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Full text of "University of New Hampshire and the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts : [catalog]"

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BULLETIN OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



CATALOG 



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1937/1938 



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The University of New Hampshire 
and the New Hampshire College of 
Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts 

DURHAM - NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Save this catalog and bring it 
with you. It will be needed for 
reference throughout the year. 



BULLETIN 
of the 

UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Vol. XXVIII February, 1937 No. 6 



CALENDAR 


1937 


1938 


1939 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 
1 


F 
2 


S 
3 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


S 

1 


M 
2 


T 

3 


W 
4 


T 

5 


F 
6 


S 

7 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








1 


2 


3 


4 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


29 


30 


31 










27 


28 




_ 








28 


29 


30 


31 








26 


27 


28 










SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


3 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




:: 


27 


U 


29 


30 


31 


:: 


:: 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


S 
2 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 
1 


s 

2 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 
1 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 

1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


31 


. . 


. . 


. . 


, . 


. . 






. . 


. . 




. . 




. . 


30 


31 






. . 






30 


, , 


, . 


. . 


. . 


. . 




NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 










29 


30 


31 










27 


28 


29 


30 








28 


29 


30 


31 








DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 








1 


2 


3 


4 




• • 






1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


10 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


, , 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 

• • 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 





UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
1937-38 



June 28 
June 29 
Aug. 6 



SUMMER SESSION 
1937 



Monday- 
Tuesday 
Friday 



Registration Day 
Classes begin at 8 a.m. 
Summer Session closes at 4 p.m. 



FIRST SEMESTER 
1937 



Sept. 


14 


Tuesday 


Sept. 


20 


Monday 


Sept. 


21 


Tuesday 


Sept. 


23 


Thursday 


Oct. 


15 


Friday 


Oct. 


23 


Saturday 


Nov. 


6 


Saturday 


Nov. 


11 


Thursday 


Nov. 


24 


Wednesday 


Dec. 


18 


Saturday 


Jan. 


3 


Monday 


Jan. 


14 


Friday 


Tan. 


19-28 


Wed.-Fri. 



Matriculation Day — Freshman Class 
Registration Day — Upper Classes 
Recitations begin at 8 a.m. 
University Day — Afternoon holiday 
Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees 
Dads' Day 
Home-coming Day 
Mid-Semester reports to be filed, 

5 P.M. 

Thanksgiving Recess — Wed., 12 :30 
P.M. to Mon., 8 A.M. 

Christmas Recess begins at 12 :30 p.m. 
1938 

Christmas Recess ends at 8 a.m. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees 

First Semester examinations 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Jan. 


31 


Monday 


Feb. 


1 


Tuesday 


Feb. 




Friday 



Registration Day — All Classes 

Recitations begin at 8 a.m. 

Winter Carnival, Fri., 12:30 p.m., to 
Sat, 12:30 p.m. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Mar. 


8 


Tuesday- 


Mar. 


26 


Saturday 


Apr. 


4 


Monday 


Apr. 


14 


Thursday 



Apr. 15 Friday 

May 21 Saturday 

May 31-June 9 Tu€s.-Thurs. 
June 11 Saturday 



June 12 
June 13 



Sunday 
Monday 



Town Meeting 

Spring Recess begins at 12:30 p.m. 
Spring Recess ends at 8 a.m. 
Mid-Semester reports to be filed, 

5 P.M. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Mothers* Day 

Second Semester examinations 

Alumni Day — Meeting of Board of 
Trustees 

Baccalaureate Exercises 

Class Day Exercises, 10 :00 a.m. 
Commencement, 3 :0() p.m. 



June 27 
June 28 
Aug. 5 



SUMMER SESSION 
1938 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Friday 



Registration Day 
Classes begin at 8 a.m. 
Summer Session closes at 4 p.m. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
His Excellency, Governor Francis P. Murphy, ll.d., ex officio 

President Fred Engelhardt, ph.d., ex officio 

Andrew L. Felker, Commissioner of Agriculture, ex officio 

Roy D. Hunter, President West Claremont 

June 14, 1916 to June 30, 1937 

Harry D. Sawyer Woodstock 

September 15, 1926 to June 30, 1938 

James A. Wellman, b.s. Manchester 

January 26, 1928 to June 30, 1939 

Robert T. Kingsbury Keene 

January 27, 1928 to June 30, 1940 

♦Charles H. Hood, b.s., d.sc. Boston, Massachusetts 

May 6, 1929 to June 30, 1939 

George T. Hughes, a.m., ll.d. Dover 

July 1, 1931 to June 30, 1939 

*JoHN S. Elliott, b.s.. Secretary Madbury 

July 1, 1932 to June 30, 1940 

Jessie Doe Rollins ford 

July 1, 1932 to June 30, 1938 

John T. Dallas, a.b., d.d,, ll.d. Concord 

July 1, 1933 to June 30, 1937 

Frank W. Randall, b.s. Portsmouth 

July 1, 1936 to June 30, 1940 

•Elected by Alumni. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

*RoY D. Hunter, Acting President of the University 
Fred Engelhardt, ph.d,. President of the University 

Charles H. Pettee, a.m., c.e., ll.d.. Dean of the Faculty 
John C. Kendall, b.s.. Director of the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion and Extension Service 
George W. Case, m.c.e.. Dean of the College of Technology and Di- 
rector of the Engineering Experiment Station 
C. Floyd Jackson, b.a., m.s.. Dean of the College of Liberal Arts t^ 
M. Gale Eastman, ph.d.. Dean of the College of Agriculture ^ 
Hermon L, Slobin, PH.D., Dean of the Graduate School 
Norman Alexander, ph.d., Dean of Men 
Ruth J. Woodruff, ph.d., Dean of Women 



Raymond C. Magrath, Treasurer and Business Secretary 

Oren V. Henderson, Registrar 

Edward Y. Blewett, b.a.. Executive Secretary 

Frederick W. Taylor, b.s. in agric, Director of Commercial Depart- 
ments, College of Agriculture 

William M. Prince, m.d., University Physician 

Harold W. Loveren, b.s.. Superintendent of Property 

Eric T, Huddleston, b.arch., Supervising Architect 

Eugene K. Auerbach, b.a.. Acting Alumni Secretary and Acting 
Director, Bureau of Appointments 

MAJOR ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 

Helen W. Leighton, Manager of the University Dining Hall 

Fred L. Wentworth, Manager of the Bookstore 

Doris Beane, a.b.. Secretary to the President 

E. Prescott Campbell, Accountant, Business Office 

Beatrice M. Richmond, Cashier, Business Office 

Gladys Tasker, Assistant Registrar 

Elise F. Holt, r.n., Nurse 

Sadie V. Burke, r.n.. Nurse 

Fedora L. Lessard, r.n.. Nurse 

Betty G. Sanborn, 5^ <:r^/ar:y to Director of Commercial Departments, 

College of Agriculture 
Helen F. Jenkins, Secretary to the Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts 
Evelyn H. Brettell, Secretary to the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
Mildred M. Flanders, Secretary to the Dean of the College of Technology 
Elizabeth E. McFadden, Secretary to the Dean of the College of 

Agriculture 
Alberta R. Morrill, b.a.. Secretary to the Dean of Men 
Charles O. Nason, Secretary to the Department of Physical Education 

and Athletics 

* May 23, 1936— April 1, 1937. 

10 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

Anne E. Carroll, Secretary to the Officer in Charge of Freshmen 

and Assistant to the Director, News Bureau 
Lillian B. Hudon, b.s.. Assistant Manager of the University Dining Hall 
Marcia N. Sanders, Matron of Scott Hall 
Annie L. Sawyer, Matron of Hood House 
Shirlie L. Whitney, Matron of Congreve Hall 
Emma A. Thompson, Matron of the Commons Dormitory 
Louise M. Cobb, Matron of Hetsel Hall 
Arline B. Dame, Matron of Fairchild Hall 
May E. Phipps, b.s. in educ. Matron of Smith Hall 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Marvin A. Miller, b.a., b.s.. Librarian ^ 

Charlotte A. Thompson, Assistant Librarian, emerita 

Mary H. Falt, b.a., b.s., Circulation Librarian 

J. Doris Dart, b.a.. Catalog Librarian 

Emily Washburn, b.s.. Reference Librarian 

Caroline O. Barstow, Library Assistant 

Gratia T. Huggins, Library Assistant 

Lillian R. Perkins, b.a., Stenographer-Assistant 

PROFESSORS* 
Charles H. Pettee, a.m., c.e., ll.d.. Professor of Meteorology 
C. Floyd Jackson, b.a., m.s.. Professor of Zoology 
Walter C. O'Kane, m.a., d.sc. Professor of Economic Entomology 
Alfred E. Richards, ph.d,, Professor of English 
Ormond R. Butler, ph.d., Professor of Botany 
Eric T. Huddleston, b.arch.. Professor of Architecture 
William H. Cowell, b.s., Director and Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion and Athletics 
Karl W. Woodward, a.b., m.f.. Professor of Forestry 
Horace L. Howes, ph.d.. Professor of Physics 
Hermon L. Slobin, ph.d.. Professor of Mathematics and Director of 

the Summer School 
Harry W. Smith, a.m., Professor of Economics 
Leon W. Hitchcock, b.s.. Professor of Electrical Engineering 
George F. Potter, ph.d.. Professor of Horticulture 
Helen F. McLaughlin, m.a., Professor of Home Economics 
Thomas G. Phillips, ph.d., Professor of Agricultural and Biological 

Chemistry 
Donald C. Babcock, s.t.b., m.a.. Professor of History 
George W. Case, m.c.e., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
IHerbert p. Rudd, PH.D., Professor of Philosophy 
Harold H. Scudder, b.s., Professor" of English 
T. Burr Charles, b.s., Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
George N. Bauer, ph.d.. Professor of Statistics and Officer in Charge 
of Freshmen 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. 
t Leave of absence, February 1 — June 30, 1937. 

11 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

M. Gale Eastman, ph.d., Professor of Agricultural Economics 
Harold A. Iddles, ph.d., Professor of Chemistry 
Edmond W. Bowler, s.b. in s.e.. Professor of Civil Engineering 
Edward W. Putney, Colonel, C.A.C, Professor of Military Science 

and Tactics 
Clifford S. Parker, ph.d., Professor of Languages 
Kenneth S. Morrow, m.s., Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
A. Monroe Stowe, ph.d.. Professor of Education 
Charles W. Coulter, ph.d., Professor of Sociology 
LoRiNG V. Tirrell, B.S., Profcssor of Animal Husbandry 
Ford S. Prince, b.s.. Professor of Agronomy 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS* 
Henry C. Swasey, b.s., Associate Professor of Physical Education 

and Athletics 
Arthur W. Johnson, m.b.a., c.p.a.. Associate Professor of Economics 
William G. Hennessy, a.m., Associate Professor of English ^ 
Thorsten V. Kalijarvi, PH.D., Associate Professor of Political 

Science 
Norman Alexander, ph.d., Associate Professor of Economics 
Adolph G. Ekdahl, PH.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
Robert W. Manton, Associate Professor and Director of Music 
Clement Moran, a.b., m.s.. Associate Professor of Physics 
Edward L. Getchell, b.s., e.e., Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 
Alma D. Jackson, m.a.. Associate Professor of Zoology 
LuciNDA P. Smith, m.a.. Associate Professor of English 
John S. Walsh, a.m.. Associate Professor of Languages 
Melvin M. Smith, a.m.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Harlan M. Bisbee, a.m., Associate Professor of Education 
Jesse R. Hepler, m.s., Associate Professor of Horticulture ^ 
Walter E. Wilbur, m.s.. Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Donovan Swanton, Major, Infantry, Associate Professor of Mili- 
tary Science and Tactics 
George W. White, ph.d.. Associate Professor of Geology 
Russell R. Skelton, b.s. in c.e., c.e.. Associate Professor of Civil 

Engineering 
Hem AN C. Fogg, ph.d.. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Edwin R. Rath, b.s., e.e.. Industrial Research Engineer, College of 
Technology 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS* 
Thomas J. Laton, b.s., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Clark L. Stevens, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Forestry 
Paul C Sweet, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Physical Education for 

Men 
Edward T. Donovan, b.s., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering 

• Arrangedjin order of seniority of appointment. 

12 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

Arthur W. Jones, m.a.. Assistant Professor of History 
John D. Hauslein, m.a., Assistant Professor of Economics ^ 
Irma G. Bowen, B.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics 
Frederick D. Jackson, b.s., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering 
Rudolf L. Hering, ph.b.. Assistant Professor of Languages 
Marian E. Mills, b.s., m.a., Assistant Professor of Botany 
Raymond R. Starke, a.m., Assistant Professor of Physics 
Stanley R. Shimer, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Agricultural and 

Biological Chemistry 
L. Phelps Latimer, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
Julio Berzunza, m.a., Assistant Professor of Languages 
Carl L. Martin, d.v.m.. Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science 
E. Howard Stolworthy, b.s., Assistant Professor of Mechanical En- 
gineering 
Edythe T. Richardson, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Zoology 
Allan B. Partridge, m.a.. Assistant Professor of History 
Philip M. Marston, m.a.. Assistant Professor of History 
Paul S. Schoedinger, m.a., Assistant Professor of English 
MARv^N R. SoLT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
William B. Nulsen, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer- 
ing 
Naomi M. G. Ekdahl, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Edmund A. Cortez, m.a., ed.m., Assistant Professor of English 
Paul P. Grigaut, Cert. Sorbonne, Dipl. Ecole du Louvre, Assistant 

Professor of Languages 
James A. Funkhouser, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Carroll S. Towle, ph.d., Assistant Professor of English 
Margaret R. Hoban, b.s. in ed., Assistant Professor and Director of 

Physical Education for Women 
Ruth J. Woodruff, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Economics 
Arnold Perreton, b.arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture 
Richard H. Kimball, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Miltiades S. Demos, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Leroy J. Htggtns, b.s., Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Charles M. Mason, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Harold C. Grinnell, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 
Gibson R. Johnson, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of History 
Clair W. Swonger, a.m., Assistant Professor of Economics 
William Yale, ph.b., m.a., Assistant Professor of History 
William H. Hartwell, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Physics 
Samuel L. Buracker, Major, Infantry, Assistant Professor 

Military Science and Tactics 
Theodore R. Meyers, m.a.. Assistant Professor of Geology 
George R. Thomas, b.arch.. Assistant Professor of Architecture 
W. George Devens, Captain, Coast Artillery Corps, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 

13 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

fERNEST W. Christensen, B.S., Asststaut Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation and Athletics 

Charles A. Bottorff, Jr., d.v.m.. Assistant Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry 

Carl Lundholm, b.s.. Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 

Athletics 
Herbert C. Moore, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
George M. Foulkrod, m.s.. Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
George L. Prindle, b.s.. Major, Infantry, Assistant Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics 
Robert G. Webster, m.a.. Assistant Professor of English 
tfCARROLL M. Degler, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics 
Thomas H. McGrail, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of English 
Donald H. Chapman, ph.d.. Assistant Professor of Geology 
Sylvester H. Bingham, a.m.. Assistant Professor of English 

INSTRUCTORS* 

James Macfarlane, Instructor in Floriculture 

Lyman J. Batchelder, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Helen W. Leighton, Instructor in Home Economics 

John C. Tonkin, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Stuart Dunn, ph.d., Instructor in Botany ^ ^ , , • 

William F. Marsh, Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics 

Elias M. O'Connell, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

Lewis C. Swain, b.s.. Instructor in Music and Forestry 

Marion J. Stolworthy, Instructor in Home Economics 

Harold I. Leavitt, b.s., m.ed.. Instructor in Physics 

John A. Floyd, a.b.. Instructor in Languages 

Charles O. Dawson, b.c.e.. Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Earl H. Little, m.s.. Instructor in Agricultural Education 

William L. Kichline, m.s., Instructor in Mathematics 

GwENYTH M. Ladd, B.S. IN ED., Instructor in Physical Education for 

Women 
Ruth E. Thompson, m.s.. Instructor in Zoology 
John J. Uicker, b.s., m.e., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 
James G. Conklin, m.s., Instructor in Entomology 
Henry S. Clapp, b.s.. Instructor in Ornamental Horticulture and Su- 
pervising Landscape Architect 
Albert E. Tepper, m.s., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 
Lawrence W. Slanetz, ph.d.. Instructor in Bacteriology 
Donald M. Perkins, m.s., Instructor in Mathematics 
tfERWiN W. Bard, m.a., Instructor in Political Science 
Dorothy V. Mummery, m.a., Instructor in the Nursery School In the 

Department of Home Economics 
Lawrence H. Houtchens, ph.d., Instructor in English 
Albert F. Daggett, ph.d.. Instructor in Chemistry 
Kendrick S. French, b.s.. Instructor in Chemistry 

* Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. 
t Leave of absence, November 20, 1936— February 28, 1937. 
tt Leave of absence, 1936-37. 

14 



THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY 

John J. Conroy, b.a.. Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics 

Clyde W. Monroe, m.s.. Instructor in Zoology 

W. Robert Eadie, m.s.. Instructor in Zoology 

Eleanor L, Sheehan, m.s.. Instructor in Zoology 

Constance E. LaBagh, m.s.. Instructor in Home Economics 

Ruth C. Adams, b.a.. Instructor in Economics 

James T. Schoolcraft, Jr., ph.d.. Instructor in Languages 

Edmund W. Fenn, a.m.. Instructor in Political Science 

Perley F. Ayer, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Economics 

Henry Demers, b.s., Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics 

Irving R. Hobby, b.b.a.. Instructor in Economics 

Edward J. Blood, b.s.. Instructor in Physical Education and Athletics 

Albion R. Hodgdon, ph.d.. Instructor in Botany ^ 

Joseph E. Bachelder, Jr., b.a.. Instructor in Sociology 

ASSISTANTS* 

Fred W. Wood, Sergeant, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
Fred H. Brown, Sergeant, Assistant in Military Science and Tactics 
Bethyl C. Hennessy, Assistant in Oral English 

Henry A. Davis, m.s.. Assistant in Agricultural and Biological Chem- 
istry 
Edna F. Dickey, m.a.. Assistant in History 
Elizabeth C. Fernald, a.b.. Assistant in the Nursery School in the 

Departtncnt of Home Economics 
Edmund H. Dickerman, b.s.. Graduate Research Assistant in the 

Engineering Experiment Station 
Barbara Rowell, b.a.. Assistant in English 
Donald C. Gregg, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Carl K. Shuman, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Agricultural and Bio- 
logical Chemistry 
Terrence J. Rafferty, b.a.. Graduate Assistant in Languages 
Warren F. Peckham, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Nell W. Evans, b.s. in p.e., Graduate Assistant in Physical Education 

for Women 
Marion C. Beckwith, a.b.. Graduate Assistant in Physical Education 

for Women 
WiLLARD T. Parker, b.s., Graduate Research Assistant in the En- 
gineering Experiment Station 
Wilbur H. Miller, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Gladys E. MacPhee, b.s., ed.m.. Assistant in Education 
James W. Clapp, b.s., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 
Joseph Naghski, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Botany 
Richard L. Lewis, b.s., Graduate Research Assistant in the En- 
gineering Experiment Station 
Lewis A. Knox, b.s.. Graduate Research Assistant in the Engineer- 
ing Experiment Station 
Donald L. Kyer, b.a.. Graduate Assistant in Zoology 
William J. Locke, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering 
Madeleine A. Cournoyer, a.b.. Graduate Assistant in Languages 
Herbert B. Cowden, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry 

♦Arranged in order of seniority of appointment. 

15 



NEW HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL 
EXPERIMENT STATION 

THE STATION STAFF 

fRoY D. Hunter, Acting' President 

Fred Engelhardt, ph.d.. President ^ 

John C. Kendall, b.s., Director c 

Frederick W. Taylor, b.s. in agric, Agronomist 

Walter C. O'Kane, m.a., d.sc, Entotnologist «-^ 

Ormond R. Butler, ph.d., Botanist <^ 

Ernest G. Ritzman,, m.s.. Research Professor in Animal Husbandry^ 

Karl W. Woodward, a.b., m.f.. Forester ^ 

George F. Potter, ph.d., Horticulturist'^ ^ 

Harry C. Woodworth, m.s.. Agricultural Economics*''^ 

Thomas G. Phillips, ph.d., Chemist «-- 

Walter T. Ackerman, b.s., b.s.a.e.. Agricultural Engineer^ 

T. Burr Charles, b.s., Poultry Husbandman "^ 

Kenneth S. Morrow, m.s.. Dairy Husbandman 

Todd O, Smith, m.s., Associate Chemist 

Jesse R. Hepler, m.s., Associate Horticulturist 

M. Gale Eastman, ph.d.. Associate Agricultural Economist i^ 

Ford S. Prince, b.s., Associate Agronomist 

James Macfarlane, Florist 

Albert D. Littlehale, Shepherd 

Clark L. Ste\^ns, ph.d.. Assistant Forester 

Stanley R. Shimer, m.s., Assistant Chemist 

Gordon P. Percival, m.s., Assistant Chemist 

L. Phelps Latimer, ph.d.. Assistant Horticulturist 

Max F. Abell, ph.d., Assistant Agricultural Economist 

Stuart Dunn, ph.d.. Assistant Botanist 

Leroy J. Higgins, b.s., Assistant Agronomist 

Paul T. Blood, m.s., Assistant Agronomist 

Charles A. Bottorff, Jr., d.v.m.. Poultry Pathologist 

NicHOLOs F. CoLOvos, M.S., Assistant in Animal Husbandry 

Leon C. Glover, m.s.. Research Assistant in Entomology 

Herbert C. Moore, m.s.. Assistant Dairy Husbandman 

Carl L. Martin, d.v.m., Veterinarian 

*Warren a. Westgate, m.s.. Research Chemical Assistant in En- 
tomology 

Albert E. Tepper, m.s.. Assistant Poultry Husbandman 

Roslyn C. Durgin, b.s.. Record of Performance and Certification In- 
spector 

t May 23, 1936— April 1, 1937. 

* Leave of absence, January 15, 1937 — January 14, 1938. 

16 



THE STATION STAFF 

James G. Conklin, m.s., Assistant Entomologist 
Henry A. Davis, m.s.. Assistant in Agricultural and Biological Chem- 
istry 
Harold C. Grinnell, m.s., Assistant Agricultural Economist 
Lawrence W. Slanetz, ph.d., Assistant in Bacteriology 
Lawrence A. Dougherty, b.s.. Assistant Economist in Marketing 
Arno J. Hangas, B.S., Research Field Assistant in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics 
Roger M. Doe, b.s.. Assistant in Animal Husbandry 
Alan G. MacLeod, m.a.. Assistant Economist in Marketing 
William W. Smith, ph.d.. Research Assistant in Horticulture 
Mary A. Tingley, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Horticulture 
Joseph Naghski, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Botany 
Willard R. Gillette, b.s.. Graduate Assistant in Botany 

ASSISTANTS TO THE STAFF 

Henry B. Stevens, a.b.. Executive Secretary 

Marvin A. Miller, b.a., b.s., Librarian 

Raymond C. Magrath, Treasurer and Business Secretary 

Beatrice M. Richmond, Bookkeeper 

John P. Neville, b.a.. Assistant Agricultural Editor 

Elizabeth E. Mehaffey, Assistant Librarian and Mailing Clerk 

Betty G. Sanborn, Seed Analyst and Secretary 

Helen H. Latimer, Gas Analyst 

Maisie C. Burpee, Secretary to the Director 



17 



EXTENSION SERVICE 

GENERAL EXTENSION STAFF 

*RoY D. Hunter, Acting President 
Fred Engelhardt, ph.d.. President 
John C. Kendall, b.s.. Director 
Earl P. Robinson, b.s.. County Agent Leader 
Daisy D. Williamson, State Home Demonstration Leader 
fCLARENCE B. Wadleigh, B.S., State Club Leader 
Mary L. Sanborn, Assistant State Club Leader 
Ann F. Beggs, Extension Economist, Home Management 
Harry C. Woodvvorth, m.s.. Extension Economist, Farm Manage- 
ment 
Kenneth E. Barraclough, b.s.. Extension Forester 
Max F. Abell, ph.d., Assistant Economist, Farm Management 
Edson F. Eastman, b.s.. Extension Dairyman 
Hazel E. Hill, b.s. in ed., Extension Specialist in Clothing 
Elizabeth E. Ellis, b.s., m.a., Extension Nutritionist 
Lawrence A. Dougherty, b.s. in agric, Extension Economist in Mar- 
keting 
Cecil O. Rawlings, b.s.. Extension Horticulturist 
R. Claude Bradley, ph.d., Extension Poultry man 
Walter T. Ackerman, b.s., b.s.a.e.. Agricultural Engineer 
Samuel W. Hoitt, m.s.. Assistant State Club Leader 
Clyde N. Hall, b.s., Assistant Extension Dairyman 
Nancy E. Carlisle, b.s.. Home Demonstration Agent at Large 
Jay L. Haddock, m.s.. Extension Agronomist 
Warren H. Rogers, b.s.. County Agent at Large 
Alan G. MacLeod, m.a.. Assistant Economist in Marketing 
Perley F. Ayer, b.s.. Specialist in Rural Organisation and Recreation 
Clarence S. Herr, m.s.. Assistant Extension Forester 
Stanley E. Wilson, b.s.. Assistant in Poultry Improvement and 
Horticultural Improvement 

COUNTY AGRICULTURAL AGENTS 

Howard N. Wells, Sullivan County 

W. Ross Wilson, b.s., Grafton County 

James A. Purington, m.s., Rockingham County 

Daniel A. O'Brien, Cods County 

Edward W. Holden, b.s., Merrimack County 

Everett W. Pierce, b.s., Hillsborough County 

Eloi a. Adams, b.s., Strafford County 

Royal W. Smith, b.s., Belknap County 

Errol C. Perry, b.s., Carroll County 

Cornelius J. Ahern, b.s., Cheshire County 

* May 23, 1936— April 1, 1937. 

t Leave of absence March 1 — August 31, 1937. 

18 



THE EXTENSION STAFF 

COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 

tfMiRiAM F. Parmenter, Cheshire County 
Myrtis E. Beecher, Hillsborough County 
Rena Gray, b.s., Belknap County 
Una a. Rice, b.s., Grafton County 
E. Alice Melendy, b.s., Carroll County 
Hope A. Dyer, b.s., Sullivan County 
Grace H. Smith, b.s., Strafford County 
Anita N. Babb, Rockingham County 
Eleanor Wiliamson, b.e.. Cods County 
Mabel A. Lash, b.s., Merrimack County 

COUNTY BOYS' AND GIRLS' CLUB AGENTS 

Kenneth E. Gibbs, b.s., Hillsborough County 

Stanley W. DeQuoy, Grafton County 

Elizabeth Bourne, Rockingham County 

Norman F. Whippen, b.s., Sullivan County 

Paul J. Dixon, b.s., Carroll County 

Elizabeth R. Roper, b.a., Strafford County 

*RuTH C. Weston, b.a., Cheshire County 

Alden H. Mead, b.s., Coos County 

Wilfred G. Purdy, m.s., Merrimack County 
County 

Irene E. Jewett, b.e., Assistant County Club Agent in Grafton County 

Hazel A. Colburn, b.s.. Assistant County Club Agent in Hills- 
borough County 

Clifford C. Ellsworth, b.s.. Assistant County Club Agent in Rock- 
ingham County 

James P. Edney, b.s.. Acting County Club Agent in Cheshire County 

Vera M. Ford, b.s.. Assistant County Club Agent in Merrimack 
County 

ASSISTANTS TO THE STAFF 

Henry B. Stevens, a.b.. Executive Secretary 

Raymond C. Magrath, Treasurer and Business Secretary 

Beatrice M. Richmond, Bookkeeper 

John P. Neville, b.a.. Assistant Agricultural Editor 

John W. Spaven, b.s.. Executive Assistant 

Elizabeth E. Mehaffey, Assistant Librarian and Mailing Clerk 

Maisie C Burpee, Secretary to the Director 

tt Leave of absence, September 1, 1936 — August 31, 1937. 

* Acting County Club Agent, Belknap County, September 1, 1936 — 
June 30. 1937 



19 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



The University of New Hampshire was incorporated by an act of 
The General Court of New Hampshire on May 4, 1923. The new cor- 
poration included the old corporation known as the New Hampshire 
College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, a College of Technol- 
ogy and a College of Liberal Arts. The act of incorporation took 
effect on July 1, 1923. Under the provisions of the act the trustees of 
the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts 
became the trustees of the University of New Hampshire. 

The administration of the University is vested in a board of thirteen 
trustees, of which the Governor of the State, the Commissioner of 
Agriculture, and the President of the University are ex officio mem- 
bers. The alumni elect two trustees, and the others are appointed by 
the Governor with the advice and consent of the Council. 

The original corporation, the New Hampshire College of Agricult- 
ure and the Mechanic Arts, was created by an act of the Legislature in 
1866 and was established at Hanover as a state institution in connec- 
tion with Dartmouth College. The year 1866 saw the entrance of the 
first class. Before the college was founded, the Legislature of 1863 
had accepted the conditions of an Act of Congress of July 2, 1862, en- 
titled, "An act donating public lands to the several states and territor- 
ies which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts." 

In 1893 the college was moved from Hanover to Durham. This 
action followed the death of Benjamin Thompson, a farmer of Dur- 
ham, who died January 30, 1890, and left to the college, with the 
exception of a few minor reservations, his entire estate. The Legisla- 
ture accepted this bequest March 5, 1891, and appropriated the neces- 
sary money for the first buildings. 

Shortly before the State accepted Mr. Thompson's gift the Legisla- 
ture further provided for the college by accepting the provisions of 
Congressional legislation known as the Morrill Act. This legislation 
made available federal appropriations "for instruction in agriculture, 
the mechanic arts, the English language, and the various branches of 
mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with special 
reference to their applications in the industries of life, and to the 
facilities for such instruction." 

20 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

Although the college was able to make use of the Thompson land as 
early as 1893, it was not until 1910 that the income from the endow- 
ment of almost $800,000 became available. At present the college has 
an annual income from the Thompson fund of nearly $32,000. It also 
receives moneys which are available as the result of the acts of Con- 
gress referred to, and a yearly appropriation from the State amounting 
to one mill per dollar on the assessed valuation of all taxable property. 

Although engineering instruction had been carried on in a division 
of engineering from the founding of the college, the work became 
unified and specialized when the College of Technology became one of 
the administrative units of the University in 1923. 

Study of the liberal arts had been offered before the change of 
nomenclature of the corporation in 1923. The University of New 
Hampshire included a College of Liberal Arts, intended to care for 
the students who desire preparation for life in fields other than agri- 
culture and engineering. 

Graduate study, although not new to New Hampshire, as it had been 
carried on for some time under the direction of a faculty committee, 
was definitely organized in 1928 as a Graduate School. 

A branch of the University, known as the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, was established by the State August 4, 1887, under the terms 
of an Act of Congress passed in March of that year. Its purpose is to 
acquire agricultural knowledge and to bring its information to the 
people of the State. The station is actively engaged in this work not 
only in Durham but throughout the commonwealth. Members of the 
faculty of the College of Agriculture serve on the station staff. 

In addition to its functions of teaching resident students and con- 
ducting research investigations, the University has developed its 
function of carrying information and assistance in agriculture and 
home economics into all parts of the State. Funds appropriated for 
the University by acts of Congress and the Legislature provide the 
means for promoting this type of work. 



21 



SITUATION 



Durham, the home of the University, is an attractive village on the 
Portland division of the Boston and Maine railroad, sixty-two miles 
from Boston, fifty-four from Portland, and five from Dover, a city 
of 15,000 population. Good train service and excellent trunk-line 
motor roads make the University easily accessible from all parts of 
the state. 

Durham, organized in 1732, is one of the historic towns of New 
Hampshire. In the early days it was the home of a prosperous ship- 
building industry. Situated at the head of tidewater on the Oyster 
River, it served as a distributing center for the interior of the state. 
During the Revolutionary War it was famous as the home of Major 
General John Sullivan. Near his home, in the village, the state has 
erected a fitting monument to his memory. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 



BUILDINGS FOR ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION 

Thompson Hall, the general administration building, was built in 
1893 and is named for Benjamin Thompson of Durham, the greatest 
individual benefactor of the College and University. It contains the 
office of the President and the offices of other general administrative 
officers, and also affords classroom and laboratory facilities for work 
in physical education for women, zoology, entomology, and home 
economics. 

CoNANT Hall, also built in 1893, is named for John Conant of Jaf- 
frey, an early and generous friend of the College. This building, 
origfinally constructed to house scientific departments, gradually be- 
came during the passage of years the headquarters of the department 
of chemistry. It was in this building that Professor Charles James 
accomplished his researches in the rare earths and minerals. Upon 
the completion of Charles James Hall in 1929, this building was 
largely given over to civil engineering and geology . 

Nesmith Hall, another one of the four original buildings erected 
in Durham in 1893, is named for Judge George W. Nesmith of Frank- 
lin, who was active as president of the Board of Trustees from 1877 

22 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

to 1890. This small building was enlarged and renovated in 1933 and 
now houses the departments of botany and agricultural economics. 

Shops, originally constructed in 1893 and enlarged during and imme- 
diately after the World War, provides facilities for the department 
charged with the maintenance of the buildings and grounds. This 
building also houses practical laboratory work in mechanical engineer- 
ing, and in one section provides space for practical instruction and 
research in the handling and storage of horticultural products. 

Morrill Hall, built in 1902, is named for Senator Justin Morrill 
of Vermont, sponsor of the Land Grant Act. This building serves as 
headquarters of the College of Agriculture, and contains also the office 
of the director of Experiment Station and the Extension Service. In 
this building are the laboratories and classrooms of the departments 
of agronomy, animal husbandry, horticulture, poultry husbandry, for- 
estry, and offices for agricultural extension and station staff members. 

Armory and Gymnasium, erected in 1906, contains a large drill hall 
and gymnasium and provides space for the offices of the departments 
of ph3^sical education and athletics and military science and tactics. 
In the basement facilities are provided for showers and lockers and 
for the storage of military and athletic equipment. 

Hamilton Smith Library was erected in 1907 with a union of 
funds left by Hamilton Smith of Durham for the erection of a town 
library building and funds from the Carnegie Corporation and the 
State of New Hampshire. The library serves not only the faculty and 
students of the University but also the residents of the town of Dur- 
ham, being one of two such libraries in the United States so consti- 
tuted, and because it is the library of the state university, it serves as 
far as possible the people of the State of New Hampshire. 

Dairy Building, constructed in 1910, is arranged and equipped for 
purposes of dairy instruction. It contains equipment usually found in 
an up-to-date dairy and affords splendid opportunities for the study 
of all phases of the dairy industry. 

DeMeritt Hall, provided in 1914, is named for Albert DeMeritt of 
Durham, a long-time friend and staunch supporter of the College. It 
serves as the headquarters of the College of Technology and affords 
lecture, recitation, laboratory and office rooms for the departments of 
mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, physics, and archi- 
tecture. 

2Z 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MuRKLAND Hall, built in 1927, is named for Charles Sumner Murk- 
land, President of New Hampshire from 1893 to 1903. It provides 
classroom and office facilities for the majority of the departments of 
the College of Liberal Arts. It houses the departments of economics 
and accounting, English, languages, mathematics, sociology, philoso- 
phy and psychology, history, and political science. 

Charles James Hall, dedicated in 1929, bears the name of Charles 
James, Professor of Chemistry at New Hampshire from 1906 to 1928. 
This structure houses the department of agricultural and biolog- 
ical chemistry and the department of chemistry. It provides lecture 
and recitation rooms and laboratories for instruction and research in 
both of these departments. 

Ballard Hall, originally constructed in 1905 and acquired by pur- 
chase in 1914, affords office and classroom facilities for the depart- 
ments of education and music, accommodations for Christian Work, 
Inc., and offices for student organizations. 

RESIDENTIAL HALLS 

Commons was erected in 1919 and enlarged in 1925. It contains the 
freshman dining hall, a faculty dining room, a cafeteria, a trophy and 
lounge room, rooms for meetings of student organizations, and pro- 
vides on the third floor dormitory facilities for a limited number of 
undergraduate men. 

Fairchild Hall, erected in 1916, honors Edward Thomson Fair- 
child, President of New Hampshire from 1912 to 1917. It is a brick 
structure of colonial design and furnishes accommodations for 150 
undergraduate men. 

East and West Halls were erected by the United States Govern- 
ment in 1918, in order to furnish housing facilities for troops in train- 
ing at the College during the World War. These buildings have since 
been partitioned into moderate-sized rooms and provide desirable 
accommodations and comfortable quarters at low cost for 230 men. 

Smith Hall was originally constructed in 1908 with funds made 
possible by the generosity of Mrs. Shirley Onderdonk of Durham, who 
made this provision as a memorial to her mother, Mrs. Alice Hamilton 
Smith. The original building and an annex constructed in 1918 fur- 
nish desirable rooming facilities for 68 women students. 

24 



EQUIPMENT 

CoNGREVE Hall was built in 1920 with funds made available through 
the will of Mrs. Alice Hamilton Smith of Durham, and bears the 
name of a family intimately connected with Mrs. Smith's ancestry. 
The original building and a wing erected during the summer of 1922 
accommodate 100 undergraduate women. 

Hetzel Hall, built in 1925, is named for Ralph D. Hetzel, President 
of New Hampshire from 1917 to 1927. It is the newest men's dormi- 
tory on the campus and accommodates 156 undergraduate men. 

Scott Hall, completed in 1932, is named for Clarence Watkins 

Scott, Professor of History at New Hampshire from 1879 to 1930. 

This building furnishes comfortable accommodations for 120 under- 
graduate women. 

Elizabeth Demeritt House, erected in 1931, named for Mrs. 
Elizabeth P. DeMeritt, Dean of Women from 1919 to 1931, is a 
new and well-furnished practice house for use by students in home 
economics. 

Charles Harvey Hood House, an infirmary and rest house erected 
in 1932, is the gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Harvey Hood of Boston. 
It was erected and will be maintained by funds presented to the Trus- 
tees in 1930, the fiftieth anniversary of Mr. Hood's graduation from 
New Hampshire. Hood House, designed and furnished in a cheery, 
homelike style, is unusually well equipped to care for sick and ailing 
students and teachers. It will accommodate normally thirty patients 
in both wards and private rooms. The office of the University Physi- 
cian and quarters for three trained nurses are also located in Hood 
House. 

Lewis Fields, outdoor recreational center, dedicated October 10, 
1936 in honor of Dr. Edward Morgan Lewis, President of the Uni- 
versity from 1927 to 1936, include six fields for football, soccer, la- 
crosse, and four baseball diamonds for alternate use with some of the 
aforementioned, a first-class cinder track with a 220 yard straight- 
away and pits and runways for jumping and vaulting, fourteen com- 
position and six clay tennis courts, concrete bleachers seating 1750 
spectators at baseball games and concrete stands seating 5000 spec- 
tators at football and track and field contests. The entire equip- 
ment was built in cooperation with Federal work-relief agencies. 
Materials used in the construction of the main field stands were 
provided by alumni of the University as the first project of the 

25 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Alumni Fund. The varsity baseball field on Lewis Fields is known 
as Brackett Field, in honor of William H. L. Brackett, '14, prom- 
inent student leader of his college generation who died from wounds 
received during the World War. 

Other buildings on the campus include the President's House, a sub- 
stantial, attractive building erected in 1904 to provide a residence for 
the President and his family ; the Power Plant, equipped for heating 
the buildings of the institution; the Greenhouses, which provide facili- 
ties for botanical and horticultural research and instruction ; the sev- 
eral large and well-equipped farm buildings adapted to the needs of 
the College of Agriculture ; and a frame dwelling used for instruction 
in the care and nurture of children of pre-school age. 

EQUIPMENT 
Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering. — For farm crops 
work, this department has a very complete collection of dried speci- 
mens of the different forage crops, and of the more important varie- 
ties of corn, wheat and oats. Seed testing apparatus, grass charts, and 
other illustrative material form a part of the equipment. 

The lecture room is equipped with a combined lantern and reflecto- 
scope, together with a large number of lantern slides. 

A new soil physics laboratory contains soil bins, chemical and 
torsion balances and various kinds of physical apparatus for the 
study of soils, including that for the determination of specific gravity 
and for the making of mechanical analyses. 

The farm, with its 1,300 acres of land, has a variety of soils suited 
for the growth of various farm crops. 

For instruction in agricultural engineering improved facilities are 
provided by the use of two and one-half floors in a building measur- 
ing 45 feet by 98 feet which contains laboratories for the study of 
farm, equipment, building construction and maintenance, and other 
engineering problems related to farm enterprises. Four to six makes 
of tractors are available in the tractor laboratory ; several types and 
sizes of stationary engines and light plants are provided in the gas 
engine laboratory. Considerable space is devoted to a large variety 
of representative makes of modern field machinery for study of 
machine methods, selection, care, adjustment and operation. 

Facilities for instruction in electrical farm equipment and methods 

26 



EQUIPMENT 

of operation are provided. In the electric farm power laboratory for 
rural electrification are available many electrical appliances especially 
developed for agricultural use. 

Tools and facilities are provided for the care, adjustment and 
operation of equipment, and a modern farm shop is employed in the 
instruction in repair work. 

Drainage levels for laying out drains, plane tables for mapping plots 
of land, polar planimeters for measuring plotted areas, steel tapes, 
chains, range poles, etc., are available for practical work in farm sur- 
veying, mapping and drainage problems. 

A dynamometer, apparatus for studying draft problems, and many 
measuring, recording and other instruments of the experiment station 
are available for technical, as well as practical, class instruction. 

Animal Husbandry. — The stock barn is thoroughly equipped with 
modern appliances, and houses an excellent herd of pure-bred Short- 
horns, several Herefords, small flocks of pure-bred Shropshire and 
Dorset sheep, and a well-bred Percheron stallion. 

The piggery accommodates a herd of Chester White hogs. All ani- 
mals are used for instructional purposes. 

The classroom is equipped with various anatomical models, charts, 
and lantern slides, and an up-to-date livestock library is available for 
student use. 

Herd books of the most prominent breeds are used for the purpose 
of familiarizing students with the methods of tracing pedigrees and 
with the practices of breeders' associations. 

Architecture. — The department of architecture is well equipped to 
meet the needs of the courses offered. The drafting rooms are sup- 
plied with tables and lockers, and the free-hand studio with suitable 
stands and easels. For free-hand drawing there is a good supply of 
geometric models, and for advanced work in charcoal drawing the 
nucleus of a good collection of plaster casts exists, consisting of his- 
toric ornament, details of plant and animal life and of the human 
form. For special work in this subject there is available the museum 
of casts, consisting of examples of antique and modern sculpture. For 
work in architectural drawing an excellent library of books, period- 
icals, and blue prints of all classes of buildings are available for refer- 
ence and use in the drafting rooms, while a goodly collection of 
samples of building materials is being added from time to time. 

27 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Botany and Bacteriology. — The department has laboratories and 
greenhouses equipped for work in general botany, pathology, physiol- 
ogy and bacteriology and a working library of 2,000 volumes. Ample 
facilities are provided also for advanced work because of the affilia- 
tion of the department with the experiment station. The bacteriology 
laboratory is equipped for work in general and applied bacteriology, 
and opportunity is provided also for advanced work. 

Chemistry. — The departments of chemistry and agricultural chem- 
istry occupy the new building, Charles James Hall. Laboratories, 
equipment and recitation rooms, entirely modern in every respect, are 
provided for instruction in all fundamental courses. In addition ample 
facilities are available for advanced instruction and research work in 
inorganic, analytical, physical, and organic chemistry. 

Civil Engineering. — The civil engineering department is located in 
Conant Hall. The offices and the drafting, recitation, and lecture 
rooms are on the first floor, and the instrument rooms and laboratories 
for material testing and highway investigation are in the basement. 
The hydraulic laboratory, in the basement of DeMeritt Hall, is used 
by the civil engineering department for instruction and experimenta- 
tion. The department is well equipped with transits, levels, plane 
tables, and current meters for plane, topographic and hydrographic 
surveying. 

Dairy Husbandry. — The dairy husbandry laboratories, located in 
the dairy building and in the dairy barn, are well equipped for instruc- 
tional purposes. The equipment includes power churn, power separa- 
tor, pasteurizers, coolers, ice cream freezers, bottler, two mechanical 
refrigeration units and homogenizer. The milk testing and bacterio- 
logical laboratories have equipment necessary for milk testing and 
inspection, and dairy bacteriology. 

The University dairy herd is made up of representatives of the 
Ayrshire, Guernsey, Holstein and Jersey breeds. 

A new dairy barn unit, completed in the spring of 1932, provides 
accommodations for some 120 dairy animals. This unit consists of the 
following : main barn, for 60 cows ; wing, for bulls, calves and young 
stock ; isolation barn ; dry cow and young stock barn, for 50 head ; 
combine milk room ; milk house, with equipment for cooling, bottling 
and storing milk, and for washing and sterilizing bottles and equip- 
ment. 

28 



EQUIPMENT 

Electrical Engineering. — The laboratories for electrical engineer- 
ing are located in DeMeritt Hall. The main laboratory is used for 
testing electrical machinery, and contains a large distribution switch- 
board on which are mounted instruments, switches, circuit breakers, 
and plugging devices. These devices are so arranged that by making 
the proper connections thereto, direct current and alternating current 
can be supplied to the various panels in the laboratory and to the 
lecture rooms in the building. In addition to this main laboratory there 
are others devoted to communication and storage batteries. 

The general equipment includes direct and alternating current gen- 
erators and motors, transformers, rectifiers, rotary converters, tele- 
phone, telegraph and radio communication equipment, demonstration 
equipment, storage batteries, and the necessary measuring instruments 
adapted to the needs of students taking this course. 

The lecture room of the department is connected directly with the 
switchboard in the main laboratory and is equipped with such appa- 
ratus as is needed to supplement lectures with demonstrations. 

Farm. — The College of Agriculture has a large, well-equipped farm. 
It serves as a laboratory for much of the instruction in agriculture 
where approved methods and practices may be seen and where many 
students may gain experience by actually performing the work with 
their own hands. 

The several farms of the University total about 1,305 acres. Of this 
area about 154 acres are devoted to the campus and athletic fields ; 
about 275 acres are used for hay, tillage, orchards and gardens ; about 
558 acres are forest, wood and brush land; about 300 acres are in 
pasture; and about 18 acres in ponds. 

Forestry. — Durham is well situated with reference to the study of 
woodlot forestry. All types of native second-growth forests are found 
near by, and the college owns a tract of 50 acres of old-growth timber 
and 500 acres of second-growth. A nursery for the growing of seed- 
ling forest trees has been established. To give an insight into the 
problems of large-scale forest management, the summer camp is lo- 
cated in the White Mountain National Forest, which has an area of 
over 500,000 acres. 

The necessary instruments for making forest maps and measure- 
ments, together with collections of wood specimens, lantern slides and 
photographs, are available in connection with this work. 

29 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Geology. — The geology department, located on the second floor of 
Conant Hall, offers courses in structural and dynamic geology, phys- 
iography, mineralogy, economic geology, and paleontology. The lect- 
ures in these courses are supplemented by laboratory exercises and 
field trips. 

The working equipment of the department includes numerous topo- 
graphic and geologic maps, and a fairly complete collection of miner- 
als, rocks and fossils. Microscopes are available for problem work in 
mineralogy, petrology, and paleontology. The departmental museum 
displays a wide variety of geological specimens and contains the 
Hitchcock collection, the Clough collection, and a portion of the Exeter 
Historical Society collection. 

Few areas present such a wide variety of geological phenomena as 
the country in and about Durham. Features such as mountain and 
continental glaciation, marine erosion and deposition, vulcanism, oro- 
geny, and metamorphism, are well shown. 

Home Economics. — The home economics department has two offices 
and three large classrooms in Thompson Hall, a thoroughly modern 
home management house, and a nursery school-kindergarten. The 
food laboratory consists of a small unit dining-room and a working 
area equipped with individual desks and cupboards for utensils and 
supplies. The clothing laboratory is equipped with tables, cupboa ds, 
various types of sewing machines and has a fitting room. The fnird 
classroom is equipped for weaving and textile study and contains a 
delineascope. 

The Elizabeth DeMeritt House, maintained for practice in home 
management, is a modified Cape Cod cottage, thoroughly equipped 
with modern household devices and furnished to illustrate various 
types of treatment in keeping with its style. It will house eight resi- 
dent students and two instructors. 

The Durham Kindergarten and Nursery School is located in a cot- 
tage house at the rear of Smith Hall. It is furnished with the necessary 
equipment to maintain the school as a laboratory for child care and 
training. 

The Library. — The Hamilton Smith Library, by virtue of an agree- 
ment between the Town of Durham and the then New Hampshire 
College in 1907, contains not only the books belonging to the Univer- 

30 



EQUIPMENT 

sity but also those of the Durham Library Association, the Durham 
Public Library and the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

The library collection includes 88,000 bound volumes. One thousand 
periodicals, continuations and proceedings of scientific societies are 
received currently. The library is a depository for United States gov- 
ernment publications. The main collections are housed in the Hamil- 
ton Smith Library. The volumes of the New Hampshire Agricultural 
Experiment Station are kept in Morrill Hall. Seventeen department 
libraries are maintained for the departments of the Colleges of Agri- 
culture and Technology. Periodicals appropriate to the department 
libraries are sent there. 

The library publications include The Library Handbook containing 
information, directions for the use of the library and library tools, 
and library regulations ; and the Library Lantern^ a monthly news 
bulletin about books and libraries. These are free. 

The library attempts to provide all books needed for reading and 
research save the individual texts adopted for the various courses ; to 
provide recreational reading of a wide and varied character, including 
current, ephemeral and standard material of value ; and to add gradu- 
ally to its collections of the classics, serial sets, research and reference 
works. 

Mechanical Engineering. — This department Is located in DeMer- 
itt Hall. On the second and third floors are the advanced drawing and 
designing rooms. In addition to these drafting rooms there are two 
lecture rooms, and department offices. One of the lecture rooms is 
equipped with a motion picture machine and stereopticon lantern for 
illustrated lectures. 

In the basement are located certain of the mechanical engineering 
laboratories, one of which is the laboratory equipped with the appara- 
tus for making analyses of flue gases, for calorimetric determinations 
of the heat values of solid and liquid fuels, and for conducting the 
usual work in heat treatment of steel. Apparatus needed in determin- 
ing the viscosity and flash points of lubricants as well as an oil testing 
machine for determining the lubricating and wearing qualities of 
lubricants is located in the automotive laboratory in the Shops. Mate- 
rials testing machines of this department are located in the basement 
of Conant Hall. 

31 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The main room of the DeMeritt laboratories is given over to the 
testing of steam, gas and hydraulic machinery as well as of air com- 
pressors, air conditioning, refrigeration and heat transfer apparatus. 
This laboratory is equipped with machinery needed for such testing. 
There is also an ample supply of other apparatus needed in conducting 
various tests and doing research work in various lines. 

The new heating plant has been designed to serve also as a steam 
laboratory for this department. 

Aeronautical equipment and internal combustion engines are. lo- 
cated in the automotive laboratory at the rear of the Shops. 

The wood shop is fully equipped with modern woodworking 
equipment. 

The equipment of the machine shops consists of the modern appara- 
tus found in an up-to-date commercial shop, and a large number of 
small tools, including micrometers, calipers and gauges necessary for 
accurate work. This shop was entirely remodeled and equipped with 
new lathes in 1931. 

The forge shop is equipped with down-draft forges and all neces- 
sary tools. This shop was entirely remodeled and new down-draft 
equipment installed in 1931. 

Military Science. — Recognizing in military training a source of 
physical, mental, and moral development for the individual and a 
future safeguard for the nation, the University maintains two units 
of the Reserve Officers Training Corps. This corps, described in later 
pages, is made up of units at 125 principal educational institutions in 
the country. It was organized by Congress in 1916 to provide system- 
atic military training in civil institutions and to train specially selected 
students as reserve officers in the military forces of the United States. 

The training of the corps is under the supervision of the Secretary 
of War. Officers and non-commissioned officers of the Regular Army 
are detailed at the University to conduct this training. The War De- 
partment loans all the necessary equipment of the latest type, so that 
with the exception of a few text-books required by students, members 
of the R.O.T.C. are put to no expense for arms or equipment. 

In addition to the infantry and artillery equipment furnished by the 
government, there are a 75-foot indoor gallery practice rifle range, a 
1,000-inch outdoor machine gun range, and a 50-yard outdoor pistol 
range available for the use of students. The rolling country in the 
vicinity furnishes opportunity for extended order drill and field exer- 
cises, and the athletic fields for close order drill. 

32 



EQUIPMENT 

The cadets wear, when on duty of a military character, a uniform 
furnished by the War Department. 

Upon the graduation of each class, those students who have satisfac- 
torily completed the course receive commissions as second lieutenants 
in the Officers Reserve Corps of the United States Army. 

Physics. — The department of physics is housed in the west end of 
DeMeritt Hall. In the basement are located the introductory physics 
laboratory with apparatus room, an electrical measurements labora- 
tory, a switchboard hall, a storage room and a suite of dark rooms 
to accommodate students in photography. On the first floor are 
located the general physics laboratory and apparatus room, a recita- 
tion room and the department office. On the second floor is located 
the lecture room, with adjoining apparatus room. 

Instruction in physics is given primarily by recitations and labora- 
tories, with frequent lectures, examinations, written reports and per- 
sonal conferences. The aim of the department is to develop student 
minds capable of doing independent thinking in the science of physics. 
There is a small but well chosen collection of apparatus for use in 
laboratories and lectures. 

Poultry Husbandry. — The equipment of the poultry plant consists 
of a permanent laying house for 1,000 birds ; a laying house for 750 
birds, one unit of which is equipped with 480 laying cages ; a long type 
special-pedigree mating house of fourteen pens; a permanent long 
type brooder house capable of brooding 5,000 chicks ; battery brooder 
rooms with a capacity of 4,000 chicks to broiler age ; an incubator cellar 
containing cabinet type incubators of 1,400-egg and 8,000-egg capa- 
city, as well as several small machines for student instruction. A unit 
of six colony brooder houses is also available for student practice 
work. 

Improved range facilities are now available consisting of four per- 
manently-fenced areas, each of approximately ten acres, for chickens, 
and additional areas for turkeys. 

The poultry flock consists of Barred Plymouth Rocks, Single Comb 
White Leghorns and New Hampshires, also representative units of 
Bronze turkeys. White Pekin ducks, and Toulouse geese. 

The poultry plant is operated for instructional and research pur- 
poses. Experiments are constantly in progress in nutrition, breeding, 
brooding, management and diseases. 

A special poultry pathology laboratory is maintained for diagnosis 

33 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

and research in poultry diseases. This laboratory is available for stu- 
dent instructional purposes. 

Zoology. — The University is favorably situated geographically for 
the study of zoology. Within a few minutes' walk of the laboratory, 
the Oyster River meets the tide water from Great Bay. This furnishes 
a graduation of salt, brackish and fresh water with an abundance of 
their characteristic fauna. On the other hand, there are numerous 
bodies of fresh water, with typical fresh water forms. 

The department of zoology is prepared to offer courses in systematic 
zoology, physiology, sanitation, philosophical zoology, and anatomical 
zoology. 

The equipment for the work in systematic zoology consists of a 
well-lighted laboratory, provided with tables, charts, dissecting and 
compound miscroscopes. All of the latest books and periodicals on 
systematic zoology are at the student's disposal. 

The proximity to both salt and fresh water renders the work in 
advanced systematic zoology unusually attractive. In addition to the 
regular collecting equipment, nets, aquaria, etc., advanced students 
also have the use of rowboats and a gasoline launch. 

In the work in physiology, hygiene and sanitation, the department 
is provided with an unusually fine collection of injected preparations 
of the human body, and with numerous charts. 

For work in evolution and experimental zoology the department has 
a very complete library. Studies in ecology in Great Bay and vicinity 
are encouraged, for which purpose the students have the use of camera 
equipment. In addition to the study of evolution under natural con- 
ditions the department also furnishes aquaria for laboratory study 
and experiments. 

The work in anatomical zoology is greatly facilitated by an abun- 
dance of fresh material which may be collected as needed. For the 
study of human and comparative anatomy a full set of skeletons and 
preserved material is provided. Students interested in histology have 
access to a private collection of some two thousand microscope slides. 

Museum. — The museum had for a nucleus the collection made dur- 
ing the state geological survey. To this, additions have been made 
from various sources. Specimens are being collected to illustrate the 
zoology of New Hampshire, and New Hampshire collectors and natu- 
ralists are invited to make the museum the permanent depository of 
their collections. 

34 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
EXPENSES 



Estimate of Freshman Expenses 

High Average Low 

Room (Dormitories)* $120.00 $80.00 $64.00 

Board (at Commons) 200.00 200.00 200.00 

Tuition** 150.00 150.00 75.00 and a 

scholarship 

Uniformf 

Books 35.00 35.00 35.00 

Laundry 35.00 20.00 15.00 

Incidentalstt 100.00 60.00 50.00 

Total $640.00 $545.00 $439.00 

Expenses, First Semester $340.00 $275.00 $230.00 

Tuition — Four- Year Students. — Tuition is $150 a year for resi- 
dents of New Hampshire and $250 for non-residents. Tuition is paid 
in advance in two equal installments, one on the first day of each 
semester. Students who find it difficult or impossible to procure the 
necessary funds for payment on the regular registration day may 
make arrangements acceptable to the Treasurer for a series of pay- 
ments during a semester. 

A diploma fee of $5 is charged upon graduation. Charges will be 
assessed for extraordinary breakage or damage. No laboratory or 
course fees are charged. Payment of the tuition entitles the student 
(four-year, two-year) to admission to all home 'varsity athletic con- 
tests. 

* See bulletin on Residential Halls. 

** If not a resident of New Hampshire add $100 to high and average and $175 
to low. If a resident and not a holder of a scholarship, add $75 to low. 

t Uniform for members of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps is provided by 
the Federal government. A deposit of $15 is required of each student to whom 
military equipment is issued. 

tt Expenses for travel, clothing, etc., vary with the individual student, and 
should be added. The Student Activity Tax, authorized by vote of the under- 
graduate students, with the approval of the Board of Trustees, is paid by each 
undergraduate to a duly authorized delegate of the Associated Student Organiza- 
tions at the time of registration. The University Business Office will require 
evidence of the payment of the tax before registration receipt is issued. The 
revenue from the tax provides each student with The New Hampshire, semi- 
weekly newspaper; The Granite, University annual; student government and 
class activities. During 1936-37, the tax was $3.65 for men students and $4.50 
for Women. 

35 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Tuition — Two- Year Students. — Tuition for two-year students in 
agriculture is $75 for residents of New Hampshire and $175 for non- 
residents. Tuition is payable in advance in two equal installments, 
one on the first day of each semester. 

Books. — Students may purchase books, drawing instruments, mate- 
rials, etc., at the University Bookstore in Thompson Hall. 

