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Full text of "The Canadian Nurse Volume 70"

The 
.....1 
Nurse 


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January 1974 Q 


THE 
PROBLEM- 
SOLVING 
TECHNIC: 
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RELEVANT 
TO 
PRACTICE? 



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RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE 
NURSING 
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston 
. . . A comprehensive presentation of current inter- 
disciplinary practices in respiratory and nursing 
care. 
Little, Brown April 1973 
COMMUNICAnON IN NURSING 
PRACTICE 
Hein 
. . . Presents a simple, formal model of the com- 
munication process between nurse and patient. but 
emphasizes the need to use variety in meeting 
va riety. 
Little. Brown July 1973 $6.25 
LEADERSHIP TECHNIQUE IN EXPECTANT 
PARENT EDUCAnON 
2nd edition Clark 
. . . Designed to equip the nurse instructor to con- 
duct well planned educational sessions for pros- 
pective parents. 
Springer June 1973 
MONITORING CENTRAL VENOUS 
PRESSURE: A Programmed Sequence 
Krueger 
. . . A programmed text on the aspects of central 
venous pressure of concern in nursing. 
Springer June 1973 $4.25 
EFFECnVE APPROACHES TO PAnENT 
BEHAVIOR 
Lipkin and Cohen 
. . . How the nurse should approach an emotionally 
disturbed patient when giving direct nursing care. 
Springer June 1973 $5.50 


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TIle Body's Response 
to TI'IUIII8: FrtctUfes 


Recent releases 
jor clinical 
competence 
o 


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THE BODY'S RESPONSE TO TRAUMA: 
Fractures 
Clissold 
. . . In this programmed text, fracture is used to 
demonstrate the responses of the cells of the body 
to trauma. 
Springer June 1973 
WINTERS' PROTECTIVE BODY 
MECHANICS: A Manual for Nurses 
Bilger and Greene 
. . Concentrates on the physical and physiological 
princip
es underlying the body movements that need 
to be initiated to achieve therapeutic objectives In 
patient care. 
Springer May 1973 $6.25 
ADMINISTERING NURSING SERVICE 
DiVincenti 
. . . A straight forward presentation of everyday 
approaches to the management of nursing services 
and the application of management theories to the 
care of patients. 
Little. Brown December 1972 
MATERNAL-CHILD NURSING 
Broadribb and Corliss 
A family centered text for students being prepared 
to give direct care to mothers and children. 
Lippincott September 1973 about $11.00 
PERSPECTIVES IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: Nursing Throughout 
the Life Cycle 
Sutterfey and Donnelly 
. . . Emphasizes a multi-disciplinary, holistic view of 
man. the promotion and maintenance of health as 
well as intervention in times of physical, emotional 
and social stress. 
Lippincott May 1973 
THE PRACTICE OF MENTAL HEALTH 
NURSING: A Community Approach 
Morgan and Moreno 
. . . Reflects the dynamic quality of psychiatric care 
in a community setting and desirable colleague re- 
lationships required for successful treatment of the 
emotionally disturbed 
Lippincott May 1973 flexible cover $5.95 
CRITICAL CARE NURSING 
Hudak, Gaffo and Lohr 
. . . A comprehensive course in the area of critical 
care nursing unexcelled in depth and content. 
Lippincott August 1973 about $9.95 


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Springer Publishing Company, Inc. 



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SARNIA 
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Lockharts Ladies Wear 
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Eaton's 
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ST-HYACINTHE 
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SASKATCHEWAN 
PRINCE ALBERT 
C.8. Department Store 
PRINCE RUPERT 
Fraser Co. Stores 
210 - 3rd Ave. W. 
REGINA 
Eaton's 
SASKATOON 
Eaton's 
Fashion Uniforms 
150 - 2nd Ave. N. 
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MlHITE 
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PROMINENT DEALERS 
listed alphabetically by 
geographic location 


BE FIRST ON THE SCENE 



The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


ð 

 


A monthly journal for the nurses of Canada published 
in English and French editions bv the Canadian Nurses' Association 


Volume 70, Number 1 


January 1974 


19 Guest Editorial ........,.............................................,.......... M. Lalonde 


21 The Problem-Solving Technique: 
Is It Relevant to Practice'? ..................................................... B. Geach 


23 Electrophrenic Respiration 
in QUddriplegia ................... R.G. Vanderlinden. L. Gilpin. J. Harper. 
M. McClurkin. and D. Twilley 


27 When You Visit a Sick Friend ....... 


2H I've Got a Wolf By the Ears ............................................... B. Hartley 


32 Protecting Nonsmokers in Public Places .............................. S. Kessler 


rhe vie,,' e"pre"ed in the ùlilorial and va...ou' article' arc Iho,e of Ihe .ltuhor, and 
do nOI nece"arily repre":nllhe polieie, \11' vie", of Ihe Canadian Nur'e,' ^",u:ialion. 


4 Letters 42 Research Abstracts 
7 News 44 Books 
37 Dates 49 A V A ids 
38 Names 50 Accession List 
41 In A Capsule 64 OITicial Directory 


Exccutivc Dircclor: tlelen h.. MU!o.,allem_ 
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50 I hc Drivc\\ay. 01101"". Onl..ri... "21' 11.2 


c (..lIli.llh.1I1 'ur'\." \...,cl\:laUon 197--1 


. , 


Editorial I 


"Have you got the Cps1" a colleague 
asked. 
"Gosh no," I replied emphatical- 
ly, darned glad I didn't have creep- 
ing pruritis systemicus. 
"You're wrong," she said, "you 
do have the cPs." And with that she 
picked up the latest edition of the 
Compendium of Pharmaceuticals 
and Specialties from my desk and 
whisked it off to her office. 
That episode convinced me that 
I just don't "think in abbreviations." 
I need to have everything S-P-E-L-L- 
E-D O-U- T. 
I first noticed this weakness sev- 
eral years ago, while I was covering 
the annual meeting of the Turnip 
and Parsnip Society (TAPS). I kept 
forgetting what the acronym stood 
for, realizing only that it made me 
thirsty. Finally I gave up and went 
out and had a beer. 
I admire the person who. when 
reading a report, rhymes off a series 
of acronyms that would choke a 
HORSE (Honorary Officer in the 
Royal Society of Eggnogs). Even 
more, I admire the individual who 
really understands what the abbre- 
viation stands for. This is not easy. 
For example, who but a fruit or 
vegetable would know that GARBAGE 
stands for "Group Against Ripe 
Bananas and Garlicky Endives?" 
Just when you bel ieve you've 
cracked the code, you discover an 
anomaly. For example, C at the 
beginning of an acronym usually 
means Canadian; however, it can 
also stand for Council. As a rule, F 
stands for Federation; but the F may 
refer to another word. such as the F 
in the Canadian Fertilizer Associa- 
tion. You have to be careful. 
Anyhow, it's all very trying. I 
can't even GASP anymore. That 
word belongs to the Group Against 
Smokers' Pollution! - VAL 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 3 


JANUARY 1974 



letters 


{ 


Letters to the editor are welcome. 
Only signed letters, which include the writer's complete address, 
will be considered for publication. 
Name will be withheld at the writer's request. 


Reader has questions 
It is good to see that a nurse has taken 
the initiative in suggesting some accept- 
able methods of dealing with physically 
aggressive behavior (Controlling the 
Fight/Flight Patient. October 1973). 
As a staff development teacher in a 
provincial psychiatric hospital. I would 
like to comment on the following. 
The concept of a crisis team is good. 
But what do the staff members do if 
there is no time to call the team and 
they have to intervene immediately 
for the safety of the patient and others? 
Another question is. What do you do 
with the patient who has backed into a 
corner and is using a chair or other ar- 
ticle as a weapon? 
Much emphasis has been put on the 
u!\e of p.r.n. medication. which is 
another type of restraint. I would like 
to see more emphasis on recognizing 
the signs of impending aggression and 
methods of intervening before physical 
restraint is necessary. Many nursing 
<;taff miss behavioral cues that indicate 
<tgitation; are unaware of how effective 
talking. walking. or sitting are with the 
patient at this time; and are unaware 
that p.r.n. medications and physical 
restraint may be unnecessary. 
The staff on our unit. in conjunction 
with the psychology departmeñt. made 
a videotape of the signs and symptoms 
of impending aggressive behavior and 
three acceptable methods of restraint. 
This videotape has been shown to all 
the stafr. It is now part of the orienta- 
tion program for all new nursing staff. 
and has been recommended for educat- 
ing staff in all Ontario psychiatric hos- 
pitals. 
In the discussion that follows the 
viewing of this videotape, nurses be- 
come aware that staff get the behavior 
they expect. there is a reason for it. and 
the choice of intervention depends on 
what is happening with the patient. - 
Chadalllle Jallsoll, Reg.N., LOlldoll, 
Olltario. 


Author replies 
There is no single right method that 
everyone can use in dealing with a pa- 
tient \\ho is out of control. Guidelines 
that fÒlh)\\ 
oullll. theoretical know- 
ledge require modifications for those 
whose duty i!\ to administer them. 
There is a common fallacy that more 
is better - more staff to control one 
4 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


patient. One to four well-trained staff 
members are more effective than any 
number (and I have seen the odds ten 
to one!) who are fearful and/or untrain- 
ed. The staff present who know and are 
known by the patient must intervene by 
verbal and nonverbal communication. 
A calm voice. even if the language is 
not understood. shows that someone is 
in control and goes a long way to alle- 
viate the patient's fears. I nvolving those 
present - be they other patients, 
protessional or nonprotessional staff. 
and visitors - can sometimes be more 
effective than any "crisis team:' 
The second query. regarding a 
patient with a weapon. is always ti'ight- 
ening. However. taking a defensive 
posture is natural. Staff can dodge ar- 
ticles that are thrown. but they should 
make no attempt to overpower the 
patient. They should try to convey the 
need to help. and use all the negotiat- 
ing powers of communication available 
so that the patient is not stripped of his 
pride. Here is where time becomes 
everyone's greatest ally. time for the 
patient to listen and feel others' calm- 
ness and helpfulness. and time to gain 
control of himself; and time for the 
staff to be alert to cues presented by 
the patient. and to act on these for 
everyone's safety. - Jeall A. Reid, 
MOlltreal, Qllehec. 


Where was the humor? 
I will not say I was offended by the 
cartoon that appeared in the October 
1973 issue (page 48). Not impressed 
is a more accurate description. 
With the maternity ward as a 
etting, 
the cartoon depicted a rather hybrid 
combination of latter-day "longhair" 
clothed in tourist garb, carrying a pair 
of somewhat anachronistic bongo 
drums. In the caption. the nurse says 


Rcgi,tcrcd Il\I"C
, 
your community nccds 
the henefit of your 
skills and experience. 
Volunteer now to 
tcach 51. John Ambulance homc 
mlr,ing and child care cotlrse
. 
('(lntact your Provincial Headquarters, 
St. John Ambulance. 


to the tather. "Congratulations - it's 
a person!" 
Of course. there is nothing wrong 
with seeing the humor in a situation. 
but was there any at all here? Subtle 
it was not. I hope nurses are worthy 
of better. - Erica C. Fowles, Vall- 
CO/H'('/', R.C. 


Student learns from article 
I was very interested in the article by 
rhora KlOn. "How we communicate 
non verbally with patients" (Nlwember 
1972). It is true that bedside manners 
are important in communicating with 
patients. 
I was reminded of an unpleasanl 
experience I had last year \\hen I gave 
an injection to a patient for the first 
time. I was read} to give the injection. 
when the patient suddenly grabbed my 
other hand and said. .. rhis is your first 
time giving an injection. and -I do not 
want to be pract iced upon." 
I was ama7ed and asked him why he 
said that. He replied, "Your looks re- 
veal it. You are trembl ing and perspir- 
ing profusely, and you look frightened:' 
The instructor came and found us ar- 
guing; I wa
 been able to .convince the 
patient to receive the injection. under 
supervision. 
I was so embarras
ed. I did not 
know why I behaved the way I did, in 
spite of le:lrning the right principles in 
the classroom. However, that experi- 
ence taught me a good le!\son. It also 
showed the ditTerence between know- 
ing something in theory and in practice. 
No\\ I am a jun ior nursing student 
and have given countless numbers of 
injections to patients. I am glad I have 
never experienced 
uch embarra
!\ment 
since. rhe artide in Ihe Callad iall 
N /I,..\'e made nw more awarl.' of my ges- 
tures and actions when I deal \\ilh pa- 
tients. and helped mc avoid loss of 
con fidence. 
I highly recommend that every stu- 
dent nurse read about the crfects of 
nonverbal comnll.nication with patients. 
I hope you will puhli...h morc articles 
of this type, a... the} are interesting and 
an' applicable to the practice of nursing. 
cspecialJ} 1'01 student nurses who are 
still learning the ba
ic principles in 
nursing. - /Hdo .It'all L ^-1allalo, 
School I
f N/lnillg. fhilippillt' Ullioll 
College, Mallila. 9 
JANUARY 1974 



. 


. 


- 


..- 


Davolchanged suction instruments 
jUst enough to make a big difference. 


There's only one difference 
between Davol instruments and 
metal ones. 
Davol made them disposable. 
80 now nursing staffs save time 
because there's no recleaning. 
And most important, there's no 
risk of contamination. 
Everything else is the same. Your 
surgeons get the look, feel and action 
they're used to in metal Yankauers, 
Pooles, Fraziers and sigmoidoscopic 
instruments. 


BUILDING ON A CENTURY OF QUALITY 
HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 


'11l1li<(' 


Price? 
Davol suction instruments are 
priced to make disposability practical 
Davol introduced disposable 
suction instruments. Since then 
over two thousand hospitals have 
already converted. 
Apparently, we made a big 
difference. 
Davol Canada Ltd., 1033 Range 
View Rd., Port Credit, Ont., 
L5E-1H2 (416)274-5252 


"J.:.. . .J 1874-1974 



= 


Who makes surgeons' 
gloves for the giants 
of skill who are 
small in statu
 
and wear 
size 5 1/ 2 
, 
. 


. 




 


t \ 

J ,\ 

 


I. 
I 
I 


Perry!. . .Naturally! But why? -Because small in stature doesn't mean small in the 
appreciation of proper fit and other features and benefits that have made Perry the 
most widely used latex surgeons' gloves-in any size! like all Perry Latex Surgeons' 
Gloves, size 5112S have beaded wrists for added protection and strength, whisper thin 
palms to lessen hand fatigue, exclusive Dermashield@ process that provides a durable 
hypo-allergenic finish and packaging to fit your preferred dispensing technique. If 
you'd like a sample of Perry Latex Surgeons' Gloves, please write us. By the way, you 
don't have to wear size 5112, we'" send you the size gloves that fit you. 


erry gloves 
A PRODUCT OF 
AFFILIATED MEDICAL PRODUCTS LIMITED 
90 Commercial Ave., Ajax, Ontario 


6 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


JANUARY 1974 



news 


1 
I 


"Action Needed" Summarizes 
National Nursing Conference 
Ottawa - "The time for rhetoric and 
philosophizing is over. What we need 
now is action:' is the way Alice Baum- 
gart summarized the four-day National 
Conference on Nurses for Community 
Service. held in Ottawa November 
13-16. Ms. Baumgart. winner of the 
3M Nursing Fellowship for 1973. 
awarded by the International Council 
of Nurses. is a doctoral student at the 
University of Toronto. 
Ms. Baumgart said the most visible 
participants at the conference were 
the consumers and nurses from nursing 
practice. education. and administra- 
tion. She made special mention of the 
nursing assistants and psychiatric 
nurses. whose prcsence marked "a 
turning point to more open and cordial 
relations:' 
The question "who should partici- 
pate" in community care is different 
from "who can participate:' she noted. 
"The latter is where I would like to 
see the emphasis put:' 
Taking up one idea raised during 
the panel discussion on November 14. 
Ms. Baumgart questioned the notion 
of the nurse as a coordindtor. "Is this 
role compatible with our interests in 
upgrading the clinical competencies 
of nurses'?"" she asked. "Does our affi- 
nity for this role relate to the fact that 
most nurses are women and we take to 
it as we accept the role of secretary or 
tea server'!"" 
Ms. Baumgart highlighted three 
points that were "mentioned in passing" 
during the conference: 
. Nursing students are not all young 
and all nurses are not female. 
. Nurses are increasingly turning to 
their own colleagues tor consultation. 
. Nurses do not write enough about 
what they arc doing. 
The conference was sponsored joint- 
ly by the department ot national health 
and welfare and the Canadian Nurses' 
Association. The impetus for the meet- 
ing came from a resolution. accepted 
by delegates at the 1972 CNA annual 
meeting and convention in Edmonton. 
which asked. in part, that Uthe global 
objectives of nursing education be 
redefined in accord with the evolution 
in nursing." 
CNA directors decided at their 
meeting in Septemher 1972 that it 
might he timely to review nursing edu- 
JANUARY 1974 


. 


cation trends across Canada and that 
a national conference including nurse 
educators from various kinds of pro- 
grams, together with "nurse practi- 
tioners:' should be held. (See News. 
"CNA Directors at work." November 
1972 and March 1973.) 
Participants in the conference in- 
cluded nurses from all provinces and 
the Northwest Territories, student 
nurses, nursing assistants. and repre- 
sentatives of the Psychiatric Nurses' 
Association of Canada, Canadian Med- 
ical Association, Canadian Hospital 
Association, Canadian Public Health 
Association. department of national 
health and welfare, and provincial 
departments of education and health. 


Future Health Needs Demand 
Less Complex Structure 
Ottawa - "A crying need for the future 
will be a less complex hureaucracy. .1 
heahh-care structure that consumers 
can understand:' This comment was 
made by Helen Frayne, a member of a 
panel that discussed future health care 
needs. during a session at the national 
Conference on Nurses tor Community 
Servicc Novemher 13-16. 1973. The 
conferencc was sponsored jointly by 
Health and Welfare Canada and the 
Canadian Nurses' Association. 
Ms. Frayne. an Ottawa writer and 
hroadcaster, said the present system 
of providing care is top-heavy. "1 f 
the structure is simplified. perhaps even 
those who administer it will have some 
understanding of its work ings:' ...he 
suggested. 
Spea"ing about community health 
eenters. Ms. Frayne mentioned the 
Hasting's Report which. she said, 
s"ined the issue of control and did 
not deal with the need for "govern- 
ment seed money" so a center could 
hecome self-sufficient. "Control hy 
the local community must be ensured 
at the outset through conditions attached 
to provision of puhlic funds:' she said. 
Consumers arc taking an increased 
intere...t in health costs. while cxamin- 
ing the quality of care. Ms. Frayne said. 
"We won't be content to pay high cosh 
t()r indifferent care in the future:' 
Another panclist. Yvonne Vanden- 
engel of Montreal. deplored the fact 
that phy...icians rarely ma"e house calb. 
and suggested that RNs should fill thi... 
gap. The nurse should diagnose the 


ailment. referring patients with serious 
illness to the doctor, Ms. VandenengcJ 
said. She had some advice for hosp;tal- 
based nurses who don't like ma"ing 
home vi...its and prefer the hospital 
setting. "Stay there,"' she said. 
Nurses who make these home "isits 
should have "peripheral vision." Ms. 
Vandenengel explained. "Out {)f the 
corner of their eyes they oh...erve. with- 
out being noticed. They see the type 
of home. the hahit... of the family- 
anything that will shed light on the 
health problems of the patient." 
The tour-day national Conference 
on Nurses t()r Community Service was 
attended hy more than 200 health 
profcs...ionals and their "clients." The 
theme of the conferencc was "the ...hift 
of nursing services from acute. curative 
care in institutions to the promotion 
of hcalth in the community:' 
Keynote spca"er on the opening 
day of the conference \\ as 1\'1arguerite 
Schumacher. CNA presidcnt. Her topic 
wa... "The Identity of Nursing in the 
Electronic Age." 


Panelists Set Forth Skills And 
Knowledge Of Nurse Of Tomorrow 
()f(aWlI - In reporting to the plenary 
...ession on the sccond da" of the 
national Conference on N'urses for 
Community Service. held in November. 
Denise Lalancette, nurse clinician, 
University of Sherhroo"e Clinic. ...aid 
shc was made uncomfortahle hv what 
she had heard the day before. - 
She \\ a... disturhed hy nurse.... hesita- 
tion and reluctance to assume their 
rc"'ponsihility to meet the need... 01 
tomorrow: by the lac" of nurses' ser- 
"ices in homes and disad"antaged 
area...: h} their apparent content with 
the "system" in that the} do not que...- 
tion if u...crs lIl't'c1 their service... a... nO\\ 
offered: and hy their lac!.. of attcntion 
to the individual nceds and comll)n of 
patients. 
M.... I alancelte felt rea......ured ho\\- 
ever. \\ hen she al...o heard: .. rhere are 
hcalth \\Ior"ers who clre ahle to care 
for u... at a price \\Ie can pa}. 1 he} are 
the nurse...... "We nurses must get going 
and II.\(' our ..."ilk" she conclud\..x1. 
Pamela Poole, re...earch consultant. 
Health and Welf;lre Canada, \\a... the 
fir...t paneli...t tl) ma"e projection... on 
the "no\\ ledge and ..."ills for future 
nUI...ing practice. Her... \\a... the general. 
fin CANADIAN NURSE 7 



news 


and personal. view: "Our mandate of 
physician'
 help
r will change to that 
of autonomous decision-ma!..er. The 
nurse of the future will have a gr
ater 
sense of being independently respon- 
sible (0 the public he or she serve
 than 
to the agency."' 
M
. Poole further foresaw a health 
care system \\-here the nurse in com- 
munity service will be able to care and 
will be concerned with health. 'There 
will not be a separate individual for 
prevention and another for cure." she 
said. "and thc needs of the people will 
take precedence over th
 needs of the 
providers [of care)." 
Projections were made for nun,ing 
in ti.)ur areas: acute care nursing by 
Joyce Bailey. specialty nursing practice 
by Audrey Thomp
on. continuing 
nursing care by Lorine Besel. and pri- 
mary nursing care by Geneva Le", is. 
Ms. Lewis, director of puhlic health 
nursing, Onawa-Carleton health unit 
envisioned the communitv nurse of the 
future as a s!..illed he
llth educator 
capable of supervising and counseling 
the well individual from birth to lkath. 
constantly alert to sign
 of di

ase to 
permit early intervention. 
Ms. Besel, nursing director. Allan 
Memorial Institute, Montreal. 
tressed 
that long-term patients need someone 
to care lIhollt them. not just (or them. 
"We must get away fronl the focus on 
illness, when a patient is an interesting 
case. We must fÒster an emotional 
curiosity and be able to Wne in to the 
patient's emotional experience as he 
goes through the various stagö of adap- 
tation to his ilIn
ss." 
Ms. Thomp
on. director of nursing. 
Reo Deer Hospital. and vice-president 
of the Regi
tered Nurses' A

ociation 
of Alberta, said that no basic nursing 
Lxlucation program can provide a prac- 
titioner with all that is needed tÒr con- 
tinuing skilled practice and it is the 
individual nurse who must be motivat
d 
to constantly search for answer
 to 
prohlems that .Iri
e. 
In her opinion. the nurse of the 
future. even though a group memher. 
will need to be self-directed, ahle to 
ma!..e aulOnomou
 professional deci- 
sions. and he accountable for his or her 
actions. This nurse", ill need to ta!..e a 
stand on issues, to speak out. and may 
have to learn to lobby. she added. 
"Does the nurse want to be more in- 
volved in direct patient care. or wish 
administrative responsihility or direc- 
tion over all those who deal with pa- 
tients'!" she as!..ed. Ms. fhompson be- 
8 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


heves nursing may become extinct un- 
less nurses have compassion for and 
involvement", ith patients. 
!'vh. Bailey. director of nursing, 
Wellesley Hospital. Toronto. remindcd 
the audience that care of the acutely 
ill '" ill continue to be in an institution 
with sophisticated procedurcs. ma- 
chines. and qualified staff. The nurse in 
this 
ning must possess "the ability to 
deal personally in a caring way with 
the critically ill and an understanding 
of th
 depersonalization that can occur 
in intensive care areas. Also important 
will be a !lex ihil ity to learn new ap- 
proaches. .. 
Ms. Bailey warned nurses to be aware 
that. with the continuing explosion of 
specialties and subspecialties, their role 
is becoming more and more fragment- 
ed. "The point may he reached where 
there is very linle left for nurses to do:' 
she said. However. the future of nursing 
and acute care nursing as a specialty 
is "as hright and as exciting as we wish 
to ma!..e it," she added. 


Family Practice Nurse Role 
To Be Tested In Urban Setting 
Ottawa - "Il is in the urban, fee-for- 
service. multipractice setting that the 
acid test of feasibility of the attached 
nurse practitioner waits:' Dr. Boyd 
Sunie told those attending the national 
Conference on Nurses for Community 
Service, on November 15, 1973. 
Dr. Sutti
 is president of the Cana- 
dian Puhlic Health Association and 
professor of health care delivery at 
Memorial Univcrsity, St. John's., Ntld. 
He was a member of a panel discussing 
the preparation of tomorrow's prac- 
titioners. 
Dr. Suttie outlined a demonstration 
pn
iect in Newfoundland to measure 
the impact on patient care. function 
tran
lcrs, and costs, of introducing a 
nurse to each of 10 urban general prac- 
tices. "For us fl) have chosen the rural 
or nllrth
rn scene IÌJr this project would 
have heen a mistake:' he said. . . . "To 
have devoted our efforts exclusively to 
the rural and northern areas could have 
led to the recognition of the expanded 
role nurse as a seeond-rate solution to 
the problem of provision of primary 
care in the ahsence or scarcity of phy- 
sicians. and the expanded role nurse 
has more to oller than that. 
"The time has come. . . for the for- 
malizing of the education and the utili- 
Dltilln of the expanded role nurse. and 
for a sound. scientitic eval uation of 
her impact. . . , We are not just chang- 
ing one role of the nurse. We are start- 
ing a chain of events that will change 
the role and relationship of the physi- 
cian and adjacent health professionals. 
particularly in primary care - a chain 
of events that will change the patterns 


of the practice of medicine." he said. 
"N ursing has long supported the 
need for continued learning but con- 
tinues to invest most of its time. energy, 
and money in basic and higher educa- 
tion for nurse," Margaret Neylan. a 
member of the panel, said. "Practicing 
nurses generally have limited. unsyste- 
matic access to fragmented learning 
resources. Thus. they are doomed to 
early obsolescence of knowledge and 
skills. and often become far from exem- 
plary role models for students." 
Ms. N eylan. associate professor and 
director of continuing education at the 
University of British Columbia school 
of nursing. told delegates at the confer- 
ence, "Our society pays for all the cost 
of elementary and secondary education. 
up to l)O percent or postsecondary edu- 
cation. but less than 5 percent of con- 
tinuing education instruction. This ap- 
proach constitutes educational suicide." 
'She pointed out that even if contin- 
uing education was provided with un- 
limited resources, this would not ensure 
high standards of nursing practice. To 
make certain that the highest possible 
level of competence is maintained. 
specific clinical standards for measuring 
patient care will have to be developed. 
Once these standards are accepted. 
deficits can be assessed and programs 
for continued learning can he pre- 
scribed. 
Assessing the national scene in nurs- 
ing education. panelist Dr. Bevcrly 
Du Gas said. "We have not put enough 
stress, except in baccalaureate pro- 
grams, on the nurse's role in prevention 
and health maintenance; we have focus- 
sed our attention 011 the care of the sick 
in a hospital setting." 
Dr. Du Gas, director of the health 
manpower planning division of Health 
and Welfare Canada and first vice- 
president of the Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation. said. "One of our biggest sins 
of omission in nursing educatIon has 
heen the failure to differentiate clearly 
hetween the responsibilities of differing 
levels of nursing practioner - the prac- 
tical nurse. the diploma RN. and bac- 
calaureate graduate. Great confusion 
exists in the minds of employers as to 
what to expect from graduates of these 
three different programs."' 


. 


ANPQ Approves Name Change 
And Reelects President 
Montreal, P.Q. - Delegates to the 
annual meeting of the Association of 
Nurses of the Province of Quebec 
(ANPQ) adopted a resolution to change 
the name of the organization to Order 
of Nurses of Quebec (ONQ). effective 
when the legislation has received royal 
assent. 


(COl/lilll/ec/ Oil pliKe 10) 
JANUARY 1974 



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news 


I' 
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I' 


and personal. view: "Our m 
physieialÙ help
r will chan
 
of autonolllOU'i decision-ma 
nurse of the future will have 
sense of heing independentl 
sible to the public he or she s 
to the agency," 
Ms. Poole further ti.>resaw 
care system where the nurse 
munity service will be able to 
will he concerned with healt 
will nol be a separate indiv 
prevention and another ti.>r c 
said. "and the needs of the p 
take precedence over the nee 
providers [of care}." 
Projections were made 1'0 
in fi.1ur areas: acute care n 
Joyce Bailey. specialty nursin 
by Audrey Thompson. c 
nursing care by Lorine Beset 
mary nursing care by Geneva 
Ms. Lewis, director of pub 
nursing, Ottawa-Carleton he. , 
envisioned the community nurse of the 
future as a s!..illed heîllth educator 
capable of supervising and counseling 
the well individual from hirth lo death. 
constantly alert to signs of disease to 
permit early intervention. 
Ms. Besel, nursing direclor. Allan 
Memorial Institule. Montreal. stressed 
that long-tcrm patients need someone 
to care aholll them. not just If)/' them. 
"We must get away fronl the focus on 
illness. when a patient is an interesting 
case. We must fÓster an emotional 
curiosity and be ahle to tunc in to the 
patient's emotional experience as he 
goes th rough the various stages of adap- 
tation to his illness," 
Ms. Thompson. director of nursing. 
Red Deer Hospital. and vice-pre'iid
nt 
of the Registered Nurs
s' Association 
of Alberta. said that no basic nursing 
education program can provid
 a prac- 
titioner with all th.1t is needed for con- 
tinuing skilled practice and it is the 
individual nurse who must he motivated 
to constantly search for answers to 
problems that arise. 
In her opinion. the nurse of the 
future, even though a group member. 
will need to he sclf-direct
d. able to 
make autonomous professional deci- 
sions. and be accountable for his or her 
aetions. This nurse will need to ta!..e a 
stand on issues. to spea!.. out. and may 
have to learn to lohby. she added. 
"Docs the nurse want to be more in- 
volved in direct patient care. or wish 
administrative responsibility or direc- 
tion over all those who deal with pa- 
tients'!" she as!..ed. Ms. Thompson bc- 
8 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


L 


lIeves nursing may hecome extinct un- of the practice of medicine." he said. 
. - I .."...... . _ . 


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Uttllll'lI - "It IS 111 the urban. tee-tor- 
...ervice, multipractice setting that the 
acid test of feasibility of the attached 
nurse practitioner waits," Dr. Boyd 
Suttie told those attending the national 
Conference on Nurses for Community 
Service, on November IS. 1973. 
Dr. Sunie is president of the Cana- 
dian Public Health Association and 
proll:ssor of health care delivery at 
Mcmorial University, St. John's. Ntld. 
He '" as a member of a panel discussing 
the preparation of tomorrow's prac- 
titioners. 
Dr. Suttie outlined a demonstration 
pn
ject in Newfoundland to measure 
the impact on patient care. function 
transll:rs. and costs, of intnxlucing a 
nurse to each of 10 urban general prac- 
tices. "For us to have chosen the rural 
or northern scene for this projcct would 
have heen a mista!..e," he saiJ . . . . "To 
have devoted our efti.>rts exclusively to 
th
 rural and northern areas could have 
led to the recognition of the expanded 
rok nurse as a second-rate solution to 
the problem of provision of primary 
care in the ahsence or scarcity of phy- 
sicians. and the expanded role nurse 
has more to offer than that. 
"The time has come. . . for the for- 
malizing of the education and the utili- 
zation of the expanded role nurse. and 
for a sound. scientitic evaluation of 
her impact. . . . We are not just chang- 
ing one role of the nurse. We are start- 
i ng a chain of events that will change 
the role and relationship of the physi- 
cian and adjacent health professionals. 
paJticularly in primary care - a chain 
of events th,lt will change the patterns 


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patient care will have to be developed. 
Once these standards are accepted, 
deficits can he assessed and programs 
tor continued learning can be pre- 
scribed. 
Assessing the national scene in nurs- 
ing education. panelist Dr. Beverly 
Du Gas said. "We have not put enough 
stress, except in baccalaureate pro- 
grams. on the nursc's role in prevention 
and health maintenance; we have tocus- 
sed our attention 011 the care of the sick 
in a hospital setting." 
Dr. Du Gas. director of the health 
manpower planning division of Health 
and Welfare Canada and first vice- 
president of the Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation. said. "One of our biggest sins 
of omission in nursing education has 
been the failure to differentiate clearly 
hetween the responsibilities of differing 
levels of nursing practioner - the prac- 
tical nurse. the diploma RN. and bac- 
calaureate graduate. Great confusion 
exists in the minds of employers as to 
what to expect trom graduates of these 
three different programs," 


ANPQ Approves Name Change 
And Reelects President 
Montreal, P.Q. - Delegates to the 
annual meeting of the Association of 
Nurses of the Province of Quebec 
(ANPQ) adopted a resolution to change 
the name of the organization to Order 
of Nurses of Quebec (ONQ). effective 
when the legislation has received royal 
aSsent. 


(Contillued Oil PllKC' 10) 
JANUARY 1974 



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· in emergency room care? 
· in pharmacology? 
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· in your pediatric and maternity care? 


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munication in actual nursing situations. 55.95 
38480. THE CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST. 
Edited by Joan Riehl, R.N., and Joan Wilcox 
McVay, R.N. All about career trends and training 
programs including new jobs such as "physician's 
assistants" and "health associates." SI1.00 
39691. COMMUNITY HEALTH Nt.:RSING. 
Kathleen Leahy, M. Ma,gue,ite Cobb, and Ma,y 
Jones. A wealth of practical information on the 
delivery of health care. Case histories show how 
to bring nursing care into the community. 58.50 
40131. CONCEPT FORMALIZATION IN 
NURSI
G. The Nursing Developna.nl Confe,- 
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64941. Nt.:RSING THE OPEN-HEART SUR- 
GERY PATIENT. Mary Jo Aspinall, R.N., M.N. 
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TRODt.:CTION TO OPERATlNG- 
ROO
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60420. A MANIJAL OF CARDIAC ARRHY- 
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60710. MATERNITY NL'RSING TODAY. Joy 
P,inceton Clausen, Ma,garet Hemp Flook, Bon- 
nie Fo,d, Ma,ilyn M. G,een, and Elda Popiel. 
Forty contributors provide c1earcut guidelines for 
maternity nursing. Practical nursing know-how 
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72990. PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF TER- 
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ties, help the patient cope with his. . . new 
psychological skills to apply. 512.50 
73960. RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE 
NURSING: From Beth Israel Hospital. Sha,on 
S. Bushnell, R.N. What to do for respiratory 
crises and ways to prevent and deal with many 
respiratory complications such as pneumonia 
and atelectasis. Spiral bound. 59.95 
64991. NURSE'S GUIDE TO CARDIAC SUR- 
GERY A
D NURSING CARE/THE Nt.:RSE'S 
GUIDE TO FLUID AND ELECTROLYTE 
BALANCE. Every aspect of caring for the pa- 
tient before, during, and after cardiac surgery. 
Plus guidelines for handling electrolyte problems 
-diet, drugs, and emergency steps. Many charts. 
The 2 books coun' as one. 510.15 
67180. PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN THE 
HOSPITAL. Ca,ol Ha,dg,ove and Rosemary 
Dawson. Successful new programs where mothers 
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tlee. Cheste, Keefe" M.D., and Robe" Wilkins, 
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detection and treatment of hundreds of clinical 
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64930. I'oURSI'G CARE OF THE CHILD 
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thinking on the exacting science and art of nurS- 
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64940. NL'RSING MANAGEMENT FOR PA- 
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67641. PEDIATRICS. Edited by Mohsen Ziai, 
M.D. A major, 10000page medical guide on care 
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lescence. Softbound. 511.50 
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Reac:tloDS. RUlh R. Levine. How drugs work and 
specific examples of hundreds of drugs you'll 
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$14.so 
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Linke, Schwa"l. Focuses on people's reactions 
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hospitalization. Fascinating insights into the con- 
scious and unconscious mind. S10.95 
40590. CORONARY CARE/PATIENT CARE 
IN CARDIAC SURGERY. First, coronary care 
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surgery. The 2 books count as one. SIJ.4! 
44460. EMERGENCY ROOM CARE, 2nd EdI- 
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gencies, wounds to orthopedic injuries. $14.00 
49360. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHE'\IOTHER- 
APY. William B,ewste, P,att, M.D. E"ery chem- 
ical and clinical aspect of drug therapy: indis- 
pensable for today's nurse. 510.so 
52230. HANDBOOK OF DRLG INTERAC- 
TIOI'oS. Gerald Swidle,. Sets down the interac- 
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515.00 
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news 


I COllI i 1111/,,1 f,.oll/ pll.l!l' 8 J 


The annual meeting was held in 
Montreal's Queen Elizabeth Hotel on 
November 5. 6, and 7, 1973. At the 
meeting. delegates reeleeted Rachel 
Bureau, Quebec City, as president for 
a third term. 
Under the new Quebec Nurses' Act 
(Bill 273). nurses had a choice of name: 
Professional Corporation of Nurses of 
Quebec or Order of Nurses of Quebec. 
Because the word "Order" appl ies 
specitìcally to professions with an ex- 
clusive right to practice, while "Corpo- 
ration" applies mainly to professional 
organizations with a reserved title only, 
the voting delegates chose OM). 
Delegates approved resolutions ask- 
ing the AN P() to inform nurses on action 
to be taken and legal implications of 
their possible intervention on the scene 
of an accident. to exert pressure on the 
federal government to ensure that the 
Quebec Nurses' Act is respectcd when 
federally employed nurses work in 
Quebec. and to request the Quebec 
minister of social affairs to increase 
the number of specialized establish- 
ments for carc of the chronically ill. 
ANP() was as"ed, by resolution. to 
make enquiries on the potential role 
of the nun.e in acupuncture and to 
participate in any Chinese-Canadian 
group formed to study this subject. 
I he results ot a study of functions 
delegated to nursing personnel in health 
centers throughout Quebec were pres- 
ented to the annual meeting. More 
than 5.ROO nurses participated in the 
study. 
The report says. "32.000 nurses 
work illcgally each day... for daily 
thcy perform acts for which they were 
trained but which the law does not 
recognize as an integral part of the 
nursing role. ... The present study 
concerns thc problem posed by the 
"borderline act" in demonstrating. with 
percentagc for cach procedure, the 
broad responsibilities accepted by the 
nurse. .. 
The study i.. designed to obtain 
delegation of acts belonging to nursing. 
so nurses can work freely in their own 
field. The profession of nursing is 
defined in the Quebec Nurses' Act Ll<; 
"Every .lct the object of which is to 
identify the health nceds of persons, 
contribute to methods of diagnosis. 
provide and control the nursing care 
required for the promotion of health, 
prevention of illness. treatment and 
rehabilitation. and to provide care 
according to a medical prescription." 
10 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


L. 


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Nurses and technicians in the OKs of the Health Sciences Centre. Winnipeg. 
compensate for the lack of haute couture in gowns by wearing light-weight 
cotton caps of their own design and manul
lcture. Helen Ja"ab. h
ti. and Molly 
Brewster, right, are shown in their tlowered headgear: they are nurses' aides in 
the operating room at the Children's Centre in Winnipeg. Manitoba. 


According to the Act. a nurse may, 
in practicing her profession. inform 
the population on health problems. 
The Act also provides that no one ex- 
cept a nurse may do any of the acts 
described in the definition; this does 
not apply to health teaching. 
Early results of the questionnaire 
on delegation of functions were used 
to support ANP() briefs to the parlia- 
mentary commission studying the Bill
 
related to nursing. (News. June IY73, 
page 10). The completed ANP() study 
will be used as a working document 
when the corporations of nursing and 
medicine discuss the delegation of 
functions that lie on the border between 
nursing and medical practice. 
The study report contains the gen- 
eral recommendation that the delega- 
tion of nursing acts is made to define 
the nurses' role without orienting it 
toward the medical domain for which 
she is not prepared. and that the lim its 
of the nursing field take account of the 
scientific preparation of nurses. The 
report contains 65 specific recommen- 
dations. such as: the nurse receiving 
an order by telephone take the respon- 
sibility of carrying it out or of suspend- 
ing its application according to her 
judgment. since the professional pres- 


cribing cannot observe the patient; 
ordering an FCG. in the absence of a 
physician. is delegated to the nurse; 
and the nurse can modify the thera- 
peutic diet according to the patient's 
condition. 
Some of the recommendations re- 
late to the nurse working in an out- 
post or one who is the only health pro- 
fessionaL such as. the outpo
t nurse 
may give oral medications without 
a doctor's order. 
In a report of AN P() priorities. 
work inherent in the two pieces of 
legislation. the Code of the Profes- 

ions and the Nurses' Act. were iden- 
tilïed. They are to develop ANP() by- 
laws; set up a competency board to 
evaluate mcmbers' professional "now- 
ledge; develop a code of ethics applying 
to the practice of nursing. a requirement 
of the Professional Code (Bill 250); 
and implement professional inspection 
prowams to <;upervise the practice of 
nur"lIlg. 


Nurses Want Greater Voice 
In B.C. Health Corporation 
ViIl/COIn-l'r, R.C. - Directors of the 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
British Columbia (RNABC) have en- 
IANUARY 1974 



dorsed the establishment of an interim 
nursing advisory committee to advise 
the board of the ne\\ B.c. cm\\ n corpo- 
ration on health. the B.c. Medical 
Centre. 
Matters on v. hich the interim com- 
mittee could advise the B.c. Medical 
Centre Board include the nursing care 
of patients and the education of nursing 
personnel. The RNABe and the Univer- 
sit} of B.c. school of nursing \\ ill ask 
J. V. Cristensen. chairman of the B.c. 
\1edical Centre. to make the nursing 
advisory committee an official com- 
mittee of the complex. 
The bill creating the crO\\n corpo- 
ration for health v. as given ro) al assent 
early in November I <)73. It gives the 
health corporation the responsibility 
to establish and operate in Vancouver 
a provincial mcdical and health sci- 
ences center: to establish training 
..chools and courses tÌJr medical. dental. 
and paramedical persons. for nurses. 
and fÒr othcr persons in the health 
field: to providc public cducation in 
hcalth: and to carryon mcdical and 
hospital research. 
-I \\0 chief officcrs of the ncw corpo- 
ration \\-ere recruited from Vancouver 
Genera] Hospital. The corporation's 
chairman. Mr. L hnstensen. was for- 
merly chairman of thc VGH board: the 
corporation president. who is the chief 
administrative officer. is K.R. 'Weaver. 
fÒrmer executive director of VGH. 
fhe B.C. Medical Centre's profes- 
...ional advisory comm ittee is made up 
of 15 doctors plus one appointee from 
RNASe. one appointee from each of 
tv. 0 othcr professional groups. and a 
health sciences student elected by the 
student bod\, The RNABe board had 
supportcd a'LBc proposal for a profes- 
sional advisory board to "permit all 
health professionals to have an equal 
voice in cxpressing their views through 
their chairman to the governing body:' 


RNs And LPNs Come Together 
In Three Manitoba Agreements 
It'if/llipeg. Mall. - The three most re- 
cent collective bargaining units to be 
certified in Manitoba include. for the 
first time. both registered nurses and 
licensed practical nurses. Thc Selkirk 
Nurses' Association was first. follow- 
ed by thc Souris Rcgi'itered Nurses' 
and Licen...ed Practical Nurses' Asso- 
ciation. and the Pine Falls Nurses' 
Association. 
At thc annual meeting of the \1ani- 
toba Association of Registered Nur'ies 
held in Ma}. \IARN mcmbers accept- 
ed a resnlution to "approve in princi- 
ple the <\malgamation of thc thrce 
nursing group... - registered nurses. 
licensed practical nurses. and registered 
psychiatric nurses - under onc Act. in 
JANUARY 1974 


such a manner as nUl} bc decmed in the 
best intcrests of all group'" and thc 
health care of people of Manitoba:' 
The \tAR' Nl,It's of September/Oc- 
tober I <)73 said: "The movement that 
has taken place tov. ard the unification 
of nurses over the past } ear and thc 
resolutions passed at the \IARN annual 
mccting intluenccd the deci'iion" to 
include LPl':s in the Selkirk '\iurses' 
Association. 
The Provincial Staff Nurses' Coun- 
ciL cstablished in 1<)70 by b}la\\- of the 
t\1 '\RN Act. is made up of nurses who 
are eligiblc for inclusion in collcctivc 
bargaining units. elected by their pccrs: 
the president of t\1-\ RN is not a mem- 
ber of the Council cx oftìcio. 
The Council is rcsponsible for as- 
sisting local staff nurses' assoc iations 
in collective bargaining. According 
to a recent Council nev.sletter. separatc 
negotiations havc becn held fix 14 of 
I X
 collective bargaining uni", bccause 
cmplo} ers refuscd to negotiatc cen- 
trail} . 


Ont. Nurses' Association Formed 
For Province-Wide Bargaining 
Torollto, Ollt. - Last October 13. a 
significant stcp toward province-wide 
collective bargaining by nurses \\as 
taken when the Ontario Nurses'Asso- 
ciation (ONAI v.as formed. 
Attending the founding meeting 
were more than 300 reprcsentatives 
from 85 independent nurses' associa- 
tions. which are ccrtified as bargaining 
agents for nurses employed in health 
care institutions. publ ic health units. 
visiting nurscs' organizations. and in- 
dustry. Thcsc founding members adopt- 
ed a constitution and electcd a board of 
directors who will hold office until the 
first annual meeting is held. 
It is expected that the 100 indcpend- 
cnt nurses' associations in the proVll1cc. 
representing more than 10.000 nurscs. 
will merge with the ONA. Some 35.000 
to 40.000 nurses \\-ork in Ontario at 
prese nl. 
At its I <)73 annual meeting. thc 
Registered Nurscs' Association of 
Ontario passed a resolution endorsing 
the establ ishmcnt of a separate central 
vehicle for collcctive bargaining by thc 
Nurses' Central Security Fund (in 
which the 100 indcpendent nurses' 
associations participate). 
Ontario labor legislation appears to 
prevent RN AO. as prescntly structured. 
from becoming ccrtificd as a tradc 
union because its membership is not 
open to graduate nonrcglstered nurscs 
who are now included in bargaining 
units. and because some of its members 
are in management positions. 
Anne Gribben. director of RN o\(>'s 
cmployment rel.!tions department. 
explained. "By crcating a central body. 


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THE CANADIAN NURSE 11 



news 


nurses will be ready to engage in pro- 
vincial, central, or regional bargaining 
when it becomes appropriate and the 
Ontario Government or employers 
agree to take the step." 
The DNA will have to be certified as 
an appropriate trade union by the 
Ontario labor relations board. To do 
this, one of the independent nurses' 
bargaining units will have to apply to 
the board to merge with the DNA; when 
this occurs, the other nurses' units will 
be able to become charter members of 
DNA. 
DNA presIdent Jean Lowery said 
that "a central body, through the sheer 
strength of its numbers and resources, 
should exercise more impact at the 
bargaining table, both now and in the 
future." In addition to the president 
and secretary-treasurer, there are 13 
regional representatives of ONA. 


RNABC's Consulting Service 
Helps Smaller Hospitals 
Vancouver, B.C. - The Registered 
Nurses' Association of British Colum- 
bia has launched a Clinical Expert con- 
sulting service to help smaller hospitals 
solve problems in administration, plan- 
ning, and inservice education of staff 
in four clinical areas: intensive and 
coronary care, maternity and high risk 
newborns, operating room management 
and techmques, and intnivenous ther- 
apy. 
Sixteen clinical experts from British 
Columbia hospitals attended a work- 
shop in October 1973 at RN ABC head- 
quarters. Their services are otTered 
through the cooperation of the nurses' 
association, large hospitals and their 
clinical experts, and smaller hospitals 
who request the consulting service. 
Therese Schnurr. director of nursing 
services for RNABC, said "the cost to 
the hospital receiving the "ervice will 
be small in comparison to the big re- 
turn expected in bette r patient care." 


Government Council On Women 
Disapproves Award To Nurses 
Oltawa - The advisory council on the 
status of women has expressed to Trea- 
sury Board chairman C.M. Drury their 
disapproval of the arbitration award 
made to federally employed nurses. 
(News, December 1973, page 7.) 
The advi!>ory council, which met in 
Ottawa on November 13 and 14, asked 
Mr. Drury to reopen negotiations 
with the nurses immediately. The coun- 
1.2 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


l 


cil said, "The regional wage application 
creates great discrepancies among 
nurses pcrtorming the same tasks in 
different parts of the country:' 
The council was also critical of the 
study of nursir'1g in the federal services, 
announced by Mr. Drury in the House 
of Commons on November 6. because 
it does not include an inquiry into the 
job evaluation of nurses. The Royal 
'Commission on the Status of Women 
in Canada recommended that "the pay 
rates for nurses. dietitians, home econo- 
mists, librarians, and social workers 
employed by the federal government 
be set by comparing these professions 
with other professions in terms of the 
value of the work. and the skill and 
training involved." 
Frank Howard, MP for Skeena, B.C., 
asked a question in the House of Com- 
mons on April 2, 1973. on what action 
has been taken on that recommenda- 
tion and others. Labor Minister John 
Munro answered, with respect to the 
question about pay rates. that "these 
groups bargain collectively for their 
teons and conditions of employment 
under the Public Service Staff Rela- 
tions Act, and are represented by the 
union of their choice:' The advisory 
council on the status of women said 
they attach great importance to the 
study recommended by the Royal 
Commission. 
The report of the Royal Commission 
proposed a council directly responsible 
to Parliament. to advise on matters 
pertaining to women, and to propose 
legislation and policies to improve 
the status of women. On May 31, 1973, 
Mr. Munro, the minister responsible 
for the status of women, announced 


It's Winnipeg In '74 


ð 

 


The Gateway to the West swings 
both ways - join nurses from across 
Canada at CNA'S annual meeting and 
convention in Winnipeg, June 16 
to 21, 1974. There is murky water 
(Cree meaning of Winnipeg) at the 
juncture of the Assiniboine and Red 
Rivers, but if you can see your way 
clear to come, you'll have a "buffalo 
of a time!" (No whales in the Red 
River!) 


in the House of Commons the establish- 
ment of the advisory council. 
Its terms of reference are to advise 
the minister responsible, currently Mr, 
Munro, on matters relating to the status 
of women that the minister may refer 
to the councilor that the council con- 
siders appropriate. Although the 
advisory council reports to the minister 
of labor, the group has the right to 
make its reports and recommendations 
public. 
Two nurses are among the 28 mem- 
bers of the advisory council; they are 
Maria Masson, Quebec City, who is 
vice-president of CEGEP Francois- 
Xavier Garneau, and Barbara Bromley, 
a public health nurse in Yellowknife, 
NWT. 


N.B. Court Finds RN Negligent 
Supreme Court Appeal Planned 
Fredericton, N.B. - Cheryl Wilcox, 
a Saint John registered nurse, has been 
ordered to pay $49,321.19 plus costs 
in a recent judgment handed down by 
the Appeal division of the New Bruns- 
wick Supreme Court. The decision, 
which reverses an earlier judgIllent by 
the Queen's Bench division, will be 
appealed to the Supreme Court of Can- 
ada. 
According to the newsletter of the 
New Brunswick Association of Regis- 
tered Nurses (NBARN), the trial in- 
volved a patient's claim for damages 
for personal injuries that he alleged 
resulted from negligence by Ms. Wilcox 
and a medical practitioner while they 
were treating him for an illness in jan- 
uary 1971. . 
After receiving an injection in his 
left arm by the nurse, the plaintiff 
developed gangrene that necessitated 
amputation of the fingers and thumb 
of the left hand. The patient based his 
claim on alleged negligence of the nurse 
in administering the injection and the 
doctor in failing to respond promptly 
to a phone call and failing to diagnose 
properly and treat the gangrene. 
The first court dismissed the nurse 
from any liability in the case; in both 
courts the doctor was acquitted. Ms. 
Wilcox, 33, was employed at the Saint 
John General Hospital at the time of 
the alleged negligence. 
The nurse injected two cc. of Bicillin 
intramuscularly into the Jeltoid muscle 
of the patient's left arm with a I 1/2- 
inch needle. According to the evidence 
given at the tr.ial, the patient did not 
wish to lower hIs pants tor the 1M. After 
the patient returned home from the 
ut- 
patient department of the hospItal 
where the injection was given, his 
left hand and arm became white and 
the fingers were clenched. The patient 
complained of extreme pain. 
JANUARY 1974 



Dunng the trial, Ms. Wilcox de- 
scribed in detail the technique she used 
for giving an 1M injection. Several 
expert witnesses testified that her metn- 
od was proper. The nurse also testified 
she could not recall the routine details 
of giving that particular injection, but 
she knew she followed the described 
method because she always did it that 
way. 
Expert witnesses also testified that 
the deltoid muscle is a recommended 
and acceptable area for injection under 
certain circumstances; that aspiration 
is the only practical way to establish 
if the needle is in a blood vessel, but 
the technique is not foolproof; and that 
Bicillin is a suspension that could plug 
an artery and cut off the blood supply, 
which could result in symptoms similar 
to those described by the patient. Wit- 
nesses also said that, although there are 
several treatments suggested for gan- 
grene, they are not usually successful. 
The appeal judge upheld the trial 
judge's finding. supported by evidence, 
that Bicillin had somehow gotten into 
an artery and caused the damage suf- 
fered. In delivering the judgment 
against Ms. Wilcox, the appeal judge 
reasoned that the nurse's testimony 
as to what she did was not based on a 
recollection of events, but on her belief 
that she must have followed a particular 
technique because she always did. 
The judge concluded that the nurse 
failed to establish that the gangrene 
developed, or probably developed, from 
an unknown cause for which she cannot 
be held responsible. According to the 
judgment, the evidence is sufficient 
to support the conclusion "that the gan- 
grene would not have developed in the 
absence of fault in administering the 
_ injection. 
"N BARN is pleased that the case is 
going to be appealed," Nancy Rideout, 
NBARN's liaison officer, told The 
Canadian Nurse. She said the Saint 
John General Hospital's insurance will 
cover the nearly $50,000 damages as- 
sessed against Ms. Wilcox. 


Nursing Concerns Clearly Heard 
At Ontario Hospital Convention 
Toronto. Onto - During nursing ses- 
sions and panel discussions held at the 
annual convention of the Ontario Hos- 
pital Association October 29 to 31, 
1973, nurses from all parts of the prov- 
ince were vocal in sharing their con- 
cerns about the profession. 
Tom Carnaham, director of nursing 
at Ottawa's Montfort Hospital, spoke 
critically of nursing leadership. "We 
continue to elect traditional, staid, 
conservative. quiet-spoken. chicken- 
hearted leaders," he said. The orofes- 
sion is further "hamstrung,"' he added. 
JANUARY 1974 


by the lack of unity. "Nurses don't 
usually support each other profes- 
sionally," he explained, which relates 
to the lack of leadership. 
Mr. Carnaham also said it is time for 
nurses to make decisions for them- 
selves, instead of letting other groups 
make decisions (such as the new two- 
year college nursing programs) for 
them. The idea that nurses must ob- 
tain power was voiced repeatedly. 
One nurse from London. Ontario. 
was applauded by the large audience at 
the nursing session when she said, "I 
think our problem lies in 'being nice'. 
Nurses are educated not to rock the 
boat, and by the time they become 
administrators, they are so used to this 
. . . ." If a nurse challenges anything 
she is threatened by her co-workers, she 
conti nued. 
A number of persons in the audience 
criticized the community colleges for 
making decisions about nursing, includ- 
ing program philosophy and the setting 
of standards, without involving nurses. 
Anger was also expressed over the 
colleges cutting clinical time for nurs- 
ing students and making them take 
subjects unrelated to nursing. 
"The Primary Contact Nurse" was 
the subject discussed by a panel at a 
general session on the final morning of 
the convention. Kathleen McPhee, past 
president of the Emergency Nurses' 
Association of Ontario. said these 
nurses are frustrated because they 
have a talent that is untapped. "We 
see the patient first. Then what can we 
doT Nurses are the primary contact 
in the emergency department and they 
want to expand this role, she said. 
Nurses working in emergency have 
been a "yes, doctor" type of nurse. 
They are no longer content with this, 
explained Ms. McPhee. She said many 
patients in emergency can be effectively 
treated by a nurse. "Our assessment of 
each patient is very accurate:' 
An enthusiastic account oftwo nurses 
working in small clinics in under- 
privileged areas was given by Dr. 
Richard T.G. Milne, who is engaged in 
family practice in Kingston. He describ- 
ed the work being done by nurses in 
the clinics, which were set up to "give 
care to people who did not have it.'- 
Among the resol utions approved by 
OHA members was one that calls on 
OHA to "take the necessary steps to 
achieve policy changes which will 
enablèqualified and experienced nurses 
from abroad to become registered in 
Ontario, based upon their nursing skills 
and training." 
Another resolution calls ìor studying 
the Ho
pitals of Ontario Pension Plan 
to establish the feasilibity of removing 
discrimination because: " .. the 
clau
es pertaining to benetït
 in the. . 
IColltitll/('d Oil f'l/1!(' I
) 


Next Month 
in 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


. A Diploma Is Not 
An Oil Painting 


. Ethics of Nursing Practice 


. Clinical Laboratory Procedures 


ð 

 


Photo credits for 
January 1974 


Health Science
 Centre. 
Winnipeg, Man., p. 10 


Toronto Western Ho
pital. 
Toronto. Ont.. p. 25 


University of British Columbia, 
Vancouver, B.C, p. 
9 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 13 



1Â R.."". N.". PI
.. . .I'ooast 
qu.III" $11'.....1 l"yl g, 
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MRS. R. F. JOHNSI

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SUPERVISOR 


IN 


---- 


CHARLENE HAYNES 

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 ,";r. t OHN, L.PN. 


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.---------- ---- 
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I LETTERING:______________________ 2nd LlNE:________________ 
. 1 S!.!,L f I .IAl MITAL I IAC
SRDUIlÐ I UTTERING PRlCU' 
ftII J DESCRIPTION COlOi flNISW (

:) COLOR 'Enlmeli' l... hi'"'' 2l,," 
I ALL METAL rich, trim and 0 Gold [ 0 Duotone Does B g
ac:lue 0 1 Pin 2.25 1 Pin 3 OQ 
1169 
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1559 
I 
1- METAL FRAMED ClassIc 0 Gold Poh
hed 
I 100 'SIRn; snow white DlaS!lc with 0 SII\ler frame 
l_p".I

 -dh\.._
 onlv 
I MDLDED PLASTIC .sllnPJ
.5>mart. 1 Does I Does 
510 ( ooomicat WIU never discolor. not not 
I Smooth rounded corners and edges. apply apply 
I . QUANTITY DISCOUNTS: 1()'24 pins, deducl 10%; 
I .Please Idd 25.. per Drderlar 3 pinS or lesi. 25.99 pins, 15%; 1000r more pins. 20%. 
--------------------------------------. 


--------------------- 


T .1Iar... 
All ..tal 
.....169 


IT'S EASY TO ORDER REEVES NAME PINS FOR YOURSELF OR FRIENDS! 
Choose style you want, sl10wn left _ Print name land 2nd bottom left. Altach edra sheet for ad(hlional pms 
hne if deslled) on dolted lines below Cileck otfJer mfo In HOTE SAVINGS ON 2 IDENTICAL PINS. _ . mare convenient. 
boxes on chart, clip this section and attach to coupon spare in casl of loss. 


P/U"ic 
UlBiIiltI 
5!i8 



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l'1li" 
,,1110 


PLASTIC LAMINATE... slimmer, 
t-roader. engraved thru surface to 
! ntrastmg core color. Beveled 
border matches lettering 


AIIMlItti 
P..,tIc 
"'.510 


MEDI-CARD SET HandIest reference 
ever! 6 smooth plastic cards (3
" x 5Y.z") cram- 
med with information, including Equivalencies of 

t::

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, Htfr

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Blood Chern., Liver Tests, Bone Marrow, Disease 
Incub. Periods, Adult Wgts. 
All In white vinyl holder with gold stamped 
caduceus. No. 289 Clrd Sit . . . 1.50 SI. 
6 Dr more 1.25 'a. 12 Dr more 1.10 ... 
Your initials lold-stamped on holder, 
.dd 50. per lei. 


A superb Instrument especially 
designed for nurses! Imported from pre- 
CISion craftsmen in W. Germany. Easy. 
to-attach Velcro cuff, lightweight, com. 
pact, fits into soft sim. leather zippered 
case 2Y.z".x 4" x ]". Dial calibra- 
ted to 320 mm., IO.year accuracy 
guaranteed to ::!::3 mm. Serviced by 
Reeves If ever required_ Your ini- 
tials engraved on manometer and 
gold stamped on case FREE. for 
Dermanent identification and 
distinction. A wise investment for 
a lifetime of dependable service! 
No. 106 Sphyg. . . . 37.95 ea. 


NURSES PERSONALIZED 
ANEROID SPHYG. 


CAP ACCESSORIES 


I 
. 



_.-
 
CAP TOTE keeps your caps crisp and clean 
 
while stored or carried. Flexible clear plastic, white 
trim, zipper, carrying strap. hang loop_ Stores flat. Also 
for wiglets, curlers, etc. 81,7" dia, 6" high. 
No. 333 Tole. . 2.65 ea., 6 Dr more. . 2.35 el. 
Your iniliall gold,"lImped, Idd 50. per Tole. 

 WHITE CAP CLIPS Kolds capl 

 firmly in place! Hard-to-find white bobbie pins, 
......-::; enamel on fine sprin, steel. Eight 2" and eipt 
3'/ clips included in plastic snap box. 
No. 529 Clips. . . 3 boxes lor 2.25, 
. 6 for 65, ea., 12 for 60.. ea. 
MOLDED CAP TACS 
 _ 
Replace cap band instantly. Tiny plastic tac, 
 ' _ 
 
dainty c.aduceus. "Choose Blad., Blue, White 
 
Dr Crystal with Gold Caduceus; Dr all BI.ck. . -_. - -.:: 
 
(plain). The neater way to fasten bands. : -. U

 

.

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t::t:


.p.;,1i:
P....t. ':----. 
 ;- 

 
 METAL CAP TACS Pair 01 dainl, 
IA.lA..I jewelry-quality Tacs Witt! grippers. flolds cap 
IWUI bands securely. Sculptured melal, gold finish. 
... approx. 
'J wide. Choose RN, LPN, LVN. RN 

 Ceduceus or Plain Caduceus. Gift boxed. 
n M'O .. 
 No. CT.l (Specify Iniliall), No. CT-2 (PI.ln 
t.:.V1.U Cad.) 01 No. CT.3 (RN Cld.) . . . 2.95 pro 
SEL-FIX CAP BAND Blackwelvel r---.. 
band material. Self-edheslve. presses on, 
. . 
pulis oft; no sewing. Dr pinning. Reusable . 
several times. Each bind 20" Ion,. pre-cut to \ 
popular widths: Y.z" (12 per plastic box) Y.z" . 
(8 per box) %" (6 per box) I" (6 per ))bxl 
Spectfy widttl under ITEM column on coupon. 

. ...; B nd. . . ,.r bax 3 Dr more. .1.50 ea. 
CROSS PEN -- 
 . Ia,"G,.
.J(a....... 
 
World-famous ballpomt, Witt! 
 , 
scu
tured caduceus emblem. Full name - _ 

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ecuupOn). -c...- 
No. 3502 Chrome 8.00 e.. No. 6602 12kt. G.F. 11.50 ... 
TO: REEVES COMPANY, Box C . Atlleboro, Mass. 02703 
ORDER NO. In rmDlmlmmmml 
-- 


. 
. 
. 
t 


Use extra sheet for additional Items or orders. 
INITIALS al deli red, _ _ _ 
(Good Idea. . . feJ distinctive identification) 


TO ORDER NAME PINS, lill out all inlormalion in box lop 
nght, clip out and attach to this coupon. 


I enclose $ (Mass. residenls add 3% S. T.) 
Sorry, no COD's Dr billing lerms .vaillble 


L. 


. 
I S.nd 10 .. 
· City 
a . . 


. 


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Street 


.Stale .' 


..Zip ......... 
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. 


. 


. 


. 


-- KELLY FORCEPS So handy lor 
every nurse! 5Y.z" stainless steel, fully 
guaranteed. Idesl for clamping off tubing. Your 
own initials help prevent loss. 
No. 25-72 Fo..ep.... 2.75 eo. 6 Dr more 2.50 U. 
Tour Inltl.l. onlfaved. add 50. por I....p.. 


. 


. .. 


r:i

aIS " 

:l:
Y ) ed I 
Free 
Scope 
Sack 
\
 - .I v.-.- 


Free Initials and Scope Sack 
with V1nU' own 
Littmann" Nurteteope I 
BRAND 


Famous LIttmann nurses' 
diaphragm stethoscope . . . 
a fine precision ,"strumenl, 
with high sensltivit, for 
blood pressures, apical pulse 
rate. Only 2 ozs., lits in 
pocket, wilh gray vinyl anti. 
collapse tubing, non-chIlling 
epoxy diaphragm. 28" over. 
all. Non.rotating angled ear 
tubes and chest piece beau. 
t,lully slyled in choice of'S 
jewel-like colors: Goldlone. 
Silvertone, Blue, Cleen, Pink.' 
FREE INITIALS AND SACK! 
Your ,"itials engraved FREE 
on chest piece; lend individ- 
ual distinction and help pre- 
vent loss. Also FREE SCOPE 
SACK included, worth $1. 
(Free sacks nol personal. 
Ized; add SO
 if initIals de- 
sired.) Note big savings on 
Quantily orders. 
No. 216 Nursescope . . . 13.80 ea. ppd. 
6-11 . .. 12.80 ea. 12 or mOre. . . 11.80 ea. 
Group Discounts 
 free Initials and Sack! 
.IMPORTANT: New "MedallIon" styling Includes tubIng in 
colors 10 match metal parts. If desired, add $1. ea, to 
prices above; add "M" to Order (No. 216
) on coupon. 
No. 223 Scope Sack only. . . 1.00 ea. ppd. 
6 or more 75t ea. Gold stamped initIals, add 50t 


(-. 


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fõr 
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ft... 


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Does 
nol 
apply 


Does 
not 
apply 


o Wh,le nO BI.ck 
o Med. Gree ry: lö Dt<: Blue 
OMed Blue White 
DCccoa letters only 


n I Pin .95 j 1 Pin 1.55 
'î 2 Pms 1.65 
 2 Pins 2 60 
Iwme n.mel Iwme fio!lmel 


White 
only 


o Black 01 Pin 225 01 Pm 3_00 
o D" Blue fl2 PinS 3.15 rJ 2 Pin!. 4.95 
(Wm@' '1i'Jrn
J Is me "<'Im!'1 


White 
only 


o Black [j 1 Pm .95 U I Pm 1.55 
o Dk Blue 0 


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3W' LISTER MINI.SCISSORS 

 tiny. handy. Shp Into undorm pocket or 
purse Choose Jewelers Cold or gleaming 
Chrome plite finish on coupon 
BeL No 3500 Mini.Scissors . . . 2.75 e.. 
4W' or 5W' LISTER SCISSORS 
As above. but larger lor bigger 
s ChrCl11t finISh only 
N. 4500 141'1"1 or No 5500 15V."1 Scissors. . . 2.75 
5W' OPERATING SCISSORS _ . 
 
Stamless steel. with sharp I blunt 

 '\ 
poinls Beauh!ully pOhshed flmsh. - 

 
No. 705 DR SCII,Ors . . . 2.75 ea. - '7' 
All scissors above: 1 dOl. Dr more (anr stylel . . . 2 00 ea. \.. .) 
Your initials eneraved. add :iDe per SCISSOrs 


CLAYTON DUAL STETHOSCOPE tIght. 
weight Imported dual scope; highest sensitivity for apica 
pulse rate. Chromed head tubes and chest piece with , 
11;'s" bell and I f." diaphragm, grey anti-collapse <@)j 
 
tubing. 4 OZ., 29" long. Extra ear plugs and e D 
diaphragm included. 
 mitlals engraved free. 
No. 413 Dual SIelh . . . . . . . . 17.95 ea. 
. JEWELRY NURSES CHARMS '1;, 
. 
Finest sculptured FistJer tharms,
 "-oc.."'-J 
Sterling Dr Gold Filled (specify under COLOR on couponl. i' .. .... 
For bracelet or pendant chain_ Add to your collection! /' ("\ f 
 
No. 263 Caduceus; No. 164 Cap; No. 68 J'! .. '1 
Grad. Hat: No. B. Band. Scissors. . 3.49 el. (" íI '\ 
",II, I
_14K PIERCED EARRINGS 

f7""" Dainty. detailed 14K Cold ceduceus. for on Dr off duty 
'Ii wear. Shown actua1 SIZ
. Gift boxed for fflends, too. _ 
. No. 13/297 Ea",ngs . . . . . . . . 5.95 per pair. 
PIN GUARD Sculplured caduceus, chained 
 
to your professional letters. each with pinbackl 
 
safety catch. Or replace either with class pin for ,
 
salety. Gold finish, gift boxed Choose RN. LPN 
Dr LVN. No. 3420 Pin Guard. . . . 2.95 'a. 
(1n
) ENAMELED PI NS Beautifully sculplured .tatus 

 insignia. 2-color keyed. hard. fired enamel on gold plate. 
A Dime.siled. pin-back. Specity RN, LPN. PN. LVN. NA 01 

 ::
. ;
5co

:
. Pin 1.95 88., 12 or more 1.50 ea. 


.. 


Endura NURSE'S WATCH F,ne SWISS made 
waterproof timepiece. Raised easy-to-read white numerals 
and hands on black dial, luminous markings. Red sweep. 
second hand. Chrome fimsh, stainless back Includes 
black velvet strap. Gift-boxed, with 1 year guarantee 
Very dependable. Includes 3 initials en,raved FREE! 
No. 1093 Nurse. Walch. . . . .. . . . . . 19.95 ea. 
. I . Prevent stains and wear! E[} 

 Smooth, pliable pure white vinyl. Ideal 
low-cost group gifts or favors. ,. 
No. 210.1. Iript), two compertments 
with flap, gold stamped caduceus. . . 
- 6 for 1.50. 25 Dr more 20. e. 
o No. 79t lIeft) eeluxe Saver, 3 compt J J 
chan,Re pocket & key cham . . . I 
6 lor 2.98, 25 Dr more 35. la. 

 D Nurses' POCKET PAL KIT 
. ,. Handiest for busy nurses Includes while Ðeluxe 
:


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hanðsClme httle pen light .. all sil1Jer fmrstJed 
o Change compartment, key chall'. 
, No. 291 Pal Kil . . . . . . . . 4.95 '". 
3 Initials enlraved on shears. add 50.. per kit. 


Bzzz MEMO-TIMER TIme hot packs, heat '" ro ."", 
lamps, perk meters. Remembar to check vital signs 
 ø " .,i 
give medication, etc. lightweight, compact n Y.z" dia), , 
sets to bUlZ 5 to 60 min. Key ling. Swiss made. 
 ,. 
No. M'22 Timer. . . . . . .4.95 el. .... .' 
3armore 3.95 ea.i6 or more 3.50 ea. .... ... 



 
 EXAMINING PENLIGHT 
White barrel with caduceus imprint, aluminum 
band and clip. 5" long. U S_ made. baUeries mcluded Ire- 
- - placement batteries available any store). Your own hght. gift boxed. 
No. 007 Penlipt. . 3.00 ea. Your Inlli.l. enlra'ed. .dd 50. per lip.. 


.. .- - .....-.......... 



Whittenton fåJhiollA 
Uni/ofPt 
 


New "Saucy" Bump Toe Moc 
little fashion notches run around sole and 
heel; latest bumper toe look with 
=- big bold eyelets; sturdy extra hght 
cushion crepe sole and heel; finest 
long-wearing white glove leather 
the ideal shoe to feel pretty 
in uniform. Fit guaranteed 
or return (unmarrE-dJ 
for Size exchange 
No. 854 Saucy Shoe 
...16.95 pro 


( 


-- 


., 



 


MISS FIVE. 
Umque smock style with a httle 
I.rl look Generous patch pock- 
ets. inner surgical pocket 
Short sleeves 100% Dacron 
Double Knit. 
STYLE No. 4632 
3/4.15116...21.95 


, 
.. '\ 


, 



 



 


SIZES. 
u.a;I-11 
..C,..r(-l-l1 ' 

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.REEVA 
Young fresh multi-luck bib 2- 
button cuff Gusset 
. sleeves 
130'7 0 nacron Double Knit 
STYLE No. 4697 
6.20.4 16 Petite... 22.95 
141f2.26'h...24.95 
15% Do<.on/25% Cotlon 
STYLE No. 4797 
6-2D. 4.16 Petite... 16.95 
14%-26%.. .17.95 


C 
.1 


. , 


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1 


.GIBSON GIRL 
Youthful hip nse WIlst, mini 
soft shirred skirt. pleated 
blouse. Inner surgical pocket 
100% Polyester Warp Knit :t;. 
sleeves. 
STYLE No. 4624 
314.15116... 18.95 
60% Dacron, 40% Nylon cord 


l'Es,:
 
e;:s. 
314.15/16. .15.95 


Famous 
NLJRSE 
J\.1:ATES & 

hær 


New "Kork
 Featherweight Style 
Extremely lightweight. . . '11lIth the new 
"bottom" look Smlrt comfortable lace- it 
up heel oxford. Thick Slm cork sole .......... 
with Hil" cork heel (very sllp-reslstln" ','" ) 
outwears crepeJ. White washable 

 
soft glove upper leather. tricot 
 
 V . 
lined. arch vents fit guaran- 
 
teed or return (unmarred) 
for size eJichange. 
No. 638 Kork.Lite Shoe \.. 
. . . 16.95 pro 


IIUS: 
AAorA 1-11 
..r c: 4"J.11 

__
I . er E: '.11 


iliA 


... 


All-Weather NURSES' CAPE 


St,y snug In cool weather dry IR the rain 
Traditional Navy with Bught Red lining 
flRest lallorlng of 65% Dacron polyester, 
35
Q combad cotlon lepel trealed tOO'\. 
Nylon Duralyn IInlng_ Sn.iP fasteners. arm 
openings Matching head scarf SMALL (up to 
34 busU. MEDIUM 135381 or LARGE 139421 
specify Slle on coupon. 
No. Ii58 Cape . . . . . . . 14.95 ea. 
3 Sold Inltlall In collar. Id1l1.00 per cape. 
t. U 
_ _ .. b A lifetime of service 
for visiting nurses! finest black 
" thick 
genuine cowhide. beautrfully crlfted with 
ruued stitched Ind rivet construction 
Water repellant Roomy mtellor, with snip- 
m washable liner and compartments to 
. 


n

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tr

d:ro: e
ol 
" \ 
 TWD ru
ed carrying straps. 6" x 6" x 12". 
1 . r' Your Initials gold embossed fREE on top_ An 
P'J
tf1dlßl value of superb quahty. 

oJ 1M4t1 801 (with liner). . 37.95 ea. 
Extr. liner No. 4415. . . . . _ . _ 6.95 ea. 


t. 


<CD 

. 


news 


(Continued from page /3) 
plan are discriminatory. in that the 
residual benefits in event of the death 
of the beneficiary are only paid to the 
surviving spouse in the case of female 
beneficiary. if the widower is incapaci- 
tated and wholly supported by his wife. 
"Similarly. there is a difference in 
the treatment of the surviving children 
between a male and female beneficiary. 
" . . . Male and female employees 
are required to pay the same rate of 
premium and should be entitled to the 
same benefits." 


H.C. Labor Relations Act Gives 
Govt. RNs Bargaining Rights 
Vancouver, R.C - Employees in the 
British Columbia government service 
are expected to begin collective bargain- 
ing early in 1974. The new Public Ser- 
vice Labour Relations Act allows these 
government employees - including 
about 750 registered nurses - to en- 
gdge in collective bargaining for the 
first time in the province's history. 
The Registered Nurses' Association 
of British Columbia began prepara- 
tions for these new bargaining activities 
in the fall of 1973. Ann Sutherland. 
director of continuing education at 
Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops. 
assisted the association for 10 weeks 
in the education and information pro- 
gram for nurses employed in the pub- 
lic service. 
Ms. Sutherland said. "I've been 
meeting with groups of registered 
nurses covered by the new legislation. 
I n our discussions. I have explained 
the Act and the 1TJethod of bargaining 
prescribed. . . , and also assisted with 
the gathering of items to be negotiat- 
ed." 
Registered nurses and registered 
psychiatric nurses - some 2.000 in 
total- form the nurses' bargaining 
unit. which is one of three units provid- 
ed for in the new legislation. The other 
two units are the licensed professional 
bargaining unit and a public service 
bargaining unit for all others employ- 
ed by the provincial government and 
covered by the legislation. 
Two collective dgreements will 
apply to each bargaining unit. First 
there is to be a master agreement to 
include all the terms anå conditions 
of employment that are common to all 
employees in the bargaini ng unit. 
Nurses will then split to negotiate two 
subsidiary agreements; one will be for 
RNs and registered psychiatric nurses 


employed in institutions. and the other 
will cover employees. such as public 
health nurses. who do not work in insti- 
tutions. The subsidiary agreements will 
cover items specific to these groups. 
The nurses' bargaining committee. 
established from a joint organiLing 
group of the RNABC and the Registered 
Psychiatric Nurses' Association of 
British Columbia. is preparing contract 
proposals. A smaller joint group has 
been elected to negotiate. with the help 
of professional staff from each nurses' 
association. 


McGill Offers Master's Program 
To Nurses And Nonnurses In '74 
MOlllreal, P.Q. - McGill University 
School of Nursing will offer a new 
master's degree program with two op- 
tIons: nurse clinician and research, 
beginning in September 1974. By taking 
a qualifying year. non nurses with a 
B.A. or B.Se. degree in either social or 
biological sciences may enter either 
option of the master's degree program 
m nursmg. 
The one-year qualifying program 
for non nurse baccalaureate graduates 
includes three nursing courses with 
concurrent field experience. a course 
on history aJld development in nursing. 
and one elective. which will be ph) siol- 
ogy in most cases. The qualifying year 
will also be offered in 
eptember 11)74. 
The length of the master's program. 
minus the qualifying time. will be two 
academic years; part-time study may 
be arranged for both the master's pro- 
gram and the qualifying year. 
To be admitted to the nurse clinician 
option of the master's program. regis- 
tered nurses must have outstanding 
achievement at the baccalaureate level. 
baccalaureate preparation in nursing 
comparable to the B.N. or B.Se. (Nurs- 
ing) program offered at MeGill. and 
accomplishment and development as a 
nurse. 
For the research option. in addition 
to outstanding achievement at the 
baccalaureate level. and accomplish- 
ment and development as a nurse. the 
nurse needs baccalaureate preparation 
in nursing comparable to the B.Sc. 
(Nursing) program offered at McGill. 
The nurse clinician option is design- 
ed to prepare nurses t0i the expanded 
function of nursing in any field. includ- 
ing health centers and family pi act ice 
units. The research option tocuses on 
research in clinicdl nursing or in health 
care provision .1I1d evaluation. 
Dr. Moyra Allen, professor of nur!>- 
ing. is directing the development of 
ML-Gill school of nur!>ing's research 
unit. The nur'iing facult) plans to pro- 
vide demonstration projects in the 
expanded function ot nursing. 
' 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 15 



IE 


VANGUARD 
OF CONTEMPORARY NURSING 


Trend-setting Mosby texts delineate 
modern nursing ideas and techniques. 


A New Book! 


Johns 


PHARMACODYNAMICS 
AND PATIENT CARE 


Proliferation of knowledge in pharmacology has 
created a veritable avalanche of information on the 
sources, structure, function, actions and interactions 
of drugs. To expect future nurses to store isolated 
bits of information on this ever-increasing multitude 
of drugs is impractical and even hazardous. This new 
text places the study of drugs within a meaningful 
framework of patient problems and relates informa- 
tion vital to the professional nurse's role in planning 
patient care. Unlike conventional approaches which 
group drugs by chemical structure or body system 
effect, this approach allows for single, in-depth 
presentation of drugs with known therapeutic effec- 
tiveness. It views each medication in relation to the 
biochemical or physiological effect it produces to 
control specific functional disorders and provides 
guidelines for nursing actions that contribute to the 
effectiveness of drug therapy. From this pharmaco- 
dynamic perspective, students learn to formulate 
nursing care plans that protect the patient's resources, 
support the action of medications administered and 
make optimum use of physiologic function restored 
by the drug. Chapters are arranged in units represent- 
ing commonalities of patient problems with each 
chapter designed as an independent module. Students 
can analyze and compare the effects of drugs used to 
control hemodynamics; activity and pain; anabolic- 
catabolic balance; reproduction and fertility; infec- 
tion and inflammation; and excretion of fluid, 
metabolic wastes, and toxicants. Each section thor- 
oughly discusses effector sites, the drugs predictable 
action in modifying physiologic action and its pos- 
sible adverse effects. Numerous line drawings lend 
added emphasis to the discussions. Although change 
is constant in pharmacology, this new text provides 
students with lasting guidelines for the study of any 
drugs with comparable pharmacodynamic effects. 
By MARJORIE P. JOHNS, R.N., B.S., M.S. January, 1974. 
Approx. 384 pages, 7" x 10", 62 illustrations in 49 figures. 
About $8.90. 


New 3rd Edition! 


Hart 


THE ARITHMmC OF 
DOSAGES AND SOLUßONS: 
A Programmed Presentation 


I n this new 3rd edition, simplicity is definitely a 
virtue. Vital information on systems and procedures 
used in preparing drug dosages and solutions is 
presented in step-by-step, easy to digest pieces. 
Students are allowed to pace their own learning and 
to do it independent of instructor and classroom. 
Program frames proceed in logical order; each step 
builds on the one before; correct answers to each 
problem are revealed immediately at the end of the 
exercise offering maximum learning reinforcement. 
This innovative self-directed learning approach is 
designed for student nurses who possess the basic 
mathematical skills of addition, subtraction, multipli- 
cation and division. For those who need a refresher 
on fractions, decimals, percentages and ratios, a brief, 
but extremely helpful, review is provided. Convenient 
sections on abbreviations commonly used in medica- 
tion orders and formulas for calculating infant's and 
children's dosages are also included for reference and 
review purposes. I n addition to these standard fea- 
tures this new edition conveys a wealth of new 
infor
ation and has been totally reworked and 
reworded to insure clear and accurate explanations. 
Updated and expanded discussions precisely demon- 
strate how to calculate intravenous fluid flow and the 
use of the 10% rule for converting from one system 
of measurement to another. Seven new problems 
clarify an excellent presentation on insulin. All of the 
superb illustrations are also new to this edition. 
By LAURA K. HART, R.N., B.S.N., M.Ed., M.A:: Ph.l?,. 
April, 1973. 3rd edition, 76 pages plus FM I-VIII, 7 x 10 . 
Price, $4.15. 


INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE: To receive a complimentary 
copy for firsthand evaluation, write to the Textbook 
Department mentioning your position, course and 
enrollment. 


16 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


JANUARY 1974 



A New Book! 


Barber-Stokes-B i II i n gs 


ADULT AND CHILD CARE: 
A Client Approach to Nursing 


The first medical-surgical nursing text to integrate 
adult and child care according to basic human needs, 
this landmark work stresses common, recurring health 
care problems including those in home and non- 
hospital settings. Taking a unique client approach, the 
text's comprehensive coverage extends from neonatal 
pediatrics to the physiologic changes of aging. Dis- 
cussions consider 20th century phenomena not often 
included in medical-surgical texts: artificial insemina- 
tion; noise pollution; organ transplants; genetic coun- 
seling; to name only a few. Students gain insight and 
instruction in: need promotion; the foundations of 
deprivation; learning disorders; crisis intervention; 
health hazard appraisal; and much more. 
By JANET MILLER BARBER, R.N., M.S.; LILLIAN 
GATLIN STOKES, R.N., M.S.; and DIANE McGOVERN 
BILLINGS, R.N., M.S. May, 1973.814 pages plus FM I-XVI, 
8" x 10",516 illustrations. Price, $16.30. 


New 3rd Edition! 


Havener et al 


NURSING CARE IN EYE, 
EAR, NOSE, AND 
THROAT DISORDERS 


This new edition emphasizes the nurse's expanding 
role in the health care system. It offers vital assistance 
in the assessment role and in the development of 
nursing care plans based on thorough understanding 
of the pathophysiology, treatment and related prob- 
lems of patients with eye, ear, nose and throat 
disorders. Significantly revised, this edition places 
increased emphasis on patient teaching and nurse- 
patient communications. Highlights include: a new 
chapter on nursing care and assessment of patients 
with visual disabilities; more extensive coverage of the 
laryngeal examination and carcinoma of the larynx; 
and new material on the causes of hearing loss. 
By WILLIAM H. HAVENER, B.A., M.S.IOphth.l, M.D.; 
WILLIAM H. SAUNDERS, B.A., M.D.; CAROL FAIR 
KEITH, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.; and ANORA W. PRESCOTT, 
R.N. February, 1974. 3rd edition. aoprox. 448 pages, 6y," x 
9y,", 357 illustrations. About $12.35. 


A New Book! 


FAMILY-CENTERED 
COMMUNITY NURSING: 
A Soåocultural Framework 


This highly useful book of readings examines the 
cultural and psychosocial factors which determine 
whether families are likely to make constructive use 
of available health care services. Emphasizing the 
varied facets of family and community living which 
must be considered in planning and delivering health 
care programs, it illustrates the nature of new roles 
the nurse is expected to assume. The nurse-midwife, 
clinical associate, family nurse practitioner, nurse in 
independent practice and crisis intervention nurse - 
all receive close consideration. Moving from broad 
issues to specific community problems, the readings 
stress the importance of understanding cultural and 
social factors including appropriate methods of com- 
munication, data-gathering and analysis, and inter- 
personal relations. Salient factors concerning back- 
ground, customs and attitudes of minority groups are 
included in numerous articles. 
Edited by ADINA M. REINHARDT, Ph.D.: and MILDRED 
D. QUINN, R.N., M.S.; with 40 cOl')tributors. October, 1973. 
304 pages plus FM I-XVI, 6y," x 9y,". Price, $6.60. 


INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE: To receive a complimentary 
copy for firsthand evaluation, write to the Textbook 
Department mentioning your position, course and 
enrollment. 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY L TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAO 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


JANUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 17 



IE 


VANGUARD 
OF CONTEMPORARY NURSING 


, 


Mosby references lead the way to career advancement. 


A New Book! 


Roberts 


A REVIEW OF PEDIATRIC NURSING 


This concise, question-and-answer review of the entire 
spectrum of pediatric nursing places emphasis on 
family centered nursing care. With content structured 
around the wellness-illness continuum, it considers all 
aspects of a particular situation down to the critical 
details. Psycho-social, economic, pathogenic, diag- 
nostic, and nursing management considerations - all 
are detailed_ Both the positive mental health of the 
sick child and the psychological needs of his family 
are stressed. A section on pediatric pharmacology is 
included. 
By FLORENCE BRIGHT ROBERTS, R.N., M.N. Aprit, 
1974. Approx. 240 pages, 5%" x 8%". About $6.25. 


A New Book! 


Lipkin 


PSYCHOSOCIAL ASPECTS OF 
MATERNAl/CHILD NURSING 


This new book considers behavioral and environ- 
mental conditions which affect the family unit and 
regards physical and emotional growth as inter- 
dependent factors. Discussions follow the family 
from premarital counseling through the child's adoles- 
cence and outline nursing assessment and care plans 
for each situation. Coverage of maternal deprivation 
and emotional impacts, the terminally ill child, and 
family reorganization at childbirth is especially en- 
lightening. 
By GLADYS B. LIPKIN, R.N., M.s. April, 1974. Approx. 
192 pages, 7" x 10",31 illustrations. About $6.55. 


A New Book! 


Tobin et al 


THE PROCESS OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT: 
COMPONENTS fOR CHANGE 


Staff development is fast becoming an urgent issue 
with recent legislation requiring nursing license re- 
newal. This new book sets guidelines for establishing 
or altering staff education programs and provides 
information on teaching methods, aids and evalua- 
tion; organization and administration; adult learning; 
and more. 
By HELEN M. TOBIN, R.N., M.S.N.; PAT S. YODER, R.N., 
M.S.N.; PEGGY K. HULL, R.N., M.A.; and BARBARA J. 
CLARK, R.N., M.A.; with two contributing authors. April, 
1974. Approx. 224 pages, 7" x 10", 21 illustrations. About 
$9.50_ 


A New Book! 


Vitale-Schultz-Nugent 


A PROBLEM SOLVING APPROACH TO 
NURSING CARE PLANS: A Program 


A self-teaching tool, this new programmed approach 
aids in formulating relevant nursing care plans. It 
examines the purposes of the nursing care plan; data 
collection; deduction; nursing diagnosis; and more. 
Case studies reinforce the concepts demonstrated. 
By BARBARA ANN VITALE, R.N., M.A.; NANCY V. 
SCHULTZ, R.N., M.A.; and PATRICIA MARY NUGENT, 
R.N., M.S. April, 1974. Approx. 128 pages, 7" x 10", 28 
illustrations. About $5.25. 


A New Book! 


T reece-Treece 


ELEMENTS OF RESEARCH 
IN NURSING 


This new book offers concise explanations for each 
step of the research process. I t treats the relationship 
between theory and method in depth and provides 
tips on writing, reporting and publishing research 
findings. 
By ELEANOR WALTERS TREECE, R.N., B_A., M.Ed., 
Ph.D.; and JAMES WILLIAM TREECE, Jr., B.R.E., B.A., 
M.A. June, 1973. 284 pages plus FM I-XII, 7" x 10", 56 
illustrations. Price, $9.75. 


A New Book! 


Story 


CAREER MOBILITY: 
Implementing the ladder Concept in 
Associate Degree and Practical Nursing 
Curricula 
This new book serves as an excellent model of the 
successful "ladder concept" program in nursing edu- 
cation. It presents guidelines for adapting curricula in 
institutions having both Associate Degree and 
LPN/L VN programs and completely outlines course 
structure, content, unit hours, and texts suited to the 
program. 
By DONNA KETCHUM STORY, R.N., B.S., M.A. March, 
1974. Approx. 200 pages, 6'%" x 9'%", 16 illustrations. About 
$6.25. 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRRDR 
THE C. V MOSBY COMPANY, L TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAD 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


18 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


JANUARY 1974 



.
 


"'\ 
1f"ò'" 


JANUARY 1974 


Guest Editorial 


The Honorable Marc Lalonde 


Minister of National Health 


and Welfare 


I am grateful for this opportunity to 
share some of my views with the reg- 
istered nurses of this country. As 
ministcr of National Health and \VeI- 
fare. I have had occasion to appreciate 
the contribution of nur!.es to health 
care in Canada. 
Two of the key attributes I have 
noticed are your significant role in 
providing the essential element of 
continuity to the client's care. and the 
versatility of your services, which have 
facilitated the development of alter- 
native means of providing necessary 
client services. Also, because of your 
long history of dedication to preventive 
services, your impact will be felt even 
more. now that our government is 
striving to locus on a more p:>sitive 
approach of health promotion. This 
should result in a better halance between 
prevention and cure. 
Recently. my department !.tudied the 
major causes of death and sickness in 
Canada to identify better our main 
health probkms. From this evolved a 
conceptual framework that allow
 a 
more integrated approach to the 
tudy 
of the whole health lïdd; at the same 
time, it provides us with potential Ii.)r 
a broader spectrum of health-promot ion 
activities. This framework. which we 
call the Health Field Concept. has four 
principle clements. human hiology. en- 
vironment. life-style. and health-care 
organization. 


Human biology includes all those 
aspects of health that are endogenous 
to the individual. such as genetic inher- 
itances, the aging process. the health 
consequences of puberty, the metabolic 
processes, overall processes of matura- 
tion, and so on. 
The second element, identilïed as the 
environmenC includes the conditions in 
the societal and physical environment 
of the individual that affect his health. 
yet over which he has little or no con- 
trol. In this case. unsafe or contaminat- 
cd food!.; drugs. or cosmetics; noise 
and water pollution; cro\\-dcd cities; 
and stresses of urban living arc part of 
the environment from which individuals 
cannot always protect themselves. 
Life-style, the third clement. relates 
to self-imposed risks that result from 
personal decisions and habits over which 
the individual has some degree of 
control. The individual decides whether 
to smo"e. to overeat, to use alcohol 
excessivcly, or to lead a sedentary life. 
The life-style pursued by the individual 
wilI affect the requirements for using 
the health system. including its 1
lcilitie!. 
and human resources. 
The health-care organi/atlon, or 
fourth element, is known to all of us a<; 
the health-care sy!.tem and consist!. of 
the quantity. quality. arrangement. 
nature, and relationships of people 
and resources. It includes hospitals 
and extendcd-care institutions. public 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 19 



and community health care services, 
and ambulance services; both person- 
nel and facilities are part of this 
element. 
As we use this conceptual framework 
as a basis for assessing federal health 
policy, we are discovering that the 
causes of sickness and death in this 
country are found in the first three 
elements. Yet, until now, up to ninety- 
five cents of every dollar of our re- 
sources have been spent on the fourth 
element. It is this discrepancy we are 
striving to correct. 
As we reviewed the major causes of 
death in Canada in 1971, we found 
heart diseases to be the most significant 
after the age of 50. Motor-vehicle 
accidents and all other accidents ac- 
counted for more than one-half and 
even up to two-thirds of deaths in young 
men between the ages of 5-40. Suicide 
was a signitïcant cause of death as early 
as 15 years of age. Respiratory dis- 
eases and lung cancer accounted for 
15 percent of deaths for men between 
the ages of 55-70. 
The morbidity in hospitalized pa- 
tients corresponds to the aoove causes, 
with the additional important fact that 
one-third of all hospital beds and hospi- 
tal days are for mentally ill patients. 
Indeed, in 1969, mental illness was 
responsible for some two million hos- 
pital days. We recognize that environ- 
mental and life-style factors, such as 
malnutrition, excessive smoking, lack of 
physical exercise, daily stresses, air 
and water pollution, and so on, have an 
important bearing on the major health 
problems noted, 
A shift from a cure orientation to 
health promotion does not negate the 
need and value of therapeutic services; 
however, we must recognize the need 
for, and the development of, programs 
20 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


that foster a safer environment and 
promote life-styles conducive to good 
health. Such programs should result in 
greater returns from our efforts and 
financial expenditures. 
Acceptance of this challenge has 
many implications for health profes- 
sionals. governments, health institu- 
tions, and individual citizens. It means 
better identification of those compo- 
nents of daily living that are conducive 
not only to longevity, but also to a 
happier and fuller life for Canadians. 
The search for these positive factors 
and their reinforcement should gradual- 
ly contribute to the lowering of the 
negative factors previously identified. 
Simultaneously, increased efforts 
should be made and resources allotted 
to augment research aimed at explor- 
ing the most effective ways of reaching 
people to persuade them to adopt 
life-styles conducive to good health, Of 
equal importance is the search for sen- 
sitive health indicators that will serve 
to diagnose the health status of our 
diverse communities and to measure 
effectiveness of new health programs. 
If we are to increase the individual's 
responsibility for his own health, we 
will require additional health education 
and better orientation to these prevent- 
ive resources. For nurses and other 
health professionals, role reevaluation 
will be needed more than ever; this, in 
turn. implies necessary role and curri- 
cular adjustments. 
The development of greater equil- 
ibrium between cure and prevention is 
the responsibility facing individuals, 
communities, nurses, physicians, other 
health workers, and governments, work- 
ing cooperatively at every level. We 
are all implicated as we strive to en- 
hance the quality of life for Canadians 
through a healthier state. 


As the largest single health profession 
in Canada, your manpower capacity is 
unparalleled in helping to make our 
health system more sensitive and 
responsive. 
 


JANUARY 1974 



The problem-solving 


technique: 


is it relevant to practice? 


Now that the problem-solving technique 
is a well-entrenched part of the reper- 
toire of nurse educators, it seems 
reasonable to examine its influence on 
teaching and on nursing practice. 
The use of the term "problem-solv- 
ing technique" in nursing literature is 
fairly recent. In 1960, Abdellah et at 
wrote: "Nurses need training in the 
identification of both types of problems 
[ covert and overt] , as well as exper- 
ience in total problem-solving. "* 
Analysis of nursing problems and 
selection of the necessary course of 
action for the nurse to adopt is believ- 
ed by these authors to be a basic ele- 
ment of nursing practice. 
This idea is expanded by Abdellah 
and Levine, who state, " . . . the unique 
function of the professional nurse is 
conceived to be the identification or 
diagnosis of the nursing problem and 
deciding upon a course of nursing action 
to be followed for the sol ution of the 


· F.G. Abddlah et a/., Patiellt-Celltered 
Approach(',
 to N IIßillR, N.Y" Macmillan. 
\%0. p. 10. 
JANUARY 1974 


If problem-solving techniques are foreign to nursing practice, then teachers 
should realize this. And nurses in clinical practice are the persons to inform 
them. 


Barbara Geach, S.R.N., S.CM., M.S.N. 


problem. . . . "* * 
There has been a steady progression 
from viewing the problem-solving 
technique as a basic tool to seeing it as 
a central professional activity, one 
that marks the user as professional. 
I have not found nearly as many 
clinical authors as educators writing 
with enthusiasm about the problem- 
solving technique, or explicitly referring 
to it as the basis of their practice. This 
may be because when one reads closely 
the literature that has appeared, one 
finds that it is sometimes nursing prob- 
lems that are to be solved, and some- 
times patient problems. I do not know 
whether these are two kinds of prob- 
lems, or one. 
It is not within my !>Cope to clarify 
this issue; but the presence of this 
confusion suggests that, although the 
technique is well established - among 
educators, at least - it i!> not as clearly 
understood as we believe. Perhaps the 


.. F-.G. Abddldh. and E. I evine. Belter 
Patiel/t Care ThrollKh NIIHill
 R('.\('arch. 
N.Y.. Mdcmillan. \965, p. 12. 


confusion accounts, in part, for the 
silence aoout it from clinicians. They 
may generally feel that nursing prob- 
lems are up to the teachers to clarify. 
and that their business concerns patient 
problems, which can be. and often are. 
expressed in terms of medical diagnosis 
or psychosocial adjustment. and dealt 
with in those terms, clinically and on 
paper. 
Whatever the reason, the small num- 
ber of contributions from clinicians is 
disturbing. Perhaps clinicians who use 
the problem-solving technique do not 
have time, energy, or talent to document 
its application. If so, this worries me. 
Too often, students regard the intel- 
lectual exercises set by their teachers 
as so much busywork. Students submit 
nursing care plans, nursing diagnostic 
interviews, and so on with remarkable 


The author is a grddudte of the Univer!>itv 
College Hospital. london. Engldnd. and 
the Y die l'nivcrsity School of Nursing. 
New Haven. Conn. She is A"i"tant Pro- 
fessor at the Universitv of Connecticut 
School of Nur,ing. W,lIlingford. Conn. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 21 



docility; yet I have the feeling they are 
horcd doing these things and cannot 
wait to be out of school and function- 
ing in a context that demands none of 
these evidences of cerebral activity. 
Not being a clinician at present, I 
cannot right this situation by describ- 
ing nursing care I give using the prob- 
lem-solving technique. So I urge my 
fellow nurses in clinical practice to 
come out in print with lively documen- 
tations about the usefulness of the 
technique. Otherwise, how can I. in 
conscience, continue to exact labori- 
ously constructed exercises in problem- 
solving from my students, when I lack 
evidence from clinicians that it is mean- 
ingful and leads to better care? 
As I write, I have the fantasy that 
some clinicians reading this are smiling 
and saying to themselves: "I'm not 
going to turn out written documenta- 
tion of this process in action. The 
problem-solving technique is a good 
tool for students to use; however, once 
they know how to use it, problem-solv- 
ing will become second nature. I do it 
automatically. No longer is it conscious, 
any more than driving my car involves 
being conscious of all the steps involv- 
ed. I no longer need to categorize my 
thoughts and actions that way." 
So much for fantasy; if it is accurate, 
I would like to know. And it is this 
intormation I would like to see docu- 
mented by clinicians. I would especially 
like them to say how it became "second 
nature." Was it gradual? Or did it sud- 
denly "click," after they had carried 
the whole process through automatical- 
ly, that they had actually used the 
problem-solving technique'! 
I can remember, as a jW1ior, realiz- 
ing that a patient was having a grand 
mal seizure. I removed her dentures 
and turned her head to one side, and 
then pushed a nearby piece of furniture 
away from her thrashing limbs. I cer- 
tainly was not conscious of assessing 
her. planning, or implementing my plan. 
I guess when I thought about it after- 
ward, with some surprise at my !.peedy 
reactions, I was consciously evaluating 
the effectivene!.:> of my action to pre- 
22 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


serve her airway and prevent injury. 
But I had not thought this through 
conceptually as I worked. For me, the 
process suddenly "clicked." Before, 
it had to be thought through painfully 
and slowly; now this was no longer 
true. In retrospect, I can describe the 
components of the nursing process as 
I applied it - something I didn't do 
then and didn't find necessary at the 
time. Perhaps experienced clinicians 
would feel as artificial as I, if they were 
to relate their nursing care in terms of 
the problem-solving process. 
I have used this. "grand mal seizure" 
experience in teaching students. When 
they seem oored with the chores of writ- 
ing nursing care plans, for example, I 
have tried to indicate how the problem- 
solving technique governs good practi- 
ce, even when it is carried out in a few 
seconds without writing down each step. 
"Eventually" I tell them, "problem 
solving becomes such a practiced skill 
that you can exercise it without all this 
thinking and writing. I am simply try- 
ing to help you be conscious of and 
articulate the steps in your practice. 
When you have to apply these steps 
quickly, you can do so with reasonable 
assurance that you are operating logi- 
cally and safely, because all the relevant 
data have been taken into account." 
I would find it helpful if I could 
point to examples other than the exper- 
ience I mentioned. Perhaps clinicians, 
remembering the painful process of 
their own learning, could help by 
making conscious once more their now 
unconscious skill in applying the tech- 
mque. 
But perhaps the students are right; 
maybe I am asking for an exercise that 
is only remotely, if at all, related to the 
real world of clinical practice. Just as a 
clinical phenomenon has to be stated in 
research terms to make it susceptible 
to scientific investigation, so a phrase 
which, in educational terms is full of 
meaning, may have to be rewritten 
carefully in clinical terms to make it 
meaningful to the clinician and the 
student. 
Clinical entities have to be concep- 


tualized carefully for teaching purposes. 
So it seems as if one might have to 
perform a kind of reverse conceptuali- 
zation with concepts that have become 
useful in teaching so as to make them 
useful in clinical practice. If this cannot 
be done, the value of a concept, even in 
teaching, may be rather restricted. For 
in nursing, what holds meaning in 
clinical practice must somehow be 
taught, and the two activities are too 
interdependent for each of them to 
develop jargon with limited value to 
the other. 
If, indeed, exercises in problem- 
solving techniques in nursing are foreign 
to real practice, then educators need 
to know this. And iftheproblem-solving 
technique is truly the basis for good 
practice, yet the means by which we 
seek to teach it is far removed from 
the way it is used in practice, then 
teachers must get together with clini- 
cians and evolve a common language, 
one that expresses the facts of practice 
authentically. 
The profession is not served by hav- 
ing its teachers and its practitioners 
running on parallel tracks' that never 
meet. The student can only be confused 
if the teachers who grade and evaluate 
her competence do so on the basis of 
criteria that hold no meaning for clin- 
icians and that practitioners laugh at as 
"okay for those ivory-tower, clinically 
inexperienced teachers." 
Ultimately, patient care will suffer if 
new graduates - who form a large 
proportion of the staff of hospitals- 
have to spend the first few months of 
their careers in practice shedding the 
dead trappings of their schooling, and 
learning a different professional lan- 
guage. And surely educators and prac- 
titioners have good patient care as a 
common goaL 
 


JANUARY 1974 



Electrophrenic respiration 
in quadriplegia 


Acute respiratory failure is commonly 
encountered and successfully managed 
in the respiratory units of large teach- 
ing hospitals. These units. staffed by 
anesthetists. respirologists. and highly 
trained nurses. have significantly re- 
duced the mortality rate; they owe their 
success to the team approach to respir- 
atory problems. These patients. cared 
for by nurses on a one-to-one ratio. are 
ventilated by various types of mechan- 
ical respirators that tide them over the 
acute stages of illness until satisfactory 
gaseous exchange recurs or until death. 
resulting from cerebral or cardiac 
reasons. supervenes. 
Approximately 10 percent of cases 
of respiratory failure are on a neuro- 
logical basis. The pulmondfY system is 
intact. but the central control or Its 
peripheral outt10w is deranged. Pa- 
tients in coma from head injury or 
increased intracranial pressure either 
recover with treatment or die. 
A patient who has a rare type of 
central nervous system viral infection. 
such as poliomyelitis. rhomboenceph- 
alitis. or Guillan-Barré syndrome. may 
survive with intact cerebral function 
but have impaired respiration due to 
involvement of the medullary respir- 
atory center. the anterior horn cells. or 
the ventral roots of the phrenic and 
intercostal nerves. Many of these pa- 
tients recover. but continue to sutfer 
from a hypoventilation syndrome char- 
JANUARY 1974 


How team members worked together to help a young quadriplegic regain 
some measure of independence. 


R.G. Vanderlinden, M.D., L. Gilpin, R.N., 
J. Harper, R.N., M. McClurkin, M.S.W., 
and D. Twilley, R.N. 


acterized by cyanosis. hypoxia. hyper- 
carbia. and re
plratory acidosis. espe- 
cially during sleep when there may be 
prolonged pericxJs of apnea (Ondine's 
curse*). 
The hypercarbia results in cerebral 
arterial dilatation and increased intra- 
cranial pressure. which cause matutinal 
headache. nausea. drowsiness. and 
confusion. These patients have been 
managed on a rocking bed or a cuirass- 
type ventilator during 
Ieep. This venti- 
latory lli>
i
tance tends to maintain p02 
and pC0 2 at the diurnal levels to \\ hich 
they have become accu
tomed. Obvi- 
ously these patients have little reserve. 
and even a mild respiratory infection 
is life threatening. 
A much rarer cause of acute respir- 


· According to Jahlons"ï
 /IIl/strateci 
Dictiol/llry oJ Epol/\'II/ic SYI/clrome.\ (///(/ 
DiWII.H'.\ 11/1(/ their .\'I'fltmym.\ (W.B. 
Saunders 19f191. "Ondine's cursc" is: 
"Failurc of dUlOmatic respiratory func- 
tion with dpned. especially evident 
duri ng sleep. and retdined ability to 
hrcathe on command, .Ondine's cursc' 
is helieved to have heen eoined bv [ a 
Dr.] Severinghdm. \\ ho relates it to the 
legend of Undine. a water nymph. who 
punished her mortal hushdnd hy depriv- 
ing him of the ahility to breathe dUto- 
maticall}. rhus. on falling asleep. he died. 
not being ahle 10 rememher to hre.llhe." 


atory failure is high cervical cord trau- 
ma. Although fractures and even di
- 
locations in the atlanto-axial (C I and 2) 
region are not uncommon. mo
t ot 
these injuries do not result in neurolog- 
ical deticit. If the spinal cord is signif- 
icantly traumatized above the origin
 
of the phrenic nerves. \\ hich arise from 
the third. fourth. and fifth cervical 
segments. apnea results immediatel)' 
and the patient is dead on arrival at the 
hospital. 
With increased public a\..arenes
 ,.nd 
training in the use of mouth-to-mouth 
respiration. some of these victims \\ ill 
survive in a state of complete quadri- 
plegia and total dependenq on me- 
chanical ventilation. This is a ne\\ prob- 
lem; fortunately. hO\\ever. a new solu- 
tion to chronic respirator) insufficiency 
has recently been developed - electro- 
phrenic respiration. 


Historical development of EPR 
In 1937. Waud reported that rabbits 
could be maintained in .1 satisfactory 
respiratory condition flU hours b) 
rhythmic electrical stimulation of the 
phrenic nerves.' Sarnoff (I94H) exper- 
imented with 
everal other 
pecies and 
noted that submaximal electric 
timula- 


'1 hc authors arc stdl'f mcmhers at the 
roronto \Vestern Hospit.IL Il'ronto. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 23 



tion of a single phrenic nerve produced 
adequate gaseous exchange for at least 
22 hours. 2 He coined the term "elec- 
trophrenic respiration" (EPI{) and even 
stimulated phrenic nerves percutane- 
ously in man. The technology was crude 
and the technique limited by the devel- 
opment of infection around the nerve. 
Glenn (1959) developed the first 
cardiac pacemaker by inducing, trans- 
cutaneously. an electric current in a 
buried electrode, using an external 
radio wave frequency power source. 3 
His success led to the development of 
suitable electrodes. radioreceivers. and 
a pacemaker for EPR. In 196R he 
reported using EPR to obtain ventila- 
tory assistance in a case of hypoven- 
tilation syndrome,4,5 
In Novcmber 1970, Dr. Glenn first 
implanted phrenic electrodes bilater- 
ally in a racing car driver who had 
sustained an odontoid fracture and a 
complete spinal cord lesion at the C2 
level. 6 He has now been totally main- 
tained by EPR for three years. Since 
then. Dr. Glenn has implanted bilateral 
electrodes in three patients with a high 
cervical cord lesion; our case is the 
first outside the United States. 


Case report 
A 17-year-old girl dived into the 
shallow end of a swimming pool on 
September 2, 1972, sustaining a frac- 
ture of C I and a fracture dislocation 
of the odontoid process of C2. She 
was rendered apneic and lay submerged 
and lifeless in the pool until one of her 
companions jumped in and administer- 
ed mouth-to-mouth respiration while 
they were rushed to the local hospital. 
An endotracheal tube was inserted 
and she was transferred to the neuro- 
surgical service of the Toronto West- 
ern Hospital; ventilation was main- 
tained by a Bird respirator. The patient 
had complete tlaccid quadriplegia and 
an anesthesia level at the mandible. 
Although conscious and oriented, she 
was unable to breathe when the respir- 
ator was turned off briefly. A trache- 
ostomy was performed, skull tongs 
were applied, and constant urinary 
24 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


drainage was established. The girl was 
placed on a Stryker frame in the respir- 
atory unit. 
As the spinal cord lesion was com- 
plete from the onset. no hope of re- 
covery could be expected; we antici- 
pated that the patient would die of 
pneumonia. Her system adjusted to the 
quadriplegic state and after three 
months it was apparent she would sur- 
vive for an indefinite period. 
The prospect of an intelligent, 17- 
year-old girl spendi ng the rest of her 
life in the respiratory unit of an acute 
general hospital seemed unacceptable 
on human itarian and econom ic 
grounds. To improve this patient's 
quality of life, to give her a certain 
degree of mobility. and to permit trans- 
fer to a rehabilitation or chronic care 
institution. we decided to investigate 
the suitability of electrophrenic respir- 
ation. 
Our tirst priority was to establish 
the electric excitability of the phrenic 
nerves and their ability to produce 
contraction of the diaphragm. This 
was done by inserting a trans venous 
pacemaker into the right atrium and by 
stimulating the right phrenic nerve 
through the wall of the heart. Diaph- 
ragmatic contraction was apparent 
on fluoroscopy, and clinically a hiccup 
was produced. 
Our second priority was to ensure 
that the phrenic nerve electrodes. the 
radioreceivers. and the pacemaker it- 
self were available. Dr. Glenn's electro- 
nic equipment had largely been custom- 
made by the Avery Laboratories, Fra- 
mingdale, N.Y., working in conjunc- 
tion with his electronic engineer. Avery 
assured us that the necessary equip- 
ment was available and that the com- 
pany's engineer, Marc Weinstein, 
would be present at the operation to 
monitor it during the various stages 
of the procedure. 
Our third priority, to learn the 
operative technique, culminated in a 
trip to Yale University, New Haven, 
Conn., to meet Dr. Glenn and observe 
him implanting a phrenic pacemaker. 
On May I, 1973, the patient was 


anesthetized by endotracheal anes- 
thesia, the tracheostomy tube removed, 
and the tracheostomy stoma prepared 
with Betadine and occluded with sterile 
gauze and Vidrape. A horizontal in- 
cision was made about 3 cm. above the 
medial third of the left clavicle, and the 
scalenus anticus muscle was identitied. 
The phrenic nerve running down- 
ward along the anterior surface of the 
muscle was stimulated to establish its 
identity and confirm diaphragmatic 
contraction. A bipolar platinum elec- 
trode, enclosed in a silastic cuff, was 
placed around the nerve and anchored 
firmly to the underlying muscle by su- 
tures. A subcutaneous pocket was devel- 
oped along the lateral chest wall, and 
the electrode wires were brought down 
subcutaneously into the pocket where 
they were connected to the radiore- 
ceiver. The wounds were then sprayed 
with Polybactrin and closed. 
A sterile antenna, attached to the 
phrenic pacemaker, was held over the 
radioreceiver; the left hemidiaphragm 
contracted rhythmically. A similar 
electrode and radioreceiver were im- 
planted on the opposite phrenic nerve 
so the right hemidiaphragm also res- 
ponded to radio frequency stimulation. 
Postoperatively. the patient was 
placed back on thc Bird respirator until 
the wounds had healed. Pacing was 
begun two weeks later, but initially she 
could tolerate only six minutes on each 
side before becoming fatigued, as the 
diaphragm had not contracted for over 
eight months. Her tolerance improved 
rapidly and, by July I, total electro- 
phrenic respiration was established. 
Each side is stimulated for 12 hours 
alternatively and this is sufficient to 
maintain normal blood pH, p02' and 
pC0 2 . The tidal volumes measured on 
each side are approximately 50U ml. 
and appear to be improving steadily. 
We removed the patient's tracheos- 
tomy tube. but kept the tracheostomy 
open with a small silastic stomal tube 
that permits periodic suctioning. The 
stomal tube is corked to allow normal 
speech. 
Prior to surgery, the patient learn- 
JANUARY 1974 



ed a breathing technique of contracting 
her platysma, sternomastoid, and trape- 
zius muscles, which are innervated by 
cranial nerves. She can maintain this 
"breathing'" for 10 minutes before she 
tires; this would allow sufficient time 
for her to summon help in an emergen- 
cy. Her nurse has been instructed to 
attach an Ambu bag to the stomal tube 
and assist respirations until the prob- 
lem has been solved. 
An additional fail-safe mechanism 
is the fact that, unlike patients with 
hypoventilation syndrome. the chemo- 
. receptors in the medullary respiratory 
center of quadriplegics are nonnally 
sensitive to elevated pC02. One night 
while our patient was sleeping, the 
pacing temporarily stopped and she 
began to "breathe" spontaneously. 
This awakened her, and the nurse who 
was in the room made necessary adjust- 
ments to the antenna to reestablish EPR. 


Respiratory nursing care 
Respiratory nursing care entails 
tracheotomy suctioning. changing the 
tracheotomy dressing, and checking 
the minute and tidal volumes to ensure 
adeq uate ventilation. 
The phrenic nerve pacer consists 
of four different parts. The two elec- 
trodes, as previously described, are 
wrapped around the phrenic nerves 
above the clavicles. Connected to each 
electrode is a receiver, situated sub- 
cutaneously under each axilla. A cir- 
cular antenna, placed externally over 
each receiver, transmits timed impulses 
from the pacer; these impulses initiate 
respiration (Figure J .) 
The current output of the pacer is 
measured in milliamperes and can be 
adjusted for each 12-hour period of 
pacing. The doctors initl..Jly set the 
current level and increased the dura- 
tion of pacing from 6 minutes to 20 
minutes on each side. The nurses then 
assumed the responsibility for pacing 
20 minutes on each side, 3 times daily, 
and progressed slowly over 6 weeks to 
continous phrenic nerve respiration. 
When the patient is in bed. the 
phrenic pacemaker is plugged into 
JANUARY 1974 


-=- 


- 



'
 

J " 
-- 


I 



 ..J 


-- 


. 


, 


--- 


, ......... 
, 



 



 
. 


\. 


Figure J: The patieflt with radiofrequenc)' phrenic nerve pacemaker, which is set 
at 2.0 milliamperes and powereJ by a transformer plugged into a wall outlet. The 
circular antenna taped to her chest induces a stimulating current in the subcutane- 
ous radio receiver attached to the electrode on the phrenic nen-e. 


a wall outlet; when she is in a wheel 
chair. the unit is battery powered. In 
the sitting position, more current is 
necessary to provide adequate tidal 
volwnes. Initially. tidal and minute 
volumes were measured and recorded 
every tive minutes: however. when 
total EPR was established, these re- 
cordi ngs were taken every four hours. 
The speech therapist saw the patient 
while she was still on the Bird respi- 
rator and taught her a form of glottal 
speech that could be maintained for 
a long period but required little air. 
Her vocal cords were quite tight and 
only a monotone was produced. After 
EPR was established. she was able 
to speak in a normal voice. with moder- 
ate range in volume. when the trache- 
otomy tube was corked and the cuff 
deflated. She is being taught to cough 
up mucous so she will not require 
deep suctioning. 


Quadriplegic nursing care 
The usual problems of nursing the 
quadriplegic existed in this patient. 
but were complicated by the high level 
of cord injury. She wa
 on a Stryker 
frame for six weeks with skull-tong 
traction. but tolerated the prone posi- 
tion poorly. Intensive skin care was 
required almost hourly. Once she was 
in a bed, sheepskins were used to pro- 
tect her skin and she was po
itioned 
with pillows and sandbags. 
As the 
ympathetic nervous supply 
to the body was destroyed. there wa<; 
no perspiration and her skin had to 


be protected against dryness. An ex- 
cessive sebaceous secretion developed 
on her face, creating moderately severe 
acne that required frequent cleansing. 
The skin under the antenna needed 
extra care. 
The physiotherapist applied daily 
ice packs to the patient's legs and put 
her joints through a full range of passive 
exercises to prevent contracture deform- 
ities. These treatments reduced muscle 
spasms that developed after three 
months and at times were severe. RolI
 
of padding were used in the hands to 
prevent finger contractures. 
Placing the patient in the chair was 
also a ditlìcult maneuver. A quadripleg- 
ic chair with horizomalleg support and 
head support was used; pillows 
upport- 
ed her head and arms. Tensor bandages 
were applied from the toes to the groin 
to help maintain blood pressure. and an 
abdominal binder supported the abdo- 
men and back. Jobst panty hose provid- 
ed good support but were abandoned 
when she gained weight and they be- 
came too tight. 
The back of the wheelchair was 
first placed at a 45-degree angle and 
slowly raised to an upright position. 
We had to lift the patient every halt 
hour to relieve pressure on her sacrum. 
The legs are lowered gradually to a 
45-degree angle. There has been some 
problem with spasms. causing her to 
hyperextend her back and slide down 
in the chair. 
Despite a good diet. profound mus- 
cle atrophy resulted in weight lo
s 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 25 



during the tÏrst three months, until 
the patient stabilized and started to 
regain weight as fat. Urinary drainage 
was accomplished by an indwelIing 
Folcy catheter with continuous bladder 
irrigation. If no spontaneous bowel 
movement occurred, a glycerin sup- 
pository was inserted every other day. 


Emotional support 
The social worker acted as a liaison 
because of the patient's complex family 
situation. Her parents had separated 
when she was four; an older brother 
and sister lived with the father, while 
she and a younger sister remained with 
the mother. Each parent subsequently 
remarried and had further children. 
The patient was heavily involved in 
domestic chores and the raising of four 
younger children. She had left school 
after completing Grade XI and was 
training as a hairdresser at the time of 
the accident. As the two families lived 
outside the city. much of the emotional 
support required by the patient had to 
be provided by the nursing staff and 
the social worker. 
The patient's condition naturalIy 
caused her a great deal of fear. anx iety, 
and hostility. which resulted in a reac- 
tive depression. Aided by a psychiatrist, 
the social worker attempted to unders- 
tand these emotions to help the patient 
use inner strengths and develop effect- 
ive coping mechanisms. For example, 
her usual method of handling anger and 
frustration had been withdrawal; in 
hospital. however. this method was not 
only ineffective but was also destruc- 
tivc because it fed into the depression. 
Understanding this. she learned to 
handle her anger more directly. 
In discussions with the patient con- 
cerning her present condition and the 
future. emphasis was placed on the 
goals she would be able to attain. An 
honest "I do not know," or "There is 
no way anyone can promise you that," 
was the answer to many of her voiced 
hopes. 
Many times. however, she became 
depressed and withdrawn. sometimes 
for several days. We were eventually 
26 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


able to help her get rid of these periods 
of depression by being with her cons- 
tantly, showing an understanding of her 
behavior and, at the same time, setting 
limits for her demanding and attention- 
seeking actions. 
To strengthen personal relationships, 
the same two nurses attended the pa- 
tient during the day and evening shifts 
of the first eight months of her hospi- 
talization. They felt emotionalIy drain- 
ed after eight hours when the patient 
was depressed, but for the most part 
her natural vivacity and courage help- 
ed sustain them during the difficult 
times. They found it a humbling exper- 
ience to care for someone who was so 
completely and totally dependent on 
others. 
The patient is a pretty girl and her 
appearance is important to her. Her 
hair was washed and set frequently. 
nails were kept well manicured and 
polished. and makeup was applied 
daily. She was dressed in feminine 
gowns made by her stepmother, and 
wore jewelry most of the day. For 
diversion she had a television set and 
a stereo, which she used a great deal. 
The walls of her room were decorated 
with posters and with photographs of 
her family and friends. 
Since she first was helped into a 
chair, she has been out of her room as 
much as possible. up to the sun deck, 
out on the hospital grounds. and down 
to coffee with the nurses in the even- 
ings. She was even able to leave the 
hospital for six hours with her nurse to 
attend her girl friend's wedding recep-- 
tion. 


Rehabilitation 
The occupational therapist provid- 
ed a wedge to prevent her from slipping 
down in the wheelchair, and a special 
table for use while sitting. The dental 
clinic designed a plastic mouthpiece 
to which a pen or paint brush could be 
attached; the patient is now learning to 
write and paint with her mouth. Ap- 
titude testing was done to provide a 
baseline from which the therapist and 
rehabil itation personnel could work 


toward a realistic vocational goal. 
This patient wilI always require the 
facilitie'i of a chronic hospital that 
provides a high level of nursing care. 
The chief rehabilitative efforts have 
been directed toward obtaining an 
electric wheelchair that the patient 
can operate by blowing, or using her 
tongue and I ips. 
Devices for remote control of light 
switches. television. doors. boo" pages. 
and even a typewriter can he attached 
to the wheelchair and allow the patient 
a far greater range of independence. 
Financial support fÖr this apparatus 
has heen secured and it is presently on 
order from the manufacturers. 
There will be more patients like ours 
in the future - aware. alert individuals 
who must not be showered with pity, 
but encouraged to achieve what is pos- 
sible. The chalIenge is great, but it can 
be met by a competent and dedicated 
team approach to the problem. 


