 169, 364 

Turner, Dorothy 368 

Turner, Margaret 104 

Turner, Marjorie 364 

Tuttle, Jean 104 

Tuttle, Jane 373 

Twitchel, Herbert 412 

Twohy, Richard 417 

Twombley, Tad 104, 183,408 

Tyler, Edward 404 

Tyler, Nancy 364 

Tyre, Eleanor 365 

Tyre, Helen .... 152, 186, 188.379 

U 

Uba, Mahito 104 

Udell, Larry 428 

U.D.S 187 

UNDERGRADUATE 

LIFE 1 14, 1 15, I 16, I 17 

UNIVERSITV RELIGIOUS 

CONFERENCE 188 

Upham, Betty 384 

Urion, Patricia 375 



V 

Vail, Alexander 405 

Valense, Steven 104 

Van Buskirk, Mary Alice 19! 

Vandergrlft, Bettc 364 

Vandergrift, Roger 411 

Vanderhoof, Frank 58 

Van Dyke, Susan... 105, 169, 173 
188,378 

Van Meter, Robert 105 

Van Patten, Muriel 105 

Van Renssler, Schuyler 413 

Van Vranken, Mary June 378 

Varney, Pauline 105 

Valcher, Jane 376 

Vaughn, Dolly 193,366 

Vernon, Dorothy 104, Is/, 164 

Vetter, Ellinor 211,381 

VianI, Violante 104 

VIckman, Henry 104, 400, 416 

Vickman, Robert 416 

Viger, Joe 404 

Vincent, Marjorie 104, 164 

Vinson, David 426 

Vinton, Evelyn 104, 190, 193 

Vitale, James 421 

Vollstedt, Beth 104,368 

Von DIetz, Marrcele 363, 369 

Voyda, Gladys 105,380 

Vrba, John 184,244,412 



W 

W.A.A. COUNCIL 202 

W.A.A. SPORTS 204, 205 

Wagganer, Donald 413 

Wagner, Belan 404 

Wagner, Mary Jane 105, 380 

Wal, Francis 105 

Wain, Jack 416 

Wakefield, Betty Jo 366 

Waldman, Milton 104,422 

Walin, Shirley 365 

Walker, Mary 363,380 

Wall, Donald 428 

Wallace, Margaret 104 

Wallace, Ralph 426 

Wallin, Leona 366 

Wallls, Ben 240 

Walsh, Arthur 104, 165, 401 

Walsh, Odette 381 

Walsh, Weldon 159 

Walter, Aaileen 365 

Walter, Betty 181, 373 

Walter, Hugh 420 

Walther, Harley 419 

Walther, Lawrence 419 

Ware, Virginia 374 

Ward, Barbara 382 

Ward, Charles 104, 156 

Ward, Clare 171,368 

Ward, Janet 105,375 

Ward, Mary 367 

Ward, Mary Elizabeth 395 

Ward, Patricia 372 

Ward, Phyllis 385 

Ward, Robert 403 

Ward, William 277 

Wardlaw, John 404 

Warfel, Betty Jane 377 

Warnack, Betty 389, 393 

Warne, Dorothy . . 177, 182, 376 

Warren, Barbara 375 

Warren, Betty 373, 377 

Warren, Mary 395 

Warrener, Jean 393 

Washington, Kenny 250 

Wasson, Frank 400,401 

WATER POLO 330 

Watcrhause, Norma 171, 383 

Watkins, Beth 105, 178,385 

Watkins, Dean Gordon 24 

Watkins, Mary 369 



462 



Watkins, Margaret 105 

Walson, Margaret 390 

Watt, Ethel 105 

Watters, Charles 105 

Watts, Seymour 424 

Waugh, Martha 105 

Way, Katherlne 104, 385 

Wayman, Walter 185,417 

Weaver, Leta Frances .... 104, 367 

Webb, Carolyn 367 

Webber, Richard 104 

Weber, Aileen 187, 189 

Weber, Arthur 417 

Weber, Jane 104,374 

Weber, John 105 

Webster, Betty 369 

Wcdemcyer, Anna 105 

Wcdenneyer, Elise 105 

Well, Robert .• 428 

Weill, Hortense 365 

Weill, Jean 182 

Weineke, Ruth 364, 390 

Welner, Dorothy 105 

Weisberg, Howard 415 

Weisel, Doris 365 

Weiss, Hubert 185 

Weisstein, Charlotte 365 

Weitzmann, Patricia 375 

Welch, Margaret 189 

Welch, Mary 187, 376 

Welsh, Graeme 105, 154 

Welcome, Jane 377 

Wells, Betsy Lou 157, 366 

Wells, Donald 405 

Wells, Marion 170 

Werner, Spencer 105, 165 

West, James 418 

West, Marie 153, 191 

West, Mildred 106 

WESTGARD CO-OPERATIVE. 190 

Westman, Lillian 385 

WESTWOOD CLUB 191 

WESTWOOD HALL 391 

Wetherbee, Barbara ... 363,373 

Weyman, Bethy 377 

Whalen, Janice 106, 396 

Wheaton, Alice 186,381 



Wheeler, Donald 424 

Whldden, Betty .... 106, 173, 176 

White, Barbara 364 

White, Helen 106, 18! 