Rooms. — The University has three dormitories for women and five 
for men. Men of the upper classes may reserve rooms in Hetzel, Com- 
mons, and West Halls. East and Fairchild Halls are reserved for 
men of the freshman class. Certain rooms in Hetzel Hall, not taken 
by upperclassmen, may also be available to freshmen. All rooms are 
heated, lighted and furnished. Bed linen, quilts and towels, however, 
are provided by the individual student. Each women's dormitory is 
equipped with a laundry. A service room is provided in each dormi- 
tory where grills and irons may be used with safety. Prices range 
from $64 to $120 a year. Applications for rooms in the dormitories 
should be addressed to The Registrar, University of New Hampshire, 
Durham. 

A Five-Dollar ($5.00) Room Deposit must accompany each appli- 
cation, this deposit to be forfeited if the room accepted is not occupied 
by the applicant. The deposit is held as a guarantee against breakage 
and will be returned at the close of the year or upon withdrawal. 

Room rent is payable in advance in two equal installments, one on 
August 15th and one on registration for the second semester. Rooms 
reserved will be held only until August 15th unless one-half of the 
annual rent is paid before that date. 

Rooms paid for and not occupied one day after registration may be 
declared vacant and the room rent returned, unless the individual 
holding the reservation makes a written request to the Registrar to 
hold the room until a later date. The advance payment for the room 
will not be returned to those making this special request. No room 
will be reserved more than ten days after the registration date. Early 
application is necessary in order to secure a choice of rooms. Rooms 
in private dormitories or families may be secured for about the same 
prices as for those in college dormitories. 

Women students, unless living at home, are required to room in one 
of the women's dormitories, or in approved houses. A competent 
house director is in charge of each women's dormitory. 

36 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Board.— A Dining Hall is operated and supervised by the University 
for the accommodation and benefit of the students. All freshmen, 
whose homes are not located in Durham, are required to board at the 
University Dining Hall. The aim of the compulsory regulation is to 
insure a broad fellowship in the class, and to safeguard the health of 
the first-year students by offering skilled dietetic oversight in the selec- 
tion and preparation of their food. The Dining Hall is equipped with 
the best appliances for cooking and serving on a large scale, and is 
subject to constant sanitary inspection by the University Physician. 
Board is $200 for the college year, payable $100 at registration for 
each semester. 

The Dining Hall is not operated for profit. Savings made possible 
by reduced costs of operation are passed along to the students in the 
form of a reduced board charge in the second semester. 

A cafeteria is open to all students of the upper classes who may 
desire to take advantage of the low price and the high quality of food 
available at the University Dining Hall. 

HooD House.— The Health Department with the University Physi- 
cian in charge is devoted to the prevention of sickness and the main- 
tenance of the health and efficiency of the students. The Charles 
Harvey Hood House, a completely equipped and home-like infirmary 
and rest house, with a physician and trained nurses in charge, is avail- 
able for use by all students. 

Checking Accounts. — Students are earnestly urged to arrange 
checking accounts in their home banks or to place money on deposit 
in the Business Office until needed, in order to avoid possible loss 
resulting from keeping on hand considerable sums of money. Such 
banking arrangements will also facilitate payment of registration bills 
which are strictly due and payable on registration day. The Business 
Office will accept and cash student checks. 

Self-Support. — A great many students earn their education in part 
by means of their own labor during summers and while in college. 

All students and prospective students are advised, hozvever, to 
carefully survey their individual physical strengths and scholastic 
aptitudes before comtnitting themselves to the arduous combination 
of intensive study and part-time employment. 

Students are urged not to count too much upon earning their way 
the first year, and should be sure of at least $400 from other sources, 

27 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

a low estimate of the first year's expense. Inquiries from men con- 
cerning self-support should he addressed to the Bureau of Appoint- 
ments, Durham, N. H. 

Student Employment Committee. — In order to insure an equitable 
distribution of University part-time employment, a committee of the 
Faculty is charged with the responsibility of rating students for em- 
ployment. The committee accepts no responsibility for the annual 
placement of students on jobs. Its only function is to try to see that 
only needy students are certified as eligible to hold positions. Ap- 
plication blanks, obtainable at the office of the Dean of the Faculty, 
must be filled out and each student rated before he becomes eligible 
for a University position. Applications for Federal aid work are 
also handled by the office of the Dean of the Faculty. 

Bureau of Appointments. — The University Bureau of Appointments 
assists in finding opportunities for men students for employment in 
faculty homes and about the village of Durham. In the fall and spring 
months freshmen may secure work several afternoons a week doing 
such odd jobs or chores as taking care of lawns, gardens, furnaces, etc. 
By the end of freshman year they may reasonably hope to secure 
steady work, such as waiting on table, serving as janitor in one of the 
University buildings, etc. 

Women Students. — Employment for women students, except for 
positions in the University offices or departments, is in the hands of 
the Dean of Women,, and inquiries from women students should be 
addressed to her. 

Freshman women are advised not to attempt to earn their room 
and board in private families unless they are in good physical con- 
dition and have excellent preparation for theUr University work. 

UNIVERSITY AIDS TO STUDENTS 
Scholarships. — A limited number of scholarships are awarded 
annually to deserving students. In order to grant scholarships equit- 
ably the University requires full information of all applicants relative 
to the necessity for scholarship aid. Scholarship application blanks 
will be provided upon request to the Dean of the Faculty. 

These scholarships will be forfeited at any time for misconduct. A 
student placed on probation thereby forfeits his scholarship during 
the semester of probation. 

A more detailed description of the several classes of scholarships 
follows : 

38 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

State Scholarships.— To aid students who need and deserve financial 
assistance, the Trustees award 250 scholarships annually to residents 
of New Hampshire who have attended the University less than two 
semesters. Each scholarship pays $75 per year, and is good for one 
year only. 

Applications for these scholarships must be returned to the Dean of 
the Faculty not later than July 15. 

Recommendations for scholarships may be made by the subordinate 
and Pomona Granges, State Senators, State Federation of Women's 
Clubs, and citizens of New Hampshire. 

Upon investigation and approval scholarships will be granted to 
those whose need appears to the committee to be the greatest. 

Conant Scholarships.— These scholarships provided by the bequest 
of John Conant, of Jaffrey, pay $75 at present and are good for one 
year. By terms of the bequest they are open to men taking agricultural 
curricula and preference is given to residents of Cheshire County. 
Application should be made to the Dean of the Faculty. 

Nancy E. Lougee Memorial Scholarships.— Since 1921 the interest 
on $5,000 bequeathed by Amos D. Lougee, of Somersworth, has been 
expended for scholarships of $75 each. They will be assigned each 
year and will be good for one year only. No applications can be ap- 
proved without satisfactory evidence that the candidates would be 
unable to attend without the aid of the scholarships. Until July 15 of 
each year, preference will be given to residents of Strafford County. 
Application should be made direct to the Dean of the Faculty. 

Valentine Smith Scholarships. — Through the generosity of Hamil- 
ton Smith of Durham, the sum of $10,000 has been given to estabhsh 
the Valentine Smith Scholarships. 

"The income thus accruing shall be given to the graduates of an 
approved high school or academy who shall, upon examination, be 
judged to have the most thorough preparation for admission." 

These are the most remunerative endowed scholarships that the 
institution has to offer. They pay $100 a year and are good for four 
years if reasonable scholarship is maintained. 

Competitive examinations for these scholarships will be held in 
Thompson Hall at the University, September 13 and 14, 1937. Exami- 
nations will commence at 8 a.m. on Monday. Contestants must present 
the usual credentials fulfilling the requirements for entrance, and must 

39 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

pass examinations in English, American history, algebra (through 
quadratics), plane geometry and either physics or chemistry. 

Requests for examinations should be forwarded to the Dean of the 
Faculty at least one week before the beginning of the examination 
period, and must state the names and addresses of the students, and 
the examinations desired. 

Examinations are not restricted to residents of the state. 

Class Memorial Scholarships. — In accordance with a communication 
presented to the Board of Trustees by the Alumni Association in 1922, 
each class upon graduation may establish a fund of $3,000, the interest 
of which will be used in payment of a class scholarship, to be awarded 
by a committee appointed by the President. The respective classes 
shall forward recommendations to this committee which will investi- 
gate such recommendations before awarding the scholarships. 

Scholarships shall be limited to candidates of the highest moral 
standards, physically sound, and preference shall be given to those 
who require financial aid in order to continue their education, and 
shall be dependent upon the same factors as govern the holding of 
other scholarships as regards grades. 

Eighteen classes, 1922 to 1940, are expected to establish these schol- 
arships, and each scholarship shall be dedicated to the name of one of 
the eighteen New Hampshire men who died in the service of his coun- 
try during the World War. Nine classes have established their schol- 
arships to date. 

They are : Forrest Eugene Adams Scholarship, Class of 1922 ; Paul 
Edward Corriveau Scholarship, Qass of 1923; Pitt Sawyer Willand 
Scholarship, Class of 1924 ; George Downes Parnell Scholarship, Class 
of 1925; Cyril Thomas Hunt Scholarship, Class of 1926; Donald 
Whitney Libby Scholarship, Class of 1927 and family ; Frank Booma 
Scholarship, Class of 1928; Earle Roger Montgomery Scholarship, 
Class of 1929 ; Fred Weare Stone Scholarship, Class of 1930. 

Ralph D. Hetzel Interscholastic Debating Scholarships.— The Board 
of Trustees on December 20, 1926, set aside three scholarships each 
year (each for three years) to be awarded to the three interscholastic 
debaters who may qualify under regulations defined by the Interschol- 
astic Debating League or by the University. These scholarships are 
limited to residents of New Hampshire. 

Hunt Scholarship. — A special scholarship paying $75 has been estab- 

40 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

lished by the Trustees at the request of the United States War Depart- 
ment for the benefit of soldiers, or sons and daughters of soldiers, in 
the United States Army. This scholarship is named in honor of Col- 
onel William E. Hunt, '99, and Colonel Charles A. Hunt ,'01, who have 
rendered conspicuous and gallant service as officers of the Regular 
Army before, during and since the World War. This scholarship will 
be granted each year and will be good for one year only. Application 
should be made direct to the Dean of the Faculty. The application 
cannot be approved without satisfactory evidence that the candidate 
would be unable to attend without the aid of scholarship. Preference 
will be given to a New Hampshire soldier. 

Concord Alumni Scholarship Fund. — The Concord Branch of Alum- 
ni of the University of New Hampshire has established a scholar- 
ship fund. In accordance with the suggestion of the Concord 
Branch, money paid in from year to year is employed as a part of 
the Student Loan Fund of the University. Ultimately, the principal 
and such interest as accrues will be transferred to a special scholar- 
ship fund. 

Frank B. Clark Fund. — A trust fund of $10,000 has been provided 
by Frank B. Clark of Dover, N. H., the income of which is to be used 
for the purpose of assisting and encouraging needy and worthy stu- 
dents who are suffering from physical impairment or deformity. 

"Students impaired by the loss of an arm shall receive prior con- 
sideration." 

"The benefits of this gift are to be available to students in any sec- 
ondary school or college except a secondary school or college which is 
under the direction or control of a church or religious affiliations or 
preferences, and with the further understanding that students at the 
University of New Hampshire shall be given prior consideration." 

Dads'-Hetzel Scholarship Fund. — At the second annual Dads' Day 
at the University, the fathers present voted to establish a scholarship 
fund to be known as The Dads'-Hetzel Fund and subscribed $304. For 
the present this money will be employed as a part of the Student Loan 
Fund of the University. Ultimately the principal and such interest as 
accrues will be transferred to a special scholarship fund. 

Edmund L. Brigham Scholarships. — The income of a trust fund of 
$4,812, provided by the will of Edmund L. Brigham, a member of the 

41 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Class of 1876, is divided into two scholarships of equal sums each to 
be known as the Edmund L. Brigham Scholarship. They will be 
awarded at the end of each year to the two members of the freshman 
class who under the pressure or necessity of having to earn a portion 
of their college expenses show either a constant improvement in schol- 
arship, or a high scholastic average, or both. 

New Hampshire Branch of National Civic Federation Scholarship. 
—From the income of a fund of $1,000, established in June, 1930, by 
the New Hampshire Branch of the National Civic Federation, a schol- 
arship is to be awarded annually to the junior woman majoring in eco- 
nomics or business who, at the end of her junior year, by excellence of 
scholarship, character and promise of leadership, is judged to be most 
worthy. The Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and the two ranking 
members of the Department of Economics shall name the winner of 
this scholarship in each year. 

S. Morris Locke Memorial Scholarship. — The income of a fund of 
$3,000 established by the late Mary D. Carbee of Haverhill, N. H., as 
a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. S. Morris Locke, shall be known as the 
S. Morris Locke Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship is to be 
awarded each year to the highest ranking junior majoring in chemis- 
try, entomology, or in any work where the microscope or microscopic 
technique is largely employed, who has demonstrated outstanding 
qualities of application, industry and initiative in any of these fields 
of work. 

Cogswell Scholarships. — Through the generosity of the Trustees of 
the Cogswell Benevolent Trust of Manchester there will be available 
to members of the Class of 1938, during their senior year. 20 scholar- 
ships of $200 each and 10 of $100 each. These scholarships will be 
given to members of the class whose general record of scholarship, 
attainments and conduct during the freshman, sophomore, and junior 
years are adjudged by a committee of the Faculty to be most worthy. 
The committee will scrutinize closely the record of the junior year, 
and will give weight not only to the general excellence of the scholar- 
ship record, but to growth and improvement as well. Prior considera- 
tion will be given by the committee to the achievements of the members 
of the class who are residents of the Town of Henniker and the City 
of Manchester. 

42 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Hood Scholarships. — Through the generosity of Charles H. Hood. 
'80, there are available to qualified students in the College of Agri- 
culture whose aims are set definitely to promote farming as a life 
opportunity five scholarships of $200 each. These scholarships are 
awarded to students who maintain high standards of scholastic excel- 
lence, strong characters and, in case of competition, are assigned in 
preference to students who intend after graduation to take up work 
relating to farm milk production. 

George H. Williams Fund. — The income of the fund of $9,900, be- 
queathed to the University by the late George H. Williams of Dover, 
New Hampshire, known as the George H. Williams Fund, shall be 
used to award scholarships to deserving and meritorious students of 
Dover. This income shall be divided into four annual scholarships of 
equal value. These scholarships, awarded for one year only and not 
renewable, will be granted to men and women students, residents of 
Dover, for either the sophomore or junior year. Eligibility shall de- 
pend upon character, meritorious scholarship, self-help and evidence 
of financial need. Application should be made to the Dean of the 
Faculty. 

The Ordway Fund. — Through the bequest of Martha H. Ordway, 
of Hampstead, made in 1934, the income from $2,000 will be expended 
each year for the benefit of indigent students from Sandown or 
Hampstead, if any; otherwise for the benefit of other indigent stu- 
dents attending the University. Application should be made to the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

Charles H. Sanders Fund. — The income from a bequest of $3000 
from the estate of Charles H. Sanders, Class of 1871, provides a 
scholarship in memory of the first class to be graduated from the 
University in 1871, consisting of William P. Ballard of Concord, 
Lewis Perkins of Hampton, and Charles H. Sanders of Penacook. 
This scholarship will be awarded to a needy member of the Junior 
class who has excelled in scholarship or has shown marked im- 
provement in his scholastic achievement during his first two years 
at the University. Application should be made to the Dean of the 
Faculty. 

John N. Haines Scholarship. — The income from a fund of $2475 
bequeathed by John N. Haines of Somersworth will be used to pro- 
vide a scholarship for a deserving student of the University. Pre- 

43 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ference will be given to a student whose home is in Somersworth. 
Applications should be directed to the Dean of the Faculty. 

C.M.T.C. Scholarship. — One of the 250 state scholarships already 
established by the Board of Trustees, will be awarded each year to 
a member of one of the Citizens' Military Training Camps in the 
First Corps Area selected from red, white, or blue students by the 
Commanding General of the First Corps Area. This scholarship, 
available to a freshman for one year only, will be awarded to a 
resident of the State of New Hampshire whose application for ad- 
mission to the University has been accepted without condition and 
who needs help in order to attend the University. The scholarship 
will be awarded after August 15 of each year. 

Distribution of Loan and Scholarship State Assistance Funds by 
the Student Aid Committee. — For the present "Cash Loans" will be 
granted to needy Juniors and Seniors and "Deferred Tuition Loans" 
to needy Sophomores. "Free Scholarships" and "Deferred Tuition 
Loans" will be granted to needy Freshmen and Two-Year Agricult- 
ural Students. 

Exceptions to the above procedure may be made by vote of the Stu- 
dent Aid Committee. 

Cash Loan Fund. — Money will be loaned to needy juniors and sen- 
iors who are economical in their expenditures and who are working to 
pay a portion of their expenses. These loans will bear interest at 2 
per cent until graduation or withdrawal from the University, and 5 per 
cent after graduation or withdrawal and are payable as follows : $5 
a month beginning one year after graduation or withdrawal ; $10 a 
month beginning two years after graduation or withdrawal; $15 
a month beginning three years after graduation or withdrawal ; and a 
like sum each month thereafter until principal and interest are paid. 

The John H. Pearson Trust. — In cooperation with the trustees of 
the John H. Pearson Estate, Concord, N. H., a student loan fund 
known as The John H. Pearson Trust has been established, and is ad- 
ministered under the conditions governing the University Loan Fund. 

James B. Erskine Loan Fund. — In 1930, a bequest of Dr. James B. 
Erskine, of Tilton, provided a fund of $3,642 for loans to students ; 
loans to bear interest at the rate of 5 per cent until paid. This fund 
will be reserved for members of the senior class. 

44 



PRIZES 

S. Morris Locke Loan Fund. — Through a bequest of the late Mary 
D. Carbee of Haverhill, N. H., a fund has been created for loan pur- 
poses in memory of Mr. and Mrs. S. Morris Locke. The fund now 
totals $18,870. 

R. C. Bradley Loan Fund. — The New Hampshire Poultry Grow- 
ers Association has established a loan fund for loan assistance to 
undergraduates who have been in attendance at the University at 
least two years with preference given to seniors. Loans are open 
only to students majoring in Poultry Husbandry in the College of 
Agriculture and are based on character, scholarship, and need of 
financial assistance. Applications made to the Committee on Student 
Aid are approved by that committee with the advice of a committee 
selected by the directors of the Poultry Growers Association. 

Deferred Tuition Loans. — In order to enable students to attend the 
University who would be unable to do so without the aid of a loan, the 
University may grant loans to be applied toward tuition up to $100 in 
each college year, except that freshmen holding free scholarships may 
borrow in addition not in excess of $25. These loans will bear interest 
at the rate of 2 per cent until graduation or withdrawal from the Uni- 
versity, and 5 per cent after graduation or withdrawal, and are 
payable as follows : $5 a month beginning one year after graduation 
or withdrawal ; $10 a month beginning two years after graduation or 
withdrawal ; $15 a month, beginning three years after graduation or 
withdrawal, and a like amount each month thereafter until the loan 
is paid. 

PRIZES 

Bailey Prize. — To endow the prize formerly offered by C. H. Bailey, 
79, and E. A. Bailey, '85, a fund is being created by winners of the 
prize, the income of which will continue the prize for proficiency in 
chemistry. 

Erskine Mason Memorial Prize. — Mrs. Erskine Mason of Stam- 
ford, Conn., has invested one hundred dollars as a memorial to her 
son, a member of the class of 1893, the income of which is to be given 
to that member of the senior class who has made the greatest im- 
provement during his course. 

Interscholastic Debating Prize. — The University of New Hampshire 
Debating League was reorganized in 1921, and is under the direction 

45 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

of the instructor in debating and public speaking in the University. 
Any secondary school of the state is eligible for membership. Prelimi- 
nary contests are conducted at the schools, and a final contest is held 
at the University to determine the winner of the League. A prize cup 
is awarded in rotation to the winners. Other prizes, such as medals 
and certificates, are awarded to individual debaters from time to time. 

Interscholastic Prize Speaking Contest. — This contest, for students 
of any accredited high school of the state (provided they have not al- 
ready won the first prize in a previous year) was first held in May, 
1912. Three prizes are provided by the University for the winners. 

University Inter-Fraternity Scholarship Trophy for Men. — Through 
the generosity of Wilford A. Osgood, '14, who has donated trophies 
for similar purposes in the past, a plaque is donated which is to be 
awarded each year to that fraternity whose members have the highest 
scholastic standing as certified by the Registrar. 

Diettrich Cup. — This cup was given by the class of 1916 in memory 
of Rosina Martha Diettrich, a member of that class, who died a few 
weeks before graduation. The cup is to be awarded each year to the 
girl who attains the highest scholarship in her junior year. The cup is 
to remain in her possession throughout her senior year and until the 
next winner is named. 

The American Legion Award. — The New Hampshire Department 
of the American Legion as a mark of recognition of the University's 
contribution in the World War, and as an expression of its interest in 
national defense, offers yearly a medal to that man in the senior class 
who has attained the highest distinction determined by achievement in 
military science, athletics, and scholarship. The name of the winner 
will be inscribed on a trophy. This trophy, made possible by the gener- 
osity of the American Legion of this state, is to remain in the perma- 
nent possession of the University. 

Bartlett Prize. — Former Governor John H. Bartlett, Hon. '20, of 
Portsmouth, N. H., offers a prize of $50 each year, to be awarded 
annually to that New Hampshire student, a member of the Junior 
class, who ranks highest in scholarship for the year among those 
young men who have earned at least one-half their expenses since 
entering the University. This prize was awarded first in June, 1921. 

Chi Omega Prize. — Mu Alpha Chapter of Chi Omega awards an 
annual prize of ten dollars at Commencement to the undergraduate 

46 



PRIZES 

woman student at the University who shall submit to the committee on 
award the best thesis on any subject dealing with problems of civic 
interest in sociology or economics. The title shall be approved by the 
head of the department concerned and the thesis shall be received, not 
later than June first, and graded by a joint committee composed of the 
heads of the departments of sociology, economics and English. If, 
however, no thesis is found by the committee to deserve the award, no 
prize shall be given. 

Class of 1899 Prize.— Tht class of 1899 has given to the University 
a fund of $500, the income to be used as a cash prize to be awarded 
"by the Faculty to the senior who in their opinion has developed the 
highest ideals of good citizenship." 

Phi Mu Medal— The local chapter of Phi Mu offers a gold medal to 
a senior girl to be awarded on the following basis : 50 points for excel- 
lence in physical education, determined by both skill and the spirit in 
which the work is carried ; the remaining 50 points must be attained 
by evidence of unusual scholastic capacity, democracy, loyalty, and 
helpfulness in college associations and activities. No candidate will be 
considered who does not have an average grade for her college work 
above 80. 

Phi Sigma Prize.— In order to promote high scholarship in zoology 
and the allied sciences, the Phi Sigma national honor fraternity offers 
a prize of $25 to be awarded at Commencement to that senior who 
ranks highest in zoological courses throughout the entire four years of 
collegiate work. The amount of work carried in biology, together 
with the average grade in all other courses shall be considered in mak- 
ing this award. The prize has been offered each year since 1921. 

Hood Pn^^.?.— Through the kindly interest and generosity of 
Charles H. Hood of the class of 1880, the income of funds given to the 
University in 1921 and in 1924 will be used for the encouragement, aid, 
and benefit of deserving students. 

In accordance with the suggestion of the donor, for the present the 
income will be expended as follows : 

First. Hood Achievement Prize.— A gold medal will be awarded 
annually to that member of the senior class whom the members of the 
three upper classes choose as giving the greatest promise of becoming 
a worthy factor in the outside world through his character, scholar- 

47 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ship, physical qualifications, personal popularity, leadership and use- 
fulness as a man among men. 

Second. Hood Dairy Prises. — A part of the Hood income will be 
devoted each year to paying a portion of the expenses of the members 
of a team or teams chosen for excellence in judging dairy cattle and 
sent to participate in intercollegiate or other dairy contests. Suitable 
medals will also be provided for the individual members of such teams. 

Third. Hood Supplementary Bequest. — The income from this be- 
quest will be used for the purchase of a suitably inscribed trophy to 
become the property of the University. The names of the winners of 
prizes in dairy cattle judging are to be inscribed annually upon this 
trophy which will thus serve as a permanent record to the institution 
of their skill and accomplishment. 

The Fairchild Memorial Prizes. — In 1927 Mask and Dagger, the 
dramatic society of the University of New Hampshire, established two 
prizes of twenty-five dollars each to be awarded each year to the two 
seniors who have done the most to promote dramatics during their 
four years at the University. These prizes are given in memory of 
Edward T. Fairchild, late president of the University. 

Thomas J. Davis Prize. — By gift of Thomas J. Davis. Duluth, 
Minn., a native and former resident of Durham, a fund has been pro- 
vided for the establishment of dairy and household science prizes as 
follows : 

First. For competitive judging of dairy cattle by "short course 
students," excluding all four-year students, and allowing a suitable 
handicap in favor of students who are taking a course of not more 
than four months. 

Second. To young women taking a short course for competitive 
bread baking as a half unit and for dairy butter making as another 
half unit. 

Lock-e Prise. — The income of a trust fund of $3,000 bequeathed by 
the late Mary D. Carbee of Haverhill, N. H., as a memorial to Mr. and 
Mrs. S. Morris Locke, will be awarded at the end of each year to that 
junior majoring in Latin, who is adjudged by a committee of the Fac- 
ulty to have excelled in the study of that language. In awarding the 
prize the committee shall give weight not only to the average grade in 

48 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Latin, but also to the general record of scholarship, other attainments 
and character. 

Alpha Xi Delta Cup. — A cup will be awarded annually by the Alpha 
Xi Delta sorority to the senior girl who proves herself to be the best 
athlete in her class. The cup will be awarded on consideration of the 
following qualifications : good sportsmanship, physical fitness, athletic 
achievements, and superior skill. The cup will be awarded by a board 
of judges including the members of the department of physical educa- 
tion for women, the president of the Association of Women Students 
and the president of the Women's Athletic Association. 

Mask and Dagger Achievement Prises. — In 1929 and in 1930, Mask 
and Dagger established two annual prizes of twenty-five dollars each 
to be known as the Mask and Dagger Achievement Prizes. These are 
awarded each year to the seniors who, during their college courses, 
have made the most outstanding artistic contributions to the dramatic 
work of the University. 

Edward Monroe Stone Cup. — This handsome cup, presented in 1929 
by Edward Monroe Stone, '92, is awarded annually to any fraternity 
or sorority for superior ability in intra-mural forensics. The debates 
are conducted by the local chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha, whose plans 
and methods relative to the awarding of the cup are subject to the 
approval of the instructor in charge of forensics. The cup will become 
the permanent possession of any fraternity or sorority winning it three 
times in succession. 

Psi Lambda Cup. — Psi Lambda, the home economics club, each year 
awards a cup to the Home Economics senior who has shown the great- 
est improvement in personality and scholarship during her four years 
in college. 

Alpha Chi Omega Price. — A ten dollar prize will be awarded annu- 
ally by Alpha Tau Chapter of Alpha Chi Omega to the undergraduate 
student of the University who submits to the head of the department 
of English the best informal essay of less than three thousand words. 
The title may be chosen by the student. All essays must be written 
specifically for the Alpha Chi Omega Prize. Such essays will be due 
May 27 of each year. After the prize has been awarded, all essays will 
be returned upon request. 

49 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Delta Chi Trophy. — Delta Chi, honorary mathematics society, will 
present, at the end of each academic year, a silver cup to that member 
of the sophomore class, eligible for membership in the society, who 
during two years* courses in mathematics has demonstrated valuable 
mathematical ability, by ranking as one of the five high students in 
mathematics. General scholastic standing and personality shall also 
figure in determining the award. A committee consisting of the Dean 
of the College of Technology, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, 
the head of the Department of Mathematics, the president of Delta 
Chi, and one other student member of the society shall determine the 
winner in each year. 

Association of Women Students Award. — The Association of 
Women Students will award annually twenty-five dollars to the 
woman student who has proved to be of value to the women's student 
body, and who has shown by scholarship, self-help, leadership, and 
loyalty that she is worthy of this award. 

Alpha Zeta Scholarship Cup. — A cup is awarded annually by the 
Granite Chapter of the Fraternity of Alpha Zeta to the sophomore in 
the College of Agriculture who has made the highest scholastic aver- 
age during his first three semesters' work. The winner is to have his 
name engraved on the cup and to hold it for one year. 

General Chemistry Award. — The local chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, 
professional chemistry society, engraves each year on a trophy placed 
in Charles James Hall, the name of the freshman who secures the 
highest average grade in chemistry. 

Phi Lambda Phi Award. — Phi Lambda Phi, physics honor society, 
will award annually a prize of ten dollars to a senior member of the 
society who is most deserving, as revealed by proficiency in physics 
and general scholarship. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student Government 

Student Council. — The Student Council exists to serve the under- 
graduate body as (a) a coordinating body between the University Ad- 
ministration and the student body, and to make recommendations to 
the Administration; (b) in cooperating with the student body, secur- 

50 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

ing and assuring the highest interests of morale on the campus ; (c) in 
creating a group of student leaders to initiate, supervise, and adminis- 
ter student affairs of common concern. Members of the Council are 
elected by ballot each spring. The President of the Association of 
Women Students meets with the Student Council during considera- 
tion of matters pertaining to the whole University. 

Association of Women Students. — The purposes of this Associa- 
tion, as stated in the Constitution of the organization, are as follows : 
(a) to promote a sense of individual and collective responsibility 
among the women students in maintaining the highest standards of 
university life; (b) to promote the highest standards of honor and 
integrity in all matters of personal conduct; (c) to enact and enforce 
laws in all matters operating for the welfare of the women students 
and which do not fall under the immediate jurisdiction of the Uni- 
versity Administration; (d) to encourage active cooperation in the 
work of self-government among the women of the University. 

Casque and Casket. — A society which is composed of students of 
the upper classes, having an equal number of representatives from 
each fraternity. Its duty is to regulate the campus interfraternity rela- 
tions. It is particularly charged with drawing rules governing the 
fraternity rushing period. 

Pan Hellenic. — An organization designed to transact all business 
of common interest to the women's fraternities, including the regula- 
tion of the rushing period. 

Religious Activities 

Christian Work. — Christian community service is encouraged by 
various activities. 

The Advisory Board for Christian Work employs an inter-church 
student's pastor and a women's secretary. They cooperate with the 
Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. in the promotion of their work, as well as in 
carrying definite responsibility for the pastoral work among the stu- 
dents. General contributions are received yearly from the Baptist, 
Congregational, Methodist Episcopal, Episcopal, and Presbyterian or- 
ganizations and the State Committee of the Y.M.C.A. Everything 
possible is done in a social and pastoral way for the students of all 
religious denominations, whether Protestant, Catholic or Hebrew. 

51 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Students receive a cordial welcome at the services of the Commun- 
ity Church (Congregational). Roman Catholic services are held every 
Sunday morning in the auditorium in Murkland Hall, and all students 
of that faith are urged to participate. Christian Work conducts Sun- 
day evening meetings, frequently with outside speakers, and other 
voluntary religious meetings, including occasional special assemblies 
with addresses of an inspirational charatcer. 

Menorah Society. — A local chapter of the Intercollegiate Menorah 
Association for the study and advancement of Jewish culture and 
ideals. Organized in 1928. 

National Honor and Professional Societies 

Phi Kappa Phi. — A national honorary fraternity founded at the 
University of Maine in 1897 for the purpose of promoting the highest 
grade of scholarship. A chapter was established at the University in 
1922. Its membership is taken from the highest ranking members of 
the Senior class. New members are elected at the beginning of the 
first and second semesters. 

Alpha Zeta. — A national professional honor fraternity of agri- 
cultural students, organized at the University in 1903. Membership is 
honorary and is restricted to students obtaining high class standing or 
to graduates who have shown marked ability in agricultural study and 
research. 

Phi Sigma. — A national honor society for students doing major 
work in biology who have completed a certain number of courses with 
honor grades. Established in 1915. 

Tau Kappa Alpha. — A national honor society which takes its mem- 
bership from students who have been outstanding in debate and ora- 
tory. Established on the New Hampshire campus in 1925. 

Kappa Delta Pi. — A chapter of the national educational society, 
organized from a local group formed on this campus in 1926. 

Alpha Chi Sigma. — A professional fraternity with chapters in va- 
rious colleges and universities. Members are elected from high rank- 
ing students whose major work is in the Department of Chemistry. 
Established on this campus in 1911. 

52 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Scabbard and Blade. — A national honorary military fraternity. The 
New Hampshire Company (Company F, Sixth Regiment) was organ- 
ized in 1926. 

Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. — 
A student organization conducted in accordance with the By-Laws of 
the Institute, whose meetings are given a place on the student's class 
schedule. The purpose of the organization is to promote interest in 
electrical engineering, to foster acquaintance and good fellowship 
among the faculty and students in the Department of Electrical En- 
gineering. 

Branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. — 
An organization of upperclass men in mechanical engineering. Holds 
regular class meetings for the presentation and discussion of engineer- 
ing papers by members and by visiting engineers. 

Branch of the American Society of Civil Engineers. — An or- 
ganization of upperclass students in civil engineering. Regular class 
meetings are held for the purpose of investigating by reading and 
discussion various engineering topics of the day. 

Student Publications 

"The New Hampshire." — A semi-weekly newspaper presenting 
undergraduate and alumni news, published by an editorial board com- 
posed of students. 

"The Granite." — An illustrated annual published by the Junior 
class. 

"The New Hampshire Student Writer." — An annual collection of 
outstanding student compositions in prose and poetry. This publica- 
tion is supervised by the Department of English. 

Departmental Clubs 

Folio. — A society composed of students interested in creative writ- 
ing, particularly the short story and essay. 

Erato. — A society composed of students interested in the study and 
writing of poetry. 

Phi Lambda Phi. — An honor society whose members are students 
of high standing in Physics. 

53 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Le Cercle Francais.— This society was established in the spring of 
1919 to offer competent students an opportunity to acquire a speaking 
knowledge of the French language and to stimulate an interest in the 
intellectual life of France. 

Alpha Sigma. — An organization established in 1925, whose mem- 
bership is taken from high ranking students in Architecture. 

Delta Chi.— A society founded in 1925, whose membership is taken 
from high ranking students in Mathematics. 

Psi Lambda.— A society composed of high ranking students in 
Home Economics. Established in 1926. 

"N. H." Club.— Membership in this organization is open to all men 
who have earned varsity athletic letters. 

Classical Club.— This society, established in 1927, takes its mem- 
bers from students interested in Latin and Greek. 

The University 4-H Club. — This organization is composed of stu- 
dents who have been engaged in boys' and girls' club extension work. 

Gamma Kappa. — An organization, established in 1933, whose mem- 
bership is taken from high ranking students in Geology. 

Dramatic and Musical Organizations 
Mask and Dagger.— This is a dramatic club which aims to make a 
practical study of the drama and to present each year three plays on 
the stage of the "little theater" in Murkland Hall. Membership in this 
society includes students who have participated in plays or who have 
assisted in stage production. 

University Band.— This is a military and concert organization 
whose membership is taken from members of the University Regiment 
and selected students. Academic credit is given for successful comple- 
tion of each semester's work. The band plays at various University 
functions and games. 

Glee Club.— The Glee Club is divided into two organizations, one 
for men and one for women. Membership in the club is open to all 
undergraduates interested in choral singing who fulfill the require- 
ments of a try-out. The club presents programs of choral singing 
several times each year. 

54 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Associated Student Organizations. — An organization composed 
of all extra-curricular activities, societies or groups for the purpose of 
securing a satisfactory administration of activity funds. Activities 
receiving funds from the student activity tax are members of this 
organization. A committee of six appointed by the President of the 
University advises with organizations relative to the budgeting and 
expenditure of monies resulting from the collection of the student 
activity tax, approves the budgets presented, and makes recommenda- 
tions to the President of the University relative to the general ad- 
ministration of the tax. This committee includes undergraduates and 
Faculty members. 

Athletic Association. — The Athletic Association, composed of the 
entire student body, was organized in 1897, for the conduct, in cooper- 
ation with the Administration and Faculty, of a wholesome program 
of intercollegiate sports. Every undergraduate automatically becomes 
a member of the Association at the time of registration. A ticket is 
issued to each student at that time which admits him to all home var- 
sity athletic games. 

Outing Club. — This organization, established in 1915, chiefly inter- 
ested in life outdoors, maintains three cabins, encourages winter 
sports, hiking and other forms of outdoor recreation. Membership 
is open to all students. 

Social Fraternities and Sororities. — The following fraternities 
and sororities have chapters on the New Hampshire campus. The 
dates listed indicate (1) date of founding as local fraternity (in par- 
entheses) and (2) date of granting of national charter. 

Fraternities. — Kappa Sigma, (1894) 1901; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
(1894) 1917; Theta Chi, (1903) 1910; Lambda Chi Alpha, (1906) 
1918; Alpha Tau Omega, (1907) 1917; Phi Mu Delta, (1914) 1918; 
Pi Kappa Alpha, (1921) 1929; Sigma Beta, 1921; Phi Alpha, (1922) 
1924; Theta Kappa Phi, (1922) 1923; Alpha Gamma Rho, 1924; Phi 
Delta Upsilon, 1924; Tau Kappa Epsilon, (1926) 1932. 

Sororities.— Chi Omega, (1897) 1915; Alpha Chi Omega, (1913) 
1924; Alpha Xi Delta, (1913) 1914; Phi Mu, (1916) 1919; Kappa 
Delta, (1919) 1929; Theta Upsilon, (1926) 1930; Pi Lambda Sigma, 
1929. 

55 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 



Provided the special requirements of the separate colleges are fully 
met, the University will admit without examination properly prepared 
New Hampshire students who are graduates of high schools or acad- 
emies of New Hampshire that are approved by the State Board of 
Education, or those who are graduates of other specially approved 
schools. 

Applicants whose records do not give evidence of capacity, disposi- 
tion, and preparation adequate for successful college study may be 
required to withdraw their applications or to submit to examinations 
to determine their fitness for college study. This applies directly to 
those who stand in the lowest quarter of their respective classes in the 
secondary school, and to others concerning whose qualifications there 
may be doubt. In so far as is practicable, officers of the University 
zmll arrange for personal conferences with such applicants. 

The number of persons, not residents of New Hampshire, admitted 
each year is determined by vote of the Trustees and the following 
State law: 

"The number of new students entering the University of New 
Hampshire from the states of Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont 
shall not exceed eight per cent of the total enrollment of the entering 
class of the four-year course of the preceding University year ; and the 
enrollment of new students, exclusive of those from the states of New 
Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont, shall not exceed four 
per cent of the total enrollment of the entering class of the four-year 
course of the preceding year." This law is waived by act of the 
Legislature until June 30, 1937. For the present, the number of out- 
of-state students permitted entrance is limited by the available dormi- 
tory and instructional facilities. 

Each applicant for admission to the University will be required to 
submit two application forms: (1) an "admission credential" blank 
filled out by the headmaster or principal of the secondary school from 
which he is graduated ; (2) a "personal statement" blank filled out by 
the applicant. These blanks are distributed through New Hampshire 
and other secondary school officials or they may be secured by applica- 

56 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

tion to the Dean of the Faculty, at Durham, to whom all such blanks 
should be forwarded. 

In order to give ample time for the selection of out-of-state stu- 
dents, and for full investigation of New Hampshire applicants of 
doubtful preparation, it is desirable that applicants for admission, 
both from within and without the state, forward their personal state- 
ments and credentials during the month of April, it being understood 
that the preparatory school work will be completed in June. Cre- 
dentials should cover work done as nearly as possible to date of 
application. 

Candidates for admission to the freshman class must show evidence, 
either by credential or examination, that they are prepared in 15 units 
as indicated in the following table. At least 12 of these units should be 
from Groups A, B, C, D, and E. 

An entrance unit represents one study of four or five recitations a 
week for one year. It is assumed that two hours of manual training 
or laboratory work are equivalent to one hour of classroom work. 

College College College 
Required Units of Agri- of Lib- of Tech- 
culture eral Arts nology 

Group A English 3 3 3 

Group B* Mathematics 2 2 3t 

Group C Social Science and History 111 

Group D Natural Science 1 1 1 

Group E Foreign languages 

Group F Vocational Subjects 

7 7 8 

Elective Units 8 8 7 

Total for admission 15 15 15 

Elective units may be offered from all groups, including a fourth 
year of English. 

* At least two years of mathematics consisting of one year of algebra and one 
year of plane geometry are required for entrance except that a candidate for ad- 
mission to the General Curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts who offers two 
units in a single foreign language may substitute for the two units required in 
mathematics two additional units in subjects named in groups A, C, D and E above. 

t Students entering the College of Technology must offer three units of mathe- 
matics which should include elementary and advanced algebra, plane and solid 
geometry. 

57 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Entrance examinations will be given at the University September 1 
and 2. Requests for these examinations should be forwarded to the 
Dean of the Faculty at least one week in advance. 

Cases not covered by the above statements will be decided by the 
Entrance Committee of the Faculty. 

Candidates for advanced standing may be admitted on the basis of 
the work completed at the institution from which they come. 

Every candidate for admission to the University shall be required 
to procure a statement, signed by the town or city clerk, to the effect 
that the father or legal guardian is a resident of the town or city and 
state from which he purports to register. Students admitted from 
foreign countries or states other than New Hampshire shall be deemed 
to be non-resident students throughout the entire University course 
unless and until the parents or out-of-state legal guardian shall have 
gained residence in New Hampshire. 

Admission of non-resident candidates will be by selection, and only 
records of good grade will be considered ; character, leadership, alert- 
ness, etc., will also be taken into account. Because of the large number 
of New Hampshire students needing financial assistance in the form 
of employment, only a very limited number of applications can be con- 
sidered which do not give evidence of reasonable financial backing. 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

Freshman Week was instituted at the University of New Hampshire 
in 1924. It is evident from a study of the results of the activities of 
this week that it has served as a valuable means of adjusting freshmen 
to their new environment, of creating right attitudes towards college 
work and of minimizing the usual delays during the first few weeks 
of the regular term. By means of so-called "placement tests" the stu- 
dents will be sectioned according to their abilities and aptitudes. The 
week also affords an opportunity for the students to learn to know 
each other, to organize their efforts, to work together, to play together, 
and to become acquainted with the campus, the buildings, the Faculty 
and with the courses of study and the traditions of the University. 

Attendance of all freshmen throughout Freshman Week, beginning 
Tuesday, September 14, and continuing through Saturday, September 
18, will be obligatory. Any prospective candidate for the freshman 
class who is absent from the exercises beginning on September 14 
will seriously imperil his admission to the University. 

58 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS IN DETAIL 

GROUP A. ENGLISH 

The requirement in English is that recommended by the National 
Conference on Uniform Entrance Requirements in English :* 

"1. Habits of correct, clear, and truthful expression. This part of 
the requirement calls for a carefully graded course in oral and written 
composition, and for instruction in the practical essentials of gram- 
mar, a study which should be reviewed in the secondary school. In all 
written work constant attention should be paid to spelling, punctua- 
tion, and good usage in general as distinguished from current errors. 
In all oral work there should be constant insistence upon the elimina- 
tion of such elementary errors as personal speech-defects, foreign 
accent, and obscure enunciation." 

"2. Ability to read with intelligence and appreciation works of 
moderate difficulty ; familiarity with a few masterpieces. This part of 
the requirement calls for a carefully graded course in literature." 

Lists of books should be provided from which a specified number of 
units must be chosen for reading and study. These lists should be 
progressively difficult, ranging from the simpler books suitable to the 
earlier years in the secondary schools to those requiring the closer 
study warranted in the later years. Such lists should include the fol- 
lowing : 

At least one novel each by Scott, Eliot, Dickens, Hardy, Stevenson, 
Hawthorne, Cooper and Mark Twain; The Merchant of Venice, As 
You Like It, Hamlet or Macbeth, Midsummer Night's Dream; Mil- 
ton's Minor Poems', Irving's Sketch Book; Coleridge's Ancient Mar- 
iner; Palgrave's Golden Treasury; speeches by Washington and 
Lincoln. It is also highly desirable that the prospective college stu- 
dent should have read the following : some of the great epics in trans- 
lation ; collections of modern verse, of scientific writings, and of 
modern plays; some biography; and Myths and Their Meaning, by 
Herzberg. 

GROUP B. MATHEMATICS 

1. Elementary Algebra. — The four fundamental operations for 
rational algebraic expressions. Factoring. Fractions, including com- 

♦ Reprinted from Document 123 of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
t For more detailed information concerning the reading, write to Head, Depart- 
ment of English, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire. 

59 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

plex fractions, and ratio and proportion. Linear and quadratic equa- 
tions, both numerical and literal. Problems depending on linear and 
quadratic equations. Radicals, including the extraction of the square 
root of polynomials and of numbers. Exponents, including the frac- 
tional and negative. 

2. Advanced Algebra. — The formula for the nth term and the sum 
of the terms of arithmetical and geometrical progressions, with appli- 
cations. The theory and use of logarithms, without involving the use 
of infinite series. The binomial theorem for positive integral expon- 
ents. Complex numbers, with graphical representation of sums and 
differences. Determinants limited to simple cases. The elements of the 
theory of equations. 

3. Plane Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of 
good text-books, including the general properties of plane rectilineal 
figures ; the circle and measurement of angles ; similar polygons ; 
areas ; regular polygons, and the measurement of the circle. The solu- 
tion of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. Applica- 
tions to the measurement of lines and plane surfaces. 

4. Solid Geometry. — The usual theorems and constructions of good 
text-books, including the relations of lines and planes in space; the 
properties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones ; 
the sphere and the spherical triangle. The solution of numerous origi- 
nal exercises, including loci -problems. Applications to the measure- 
ment of surfaces and solids. 

5. Plane Trigonometry. — The subject-matter of plane trigonom- 
etry as presented in good text-books, including the solution and use of 
trigonometric equations of a simple character, the use of logarithms, 
the solution of right and oblique triangles, and practical applications. 

6. Review Mathematics. — A general mathematics review during 
half of senior year is recommended, especially for students preparing 
for college engineering courses. A certificate covering the work of not 
more than one unit will be accepted for entrance. 

group c. social science and history 

This group includes History, Economics, and Commercial Law. 
Although there are excellent text-books in history, an adequate 
preparation cannot be obtained by these alone. Some collateral work 

60 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

is necessary, whatever book is used, and with certain ones a large 
amount is necessary. The details of the preparatory work in the social 
sciences are stated in "The Program of Studies Recommended for the 
Public Schools of New Hampshire," by the State Board of Education. 

1. History of Civilization. 

2. Ancient History. — This may include the earliest nations and the 
period to 800 a.d., or it may be limited to Grecian History and Roman 
History to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. 

3. Mediaeval and Modern History. 

4. English History. 

5. American History and Civics. — It is assumed that a reasonable 
amount of time is to be given to the study of the Constitution of the 
United States. 

6. Economics. — The work in this field should consist of the mastery 
of a standard text or its equivalent assignments from one or more 
standard works. The study should introduce the student to the broad 
field of historical and descriptive Economics. This should include: 

1. Elementary economic geography. 

2. The leading facts in the economic history of the United 

States. 

3. Human wants and their satisfaction. 

4. A description of money and a brief study of its function. 

5. Distribution, including some study of land, labor, capital. 

6. Governmental relation and control of business. 

For a more complete description see the "Program of Studies" recom- 
mended by the State Board of Education of New Hampshire. 

7. Commercial Law. — The work in Commercial Law should include 
a study of the elementary principles of the law of contracts, agency, 
sales, bailments, negotiable instruments, business organizations, per- 
sonal and real property. (For a detailed statement, see "Program of 
Studies Recommended for the Public Schools of New Hampshire" by 
the State Board of Education.) 

GROUP D. NATURAL SCIENCE 

A notebook, carefully kept, and examined by the teacher, is an essen- 
tial part of all laboratory work in science. 

61 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1. Botany. — The work in botany should consist of (1) the study of 
a standard text; (2) four or five exercises a week, at least one of 
which should be laboratory work. Either a half or the whole of a 
year's work will be accepted. 

2. Chemistry. — Elementary inorganic chemistry should cover (1) 
a study of the more common non-metallic and metallic elements and 
their most important compounds ; (2) an introduction to the general 
theoretical principles; (3) calculations based upon chemical equations 
and changes of gaseous volumes. A year's work should consist of four 
or five exercises per week, at least one of which should be in labora- 
tory work. 

3. Physics. — The work in physics should consist of (1) the study 
of a standard text for one school year under the guidance of a science 
teacher. The minimum time devoted to this phase of the work should 
be four periods a week. (2) Performance of such experiments as the 
science teacher suggests, under the personal guidance of the teacher. 
The minimum time for this phase of the work, to include both per- 
formance of experiment and writing of report, should be two periods 
per week. 

4. Zoology. — A study of the fundamental principles of animal struc- 
ture and the dissection of type forms. The student should become 
familiar with the characteristics of the various phyla of the animal 
kingdom. The study should consist of four or five exercises a week, at 
least one of which should be laboratory work. Either a half or the 
whole of a year's work will be accepted. 

5. General Science. — To meet a recent movement in the disposition 
of the science work in the high schools, a course in general science 
which amounts to at least four exercises a week for one year will be 
accepted. Such a course may include something of the biologic and 
earth sciences, the sciences employed in household economy, and the 
more common phenomena of physics and chemistry. 

GROUP E. foreign LANGUAGES 

1. French. — Work of the first year should include (1) careful drill 
in pronunciation, through dictation, conversation, and reading aloud ; 
(2) drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with some translation of 

62 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

simple English into idiomatic French; (3) reading of 200 pages of 
French prose, if French is not the language of the classroom and a 
large amount of oral French is not used by teacher and pupils, or of 
100 pages if French is the language of the classroom and the time 
saved by a reduced reading standard is devoted to oral work in 
French ; in both cases the reading should be divided between some in- 
tensive, accurate study of the French prose, with translation into Eng- 
lish to check up on the pupils' understanding of the passage, and some 
extensive reading to induce pupils to read French for the pleasure and 
satisfaction it affords. 

Work of the second year should include (1) the reading of 300 or 
400 pages of French prose, the amount to depend, as in the first year, 
upon the time devoted to oral work, the reading being again divided 
into intensive and extensive; (2) dictation, conversation, grammar 
drill, and composition, based on topics connected with the classroom 
and events of everyday life in France ; (3) some practice in translating 
into French from English variations or paraphrases of the French 
texts read, so as to fix important words and idioms in the memory and 
to transpose the passive knowledge gained from reading into an active 
command of French. 

Work of the third year should include (1) the reading of 500 or 600 
pages of French, part intensively, part extensively, with emphasis on 
books of recognized literary value and on those which describe the 
history and civilization of France; (2) continued oral drill (dictation, 
discussions, etc.) ; (3) emphasis upon the writing of grammatically 
correct and idiomatic French dealing partly with the texts read, partly 
with the ordinary experiences of life here and in France. 

2. German. — Work of the first year should include (1) careful drill 
in pronunciation; (2) drill upon the rudiments of grammar; (3) dic- 
tation and other oral work; (4) the reading of from 100 to 200 pages 
of prose ; (5) translation of simple English into correct, idiomatic Ger- 
man. Work of the second year should include (1) the reading of from 
200 to 300 pages of prose, part intensively to make the pupils acquire 
habits of accuracy, part extensively to encourage them to read for 
pleasure and satisfaction; (2) oral drill (dictation, discussions, read- 
ing aloud) ; (3) continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, 
through exercises based upon the texts read and others dealing with 
life in Germany ; (4) the study of German history, customs, and insti- 

63 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

tutions through appropriate reading texts and composition exercises ; 
(5) reading and memorizing of simple German lyrics. 

3. Latin, Elementary. — Grammar and the equivalent of four 
books of Caesar. Two years' work. 

4. Latin, Advanced. — Equivalent of Virgil, six books, and Cicero, 
six orations. 

GROUP F. VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS 

1. Agriculture (Smith-Hughes). — The work in agriculture cov- 
ers ten periods a week throughout the school year and includes a study 
of and participation in the following, supplemented by at least six 
months of supervised, individual project work on the home farm: 

a. Major, contributory and minor agricultural enterprises in the 

community based upon the results of a survey of local farm 
practice. 

b. At least twenty per cent of the total time allotted each year is 

devoted to farm mechanics, comprising the daily jobs con- 
fronting the farmer in keeping his equipment in the best of 
condition and in doing the ordinary repair and construction 
work which arises on the farm. 

c. Agricultural economics and farm management are considered 

each year in relation to each of the three types of enterprises. 
In addition, part of the work of the senior year is devoted to a 
synthesis and extension of the principles applied in connection 
with the three types of enterprise in each of the three preceding 
years. 

Centering around the farm job and the home project, the activities 
of the pupils include discussions, surveys, directed study, demonstra- 
tions, field trips and manual work. 

2. Commercial Subjects. — Junior business training, commercial 
arithmetic, bookkeeping, commercial geography and history, stenog- 
raphy and typewriting, office or secretarial practice. 

3. Domestic Arts.— -Textiles and clothing, foods and nutrition, the 
home, its care and management, the family and its members, and child 
development. 

64 



METHODS OF ADMISSION 

4. Mechanic Arts. — Cabinet making and wood turning, pattern 
making and molding, tool forging and work on lathe, shaper, planer, 
drill press and milling machine, electrical work, automobile mechanics 
and repair, printing, related mechanical drawing, shop mathematics, 
shop physics, mechanics, shop organization. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

A mature student who is not a candidate for a degree may be admit- 
ted as a special student for one year upon the approval of the entrance 
committee and the dean of the college in which he desires to work. In 
addition, each application for a course must have the approval of the 
head of the department whose work the applicant desires to take. No 
credit earned by a special student shall count toward a degree except 
upon recommendation of the entrance committee and the vote of the 
appropriate college faculty. 

ADMISSION BY TRANSFER 

A candidate for admission to advanced standing from an institution 
of collegiate rank may receive credit without examination for work 
completed at such institution subject to the following requirements: 

(1) He must present a catalog of the institution from which he 
comes together with an official certificate showing (a) all preparatory 
subjects accepted for entrance, (b) a complete transcript of his record 
including grade of scholarship in each subject, (c) a statement of 
honorable dismissal. 

(2) All candidates for the bachelor's degree, admitted to advanced 
standing, must spend their last year in residence, either in course or in 
summer school. This requires the completion of at least 32 semester 
credits. 

(3) Regardless of the amount of advanced standing a student may 
secure, in no case will he be given a bachelor's degree until he has sat- 
isfied the full requirements of the curriculum he may elect. 



65 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



AIMS 
The Graduate School aims to meet the needs of superior students 
who are preparing to become teachers in colleges or universities, or 
investigators, and to offer opportunities to qualified students for a 
more advanced training than they can obtain in an undergraduate 
curriculum. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Graduate work is offered, under the supervision of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, by competent members of various departments of 
instruction and research. These members constitute the Faculty of the 
Graduate School. 

The general administrative functions of the Faculty are delegated 
to the Dean and the Council. 

ADMISSION 

A student who holds a bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, from an 
approved college or university, is eligible for admission to graduate 
study. 

Admission to graduate study does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. Students who are not planning 
to become candidates for an advanced degree may be admitted to grad- 
uate study upon the recommendation of the heads of the departments 
concerned, and with the approval of the Dean. 

A student may major only in the departments represented in the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 

REGISTRATION 

A student desiring to register for graduate study must submit to the 
Dean of the Graduate School the official application for admission to 
graduate study. Blanks for this purpose may be obtained from the 
Dean of the Graduate School. 

Upon admission to graduate work, a student first pays his fee at the 
Business Office and deposits his enrollment cards with the Registrar. 

66 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE CREDIT 
Graduate credit will not be allowed to undergraduate students unless 
such credit has been approved in advance by the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

A student will not receive graduate credit for a course in which he 
has obtained a grade lower than 70. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

The advanced degrees conferred are: Master of Science, Master 
of Arts, Master of Education, Master of Civil Engineering, Master 
of Electrical Engineering and Master of Mechanical Engineering. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree 

Residence. — A minimum of one full academic year, or four sum- 
mer sessions, in residence, is required. 

Credits. — An average grade of at least 80 in not less than 30 semes- 
ter credits is required, of which not less than 17 or more than 20 
semester credits shall be devoted to the major course (including the 
thesis), and not less than 6 or more than 10 semester credits to the 
minor courses. Work in allied departments may be properly corre- 
lated with the major course. Of the total credits required for an ad- 
vanced degree, not more than half may be transferred from another 
institution. 

Thesis. — If a thesis is required, the candidate must file with the 
Council, for their approval, a statement of the thesis subject as recom- 
mended by the head of the department in which the thesis work has 
been done, at least six months previous to the time the degree is 
sought. 

All theses must be typewritten upon standard paper, eight and 
one-half by eleven inches, medium weight, neatly bound in black cloth, 
and gilt-lettered on the first cover with the title, name of author, de- 
gree sought, and year of graduation. The title page should bear the 
following statement: 

"A thesis submitted to the University of New Hampshire in partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of 

Master of Arts in (name of "major" subject) 
Master of Science in (name of "major" subject) 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Master of Education 
Master of Civil Engineering 
Master of Electrical Engineering 
Master of Mechanical Engineering." 

Whenever a thesis is printed in any periodical, it must be desig- 
nated as having been accepted as a Master's thesis by the University 
of New Hampshire. 

Two bound copies must be filed before Commencement Day, one 
with the Librarian and one with the head of the department in which 
the major work has been done. 

Examinations.— All candidates must meet the regular depart- 
mental requirements as to examinations in the courses for which they 
are registered, and the requirement of a special comprehensive ex- 
amination, by the heads of the departments in which the major and 
minor courses have been taken, three months previous to the time 
the degree is sought. In addition, the candidate must pass an oral 
examination by a special committee designated by the Council and 
including the heads of the departments in which the major and 
minor courses have been taken, before the candidate may be recom- 
mended for the Master's degree. At least two months previous to 
the time the degree is sought the candidate must file with the Dean 
of the Graduate School the "Application for Examination for Ad- 
vanced Degree." The application forms may be obtained at the office 
of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

For detailed information concerning graduate study, see the Catalog 
of the Graduate School. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

Mechanical, Electrical, and Civil Engineering graduates of the Uni- 
versity of New Hampshire are eligible to register as candidates for 
professional degrees in these three branches of engineering. 

These degrees will be granted, after the preparation of acceptable 
theses, to those having not less than four years' professional experi- 
ence subsequent to the bachelor's degree, in which the applicants have 
wholly or in part supervised, directed or designed engineering work ; 

68 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

or have been in responsible charge of instruction or research in engi- 
neering. The acceptability of the theses and professional experience is 
determined by an examining committee. 

Procedure. — The procedure for candidates for professional engi- 
neering degrees is as follows : 

(1) Prepare an outline for a thesis after consultation with the head 
of the department concerned. This consultation may be by letter. 

(2) When the thesis subject is accepted by the head of the depart- 
ment in which the degree is to be taken, the candidate will be registered 
in the Registrar's Office. This registration must be completed by Oc- 
tober 1st of the academic year in which the degree is to be conferred. 

(3) The first draft of the thesis must be submitted to the professor 
in charge not later than March 1st, and the completed thesis in its final 
form by May 1st. 

(4) Pass an examination at the University covering the candidate's 
professional practice and the engineering principles underlying the 
thesis. 