References 
I. Waud. R.A. Production of artificial 
respiration by rhythmic stimulation of 
the phrenic nerves. Naturl' I 
O:J550: 
149. Nov. I J. 1937. 
2. Sarnof( SJ. et al. Electrophrenic 
respiration. Scil'lICl' IOX:4H2. Oct. 29. 
194K 
J. Glenn. W.W.L Remote stimulation of 
the heart by radiofrequency transmis- 
sion: clinical application to a patient 
with Stoj"ö-Aùams synùrome. Nl'w 
Ellg. J. ,\ll'd. 261: 19:9
X-51. Nov. 5. 
1959. 

. Judson. J.P. and Glenn. W.W.l . Raùio- 
frequency elect rophrenic re'ipiration. 
Long-term application to a patient 
with primary hypovcntilation. JAAIA 
2<U:I<UJ-.H. Mar. IX. I%H. 
5. Glenn. W.W.L et al. Centrdl hypoven- 
tilation: long-term ventilatory a
sist- 
ance by raùiofrequency electrophrenic 
rðpiration. A 1111. Surg. 172:755-7 .
. 
Oct. 1970. 
6. Glenn. W.W.L et al. rotal ventilatory 
support in a quaùripkgic patienl with 
radiofrequency electrophrenic respira- 
tion. Nc'w Lng. J. Ml'd. 2H6:5IJ-I
. 
l\lar. 9
 1972. -
 


JANUARY 1974 




 
I 


,,< 
I l 
Jüø 


..... 


"00 BRING OR SEND YOUR 
FRIEND A FEW FLOWERS----" 


r 


"00 MAKE YOUR VISIT SHORT---" 


When you visit 
a sick friend__ ___ 


Vanvouver cartoonist J.F.Dunnet 
illustrates some suggestions from the 
Catholic Hospital Association's pamphlet 
Visiting Patients: Some Hints on 
What to Do and Say. 


(]) 


"00 RESTRAIN YOURSELF 
FROM PRYING INTO WHY HE 
IS HOSPITALIZED" 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 27 



I've got a wolf by the ears 


"I've got a wolf by the ears, as they say; I can't let go [and can't hold on]." 
Terence, Phormia (Act 11/ sc.2, 506-507) 


Bonnie Hartley 


I have systemic lupus erythematosus! 
I am learning to live with it. but there 
is much to learn if I am to keep the 
"'wolf' subdued. 
When I first learned the diagnosis. 
I knew little about the disease. What 
did the future hold for me? Could I 
carryon at my job? What could I do 
tor recreation? Gradually. many of my 
questions have been answered. Adjust- 
ment to my disease has been greatly 
aided by my belief in a personal Christ 
and by realizing I can still be useful. 
even with lupus. 
What is systemic lupus erythema- 
tosus'! An altered immune reaction 
that can affect a single organ or several. 
The course of the disease is usually 
marked by remissions and exacerba- 
tion. 1 
Systemic lupus erythematosus ISLE> 
occurs 6 to X times more frequently in 
women than in men. and the peak 
incidence usually begins between 20 
and 40 years of age, although it ma) 


I he author wa
 with the department of 
nur
ing L-ducation. I he Ho
pital fÖr Sic" 
Children. loronto. Ontario. She i
 pre- 
sently employed hy Rycr
on Poly technical 
In
litute 111 roronto. She ac"nowkdge
 
the a,
i
tance of Or. G Davie... Sunn}'- 
hroo" \lcdical Centre. loronto. and the 
department of medil:al puhlil:alion
. I he 
Hospital for Sic" Children, Toronto. 


28 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


start as early a:-. 2 years or as late as 97. 
Exact figures on the incidence are hard 
to find, but in 1972, in one 500-bed 
Canadian teaching hospital. 6 new cases 
were diagnosed. 
The patient with SLE manufactures 
a multitude of autoantibodies that 
attack his own tissues. Just how has yet 
to be discovered. Some researchers 
believe that tissue injury allows the 
release of potentially antigenic sub- 
stances to which the body then bu ilds 
antibodies: but what causes the damage 
in the first place remains a mystery. The 
antihody most characteristic of SI E is 
the lupus erythematosus II EI factor. 
which promotes phagocytosis of nucleo- 
protein. Many patients also have anti- 
nuclear factors (AN Fl. antibodies that 
react against the whole nucleus. nucleo- 
protein. DNA. and histone. 


How SLE begins 
There is nothing characteristic about 
ho\\ SLF begins. It can begin with 
fever, malaise. weight hJss. and fatigue. 
Arthritis is common but rarely produces 
permanent deformity. The arthritis of 
SLE frequently mimics rheumatoid 
al thritis and may be so transitory that 
it is ignored. My initial joint pain and 
swelling lasted only 36 hours and oc- 
curred about 6 weeks he fore I had any 
other symptoms. 
Frequently. a "'butterlly" rash 
spreads over the bridge of the nose and 
flares out on the cheeks. A nineteenth 
JANUARY 1974 



century physician de
ribcd the skin 
lesions as looking like the bite of a 
wolf. The name literally means "red 
wolf disease.'"2 
Ultraviolet light makes the rash 
worse. At first I had only a slight Ilush 
but. as summer progressed. the rash 
became deep red. Being a red-head 
and pale complexioned. I was very 
conscious of th.e strange appearance it 
gave me. Blemish stick. makeup. and 
powder did little to disguise it. To my 
great relief the rash faded after using 
steroid cream (Betnovate 0.1 ('fc ). 
The pleurisy and pleural effusions 
that accompany the condition produce 
chest pain and dyspnea. A slight hill 
between my apartment and the subway 
suddenly became a mountain. I had 
bilateral pleural effusions. 
The problems of diagnosis are com- 
pounded by !'.ymptoms related to the 
organs affected. If the onset is gastro- 
intestinal. the patient may experience 
abdominal pain. nausea. vomiting. 
diarrhea. or constipation. imitating 
acute appendicitis or renal colic. Epi- 
leptic-like seizures may be early 
evidence of 51 E. although they are 
unusual. This and mental depression. 
excitability. headache. forgetfulness. 
or even a nervoùs breakdown can mark 
the onset. When lupus attacks the kid- 
ney!'.. nephritis or protein-losing 
nephro!'.is results. Diagnosis is usually 
confirmed by a kidney biopsy. 
Several tests help to make a diag- 
nosis certain. Blood tests for the IE 
factor ma) occa!'.ionally be negative. 
even -when the di!'.ease is present. If the 
antinuclear factor is present in the 
blood. it usually fall!-. when a remission 
occur!'.. Mo!'.t patients with SI f also 
have low serum complement levels 
(normal I
O to 160). -which are closcl) 
linked to renal disease. These slowly 
ri'>C a!'. the di!'.ease is brought under 
control. As well. mo!'.t SI E patient!'. have 
an elevated erythrocyte 'iedimentation 
rate. perhaps a'i high a!'. 100 mm/hour. 
and normochromic anem ia. 
1\.1an) factors. although not causes 
JANUARY 1974 


,þ . 
-Ät/ 


r 



 



- 


. 


.. A 1lIuJ/(gh I loo/.. 
'ery fmhiollab/e ill my large-brimmed hat alld .H'er.\ucÅerjacÅet, 
I'd pnjer to lem'e them at hOlne whell it is 100 0 ill the shade.''' 


of 5LE. precIpitate an exacerbation. 
These include. sunlight and ultraviolet 
radiation: local infections. such as a 
sore throat; the administration of a 
foreign protein. such as tetanus anti- 
toxin; certain drugs. such as !'.ulfona- 
mides. penicillins. apresoline. mezan- 
toin. or hydantoin (Dilantin); and 
emotion. Just as dt the time of diagno- 
sis. the exacerbation is ushered in by 
symptom!'. related to the organs affect- 
ed. 
Although the treatment of choice is 
the use of corticosteroids. the anti- 
malarial drugs. such as quinine or 
chloroquine (Aralen). are still u!'.ed. 
Salicylates help to control joint s)mp- 
toms. hut none of these drugs except 
the !'.teroid!'. alter the course of the 
disease. The latest treatment involve.. 


the use of immunosuppressive agents. 
!'.uch as azathIOprine (lmuran) or 
cyclopho!'.phamide (Cytotoxan). Fre- 
quently. much of the treatment is direct- 
ed at preventing further deterioration 
of renal function. 


Helping patient and family 
What special challenges doe!'. the 
patient with SI E present to the nurse'! 
Symptomatic and supportive care are 
.tlwa) s necessary in the acute stage. 
but nurses should .tlso prepare them- 
selves to answer the man) questions 
the patient and his family will have. 
The famil) has to cope with the acute 
anxiety resulting from a serious illness 
and the mood changes characteristic of 
patients receiving 'iteroid therapy. 
which may be inten..e and hard to live 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 29 



with. My doctor warned my family 
\\ hat to expect so that my emotional 
swings v.ere no surprise. The fatigue, 
the increased dependence, the confine- 
ment. all accentuated these swings. 
In the past few years I have read 
much about the communication barrier 
erected by nurses between themselves 
and their seriously ill patients. I dOlÙ 
"now if I intimidated nurses because I 
am a teacher of nursing or if the diagno- 
sis of my disease scared them. In any 
event. during my six wee"s in hospital 
only two nurses ever ac"nowledged the} 
knew what was wrong with me or had 
any understandi ng of the long-teml 
nature of the disorder and what it might 
mean fÒr me. Luc" ify. the doctors were 
willing to answer my many questions. 
NtH\ that I am bac" at wor", man} 
people tell me of patients \\ ith lupus 
who are doing well. 
I have lived with lupus for 10 
months. I am not p<lstthe time of great- 
est danger. The mortality rates arc 
highest in the first year after diagnosis. 
Of the patients who survive this first 
year, lJU percent of the adults without 
renal disease and XU percent of those 
with renal disease will survive five ye.lrs 
or more. In children the prognosis is 
kss favorable. Patients with lupus 
usually Jie of renal cause... central 
nervous system complications, or in- 
fections. 3 Generally. the easier it is to 
induce a remission and the longer the 
remission lasts. the beller is the pro- 
gnosIs. 
To reach her full potential. the nurse 
must he prepared to clarify intt)rma- 
tion the doctor gives and augment this 
with the appropriate patient teaching. 
She should "no\\ and make ",ure her 
patient "nows that exposure to ultra- 
\ iolet radiation can cause a sunhurn 
and kad to an exacerhation. Outdoor 
activities. such a!>. swimming. garden- 
ing. sailing. or \Vater s"jing. should be 
.!voided het\\een lJ.UU A.:\L and 4.00 
P 1\1 true ,>un time. 2 The patient need 
not give up all sports. but should prac- 
tice them in the earl) morning or late 
30 TH E CANADIAN NURSE 


afternoon to avoid the strong sun. 
Naturally, other torms of ultra- 
violet. such as sunlamps or "Disinfec- 
taires," should also be avoided. a spe- 
cial problem for me as I am a nurse in 
a pediatric surgical unit where Disin- 
fectaires hang in every haby's cubicle. I 
find it a nuisance to remember to turn 
off these lamps when I am caring tor the 
baby and harder still to remember to 
turn them on again when I leave the 
room. 
When I walk to worl-., I cannot al- 
ways avoid the sunshine so I use an 
ultraviolet screening agcnt. Today's 
fashions - the big hats, the long 
sleeves, and the lightweight jackets - 
favor the girl with SLE. Although 1100" 
very fashionable in my large-brimmed 
white hat and seersuc"er jac"el. I 
would prefer to leave them at home 
when it is 100 0 in the shade. Because 
a tan is fashionable. I stand out from 
my friends and co-workers. 
H aseric" statcs, "A gradual return 
to full, normal activities after an I F 
nare [-up I is best, usually over a period 
of several momhs." 2 1 will never torget 
the overwhelming fatigue so frequently 
a part of lupus. Some days my fatigue 
was so great that even readi ng was too 
much etlÙr\. I bec.mle discouraged and 
depressed. 
At lea!>.t eight hours sleep or more 
each night is essential: during the tirst 
few months after leaving hospital. a 
daytime nap is advisable. Patients 
need to he reminded that, if they feel 
tired after some activity, the} should 
have done less and "topped "ooner; at 
fir"t. they "hould avoid heavy cleaning, 
lifting of children and bas"ets of wet 
wash, and long periods of ironing. 
After three months' off duty. I 
returned to wor" for two hours a day 
and was certainly glad to go home to 
bed at the end of this time. Gradually 
the hours increased and. \\ ithi n three 
\Vceb. I was hac" to work full time. 
Today. my energy level is just about 
normal. 
fhe nurse who cares for a patient 


with SI E needs not only 'pecial know- 
ledge. but alst) special fran"ness. 
Although the whole question of preg- 
nancy should be discussed thoroughly 
with the doctor, sometimes the patient 
turns to the nurse for further interpre- 
tatiun. According tt) Roo" et al. preg- 
nancy does not affect the state of lupus 
in 50 percent of patients; in about 17 
percent of patients, the severity of the 
disease decreases: but in ahout :n per- 
cent, it increases either during the preg- 
nancy or in the early postpartum 
period. 4 Most physicians advise 
against pregnane) if the "idneys are 
severely affected. 
The wise nurse will try to ma"e sure 
the patient understands that imllluniza- 
tion and certain drugs. such as the sul- 
fas. should be avoided and that self- 
medication is dangerous. Any person 
on long-term drug therapy should he 
aware of the advantages of special 
identification, such a!> a "Medic-Alert" 
bracelet or nec"laee. 
If the doctor fails to explain that the 
Wassermann is falsely positive in about 
I 0 to 20 percent of SI E paticnts, then 
the nurse should do so to deereasc the 
possibility that the patient will be 
embarrassed by finding out later. 


A way of life 
Above all. the patient Illust under- 
stand that continuous drug thcrapy will 
become a way of life. He must ncver 
fail to ta"c the drugs pre!>.cribed. and 
he must "now the eftects and side ef- 
fects of these drugs. \1edieal chec" -ups, 
drug", and perhaps diet. too. hecom.: 
the new direction. 
I was pleasantly surprised at how 
quidly I adjusted to my high-protein. 
low sodium (I gram per day) die\. At 
first all the fÒod seemed tlat: but now. 
after 10 months. meals oncc again are 
interesting and satistying. I find it 
frustrating that quick toods that meet 
my diet re!>.trietions .Ire unavailahle. 
Salt - free preparations of condiments. 
such as "etchup. pie"les. mustard. and 
Worcester sauce. are not to be found in 
JANUARY 1974 



Eastern Canada. although they can be 
had in the United States. Health-food 
stores here stock a salt-free. crunchy- 
style peanut butter and mayonnaise. 
For me. the salt substitutes give ti')()d 
a peculiar taste that isn't at all salty. 
A high-protein diet demands milk. 
But the quest for low sodium milk was 
long and frustrating. The dietitian 
recommended one of the known prod- 
ucts as being better tasting than the 
other. and gave me a list of places 
where I could buy it. None of the pla- 
ces she listed carried the product or 
knew anyone who did. The manufactur- 
er was no better informed. Finally. a 
friend tackled the drug stores in the 
ydlow pages and found one. miles from 
where I live. that sold low sodium milk. 
For the healthy. such deficiencies would 
be merely an irritation; for the patient 
with lupus. who must travel abroad 
and survive at home. they are crucial. 
Lupus patients on steroids are 
particularly prone to infection and 
must avoid people with colds or other 
infections. Pediatric nursing. my spe- 
cialty, is hazardous for me. Already an 
outbreak of chicken pox on one of my 
wards has put certain rooms out ot 
bounds. A primary contact with a child 
with mumps meant I had to have a 
series of gamma globulin injections. 
Over the months the continued med- 
ical supervision can become onerous. 
Weekly. biweekly, or monthly visit... 
to the doctor. the repeated and repeat- 
ed blood tests and urinalyses require 
much adjustment. So far I have been 
able to SC:hedule my working hours 
around my appointments; but a per- 
son with less flexible hours would find 
all this supervision difficult to arrange. 
even though his survival depends on it. 
Drugs cost money. As well as the 
steroids (doses during the early part of 
the treatment may be 60 mg. or more 
per day), and immunosuppressives. 
there w ill also be antacids to prevent 
gastrointestinal upsets. I mix Amph
iel 
and Maalox. It's hard to remember to 
tdke all these medicines regularly. as 
JANUARY 1974 


TABLE I 


Frequency of Appearance of Clinical Symptoms 


Symptoms Frequency U u Symptoms Frequency . 
Arthritis 91 Pericard it is 33 
Fever H4 Murmurs 2
 
Skin 76 EKG Changes IX 
Renal 54 Adenopathy 46 
Gastrointestinal 55 Splenomegaly 10 
Pleurisy 49 Hepatomegaly 23 
Plural Effusion 29 Central Nervous 30 
System 
Pneumonia 30 


Adapted from Cecil-Loeh TextbooÅ of Medicine, /3ed., Philadelphia, n.8 
Sal/nders. /97/, p. 8/8. 


the activities of the day crowd in to 
blot out such mundane matters. 
Yes, there is much for the patient 
\\ ith lupus erythematosus. The most 
important is that he can I ive a produc- 
tive, normal life. The "wolf' can be 
held by the ears and subdued - al- 
though rarcl) tamed. 


D.S. cd. Int!>oo/.. 01 dalllatolos:.I'. 
ed. 
Oxford. Hhu:""ell <.;cientilïc Pllblica- 
t ion
. 1972. p.1 061-11 '6. '" 


References 
I. Tumllity. P.A. S}'tenllc IUPll' el')the- 
mato,us. III \Vintrohe. \J .:\1. et al Lxi. 
HalTi.\(}II'.
 prillciple.\ or i",ell/(/I lIIed- 
icille. 6ed. I'oew Yor". \IeGr,l\\< Hill. 
1<170. p. 1962-7. 
2. Ha,,:ricl... J.R. and "-dlum. R.E. Prillla 
I;',. pariel/t.\ with IlIplls ('/"ythelllato.\II.
. 
Cleveland. Dep..trtment of DermalOl- 
l)gy. Clevcldnù Clinic "ounù.ttion. 
1962. 
.'. Schur. Peter H. S},temic lupu
 el)the- 
mato
u
. III Bcöon. 1'.8. and I\IeDcr- 
mott. \\' Lxi. Cecil-Loeh tetrhoo/.. 01 
lIIedicille. I.'cd. 10l'Onto. Saunùcr... 
1971. p. X 16-22. 
4. Ro"dL 
.R. IllPU' cl'}thcm,lto'l.... 
-.ckrodcrm.t and dcrmatomYlhiti,. I hc 
"collagen"' or "connective-ti

ue" di
- 
ea'>C. III Roo" Arthur and \\,il"in'on. 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 31 



Protecting nonsmokers 
in public places 


The issue of the rights of the nonsmoker 
has grown strong in many a community, 
so much so in ours that the American 
Lung Association of Southeast Florida 
has jumped into the program with both 
feet. 
The Southeast Florida association 
was pushed into the program by citizens 
who phoned asking us to do something 
about smoking in public places. People 
would call and say, for example, 
"Smoking is still allowed in the public 
library. I have asthma, so I can't sit in 
a room where people are smoking 
without being extremely uncomfort- 
able." Or someone would say, "Do you 
know that in this day, there's no regula- 
tion against smoking in the municipal 
auditorium? Do you think that's right? 
Can you do something about it?" 
So many calls came in that the lung 
association decided it had better try to 
do something to start protecting the 
rights of nonsmokers. 
The program has been going for two 
years now, Let me tell you something 
about the methods we used, the results, 
and the mistakes we made - and we 
made quite a few. 


It's a health issue 
Before going into the program, the 
Southeast Florida association made a 
basic decision about the focus: From 
32 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


"I have asthma, so I can't sit in the auditorium because people are allowed 
to smoke," the caller stated. Complaints like this started the Southwest 
Florida Lung Association on a campaign for the rights of nonsmokers. 


Sandra Kessler 


experience with other types of anti- 
smoking programs, the association had 
learned that you get nowhere if you 
say only that cigarette smoke is annoy- 
ing. Instead, you must back up your 
plea with the facts about the health 
hazards. 
It wasn't too difficult to draw up a 
fact sheet on the health hazards of 
cigarette smoking from the various 
sources available. 


Battleground: the library 
The first battleground was the public 
library. Many citizens - especially 
older people with respiratory diseases 
- had phoned the association com- 
plaining that they wanted to use the 
facility but couldn't because smoking 
was allowed on the main floor. Because 
I serve the association as program ad- 


Sandra Kcssler is program administrator 
of the American Lung Association of 
Southeast Florida. f'ollowing her gradua- 
tion from the University of Georgia. I\ls. 
Kcssler participated in the N rRDA carecr 
developmcnt program in Virginia and then 
wor\..ed as director of information for the 
Gcorgia Lung Association. This article 
is a condens.ltion of !\h. .....es"lcr"s presen- 
tation at thc AI A's annual mceting in 
New YOI'\.. City. N.Y.. U.S.A. 


ministrator in smoking deterrent pro- 
grams, I made an appointment to tau., 
with the library's board of directors. To 
prepare for the meeting, I stuffed the 
fact sheet and several letters from phy- 
sicians in the briefcase. (It didn"t occur 
to me that a physician should be on 
hand to present the scientific arguments 
against smoking.) Somebody from the 
cancer society and a library patron or 
two went with me for moral support. 
When our small group got to the 
library board meeting, the directors 
didn't bother to look at the fact sheet 
or the letters from physicians. They said 
we were a radical group and that they 
weren't in business to monitor public 
health. They voted not to ban smoking 
in the public library. 
That was super flop number one. 
But even though the effort failed. 
the newspaper report about the request- 
ed smoking ban registered with a num- 
ber of the local citizens. Many people 
called the lung association saying, "I 
want to report that smoking is allowed 
in such-and-such building." Or "Are 
you aware that the bank tellers are 
smoking on the job?" Or "I want you to 


Reprinted with permission from the Sep- 
tember 1973 Americal/ LIII/M A .
.mcillrÙJ// 
BIIlletil/. 


JANUARY 1974 



know that there's smoking in Dr. XYZ's 
office. " 
When somebody phoned with this 
kind of information, I made a file card 
with the person's name and address. 
This was the start of our new nonsmok- 
er,s rights constituency. Then I would 
write an authoritarian letter which 
started out like this: "It has been 
brought to our attention that smoking 
is being allowed in your office (or 
building) . . . ." Or the letter would 
begin, "The American Lung Associa- 
tion of Southeast Florida has been 
receiving reports from your patients 
that you are allowing smoking in your 
waiting room. . . . " The letter would 
end with a formal request to no longer 
permit tobacco smoking in the office 
or building. A copy of the fact sheet 
was enclosed with each letter. 
I don't really know whether the let- 
ters did any good, except that every 
person who received one at least started 
thinking about the rights of nonsmokers 
to a clean indoor environment. And the 
recipient learned that the lung associa- 
tion is concerned about the health 
hazards of cigarette smoking. I should 
add that the rights of the nonsmoker 
concept was very new at the time. 


The municipal auditorium 
The next assault was on cigarette 
smoking in the municipal auditorium. 
The city commissioners had the author- 
ity to say yes or no. 
This time we brought along not 
letters from phy!>iciam. but a know- 
ledgeable physician to state the scientific 
evidence. When a doctor stands up at a 
meeting and talks about a health prob- 
lem, he's going to be listened to with 
respect. 
Then we got some students to write 
letters saying, for example, "Smoke 
is a problem to me because I have 
asthma. I want to go to a rock concert - 
or the skating rink, or wherever - in 
JANUARY 1974 


the Municipal Auditorium, but I can't 
because you allow smoking." These 
statements really packed a punch. Any- 
thing from kids has a definite appeal. 
Then the newspapers took up the 
cause. One ran an editorial. and another 
supported us with an editorial cartoon. 
Yet the city commissioners were 
reluctant to make a firm decision. So 
they said, "We"re not going to support 
any ban on smoking, but we will consid- 
er separate seating sections." 
The lung association was still waiting 
to appear before the commissioners. 
We started a massive letter-writing 
attack. We were able to interest a 
number of students in the cause, and 
some of them even delivered letters 
about the health hazards of smok ing and 
consideration of the nonsmoker to the 
commissioners' homes. 
On the day of the presentation, the 
lung association brought along a group 
of junior high students who, with their 
teacher. were extremely inttTðtcd in 
the proposed smoking ban in the audi- 
torium. The students put on a couple 
of skits in the city chambers. They also 
made signs, gave testimony, and helped 
pack the room. Testimony was also 
given by other municipal auditorium 
patrons, including emphysema patients. 
After hearing the people out, the 
commissioners voted 4 to I to ban 
smoking totally in the auditorium. fhat 
was our first real victory. It is signifi- 
cant that the vote was 4 to I because 
four of the commissioners \\-ere non- 
smokers and one was a smoker. Even 
though the commissioners are elected 
representatives of the people, in this 
matter they voted according to their 
own taste. 
We tactically made one important 
mistake in the municipal auditorium 
campaign: We asked the commissioners 
to ban smoking as a matter of policy. 
We did not a<;k for an ordinance against 
smoking. An ordinance is enforceable. 


A policy has much less weight; the 
patrons are simply asked not to smoke. 
I n an effort to strengthen the ban, 
we stated to the commissioners that, if 
they did not enforce the no-smoking 
policy, we'd go back to them and ask for 
an ordinance. As a matter of record, 
we have not yet asked for that ordi- 
nance. People still smoke in the audito- 
rium, but there are fewer smokers 
now, and the number is decreasing. I 
think we have pretty much won the 
game in that arena. 


A smoking deterrence committee 
The next phase in the campaign was 
the organization of a smoking deter- 
rence committee from the lung associa- 
tion's board of directors. This new com- 
mittee decided to continue the associa- 
tion's rights of the nonsmoker efforts. 
Straight off, the committee decided to 
start an all-out public awareness cam- 
paign to help people stop and think 
when others are smoking in public 
pI aces. 
Understandably. the committee 
couldn"t come up with Madison Ave- 
nue-type slogans the fir!>t time around; 
they are not an advertising agency. 
But they did reprint, with permission, 
some of the posters dreamed up by 
GASP (Group Against Smokers" Pol- 
lution), a nonsmokers' organization 
located in Maryland. You may have 
seen the poster "Plea<;e don"t !>moke. 
People are breathing" done by GASP. 
We reproduced this poster plm, two 
others: "In consideration of others, 
please don"t smoke" and "Enjoy clean 
air? Hide your a<;htrays." Copies went 
to physicians, and citizen volunteers 
also distributed them in public places. 
An envelope accompanied each piece. 
Floods of reque!>ts for the posters 
came to the lung association. This was 
one activity that people are very much 
interested in giving money to because 
of its specific appeal. The posters paid 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 33 



ociatiof' 
Disease þ..ss Cþ..RD 
RespiratOry E.\\QUE.\\E. 
SN\O\ZE. RS SMO\(\NG............... 
fOf\ NO'- 
,- L1AN\( YOU "'AI'- ,-0 SEE 
rt ..''-'ILE I .. 
O ..r> O c,-OR. 
,-I-IE 0 
'/OU \,/ISI'- 
o V'JI-I

OSPI'- AL. 
,-1-1 M" cl-ll L, 
N'- Of 
GIN fRO M'/ BAB'/. 
'/OU I-IOLO 
O V'JI-IILE 
MEE1'I NG . 
OOUR\NG ,-I-I\S 


EA,-\NG. 
o V'JI-I\LE \ AM 
M'/ I-IOME. 
o IN CONcERT. 
oUR\NG '-\-I
CE. SI-IOV'J. 
O ERfORMA 
P ,,^,-OR. 
E ELEv"'" 
o \NS\OE ,-1-1 
'/ OffiCE. 
O AT M ROoM. 
oV'JoEO 
o \N ,-I-I\S cR 


for thcm!>clves within a short time. 
Out of the committec itself came 
an equally succcssful item: a smo"er's 
etiquette card. It's a wallet-size piece 
that you can slip underhand to a smok- 
er. It says, "Please don't smoke. . . ," 
and the person giving away the card 
checks the next part: "while you are 
holding my baby:' "in my homc." "sit- 
ting next to me," "in this concert," "in 
the office," "in the restþlurant," and so 
on. 
Not only does the card make a state- 
ment, but it has a second use: On the 
back there's a form saying, "I would 
like to report that indiscriminate smok- 
ing i!> being allowed at. . . ,.. and there's 
a blan" to be filled in plus the lung 
association's address. The association 
follows up with a letter to the so-called 
offender, trying to make it sound a!> if 
the complaint were about a bonfire 
in the middle of the building. 
"A resolution for creature comfort" 
was the next item that the ALA-SEF 
smoking deterrence committee turned 
out. It was devised in response to an 
organization which asked the lung asso- 
ciation to write up a resolution saying 
that smoking will be prohibited at its 
upcoming convention. The group want- 
ed a resolution that would pass its board 
of directors. The wording did pass, so 
the lung association then sent copies 
ofthe standard "Resolution for Creature 
34 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Comfort" to about a thousand organi- 
zations in southeast Florida. A whop- 
ping 35 wrote us back, saying their 
organization had voted to ban smoking, 
and about 20 reported they had voted 
not to ban smoking. 
A survey of smoking policies in 
hospitals was the next thing the com- 
mittee attacked. "I'm going to be in the 
hospital, and I'm scared to death to 
room with a smoking patient." We 
found that, out of 16 hospitals, only 
5 were separating smoking patients 
from nonsmokers. As a follow-up, we 
sent the report to the medical staff and 
the hospital directors, asking that they 
take up the matter of separating patients 
at their next board meeting. That move 
was made recently, and we don't have 
responses from all the hospitals as 
yet. 


Social awareness 
Behind the various facets of the rights 
of the nonsmoker program is one over- 
all objective - to create social aware- 
ness of how offensive smoking can be 
to nonsmokers. If the association hears 
of a theater that dccided not to allow 
smoking, we phone the theater manager 
and congratulate him, adding that the 
lung association hopes the theater will 
continue that policy. We then intorm 
the lung disease patients in the area that 
they can now go to that particular thea- 


ter without experiencing discomfort. 
A lot has been done behind the 
scenes to accomplish our objectives. 
There's a certain amount of sensation- 
alism in going before the city or county 
commissioners with a request to ban 
smoking in a big auditorium. But there 
are other ways to accomplish the same 
objectivc. For instance, wc wcnt direct- 
ly to thc head of a local health depart- 
ment to Ict him know that his staff 
members were smoking in the clinics. 
The health commissioner responded 
by directing his employees not to smoke 
on the job. All that was necessary was a 
decision by the head of the department. 
You can usually engineer a' change of 
policy by going to the right pcrson. 
The lung association's current project 
is an effort to persuade physicians and 
dentists to prohibit smoking in their 
offices. The Michigan TB-RD Associa- 
tion wrote a strong letter to physicians 
that we adapted for use in Southeast 
Florida. Many replies have already 
come back from physicians in our area. 
We ultimately hope for city and 
countywide ordinances to ban smoking 
in publ ic places. St. Petersburg, Florida, 
has such an ordinance, which is well 
written. 


Suggestions for a campaign 
I've written up a short summary of 
the things lung associations and other 
organizations should "eep in mind in 
conducting a "rights of thc nonsmo"cr" 
campaign. I've put down all thc suggcs- 
tions I can thi nk of and some things you 
should watch out tor. 
v First of all, you should get a non- 
smoker to head up the campaign. 
v Second, you're going to have to 
convince your chief executive and your 
board of directors that a little contro- 
versy never hurt anybody and that 
you'll probably get some bad press. 
You need a board that' will not die 
of embarrassment just because some 
JANUARY 1974 



newspaper editors may not agree that 
nonsmokers have rights. Some editors 
will come out and say that you're being 
radical. 
v Next, be sure you compile a mail- 
ing list of everybody\'. ho's interested 
in what you're doing. so that you can 
involve them in your activities. 
v Next, use a fact sheet. Always 
stress that smoking is a health issue. 
You can't get by with saying, "It 
bothers me." or "It.s annoying," or "It 
makes me mad:' Smoking is a public 
health hazard. It's indoor open burning. 
.; Become fam il iar with all your local 
ordinances - especially fire regula- 
tions because these are nebulous in 
that the fire chief can interpret them 
the way he wants. You may save your- 
self a lot of work by turni ng up the fact 
that there's a fire regulation that has to 
do with smoking. The fire chief may 
interpret it to mean that smoking is 
forbidden in a certain area. 
.; Attend city and county commis- 
sion meetings to learn how they func- 
tion. You can tell if you're going to get 
a negative response just by seeing how 
the commissioners react to other situa- 
tions. Learn who in these bodies smoke 
because that helps give you a good idea 
of how successful you're going to be. 
v Use students because it's hard for 
the commissioners to say no to plead- 
ing, young, sweet, smiling voices- 
and by students I mean younger stu- 
dents. I f you get college students, some- 
times the elected officials think that 
nonsmokers' rights is another radical 
Issue. 
v Try to get smoking banned in your 
own association's offices and at meet- 
ings of your organization. If you live 
in smo"y hou
cs, it'" hard to throw 
stones. 
v Always precede your appearance 
at hearings with many letters. 
v Tell the newspapers what you're 
gomg to do, because this is legitimate 
JANUARY 1974 


news for all their readers. 
v Remember that nonsmokers are 
the majority. 
,/ Expect increased contributions. A 
$5 Christmas Seal contributor wrote 
us to say.' "Because of what you're 
doing to get smoking prohibited. I'm 
increasing my contribution to $200." 
Also expect letters from smokers say- 
ing, "Go to -!" 
v Do expect a large demand for your 
materials. 
v One of your biggest problems will 
be getting people to stand up and speak 
for the rights of nonsmokers, because 
they don't want their neighbors to 
think they're fanatics. Some people will 
readily testify, but others will call you 
and say, "Do this, this, this and this." 
And you say, "Okay, fine, come down 
to the place and testify." And they say, 
"Oh, no, I'm not going to get involved." 
" You can expect strongly negative 
reactions from some governing bodies 
to the proposition that they ban smoking 
in their building or public facilit). 
Because smoking has been socially 
acceptable for so long. it's hard for them 
to realize that nonsmokers, who are in 
the majority. no longer find it accept- 
able. 
" When you approach the governing 
body of a community organization, 
always explain that you're carrying out 
the directives of your board of direc- 
tors - not a personal campaign. When 
people realize you're representing an 
organization interested in fighting res- 
piratory problems, that gives you a lot 
more clout. 
" Finally, you can expect a lot of 
crank calls. One classic call I got was 
from a man who said that the municipal 
auditorium was a tax-supported institu- 
tion. I agreed with him. He said that, 
when the public let their money be 
used to build that building, they "new 
that smoking would be allowed. and. 
if they had known that smoking wouldn't 


be allowed, they would never have let 
it be built. 
I had one other classic call. The man 
said, "I wish you'd just bug off and 
leave us alone." He continued, "You 
are a very frustated old maid. and if 
you would get married, the smoke 
wouldn't bother you so much:' 
So I responded. "Well. if my getting 
married would stop the smo"e from be- 
ing a serious health hazarù. I would 
do it tomorrow. I'd go out and find 
somebody:' But I have a feeling that 
he didn't want to get involved either. 
if I had asked him to marry me. he 
would probably have said no! 
Working for clean air in public 
places can easily he carried out by dIlY 
association in the country. This is one 
problem that is not endemic to only 
one particular pan of the country or to 
a certain type of citizen. Wherever you 
have people, you have tobacco smok- 
ing; and wherever you have smoking. 
you have lungs. All you need is enough 
smoke, inadequate protection for non- 
smokers, and lots of angry breathers! 'Þ 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 35 



The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


50 The Driveway, Ottawa, K2P IE2, ant. 


ð 

 


Information for Authors 


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The Canadian Nurse and L'infirmière canadienne welcome 
original manuscripts that pertain to nursing, nurses, or 
related subjects. 


All solicited and unsolicited manuscripts are reviewed 
by the editorial staff before being accepted for publication. 
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tion to readers; and presentation. A manuscript accepted 
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Insert short, descriptive titles to indicate divisions in the 
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Webster's 7th College Dictionary are used as spelling 
references. 


References, Footnotes, and 
Bibliographv 


References, footnotes, and bibliography should be limited 


to a reasonable number as determined by the content of the 
article. References to published sources should be numbered 
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article. Information that cannot be presented in formal 
reference style should be worked into the text or referred to 
as a footnote. 


Bibliography listings should be unnumbered and placed 
in alphabetical order. Space sometimes prohibits publishing 
bibliography, especially a long one. In this event, a note is 
added at the end of the article stating the bibhography is 
available on request to the editor. 


For book references, list the author's full name, book 
title and edition, place of publication, publisher, year Ilf 
publication, and pages consulted. For magazine references, 
list the author's full name, title of the article, title of mag- 
azine, volume, month, year, and pages consulted. 


Photographs, Illustrations, Tables, 
and Charts 


Photographs add interest to an article. Black and white 
glossy prints are welcome. The size of the photographs is 
unimportant, provided the details are clear. Each photo 
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The Canadian Nurse 
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE CANADIAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION 



dates 


February 6-8; February 13-15, 1974 
May 8-10; May 15-17,1974 
Three-day pediatric nursing confer- 
ences for registered nurses. Registra- 
tion limited to 60 for each conference. 
Fee: $15. A minimum of 40 registrants 
required for each conference. For 
further information, write to: Ms. E. 
Morrow, Continuing Nursing Educa- 
tion, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 
University Ave., Toronto, Ontario, 
M5G 1 X8. 


February 18-22, 1974 
Occupational health nursing program 
for registered nurses employed in 
the field of occupational health nurs- 
ing. Fee: $95. For further information, 
write to: Continuing Ed ucation Pro- 
gram for Nurses, Faculty of Nursing, 
University of Toronto, 50 St. George 
St., Toronto, Ontario. 


March 1-3,1974 
Orthopedic Nurses' Association, first 
national congress, Atlanta, Georgia. 
For further information, write to: Clara 
A. Donahoo, Executive Director, Suite 
705, 1938 Peachtree Rd., NW., Atlan- 
ta, Ga. 30309, U.S.A. 


April 5-6,1974 
Annual Stewart Rt::search Conference 
and celebration of the 75th anniversary 
of the department of nursing education, 
Teachers College, Columbia Universi- 
ty, New York. Fee: $25. For information 
and reservations, write to: Dr. M. Louise 
Fitzpatrick, Chairman, Stewart Re- 
search Conference, Box 150, Dept. 
of Nursing Education, Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia U., 525 W. 12Oth, New 
York, N.Y. 10027, USA. 


April 29-30, 1974 
Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 14th 
annual meeting, Sheraton-Park Hotel, 
Washington, D.C. Abstracts are invited 
to be considered for presentation at 
the scientific sessions. For further in- 
formation, write to: E.S. Hillman, M.D., 
Montreal Children's Hospital, 2300 
Tupper St., Montreal 1 08, Quebec. 
JANUARY 1974 


May 2-4, 1974 
Vancouver General Hospital 75th anni- 
versary. gala celebration and alumni 
banquet, Regency Hyatt Hotel, Van- 
couver, B.C. For further information, 
write to: Executive Secretary, VGH 
Alumni Association, 2851 Heather St., 
Vancouver 9, B.C. 


April 25-26, 1974 
27th national conference on rural 
health, sponsored by the American 
Medical Association, The Detroit Hil- 
ton, Detroit, Mich. Theme: "Rural Health 
is a Community Affair." Registration 
fee: $25. For further information, write 
to: BL Bible, Ph.D., Dept. of Rural 
Health, American Medical Association, 
535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 
60610, USA. 


write to: Ms. Dorothy Hart, Publicity 
Chairman, 895 Richmond Street, Lon- 
don, Ontario. 


June 7-8, 1974 
Third workshop on neurological edu- 
cation, Dalhousie Medical School, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. For further infor- 
mation, write to: Chairman, Dr. T.J. 
Murray Dalhousie University, Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. 


June 16-21, 1974 
Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation annual 
meeting and conven- 
tion, to be held in the 
Manitoba Centennial 
Centre Concert Hall, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 


ð 

 


April 25-27, 1974 lune 17-19, 1974 
British Columbia Operating Room Emergency Nurses' Association of 
Nurses Group, fourth biennial institute, Ontario, third annual conference, Royal 
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C. For Connaught Hotel, Hamilton, Ontario. 
further information and advance regis- For further information, write to: Ms. 
tration, write to: Ms. Jean Lowery, 1/1 - Jean Grote, 137 Duke St., Apt. 4, Ham- 
7151 Cambie St., Vancouver, B.C. ilton, Ontario L8P 1 X8. 


May 5-10,1974 
Third Canadian Operating Room 
Nurses' convention, The Queen Eliza- 
beth Hotel, Montreal, Quebec. For 
additional information, write to: Ms. 
Peggy Iton, c/o Jewish General Hospi- 
tal, 3755 Cote St. Catherine Road, 
Montreal 249, Quebec. 


May 8-10, 1974 
Annual meeting, Registered Nurses' 
Association of British Columbia, Bay- 
shore Hotel, Vancouver, B.C. 


May 27-28, 1974 
Alumni committee, faculty of nursing, 
University of Western Ontario, third 
annual conference. Symposium enti- 
tled "Today's Youth - Problems, Cop- 
ing and Helping" will be led by Dr. 
Fritz Red!. For further information, 


August 12-16, 1974 
Sixth international congress of the 
World Federation of Occupational 
Therapists, Vancouver, B.C. Theme: 
"Occupational Therapy Health Care 
in the 70's." Registration from all 
health professions welcome. Direct 
enquiries to: World Federation of 
Occupational Therapists, Total Park 
Convention Centre, University of B.C., 
Vancouver 8, B.C. 


August 15-18, 1974 
Victoria Public Hospital, three-day 
homecoming reunion, coinciding with 
the final graduation exercises of the 
school of nursing. Former directors 
and graduates of the school should 
write to: Ms. Shirley Farrell, Publicity 
Chairman, VPH Alumnae. Apt. 20, 15B 
Waggoner's Lane, Fredericton, Ne
 
Brunswick. \ow 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 37 



names 


Nancy Garrett has 
left her position at 
CNA House in Ot- 
tawa to work in a 
less frigid cI imate. 
She has acccpted a 
two-year assignment 
with a team from 
Harvard University 
to work in Yaoundé, 
the capital of Cameroun. 
Under the auspices of the Ccntre 
univer
itaire dcs sciences dc la santé. 
the two physicians and two nurses will 
train nursing students who are aiming 
at what corresponds to our baccalaure- 
ate degree. The team will supply the 
nl<lternal and child health component 
to the center. 


?
 
.;!> 
.." 


Ada McEwen, national director. has 
announced the appointmcnt of Lorette 
Morel Sutton as an assistant director at 
the national office of the Victorian Or- 
der of Nurses for Canada in Ottawa. 
Ms. Sutton (B.Sc.. 
public health nurs- 
ing. M.Ed.. U. of 
Ottawa) was former- 
ly health education 
and nursing consult- 
ant for the Cana- 
dian Tuberculosis 
and Rcsp iratory 
Diseases Associa- 
tion. Her new responsibilities include 
the identification of educational needs 
of VON staff and the devclopment of 
programs to mect thcm. 


..... 


, 


I 


Dawna Sedun (Reg.N.. Hosp. for Sick 
Children, Toronto) has been appoint- 
ed infant nutrition/family planning 
specialist with Wycth Ltd. 
Ms. Sedun was re- 
cently employed as 
a medical represent- 
ative with a major 
pharmaceutièal 
company in the T 0- 
ronto area. In her 
new position she 
will be responsible 
. for maintaining liai- 
son be
w.een Wyeth Ltd. and ho
pital 
and clime pasonncl who deal with 
infant nutrition and birth control. She 
will be located at the company's cxecu- 
tive office in Toronto. 
38 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


-- 


.,. 


At its annual meeting in Montreal in 
November- the Association of Nurses 
of the Province of Quebec gave a 
reception in honor of Alice Girard, at 
which time she was presented with a 
hrooch. 
Dr. Girard. who recently retired as 
dean of the faculty of nursing at the 
University of Montreal. has acccpted 
an appointment on the teaching staff 
of the school of nursing at the Univer- 
sity of Moncton, Moncton. N .B. 


Appointments and reinstatement
 to the 
nursing faculty of Mount Saint Vincent 
University, have been announced. 
M. Marguerite Muise, B.Se.N., M.S., 
is coordinator of the nursing program. 
She had been on the faculty of the uni- 
versity for four years prior to working 
a year as staff nurse at S1. Vincent's 
Hospital. Ottawa. 
Judith Arlene Allan, B.N.. is nursing 
instructor. She was formcrly staff nurse 
at the Isaak W. Killam Hospital for 
Children. Halifax. 
Patricia Beattie Huggan, B.N.. has 
been clinical instructor since 1972. Her 
previous experience includes publ ic 
health nursing in Charlottetown. and 
hospital staff nursing in Eugene. Ore- 
gon. and Halifax. 
Marilyn Kelly, R.N.. S.C.M., B.Sc.N.. 
is chairman of the third-year basic 
degree program. She worked in Mel- 
bourne fÌ,)r several years. then was asso- 
ciate director of nursing education at 
Western Memorial Hospital. Corner- 
brook, Newfoundland, before joining 
thc un iversity faculty in 1972 as in- 
structor. 


Lillian Grady, who was made an 
honorary member of the Registered 
Nurses' Association of Nova Scotia at 
its annual meeting. retired as director 
of the department of nursing education 
at the Halifax Infirmary last August. 
Except for studies at St. Louis Uni- 
versity. St. Louis. Mo.. to earn a 
B.Se. (nursing education) and M.Sc. in 
nursing, Ms. Grady has devoted most 
of her long association with the Halifax 
Infirmary to furthering the education 
of nurses. 
Active in her profession. Ms. Grady 
has been president of the RNANS and 
president of the Atlantic Council of 
Catholic Nurses. 


Rachel Bureau of 
Quebec City accept- 
ed her third man- 
date as president of 
the Association of 
Nurses of the Prov- 
ince of Quebec at 
its annual meeting 
in November. It was 
during her terms of 
office that legislation affecting Quebec 
nurses was enacted. 
Other officers of ANP() arc. 1st vice- 
president (French), Pierrette Proulx, 
Montreal; 1st vice-president (English). 
Sheila O'Neill; 2nd vice-president 
(French), Yvan Lepage, Mont-Joli; 2nd 
vice-president (English). Judith Pink- 
ham, Vlontreal; honorary secretary. 
Pierrette Boucher. Montreal; honorary 
treasurer. Claire Royer. Sherbrooke. 


...... 
-- 


J 


- 



 \ ' 


Nicole Du Mouchel. who was chosen 
by the Association of Nurses of the 
Province of Quebec to rcpresent nurses 
on the Interprofcssional Council of 
Quebec. has been elected secretary to 
the council. Ms. Du MouehcI is the 
executive director and secretary-regis- 
trar of AN P(). 


Bertha G. Lapointe 
has been appointed 
regional nursing su- 
pervisor in the Wey- 
burn-Estevan 
Health Region, 
Saskatchewan de- 
partment of public 
health. Ms. La- 
pointe (Reg.N., 
Regind Grey Nuns school of nursing. 
Regina; Dip\. Public Health Nursing. 
U. of Saskatchewan; B.N., McGill U.. 
Montreal) has worked as a staff nurse 
in hospitals in Saskatchewan and Ottawa 
and as a puhlic health nurse in Calgary 
and in Saskatchewan health regions. 
She was acting regional nursing su- 
pervisor for a year and assistant to the 
nursing supervisor in the North Battle- 
fÜrd Health Region for two years prior 
to her present appointment. She suc. 
ceeds Muriel Niblett who rctired in 
November. Ms. Niblett (Reg.N.. Este- 
van General Hosp. School of Nursing; 
Dip\. Public Health Nursing, U. of 
Toronto) worked in Saskatchewan. in 
the Mayo Clinic. Rochester, Minn.. and 
JANUARY 1974 


.... 


, 


j. 


-":Þ 

 4
; 
--
 



!>
n
d in the Canadian Arm\' o"erseas 
hdor
 joining the ,talloI' the \V

 hurn- 
Estc\ an H
alth Region as a puhl ic 
health nurse. 
She \\ ill li\ 
 in \\ e\ hurn and hope, 
to tra\ el. - 


G. Margaret Clark is the ne\\ director 
of nursing at Joseph Brant \1cmorial 
Ho"'pital. Burlington. Ontario. Th
 
form 
r d ir
etor \\ as Betty Davidson. 
\1.... Clark has becn \\ ith the ROF" 
Victoria Hospital in Ñtontreal for sev- 
eral 

ars. her most recent position 
th
re ha" ing heen director of nursing 
and principal of the 'iChllol of nursing. 


Barbara E. Burke, 
R.'\;.. B.i\.. \1.Sc. 
(AI. \\as reeenth 
appointL"d dir
ctoí' 
of nursing at thL" 
V ietori a G
neral 
Hospital. Victoria. 
B.C The form
r 
dir
etor of nursing 
at Doctors Hospital 
in Toronto. \Is. Burke had until 11.)72 
nhlde \tomreal and district her ha...e. 
She has heen on the nur,ing facult" of 
0<1\\ son College. \\'estmouiit: a...sistant 
director of nu'í-sö. I akeshore General 
Hospital in Pointe Claire: charge and 
senior ,taffnurse \\ ith the Victorian Or- 
der of Nup;es in I aSalie and \Iontreal. 


". 


J 


-...;. 


- 


On the occasion of the 40th alll1i\ er- 
sarv of the school of nursing. celehrat- 
ed ãt its fall comocation. the-Universit" 
of OWI\\ a conferred honorar
 degreé!> 
on Sister Madeleine de Jesus (Corinne 
f. Lat1,unmel and Isabel Black. 


r--.. \ 


.. 



 



 
Sr. M. de Jesus 



 

 
 
..,
 
Isabel Black 


Sr. Madeleine de Jesus. prolessor 
emcritus. was recogni/ed fÒr her work 
as the first director of the ...chool of 
nursing. a post she held from 11.)33 until 
her retirement in 11.)61. 
:vIs. l3I,ICk. principal nur...e-consul- 
tant \\. ith the röearch and aIMI)' sis 
division of the Ontario ministr} of 
health. \\.J,S given recognition Ilx her 
work in nursing development in Can- 
ada. She is the author of ...e"eral puh- 
lications dealing \.. ith the availdbilit} of 
clinical nursö and nur...ing education. 


JANUARY 1974 


Penelope lessop, 
Reg.,.. B.Se'\... 
ha...-been appointed 
nurs
 clinician. am- 
hulaton care J
- 
partme;n. SI. Jo- 
seph's Hospital. 
Hamilton. Her ex- 
perience a... assistant 
director. staff edu- 
cation. at the Kingston G
neral Hos- 
pital and as clinrcal and classroom 
teacher ..t SI. \1 al) . s Scholll of Nursing 
in K itchener j... h
ing put to good USL" in 
h
r nL'\\ position. \\.hich she finds 
"
\
iting and r
\\arding." 
\"- fes...op is co-author. \\ ith Fran- 
ce... HO\\ard. of "Prohkm-orient
d 
charting a nur,ing \ ie\\ point" 
(Cwulll. ,Vllne. August. IlJ73 I. 


... 


-- 


\ 


) 


eN.A.M. Stokvis (S.R.J\.. S.C\1.I ha' 
been appointed director of the SI. Boni- 
face General Hospital school (If nur...- 
ing. \\ innipeg. 
Ms. Stok" is. \\ho \\as horn III Hoi- 
land. studied nur.,ing in England. Ha 
career th
re included \\ ork \\ ith the 
British Red Cross rehahilitation unit. 
röearch. and tutoring in mid\\ ifcr
 
Since coming to Canada. :\Is. Stok vis 
has heen engaged in supervision and 
teach ing. her mo"t recent association 
being with the \1etropolitan General 
Ho...pital in \\ ind!>or. Ontario, as clini- 
cal instructor of obstetrical nursing and 
assi!>tant director of nur;ing education. 


Lucille E. Notter, Ed.D.. R.:'\.. has 
retired as editor of .\'lInillg Rewa"c". 
She has also heen editor of th
 lilt('/"- 
lIatiollal .Vllnillg Illdex. 
Concurrent \\ ith Dr. '\otter"s r
tir
' 
m
nt is the reka...e of her n
\\ hook. 
L IIden/ellldillg VII/'\illg Rewa"c", 
puhlished hy the Spring
r Puhli,hing 
Co.. Ne\\ York Cit
. Other puhlished 
\"or'" include Prt}fl'.uiOlIllI Nllnillg. 


Elaine McClintock \\as appoint
d chair- 
man llf the health ...ciences depal1nwnt 
01 SI. I awrence College. Brock\ ilk. 
\\hen the Gen
ral Ho...pital school 01 
nursing. of\\.hieh she had h
en dir
ctor. 
\\ as oflïeiall} tran...lár
d to th
 eolkg
 
\b. \1 cCI inhH:k 
H.Sc.i\.. is a IlJ74 
candidate for a 
master.... d
gr

 in 

ducational admin- 
i...tr.ltion from 
üu

n's l'ni\
rsit\. 
Kingston. Prior io 
joinTng th
 Brock- 
\'ill
 Gena.11 Ho...- 
pital ...chool of nursing in IlJt10. she had 
h
en .1 ...t.11l nur"'
 \\ ith th
 \ ictorian 


...... 



 ' 


Order of :'\urs
s in 13roek\ille. Her 
prCs
nt r
sponsihilitiö. in addition hI 
nursing. include the allied health plO- 
gram... of h
ha\ ioral "cienee and child- 
èare \\ ork
r. 


S
\ 
ralne\\ appointm
nt... to the facuh
 
ofnursing.! ak
h
aJ Uni\Cfsit}, 1l111l1- 
der Ba\. Ontario. ha\ e h

n .lnnoune
d. 
Marjorie Wallington, R.\:., B.S
.:'\.. 
\1.Sc.:\.. assi...tant prokssor and acting 
chairman of th
 facuh\. has \\ ork
J in 
roronto for se\ eral \ 
;Irs - as instruc- 
tor. then clinical nurs\,' "'pL'Cialisl. at the 
I oronto Generdl Ho...pital. and a... IlIlr...- 
ing C(ln...ult.UlI \\ ith th
 ministl'\ of 
h
:llth of Ontario. - 
Margaret Drummond Page, Reg.:".. 
H.Sc.:--':.. \1.P.H.. a......i,tant prokssoL 
ha... for thc pa't t\\ 0 
 
ar'" hc
n IlUr,ing 
consultant \\ ith the Ontario ministn of 
h
alth. ronmto. Prior to this sh
 \\ ;,rk- 
ed in I hunder Ba\ (Port AJlhurl in th
 
ar
as oh\dfare a;ld puhlic h
alth. 
Carolyn Wojtysiak Adams, 13A 
;\Iurs., :vI.Sc.N., special lecturer, com- 
pkt
d graduat
 studies in nursing atth
 
Uni\ er,it\ of \\ 
...t
rn ()ntarill during 
the past ýear. 


0(' 


--. 
- -- 


'" 


- 


- 
- 


... 


\ 


--- 
II .If 
I il/iall Hrudie 


Catherille Allan 


Catherine Brcwer Allan, R
g.'\... 
B.Se.N.. M.S.. lecturer, is returlllng to 
th
 facult\ of I ak
h
ad l ni\ 
;'it\ 
aft
r comp.kting her ma...ter"... d
gr
e iíl 
puhl ic h
alth nur,ing at the Uni\ 
rsit
 
of \1 in ne...ota. \1inneapl l li.... 
Lillian Gallan Hrudic, R
g.:'\. 
B.Sc.N.. special lecturer. ha
 been 
a t
acher at' I akdl
aJ R
gional School 
of
ur...ing IÙr the pa...t I\\
' 
ear.... Prior 
to thl'" sh
 \\ as on th
 t
aching stallllf 
St. Jos
ph'... schllol of nUl ...i
lg. Port 
-\rthur. 
Elizabeth McNaught McCowatt, 
S.R.
.. S.C:\L B.ScN.. sp
ci.lliectur- 
er, ha, taught at the Lakehead R
gional 
5.:hool llf '\iur...ing. For '
\
ral -\
ars 
...h
 \\ork
d at St. Jos
ph'... (j
íleral 
Hl"pital in ! hunder 13a
. fir...t on ...tall. 
th
n as a t
.leher of ohst
trics in th
 
Illl'pit.tl"s ...chool of nursing. 
Elaine Petcrs Mullen. R.:\.. B.Sl.".:\., 
...pecialkctUi 
r. ha... \\ork
d in \\ inJ...or 
and D
t((lit .IS a Ill
dical-,.,urgical in- 
StluctOr. She has mor
 r
n:'lil\ h

n 
clinical a......i...t.lIlt at the Uni\er
...it\ of 
\\ 
...t
rn ()ntario -.chool 01 nUl''''lI1g 111 
I olldon. Ont.lrio. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 39 



names 



p
ciali
t in ps)chiatric nur
ing at 

kMast
r l1niwr...it) !\1
dical C
ntr
. 
D. Joan Eagle, B.Sc.N.. \1.N.. as- 
sl'ciat
 professor. 
chool of nursing. 
and coordinator of pediatric care. 
Hamilton G
n
ral Hpspital. has been 
on the faculty of Md\1aster University 
...chool of nursing for s
veral ) 
ars. 
Mary Fawcett, B.Sc.N.. lecturcr. 
has. since ll}tJ I. been with the faculty. 
on an intermittent basis. 
Agnes Griffin, 8 .Sc. N.. lecturer. 
has operated a group home in which 
th
 Children's Aid Soci
ty has placed 
)oung girls on a t
mporan basis. 


:vkl\1aster l'niversity ...chool of nurs- 
ing has announced new appointm
nh 
to its facultv. 
Marilyn - Booth, B . Sc. 1\ '. Icctur
r. 
worked for two years as a public 
health nurse in Etobicokc. fÒllowing 
graduation from McMaster Univcrsity
 
Olga Darcovich, B.S.;-.J.. M.A., a
- 
sistant prolL>......or. \\ as recently din ical 


NOWI 


HOllister'S comDlete 
U-BAG 
system 


regular 
and 24-hour 
colleclors 
In newborn 
and 
pedialriC 
sizes 


40 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


gel any Inlanl urine SDeelmen when YOU wanlll 


The sure way to collect pediatric urine specimens 
easily. . . every time. . . Hollister's popular U-Bag 
now has become a complete system. Now, for the 
first time, a U.Bag style is available for 24-hour as 
well as regular specimen collection, and both styles 
now come in two sizes. . . the familiar pediatric size 
and a new smaller size designed for the tiny contours 
of the newborn baby. 


Each U.Bag offers these unique benefits: - double. 
chamber and no-flowback valves - a perfect fit on 
boy or girl, newborn or pediatric - protection of the 
specimen against fecal contamination - hypo.aller. 
genic adhesive to hold the U.Bag firmly and comfort. 
ably in place without tapes - complete disposability. 


I 


Now the U.Bag system can help you to get any infant 
urine specimen when you want it. Write on hospital 
or professional letterhead for samples and informa. 
tion about the new U.Bag system. 


HOLLISTER LIMITED. 332 CONSUMERS RD., WILLOWDALE. ONT, 


Edith Murray, B.PT..I'v1.Sc.. assistant 
professor. was previously as...i...tant 
professor inth
 departm
nt of rchabili- 
tative medicine. Cniversity of Sas- 
katchewan. 
Cornelia P. Porter, 8.S.N.. M.N.Ed.. 
assistant profcs
or. has wor"ed in 
various capacit ies at th
 Pediatric 
Continuity Clinic of the University 
of Rochester. 
Marilyn A. Ray, B.Sc.. M.Sc.. as...is- 
t
lIlt p
ofe
so
, has held teaching po
i- 
lions III medIcal-surgical nursing and 
maternal-child nursing at the University 
of California school of nursing. Sa;, 
Francisco. 
Marjorie E. Shaw, B.Sc.N.. lecturer. 
has held various positions with the 
Montreal Children's Ho
pital. most 
recently ...ervi ng a
 home-care coordi- 
natoI'. 
Cecily Margaret Smith, R.N.. B.A.. 
M.Ed.. lecturer. has been a teacher 
at SI. Joseph"s Hospital ...chool of nurs- 
ing in Hamilton. 

Grace E. Terry, B.Sc.N.. lecturer. 
has relUlll
d to the facultv after an 
ab
ence of 1\\0 veal'S. during which 
he 
wor"ed as staff í1Urse. then head nurse. 
at S1. joseph's Hospital in Hamilton. 


Helen Gary, R.N.. BSN.. a head 
nurse at St. Paul's Ho
pital. Vancouver. 
was the r
cipi
nt of the I nno\ative 
Nurse Award in recognition of her 
project on pnmary nursing care con- 
ducted at that hospital. This award was 
established to give recognition to 
Greater Vancouver District registered 
nurses who have implcmenkd methods 
to facilitate patient car
. and to offer 
financial support to\\,ard organiJ:ing 
,md implementing such methods. 


lean Laing of foronto was elected pres- 
ident of the Ontario Occupational 
Health Nurses" A
sociation at its an- 
nual meeting. She suec
eds Patricia 
Ewan of Niagara falls. 
Dorothy Schwah of SI. Catharines is 
first vice-president and Gail Pearson 
of Guelph, secretary, 


Roy Harding (R.N., 51. Joseph's Hos- 
pital school of nursing. Victoria; Dipl. 
Nur
ing Service Admin., Dalhousie 
U., Halifax). is earning his M.D. at 
Dalhousic University. 
Mr. Harding's professional exper- 
ience has included that of "medic" on 
an off-shore oil rig. where he looked 
atier the general health of the rig's 
pcrsonnel and rcndered emergency 
treatment ",hell n
eessarv. H.: was. lor 
two 
ears. chairman of "the ...oeia! and 
economic \\elfare committee of the 
Registered N ur
es' Association of Nova 
Scotia. '.,.;. 
IANUARY 1974 



in a capsule 


Hepatitis from clams 
A lettcr to the editor of the Journal (
r 
'hc A maimll Med ical A ssoÔatioll 
(Oct. :!l), IlJ73) tell
 how five of six 
per
ons \';ho ate clams at a family reun- 
ion became ill with hepatitis. 
Apparently it i
 not enough merely 
to steam clams until they open, u
ually 
\';ithin the first minute of steaming. 
The t\';o ph)'sicians who wrote the 
article advise that inadequately 
team- 
ed clams may indeed transmit hepatitis, 
and that illadequate probably means 
failure to steam the clams "for at \cast 
4 to 6 minutes:' 


Health, health, health 
A major ne\';, prime time TV 
efles 
on health. designed for an adult 
audience. is being developed by the 
Children's Television Workshop. 
creators of "Sesame Street,'" and will 
premiere in the fall of 1974. 
A total of 26 original. hour-long 
programs will be created for the series' 
first experimental season, providing 
practical health information in an 
entertaining and instructional form. 
A primary target audience of the 
program will be the young parents who 
play major roles in the general health 
and nutritional well-being of their 
immediate families. The needs and 
problems of the povert} famil} will be 
of particular concern to the producers. 
The overall objective of the series 
is to get people to- improve the level ot 
their own health and that of their 
family. Health is closel) related to life- 
style and the individual has much great- 
er power than most people realize to 
maintain his or her own health and 
to prevent illness. 


Have wheelchair, can travel 
r he attractions of travel in Canada, 
the United States. Mexico. and Puerto 
Rico can be realized by the handi- 
capped. A guide is now available to help 
handicapped travelers decide on their 
destination. 
The Wheelchair Traveler, which is 
described in the September IlJ73 issue 
of CA.R. Scope (published by the Ca- 
nadian Arthritis and Rheumatism 
Society), is the name 01 a guide that 
li
b all the information available on 
facilities at each hotel ,U1d motel. res- 
JANUARY 1974 


taurant, L)r resort. The listings were 
supplied by handicapped travelers and 
organizations for the handicapped. 
Douglas R. Annand. a paraplegic who 
has spent 20 years in a wheelchair, edit- 
ed the information. 
For information about this guide, 
write to The Wheelchair Traveler. 
Ball Hill Road, Milford, N.H. 03055. 


Progress for European women 
The first issue of Womell at J1;orÁ, 
published in October 1973 by the 
Women's Bureau. Canada Department 
of Labour. mentions some better deals 
for women in France and England. 
In France, the government is draft- 
ing new legislation that would give 
mothers retirt>ment pensions. The 



 



 


l 
I 
v \




 


,
'.. " 
...I.
.il!', 
..". ..., 

 .";.. '-- 
CC) 


legislation. which was expected to go 
before parliament b) the end of IlJD. 
would give pensions to mothers. mar. 
ried or not. who have had no regular 
paid wor" and have devoted them- 
selves fully to their family duties. Ac- 
cording to infonnation from the Minis- 
try of Lahour. more French ....omen 
between 20 and :' 5 years of age wor" 
outside than inside the home. 
In England. women in the puhlie 
service receive three months' paid 
maternity leave and a further three 
months' leave without pay if necessary. 
Government departments have also 
been encouraged to arrange office 
hours to suit employees' needs: there 
are provisions for extra unpaid leave 
for men or women to cope \\ ith domes- 
tic duties. 
' 


".'.... I ' 
...
f. . 

... 
.li.
)c.,.J 
J........ __,..! I 


-

 


"Look! They have twu more traps set... 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 


41 



research abstracts 


Th!: fÒllowing arc abstracts of studi!:s 
selceted from the Canadian Nurs!:s" 
Association Repository Collection 01 
Nursing Studies. Abstract manuscripts 
ar!: pr!:pared by th!: authors. 


kezala, Wilton S. Till' COI1!/iJrt (d' pa- 
liel/I,\ il/ lractiol/: a de.\cripIÏl'e sludy. 
Montreal. P.O.. ILJ72. Thesis (J\;1.Sc 
(Appl.)) McGill U. 


"I his s\Ud} d!:seribes th!: behaviors of 
patients who were immohilized in 
traction in a gen!:ral hospital. Its pur- 
pose \\as to ascertain the rdative lk- 
grees of comfort or discomfort these 
patients had. ComlÙrt was eonceptllal- 
i/L'd as a state of being r!:vealed through 
the patient'.. heha" iors in 1\\ 0 respects. 
the amount of ph} sical restlessness h!: 
exhibited and the nature of concerns 
he expre...sed' 
The method used in investigating 
patients' hehavior... was direct oh
erv,
- 
tion. Data collection \Va... carried out at 
various times of the day. and all pa- 
ti!:nts on one \\ard \\ho were in traction 
\\L're t1b...!:rved more than once during 
the investigative period. 
fhe findings r!:vealed the 1'0110\\ ing. 
I. Some degree of phy...ical restless- 
nes... !:xist!:d in all patient.... and it ap- 
peared to have three main compo- 
nents. physical movement. change of 
focu... of activit}. and behaviors indica- 
ti"e of pain. 
2. Almo...t without exception theo;e 
three a...pects of restle...sne...... co-vari!:d. 
rhat is. continuous physical movement 
was associated with frequent changc 
of activity and numerou... pain hehav- 
iors. Converse!}. in freq uent physical 
mov!:ment. in frequent activit} change. 
and few pain behavior... t1ccur!:d to- 
geth er. 

 J. Patient... exhibited varying degree... 
of phy...ical restle...sne....... as de...cribed 
bv behaviors related to the above 
three factors. What \\a:-- prnbahl} ...ome 
kind of continuum from a very high 
to a very low degre!: of restlessne...s 
was conceptuali/ed in the three cate- 
goric... of high. mt1derate. and low re...t- 
'Ïcs...ncs.... AI; clevakd hed and ...kdetal 
traction tended to he as...oeiated \\ ith 
a high degrec of restlessnös. 
4. Pati!:nts who were verv restlc...s 
and were therefore in pain g;lve ...peci- 
fic instructions h1 the Ilur...es ahout how 
to handle their (patients') injured limhs. 
42 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Nurses usuall) responded to the pa- 
tients' ilhtructions. and patients appear- 
ed relie\ed 
5. Vcr) rest Ie...... patients appeared 
to heeome less rest Ie...... \\ hen the} 
\\ere \\ ith their relatives. hut this did 
not ..eem to occur when they were with 
others. 
h. Patients sought advice from nurses 
and fnml Idlow patients concerning 
pain and their treatm!:nt. When they 
received the advice, thcy used it to 
COPL' \\ ith their pain and di..comfort. 
7. Vcr) restless patient-. and )ounger 
patients appeared to hL' concerned with 
the immediate recovery in hospital. 
whereas th!: les... restless patients and 
older patients. except those who were 
in ...ke!etal traction. appeared to be 
eoncellled \\ ith the later (ultimate) 
rL'covery at homL' and ahout their home 
alfairs. 
On the ha...is of the...e findings it was 
...een that patients in traction experience 
varying degrees of phy...ical. a... well as 
PS) chologieal. com fort and discomli.1rl. 
To reduce patients' discomfort would 
thercli.1re require nurses to recognize 
the contributing factors outlined in this 
study. 
 


Macdonald, Myrtle I. 11Ie cirCUmSlal/- 
ces ill II'hicll posloperali\'e palÙ'Il1S 
al/d llIeir mtrseS delermil/l' I/eed .lin' 
(/11 (f/w/gesic Montreal. P .0.. IlJ71. 
fhesis (M.s.:. (Appl.)) MeGilll!. 


rhis s\Ud) was undertaken to discover. 
I. the circumstances under \\ hich nur...es 
perc!:ive thc possihility of patients 
having pain. 2. the fÙcHu.... nurses con- 
,ider \\hen determining the need for an 
analgesic. J. the factors pati
nts con- 
...ider \\ hl:n deciding to ask tor some- 
thing li.Jr pain. and
4. \\hether there is 
delay in GilT) i ng out requests of pa- 
tients li.Jr analgesics. 
Data \\ere collected hy participant 
ohservation in threl: ...urgical units. 
All postoperative patients and nur
es 
involwd in decisions about analgesIcs 
during the ohseJ\'ation period... Wl:re 
included in the sample. fhe sample 
con...istcd of 94 instances. 72 of giving 
and 22 of not gi"ing analgesics to JX 
patients. . 
Findings ,hm\ that there were lour 
ways that nurses perceived the pos...ibil- 
ity of the patient needing an analgesic. 
I. perceiving e" idence of pain firsthand 


while the patient was moving or being 
moved. 2. receiving rl:ports of pain or 
ITquests for an analgesic from the pa- 
tient. J. anticipating pain through 
knowledg!: gain!:d lïr...thand in previou... 
nur
ing interaction. or through formal 
and informal reports. and 4. anticipating 
need Ii)!" an analgesic through theore- 
tical knowledge and routine practice. 
Decisions by patients' nurses to give 
or withhold analgcsics were based 
largely on evidence gained while nurs- 
ing patients and fell into the first cate- 
gory. and "medication nurses" made 
their decisions on the basis of the last 
three forms of evidence. 
f ven whl:n they were at the hl:dside. 
"medication nurses" seldom noticed 
nonverbal signs of pain. The data sug- 
gest two reasons. they did not see the 
patient in movement. and their atten- 
tion was tl)Cu
ed on the routines of 
giving medications. If they anticipated 
pain. they ohtained further information 
hy going to the patient or his nursc. It: 
on thl: other hand. the patient's nursc 
r!:quest!:d an analgesic, the "medica- 
tion nurse" gave it without further 
assesSment of pain and gave it imme- 
diately with no more than 10 minutes" 
delay. 
Patients cried out in surprise from 
pain when they were turned early 
after surgery. then learned to brace 
themselves. next to report pain, and 
later to a..k for an analgesic. The cal! 
light was used onl) four tim!:s hy pa- 
tients during the observation period 
and ne\er hefore the fifth po...topera- 
tivc day. 
Decisions to ask IÒr an analgesic 
\\ere hased on a numbl:r of the follow- 
ing factors. the previous advice of 
doctor or nurse. a desire for rcst or 
sleep. the steadiness and/or sevcrity 
of pain in comparison with other exper- 
iences of pain, the nced to be brave, 
the fear ofaddiction. and the knowledge 
of other ways to cope with pain. fo 
weigh a numher of thesc factors and 
then wait IÒr a nurse to comc into thc 
room took as long as two hours. 
fhe u...e of analgesics to promote 
movement was not undcrstood hy pa- 
tic Ills. for analg!:sics wcre ctmsidered 
to have a sedative effect oppo...ite 
to the ohjective of movement. 
fhl:re' were 12 cascs of unreported 
pain noticed by nurses, all occurring 
after the second postoperative day. 
Nurses' criteria ti.lr assessing pain 
JANUARY 1974 



aftcr thc ..ccond da\ \\ ae \ ague. fhe\ 
m i....ed and/or III 1,interpreì
d ..om
 
nOI1\ erhal ..ign.. of pain. The) had 
difficult) desnibing pain. and thc \\ ord.. 
u..cd implied as,umption.. a.. to 
etiolog). 


Carleton, E. Gail. Relaliol/Ships he- 
III'eell 1/I111/1IITied l1/olhen alld Iheir 
lIell'horll ÌI
flllll\ ill hospital. 'Vlont- 
real. P.Q..llJ71. Thöis( \1.Sc.( Appl.)) 
McGill U. 


L'..ing qualitative research methods. 
this dcscriptivc study \\, as designed to 
investigate interaction hCI\..een un- 
married mothcrs and their infant!, as it 
occurrcd during thc time cach inl
lIlt 
\\,as hcing fed hy hi.. mother. Partici- 
pant ohscrvation was the approach uscd 
to collect data during thc fir,t feeding 
period on postpart.7.n da} one. and 
during onc fecding period on cach of 
the four suh..equent postpartum da) s 
IÒr each d\ ad. 
The stúd} \\as conducted on thc 
35-hcd obstetrical unit of a 266-bOO 
general hospital. 
The ...unpk includcd lJ unmarried 
mot her.. and their ne\.. horn infant... 
Both mothers \\, ho \..erc planning to 
\..eep their inl
lI1ts in their 0\\ n care and 
tho..e \\ ho were placing their inl
lIlts 
for adoption \\ere included in the 
sampk. the relevant critaion heing 
that the mother \\,as fccding hcr infant 
during the live-thl} ho"pitalization 
paiot\. 
Data anal) sis began carl} in the 
period of data collcction. Through thi.. 
joint process the specitic research 
question \\,as fÖrmulated. and. lata. 
a cla..silìcation system \\ a, evolved. 
L'sing thi.. cla....ification s) stem. the data 
from 
5 feeding periods of 
5 minutes 
\\,cre analyzed. 
Fl}Ur pattern.. of mother-infant rela- 
tion..hip.. \\ere identified in the data 
and döcribed in detail. Thcsc pattern.. 
could be di..tingui..hed from one anoth- 
er III that t\\O of the pattern, were 
eharacteri7ed b) thc di,'enified beha... 
ior.. of mothers and inl
lIlt.. (changing 
fmm day to day), while thc othcr 
t\\O 
patterns \\ ere charactcrized b} 11011- 
dil'l'n!/Ïec! heha\ ior.. of mothers and 
infant.. (much the s.lme from da) to 
da}). 
Of the t\\,o nondiversified patterns. 
one \\ as remar\..ahk for the ph) ..ical 
closcne.... bctwcen mother and infant 
and the passivity of each ovcr the five 
da}s (close-pa.Hi"e patlall): the ..ccond 
\\as remar\..ahk for the ph}sical di,- 
tancc het\\,een mother and inl
tnt and 
the relative activil\ 01 each ovcr the 
five days (di.\{CIIlI-aé-ti,'e patlem). 
The 1\\0 diver..ilìed pattern.. could 
be diflerenti.ned from each other h) 
JANUARY 1974 


the progre....ion of the heha\ ioral 
change.. oh..cr\etl. One of them \\,a.. 
mar\..
ed h\ the fluctuating naturc of 
hoth moth
r and infant heha\ iors from 
da) to da) UTl/ell/aliOI/ patterll!. In 
contrast. the other pattcrn had a rela- 
tivel) ..mooth progre....ion of change.. 
fmm da\ to da\ - graduall\. a hala;'Íce 
\\ a.. ach ic\ cd" \\ he'í-c thc "i nfant \\ as 
alert .lIld ..uc\..ing \\ell and the mother 
was anticipating his necd.. and re..pond- 
ing to them .dlccti\eI) (dC'l'e1opl1/el/tal 
patterll). 
\\ ithin the limits afthe small sample. 
the findings of this ..\Ud} indicate that 
patterns of mother-inl
lI1t relation..hip.. 
cannot be differentiated on the basis of 
cthnicity of the mother, nor on the 
ba,is of \\, hether she plan.. to rear the 
infant herself or relinquish him II.}r 
adoption. There arc. hm..e\er. implica- 
tions that ..ome features of the close- 
pa..sive pattern and the fluctuation pat- 
tern ma} bc ..pecific to teenage moth- 
ers. For this reason. further re..eareh 
is indicated to study a large sampk ot 
hoth married and unmarried mothers 
to identil} the existence of the..e and 
other patterns of mother-infant rela- 
tion..hips developing OWl' the lir..t 
live thl)" postpartum. 
Thi.. ..tud} also raises other que..- 


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tion.. II.}r nur,ing re..eareh. I <\re there 
identiflahle n..7r..ing care need.. of 
mother-infant d)ad..
 di'pla) ing each of 
the fÒur pattern.. of rd.ltion..hip'! 2. Arc 
there "peeilïc pattern, of interaction 
hel\\een mother.. and nur..ö. \\hich 
coe\ist \\ ith ..pecilic pattern.. of mother- 
infant re!.ltion..hips'.' 
. HO\\ are nur..e..' 
hehavior.. alleeting the indi\ idualmoth- 
er-infam d}ad.. th
t display a particular 
pattern of re!ation..hip'.' 


II 


Furnell, Margery D. Aclole.\('el/t (11.'- 
p/'e.\.\ioll 1I1lc! illle/'pe/'.\(Jl/C/llwhCll'ior. 
Vancpu\'er.B.( '.llJ73.The,i..C\1.S.7'J.) 
L. of British Columbia. 


:1 


Adolescents ma) he particularly vul- 
nerahle to depression. \ et public health 
nurses \\or\..ing \\ith large groups 01 
ado\öcents are often unable to recog- 
nile depressed }outh... due to the lac\.. 
of simple. re!iahk screening tool... Thi.. 
cxplorator
 ..tud} \\as undcrta\..en to 
gain information that could be u..ed 
to dL'\ elop such a \001. 
Specilicall). the 1<}lIlming question 
\\a.. po..ed. "Are there modes of relat- 
ing interpersonall) that can he used to 
distingui..h the highl} and moderatel) 
depressed adole'Cent from the non- 
deprösed adolc..
ent"" The ans\\ er 
\\as 'ought from inl<mnation ohtained 
from ad7}lescent ..elf-reports on Bec\..'s 
Dcpres..ion Irl\entor) and an adapted 
and pretested II.}rm of :\k:\air and 
Lorr'.. I nte rpcr..ona I Behavior Il1\en- 
tOJ'}. rhcse i 11\ entorie.. \..ere adm inis- 
tered to 25 adolescents \\ ho attended a 
treatment center I<}r adolescent.. \\ ith 
emotional prohlems and 77 randomly 
..elected adolescents \\ ho attended I<Hlr 
Catholic high ..choob in Vancouver. 
Adolesc
nts \\ere classified as non- 
depres..ed. modcrate!} depressed. and 
highl}' depressed on the hasis of their 
..core, on lkc \.. -., Depression Ill' entor). 
A n anal.. si.. of \ariance \\ as carried 
out todi..ct)\er iftherc\\asa ..ignilicant 
dillerence in intcrper..onal hehavior 
score.. 01 nondepressed. mpderately 
depressed. and highl) deprösed ado- 
Ic,cents. A simple regression anal}'sis 
and a multiple step\\ i..e regre....ion anal- 
}si.. \\as done to ..ee if there \\a.. a 
sign ilïcant correlation het\\ een an} 
interpersonal beha\ ior categories that 
could di..tingui..h het\\een the non- 
lkpre,",ed. n
oderatcl
 depres..ed. and 
highl} depre....ed .ldole..cenL 
The fmdings ..upported the o\erall 
conclusion. adolescent... \\ ho exhibit 
mistrust. competition. and detachment 
mo..t of the time or all of the time and 
exhihit dominance onl\ some of the 
time. or not at all. ma\" he nwderatel\ 
or highl} depres..ed adl)Ie'Cents. - 
I he lïndings did not support the 
generall} held thesis that supressed 
hostilit) is an impollant factor in the 
depre....cd pep.,on. "'"" 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 43 



boo ks 


Emergency Medical Guide, 3ed.. by 
John Henderson. 651 pages. To- 
ronto. McGraw-Hili Ryerson. 1973. 
Reviewed bv Nicole Marcha/.., Direc- 
tor, Nation(/l De/Jclftment (
r Family 
Health, Canadian Red Cross Sol'Ìety, 
Toronto, Ontario. 


It is difficult to classify this book in any 
particular category and it is even more 
difficult to clearly understand for whom 
it is written. The author states that the 
boo" is neither a first aid book nor a 
medical textbook; it is rather"a view in 
depth of many pressing medical prob- 
lems which could face a person at some 
time." 
The result is a un ique product. not 
concise enough to ...erve the purpose of 
a text on first aid and not sophisticated 
enough to be used by medical or nursing 
students. It has been written according 
to a dctinite medical model (...igns. 
symptom.... treatment) and I wonder if 
it were written tin in-between groups 
such as medics or physicians' assistants. 
Ten chapters arc dedicated to major 
first aid concerns such as resuscitation. 
hemorrhage. shock. fractures. poison- 
ing. In methods of artificial respiration. 
the author describes mouth-to-mouth 
resuscitation and also the modified 
Silvester method and the Holger N icl- 
son method. 
Experts have practically abandoned 
the teaching of the latter two (especially 
Holger Nielson) because. except in rare 
cases. mouth-to-mouth remains the 
simplest and most efficient technique of 
artiticial respiration. 
The technique of external cardiac 
massage is described and. although this 
is a dangerous procedure. the author 
docs not seem to be concerned with the 
possible serious damages to the body 
if this procedure is carried out by 
amateurs. 
Personally. I would not wish to have 
"a person" apply a downward pressure 
of 70 to 90 pounds on the lower th ird of 
my breastbone so that it moves one to 
two inches toward my spine - even 
though this "person" has been warned 
by the author not to pressure my ribs 
with his or her fingers and not to get 
excited. because the ribs could be 
bro"en or the heart muscle bruised. 
One chapter is dedicated to anatomy 
and physiology and this seems beyond 
the purpose of writing for emergencies. 
Discussion of drug abuse is a popular 
44 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


topic these days and is included in the 
hook. along with emergency child birth. 
The author seems to think that pail)- 
ful menstruation is a medical emergency 
and has listed a series of exacises to 
improve po...ture and develop pelvic 
...tructure for the young woman. Also 
thrown in as a bonus arc basic home 
nursing techniq ues. a schedule for ac- 
tive immuni7ation of infants. and an 
immunization record. 
It is deplorable that the author has 
tried to cover too much with one pub- 
lication; his objective remains obscure. 
It docs not see'm to contain inaccurate 
facts and could he interesting tin an 
individual who feels quite nostalgic 
ahout not having trained as a medical 
doctor. 
This hoo" would not be convenient 
tor a true first-aider nor for professional 
workers in hO'ipital emergency wards. 


Psychiatric Nursing, ged.. by Margue- 
rite Lucy Manfreda. 557 pages. 
Philadelphia. F.A. Davis Company. 
1973. Canadian Agent: McGraw- 
Hill Ryerson. Scarborough. Ontario. 
Reviewed bv Jean Forrest, A .\'So- 
l'Ìate P/'(
f'es.\or, Faculty (
r Nursillg, 
The University (
r Western Ontario, 
Londoll, Olllario. 


The ninth edition of this boo" reviews 
the current field of mental illnes... and 
psychiatry as an introduction to psy- 
ehiat ric nursing. Psych iatric care today 
indicates intervention by a variety of 
health professionals. This book includes 
a rather limited description of a team 
approach for the individual's care. 
The need... of each individual req uir- 
ing psychiatric care arc indicated in 
Unit 5. but arc not followed through 
in Unit X to a sufficient degree. The 
medical model. used by this author. is 
increasingly under consideration and 
question as a method of practice tin 
other members of the health team. 
As memhers of the team. nurses 
must assess the behaviors. thought.... 
and feelings that have brought the 
individual fin professional help. either 
voluntarily or involuntarily. By care- 
ful assessment, the nun,e can e...tablish 
therapeut ic nursing in collaboration 
with other members of the psychiatric 
health team. 
Unit X is focused on the behavior 
and nursing care of patients. By using 


the medical model as the basis tin 
discussion of nursing care. there is 
limited reference to the current nurs- 
ing modalities now being described in 
the literature. 
Nurses arc practicing in one-to-one 
therapeutic relationships. as leaders or 
co-leaders in therapeutic groups. as 
nurse family therapists. as behavior 
therapists. as milieu therapists - what- 
ever the method of treatment, the 
nurse hy therapeutic use of self and 
a variety of techniques permits the 
individual to move to more acceptable 
behavior. 
Several chapters are worthy of men- 
tion: chapters 10. II. 12. 13. and 14 
have a succinct review of behaviors. 
patterns. and symptoms that require 
assessment. Chapter 29 has a good 
review of the current drugs and their 
side effects. 
This reviewer believes that a book 
with a title of PsychiatrÙ' Nursing 
should include a broader base and 
clearer discussion of current nursing 
practice related to the modalities now 
being described in the nursing liter- 
at ure. 


Foundations of Pediatric Nursing, 2ed.. 
by Violet Broadribb. 500 pages, 
Toronto. Lippincott. 1973. 
Rel'ieU'ed h)' Carolvn Roberts, As- 
\';stalll Pro/i.'s.\or, Faculty of Nurs- 
ing, University (
r Weste/'ll Ontario, 
London, Ontario. 


Often the second edition of a textbook 
differs little from the first. However. 
the author of Foundations of Pediatric 
Nursing has revised and expanded the 
first cd ition considerably. 
Ms. Broadribb purports to have pre- 
pared a book on pediatric nursing that 
prov;..lcs a basis from which a student 
.. . . . can build to the depth and breadth 
she needs and desires. The emphasis is 
011 getting started.... The student 
needs practical help as well as broad 
guidelines." Thus. th
 intent is a basic, 
practical text. As such. the emphasis is 
on the what and the how. rather than the 
why of pediatric nursing. 
The boo" has much to recommend it. 
The text is supplemented by illustra- 
tions. tables. and case studies that 
facilitate aClluisit ion of the material. 
On the whole. the material is current 
(Co,,/ill/I/'tf 0" f'age 4(,1 


JANUARY 1974 



Instead of holding 
moisture, Pampers 
hydrophobic top sheet 
allows it to pass 
through and get 
<<trapped" in the 
absorbent wadding 
underneath. The inner 
sheet stays drier, and 
baby's bottom stays 
drier than it would in 
cloth diapers. 


I 


Saves 
you tiIl1e 
Pampers construction 
helps prevent moisture 
from soaking through 
and soiling linens. As a 
result of this superior 
containment, shirts, 
sheets, blankets and 
bed pads don't have to 
be changed as often 
as they would with 
conventional cloth 
III diapers. And when less 
time is spent changing 
linens, those who take 
care of babies have 
more time to spend on 
other tasks. 


KeelJS 
him drier 


, 3(J"" 
---""""'- 
 
.... "...í, II 


Pa 'I) 
e1"8. 


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books 


(Col/tiuued /;'011/ pllge 4-1 J 
and retlecb area!> of increased concern 
in pediatrics. such as drug ahuse. neo- 
natal intensive care unit--.. the 
tages of 
grief. and the concept of prespeech 
training for infants with cleft palates. 
The text is mosl explicit in what to do 
and how. over a broad range of s\..ills 
from Apgar scoring to the use of a uri- 
nometer. 
The author states .. . . . no attempt 
is made in this boo\.. to delve deeply 
into the psychological aspects of child 
behavior:' It is this aspect of pediatric 
nursing that this reviewer found to be 
most uneven. For example, the psycho- 
logy of the family and the child with a 
chronic or terminal illness is discussed 
adequately. but for those concerned 
with the battered or burned child. the 
author alludes cursorily to some of the 
salient psychoJynam ics without clinical 
appl icat ion. 
The role of the nurse in counseling 
parents of retarded children is a cogent 
and succinct presentation, but the dis- 
cussion of the eneuretic child is incon- 
sistent with the research of the last 
decade in terms of both etiology and 
treatment. 
As this is an American text. infor- 
mation on such matters as immunization 
schedules and legalities specific to 
pediatric nursing do not apply to the 
Canadian practitioner. 
This reviewer regrets some of the 
deletions from the first cJition, includ- 
ing the sample PKU menu and the 
homemade play materials. 
As a technical. how-to book on 
pediatric nursing, this is a dandy that 
should have a place in the library of 
everyone interested in pediatric nursing. 


Introductory Maternity Nursing, 2ed., 
by Doris C. Bethea. 276 pdges. To- 
ronto. Lippincott. 1973. 
Reviewed by Mary tl/et/ Dris('()l/, 
Staff Nurse, St. Joseph's Hospital, 
ScÚt/t John, New Brut/swick. 


In the preface the author states. "the 
purpose of this second edition is to 
present the latest inti.>rmation and 
trend of thinking in the area of mater- 
nity nursing." With the exception of 
her discussion of certain aspects of 
neonatal care. such as oxygen admin- 
istration. indications for phototherapy. 
congenital heart disease, and temper- 
ature control. the author has certainly 
fulfilled her purpose. 
In the chapter. "The Family and 
Pregnancy." she ha!> given necessary 
46 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


attention to the possible effects a preg- 
nancy can have on the entire famil). 
The author has included the high 
risk mother in this edition. The medical 
conditions that may cause an expectant 
mother to be classified as high ris\.. arc 
well presented; however. the author 

xpresses some questionable views. 
in this day and age, in relation to the 
social conditions that may cause an 
expectant mother to be considered high 
ris\... 
The title of this boo\.. is misleading. 
It is not an introduction to maternity 
nursing per se. but rather is a pertinent. 
up-to-date summary of the highlights of 
reproductive physiology - an excellent 
and necessary companion to a maternity 
nursing care text. 


Problem Pregnancy and Abortion Coun- 
seling, edited by Robert R. Wilson. 
120 pages. Saluda. North Carolina. 
Family Life Publications. 1973. 
Re\'iewed hv MJ. Mildred Morris, 
Assistall1 PI:(
re.uor, School (
r Nurs- 
it/g, Ut/Í\'ersity (
r Vuay,'a, OUmm, 
Ot/tario. 


This book is designed for anyone who 
counsels those who have a problem 
pregnancy. It may be used a!> a training 
manual or as a resource. Several authors 
h.lve contributed to this excéllent wor\... 
The specific techniques the counselor 
needs to be nondirective and nonjudg- 
mental arc presented in detail. 
The first chapter covers the coun- 
selor's primary role in helping the 
woman decide upon a course of action. 
The author emphasizes that the coun- 

elor's goals must be focused on the 
examination of alternatives and on the 
decision-ma\..ing process. rather than 
on attempting behaviorarchange and/or 
tension reduction. By accepting and 
understanding the client's situation, by 
providing information. and by enabling 
her to face the decision-ma\..ing pro- 
cess and come up with an alternative 
she can live with. the woman is helped 
to make a decision. Whenever possible 
and appropriate. the male is included 
in decision ma\..ing. 
The fÖlIowing chapters deal with 
the alternatives in continuing the preg- 
nancy and the abortion alternative. 
However. the deci!>ion is not treated 
as absolutely final. 
In the second chapter. the role of the 
male partner is further emphasi7ed. In 
counseling for keeping the pregnancy. 
the areas deserving concentration arc: 
the future of the child. and using the 
pregnancy experience as an opportu- 
nity for learning and growth. The prob- 
lems that may emerge during an un- 
plan:1ed pregnancy and their possible 
solutions arc treated at length. The 
alternatives of \..eeping the child or 


placing him for adoption are fuiiy ex- 
plored. No pressure fÒr either alterna- 
tive. but as free a choice as po
sihle. 
i
 the main objective in counseling. 
The abortion alternative is presented 
in great detail in the third chapter. The 
three sections ma\..ing up this chapter 
discuss abortion counseli ng, medical 
aspects of abortion, and the changing 
abortion laws. Abortion counscling 
means working with a woman who has 
made a responsible decision to see\.. an 
abortion. These sections provide more 
than adequate information for the 
counselor. 
To insure that a problem pregnancy 
will not recur. the woman requires 
help to establish a pattern of responsible 
sexual behavior. and instruction in the 
most rcliable tÌJnn of contraception that 
is acceptable to her. The concluding 
chapter
 contain information that will 
guide the counselor in helping his 
clien!
 to avoid future problem preg- 
nanCies. 
This boo\.. is highly recommended 
for anyone who counsels persons who 
have a problem pregnane}. It should 
enable coun
clor!> to cope in an intelli- 
gent. effective way with the problems 
presented by their clients. It would be 
a valuable addition to any nurse's 
library. 


The Teaching Function of the Nursing 
Practitioner, 2ed.. by Margaret L. 
Pohl. Ill) pages. Dubuque, Iowa. 
Wm. C. Brown Company. 11}73. Ca- 
nadian Agent. Burns & MacEachern. 
Don Mills. Ontario. 
Re\'ieU'ed hy /:". Mary BI/::::.ell, As- 
sociate P/'(
fés.\()r, School (
r NI/rsing, 
McMaster Uni\'('/"sity. Hamilton, 
()t/lario. 


rhis book, which is an outgrowth of 
the author's re!>earch for her doctoral 
degree, is intended to assi
t nursing 
practitioners who desire to impHh'e 
their teaching ability. In this ne\\, edi- 
tion. references at the eonel usion of each 
chapter have been updated beyond 
IlJ60. A new chapter on evaluating 
teaching and learning, plus addLd em- 
phasi!> on the period of convalescence. 
is indeed val uable. 
The objective of the bou\.. is achiev- 
ed. Conteil\ is built around the exam ina- 
tion of principles of learning and teach- 
ing with emphasis on teaching a!> the art 
of helping people learn. Factors affect- 
ing teaching and learning arc described. 
Chapter!> deal ing with suhject matter. 
methods of teaching, and teaching 
materials arc up-tn-date and explicit. 
The infÖrmation on planning for teach- 
ing and evaluation provide good exam- 
ples fÒr the reader. 
(Co//ti//ued 01/ fluge -IX) 


,ANUARY 1974 



How do you handle 
a patient who wants to die? 


Or, how do you resolve a professional disagreement with a doctor. . . or deal with a 
tyrannical supervisor? Most nursing textbooks don't face up to these situations. 
Critical Incidents in Nursing does. 


Editors Loretta Sue Bermosk and Raymond Corsini provide you with a collection of 
everyday human relations problems that confront today's nurse along, with accomp- 
anying commentary from a panel of specialists on how to approach each incident with 
regard to ethics and professionalism. 


Critic-al 
Illei(lCllts 
ill 

llrH. 1. 


" 


" 


A variety of ideas and a wide range of attitudes rise out of each situation. Some 
consultants may mirror your feelings; others may present opposing views. The 
editors point out that there are many ways to approach any interpersonal situation, 
and that these multiple approaches emphasize the complexity of the problems facing 
the nurse and the diversity of possible solutions. 


This unique book is patterned after "critical incident" volumes in other specialties. 
Selected incidents have been grouped into six areas of nursing interaction: with the 
patient, with other nurses, with doctors, with the family, with supervisors, and with 
th
 system, Editors' overviews precede each section, offering useful reading suggest- 
ions derived from experience with prior "critical incident" volumes. It provides a bene- 
..;ial learning experience for any nurse. 


Ideally suited for classroom use or self-study. 


By Loretta Sue Bermosk, R.N., M.Litt.. Professor, School of Nursing, University of 
Hawaii, Honolulu; and Raymond J. Corsini, Ph.D., Research Affiliate, School of Pub- 
lic Health, University of Hawaii, Honolulu. 
369 pages. $11.85. Published June 1973. 
r-----------------------------------------, 

 W. B. SAUNDERS COMPANY CANADA, L TD.I 
L
) 833 Oxford Street, Toronto, Ontario M8Z 5T9 : 
Please send me for: I 
o my personal library _ for classroom adoptIon I 
School 
Positio n I 
1696 Bermosk & Corsini: Critical Incidents In Nursing $11.85. : 
Name Address I 
Provo I 
L _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .!:
1.:!.4-1 


JANUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 47 



books 


(('''lIlilllled ',..,11/ pag.. 461 


One of the strong points of the book 
i
 its organization. Each chapter con- 
tains a summary. excellent references. 
and is organized clearly, systematically. 
and concisely. The application to vari- 
ous nursing settings lends itself to use 
as a quick reference. 
In summary. this book is an excellent 
resource text tlJr both nursing studenb 
and tÒr graduates who are interested in 
improving their teaching. This revised 
boo\.. is a valuahle addition to the other 
cight books in the Foundations of 
N'Ursing series. 


International Directorv of Nurses with 
Doctoral Degrees. 106 pages. New 
Yor\.., American Nurses' Foundation. 
1973. 


The American Nurses' Foundation puh- 
lished its first Directory of Nurses 
lI'ith t'amed Doctoral Degree.\ in 1969. 
Thi
 was a follow-up to the list com- 
piled by Amy Frances Brown for an 
appendix to hcr Research ill Nursillg 
(Philadelphia. Saunders. 195X). Both 
these I ists. and the 1970 and 1971 
supplements to the AN f- Directory, 
were national compilations for the 
United State
. 
Canadians will be particularly 
pleased that the ANF has made this 
1973 cd it ion international. Canada 
is next to the United State
 in haviLg 
employed 'Å'ithin her borders the most 
nur<;es with earned doctoral degrees. 
that is. of the 55 nurses with carned 
doctoral degrees \\or\..ing outside the 
United States. 2X arc in Canada. We 
must admit. of course. that Canada, 
as a neighhor of the United State<; with 
ready aece<;s to the many American 
institution
 offering doctoral degrees 
in fields of interest to nursing. is in "a 
most favored country" position in this 
regard. 
The nursing profession hegan to loo\.. 
seriously at research in the 1950s. 
Nursing associations in many coun- 
tries agitated for more personnel and 
resources for this important aspect of 
the development of the profession. The 
Directories are an excellent indication 
that progre
s in both is being made. 
Dr. Bro\\n listed 109 American 
nurse
. dnd the 1973 Directory'
 inter- 
national total is 1.019 nurses with earn- 
ed doctoral degrees. (Somewhere the 
"Earned" has been omitted from the 
handsome gold-on-blue cover of the 
1973 editi(;Jl. This is 
urely a bindery 
oversight since the Preface and "A W on.1 
48 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


About the Entries" on page ix ma\..es 
the intent to cover only earned degrees 
quite clear.) 
The entries in the Director} include 
more information than in previous 
Directories. The data on clinical inter- 
est areas. wor\..ing experience. and 
current employment status and field 
extend its usefulness tlJr employers and 
research departments seeking personnel 
with special qualifications. For exam- 
ple, an individual whose doctoral 
!>t

ies 10 years ago were in a specific 
chl1lcal area may have proceeded in 
administration or teaching and the 
cI inical expertise is no longer current. 
The value of the emphasis on minori- 
ty groups and the indication of race 
appears less obvious. What constitutes 
a minority group varies from country 
to country. 
Cooperation from nurses eligible 
ti)r this Directory must generally have 
been good. Of the two Canadians who 
are missing from the listing, one is no 
I
mger actively in the nursing profes- 

Ion and the other was on sabbatical 
leave out cf the country at the time of 
the survey. To balance this lo
s. two 
others shown as employed in Canada 
arc not. we suspect, Canadian citi7ens! 
Three indexes that are new features 
of the 1973 Directory extend its use- 
fulness. The tigure quoted earlier of 
nurses with earned doctoral degrees 
employed beyond the United Sates 
were from the I ndex by Geographical 
Location of Employment. This partic- 
ular index might be more useful by 
country of citizenship and the optimum 
would be, of course, to have both. 
The other Indexes, by Su
ject of Doc- 
toral Dissertation. and by Field of 
Doctoral Study are indicators of areas 
of research helpful for research workers 
and prospective doctoral candidates 
loo\..ing ti.Jr new channels of investiga- 
tion, and for historical and trend 
studies. 
The American Nurses' foundation 
has malic a splendid contribution to 
the tools of nursing research with this 
collection of all health science and 
research libraries serving nurses. 


A Very Private Malter: The Ostomy 
Handbook by Edith S. Lenneberg 
and Miriam Weiner. :!X pages. Los 
Angeles, Calif.. United Ostomy As- 
sociation. 1973. 
Re\'iewed hy Gellevie\Je fllO"'p.
(}", 
ElI1erostolllal TherapisT. St. Joseph's 
Gelleral Hospital, nll",cler Bay. 


This boo\.. was written with not only 
the nur
ing profession in mind but the 
general public, who would have reason 
to be interested in the subject of stomas. 
Its purpose is to acquaint the reader 


with generalities and provide under- 

tanding of the various types of "stlJ- 
mas" and problems that may etrect the 
patient after this type of surgery. 
One of the prime o
iecllves IS to pre- 
sent the suhjeet to the reader so he may 
understand the extent of the problems 
involved and the need for specialized 
services ti)r complete rehahilitation. 
The authors also explain that these ser- 
v ices arc not only necessar} for the 
patient with reccnt surgery. but also tl)r 
patients who hdve had this handicap 
tor many years. This type of rehabili- 
tation is an ongoing process. 
The boo\.. is easy to read and has 
continuity of subject matter. Descrip- 
tion of anatomy is concise and explicit, 
with the exception of the illustration of 
the ileal conduit. which all readers may 
not tind clear. I found the sense of 
hUmor. in which "the nature of the 
handicap" was described. delightful. 
The purpose may not have been to pro- 
duce entertainment, but to convey the 
sense of humor that must be maintained 
to avoid projecting the ICeling of com- 
plete hopelessness. 
Good management of a stoma is a 
complex matter - medically. surgi- 
cally, and technically. All these aspects 
are well explained. further stressing 
the involvement of several agencies and 
personnel to provide complete service 
to the patient. The importance of stoma 
location is stressed. This information is 
scldolllmentioned to any extent in most 
texts and is an imperative surgical 
decision. 
The discussion of emotional adjust- 
ment is well expressed. I feel nursing 
personnel. patients. and involved 
families. have difficulty in accepting 
the fact that it is "normal" to express 
hostilities and anxieties during the 
stages of acceptance. If these thoughts 
were not suppressed. long-term man- 
agement would come more easily. 
The pictorial glossary of stoma sites 
and appliances definitely highlight 
the boo\... It was good to see a variety 
of manufacturers' products illustrated. 
The stoma sites would have been more 
effective in color. 
In summary. the authors have offered 
a un iy ue hasic boo\.. rei ated to ostOIll y 
care. It offers a complete understanding 
of the word "stoma" and all the com- 
pi ications and problems involved in 
returning such patients to an active. 
productive role in the community. A 
stoma is not a disease; instead. it res- 
tores the patient to health -the point 
brought out hy the text. The boo\.. would 
definitely be useful in teaching those 
who arc involved in managing the pa- 
tient and the patient. who must he 
given tool<; to help himself. 
As a reference boo\.. tl)r any individ- 
ual who may he in need of intormation 
or see\..ing assistance, it is excellent. ,.; 
JANUARY 1974 



A V aids 


o A series of tapcd television pro- 
grams on "The Canad ian \\ oman." 
produced in 1972 by 
me 75 Montreal 
women and telecast on a Montrcal 
cable station. arc nol.I. available at no 
cost tor shOl.l. ing on cable stations 
across Canada and to women's groups. 
There are t\\O sets of these color. half- 
hour. half-inch tapes; one is available 
from any regional office of the citizen 
section of the secretary of state depart- 
ment and the other from the Women's 
Centre of the '\ we A. 1355 Dorchester 
Blvd. W.. Montreal. Deposits of $10 
per tape. plus shipping chargcs. are 
required for the Montreal source. 
These 25 taped programs can be 
viewed on any hut Portopak projectors. 
Included in the program series are the 
subjects: women in the family; cons- 
ciousnes" raising; feminism; scxualit) 
of women. in two parts; women. the 
Native experience; women as artists; 
the prostitution of women; womcn at 
work. in two parts - in the labor force 
and returning to work; women in revo- 
lution; the feminine consciousness in 
contemporary literature; women from 
the vie\\point of the la\\, in two parts; 
communal living. the psychology of 
women, III three parts; women from 
the vicwpoint of the church; and wo- 
men from the viewpoint of politics. 


o "Learning to Nurse," a series of 
videotapes for use in the teaching of 
nursing. is available from Videotape 
Research Program. School of Nursing. 
ÑkGill University. 3506 University 
Street. Montreal 112. Quebec. The aim 
of each tape is "to demonstrate cvery- 
day. ordinary behavior and perfÖrm- 
ance of people." These tapes. made 
for demonstration purposes in a rc- 
search pn
iect. arc for sale only. 
The tapes avail.lblc arc: Admission 
to Discharge of a Little Girl with T and 
A (34.5 min.) and the Admission of an 
Infant to Hospital (12 min.); An Infant 
with Cleft Palate and Harelip (10 min.). 
and Suctioning an Infant in Respiratory 
Distress (7 min.); A Child with Dia- 
betcs: A Comparative Study in Three 
Families (2X min.); Diabetes. Socializ- 
ing the Child and Family (26 min.); 
Diabetes in the Child - A Late Find 
(14 min.); Ageing and Diabetes (23.5 
min.>. A Comparative Study. Aging 
and II1ness - Part A (27.5 min.). Part 
B (31.5 min.), Part C (19.5 min.); and 
The Aged in Hospit.d (40 min.). 
JANUARY 1974 


c:t
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British Columbia hospitals located in communities with fcw doctors can call on 
the Mobile Instructional Resources Centre - a fancy name fÖr a continuing 
education program set up in a bus. The Universit) of British Columbia's 
division of conti nuing education in the health scienccs bought the bus. \\ hich 
has been converted into an audiovisual library and classroom. The software 
on one side includes 1.000 audio- and 30 videotapes. 15 movie cartridges. 
and 30 slide-tape programs. Three cubicles on the other side contain three tape 
recorders. three sl ide projectors. t\\O TV sets. an autotutor. and a cartridge 
movie pn
iector. Six persons can use headsets at one time to listen to or watch 
six different programs. So far. nurses have made most use of the programs. 
The Registered '\iurses' Association of British Columhia has donatcd SH.OOO 
toward purchasing and producing A V materials and has allocated S5.000 to 
the end of 1974 1'I.)r developing instructional packages. The A V material used 
in this continuing cducation program is being constantly updated. 
---- 


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THE CANADIAN NURSE 49 



AWARD OF MERIT 
o On October 25. 1973. the First 
Canadian Festival of Institutionally 
Produced Instructional Media and 
Canadian Education Showplace pre- 
"ented The University of Western 
Ontario in London with an Aw,m.1 of 
Merit tix the entry E\lIl1/ifllltio/l (
r 1I 
N l'l\'bvrfl. 
Dr. N. Jaco made this cassette at 
the request of Carol Anonsen, nurse 
coordinator, for use in the clinical 
training course offered at U.W.O. for 
nurses in the north. \-? 


accession list 


Publications on this list have been 
received recently in the CNA library 
and are listed in language of source. 
Material on this list, except reference 
items, may be borrowed by CNA mem- 
bers, schools of nursing and other ins- 
titutions. Reference (R) items (Archive 
books and directories, almanacs and 
similar basic books) do not go out on 


Tropical 
Diseases 
and 
Parasitology 


loan. These are on Reserve and may 
go out on Interlibrary loan only. 
Request for loans should be made on 
the "Request Form for Accession List'" 
and shmild be addressed to. The Libra- 
ty. Canadian Nurses' Association. 50 
The Drive\\ay. Ottawa. Ont. K2P IE2. 
No more than thn'l' titles should be 
requested at anyone time. 


BOOKS AND DOCUMENTS 
I. Ad"lr "lid cl,ild c",.I'; II dil'lII II/>p/'tJlld, 10 
IIunill}.!, ny Janet I\liller Harner et al. 51. 
I oui
. I\losny. 197.'. XI-Ip. 
2. Alienl/ai,'(' 10 iU'liluliollll1 UII'/' I",. olt"''' 
AII/<'I'iulI/.': I'racticl' al/(l plallllillg. A ('(II/{;"'- 
ellce I'l'POI'I, edited by Eric Pfeiffer. DUr- 
ham. N.C.. Center for the Study of Agmg 
and Human Development. Duke Univ.. 1973. 
197p. 
3. Le., lI.uell/hiée.' dé/ihérllllies (dllIlS Ie.' coo- 
pé/'{/Ii,'e.,), par Claude Béland. Ville 1\10nt- 
Royal. P.Q.. Editions Robel. 1969.20Xp. 
4. ßcf"/I'i",' II/odi/iclllioll 111/{1 I(,e ullnillg 
pmn'.u, by Rosemarian Berni and Wilbert I . 
Fordyce. St. Louis. Mosby. 1973. 135p. 
5. Call1ldillll Hmpillli A.'.'O/'Ílliioll ol1ìu' 111/{1 
IIs.,odalioll direclo,.y, 11)73. Toronto. Cana- 
dian Hospital Association. 1973. Mp. R 
6. Clllllldillll Nu,..\(,s' A.,.\/J/'Íalioll ,lal/'II//'lIls. 
Ottawa. Canddian Nurses' Association. 1973. 
1 vol. 
7. nil' dilliClI1 /lPP,.ollch 10 I(,e palie/ll. by 
William 1 . Morgan and George L. Engel. 


roronto. Saunder
. 19ó9. 31-1p. 
X. ClilliclIl //l'urolo}.!y. ny Francis I\liehael 
I-or
ter. 3ed. SI. I ollis. \Iosby. 1973. 20Xp. 
9 COlI/lIIUllity (,1'11111, - ,lra/('}.!Ù" .to,. "/"'"<:1'. 
Pllpe,.., p,.es('lIled al 1(,(' /I)/Z l'L'giolllll II/eel- 
ill}.!' o{ II" Co II 11";1 0/ /1'''"1' 1/(,11111, Agell- 
cin 1111.1 CO'" 11/1/111/" HIIIII(, -'e/'l'in', (,eld 
ill Alllllllic Cil", \../.. l\'o"(,lI/hlT 17-1l!, "",I 
0"1/,,.,. I ('X".,, [)eCI'II""''' II-I:!. New '\- 01'1.. 
National I eaglle for Nursing. Oept. of Home 
Health Agencie
 and Community Health 
Services. 1973. 76p. 
10. COlllrol/ill<: 111.. "1'1'",,1 or ill/(T/iOIl: " 
p,.ogn/ll/ll/l'd 1I/"'.'l'l11l11ioll, by Helly :\lclnnes. 
St. I ollis. !\1o
by. 191-'. Illp. 
II. 71/(' .IllY ('((H' I,oo/-.., by Barb Cameron el 
al. Toronto. Canadian Women's Educa- 
tional Press. 1972. 4Rp. 
12.01"''''01''''''111' ill 111.. cO'T('('liol/.\ {ìdd ill 
C""lIdll. Ollawa. Canadian Criminology and 
Corrections Association. JYI). )4p. 
13. Di,.eclon' ,!r CIIH".,. ",ohilily oPI>tlrtulli- 
lit" ill IIlInillg. Prepared by C,trrie H. I en- 
burg. Walter L John
on ,md Jo Ann T. 
Vahey. New '\-orl.. National League for 
Nursing. Div ision of Research. 1973. 21 Xp. 
1-1. D,.ug, , d..",ol/." dol'lon 1111.1 di-",,,.\(', by 
Perry A. Sperber. SI. I ollis. \\'an'en H. 
Green. 1973. 294p. 
IS. flt''''''III., "r ,.e.' (,,,,.<1, ill II IIn illg , by 
Eleanor Walters Treece and Jame
 Wil- 
liam Treece. St.1 olli
. Mosby. 1973. 2X-Ip. 
16. 1-."'lIluIII iOIl o{ g,.",IIIII/," 01 "'.w/'ÍII/.. 
.leg,..... IIlInillg p,.ogra",.,. by 1\1 ildred I. 


Nursing 
Faculty 


Program 
Position 


Applicant must be prepared to teach basic nursing 
concepts and skills at the diploma level. Masters 
Degree preferred. 
Mount Royal College IS an old established institu- 
tion with a completely new campus designed for 
independent study and individualized instruction. 
This opening is for the 1974-75 school year Earlier 
appointment is possible. 
Personnel policies are excellent. 
Salary up to $14,725 commensurate with educa- 
tional preparation and teaching experience. 


Take our special course In Iropical diseases 
and relaled subJecll. Thla equips you 10 lunctlon 
intelligently 81 8 nurse In 8n environment where 
luch dlleasel pose a heallh problem. 



pen to graduat" nurses currently registered in 
their own province or slale Comprehensive 16 
week course commenCes in September and 
February Train In modern, equipped cenlre Wllh 
attraclive accommodalion lor living in localed 
in Melropolltan Toronlo 


For information write to: 


Co-ordinator. 


e 


. 


..II . 
health institute 


I;" 


.. 


4000 Lealie Street, 'Mllowdale, 
Ontatio, Canada. 


50 THE CANADIAN Nl.!RSf 


Apply to: 
Vice-President, Instruction 
Mount Royal College 
4825 Richard Road S.W. 
Calgary. Alberta 


MOUNT ROYAL 
COLLEGE 


LINCOLN PARK CAMPUS, CALGARY, ALBERTA 
TELEPHONE 246-6111 


JANUARY 1974 


.1 
.If 
f 
. A 
r 



Montag. Ne.... York. publi,hed for the Dept. 
of Nur,ing Education h} Teachers College 
Pre". Teacher, College. Columbia Univer- 
,ity. 1')72. lOOp. (Nur,ing education mono- 
graph, no. 13) 
17. Fouudaliol/.l or I'..diall'ic uunillg, by 
Violet Bmadribb. :!ed. Toronto. Lippincott. 
1973. 500p. 
II!. Gmlll.' alld /11\'(11'11.' gUll/(', 1<)73. Ottawa. 
:l.ledical Re,earch Council. 1973. ó3p. 
I '). fill' gl'oup IIppl'Ollcll ill lIunillg pl'actic.., 
b} G....en D. I\larram. SI. louis. Mo,by. 
1973. 2:!Op. 
20. Iflllld"oo/.. !;". lIunillg lIide.'. 
vi-.ed. :\Idbourne. Ho'pital, and 
Commi"ion for Nur,ing Aide 
Schools in Victoria. 1973. 310p. 
:! I. 11I!;'Clioll: p/'(Telllio" IIl1d C 01111'01. by 
Haine C. Duba} and Reba D. Grubb, SI. 
I oui,. :l.lo,by. 1973. I óOp. 
:!:!. Il/te"''''li",,,,1 dil'ectol'Y ,
! "W'.,C'.' lI'ill, 
doclowl degl'ee.\. Ne.... York. American 
Nurses' Foundation. 1973. 1U6p. 
23. I"II'(/\'e"ous IIIeelic(/(iol/.l; a Iwnelhoo/.. fol' 
''''I'.'e.' IInel olhel' allieel heallh pel'"onnel, by 
Betty L Gahan. St. Louis. Mosby. 1973. 
176p. 
2-1. 11I1I'oduClioll 10 clillical lIunillg, b} 
\lyr.l E,trin I evine. :!ed. Philadelphia. Da- 
vi,. 1')7]. 5 15p. 
25. II/tl'odllclol'Y ",lIlen/il,' lIunillg, by Do- 
ris C. Bethea. 2ed. Toronto. Lippincott. 
191.'. ::!76p. 
26. \Ic'",oil'e 'Ul' Ie pl'ojel ell' I'èr:/('",..nl 1110_ 


JOed. re- 
Charities 
fraining 


difìc",1 Ie I','gl"",,'111 ,'II "('I'lu de la loi 'Ul' 
1<'.\ .\t'/Tic...\ d.. .\illllé el /('., .'en'ice'.' .'odllux. 
Montreal. Fédération de, Admini,trateur, 
ue, Service, de Santé et ue, Services \OCiaux 
du Québec. 1973. 54p. 
27. Alicl'o"iology: III"ol'alol'Y III "" uIII lIud 
II'OI'/.."OO/... by Alice I orraine Smith. 3ed. 
St. Louis. :\Io,by. 1973. l7:!p. 
21( Nunillg ill Ihe .\tTel/tie.\; .\('Ie('(eel I'ead- 
illg., Ihlll pl'e.\t'1I1 "olh Ihe o/c1 ali<I Ih.. lIell" 
lI'ell</.' I" h..lp C'I','(/(e betteI' lIunillg (<U'C' f;". 
palielll.,. Compiled by Anne K. Roe and 
I\1ary Sherwood. Toronto. Wiley. 1973. 
32lp. 
:!9. P,'ople cllld idea.,. ,'IIunilll! III li/e.'lel'lI. 
I <):!O-I<)7U, by Hendrick Overduin. London. 
Ont.. Faculty of Nursing. University of 
Western Ontario. 1')70. 150p. 
30. l'el'.'p''Cli,'"., iu l"'IIIall de \. "'''1'111 ,'111; 
"unillg Ihl'"ugllOuI Ihe IiI<' c:\'C-{e. by Dori, 
Cool. Sutterly and Gloria Ferraro Don- 
nelly. Toronto. Lippincott. 1973. 331p. 
3 L The pmclicc of III"lIIal hea/tll nUl'sing: 
II C,WllllUllily appl'ollch, by Arthur Jame, 
Morgan and Judith Wil,on Moreno. Toron- 
to. I ippincott. 1973. 2 II p. 
32. l'I'ecisi"" joul'ullli,,": II /'('pm'lel'\ il/tl'''- 
dUC'ti,,1I I" ""dlll .,d"II,'e ",elllOd." by Phi- 
lip Meyer. Hloomington. Ind.. Indiana Univ. 
PI'.. 1973. 342p. 
.'3. PI'iucipln or illlt'I"in' ('(1/'(', by E.R.J. 
Emery et al. Lonuon. Engli,h Univer,itie' 
Pr.. 1973. lóXp. 
34. PI'iudple.' of III ic/'()"i,,{og\, , by Alice I 01'- 


Request Form 
for "Accession list" 


r.line Smith. 7ed. St. 1 oui,. \lo,b\. 1')73. 
681p. 
3.
. 1'I'"ble", I,,'..gll""n ali<I """rri,," COIIII- 
,dillg. hlited by Rohert R. \\ ihon. S,llud. 
N.C.. Famil} life Publicalion,. 1')7'. 120p. 
36. Relldillg' iu gel'olll"logy. ed ited by V irgi- 
nia ;\I. Brantl and Si,ter Marie Ra}mond 
Hro"n. St. I oui,. \Io,by. 1973. 117p. 
37. R'p"I'1 1<)73. Otta....a. Canadian C"mi- 
nology and Correction, A"ociation. 1973. 
I vol 
3K R"I'''I'I 1<)71-73. Otta.....I. Intern.llion.ll 
Development Rc,earch Centre. I ')73. IO-Ip. 
39. I'{,e lelld,illg lì",clioll "f lire lIunillg 
pracliliollel', b} \largaret I. Pohl. 2ed. 
Dubuque.lo....a. Bro....n. 1')73. 12')p. 
40. 7 eXlb""/,, "r p..dillll'ic IIIInilll!, b} Doro- 
thy R. Marlo..... -led. fomnto. Saunder,. 
1973. 77óp. 


PAMPHLETS 
41. Aid I" II". I"'",allilin IIl1d \(willl \(';"11- 
cn. Otta....a. Canada Council. 1')73. 17p. 
-12. flit, ('''''e of Y"ul' ('o{"\to",,. by John 
Cedric Goligher and \Iurid PolI.lrd. 2ed. 
london. Hailliere. frndall. IQ7'. 'Ip. 
4.:\. 1\1111111111 0/ COlllillllillg /1111 \ ill!! cdunlf;"11_ 
Vancouver. 13.<.. Univer,it} of Hriti,h (0- 
lumbia. 197'. Xp. 
4-1. ,\'lIr.\;'lg ('llllclIl;on (Illtl rCI!;\lral;oll: 
,lali,lind I'ep 0 1'1 , I <)7:!. fo!'Onto. College 
of Nur,e, of Ontario. 197' 'Xp. 
-I
. Ref'orr 1<)7:!. loronto. C.tnadi,tn \len- 
tal Heallh A'\()ci.ltion. 1973. 


In decubitus 
ulcers 


CANADIAN NURSES' 
ASSOCIATION LIBRARY 


Send this coupon or facsI'11I1e to 
LIBRARIAN, Canadian Nurses' Association, 
50 The Driveway, Ottawa K2P 1E2. Ontario. 
Please lend me the fOllowmg publications, listed in the .............. 
...................................... ...... ........ issue of The Canadian Nurse, 
or add my name to the waiting list to receive them when 
available. 
Item Author Short title (for identification) 
No. 


Nursing Care is 
what it's all about. 


A comprehensive film on the role of the nurse 
In the treatment and prevention of decubitus ulcers 
plus a unique concept in skin care, is available 
upon request from the Education Department, 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals, l20North Queen Street. 
Toronto, Ontario M8Z 2E3. 
Suppliers of Alpha-Keri.. therapeutic bath 
oil, and Keri'" Lotion, all over body lotion. 
"T.M. Auth. User 


Request for loans will be filled in order of receipt. 
Reference and restricted material must be used in the CNA 
Ii brary. 
Borrower '. .....,............. .......... ......... .......... ........................ .... ....... 
RegistratIOn No. ........................................................ 
Posi tion ....... ......... ............. ........ .............. ........ ...................... 


ß 


--------------- 


-- 
--- 


c 


D YES. please contact me to schedule a viewing of 
Westwood's in-service film on decubitus ulcers. 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals Toronto Ontario M8l 2E3 


Name 


Area code_ Telephone No._ 


Title 


Address... .... ..... ......... ...... .... ..... ....... .... ........ .., ..... ....... ... ...... ......... 


Date of request ...... 


Institution 


Address 


JANUARY 1974 


City 


Province 


Poslat Code 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 51 



COriGidin'D ' 


DESCRIPTION: 
Coricidin 'D': Each white, coated 
tablet contains: 
2 mg chlorphemramine maleate US.P., 
390 mg acetylsalicylic acid, 
30 mg caffeine and 
10 mg phenylephrine. 
Available in blistersoftz 
and 24, and botdes of 100 tablets. 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: Each orange- 
pineapple-flavored multicolored tablet contams: 
0,5 mgchlorphemramine maleate U.S.P., 
80 mg acetylsalicylic acid and 
2,5 mg phenylephrine HC\. 
Available in boxes of 24 Medilets in a 
child's protective package. 
INDICATIONS: 
Symptomatic relief of nasal congestion and 
other discomforts associated with sinusitis, 
colds and allergic or vasomotor rhinitis. 
CONTRAINDICATIONS: 
Sensitivity to any of the components, 
patients receiving MAO inhibitors 
PRECAUTIONS: 
Administerwithcaretopatients with hyper- 
tensIon, cardiac d,sorders, hyperthyroidism, 
diabetes mellitus and patients hypersensitive 
to sympathomimetic compounds. 
Patients should be cautioned not to oper- 
ate vehicles or hazardous machinery until 
their response to the drug has been deter- 
mined. Since the depressant effects of anti- 
histamines are additive to those of other 
drugs affecting the central nervous system, 
patients should be cautioned against drink- 
ing alcoholic beverages or taking hypnotics, 
sedatives, psychotherapeutic agents or other 
drugs with CNS depressant effects during 
anti histaminic therapy. 
Rarely, prolonged therapy with antihista- 
mine-containing preparations can produce 
blood dyscrasias. 