White, John 414 

Whited, Beverly 106, 380 

Whitlock, Suianne 374 

Whitmore, Marie 376 

Whiltenberg, Mildred 170 

Whittle, Richard 414 

Whyman, Peggy 386 



Wi 

Wi 

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Wi 

Wi 

Wi 

Wi 

w 

Wi 

Wi 

w 
w 
w 

Wi 

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Wi 

W 
W 

Wi 
Wi 
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W 
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W 
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WI 



chman, Lennis 420 

ckman, Ted 41! 

ddlcomb, Marlon 375 

ese, John 107, 183 

ght, Barbara 107,202, 366 

Icox, Lenore 157, 170, 191 

Icox, Thelma 107, 182 

les, Wilma 393 

ley, Robert 192,403 

Ik, Ascher 104 

Ike, Marjorie 177, 186 

Ikinson, Rhea 186, 376 

Ikinson, Virginia Lee 106, 173,376 

liardson. La Drue 421 

lleford, Helen .... 106,389,396 

llenberg, Martha 106 

llctte, Bonnie 372 

lley, Helen 383 

lllams, Alice 384 

lllams, Barbara 106, 378 

lliams, Betty 158 

lllams. Dean 106, 165 

lliams, Elizabeth 395 

lllams, Florence 375 

lllams, Irene 190 

lllams, J. Harold 26 

lllams, Jim 418 

lllams, John 107,418 

lllams, lew 429 

lliams, Martha 39! 

lllams, Rachel 362,38! 

lllams, Spencer 423 

lllams, Welsley 425 

lliamson, Winifred 378 

Iner, Bill 428 

oughby, Virginia 377 



Wilson, Bill 421 

Wilson, Bob 418 

Wilson, Carolyn 396 

Wilson, France 368 

Wilson, Jeannette 171 

Wilson, Kathryn 367 

Wilson, Leonard 411 

Wilson, Norman 412 

Wilson, Roxanna .... 107, 153,396 

Wilson, Roy 411 

Wilton, Margaret 372 

Winans, Adelaide 376 

Winchester, Eugene 404 

Windier, Frances 107, 177 

Windsor, Gayle 425 

Winegar, Harold 106 

Wlnegardner, Robert 410 

WInnIck, Minnette 365 

WINSLOW ARMS 

PHRATERES 397 

Wirschlng, Pat 378 

Withey, Dorothy 382 

Wodars, Geraldlne . . 106, 178, 369 

Wocllncr, Frederick 43 

Wolcott, Robert 401 

Wold, Stella 107 

Wolf, Beatrice 379 

Wolf, Geraldlne 363. 365 

Wolf. Shirley 379 

Wolf, Winifred 365 

Wolfberg, Selma 379 

Wolford, Ruth 107 

Wolfson, Muriel 365 

Wolven, Paul 429 

WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS 196 

Wood, Jim 408 

Wood, Marian 364 

Wood, Tom 411 

Woodal, Harold 107 

Woodlll, Alfred 417 

Woods, Richard. 159, 179,400,417 

Workman, Trafford 403 

WRESTLING 333 

Wright, Mary Alice 107,391 

Wright, Thomas 408 

Wyatt, Gall 107 

Wyatt, Josephine 378 



Wykoff, Jack 413 

Wynns, Jack 408 

y 

YELL LEADERS 244 

Yager, Loretta 199 

Yager, Loretta 380, 389, 393 

Yamasaki, Frances 373 

Yamasakl, May 107, 347 

Yamasaki, Peter 106 

Yellner, Helen 376 

YEOMEN 192 

Yeoman, Elizabeth 106. 366 

Yeoman, John 107 

Yerby, Barbara 107,377 

Yoder, Don 402 

Yonemura, HitoshI 244 

Yost, Otis 412 

Young, Gertrude 107 

Young, Jack 410 

Young, Margaret 381 

Young, Robert 426 

Younger, Clara 107 

Yourell, Lorraine 381 

Yungflelsch, Joe 419 

Yuzawa, Chleko 373 

Y.W.C.A. CABINET 193 

Z 

Zaby, John 107 

Zacher, Aleenc 378 

Zacher, Richard 410 

Zager, Esther 155 

Zampathas, Stagie 424 

Zanella, Olive 186,387 

Zastro, Jim 192.405 

Zegar, Esther 394 

Zelkin, Lila 365 

ZETA BETA TAU 428 

ZETA PHI ETA 189 

ZETA PSl 427 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 387 

Zlegler, Paul 425 

Zimmerman, Avalyn 107 

Zolle, Roberta 374 



463 



TECH n C I H S 

CARL A. BUNDY QUILL AND PRESS 
John Morley, representative 

STAR ENGRAVING COMPANY 
Al Butterworth, representative 

MARTELL-HOWLEn STUDIOS 
Joseph Fleischer, manager 
George Fales, photographer 

HENDERSON TRADE BINDERY 
John Henderson 

ROBERT DALE CO., Inc. 

Tom Meek, representative 



FINIS 



The editor and manager of the Southern 
Campus wish to thank the following peo- 
ple for their invaluable help during the 
production of the book: 

HERB DALLINGER 
BOB PRITCHARD 
ALICE TILDEN 



AM 



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