(5) Pay the diploma fee of $5.00 at the Business Office not later 
than 12 noon of the Saturday next preceding the date when the degree 
is conferred. 

Thesis. — The thesis must be typewritten upon standard paper, eight 
and one-half by eleven inches, medium weight, neatly bound in black 
cloth, and gilt-lettered on the first cover with title, name of author, 
degree sought, and year of graduation. The title page should bear the 
following statement ; 

"A thesis submitted to the University of New Hampshire in partial 
fulfillment of the requirements for the professional degree of Mechan- 
ical Engineer (Electrical Engineer, Civil Engineer)." 

Whenever a thesis is printed in any periodical, it must be designated 
as having been accepted as a Professional Engineering thesis by the 
University of New Hampshire. 

Two bound copies must be filed before Commencement Day, one 
with the Librarian and one with the head of the department in which 
the major work is done. 

69 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

The University confers two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of 
Science and Bachelor of Arts. 

Agriculture and Technology : The degree of Bachelor of Science is 
conferred upon students graduating from the College of Agriculture 
and from the College of Technology. 

Liberal Arts : The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon 
students graduating from the College of Liberal Arts who have 
elected a prescribed curriculum in General Business, Home Econom- 
ics, Pre-Medical, Education-Teacher Training, Social Service, Sec- 
retarial, or who have majored in the General Arts Curriculum in any 
of the following departments : Architecture, Botany, Chemistry, Eco- 
nomics and Accounting, Education, Entomology, Geology, Home 
Economics, Mathematics, Physical Education for Women, Physics, 
Sociology, Zoology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students graduat- 
ing from the College of Liberal Arts who have majored in the Gen- 
eral Arts Curriculum in any of the following : Art in the department 
of Architecture, English, French, German, Latin, Spanish, History, 
Music, Philosophy, Psychology, Political Science. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE REQUIREMENTS 

Each candidate for a degree must complete 144 semester credits and 
the courses prescribed in one of the major four-year curricula. 

Students graduating from the four-year curriculum in Animal 
Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, Teacher Training or General Agri- 
culture must present to the Dean of the College of Agriculture, at 
least two weeks prior to Commencement, satisfactory evidence of hav- 
ing had practical experience in farm work, either through having lived 
on a farm for at least two years subsequent to the age of 12, or 
through having worked on a farm at least six months subsequent to 
the age of 16. 

Students graduating from the Forestry Curriculum must have spent 
at least three months in practical forest work, in addition to attend- 
ance at an eight weeks' summer camp under supervision of the fores- 
try department. 

Students graduating from the Horticulture Curriculum or the Poul- 
try Curriculum must have had practical experience on the College 
Farm and elsewhere to satisfy the heads of the major departments 
concerned. 

70 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

Teacher Training Seniors must take one semester of supervised 
teaching in some high school in the state designated by the State 
Department of Education. 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS REQUIREMENTS 

Each candidate for a degree in the College of Liberal Arts must 
complete 128 semester credits of which 64 must be with a grade of 70 
or better, and in addition must fulfill each of the following require- 
ments, or the requirements of one of the prescribed curricula offered 
by the College of Liberal Arts. 

1. General Liberal Arts Curriculum 

A. General University Requirements. 

Convocation Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years 

Freshman Assembly Freshman year — First Semester 

Physical Education for Men Freshman and Sophomore years 
Physical Education for Women 

Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years 
Military Science Freshman and Sophomore years 

B. Special Freshman Requirements. 

The completion of the following special Freshman courses : 
♦English 1 and 2 

♦Introduction to Contemporary Civilization, History 1 and 2 
*A biological science (Botany 1, 2 or Zoology 1, 2), or a physical 

science (Chemistry 1, 2; Geology 1, 2; or Physics 1, 2). 

C. Special Language and English Requirements. 

All students are required to pass a reading test in French, German, 
Latin, or Spanish before graduation. This test will be based on two 
years of secondary school language training or the equivalent. Also 
12 semester hours of English,* including Freshman English, are re- 
quired for graduation. 

D. Sophomore Group Requirements. 

Students are required to complete one year, elected from each of 
the following three groups of courses. Not less than one year's work 

* Not counted toward the fulfillment of major or group requirements. 

71 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

in any given course shall count toward the fulfillment of this require- 
ment. 

Group I. 

(a) Mathematics 

(b) History 

(c) English, French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish 

Group II. 
A biological science (Botany 1, 2 or Zoology 1, 2), or a physical 
science (Chemistry 1, 2; Geology 1, 2, or Physics 1, 2). Students 
electing a biological science during their freshman year must 
elect a physical science during their sophomore year, or vice versa. 

Group III. 
Economics, Education, Political Science, Psychology, Philosophy, 
Sociology. 

E. Major Requirements. 

Each student pursuing the General Liberal Arts Curriculum in the 
College of Liberal Arts shall select at the beginning of the sophomore 
year a major department in which he must pass courses to a total of 
24 semester credits with a grade of 75 or better. Courses ordinarily 
open to freshmen or taken in the freshman year may not be counted 
toward the fulfillment of the major requirements. Courses in other 
departments closely related to the major courses may be counted with 
the consent of the head of the major department. 

The following major departments are open to students in the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts. Students majoring in departments not in the 
College of Liberal Arts must have their schedules approved by the 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 

Art and Architecture Languages 

Botany Mathematics 

Chemistry Music 

Economics and Accounting Philosophy and Psychology 

Education Phys. Ed. for Women 

English Physics 

Entomology Political Science 

Geology Sociology 

History Zoology 

Home Economics 

72 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

2. Prescribed Curricula (College of Liberal Arts) 

The following prescribed curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science: General Business; Education-Teacher Training; Home 
Economics, Teacher Training, Institutional Management, Extension 
Training; Social Service; Secretarial. 

Students may elect a prescribed curriculum only with the consent 
of the head of the department in which the curriculum is offered. 
They must also satisfy the special freshman and the special language 
and English requirements, (see B and C under General Liberal Arts 
Curriculum) and must pass at least 24 semester credits of the required 
courses in the prescribed curriculum with a grade of 75 or better. 

COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS 

Each candidate for a degree must complete 144 semester credits and 
the courses required in one of the four-year curricula. 



7Z 



FOUR-YEAR CURRICULA 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

M. Gale Eastman, Dean 

DEPARTMENTS 

Agricultural and Biological Chemistry Dairy Husbandry 

Agricultural Economics Entomology 

Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Forestry 

Animal Husbandry Horticulture 

Botany and Bacteriology Poultry Husbandry 

The object of the four-year curricula of this College is to give a 
broad general education and thorough training in the basic sciences as 
well as to develop specific technical knowledge relating to the various 
phases of agriculture. To this end several subjects in the Colleges 
of Liberal Arts and Technology have been added to those provided 
by the faculty in Agriculture. The lecture and recitation work of the 
classroom in agriculture is amply supplemented in all cases by prac- 
tical exercises in the laboratories and about the farm. Seminars and 
discussion courses also are provided for seniors or other advanced 
students. 

Many of the graduates of the four-year curriculum return to the 
farm for the purpose of putting into practice the knowledge and train- 
ing gained in their college courses, and many of them have become 
successful and prosperous citizens of their communities; others, who 
have no farms of their own, accept salaried positions as superintend- 
ents or foremen on large dairy, fruit, stock or poultry farms; still 
others take positions as teachers of science and agriculture in our sec- 
ondary schools, or as assistants in our agricultural colleges, experi- 
ment stations or extension services; and, finally, an increasingly 
large number continue in specialized work, here or elsewhere, toward 
graduate degrees. 

The major curricula from which the agricultural student may make 
his selections are as follows : 

74 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

1. General Agriculture 6. Entomology 

2. Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 7. Forestry 

3. Animal Husbandry 8. Horticulture 

4. Botany and Bacteriology 9. Poultry Husbandry 

5. Dairy Husbandry 10. Teacher Training 

During the freshman and sophomore years, all agricultural students 
pursue the same general curriculum of fundamental work. During this 
period, a very few choices or alternative courses are indicated. The 
purpose of such a scheme is to make possible a deferred decision by 
the student who is uncertain of his interests, and therefore cannot 
decide at once on a curriculum. However, there are definite advan- 
tages that accrue from making a proper selection of courses even in 
the freshman year, and students are urged to consider their aptitudes, 
discuss their problems with advisers, and heads of departments, and 
reach decisions as to their curriculum preferences during Freshman 
Week. 

In other words, these introductory courses are not electives in the 
usually accepted sense, to be taken or not at the discretion of the stu- 
dent, but rather they make possible the rounding-out of the funda- 
mental work in the interests of perfecting the major curriculum to 
be finally completed. The highly technical or semi-professional cur- 
ricula, such as Agricultural and Biological Chemistry, Entomology, 
Forestry, and Teacher Training, involve sequences of subject-matter 
for the whole four years, and so much of it that certain courses even 
in the freshman year must be carefully selected and prescribed. 
Other curricula may be a little less exacting, but there will always 
be a decided advantage to the student in making an early and accu- 
rate selection of his major work. 

The earlier a student can decide on his curriculum, the surer will 
the prescribed work for a degree be completed in the allotted time, 
and the more easily will he find opportunities for choosing electives 
to suit his personal desires. 

The general descriptions of curricula which follow should be care- 
fully studied. 

General Agriculture. — This curriculum is offered for the student 
who wishes to secure a broad, general training in many important 
branches of agriculture without specializing unduly in any particular 

75 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

department. To this end, it is assumed that the student will take dur- 
ing his four years an average of about two semester courses in at 
least ten of the following departments: Agronomy, Animal Hus- 
bandry, Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Economics, Botany, 
Chemistry, Dairy Husbandry, Economics, English, Entomology, For- 
estry, Horticulture, Mathematics, Physics, Poultry Husbandry, Zool- 
ogy. A majority of these covering work in other colleges is required 
during the freshman and sophomore years, but several in the College 
of Agriculture may be elected in the freshman or sophomore year. In 
addition to such of these courses as have been completed by the end 
of the sophomore year, obviously other advanced and supplementary 
courses will be required in the junior and senior years. However, a 
considerably greater choice of subject-matter is allowed here than in 
the more specialized curricula. 

Students who expect to engage in farming will find this so-called 
general curriculum with its wide range of fundamental courses a 
most profitable one. This curriculum should also prepare for exten- 
sion work like that of a county agent, a boys' and girls' club leader, 
a marketing or farm management investigator, or a soils and crops 
specialist. For those expecting to specialize later in graduate work, 
the broad foundation of fundamental subject-matter made possible 
by this curriculum should provide a most desirable background. 

During the freshman and sophomore years the student should 
complete at least three introductory courses in the first semesters and 
four in the second semesters. In the freshman year this might include 
any of those listed except Forestry 5 and 6, and in the sophomore 
year the elective list is increased by Agronomy, both semesters. Ento- 
mology 1, Agricultural Engineering 4, Agricultural Chemistry 2 or 
4 and Geology (7). 

Agricultural and Biological Chemistry. — Students majoring in 
this curriculum receive training in the various branches of general 
chemistry and in their application to the growth and development of 
plants and animals. The methods used in the chemical analysis of 
plants and agricultural products and in the study of animal nutrition 
and metabolism are given especial attention. Aside from the technical 
and general requirements, numerous electives are offered which enable 
the student to obtain a more general training, to select work in the 

76 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

applied departments of the college, or to obtain the professional work 
needed for teaching in the schools of New Hampshire. The curricu- 
lum is designed to provide a thorough foundation for those expecting 
to prepare themselves for teaching and research in colleges and ex- 
periment stations. The department is fortunate in being associate'! 
with the experiment station and in that connection having charge of 
the chemical analysis of feeds and fertilizers for the State Department 
of Agriculture. This furnishes an opportunity for the student to come 
in contact with the inspection and research work of the department 
and to have the benefit of its equipment. 

Students who expect to pursue this curriculum must take Mathe- 
matics 5, 6 in the freshman year and Chemistry 47, 48 in the sopho- 
more year. Additional credits as needed may be elected from the 
introductory courses. 

Animal Husbandry. — This curriculum is offered to students who 
wish a specialized training in the practical and intelligent manage- 
ment, selection, breeding and feeding of livestock, including horses, 
beef and dual-purpose cattle, sheep and swine. Special attention is 
given to studies which will prepare students for various lines of work, 
including the extension service, production and sales work with feed 
concerns and packing plants, the management of estates and general 
livestock farms. 

Many have found this curriculum excellent preparation for ad- 
vanced work in veterinary science, civil service, and other specialized 
lines. 

During the junior and senior years each student is advised to elect 
as many courses in dairy production as possible, thus obtaining fun- 
damental information about a closely-related type of enterprise. 

Freshmen should complete Animal Husbandry 1 the first semester, 
and Forestry 2 or Horticulture 2 or 14 the second semester. In the 
sophomore year Entomology 1 should be completed in the first semes- 
ter, together with Agricultural Engineering or Poultry Husbandry. 
During the second semester. Agricultural Chemistry 4 is expected 
and Animal Husbandry 2. Geology may be added to the electives al- 
ready suggested for the freshman year to make possible the com- 
pletion of two more courses. Dairy Husbandry 2 is not advised in 
this curriculum. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Botany and Bacteriology. — The curriculum is flexible and so 
arranged that students in either the College of Agriculture or the 
College of Liberal Arts may take major work in the department. 
The work taken may be broadly cultural or the student may special- 
ize with a view to teaching, or in preparation for graduate study. 

Introductory or elective courses in the freshman and sophomore 
years may be selected largely subject to the desires of the student. 
An extra year of English will be required not later than the junior 
year. 

Dairy Husbandry. — Students majoring in dairy husbandry are 
offered specialized courses in (1) Dairy Production and (2) Dairy 
Products or Dairy Manufactures. Dairy Production courses include 
a study of the dairy breeds and all phases of care, feeding, manage- 
ment, herd analysis, judging and selection of dairy cattle. Dairy 
Products courses include a study of market milk, tests of dairy prod- 
ucts, including the use of the Mojonnier Milk Tester, dairy bacteri- 
ology, and the manufacture of butter, cheese and ice cream. The 
dairy herd on the campus together with the daily-operating market 
milk pasteurizing and ice cream units in the Dairy Building contribute 
to the practical training of students in any one of several lines of the 
dairy industry. 

Freshmen are advised to take Mathematics 5 and 6 if they intend 
to major in Dairy Products or Dairy Manufactures, which makes a 
full schedule for the year. Other students should complete Animal 
Husbandry 1 and Forestry 2 or Horticulture 2 or 14. All dairy stu- 
dents must complete Animal Husbandry 1 as freshmen or sopho- 
mores, and Agricultural Chemistry 4 as sophomores. Production stu- 
dents in every case should complete Entomology 1 as sophomores. 
Other introductory courses for the two years may be selected from 
such titles as the following : Agricultural Engineering 1 and 4, Poul- 
try Husbandry 1, and Geology (7). Dairy Husbandry 2 is not in- 
tended for Dairy Husbandry majors. 

Entomology. — The Department of Entomology offers various 
courses and selections of courses for students who wish to major in 
entomology, and especially for students who desire to secure training 
through which they can later take up one or another aspect of ento- 
mology as a profession. 

78 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

There are several aspects into which entomology naturally divides 
itself. Each of these represents a definite field of specialization, and 
an opportunity for professional work according to the training that 
the student has had. There is definite advantage in deciding on this 
major early in the course of undergraduate training. Equipment for a 
professional position is based on suitable undergraduate work to be 
followed by more fully specialized graduate work. 

Outlines of specific, suggested courses of study are available to the 
student on application at the department office. These outlines refer 
to the following specialized fields of entomological training, any one 
of which is offered by the department to students majoring in ento- 
mology. 

General Entomology. — A broad selection of courses which furnish 
a suitable background for later specialization in the following: (a) 
life history studies of insects ; (b) control of animal parasites ; (c) 
systematic entomology; and (d) the relation of insects to their envir- 
onment. Students who are interested in entomology in general, but 
have not yet determined what special field they might wish to enter, 
may take this grouping of courses. 

Toxicology.— This specialized field relates particularly to the control 
of insects by chemical means. It is a professional field that is rapidly 
developing. A student who elects it will be given extensive training in 
chemistry as well as entomology, and in graduate work will be ex- 
pected to give considerable attention to insect physiology. 

Medical Entomology.— The undergraduate training looking toward 
specialization in medical entomology includes courses in zoology and 
human physiology, as well as studies in the life histories of important 
insects that serve as the transmitting agents for various human dis- 
eases and in the means of control of such diseases through control of 
the insects that transmit them. 

Forest Entomology. — This aspect of entomology is closely related 
to the study of forest practices. Students who specialize in this field 
will take certain courses in forestry as well as fundamental entomol- 
ogy and specialized studies in the life histories of insects attacking 
forest and shade trees. 

79 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Biologic Control. — Certain fundamentals of general entomology 
are taken up in the subjects studied by a student majoring in this 
aspect of entomology. In addition special attention is given to the re- 
lation of various natural enemies to insects, including insect parasites 
and the effects of fungous and bacterial diseases upon insect life and 
abundance. 

In the freshman year, Mathematics 5 and 6 should be completed. 
In the sophomore year. Entomology 1 is required. Other introductory 
courses may be selected for additional credits to meet the student's 
special interest needs. 

Forestry. — The training and instructional work in forestry is 
intended to meet the needs of three classes of students : (1) those who 
wish to secure four years' training in the science and practice of fores- 
try ; (2) those who wish to fit themselves for positions in the lumber 
business ; and (3) those who desire a foundation for professional or 
graduate work in forestry. All students take the same work during 
the first two years, and their courses of study as juniors and seniors 
must depend on their records as freshmen and sophomores. 

General Group. — This group includes those students who wish to 
secure a sound training in forestry, but who do not care to spend more 
than four years in college. Considerable latitude is given in the courses 
which the student may elect, but his efforts are directed toward secur- 
ing a general education which will be of assistance to him in case he 
goes into some other line of work after graduation. 

Business Group. — The student who chooses this course of study 
receives a satisfactory training in the fundamental principles of for- 
estry, and, in addition, elects certain courses in the field of business 
administration. 

Professional Group. — This course of study is designed to fit the 
student for advanced work at some other institution, where he will be 
able to satisfy the requirements for an M.F. degree in one year. Stu- 
dents who plan to enter the United States Forest Service, to become 
teachers, research workers, or consulting foresters, should elect this 
course. The requirements, however, are high for this group, and 
only the best students will be encouraged to undertake it. 

80 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

All freshmen should take Forestry 5 and 6. Sophomores will take 
Civil Engineering 7 and 8, Entomology 1, and Forestry 9 and 10. 
Agricultural Chemistry 2, Agricultural Engineering 4, Geology (7) 
or other introductory courses may be elected. 

Horticulture. — The Department of Horticulture offers instruction 
which, by thorough preparation in fundamentals, fits the student for 
intelligent and resourceful production and marketing of fruits and 
vegetables. Students of superior ability will find it possible by sup- 
plementing their undergraduate work with postgraduate study to 
prepare for professional positions in teaching, research, or extension 
work. 

The course in ornamental horticulture and floriculture is designed 
to fit the student for work on large private estates or with nursery 
companies. It does not presume to prepare professional landscape 
architects. 

Major students in this department must elect a minimum of 25 
semester credits of advanced horticultural and related courses. In 
addition, because fundamental to all horticultural work, the study of 
economics, of plant physiology, and of the control of insects and 
diseases is required of all students. Similarly, subject-matter in 
other departments related to the student's chosen field of endeavor 
may be required at the discretion of the head of the department. 

Mathematics 5 and 6 is to be preferred in the freshman year for 
students who expect to do graduate work. Other students should 
elect some of the introductory courses for additional credits. Agri- 
cultural Engineering and any of the horticultural courses listed are 
recommended. 

In the sophomore year. Entomology 1 and Agricultural Chemistry 
2 should be completed. Additional credits will then be obtained from 
the introductory courses previously mentioned and from those 
in the sophomore list, like Animal Husbandry 1, Poultry Husbandry 
1, in the first semester ; and Dairy Husbandry 2, Forestry 2, Geology 
(7) and Horticulture 28 in the second semester. 

Poultry Husbandry. — The curriculum in poultry husbandry has 
been designed to offer students fundamental and special training in 
the practical as well as professional fields of poultry. The courses 
are also offered to those majoring in other departments. 

81 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

A brief but comprehensive period of practical work is offered for 
those who lack sufficient experience in the actual care and production 
of chicks and laying birds. All of the facilities of the University poul- 
try plant are available for such students. 

During the freshman or sophomore year it is necessary that Poultry 
Husbandry 1 be completed, since it is a prerequisite for many of the 
other advanced courses in this department. Agricultural Chemistry 
4 should be completed. Any of the other introductory courses in the 
freshman list are recommended for additional credits except Fores- 
try 5 and 6 ; and in the sophomore year Agricultural Engineering 4, 
Entomology 1, and Geology (7) may be added to the courses available. 

Teacher Training. — Under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes 
Act, the University of New Hampshire has been designated as the 
institution in this State for the training of teachers of agriculture. 
This curriculum gives the young man a broad training in the funda- 
mental sciences and in general agriculture. In addition, he receives 
professional training in such educational subjects as psychology, prin- 
ciples of education, methods of teaching in supervised practice teach- 
ing. Students who complete the curriculum and who have had the 
requisite amount of practical experience on a farm will be accredited 
as teachers. 

There is a rapidly increasing demand for teachers of agriculture in 
our secondary schools. Local school boards are beginning to appreci- 
ate more fully the value of instruction in agriculture both for the 
boys who will engage in agriculture after leaving high school, and 
as electives to maintain the interest of those young men who may 
wish to take at the University further education in this basic indus- 
try. As a result, there are many good positions open for the young 
men who wish to make the teaching of agriculture a profession. 

Freshmen may elect any one of the introductory courses for each 
semester except Forestry 5 and 6 and Horticulture 26. In the sopho- 
more year more of these same courses should be completed with the 
addition of Geology (7) and possibly Agricultural Engineering 4, 
Animal Husbandry 2 and Entomology 1. 



82 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Freshman Year 

All Curricula 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 

Convocation (Required) 

Freshman Assembly (Required First Semester) 

Mil. Sci. 1, 2 VA VA 

Phys. Ed. 31, 32 ^ J^ 

Bot, 1, 2 (General) 4 4 

Chem. 1,2 (Inorganic) 4 4 

Eng. 1 , 2 (Composition) 3 3 

Math. 5, 6 (First Year) or 

Math. 21, 22 (Elements of Analysis) 3-5 3-5 

Elective 0-2 0-2 

18 18 

Introductory courses scheduled to satisfy curricula requirements for the fresh- 
man year. 



First Semester 
Forestry 5 [3] 

Agricultural Engineering 1 [3] 
Animal Husbandry 1 [3] 
Poultry Husbandry 1 [3] 



Second Semester 
Forestry 6 [3] 
Dairy Husbandry 2 [3] 
Forestry 2 [3] 
Horticulture 2 or 14 [3] 
Horticulture 26 [3] 



Sophomore Year 



All Curricula 



Convocation (Required) 

Mil. Sci. 3, 4 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 

Phys. 1, 2 (Introductory) 

Agr. Chem. 1 (Introductory) or 1 

Chem. 47, 48 (Organic) ) 

Zool. 48 (General) 

Elective 



First 

Semester 

Credits 


Second 

Semester 

Credits 


I/, 


UA 


/2 

4 


/2 

4 


5 


0-5 


7 


3 

4-9 



18 



18 



Introductory courses scheduled 
more year. 

First Semester 
Agronomy 1 [3] 
Agricultural Engineering 1 
Animal Husbandry 1 [3] 
Civil Engineering 7 [2] 
' Forestry 9 [3] 
Education 41 [3] 
Entomology 1 [3] 
Poultry Husbandry 1 [3] 



to satisfy curricula requirements for the sopho- 



[3] 



Second Semester 
Agronomy 2 [2] 
Agricultural Engineering 4 [1] 
Animal Husbandry 2 [1] 
Civil Engineering 8 [2] 
Forestry 10 [3] 

Agricultural Chemistry 2 or 4 [3] 
Dairy Husbandry 2 [3] 
Forestry 2 [3] 
Geology (7) [3] 
Horticulture 2 or 14 [3] 
Horticulture 28 [3] 



83 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



GENERAL AGRICULTURE 

Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Agr. Econ. 1 (Rural) 

Agr. Econ. 3 (Farm Accounting) 
Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) . . 

A. H. 3, 2 (Feeds Judging) 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) 

Elective 



First 

Semester 

Credits 

2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
5 



18 
Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agron. 3, 4 (Crop Production; Field Crops) 3 

Agron. 5 (Soil Utilization) 2 

Agron. 7, 8 (Agronomic Literature) Arr. 

A. H. 9, 10 (Horses, Beef Cattle; Sheep and Swine) Arr. 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) 4 

D. H. 7, 10 (Butter and Cheese; Bacteriology) 2 

D. H. 13, 14 (Judging) 1 

Ent. 53, 52 (Animal; Orchard, Garden) 2 

Hort. 1 (Pomology) 3 

P. H. 3, 4 (Problems) 1 

Zool. 49 (Genetics) 2 

Senior Year 

Agr. Econ. 5, 4 (Coop. Marketing; Farm Management) 2 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 2 

Elective 14 

18 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Econ. 7, 8 (Statistics; Rural Community) 1 

Agr. Eng. 3, 2 (Electricity ; Power and Machinery) 3 

D. H. 3, 4 (Cattle; Milk Production) 3 

D. H. 5, 6 (Market Milk; Ice Cream) 3 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

Others from junior list 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



2 

1 

3 

12 



18 



Arr. 
Arr. 

4 

4 

1 

2 



3 

3 

12 

18 



3 
2 
3 
3 
2 



84 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 



Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) , 

Chem. 25, 26 (Quantitative and Qualitative) 

Lang. (French or German) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agron. 3, 4 (Crop Production; Field Crops) 

A. H. 3 (Feeds) 

D. H. 3, 2 (Dairy Cattle ; Fundamentals) 

Geol. 1, 2 (Principles) 

Hort. 2 or 14 (Pomology; Vegetable Gardening) . . 

Senior Year 

Agr. Chem. 51, 52 (Physiological) 

Agr. Chem. 53, 54 (Agricultural Analysis) .... 
Eng. 41 (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 
Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Chem. 55 (Plant Chemistry) 

Bot. 4 (Physiology) 

Chem. 55, 56 (Advanced Organic) . . . 

Chem. 83, 84 (Physical) 

Zool. 59, 60 (Physiology) 



First 

Semester 

Credits 

3 
4 
3 
3 
5 

18 



3 
3 

3 
4 



5 
4 
2 
7 

18 



3 

5 
4 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 

2 
4 
3 
3 
6 

18 



3 
4 
3 



5 
4 
3 
6 

18 



4 
3 
5 
4 



85 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Junior Year 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 

Convocation (Required) 

Agron. 1, 2 {Soils; Fertilizers) 3 2 

Agron. 3 (Crop Production) 3 

A. H. 5, 6 (Veterinary Science) . . . ; 3 3 

A. H. 3 (Feeds) 3 

A. H. 4 (Advanced Judging) * 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) 3 3 

Elective 3 V 

18 18 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr, Econ. 1 (Rural) • 2 

Agr. Econ. 3 (Farm Accounting) 2 

Agron. 4 (Field Crops) 3 

D. H. 14 (Judging) \ 

Econ. 24 (Marketing) 3 

For. 2 (Principles) 3 

Zool. 49 (Genetics) 2 

Senior Year 

Agr. Econ. 5, 4 (Coop. Marketing; Farm Management).... 2 3 

A. H. 7, 8 (Breeding; Markets) 3 2 

A. H. 9, 10 (Horses. Beef; Sheep, Swine) 3 3 

A. H. 12 (Seminar) , 1 

D. H. 3, 4 (Dairy Cattle; Milk Production) 3 3 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 2 3 

Elective _5 _3 

18 18 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Eng. 3, 2 (Electricity ; Power and Machinery) 3 3 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 2 



86 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 
Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Eng. (Advanced) 

Lang. (French or German) 

Elective 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) 

Bot. 3, 4 (Histology; Physiology) 

Chem. 25, 26 (Quantitative and Qualitative) 

Chem. 47, 48 (Organic) 

Ent. 1 (Principles) 

Ent. 54 (Medical Entomology) 

Geol. 1, 2 (Principles) 

Hort. 94 (Plant Breeding) 

Zool. 1, 2 (Principles of Zoology) 

Zool. 49 (Genetics) 2 

Senior Year — Botany 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) 4 

Bot. 5, 52 (Plant Pathology; Systematic) 3 

Bot. 53, 54 (Advanced) 4 

Elective 7 

18 
Senior Year — Bacteriology 

Bact. 51, 52 (Advanced) 4 

Zool. 17, 18 (Human Anatomy; Physiology) 3 

Zool. 15, 16 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates) 2 

Elective 9 

18 
Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Chem. 51, 52 (Physiological) 5 

Eng. 41 (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 2 

Geol. 1, 2 (Principles) 4 

Ger. 5, 6 (Scientific German) 3 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

Phys. 14 (Elementary Optics and Photography) 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


3 


3 


3 


3 


12 


12 


18 


18 


3 


2 


4 


4 


2 


4 


3 


3 


5 


5 


3 






2 


4 


4 




2 


4 


4 



4 
2 
4 
8 

18 



4 
3 
2 
9 

18 



5 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 



87 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Junior Year 

First 

Semester 

Credits 

Convocation (Required) 

Bact. 1 (General) 4 

D. H. 7, 10 (Butter, Cheese; Bacteriology) ^ 

D. H. 13, 14 (Judging) \ 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) ^ 

Elective ^ 

18 
Prescribed or Recommended Elective s . 

Acct. 1 , 2 (Elementary) ^ 

Agr. Econ. 1 (Rural) ^ 

Agr. Econ. 3 (Farm Accounting) •^ 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 3 

A. H. 5, 6 ( Veterinary Science) 3 

Bact. 2 (Applied) 

Ent. 53 (Insects of Domestic Animals) 2 

Zool. 49 (Genetics) 2 

Senior Year 

Agr. Econ. 5, 4 (Coop. Marketing; Farm Management) 3 

A. H. 3 (Feeds) 3 

d! h! 3, 4 (Cattle; Milk Production) 3 

D. H. 5, 6 (Market Milk; Ice Cream) 3 

D. H. 12 (Seminar) 

D. H. 16 (Advanced Dairy Science) 

Eng. 41 (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 2 

Elective _ 

18 
Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agron. 3 (Crop Production) • 3 

Agr. Eng. 3, 2 (Electricity; Power and Machinery) 3 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

Others from junior list 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



4 
1 

3 
10 



18 



2 
3 

4 



3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 

18 



2 
2 



88 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



ENTOMOLOGY 
Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) 

Econ, 1, 2 (Principles) 

Ent. 57, 58 (Advanced) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Bot. 5, 54 (Pathology) 

Chem. 25, 26 (Quantitative and Qualitative) 

Chem. 47, 48 (Organic) 

Chem. 81, 82 (Physical) 

Ent, 54 (Household) 

Ent. 56 (Forest) • • 

Forestry 7, 8 (Mensuration) or (. 

Forestry 9, 10 (Silviculture) 5 

Lang. (French or German) 

Zool. 3, 4 (Hygiene and Sanitation) 

Senior Year 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 

Ent. 59, 60 (Advanced) 

Lang. (French or German) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Chem. 51, 52 (Physiological) 

Bot. 3, 4 (Histology; Physiology) 

Chem. 83, 84 (Physical) 

Zool. 51, 52 (Invertebrates) 

Zool. 53, 54 (Histology) 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


7 


7 


18 


18 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


5 


2 


2 




2 




2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


3 


2-5 


2-5 


3 


3 


8-11 


7-10 


18 


18 


5 


5 


2 


4 


5 


5 


3 


3 


4 


4 



89 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FORESTRY 
Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Agron. 1 iSoils) 

Bot. 4 (Plant Physiology) 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) 

For. 7, 8 (Mensuration) or \ 

For. 9, 10 (Silviculture) ) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 



First 

Semester 

Credits 



3 
9 

18 



Bot. 3, 52 (Histology; Systematic) 2 

Ent. 1, 56 (Principles; Forest) 3 

For. 11, 12 (Utilisation) 3 

For. 13, 14 (Improvements; Fish and Game) 2 

Lang. (French or German) 3 

M. E. S4 (Wood Shop) t 

M. E. S12 (Forge Shop) S 

Home Econ. 21 (Camp Cooking) 1 

For. 22 (Summer Camp) 8 weeks 

Senior Year 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 2 

For. 19, 20 (Management) 4 

Elective 8 

14 
Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Bot. 5 (Pathology) 3 

For. 15, 16 (Thesis) 2 

For. 18 (History) 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

Others from junior list 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



4 
3 



3 
8 

li 



2 
2 
3 

2 
3 

3 



8 



3 

4 
7 

14 



2 
3 
2 



90 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

HORTICULTURE 
Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 

Bact. 1 (General) 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) 

Hort. 44 (Practice) 

Ent. 52 (Orchard and Garden) 

Zool. _ 49 (Genetics) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Econ. 3 (Accounting) 

Agron. 3 (Crop Production) 

Bot. 52 (Systematic) 

Hort. 3, 2 (Fruit Judging; Pomology) 

Hort. 27, 26 (Ornamentals) 

Hort. 38 (Floriculture) 

Hort. 48 (Beekeeping) - 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

P. H. 8 (Incubation) 

Senior Year 

Agr. Econ. 5, 4 (Coop. Marketing ; Farm Management) 

Bot. 5, 4 (Pathology; Physiology) 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos. Writing; Public Speaking) 

Ent. 52 (Orchard and Garden) 

Hort. 91, 92 (Seminar) 

Elective 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


3 


2 


4 




3 


3 




5 




2 


2 




6 


6 


18 


18 


2 




3 






2 


2 


3 


3 


3 




1 




2 




2 




3 


2 


3 


3 


4 


2 


3 




2 


2 


2 


9 


4 



18 



Agr. Econ. 1 (Rural) 2 

Agr. Eng. 3 (Electricity) 3 

Hort. 1, 54 (Pomology ; Advanced) 3 

Hort. 39 (Greenhouse) 3 

Hort. 49 (Beekeeping) 2 

Hort. 65 (Advanced Vegetable Gardening) 3 



18 



91 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 
Junior Year 



First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 



Convocation (Required) 

Agr. Econ. 3 {Farm Accounting) 2 

Econ. 1, 2 {Principles) 3 

P. H. 7, 6 (Judging; Breeding) 3 

P. H. 13, 14 (Management; Practice) 3 

Zool. 49 (Genetics) 2 

Elective ^ 

18 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Economics S (Coop. Marketing) 2 

Agr. Eng. 3, 2 (Electricity; Power and Machinery) 3 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 3 

Agron. 3, 4 (Crop Production; Field Crops) 3 

A. H. 3 (Feeds) J 

Bact. 1, 2 (General; Applied) 4 

P. H. 12 (Housing) 

Senior Year 

Eng. 41, (35) (Expos, Writing; Public Speaking) 2 

P. H, 9, 8 (Marketing; Incubation) 2 

P. H. 15, 10 (Diseases; Feeding) 4 

P. H. 17, 18 (Seminar) 1 

Elective _^ 

18 

Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

Agr. Econ. 7, 4 (Statistics; Farm Management) 1 

Met. 2 (Elementary) 

P. H. 3, 4 (Problems) 1 

Others from junior list 



3 
2 
4 



18 



2 
2 
3 

4 
2 



3 
3 
3 
1 
8 

18 



3 
2 
1 



92 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



TEACHER TRAINING 
Junior Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Agr. Econ. 3 (Farm Accounting) 

Agr. Econ. 5 (Coop. Marketing) 

Agron. 1, 2 (Soils; Fertilizers) 

Agron. 4 (Field Crops) 

A. H. 3 (Feeds) 

D. H. 4 (Milk Production) 

Educ. 41, 42 (Psychological Principles of Secondary Ed- 
ucation) 

Educ. 92 (Problems in Teaching of High School Agriculture) 

M. E. S23 (Forge Shop) 

P. H. 11 (Poultry for Teachers) 

Elective 



First 

Semester 

Credits 

2 

2 
3 



2 
2 
1 

18 



Prescribed or Recommended Electives 

P. H. 13 (Management) 3 

For others, refer to lists in General Agriculture. 

Senior Year 

Agr. Econ. 4 (Farm Management) 

Agr. Econ. 8 (Rural Community) 

Agr. Eng. 6 (Farm Shop) 

D. H. 14 (Judging) 

Educ. 93, (45) (Supervised Teaching; State Law) 18 

Elective 

18 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



2 
3 



3 
3 



18 



3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
7 

18 



93 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
C. Floyd Jackson, Dean 



DEPARTMENTS 

Economics and Accounting Music 

Education Philosophy and Psychology 

English Physical Education for Women 

Geology Political Science 

History Sociology 

Home Economics Zoology 

Languages 

In the College of Liberal Arts the following curricula are offered : 

General Liberal Arts Curriculum. — This curriculum provides a 
general college training which especially prepares for citizenship, sec- 
ondary school teaching, business, or graduate study. By means of the 
group system of elective studies an opportunity is given the student to 
secure an A.B. or B.S. degree. 

Education — Teacher Training Curriculum. — This curriculum 
has been prepared to guide those who wish to prepare for teaching in 
junior and senior high schools. It is sufficiently flexible to provide 
the differentiation necessary to meet the needs of those who may be 
planning to teach: (1) English and the foreign languages, (2) Eng- 
lish and the social sciences, (3) Mathematics and the biological and 
physical sciences, or (4) the commercial subjects. 

The New Hampshire State Board of Education grants a license to 
teach in New Hampshire secondary schools to candidates whose 
courses have included twelve semester hours of college work in Edu- 
cation. All candidates must pass the examination set by the State 
Board in Program of Studies and School Law. They may offer in 
lieu of examinations certified college courses in Educational Psychol- 
ogy, Methods of Teaching (General or Special) and Secondary Edu- 
cation or School Management. 

94 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The following courses may be considered as work in Education : 
Educational Sociology, Educational Psychology, Practice Teaching, 
Methods of Teaching, History of Education, School Law, School 
Management, General Methods Course, Special Methods Course, and 
work in Tests and Measurements. 

Home Economics Curricula. — The curricula in home economics 
are planned to meet the demands for scientific training in home- 
making; also special curricula are outlined for students who wish to 
enter fields of professional activity in educational and institutional 
work. Several courses are offered as electives for those who do not 
wish to major in home economics but who desire to study one or 
more phases of homemaking. 

The courses in home economics are based upon the physical, 
biological, and social sciences. The technical work in foods, nutrition, 
and dietetics is based upon the principles of chemistry and physiology ; 
that in sanitation necessitates a knowledge of chemistry and bacteri- 
ology. Home administration and the care and education of children 
demand knowledge of the principles of human nutrition and dietetics, 
as well as of economics, psychology and sociology. A nursery school- 
kindergarten furnishes a laboratory for child study and guidance. 
The study of color and design is fundamental to the courses in cos- 
tume design and house decoration. 

The home economics curricula offered are as follows : 

(1) Teacher Training Curriculum. To prepare students to teach 
home economics in junior and senior high schools. 

(2) Institutional Management Curriculum. To train students for 
positions as dietitians and managers in public institutions, such as 
college dormitories, hospitals, tearooms, cafeterias, etc. 

(3) Extension Training Curriculum. To prepare students to be- 
come home demonstration and boys' and girls' club agents. 

Students wishing to train for homemaking and child guidance 
should take a General Liberal Arts curriculum, majoring in home 
economics. (See page 98) 

General Business Curriculum. — Students who wish to prepare 
for a business career should take the curriculum in general business. 

95 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

This curriculum has been planned so as to offer the foundation for a 
broad cultural education during the first and second years of the cur- 
riculum, and to introduce the student to the business courses in the 
junior and senior years. 

Pre-Medical Curriculum. — This curriculum is offered to meet the 
needs of students who are preparing for the medical or dental pro- 
fessions. 

It is highly desirable that a student spend four years at this insti- 
tution in preparation for a medical training, although some medical 
colleges do not require a degree for entrance. The four years of 
pre-medical work will, however, give the student a good cultural 
foundation for his future medical work. Students who wish to take 
this curriculum must obtain the permission of the Committee on Pre- 
Medical Instruction. 

Students following the prescribed pre-medical curriculum will be 
eligible for entrance into any Qass A medical school. However, owing 
to the crowded condition of most medical schools, only those students 
standing in the upper third of their class during their pre-medical 
work may be admitted. Some medical institutions restrict the number 
of students admitted from any one pre-medical school. Preference is 
always given to those students having the most complete training and 
highest standing in their pre-medical work. 

Students desiring to prepare for dental school may do so by con- 
centrating certain courses in the first two years of the pre-medical 
curriculum. 

Students who are interested in nursing and technician training 
should major in the Department of Zoology, where they will be 
allowed to pursue a modification of the pre-medical curriculum. 

Social Service Curriculum. — Students may prepare for social 
work as a career under one of three plans, (a) In every way the most 
desirable is to take the full four years at the University of New 
Hampshire as a cultural background preparation for a two year 
course in a recognized school of social work, (b) Failing the neces- 
sary resources for such extended graduate training, it is possible to 
acquire the fundamental social service principles and techniques by 
taking a sociology major at the University of New Hampshire, in- 
cluding the social work courses (61, Id, 83, 98). (c) To meet 

96 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

the needs of students desiring supervised urban training, three years 
may be taken at the University of New Hampshire, and the fourth 
at Simmons College or another approved school of social work. The 
year's residence requirement will be waived and the degree of bache- 
lor of science will be awarded by the University of New Hampshire 
on the successful completion of the fourth year in such a school. 

Secretarial Curriculum. — This curriculum has been prepared to 
give a course in secretarial training, based as much as is practical 
on a liberal education. Its primary purpose is to train students for 
secretarial positions. It combines the technical training of a business 
secretary with that of a liberal arts education. 



97 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL LIBERAL ARTS CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 
All Curricula 



Convocation (Required) 

Freshman Assembly {Required First Semester) 

Mil. Sci. 1,2 

Phys. Ed. 31, 32 (For Men) 

Phys. Ed. 1, 2 (For Women) 

Eng. 1, 2 (Composition) 

Hist. 1, 2 (Contemporary Civilization) 

*A biological science (Bot. 1, 2 or Zool. 1, 2) or a physical 

science (Chem. 1, 2; Geol. 1, 2; or Phys. 1, 2) 

Suggested Electives: _^_^ 

Bot. 1, 2 (General Botany) 

Chem. 1, 2 (Inorganic Chemistry) ^ 

Eng. 3, 4 (Survey of English Literature) 

Geol. 1, 2 (Principles of Geology) 

Hist. 3, 4 (Modern European History) 

H. E. 1, 2 (Homemaking) 

JLang. (French, German Latin or Spanish) 

**Math. 1, 2 (First Year Math.) or \ 

Math. 31, 32 (Elem. Mathematical Anal.) 3 

Phys. 1, 2 (Introductory Physics) 

Zool. 1, 2 (Basic Principles of Animal Life) 



Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Mil. Sci. 3, 4 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 (For Men) 

Phys. Ed. 3, 4 (For Women) 

tEng ; 

Elect one year's work from each of the three following groups: 

Group I. Math. (One year) 

Hist. (One year) 

Lang. (French, German, Greek, Latin, Span- 
ish) (One year) 

Eng. (A third year of English) 

Group II. *A biological science (Bot. 1, 2; or Zool. 
1, 2) or a physical science (Chem. 1, 2; 
Geol. 1, 2; or Phys. 1, 2) 



First 

Semester 

Credits 



1/2 

2 
3 

4 



4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

3 

4 
4 



16 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



2 
^3 

4 



4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

3 

4 
4 

16 



'Y; 


i/L 


72 
1 

3 


72 

1 

3 


3 
3 


3 
3 


3 
3 


3 
3 



* Students electing a biological science during their freshman year must elect 
a physical science during their sophomore year, or vice versa. 

t All students are required to pass a reading test in French, German, Latin or 
Spanish before graduation. This test will be based on two years of secondary school 
language training or the equivalent. Students not passing this test during the 
Freshman Week examinations are advised to elect language their freshman year. 
Students will be assigned to language courses on the basis of their grades in the 
Language Placement Examination given during Freshman Week. 

** Open only to students with one year each of algebra and plane geometry. Stu- 
dents who wish to continue mathematics beyond the freshman year should take 
Math. 1, 2. 

t A second year's work in English is required but may be taken during the sopho- 
more, junior or senior year. See special Language and English requirement 



^ 



98 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Group III. Econ. (One year) 3 3 

Educ. (One year) 3 3 

Pol. Sci. (One year) 3 3 

Phil. (One year) 3 3 

Psych. (One year) 3 " 3 

Soc. (One year) 3 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 



Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 5, 6 (For Women) 

Major course: (First major course with grade of 75 or better) 
Major course: (Second major course with grade of 75 or 

better) 

Electives to^^meet semester requirements 



Senior Year 

Major course: (Third major course with grade of 75 or bet- 
ter) 

Major course: (Fourth major course with grade of 75 or bet- 
ter) 

Electives to meet semester requirements 



X 



16 16 



1 

3 


1 
3 


3 


3 


6 


16 


3 


3 


3 


3 



16 16 



99 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULA 

A. Teacher Training Curriculum 

B. Institutional Management Curriculum 

C. Extension Training Curriculum 

D. *General Arts Major in Home Economics 

Freshman Year 

First Second 

Semester Semester 
Credits Credits 
See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested Elective: 

H. E. 1, 2 (Homemaking) 3 3 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 3, 4 1 J 

**Eng. (A second year of English) 3 3 

Chem. 1, 2 (Inorganic Chemistry) 4 4 

H. E. 3, 4 (Clothing Selection) 3 3 

li. E. 15, 16 (Foods) 3 3 

Suggested electives: ' 

§Educ. 41, 42 (Psych. Prin. of Secondary Educ.) 3 3 

ilPsych. 51 (Psych, of Childhood and Adol.) 3 

ilPsych. 62 (Mental Hygiene) 3 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 5, 6 1 1 

Agr. Chem. 5 (Organic and Biol. Chem.) 5 

II Agr. Chem. 6 (Chem. of Food and Nutrition) 3 

H. E. 20 (Dietetics) 3 

§Educ. 51, 52 (Soc. Prin. of Secondary Educ.) 3 3 

H. E. 31, 32 (Home Building and Furnishing) 3 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 16 

* Students taking the General Arts curriculum in Home Economics should follow 
the General Liberal Arts Curriculum on page 98. 

** A second year of English must be taken before graduation, 

H Institutional and Extension majors only. 

§ Teacher Training majors only. 

II Required of students who intend to become hospital dietitians; elective for 
others. 



100 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULUM 



Senior Year 



First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 



H. E. 35 (Home Management House) 3 

H. E. 25 (Child Development) 3 

H. E.-Ed. 91 (Problems in the Teaching of High School 

Home Economics) 3 

H. E.-Ed. 94 (Supervised Teaching) 10 

H. E.-Ed. 96 (Seminar) 3 

Suggested Elective: 

Educ. 45 (N. H. State Program of Studies and School 

Law) 2 or 2 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 16 



INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 



H. E. (35) (Home Management House) 

H. E. 17, 18 (Advanced Foods) 

H. E. 41 (Institutional Management) . . 
H. E. 43, 44 (Institutional Practice) . . . 

H. E. 19 (Nutrition) 

Acct. 1, 2 (Elementary Accounting) 

Electives to meet semester requirements . . , 



2 

3 
2 
2 
4 



16 



3 
2 

2 

4 

16 



EXTENSION TRAINING CURRICULUM 

Agr. Econ. 8 (Rural Community) 

H. E. (35) (Home Management House) 

H. E.-Ed. 91 (Problems in the Teaching of High School 

Home Economics) 

H. E. (25) (Child Development) 

H. E. 5, 6 (Clothing Construction) 

H. E. 17, 18 (Advanced Foods) 

Electives to meet semester requirements 



2 
2 



16 



3 
3 



3 
2 
2 



16 



101 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL BUSINESS CURRICULUM 
Freshman Year 



See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested Elective: 

Math. 31, 32 (Mathematics) 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Mil. Sci. 3, 4 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 

*Eng. (A second year of English) 

Acct. 1, 2 (Accounting) 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles of Econornics) 

Econ. 3 (Economic and Commercial Geography) 

Econ. 4 (Economic and Commercial History) 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Acct. 3, 4 (Accounting) 

Econ. 21, 22 (Commercial Law) 

Econ. 23 (Public Regulation) 3 

Econ. 24 (Marketing) 

Electives 

16 

Senior Year 

Econ. SZ (Money and Banking) 3 

Econ. 51 (Labor Problems) 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 



First 

Semester 
Credits 


Second 

Semester 

Credits 


3 


3 


16 


16 


1/. 
V2 
3 
4 
3 
3 


V2 
3 
4 

3 
3 


16 


16 


3 
3 


3 
3 



16 



* A second year of English must be taken before graduation. 



16 



16 



102 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM* 



First 
Semester 
Credits 
See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested Electives: 

Chem. 1, 2 (Inorganic Chemistry) * 

Zool. 1, 2 (Principles of Zoology) _* 

16 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) . 

Mil. Sci. 3, 4 ^Y/ 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 V^ 

Eng. (Second year of English) ...... J 

Zool. IS, 16 (Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates) 3 

Suggested elective: , 

Lang. (French or German) ; ^ 

Chem. 25, 26 (Quantitative and Qualitative) 3 

16 
Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) _ 

Phys. 17, 18 (Pre-medical Physics) 5 

Chem, 53, 54 (Organic Chemistry) 5 

Suggested electives: 

Advanced Chemistry ^ 

Economics ^ 

Advanced English ^ 

Foreign Language ^ 

History ^ 

Mathematics ^ 

Political Science ■^ 

Psychology ^ 

Sociology ^ 

Advanced Zoology _^ 

16 

Senior Year 

Adv. Zool 4 

Suggested electives: 

Advanced Chemistry ^ 

Economics | 

Advanced English 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History 3 

Mathematics ^ 

Political Science | 

Psychology | 

Sociology 3 

Advanced Zoology ^ 

16 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



4 
4 



16 



3 
3 

3 
3 

16 



5 

5 

4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 

16 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 

16 



* Students who wish to take the Pre-medical Curriculum must obtain the permis- 
sion of the Committee on Pre-medical Instruction. 



103 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

•UNIVERSITY TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 



First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 



See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested elective: 

**Teaching major (First year) 

16 

§ Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Mil. Sci. 3, 4 VA 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 (For Men) J^ 

Phys. Ed. 3, 4 (For Women) 1 

Eng. (Advanced English) 3 

Educ. 41, 42 (Psychological Principles) 3 

Teaching major (Second year) 3 

First teaching minor (First year) 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 5, 6 (For Women) 1 

Educ. 51, 52 (Social Principles) 3 

Educ. 61, (61) (Principles and Problems) 3 

Teaching major (Third year) 3 

First teaching minor (Second year) 3 

Second teaching minor (First year) 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 

Senior Year 

tTeaching major (Fourth year) 3 

JFirst teaching minor (Third year) 3 

jSecond teaching minor (Secojtd year) 3 

Problems in teaching (major) 3 

Problems in teaching (minor) 3 

Supervised teaching 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 



16 



1/2 
/2 
1 

3 
3 
3 
3 



16 



or 



1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



16 

3 
6-10 
16 



* The program of this curriculum may be completed by students majoring in any 
of the departments of the University offering work, the subject-matter of which is 
offered in the secondary school. A satisfactory completion of this curriculum will 
entitle the student to a certificate indicating the fact. 

** See section covering Department of Education in later pages for description 
of teaching major and teaching minor subjects. 

§ General Arts College students satisfactorily completing this curriculum are 
released from the sophomore group requirements of this general curriculum and are 
entitled to receive the degree given to students majoring in their respective subjects. 

t Remainder of the total of 24 semester credits required for the satisfactory com- 
pletion of the curriculum. 

t Remainder of the total of 12 semester credits required in each teaching minor. 



104 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

SOCIAL SERVICE CURRICULUM 
Fkeshman Ysar 



See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested elective: 

Zool. 1, 2 (Principles of Zoology) 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 3, 4 

Eng. (A second year of English) 

Psych. 21, 22 (Elementary) . .. 

Zool. 3, 4 (Hygiene and Sanitation) 

Soc. 1 (Principles) 

Soc. 2 (Social Psychology) 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 5, 6 

Soc. 61 (Social Pathology) 

Soc. 62 (Community Organization) 

Soc. 71 (Crime and Its Social Treatment) 

Soc. 72 (The Family) 

Soc. 76 (Principles of Social Case Work) 

Suggested electives: 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles) 

Pol. Sci. 1, 2 (Citizenship) 

8 weeks' summer social service field work with an approved 
agency. (2 credits may be used for major credits) 

*Senior Year 

Psych. 61 (Abnormal) 

Psych. 62 (Mental Hygiene) 

Soc. 75 (Methods of Social Research) 

Soc. 83 (Social Work Organisation and Admin.) 

Soc. 84 (Methods of Social Progress) 

Suggested electives: 

Econ. 9 (Labor Problems) 

Zool. 29, 30 (Cytology and Genetics) 



May be taken in a school of social work, see page 96. 



First 

Semester 

Credits 


Second 

Semester 

Credits 


4 


4 


16 


16 


1 
3 
3 
3 
3 


1 
3 
3 
3 



16 



1 
3 



3 
3 



16 

3 

3 
3 



3 
4 

16 



16 

1 

3 

3 
3 

3 
3 

16 

3 

3 

4 

16 



105 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SECRETARIAL CURRICULUM 
Freshman Year 



See Freshman Requirements, page 98 
Suggested Elective: 

Lang, or Math. 31, 32 ^ 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 3, 4 

Eng. iA second year of English) ; • 

Econ. 3, 4 (Economic and Commercial Geography and His- 
tory) 

Acct. 1, 2 (Accounting) • • .• • • 

Suggested electives to meet semester requirements: Education, 
Language, Statistics, Sociology 

16 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 5, 6 1 

Shorthand 1,2 3 

Typewriting 7, 8 2 

Eng. (A third year of English) 3 

Econ. 1, 2 (Principles of Economics) 3 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 
Senior Year 

Shorthand and Office Practice 3,4 3 

Typewriting 9, 10 2 

Electives to meet semester requirements 

16 



First 

Semester 

Credits 


Second 

Semester 

Credits 


3 


3 


16 


16 


1 
3 


1 
, 3 


3 
4 


3 
4 



16 



1 
3 
2 
3 
3 



16 

3 
2 



16 



Note: Students preparing to teach secretarial subjects must elect in addition a 
sufficient number of courses in Economics, Accounting and Education to meet State 
requirements. 



106 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 
George W. Case, Dean 



DEPARTMENTS 

Architecture Mathematics 

Chemistry Mechanical Engineering 

Civil Engineering P hysics 

. Electrical Engineering Engineering Experiment Station 

V 

The College of Technology offers the following four-year curric- 
ula: 

Architecture Curriculum. — This curriculum is planned to prepare 
its graduates for immediate usefulness in the profession of architect- 
ure and, while it is highly technical, it does not overlook the need of 
the professional man for a broad cultural background. 

The first three years aim to provide fundamental instruction and 
discipline in the art, science, theory, and history of architecture, sup- 
plemented with such basic courses of study in related departments of 
the University as shall give a proper background for independent 
work in architectural design and construction. 

The fourth year is devoted chiefly to thesis work in the design of a 
civic or residential development in harmony with New England tradi- 
tions, followed by complete working drawings and specifications cov- 
ering all branches of the work and supplemented with studies of office 
procedure including contract forms, accounting and bookkeeping, the 
aim being to prepare the student for immediate service in an architect's 
office or in some branch of the building construction industry. 

Chemistry Curriculum. — This curriculum is intended to fit the 
student for the career of a professional chemist, and to give a good 
foundation for original and independent chemical research. 

Instruction is imparted by lectures, recitations and a large amount 
of carefully supervised laboratory work. The laboratory study is 
largely individual, and the work of each student is conducted with 
reference not only to the particular subject he may have in view, 
but also to the acquirement of a broad knowledge of chemical science. 

107 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The student is given a training in either German or French to enable 
him to read with ease the chemical literature; a grounding in mathe- 
matics, necessary for advanced theoretical chemistry or chemical 
engineering ; a somewhat limited amount of special work in both me- 
chanical and electrical engineering and a thorough undergraduate 
training in theoretical and applied chemistry. He is encouraged to 
develop the power of solving chemical problems by independent 
thought through the aid of the reference library and chemical period- 
icals. 

Civil Engineering Curriculum. — This curriculum is designed to 
give the student theoretical and practical training in the principles 
upon which the practice of civil engineering is based, and to allow him 
the opportunity to apply these principles to problems of professional 
practice in the classroom, in the design room and in the field. 

Civil engineering, the oldest of the engineering professions, still 
covers a broad field of activity, including topographical, structural, 
transportation, hydraulic, and sanitary engineering. This curriculum 
places about equal emphasis upon each of these various branches and 
allows the student some opportunity to develop his special interests 
through the thesis requirement. 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum. — The electrical engineering 
curriculum is intended to meet the demands of young men fitting 
themselves for professional engineering in connection with the various 
applications of electricity. 

By means of lectures, recitations and laboratory work, the courses 
of the curriculum are brought to the attention of the student in such a 
manner as not only to emphasize the present needs of the practitioner 
and engineer, but to give him the principles needed to understand the 
constantly increasing number of new problems that require solution. 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum. — The mechanical engi- 
neering curriculum is intended to train young men for positions of 
responsibility in the field of the mechanical industries, and is designed 
to fit them socially for their proper places in the world. The courses in 
the curriculum are scientific, including mathematics, physics and chem- 
istry, and technical, including drawing, shop work, thermodynamics, 
hydraulics, machine design, electrical engineering, power engineering. 
Two years of economics are available as alternates. 

108 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Instruction is given by means of recitations, lectures and laboratory 
work supplemented by illustrated lectures and assigned reading. 
Throughout the curriculum the theoretical work is supplemented by 
actual practice in mechanical operation and scientific research, by train- 
ing in the use of tools for working wood and metals, and by experi- 
mental tests and demonstrations in the mechanical, electrical, chemical 
and physical laboratories. 

Engineering Experiment Station.— The Engineering Experiment 
Station was established for the purpose of making available the advis- 
ory assistance of heads of departments and experienced men in the 
Faculty of the College of Technology, and the use of laboratory facili- 
ties of these departments for service and assistance of New Hamp- 
shire industries and the people of New Hampshire in solving their 
technical problems. 

Alumni Representation. — An Advisory Committee of Alumni of 
the College of Technology, composed of men in direct contact with 
industry and practical professional afifairs, serves to keep the Faculty 
in touch with developments in the several fields which attract our 
graduates. Members of this committee also serve as consultants when 
important changes in curricula, faculty personnel and policies of 
administration are considered. The members are : 

Henry H. Calderwood, B.S. in E.E., '01, 16 Prospect Street, Saugus, 

Mass. 
John T. Croghan, B.S. in M.E., '08, 574 Chestnut Street, Waban, Mass. 
Robert A. Neal, B.S. in E.E., '10, 286 Burlington Road, Wilkinsburg, 

Pa. 
Lester A. Pratt, Ph.D., '09, 13 Wildwood Street, Winchester, Mass. 