ADVERSE EFFECTS: 
Drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, increased 
Irritability or excitement may be 
encountered. 


DOSAGE: 
Coricidin 'D': Adults: 1 tablet every 4 
hours, not to exceed 4 tablets in 24 hours 
Children 10 to 14 years: 1/2 adult dose: 
under 10 years: at discretion of physician 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: 2 to 6 years: 
1/4 to I Medilets: 7 to 1 2 
ars: 1 to 2 
Medilets. Each dose may be repeated every 
3 to 4 hours, but not more than 4 Medilets 
should be given in one 'day to children 2 to 
6 years, and 6 Medilets to children 7 to 12 
years. Lir
1it treatlj1ent to 3 days. The recom- 
mended dosage should not be exceeded 
except on a phys,lcian's advise. 


Detailed information is available on 
request. 
SCHERING CORPORATION LIMITED 
Pointe Claire, Quebec H9R IB4 

 


52 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


accession list 


46. Occ"palio"al linl aid, by SI. John Am- 
bulance Association and Brigade. I.ondon. 
I\lacmillan Journals. 1973. 43p. 
47. Sla/c""'111 of hdll:r nmlill"illg cd"ca- 
lioll '/"1' I'('gi.H('I'cd 11 "/'.\c,,. Edmonton. 
Alberta Association of Registered Nurses. 


GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 
Callatla 
4K Depl. of Industry. Trade and Commerce. 
Rcpo'" 11)70 "f /"c A-li"i.,Il'/' ,!f... ,,"d<'l' 
III<' CO/poraliol/.' ali<I Laho"r Vlliol/.' Rcll/l'I'" 
Act. Ottawa. 1973.2 vols. 
49. Dept. of the Solicitor General. The gene- 
ral prograll/ ./i,,' I"C tll'\"dop"Il'III ,d' P-\\'- 
c"ialric sl'/Tices ill .Ii'tleral cO/Tl"l'/iollal scr- 
I'icn ill Callatla. Ottawa. Information Cana- 
da. 1973. óOp. 
50. I.abour Canada. Laho"r OI
r:'lI/i::alioI/.I 
ill Callatla. 11)72. Ottawa. Information Ca- 
nada. 1973. 147p. 
5 L Stat 1st ics Canada. AtlI'allC<' .,Iali.,/in or 
('tI"cmioll /973174. Ottawa. Informatio
' 
Canada. 1973. 39p. 
52. Statistics Canada. AIIII"t/1 l'l'l,orl '11' 110- 
lilìt/f>le diwt/w." 11)72. Ottawa. Information 
Canada. 1973. 44p. 
53. -.Ct/ll/ldiall ,,"i,'cni/in t/II</ collcgc.I, 
11)73. Ottawa. published jointly by... and 
AUCC 1973. 51:'ip. R 
54. -.Ft/II "IIroIIl/CIII ill I",it'er.,ilit'.\' ali<I 
wlll:!!"s, 11)71/72. Ottawa. Information Ca- 
nada. 11)73. 15:!p. 
.
5. -.lIo"I'i/ul .,Iali,,/in /1)71: "0/. 7, Ho.I' 
I,ilt/I illdict/lor.\'. Ottawa. Information Cana- 
da. 1973. 151p. 
:'ió. -.t/l.l/r"C/io", all</ dclilli/iol/.I ./i,,' I"e 
t/IIII"al 1'1'1"1'11 of Iw.'pital.,. by... and Depl. 
of Nat ional Health and Welfare. Ottawa. 
57. Statistique Canada. Direc/ÍI'e.I' de déjìni- 
liOl'.I 1'0"1' Ic rt/ppor/ d'uctil'ilé tle.I II,ipiIU"X, 


par. . . et Ministère de la Santé et du Bien- 
étre social. Ottawa. 1972.2 vols. 
:'ilt -. SIt/li.Hill"" de /'ell.\{'igllcII/elll-l'.llill/t/- 
lio".I, /1)73174. Ottawa. Information Cana- 
da. 1973. 39p. 
Vniled Silltes 
59. National Institutes of Health. A hiblio- 
grllp"y (II' C"ille.\{' sO/ll'n'.,' Oil /IIedicille 1111<1 
I",blic "elllih ill the l'eop/l".1 Rep"blic ,!f 
Olillt/: 11)60-/1)70. Washington. U.S. Govt. 
Print. Off.. 1973. 486p. (U.S. DHEW Pub- 
lication no. (NIH) 73-439) 
60. National Library of Medicine. Biblio- 
g/'//ph.\' "I' t"e his/ory "I' ",,'dicille, 110. 6. 
11)70. Bethesda. Md.. 1973. 21)5p. 


STUDIES DEPOSITED IN CNA REPOSITORY 
COLLECTION 
Ó I. Em/,,"tioll de I'<:f.f(-t .\I,,' I'lll/xiété pré- 
hrollclw.lcopie. d',,11 II/,,,Ie dïl!/"rll/atioll ré- 
pOll/llllIt u"x lI11<'.\'1;''''' de cliellts IIo.lpitali- 
,IÓ, par Maria Da Encarnacao Serralheiro. 
Montreal. 1970. 141p. (Thèse (M.Nurs.)- 
Montreal! R 
ó2. Hellit" cllre ill CIII/ada: a COII"l/l'lItllry, 
by H. Rocke Robertson. Ottawa. Informa- 
tion Canada. 1973. 173p. (Science Council 
of Canada. Special study no. 29) 
ó3. 1.1 red Ii,,' dllllg{'/'; U IlIId,' ,
r t"" \'OII/alic 
/'{'uctiol/.\ or r..dlwired c"ildrell 10 illlles.I, 
by Elinor Bridget Leslie Peer. Gainesville. 
Fla.. 1973. 30p. (Thesis (M .Sc.N .)- Florida)R 
64. N"rse aide similarit}' to patient and feel- 
illgs or "dp/e.I.II/l'.I'.I. by Charlotte Tramblay. 
Cleveland. Ohio. 1971. 38p. (Thesis (M.Sc.N.) 
-Case Western Reserve)R 
ó:'i. N /II'.\{'.\" perceplu",.' ,!f thâr hO.'pital'.1 
orgalli::utiOlwl clW/'//cl{'/'i.'lin. by Audry 
De Block. Milwaukee. Wisc.. 1%9. 70p. 
(Thesis (M.Sc.N.)- Marquette) R 
óó. A .'/IITe.\' ,,1' CUlllldiuII .Ic""ol" or ""/'.Ii",!! 
10 det<'l'II/ille /11l' illslr"ctioll alld cli"ical 
experiellce pr()\'ided ill mental retardation. 
by Elsie I.E. Pearen. Vancouver. B.C.. 1973. 
!!7p. (Thesis (M.Sc.N.) - British Columbia) R 


Library Photocopies 


The CNA library has a large collec- 
tion of journals. Many of them. for 
example the foreign nursing journals. 
are not readily available elsewhere in 
Canada. The library has never loaned 
journals. either single issues or bound 
volumes. However. to make them 
available to those who cannot come 
to the library to use them. photocopies 
of articles have been supplied at a 
charge of ten cents a page tor all 
pages over five. 
The volume of requests for this 
service has increased considerably. 
Library staff spend an appreciable 
time searching the articles. which are 
frequently poorly cited. and processing 
them for. and after. photocopying. 
CNA has decided. therefore. to in- 
crease the charge for photocopying 
to come closer to the actual cost of 


the service. This increase will bring 
the CNA photocopying policy in line 
with that of other libraries. notably 
the National Science Library. Be- 
ginning I January 1974, the charges 
for photocopying periodical articles 
will be: 
10 cents per page 
Minimum charge per article $1 
i.e., the charge for a request tor 
3 pages from one article and 2 
pages from another will be $2. 
This will still be "a token charge," 
Even this increase in charging will 
not fully cover the cost of the service. 
In line with the practice tollowed 
by the CNA Publ ications Order De- 
partment, charges under $5. must be 
prepaid. 
Photocopying of books and docu- 
ments will not be done. 


JANUARY 1974 



classified advertisements 


ALBERTA 


DIRECTOR OF NURSING required for modern 25-bed 
Hospital on Highway 12, East Central Alberta. Please 
apply to: Administrator. CORONATION MUNICIPAL 
HOSPITAL. CORONATION. ALBERTA, TOC 1CO. Tele. 
phone: 578-3691. 


REGISTERED NURSES required immediately for 72- 
bed accredited. active treatment hospital. Also 1 Rlt. 
tor 50.bed Nursing Home. AARN-AHA contract In 
force Refund of lare after one year of service. Apply: 
Director 01 NursIng. Providence Hospital. High Prai- 
rie. Alberta TOG 1EO. 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


REGISTERED NURSES AND LICENSED PRACTICAL 
NURSES WANTED FOR FULLY ACCREDITEO HOS. 
PITAL EXPANDING TO 190 BEDS IN JANUARY 1974. 
GENERAL DUTY POSITIONS IN MEDICAL-SURGICAL 
PSYCHIATRIC AND ICU-CCU AREAS MUST BE 
ELIGIBLE FOR B C REGISTRATION BASIC SALARY 
1973 - 5672 00 (NEW CONTRACT BEING NEGOTIAT- 
ED). APPLY. DIRECTOR OF NURSING. ST. JOSEPH'S 
GENERAL HOSPITAL. COMOX BRITISH COLUMBIA 
V9N 4B1. 


ADVERTISING 
RATES 


FOR ALL 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 


$15.00 for 6 lines or less 
$2.50 for each additional hne 


Rates for display 
advertisements on request 


Closing dale for copy and cancellation is 
6 weeks prior to 1st day of publication 
month. 
The (anodian Nurses' Associafion does 
not review the personnel policies of 
the hospitals and agencies advertising 
in the Journal. For authentic information, 
prospective applicants should apply to 
the Registered Nurses' Association of the 
Province in which they are interested 
in working_ 


Address correspondence to: 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


ð 

 


SOTHE DRIVEWAY 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO 
K2P 1 E2 


JANUARY 1974 


I I 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


HEAD NURSE required for Obstetrical-Gynecological 
Nursing Unit (IncludinQ nursery) In 230-bed active 
treatment hospJlal In Okanagan Valley of British 
Columbia RNABC contract In eltect. Apply to. Direct- 
or of Nursing. Penticton Regional Hospital, Pentlcton, 
Bntish Columbia. 


WANTED HEAD NURSE for 5-bed Intensive Care 
Unit In Okanagan. Duties to commence February 1st. 
1974. Eligible for B.C. registration. Preparation ancJl 
or previous experience in I.C.U and Administration. 
Salary and benefits In accordance with RNABC 
Contract. Please apply to: Director of Nursing, 
Vernon Jubilee Hospital, Vernon, British Columbia. 


OPERATING ROOM NURSE wanted for active mo- 
dern acute hospital. Four Certified Surgeons on 
allendlng staff. Experience of training desirable. 
Must be eligible for B.C. Registration. Nurses 
residence available. Salary 5687 per month starting. 
Apply to: Director of Nursing, Mills Memorial HOSPI- 
tal, 2711 Tetrault SI.. Terrace, British Columbia 


EXPERIENCED NURSES required In 409-bed acute 
HOspital with School of Nursing. VacanCies in 
medicel, surgical, cbsletric, operahng room. pediat- 
ric and Intensive Care areas. BasIc salary $672.- 
$842. B.C. Registration required. Apply: Director 
of Nursing. Royal Columbian Hospital, New West. 
mmster. British Columbia 


GRADUATE NURSES for 21-bed hospital preferably 
with obstetncal experience. Salary in accordance 
with RNABC. Nurses residence. Apply to: Matron, 
Toflno Genera' Hospital, Tofino, Vancouver Island. 
British Columbia. 


NURSES REOUIRED FOR GENERAL DUTY AND 
INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, IN EIGHTY-FOUR BED 
MODERN ACUTE GENERAL ACCREDITED HOSPITAL 
IN CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA RNABC CON- 
TRACT WAGES. RESIDENCE ACCOMMODATION 
AVAILABLE. PLEASE APPLY IN WRITING TO: DI- 
RECTOR OF NURSING, CARIBOO MEMORIAL HOS- 
PITAL. 517 NORTH SIXTH AVENUE, WILLIAMS 
lAKE. BRITISH COLUMBIA 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 41-beo 
hospital, located On the Alaska Highway. Salary and 
personnel policIes on accordance wIth RNABC 
Accommodation available in residence. Apply: 
Director of Nursing, Fort Nelson General Hospital, 
Fort Nelson. Brollsh Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES REOUIRED FOR 21-BED 
HOSPITAL 120 MILES NORTH OF PRINCE GEORGE. 
B C RNABC POLICIES IN EFFECT APPLY TO' 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING. MacKENZIE HOSPITAL. 
BOX 249. MacKENZIE. BRITISH COLUMBIA 


ExPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES reqUired for 
151-bed Hospital. BasIc Salary 5672 - $842 per 
month. Policies In accordance with RNABC Contract. 
Residence accommodation avaIlable. Apply to: 
Director of Nursing. Powell River General HO
:)ltal 
5871 Arbutus Avenue, Powell River. Brollsh Columbia. 


WANTED: GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 70- 
bed hospltat, (48 acute beds - 22 Extended Care) 
located on the Sunshine Coast, 2 hrs. from Vancou- 
ver. Salaries and Personnel Policies In accordance 
with RNASC Agreement. Accommodallon available 
(female nurses) In residence. Apply The Director 
of Nursing. St. Mary's Hospital, P.O Box 678. Se- 
chell, Brotlsh Columbia. 


II 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES lor modern 
10.bed hospItal with doctors offices In hospital. 
Situated beautiful west coast of Vancouver Island. 
Accommodation S50.00 a month. Apply Admlnlstra. 
tor. Tahsls HospItal Bo. 399 Tahsls British 
COlumbia 


GENERAL DUTY NURSE wanted for 87-bed modern 
hospital. Nurses Re.sldence. Salary 5646.00 per 
month lor BC Registered Apply Director of Nursing, 
Mills Memorial Hospital. Terrace, British Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES required Immediately for 
hospital In central B C This IS a new hospital opened 
In Mayor this year. Residence accommodaltons 
available. RNABC pohcles In effect Apply to 
Director of Nurses. SI. John HosPital Vanderhoof 
Bntish Columbia 


MANITOBA 


D.O.N. required for 58.bed Personal Care Home 
a new facility. Excellent salary and fringe benefits 
Will credit for past experience Must be bilingual 
and have experience In geriatrics For further in- 
formation write to Administrator. Foyer Notre Dame 
Inc. Notre Dame de Lourdes Ma""oba ROG 1MO 


TWO REGISTERED NURSES are required by Baldur 
District Hospital for general duty Duties to commence 
In early 1974. Attractive residence In 16-bed hOSPital 
Sal ary based on Government scale with conslderalton 
fOr experience For further information contact Mrs 
K Gordon. Director of NursIng, telephone 535-2373 
Baldur District Hospital Baldur Manitoba 


Required ImmedIately - 3 REGI STERED NURSES and 
3 LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES for a new 50-bed 
Personal Care Home. Salary In accordance with the 
recommendations of the MARN Apply Director of 
Nursing. Swan River Valley Personal Care Home 
Inc.. SWAN RIVER Manitoba ROL 1Z0 


NOVA SCOTIA 


REGISTERED NURSES (3) for general duty and (1) 
wIth Operating Room experoence requored for 22-bed 
hOSPital In Sheet Harbour. Nova Scotia (situated on 
the scenic Eastern Shore). Apply to Administrator 
Eastern Shore Memorial Hospital Sheet Harbour. 
Nova Scolla. 


ONTARIO 


Apphcatlons for the position of' NURSING ADMINIS- 
TRATIVE SUPERVISOR and HEAD NURSE for the 
Paediatric Oepartment of a 14:> oed General Hospital 
are now being accepted. Preference will be given to 
applicants with formal preparation In Nursmg Servl( . 
Administration. but those with administrative expe r 
lence will be considered Completely furnish d apan 
ments with balcony and swimming pool adjacent ''''I 
hospital and lake are available and the loca n IC 
within easy driving distance of American and Cana- 
dian metropolitan centres Apply Director of Nur! ng 
General Hospital Port COlborne Ontario 


SUPERVISOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING: for 
progressive Health Unit with ger. alllc program 
Nursing degree essential supervIsion and adm 
Iratlon preferred Excellent personnel polici :II Appl, 
Dr V Soudek. Medical OfflL'r of .. 'allh Lf' s 
Grenville & Lanark District Health Unil Box 130 
Brockvllle, Ontario 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 53 



ONTARIO 


REGISTERED NURSES lor 34-bed General HospItal. 
Salary $646. per month to $756 plus experoence al- 
lowance. Excellent personnel policies. Apply to' 
Dorector 01 Nursirg Englehart & DIstrict HospItal 
Inc., Englehart. Ontario. 


REGISTERED NURSES required lor a new 79-bed 
General Hospital in bilingual community ot North- 
ern Ontario. French language an asset, but not 
compulsory. Salary IS $645. to $758. monthly wIth 
allowance for past expenence, 4 weeks vacation 
alter 1 year and 18 SICk leave days per year. Unused 
sick leave days paid at 100% every year. Master 
rotation In effect Rooming accommodations available 
In town. Excellent personnel policies. Apply to: Per- 
sonnel Director, Notre-Dame Hospital, P.O. Box 850, 
Hearst, Onl. 


REGISTERED NURSES reqUired ImmedIately lor 30- 
bed general hospItal Salary range $650 - $760 wIth 
allowance for experience Residence accommodation 
avaIlable. Apply Mrs. M Simmonds. R N Director 
of Nursmg. Bmgham Memorial HospItal. Matheson, 
Ontaroo Phone (705) 273-2424 


REGISTERED NURSES AND REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS lor 45.bed Hosplta!. Salary ranges 
mel ude generous experience allowances R.N. S 
salary $645 to $745 and R N A s salary $445. to $530. 
Nurses residence - private rooms with bath - $40. 
per month. Apply to The Director 01 Nursing, Gerald- 
ton Dlstroct HospItal, Geraldton. Ontaroo. 


REGISTERED NURSES and REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS lor held hospItal In Northern Post 01 
James Bay: Fort Albany and Attawaplskat Salary 
scale according to prevIous expenence plus North- 
ern Al1owance. 4 weeks vacation after one year and 
18 sick leave days per year. Traveling expenses paid 
to a maXImum 01 $90.00 lor Fort Albany and $11500 
for Atlawapiskat upon employmenl. v;)callOn and 
termination Roommg available In nurses. reSidence 
with meals. accommodationS at the hosplta1. French 
language an asset. but not compulsary Apply to 
James Bay General HospItal POBox 370. Mooso- 
nee Ontaroo P01 1YO 


REGISTERED NURSES lor General Duty and I.C.U. 
- C.C.U. Unit required for 162-bed accredIted 
hospItal. starting salary $645.00 with regular annual 
Increments. Excellent personnel policies. Temporary 
residence accommodation available. Apply to The 
Director of Nursing. Kirkland and District Hospital. 
Kirkland Lake. Ontaroo. 


OPERATING ROOM TECHNICIAN required lor lully 
accredIted 75-bed HospItal. You wIll be In the 
VacatIonland 01 the North, midway between Thunder 
Bay. Ontano and Wmnipeg, Mamtoba Basic wage IS 
$4/1.50 with consideratIOn tor experience. Wnte Or 
phone the Director 01 Nursing, Dryden DIstrict 
General Hospital. Dryden. Ontaroo. 


pUBLIC HEALTH NURSES (QUALIFIED) FOR GEN- 
ERALIZED PROGRAMME ALLOWANCE FOR EXPER- 
IENCE AND lOR DEGREE USUAL FRINGE BENE- 
FITS DIRECT ENQUIRES TO. MRS. RETA McBEAN, 
DIRECTOR. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. RENFREW 
COUNTY AND DISTRICT HEALTH UNIT. PO. BOX 
128 PEMBROKE, ONTARIO 


QUEBEC 


RESEARCHERS (Ph d preferred) m the health held 
To study developmenl 01 the expanded lunctlon 01 
nursmg In new types of health selVtces descrip- 
tion evaluation To study problems of family health 
c\nd health practices relevant to nurSing and health 
serviCes Apply Dlreclor School of Nursmg McGIll 
UmverSlty Montreal Quebec H3A 2A9 


54 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


I f 


SASKATCHEWAN 


REGISTERED NURSES are required by a 228-bed 
regional hospital located close to numerouS resort 
areas. Salary and benehts according to SRNA con- 
tract. For further information contact. Personnel 
Director. Victoria Union Hospital. Prince Albert. 
Saskatchewan. 


UNITED STATES 


R.N:s - SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - ImmedIate need 
eXists for medical-surgical units. Orientation and In- 
serVIce program. Excellent salary. lull paid benelits. 
We will assÎst you with your H-1 visa for immigratIOn 
An intertm permit may be obtained trom the Ca\ifor- 
ma Board of Nursing Education and Registration to 
practice nursing In California prior to licensing. Con- 
tact. Personnel Director, The HospItal of the Good 
Samaritan 1212 Shatto Streel. Los Angeles. Caillor- 
nla 90017 (213) 482-8111 ex 287 


MONTREAL 
NEUROLOGICAL 
HOSPITAL 


A Teaching Hospital 
of McGill University 


requires 


Registered Nurses 
for 
General Duty 
PrevIous experience In neurological nursmg not 
required. Active inservice education programme. 


Apply to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
Montreal Neurological Hospital 
3801 University Street, 
Montreal 112, P.O. 


NORTH NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR 
reqUIres 
REGISTERED NURSES 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 


International Grenfell Association provides 
medical services for Northern Newfoundland 
and Labrador. We staff four hospitals. eleven 
nursing stations, eleven Public Health units. 
Our mam lBO.bed accredited hospital is 
sItuated at SI. Anthony, Newfoundland. Active 
treatment is carried on in Surgery, Medicine, 
Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatry. Also, 
Intensive Care Unit. Orientation and In.Service 
programs. 40.hour week, rotating shifts. livmg 
accomodations suppl ied at low cost. PUBLIC 
HEALTH has challenge of large remote areas. 
Excellent personnel benefits include liberal 
vacatIon and sick leave. Salary based on 
Government scal es. 
Apply to: 
INTERNATIONAL GRENFELL ASSOCIATION 
Assistant Administrator of 
Nursing Services, 
St. Anthony, Newfoundland. 


THE CAPTAIN WILLIAM JACKMAN 
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 


LABRADDR CITY 


require the following nursmg personnel to 
meet extension of services commencing early 
January 1974. 
Day supervisor - Nurse II 
Head Nurse - Nurse II 
Staff Nurse - Nurse I 
Certified nursing assistants (male and 
female) 
Ward cl erk 


Applicants should apply in own handwriting to, 


Director of Nursing 
Captain Wm. Jackman Memorial 
Hospital 
410 Booth Avenue 
Labrador City, Newfoundland 


REGISTERED NURSES 
GENERAL DUTY 


Required for modern, fully equipped 28-bed 
hospital, with two Medical and one Dental 
staff. Salary per S.R.N.A..S.H.A. schedule. 
Excellent personnel policies. Accommodation 
available in residence. Kipling is located 
near the summer resorts of the Qu'Appelle 
Valley Lake System and also the Moose 
Mountain Provincial Park. 


Apply to: 
Administrator 
KIPLING MEMORIAL UNION 
HOSPITAL 
Box 420 
KIPLING, Saskatchewan 
SOG 2S0 


GENERAL DUTY 
NURSES 


- for 360.bed acute general hospItal 
- clinocal areas include, - Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrocs, Paedlatrocs. PsychiatrY, Rehabill. 
tation, Extended Care and Coronary Care 
- B C Registration preferred but not manditory 
dunng inotial employment 
- Personnel policies In accordance with 
R NABC C ontr act. 


Please contact the: 
Director of Nursing 
Nanaimo Regional General 
Hospital 
Nanaimo, British Columbia 


JANUARY 1974 



GENERAL DUTY NURSES 


Required Immediately 


. for 270.bed acute care general hospital 
expanding to 370 beds 
. clinical areas include: Medicine Surgery 
Obstetrics Paediatrics Psychiatry Rehabilita- 
tion Extended Care and Intensive and 
Coronary Care 
. Must be eligible for B.C. registration 
. Personnel pOlicies in accordance with 
RNABC Contract 
. 1973 Salary $672 - $842.00 per month 


Please contact: 


Director of Nursing 
Prince George Regional Hospital 
Prince George. B.C. 


REGISTERED NURSES 


Required for 110-bed hospital for 
chest diseases. 


Situated in Laurentian Ski Resort 
area 55 miles north of Montreal. 
Residence accommodation avail- 
able. 


Apply to: 
Director of Nursing 
P.O. Box 1000 
Ste. Agathe des Monts, Quebec 
J8C 3A4 


RIVERVIEW UNIT 
WINDSOR WESTERN HOSPITAL 
CENTRE 
Invites applications from 
REGISTERED NURSES 


Startong Salary $655 
Increments for Contemporary Experience 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 
Starting Salary December 1st $493 
TOP FRINGE BENEFITS 
All Shifts 
Permanent posItIons available 
Afternoons and Nights 
Onentatlon and Staff Development Program 
Windsor offers cUltural and educational oppor- 
tunities including Unoversity and Community 
College. 
WE ARE PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE 
in the rapidly progressing specialty of chronic 
care and rehabliltatoon. We offer 
- a challenge 
- Job satisfactIon 
-a happy environment 
Apply to, 


Director of Nil'sinll 
3177 Riverside Drive E., 
Windsor, Ontario 
NBY 452 


JANUARY 1974 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
TORONTO, ONTARIO. 


REGISTERED NURSES 


630-bed fully accredited Hospital provides 
experience in Emergency, Operating Room, 
Post Anaesthesia Room. I ntensive Care Unit, 
Orthopaedics," Psychiatry, Paediatrics, Obste- 
trics and Gynaecology. General Surgery and 
Medici ne. 
Basic 2 week Orientation Program and con. 
tinuing Active Inservice Program for all levels 
of Staff. 
Salary is commensurate with preparation and 
experience. 
Benefits include Canada PensIon Plan, HospItal 
Pension Plan, Unemployment Insurance. - 
Group life Insurance and O.H.I.P. (66.2/3% 
Basic Rate paid by Hospital). - Extended 
Health Care Plan - Supplementary Blue Cross. 
After 3 months. cumulative sick time. 
Rotating periods of duty - 40 hour week- 
10 Statutory holidays - 3 weeks annual vaca. 
tion aftèr completion of one years service. 
APPLY: 


ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR 
OF NURSING SERVICE 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
30 The Queensway 
TORONTO 3, ONTARIO. 


CITY OF VANCOUVER 
CARE FACILITIES 
CONSULTANT II 


THE POSnl0
: Considerable pa
t 
involvement in community care facilitie, 
\\<ill permit the succes,ful dpplicant to 
develop new consultative ,ervices. The 
aim is to assist in the operation of re,i- 
dential rest homes. pe"onal care home 
facilities. and supervisory and educa- 
tional facilitie
 for children up to 15 

ears of age. The po,ition \\<ill involve 
the co-ordination and motivation of a 
'mdll 
taff conducting initial. continuing 
and annual visitations. 


THE APPLlC\
T: Will have a un i- 
ve"ity degree in the 'ocia! o,çiences and 
may have taken relevant po,t graduate 
training. Considerable experience in 
institution
 and facilities listed above. 
preferably in an administrative. consult- 
ative or supervisory capacity is required. 
THE SALARY: $9X6 to G;llX5 per 
month. 


THE \PPUCATIO
S: 
lust be ob- 
tained from and returned along \\ ith a 
detailed re
ume of education and exper- 
ience to the Director of Personnel Ser- 
vice
. 453 \\'est 12th Avenue. Vancouver 
10. B.C.. as soon as po"ible. Please 
quote competition P-x9XX. 


HUMBER MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 


Telephone 249-8111 (Toronto) 
200 Church Street, 
Weston, M9N-1 M8, Ont. 


Registered Nurses and Registered Nursing Assistants seeking 
employment in an active treatment hospital in NORTH WEST 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO, are requested to write to the Di- 
rector of Nursing concerning employment opportunities. 
Orientation and Staff Development Programmes are provided. 
Competitive salaries offered to qualified personnel. Registered 
Nurses are urgently required for temporary employment July, 
August and September. 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 55 



MISERICORDIA HOSPITAL 
EDMONTON, ALBEUA 
has vacancies for 


GENERAL DUTY 
REGISTERED NURSES 


Edmonton is a fast growing Met- 
ropolitan area of 500,000 people. 
Our modern 555 bed active treat- 
ment hospital offers an orientation 
program combined with an active 
inservice education program 


Please apply to: 
Misericordia Hospital 
16940 - 87th Ave. 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T5R 4H5 


VANCOUVER 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 



 


requires 


REGISTERED NURSES 
FOR REGULAR ANO 
VACATION RELIEF POSITIONS 
For details and application 
please write to: 


PERSONNEl SERVICES 
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 
855 West 12th Ave. 
Vancouver 9, B.C. 
Registration in Brihsh Columbia reqUired. 
Contact: 
Registered Nurses' Association of B.C. 
2130 West. 12th Ave., 
Vancouver 9, B.C. 
for details. 


CLINICAL NURSE 
SPECIALIST 
FOR 
MED-SURG 
NURSING 


REQUIRED IN 254-BED 
ACTIVE CARE 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


APPLY TO: 
Director of Nursing 
Moose Jaw Union Hospital 
Moose Jaw, Sas::. 
692-1841 


56 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


McMASTER 
UNIVERSITY 
School 
of Nursing 


Nurse laculty members including an Asso- 
ciate Director. reQuired lor July. 1974 by a 
progressIve School 01 Nursing. The School .s 
an Integral part 01 a newly developed Health 
SCiences Centre where collaborative relatlon
 
ships are fostered among the various health 
professions. 


ReQUirements. master s or doctoral degree 
preferred. with clin1cal speclahst preparation 
or expenence and/or preparation in teaching. 


Salaries. commensurate with education and 
expenence. 


Application, with copy of 
curriculum vitae and two 
references to 
Dr. D.J. Kergin, Director, 
School of Nursing, 


McMaster University, 


Health Sciences Centre, 
1200 Main Street West, 
HAMILTON, Ontario, 
L8S 4J9. 


THE MONTREAL 
CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
REGISTERED NURSES 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 


Our patient population consists of 
the baby of less than an hour old 
to the adolescent who has just 
turned seventeen. We see them in 
Intensive Care, in one of the Med- 
ical or Surgical General Wards, or 
in some of the Pediatric Specialty 
areas. 
They abound in our clinics and 
their numbers increase daily in our 
Emergency. 
If you do not like working with 
children and with their families, 
you would not like it here. 
If you do like children and their 
families, we would like you on our 
staff. 
Interested qualified applicants 
should apply to the: 
DIRECTOR OF t-IURSING 
Montreal Children's Hospital 
2300 Tupper Street 
Montreal 108, Quebec 


DOUGLAS HOSPITAL 
IN METROPOLITAIN MONTREAL 
A multi-disciplinary psychiatric hospital with 
1,100 adult and 100 children's beds; 
requires 


NURSING STAFF ON ALL LEVELS 


We invite enquiries from registered nurses with 
experience in psychiatric nursing or new 
graduates for our medical. geriatric or 
children's services. 
Nursing assistants with experience or newly 
graduated. Psychiatric nursing background is 
preferable but not essential. 
language requirement for I icensmg in Quebec 
not appl icabl e to Canadian citizens. 
Applications and enquiries should be sent to: 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
6875 LaSalle boulevard 
Verdun 204, Québec. 


REGISTERED NURSES 
AND 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 


required for a 104-bed active treatment plus 
72-bed chronic care unit located at Halleybury. 
The Tri-Town area consisting of New liskeard, 
Haileybury, Cobalt all within 5 miles of each 
other is located 90 miles from North Bay 
with daily plane, train and bus service to and 
from Toronto etc. Beautiful recreational facil- 
ities including curling, skating, skiing, swim- 
ming, boating, hunting, fishing. 
Salary fully appropriate to the responsibility 01 
the position; personnel policies in line with 
mdustry and hospital practice. Orientation 
and In-Service Educational programmes are 
provided 


Apply in writing to: 
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 
Temiskaming Hospitals, 
Haileybury, Ontario. 


THE LADY MINTO HOSPITAL 
AT COCHRANE 


invite applications from 


REG ISTERED NURSES 


54-bed accredited general hospi- 
tal. Northeastern Ontario. Compe- 
titive salaries and generous bene- 
fits. Send inquires and applications 
to: 


MISS E. LOCKE 
Director of Nursing 
The Lady Minto Hospital at 
Cochrane 
P.O. Box 1660 
Cochrane, Ontario 
POL 1CO 


JANUARY 1974 



. 


I:XCITEMENT IN NURSING 
plus 
rHE MAGIC OF ARIZONA 
Jlessionalism in a perfect settmg Jom 
1m in a new, modem. fully accredited 
I with services focused on care of adult 
s. Openmgs all shifts for RNs and LPNs. 
opportunities also for mterested or 
nced ICU-CCU Nurses. 
our nursmg Units are m.the.round 
II ng our giving mdlvlduallzed patient 
located in a delightful retirement 
nity near Phoenix. Arizona. This IS the 
t safest. resort area In the U.S. You 
joy the advantages of a large metro. 
area with none of ItS probl ems. 
ke the opportunity to give you all the 


I: 
Welch 
tant Director of Nursing 
ER O. BOSWEll HOSPITAL 
Box 10 
:ity, Arizon a. 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. 


GENERAL DUTY and 
NSIVE CARE UNIT NURSES 


lur 139 Acute, 30 Extended Care 
Bed Modern Accredited Hospital 
on Vancouver Island. Excellent 
recreational facilities and within 
easy reach of Victoria and Vancou- 
ver. 
Personnel Policies as per RNABC 
Contract. 


Apply: 
Director of Nursing, 
West Coast General Hospital, 
814 - 8th Avenue, North, 
Port Alberni, B.C. 


COLLEGE OF 
NEW CALEDONIA 
FACULTY POSITION 
DIRECTOR OF NURSE TRAINING 


REQUIRED A qualified person to develop and 
co-ordinate a two year registered nurse 
diploma programme, this IS a new programme 
planned to start in the fall of 1974 m a 
growing commumty college. 
QUALIFICATIONS: Masters degree m nursing 
or equivalent experience in nursing educa. 
tlon knowledge of current nursing praclices 
administrative experience helpful 
Salary commensurate with educalion prepara. 
tlOn and experience, attraclive fringe benefits 
and relocation allowance. 
Apply in writmg immediately statmg qualiflca. 
tions, experience. references and date avaIl. 
able tl' 
Dr. FJ. SPECKEEN, PRINCIPAL, 
COLLEGE OF NEW CALEDONIA, 
2001 CENTRAL STREET, 
PRINCE GEORGE. B.C. 


1;.' 


JANUARY 1974 


Everyone Knows 
Where We Are! 


Where Are You? 


Come and nurse in exciting Montreal at - 


The Montreal General Hospital 


a teaching hospital of McGill University 


-------------------------------- 


liD\ 
\Uf 


The Montreal General Hospitol 
1650 Cedar ....venu.. Montreal 109. Qu.b.c 


PI.as. t.1I me about hospital nuning und.r Qu.bec's n.w conc.pt of Social and 
Preventive Medicine. 


Nom. 


....ddr... 


Qu.b.c languag. r.quir.m.nll do nat apply to Canadian applicantL 


L_______________________________
 
I 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 57 



MISERICORDIA HOSPITAL 
EDMONTON, ALBEUA 
has vacancies for 


GENERAL DUTY 
REGISTERED NURSES 


Edmonton is a fast growing Met- 
ropolitan area of 500.000 people. 
Our modern 555 bed active treat- 
ment hospital offers an orientation 
program combined with an active 
inservice education program. 


Please apply to: 
Misericordia Hospital 
16940 - 87th Ave. 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T5 R 4H5 


VANCOUVER 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 



 


requires 


REGISTERED NURSES 
FOR REGULAR ANO 
VACATION RELIEF POSITIONS 
For details and application 
please write to: 


PERSONNEL SERVICES 
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 
855 West 12th Ave. 
Vancouver 9, B.C. 
RegistratIOn in British Columbia required. 
Contact: 
Registered Nurses' Association of B.C. 
2130 West - 12th Ave., 
Vancouver 9, B.C. 
for details 


CLINICAL NURSE 
SPECIALIST 
FOR 
MED-SURG 
NURSING 


REQUIRED IN 254-BED 
ACTIVE CARE 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


APPLY TO: 
Director of Nursing 
Moose Jaw Union Hospital 
Moose Jaw, Sas:;. 
692-1841 


56 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


McMASTER 
UNIVERSITY 
School 
of Nursing 


Nurse laculty members. Including an Asso. 
ciate Director. reQuired lor July. 1974 by a 
progressive School of Nursing. The School IS 
an Integral part of a newly developed Health 
SCiences Centre where collaborative relation- 
ships are fostered among the Vanous health 
professions. 


ReQuirements master's Or doctoral degree 
preferred. with clinical specialist preparation 
Or experience and/or preparation In teaching. 


Salaries: commensurate with education and 
expenence 


Application, with copy of 
curriculum vitae and two 
references to 
Dr. D.J. Kergin, Director, 
School of Nursing, 


McMaster University, 


Health Sciences Centre, 
1200 Main Street West, 
HAMilTON. Ontario, 
l8S 4J9. 


THE MONTREAL 
CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
REGISTERED NURSES 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 


Our patient population consists of 
the baby of less than an hour old 
to the adolescent who has just 
turned seventeen. We see them in 
Intensive Care, in one of the Med- 
ical or Surgical General Wards, or 
in some of the Pediatric Specialty 
areas. 
They abound in our clinics and 
their numbers increase daily in our 
Emergency. 
If you do not like working with 
children and with their families, 
you would not like it here. 
If you do like children and their 
families, we would like you on our 
staff. 
Interested qualified applicants 
should apply to the: 
DIRECTOR OF t-IURSING 
Montreal Children's Hospital 
2300 Tupper Street 
Montreal 108, Quebec 


DOUGLAS HOSPITAL 
IN METROPOLITAIN MONTREAL 
A multi.disciplinary psychiatric hospital 
1,100 adult and 100 children's beds; 
requires 


NURSING STAFF ON ALL LEVEL: 


We invite enquiries from registered nurse 
experience in psychiatric nursing 01 
graduates for our medical, geriatr 
children's services. 
Nursing assistants with experience or 
graduated. Psychiatric nursing backgro 
preferable but not essential. 
Language requirement for licensing In ( 
not applicable to Canadian citizens. 
Applications and enquiries should be sent 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
6875 LaSalle boul evard 
Verdun 204, Québec. 


REGISTERED NURSES 
AND 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTAt 


required for a 104.bed active treatmel,. t"_O 
72-bed chronic care unit located at Haileybury. 
The Tri-Town area consisting of New Liskeard, 
Haileybury, Cobalt all within 5 miles of each 
other is located 90 mil es from North Bay 
with daily plane, train and bus service to and 
from Toronto etc. Beautiful recreational facil. 
ities including curling, skating, skiing, swim- 
ming, boating, hunting, fishing. 
Salary fully appropriate to the responsibil ity of 
the position; personnel policies in line with 
industry and hospital practice. Orientation 
and In-Service Educational programmes are 
provided. 


Apply in writing to: 
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 
Temiskaming Hospitals, 
Haileybury, Ontario. 


THE lADY MINTO HOSPITAL 
AT COCHRANE 


invite applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 


54-bed accredited general hospi- 
tal. Northeastern Ontario. Compe- 
titive salaries and generous bene- 
fits. Send inquires and applications 
to: 


MISS E. LOCKE 
Director of Nursing 
The lady Minto Hospital at 
Cochrane 
P.O. Box 1660 
Cochrane, Ontario 
POL 1CO 


JANUARY 1974 



EXCITEMENT IN NURSING 
plus 
THE MAGIC OF ARIZONA 
For professionalism in a perfect setting, lOin 
our team In a new, modern. fUlly accredited 
hospital with services focused on care of adult 
patients. Openings all shifts for RNs and LPNs 
Great opportunities also for Interested or 
experienced ICU.CCU Nurses. 
All of our nursing units are in.the.round 
facilitating our giving individualized patient 
care. Located in a delightful retirement 
community near Phoenix, Arizona. This is the 
sunniest. safest. resort area in the U.S. You 
will enjoy the advantages of a large metro. 
politan area with none of ItS problems. 
We'd like the opportunity to give you all the 
details! 
Write to: 
Mary Welch 
Assistant Director of Nursing 
WALTER O. BOSWElL HOSPITAL 
P.O. Box 10 
Sun City, Arizona. 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. 


GENERAL DUTY and 
INTENSIVE CARE UNIT NURSES 


for 139 Acute, 30 Extended Care 
Bed Modern Accredited Hospital 
on Vancouver Island. Excellent 
recreational facilities and within 
easy reach of Victoria and Vancou- 
ver. 
Personnel Policies as per RNABC 
Cont ract. 


Apply: 
Director of Nursing, 
West Coast General Hospital, 
814 - 8th Avenue, North, 
Port Alberni, B.C. 


COLLEGE OF 
NEW CALEDONIA 
FACULTY POSITION 
DIRECTOR OF NURSE TRAINING 


REQUIRED A qualified person to develop and 
co-ordinate a two year registered nurse 
diploma programme. this I s a new programme 
planned to start In the fall of 1974 In a 
growing community college. 
QUALIFICATIONS: Masters degree In nursing 
or equivalent experience in nursing educa- 
tion knowledge of current nursing practices 
administrative experience helpful 
Salary commensurate with education prepara- 
tion and experience. attracllve fringe benefits 
and relocation allowance. 
Apply in writing immediately stating qualifica- 
tions, experience, references and date avail. 
able tC' 
Dr. F J. SPECKEEN, PRtNCIPAL, 
COLLEGE OF NEW CALEDONIA, 
2001 CENTRAL STREET, 
PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. 


1;.' 


JANUARY 1974 


Everyone Knows 
Where We Are! 


J 
I 


Where Are You? 


Come and nurse in exciting Montreal at - 


The Montreal General Hospital 


a teaching hospital of McGill University 


-------------------------------- 


liD\ 
'U i 


The Montreal General Hospital 
1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal 109. Quebec 


Please tell me about hospital nursing under Quebec'. n_ concept of Social and 
Preventive Medicine. 


Name 


Addre.. 


Quebec language requirements da not apply to Canadian applicant.. 


L_______________________________J 
I 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 57 



UNIVERSITY OF 
ALBERTA HOSPITAL 


EDMONTON, ALBERTA 


invites applications from general duty nurses 


Opportunities for Professional development in 
general and specialty areas of Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing, Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatry, 
Operating Room, Renal Dialysis Unit, and Extend- 
ed Care. 


Planned Orientation Program, 
In-service Education Program. 


Salary commensurate with education and expe- 
rience. 
For further information write to: 


EMPLOYMENT SUPERVISOR - NURSING 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA HOSPITAL 
84 Avenue & 112 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 


w:_ 


BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA 


REGISTERED NURSES 


Applications are invited from Registered Nurses to fill 
vacancies on the staff of the Royal Brisbane Hospital, 
Brisbane, Queensland. Australia. Its associate, the Royal 
Women's Hospital, invites applications from Registered 
General Nurses desirous of undertaking 12 months' mid- 
wifery training course. 
Wages and conditions are in accordance with Nurses 
Award (Queensland). Uniforms are provided and laundered 
free of charge; nurses' swimming pool and tennis courts 
are available. Accommodation at a reasonable charge is 
available for applicants wishing to 'live in'. 
Royal Brisbane Hospital and Royal Women's Hospital, 
Brisbane together with Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane 
form a major teaching hospital complex of approximately 
1700 beds, in a city of approximately 800,000 people. 
Enjoying a sub-tropical climate, Brisbane is within easy 
access to popular surfing beaches and tourist resorts with 
the Great Barrier Reef a little further away. (No work permit 
is necessary on entry to Australia). 
For further information, contact the General Matron, 
the North Brisbane Hospitals Board, Base Hospitals 
Post Office, Brisbane, Queensland 4029, Australia. 


REGISTERED NURSES 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 


An exciting and rewarding career awaits the Canadian educated registered nurse at Saint John's 
recently expanded 611 bed acute-care hospital in sunny Southern California. Challeng ing positions 
are offered to those who wish to utilize their knowledge and nursing skills in the following areas: 
Coronary and Post Coronary Care; Medical-Surgical; Intensive Care; Orthopedic; Psychiatry; 
Hemodialysis; Emergency Room; Operating Room Nursing; Obstetrics; Pediatrics and Extended Care. 
Located within sight of the beautiful Santa Monica beaches, Saint John's Hospital is at the center of 
Southern California's many diverse recreational, educational and cultural areas. Such activities as 
skiing, boating, sWimming, golf and tennis are excellent year around. This together with the numerous 
colleges and universities located within minutes of Saint John's enhances the already attractive 
employment opportunities. You may even meet "Marcus Welby" as our hospital is often used as the 
set for the T. V. series. 
An outstanding fringe benefit package is supported by an equally impressive salary schedule. General 
starting salary guidelines are as follows: 
R.N.'s one year experience 
R.N.'s B.S. degree 
R.N.'s B.S. degree & one year's experience 
A ten-percent shift differential is paid for evening or night shift work. 


$845/mo. USA 
$845/mo. USA 
$888/mo. USA 


Please don't hesitate! Write today for information regarding California Licensure and 
work visa requirements. 


Employment Office 
Saint John's Hospital -1328 22nd Street, 
Santa Monica, California 90404 


58 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


JANUARY 1974 



CARIBOO COLLEGE 
KAMLOOPS 
BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Situated north of the Okanagan Valley in a city of 
55,000. 
Applications are invited for teaching positions in an 
established. approved two-year diploma nursing 
program. Positions will be available from the spring 
of 1974. 
Applicants with a Master's degree are preferred. 
Minimum requirements are a baccalaureate degree 
with experience in nursing and teaching and eligibili- 
ty for registration in B.C. 
Attractive salaries commensurate with preparation 
and experience. 
Apply in writing stating experience, qualifications 
and references to: 
Chairman of Nursing 
Cariboo College 
Box 860 
Kamloops. B.C. V2C SN3 


Invites applications for the position of 
DEAN OF NURSING 
EDUCATION 


This position has direct responsibility for the administra- 
tion, co-ordination and development of nursing education 
programs throughout the College. These at present consist 
of about 700 students enrolled in R.N. and RN.A. pro- 
grams. The College has also been developing post diploma 
courses in various nursing fields. In addition to responsi- 
bility for nursing education, the person appointed will be 
expected to assist the senior management team of the 
College and to contribute to the development of overall 
College policies in this area. 
Candidates should be nurses registered (or eligible for 
registration) in the Province of Ontario with advanced prep- 
aration in either administration or education and prefer- 
ably with considerable experience in nursing education and 
related fields. 
Applications, giving full details of education, qualifications, 
experience, and the names of two referees, should be sent 
to: 


The Personnel Officer, 
Fanshawe College. 
P.O. Box 4005. 
Terminal C. 
London, Ontario N5W 5H1 
Closing date for applications: 31st January 1974 


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Jewish G
!1..
!lJ' Hospital 
A modern 700 bed non-sectarian hospital which has general and special services. 
Active In-Service Education Programme, including Planned Orientation Prog!"dmme. 
Excellent personnel policies. Bursaries for post-basic University courses in Nursing 
Supervision and Administration. 
Applications invited from Registered Nurses and Nursing Assistants. 
For further information, please write: 
Director, Nursing Service JEWISH GENERAL HOSPITAL 
3755 Cote St. Catherine Road Montreal 249, Quebec 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 59 


JANUARY 1974 



ROYAL VICTORIA 
HOSPIT AL 


MONTREAL, OUEBEC 


invites applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 


for 


GENERAL DUTY 


Inservice Education program, progressive Personnel 
Policies. Inquiries from nurses with special clinical or 
educational preparation are welcome, including cardiac 
and other intensive care areas. 
Language requirement for licensing in Quebec not 
applicable to Canadian citizens. 


For further information apply to: 


The Director of Nursing 


ROYALVICTORIA HOSPITAL 


Montréal112. P.O. 


TORONTO 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


Invites applications Irom 


REGISTERED NURSES 
REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS 
FOR GENERAL DUTY 


- Superior opportunities for Professional Growth 
and Development. 
- Progressive Personnel Policies. 
- Excellent opportunities for advancement in 
atmosphere of medical excellence. 


Please apply to:- 


Personnel Office 
TORONTO CENERAL HOSPITAL 
101, College St., 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M5G 1L7. 


60 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


.- 


OTTAWA CIVIC 
HOSPITAL 


REQUIRES 


HEAD NURSES FOR 
MEDICAL UNITS 


AND 


SUPERVISOR OF 
ORDERLIES 


Apply in writing to: 
Miss Marjorie Mills, Reg.N. B.Sc.N. 
Assistant Director Nursing Service 
Ottawa Civic Hospital 
1053 Carling Ave. 
Ottawa, Ontario 
K1 Y 4E9 



Q
 
ORTHOPAEDIC 6<: ARTHRITIC 
HOSPITAL 
'VI
 


43 WElLESLEY STREET, EAST, 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
M4Y 1H1 


Enlarging Specialty Hospital offers a unique op- 
portunity to nurses and nursing assistants interested 
in the care of patients with bone and joint disorders 
Must be registered in the Province of Ontario. 
Preparation by post-graduate education or exper- 
ience required for Senior positions. 


JANUARY 1974 



DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 


SCHOOL OF NURSING 


FACULTY POS,ITIONS AVAILABLE 


July, 1973 


1) Medical Surgical Nursing 
2) Psychiatric Nursing 
3) Community Health Nursing 
4) Maternal-Child Nursing 
Masters degree required 


Apply to: 


Dr. Floris E. King 
Director 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 
DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 
Halifax, Nova Scotia 


WE CARE 

 


's; 



 
þ 
"- 
,. 
"" 


f 

 

. c, 


HOSPITAL: 
Accredited modern general - 260 beds. Expansion 
to 420 beds in progress. 
LOCATION: 
Immediately north of Toronto. 
APARTMENTS: 
Furnished - shared. 
Swimming Pool, Tennis Court, Recreation Room, 
Free Parking. 
BENEFITS: 
Competitive salaries and excellent fringe benefits. 
Planned staff development programs. 
Please address all enquiries to: 
Assistant Administrator (Nursing) 
York County Hospital, 
NEWMARKET, Ontario. 
L3Y 2R1 


IANUARY 1Q74 


NURSING 
ADMINISTRATOR 


A V AILABLE 
A challenge in the Community Nursing Education 
Prog ramme 
WHERE 
Evening Division 
Loyola of Montreal 
Health Education 
HOW 
As Assistant to the Coordinator of Community 
Health Nursing 
WHO 
Holds a Master's Degree in Nursing and has the 
ability to work with people in a challenging multi- 
discipline programme, preferably bilingual 
SALARY 
According to University scale 


WHEN 
Begins July 1,1974 


INFORMATION FROM 
G. Lennox 
Programme Coordinator for Health Education 
Loyola of Montreal 
Evening Division 
7270 Sherbrooke Street West 
Montreal. Quebec 
H4B 1R6 
Tel. 514-482-0320 (Ioc. 427) 


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- 


. 
THE SCARBOROUGH 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


.. 


... 


invites applications from: 
Registered Nurses and Registered Nursing Assist- 
ants to work in our 650-bed progressive, accredit- 
ed, community-centered, active treatment hospital. 
We offer opportunitIes in Medical, SurgIcal, Paediatric, and Obstetrical 
nursing. 
Our specIalties Include a Burns and Plasltc Unit, Coronary Care, Intensive 
Care and Neurosurgery Units and an active Emergency Department 
. Obstetrical Department - participation in "Family celltered" teach. 
ing program. 
. Paediatric Department - participation in Play Therapy Program. 
. Orientation and on-goirc staff education. 
. Progressive personnel policies. 
The hOspital IS located In Eastern Metropolitan Toronto. 
For further information, write to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
SCARBOROUGH GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
3050 Lawrence Avenue, East, Scarborough, Ontario. 


THL CANADIAN NURSE 61 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 
requires 
REGISTERED NURSE - 
HOSPITAL CONSULTANT 
(I NSPECTOR-HOSPIT ALS AND 
CONSULTANT) 
VICTORIA 
B.C. Hospital Insurance Service. To carry out consul- 
tation and on-site inspection work related to acute, 
rehabilitation, extended care and private hospitals 
(nursing homes), requiring some travelling; to advise 
on standards and quality of care; to prepare and 
make recommendations; to conduct special surveys; 
to co-operate with other Consultants in the review 
of hospital operating estimates and construction 
plans; to perform research duties and recommend 
methods of increasing efficiency and improving 
nursing administration; to stimulate the development 
of new programs. Requires Registration, or eligibility 
for Registration, with the Registered Nurses' Associa- 
tion of British Columbia; preferably, a University 
degree in Nursing; OR, a diploma in teaching, admin- 
istration, clinical supervision, or equivalent, plus 
considerable experience, including work at a senior 
administrative level. Starting salary up to $1,011, 
depending on qualifications and experience, rising 
to $1,133. Obtain applications from the CIVIL SER- 
VICE COMMISSION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 544 
Michigan Street, VICTORIA, and return IMMEDIATE- 
LY. COMPETITION NO. 73:1656. 


THE RELIGIOUS 
HOSPITALLERS 
OF SAINT JOSEPH 


INVITE YOU 


to share their 300 year heritage of service to the 
Church in health, education and welfare services in 
the United States, Canada and France 
to share their availability to reach out to those in 
need in Africa, Peru and the Dominican Republic 
procla iming Christ's love by care and preventIOn. 
teaching and development programs 
to share their common life of prayer and work In a 
spirit of openness to God and the needs of others 


R.S.V.P. FORMATION CENTER 
438Y2 College St. 
Burlington, Vermont 
05401 


FORMATION CENTER 
4 Toronto Street, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 
K1 S ON2 


62 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


BORED? 
RESTLESS? 



 


- Stimulating General Duty activities in 
a 675 bed hospital- on a unit of your 
choice 
- Leisure time activities that are interest- 
ing and exciting 


Apply to: 
Director of Nursing 
Regina General Hospital 
Regina, Saskatchewan 


JANUARY 1974 



I nd ex 
to 
Advertisers 


January 1974 


Oavol Canada. Ltd. ................................................ 5 
Holl i...ter Limited ..... ....... .................... .......... ....... 40 
International Health Institute ............................... 50 
J.B. Lippincott Co. of Canada Ltd. ........................ I 
Mont Sutton. I nc................................................. II 
C.V. Mo...by Company. ltd. ..................... 16. 17. I X 
The Nurses' 8001-.. Society...................................... l) 
Perry Rubber Company......................................... 6 
Procter & Gamble ................................................ 45 
Reeves Company............................................ 14. 15 
W.B. Saunder... Company Canada. Ltd. ................ 47 
&:hering Corporation Limited ............. 52. Cover IV 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals .................................. 51 
White Si...ter UnilÙrm. Inc. ...... 2. Cover II. Cover III 



 tin'''' i \i ilK l\1wws:a 
Georgina Clarke 
The Canadian Nurse 
50 The Driveway 
Onawa K2P I f2 (Ontario) 


A tln.'rfi.\Ù1K Repn'S('1lTlif/ "Ö 
Richard P. Wilson 
219 East Lancaster Avenue 
Ardmore, Penna. 19003 
h.'k'phone. (215) \1Ilh\,,) lJ-14lJ7 


Gordon Tiffin 
2 Tremont Crescent 
Don Mills. Ontario 
I dephone. (416) 444-47J I 


Member of Canadian 
Circulations Audit Board Inc. 


BEl:] 


JANUARY 1974 


Serve Canada's 
native people 


6. 


.... 


. 


- 


---- 


/ 



 
1 ... 
. 
j 


. 


In 
a well 
equiRped 
hospital. 


I . Health and Welfare Sanlé eI B.en.être social 
Canada Canada 
,---------------
 
I Medical Services Branch I 
I Department of National Health and Welfare I 
I Ottawa, Ontario K 1 A OK9 I 
I I 
I Ple...e send me informuion on hOsPital I 
I nursing with this servIce. I 
I Name: I 
I Address: I 
City: Pray: _ 

_______________J 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 63 



...- 


PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS OF REGISHRED NURSES 


Alberta 
Alberta Association of Registered Nurses. 
10256-1 I2 Street. Edmonton. T5K IM6. 
Pre.
.: A.J. Prowse; Pre.
.-Elect: D.E. Huff- 
man; Vke-P/"('.
.: A. Thompson. I. Walker. 
COII/II/ittee.
- Stl(l1" Nur-'l'.
: C. Asp; N.W. 
ElIu('.: W. Mills: N
R. P/'((l'tin': A. Clark; 
Supen'. Nur.n'.
: J. Smith; Pmjl.(.t Din!('. N,w. 
ElIu('.: M. Moncrieff. Pml'. O,ffil'e Stl(IT- 
Puh. Rei. O,ffin"': A. Shaw; Ell/ploy. Rei.: 
Y. Chapman; Ant. Ell/ploy. Rd. O,[(il'(,/,: 
R.R. Donahue; N
R. Sel'l'. Cmm,lt.: 8. Sel- 
lers; COII/II/. Adl'Í.mr: H. Coller; R"Ri.\trar: 
A.R. McKinnon; Ex('('. S('('.: H.M. Sabin; 
O.lTin' MWIlIR("': M, Garrick. 


British Columbia 
Registered Nurses' Association of British 
Columbia. 2130 West 12th Avenue. Van- 
couver. Pre.
.: G. LaPointe: Vin'-Pn'.\.: T. 
Duck. R. Macfadyen. COII/II/itt('e.
- N.
R. 
ElIlIl'.: J.K. Griffith: N.I'R. Pmctin': E.H. 
Dancer; SoC, & Enll/. W('
r: B. Archer. Stl!l1 
- En'('. Din'('.: F.A. Kennedy; ReRÌ-\'trar: 
H. Grice: A.ut. R('RÌ-\'t,.(//.: J. Small; Din'c. 
&111('. S,"T.: C. Kermacks; A.ut. Din'(', Edm'. 
Sel'l'.: J. McCullagh; Din'('. N.W. Sel'l'.: T. 
Schnurr; Di,.,!c. Pe".
ol/l,d Sal'.: N. Paton: 
A.
M. Din'('. Peno""d Se/'l'.: (Plan'II/('IIt 
Sel'l'.): F. MacDonald. (Li,h",' Rd.): G, 
Smale; Din'('. COII/II/. Sel'\'.: C. Marcus: 
Lihm/'iall: J. Molson: Adll/ill. A.ut.: D. St. 
Germain. 


Manitoba 
Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses. 
647 Broadway Avenue. Winnipeg. RJC OX2. 
P/'('.
.: F. McNaught: Pa.w P"('.
.: E.M. Nu- 
gent; Vin'-Pn's.: R.G. Black. L. McClure. 
COII/II/itt(.(..
- N
R.: A. Croteau. M. Swe- 
dish; So('. & Emil. We({.: A. Daniels: LeRÌ-\'I.: 
O. McDermott: Brd. l
r Exalll.: O. McDer- 
mott: Fillalll'e: K. DeJong: P"l
(e.
.
. Sta.lT- 
Ell/ploy. Rd. Adl'i.
.: J. Gleason: Pllh. Rd. 
O,[(ic('/': M. Paynter; ReRi.
tm": M. Caldwell; 
COlltill. Edllc, Adl'i.
.: H. Sundstrom. 


New Brunswick 
New Brunswick Association of Registered 
Nurses. 23t Saunders Street. Fredericton. 
Pre.
.: B. LeBlanc: Pa.vt P"e.
.: A. Robichaud; 
Vke-Pre.
.: S. Cormier. R. Dennison; HOll. 
Sec.: S. Robichaud. COIIIII/itt(.(..
- NW.: 
Z. Hawkes. S. MacLeod; N
R. A.ut. COII/II/.: 
J. Sherwood: LeRi.
/.: K. Wright: Exe('. Se('.: 
MJ. Anderson; Liai.
oll o'llìa,': N. Rideout; 
CO/wilt. So('. & EnJ//. W('({.: G. Rowsell; 
ReRi.
,,'(//': E. O'Connor; A.
.
t. Ere('. Sec. & 
ReRi.
t"(I/': M. Russell: &llIc COll.llllt: A. 
Christie. 


Newfoundland 
Association of Registered Nurses of New- 
foundland. 67 Le Marchand Road. St. John's. 
Pre.
.: E. Wilton: Pa.w P"('.
.: P. Barrett: P"e.
. 
Ðect: F. Bouzan; Vin'-Pn'.
.: E, Summers. 
J. Nevitt. COII/II/itt('e.
 - Nw. 1::<111('.: E. 
64 THE C ANADI N NURSE 


Gardner: N.\R. S('/"I'.: J. Pawlett: Soc. & En"'. 
We
{.: W. Williams: Exec Sec: P. Barrett. 


Nova Scotia 
Registered Nurses' Association of Nova 
Scotia. 60J5 Coburg Road. Halifax. 
Pre.
.: M. Bradley: Pa.
1 Pre.
.: J. Fox: Vice- 
Pr('.\.: Sr. M. Barbara. G. Smith. C. Butler: 
Rel'ord. 5f.'c: Sr. M. Gillis: Erec, S,.c: F. 
Moss. COII/II/ittee.\- N.w. Edll('.: T. Blaikie: 
N.
R. Sen'.: S. MacDonald: Soc & EnJ/l. 
Weir: G. Murphy: Alfl'i". N
J!. EdIlC.: Sr. C 
Marie; Adl'i.
. N
R. Sen'.: J. MacLean: Eli/- 
ploy. Rd. O,lfin'r: M. Bentley: Pllh. ReI. OOì- 
n'r: D. Miller: Adll/ill. A.\,".: E. MacDonald. 


Ontario 
Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario. 
JJ Price Street. Toronto. M4W I Z2. 
Pre.
.: W.J. Gerhard: Pres. Elect: N.M. Ma- 
rossi. COlI/lI/iUl'('S - 5f.)('io-EnJ/l. W df: C,J. 
Seppala: N\R.: G.L Schmidt: &III('(/t"r: C,J. 
Faulkner; Adll/ill.: M.L. Peart: Exec. Direc.: 
L Barr: A.w. Exec. Direc.. D. Gibney: 
Din'c. Ell/ploy. ReI.: A.S. Grihben; Dire('. 
P"'
'('.
.
. Del'd.: eM. Adams: ReI!. Exec. 
Sec: M.I. Thomas. F. Winchester. 


Prince Edward Island 
Association of Nurses of Prince Edward 
Island. 188 Prince SI.. Charlottetown. 
Pre.
.: E. MacLeod: Pa." Pre.'.: C. Carruther
: 
P"('.
. Elecl: B. Robinson: Vice Pr,..\.: S. 
Mulligan: Exec, Sec.-ReR.: L. Fraser. COII/- 
II/itt('e.
- Nw. Edllc.: D. Sawler; NW. 
Sell'.: J. Peters: Pllh. Rd.: H. Wood: Fillall- 
n': C. Carruthers: Le!:i.\'l. & By-Ll/II'.\: Sr. 
M. Cahill; Soc & Emil. We(f.: M. Babineau. 


Quebec 
Association of Nurses of the Province of 
Quebec. 4200 Dorchester Blvd.. W.. Mont- 
real. H JA I V2. . 
P"('.
.: R. Bureau: Vke-Prn.: S. O'Neill. 
J. Pinkham. (Eng.). P. Proulx. Y. I ePage. 
(Fr.): HOIi. Trea.\.: C. Royer: HOll. Sec' P. 
Boucher. COII/II/itt""x- N.
R. &111('.: G. Al- 
Ien. D. Lalancette. Nw. S,.n'.: J. Had,well. 
R. Dionne: P,.,
'{'s'\. SI"T.: S. O'Neill. P. Mur- 
phy: School l
" N\R.: R. Atto. C. de Villiers 
Sauvé: LI'Ri,
/.: 1\1. Masters. C. Bélanger: 
Sec. R('!:.: N. Du Motlchel: PilI>. Rei. o.tfil'(,/,: 
M. Jean. 


Saskatchewan 
Saskatchewan Registered Nurses' As
ocia- 
tion. 2066 Retallack St.. Regina. S4T 2K2. 
Pr,..,.: DJ. Pipher; Past Pre.'.. E. Linnell; 
Pre.
. Elect: J. MacKay: I'in'-Pr,..\.: Sr. B. 
Bezaire. S. Rhoden. COlllllliuel',,'- NW.: 
I. Watson; Chapter.,. & PI/h. Rei.: R. Leding- 
ham; Soc. & EnJl/. We(f:: G. Hutchin,on: 
Exec. S('(,.: A. Mills; ReRi.w'ar: E. Dumas: 
Pllh. 1t!f<VIII. Ofjìcl'r: B. Schill: N'R. Cal/.\lIlt.: 
R. Mireau: As.w. ReRi.'tm,': J. Passmore. 


- 


ð 

 


Canad ian 
Nurses' 
Association 


Directors 


President 
................ Marguerite E. Schumacher 


Pre
ident-Elect. ...... Huguette Labelle 


1st Vice-Pre,ident.. Beverly Du Gas 


l\1emher-at-Large ..... Glenna Rowsell 


Member-at-Large .. K. Marion Smith 


1\'lember-at-Large 
.............................. Deni
e Lalancette 


Member-at-Large ..... Roberta Coutts 


A.J. Prowse ............................. AARN 


G. LaPointe .......................... RNABC 


F-. McN aught .......................... MA RN 


B. I eBlanc ............................ NBARN 


E Wilton ................................. ARNN 


\1. Bradley............................ RNANS 


W. Gerhard ............................. RNAO 


E. MdcLeod ............................ AN PEl 


R. Bureau ........... ................... ANPQ 


OJ. Pipher ............................... SRNA 


Executive Director 


........................... Helen K. Mussallem 


JANUARY 1974 



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February 1974 
 


....1.. 
:;A 
Nurse 


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OTTAWA 


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Hudak. Gallo and Lohr 
This book's holistic approach is based on the 
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Lippincott 500 pages 1973 $9.95 


STUDENT WORK MANUAL IN 
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Lippincott 1973 90 pages $3.75 


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THE GERIATRIC AIDE 
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Techniques and procedures in such specific 
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control are included. Important chapters deal 
with common geriatric conditions requiring 
special care, such as stroke, arthritis, mental 
disorders, and diabetes. A handy study guide 
of questions at the beginning of each chapter, 
a helpful glossary of terms, and a student work 
record are just a few of the useful items in- 
cluded. 
Little Brown 


1974 


375 pages, illustrated 
paperbound $7.95 


CD 


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GUIDELINES FOR COMPREHENSIVE 
NURSING CARE IN CANCER 
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 
Report of a series of seminars directed by 
Beatrice Chase and Guy Robbins, M.D., bring- 
ing together today's expert knowledge about 
caring for patients with various types of cancer. 
Springer 1973 399 pages $7.95 


CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT 
Birchenall and Streight 
A valuable text in an increasingly important 
area of health care for the practical/vocational 
nurse. Content includes the older person in the 
family and society, deve:opmental tasks; com- 
munity aspects; housing, health, nutrition, 
recreation; normal aging; nursing in long-term 
facilities. Restorative nursing is emphasized. 
Lippincott 1973 250 pages paperbound $4.75 


ESSENTIALS OF NURSING RESEARCH 
Notter 
This eminently knowledgeable book, by the 
recent editor of Nursing Research, explains the 
techniques of preparing and using research re- 
ports. Specifically designed for nurses and stu- 


dents of nursing, the volume is in three main 
parts: Introduction. The Research Process 
Reporting and Evaluating Research. 
Springer 1974 160 pages $8.95 


DYNAMIC PSYCHIATRY IN SIMPLE 
TERMS 
Mezer 
Revised and expanded 5th Edition of this pop- 
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clear English, a basic understanding of psy- 
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illness, as well as the methods of treatment. 
Springer 1974 200 pages $4.95 


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75 Horner Ave. 
Toronto, Ontario M8Z 4X7 
Representing in Canada: 
Little Brown and Company 
Blackwell Scientific Publications Ltd. 
Springer Publishing Company, Inc. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


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o Payment enclosed (send postpaid) 
Books may be returned within 15 days 


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CN-2-74 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 1 




 



 
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The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


ð 

 


A monthly journal for the nurses of Canada published 
in English and French editions by the Canadian Nurses' Association 


Volume 70, Number 2 


February 1974 


19 A Diploma Is Not an Oil Painting! ...................... M. MacDougall 


22 Ethics of Nursing Practice ..................................................... M. Allcn 


24 When You Visit a Sick Friend ...... 


25 Clinical Laboratory Procedures ............... E.M. Watson. A.H. Neufeld 


I h.: vi.:", .:xpr,:"ùl In Ih.: 
xlilorial and variot" arlicl
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4 Letters 51 Rescarch Abstracts 
7 News 54 Books 
45 In a Capsule 6U Av Aids 
46 Dates 61 Accession Li'it 
47 Names 79 Indcx to Advertisers 
49 Ncw Products XU Official Directorv 


E- xc'cutiw Dir"Clllr: lIeI"n "'. .\lu"aU"m. 
hillor '\ i
inia \. l.indabur
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hlitor" I.;' -tJI"n I.ock"b"r
. Uorolh
 S. 
Starr. I clitorial \"I,t,n1l' Carol \. 1)\\01'- 
I..ill . Produclion ..\"i'tanl tJi/ahclh .\. 
Stanton. ('Irculatlon :\I,lI1ag"r. ""r
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log....thl..r \\ilh rl"g.'lratloJ1 llul11h... o r In .1 pro- 
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 Driv"""v. 011.1",1. Ontario. "21' II :! 


C (".IIMd..I11 'lII'I.... \.......J\:I.IIIOIl It) .J 


FEBRUARY 1974 


I'm presently reading Margaret M. 
Street's book "Watch-fires on the 
mountains: the life and writings of 
Ethel Johns'" This is a fascinating 
biography of the late Ethel Johns, 
who was editor of The Canadian 
Nurse from 1933 to 1944. 
Ms. Johns had a lively sense of 
humor, which frequently found its 
way into her monthly column "Off 
Duty." In her August 1943 column, 
she wrote about her lack of "math- 
ematical sense," which presented 
problems when she tried to com- 
plete her income tax return. Her 
unique method of calculating this 
tax is inspirational at this time of 
year. 
"First, we bought a book that 
claimed to tell all about it in six easy 
lessons. Then we wrapped a wet 
towel round Our aching brow, prop- 
ped the book open in front of us, 
and filled in the form to the best of 
our ability. 
"The next morning we took it to 
the Income Tax office and proudly 
offered it to a bored official. He 
didn't seem to share Our high opin- 
ion of it and ran a disdainful pencil 
through our carefully computed 
percentages. . .. 'You have not 
indicated whether the total of com- 
pulsory savings portion is the lesser 
of either (a) one-half of item J Or (b) 
is greater than the total of voluntary 
savings (if any) as compared with 
the refundable portion of tax, less 
item K.' 
"We feebly muttered that we 
hadn't gone that far at school and 
that it wasn't in the Income Tax 
book either. 
"'We can't help that, madam,' 
said he. 'False information or omis- 
sion incurs a fine of ten thousand 
dollars or six months imprisonment 
or both.' 
"Si nce we evidently have to go to 
jail anyway. we arrived at the requi- 
red estimates by adding our tele- 
phone number to item J and then 
subtracting the total from item K. 
"It seemed wise to refrain from 
submitting this final revision per- 
sonally. so we just sent it by regis- 
tered mail to the Receiver General 
of Canada. We will let you know 
later how he reacted to it. They let 
you write letters even in jail. - E.J." 


-VAL. 


* A review of this book will appear in a 
future issue of The Canadian Nurse 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 3 



letters 


{ 


Letters to the editor are welcome. 
Only signed letters, which include the writer's complete address, 
will be considered for publication. 
Name will be withheld at the writer's request. 


Readers recall influenza 
I was interested in the article in the 
December issue by Gladys Morton. 
.. fhe pandemic intluenza of 19 I X." I 
do not imagine many nurses practicing 
today will recall those times. I was only 
a child of 10, but I can vividly remem- 
ber the horrors of that epidem ic. 
I was the eldest of three children 
living on a farm in central Saskatch- 
ewan. My father, a road construction 
contractor who used to come home on 
weekends to instruct nw mother in 
farm operations. suddenly"arrived home 
very ill and reported having to clo
e 
down his work because 70 to XO percent 
of his men were ill. 
Within a week our two hired men 
and the family. except my mother and 
mvscI f. were ill. Outside chores. cook- 
ing. caring fÓr the sick. and so on were 
left to us. Within another wee"- I sud- 
denly became ill: although not acutely 
sick, I 
pcnt nearly three month
 recov- 
ering. Mother worked outside. cooked. 
and cared for the sick without help. 
Every household in the community 
and village was stricken and deaths 
occurred daily. My t
lther and brother 
were very ill with pneumonia, but re- 
covered as did my young sister. 
Our one village doctor. who had a 
chauffeur. slept in his car only between 
calls. Being on the road day and nigh!- 
he visited at all hours. How he survived 
only God knows. He was concerned 
about my mother, who never seemed to 
rest. He tinally organized a makeshift 
hospital and moved our two hired hands 
there. 
When my father began to improve 
and felt he should relieve mv mother of 
the outdoor chores. my mother - usu- 
ally a placid soul -locked him in the 
house while she carried on with the 
chores. I can still recall his ranting over 
the fact that mother had defied him. 
My 1
lther said his frequent hot 
whiskey toddies saved his life. How- 
ever my mother. who was a teetotaler. 
did not altogether agree with him. She 
simply maintained that she never had 
time to become ill. - E. Sa/lders, 
Maid.weJ//e, SasJ..wdlel\'l/ll. 


I was particularly interested in the 
article concerning the influenza epi- 
demic of 191 X. I was a 12-year-old 
living in Massachusetts at that time. 
My brother was due to enter the army 
in October. presumably to be sent to 
4 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


France. He went to VISit friends in 
another city and came back to report the 
death of one from 11u and the illness 
of another. A few days later my brother 
wa
 in bed with the 11u and 
oon con- 
tracted pneumonia. 
I ahoo had a mild case of the 11u. 
o 
was confined to bed. I was too voung 
to realize how ill my brother w.
\. My 
chief thought wa
 that his entrv into 
the army h
ld been postponed. " 
This article brought back memories 
of m)' parents' days of worry. and made 
me realize how serious the t
lmilv situ a- 
tionmight have become. Becausé of the 
illness. mv brother's induction was 
postponcd to November I I. and his en- 
tire four months of army service were 
spent in Boston harbor. instead of in 
France! - Ed/la Frye, Verlllolll. 


Second-class nurse 
I am getting tired of being considcred 
a second-class nurse because I work in 
a home for the aged. I think it is time 
to do 
omething about this. 
Regi
tcred nurses in Canada who 
work with the aged are not giving them- 
selves a chance. They have allowed 
them
elves to be pushed into a corner 
of the nursing world and forgotten- 
the way some people forget their old 
folk. 
Is it fair that we should be paid less 
because we choose to work with the 
aged'! Does working with the aged 
mcan we can take life easy. not have 
to care about the job. and not work as 
hard as we would in a hospital'! Some 
persons apparently think so. 
Let anyone take over. for just om: 
day. the duties of an RN caring for 50 
or more agitated. noisy. confused. 
demanding. and senile aged persons. 
One day should be enough to convince 
them of the RN'S value and make them 
ask why she is being paid less than her 
hospital sisters. 


Rcgi
tcred ",1r'C
, 
your community necds 
the henefit of yoU! 
skills and experience. 
Volunteer now to 
tcach St. John Amhulance home 
nur
ing and child care courses. 
('ontad your Provincial Headquarters, 
St. John Ambulance. 


There is another hlcet to thi
 argu- 
ment - our patients, them
elves. Arc 
they not the ones who 
truggled through 
a depression and helped

in a w.;[.'! 
To many of these old folks. whose rela- 
tives arc either gone or do not have 
time for them now that they are old, 
the RN who cares for them is a queen. 
a reason for living. one of the few links 
with an outside world that seems other- 
wise to have forgotten their existence. 
Should we punish them because thcv 
have dared to grow old'! Of course not! 
But they arc being deprived because 
good nurses. who are particularly suit- 
ed to .caring for thy aged. are being 
lured mto better-paId jobs in hospitals 
- jobs that any RN could do. 
Only the truly dedicated nurse will 
deliberately choose to work for a lower 
salary, and with the lower status that 
implies, however much she might be 
drawn toward the elderly. Dedication 
is fast becoming a luxury in this topsy- 
turvy world. 
By not standing up for our rights. 
we are not just letting ourselves down. 
We arc letting our patients down. too, 
because we are implying they are not 
important enough to fight for. or to care 
for. They deserve the best we can give 
them. ----;- Patricia M. Briggs. SRN, SCM. 
Reg.N., Londo/l. Ontario. 


Letter must be answered 
fhe letter "Nurses should not n:tire" 
(December 197.\ page 4) must be 
answered. 
I was out of nursing for ]0 year
 and 
have been back for two. I must admit 
th,lt at first it was grim. You need a 
brave director of nursing and a long 
sufferi ng head nurse. Medicines are 
all new. Intensive care units did not 
exist. but it is ama7ing what docs come 
back. 
About five or seven years ago. one of 
the hospitab in my city had a refresher 
course, but I wa
 unable to attend. This 
winter. SI. Lawrence College is giving 
a IS-week refresher course. 
I certainly resent being told to qep 
down to a registered nursing assistant 
po
ition. I was a good nurse <lI1d still 
am. although in a limited capacity. 
Since I graduated. I have never given 
up reading 711e Ca/laclia/l Nun/!. There 
arc also many good nursing texb. which 
nurses can borrow from their hospital 
to answer their many questions. - J. 
N/!LIIlIa/l, Ki /lgsfO/l, Omario. 1;] 
FEBRUARY 1974 



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2. Polyester and nylon tricot rib kmt with button front jacket, pintuck detail at cuffs 
and waist, action sleeves and pockets. Sizes 8 to 18. In white, 30.00. 
3. Polyester and nylon shirt look with patch pockets, drawstring waist. short sleeves, 
yoke detail, action sleeves and pointed collar. Sizes 5 to 15. In white, 26.00. 
4. Polyester and nylon princess style with pintucked front, button trim, back zipper 
closing, short sleeves and patch pockets. Sizes 10 to 20. In white 27.00; pink 28.00. 
EATON'S 



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6 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Xylocaine
 100 mg 
(lidocaine hydrochloride Injection U.S P) 
INDICATIONS-Xylocaine administered Intra- 
venou
lv is specifically indicated In the 3Lute 
management oft I) ventricular arrh) thmias OCLUf- 
ring during cardiac manipulation. 'iiuch dS cardia," 
surgery: and (2) life-threatening arrhythmias. par- 
ticularly those which are ventricular in ongin. such 
as occur during acUle myocardial infarction. 


CONTRAINDICATIONS Xylocaine i. wntra. 
indicated (I) in patients with a known history of 
hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide 
type: and (2) in patienl'ii \\'ith Adams-Stokes syn- 
drome or \\ith severe degrt:es of sinoatrial. atrio- 
ventricular or intraventricular block. 


", ARNINGS-Constant monitoring with an elec- 
trocardiograph is essential in the proper adminis- 
tration ofXylocaine intravenousl\'. Sign
 of exce... 
sive depression of cardiac conductivih. 'iuch as 
prolongation of PR interval and QRS complex 
and the appearance or aggravation of arrhythmias. 

hould be followed by prompt cessation of the 
intravenous infusion of this agent It is mandator) 
to have emergenc\' resuscitative equipment and 
drugs immediately available to manage pos\;;ible 
adverse reactions involving the cardiovascular. 
respiratory or central nervous systems_ 
Evidence for proper usage in children is hmited. 


PRECAUTIONS-Caution should be employed 
in the repeated use of Xylocaine in patients with 
severe liver or renal disease because accumulation 
may occur and mdY lead to toxic phenomena. since 
Xylocaine I
 metabolized mainly in the hver and 
excreted by the kidney. The drug should 31\;;0 be 
used with caution in patients with hypovolemia 
and 'ihock. and all forms of heart block (see CON- 
TRAINDlCATlONS AND WARNINGS) 
In patients with sinus bradycardia the adminis- 
tration ofXvlocaine intravenously for the elimina- 
tion of ventricular ectopic beats without prior 
acceleration In heart rate (t=.g. by Isoproterenol 
or by electric pacing) may provoke more frequent 
and serious ventricular arrhythmias. 


ADVERSF REACTIONS Systemic reactions of 
the following types have been reported. 
(I) Central Nervous System: lightheadednes,. 
drowsmess: dlzLmess: apprehension: euphoria: 
tinnitus: blurred or double vision: vomiting: sen- 
sations of heat. cold or numbness: twitching. 
tremors: convulsions: unconlliiciousness: and respi- 
ratory depression and arrest. 
(2) Cardiovascular System: hypotension: car- 
diovascular collapse: and bradycardia which may 
lead to cardiac arrest. 
There have been no reports of cross sensItivity 
between Xylocaine and procainamidc or between 
Xylocaine and quinidine. 


DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION SinRle 
Injection: The usual do
e is 50 mg to 100 mg 
administered intravenouslv under ECG monitor- 
ing. This dose may be administered at the rate 
of approximately 25 m@: to 50 mg per minute. 
Sufficient time should be allowed to enable a slo\\ 
circulation to Larry the drug to the sÎle of action 
If the initial injection of 50 mg to 100 mg does 
not produce a desired response. a second dose mav 
be repeated after 10-20 minutes. 
NO MORE THAN 200 MG TO 300 MG OF 
XYlOCAINE SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED 
DURING A ONE HOUR PERIOD. 
In children expenence with the drug is limited. 
Continuous Infusion: Following a smgle injection 
in those patients in whom the arrhythmia tends 
to recur and who are incapable of receiving oral 
antiarrhythmic therapv. intra\'enous infusions of 
X)locaine may be administered at the rate of I 
mg to 2 mg per minute (20 to 25 ug/kg per minute 
in the average 70 kg man). Intravenous mfusions 
ofXvlocaine must be administered under constant 
ECG monitoring to avoid potential overdosage 
and toxicity. Intra\'enous infusion should be ter- 
minated as soon as the patient's basic rhythm 
appears to be stable or at the earliest signs of 
toxicity. It should rarely be necessary to continue 
intravenous infusions beyond 24 hours. As SOOn 
as possible. and when indicated. patients should 
be changed to an oral antiarrh)thmic agent for 
maintenance therapy. 
Solutions for intravenous infusion should be 
prepared by the addition of one 50 ml single dose 
vial of Xylocaine 2"J or one 5 ml Xylocaine One 
Gram Disposable Transfer Syringe to I liter of 
appropriate solution. This will provide a 0.1% 
solution: that is. each ml will contain I mg of 
Xylocaine HCI. Thus I ml to 2 ml rer mmute 
will provide I mg to 2 mg of Xylocaine HCI per 
minute. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



news 


Nursing And Health Is Theme 
Of 1974 CNA Convention 
()(tl/l\'(/ - Th
 theme of th
 '<)74 CNA 
ann ual m

t ing and conv
nt ion \\ ill 
b
 "Nursing and H
alth'" It will be 
held in Winnipeg at the Manitoba 
c
nt
nnial center. June 16 to 2L 1<)74. 
Registration will begin on Sunday. 
June 16. at noon. An interfaith church 
servic
 \\ ill he held at 1600 hours. and 
the opening ceremony at 1<)30 hours. 
follO\\ed hy a reception. 
\10nday. June 17, will he a husiness 
s
ssion with reports from the ex
cutiv
 
dir
ctor. special committ
es on the 
testi ng s
rvice and on r
search. finan- 
cial rcports. and th
 r
port of the com- 
mitt
e on nominations. At the Monday 
night di nner. ther
 will he a presenta- 
tion to nurses to he honored. 
Two panels on nursing and health 
will h
 presented on Tuesday. June I K 
In th
 morning. a panel will discuss 
New Work Relationships: th
 afternoon 
panel \\ ill fixus on N
w Structures in 
H
alth Care Deliwry. An open forum 
\\ ill 1'0110\\ th
 second panel presenta- 
tion. 
Wednesday morning. June IY. th
 
Canadian Nurses' Foundation will hold 
its annual meeting. Also on Wednesday 
morning. CNA voting delegates will 
choose CNA officers for the biennium. 
\\'
dnesday altermxlIl is free time. 
Thursday, June 20. is the second day 
d
vot
d to th
 topic of Nursing and 
Health. In the morning. a panel on 
Personal Attitudes and Professional 
Image is sch
duled. to be followed hy 
an l
pen forum. Multiple sessions arc 
on the program for Thursday afternoon. 
ind ud ing cI i nical topics. current re- 
search in nursing practice, relicensing 
and continuing education. special il'a- 
tion in nursing. and experiments in use 
of hospital nursing manpower. 
A g
neral husiness session is sched- 
uled for the morning of the final day of 
the annual m
eting and convention. 
Friday. June 21 
rhe ne\dy-clected officers \\ ill he 
installed at 1400 hours: the president" s 
reccpt ion 1'011 ows. 


NBARN Requests Govt. Attention 
To Pension Plan Discrimination 
Fredericto/l, N.R. - Last December. 
th
 New Brunswick Association of Reg- 
i
tered Nurses sent telegrams to the 
FEBRUARY 1974 


federal government requesti ng that it 
give priority to the removal of discrim- 
inatory aspects of the Canada Pension 
Plan (cPp). 
Bernadette LeBlanc. NBARN presi- 
dent, explained that nurses in the prov- 
ince are deeply concerned about the 
unfairness of the Cpp's henefit paid on 
the death of a female contributor. 
"Although male and female contrib- 
utors are treated alik
 as far as pay- 
ments are concerned, the spouse and 
family of the female contributor receive 
less benefit from the plan than the 
spouse and family of the male contrib- 
utor," the president said. N BARN's 
membership is <)9.7 percent female: 
64.4 percent of these members arc mar- 
ried contributors. 
The association's action followed a 
me
ting of its executive committ
e. 
Accordi ng to Ms. LeBlanc. further 
study on the CPP as it affects nurses 
is being undertaken by a special NBARN 
task committee. 


MARN Studies RNs' Need 
For Refresher Programs 

Vi/l/lipeg, Ma/l. - The Manitoba As- 
sociation of Registered Nurses (I\tARN) 
is conducting a province-wide survey 
to determine the numher of nurses who 
would return to active practice if re- 
fresher programs were availahle in 
centers throughout Manitoha. 
The need 
fÒr such a survey arose 
because many Manitoha hospitals. 
especially in rural areas. are having 
difficulty in ohtaining sufficient nursing 
staff. I\1ARN believes there arc a num- 
ber of registered nurses who haw been 
out of nursing fÒr several years and 
who would return to active nursing if 
refresher programs \\ere available. 
I\tARN is distributing a questionnaire 
across the province via its members. as 
well dS through community newspapers. 
The questionnaire a..,ks fÖrmerly aetive 
regist
r
d nurses to indicate their prcf 
erence of 100 centers at \\ hic h refresher 
programs could be held. the preiCrred 
time of year for a course. and whether 
the RNs would be pn:pared to \\ork 
full- or part-time after completing the 
program. . 
Marlene Caldwell. I\tARN registrar. 
said. "Refresher programs thus far 
have not heen av,lIl,thJc 111 rural cen- 
ters. This has meant that som
 fÒrmer 


nurses. particularly in rural Manitoba, 
becau
e of family responsibilities. have 
heen unahle to take advantage of the 
chance to update their professional 
knowledge. 
"By offering refresher programs in 
different centers we are hoping to 
encourage these nurses to con'iider 
returning to active practice:' 


Nursing Committees Set Up 
By BC Health Corporation 
Va/lcouver, H.C. - A nursing advisory 
committe
, recomm
nded by the direc- 
tors of the Registered Nurses' Asso- 
ciation of British Columbia (RNASe), 
has heen established fÒr the new pro- 
vincial crown corporation on health. 
called the B.C. Medical Centre. (Ne\\ s, 
January 1974. page 10). 
Patricia Wadsworth, director of pa- 
tient scrvices at Vancouver General 
Hospital. \HIS named chairman of the 
committee by the Centre's administra- 
tion. The RNASC named Audrey Mur- 
ray, director of nursing at SI. Paul's 
Hospital. Vancouver. to be vice-chair- 
man. 
The RNASC has he
n given the op- 
portunity to appoint two more repre- 
sentativcs to the Centre's professional 
advisory committee: it already has one 
appointee. RNABC president Geraldine 
l aPoint
. The other two named to [he 
committee arc Thurley Duck. RNASC 
first vice-president. and Kirsten \\ eh- 
her. assistant professor at UBe school 
of nursing. The protCssional advisory 
committee at the B.\'. Medical C
ntre 
takes the place of the medical advisory 
committee th,lt i.. usual in hospitals. 
Th
 B.C. Medical Centre has ,lIso 
e..tablished a nursing task committee 
to act in an advisory capacity to th
 
planning and building committee. one 
of the C
ntre"s six m,
jor committees. 


SRNA Recommendations Concern 
Nursing Role In Health Ce.nters . 
Regina, Sas/... - rhe nursll1g role 111 
Saskatche\\an's community health and 
soci,d eenters should be devdoped 111 
consultat ion \\ ith the Saskatchew,1Il 
R
gistered Nurses' Association. and 
the department of publie health should 
mak
 consultation services on nursing 
matter.. available to nurses employed in 
the...
 centas. 
TH E CANADIAN NU RSE 7 
. 



news 


(COIl/ i I/I/I'd li'olll fllI,!!1' 7) 
These two recommendations. ap- 
proved at a meeting hdd November 
1-3. 1973, by the SRNA council. will 
be communicated to Health Minister 
W.F. Smishek. 
SRNA supports III principle the 
concept of these health and social 
centers. providing they incorporate 
a significant preventive health com- 
ponent in their services. Some of the 
association's concerns regarding the 
community centers are: 
. Nurses employed in the
e centers 
re.ceive no orientation on the concept 
01 the centers, on the preventive care 
role. of the nurse. or on community 
nu rSlllg. 
. There are no written policies per- 
taining to nursing practice in the cen- 
ters. 
. No mechanism h.1S been established 
to allow nurses. physicians. and board 
members at the centers to meet annually 
or semiannually tì.)r educational pur- 
poses and program planning. 
. Advisory boards. as suggested by the 
department of public health. have not 
been establ ished. 
. No criteria have been developed to 
cover the ()B-call function of nurses III 
the centers. 
SRNA will also urge that standards 
officers with the Saskatchewan Hospi- 
tal Services Plan make the same visib 
to community health centers as they 
make to hospitals. 
The association's nursing consultant 
has visited tive of the existing centers 
to obtain intì.mllation about the com- 
munities' plans Iì.)r their centers and the 
role and functions of the nurses em- 
plo)ed there. 
At the November meeting. the SRNA 
council approved two recommendations 
from the board of examiners concern- 
ing refresher courses for nurses. 
Nurses taking a refresher course 
will be required to reregister imme- 
diately after completing the course. 
and will have to work 30 days within 
the following year. They will also have 
to complete the c1 inical portion of the 
course within one and ()Be-half years 
from the date they began the theory 
part of the course. 
Nurses who have not been active 
in nursing for five years or more will 
have to take a refresher course approv- 
ed hy SRNA before they are eligible 
to practice. At present. a correspond- 
ence refresher course is availahle 
th rough the extension department of 
the U. of Saskatchewan. Regina. 
SRNA's standing committee on nurs- 
a THE CANADIAN NURSE 


ing requested the counci I to <Ippoint a 
consumer to the committee. It wa
 
agreed that the Sa
katchewan branch 
of the (\msumers' As:-.ociation of 
Canada be asked to name a per
on to 

erve on thi
 committee. 
A motion to disallow smoking dur- 
ing SRNA council meeting
 was also 
approved. 


leDain Report Explains Reasons 
Behind Nonmedical Drug Use 
Ottawa - The crucial factor in using 
an opiate narcotic. such a
 heroin. Iì.)r 
the first time is access to the drug. '"It 
is a combination of a person being 
psychologicall) or socially vulnerable 
to heroin use. and receiving encourage- 
ment or per
ua
ion from another per- 

on on whom one feels :-.omewhat de- 
pendent. . .,'" says the final report lIf 
the Commission of Inquiry Into the 
Non-Medical Use of Drug
. 
This 114X-page report wa
 released 
to the public last Dcccmber. four and a 
half years after the five-member com- 
mission wa
 appointed by the federal 
government. Gerald L cDain, dean of 
Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. 
was the chairman. 
I n its introduction, it notes the im- 
portance of preventing contact with 
drug users. "especially when persons 
are young. inexperienced, and perhaps 
less able to make prudent choices.'" 


Official Notice 
of 
Annual Meeting and Convention 
of 
Canadian Nurses' Association 


The 1474 annual meeting and con- 
vention of the Canadian Nurses' 
Association wi 11 be held June 16- 
21. 1974. in the Concert Hall of the 
Manitoba Centennial Centre. \\ in- 
nipeg, Manitoba. The opcning 
ceremony will be held on Sunday 
evening. June 16. .1t 1430 hours, 
tì.)lIowed by d recept ion fÒr the 
member
, students. and guests 
registercd fÓ. the meeting. An 
inter- 
faith church service will
be held on 
Sunday afternoon at 1600 hoUl
. 
Busines
 and special interest se
:-.ions 
w ilI commence at 0400 hours. \1on- 
day June 17. continuing dail) and 
concluding on Friday afternoon. 
June 21. Students enrolled in schools 
of nur
ing in Canada n1a) register as 
ohservers at the annualmceting and 
can participate in 
pecial intere
t 

essions anl! social events. - He/ell 
K. ,\1u.Ha1/e/ll, Ereclllh'e Director, 
('WIlIl/ÙIIl Nunes' A.\SoÓatioll. 


However. Illany other faetors that 
contribute to nonmedical drug use are 
mentioned. For example. "The drugs 
themselves. as a means of relieving 
discomfort and affording pleasure. exer- 
cise a powerful attraction for people 
who have been conditioned more and 
more to seek com lort and pleasure. 
Modern advertising encourages the 
notion that there is no reason to put up 
with di
comfort. '" 
Although the report :-.ays that 
ome 
forms of nonmedical drug use seem to 
have levelled off and eve.
 decreased in 
certain ca
e
. as a whole it has conti- 
nued to increase. Other findings are 
that. 
. Alcohol and tobacco remain the ma- 
jor sources of drug-related public 
health problems; 
. The dominant pattern is one of mul- 
tiple drug use. with a hard core of 
indi
criminate. chronic multidrug u:-.ers 
who encourage the spread of harmful 
drug use; 
. A marked increase has occurred III 
experimental and dependent use of 
the opiate narcotics; and 
. Hallucinogen users have become 
more sophisticated in the abilit) to 
avoid acute adverse reactions. 
As for treatment of drug dependence. 
the commission considers the outlook 
discouraging. "Efforts to promote 
ab
tinence in drug-dependent individ- 
uals by long periods of contÏnement 
in prison or hospital settings have yield- 
ed poor results in the long run." Al- 
though the comm ission released its 
report on treatment earlier. it devotes 
one section in the tinal report to opiate 
maintenance and a shorter section to 
the therapeutic community. 
The adverse effects of Impnson- 
ment of drug offenders are described 
and suggestions made. "Prison i
 in 
many ways a finishing school for crim- 
inals. ... It i
 difficult to think of a 
better way to train people tì.H crime 
than to bring all the criminal t)-pes 
togethcr in one long live-in seminar 
on crime. There would be. on the con- 
trary. every interest in trying to keep 
them a\\<ay from one another. . . . 
"These adverse effects. . . are par- 
ticularly retlected in the treatment 01 
drug offenders. . . . There is consider- 
able circulation of drug
 within penal 
institution
.. . . offenders are reintÖrced 
in their allachment to the drug culture, 
and. . . in many cases they are intro- 
duced to certain kinds of drug use by 
pri 
on contacts." says the report of the 
LcDain COlllmi
:-.ion. 
In its conclusions and recommenda- 
tion
 fÒr control of the drug user. the 
commi
sion strongly recommends 
against extending the offence of sim- 
ple posse
silln. ':"We believe that we 
should gradually withdraw from the 
(COI///lII/(.tI,,,, fllI):1' 10/ 
FEBRUARY 1974 




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Next Month 
in 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


. Cholera Epidemiology 
and Control 


. Poor Baby: The Nurse 
and Femini
m 


. Adjusting to Imminent Death 


. A Volunteer Nurse 
in Israel 


ð 

 


Photo credit for 
February 1974 


Public Relations Dept.. Cit} Hall. 
Montreal. Quebec. cover photo 


10 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


news 


(Co"l Ú/I//'d /i'OI" (J(/g/' 81 


use of the criminal law against the non- 
medical user of drugs.. . . There is 
virtually no limit to the number of 
drugs to which it would have to be 
applied if it were to be pursued to its 
logical conclusions:' However. this 
recommendation does not apply to the 
strong hallucinogens, such as LSD and 
"IDA. 
If there is a serious effort to use the 
criminal law process for diversion to 
treatment or management of opiate 
dependence. the report warns "there 
will have to be not only an increase in 
treatment facilities oi all kinds..., 
including specialized methadone units 
and therapeutic communities. but a 
considerable increase in the number 
of probation officers and llthers cap- 
able of assisting with the task of social 
rehabilitation. " 


MARN Approves $40 Daily Fee 
For Private Duty Nurses 
Winnipeg, Man. - rhe directors of 
the Manitoha Association of Registered 
Nurses (:\t<\RN) recently approved a 
fee increase to S-lO for X hours' nursing 
care by RN
 in private practice. 
The new rate \\-as effective January 
I. IY7-l. It replaces a fee of 
31 fÌJr X 
hours. which has been in effect fix 2 
years. The new houri) rate will be 
S 7 ..'i0 for periods of less than -l hours. 
The increase brings salaries of the 
self-employed nurses into c1o
er align- 
ment with nurses employed by health 
care institutions. \t<\RN says. 


New Labor I.egislation In Ntld. 
Limits Right To Strike 
SI. John's, N.tld. - With the recent 
passing of a controversial bill in the 
Newfoundland House of A
òembly. 
"trikes by public service employees 
who are classified as "essential" are 
illegal. 
The draft legislation. which was 
passed in October IY7J after much 
debate and amendment. governs collec- 
tive bargaining with respect to certain 
employees in the provinee's public ser- 
vice. The labor movement has objected 
strongly to three sections of the bill. 
One of these sections states in part. 
"Upon certification of a bargaining 
agent, the [labor relationsJ hoard sh.1I1 
request the employer of employees in 
the unit to. . . provide the board and 
the bargaining agent with a statement 


in writing of the employees or classes 
of employees in the unit. . . considered 
by the employer to be essential em- 
ployees. . . . .. By "essential:' the bill 
defines employees whose duties "may 
be necessary for the health, sakty. or 
security of the public or otherwise in 
the publ ic interest." 
David Sparkes. employment relations 
officer for the Association of Reg- 
istered Nurses of NewfÖundland, told 
The Canadian Nurse that the main ob- 
jection to this section "is that to pro- 
hibit essential employees from striking 
is to limit the effectiveness of the strike 
weapon. For example, if 50 to 75 per- 
cent of the employees were declared 
es
ential. then a strike would be com- 
pletely ineffective and meaningless." 
Another objectionable feature of this 
legislation, M r. Sparkes noted. was 
that compulsory arbitration can be 
imposed under specific circumstances. 
This is "totally unacceptable to prac- 
tically all unions," he said. 


Western Nurse-Midwives 
Form Regional Association 
Fdll/onlon. A/ta. - Nurse-midwives in 
Western Canada have fÖrmed an a......o- 
ciation to include members from Al- 
berta. British Columbia. Saskatchewan. 
the Yukon. and the Northwest Terri- 
tories. 
President of the Western Nurse- 
Midwives Association is Pat Hayes. 
Edmonton; other officers are Sarla 
Sethi. Calgary. vice-president: Peggy- 
Anne Field. Edmonton. secretary- 
trea
urer; and members-at-Iarge Jose- 
phine Bertrand. St. Walburg
 Sask.. 
and Ytiriam Roberts. Drayton Valley. 
Alta. 
The association adopted the state- 
ment of the role and functions of nurse- 
midwives delineated hy the Registered 
Nurses' Association of Ontario (News. 
July IYD. p.12) and supported b) the 
Canadian Nurses' Associ.Hioll (News. 
Deccmber IYD. p.7). Two ad hoc 
committees were named by the new 
a
soeiation: the constitution committee 
is chaired b) Judith Friend. Edmon- 
ton. and the continuing education com- 
mittee is headed by \1ary McLees. 
Calgary. 
One o
iective of the western mid- 
\\ ives a
sociation is to promote up- 
grading of nursing care in all areas 
of the maternit) cycle in Canada hy 
working toward continuing education 
fÖr nurse-midwives and by acting as 
a resource for nurses in oh
tdric,d or 
puhlic health 11llr
ing. 
rhe group is aiming for a national 
organization of nurse-midwives. a pre- 
requisite for adm ission to thc I ntcr- 
national Congre

 llf Midwive
. 
(Col//il/lIl't1 Oil {J(/gl' I:! 1 


FEBRUARY 1974 



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FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 11 
. 



1 


have to be a communist to love your 
brother. It comes from the Bible." 
Speaking at the opening of the OHA 
convention, held October 2() to 31. 
1973. the executive director of the 
Rehabilitation Institute of Montreal 
left the impre:-.sion that Canadian:-. 
could learn from the Chinese people's 
"acknowledgement of the inadequacies 
of health care there. the modesty. . . 
concerning m<
ior advances, the zeal 
of pursuing plans for further imp.ove- 
ment. and the complete subordination 
of individual goals 10 the success of 
group effort. . . . '. 


news 


(('oll/illlll'd 1;'0111 I'"ge IV) 


You don't Have To Be A Communist 
To Love Your Brother, OHA Told 
Toronto, Ollt. - After a recent trip 
to China as leader of a Canadian med- 
ical delegation. Dr. Gustave Gingras 
told men
bers of the Ontario Hospital 
Association October 2(). "You don't 


in geriatric atonic constipation. . . 
Glysennid'tonight- 
action tomorrow! 


Glysennid. for predictable action. Taken at bedtime, it 
acts in the morning! Ideal for geriatric atonic constipation. 
Glysennid. . supplied in easy-to-take tablets. 
Glysennid . . . clinically proven, constant potency. 
Glysennid . . . acts systemically to help re-establish nor- 
mal bowel evacuation patterns. ideal for nursing 
homes. institutions. 


Composition: Each tablet contains 12 mg. sennosides A and B 
Average dosage: 2 tablets at bedtime until normal routine is estab- 
lished Then 1 tablet at bedtime. Dosage may be increased to a maximum 
of 5 daily if required 
Contraindications: Appendicitis. intestmal hemorrhage, ulcerative 
colitis. 
Supply: Bottles of 100 and 500 tablets. 
Full product information available upon request. 


@ 
SANDOZ 
DORVAL. QUEBEC 

 


Sandoz Pharmaceuticals DIVISion of Sandoz (Canada) Ltd Dorval Ouebec 


I 
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12 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Dr. Gingras pointed out that once 
a year in China, each general hospital 
sends a medical team to visit the coun- 
tryside to treat patients, consult, and 
teach for a few months to a year. Even 
if it is only for a few weeks, '"why can't 
we do the same in this country'!"" he 
asked. 
Referring to the rising costs of hos- 
pital care in this country. Dr. Gingras 
said he remembers the abysmal salaries 
paid to dedicated hospital workers, in- 
cluding nurses, a few years ago. '"Many 
of the millions and percentage increases 
in hospital costs have simply corrected 
one of the greatest social injustices of 
our time:' 
He said he has no objections to grown 
men being paid $40,000 or S50,000 
per year to playa boy's game on ice or 
on a football tÏeld. "But as long as we 
tolerate. . . that standard, by compari- 
son the nursing supervisor in a cardiac 
intensive care unit is grossly under- 
paid. .. 
So far, the general puhlic has not 
become aware or started to criticize 
hospitals for generally having the most 
junior, inexperienced staff instead of the 
most capable in emergency departments 
on evenings and weekends when the 
most criti
ally ill patients are brought 
in. said Dr. Gingras. 
Nor is the public aware that 25 per- 
cent of patients with spinal cord in- 
juries who are referred by university 
teaching hospitals to rehahilitation cen- 
ters have one or mure large decubi- 
tus ulcers. 
Dr. Gingras asked why it is that 
hospitals. '''where open heart surgery 
and organ transplantations are per- 
formed. cannot prevent... pressure 
sores," which jeopardize the rehabil- 
itation program of so many patients. 
"Do they realize that eaeh decubitus 
ulcer costs the tax payer $1 ('-000 to 
$15,OOO'!"" 
As an authority on rehabilitation, 
Dr. Gingras emphasiLed that the needs 
of the many Canadians who are over 
65 "far exceed those of our young popu- 
lation:' The health profession.he said, 
has to "combat the deplorahle aversion 
to the problems of advanced age:' 
Although "geriatrics has not presented 
the most promising career," he predict- 
ed this has to change soon. 


Help Dying Patient Feel Useful 
U.S. Nurse Tells Conference 
()l1awa - A nurse consultant with the 
American Cancer Society cautioned 
nurses October 13 to avoid acting in 
ways that could make a patient 
ear 
death feel he is no longer useful. 
Instt:ad of referri
g to death by 
euphemisms. if it is mentioned at all. 
(COII/illlled Oil flage 151 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Kee))s 
hil11 drier 


Instead of holding 
moisture, Pampers 
hydrophobic top sheet 
allows it to pass 
through and get 
<<trapped>> in the 
absorbent wadding 
underneath. The inner 
sheet stays drier, and 
baby's bottom stays 
drier than it would in 
cloth diapers. 


, .... 
=--
 --=- 
, 
... -a t 


Sa\res 
)'Oll tinle 
Pampers construction 
helps prevent moisture 
from soaking through 
and soiling linens. As a 
result of this superior 
containment, shirts, 
sheets, blankets and 
hed pads don't have to 
he changed as often 
as they would with 
convc
1tional cloth 
diapers. And when less 
time is spent changing 
linens, those who take 
care of babies have 
more time to spend on 
other tasks. 


. d 


Po 
Þel's 


, 


.... 



 


\ 


'"" 


.. 


\ 
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... 


PROCT.ER II GAMIILE CAR.HZ 



R_ Nama Pins.. .11_ 

uallty, IIIIoIrUSt styling. 
wIth salaty c'a.ps. Naw 
opt,ona' D........ finish wIth 
contrasting utln ....kl'Ound 
and polished .....s tar I 


tf{. 
.Jtr 
MRS. R. F. JOHNSON 
SUPERVISOR 


CHARLENE HAYNES 
 
-\1
' 

--
 

 'OHN, L.f?N. l\ 


NURSES PERSONALlZED 
 . . 05eJù . pe.R 
ANEROID SPHYG. _.-
 

.

 


A superb instrument especially I 
designed for nurses! Imported from pre- 
cision craftsmen in W_ Germany_ Easy- 
to attach Velcro cuff. lightweIght, com- / 
pact, fits into soft sim. leather zipperec 
case 21,7" x 4" x 7". Dial calibra- 
ted to 320 rom., 10 year accuracy 
guaranteed to ::!:3 mm. Serviced by 
Reeves if ever reQuired. Your ini- 
tials engraved on manometer and 
gold stamped on case FREE, for 
tlermanent identification and 
distinction. A wise investment for 
a lifetime of dependable service! 
No. 106 Sphyg. . . . 37.95 ea. 


:' / Duty 

 free 


CAP ACCESSORIES 
____, 
CAP TOTE keeps your caps crisp and clean __ 
while stored or carried. flexible clear plastic, white 
trim, zipper I carrying strap, I1ang loop. Stores flat Also -- 
for wiglets. curlers. etc. 81,7" dia_. 6" higl1. 
No. 333 Tote. . 2.65 ea., 6 or more. . 2.35 ea. 
Your initials gold-stamped, add SOli! per Tote. 

 WHITE CAP CLIPS Holds caps 
. 
 flrmly in place! Hard-Ia.flnd white bobbie p
ns. 
"-. - enamel on fine sprin, steel. Eight 2" and eight 
.. 
 3" clips included in plastic snap box 
No. 529 Clip. . . . 3 boxe.lor 2.25, 
\:' 6 for 65. ea., 12 for 60, ea. 
MOLDED CAP 
 4 
Replace cap band instantly. Tiny plastic tac, - ...
 
 
dainty caduceus. -thoose Black, Blue. White _ 
or Crystal wit" Gold CeduceUSi Dr all Black ,- - -'.. -. 
 
(plain). The neater way to fasten bands. : . -. ---f 


':'
:r
t ::t
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 'pi/s
t5 perset. 
o:-- .' \ 
 
r::'N'I .,., METAL CAP TACS Pair of dainty 

, jewelry-quality Tacs wit" Rnppers. holds cap 
(illRI bands securely. Sculptured metal, gold finish, 
... . approx. 
" wide Choose RN, LPN, LVN, RN 
po ...... V..- Caduceus or Plain Caduceus. Gift boxed. 
ntvF.f1 .t{
 No. CT.1 (Speclly Initial.), No. CT.2 (Plain 

-vLU L"'" Cad.) or No. CT.3 (RN Cad.) . . . 2.95 pro 
SEL-FIX CAP BAND Blackvelvet :-----.. 
band material. Self-adl1esive, presses on, L 1 
 . 
pulls ofl; no sewing. or pinning. Reusable ,... __ 
several times. Eacl1 band 20" long, pre-cut to \ 
popular widths: 1/4" Cl2 per plastic box) 1,7" 

p:c

y b
t


J:r 

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I
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u


 
 
B nd. . . ,er box 3 or more. .1.50 ea. 
CROSS PEN - -.....; 
 '""'''
' ,J(a
"''' ro ' 
World-famous ballpoint, with 
 , . 
scu
tured caduceus emblem. Full name _ 
::
III:




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ouponJ. 
 
No. 3502 Chrome B.OO ea. No. 6602 12kt. G.F. 11.50 ea. 
.. I . 


ORDER ND. 


CDLDR I SIZE QUANT. PRICE 
I 


ITEM 


. 
I 
. 
t 


INITIALS as desired, _ _ _ 
(Good idea. . . for distinctive identification) 


TO ORDER NAME PINS, fill out all inlormatiDn in box top 
right, clip out and attach to this coupon. 


I enclose $ (M.... resIdents add 3% S. T.) 
Sorry, no COCos or billing terms available 


Send to ..... 


Street 


,

 
...;-Btm 


r---------- --------------------------. 
IT'S EASY TO ORDER REEVES NAME PINS FOR YOURSELF OR FRIENDS! 
I Cl100se style you want, sl10wn left. Print name (and 2nd bottom left. Attacl1 extra sl1eet for additional pinS. I 
I line if desired) on dotted lines below Cl1eck otl1er Info in NOTE 
AVINGS ON 2 IDENTICAL PINS . more convenient, I 
I boxes on cl1art, clip this section and attach to coupon spare In case of loss. I 
I LETTERING,______________________ 2nd LlNE,________________1 
I STYLE DESCRIPTION METAL "HAL I'
OCL

UNO LUTEalNC "ICES' I 
I filO. COLOR fiNISH (Pbstiel COLOR Elliraveill1 LI., Elllrøtd 2 lines I 
I ALL METAL... nch, trim and 0 Gold 1 0 Duolone Does I 0 Black 0 I Pin 2.25 0 I Pin 3.00 I 
. . ;
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o





I



mooth 0 Silver IS 

:

hed a


y IS 

I
:ue 0 
s

sn;:e
 0 
:;
esn:;e
 
Does I DWhlte 
 o 

c:1 0 1 Pin .95 0 I Pin 1.55 
not 0 Med. Green . ue 0 2 Pms 1.65 0 2 Pms 2.60 
apply 0 Med. Blue White CYme name) (yme namel 
OCoroa lettpr.. only 
White I 0 Black 0 1 Pin 2.25 0 I Pin 3.00 
only 0 Ok Blue 0 
 P
.. '
;e
 0 2 

s n


 
White I 0 Blacl< U I Pin .95 LJ I Pin 1.55 
only 0 Dk. Blue 0 


 n

e
 0 2 
ins 2
e
 
QUANTITY DISCOUNTS, 10-24 pins. deduct 10%; 
25-99 pins, 15%; 100 or more pins. 20%. 


..lIrtII 
tit 
..161 



. 


PLASTIC LAMINATE . slimmer. 
broader: engraved thru surface to 
)ntrastmg core color. Beveled 
border matches lettenng. 


.. 


METAL FRAMED. . ClassIC 1 0 Gold 
::OSlli!n. snow.whlte clashc with 0 Silver 
MOLDED PLASTIC 5..m..,le,smcut, DO.::5 
onomlcal Will never discolor. not 
Ie ply 


IIIPlease add 25_ per order for 3 pins Dr less. 


MEDI-CARD SET HandIest refer.nce 
-' ,
-,
. - "', ,""",. 
 
med with mformatlon, IncludmK EQuIvalencies of \. , 
Apothecary to Metnc to Household Meas., Temp. ,_... ..... 
oC to of, Prescrop Abbr., UrmalySlS, Body Chem.. \ 1 \ 
Blood Chern., Liver Tests, Bone Marrow, Disease 
Incub Peroods, Adult Wgts 
j I 
AU In wl1lte vinyl holder with Kold stamped l 
 _
 l 
caduceus No. 289 Card Set. . . I_50 ea. 
"'S 
6 Dr more 1.25 ea. 12 Dr more 1.10 ea. 
Your initial. gold..tamped on holder, 
add 50. per set. 
./' KELLY FORCEPS SO handy for 

 every nurse! 51,7" stainless steel, fully 
=+ 
 
 6 guaranlead. Id.al for clampmg off tubIng YOUI 
. own Imtlals help prevent loss. 
. eA R No. 25-12 Forceps. . . 2.75 ... 6 Dr more 2.50 el. 
Your Initials enrraved, add 50tl per forceps. 


. ... 


Your 
Initials 


l:
. 
 ed " 
Free 
Scope 
Sack 

 


, 


þ 


Ii 


- 


1 


Free Initials and Scope Sack 
with V1nß' own 
Littm
IJNJj NurteteOpe I 
Famous Littmann nurses' 
diaphragm stethoscope . . . 
a fine precision instrument, 
with hIgh sensilivity for 
blood pressures, apical pulse 
rate. Only 2 OZS., fits in 
pocket, with gray vinyl anti- 
collapse tubing, non-chilling 
epoxy diaphragm. 28" over- 
all. Non.rotating angled ear 
lubes and chest piece beau- 
tifully styled in choice of'S 
jewel-like colors: Goldt.ne, 
Silvertole, Blue, Green, Pink.' 
FREE INITIALS AND SACK! 
Your initials engraved FREE 
on chest piece; lend individ- 
ual distinction and help pre. 
vent loss. Also FREE SCOPE 
SACK included, worth $1. 
(Free sacks not personal. 
ized; add SOt if inllials de- 
sired.) Nole big savings on 
Quanl,ly orders. 
No. 216 Nursescope.. .13.80 ea. ppd. 
6-11 . . . 12.80 ea. 12 or more. . . 11.80 ea. 
 
Group Discounts 
 free Initials and Sack!
 
oIMPORTANT, New "Medallion" styling includes lublng In 
 
colors 10 malch melal paris. If desHed, add $1. ea IO:J 
plOces above; add "M" 10 Order (No. 216
) on coupon.O 
No. 223 Scope Sack only. . . 1.00 ea. ppd. 
6 or more 75
 ea. Gold stamped initials, add 50
 


.,..
. 1,;., ...... 


1.-.. rl ..:.. _ .... --(- 


Does 
not 
apply 


Polished 
frame 
only 
Doc
 
not 
., 


3V." LISTER MINI.SCISSORS 

 'tmy, handy, shp mto uniform pocket or 
purse Choose Jewelers Gold or gleammg 
Cl1rome plale fmlsh on coupon 
BeL No. 35DD Mini.Scissors . . . 2.75 ea. 
4V." or 5V." LISTER SCISSORS 
As above. but larger for bigger JObs Chrome finish only 
No 450014%") or No 5500 (5'/2"1 Scissors. . . 2.75 
5'12" OPERATING SCISSORS _ . 
 
Stainless steel, with sl1arp/blunt ._ 
 
-'" 
pornts Beautifully polished finish 
 
No. T05 DR Scissors . . . 2.75 ea. - 
All scissors .3bowe: 1 dOl. or more lany style) . . _ 2.00 ea. 
Your Initials engrawed, add 50c per scissors. 


CLAYTON DUAL STETHOSCOPE light. 
weight imported dual scope; highest sensitivity for apical 
pulse rate. Chromed head tubes and cl1est piece with , 
Jl/," bell and F/s" dlapl1ragm, grey anti-collapse .....-.. tri.. 


:



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u

J
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:v:
dfree. @ ty 
No. 413 Dual SteU1. . . . . . . . 17.95 ea. ree 
JEWELRY NURSES CHARMS 'Q, 
Fmest sculptured Fisher cl1arms,
 

} 
Sterlmg or Gold Fillea (specify under COLOR on coupon" 
 .. .. 
For bracelet or pendant cham. Add to your collection! I
 t:'\ f ; 
No. 263 Caduceus; No. 164 Cap; No. 68 J"" 
=
;.; N
.4BKB;
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C

0
..Ë:



GS {
 f\ 
-"
!:;'t'J Damty. detailed 14K Gold caduceus. for on or ()fl duty 
.. "s.u wear. Shown actual size. Gift boxed for fnends. too. 
If No. 13/297 Earrings. . . . . . . . 5.95 per pair. 
PIN GUARD Sculptured caduceus, chained 
 


f:
rC:


eò
io;:
lal

t:

he

rth w


st
rna;
 
 
 
 
safely. Gold finish, gift boxed. Choose RN, lPN 
or LVN No. 3420 Pin Guard. . . . 2.95 ea. 
(,.IDì ENAMELED PINS Beautifully sculptured slatus 

 I insignia, 2-color keyed, hard.fired enamel on gold plate. 
I.'m\ . O,me.sized, pin.back. SpecIfy RN. LPN, PN, LVN, NA. or 
(!F, 
:. ;
5co



. Pin 1.95 ea.. 12 Dr more 1.50 ea. 


. 


Endur3 NURSE'S WATCH Fine Swiss.made 
waterproof timepiece_ Raised easy.to-read wl1lte numerals 
and hands on black dial, luminous markings. Red sweep. 
second l1and. Chrome fmist!. stainless back. Includes 
black velvet strap. Gift boxed, with 1 year guarantee 
Very dependable. Includes 3 initials enaraved FREE! 
No. 1093 Nur.e. Watch. . . . . . . . . . . 19.95 ea. 
. · .. Prevent stains and wear! ïJ 
@. smooth'PliablepurewhiteVinYI'ldeal 
low-cost group gifts Or favors. .,. 
I No. 21D.E (right). two compartments 
wltl1 flap, gold stamped caduceus. . . 
6 for 1.50. 25 or more 2D. ea. 
'- 0 . MI. 191 Deft) Deluxe Saver, 3 compt. 
. '-../ change pocket & key chain . . . 
6 for 2.9B, 25 Dr more 35. el. 

 D Nurses' POCKET PAL KIT 
,::) .. Handiest for busy nurses. Includes white Deluxe 
Pocket Saver, wltl1 5" Bandage Shear (botl1 sl10wn 
opposite page), T ri.Color ball-point pen, plus 
U . \ . handsome IlttI. pan light. . . all silver fInished. 
o Change compartment, key chain. 
, No. 291 Pal Kit . . . . . . . . 4.95 .a. 
3 Initials enaraved on shears, add 50, per kit. 



 


Bzzz MEMO-TIMER TIme hot pa<:ks, heal. dJ " 
lamps, park meters. Remember to check vital siJns 
. , ,. 
give medication, etc. Lightweight, compact n 1,7" dlaJ, 

 
sets to bUll 5 to 60 min. Key ling. Swiss made. 
 
No. M.22 Timer. . . . . . .4.95 ea. ........ 
3 or more 3.95 ea.; 6 or more 3.50 ea. 



 D ) EXAMINING PENLIGHT 

 White barrel with caduceus Impnnt, aluminum 
A.
".}, band and chp. 5"' long, U.S. made, battenes mCluded Cre- 

...... placement batteries available any store). Your ownligt!t, gift boxed. 
No. 001 Penliaht. . 3.98 ea. Your Initials IInaraved, add 50, per IIKht 


"""--". . ___--.ttlme_. 



Whittenton /åðhionJ 
Uni/ornt 
 


, 



 


.REEVA 
Young fresh multi-tuck bib. 2- 
button cuff Gusset 
4 sleeves 
100% Dacron Double-Knit 
STYlE No, 4697 
6-20,4.16 Petite... 22.95 
14V,.261,7. . . 24.95 
75 0 0 08cron/25% Cotton 
STYlE No. 4797 
6-20,4.16 Petite... 16.95 
14';'.261,7 . . . 17.95 


.. 

 .1 


. 


MISS FIVE. 
UniQue smock style with a little 
girl look Generous patch pock- 
ets. inner surgical pocket 
Sl10rt sleeves. 100% Dacron 
Double Knit 
STYLE No. 4632 
314.15/16...21.95 


\ 



 


r- 


... 
.GIBSON GIRL 
Youthful high rise waist, mini 
soft shirred skirt. pleated 
blouse. Inner surgical pocket 
100% Polyester Warp Knit % 
sleeves 
STYLE No. 4624 
314'15/16...1B.95 
60% Dacron, 40% Nylon cord 
Jersey, short sleeves. 
STYLE No. 4824 
3/4.15/16.. .15.95 


( 

 


( 


Famous 
NURSE 
MATES'" 

hoer 


New "Saucy" Bump Toe Moc 
Little fashion notches run around sole and 
l1eel; latest bumper-toe look witl1 
n -- b1i bOld eyelets; sturdy extra light 
, cushion crepe sole and heel; finest 

 long.wearing wtlite glove leall1er 
"'\... .. '- . _ the ideal sl10e to feel pretty 
... . '- in uniform. Fit guaranteed 
.' Dr return (unmarred) 
SIZES: '- 
 forsizeexcl1anRe. 
UorA;a.11 
B, C, D or f; 5-11 . No. 854 Saucy Shoe 
1S,Ic"""'_
1 -.....,... ..,.... ...16.9Spr. 


New "KorkPLit
 Featherweight Style 








 II






: cõm

h

: I

:. / 
up l1eel oxford. Thick sim. cork sole "'"'-I;... "C.. 
with II/s" cork heel (very slip resistant, 
. _ ;J 
 
outwears crepe). White washable 'V).' '? 
soft glove upper leather, tncot 

 / " . 
Imed, arch vents. Fit guaran- ._ 
teed Dr return (unmarred) "= 
for Silt exchange. I 
I SIUS: 
No. 638 Kork-Lite Shoe 
 ....0' .. loll 
. 16.95pr. rs,.u,.IN.......1 .
':r.::f5:;: 


All-Weather NURSES' CAPE 


é@Æ ..; 


'ì:'
' 1. 
'\ " 


Stay snug in cool weather, dr
 in the ram 
Traditional Navy with Bnght Red hnrng 
Fmest tallonng of 65% Dacron polyester, 
35% combad colton. Zepel treated 100% 
Nylon Duralyn hnrng. Snap fasteners. arm 
openings. Matching head scarf SMAll (up to 
34 bust). MEDIUM (35.38) Or LARGE (39-42) 
. specify size on coupon. 
No. 658 Cape . . . . . . . 14.95 ea. 
3 GOld Initials on collar, add 1.00 per cape. 

 NU 
_ 
 : '... A lifetime of service 
for visiting nurses! Fmest black 
" thick 
genuine cowhide, beautifully crafted with 
ruued sfltched and rivet construction. 
Water repeUant Roomy Intenor. with snap. 
In washable tlner end compartments to 

 organize contents. Snap strap holds top 

 open durini use. Name card holder on end. 
Two ru..ed carrYing straps. 6'f . 8" . 12". 
\ :

:t


:

s 
:I
e eo

:

 :

t

 top. An 
No. 1544-1 Bag (wIth liner). . 37.95 ea. 
Extra liner No. 4415. . . . . . _ .6.95 ea. 


\ . 


news 


(COllltI/lH'cll;'OIl/ I'llge J:!) 
nurses should "prolong the vitality of 
life and show by example that members 
of the patient's family should act like- 
wise:' Virginia Barckley told 125 par- 
ticipants in a health team conference 
at the University of Ottawa. The con- 
ference was sponsored hy the universi- 
ty's school of nursing and the Canadian 
Cancer Society. 
Patients have "a curious way of meet- 
ing our expeetations:' she said. "I l' we 
expect them to be depressed or un- 
stable, they will be. and if we expect 
them to cope, we will be amazed at 
their depth and resources:' 
Ms. Barcklcy told her audience that 
one of the bonuses of nur
ing i
 
eeing 
"the heigh\!-. of nobility that our fellow 
human beings. under the greatest ima- 
ginable stress. can and do reach." 
In the cancer situatio;l. there are 
many way!'. to help patients. for exam- 
ple. she said, "We can help them main- 
tain their personalities. Too often we 
speak impersonally of 'the dying: Too 
often we treat them by rote. deper!'.on- 
alizing them. . . ... 
She suggested that nurses "can en- 
courage t
lmilies to turn to patienb for 
advice. Unable to serve those the) love. 
the patient
 then have a scnse of still 
being needed and wanted. Through 
prescrving the role for the patient that 
was alwa)s important to him. we make 
it possible for him to die with dignity:' 
In M!'.. Barckley's opinion. what 
nurses say to patients i
 never as im- 
portant as what the) let patient!'. tell 
them. She also places more importance 
on the feeling with which communica- 
tion i
 made than on the words. 
In her conelusion. the speaker point- 
ed out that one of the chief ta
ks in 
nursing "is to help patients, threatened 
by physical suffering .lIld inner tur- 
moil, to maintain their individuality." 
She said nurses 
hould rem em her that 
many patients meet death \\ith a digni- 
ty that enriches the lives ot everyone 
around them. 


Hospital Launches Campaign 
To Help Victims Of Child Abuse 
/"orOI/IO, (JI/I. - A new campaign to 
save victim!'. of child ahu!'.e and help 
their familie
 has heenlaunehed h\ The 
Ho!'.pital 11)1' Sick Children. in co
lper- 
ation with the Catholic and Metropol- 
itan Children'!'. Aid Societies. 
Any nurse or doctor who <;ee!'. a case 
of suspectcU ahuse is to report to a 


special child-abuse team immediately. 
This team consists of Dr. Robert Bates. 
a pediatrician; Ruth Koch-Schulte, a 
coordinator; and Dawn Blackler, a 
social worker who was recently ap- 
pointed by the hospital. 
Team members will give patients a 
thorough physical examination, includ- 
ing x-rays, to detect any injuries (new 
and old) and will meet informalIy with 
the families involved. Instead of making 
accusations, they wilI show concern and 
offer the family help. 
The hospital believes that parents 
who bring a child for treatment are 
asking for help. and intervention at 
this point might prevent further abuse. 
Close affiliation with Children's Aid 
will facil it ate the referral of famil ies 
to many of its services, which include 
day-care centers and visiting home- 
makers. 
In 1972, the hospital treated 100 
abused children, five of whom died; 
the Children's Aid Society investigated 
15.000 possible cases of neglect or 
abuse. 
Dougléls Snedden, executive director 
of The Hospital for Sick Children, 
explains it is no longer sufficient to 
report child abuse. He says the hospital 
must become involved with the families, 
advise them, refer them to agencies in 
the community, and do everything in 
ih power to "break this vicious cycle," 


U.S. Nurses Will Show Muscle 
When ANA Forms Political Arm 
1\.1Imas Cil\', Missouri - The Ameri- 
can Nur!'.es: Association i
 estahlishing 
a nonpartisan. political arm that will 
enable nur!'.es to exercise more pol itical 
intluence nationalIy. 
fhe purpose of thi!'. new unit i!'. to 
educate nurse
 and other per
ons on 
pol itical is!'.ues. help nurses and others 
organi7e tÌ1r effective political action 
and for carrying out civic responsibili- 
tic!'.. and rai!'.e fund!'. tl)r political can- 


Have an idea you'd like to 
share with your colleagues? 
The Canadian Nurse will pay 
up to $15 for each idea ac- 
cepted for its "ideaexchange" 
page. 
Put your ideas on paper now! 
Forfurther information write: 
Editor, The Canadian Nurse, 
50 The Driveway, 
Ottawa, K2P 1 E2. 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 15 
. 



o 


MONT SUTTON commands the highest peak 
within a radius of 100 miles of Montreal. 
20 miles of trails and slopes, 6 modern 0 
lifts, ski school, ski shop and full range 
\ of facilities, great snow and superior 
grooming! 
Mid-Week Special 
SUTTON 5 


Lift tickets and Ski Lessons. . . . . $43.00 
a) 5 consecutive days (Monday to Friday) 
, with 4 hours of ski lessons per day. 
b) 5 days to be enjoyed at will over a 
period of your choice, with 2 hours of ski 
lessons per day. 
Lift tlckels only . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 
a) 5 consecutive days (Monday to Friday). 
b) 5 days of skiing to be enjoyed at will 
, over a period of your choice. 
Also. . . a special BONUS. 
Buy your regular mid-week day ticket any- 
time after 12:00 noon and you automa- 
tically receive another full-day mid-week 
ticket. . . FREE, usable anytime, except on 
holidays and week-ends. 
We invite you to ski with us this season, 
MONT SUTTON INC. Sutton, Québec 
Tel.: (snow reports). . (514) 866-7639 
(514) 866-7718 
Accommodation .... . (514) 538-2646 
Office, . . . . . . . . (514) 866-5156 
(514) 538-2545 


16 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


news 


didates who have supported issues im- 
portant to nurses. fhese arc areas not 
open to ANA. 
The unit will not lobby or take its 
own po
ition on issue
. but will be 
guided in its actions by .'\NA policies. 
Although ANA will provide some of the 
financial 
upport. eontri but ions arc 
also expected from interested individ- 
uals. The organiL<ltional details have 
not been announced yet. but some 
ANA board members arc expected to 
be on the unit's board of director
. 
For some time. legally 
parate. 
political action arm
 have been working 
with state nurse
' as
oeiation
 in Cali- 
fornia. Colorado. and \Va"hington. 


St. John Ambulance Offers 
Bursaries For Master's Study 
Ottawa - St. John Ambulance offers 
one or more bur
aries of $1.000 from 
the Margaret MacLaren Memorial 
Fund. awarded annually. to experienced 
registered nurse
 fÓr study at the mas- 
ter's level. This fund also serves student 
nurses; preference is given to those with 
St. John Ambulance affiliation. 
Applications must reach national 
headquarters not later than May 1st. 
addressed to the Chairman of Bursary 
Funds, 321 Chapel Street. Ottawa, 
Ontario. KIN 7 L2. 


New Nurse Practitioner Program 
Begins At U. Of Saskatchewan 
Regil/a, SaSh. - A ne\\ nurse practi- 
tioner program begin
 March \. 1974 
at the University of Sa
katchewan'" 
college of nur
ing in Sa
katoon. The 
program will prepare experienced 
nur
es to give primary medical care 
in rural communities that arc without 
re
ident doctors. 
To begin. only four nur
es will be 
admitted to the program. which eon- 

ists of a six-month training course and 
two years of service in one of four com- 
munities. fhe training program i
 
de
igned to prepare the nurses to as- 
sume an extended and independent 
role as member
 of the health care 
team. 
When the nur
e practitioners com- 
plete the two-year employment period. 
the program will be evaluated and a 
decision made about whether to expand 
it. The Sa
katehewan government is 
financing the training course and the 
employment program. A committee 


respon
iblc for the program eonsish of 
repre
entative" from the Saskatche\\ ,Ill 
Regi
tered Nurses' Association. Sas- 
katche\\an Medical A
"ociation. col- 
leges l)f nursing and medicine at the 
Saskatoon campus. and provincial 
department of public health. 
The four rural communities chosen 
as demonstration areas - Marylïeld. 
Leroy. Fox Valley. and \kadow Lake 
- arc repre
entative of comll1unitie
 
that have difficulty obtaining primary 
medical care. Community health and 
social centers arc operated by the Mary- 
field and Lerov eommunitie
. 
All four núrse practitioners will be 
employed by local boards in the com- 
munities and will \\ork elo
ely with 
doctor
 in nearby centers. The nurse 
who serves the Mcadow Lake area will 
also 
erve fÒur other areas on a visiting 
basis. fhcse nur
e
 will be the health 
workcr
 of lïr
t contact. pro" iding 
initial a
ses
ment and screening pa- 
tients. giving immediate treatment li.Jr 
minor condition
 and emergcncy treat- 
ment when necessary. and referring pa- 
tient
 to doctors lix further treatment. 
fhe colleges of nursing and medicine 
at the U niversit\ of Saskatehe\\ an arc 
cooperating to gi"e the training PIO- 
gram. Four major courses m<lke up the 
curriculum; they include theory and 
practice. as \\ell a
 a period of supervis- 
ed experience \\ ith a phy
ician. The 
cour
es relate to diagnosi
. management 
and treatment of disea
e. counseling 
and teaching health maintenance. and 
ethics. roles
and rclationship
. 
N urscs interested in receiving further 
information or in applying to the pro- 
gram 
hould write to 1V1s. i\1.E. Craw- 
ford. Associate Professor of Nursing, 
College of Nursing. University of 
Saskatchewan. Sa
katoon S7N 0\\ O. 
Pn:fcrenee in 
electing candidates will 
be given to nurse
 \\ ith experience in 
a rural setting and in publ ic health. \d 


Going 
on 
Vacation 
? 


YOU'LL ENJOY IT 
MORE IF YOU + 
GIVE BLOOD 
BEFORE YOU GO. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



ê 


"" 
.... 


j
 


o 


o 
o 0 00 0 0 


o 


I 


Your patients will 
appreciate knowing about new 


a therapeutic bath oil for dry skin care that: 
· Gives relief from itching 
· Supplements natural skin oils 
· Helps to retain moisture 
· Is economical 


C!:>>e.....i
 
Division of William H. Rorer, (Canada) Ltd., Bramalea, Ontario 


FEBRUARY 1974 


ruE CANADIAN NURSE 17 
. 



The Davol story on suction catheters 
begins at the end. 


At the end of our catheters, you'll 
find an exclusive anti-traumatic tip 
that's extra gentle to sensitive 
mucosa. 
It's a big difference, and one that's 
made us the number one supplier of 
plastic and rubber catheters. 
But it's not the only difference. 
Our latex catheters are easy to 
insert. And they're the softest 
catheters made. 
Our plastic catheters have a 
special slip finish that slides easily 
through endotracheal tubes. 
All have raised control vents to 
BUILDING ON A CENTURY OF QUALITY 
HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 


keep exudate from contaminating 
fingers. 
And all are packaged individually 
in see-through, peel-back packs, and 
are also available in cath/ glove kits 
and tracheal suction trays, and as 
our innovative Cath 'N Sleeve. 
No doubt about it. Davol makes a 
lot of difference. And that's where 
our story really begins. 
Davol Canada Ltd., 1033 Range 
View Rd., Port Credit, Ont., 
L5E-1H2 (416)274-5252 


DO 1874-1974 



- 


Can you see an analogy between the 
suburban housewife, who has been 
saving for an original oil painting to 
hang above her tireplace. and the nurse. 
who studies and works diligently until 
graduation day when she receives her 
diploma or degree'? 
The housewife finds the painting 
she wants at a price she can afford. 
she completes the transaction. and 
hangs her treasure to be admired t'ör- 
ever more. The nurse proffers the 
parchment evidence of her accomplish- 
ments to her initial employer and then 
places it among her possessions to be 
admired forever more. 
Ten years later. the suburban house- 
wife is still satisfied with her initial 
purchase and has no desire to acquire 
another. and 10 years later the nurse is 
still satisfied with her initial acquisi- 
tion and feels no need to add to her 
educational accomplishments. 
The analogy is not flattering to 
professional nurses but it - is none- 
thelcs.'i deserved. Although less preva- 
lent than formerly. the belief still exists 
<lmong many of my practicing col- 
leagues that education has already 
been accomplished and that there 
remains the job to be done - the 
patients to be cared for, the time sheets 
to be arranged. the union regulation
 
to be considered when assigning duties 
for today and planning for tomorrow. 
For many of us, this routine remains 
FEBRUARY 1974 


- 


OPINION 


A diploma is not 
an oil painting! 


The author compares the nurse who believes her education is complete 
and the job is now to be done, to a housewife who finds the oil painting 
of her choice and hangs it on the wall, desiring no change. Nurses who want 
job satisfaction will demand opportunities for learning as an integral part 
of the work day. 


Moira MacDougall, B.N. 


unchanged, broken only occasionally 
when one or two of the more senior 
nurses is offered the opportunity to 
attend a conference or workshop. Of 
course. stipulations will be made that 
those who attend must later report to 
their colleagues remaining on the ward. 
but pressures. tensions. and the general 
amount of work all too often make 
reporting impossible. 
Why docs this lackadaisical attitude 
toward continuing education exist on 
a continent where nurses call thcm!-.elves 
professionab"! In part. it exist... becau!-.e 
of the well-internalized image of the 
nurse as a doer of tasks. as a giver of 
time. attention. and technical skills. In 
part. because of the nurse's acceptance 
of the handmaiden role. which makes 
it easier to act under the physician's 


Ms. \ldcDougali. a graduate of SI. 
:\Iartha'
 Ho
pitaJ 
chool of nur
ing. 
Antigoni
h. Nova Scotid. and the po
t- 
grdduate clinical cour
e in ps\chiatric 
nursing at the Allan I\lcmnridJ Institute. 
I\lontreal. received a A.I'<. trom I\kGill 
University. She says, 'The article i
 the 
re
ult of three }edr
' experience in in
er 
vice education and of nUmerou\ di
euv 
sion
 with colleague
 - nur
ing st,llf dnd 
nur
ing admini
tr,ttor'. :\h \lacDougali 
ha
 recentl} ,Iccepted ,I po,ition with the 
department of natiûndl health dnd welfare 
to work in public health in Inuvi". NWT. 


direction and to learn from him than 
to exercise control over her own pro- 
fessional life and identify her own 
needs for continuing education. And. 
also. partly because many nurses see 
nursing as a respectable, middle-class 
profession to be practiced full time 
until wedding bells beckon. and there- 
after between babies or to supplement 
the husband's income. 
When you add these reasons to the 
fact that there are still directors of nurs- 
ing who, because of existing staffing 
shortages, prefer to place additional 
staff in direct service areas rather than 
in the more nebulous area of continuing 
education. you understand why estab- 
lished inservice programs exist only in 
some hospitals. 
Are inservice or continuing educa- 
tion programs nebulous entities to be 
considered secondary to staftìng? Defi- 
nitely they are, when nursing produc- 
tivity is measured by number of nurs- 
ing hours per patient per day. And 
these programs will continue to be 
nebulous as long a
 
tatistics do not 
differentiate between number of nur
- 
ing hours and number of intelligently 
spent nursing hours. Educational pro- 
gram
 arc luxury item
 to be encour- 
aged only when time allows some en- 
richment of our job satisfaction. 
If you doubt this, try to tell bu
y. 
run-off-their-feet nurses that their lives 
will be enhanced by the hour they take- 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 19 



to attend a lecture or participate in a 

'orkshop. The hour away from their 
duties probably means an hour overtime 
to finish the reports and charting they 
won't have time to do if they attend 
the program, designed to help them 
function more adequately and to enrich 
their working lives. 
In our North American, work-orient- 
ed culture, enrichment is what you do 
with your free time; it IS definitely not 
what you do in working hours. But, why 
not? Many of us spend almost one-third 
of our I ives. between the ages of 20 and 
60, working. Wouldn't patients benefit 
if nurse
 were more proticient in their 
work and enjoyed it no less'! If we 
believe that we ourselves and our pa- 
tients would benefit from inservice 
programs, there are several things we 
can do to make these programs a gen- 
eral reality. Responsibility for initiat- 
ing these programs lies in two areas. 
the director of nursing and her asso- 
ciates, and the inservice educator. 


Responsibilities of the director 
First and foremost among the re- 
!-oponsibil ities of the director of nurses 
and her associates is active involve- 
ment with the inservice educator in 
setting up the programs. The resultant 
programs will better reflect the priori- 
ties and interests of both teaching and 
administration. An inservice program 
designed wholly by administration, or 
wholly by teaching, will bc incomplete 
and biased toward one set of priorities 
or the other. The most direct ways in 
which the director can show her support 
arc by advertising the existence of such 
program!-' to potential employees and 
hy reminding newly hired employees 
that attendance will be encouraged and 
supported. She can also give evidence 
of support by attending herseU'. If shc is 
too busy to participate, can junior staff 
members be criticiLed for not attending 
for the same reason'! 
The policy of the director, which is 
conducive to the sueccssful function- 
ing of an inservice program, could be 
derived from the following values. 
. Recognition that stimulation of 
curiosity is a human need as basic as 
arc the needs for food and shelter. Few 
persons are able to work productively 
20 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


for years in a situation where no pro- 
vision h..s been made for meeting the 
need for stimulation, without symp- 
toms that accrue from prolonged bore- 
dom. Some of these symptoms are: 
an entrenched helief in the validity of 
nonchange, an inability (more potent 
than a refusal) to consider anything 
new, a higher rate of absenteeism and 
illness. and irritability and anxiety 
when the prospect of change threatens 
establ ished ritual. 
. Belief in the ability of all to learn 
and to grow, to reexamine, and to 
change. It does nothing but disservice 
to the person involved to assume that 
behavior is too well entrenched to allow 
for new learnings. ' 
. Realization that inservice educa- 
tion programs cannot be successful 
unless Iu policy of reimbursement fÓr 
individual effort is adopted. This 
compensation can be made by providing 
participating members of a program 
with replacement for time away from 
the wards. Staff cannot always be 
expected to work overtime to "pay 
back" educational opportunities provid- 
ed for thcm. This replacement can be 
provided by having head nurse ..nd 
supervisory personnel take their turn 
replacing junior staff on the wards ..t 
conference or workshop time. Another 
relatively painless method of compen- 
sation is for staff who participate to 
be permitted to leave work early when 
the situation allows. These compensa- 
tory measures are important because df 
their implicit message to staff: We are 
encouraging and supporting your efforts 
to learn, to grow, to change. 


Responsibilities of the educator 
In these days, when we have a num- 
ber of varied programs for the basic 
education of nurscs and an ongoing 
evaluation of formerly used methods, 
a considerable amount of anxiety is 
elicited from all membcrs of this 
profession. Anxiety in the graducites 
from the newer programs takes thc 
form of wondering if they will be ..c- 
cepted by graduates of the more tra- 
ditional ..nd work-oriented schools. 
Graduates of the latter schools wondh 
if their knowledge will be sufficient to 
cope with these younger and often 


more inquiring minds. 
The educator must acknowledge and 
understand these feelings of suspicion 
and seek ways to lesscn them by bring- 
ing groups together. She can best do 
this by stressing the fact that wisdom 
is derived from both tÒrmal study and 
life experience, and that neither is 
complete without thc other. By func- 
tioning as a catalyst who is skilled in 
identifying problems and at eliciting 
solutions from this combined group, 
she will avoid the pitfall of treating 
grad uates I ike basic students. 
She must realize that, although staff 
members who have not recently had 
opportunity to look at their own 
preparation and experience to find the 
solution of a problem will be reluctant 
to come forward and volunteer their 
knowledge, the reason is not because 
they lack the ability. There are nurses 
who have not taken time at work to sit 
and reexamine their beliefs and ideas 
since student days. These people will 
initially expect the educator to do all 
the work while they sit, pcrhaps reluc- 
tantly, and listen. But. if the educator 
is skillful enough to eI icit their partici- 
pation initially, the satisfaction they 
derive from finding a solution to their 
problems will encourage further and 
more extensive participation. 
An educator who is able to deal 
with thcse initial reluctanccs is well 
on the way to meeting her first respon- 
sibility - setting up an environment 
that is conducive to further and joint 
learning. Her other responsibilities 
arc. 
. Prohlem soh'il/g. Individuals are 
most willing to learn what they need to 
know at a particular time. An inservice 
educator must realize she has an ohliga- 
tion to identify the areas that pose 
problems to her staff and to zero in on 
these to search for a solution. She can 
do this by her presencc. She will never 
be ablc to identify areas of contlict if shc 
remains closeted behind a desk in her 
office. 
Her availability to staff on the wards 
will sharpen her perceptions ahout 
what is actually happening and will 
make her a figure to be included and 
consulted. She can also elicit sugges- 
tions from the staff on the content 
FEBRUARY 1974 



r 


A DIPLOMA IS NOT 


they desire; then. she can choose the 
problem that is relevant at a particular 
time and arrange a session to discuss 
the problem and to attempt to elicit the 
most acceptable solution. 
Problems solved in this way. with 
the identification of the problem. the 
discussion. and the solution coming 
from a group of the nurses involved, 
with the added resources of the inscrvice 
educator. will provide more learning 
than a situation in which the educator 
gathers pcople together to say "this is 
your problem. and this is my solution." 
. 1
/lII/Ilil/g fàr procedures. All of us 
experience some anxiety at the pros- 
pect of breaking with established policy 
and emb.lrking on a new course. How- 
ever. the earlier people are consulted 
and the more time available for accept- 
ing .lI1d working out these feel ings. the 
greater is the chance of success lor the 
new program. The inservice educator 
must. therefore, be prepared to inform 
staff of changes in procedure or the 
IIltroduction of a new operating policy. 
To do this successfully, she mu<;t her- 
FEBRUARY 1974 


A N 0 I L P A I N T r N G! 


self be a part of the institution's deci- 
sion-making structure. It is also her 
responsibility to keep senior adminis- 
trative personnel aware that early 
involvement of nonmanagement nurs- 
ing staff could elicit comments from 
this group about the effect of the 
proposed change. 
. Reil/forcell/cnt of old II/literial. 
Knowledge and techniques previously 
learned and not used frequently arc 
likcl) to be ignored or forgotten. There 
are several areas of learning in this 
category that must not be fÖrgotten. 
and the educator must be prepared to 
reinforce these. Here is an example: 
nurses in a psychiatric hospital become 
less adept at dealing with physical 
emergencies th.m do their colleagues 
in a general hospital. A general review 
for all nurses in this category. conduct- 
ed at rcgular intervals. must be part 
of an inservice education program. 
. GCl/cral still/ulatiol/. rhis last area 
is fourth in order but not in importance. 
We would be dull indi\ iduals indeed 
if we learned only what is immediately 


relevant. Material that has no direct 
daily use still has an application for 
nurses. as it has for all intelligent 
beings. It is often this category of 
knowledge that makes us interesting. 
infÒrmed. and interested human beings 
who approach others with an active 
curiosity and genuine desire to know 
and understand. And, is it not this 
nurse we would choose to work beside 
or to work with us if we were ill'! An 
example of this area of education 
would be an examinatiun of the cultural 
background of patients whose culture 
is different from ours. 


Conclusion 
I believe that within a fe\', years 
inservice education tÙr nurses will no 
longer be considered a luxury fÒr the 
well-staffed. generously supported hos- 
pital. I further anticipate that the tra- 
ditional resistance to learning as a life- 
long occupation will lessen. Why am I 
so optim istie'! Because hospitals are 
hiring staff from a variety of academic 
and experiential backgrounds. The 
days when a particular hospital is 
largely staffed by its own graduates 
are limited. Putting together peuple 
from various schools leads to sharing 
and sharing leads to mutual problem 
solving. 
In addition. nurses arc becoming 
more realistic business people \',ho 
know that annual increments and the 
ProSPL'Ct of job security. bal ring some 
accident. arc not enough. 111l:y <II e no\', 
beginning to demand less tangible 
benefits. like job satisfaction. rhis ...al- 
isfaetion comes m.tinly frnm challenge 
and from creative involvement \', ith 
their work. In an effort to achiew thi... 
challenge and involvement, nurses .Ire 
demanding continuousl) plOvided op- 
portunities to learn. to quest ion. and 
not to be relegated to a niche defined 
on I} by their initial qualifications and 
years of service. For these nurses. .111 
inserviee program, ba...ed on coopera- 
tion between education and adminis- 
tration and IÙunded on the pI inciples 
outlined. will become as integral a 
part of their working day as the 
collee 
break ; 


mE CANADIAN NURSE 21 



Ethics of nursing practice 


The CNA special committee on nursing research asked nurses to describe 
ethical problems they had encountered in their nursing practice. A member 
of the nursing research committee analyzes the problems reported by 
Canadian nurses. 


Moyra Allen, R.N., Ph.D. 


One of the first activItIes undertaken 
by the Canadian Nurses' Association 
special committee on nursing research 
was to prepare a statement on the 
ethics of nursing research. Early in 
this endeavor, the committee members 
bccdme increasingly aware of the 

hanging nature of nursing practice 
and of the potential ethical and moral 
problems confronting practitioners. 
The committee decided to carry out 
a preliminary inquiry into the ethical 
problems nurses are facing and, with 
this as a basis. to plan a more formal 
study of the ethical problems in 
modern nursing practice. 
Statements appeared in The Cana- 
dian Nurse requesting nurses who had 
faced a particular ethical problem to 
describe the situation in detail and to 
forward the description to the Cana- 
dian Nurses' Association. This method 
was employed to obtain some basic 
information in as simple a fashion as 
possible. Although the request appear- 
ed in several issues of the journal, only 


Moyra Allen i
 professor of nursing. in 
chdrge of the re
earch unit in nursing and 
health. School of Nur
ing. I\h:(jill l'ni- 
ver
ity. She i
 a graduate of the Montreal 
General Ho!-'pital ...chool of nursing. Dr. 
Allen received a B.N.. I\IcGill Univcr...ity: 
M.A.. University of Ch,c.lgO: and Ph.D., 
Stanford University. 


22 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


22 responses were received from the 
more than 100,000 nurses across 
Canada. Certainly 22 cannot be con- 
sidered a representative sample of the 
nurses of Canada or of the ethical 
problems they experience. 
However, owing to the nature of 
the problems and the detailed descrip- 
tions that some responders included, 
the committee believes it is reasonable 
to provide the nursing public with some 
notion of the problems indicated in 
these few responses. The committee 
hopes that when nurses read this article, 
they will be concerned and feel obliged 
to describe any ethical problems they 
dre experiencing and to forward their 
descriptions to the Canadian Nurses' 
Association. 
If these problems have any relevance 
for you or if they bring to mind other 
types of problems you face, the CNA 
would be pleased to receive informa- 
tion about them. (All material will be 
treated confidentially.) Ultimately, an 
analysis of these materials will be 
carried out and be made available to 
assist al/ nurses in their practice. 


Three kinds of problem 
The 3 types of problem discovered 
in the 22 responses receIved from 
nurses across Canada are presented 
here. 
o To whom lI/ll I responsible? This will 
determine 
1.-'hat should be done and, 
FEBRUARY 1974 



therefÒre, lilY course ofllction. 
Ethical problems are seen as situa- 
tions in which the nurse perceives a 
difficulty in determining where her 
responsibility lies, that is, to whom she 
is responsible. She feels a conflict with- 
in hersel f because she is being pulled or 
pU'ihed into action on two sides and 
from opposing torces. Somewhere in 
this conflict the nurse fecls she ought to 
do something, but she is being pressed 
toward different courses of action. If 
she could determine to whom she is 
responsible. her problem would be 
solved. 
Most of the responses were of this 
nature. Some examples follow. Am I 
responsible to the hospital and ward 
doctor with reference to the patient or 
to the patient"s own doctor \\ho is an 
outsider not on the staff of the ho!'>pi- 
tal'! The outside doctor is concerned for 
his patient"s welfare and requires 
inti.,rmation on the plan of treatment 
and the patient's progress. 
What i!'> my responsibility to a co- 
wor"er. a nurse who is ta"ing drug!'>'! I 
wish to protcct her and prevent anyone 
from "no'Wing but I have a responsibility 
to the institution. too. 
As a scho(,1 nurse, what is my res- 
ponsibilit) to a teenager who is ti.mnd 
to be ta"ing drugs or is in nl'cd of an 
abortion'! 
Am I responsible to bapti/e a sic"ly 
newborn, ,I!'> indicated b) hospital 
policy. or not to bapti/e him. o'Wing to 
the critical nature of his condition'! 
Am I to call the clergy for a d}ing 
paticnt. according to hospital policy. 
or to assess the need., of the patient 
and to follo'W them'! 
What is my respon!'>ibil ity to the 
paticnt who is having an abortion 
(consent signed by the dl'ctor) and to 
the husband who should legall) "now 
and agree to the abortion. although the 
hlhband i!'> not the father of the child'! 
\Vhat is my responsibility to the idea 
of one doctor-one patient ver!'>us the 
real situation: three doctors caring tÓr 
one patient. preoperativel}. during the 
oper,nion. and postoperativel) '! 
FEBRUARY 1974 


01 ÁnoH' what should he done, hut 
what course (
r lIction should ItaÁe? 
A small number of responses con- 
cerned themselves with a problLill with- 
in the selL the individual "new she 
should act in a certain way and she 
either did act in that way or did not. or, 
in some cases. she withdrew from the 
situation. In no case was there conflict 
within the person as to what should be 
done. N ur<,es described thc following 
situations as raising ethical problems. 
A sterilization procedure is frequent- 
ly carried out fÓr women who are said 
to be intolerant of the pill. However. 
the nurse discovered that they were not 
intolerar
t of the pill; th is reason was 
given so that the procedure could be 
charged to hospital insurance. 
Reporting of medication errors is 
not possible because many of the errors 
are made by blac" nurses. Blac" nurses 
cannot be reported because the nurse 
reporting 'Will be said to be discriminat- 
ing ,md will be called up by the Human 
Rights Commission. 
Nurses are a'i"ed to add the drug to 
IVs to initiate an abortion. ( fhe nurse 
decided she would nurse these patients 
but she would not initiate the abortion.) 
Nurses are as"ed to teach birth con- 
trol. 
Of all the respon!'>es thdt were for- 
warded. onl} three nurses experienced 
eth ical problems related to the negation 
of the human person or to inhumanity 
in dealing with patil'nts. These ex,lmplcs 
centered around the harassment of the 
agcd and chronically ill in an institu- 
tion. the battering of bahies in an infant 
ward. and the destruction of the fetus 
in !'>urgical abortions. 
DIn gcncral, the quality (
r ('tIrc i.\ 
l/Il.\at i.
/àctory. Whllt ('tin I do? 
Other problems related to difficult 
situations in which d \\hole group ot 
pcople and. in 'iome instances. the 
institut ion a!'> a whole was described b) 
the nur!'>e as sanctioning and condoning 
factors that produce exceedingly poor 
care for patients; for example, dirt. 
filth. coc"roaches. inadcquate linen 

uppl). poor food. numerous medication 


errors. inadequate care on all sides. 
and so on. The individual nurse in this 
situation was not apparently experienc- 
ing an ethical problem within herself. 
Her problem lay in how to deal with 
the situation and what she could do to 
change it. In fact, many of these situa- 
tions dealt with the problem of perceiv- 
ed unethical behavior in other people. 
In analyzing these examples. it would 
appear. in many instances. that the 
problem of responding to the individual 
patient and of meeting his needs was 
perceived to be in contlict with direc- 
tives arising from other sources- 
medicine. hospital policy, the law. or 
religion. Other ethical considerations 
dealt with how to cope or how to re- 
spond in highly complex. multiproblem 
situations. 
No problem 'Was cited that dealt 'W ith 
the eth ic of the individual versus the 
ethic of the group. with the problem of 
life .lnd death. such as maintaining lite 
lor long periods in nonresponding 
individuals. euthanasia. or with the 
ethical considerations experienced in 
nursing patients with organ transplants. 
In real it). it wlHlld appear that 
nurses seldom experience ethical prob- 
lems. In the first instance. the nurse. 
if she "new how to determine to \\ horn 
she 'Wa.'i responsible, 'Would then "nO\\ 
\\ hose direct ive shoul d be fÓllowed. In 
the second instance. the nurse believes 
that !'>he "no'Ws what the ethical 
behavior !'>hould be; the problem lies in 
hO\\ to get other people to behave in 
this ethical fashion. 
' 


I he ,Iulhor an,.I}LeU the material recei\úl 
from re
ponucnt" ,II1U a"umc,. f,'r thi, 
rea,on. full re"p,'n,ihilit
 tor thc content 
of thi" allicle. 


THE CANA IAN NURSE 23 



When you visit a sick friend__ ___ 


-- 


è 
I
I 
li 


Vanvouver cartoomst J. F.Dunnet 
illustrates some suggestions from the 
Catholic Hospital Association's pamphlet 
Visiting Patients: Some Hints on 
What to Do and Say- 


"00 Remember That Even Minor Surgery 
Is Of Major Concern To The Fellow Who 
Has It.... " 


24 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Clinical Laboratory Procedures 


This is a 1973 revision of the summary first published in 1949 and subse- 
quently brought up-to-date in 1956, 1960, and 1969. 


E.M. Watson, M.D., F.R.C.P.(C) 


Rl'I'i
ed hy A.H. \elddd, M.D., Ph.D.. F.C/I 


In laborator) mcdicinc, approachcs and 
tcchniqucs arc changing morc rapidl) 
than in am othcr branch of mcdicinc. 
At prcscnt: automation and thc increas- 
ing usc ,)f various t) pcs of data proccs- 
sing unfortunateh tcnd to automate thc 
patient ao; \\cll.- In addition. highl) 
spccial iled units and scrvices. \\ hich 
are coming into bcing at an incrcasing 
tcmpo. are also hcavil) dcpcndcnt on 
laboratory data. Thcsc includc intcn- 
sive care: cardiac un its. hem od iah sis. 
opcn hcart surgcr). organ transpldnts. 
and so on. 
It is. therctÙrc, pertincnt that thc 
medical team. especialh the nup,ö. 
have a better undcrstandi ng of the sig- 
niticancc of o;pccilïc labor.uory data 'io 
thc \\clfare of thc paticnt. rhcrcforc, 
thc 1()lIm\ ing condcnsed information i" 
prcscnted. 
 
A numher of changes. additions. and 
deletions have agailï hecn nccessar) 
Seq uencc jo; based on the usual adm inis- 
trative arrangements in the laboratOJ). 
The ordcr. ho\\cver. is not nccessarily 
the order of importdnce. 
Hcmatolog) 
Blood Ban" 
Biochcmistr) 


Function test<. 
M icrobiolog) 


- se
um and plasma 
- unne 
- cercbrospinal 
Iluid 
and im e"tigations 


Tests identified by proper names 
The use of a man's name lor labor- 
mon tests lÎ.Jrtunateh is on the \\ ,1\ 
out: along \\ ith outm
xlcd tests. Htm-- 
ever. son1e still persist and tho".: most 
commonl) used 1'0110\\ . 
R(,lIce-Jo/l('.\ pro!eill - the ahnormal 


FEBRUARY 197.. 


protein found in the urine of about 
50 percent of patients \\ith myeloma 
RodelllsJ"y IIl1i! - thc amount of phos- 
phatasc rcquircd to libcratc I mg. 
of pho"phoruo;; tCO;1 rcsult for al"al ine 
or acid phosphatascs (SCC alst) Sigma) 
Cool/lhs - a tcst used in prcgnant 
\\omcn and ne\\ horn infant" reldti\ e 
to Rh o;ensiti/ation; also used in 
hemol\ tic anemias. and so on. 
DIIJ"e --a method I()r dctcrmining thc 
blecding timc of a paticnt 
 
I\a//Il- a töt for s)phili" 
Killg- -'lrll/.HrOllg IIl1i!- an amount 01 
phosph,ltase rcquired to liherate I 
mg. of phcnol: test rcsult for al"alinc 
or acid phosphatases 
Lallge's Colloidal (jolcl- a tc"t on 
C.S.F. as an aid in diagnosis 
\.1o.\('lII/wl - a t\\ o-hollf specific gr,l- 
vit) volume tc"tl()r e\ aluating "idne) 
function 
Papallicolaoll - ,I tcchnique for ident- 
il
 ing cancer cells 
Palll-R/IIlIId/- d serol,)gic,11 te"t t(JI' 
infectious mononudco':-is 
R/llI/ple-Leedc - not a 1,lhur,ltor) tc,,\. 
hut ,I method to dctermine capillar) 
fragilit) b) inllating a hlood pres"urc 
cuff and counting thc petechi,le in 
a cireum"cribcd area of s"in 
Schillillg - a radioi"otope te"t I()r 
pcrniciou" ,lIlemia 


Dr. \\ .It''OIl. 10lmerh Prok",nr and He,ld 
nl P,llh,)lt)gic.11 ( hemi"lr\ .lIld Seninr \,- 
,nciale in :\Iedicine. I acull\ ,)t \JediclIle 
l nihT,il\ nt \\ e,lcrn OIlI,II'in, .lIld Cli- 
nic,1! P,(lh,)lngi'l ..II \ icwri,1 H,,,pil..ll. 
died J une 
(). 147
. Dr. 'eutcld. Prote" 
,nr I--me,itu,. I .ICUIt\ ,.1 :'\Iedieine. lini- 
\ er,"\ 01 \\ e,lern Ont.lri,), ,uecceded Dr 
\\ .,"on .r- Plofe",,,' In I YhO 


TIn CANA IAN NURSE 25 



Sigma - the amount of phosphatase 
required to liberate I mg. of phos- 
phorus: test result tix al"aline or 
acid phosphatases (see abo Bodan- 
!'>"y) 
Wa.uermallll - the original test fÒr 
s) phylis 
. 
It ntergrell - a technique for perfÒrm- 
ing the R.B.C. sedimentation rate 
Widol - a serological test for typhoid 
and paratyphoid fever!'> 
Wimmhe - a special tube for deter- 
mining red cell volume and sedimen- 
tation rate 
Zi('h1-N('e1
ell - a stain for acid-fast 
bacteri a, usually for tubercle bacill i 


Abbreviations and symbols 
ABO - the main blood group syslt:m 
Ac. - acid 
A.C .D. - anticoagulant used in pre- 
serving blood (acid-citrate-dextrose) 
ACTH - adn:nocorticotrophic hor- 
moll\.: 
.\.F.B. - acid-fast baccilus: a char- 
acteristic "taining quality of the tu- 
bercle bacillw. 
AII...- al"aline 
B.S. - blood sugar 
BSP - bromsulphalein: a liver func- 
tion test 
B.T. - bleeding time 
Bl'N - blood urea nitrogen 
C. - centigrade 
Ca - calei'úm 
cc. - cubic centimeter (not used now) 
CI- chlorine 
C.P.h.. -thc enLymc creatine phos- 
p ho" i nase 
Cr- chromium 
C.S.F. - cerebrospinal tluid 
Cu - copper 
C.\.I. -cell \olume index 
Difl'. - diflì:rential:used \,ith reference 
to a smear of blood or C.S.F. to de- 
term ine the types and percentage" 
of white blood cells present 
E("(; or FKG - electrocardiogram 
EnT.\ - an anticoagulant. frequentl) 
used in blood samples ti,r hem atology 
EE(; - electroenceph.tlogram 
Eos. - eo!'>inophil: a variety of white 
blood cell 
E.S.R. -er)thn>cyte !'>edimentation 
rate 
.... - Fahrenheit 
F.B.S. - fasting hlood !'>ugdr 
Fe - iron 
FSH - follicle stimulating hormone 
of the pituitary gland 

. - gram 
G..\. - ga!'>tric analysis 
(;C - gonococcus. causative organism 
of g0710rrhca 
 
GI - ga"trointestilMI 
II &. F'=- hematoxylin amI eo"in stain: 
u"ed in the preparation of patholo- 
gical matcrial fÒ, examination 
1711C - 17-hydroxycorticoids 
HCG - human chorionie gonadotro- 
26 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


phic hormone. present in pregnancy 
(pregnancy tc!'>t) and malignant tu- 
mors of the tcstcs 
H
 - mercury 
H
h. - hemoglobin 
5HIAA - )-hvdroxvindoleacetic acid 
Ht. - hematoérit - 
ICDII - isocitric dehydrogenase. a 
tissue enzvme 
Ig -the hlt;od immunoglobulins. such 
as IgA. IgG. IgM. etc. 
III - international unit 
I.\'. - intravenous 
K - potassium 
17KS-17-"clOsteroids: urinary hor- 
mones from the adrenal cortex and 
teste!'> 
L. or I. - liter 
LnH - lactic dehydrogenase, a tis- 
sue en7yme 
L.E. - lupus erythemah,,>u!'> 
L
 mph. -I) mphocyte, a type of white 
blood cell 
MeH - mean corpuscular hemoglobin 
:\ICH( - mean corpuscular hemoglo- 
hin concentration 
\IC\ - mean corpuscular volume 
mEq./I. - milliequi\ alent per liter 
m
.- milligram: see Weights 
ml.-millilltcr. Iii 000 part of a liter: 
apptoximately thc same as cc.. but a 
more exact expression of measure- 
mcnt 
mOsm - milliosmole. 1/1000 part of 
an osmotically active unit per liter 
I\I
 elo - myelocyte. the forerunner of 
the granular !eu"ocyte 

 - nitrogen 

a -- sodium 

eut. - neutrophile. a variety of\., h ite 
hlood cell 
'I)
 - nonprotein nitrogen 
O 2 - oxygen 
Osm - one osmotically active unit 
(molecule or ion) per liler 
P..\. - pernicious anemia 
Pap stain - Papanicolaou stain tix 
cancer cells 
PHI - protein-hound iodine. and esti- 
mation used in connection with thy- 
roid function 
pCO 2 - partial pressure of carhon 
dioxide 
pH - a symbol used to express acid- 
ity and al"alinity 
1)1. Ct. - blood platelet count 
1)0 2 - partial pressure of oxygen 
P.S.I). - phcnohulphonaphthalcin 
kst. a method for assessing "idne) 
function 
R..\. - rheumatoid arthritis 
R.B.L - red hlood ccll count 
Rctic - reticulocytc. a young R.B.C. 
RF - rheumatoid factor. pre!'>enl in 
blood in rheumatoid arthritis and 
occasionally in lupus erythematosis. 
etc. 
Rh - Rhesus. the Rh factor of blood 
risa- radio-iodinated serum albumin. 
a material for measuring plasma 
volume 


S<;OT - serum glutamic-ox,lIacetic 
transaminase 

(;PT -serum glutamic-pyruvic 
transaminase 
S.G. - specific gravity 
T 3 - an ill I'itm test for thyroid func- 
tion 
T 4 - a test fì.,r thyroxine. lhe thyroid 
hormone 
T.P.I. - Treponema pallidum immo- 
bilization. ,\ specific test of scrum 
for syphilis 
TSH - thyroid stimulating hormone of 
the pituitary gland 
l'.- unit. a comparative weight mea- 
sure 
L..\. - urine analysis 
l'r.Ac. - uric acid 
\'DRL - tlocculation test for syphilis 
\ M.\. -\anilmandelic acid. a test for 
adrenal medulla function 
W .B.C. - white blood cell count 
Weights - I "g. "ilog. 10 3 g, 
I g. gram 
I mg. mill ig. 10- 3 g. 
I mcg. 111 icrog. I U -6 g. 
I ng. nanog. 10- 9 g. 
I pg. picog. 1lJ-}2 g. 
".R. - Wassermann reaction 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Determination 


Autohemolysis 


Bleeding time 
(Duke) 


Blood volume 


Carbon mUlloxide 
hemoglobin 


Clot retraction 


Coagulation 
(clotting time) 


Coagulation 
factors 


Differential 
White ceIl count 


FI:BRUARY 1974 


Hematological Values 


Most hematological allaly.\es are carried Ollt Oil blood collected âther ill (/ potassium- 
amllollium oxalate or ill EDT A. t.'xceptiolls to this are the prothrombill alld partial 
thromplostill time, collected ill fluid af/ticoagulallt, alld the LF preparatioll Oil dotted 
blood. Usually fi'tJ/1l 3-7 mi. is adequate for allalysis. 


Normal Values 


Clinical Significance 


0.5-3.6% without glucose 
O.I-OJV( with glucose 


differential te'it for 
certa in anemias 
(spherocytoxic) 


1-3 min. 


prolonged when platelet<; 
reduced (as in thrombo- 
cytopcnia purpura) 


60-90 ml./kg. 


increased in polycythcmia 
vera: dccreased in dehy- 
dration. shoc,," hcmorrhagc, 
postopcratively, ctc. 


none 


in carbon monoxide poison- 
ing or intoxication (car 
exhau!'>t. etc.) 


complete and perfect 
in 24 hours 


delayed and imperfect in 
th rom bocytopen ia purpura 
(platelet detìc iency) 


!'\-IS min. (test tube 
method); 1-5 min. (capil- 
lary tube method) 


prolongcd in hemophilia. 
also aftcr heparin ad- 
m i n istr at ion 


"'actor VIII deficiency 
Factor IX deficiency 
other Factors 


classical hcmophilia 
Christmas disea'ie 
other coagulopathie!'>. usu- 
ally chronic 


Mature neutrophils 
52-7OCh ; 3.000-6J)()0/cu.mll1. 
Young neutrophils 
3-5 c (; 150-400 
Eosinophils 
I-4Cfc ; 50-400 
Basophils 
0-1.5 (( ; 15 -I 50 
1 ymphocites 
20-35 r ( (up to 50( ( m 
childrcn) 1.500-3,000 
monocyte!'> 
2-6( ( : 100-600 


increased in manv infections: 
decreased in agr.;nu JoC) tosis 


incrcascd in many aIlcrgic 
condit ions 


increascd in lymphocytic 
lcukcmi.l. infectious mono- 
nucleosi s. .md w hooping cough 


THE CAN
IAN NURSE 27 



Determination Normal Values Clinical Significance 
and Notes 
Fibrinogen 200-500 mg./ I 00 ml. decreased or prolonged in 
Fibrindex -less than severe liver disease and 
60 sec. in a complication of 
pregnancy 
Folate >
 ng./ml. folate deficiency anemia 
Folate in R.B.C. >175 ng./ml. as above 
G-6-PD (glucose- 120-240 mU'/1 Os R.B.C. Familial hemolytic anemia 
6-phosphate (primarily in Negroes) 
dehydrogenase) 
Hematocrit Male. 40-547c decreased in the anemias; in- 
Female. 37-47l',{- creased in polycythemia 
and hemoconcentration 
Hemoglobin Adult male. decreased in the anemias; 
14-17.5 g./IOO ml. increased in polycythemia 
Adult female: and hemoconcentration 
12-15.5 g./IOO ml. (shock, burns, myocardial 
Children. infarction) 
11-13 g./IOO ml. 
Infants (I day to 2 decreased in hemolytic 
weeks). 15-22 g./ I 00 ml. disease of the newborn 
( erythroblastosis) 
Hemoglobin electro- HgA - about Y5 ri hemoglobinopath ies 
phoresis HgA2 - <:3 r ,f (sickle cell anemia, 
HgF -< 2C;;" (50-YW
 in the thalassemias, etc.) 
newborn ) 
Iron 60-150 mcg./IOO ml. increased in hemolytic 
anemias. hemochromatosis, 
high intake; decreased 
in iron dctìciency 
anemIa 
Iron binding 220-400 mcg./1 00 ml. increased in iron detì- 
capacity ciency anemia and late 
pregnancy; decreased in 
hcmolytic anemia, P.A., 
hemochromatosis 
L.E. preparation none positive in lupus 
eryth em atosi s 


28 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



r 


Determination Normal Values Clinical Significance 
and Notes 
Mean corpusclar 27-32 ng./IOO ml. increased in macrocytic 
hemoglobin anemia {e.g" pcrnicious 
anemia}; low in hypo- 
chromic anemia 
Mean corpuscular 33-3R 17i same as above 
hemoglobin 
concentration 
Mean corpuscular 80-94 cubic micra same as above 
volume 
Partial thromboplas- 0.34% a test for hemophilia- 
tin time (PTT) 60-70 sec. li"e states 
Paul-Bunnell negative a test II.)!, infectious 
{heteroph ilc monocucleosis 
antibodies} 
Plasma hemoglobin 0-4.0 mg./IOO ml. increased in hemolytic 
anemia and other hemor- 
rhagic processes (mis- 
matched blood. etc.) 
Plasma iron incorpor- 75% and over in 7-10 decreased In hemolytic 
ation ( 59 Fe) days anemia; a measure of the 
rate of formation of red 
blood cclls 
Plasma iron turn- 0.061 mg./day/g.Hg. important in study of 
over (59Fe) iron metabolism 
Plasma volume 34-60 ml./kg. decreased in hemoconcen- 
tration; increased in 
'>ome with hypertension. 
Pagers disease. and some 
other clinical conditions 
Platelets 150.000-450.000/cu. mm. decreased in thrombocyto- 
penia purpura and other 
clinical conditions 
Prothrombin time 12-16 sec.. reported mainly used in control 01 
with control anticoagulant therapy 


FEBRUARY 1974 


mE CArMDIAN NURSE 29 



Determination 


Radioiron clearance 
(59Fe) 


Red blood eell 
count 


Red blood cell 
volume (1311) 


Red cell fragil ity 
(osmotic fragility 
test) 


Red cell survival 
test (with 51 Cr) 


Ret icu locytes 


Schilling test 
(radio cobalt 
Vitamin B 12) 


Sedimentation rate 
(Westergren) 


Total body water 
(tritium space) 


30 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Normal Values 
and Notes 


Clinical Significance 


T! -120m in. 


decreased in iron defi- 
ciency: increased in 
hemósiderosis and apl as- 
tic anemia 


Adult male. 
4-5 million/cu.mm. 
Adult female: 
4-5 million/cu.mm. 
Infants. 
5-7 million/cu.mm. 
at birth. gradually 
decreasing to adult 
at 15 years 


decreased in the anemias: 
increased in polycythemia 
and hemoconcentration 
(shoc,," burns. myocardial 
infarction) 


2Y-33 ml./"g. in males 
20-26 ml./"g. in 
females 


decreased in blood loss; 
increased in polycythem- 
ia vera and hemoconcen- 
tration 


hemolysis begins at 
0.43'.:( NaCi 
hemolysis complete at 
0.34-0.3
.f NaCl 


fragility increased in 
hemolytic jaundice; de- 
creased in obstructuvc 
jaundice 


Half-life: 25-35 days 


decreased in hemolytic 
anemias: a test for life 
span of the red blood 
cell 


0.5-1.5(/( of all red 
blood cell., 


increased in pernicious 
anemia following Vita- 
min B 12 therapy and in 
hemolytic anemias: de- 
creased in aplastic and 
pernicious anemia 


I {)l 'c and over 
(urinary excretion) 


this is a specific test 
for pernicious anemia 


\1ale: 0-9 mm./hr. 
Female. 0-20 mm./hr. 


increa<;ed in infectious 
and intlammatory dis- 
eases 


50-7W I of body weight 


increased in edema; de- 
creased in hemoconcen- 
tration (burns. shoc". 
etc.) 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Determination 


Values 


Clinical Significance 


Vitamin BI2 


;>150 pg./ml. 


increa
ed in acute and 
chronic Iculo.emia. infec- 
tious hepatiti
. liwr 
cirrhosis: decrea
ed in 
the anemias. malabsorp- 
tion. malnutrition} 


Blood Bank Values 


Determ ination 


Values 


Clinical Significance 


ABO groups 


0-45 q of population 
A-40 c e of population 
B-IOC. of population 
AB-5 c e of population 


e
scntial to determine 
he/ore blood transfusion 


Rh groups 


o - Rh pos. X5 c(- of pop. 
d - Rh neg. 15 c { of pop. 


important in pregnancy 
The Rh neg. mother \\ ith 
a possible Rh pos. fetu
 
mightlcad to er}throblas- 
to
is fetalis: abo in 
person
 recelvlIlg re- 
peated transfusion
 


Rh phenotypes 


o cau
es most diffi- 
culties in transfu- 
sion: other" <C E) 
may cause difficul- 
ty in cros
match 


difficulties are piclo.ed 
up in d cros
match: in 
rare instance
 no cross- 
match pmsible and then 
blood l11u
t be given \en 

IO\\ Iy with clo
e oh
er-' 
vation 


Cros
match 


match ABO group: in 
the Rh group. D:d 


ö...ential in order to 
eI im in ate transfusion 
reaction 


Antibody screen 


screening procedure for 
other Rh phenot) pes and 
other blood grollp
 - 
:\1. KclL etc. 



al11e ,I" Rh phenot) pe
: 
abo in lì.ll'en
ic p.tth- 
olog) 


Coomh
 te"t 


a te
t for Rh anti- 
bodies 


Rh neg. mother \\ ith Rh 
po
. fctlls ma
 1I:,ld to 
increa
ed antiblllh to D. 
Fortunatelv thi
 C
1I1 nm\ 
be climinaied b\ tre.tt- 
ing mother al p:trturition 
\\ith high titer ami-D 
serum 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 31 



Determination Normal Values Clinical Significance 
and Notes 
Cold agglutinin
 \\hen present. these ag- essential to identify; 
glutinatc patient's this can be cither re- 
red cell!'> versed or weakened by 
warming the blmx! to 
37 0 C 
Amniotic tluid test for several chell1i- in the Rh mother, tests 
anal)'ii!'> cal s (b il irubin. etc.) will !'>how whether fetu'i 
is Rh neg. or Rh po...; 
also for genetic dis- 
orders 


Biochemistry, Blood Plasma or Serum Values 


In the lIIl!iority (
fl/(lspitals. all hiocllellli.Hry analyse
 are clI1Tied Olll Oil serulII. 1I0H'e
'er, 
sOllie hospitals still use oxal{/fed Mood .IiJr allllllonict, BUN, glucose. and N PN. A 1II00IIlts of 
Mood Il'l/uired .If)r the analyses range .Ii-tJln 5 -10 1111. 


Determination Normal Value Note Clinical Significance 
Aldola
e 3-X U ./ml. increased in viral 
i hepatitis. progres- 
I ...ive mu!'>cular dystro- 
phy, myocardial in- 
farction 
Ammonia 4X-115 mcg./IOO ml. te!'>t must be increased 111 severe 
nitrogen done ill1ll1edi- liver diseasc and 
atcly bleeding into gastro- 
intestinal tract. es- 
pecially from e...opha- 
geal varices 
Amylase 60-160 Somogyi do not draw increased in acute pan- 
U./100 ml. during or creatitis: also in 
just ti.)lIow- pdrotiti
. pcrti.)J'ared 
'ing 1.V. peptic ulcer. abdom- 
glucose or inal trauma. after 
after adm in- morphine. etc. 
istration of 
morphine 
Ascorbic acid 0.6-1.2 mg./100 ml. blood must be low in scurvy 
(Vitamin C) placed in a 
tube surround- 
ed by ice and 
sent immedi- 
atelv to the 
lab/;rarory 


32 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Determination Normal Value I Clinical Significance 
Note 
Bicarbonate see pulmonary func- 
tion 
Bilirubin (Van 0.1-0.8 mg./loo-mt. increased in jaundice; 
den Bergh latent jaundice 0.5- 
test), total 2.0; clinical jaundice 
above 2.0 
Bilirubin, 0-0.2 mg./100 mt. increased in obstruc- 
Direct tive jaundice 
Calci urn 9-11 mg./100 mt. low in hypoparathy- 
or 4.5-5.7 mEq./l. roidism, sprue, and 
steatorrhea; increased 
in hyperparathyroidism 
and some bone diseases 
Ceruloplasmin 35-65 IU/mt. decreased in Wilson's 
disease 
Chlorides 96-105 mEq./l. decreased in vomiting, 
starvation, and after 
gastrointestinal 
surgery 
Cholesterol Adults: 150- increased in hypothy- 
275 mg./100 mt. roidism, diabetes, and 
Children: 100- nephrosis; also in 
225 mg./100 mt. hyperlipidemia, in 
Infants: 70- hypercholesterolem ia 
125 mg./IOO mt. 
Chol ine'iterase 0.62-1.26 decreased in hepato- 
U./mt. cellular jaundice, ad- 
vanced cirrhosis, after 
hepatotoxic agents: 
familial 
Copper RO-120 decreased in Wilson's 
mcg./ I 00 mt. disease (hepatolentic- 
ular degeneration) 
Creatinine 0.7-1.4 mg./loo mt. impairment of urine 
flnmation or excre- 
tion (renal and/or 
pre-renal) 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 33 



Determination Normal Value Note Clinical Significance 
Creatine phospho- 0-20 IU/ml. increased in muscle- 
kinase (CPK) wasting disease, mus- 
cle trauma. C.Y. ac- 
cident. severe mus- 
cular exercise 
Glucose (fasting) 70-100 mg./100 ml. up to 140-160 increased in diabetes 
after meals mellitus. Cushing's 
disease; decreased in 
hyperinsulinism. 
fasting 
Growth hormone male. 0-8 ng./ml. used with increased in acromeg- 
female: 0-30 ng.lml. challenge aly. pituitary giant- 
Child: 0-10 ng./ml. dose of in- ism, and related con- 
suI in or ditions; decreased in 
child. 0-10 ng./ml. arginine hypopituitary states 
17-Hydroxycorti- 5-25 mcg./IOO ml. heparinized increased in Cushing's 
costeroids blood disease, moderate in 
(cortisol) infections. burns. 
surgery; decreased in 
Addison's. etc. 
Insulin 4-24 mc. U.lml. usually with insulin resistant 
glucose tol- diabetes; presence 
erance of an insulinoma 
hocitric dehy- 
drogenase (lCDH) 50-260 U ./1 ()() mt. increased in diseases 
of the liver 
Lactic dehydro- 200-450 u.lml. test for the increased in myocar- 
genase (LDH) five isoen- dial infarction, li- 
z
mes will ver diseases. pulmon- 
gIve more ary infarct, etc. 
specific in- 
formation 
Lipase 0.2-1.5 U./ml. increased in acute pan- 
creatitis. etc. 
Lipoproteins 300-800 mg./iOU ml. consists of differential diagnosis 
four frac- of hyperlipoprotcin- 
lions: chylo- emias (five types) 
microns. beta. pre-beta. 
alpha 


34 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Determination Normal Value Note Clinical Significance 
Magne
ium 1.3-2.5 mEq./l. draw in poly- decreased in unexplained 
ethylene tube tetany and in marked renal 
insufficiency 
pH see pulmonary func- 
tion 
Phosphata
e. 0.13-0.63 Sigma increa
ed in c..IIlcer of 
acid U/100 ml. the prostate with meta- 
0.1-0.R Bodansky stases of bone: also in 
U/IOO ml. hemolized serum 
1-4 King-Armstrong 
U/IOO ml. 
Phosphatase. O.R-l.3 Sigma test for the increased in h)-perpara- 
alkaline U/IOO ml. IsoenLymes thvroidism. bil- 
1-4 Bodansky may be more iai-y obstruction. rick- 
U/IOO ml. specific ets. active bone depoo;- 
3-13 King-Armstrong it ion (excess osteo- 
U/IOO ml. blastic activity> 
Child: 2.R-b.7 
Sigma U/IOO ml. 
Phosphorus. adult: increased in severe 
inorganic 2-4.5 mg./IOO ml. nephritis. sometimes in 
child: ricl,ets: úecrea
d in 
4-6.5 mg./IOO ml. conditions in \'.hich 
serum calcium is 
elevated 
Phosphol ip ids 150-300 mg./IOO ml. important in relation 
to disorders involving 
1
1t mdaholi'm 
Potassium 3.5-5 mEqA serum must be increased in renal 
separated from failure and se\ere 
the cells w ith- Addison's disease: de- 
in one hour creased in diabetic 
comJ.: especiall)- im- 
pmtant for patienb 
on hemodial)- sis 
Protein bound 4-X mcg./I ()O ml. decreased in dcbilita- 
iodine (PBI) ting ,lIld febrile ill- 
ne
ses: increased in 
h) penh) roidism. preg- 
narK) . oral contr,lcep- 
tives. and iodine-con- 
taining drug
 
I 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 35 



Determ ination Normal Value Note Clinical Significance 
Proteins. adult: decreased æ, a result 
by. electrophor- of marked and prolong- 
eSls ed albuminuria. ncph- 
Total 6-H g./100 ml. ritis. livcr disease. 
Albumin 3.2-5.6 g./l 00 ml. starvation causing 
Globulin 1.2-3.2 g./I 00 ml. edema; increased in in- 
Alpha I 0.1 -0.4 g./I 00 ml. fections. pneumonia. 
Alpha 2 0.4-1 .2 g./l 00 ml. multiple myeloma. etc. 
Beta 0.4-1.0 g./lOO ml. 
Gamma 0.4-1.5 g./lOO ml. 
Fibrinogen 0.2-0.5 g./lOO ml. 
Newborn. 
Albumin 3.3-5.1 g./100mJ 
Globulin 
alpha 1 0.12-0.32 g./lOO ml. 
alpha 2 0.25-0.4 7 g./I 00 ml. 
beta 0.17-0.61 g./lOO ml. 
gamma 0.4-1.41 g./l 00 ml. 
I year. 
AI bum in 4.0-5.0 g./l 00 ml. 
Globulin 
alpha I 0.15 -0. 35 g./l 00 ml. 
al pha 2 0.5 -1.11 g./I 00 ml. 
beta 0.52-0.H3 g./IOO ml. 
gamma 0.45-0.66 g./100 ml. 
over 4 years: 
Albumin 3.7-5.5 g./lOO ml. 
Globulin 
alpha I 0.12-0.3 g./100 ml. 
alpha 2 0.35-0.95 g./100 ml. 
beta 0.47-0.92 g./IOO ml. 
gamma 0.53-1.2 g./IOO ml. 
Rheumatoid negative increased in rheumatic 
factor (RF) fever. rheumatoid 
arthritis. lupus: and con- 
ditions with immuno- 
logic stimulation 
Sodium (Na) 133-14H mEg./l. increased after ex- 
cess intake of NaCI 
hy patient with im- 
paired kidney func- 
tion: decreased in 
vomiting. GI dis- 
orders. tube drain- 
age (postop). diabetic 
coma. Addison's dis- 
ease 
T3 25-35/', uptake decreased in hypothy- 
roidism. pregnancy. 
after oral contraceptives; 
increased in hyper- 
thyroid ism. nephrosis. 
liver disease. after 
coumarin drugs. sali- 
cylates 


36 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



... 


Determination Normal Value Note Clinical Significance 
T4 5.S-12.3 mcg./IUO ml. more specific measure 
than above 
Thyroid binding 10-26 mcg./100 ml. as above; also cret- 
globulin (TBG) inism. etc. 
SGOT 10-50 Karmen U/ml. increased in myocar- 
Transam inase (3-20IU) dial infarction. in- 
fectious hepatitis. 
muscle-wasting 
diseases 
SGPT 5-35 KU/ml. increased in acute 
T ransam inase (3-1R IU) hepatitis, cirrhosis 
in relapse. less in 
myocardial infarction 
Triglycerides 50-150 mg./IOO ml. increased in hyperlip- 
idemia (diabetes. xan- 
thomatosis. biliary 
cirrhosis. etc.) 
BUN (Urea 9-20 mg./I ()() ml. decreased in malnutri- 
nitrogen) tion. pregnancy; in- 
creased in nephritis. 
urinary tract obstruc- 
tion. congestive heart 
failure. shock 
Uric acid 2.5-7.5 mg./I 00 ml. increased in acute 
gout. nephritis. leu- 
kemia. frequently in 
myelomatosis 
Urine Values 
Determ inatio n Normal Value Specimen Note Clinical Significance 
Required 
Aldosterone 2-20 mcg./24 hr. 24 hr patient hyperaldosteronism in 
must be hypertension 
on spe- 
cial diet; 
ke
p 
urme 
bottle 
cold 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 37 
. 



Determination Normal Value Specimen Note Clinical Significance 
Required 
Amylase 60-225 Somogyi U.I random increased in acute 
I 00 m I. pancreatitis. paro- 
titis. peptic ulcer. 
abdominal trauma 
Calcium 50-300 mg./24 hr. 24 hr. paticnt increased in hyperpara- 
on spe- thyroid ism. myeloma- 
cial tosis with bone metastases 
diet 
Catechol am i nes up to 100 mcg./ 24 hr. patient must increased in adrenal 
24 hr. be off cer- medulla tumors and 
tain medica- those of neural or- 
tion. hyper- Igm 
tensive drugs. 
tetracycl ine, 
epinephrine- 
like. etc. 
Chloride,; 170-250 mEq./I. random important in control- 
ling saline adminis- 
tration 
Copper up to 70 mcg.1 24 hr. preserve In increased in Wilson's 
24 hr. polyethy- disease 
lene bottle 
Copropor- 50-160 mcg.1 24 hr. preserve In increased in the 
phyrins 24 hr. polyethy- porphyrias 
Child: lene bottle 
0-80 mcg. 
Creatine 50-100 mg./ 24 hr. prc!>erve In used in the study of 
24 hr. toluene muscle diseases 
Creatinine 0.X-I.5 g.1 24 hr. preserve in normally excretion 
24 hr. toluene constant; altered in 
certain muscle dis- 
eases 


38 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Determination Normal Value Specimen Note Clinical Significance 
Required 
Estrogens ovulatory 24 hr. preserve in Increased in tumors 
cycle. polyethy- of the ovaries; de- 
4-64 mcg./24 hr. lene bottle; creased in ovarian 
normal male. keep cool and pituitary mal- 
4-25 mcg./24 hr. function 
prepubertal 
male and female. 
4-25 mcg./24 hr. 
postmenopaus- 
al. 
0.5 mcg./24 hr. 
pregnancy (3rd 
trimester): 
26-60 mg./24 hr. 
Follicle before puberty. 24 hr. important in 
Stimulating less than 6.5 the investigation 
Hormone (FSH) Mouse U./24 hr. of endocrine dis- 
after puberty: turhance:" 
6.5-52; 
after meno- 
pause. 
96-600 
17-hydroxy- female: 5-18 24 hr. preserve in important in the in- 
corticoids mg./24 hr. polyethy- vestigation of adre- 
male: 8-25 lene bottle; nal and testicular 
mg./24 hr. keep cool malfunctions 
5 -hydroxy- 60-1 60 mcg./ 24 hr. patient must increased in carcin- 
indole- 24 hr. avoid eating oid tumors 
acetic acid bananas dur- 
(Serotonin) ing collec- 
tion 
17-keto- under 10 yr.. 24 hr. preserve In important in the in- 
steroids 0-4 mg./24 hr.; polyethy- vestigation of endo- 
10-15 yr.: lene bottle; crine disturbances 
3-10 mg./24 hr.; keep cool (adrenal. testes) 
Adult female. 
2-17 mg./24 hr.; 
Adult male: 
3-23 mg./24 hr. 
Lead 0-0. I 2 mg./24 24 hr. preserve III increased in lead 
hr. polyethy- intoxication 
lenc bottle 
O'imolality 500-H50 mO
l/ random concentrating and di- 
(Osm) kg. water or 24 luting ahility of the 
hr. kidneys 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 39 
. 



Determination Normal Value Specimen Note Clinical Significance 
Required 
Potassium 25 -100 mEq./l. 24 hr. varies with useful in the study of 
dietary in- renal and adrenal dis- 
take turbance, water and 
acid-base balance 
Pregnanediol female: 24 hr. preserve In increased in corpus 
3-10 mg./24 hr. Eolyeth y - luteum cysts and some 
male: ene bottle; adrenal cortical 
0-1.5 mg,f24 hr. keep cool tumors; decreased in 
threatened abortions 
Sodium 130-260 mEqA 24 hr. varies with same as potassium 
salt intake 
Urea 8-15 g./24 hr. 24 hr. preserve In important in the 
nitrogen tol uene investigation of 
metabolic disturb- 
ances 
Uric acid 0.4-1.0 g./ 24 hr. preserve In useful in the inves- 
24 hr. toluene tigation of metabol ic 
disturbances 
Urohilinogen Qualit.: Random preserve increased in liver 
Pos. in I :20 or 24 with sod. diseases and hemoly- 
Quant.: hr. carbo un- tic jaundice 
0.2-3.3 mg./24 hr. der pe- 
troleum 
ether 


Cerebrospinal Fluid Values 


Test Normal Value Clinical Significance 
Color and appearance clear and colorless; may cloudy, turbulent. or gros- 
be slightly blood tinged sly purulent in meningitis; 
from needle trauma; no bloody or yelIow when hem- 
clot orrhage involves CNS 
Pressure 7-15 mm. Hg. (100-200 mm, increased in meningitis, 
of water), patient lying down; edema of the brain. hemor- 
15-22 mm. Hg. (200-300 rhage, neurosyphilis; de- 
mm, of water), patient sit- creased in shock, dehydra- 
ting up; tion, and spinal canal 
Child: 3.5-7 mm. Hg. (50- block 
100 mm. of water), patient 
lying down 


40 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Test Normal Value Clinical Significance 
CeIl count 0-5/cu.mm.; all lymphocytes increased in the various 
types of meningitis, polio- 
myelitis, neurosyphilis. 
and encephalitis; pus celIs 
predom inate in the acute 
bacterial processes. In- 
creased lymphocytes in 
tuberculous meningitis. po- 
liomyelitis. and neuro- 
syphilis 
Glucose 45-80 mg./100 ml. increased in diabetes. en- 
cephalitis. uremia. and 
sometimes in brain tumor. 
Decreased in acute menin- 
gitis. tuberculous meningitis 
and insulin shock. 
Normal values usually 
found in neurosyphil is. 
Proteins 15-40 mg./IOO ml. increased in those condi- 
albumin 52% tions with an increased cell 
alpha I 5% count (see above); increased 
alpha 2 14% in spinal cord tumor and 
beta 10% infectious polyneuritis 
gamma 19% 
Chlorides 120-130 mEq./l. increased in urem ia; de- 
creased in tuberculous 
meningitis 
Colloidal Gold 0000000000 abnormal forms in meningi- 
test tis, and syphilis. Examples: 
555554321000. paretic-type 
curve; 0244310000. luetic- or 
tabetic-type curve; 
0000245520. mcningitis- 
type curve 
Bacteriologic neg. important in differentiat- 
examination ing between bacterial. 
viral. and other cau.,es 
of meningitis 
Serologic tests neg. for syphilis 
for syph il is 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 41 
. 



Function Tests and Investigations 


Tests Principle Normal Value Clinical Significance 
a.c. - p.c. per:.on's abilit) a.c.. 70-100 mg./ a screening tcst for 
blood to handle diet- 100 ml. diabetes mell itus, 
glucose ary carbohydrate p.c.. less than Cushing's syndrome, 
150 mg./IOO ml. etc. 
Glucose a test of ability blood glucme not for diagnosis IJf 
tolerance to store and util- to exceed 150 mg. diabetes melIitus. 
ize dietary carbo- and return to Cushing's syndrome, 
hydrate. The normal in 2 hr. dumping syndrome, 
standard test, one etc. 
dose glucose (50 
or 100 g.), blood 
samples t ,hr.. 
I hr., 2 hr.; oc- 
casionally 4, 5, 
or 6 hr. test 
required 
Intravenous eliminate possi- blood glucose same as for glucose 
gl ucose hility of impair- returns to nor- tolerance 
tolerance ed absorption mal fasting 
from the intes- within 1- t 
tines hr. 
Insulin test of patient's blood glucose test for hypopitu- 
sensitivity sensitivity to decreased about itarism, also use- 
test insulin, to pro- 45 mg./IOO ml. ful in Addison's 
mote withdrawal one hr. after disease 
of glucose from ingestion of 
blood stream. glucose with 
Dose. 0.25 U./ insulin. then 
kg. body wt. with glucose alone 
Bromsulphalein Bromsulphalein, 0-7% in 45 min. a liver function 
after I.V. in- test in patients 
jection, is ex- without jaundice 
creted almost en- 
tirely by liver 
Renin activity renin-angioten- 40-275 ng./100 ml. in hypertension; mar- 
(angiotensin sin control of kedly influenced by 
II) aldosterone se- physical activity 
cretion and salt intake 
Kidnev function, based on abili- morning specimen valuable in renal dis- 
diurnal varia- ty of kidneys S.G. 1.023 or case, especially slow- 
tion to concentrate higher Iy developing chronic 
unne discases 
Moscnthal test ability of kid- night specimcn same as above 
neys to concen- not to exceed 
trate urine af- 575 ml.. S.G. 
ter a test meal >1.0 I H; day spe- 
cimens S.G. 
varies hy <J points 
or more, reaching 
1.020 in one or 
two specimens 


42 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Tests Principle Nonnal Value Clinical Significance 
P.S.P. excretion normal kidn
 - 30-5OCé excreted test tor renal tubu- 
rapidly and in 15 min. lar function 
efficientl} 
excrete the dye 
Creatinine rate of elimi- 80-160 ml./min. test tor glomerular 
clearance nation of cre- function of the 
atinine b" the kidneys 
kidneys 
G I absorption triolein is di- >8lk in the 4th. malfunction of bile 
test 125) gested by pan- 5th, and 6th hr. and pancreas; dis- 
triolein creatic lipase eases of liver and 
and absorption is pancreas 
facilitated by bile 
GI absorption absorption re- same as above diseases of the liver: 
test 125 I quires presence with triolein test 
oleic acid of bile eliminates diseases of 
the pancreas 
Xylose tolerance xylose is ab- I he 29-49 useful test tor GI ab- 
sorbed bv dif- mg./ I 00 mL sorption in absence 
fusion míd not 2 hr.: 20-60 of renal disease 
metabolized \\ hen 3 hr.: 8-16 
given b} mouth 5 hr. urine 
4-8 g. 
ACTH stimulation ACTH stimulates >8-16 mg./24 hr.; diseases of the pitu- 
the adrenal cor- also blood 17HC itary and adrenal 
tex to secrete cortex 
corticosteroid" 
Congo red amyloid tissue pre- <35( , retention amyloid disease prim- 
ferentially ab- ary and secondary 
sorbs the dye. 
Given LV. and mea- 
sured serially in 
hlood 
Gastric function acidity of fa'>t- fasting: 5-100 mL diseases of the 
ing content: ser- 1st hr.: 30- 300 mL stomach 
ial samples after titratable HCI 
test meal (with female: 0-25 
or without his- mEq./l./hr. 
tamine) male: 0-48 mFq 
Maximal gastric modification of female basal: diseases of the 
secretion above to create 0.5-2 mEq./I.; stomach 
a max imum res- post-hist. 10- 
ponse: with large 24 mEq 
dose of antihis- male basal: 1-3 
tamine folkmed mEq./I.: post- 
by large dose of his!. 10-30 mEq 
histdmine 
Gastric function pH of gastric sam- as above. but more 
(recent trend) pic,> under contin- precise data 
uous aspiration; 
intubation under 
radiological con- 
trol: can be com- 
hined with secre- 
tin stimulation 
- - 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANA
IAN NURSE 43 



Tests Principle Normal Value Clinical Significance 
Pulmonary function blood must be drawn 18-25 mEqA complete investiga- 
HCÜ3 without stasis from tion of acid-base 
(hil:arbonate) tournique balance; will estab- 
pH dra\\ n in a spec;al lish the relative 
7.35-7.45 contributions of 
syringe without respiratory and non- 
stasis respiratol) factors. 
pO as ahove 90-110 mm. Hg. thereby indicating 
2 necessary therapy to 
pCO
 restore balance 
as above 35-45 mm. Hg. 
B .E. (base calculated from 10 (:t2) 
excess) above data 
L.E. test abnormal granulo- neg. positive results in 
cytes in blood with lupus, liver dis- 
large amount of ease. myelomatosis; 
nuclear material occasionally in rheu- 
matoid arthritis 
Sweat tcst in certain dis- sodium 10-80 increased sodium 
eases of the pan- mEq.n. and chloride in the 
creas there is chloride 4-60 sweat in fibrocystic 
excess secretion m Eq ./1. diseases of the pan- 
of sodium chlor- creas (mucoviscidosis) 
ide in the sweat 
Fecal fat most dietary fat 1-7 g./24 hr. increased amount io 
is digcsted and ab- 7-25% (dry sprue, steatorrhea. 
sorbed; increase weight) etc. 
in fecal fat is. 
therefore. signif- 
iCJnt 
Fecal to establish pres- reported <is differential diagno- 
bacteriology ence of abnormal "normal flora" sis in diseases as- 
bacteria in GI and any abnor- sociated with diar- 
tract; specimen mal organisms rhea. 
must be fresh 
Fecal mycology to verify presence presence of ova same as above 
of ameba. etc.. in or spores re- 
GI tral:t; speci- ported 
men must be fresh 


Clinical mil:robiology is a specialty 
that includes bacteriology. mycology. 
parasitology. and virology. It is most 
essential that sterile techniques be fÒI- 
lowed for all specimen collection. con- 
tainers used. and transport to the lahor- 
atory: the slightest contaminent may 
well II1valillate the result. 
Bacteriology: I n the laboratory most 
specimens are cultured on various 
media. depending 011 the presence 01 
suspected organisms. They are sub- 
sequently identified and subjected 
to various te,t-., such as antihiotic 
sensitivity. etc. 
h is important that. whenever 
44 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Clinical Microbiology 
possible, specimens be procured prior 
to use of antiseptics or antibiotics. 
Mycology: These organisms (fungi) 
can frequently be identified by micro- 
scopic examination. When it is necessa- 
ry to culture them. they require up ta 
several weeks for growth and identi- 
lïcation. 
Parasitology: With increasing travel 
and temporary residence ahroad, just 
about all human parasitic infections 
are being seen in Canada. In general, 
specimens. especially stools. must be 
delivered to the laboratory in as fresh 
a state as possible. 
Examples of medically important 


parasites are as follows: 
. Prot070a-amoebic dysentery. 
malaria 
. Platylhelminths - tapeworm. schis- 
tosomiasis 
. Nemathelminths-round worms. 
pll1worms 
. Arthropods - scabies. body lice 
Vimlogy: The presence of virus is 
established either serologically or by 
isolation. Virus laboratories are highly 
specialized centers. Therefore. in most 
instances. specimens are referred to 
them for isolation and identification. 
Usually, special specimen containers 
are supplied. {;:; 
FEBRUARY 1974 



in a capsule 


The vertical wrinkle 
This letter to the editor appeared in the 
Journal of the American Medical 
Association last November 12: 
"As a plastic surgeon, I have a 
problem with the \ertical wrinkles 
often seen on the upper lip [between 
lip and nose]. almost invariably in 
women. Fortunately. we can treat these 
effectively today with a chemical peel 
procedure. 
The question is, though, are these 
vertical wrinkles from cigarette smok- 
ing. or pipe smoking. or whistling. or 
kissing. or drinking from a straw, or 
applying lipstick. or not shaving. or 
pouting. or having more female hor- 
mones. or holding diaper pins between 
the lips. or what? - Edward N. Ludin. 
M.D.. Cherr\' Hill, ^'.J." 
Perhaps 'from holding tongue in 
cheek .! 


Staff passion aroused 
The following notice appeared on the 
letters-to-the-editor page of the Decem- 
ber 1973 i

ue of What's Ne>>', pub- 
lished b) The Hospital for Sick Children 
in Toronto. 
"No recent issue has rou
ed staff 
passion and fury ao; the great tobaceo 
vendetta. When a box of exploding 
cigars was left in the doctors' lounge. 
administration decided the time had 
come for action. 
"Consequently. effective Janual) 30. 
1974. segregated dining will be intro- 
duced to the cafeteria. The Non-Smok- 
ers' Preserve will scat 2:-:0 in thc center 
and north sections. Black-lunged 
lunchers will bc confined to 124 
eats 
in the south (bring your compass). Signs 
will be po
ted. and the admini
tration 
hopes all will cooperate. Suspected 
intiltrators will be a
ked to submit to a 
nicüti ne-stain finger inspection." 


Comment on "consumer" 
Thoo;e who object to the expression 
"dclivel) of health eJre:' believing the 
\\ord deliven' is best lIsed \\hen refer- 
ring to milk. are no doubt beating 
their brlms ahout the use of the \\nrd 
COII.\Wller when talking about those 
who require or \\ill require health care. 
FEBRUARY 1974 


These persons will welcome the word
 
of Dr. E. Gra
 Dimond, provmt for the 
health sciences at the Universit) of 
\] is
ouri. 
Writing in the October 9. 1973 i

ue 
of Saturda\' Re\'ind World, Dr. Dimond 
sa)s. nAs' alwa)s, there will be tho
e. 
both on the medical faculty and among 
the public (now reterred to. digestivel\. 
.IS health consumers) . .. n . 


Warning to farmers 
An article in the :-.Jovember 1l)73 i

ue 
of the American Lung Association 
Bulletin tells of a disease called "farm- 
er's lung," which is traceable to expo- 
sure to moldy hay. 
This is one of the hypersensitivit\ 
diseases. which are "due to a pulmonar} 
reaction to an organic (usuall) vege- 
table) dust inhaled b} persons sensitized 


t', 
.'" 
;.. 
I' " "if-:' 
-:"'''/ -......ø
. 
.'.#i

 
. 
. "." t. 


. . . to the dust by pre\ ious exposure to 
it. .. 
The article also notes that the disease 
"occurs four to eight hours after expo- 
sure to hay that has become mold\ 
during storage in poorly ventilated 
barns or bins. The first symptoms are 
chills and fever, cough. and shortness 
of breath. A
 a rule. the acute stage 
subsides in a week or 10 days. 
me- 
time
 to recur." 
According to thi
 article. there i
 
no specific treatment. although 
teroid
 
are prc
cribed in some cases to reduce 
intlammation. The bC'it treatmcnt io; 
prevention. the article note
. 
Because of heav\' rain
 in 1l)73. 
fam1ers are \\arned to take the utmo
t 
precaution to mJke 
ure that hav and 
other fa. m products are protected" from 
dampness \\ hen the
 are stored in barn, 
and bin
. i7 


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\ ....
. 


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"I don" know - she claims to be someone's an"" 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 45 
. 



dates 


March 2, 1974 
One-day clinical nursing session on 
"Shock: Pathophysiology, Therapy 
and Nursing Care," Cody Hall, Univer- 
sity of Toronto. Fee: $12.00. For further 
information, contact: Faculty of Nurs- 
ing, Continuing Education Program, 
U. of Toronto, 50 St. George St.. To- 
ronto, Ontario M5S 1 A 1. 


March 23, 1974 
One-day clinical nursing session on 
"Crisis Intervention in Health and Ill- 
ness for Individuals and Families," 
Cody Hall, University of Toronto. Fee: 
$12.00. For further information, con- 
tact: Faculty of Nursing. Continuing 
Education Program, U. of Toronto, 50 
St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 
1A1. 


March 30,1974 
One-day clinical nursing session on 
"The Role of the Nurse in Sexual Coun- 
selling and Family Planning," Cody 
Hall, University of Toronto. Fee: $12.00. 
For further information, contact: Fa- 
culty of Nursing, Continuing Education 
Program, U. of Toronto, 50 St. George 
St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1. 


Spring 1974 
Workshops on staffing for hospitals 
entitled "Cost Effective Staffing Direct- 
ly Related to Patient Needs." Locations 
for workshops: Toronto - March 11- 
13; London - March 14-16: Thunder 
Bay - May 23-25; Ottawa - May 27- 
29; Sudbury-June 6-8,1974. Confer- 
ence fee: $80.00. For further informa- 
tion, write to: Professional Develop- 
ment Dept., Registered Nurses' Asso- 
ciation of Ontario, 33 Price St., Toron- 
to, Ontario M4W 1 Z2. 


April 1-3,1974 
Three-day course on audiometry and 
hearing conservation in industry for 
nurses, doctors and technicians, Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New 
York. For further information, write 
to: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 
Communications Center 209, Troy, 
N.Y. 12181, U.S.A. 
46 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


April 8-9,1974 
Two-day conference on "State of the 
Art of Psychiatric Nursing," Rutgers 
Continuing Education Center, Rutgers 
University, New Brunswick, New Jer- 
sey. Dr. Hildegarde Peplau will be 
director of the conference. 


May 2-4, 1974 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
Ontario, annual meeting, Royal York 
Hotel, Toronto, Ontario. 


May 4,1974 
All-day public conference on "Human 
Rights and Health Care," University 
Commons, Rutgers University, College 
of Nursing, New Brunswick, New Jer- 
sey. 


May 8-10,1974' 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
British Columbia, 62nd annual meeting, 
Bayshorelnn, Vancouver, B.C. 


May 9-11, 1974 
Atlantic Conference on Adolescent 
Health Care, Sir Charles Tupper Build- 
ing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. 


May 12-15,1974 
Workshop on evaluation of student 
nurse clinical performance, co-spon- 
sored by the faculty of nursing and the 
summer school and extension depart- 
ment, University of Western Ontario, 
London, Ontario. The instructor will 
be Vivian Wood. Tuition fee of $130.00 
includes course fees, accommodation, 
and meals. For further information, 
write to: Summer School and Exten- 
sion Dept., U. of Western Ontario. 
London, Ontario N6A 3K7. 


May 23, 1974 
Conference on "Rehabilitation of the 
Geriatric Patient," Maimonides Hospi- 
tal and Home for the Aged, Montreal, 
Quebec. For further information. write 
to: Gilbert M. Rosenberg, M.D., 5795 
Caldwell Ave., Montreal, P.Q. H4W 1W3. 


June 16-21, 1974 
Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation annual 
meeting and conven- 
tion, to be held in the 
Manitoba Centennial 
Centre Concert Hall, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 


ð 

 


June 17-19, 1974 
Emergency Nurses' Association of 
Ontario, third annual conference, Royal 
Connaught Hotel, Hamilton, Ontario. 
For further information, write to: Ms. 
Jean Grote, 137 Duke St., Apt. 4, Ham- 
ilton, Ontario L8P 1 X8. 


June 17-21, 1974 
One-week conference, immediately 
following the American Nurses' Asso- 
ciation convention in San Francisco, 
on "An Adventure in Transcultural 
Communication," Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Tours, special airfare and post-con- 
ference trips will be available. For 
further information, write to: Continu- 
ing Education Coordinator, University 
of Hawaii, School of Nursing, Webster 
301, 2528 The Mall, Honolulu, Hawaii, 
96822, U.S.A. 


June 18-21, 1974 
Canadian Public Health Association, 
65th annual meeting, St. John's, Nfld. 
Theme: "Patterns of Health Delivery- 
Rural and Urban." CPHA members and 
non-members wishing to participate in 
the scientific sessions should submit 
abstracts of proposed papers to: Lowell 
W. Gerson, Ph.D., Chairman, Scientific 
Program Planning Committee, Faculty 
of Medicine, Memorial University of 
Newfoundland, St. John's. Deadline for 
submission of abstracts is February 15, 
1974. 


June 22, 1974 
"Jubilee" and "Adieu" celebration, 
St. Joseph's School of Nursing, To- 
ronto, Ontario. For further information, 
write to: Ms. Nancy Litwak, 1048 Lake- 
shore Road West, Mississauga, On- 

riQ 
 
FEBRUARY 1974 



names 


. .... 



 




 


.. ... 


','\,... . 


J 


Eli;:,ah('tf1 Boargouill 


Paul BOIII'Kouiu 


Elizabeth Johnson Bourgouin and her 
husband. Dr. Paul Bourgouin. have ar- 
rived in I ndonesia to serve for two years 
with r.1EDICO. a service of CARE. They 
are stationed at a hospital complex in 
Surakarta (Solo). Central Java. as part 
of a 15-member CARE-
IEDICO team. 
The program. which is presently ex- 
panding into obstetrics and pediatrics. 
includes an inservice education pro- 
gram for nurses. 
Ms. Bourgouin (R.N.. Montreal Gen- 
eral Hospital school of nursing) has 
been on staff at The Montreal General 
Hospital. has nursed in Trinidad. West 
Indies. and has been an air stewardess 
with Air Canada. 
Dr. Bourgouin graduated in medicine 
at Laval University. Quebec City. and 
completed his postgraduate training at 
The Montreal General Hospital. Prior 
to joining M f'DICO. he worked in Maria 
in the Gaspé. 


Dorothy Wyatt (B.A.. B.Ed.. B.N.) 
was elccted mayor of SI. John's New- 
foundland in November. She is the first 
woman to hold that post. 
Ms. Wyatt will no longer be nurse- 
secretary for her husband. Dr. Donald 
Wyatt. as she will devote her full time 
to her duties as mayor. 


Carolyn J. Isley is the new director of 
nursing at the North Okanagan Region- 
al Ho
pitals. a tri-hospital complex 
comprising Vernon Jubilee Hospital. 
Armstrong-Spall umeheen Hospital. 
and Enderby and District Memorial 
Hospi tal. 
Before coming to Vernon. B.C. in 
1972. Ms. Isley (R.N.. Moose Jaw 
Union Hospital school of nursing; Dipl. 
teaching in schools of nursing. ll. of 
Saskatchewan, Saskatoon. SasJ....) work- 
ed in various capacities at the Moose 
Jaw Union Ho
pital in Moose Jaw. 
Saskatchewan. 
FEBRUARY 1974 


Mary Mills (Reg.N.. Belleville Gen. 
Hosp. school of nursing; B.A.. Carle- 
ton University. Ottawa) was appointed 
executive director of Planned Parent- 
hood Ottawa. Her responsibilities 
i.ncl';lde pro
oting and developing 
famIly planmng programs. working 
with volunteers, fund raising. and ad- 
ministrative duties. 
Ms. Mills is a member of the NUrs- 
ing Advisory Committee for Children's 
Hospital of Eastern Ontario, and was 
formerly a ehild-care supervisor in 
the children's inpatient unit <It Royal 
Ottawa Hospital. 


E.A. Pattinson is director of the extended 
care department of the Burnaby Gen- 
eral Hospital. Burnaby, B.C She was 
appointed a year before the depart- 
ment opened. and was actively involved 
in its planning. 
Ms. Pattinson (R.N.. Royal Inland 
Hospital school of nursing. Kamloops. 
B.C; Dipl. Nurs. Servo Admin.. U. of 
Saskatchewan) has been on staff of the 
Burnaby General Hospital for several 
years. having been assistant director of 
nursing prior to her current appoint- 
ment. 


The nursing department of Grant Mac- 
Ewan Community College in Edmon- 
ton. Alberta. has appointed the follow- 
ing instructors: 


...... 



] ') 
JII/ial/a La;:arul. 


... 
Barry Olwl/ 


Juliana Lazaruk (R.N.. St. Boniface 
General Hosp.. Winnipeg; Dipl. Teach- 
ing and Superv.. U. of Manitoba; B.A., 
U. of Winnipeg) has had experience in 
clinical nursing and has taught medical- 
surgical nursing. 
Barry Olsen (R.N.. Red Deer College 
Red Deer; R.P.N.. Alberta Hosp.. 
Ponoka; B.Sc.N.. U. of Alberta. Ed- 
monton) has had experience in general 
duty and psychiatric nursing. 



 


.. 
 



 
- 
- 



\,' 



. 
:'9-' 
 
 1;' 
Billie I'urcell 



 


Pat RoddlCI. 


Billie Purcell (R.N.. Edmonton Gen- 
eral Hosp.. Edmonton; B.N., McGill 
U., :\1ontreal) has had experience in 
clinical nursing and has taught medical- 
surgical nursing. 
Pat Roddick (R.N.. Edmonton Gen- 
eral Hosp.. Edmonton; B.Sc.N.. U. of 
Alberta. Edmonton) has had experience 
in clinical nursing. has taught mcdical- 
surgical nursing. pediatrics. and has 
also taught in the nursing orderly pro- 
gram in Edmonton. 
A former instructor in the nursing de- 
partment. Jenniece Larsen (R.N.. Mis- 
ericordia Hosp.. Edmonton; R.P.N., 
__ w..... Alberta Hosp.. 
"" .
 '. Edmonton: B.Se.N., 
Ý U. of Alberta. Ed- 
.. l' \ monton) has been 

 appointed Chair- 
-;: '" man of the Allied 
.. Health Department. 
This department in- 
cludes several pro- 
grams related to 
health services and includes all types 
and levels of health care worker.,. It is 
signiticant to note that a nurse has been 
chosen for this coordinating position. 


-- 
- 


Lucille Carber is the public health/hos- 
pitalliaison nurse in the Prince Edward 
Island Department of Health. A grad- 
uate of Dalhousie University school ot 
nursing. Ms. Carber was formerly em- 
ployed at the Isaac Walton Killam Hos- 
pital in Halifax. N .S. 


Fernande Harrison, health services 
administrator-nursing. Alberta Hos- 
pital Services Commission. was present- 
ed \\ith the Roben Wood Johnson 
Award. This award of 5 LOOO and cer- 
tificate of merit is made available 
annually by Johnson & Johnson Limited 
to the graduating student in the health 
services administration course at the 
University of Alberta who is considered 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 47 
. 



names 


Vivian B. Kirkpatrick was recently ap- 
poi ntcd director of nursing service at 
Doctors Hospital, Toronto. 
During her nursing career, Dr. Kirk- 
patrick (Reg.N., Women's College Hos- 
pital school of nursing, Toronto; B.N., 
McGill U., Montreal; M A. and Ed.D., 
Columbia U., New York) has worked 
with WHO in Formosa and India, has 
taught public health nursing at the 
University of Western Ontario and the 
University of Hawaii, has been a nurs- 
ing consultant for the Ontario depart- 
ment of health, and has been director 
of education and service at Galesburg 


by the faculty as most likely to m_ake 
a substantial contribution to the held 
of health services administration. 
Ms. Harrison (R.N., Misericordia 
Hospital s.::hool of nursing, Montreal; 
B.Sc.N., and M.H.S.A.. U. of ,'\Iberta) 
is a former director of nursing adminis- 
tration at the Misericordia Hospital, 
Edmonton. 


NDYlI 


HOllister's comolete 
U-BÄG 
system 


regular 
and 24-hour 
collectors 
in newborn 
and 
pediatric 
sizes 


48 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


gel any Inlanl urine sDeclmen when YOU wanlll 


The sure way to collect pediatric urine specimens 
easily. . . every time. . . Hollister's popular U.Bag 
now has become a complete system. Now, for the 
first time, a U.Bag style is available for 24.hour as 
well as regular specimen collection, and both styles 
now come in two sizes. . . the familiar pediatric size 
and a new smaller size designed for the tiny contours 
of the newborn baby. 


I 


Each U.Bag offers these unique benefits: - double- 
chamber and no-flowback valves - a perfect fit on 
boy or girl. newborn or pediatric - protection of the 
specimen against fecal contamination - hypo.aller- 
genic adhesive to hold the U-Bag firmly and comfort- 
ably in place without tapes - complete disposability. 
Now the U-Bag system can help you to get any infant 
urine specimen when you want it. Write on hospital 
or professional letterhead for samples and informa. 
tion about the new U-Bag system. 


HOLLISTER LIMITED. 332 CONSUMERS RD., WILLOWDALE. ONT. 


State Research Hospital in Illinois. 
More recently, Dr. Kirkpatrick 
organized the school of nursing and 
later taught psychiatric nursing at 
Laurentian University in Sudbury. 


Margaret Wootton 
(B.S.N., U. of Brit- 
ish Columbia) has 
been appointed sen- 
ior public health 
nurse of the North 
..., Okanagan health 
- unit, Salmon Arm, 
*' B.C. She is respon- 
\. sible for the nurses 
in the Enderby, Salmon Arm, and Re- 
vel stoke areas. 
Ms. Wootton has been public health 
nurse at the South Okanagan health 
unit in Rutland and at the South Cen- 
tral health unit in Kamploops, B.c. 


Jean Lowery has been elected president 
of the Ontario Nurses' Association 
(collective bargaining). Ms. Lowery is 
public health liaison and coordinator 
of home care services at Qucensway 
General Hospital, Toronto. 


Marlyn Andrews, (R.N., St. Michael's 
sehool of nursing, Dip\. PHN, Univer- 
sity of Alberta), has been appointed to 
the new position, public health nursing 
consultant in mental health, established 
by the public health nursing division 
of the Edmonton local board of health. 
In preparation for her role, Ms. An- 
drews interned for a year with the com- 
munity psychiatric services of Edmon- 
ton's board of health. She has had 
experience in hospital nursing and 
public health nursing in southern Sas- 
katchewan and with the city of Edmon- 
ton. 


Honors in the Order of St. John were 
granted two Nova Scotia nurses at the 
annual investiture of the order. 
Margaret Mary Matheson of Stellar- 
ton was promoted to the rank of Oftï- 
cer Sister. Also active in the Registered 
Nurses' Association of Nova Scotia, 
she was president in 1951)-61 and was 
the recipient of a lite memhership in 
the association in 196X. 
Jean Nelson, director of nursing at 
Camp Hill Hospital, was admitted to 
the Order of St. John in the rank of 
Servi ng Sister. She was with the Royal 
Canadian Army Medical Corps as 
nursing sister during World War II, 
and prior to her present appointment 
was assistant director of nursing at St. 
Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Department 
of Veterans Affairs. <;J 
FEBRUARY 1974 



new products 


{ 


Descriptions are based on information 
supplied by the manufacturer. No 
endorsement is intended. 


New lightweight cast 
It might have heen a dull 
ummer fur 
four-)'ear-uld Pierre Martin. if he had 
heen burdened ",ith a heavy plaster 
ca
t. \\ ith the ne\\ I ightcast I I. avail- 
ahle throughout Canada from Charles 
E. Frosst 
& Co.. restrictions to his 
normal activities were cut to the 
minimum. In addition to being thin 
and light, thi" east is strong and dur- 
able. is water immersible. and dries 
quid..I)'. 
For further information. write to 
Charles E. Frosst & Co., P.O. Box 
217. Pointe Claire. Dorval 700. P.Q. 


New rescue system 
The new Bradford Casualty Carrier is 
a multipurpose rescue and evacuation 
system. It may be used as an amhulance 
streteher or as a rescue stretcher to suit 
all conditions. rhe carrier makes it 
possible to move a patient from an 
accident location to the amhulance. 
hospital emergency, hospital trolley. 
or x-ray bed ",ithout creating additional 
trauma or discomfort. 
The Bradford Casualty ("arrier can 
serve as a rigid ambulance stretcher 
with backrest, in place of a "hasket - 
typl' litter." or as an enveloping stretch- 
er for difficult extrication prohlems. It 
ma) he lifted in a horizontal position tu 
he hoisted by a helicopter or crane or 
in a vertical position for extremely 
difficult rescues. A patient can he 
carried through holes 25 inches wide. 


.... 


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Chilcl\ Mitt 


FEBRUARY 1974 



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This produet is availahle from Safet) 
Supply Cumpany. 
 14 King Strcet 
East. roruntu. Ontariu. 


Chi;d's mitt 
rhe P('
e) Cumpany recentl) introduced 
a child's mitt that i
 de:-.igncd to keep a 
)uungster from putting his hand duwn 
his throat or using hi... lincers. 
rhe hack 1.11' 
the mitÌ IS m..de of 
Posey ßreezeline dacron me
h. \\hich 
gives full vision uf the hack 1.11' the h.lI1d. 
The palm is rilled \\ ith Inil iant pul) e
- 
teL For mure infol mat ion. \\, rite to F nn:-. 
& G ilmol e I td.. 10.\_\ R.lIlgevic\\ Rd., 
Port Credit, Ontariu. 


New tricyclic antidepres!>ant 
Anafranil (domipr.lmine) is a ne\" 
tril'ydic antidepre,"sant that is potent 
and rapid acting. An..rranil h.l:-. :-.hu\\n 
excellent re...ult<; in the treatment of 
depressive ill ncs:-.. according to Geig) 
Pharmaceuticals. It provides a distinct 
threc-fÒld action, relieving the total 
...)mptom complex 1.11' depre

ion 


through elevation of muod. remlSSlun 
of so'matic symptoms. and alle\ iation 
of anx iet). 
Anafranil is available as a sugar- 
coated, 25 mg. pale yellow Ientic
I.lr 
tahlet. It cumes in hottles 1.11' 50 and 
500. :\10re information i
 availahle 
from Geigy Pharmaceuticals. Dun al. 
Quehec. 


Literature available 
A ne\\ 40-page guide de
crihing nearl) 
300 ...il icone products and their appli- 
cations is available from DO\\ Curning 
Silicones Inter-America Itd.. I lïppet 
Ruad. Downsvie\\, Ontario :\DH 5 L
. 
rhis hrochure. entit!ed "A Guide to 
Dm\ Corning Products," i
 organi/ed 
fÒr select iOIl 1.11' 
 il icone product
 hy 
indu
try cla
:-.ilï
at iun. I'here are 
X 
product groups. ranging from ruhher 
compoum,h tu p(J\\der treatment:-.. de- 
fo.ll11ers and luhricant
. Thl'se produet 
group:-. .Ire cro:-.
-indC\eJ to II.) industr
 
classifications. \\ h ich inelude appl i- 
ances. chemical proces...ing, rubher. and 
equipment. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 49 



POSEY LAP ROBE 


The Posey Lap Robe is one 
of the many products included 
in the complete Posey Line. Since 
the introduction of the original 
Posey Safety Belt in 1937, the Posey 
Company has specialized in hos- 
pital and nursing products which 
provide maximum patient protec- 
tion and ease of care. To insure the 
original quality product always 
specify the Posey brand name when 
ordering. 
The Posey Safety Lap Robe provides 
the patient warmth while preventing 
him from sliding forward or slumping 
over. This is one of eleven wheelchair 
safety products providing patient se- 
curity. #5163-4532, $21.00. 


\ 


-- 



l .
 
'.... " 


The Posey Foot-Guard is designed 
with a rigid plastic shell providing 
support and synthetic wool liner to 
prevent pressure sores on heels and 
ankles. The Posey line includes 
twenty-three rehabilitation products. 
#5163-6410, $15.00 ea. 


'- 



 


. 


", 


The Posey "V" Safety Roll Belt se- 
cures under the bed out of the pa- 
tient's reach, yet offers maximum free- 
dom to roll from side to side and sit 
up. This belt is one of seventeen 
Posey safety belts which insure pa- 
tient comfort and security. #5163- 
1131 (with tie ends), $9.90. 



 
. 
, 


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The Posey Body Holdermay be used 
in either a wheelchair or a bed to 
secure chest, waist or legs. There are 
sixteen other safety belts in the com- 
plete Posey line. #5163-1731 (with 
ties), $5.10. 



< 


'; '. 
,..,. . 


.... 


,\1\\ 
The Posey Houdini Security Suit, 
constructed of cool breezeline mate- 
rial, is virtually impossible for patient 
to remove yet provides security with 
comfort. There are eight safety vests 
in the complete Posey line. #5163- 
3412, $15.00. 


Send for the free all new POSEY catalog - supersedes all previous editions. 
Please insist on Posey Quality - specify the Posey Brand name. 


50 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Send your order today! 
POSEY PRODUCTS 
Stocked in Canada 
ENNS & GILMORE LIMITED 
1033 Rangeview Road 
Port Credit, Ontario, Canada 


new products 


The following sections of the bro- 
chure give data on the applications and 
characteristics of each product group. 

t the end is a list of applications 

n
exed . to the appropriate product 
mformat Ion. 


Treatment for menopausal symptoms 
Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd. 
has developed a programmed method 
llf oral treatment for the menopause. 
wh ich can be obtained by prescription. 
The treatment combines two synthetic 
hormones. estrogen and progestin. with 
a sequential tablet package. Each tablet 
is numbered to correspond with days 
of the month. from the first to the 
twenty-fourth. After the twenty-fourth 
day. the tablets are disconti nued until 
the first day of the next month. 
Program tablets are available in 
three different color-coded packages, 
according to required strengths tÒI 
the individual patient. The first 17 
tablets contain only estrogen, and the 
next 7 tablets contain estrogen plus pro- 
gestin. These ingredients replace the 
natural ovarian hormones of estrogen 
and progesterone. the levels of which 
arc signiticantly reduced at the onset of 
menopause. 
Estrogen-relatn.l symptoms include 
depression. adverse skin effects, hot 
tl ushes. and hypertension. Progester- 
one-related symptoms include im- 
balance of the nervous system, mam- 
mary changes. and irregular bleeding 
More information is available from 
Ortho Pharmaceutical (Canada) Ltd., 
19 Green Belt Drive. Don Mills. 
Ontario. 


Disposable isolation tray 
A new disposable isolation tray service 
is available through American Hospital 
Supply. 1076 Lakeshore Road East, 
Mississauga. Ontario L5E 3B6. Includ- 
ed in this tray service arc dishes. bowls 
and lids. tlatware, napkin. nonwoven 
fabric tray cover. and individual poly 
bags for disposing of each service. 
Iso-Pak components. which are 
ED.A. approved. insulate foam to 
hold tood at a maximum eating temp- 
erature. The foam withstands tem- 
peratures from minus 40 degrees 
fahrenheit to I X5 degrees fahrenheit 
without distortion. and can be used in 
microwave ovens. fhe Iso-Pak bowls 
and dishcs do not absorh liquids. are 
firmly rigid tllr eas
 handling. and give 
no odor or taste to food. 
All the items neeessar
 for the tray 
service are in one box and the trays in 
a second box. {;:; 
FEBRUARY 1974 



research abstracts 


Mooney, Sr. Mary Margaret. A cOlllpar- 
ati\'l' stlldy (
f IlllneS' recordillg (
f 
allalgesic therapy. Cleveland. Ohio. 
1972. Thesis (
I.s.
.) Case Western 
R esen e (' . 


A review of the literature re\ealcd 3 
consistenc) of expectation as to the 
content of nursing notes. Included in re- 
corded nursing observations are nota- 
tions <IS to the kind and amount of anal- 
gesic. the time of administration of 
p.r.n. analgesics. descriptions of the 
patienfs pain, and notations of patient 
response to analgesic therapy. It is 
proposed that certain approaches to 
recording nursing obsen ation, promote 
the inclusion of more expected content 
than other approache... to recording 
nursing observations. 
This stud\ considered \\hether the 
use of a prZ)blcm list as a guide for 
recording nursing observations con- 
tributed to the inclusion of more ex- 
pected and recommended content than 
\\ as included in nursing notes \\ hen 
such a problem list \\as not used. Pa- 
tient age. patient ,ex. length of hospi- 
talization. length of postoperative 
period. t)pe of service. and the occupa- 
tional status of the recorder of nursing 
notes \\ ere other variables considered. 
The nursing notes from the patient 
record of 100 medical-surgical adult 
patients in three Clevcland hospitals 
\\ ere anal)zed for expected content con- 
cerning the ,ldministration of p.Ln. 
analgesics. fhe 11111m\ ing h) potheses 
\\ere tested and conlirmed. 
I. The administration of p.Ln. anal- 
gesics is recorded \\ ith significantl) 
greater frequency in problem-oriented 
nursing notes than in nursing notes 
that are not problem-oriented. 
2. Descriptions of pain cxperienced 
b) the patient immediatd) prior to or at 
the time of administration of p.r.n. 
anal gesics arc recorded \\ ith sign ilicant- 
I) greater frequency inprohlem-oriented 
nursing notes than in those that arc not 
problem -oriented. 
3. Patient response to p.r.n. anal- 
gesics is recorded with ,ignificantl) 
greater frequenq in problem-oriented 
nur,ing note, than in those that arc not 
pnlblem-oriented. 
fhe conclu,ions a... as,essed in this 
,tud\ \\ ere that: 
· pr
lblem-I'riented nursing notes arc 
more likel) to contJin expected content 
FEBRUARY 1974 


than non problem-oriented nursing notes 
. e:\pected content in problem-oriented 
nursing note... of surgical patients is 
more likely to be recorded concerning 
the administration of parenterall) ad- 
ministered analgesics than concerning 
the administration nf orall\ administer- 
ed analgesic... J 
. the response of male patients to anal- 
gesic therap) is more likel) 10 be re- 
corded in the nursing notes than the 
response of female patients. irrespec- 
tive of \\ hether or not the nursing notes 
arc prohlem-oriented 
. expected content concerning the ad- 
ministration of p.r. n. analgesics is 
morc likel\ to be recorded in the nur...- 
ing notes '01' patients \\ho hale been 
hospitalized ...ix da) s or less than for 
tho,e hl'spitalized seven days or more. 


Robinson, Leola Anne. IlllimllatÙm 
lItili
ed hy del'ell ('lIrdia
' patie/lts 
alld the relatioll.\hip (
,. this ill- 
.!c1nlllltioll to progress (!Iia discharge. 
:\1ontreaI. Que.. 1 1 )73. Stud\ (I\1.Sc. 
(Appl.)) \1cGill U. - 


This stud) used qual itative re...earch 
techniques to examine the inrÓrmation 
u'ed h) II cardiac patients in assessing 
their illness situations. Each patient 
\\ as visited throughout a period of ho...- 
pitalization. and at least t\\ ice after 
discharge. Follo\\-up medical-record 
data \\ere al...o obtained for all patients. 
The data revealed six sources 01 
information used by patients. Three 
of these were external to the patient\ 
personal experience: the health team. 
the public media, and others \\ ith heart 
disease. The other three ...ources \\ ere 
internal to the patienfs personal exper- 
ience. past illnesses. ph)siological feed- 
back. and factors in one's life situatinn. 
The summ,ltion of all the informa- 
tion accumulated by each patient in- 
dicJted the information hase for that 
patient, This information hase rcsulted 
in the patienfs vie\\ ing the ill ness in a 
particular \\ a). fhree "vie\\ of illness" 
categories \\ere identified. optimi...tic, 
uncertain. and pessimi...tic 
The vie\\ of illnes, a patient po...,cs...- 
ed \\as po...itivd) associ,lted with his 
progress t\\O to Il'ur month, after dis. 
charge. That is. patients with an opti- 
mistic vie\\ of their illness did \\dI. and 
patients \\ith a pessimistic or uncertain 
vie\\ of their illne...s did poorl). 


The findings of thi... stud) suggest 
that it \\ould be helpful for the health 
team to be a\\are of the information 
hase a pat ient possesses. In th is \\ ay. 
health team intervention can be directed 
more readily to\\ard the specific needs 
of each patient. Patients \\ ith an opti- 
mistic vie\\ of their illness mal onl\ 
need straightfof\\ard guidelin
s and 
instructions. Patients \\ Ith uncertain or 
pes...imistic vie\\s of their illne...s require 
more than this. 


Clements, Dianne B. Loss: a II/q;or COIl- 
l'e/'.\atiollal thell/e of the elder/,'. 
'\lomreal. Que.. JI)7j. Stud\ ('\1.Sc 
(Appl.)) \1cGill U. - 


fhe purpose of th is research \\ as to 
stud) S) stematicall) thl' theme of 10...... 
donlinJnt in the cOI1\'er...,ltion of the 
elderly. This \\a... done to determ ine 
patterns of cOl1\ersation about loss and 
predict \\hat groups of people would 
talk about particular losses. 
Unstructured inter\ie\\s \\ere car- 
ried out \\ ith 24 peopk het\\cen the 
ages of 65 and XX) cars. The ana" sis of 
the COI1\ ersation... re\ ealed IÏ\ e "nwlor 
themes of loss: lo,s of sdL los.... of 
others, loss of home. loss of acti\ ities. 
and loss of health. These major Ip" 
themes \\ ere related to sdeetCli demo- 
graphic variahles and COI1\ ersational 
characteristics. fhe researcher dis- 
covered that pepple \\ ho t,llked about 
a particular kind PI' los... had ccrtain 
characteristics in common. 
Those \\ho talked most ahl'ut their 
o\\n death. I os... of self. \\ere in the older 
age group nf the "',Imple leightie, and 
late se\entiesL and talked about a large 
numher nf lossc,. The com ers,l\iO
l'" 
\\ere either vel') short or \el) long. 
\\ idO\\.... \\ ho \\ere alsp in the old
r 
group and talked ahout multiple losses. 
tended to talk mo,t ahout the Ip...... 01 
others. 
fhose \\ ho h,ld either li\ed nn one 
farm all of their li\e, or :.ad been born 
in Europe talked about the 10" pf their 
homes or the los, of their nati\ eland. 
Tho...e in till' youngcr age group 
(...ixties and earl) ,e\entie,) talked 
about le\\ er lo......es and IIICused on 10...... 
of acti\it). fhe )ounger pepple \\ho 
mentioned fe\\ Ip,ses. hut \\ ho ,11-.0 
talked for rclati"el) ,hort period" 
fÒcu...cd on los... of health. 
The...e findings ma) lead nur...c... to 
THE CANAglAN NURSE 51 



research abstracts 


question some of the hasic assulllptions 
that guide their nursing care of the 
elderly. Further qualitative re
earch 
i
 needed to obtain a more complete 
and detailed picture of the importance 
of lo

 to the elderly and the role of 
the nur
e in helping these people 
cope \\, ith the <lging proce

. 


Reighley, Ronald S. The (,(l/Icer1/.\ e.'- 
presscd hy patiellt.\ with cardiac 
('(mdiliollS dl/ring the /ïnt 13 da\'Sor 
IIO.\'pitali:.atiou aud till' resfJol/.\
'.\' (Ù 
health 1\'()/"J..e/"'\ and other patient.\ 
to thne concern.\'. Montreal. P.O.. 
1<)71. Stud) (M.Sc. (Appl.)) Mc- 
GilllJ. 


rhls 
tUdy. uSll1g qualitative research 
methods. was de
igned to inve
tigate 
the concerns expres
ed h) 3X patient
 
\\ ith cardiac conditions during the 
fir
t 13 days in hospital. and the res- 
ponse, made b} hospital personnel 
,1Ild other patient
 to the
e concerns. 
Se\en categorie
 of concerns and 
five eategori

 of responses \\ ere 
identified from the 11.f incidents ex- 
trapolated from the data. rhe re
pon
e
 
to the concerns expressed by patients 
\\ ere anal} zed in terms of the crfect 
they had on the expressed concern. 
Re
pon,es that allowed JiJr a re.,olu- 
tion or Ic,sening of a concern \\ ere 
termed facilitative. and respon
es 
eon,idered not to as
ist q.r to Icssen 
a concern \\erT termed nonfacilitative. 
rhis stud\ found that nonfacilitativc 
rc"pon
es predominated for lJ of the 
13 da\ s. rhe greater proportion of non- 
facilitati\e re
ponse
 \\ ere demonstrat- 
cd during the fir
t four da}s l)f hospita- 
I i/ation. and only on the twelli.h day 
did facilitative rcspom,es exceed the 
nonfacilitative responses. 
rhe findings indicated that the 
t) pe of concern expre

ed b} a patient 
\\ ith a cardiac condition. during the 
first 1.\ da)s of hospitali/ation, i
 clo
e- 
Iy related to the numher of day" "pent 
in hospital. 
It \\ as tiJund that a strong rdation- 
.,hip existed het\\een the categol'} of 
personnel making the respon
e and 
the t} pc of re
pon.,e given in re"ponse 
to a patient's cxpres
ed concern. 
rhe finding that the concern
 of 
patient
 \\ ith cdl'diac conditions tend 
to be "da) 
pecilïc" ,uggöh that pa- 
tient education could he geared to Ihe 

hanging cOI.Kern pattern. Such a pro- 
Ject could torm the ba
is of further 
research. 


52 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


11le great variatil)(1 of re
pon
es h} 
hospital personnel suggests an area 
for further research to ascertain the 
difll:rent frames of rell:rence being 
usnl h)' the health \\orkers giving eare
 


McMahon, Sister Mary. 4 stl/dy to 
identU."" the concerns or I//Other.\, 
the strategie,\ wed to e.'press thell/, 
awl the nl/rsing imelTl'ntion elicited 
hy thel/l a.\ re\'eall'd dl/ring the hath- 
iug (
r the hahy. Montrea I. Oue.. 
IlJ72. Stud) (M.Sc. (Appl.)) Mc- 
Gilll'. 


This 
tud}' wa
 designed to identify 
the eoncern
 of mothers in relation to 
the care of their babies during the post- 
partum hospitalization period. 
In this study, concern rcfer
 to any 
interest. worry, or de
ire to know exhi- 
bited by the mother during the bathing 
ot the baby. 
By means of the participant-observer 
role, data were collected at the time the 
mothers were bathing their intants. This 
was a return bath, since mo
t mothers 
in the sample had been given a bath 
demonstration the previous day. The 

amplc included 36 mothers - 26 
primIpara and 10 multipara. 
Mothers' concerns fall into six cate- 
gories and the}' use four strategie
 to 
express them. Five categories of nursing 
intervention are employed to re
pond 
to the mothers' eoneern
. 
Analysis of the data in relation to 
the three variablc
, Illothers' concerns, 

trategies used to express them. and 
nursing intervention. reveals that two 
interaction patterns emerged from the 
data. 
Pattern I: When mothers arc con- 
cerned about the procedure and the care 
and condition of the baby, they use the 
qrategy of inquiry. and the nurses 
re
pond by giving directions, infomling. 
or approving, 
Pattelï/ II: When mothers' concerns 
are in the area of the baby'
 behavior. 
their own performance. socializing, and 
compari
H1 with sibling
 they u
 the 
strategies of commenting to the nurse 
or commenting to the baby. The nurses 
primarily do not respond but. on occa- 
sion, giw approval. 
Findings reveal that: 
I. Mothers' greatest eoncern
 dre 
with the procedure OX percent), care 
and condition of the baby (2X percent), 
and baby's behavior ( I () percent), 
2. Mothers use the 
trategies of in- 
quiry (37 percent), commenting to 
the nur
e (29 percent), and commenting 
to the baby (2lJ percent) most frequent- 
ly. 
J. Nursing intervention is primarily 
in relation to the procedure (66 per- 
cent). 


4. Mothers comply with the nursing 
intervention in 50 percent of the cases, 
while in I X percent of the cases they do 
not re
pond at all, and in 17 percent of 
the cases they inform. 
5. Nur
e
 do not respond to mothers' 
concerns 36 percent of the time, and 
give infÒrmation in 3 I percent of the 
ease
. 
These findings suggest that when 
mothers inquire about their concerns. 
they arc more likely to obtain a response 
than when they comment to the nurse 
or to the baby. 
The lìnding that the mother's great- 
est concern is the procedure suggests 
that for mothers to be able to perform 
the procedure properly is a sign to 
them of their confidence in being able 
to care tor the baby. It could also sug- 
gest that the mothers arc responding to 
the manner in which the bath demons- 
tration was given. 
The high proportion of compliance 
(50 percent) to the nursing intervention 
suggests the amount of intluenee the 
nurse ha
 in this 
ituation. 


Tremblay, Charlotte. Nurse aide sim- 
ilarity to patil'1If and feelings (
l 
IIClple.Hl/l'.n. Cleveland, Ohio. \<)71. 
Thesis (M.S.N.) Case Western Re- 
serve U. 


rhe present study was to investigate 
the relation
hip between the perception 
of similarity of the nursc aide between 
her
clf and the terminally ill patient. 
and the nurse aidc'
 fceling
 of help- 
lessne
s in caring li)r the terminally ill 
patient in nursing homes. 
Subjects for the present study were 
30 female nurse aides worki ng in three 
nursing homes. rhe criteria ti)r inclu- 
sion of nur
e aides were that they had 
given care to one of the women patients 
for at least 15 day
 and that they knew 
how to read and to write. 
rhe hypothesis statcd that there is 
a relationship between the perceived 

imilarity of the nurse aide between 
herself and the terminally ill patient. 
and the nurse aidc's feelings of hclp- 
Ie
,ne
'. 
A Pearson product moment correla- 
tion eoefficient was computed to de- 
terminl' the extent of relationship 
between these variables. The obtained 
correlation of + .3X wa
 significant at 
the .05 level on a two-tailed test. 
The h) pothcsis \\ as supported. This 
meant that \\hen nur
e aides perceived 
them
elves as being more similar to 
thl' pal ients. nu rse aides reported feel- 
ing
 of hclpfulne
s. and ",hen nurse 
aides perceived themsclve
 as being 
lös similar to the patient
. nur
e aides 
reported feeling
 of helplessness. 
The investigator concluded that 
inserviee education in regard to the 
FEBRUARY 1974 



varia hie... in thi., ,tud) may he helpful 
to nurse aide, \\ho arc \\orking \\Îth 
terminall) ill patients innur,ing home.... 
Research i... needed to e'\pltJre more 
fully the relation...hip hel\\een the per- 
ceived ...imilarih of the nurse aide... 
hetween themseives and th
' term inal h 
ill patients. and the nurse aiue'; rccÍ- 
ings of helplcssnc....... Such re...earch 
could enable nurse... to formulate plan... 
to help nur.,c aiues feel more helpful 
in caring tÒr term in all) ill patient.... 