109 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ARCHITECTURE 



Freshman Year 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 

Convocation (Required) 

Freshman Assembly (Required First Semester) 

Phys. Ed. 31, 32 ^ H 

Mil. Sci. 9, 10 VA UA 

Math. 1, 2 (Algebra and Trigonometry) 4 4 

Eng. 1, 2 (Composition) 3 3 

*Chem. 1 (Inorganic Chemistry) 4 

*M. E. 1 (Enpineering Drawing) 2 

*M. E. SI (Wood Shop) . ., 3 

Arch. 2 (Elements of Design) 2 

Arch. 24 (Elements of Architecture) 2 

Arch. 26 (Shades and Shadows, Perspective) 3 

Arch 38 (Freehand Drawing) 2 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 ^ J^ 

Mil. Sci. 11, 12 VA VA 

Arch. 5, 6 (History of Architecture) 2 4"- - 

Arch. 27, 28 (Architectural Design) 6 6 

Arch, 39, 40 (Freehand Drawing) 2 2 

Phys. 3, 4 (Physics) 4 4 

tEng. 35 (Public Speaking) 2J/i 

18i/l> 18 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Arch. 9 (Architectural Composition) 2 

Arch. 14 (Domestic Architecture) 3 

Arch. 29, 30 (Architectural Design) 6 6 

Arch. 41, 42 (Water Coloring and Modeling) 3 3 

M. E. 11, 12 (Mechanics) 3 3 

M. E. 41 (Heating and Ventilating) or ) 2 

E. E. 31 (Electricity) j 

IfHhtory 51, 52 (Recent World History) 3 3 

19 18 
Senior Year 

Arch. 1 5 (Professional Practice) 2 

Arch. 16 (Specifications and Appraising) 2 

Arch. 19, 20 (Building Construction) 3 3 

Arch. 21 (Architectural Seminar) 2 

Arch. 31, 32 (Architectural Design and Thesis) 6 6 

Arch. 44 (Model Making) 2 

tEng (41) (Expository Writing) 2 

Phil. 83 (Ethics) 3 

tEcon. 46 (Legal Principles of Business Transactions) 2 

M. E. 41 (Heating and Ventilating) or \ 2 

E. E. 31 (Electricity) j 

18 17 

* A course approved by the department head may be substituted for M. E. 1, 
M. E. 81, Chem. 1. 

t A course approved by the department may be substituted only if a conflict exists. 

110 



C. E 


. 9 


or (9) 


Econ 


. 1, 


2 


Econ. 


. 45 




Eng. 


3, - 


4 


Eng. 


29, 


30 


Geol. 


7, 


(7) 


Hist. 


11 




Hist. 


12 




Hist. 


13, 


14 


Hist. 


IS, 


16 


Hist. 


17, 


18 


Hist. 


19. 


20 


Modern Language 


Music 




Phil. 


49 




Phil. 


84 




I'ol. ! 


Sci. 


3,4 


Soc. 


1 




Soc, 


2 





COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Recommended Electives 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Credits Credits 

Plane Surveying 2 or 2 

Principles of Economics 3 3 

Business Organization and Finance 2 

Survey of English Literature 3 3 

Survey of Art 3 3 

General Geology 3 or 3 

Ancient Orient 3 

Greece 3 

Roman 3 3 

Medieval 3 J 

Renaissance 3 3 

Modern European 3 3 

A year's work 

A year's work 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

Ethics 3 

American Government 3 o 

Principles of Sociology 3 

Social Psychology 3 



111 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 



Freshman Year 



First 

Semester 

Credits 



Convocation (Required) 

Freshman Assembly (Required First Semester) 

Phys. Ed. 31, 32 54 

Mil. Sci. 9, 10 154 

Eng. 1, 2 (Composition) 3 

Math. 5, 6 (First Year Mathematics) 5 

Chem. 1, 4 (Inorganic Chemistry) 4 

M. E. 1 (Engineering Drawing) 2 

M. E. (Shop Work) 2 

Geol. (7) (General Geology) 

18 
Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 J4 

Mil. Sci. 11, 12 154 

Chem. 21, 22 (Analytical Chemistry) 4 

Math. 7, 8 (Calculus) 3 

Phys. 7, 8 (General Physics) 4 

Phys. 9, 10 (Physics Laboratory) 3 

Ger. 1, 2 (German) 3 

19 
Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Chem. 47, 48 (Organic Chemistry) 5 

Chem. 31, 32 (Quantitative Analysis) S 

Chem. 61, 62 (Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry).... 2 

E. E. 33 (Electrical Engineering) 4 

Phys. 52 (Electrical Measurements) 

Approved Elective 3 

19 
Senior Year 

Chem. 83, 84 (Physical Chemistry) 5 

Chem. 71, 72 (Industrial Chemistry) 3 

Chem. 87, 88 (Thesis, Bibliography and Seminar) 7 

Approved Elective 3 

18 



Second 

Semester 

Credits 



/a 
154 
3 
5 
6 



19 



54 
154 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 

19 



5 
5 
2 

3 

3 

18 

5 
3 
7 
3 

18 



112 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Freshman Assembly (Required First Semester) 

Phys. Ed. 31, 32 

Mil. Sci. 9, 10 

Math. 5, 6 (First Year Mathematics) 

Chem. 1, 2 (General Chemistry) 

Eng. 1 , 2 (Composition) 

M. E. 1, 2 (Engineering Drawing) ............. 

M. E. SI, S2 (Wood, Forge and Machine Work) 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


V2 


^ 


1/a 


W2 


5 


5 


4 


A 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


3 



19 



19 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Sophomore Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 Yj 

Mil. Sci. 11, 12 1'/^ 

C. E. 1, 2 (Surveying) • o 

C. E. 4 (Location Surveying and Earthwork) 

Math. 7, 8 (Calculus) 3 

Phys. 7, %(Physics) •' \ 

Phys. 9, 10 (Physics Laboratory) 3 

18 
Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

C. E. 5, 6 (Location Surveying and Mapping) 1 

C. E. 16 (Engineering Materials) 

C. E. 22 (Hydraulics) 

C. E. 27, 28 (Theory of Structures) 4 

C. E. 41, 42 (A.S.C.E.) (Required) 

M. E. 9, 10 (Applied Mechanics) 3 

E. E. 35 (Electrical Machinery) 4 

Geol. 7 (General Geology) • • 3 

Econ. 45 (Business Organization and Finance) I 

Econ. 46 (Public Regulation of Industry) I 

Econ. 47, 48 (Economic History of the Working Classes) or [ 

Mil. Sci. 13, 14 (Coast Artillery) J ^ 

18 

Senior Year 

C. E. 31 (Highway Engineering and Transportation) 4 

C. E. 32 (Transportation Engineering) 

C. E. 33, 34 (Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering) 4 

C, E. 35 (Structural Design) 4 

C. E. 36 (Reinforced Concrete Structures) 

C. E. 38 (Thesis) 

C. E. 43, 44 (A.S.C.E.) (Required) 

M. E. 21, 22 (Heat Power Engineering) 2 

Eng. 41 (Expository Writing) 2 

*Mil. Sci. 15, 16 (Coast Artillery) 

•M. E. 45, 46 (Management) 2 

18 



V2 

1/a 

4 

2 

3 

4 

3 

18 



1 
2 
4 
4 



3 
18 



3 
4 

4 

2 



3 
18 



* Students electing Mil. Sci. IS, 16 are not required to register for M. E. 4S 
and C. E. 32. 

113 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Sophomore Year 



Convocation ^Required) 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 

Mil. Sci. 11, 12 

Math. 7, 8 {Calculus) 

Phys. 7, 8 {General Physics) 

Phys. 9, 10 {General Physics Laboratory) 

E. E. 1, 2 {Electrical Engineering) 

M. E. 3 {Machine Drawing) 

M. E. 4 {Kinematics) 

M. E. (S17) {Machine Work) 

C. E. 9 {Surveying) 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


^ 


V2 


1/2 


iy2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 






3 




2 



Junior Year 

Convocation {Required) 

E. E. 3, 4 {Electrical Engineering) 

E. E. 13, 14 {Electrical Problems) 

E. E. 15, 16 {A.I.E.E.) {Required) 

E. E. 23, 24 {Electrical Laboratory) 

M. E. 9, 10 {Mechanics) 

M. E. 25, 26 {Heat Power Engineering) 

M. E. 27 {Mechanical Laboratory) • 

Econ. 45, 47 {Business Organisation and Econ. History) and 
Econ. 46, 48 {Public Regulation of Industry and Econ. 

History) , or 

Math. 51, 52 {Differential Equations and Vector Analysts) or 
Mil. Sci. 13, 14 {Coast Artillery) 



Senior Year 



E. E. 5 {Electrical Engineering) 

*E. E. 7, 8 {Electronics and Communication) . . 

*E. E. 10 {Advanced Circuit Theory) 

E. E. 12 {Illumination) 

E. E. 17, 18 {A.I.E.E.) {Required) 

*E. E. 25, 26 {Electrical Laboratory) 

*E. E. 28 {Advanced Electronics Laboratory) 

Phys. 51 {Theory of Electrons) 

Phys. 52 {Electrical Measurements) 

C. E. 23 {Hydraulics) 

Eng. (41) {Expository Writing) 

JM. E. 45, 46 {Management) 

Mil. Sci. 15, 16 {Coast Artillery) 

Approved non-technical elective 



18 



19 



3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


4 


3 


4 


2 




> 




3 


3 


18 


17 


3 




3 


5 




4 




2 


4 


4 




4 


2 






3 


2 






2 


2 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



19 18 

t Students electing Mil. Sci. 15 are not required to register for M. E. 45. 
* E. E. 8, 10, 26 and 28 are elective courses. 



114 



COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Sophomore Year 



Convocation (Required) 

Phys. Ed. 33, 34 

Mil. Sci. 11, 12 

Math. 7, 8 (Calculus) 

Phys. 7, 8 (General Physics) 

Phys. 9, 10 (General Physics Laboratory) 

M. E. 3 (Machine Drawing) 

M. E. 4 (Kinematics) 

M. E. 5, 6 (Mechanical Laboratory) 

M. E. S17 (Machine Work) 

C. E. (9) (Surveying) 

Junior Year 

Convocation (Required) 

A.S.M.E. 1, 2 (Required) 

E. E. 37, 38 (Electrical Machinery) 

M, E. 7, 8 (Mechanics) 

M. E. 23, 24 (Thermodynamics) 

M. E. 29, 30 (Mechanical Laboratory) 

M. E. 39 (Heating and Ventilating) 2 

C. E. 24 (Hydraulics) 

Econ. 45, 47 (Business Organization and Econ. History) and 
Econ. 46, 48 (Public Regulation of Industry and Economic 

History) , or 

Mil. Sci. 13, 14 (Coast Artillery) J 3 

18 

Senior Year 

A.S.M.E. 3, 4 (Required) 

M. E. 13 (Manufacture of Iron and Steel) 3 

M. E. 15, 16 (Machine Design) 3 

M. E. 32 (Mechanical Laboratory) 

M. E. 33, 34 (Power Plants) , 2 

M. E. 35, 36 or 37, 38 (Automotive Eng. or Aeronautics) . . 3 

M. E. 45, 46 (Management) 2 

M. E. 50 (Thesis) 

Eng. 41 (Expository Writing) 2 

Mil. Sci. 15, 16 (Coast Artillery) or Approved elective 3 

18 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semestet 


Credits 


Credits 


V2 


Vi 


1J4 


154 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 






3 


1 


1 


2 






2 


17 


18 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


2 


1 



3 

18 



3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 



18 



115 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

The University of New Hampshire Summer School (the four- 
teenth session of which will be held from June 28 to August 6, 1937) 
offers courses in most departments of all three colleges. The Sum- 
mer School is designed to meet the needs of : 

1. Teachers, superintendents and supervisors of secondary schools. 

2. Students in the University of New Hampshire and in other col- 
leges who desire to utilize the vacation period for the purpose of an- 
ticipating courses or supplying deficiencies. 

3. Graduate students who may earn the degree of Master of Arts, 
Master of Science or Master of Education for work done exclusively 
during summer sessions. 

4. Candidates for admission to any of the colleges of the University 
who desire to obtain advanced standing or to complete some special 
requirement for admission. 

For Summer School Bulletin, information as to particular courses, 
etc., address the Director of the Summer School, University of New 
Hampshire, Durham, N. H. 

EXTENSION COURSES FOR UNIVERSITY CREDIT 

In response to the insistent demand of the teachers of the state the 
Trustees of the University have approved offering extension courses 
for university credit. Professors are sent out to centers within the 
state where there is a demand for classes to be formed. At present the 
courses offered will depend on the teaching schedules of the various 
departments. 



116 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

The title of the course is given in capital letters and small capital letters. The 
numeral designates the particular course. Odd numerals indicate courses offered in 
the first semester. Even numerals indicate courses offered in the second semester. 
Numerals enclosed in parenthesis indicate that a course is repeated in the semester 
following. Thus, course 1, (1) is offered in the first semester and is repeated in 
the second semester. 

Courses numbered 1-50 are open to undergraduates only. Courses numbered 
51-100 are open to undergraduates and graduate students. Courses numbered 
101-200 are for graduate students only. Courses numbered above 200 are open only 
to students in the Two Year Curriculum in Agriculture. 

Following the title of each course is the description of the work given and the 
name of the instructor. 

The next paragraph gives the following information in the order indicated: (1) 
prerequisites, if any; (2) the curricula in which the course is required and the 
undergraduate year in which it should be taken; (3) the number of hours of reci- 
tations or laboratory periods required each week; (4) the number of semester credits 
the course will count in the total required for graduation. Lectures and recitations 
are fifty minutes in length. Laboratory periods are two and one-half hours in length. 

All courses (unless otherwise marked) are open to students who have passed the 
prerequisites. 

An elective course will be given only when there is a minimum of five students 
registered therefor. 



ACCOUNTING 
(See Economics) 



AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Thomas G. Phillips, Professor 
Stanley R. Shimer, Assistant Professor 
Henry A. Davis, Assistant 
C. Kenneth Shuman, Assistant 

1. Agricultural Chemistry. An introduction to organic chemis- 
try and a brief survey of biological chemistry. Professor Phillips, 
Assistant Professor Shimer, and Mr. Shuman. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. Required of Sophomores in 
Agriculture. 3 lectures; 2 laboratories; 5 semester 
credits. 

2. Agricultural Chemistry. The chemistry of plant growth, soils 
and fertilizers. Professor Phillips and Mr. Davis. 

Prerequisite : Agricultural Chemistry 1 or its equivalent. 
Elective. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

117 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

4. Agricultural Chemistry. The chemistry of animal nutrition. 
Assistant Professor Shimer and Mr. Davis. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 1 or its equivalent. 
Elective. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

5. Organic and Biological Chemistry. An introduction to or- 
ganic chemistry and a brief survey of biological chemistry. Assistant 
Professor Shimer and Mr. Davis. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 2. Required of Juniors in Home 
Economics. 3 lectures ; 2 laboratories ; 5 semester credits. 

6. Chemistry of Food and Nutrition. The chemistry of food 
materials and of digestion, absorption, metabolism and excretion. 
Assistant Professor Shimer and Mr. Shuman. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 5 or its equivalent. 
Elective for Home Economics students. 2 lectures ; 1 lab- 
oratory; 3 semester credits. (Formerly 24-b) 

51, 52. Physiological Chemistry. The chemistry of fats, carbo- 
hydrates and proteins, colloids, enzyme action, digestion, metabolism 
and excretion. The qualitative and quantitative examination of blood 
and urine. Assistant Professor Shimer. 

Prerequisite : Satisfactory preparation in Organic Chem- 
istry and Quantitative Analysis. 3 lectures ; 2 labora- 
tories ; 5 semester credits. 

53, 54. Agricultural Analysis. A study of the methods of ana- 
lysis of soils, fertilizers, feeding stuffs, and other products important 
in agriculture. Professor Phillips and Assistant Professor Shimer. 

Prerequisite : Satisfactory preparation in Organic Chem- 
istry and Quantitative Analysis. 1 lecture ; 3 laboratories ; 
4 semester credits. 

55. Plant Chemistry. A study of the chemistry of plant growth 
and of methods for the analysis of plant materials. Professor Phillips. 

Prerequisite : Agricultural Chemistry 2. 2 lectures ; 2 
laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 

For courses primarily for graduate students, see Catalog of the 
Graduate School. 

118 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

M. Gale Eastman, Professor 

Harold C. Grinnell, Assistant Professor 

Perley F. Ayer, Instructor 

1. Rural Economics. History and economy in the development 
of rural living, with special emphasis on the relation of current public 
problems to the agricultural industry. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Required of Juniors in certain curricula. 2 lectures ; 2 
semester credits. 

3. Farm Accounting. A practical course in accounting methods 
as applied to the farm business. Inventories, records of receipts and 
expenses, farm cost accounts, and the interpretation of the summaries 
of these accounts vf\\\ be emphasized. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Required of Juniors in Animal Husbandry, General Agri- 
culture and Teacher Training. 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 

credits. 

4. Farm Management. Deals with the organization of the farm 
business from the point of view of efficiency and greatest continuous 
profit. Types of farming, factors affecting financial success, measures 
of financial success, cropping systems, livestock problems, labor prob- 
lems, etc. Practical problems in analyzing typical farm businesses and 
in the reorganization of at least one nearby farm. Assistant Professor 
Grinnell. 

Required of Seniors in Agriculture, except those regis- 
tered in Agricultural Chemistry, Botany, Entomology, 
Forestry and Poultry. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

5. Cooperative Marketing. The essential characteristics of co- 
operative development in this country, something of its present impor- 
tance, and the principles underlying sound organization. Types of 
cooperatives, legal phases and problems in corporation finance are 
emphasized. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Required of Seniors in Agriculture, except those regis- 
tered in Agricultural Chemistry, Botany, Entomology, 
Forestry and Poultry. Elective for other students. 2 
lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

119 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

7. Agricultural Statistics. An elementary course to acquaint 
the agricultural student with some every-day problems of chance in 
biological phenomena and to give him some immunity against snap 
judgments, and some basis for the interpretation of current research 
information. Professor Eastman. 

Elective for Seniors in Agriculture. 1 laboratory; 1 
semester credit. 

8. The Rural Community. A consideration of farming as a mode 
of life ; the attitudes, problems and satisfactions of rural people ; 
social institutions and human-relationship organizations, including 
Agricultural Extension. Lectures, reference work, and actual labora- 
tory demonstrations will be provided. The State Extension Staff will 
cooperate. Professor Eastman and Mr. Ayer. 

Required of Home Economics Extension and Agricul- 
tural Teacher-Training Seniors. Elective for other Agri- 
cultural Seniors. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester 
credits. 

51, 52. Special Agricultural Economics. Graduate or under- 
graduate credit to satisfy a student's needs may be obtained in this 
course in special cases by permission of the head of the department. 
Professor Eastman and Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Hours of meeting and number of credits to be arranged. 



AGRONOMY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Ford S. Prince, Professor 

Leroy J. HiGGiNS, Assistant Professor 

George M. Foulkrod^ Assistant Professor 

Agronomy 
1. Soils. A study of the nature and properties of soils, giving 
special consideration to the fundamental physical, chemical and bio- 

120 



AGRONOMY 

logical processes and characteristics of productive soils. The subject- 
matter will be of an introductory nature to serve all students in the 
College of Agriculture and will be fundamental for those who con- 
tinue in agronomy work. Laboratory work will put into application 
some of the more important principles considered in class. Assistant 
Professor Higgins. 

Required of Juniors in Agriculture, with a few excep- 
tions. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

2. Fertilizers. A study of the occurrence and function of plant 
food materials in soils and the use of manure and fertilizers in crop 
production. Special attention will be given to the production, care and 
preservation of manure, to the compounding of fertilizers, and the 
response of different types of crops to the several materials now used 
to stimulate crop production. Professor Prince. 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Chemistry 1. Required of 
Juniors in Agriculture, with a few exceptions. 2 lec- 
tures; 2 semester credits. 

3, 4. Crop Production. First semester comprises an introduction 
to the study of crops in general, considering distribution, choice, 
growth processes, cropping practices, preparation of seed beds, care, 
improvement and breeding. In the latter part of the semester root- 
crops and potatoes will be considered in detail. Second semester 
continues in more detail concerning forage, cereals, and other crops 
grown in New England. Laboratory work consists of practice in 
identification and judging. Hayland and pasture management will 
be emphasized. Assistant Professor Higgins. 

Prerequisite : Agronomy 3. Required of Juniors in Agri- 
culture, with a few exceptions. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 
3 semester credits. 

5. Soil Utilization. A study of the classification, utilization 
and management of soils, particularly those of New Hampshire. 
Available literature will be cited. Laboratory will consist of practical 
soil management and utilization problems, field trips and mapping. 
Assistant Professor Higgins. 

121 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite : Agronomy 1. Elective for Seniors. 1 lect- 
ure; 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 

6. Seed Testing. A study of the official method of analyzing agri- 
cultural seeds for purity and germination, involving studies in the 
identification of seeds, as well as the technique of using equipment 
in weighing, germinating, counting, estimating, etc., for official reports. 
Assistant Professor Higgins. 

Prerequisite : Botany 2 and Agronomy 4. Elective for a 
very limited number of Seniors. Hours arranged. 1 lab- 
oratory; 1 semester credit. 

7, 8. Agronomic Literature. A special study of literature relating 
to soils and crops. Designed to meet the needs of students interested 
in some phase of agronomy. Practice in looking up literature and in 
the preparation of reports and abstracts will be given. Professor 
Prince. 

Prerequisites: Agronomy 1, 2; 3, 4. Elective for Seniors. 
Number of credits to be arranged. 

Agricultural Engineering 

1. Basic Agricultural Engineering Applications. The entire 
field of agricultural engineering is covered in such a manner that the 
student will be familiar with the methods most commonly employed 
in solving every-day farm problems. Farm mechanics ; farm map- 
ping; farm water supply and sanitation; farm machinery and power 
applications ; farm drawing and sketching ; and types and purposes of 
farm buildings are covered in theory and demonstration. Assistant 
Professor Foulkrod. 

Elective for all Agricultural Freshmen and Sophomores. 
2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

2. Farm Power and Machinery. A study of the development of 
the farm tractor and its special tools, together with a complete review 
of the development of the machines at present available to the farmer, 
with special emphasis on those of economic importance in this section. 
Care, repair and adjustment will be carefully considered in the labora- 
tory, supplemented by operation under actual field conditions. As- 
sistant Professor Foulkrod. 

122 



AGRONOMY 

Prerequisite: Agricultural Engineering 1. Recommended 
for Seniors in General Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, 
Dairy Husbandry, and Poultry Husbandry. Elective for 
all other Agricultural Juniors and Seniors. 1 lecture; 1 
laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 

3. Electric Farm Power. A course embracing the comparative 
utility of individual plant and central station current; rural line ex- 
tension procedure ; proper wiring for farm applications with particu- 
lar emphasis on household, farmstead, dairying, poultry farm and 
horticultural uses. Special attention will be given the economics of 
various methods, cost of operation, care and maintenance of equip- 
ment, quality of results obtainable and effect on farm labor problem. 
Assistant Professor Foulkrod. 

Recommended for Seniors in Animal Husbandry, Dairy 
Husbandry, and Horticulture and Juniors in Poultry 
Husbandry. Elective for all other Agricultural Juniors 
and Seniors. 2 recitations; 1 laboratory; 3 semester 
credits. 

4. Agricultural Drawing. This course is designed to meet the 

needs of all agricultural students, and includes beside the elementary 

principles of drawing and lettering the application of these principles 

to the making of charts, graphs, maps, machines and shop sketches, 

as well as to plans for minor farm buildings. Assistant Professor 

Foulkrod. 

Recommended for all Sophomores in Agriculture. 1 lab- 
oratory; 1 semester credit. 

5. Farm Buildings and Equipment. The lectures on types and 
purposes of farm shelters, materials, equipment and sanitary require- 
ments will be paralleled by drafting room work in design and labora- 
tory work in construction, with special attention to remodeling exist- 
ing buildings. Assistant Professor Poulkrod. 

Prerequisite : Agricultural Engineering 4. Elective for all 
Juniors and Seniors in Agriculture. 1 lecture; 1 labora- 
tory; 2 semester credits. 

6. Farm Mechanics Shop. Planned to give the Teacher Training 

Senior the greatest amount of practice in farm mechanics in the 

shortest possible time ; to develop his skill with tools, and his general 

knowledge of farm mechanics applications. Assistant Professor 

Foulkrod. 

Required of Agricultural Teacher Training Seniors. 2 
laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

123 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

LoRiNG V. TmRELL, Projessov 

Carl L. Martin, Assistant Professor 

1. Types and Breeds of Livestock. A study of the different breeds 
of horses, cattle, sheep, and swine in respect to their origin, history, 
development, characteristics, and adaptability to different conditions 
of climate and soil. One afternoon each week is devoted to judging 
the different breeds. Professor Tirrell. 

Recommended for Freshmen in Agriculture. 2 lectures ; 
1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

2. Livestock Judging. The work consists of a study of the princi- 
ples and practice of judging horses, beef cattle, sheep and swine, and 
of the market classes and grades of horses and meat animals. The 
judging teams which represent the University at such expositions as 
the Eastern States at Springfield and the International at Chicago are 
selected from students taking courses 2 and 4. For a part of the lab- 
oratory work, trips are taken to some of the best breeding establish- 
ments in New England. Professor Tirrell. 

Prerequisite : Animal Husbandry 1. Required of Sopho- 
mores electing Animal Husbandry. 1 laboratory; 1 
semester credit. 

3. Feeds and Feeding. A study of the character, composition and 
digestibility of feedstuffs, and the methods of feeding different kinds 
of farm animals. Numerous samples of grains and by-products are 
used for the purpose of familiarizing the students with the different 
feedstuffs. Practice is given in calculating rations for various pur- 
poses. Professor Tirrell. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry, Dairy Hus- 
bandry, General and Teacher-Training curricula. 3 lec- 
tures ; 3 semester credits. 

4. Advanced Livestock Judging. This is a continuation of 2 and 
is open to students who have previously taken 2. Professor Tirrell. 

1 laboratory; 1 credit. 

5. 6. Veterinary Science. First semester comprises systematic 
anatomy of the different farm animals, animal physiology, and the 

124 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

prevention of animal diseases. This course is especially designed for 
the agricultural student to acquaint him with the anatomical structures 
of the domestic animals, the functions of the organs of the body, and 
preventive veterinary medicine. The second semester is devoted to a 
study of the more common diseases of farm animals, their prevention, 
and control. Assistant Professor Martin. 

Required of Juniors in Animal Husbandry. Elective for 
others. 3 lectures; 3 semester credits. 

7. Animal Breeding. A study of the principles and practices of 
breeding farm animals, including cross-breeding, in-breeding, selec- 
tion, inheritance, breed analysis, reproductive efficiency, fertility, ster- 
ility, Mendelism in relation to farm animals, acquired characters and 
variation. Practice is given in tracing and studying pedigrees. Pro- 
fessor Tirrell. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. 2 lectures; 
1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

8. Meat and Its Products; Livestock Markets. A study of 
meat, farm slaughter, curing and identification of cuts ; livestock mar- 
kets, stockyards and transportation. Occasional trips will be taken to 
slaughter houses and packing plants. Professor Tirrell. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures; 2 semester credits. 

9. Management of Horses and Beef Cattle. Lectures and recita- 
tions upon the care of brood mares and cows, management of stallions 
and bulls, the breaking and training of colts, preparation of animals 
for the show ring, the management of pure-bred beef herds, and the 
feeding and handling of steers. Professor Tirrell. 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

10. Sheep and Swine Husbandry. A consideration of the judg- 
ing, breeding, feeding, management and preparation for the show 
ring of sheep and swine, with special reference to New Hampshire 
conditions. Professor Tirrell. 

125 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

12. Animal Husbandry Seminar. Library and reference work 
and the preparation of papers on various animal husbandry subjects 
of timely importance. Professor Tirrell. 

Prerequisites : Animal Husbandry 3 and 7. Required of 
Seniors in Animal Husbandry. Elective for others. 1 
lecture; 1 semester credit. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Eric T. Huddleston, Professor 
Arnold Perreton, Assistant Professor 
George R. Thomas, Assistant Professor ,, 

2. Elements of Design. A lecture course introductory to the 
principles of architectural design, discussing modern building materi- 
als, the function and form of modern architectural elements such as 
walls, columns, roofs, doors, windows, interiors, moldings and orna- 
ment, etc., followed by a synthesis of their application and relation 
to architectural design. Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Elective by permission. Required of Freshmen in Archi- 
tecture. 2 recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

5, 6. History of Architecture. Lectures with assigned reading 
and sketches on the historical development of the different periods of 
architecture and an analysis of the chief contributions each period 
made toward a constructive and artistic advance in architectural ex- 
pression. Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Elective by permission. Required of Sophomores in 
Architecture. First semester : 2 recitations ; 2 semester 
credits. Second semester: 3 recitations; reports; 4 se- 
mester credits. 

9. Architectural Composition. Lectures on the analysis of the 
principles governing architectural design and methods of applying 
these principles to the current design course to achieve an architect- 
ural expression which reveals the intrinsic qualities that are present 
in every type of modern building. Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Required of Juniors in Architecture. 2 recitations ; 2 
semester credits. 

126 



ARCHITECTURE 

14. Domestic Architecture. Lectures and recitations devoted to 
a brief study of the history of domestic architecture with special em- 
phasis placed on early American housing as a basis for an appreciation 
of the New England Colonial architecture. Further study is given to 
modern housing problems, including the relation of the house plan to 
the individual site, to the garden, to accessory buildings, and to the 
community, with special consideration given to economy in design 
and material and the need for intelligent cooperation on the part of 
the prospective owner with the architect and builder. Professor Hud- 
dleston. 

Required of Juniors in Architecture. 2 recitations; 1 
laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

15. Professional Practice. Discussions and assigned reading 
covering the personal, ethical, business, and legal relations of the 
architect with clients, contractors, craftsmen, etc., and the relations 
that should exist between the architect and the community in which he 
lives; followed by studies of office procedure in the conduct of an 
architect's office, i.e., contract forms, bookkeeping, and accounting as 
they apply to his professional work. Professor Huddleston. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. 2 recitations; 2 
semester credits. 

16. Specifications and Appraising. A study of the fundamentals 
of specification writing and the preparation of an outline specification 
adapted to the requirements of the thesis problem designed by each 
student. Methods of estimating and appraising buildings, both before 
and after construction, will be studied. Professor Huddleston. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. 2 recitations; 2 
semester credits. 

19, 20. Building Construction. The principles of structural de- 
sign and an analysis of structural systems as applied to wood frame 
house construction, light and heavy timber construction, steel and re- 
inforced concrete construction. 



While emphasis is placed upon the principles involved in the selec- 
tion of structural systems in the solution of various types of building 
construction problems, detailed study is made of the practical methods 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

used in applying the various materials of construction as they occur 
in modern practice: excavations; foundations; plain and reinforced 
concrete ; waterproofing ; wood frame and heavy timber construction ; 
floor, wall, and partition construction in wood, masonry, and steel; 
brickwork and stone ; roofing and sheet metal ; millwork, stairs, plas- 
tering, etc.; and the introduction of the mechanical equipment for 
plumbing, heating, ventilating, and electrical systems. Professor 
Huddleston. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 30 and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 12. Required of Seniors in Architecture. 3 labora- 
tories ; 3 semester credits. 

21. Architectural Seminar. Library research and the prepara- 
tion of papers on approved subjects related to the thesis problems. 
Each student is required to present and lead the discussion on his sub- 
ject. Professor Huddleston. 

Required of Seniors in Architecture. 2 recitations; 2 

semester credits. 

24. Elements of Architecture. Drafting room exercises, pro- 
gressing in parallel with the lectures on Elements of Design (Archi- 
tecture 2). Instruction in the accepted methods of architectural draft- 
ing. Assistant Professor Thomas. 

Architecture 2 must be taken either in parallel or as a 
prerequisite. Elective by permission. Required of Fresh- 
men in Architecture. 2 laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

26. Shades, Shadows and Perspective. Determination of con- 
ventional shades and shadows as they occur in architectural drawings ; 
problems illustrating the architectural application of descriptive geom- 
etry; theory of perspective and practical construction of perspective 
drawings. Rendering in wash of problems illustrating light, shade, 
and shadow. Assistant Professor Thomas. 

Elective by permission. Required of Freshmen in Archi- 
tecture. 1 lecture; 2 laboratories; 3 semester credits. 

27, 28. Sophomore Architectural Design. A progressive series 
of competitive problems in the composition of architectural elements 
in exterior and interior design, with special emphasis given to the use 
of modern materials, and archeology, the subjects for which will be 
drawn from the parallel course in the History of Architecture (Archi- 
tecture 5, 6). Assistant Professors Perreton and Thomas. 

128 



ARCHITECTURE 

Prerequisite : Architecture 24 and 26. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Architecture. 6 laboratories ; 6 semester credits. 

29, 30. Junior Architectural Design. A progressive series of 
competitive problems in the application of the elements of architecture 
and the principles of architectural design to the design of modern 
buildings, taking into consideration the functional planning, charac- 
teristic composition, and decorative expression of residential, recrea- 
tional, commercial, and municipal buildings of contemporary town and 
small city scale. Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 28. Required of Juniors in 
Architecture. 6 laboratories; 6 semester credits. 

31, 32. Senior Architectural Design and Thesis. A practical 
course of building design to conform to the specified requirements 
such as are found in the architect's practice. The design and thesis 
includes a civic or residential development. From this will be taken a 
residence and public building, designed to conform to the specified 
requirements of hypothetical clients. This is followed by complete 
working drawings and details, including structural and equipment 
drawings to conform to the current architectural practice. Professor 
Huddleston and Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 30. Required of Seniors in 
Architecture. 6 laboratories; 6 semester credits. 

33, 34. Advanced Architectural Design. Either Class "A" Pro- 
ject problems issued by the Beaux Arts Institute of Design or an 
approved program proposed by the student will be used for advanced 
study in architectural design. Assistant Professor Perreton. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 30. Elective by permission 
only. Credits to be arranged. 

yi. Freehand Drawing. Studio exercises in graphical representa- 
tions designed to stimulate and develop the student's expression of 
creative thoughts. Original ideas will be guided through the process 
of development by criticism and suggestions only, the student being 
given perfect freedom for self-expression. Assistant Professor 
Thomas. 

Elective by permission. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

38. Freehand Drawing. Elementary drawing in charcoal from 
casts and architectural ornament, aiming at the stimulation and devel- 

129 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

opment of creative thought through the study of fundamental forms. 
Assistant Professor Thomas. 

Elective by permission. Required of Freshmen in Archi- 
tecture. 2 laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

39, 40. Freehand Drawing. Studio exercises from architectural 
details, cast ornament, and the cast figure in various media, with atten- 
tion to accurate reproduction of proportions, the principles of free- 
hand perspective, and the expression of mass by means of line and 
simple light and shade. Weather permitting, sketching from nature 
with special emphasis on tree and shrubbery forms. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Thomas. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 38. Elective by permission. 
Required of Sophomores in Architecture. 2 laboratories ; 
2 semester credits. 

41, 42. Water Coloring and Modeling. Exercises in the handling 
of wash; studies in water color from documents, photographs, and 
still life; supplemented with lectures presenting the theory of color, 
both scientific and aesthetic. Outdoor sketching, if weather permits. 
Exercises in modeling clay of historic architectural ornament, fol- 
lowed by original designs from programs. Assistant Professor 
Thomas. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 40. Elective by permission. 
Required of Juniors in Architecture. 1 lecture ; 2 labora- 
tories ; 3 semester credits. 

44. Model Making. To create further appreciation of three- 
dimensional design, a complete model of the senior thesis problem 
will be constructed. The model will be executed in the scale and man- 
ner of the type often presented by the architect to the prospective 
client in assisting him to interpret the various plans and elevations. 
Instruction in the construction of the various types of architectural 
models. Assistant Professor Thomas. 

Prerequisite: Architecture 42. Required of Seniors in 
Architecture. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

45, 46. Advanced Freehand Drawing. A general advanced study 
of special types, depending upon the student's previous training. The 

130 



BOTANY 

student will do a variety of work in the studio under individual super- 
vision and criticism. Assistant Professor Thomas. 

Special permission must be obtained from the head of the 
department before registering in this course. Hours and 
credits to be arranged. 



BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Ormond R. Butler, Professor 
Marian E. Mills, Assistant Professor 
Stuart Dunn, Instructor 
Lawrence W. Slanetz, Instructor 
Albion R. Hodgdon, Instructor 
Joseph Naghski, Assistant 

Botany 

1, 2. General Botany. A study of the seed-bearing plants with 
especial emphasis on the structure and functions of organs, followed 
by a general survey of the plant kingdom with especial emphasis 
upon development, reproduction and relationships. Evolution and 
heredity in plants. Assistant Professor Mills and Mr. Hodgdon. 

Prerequisite : Botany 1. Required of Freshmen in Agri- 
culture. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 2 laboratories ; 
4 semester credits. 

3. Plant Histology. Characterization and differentiation of plant 
tissues ; micro-technique. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite : Botany 2. Required of Juniors in Botany 
and certain Forestry students. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester 
credits. 

4, Plant Physiology. Structure and properties of the cell; ab- 
sorption and movement of water ; metabolism ; growth and irrita- 
bility. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisites : Botany 2 and one year of Chemistry. Re- 
quired of Juniors in Botany and Forestry, and of 
Seniors in Horticulture. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 
2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 

131 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

5. Plant Pathology. The bacterial and fungous diseases of 
plants, their symptoms, cause and prevention. Mr. Dunn. 

Prerequisite: Botany 2. Required of Juniors or Seniors 
in Botany and Horticulture. Elective for others. 1 lect- 
ure ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

52. Systematic Botany. A study of the higher plants of our 
native flora. The student is required to collect an herbarium of 60 
specimens. Assistant Professor Mills and Mr. Hodgdon. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1. Required of Seniors in Botany 
and certain Juniors in Forestry. Occasional lectures ; 
laboratory work ; field trips ; 2 semester credits. 

53, 54. Advanced Botany. The subject-matter will depend upon 
the training and desire of the student. It cannot be elected without 
previous consultation. Professor Butler, Assistant Professor Mills, 
and Mr. Dunn. 

Credits to be arranged. 

Bacteriology 

1. General Bacteriology. Morphology, physiology and classifica- 
tion of bacteria. The bacteriology of water, sewage, milk and foods. 
Relationships of bacteria to agriculture, home economics, and the 
arts and industries. Mr. Slanetz and Mr. Naghski. 

Prerequisite : One year of Inorganic Chemistry and Agri- 
cultural Chemistry 1 or its equivalent. Required of Home 
Economics Juniors and required of or elective for Jun- 
iors in various Agricultural curricula. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 

2. Applied Bacteriology. A study of infection and immunity ; im- 
portant pathogenic bacteria ; bacteriological and serological methods 
of disease diagnosis ; bacteriological analysis of water, milk, meat, 
and canned products ; antiseptics and disinfectants. Mr. Slanetz and 
Mr. Naghski. 

Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1. 2 lectures; 2 laboratories; 
4 semester credits. 

51, 52. Advanced Bacteriology. The subject-matter will depend 
upon the training and desire of the student. It cannot be elected with- 
out previous consultation. Mr. Slanetz. 
Credits to be arranged. 

132 



CHEMISTRY 

Harold A. Iddles, Professor 

Melvin M. Smith, Associate Professor 

Hem AN C Fogg, Associate Professor''^ 

James A. Funkhouser, Assistant Professor '^ " 

Richard H. Kimball, Assistant Professor 

Charles M. Mason, Assistant Professor ■ 

Albert F. Daggett, Instructor 

Kendrick S. French, Instructor 

Donald C. Gregg, Assistant 

Warren F. Peckham, Assistant 

Wilbur H. Miller, Assistant 

James W. Clapp, Assistant 

Herbert B. Cowden, Assistant 

Breakage. A breakage deposit is required in certain 
laboratory courses, from which the actual breakage is 
deducted. The deposit receipt must be presented to the 
instructor at the first class meeting. 

1, 2. General Chemistry. The course covers the fundamental 
laws and conceptions of chemistry, and includes a study of the non- 
metals and metals, together with their compounds. The theoretical 
principles are illustrated and explained by many lecture demonstra- 
tions, and the applications of chemistry in the professions are ex- 
plained. Associate Professor Smith, Assistant Professor Funkhouser, 
Assistant Professor Kimball, Mr. Daggett, Mr. French, and assistants. 

Elective for Liberal Arts students. Required of Fresh- 
men in the College of Technology, Freshmen in Agri- 
culture, and Sophomores in Home Economics. The class 
will be sectioned for those entering with credit and with- 
out credit in high school chemistry. 2 lectures ; 1 recita- 
tion ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

4. Inorganic Chemistry. This course is a continuation of Chem- 
istry 1 and covers the fundamental laws and conceptions of chemistry 
involved in a study of the non-metals and metals, together with their 
compounds. Facts and practical applications are given and the prin- 
ciples are explained and illustrated by demonstrations in the lectures. 
The course is designed for major students in chemistry. Professor 
Iddles, Associate Professor Smith and assistants. 

133 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Freshmen Majors in Chemistry. 2 lectures; 
1 recitation; 3 laboratories; 6 semester credits. 

21, 22. Introductory Analytical Chemistry. The first semestei 
is devoted to the study of qualitative analysis. The lectures present a 
discussion of the reactions and theories of solutions involved in the 
qualitative scheme of analysis. Problem work dealing with hydrogen 
ion concentration and solubility product is included. In the laboratory, 
a study is made of the technique necessary for the separation and 
identification of the more common metallic and acidic constituents. 
The second semester covers theory, problems and laboratory tech- 
nique necessary in gravimetric analysis and acidimetry and is designed 
for those who expect to continue with Chemistry 31, 32. Associate 
Professor Fogg and Mr. Daggett. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 2 or 4. Required of Sophomores 
in Chemistry; elective for others. 2 lectures; 2 labora- 
tories; 4 semester credits. Deposit: Ten dollars for the 
year. 

25, 26. Introductory Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis. 
The first semester covers the theory, problems and manipulation in- 
volved in some of the common procedures in quantitative analysis and 
includes work in both gravimetric and volumetric methods. More 
stress is placed on volumetric work than in course 21, 22 and includes 
acidimetry, the determination of pH, oxidation-reduction processes, 
etc. The work is designed particularly to meet the needs of pre- 
professional students and prospective teachers of chemistry in second- 
ary schools. The work of the second semester deals with qualitative 
analysis. The course seeks to acquaint the student with the theory, 
problems and laboratory technique necessary for the separation and 
identification of the more common metallic and acidic constituents. 
Associate Professor Fogg and Mr. Daggett. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. Elective for Pre-medical 
Sophomores ; elective for others to the limit of laboratory 
space. 1 lecture ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester credits. De- 
posit : Ten dollars for the year. 

31, 32. Quantitative Analysis. This is a continuation of Chem- 
istry 21, 22 and covers the theory, problems and methods involved in 
the determination of pH, precipitation reactions, oxidimetry, electro- 

134 



CHEMISTRY 

analysis, and colorimetry. The major portion of the second semester 
is devoted to a study of methods and apparatus used in the industrial 
field for the technical analysis of gas, fuel and oil. Throughout the 
course, an attempt is made to present modern trends and newer pro- 
cedures in quantitative analysis. Associate Professor Fogg. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 22. Required of Juniors in 
Chemistry ; elective for others. 2 lectures ; 3 labora- 
tories ; 5 semester credits. Deposit : Ten dollars for the 
year. 

47, 48. Organic Chemistry. The lectures deal with the principal 
classes of organic compounds, aliphatic and aromatic, with emphasis 
upon class reactions and structural theory. In the laboratory, the 
preparation and purification of a selected number of organic com- 
pounds is carried on. The latter part of the laboratory work involves 
the use of group reactions for the identification of organic substances 
in a systematic scheme of qualitative organic analysis. Professor 
Iddles. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 22. Required of Juniors in 
Chemistry ; not an elective course. 3 lectures ; 2 labora- 
5 semester credits. Deposit: Ten dollars for the year. ' 

53, 54. Organic Chemistry. The lectures consider the chief divi- 
sions of organic chemistry, aliphatic and aromatic. These are consid- 
ered with the needs of the pre-professional student in mind and are 
followed by a more detailed consideration of carbohydrates and pro- 
teins. The laboratory course is designed to develop the technique of 
organic chemical methods as illustrated in the preparation and puri- 
fication of typical organic compounds. Assistant Professor Funk- 
houser. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 1, 2 and Chemistry 26 when pos- 
sible. Elective for Liberal Arts students. Required of 
Junior Pre-medical students. 3 lectures ; 2 laboratories ; 
5 semester credits. Deposit : Ten dollars for the year. 

55, 56. Theoretical Problems of Modern Organic Chemistry, 
A consideration of the principles underlying the behavior of organic 
compounds, and the problems awaiting solution. The first semester 
includes such topics as free radicals, the nature of organic linkages, 
unsaturated compounds including conjugated systems, polymerization 

135 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

and tautomerism. The first portion of the second semester is devoted 
to a discussion of cyclic compounds and the benzene problem ; the 
major portion to stereochemistry, including stereoisomerism, ring 
formation, and steric hindrance. Assistant Professor Kimball. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 48 or 54. Elective for Seniors 
in Chemistry. 3 lectures ; 3 semester credits. 

61, 62. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. The lectures of 
this course treat with the structure and properties of matter as devel- 
oped from studies of radioactivity, atomic structure, crystal structure, 
etc. With these as a foundation the course develops the relations 
between elements as they occur in the periodic arrangement. Werner's 
theory of complex compounds is considered at the close of the year. 
An effort is made to develop the historical background of all these 
topics as they are discussed. Assistant Professor Funkhouser. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 22. Required of Juniors in 
Chemistry ; elective for others. 2 lectures ; 2 semester 
credits. 

71, 72. Industrial Chemistry. This course consists of a study of 
inorganic chemical processes, organic chemical processes and some of 
the unit processes of chemical engineering. Professor Iddles and 
Assistant Professor Mason. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 32 and 48. Required of Sen- 
iors in Chemistry. 3 lectures ; 3 semester credits. 

41, 42. Elementary Physical Chemistry. This course is devoted 
to those topics in physical and theoretical chemistry which have appli- 
cation in such medical work as physiology, bacteriology, and in 
other branches of biological science and agriculture. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mason. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 2, Elementary Physics, and 
some training in college mathematics. 2 lectures; 2 
semester credits. 

83, 84. Physical Chemistry. This course will take up the general 
principles of chemistry from the quantitative standpoint. It will in- 
clude a study of the properties of gases, liquids and solids. The prin- 
ciples of thermodynamics will be presented and their application to 
chemistry discussed. These will be used as a basis for the study of 
solutions, ionic theory, chemical equilibria, thermo-chemistry, con- 

136 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

ductance, and electromotive force. The experiments in the laboratory 
will include accurate measurements illustrating the principles studied 
in the lectures. Problems will be assigned for solution by the student. 
Assistant Professor Mason. 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 32, Mathematics 8, Physics 8. 
Required of Seniors in Chemistry. 3 lectures ; 2 labora- 
tories ; 5 semester credits. Deposit : Ten dollars for the 
year. 

87, 88. Thesis, Bibliography and Seminar. The thesis time is 
devoted to some selected subject, and the student is required to present 
a thesis covering the related background and experimental observa- 
tions of his year's investigation. In one class meeting a week a dis- 
cussion designed to aid the student in the use of the chemical library 
is presented. Actual problems are assigned requiring the use of vari- 
ous chemical journals, dictionaries, reference books and other sources 
of information on chemical subjects. Following this section of work 
the class period is devoted to individual student reports on recent 
topics of interest in chemistry. Members of the staff. 

For Seniors in Chemistry who have completed Chemistry 
32 and 48. 1 lecture ; 5 laboratories ; 7 semester credits. 
Deposit : Ten dollars for the year. 

For courses primarily for graduate students, see Catalog of the 

Graduate School. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Edmond W. Bowler, Professor ^""'^ 
Russell R. Skelton, Associate Professor ^-"""^^ 
Charles O. Dawson, Instructor ^' 
William J. Locke, Assistant 

1. Surveying. The theory and use of surveying instruments and 
methods, including measurement of angles, direction and distance, 
differential and profile leveling, trigonometric and stadia leveling, note 
keeping, stadia surveys, land surveying, calculations and plotting re- 
lating to traverses, and topographic surveying, mapping and drawing. 
Mr. Dawson and Mr. Locke. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 2. Required of Sophomores In 
Civil Engineering. 2 recitations ; 4 laboratories ; 6 semes- 
ter credits. 

137 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

2. Surveying. Further theory and use of surveying instruments 
and methods, including the plane table, city surveying, observations on 
the sun and polaris for latitude, longitude, time and azimuth, highway 
and railway curves, adjustment of surveying instruments, and the 
solution of miscellaneous problems in plane and topographic survey- 
ing. Mr. Dawson and Mr. Locke. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 1. 1 recitation ; 3 labora- 
tories; 4 semester credits. 

4. Location Surveying and Earthwork. Theory and practice re- 
lating to location surveys as applied to preliminary surveys for high- 
ways, railroads, bridges, pipe lines and sewer lines. Theory and 
problems in earthwork, including earthwork computation, cross- 
sectioning, slope stakes, vertical curves, and mass diagram method of 
distribution. A field survey is made to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of location. Associate Professor Skelton. 

Prerequisites : Civil Engineering 1 and Civil Engineering 
2, either in parallel or as a prerequisite. Required of 
Sophomores in Civil Engineering. 1 recitation ; 1 labora- 
tory; 2 semester credits. 

5, 6. Location Surveying and Mapping. The completion of the 
field survey started in Civil Engineering 4 ; from these notes a map is 
prepared. A paper location is projected on the map, from which stud- 
ies are made towards a final location. The final location is made in the 
field during the second semester, involving: the establishment of the 
center line for about one mile of highway, the taking of cross section 
notes, additional topography, and staking out structures. Associate 
Professor Skelton. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 4. Required of Juniors 
in Civil Engineering. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

7. Surveying. The theory and use of surveying instruments and 
methods on plane surveys, including measurement of angles, direction 
and distance, differential and profile leveling, calculations relating to 
traverses, and observations on the sun for direction. Mr. Dawson. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 6 or 22. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Forestry. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

8. Surveying. The theory and use of surveying instruments and 
methods in topographic surveying and mapping, including a topo- 

138 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

graphic survey of a small area in the field and the plotting of a 
topographic map of the same area in the drafting room, and observa- 
tions on the polaris for direction. Mr. Dawson. 

Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 7. Required of Sopho- 
mores in Forestry. 2 laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

9, (9). Surveying. Theory and use of the tape, transit and level 
in making plane surveys with computations and drafting exercises 
necessary to plot field notes. Professor Bowler and Mr. Locke. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. Required of Sophomores 
in Electrical Engineering during first semester and of 
Sophomores in Mechanical Engineering during second 
semester. 1 recitation; 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 

16. Engineering Materials. This course is arranged to acquaint 
the student with the methods of manufacture, physical properties 
and the application of the various materials in engineering use, 
including timber, steel, stone, brick, cement, concrete, gravel and bi- 
tuminous materials. Associate Professor Skelton. 

Prerequisites : Geology 7 and Mechanical Engineering 
10, either in parallel or as prerequisites. Required of 
Juniors in Civil Engineering. 2 recitations ; 2 semester 
credits. 

22. Hydraulics. A study of the principles of hydrostatics and 
hydrokinetics, including the laws governing static pressures, the flow 
of water through orifices, tubes, nozzles, weirs, pipe lines and open 
channels, the dynamic action of jets and streams and fluid flow in 
pipes. This course includes laboratory exercises in hydraulic machin- 
ery and in stream gaging. Professor Bowler. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 9. Required of 
Juniors in Civil Engineering. 3 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 
4 semester credits. 

23. Hydraulics. Fundamental principles of hydrostatics and hy- 
drokinetics. A study of fluid pressures, hydraulic gauges and meters, 
flow through pipes, tubes, orifices and nozzles, flow over weirs, flow in 
open channels, and the dynamic action of jets and streams. Mr. Daw- 
son. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 9, either in paral- 
lel or as a prerequisite. Required of Seniors in Electrical 
Engineering. 2 recitations; 2 semester credits. 

139 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

24. Hydraulics. Fundamental principles of hydrostatics and hy- 
drokinetics. A study of fluid pressure and fluid flow, hydraulic gauges 
and meters, flow through pipes, tubes, orifices and nozzles, flow over 
weirs, flow in open channels, the dynamic action of jets and streams, 
and the theory of tangential and reaction turbines. Mr. Dawson. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 7. Required of 
Juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 3 recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

27, 28. Theory of Structures. The graphical and analytical meth- 
ods of determining reactions, moments and shears in beams, girders 
and trusses under fixed and moving loads and the stresses in various 
structures including simple, subdivided and multiple trusses, portals, 
viaducts, cantilevers and three-hinged arches. The computation of 
deflections and the application of the method of least work to statically 
indeterminate structures. Professor Bowler. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 8, and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 9 and 10 as prerequisites or in parallel. Required of 
Juniors in Civil Engineering. 3 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 
4 semester credits. 

31. Highway Engineering and Transportation. A detailed study 
of the economics of location and design of highways and city streets, 
the methods of construction, maintenance and the specifications 
governing the various types of surfaces, and the administration and 
financing of our highway system. Special emphasis is given to the 
study of highway transportation. The subject is presented by means 
of lectures, recitations, field location, and the complete design of a 
section of highway. Associate Professor Skelton. 

Prerequisites : Civil Engineering 6 and Civil Engineering 
16. Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering. 2 recita- 
tions ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 

32. Transportation Engineering. A course embracing a study 
of the transportation forms, methods and facilities of land, water 
and air carriers, with emphasis on the various problems incidental 
to operation, engineering development, and the influence of trans- 
portation on our national growth. This course includes a brief 
study of railroad construction and maintenance from an engineering 
viewpoint, and is presented by lectures, recitations, problems and 
assigned reading. Associate Professor Skelton. 

140 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 31. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. 2 recitations; 1 laboratory; 3 
semester credits. 

33, 34. Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering. A study of water 
power engineering, water supply and purification and sewerage and 
sewage disposal. This course covers precipitation, water losses, run- 
off, drainage areas, stream flow, water power estimates, hydraulic tur- 
bines, dams and water ways ; the sources, quantity, quality and sani- 
tary aspects of public water supplies ; the methods of purification and 
distributing systems ; the theory and problems of sewerage, the prin- 
ciples governing the disposal of sewage and the various methods of 
sewage treatment. This course consists of lectures, recitations, com- 
putations, reports and problems of design. Professor Bowler and Mr, 
Locke. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 22. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. 3 recitations; 1 laboratory; 4 

semester credits. 

35. Structural Design. Theory and problems relating to the de- 
sign of steel and timber structures. A steel girder and steel roof truss 
are completely designed and working drawings prepared. Individual 
parts of steel bridge trusses and buildings are studied and designed. 
Emphasis is placed on economy of design, accuracy of results, clarity 
of vision and analytical thought. Associate Professor Skelton. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 28. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. 2 recitations; 2 laboratories; 4 

semester credits. 

36. Reinforced Concrete Structures. A course arranged to cover 
with equal emphasis the theory and design of reinforced concrete 
structures, such as beams, slabs, columns, footings, retaining walls 
and small bridges. The problems relating to construction are studied 
together with problems illustrating the theory. Associate Professor 
Skelton. 

Prerequisite : Civil Engineering 35. Required of Seniors 
in Civil Engineering. 2 recitations; 2 laboratories; 4 
semester credits. 

38. Thesis. The student selects a subject of engineering, scientific 
or commercial interest for investigation or design. The results of his 

141 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

studies are presented as a thesis in which equal emphasis is placed 
upon composition and accuracy of subject-matter. The student con- 
fers with a member of the department each week for discussion of 
progress and for guidance in study. Departmental standards for form 
of presentation are strictly followed. Professor Bowler, Associate 
Professor Skelton and Mr. Dawson. 

Prerequisite: English 81. Required of Seniors in Civil 
Engineering. 1 conference each week; 2 semester 
credits. 

41, 42, 43, 44. Student Chapter of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. Junior and Senior students in Civil Engineering 
are required to join the student chapter of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers. In addition to the ordinary life of the student chap- 
ter which is carried on under the guidance of the student officers, the 
chapter meets once a week under the direction of an instructor. These 
meetings consist chiefly of the presentation of prepared addresses by 
the student members. Professor Bowler and Associate Professor 
Skelton. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Civil Engineering. 
No Credit. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Kenneth S. Morrow, Professor 
Herbert C. Moore, Assistant Professor 

2. Fundamentals of Dairying. A general survey of the dairy 
industry, with definite study of the composition and properties of 
milk and other dairy products, dairy manufacturing processes, and 
market milk; the selection and judging of dairy cattle. Professor 
Morrow and Assistant Professor Moore. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen or Sophomores in 
Agriculture not specializing in Dairy Husbandry. 2 lec- 
tures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

3. Dairy Cattle. A study of pure-bred dairy cattle; breed his- 
tory ; pedigrees ; family lines and methods of outstanding breeders ; 
the application of the principles of genetics to the improvement of 
dairy cattle; herd analysis. Professor Morrow. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. 2 lectures ; 1 
laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

142 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

4. Milk Production. A study of the feeding and management of 
dairy animals; calf feeding; raising young stock; feeding for eco- 
nomical milk production. Professor Morrow. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. 2 lectures ; 1 
laboratory ; 3 semester credits. * 

5. Market Milk. A study of the producing, handling, and dis- 
tributing of market and certified milk ; dairy farm inspection ; control 
of milk supply. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. 2 lectures; 1 
laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

6. Ice Cream. A study of the making, handling, and marketing of 
ice cream and ices. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. 2 lectures ; 1 
laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

7. Butter and Cheese. (1) A study of the secretion and of the 
chemical and physical properties of milk; pasteurization; cream ripen- 
ing ; starters ; churning ; organization and operation of factories. 
(2) A study of the manufacturing and marketing of more important 
types of cheese. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Required of Juniors in Dairy Husbandry. 1 lecture; 1 

laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 

9. Domestic Dairying. Nutritive value of milk, market milk, 
modified milk, certified milk, condensed milk, milk powder, fermented 
milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. Laboratory exercises are given 
in the manufacture of dairy products. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors in Home Economics and 
Liberal Arts curricula. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

10. Dairy Bacteriology. A study of the methods of bacteriolog- 
ical analysis of milk and its products ; relation of bacteria to milk and 
its products ; study of effect of bacteria in milk on separation, clarifi- 
cation, pasteurization, aeration, and straining; and the application of 
bacteriological principles to the dairy industry. Assistant Professor 
Moore, 

143 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Bacteriology 1. Required of Juniors in 
Dairy Husbandry. 2 lectures ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester 
credits. 