Kravitz, Mona B. Jo/...illg bel,m'iOllr 011 
orthopedics - a descriptil'e stlidy. 
M,)ntrcal. Que.. 1973. Stud\ (\1.Sc. 
(Appl.l) McGill L'. - 


This descriptive study \\ as to generate 
useful knO\\ ledge ahout joking in the 
subo;tantive context of orthopedic pa- 
tient care. 
Joking beha"ior \\as defined as an) 
statement or action that evokes laugh- 
ter in the subject or listener. 
Participant observation permitted 
exploration of some of the suhtle nu- 
ances of interaction among patient... and 
between patients and nurses. Written 
records aIlo\\ed the researcher to learn 
something about \\ hat patients \\ere 
like prior to hospitalization. their prog- 
ress in hospital. and the beh aviors on 
which nurses focused in \\ ritten reports. 
The sample consisted of 24 ortho- 
pedic patients on bed rc...t. Patients in 
the immediate postoperative phase 
were excluded. Patients were observed 
on at least t\\O separate occa,ions. The 
average hours of observation per pat ient 
were 1.75. All hut one patient \\ ere in 
four-bedded rooms. 
As some patients joked during the 
observation periods \\ hile others did 
not. a category set was thus identitied. 
Jokers and NOII;o/...en \\ere among the 
patient, observed. and a number of 
differences were observed between 
them. 
I. Jokers demon.,trated considerahle 
verbal anu social skill in interaction... 
with others. This was not evident in 
the nonjoker group. Interactions ob- 
served bet\\ een nur,es and jokers \\ ere 
suggestive of a sharillg (?t' uhat it lI'a.\ 
like to llline and u'hat it l\'ll
 li/"'(' [(} be 
nlined. Little interaction \\a... ob...erved 
between nonjokers and nurses and non- 
jokers anu other patient.... 
2. Joker... tendeu to he in rooms 
where other occupants joked. '\1on- 
jokers tenued to be in rooms where 
other occupants did not joke. In their 
spdre moments. nur...es tended to gr dvi- 
tate to rooms characteri7ed b) ajoking 
climate. 
J. Jokers diu not tend to complain 
of pain and minimi.red other ph) ...ical 
and p...ychological d i.,com forts. Non- 
FEBRUARY 1974 


jl)kers appeared to be preoccupied with 
...uch discomforts. 
4. \lore non jokers than jokers re- 
ceived tranquilÌiLers uuring' ho"'pitali- 
7ation, 
5. :\1ore jokero; \\ere gainfull) em- 
ployed prior to hospitaliLation than 
nonjokers. \1any nonjoker... were social- 
I) ueviant \\ ith respect to problems of 
alcohol ism. retardat ion. mental illness. 
and criminal activity. 
6. Joker... focused on lik outside 
hospital - their \\ork and recreational 
acti vities. Nonjokers did not. 
Variables that did not discriminate 
bet\\een jokers and noniokers \\ere. 
fever. diagnosis. :o.urger). tÌ-action. anal- 
gesic and sedative medication. length 
of stay. previous hospital experience, 
la'
g.uage, age. sex. religion. and ethnic 
orrglll. 
A perceptioll wa., conceptualized a... 
a judgment hy a person of another's 
characteri...tics or attrihutes. A total of 
II I statements were collected and cate- 
gorized along the dimension of IlI/neS' 
perception. !\: inet) -four (X5 percent) of 
them \\ ere ohtained from \\ ritten re- 
corus. and 17 ( 15 percent) from verhal 
remarks made by nur...es ahout patients 
in casual convcrsation. Items were 


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as...igned to t\\O categories. the .,ocial 
nature of the patient and the progre...., 
he \\ a... making in ho"'pital. :\urse...tenu- 
cd to perceive joker... a... soci.tble anu 
progre,...ing \\ell. and nonjoker, a... un- 
...ociable and not progressing well. 
A total of 42 statements nldde bv 
patients about nurse, and/or nursing 
care \\ere considered as indice... of pat- 
terns of patiell1s' perception. Jokers 
tended to perceive nur...e... as ...ociahle. 
efficient. but busy, Nonjokers tenued to 
percei\'e nup,e... a... unsociahle. ineftÏ- 
cient. and bus). 


Bhusari, Marjorie. A \tlidy of 
Hrategies and slih.\('lf/i('111 
ol/1co/lle.\ ill a p.\)'chiatric 
\h1Jltre.11. Quehec. I (r I. 
(\'1.5c. (Appl.)) \1cGill L'. 


111/ r.\ /II,!.! 
patiem 
\eftillg. 
Stud) 


In nur
ing \\e ha"e little de...niptih: 
e\ idenn: on \\hich to h.lse hoth practice 
and teaching. of ho\\ nur...e... practice. 
or of h(m patients hehave in respon...e 
to their nur...ing, This is a de.,eripti\e 
study of the rdation...l1Ïp... among nur...- 
ing ...trategie... and sub.,equent paticnt 
outcomes. 
:\. nur.,ing .,trateg) \\ as defined a... 
a verhal or nOI1\ erhal nur'\e heha\ inr 
performcu \\ hile nur.,ing a pati.:nt. anu 
a patient outcome as a behm ior occur- 
ring in response to a nur.,e ...tratcg
. 
The ...tUlh \\ as conducted h\ the method 
of groundeu theol'\. D.lta \\'ere collect.:d 
h
 
 participant (;b...en ation of inter- 
action... het\\een 
l) patient... and 13 
nur...ing ...taIT. in a ...hort-term p...)ehiatric 
...eui ng. 
'\n7Ih.,i., re\caleu that nur...e ...trat- 
egie... \\- ere not ljual itat i\ eI) uifll:rent 
from patient l'lItcome.... Six .,uch ...trat- 
eg) anu outcomc t
 pc... \\ere identilïeu. 
a\ oidance. p()\\er-prote.,t. hargaining. 
illiorming. inquir). and aCljuie.,cence. 
Both nurse... and patient... u...ed inform- 
ing. inljuil'). and P(1\\ .:r-protc...t .,trat- 
egie... more frelju.:ntl) than the) did the 
remaining three. Characteri...tic panel'll" 
llf relation...hip... \\ere identilïed anll)J]g 
.,tratcg
 t
 pc... and outcome I) pc.... IlK' 
\ ariou., qrategie... of nur.,e... and p.ttienlS 
\\ere conceplUali/ed a... falling along a 
...inglc control-compliance conllnuum 
extending from a\oidance to acquie.,- 
ccnce. 
rhe finding., .,ugge...t "e\ eral area., 
for .,Uh.,L'l.luent de...crrpti\e re
earch. 
I. hm\ .,trategie... anu oulcome., arc 
affected h) .,eiíing. t
pe of illne.,.,. 
...tage of illnc....... or the e'\p.:cted COlli ,e 
of illnc....... 
2. the di.,co\ er
 01 conceph and 
h
 pothe...e... rele\ anI hI the area of 
control. 
3. the effect... in pr.lctice of teaching 
nur...ing a... inljuir). that i.,. a" a continu- 
ing inljllir) into \\ hat OCClll.... ...uh...
.lju'-.nt 
to particular 1lI11,.,ing .tct.,. .: 
THE CANAQIAN NURSE 53 



books 


The Crisis Team: A Handbook for the 
Mental Health Professional by Ju- 
lian Lieb. Ian I. Lipsitch. anu An- 
drew E. Slaby. I X6 pages. Hagers- 
town. Maryland. Harper and Row, 
1973. 
Rl'I'Ù'ln'li hy Philip /-. T. COI\'l'/' , 
(ormer A ssistafll Director (
( Nursing 
Sen'icc, Queell Strl'l't MClltal Health 
Cell1re, {orollto, ()ll1ario. 


In this expensive paperback. the organ- 
izational structures required to support 
a multidisciplinary team's work in crisis 
intervcntion MC plainly stated and 
described. Because it is aimed at prac- 
tically anyone interested in this work. 
psychiatrists or clinicians familiar with 
this aspeet of psychiatric care will tind 
The Crisis ream somewhat repetitious. 
Nev\'comers and trainees. on the other 
hand. \\ill find thc book a helpful walk- 
through of how to set up and run a suc- 
ccssful crisis intervention center. 
The varied readership at which this 
hanubook is aimeu somewhat blunts 
the two major elements. fhe review 
of crisis intervention as a technique 
is too briefly outlined to provide a 
complete grasp of the real nature of the 
worL and the clinical casc histories. 
\,hile numerous. arc too sketchy to be 
proper models for emulation. 
In addition. the descriptions of the 
structure and functioning of. a unit as 
an organization would need furtha 
amplil
cation to be really helpful. How- 
ever. ample references on crisis inter- 
vention methodology arc provided, anu 
careful reading will sort out the form 
of organiLation the authors recommend. 
rhe appendix is useful to those 
who are unfamiliar with the Spitzer 
and Endicott computerized Psychiatric 
Anamnestic Record and Mental Status 
Examination Forms, as an exact copy 
of each form is provided. I was disap- 
pointed that the authors did not give an 
addres:, where more eopies of the forms 
could be obtained, as they are com- 
pre hensive. scl f-explanatory. and adapt- 
ahle to a variety of settings. 
Crisis intervention is an essential 
p<lrt of modern. community-oriented 
p"ychiatric nursing practice. and this 
handbook gives full recognition and 
support to the validity of professionals 
other than psychiatrists taking on this 
helping role. As it assumes that the 
qual it ies needed for successful perform- 
54 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


ance arc not restricted to doctors. this 
book encourages nurses or other profes- 
sionals to accept an active role in the 
organization and pr,wision of a com- 
plete eri"is intervention service. 


Midwifery by Jean L. Hallllm. 15::! 
pages. London. English Universities 
Press. 1972. Canadian Agent. Mus- 
son, Don Mills. Ontario. 
 
Rel'iel\'ed hy ,\;J.1'. ,\;Jilt/red Morris, 
A ssislallt Prt
f'e.,.'or, School (
( Nun- 
illl<, Ullivcrsity (
( Ottal\'a, Ottal\'a, 
Oll1ario. 


This text is part of a modern nursing 
serics designed for student midwives 
in the United Kingdom. The author 
stresses that childbirth is a natural phe- 
nomenon. and states: "U nnccessary 
interference with nature can cause much 
harm:' 
Further. the author deplores undue 
haste in the management of labor. She 
gives as examples 
thc use of an episio- 
tomy except in an emergency. oxytocics 
ro hasten placental separation, anu the 
Brandt Andrews method to deliver the 
placenta. However. in North America 
thcre is general acccptance hy nurse- 
midwives of the use of midline episio- 
tomy where indicated; these indications 
arc broad compared to those listed hy 
Hallum. such as prevention of a severe 
pcrinealtear. 
Careful proofreading would have 
elim inated distracti ng typograph ical 
errors. ti,r instance on page II. 510 gm 
is given as the weight of the non- 
pregnant lIterus. and on page ::!9. chro- 
nic villi. Generally. this work seems 
oversimplified; the physiologic hasis 
1'01 treatment is not generally stah:d. 
hut rather information is presented 
without explanation. However, the good 
line-drawings add to the reader's unuer- 
standing. The lIse of rhetorical ques- 
tions hreaks the continuity of the 
material and. at times. the author secms 
\0 he "crmonizilll
. 
One wonuers 
 why a treatment re- 
garded hy North American and Euro- 
pean authorities as heing of historical 
interest, the use of Willet's forceps to 
apply traction to the fetal scalp in the 
management of marginal placenta pre- 
....i<l. is incluued in a basic text. 
An excellent summar) of the train- 
ing programs for miuwives in the UK 


is included. which should interest 
nurses and nurse-midw ives in other 
countries. The use of thi" \\ork as a 
reference for Canadian nurses and 
nurse-mid\vives is limited. since mater- 
nit) care here. particularly management 
of lahor. is di fferent from that descrihed 
hy the author. 


The Interpersonal Basis of Psychiatric 
Nursing hy A. H. Chapman and E]/a 
1\1. Almcida. 5lJ
 pages. Ne\\ Y 01'''- 
Putnam's. IlJ'::!. Canadian Agent. 
:Vlacmillan. Toronto. 
Rn'icl\'ed I", A1(/r
arct R. Wehh, 
IllSlrt/clor, .\cl!ool ;
( N IIni IIg, Ulli- 
\'enily o((ì"gary, ('/lig/lry, Alla. 


This text meets the ohjective set forth 
hy thc authors. it is a "'clear. compre- 
hensive texthook of psychiatric nurs- 
ing:' The book covers all aspects of 
psychiatric nursing. ranging flOm its 
heginnings in the nineteenth century 
10 the present. As well. sections are 
included that are not typically ll1und 
in ps)chiatric nursing texts. such as 
di"cussion of common ènll1tional proh- 
lems found in medical and pediatric 
nursing. and the nurse's role in psychiat- 
ric research. 
This is a valuahle text Iì.>r under- 
graduate students. and one thl:) would 
USè in all areas of nursing. Each chapter 
is summarized hy a list of the important 
nmcepts presented in that chapter: a 
fairly extensive glossary of psychiatric 
terms is included at the end of the hook. 
Unlike many of the current ps}chiat- 
tric nursing texts. this book still relàs 
to patient... as diagnostic entitie
 rather 
than in hehavioral terms. However. 
includcd \\ithin each patiènt classili- 
cation is an e'\tensive description of the 
nursing care required b) these patiel1ls. 
Of particular interest is a chapter deal- 
ing with the assessment of the ps)chiat- 
ric patient. An a.,...e,smènt fr;lIl1e\\orh 
is outlined. indicating the various wa\s 
in which each memher of th
' healíh 
team. such as the nurse. the p"ychol- 
ogist. and thc ps}chiatrisl. contribute 
to thè tÒrmulation of the p"ychiatric 
diagnosis. 
As well as hcing useful for the un- 
dergraduate student. th is hook would 
unlk)l(htedly he a valuable refercnce 
"ouree Illr nursing libraries. 

 (Continued on page 56) 
FEBRUARY 1974 



. 
. 


. 
. 


E 


. 


51 


I 


INSTRUCTOR'S NOTE: To receive a com- 
plimentary copy for firsthand evaluation, 
write to the Textbook Department, men- 
tioning your position, course, and enroll- 
ment. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


New 6th Edition! 
NEUROLOGICAL AND 
NEUROSURGICAL NURSING 


Carini-Owens 


Highlighted by extensive revisions, this new 6th edition appears as the 
most comprehensive neurological and neurosurgical nursing text available. 
Students will find a new section on acupuncture, a totally revised section 
on multiple sclerosis, an all-encompassing presentation of drugs; plus 
in-depth treatment of broad topics in the field, including cerebrovascular 
disease, and related procedures and nursing care. 
By ESTA CARINI, R.N., Ph.D.; and GUY OWENS, M.D. April, 1974. Approx. 424 
pages, 7" x 10",155 illustrations, 2 in color. About $11.85. 


A New Book! 


Conover 


CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS: 
Exercises in Pattern Interpretation 
This practical volume can reinforce and broaden your student's expertise 
in the interpretation of arrhythmias. Common and rare patterns - more 
than 200 - are included for their personal diagnosis. An analysis by the 
author follows each. 


By MARY H. CONOVER, R.N., B.S.N.Ed. Januarv, 1974. Approx. 240 pages, 8" x 
10",266 illustrations in 234 ECG tracings. About $7.10. 


. 



 


I 


new Mosby nursing books 
accelerate student 
achievement 


... 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY. L TO 
86 NoRTHLINE ROAD 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


New 3rd Edition! labunski et al 


WORKBOOK AND STUDY GUIDE 
FOR MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING, 
A Patient-Centered Approach 


This carefully revised patient-centered workbook encourages the use of 
problem-solving techniques. Each case study first examines the patient as 
an individual and family member and notes the etiology and early 
symptoms of the disease. Students are given the opportunity to apply 
basic science principles to patient care and patient care planning. 
By ALMA JOEL LABUNSKI, R.N., B.S.N.; MARJORIE BEYERS, R.N., B.S.. M.S.; 
LOIS S. CARTER, R.N., B.S.N.; BARBARA PURAS STELMAN, R.N., B.S.N., 
MARY ANN PUGH RANDOLPH, R.N.. B.S.N.; and DOROTHY SAVICH, R.N., B.S. 
October, 1973.331 pages plus FM I-VIII, 7%" x 10W'. Price, $6.25. 
THE CAN DlAN NURSE 55 



books 


(Coll/illllt" li'olll!'agt 541 


Childhood Learning, Behavior and the 
Family by Louise C. Taichert. 112 
pages, Ne\\ Yor\.... Behavioral Pub- 
] ications. 1973. 
Re\'iewed hy ClIthrYlI GlwlI'ille, As- 
sociate Profl'Hor, ,'\,1cMaster 1I 11 i- 
I'ersi ty School (
r Nllrsillg. Ilamiltoll, 
01ltario. 


This boo\... presents a neurodevclop- 
mental-family approach to understand- 
ing and managing childhood learning 
and behavioral problems. 
The neurodevclopmental approach is 
based on the assumption that. although 
the ch ild and his fam il) are separate 
systems. they must be viewed together 
as a functional unit. Such an approach 
provides fÒr a process-oriented. non- 
catagorical assessment of the child's 
devclopmental levc\ and how this is 
inlluenced by many variables \\ithin 
the family system. fhese variables could 
be. communication patterns. norms. 
values. and roles. fhis approach is 
quite different from the traditional 
meuicalmoucls. which tend to empha- 
sile diagnostic labels and management 
of the child in isolation from the towl 
family. 
The first t\\O chapters present a 
historical review of critical issues of 
ehildhood learning and behavior. whieh 
extends beyond the nature-nurture con- 
Ilict. Critical phases of learning as des- 
cribed b) Eri\...son. Piaget and Freud 
are compared. 1 he author not onl) 
identifies specitïc learning problems. 
but abo describes th.
 learning process 
involved in achieving academic las\...s, 
Chapters three 

ld four focus on 
behavioral evenls occurring as the child 
\\ith specific learning diso
ders and his 
familv interact with each other. Pat- 
terns 'of communication within a dosed 
family system and a dysfunctional 
famil) system are examined and cases 
cited as exampk
s. 
As the treatment anu management of 
childhood learning and behaviZml1 prob- 
lems are described in chapter five. 
continuous emphasis is placed on the 
signitìcance of early detection of high- 
ris\... children. 
Chapter six describes how the neuro- 
developmental approach to learn ing anu 
behavioral problems is made operation- 
al through the use of gestalt-oriented. 
conjoint. family therapy. Cases are 
presented to illustrate the therapists' 
tas\... in helping the chilu and his family. 
This boo\... is excellent for anyone 
\\or\...ing with childn:n and their fami- 
lies. 
56 THE CANADIAN NURSE 



 
t 

'''''' " 
"" :J 
" 
""'- " 
.,.... :; 

 


Go..... r 


""'(fri. 



'C 


IEt.,
" 


I'C"' '" r" 


Perspectives in Human Development; 
Nursing Throughout the Life Cycle 
by Doris Coo\... Sutterley and Gloria 
Ferraro Donnely. 331 pages. New 
York. Springer. 1973. Can:.!dian 
Agent. Lippincott. foronto. 
Rel'ieU'ed hy Raymolld M. Ihomp- 
.\IJI/, Assi,\tWll PrOfl'\'Sor, UlIÎl'ersit\, 
(
r British CollI>>ll,jo School (
r NUI'.
- 
illg, VallCOlIl'er, B.C. 


rhe authors of this publication have 
used systems theory for presenling a 
multidiscipl inary view of man. fhe 
boo\... is intended to meet the learning 
needs of freshman nursing students. 
 
Eight life processes form the frame- 
\vor\... tiJr the presentation of content. 
An attempt is made lo demonstrate 
the relationship among the processes. 
thereby credting a multidimensional 
view of man. Olher content areas of 
panicular note are related to systems 
theory. clwironmental factors inlluen- 
eing man. and the profession of nursing 
vicwed as an open system. fhe treat- 
ment of the content is of sufficient 
breadlh and depth to be stimulating 
tÒr the beginning IlUr"ing student. 
Cases are used to illustrate the con- 
tent and to show generally how the 
nurse functions in a variety of settings 
with a variety of health-team members. 
A select fc\\ of the cases pose problems 
and could be used as a basis for further 
discussion; otherwise the use of the 
cases for lhis purpose is extremely 
limited. 
An extensive number of tïgures and 
tahlcs provide the reader with vast 
amounts of data in an organized. use- 
ahle format. Of particular note are the 
\\hipple Age-Ponrait Summaries that 
permit the reader to rake a theory. such 
as hic\...son's. and identify behaviors 
characteri/ed in lhat theory. A few 
of these tabks and figures are complex 
and appear superfluous to the purposes 
of the boo\.... 
Each chapter division is provided 


with a large number of references that 
should provide the reader with addi- 
tional scope in a given content area. 
A small number of the references 
arc for p.::rioJicab. which is interesting 
because these publ ieations are the 
source of much of the up-to-date infor- 
mation. Also of note is a uearth of 
nursing references. particularly \\hen 
excellent ones relevanl \0 some areas. 
such as systems theory. do exist. 
Although the publ ication is for 
nursing and is relevant to nursing. there 
is a lim ited attempt to demonstrate for 
the intended audienee just how the data 
may be used in an application setting. 
The content needs to be supplemented 
by the provision of some tools. such as 
a nursing history tool and physical and 
developmental appraisal tools. Ba- 
sically. the boo\... may well serve as one 
item in the data base needed for the 
effective use of the nursing process. 
The chief value of this hoo\... is as 
a reference in obtaining a brnau. inte- 
gratcd view of man throughout the life 
cycle. Because of its particular frame- 
wor\... t{,r the prcsentat ion of content. 
il may be difficult to use this success- 
fully as a text in a curriculum lhat uses 
a diflerent system model. 


Industrial Mental Health and Employee 
Counseling, edited by Robert L. 
Nolanu. 432 pages. New York, 
Behavioral Publications, 1973. 
Reviewed hv Rachel Aim Gow. 
Industrial Ni,rsc, Air Canada, To- 
romo I nterflat iOflal Airport. 


"A problem employee is one who does 
not eontorm to the social-vocational 
role expected of him at his place of 
employment." This boo\... is concerned 
with the problem employee. Its purpose 
is to provide the reader with a com pre- 
hen
ive view of what various compan ies 
and individuals have uone to understand 
/Co,,/il/{It'd 0" {Jllg<, 5X) 


FEBRUARY 1974 



A New Book! 
CONTROLLING THE SPREAD 
OF INFECTION: A Programmed 
Presentation 
As a handy reference, this new programmed presentation offers the 
scientific principles of asepsis for immediate and realistic application in the 
everyday care of patients. Emphasis throughout is on these principles as 
they apply to both patients and health care personnel, and on the 
infection control procedures necessary to establish and maintain an aseptic 
environment. 


Mcinnes 


By BETTY MciNNES, R.N., B.Sc.N., M.Sc.IEd.1. July, 1973. 112 pages plus FM 
I-XII. 7" x 10". Price, $4.75. 


A New Book! Dubay-Grubb 
INFECTION: Prevention and Control 


This new reference guides you in establishing a program for prevention and 
control of infection in all health care facilities. Pertinent chapters discuss 
meeting the needs of the isolation patient, legal aspects of hospital- 
associated infections, and much more! 
By ELAINE C. DUBAY, R.N.. B.S.; and REBA D. GRUBB, Medical Writer. August, 
1973.160 pages plus FM I-XVI. 6" x 9", 40 illustrations. Price, $5.15. 


. 
. 


 SICS 
EY.N. 


. 



 


. 
. 


... 


new Mosby nursing books 
initiate professional 
awareness 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY. l TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAD 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 
A New Book! Gahart 
INTRAVENOUS MEDICATIONS- 
A Handbook for Nurses And Other Allied Health Personnel 
In this unique new volume, the author presents the complete, specific, stat 
information designed to aid you in the administration of all LV. 
medications. 
By BETTY L GAHART. R.N. May, 1973. 176 pages plus FM I.XII, 6" x 9". PrIce, 
$5.00. 


A New Book! 
READINGS IN GERONTOLOGY 


FEBRUARY 1974 


As a current sourcebook for selected readings. this new volume considers 
gerontology. psychology, physiology, medical science, sociology, and 
more! 
Edited by VIRGINIA M. BRANTL, Ph.D.; and SISTER MARIE RAYMOND 
BROWN. R.S.M.. M.N.Ed. July, 1973. 118 pages plus FM I-X. 6" x 9". Price, $4.15. 
THE CANA
AN NURSE 57 



books 


(Col/ti/ll/C'c/ f,.o/ll I'"ge 56) 


and deal effectively with problem 
employees. 
The book is divided into tïve parts; 
each part is a collection of papers by 
academic, medical. and industrial 
experts. 
Part I concerns mental illnes
, hO\\ 
it effects productivity and efficiency, 
and the economic consequences of job 
disruption. An interesting chapta 
deals with identifying emotional di
- 
turbance in persons seen in industrial 
clinics. 
A recent study tì.)und 15 percent 
fewer industrial clinic patients than 
patients in a general group medical 
practice were considered b) nonpsy- 
chiatric phy-;icians to have an emotional 
problem. The author feels thi
 coulu 
be attributable to the fact that employ- 
ee
 in these companies were initially 
screened th rough job interview
 and 
phy
ical examinations. 
Where companies encourage health 
care by partial subsidy of good in sur- 
dnce coverage and where a company is 
supportive of employees with emotional 
problems by eliminating stressful 
on-tne-IOD situatIons, even it this means 
changing jobs, the incidence of employ- 
ee emotional problems seems to be 
lessened. 
"It can be correctly stated that a 
worker can be a bit fearful. a hit 
forgetful. a bit 
uspicious, a bit compul- 
sive. irritable, and angry. and still be 
very much a normal person," These 
anu other traits arc discussed in Part 
I L The reader is given sufficient 
historical background in the problems 
of employee mental health to enable 
her to understand both problems and 
trends in current industrial mental 
health and employee counseling. 
Part I II deals with the multiple 
approaches to employee counseling. 
from the role of the psychiatri
t in 
industry. through the value of clinical 
counseling. to the role of the pa
tor 
in employee counseling. 
Part I V has four ch apters deal ing 
with the mental health of supervisory 
and managerial personnel. the impact 
of their problems on the organiLatiÒn, 
and the care that must be taken in 
dealing with the problems of people 
at this level. 
Part V is composeu of eight chapters 
that deal with the latest trends for 
cooperation of labor management and 
community resources. It relates the ex- 
periences of unions in bargaining for 
and setting up mental health services. 
58 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


This book is well written, well 
documented, anu interesting to read. 
It eould be a val uable reference tÖr 
any occupational health cI i nic, for 
college 
tudents in personnel or indu
- 
trial management, or management 
personnel and industrial training in- 
structors. 
Although the book deals exclusively 
\\ ith American companies, it is quite 
easy to equate the same mental health 
problems with Canadian industry. 


Effective Approaches to Patients' Beha- 
vior by Gladys B. Lipkin and Rober- 
ta G. Cohen. 19X pages. New York. 
Springer, 1973. 
Reviewed by Christina I. Mihoski, 
Teacher. Nursing Program, Confed- 
eration College, Thunder Bay, Om. 


rhis book deals with behaviors tì.1Und 
in per
ons with various health problems. 
which makes it more versatile anu 
worthwhile than a basic text related 
specificalh to psychiatric problem
. 
The authors recognize the need for 
all health workers to develop mean- 
ingful anu as
ertive intervention to meet 
a dienfs emotional needs. It is pointed 
out that m<iny' health workers avoid 
patients with emotional needs as the 
worker is not sure of what to say or 
do. With thöe two premises in mind. 
the authors have prepared a short man- 
ual that describes problem behavior, 
discus
cs the dynamics i nvol\, cd, and 
suggests approaches suitable tì.)r use 
in any ho
pital or community setting. 
The book is divided into two sections. 
The short, tïrst one deals with some of 
the key concepts of interpersonal rela- 
tionships and preventive psychiatry. 
There is a noteworthy focus on the 
attitudes and approaches of the health 
worker. This is as im.portant as studying 
and understanding the patient, since 
the health worker is 50 percent of a 
one-to-one rei ationsh ip. 
It also establ ishes that the health 
\\orkcr cannot begin to understand 
and help the patient until she has 
understood and dealt with her own 
fedings appropriately. Many examples 
illu
tratc that. too often. the nurse's 
conclusions about a patient arc colored 
b) her own per
pectives and do not 
accuratel) re!lect the patient's needs. 
The chapter dealing with crisis 
inh:rvention provide-; a broad over- 
view of crisis points in lite, as seen 
from a maturational outlook (the stress 
time
 of growth and development!. It 
might have been auvisablc to delineate 
between the normal development.,1 
crisi
, such a
 weaning or puberty, and 
the accidental type of crisis. such as 
loss of a joh, illness, or being a victim 
of a disaster. 


In the longer, second section of the 
boo", each chapter deals with a specific 
behavioral problem - "The Hostile 
Patient," "The Helpless Patient"- 
or an illness entity in which the com- 
plexity of behavior poses a challenge. 
"The Patient Undergoing Renal Dial- 
ysis or Transplant." 
Each patient behavior is simply 
anu clearly described. There is some 
interpretation of possible causes and 
significance. This is frequently followed 
by a discussion of common, negative, 
nurse reactions. 
The second portion of each chapter 
identifies specific approaches to the 
behavioral problem. This is done in 
steps that include practical dos and 
don'ts. 
Concrete directions are given, with 
actual examples of what to do and what 
to say. These suggested approaches 
are one of the strongest points in the 
book. Too often, textbooks provide 
only wonderful ideas, concepts, theories, 
and generalizations. Many health work- 
ers. Including diploma student nurses, 
need assistance in transferring such 
knowledge into a form suitable for 
practical application. This book does 
just that. 
The authors are to be commended 
for preparing a practical resource man- 
ualthat coulu be an asset to any health 
worker in any setting. It meets the 
authors' intentions of helping the reader 
to understand the whys and to acquire 
the knowledge of what and how to do 
it. as related to specific behaviors, 
regardless of the diagnosis. 


Monitoring Central Venous Pressure; 
a Programmed Sequence by Jean M. 
Krueger. ill us. by Jane SulIivan. 95 
pages. New York, Springer, 1973. 
Rniewed by Kay Dejong, Inservice 
t.'dllcatio" Instructor, St. Bon
face 
Gl'fllnil Hospital, Winnipeg, Man- 
itoba. 


As happens so often in this rapidly 
changing world of health care, the 
specialty world for which a book was 
originalIy intended is part of the non- 
specialty world of general nursing by 
the time the book is published. This is 
evident in the section entitled "Assump- 
tions about Learner
," in which the 
author assumes that the nurse to whom 
her book is directed is "idealIy" a nurse 
who works in an leu or ecu. This 
nonvalid assumption, however, in no 
way detracts from the value of the text 
on an "In" procedure in today's hos- 
pitaL 
The introduction and objectives 
state clearly, in language understood 
by undergraduate or graduate, what 
the book is all about. 
(Colltil/I/eel Oil (Jage 60) 


FEBRUARY 1974 



New 2nd Edition! 


Aguilera-Messick 


CRISIS INTERVENTION: 
Theory and Methodology 
Thoroughly revised and updated, this new edition presents the problem- 
solving approach which offers clear-cut rationale to follow in stressful 
situations. Directed toward all levels of health care, it discusses all aspects 
of crisis intervention. 
By DONNA C. AGUILERA, M.S.; and JANICE M. MESSICK, M.S. April, 1974. 
Approx. 146 pages, 6%" x 9%",13 illustrations. About $6.30. 


A New Book! 
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 
AND THE NURSING PROCESS 


Berni-Fordyce 


Designed to acquaint you with the rudiments of behavioral analysis, this 
new volume outlines procedures and principles to follow in applying 
behavioral analysis to the wide range of problems you encounter in your 
daily work. 
By ROSEMARIAN BERNI, R.N., B.s.; and WILBERT E. FORDYCE, B.S., M.S.. 
Ph.D. June, 1973.136 pages plus FM I-XII, 5%" x 8W'. Price, $4.15. 


BASICS 
BEY · I 


. 



 


... 


new Mosby nursing books 
enhance interpersonal 
perception 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY, l TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAO 
TORONTO ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


New 2nd Edition! Douglass-Bevis 
NURSING LEADERSHIP IN ACTION: 
Principles and Application To Staff Situations 
In seven highly informative discussions, the authors show how to 
formulate principles from reference readings and resource material. They 
provide a theoretical framework and practical methods for administrative 
nursing activities. 
By LAURA MAE DOUGLASS, R.N., B.A., MS.; and EM OLIVIA BEVIS, R.N., 
B.S., M.A. April, 1974. Approx. 192 pages, 7" x 10", 17 illustrations. About $6.05. 


A New Book! 
NURSING AND THE PROCESS 
OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 


Popiel 


This book works as a handy reference to successful continuing education 
programs. 
Edited by ELDA S. POPIEL, R.N., B.s., M.s.; with 32 contributors. July, 1973. 
248 pages plus FM I-XX, 6Y," x 9%". Price, $7.30. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADtAN NURSE 59 



books 


(Co/lti/l/led /;'0111 page 58) 


The division of the boo\... into three 
parts lends itself to either study or 
review. The brief end-of-sequence re- 
views would be excellent refreshers 
for nurses who have had previous in- 
struction or experience. 
Beginners at CV p's will tind the 
entire program necessary and benefi- 
cial. The author has repeated many 
questions several different ways; this 
ma) stimulate learning in the young 
student. but may not do the same for 
the RN who wishes to review CVP. 
The objectives. generally spea\...ing, 
have been met. 
The author's style of writing makes 
what could be a boring procedure an 
interesting and absorbing exercise. 
The light weight of the text makes it 
easy to handle and carry in a pocket 
or purse. This lightness could be a 
drawback if the text were goillg to be 
used by a large number of people. Its 
spine may not stand the stralll 
 
There are areas that \Ve fÓund to be 
inadequately dealt with or completely 
lacking. It should be stressed that final 
assessment of the position of the CVP 
catheter tip can be done only with an 
anterior/posterior x-ray of the chest. 
The second area of weakness is in 
determining the CVP zero point. The 
method the author outlines can lead 
to variations in implementing the CVP 
procedure. We prefer to use the 4th 
intercostal space and mar\... our patient's 
chest wall halfway between the spine 
and the top of the chest: in this way all 
personnel use the same criteria for 
finding the zero point. The positioning 
of the manometer is rarely" . . . initial- 
ly determined by the physician," but 
is done by the nurse. 
More detail on technique of dressing 
the puncture site should have been in- 
cluded. as the consequences of infec- 
tion are grave. 
"Flushing the catheter" is a proced- 
ure that is fraught with danger. The 
author has not claritied whether tlush- 
ing is accomplished by gravity !low of 
IV solution or by forcing tluid under 
pressure through the tubing. Gravity 
tlow would probably not dislodge a 
wcll-formed clot in the evp catheter. 
but tlushing with a pressure device 
could. resulting in the death of a pa- 
tient. due to an embolus. 
The procedure for removing the 
CVP catheter has not been included by 
the author. 
Although the author has recommend- 
ed the book for both grauuate!-. anu 
undergraduates. I would recommend it 
60 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


primarily as a teaching tool for student 
nurses who wish to understand the 
purpose and functioning of the CVP 
procedure. But the book could be used 
by RNs to be assured of the same 
"<;tandard" of \...nowledge and perform- 
ance of CVP mea<;urement. 


Behavior Modification and the Nursing 
Process by Rosemarian Berni and 
Wilbert E. Fordyce. 135 pages. St. 
Louis. Mosby. 1973. 
Reviewed by Beverlee Cox, Lectur- 
er, University of British Columhia 
School of Nursing, Vancouver, 
British Columbia. 


For those professional nurses who wish 
to acquire the basic knowledge relating 
to learning theory and its specific appli- 
cation in the treatment modality known 
as behavior modification, this book will 
prove to be a useful guide. The authors 
state: "This boo\... seeks to acquaint 
nursing personnel and others working 
in the health care field with the rudi- 
ments of behavioral analysis and with 
procedures and principles to follow in 
applying behavioral analysis to a range 
of problems in their daily work." 
They have managed to do just that, 
through a careful and logical develop- 
ment for the unitiated reader of the 
various concepts underlying the prac- 
tice of behavior moditication. Of par- 
ticular value is their frequent use of 
examples of patient situations, describ- 
ingobservable and measurable behavior 
that is amenable to conditioning tech- 
niques through the use of appropriate 
reinforcement. 
The major portion of the book is 
devoted to a detaileu. systematic expo- 
sition of the "behavioral analysis pro- 
cess," as the authors have termed it. 
In each chapter. fundamental concepts 
and principles from learning theory 
are presented. Definitions of terms 
arc provided, and generally the con- 
cepts are well explained. 
What is not fully explained. how- 
ever, is the rationale for the use of this 
methodology in nursing situations. A 
brief historical overview of the develop- 
ment of learning theory, citing the work 
of such major theorists as Skinner, 
Eysenck. and Wolpe, is lacking in this 
book. This background information, 
had it been included, would have 
provided the reader with some inkling 
of the giant leap that learning theory 
has taken from the experimental work 
done in animal laboratories to the 
more recent application in clinical 
settings. 
Probably of greatest interest to 
nurses is the material contained III 
the last few ehdpters of the book, III 
which thoughtful consideration is 
given to the planning and implementa- 


tion of behavior modification in the 
nursing situation. There is also a chap- 
ter devoted to evaluation and problcm- 
oriented charting, one to ethical issues, 
and another to a discussion of future 
trends for the use of behavior modifi- 
cation. These are all timely subjects, 
and treated in sufficient depth to give 
the reader an increased understanding 
of them. 
In the chapter on ethical issues, the 
authors have made the point quite 
unequivocally that patients must be 
involved in setting the terms of a 
contract that employs a behavior modi- 
fication scheme. This shoulu allay the 
fears of those who view behavior mo- 
dification as a covert manipulation of 
patient behavior. 
The book itself takes the fonn of 
a manual, designed to promote self- 
learning by the inclusion of practice 
problems at the end of each chapter. 
The authors have also provided cogent 
summaries of the major topics covered 
at appropriate points in the text. 
This book should serve as a useful, 
practical guide for those students and 
practitioners who arc interested in 
applying a well-defined methodolog) 
for nursing intervention, rQ 


AV aids 


DATA BANK SERVICE 
o The University of Southern Cali- 
fornia is otfering the N ICEI\I Update 
Subscription Service to upuate and 
supplement all previous NICEJ\I in- 
dexes. NICEM has published 14 com- 
prehensive volumes dealing with non- 
book media. The subscription sèrvice 
provides 10 yearly volumes, each 
containing a subject section outline, 
subject guide, alphabetical guide, and 
producer/distributor directory. This 
allows the user of the 14-volul11e set 
to find new titles in all the media and 
all subject areas, and abo helps those 
who only need access to one media 
volume, such as the Inuex to 16111m 
Educational Films. 
For more information, write to the 
University of Southern California, 
National Information Center for Edu- 
cational Media, University Par\..., Los 
Angeles. California 90007, U.S.A. 


AUDIO CASSETTES 
o Educational Testing Service has an- 
nounced the availability of Proceed- 
ings and audio cassettes of presenta- 
tions made at its 1973 Invitational 
Conference on Testing Ij>ro
lcms. The 
FEBRUARY 1974 



theme of the conference was measure- 
ment for self-understanding and per- 
sonal development. 
A separate audio cassette is avail- 
able for each of the tive presentations: 
the uses anu abuses of moral stages; 
the uses of psychology in contlict reso- 
lution in a university setting; exploring 
values for career decision making: a 
computer-based system of interactive 
guidance and information (SIG I); a 
signiticant change in direction: its im- 
plications for psychological measure- 
ment; and four talks on the contribu- 
tion of measurement to self-under- 
standing. 
The Proceedillgs contain all presen- 
tations. Orders should be directed to 
Invitational Conference on Testing 
Problems. Educational Testing Ser- 
vice. Princeton. New Jersey 08540, 
U.S.A. 


FILMS 
D Films on a variety of health sub- 
jects are available from International 
Tcle-Film Enterprises, Toronto. Ont. 
Among these films, The Heart A !tack 
(25 min.. color) explores the nine risk 
factors of heart disease: high blood 
pressure. cholesterol level, excess 
weight- overnutrition. sedentary living, 
stress. age. diabetes. and heredity; 
The Heart: Counteratlack (25 min., 
color) gives advice on how heart disease 
can be prevented and demonstrates 
modifications of the dangerous pat- 
terns of life many lead; Muscle (30 
min., color) combines animation tech- 
niques with commentary to show the 
dynamics of muscle tissue and the 
processes involved in muscle contrac- 
tion; The Cell: A FUllctiollillg Struc- 
l/Ire, Part I (30 min., color) covers 
aspects of the living cell as pan of the 
proeess of I ife and death at the molecul- 
ar level: The Cell, Part II (30 min., 
color) concentrates on the chemical 
events taking place within the cell; 
and IlIflillCY (20 min., color) examines 
the infant's early development. 
Films on abortion and acupuncture 
anesthesia are available from Cinema 
Images, a division of International 
T dc-Film Enterprises. 221 Victoria 
St.. Toronto. Ontario M5B IV5. 'G' 


accession list 


Publications on this list have been 
received recently in the CNA library 
and arc listed in language of source. 
:\I.lterials on this list, cxcept refer- 
FEBkUARY 1!Í74 


ence items, may be borrowed by CNA 
members, schools of nursing and other 
institutions. Reference IRI tlems (ar- 
chive books and directories. almanacs 
and similar basic books) do 1I0t go out 
on loan. Theses. also R are on Reserve 
and may go out on Imer/ibmry loall 
ollly. 
Request for loans should be made on 
the "Request Form for Accession List" 
and should be addressed to: The Libra- 
ry. Canadian Nurses' Association. 50 
The Driveway. Ottawa. Ont. K2P I E2. 
No more than three titles should be 
requested at anyone time. 


BOOKS AND DOCUMENTS 
I. Areawide pIW/l/Ù/R for illdepell<lellt lil'illR 
Ji)r older people. COllft.'rellce 01/ Gt.'rolltology, 
2211<1, UI/il'enih of Florida, Feh. 6-8, edited 
by Carter C. Osterbind. Gainewille. Fla.. 
University of Florida Pres
. 1973. 14:!p. 
2. Bartlett',\ I/llji,,"ilill/ quotatioll.\. by I eo- 
nard Louis Levinson. Chicdgo. Cov.les Book 
Co.. 1971. 341p. R 
3. Ba.çic 1i/Cl" of hody lI'att.'r al/d ion\, by 
Stewart Marshall Brooks. 3ed. New York. 
Springer. 1973. 117p. 
4. Ba.\ic IlI/lllall (/IwtolllY ali<I pi,,' \t%g.". 
by Charlotte M. Dienhart. :!ed. Toronto. 
Saunders. 1973. 280p. 
5. BaÜi lihmry lIIallaRi'lIIi'llI fi,r Itealth 
"ciel/ce.\' lih/'{/rie.ç, by Ann L Schadp. :!ed. 


:\Iadison. Wise.. University of Wi'iConsin 
Extension. Depl. of Communication Arts. 
1973. 304p. 
6. Biller lI'age.ç; Ralplt Nada'" "lUdy Rroup 
report Oil di.\i'a.\(' alld illjul\' Oil tlte joh, by 
Joseph A. Page and Mary-Win O'Brien. 
New York. Grossman. 1973. 314p. 
7. Cal/adial/ gOl't.'rI/I//l'l/t prORI'l/lIIl11e.\ alld 
"en'ii'i'.\; Ro\'erlllllellt orR(llIi
lIti,,". Sepl. 
1973. Don Mills. Ont.. CCH Canadian 
Limited. 1973. 1 vol. R 
8. Critical illcidellt.\ ill IIursillg. Edited by 
Loretta Sue Bermosk and Raymond J. Cor- 
sini. Toronto. Saunders. 1973. 369p. 
9. Deci"ioll mll/..illg ill lite corOllal)' ('arc Ullit; 
a mtllllwi alld 1I'0r/..boo/.. for IIurse.\, by Wil- 
liam P. Hamilton and 
Iary Ann Lavin. 
SI. Louis. Mo
by. 1972. 1 
Op. 
10. Dictiolllwire pratique de thél'llpi'lIIique 
",édicale. par Léon Perlemuter et al. Paris. 
Mæ-son. 1972. 1200p. R 
II. Directory (
f ill/ulihrary 10111/ policie.f 
alld plwto('op\'il/K serl'ice.. ill Call1ldillll li- 
hl'llries. Compiled by the Committee on the 
Directory. . . , Information Services Section. 
Ottawa. Canadian Library Association. 1973. 
S8p. 
I:!. E\'(lIuatioll ill the cOllti/wUIll (
f medical 
educatiol/. Philadelphia. National Board 
of Medical Examiners. Committee on Goals 
and Priorities. 1973. 94p. 
13. Forlll al/(l fill/clioll of II'ril1ell IIgreemel/1.\ 
ill tlte clillical educatioll (
f healtlt profe.ç- 


Some nurses are just nurses. 
Our nurses are also 
COmmissioned Officers. 


Nurses are very special people in the Canadian Forces 
They earn an Officer's salary, enjoy an Ofhcer's pnvlleges 
and live In Officers' Quarters (or in civilian accommodation If they 
prefer) on Canadian Forces bases all over Canada and In many 
other parts of the world 
If they decide to specialize, they can apply for postgraduate 
trammg with no loss of payor privileges. Promotion IS based on 
ability as well as length of service And they become eligible for 
retirement benefits (mcluding a lifetime pension) at a much earlier 
age than In civilian life. 
If you were a nurse m the Canadian Forces, you would be 
a special person domg an especially responsible, rewardmg and 
worthwhile Job. 
For full mformatlon, wnte the Director of Recuitmg and Selec- 
tIOn. NatIonal Defence Headquarters, Ottawa. Ontano KIA OK2 


,>þ 
'\.r
 
,

 



,'t 
--:

 
- ,,- 


Cet involved with the 
canadian Armed Forces. 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 61 
" 



accession list 


,iOlwls. by Margaret L Moore et al. Thoro- 
fare. N.J.. Charles B. Slack. 1972. II I p. 
14. I tI ./i'rllltilioll de.' chac/"'lIn ell .'CÙ'IICl'., 
lIIedi..tlll's; COIII/Hl' rl'",11I d'lI11l' ltlhll' rOllde 
orl:tllli"él' par Ie C/O/\1S lII'l'C /'a\\i.\l"'lCl' 
de /'O,\1S d de {'VNESCO, Gelli'!'{. /0-/ I 
'eplelllhre 1970. Genève. Organi
ation I\10n- 
diale de Sante. 1973. 206p. 
15. C'l'al adl'l'II1llrl" ill IIl1nÙ/K, edited by 
Helen Wright and Samuel Rappolt. New 
\ or". Harper and Brother
. 1960. 2XXp. 
16. \1l'lIIhl'nhip dirl'clory. /973. American 
I ibrary A

ociation. 1973. 21 Xp. R 
17. 1",IU.\lrial III ell lal /1< allh al/{l l'lIIplm'l'l' 
cOllmdillK, compiled by Robert L Noland. 
Ncv. York. Behavioral. 1973. 432p. 
I K A II ill1rodllCliolllo lI'or/..illK lI'ilh lhl' agillg 
{'l'noll II'ho i' I'i.,"all\' 1I<lIldicappl'd. New 
\ or". American Foundat ion for the BI indo 
1972.51 p. 
19. ,\ficro-Rohal: dic1iol/lwire dll Inlll{1li., 
pril/lordial, apr Paul Robert. Pari
. S.N.L 
Le Robert. 1971. I 207p. R 
20. .\ oi.,l'; all occllpaliollal I",:ard a ",I 
pllMic IIl1i.mlla, by Alan Bell. Geneva. 
World Health Organization. 1966. l3lp. 
,World Health Organization. Public health 
paper
 no. 30) 
21. ,vlll'.\{',' allllllllae jOllrnal, 1973. Winnipeg. 
The Alumnae A
'>Ociation of Winnipeg 
General Ho
pital. School of Nursing. 1973. 
91p. R 
22. flI<' IIl1nillg clillic., of Norlh AIIH'/ ica, 
1'01. 8, 110. 3, Sepl. 1973. Toronto. Saundep;. 
1973. p.375-570. (Contents. -Fmergency 
nur
ing, -Maternal and infant care in high- 
ri
" fam il ie
) 
23. PO"/..l'l pal. A gHlphic- arl.' dig"'l ti". 
I,rilllen alld {/{/I'l'rli.,iIlK I,rodllclioll 111"'/- 
"Ken. ged. New Yor". International Paper 
Co.. 1966. 190p. 
24. I he prillcipll',' alld praclicl' 01 '"rKelY 
Ie". IIl1nl'.' al/{l allied Im!le.\.\ioll,'. by Denis 
I-rederic Elli
on Na
h. Sed. London. Ed- 
ward Arnold. 1973. 9X7p. 
2'i. P'yehologicalle.\ls: rlll'ir II\{' a",/I'alidil\' 
ill sdec1illg calldidall'.' lor .,c/wo/., 01 IIl1nillK 
ill ISl'lIl'I, by Rebecca Bergman et al. Tel- 
Aviv. Tel-Aviv Univ.. Faculty of Continuing 
:\Iedieal Education. Dept. of Nur
ing. 1973. 
46p. 
26. Reader ill IIIl'diml lihnlriall.,f1ip. Edited 
by Winifred Sewell. Washington. CD.. NCR 
Microcard Fdition... 1973. 3X2p. 
27. {!//{'.'l '/;'1' lhe 01' lilll 11111. Procl'l'dillg' 01 
lhl' "'/llualllled illK or A .\.\oc ia 110 11 or Vllin'r- 
,ilie.' alld College., 01 Callada, TOI'OIIlo. Ocl. 
3()-Nm'. 2, 1972. Ottawa. The A"ociation. 
1972. 123p. 
2X. Rl'fl'l'l'IIC<' hoo/.., ill papl'rhtlc/..: all alllwl- 
aled gllidl, edited by Bohdan S. Wynar. 
I ittleton. Colo.. Libraries Unlimited. 1972. 
199p. 
29. Rl'pOrl 1973. london. Royal College of 
62 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Nursing and National Council of Nurses of 
the l'nited I<..ingdom. 1973. 66p. 
30. Reporl 01 lhe Calladiall Vllin'nily Nlln- 
illl: Sllldl'lIl.' A.\.\ocialioll COlllál'IICl', Hali- 
Iltx. rl'h. 9-1 I. 1973. Halifax. Dalhousie 
Univer
ity. School of Nursing. 1973. 161p. 
31. Rl'.'I' ira 10/"1' illll'II.,il'l' carl' IIunillg, .fi-Olll 
Bl'lh Isra'" Ho'pilal, BO.'lOll, by Sharon 
Spaeth Bushnell with 3 contributing authors. 
Boston. Little. Brown. 1973. 3'i4p. 
32. Saullden Il'.'I.' I;", sl'(t:l'nilllalioll l!f 111/1'.'- 
illg COlllpl'1<'IICl', by Dee Ann Gillie
 and Ire- 
ne Barrett Alyn. 2ed. Toronto. Saunders. 
1973. J92p. 
33. A rl'xlhoo/.. lêJr IIl1nilll: ani.'lal/ls. by 
Gertrude D. Chere
cavich. 3ed. St. Loui
. 
Mosby. 1973. Hip. 
34. The Vllin'nily l!f Ollall'a School l
f 
Nllnillg 1933-1973. Ottawa. University of 
Ottawa. School ofNur
ing. 1973. 145p. R 
35. WOlIIl'lI ill lhl' In,r/.. "}ITl': procl'l'dillg\ l!f 
a COl
lál'lIcl' spolI.",rl'd hy lhl' Dil'isioll of 
Pl'nOIlIl'" P'yc1wlog\' oj lhl' Nell' YOI'/.. Slall' 
P\\'chological A.\.\ol'Íalioll. NOI'l'mher, 1970, 
.Vell' } or/... Edited by Mildred E. I<..atzell 
and William C Byham. Nev. Yor". Behav- 
ioral. 1972. X6p. 


PAMPHLETS 
36. Addrl's., lisl, 1973-74. Ottawa. Canadian 
Medical As'>Ociation. 1973. '9p. R 
37. Alllhulalory care: all al/lw1aled hihlio- 
graphy ld' recell1 plallllillg lilerawre, by 
Gerald 1\1. Richmond and W. David Helms. 
Monticello. ilL. Council of Planning Libra- 
rians. 1973. 37p. (Council of Planning Libra- 
rians. Exchange bibliography no. 404) 
3X. Call lI'e cOllquer nlllcer? by Clifton R. 
Read. New York. Public Affairs Committee. 
1973. 2Xp. (Public affair
 pamphlet no. 496) 
39. The Calladiall 'celie. Firsl El.,ie Sll'phell- 
SOli ,\lelllorial Leclure deli,'erl'd hy Pro.fi's.,or 
IIdell ,\t. Carp ell I{'/' 01 Facully of Nur.,ÙlR, 
Vllil'er.\lly or Torolllo Oil Wedlle."lay, 141h 
.\larch. 1973. Edinburgh. University of 
Edinburgh. 1973. 15p. 


... 


114'" 
0" 
,\ 'AC, 


4" 


.... 


'I 


LOWE "fl".ff 


NO" HA ....\'! 1 
hdd ugly \uperlluous hair.., was 
unloved, . . discouraged. Tried many 
things. . . even razors. Nothing was 
satisfactory. Then I developed a sim- 
pic. painless. ine'"pensive. nonelectric 
method. It has helped thow...mds win 
heauty. love. happiness. !\Iy "RFE 
book. "What 1 Did About Super- 
Iluous Hdir" explains method. ylailed 
in plain envelope. Also Trial Offer. 
Write :\Ime Annette I anLette. P.O. 
Box (,10. Dept. C-376. Adelaide SI. 
P.O.. roronto 210. Ont. 


40. COlllprellell.,i,'e hl'allil plallllilll? hihlio- 
gmphy, by Robert G. Dyck. Monticello. ilL 
Council of Planning Librarians. 1973. 28p. 
(Exchange bibliography no. 392) 
41. Housillg: a lIalio1ll,'ide crisi" by Maxwell 
S. Stewart. New York. Public Affairs Com- 
mittee. 1973. 2Sp. (Publ ic affairs pamphlet 
no. 495) 
42. Tile N LN pre-Il/Ir.,illg alld Ruidallce exa- 
lIIillalioll. 4ed. New York. National League 
for Nursing. Division of Nursing Education. 
1965. 37p. 
43. NUl'.\illg paper.', "01. 5, 110. 2, Seplemher 
1973. Montreal. McGill University. School 
for Graduate Nur
es. 1973. 35p. (Contents 
-Teaching as guidance of learning. -Group 
method
 and personal growth. -Identifica- 
tion of learning needs by means of critical 
events. -Concept teaching in nursing) 
44. Regi.\I/'l/lioll eXall/illalioll policie.
. Fre- 
dericton. New Brunswick Association of 
Registered Nurses. 1973. 
45. ReporT, 1973. Ottawa. Canadian Council 
on Social Development. 1973. 24p. 
46. SOllie .,lalisl"'S 011 haccalaureale al/{l 
Iligller deg".e pl'OgralllS ill lIursillg 1972-73. 
New York. National League for Nursing. 
Division of Research. 1973. 17p. 
47. S.\'/IlposiulII 011 Child Ahuse, Nell' York 
Vllil'{'/'.\Í1Y Medi{'{/I Celllre, Nell' York. Jlllle 
15, 197/. Edited by Aaron R. Rausen. Evan- 
ston. ilL. American Academy of Pediatrics. 
1973. p.771-812. (Pediatrics. v.51. noA. pt.2. 
April 1973) 
48. A syslemalic allal).'.\i,' of joh de.\Y:riplioll.\ 
fi}r lIu/'.\illg I//lllwgelll ell I: 11011' 10 produce 
Ihelll, holl' 10 u.\e Ihem, by Bernard W. Steel. 
Edgware. Eng.. B.W. Steel. 1971. 31p. 


GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 
Ca Illlll" 
49. Commission de la Fonction publique. 
Bureau des Langues. Rédaclioll admillisl/'l/- 
lil'e. Ll.xique. ji'{/Ilçai.\-aIlRlai." allglai.\-f/'llll- 
çais. 3éd. Ottawa. 1971. l72p. 
50. -. Bureau des Langues. Rédaclioll ad- 
milli.'l/'l/lil'e. Ottawa. 1971. 7 vols. 
51. Conseil des Sciences du Canada. Ewdt,., 
sur cl'rlaill aspe{'/s de I" polilique de,\ riches- 
.'es IIlIWrel1es, par W.o. Bennett et al. Ot- 
tawa. Information Canada. 1973. 126p. 
(It
 Etude spéciale no. 27) 
52. Economic Council of Canada. for the 
Interdepartmental Committee on Candide. 
CANDIDE lIIodei 1.0: .\lII'illg alld cOI/.\IImp- 
lioll, by Thomas T. Schweitzer and Tom 
Diedule. Ottawa. 1973. 73p. (CANDIDE. 
Project paper no. 2) 
53. Health and Welfare Canada. Halldhoo/.. 
Oil dl','elopmelll l!r cOlllllllmily ell/ergellcy 
II'l'
f<m' ,\C'/Tin'.'. Ottawa. 1973. 47p. 
54. Labour Canada. Del'elopmelll.\ ill lhe 
ellaCllllel/l l/Iul adlllillislralioll of laho"r """.\ 
ill Callada. 110. I, J/Ille 1973. Ottawa, 1973. 
ll'ip. 
55. Manpower and Immigration. Offices 
"hroad. Ottawa. 1973. 9p. R 
56. Parliament. Senate. Special Committee 
on Science Policy. Repo,." ,'ol.J, A gOl'ern- 
1I/{'1I1 orgalli;:"lÙJ1l lor lhe .'el'elllies. Ottawa. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



Information Canada. 1973. I vol. 
57. Public Service Canada. 111/plel1/elllatioll 
repOlt Oil statlls of ",Ol1/ell report rl'COIII- 
l1/ellllatioll.\ hy the Pllhlic Sl'n'iCl' COl1/lIli.\- 
.\ioll. Ottawa. Information Canada. 1973. 
58. Science Council of Canada. St/"l/tl'gÍl'\ of 
tJt'I'doPlIIl'IIt . (tn' the Calladiall cOlllpllter 
il/dll.\try. Ottawa. Information Canada. 1973. 
80p. I Its Report no. 21) 
59. Statistics Canada. AmI/wi .\"Iaril'.\ of 
pllhlic health I1//nl'.\, 1971. Ottav.a. Infor- 
mation Canada. 1973. 50p. 
60. -. COlltillllillg l'dllcatioll; pt.I, dl'l1/l'II- 
tan-.\l'colll(ary Il'l.ef, 1970-71. Ottav.a. In- 
formation Canada. 1973. 79p. 
61. -. Falllilv l'xpellditllrl' ill Callada, 1969. 
Ottawa. Information Canada. 1973.2 \ols. 
62. -. HlJ.\pital .\tatl.\11CS, 1'01.2 HOIpital 
.\t'r\"Íces, 1971 Ottawa. Information Canada. 
1973.207p. 
63. -. Ho.\pital .\tatlstlCS, I'ol'} Ho.\pital 
per.\ml/lei. 1971. Ottawa. Informatiop 
Canada. 1973. 228p. 
64. -.Hmpital .\llIti.\1io, 1'01. 4 haltlllt'(' 
.\'hl'et.\, 1971. Ottawa. Information Canada 
1973. lOOp. 
65. -. Hospital stati.\tin, 1'01. 5 Ho.\pital 
l'l'l'IIl1e.\, 1971. Ottawa. Information Canada. 
1973. 78p. 
66. -.Hmpital .wat;..tin, 1'01. 6 Hmpital 
expellditllre.\, 1971. Ottawa. Information 
Canada. 1973. 249p. 
67. -. IIIstmctim/tl1 media ill the lI11il'l'r;itil's 


(
f the AtlalltÍl pro\'Í//( l'.\, 1971. Ottav.a. 
Information Canada. 1973. 35p. 
68. -. II/.\tructio//\ allli dl'fìllitio/l.\ (tn the 
wlllllal relllrll of p.\\'ch Ílltl ic lI11it.\. Otta" a. 
1972. 1 vol. 
Mallitoha 
69. Committee on Health. Education and 
Social Policy. White papel "" health policy. 
Winnipeg. 197'2. 3 vol
. 
Olltario 
70. Ministry of Labour. IIIIllI.\try-spo/l.\ored 
traillillg prog/"l/lIIlIll'S ill Oll1ario. AllglI.\t 
1968-JII1.\ 1969. Toronto. 1973. 78p. 
71. - Lahollr I/",r/..l't n'fJ('/"il'IICl' oj penoll.\ 
who rl'cl'Í\'ed adl'llllt'(, II"ticl' of l'l1/plo\1/1('1/1 
terlllillatioll. by Ian B. Mch.enna. Toronto. 
1973. II p. I Employnrent 'information o,erie
 
no. 4) 
7'2. \linistry of Social Development. Lqllal 
opportllllity .I;lr "'0111('11 ill O/llario: a plt", 
for actioll. Toronto. 1973. 73p. 
73. Workmen'
 Compen!>3tion Board. Al/lll1al 
report. 1972. Toronto. 1973. 36p. 
Ullitl'd Statl'.\ 
74. Library of Congres
. Subject Catalogmg 
Division. SlIhjC'ct headillg.\ lI.\ed ill the dic- 
tiollary catalog\ of tl" Lihmry of COIIgreH. 
7ed. Edited by Marguerite V. Quattlebaum 
Washington. 1966. 1432p. 
75. National I n
titute
 of Health. SOI'Iet 
l1/edie ille: a hihlio[?raphy 0.1 hihliogmphie.\. 
Washington. U.S. Govt. Print. Off.. 197.:' 
46p. (DHE\\ Publication no. INIH) 74-5751 


Request Form 
for "Accession List" 


76. Public Health Service. The hmlth COII- 
.\('lJI/('IIn'\ of.\lIlo/.. Ùw; a report of Ihe SlIrgeoll 
G(//<'Ial: 1971. Bethe
da. I\fd.. 1971. 458p. 
77.- -. Di\i
ion of Nursing. Re.\('arch Oil 
III1/'.\e .\taOillg ill I/(I.\pital.\; report of a COII- 
f<'rellu, \la\' 1971. Bethesda. I\ld.. 1973. 
I 87p. (DHI-'W Publication no. INIH) 73--B4) 


STUDIES DEPOSITED IN CNA REPOSITORY 
COLLECTION 
7K A di\CII\\ioll paper Oil ""nilll! a\.\i.\ItIllH 
ill C(//lIl/la. A report of a .\lIn'l'Y. Prepared 
for the Canadian N ur
e
' As
ociation. by 
Sl
ter \Iadeleine Bachand. Ottav.a. Can,ldian 
Nur
e
' A
ociation. 1973. lip. 
79. A I1/lIltidilll(,/l.\icmal (//1//1.\'\i\ 01 1'01(' 
p erc l'f'tio/1 ill a I1/l'lI1//1 h('{tlth \\'\telll. by 
Beverley J. Riddell. Calgary. A.lberta. 1971. 
70p. IThe
is (:\I.Sc.) - CalgarY)R 
XO. R('\ollrce.\ for the preparatioll of 'mr.\t'- 
leach('r.\ - e\'/""Ùlt/tiO/1 o( a .\itll/llioll. b} 
Shirley Yvonne Alcoe. :-.Jev. York. 1973. 
238p. rThesis- Teachers College. Colum- 
bia) R 
81. The roll' of th(' 'IIInl' (prof;'.\\iolla/l ill 
Ihe adlllilliwratioll allli il1/plellll'IIlatioll of 
patiellt care, by h.atherine I\lacLaggan. Nev. 
York. 1966. 54p. R 
82. SOl1/e COIICl'pt.\ of dru[?-rdatl'd f'tlliellt 
cart a.\ I iewed hy Ihe lIIajor health (art' 
profn.\iclll\ ill Olllario. by James Lyon :\lann. 
Toronto. 1972. 246p. (Thesi
 1\1.Sc.Phm.) 
- Toronto) R 'G' 


Tropical 
Diseases 
and 
Parasitology 


CANADIAN NURSES' 
ASSOCIATION LIBRARY 


Send this coupon or facsimile to 
LIBRARIAN, Canadian Nurses' Association. 
50 The Driveway, Ottawa K2P 1E2, Ontano. 
Please lend me the following publications, listed in the .............. 
....................................................... issue of The Canadian Nurse, 
or add my name to the waiting list to receive them when 
available. 
Item Author Short title (for identification) 
No. 


T.ke our specie. cour.. In troplce. dl...... 
and ralatad subjacts. Thla equip. you to lunction 
Intelligently.. . nur.. In .n environment wher. 
.uch dl....e. po.e a health problem. 


Open to gr.due'e nurse. Currently rev.l.ered In 
their own prov.nce or .t.te ComprehenSlye 16 
week cour.. commences In September .nd 
Februery. Tr.in In modern. equipped centre with 
.ttrectlye .ccommodetion 'or living in located 
In ....'roPollt.n T oronlo 


Request for loans will be filled in order of receipt. 
Reference and restricted material must be used In the CNA 
library. 
Borrower ............................................... ................... 
Registration No. ......................................................................... 
Position... .......... ...... ........ ....... ........... .... .... 


Co-ordln.tor. 


For information wrlle to. 


. 


. 


I;' 


..II . 
health institute 


.. 


Addre ss . ................ .... ...... ......... .... ........... ....... ............ ............... ... 


4000 Lealie Street, 'Mllowdale, 
Ontatlo. Canada. 


..................................................................................................... 


Date of request ...................................................... ..................... 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 63 
. 



classified advertisements 


ALBERTA 


DIRECTOR OF NURSING required lor modern 25-bed 
Hospital on Highway 12, East Central Alberta. Please 
apply to Administrator. CORONATION MUNICIPAL 
HOSPITAL CORONATION. ALBERTA, TOC lCO. Tele- 
phone 578-3691. 


REGISTERED NURSES required lor 70 bed accredited 
active treatment Hospital Full time and summer 
relief All AARN personnel policies. Apply In wrlllng 
to the Director of Nursmg. Drumheller General Hos- 
pital. Drumheller Alberta 


REGISTERED NURSES required immediately for 72 
bed accredited. actove treatment hospital. Also 1 R.N 
lor 50-bed Nursing Home. AARN.AHA contract In 
force Refund of fare after one year 01 service. ApPly 
Director of Nursing. Providence HosPital High Prai- 
rie. Alberta TOG lEO 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


HEAD NURSE required for an acute modern 35-bed 
hospital. located In southern 8 C s Boundary area 
with excellent recreation facilities. PosItion to be 
fIlled by April. 1974 Salary and personnel policies 
In accordance with the RNABC Apply by March 31 
1974 to Director of Nursing Boundary Hospital 
Grand Forks British Columbia 


ADVERTISING 
RA TES 


FOR ALL 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINC 


$15 00 for 6 lines or less 
12.50 for eoch additionol line 


Rafes for display 
advertisements on request 


Closing date for copy and cancellalion is 
6 weeks prior 10 1 Sf day of publicalion 
monlh 
The Canod,an Nurses' Association does 
not review the personnel policies of 
the hospitals ond agencies advertising 
in the Journal. For authentic information, 
prospective applicants should apply 10 
the Registered Nurses' Association of the 
Province in which they ore interested 
in working. 


Address correspondence to: 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


g 


50 THE DRIVEWAY 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO 
K2P 1 E2 


64 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


I I 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 






n
U 0'

 r'





QfO
u

:::)tro,
aI2
Ó_
.,"JI
:fv
 
Ireatment hospital In Okanagan Valley of Brillsh 
Columbia. RNABC contract In effect. Apply to: Direct- 
or of Nursing. Penticton Regional Hospital. Penticton. 
British Columbia. 


OPERATING ROOM NURSE wanted for actIve mo- 
dern acute hospItal Four Certilied Surgeons on 
attending staff. Expenence of tralnmg desirable. 
Musl be eliQlble for B.C Registrallon. Nurses 
residence available. Salary accordong to RNABC 
Contract. Apply to Director pf Nursong, Mills Mem- 
orial Hospital 2711 Tetrault St Terrace, Bnllsh 
COlumbia 


EXPERIENCED NURSES required In 409-bed acute 
Hospital with School of Nursing Vacancies In 
medical, surgical, obstetric, operating room, pediat- 
ric and Intensive Care areas. BasIc salary $672.- 
$842. B C. Reglstrallon required. Apply' Director 
01 Nursing. Royal Columbian Hospital, New Wesl- 
minster. Bntlsh Columbia. 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES AND 
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES required for small 
upcoast hospital Salary and personnel policies as 
per RNABC contract. Salaries start al $672.00 for 
Registered Nurses, $577 75 for Licensed Pracllcal 
NUrses. Residence accommodation $25.00 per month. 
Transportatoon paid lrom Vancouver Apply to 
Director 01 Nursing. St George s Hospital. Alert Bay. 
Bnllsh Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES AND LICENSED PRACTI- 
CAL NURSES for modern 130.bed accredited hospItal 
on Vancouver Island Resort area - home 0' the Tyee 
Salmon. Four hours travelling lime to city 0' Vancou- 
ver Collective agreements with Provincial Nursing 
Association and Hospital Employees Union. Resl' 
dence accommodation available. Please direct in- 
QUiries to Director of Nursing Services. Campbell 
River & Di stnct General HospItal. 375 - 2nd Avenue. 
Camobell River. British Columbia. V9W 3Vl 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 41-bed 
hospital, located on the Alaska Highway. Salary and 
personnel policies In accordance with RNABC 
Accommodation available In residence. Apply: 
Director 01 Nursing, Fort Nelson General Hospital. 
Fort Nelson. Brollsh Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES. lor modern 35-bed hospl 
tal located In southern !:J.C. 's tJoundary Area with 
excellent recreation facilities Salary and personnpl 
policies in accordance with RNABC. Comfortable 
Nurses's home. Apply: Director 01 Nursing Boundary 
Hospital, Grand Forks. British Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES REQUIRED FOR 21.BED 
HOSPITAL 120 MILES NORTH OF PRINCE GEORGE. 
B C RNABC POLICIES IN EFFECT APPLY TO 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING. MacKENZIE HOSPITAL 
BOX 249 MacKENZIE, BRITISH COLUMBIA . 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES required for 
151-bed Hospital BasIc Salary $672 - $842 per- 
month Policies In accordance with RNABC Contract. 
Residence accommodallon available. Apply 10: 
Director of Nursing, Powell River General Ho$5ltal 
5871 Arbutus Avenue, Powell River. Brollsh Columbia 


I I 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 
10-bed hospital with doctors' offices in hospital. 
Situated: beautiful west coast of Vancouver Island: 
Accommodation: 550.00 a month. ApPly' Admlnistra. 
tor. Tahsls Hospital. Box 399, Tahs.s, British 
Columbia. 


NURSES REQUIRED FOR GENERAL DUTY AND 
INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, IN EIGHTY-FOUR BED 
MODERN ACUTE GENERAL ACCREDITED HOSPITAL 
IN CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA. RNABC CON- 
TRACT WAGES. RESIDENCE ACCOMMODATION 
AVAILABLE. PLEASE APPLY IN WRITING TO' DI- 
RECTOR OF NURSING, CARIBOO MEMORIAL HOS- 
PITAL. 517 NORTH SIXTH AVENUE, WILLIAMS 
LAKE. BRITISH COLUMBIA. 


MAN ITOBA 


REGISTERED NURSES required lor an 11.bed hos. 
pital at Notre Dame de Lourdes. Manitoba. E xcell ent 
salary and will credit for acceptable past experience. 
Please apply to' Admlnlslrator Notre Dame Hospital. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes. Manitoba. 


TWO REGISTERED NURSES are required by Baldur 
D.slnct Hospital for general duty. Duties to commence 
in early 1974. Attractive residence in 16-bed hospital. 
Sal ary based on Government scale with consideration 
fOr experience. For further .nformation contact: Mrs. 
K. Gordon. Director of Nursing. telephone 535-2373. 
Baldur Dislroct Hospital, Baldur, Manlloba. 


Required Immediately - 3 REGISTERED NURSES and 
3 LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES for a new 50-bed 
Personal Care Home. Salary 10 accordance with the 
recommendations 01 the MARN. Apply: Director 01 
Nursing. Swan River Valley Personal Care Home 
Inc.. SWAN RIVER. Manitoba ROL lZ0. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


REGISTERED NURSES required immediately for 
general duty in 300 acllve treatment hospitaL Salary 
5567 5658 per month. dependant on experience. 
Excellent fronge benefits. Apply Personnel Director. 
West Saint John Community Hospital. B3610. Postal 
Stallon B, Saint John. New Brunswick E2M 4X3 


Additional laculty member needed by July 1 1974 tu 
coordinate and teach an Introductory course In in- 
tegrated baccalaureate program. Recent master s 
degree In medical and surgical nursmg required, 
and some experience team teaching In integrated 
programs preferred. The extras We have to off.er are 
an exciting neW curriculum approach. a new. well- 
equipped self-Instrucfional laboratory. and the ad. 
vantages of living In a beautiful. small city. Address 
Dean. Faculty of Nursing. The University of New 
Brunswick. Fredericton. New Brunswick 


ONTARIO 


REGISTERED NURSES required lor a new 79-bed 
General Hospital In bilingual community 01 North- 
ern Ontaroo. French language an asset. but not 
compulsory. Salary is $645. to $758. monthly with 
allowance for past experience, 4 weeks vacation 
aller 1 year and 18 sick leave days per year. 
nused 
sick leave days paid at 100% every year. Master 
rotation in effect. Rooming accommodations available 
in town. Excellent personnel policies. Apply to: Per- 
sonnel Director, Notre-Dame Hospital, P.O. Box 850. 
Hearst. Ont. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



ONTARIO 


REGISTERED NURSES lor 34.bed General HospItal. 
Salary $646. per month to $756. plus experoence al- 
lowance. Excellent personnel policIes. Apply to: 
Director 01 NursIng Englehart & DIstrict HospItal 
Inc.. Englehart, Ontaroo 


HEGISTERED NURSES AND REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS lor 45.bed Hosp,ta'. Salary ranQes 
Include generous expenence allowances R N s 
3alary S680 to S780. and R N A s salarv S
90 to S565 
Nurses residence - pr.vate rOoms With bath - $40. 
per month. Aoolv to: The Dorector of Nursing Gerald- 
ton Dlstroct Hospital GeralOton. Ontaroo POT 1MO 


REGISTERED NURSES FOR GENERAL DUTY. I.C.U.. 
C.C.U. UNIT and OPERATING ROOM lequored lor 
lully accredited hospllal Startong sdlary 5697 00 WIth 
regular increments and with allowance for expen- 
ence Excellent personnel policies and temporary 
res. dence accommodation available Apply to The 
Director of Nursing Kirkland &. District Hospital 
Korkland Lake. Onlaroo P2N 1R2 


OPERATING ROOM TECHNICIAN requored lor lull) 
accredIted 75-beo HospItaL You will be In the 
Vacationland 01 the North. mIdway between Thunder 
Bay, Ontano and Wmmpeg, Mamtoba. BasIc wage IS 
$471.50 with conSlderalion tor experience. Write Or 
phone the Director 01 Nursong, Dryden Dlstroct 
General HospItal. Dryden, Ontaroo. 


QUEBEC 


RESIDENT CHILDREN S CAMPS IN THE LAUREN- 
TlANS REOUIRE: GRADUATE NURSES for the sum 
mer. Apply JewIsh Community Camps 5151 Cote SI. 
Catherone Road. Room 203 Montreal Quebec H3W 
1 M6 Ph one 735-3669 


UNITED STATES 


NURSING DIRECTOR: Laredo JunIor COllege at 
Laredo. Texas. IS seekmg a nursing director lor a 
forward-moving open-curnculum nursing program 
which Includes three levels health assistant licens- 
ed vocational nurse and registered nurse. Program 
IS well established. Person sought must have a 
Masters Degree with some experience preferably 
tn educational administration. A very cnallengmg 
program Salary open. Please contact Belty SchmIdt 
Director Nursmg Education. Laredo Jumor College. 
POBox 738. Laredo Texas 78040 512-722-0521 Ex. 
46 (collecl) 


NURSING INSTRUCTOR. Laredo Junonr College al 
Laredo. Texas. IS seekmg nursing instructors for a 
forward-movang. open-curriculum nursing program 
which Includes three levels health assistant. licens- 
ed vocatIOnal nurse and registered nurse Program IS 
well establoshed. Masters Degree preferable A 
very challengong program Salary open Please con- 
'act Betty Schmidt. Director. NursIng Educatoon. La- 



 Junoor College. POBox 738. Laredo Texas 


Monte Vista, COlorado requires REGISTERED 
NURSES lor 50-bed hospItal Workong visa readily 
available after January 1st 1974 TransportatIOn one 
way can be obtained Please write directly to the 
Administrator Monte Vista General Hospital Monte 
Vista Colorado 81144 or call Calgary 271.2502 alter 
5p m 


TEXAS wants you! If you are an RN. expenenced Or 
a recent graduate come to Corpus Christi Sparkling 
CIty by the Sea a cIty bUilding lor a belter 
future where your opportunities for recreation and 
studies are limitless Memonal Medical Center 500- 
bed general teachmg hospital encoureges career 
advancement and provides an-service Orientation 
Salary Irom S68200 to $94000 per month. com 
mensurale with education and expenence Dlfferentl a' 
for evenang shifts available Benefits Include holi- 
days sick leave. vacations. paid hospltahzallon 
t'Jealth hfe Insurance. pension program Become a 
vital part of a modern up-to-date hospital Write or 
call collect John W Gover Jr Director of Per 
sonnel. MemOrial MedIcal Center POBox 5280 
Corpus Christo Texas 78405 


I I 


UNITED STATES 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
TORONTO, ONTARIO. 


REGISTERED NURSES 


630-bed fully accredIted Hospital provides 
expenence in Emergency, Operating Room, 
Post Anaesthesia Room I ntenslve Care Unit 
Orthopaedics. Psychiatry. Paediatrics, Obste: 
tries and Gynal:cology, General Surgery and 
MedicI ne. 
BasIc 2 week OnentatlOn Program and con. 
tinuing Active Inservlce Program for all levels 
of Staff. 
Salary IS commensurate wIth preparatIon and 
experience 
Benefits onclude Canada PensIon Plan. Hospital 
PensIon Plan. Unemployment Insurance.- 
Group L,fe Insurance and O.H.I.P. (66.2/3 0 0 
Basic Rate paid by Hospital). - Extended 
Health Care Plan - Supplementary Blue Cross. 
After 3 months. cumulative sIck tIme. 
Rotatong periods of duty - 40 hour week- 
10 Statutory holidays - 3 weeks annual vaca- 
tIon aftër completion of one years service. 
APPL Y: 


ASSOCIA TE DIRECTOR 
OF NURSING SERVICE 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
30 The Queensway 
TORONTO 3. ONTARIO. 


HUMBER MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 


Telephone 249-8111 (Toronto) 
200 Church Street, 
Weston, M9N-1 M8, Ont. 


Registered Nurses and Registered Nursing Assistants seeking 
employment in an active treatment hospital in NORTH WEST 
METROPOLITAN TORONTO, are requested to write to the Di- 
rector of Nursing concerning employment opportunities. 
Orientation and Staff Development Programmes are pr"vided. 
Competitive salaries offered to qualified personnel. Registered 
Nurses are urgently required for temporary employment July, 
August and September. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 65 
. 


R.N.'s - SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - Immediate need 
eXists for medical-surgical umts Onentatlon and In- 
service program. Excellent salary. full paid benefits 
We will assist you with your H-1 visa for Immigration 
An interim permit may be .obtained from the Califor- 
nIa Board of Nursing Education and Registration to 
practice nursmg In California prior to licensing. Con- 
tact. Personnel Director. The HospItal 01 the Good 
Samaritan, 1212 Shalto Sireel. Los Angeles. Calofor- 
nla 90017 (213) 482-8111 ex 287 


PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER 


Responsible for providing information services to 
members of a professional association and the public 
in support of the public relations objectives ofthe Asso- 
ciation. 
General duties indude writing, editing and layout of a 
monthly news bulletin, press releases, media contacts 
and the coordination of the annual convention. 
Applicants should have the type of qualifications and 
experience which would allow them to perform the 
above duties competently. Experience in communica- 
tions and public relations with an association would be 
desirable. 
Salary will be commensurate with experience and 
preparation. 
Send your resume to: 
Executive Secretary 
Alberta Association of Registered 
Nurses 
10256 - 112 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T5K 1 M6 



THE 
PEDIATRIC PAVILlDN 
NURSING DIVISION 
OF THE 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY - 
UNIVERSITY OF SDUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
MEDICAL CENTER 


invites Canadian Nurses interested in 
comprehensive Pediatric Nursing to write 
for more details about our hospital. 
Starting Salary: $842 month 
Pr0n7060nalOpportuni6es 
In-Service Programs 
Excellent fringe benefits 
Write: 
Mrs. Dorothy Easley, R.N. 
Box 2071, 
1200 North State Street, 
Los Angeles, California 90033 


RED DEER COLLEGE 


requires 


NURSING 
INSTRUCTOR(S) 


Position(s) open July 1st, 1974. Masters 
Degree in a Clinical Specialty preferred, but 
Baccalaureate Degree considered. Exper- 
ience in Nursing Practice essential. Instruc- 
tors involved in several practice settings. 
Program is integrated by teaching of basic 
concepts of Nursing. Post-basic nursing 
courses also in the planning stages. 
Apply with - 
(1) Curriculum Vitae 
(2) References 
to: Dr. G.O. KEllY 
Director of Programs 
Red Deer College 
Red Deer, Alberta. 


GRANDE PRAIRIE HEALTH UNIT 
requires a 


NURSE 


For general public health nursing to work out of 
Valleyview Sub-Office. Minimum qualification 
R.N. (P.HN. or B.Sc. preferred). Annual salary 
range $7056 - $1 0,512. Starting salary dependent 
on qualifications and experience. Generous 
fringe benefits. Application forms and further 
details from: 


Grande Prairie Health Unit 
9640 - 105 Avenue 
GRANDE PRAIRIE, Alberta 
T8V 385 
532-4441 


66 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Applications are invited trom: 


McMASTER 
UNIVERSITY 
School 
of Nursing 


PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 
NURSING INSTRUCTORS 


lor 


Nurse faculty members Includmg an Asso- 
ciate Director, required lor July. 1974 by a 
progressive School of Nursong. The School IS 
an integral part of a newly developed Health 
SCiences Centre where collaborative relatton- 
ships are fostered among the various health 
professions. 


OVERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 


(Minimum three-year term) 


ReqUirements master s or doctoral degree 
preferred. with cllmcal specialist preparation 
Or experience and/or preparation in teachtng 


Salaries: commensurate with education and 
experience. 


Further information and application 
forms from: 


Application, with copy of 
curriculum vitae and two 
references to 
Dr. D.J. Kergin, Director, 
School of Nursing, 


The Division of Ministry Personnel and 
Education 
The United Church of Canada 
85 SI. Cia ir Ave. East 
Toronto, Ontario. M4T 1M8 
Attention: Mrs. Jean Parker 


McMaster University, 


Health Sciences Centre. 
1200 Main Street West, 
HAMilTON, Ontario, 
l8S 4J9. 


MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF 
NEWFOUNDLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 


IS 


Analyzing and revising its curricula and is expanding programs to better prepare 
graduates in leadership for the future health care system. 
Additional personnel required August 1974. 
There are positions open for faculty with creative ability and advanced preparation 
in: 


NURSING OF ADULTS 
NURSING OF CHILDREN 
PARENT-CHILD NURSING 
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 
CURRICULUM DESIGN 
MANAGEMENT OF NURSING CARE 
RESEARCH IN NURSING 
COMMUNITY NURSING 
Preparation at the Master's level is preferred but persons with a baccalaureate and 
appropriate experience will be considered. 
Please direct inquiries or applications to: 
Miss MARGARET D. McLEAN 
Director, School of Nursing 
Memorial University of Newfoundland 
St. John's, Newfoundland 


FEBRUARY 1974 



EXCITEMENT IN NURSING 
plus 
THE MAGIC OF ARIZONA 


For professionalism m a perfect settmg, loin 
our team in a new, modern, fUlly accredited 
hospital with services focused on care of adult 
patients. Openmgs all shifts for RNs and LPNs. 
Great opportunities also for mterested or 
experienced ICU.CCU Nurses. 
All of our nursing units are in-the.round 
faCilitating our glvmg mdividualized patient 
care. Located m a delightful retirement 
commumty near Phoenix, ArIZona. This is the 
sunniest, safest. resort area in the U.S. You 
will enjoy the advantages of a large metro. 
politan area with none of its Problems. 
We'd like the opportunity to give you all the 
details' 
Write to: 
Mary Welch 
Assistant Director of Nursing 
WALTER O. BOSWELL HOSPITAL 
P.O. Box 10 
Sun City, Arizona. 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. 


CLINICAL NURSE 
SPECIALIST 
FOR 
MED-SURG 
NURSING 


REQUI RED IN 254-BED 
ACTIVE CARE 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


APPLY TO: 
Director of Nursing 
Moose Jaw Union Hospital 
Moose Jaw, Saslt 
692-1841 


THE LADY MI NTO HOSPITAL 
AT COCHRANE 


invite applications from 


REG ISTERED NURSES 


54-bed accredited general hospi- 
tal. Northeastern Ontario. Compe- 
titive salaries and generous bene- 
fits. Send inquires and applications 
to: 


MISS E. LOCKE 
Director of Nursing 
The Lady Minto Hospital at 
Cochrane 
P.O. Box 1660 
Cochrane. Ontario 
POL 1 CO 


FEBRUARY 1974 


1+ 


Public Service 
Canada 


Fonction publique 
Canada 


THIS COMPETtT/ON IS OPEN TO BOTH MEN AND WOMEN 


REGISTERED 
NURSES 


General duty nurses are required for full-time staff positions, 
with rotating shifts. There are immediate vacancies. Know- 
ledge of the English language is essential. 


Department of 
Veterans Affairs, 
Camp Hill Hospital 


Further information on duties and qualifications may be obtain- 
ed from and applications should be directed immediately to: 


Salary: 
$6938 - $8308 


PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT ADVISOR, 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, 
CAMP HILL HOSPITAL, 
HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA. 


Eff. December 31 n3 
$7701-$9216 


Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. 


Please quote reference number 73-H980. 


Appointments as a result of this competition are subject to the 
provisions of the Public Service Employment Act. 


ADMINISTRA TIVE 
NURSING SUPERVISOR 


Required for the late night tour of duty. To assume administrative nursing 
responsibility for a chronic care hospital of 500 beds. 


The successful candidate must be a registered nurse in possession of a 
certificate of Hospital Departmental Management of the Canadian Hospital 
Association, or its equivalent and have at least 5 years of administrative 
experience at the Head Nurse and Supervisory level. 


For applications and further information, please contact: 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT, 
QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL, 
130 DUNN AVENUE, 
TORONTO, ONTARIO. 
M6K 2R7 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 67 
. 



REGISTERED NURSES 
AND 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 


required for a ID4.bed active treatment plus 
72.bed chronic care unit located at Haileybury. 
The Tn-Town area consisting of New Llskeard, 
Hatleybury. Cobalt all within 5 miles of each 
other is located 90 miles from North Bay 
with dally plane. tram and bus service to and 
from Toronto etc. Beautiful recreatIOnal facil 
Itles including curling, skatmg, skimg, sWim. 
ming, boating, hunting, flshmg. 
Salary fUlly appropnate to the responsibility of 
the position; personnel policies m I me with 
mdustry and hospital practice. Orientation 
and In-Service Educational programmes are 
provided. 


Apply in writing to: 
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, 
Temiskaming Hospitals. 
Hailevburv, Ontario. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES 


Required Immediately 


. for 270.bed acute care general hospital 
expanding to 370 beds 
. clmical areas mclude: Medicine Surgery 
Obstetrics Paediatrics Psychiatry Rehabilita- 
tion Extended Care and Intensive and 
Coronary Care 
. Must be eligible for B.C. registration 
. Personnel policies m accordance with 
RNABC Contract 
. 1973 Salary $672 - $842.00 per month 


Please contact: 


Director of Nursing 
Prince George Regional Hospital 
Prince George, B.C. 


RIVERVIEW UNIT 
WINDSOR WESTERN HOSPITAL 
CENTRE 
Invites applications from 
REGISTERED NURSES 


Startmg salary $655 
Increments for Contemporary Experience 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 
Starting Salary December 1st $493 
TOP FRINGE BENEFITS 
All Shifts 
Permanent positions available 
Afternoons and Nights 
Orientation and Staff Development Program 
Windsor oilers Cultural and educational oppor. 
tunitles including University and Community 
Collel!e. 
WE ARE PEDPLE HELPING PEOPLE 
In the rapidly progressing specially of Chronic 
care and rehabilitation. We offer 
- a challenge 
- Job satisfaction 
- a happy envi ronmenl 
Apply to: 


Director of Nursing 
3111 Riverside Drive E., 
Windsor. Dntario 
N8Y 4S2 


68 TH E CANADIAN NURSE 


THE MONTREAL 
CHilDREN'S HOSPITAL 
REGISTERED NURSES 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 


Our patient population consists of 
the baby of less than an hour old 
to the adolescent who has just 
turned seventeen. We see them in 
Intensive Care, in one of the Med- 
ical or Surgical General Wards, or 
in some of the Pediatric Specialty 
areas. 
They abound in our clinics and 
their numbers increase daily in our 
Emergency. 
If you do not like working with 
children and with their families, 
you would not like it here. 
If you do like children and their 
families, we would like you on our 
staff. 
Interested qualified applicants 
should apply to the: 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
!VIontreal Children's Hospital 
2300 Tupper Street 
Montreal 108, Quebec 


DURHAM COLLEGE 
OFAPPUED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY 


invItes applicants for 


FACUl TV POSITIONS 
in the Nursing Department 


Qualifications: 
- Registration In Ontario 
- University preparation In Nursing education. bac- 
calaureate degree preferred 
- Minirrum of two years bedside nursing experience 
Responsibilities: 
- Classroom teaChing and dinlcal SUpervision. 
Salary: 
- Commensurate with preparation and experience 
WIthin the CSAO range 
Starting Date: 
-August 1, 1974 


Direct applicatIOns wIth 
complete resume to: 


DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, 
DURHAM COLLEGE OF APPLIED 
ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY, 
BOX 385, 
OSHAWA, ONTARIO. 
L1 H 7L7 


NORTH NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR 
requires 


REGISTERED NURSES 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 


International Grenfe!1 Association provides 
medical services for Northern Newfoundland 
and Labrador. We staff four hospitals, eleven 
nursl ng statIOns. eleven Public Health units. 
Our main 180.bed accredited hospital IS 
situated at St. Anthony, Newfoundland. Active 
treatment IS carried on m Surgery, Medicme, 
Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatry. Also, 
Intensive Care Unit. OrientatIOn and In.Service 
programs. 40-hour week, rotating shifts. Livmg 
accomodations suppl ied at low cost. PUBLIC 
HEALTH has challenge of large remote areas. 
Excellent personnel benefits mclude liberal 
vacation and sick leave. Salary based on 
Government scales 
Apply to: 
INTERNATIONAL GRENFELL ASSOCIATION 
Assistant Administrator of 
Nursing Services, 
St. Anthony, Newfoundland. 


GENERAL DUTY and 
INTENSIVE CARE UNIT NURSES 


for 139 Acute. 30 Extended Care 
Sed Modern Accredited Hospital 
on Vancouver Island. Excellent 
recreational facilities and within 
easy reach of Victoria and Vancou- 
ver. 
Personnel Policies as per RNASC 
Contract. 


Apply: 
Director of Nursing, 
West Coast General Hospital, 
814 - 8th Avenue. North. 
Port Alberni, B.C. 


GENERAL DUTV 
NURSES 


- for 360.bed acute general hospital 
clinical areas mclude: - Medicine. Surgery, 
Obstetrics. Paediatrics, Psychiatry, Rehabili. 
tatlon. Extended Care and Coronary Care 
B C. Registration preferred but not mandltory 
dUring initial employment 
- Personnel policies m accordance with 
RNABC Contract 


Please contact the: 
Director of Nursing 
Nanaimo Regional General 
Hospital 
Nanaimo. British Columbia 


FEBRUARY 1974 



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Sante e1 Blen-etre social 
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,---------------
 
I Medical Services Branch I 
I Department of National Health and Welfare I 
I Ottawa, Ontario K 1 A OK9 I 
I I 
I Please send me onformatlOn on career I 
I opportunities In this service. I 
I Name: I 
I Address: I 
City: Prov: _ 

--------_______J 


1+ 


Public Service 
Canada 


Fonction publique 
Canada 


THIS COMPETITION IS OPEN TO BOTH MEN ANO WOMEN 


NURSING ADVISORS 


$13,542 to $16,642 (Under negotiation) 


Ottawa 


WIth 


Health Programs 
National Health and Welfare 


Under the general dIrection 01 the Semor 
Advisor. Health Systems. plans. organ. 
Izes and directs the work of teams 
composed 01 Federal/ProvIncial and 
non-govemment professIOnals in analy- 
sis of present and proposed health care 
sub systems related to nursIng commu. 
noty health care needs, resources and 
programs; coordmates and directs a 
Federal/ProvincIa] multidisciplinary 
team m the condud of major studies 
related to the total health care system 
or major portions of It; coordinates and 
directs the development, evaluatIon and 
use of methodologIes related 10 utlllza. 
tlon of health care facIlitIes and assess. 
ment of present and future resource 
requirements; provIdes professional 
advlæ to the Assistant Deputy Minoster 
the SenIor Advisor. Health Systems and 
other Branch and Department officers 
to assist In formulating departmental 
attitudes and policies; participates In 
departmental assIstance 01 educatIon of 
health persomel on a national basIs and 
performs related dutIes 


- EligibilIty for reg'stration as I nurse In a province 01 Canada 
- Badlelor's degree in Nursing 
- Considerable elperlence in all fields 01 nursing adm,",strat,on 


For the posrtlon with Health Program. knOWledge of the Englosh language IS essential. For the pOSItIon 
wIth Canadian Penitentiary Se",ces, knOWledge of both the Englosh and French languages IS essentIal 
For thIs lalter posItIon unlilngual persons may also apply on thIS competItIon They must however. 
indIcate In wntlng. theIr wliiongness to undertake continUOUS language traIning at pUblIc expense for 
a penod 01 up to twelve months Such training shall be undertaken ImmedIately at the tIme ot condoM nal 
appOIntment. In or through the Publoc Service CommIssIon s language Bureau and at locat,ons 
specIfied by the Publoc Service CommIssIon 
The PublIc Service CommISSIon wIll seek evidence 01 the likely capacl1y ot un!llngual candIdates from 
outsIde the Public Service to become bIlingual 
Please apply on 'ApplicatIon for Employment'. Form PSC 367-401, avaIlable at Post Offices. Canada 
Manpower Centers and offices of the Public ServIce CommIssIon of Canada, and send to 


SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA 
TOWER "A", PLACE DE VILLE 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO K1A OM7 


Pfe.se quote compelillon number 73-166-02 on all correspondence. 
Appolntmenb IS a result 0' thi. compel/lion are sublectto the provision. 0' the Public 
Setvice Employment Act. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 69 
. 


Canadian Penitentiary 
Services Solicitor General 


Under the direcllon ot the Director, 
Medical ServICes. wdl assist in the re- 
organIZation of the "tal nursing program 
of the Canadian Penrtentiary Service to 
provide nursing care to apprOJumately 
7000 inmates in some 35 institutions: 
advises the Director on the continuing 
efficiency of the nursing services as relat- 
ed to medIcal. psychlatnc. dental and 
surgical care and nursing administratIOn; 
assists In the development of training 
programs of nursing staff and nursing 
service pOlicies which will attract qualifi- 
ed staff and promote maxImum ut,Ioza- 
toon of all nursIng personnel; participates 
in establishing a budget for the nursing 
servIce and In the planning of the phYSIcal 
facilities. In consultatIOn. initiates studies 
and research and prepares recommenda- 
tions in related areas; maintains pertinent 
records; Will represent the Canadian 
Penitentiary Service In Interdepartmental 
committees and liaise With nationa] and 
provinCIal nursing associatIOns. federal 
and provIncIal departments of Health. 
hospitals and universities; other related 
duties. 


QUALIFICATIONS: 


LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS: 



FACULTY 
POSITIONS 


Open tor clinical experts 
to teach in lIIe 
undergraduate programs. 


COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING 
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 
MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING 
OBSTETRICAL NURSING 
and 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 


Personnel policies and salanes in acrord with University 
schedule based on Qualifications and experience. 


Apply in writing to: 
RUTH E. McCLURE, M.P.H. 
Director, School ot Nursing 
University ot Alberta 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6G 2G3 


Wanted 'Dr a 56-bed hospital in the Lakes 
District of Central B.C.: 


(1) A DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
- Degree in nursing preferable. exper- 
ience in Nursing Administration in a small 
acute Hospital essential. 


(2) GENERAL DUTY NURSES 
1::ìalary and benefits according to 
R.N.A.B.C. contract. 


Please apply to: 


The Administrator. 
Burns Lake and District Hospital. 
Box 479, 
Burns Lake, British Columbia. 
VOJ 1 EO. 


INTENSIVE CARE UNIT NURSES 


With preparation and/or expenence in Intensive and Coronary 
Care Nursing, or mterestln training tor this Nursing Speciality 
QUAUFICATIONS: Successful completion ot an approved basIc 
course In Nursing. Active registration in New Brunswick. or 
eligible tor same. Must be able to work rotating shift. 
SALARY RANGE: $567 - $651! per month. Salary commensurate 
with Qualitlcatlons and expenence. 


REHABILITATION NURSES 


With preparation and/or experience In RenaDilitatlon Nursing 
QUALIFICATIONS, Successful completion ot an approved basIc 
course In Nursmg Active registrallon in New Brunswick. or 
eligible tor same Must be able to work rotating shift. 
SALARY RANGE: $567-$65B per month. Salary commensurate 
with Qualifications and expenence. 


Excellent tringe benefits Three weeks vacation aller one year 
service Insurance and pension programs 37'
 hour week. 


Apply to: 


Personnel Director 
WEST SAINT JOHN COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 
B 3610. Postal Station B 
Saini John. N.B. E2M 4X3 


70 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


2 L.P.N.'S 
REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY 


For a 58-bed Personal Care Home, a mo- 
dern facility, 80 miles south west of Winni- 
peg. Thriving community of 1500 people. 
Living quarters provided. Will credit for past 
experience. Excellent salary and fringe 
benefits. 


For further information contact: 
Mr. René Comte 
Foyer Notre Dame Inc. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes, 
Manitoba 
ROG 1 MO 
248-2092 


DOUGLAS HOSPITAL 
IN METROPOLITAIN MONTREAL 
A multl.disciplinary psychiatric hospital with 
1 lOa adult and 100 children's beds; 


reqUi res 


NURSING STAFF ON ALL lEVELS 


We onvite enqUiries from registered nurses with 
experience in psychiatric nursong or new 
graduates for our medical, geriatric or 
children's services. 
Nursing assistants with experience or newly 
graduated. Psychiatric nursing background is 
preferable but not essential. 
Language requirement for licensing in Quebec 
not applicable to Canadian citizens. 
Applications and enquiries should be sent to: 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
6875 LaSalle boul evard 
Verdun 204. Québec. 


DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY 


For a 58-bed Personal Care Home, a mo- 
dern facility, 80 miles south west of Winni- 
peg. Thriving community of 1500 people. 
Living quarter$ provided. Excellent salary 
and fringe benefits. Will credit for past ex- 
perience. Must be bilingual and have ex- 
perience in geriatrics. 


For further information contact: 
Mr. RENÉ COMTE 
Foyer Notre Dame Inc. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes 
Manitoba 
ROG 1 MO 
248-2092 


REGISTERED NURSES 


for 


GENERAL DUTY 


for 
General or Specialized wards includ- 
ing a.A. for 550-bed hospital on Uni- 
versity Campus. 
Team or Unit Nursing 
Liberal fringe benefits 


for further information please 
contact: 
Employment Officer, Nursing, 
University Hospital, 
Saskatoon, Sask. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 


FACULTY POSITIONS 


Rapidly developing new curriculum re- 
quires ten senior faculty members with ex- 
perience in all clinical areas as well as 
in education, evaluation, curriculum dev- 
elopment and research. Positions available 
now. 


Apply to: 
Muriel Up richard, Ph.D. 
Director 
School of Nursing, IRC Bldg. No. 341 
University of British Columbia 
Vancouver, B.C. 
V6T 1 W5 


OPERATING ROOM 
NURSES 


- required for 270 bed acute care 
hospital 
- expanding to 370 beds 
- must be eligible for B. C. registration 
Personnel policies in accordance 
with RNABC contract 
-1973 salary $672.00 - $842.00 per 
month plus credit for postgraduate 
certificates and experience 
Please contact: 
Director of Nursing 
Prince George Regional Hospital 
Prince George, B.C. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



career opport__nity 


DIRECTOR OF 
PUBLIC HEALTH 
NURSING 


Local Board of Health 
City of Calgary Health District 
To direct and deploy a staff of approximately 95 Public 
Health Nurses in generalized functions, including programs 
of Child Health, Communicable Disease Control, Tubercu- 
losis Control and Family Planning. 
SALARY: $13,500.00 to $17,500.00 per annum. 
Requires a minimum of a Bachelor's Degree in Public 
Health Nursing with broad related experience in supervision 
and administration. 
Competition No. 73-315 
Qualified applicants are invited to submit application forms 
or resumes in confidence to: 
Mr. C. Lukenbill, 
Supervisor of 
Employment 
Manpower Dept. 


Box 2100, 
Calgary, Alberta 
T2P 2M5 
MP-739 


THE CITY OF CALGARY 


INSTRUCTOR, TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
(DIPLOMA NURSING PROGRAM) 


required by 


Department of Continuing Education 
KESLEY INSTITUTE of Applied Arts and Sciences 
Saskatoon 


SALARY: 
Under negotiation and commensurate with education and 
experience. 
Range IV - $8,268 - $13,440 per annum 
Range V - $9,120 - $14,820 per annum 
Range VI - $10,056 - $15,552 per annum 
DUTIES: Teaching and clinical guidance of students in the first 
and second year of the program. 
QUALIFICATIONS: Registered Nurse with Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing degree, teaching preparation and experience in nursing 
education and nursing practice. 
NOTE: Suitable applicants will form an eligible list for positions in 
Saskatoon, North Battleford and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. 
Please quote competition number: cc6203 
Closing date for receipt of applications: As soon as possible 


For application forms, please contact: Public Service 
Commission, 1820 Albert Street, Regina, Sask. 


VANCOUVER 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 



 


Invites applications for 


REGULAR and RELIEF 
GENERAL DUTY 


Nursing positions in all clinical areas of an active 
teaching hospital, closely affiliated with the University of B.C. 
and the development of the B.C. Medical Centre. 


For further information, please write to: 
PERSONNEL SERVICES 
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 
855 WEST 12TH AVE. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 71 



WE CARE 


"ÎIiJ 



 


J 


HOSPITAL: 
Accredited modern general - 260 beds. Expansion 
to 420 beds in progress. 
LOCATION: 
Immediately north of Toronto. 
APARTMENTS: 
Furnished - shared. 
Swimming Pool, Tennis Court, Recreation Room, 
Free Parking. 
BENEFITS: 
Competitive salaries and excellent fringe benefits. 
Planned staff development programs. 


Please address all enquiries to: 
Assistant Administrator (Nursing) 
York County Hospital, 
NEWMARKET, Ontario. 
L3Y 2R1 


BORED? 
RESTLESS? 


B: 


- Stimulating General Duty activities in 
a 675 bed hospital - on a unit of your 
choice 
- Leisure ti me activities that are interest- 
ing and exciting 


Apply to: 
Director of Nursing 
Regina General Hospital 
Regina, Saskatchewan 


72 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


NURSING 
ADMINISTRATOR 


AVAILABLE 
A challenge in the Community Nursing Education 
Prog ramme 
WHERE WHEN 
Evening Division Begins July 1, 1974 
Loyola of Montreal 
Health Education 
HOW 
As Assistant to the Coordinator of Community 
Health Nursing 
WHO 
Holds a Master's Degree in Nursing and has the 
ability to work with people in a challenging multi- 
discipline programme, preferably bilingual 
SALARY 
According to University scale 
INFORMATION FROM 
G. Lennox 
Programme Coordinator for Health Education 
Loyola of Montreal 
Evening Division 
7270 Sherbrooke Street West 
Montreal, Quebec 
H4 B 1 R6 
Tel. 514-482-0320 (Ioc. 427) 


TORONTO 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


Invites applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 
REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS 
FOR GENERAL DUTY 


Superior opportunities for Professional Growth 
and Development. 
- Progressive Personnel Policies. 
- Excellent opportunities for advancement In 
atmosphere of medical excellence. 


Please apply to:- 


Personnel Office 
TORONTO CENERAl: HOSPITAL 
101. College SI., 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M5G 1L7. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



ADVISER IN NURSING 
ONTARIO MINISTRY OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES 


This new position provides for the development of nursing 
services within a multi-disciplinary concept of health care at 
the Ministry's juvenile and adult institutions. 
The successful candidate will be a person of proven ability 
in the areas of programme administration, and one who can 
apply new models of nursing care and plan corresponding 
training programmes. 
The Adviser in Nursing will be based in Toronto, but the posi- 
tion will require frequent trips. This is a full-time contract 
position, salary negotiable, and intended to attract persons 
who have held senior nursing appointments. 
Enquiries should be directed to the: 
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 
MINISTRY OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES 
434 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 



 
Ontario 


Ontario 
Ministry of 
Correctional 
Services 


Montreal is a fascinating, 
bicultural city, but don't 
take our word - Enjoy it 
from the vantage point of 
"THE ROYAL VIC" situated 
in the heart of the city. 


Those of you who are 
ready to meet the challenge 
of new experience, 
we will prepare you 
for nursing roles in 
a research - teaching 
hospital 
where 
NURSES ARE IMPORTANT 


No special language requirement 
for Canadian Citizens but the 
opportunity to improve your 
French is open to you. 


Write to: 
Anne Bruce R.N. 
Nursing Recruitment Officer 
Royal Victoria Hospital 
687, Pine Avenue West 
Montreal, Quebec. Canada 
H3A 1A1 


FEBRUARY 1974 


ASSOCIATE DIREC10R OF 
NURSING-PATIENT CARE 
VICTORIA GENERAL HOSPITAL 


An exciting opportunity exists for a person with 
broad knowledge and experience in nursing practice 
and management with this leading 430-bed acute 
general hospital in one of Canada's most beautiful 
citið. 
The Associate Director of Nursing will be responsible 
for the performance of safe, efficient and thera- 
peutically effective nursing care for patients. 
This is a unique opportunity in that the Associate 
Director of Nursing will be concentrating on patient 
care matters rather than just administration. In 
addition, this person will join a young management 
team that is leading this hospital in a new phase 
of its development. 
Interested candidates should call or submit their 
I!.sumes in confidence to Kyle R. Mitchell at: 


""nl,ill 


220 - 1155 West Georgia St, Vancouver 5, B.C. 
604-685-0261 


ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 73 



UNIVERSITY OF 
ALBERTA HOSPITAL 


EDMONTON, ALBERTA 


invites applications from general duty nurses 


Opportunities for Professional development in 
general and specialty areas of Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing. Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatry, 
Operating Room, Renal DialysIs Unit, and Extend- 
ed Care. 


Planned Orientation Program, 
In-service Education Program. 


Salary commensurate with education and expe- 
rience. 
For further information write to: 


EMPLOYMENT SUPERVISOR - NURSING 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA HOSPITAL 
84 Avenue & 112 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 


DALHOUSI E UN IVERSITY 


SCHOOL OF NURSING 


FACULTY POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


July, 1973 


1) Medical Surgical Nursing 
2) psychiatric Nursing 
3) Community Health Nursing 
4) Maternal-Child Nursing 
Masters degree required. 


Apply to: 


Dr. Floris E. King 
Director 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 
DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY 
Halifax, Nova Scotia 


74 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


LAKEHEAD UNIVERSITY 


REQUIRES A 
CHAIRMAN, SCHOOL OF NURSING 


An experienced academic administrator who can assume 
responsibility for a well established Baccalaureate Degree 
Program. The successful applicant will hold academic rank 
in the faculty. 
Administrative ability, teaching experience in a speciality 
area and skill in interpersonal and public relations are prime 
qualities sought. 
Interested individuals, qualified at a Master's level or 
higher, are invited to submit curriculum vitae and other rele- 
vant information, together with names of three referees, to: 


Mr. D. AVRE 
Secretary of the University 
Lakehead University 
Thunder Bay, Ontario 
P7B 5E 1 
Attention: School of Nursing Search Committee 


ACCEPT THE CHALLENGE 


ST. BONIFACE GENERAL HOSPITAL 


Due to the expansion of our present program and 
facil ities, invites applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 
FOR GENERAL DUTY 
FOR A NEW 
200 BED EXTENDED CARE WING 


The wing comprises five nursing units designed to 
provide care for patients requiring active rehabilita- 
tion and a planned team approach. 
To be a member of this team please for:vard all 
applications and enquiries to: 


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
NURSING SERVICE (STAFFING) 
ST. BONIFACE GENERAL HOSPITAL 
409 TACHE AVENUE, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA 
R2 H 2A6 


FEBRUARY 1974 



NATIONAL HEALTH CARE 
EVALUATION SEMINAR 


THE RELIGIOUS 
HOSPITALLERS 
OF SAINT JOSEPH 


Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University 
Halifax, Nova Scotia 
June 10-14, 1974 


OBJECTIVES: 
To assist people involved in health care delivery and re- 
search to develop an understanding of methods and tech- 
niques required for demonstrating and evaluating health- 
care projects. 
PARTICIPANTS: 
Health professionals, administrators, and others, from all 
health fields, concern&d with evaluating health care. 
EXPENSES: 
Tuition is $100. Lodgings will be arranged at the University 
for $5.00/ day. Limited financial support is available. 


INVITE YOU 


to share their 300 year heritage of service to the 
Church in health, education and welfare services In 
the United States, Canada and France 
to share their availability to reach out to those In 
need In Africa, Peru and the Dominican Republic 
proclaiming Christ's love by care and prevention, 
teaching and development programs 
to share their common life of prayer and work in a 
spirit of openness to God and the needs of others 


For information and application forms, write to: 
Mrs. Marilyn Janigan (Program Co-ordinator), 
Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of 
Medicine, 
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Deadline for application: May 1, 1974. 
This seminar is supported by a grant from the Department of National 
Health and Welfare. 


R.S.V.P. FORMATION CENTER 
438V2 College SI. 
Burlington. Vermont 
05401 


FORMATION CENTER 
4 Toronto Street, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 
K1 S ON2 


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A modern 700 bed non-sectarian hospital which has general and special services. 
Active In-Service Education Programme, including Planned Orientation Programme. 
Excellent personnel policies. Bursaries for post-basic University courses in Nursing 
Supervision and Administration. 
Applications invited from Registered Nurses and Nursing Assistants. 
For further information, please write: 
Director, Nursing Service JEWISH GENERAL HOSPITAL 
3755 Cote St. Catherine Road Montreal 249, Quebec 


FEBRUARY 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE ì:J 
. 



REGISTERED NURSES 


This 500-bed chronic and convalescent hospital has imme- 
diate full-time and part-time vacancies for Registered 
Nurses or Graduate Nurses with pending Ontario registra- 
tion. 
Positions offer starting salaries commensurate with exp""r- 
ience, liberal fringe benefits and scope for advancemen. 


For an interview please contact: 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL 
130 DUNN AVENUE 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
M6K 2R7 
Tel.: 537-2411 



D
 
ORTHOPAEDIC &: ARTHRITIC 
HOSPITAL 
'VI'V' 


43 WElLESLEY STREET, EAST, 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
M4Y 1H1 


Enlarging Specialty Hospital offers a unique op- 
portunity to nurses and nursing assistants interested 
in the care of patients with bone and joint disorders 
Must be registered in the Province of Ontario 
Preparation by post-graduate education or exper- 
ience required for Senior positions. 


76 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


THE COllEGE OF NURSES OF ONTARIO 


invites applications for the position of 


ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - 
PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS 


Position available - June 1, 1974 


Position - 
The position provides opportunity to assist the Director in conduct- 
ing the affairs of the College, with prime responsibility for the dev- 
elo r 'nt and maintenance of standards for registration of nurses 
ana, ...Jrsing assistants and for the discipline of registrants. 
The Assistant Director is responsible for coordinating the activities 
of the staff of the Professional Standards Department. 
Qualifications - 
A registered nurse with master's degree and progressive experi- 
ence in nursing practice or education. Must have demonstrat- 
ed competence in administration in a senior position. 
Salary -dependent upon qualifications. 


Apply to: 


The Director 
The College of Nurses of Ontario 
600 Eglinton Avenue East 
Toronto, Ontario 
M4P 1 P4 


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THE SCARBOROUGH 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


invites applications from: 
Registered Nurses and Registered Nursing Assist- 
ants to work in our 650-bed progressive, accredit- 
ed, community-centered, active treatment hospital. 
We offer opportumties In Medical, Surgical, Paediatric, and Obstetrical 
nursing. 
Our specialties include a Burns and Plastic unit, Coronary Care, Intensive 
Care and Neurosurgery Units and an active Emergency DepartrJ12nt. 
. Obstetrical Department - participation in "Family centered" teach- 
i ng program. 
. Paediatric Department - participation in Play Therapy Program. 
. Orientation and on-going statt education. 
. Progressive personnel policies. 
The hospital is located In Eastern Metropolitan Toronto. 
For further information, write to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
SCARBOROUGH GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
3050 Lawrence Avenue, East, Scarborough, Ontario. 


FEBRUARY 1974 



SUNNYBROOK 
HOSPITAL 
is 
PEOPLE 
JOIN US 


Write to: 
Selection Officer 
Personnel Department 
SUNNYBROOK HOSPITAL 
2075 Bayview Avenue 
Toronto 315, Ontario 


EXTENSION COURSE IN 
NURSING UNIT ADMINISTRATION 


REGISTERED NURSES employed full time in management posi- 
tions may apply for enrolment in the extension course in Nursing 
Unit Administration. A limited number of registered psychiatric 
nurses may also enrol. The program is designed for nurses who 
wish to improve their administrative skills and is available in French 
and in English. 
The course begins with a five day Intramural session In September, 
followed by a seven month period of home study. The program 
condudes with a final five day workshop session in April or in May 
The intramural sessions are arranged on a regional basis. 
The extension course in Nursing Unit Administration is sponsored 
jointly by the Canadian Nurses' Association and the Canadian Hos- 
pital Association. 
Registered Nurses interested in enrolling in the 1974-75 class 
should submit applications before May 15th. Early application is 
advised. The tuition fee of $175.00 is payable on or before July 1 st. 


For additional information and application forms direct 
enquiries to: 


Director, 
Extension Course in Nursing Unit Administration, 
25 Imperial Street, 
Toronto, Ontario M5P 1C1 


Sunnybrook Hospital 
· a 1,200 bed University owned 
teaching hospital with 
opportunities for development 
in modern specialty 
nursing units. 
· comprehensive range of 
fringe benefits. 


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FEBRUARY 1974 


REGISTERED NURSES 
Immediate Openings in all Services 
Come wor\( and play in Newfoundland's second largest city! 
Comer Brook has a population of approximately 35,000 with a 
temperate climate in comparison with most of Canada. Outdoor life 
is among the finest to be found in North America. The airports serv- 
ing Comer Brook are at Deer Lake, 32 miles away. and Stephenville, 
50 miles away. 
Connections with these airports make readily available air travel 
anywhere in the world. 
- Present Salary Scale: $6,900.00 - 8,810.00 per annum 
- Effective Apnl1, 1974: $7,452.00 - 9,515.00 per annum. 
- Effective September 1, 1974: $7,652.00 - 9.715.00 per annum. 
- Service Credits - One step for two years experience, maximum 
two steps April 1st. 1974 - maximum, three steps. 
- Educational differentia/for B.N. and master's degree in Nursing. 
- .80rt per shift for rotating evenings and nights. 
- $2.00 per shih for Charge Nurse. 
- $50.00 uniform allowance annually. 
- 20 working days annual vacation. 
- 8 statutory holidays. 
- Sick Leave - 1 

 days per month. 
- Accommodatiorl available. 
- Two week orientation on commencement. 
- Continuing Staff Education program. 
At the present time, a major expansion project is in progress to 
provide regional hospital facilities for the West Coast of the Prov- 
ince. The Hospital will have a 350 bed capacity by December, 1974. 
Services include Medicine, Surgery, Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psy- 
chiatry, CCU, and ICU. 
Letters of application should be submItted to: 
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL, 
WESTERN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 
CORNER BROOK, NFLD. 


I 


. competitive salaries. 
. staff residence 
accommodation with parkland 
setting and excellent 
transportation to 
downtown Toronto. 
. recreation facilities. 


.. 
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I 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 77 



CARIBOO COLLEGE 
KAMLOOPS 
BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Situated north of the Okanagan Valley in a city of 
55,000. 
Applications are invited for teaching positions in an 
established. approved two-year diploma nursing 
program. Positions will be available from the spring 
of 1974. 
Applicants with a Master's degree are preferred. 
Minimum requirements are a baccalaureate degree 
with experience in nursing and teaching and eligibili- 
ty for registration in B.C. 
Attractive salaries commensurate with preparation 
and experience. 
Apply in writing stating experience, qualifications 
and references to: 
Chairman of Nursing 
Cariboo College 
Box 860 
Kamloops. B.C. V2C SN3 


REGISTERED NURSES 


and 


LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES 


required for 
fully modern 433-bed accredited hospital 
comprising 232 acute treatment beds and a new 201 
bed rehabilitation and extended care facility to open 
in January 1974. 
Brandon is an attractive, growing, university city in western 
Manitoba with population of 35,000 and offers a full range of 
year around recreational facilities. 
Staff nurse positions are available in - 
CLINICAL AREAS- 
MEDICINE 
SURGERY 
OBSTETRICS 
INTENSIVE CARE 
REHABILITATION 
EXTENDED CARE 
An active staff development program is in existence 
Apply in writing to: 
Mr. A. lESKO, 
PERSONNEL OFFICE, 
BRANDON GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
BRANDON, MANITOBA 
R7 A 1 l7 


78 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


DO YOU 
WANT TO HELP 
YOUR PROFESSION? 


Then li/l out and send in the lorm below 


----------- 


REMITTANCE FORM 
CANADIAN NURSES' FOUNDATION 


50 The Driveway, Ottawa K2P 1 E2, Ontario 


A contribution of $ . payable to 
the Canadian Nurses' Foundation is enclosed 
and is to be applied as indicated be1ow: 


MEMBERSHIP (payable annually) 


Nurse Member - Regular 
Sustaining 
Patron 


$ 5.00 
$ 50.00 
$500.00 


Public Member - Sustaining 
Patron 


$ 50.00 
$500.00 


BURSARIES $.. 
MEMORIAL $ 


RESEARCH $ 


in memory of . 


Name and address of person to be notified of 
this gift ..... 


REMITTER 


(Print name in full) 


Address 
Position 
Employer 


N.B.: CONTRIBUTIONS TO CNF 
ARE DEDUCTIBLE FOR INCOME TAX PURPOSES 


FEBRUARY 1974 



I nd ex 
to 
Advertisers 


February 1974 


Astra Pharmaceuticals Canada Ltd. ................................................ ...m....... h 
Canadian Armed forces ............................................................................. 61 
CI i n ie Shoenl akers ..... .............. ........................ ......... ......... ................... ..... m.. 2 
DavI)1 Canada Ltd. ......................................................................................... I X 
Holl ister Li m ited ....................................................................................... .....+X 
ICN Canada Ltd. ........................................................................................... II 
I nternational Health Institute ......................... ............................ ................... 63 
Lanzette Prod ucts ...... ...... ............ ........... ....................... ................................ 62 
J .8. Lippincott Co. of Canada Ltd. ......................................m...................... I 
Monl Sulton I ne. ............................................................................................ I h 
C. \'. Y10shy Company. Ltd. ............................................................. 55. 57. 51} 
J .1'. Pose) ('ompan) . .................................................................................... 50 
Procter &. Gamhle ......................................................................................... I 3 


Reeves Cornpan) ..................................................................................... I..L 15 
Will iam H. Rorer (Canada) Ltd. ................................................................. I 7 
Sando/ ICanada) Ltd. ................................................................................... 12 
Sehering Corporation limited..................................................... 7<). Covcr I\' 
While Sisler UnifÒrm. Ine. .............................. 5. 9. Covcr II. Covcr III 


Acll'crtisil/g Mwwgcr 
Georgina Clarke 
The Canadian Nurse 
SO The Driveway 
Ottawa K2P I E2 (Ontario) 


4 cll'('Ylising RepreWn1l11/l'e.\ 
Richard P. Wilson 
219 East Lancaster Avenue 
Ardmore, Penna. 19003 
I'dephone. (215) Mid\\a) 9-1'+97 


Gordon Tiffin 
2 Tremont Crescent 
Don Mills. Ontario 
T dephone. (416) 444-4731 


Member of Canadian 
Circulations Audit Board Inc. 


I31!EI 


FEBRUARY 1974 


1- 


, CoriGidin'D" 


DESCRIPTION: 
Coricidin 'D': Each white, coated 
tablet cont,lins: 
2 m
 chlorphemramine maleate U.S P.. 
390 m
 acetylsalIcylic acid. 
30 mg caffeine and 
10 mg phenylephrine 
A vadahle In blIsters of [2 
and 24. and bottles of 100 tablets. 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: Each orange- 
pineapple-flavored multicolored tablet contains 
O. j mg chlorpheniramlne maleate US P.. 
!<(1 m
 acetylsalicylic acid and 
2.5 m
 phenylephrine HCL 
A,all,lble in boxe< of 24 Medilets in a 
ch,ld's protective package 
INDICATIONS: 
Symptomatic relIef of nasal congestion and 
other discomforts associated with sinusitis, 
colds and allergIc or vasomotor rhinitis. 
CONTRAINDICATIONS: 
Sensltl\'itv to any of the components. 
patients receIving MAO inh,b,to" 
PRECAUTIONS: 
Admlnisterwith care ropatients with hyper- 
tensIon. cardiac disorders. hyperthyrOidism, 
diahete, mellitus and patients hypersensitive 
to sympathomimetic compounds 
Patients should he cautioned not to oper- 
ate veh,cles or hazardous machinery until 
their response to the drug has been deter- 
mined Since the depressant effects of anti- 
h,stdmlnes are additive to those of other 
drugs affecting the central nervous system, 
patients should he cautioned against drink- 
Ing alcoholic beverages or taking hypnotics, 
sedatives, psychotherapeutic agents or other 
drugs \\',th CNS depressant effects during 
anti histaminic therapy 
Rarely, prolonged therapy with antihista- 
mine-containing preparations can produce 
hlood dvscrasias 


ADVERSE EFFECTS: 
Dn)" sines5, dizziness, nausea, Increased 
Ittltah,hty or excitement may be 
enClmnten.J 


DOSAGE: 
Coricidin 'D': Adutts: I rahlet every 4 
hours. not to exceed 4 tahlets In 24 hours. 
Ch,ldren 10 to [4 years' 1/2 adult d,.se' 
under I (1 years' at discretion of physiCian. 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: 2 to 6 years 
II 4 to I Med,lets ì to 12 yt',\ts: I to 2 
Med,let'. Each dose may be repeated every 
3 to 4 hours. but not more than 4 Medilets 
should he given In one day to children 2 to 
6 Yl'ars. and 6 Medilets to ch,ldren 7 to 12 
years Li
it treatment to 3 days The recom- 
mended dosage should not he exceeded 
except on a physician's advise 


Detailed information IS avaIlable on 
req uest 
SCHERINGCORPORATION LIMITED 
Poinl" Claire, Quebec H9R r B4 
I PMAC ] 



PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS OF REGISTERED NURSES 


Alberta 
'\thcrla ,\
.,ociation of Regl'telcd Nu"e,. 
102
(' 112 Stleet. Fdmnnton. r
" 11\1(,. 
1'1'('\.. A.J. Pro'A,e: I're'.-llecI: D.F. Huff- 
man: I iu,-Pr('\.: A. Thomp,on. I. Wall-.cr. 
c.",,,,,itte,.' - SII/If \'II/'\n: ( "'p: \ '.t:. 
1..<1 lie.: W. 1\1 ilh: "-'-t:. I'ractice: \. Clark 
SUP"/T \'unn: J. Smith: I'roje('/ Oire(. \ '-t:. 
t:.luL. 1\1. \loncricff. 1'1'01' O/lìn SII/If- 
I'ul>. Rd. Om( <'1': '\. Sha'A: Flllpl",'. ReI.: 
, Ch,'pm.lJ1: -1.\\1. huplo"- ReI. Of/it cr: 
R.R. Dnnahuc: \ 'g. Sen'. COl/.\ull.: H. Sei- 
ler,: COIIIIII. Adl'i.'or: H. Cotter: R"t:/.,Imr: 
'\.R. :\Ic"innon: Ü". .'iLc: H.1\1. Sahin: 
OlliCL' \{(///(/t:,'r: 1\1. Galricl-.. 


British Columbia 
Regi,tcred Nu"c
' '\,'>Ociation of Hriti,h 
Columhia. 2\30 Wc,t 12th Avenue. Van- 
couver. PI''''.: G. I aPointe: 1 ÙT-I'rn. r. 
Ducl-.. R. M.lcfadycn. COllllllittee.'- 'I.\g. 
f:.cluc.. .I.". Griffith: I\,'g. Practice: F.H. 
Dancer: .\oc & FnJ//. It elt:: H. Archcr. SI,!Il' 
- b:l'C f>in'c F.A. "cnnedy: Regi.\lrar: 
H. G ricc: A.\.\t. Regi.'lrar: J. Small: Dir" 
/..due. SnT.:L. "clmacl-.,: -1.\\1. f)ire(. hluc 
Sen'.: J. :\IcCuliagh: f)ir('('. V'g. .\1'1'1'.: T. 
Schnurr: lJiree. I'e/'\oll/wl Se/l'.: N. Paton: 
-1 \\1. I>irec. 1'1'1'.'01111"1 Se/T.: (1'11/(,('111('111 
SnT.): F. \lac Donald. (/',1/1>01' Rd.l: G. 
Smalc: f)irec. COIIIIII. Se/'l'.' C I\larcu,: 
1 il>raril/II: J. \lol'on: Adlllill. A \\1.: D. St. 
Germain. 


Manitoba 
\lanitoha A

ociation of Rcgi,tercd Nu"ö. 
('..J7 Rroad'Aay Avenuc. Winnipeg. K 
( OX2 
1'1'1".. F. I\IcNaught: 1'<1\1 1'1'0.: 1'.1\1. Nu- 
gcnt: I in'.Pn'.'.: K.G. Black I. 1\1c( lure. 
COllllllillee., - ,'I/'g.. A. Crotcau. 1\1. Swc- 
di,h: SOl'. & l:.ám. We(l.: A. Danick le/!i,I.: 
O. \lcDcrmott: Hi'll. of /:'\(/111.: 0 \kDer- 
mott: FiliI/lice: ". Dejong: Pn!/l'.\\. Staa - 
/'1111'10\'. Rd. Ad,'i.'.: J. Glea.,on: PilI>. Rei. 
OUi""/': M. Pay nter: Ret:i'lrar: 1\1. Caldwell: 
Co/llill. Edll(. Ad,'i.'.. H. Sund,trom. 


New Brunswick 
New Brun,'A icl-. A.,.,oci.ltion of Kcgi'1cred 
N ur.,e
. 231 Saunder' Strcct. F rcdcricton. 
1'1'('\.: B. I cHlanc: PI/.,I 1'1'('\.: A. Rohichaud: 
I ice-Pre.'. S. COlmier. K. Denni'o(}n: /foil. 
.\ec.: 5. Kohichaud. COlli III ill,'" , - ,'Ii \g.: 
7. Ha'Al-.e,. S. /\lac( eod: N\<.:. Aul. COIIIII/.: 
J. Shelwood. 1 egi.,I.: ". Wright: Lxee. .\1" 
\U. Andc"on: Lil/i.'oll (Jf1Iu'/: N. Kideout: 
COli \/III. .\oc & {-'COli. We(l.. G. Kow,ell: 
Regi\lmr: F. O'Connor: A \.\1. F,,'(, Sn. ,I:. 
Regi\lmr. 1\1. Ru.,.,ell: r.dll<. Co 11\ II II: ^. 
Chri
t ic. 


Newfoundland 
A.,.,ociation of Kegi'itered Nu"e, of New 
foundland. 67 I c :\Iarchand Koad. St. John'.,. 
1'1'1'.'. F. Wilton: 1'(/.\1 1'1'1'.'.' P. Harrett: 1'1'1'.'. 
f', cl: F. HOIlLan: 1 iu'-Pn',.: E. Summer- 
J. Nevitt. COII/II/ill,'n - V\g. Ellie.: 1-. 


80 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Gardner: N,'g. Se/'l'.:J. P,mlett: SOl'. & fcoll. 
11.'11.: W. William
: [<;,I,'C Sl'C.. P. Harrctt. 


Nova Scotia 
Reg"tcrcd Nu"e
' ^'
ociation of Nova 
Scotia. AOY' Cohurg Rn.ld. Halifax. 
1'1'<'1.. M. Hr.ldlev: 1'''.'1 1'1'1'.,.: J. 1'0": I ice- 
I'n".: Sr. 1\1. Harhdra. G. Smith. (. Butler: 
flu 0/'(1. Su.: Sf'. \1. (jilli.,: FI('('. S..c: F. 
I\ln.,.,. COllllllille('\ - \"g. I'd"e.: r. Hlaikie: 
\"t:. .\"1'1'.: S :\l.lcDlII lid: \'"e. ,( 1"011. 
II eU.: G. \Iurph}: Ad,'i,. .v ,g. I dill'.. Sr. C 
Marie: -1d,'i,. \"... ,'it IT.. J. I\lacLcdn: Fm- 
1'10.\. Rd. Oail'''/': \1 Bentley: Pllh. Rei. Otfì- 
l'er: D. :\Iiller: Adlllill. A \\1.: F. :\lacDonald. 


Ontario 
Kcgi.,tercd Nu"e
' A.,.,ociation of Ontario. 

3 Price Strect. Toronto. I\I..JW I L2. 
Prn.: W.J. Gcrhard: 1'1'1'.\. necl: N.1\1. \Ia- 
ro.,.,i. C"mmittee.' - Soâ,,-EulII. Wd/.: CJ. 
Sepp.lld: \"g.: G.I . Schmidt: bllln/lor: CJ. 
Faull-.ner: Admill.: 1\1.1 . Peart: Exec DinT.: 
I.. Barr: A.'.II. E.\('c. Dirn.: D. Gibney: 
Din'c. hllplo"- Rd.: AS Cìribhen: Direc 
Prole.\\. f)('I'"I.' C.1\1. Adam.,: R"g. En'c 
Sec: 1\1.1. Thoma
. F. WinchesleL 


Prince Edward Island 
A

ociation of Nu"c' of Prince Edward 
(,land. I XX Prince SI.. Charlottetown. 
Prn.: F. !\Iacl eod: Pa,l Prn.: (,. Carruthers: 
PI'''' /-'I"CI. B. Rohin.,on: I iu' Pre.'.. S. 
Mulligan: En'(. 'ie( .-Reg.: I . Fra,er. Com- 
mitt""., - V'g. F.lllc.: D. Sawler; V,'g. 
.'in,... J. Pctc,,: Pllh. Rei.: H. \Vood: Fill'lI/- 
n" t. (aIrUlhc,,: Legi,l. ,I:. II\'-ll/I\'-': Sr. 
i\1. Cahill: SOl' ,( 1....111. Welt:. 1\1. Babineau. 


Quebec 
A.,.,ociatlon of Nu"c, of the Province of 
()uehcc. ..J200 Dorche,ter Hlvd.. W.. \lont- 
real. H 
^ I V2. . 
1'/'(".. R. Hureau: I in'-Prn.: S O'Neill. 
.I Pinl-.ham. (Fng.1. P. Proulx. ,. I ePage. 
(I-L): HOIl. !re(/,\. (. Roycr: [foil. Sec: P. 
HoucheL COIIIII/ill"", - ,\'.,t:. fdllc.. G. Al- 
Ien. D. (.danccttc. N'g. S"/I'. J. Hacl-.'Aeli. 
K. Dionne: P/,,,Ie\\. Sen'.: S. O'Neill. P. Mur- 
phy; School 01 I\\g.: K. '\no. C. de Villie" 
Sauve: 1 egi,l.. \1. I\la,ter,. (. BeI.mger: 
.\ec R'g.' N. Du :\Iouchcl; Pllh. Rd. Officer: 
\1. Jcan. 


Saskatchewan 
Sa
l-.atchc'Aan Kegi,terL-d Nu"e,' A.,.,ocia- 
tion. 20(,(, Ket..llack SI.. Regina. S..JT 2"2. 
PI< ,. DJ Piphcr: I',,'! Pre.'.. (C. Linnell: 
r/'e.' Fle('/: J. I\lac"dY: Vice-Pre.'.: Sr. B. 
BCLaire. S. Khodcn. COII/II/ illee,' - ,Y.W.: 
I. W,,"on: CIl<lplen & Pllh. Rei.: R. I cding- 
hart'!; SO(. & Fcoll. Wdt:: G. Hutchinson: 
I.\el'. Sec. A. I\lil).,: R('/!i.'lr<ll: E. Duma,: 
PilI>. IIII,,/'m. (.)!lìc<'r: H. Schill: N,/!. COI/.\IIII.: 
R. :\lireau: A.'.'1. Regi.'I/W" J. Pas.,more. 


ð 

 


Canad ian 
Nurses' 
Association 


Directors 


Prc
ident 


1\1 arguerile E. Schumacher 


Pre.,ident.Flect. 


. H ugucttc I ahellc 


I ,t Vicc-Prc
ident.. Beverly Du Ga, 


I\lember-at-1 arge ..... Glenna RO'A.,cll 


I\!ember-at-Large .. ". /\Iarion Smith 


/\I cmher -at-Large 
.............................. Deni.,e I.alancette 


I\lemher-at-1 arge ...... Koberta C'OUlb 


A.J. Prow.,c ............................. AAKN 


G. I aPolllte .......................... RNAB( 


1-. I\lcNaught .......................... I\IAKN 


B. LcBlanc ............................ NHARN 


F. Wilton ................................. AKNN 


1\1. Hradley ............................ KNANS 


W. Gerh.trd ............................. KNAO 


E. Mad cod......... .................. ANPEI 


R. Hureau 


.... ANP() 


DJ. Piphcr ............................... SRNA 


Executive Director 


..................... Helen ". I\lus.,allem 


FEBRUARY 1974 



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1254 BAY ST. 


I VUE: I ntK 


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42353 Style # 42411 
Royale oxford tricot. 
Sizes 5-15 
White .............. $25.00 
Navy................ 528.00 
Style # 2857 
Royale oxford tricot. 
Sizes 6-16 
White only...... $19.98 

 Style # 42353 
'.:\ Royale rib tricot knit. 
\\ Sizes 3-15 
'White only...... $29.00 


, 

 '/' 
MAIL ORDER DIVISION 
372 QUEEN ST. W. 
TORONTO M5V 2A3 
Please send II mail orders to 


SHOP IN PERSON AT OUR 
NEW BAY STREET 


CTfîDI:' 



Howto1tatch"a cold. 


-- 


Surprise a cold right at its onset with 
Coricidin '0' for adults and Coricidin '0' 
Medilets ,': for children, You can recom- 
mend these products knowing they will 
provide relief from aches, pains and 
fever plus decongestant action; 
Coricidin '0' and Coricidin '0' 
Medilets contain Chlor-Tripolon;: 
one of the world's most widely used 
antihistamines; phenylephrine, a 
highly effective decongestant and acetyl- 
salicylic acid for aches, pains and fever. 
The adult form contains caffeine as a mild 
stimulant to keep your patients on the go. 
Coricidin'D
 



 
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For complete product inform.ltion 
ee page 79. 


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March 1974 Q 


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WHITE SISTER WRAPS YOU IN CONFIDENCE 
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About ............................ $29.00 

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CAREER APPAREL 


# 2342 


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"Royale Rib" Tricot Knit 
Sizes 8-18 - Missy length 
White only 
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Style No. 2364 
"Royale Rib" Tricot Knit 
Sizes 8-18 
White only 
About .................................. 530.00 


CAREER APPAREL AT FINE STORES ACROSS CANADA 



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Recent releases 
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CD 


WINTERS' PROTECTIVE BODY 
MECHANICS: A Manual for Nurses 
Bilger and Greene 
. . . Concentrates on the physical and physiological 
principles underlying the body movements that need 
to be initiated to achieve therapeutic objectives In 
patient care. 
Springer May 1973 $6.25 


f7'\ MONITORING CENTRAL VENOUS 

 PRESSURE: A Programmed Sequence 
Krueger 
. . . A programmed text on the aspects of central 
venous pressure of concern in nursing. 
Springer June 1973 $4.25 


CD 


THE BODY'S RESPONSE TO TRAUMA: 
Fractures 
Clissold 
. . . In this programmed text, fracture is used to 
demonstrate the responses of the cells of the body 
to trauma. 
Springer June 1973 $6.75 


CD MATERNAL-CHILD NURSING 
Broadribb and Corliss 
A family centered text for students being prepared 
to give direct care to mothers and children. 
Lippincott September 1973 about $11.00 


o 


RESPIRATORY INTENSIVE CARE 
NURSING 
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston 
. . . A comprehensive presentation of current inter- 
disciplinary practices in respiratory and nursing 
care. 
Little, Brown April 1973 $10.95 


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COMMUNICATION IN NURSING 
PRACTICE 
Hein 
. . . Presents a simple, formal model of the com- 
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emphasizes the need to use variety in meeting 
va riety. 
Little, Brown July 1973 $6.25 




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PERSPECTIVES IN HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT: Nursing Throughout 
the Life Cycle 
Sutterley and Donnelly 
. . . Emphasizes a multi-disciplinary, holistic view of 
man, the promotion and maintenance of health as 
well as intervention in times of physical, emotional 
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Lippincott May 1973 $8.75 


CD THE PRACTICE OF MENTAL HEALTH 
8 NURSING: A Community Approach 
Morgan and Moreno 
, . . Reflects the dynamic quality of psychiatric care 
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Lippincott May 1973 flexible cover $5.95 


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Please send me the book(s) whose number(s) I have circled 
1 5 
2 6 
3 7 
4 8 


Serving the health professions in 
Canada since 1897 
J. B. Lippincott Co. of Canada Ltd. 
75 Horner Ave. 
Toronto, Ontario M8Z 4X7 
Representing in Canada: 
Little, Brown and Company 
Blackwell Scientific Publications Ltd 
Springer Publishing Company, Inc. 


Name 
Address 
City 


Province 


Position 
Postal Code 


o Payment enclosed (send postpaId) 
Books may be returned within 15 days 


o Use my Charge. number 
o Charge and bIll me 


CN-3.74 


MARCH 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 1 
. 




 


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THE 

LINIC 


T..ADfIol"t.lllII. IJII I I ....1 Of" . CAl\lAOA "AI 


SHOE 
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SOME STYLES ALSO AVAILABLE IN COLORS... SOME STYLES 3%-12 AMA-E, about 23.95 to 29.95. 
For a complimentary pair of white shoelaces, folder showing all the smart Clinic styles, and list of stores selling them. write: 
THE CLINIC SHOEMAKERS Dept. CN-3, 7912 Bonhomme Ave. . St. Louis. Mo. 63105 
2 THE CANADIAN NURSE MARCH 1974 



The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


ð 

 


A monthly journal for the nurses of Canada published 
in English and french editions bv the Canadian Nurses' Associalion 


Volume 70, Number 3 


March 1974 


17 A Death At Home ............................................................. D. McNeil 


21 Poor Baby: The Nurse and Feminism ............................... D.5. Starr 


25 Cholera Epidemiology and Control.............................. l.W. Davies 


28 Surviving in the Bush ........................................................ J. O'Brien 


31 A Volunteer Nurse in Israel........................................... C. Dworkin 


33 The Hair Dryer Treatment for Decubiti ................... D.H. Denholm 


I h... 'I...", ""pl..."...d in Ih... ùlihnial and \;11'011' ani...!.:, OIl'" Ih,,,... of Ih,' allihor, and 
do no. n....;...,,,,1'11 
 1'''' pr...,...nt I h... pul i... i..., or , i...", of I h... ( anad ian :-. III""'" \ "o...ial ion. 


4 letters 41 Names 
7 News 42 New Products 
35 In A Capsule 46 Books 
36 Dates 52 Accession list 
38 Research Abstracts 72 Index to Advertisers 


EX.:cUli,,' Dir':c!OL Udcn 11.. \Iu"all,'m_ 
l'd,1I1f' \ ifJ!inia \. I indahur
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V1.\K). I"" 
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$6.50; Iwo years, $12.00. Single copIes. 
$1.00 each. Mdke cheques or money orders 
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MARCH 1974 


c (.1I1.IlII.1I1 'UI...\.... \......II\.I.llIuli 197' 


In 1907. Ethel Johns wrote that 
nurses must choose between the 
profession of nursing and matri- 
mony. According to her biography. 
Watch-fires on the Mountains, Ms. 
Johns warned: "00 not hope to con- 
cil iate both r marriage and nursing]. 
They are quite incompatible. Like 
iron and whiskey they are both 
valuable - but you cannot take 
them in the same glass." 
Social circumstances have 
changed somewhat In the past 64 
years: the extended family has 
shrunk and day-care centers prolif- 
erate, the nursing workweek is 
about half as long as in 1907. and 
technology may be used to prevent 
conception. But nurses still must 
take difficult decisions about per- 
sonal priorities. 
The article Poor Baby points out 
that women today. including nurses. 
base important decisions on soci- 
ety's expectations: Every girl wants 
to get married. Every married wom- 
an will have at least one child to 
prove her femininity and her mate's 
virility. A husband's needs are more 
important than a career's require- 
ments. 
Why? More important to whom? 
Women are asking questions and 
considering alternatives rational- 
ly, as they seek ways to achieve 
satisfying personal relationships 
and creative professional lives. 
Some men have achieved this: 
many men have failed. But men do 
not believe they have to choose 
between marriage and a career. 
Although women today should 
not have to choose. many still be- 
lieve there is a basic incompatibility 
between marriage and a woman's 
professional commitment -like 
iron and whiskey. 
The nursing profession should not 
shrug off feminists as kinky bra- 
burners. formerly marrieds. and 
sexual deviants. Nursing needs 
feminist answer-seekers. 
Rather than adapting to soclety's 
notions. for example, that mothers 
are more responsible than fathers 
for the joint product of conception. 
nursing should support women's 
efforts to obtain equal rights and 
responsibilities in activities of daily 
life. 
Nursing could support part-time 
work for both mothers and fathers. 
so both can share child-care and 
careers. Nursing could reconsider 
the attitude. "fecund is beautiful. 
and award equal status to mother- 
hood and voluntary childlessness. 
-D.S.S. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 3 
. 



letters 


{ 


Letters to the editor are welcome. 
Only signed letters, which include the writer's complete address, 
will be considered for publication. 
Name will be withheld at the writer's request. 


Article arouses interest 
I would to share with fhe Callad iall 
Nurse staff and rcaders the interest that 
has been shown in my article "Control- 
ling the fight/flight patient"' (October 
1973). 
. An excellent letter from a practicing 
nurse was forwarded to me. Both the 
lelter and my attempt to clarif) some 
points were published in the January 
1974 issue. 
. I agreed to a request to reprim the 
complete article in The A ustralasiall 
Nurses Jourllal in 1974. 
. In November IlJ73. I '" as invited to 
participate in an inservice program with 
the supervisor) nursing "talf at the 
Royal Ottawa Hospital. My article. 
plu" a videotape produced by the psy- 
chology department at the University 
of Western Ontario in London. were 
part of an interesting program. fhe 
videotape. which depicted visual meth- 
ods and commentar) used by staff in 
coping with heightencd anxiety in 
patients. elicited both positive and 
negat ive reactions hy those present. fhe 
nursing department of the Allan Me- 
morial Institute in Montreal has begun 
taping some useful material in this 
field. using equipment from McGill 
Universit\ . 
Person:.1 Iclters and messages have 
surprised and flaltered me. The need 
to communicate what we see as daily 
routine activity in crisis situations is 
topical. - Jeall A. Reid, Ottawa. 


Article draws support 
It '" as with real rei ief that I read 
andra 
Kessler's article. entitled "Protecting 
nonsmo"ers in public places" (Januar) 
IlJ74). As a nonsmo"er. I get tired of 
all the stress laid on smo"ers' health. 
while nothing is said about our health 
in their polluted world. 
I am a nurse presently on leave 
from a large Canadian hospital (whose 
cafeteria and coffee shop are notorious- 
ly slllo"e-Iïlled). I have been wor"ing 
for a few months as an office assistant 
in a new and modern YM-YWC'\ com- 
plex. and have been appalled at the 
amount of smo"ing around me. In all 
fairness. I understand that smoking is 
not allo,"ed in the health and physical 
education department, but there seems 
to be no restriction elsewhere. I wor" 
in a small suite of offices, hous ing from 
five to eight staff members at a time, 
4 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


most of whom smo"e in varying 
amounts. By 5.00 1'.1\1. each da) I feci 
overpowered by thic". smelly air. The 
wal" home on city sidcwalb is fresh by 
comparison. 
For three months. I have made count- 
less remarb - humorous. concerned. 
or frustrated. Every comment is either 
ignored or treated as a jo"c. The solc 
result of three months of campaigning 
is my refusal to allow an ashtray on 
my des" while I am seated at it. 
In summary. and in reaction to your 
editorial, (January 1974). no campaign 
is better named than GASP! - R,V, 
Olllariu (llall/e withheld Oil request). 


Surgery "in the second person" 
Reading Margaret Guthrie's fran" and 
perceptive article. "Cardiac surger) 
in the first pers')Jl" (September I 'J73>. 
was a truly movi ng experience for me. 
as 9ne who had undergone the exasper- 
ating procedure "in thl' second person" 
with a husband who was a heart patient. 
Unli"e Ms. Guthrie. who was a pa- 
tient in intensive care and found it "a 
safe retreat'. after surgery. I was in the 
unfortunate position of being the w ifc 
of the patient and a registered nurse. As 
an RN. I thought I could expect somc 
response from the nursing staff regard- 
ing my husband's condition. 
1\1) experience. ho,"ever. \\as similar 
to the impersl)nality Ms. Guthrie felt 
,"hen she was first examined. fhis ma) 
have been because I was regarded as 
a potential IIlterkrence by the nursing 
staff. The "ind of interaction that should 
have ta"en place in the intensive care 
unit did ta"e place with the staff of the 
eoronar) care u nit. where my husband 
and I were treated as individuals. I 
will always be particularly grateful to 
one Philippine nurse who was ahle to 


Regi
tered nur
cs. 
your community needs 
the benefit of YOUI 
skills and experience. 
Volunteer now to 
teach 51. John Ambulance home 
nursing and child care course... 
Contact your Provincial Headquarters, 
St. John Ambnlance. 


consider the situation from my perspec- 
tive and helped restore my conlïdence 
in mysel f as a nurse. 
. Ms. Guthrie's description of the 
traumatic move from ICt I to the ward 
and the problems "he encountered there 
elicited my sympalhetic response. This 
transition ta"es place at a crucial time 
in the patient's recovery. ,"hen a proper 
understanding of his condition and 
encouragement arc required. I found 
there was inadequate briefing as to what 
the patient should expect and insuffi- 
cient consideration by the nursing staff. 
I agree entirely with the suggestions 
\1s. Guthrie ma"es in her conclusions. 
and would add the following. the medic- 
al and surgical teams should come to 
some agree
ment on the best course the 
patient should fÖllow with respect to 
such subjects as activity and alcohol 
consumption: those closest to the pa- 
tient should he given some medically 
infÒrmed advice as to what one may 
expect to see in a patient's behavior 
fÒllowing cardiac surgery. i.e.. severe 
depression and personality change: 
and there should also be follow-up 
treatment fÒr patients who have had 
major surgery. even if a relative of the 
patient is an RN. 
I am thanHul to Ms. Guthrie for 
describing the patient's position so well 
and for reflecting my own experience 
in an honest and enlightcning way. - 
Barbara A. Chandler, London, Ontario. 


June reunion in Winnipeg 
In conjunction with Winnipeg's centen- 
nial celebrations. we arc planning a 
large reunion of all Grace General 
Hospital graduates. including those of 
the 3-)ea
 program from the last ..HJ 
years and from the 1 X-month obstetrical 
program prior to 193-1-. 
Events from June 27 to 30. 197-1-. 
will include an alumnae hanquet for 
the 197-1- graduating class. graduation 
exercises. a garden party and hmrs of 
Grace General Hospital. and church 
services at the Citadd. 
As bOl)"ings might he heav) this 
\ car. we \\ould li"e to hear from ollr 
;lIulllnac by \pril I. Write to Brigadier 
Frances \\'agner. Grace General Hos- 
pital. 300 Booth Drive. Winnipeg. 
\1anitoha R.U 3M7. - L Degen, 
\e(T('tan', (ira('(' (;('//('/'al Hospital 
N IIr,\cs' A IIII/I//a('. 
' 


MARCH 1974 



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Davolchanged suction instruments 
just enough to make a big difference. 


There's only one difference 
between Davol instruments and 
metal ones. 
Davol made them disposable. 
So now nursing staffs save time 
because there's no recleaning. 
And most important, there's no 
risk of contamination. 
Everything else is the same. Your 
surgeons get the look, feel and action 
they're used to in metal Yankauers, 
Pooles, Fraziers and sigmoidoscopic 
instruments. 


Price? 
Davol suction instruments are 
priced to make disposability practical 
Davol introduced disposable 
suction instruments. Since then 
over two thousand hospitals have 
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Apparently, we made a big 
difference. 
Davol Canada Ltd., 1033 Range 
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L5E-1H2 (416)274-5252 


BUILDING ON A CENTURY OF QUALITY , ' C 
 . 0' 1874-1974 
HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 
..... Ä ') 



news 


CNA Gives Over 100 Gift Copies 
Of Biography Of Ethel Johns 
Oflall'a, (Jw. - fhe Canadian '\Jur"es' 
A",ociation has 'ent over 100 eopie" 
of Walch-lire\ Oil II/(' II/ol/Illaill\: II/(' 
ht'e alld 1I.,.;lillgs (
f'/:'-1/u'l ]ohm, a" gifts 
to national and international nur"ing 
kadel'". rhe hiograph
 of \,..,. Johl1"
 
editor of The Calladiall .'VI/r.\(' from 
IlJ.
3to IlJ.+-L \\a" \Hill..'11 h) I\largaret 
\1. Street. Valll:ou\er. 
In Septemher IlJ72. CN '\ director" 
agreed to "upport puhlieation of the 
hool.. h) pun:ha"ing copie" to the value 
of S 1.000. Gift wpie" of Wlllch
/irn 
Oil Ihe mOl/lllaillS have heen "ent to 
Fngli...h-"peal..ing. national nursing 
assol:Îation" that arc memhers of the 
International Cou nl:Ï I of Nurse" and 
to honoraI') member". pa"t pre"idenh. 
and director" of CN/\.. a... ",ell a" to 
other leader... of the nur"ing profc""ion 
in Canada and ahroad. 
A revie\\ of W(/{ch
fires Oil II/(' 
mOlllllllim appears on page 44. 


Quebec Association Name Change 
Became Effective February 1st 
MOll1real. (jlle. - fhe Professional 
Code of the province of Quehec was 
proclaimed on February I. 1974, so 
the title for the Quebec nur"ing a<;so- 
ciation is now: Order of Nurses of Que- 
hec (ON()). 
At the annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciation of Nurses of the Province of 
Quebec, held in November 1973. dele- 
gates adopted a resolution to change 
the name to Order of Nurses of Que- 
hee when the Professional Code was 
proclaimed law. (News. January 1974, 
pp. 9-10.) 


SRNA Rejects Setting Up Of Board 
To Regulate Health Disciplines 
Regilla, Sa.\/... - rhe Sasl..atehe\\an 
Regi...ten:d Nur"es' A""ociation ha... 
rejected thc e...tabl i...hment of a health 
di
cipline" regulation hoard. as recom- 
mcnded in the Md eod Report. v. hich 
\\ a... commi",ioncd b) thc provincial 
hcalth minister and rdea...ed 1'01 public 
discu...sion in A ugu"t IlJ73. 
rhc Md eod Report ad\ocate" con- 
<;umcr participatIon on the governing 
bodie" of profcs...ional a"sociation". 
con'umer and practitioner repre...enta- 
tion on health ,Id\ isor) and planning 
hodie,. puhlic regulation of the profc...- 
MARCH 1974 


"Hark! Hark! The Lark At Heaven's Gate Sings" 


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IlK Royal Winnipeg Hallet. thl: \\ innipeg S
mpht))]) Orche'tra. and lIther 
rcno\\ ned cultural group" havc pla
ed tocapacit
 audiences in thc conce
.t h;
11 
of the Manitoha Centennial Centre in \\ innipeg. I he katured aUractu))] 111 
the hall from Junc 16 to 21, IlJ74. \\-ill he the annual meeting and convention 
of the Canadian Nurses' A<;sociation. 


...ion" through .1 health di'clpline<; regu- 
lation hoard compo"ed of lay per<;on". 
decentrali7ation of health <;ervices, and 
the de\e1opment of communit) health 
and social centers. 
rhe health di'cipline, regulation 
hoard \\ould have thc po\\er to revie\\ 
and re\oke regulation" made h) indi- 
vidual profc,...ions. It... ruling" \\(\llId 
be hinding on the protCsslOns: there 
is no provision for <lppeal. The board 
\\ould he composed llf three to fi\ e hi) 
memh........ appointed h
 thL' Cnl\\n. 
In ih initial re'pon"e to the report. 
sent to Health Mini"ter W.F. Smishel.. 
on Deccmhl:r 21, IlJ73. the a...'ociation 
said it ,trongl} reject... the e"tahl i,h- 
ml:nt ot ...uch a health di'cipline" rcgula- 
tion ho.u'd. SRN ,\ notc' that thc pre- 
sent mechanism for review of proks- 
"ional .Ict-.. reculat ion.... ,lIld h\ b\",- 
h} the I egi,I"tive A,...cmhl) ha,,'heen 
,ati,factol"). 
'iRN ,\ "tate, it-. helief that thl' nK'- 
chani"m i" in the hest interest 01 the 
peoplL' of S,lsLllche\\an and th.lt thc 
rc"pon,ihilit\ lor rc\ il:\\ ...hould h.., 


retained b\ the elected repre"entati\ c, 
of thl: pro\'ince. 
rhe nur"e,,' a'"ociation "UPPOrl' 
the need to re\ ie\\ proks,ional aCh, 
hut ,ee" thi...IT\ ie\\ a" the re"ponslhilit) 
of the I egislati\e Å".....'mhl
. \lthough 
it cndor,es the need for profc""ional 
act... to "rdlect ni,ting "ocial nceds:' 
it emphasl/es that ct
n'ultation \\ ith 
the gOY erning hod) III' each proks...ional 
a"sociation is imperat i\ e heforc an
 
re\ i<;iolh are made. 
\RN.\ 'upport-. in principlL' con...um- 
n participation on the governing hodies 
of prok"sional .ls"ociation'. hut reject... 
consumer palt icipat ion on prok,,,ional 
as...ociations' di'ciplinar
 ùlmmiuce". 
"1î1i, I... the respon"ihilit
 or the pro- 
k...,ion ,lIld mcmher" ,hould be entitkd 
to a peer re\ie\\:' the a""lIciation 
'a) s. It aho note" in its respon"e that 
th.....c nHI't he a general unlkr'tanding 
and acceptance of the term "con'IIIlle..." 
rhc SR N \ re,pon"c 'UPPOI t... the 
concept of con"IIIller and practitillnèr 
participation in detcrmining thc pri- 
(Co"t ;'11/, d 0" 1'''':'' 15) 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 7 
. 



news 


Saskatchewan 
urses Look To SU:'I. 
For Bright Bargaining Future 
Sll\/(aloon. 
s/... - 
urses In S.I
- 
latche\\, an ha\ e established a prm ince- 

 Ide union. called the Saslatche\\ an 
L'nion of ....ur
s (SL '). for the purpose 
01 collecti\ e bargain ing for nurse-.. b
 
nur!>es. 
-\t a meeting last J<lßu<lf). X9 nurses 
representing .B staff nurse associations 
and nurse groups in the prO\ ince \oted 
in favor of setting up the union and 
elected a 12-member bodrd of directors. 
The organization's constitution di\ ides 
the pro\ ince into ï geographical ho
pi- 
tal regions and one nursing home 
region. 
-\ statf nurse association prO\ incial 
steering committee 
æ. established in 
'-10\ ember 19-3. alter the Saslatche\\ an 
Registered ","urses' As!.OCiation decided 
against an) im 0" ement in collecti\ e 
bargaining because of the Supreme 
Court of Canada ruling ('e\\,S. Decem- 
ber 19-3. page 121. 
\L' 
as set up to represent nur!>es 
in an\ health care institution in the 
prO\ lñce. \lembership in the union 
 ill 
be b\ affiliation as a chartered. local 
stalf- association or through direct 
membership. 
The 
 nurse
' union 
 ill .Ippl
 .IS 
soon as possible to the provincial 
Labor Relations Board for certification 
as the bargaining representati\e for 
\ arious groups of nurses in SdSlatche- 
\\an. This represents a change in 
bargaining approach b) the nurses. 
Pre\iousl
. independent bargaining 
groups dpphed to the Labor Relation
 
Board for certificdtion: "'L' members 
bel ic\ e that a central bdrgai ning organi- 
zation. 
hich can be certified æ. the 
bargaining agent for aJl groups of 
nur<oes. 
 ill exert more impact dt the 
bargdining table. 
SL"s board of directors accepted the 
previous nur
s' prO\ incial negotiating 
committee as a committee of the ne\\, 
union. This committee has been 
negotiating 
ith the Sdslatche\\dJ1 
Ho...pital Association since late ",0- 
\ember 19"73 for a ne
 contract for 
ho<,pital nur..es. The pre\ ious contr.lct 
expired at the end of 1973. 
AI Shalansk
. formerl\ emplO\ment 
relations officer for SR
 -\. is a consul- 
tant to SL '. \1af) Parche"sk), Sas- 
katoon. IS the SL' president: Jeaf! 
Hodgson. Rel!ina. is first \ice-presi- 
dent (hospital groupl: and Geraldine 
\.1ang. \1el\ ille. is second \ ice-presi- 
dent (nursin/Z: home groupl. 
8 THE CA'...ADIAN "'URSE 


C
A 
embership Continues To Groy, 
Figures for 0-\ members in 1973. compared to 1971 and 1972 show an 
mcr
 of .nearh 5,000 in the past ) ear. o.A membershIp. by pro\-incial 
asSOCiatiOn, IS. 


Alberta 
British Colwnbia 
\.fanitoba 
"' e\\ Brul1S\\ ick 
.... e\\, foundland 
"'ova Scotia 
Ontario 
Prince Ed" ard Island 
Quebec 
Saskatche\\ an 
Total 


1971 
9, -S.t 
I I. 90
 
5..l66 
3J
56 
2.243 
5.072 
11.5"79 
725 
32.198 
6,0-5 

.8 3 


I'F2 
10.261 
12.530 
5.719 
-t.1 
5 
2.204 
5.2-3 
I I. x29 
755 
33,391 
6.253 
92.315 


19-3 
10,060 
13.389 
6.007 
-t,339 
2.4 2 
5.263 
13,183 
803 
35.196 
6.4"'0 
91.1 
:! 


labor Relations Board Approves 
Central Union For Ontario I"urses 
Toronlo ani. - The prO\ince-wl()e 
collective bargaining unit for nurses in 
Ontario "as approved b) the Ontario 
Labor Relations Board at a hearing on 
Janu3J) ).t. 19-4. 
The 'urses' Association Halton 
Count) Health Lnit applied to the 
Labor Relations Board for apprO\al 
to merge" ith the Ontario ",urses' A<;- 
sociation (O'A) and became Local I 
of the ne" association. The hearing 
before the Labor Relations Board 
as 
held to pro\-e the 
tus of 0' A as an 
appropnate trade union. 
When the O'A was formed in Octob- 
er 1973. representatives of 85 of On- 
tario's 100 indi\idual collecti\e bar- 
gaining units for nurses indicated a 
desire to merge "ith a central union. 
(
e
s, January 1974. p. II). 
The board of the Halton County 
Health Cnit. emplo)ers of the nurses in 
O'A Local I. introduced no eVidence 
opposing ihe application "hen it "as 
heard b\ the Labor Relations Board. 
accordiñg to the Registered 
urses' 
Association of Ontario (R.....AO). But 
counsel did cro
s-examme the associa- 
tion "itnesses to make sure that all the 
proper procedures for forming a ne\\ 
union and for transfer of bargaining 
rights had been obsened 
An R'AO report sa
s. "Apparentl
 
the L labor Relation
] Board 
as well 

dti..tJed 
ith the evidence gi\en. The 
certificate. . . was dated Janu3I)' 
15th!", one day after the hearing. 


Preparation For Disaster Nursing 
Discussed By Nurses In N.S. 
Halifax. X.S. - 
urses working in 
emergenc
 health !>ervice<; at the fed- 
eraJ and provincial government levels 
met with faculty representati\es of 
schools of nursing in ,,"ova Scotia on 


Janu3T) 24. 19- -to to discuss the prep- 
aration of nurses for a responsible role 
in disaster nursi-g. 1ne meeting "as 
held at the headquarters of the Register- 
ed 'urses' As.sociation of '\0\ a Scotia. 
A 19"72 Disaster \'ursing Stud). is- 
sued b) Health and \\ elfare Canada, 
sho"ed that 41.8 percent of teaching 
staff in Nova Scotia schools of nursing 
had recei\ed specific preparation in 
di
aster nursing: this percentage "as 
higher than in an) other province. 
Follo
 ing ....ova Scotia was \fanitoba, 
"ith :!O.ð percent of nursing faculty 
prepared. In 5 pro\-ince
. fe"er than 
10 percent of the teaching staff in 

hools of nursing had recei\ed such 
preparation. 
F. Lorraine Da\les. nursing consul- 
tant to the emergency health sen ices 
division of Health and \\ elfare Canada. 
was invited by '-Iova Scotia to partici- 
pate in the one-da) seminar. \,k Da\ ies 
initiated the federa) go\ernment study 
on disaster nursing and prepared the 
report on iL 
The Disaster \ursing Stud) pointed 
to the continuing "need to provide a 
federal course at the Canadian Emer- 
gency Measures College in Arnprior. 
l Ontario). where nurse educators can 
be exposed to the total. broad concept 
of disaster planning in Canada." 
But this stud) noted that "the main 
responsibility for emergency health 
planning lies at the provincial Ie\el." 
The federal emer2en
 health -.er\Ïces 
organization's prim
 ta..l 'is to .ad- 
\ ise and asSiSt the prO\ inces in meet ing 
their plaMing objecti\ e5." 
Christine Steele, nurslOg officer" Ith 
the ""ova Scotia government's emer- 
gene) health services division aoo 
one of the participants in the Januaf) 
seminar. sa)S she is encouraged b
 the 
response she is getting from nurses in 
the province. who are recognizing more 
and more that one of their prime res- 
COlll,,1It
d Oil pag
 10 
\-\ARCH 19-4 




EAS:: I'ìEc..3TE? E FO'" 
N.
UAL MEETING. CANADIAN NURSES ASSOCIATION 
Cen1ennIIII Cenn. _"
 
.June 16-21 1'174 

 I'8C8JIl aar.s.on can1 lilt 
or m acco.....0d06..0 I!o . see ce.w d card 


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art of Le ContL,ert" 



news 


Saskatchewan Nurses Look To SUN 
For Bright Bargaining Future 
SlIshlltoOfl, Sæ;h. - N ur
es in Sas- 
"atchewan have established a province- 
wide union. called the Sas"atchewan 
Union of Nurses (SI 'NL for the purpose 
of collective bargaining for nurses. by 
nurse
. 
At a meeting last January. H9 nurses 
repre
enting .n staff nurse as
ociations 
and nurse groups in the province voted 
in favor of setting up the union and 
elected a 12-member board of directors. 
The organization's constitution divides 
the province into 7 geographical hospi- 
tal. regions and one nursing home 
region. 
A staff nurse association provincial 
steering committee was established in 
November 1973. after the Sa
"atchewan 
Registered Nurses' Association decided 
against any involvement in collective 
bargaining because of the Supreme 
Court of Canada rul ing (N ews. Decem- 
ber 1973. page 12). 
SUN was set up to represent nurses 
in any health care institution in the 
province. Membership in the union will 
be b) affiliation as a chartered. local 
staff association or through direct 
member
hip. 
rhe new nurses' union will apply as 
soon as po
sible to the provincial 
L.bor Relation
 Board for certification 
as the bargaining representative for 
various groups of nurses in Sas"atche- 
wan. This represent
 a change in 
bargaining approach by the nurses. 
Previously, independent bargaining 
groups applied to the Labor Relations 
Board for certification; '-;UN members 
believe that a central bargaining organi- 
Lation. which can be certified as the 
bargaining agent fÒr all groups of 
nurses. will exert more impact at the 
bargaining tabIe. 
SLN's board of directors accepted the 
previous nurses' provincial negotiating 
committee as a committee of the ne\\- 
union. This committee has been 
negotiating with the Sas"atchewan 
Ho'>pital Association 
ince late No- 
vember 1973 for a new contract for 
ho
pital nurses. The previous contract 
expired at the end of 1973. 
AI Shalansky, formerly employment 
relations officer for SRNA, is a consul- 
tant to SUN. Mary Parchewsky, Sas- 
katoon, IS the SL N president; J ear. 
Hodgson, Re
ina, is first vice-presi- 
dent (hospital group); and Geraldine 
Mang, Melville, is second \ice-presi- 
dent (nur
ing home group). 
B THE CANADIAN NURSE 


l 



igur 
mcre. 
assoc i 


Alber 
Britisl 
Manit 
New I 
Newf< 
Nova 
Ontar 
Princ!: 
Quebf 
Saskat 


Labor 
Centra 
Torant 
collecti 
OntarÌl 
Labor Relatio,;; Board at a hearing on 
January 14, 1974. 
The Nurses' Association Halton 
County Health Unit applied to the 
Labor Relations Board for approval 
to merge with the Ontario Nurses' As- 
sociation (ONA) and became Local I 
of the new association. The hearing 
before the Labor Relations Board was 
held to prove the status of ON A as an 
appropriate trade union. 
When the UNA was formed in Octob- 
er 1973, representatives of R5 of On- 
tario's 100 individual collective bar- 
gaining units for nurses indicated a 
desire to merge with a central union. 
(News, January 1974, p. II). 
The board of the Halton County 
Health Unit, employers of the nurses in 
ONA Local I, introduced no evidence 
opposing the application when it was 
heard by the Labor Relations Board, 
according to the Registered Nurses' 
Association of Ontario (RNAO). But 
counsel did cross-examine the associa- 
tion witnesses to make SUre that all the 
proper procedures for forming a new 
union and for transfer of bargaining 
rights had been observed. 
An RNAO report says: "Apparently 
the l Labor Relations] Board was well 
satisfied with the evidence given. The 
certificate. . . was dated January 
15th!", one day after the hearing. 


Preparation For Disaster Nursing 
Discussed By Nurses In N.S. 
Halifax, N.S. - Nurses working in 
emergency health services at the fed- 
eral and provincial government levels 
met with faculty representatives of 
schools of nursing in Nova Scotia on 


A 1972 Disaster Nursing Study, is- 
sued by Health and Welfare Canada, 
showed that 41. R percent of teach ing 
staff in Nova Scotia schools of nursing 
had received specific preparation in 
disaster nursing; this percentage was 
higher than in any other province. 
Following Nova Scotia was Manitoba, 
with 20.R percent of nursing faculty 
prepared. In 5 provinces, fewer than 
10 percent of the teaching staff in 
schools of nursing had received such 
preparation. 
F. Lorraine Davies, nursing consul- 
tant to the emergency health services 
division of Health and Welfare Canada, 
was invited by Nova Scotia to partici- 
pate in the one-day seminar. Ms. Davies 
initiated the federal government study 
on disaster nursing and prepared the 
report on it. 
The Disaster Nursing Study pointed 
to the continuing "need to provide a 
federal course at the Canadian Emer- 
gency Measures College in Arnprior, 
{ Ontario]. where nurse educators can 
be exposed to the total, broad concept 
of disaster planning in Canada." 
But this study noted that "the main 
responsibility for emergency health 
planning lies at the provincial level." 
The federal emergency health 
ervices 
organization's primary task "i
 to ad- 
vise and assist the provinces in meeting 
their planning objectives." 
Christine Steele, nursing officer with 
the Nova Scotia government's emer- 
gency health services division and 
one of the participants in the January 
seminar, says she is encouraged by the 
response she is getting from nurses in 
the province, who are recognizing more 
and more that one of their prime res- 
(Colltillued 011 pllKe 10) 
MARCH 1974 



Annual Meeting and Convention 
Canadian Nurses' Association 
Manitoba Centennial Centre 
Winnipeg, June IS-21, 1974 


Canada's Friendly People Province 
Welcomes You to Winnipeg 
"Heart of Ü1e Continent" 


, I 




 


,
 . 


/IIiii!11.'
"; 
 rt1). 
'if".t
\I\' 0 U
 
$1:/ 5 


MONT SUTTON commands the highest peak 
within a radius of 100. miles of Montreal. 
20 miles of trails and slopes, 6 modern 
lifts, ski school, ski shop and full range 
of facilities, great snow and superior 
grooming! 
Mid-Week Special 
SUTrON 5 


Lift tickets and Ski Lessons. . . . . $43.00 
a) 5 consecutive days (Monday to Friday) 
with 4 hours of ski lessons per day. 
b) 5 days to be enjoyed at will over a 
period of your choice, with 2 hours of ski 
lessons per day. 
Lift tickets only . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 
a) 5 consecutive days (Monday to Friday). 
b) 5 days of skiing to be enjoyed at will 
over a period of your choice. 
Also. . . a special BONUS. 
Buy your regular mid-week day ticket any- 
time after 12:00 noon and you automa- 
tically receive another full-day mid-week 
ticket, . . FREE, usable anytime, except on 
holidays and week-ends. 
We invite you to ski with us this !reason. 
MONT SUTTON INC. Sulton, Québec 
Tel.: (snow reports) ... (514) 866-7639 
(514) 866-7718 
Accommodation . . (514) 538-2646 
Office. . . , . . . . . , , (514) 866-5156 
(514) 538-2545 


news 


(Col/tinl/ed FOil! fllI
e lÎ) 
ponsibilities is to accept d leadership 
role in emergencies. 
'"Nurses are telling me that they 
want to do their part, not only as profes- 
sionals but as good citizens, in prepar- 
ing themselves for emergencies rand] 
in participating in the campaigns lO 
cut down accident rates and upgrade 
ambulance services. They feel that 
special first-aid courses should be 
included in the curricula of all schools 
of nursing." says Ms. Steele. 


Nursing Home Strike Averted, 
Nurses Gain Wage Increases 
Winnipeg, Melfi. - '"A threatened with- 
drawal of service has served its intend- 
ed purpose," announced the Manitoba 
provincial staff nurses' council when a 
collective agreement was reached be- 
tween the Convalescent Home register- 
ed nurses' association and the Convales- 
cent Home of Winnipeg. If the 6 nurses 
employed at the 84-bed nursing home 
had gone on strike, it would have been 
Manitoba's first strike by registered 
nurses. 
The collective agreement. which 
covers a 19-month period from Decem- 
ber I. 1973 to June 30, 1975, provides 
for 3 salary increases. The increases 
raise the starting salary by $80 a month 
and the top of the salary scale by $220 
a month during the life of the agree- 
ment. This provides a starting salary 
$15 below the rates for hospital head 
nurses. 
fhe number of increments is increas- 
ed by the new agreement from I to 4 
on December I. 1973, and a fifth in- 
crement is added on January I. 1975. 
In addition, each nurse will receive a 
lump sum payment of up to $250 to 
compensate for the period in 1973 that 
was not covered by the agreement. 
The collective bargaining unit at 
the Convalescent Home was formed in 
March 1973 and certified by the Man- 
itoba Labor Board on May 10, 1973. 
Although negotiations began in May. 
the employer did not make a salary 
offer until early October. A concilia- 
tion officer was appointed in Novem- 
ber. 
The 6 nurses, 2 of whom wor" full- 
time and 4 part-time, earned $620 to 
$629 a month on the previous wage 
scale. Residents of the nursing home 
include 56 persons classified as ex- 
tended care patients and only 28 who 
are personal care patients. A nurse 
works alone on each shift, as the only 


registered nurse on duty in the Con- 
valescent Home, except for the m.ltron 
of the home. 
The Convalescent Home of Winni- 
peg is a nonprofit organization control- 
led bv a board of 20 women. I t is the 
oldest personal care home in Manitoba, 
established in 1883, according to a 
Winnipeg newspaper. 


Six Nurses' Associations Join 
Commonwealth Nurses Federation 
Ottawa - Six national nursing asso- 
ciations were admitted to membership 
in the Commonwealth Nurses Federa- 
tion at a meeting of the federation's 
interim board, held in Lagon. Ghana, 
in January 1974. The new members re- 
present nurses in Bangladesh, Com- 
monwealth of the Bahamas. India, 
Lesotho, St. Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla, and 
Tanzania. 
Two other groups of nurses. from 
the Grand Cayman Islands and from 
the Turks and Caicos Islands, were 
admitted to affiliate membership in 
the federation. Meetings of the interim 
board of directors coincided with the 
first African regional seminar sponsor- 
ed by the Commonwealth Nurses Fede- 
ration, which was held at the Univer- 
sity of Ghana. January 2 to 8,1974. 
Helen K. Mussallem. executive di- 
rector of the Canadian Nurses' Asso- 
ciation. was the only representative of a 
non-African country invited to partici- 
pate in the seminar. Dr. Mussallem 
spoke to seminar delegates about the 
Canadian health field concept and its 
implications for nursing education. 
The seminar was on the general topic 
of "Educating Nurses for Community 
Health Services." It was planned by the 
host association. the Ghana Registered 
Nurses' Association, and the Nigerian 
Nurses' Association. with the help of a 
temporary adviser from the World 
Health Organization. More than 40 
senior nurses, who are employed in 
nursing education and service, attended 
the seminar; they came from 16 African 
countrie
. 
A federation of nursing as
ociation
 
in Commonwealth countries was tïrst 
considered in June 1969. when repre- 
sentative!> of 33 Commonwealth coun- 
tries met in Montreal during the con- 
gress of the International Council of 
Nurse!> (lCN). The group appointed an 
ad hoc committee, with member!> from 
six regions of the Commonwealth, to 
100" into the possibility of forming a 
Commonwealth organization of nurses. 
CNA executive director Dr. Mussallem 
was a member of the ad hoc committee, 
representing the Atlantic region. which 
includes the Caribbean countries and 
Canada. 
The ad hoc committee reported at 
(Conlill/H'd Oil f'''
(' J! J 
IUAPrl-l1Q74 



"DESIGNERS CHOICE" THE LOOK OF 
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HIS NEW LINE AT 
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Next Month 
an 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


. CNA Annual Meeting 
and Convention Highlights 


. Nurses "Break the Ice" 
on the Sir John A. Macdonald 


. Parents Make the Decisions 


ð 

 


Photo Credits 
for March 1974 


Manitoba Centennial Centre. 
Winnipeg. p. 7 
M iller Services Ltd., 
Toronto, pp. 19.21,23 


J an O'Brien. photographer, and 
Whitchorsc SllIr. \\ hitehor
e. 
Yukon. pp. 2H-29 


brael lnformatiun Ser\'lce. 
Jcru
alcm. p. 
2 


Margaret M. Street and 
Vancouver General Hospital. 
p. 44 


1'> Tuo::rA....IAnIAIIJ 1IJ1111...J: 


news 


(("oll/illlledfrOIll I"'R" 10) 
a meeting of Commonwealth nurses' as- 
sociations. held in July 1971 in Lon- 
don. England. that 23 national associa- 
tions. including the CNA, had voted 
in favor of establishing the federation. 
A constitution was accepted and the 
federation formed. subject to financial 
grants. 
The Commonwealth Foundation gave 
an unusually large grant, the equivalent 
of $36,000 per year for three years, 
to help nurses form the Commonwealth 
Nurses Federation. 
Members of the ad hoc committee. 
formed in 1969, have served until the 
present as the interim board of the 
federation. Election of the first regular 
board of directors has been carried out 
in recent months; ballots were mailed 
to non nurse scrutineers in England by 
February 15, 1974. A board member 
is to be elected from each of six geo- 
graphic regions. East and Central 
Africa; West Africa; Atlantic; Austra- 
lasia, the Far East. and Pacific; South 
Asia; and Europe. 
The CNA board nominated Dr. Mus- 
sallem to represent the Atlantic region 
on the new federation board. The re- 
presentative of each region is to be 
elected by the associations in the region. 
Commenting on the relationship be- 
tween the International Council of 
Nurses and the Commonwealth Federa- 


Happy Birthday, Dear Winnipeg 


..r.!h-. 

 
 IIJ 
 
 
 
, 
 

, 

 


1 he 197-f annual meeting anò con- 
vention of the Canadian Nurse< 
Association \\ ill he held in Winnipeg 
during the city"... centennial year. 
Nurse
 from acros
 the country will 
gather to deli herate. dehate. and 
participate on June I ó to 21. \\ ill 
you hlo\'\' in to help hlow l)ut the 
candles on Winnipeg.... hirthda) 
cake'.' 


tion of 
urses. Dr. Mussallem told The 
Canadian Nurse: "There is no fonnal 
relationship but there is continuing 
liaison. ICN is kept informed of action 
taken by the federation and plans are 
being made to have ICN representation 
at future meetings of the federation 
board. The two international groups do 
not compete: the Commonwealth Fede- 
ration is able to do things for developing 
countries, such as assisting with the 
recent seminar for the two federation 
regions in Africa. 
"We are now planning not only 
collaboration with other nursing bodies 
but to invite other Commonwealth 
professional federations to participate 
in regional meetings:' 


Ontario CAA T Regents Set 
Nursing Program Standards 
Toronto, Onl. - Standards for nurs- 
ing education programs in Ontario 
arc now set hy the council of regents. 
governi ng body of all colleges of appl ied 
arts and tech nology (C AA T), becau
e 
diploma nursing education has been 
transferred from hospital. regional. and 
independent schoob of nursing to com- 
munity college programs. 
Joan Macdonalò. executive director 
of the College of Nurses of Ontario 
((NO). told the directors of the Regis- 
tered Nur
es' .\
sociation of Ontario 
(RNAO) that the community college 
regents arc "committeò to ensuring 
that the nursing program... maintain a 
...tandard which is at least as good as 
in the past or even better." The College 
of Nurses was responsihle for determin- 
ing standards for diploma and degree 
nur...ing education programs before 
Sept em her 197 
 when the diploma 
programs shifted from the ministry lIf 
health to the ministry of education. 
(Ne\\
, March IYD. page l-f.) 
The council of regents agreed. M.... 
Macdonald said. to accept the standards 
proposed hy the College of Nur
es, a
 
a hasi... I'llI' program approval. The 
council of regents asked the CNO in- 
spectors to continue assessing nursing 
programs Il)r a 
-year period. to en...ure 
the maintenance of program qualit). 
Thi
 arrangement will he reasses...eò in 
2 year.... 
A provincial advisory committee on 
nursing. to make recommendations to 
the co'Uncii of regent
 regaròi ng initial 
anò continuing approval ,)f diploma 
nur
ing and nur...ing a
si
lant programs 
in C -\A I . ha
 heen estahli
hed. Repre- 

entatioll on the aòvisnry comm ittee 
includes 5 CNO members nominated 
bv the council of the CNO; I member 
eZlch nominated h) RNAO. the Ontario 
A......ociation of Registered Nursing A...- 

istanb. the ministry of health. ministry 
(Coll/illu"d Oil IJ//Re 15) 
MARCH 1974 



KeelJS 
hiIll drier 


Instead of holding 
moisture, Pampers 
hydrophobic top sheet 
allows it to pass 
through and get 
<<trapped" in the 
absorbent wadding 
underneath. The inner 
sheet stays drier, and 
J 
babv's bottom stays 
J J 
drier than it would in 
cloth diapers. 


3" 


Saves 
YOll tiIl1e 
Pampers construction 
helps prevent moisture 
from soaking through 
and soiling linens. As a 
result of this superior 
containment, shirts, 
sheets, blankets and 
hed pads don't have to 
he changed as often 
as they would with 
conve
tional cloth 
diapers, And when less 
time is spent changing 
linens, those who take 
care of babies have 
more time to spend on 
other tasks. 


, 
po ',I ( 


Þt. 'h 
...e:r8 


. 



 



 


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PROCTER I GAWBL 


CAR.U! 



tY.1)III
-1)lJrr 
#IN 


RelYel N..... Pinl . . . flnftt 
qu.llty, sm.rt..t Itylinl, 
wIth ufety ol'lps. New 
aplionll Ducrtane finish with 
contrntml satIn backlfOund 
.nd palllh.d IdJIIII for I 
" InetlVe llelr. 


Mte 
 
 7Z,v...;-
 


/ 


MRS. R. F. JOHNSON 
SUPERVISOR 


IN 


CHARLENE HAYNES 


NURSES PERSONALIZED 
 tYêJù 
ANEROID SPHYG. 
 
 
A superb instrument especially --.- ::"'I!!'IIW tI . 
designed for nurses' Imported from pre. ;::s::; 
CISlon craftsmen In W. Germany. Easy- 
to-attach Velcro cuff, lightweight, com- / (- f 
pact, fits into soft sim. leather llppere
 , I 
case 2112" J: 4" X ]". Dial cahbra- _ .,. 
led to 320 mm.. IO.year accuracy 
guaranteed to ::!:::3 mm Serviced by 
Reeves If ever required. Your ini- 
tials engraved on manometer and 
gold stamped on case FREE, for 
:



ri:
.t Ai
i:etiif

:s\i

ntafo
 \ 
a lifetime of dependable service! 
No. 106 Sphyg. . . . 37.95... 


:
 Duty 

 free 


CAP ACCESSORIES 


I 
I 
. 
. 
. 
. 
. 
. 
. 
. 



---... 
CAP TOTE k.eps your caps crisp and clean ____ 
while stored or carried. flexible clear plastic, white 
trim, zipper, carrying strap, hang loop. Stores flat. Also 
 
for wiglets, curlers, etc. 81/2" dia.. 6" high. , 
No. 333 Tot. . . 2.65 ..., 6 or more . . 2.35 ... 
Your initl.ls IDld.lt.mp.d, add 50. p.r Tate. 

 WHITE CAP CLIPS Kolds caps 

 firmly In place! Hard to-find white bobbie pinS, 
1_ " -- enamel on fine spring steel. Eight 2" and eight 
.. 3" clips included in plastic snap box. 
. No. 529 Clips. . . 3 bax.s for 2.25, 

 6 for 65, ..., 12 for 50, ... 
MOLDED CAP TACS ....--:: 
_
__'''_b< 't,'4 
dainty caduceus. -tl1oose Black, Blue, White 
r
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>--, ;;:- 
Rr.n 
 METAL CAP TACS p.ir of dainty 
IAJÀ.f Jewelry-quality Tacs with grippers, 110lds cap 

 bands securely. Sculptured metal, gold finisl1. 
.. approx. 
" wide. Choose RN, LPN, LV", RN 
,.. ./ Caduceus or Plain Caduceus. Gift boxed. 
n Mm [ :"tt!!, No. CT-l (Sp.cify Initl.ls), No. CT.2 (Plain 

U 
 Cad.) or No. CT-3 (RN C.d.) . . . 2.95 pro 
SEL-FIX CAP BAND BI.chelvet r----... 
band material. Self-adhesive, presses on, 4 --1 
pulls off; no sewing. or pinning. Reusable 
several times. Each band 20" long, pre-cut to 
popular widths: 1/4" (]2 per plastic box) 1/2" 
(8 per box) 
" (6 per box) 1" (6 per bbxl. 
Specify width under ITEM column on coupon. 
B nd. . . .er box 3 Dr more. .1.50 ea. 
CROSS PEN -- ...... ' aluluL;,Jto_ (\f) 
World.famous ballpomt. with '- , " 
SCUlttured caduceus emblem. Full name 



III:



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;

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oupon). 
 
No. 3502 ChrDm. 8.DO ... No. 6602 12kt. G.F. 11.50 ... 
TO: REEVES COMPANY, BOI C ' AUleboro, Mass 02703 
ORDER HO. IU mmlmlmmmmi 
-- -1 


I 
I I I I 
I I I I 
Use extra sheet for additional items or orders. 
INITIAlS.s d.sired, - - - 
TO ORDER NAME PINS. fill aut all mformation in box, top 
fight. clip out and attach to this coupon. 
, No COD's or billing to Individuals 
I enclose $ I Mass. residents add 3% S. T. 
Blllmg terms available to Institutions only' $1. service charg 
added on all orders billed at $10 or less. 
Send to 
Street 
r.t, 
t",t.,. 7," 


r-------------------------------------. 
IT'S EASY TO ORDER REEVES NAME PINS FOR YOURSELF OR FRIENDS! 
I Choose style you want, shown left. Print namE {and 2nd bottom left Attach extra stleet for additional pinS I 
I 

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11:t\

sli
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t
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a

 
:


So

o
s
D(NTICAL PINS. .. more convenient. I 
I I 
I lETTERING,______________________ 2nd lINE,________________1 
I STYLE OE5CRIPTIO" METU METAL IA


':UND linERI"' PRICES' I 
I NO. COLOR FINISH (PmtK:) COLOR b(ravl!d I Lilli [nl,...d 2 tines I 
II ALL METAL... riCh, trim and 0 Gold 1 0 Ouotone Does I 0 Black I 0 1 Pin 2.25101 Pin 3.00 I 
;

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I




I


é

ooth 0 Silver B 




hed a


y 8 

I

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I 
DtP;n .95 DlPin 1.55 I 
02 Pins 1.65 02 Pins 2.60 I 
(same n.-nel (same n
"Tle) I 
D Black U 1 Pon 2.25 [j 1 Pm 3.DD I 
o Ok. Blue 02 Pins 3.75 02 Pins 4.95 I 
Is.II
 n..
1 Isame nam..) I 
o Black 0 1 Pin .95 0 1 Pm 1.55 I 
o Ok. Blue 0 
!;
 n

e
 0 
:;
 n

 I 
I . . QUANTITY DISCOUNTS, 10-24 pins, deduct 10%; I 
I Ple.s. add 25, p.r artl.r lor 3 pms Dr l.sl. 25.99 pIns, 15%; 100 or more pins, 20%. I 
______________________________________w 


liIond 

Metal 
.119 


Iastic 
'.559 


I- 
I 
559 


PLASTIC LAMINATE... slimmer, 
'oader; engraved thru surface to 
)ntrastmg core color. Beveled 
bOrder matches lettering. 


,tal 
rallied 
0.100 


METAL FRAMED... ClassIc 
"SIRn; snow-white plastic with 
_Jtt hpd bevplf' mf' 


o Gold 
o Silver 


1100 


I Whlta 
PIIstic 
'.510 


MOLDED PLASTIC.. .SU11pll2.smart, Does 
510, onomlcal W,lIneverdlscolor. not 
md s. applv 


MEDI-CARD SET Klnd;est ref.r.nce 
-,.._-_.....'.'- Æ 
med with mformatlon, ,"cludlng Equivalencies of - 
Apothecary to Metroc to Kousehold M.as., Temp. I '- 
oC to of, Prescrip. Abbr., Urin.lysis, Body Chern., I 
r


. 


:ds
i:

ll

s.Bone Marrow, Disease J
 
 
:
d':;eu


. 

 ð
:cÍr s::t
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ldl.
:
 t . ë:=' 
6 Dr mo.. 1.25 ... 12 or ma.. 1.10 ... I 
Your initi.11 gald.ltlmp.d on holder, 
add 50, p.r lat. 
o ....c. KELLY FORCEPS So handy for 
a:; ' every nurse! 5W' stainless steel, fully 

 guaranteed. Ideal for clamping off tubing. Your 
own initials help prevent loss. 
eA.R. No. 2H2 fDrelps . . . 2.75 II. & Dr ma.. 250 .1. 
Your Initi.ls Inl'uld, Idd 50. por I1Ire.ps. 


... 


,'. 


Your 
Initials 
:
::
. 
 ed 
Free 
Scope 
Sack 

 


# 


! 


, 


1 



- 


Free Initiars and Scope Sack 
with v.our QWD 
Littmi!11Jj NurteteOpe I 


famous Littmann nurses' 
diaphragm stethoscope , . . 
a fine precision instrument, 
with high sensitivity for 
blood pressur,/!s, apical pulse 
rate. Only 2 ozs., fits in 
pocket, with gray vinyl antl- 
collapse tubing, non,chilling 
epoxy dIaphragm. 28" over- 
all. Non-rotating angled ear 
tubes .nd chest piece beau- 
tifully styled in Choice of'S 
jewel-like colors, Goldtone, 
Silvertone, Blue, Green, Pink.' 
fREE INITIALS AND SACK! 
Your initials engraved fREE 
on chest piece; lend individ- 
ual distmction and help pre- 
vent loss. Also fREE SCOPE 
SACK included, worth $l. 
(free sacks not personal- 
ized; add SOt if initials de- 
sired.) Note big savings on 
QuantIty orders. 
No. 216 Nursescope. ..13.80 ea. ppd. 
6-11 . . . 12.80 ea. 12 Dr more. . . 11.80 ea. 
 
Group Discounts i!!E!!!!!! free Initials and Sack!,:: 
'IMPORTANT: New "MedallIOn" styling Includes tubing m?; 
colors to match metal parts. If desired, add $1. ea. to:> 
prices above; add "M" to Order (No. 216!!!) on coupon.O 
No. 223 Scope Sack only. . . 1.00 ea. ppd. 
6 Dr more 75t ea. Gold stamDed initIals. add 50
 


t-. 


Ae:N 


FOr 
:: 

... 


Does 
nol 
apply 


Does 
nol 
apply 


o White r 0 Black 
o Med. Green lbJ Ok. Blue 
o Med. Blue 
 White 
DCocoa _I Letters only 


POlished 
frame 
only 
Does 
nol 
apo 


White 
only 


White 
only 


3'12" LISTER MINI-SCISSORS 

 tinY, handy, shp Into umform pocket or 
purse Choose jewelers Gold or gleaming 
Chrome plale 'Inlsh on coupon 
BeL Ho. 3500 Mini.ScisSDrs . 2.15 ea. 
4'12" Dr 5V2" LISTER SCISSORS 
As above, but larger for bigger JObs Chrome fInish only 
No. 4500 14 1 12") or No 5500 15YJ") Scissors. . . 2.15 
5V2' OPERATING SCISSORS _ . 
 
St
mlesssteel, with sharp/blunt 
 
 
péints. Beautifully polished finish. - . _ 
HD. 705 OR Scissors . . . 2.15 .a. 
All sCissors above: 1 doz. or more (any style) . . . 2.00 el. 
Your initials enaraved, add SOe per scissors. 


CLAYTON DUAL STETHOSCOPE tight. 
weight Imported dual scope; highest sensItivity for atHCa 
pulse rate. Cl1romed head tubes and cllest piece wltl1 
IV." bell and 1 %" diaphragm, grey anti-collapse 
tubing. 4 OZ , 29" long. Extra ear plugs and 
diaphragm included. Two imtials engraved free. 
No. 413 Du.1 St.th . . . . . . . . 17.95 ... 
JEWELRY NURSES CHARMS 
 
 
finest sculptured Fisher charms, 

} 
Sterling or Cold fill.d (specify under COLOR on couponl., '.. 
For bracelet or pendant cham. Add to your collection! ^ f' 1f < 
No. 263 Caduc.us; No. 164 C'P: No. liB &." .- '. 
Grad. Hati No.8. Band. Scissors. . 3.49 8a. (A I 

I. 1/ 14K PIERCED EARRINGS 
,, ' 
 Dainty, detailed 14K Gold caduceus. for on or off duty 
wear. Shown actual Slle. Gift boxed for fnends, too. 
No. 13/297 E.rring. . . . . . . . . 5.95 p.r p.ir. 
PIN GUARD ScuIPtur.dcaduceus,ch.,"ed 
 
to your professional letters, each with pinback/. 
 
safety catcl1. Or replace either with class pm for . 4: 
safety. Cold hnish, gIft boxed. Choose RH, LPN - 
or LVH. No. 3420 Pin Gu.rd . . . . 2.95 ... 
/iñì- ENAMELED PINS Beautifully sculptured status 
\. 
 insignia, 2-color keyed. l1ard-fired enamel on gold plate 

 . Dime-sized, pin-back Specify AN, LPN, PN, LVN, NA. Dr 

 
:.. :;o;:
. Pin 1.95 el., 12 Dr mOre 1.50 el. 


,. 


Endur3 NU RSE'S WATCH fine Swiss.made 
waterproof timepiece. Raised easy.to-read white numerals 
. and hands on black dial, luminous markings. Red sweep. 
second l1and. Chrome fiOlsh, stainless back. Includes 
black velvet strap. Gift boxed, witl1 1 year Ruarantee 
Very dependable. Includes 3 initials engraved FREE! 
No. 1093 Nurs.s W.tch . . . . . . .. . . . 19.95 .a. 
, . Pr.vent stains and wear! PJ . 

 Smooth, pliable pure white vinyl. Ideal 
low-cest group gifts or favors. ,.. 
No. 210.E (ript1, two compartments I 
with flap, gold stamped caduceus. . . 
& for 1.50, 25 Dr ",0" 20. el. 
'-. HI. 791111ftJ Deluxe Sav.r, 3 compl. 
-... - change pocket & key chain . . . 
& for 2.98, 25 Dr mD" 35. la. 

 D.A Nurses' POCKET PAL KIT 
o .. Handiest for busy nurses Includes white Deluxe 
\ Pocket Saver, with 5" Bandage She
r (both shown 
opposite page), Tn Color ball,polnt pen, plus 
l1andsome little pen light all sliver finished 
Change compartment, key cham 
'-. No. 291 P.I Kit . . . . . . . . 4.95 ... 
3 Initials enaraved on shean. add 50.. per kit 


Bzzz MEMO-TIMER T,me hot packs. heal , (0 "'" 
lamps. park meters. Remember to check vital si
ns 
. j JI 
give medication, etc. LI
htwelght. compact (] 1/2" dlaJ. 

 
sets to bUZl 5 to 60 mm. Key ling. Swiss made. \.V
 
No. M.22 Tim.r . . . . . . .4.95 .a. ..... 
3 or more 3.95 ea.; 6 Dr more 3.50 ea. 



 .
 EXAMINING PENLIGHT 

 
 Wt1lte barrel with caduceus imprint, aluminum 
Lti band and clip. 5" long, U.S. made. battenes meluded (re. 
1ii placement batteries available any storel. Your own light, gift boxed 
No. 001 P,nlitht . . . 3.98 la. Your Initials Inl'lVId, add 50. por litht 



Whittenton faAhitJ 
Uni/onn 
 


.
 


.REEVA 
Young fresh multi tuck bib. 2 
button tu" Gusset 
4 slee\les 
100% Dacron Double Kmt 
STYLE No. 4697 
6.20,4.16 Petite... 22.95 
14' 2.26
1:z . . . 24 95 
75% Dacron/2l:GI Colton 
STYLE No. 4797 
6.20,4.16 Petite... 16.95 
14' 2-26112. . . 17.95 


, 


l 


MISS FIVE. 
UmQue smock style with a little 
girl look Generous patch pock- 
ets, Inner surgical pocket 
Short sleeves. 100% Dacron 
Double Knit 
STYLE No. 4632 
3/4-15/16. ..21.95 


\ 


( 

 


( 


.GIBSON GIRL 
Youthful high-rise waist, mini 
soft shirred skirt, pleated 
blouse. Inner surgical pocket 
100% Polyester Warp Kmt 
 
sleeves. 
STYLE No. 4624 
3/4,15/16... 18.95 
60% Dacron. 40% Nylon cord 
,ersey, short sleeves 
STYLE No. 4824 
3/4.15/16. .15.95 


Famous 
NURSE 
MATES'" 

hær 


New "Saucy" Bump Toe Moc 
Little fashion notches run around sole and 
'- . -. l1eer; latest bumper-toe look wltl1 
A - - big bold eyelets; sturdy extra-light 

 , cushion crepe sole and heel; finest 

 long wearing white glove leat"er 

 . "", . the ide.1 shoe to feel pretty 
'" G in umform Fltguaranteed 
or return (unmarred) 
SIZES:' 
 for Sll! exchange. 
All Dr A: 1-11 No. 854 Saucy Shoe 
I,C.Dor1:: S-11 .. . 16.95pr. 
a.cdr_"
1 .... ..... 


New"Korlt5'Lites Featherweight Style 


Extremely lightweight with the new 
bottom" look Smart comfortable lace 
up heel oxford. Thick sim cork sale 
with IIj8'J cork heel (very slip resistant. 
outwears crepel White washable 
soft glove upper leather, tncot 
lined. arch vents Fit guaran. 
teed or return (unmarred) 
for Sile exchange 
No. 638 Kork.Lite Shoe 
. . . 16.95 pro 


.
 . 
/;{:.
.. - 


". "y. 


SIZEI: 
&A Dr ". 1.11 
I Dr c: "1
 II 
a.cdr.IN.....' D Dr I: 5.11 


-
 '...- 
\ 
I 


AII.Weather NURSES' CAPE 


'1 


Stay snug In cool weather. dry m the ram 
Traditional Navy with Elrlght Red limng 
Finest tallonng of 65% Dacron polyesler. 
35% combed coUon lepel trealed 100% 
Nylon Duralyn limng Snap fasleners, arm 
opemngs Matching head scarf SMAll (up 10 
34 bust), MEDIUM 135.38,1 or LARGE 139421 
.' specify Slle on coupon. 
No. 658 C.p. . . . . . . . 14.95 e.. 
3 Gold Inilials on callar. add 1.00 per cape. 
, I . :. A IIfelime of sePllce 
lor vlsltmg nurses! Finest black 1,1" thick 
geoome cowhide, beaullfully crafted with 
rugged stitched and nvet constructIOn. 
Water repellant. Roomy intenor. With snap. 
m washable hner and compartments to 




n

n
:n
::t
a

a
8r
I

d
o
: e

 
Two ru,ged carrymg straps 6'J x 8" I 12". 
Your Imtlals gold embossed FREE on top An 
outstandmg value of superb quality. 
No. 1544.1 8.g (with loner). . 37.95 e.. 
b:tr. liner No. 4415. . . .. ..6.95 ea. 


4D 
.. 


.. 
.1 


news 


I COlli illlled li'o1ll I'",!!e J 21 


of education. Ontario Ho..pital A ""0- 
ciation. Ontario I\kdic,11 A....ociation. 
at the ( \ \ r L"ounci I of pre..ident-.. 
Thc Ontario 
ur
es' Act regulating 
..choob 01 nursing wa.. considered h) 
thc government to hc inappl icahle 
...ince. in it-. interpretation. there arc 
no diploma schoob of nursing no\\ but 
rather nur...ing program.. in collegcs of 
applied arts and technolog). 
The College of Nurses of Ontario 
continues to have responsibility for 
..citing standards for admission to the 
profc
sion. The C "" r council of regents 
requires as..uranee in \\riting from the 
College of Nurses that graduates of 
C A" t nursing program... \\ TII he cI igible 
for recognition hy the CNO as the regis- 
tering bod). before program.. arc ap- 
proved. 
I aura Barr. executive director of 
R:-.J AO. told Ihe ClIl/lIe1 illll Nune: "The 
RNAO mu...t reassess it.. role in nursing 
euucation. We have establi"hed a ta..
 
IÌJrce to loo!" at the RNAO role and to 
have a statement read) lor the annual 
meeting in '\1a) 
'The R ;\JAO nced.. to reassert itscl L" 
Ms. Barr said. "A ...trongcr profc"sional 
a"..ociation i... ah"olutcl\' e....ential. Wc 
must establi..h principles on which 
nur..e-Il:.tcher... can stand. The R:-.JAO 
will be the \\atchdog for its members'" 


.\1<\ , /'(';, r I, . I, olllitllll d li'oll/!,"!!!, 71 


oritie... in health ...cn ice.. and in the 
health ...\ ...tem at all Ie\ eb. It also 
..trongl) '..upport-. thc \'d cod report 
regard ing the nced to rcprescnt the 
disalh,lnt,lged a.. \\'cll as the affluent 
and m iddlc-das... con..unll:r on health 
ad\ j'IH) and planning bodie.... 
'\RN \ doc.. not agrce \\ ith the propo...- 
cd ratio (one-third ph)...icians. one- 
thiru allied health personnel. lme-third 
ht) men) for a health council to ad\ ise 
the mini"h:r of he,lIth. lI1..te,ld. the as"I'- 
ciation recomllll:nds that thc hcalth 
practitioncr component be di..tributcd 
in relation to the population \\ ithin the 
health profc...sion.... ,\.. the large..t 
group of health practitioner... in the 
Pll1\ incl'. SRN \ hel icvcs it mu"t ha\ e 
...ignificant n:pre...entation. 
\R:"':.\ "Upporh in principle the re- 
port's recommendation that communit) 
health ,lIld social L"Cnters. a.. recom- 
mended b) the Ha..ting... Report. be e..- 
tahli..hed. pro\ iding the center.. in- 
corporate a ..ignilïcant component of 
prnenti\e health ...en ices. It ...a)s it 
mll...t bl' imol\l'd in de\cloping the 


nurse's role in such centers. (Ne\\ s. 
February 1974. page 7). 
rhe association endor...es the recom- 
mendation that a regional health ...ys- 
tcm he de\ doped in the prm ince as 
long as it emph,l..i/es thc ,Idministra- 
tion anu pro\ ision of coordlllated health 
..crv iccs. Expanding ...uch a s) ...tem to 
i nduue other services. ..uch as :-.ocial 
...en ice.... euucation. and agriculture. 
:-.hollid he uecided through 7. \otc by 
the population in each region, says 
SRN \. 


Pill's Potential Not Achieved 
Says Developer Of Contraceptive 
(Ï/;mgo, III. - The pill has not aclHev- 
ed its potential in the 22 years it has 
bcen u..ed. ..,1\ s Carl Djerassi. Ph.D.. 
the man \\ ho 
) nthesi/ed the IÜ...t oral 
contraccpt ive. 
Dr. OJ cras...i sa)" that "hypcrcau- 
tion" on the part of fedcral authoritie... 
has ...Iammeu the door shut on the in- 
troduction of ne\\ birth control method... 
aceordino to the J anuar\, 1974 i:-....ue of 
PrislI/, published b) 'the Amcrican 
!\1edieal As:-.ociation. ., ro me," Dr. 
Djerassi ..aid. "the pill \\ a" only ,I 
beginning - a vel') 1111 perfect begin- 
ning." He expccted it \\ mrld lead to 
other, better methods. 
He finds that liS federal authorities. 
responding to prcssure from legislator... 
and "sensational press cm erage" of the 
pill. ha\e impo...ed "uJl\\arrantcu h)- 
percaution" on consideration of ,Ill) 
ne\\ birth control method. He said. 
'lhe amount of practical clinical re- 
search in reprodueti\ c biolog) no\\ 
being done by the indu..tr) or in the 
uni\ er...ities has gone do\\ n. and "'pec- 
tacular ,Id\ ance... arc no longcr in the 
cards. .. 
Accordlllg to Dr. D.ler,I......i. accept- 
ance of the pill b) almo...t e\ er) rei igious 
and cthnic group mean.. that "\\omen 
ha\ e come into control of their fenilit\ 
and hale been able to ma!..e a deci..ioil 
that previously hau heen left to men 
or chanec. :'\Jothing ha.. had a bigger 
impact on the ema
lcipation of \\oñlcn 
and on the tÒstering and ...timulation of 
\\omen's righb." 
 
In hi.. \ fe\\. the pill I" not the ulti- 
mate answer to the world's rapid popu- 
lation growth. rhe development of a 
once-a
month. menses-inducing abor- 
tifacient pill is foreseen by Dr. Djerassi. 
A pill of this !..ind would be "the mOst 
useful contraceptive and something that 
would. by no means. ta!..e as long to 
devcll'p ,IS an immunological contra- 
ceptive. .. 
I he ultimate concept \\ ould bl: the 
ahilit\ to ..\\ itch on and 011 a \\om.ln's 
fertil (t\. ..afch and con\L'n ienth. rather 
than ríeg"till!.! naturc during tlíe mcn...- 
trual n
de. 
But Dr. Dier
.....i doe....Ù 
thin!.. "'llCh.l techni4ue \\ill hl: l!c\clop- 
cd in Ie...... than .
5 ) car... 
THE CANA
IAN NURSE 15 



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· Gives relief from itching 
· Supplements natural skin oils 
· Helps to retain moisture 
· Is economical 


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Division of William H. Rorer, (Canada) Ltd., Bramalea, Ontario 
16 THE CANADIAN NURSE MARCH 1974 



A death at home 


The diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis could have been a death 
sentence; but the three years of decline became a family affair, even to the 
final hour of life. 


Dawn McNeil 


Amyotrophic lateral sclcrosis was a 
disease I had never heard about before, 
yet I "new that very quic"ly it would 
be affecti ng our I ivcs as the doctor told 
my father. "There is no "nown cause: 
there is no curc:' My fathcr was a strong 
man who enjoyed life to its fullest. but 
this disease was somethi ng in I ifc we 
were finding hard to comprehend. 
Tears filled father's eyes as he sat 
across from me in our car one cold 
Octoher day almost four years ago. It 
was diftïcult to tell me he was ill. but it 
was even more difficult to tell me he 
was dying. I had had no idea previously 
of anything '\eriously wrong. as I \Vas 
heginning a new life for myself away 
from home at university. This was go- 
ing to be my first encounter with death. 
J was shoc"ed and frightened. 
f'or several years my father had 
noticed a wea"ness in his left arm and 
that he was beginning to drop things. 
He did not pay much attention to these 
early symptoms until he suffered a fall 
off a ladder earl} in IlJólJ. which in- 
creased the difficulty with his left arm. 
rhe doctors thought there could he an 
impacted vertebra in the nec" causing 
pressure on the arm. hut they were also 
concerned that there might he some 
other influencing condition. 
A serics of x-rays and tests "ere 
conducted in the fall of Il)6lJ to tl) 
to establish the diagnosis. Electrical 
analysis of the muscles of the left arm 


MARCH 1974 


showed a mar"ed deviation from the 
normal wavy line. which causcd the 
doctors a considerable amount of ex- 
citement and concern. 
It was two wee"s of anxious waiting 
before my parents were told. The dlx:tor 
was lJO percent sure of the diagnosis, 
hut wished to do some further tests to 
eliminate th
 possibility of <I brain 
tumor or a spinal lesion. 
After further consultation. t
lther 
was told that he had a form of progres- 
sive muscular atroph}. 
The doctor was most gracious and 
"ind. He explained that thc condition 
was quite rare - a disease that is com- 
mon in one or two islands in the mid- 
Pacific. but rather uncommon in North 
America. It usually occurs in males 
over the age of 40. with normal lite 
expectancy after diagnosis of t\\O to 
th ree ) cars. 


A 
 I H< I w- ()l 11'1 01 the initial 
shoe". m) parents spent some time 
together discussing "hat thc} might 
100" forward to and searching for in- 
formation in thc MacA ."vIedical ."vIal/- 
lIal about th
 prognosis of the dj'ease 
and the different things \Ve \\ould ha\c 
to contend with. 


I he aUlhor. curn:ntl) In I'uf't'pe. ohtained 
her B.Sc.N degree from the l nivCI',il\ l,t 
Sa,"alehew.1Il in :\la). 197
. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 17 



Looking ahead "a
 terriI') ing. but 
\w all soon learned that any probkm 
Imes much of its magnitude when it 
is faced one day at a time. rtuoughout 
the course of the illness. I marvelled 
at my father'
 continued determination 
and joy of living a
 his phy
ical 
trength 
deteriorateo with each week and month 
that pa

ed. 
The normal proce
s in dmyotroph ic 
lateral sclero
i
 i
 that nerves in the 
central spinal sy
tcm that control the 

kdetal muscles arc damaged. fhese 
nerves die. and all impulses to the 
mu
eles arc cut off. As a result. the 
muscles gradually ""aste away. begin- 
ning ""ith the small. finer muscles. 
The wasting began in my father's 
left hand and arm and quickl) spread 
to hi... right hand and arm. The wasting 
of the muscles is acclllllpanied or pre- 
ceded by a fasciculation of the muscle. 
Soon my father could no longer hold on 
to objects. bUllon or unbUllon his 
clothes. or turn knobs on the radio or 
television. 
Wasting continued through hi
 arms 
and shoulders. and then plIJeeeded 
dow nward to the muscle
 of his legs. 
again with the finer muscles wasting 
away first. He was having difficulty in 
maintaining balance when walking and 
soon began tripping and falling. as his 
feet tended to drag with each step. 
When we first got a wheelchair. it was 
difficult to accept. but father had al- 
ready suffered -'0 to ..J.O falls. somt-' 
more 
evere than others. 


A s A I-A:\III Y. WI-' RFr\1 In. I) \\e had 
two choices: we could squander 
the time we had left together feeling 

orry rÒr ourselves. or we could cherish 
it. Wt-' decided we weren't going to 
waste any time. Although it was most 
difficult at times. something wonder- 
ful happened to the relationship within 
our family. We laughed more and had 
a rich and deep fellowship together - 
more sharing and doing things together. 
My father helped u
 reali/e that 
much of the fun of I ife is lost when 
people arc drivcn by desire for material 
thi ngs. fhe material valut-'s that used 
18 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


to mean 
o much became less important 
to us. as people became more and more 
so. With this came increasingly open 
free communication within our famil) 
and with friends. We realized that so 
much around us is beautiful and won- 
derful - even a drive around the park 
became 
omething special. M) father 
wantcd to take in a
 much as possible 
before he had to leave it all. 
We spent a great deal of time to- 
gether as a family discussing the future. 
We did not play games or pretend 
that things would be different from 
what the) really werc. Father believed 
it is every man's responsibility to pre- 
pare his wife for widowhood. One ad- 
vantage of a terminal disease over 
sudden death is tile time it gave us to 
di
cuss. plan. and prepare for the 
future. We talked about life. and we 
talked about serious illness and the 
eventuality of death. 
We tried to help one another face 
the situation realistically without fear. 
'VIy father had no fear of death through- 
out his illness. as he felt that things 
were in good control and that God 
would prepare him to meet ""hate vcr 
wa
 ahead. 
We were continuall) amaLed by 
father's sense of humor. He 
eemed to 
reach state
 of euphoria where things 
would strike hi m as highly amusing. 
fhis is an interesting aspect of the 
disease. as he became supersensitive 
to certain emotions. particularly to 
certain sensory reactions. He did not 
have any particular periods of depres- 
sion. but would quickly become dis- 
couraged if 
omething was bothering 
anyone of the family. 


A " rH I-' DlSI-' AS!:' PRO(j R ESSI-'I). the 
muscles in father's neck graduall) 
became quite seriousl) affected. Th is 
meant verbal communie<lIion was 
soon to be eliminated. It was difficult 
wht:n he tïnall) reached this point. A
 
long as "e could talk together. things 
didn't seem too bad. 
\Ve were able to work out a form 
of communication by 
pelling out words 
"hile tither was able to blink his e)es 


and move his eyebrows to indicate the 
kller
 he "anted. This got to be frus- 
trating at times when father ""a
 trying 
to tell us something and we couldn't 
understand: but we had to communi- 
eate. 
Sitting III a "heelehair presemed 
additional problems as hither was not 
able to support his own head due to the 
weakened neck musc1e
. My brothers 
and an occupational therapist from a 
local hospital worked together to de- 
sign a head 
upport "ith a sy
tem of 
pulleys. .This allowed father a good 
range of motion of his head and neck. 
yet gave the support he net:ded for sit- 
ting up. He was then able to be up lor 
long periods and to read with the help 
of an electric paper turner. 
Eating and drinking became more 
difficult with each meal. and we lived 
daily "ith the fear of having father 
choke to death. By J anuar) IY72 hc 
was very thin and hungry. weighing 
only 90 of his original 155 pounds. We 
decided. with the doctors. to have a 
gastrostomy done. fhe l;perat ion was 
perfÒrmed under a local anesthetic. as 
the risk otherwise was too great with his 
decreased respiratory function. Follow- 
ing the operation. my father no longer 
had anything to cat by mouth. which 
eliminated all the strain and stress of 
c hok i ng. 
We talked about a tracheotomy and 
the possibility of an artificial respirator. 
but we felt we should do only what 
would make I ife easier without undul) 
prolonging it. This was father's deci- 
sion as well as that of the rest of the 
family. 


W F WI-'RF I-ORTUNA rE as a fam- 
ily to be able to keep our t
lther 
at home throughout the course of his 
illnes
. He was put on a paraplegic 
program. through one of the hospitals 
in the city. which provided us with any 
equipment we needed - electric page- 
turner. hospital bed. wheelchair. Hoyer 
hydraulic lift and swing. raised toilet 
seal. and portable oxygen equipment. 
A dll(\Or loaned us an electric suction 
from his office. 


MARCH 1974 



\\ 
 cOIl\
rtcJ our livingrooll1 into 
fath
r'
 h
Jroom. Thi
 allo\\
d him to 
h
 a part l)f th
 activiti

 of the hou

- 
hold. 
rh
} \\
r
 thr
e Jiftìcult )
ars, but 
abo \
r) r
\\arding. Th
re \\
r
 times 
of discourag
m
nt. 
\'
n tim

 of 
r


ntI11l:nt: thn
 \\a
 pain: and th
re 
\\
r
 long nights of 
ilting h) rath
r's 
...id
 as h
 ...truggkd \\ ith th
 la
t k\\ 
da) 
 and hours of hi
 lik. 
Hl.' died p
acefull) in August. IlJ7'!.. 
Th
re \\ as no struggle but. rather, a 
peaceful ...urrender to a long battle. 
:\1) mother and I ...at hy his 
ide hold- 
ing hi
 hand. and I sensed that he felt 
our pr
"'ence. We gath
red a
 a family 
- thae \\ a... nohody to hustk us .1\\ a). 
Fath
r 
eem
d tl) have a "mik of con- 
t
ntml.'nt on hi... rüc
 as we 
at in the 
li\ ingroom \\ith him. 
It \\ a
 hard to kt the ambulance 
lake him a\\<I). His iIlI1l:

 and dcath 
had he
n a famil) affair. I \\ ish \w 
could ha\ 
 huril.'d him in l)ur 0\\ n 
garJ
n. \\hich h
 had lo\
d "'0 much 
during hi
 lik. 
He is mi


d. Our r
membrance i
 
of a strong. activ
 man who fac
d lik 
courag
ou
l) and surr
nd
red this 
lik a
 \\
 knl'\\ it \\ith a grcat dcal of 
dignit). Hi
 a
hc'" li
 b
neath th
 first 
tree h
 planted - a very tall. majestic 
tree. 
' 


MARCH 1974 


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THE CANADIAN NURSE 19 



OPINION 


A current TV ad depicts a man who 
has a cold. A woman addresse
 him 
as "poor bahy:' and bring'i him a head- 
ache-fevcr-
tuffy nose remedy; soon he 
feels well enÔugh to take out the gar- 
hage. A contrasting rv ad shows a 
young woman surrounded by noisy 
children at a hirthday party: 
he. too. 
feels unwell. No one "poor haby
" her; 
she goes to the medicine cuphoard, 
dose
 hcrself with a headache remedy. 
and carries on her ho
tessing. The other 
women at the part} do not a
si
t her. 
according to the ad. 
Nurses 
uller from the "poor baby" 
syndrome. A predispo
ition 10 it i
 
indicated in the rea
on given by women 
for entering a nur
ing program. "I want 
to help peopk and take care of them 
when they're sick:' A nurse expects to 
subordinate her interest
 to those of her 
patients. Nurses carry the attitudc into 
their private lives a... adult women. and 
subordinate their interests h) tho
c of 
hu
band, children. neighbors. or com- 
munity activitie
 and. in the work 
world. to tho
e of doctor'i and of nur
es 
above them in the nursing hierarchy. 
Imperceptibly, 1ll1r
eS come to de- 
pend on the maternal stancc for their 
self-re
pect and self-image. They get 
hooked on 
e1f-deprivation. Women arc 
20 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Poor baby: the nurse 
and feminism 


Most nurses are ill-suited to the debate and demands of a push for women's 
rights and ill-equipped to organize on behalf of women's interests. They are 
hooked on self-deprivation and subordinate their interests to family, com- 
munity, doctors, and nurses above them in the nursing hierarchy. The author 
suggests five remedies for the "poor baby" syndrome. 


Dorothy S. Starr, M.N. 


the ones who make the coffee, takc the 
minute
. do the errands. and put them- 

e1ve'i - their gW\\ th and development. 
their satisfaction
 -last. Nurses. along 
with others. have ahrogated their righb 
and denied their intercsts as womcn. 
A feminist is committed to creating 
the equal it}. not the samenes
. of the 
sexes in all the rights and responsibili- 
ties of Ii IC. It is not surprising that 
nurses are not notieeahly active in the 
fcmini'it movement. Mostnur
e'" are ill- 

u ited to the de hate and dem and
 of a 
pu
h for womcn's rights. and ill-equip- 
ped to organi.te on hehalf of women''i 
interöts. 
Many nur
es have difficulty seeing 
a place for themselves in the feminist 
world. rheir reasoning goes. Since I 
am part of a profession of women. therc 
i... no question of women's right
. no 
competition with men. But thcre's a 
world of men and women around us. I I' 
nurse
 lift their 
ights from the kitchen 
'iink, the neatly made hed. and the pwb- 


\h. Starr i, an a"i...tant cditor of 1]'<, 
((/llI/elic/l/ ,\ 11/'\('. I hi... art ide i
 h..sed on 
a spcceh ,hc gav.: to thc Alumni A...soÒ<I- 
tion of t he Univcr'iity of Ottawa School of 
Nur...ing in Novcmher (')7 .
. 


lem-oriented patient records. the need 
for the feminist movement in nurses' 
per
onal and professional lives will 
become apparent. 


Restraints 
The most important restraints on 
women in a male-oriented, male-domi- 
nated society are social. embedded in 
attitudes. Evcry individual experiences 
restraints on his behavior. imposed by 
living with others. Few women have 
questioned why they do not feel free to 
do what is best for them as individuals, 
within the group restrictions. For most 
couples, the male's educational or job 
opportunities rank ahead of the fe- 
male's. A woman's income is regarded 
as a supplement to the family income; 
"family" equals male. in this context. 
rhese attitudes were, perhaps, under- 
standable when most women devoted 
their working lives to the home, and the 
male wage-carner provided the family 
income. roday. over ..J.6,OOO married 
nurse
 are employed full-time in nursing 
and nearly 20.000 married nurses work 
part-time. 1 
Nurses consider a man unusually 
under
tanding when he a
sists his wife 
to attend univcrsity. hut a nurse is only 
doing what i
 expected when she helps 
MARCH 1974 



MARCH 1974 


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THE CANADIAN NURSE 21 



her hushand to go to schooL Examples 
arc numerou
 of the automatic prece- 
dence given maJe
 over femaks. Some 
men ht;ld doors and chairs for women. 
but this cannot be equated with the 
educational and career opportunities 
afforded to men .as their right. 
Some Canadian laws restricting 
\\omell"s activities have been rescinded 
and others arc in the process of change. 
When Hi" Maje
t):s Privy Council in 
London overruled the Supreme Court of 
Canada in I Y2Y. and ruled that the 
word "persons" includes members of 
the mak and female sex and that 
women are eligible to bc summonsed 
and hecome memhers of the Senate of 
Canada. the legal way was cleared for 
women to participate in Canadian pol it- 
icallife. 
The Royal Commis
ion on the Status 
of \\/omen in Canada. whose report 
wa
 publishcd in IY70. made 167 re- 
commendation
 to ensure for women 
equal opportunities with men. National 
and provincial committees on the status 
of\\onH:n arc prodding for implementa- 
tion of these recommendation
. 
Hut what ahout restraint
 that arc 
self-impo
ed'.' Appropriate behavior for 
men and women toward each other and 
tow,u'd their own sex i
 learned from 
early childhood. Little girls are made 
of sugar and spice and all things nice. 
according to the nursery rhyme. while 
I ittle boy
 .Ire constructed of nails and 
snail... and PupP) dogs' tails. Even the 
ingredient
 of little boys arc active. 
while ...ugar and spice ju
t sit there! 
Rooks lix children emphasi7e an 
active. prohlem-
olving role for mak
 
anu a pas
ive. dependent role for fe- 
malc
. "Oh. oh! Ltx,k. look! See Dick 
run! Oh. oh! Look. look! See Jane sit!"' 
If the male is the active and dominant 
one. he is important. females compete 
for hi
 attention and 
pend time with 
other femaJc
 a... second-hest. The man- 
\.\oman games \.\e play arc pan iall) the 
re
ult of ideas implanted in mind
 too 
young to query the rationality of the 
grown-up.... and partly the re
ult of 
conll ict
 aroused hy the hurgeoning 
...exual ity of adolescence. 
Alix Kates Shulman wrote about 
relation
hips hetween adole
cent hoy
 
22 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


and girls from a woman's point of view. 
in an anicle entitled "The War in the 
Ibel-, Sl.'at." 2 She 
ay... the ohjeet of the 
real-life dating game in the IlJ..J.O... and 
'50s was. tl)r the hoy. sexual intercourse 
and. for the girl. avoidance of vaginal 
penetration without complete alienation 
of the hoy. It was psychological war- 
fare in the back scats of cars and in 
other uncomfortable. unprivate places; 
no one emerged unscarreu or victorious. 
A current philosophy of sexual he- 
havior i
 that women should be as free 
as men to select their partncrs and 
to enjoy relationsh ips. freed by the Pill 
from the deterrent fear of pregnancy. 
Rut today's young adults arc the off- 

pring of parents whose attitudes were 
"haped by the war in the hack scat. A 
double standard continues to be applied 
to the behavior of men and women bc- 
cause many can't shake free of their 
guilty hang-ups. 
As a result. women react to men by 
a tea"ing. tlirting. advance-and-retreat 
behavior that mitigates against honest 
friend
hip
 and inhihits a woman's 
ability to do her best work and make 
her maximum eontrihution in business 
and profcs
ionallifc. 
We live in a male-oriented. male- 
dominated society. as our mothers did. 
and we adapt to it with covert behavior 
and sly maneuvering. By such behavior. 
\.\e support the present status of women. 
including ourselve
. and fail to que,,- 
tion or challenge our accorded statu
. 
Phy II i
 Chesler makes the frighten ing 
point in her book. Womell lIlld MlId- 
lleH,3 that male p
ychiatrists may diag- 
nose a woman as mentally ill if she 
reheb against m,lIe uomination. 
A married woman in prc"ent-day 
Wcstern society suffers a terrible eco- 
nomic and social vulncrahility. She 
can come to middle-age \.\ ithout know- 
ing the particulars of the family's 
busine
s and financial affair.... without 
making major. long-range uecisions. 
I I' she is kh on her own by ueath. deser- 
tion. or divorce. she lacks neces
ary 
information and experience. 
Housewives. nurscs. and secretaries 
arc all \ ictims of a fatal availahility. 
The \\ illingness to accept rc
ponsihility 
for the housekeeping. nurturing tasks 


and a denial of self - an unselfishness 
- lead to nonpermanent achievements. 
Daily meal
 mu
t be cooked. patienh 
hathed. and kill' 1'" typeu: no one douhts 
these ta
ks need to be done or that they 
can be donc with 
kill anu devotion. 
Rut a job consisting of tasks in which 
one worker can replace another. almo
t 
without pause. docs not give the worker 
power. 
Nur...e" arc without open power. A
 
Virginia Cleland asked, "Just who 
makes the reall) important decision
 
tÖr nurses and nur
ing?"4 A variation 
of the man-woman game. the nurse- 
doctor game. has bcen de
cribed many 
timcs. The nurse who insinuates sug- 
gestions into a conversation \\ ith a doc- 
tor. in such a way that the doctor thinks 
the ideas for hetter pat ient care origi- 
nate with him. is playing the nurse- 
doctor game. 
A" women and nurses. we support a 
role for the male as master and enemy. 
loved and despised. whom women cajole 
anu trick. cosset and cheat but. when 
the crunch comes. to whom they defer. 
Although we say "poor baby:' we arc 
the poor babies. 


Remedies 
Here arc tïve remedie
 for the poor 
baby "yndrome: become aware. make 
per...onal choices, change child-rearing 
practices. support other womcn. and 
work tl)r a two-gender nursing. 
1'0 become aware. read. listen. and 
look. A
 the level of con
elOusnes... 
ri
e
. so will the hlood pre
sure. The 
numh
r of put-down
 woml.'n take i... 
incredihle! If a woman remarks on an 
ad or a movie dim in ishing \\Omen. a 
man will 
ay "Oh. comc no\\. You 
don't take that seriously'.' Where.... your 
...en"e of humor ," 
Rdu
al to laugh off humor that 
treats women as 
ex ohjects can have 
po
itive results. rhe Metric Commi...- 
"ion tried to make Canadian
 ,1\\ arc of 
metric measuremenh h) picturing a 
scantilv clad female \\ith hu
L \\al
L 
and hip circumference printed in cen- 
timeters; the outcry of wom
n got Ihe 
poster removed from circulation. 
To hecome aware i
 to become irri- 
tated and fru
tr<lted. to hl.' forced to 
MARCH 1974 



reconsider per
onal relation,hips, and 
to discover that 
ome treasured child- 
hood legacies arc sexist. It is sad to 
realize that The Little Prince was a male 
chauvinist to\\ard his Rosc. 
A warcness of facts, trends, and 
social nuance
 is the fir
t step in moving 
women closer to equality. 
After becoming aware. women need 
to make personal choices based on 
themselves as individuals and not on 
society's view of women. \\Ie can prom- 
i
e that we will never again refer to 
ourselves as "just" anything. just a 
housewife. just a mother, just a nurse. 
\\ e put women down when we u
e 
helittling phrases about ourselves. 
Each woman has to decide for her- 
self what she wants to be free from. 
what she wants to be freed to be and 
do. and what price she is willing to 
pay for her particular freedoms. As a 
suburhan housewilC, who became a 
feminist organizer. said. 'Tm a woman 
just as much a
 a wellÜfe mother, inas- 
much as we're assigned certain roles 
b} ,ociety. Just because I'm middle 
class doesn't mean I'm not oppressed." 5 
Women who have children or work 
with children w ill find their growing 
awarene
s reflected in child-rearing 
practice
. They will try to make <;ure 
that little children arc treated a
 per- 
son
 first. and persons of a certain sex. 
second. In nonsexist nursery 'ichools, 
little girl
 will play with trucks and 
little boys pour water at make-helieve 
tea parties. Someday our society will 
no longer a
sume that boys arc born 
with.. mechanical aptitude that auto- 
matically di
qualitïes girls from a range 
01 hohbies and careers. 
Another remedy is to have confidence 
in women and support them in their 
endeavors. Many women e
tahli
h only 
,upertïcial rdation
hip
 with other 
\\omen. and ne'-'er discu
s important 
matter
 with another woman. Ideally, a 
lawyer. denti
t. or doctor is chosen f{\r 
her or hi
 competence. I I' one ha, no 
criterion or information, why not trust 
a woman lawyer or denti,t! A \\omen's 
center in your community can 
ugge't 
name
 of.... omen profe....ionals. 
Recome ,1\\ are of and support wom- 
en who have accepted high office and 
MARCH 1974 


high re
pon
ibility in puhlic life. There 
are seven women in the federal govern- 
ment's 700 senior executives. Seven 
isn't many among 700. hut if we sup- 
port the women at the top and help 
them with comments. suggestions. and 
encouragement. there will be more 
women willing and able to accept the 
pres,ure of high-level decision-making. 
If women don't support women in pub- 
lic life. who will'! Many men will not. 
because they don't think \\Oml'n can do 
a good joh in public life. 
A final remedy suggested is that 
nurses work for a two-gender nursing 
profession. Any profession that is ex- 
clusively one sex is not whole and 
halanced. It is good to have women 
engineers, economist
. and veterinari- 
ans; it is good to have mcn as nurses. 
We don't need men so they can take 
all the top nursing job
 and replicate 
the present. male-dominated society. 
And not, as some have suggested. so 

ociety .... ill perceive the male's nccd 
for an adequate salary and so raise the 
pay of all J1l1r
e
. One reason for hav ing 
numhers of mCn in nur,ing is to help 
hrcak down the old doctor{nur
c. male{ 
female ,tercotype and let doctors and 
nur,es relate to one another as per...ons. 
ti)r the betterment of patient care. 


Rewards 
At present. the rewards of a 
uccess- 
ful fcmini
t movement in which the 
righb and interest-; of \\ omen arc 
hI ought into halance \\ ith those of men 
arc speculative. In ,ociety generally. 
the interest, of \\omen and children 
will hL' protected only as \\omen acceed 
to po
ition
 of inlluenee and decision- 
mal... i ng. 
N ur
e
' re.... ani.. ti)r pal1ieipating in 
the fcm in i
t movement \\ ill he a more 
nearl} autonomou
 profcs...ion \\ ith 
more open po.... er. I hi, mean, nur
es' 
ability to help patient... will he magni- 
lïed. through their dhilit) to get deci- 
,ion, and plan
 implemented. Another 
re\\ ard \\ ill he attracting into the pro- 
les
ion creati\e. thinking. compa....ion- 
ate people of hoth sexe.... 
On a pcr,onal h.l,i" growth in he. 
lie\ IIlg in her own right-. and intaesb 
produce, a \\oman \\ho 'tri\es to rea- 


li7e her O\\n potential. ....hatever it ma} 
be. Simone de Beauvoir said it. "What 
\'.oman e
sentially lacks today for doing 
great thi ng, i... ti.Jrgetful ness of herself; 
but to li.Jrget oneself it i, first necessary 
that now and for the future. one has 
found onesel f. ,. 6 


Summary 
The liheration of women will result 
in freeing feminine qualities - the real 
feminine qualitie
, such as compas
ion. 
tendernes" empathy - in persons of 
both 
exe
. fhe tCminist movement's 
message to the nurse is: Don't poor 
haby another person and don't be a 
poor baby yourself. 


References 
I. Canadi,\11 ;o-Jur,e,' A,..ocialll1n. COII/1I- 
clown 1972. Ültaw.1. Canadian I'<urscs' 
A "ociat ion. 1'J7 _
. p.1 2. 
2. Shulm.lIl. Alix "-atcs. I'he War in the 
Hack Seal. !ll<' A Iial/lic. 2.
O: I 50-". 
J ul
 1lJ72. 
:\. Chc,lcr. Phylli... 11'01//1'1/ ancl ,\lacll/e.n. 
l,arden Cit
. :-".'1.. Douhkda
. 1972. 

. Cleland. Virginia. Sn di...crimin.ttion: 
Nursing', \Jo,t Perva,ive I'rohkm. 
AI//erical/ ./ol/rl/al (
,. .V"rsil/g, 71.S: 
1542-7. Augu,t 1971. 
5. Johnson, \' alcrie :\1 i ner. I'he Suhurhan 
Housewife a, f-emil1lst Organizer. Sa- 
I"rday .Viglll. July 1973. pp.15-X, 
h. de Hcauvoir, Simone. Ihe S('('ond ,\)1' r. 
Tran" H .1\1. Parshlcy. "Ic.... '\ 01'10., 
"-nopf. 1971. ? 


1 
... 



 


"... 


...... 


.. 


, 



 


THE CAN DIAN NURSE 23 



The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


50 The Driveway, Ottawa. K2P IE2, Ont. 


ð 

 


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24 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


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The Canadian Nurse 
OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE CANADIAN NURSES' ASSOCIATION 
MARCH 1974 



Cholera epidemiology 
and control 


Cholera has been endemic in the delta 
of the Ganges River in eastern India 
since the beginning of recorded history. 
and has periodicalIy ranged over the 
entire globe. Between the years I H 17 
and 1923. six cholera pandemics spread 
beyond this area along the trade routes 
to involve most of the globe. Except 
for one isolated epidemic in Egypt in 
IlJ47. cholera was confined to the 
endemic regions of South East Asia 
from 1923 to 1959. 
The seventh pandemic. which start- 
ed in 1960. spread from a focus in the 
Celebes Islands in what is now Indo- 
nesia f Figure n. It was a long time 
before scientists realized that the of- 
fending organism was EI Tor vibrio. 
not the classical Vibrio cholerae. B\ 
1963. the disease had extended north- 
ward as far as Korea. China. and the 
Philippines; by 1965. classical V. 
cholerae in India had been almost 
completely replaced by EI Tor vibrio. 
In East Pakistan. however. the classical 
V. cJlOlerae, serotype Inaba. remain- 
ed predominant. 
Since 1965. cholera has spread west 
via West Pakistan. Afghanistan. Iran. 
and Iraq. I n 1970 it struck Odessa and 
Kerch on the Black Sea, the Middle 
East. and North Africa. In August 
IlJ70. EI Tor cholera Ogawa 
erotype 
was introduced into Guinea. West 
Africa. where it had not been recogniz- 
MARCH 1974 


Cholera can be introduced into any country despite the use of mmuniza- 
tion. The most effective way of keeping this dreaded disease under control 
is by improving the environmental sanitation and the personal hygiene 
habits of the inhabitants. 


John W. Davies, M.B., B.S., D.P.H., M.Sc. 


ed since I XlJ4. Since then. the disease 
has been reported by more than a d07en 
West African countries. 
Spread of cholera in Africa folIow- 
ed one of two routes. the coast border- 
ing the Gulf of Guinea. and the Niger 
River. In both areas water serves as the 
major transportation and communica- 
tion link within and between countries. 
Cholera is introduced by fishermen and 
traders to a given region; then. multiple 
factors. such as availability of safe water 
supply. eating and cooking practices. 
level of personal hygiene. and com- 
munity sanitation, intluence the effect 
of the importation. 
Official reports from these West 
A frican countries indicated approx i- 
matelv 2..J..000 clinical cases. \\ith over 
3.000' deaths. It has been estimated. 
however. that in reality more than 
three-quarters of a million cholera 
infections have occurn:d in "'cst 
Africa since August IlJ70. 
The summer of IlJ71 \Vas notahle in 
three ways. 
I. There was further extension of the 
disease in Africd. affecting Hhiopia. 
Somalia. and East Africa. t..) involvc 


Dr. Oavies is Director. Hure.IUI)1 l'pidclll- 
iolog}. I anorato) 
 (e11l rc fl'r Disease 
('01111'01. H
'alth Proteelion Branch. 
kalth 
.\ \\ d lill C ( anad;1. 011;1\\ .1. 


altogether a total of ahout 20 countries. 
2. Mas
ive epidemics of cholera oc- 
curred in refugee camps in West Bengal 
and along the frontier of East Pakistan. 
\\ ell over 20.000 cases and 3.000 
deaths occurred in this area. 
3. Cholera \Vas imported into a num- 
her of Euroflean countries. including 
France. Spain. Portugal. Sweden. and 
the L'nited Kingdom. usualI) by return- 
ing tourists. 
In August IY7
. Italian officials 
notilied the "'orld Health Org.lIli7a- 
tion of an outhreak of cholera in t\\ 0 
localities south 01 Naples. Several 
hundred cases occurred hefore this 
epidem ic \\ as hrought undcr control. 
Epidemiological investigation tended 
to confirm that inkcted shellfish \\cre 
the sources of the epidemic. 
Another notahle event in August 
IY7.3 was the report of a single con- 
firmed case of cholera in Port I avaca. 
Texas. The source was never found 
and there \\ as no spread of the disease. 
I'his is the lirst recogni/ed case in 
North America in over 50 \ cars. 
Iîle ever-\\idening geographic dIs- 
persion of thc disease raises the threat 
of further importation intp the \mcri- 
can continent. 


Organisms 
In man} respects. choler.. resembles 
other enteric infections. but is cha- 
THE CAN DIAN NURSE 25 



racterized by its greater potentiality to 
spread rapidly in receptive areas and its 
ability in severc cases to kill within 
hours. 
The two recognized biotypes are 
the classic and El Tc variants. which 
are antigenically separated into two 
mains serotypes, Ogawa and Inaba. 
V. cho[erae, biotype EI Tor, is the 
predominant etiological agent in all 
the countries affected except East 
Pakistan. where classical cholera is 
prevalent. More recently. thc cla
sical 
type is again being isolated in neighbor- 
ing West Bengal. India. 
EI Tor is somew hat more resistant 
than classical cholera and survives 
longer in the environment. It is more 
easily detectable in bacteriological 
surveys of water and night-
oil samples. 


Seasonal pattern 
Cholera has a characteristic sea- 
sonal pattern, although this pattern 
varies from place to place. For example, 
in Dacca, Bangladesh, the cholera 
season follows the monsoon rains, peaks 
in November, December, and January, 
and usually disappears during the dry 
months. 
In Calcutta. by contrast. the cholera 
season characteristically rises to its 
peak during the hot. dry season and 
hence declines with the onset of the 
monsoon. In some parts of the Philip- 
pines, cholera tends to reach its peak 
during the rainy 
ea
on. The cause of 
these seasonal pattern!> is unknown. 


Pattern of spread 
Bad environmental sanitation. par- 
ticularly a lack of adequate fresh water 
for personal use. seem!> to be the 
fundamental factor in the spread of 
cholera. Provision of abundant amounts 
of safe water for all pcrsonal use can 
break this cyclc. leading to its control. 
There are two main types of spread. 
I. The cxplosive epidemic where a 
common source or common vehicle. 
such a!> water. i
 implicated and an 
explosive outbreak appears over a 
short time. An example of thi
 is the 
Broad Street Pump epidemic in I X54. 
identified by Snow. * 


: John Sno\\'. SilO II , Oil ('!lo/era. I{cprinl- 
Lxi IlJ.
6 CÙ.. ,,"cw York. H"fncr. IlJ65. 
26 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


2. By contrast, protracted epidemics 
may occur with the appearance of only 
sporadic clinical cases over a period of 
time. I n these outbreaks the means of 
transmission is not always well detìn- 
ed. Contact spread has heen suggested, 
but this has not been conclusively 
documented. As a rule, cholera is not 
easily spread by person-to-person con- 
tact. Numerous inapparent infections 
and occa
ional small explosive out- 
breaks may be demonstrated in famil) 
groups that have a common food and 
water supply. 


Susceptibility 
Cholera usually affects individuals 
of the lowest socioeconomic groups 
because of their poorer sanitation. 
When an epidemic strikes a new area, 
the earliest cases are often predom inant- 
Iy adult males. due to their mobility 
and higher exposure to potential 
sources. When a disease is established 
in a community, the sexes are equally 
affected. 
In the endemic cholera areas, the 
attack rate is much higher for children 
than for adults, because adults in these 
areas acquire antibodies as a result of 
previous repeated exposures. 


Reservoir of infection 
The only known natural reservoir 
is man. Cholera is maintained by a 
cycle of transmission from man to man 
th rough the environment. As a rule. 
infected individuals excrete vibrios for 
several days. but a fe", chronic carriers 
have been described. Maintenance of 
iniection in communities is facilitated 
by the presence of subclinical cases 
and by the relatively brief immunity 
following infection so that reinfections 
from year to ycar are common. 


Clinical picture 
The spectrum of diarrheal disease 
for wh ich V. cho[erae i!> responsible 
ranges from a completely asymptomatic 
state to severe diarrhea and vomiting 
that require hospitalization. In the 
case of classical cholera, the ratio of 
severe to mild or inapparent cases is 
about I to I U, and for E I Tor cholera, 
perhaps as Iowa!> I to 50 or I to 100. 
In the classical textbook description. 
patients usually have an abrupt onset of 
effortless vomiting and watery diarrhea 
that quickly assumes the characteristic 


rice-water appearance (colorless with 
tlecks of tloating mucus), although it 
may occasionally be cream colored or 
even bloody. Soon after the onset ()f 
diarrhea. the patient cedses to urinate 
and exhibits moderate thirst. followed 
by cramps in the muscles. 
The massive gastrointestinal loss of 
isotonic tluid of very low protein but 
high bicarbonate and potassium content 
leads to profound dehydration with 
hemoconcentration, !>hock. hypokale- 
mia, and metabolic acido
is. In the 
extreme case the patient will be cold 
and pulseless on admission, with 
cyanosis of finger tips, tongue, and 
lips. 
If untreated, these patients have a 
mortality rate of 60 percent or greater. 
Many countries report mortal ity rates 
of 20-30 percent tor cholera; however, 
with adequale treatmcnt. including 
correction of saline depletion and 
acidosis. mortality should be almo
t nil 
in all age groups. 


Treatment 
Treatment should be given immedi- 
ately. It consists chietly of intravenou!> 
tluids and electrolytes to restore the 
circulation and to corrcct the dehydra- 
tion, acidosis, and potassium loss. 
Tetracyclines are valuable III !>hortenÎng 
the period of diarrhea and eradicat- 
ing the organism. 
Chemoprophylaxis of contacts with 
tetracyclines has a limited place in 
controlling the disease becau
e of the 
ri sk of developing drug-resistant 
vibrios. 


Cholera surveillance and control 
Cholera can be introduced into an} 
country despite immunization with 
presently available vaccines and the 
use of other preventive measures list- 
ed under the International Health 
Regulations. It should be recogni7ed, 
however, that cholera can spread only 
in areas with poor environmental 
sanitation and personal hygiene and 
with inadequate basic health 
ervices. 
The risk of further invasions is much 
greater at present as cholera has be- 
come endcmic over a wide area of the 
world. Also. the E I Tor biotype. with 
its high proportion of mild ca
es and 
carriers. spreads more easil)' than the 
classical hiotype. 
The wide geographic dispersion of 
MARCH 1974 



FICURE I 
Extension of Cholera, 1961-70 


'} 


SOllrcl': 
J ee/..I\' Lpide/ll;ologiclIl R('('ord, 46 13JI Allg. 6. /97/. World Hellirh Association. 


cholera in recent years and thc 
magnitude of tourist traffic make this 
continent morc vunlerable to the im- 
portation of chokra. The risk of spread 
of the disea.<;e is minimal. however. with 
the exception of certain Latin American 
countries and the Caribbean - coun- 
tries that have poor environmental 
sanitation. 
The risk will be minimiled further 
in such areas by ensuring the availability 
of health per
onnel trained in epide- 
miology. bacteriology. and treatment of 
cholera; the existence of well-organiz- 
ed laboratory scrvices' equipped with 
standard diagnostic reagents and media 
for diagnosis of cholera: facil ities tor 
treatment. chemoprophylaxis. and 
health education; and the existence of 
personnel and equipment to improve 
sanitation and water suppliö. The 
stockpiling of rehydration tluid
. 
lalx)ratory supplies. vaccines for select- 
ive vaccination. ...upplie... tor disinfec- 
tion of water. and antibiotics has been 
recommended by the World Health 
Organization in area... threatened b) 
cholera. 
The mo
t etlective ,1I1d long-lasting 
way of making countries unreceptive 
to cholera is by improving environment- 
al 
anitation and personal hygiene for 
the inhabitant
. Particular emphasis 
MARCH 1974 


should be put on vulnerable commu- 
nities or situations that are conducive 
to implantation. 
Although introduction of cholera 
into a country cannot be prevented. its 
spread can be checked by early detec- 
tion of outbreaks and immediate ac- 
tion to control the disease. Fortunately, 
in a country ...uch as Canada. cholera, 
even if importcd. has little prospect of 
ötablishing ibelf. 
During the past decade. only 
ix 
reported cases of cholera and no deaths 
have occurred among the millions of 
North Americans who have traveled in 
cholera-infected areas of the world. It 
wuuld be a wise precaution, however. 
fi.>r physicians to take measures to ex- 
clude this disease by perfÒrming bacter- 
iological tests on tourist... with diar- 
rheal disea<;e who are returning to Can- 
ada from countrie
 where cholera has 
been" problem. 


Summary 
Seven cholcra pandemics have in- 
volved the globe since I X 17. The cur- 
rent pandemic 
tarted in Indonesia in 
1l){lO and in ever-increasing waves 
extended northwest to involve progres- 
...ivcly China. I ndia. the Middle East. 
Africa. and. a decadc latcr. Europe. 
Simultaneously. the classical Vihrio 


cho/erae was almost completely replac- 
ed by the EI Tor vibrio. 
The wide geographic dispersion of 
cholera and the magnitude of tourist 
traffic make parts of this continent 
more vulnerable to importation. It 
can bc introduced into any country 
despite immunization with presently 
available vaccines and the use of 
other measures listed under the Inter- 
national Health Regulations. Its spread 
can be checked by early detection and 
immediate action to control the disease. 
Vaccines have limited usefulness. 
Cholera is maintained in nature by a 
cyclc of transmi
sion from man to man 
through thc environment. The funda- 
mental factor in spread of the disease 
is inadequate sanitation. particularl) 
lack of adequate water supplies for 
pcr
onal u
e. 
The most effective and long-lasting 
way of making countries unreceptive 
to cholera is by improving environ- 
mental sanitation and personal hygiene 
for the inhabitants. 
, 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 27 
. 



S
t\lng 
nar
s. huilding fire:-.. and 
making lean-It'
 ar
 nl)t tasks usually 
a

ociated \\ ith nur
ing. But thi
 i
 
what northern health service (NHS) 
nur
e
 havc bc
n doing recently. 
rh
 Canadian Force, and NHS hav
 
h
en jointl) conducting a "survival in 
th
 north" -.
minar. Yukon puhlic health 
Illlr

-' learn
d th
 
urvi\'al th
or) on
 
day and put it into practice the next. 
"I t"s a very e-.sential part of a north- 
an nllr,
'...training. I hope the program 
\\ill h
 held 
\'
ry )
ar:' Yukon field 

uper\'i,nr HeI
n \\illianh said. 
\1s. Will iams said the tv. o-da) 
cour,e \\ a'- a fir
t Iilr the nur:-.es and 
i
 som
thing Illll....

 ha\e heen a
king 
for. 
N HS nur'e
 are frcy u
ntl) called 
upon to accompan) ,eriou...ly ill patient
 
on ,IiI' evacuation 11 ights. usuall) under 
adver:-.e 
onditions imposed hy an emer- 
gency ...ituation and the har
h Arcllc 
environm
nl. TherdÒre. instruction 
\\a
 nri
nt
d to\\ard air emergencic.... 
A ) 
ar ago. a nur
e \\l)rk ing in th
 
North\\c,t Territori
s died \\hen a 
plane \wnt off cour
e and cra...hed. 
M,. Williams said the accident had a 
lot to do with setting up the seminars. 
"1 think 
urvival in the north is 
som
thing that is on our mind
 a lot. 
e:-.peciall) for th
 nursö \..ho 11)." she 
...aid. 
Hata Richter. a nursc in the 't ukon\ 
mo't r
mot
 community. Old Cnl\\. 
:-.aid the cour,c had reinforced the 
thing' ,he had kml\\n a per:-.on should 
do in an em
rgency situation. 
"\r10,t of u... hav
 it at the back 01 
our mind. I h
 pos...ihilit) of having to 
:-.urvive in th
 outdoors al\\'a)
 cxi'h 
\\h
n \\e'r
 traveling." 
Th
 I I nu rsö from cach of the 
Yukon'., nur
ing 
tation
 received in
- 


\h. U'I!llen 1'- a reportCl' and photograph- 
er \\ Ilh I Ill: Ii hild,,,1'''' 'i1"I'. \\'hllchOI,e. 
) lI"on. I hi, arllck j, ad'lptcd from her 
,lItlde that dppeared III J hI' II hilc!"'/'\I' 
'i1"I'. '\olnemhcr 2
. I (r.
. 