12. Dairy Seminar. Studies of experiment station and other lit- 
erature covering the field of dairy husbandry. Professor Morrow. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. Elective for 
other students. 1 lecture; 2 semester credits. 

13, 14. Dairy Cattle and Dairy Products Judging. (1) The 
comparative judging of dairy cattle. Animals in the college herd and 
in nearby herds will be judged. (2) The various standards and grades 
of dairy products will be studied. Practice will be given in judging 
milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream. 

Cattle judging given first half of fall semester and last half of 
spring semester; products judging alternates with this schedule. Stu- 
dents interested in competing for places on college judging teams 
should elect this course. Professor Morrow and Assistant Professor 
Moore. 

Prerequisite : Dairy Husbandry 13. Required of Juniors 
in Dairy Husbandry. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

16. Advanced Dairy Science. Basic data, fundamental observa- 
tions, and discussions of research contributing to the present status of 
the dairy industry. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Required of Seniors in Dairy Husbandry. Elective for 
other students who have adequate preparation in chemis- 
try and bacteriology. 2 lectures; 2 semester credits. 

ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

Harry W. Smith, Professor 
Arthur W. Johnson, Associate Professor 
Norman Alexander, Associate Professor 
John D. Hauslein, Assistant Professor 
Ruth J. Woodruff, Assistant Professor 
Clair W. Swonger, Assistant Professor 
♦Carroll M. Degler, Assistant Professor 
Ruth C. Adams, Instructor 
Irving R. Hobby, Instructor 

• Leave of absence, 1936-37. 

144 



ex 



ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 
Economics 

Students majoring in Economics are expected to take Economics 1 
and 2. 

History, Philosophy and American Government will be approved as 
related work for a major in Economics. 

1, 2. Principles of Economics. The fundamental principles which 
:plain the organization and operation of the economic system. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. Required of General 
Business students. Elective for other Sophomores, Jun- 
iors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

3. Economic and Commercial Geography. The economic aspects 
of geography. The sources and methods of production of the world's 
staple commodities. The influence of physical environment on eco- 
nomic, commercial, and financial development of Europe. Assistant 
Professor Swonger. 

Required of General Business students. Elective for 
Sophomores. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

4. Economic and Commercial Development of the United 
States. The economic, commercial, and financial development of the 
United States. Professor Smith and Assistant Professor Degler. 

Required of General Business students. Elective for 
Sophomores. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

5. Economic and Commercial Development of Europe. The eco- 
nomic, commercial, and financial development of Europe. Assistant 
Professor Degler. 

Elective for Sophomores. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. (Not given In 1937-38) 

51. Labor Problems. This course deals with the historical back- 
ground and present status of labor organizations and problems. Pro- 
fessor Smith. 

Prerequisite : Economics 2. Required of General Busi- 
ness students. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

52. Public Finance. This course presents the theory and practice 

145 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

of public expenditures and collection of public revenues. It empha- 
sizes changed tendencies and policies in taxation reform. Particular 
attention will be given to taxation problems in the State of New 
Hampshire. Professor Smith. 

Prerequisite : A satisfactory average in 12 semester cred- 
its in Economics. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

11. Transportation. This course gives an account of the develop- 
ment and organization of transportation agencies. Professor Smith. 

Prerequisite : Economics 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

12. International Trade. The basic theories of international 
trade, foreign exchange and international payments. 

Prerequisite : Economics 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

53, 54. Money and Banking. The theory and practice of money 
and banking. Assistant Professor Swonger. 

Prerequisite : Economics 2. 13 prerequisite for 14. Re- 
quired of General Business students. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

55. Corporations. The development and forms of business organi- 
zation and combination. Assistant Professor Degler. 

Prerequisite : Economics 2. Elective for Juniors and Sen- 
iors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

56. Corporation Finance. The methods of financing corporate 
enterprise. Assistant Professor Swonger. 

Prerequisite: Economics 15. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

21, 22. Commercial Law. The law of contracts, agency, sales, and 
negotiable instruments. Associate Professor Alexander. 

Required of General Business students. Elective for 
Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

23. Public Regulation of Business. A study of the federal con- 
trol of business organizations and their activities with special refer- 
ence to anti-trust legislation. Associate Professor Alexander. 

146 



FXONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

Prerequisite: Economics 2. Required of General Busi- 
ness students. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lect- 
ures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

24. Marketing. The economics of the marketing functions, agen- 
cies, and special problems of marketing. Assistant Professor Degler. 

Prerequisite: Economics 2. Required of General Busi- 
ness students. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lect- 
ures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

57, 58. History of Economics. It is the aim of this course to pre- 
sent a critical account of the development of economic thought in the 
leading nations of the Western world ; to study the economic systems 
of Greece, Rome, medieval and modern Europe, including the man- 
orial, guild, mercantile, kameralistic, physiocratic, laissez faire, class- 
ical, historical and socialistic systems ; and to indicate the important 
relations of economic philosophy to historical, political and social 
environment. Professor Smith. 

Prerequisite : Senior standing and a satisfactory average 
in 12 semester credits in Economics. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

59, 60. Seminar in Current Economic Problems. Professor 

Smith. 

Elective for Seniors majoring in Economics who have 
attained a satisfactory average in the department. Reci- 
tations and reports ; 3 semester credits. 

Service Courses 

Economics 45, 46 ; 47, 48 are service courses for the Col- 
lege of Technology. 

45. Business Organization and Finance. Assistant Professor 
Swonger. 

For Juniors in the College of Technology only. 2 lectures 
or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

46. Public Regulation of Industry. Associate Professor 
Alexander. 

For Juniors in the College of Technology only. 2 lectures 
or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

147 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

47, 48. Economic History of the Working Classes. Professor 
Smith. 

For Juniors in the College of Technology only. 1 lecture 
or recitation; 1 semester credit. 

ACCOUNTING 

Note. — Students who have completed two or more years 
of bookkeeping in preparatory school will be permitted to 
register for Intermediate Accounting (3, 4) upon passing 
an examination covering the material of Elementary Ac- 
counting (1, 2). 

Schedule the following courses as Acct. 1, etc. 

1, 2. Elementary Accounting. A thorough study of the basic 
principles and theory of accounting. Extensive practice in accounting 
problems of the single proprietorship and partnership types of busi- 
ness organization. Assistant Professor Hauslein. 

Prerequisite: 1 prerequisite for 2. Required of General 
Business Sophomores. Elective for other Sophomores, 
Juniors and Seniors. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 labora- 
tories ; 4 semester credits. 

3, 4. Intermediate Accounting. This course is designed to follow 
2, continuing with the work in partnerships, followed by a compre- 
hensive study of corporation accounting. Extensive practice work in 
handling problems of corporation accounting. Associate Professor 
Johnson. 

Prerequisite: 3 prerequisite for 4. Required of General 
Business Juniors. Elective for students who have com- 
pleted Accounting 2 or its equivalent. See note above. 
2 lectures or recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester 
credits. 

5, 6. Advanced Accounting. Advanced theory of accounting and 
extensive practice in solving problems involving such theory. Study 
of Federal Income Tax law and the accounting procedure in connec- 
tion therewith. Practice in computing income tax returns. Associate 
Professor Johnson. 

Prerequisite : 5 prerequisite for 6. Elective for students 
who have completed Accounting 4 or its equivalent. 2 
lectures or recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits, 

148 



ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING 

7, 8. Cost Accounting. The relation of cost accounting to general 
accounting. The place of cost accounting in modern business. Study 
of types of cost systems and their application to particular lines of 
business. Careful analysis of methods of computing costs. Effect of 
recent Federal legislation on cost accounting. Associate Professor 
Johnson. 

Prerequisite: 7 prerequisite for 8. Elective for students 
who have completed Accounting 4 or its equivalent. 2 
lectures or recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 

SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Schedule the following courses as Shorthand 1, etc., and 
Typewriting 7, etc. 

1, 2. Shorthand. A thorough study of the fundamental princi- 
ples of Gregg shorthand. Miss Adams. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. Required of Secretar- 
ial students. 5 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

3, 4. Shorthand and Office Practice. This is an advanced 
course in shorthand. The second semester will combine the work of 
the second semester of Advanced Typewriting with laboratory pro- 
jects in which shorthand, typing, filing, mailing, mimeographing, and 
other modern office projects that will furnish valuable secretarial ex- 
perience will be directed and supervised. Miss Adams. 

Prerequisite : Shorthand 2, or the equivalent. 3 prerequi- 
site for 4. Required of Secretarial students. 5 lectures, 
recitations, or laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. Typewriting. This course includes keyboard drill, practice 
in tabulating, setting up letters and business forms. Miss Adams. 

Prerequisite : 7 prerequisite for 8. Required of Secretar- 
ial students. 5 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

9, 10. Typewriting. Transcription of shorthand notes. Typing 
of legal and technical forms, etc. To be taken only in conjunction 
with Shorthand 3, 4. For second semester, see description of Short- 
hand 4. Miss Adams. 

Prerequisite : 9 prerequisite for 10. Required of Secre- 
tarial students. 5 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

149 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EDUCATION 

A. Monroe Stovve, Professor 

Harlan M. Bisbee, Associate Professor 

Gladys MacPhee^ Assistant 



Helen F. McLaughlin, Fro/^j^or (Home Economics-Education) 
LuciNDA P. Smith, Associate Professor (English-Education) 
Walter E. Wilbur, Associate Professor (Mathematics-Education) 
Margaret R. Hoban, Assistant Professor (Physical Education) 
John A. Floyd, Instructor (French-Education) 
*Earl H. Little, Instructor (Agriculture-Education) 

The purpose of the courses in Education is to unite and correlate 
the forces of the University which contribute to the preparation of 
educational leaders in teaching and supervision in the secondary 
schools. 

Freshmen who plan to complete the University Teacher Training 
Curriculum in the teaching of history or social studies should elect 
European History (History 3, 4). 

Prospective teachers, in order to be certified for cadet teaching, 
must complete the following courses in Education with a grade of at 
least 75 in each course: Education 41, 42; 51, 52; and 61 or (61). 

Since the State requires each candidate for certification to be pre- 
pared to teach three subjects which are referred to as "teaching 
major" and first and second ^'teaching minors," the University 
Teacher Training Curriculum requires the prospective teacher to 
complete satisfactorily 24 semester credits in a teaching major, 12 
semester credits in a first teaching minor, and at least 12 semester 
credits in a second teaching minor. 

Majors in other departments may complete their preparation for 
teaching by organizing their work so as to include the education 
courses and the teaching major and minors described in the Univer- 
sity Teacher Training Curriculum. (See page 104) 

41, 42. Psychological Principles of Secondary Education. The 
purpose of this course in educational psychology is to help students 
acquire an appreciative understanding of important principles of 
human behavior, of the educational needs of adolescents, and of the 
most effective ways of meeting those needs. Professor Stowe. 

* Representing the State Department of Education in the administration of the 
Smith-Hughes Act. 

150 



EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: 41 prerequisite for 42. Open to Sopho- 
mores. Required of students completing the University 
Teacher Training Curriculum. 3 class meetings ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

45, (45). New Hampshire State Program of Studies and School 
Law. a study of the aims and purposes, the plan of organization and 
administration of the secondary school as outlined in the New Hamp- 
shire State Program of Studies and School Law. Associate Professor 
Bisbee. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. Preparatory for the State 
Examinations in Secondary Program and in School Law. 
2 class meetings; 2 semester credits. 

51, 52. Social Principles of Secondary Education. This course 
in educational sociology and secondary education is devoted to a con- 
sideration of the educationally significant aspects and needs of our 
modern democratic society and to a study of the organization, func- 
tions, curricula and outstanding problems of our American institutions 
of secondary education. Professor Stowe. 

Prerequisite: Education 41, 42. 51 prerequisite for 52. 
Required of students completing the University Teacher- 
Training Curriculum. 3 class meetings ; 3 semester 
credits. 

61, (61). Principles and Problems of Teaching in the Second- 
ary School. This course is devoted to a study of the following aspects 
of teaching in secondary schools: (1) Secondary school objectives 
and the objectives in the teaching of secondary school subjects; (2) 
principles of teaching and of directing learning incorporated in teach- 
ing which meets the needs of high school students and attains the 
objectives of the secondary school; (3) secondary school tests and 
the ways in which teachers are endeavoring to ascertain the extent 
to which their objectives are being attained; (4) class management, 
the purpose of which is to insure conditions favorable to the attain- 
ment of the objectives of the secondary school. Associate Professor 
Bisbee. 

Prerequisite: Education 41, 42. Required of students 
completing the University Teacher Training Curricu- 
lum. 3 class meetings; 3 semester credits. 

151 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

71, 72. History of Education. Students who are interested are 
advised to elect History 53, 54. (Not given in 1937-38) 

75. Democracy in Education and Character Development. 
This course will discuss student participation in high school control ; 
social functions ; the underlying principles of club work ; the problem 
of character education and a discussion of the moral standards in our 
high schools as revealed by investigations. Associate Professor Bisbee. 

Prerequisite: Education 41, 42. 3 class meetings; 3 
semester credits. 

76. Philosophy of Education. A consideration of the fundamen- 
tal concepts and ultimate objectives of education, current educational 
doctrines and controversies, changes in educational procedures, his- 
toric background and philosophical implications. Associate Professor 
Bisbee. 

Prerequisite: Education 51, 52. 3 class meetings; 3 
semester credits. 



COURSES in problems IN THE TEACHING OF HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS 

fThe following courses in professionalized subject-matter are de- 
voted to a study of problems of objectives, selection and organization 
of subject-matter, teaching and testing techniques and classroom man- 
agement in the teaching of the respective subjects. A student desir- 
ing to do supervised teaching must complete with a grade of at least 
75 one of these courses in the subject in which he hopes to do su- 
pervised teaching. 

Agriculture-Education (Ag-Ed) 92. Problems in the Teach- 
ing OF High School Agriculture. Mr. Little. 

Required of Seniors taking the Agricultural Teacher- 
Training Curriculum, and open only to those students. 
The equivalent of 2 class meetings ; 2 semester credits. 

t For details concerning prerequisites and nature of these courses, see descrip- 
tions given under respective subject-matter departments. 

152 



EDUCATION 

English-Education (Eng-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching 
OF High School English. Associate Professor Smith. 

3 class meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

French-Education (Fr-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching of 
High School French. Mr. Floyd. 

3 class meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

Home Economics-Education (HE-Ed) 91. Problems in the 
Teaching of High School Home Economics. Professor McLaugh- 
lin. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher 
Training and Extension Curricula. 3 class meetings ; 3 
semester credits. 

Mathematics-Education (Math-Ed) 91. Problems in the 
Teaching of High School Mathematics. Associate Professor 
Wilbur. 

3 class meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

Physical Education (P-E) 91, 92. Problems in the Teaching of 
Physical Education for Women. Assistant Professor Hoban. 

3 class meetings ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester credits. 
*Biology-Education (Bi-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching of 
High School Biology. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students who have satis- 
factorily completed one year of college biology and 
Education 61, or 141-a, 142-b, or 40-c. Required of stu- 
dents who desire to do supervised teaching in biology. 
3 class meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

*Chemistry-Education (Ch-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching 
OF High School Chemistry. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students who have had 
two years of college chemistry and have satisfactorily 
completed Education 61, 141-a, 142-b, or 40-c. Required 
of students who desire to do supervised teaching in 
Chemistr3\ 3 class meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

♦Physics-Education (Ph-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching 
OF High School Physics. 

* Not offered in 1937-1938, but offered in the summer session. 

153 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Open to Seniors and graduate students who have satis- 
factorily completed one year of college physics and Edu- 
cation 61, or 141-a, 142-b, or 40-c. Required of students 
who desire to do supervised teaching in physics. 3 class 
meetings ; 3 semester credits. 

History-Education (Hist-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching 
OF High School History. 

Open to Seniors and graduate students who have satis- 
factorily completed the following courses : History 7, 8 ; 
Political Science 1, 2; either Economics 1, 2 or 4; and 
Education 61. Required of all students who desire to do 
supervised teaching in history. 3 class meetings ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 



courses in suPER\asED teaching 

The work in supervised teaching is under the direction of the Pro- 
fessor and Associate Professor of Education serving as Director and 
the Associate Director of Student Teaching. Students teach under the 
general direction of the members of the University instructional staff 
conducting the courses in problems of teaching the various school 
subjects. Students teach under the immediate direction of selected 
classroom teachers in high schools approved by the University. 

In the supervised .teaching courses the student participates in the 
conduct of class exercises and in the control of the classroom, at first 
chiefly as an observer, but gradually entering into teacher responsi- 
bilities until complete charge of the classroom is secured. Frequent 
conferences and discussions. 

This work is required in the Teacher Training Curriculum. It is 
open only to students whose applications are approved by the head of 
the Department of Education and the supervisor of student teaching 
in the subject or subjects in which the applicant desires to do super- 
vised teaching. Applications should be filed in the office of the Depart- 
ment of Education in October of the academic year in which the 
supervised teaching is to be done. No applications will be considered 
unless the applicant has completed with a grade of at least 75 the fol- 
lowing courses in Education: 41, 42 (or 121-a, 122-b, and 123-c), 51, 
52, (or 131-a, 132-b, and 133-c), and 61, (or 141-a, 142-b) and, with 
an average grade of 75 or better, at least 18 semester credits in the 
subject-matter field in which he desires to teach under supervision. 

154 



EDUCATION 

The applicant must also complete with a grade of at least 75 a course 
in the problems of teaching the subject in which he desires to do su- 
pervised teaching. 

Students may be enrolled for from 6 to 10 semester cred- 
its of work in supervised teaching in the second semester 
of the academic year. 

Education-Agriculture (Ed-Ag) 93. Supervised Teaching in 
High School Agriculture. Each Senior in the Teacher Training 
Curriculum will spend at least ten weeks as an apprentice teacher in 
some agricultural high school selected by the State Commissioner of 
Education and the Professor of Education at the University of New 
Hampshire. This work will be in charge of the regular teacher of 
agriculture in the high school, and will be supervised by the instructor 
in agricultural education at the University of New Hampshire. Mr. 
Little. 

Required of Seniors taking the Agricultural Teacher 
Training Curriculum, and open only to those students. 

Education-Biology (Ed-Bi) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Biology. Prerequisite: Bi-Ed 91. 

Education-Chemistry (Ed-Chem) 94. Supervised Teaching in 
High School Chemistry, Prerequisite: Ch-Ed 91. 

Education-Civics (Ed-Civ) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Civics. Prerequisite: Hist-Ed 91. 

Education-Commerce (Ed-CS) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Commercial Subjects. 

Education-Economics (Ed-Econ) 94. Supervised Teaching in 
High School Economics. Prerequisite: Hist-Ed 91.. 

Education-English (Ed-Eng) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School English. Prerequisite: Eng-Ed 91. 

Education-French (Ed-Fr) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School French. Prerequisite : Fr-Ed 91. 

Education-History (Ed-Hist) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School History. Prerequisite: Hist-Ed 91. 

Education-Industrial Arts (Ed-IA) 94. Supervised Teaching 
IN High School Industrial Arts. 

Education-Latin (Ed-Lat) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Latin. 

155 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Education-Mathematics (Ed-Math) 94. Supervised Teaching 
IN High School Mathematics. Prerequisite: Math-Ed 91. 

Education-Physics (Ed-Ph) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Physics. Prerequisite: Ph-Ed 91. 

Education- Sociology (Ed-Soc) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Sociology. Prerequisite: Hist-Ed 91. 

Home Economics-Education (HE-Ed) 94. Supervised Teach- 
ing in High School Home Economics. Professor McLaughlin. 

Required of Seniors in Home Economics Teacher Train- 
ing Curriculum. Prerequisite: HE-Ed 91. 

Education-Zoology (Ed-Zo6l) 94. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Zoology. Prerequisite: Bi-Ed 91. 

Education-Botany (Ed-Bot) 93. Supervised Teaching in High 
School Botany. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Leon W. Hitchcock, Professor ' 
Frederick D. Jackson, Assistant Professo 
William B. Nulsen, Assistant Professor 



1, 2. Electrical Engineering. An elementary study of electrical 
circuits and machinery. Professor Hitchcock. 

Required of Sophomores in Electrical Engineering. 1 
recitation ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 

3, 4. Electrical Engineering. A continuation of Electrical En- 
gineering 2. Electric and magnetic circuits, direct current generators 
and motors, armature windings, batteries, alternating current cir- 
cuits, alternators and transformers. Professor Hitchcock and As- 
sistant Professor Jackson. 

Prerequisites : Physics 8, Mathematics 8 and Electrical 
Engineering 2. Required of Juniors in Electrical Engi- 
neering. 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

5. Electrical Engineering. A continuation of Electrical En- 
gineering 4. Induction motors, regulators, synchronous motors, 

156 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

converters and rectifiers ; transmission line regulation, efficiency, in- 
sulation, lightning protection, sag and tension, etc. Professor 
Hitchcock. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 4. Required of Sen- 
iors in Electrical Engineering. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

7. Electronics and Communication, The principles of electron 
tubes and their application to communication and industry; the 
fundamentals of sound, speech and hearing; the principles of radio 
transmission and reception; basic telephone apparatus and circuits. 
Assistant Professor Jackson. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 4, 33, 35 or 38. Re- 
quired of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

8. Electronics and Communication. A continuation of Electrical 
Engineering 7. A more detailed study of telephone transmission in- 
cluding inductive interference, equivalent netv^orks, the infinite trans- 
mission line, the determination of line and cable characteristics, 
repeaters, filters, electron tube experiments, measurement of trans- 
mission characteristics, and the study of routine repeater tests. Assist- 
ant Professor Jackson. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 7. Elective for Sen- 
iors in Electrical Engineering. 3 recitations ; 1 labora- 
tory ; 5 semester credits. 

10. Advanced Circuit Theory. Application of mathematics to the 
solution of electrical circuit problems, including the use of differential 
equations, Heaviside's operators, and symmetrical phase components ; 
derivation of fundamental formulas and constants. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Nulsen. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 5. Elective for se- 
lected Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 3 recitations ; 1 
laboratory; 4 semester credits. 

12. Illumination. Principles of illumination and photometry, 
light sources, residential and commercial lighting, street lighting, 

157 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

display and advertising lighting ; wiring methods and calculations : 
National Electrical Code rules. Assistant Professor Nulsen. 

Required of Seniors in Electrical Engineering. Elective 
for students who have completed Electrical Engineering 
33. 35 or 38. 2 recitations; 2 semester credits. (Form- 
erly E.E. 9.) 

13, 14. Electrical Problems. The solution of problems involv- 
ing magnetic circuits, direct and alternating current circuits and 
machinery, and complex notation. Professor Hitchcock and As- 
sistant Professor Nulsen. 

Required of Juniors in Electrical Engineering. 2 reci- 
tations ; 2 semester credits. 

15, 16, 17, 18. Student Branch of the American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. A student organization conducted in accord- 
ance with the by-laws of the Institute with meetings given a place on 
the student's class schedule. Each student is required to present and 
discuss an approved subject. At times the meeting may take the form 
of a debate, an address by an outside lecturer or a motion picture of 
an instructive nature. Students in this course must become student 
members of the A.I.E.E. and must subscribe to a magazine selected 
by the department. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. 1 recitation ; no credit. 

23, 24. Laboratory. Operation and test of direct and alternating 
current equipment; study of laboratory practice and report presenta- 
tion. Assistant Professor Nulsen. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 2. Required of Jun- 
iors in Electrical Engineering. 1 laboratory; 2 semester 
credits. 

25. Laboratory. A continuation of Electrical Engineering 24. 
Assistant Professor Nulsen. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 24. Required of 
Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 2 laboratories; 4 
semester credits. 

26. Laboratory. Advanced laboratory testing and special prob- 
lems. The student works on problems of his own selection which 
have been definitely outlined by him and have received approval. 
This may take the form of a semester thesis, or it may consist of a 

158 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

series of original experiments in which the student is especially 
interested. Assistant Professor Nulsen. 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 25. Elective for 
selected Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 4 laborator- 
ies ; 4 semester credits. 

28. Advanced Electronics Laboratory. Special radio problems 
or electron tube applications of a research nature for Technology 
Seniors. Assistant Professor Jackson. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 7. Elective with 
permission of the department. Laboratories and confer- 
ences ; 4 semester credits. 

31. Electric Circuits. Adapted primarily to students in architect- 
ure. A study of types of lighting fixtures, the service for which each 
is designed and the proper spacing and mounting height; outlets for 
fixtures, appliances and switches ; methods of attaching outlets ; cir- 
cuits ; individual and group control ; exposed and concealed wiring ; 
entrance and meter location; costs of wiring; the calculation of wire 
sizes for circuits; a comparison of the three-wire with the two-wire 
system of distribution; the requirements of the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters in connection with electrical installations ; wiring 
for and methods of control of radio, refrigeration, oil furnaces, ele- 
vator, ventilator, signal, alarm and inter-communicating devices ; out- 
side lighting, including electric signs, flood lighting, and the lighting 
of gardens, drives, swimming pools and fountains ; underground wir- 
ing; studies of specifications. Professor Hitchcock. 

Required of students in Architecture. 2 recitations ; 2 
semester credits. (Given in alternate years; offered in 
1937-1938) 

33. Fundamentals of Electricity. Fundamentals of electric and 
magnetic circuits, storage batteries, direct and alternating current 
equipment, electronics. Assistant Professor Nulsen. 

Required of Juniors in Chemistry. 3 recitations ; 1 lab- 
oratory ; 4 semester credits. 

35. Construction Equipment. Direct and alternating current 
circuits, wiring for light and power, generation of electric power, 
motors, transformers, controlling devices. Professor Hitchcock. 

Required of Juniors in Civil Engineering, 3 recitations ; 
1 laboratory; 4 semester credits. 

159 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Zl, 38. Electrical Machinery. Direct and alternating current 
circuits, theory and characteristics of electric motors and generators, 
starting and control equipment. Assistant Professor Jackson. 

Required of Juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 3 reci- 
tations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

42. Principles and Applications of Electron Tubes. A study 
of vacuum tubes, vacuum tube amplifiers, gaseous triodes, photo-elec- 
tric cells and their application in industry. Assistant Professor Jack- 
son. 

Prerequisite : Electrical Engineering 33, 35 or Zl . Elective 
for students not registered in the Electrical Engineering 
Curriculum. 3 recitations ; or 2 recitations and 1 labora- 
tory; 3 semester credits. 



ENGLISH 

Alfred E. Richards, Professor 
Harold H. Scudder, Professor 
William G. Hennessy, Associate Professor 
Lucinda p. Smith, Associate Professor 
Edmund A. Cortez, Assistant Professor 
Paul S. Schoedinger, Assistant Professor 
Carroll S. Towle, Assistant Professor 
Robert G. Webster, Assistant Professor 
Thomas H. McGrail, Assistant Professor 
SYL\rESTER H. Bingham, Assistant Professor 
Lawrence H. Houtchens, Instructor 
Bethyl C. Hennessy, Assistant 
Barbara Rowell, Assistant 

general requirements 

All Freshmen are required to take English 1, 2. However, upon the 
recommendation of the head of the Department of English, and with 
the approval of the dean of his college, the exceptional student who 
demonstrates his ability to proceed to more advanced work may be 
excused from the regular course and enrolled in a special section for 
work of higher grade. 

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ENGLISH 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

A major program in the Department of English consists of 24 
semester credits of English literature passed with a grade of 75 or 
better. The following courses are required of all English majors: 
Survey of English Literature, Survey of American Literature, Shakes- 
peare's Plays, Chaucer. Of these courses, all but the first-mentioned 
(Survey of English Literature, which is open to Freshmen) carry 
major credit if passed with the required grade of 75 or better. 

1 (1), 2 (2). Freshman Composition. The aim of this course 
is to enable the student to write correct English. The principles of 
exposition, description, and narration are studied. There is drill in 
the mechanics of composition, and there is constant writing of themes 
both as outside assignments and as laboratory work in class. Two 
sections, composed of students who have attained high rank in pre- 
vious tests in this course, will follow a special program directed by 
Associate Professor Lucinda P. Smith, assisted by Assistant Pro- 
fessor McGrail. The entire staff of the department will share in 
the teaching of the course. Associate Professor Smith. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. Required of all Fresh- 
men. 3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 

3, 4. Survey of English Literature. A general survey of Eng- 
lish literature from its beginnings to the year 1900. Lectures and 
recitations. Assistant Professor Schoedinger. 

Open to all students. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 se- 
mester credits. 

5, (5). Play Production. This is not an elective, but a laboratory 
course in the public presentation of notable plays. Members of the 
course are elected by competitive trial, and credit is given both for 
acting and for technical assistance. The course is open to all students 
except, in the first semester, Freshmen. Associate Professor Hen- 
nessy. 

14 to 3 semester credits. 

161 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

COURSES PRIMARILY FOR SOPHOMORES 

7, 8. Advanced Composition. The study and practice of writing 
brief impressions, followed by the writing of essays, sketches and 
narrative. Collateral readings; weekly conferences. Each semester's 
study must be taken in its chronological order, unless special permis- 
sion to invert that order is given by the instructor in charge. Assistant 
Professor Towle. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

10. News Writing. A practical study of the preparation of 
articles for newspapers and magazines. It is for all whose vocations 
will demand frequent writing for publication, and it is a preparation 
in part for those who intend to take up newspaper work after gradu- 
ation. It does not cover the entire field of journalism, but the student 
will be instructed in the duties of a reporter and be given constant 
practice in writing news stories. Professor Scudder. 

Prerequisite : For Sophomores, a grade of 75 or better in 
English 1, 2; for Freshmen, the recommendation of the 
instructor in charge of English 1, 2. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. (Formerly 9) 

11, 12. Survey of American Literature. Lectures and extensive 
outside reading. Professor Scudder. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lec- 
tures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

14. Mediaeval and Elizabethan Drama. A survey of the Eng- 
lish drama, exclusive of Shakespeare, from its beginnings to the clos- 
ing of the theatres (1642). Professor Scudder and Mr. Houtchens. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

15. Non-Dramatic Elizabethan Poetry. A study of the English 
Renaissance in non-dramatic poetry and its development throughout 
the sixteenth century, with special reference to Spencer's Faerie 
Queene. Professor Richards. 

162 



ENGLISH 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

17, 18. English Literature in the Seventeenth Century. 
Poetry and prose from Shakespeare and Bacon to Swift and Pope, 
omitting the drama and the works of Milton. The poetry of John 
Donne and his school; of Jonson, Herrick and the "Cavaliers"; of 
Denham, Waller and Dryden; of the followers of Spenser, etc. The 
prose of such writers as Izaak Walton, Bunyan, Sir Thomas Browne, 
Fuller, Taylor, and John Dryden. One hour of the week will be de- 
voted to round-table discussion in small groups. Assistant Professor 
Towle. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2; 17 prerequisite for 18. Elect- 
ive for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 2 lectures or 
recitations; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. (Not 
given in 1937-38.) 

20. Pope and His Age. The literature of the first half of the 
eighteenth century, with special reference to Pope, Swift, Addison, 
and Steele. Assistant Professor Schoedinger. 

Prerequisite: English, 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

22. Johnson and His Circle. Boswell, Johnson and their time. 
Professor Scudder. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. (Not given in 1937-38.) 

23, 24. Victorian Prose. A study of English prose of the nine- 
teenth century. Particular attention is given during the first semester 
to the work of Coleridge, Lamb, Carlyle, Hazlitt, and Matthew Ar- 
nold ; in the second semester to the work of John Ruskin as a writer 
of brilliant prose, art critic, and social reformer. Professor Rich- 
ards and Assistant Professor Webster. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

163 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

25. 26. Victorian P(«try. A study of English poetxj- from 1830 
to 1900, with special reference to the poetry of Tennyson and Brown- 
ing. Assistant Professor Schoedinger. 

Prerequisite: English 1, 2; 25 prerequisite for 26. Elect- 
ive for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or 
recitations; 3 semester credits. (Not given in 1937-38) 

28. The Brsiz as Literature. A study of the various literary- 
types found in the Bible, and a survey of the influence of the Bible on 
English literature. Professor Richards. 

Prerequisite: English 1. 2. Elective for Sophomores. 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

29, 30. Survey of Art. This course stresses the development of 
architecture, painting, iri sculpture as illustrated by representative 
masterpieces from the C-rtt-i. Roman, Gothic, Renaissance and mod- 
em periods. Lectures. £5s:^:.t : r tidings, and the study of art prints. 
Associate Professor I-If: :.r = -y. 

Elective for Sophornirci, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lect- 
ures; 3 semester credits, 

32. Mgoern British Poetry. A study of British poetry written 
since 1900. Assistant Professor Towle. 

Prerequisite: Elnglish 1. 2. Elective for Sophomores. Jun- 
iors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

34. MaffiSK Amebicak P(«try. A study of American poetry writ- 
ten since 1900. Assistant Professor Towle. 

Prerequisite : English 1, 2. Elective for Sophomores. 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. (Not given in 1937-38) 

35, (35). Pl'blic Speakixg. Practice in the use of time, change in 
pitch, emphasis, and inflection of voice ; drills in articulation and pro- 
mmdation ; exercises in posture and poise ; extemporaneous speaking ; 
a foundation course for prospective business men and teachers. 
•Assistant Professor Cortez. 

Elective for Sophomores. Juniors, and Seniors. 3 recita- 
tions ; 2}4 semester credits. 

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ENGLISH 

36. Oral Reading. The art of reading from the page ; expressive 
reading of lyrics and other types of literature; platform reading for 
entertainment; drills in interpretation in terms of conception of 
thought ; declamation for various programs. Students must secure 
permission of the instructor before enrolling for this course. Assist- 
ant Professor Cortez. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 recita- 
tions; 2H semester credits. 



COURSES PRIMARILY FOR JUNIORS 

yj, 38. Forum Discussion and Debate. First semester : the propo- 
sition and its main issues; sources and tests of evidence; construction 
of the argumentative brief; principle laws of reasoning; principle 
fallacies of reasoning; practice debates. Second semester: elements 
of parliamentary law and parliamentary debates; forum discussion 
and debate; "round table" discussion; court pleas; sales argument, 
etc. The subjects for research and debate will be selected from cur- 
rent events of state, national, and international importance. Assistant 
Professor Cortez. 

Prerequisite : Zl prerequisite for 38. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors (and for Sophomores by permission of the 
instructor). 3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 

40. Stage Direction. This is a laboratory course in the fundament- 
als of acting, stage direction, and allied phases of play production. 
It is designed to fit the needs of prospective teachers, particularly 
teachers of English. Associate Professor Hennessy. 

Prerequisite : the permission of the instructor. Elective 
for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 laboratory 
classes ; 3 semester credits. 

52. Introduction to Drama. This course is a comprehensive sur- 
vey of dramatic literature from the Greek drama to the present. Asso- 
ciate Professor Hennessy. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors and graduate students. 3 
lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

165 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

53, 54. Shakespeare's Plays. This course comprises a study of 
the major histories, comedies, and tragedies. Shakespeare is inter- 
preted as poet and as dramatist. Associate Professor Hennessy. 

Prerequisite : 53 prerequisite for 54. Elective for Juniors, 
Seniors, and graduate students. 3 lectures ; 3 semester 
credits. 

55. Milton. A detailed study of Milton's minor poetry and the 
Paradise Lost. Consideration is also given to the social, political and 
religious history of Milton's day. Professor Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 3 
lectures ; 3 semester credits. 

57. The English No\tel in the Eighteenth Century. The 
novel from Defoe through the Gothic Romance. There will be 
lectures and constant outside reading. Assistant Professor Schoe- 
dinger. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and graduate students. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

59. The English Novel in the Nineteenth Century. A study 
of the novel from Jane Austen to Thomas Hardy. There will be 
lectures, recitations, and constant reading. Professor Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 3 
lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. (Not given 
in 1937-38) 

61, 62. The English Romantic Writers. A course dealing with 
the major writers of the early nineteenth century, such as Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Byron, Lamb, Shelley, Hazlitt and Keats. Readings 
also from the work of many minor writers, especially those of the late 
eighteenth century. One hour of the week will be devoted to round- 
table discussion with small groups. Assistant Professor Towle. 

Prerequisite: 61 prerequisite for 62. Elective for Juniors, 
Seniors, and graduate students. 2 lectures ; 1 recitation ; 
3 semester credits. 

166 



ENGLISH 

63, 64. Advanced American Literature. A series of studies in 
special fields, the subjects to be announced. In 1937-38 the subjects 
are: The American Novel, and The American Short Story. Pro- 
fessor Scudder. 

Elective for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 3 
lectures ; 3 semester credits. 

65, 66. Writing as an Art. A course in the study and practice of 
the forms of writing through an examination of the history of liter- 
ary criticism. The reading of famous critical essays and of many 
contemporary opinions, correlated with practice writing of various 
types. Each student is allowed to spend much of his time with the 
type he finds most congenial. Collateral readings, with frequent class 
discussions and conferences. Assistant Professor Towle and As- 
sistant Professor Webster. 

Prerequisite : English 7. 65 prerequisite for 66. Elective 
for Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 2 lectures ; 1 
recitation ; 3 semester credits. 

COURSES PRIMARILY FOR SENIORS 

67, 68. Chaucer. A study of Chaucer's life and times, and a read- 
ing of most of his poetry. In the first semester, lectures are given 
upon Old and Middle English grammar as an introduction to the 
language of Chaucer, and the longer minor poems are read. In the 
second semester, Troilus and Cressida, and The Canterbury Tales 
are read. Professor Richards. 

Prerequisite : 67 prerequisite for 68. Elective for Seniors 
and graduate students. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

SERVICE COURSES 

41, (41). Expository Writing. Practice in the writing of reports 
and other papers pertaining to technical subjects. The reports will 
take the form of recommendation reports, progress reports, and in- 
formation reports. Other papers will take the form of term papers or 
short theses. In addition to these, there will be required the writing 
of business letters of various types, such as letters of application, of 
complaint, and of sales. Assistant Professor Webster. 

167 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required of Seniors in Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical 
Engineering, and of Seniors in Agriculture. 2 lectures, 
conferences; 2 semester credits. 

English-Education (Eng-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching 
OF High School English. This course deals specifically with the 
selection and organization of subject-matter, with the most efficient 
methods of presenting this material, and with the problems which 
arise within the wide field of the teaching of high school English. 
Associate Professor Smith. 

Prerequisite: three years of English courses. Required 
of students majoring in English who plan to teach Eng- 
lish in secondary schools. Elective for students majoring 
m language, history, or education. 2 lectures ; 1 labora- 
tory; 3 semester credits. 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Walter C. O'Kane, Professor 
James G. Conklin, Instructor 

Note. — Work in the Department of Entomology is 
largely individualized. So far as possible each student is 
permitted to choose the topics to which he will give spe- 
cial attention. This applies to each course offered by the 
department. Laboratory work may be done at any time 
that the laboratory is open. Reference books are issued 
from the department library at any time. Lecture periods 
are occupied largely with discussion, in which students 
participate. 

Professional Training.— The Department of Entomol- 
ogy is prepared to offer professional training in Ento- 
mology. For adequate training, a broad foundation as 
well as thorough specialization is necessary. To accom- 
plish this the period of training should extend beyond 
undergraduate college work. Students who desire to 
specialize in Entomology are requested to consult the 
head of the department in order to plan an adequate and 
comprehensive sequence of studies. 

1. Principles of Economic Entomology. The relation of the 
structure and classification of insects to methods of insect control. 
The preparation and application of insecticides. Studies of the life 

168 



ENTOMOLOGY 

history and control of insect pests. Professor O'Kane and Mr. Conk- 
lin. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Agriculture. 2 
lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

52. Insects of Orchard and Garden. The application of methods 
of insect control of typical injurious species. Studies of the life histor- 
ies and habits of important insect pests of orchard, garden and certain 
field crops. Adapted especially for students in Horticulture and in 
General Agriculture. Professor O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. 1 lecture; 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 
(Given in alternate years; offered in 1937-38) 

53. Insects of Domestic Animals. The insect enemies of do- 
mestic livestock; the life histories, habits and means of control. 
Adapted especially for students in Animal Husbandry. Professor 
O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 
(Given in alternate years; offered in 1938-39) 

54. Household Insects. Medical Entomology. The life histories, 
habits and means of control of insects of the household and of stored 
products. The relation of insects to disease. Adapted especially for 
students in Home Economics. Professor O'Kane. 

Required of Seniors in Institutional Management. Elect- 
ive for Juniors and Seniors. 1 lecture; 1 laboratory; 2 
semester credits. 

56. Forest Insects. Studies of the life histories and habits of the 
more destructive forest insects and the means of their control. 
Adapted especially for students in Forestry. Professor O'Kane. 

Prerequisite: Entomology 1. Recommended for Juniors 
in Forestry. Elective for others. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 
2 semester credits. 

57, 58. Advanced Entomology. Studies of the external morphol- 
ogy of insects, with special reference to the structures used in classi' 
fication. Professor O'Kane and Mr. Conklin. 

169 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: 57 prerequisite for 58. Open to students 
only by permission of the head of the department. Re- 
quired of students specializing in Entomology. 2 lec- 
tures ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semeter credits. 

59, 60. Advanced Economic Entomology. Detailed studies of 
problems involved in applied entomology. The literature of economic 
entomology. Investigational methods. Practice in arranging projects. 
Studies in the specialized phases of entomology. Professor O'Kane 
and Mr. Conklin. 

Open to students only by permission of head of depart- 
ment. Prerequisite : 59 prerequisite for 60. Required of 
students specializing in Entomology. Hours and credits 
to be arranged. 

For courses primarily for graduate students see Catalog of the 
Graduate School. 



FORESTRY 

Karl W. Woodward, Professor 
Clark L. Ste\^ns, Assistant Professor 
Lewis C. Swain, Instructor 

2. Principles of Forestry. This course is intended to meet the 
needs of students who desire to obtain a general knowledge of the 
principles of forestry. The value of forests, their protection, their 
utilization, their improvement and regeneration, are discussed with 
special reference to New Hampshire conditions. Professor Wood- 
ward. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Agriculture ex- 
cept those in Forestry. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 
semester credits. 

•4. Principles of Forestry. The same as Forestry 2, except that 
no laboratory work is included. Professor Woodward. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

5, 6. Tree and Wood Identification. This course deals with the 
characteristics of our native tree species, and with the identification of 
trees in the field and from specimens. Additional practice in identify- 
ing northern species is given during Summer Camp. 

170 



FORESTRY 

A study is also made of the uses of lumber, the physical properties 
and the identification of the commercially important woods. Each stu- 
dent is required to provide himself with a hand lens. Mr. Swain. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Forestry, elect- 
ive for others. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester 
credits. 

7, 8. Forest Mensuration. Includes practice in forest mapping; 
measurement of forest products; timber cruising; and studies of 
growth and yield of the commercial tree species of New England. The 
course is continued during Summer Camp. Each student is required 
to provide himself with a box compass. Mr. Swain. 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Elective for others, 
with approval of the instructor. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 
3 semester credits. 

9, 10. Silviculture. The art of producing and tending a forest. 
Includes seed collection, storage and testing; nursery practice; forest 
plantations; systems of natural regeneration; intermediate cuttings; 
forest protection, and discussion of silvicultural practice in the most 
important forest regions of the United States. Assistant Professor 
Stevens. 

Required of Sophomores in Forestry. Elective for others, 
with approval of the instructor. Prerequisites : Forestry 
5, 6. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

11, 12. Forest Utilization. Methods and costs of logging and 
milling in the chief lumber-producing regions of the United States ; 
various types of forest products, their manufacture and marketing 
together with special problems of the lumber business. Emphasis is 
placed upon New England conditions. Attendance on instruction 
trips is required for credit in this course. Mr. Swain. 

Required of certain Juniors in Forestry. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

13. Forest Improvements. Lectures on the methods of construc- 
tion and the costs of the more important structures listed as improve- 
ments of the forest. Includes roads, trails, simple bridges, logging 

171 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

railroads, telephone lines, flumes, slides, ranger cabins, lookout sta- 
tions, etc. Mr. Swain. 

Recommended elective for Juniors in Forestry. Elective 
for others, with approval of the instructor. 1 lecture; 1 
laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 

14. Fish and Game Management. This is an introductory course 
designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental principles un- 
derlying the handling of wild life as a forest crop. Laboratory work 
consists of instruction trips to game farms, fish hatcheries, and the 
White Mountain National Forest. Attendance on these is required 
for credit in the course. Additional field work will be carried out dur- 
ing Summer Camp. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

Recommended elective for Juniors in Forestry. Elective 
for others with approval of the instructor. 2 lectures ; 2 
semester credits. 

15, 16. Thesis. Work to be arranged according to the needs of 
individual students. Professor Woodward and Assistant Professor 
Stevens. 

Prerequisites : Forestry 5, 6 ; 7, 8, and 9, 10. Required of 
certain Juniors and Seniors in Forestry. 2 lectures; 2 
to 3 semester credits. 

17. National Forest Administration. The principles and meth- 
ods employed in the national forests. Professor Woodward. 

Prerequisites: Forestry 5, 6; 7, 8 and 9, 10. Recom- 
mended elective for Seniors. 3 lectures; 3 semester 
credits. 

18. History of Forestry. The history of forestry, its development 
and present status in different countries; the work of the Federal 
Government and its management of the national forests ; state forest 
policies ; the lumber industry in the United States. Lectures and spec- 
ial readings. Professor Woodward. 

Required of certain Seniors in Forestry. Elective for 
others with approval of the instructor. 3 lectures; 3 
semester credits. 

19. 20. Forest Management. The management of woodlots and 
large forest tracts for the purpose of gaining the largest immediate 

172 



GEOLOGY 

and future returns; and the preparation of working plans to co- 
ordinate the protection, improvement, and regeneration of forests 
so as to make them yield the highest net returns. Professor 
Woodward. 

Prerequisites: Forestry 5, 6; 7, 8; 9, 10; 11, 12. Re- 
quired of Seniors in Forestry. 2 lectures; 2 labora- 
tories ; 4 semester credits. 

22. Summer Camp. An eight weeks' course at the Swift River 
Camp, Passaconaway, N. H. Lectures and field work on the following 
projects : a forest survey of a large area of the White Mountain Na- 
tional Forest ; silvical studies of the northern forest types ; fish and 
game in the national forests ; dendrology. This is an opportunity for 
instruction by officers of the U. S. Forest Service, and from three to 
six days are spent under their supervision on such work as fighting 
forest fires, building trails, telephone lines, etc. Each student is re- 
quired to act as cook for a part of the course, and the details of run- 
ning the camp and directing the survey are handled by the students 
as part of the instruction. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

Required of Juniors in Forestry. Prerequisites : For- 
estry 7, 8; 9, 10, and C.E. 7, 8. 8 semester credits. 

GEOLOGY 

George W. White^ Associate Professor 
Theodore Ralph Meyers, Assistant Professor 
Donald H. Chapman, Assistant Professor 

The courses in geology are designed to give the student a general 
insight into the materials, structure, and history of the earth upon 
which he lives. They are intended for the student with broad general 
interests, who wishes some insight into earth science, as well as for 
the student who is looking forward to professional or graduate work 
in geology. The courses are non-technical, in the sense that they do 
not fit a student to enter the career of professional geology without 
further training. 

Two major programs are suggested. The first is for the student 
who is seeking a broad cultural training, and should include Princi- 

173 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

pies of Geology, Elementary Chemistry, and any four courses in geol- 
ogy for major work. The second program includes, besides geology 
courses, certain other courses which the student will find desirable as 
a prerequisite for graduate or professional work. Courses which 
should be included in this pre-professional program are Principles of 
Geology, Physiographic and Structural Geology, Mineralogy, Eco- 
nomic Geology, Paleontology, Field Problems, Inorganic Chemistry, 
Physics, Surveying, Engineering Drawing (M.E. 1, 2), Mathematics, 
and German. 

1, 2. Principles of Geology. The study of the earth and its his- 
tory. A consideration of the forces that have operated to produce 
land forms and structures, and a discussion of the materials of the 
earth's crust. These facts will then be applied to the interpretation of 
past geologic events, together with their effect on the development of 
life forms. Laboratory study of various land forms of the United 
States by means of maps ; of common minerals and rocks of the 
earth's crust ; and of the more common fossils, will closely parallel the 
class work. Occasional field trips are taken to nearby points of geo- 
logic interest. Associate Professor White, Assistant Professor Mey- 
ers, and Assistant Professor Chapman. 

Prerequisite: 1 prerequisite for 2. Freshman and 
Sophomore course. 3 lectures or recitations ; 1 labora- 
tory; 4 semester credits. 

3. Geography of the World. A course designed for the student 
interested in learning the essential geographic facts regarding the 
earth. The earth as a planet and the processes which are at work 
modifying the appearance of its surface are first briefly discussed. 
The continents are next considered one by one, with emphasis placed 
on their physical aspects. Finally, the climates of the world are briefly 
treated. Assistant Professor Chapman. 

This course cannot be used to fill science requirements. 
Freshman course. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

4. Geography of North America. A course intended for the stu- 
dent who is interested more particularly in the North American Con- 
tinent and its physical aspects. A brief treatment of the weather and 

174 



GEOLOGY 

climate of the continent is followed by a discussion of the countries, 
treated regionally. This course concludes with a more intensive study 
of the physical geography of New England. Assistant Professor 
Chapman. 

This course cannot be used to fill science requirements. 
Prerequisite : Geology 3, or special permission. Freshman 
course. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

11. Physiography. Attention in this course is directed toward 
the forces which have been at work in producing the present aspect 
of the land surface, and particularly that of New England. Special 
emphasis is given to the work of running water, glaciers, and marine 
agents. Field trips are taken during the fall season to points easily 
reached from Durham. Assistant Professor Chapman. 

Prerequisite : Geology 2. Sophomore course. 3 lectures 
or recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

12. Structural Geology. An advanced study of the structures of 
the earth's crust and of the dynamics of their formation. Included 
is discussion of mountain systems, metamorphism, and igneous struct- 
ures, and of the theories of earth origin. Associate Professor White. 

Prerequisite : One course in Geology. Sophomore course. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

51, 52. Mineralogy. A study of the minerals that make up the 
earth's crust. A study of crystals, by means of models and specimens 
showing well defined crystals, will be followed by a study of minerals 
and their determination by means of physical characteristics ; and in 
addition, the aggregation of minerals to form rocks. Associate Pro- 
fessor White. 

Prerequisite : One course in Geology and one course in 
Chemistry. 51 prerequisite for 52. 2 lectures or reci- 
tations ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

53, 54. Economic Geology. A discussion of the metals, their ores, 
and their occurrence; the types of coal and their occurrence in the 

175 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

coal fields of the United States; petroleum, the structures in which 
it is found, and the distribution of the oil fields, especially those of 
the United States. Lime, cement, building stones and related products 
will be treated briefly. Assistant Professor Meyers. 

Prerequisite : One year's work in Geology. 3 lectures or 
recitations ; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years ; 
not offered in 1937-38) 

55, 56. Paleontology. A study of the history, development, and 
morphology of the various groups of plants and animals as recorded 
by fossils found in the rocks of the earth's crust. More attention will 
be given to the development of animals than to plants. Assistant Pro- 
f'^ssor Meyers. 

Prerequisite: One year's work in Geology or Zoology. 
55 prerequisite for 56. 2 lectures or recitations ; 1 lab- 
oratory; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate i^ears ; 
offered in 1937-38) 

57, 58. Geologic Problems. A study of special problems by means 
of conferences, assigned readings and field work. The work will be 
fitted to the needs of the individual students. Associate Professor 
White, Assistant Professor Meyers, and Assistant Professor 
Chapman. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the instructor. Credits to be 
arranged. 



SERVICE COURSE 

7, (7). General Geology. A general introductory course in phys- 
ical geology, in which the structures and materials of the earth's crust 
are discussed, together with the forces which have produced and al- 
tered them. Assistant Professor Meyers. 

Required of Freshmen in Chemistry, and Juniors in Civil 
Engineering. Elective for other students in Technology 
and for students in Agriculture. Open to Liberal Arts 
students by permission only. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 



176 



HISTORY 

Donald C. Babcock, Professor 
Arthur W. Jones, Assistant Professor 
Allan B. Partridge, Assistant Professor 
Philip M. Marston, Assistant Professor 
Gibson R. Johnson, Assistant Professor 
William Yale, Assistant Professor 
Edna Dickey, Assistant 



A. Monroe Stowe, Professor (History-Education) 

In the courses in history an important place is given to historical 
reading carried on in the reference room. Oftentimes a considerable 
part of the work is written. 

The statements as to prerequisites, etc., below are for Liberal Arts 
students. Agriculture and Technology students should consult the 
head of the department. 

Any department in the College of Liberal Arts, except Geology, 
Home Economics, Physical Education for Women, and Zoology, may 
be considered as a related department. Students majoring in history 
are required to take History 55, 56 and 57, 58 before graduation. 

courses for freshmen 
The following subject constitutes a basic course, required of all stu- 
dents in the College of Liberal Arts. 

1 (1), 2 (2). Introduction to Contemporary Civilization. This 
course is designed to give the student a background which will enable 
him to understand the problems of human society rather than the 
record of specific historic events. It therefore takes up prehistoric 
as well as historic social evolution. It aims at the historic explana- 
tion of how modern life has come to be what it is, and an apprecia- 
tion of the problems of contemporary society. Professor Babcock, 
Assistant Professor Marston, Assistant Professor Johnson, Assistant 
Professor Yale, Assistant Professor Partridge, Assistant Professor 
Jones, Miss Dickey. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. 4 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 4 semester credits. 

3, 4. Modern European History. This course is intended to sup- 
plement the Freshmen students' general knowledge of European his- 

177 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

tory, taking up the history of modern Europe, European states, and 
the expansive development from about 1500 to 1914. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Jones. 

Open only to Freshmen. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 
semester credits. 



COURSES FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 
GROUP I 

5, 6. Colonial and Revolutionary American History. A study 
of colonial beginnings in America, national rivalries, the English colo- 
nies, the Revolution, and our national life to 1789. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Marston. 

Prerequisite: 5 prerequisite for 6. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors, and for Sophomores who are taking 7 or 8. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. The United States since 1789. Beginning with the ad- 
ministration of Washington, the great forces of nationalism, expan- 
sion, sectionalism, and democracy are traced up to the present time, 
with reference to as many aspects of our national life as possible, 
including literary, artistic, scientific, and everyday life-ways, as well 
as the more usual political and economic events. Professor Babcock. 

Prerequisite : 7 prerequisite for 8. Elective for Sopho- 
mores, Juniors, and Seniors. 4 lectures or recitations ; 4 
semester credits. 

9, 10. Latin- American History. The purpose of the course is 
three-fold: (1) to trace the development and influence of Spanish 
and Portuguese culture as a wide-spread world force; (2) to see 
what the history of the Latin-American peoples has been; (3) to 
relate Latin-America to North America, particularly in view of re- 
cent growth in friendly relations. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lec- 
tures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

178 



HISTORY 

GROUP II 

11. The Ancient Orient. A study of pre-literary culture in the 
Near East, followed by a consideration of the contributions made in 
Egypt, Babylonia, Assyria, Chaldea, Palestine, and Persia to civiliza- 
tion prior to the rise of Greece. Assistant Professor Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures 
or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

12. History of Greece. An examination of all features of Greek 
culture and its influence, including adequate attention to the Hellen- 
istic period after the death of Alexander the Great. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures 
or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

13. 14. History of Rome. In the first semester, the pre-literary 
foundations and legendary origins are studied, followed by an analy- 
sis of republican life and institutions to the first century B.C. In the 
second semester, a study is made of the transition from republic to 
principate and concludes with the account of the later Roman Empire 
to the time of Justinian in 565. Assistant Professor Partridge. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures 
or recitations; 3 semester credits. (Not offered in 
1937-38) 

15, 16. Medieval History. This survey of the pageant of the Mid- 
dle Ages begins with the death of Justinian and goes as far as the 
first crusade in the first semester. The second semester's work carries 
the student into the 14th century. Assistant Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite: 15 prerequisite for 16. Elective for Jun- 
iors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by permission. 3 
lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

17, 18. The Period of the Renaissance. The Renaissance as a 
regathering of past values and as a forward movement introducing 
the Modern Period. Assistant Professor Jones. 

179 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite : 17 prerequisite for 18. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors, and for Sophomores by permission. 3 lect- 
ures or recitations; 3 semester credits. (Not offered 
in 1937-38) 

19, 20. Modern European History. This course takes up the his- 
tory of the modern European states and of Europe as a whole in its 
expansive development and world leadership from about 1500 to 1914. 
Eastern Europe and Asia and Africa are studied as backgrounds for 
the colonial history of modern times. Assistant Professor Jones. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lect- 
ures or recitations; 3 semester credits. (Students who 
have received credit for History 3, 4 cannot receive credit 
for 19, 20) 

21, 22. History of England. A general survey of the history of 
the British Isles from the time of their discovery to contemporary 
developments. Attention in the first semester is given chiefly to 
Anglo-Saxon, Norman, and later medieval times, and to the opening 
of the modern period, through the reign of Queen Mary Tudor. The 
second semester begins with the study of the Age of Elizabeth and 
concludes with an examination of the contemporary history of the 
British Commonwealth of Nations. Assistant Professor Partridge. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors, and for Sophomores by 
permission. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

23, 24. Historical Origins and Development of Christianity. 
An historical survey is made of the life, literature, religion and 
social development of the Old Testament as a culture background. 
This is followed by an investigation of the historic data existing 
about the life, character and teaching of Jesus. The growth and 
expansion of the Christian movement is traced. The course is de- 
signed to furnish students an opportunity to investigate and evaluate 
their own religious heritage in the light of Contemporary thought, 
and to make a special study of any particular intellectual problems 
they may have in this field. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or 
discusions; 3 semester credits. (Not offered in 1937-38) 

25, 26. History of Religions. A study of religion as an historic 
force in society. The nature of religion, its origins, and early de- 
velopment are treated in connection with primitive social history. 

180 



HISTORY 

This is followed by a study of the principal religions of the world, 
special attention being given to Hinduism, Buddhism, Zoroastrian- 
ism, Confucianism and Mohammedanism. The history, literature, 
and philosophy of the oriental civilizations and cultures are investi- 
gated as a background for understanding these religions. Assistant 
Professor Johnson. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or 
discussions ; 3 semester credits. 

51, 52. Recent World History. An historical introduction to the 
post-war period with a study of its most outstanding historical de- 
velopments based on study of the World War, its causes, its progress, 
and its settlement, showing how these are connected with historic 
developments since 1919. Assistant Professor Yale. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits ; section 2. Also a special sec- 
tion (section 1) elective by permission of the instructor. 
4 lectures or recitations ; 4 semester credits. 

53, 54. The History of Civilization. This course is designed to 
show the close connections between the historical development of 
western society in both Europe and North America and their educa- 
tional institutions. It traces the early development of educational in- 
stitutions in the Ancient Orient, Greece, and Rome, through the Dark 
and Middle Ages down to modern times. It connects the development 
of modern educational systems in Europe and the United States with 
nineteenth and twentieth century developments. Assistant Professor 
Yale. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

55, 56. The Interpretation of History. An investigation of some 
of the ways in which thoughtful persons have viewed the historic pro- 
cess as a whole. The aim is the interpretation of life ; the method is 
to combine philosophy, sociology, and history, with emphasis on the 
latter. Professor Babcock. 

Required of students majoring in History. Elective for 
Juniors and Seniors on consultation with the instructor. 
3 lectures or discussions; 3 semester credits. (Not 
offered in 1937-38) 

181 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

57, 58. Historiography. A study of the lives and writings of some 
of the leading historians from earliest times to the present, with the 
motive of learning what their contributions were to the scope, method, 
viewpoint, and literary achievement in the historical field. Assistant 
Professor Partridge. 

Required of students majoring in History. Elective for 
Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

History-Education (Hist-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching of 
High School History. This course includes a study of the purposes 
and objectives of teaching high school history, of the selection and 
organization of teaching material, and of teaching and testing tech- 
niques which may be advantageously used in teaching high school 
history. The course will include experiments in studying and teaching 
recent American history. Professor Stowe. 

Open to students who have satisfactorily completed His- 
tory 7, 8, Political Science 1, 2, Economics 1, 2 or 3, 4, 
and Education 61. 3 class meetings; 3 semester credits. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Helen F. McLaughlin, Professor 
Irma G. Bowen, Assistant Professor 
Helen W. Leighton, Instructor 
Marion Stolworthy, Instructor 
Dorothy Mummery, Instructor 
Constance LaBagh, Instructor . 
Elizabeth Fernald, Assistant 

Students majoring in Home Economics must take Home Economics 
1 and 2 before graduation. 

1, 2. Homemaking. a brief consideration of the various phases of 
homemaking and the vocational opportunities open to women. Pro- 
fessor McLaughlin and other staff members. 

Basic course for students majoring in Home Economics. 
Elective for other students. 3 lectures or demonstra- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

182 



HOME ECONOMICS 



CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 



3, 4. Clothing Selection. Problems in the selection of suitable 
and becoming clothing. A study of textile materials from the point 
of view of the consumer. Care and renovation of clothing. Assistant 
Professor Bowen and Miss LaBagh. 

3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

5, 6. Clothing Construction. Application of the principles of de- 
sign and development of technique in garment construction. Assistant 
Professor Bowen and Miss LaBagh. 

2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

7, 8. Historic Costume and Design. The study of costume 
changes from the primitive to the present, together with something 
of the historical events that influenced such changes. Adaptation of 
period costume to modern use. Assistant Professor Bowen. 

First semester : 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester cred- 
its. Second semester : 1 lecture ; 2 laboratories ; 1-3 
semester credits. 

9, 10. Applied Design. The basic principles of design and color 
applied to simple hand crafts, table decorations, and favors. Students 
retaining finished products pay for the cost of materials used. Assist- 
ant Professor Bowen and Mrs. Stolworthy. 

1 lecture or recitation; 1 or 2 laboratories; 2 or 3 se- 
mester credits. 

FOOD and nutrition 

15, 16. Foods. A study of the nutritive values, healthful preserva- 
tion and preparation, and the attractive and efficient serving of foods. 
Mrs. Stolworthy. 

Prerequisite: 15 prerequisite for 16. 2 lectures, 2 lab- 
oratories ; 3 semester credits. 

17, 18. Advanced Foods. An advanced study of problems con- 
cerning the selection and preparation of foods, culminating in the 
actual solution of individual experimental problems. In the first 
semester experimental projects are taken up; in the second semester, 
tea room management. Mrs. Stolworthy. 

183 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: H. E. 15. 16. 17 prerequisite for 18. First 
semester : 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester credits. 
Second semester : 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

19. Nutrition. A reading course in the current literature of nutri- 
tion. Professor McLaughlin. 

1 conference ; 5 hours outside reading ; 2 -semester 
credits. 

20. Dietetics. Application of the principles of human nutrition to 
varying physiological, social, and economic conditions. Professor 
McLaughlin and Mrs. Stolworthy. 

2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

21. Camp Cookery. A study of cookery especially adapted to camp 
life. Professor McLaughlin. 

Elective for Forestry students. 1 lecture-recitation ; 1 
laboratory; 1 semester credit (first ten weeks of semes- 
ter). 



CHILD development 

25, (25). Child Development. A study of the development of the 
young child, his environment, and methods of child guidance. Miss 
Mummery. 

Prerequisite or parallel requirement: Education 41, or 
Psychology 51. 2 lectures or discussions ; laboratory work 
with children at the Nursery School-Kindergarten ; ref- 
erence reading; 3 semester credits. 

27, (27). Projects in Child Development. A study of the prob- 
lems which arise in the guidance of young children. Class discussions 
will be based upon the special interests of the students enrolled. Miss 
Mummery. 

Prerequisite : H.E. 25. 2 lectures or discussions ; labora- 
tory in the Nursery School-Kindergarten ; reference 
reading; 2-3 semester credits. 

184 



HOME ECONOMICS 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

31, 32. Home Building and Furnishing. The evolution of Ameri- 
can housing from the time of the early settlers to the present. Study 
and discussion of problems pertaining to the selection of a site, the 
planning, decorating and furnishing of a modern home. Assistant 
Professor Bowen. 

Prerequisite : 31 prerequisite for 32. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

34. Home Management. A study of the organization of the 
household as a home, and of the principles involved in its management. 
Miss LaBagh. 

2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

35, (35). Home Management House. Practice in homemaking; 
managerial and dietetic problems ; nine weeks' residence in the Home 
Management House (two groups each semester). Miss LaBagh. 

Required of all Vocational Home Economics majors; 
elective for other students by permission of the head of 
the department. Class limited to eight. 3 semester credits. 

37. Home Care of the Sick and First Aid. Emergency treatment 
of minor injuries and care of the sick at home. Red Cross cer- 
tificate given to those taking and passing Red Cross examinations. 
Mrs. Stolworthy. 

2 lectures or recitations ; 1 hour laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 

institutional management 

41. Institutional Management. A study of the organization, 
equipment, and management of typical institutions ; and of the buying, 
planning, preparing and serving of meals for large groups. Field trips 
to study equipment and management of institutions are included in 
the course. Mrs. Leighton. 

3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

185 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

43, 44. Institutional Practice. Practical experience in the kitch- 
ens and serving rooms of the University Commons. Mrs. Leighton. 

Prerequisite: 43 prerequisite for 44. 2 laboratories; 
2 semester credits. 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

47, (47). Projects in Home Economics. This course provides 
Opportunity for students to work out projects supplementary to or in 
advance of other courses. Members of Home Economics staff. 

Conferences and assignments ; reference readings ; 1-3 
semester credits. 

Home Economics Education (HE-Ed) 91. Problems in the 
Teaching of High School Home Economics. Professor McLaughlin 
and other staff members. 

3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

Home Economics Education (HE-Ed) 94. Supervised Teaching 
IN High School Home Economics. Professor McLaughlin. 

12 weeks supervised teaching; 10 semester credits. 

Home Economics Education (HE-Ed) 96. Seminar in the 
Teaching of High School Home Economics. Professor McLaugh- 
lin and other staff members. 

Required of all students who have done supervised teach- 
ing. 6 weeks intensive work following period of super- 
vised teaching. 2 semester credits. 



186 



HORTICULTURE 

George F. Potter, Professor 
J. Raymond Hepler, Associate Professor 
L. Phelps Latimer, Assistant Professor 
James Macfarlane, Instructor 
Henry S. Clapp, Instructor 

1. Harvesting and Marketing of Fruits. The handling of fruit 
crops, technicalities of fruit grading, agencies used and problems met 
in storing, transporting and merchandising the crop, with laboratory 
practice in packing-house work. Professor Potter. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 
semester credits. 

2. Elementary Pomology — Orchard and Small Fruits. A brief 

consideration of the principles and practice involved in orcharding 

and in the culture of the most important of the small fruits. Professor 

Potter. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Agriculture. 2 
lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

3. Fruit Judging. A study of the fruit characters and commercial 
characteristics of the leading varieties of fruits with special refer- 
ence to those important in New England. The student is required to 
become proficient in recognizing varieties, in determining causes of 
various blemishes, and in judging exhibition fruit. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Latimer. 

Elective for any student. 2 laboratories; 2 semester 
credits. 

13. Vegetable Forcing. A study of special vegetables as grown 
under glass. Emphasis is placed upon the commercial phases of the 
work, including varieties, culture, and marketing. Each student is 
required to grow crops from seeding to maturity. Associate Pro- 
fessor Hepler. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 
semester credits. 

14. Vegetable Gardening. A study of garden soils, testing, and 
planting seeds, selection of varieties with reference to New Hamp- 

187 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

shire conditions, construction and management of hotbeds and cold 
frames, and the fertilization, cultivation, and irrigation of the garden. 
Associate Professor Hepler. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Agriculture. 2 
lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

26. Ornamental Woody Plants in Spring. A study of woody 
plants used for landscape purposes in New Hampshire and northern 
New England as they appear in spring and summer. Mr. Clapp. 

Required of Horticulture students who do not elect 
Horticulture 55 or 65. Elective for any other student. 2 
lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

27. Ornamental Woody Plants in Autumn. The identification 
of ornamental woody plants for landscape use in New Hampshire 
and northern New England. The characteristics of the plants in fall 
and early winter are particularly noted. Mr. Clapp. 

Required of Horticulture students who do not elect Hor- 
ticulture 55 or 65. Elective for other Sophornores, Jun- 
iors, or Seniors. Preferably preceded by Horticulture 26. 
1 lecture ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

28. Elementary Landscape Design. A study of the principles in- 
volved in ornamental and landscape gardening. Special attention is 
given to beautifying the home surroundings. Mr. Clapp. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 
semester credits. 

38. Floral Design. This course is arranged to instruct in the prin- 
ciples and theories of floral design and the use of flowers in the 
home. To a limited extent, a survey is made of the use of flowers at 
public functions held in halls and churches. Participation in the actual 
practice of floral arrangement will be required of each student. Mr. 
Clapp. 

Elective for any student. Registration by permission of 
the instructor. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

39. Greenhouse Construction and Management. This course 
treats of modern methods of greenhouse work and the more important 

188 



HORTICULTURE 

plants grown commercially under glass. Varieties, culture, marketing, 
and enemies of greenhouse plants are studied. Each student is re- 
quired to do practical work in propagating, potting, watering plants 
and ventilating greenhouses. A study is made of the history and de- 
velopment of different types of greenhouses, including methods of 
heating and general management. Mr. Macfarlane. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 
semester credits. 

40. Outdoor Floriculture. A study of the art of growing flowers 
both indoors and in the garden. It includes the classification and 
culture of foliage and flowering plants for indoor use, and of flower- 
ing annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs and bedding plants for the 
outdoor garden. Lecture and laboratory work is supplemented by 
field trips. Mr. Macfarlane. 

Elective for any student. 2 lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 
semester credits. 

41, 42. Advanced Horticulture. Subject-matter in any phase of 
horticulture (with laboratory practice if desirable) to meet the needs 
of special students or groups of students may be taken by arrange- 
ment with the head of the department. Professor Potter and staff. 

i in 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Students must obtain 
permission to register from the head of the department. 
Hours and credits to be arranged. 

44. Advanced Pomology Laboratory. Seasonal practice work in 
fruit-growing including such operations as pruning, grafting, plant- 
ing, and spraying, or similar practice in growing vegetables or orna- 
mental plants. Students are expected to spend two half-days each 
week in the orchard, garden or greenhouses, and will meet for one 
hour to discuss fundamental principles involved. Professor Potter. 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 2. 14 or 40. Elective for any 
student. 1 lecture ; 4 laboratories ; 5 semester credits. 

48, 49. Beekeeping. The second semester course should prefer- 
ably precede the first. It comprises a study of the life history and 
habits of honey bees and their adaptation to apiary conditions. 

189 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The laboratory work includes the assembling and use of hives and 
hive fittings, and practice in handling bees. In the first semester 
attention is given to the principles and methods underlying the 
production of commercial crops of comb and extracted honey, with 
laboratory practice in the care and protection of bees during the 
fall and winter, the extraction of honey and the preparation for 
market of extracted honey, comb honey, and wax. Associate Pro- 
fessor Hepler. 

Elective for any student. 1 lecture; 1 laboratory; 2 
semester credits. 

54. Advanced Pomology : Orchard and Small Fruits. A de- 
tailed study of fundamental principles and experimental data and 
their application to orchard problems such as growth and rest period 
in fruit plants, water requirements, soil management, pruning, fruit 
bud formation, fruit setting, pollination, thinning, winter injury and 
the quality and keeping period of fruits in storage. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Latimer. 

Prerequisite: Botany 1, 2 and Horticulture 2. Elective 
for Juniors and Seniors. 2 lectures ; 2 cemester credits. 

55. Systematic Survey of Fruits. The important species of fruits 
and nuts of temperate regions and their botanical relationships are 
studied. The student is expected to become familiar with the history, 
distribution, and merits of each species, and the horticultural varieties 
developed from it. Assistant Professor Latimer. 

Prerequisites: Botany 1, 2 and Horticulture 2. Elective 
for Juniors and Seniors. Required of Seniors in Horti- 
culture who have not taken Horticulture 65 or Horticul- 
ture 26, 27. 2 lectures; 2 semester credits. (Given in 
alternate years; offered in 1938-39). 

65. Advanced Vegetable Gardening. This course deals with the 
management of commercial vegetable gardens. It also includes a 
systematic study of the species and varieties of the more important 
families of vegetables. Associate Professor Hepler. 

Prerequisite: Horticulture 14. Required of Horticulture 
students who do not elect Horticulture 55 or Horti- 

190 



LANGUAGES 

culture 26 and 27. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 2 
lectures; 1 laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

91, 92. Horticultural Seminar. A review of recent horticultural 
literature and methods of investigational work. Each student is re- 
quired to prepare and present a term paper on some horticultural 
topic. Professor Potter and staff. 

Required of Seniors in Horticulture. Other students 
must obtain permission to enroll. 2 lectures ; 2 semester 
credits. 

94. Evolution and Improvement of Plants. The application of 
the principles of genetics to agricultural plant-breeding. Hybridiza- 
tion and selection are studied as means of improving horticultural 
varieties of plants. Professor Potter. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 49. Elective for any student. 2 
lectures; 2 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
offered in 1938-39) 



LANGUAGES 

Clifford S. Parker, Professor 
John S. Walsh, Associate Professor 
Rudolf L. Hering, Assistant Professor 
Julio Berzunza, Assistant Professor 
Paul P. Grigaut, Assistant Professor 
John A. Floyd. Instructor 
James T. Schoolcraft, Jr., Instructor 
Terrence J. Rafferty, Assistant 
Madeleine A. Cournoyer, Assistant 

Courses 1, 2 and 3, 4 in French, German, and Spanish are planned 
particularly to help students acquire a reading knowledge of the re- 
spective language and thus enable them (1) to pass the reading test 
described on page 98 of the catalog, and (2) to utilize the language 
as an asset in other fields of learning and along many vocational 

lines. 

The advanced courses have two main objectives: (1) to prepare 
students to become teachers of French, German, Latin, or Spanish in 

191 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

secondary schools ; (2) to give all students a valuable acquaintance 
with the language, literature, and civilization of foreign countries in 
ancient and modern times. 

For special requirements expected of majors in languages, students 
should consult the head of the department. 

All students are cordially invited to attend the weekly meetings 
of the French Club for practice in conversational French. 

FRENCH 

(Freshmen will be assigned to French 1, French 3, or 
French 5, on the basis of their performance in the 
French Placement Exanmiation in Freshman Week.) 

Professor Parker, Assistant Professor Grigaut, Mr. Floyd, 
Mr. Rafferty, Miss Cournoyer 

1, 2. Elementary French. Elements of French grammar, read- 
ing of simple prose, oral practice, dictation. The course will be sec- 
tioned for those entering with credit and without credit in high school 
French. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. 5 recitations ; 4 semes- 
ter credits. 

3, 4. Intermediate French. Reading and translation, review of 
grammar, oral practice, composition. 

Prerequisite: French 2 or its equivalent. 3 prerequisite 
for 4. 3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 

5, 6. Masterpieces of French Literature. Prose and poetry of 
some of the most important writers of the seventeenth, eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries; history of French civilization; composi- 
tion and oral practice. 

Prerequisite: French 4. 5 prerequisite for 6. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

13, 14. French Composition and Conversation. The use of writ- 
ten and spoken French is taught by careful attention to pronunciation, 
composition and grammar. 

This course is especially valuable for students who wish to teach 
French and conduct French clubs. Such students will have an oppor- 
tunity to cooperate with the instructor in the preparation and pres- 

192 



LANGUAGES 

entation of French plays. This course should be taken by every student 
desiring to obtain departmental recommendation for the teaching of 
French. Enrollment is limited to twenty students per section. Per- 
mission of the instructor or of the head of the department is required 
before enrollment. 

Prerequisite: French 4 with grade of 75 or better; or 
French 6. 13 prerequisite for 14. 3 recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

11, 12. French Classicism. This course, covering the period from 
1600 to 1750, will trace the rise and development of the classical ideal 
in French literature, study the masterpieces of the great writers of the 
age of Louis XIV, and examine the decline and disintegration of 
classicism in the 18th century. 

Prerequisite: French 6. 11 prerequisite for 12. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

53, 54. French Romanticism. This course, covering the period 
from 1750 to 1850, will begin with a study of J. J. Rousseau's work 
and influence, continuing with the important writers of the Romantic 
school in the 19th cenutry, and analyze the intermingling of Romanti- 
cism and Realism in the work of Balzac. 

Prerequisite : French 12. 53 prerequisite for 54. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

57, 58. French Literature from 1850 to the Present. This 
course will study Realism and Naturalism in the novel and drama, 
the Parnassian and Symbolist schools in poetry, the psychological 
novels of Bourget, and the various schools and trends of the late 19th 
and early 20th centuries. Conducted largely in French. 

Prerequisite: French 12 or 54. 57 prerequisite for 58. 
3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

61, 62. French Grammar. This course, intended primarily for 
those who intend to teach French, will be devoted to a systematic 
study of French grammar in all its phases from elementary to highly 
advanced. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the instructor or of the head 
of the department. Permission will be granted only to 

193 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students. 61 prerequisite 
for 62. 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

63, 64. French Literature and Civilization of the Middle Ages 
AND THE Renaissance. A study of the various forms and master- 
pieces of French literature from the beginning to the year 1600, with 
consideration of their historical and social background. Lectures, 
extensive reading, reports, and recitations. Recommended for Sen- 
iors and graduate students. 

Prerequisite : French 12 or 54. 63 prerequisite for 64. 

2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

71, 72. Studies in Modern French Literature. This course will 
take up several of the greatest French writers from 1600 to 1900 for 
a detailed and comprehensive study of their work. The choice of 
writers to be studied in a given year will depend upon the needs or 
tastes of the students electing the course. The work will be conducted 
largely in French. 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 71 prerequi- 
site for 72. 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

French-Education (Fr-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching of 
French in the High School. This course will study the special ob- 
jectives, methods, and problems of high school French. It is open only 
to Seniors and graduate students who are planning to teach. Visits 
to schools to observe the work of experienced teachers will be ar- 
ranged. Students in this course may be given an opportunity to assist 
in the work of French 1, 2. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the head of the department. 

3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 



GERMAN 

Professor Parker, Assistant Professor Hering, 
Mr. Schoolcraft 

1, 2. Elementary German. Pronunciation, grammar, word build- 
ing, reading of easy prose, composition, conversation, dictation, mem- 
ory work. 

194 



LANGUAGES 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. 3 recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

3, 4. Intermediate German. German syntax, reading of from 
150 to 200 pages in class and about 300 pages of outside reading, com- 
position, dictation, word-building, and conversation. 

Prerequisite : German 2 or two years of high school Ger- 
man. 3 prerequisite for 4. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

5, 6. Scientific German. This course is primarily for students 
in the scientific, pre-medical, and technological curricula. The aim is 
to give students the ability to read scientific German and to translate 
very accurately. 

Prerequisite : German 2 or two years of high school Ger- 
man. 5 prerequisite for 6. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

7, 8. Modern German Fiction and Drama. The different move- 
ments in German literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, 
compared with those of the preceding century. The influence of 
Lessing, Schiller, and Goethe on the drama. The development of the 
drama from classicism to naturalism. Course to be conducted mainly 
in German. Written themes in German, outside reading and reports, 
oral discussions. 

Prerequisite: German 4. 7 prerequisite for 8. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
not offered in 1937-38). 

11, 12. German Literature of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. A study of the structure of the drama of the classic 
period is the chief aim of this course. The plays of Lessing, Schiller, 
Goethe and Hebbel will be studied either in class or as outside reading. 

Prerequisite: German 4. 11 prerequisite for 12. 3 reci- 
tations; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
offered in 1937-38). 

13, 14. Conversation and Composition. The aim of this course is 
to give students the ability to converse on everyday topics and to 
express themselves easily in writing. The work will be conducted in 
German. 

195 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: German 4. 13 prerequisite for 14. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. 

51, 52. German Literature. A survey of German literature. 

Readings, themes and reports on outside readings. Lectures and 

quizzes. 

Prerequisite : Three years of college German or equiva- 
lent. 51 prerequisite for 52. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. (Given in alternate years; offered in 1937-38) 

55, 56. Deutschkunde. The history of German civilization. 

Prerequisite : Three years of college German or equiva- 
lent. 55 prerequisite for 56. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 
1937-38) 



greek 

Associate Professor Walsh 

1, 2. Elementary Greek. Grammar, composition, translation. 
(Given every third year; not offered in 1937-38.) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1 prerequi- 
site for 2. 3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 



latin 

Associate Professor Walsh 

3, 4. Advanced Latin. This course will be devoted to the improve- 
ment of the student's ability to read Latin prose and poetry. The first 
part of the year will be given over to a concentrated review of gram- 
mar and vocabulary. Work on unseen passages and prepared lessons 
in prose authors will occupy the rest of the year. 

Prerequisite: Two years of high school Latin. 3 pre- 
requisite for 4. 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

5, 6. Latin Poetry. Study of selected poems of Catullus, Ovid, 
Phaedrus, Martial and the odes and epodes of Horace. Translations, 

196 



LANGUAGES 

lectures, and study of Latin influence on English poetry. This course 
is open to students who have passed three years of Latin in prepara- 
tory school. 

Prerequisite : Latin 4. 5 prerequisite for 6. 3 recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

7, 8. Latin Prose and Comedy. The plays of Plautus and Ter- 
ence, Livy's History (Books I and II), and Pliny's Letters will be 
studied for their value as mirrors of the life and history of Rome as 
well as for their literary value. 

Prerequisite : Latin 4. 7 prerequisite for 8. 3 recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

51, 52. Philosophy and Satire. Particular attention will be paid 
to the study of philosophy, religion, natural science and social theories 
of the Romans, as exemplified in the writings of Horace, Martial, and 
Cicero. 

Prerequisite: Latin 8. 51 prerequisite for 52. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
offered in 1937-38) 

55, 56. Literature and History. This course offers a compre- 
hensive view of Latin literature of the Golden Age. The works of 
Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil will be studied for their literary value 
and historical content. The history of Rome during the Golden 
Age will be studied in order to provide the background necessary to 
the student or teacher of the classics. 

Prerequisite: Latin 8. 55 prerequisite for 56. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
not offered in 1937-38) 

63, 64. Latin Composition and Teaching Methods. Translation 
of English narrative, beginning with the fundamentals of grammar 
and progressing to a study of prose style and effective idiomatic 
expression. 

It is open to those who have taken or are taking another course in 
college Latin and is most necessary for prospective teachers of Latin. 

Prerequisite. 63 prerequisite for 64. 3 recitations; 3 
semester credits. 

197 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SPANISH 

Assistant Professor Berzunza, Mr. Floyd, Mr. Rafferty 

I, 2. Elementary Spanish. Elements of Spanish grammar, read- 
ing of simple prose, oral practice, dictation. 

Prerequisite : 1 prerequisite for 2. 3 recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

3, 4. Modern Spanish Prose and Poetry. Review of grammar, 
memorization, composition, oral practice and reading. 

Prerequisite : Spanish 2 or its equivalent. Freshmen who 
offer two or more units of Spanish for admission to col- 
lege may take this course. 3 prerequisite for 4. 3 reci- 
tations ; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. The Spanish Novel. In the first part of the course, repre- 
sentative novelists of the modern period such as Fernan Caballero, 
Valera, Perez, Galdos, Pardo Bazan and Palacio Valdes form the 
subject of study. In the latter part, Cervantes will be studied. Col- 
lateral reading, reports, and lectures on the history of the novel. 

Prerequisite : Spanish 4. 7 prerequisite for 8. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
not offered in 1937-38) 

II, 12. Spanish Drama. Dramas of Lope de Vega, Calderon, 
Echegaray, the Brothers Alvarez Quintero, Benavente, and others. 
This course is carried on as far as possible in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 4. 11 prerequisite for 12. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
offered in 1937-38) 

13, 14. Spanish Composition and Conversation. The use of 
written and spoken Spanish is taught by careful attention to pronun- 
ciation, grammar, and composition. 

This course is especially valuable for students who wish to teach 
Spanish and conduct Spanish clubs. Permission of the instructor is 
required before enrollment. 

Prerequisite : Spanish 4. 13 prerequisite for 14. 3 recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. 

198 



MATHEMATICS 

Hermon L. Slobin, Professor 
George N. Bauer, Professor "^ 
Walter E. Wilbur, Associate Professor y 
Marvin R. Solt, Assistant Professor 
MiLTiADES S. Demos, Assistant Professor 
William L. Kichline, Instructor 
Donald M. Perkins, Instructor 

1. Algebra. A study of algebra, beginning with a review of the 
fundamental principles of high school algebra and continuing with 
the subject matter of Mathematics 5. This course is designed for 
students whose high school training does not fit them for Mathematics 
5. Mr. Perkins. 

Prerequisite: Two years of mathematics in high school 
including at least one year of algebra. 6 recitations ; 4 
semester credits. 

2. Trigonometry. The theory and applications of plane trigonom- 
etry and the analytic geometry of the straight line and certain special 
curves. Mr. Perkins. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 1, or its equivalent. 5 recita- 
tions ; 4 semester credits. 

3. Analytic Geometry. A course in analytic geometry equivalent 
to that part of Mathematics 6 covering analytic geometry. Assistant 
Professor Demos. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 2, or its equivalent. 3 recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

4. Calculus. A study of some of the more elementary fundamen- 
tal concepts and operations of the calculus. It is designed to give to 
those who are not planning to continue the study of advanced mathe- 
matics some conception of the calculus as an instrument in the sci- 
ences, as a culture, and as a mental discipline. Associate Professor 
Wilbur. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 3 or 6. 3 recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

5. 6. First Year Mathematics. This constitutes a course in alge- 
bra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Professor Slobin, Associate 

199 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Professor Wilbur, Assistant Professor Solt, Assistant Professor De- 
mos, Mr. Kichline, and Mr. Perkins. 

Prerequisite : See requirements of mathematics for ad- 
mission to College of Technology. 6 recitations ; 5 semes- 
ter credits. 

7, 8. Calculus. Applications of differentiation and integration; 
special methods of integration; the definite integral, applications of 
the definite integral to geometry, physics, and mechanics ; introduction 
to sequence and series. Professor Slobin, Assistant Professor Solt, 
Mr. Kichline and Mr. Perkins. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 3 or 6. 3 recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

10. Astronomy. A brief descriptive course. The earth as an astro- 
nomical body; the sun and the solar system; the constellations; the 
stars. Assistant Professor Solt. 

3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

20. Solid Geometry. Elements of solid geometry. Mr. Perkins. 

Prerequisite: High school algebra and plane geometry. 

2 recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

21, 22. Mathematics for Students of Agriculture. Elements of 
algebra, geometry and trigonometry. Associate Professor Wilbur, 
Assistant Professor Solt and Mr. Kichline. 

3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

31, 32. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. This course is 
designed to prepare students for the study of statistics and mathe- 
matics of finance. It uses both analytical and graphical methods. 
The subjects studied are some of the fundamental functions, 
logarithmic computations, the simpler elements of least squares, etc. 
Emphasis is placed upon finding mathematical laws or formulae 
from empirical data. Professor Bauer, Associate Professor Wilbur 
and Mr. Kichline. 

Prerequisite: High school algebra and plane geometry. 
3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

200 



MATHEMATICS 

34. Mathematics of Finance. A study of simple and compound 
interest, discount, annuities, depreciation, evaluation of securities, 
building and loan associations, and the elements of life insurance. 
Associate Professor Wilbur. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 31, 5 or 1. 3 recitations; 3 
semester credits. 

41, 42. Statistical Methods. This is a basic course and aims to 
present some of the fundamental principles and methods of statistics. 
Illustrative material drawn from several fields of study including edu- 
cation, business, sociology, and chance. It deals with such topics as 
the graphical representation of statistical material, frequency distri- 
bution, measure of dispersion, averages, time series, index numbers, 
correlation and estimations. Professor Bauer. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 32, 6 or 3. 3 recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

51, 52. Advanced Calculus, Differential Equations, Vector 
Analysis and Their Application to Engineering Problems. Assist- 
ant Professor Solt. 

r 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 8. 3 recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

53. Economic and Social Statistics. Applications of the sta- 
tistical method to economic and social problems. Professor Bauer. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 42. 3 recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

55, 56. Advanced Plane and Solid Analytical Geometry. Pro- 
fessor Slobin. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 8. 3 recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. (Given in 1937-38 and thereafter in alternate 
years.) 

57. The History of Mathematics. This course is designed espe- 
cially for those preparing to teach mathematics in the high school. It 
aims to give an historical background and an appreciation of the de- 
velopment of various fields of mathematics. Associate Professor 
Wilbur. 

201 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 4, or 7. 3 recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 
1937-38.) 

61, 62. Sequences and Series. An introduction to advanced analy- 
sis. Professor Slobin. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

71, 72. Advanced Algebra. The following topics will be treated in 
this course : matrix theory, including elementary divisors and invari- 
ant factors ; linear transformations ; quadratic bilinear, and Hermitian 
forms; invariants and covariants with geometric applications; and 
topics from the theory of equations, including symmetric functions, 
and groups of substitutions. Assistant Professor Demos. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 8. 3 recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1937- 
38.) 

Mathematics-Education (Math-Ed) 91. Problems in the 
Teaching of High School Mathematics. A study of the aims and 
values of secondary school mathematics, the recommendations of the 
national committee on mathematics requirements, and the state board 
requirements; also a study of the subject-matter and the sequence in 
which it should be presented in both junior and senior high schools, 
and the various techniques used in teaching secondary school mathe- 
matics. Errors, testing program, and remedial teaching will be in- 
cluded. Lectures, assigned readings and discussion. Associate Pro- 
fessor Wilbur. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 8, or 34 and 4. Students pre- 
paring to teach mathematics in high school should regis- 
ter for this course. 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 



202 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

George W. Case, Professor 

Edward L. Getchell, Associate Professor'^ 

Thomas J. Laton, Assistant Professor 

Edward T. Donovan, Assistant Professor 

E. Howard Stolworthy, Assistant Professor^ 

John J. Dicker, Instructor - 

Lyman J. Batchelder, Instructor ^' 

John C. Tonkin, Instructor >-- 

Elias O'Connell, Instructor , 

1, 2. Engineering Drawing. The fundamentals of engineering 
drawing, including free-hand lettering, use of drawing instruments, 
the solution of problems in engineering drawing by applying the 
principles of descriptive geometry, including a brief study of isomet- 
ric drawing. Assistant Professors Laton and Stolworthy and Mr. 
Uicker. 

1 : Required of all Technology Freshmen. 2 : Required of 
Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Freshmen. 
2 laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

3. Machine Drawing. Application of the principles of engineer- 
ing drawing to the drawing of machine parts. Various pictorial sys- 
tems are studied as an aid in sketching. Commercial drafting room 
methods are employed in sketching machine parts, drawing from 
sketches, and making tracings. Reproduction methods and modern 
drafting room organizations are studied. Assistant Professor Laton. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 1. Required of 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Sophomores. 2 
laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

4. Kinematics. A study of motion in machine construction ; belts, 
and other flexible connectors ; gears and gear teeth ; wheels in trains ; 
epicyclic trains ; cams ; instantaneous centers ; linkwork, velocity and 
acceleration diagrams. Assistant Professor Laton. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 1. Required of 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Sophomores. 2 
recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

5. 6. Mechanical Laboratory. This course is primarily to ac- 
quaint the student with the field of mechanical engineering. The 

203 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

student will be introduced to the mechanical laboratory and the Uni- 
versity power plant and familiarized with the equipment therein. 
Problems in mechanical engineering practice will be presented and 
solved. Assistant Professor Donovan. 

Required of Sophomores in Mechanical Engineering. 1 
laboratory ; 1 semester credit. 

7, 8. Mechanics. A study of forces and moment of forces ; de- 
termination of stresses in trusses and cranes ; centroids and center 
of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; translation and rota- 
tion of bodies ; work, power and energy. The application of Mechan- 
ics to the determination of stress and strain in rigid bodies. The 
study of thin walled cylinders; riveted joints; torsion; transverse 
loading of beams ; deflection in beams of all kinds ; study of col- 
umns ; compound stresses as applied to design of machine parts. 
Work in the second semester to be paralleled by exercises in the 
materials laboratory. Associate Professor Getchell. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8. Required of Juniors in 
Mechanical Engineering. 7: 4 recitations; 4 semester 
credits. 8 : 3 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester 
credits. 

9, 10. Mechanics. Similar to 7 and 8, but with those portions 
having application to the design of machine parts omitted. Associ- 
ate Professor Getchell. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 8. Required of Juniors in 

Civil and Electrical Engineering. 9: 3 recitations; 3 

semester credits. 10 : 3 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 
semester credits, 

11, 12. Mechanics. Principles of Mechanics as applied to archi- 
tectural work. Study of force systems, moments, equilibrium, trusses, 
center of gravity and moment of inertia; tension, compression and 
shear; riveted joints; strength and deflection of beams; columns; 
reinforced concrete. Associate Professor Getchell. 

Required of Junior Architects. 3 recitations; 3 semester 
credits. 

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

13. Manufacture of Iron and Steel. Study of the location of 
ores and other raw materials entering into the manufacture of pig 
iron; of the blast furnace and conversion of pig iron into wrought 
iron; Bessemer and open hearth steels, and of the manufacture of 
steel by electrical methods. Course to be paralleled by a laboratory 
devoted to the identification and heat treatment of various types of 
steel. Associate Professor Getchell. 

Required of Seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 2 reci- 
tations ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

15, 16. Machine Design. The application of the principles of Me- 
chanics to the design of machine elements. This work to be taken up 
with the idea of manufacturing the parts in the most economical man- 
ner in the shops. General principles of design will be followed rather 
than attempting to develop any particular system of procedure. 
Assistant Professor Laton. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 8. Required of 
Senior Mechanical Engineers. 1 recitation; 2 labora- 
tories ; 3 semester credits. 

21, 22. Heat Power Engineering. A general study of power gen- 
eration by steam and gas engines. The fundamental thermodynamic 
theory is briefly studied and power plant operation and equipment 
analyzed. Mr. Uicker. 

Prerequisites : Mathematics 7 and Physics 8. Required 
of Civil Engineering Seniors. 21 : 2 recitations ; 2 cred- 
its. 22: 1 recitation; 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 

23, 24. Thermodynamics. A study of the fundamental laws of 
thermodynamics and their relation to the operation of mechanisms 
using gases and vapors as their working substances. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Donovan. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7. Required of Junior Me- 
chanical Engineers. 3 recitations; 3 semester credits. 

25, 26. Heat Power Engineering. A study of the laws of en- 
gineering thermodynamics and a consideration of steam power plant 
and internal combustion engine equipment. Assistant Professor 
Donovan. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 7. Required of Junior Elec- 
trical Engineers. 25 : 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 
26 : 3 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

27. Mechanical Laboratory. A study of the apparatus and 
methods of testing power plant operation and equipment. Assistant 
Professor Donovan and Mr. Uicker. 

Parallel requirement: Enrollment in Mechanical Engi- 
neering 25, 26. Required of Junior Electrical Engineers. 
2 laboratories; 2 semester credits. 

29, 30. Mechanical Laboratory. Methods of investigating opera- 
tion and testing of power plant equipment. Assistant Professor Dono- 
van and Mr. Uicker. 

Parallel requirement: Enrollment in Mechanical Engi- 
neering 23. Required of Junior Mechanical Engineers. 
29 : 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 30 : 1 laboratory ; 
1 semester credit. 

Z2. Mechanical Laboratory. Testing of steam and gas engines 
in accordance with A.S.M.E. power test codes. Assistant Professor 
Donovan. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 30. Required of 
Senior Mechanical Engineers. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester 
credits. 

ZZ, 34. Power Plants. A study of the steam generating power 
plant dealing with its equipment and costs. Assistant Professor Dono- 
van. 

Prerequisite : Mechanical Engineering 24. Required of 
Senior Mechanical Engineers. ZZ : 2 recitations ; 2 semes- 
ter credits. 34 : 1 recitation ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 

35, Z(i. Automotive Engineering. A study of the internal combus- 
tion engine including its thermodynamics, carburetion, lubrication and 
vibration. Consideration is given to the design of the principle moving 
parts of the automotive vehicle. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Prerequisites : Mechanical Engineering 8 and 24. Alter- 
nate with Aeronautics for Seniors in Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 2 recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

37. Aeronautics. Elementary aerodynamics and aircraft con- 
struction ; the use of the wind tunnel. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Prerequisites : Mechanical Engineering 8 and Civil En- 
gineering 24. Alternate with Automotive Engineering 
for Seniors in Mechanical Engineering. 2 recitations ; 1 
laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

38. Aerial Navigation. The instruments and methods used in 
navigation of aircraft. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Prerequisite : To be taken concurrently with Meteorol- 
ogy 4. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

39. Heating and Ventilating. A study of the heat losses and 
ventilation requirements of buildings, and the design of specific heat- 
ing and ventilating systems. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Required of Juniors in Mechanical Engineering. 2 lab- 
oratories ; 2 semester credits. 

41. Heating and Ventilating. A study of the present methods of 
heating and ventilating buildings. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Architecture. 2 lab- 
oratories; 2 semester credits. (Given in alternate 

years; not offered in 1937-38.) 

45, 46. Management. A study of the principles of management as 

they deal with the organization of operations, the administration of 
personnel and the economic expenditure and investment of money. 
Professor Case. 

45 : Required of Senior Mechanical Engineers and op- 
tional for Senior Civil and Electrical Engineers. 46 : 
required of all Senior Engineers, 45 : 2 recitations ; 
2 semester credits. 46 : 3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

47, 48. Contribution of Engineers and Scientists to the Field 
OF Engineering. Studies of the personal characteristics and life work 
of engineers and scientists. This course is intended for engineering 
students who are disqualified from Military Science and Physical 

207 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Education. Less reading will be required of students disqualified only 
from Military Science. Mr. Dicker. 

2 recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

50. Thesis. The thesis embodies research or commercial investi- 
gation. Equal emphasis is placed upon composition and accuracy in 
subject matter. 

Required of Senior Mechanical Engineers. 1 recitation ; 
2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

A.S.M.E. 1, 2, 3, 4. Student Branch of American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. An organization of Junior and Senior 
students in Mechanical Engineering. The course consists of prepara- 
tion and presentation of addresses on mechanical engineering topics 
by members and in which the instructor present criticizes the work 
from the point of view of delivery, subject matter and terms used. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. No credit. 

mechanical engineering shop courses 

51, S2. Elementary Shop Practice. For Shop Work, Fresh- 
men in Technology, except those in Architecture and Chemistry, are 
divided into three groups meeting simultaneously in wood shop, 
machine shop and forge shop. The work in the wood shop consists 
of pattern making and elementary foundry practice. In the machine 
shop, practice is given in the operation of engine lathes and other 
machine tools, and particular attention is given to the machinability 
of metals in the preparation of test specimens for use in the course 
in strength of materials. In the forge shop study is made of the 
operations necessary in the forging and welding of iron and steel, 
in the hardening, tempering, and annealing of steel. These groups 
interchange at the end of each twelve week period, so that all three 
subjects are covered during the year. Mr. Batchelder, Mr. Tonkin 
and Mr. O'Connell. 

1 lecture; 2 laboratories; 3 semester credits. 

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

53, (S3). Wood Work, Plain cabinet making and finishing; use of 
stain filler, varnish, shellac, enamels, etc. Mr. Batchelder. 

Elective for Liberal Arts and Teacher Training students. 
2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

54. Wood Shop. Instruction in the care and use of tools in farm 
carpenter shop ; saw filing ; the making of various implements used on 
the farm ; use of steel square ; laying out frames ; care of lumber on 
the farm. Mr. Batchelder. 

Elective for students in Agriculture. 2 laboratories ; 2 
semester credits. 

55, (S5). Wood Shop. Practice teaching under the supervision of 
the instructor in wood working. Mr. Batchelder. 

For Seniors in Industrial Teacher Training and Educa- 
tion. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

56. Wood Shop. Advanced pattern making and advanced cabinet 
making. Mr. Batchelder. 

Prerequisites : Mechanical Engineering SI and S3. For 
Seniors in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and 
Education. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

512. Forge Shop. This is a study of the forging of iron and 
steel; and is designed to teach the operations of drawing, welding^ 
upsetting, twisting, splitting, and punching of iron; the hardening, 
tempering, and annealing of steel ; and the case hardening of mild 
steel as adapted to agricultural work. Mr. O'Connell, 

Elective for students in Agricultural Teacher Training 
, Curriculum. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

513, (S13). Forge Shop. Advanced work in forging, electric and 
acetylene welding, tempering, case hardening, tool dressing. Mr 
O'Connell. 



Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering ^S 11. For Seniors 
in Industrial Teacher Training Curricuhifn. 2 laborator- 
ies ; 2 semester credits. 

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UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

S17, (S17). Machine Shop. Continuation of work given in SI, 
S2. Mr. Tonkin. 

Required of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering 
Sophomores. 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

S19, S20. Machine Shop. Advanced work on the lathe, milling 

machine, planer, shaper and turret lathe, involving making of tools 
and special machinery and apparatus. Mr. Tonkin. ^ .^.-.^ 

Prerequisites : Mechanical Engineering SIS and S17. 2 
laboratories; 2 semester credits. '^^ 

S21, (S21). Machine Shop. Manufacturing. A course in the 
appreciation and measurement of skill, production methods, shop 
management and time study. Mr. Tonkin. 

Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering S20. 2 laborator- 
ies ; 2 semester credits. 

S23. Farm Shop. A short course in general shop work to suit the 
individual needs of a small class of Agricultural Teacher Training 
juniors. The work is to some extent adjusted to meet experience in 
shop work that students have already had. Mr. Tonkin and Mr. 
O'Connell. 

Limited to Agricultural Teacher Training Juniors. 2 lab- 
oratories ; 2 semester credits. 



210 



METEOROLOGY 

Charles H. Pettee, Professor 

E. Howard Stolvvorthy, Assistant Professor 

Donald H. Chapman, Assistant Professor 

2. Elementary Meteorology. A general course designed to aid 
the student in the interpretation of atmospheric phenomena. The ma- 
jor topics for discussion are: the earth as a planet, the heating and 
circulation of the atmosphere, the seasons, and the nature and move- 
ment of the air masses which influence the weather of North America 
and particularly New England. The course concludes with a brief 
consideration of some of the practical rules and methods of weather 
forecasting. Assistant Professor Chapman. 

Elective for all students. 2 lectures or recitations; 2 
semester credits. 

4. Principles of Meteorology. Fundamental physical and thermo- 
dynamic laws and general structure of the atmosphere. Air mass 
theory and a brief study of the technicalities underlying forecasting 
of atmospheric changes. Assistant Professor Stolworthy. 

Prerequisite : Physics 7 or its equivalent. Optional for 
Seniors in Mechanical Engineering; to be taken concur- 
rently with Mechanical Engineering 38. Elective for 
others. 2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Colonel Edward W. Putney, Coast Artillery Corps, Professor 
Major Donovan Swanton, Infantry, Associate Professor 
Major George L. Prindle, Infantry, Assistant Professor 
Major Samuel L. Buracker, Infantry, Assistant Professor 
Captain W. George Devens, Coast Artillery Corps, Assistant Pro- 
fessor 
Sergeant Fred W. Wood, Coast Artillery Corps, Assistant 
Sergeant Fred H. Brown, Infantry, Assistant 

Military training is carried on concurrently with the academic work 
in order that the college man may be prepared for service in time of 

211 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

national emergency as well as for the pursuit of his business or pro- 
fession. 

Two courses in Military Science are offered, one in Coast (heavy 
and anti-aircraft) Artillery, and one in Infantry, each leading to a 
commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps of the United States Army. 
Each course, which covers four years, is divided into the basic course, 
covering the first two years, and the advanced course, covering the 
succeeding two years. The basic course is required of all male Fresh- 
men and Sophomores who are physically fit. The advanced course is 
elective for those who have completed the basic course. 

Exemptions or permission to be absent cannot be accorded to Fresh- 
men or Sophomores ; and any student who is absent from any part of 
the instruction will be required subsequently to make up the omitted 
training or its equivalent before being credited with the number of 
credits necessary for graduation. 

Students enrolled in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Agriculture 
will be assigned to the Infantry Course, and students enrolled in the 
College of Technology will be assigned to the Coast Artillery Course. 
Both courses include the fundamentals of military training, the object 
of which is the development of qualities which make for success in 
either civil or military life, such as good health and an erect carriage, 
courtesy and agreeable manners, enthusiasm, honor, aggressiveness 
and leadership. In addition, each course pays particular attention to 
the special material and methods used in that arm. 

The Coast Artillery Course covers the principles of construction, 
use, and care of artillery. To the engineering student this course 
offers, in addition to military training, an excellent opportunity to 
observe practical applications of his classroom work and to enlarge 
his view of the engineering field. 

The Infantry Course covers the organization, equipment, tactics and 
administration of Infantry units from the squad to the battalion. This 
course stresses leadership. 

The Reserve Officers Training Corps 

Physically fit male students who take military training are enrolled 
in the Reserve Officers Training Corps. Enrollments are for two years 

212 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

each in the Basic and the Advanced Courses. Members of the Corps 
are loaned* all uniforms and equipment necessary in the training. 

Advanced Course. — The students who are selected for the Ad- 
vanced Course and who devote the prescribed time to this course, and 
attend such summer training camps as may be prescribed by the Sec- 
retary of War, are allowed during their Junior and Senior years 
commutation of subsistence at such rate as the Secretary of War may 
prescribe. During the academic year 1936-37 this was 25 cents per 
day, totalling about $160 for the two years. In addition, members of 
the Advanced Course are paid at the same rate of pay as privates of 
the Regular Army, while in actual attendance at the summer training 
camp. Allowance is also made for the purchase of uniforms and 
equipment by members of the Advanced Course. 

Membership in the Corps does not require the student to enter into 
any agreement to continue in college a definite length of time, nor does 
it bind him to any military service. He is as much at liberty to leave 
college as though he were not a member. He is required, once having 
entered upon the course, to complete it as a requisite toward gradu- 
ation in any college maintaining a unit of the Corps, and to observe 
the rules and regulations prescribed for the government of the Corps. 

Commissions. — Each year upon the completion of the Advanced 
Course, all qualified students are tendered commissions in the Officers* 
Reserve Corps of the Army of the United States. 

Summer Camps. — The requirement of members of the Advanced 
Course to attend the summer training camps is prescribed from time 
to time by the Secretary of War. These camps are organized by bring- 
ing together members of the R.O.T.C. from several colleges. The 
training taken at college is elaborated upon and special attention is 
paid to its practical side. The student is furnished transportation to 
and from camp and is provided with appropriate uniform for wear 
during this period, so that his only expenses are for laundry and such 
other personal expenditures as he may care to make. Excellent food 
is provided. Moral conditions are carefully controlled by the Regular 
Army officers in charge. The health and hygiene of the students are 

* A deposit of $15 is required of each student having military equipment in his 
possession, whether registered for Military Science or not. At the end of the 
academic year or upon a student's seve/ing his connection with the University 
this deposit will be refunded to him upon the satisfactory return to the University 
of all military property loaned except that a reasonable deduction will be made to 
cover any damage beyond natural wear and tear or for the loss of any of the 
equipment. 

213 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

under direct supervision of medical officers and medical attention is 
provided for those requiring it while at camp. Athletic contests are 
a feature of the camp and intercollegiate athletics between members 
of the different units are encouraged. The student agrees to observe 
the rules of the camp and to give his best efforts to the comrse of train- 
ing. Thus he is offered at no expense an exceptional opportunity for 
physical and mental development. 

Organization. — The unit is organized into a regiment consisting of 
one battalion (three companies) of Infantry and one battalion (three 
batteries) of Coast Artillery. Student officers, selected from the 
Senior class by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, with the 
approval of the President, are designated for field, staff and company 
officers not later than the opening of the spring term. 



MILITARY SCIENCE COURSES 

Basic Course, Infantry 

1, 2. Military Fundamentals. Organization of the Army and 
Infantry; military discipline, courtesy and customs of the service; 
military history and policy ; National Defense Act and the R.O.T.C. ; 
military obligations of citizenship ; the current international situation ; 
military sanitation and first aid ; weapons ; rifle marksmanship ; map 
reading; leadership; drill and ceremonies. 

No prerequisites. Required of Freshmen. 2 recitations ; 1 
drill; or 3 recitations, according to season; IJ^ semester 
credits. 

3, 4. Second Year, Basic. Military history and policy, weapons, 
scouting and patrolling, musketry, combat principles, leadership, drill 
and ceremonies. 

Prerequisite : 2. Required of Sophomores. 2 recita- 
tions ; 1 drill ; or 3 recitations, according to season ; 
1^ semester credits. 

Advanced Course, Infantry 

5, 6. First Year, Advanced. Weapons, aerial photograph reading 
and interpretation, combat training, estimate of the situation and 
combat orders, field fortification, leadership, drill and ceremonies. 

214 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

Prerequisite: 4. 3 recitations; 1 drill; or 4 recitations, 
according to season; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. Second Year, Advanced. Military history and policy; com- 
pany administration; military intelligence; signal communications; 
chemical warfare, defensive use of non-toxic agent; military law; 
combat principles, platoon, company and battalion; leadership; drill 
and ceremonies. 

Prerequisite : 6. 3 recitations ; 1 drill ; or 4 recitations, 
according to season ; 3 semester credits. 



Basic Course, Coast Artillery 

9, 10. Military Fundamentals. Organization of the Army and 
Coast Artillery; military discipline, courtesy and customs of the ser- 
vice; military history and policy; National Defense Act and the 
R.O.T.C. ; military obligations of citizenship ; the current international 
situation; primary coast artillery instruction; rifle marksmanship; 
ammunition, weapons and material; military sanitation and first aid; 
leadership; drill and ceremonies. 

No prerequisites. Required of Freshmen in Coast Ar- 
tillery. 2 recitations; 1 drill; or 3 recitations, according 
to season; 1^^ semester credits. 

11, 12. Second Year, Basic. Fire control and position finding for 
seacoast artillery; characteristics of naval targets; fire control and 
position finding for antiaircraft artillery; identification of aircraft; 
leadership ; drill and ceremonies. 

Prerequisite: 10. Required of Sophomores in Coast Ar- 
tillery. 2 recitations ; 1 drill ; or 3 recitations, according 
to season; 1% semester credits. 



Advanced Course, Coast Artillery 

13, 14. First Year, Advanced. Map and aerial photograph read- 
ing ; combat orders ; gunnery, seacoast and antiaircraft artillery ; lead- 
ership ; drill and ceremonies. 

215 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite : 12. 3 recitations ; 1 drill ; or 4 recitations, 
according to season ; 3 semester credits. 

15, 16. Second Year, Advanced. Military history and policy; mo- 
tor transportation ; artillery tactics ; artillery material, guns, carriages, 
mines and ammunition ; military law ; orientation, topographical oper- 
ation required for artillery firing; field engineering; administration; 
leadership ; drill and ceremonies. 

Prerequisite : 14. 3 recitations ; 1 drill ; or 4 recitations, 
according to season ; 3 semester credits. 

Note. — Students following courses 1, 2; 3, 4; or 9, 10; 11, 12 above, 
who also elect to serve in the University Band, will receive ^ credit 
additional per semester. 



MUSIC 

Robert W. Manton, Associate Professor and Director 
Lewis C. Swain, Instructor and Bandmaster 

The courses offered by the department for a major are of three 
kinds : 

1. Courses which are technical and grammatical in nature and are 
meant to provide a solid background for students intending to follow 
the musical profession as teachers and composers. These are Music 
21, 22; 23, 24; 25, 26; 27, 28; 33, 34. 

2. Courses which treat of the historical, literary and aesthetic side 
of music and are meant for those who wish to acquire a broad appreci- 
ation of the art, and to familiarize themselves with the standard works 
of musical literature. These courses are Music 15, 16; 17; 19, 20; and 
29, 30. 

3. The third group of courses is practical in nature and embraces 
the educational activities of the University Glee Clubs, Band, and 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Closely related departments are Languages (French and German), 
and English (English Literature and Appreciation of Art). 

It is recommended that students who intend to elect Music as a 
major consult the head of the department as early in the Freshman 

216 



MUSIC 

year as possible relative to the best disposition of the sequence of 
courses in the major. All students majoring in Music are required 
to take the following subjects before graduation: Music 15, 16; 17; 
19, 20; 21, 22; 23, 24; 25, 26. 

For students who intend to take only one or two courses in Music, 
for the cultivation of musical taste and general knowledge. Music 15, 
16, 17, or 19, and 20 are recommended as best adapted to this end. 

Students interested in some particular musical organization, such as 
glee club or orchestra, are permitted to elect the work desired. 

I, (1). University Band 

Prerequisites : Ability to play some band instrument and 
satisfactory completion of Basic Course, R.O.T.C. Open 
to others with special permission of the Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. V/i semester credits. 

3, (3). The Men's Glee Club 

Open to all undergraduates interested in choral singing 
who fulfill the requirements of a try-out. J^ semester 
credit. 

5, (5). Advanced Choral Club (Men) 

Prerequisite: Music 3 and participation in some extra- 
curricular work. 1 semester credit. 

7, (7) The Women's Glee Club. 

Open to all undergraduates interested in choral singing 
who fulfill the requirements of a try-out. ^ semester 
credit. 

9, (9). Advanced Choral Club (Women) 

Prerequisite : Music 7 and participation in some extra- 
curricular activity. 1 semester credit. 

II, (11). The University Symphony Orchestra 

Open to all undergraduates interested in orchestral play- 
ing who can fulfill the requirements of a try-out. Yi 
semester credit. 

13, (13). Advanced Orchestral Club 

Departmental class illustrations, string quartet, trio play- 
ing and the like. Prerequisite : Music 11 and participation 
in some extra-curricular work. 1 semester credit. 

Note: In all the above activities the educational values 
will be strongly stressed. The principles of ensemble, 

217 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

solo work, tone production, diction and above all sound 
musicianship, will be studied and concerts prepared sepa- 
rately and in combination to enhance and vitalize the 
university life. 

15, 16. The History of Music. This course will attempt to cover 
the period from modern Greece up to the twentieth century. The 
instruction is given in the form of lectures, and stress will be placed 
upon an intensive study of the actual systems, spirit and content of 
the music of the period rather than a brief resume of biography 
and critical evaluations. The four divisions of study are as fol- 
lows : (1) From Plain Song through Palestrina, Vittoria, etc., and 
the secular music of the English Madrigalists ; (2) the Seventeenth 
Century and Johann Sebastian Bach; (3) the Classicists to Schu- 
mann; (4) Schumann to Debussy. Associate Professor Manton. 

Elective. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

17. Twentieth Century Music. This course is the logical contin- 
uation of Music 15 and 16, and emphasizes the significant trends in 
modern music since 1900. The works of such contemporary compos- 
ers as Sibelius, Stravinsky, Ravel, Hindemith, Schoenberg, Delius, 
Vaughan-Williams, Hoist, Walton, Griffes, together with many others 
will be considered, listened to, and the values, gains, losses and shifts 
of emphasis discussed and every attempt made to adjust the listener's 
ear to the new values. Associate Professor Manton. 

Elective. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

19, 20. The Appreciation of Music. This course begins with a 
study of the elements of music such as: rhythm, melody, harmony, 
homophonic and polyphonic types, constructive formulae, and the 
musical forms employed in composition; for upon the recognition of 
these elements depends the approach to intelligent listening. Compre- 
hensive illustrations of the great musical literature with special atten- 
tion to twentieth century music will be played and jointly analyzed by 
the instructor and students from the point of view of the listener. 
This course is open and especially recommended to all students who 
wish to become familiar with the art of music in its many phases, 
and gain a wider acquaintance with the past and present masterpieces 
of musical art. Associate Professor Manton. 

218 



MUSIC 

Prerequisite : 19 prerequisite for 20. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 2 semester credits. 

21, 22. Harmony, The Grammar of Music. The fundamental 
principles of the craft of music are embodied in the study of harmony. 
This course treats of the different chords in their natural and com- 
bined relations : triads, seventh and ninth chords with their inversions 
and resolutions; cadences, chromatically altered chords, augmented 
chords, suspensions ; embellishing tones, modulation, melody writing, 
and pedal point. 

The work consists of exercises on figured basses and the harmoniza- 
tion of given melodies and dictation. This course is especially recom- 
mended to Freshmen but may be elected by others. The ability to play 
some instrument will facilitate an understanding of the course. Asso- 
ciate Professor Manton. 

Prerequisite : 21 prerequisite for 22. 2 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 2 semester credits. 

23, 24. Advanced Harmony and Strict Counterpoint. This 
course is intended to supplement Music 21 and 22, and to lay stress 
on the many significant innovations found in modern harmony; to 
make a study of modal harmony and its relation to the appreciation 
of fifteenth and sixteenth century music ; and to study the five orders 
of strict two-part counterpoint. Associate Professor Manton. 

Prerequisite : Music 22. 23 prerequisite for 24. 2 lectures 
or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

25, 26. Counterpoint and Elementary Composition. Counter- 
point is the combining of several melodic voices, a horizontal concep- 
tion of writing, and is essential to all finished craftsmanship. The 
work will consist of the writing of three and four-part counterpoint, 
double counterpoint, choral figuration and free imitation. 

The work in composition will include the detailed training relative 
to sentence formation, figure treatment, two-part and three-part 
forms, inventions, the variation forms, and the various rondo forms 
up to the sonata form. Associate Professor Manton. 

Prerequisite: Music 22 and 24. 25 prerequisite for 26. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

219 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

27, 28. Instrumentation. This course is designed to ground the 
student in the idiomatic writing and technique necessary to score 
effectively for the symphonic orchestra. It necessitates a good grasp 
of the fundamental principles of harmony and counterpoint. All the 
orchestral instruments will be considered individually as to their 
technique, range, tonal qualities, possibilities and limitations ; then in 
separate choirs, and finally in combination as a unit. 

Orchestral scores will be studied in detail ; score reading and reduc- 
tion emphasized ; and original work in this idiom encouraged. Asso- 
ciate Professor Manton. 