28 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Surviving in the bush 


Ian O'Brien 


tructilJll in huildi ng :-.helt
rs. living 1)ll 
the land. search and röcu
 procedures. 
air signals. and th
 psychology of sur- 
\' ivaI. fhey huilt lean-tos. start
d lires. 
and learned 10 set 
nare, in the wood... 
outside Whitehorse. in _25 0 F. weather. 
"\\le hop
 to make the nurses aware 
that there i... a prohlem and get them to 
develop a little int
rest so they will 
read and practice survival techniqu
s 
on their ov. n:' said Warrant Officer 


Wielding an axe is 
Watson Lake nurse Liz 
Barclay. She was one of 
11 Yukon nurses who 
participated in a "sur- 
vival in the north" 
course last November. 


.......'" 

'" 


,.. 


I 


11 


! 
I 


.J 


Boh Coopa of the sun. ivai training 
school in Edmonton. 
Hc said the group \\' as much more 
enthusiastic than militar) groups he 
lNlalI) teaches "prohahly because 
they v. ant to he here:' He added that it 
is not po...sihlc to teach all there is to 
know ahout survival in two days. 
For nurses unable to attcnd the 
course. vid
otaped recordings of the 
teaehi ng 

ssions v. ill he distrihuted. 'if 


.<I/Iff' 


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; be used for warmth and as a distress 

 . j signal, are some Yukon nurses and 

 
,;;;., their Canadian Armed Forces instruc- 
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Carmacks nurse Barbara 
Ludwig starts a fire from 
spruce twigs. Fire making 
was one of the many survi- 
val techniques that northern 
federal nurses practiced. 


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Yukon field supervisor, Helen Williams, 
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MARCH 1974 THE CAf'tADIAN NURSE 29 



A volunteer nurse 


in Israel 


When war exploded in the Middle East last October, at least one Canadian 
nurse knew where she was needed. Leaving three young children at home 
was not easy for Rivqa Resnick, but she felt she had to volunteer her help. 
For over three weeks, she gave bedside care and comfort to many, while 
absorbing the somber mood of this small country. 


Carol Dworkin 


When war took IsraeIis by surprise in 
October 1l)7J. normal life came to a 
standstill. As so many civilians had to 
rcport for military duty - men to the 
front lincs and women to noncombat 
assignments - essential services had 
to be maintained by the rest of the 
population. For this reason. volunteers 
from other countries were badly need- 
ed. 
Israeli-born Rivqa Resnick of Ot- 
tawa knew this. In addition to working 
as a nurse in reI Aviv from (lJó.' to 
(lJó4. * she had lived in Israel during 
her husband's two sabhatical years. 
Thus the nun..e's husband and three 
youngsters understood her decision to 
offer whatever help she sould during 
thc Israeli crisis. 
On the night to Israel, Ms. Resnick 
met an organized health care team, con- 
sisting of operating room nurses. phy- 
siotherapists, and orthopedic surgeons 
from various parts of Canada and the 
United States. The Ottawa nurse 


I\h. Dwor"in is a graduate of the Carleton 
University School or Journalisill. She i.. 
l.'Òitorial a..sistant. Ihi' CI/IUUIÙIII Nul'.\i'. 


30 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


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RiHja Resnie" is a graduate of the Jew- 
ish (ieneral Hl)Spital in :\Ionlreal. where 
she wor"ed in the emergency dep.lrlment 
from 19hO to Il)h.
. and again after her 
return from (...rae\. She ha.. .11..0 wor"ed 
part I ime in ..everal Ottawa hospitals. 
MARCH 1974 



thought she would join this team. which 
had been requested by Israel. But thc 
nurse from the Israeli Health Ministry 
who met the volunteers at Lod Airport 
in Tel Aviv decided otherwise. 
Ms. Resnid was sent to the 600-bed 
Ichilov Hospital. the largest in Tel 
Aviv. It had been converted from a 
general hospital to a military hospital; 
the civilian patients who could not be 
discharged had been transferred to a 
local hospital. 
During the three and one-half weeks 
when she did bedside nursing and visited 
grieving relatives in the country. Ms. 
Resnick learned about the organization 
of Israel's medical services for wartime. 
the mood of the people. and the psy- 
chological effects of the war. Last 
December. in the comfort of her mo- 
dern Ottawa home. she discussed her 
hrief but intense experience. 


Treatment begins on the field 
For many 'ioldiers wounded in the 
Sinai or on the Golan Heights. under- 
ground field hospitals - built in the 
form of air raid shelters - provided 
immediate cmergency treatment. Teams 
of soldiers. who had heen tauglrt to 
administer medical care. and doctors 
cleansed and bandaged wounds. gave 
morphine when necessary. and started 
IVs. Doctors in the field also used 
hypnosis to treat shell shock. 
Followi ng these emergency proced- 
ures. the sol iders were transferred by 
air or ground to regular hospitals. At- 
tached to each of the wounded was a 
chart that related pertinent information, 
such as vital signs and the initial treat- 
ment given. 
At Ichilov Hospital. a team of doc- 
tors and nurses met the wounded as 
they arrived. In the hospital lobhy. 
\>.hich had hecome an adjunct to the 
emergency department. they rcex,lI1lÌned 
the soldiers. cleansed their wounds. 
,lIld gave further treatment and medi- 
cation. 
From the lobby. the men were ad- 
mitted to one of lïve departments. gen- 
eral surgery. orthopedics. ophthal- 
mology. neurological. and hurn. On the 
general surgical ward where Ms. 
MARCH 1974 


Resnick was working 12-hour days. 
six days a week. most of the men suf- 
fered from a combination of shrap- 
nel wounds. fractures. amputations. 
and burns. 
More burns than are usually seen 
in war victims resulted from the 
antitank missiles. explained Ms. 
Resnick. She mentioned her sur- 
prise at hcaring that young men who 
had no history of ulcers developed 
bleeding ulcers within two weeks 
because of the immense tension the) 
experienced. 
As soon as active treatment was 
no longcr necessary, the soldiers 
were transferred to convalescent 
hospitals. The aim of this was to pro- 
vide a morc cheerful setting. where 
the men could partake in other ac- 
tivities. At the same time. the transfer 
made beds available for others. 


Nursing care is more emotional 
Ms. Resnick describcd how the emo- 
tional care provided by the nurses dif- 
fered in wartime. "There was a remark- 
able difference in the staffs attitude 
toward thc patients. Under normal 
circumstances. nursing carc is objective. 
kind. and efficient. Now the care was of 
a more subjective and maternal nature. 
Th is continued in spite of the ver) 
long working hours [12 to 16 hours a 
day]. .. 
She said everyone was emotionnally 
involved with the patients. "If it wasn', 
your brother who was wounded or kil- 
led. it was your hushand:' In such a 
small country. where the civilians com- 
prise the army, everyone is in the same 
predicament. 
It was not surprising that every 
nurse found this experience emotion- 
ally draining. At one time, \1s. Resnick 
noticed that all the nurses in the group 
she wa.'> with were in tears hecause 0' 
what they were seeing. 
The staff-relative relationship \vas 
also unique. Ms. Resnick pI,inted out 
th,lt the staff had a tremendous feel ing 
of empathy toward the patients' rela- 
tives. Since all regulations governing 
visiting hours were ignored. m,lI1) 
relatives stayed with patients around- 


the-clock. Yet they did not interfere 
with nursing or medical procedures. 
Relatives' reaction to the wunded 
was different than normal. Whereas 
they are usually upset and may be 
difficult to deal with. at this time they 
were happy to see the men al ive and 
particularly grateful to the staff. ex- 
plained the nurse. There was a mix.ture 
of rei ief and grief. 
A year of experiencc in psychiatry 
that Ms. Resnick had at the Jewish 
General Hospital in Montreal helped 
her a great deal in communicating with 
her patients. By speaking with them 
<IS much as possible and listening to 
them. she fÒund she was able to allay 
their anxiety. 


Didn't know what hit them 
Each day Ms. Resnick cared tor 
three patients. who ranged in age from 
19 to 21 years. For these young men, 
the first encounter with war was es- 
peciaIl) cruel. 
.. Razicl was one of the young men 
on the Bar-l ev line [overrun b) the 
Egyptians] when the war broke out. 
Thcse men just didn't know what hit 
them. This Il)-year-old. who was about 
to be married, had onc lung pierced. 
one testicle severed. and had to have 
one leg amputated belo\>. the knee. 
Because of severe shrapncl wounds. 
one kidney was also removed. rhere 
were periods when he hurst into tears 
and \vhen he had feelings of hopeless- 
ness." 
Another of her patients was 21-year- 
old Arid. an Israeli oflïcer who \>.as 
vacationing in Europe when the war 
began. He returned home immediately 
and \vas sent to Sinai. There he sustam- 
ed multiple injuries. including second 
and third-degree burns on his shoulder 
and back. Gangrene developed in one 
leg. 
Ariel kept dozing off. and \>.hile he 
was asleep he would relive the baltle. 
hollering out orders. \Is. Resnick also 
recalled that hecause he \\ as so proud 
and hi., burns \\ere so painful. he would 
ask her if he could yell ever) time she 
changed his dressings. rhis p,ltient''i 
elderly mother never left the hospital. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 31 



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When \1
. Re.,nick arrived on the 

urgical ward. 
he found that the Kar- 
dex system \\'a
 not heing u
cd. which 
made it difficult for those who wcre 
unfamiliar with the patients' condi- 
tions. She wa
 the first one to introduce 
the Kardex. The staff \\elcomed the 
idea. "I helieve they will use it now. 
she said. 


Nurses come from other countries 
About .
o nurse volunteers went to 
hrad during the war. Ms. Resnick met 
three non-Jewish nurses - from Hol- 
l,lIld. S\\eden. and the United States 
- who were also \\orking at Ichilov 
Hospital. Another two volunteers, 
both operating room nurse
 from the 
U.S.. i nsi
ted on being sent to a field 
ho<;pital. 
32 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


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During thc time Ms. Resnick spcnt 
at the Tel Aviv hmpital, the director of 
nursing invited all the nurse voluntcers 
t'Òr tea. This gave them an opportunity 
to talk about their work. 
Ms. Resnick. who had left Israel 
in 1952 with her parents. found that 
spcaking Hebrew was a great help, 
though not essential. Most of thc sol- 
diers spcak English and many nursing 
dutiö can be done without knowing 
Hebrew, she said. "Without the lan- 
guage though, it was more difficult 
fÒr the volunteer nurses to adjust, but 
they were all strong willed." 
The nursi ng staff at the hospital 
was divided into two shifts. with ap- 
proximately 60 nurses per shift. That 
meant one nurse for 10 patients. Ms. 
Resnick said nurses in Israel are over- 


..... . 


worked in comparison with Canadian 
nurses, although nurscs' aidcs do just 
about everything an RN does, e'ven 
administering medication and changing 
I Vs. As the schools were closed then. 
nursing and medical students also work- 
ed with the nurses. 
By the time Ms. Resnick left the 
hospital, no new casualties were being 
brought in. 


Aftermath of war 
Ms. Rcsnick described the mood in 
Israel while she was there: 'There was 
an ominous aura of sadness and fatigue, 
but on the surface there was a thin 
layer of hope. The entire population's 
main thought and activities revolved 
around the bereaved and the wounded. 
"Women who would ordinarily be 
sitting in coffee houses knitting and 
sipping expresso coffee, were now 
serving food trays to the wounded, 
feeding where necessary, or washing 
dishes. High school students also vo- 
lu nteered to act as messengers around 
the hospitals or work in kitchens and 
laundry rooms. 
"Many persons volunreered to drive 
staff and relatives to and from hospi- 
tals. School children were busy writing 
soldiers "get well" notes, and enter- 
tainers offered their services in the 
form of nightly shows for the injured. 
Unfortunately, the audience could not 
respond to anything light-hcarted:' 
Another sad aspect of this war was 
also explained by Ms. Resnick. "An 
Israeli could never allow himself the 
luxury of planning ahead, since he 
did not know what the next month would 
bring. In the last six years. however. 
people had begun relaxing and were 
more optimistic about the future. This 
war destroyed every hope they had." 
Despite their shattered economy, 
deepening fear for their prisoners 
of war in Syria, and sense of person- 
al loss, the Israelis continue to hope 
for a peaceful future, 'fd? 
MARCH 1974 



The hair dryer treatment 
for decubiti 


fhe article "Oecubitis ulcer manage- 
ment - a team approach" (October 
I YD. pp. 41-4J) \\hIS valuablc and in- 
teresting:. fo motivate further discussion 
of the subject and to ,upport the benefit 
of continuity of daily care given b) the 
same persons. the followi ng classilïca- 
tion of ulcers and their treatment is 
gIven. 
Four general types of decubitus 
ulcer. progressing in severitv. arc: 
superficial, suhCUlancous. anoxic, and 
prC
lIl\
rCI/(J/lS . 
A superficial ulcer is a break in the 
sk in that occurs if moisture is neglected 
or if adjacent skin surfaces arc not 
kept separated. These ulcers arc easily 
healed. often in less than a week. by 
changing the individual's position fre- 
quently and having him lie prone if 
possible. The ulcer is cleansed with 
h)drogen peroxide and exposed to 
rapidly cm:ulating. warm air. A hair 
dryer is placed on an uverbed table with 
the air stream directed at the ulcer lix 
20 minutes daily. A mild ointment or 
powder is applied. and a light dressing 
fastened with nonallergic tape. 
If a superficial ulcer is not treated 
and becomes infected. it soon goes 
decpa into the skin. Suhcutaneou' 
ulcer., ma) be caused by pressure for as 
short a time as 2 to 3 hours in a sick. 
immobile individual. such as a patient 
\\ it h a severe CV A or a fract u red hip. 
Suhcutaneous ulcers usu.llly occur in 
MARCH 1974 


The author, who has worked in an extended care hospital for the past 10 
years, describes the treatment of decubitus ulcers of varying severity. 


Dorothy H. Denholm 


the coccygeal area or over bony pro- 
tuberances. such as the hip or anklc. 
fhe treatment is irrigation- 
prefer a bulb syringe with which a 
gentle Ii.H'Cl
 ma) he exercised. using 
Eusor' I/.
 strength solution: prone. 
or at least semi prone position. while 
under the hair dryer; gentle packing 
in the open area. usuall) Sofra-Tulle 
or iodoform dressing; and absorption of 
a nutrient. 
An ulcer of this type docs not take 
more than a week or two to be free of 
infection. but healing i!. slow unless a 
local appl ieation of a nutrient is intro- 
duced with the packing. M) favorite 
kinds arc vitamin A and 0 ointment. 
Gel fuam flakes. granulated sugar crys- 
tals. or cod-liver oil packing. In patients 
with dark complexions. cod-liver oil is 
immediately beneficial. whilc in Cau- 
casians the vitamin ointment or GcI- 
foam is absorbed more quickly. 
I often prevail upon our medical 
stall to order ascorbic acid 100 mgs. 
three times daily IÒr one week. as this 
is a reducing agent and may be neces- 
sary for healing. Elderly and sick pa- 
tients arc often deficient in ascorbic 
acid. General nutrition - calories. 
protein' - arc important. In man) 


Eu'ol 'olUlion j, madc wilh 'l.dium 
h
 pochloritc: full-'Ircnglh Sl.lulion IS 
II. I::!:' percent a\ ailahlc chlol inc. 


long-term patients. metabolism is slower 
than normal. thus epithcl ialization takes 
place fa!.ter if aided b) these nutrients. 
Subcutaneous uleers gradually close in 
from the edges to the center. finally 
being covered \\ ith new epithelium. 


Anoxic ulcers 
Ulcers form soon after spinal cord 
injuries. caused by damage done during 
()r immediately after the injur). The) 
occur on any weight-bearing protuher- 
ence. or occasionally on a metatarsal 
joint. The response b) the s)'stem is 
called reactive hyperemia: a flare. or 
vascular dilatation. is the response to 
pressure .J.nd is indicative of marked 
slowing of the circulation and preexist- 
ing vasoconstriction. 
Pressure causes h) pt.xi.1 (interference 
in the use of oX)gen in the tissues). 
which results in anoxia - litera II). no 
oxygen in the ti!.sues. Unless immediate 
allention is given to relieving the are,1 
of \\eight. necrosis sets in belo\\ the 
skin surface and spreads radially. un- 
dennining the surrounding sl..in. A dry. 


:\h. Iknhl,lrn i, a gradu,lte 01 \\ in nipeg 
Gene....1 H,"pit,tI ,eho,.1 of nur,mg. "he 
h,., worlo.ed at \1. \ it.tl ,.\tended Ire,lt- 
ment Ho'pital in \\ innip'"!,!. \t,mih)h,1. 
for the p,.,t I II ) e,lrs. I he ,ILII h"r e\pre'- 
'e, her than'" to Dr. \1 '\,eWIll,tn. neul'l'- 
I"g"\' tor hi' ,.-.slSt,IIlCe wilh th
' ,trtielc 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 33 
. 



blac" 
cab 
nsue
. frequ
ntly with in- 
kction untkr it: if th
 infection is not 
c h
ck
d. it ma) 
nt
r th
 t
ndons. and 

\'
n the bones. 
I n mo
t cas
s of p
r
ons \\ ith 
pinal 
cord injur). 
o much att
ntion is giv
n 
to oth
r a
p
cts of tr
atm
nt that it i
 
not r
alized that perman
nt damag
 
i
 occurring. which may b
 pr
v
nt
d 
b) 
a
ing th
 \\ eight from any w
ight- 
b
aring ar
a. rh
 id
al tr
atm
nt i
 
pr
v
ntion: 
om
 advise hyp
rbaric 
OX) g
n. 
Anoxic ulc
rs can be tr
at
d with 
compre

c
 of half-str
ngth Eusol 

olution. k
pt on for l)J1
 hour. thr
e 
times dail) and a dressing with an oint- 
ment containing enLyme
 - Ela
e or 
Varidasc - gen
rously appli
d be- 
t\\ 

n compress tr
atm
nts. The com- 
pr
sses caus
 the scab to 
hrink from 
the 
dge
. As soon as it is po
sibk to 
lift even a corner of th
 
eab. the depth 
of th
 ulcer can be irrigat
d and packed. 
or Cicatrin powder blown under it. The 

cab graduall) dries and can be dipped 
back 
ach day. thu
 p
rforming a grad- 
ual debridement. At thi
 point. the use 
of the hair dryer is beneficial as a dr)- 
ing ag
nt and to 
timulat
 circulation. 
Generous applications of nutritive 
substances should now be applied: 
granulated sugar acts as a gentle abra- 
sive and. used with Gelfoam Ilake
. 
bring
 noticeable results. rhe
e should 
be used for a period of about a week. 
then vitamin A and D ointm
nt in- 
creas
s granulation. 
rh is tr
atment is long and not al- 
way
 
ucces
ful. though man) ulcers 
h
al completely. The g
neral condi- 
tion of th
s
 patients frequentl) pro- 
hibit" surgical treatment. esp
cially if 
the vitality of d.ny propo
ed donor ar
a 
is lading. due to the individual's age 
or disturbance of hi
 c
ntral nervous 
s) stem. 


pregangrenous ulcers 
Threat of gangrene is involved in 
peripheral vascular disease, with the 
occurrence of a th icken
d dark 
cab. 
u
ually on a heel. metatar
al joint. or 
34 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


even toes. Diabetic patients arc prone 
to this t)pe of ulcer. and many individ- 
ual, do not seck medical ad\ ice until 
the ulcer i, advanced to the stage of 
necrotic tis
ue under the scab. 
In treatment. the prone position i
 a 
mu
t! There is no substitute for this 
position. which allows free circulation 
to the heels. A Stryker frame may be 
necessary but these persons must turn. 
One member of our medical staff expli- 
citly ordered prone lying except while 
up in a chair. so the pati
nt sat up in a 
chair for meals and vi
itors and lay 
prone the rest of the time. A huge ulcer 
on the patient's heel complete!) healed. 
I n addition to the prone po
ition. 
a Eusol soak h.:lp
 th
 ulcer. I hold 
the heel in a small amount of half- 

trength Eusol solution for about 10 
minutes. th
n dress the ulcer with 
Erase ointment and Sofra- Tull
. Again. 
loosen an edge of the scab as soon a
 
pos
ible. Paint the scab, and as far 
undcr it as po-.-.iblc. with tincture of 
b
nzoin compound: this s,)on gives 
the necrosis d "honeycomb" appearance 
and the Cicatrin powder can penetrate 
deeper. The same sequence of debri- 
dement. hai r dryer treatment. and 
nourishm
nt is used as described above 
tÒr the anoxic ulcer. 
These arc the various typ
s of ulcers. 
or bed s,)res. that plagu
 ever) h()
pital. 


Purchased aids 
Several aids. \\hich may be pur- 
cha
ed. arc helpful in caring for p
r- 
sons with decubitus ulcas. 
An air mattr
ss with electric pump 
allows pressure to alternate on weight- 
b
aring area
. A fine. foam material. 
adh
sive on one 
ide. ma) be placed in 
a hur
e
hoc 
hap
 around a pressur
 
area to prevent sk in breakdown. Mois- 
ture cannot penetrate this and it can be 
left on. even during a bath. It adheres 
bett
r if th
 area i
 first painted with 
tinctur
 of benzoin compound. Such 
material 
hould be removed at lea
t 
once a week and left off for a day or 
two. as it inhibits washing and rubbing 
of the area. 


A portable hair dryer is an e
sential 
piec
 of equipm
nt. 
Boots of a synthetic material resem- 
bling sheepskin are made into a heel 
covering. strapp
d o\
r the inst
p. 
The
e offer good protection fÒr heels. 
but patients often complain that the 
boot
 arc too warm. Sheepskin placed 
ov
r the drawsh
et. large enough for a 
pati
nt'
 torso. is an excellent preventivc 
measure. rhe natural oil in th
 
heep- 

kin is of value. Sheepskin is apen
ive. 
how
ver. and a v. ashablc synthetic 
material is somclimes sub
[ituted. 


Continuity of care 
Continuit) of care - ,me nurse 
doing the treating of bed 
or
s day 
after da) - is the most important and 
most b
netlcial suggestion I can oller. 
Only thi
 nur

 can recognize v. hen it 
is prudent to mov
 on to a more ad- 
vanced treatm
11l and can quickly assess 
the type of ulcer. Although ulcer treat- 
ment is discouraging at times. it is v
r) 
r
warding to the nurs
 on the whole. 
rh
 main thing is lIl'\'cr to give up! 


Bibliography 
:\Iunro. Donald. "Ikd Sores." In ,\lot/em 
,vel/rotoR.\'. edited hy 
il1l
on I od,e. 
pp. ó07-12. Bo
ton. I iuk. Bro\\n and 
Com pan). 1')hlJ. g 


MARCH 1974 



in a capsule 


"Up Canada" 
rh!: Hous!: of Commons debates. as re- 
cord!:d in Hallsard, can scarcely com- 
p!:t!: \\ ith a Bob Hopc script. There ar!: 
!:x!:!:ption
. ho\\ever. as this excerpt 
from HallSanl reveals. (The speaker is 
F. Ob!:rlc. MP fur Prince George- 
Peace River.): 
 
"Mr. Speaker. on January X. 1974, 
the night before last, the government- 

ubsidized national television network 
aired a program called 'Up Canada: a 
portion of v\hich was dedicated to a 
soap opera called, 'One Honorable 
M!:mher: It may be coincidental that 
this program was followed immediately 
by a program called. 'Some Honorable 
Members: L and I am sure most hon. 
members. appr!:ciate the media's re- 
cognition of our presence here in Ot- 
tawa, but we must object to the use of 
the national network i'n creati ng a false 
impression about our activities here. 
"The scene in the opera showed one 
hon. memb!:r from the we
t cua
t. whose 
name and address were almo
t identical 
with those of one of m) collcagues, 
in bed with another member's secre- 
tal'). rhe male actor wa
 clad only in a 
hlanket with which he protected his 
vitals. and the female wa" devoid of 
any clothing apart from false !:yelashe
 
and fingernails. 
"An 
argument en
ued in bed over 
the arrival of the member's wife from 
the \\est coast. The girl decided to 'spl it 
the sheets' and she called a taxi which 
was to arrivc in five minutes. As it 
happened. the taxi was on the 
pot al- 
most immediately. 
"I would expect, \1r. Speaker. that 
th!: mini
ter re
ponsible fix financing 
the corporation would make every ef- 
fort to 
top the continuation of this 
exhilarating cultural experience so that 
we do not create the impres
ion in 
Canada that any member or his secre- 
tary can call a taxi in Ottawa and ex- 
pect to have it arrive in less than half an 
hour. 
SOllie 11011. ^1emhers: Hear. he<lr! 


Cancer of e!>ophagus 
1'\\0 main ri,k ractor
 predominate in 
the cau
e of cancer of the csophagus. 
"moking and high alcohol consumpllon. 
In an article in la
t December's i

ue of 
thL' JOl/mal (If tile 4111cricall 'I,,/edic al 
.1.\\ociatÙ"" 1\\11 doctor
. r. 
)nder 
and" Mahuchi. r!:port tlMt thL' n
k tlf 
MARCH 1974 


devcloping cancer of th!: esophagus i
 
signifïcantl) higher among 
moker
. 
wh!:th!:r cigarett!:s. cigars. or pipes are 
involvL'd. Serveral studie
 have sho\\ n 
that heav) alcohol consumption in- 
cr!:ases the risk of smokers to develop 
!:
llphag!:al canc!:... 
In their artiele. Drs. Wynder and 
\1ahuchi say that long-term nutrition- 
al defïciency. particular!) chronic 
dclïciencies of iron or any of th!: vita- 
min B complex. can lead to esophageal 
cancer without th!: added intluenc!: 
of either tobacco or alcohol. 
The rate of esophageal canc!:r is 
higher in certain countrið than in 
others. according to the i\JD
. France. 
fÒr example. has a high rat!:. paral- 
lekd by a high level of alcohol con- 

umption; India and Ceylon also have 
high ratö. probably a
 a re
ult of the 
"chewing of hetel and the general nutri- 
tional deficiencies endemic in Asia:' 


Traditionallv. there is Ie

 drinking 
.tmong Jewish- people than non-Jc\\s
 
perhaps not surpri
ingly. Jewish peo- 
pic have a lower rate of esophageal 
cancer. Seventh Dav Adventi
ts. who 
arc forbidden to 
nl(;ke and drink. have 
accordingh lower incidence rates of 
cancer of the csophagu
. 
The nonfat, fat cookbook 
A cookbook published by the American 
Heart Association contains more than 
SOO r!:cipe
. cho
!:n h\ the a

ociation'
 
nutritionists. which åre aimed at de- 
creasing excess fat intake and replacing 
saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats. 
The 412-page hardbound book. 
which give
 traditional dishes from all 
regions of the United States, is publish- 
ed by David McKay Company Inc. 
Thi
 information appeared in th!: 
September 1973 issuL' of the Americall 
Jour/wi or Nunillg 
 


,- 


..... 
'- 


-,,-' 


.., 


- 
 ...... 
\ 
. 

 . -
 Ð 
..,
A .
 ,

. 


. .
. 


( 


"Whose idea was it to re-surface the slide?" 


THE CA
DIAN NURSE 35 



dates 


March 18- June 28,1974 
Four-month program in neonatal inten- 
sive care nursing, to be repeated in 
October 1974, will be conducted by 
the nursing education department, 
The Hospital for Sick Children. In- 
cluded will be a study of the high risk 
mother and implications for the baby's 
health; detailed study and practice 
with the premature and sick newborn. 
Fee: $200. Maximum enrolment of 10 
for each program. For further infor- 
mation and application forms, write to: 
Ms. Hilda Rolstin, Acting Director, 
Nursing Education, The Hospital for 
Sick Children, 555 University Ave., 
Toronto, Ont. M5G 1X8. 


April 17-19, 1974 
Symposium entitled "Today's Psychia- 
tric Unit in the General Hospital," 
sponsored by the department of psy- 
chiatry, Focthills Hospital, and faculty 
of medicine, U. of Calgary. Guest 
speaker: Dr. Peter Sainsbury, Director 
of Clinical Psychiatry Research Unit, 
Medical Research Council of Britain. 
For further information, write to: 
Psychiatry 74, Foothills Hospital, Cal- 
gary, Alberta. 


April 18-19, 1974 
Operating Room Nurses of Greater 
Toronto. educational seminar, Royal 
York Hotel, Toronto, Ontario. Enquiries 
may be directed to: Ms. J.G. Mansell. 
Operating Room, The Hospital for Sick 
Children, Toronto, Ont. M5G 1 X8. 


April 20, 1974 
One-day workshop on "Nursing and the 
Law," Scarborough Regional Campus 
of Centennial College of Applied Arts 
and Technology. Fee: $5.00. Speaker: 
Mr. L.E. Rosovsky, barrister and solici- 
tor. For further information, write to: 
R. Hopper, Scarborough Regional 
Campus (Nursing), 651 Warden Ave- 
nue, Scarborough, Ontario. 


April 25-28, 1974 
National Student Nurses' Association, 
22nd national convention, Salt Lake 
City, Utah. For further information, 
36 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


write to: National Student Nurses' 
Association, Inc., 10 Columbus Circle, 
New York, N.Y. 10019, U.S.A. 


April 29-May 10,1974 
Calgary General Hospital. departments 
of physical medicine and rehabilita- 
tion, nursing service and nursing 
education, offer a course in "Organiza- 
tion and Techniques of Rehabilitation 
Medicine" for directors of nursing. 
head nurses, general duty nurses, ad- 
ministrators, and board members. This 
course satisfies the prerequisites for 
the setting up of physiotherapy and 
rehabilitation services in small rural 
hospitals as outlined in Alberta Hos- 
pital Services Commission Bulletin 
no. 4, October 30, 1972. For further 
information, write to: Ms. E.A. Halver- 
son, Course Coordinator, Calgary 
General Hospital, 841 Centre Ave.. E., 
Calgary, Alberta. T2E OA1. 


May 1, 1974 
Workshop on tuberculosis and respi- 
ratory disease, Nurses' Residence, 
The Moncton Hospital, Moncton. N.B. 
Sponsored by the New Brunswick 
Tuberculosis & Respiratory Disease 
Association, in cooperation with the 
Moncton Hospital. Workshop to be 
conducted In Engl ish. No registration 
fee. For further information, contact: 
A.H. Gardner, Executive Director, 
NBTRDA, P.O. Box 1345, Fredericton, 
N.S., E3B 1N6. 


May 2-4, 1974 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
Ontario, annual meeting, Royal York 
Hotel, Toronto, Ontario. 


May 7-10. 1974 
Alberta Association of Registered 
Nurses. annual convention, Chateau 
Lacombe, Edmonton, Alberta. Conven- 
tion theme: "Continuing Education." 


May 8-10,1974 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
British Columbia, 62nd annual meeting, 
Bayshore Inn, Vancouver, S.C. 


May 19-22,1974 
Conference on "Man and His Environ- 
ment," Banff, Alberta. Topics to be 
discussed include limits to growth, 
natural resources, population. produc- 
tion and pollution. and man in the tech- 
nological world. More information is 
available from Dr. M.F. Mohtadi. Con- 
ference Chairman, Chemical Engineer- 
ing Dept.. University of Calgary, Cal- 
gary, Alberta. 


May 22-24, 1974 
Registered Nurses' Association of Nova 
Scotia, annual meeting. Amherst, Nova 
Scotia. 


May 26-28, 1974 
Manitoba Association of Registered 
Nurses. annual meeting, Winnipeg, 
Manitoba. 


May 28-30, 1974 
New Brunswick Association of Regis- 
tered Nurses, annual meeting, Bathurst 
Trade School, Bathurst, N.B. 


June 5-7. 1974 
Canadian Hospital Association. an- 
nual meeting. Vancouver Hotel. Van- 
couver, B.C. 


June 10-12. 1974 
Canadian Tuberculosis and Respira- 
tory Disease Association, 74th annual 
meeting: Canadian Thoracic Society. 
16th annual meeting; and 11th annual 
nurses' institute, Chateau Laurier 
Hotel, Ottawa. Ontario. For further in- 
formation, write to: Mr. H.E. Drouin. 
Executive Secretary, CTRDA. 345 
O'Connor Sf.. Ottawa, Ont. K2P 1 V9. 


June 16-21, 1974 
Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation annual 
meeting and conven- 
tion, to be held in the 
Manitoba Centennial 
Centre Concert Hall, 
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 


ð 

 


MARCH 1974 




 

 
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research abstracts 


Tht: 1'0110\\ ing art: ab
tracts of studks 

dt:cted fron; thc Canadian Nur
es' 
A

ociation Rt:pository Collection 01 

ursing Studie
. Ab...traet manuscript... 
are prepan:d b) tht: authors. 


Finch, Elizabeth. A stlle/y (
(tI/(' cOllcems 
o(a/l/hlliatory pmiellts ill the hospital 
C'/l/C'rgellcy roo/l/ a/l(l thC' profl'.niOlwl 
rC'spo/l.\(' to tluHe COllcenlS. Mont- 
rt:al. Qut:hec. I lJ7J. SlUt!) f M .Sc. 
(Appl.)) McGill U. 


fhi
 "'lUd). u
ing qualitati\t: re
t:arch 
mt:thot!
. identilït:d and cla

ilït:d tht: 
ht:alth conct:rn
 of ambulator) patit:nb 
\\ ho IN: tht: ho
pital t:mt:rgenc) room 
a
 a primal') carl' ct:ntt:r. and tht: rt:...- 
pOlht: stratt:giö of prok...
ionab inh:r- 
acting \\ ith Iht:m. 
D,
ta \\ I:I'l' colkeled b\ oh
t:r\ ing 
palit:nt-nur...t:. patit:nt-doétor intt:l:-:' 
aClions. and h\ tht: use of unslructurt:d 
inkn ic\\.... Thl' 
amrk consislt:d of 
-'0 palit:nb. Il) mak
 and II fcmak
. 
In th i
 ...t ulh. conct:rn rt:fcr
 to an\ 
hdla\ ior nhiblted h) the patient during 
hi
 ...Ia\ in tht: t:mt:rgt:ne\ room Ihat 
\\ ould ï"ndicalt: an intt:
t:
ll;r unl'asint:

 
rdalt:d II) hi... 
Iall' of ht:alth or Iht: con- 
dilion
 
urrounding it. Profc...
ional 
re"'ponst: i... dl'lï nt:d a
 all\ statl'IlIt:nl or 
action on thl' pari of " ní.lr
l' or doctor 
rdatl'd to Iht: t:xpn:...sion or rl'...olution 
of patit:nt
' conct:rns. 
Patit:nb t:xprö
ed a total 01 I.n 
concern... 
O to nurse
 and doclor
. 
till' rt:IlIaindt:r 10 tht: rt:
t:archt:r. Con- 
ct:rn
 of 
) IlIp\l1Il1al ic di
coml'ort werl' 
t:xprt:
"'l'd mO...1 frt:quenll) (5 :-'.Ó4 per 
ct:nt) and profö
ionab concentralt:d 
Iht:ir dli.Jrh on diciting and rc
olving 
tht:
t: concerns (5:-' tlf the 70L 
 
Approximatd) 
O pt:rct:nt 01 con- 
cI:I'n
 \\ t:re rdatt:d to t:mngt:llC\ hl'alth 

t:n'jce and ...oeial and eco
omJc ...itua- 
tion. and Ihe maioril\ of tht:...e wI:I'e 
diÒIt:d h\ the re
èarclíer. 
Anal) ':i... of prorc

ional re
ponse... 

ho\\ed a 10lal of 2
S rt:
pon
e... madt: 
10 70 concern
. \\ith a mt:an l)f 3.97 
röpon
e
 pt:r conct:rn. 
Mort: rt:"'pon
t:
 \\ere madt: 10 facil- 
itate t:xpre

ion of concern ( I -' X I than 
wcre madt: 10 lacililatt: rt:
olulion of 
conct:rn (I 19 L Ft:\\ rt:
pon
t:
 \\ erc 
inhihilon ,21 ). Doctor
 madt: mort: than 
1\\ ice th
 Illlmht:r of re
pon
t:
 than 
nur"'e
 (19
 10 S)I. Rt:...ponding ...tra- 
38 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


legit:
 of nur
t:s maini\ wert: to facilitatt: 
n
prt:s
ion ofconcern
 Inquiring \\ a
 the 
...trategy mo
t frequt:ntly u
ed by both 
rt:
pondenb. 
Bt:C<IU
t: of ib ready aeces
ihility 10 
the cOIllmullit\. Ihe emt:rgt:llCV room 
slall ha
 a uniqut: opportul;it\ ío ...1lJ(h 
community ht:alth needs and to exper- 
iment with health care practice... de- 
signt:d to meet thme need
. Finding... 
fr
)(ll thi
 
Iudy providt: a ba
is I
r 
experimenlation of this nature. 


Funke, Jeanette and Irby, Margaret 
Imle. A stlldy (
( predictil'e criteria 
ill re/atioll to /Ilothaillg hC'hll\'ior. 
Dt:nver. Colo.. I Y7 3. Study (M.s. 
(Nurs.)) U. of Colorado. 


Predictive criteria for as
essing pott:n- 
tial mother-child rt:lations have been 
"udied but have not ht:en sufficiently 
researched to be I'd iable for all pOpl
- 
lations. ThercfÒre. the two-fold purpo
e 
of th is study was: I. to asses
 the rda- 
tionship bet\..een the answer
 from the 
predictive questionnaire and the sub- 
sequent per Il)fm anct: of mothering 
beha\ ior. and 2. to develop a useful. 
rdiablc tool that can he used succes
- 
full y to predict inadequate motht:rs. 
The target population was thc pre- 
natal cI inic patients at a county general 
hospital in a large metropolitan area. 
The re
earch de
ign was a nonexperi- 
mental retrospective study of one group. 
The research consisted of a content 
analysis of the prenatal predictive ques- 
tionnaire and interview. which was rated 
and scored as prcdictive of futurt: 
mOlher-child rdationships. rhese pre- 
dictive scores were then compared with 
a hehavioral <Isse
sment tool that a
sess- 
ed the perfÒrmance of mothering be- 
havior four to six weeb postpartum. 
The results of this study indicate that 
the following questions 
Ire prt:dictive 
of maladaptive mothering behaviors: 
I. When you were a child: (a) How did 
your parents discipline you'! (bl Did 
you think the wa) your parenb disci- 
plined you was the best way'! 2. When 

omcthing you try to dll docsn't work 
out the \Va) you want it to. what do you 
do'! 3. When you fi rst kit movemcnt. 
how did it make you feeL' 4. HO\\ do 
you plan 10 discipline your bahy'! 
SlUdy re
ults of the hehavioral assess- 
ment tool indicated a higher frequency 


of maladaplive mothering behavior in 
the following behavioral catt:gorie
. 
feeding. moving and holding. verbal 
and nonverhal communication. and 
touching. 
The researchers hope that. with 
further development of the
e toob, 
inadequate mothering behavior can be 

uccessfully predicted and evalualed. 
Having accomplished this. the ba
ic 
foundation will be laid for providing 
nursing intervcntion for tho...e mother... 
predicted to have poor mother-child 
rclation
. 


Christensen, Patricia Anne. ]JIC' lu}\tilC' 
hchCII'ior o( 1I prillligrCII'ic/a. Pilh- 
burgh. Pa. rhe
is (M.N.) U. of Pilt
- 
burgh. 


Thi
 stud\ \\ as undcrtaken tll idelllif\, 
the fccling
 about 
elfa
 reflected in th
' 
ho
tile behavior of a sdected prim i- 
gra\ ida. Tht: hehavior \\ a
 exam ined 
for indication of a reaction to preg- 
nancy. evidence of variation in in- 
tensity. and e\ idenct: of change. 
A hostile primigravida \\as cho
t:n 
fur the study. the ba
i
 of the 
ekcti(1n 
being "inapf1ropriate attire." I he 
tud) 
extended uver two monlh
. Initial 
contact \\-jth thc subject occurred during 
her Ihirty-Iïr...t \"eek of pregnanc). 
fhc clinical setting for the 
tudv \\as 
the anlepartal clini2 of a large." uni- 
\ersily-aITiliated. \\omen's ho
pital 
in a mid-ea
tern city in the l 'nited 
States. 
During data collectil'1l. the \\- riteI' 
functioned a
 a participant-oh
ef\er. 
gathering data in free a
sociation inter- 
view
 that \..ere terminatt:d h) the suh- 
ject. Following each interview. the 
uata were recorded. interpreted. and 
analyzed. The focu
 of the ...tudy emerg- 
ed on completion of data collection. 
The data were then reinterprt:led, 
Pregnancy was a time tl)f thl
 
primigravida 10 experience fccling
 
of douht and hate ahout her
clf a
 a 
person. a woman. and a mother-to-he. 
ScI f-hate was expre

ed in pn
iected 
hO
lility and 
clf-depreciation. 
The hostiJc hehavior of this primi- 
gravida could not he identified a
 a 
specific reaction to pregnancy. Ho\\-- 
evcr. it was identified as a reaction to 
one component of pregnancy. that 01 
MARCH 1974 



chiluhearing. rhis primigra\ iua had 
fantasies that her \\orthless self would 
he retlecteu in the child she bore. The 
hostilJt
 expressed as a reaction to the 
rear of chiluhirth uecreased as clarifi- 
cation of the fear occurreu. 
The intensit} of this primigraviua"s 
hostilit) \ aried As ,hpects of herself 
\\ ere unveiled. she experienced acute. 
o\emhelming hostility that \..as project- 
eu out\\aru. A less intense hostilit\ \\as 
apparent fÒlhm ing the episoués of 
acute hostilit\. While the intensit\ of 
her hostilit) -\\as uecrea'iing. this' pri- 
migra\ iua cIarilÏeu her feelings of self- 
dOllbt. - 
This primigrm ida's hostile heha\ lor 
anu 'ielf-douht changed 0\ er time. rhe 
episodes of acute hostilit) decreaseu 
and the components of her ...elf-hate 
changed. rhere \\ as mo\ ement from 
e"pr
ssing self-hate as a \\(unan. a 
person. and a mother-to-be to express- 
ing an increaseu self-esteem for herself 
as a \\ oman and nl\1ther-to-be. 
Concomitanth. there \\ as a mo\ e- 
ment from rejeéting her identitv a'i a 
\\oman tlmard ide
l\it\ ing herself as 
a \\oman. anu e'\pres...íng -herself as a 
\\ oman. Simultaneoush. there \\ as a 
decrease in expression
 of self-uouhl. 
rhe change in her feelings ahout her- 
...elf ...lTm:d to hl" related to Ihe \erhal- 
i/ation of her hostilit). \\hieh appear- 
ed to ...en e as a catharsis anu as a 
means of gaining perspeclive about \\ hl) 
she. as a \\(unan. \\as anu \\ ho ...he, a... 
a \\ llln.ln. \\ i...hed tl) hecome. 
Feelings of shame \\ere experienced 
concom itantlv \\ ith feel ings of uoubt 
and hate. Tlie feeling... o( shame and 
...elf-hate ma\ ha\ e - motivated this 
prim igl a\ ida io become someone other 
than \\ ho ...he percei\ed herself to bc. 


Robertson, Carolin{'. A slIldv COIICl'rll- 
illg chile/rell with 1I termflllll illllen 
1I11e/ their rdlltiollship to others \\'!Úle 
ill hmpital. Montreal. Que.. IYT.!.. 
rhesis (\1.sc. (App\.)) McGilll '. 


I his descriptive 'itud). carried out in a 
pediatric setting. examined the hehav- 
ior... of 12 children \\ ith a terminal ill- 
ness. and those of thc mothers. nurses. 
...tudent nurses. and others \\ ith \\ hom 
thc\ inter.lcted. 
ï-I1C pu rpo...e 01 thl' stuU) \.. as to 
idcntit\ the nature of these children's 
re!atio
lships \\ ilh others in the hospital 
situation. 
rhe data consisleu of the interaction 
sequcnccs \\hcre the child or adult ini- 
tiatcd the con"crsation and had a rcsult- 
ing rcsponse. f he content of the inter- 
.Iclion and the outcomc of each se- 
qucnce \\ere alsl) considered. 
It \\ a.. found th,1t the children began 
the interaction \..ith thc adults ab
)ut 
MARCH 1974 


half as frequcnt!) as the .Idul", heg,1Il 
it \\ ith them. The most frequent eI iciting 
behavior'i of thc chiluren \..ere dcmanu- 
ing (42 percent) and protesting (24 
percent). \\ hile the adults commcnceu 
interaction hy inquiring (n percent) 
and informing (2X percent). 
When children began the interaction. 
the common pattern \\ as a dem and h) 
the child. \\ith a cooperating response 
hy the adult. This accomplished thc 
child's ohjective. The most frequent 
pattern fÒr adults began b) inquiring 
and the rest of the sequence developed 
in the same \\ a\. 
The child-niother relationship \"'IS 
typically a cooperating-cherishing 
dyad. Children gained their objectives 
\\ ith their mother'i in X4 percent of the 
sequences. 
rhe child-nurse rel,nillllShip \\as 
characteri/cd by the nurse using "in- 
forming"" some\\hat more with the chil- 
dren than the rest of the group. She 
was also the most frequcnt confidante 
of the child on the topic of loss of his 
mother. The children talked about loss 
as much as they did about pia). 
rhere \\ere t\\O distinctive charac- 
teristics of the child student nurse rela- 


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tionship. I he ...tuuent u...cu "inquiring"" 
a... eliciting beha\ ior more Ihan amone 
eI...e. She ,11"'l) cooperated \\ ith the éhild 
almost as Illueh as uiu the mother. 
rhe chilu's relationship \\ ith others 
appe,lred least cIosc of all. Although 
others uscd Ihe "enjo) ing" re...pon...e 
mosl \\ ith the child. he uid not do so 
\\ ith them. The pattern of helM\ ior that 
leu to t he outcome of \\ Ilhdr,1\\ al. al- 
though infrcquent. occured mosl oftcn 
\\ ith others. 
There is a hint of regression in the 
frequent use of uemanding and protest- 
ing b) these children. Hm\e"er. it can- 
not be stated that the group under stud} 
shO\\ cd a demonstrahle difference to 
other groups of hospitali/cd children. 
TherdÒre. it is sugge'ited thai further 
stud} of such a group he done. through 
observation of the heha.. iors \\ hile at 
hospil,tl and at home. to disemer if the 
frequenq of demanding and protesting 
differs in the t\\O situations. 


Olofinboba, lola. COllcems of e/illhctÙ 
childrCI/ alld pan'lIls (d' e/iahetic 
childrcl/. :\1ontre,11. Que.. IY7J. 
The
is (M.Sc. (App/.)) ;\kGilll 


This stud
 employed qualitati"e re- 
search Illethods 10 in"estigall' the con- 
cerns that diahctic children and parents 
of diahetic children hm e in rdation to 
diabetes mellitus. The aim \"as to gener- 
ate "nO\\ ledge that might shed "ddition- 
allighton t';e needso!'\oungdiabeties. 
rile sample consisted of ì 6 uiabetic 
ehildrcn \\ho \\ere intervie\\ed and 16 
parents \\ ho \\ere observed \\ ith their 
children during their visit \\ ith the 
doctor. The d..lta consisted of verbal 
cxpre....,ions. and these \\ ere ,lIlal}led 
according to their contents and lilcu... 
of concern. 
Findings \"ere as 1'0110\\ s. 
I. All children indicated that ha.. ing 
diabetcs did not hother them. The
 
focused on the "normal"' aspeci of thei'r 
life situ,ttil)n more than Iheir uisease 
process. The conclusion \\ a... th,1\ the
 
found diabete... relative!) unprohlem- 
atic. 
=:!. Children g""e various re.lsOlh li)r 
not feeling hoìhered h) Iheir disea...e. 
Among these \\cre. the) did not look 
differcnt: thl') \\ere as .Ictive as their 
fricnd...: Ihe) de.. i...cd mC,IIl'" of coping 
\\ ith their prohlems. 
J. All p,lrent... \\ erc concerned ahout 
management of the diabetic rl'gimc. 
The} -Iendeu to emphasi/e the di';,ease 
proce...... 0\ cr thl" child's "nolll1al"' I ill: 
situ.ltlon. 
4 \i1ost parenh ...tre...sed the degree 
of cooper,ttion recei\ cd from Iheir 
children in 10110\\ ing the prescrihed 
regime. :\0 relationship \"as indic.tted 
hel\\een numher of prohlems and the 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 39 



research abstracts 


child's coopcration or lack of coopcr- 
ation. 
Two hypotheses were generated: 
. I\.now led ge dcrived from direct exper- 
ience with diahetcs and its inherent 
problems and solutions results in a 
focus of concern on thc "normal" life 
"ituation and a response characterized 
by l1exihility regarding the therapcutic 
regime (i.e.. diabetic children). 
. Knowledge derived from inuireet ex- 
perience with diabetes results in a focus 
of concern on the disease process and a 
rcsponse char.lcterized hy inl1exibility 
regarding the therapeutic regimc (i.e.. 
rarents). 
ImplinllÙms arc. I. There is a need 
to encourage thc diahetic child to take 
a more active role in his carc. 2. Parents 
net:d help with developing criteria for 
assessing cooperation and crises so that 
minor departures from the diabetic 
regime are not perceived as critical. 
3. There is a need to explore ways of 
helping children to share their "testing- 
out"" experiences with their parents and 
health personnel. This exchange of in- 
formation would lead to a greater tlex- 
ihility on tlH.' part of parents and health 
professionals. 


DeMarsh, Kathleen G.; Anderson, A.I.; 
Poole, Pamela E. A stltdy (
( the e..f
 
fi'clS (
( a specUìc illSen'ice edltc(/- 
timl program .f(JI' registered Illirses 
Oil patiellf we(((/re and hospilllI 
operatioll. \Vinnipeg. Man. Research 
Project (National Health Grant No. 
607 -21-1 ), Health Sciences Centre. 


This project was concerned with the 
cfkcts of a specific inservice education 
progl am for registered nurses on pa- 
tient welfarc and hospital operation. 
1'\\0 surgical wards of comparahle size 
on the same 11001' of a large teaching 
hospital were involved. one as the 
experimental and the other as the con- 
trol ward. 1 he pfl
iect used a "hefore 
and after" design that provided ti.Jr the 
samc tïve-month data collcction periods 
in each of three years and two scven- 
month intervals when nurses on the 
experimental ward participated in d 
planned inservice education program. 
Each \\-ard was compared to itself 
ovcr the three time perious on all 
measures except mobility of auxIliary 
staff and incidence of absentet:ism. 
I n these instances the two wards were 
comparcd \\- ith each other. 
The findings indicate that the spe- 
40 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


cific inservice education program tÙr 
registered nurses did not inl1uence drug 
use. However, there were signitïcant 
decreases in the number of day
 pat ients 
remained on intravcnous tlLuds post- 
operatively and in thc amount of intra- 
venous l1uius consumed by patients on 
the experimental ward. rhese decreases 
were rel1ected in per uiem costs and 
in the use of goods from the central 
supply room, 
here a steauy decrease 
in costs occurred over the three time 
periods. 
1 evine tuhes were removed earlier 
each year on the experimental waru. 
and one surgeon was intluenced to 
changc his routine orders for cholc- 
cy.;tectomy paticnts. 
Awareness of the individuality of 
pat ients was sign i ficantly increased in 
more than half the I X nur<;es exposcd 
to the inservice cducation program. A 
changc in nurse hchavior hecause of 
this was evidenced by thc positive 
change in the patients' assessment of 
their care over the three time periods. 
Differcnccs in staff mohility and in 
pattcrns of ahscnteeism suggest that 
the mil icu of the expcrimental ward 
\\- as morc conducivc to joh satisfaction, 
hut the findings on the latter are in- 
conclusive. 
Somc differences in paticnt and nursc 
pcrccption of what is important. and 
of thc care that is providcd. are reveal- 
ed on comparing responses to matched 
items on thcir respective inventories. 
Also. some intcre"ting qucstions are 
raised concerning thc potcntial ability 
of nurses to indi'v idual i7e care, and thc 
possihility of measuring this potential 
in applicants prior to thcir admission to 
schools of nursing. 
Copies of this
stud} may hc ohtain- 
ed hy writing to Kathlcen G. DeMarsh, 
Vice-Prcsidcnt, Nursing. Health Sci- 
encesCcntre, 700 William Ave., Winni- 
peg. Man., R3E OZ3. Each copy costs 
$3.50. 


Christensen, Judith C. Saline ahortion: 
a study (
f female hehm'ior ill (/ crisis 
situatioll. Montreal. Q uc.. 1972. 
Thcsis (M.Sc. (Appl.)) McGill U. 


This study, set in the maternit} unit 
of a large gencral hospital. used quali- 
tative methods to cxamine the bchavior 
amI certain attitudes of a group of 
women during their hospitalization to 
terminai.e a mid-trimestcr pregnancy by 
means of 20 pcrcent hypertonic saline. 
A serics of four visits madc to most 
of the 21 women included in this study 
were timed to coincide with what seem- 
ed to he the most critical periods of the 
process: admission. injection. labor and 
delivery, and the postabortion pcriod. 
As data collcction progressed, a set 
of questions was formulated, which 


dcterm lIlt:d the nature of the sub- 
sequent analysis. The analysis is a gen- 
cral summation of the data designed to 
answer these questions. 
. What are the social characteristics of 
women who use the facilities of a public 
hospital for an abortion'! 
. What reasons are given for termina- 
tion of tht: pregnancy'! 
. What kinds of behaviors emerge 
during the stagcs of the abortion pro- 
cess'! 
. \Vho does the woman inform about 
the pregnancy and hcr desire for abor- 
tion'! 
. What is the woman's altitudc toward 
tht: product of conception'! 
. What is the woman's attitude to futu rt: 
use of a contraceptive dev ice'! 
It soon became eviJent that ohstt:t- 
rical history was an important distin- 
guishing feature. This was choscn as a 
simple dichotomous classification 
scheme for organization of the findings 
in answer to the research questions. 
Multigravidas tended to be oldcr. were 
more likely married, had young chil- 
dren at home. were usually receiving 
financial assistance from the state, 
kncw less about the det:1Î1s of the ahor- 
tion sequence, expcrienced a shorter 
labor or no labor at all. and required 
les
 sedation. 
Most othcr generalizations derived 
from the data refer to the group as a 
whole. For example: 
. \\-'omen undergoing abortion b\ 
means of saline injection tend to be 
generally subdued' and submissive 
during thc process. 
. Women undergoing abortion do not 
seek information from persons involved 
in the performance of a task, or who 
seem to be in a hurry, even whcn a 
problem is obviously developing. 
. Women often weep during the injec- 
tion procedure. but become increasingly 
composed after thc needle is inserted. 
. Bchavioral cues that lahor has com- 
menced arc an important indicatIon of 
the kind of analgesic required to re- 
I ieve d iscom fort. 
. Delivery of the fetus is not a painful 
or cxtremely distressing experience. 
. Only selected persons in the woman's 
fam ily and group of friends arc inform- 
ed of the prcgnancy and wish fÒr 
ahortion. 
. Depersonalization of the fetus. cvi- 
denced by the frequent use of "it" a
 a 
term of rcference, is common. 
. Women may. or may not. ask to see 
and/or know the sex of the fctus. The 
most common timc fÒr this request is 
at the time of abortion. 
. Most womcn undergoing dcctive 
ahortion have not uscd any fÒrm of con- 
traception previously. 
. Most women will agrce to u
 an oral 
fÒrm of contraccption after the abor;- 
t
n. W 
MARCH 1974 



names 


Margaret M. Street, author of Wa[('Il- 
Fires Oil tile MOl/lllail/.\', has h
l:n 
awarded the Dr. Walter Stewart Baird 
Memorial Medal. This honor wa
 con- 
ferred on Ms. Street by the president of 
the University of British Columhia fix 
her outstanding work in the history of 
health sciences. 


K. Marion Smith, assistant dirl:ctor of 
nursing at Surrey Ml:morial Hospital. 
has been appointed to thl: new position 
of associate executive director of thl: 
Registered Nurses' Association of 
British Columhia. effective February 
15. IlJ74. 


A former honom!} 
secretary of the 
RNASe. Ms. Smith 
has heen active on 
numerous assocla- 
tioncommittees. She 
is a memher of thl: 
task committee to 
develop criteria for 

taffing th
 operat- 
ing room and was chairman of the com- 
mittee on mandatory registration. which 
recommended lay participation on the 
association's board of directors and 
stand ing comm ittces. 
Ms. Smith is serving a two-year 
term as one of four members-at-Iarge 
on the Canadian Nursl:s' Association 
board of directors. representing the ar
a 
of nursing administration. 
Ms. Smith (B.Sc.N.. U. of British 
Columbia, M.S.. McGill U.) was a nurs- 
ing sister in the Royal Canadian Air 
Force from IlJ5X until IlJól. serving 
as flying officer in Ontario. Lahrador. 
and Alherta. 


" 


-- ,., 
'
' 
--"
 
-..- 
 . 

:_-' 


Irene MacMillan is ins
rvice director 
at the New \\, aterfÙrd Consol idated 
Hospital. New Waterford. N.S. 
Ms. MacMillan 
earned h
r R. N. at 
the Nl:w \\ aterford 
General Hospital 
school of nLIP..ing. 
returni ng a ICw ye.lrs 
later to hecome 
night supervisor 
there. After the ho<,- 
pital was ren,lIl1ed 
the Consolidated Hospital. Ms. 1\1,IC- 
Millan was. for several years. its even- 
ing and night supervisor of nurses. 
MARCH 1974 



 


-- 

 



 


..... 


""""=> 


Dorothy McClure 
(Rl:g. N.. Victoria 
Ho...pital School of 
Nursing. london. 
Ont.: B
Sc.N.. U. of 
Wötern Ontario. 
london: :vt.Sc.N., 
Boston l'., Boston) 
has be(:n appointed 
director of the 
school of nursing at Lamhton College 
of Applied Arts 
and fechnolng). S.rr. 
nia. Ontarill. 
M.... McClurl:.... nur...ing e"periencl' 
includes several years on the nursing 
staff of Victoria Hospital and West- 
minster Hospital. London. and Sunn)- 
brook Hospital. Toronto. and t\\O Yl:ars 
with the North Atlantic freaty Organ- 
ization/Royal Canadian Air Force in 
France. She \'-as a puhlic health nur...e 
<it Norfolk County Hl:alth l'nit and 
Brant Countv Health l'nit in Ontario. 
Ms. :\1cérurl: taught at Hamilton 
Ci.. ic Hospitals sc hool of nursi ng. \\ here 
she \\as activelv il1\'ohed III developing 
and implementÍng the curriculum for the 
t\'-o-)ear program. More recently. Ms. 
McClure \'-as an as...istant proICssor at 
\1cMaster Universit\ \'. here she \\as 
responsi hie t(lr coordi nati ng the Year 
I nursing cour
e in the baccalaureate 
program. 



 
. 
,. 


-or 


. . 


,
 


'\ 
-.".. . 


\ 


\ ^. 
'It /" 


r he current slate of officers of the 
Ontario Occupational Health Nursl:s' 
Association i... a... foHm\ s. 
Prl:Sident. Jean Laing (Nursing Sa- 
vice Supervisor. Bell Canada. rOfOnto): 
past prl:sident. Patricia Ewen, (Ahitihi 
Prlwincial Papa ltd.. 1l1Orold): 1st 
vice-pre-ident. Dorothy Schwab (Fos- 
ter-Wheeler Co.. St. Catharines): 2nd 
vice president. Joan Subasic (L'ni..ersit
 
Hospital. london): sl:cretary. Gale 
Pearson (St. josl:ph's Hospital. Gudph); 
and trl:asurer. Barbara Bollis (\\olvl:rinl: 
fuhl: ltd.. London). 


Kerry Marshall, currentl) din.'ctor of 
nursing at the Bdlevilk Gl:ncral Hos- 
pital. 
Ikllevilk. Ontario. has hel:n 
ml:dical-surgical ...upervisor at thl: 
rnronto Gl:neral Hospital and statf 
nurse and supl:rvisor at thl: Ro) al \' ic- 
toria Ho"pital in :\lontrl:al. 
Ms. Marsh,11I (Reg.K, Toronto Gen- 
eral Hospital school of nursing: B.N.. 


:YkGill ll.) \\as. in IlJ73. granted a 
diploma in health administration from 
the Uni vcrsity of Toronto. t('r \\ hich 
shl: conductl:d a survl:Y on .. Profc......ional 
nursl:s' altitudes to physicians and the 
pasonnd in ho...pital departments." 


Carol Koester of Rl:gina has been named 
the consumer reprl:sentati ve on the 
Saskatchewan Regi'itered Nurscs' A...- 

ociation standing
 committee on nurs- 
IIlg. 

\1s. K.oestl:r has heen active with the 
Regina and provincial hranches of the 
Canadian Association of Consumers tÒr 
more than 10 years. and is a past pres- 
ident of the provincial branch. 
A graduate of the Uniwrsit) of 
Sas"atchl:wan. Saskatoon Campus. 
holding a bachdor of arts degree and a 
hachel
'r"s degree in educ.rtion. Ms. 
KOl:Ster is currl:ntly opaating a private 
nursl:ry school tÌlur days ,I \\I:e". 


Sister Joan Carr, (R.!"... B.Sc. (Elem. 
Educ.). B.SeN., M.Sc.N.), is the new 
director of nursing education at the Ha- 
lifax Infirmary. 
Active in the Registered Nurses' 
Association of Nova Scotia. Sister Carr 
has been chairman of the nursing edu- 
cation committee of its Cape Breton- 
Victoria branch. chairman of the prov- 
incial nursing education committee. 
and a memher of curriculum council. 


Louise Beaton \'.as appointed regional 
nursing 'iupervisor for thl: Prince AI- 
hert Health Rl:gion in PI ince Alhl:rt 
S,lskaskatchl:wan. . 


Ms. Ikaton (R.N., 
SI. Paul'... Hospital 
school of nursing. 
Saskatoon; Dlpl. 
P.H.. B.Sc.;\:.. L'. of 
S as" a t c hew a n. 
Saskatoon) has bcen 
a clinical instructor 
.\ \\ ilh the Saskatoon 
\.--,., City Hospital. and 
puhlic health nursl: \\ ith the Saskatoon 
Cit) Hcalth Oep,1( tmcnt and \\ ith the 
Victorian Orda of Nurse.... Prior to her 
currl:nt ,Ippointment. I\ls. 81:,lIon \\ as a 
puhlic health nursl: in thl: S,lskatoon 
Rural Hl:alth Rl:gion. 
 
THE CAN DIAN NURSE 41 


... 


'" 


.. 



new products 


{ 


Descriptions are based on information 
supplied by the manufacturer. No 
endorsement is intended. 


\ 


\ I I 
1 
H H 
\1
:\:;

, h 
'. \\ I l , 
.. 
2011 '" 
't' 


'" 



,
 
,,
. 
 
" ,,
 


""-- 


'- 


C,rClllllci.I'Wf/ I ray 


Blood Collel'ling Needle.I' 


Circumcision tray 
fhe Holli
ter circumcision tray puts 
cverything at the ohstetricialÙ finger- 
tips for quick circumcision in the deli- 
very room. nur
ery. or physicidn's 
oflïce. Contents, ",h ich are guaranteed 
sterile, include prep sponges and 
fenestrated drape (in seq ucnce of use). 
Plastihell circumcision device with 
ligature. and all instruments. The tray 
eliminates costly preparation tillle and 
the chance of finding an instrument 
dulled by previous use. Single-use 
instrument'i are designed specilïcall)' 
for the three-minute circumcision 
procedure. 
This tra)' is supplied by Hollister 
Limited. Tn Consumers Road. Wil- 
Jo\\dalc. Ontario. 


Blood collecting needles 
The ne\\ Jdco Disposable Blood Col- 
lecting Needles. Safc I and Safe II, have 
heen designed i'l,I' patient 'iafety and 
fÓr the safety of technicians. Bleeding 
thumbs are eliminated with the ...arc 
puncture-re"istant package. 
42 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


According to the company. the triple- 
beveled needle point and exelusive 
micro-bonded siliconized needle 
reduces patient pain to a minimum. 
Needle "spinout" is prevented hecause 
the threaded metal hub locks firmly 
onto the needle holder. On the multiple- 
sample needle, the resiliencv of the 
valve permits repeated draws without 
leakage. 
Three needle siles are available. 
For further information, write to 
Arhrook Lid.. Peterhorough, Ont. 
KlJJ 7BlJ. 


Ventilator control system 
The Life Systems Division of Bourns, 
Inc. has introduced the Model LS125 
Ventilator Control SYstem. This unit 
provides volumetric íimit control and 
continuously variable sigh function 
control for any pressure limited ventil- 
ator (I PPV). 
It controls the volume of gas deliver- 
ed to the patient from the ventilator 
within the pressure and flow capabilitie'i 
of the ventilator used, without impair- 


ing any of the control functions of the 
ventIlator. including dssist. assist- 
control. and control modes of ventila- 
tion. The system provides alarms for 
high and low pressure. plus an alarm 
for apnea. all of which deliver both an 
audihle and visual signal. 
The Model 1 S 125 is pi aced in the 
pneumatic line hetween the ventilator 
and the patient "' ith no functional 
mechanical interconnection with the 
ventilator. hence its intCfchangeahility 
with any I PPV. Mechanical support is 
provided hy accessory mOllnting hrack- 
ets. and inten:onnecting tuhing for 
various respirators is ava
ahle. 
 
There are two Canadian distrihutors 
of this system. E-I-L Inc.. 1565 Lou- 
vain SI. \\., Montreal II. Quehec: and 
Mid-Canada Medical. 12-t-t Alhert 
Street. Regina. Saskatl:hewan. 


New approach to ileostomy 
The Swcdi...h International Pn:ss 
Bureau reported last January that a 
new approach to ileostomy has done 
much to remove patients' objections to 
MARCH 1974 



the operation, which previously caused 
distressing side effects. 
Dr. Nils Kock of Sahlgrenska Hos- 
pital. Gothenburg, has used his new 
method on some 100 patients so far. 
This method provides for a bag to be 
placed inside the abdomen. Its outtlow 
is fitted with a special valve, which 
prevents involuntary emptying of the 
intestine and eliminates odor. Dr. Kock 
has used the modified surgery on 10 
patients who had undergone the con- 
ventional operation. which calls tÖr 
the removal of the colon and creation 
of an artificial opening into the ileum. 
The newspaper Svensk,a Dagbladet 
first reported this new method. 


Literature available 
A bulletin (no. 51-215) on Dow Corn- 
ing's new Silastic contour design 
mammary prosthesis is available from 
Dow Corning Silicones Inter-America 
Ltd., I Tippet Road, Downsview. On- 
tario M3H 5T2. This bulletin describes 
the prosthesis, gives the instructions for 
using it. and explains the surgical 
procedure (Cronin technique) fÒr an 
augmentation. 
The shape of this prosthesis is not 
new when it is compared to prior seam- 


less contour design, but its envelope is 
thi nner. The soft. seamless envelope. 
which characterizes the prosthesis. 
contains a low viscosity, translucent 
silicone gel that closely approximates 
the softness. mobility. and weight of 
the norm al breast. 


Lumex. Inc. has issued a new brochure. 
which outlines the company's line of 
bed rails and safety sides available in 
a variety of models to fit all types of 
beds. The brochure is available in 
Canada from Bercotec, Inc., 11422 
Albert Hudon Blvd.. Montreal 462. 
Quebec. 


Ileostomy patients can get advice about 
specific techniques of care. use of ap- 
pliances, and other areas of concern 
from Li
'i/1g CO/1(f(J/.tah/y with Your 
Ileostomy, a hooklet publ ished by Sister 
Kenny Institute. M inneapol is. M inne- 
sota. This revised edition contain-; 
photographs of step-by-step proced- 
urcs. as well as current eq uipment 
information. Techniques that enahle 
the patient to care for his ileostomy 
with maximum ease are described. 


A discussion of necessan adjust- 
ments is included. There aré seciion" 
on topics. such as sk in care. general 
Care and bathi ng. physical acti\ ities. 
clothing. daily I iving. and travel. A diet 
guideline for the patient to folio\\< dur- 
ing the first six weeks following surgery 
is provided. An information form IÖr 
ordering suppl ies - to be completed 
by physician and patient - simplifies 
this task. 
This manual. which was \\ ritten hy 
a nurse, mav be obtained from the 
Puhlication Óepartment. Sister Kenn) 
Institute. I XOO Chicago A\ enue. \lin- 
neapolis. Minnesota 
 55404. U.S.A. 
Prepayment of $1.25 pcr copy is re- 
quested on orders under '&5. 


Heel Protector 
Posey Company has introduced a new 
heel protector. designed not to ride up 
the patient's leg nor be kicked off by a 
restless patient. This protector is avail- 
able in synthetic fur or polyurethane 
toam. Plenty of air circulation is insur- 
ed because the protector is vented on 
both sides of the ankle and at the heel. 
This product is availahle from Fnns 
and Gilmore Limited. 1033 Range- 
view Road, Port Credit, Ontario. 'Î:-! 


\ I 
" \\ / 
- " 
- '. 
. 


f Introducing an 
""/! _ --: ex
m
1y useful new 
., ø medical mstrument. 
Although the 'BIC 4' colour pen may not rank with the greatest medical inven- 
tions of the century, it's certainly one of the handiest With this one neat 
little device you can mark down temperatures, blood pressures, allergies 
and do all the strange things doctors and nurses do, all in different 
colours. You also pay less for it than you would for even the simplest 
medical instrument. The 'BIC 4' colour pen is only $1.29, And our almost 
as useful 'BIC 2' colour pen is 79<I: Both come in Fine or Medium points 
and are available everywhere. 


M
étG 
Fine
 


MARCH 1974 


fJ: (B i C) 

I 

 l 

-' 


couleurs 
colour pen 


1231.H74.? 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 43 



books 


Watch-fires on the Mountains: The 
Life and Writings of Ethel Johns, 
by Margaret M. Street. 336 pages. 
Toronto. University of Toronto 
Press. 1973. 
Re\'ieH'ed by Je(111 E. Hac Gregor , 
LihrarÙlII, Natiollal Sciellce Lihran', 
Ottawa, andformer Associate/:.{Iit(;r, 
The Canadian Nur
e. 


Every profession numbers in its ranks 
tho
e. who through excellence of mind 
and spirit. not only make history but 
themselves become an enduring part of 
it. Ethel Johns is of this company. We 
are indebtcd to her biographer - her- 
self a distinguished Canadian nur"e 
- for affording us the opportunity 
of seeing this courageous and dynamic 
woman within the perspective of both 
national and international nursing. 
The author undertook the project to 
mark anl)ther mik"tonc in Canadian 
nursing history - the Golden Jubilee 
of the UBC School of Nursing. Ms. 
Johns was its tirst director. 
Painstakingly researched and record- 
ed with warmth and understanding. the 
story of this eventful life gradually un- 
folds in a serie
 of chapters correspond- 
ing to significant periods of personal 
and professional development. Proba- 
bly best known in her various profes- 
sional capacities. the glimpses of an- 
other. more intimate side of Ms. Johns' 
nature arc douhly appreciated. 
Thc littk girl who ...ailed from Eng- 
land in l,lJ2 to join hcr parents in 
Canad,\ had a!l'cady learned much sdf- 
reliance. The subsequent mne years on 
the Wabigoon Indian reserve \\-ere to 
test those inner resources even more 
deeply. The sudden death of her father 
committed her to an indefinite period 
in an isolated area. and da!>hed hopes 
for additional tÌJrmal education. She 
was 20 years of age when the way was 
finally clear for her to enter the Winni- 
peg General Hospital Training School 
for Nur'ie
. The year wa
 I XlJ9. and 
Ethel Johns was launched on her varied. 
sometime" controversial. career. 
In the years that opened bctore 
her. she was to become known as nurse 
educator. lecturer. administrator. edi- 
tor. <lnd author. She was to he held in 
high e'iteem fÒr her fore"ightcdne...". 
sound judgment. and integnty. Her 
opinion.. and advice were to be sought 
both wi-thin and outside her own pro- 
fession. She was a vi!>ionary who saw 
JIJI TUJ: rAI\JAnlAIIJ 1IJ111l4;;1= 


. 
- 


:-
 


... 



 

 


Ethel JO/JIlS, circa 1919. 
nursing not only as it was. but as it 
could be. Consequently. the causes that 
she championed were onen far in ad- 
vance of the time. 
As a young graduate. troubled over 
the deficiencies in current nursing edu- 
cation programs. she looked ahead to a 
better day when schools of nursing 
would be under university di rection. 
Concern fÒr the protection of the public 
and her profession prompted her sup- 
port of nurse registration. Her convic- 
tion that tho"e slated fÒr nursing leader- 
ship required advanced learning won 
her enthusia!>tic efforts on behalf of 
university programs. She foresaw a role 
for an auxiliary group of nursing atten- 
dants who could free the professional 
nurse fÒr more difficult and highly 
'ik illed duties. Her faith in the effective- 
ness of organized groups led to her 
involvement in nursing and hospital 
organizations. 
Coming from a family where culture 
and learning had been paramount. Ethel 
Johns inherited considerable literary 
talent. Her lack of more formal educa- 
tion had been offset by the reading pro- 
gram set fÒr her by her father. and her 
own continuing thirst for knowledge. 
Her appointment as editor of TIle 
Calladiall Nurse came at a critical per- 
iod in the journal's history. Depres- 
sion years were at their height; sub- 
scriptions were declining. The Weir 
Report on nursing education in Canada 
had just been released; it was hoped that 
the Journal would contribute substan- 
tially to its effectiveness. 


From the day she started work as 
editor in 1933. until her retirement in 
1944. Ms. Johns devoted herself to the 
growth and improvement of the publi- 
cation. She enlisted support through her 
ability as a speaker and her encour- 
agement of nurse authors. Her own 
writing talent was given an outlet as 
well. They were not easy years. but they 
were good years as both the journal and 
the Canadian Nurses' Association ex- 
perienced growing pains. 
Ethel Johns' biography belongs in 
any collection of nursmg or medical 
history. for she was truly an interna- 
tional figure. Her life touched or was 
touched by many of the outstanding 
leaders of her profession on this conti- 
nent. Students of Canadian nursing his- 
tory will appreciate both the additional 
information and the immensely read- 
able format III which it i" pre"cnted. 
There is a need tor more contribu- 
tions of a similar nature. Canadians 
tend to be somewhat dilatory in their 
recognition of the great ones in their 
midst. Readers outside the profession 
can enjoy and appreciate this chapter 
in the history of a nation; the causes 
championed were to affect the lives of 
everyone. Above all, nurses can be 
grateful that Ethel Johns. and others like 
her. "climbed the hill" and lit the 
watch-fires. 


A Programmed Introduction to Micro- 
Biology, 2ed. by St
art M. Brook!>. 
124 pagcs. Saint Louis. '\1osby. 
IlJ73. 
RnÙ'II'ed !>\. Richard 1. Boz\'llsJ...i, 
\,1asta, NlII':
illg Program, COIÙ('da. 
atio/l College, n/lmda Bay, Olll. 


fhis thin. wire-bound "self-kamer" i!> 
intended to he u"cd with any "tandard 
texthook of introductory microhiology. 
The usc of this paperhack is threcfÒld. 
to provide the instructor with a skeleton 
for his notcs; to provide the stuuent 
with a simple format for review; and 
to help the student \\ ho is learning thc 
subject for the firsttimc. 
. fn this seconu euition. all the intor- 
mation ha" bcen upuated and stream- 
lined. Thc intcrest of tcaehcrs anu 
studcnt!> has heen kept in mind; many 
of thc changes were prompted hy "ug- 
ge"tion" and constructive criticisms. 
- Thi" ""elf-learner" is contemporary 
(ColIl/lllled Oil l'lI1:e 461 
MARCH 1974 



A New Book! CHILD HEALTH MAINTENANCE: Concepts in 
Family-Centered Care. This book provides a comprehensive resource for 
the study of concepts needed to maintain or restore health for the child 
within the context of his family and environment. In addition, the 
book provides the only summary of developmental physiology avail- 
able. Behavioral theories and a philosophy of comprehensive health care 
by a multi-professional team are presented in the same detail. By 
PEGGY L. CHINN, R.N., Ph.D. March, 1974. Approx. 608 pages, 8" x 
10",214 illustrations. About $14.20. 
A New Book! CHILD HEALTH MAINTENANCE: A Guide to Clinical 
Assessment. In easy-to-use table form, this complete guide integrates 
principles of behavior, nutrition, family and environmental scienæs. 
Topics include: developmental differences; immunizations; vital signs; 
lab procedures; environmental standards; assessment of growth and 
development; common illnesses; and nutrition. By PEGG Y L. CHINN, 
R.N., Ph.D.; and CYNTHIA J. LEITCH, R.N., M.S. March, 1974. 
Approx. 148 pages, 8" x 10", 20 illustrations in 20 figures. About 
$5.20. 


New 7th Edition! SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES IN NURSING. Providing 
a concise, clear-cut foundation for effective application of scientific 
principles in the daily ministration of patient care, this book supplies a 
rational approach to planning nursing care that meets the needs of the 
patient as he responds to his environment. Concepts of stress and 
homeostasis are presented throughout as components in planning 
holistic care. By SHIRLEY HAWKE GRAGG, R.N., B.S.N.; and OLIVE 
M. REES, R.N., M.A. April, 1974. Approx. 480 pages, 7" x 10", 259 
illustrations. About $10.25. 


A New Book! ESSENTIALS OF NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY. 
Designed to contain current material pertinent to the needs of health 
workers at all levels, this text includes material on nutritional 
counseling, food needs and costs, electrolytes and metabolism, and in 
depth material on ethnic groups, their nutritional needs, and family 
customs. Of special significance is a complete chapter on the food 
environment including ecology of human nutrition, economic and 
political environment, hunger, poverty and government programs. By 
SUE RODWELL WILLIAMS, M.R.Ed., M.P.H. April, 1974. Approx. 
352 pages, 7" x 10", 33 illustrations. About $7.30. 


New 7th Edition! HISTORY AND TRENDS OF PROFESSIONAL 
NURSING. Stressing the evolutionary role of women in today's society 
and interweaving it with the equally monumental change in nursing and 
the delivery of health services, the authors report on such current topics 
as: female liberation; abortion laws; legal aspects of nursing; continuing 
education in nursing; research; the ladder concept; and the "nurse 
practitioner". By GERALD JOSEPH GRIFFIN, B.S., M.A., Ed.D., R.N.; 
and JOANNE KING GRIFFIN, B.S., M..4., R.N.; with a special unit on 
Legal Aspects by ROBERT G. BOWERS, B.A., J.D. July, 1973. 312 
pages plus FM I-XII, 7" x 10",62 illustrations. Price, $9.45. 


, 
,
 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C. V MOSBY COMPANY L TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAD 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


MARCH 1974 


VITAL SIGNS 
OF NURSING 
PROGRESS... 
NEW BOPKS 
FROM MOSBY 


CLINICIAN 
INTERVENTION 
ASSESSMENT 
PRACTITIONER 
ICU 
CCU 
PRIMARY 
PSYCHOSOCIAL 
COMMUNITY 
MO 81 LlTY 
REVIEW 
RESEARCH 
CHALLENGE 
O.R. 
EDUCATION 


THE l.ANAOIAN NURSE 45 



books 


rCO/lli/llll'd/;'01I/ ""KC 44) 
wiih the needs of nurses who are requir- 
ed to upgrade their education. A well- 
organized tl:xt. it graduall) develops 
the learner's knowledge of the subject 
with a simple to complex approach, 
to give the student a general under- 
standing of microbiology. 
Lnderstanding of new content i!. 
reinforced by a repetative and progres- 
sive use of term inology and facts in 
structuring thc questions. Answers 
are given in the margin opposite the 
question; a mask is provided with the 
test to cover the answer(s). 
fhis "self-Iearner" is divided into 
three major parh. Part I deals with the 
general pri nci pi es of m icrob iology. such 
as the various microorganism!. and 
their charactcrist ics. Part II fam il iarizes 
the student with medical microbiology. 
dealing with such topics as infection. 
immunity. diagnosis, and diseascs 
caused by the various classifications of 
microorganisms. Part III provides' the 
student with an understanding of 
sanitary. industrial, and soil micro- 
biology. 
The apparent intent of thi!. program- 
med text is to provide a general know- 
ledge of microbiology. An adequate 
reference list for both teachers and 
students is included in the text. 
The general impression of those 
who have shared with me A Program- 
/lied Introd IICt io II to Microhiology is 
that it ranks among the better program- 
med texts. 


Dr. Turtle's Babies by William John 
Turtle. 31R pages. Toronto, W.B. 
Saunders Company, 1973. 
Rn'iewed bv Barbara G. Brown, 
Assislallt P/'(
fessor, Facility (
fNlIrs- 
ill.'?, 11Ie Ulliversity (
r Western 011- 
tario, London, Ollll/rio. 


Dr. furtlc. a retired pediatrician, found 
that most of his time in practice had 
been spent trying to assist parents deal 
with handling and behavioral prob- 
lems. This hook. an outgrowth of a 
discussion group !.eries for expectant 
parents. is Dr. Turtle's attempt to give 
parents a clear. beforehand picture of 
how bahies grow, develop, and behave, 
and to help them under!.tand what is 
involved in rearing a child. 
In the first part of the book, the 
author discusses the fundamentals in- 
volved in the job of being parents. These 
fundamentab are divided into four as- 
pects: six major areas of responsibility 
46 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


in care and handling of a baby; tech- 
niq ue of feeding; specific problem!. in 
care and handling; and nursery set-up 
and equipment. 
On Nature rests the prime respon- 
sibility for the first two areas. treatment 
of infections and feeding, with the 
parents playing a supportive role. The 
four remaining areas of responsibility. 
prevention of accidents, training, dis- 
cipline, and education, rest on the 
shoulders of the parents. The section on 
technique of feeding is comprehensive 
and, what is most important. equal 
treatment is given to breast and bottle 
feeding. practical suggestions related 
to both tcchniques are offered. 
As Dr. Turtle stated in the intro- 
duction, he discusses a few specific 
problems in care and handling. Al- 
though most of these are problems Ihat 
will inevitably arise, they are too few 
and too specific. This section would be 
more useful had the author included 
some principles applicable to dealing 
with problems in general. 
I n the second part of the book the 
author has taken the fundamentals 
dealt with in the first part and applied 
them duonologically to the care and 
rearing of an infant from birth 10 one 
year. fhe format and presentation of 
the material with repetition of points 
- not only from part one to part two 
but within each part - combined with 
the frequent use of italics and the enu- 
meration of steps or requirements, puts 
across the author's message in a pedan- 
tic manner. This same style. however, 
makes it easy for the reader to locate 
a specific topic or point, and thus in- 
creases the book's value as a reference. 
The practical approach to the care 
and handling of an infant. with an 
emphasis on prevention, makes this 
book useful. not only a!. a guide tor its 
intended audience - expectant pa- 
rents - but also as an additional refer- 
ence for nurses. particularly neophytes, 
working with parents expecting and 
rearing young children. 


Family Health Care b) Debra P. Hymo- 
vich and Martha Underwood Bar- 
nard. 462 pages. Toronto. McGraw- 
Hill. IlJ73. 
Reviewed hv Jallet C. Kerr, A ssis- 
tant Prore
sor, School of Nursillg, 
Ulliversity of Calgary. Calgary, 
A Iherta. 


This volume of original contrihutions 
by some 34 authors represents an im- 
portant contrihution to the literature 
relating to health care and families. It 
cuts across mueh of the current theOl} 
arising from various disciplines con- 
cerning the family and applies this to 
health care. In so doing. it is unique 
because it provides a com prehensive 


reference on the subject. not previousl) 
available for nurses in practice and 
nursing students. 
Part one of the three-part book pre- 
sents concepts. which relate to the hl- 
mily. from a number of disciplines, 
including nursing. medicine. law. socio- 
logy, economics. and anthropology. 
Significant aspects of this section of the 
book indude the account of the histori- 
cal development of t
lmily nursing and 
family medicine. 
In Part two the tixus of discussion 
is the expanding and contracting fa- 
mily. Consideration is given to family 
planning; the adopting family; and 
families with infants. young children, 
school-age children. adolescents, and 
elderly members. The tamily in crisis is 
the topic for Part three and a number 
of possible family crises are used as 
illustrative material in this section. 
Some of the specific content areas cov- 
ered include the family with a child with 
a birth defect, child abuse, abortion, 
suicide. myocardial infarction, and ter- 
minal ill ness. 
fhis boo" will undoubtedly prove 
to be a useful and exciting tool for 
nurses interested in providing improved 
health care for families. However. the 
author!. have intended that their book 
be used more widely and it is certain 
that this volume will provide a valuable 
referencc fÒr the health professions 
generally. 


Principles of Microbiology, 7ed., and 
Laboratory Manual and Workbook, 
by AI ice Lorraine Sm ith. 681 pages. 
St. Louis, Mosby, 1973. 
Reviewed by Jean Jenny, Instructor, 
University of Ottawa, School of 
Nursing, Ottawa, Of1lario. 


Those familiar with Smith's textbook, 
Principles of Microbiology, will wel- 
Come this updated and greatly expand- 
ed seventh edition. It has been rework- 
ed "to give contemporary coverage in 
microbiology and ordered to progress 
in a design readily assimilated by stu- 
dents in health science training pro- 
grams. " 
The material comprises six separate 
units. The first two introduce the nature 
of microbiology and its basic principles 
and procedures, including emphasis on 
the use of the microscope. A separate 
chapter on specimen collection would 
be useful to the student in her clinical 
practice, 
Units three and four discuss or- 
ganisms in relation to infection and 
disease, particularly stressing inuTIu- 
nology and the immunologic reactions. 
A variety of tables, such as a listing of 
distribution of organisms resident on 
the body, the transmission of disease, 
rCOllli/lllCd Oil paKl' 4[1,) 
MARCH 1974 



A New Book! READINGS IN CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHI- 
ATRIC NURSING. Here is the only volume specifically directed to the 
nurse's therapeutic role with the emotionally disturbed child and 
adolescent. The book is divided into three parts: the first part providing 
an overview of nursing in child psychiatry; the second part dealing with 
therapeutic intervention with latency age children; and the third part 
focusing on therapeutic intervention with emotionally disturbed adoles- 
cents. Edited by CLAIRE M. FAGIN, Ph.D., R.N.; with 34 contributors. 
January, 1974. 190 pages plus FM I-XI V, 6" x 9", 10 illustrations in 10 
figures. Price, $6.05. 


New 2nd Edition! CRISIS INTERVENTION: Theory and Methodology. 
Presenting a comprehensive overview as well as an introduction and 
guide to crisis intervention from its historical development to its 
present utilization, this book shows different techniques used in 
short-term therapy as opposed to those for extensive analysis. Factual 
discussions in non-technical language describe events which may 
precipitate a crisis and introduce practical methods for intervention. By 
DONNA C. AGUILERA, M.S.; and JANICE M. MESSICK, M.S. June, 
1974. Approx. 148 pages, 6'/:," x 9'/:,", 13 illustrations in 13 figures. 
About $6.30. 
A New Book! FAMILY-CENTERED COMMUNITY NURSING: A 
Sociocultural Framework. Emphasizing the varied facets of family and 
community living essential to planning and delivering health care, this 
new book illustrates the nature of new roles the nurse is expected to 
assume. The readings examine the cultural and psychosocial factors 
which determine whether families are likely to use available health care 
services. By ADINA M. REINHARDT, Ph.D.; and MILDRED D. 
QUINN, R.N., M.S.; with 40 contributors. October, 1973. 304 pages 
plus FM I-XVI, 6'/:," x 9'/:,': Price, $6.60. 


A New Book! SCHOOL NURSING IN TRANSITION. Specific guide- 
lines are presented for developing and administering programs, and the 
core nursing procedures involved in health service delivery are detailed. 
The need for new techniques is emphasized to increase the effectiveness 
of school health services. The book outlines principles of interrelation 
between the school nurse and children, parents, and community and 
school personnel. Problems discussed include health appraisal and 
communicable disease care. By DORIS S. BRYAN, R.N., M.P.H., Ph.D. 
October, 1973. 204 pages plus FM I-XIV, 7" x 10", 57 illustrations. 
Price, $8.40. 


A New Book! CLINICAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NURSE PRACTI- 
TIONER. The authors of this new book provide a helpful overview of 
the clinical diagnostic process. The book explores the essentials of 
patient history-taking, performing a physical examination, keeping 
meaningful patient records, and ordering and interpreting appropriate 
laboratory studies. Anatomical and pathological processes are briefly 
outlined, and a final chapter applies diagnostic methods to specific 
patient situations. By WILLIAM C. FOWKES, Jr., M.D.; and 
VIRGINIA K. HUNN, R.N., B.S.N. August, 1973. 190 pages plus FM 
I-X, 7" x 10", 36 illustrations. Price, $6.30. 


, 
,
 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY l TO 
86 NORTHLINE ROAO 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


MARCH 1974 


VITAL SIGNS 
OF NURSING 
PROGRESS.. . 
NEW BOOKS 
FROM MOSB
 


CLINICIAN 
INTERVENTION 
ASSESSMENT 
PRACTITIONER 
ICU 
0 
CCU 
PRIMARY 
PSYCHOSOCIAL 
0 COMMUNITY 
MOBILITY 
. 
REVIEW 
RESEARCH 
CHALLENGE 
O.R. 
EDUCATION 


THE CAN
IAN NURSE 47 



books 


(Co/lfi/ll/I'd/i''''/I f'1IJ:1' 46) 
and hou
ehold pets as sources of in- 
fections, enlarge on the topic of infec- 
tiousness. One would, perhaps, have 
expected more than a half page on 
autoimmune diseases. 
Unit four covers the principles of 
sterilization. providing a useful refer- 
ence in central supply and isolation 
techniques for practicing nurses. 
Unit tïve. the largest. present
 a 
roster of significant pathogens 
r;d 
parasites. Material on the venereal dis- 
eases has been augmented. presumahly 
to _reflect current epidemiological 
trends. The maior infectious diseases 
are dealt with cornprehensively, making 
this text an excellent reference source 
for graduate nurses. 
Unit six relates to the microbial 
presence in everyday life. A survey, 
it mcludes the latest mformation on 
immunization and emironmental san- 
itat ion. 
Also available is a Wicmbiology 
Laboratory ManITaland Workbook hy 
the same author. It is designed to he 
used with the textbook. as indicated in 
the reference sources. Each exercise 
is directed toward specific, stated ob- 
jectives and lists the equipment needed 
and techniques to employ. Twenty- 
nine exerci
e
 are descrihed. covering 
such subjects as cultivation of bacteria, 
sources . of infection, phagocytosis, 
anaphylaxis. and te!>ting the efficiency 
of sterili7 ation procedures. It is a 
good hasic laboratory manual with 
clear and easy-to-follow instructions. 
Both volumes would be excellent for 
use in presenting a comprehensive 
course in microbiology for nurses. 


A Practical Manual on Reproduction 
hy Jacques E. Rioux and John Col- 
lins. Eds. .no pages. Laval. Presses 
de rUniversité Laval, 1<)73. 
Reviewed bv Mav Toth, Lecflfrer, 
Matemal-Cliild Nursing, School (
r 
Nursing, McMaster U ni\'ersity, Ham- 
ilton, OTllario. 


Thi!> hook is bilingual. The editors 
were directed to produce it by the 
Canadian Fertility Society. They sug- 
gest that the hoo" will he of practical 
value to medical students and family 
physicians. Fourteen authors were 
involved in the presentation of the 
material. 
The material presented covers the 
general areas of anatomy and physiology 
of the male and female genitalia, con- 
48 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


= 
GIN. - 
. 
(- S' 
\ ,.,,
 , 

""" " ,'c 
 v " 
'" 'J Ik Z 
. 
..."'" 
. ( ) G 

 í 
 
 -'I f 
."..... .. Y 
""'...
 
Q H'c. .. 
c 


ception, intertil ity, contraception, abor- 
tion, sexual behavior, and sex education. 
There is a liberal supply of diagrams 
and charts throughout the text. 
The amount of bihliographic mater- 
ial offcred varies from author to author. 
For example, there were only two rc- 
ferences given in regard to the hormon- 
al methods of hirth control. 
The section covering the anatomy 
and physiology of the genitalia and 
conception is easy to understand and 
well supplicd with diagrams. Material 
related to development of the organs in 
utero is helpful. However, it is disap- 
pointing to note that though two para- 
graphs arc devoted to the male sexual 
response, no space is devoted to the 
female scxual response. 
The section on reproductive failure 
IS helptul. Many possible problems, 
and tests to aid in the diagnosIs ot 
problems. are cited. The technical as- 
pl'Cts of investigative procedures are 
discussed in several instances. There 
is a periodic attempt to consider the 
psychosocial aspects of care. 
Thc section on reproductive control 
is gcnerally adequate. The authors of 
the chapters on !l'Ds and steril ilation 
are, perhaps, rather conservative in 
their approaeh to the use of these meth- 
ods. Long-term effects of sterili7ation 
are inadequately eovered. 
The section on sexual hehavior is 
useful hut too hrief. It is not free from 
villue judgments. The one on sex edu- 
cation in schools i!> extrcmely valuahle. 
rhe authors combined medical and 
educational theory. fhe result is a 
usahle study of the suhject. 
The text could he a useful reference 
fÒr health-care pract itioners and student 
practitioners, if it is kept in mind that 
the need for hrevity has necessitated 
s"imming many suhject area!>. It is cer- 
tainly useful to h,lve material on infer- 
til ity and contraception in the same 
text. practitioners and learners would 


he wise to use additional reference 
material in most areas. 
The fact that the text is bilingual 
is hoth an advantage and a disadvan- 
tage. Had the book been published 
simultaneously in French and English, 
a smaller and less costly book could 
have been produced. The bilingual 
text is useful for libraries serving bi- 
lingual populations. Individual pur- 
chasers might prefer to purchase it in 
one or the other language. 


The Cardiac Rhythms: A Systematic 
Approach to Interpretation by Ray- 
mond L Phillips and Mary K. Feen- 
ey. 354 pages. Toronto. Saunders, 
1l)73. 
Re\'iewecl by Joan Royle, Me MaSTer 
L'ni\'eniTy School of Nursing, Ham- 
ilton, (}fI(lIrio. 


As the title implies, this hoo" is intend- 
ed to help the student recognize and 
descri he the common disorders of the 
cardiac rhythm. 
The authors hegin with a brief re- 
view of the emhryological development 
and clcctrophysiology of the human 
heart. The scction on the standard elec- 
trocardiogram and lead ...ystem pro- 
vide!> the hasis for interpretation of 
arrhythmias. 
The major portion of the boo" deals 
with the common cardiac rhythms, 
which are discussed according to the 
anatomical source of the deviation. The 
content is made more meaningful to the 
reader hy the use of actual patient 
histories and tracings and hy the many 
practical points the authors share from 
their experiences. Many test tracings 
throughout the text provide the rcader 
with feedback on his comprehcnsion of 
the text. 
Scdions on electronic paccma"ers 
and cardiac drugs provide a basis for 
(Co/lfi/ll/I'd 0/1 f'1IJ!1' 50) 
MARCH 1974 



New 2nd Edition! INTENSIVE NURSING CARE. This new book 
presents essential information needed by personnel who care for 
critically ill patients and briefly explains the physiological mechanisms 
involved. Discussions include problems and skills involved in care of 
patients with respiratory, neurological, gastrointestinal, renal and 
endocrine disorders; management of obstetric complications, shock, 
and poisoning; as well as care of the critical cardiac patient. By 
LENETTE OWENS BURRELL, R.N., B.S., M.S.N.; and ZEB L. 
BURRELL, Jr., A.B., M.D., F.A.C.P. June, 1973.360 pages plus FM 
I-XVI, 7" x 10",84 illustrations, with drawings by WEONA WRIGHT. 
Price, $10.25. 
A New Book! UROLOGIC ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES. Designed to 
serve as an informative guide for understanding the patient in the 
urologic endoscopic room, this book informs you of the indications and 
equipment requirements for urologic endoscopic procedures. Basic 
equipment and instrument requirements for specified procedures, and 
techniques for instrument sterilization and maintenance are described 
in detail. Included also are chapters devoted to patient care before and 
after the urologic proædures. By ALICE MOREL, R.N.; and GILBERT 
J. WISE, M.D., F.A.C.S. May, 1974. Approx. 144 pages, 6'Jf." x 9t4", 
172 illustrations. About $10.00. 


New 2nd Edition! MATERNITY NURSING. Presenting the entire 
maternity cycle as a normal physiologic proæss, this new edition 
emphasizes nursing responsibility throughout. Material is included on 
the preparatory phase, pregnancy, labor and parturition, the post- 
partum period, and the neonate. A new unit of review questions, 
following case histories of two expectant mothers completely through 
the maternity cycle, has been added. By CONSTANCE LERCH, R.N., 
B.S.fEd.). April, 1974. Approx. 352 pages, 7" x 10", 189 illustrations. 
About $11.50. 
New 3rd Edition! WORKBOOK FOR MATERNITY NURSING. This 
workbook covers all aspects of the subject - anatomy, conæption, 
fetology, labor and delivery, and the newborn infant. It reviews 
techniques and proædures pertaining to successful maternal care; 
discussing diagnosis of pregnancy, resultant physiological changes, and 
complications. Up-to-the-minute topics include: the nurse and the 
unwed mother; the prenatal clinic; high-risk labor and delivery; and the 
high-risk neonate_ By CONSTANCE LERCH, R.N., B.S.fEd.J. October, 
1973. 194 pages plus FM I-VI/I, 7%" x 10'/:,", 37 illustrations. Price, 
$5.55. 


A New Book! REVIEW OF PHARMACOLOGY IN NURSING. This 
concise addition to the Mosby Comprehensive Review Series fosters an 
understanding of basic pharmacologic action and its clinical application. 
In a question-and-answer format, this book looks at pharmacologic 
principles, administration of drugs, specific drugs which act on the 
various body systems and toxicology. Also discussed in a pertinent, 
up-to-the-minute chapter is recognition, control and treatment of drug 
abuse. By BETTY S. BERGERSEN, R.N., M.S., Ed. D.; and JURA TE A. 
SAKAL YS, M.S. May, 1974. Approx. 176 pages, 5'/:," x 8W'. About 
$4.75. 


, 
'.' 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY L TO 
BS NORTHLINE ROAO 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


MARCH 1<J74 


VITAL SIGNS 
OF NURSING 
PROGRESS.. . 
NEW BOOKS 
FROM MOSB
 


CLINICIAN 
INTERVENTION 
ASSESSMENT 
PRACTITIONER 
ICU 
CCU 
PRIMARY 
PSYCHOSOCIAL 
COMMUNITY 
0 
MOBILITY 
REVIEW 
RESEARCH 
CHALLENGE 
O.R. 
EDUCATION 


THE CANA IAN NURSE 4<J 



books 


(Col//il/lli'd li'"," pm:i' 411) 
understanding the treatment of various 
arrhythmia
. 
 
The authors have collected and or- 
ganized a vast number of electrocar- 
diographic tracings into a text designed 
as a primer for self-study. The student 
or graduate nurse preparing to function 
in a coronary care unit or \\ ishing to 
increase her skill in recogni7ing and 
de
cribing cardiac arrh)thmias will 
find this a valuable reference book. 
The author
 do a good job in delivcr- 
ing what they promise. a plan for ac- 
quiring 
kill in the electrocardiogra- 
phic interpretation of thc heartbeat. A 
major criticism of scope lie
 in the 
authors' failure to di
cuss vector ana- 
lysis and to provide sufficient depth 
in cardiac physiolog) and clectrophy- 
siology to enable the reader to under- 
stand the pathophysiological proces;;es 
underlying thc arrhythmias. 


Leadership Technique in Expectant 
Parent Education, 2ed.. by Anne L. 
Clark. 118 pages. New York. Spring- 
er. 1973. Canadian Agent. Lippin- 
cott. Toronto. 
Re\'iewed by Catherine McCqffrey. 
Lecturer, School of Nursing, The 
Universitv (
r Manitoba, Winnipeg, 
Manitoba. 


The main purpose of the book is to 
provide a guide for the bcginning 
in
tructor and to help her develop 
skill in using the group leadership 
method to conduct parcnt education 
cour
es. 
Further objectives identitied are. 
to encourage 'thc nurse instructor to 
develop her own teaching style. and 
to keep abreast of current research 
and practices in parent education. 
One partiéularly interesting piece 
of research is in the area of "reaction 
to the state of pregn.lIlcy." Some reports 
indicated that up to X5 percent of 
women were unhappy upon first dis- 
coveri ng that they were prcgnant. It 
was found that many women do not 
like to be pregnant and may resent it. 
This response seems to be especially 
relevant \\ hen one considers ho.... socict)' 
view... pregnancy. Society make
 thc 
assumption that every pregnant mother 
(married) wants her baby. 
One item. \\ hich was difficult to 
grasp in terms of feasibility. was that 
of "employmcnt" of thc expectant 
mother. The book 
tates: "Generally 
speaking, if she is happy in her position. 
50 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


the work not overly tiring and her 
pregnancy progressing normally. she 
may be perm itted to do so." I wondered 
ho\\ many expectant mothers have this 
choice. especially in the present time 
of intlation and world tensions. 
I strongly recommend thi
 book to 
those concerned with parent education. 
The value of 
uch a book lies in its 
variety of applications. Not only is it 
an excellent guide ti.)r the beginning 
instructor. but It has great potential for 
teaching at all levels. For example. the 
benefit of such a book. incorporated 
into the teaching of baccalaureate stu- 
dent
. can be readily seen and was also 
demonstrated by the author. 
Another major asset of this book 
is its current and relevant bibliography. 
One can appreciate the human aspect 
of the extent of the research. as demon- 
strated by the participation of pregnant 
mothers in the Olympic games; one 
can easily see how such information 
would incite the interest of the univer- 
sity student. Another benetit of this 
book is the concise form of its presenta- 
tion. which provides accessible material 
to all readers. 


Controlling th(' Spread of Infection: 
A Programmed Presentation by Belty 
Mcinnes. III pages. St. Louis. Mo
- 
by. 1973. 
Re\'iewed h\' J('{II/ Shea, reacher, 
Department - (
r Nursing, Humher 
College (
r Applied Arts and Tech- 
nology, Rexdale, Ontario. 


The author states. "the purpose of this 
book is to present. primarily to nursing 
students but also to othcr hospital per- 
sonnel. basic fundamentals that can 
be applied to the nursing management 
and control of the spread of infection 
without a prior knowledge of microbi- 
ology." The author has fulfilled her 
purpose. 
This programmed learning book has 
a traditional 
et-up. The answer(s) fÒr 
each frame appears in the answer co- 
lumn beside the frame. The frames 
are clearly and concisely written so 
that students should not have difficulty 
comprehending them. 
The book is divided into three parts. 
Part I-The Microscopic Enemy- 
presents good basic information regard- 
ing microorganisms and the spread of 
infection. One error was noted in this 
sect ion. The author states that "sterile" 
masks and cap
 must be worn in the 
operating room: this is incorrect. 
Part II - Asepsis - co"ers asepsis 
in general; mcdical asepsis. with con- 
siderable stre
s on handwashing; and 
surgical a
epsis. including methods of 
stcrilization. Part III - Practical Ways 
of Controlling the Spread of Infection 
- covers basic protective measures for 


the nurse and the patient. and princi- 
ples of asepsis as applied to nursing 
skills and to Isolation. 
The information presented in thi
 
book provides a good basic understand- 
ing of the fundamentals of microbiology 
and control of infection. There is some 
repetition from Part I in Part II. and 
from Part 11 in Part 111. It is outlined 
as being review and would be most 
helpful if the sections were being used 
at different times. In each section. 
principles. rather than specific pro- 
cedures. are stressed. 
Case stud)' frames are used through- 
out the three parts. nece
sitating appli- 
cation of the principles to practice. This 
book is appropriate for beginning nurs- 
ing studenb and other allied health 
workers who arc concerned with the 
spread of infection but who do not re- 
quire knowledgc in depth. The section 
on surgical asepsis could be omitted 
ti.)r workers not requiring this infor- 
mation. 


Rehabilitation Nursing: Perspectives 
and Applications by Victor A. Chris- 
topherson. Pearl P. Coulter and Mary 
O. Wolanin. 51'6 pages. New York. 
McGraw-HilI. 11)74. 
RI'\'iewed hy Olga Greenwell, Head 
.'Vurse, S/llIlighne.uy Hospital, Van- 
co//\' ('/". B. C. 


It has bccn rewarding to read a book 
that has so clearly done what the editors 
sct out to do. Their objective was to 
providc a single volume to u
e as a 
reference work for personnel practicing 
in i
olated area
 with limited library 
resources. or tÙr those with limitell 
readi ng time. The book is concise. 
easily read. and highly instructive. 
fhere arc 74 articlcs. called readings 
in this volume. culled from various 
journals published over the past \0 
years. The authors arc mostly nurses. 
ph)
icians. physical therapists. or social 
science personnel. Although emphasis 
has been placed on rehabilitation. the 
diseu
sion of nursing care planning and 
asse;;sment will be enlightening to 
nurses working in any field. 
The infÒrmation runs the gamut 
from pediatric
 to geriatrics. amputa- 
tions to drug abuse. alcoholi
m to CV As. 
and many more. One area that is fre- 
quently neglected but is \\ell covCfed 
here is sexualit). The book provide
 a 

eries of readings on sexuality that not 
only confirm that it is a real and dis- 
tressing problem for both stall and 
patient. but also give some do\\ n-to- 
earth advice on how to deal with the 
problem in general and ho\\ to go about 
gelti ng help for the patient. 
A unique facet of this book is that 
many of the contributors were patients 
(Col/ti/lllt'd 01/ I"'):t' 51) 


MARCH 1974 



New 8th Edition! Mosby's COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF NURS- 
ING. Extensively revised to incorporate current ideas and develop- 
ments, this respected new edition correlates nursing arts and basic 
science knowledge with clinical nursing. Including a close examination 
of the entire spectrum of nursing subjects, this book features expanded 
coverage of medical-surgical nursing and a completely updated section 
on fundamentals of nursing. A convenient outline format adds to the 
book's utility. By an editorial panel of 12_ September, 1973_ 645 pages 
plus FM I-XII, 7%" x 10'/:,". Price, $11.05. 
A New Book! CURRICULUM BUILDING IN NURSING: A Process. 
This "how to" book is designed to facilitate the task of the curriculum 
builder or planner by providing essential theory and its application to 
nursing curricula. An outstanding feature is the heuristics - examples 
of devices for involving people - placed at the end of each chapter. 
Among the many topics considered are future nursing functions; 
student and faculty characteristics; evaluation methods; learning strate- 
gies; educational and health environments; and content development. 
By EM OLIVIA BEVIS, R.N., B.S., M.A. August, 1973. 172 pages plus 
FM I-XII, 7" x 10",28 illustrations. Price, $7.10. 


A New Book! A PROBLEM-SOLVING APPROACH TO NURSING 
CARE PLANS: A Program. In this new book, case studies are used to 
reinforce and demonstrate principles in the problem solving approach 
relating to implementation of relevant nursing care plans. The book 
details problem-solving process, purposes of nursing care plans, and data 
collection and methods. By BARBARA ANN VITALE, R.N., M.A.; 
NANCY V. SCHUL TZ, R.N., M.A.; and PATRICIA MARY NUGENT, 
R.N., M.S. April, 1974. Approx. 128 pages, 7" x 10",28 illustrations. 
About $5.20. 


A New Book! THE PROCESS OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT: Com- 
ponents for Change. This book presents the development process and 
concepts of staff development education and its relationship to the 
overall continuing education effort. Areas discussed include: the history 
of staff development; adult learning; motivation; organization and 
administration; philosophy; and learning needs. By HELEN M. TOBIN, 
R.N., M.S.N.; PA T S. YODER, R.N., M.S.N.; PEGGY K. HULL, R.N., 
M.A.; and BARBARA J. CLARK, R.N., M.A.; with 2 contributing 
authors. April, 1974. Approx. 224 pages, 7" x 10", 21 illustrations. 
About $9.40. 
A New Book! THE GROUP APPROACH IN NURSING PRACTICE. 
Describing the scope of group work in nursing and illustrating the 
theoretical frameworks that guide study and practice in this area, this 
book provides a clear understanding of group process, leadership and 
methods as well as the therapeutic potential. Group psychotherapy and 
therapeutic, reference, self-actualization, self-help and reference groups 
are discussed. Other topics include co-leadership and co-therapy and 
basic leadership function. By GWEN D. MARRAM, R.N., B.S., M.S., 
Ph.D. May, 1973.220 pages plus FM I-XII, 6" x 9". Price, $5.80. 


, 
" 


MOSBY 


TIMES MIRROR 


THE C V MOSBY COMPANY L TO 
86 NORTHUNE ROAD 
TORONTO. ONTARIO 
M4B 3E5 


MARCH 1974 


VITAL SIGNS 
OF NURSING 
PROGRESS... 
NEW BOOKS 
FROM MOSBY 
0 
CLINICIAN 
INTERVENTION 
ASSESSMENT 
PRACTITIONER 
ICU- 
CCU 
PRIMARY 
PSYCHOSOCIAL 
COMMUNitY 
MOBILITY 
REVIEW 
RESEARCH 
CHALLENGE 
O.R. 
EDUCATION 


THE CANAOIAN NURSE 51 



themsdws in the sellings they descrihe. 
These particular articles offer an insight 
and immediaC) that brings home their 
me
sage \\ Ith darit). They will 
timu- 
late 
taff in even the most efficient 
rehahilitation selling to look over their 
program
 for improvements. For exam- 
ple. the author of Reading 25 describes 
how he. a C\- ,\ \\ith visual-auditory 
disturbances. could have heen spared 
much anxiety and trauma if a lillle 
thought had becn given to his bed pla- 
cement in the ward. 
"I was one of those unfortunates:' 
he writes. "whose unimpaired left 
ide 
visual-auditory fields were focused on 
a blank wall. ... Even the patient in 
th.e bed to my right was unseen. I! was 
frightening to feel isolated in a room 
full of patients who. due to blatant cir- 
cumstances. also ignored my allcmpts 
to 
ocialize. Even the most casual lan- 
guage stimulation wa
 absent while I 
was in that 'dead' corner except during 
the visitations made by my wife." 
This boo". easily read and highly 
instructive. will provide techniques 
and 
timulation for nurses in any area. 
I! should be forgiven the few lapses 
into jargon that require a second reading 
here and there. 'f;J 


accession list 


Publications on this list have been rc- 
eeived recently in the CNA library and 
are listed in language of source. 
Materials on this list except referellce 
items may be borrowed hy CNA mem- 
bers. schonb of nursing and other ins- 
titutions. Rcfáell(,c (R) itcm.\ (archive 
books and directories. almanacs and 
similar basic hooks) to IIOf go out on 
loan. rheses. also R. an: on Reserve 
and may go out on Illtcr/ihrary 10illl 
ollly. 
Requcst for loans should be made on 
the "Request Form for Accession List"' 
and should be addressed to: The Li- 
bran. Canadian Nurses' Association. 50 
Thc briveway. Ollawa. Onl. K2P IE2. 
No more than three litles should be 
requested at anyone time. 


BOOKS AND DOCUMENTS 
I. rhl' ANA ill WasllÍllgtoll, by Julia Thomp- 

on. h.ansas City. 1\1 issouri. American 
Nurses' A
sociation. 1912. 147p. 
:!. A f\' A d illical se.Hio//.\ ,'I A /)/el'/('(II/ Nu/'-'I's' 


a residential conference on: 


-I.\.",cia , tioll /<;71. New Yor". Appleton- 
Century-Crofts. 197
. :!J7p. 

. Til/' A/J/ericall Heart A.\.\o('Íatioll coo/..- 
"oo/... by the American H earl Association. 
New )01'''. DaviiJ McKay. l<n
. 41:!p. 
4. Ad/J/illi.\terillg IIlInillg .\t'/Tin', by Marie 
DiVinccnti. Boston. I ittle. Brown. 1912. 

40p. 
5. Adll/i.\.\ioll (
I patiellt.\ to hospital, by 
Howard Baderman et al. London. King 
hlward's Hospital Fund for london. 1973. 
51p. 
Ó. Alfied /J/edical educatioll directory, /973. 
4ed. Chicago. American !\Iedlcal Associa- 
tion. Council on I\ledical hlucation. f 973. 
4:!
p. 
7. Architecfllral ha,.ri,.,..\ to the physically 
di"ahfed. by Sue-Anne h.ir"land. Toronto. 
Canadian Rehabilitation Council for the 
Disabled. 1973. 54p. 
H. Cart de ga,.,ler le,\ e/((;/)/t.\, par Thérèse 
Grenier-Forest. J\lontréal. Editions du Jour. 
1973. 179p. 
9. 8,,1;,,-e addictioll: holl' to hell' yomh, by 
Florence I ieberman ct al. New) or". Behav- 
ioral. 1973. 131p. 
10. rhe hiologic age.\ o.f 11/(11/ (i'o/J/ ((Jl/cep- 
tim/ through old age. Edited by David W. 
Smith and Edwin L. Bierman. Toronto. 
Saunders. 1973. :!llp. 
(Colltillued 01/ page 54) 


This 
Publication 
is Available in 
MICROFORM 


AUTHORITY, LEADERSHIP 
AND ORGANIZATION 


June 19th-23rd, 1974, in Toronto 
sponsored jointly by 


ROSEHILL INSTITUTE OF 
HUMAN RELATIONS 


and 




 
.. 
---

 
,
 
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, -.- /11'" 

,. 
.;":' :---. ',f
.... 
 




 

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- 




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' 
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4IÞ:
 
 
' 
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... 
. 11,1..""..... '" 
J/.J 
.,' 


TAVISTOCK INSTITUTE OF 
HUMAN RELATIONS 
Centre for Applied Social Research 
London, England 
To study the dynamics of organizational functioning through 
group and intergroup events. 
Tuition: 
$250.00, plus $100.00 accommodation. 
Total fee $350.00 


from... 


Xerox University Microfilms 
300 North Zeeb Road 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 
Xerox University Microfilms 
35 Mobile Drive 
Toronto, Ontario, 
Canada M4A 1 H6 
University Microfilms Limited 
St. John's Road, 
Tyler's Green, Penn, 
Buckinghamshire, England 
PLEASE WRITE FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION 


\1\ Þ 
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Enquiries: 
Dr. Sheldon Heath, 
Rosehiliinstitute of Human Relations, 
1365 V onge Street, 
Toronto, Ontario. 
M4T 2P7 
(416) 922-3203 


52 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


MARCH 1974 



New...ready to use... 
"bolus" prefilled syringe. 
Xylocainê100 mg 
(lidocaine hydrochloride injection, USP) 


For 'stat' I.V. treatment of life 
threatening arrhythmias. 


\ 


o Functions like a standard syringe. 
@ 
o Calibrated and contains 5 ml Xylocainé. 


o Package designed for safe and easy 
storage in critical care area 


o 


The only lidocaine preparation 
with specific labelling 
information concerning its 
use in the treatment of cardiac 
arrhythmias. 


\ 


, 


+.1- 
<"0 

 

. 
"'0 
o 
." 



 


an original from 
.\.S T I
.' 


MARCH 1974 


Xylocaine'F' 100 mg 
(lidocaIne l1ydrocl1londe inlection U S.P ) 
INDICATIONS-Xylocame administered intra- 
venously is specifically mdlcated In the acute 
management or(l) vcntricular arrhythmias occur- 
ring during cardiac manipulation. such as cardiac 
surgery: and(2) life-threatening arrhythmias. par- 
ticularly those which 8rc ventricular in ongin. such 
as occur during acute myocardial infarction. 


CONTRAIII,DlCATIONS-Xylocaine is contra- 
indicated el) in patients with a known history of 
hypersensitivity to local anesthetics of the amide 
type: and (2) in patients with Adams-Stokes syn- 
drome or with severe degrees of sinoatrial. atrio- 
ventricular or intraventricular block. 


WARNINGS-Constant monitoring with an elec- 
trocardiograph is essential in the proper adminis- 
tration ofXylocaine intravenously. Signs of exces- 
sive depression of cardiac conductivity, such as 
prolongation of PR interval and QRS complex 
and the appearance or aggravation of arrhythmias. 
should be followed by prompt cessation of the 
intravenous infusion of this agent. It is mandatory 
to have emergency resuscitative equipment and 
drugs immediately available to manage possible 
adverse reactIOns involving the cardiovascular. 
respiratory or central nervous systems. 
Evidence for proper usage in children is limited. 


PRECAUTIONS-Caulion should be employed 
in the repeated use of Xylocaine in patients with 
severe liver or renal disease because accumulation 
may occur and may lead to toxic phenomena. since 
Xylocaine is metabolized mainly in the liver and 
excreted by the kidney The drug should also be 
used with caution in patients with hypovolemia 
andshoek, and all forms of heart block (see CON- 
TRAINDICATIONS AND WARNINGS). 
In patients with sinus bradycardia the adminis- 
lTation ofXvlocaine intravenously for the elimina- 
tion of ventricular ectopic beats without pnor 
acceleration in heart rate (e.g. by isoproterenol 
or by electric pacing) may provoke more frequent 
and senoUs ventricular arrhythmias. 


ADVERSE REACTIO"lS-Syslemic reaclions or 
the followmg types have been reported. 
(I) Central Nervous System: lightheadedness. 
drowsiness; dizziness: apprehension; euphoria: 
tinnitus; blurred or double vision: vomiting: sen- 
sations of heat. cold or numbness: twitching; 
tremors: convulsions: unconsciousness; and respi- 
ratory depression and arrest. 
(2) Cardiovascular System: hypotension: car- 
diovascular collapse: and bradycardia which may 
lead to cardiac arrest 
There have been no reports of cross sensilivity 
between Xylocaine and procainamide or between 
Xvlocaine and quinidine 


DO"AGE AND ADMINISTRATlOII/ Songle 
Injeclion: The usual dose is SO mg to 100 mg 
administered intravenously under ECG monitor- 
ing. This dose may be administered at the rate 
of approximatelv 2S mg to SO mg per minute. 
Sufficient lime should be allowed to enable a slow 
circulation to carry the drug to the site of action. 
If the initial injection of 50 mg to 100 mg does 
not produce a desired response. a second dose may 
be repeated after 10-20 minutes. 
NO MORE THAN 200 MG TO 300 MG OF 
XYLOCAINE SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED 
DURING A ONE HOUR PERIOD 
In children expenence with the drug is limited 
ConlinuoulIJ Infusion: Followin! a single injection 
in those patients in whom the arrhythmia tends 
10 recur and who are mcapable of recelvmg oral 
antiarrhythmic therap)'. intravenous infusions of 
Xylocaine may be administered at the rate of I 
mg to 2 mg per minute (20 1025 ug/kg per minute 
in the average 10 kg man). Inlravenous mfuslOns 
ofXylocaine musl beadmmislered underconstanl 
ECG monitonng to avoid potcntlal overdosage 
and toxicity. Intravenous inCusion should be ter- 
minated 8S soon as Ihe patient"s basic rhythm 
appean to be stable or at the earliest signs of 
toxicity. It should rarely be necessd.ry to continue 
intravenous inCusions beyond 24 hours. As soon 
as possible, and when indicated. pallenls should 
be changed to an oral antiarrh)thmlc agcnl for 
mamtenance therapy. 
Solutions for intravenouli IOCuslon should be 
preparcd by the addition of one SO ml sm!le doc;e 
vial of Xy)ocaine 2f.4. or one 5 m) Xvloeame Onc 
Gram Disposable Transfer Svnnf!:e to I litcr of 
appropriate solulion. This will proYlde a 0.1"" 
solution
 thai IS. each ml will contain I mg of 
Xvlocaine HCI. Thus I ml 10 2 ml per minUie 
wdl provide \ mg \0 2 mg of Xvlocaine HCI per 
mmute. 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 53 



accession list 


(CO/lfilllled li'olll page 51) 


I 1. Ihl' cardiac arrh\'lhlllll/.'. by Brendan 
Phibb
. 2ed. SI. Loui
. :\Io..by. IY13. 20:'p. 
12. Carl' or The ,'-'TOIII\' IJ//TieIlT. bv Virginia 
Vu"ovich and Reba D. Grubb. SI. Loui... 
!\lo
b}. I Y73. I3Hp. 
13. CaTalogll1' de .fillll' <'1 d'w//lio-\'i.'"d.,. 
1973. Otta"a. Con..eil canadien pour la 
cooperation internation.lle. 1973. ó2p. 
I.t. (;/1alo.<:II(, ol'.fillll' Oil lI'orid dl'l'eloplII('1/1 
1973. Olla"a. Canadian Council for Inter- 
national Development. 1973. ó2p. 
I:'. CI illi('al a.'-'L".\Il/eIlT 1;'1' Tfle I/u/'.\e p/'//c- 
TiTioll/,/,. by William C Fo,,"e.. and Virginia 
"'. Hunn. 51. I oui... 1\10..by. 1973. 190p. 
I ó. COIITelllpol'llry i.'.'/II'.' ill Calladiau lall' 
'''1' lIur.\/'.', b} 5hirlev R. Good and Janet 
(. "'err. :\Iontreal. Holt. Rinehart and Win- 
..ton. 1973. 19
p. 
17. CurricululII lJ//i1dillg ill lIunil/g; a 1'1'0- 
c/'.\s. b} Em Olivia Bevi... St. Loui... 1\10..by. 
I Y73. 172p. 
I K Day care, [troll'il/.<:, karl/il/g, caril/g; 
l/aTÍ/"Il/1 guidelil//'\ I,,,, The de\'elop1/1el/1 01 
da,' care .I/'/Tin', Ii". childrell. OtHt"a. Cana- 
dian Council on Social Developmenl. 1973. 
:':'p. 
19. Di.'Tril>uTiol/ or lu'alTh 1/1111IPOII'('/'; al/ 1111- 
/I/ITI/1ed hihliogl'llphy prepared by Fllen Sax. 
l\1anpo"CI' Distribution Project. Ne" Yor". 
National Health Council. In3. 2óp. R 
20. Falllily I,'alll/il/g il/ The edl/
'/I1iol/ I
r 
11111'.'/'.\ al/d 1/1idll'i"I'.', Edited by lily \1. 
Turnbull and Helena Pi7ur"i. Geneva. World 
Health Organization. 1973. :,Op. .World 
Health Organization. Public health pape,.. 
no. :'3) 
21. Guide 10 The healTh ('//re lield, 1973. 
Chicago. American Ho..pital A..
ociation. 
I Y7 3. 5H
p. R 
22. H('/IITh .,('iel/(,(" educaTiol/. Price ..chedule. 
Toronto. Mediascience Ltd.. 1973. I vol. 
23. Il/1rod ucTory cOII('/'pT.' il/ ('01/11111111 icaT iOIl 
proc<'.\.\/'.' , b} Robert O. Reid. Toronto. Her- 
"eley Studio. 1973. ó:'p. 
2
. I a jeUI/I'",e eT la drogue; raPI'orr I/'TIII 
GrouI'e d'e11lde de /'0 \IS. Genève. Organi- 
..ation I\londiale de la Santé. 1973. 
Xp. lit.. 