Prerequisite: 22 and 24. 3 lectures; 3 semester credits. 

29, 30. The History and Development of Choral Music. This 
is a special course consisting of lectures, reading and reports. Only 
a limited number of qualified students will be admitted. 

The course is designed to trace a straight line through such study 
as: Gregorian Chant, folk song, the music of the Troubadours, the 
beginnings of harmony and counterpoint, the work of the Netherland 
masters and of Palestrina and his contemporaries ; the German choral 
works of the Reformation, the Tudor School in England ; the choral 
works of Bach, Handel, etc. It ends with a consideration of the 
choral literature of the nineteenth century and of the modern French, 
English and Russian choral composers, such as Elgar, Delius, Hoist, 
Vaughan-Williams, Lambert, Walton, Honegger, etc. 

Students will meet three times a week, the third meeting being de- 
voted to class singing and study of the works considered in the 
lectures. Associate Professor Manton. 

3 lectures or recitations; 2 semester credits. (Given in 
alternate years ; offered in 1937-38) 

31, 32. Public School Music and Its Allied Fields. The pur- 
pose of this course is three-fold in nature. First, to lay down basic 
method material and principles of approach for the purpose of cul- 
tivating the taste for the best music; and the expansion of these 
methods and repertoire through the junior and senior high school 
periods. Second, to cultivate through the principles of appreciation 
a growth in perception, understanding and general responsiveness to 

220 



MUSIC 

the art of music, approaching it through formal design and emo- 
tional content. Third, to give the individual student training and 
practical experience in the art of conducting, organization and the 
production of artistic results in glee clubs and orchestras. 

Prerequisite : 31 prerequisite for 32. 2 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 2 semester credits. 

33, 34. Canon and Fugue. Canon and fugue are the most ad- 
vanced forms of polyphonic composition and require a thorough 
grounding in harmony and counterpoint. The object of this course 
is to perfect the contrapuntal technique of the student, enabling him 
to study the larger and freer forms of composition. The work will be 
based on the fugal works of Bach and Franck, and consists of prac- 
tice in writing rounds, the more practical types of canon, and of the 
analysis and composition of fugues. Associate Professor Manton. 

Prerequisite: Music 22, 24, and 26. 33 prerequisite for 
34. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

VOICE 

Frances E. De Wolfe, Instructor in Voice 

An opportunity to secure private instruction in voice is available to 
all students. This offering does not carry academic credit and there- 
fore cannot be used to satisfy major, group, college and university 
requirements. 

Tuition: Students who elect this course will pay tuition (in addition 
to University tuition) as follows : 

Private instruction in voice, $1.50 per 30-minute lesson. 

It is possible to take one lesson every other week, according to the 
individual circumstances of a student. 

Voice 1. Elementary Course. This course consists of a correct 
knowledge of such fundamentals as : breath control, resonance, flexi- 
bility of voice, attack, enunciation and articulation. It also consists 
of a practical knowledge of sight singing which enables the student 
to read and understand his music as fast as the voice acquires the 

221 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ability to perform the same, supplemented by the correct singing of 
the simpler form of song or ballad. 

Elective. 1 lesson a week. 

Voice 2. Intermediate Course. This course consists of the devel- 
opment of the fundamentals of voice placing such as : breath control, 
resonance, etc., together with a progressive step in reading made by 
singing through the different keys. This is supplemented by songs 
and ballads of medium difficulty, church music, quartet work. Empha- 
sis is placed on dramatic values from the singer's standpoint. 

Prerequisite : Voice 1 or the equivalent. 1 lesson a week. 

Voice 3. Advanced Course. This course presupposes the two pre- 
vious ones ; furthers the fundamentals of voice placing ; aids in the 
mastery of all modes, intervals and musical phrases; develops the 
voice and acquires control of it for finished execution. This is supple- 
mented by a study of the oratorio, opera, and the master works of 
song. 

Prerequisite : Voice 1 and 2. 1 lesson a week. 
Note : Voice 1-3 are fee courses. 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Herbert F. Rudd, Professor 

Adolph G. Ekdahl, Associate Professor 

Naomi G. Ekdahl, Assistant Professor 

philosophy 

Professor Rudd 

49. Introduction to Philosophy. A general survey of the persist- 
ent problems of life in the light of modern scientific and philosophic 
insights. Topics include the origin and nature of the universe, of life, 
and of mind ; also the nature of religious, ethical and aesthetic values. 

Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lect- 
ures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

222 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

50. The Art of Thinking: Logic. A study of the many factors 
which determine the quality of human thinking as trustworthy or un- 
trustworthy and an effort to discover all of the aids to better thinking 
practices. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 49. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

81. Major Movements in European Philosophy. A selective 
study of the most significant systems from Thales to Nietzsche. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
offered in 1937-38) 

82. Major Systems and Problems of Current Philosophy. A 
study of the chief efforts to build integrated world-views in the light 
of modern scientific, economic and social changes ; and the possibili' 
ties of a constructive synthesis of modern thought patterns. 

Prerequisite : Philosophy 81 or its equivalent. Elective 
for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. (Given in alternate years; offered in 
1937-38) 

83. The Evolution of Social Values and Ethical Judgments. 
An outline of the development of biological, psychological and social 
capacities which are essential to the appearance of any community val- 
ues; a study of the moral significance of early group life; the eco- 
nomic and cultural factors which shape value systems ; the divergent 
patterns of moral sentiment in advanced civilizations; and possible 
standards of judging folkways and ethical assumptions. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. 

84. Ethical Problems of Today. An analysis of the factors which 
bring personal and social crises in the present generation ; and a study 
of the ideals, principles and programs which may successfully meet 
these problems. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 83. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

223 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

85, 86. The Philosophy and Culture of the Far East. A study 
of major movements in the life and thought of eastern Asia. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions ; 3 semester credits. (Given in alternate years; 
not offered in 1937-38) 

87, 88. Seminar: Special Problems in Philosophy. 

Elective for Seniors with the consent of the instructor. 
Credit to be arranged. 



psychology 

Associate Professor A. G. Ekdahl 
Assistant Professor N. G. Ekdahl 

Graduate Work : For courses primarily for graduate study see Cata^ 
log of the Graduate School. 

21, 22. Elementary Psychology. This course is a study of the 
individual personality. It is designed to assist the individual to avoid 
unwholesome attitudes and cultivate wholesome ones. Practical helps 
will be given in regard to study and vocational and social problems. 
In the second semester, the student will learn of the laws and princi- 
ples of general elementary psychology, with their applications to 
everyday situations. Associate Professor Ekdahl and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : 21 prerequisite for 22. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations ; 3 semester credits. 

51. Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence. A study of the 
normal child and adolescent. The mental processes and emotional re- 
actions are studied in order that child and adolescent personality may 
be understood. Suitable for those preparing to be teachers, home- 
makers, social workers, pediatricians, nurses, school psychologists, 
and clinicians. Assistant Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : Psychology 22. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

52. Learning and Measurements. This course is a study of the 
learning process of the individual and a survey of measurements of 

224 



s 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

intelligence and educational achievement. Administration of intelli- 
gence tests and construction of informal objective examinations are 
projects of the course. Assistant Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : Psychology 22. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 
semester credits. 

55, 56. Applied Psychology. The elementary laws, facts and prin- 
ciples of psychology are considered with special reference to the prob- 
lems of advertising and selling. In the second semester, psychological 
problems relating to general industrial efficiency and personnel are 
considered. Associate Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : One year of Psychology. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations ; 3 semester credits. 

57, 58. Experimental Psychology. Standard experiments on sen- 
sation, perception, association, imagination, learning and reasoning. 
Emphasis will be given toward the development of the proper tech- 
nique of psychological investigation. Associate Profesor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 22. 1 lecture and 2 laborator- 
ies; 3 semester credits. 

6L Abnormal Psychology. A study of abnormal phenomena such 
as the disorders of perception, association, memory, judgment and the 
personality. The symptoms of the more common psychoses will be 
presented and some mention made of the psychoneuroses. A brief 
review of mental defectiveness will also be given. Visits to institu- 
tions. Associate Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 22. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 
semester credits. 

62. Mental Hygiene. A study of the problem individual. Preven- 
tion of problems is stressed but detection and simple diagnosis taught. 
Ways and means of maintaining a normal mind and re-educating the 
individual of distorted attitudes are discussed. Case studies are made 
and an instruction trip taken. Suitable for those preparing to be teach- 
ers, home-makers, social workers, physicians, nurses, school psycholo- 
gists, and clinicians. Assistant Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 22. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 
semester credits. 

225 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

65. Physiological Psychology. A study of the physiological as- 
pects of sensations, perceptions, memory and learning and a consid- 
eration of possible correlations between nerve functions and mental 
activity. Associate Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : One year of Psychology. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations; 3 semester credits. 

66. Comparative Psychology. A study of psychogenesis begin- 
ning with the one-celled animals. Simple experiments in animal 
learning. Associate Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : One year of Psychology. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations ; 3 semester credits. 

68. Systematic Psychology. A brief survey of the field of theo- 
retical psychology. Psychological concepts and theories as developed 
by the various modern "schools" of psychology, such as Functional- 
ism, Behaviorism, Gestalt, and Structuralism, are considered. Asso- 
ciate Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : One year of Psychology. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations ; 3 semester credits. 

71, 72. Seminar : Special Problems in Psychology. Associate Pro- 
fessor Ekdahl and Assistant Professor Ekdahl. 

Prerequisite : Two years of Psychology. J^ to 3 semester 
credits. 



226 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
William H. Cowell, Professor, Director of Athletics and Coach of 

Football 
Henry C. Swasey, Associate Professor, Supervisor of Intramural 

Sports, Coach of Baseball and Basketball 
Paul C. Sweet, Assistant Professor, Supervisor of Corrective 

Physical Education, Coach of Track, Cross-Country and Relay 
E. W. Christensen, Assistant Professor, Assistant Coach of Varsity 

Football, Coach of Hockey and Lacrosse 
Carl Lundholm, Assistant Professor, Assistant Coach of Varsity 

Football, Supervisor of Interscholastic Basketball Tournament, 

Coach of Freshman Baseball 
John J. Conroy, Instructor, Assistant Supervisor of Intramural 

Sports, Coach of Freshman Basketball 
Edward J. Blood, Instructor, Coach of Winter Sports, Assistant 

Coach of Cross-Country and Track 
Henry DeMers, Instructor, Coach of Freshman Football and Intra- 
mural Activities 
Charles O. Nason, Department Financial Secretary 
William F. Marsh, Trainer 
Edwin F. Dorr, Department Secretary 
Charles Schoonmaker, Supervisor of Athletic Equipment 

Aims — 1. To promote regulated exercise and to provide an incen- 
tive and opportunity for every student to receive physical recreation. 

2. To secure good posture, a uniform development, and a reason- 
able amount of bodily skill and grace. 

3. To stimulate the habit of exercise. 

Equipment. — The Gymnasium affords accommodations for train- 
ing and indoor games. 

Lockers and showers are provided on the ground floor, offices and 
main exercise floor on the first floor, and department offices on the 
second floor. 

227 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

The Memorial Field adjoins the Gymnasium. Adjoining Memorial 
Field is an attractive pond providing fine facilities for swimming, 
skating, hockey, and winter sports. Nearby is an oval board track 
for winter training in track and relay. 

Lewis Fields, located a short distance from the Gymnasium, in- 
clude six fields for football, soccer, lacrosse, and four baseball dia- 
monds for alternate use with some of the aforementioned, a first- 
class cinder track with a 220 yard straightaway and pits and run- 
ways for jumping and vaulting, fourteen composition and six clay 
tennis courts, concrete bleachers seating 1750 spectators at baseball 
games and concrete stands seating 5000 spectators at football and 
track and field contests. The 'varsity baseball field on Lewis Fields 
is known as Brackett Field, in honor of William H. L. Brackett, '14, 
prominent student leader in his college generation who died from 
wounds received during the World War. 

Requirements. — All men students in the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to complete the prescribed work in Physical Edu- 
cation. All men disqualified from the regular class work in Physical 
Education shall be required to register for work in corrective gym- 
nastics, unless excused by the University Health Officer upon recom- 
mendation of the University Physician. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the department consists of a gray 
cotton sleeveless jersey, gray trunks with blue trimming on leg seams, 
white woolen socks and rubber-soled tennis or basketball shoes. This 
suit must be worn at all class exercises in Physical Education. 

The minimum requirement of each semester's work calls for par- 
ticipation in some form of approved physical exercise for two periods 
weekly for 13 weeks. 

Students may elect any scheduled activity desired, either as mem- 
bers of an organized athletic squad or as members of regular sections 
of an approved activity. 

The activities which are offered during the year are baseball, bas- 
ketball, cross country, football, hockey, skating, skiing, snowshoeing, 
tennis, track and volley ball. 

{Consult "Subject and Room Schedule" for Schedule of Approved 
Activities.) 

31, 32. Physical Education. The program for the year consists 

228 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

of numerous seasonal activities. Students may elect the activity de- 
sired. For students physically unfit, corrective gym work will be pre- 
scribed. 

Required of all Freshmen. Work, 2 hrs. ; Vz credit. 
Z2>, 34. Physical Education. The year's program consists of 
numerous seasonal activities. Students may elect the activity desired. 
For students physically unfit, corrective gym work will be prescribed. 

Required of all Sophomores. Work, 2 hrs. \ Yi. credit 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

Margaret R. Hoban, Assistant Professor and Director 
GwENYTH M. Ladd, Instructor 
Nell Evans, Assistant 
Marion Beckwith, Assistant 

Requirements. Freshmen women are required to take Physical 
Education 1, 2. Every woman student must take at least one course 
of physical activity each semester of her Freshman, Sophomore, and 
Junior years. One additional activity each semester, or a Physical 
Education theory course each year, may be elected for credit. Elx- 
cept in special cases, no more than two semesters of the same ac- 
tivity shall be credited. 

Zoology, Psychology, and Education are related departments. Cer- 
tain courses in these departments will be accepted for the completion 
of a major. 

Each student must, upon entering, have a physical examination by 
the University Physician and a posture test by the Physical Education 
Staff. Semester activities elected by students are approved by the de- 
partment on the basis of the results of these examinations. Students 
unfit for active Physical Education are assigned theoretical work 
in hygiene. 

Objectives. To encourage wholesome recreational activities; to 
establish fundamental health habits; to maintain a balance between 
mental and physical development 

229 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Required Costume. White step-in blouse, New Hampshire blue 
tunic, blue ankle-length hose, and regulation gymnasium shoes. 

1, 2. Physical Education. 

A study of the art of healthful living, problems of personal ad- 
justment in relation to health, personal appearance, conduct, and 
development of personality will be discussed together with a con- 
sideration of the contribution of college training to woman's place 
in the social world. 

The objectives of the course are the development of poise, per- 
sonal appearance, and health. There will be one lecture or recita- 
tion period per week. In addition to the above, practical work in 
physical education will be scheduled as follows : 

First Semester. Hockey, soccer, tennis, archery, basketball, formal 
gymnastics, informal gymnastics, folk dancing. (Consult Course 
Time and Room Schedule for combinations of the above courses 
according to season of the year.) Individual gymnastics (required 
of each freshman whose physical condition indicates this need.) 

Second Semester. Informal gymnastics, formal gymnastics, bas- 
ketball, archery, tennis, baseball, lacrosse. (Consult Course Time 
and Room Schedule for combinations of the above courses accord- 
ing to season of the year.) Dancing, individual gymnastics. (These 
courses continue throughout the semester.) 

Required of all Freshmen. 1 lecture or recitation ; 2 
laboratory periods; 2 semester credits 

11, 12. Physical Education. 

Elective courses open to Freshmen are the same as Physical Educa- 
tion 1, 2. 

Open to Freshmen. 2 periods ; 1 semester credit. 

3, 4. Physical Education. 

First Semester. Archery, tennis, hockey, soccer, bowling, infor- 
mal gymnastics, formal gymnastics, winter sports, fencing, basket- 
ball, folk dancing. (Consult Course Time and Room Schedule for 
combinations of the above courses according to season of the year.) 
Tap dancing, modern dancing, individual gymnastics. (These 
courses continue throughout the semester.) 

230 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Second Semester. Informal gymnastics, formal gymnastics, fenc- 
ing, basketball, tap dancing, bowling, winter sports, archery, tennis, 
lacrosse, baseball, golf. (Consult Course Time and Room Schedule 
for combinations of the above courses according to season of the 
year.) Dancing, individual gymnastics. (These courses continue 
throughout the semester.) 

Required of Sophomores. 2 periods; 1 semester credit. 

13, 14. Physical Education. 

Elect semester courses from the list under Physical Education 3, 4. 

Open to Sophomores. 2 periods; 1 semester credit. 

5, 6. Physical Education. 

Elect semester courses from the list under Physical Education 3, 4. 

Required of Juniors. 2 periods ; 1 semester credit. 

15, 16. Physical Education. 

Elect semester courses from the list under Physical Education 3, 4. 

Open to Juniors. 2 periods; 1 semester credit. 

7, 8. Physical Education. 

Elect semester courses from the list under Physical Education 3, 4. 

Open to Seniors. 2 periods ; 1 semester credit. 

17, 18. Physical Education. 

Elect semester courses from the list under Physical Education 3, 4. 

Seniors majoring in this Department are expected to elect this 
course. 

2 periods ; 1 semester credit. 

In addition to the regulation costume required of all students, the 
following regulations and approximate prices should be noted: stu- 
dents are required to furnish their own individual equipment for such 
activities as tennis, tap dancing, modern dancing, individual gym- 
nastics, winter sports ; bowling, 20 cents a class. 

MAJOR courses 

Students majoring in physical education are expected to take the 
courses listed below. Women students from other departments may, 
however, elect any of these courses provided they have the proper 
prerequisites. 

231 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

19. Introduction to Physical Education. A study of the 
ideals and development of physical education from ancient times 
through the medieval and modern ages ; the development of the Swed- 
ish, German, and American systems, and the social, political and 
religious conditions which have influenced the physical life of na- 
tions. Assistant Professor Hoban. 

2 lectures; 2 semester credits. 

21, 22. Play and Recreation Leadership. This course includes 
the theories of play, the place of play in education; administration 
and organization of play, leadership of play and recreation, hobbies, 
camping, pageantry, dancing, and leisure time activities. Very useful 
for those who intend to do playground, summer camp, or community 
recreation work. Assistant Professor Hoban. 

3 lectures ; 3 semester credits. 

31, 32. The Theory and Coaching of Athletics. A detailed 
study of the principles involved in the teaching of team games and 
individual sports. Emphasis will be placed on coaching methods and 
officiating. Miss Ladd. 

1 lecture or recitation ; 2 laboratories ; 2 semester credits. 

41, 42. Remedial Gymnastics and Massage. This course deals 
with the adaptation of exercise to individual needs; physical abnor- 
malities and their corrections ; theory and practice of massage. Assist- 
ant Professor Hoban. 

Prerequisites: Zoology 1, 2; 3, 4. 41 prerequisite for 42. 

2 lectures or recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester 
credits. 

(P-E) 91, 92. Problems in the Teaching of Physical Educa- 
tion FOR Women and Supervised Teaching. A professional point of 
view of modern physical education. The course includes a definitely 
organized program of activities from the primary grades through 
college. Opportunity will be given the students for supervised teach- 
ing in the grades and high school. Miss Ladd. 

3 lectures or recitations ; 2 laboratories ; 4 semester 
credits. 

232 



PHYSICS 

Horace L. Howes, Professor 
Clement Moran, Associate Professor 
Raymond R. Starke, Assistant Professor 
William H. Hartwell, Assistant Professor 
Harold I. Leavitt, Instructor 

1, 2. Introductory Physics. The properties of matter, heat, 
niagnetism, electricity, wave-motion, sound, and light. The course 
includes experimental lectures and laboratory exercises in addition 
to recitations from Black's College Physics. 

Required of students in Agriculture. Elective for Liberal 
Arts students. 1 lecture; 2 recitations; 1 laboratory; 4 
semester credits. 

3, 4. Physics for Architects. An introductory course in which 
attention is given to stresses in solids, pressure in fluids, transmission 
of heat, distribution of illumination, acoustics, etc. Lectures, recita- 
tions, problem work and experiments. A knowledge of high school 
algebra and geometry is presupposed. Assistant Professor Hartwell. 

Required of Sophomores in Architecture. Elective for 
Liberal Arts students. 1 lecture ; 2 recitations ; 1 labora- 
tory; 4 semester credits. 

5, 6. Pre-Medical Physics. A course in the general principles of 
physics with attention to the needs of the students in preparation for 
medical work, such as the presentation of data in graphical form, also 
the handling of electrical apparatus. Assistant Professor Starke. 

Open only to Juniors and Seniors in the Pre-Medical 
Curriculum. 3 recitations ; one 3-hour laboratory ; con- 
ferences ; 5 semester credits. 

7, 8. General Physics. Mechanics and properties of matter; 
heat ; selected topics in sound and light ; electricity and magnetism ; 
from Duff's Text Book of Physics. 

Prerequisites : Mathematics 3 or 6 in advance, and 
Mathematics 7, 8 either in parallel or as a prerequisite. 
Physics 7 prerequisite for 8. Required of Sophomores in 
Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Mechanical Curricula. 
Elective for those Liberal^ Arts students who have passed 
1, 2 and have the prerequisites in Mathematics. 1 experi- 
mental lecture; 3 recitations; 1 problem hour; 4 semes- 
ter credits. 

233 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

9. General Physics Laboratory. Open only to those students 
who are studying Physics 7, or who have previously obtained credit 
for Physics 7. Experiments in mechanics and properties of mat- 
ter, with report writing and curve plotting of data. The reports are 
carefully criticized by the department and corrected by the student. 
Appreciation of the laws of physical science; the development of 
laboratory technique, and the estimation of the limitations of scien- 
tific experimentation are the aims. 

Prerequisites : The same as those for Physics 7, 8. Re- 
quired of Sophomores in Chemical, Civil, Electrical and 
Mechanical Curricula. Elective for Liberal Arts students 
under the same conditions as specified for Physics 7. 2 
laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

10. General Physics Laboratory. A continuation of Physics 9 
to include experiments in heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. 

Prerequisites: Physics 7 and 9. Physics 8 in parallel or 
as a prerequisite. Required of students in Chemical, Civil, 
Mechanical and Electrical Curricula. Elective for Lib- 
eral Arts students. 2 laboratories ; 3 semester credits. 

14. Elementary Optics and Photography. The fundamental 
principles of geometric optics as applied to photographic instruments. 
Laboratory work includes a study of focal planes, images, and other 
properties of lenses, together with the making of photographs. Stu- 
dents will furnish their supplies, which will cost approximately $2.00. 
Associate Professor Moran. 

Prerequisites : Physics 2, or 8. Course not open to 
Freshmen. 1 lecture; 1 recitation; 1 laboratory; 3 se- 
mester credits. 

51. Theory of Electrons. A brief study of the theory of electric- 
ity to include the passage of a current through a gas, the mobility of 
ions, the determination of charge and mass of the electron, ionization 
by collision, the corona discharge, cathode rays, positive rays, thermi- 
onic emission, photo-electricity, and X-rays. Professor Howes. 

Prerequisites : Physics 7, 8 ; Mathematics 7, 8. Required 
of Seniors in Electrical Engineering Curriculum. Open 
to Juniors or Seniors in Liberal Arts on the same condi- 
tions. 2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

234 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

52. Electrical Measurements. Experiments on the use of precis- 
ion potentiometers, the constants of sensitive galvanometers, time 
tests of batteries, low resistance by the Kelvin double bridge, high re- 
sistance by the method of leakage, the use of alternating current 
bridges for measuring capacity, self and mutual inductance and fre- 
quency, the characteristics of various types of photo-electric cells, 
and the Millikan oil-drop experiment. Associate Professor Moran. 

Prerequisites : Physics 8 and 10. Required of students in 
Electrical Engineering and Chemistry. 1 lecture ; 1 lab- 
oratory ; 3 semester credits. 

54. Acoustics. An elementary course in the principles of sound 
origins, propagation, and reception. The course consists of recitations 
based on Sound by Capstick. Professor Howes. 

Elective for students who have passed Physics 2 or 8. 
3 recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Thorsten Kalijarvi, Associate Professor 
*Erwin W. Bard, Instructor 
Edmund W. Fenn, Instructor 

Courses in this department aim to give the student a grounding in 
political science which should not only serve the purpose of general 
culture, but also prepare for more intensive work in fields of special- 
ized study, such as law, teaching, politics, government service, and 
social work. Students are urged to supplement their work in political 
science with courses in English, economics, history, and sociology. 
The department, with a view to broadening the student's range of 
ideas, or in preparation for research, recommends the acquisition of a 
reading knowledge of one or more foreign languages, preferably 
French and German. 

1, 2. Citizenship. This is the introductory course in political 
science which majors in the department are advised to take in the 
Sophomore year, and to which students seeking an initial elective in 
political science are referred. It deals with problems and mechanics 
of political expression such as public opinion and its agencies; the 

* Leaye of absence, 1936-37. 

235 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

history, membership, structure and aims of organizations exerting 
political pressure, especially political parties, nominations, and elec- 
tions ; and political democracy and the meaning of the state. 

Public Lectures. Prominent individuals in local, state or national 
public life will be invited to speak on phases of governmental organi- 
zation or policy. These lectures will be open to anyone who is inter- 
ested without registration. Associate Professor Kalijarvi and Mr. 
Bard. 

3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

3, 4. American Government. A discussion of the work and or- 
ganization of federal, state, and local government, and political 
parties in the United States. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
functional relations between the several branches of government, 
and between political organizations and governmental policies. Mr. 
Bard. 

Prerequisite: 3 prerequisite for 4. Open to Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 

5, 6. European Governments. A survey of the character, form 
and political practices of contemporary foreign governments. Some 
attention will be given to contemporary movements and developments. 
A comparison of the organs of governments as they are observed in 
action or as they may be evaluated in theory. Mr. Bard. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. 3 lectures or 
recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. International Law. The study of the law governing the 
relations of states, consisting primarily of discussions supplemented 
by the preparation of hypothetical cases. Associate Professor Kali- 
jarvi. 

Prerequisite : One semester's work in Political Science. 
7 prerequisite for 8. Junior course. 3 lectures or reci- 
tations; 3 semester credits. 

51. Constitutional Law. The case study of the constitutional 
development of the United States in terms of supreme, federal, and 
state court decisions. Associate Professor Kalijarvi. 

Prerequisite : One year's work in Political Science. Jun- 
ior course. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

236 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

52. Introduction to Jurisprudence. A study of the generalized 
principles of law and legal institutions. A survey of the law as an 
institution of social and political control. Discussion and lecture. 
Associate Professor Kalijarvi. 

Prerequisite: Political Science 7 or 8 or 51. 3 lectures 
or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

53, 54. Political Theory. A reading course in the classics of 
political thought, including one important work of Plato, Aristotle, 
Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Paine, Adam Smith, 
Ricardo, Bentham, Marx, and of others as time will permit. An effort 
will be made to analyze the political philosophy of the several 19th 
century schools, and to give the student a philosophical approach to 
modern political problems. Mr. Bard. 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Political Science. Sen- 
ior course. 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

55, 56. International Relations and World Government. A 
study of the forms of international organizations and world politics. 
This course deals with the rise of the modern nations and their rela- 
tion to each other. Special effort is made to acquaint the student with 
the international world in which he is living. Associate Professor 
Kalijarvi. 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Political Science. Open 
to Seniors majoring in History and Economics. 3 lec- 
tures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

9, 10. Seminar. Papers will be prepared on assigned topics, and 

reports made under the guidance of the head of the department. 

Associate Professor Kalijarvi. 

Prerequisite : 9 prerequisite for 10. For majors who have 
completed two years' work in Political Science. J4 to 4 
semester credits. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

T. Burr Charles, Professor 

Carl L. Martin, Assistant Professor 

Charles A. Bottorff, Assistant Professor 

Albert E. Tepper, Instructor 
1. Farm Poultry. A course devoted to a study of the general 
principles of poultry husbandry and their practical applications. Em- 
phasis is placed on factors of culling, breeding, housing, feeding, 

237 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

marketing, diseases and parasites, incubation and management. Pro- 
fessor Charles. 

Recommended elective for Freshmen in Agriculture. 2 
lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

3, 4. Poultry Problems. Students make a study of various se- 
lected poultry problems, compiling and presenting such accurate and 
detailed information as will add materially to their fund of knowl- 
edge. Professor Charles and Assistant Professor Martin. 

Required of certain Seniors in Poultry Husbandry. 
Hours to be arranged. 1 semester credit. 

6. Poultry Breeding. A study of the genetic principles involved 
in breeding for egg production including practical application and 
demonstration. Professor Charles. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1. Required of all Jun- 
iors in Poultry. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 2 semes- 
ter credits. 

7. Poultry Breeds and Judging. The origin, history and classi- 
fication of breeds. Theory and practice in judging fowls for tgg pro- 
duction and exhibition. Mr. Tepper. 

Required of Seniors in Poultry. Elective for others. 2 
lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

8. Incubation and Brooding. A study of the principles involved 
in incubation and brooding of poultry ; embryonic development. Stu- 
dents individually operate incubators and care for groups of chicks. 
Professor Charles. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1. Required of Seniors 
in Poultry. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 1 labora- 
tory ; 3 semester credits. 

9. Poultry Marketing. The preparation of poultry and eggs for 
market. A study of egg qualities and grades, candling and packaging; 
study of egg and poultry market conditions ; practical instruction in 
killing, picking, dressing and similar operations. Mr. Tepper. 

Required of all Juniors in Poultry. Elective for others. 
2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

238 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

10. ' Poultry Feeding. A study of the principles of feeding ; analy- 
sis of recent experimental work and current feed problems. Each 
student will care for a group of birds for several weeks for practical 
observation and collection of data. Mr. Tepper. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1. Required of Seniors 
in Poultry. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 
3 semester credits. 

11. Poultry for Teachers. This course is designed to give to 
Teacher Training students the information which they will need in 
teaching courses in poultry in secondary schools. Open to Teacher 
Training students only. Mr. Tepper. 

Hours to be arranged. 2 semester credits. 

12. Poultry Housing. Design and construction of poultry houses 
and equipment. Study of plans ; costs of materials ; management prin- 
ciples. Mr. Tepper. 

Required of certain Seniors in Poultry. Elective for 
others. 1 lecture; 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 

13. Poultry Management. The application of successful business 
principles to poultry farming; study of surveys and production costs. 
As a part of the laboratory work, a detailed "three year" development 
plan of a poultry farm will be studied. Professor Charles. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1, Required of Juniors 
in Poultry. Elective for others. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 
3 semester credits. 

14. Poultry Practice. This course is designed to give the student 
practical work at the University poultry plant in the hatching, rear- 
ing and care of chickens. Professor Charles. 

Required of all Juniors in Poultry. Ten hours of prac- 
tical work. 4 semester credits. (Note: By permission of 
the Department, students who have had previous practical 
poultry experience may substitute 4 semester credits of 
electives for this course.) 

239 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

15. Poultry Diseases. A study of the anatomy of the fowl and 
poultry diseases and parasites encountered in poultry practice. Lec- 
tures and clinics for discussion of methods of prevention and 
control. Assistant Professor Bottorff. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1. Required of all Sen- 
iors in Poultry. Elective for others. 3 lectures ; 1 labora- 
tory; 4 semester credits. 

17, 18. Poultry Seminar. A consideration of experimental data 
on all phases of poultry husbandry. Students abstract and report on 
various current poultry topics. A thesis will be required. Professor 
Charles. 

Prerequisite: Poultry Husbandry 1. Required of all Sen- 
iors in Poultry Husbandry. Elective for others. 1 hour 
conference; 1 semester credit. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Charles W. Coulter, Professor 
Joseph E. Bachelder, Jr., Instructor 

It is the aim of the department: (1) to develop in the student an 
understanding of the society in which he lives — its laws, processes, 
institutions and organizations, so that he may effectively function as a 
unit in the social order ; (2) to provide for pre-professional and lim- 
ited professional training in the methods and techniques of social 
work; (3) to provide a professional background for students prepar- 
ing to teach sociology in secondary schools. 

Requirements for a major in sociology — 24 semester credits with a 
grade of 75 or better. Students electing a major are expected to in- 
clude Principles of Sociology 1 ; Social Psychology 2 ; Methods of 
Social Progress 84, or Methods of Social Research 75 ; and at least 
6 semester credits (depending on field of interest) of specified work 
in one or more of the following correlated departments : Economics, 
Political Science, History, Psychology, Home Economics or Zoology. 

1. Principles of Sociology. A comprehensive study of the under- 
lying laws of human society, especially those governing the origin, 

240 



SOCIOLOGY 

growth and decline of institutions; group relationships to biological 
and geographic environments ; social processes such as conflict, com- 
petition, imitation, accommodation, cooperation, assimilation and 
differentiation; societal isolation; culture, its organization, content, 
location and formation ; social institutions including the familial, re- 
ligious, economic, educational, recreational and political ; social change 
with its attendant maladjustments, and social control. Mr. Bachelder. 

3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

2. Social Psychology. An analysis of the social aspects of person- 
ality, of the process whereby the individual's impulses are defined by 
the cultural patterns of the group, of the processes by which one ac- 
quires the social world in which he lives, and of the factors which 
determine attitudes, wishes, habit systems, one's conception of him- 
self and his social role. A critical discussion of the methods utilized 
at present for the study of human nature introduces the course. Pro- 
fessor Coulter. 

3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

53. CxjLTURAL Anthropology and Ethnology. This course in- 
cludes: (a) a comparative study of primitive folk-ways, institutions 
and social organization, marriage, economic activities, religion, prop- 
erty inheritance and folklore. An examination of the factors affecting 
culture and the principles of its development. The significance of 
primitive culture for an understanding of contemporary civilization; 
(b) a comparative study of peoples; environmental factors; societal 
effect of invasion, colonization, and linguistic fusions ; race and class 
struggles; jingoism; race relations in mid-European territory and in 
the Far East; the problem of world peace. Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

54. The Immigrant and the Negro. An investigation of negro 
and immigrant heritage with special reference to the problems of 



241 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

assimilation and Americanization. Attention is directed to intensive 
study of selected groups, the Negro, the Jew, the Italian, the Pole, 
the Greek, the French-Canadian, and the Japanese. Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

57. Rural Sociology. A study of the foundation materials of 
rural life ; the physical setting — land, land-policies, land-tenure ; land- 
economics ; farm and village population — its composition, its changes ; 
the income basis of rural life, the standard of living; rural habits, 
attitudes ; rural groupings, arrangements, the mechanisms of com- 
munication and social control; a study of rural institutions with re- 
spect to welfare, sociability, education and religion. Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

60. Urban Sociology. A study of the changes in community life 
that have come with the shift of population from rural districts to the 
city; the factors involved in the rapid growth of cities since 1800; 
physical structure of the city, processes of internal growth ; the segre- 
gation which makes of the city a mosaic of distinct cultural worlds ; 
increase in mobility which multiplies social stimuli ; typical areas 
within the city — foreign colonies, rooming house districts, apartment 
and hotel areas, outlying areas of homes ; the effect of the city upon 
community life, the family, church, school, unorganized group behav- 
ior, attitudes and life organization of the person. Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

61. Social Pathology. A survey of personal, institutional and 
community disorganization. A study of the social factors involved in 
alcoholism, drug addiction, prostitution, poverty, vagrancy, juvenile 
and adult delinquency, divorce and desertion; and instances of the 
break-down of public opinion, and of community, family, religious 
and legal sanctions as forces for social control. A consideration of 
remedial measures based upon a discussion of human nature and the 

242 



SOCIOLOGY 

physical conditions of modern life. Especially recommended for pre- 
medical, pre-legal, and other students who will be handling social 
variants in the field of their professions. Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

62. Community Organization. A study of town and country 
community organization with respect to natural and interest groupings 
and with respect to relationships between town and country ; the sur- 
vey ; methods of analyzing problems of community organization ; 
methods of utilizing institutions and equipment in the development of 
programs and organizations for health, recreation, general welfare 
and control. Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

71. Crime and Its Social Treatment. A brief presentation of the 
increase and extent and more popular theories of crime : delinquency, 
juvenile and adult. Case studies of disorders of conduct and of the 
criminal behavior of individual delinquents with special reference to 
the influence of family and neighborhood environments ; typical social 
situations and their influence upon specific types of delinquency ; pro- 
grams for the social treatment of crime, the reorganization of reform- 
atory institutions, classification of offenders for separate treatment, 
the "honor system," limited self-government, parole and probation, 
and the juvenile court as agencies for the prevention of delinquency. 
Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

72. The Family. The rise of the marriage institution and the 
family. Modern problems of the family : divorce, desertion, changing 
status of women, child welfare, child labor laws, and related problems. 
Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2, or by special permission. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

243 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

75. Methods of Social Research. A study of the methods of 
science and research, the prospects of the social sciences, and the 
application of the historical, survey, statistical and case methods to 
social data. Emphasis is also given to the procedure involved in mak- 
ing social studies, i. e., the use of bibliography, definition and selection 
of the problem, determination of the data needed, collection and 
arrangement of the data for presentation and exposition. Mr. 
Bachelder. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recita- 
tions; 3 semester credits. 

^(i. Principles of Social Case Work. An analysis of the present 
trend in family case work; consideration of the techniques of inter- 
viewing, diagnosis, treatment and case recording; the significance of 
present day relief practices. Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

83. Social Work Organization and Administration. The field 
of contemporary social work, its scope, functions, standards, educa- 
tion, specialization and trend. Types of administration including the 
history, program, machinery, and personnel problems of state and pri- 
vate organizations, the place and use of volunteers, professional stand- 
ing and accrediting. Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 1, 2, 61, and 62. 3 lectures or 
recitations ; 3 semester credits. 

84. Methods of Social Progress. A study of efforts to improve 
social conditions and attain a larger measure of social justice. Com- 
munity experiments. The development of modern social legislation. 
The application of the principles of insurance to social problems. 
Various forms of mutual aid and of philanthropy. Endowments and 
special foundations. Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

87. The Church in American Society. Contemporary organiza- 
tions for worship in the community, their correlation, functions, and 

244 



SOCIOLOGY 

problems. The rise of the Church and its relation to Labor, the State, 
school, social welfare agencies; significance to the community of its 
organization and financing. Church federation and union. Professor 
Coulter. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. (Not offered in 1937-38) 

88. Recreation and Leisure. Problems arising from the increase 
of leisure time in modern society ; typical leisure time activities ; theor- 
ies of play ; practical training programs in recreation. 

A study of the function of leadership in this connection; analysis 
of types and qualities of leadership as exhibited by typical leaders ; a 
consideration of the material and program of leadership training. 
Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 1 and 2. 3 lectures or recitations ; 
3 semester credits. 

89, 90. Development of SoaoLOGicAL Thought. The history of 
sociological thought, with special reference to the writings of Comte, 
Spencer, and the later writers of the nineteenth century ; a compari- 
son of contemporary sociological systems. Professor Coulter. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 1 and 2. 89 prerequisite for 90. 
3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester credits. (Not offered 
in 1937-38) 

95, 96. Sociological Research. A seminar for conference and 
reports on research projects arranged for graduates and Seniors who 
have completed major work in sociology. Professor Coulter and 
Mr. Bachelder. 

Prerequisite : Sociology 75 and 84. 3 meetings ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

97, 98. Social Service and Field Work. A course designed to 
give the student practical experience in social work. Field work is 
done in connection with neighboring social agencies, and is supple- 
mented by readings, lectures and conferences. Professor Coulter. 

The course may be taken during the college year for 3 
credits each semester, or during the summer in connec- 

245 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

tion with certain approved settlements, correctional in- 
stitutions, or case work agencies. Eight weeks' summer 
residence with an agency is required, for which a maxi- 
mum of 6 semester credits is given. 

Prerequisite: Sociology Id. 



ZOOLOGY 

C. Floyd Jackson, Professor 

Alma D. Jackson, Associate Professor 

Edythe T. Richardson, Assistant Professor 

Ruth E. Thompson, Instructor 

Clyde W. Monroe, Instructor 

Eleanor L. Sheehan, Instructor 

W. Robert Eadie, Instructor 

Students majoring in zoology will ordinarily find it desirable to 
elect courses in botany and chemistry. If the objective is the teaching 
of biology, a combined major in botany and zoology will be allowed. 
Such students should complete the Freshman courses in these sub- 
jects as early in their curricula as possible. 

1, 2. Principles of Zoology. An elementary study of the princi- 
ples of life, its development, structural basis and physiological activ- 
ity. The course is continuous throughout the year. This course is 
intended to give a practical knowledge of animal life, and is required 
of all pre-medical students and others intending to major in the De- 
partment of Zoology. Professor Jackson, Miss Thompson, Mr. Mon- 
roe, Miss Sheehan and Mr. Eadie. 

Prerequisite: 1 prerequisite for 2. Freshman course. 3 
lectures or recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

3, 4. Hygiene and Sanitation. A detailed study of the principles 
of health preservation. The course deals with hygiene of digestion, 

246 



ZOOLOGY 

muscular hygiene, neural hygiene, and various other important physi- 
ological processes aflfecting health. The latter half of the work is 
devoted to a study of food, water, and general sanitation, and the 
control of bacterial disease. The course is continuous throughout the 
year. Mr. Monroe. 

Prerequisite : One year of Zoology. 3 prerequisite for 4. 
3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

5, 6. Evolution and Eugenics. Lectures and assignments dealing 
with the various problems of evolution and their relation to human 
life. Evidence of man's origin based on anatomical, embyronic, and 
paleontological data will be discussed. This will be followed by a con- 
sideration of the chief problems of eugenics. Miss Thompson. 

Prerequisite : Two years of Zoology. 5 prerequisite for 6. 
3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester credits. 

7, 8. Ecology. A study of general ecological principles as applied 
to vertebrate animals. Types of habitats with the characteristic verte- 
brate associations occurring in each, and the relation of the animals 
to the environment will be considered. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the instructor. 7 prerequisite 
for 8. 3 lectures or discussions ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester 
credits. (Given in alternate years; not offered in 1937- 
38) 

15, 16. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. A compara- 
tive study of the anatomy of vertebrate animals. Laboratory dissec- 
tions are made of each type. Mr, Eadie. 

Prerequisite: Zoology 2. 15 prerequisite for 16. Sopho- 
more course. 1 lecture ; 2 laboratories ; 3 semester 
credits. 

17, 18. Human Anatomy and Physiology. A survey of the 
structure and function of the human body, with a detailed study of 
the different systems. Collateral readings, written reports and confer- 
ences required. Assistant Professor Richardson. 

247 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Prerequisite: Zoology 2. 17 prerequisite for 18. 3 lec- 
tures; 3 semester credits. (3 lectures; 1 laboratory; 4 
semester credits — for majors in Physical Education for 
Women only.) 



ADVANCED COURSES 

51, 52. Invertebrate Zoology. A study of the structure, habits, 
and ecological relationships of the different groups of invertebrate 
animals. 

Given at the Isles of Shoals Marine Laboratory during 
the summer session. 

53, 54. Histology. A study of the microscopical anatomy of the 
human body. The slides used in the laboratory are correlated with 
the class work. The course is of special value to pre-medical students 
and majors in Zoology. Associate Professor Jackson and Mr. Monroe. 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Zoology and permission 
of the instructor. 53 prerequisite for 54. _ 3 lectures 
or recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

55, 56. Embryology. The study of type forms illustrating the fun- 
damental principles of the embryonic development of animals. The 
course is of special value to pre-medical students and majors in 
Zoology. Associate Professor Jackson and Mr. Monroe. 

Prerequisite : Three years' work in Zoology and permis- 
sion of the instructor. 55 prerequisite for 56. 3 lectures 
or recitations ; 1 laboratory ; 4 semester credits. 

57, 58. Laboratory Technique. A general laboratory course in 
the methods used in the preparation of zoological material, micro- 
scope slides, mounting embryos, making serial sections, etc. Will be 
adapted to individual needs as far as possible. Associate Professor 
Jackson and Mr. Monroe. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the instructor. 57 pre- 
requisite for 58. 1 lecture; 2 laboratories; 3 semester 
credits. 

248 



ZOOLOGY 

59, 60. Advanced Physiology. An advanced study of human phys- 
iology with special emphasis on nutrition, circulation, respiration, 
excretion and secretion. The work will consist of lectures, assigned 
topics and laboratory experiments. Assistant Professor Richardsoa 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Zoology. 59 prerequi- 
site for 60, 3 lectures or recitations; 3 semester hours, 
(3 lectures or recitations; 1 laboratory; 4 semester cred- 
its, by permission of the instructor.) 

61, 62. Cytology and Genetics. A detailed study of the cell, in- 
cluding morphology, the chemical and physical nature of protoplasm, 
mitosis, meiosis, syngamy, and related phenomena leading up to the 
physical basis of inheritance and the study of Mendel's laws, the ex- 
pression and interaction of the genes, linkage, sex and its inheritance, 
the inheritance of quantitative characters, and the types and causes 
of variations. Assistant Professor Richardson. 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Zoology. 61 prerequi- 
site for 62. 3 lectures or recitations; 1 laboratory; 4 
semester credits. (Given in alternate years; not offered 
in 1937-38) 

62, 64. Neurology. A comparative study of the nervous systems 
of the lower animals and a detailed study of the morphology, physiol- 
ogy, and histology of the human nervous system. This subject is 
intended to give a practical knowledge of the nervous system and its 
operation. Assistant Professor Richardson. 

Prerequisite : Two years' work in Zoology. 63 prerequi- 
site for 64. 3 lectures or recitations; 1 laboratory; 4 
semester credits. (Given in alternate years; offered 
in 1937-38) 

Biology-Education (Bi-Ed) 91. Problems in the Teaching of 
High School Biology. Materials and methods in presenting the sub- 
ject of biology in secondary schools and introductory college courses 
will be discussed. There will also be a general survey of the field of 
biology for the purpose of correlating the various lines of work pre- 
viously studied. 

Given at the Isles of Shoals Marine Laboratory during 
the summer session. 

249 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Education-Zoology (Ed-Zo6l) 93, 94. Supervised Teaching in 
Zoology. Qualified students will be allowed to teach under super- 
vision in the Freshman laboratory. The course will include a review 
of general zoology and will be an introduction to teaching for zoology 
students. Students planning to teach biology should supplement this 
course with similar work in the Department of Botany. Students who 
desire to take supervised teaching in high schools may elect 94 as 6 
credits under the usual regulations of the Department of Education. 

Prerequisite : Senior standing and the permission of the 
instructor, 1 lecture or recitation ; 1 or 2 laboratories ; 2 
or 3 semester credits. 

97, 98. Special Problems and Seminar. Seminar discussions 
on current zoological literature will be conducted each week. In 
addition, advanced students may elect a special problem provided 
they present a detailed outline of the subject which they wish to 
investigate and, furthermore, provided they can furnish adequate 
proof of their ability to carry the problem in view of their past 
training and the equipment available. 

Prerequisite : Permission of the instructor. Graduate 
or undergraduate credit. Credits to be arranged. 



service courses 

48. General Zoology. An elementary study of the principles of 
animal life, with a special emphasis on human anatomy and physiol- 
ogy, although the general principles of physiology, embryology and 
genetics as applied to all forms of animals will be discussed. Mr. 
Monroe. 

Required of Sophomores in Agriculture. Open only to 
. students in Agriculture. 3 lectures; 3 semester credits. 

49. Genetics. A detailed study of the physical basis of inheritance, 
laws governing Mendelian inheritance, and the application of such 
laws to plant and animal breeding. (Same content as 62.) For agri- 
cultural students. Assistant Professor Richardson. 

2 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester credits. 

250 



THE TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN 

AGRICULTURE 

M. Gale Eastman, Dean 



The Two- Year Curriculum in Agriculture, established in 1895, 
affords a splendid opportunity for the farm boys of the state to ac- 
quaint themselves with the fundamental principles and with the latest 
and most approved practices of agriculture. This curriculum is ar- 
ranged especially for the young men who wish to make a business of. 
dairying, livestock raising, poultry, horticulture or general farming, 
but who do not have the time, money or preparation to take a regular 
four-year curriculum. 

All required courses in the two-year curriculum are separate and 
distinct from those of the four-year curricula, but some electives arc 
allowed from four-year courses. The work includes training in bot- 
any, chemistry, English, and zoology as fundamental to the study and 
interpretation of information dealing with the successful production 
of plants and animals on the farm. To such a background of science 
and culture through the two years of work are added courses in the 
field of agriculture which will give as thorough and practical training 
as the limited time will permit. These agricultural courses include 
practice both in the laboratory and in the field. The facilities of the 
University's dairy barn, livestock barn, poultry plant, horticultural 
farm, and forest, as well as the milk pasteurizing, ice-cream, and apple 
storage and packing plants on campus, are always available for class 
work with students. 

Military science is not required of two-year students, but any stu- 
dent desiring to take the course may elect it with the four-year stu- 
dents. 

A student who meets the entrance requirements of the University 
may receive credit towards graduation from a four-year curriculum in 
the College of Agriculture for work completed with a grade of 75 or 
better in certain agricultural courses of the two-year curriculum. 

Entrance Requirements. — The two-year curriculum is open to 
both young men and young women. The only entrance requirements 
are a common school education involving a reasonable knowledge of 

251 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, English grammar, geography, 
and United States history. The curriculum is best adapted to students 
from 17 to 21 years of age. Older students frequently take the curric- 
ulum, but younger ones are not encouraged to enter. 

Tuition and Fees. — The tuition for students who are residents of 
New Hampshire is $75 per year. For out-of-state students the tuition 
is $175 per year. One-half of the tuition is payable at the beginning 
of each semester. 

Scholarship.— The University grants to residents of New Hamp- 
shire a limited number of scholarships which cover the tuition charges. 
Students desiring to secure scholarships should apply to the Dean of 
the Faculty, Durham, N. H. 

Expenses. — The expenses of this curriculum will vary with the 
tastes and frugality of the students. An estimate of the expenses for 

one year is as follows : ^j-^j^ Average Low 

Tuition $175 $75 Free 

Books 30 25 $22 

Room 120 72 64 

Board 200 200 175 

Laundry 35 20 15 

Incidentals _50 _J0 _25 

$610 $422 $301 

Farm Experience Requirement. — In order to graduate from this 
curriculum each student must present satisfactory evidence of having 
had practical experience in farm work, either through having worked 
on a farm for at least two years after he was 12 years of age, or 
through having worked on a farm for at least four months after he 
was 15 years of age. 

Opening, Closing. — The curriculum for this year will open Mon- 
day, September 20, 1937, and will close Monday, June 13, 1938. 

Two-year students are not required to attend Freshman Week, 
which begins September 14, 1937, but they may do so if they wish. 

Certificate of Graduation. — No degree is given at the end of this 
period of study, but a "Certificate of Graduation" is presented upon 
the completion of the prescribed curriculum of 64 credits or its 
equivalent 

252 



TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 



TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM 
First Yeas 



Convocation {Required) 

Phys. Ed. 1, 2 

Agr. Chem. 201 {General) 

Agr. Econ. 201 (Rural) 

Agr. Eng. 202 (Drawing) 

A. H. 202 (Types and Breeds) 

Bot. 201 (Elements) 

D. H, 201 (Farm Dairying) 

Eng. 201, 202 (Grammar and Composition) 

Hort. 202 or 214 (Pomology or Vegetable Gardening) 

P. H. 202 (Farm Poultry) 

Elective 



Second Year 

Convocation (Required) 

Agr. Econ. 203 (Farm Accounts) 

Agron. 201, 202 (Crops; Soils, Fertilizers) 

M. E. 202, 204 (Forging; Carpentry) 

Ent. 202 (Principles) 

For. 201 (Farm Forestry) 

Zool. 201 (Physiology and Hygiene) 

Elective 



First 


Second 


Semester 


Semester 


Credits 


Credits 


V^ 


Vi 


4 




2 






1 




3 


4 




3 




3 


3 




3 




3 




2 



16J^ 



2 
3 



2 
2 
7 

16 



15^ 



4 
2 
2 



8 
16 



Elective Courses* 

Agr. Econ. 205, 204 (Marketing; Farm Management) 1 2 

Agr. Eng. 203, 204 (General; Power and Machinery) 2 2 

•A.H. 2 (Judging) 1 

*A.H. 5, 6 ( Veterinary Science) 3 3 

*A.H. 7, 9 (Animal Breeding; Horses and Beef Cattle) .... 3 3 

•A.H. 8 (Markets) 2 

•A.H. 10 (Sheep and Swine) 3 

A.H. 204 (Feeds and Feeding) 3 

Bot. 202 (Diseases) 2 

D.H. 203, 204 (Manufacturing ; Production) 3 3 

•Hort. 1 (Harvesting and Marketing) 3 

•Hort. 3 (Judging) 2 

•Hort. 13, 28 (Vegetable Forcing; Landscape Gardening) . 3 3 

•Hort. 39 (Greenhouse) 3 

Hort. 241, 242 (Advanced) Arr. Arr. 

•P.H. 7, 6 (Breeds and Judging; Breeding) 3 3 

•P.H. 9, 8 (Marketing ; Incubation and Brooding) 2 3 

•P.H. 10 (Feeding) 3 

•P.H. 12, 13 (Housing; Management) 2 3 

•P.H. IS (Diseases) 4 

•Note: Numbers less than 200 indicate four-year courses, which may be elected 

by Two-Year students subject to the approval of the head of the department con- 
cerned. The passing grade for Two- Year students in these courses shall be SO. 

253 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF TWO-YEAR 
CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

201. Agricultural Chemistry. A study of the elementary princi- 
ples of chemistry and of the chemistry of plants, soils, fertilizers, 
foods and animal physiology. Professor Phillips and Mr. Davis. 

Required first year. 3 lectures or recitations ; 1 labora- 
tory; 4 semester credits. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

201. Rural Economics. Text book, lectures, and recitations on 
the development and significance of agricultural problems in our mod- 
ern economy. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Required first year. 2 lectures ; 2 semester credits. 

203. Farm Records and Accounts. Practice in methods of keep- 
ing accounts and records of the farm business and the practical inter- 
pretation of their summaries as affecting profits in farming. Assistant 
Professor Grinnell. 

Required second year. 1 laboratory; 2 semester credits. 

204. Farm Management. Lectures and practical problems con- 
cerning farming as a business. Types of farming, size of business, 
production, balance in organization, labor efficiency, cropping sys- 
tems, farm layout, etc. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Elective second year. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 

205. Agricultural Marketing. A general discussion of the in- 
tricate marketing system with special reference to marketing funct- 
ions, marketing agencies, and methods of sale. Some commodity 

254 



TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

grades and standards investigated. Special phases of cooperative 
marketing developed. Assistant Professor Grinnell. 

Elective second year. 1 lecture ; 1 semester credit. 

AGRONOMY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agronomy 

20L Field Crops. A study of the most important crops in New 
England with special emphasis on those of this state. Attention will 
be given to their history, value, production, management and use. The 
laboratory work will be as practical as possible, including identifica- 
tion in the laboratory and field, judging and farm seed testing. Assist- 
ant Professor Higgins. 

Required second year. 2 lectures or recitations; 1 lab- 
oratory ; 3 semester credits. 

202. Soils and Fertilizers. A study of the physical, chemical and 
biological properties of soils and the fundamental considerations of 
soil management will be offered in the first half of the semester. The 
second half of the semester will cover fertilizers and farm manures, 
giving consideration to occurrence and function of plant food, care 
and use, and the response of crops to the same. Professor Prince 
and Assistant Professor Higgins. 

Required second year. 3 lectures or recitations ; 1 labora- 
tory; 4 semester credits. 

Agricultural Engineering 

202. Agricultural Drawing. A course designed to meet the needs 
of the men directly engaged in agriculture, including practice in let- 
tering, sketches of farm layouts, machine drawing and blue-print 
reading, and making plans for minor farm buildings. Assistant 
Professor Foulkrod. 

Required first year. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

203. Basic Agricultural Engineering Applications. Agricult- 
ural engineering methods applied to the solution of every-day farm 

255 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

problems. Farm mechanics, farm mapping, farm sanitation and water 
supply, as well as types and purposes of farm buildings and their 
equipment, are covered in theory and demonstration. Assistant 
Professor Foulkrod. 

Elective second year. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 

204. Farm Power and Machinery. A course designed particu- 
larly for the manager or foreman. Selection, care, repair and methods 
of use of electrical equipment, field machinery, engines, light plants, 
motors and tractors, with special emphasis on adaptability to local 
conditions. Assistant Professor Foulkrod. 

Elective second year. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

202. Types and Breeds of Livestock. A study of the various 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and swine in respect to their origin, 
history, development, characteristics, and adaptability to different 
conditions of climate and soil. One afternoon each week is devoted 
to judging the different breeds. Professor Tirrell. 

Required first year. 2 lectures or recitations; 1 labora- 
tory; 3 semester credits. 

204. Feeds and Feeding. An elementary study of the laws of 
nutrition, the character, composition, and digestibility of feed stuffs, 
and the methods of feeding different kinds of farm animals. Numer- 
ous samples of grain and by-products are used for the purpose of 
familiarizing the students with the different feed stuffs. Practice is 
given in calculating rations for various purposes. Professor Tirrell. 

Elective second year. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semes- 
ter credits. 

BOTANY 

201. Elements of Botany. The student is given a succinct account 
of the form and structure of plants, and of how plants grow and 
feed. Mr. Dunn. 

256 



TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

Required first year. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 labora- 
tories ; 4 semester credits. 

202. Fungous Diseases of Plants. The principal fungous dis- 
eases of our cultivated plants, their cure and their prevention. Mr. 
Dunn. 

Elective second year. 1 lecture ; 1 laboratory ; 2 semester 
credits. 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

201. Farm Dairying. A general study of milk and its products. 
Assistant Professor Moore. 

Required first year. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester 
credits. 

203. Manufacturing of Dairy Products. A study of the pro- 
duction, handling, and distribution of milk; manufacturing and dis- 
tributing ice cream, butter, condensed milk, and other dairy products. 
Assistant Professor Moore. 

Prerequisite : Dairy Husbandry 201. Elective second 
year. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester credits. 

204. Dairy Production. The field of dairy husbandry in its rela- 
tion to the producer. Care, feeding and management of dairy animals ; 
dairy herd development; dairy cattle judging. Professor Morrow. 

Elective second year. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester 
credits. 



ENGLISH 



201, 202. Grammar and Elementary Composition. 

Required first year. 3 lectures or recitations ; 3 semester 
credits. 



257 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
ENTOMOLOGY 

202. Principles of Economic Entomology. The relation of the 
structure and classification of insects to methods of insect control. 
The preparation and application of insecticides. Spray machinery and 
appliances. Professor O'Kane and Mr. Conklin. 

Required second year. 1 lecture or recitation; 1 labora- 
tory; 2 semester credits. 

FORESTRY 

201. Farm Forestry. The care and management of farm wood- 
lots; log and board scaling; logging and milling; estimating standing 
timber; protection from fire, insects, fungi, etc.; thinning immature 
stands; seeding and planting; natural regeneration. Professor Wood- 
ward. 

Required second year. 1 lecture or recitation; 1 labora- 
tory ; 2 semester credits. 