érie de rapport.. technique
 no. 51ól 
25. ,\ledical curl' alld 1/1edical cal'(,; pro.'pe/'1.' 
101' TIll' orgal/i:aTÍ/1II alld lill//ll/'ÍI/g or pel'- 
.\/II/al h('/lITI, care .\/'/Tin'.'. Spyro.. Andreo- 
poulo... editor. Ne" Yor". IY72. 251p. (1\Iil- 
ban" i\lcmorial I-und. Quarterly. v.50. no.4. 
pl.21 
2ó. ,\1m !> \,\. cOl/(prelr/'li.\il'L' /'(,\,Ù'II' 01 IIl1/',- 
iI/g. Xed. SI. I oui... i\lo..by. 1973. ó
5p. 
7. .'Vu/'\illg a/1/1 Tfle pro('e.\\ or comillllillg 
edu///TI/II/, hy Fld.1 S. I>opiel. SI. I oui... :\10"- 
by. 1973. 2
Xp. 
2H. I a 1,lallilicaTi/J// dn .\0 ill , par Dolore.. 
1:'. I ink et Dori.. I . Carnevali. rraduction 
revue par Cecile Boiwerl. :\lontreal. Re- 
nouve.lu Pédagogique. 1973. 2
óp. 
54 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


29. P,'yclriaTric I/unillg, by I\larguerite I UC} 
:\I.mfreda. ged. Philadelphia. Davi... 1973. 
5:'7p. 
.HI. P,yclrology a' al'plied T,' lIunil/g. by An- 
dre" i\1cGhie. óed. Fdi nburgh. Churchill 
I iving
tone. 1973. 292p. 
31. ReporT Or Tire allll/Il/lllleeTillg 01 Tire A\\o- 
daTiol/ or Regi'Tered Vu/'.\('\ 01 Nell:f,ullld- 
lalld. SI. John.... 1913. 5
p. 
.'2. Re.,ulT/I1s lil/a!.l de /'I'Tudl' ,ur /'aeTl' 
Í/(Iirllli/'/' dall.' In dif1ál'lI(\ cl'lITrl'.' de ""'TL' 
de la pI'lJl'ill('/' de (}lIehec 1971-73. I\lont- 
real. '\..sociation des Infirmièrö et Infir- 
mier.. de la Province de ()uéhec. 1973. H2p. 
n. RL'\'ÌL'II' I
r Tealll IIlInil/g, by I aura I\lae 
Dougla
s. SI. loui
. \Io..hy. 1973. 131p. 
(1\Io..by'.. comprehen
ive review 
erie..) 
3.t, Serial IJ//Micl/Tiom; ThL'Ír place alld 
Trl aT1/1ellT il/ lil>/'//rie., , by Andre" Delbridge 
O
born. 2ed. rev. Chicago. American I i- 
brary A....ociation. 197 3. 
3-tp. 
35. A .'T/III\' or e('ol/wl/in ,
r group pl'lleTice 
III Sa.,ÁaTelll'lIall, by Donald O. Ander..on 
.md Anne OJ. Crichton. V.mcouver. H.C. 
Univer..ity of Hriti..h Columbia. 1973.2 vo!... 
3ó. Tl'llil/il/g or Tire 111'1'.11' pl'llcTiTiolll'r; a di- 
lIinti al/d .\laTi.'Tical /111l/ly.' i., , hy Dori.. :\1. 
Storm... North Haven. Conn.. Connecticut 
Health Service.. Research Series. 1973. IOHp. 
IConnecticut Heahh Service.. Re..earch 
..eries no.41 

 7. La TI'III/.'fJll/'ell(,(' dL .\Oi. par Sid ney \1. 
Jourard. Traduit de I'américain par Scrge 
Baron et al.. qui ont .Üouté un addendum ..ur 
la p..ychologie humani..tique. Quebec. Fdi- 
tion.. Ste-I-oy. 1972. 291 p, 

 K WaTclr-lires oil Tire 1110 Ul/Tail/.': TI/I' 1(';- 
al/d II'r;Til/g.' 01 Erlu'l Joi/ll.'. by \largaret :\1. 
Streel. Toronto. University of Toronto. 1973. 
33óp 


PAMPHLETS 
39. B/lsic li.\1 o(guidl" /lIId illl"1'//1/1TÙ'1/ SoUI'- 
('('s lor pl'o/l'.\.\ioll/ll /11//1 pl/Tiellf." libr/lries 
ill h/J.\piTal.,. compiJcd b} Council of National 
L ibrary Association
. Joint Commillee on 
I ibrary Service in Ho..pital... Xed. Chicago. 
American Hospital A....ociation. 1973. 27p. 

O. Beyol1d /'/J//t1iCT or (,oll/pl'oll/isL': 1/111/1/111 
pl'ogl'es.' , L'I/I'irOllll/I'I1T/l1 proTecTiou /11//1 The 
UlliTed N/lTiol/s De\'e!OPII/I'I1T Progr/luI/IlI'. 
Ne" Yor". l'nited Nation
. 1973. 39p. 

\. ßyl//ll'\ /I.' III///'I/ded \I/lY 1973. Ne" 
YorL National I eague for Nur..ing. IY73. 
29p. 
-t2. Col/ege edUC/lTioll: Áey To /I pl'o/n.,i/J/1/I1 
('/Ire('/' il/ II1/I'.\TUg 1971-73. Ne" '1'01'''. Na- 
tional I c.lgue for Nursing. [)cpt. of Hacca- 
lauredte and Higher Degree Program... 1973. 
23p. 
-t3. Cou'TiTuTioll /11//1 byl/lll'.' /I, (I/IIel1dl'd 
1973. Geneva. I nternat ional Council of 
Nur..c... 197.l. 21 p. 
-t
. A guidl' To II/eTric (,oll"I'I'.lio" (SII I\lont- 
real. A
"oci.llion of Hl1..pital.. of the I)rovince 
of Quebec. 1973. 33p. 

5. -1 Joil/T .'l//Tel/l/'//1 01 TII/' -111//'/'inll/ 
,\'u/'\n' ,-J ,.",d/lT;oll /11//1 (/u' AI/1/ ric/lII S('hool 
Ift'/lITh ,-J.,-,o/'Í/lTio". RI'/'/J//TII/I'/"//lTÙJ//' 01/ 
I'duc/lTioll/l1 p/'('p/lI'llTioll /I"d dl'lilliT;Oll 01 
TII/ e\'palldl'd roIL' /II"/li/llcTiol/.' or Tfll' .,dl<",1 


I/unl' pral T/11<//1er. "'an
a
 City. No.. Amer- 
ican Nurses' A....ociation. 1973. 6p. 

ó. A II/uITi-l/aTio"al .'Twl\' of Thl' illTe/'l//I- 
TÙJ///Il lIIigr/lTiol/ I!I phvsici/ll/.' alld "/11'.\/'.'. 
Geneva. World Health Organization. 1973, 
17p. 
-t7. Nunillg 1/IIiT.'. 11'/11'/'-'. a/1(1 1'/1 Til'l/T I}('d- 
1'001/1.\: liTera11lre I'e\'Í1' II' /III/I /II/1/OT/lTl'd bil>- 
liog/'//phv, by Shevra 1.. Martin. Washtng. 
ton. D.C. Gordon A. Friesen International. 
1973. 
3p. 
-tHo Pro.<:I'IIII/., /lccI'ediTed (or p1/h/ic he/llTh 
IIul'.\i1/g prep/l/'//Tio1/. 1971-73. Ne" Yor". 
National Ledgue for Nursing. Dept. of Bac- 
calaureate and Higher Degree Program
. 
1973. Xp. R 

9. ST/Illd/lrd., 01 pl'llc1i('l'. "'an..a.. City. 1\10.. 
American Nur
e
' A..sociation. 1973. 5 
part...-Ntll...ing practice.-Community heallh 
nur..ing practice.-Geriatric nllI...ing practice.- 
\Iaternal child health nur
ing practice.- 
P
ychiatric-mental health nllr
i ng practice. 
50. I hl'l'e c/Il/I/el/J:L'S To Thl' IIunillg pwk'- 
,i,,". 'ie!ecTl'd p/lpNS }i-olll Thl' 1971 ANA 
cO""ellTiol/. h.an..a
 City. 1\10.. American 
Nur..e..' A....ociation. 1973. 32p. 


GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 
C/lII/ld/l 
51. Dept. of National Health and Welfare. 
Trl'1//I, /II L'Íg/lrl'((1' (,,,".'UlllpTio". (;I/l/ld/l 
19:!O T" 1970. Ollawa. n.d. pam. 
52. fconomic Council of Canad.1. ,-JIII/u/ll 
1'/'\'iI'II', /973. Olla"a. Informalion Canada. 
I 973. 2 I I p. 
53. Health and \\ clfarc Canada. /Ji.'/I.'T('/' 
uunil/g <Tudy; /I /'('1'01'1 To {-'II/I'I'gl'un' f/c/lITh 
SI'J'I' , icL'.\ prepared by 1-. IOITdine Davie... 
Olla".I. 1972. Hp. 
5
. Health and Welfare Canada. \'uTriTiol/: 
/I u/lTiou/l1 prioriTy. ,-J reporT I". NuTI'iTio/1 
C/lII/ld/l To The /)ep1. 01 ,V/lTioll/l1 HI'/lITh /I/1d 
WeN"I'e. OIl.lI'a I nformat ion Canada. 1973. 
152p. 
55. I\linistry of State for Science and Tech. 
nology. Tire II/irl'ol'ed .'peCTrUII/; /I collL'cTio" 
,d' },l'pOI'1.' Ii,,' TITe II0ll-.,L'ÍI'IITi.'T alld /",//-/'11- 
Ri"e('/' /ll>ouT /lchie,'el1lL'I1T., il/ C/lI1/1di/lll 
.,cie"n' /11//1 (('cI1l1ology. OIl.lI'a. Information 
Canada. 1973. HOp. 
:'ó. National I ibrar} of Canada. RL'porT 
1971/73. Olla"d. 1973. ó7p. 
57. Stati..tic.. Canada. /Io'piT/l1 i1//liC//Ton, 
J/lIIU/lI'y-JUl1e, 1973. Ollawa. Information 
C.mada. 1973. 192p. 
5H. . /1",piT/l1 'T/IT i.'T in. ".1 Ho'piT/l1 />I'd" 
1971. Olla"a Information ..mada. 197
. 
195p. 
GI'I'/IT BriT/lil1 
59. Joint Hoard of Clinical Nur..ing Studie... 
london. 1973. OUTlille cUI'riculuII/ ill /lc/'Í- 
t!t'II! (II lei elJu'rgC'/1l y 11111".\;11.': for .\({lll' rl'gi.\- 
T('/'('d 1//11'.11'.<. 19p. (Cour..e no. 19X) 
MI. . 01l1/i1//' ('url'iculuII/ i" I//I"/II//'/'d 
f'-,.\'/'himl'i(' IIunillg 1;'1' 111/1'.\/'\ 01/ Thl' I'('gi.,- 
TI'I' lor II/(,1/T/lll/ur.\(" or Thl' rl'giMI'I' 1,,1' II/II'.'e.' 
01 The IIIL'''T/II/,' 'u/>lIol'I/1/I1. lOp. (Cour..e 
no. X201 
ól. .OuTli"L' curriculuII/ iu I>dll/l'Íour 
II/",Ii/i(,/lTio1/ ill III(,IIT/Il II/II/di< /II' Ii,,' rl'gi,- 
T(,/,I'd IIunn. 12p. (Cour..e no. 7001 
MARCH 1974 



fl2. - . Olltlille cllrricllium ill child ali<I ado- 
l('Sccllt IJ.lychiatric IIl1l'Sillg 1,,1' regi.\tered 
11111'\('.\. II p. (Course no. flOO) 
fI
. - Olltlille curricllium ill gelleral illtell- 
si,'" carl' lIunill
 lor \tate ellrolled IIl1r.\('s. 
12p. (Course no. 115) 
fl4. - Outlille cllrricllillm ill operatillg 
def'artmellt lIur,\ill
 li,r .\1ate regi.\fered 
IIlIr.\('s. l-tp. I( our
e no. 17(1) 
65. . Ol/tlille cllrricllium ill \I,ecial alld 
ill1ell.\ÍI'e l/1/r.\illf: carl' "I' the l/('II'borll. 12p. 
(Course no. 401 J 
66. -. Ollllill" CII/TiclIllI1II ill -,pe";ld (//1<1 
illtell.\i,'e IIl1nillg care of Ihe lIel\'lmrll .Ii", 
state certi/Ïed midwi,'es, .\tate regi.\tered 
IIl1l'Se.\ or regi.\(<'I'ed ,\Ícf.. childrell's IIl1r.\('s. 
l.tp. (CoUl',;e no. .tOO) 
Olltario 
67. Depl. of Health. Directory I!I mll'sir,g 
pe/'.\ollllel ill charge ,!r o.l1icial pllMic health 
IIl1nillg .\('/Ticl'.\ ill Olltario. Toronto. 197
. 
4p. R 
6!( M i ni
try of I abour. Research Branch. 
('ollectÍl'e bargaillillg prm'i\ÍolI.\ ill Olltario 
mllllicipal a
reelllel11s. Toronto. 1973. II 
p. 
Vllited Sw(('" 
fl9. Departement de la Santé. de )'I-.ducatlon 
et du Hien-être. Callcer et .\oim illfirmi<'l'.\, 
1/1(/11111,1 de /'iIl.lirl/1ihe ,'isiteu\('. Revu en 
1955. Traduction par 1\1. Jean-Rodolphe 
Bordua
. New York. Dép<lrtement de la 
Santé. 1955. X!!p. 


70. National In
titutt" of Health. "oreigll 
trailled physiciam Imd Americall medicille, 
by Rosemary Steven
 and Joan Vermeulen. 
For 
ale by U.S. GOVI. Pri nl. Off.. Washing- 
ton. D.C. 1972. 170p. IDHEW Publication 
no. (N'IH) 7J-325) 


STUDIES DEPOSITED IN CNA REPOSITORY 
COLLECTION 
71. The C;'TII1I1.\/all('('.\ ill I\'hich f'o.\(of'eratin' 
f'atiellt\ alld their 1II1I'SI'.\ det<'l'lIIille lIeed {tn' 
(/II (/III/Ige.\ic, by Myrtle I. Macdonald. Mont- 
real. 1971. tl7p. IThesis IM.Sc.IAppU) 
I\IcGill)R 
72. The com.li,,'/ of patiel11S ill /ractioll: a 
de,\(Tipti,'e .\tlllly, by Wilton S. "-e7ala. Mont- 
real. 1972. fl7p. {Thesis (:\1.&,( Appl.)J 
\lcG if)) R 
73. The cOlln'rm expre\.\ed hy patiellt.\ with 
ca/'lliac cOllditioll.\ durl1lg the }i/'.\t thirteell 
day.\ ,d' ho"piwli::utÍlm alld the rl'.\polI.\('\ of 
healtll l\'odel'S al/(l other patiellt.\ to the.\(' 
COII(,('''''.\, by Ronald S. Reighley. Montreal. 
1971. IThe
i
 (I\1.Sc.1 Appl.lJ - McGill) R 
7-t. IlIfi"'lIl1/tioll IItili::ed hy de,'ell ('(mliac 
patic'IIl.\ al/(l the rdatÍl",.\hip ,,1' thi.\ illforma- 
tioll to pmgre.\.\ a.lier di\('lwrge. by 1 eola 
Anne Robin
()n. MOn! real. 1973. 53p. (The- 
sis (1\I.Sc.(Appf.)) - McGill) R 
75. I 1'.\ r(,l/lllIIi.\.\ioll.\ 111/11-' 11'\ é('ole.\ d'illnr- 
miÌ'/'I'.\ ca/lI/dielll/('.\cfi'llI/çai.\('s, par Soeur 
Rita Gagne. Montréal. 1957. 40p. R 


Request Form 
for "Accession List" 


76. Relatiollship.\ hl'1l\'eell Ufllllll/Tied moth- 
el'S alld their IIell.horll illflll/t.\ ill hospital 
by E. G,\ÌI Carleton. Montreal. 1971. flXp. 
(The
is ( M.Sc. (Appl. II - I\IcG ill J R 
77. .\It/ill" abortioll: a .\tudy of.li-rl/ale hef"/I'- 
io"r ill 1/ nisi.\ .\irtll/lioll. by Judith C. Chri
- 
tensen. Montreal. 1972. lOOp. (ThesisIM.Sc. 
IAppl.)) - I\IcGill) R 
7!!. A .\tlldy to determille if 1/ IIeed eÜ.\1.\ for 
a /'I:fj'('.\ller c.mr.\(' .1"1' ill-a('(Ì\'I' 11111'.\('" wi.\h- 
illg to refllrll to a('t;.'e IIl1nillg, by :\Iona E. 
Ca!lin. Montreal. Association of Nurses of 
the Province of I)uebcc. 19f17. 1 flp. R 
79. rI .\tlldy to filld Ollt why /'('
i.\1er('(11I111'.\('\ 
ill ,Vell:/iJ/lI/llIllI/d are illaui"e ill II II r.\ÍIIg. 
by Dawn Hanson et at. St. John's. Memorial 
l'niver
ity of Newfou'ndland. 197
. 2f1p. R 


AUDIOVISUAL AIDS 
XII. Association de
 Médecins de langue 
française du Canada. I\lontréal. 1973. 
SOllomed. -,<,ric' I, fW. 7. - Cote A. I. i\lasse 
au 
ein. 2. Coliques du jeune bébé. 
. Phlc- 
bites. - Cote B. I. Fndomelriose. 
SOllmllec/. ,\Nie I, I/O. 8. -Cote A. I. Hypo- 
glycemiant
 oraux. 2. Alcoolisme. - COle H. 
I. Ocytociques. :!. Rhill.ite ,
Iergique. J. Im- 
pui
sance 
eJ\uelle organique. 
S(/I/(//I/ed, .\érie I, I/O. IJ. - COle A. I. Syphi- 
lis. 2. Hypothyroidie. . Cute B. I. StJabi
me 
chez I'enfanl. 2. Voix rauque. 3. Hemor- 
ruides. 9 


In deeu bitus I 1 
ulcers &l r
 

,

#C
 \ 
/ 
 
 , 
./' '- ,4- 
i \ J -,. ri ., 

 .... 
\'t. 
 8 
-- /l " ...- 1 

I "'_' 
"I 
r 


CANADIAN NURSES' 
ASSOCIATION LIBRARY 


Send this coupon or facsimile to: 
LIBRARIAN, Canadian Nurses' Association, 
50 The Driveway, Ottawa K2P 1E2, Ontario. 
Please lend me the following publications, listed in the .............. 
....................................................... issue of The Canadian Nurse, 
or add my name to the waiting list to receive them when 
available. 
Item Author Short title (for identification) 
No. 


Nursing Care is 
what it's all about. 


A comprehensive film on the role of the nurse 
in the treatment and prevention of decubitus ulcers 
plus a unique concept in skin care, is available 
upon request from the Education Department, 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals, 120 North Queen Street. 
Toronto. Ontario M8Z 2E3. 
Suppliers of Alpha-Keri", therapeutic bath 
oil. and Keri" Lotion, all over body lotion. 
'T.M. Auth. User 


Request for loans will be filled in order of receipt. 
Reference and restricted matenal must be used In the CNA 
Ii brary. 
Borrower .............. ................................................................... ..... 
Registration No. ..... ........ ........................................................... 
Position ............................................................... ....... 


8 


--------------- 


-- 
-
- 


c 


D YES, please contact me to schedule a viewing of 
Westwood's in-service film on decubitus ulcers. 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals Toronto, Ontano M8l 2E3 


T\I.lme 


Area code_ Telephone No._ 


Addre ss ,.. ...... ................ ...... ..... ........ ..... ... ... ..... ....,........ '" ....... ..... 


Title 


Institution 


....- ..
..... .... ...... ...... .... ... ........ ....... ............ ...... ........ .... ..... ... ...... ...... 


Date of request .................................... ....................................... 


Address 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 55 


MARCH 1974 


City 


Province 


Postal Code 



classified advertisements 


ALBERTA 


REGISTERED NURSES required lor 70 bed accredIted 
active treatment Hospital Full time and summer 
rellpf All AARN personnel policies Apply 10 wnting 
to the Director of Nursing. Drumheller General Hos- 
pital Drumheller Albert;:t 


REGISTERED NURSES. We need you lor our summer 
relief program Come and Jom uS for a three or four 
month period You can gain a great deal of clinical 
experience dunng thiS time. as well as get to know 
our part of the country For more information on 
Central Alberta and the Red Deer General Hospital 
wflte to Personnel Department. Red Deer General 
HosPital Red Deer Alberta. 


ImmedIate openings lor TWO GENERAL DUTY 
NURSES. Salary In accordance with AARN 5625 
5750 30.bed achve accredIted hospital 80 mlle< 
from Edmonton Accommodation available Apply 
D"ector of NurSing. Daysland General Hospital 
Daysl and Alberta TOB 1 AO 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


HEAD NURSE reqUIred for an acute modern 35-bed 
hospital. located In southern BC.s Boundary area 
with excellent recreation facilities. PosItion to be 
lolled by Apnl 1974 Salary and personnel poliCies 
In accordance wIth the RNABC Apply by March 31, 
1974. to Director 01 Nursing Boundary HospItal 
Grand Forks British Columbia 


ADVERTISING 
RA TES 


FOR All 


ClASSIFIED ADVERTISING 


$15.00 for 6 lines or less 
$2.50 for each additional line 


Roles far display 
advertisements On request 


Closing dale for copy and cancellalion is 
6 weeks prior to 151 day of publication 
month. 
The Canadian Nurses' Association does 
nol revIew the personnel policies of 
the hospifals and agencies adverlising 
in the Journal. For authentic information, 
prospeclive applocanls should apply fa 
the Regislered Nurses' Associalion of the 
Province in which they ore interested 
In working. 


Address correspondence to: 


The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


fj 


50 THE DRIVEWAY 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO 
K2P 1 E2 


56 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


I I 


BRITISH COLUMBIA 


HEAD NURSE reqUired Apnl 1 1974 for a very aClive 
.i5-bed Acute Care Umt - compnslng Paediatric 
Medical I C U Surgical and OBS servICes PrevIOUs 
Head Nurses experience essential SUite available 10 
Nurses Residence Apply to D"ector of Nursing St 
Mary's Hospital. Sechelt Bntlsh ColumbIa 


OPERATING ROOM NURSE wanted for active mo- 
dern acute hospital Four Certified Surgeons on 
attendmg slaff. Expeflence of training desirable. 
Must be ellQlble lor B C. Reglstrallon. Nurses 
residence avaIlable. Salary according to RNABC 
Contract Apply to Director pI Nursing. MIlls Mem. 
onal HospItal. 2711 Tetrault St. Terrace Bntlsh 
Columbia 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES AND 
LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES requ"ed for small 
uPCoast hospItal Salary and personnel poliCies as 
per RNABC contract Salanes start at $672 00 for 
RegIstered Nurses; $571 75 for licensed Pracllcal 
Nurses Residence accommodation $2500 per month. 
Transportation paid from Vancouver Apply to 
Director 01 NurSing. St George s Hospital Alert Bay 
British Columbia 


GENERAL DUTy NURSES lor modern 30.bed accre. 
dlted hospital Salary and personnel policies In ac- 
cordance with RNABC Apply D"ector of NurSing. 
Chetwynd General HospItal POBox 507 Chetwynd 
British Columbia. 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 41-Deo 
hospital. located OP the Alaska HIghway Salary and 
personnel pol iCles In accordance with RNABC 
Accommodation available in residence. Apply 
Director 01 NursIng, Fort Nelson General HospItal. 
Fort Nelson. Bntish Columbia. 


EXPERIENCED NURSES reqUIred '" 409-bed acute 
Hospital with School of Nursing. Vacancies In 
medical. surgical. obstetric, operating room, pediat- 
ric and Intensive Care areas. BasIc salary $672.- 
$842. B.C RegIstratIon required Apply Director 
of Nursing. Royal ColumbIan HospItal. New W-est- 
minster, Bntlsh Columbia. 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES reqUired lor 
151-bed Hospital BasIc Salary $672 5M2 per 
month. Policies In accordance with RNABC Contract. 
Residence accommodation available. Apply t(.l 
Director 01 Nursing. Powell River General HOSPital 
5871 Arbutus Avenue. Powell River Bntlsh ColumbIa. 


EXPERIENCED GENERAL DUTY NURSES for modern 
10-bed hospItal with doctors offIces '" hospItal. 
S,tuated beautrfuJ west coast of Vancouver Island 
Accommodation $50.00 a month Apply Admlnostra 
tor. Tahsls Hospital Box 399 Tahsls Bntlsh 
Columbia 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES required lor an 87-bed 
acute care hospital '" Northern B C Residence 
accommodatIOns available RNABC policies m effect 
Apply to Director of Nursing Mills MemOrial Hos- 
pital Terrace. Bn..sh Columbia V8G 2W7 


NURSES REOUIRED FOR GENERAL DUTY AND 
INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, IN EIGHTY-FOUR BED 
MODERN ACUTE GENERAL ACCREDITED HOSPITAL 
IN CENTRAL BRITISH COLUMBIA RNABC CON. 
TRACT WAGES RESIDENCE ACCOMMODATION 
AVAILABLE PLEASE APPLY IN WRITING TO. DI. 
RECTOR OF NURSING CARIBOO MEMORIAL HOS- 
PITAL 517 NORTH SIXTH AVENUE WILLIAMS 
LAKE BRITISH COLUMBIA 


I I 


MANITOBA 


DIRECTOR OF NURSING reqUIred Immediately for an 
11.bed HospItal. a modern lacliity 80 miles south 
west of Winnipeg Thnvmg commumty of 1500 
people livIng quarters provided Salary scale 59.120 
10 680 per annum Will credit for past experience 
For further mformatlon contact AdmlOlstrator Notre 
Dame Hospital Notre Dame de Lourdes Mamtoba 
ROG 1 MO. Telephone 248-2092 


1 REGISTERED NURSE - 1 LICENSED PRACTICAL 
NURSE required for small active treatment hospital 
General duty live out Apply giVing experience and 
references. to Director of Nurses Hartney Medical 
Nursing Unot Hartney Manotoba ROM OXO 


REGISTERED NURSES reqUired ImmedIately for a 
Communoty Health Centre In Leaf Rapids. Manotoba. 
salary range 5720 $835 monthly For lurther Infor. 
mation and to apply please contact Michael Hoare 
Leaf Rapids Health and Social Development Centre 
Leaf Rapids. Manitoba ROB 1 WO 


REGISTERED NURSES reqUired for the 101l0w,"g 
positions In a 68-bed acute care general h05pltal 
Night Supervisor. Operating Room Supervisor Ex. 
perlence essential. General duty nUrses In Pedlatnc 
Department Remuneration for past experience Shift 
dIfferential Salary '" accordance wIth M H S C ap- 
proved rate Apply 10 Adm'nlsrralor Sre Rose Gen 
eral Hospital Stp.Rose.du.Lac Manitoba ROL 1S0. 
ReqUired ImmedIately - 3 R'EGISTERED NURSES and 
3 LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES for a new 6O-bed 
Personal Care Home. Salary In accordance with the 
recommendations of the MARN. Apply Director 01 
Nursmg. Swan River Valley Personal Care Home 
Inc.. SWAN RIVER, Manitoba ROL 1l0. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


WANTED: TWO REGISTERED NURSES. GENERAL 
DUTY required for 17-b.....d active hospital. modernly 
PQUlPPI '1 Also ONE REGISTERED NURSING ASSIS- 
TANT. GENERAL DUTY. For further ,"formatIon con. 
tact The Administrator Albert County Hospital 
Albert New BrunswIck EOA 1AO 


NOVA SCOTIA 


SENIOR FACULTY poslflon open basIc reqUIrement 
Bachelor of Nursing Responsible for pediatric as- 
pect of an Intergrated program The pediatric pro- 
gram IS Interfaced with maternity and also with med- 
Ical and surgical nursing Apply to Director of Edu 
cation Yarmouth Regional Hospital Yarmouth 
Nova Scotia 


ONTARIO 


REGISTERED NURSES lor 34-bed General HospItal. 
Salary $646 per month to $756. plus experience al- 
lowance Excellent personnel policIes. Apply to: 
Director 01 Nursing Englehart & Dlstnct Hospital 
Inc., Engl ehart. Ontario. 


SUPERVISOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING for 
progressive generalized publIC health program Salary 
adlustment lor expenence Salary range 512000 
514000 Car allowance $6000 + 12 a mIle Apply 
Dr H H Washburn. MD. D P H Medical Oflocel of 
Health Haldlmand-Norfolk Health Unot Box 247 
SImcoe Ontallo N3Y 4L1 


REGISTERED NURSES requ"ed lor a new 79-bed 
General HospItal In bIlingual communoty 01 North- 
ern Ontario French language an asset. but not 
compulsory. Salary IS $645. to $758. monfhly wIth 
allowance for past experience, 4 weeks vacation 
aller 1 year and 18 sIck leave days per year. Unused 
sIck leave days paId at 100% every year. Master 
rotatron in effect. RoomlOg accommodations available 
In town. Excellent personnel policIes. Apply to: Per- 
sonnel Director. Notre-Dame Hosp,tal. P O. Box 850. 
Hearst. Ont. 


MARCH 1974 



ONTARIO 


REGISTERED NURSES FOR GENERAL DUTY. I.C.U.. 
C.C.U. UNIT and OPERATING ROOM required for 
fully accredited hospllal Starting salary 569700 with 
regular Increments and with allowance for experi- 
ence Excellent personnel policies and temporary 
residence accommodation available. Apply to The 
Director of Nursmg Kirkland & Dlstnct HOspital 
Kirkland Lake Ontario P2N IR2 


REGISTERED NURSES; Experienced genera' duty 
nurses required for 28 bed General Hospital In North- 
West Ontario Monthly salary schedule under review 
experience recognized Nurses Residence provides 
Indl\lIdual self-contamed furnished apartments at 
minimal rental rate. Apply to the Director of Nursing. 
General Hospital. Mamtouwadge Ontano Telephone 
8263251 (are" code 807). 


REGISTERED NURSES AND REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS for 45-bed Hospital. Salary ranges 
Include generous expenence allowances R.N.'s 
salary 5680 to 5700. and R N A s salary 5
90 to 5565 
Nurses residence 
 private rooms with bath - $40_ 
per month. Aoolv to: The Director of Nursing. Gerald- 
Ion District Hospital. Geraldton Ontano POT 1MO 


REGISTEREO NURSES for GENERAL DUTY and lor 
INTENSIVE CARE NURSING. Salary and benefits 
comparative with other areas Includes 20 days Va- 
cation shift rotation reqUired Residential accommo- 
datron available Apply to Director of Nursing. Hunts- 
ville District Memonal Hospital Huntsville Muskoka 
Ontario 


LAURENTIAN UNIVERSITY inVites appllcanls for 
the 1974
75 sessIOn to teach m all clinical nursmg 
fields In a School of Nursing offering preparation 
toward a B Sc N Degree Opportunity to participate 
In designing a new nursing curnculum In a young 
and growmg university which serves North Eastern 
Ontano_ Master s qualifications In clinical specialty 
preferably. Salary and rank commensurate with 
qualifications and expenence. Bilingual (Ef)Qllsh..:. 
French) preferred Apply to MIss Alma E Reid 
Actmg Director School of Nursing Laurentian Uni- 
versity, Sudbury, Ontario 


OPERATiNG ROOM TECHNICIAN required for fully 
accredited 75-bed Hospital. You will be In the 
Vacatronland of the North, midway between Thunder 
Bay, Ontarro and Wlnnrpeg, Manrtoba. BasIc wage is 
$471.50 with conSideration for experience. Write or 
phone the. Drrector of Nursing, Dryden District 
General Hospital. Dryden. Ontarro. 


Overnight camp In Ontario (near Ottawa) reqUires 
FULL-TIME NURSE from June 26 - August 14 1974. 
For information contact D Eln Dar. 272 COd sell 
Avenue Downsvlew Ontario M3H 3X2. Telephone 
office area code (
16) 63'.2511 Evenings - (
16) 
221 .2
22 


SUMMER COED CAMP small famlly.type situatIOn 
Northern OntaJlo appro)!. 80 campers ages 14 to 16 
requires UNMARRIED RN-7 wks .June 24 to Aug 12 
Health Centre accommodatron Wrrle Or phone CAMP 
SOLELI M 588 Melrose Avenue TORONTO Ontario 
M5M 2A6 or (416\ 781.5156 


QUEBEC 


REGISTEREO NURSE required for co-ed children s 
summer camp In the Laurentlans (seventy miles north 
of Montreal) from June 21 1974 until August 20 197
 
Call 51 
.688.175J Or write Camp Maromac 
548 
8th Street Chomedey Laval Quebec H7W 2A
 


REGISTERED NURSES with experience required Im- 
mediately for Nursing Stations In English speaking 
villages on the North Coast of Quebec Transporta. 
tlOn of patrents to hospital of Blanc Sablon by ambu. 
lance helicopter Applicants must be registered or 
eligible for registration m Quebec Salary as approved 
by Q HIS Recogmtlon for experience AdditIOnal 
Isolation allowance 525 weekly Residence accom- 
modation m Nursmg Stallons 525 monthly Please 
forward application and curriculum vitae to Louise 
Gobeli Director of Nursmg. Notre-Dame Hospital 
Lourdes du Blanc Sablon Cte DuplessIs. Quebec 


IF YOU WANT TO FEEL LitlE A PERbON CONTRIB- 
UTING TO THE COMMUNITY AND NOT JUST A 
MEMBER OF IT we need GENERAL DUTY NURSES, 
lor a modern progressive 255-bed General Hospllal 
In the West end of Montreal Applications will be 
welcomed at Queen ElIZabeth Hospital of Montreal. 
Nursmg Personnel. 2100 Mar'owe Avenue. Montreal 
260. Quebec. 


MARCH 1974 


I I 


SASKATCHEWAN 


COLLEGE OF NURSING. UNIVERSITY OF SAS- 
KATCHEWAN. LECTURER or ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR Faculty members required to leach in several 
clinical nursmg fields maternal-child nursing 
intenSive care nursmg and community nursing 
Master s degree In clinical specialty preferred 
Teaching responSibility In basIc B S N program and 
the B S N program for registered nurses Apply to: 
Dean. College of Nursing. Unrverslty of Saskalch. 
ewan Saskatoon Saskatchewan S7N OWO by May 
1.1974. 


UNITED STATES 


R.N.'s - SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA - Immediate need 
eXists for medlcal-surglcat Units. Orientation and m- 
service program. Excellent salary. full paid benefits. 
We will assist you with your H-1 visa for Immigration. 
An interim permit may be obtained from the Callfor- 
ma Board of Nursing Education and Registration to 
practice nursmg in California pnor to licensmg. Con- 
tact: Personnel Director, The Hospital of the Good 
Samaritan, 1212 Shatto Street, Los Angeles, Califor- 
nia 90017. (213) 482-8111 ex 287. 


Monte Vista. Colorado requrres REGISTERED 
NURSES for 50-bed hospital Working visa readily 
available after January 1st 1974. Transportation one 
way can be obtamed Please write directly to the 
Admmlstrator. Monte Vista General Hospital Monte 
""sta, Colorado 81144 or call Calgary 271.2502 aller 
5p.m 


RN's and LPN's - Unrverslty Hospital North, a 
teaching Hospital of the University of Oregon Medical 
School, has openrngs In a variety of HosPital ser- 
vices. We offer competitive salaries and excellent 
fringe benefits. Inquires should be directed to. Gale 
Rankin, Drrector of Nursing, 3171 S W. Sam JackSOn 
Park Road. Portland. Oregon 97201 


TEXAS wants you! If you are an RN, experrenced or 
a recent graduate. come to Corpus Christi. Sparkllilg 
City by the Sea .. a city bUilding for a better 
future. where your opportunities for recreation and 
studies are limitless Memorial Medical Center. 500- 
bed general. teaching hospital encourages career 
advancement and provides in-serVice onentation. 
Salary from $682.00 to $940.00 per month. com. 
mensurate with education and experience. Differential 
for evemng shifts. available. Benefits rnclude holi- 
days. sick leave. vacations. paid hospitalizatIOn 
health life Insurance, pension program Become a 
vital part of a modern up-to-date hospital. wnte Or 
call collect John W Gover. Jr. Director of Per- 
sonnel. Memollal Medical Center POBox 5280. 
Corpus ChrlSIr. Texas 78405 


II 


AUSTRALIA 


WESTERN AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL OF NURSING- 
PRINCIPAL Appllcalrons are invited lor the POSI- 
tion Of PRINCIPAL of a new IndePendent school of 
nursing The new school will be the first of ItS kind 
m Western Australia and will be associated with a 
mator teaching hospital of over 1.000 beds Add.lronal 
clinical experience IS also obtamable at other 
metropolitan and regional hospitals The School IS 
designed to cater for 1.100 sludents and will be an 
Independent orgamzatlon controlled by a Committee 
of Management. The Principal will be chief executive 
officer A new bUilding will be completed by April 
1975 Nurse educaliOn programmes to be conducted 
by the school will compllse the hospltal.based di- 
ploma course In general nursing. nursmg aide trammg 
and post graduate and post-registration COurses. 
Candidates are required to possess a sound knowl- 
edge of nursing principles and practices a higher 
quallhcahon m education Or an allied subject to- 
gether with admlnlstratrve experience Salar
: 513.160 
per annum Memorandun of information IS available 
on request Applications stating age quallflcallons. 
eJtpenence and the names and addresses 01 two 
prolesslonal referees together with a recent photo 
graph should be forwarded to the Chairman. Interim 
Committee of Management. Western Australian 
School 01 Nursing c/o Royal Perth Hospital Perth 
WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6000. The closing date is 
22nd March. 1974. 


FACUL TV 
POSITIONS 


Open for clinical elperts 
10 teach in \he 
undergraduale programs. 


COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING 
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 
MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING 
OBSTETRICAL NURSING 
and 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 


Personnel policies and salanes in accord with Umverslty 
schedule based on qualifications and experienC9_ 


Apply In wrlflng to: 
RUTH E. McCLURE, M.P.H. 
Director, School of Nursing 
University of Alberta 
Edmonton, Alberta 
T6G 2G3 


UNITED STATES 


J 


REGISTERED NURSES - A malor hospital In Central 
Washington has opemngs for registered nurses In 
medical surgical and critical care departments. Pro. 
gresslve Inservlce department with contmurng edu 
cation program with community college Excellent 
opportunity to work in acute care hospital that offers 
challengmg experience m all areas of nursmg Hos 
pita' located rn rural type communrty located 1 
miles from MIssion Ridge Ski Area Contacl Per 
sonnet Department. Cenlral Washmgton Deaconess 
Hospital Wenatchee Wasrungton 98801 


REGISTERED 


NURSES 


positionS available immediately in a 500 
bed active Hospital for the following 
departments, - 


MedicallSurgical 
o bstetri cs/Gy neco logy 
Psychiatry 


Excellent fringe benefits. 


Apply to: 


Director of Nursing Services. 
The Metropolitan Genèral 
Hospital. 
1995 Lens Avenue, 
WINDSOR. 
Ontario N8W 1L9 


THE CANA IAN NURSE 57 



REGISTERED NURSES 
AND 
REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 


reQuired for a 104.bed. active treatment plus 
72.bed chronic care unit located at Haileybury. 
The Tri.Town area conslstmg of New LiskearO, 
Haileybury, Cobalt all within 5 miles of each 
other is located 90 miles from North Bay 
with dally plane, tram and bus service to and 
from Toronto etc. Beautiful recreational facil- 
ities including curling, skating, skiing, swim- 
ming, boating, hunting, fishing. 
Salary fully appropriate to the responsibility of 
the position; personnel policies in line with 
industry and hospital practice. Orientation 
and In.Servlce Educational programmes are 
provided. 


Apply in writing to: 
PERSONNEL DlRECTDR, 
Tømiskaming Hospitals, 
Hailøybury, Dntario. 


NURSES 


Take this opportunity to work in Calgary 
the "Stampede City" near Banff and moun- 
tains. 
Full time general duty nurses required at 
Rockyview and Holy Cross Hospitals. 
Advise all details and what starting dates 
available from May 1. 1974 until October 
1,1974. 


Personnel Officer 
Hospital District No. 93 
100 - 6712 Fisher Street S.E. 
Calgary, Alberta T2H 2A7 


QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY 


Invites applications for the following 
positions for 1974-1975: 
1. Assistant or Associate Professors in 
Maternity Nursing, Nursing of Children 
and Medical-Surgical Nursing. 
2. Assistant Professor or Lecturer in Com- 
munity Health Nursing. 
3. Lecturers in Maternity Nursing, Medical- 
Surgical Nursing and Community Health. 
Requirements: 
Master's degree in clinical field and 
experience for appointment as Assistant 
or Associate Professor; 
Baccalaureate degree and experience 
for appointment as lecturer. 
Academic appointment and salary com- 
mensurate with preparation. 
Apply: 
Dean, School of Nursing 
Queen's University 
Kingston, Ontario 
K7L 3N6 


58 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Wanted for a 56-bed hospital in the Lakes 
District of Central B.C.: 


(1) A DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
- Degree in nursing preferable, exper- 
ience in Nursing Administration in a small 
acute Hospital essential. 


(2) GENERAL DUTY NURSES 
Salary and benefits according to 
R.N.A.B.C. contract. 


Please apply to: 


The Administrator, 
Burns Lake and District Hospital, 
Box 479, 
Burns Lake, British Columbia, 
VOJ 1 EO. 


NURSING TEACHERS 
REQUIRED 


For our 2 year Diploma Program. 
Nurses holding a degree preferred. 
Duties to commence late August. Va- 
cancies in Medical - Surgical Nursing 
and Psychiatric Nursing. 


Please apply to: 
MISS C.H.A.M. STOKVIS 
DIRECTOR SCHOOL OF NURSING 
ST. BONIFACE GENERAL HOSPITAL 
431 TACHE AVENUE 
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA. R2H 2A7 


GENERAL DUTY 
NURSES 


- tor 360.bed acute general hospItal 
- cI mlcal areas Include: - Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, Paediatrics, psychiatry, Rehabill. 
tation, Extended Care and Coronary Care 
- B.C. Registration preferred but not mandltory 
dUring mitlal employment 
- Personnel policies in accordance with 
RNABC Contract. 


Please contact the: 
Director of Nursing 
Nanaimo Regional General 
Hospital 
Nanaimo, British Columbia 


GENERAL DUTY NURSES 


Required Immediately 


. for 270-bed acute care general hospital 
exp-anding to 370 beds 
. clinical areas mclude: Medicine Surgery 
Obstetrics Paediatrics Psychiatry Rehabilita- 
tion Extended Care and Intensive and 
Coronary Care 
. Must be eligible for B.C. registration 
. Personnel pOlIcies m accordance with 
RNABC Contract 
. 1973 Salary $672 - $842.00 per month 


Please contact: 


Director of Nursing 
Prince George Regional Hospital 
Prince George. B.C. 


REGISTERED NURSES 


with training in Midwifery and pre- 
ferably with a.R. experience re- 
quired for 20-bed hospital in Labra- 
dor. 


Apply to: 


Director of Nursing 
International Grenfell 
Association 
Happy Valley. Labrador 


WANTED 


DIRECTOR OF 
NURSING 


The James Paton Memorial Hospital Board IS 
accepting applications from qualified nurses to 
fill the position of Director of Nursing. 
This IS a challengmg position In a modern. 
ISO-bed regional hospital which caters to a 
population of approximately 50,000 people. 
All general hospital facIlities are provided 
I.e.. Psychiatry, Pathology, Radiology, Urology 
Ophthamology, Paediatrics "nd Surgery. The 
hospital has a nursmg staff of 120 as well as 
a fully-qualified team of 16 physicians. 
The 
a'ary for thIS po SI'IOr. IS negotiable, on 
the scale $11,109. - $14,171 
Applications In wrltmg statmg age. educa- 
hon. trainmg. experience and references should 
be forwarded to. 
The Administrator 
James Paton Memorial Hospital 
Gander, Newfoundland 
A 1 V 1 P7 


MARCH 1974 



DURHAM COLLEGE 
OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY 


in\lites applicants for 


FACUL TV POSITIONS 
in the Nursing Department 


Oualifications: 
- Registration In OntanO 
- University preparation In Nursing ed.Jcatlon, bac- 
calaureate degree preferred 
- Minimum of two years bedside nursing experience. 
Responsibilities: 
- Classroom teaching and dintcal supervision. 
Salary: 
- Commensurate with preparation and experience 
with,n the CSAO range. 
Starting Date: 
-August 1, 1974 


Direct app/icaÐons with 
complete resume to: 


DEAN OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, 
DURHAM COLLEGE OF APPLIED 
ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY, 
BOX 385, 
OSHAWA, ONTARIO. 
L1H 7L7 


HEAD NURSE 


WANTED 
IMMEDIATELY 


to supervise and administer a modern 24- 
bed acute Psychiatric Unit attached to a 
214-bed Regional Referral Hospital. This 
is an active treatment Unit. 


Applicants must possess a Baccalaureate 
degree in Nursing; Post-graduate certifi- 
cate in Psychiatric Nursing or extensive 
background in this field is essential. 


Apply in writing to: 


Director of Nursing 
Trail Regional Hospital 
TRAil, British Columbia 


MARCH 1974 


Some nurses are just nurses. 
Our nurses are also 
COmmissioned Officers. 


Nurses are very special people In the Canadian Forces 
They earn an Officer's salary, enloy an Officer's privileges 
and live in Officers' Ouarters (or in cIvIlian accommodation if they 
prefer) on Canadian Forces bases all over Canada and In many 
other parts of the world 
If they decide to specialize, they can apply for postgraduate 
training with no loss of payor privileges Promotion IS based on 
ability as well as length of service And they become eligible for 
retirement benehts (Including a lifetime pension) at a much earlier 
age than in civilian life 
If you were a nurse in the Canadian Forces, you would be 
a special person doing an especially responsible, rewarding and 
worthwhile job 
For full Information, write the Olrector of RecUiting and Selec- 
tIOn, NatIOnal Oefence Headquarters, Ottawa. Ontano KIA OK2 


,
{
 
:

 




 
"'
E
 
. 
 


Cet involved with the 
canadian Armed Forces_ 


CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALISTS 


- Cardiothoracic and Neurological Sciences - 


An excellent opportunity for self-directing individuals who are interested in the 
responsibilities of working with nursing staff as consultants, teachers and 
researchers in their specialty area. 


Successful applicants must possess a Master's Degree in Nursing and clinical 
or teaching experience. 


Apply in confidence by sending curriculum vitae to: 


Associate Executive-Director - Patient Services 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
339 Windermere Rd., London, Ontario 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 59 



REGISTERED NURSES 


A progressive General Hospital with 
focus on the patient as a person. mem- 
ber of a family and the community re- 
qUires general duty nurses, all areas, 
commensurate salary, excellent fringe 
benefits Must be eligible for Ontario 
Reg i stration. 


Apply with full resume to: 
The Director of Nursing 
The Doctors Hospital 
45 Brunswick Avenue 
Toronto, Ontario 
I Phone: 923-5411 


MONTREAL 
NEUROLOGICAL 
HOSPITAL 


A Teaching Hospital 
of McGill University 


requires 


Registered Nurses 
for 
General Duty 
Previous experience in neurological nursing not 
required. Active inservice education programme. 


Apply to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
Montreal Neurological Hospital 
3801 University street, 
Montreal 112, P.O. 


THE LADY MINTO HOSPITAL 
AT COCHRANE 


invite applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 


54-bed accredited general hospi- 
tal. Northeastern Ontario. Compe- 
titive salaries and generous bene- 
fits. Send inquires and applications 
to: 


MISS E. LOCKE 
Director of Nursing 
The Lady Minto Hospital at 
Cochrane 
P.O. Box 1660 
Cochrane, Ontario 
POL 1CO 


60 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


REGISTERED NURSES 
GRADUATE NURSES 


and 


REGISTERED NURSING ASSISTANTS 


required for 


FIVE SUMMER CAMPS 
Strategically located throughout Ontano 
and near 
OTTAWA. LONDON. COLLINGWOOD. PORT 
COLBORNE. KIRKLAND LAKE 
(accredited members - Ontano Camping 
ASSOciation) 
Applications Invited from Nurses Interested In 
supervisory assistant and general cabm 
responsibilities In the held of rehabilitation of 
physically handicapped children 
Apply in wrihng 10: 
Supervisor of Camping and Recreation. 
Ontario Society for Crippled Children, 
350 Rumsey Road, 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M4G 1R8. 


O.R. SUPERVISOR 


required for a 268-bed. fully accre- 
ditated hospital. The O.A. Super- 
visor is responsible for the O.R.. 
P.A.R. and Emergency Depart- 
ments. 
We require someone with manage- 
ment experience and advanced 
preparation in operating room 
technique and administration. 
R.N.A.B.C. policies in effect. 


Apply to: 
Director of Nursing 
Chilliwack General Hospital 
Chilliwack, British Columbia 


NORTH NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR 
requires 
REGISTERED NURSES 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 


International Grenfell Association provides 
medical services for Northern Newfoundland 
and Labrador. We staff four hospitals, eleven 
nursing statIOns, eleven Public Health Units. 
Our main I BO.bed accredited hospital is 
situated at SI. Anthony. Newfoundland. Active 
treatment IS carned on in Surgery, Medicine, 
Paedlatrrcs, Obstetrics. psychiatry. Also. 
Intensive Care Unil. OrientatIOn and In.Servlce 
programs. 40.hour week, rotating shifts. LIving 
accomodatlons supplied at low cosl. PUBLIC 
HEALTH has challenge of large remote areas. 
Excellent personnel benefits Include liberal 
vacation and sick leave. Salary based on 
Government scal es. 
Apply to: 
INTERNATIONAL GRENFElL ASSOCIATION 
Assistant Administrator of 
Nursing Services, 
St. Anthony, Newfoundland. 


THE SALVATION ARMY GRACE 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 
anvites applicalron for 
REGISTERED NURSES 
in the 
MEDICAL, SURGICAL, OBSTETRICAL, AND 
PSYCHIATRIC DEPARTMENTS, AND ALL 
SPECIAL UNITS. 


Salary is according to the A.R.N.N. agree- 
ment beginning at $6,900 per annum. 


Please apply in writing to: 


The Personnel Director, 
Grace General Hospital, 
LeMarchant Road, 
St. John's. 
Newfoundland. 


DIRECTOR OF 
NURSING SERVICES 


ApplicationS are invited for the position of 
Director of Nursing Services for an active 
222-bed general hospital In the Okanagan 
Valley The position will be available on the 
summer 01 197
 
The hospital has undergone a recent major 
expansion and complete renovation and ope- 
rates extended activation psychlatnc mten. 
sive and coronary care programs 
Applications should be In wrltmg provldmg 
details of education expenence references 
age and mterests. and be addressed to 


Administrator, 
Penticton Regional Hospital, 
Penticton, B.C. 


DIRECTOR OF NURSING 


Applications are invited for this posi- 
tion in a 167-bed fully accredited hos- 
pital. 
Individuals possessing a BSc in Nurs- 
ing and experienced in Nursing Ad- 
ministration who are interested are 
requested to supply a short resume contain- 
ing details of education. training and expe- 
rience, and date of availability for em- 
ployment. 


Resumes should be directed to: 
The Personnel Director 
Temiskaming Hospitals 
Haileybury. Ontario 
POJ 1 KO 


MARCH 1974 



c 1 6, 
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.... ...... ".:." :.... .;.' .:.".. ...... 
.." ;...;. .".;. ":." :.;' :;"':. 
:>.:. ....:......(......... ". :
" .:.....\.....::...::. .....:::..::..:. ::.....::: "." 


VICTORIA GENERAL HOSPITAL 
HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA 
fhe 
Iaritimes' largcst tcaching hospital. has immediate 
openings for Registcred Nurses. Certified Nursing Assistants 
and Orderlies. Positions are available in Special U nits and 
for general nursi ng duties. It is the principal adult teachi ng 
hospital of Oalhousie University and also opcrates a large 
school of nursing. 
SAI ARY: 
Commensurate with 4ualifications and experience. 
SPECIAL LNIT NLRSES $8170-$9582 
REGISTEREO NURSES $7816-$9229 
CERT. NL RSING ASSISTANTS $5626-$7180 
NURSING OROERLIES $4991-$6333 
BENEf-ITS: 
Full Civil Service Bcnefits. including three wceks vaca- 
tion. four wecks after 5 vears of service and shift diffc- 
rent ial. - 
For further information and/or application forms. please 
contact: 
Pcrsonnel Office, 
Victoria General Hospital, 
Halifax. "Jova Scotia. 


McMASTER UNIVERSITY 
MEDICAL CENTRE 


is 
expanding 


Applications are invited from Ontario Registered Nurses, or those 
eligible for registration, who are interested in working at a new. 
innovative teaching hospital located on the campus of McMaster 
University. Hamilton, Ontario. 
Positions will be coming available throughout the year in a variety 
of areas. If you are contemplating a change. write us indicating 
your ar eas of interest and exp erti se. 


Mr. R.E. Capstick 
Manager, Employment & Staff Relations 
McMaster University Medical Centre 
1200 Main Street West 
HAMILTON. Ontario 
L8S 4J9 


MARCH 1974 


GOOD NURSING 
POSITIONS 
OPEN IN 
SUNNY TEXAS 


COME TO PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
OF DALLAS 


Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas in Dallas 
Texas, has openings for both new and 
experienced professional graduate nurses 


Excellent working conditions and good 
fringe benefits. 


Luxury apartments provided without cost to 
new arrivals for up to 30 days. 


We will help finance your transportation to 
Dallas by forwarding your fare. (Can be paid 
back over the length of your contract.) 


One-year contract required. 


Personal interviews with those interested 
will be conducted by our staff in Ontario. 


Presbyterian Hospital is a 485-bed acute 
care general hospital providing all major 
services. Beautiful new physical plant 
located on 70-acre campus in one of the 
city's finest and fastest-growing residential 
neighborhoods. 


For more information write: 
Barbara Woodard, R.N., Ed. D. 
Director of Nursing 


PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL OF DALLAS 
8200 WALNUT HILL LANE 
DALLAS, TEXAS 75231 
HIE CANADIAN NURSE 61 



SUPERVISOR OF NURSING REQUIREO FOR A 
COMMUNITY SPONSORED HEALTH & SDCIAL 
DEVELOPMENT CENTRE IN 
LEAF RAPIDS. A MODERN ATTRACTIVE 
NEW COMMUNITY IN THE MID.NORTH OF 
MANITOBA POPULATION OF 
APPROXIMATELY 2,000 RISING 
TO 3,000 PEOPLE 


We are looking for a person with organi- 
zational and administrative ability, in- 
terested in playing an active role in the 
early development stages of our Health 
Centre. 
SALARY: Approximately $12,000 depend- 
Ing upon Qualifications and ex- 
perience. 


Please apply to: 
Mr. Michael Hoare, 
Leaf Rapids Health and Social 
Development Centre, 
Leaf Rapids, Manitoba, 
ROB 1WO. 


THE MONTREAL 
CHilDREN'S HOSPITAL 
REGISTERED NURSES 
NURSING ASSISTANTS 


Our patient population consists of 
the baby of less than an hour old 
to the adolescent who has just 
turned seventeen. We see them in 
Intensive Care, in one of the Med- 
ical or Surgical General Wards, or 
in some of the Pediatric Specialty 
areas. 
They abound in our clinics and 
their numbers increase dailv in our 
Emergency. 
If you do not like worKing with 
children and with their families, 
you would not like it here. 
If you do like children and their 
families, we would like you on our 
staff. 
Interested qualified applicants 
should apply to the: 
DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
Montreal Children's Hospital 
2300 Tupper Street 
Montreal 108, Quebec 


62 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


nurses 


who want to 


nurse 


At '\ ork Central you can join 
an active. interested group of 
nurses \\ ho want the chancc to 
nurse in its broadest sense. Our 
I 26-bed. fully accredited hospi- 
tal is YOllJ1g. and already expand- 
ing. ;\iursing is a profession we 
re
rect and
 we were the first to 
plan and dnclop a unique nurs- 
ing audit system. I'here arc 
opportunitie<; for gain ing wide 
experience. tor getting to know 
patients as well as staff. 


Situated in Richmond Hill. all 
the cultural and entertainment t
t- 
cilities of Metropolitan Toronto 
arc available a few miles to the 
South. .. and the winter and 
summer holiday and week-end 
pleasures of Ontario are easily 
accessible to the North. If you 
are really interested in nursing. 
you arc needed and will be made 
welcome. 


Apply in person or by mail to the 
Director of :\ursing. 


YORK 
CENTRAL 
HOSPIT AL 


RICH\10
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O:\TARIO 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
TORONTO, ONTARIO. 


REGISTERED NURSES 


630.bed fully accredited Hospital provides 
experience in Emergency, Operating Room, 
Post Anaesthesia Room, Intensive Care Unit. 
Orthopaedics, Psychiatry, Paediatrics, Obste. 
trics and Gynaecology, General Surgerv and 
M
ci
, . 
BasIc 2 week Onentatlon Program and con- 
tinuing Active Inservice Program for all levels 
of Staff. 
Salary is commensurate with preparatIOn and 
experience. 
Benefits include Canada Pension Plan, Hospital 
Pension Plan, Unemployment Insurance.- 
Group life Insurance and O.H.I.P. (66.2/3 0 0 
Basic Rate paid by Hospital). - Extended 
Health Care Plan - Supplementary Blue Cross. 
After 3 months, cumulative sick time. 
Rotating periods of duty - 40 hour week- 
10 Statutory holidays - 3 weeks annual vaca- 
tion after completion of one years service. 
APPLY: 


ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR 
OF NURSING SERVICE 


ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL 
30 The Queensway 
TORONTO 3, ONTARIO. 


NURSING EDUCATION 
CO-ORDINATOR 


For community orientated General Hospital 
with expandmg programmes Approximately 
.100 nUrSI ng personnel 
Duties will Include planning. dlrectmg 1m 
plementmg and evaluating educallonal pro- 
grammes for all levels of nursmg personnel 
focusmg on the patient as a person. a mem- 
ber of the family and the community 
Salary and Frmge Benefits commensurate 
Must nave 
Masters Degree m Nursing 
Expenence In contmumg education 
Eligibility for Ontario Registration 


Write: 


The Director 01 Nursing 
The Doctors Hospital 
45 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto. Ontario 
OR PHONE: 416-923-5411 


MARCH 1974 



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VICTORIA GENERAL HOSPITAL 
HALIFAX. NOVA SCOTIA 


The :\Iaritimes' large.,t ho"pital. has immediate openings for 
Clinical Nursing Supervi"or,. It i, the principal adult teach- 
ing hospital of Dalhousie Univcrsit} and also operates a 
large school of Nursing. 
SAI ARY: $1 1.5 nO - $\3.537 
CI INICAI NLRSING SLPERVISORS 
A I\la.,ters Degree is preferable but candidates with a 
Bachelors' Degree would be given consideration, 3 years 
experience. I of which was at the supervi,ory level is 
required. Courses in Clinical Special it} Nursing. especially 
in \lcdical or Surgical Nur.,ing would he considered. 
BFNEFITS: 
Full Civil Service Benefit.,. including three weeks vaca- 
tion and four wed.., after five vears ofscrvice. 
Competition is open to both n1en and women. 
For further information and/or application form,. please 
contact: 
Personnel ültice. 
VictorIa General Ho'pitdl. 
Halifax. Nova Scotia. 


REGISTERED 
NURSES 


Applications are invited for vacancies that we expect to develop 
in all areas of this 1,000 bed fully accredited hospital. We are 
especially interested in applicants with post graduate training 
in any of the specialties. Salaries from $665 to $855 with start- 
ing rate dependant on experience and Qualifications. 
Calgary is a city of 425,000 nestled in the foothills of the Rock- 
ies. In addition to all of the usual cultural and sports activities 
available in any major city, 80 miles distant is a mountain play- 
ground of ski slopes, nature trails and hot springs. 
Why not sample western hospitality by joining the staff of a 
progressive hospital in a growing young city? 
Apply to: 


Mrs. Joyce Nazar 
Department of Personnel 
Calgary General Hospital 
841 Centre Avenue East 
Calgary, Alberta 
T2E OA1 


MARCH 1974 


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 .
 __ '}.., edical Services Branch 
I I'
' Department of National I 
I" Health and Welfare 
I , Ottawa, Ontario Kl A OK9 I 
I I 
I Please send me more mformatlon on nursing I 
I opportunities in Canada
s Northern Health Service I 
I Name: I 
I Address: I 
City: Prov: _ 

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I .. Health and We/lare Santé e! B.en êlre socIal 
Canada Canada 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 63 



Certificate In Tropical 
Community Medicine & Health 


This three.months course, held twice a year, is specifically designed 
for non.physician members of the Health Team. It is open to Nurses, 
Health Inspectors, Health Educators, Administrators and Economists, 
and others concerned with Community Health. particularly in the 
Developing Area. An objective of the course is to acquaint students 
with the nature of Health Care practices and problems i,l these areas. 
Participants are integrated with physicians attending the Diploma 
m Tropical Medicine and Hygiene course, for core subject material in 
Tropical Medicine, Tropical Community Health. Tropical Paediatrics, 
Parasitology and Entomology. So far as practicable, appropriate electives 
will be geared to the needs of individual sti{!ents. 
A Cerllf,cate in Tropical Community Medicine and Health IS awarded, 
by the Incorporated liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, on satisfac. 
tory completion of the course and examination. 
The course fee is normally (56.50 which covers tUition and 
examination. Accommodation is an additional expense and is the res. 
ponslbllity of the student. The School may be able to advise on ob. 
taining accommodation. 
A prospectus and application form may be obtamed from the Admm- 
Istrative Secretary, The School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, 
liverpooll3 5QA, England. 
Early application for places IS advised Expected dates of future 
courses are: 


September 16 - December 18,1974 
January 6 - April 9, 1975 
September 15 - December 17. 1975 
and similar dates each year. 


DIRECTOR 
OF 
NURSING 


Applications are invited for this position in a 240- 
bed convalescent - rehabilitation fully accredited 
hospital. 
Applicants should have a B.Sc. in nursing and 
experience in nursing administration. A knowledge of 
French would be an asset. 


Direct applications to: 


GENERAL MANAGER 
MONTREAL CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 
3001 KENT AVENUE 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC 
H3S 1M9 


64 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


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THE SCARBOROUGH 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


invites applications from: 
Registered Nurses and Registered Nursing Assist- 
ants to work in our 650-bed progressive, accredit- 
ed, community-centered, active treatment hospital. 
We offer opportunities in Medical, Surgical, Paediatric, and Obstetrical 
nursing. 
Our specialties include a Burns and Plastic Umt, Coronary Care, Intensive 
Care and Neurosurgery Units and an active Emergency Department. 
. Obstetrical Department - participation in "Family centered" teach. 
ing program. 
. Paediatric Department - participation in Play Therapy Program. 
. Drientati on and on-goi'1l staff education. 
. Progressive personnel policies. 
The hospital IS located m Eastern Metropolitan Toronto. 
For further information. write to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
SCARBOROUGH GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
3050 Lawrence Avenue, East, Scarborough, Ontario. 


THE RELIGIOUS 
HOSPITALLERS 
OF SAINT JOSEPH 


INVITE YOU 


to share their 300 year heritage of service to the 
Church in health. education and welfare services in 
the United States, Canada and France 
to share their availability to reach out to those m 
need m Africa, Peru and the Dominican Republic 
proclaiming Christ's love by care and preventIOn. 
teaching and development programs 
to share their common hfe of prayer and work In a 
spirit of openness to God and the needs of others 


R.S.V.P. FORMATION CENTER 
438V2 College SI. 
Burlington, Vermont 
05401 


FORMATION CENTER 
4 Toronto Street, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 
K1S ON2 


MARCH 1974 



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I\CCOMMODATION FOR 1974 ANNUAL MEETING CNA WINNIPEG MANITOBA JUNE 16.21 


HOTEL RATES 



ORTHSTAR INN 
'88 Portage Ave., 
Vlnnipeg, Manitoba 

3C OB8 
-JOTEL FORT GARRY 
Vinnipeg, Manitoba 

3C OR3 


$24 00 - $28 00 


$30.00 - $34.00 


$24.00 


$30.00 


VINNIPEG INN 

 Lombard Place 
Vinnipeg, Manitoba 

2B OY3 


$23 00 


$29.00 


vices are progressive! 


.R-Single Room DB-Double Bed TB-Twin Beds 

eaistrants will make their own reservat,ons by wnt.ng directly to the above addresses. 
300k early to aVOId disappointment' 


REQUIRED 
IMMEDIATEL Y 


So 


. 


IS nursing 


For a 58-bed Personal Care Home, 
a modern facility, 80 miles south 
west of Winnipeg. Thriving com- 
munity of 1500 people. Living 
quarters provided. Will credit for 
past experience. Excellent salary 
and fringe benefits 


at 


For further information contact: 
Administrator 
Foyer Notre Dame Inc. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes, 
Manitoba ROG 1 MO 
Telephone: 248-2092 


The Montreal General Hospital 


a teaching hospital of McGill University 


REGISTERED NURSES 


Come and nurse in exciting Montreal 


for 


GENERAL DUTY 


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for 
General or Specialized wards includ- 
ing O.R. for SSG-bed hospital on Uni- 
versity Campus. 
Team or Unit Nursing 
Liberal fringe benefits 


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The Montreal General Hospital 
1650 Cedar Avenue, Mantreal, Quebec HJG IA4 


Please tell me about hospital nursing under Quebec's new concept of Social and 
Preventive Medicine. 


for further information please 
contact: 
Employment Officer, Nursing, 
University Hospital, 
Saskatoon, Sask. 


Nome 


Addren 


Quebec language requirements do not apply to Canadian applicants. 


L-----------____________________J 
THE CANADIAN NURSE b3 


MARCH 1974 



Certificate In Tro
 
Community Medicine! 


This three-months course, held tWice a year, IS 
for non.physician members of the Health Team. It 
Health Inspectors. Health Educators. Administrat! 
and others Concerned with Community Health, 
Developing Area. An objective of the course is 1 
with the nature 01 Health Care practices and problem 
Participants are integrated with physIcIans at! 
in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene course, for core 
Tropical Medicine, Tropical Community Health. 
Parasitology and Entomology. So far as practicable, 
will be geared to the needs of Individual stëöents. 
A Certillcate in Tropical Community Medicine an 
by the Incorporated Liverpool School of Tropical 1\1 
tory completion of the course and examination. 
The course lee is normally f 56.50 which 
examination. Accommodation is an additional exp' 
ponslbility of the student. The School may be at 
ta ini ng accommodation. 
A prospectus and application form may be obtai 
Istratlve Secretary The School 01 Tropical MedicI 
LiverpoolL3 5QA, England. 
Early application lor places IS advised. Expec 
courses are: 


September 16 - December 18,1974 
January 6 - April 9, 1975 
September 15 - December 17, 1975 
and similar dates each year. 


DIRECTOR 
OF 
NURSING 


Applications are invited for this position in a 240- 
bed convalescent - rehabilitation fully accredited 
hospital. 
Applicants should have a B.Sc. in nursing and 
experience in nursing administration. A knowledge of 
French would be an asset. 


Direct applications to: 


GENERAL MANAGER 
MONTREAL CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL 
3001 KENT AVENUE 
MONTREAL, QUEBEC 
H3S 1M9 


f.4 THF CANAntAN NURSE 


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. Orientation and on-goi'1l staff education. 
. Progressive personnel policies. 
The hospital is located in Eastern Metropolitan Toronto. 
For further information. write to: 
The Director of Nursing, 
SCARBOROUGH GENERAL HOSPITAL, 
3050 Lawrence Avenue, East, Scarborough, Ontario. 


Þ1
 
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W 


THE RELIGIOUS 
HOSPITALLERS 
OF SAINT JOSEPH 


INVITE YDU 


to share their 300 year heritage 01 service to the 
Church In health, education and welfare services in 
the United States, Canada and France 
to share their availability to reach out to those In 
need in Africa, Peru and the Dominican Republic 
proclaiming Christ's love by care and prevenllon, 
teaching and development programs 
to share their common life of prayer and work In a 
spirit 01 openness to God and the needs of others 


R.S.V.P. FORMATION CENTER 
438V2 College SI. 
Burlington, Vermont 
05401 


FORMATION CENTER 
4 Toronto Street, 
Ottawa, Ontario. 
K1 S ON2 


MARCH 1974 



RED DEER COLLEGE 


requires 


NURSING 
INSTRUCTOR(S) 


Position(s) open July 1st, 1974. Masters 
Degree in a Clinical Specialty preferred. but 
Baccalaureate Degree considered. Exper- 
ience in Nursing Practice essential. Instruc- 
tors involved in several practice settings. 
Program is integrated by teaching of basic 
concepts of Nursing. Post-basic nursing 
courses also in the planning stages. 
Apply with - 
(1) Curriculum Vitae 
(2) References 
to: Dr. G.O. KELLY 
Director of Programs 
Red Deer College 
Red Deer, Alberta. 


R.N.'S & L.P.N.'S 
REQUIRED 
IMMEDIATEL V 


For a 58-bed Personal Care Home. 
a modern facility, 80 miles south 
west of Winnipeg. Thriving com- 
munity of 1500 people. Living 
Quarters provided. Will credit for 
past experience. Excellent salary 
and fringe benefits. 


For further information contact: 
Administrator 
Foyer Notre Dame Inc. 
Notre Dame de Lourdes, 
Manitoba ROG 1 MO 
Telephone: 248-2092 


REGISTERED NURSES 


for 


GENERAL DUTY 


for 
General or Specialized wards includ- 
ing a.A. for 550-bed hospital on Uni- 
versity Campus. 
Team or Unit Nursing 
Liberal fringe benefits 


for further informatIOn please 
contact: 
Employment Officer, Nursing, 
University Hospital, 
Saskatoon, Sask. 


MARCH 1974 


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Quebec's Health Services are progressive! 


So 


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nursing 


at 


The Montreal General Hospital 


a teaching hospital of McGill University 


Come and nurse in exciting Montreal 


r-------------------------------. 


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The Montreal General Hospital 
1650 Cedar Avenue, Monlreal, Quebec H3G IA4 


Please lell me aboul hospilal nursing under Quebec's new concepl of Social and 
Preventive Medicine. 


Name 


Addren 


Quebec language requirements do nol apply 10 Canadian applicants. 


L_______________________________J 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 65 
. 



EXTENSION COURSE IN 
NURSING UNIT ADMINISTRATION 


REGISTERED NURSES employed full time in management posi- 
tions may apply for enrolment in the extension course in Nursing 
Unit Administration. A limited number of registered psychiatric 
nurses may also enrol. The program is designed for nurses who 
wish to improve their administrative skills and is available in French 
and in English. 
The course begins with a five day intramural session in September, 
followed by a seven month period of home study The program 
concludes with a final five day workshop session in April or in May. 
The intramural sessions are arranged on a regional basis. 
The extension course in Nursing Unit Administration is sponsored 
jointly by the Canadian Nurses' Association and the Canadian Hos- 
pital Association. 
Registered Nurses interested in enrolling in the 1974-75 class 
should submit applications before May 15th. Early application is 
advised. The tuition fee of $175.00 is payable on or before July 1 st. 


For additional information and application forms direct 
enquiries to: 


Director, 
Extension Course in Nursing Unit Administration, 
25 Imperial Street, 
Toronto, Ontario M5P 1C1 


WE CARE 


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HOSPIT AL: 
Accredited modern general - 260 beds Expansion 
to 420 beds in progress. 
LOCATION: 
Immediately north of Toronto. 
APARTMENTS: 
Furnished - shared. 
Swimming Pool, Tennis Court, Recreation Room, 
Free Parking. 
BENEFITS: 
Competitive salaries and excellent fringe benefits. 
Planned staff development programs. 


Please address all enquiries to: 
Assistant Administrator (Nursing) 
York County Hospital, 
NEW MARKET. Ontario. 
L3Y 2R1 
66 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


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Support Easter Seals. 


UNIVERSITY OF 
ALBERTA HOSPITAL 


EDMONTON, ALBERTA 


invites applications from general duty nurses 


Opportunities for Professional development m 
general and specialty areas of Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing, Paediatrics, Obstetrics, Psychiatry, 
Operating Room. Renal Dialysis Unit. and Extend- 
ed Care. 


Planned Orientation Program, 
In-service Education Program. 


Salary commensurate with education and expe- 
rience. 
For further information write to: 


EMPLOYMENT SUPERVISOR - NURSING 
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA HOSPITAL 
84 Avenue & 112 Street 
Edmonton, Alberta 


MARCH 1974 



SHERBROOKE HOSPITAL 


SHERBROOKE,QUEBEC. 
invites applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 
GENERAL DUTY 


138-bed active General Hospital; fully accredited with 
Coronary, Medical and Surgical Intensive Care. 
Situated in the picturesque eastern Townships, 
approximately 80 miles from Montreal via autoroute. 
Friendly community, close to U.S. border. Good 
recreational facilities. Excellent personnel policies. 
salary comparable with Montreal hospitals. 


Apply to: 


Director of Nursing 


SHERBROOKE HOSPITAL 


Sherbrooke, Quebec. 



QA 
ORTHOPAEDIC k ARTHRITIC 
HOSPITAL 
'V IV 


43 WELLESLEY STREET, EAST, 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
rJl4V 1H1 


Enlarging Specialty Hospital offers a unique op- 
portunity to nurses and nursing assistants interested 
in the care of patients with bone and joint disorders 
Must be registered in the Province of Ontario. 
Preparation by post-graduate education or exper- 
ience required for Senior positions 


MARCH 1974 


Join our team at 
Sunnybrook 
Medical Centre- 
and grow! 


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· University Teaching Hospital 
· In-Service Opportunities 
· Active Care 
· Extended Care 
· Good Public Transportation 
· Residence Available 


Write today: 
Selection Officer 
Personnel Department 
Sunnybrook Medical Centre 
2075 Bayview Avenue 
Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 



 
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THE CANAOV<N NURSE 67 



OPERATING ROOM 
NURSES 


- required for 270 bed acute care 
hospital 
- expanding to 370 beds 
- must be eligible for S. C. registration 
Personnel policies in accordance 
with RNASC contract 
- 1973 salary $672.00 - $842.00 per 
month plus credit for postgraduate 
certificates and experience 
Please contact: 
Director of Nursing 
Prince George Regional Hospital 
Prince George. B.C. 


NEWFOUNDLAND 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES 


PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES are reQuired to 
carry out a generalIzed programme In rural 
areas of the province. 
Applicants should have a baccalaureate de. 
gree wIth a malor or a diploma In public health 
nursmg 
Salary and frmge benefits In accordance with 
the collective agreement of the AssociatIOn of 
Registered Nurses of Newfoundland and appll. 
cants should be eligible for registration In the 
aSSoCiatIOn 
For application forms and/or further mforma- 
tlon apply In writing to 


Director 
Public Health Nursing Division 
Department of Health 
Confederation Building 
St. John's, Newfoundland 


PATIENT CARE STAFF 


The following permanent positions are 
available for qualified experienced per- 
sonnel. Salaries will be in accordance 
with current collective agreements. 


HEAD NURSE PEDIATRICS 
REGISTERED NURSES - General Duty 
ORDERLIES 


Reply in confidence to: 


Director of Nurses 
Vernon Jubilee Hospital 
Vernon, British Columbia 
V1 T 5L2 


68 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE (CEGEP) 
Ste Anne de Bellevue 
(Suburban Montreal) 
THREE-YEAR NURSING PROGRAMME 


requires 


ADDITIONAL TEACHING STAFF 
for September, 1974. 


Applicants should possess a R.N. Bachelor's Degree in nursing and a minimum of 
two years general nursing experience. 
John Abbott College is a community college serving the West Island of Montreal. 
It offers a park-like setting, close to the city, on campus sports. recreation, and the 
pOSSibility of residence on or close to the campus. 
Teaching salaries according to Quebec teacher's scale, excellent fringe benefits, 
group insurance. pension plan, health benefits, and two months paid vacation. 


Address application and completed curriculum vitae to: 
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 
JOHN ABBOTT COLLEGE 
P.O. BOX 2000 
STE ANNE DE BELLEVUE, QUEBEC 
H9X 3L9 


MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY OF 
NEWFOUNDLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 


IS 


Analyzing and revising its curricula and is expanding programs to better prepare 
graduates in leadership for the future health care system. 
Additional personnel required August 1974. 
There are positions open for faculty with creative ability and advanced preparation 
in: 


NURSING OF ADULTS 
NURSING OF CHILDREN 
PARENT-CHILD NURSING 
MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 
CURRICULUM DESIGN 
MANAGEMENT OF NURSING CARE 
RESEARCH IN NURSING 
COMMUNITY NURSING 
Preparation at the Master's level is preferred but persons with a baccalaureate and 
appropriate experience will be considered. 
Please direct inquiries or applications to: 
Miss MARGARET D. McLEAN 
Director, School of Nursing 
Memorial University of Newfoundland 
St. John's, Newfoundland 


MARCH 1974 



The George Brown College of Applied Arts 
and Technology 


Requires 


REGISTERED NURSES 


DEAN, NURSING DIVISION 


Reporting to the Vice-president. Academic, the 
Dean will be responsible for the direction, coordination 
and development of the Nursing Division of the College. 
(Student enrolment: 1,200; staff: 170). The Dean's imme- 
diate concern will be in the integration of the Nursing 
Schools of St. Joseph's and St. Michael's Hospitals, the 
Toronto General Hospital, the Toronto Westem Hospital 
and Nightingale into a division of the College. The division 
will offer diploma nursing, affiliate and graduate programs. 


This 500-bed chronic and convalescent hospital has imme- 
diate full-time and part-time vacancies for Registered 
Nurses or Graduate Nurses with pending Ontario registra- 
tion. 
Positions offer starting salaries commensurate with exper- 
ience, liberal fringe benefits and scope for advancement. 


The appointment will be made no later than Septem- 
ber 1, 1974. 


For an interview please contact: 


Interested applicants should forward resumes by 
April 15,1974 to: 


Director of Personnel, 
P.O, Box 1015, 
Station B, 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M5T 2T9. 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
QUEEN ELIZABETH HOSPITAL 
130 DUNN AVENUE 
TORONTO, ONTARIO 
M6K 2R7 
Tel.: 537-2411 


VANCOUVER 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 



 


Invites applications for 


REGULAR and RELIEF 
GENERAL DUTY 


Nursing positions in all clinical areas of an active 
teaching hospital, closely affiliated with the University of B.C. 
and the development of the B.C. Medical Centre. 


For further information, please write to: 
PERSONNEL SERVICES 
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL 
855 WEST 12TH AVE. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 


MARCH 1974 


THE CANADIAN NURSE 6q 
. 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 


TORONTO 
GENERAL HOSPITAL 


A challenging position in a modern (1971) 192 bed psychiatric 
hospital with Day Centre and Out Patient Clinic The hos- 
pital IS about to become part of a new Community Mental Health 
Centre for the City of Halifax and surrounding area (pop. 150.000) 
and the expansion is planned to include affiliation with Dalhousie 
Uni versity. 
Qualifications 
Ehglbl e for Nursing Registration in Nova Scotia; 
A degree in nUrsing. preferably at Masters level. with consider- 
able psychiatric experience; 
Administrative experience in a psychiatric setting; 
Recent experience in Community Mental Health Programmes 
would be desirable. 


Invites applications from 


REGISTERED NURSES 
REGISTERED NURSING 
ASSISTANTS 
FOR GENERAL DUTY 


Salary: According to qualifications and experience. 


- Superior opportunities for Professional Growth 
and Development. 
- Progressive Personnel Policies. 
- Excellent opportunities for advancement in 
atmosphere of medical excellence. 


Please apply in writing with a resume stating full 
details of education and experience to: 


Please apply to:- 


The Administrator 
Abbie J. Lane Memorial Hospital 
5909 Jubilee Road 
Halifax, Nova Scotia 
B3H 2E2 


Personnel Office 
TORONTO CENERAL HOSPITAL 
101, College St.. 
Toronto, Ontario, 
M5G 1L7. 


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Jewish G
!lJ
!JfJl Hospital 


A modern 700 bed non-sectarian hospital which has general and special services. 
Active In-Service Education Programme. including Planned Orientation Programme. 
Excellent personnel policies. Bursaries for post-basic University courses in Nursing 
Supervision and Administration. 
Applications invited from Registered Nurses and Nursing Assistants. 
For further information, please write: 
Director, Nursing Service JEWISH GENERAL HOSPITAL 
3755 Cote St. Catherine Road Montreal 249, Quebec 


70 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


MARCH 1974 



SASKATCHEWAN REGISTERED 
NURSES' ASSOCIATION 


invites applications for the position of 


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 


This position entails managing the business affairs of the 
6,500-member association. Duties include participating in the 
development and implementation of policy, budgeting and 
financial management. communication with groups and individu- 
als. The successful applicant will have over-all responsIbility for a 
staff of ten. and will answer directly to the association's 
seven-member governing council. 
Salary range: $15,000 - $17,000 per annum. 
Qualifications: Applicants must be eligible for registration with 
the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses' Association, have a 
masters/baccalaureate degree with a major in administration, 
several years experience in an administrative position or related 
experience. 
Applications, giving full details of education, qualifications 
and experience, should be sent to: 


Miss ELEANOR LINNELL, Chairman 
Selection Committee 
607 - 1100 Broadway Avenue 
Regina, Saskatchewan 
S4P 1 E3 


RN and RNA 


Permanent or summer staff positions available 
Active 250-bed General Hospital 
Year-round recreational area of scenic Georgian 
Bay 
Good salary and benefits 
Residence accommodation 


For information write 


Executive Director of Nursmg 
General & Marine Hospital 
1201-6th Avenue West 
Owen Sound, Ontario 
N4K 5H3 


HEALTH 
SCIENCES 
CENTER 


WINNIPEG, 
MANITOBA 


,1 . 


\_1;. 



 


z:..- 


... 


, 


THIS 1345 BED COMPLEX WITH ITS SEVERAL AMBULATORY CARE 
CLINICS. AFFILIATED WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA 
CENTRALLY LOCATED IN A LARGE, CUL TURALL Y ALIVE 
COSMOPOLITAN CITY. 


INVITES APPLICA TrONS FROM 
REGISTERED NURSES SEEKING PROFESSIONAL 
GROWTH. OPPORTUNITY FOR INNOVATION, AND JOB 
SATISFACTION. 
ORIENTATION - Extensive two week program:.lt full salary 
ON-GOING EDUCATION - ProvIded through 
actIve in-service programmes in all patient care areas 
opportunity to attend conferences, institutes, meetings of professional 
association 
post basic courses In selected climcal specialties 
PROGRESSIVE PERSONNEL POLICIES 
salary based on experience and preparation 
paid vacatIon based on years of service 
shIft differential for rotating services 
to statutory holidays per year 
Insurance. retirement and pension plans 
SPECIALIZED SERVICE AREAS include orthopedics, psychiatry. post 
anaesthetic, casualty, intensive care. coronary care. respiratory care, dialysis. 
medicine and surgery. obstetrics, gynaecology and rehabilitation. 


ENQUIRIES WELCOME 
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE WRITE TO: 
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT. NURSING SECTION 
HEALTH SCIENCES CENTRE, 
700 WILLIAM AVENUE, WINNIPEG, MANITOBA R3E OZ3 


MARCH 1974 


THE CANA
IAN NURSE 71 



I nd ex 
to 
Advertisers 


March 1974 


Astra Pharmaceuticals Canada Ltd. ........................................................53 
Bic Pen (Canada) Ltd. ............................................................................. 43 
CI inic Shoemakers.... ....... ..... .... ....... ... .... ...... .... ............................ ....... ......2 
Davol Can ada Ltd. ............. ............ ......................................... .................. 6 
Department of National Defence ............................................................. 59 
Hall ister Limited......... ................... ..... .................. ......... ..... ................... 37 
J .B. Lippincott Company of Canada, Ltd. ................................................. I 
Mont Su tton I ne. ..................................................................................... I 0 
c.Y. Mu
by Company. Ltd. .................................................. 45. 47.49.51 
Procter & Gamble .................................................................................. 13 
Reeves Company .............................................................................. 14, 15 
William H. Rorer. (Canada) Ltd. ............................................................ 16 
Rosehilllnstitute of Human Relations .................................................... 52 
Schering Corporation Limited ................................................ 72. Cover IV 
Westwood Pharmaceuticals ......... ..... ........n...... ......... ......................, ....... 55 
\\ hite Sister Uniform. Ine. ................................... 5, II. Cover ll. Cover III 


A eh'crt i.\;'IX MllIlliXa 
Georgina Clad...e 
The Canadian Nurse 
50 The Driveway 
Otta\\a i\.2P I E2 {Ontariu} 


A clverfisinR RepreSenlallVeS 
Richard P. Wilson 
219 East Lancaster Avenue 
Ardmore, Penna. 19003 
I ekphone. (215) \1id\\a) lJ-14lJ7 


Gordon Tiffin 
2 Tremont Crescent 
Don Mills. Ontario 
1dcphonc. (416) 444-4731 


Member of Canadian 
Circulations Audit Board Inc. 


GæE 


72 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Coricidin'D ' 


DESCRIPTION: 
Coricidin 'D': Each white, coated 
tablet contains: 
2 mg chlorpheniramine maleate U.S.P.. 
390 mg acetylsalicylic acid, 
30 mg caffeine and 
10 mg phenylephrine. 
A vailable in blisters ofl2 
and 24, and bottles of 100 tablets. 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: Each orange- 
pineapple-flavored multicolored tablet contains' 
0,5 mg chlorphemramme maleate L' S P., 
80 mg acetylsalicylic acid and 
2,5 mg phenylephrine HC\. 
Available m boxes of 24 Medilets m a 
child's protective package 
INDICATIONS: 
Symptomatic relief of nasal congestion and 
other discomforts associated with smusitls. 
colds and allergic or vasomotor rhinitis 
CONTRAINDICATIONS: 
Sensitivity to any of the components. 
patients receivmg MAO mhlbltors 
PRECAUTIONS: 
Admlmster with caretopatlents with hyper- 
tension. cardiac disorders. hyperthyroidism, 
diabetes mellitus and patients hypersensitive 
to sympathomimetic compounds. 
Patients should be cautioned not to oper 
ate vehicles or hazardous machmery until 
their response to the drug has been deter- 
mined. Smce the depressant effects of anti- 
h,stamines are additive to those of other 
drugs affecting the central nervous system, 
patients should be cautioned against drink- 
ing alcohohc beverages or taking hypnotics. 
sedatives, psychotherapeutic agents or other 
drugs wIth CNS depressant effects during 
antihlstammlc therapy 
Rarely. prolonged therapy with antihista- 
mine-contammg preparations can produce 
blood dyscrasias 


ADVERSE EFFECTS: 
Drowsiness, dizziness. nausea. increased 
Irritability or excitement may be 
encountered. 


DOSAGE: 
Coricidin 'D': Adults: I tablet every 4 
hours, not to exceed 4 tablets m 24 hours. 
Children 10 to 14 years: 1/2 adult dose: 
under 10 years: at discretion of physician. 
Coricidin 'D' Medilets: 2 to b years: 
1/4 to I Medilets: 7 to 12 Y"ars: I to 2 
Medilets. Each dose may be repeated every 
3 to 4 hours, hut not more than 4 Medllets 
should be given m one day to children 2 to 
6 years, and () Medilets to children ì to Il 
years. Limit treatment to 3 days The recom- 
mended dosage should not he exceeded 
except on a physician's advise 


DetaIled mfurmatlon IS aVBllable on 
request 
SCHERING CORPORATION LIMITED 
Poínte Claire. Quebec H9R IB4 
I P......AC ) 


MARCH 1974 



e 2465 
yale Corded" Tricot Knit 
s 10-20 
te ............................ $26.00 
ow.......................... 527.00 


tf?
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#4284
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I 
I NIFORM SPECIAL TV 
\AKES IT EASY 
'0 LOOK GREAT 


e 42346 
yale Rib" Tricot Knit 
or Length 
!s 3-1 5 
te only 
00 


HOP IN PERSON AT OUR 
BAY STREET STORE 
IR WRITE TO OUR MAIL 
DER DIVISION FOR A NEW 
CATALOGUE 



 <'
ì \ 
UNIFORM SPECIALTY 
1254 BAY ST. 
(Just above Bloor) TORONTO 



 
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e 42841 
yale Oxford" Tricot Knit 
's 5-15 
te .......................... $25.00 
yale Corded" Knit 
and Yellow 
00 


MAIL ORDER DIVISION 
372 Queen St. W. 
Toronto, Onto M5V 2A3 
Please send all mail orders to 
above address r phone 366-1414 
for f;Jst sprv. c::p 



I SCHERING
 


Howto1tatch"a cold. 


"- 
-- 


- urprise a cold right at its onset with' 
Coricidin '0' for adults and Coricidin '0' 
Medilet
 ,': for children. You can recom
 
mend these products knowing they will 
provide relief from aches, pains and 
fever plus decongestant action, 
Coricidin '0' and Coricidin '0' 
Medilets c
ntain Chlor
T ripolon:: 
one of the world's most widely used 
antihistamines: phenylephrine, a 
highly effective decongestant and acetyl
 
salicvlic acid for aches, pains and fever. 
The adult form contains caffeine as a mild 
stimulant to keep your patients on the go. 
COriCidin'D
 


, 
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MISS MRA LOYER 
158 GUIGUES ST 
OTTAWA KIN 5H9 00056886 


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nurses break the ice in the Arctic 




 


"""ITE 
SISTER 


WH ITE 
SISTER 


HAS THE 
SIMPLE 
DIFFERENCE 


A) Style # 42871 
"Royale Oxford" 
Junior Length 
Sizes 5-15 


White only 
About ................ 520.0 


B) Style # 2358 
"Royale Rib" 
Missy Length 
Sizes 8-18 


White only 
About ............................ $24.( 


C) Style # 2456 
"Royale Corded" 
Sizes 8-18 


White ................ about $27.( 
Navy.................. about $29.( 


CAREER APPAREL AT FINE STORES ACROSS CANADA 



c:; 


new Bookl 
now Info.mation 


. 


. 
CD 
HlATRIC 
e (;õN.ÇE
 
tlNURSI _,.. ...... 

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Serving the health professions in 
Canada since 1897 
J. B. Lippincott Co. 01 Canada Ltd. 
75 Horner Ave. 
Toronto, Ontario M8Z 4X7 
Representing in Canada: 
Little Brown and Company 
Blackwell Scientific Publications Ltd 
Springer Publishing Company, Inc. 


New - Third Edition 
BASIC PSYCHIATRIC CONCEPTS IN NURSING 
This thoroughly revised edition provides sharper focus on the dynamics 01 
the nurse's role and function, and is designed to lacilitate the student's 
progress from the theoretical to the operational level. Proceeding Irom basic 
psychiatric concepts, the authors use case studies to explain and demon- 
strate how the nurse can intervene. Many case studies and examples of 
nursing practice are interspersed throughout. Content extensively revised 
includes drug abuse; sexual deviation; understanding of behavior; sensi- 
tivity to the human condition; nursing management of neurotic and psychotic 
patients; understanding sell in realtion to interaction with peers, super- 
visors, subordinates and patients; recognition of emotional problems faced 
by all hospitalized patients. 
600 pages/April, 1974/ about $10.00 
Joan J. Kyes, R.N., M.S.N., Altoona (Pa.) Hospital Community Health Center; 
Charles K. Holling, M.D., Sf. Louis University. 
New - Second Edition 
NURSES' HANDBOOK OF FLUID BALANCE 
The increasing responsibilities of the nurse for physical diagnosis, treat- 
ment and evaluation of laboratory findings are reflected in this thoroughly 
revised edition. All chapters include the latest findings in types of im- 
balances, treatments, and medication; each element, deficit and excess is 
discussed in greater depth and clarity An important new chapter, Fluid 
Balance in Pregnancy, incorporates new knowledge on sodium restriction 
and effects of pregnancy on body fluid disturbances. Other new chapters 
deal with routes of transport, organs of homeostasis, and disturbances in 
water and electrolytes. With many new illustrations and an attractive new 
format. 
325 pages/illustrated/April, 1974/paperbound, about $8.50 
Norma M. Metheny, R.N., M.S., Meramec Community College, Sf. Louis; 
William D. Snively, Jr., M.D., F.A.C.P., University of Evansvi/le School of 
Nursing and Indiana University School of Medicine. 


CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN NURSING 
Nursing educators are keenly aware of the impact of twentieth-century 
scientific and technological events upon the health care of the members of 
society. This text carefully examines nursing education and the process of 
change in relation to the nature and objectives of curriculum and instruc- 
tion. Part I deals with the dynamics of curriculum development and basic 
issues and participants in that development. In Part II sources of curriculum 
decisions are dealt with in relation to cultural values, social and scientific 
forces, nursing education, the student, and psychological and learning 
theories. The design, structure, and evaluation of curriculum are covered in 
the next part, and Part IV treats the nature of instruction, variables in the 
instructional process, and instructional modes and media. The final part 
deals with strategies for curriculum change, and with roles and processes 
in that change. 
Virginia C. Conley, R.N., Ed.D., Dean of the School of Nursing, The 
Catholic University of America. 673 pages, illustrated. $16.50 
November 1973 


Please send me the bookls) whose number!s) I have circled 


2 


3 


Name. .... 
Address 
City 


Province 


Position 
Postal Code 
o Use my Chargex number 
o Charge and bill me 


CN-4-74 


o Payment enclosed (send postpaid) 
Books may be returned within 15 days 




Now you can squeeze 
a little more out of Davol. 


You said bulb syringes get slippe
 
So we molded rings onto them. Now 
they won't slip even when your hands 
are wet. 
You told us you wanted a piston 
syringe you could operate with one 
hand. So we added a thumb ring and 
finger rim. 
We made some other changes, too. 
We enlarged our calibrations for easy 
reading. And gave our bulb-type 
syringes an exclusive Plivol@ bulb 


ft 
and finger grip for easy thumb- 
squeeze action. 
Most important, we gave our 
syringes superior suction power and 
capacit
 And now you can get even 
more out of Dav'ol. 
Take a close look at syringes. 
You'll see that Davol makes the 
difference. 
Davol Canada Ltd., 1033 Range 
View Rd., Port Credit, Ont., 
L5E-1H2 (416) 274-5252 
n 


BUILDING ON A CENTURY OF QUALITY , ' C -v; . ."""" . 1874-1974 
HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 
"'" A ') 


KK' 



The 
Canadian 
Nurse 


ð 

 


A monthly journal for the nurses of Canada published 
in English and French editions by the Canadian Nurses' Association 


Volume 70, Number 4 


April 1974 


21 CNA Ticket of Nominations 


31 CNA Financial Report and Auditor's Statement 


36 CNA Convention Program 


38 Nurses Break the Ice . . . . 


42 Maternity Patients Make Decisions 


45 Idea Exchange 


. . H. L. Brigstocke 


.M.B. Ratsoy 


rh
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\pl
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 \xlitorial ano \ariou, a'lid.:, ar.: tho,.: o"th.: author, ano 
Ol' Ilot Il
c.:"aril
 r.:p..:-..:nt th.: Pt-,Iici.:, or vi.:", ofth
 Canadian '-ur,c,' \"ocialloll. 


4 Letters 9 News 
47 Dates 48 Names 
50 Accession List 72 Index to Advertisers 


E:X
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S6.50; t\\O year" S12.00 Single cop,e,. 
SI.OO each. Make cheques or money order, 
p.I\"",," In t"l" C.II1.ld"on 'ur,
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lu ..:rrur' III .Iddn:..., 


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In his guest editorial in January 1974, 
Health Minister Lalonde referred to the 
need to "increase the individual's 
responsibility for his own health." The 
Canadian Nurses' Association hopes 
to sensitize nurses to ways in which 
individuals can modify their life-styles 
to improve their health. 
However, some individuals have 
existing health problems that will not 
be dissipated by a healthier mode of 
living. For such a person, responsibil- 
ity for his own health may include 
providing a means of communicating 
vital information to health care per- 
sonnel, in the event that he is uncon- 
scious or otherwise unable to speak 
up. 
The Canadian Medic-Alert Founda- 
tion offers individuals an opportunity to 
register their medical history and re- 
levant resource persons, such as 
physician and next-of-kin, with a tele- 
phone center that is open 
24-hours-a-day. (News. page 11.) 
Brief information about the individual's 
health problems is inscribed on the 
back of a stainless steel disk, worn on 
a bracelet of steel links. The front of 
the disk has an insignia in red: a 
serpent-wreathed rod and the words 
Medic Alert. It looks like this: 



 


..., 
t! q;
t 
y 
 
 


.. 


. \ 


Nurses should look for the bracelet 
and use the information in patient 
care. The disk may contain such clues 
as: contact lenses. allergic to tetanus 
antitoxin, allergic to penicillin, multiple 
sclerosis, diabetes, or glaucoma. 
Blood type may also be inscribed. 
The bracelet is functional rather 
than decorative; on festive occasions, 
a woman may fasten it in a less 
conspicuous place, such as on her bra 
strap. So watch for the bracelet when 
an emergency patient is undressed for 
medical examination and treatment. 
If you want to ensure that a continu- 
ing health problem will be recognized 
in an emergency, wear a Medic-Alert 
bracelet. When you nurse patients, 
watch for the Medic-Alert insignia and 
use its information for the wearer's 
care. 
Individuals have a responsibility for 
their own health, and health profes- 
sionals must cooperate with persons' 
efforts to be responsible. - D.S.S. 
THE CANADIAN NURSE 3 


APRIL 1974 



letters 


{ 


Letters to the editor are welcome. 
Only signed letters, which include the writer's complete address, 
will be considered for publication. 
Name will be withheld at the writer's request. 


Nurse wants to share experience 
As I have had "a wolf by the ears" for 
three years now. I read Bonnie Hartley's 
article (January 1974) with much interest. 
Having recovered from an acute ill- 
ness. I also have much to thank God for. I 
am enjoying a normal. healthy life. 
maintained on medication and working 
full-time. 
Since little is known of systemic lupus 
erythematosus. perhaps we could form a 
club or other group and communicate. I 
would like to share my experience. what I 
have learned. and am still learning. - 
Margaret Duff\'. Reg.N.. Ðo;ion. 
Quehec. 


Educator responds to article 
In response to the article by Barbara 
Geach. "The Problem-Solving Techni- 
que: Is It Relevant to Practice?" (January 
1974), I would like to make the following 
comments. 
The words "problem-solving" can be 
used in different ways and can mean 
different things. A child learning to tie a 
shoe is solving a problem. Research is 
undertaken to solve a problem. In discus- 
sing its relevance to any particular situa- 
tion. we must define what we mean by the 
term. How is it interpreted in nursing? Is 
it used as in mathematics when it refers to 
a kind of drill? Are we using it to refer to 
a method of intellectual eval'üation? 
Some authors seem to use the term 
"problem-solving" in somewhat the 
same way as B.F. Skinner uses the term 
"conditioning," in making reterence to 
the conditions within the learner, that is, 
the previous learning and recall, and 
also the conditions in the learning situa- 
tion. Some authors talk about problem- 
solving and discovery; of problem-solv- 
ing and creativity; or discuss learning 
strategy in problem-solving. and self- 
instruction in study skills. 
Ausubel (1968) discusses problem- 
solving and insight. He defines two 
principal kinds of problem-solving that 
can occur at all age levels: one is trial and 
error. and the s
econd is insight - the 
discovery of meaningful means-end rela- 
tionships. Translating this to classroom 
activity. problem-solving can constitute a 
fonn of directed or arranged discovery. 
Ausubel says that problem-solving is 
impossible without the relevant back- 
ground knowledge. that is, the concepts. 
the principles. and the transactional 
terms. in relation to the problem. 
4 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Problem-solving is relevant to practice 
in the clinical area; indeed, it is relevant 
to all aspects of living. I see a different 
type of problem-solving in the classroom 
than one would expect tu find in real life 
situations. In a clinical area. the nurse 
must have the knowledge, the confi- 
dence. and the competence to be able to 
problem solve instantaneously when an 
emergency situation arises. 
The content we teach in schools of 
nursing may not be relevant to practice. I 
agree there is an urgent need for educators 
and clinicians to work together to identify 
the real problem. and to use the problem- 
soh ing technique to find the 
answer. - Jane C. Halihurton, Director 
of Education. Yarmouth Regional Hospi- 
tal. Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. 


Comments on problem-solving 
Bravo to ,\ teacher who puhlicly I'C- 
quests the help of clinicians in devel- 
oping relevant educational content 
("The Prohlem-Sob" ing fechnique. Is 
It Relevant to Practice'.'" January 
IlJ74). Educators "uch a" Barbara 
Geach help hridge the practice-theory 
gap by "tressing the interdependence 
hetween the two worlds. 
I feel. howevcr. that the request fÒr 
documentation of the usefulne"s of 
problem-solving per se may be un- 
realistic Problem-solving is an ongoing 
process and is thus dilTi
illt to de
crib
 
in writing. Nursing care plans and the 
problem-oriented medical record show 
the results of clinical problem-solving, 
and clinicians such as Marlene Mayers 
do write about the ellcctivene"s of 
these tools. I wonder if Ms. Geach is 
looking in the wrong place for valida- 
tion. 
Changing students' attitudes toward 
this "cerehral activity" will be more 
difficult than simply reassuring one- 
self that it is a meaningful process. 
Nur"e educatol"; may use the terminol- 
ogy of problem-solving. hut it is my 
concern that thi" complex process may 
not be well understood hy them - a 
complication that would profound I) 
affect their tcaching of that process. I 
suggest that the writer's appeal for help 
"hould not onlv be directed toward 
cl inician". hut ,
so to\\ ard researchers 
\\ho arc stud) ing the proee"s of proh- 
lem-soh ing. - Je.nie 1
lal1tle. As.\o- 
ciate /'/"(!/l'.HOr, Ihe Unil'eni,y eJf West- 
ern Ontario. London. Ontario. 


Author replies 
It was pleasing to get such a rapid 

esponse to my article, although sadden- 
mg that an educator. rather than a 
clinician, should be the first to write. It 
may be true, as Professor Jessie Mantle 
suggests, that care plans and problem- 
oriented records are evidence of the 
results of clinical problem-solving. There 
is some evidence, however. to suggest 
that in at least some institutions. 
care 
plans have fallen into disuse. 
Problem-oriented records are a newer 
arrival on the scene. but they may fall into 
similar disuse in time. One could say that 
such an institution was probably a bad 
one, and that we cannot base our teaching 
or our practice on what bad institutions 
do. But the nagging question remains: 
Could the use of these tools be dropped 
because they are unwieldy encrustations 
on the work of clinicians. rather than 
something that enhances this work and 
makes it more efficient? 
Further, when one thinks carefully 
about these "evidences of problem- 
sol ving." one must concl ude that they are 
only written portions of the process, 
having their purpose chiefly in data 
collection and evaluation; that is. they 
are, at best, representative of only parts of 
the process - important parts, no doubt, 
but not the whole. 
I cannot agree that it is unrealistic to 
ask clinicians: "How do you use this 
process when you are confronted with 
situations involving one or more pa- 
tients?" The problem-solving technique 
is a label that could descrihe the way 
anybody thinks and acts any time he has 
to do a task. This has been of interest to 
the human race for some time. and there 
is no reason why clinicians should he 
immune from curiosity about how and 
why we think and act, or should be 
exempt from the responsibility to know 
themselves. 
Until we hear from clinicians. we shall 
remain at our present level: using a rather 
sterile, artificial language to expound and 
laboriously categorize the components of 
a fundamental process. Language shapes 
experience, as Whorf (Language. 
Thought, and Reality, 1956) has shown 
us. We must care that the language we 
choose is not one that is alien to the 
experience--or else neither language nor 
experience can mature and flourish in 
interaction with each other. Yes. let's 
have research! But let it be on the process 
(Collllllu"d 0" flag.. f>) 
APRIL 1974 




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letters 


(Contilluedfrom page 4) 
in action. in many context!>. and 
"operationalized" in tenns of the experi- 
ence of clinicians. - Barbara Geach, 
Assistant Professor, University of Con- 
necticut, Wallingford. 


Nursing journal is now quarterly 
In 1973. NUl".\ing Papers, the publica- 
tion initiated by the School of Nursing. 
McGill University, and supported in 
part by the Canadian Association of 
University Schools of Nursing . celebrat- 
ed its fifth year as a nur!>ing journal in 
Canada. It is devoted to research ap- 
proaches to problems in the practice 
of nursing. in teaching. and in the 
management and provision of services. 
As of this year. th
 journal will ap- 
pear quarterly. Nursing Papers is 
designed for clinicians and practitioners 
of nursing, for teachers, researchers. 
supervisors. and others. Subscription 
IS $4 annually. Further information 
regarding subscriptions. advertising. 
and publication of articles may be 
obtained from me. - Vi\'ian Geeza, 
Managing Editor, School of Nursing, 
McGill University, 3506 Universitv 
Street, Mo/ltreal, Þ.Q. H3A 2A7. 


Reasons for nurse shortage 
These days. when a shortage of nurses is 
clearly evident, the widening division 
between baccalaureate and diploma 
nurses is increasing the shortage by 
driving the well-qualified. experienced 
diploma nurses out of the profession for 
lack of reasonable opportunities for ad- 
vancement. Many positions are adver- 
tised. with the qualification requirement 
being a BN degree or more for anything 
other than patient care. 
So we are left with: 
. The experienced. older woman who 
may have nursed for 15 years or more. 
and now wishes to pass on her experience 
and expertise to younger nurses; as she 
has no degree, she is denied this oppor- 
tunity. 
. The "northem" nurse who. after a 
period of isolation. wishes to return south 
for a time. But after all the responsibility 
in the north. few of these nurses are 
anxious to return to ward work. In the 
north. they functioned at or above the 
nursing action level expected of a bac- 
calaureate nurse. Many of these nurses do 
not have degrees because no such prog- 
ram existed in the country where they 
were trained. although many may have 
spent four or five years training in various 
hospital settings. 
6 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


. A large group of diploma nurses who 
have worked and supported their hus- 
bands while they obtained their degrees. 
These women often ended up studying 
with their husbands so they could help 
them with tests. papers. and so on. 
through the liberal arts part of the course. 
if not the specialty. All this past training 
and self-education. however. count for 
approximately 20 credits, at most. toward 
a university degree. 
Having worked with both excellent and 
poor nurses from both programs. and 
knowing some diploma nurses who far 
outshine the baccalaureate ones. we 
would like to see each person evaluated 
by the universities on her experience. 
training. and savoir-faire. Possibly this 
could be achieved through university 
entrance examinations. which detennine 
the number of credits allowed toward a 
degree. 
The nur!>ing hierarchy should wake up 
to the fact that a vast source of needed 
woman- and manpower will be lost 
forever if the university nursing schools 
continue to make it so difficult for a 
diploma nurse to get a degree. - Lynda 
Dean. RN. SRN, BN; Margaret Nixon, RN. 
SRN, PHN; and Alberta Platt, RN, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba. 


Comments on gonorrhea 
I read with interest the comments con- 
cerning the international ,
mposium 
on gonorrhea (Decem her Ilr .
. pages 
15-16). Two statements concern me. 
First. the Women's Self-Help Clinic 
does not encourage women to treat 
themselves. hut rather educates \\omen 
ahout tlll:ir hodies and ahout health. 
The ohiective is to prov ide \\ omen with 
"nowledge ,0 that the) "nO\\ when to 
see" medical attention and are able 
to participate in the re,olution of an 
illnes, stage. In this dinic. \\omen hdp 
women. and a female physician is 
always present. 
Second. I stressed that the provincial 
\ D Clinic in VancoU\er i.; one of the 
few. if not the only. VD clinics run hy 
nurses. We rely a lot on puhl ic health 
nurses to carry out the \ D program IÙr 
the rest of the province. hulli Rui- 
terman, Di\'i 
ion (
( V f) CO/lfrol, Ðe- 
partme/lf (!( Hcalth SC/Ticn, VW/('O/l- 
\'('1', Briti
h Columhia. 


Fund will help northern nurses 
In memory of the two northern nurses 
who lost their lives in airplane crashes 
while on mercy flights. nurses in the 
Northwest Territories have established 
The Northern Nurses Memorial Address 
Fund. The two nurses who died were 
Julia May King. in April 1968. and Judith 
Hill. in November 1972. 
This fund will be used to bring a 
keynote speaker to edch annual general 


meeting of the Northwest Territories 
Registered Nurses' Association. The ad- 
dress will be videotaped and distributed to 
all nurses in the NWT who are unable to 
attend the session. Thus the fund will 
benefit all the nurses in the north. 
The Northwest Territories Registered 
Nurses' Association. at present a fledg- 
ling association. is planning to hold its 
first annual general meeting in the spring 
of 1974. It is attempting to improve 
communications and to give good rep- 
resentation to nurses working across this 
vast land. from Fort Smith in the south to 
Grise Fiord. the northernmost nursing 
station. and from Frobisher Bay in the 
east to Inuvik in the West. 
Anyone wishing to assist the nurses in 
the NWT with this memorial address may 
send contributions to: The Northern 
Nurses Memorial Fund. c/o The Imperial 
Bank of Commerce. Yellowknife. NWT. 
Every donation will be appreciated. - 
Lois Torrance, President, Yellowknife 
Nurses' Association. 


Plans for native women 
Having spent most of my nursing career 
working with Indian people, and having 
since taken on different types of work in 
government, I am concerned about health 
services in general for the native popula- 
tion in Canada. 
Because I have the responsibility for 
the development of programs for native 
women under the grants program in the 
native citizen's group of the department 
of the secretary of state, I believe it is 
possible to bring these nurses together to 
develop plans and programs prior to 1975 
- International Year for Women. 
Edith Green, RN (who is currently 
working in the Public Service Commis- 
sion in Ottawa) and I have contacted 
some of our friends: thus far. all of them 
are enthusiastic about the idea of getting 
Canadian Indian nurses together in the 
early spring, perhaps in Ottawa. I know 
there are a number of registered nurses of 
Canadian Indian ancestry who mayor 
may not be practicing their profession. It 
would be interesting to know how many 
there are and their geographical location. 
- Jean Goodwill, Coordinator, Native 
Women & Native Youth Programs, Citi- 
zen Branch, SecretaI')' of State Depart- 
ment, Ottawa. ? 


Regi
tered nu"c
. 
your community nec'Js 
the benefit of your 
skills and experience. 
Volunteer now to. 
tca,h 51. John Ambulance home 
nu"ing and child care course
. 
('on'aer your Provincial Headquarters, 
S'. John Ambnlance. 


APRIL 1974 



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8 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Xylocai ne 'íi1 100 mg 
(lidocaine hydrochloride injection u.s P) 
INDICATIOf'lS-Xylocame administered Intra- 
venously is specifically indicated In the acute 
management of( I) ventricular 8uhythml3S occur- 
nng during cardiac manipulatIOn. such as cardiac 
surgery: and (2) life-threatening arrhythmia",. par- 
ticularly thoilie which are ventricular in origin. such 
as occur durmg acute myocardial infarction. 


CONTRAINDICATIONS-Xviocaine IS contra- 
indicated (I) in pallents with a known history of 
hypersen\itivil} to local anesthetics of the amide 
type: and (2) in patients with Adam<iò-Stoke<;; syn- 
drome or with severe degrees of sinoatrial. atrio- 
ventricular or intraventricular block_ 


"'AR:"tII"'IGS -Constant monitoring with an elec- 
lrocardiograph is essential In the proper adminis- 
tration ofXyloeame intravenously. Sign!!. of exces- 
sive depression of cardiac conductivily. such as 
prolongation of PR interval and QRS complex 
and the appearance or aggravation of arrhythmias, 
!hould be followed by prompt cessation of the 
intravenous infusion of this agent. It is mandatory 
10 have emergency resuscilative equipment and 
drugs immediately available to manage pos...ihle 
ddverse reacliuns mvulvlng the cardio\'ascular. 
respiratory or central nervous systems. 
Evidence for proper usage in children is limited. 


PRECAl'TlONS-Cau'ion should be employed 
in the repealed use of Xyloeaine in patients with 
severe liver or renal disease because accumulation 
mayoccur and may lead to toxic phenomena. since 
Xvlocaine is metabolized main Iv in the liver and 
excreted by the kidney_ The drug should also be 
used with caution in patients wilh hvpovolemia 
and shock. and all forms of heart block (see CON- 
TRAINDICATIONS AND WARNINGS). 
In patients with sinus bradycardia the adminis- 
IratlOn ofXvlocaine intravenously for the elimina- 
tion of ventricular ectopic beat.. withoUI prior 
acceleration in heart rate (e_g_ bv isoprolerenol 
or by electnc pacing) may provoke more frequent 
and ...erious ventricular arrhylhmia... 


AÐVERSE REACTIONS Systemic reactions of 
the following tvpes have been reported_ 
(I) Central Nervous System: lightheadedness. 
drowsiness: dizziness: apprehension: euphoria; 
tinnitus; blurred or double vision; vomiting: sen- 
sations of heal. cold or numbness: twitching: 
tremors: convulsions: uncon
l.iousness: and respi- 
ratory depression and arrest 
(2) Cdrdiovascular System: hypotension: car- 
diova...cular collapse: and brad\'cardla which may 
lead to cardiac arre...t 
There have been no reports of cross sensitivity 
between Xylocaine and procainamide or hetween 
Xylocaine and quinidine. 


UOSAGE: A:-.iO AO'\1INISTRATlO"l Sin
le 
Injection: The usual do..e is 50 mg to 100 mg 
admimstered intravenously under ECG moni(Or- 
ing_ This dose may be administered at the r3tc 
of approximdtely 25 mg 10 50 mg per mlnule_ 
Sufficienilime should be allowed to enable a slow 
,'irculation 10 I.:arrv Ihe drug to the slle of action 
If the imtlal inJel.tion of 50 mg to 100 mg does 
not produce a de\lred re"pon...e. a second dose may 
be repedled dfler 10-20 mlnules. 
NO MORE THAN 200 '\1G TO 300 MG OF 
XYLOCAINE SHOULD BE ADMINISTERED 
DURING A ONE HOUR PERIOD. 
In children expenence with the drug IS limlled_ 
Continuou!t Infusion: Following a single injecllon 
in those p3t1ents in whom the arrhythmia lends 
to recur and who are incapa ble of rece)\ling oral 
antiarrhythmic therapy. intravenou!rl infusions of 
Xylocaine may be administered al the rdte of I 
mg to 2 mg per minute (20 to 25 ug/kg per minute 
in the average 70 kg man). Intravenous infusIOns 
ofXyloeaine must beadministered under constant 
ECG monitormg to aVOid potential overdo!itage 
and toxicity. Intravenous infusion should be ter- 
mmated as soon as Ihe Pdtiem's basic rhvthm 
appears to be stable or at the earliest ...ign... of 
toxicity. It should rarely be necessary to continue 
intravenous infusIOns bevond 24 hours. As soon 
as possible. and when indicated. palients should 
be changed to an oral antiarrh)thmlc agent for 
maintenance therap). 
Solutions for intravenous infusion should be 
prepared by the addition of one 50 ml single dose 
vial of Xylocaine 2% or one 5 ml Xyloeame One 
Gram Disposable Transfer Syringe to I liter of 
appropTlate solution. This will provide a 0.1% 
solution: Ihat is. each ml will con tam I mg of 
Xvloealne HCI. Thus I ml to 2 ml per minute 
will provide I mg to 2 mg of Xyloeaine HCI per 
minute. 


APRIL 1974 



news 


CNA Directors Opt For Balanced Budget In '74 
Decide To Cut CNF Support, Countdown, Services 


Ottawa - Canadian Nurses' AssociatIon 
(CNA) directors voted in favor of a 
balanced budget for 1974, during a 
meeting held on February 6, 7, and 8. 
They decided not to expand services and 
activities to help attain a break-even 
financial statement. Further adj ustments 
were left to the discretion of the CNA 
executive director, Helen K. Mussallem. 
The directors decided that Count- 
down would no longer be printed in its 
present form by CNA, effective with the 
1974 issue. CNA will continue to compile 
nursing statistics until another agency 
takes over publication of the data. There 
will be no gap in annual statistics on 
nurses. 
Directors voted [0 inform the Canadian 
Nurses' Foundation (CNF) that CNA is no 
longer able to provide financial support 
for the foundation. For over 10 years, 
CNA has assisted CNF by providing an 
office, support services, and secretarial 
and professional staff. CNA directors said 
other demands on CNA take priority now. 
At the June 1973 meeting of the CNF 
directors, it was decided that the founda- 
tion would pay the major portion of the 
secretary's salary. A CNF committee was 
appointed in October 1973, [0 study the 


problem of the foundation's finances. 
(News, December [973, page 8.) 
Proposed cuts in library service to CNA 
members include: fewer special bibliog- 
raphies prepared by library staff, discon- 
tinuing the addendum to the Index of 
Canadian Nursing Studies, and reduction 
in the number of new books added to the 
CNA Library. 
It was also suggested that telephone 
conferences are less expensive than meet- 
ings, in some instances. 
CNA directors considered the 1974 
budget at the October 1973 board meeting 
and postponed decision on it until Feb- 
ruary 1974. In October 1973, CNA staff 
members were asked to prepare a com- 
prehensive document about CNA pro- 
grams, activities, events, and budgetary 
allocations to help the directors make 
their decision. 
The lIS-page document, plus appen- 
dixes, represents a 4-month study that 
involved every member of the CNA staff. 
It took over 2,000 hours of staff time to 
prepare. The directors devoted February 6 
to the study and the discussion of the 
document, before deciding on February 7 
to hold the line on activities and services. 
and balance the budget. 


CNA Directors Rename TS Board, 
Set Up CNATS Review Task Force 
Ottawa - Directors of the Canadian 
Nurses' Association changed the name of 
the test service board to testing service 
committee, during the CNA directors' 
meeting on February 7, 1974. Commit- 
tees presently relating to the test service 
board will become subcommittees of the 
testing service committee. 
CNA directors also established an ad 
hoc committee, to be known as a task 
force, to review the initial action taken to 
establish and organize the CNA Testing 
Service (CNATS) . 
CNA directors named to the task force 
are Wendy Gerhard, London. Ont., and 
Geraldine LaPointe. Kamloops, B.C. The 
testing service committee was asked to 
make nominations from which the C\IA 
President, Marguerite Schumacher, will 
select two members for the task force. 
APRIL 1974 


The task force will have the assistance of 
a French-speaking adviser. 
The original motion to establish the 
testing service. passed by CNA directors in 
January 1970, specified a review within a 
period of S years. 
Early appointment of the review com- 
mittee was one of 13 recommendations 
contained in the report of a 3-member ad 
hoc committee on the testing service. 
This group was created on 13 April 1973 
as a committee of persons not implicated 
in the problems of the testing service 
operation"to study this complex subject 
and to report and bring forth recommen- 
dations in one ) ear. .. The commi!lee was 
asked to review all decisions made by the 
CNA directors regarding the testing ser- 
vice. The ad hoc committee was chaired 
by Dr. Alice Girard. Montreal; members 
were Alice Baumgart. Vancouver, and 
Kathleen DeMarsh, Winnipeg. 


CNA directors referred several recom- 
mendations of the ad hoc committee to 
the newly established task force. Re- 
commendations referred included: 
. That the assets of the testing service, 
including an inventory of examination 
items, be evaluated and that an inventory 
of its holdings be conducted annually. 
. That steps be taken to establish a central 
financial control mechanism for the OJA 
corporate fund with provision for a 
central payroll, single investment of 
corporate funds, and a quarterly advance 
of operating capital to the testing service. 
. That the CNATS exercise control in 
formulation of policies on content of 
tests, the process of test construction. 
security, delivery, processing, and the 
evaluation of test results. 
. That the CNA board exercise control in 
formulation of policies pertaining to 
development of the testing service, in- 
cluding major changes that may affect the 
extent and nature of the test services 
provided. 
Recommendations of the ad hoc com- 
mittee that were accepted by C!\'A direc- 
tors included maintenance of the present 
practice of having a separate audited 
statement to identify the cash flow of the 
testing service; presenting priorities of the 
testing service committee to CNA directors 
annually before they consider the testing 
service budget; and inviting senior testing 
service staff members to attend C:'IIA board 
meetings as observers. 
Directors also apprO\ed a recommen- 
dation reiterating that appointments to the 
testing service committee are made by the 
CNA directors. Jurisdictions (licen,ingl 
registering bodies in the provinces) are 
asked to nominate members for appoint- 
ment to the committee. 
Directors rejected three recommenda- 
tions of the ad hoc committee. These 
recommendations were: 
. That provision he made for the College 
of Nurses of Ontario. the major non-C\lA 
user of tests. to appoint a representative to 
the CNA board. as an exofficio member 
without voting privileges 
. That the nature of representation of user 
jurisdictions on the testing service com- 
mittee be changed to pro\ ide fÒr one R'i 
representative from each pnnincial 
registering/licensing authorit
 . plus a rep- 
resentative from a nursing assisl,Int dU- 
thoritv. 
. Thãt the feasibilil) of engaging In a 
building program to expand facilities of 
THE CANADIAN NURSE q 
. 



news 


CNA House be explored. with a view to 
providing space for the testing service. 
At the board meeting. CNA directors 
approved a CNATS recommendation that 
the fee charged to nursing assistants be 
raised to $10 per paper. beginning in July 
1974. 


Affiliation With CNA Offered 
To National Nursing Groups 
Ottawa - The Canadian Nurses' As- 
sociation will consider offering affiliate 
status to national nursing organizations. 
This recommendation by an ad hoc 
committee-working party on liaison with 
C:"JA was accepted by CNA directors at 
their meeting on February 6 to 8. There 
are no organizations in affiliation with 
CNA now. 
National nursing groups invited to 
affiliate with CNA would nor be charged a 
membership fee. Officers of an affiliate 
organization will be eligible to attend 
CNA's annual meeting without vote. and 
may be invited to L attend CNA board 
meetings as observers. Affiliate member- 
ship st
tus will provide for mutual sharing 
of infonnation on issues of concern to 
CNA and the affiliate group. 
Members of the ad hoc committee- 
working party were: Margaret Neylan. 
Vancouver, chairman; Doris Gibney, To- 
ronto; and Glenna Rowsell. Fredericton. 
Directors accepted II out of 15 ad hoc 
committee-working part) recommenda- 
tions. They voted to accept the following 
guidelines on liaison: 
. CNA should seek or maintain relation- 
ships with other groups when they assist 
CNA to achieve its objects. 
. These groups should include only the 
federal government and organizations that 
are national in scope. and in which 
residents of all provinces and territories 
are eligible for membership. 
. CNA's external relationships should be 
ordered into six categories of diminishing 
importance: federal government. nurses' 
organizations. organizations of other 
health professions, of health institutions 
and agencies, organizations with a health 
orientation. and unclassified national or- 
ganizations. 
. CNA should have relationships only with 
organizations that have stated objectives; 
have an identified structure; share a 
common concern: are self-supporting; are 
autonomous; and. if an occupational 
group. have members who are or will be 
eligible to be licensed. registered, or 
certified to practice. 
Directors also accepted a recommenda- 
tion that C:\IA adopt the principle of nurse 
10 THE CANADIAN NURSE 


Resolutions for Consideration 
at the CNA Annual Meeting and Convention 
in June 1974 


Whereas the present system of determining fees paid to the Canadian Nurses' 
Association by provinces is based on the number of nurses who are members of the 
provincial associations and decreased a