HORTICULTURE 

202. Elementary Pomology: Orchard and Small Fruits. A 
brief consideration of the principles and practice involved in orchard- 
ing and in the culture of the most important of the small fruits. Pro- 
fessor Potter. 

Required of first-year students who do not take Horti- 
culture 214. Elective for other students. 2 lectures; 1 
laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

214. Elementary Vegetable Gardening. A study of the home 
vegetable garden, and also of the methods used in commercial vege- 
table production. Associate Professor Hepler. 

Required of first-year students who do not take Horti- 
culture 202. Elective for other students. 2 lectures; 1 
laboratory; 3 semester credits. 

241, 242. Advanced Horticulture. Special work in any phase of 
horticulture may be taken by arrangement with the head of the de- 
partment. Professor Potter and staff. 

Prerequisites will depend upon the work taken. Elective 
second year. Hours and credits to be arranged. 

258 



TWO-YEAR CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

202. Forge Shop. This is a study of the forging of iron and 
steel, and is designed to teach the operations of drawing, upsetting, 
welding, twisting, splitting and punching. A study is made of the 
construction, care, and management of the forge, and instruction is 
given in tempering, case hardening and annealing. Mr. O'Connell. 

Required second year. 1 laboratory ; 1 semester credit. 

204. Wood Shop. Farm carpentry and joinery. Care and use of 
tools, making of implements for the farm, and care of lumber on the 
farm. Mr. Batchelder. 

Required second year. 1 laboratory; 1 semester credit. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

202. Farm Poultry. A general course designed especially for 
two-year students who are going back to the farm to engage in prac- 
tical poultry work. The course will include work in managing, feed- 
ing, housing, breeding, incubation, brooding and marketing, with lab- 
oratory work as practical as can be made. Mr. Tepper. 

Required first year. 2 lectures ; 1 laboratory ; 3 semester 
credits. 

ZOOLOGY 

201. Elementary Anatomy and Physiology. A general sur- 
vey of the structure of the human body, together with the study of 
the basic principles of animal life. 

Required first year. 2 lectures or recitations ; 2 semester 
credits. 



259 



NEW HAMPSHIRE AGRICULTURAL 

EXPERIMENT STATION 

John C. Kendall, Director 



The New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station, a branch of 
the University, was established by the state, August 4, 1887, under an 
act of Congress of March 2 of that year. This and subsequent acts 
appropriated funds for conducting research work on agricultural prob- 
lems in New Hampshire and throughout the nation. 

The investigations conducted by the Experiment Station vary ac- 
cording to their nature, some lasting through one season only and 
some covering a period of years. The projects of the Station now in- 
clude ninety-five fundamental investigations to determine the under- 
lying principles of agricultural science and others of more practical 
application. 

Appropriations from the state also enable the Experiment Station to 
conduct a limited amount of state service work on agricultural prob- 
lems. Advantage of the opportunities offered by the Experiment Sta- 
tion has been taken by the state in connection with the tests of seeds, 
fertilizers, and feeding stuffs ; and samples of these collected by the 
State Department of Agriculture are tested at the Station laboratories 
each year, in accordance with legislative enactments. 

Information relating to agricultural practices is supplied by the 
various departments and entails a large volume of correspondence in 
answer to individual inquiries. Samples of soil are tested ; plants and 
insects are identified; blood samples from hens are tested, and post 
mortem examinations of animals made. 

The library of the Experiment Station, which is open daily to stu- 
dents and visitors, contains complete files of all bulletins issued by the 
experiment stations in other states, all United States Department of 
Agriculture bulletins, and many other reports, bulletins and records as 
well as books of agricultural value. 

Publications of the Station comprise 294 bulletins of the regular 
series and 51 circulars, 66 technical bulletins, 51 scientific contribu- 
tions and 4 school bulletins. The publications cover a wide range 
of subjects and contain the information gathered by the experts of 
the Station while working on the various projects. The bulletins are 
issued at regular intervals, and notices of publications are sent to 
all residents of New Hampshire requesting them. 

260 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

(AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS) 

John C. Kendall, Director 



What the colleges and universities are to those young men and 
women who come within their walls, the Extension Service is, only to 
a lesser degree, to the thousands who are beyond the reach of the 
classroom. 

The teachings of the college and the findings of the Experiment Sta- 
tion and the United States Department of Agriculture are now being 
carried to farms and homes throughout the state by a regularly estab- 
lished force of field workers. A cooperative arrangement was first 
made possible in 1914 between the United States Department of Agri- 
culture, the state college and the counties of the state by the Smith- 
Lever Act of Congress, which appropriated funds to be offset by each 
state. This arrangement was extended by the State Legislature of 
1925, which passed a special extension appropriation for county work, 
and by the Capper-Ketcham and other supplementary acts of Congress. 
There are now ten agricultural agents in the ten counties, ten home 
demonstration agents, and ten boys' and girls' club agents, five assist- 
ant agents, and two agents-at-large. Farm management, dairying, 
forestry, soils and crops, poultry, horticulture, marketing, engineering, 
nutrition, clothing and home management demonstrations are also 
conducted, with specialists in charge. 

The Extension Service works largely through a group of rural 
people known as the Farm Bureau, one of which has been formed in 
each county. With its corps of fifty-eight men and women the Exten- 
sion Service relieves the college teaching staff and station workers 
from much of the miscellaneous extension work which they handled in 
the past. It also carries the work to a much larger public and carries 
it in a much more intimate way than it would otherwise be possible 
to do. 

The publications of the Extension Service comprise 176 press bulle- 
tins, 194 circulars, and 50 bulletins. Notices of new bulletins are sent 
to a mailing list, which is maintained in cooperation with the Experi- 
ment Station. Bulletins are sent free to all who request them. 

Reading courses in fifteen subjects in agriculture and home eco- 
nomics, prepared by members of the resident college staff, are offered 
during the winter months. 

261 



DEGREES AND HONORS, 1936 



At the Sixty-Sixth Annual Commencement Exercises, Monday, 
June 15, 1936, at which President Kenneth C. M. Sills, A.M., LL.D., 
of Bowdoin College, made the Commencement address, Acting Pres- 
ident Roy D. Hunter conferred the following degrees and certificates : 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Master of Arts 
In English: 

Mary Alice Herendeen Flocken, B.S., Wm. Smith College, 1921, 
Katonah, N. Y. 

In History : 

Kenneth Leslie Deene, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, Ex- 
eter, N. H. 

Edna Frances Dickey, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, Salem 
Depot, N. H. 

Bernice Clementine Roe, B.A., Univ. of Delaware, 1932, Dover, 
N. H. 

Alexander Mark Sulloway, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 
Berlin, N. H. 

Joseph Bassett Williams, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1926, 
Exeter, N. H. 

In Languages : 

' Shirley Elizabeth Baldwin, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 

East Kingston, N. H. 
Barbara May Clough, University of Paris, 1933, Lebanon, N. H. 
Paul Hubert Phaneuf, Ph.B., Holy Cross College, 1935, Nashua, 

N. H. 

Lorraine Estelle Raitt, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 
Derry, N. H. 

262 



DEGREES 



In Social Studies: 

William Coleman Chamberlin, B.A., Yale University, 1933, Dur- 
ham, N. H. 

Emerson Grabill Hangen, A.B, Albright College, 1922, Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 

Mary M. Lowney, B.S., Montana State College, 1933, Los An- 
geles, Cal. 

Carroll Elwyn Mathews, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 
Rochester, N. H. 

Maurice James Moriarty, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 
Durham, N. H. 

Master of Education 

Cecil Webster Boodey, B.A., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1921, 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
Anna Bean Brown, B.S., University of Maine, 1908, Wentworth, 

N. H. 

Mildred Linfield Doyle, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 

Concord N. H. 
Lee Blanchard Henry, B.A., Amherst College, 1935, South Nor- 

walk, Conn. 

Harold Irving Leavitt, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1921, 
Durham, N. H. 

Gladys Emerson MacPhee, B.S., Simmons College, 1916, Bristol, 

N. H. 
Harold Edgar McGrath, B.S., Wesleyan University, 1918, West 

Haven, Conn. 

Edith Stearns Morrill, B.S., Simmons College, 1916, Manchester, 
N. H. 

Willard Irving Rowe, A.B., Harvard University, 1910, Exeter, 
N. H. 

John Murray Stevens, B.S., Holy Cross College, 1931, Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 

263 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Master of Science 
In Chemistry: 

Roger Morton Doe, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire 1934, Dover. 
N. H. 

Grace Lorene Ernst, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, Man- 
chester-by-the-Sea, Mass. 

Roger Davis Gray, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1934, Dover, 
N. H. 

Lemuel Dary Wright, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, 
Nashua, N. H. 

In Geology: 

Ruth Helen Johnson, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1934, East 
Jaffrey, N. H. 

In Zoology: 

Roger Paul Brassard, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1935, La- 
conia, N. H. 

Catherine Dorothy Calnan, B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1933, 
Reed's Perry, N. H. 



264 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREES (312) 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



College of Agriculture (25) 



Name 

Phillips Brooks Badger 
*David Calvin Barton 
Walter Elmer Brown 
Byron Earle Colby 
Philip Gignac Couture 
Clark Albert Craig 
Robert Gale Dustin 
Waino William Elgland 
Edward Wilbur Foss 
Sewell Willobe Gilman 
Harry Kydd Gouck 
Ernest Wilson Gould 
Walter Stanley Hale 
Robert Newton Hayden 
jeorge Moore Keith 
jeorge Elwin Kerr 
\rthur Edwin Mitchell 
H!erman Wendell Parker 
'Henry Edson Roberts 
Tohn Tolman Spear 
Robert Francis Stevens 
^aul Carlton Traver 
Earl Haven Tryon 
Bruce Varney 
(A^alter Drury Weeks 



Course 


P.O. Address 


D.H. 


Portsmouth 


For. 


Durham 


For. 


Concord 


A.H. 


West Lebanon 


Ent. 


Laconia 


P.H. 


Antrim 


For. 


Keene 


Ent. 


West Concord 


Gen. 


Laconia 


T.Tr. 


Walpole 


Ent. 


Andover, Mass. 


For. 


Hinsdale 


P.H. 


East Rindge 


D.H. 


Brookline 


Hort. 


Dover 


Gen. 


Dover 


Hort. 


Freedom 


Gen. 


Exeter 


D.H. 


South Royalton, Vt. 


P.H. 


South Acworth 


Hort. 


Medfield, Mass. 


T.Tr. 


Raymond 


For. 


Durham 


P.H. 


Stratham 


Hort. 


Laconia 



265 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



College of Liberal Arts (145) 


Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Frank Russell Abbott 


Gen. Bus. 


Peterborough 


Ralph Edmund Abbott 


Geol. 


Wolfeboro 


Francis Thomas Ahern 


Educ. 


Manchester 


Bertha Blanche Ashley 


H.E.I. 


Windsor Locks, Conn 


Thomas Wheelock Atherton 


Gen. Bus. 


West Lebanon 


Raymond Irvin Beal 


Educ. 


Portsmouth 


Byard Charles Belyea 


Pre-Med. 


Dover 


Richard Henry Bienvenue 


Zool. 


Manchester 


Eleanora Doris Boston 


P.E. 


Dover 


Arline Eleanor Brazel 


Zool. 


Hartford, Conn. 


Ben Richard Bronstein 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Paul Frederick Brooks 


Educ. 


Greenfield 


Barbara Rand Brown 


Educ. 


Deerfield 


Jessie Mildred Bunker 


H.E. 


Kingston 


William Franklin Burnham, Jr 


. Econ. 


Durham 


Sheffield Smith Campbell 


Educ. 


Enfield 


Winnifred Abbott Carlisle 


H.E. 


Concord 


Jeremiah Allen Chase 


Educ. 


Seabrook 


Richard Irving Qark 


Gen. Bus. 


Rochester 


Elizabeth Rose Corbett 


P.E. 


Concord 


John William Coyne, Jr. 


Econ. 


Manchester 


♦William Dyer Crandall 


Pre-Med. 


Northwood Narrows 


^'Evelyn Frances Craton 


P.E. 


Hillsboro 


Gilbert Wallace Crosby 


Geol. 


Alton 


Edward Henry Currier 


Educ. 


Pelham 


Herbert Stanley Currier 


Econ. 


Pelham 


Albert Victor Cutter 


Pre-Med. 


Pelham 


• **Ruth Davenport 


Econ. 


South Danbury 


Madeleine Davol 


Zool. 


Manchester 


Edna Lougee Dearborn 


Zool. 


Laconia 


Henry Demers 


Educ. 


Manchester 


Loretto Genevieve Dolan 


Educ. 


Nashua 


Chesley Folsom Durgin 


Gen. Bus. 


Newmarket 


Emid Daniel Elgosin 


Pre-Med. 


Whitefield 


Grace Hildreth Evans 


H.E. 


Waltham, Mass, 



266 



DEGREES 



Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Montgomery Farrington 


Econ. 


Portsmouth 


**Jesse Bryan Flansburg 


Educ. 


Manchester 


Robert Knowlton Foster 


Gen. Bus. 


Walpole 


Antoine Arthur Fournier 


Educ. 


Somersworth 


Beatrice Fuller 


P.E. 


Lancaster 


Mary Garvin 


H.E. 


Sanbornville 


Kennard Entwistle Goldsmith 


Educ. 


Portsmouth 


Doris Ruberta Goodwin 


Zool. 


Piermont 


Alice Mary Gould 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Gladys Hoagland Granville 


P.E. 


Madison 


John Greene 


Geol. 


Windham 


Dorothy Jeannette Grimes 


Econ. 


Dover 


Harold Haller 


Educ. 


Dover 


Robert Gould Hamlin 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


Roland Gott Hamlin 


Econ. 


Manchester 


Russell Sanborn Hanson 


Zool. 


Tilton 


Jasper Joseph Harding 


Gen. Bus. 


West Lebanon 


Priscilla Frances Hartwell 


Educ. 


Brockton, Mass. 


Alice Janet Hazlett 


Educ. 


Durham 


*Helen Henderson 


Zool. 


Durham 


Maurice Kendall Herlihy 


Gen. Bus. 


Wilton 


Mary Wright Holmes 


H.E. 


Winchester, Mass. 


Henry Lloyd Hooper 


Ent. 


Rochester 


Edward Orton Hubbard, Jr. 


Pre-Med. 


Peterborough 


Duncan Upham Hunter 


Econ. 


West Claremont 


Donald Earl Huse 


Econ. 


North Sutton 


Robert Francis Jeannotte 


Educ. 


Nashua 


Eva Ellen Johnson 


Educ. 


Whitehall, N. Y. 


Delmar Faunce Jones 


Econ. 


Franconia 


Leslie Eugene Jones 


Pre-Med. 


Goffstown 


Mary Letitia Kennon 


Soc. 


Meredith 


William Foster Kidder 


Econ. 


New London 


William Richard Kimball 


Gen. Bus. 


Andover, Mass. 


Gertrude Dorothea Knott 


Zool. 


Portsmouth 


Robert Ernest Lamy 


Gen. Bus. 


Rochester 


Raymond Valmore LeBel 


Chem. 


Somersworth 


♦Maurice Eugene LeRoy 


Gen. Bus. 
267 


Stratham 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Everett Fisher Lombard 
Richard Ryder Loring 
Stephanie Dorothea Lowther 
Austin Joseph McCaffrey 
Daniel Francis McCarthy 
Mary Evelina McCarthy 
Kenneth Kimball McKiniry 
Dorothy Margaret McLaughlin 
Natalie Agnes McLaughlin 
James George McLeod 
Warren Elmer Marshall 
Ernest Roland Maynard 
Nettie Alice Maynard 
Joseph Lewis Miller, Jr. 
Eleanor Ruth Mitchell 
Edwin Francis Moody 
Byron Harvey Moore 
Natalie Richardson Mower 
Mary Alexine Mulligan 
Thomas Paul Nangle 
John Lewis Newsky 
Robert Edward Nixon 
Louis Vincent Orgera 
John Henry Palmer 
Ronald Ray Pariseau 
Alvin Howell Parker 
Clifford LeRoy Parkinson 
Guy Anthony Pederzani 
John Henry Perkins, Jr. 
Mildred Florence Peterson 
Marjorie Stevens Phillips 
Maurice Chapman Pike, Jr. 
Leon Anthony Ranchynoski 
Norman James Randell 
Ralph Kelsey Reed 
Edward Macaulay Rogers 
Aino Alice Rosander 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Pre-Med. 


Short Falls 


Gen. Bus. 


East Norwalk, Conn. 


Zool 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Lincoln 


Pre-Med, 


Dover 


Zool 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Kearsarge 


H.E. 


Greenland 


H.E. 


Durham 


Educ. 


Laconia 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Zool 


Nashua 


H.E. 


South Deerfield 


Econ. 


Durham 


H.E.I. 


Exeter 


Educ. 


Lebanon 


Econ. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


Lebanon 


Soc. Serv. 


Dover 


Pre-Med. 


Rochester 


Gen. Bus. 


Dover 


Gen. Bus. 


Newfields 


Educ. 


Stamford, Conn. 


Educ. 


Rochester 


Econ. 


Newport 


Econ. 


Attleboro,Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Salem 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


Econ. 


Pittsfield 


P.E. 


Portsmouth 


H.E. 


Lynn, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


Educ. 


Nashua 


Soc. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Econ. 


Durham 


Educ. 


Durham 


Soc. 


New Ipswich 



268 



DEGREES 



Name Course 

Charles Irving Rowell Gen. Bus. 

Flora Sanborn H.E. 

Helen Pauline Seaward Educ. 

Clarence Philip Shannon Zo'ol. 

Ruth Elaine Shapleigh H.E. 

Claud William Sharps Zool. 

Millicent Mae Shaw H.E, 

Richard Shuman Pre-Med. 

♦Caroline Eleanor Smith Econ. 

Pauline Georgiana Spear Pre-Med. 

Grace Mildred Stearns Educ. 

Martha Meriden Stevens H.E. 

**Samuel Arthur Stone Math. 

George Harding Sumner Econ. 
Edwin William Robert Swett Econ. 

Joseph William Symonovit Econ. 

James Birney Tatem Econ. 

Miriam Madelon Taylor H.E. 

Florence Marion Tebbetts Educ. 

Robert Wayne Thayer Educ. 

Anna Lotta Thompson Educ. 

*Frank Dillon Thompson Pre-Med. 

William Joseph Thompson Econ. 

Philip Henry Trowbridge Econ. 

Robert Baxter True Gen. Bus. 

Ransom Edward Tucker Pre-Med. 

Frances Evelyn Tuttle H.E.I. 

Guy Robert Vitagliano Bat. 

David Kimball Webster Pre-Med. 

Carolyn Pemberton Welch Educ. 

Normal Edmund Welch Gen. Bus. 

Albert Munroe Wilcox, Jr. Econ. 

Marshall Peterson Wilder Geol. 

George Clayton Williams Educ. 

Israel Wiseman Zool. 

David Nathan Yaloff Educ. 



P.O. Address 

Newport 

Brentwood 

Manchester 

Durham 

Kittery, Maine 

Or ford 

Tilton 

Dover 

Durham 

Derry 

Manchester 

North Stratford 

Claremont 

Portsmouth 

Nashua 

Pelham 

Durham 

Hinsdale 

Pittsfield 

Berlin 

IVhitefield 

Pittsfield 

Hampton 

Durham 

Fremont 

Warren, Vt. 

Peterborough 

Concord 

Concord 

Andover 

Penacook 

Effingham 

Peterborough 

Candia 

Dover 

Laconic 



269 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

College of Technology (65) 



Name 
Donald William Avery 
Robert Gaius Barrett 
Gordon Henry Bassett 
John Daniel Betley 
*Arthur William Bryan 
Paul Nicholas Caros 
Richard Thayer Carrico 
Robert Lee Cochran 
Joseph Frederick Comolli 
Joseph Vincent Conroy 
Herbert Bayley Cowden 
Edward Wright Cronin 
Earle Josiah Davis 
Joseph Shepherd Dorsey 
Laurent Oscar Dubois 
Cecil Frederic Ellingwood 
Robert Henry Elliott 
George Orsfield Goddard 
*Shubel Carpenter Haley 
Richard Tutherly Haubrich 
Parker Edward Holt 
**Fred Willis Hoyt, 3rd 
Nicholas Isaak 
Leo Edward Jositas 
Charles Sumner Joslin 
Wallace Larkin Kimball 
John William Kurtti 
William Judson Locke 
Allan Winthrop Low 
William Lucinski 
Donald Edward MacFadyen 
*Earle Lester MacKay 
Robert James McNally 
*John Thomas Maddock 
*Wilbur Hobart Miller 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Chem. 


Plymouth 


Chem. 


Franklin 


Chem. 


Marlboro 


Arch. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Wilton 


Arch, 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Port Washington, N.Y. 


M.E. 


Andover 


E.E. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Durham 


Chem. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Auburn 


E.E. 


Laconia 


Chem. 


Pequaket 


C.E. 


Newport 


Chem. 


Concord 


E.E. 


Ashland 


E.E. 


Dover 


Chem. 


Claremont 


M.E. 


South Lyndcboro 


Chem. 


Weirs 


Arch. 


Manchester 


Arch. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Durham 


M.E. 


Derry 


M.E. 


New Ipszmch 


C.E. 


Kittery, Maine 


Chem. 


Durham 


C.E. 


Nashua 


Chem, 


Dover 


E.E. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Concord 


Chem. 


Salem 


Chem. 


Raymond 



270 



DEGREES 



Name 
Claude Vernom Morse 
Everett Reed Munson 
Roy Carter Norton, Jr. 
Roland Higginson O'Neal 
Samuel Rufus Page 
Richard Patterson Parker 
Kenneth Raymond Philbrick 
Warren Abbott Phillips 
Clayton Robert Plumer 
Clyde Duane Prince 
Leo Paul Provost 
Milburn Loring Richards 
♦Ralph Whitney Robbins 
James Miller Robinson 
Milton Jack Rosen 
William Henry Sanborn 
Ray Maxwell Sargent 
William Fred Schipper 
Curtis Willard Schricker 
Donald Barker Seavey 
James Lawson Shields, Jr. 
Seth Urban Shorey 
♦Herbert Ernest Silcox 
Morgan Andrew Stickney 
Charles Stockman Tarr 
Edgar Stanley Thompson 
Alvah Glidden Tinker 
Albert Gallagher Welch 
Elmer Perley Wheeler 
Dexter Charles Wright 



Course 


P.O. Address 


M.E. 


Keene 


Arch. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Kittery Point, Maine 


E.E. 


Hinsdale 


C.E. 


Tilton 


C.E. 


South Merrimack 


M.E. 


Rye 


C.E. 


East Candla 


Arch. 


Lochmere 


C.E. 


Andover 


Arch. 


Manchester 


Arch. 


Millinocket, Maine 


M.E. 


Keene 


Chem. 


Antrim 


C.E. 


Portsmouth 


M.E. 


Seahrook 


E.E. 


Milford 


C.E. 


Portsmouth 


Chem. 


Goffstown 


C.E. 


Milford 


C.E. 


Reading, Pa. 


Chem. 


Lancaster 


Chem. 


Durham 


M.E. 


Plymouth 


C.E. 


East Wolfehoro 


Chem. 


Laconia 


C.E. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Goffstown 


Chem. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Nashua 



271 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 
College of Liberal Arts (77) 



Name 

♦Robert Rettig Anderson 
♦Eleanor Kathleen Arkell 
Arnold Maurice Baer 
Robert Alden Bailey 
Ralph Gordon Barnes 
Mary Weeks Bateman 
Harmon Simson Belinsky 
Bessie Borwick 
Ronald Forbes Buchan 
Paul William Burns 
Thomas Russell Burns, Jr. 
Anthony Theodore Campbell 
Charles Frederick Cannell 
♦Esther Fisher Carnegie 
Charlotte Elizabeth Codaire 
William Vincent Corcoran 
Marion Smith Cotton 
Mary Dodge 
Vincena Mary Drago 
Walter Arthur Emery 
Doris Mary Fowler 
Robert Alfred Goodman 
♦Delmar Winkley Goodwin 
Edwin Dvon Gritz 
Walter Ludwig Gustafson 
Robert Harris Hatch 
♦Charlotte Josephine Hills 
Edwin Knight Hodgdon 
Frank Fisher Hough 
Morey Greenwood Howe 
Eleanor Louise Huddleston 
Milton Grant Johnson 
♦Haruko Kawasaki 
Richard Harold Keefe 



Course 


P.O. Address 


French 


Milton Mills 


Latin 


Dover 


English 


Dover 


Pol Set. 


Enfield Centre 


Philosophy 


Chichester 


English 


North Stratford 


History 


Rochester 


French 


Portsmouth 


English 


Concord 


Pol. Sci. 


Manchester 


Pol Sci. 


Manchester 


Pol. Sci. 


West Tisbury, Mass. 


Psychology 


Lebanon 


Latin 


Rochester 


English 


Manchester 


Pol. Sci. 


Manchester 


English 


Warren 


French 


Durham 


French 


Milford 


English 


Manchester 


English 


Dover 


History 


Lebanon 


History 


Concord 


English 


Durham 


Pol. Sci. 


Portsmouth 


English 


Dover 


German 


Mill Hall Pa. 


History 


Epping 


Psychology 


Lebanon 


History 


Manchester 


French 


Durham 


Pol. Sci. 


Durham 


English 


Portsmouth 


Pol. Sci. 


Dover 



272 



DEGREES 



Name 
Lawrence Wendell Knight, Jr. 
Max Kostick 
Robert Roger Lambert 
Ronaldo Aristide Landry 
Samuel James Levis, Jr. 
James Athanasius MacDonald 
William Joseph MacDonald 
Ronald James McGivney 
Donald Wallace Maclsaac 
Leon Ernest Magoon 
Genevieve Armen Mangurian 
Catharine Margaretta Mason 
Charles Harrington Melnick 
Janette Deborah Milliken 
Howard Eugene Ordway 
Elinor Storey Osgood 
Martha Phyllis Osgood 
Robertson Page 
Elaine Catherine Peart 
Hilda Patricia Peart 
Mary Emerson Perkins 
Bertha Lucinda Piper 
♦Margaret Pratt 
Richard Dean Prescott 
Rosalind Ellen Putney 
Helen Winifred Rafferty 
Edith Madeline Raymond 
Edward Virginuis Rinalducci 
Arthur Weston Robinson, Jr. 
Spencer Shannon Rollins 
Marian Evelyn Rowe 
**Ralph Corlies Rudd 
John Frank Sanders 
Ruth Louise Seidel 
Lena Shuman 
Katherine Spellman 
Gertrude Whittier Stickle 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Psychology 


Concord 


Music 


Farming ton 


French 


Manchester 


French 


Laconia 


Pre-Law 


Westville 


English 


Intervale 


Psychology 


Intervale 


Pol Set. 


Berlin 


English 


Concord 


Philosophy 


Littleton 


History 


Manchester 


English 


Newmarket 


English 


Laconia 


Music 


Freedom 


Pol. ScL 


Berlin 


French 


Newbury port. Mass, 


English 


Pdttsfield 


English 


Concord 


History 


Derry 


Spanish 


Derry 


Pol Sci. 


Rye Beach 


History 


Amherst 


History 


Antrim 


Pre-Law 


Kensington 


History 


Hopkinton 


History 


Manchester 


English 


Laconia 


Pol Sci. 


Portsmouth 


History 


Durham 


History 


Laconia 


History 


Exeter 


Philosophy 


Durham 


Psychology 


Lakeport 


English 


North Salem 


Latin 


Dover 


French 


Concord 


English 


E. Cleveland, Ohio 



273 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Alice Monica Tliompson 
Madelyn Frances Tobin 
Brendan Emmett Toolin 
Elizabeth Antoinette Villanova 
Elizabeth Ellen Wall 
Elizabeth Flora Williams 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREE IN ENGINEERING 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Latin 


Whitefield 


French 


Manchester 


Pol. Sci. 


Durham 


Spanish 


Rochester 


English 


Nashua 


English 


Danbury 



Clayton William Holmes 

(B.S., Univ. of N. H., 1926), M.E. 



Haverford, Pa. 



TWO-YEAR CERTIFICATES 
College of Agriculture (8) 



Raymond Preemont Batchelder 
Charles Hugh Brady 
Douglas Robert Brown 
Earle Drake Clark 
Douglas Newcomb Grant 
J. Shumway Marshall 
Richard Edwin Moulton 
John Robertson Wentworth 



Wilton 

Newmarket 

Littleton 

Northwood 

Buckland, Conn. 

Colebrook 

Moultonboro 

Exeter 



NOTE— 

** Indicates "With High Honor" (average of 90 or above for college course). 
* Indicates "With Honor" (average of 85 to 90 for college course). 



274 



PRIZES AWARDED, 1936 

Bailey Prize — Fred Willis Hoyt, 3rd The Weirs 

Bartlett Prize — Jeremy Morrison Portsmouth 

Katherinc DeMcritt Memorial Prize — Millicent Ethel Sleeper, 

Sunapee 

Diettrich Memorial Cup — Constance Sceva Chandler . . Barnstead 

Erskine Mason Memorial Prize — Allen Winthrop Low . . Durham 

Hood All-Round Achievement Prize — Charles Sumner Joslin, 

Durham 
Hood Dairy Cattle Judging Prizes: 

First — Leonard Walter Gray Colebrook 

Second — Lester Charles Stevens Walpole 

Third — Walter Baldwin Knight, Jr Dover 

American Legion Award — Lawrence Wendell Knight, Jr., Concord 

Mask and Dagger Achievement Prizes: 

First — Henry Edson Roberts South Royalton, Vt. 

Second — Warren Elmer Marshall Manchester 

Third — Marian Evelyn Rowe Exeter 

Phi Mu Medal — Eleanora Doris Boston Dover 

Phi Sigma Prize — Philip Lincoln Wright Nashua 

Class of 1899 Prize — Henry Edson Roberts . . . South Royalton, Vt. 

Edward T. Fair child Prize: 
First — Donald Wallace MacIsaac Concord 

Second — Doris Mary Fowler Dover 

Psi Lambda Cup — Jessie Mildred Bunker Kingston 

Alpha Chi Omega Prize — Alexander Karanikas Goffstown 

Alpha Xi Delta Cup — Evelyn Frances Craton Hillsboro 

275 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Association of Women Students' Award — 

Janice Mae Pearsons Hill 

Christine Vivian Rassias Manchester 

Alpha Zeta Scholarship Cup — Robert Jenness Dover 

Lock-e Prize — Constance Sceva Chandler Barnstead 

Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Award — Allen Sanborn Hussey, 

Lancaster 
Phi Lambda Phi Award — John Thomas Maddock, Bradford, Mass. 
Notable books awarded by the French Government to students who 

have distinguished themselves in the study of French this year : 

Esther Fischer Carnegie Rochester 

Lena Shuman Dover 

Rachel Carmen Caron Nashua 

Constance Sceva Chandler Barnstead 

American Association of University Women Award: 
Eleanor Kathleen Arkell Dover 

Osgood Plaque — Phi Delta Upsilon Fraternity for 1936-37 

Intercollegiate Writing Contest: 

(Institutions competing, Universities of Maine, New Hampshire 

and Vermont) 
Short Stories : 

First Prize — Eileen Rita McLaughlin Laconia 

Second Prize — (Triple Tie) Grace Mildred Stearns, 

Manchester 

Poetry : 

First Prize — (Triple Tie) Margaret Paige North Weare 

Alexander Kjvranikas . . Goffstown 
Harper's Magazine Essay Contest: 

Third Prize— ($25.00) Arthur Kenneth Day Laconia 

Atlantic Monthly Essay Contest: 

Fourth Prize — Olive Louise Brock Haverhill, Mass. 

Fifth Prize — Joseph Leroy Lovely Exeter 

Davis Cattle Judging Prizes for Two-year Students: 

First Prize — Earle Drake Clark Northwood 

Second Prize — Richard Edwin Moulton Moultonborough 

Third Prize — Spiros Arthur Balatsos Reed's Ferry 

276 



STUDENTS, 1936 - 1937 



Abbreviations Designating Courses 

Agr. Ch. — Agricultural Chemistry 

Arch. — Architecture 

A. G. — Arts General 

Agr. — General Agriculture 

Agr. Tr. — Agriculture, Teacher Training 

A.H. — Animal Husbandry 

C,E. — Civil Engineering 

Chem. — Chemistry 

D. H. — Dairy Husbandry 
Educ. — Professional Education 

E. E. — Electrical Engineering 
Engr. — Engineering 

For. — Forestry 

Gen. Bus. — General Business 

H. E. Ex. — Home Economics, Extension Training 

H. E. I. — Home Economics, Institutional 

H. E. Tr. — Home Economics, Teacher Training 

Hort. — Horticulture 

M. E. — Mechanical Engineering 

P.H. — Poultry Husbandry 

Pre-Med. — Pre-Medical 

Sec. — Secretarial 

Soc. Ser. — Social Service 

Soc. St. — Social Studies 



277 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 
(Men, 30; Women, 19; Total, 49) 



Name Course 

Alpers, Bernard Jacob Major History 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1932 



P.O. Address 
Salem, Mass. 



Major Education Dover 



Arkell, Eleanor Kathleen 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1936 
Barnes, Ralph Gordon 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1936 
Barry, Mary Catherine 

A.B., Regis College, 1936 
Basim, Mary 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1934 
Beckwith, Marion Chipman 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1935 
Bowles, Mariette Roe 

A.B.,Middlebury College,193S 
Carnegie, Esther Fisher Major English 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1936 
Chynoweth, Anne Janes Major Education 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan, 1925 
Clapp, James Wellington Major Chemistry 

B.S.,Massachusetts State,1936 
Clarke, William Herbert Major Zoology 

Ph.C., Palmer School, 1924 

D.C, Keene, 1934 
Cournoyer, Madeleine 

A.B., Brown, 1935 
Couture, Philip Gignac 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
Cowden, Herbert Bayley 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
Danforth, Harry Raymond 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1928 
Evans, Nell Wysor 

B.S., Boston University, 1935 



Major Social Studies Northwood Ridge 
Major English Dover 

Major Social Studies Portsmouth 
Major Education 
Major English 



South Sudbury, Mass. 



Franconia 



Rochester 



Major French 

Major Entomology Laconia 

Major Chemistry 

Major Education 

Major Education 



St. Albans, Vt. 
Springfield, Mass. 



Sanford, Me. 



Suncook 



Durliam 



Concord 



Christiansburg, Va. 



27^ 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Name 
Erickson, Edward Irvin 

B.S., Bates, 1928 
Foss, Helen Elizabeth 

A.B., Bates, 1927 
French, Kendrick Stephen 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1935 
Gillette, Willard Raymor 

B.S.,Massachusetts State,1936 
Graves, John Kimball 

B.A., Washington, 1936 
Gregg, Donald Crowther 

B.S., Vermont, 1935 
Hammett, Walton Henry 

B.A., Yale, 1932 
Kyer, Donald Louvell 

B.A., Maine, 1935 
Ladd, Bradley Baybutt 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1929 
Ladd, Dolly Longfellow 

B.S., Simmons, 1919 
Landry, Ronaldo Aristide 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1936 
Locke, William Judson 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
McLeod, Dorothy Evelyn 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1935 
McLeod, Helen Patricia 

B.S., Saskatchewan, 1928 
McPhee, Gladys Emerson 

B.S., Simmons, 1916 
Miller, Wilbur Hobart 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
Naghski, Joseph 

B.S., Cornell, 1936 
O'Leary, Maurice John 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1928 



Course 

Major Education 

Major History 



P.O. Address 
Alton 

Rochester 



Major Chemistry Center Barnstead 



Major Botany 
Major History 



North Bill erica, Mass. 



Concord 



Major Chemistry Westminster West,Vt. 



Major Sociology 
Major Zoology 

Major Education 

Major History 

Major French 

Major Civil 

Engineering 
Major Education 



Durham 

Brewer, Me. 

Epping 

Epping 

Laconia 

Kittery, Me. 

Durham 



Major Bacteriology Durham 

Major Education Andover 

Major Chemistry Raymond 

Major Bacteriology New Lisbon, N. Y. 

Major Social Studies Rochester 



279 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Name Course P.O. Address 

Palmer, John Henry Major History Rochester 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
Peckham, Warren Francis Major Chemistry Concord 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1933 
Petzold, Milton Herbert Major Social Studies Portsmouth 

Ph.B., Syracuse, 1911 
Rafferty, Terrence John Major French Portsmouth 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1934 
Rowell, Barbara Major English Bristol 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1933 
Shields, Dorothy Major French Rochester 

A.B., Bates, 1936 
Shuman, C Kenneth Major Agricultural Fletcher, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State, 1935 Chemistry 

Shuman, Lena Major French Dover 

B.A., New Hampshire, 1936 
Slayton, Foster Herbert Major Social Studies Barre, Vt. 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1928 
Smith, Caroline Eleanor Major Education ^Durham 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
Stacy, Jessie Eloise Major Education Portsmouth 

B.S., Boston University, 1934 
Starratt, Howard Manuel Major Social Studies Sanford,Me. 

Th.B., Gordon College, 1930 
Stone, Samuel Arthur Major Mathematics Claremont 

B.S., New Hampshire, 1936 
VanDyke, John Howard Major Zoology Rochester 

A.B., Colgate, 1935 
Washburn, Howard Reynolds Major Social Studies West Lebanon, Me, 

A.B., Trinity, 1925 



280 



(Men, 212; Women, 99; Total, 311) 


Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Adams, Virginia Lathrop 


A.G. 


Swansey 


Alliapoulos, Cosmas A. 


For, 


Manchester 


Allen, Jessica Duckworth 


A.G. 


Springfield, Mass. 


Annett, Donald Archie 


A.G. 


Rollinsford 


Anton, William Perley 


A.G. 


Concord 


Arnfield, John Moody 


Gen. Bus. 


Hampton Beach 


Atkins, Ruth Irene 


Educ, 


Orford 


Babcock, Nancy Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Durham 


Baldwin, Dorothy 


A.G. 


Wilton 


Barker, Edmund Lee 


C.E. 


East Rindge 


Bartlett, Edmund Willis 


For. 


Salisbury, Mass. 


Barton, Genella Elizabeth 


H.E. 


Pittsfield 


Baxter, Thelma Leona 


A.G. 


Dover 


Belanger, Jeannette Marie 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Belcher, Charles, Jr. 


Pre-Med. 


East Andovef 


Belson, Elliott Eli 


A.G. 


Dover 


Benedick, Muriel Roberta 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Bennett, Robert Towle 


A.G. 


Northwood Ridge 


Bergquist, Donald Adolph 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Bickford, Albert Greenlief 


Gen. Bus. 


Rochester 


Bishop, Kenneth Paul 


A.G. 


Peterborough 


Boulton, Frederic Henry 


C.E. 


Goffstown 


Braconier, Harry Erland 


Pre-Med. 


Brockton, Mass. 


Bragg, James Gerard 


Gen. Bus. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Brown, Frank Andrew 


For. 


Hinsdale 


Brownell, Barbara 


H.E. 


Dover 


Bumford, Forrest Henrjr 


M.E. 


Dover 


Campbell, Marguerite Shirley 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Carlisle, Marjorie Crane 


H.E. 


Concord 


Caron, Rachel Carmel 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Carr, Byron Williams 


A.G. 


Contoocooh 


Cassily, Marie Margaret 


A.G. 


Dover 


Chandler, Constance Sceva 


A.G. 


Barnstead 


Chase, Adele Bevelyn 


A.G. 


Concord 


Chertok, Edwin Irving 


Gen. Bus. 


Laconia 


Chodokoski, Edward Joseph 


C.E. 


Berlin 



281 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Clark, Harold Jewett 
Clement, Richard Walter 
Collins, Leo Wendell 
Colman, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Comerford, Edward Volney 
Conner, Alfred, Jr. 
Cooperstein, Leon Isaac 
Corson, Anne Elizabeth 
Craigin, Karl Francis 
Crawford, Raymond Douglas 
Cricenti, Nicholas Joseph 
Currier, Don Osvold 
D'Allessandro, Elmo Augustus 
Dalrymple, Arthur Woodbury 
Dancause, Lucien Alfred 
Dane, Eleanore 
Dane, John Preston, Jr. 
Davis, Charles Ellsworth 
Davis, Robert Charles 
Day, Arthur Kenneth 
Dearborn, Doris Jeannette 
Dickey, Barbara Ethel 
Dickie, Logan Roswell 
Dodge, Ruth 
Doe, Amelia 
Doe, Anna Veronica 
Dondero, Mary Jacqueline 
Downs, John Austin 
Drew, Prentiss James 
Dussault, William Ernest 
Eastman, William Henry 
Edson, Philip Henry 
Emerson, Rosamond Drew 
Emery, Winston Eugene 
Enman, Arthur LeRoy 



Course 


P.O. Address 


E.E. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Gen. Bus. 


Millis, Mass. 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Agr. 


Bedford 


Gen. Bus, 


Newfields 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


Dover 


For. 


Dover 


A.G. 


New London 


C.E. 


New London 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Greenville 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Gen. Bus. 


Salem, Mass. 


M.E. 


New London 


A.G. 


Mollis 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Salem 


A.H. 


New Boston 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


C.E. 


New Brighton, N. Y. 


Gen. Bus. 


Newton Highlds., Mass 


For. 


Franklin 


C.E. 


Springfield, Mass. 


A.G. 


West Lebanon 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


C.E. 


Percy 


A.G. 


Fremont 



282 



SENIORS 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Evans, George Newell 


Chem, 


Rochester 


Evans, Winston Dockham 


A.G, 


Manchester 


Facey, William Brown 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Farmer, William Parker 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Feinberg, Doris 


A.G. 


Dover 


Fernald, Frank Wadleigh 


E.B. 


Nottingham 


Finn, John Joseph, Jr. 


Gen. Bus. 


Newfields 


Fish, Robert Benjamin 


Agr. 


Peterborough 


Fisher, Barbara Hildreth 


A.G. 


Antrim 


Flanders, Robert Algernon 


A.G. 


North Haverhill 


Flanders, Walter Clark 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Foster, Dorothy- 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Foster, Ruth 


A.G. 


Concord 


Frazer, James Oscar 


M.E. 


Monroe 


Frederick, Elizabeth Elena 


H.E. 


Voorkeesville, N.Y. 


Freese, Elisabeth 


A.G. 


Bristol 


Furnans, Ernest William, Jr. 


A.G. 


New Bedford, Mass 


Gale, Phyllis Marian 


A.G. 


Tilton 


Galway, Richard Edward 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Gardner, Alfred Emmons 


Pre-Med. 


Plymouth 


Gates, Hesslar Howell 


M.E. 


Charlestown 


Geddis, Howard Alson 


For. 


East Hebron 


Geno, Mary Lucretia 


H.E. Tr. 


Concord ' 


Gilson, Wallace Hale 


Agr. 


Hanover 


Goertz, Mrs. Georgia Mitchell 


Pre.-Med. 


Alton 


Goodwin, Curtis Leslie 


M.E. 


Dover 


Gordon, Oscar LeRoy 


A.G. 


Ashland 


Grad, Willard Stanley 


A.G. 


Meredith 


Grasso, Salvatore 


C.E. 


Milford 


Gray, Leonard Walter 


D.H. 


Colebrook 


Griney, Mary Gertrude 


H.E. 


Rochester 


Grover, William Sherman 


Arch. 


Dover 


Grupe, Wayne Stafford 


A.G. 


Winchester 


Guy, John Joseph 


Chem. 


Lincoln 


Hale, Rachel Eula 


H.E. 


East Rindge 


Halladay, Dorothy Elizabeth 


H.E.I. 


Claremont 



283 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Hance, Mary Lou 
Handschumaker, Dora 
Hankins, Dorothy Louise 
Margraves, Robert Frederick 
Hayes, Edward Henry 
Hazen, Pauline Ellen 
Hazzard, David Henry 
Heard, Emily Thompson 
Heins, George Deitz 
Hemm, Carl Henry Otto 
Henson, Dayton Mace 
Hermes, Isabelle Kretzer 
Hersey, Elizabeth Winthrop 
Hickey, Joseph William 
Hixon, Elizabeth Webster 
Hobbs, John Raymond 
Holt, Harmon George 
Hooper, Carol 
Hopps, VanBuren Fredrick 
Horton, George Stillman, Jr. 
Hoxie, Wilbar Marden 
Huntington, Everett Curtis 
Hurd, William Bromley, Jr. 
Huse, James Austin 
Hyrk, Alma Lydia 
Ingalls, Ruth Constance 
Jacques, Leo Charles 
Janvrin, Dorothy Leavitt 
Johnson, Edgar Norman 
Johnson, Frederick Herbert 
Johnson, Philip Edward 
Johnson, Robert Edward 
Johnson, Ruth Sherman 
Jordan, Barbara Colby 
Karazia, Charles Alfred 
Karkavelas, Paul George 
Kay, Ruth Elizabeth 



Course 


P.O. Address 


H.E. 


East Orange, N. J. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Durham 


C.E. 


Concord 


Educ. 


Dover 


H.E. 


Bethlehem 


A.G. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Center Sandwich 


Gen. Bus. 


Willow Grove, Pa. 


Educ. 


Colebrook 


Hor. Tr. 


Winchester 


H.E.L 


Mystic, Conn. 


A.G. 


Wolfeboro 


Ghent. 


East Rochester 


A.G. 


Lynn, Mass. 


For. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Dover 


H.E. 


Sanhornville 


A.G. 


Grove ton 


M.E. 


Plaistow 


C.E. 


Plaistow 


A.G. 


Gorham 


A.G. 


Raymond 


Chem. 


Durham 


A.G. 


East Jaffrey 


A.G. 


Berlin 


Pre-Med. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Seabrook 


Pre-Med. 


Milford 


Chem. 


Dover 


C.E. 


Milan 


A,G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Plaistow 


H.E. 


Plainfield 


Gen. Bus. 


Pt. Washington. N. Y 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Dover 



284 



SENIORS 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Kelley, Ruth Bettina 


A.G. 


New Hampton 


Kendall, Harry Alburn 


A.G. 


West Thornton 


Kimball, Howard Ray 


Educ. 


North Haverhill 


Kimball, Maurice Charles 


Educ. 


Concord 


Knight, Walter Baldwin, Jr. 


D.H, 


East Rochester 


Kramer, Howard Gray 


For. 


Ossipee 


Laing, Merta Ann 


H.E. 


Manchester 


Lampesis, Peter Theodore 


Pre-Med. 


Dover 


Lang, Benjamin Roger 


Gen. Bus. 


Onset, Mass. 


Laram.ie, Kenneth Norman 


Gen. Bus. 


Canaan 


Lekesky. Benjamin Anthony 


C.E. 


Worcester, Mass. 


Lennon, Mary Elizabeth Gillett 


A.G. 


Dover 


Levine, Noah Moses 


Pre-Med. 


Chelsea, Mass. 


Libby, Frances Marie 


Educ. 


Portsmouth 


Lilly, Avalon Robert 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Link, Howard Charles 


C.E. 


Southington, Conn 


Linscott, Jane Catherine 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Littlefield, George Martin, Jr. 


Educ. 


Hampstead 


Locke, Howard Revere, Jr. 


A.G. 


Amherst 


Lockwood, Paul Francis 


A.G. 


Dover 


Long, Avard Chipman 


For. 


Hampton 


McCormack, Stewart Vernon 


Pre-Med. 


Mil ford 


McDonough, Augustin Thomas 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


McEvoy, Weston Ernest 


A.G. 


Henniker 


McLaughlin, Eileen Rita 


A.G. 


Laconia 


McLean, Alexander Fiske 


Ghent. 


Larchmont, N. Y. 


Mack, John Hal ford 


Chem. 


Claremont 


Mallis, Constantine 


A.G. 


Berlin 


Manchester, Karl Robert 


Gen. Bus. 


Providence, R. I. 


Manchester, Winslow 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Mangold, John William 


E.E. 


Watertown, Mass. 


Mannion, Richard Thomas 


A.G. 


Concord 


Marcy, Gloria Brigden 


A.G. 


Flillsboro 


Martin, Ida Mary 


A.G. 


Hudson 


Mastin, Eleanor Josephine 


A.G. 


New London 


Matison, Matthew Irving 


A.G. 


Dover 


Matthews, Thomas Vernon 


Pre-Med. 


Concord 



285 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Matthews, William Roland 
Mattice, Edson Russell 
Mead, Mary Ella 
Meader, Elwyn Marshall 
Meeker, George Henry 
Merrill, Harold Douglas 
Merrill, Herbert Thompson 
Messer, Richard Edwin 
Miller, Belle 
Mirey, Walter Leon, Jr. 
Mitchener, Allan Edward 
Monroe, Norma 
Moore, Leonard Smith 
Morang, Ralph Waldo 
Morrill, Laurence Blake 
Morris, Frank Albert 
Morrison, Jeremy 
Moscardini, Arthur Aldo 
Mott, Ralph Ernest 
Moulton, Lewis Harvey 
Mountain, Harold Shirlev 
Mullen, Francis Edward 
Munger, Helen Elizabeth 
Munton. Alexander Vincent 
Musgrove, Frank Richard 
Nathanson, Joseph 
Ninde, Daniel M. 
Norris, Kenneth Ricker 
Norton, William Alexander, Jr, 
Nye, George Prescott 
O'Brien, Frank Edwin 
O'Neil, Paul Thomas 
Paquin, Jean Ernest 
Parsons, Carl Ellsworth, Jr. 
Pearsons, Janice Mae 
Pease, Chester Chapin, Jr. 
Peavey, Estelle Oilman 
Peters, Marion Elizabeth 



Course 

A.G. 

Gen. Bus. 

A.G. 

Hort. 

Gen. Bus. 

C.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Educ. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

P.H. 

For. 

E.E. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

For. 

For. 
Pre-Med. 

A.G. 

Chcni. 

Educ. 

Educ. 

A.G. 

Educ. 

Pre-Med. 

A.G. 

Educ. 

E.E. 

Pre-Med. 

A.G. 

Pre-Med. 

C.E. 
A.G. 

A.G. 

286 



P.O. Address 

Troy,N.Y. 

Penacook 

Bartlett 

Rochester 

Durham 

Concord 

Hanover 

New London 

Charlestown 

Ashburnham, Mass. 

Fremont 

Taunton, Mass. 

Milford 

Wiscasset, Me. 

Concord 

Newport 

Derry 

Tilton 

Portsmouth 

Moultonboro 

Berlin 

Newmarket 

Franklin 

Nashua 

Hanover 

Mil lis, Mass. 

Durham 

Melrose, Mass. 

Hopkinton 

Atkinson 

Concord 

Amesbury, Mass. 

Manchester 

Weymouth, Mass. 

Hill 

Greenmlle 

Exeter 

North Bennington, Vt, 



Name 
Petrie, William Charles 
Peyser, Charles Samuel 
Pickett, Madlon F. 
Pickford, Walter John 
Pierce, Donald Vittum 
Plumer, William Bowdoin 
Plummer, Roger William, Jr 
Powers, Nancy 
Pratt, Richard Gile 
Prince, Frances 
Prince, Ruth 
Quinn, Margaret Ann 
Rassias, Christine Vivian 
Raymond, Olive Pauline 
Redman, William Stewart 
Remick, Roland Arthur 
Richards, Olive Jeannette 
Ring, Frances Elizabeth 
Robbins, William Parks 
Roberts, Olive Carolyn 
Roberts, Ormond Armstrong 
Roberts, Hall Scott 
Rogean, Arnold Hugh 
Rogers, Zygmond Joseph 
Rollins, Edmund John 
Romanovski, Genevieve Leokade/^. G. 
Rose, William Richard 
Rosen, Bernard Davis 
Rosi, Albert Joseph 
Ross, Charles Elden 
Ross, James Otis 
Rozamus, Michael Joseph 
Sanborn, Priscilla Louise 
Sanborn, Winifred 
Sands, Barbara Winder 
Saunders, John Joseph 
Scannell, Leo Robert 



SENIORS 




Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Woodsville 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Newport 


E.E. 


Berlin 


For. 


Tamworth 


A.G. 


Bristol 


Agr. Tr. 


Hopkinton 


H.E. 


Durham 


Arch. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


New Boston 


H.E. 


Andover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Soc, Ser. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


Limestone, Me. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Bristol 


A.G. 


Exeter 


H.E. 


Wilton 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


H.E. 


So. Royalton, Vt. 


I Agr. 


Dover 


A.G, 


Dover 


Hort. 


Tilton 


Arch. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


A.G. 


Durham 


:ade/i. G. 


Hudson 


Educ. 


Portsmouth 


Chem. 


Portsmouth 


Pre-Med. 


Colebrook 


D.H. 


Berlin 


For. 


E. Barrington 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Contoocook 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


Gen. Bus. 


Somerville, Mass 


Educ. 


Manchester 



2S7 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Seamans, Roger Albert 

Shanahan, Ann Dorothea 

Shaw, Wyman Brown 

Shea, Denis Anthony 

Simpson, Allan Haines 

Sleeper, Millicent Ethel 

Smart, Robert Allan 

Smith, Clyde Reverdy 

Smith, Howard Weedon 

Smith, Raymond 

Solomon, Philip 

Stevens, Clarence Edgar 

Stevens, Jean Woodrow 

Stevens, Lester Charles 

Stevens, Robert Alwin 

Stewart, Donald Waring 

Stone, Josephine Bachelder 

Sullivan, Robert Edward 

Swidzinski, Edmund 

Taylor, Roland Arthur 

Teeri, Arthur Eino 

Thayer, Martha Louise 

Theberge, Mary Ellen 

Tinker, Rebecca Irene 

Tomkinson, Stanley Everett 

Towers, Richard Rutfred 

Trickey, Gertrude May 

Trubenbach, Alfred Chas. Eugene.4. G 

Tufts, Lewis Everette 

Twyon, Donald Edward 

Varney, Fred Maurice, Jr. 

Verville, Homer Anthony 

Vier, Dwayne Trowbridge 

Wageman, Frank Antonio 

Waldo, Stanley Chedel 

Walker, Genevieve Raycraft 

Wallace, Oliver Pagan 



Course 


P.O. Address 


For. 


Newport 


A.G. 


Somersworth 


Pre-Med. 


Dover 


Chem. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Lakeport 


A.G. 


Sunapee 


For. 


Portsmouth 


C.E. 


New London 


A.G. 


New Ipswich 


Pre-Med. 


Derry 


Pre-Med. 


Franklin 


Agr. Tr. 


Durham 


H.E. 


Derry 


Agr. 


Walpole 


D.H. 


Raymond 


Hort. 


Nashua 


H.E. 


Claremont 


For. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Quincy,Mass. 


Hort. 


Bennington 


Pre-Med. 


Durham 


H.E. 


Woodsville 


A.G. 


Salmon Falls 


H.E. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Lebanon 


C.E. 


Berlin 


Educ. 


Alton Bay 


i.4. G. 


Strafford 


Chem. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Claremont 


Gen. Bus. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Concord 


Chem. 


Dover 


A.G, 


Manchester 


For. 


Laconia 


M.E. 


Tilton 


A.G. 


Claremont 



288 



SENIORS 



Name Course 

Warren, Priscilla A. G. 
Weatherby, Albert Martin, Jr. M.E. 

Weaver, Edwina Merrie A. G. 

Webster, Peter Walker E.E. 

Weir, William Franklin A.G, 
Wentworth, Carleton Mclntire Gen. Bus. 

White, Ruth Mildred H.E. 

Wilbur, Herbert Eugene M. E. 

Wilcox, Louis Hersey For. 

Williams, Mary Kathleen H.E. 

Winn, Alden Lewis E. E. 

Witter, Vincent Michael Educ. 

Woodbury, Jane Wealthy A. G. 

Woodward, Lillian Faye H. E. 

Wootton, Margaret Bell A.G. 

Wright, Edward Nelson E.E. 

Wyman, Edgar Pitkin For. 

Zais, Melvin A. G. 

Zane, Edna Elizabeth- Ann A. G. 



P.O. Address 

Portsmouth 

Newbury port, Mass. 

Concord 

Concord 

Durham 

Nashua 

Concord 

Durham 

Center Ossipee 

Manchester 

Portsmouth 

Berlin 

Salem Center 

Deerfield 

Wolfeboro 

Portsmouth 

Somerville, Mass. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Exeter 



JUNIORS 
(Men, 197; Women, 79; Total, 276) 



Name 



Abramson, Samuel Gordon 
Ahearne, William Joseph 
Ahern, Robert Patrick 
Ahlgren, Lennart Conrad 
Aldrich, Martha Helen 
Anderson, William Ayrton 
Armstrong, Florence Catherine 
Atherton, Sumner Edward 
Baker, Ruth Helen 
Balloch, James Pardon 
Barnes, Gertrude 



Course 

A.G. 

A.G. 

D.H. 

A.G. 

H.E. 

C.E. 

A.G. 

Gen. Bus. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

289 



P.O. Address 

Berlin 

Union 

Charlestown 

Manchester 

Lisbon 

Sunapee 

Penacook 

West Lebanon 

East Kingston 

Manchester 

Billerica, Mass. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



JUNIORS 



Name 
Battin, Richard, 3rd 
Bazzocchi, Anthony- 
Bennett, Adellman Sylvester 
Bennett, Wendell Farrar 
Bergeron, Norbert Lawrence 
Berry, Joseph Ford 
Bialon, Mildred Antonia 
Boerker, Huldah Irene 
Boggis, Virginia May- 
Bond, Richard Guy 
Boucher, Arnold Eugene 
Breck, Warren Grover 
Breck, Olive Louise 
Brosius, Irene Emily 
Brown, Ellen Elizabeth 
Browning, Robert Weston 
Bullard, Charles Winston 
Bullock, Comfort 
Burnett, John Robert 
Burt, Victoria Tura 
Butterworth, William Fox 
Cain, Theresa Elizabeth 
Caldwell, Winston Flanders 
Carrico, Edward Channing 
Carroll, Kathryn Rita 
Carter, Raymond Howard 
Caswell, Gordon Alpheus 
Chandler, Alfred George 
Chellis, Ruth Watkins 
Cheney, John 
Clark, Richard Frederick 
Clement, Robert Otis 
Cling, Mordecai 
Clow, Evelyn May 
Coffey, Louise Irene 
Coney, Richard James 



Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Whitestone, N. Y. 


Gen.Bus. 


Portsmouth 


Gen. Bus. 


Gilmanton Iron Works 


Pre-Med. 


Kingston 


Pre-Med. 


Rochester 


For. 


Wayne, Me. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Kingston, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Bartlett 


E.E. 


Nashua 


Chem. 


Wentworth 


Educ. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Educ. 


BerUn 


Educ. 


Center Strafford 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Arlington, Mass. 


H.E. 


Concord 


Educ. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Brookline, Mass, 


Gen. Bus. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Milford 


M.E. 


Dover 


Gen. Bus. 


Pt. Washington, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Lebanon 


Gen. Bus. 


Berwick; Me. 


Pre-Med. 


Candia 


A.G. 


Meriden 


Chem. 


Manchester 


E.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Concord 


H.E.I. 


Greenville 


A.G. 


Townsend, Mass. 


A.G. 


Bethlehem 



Name 

Colokathis, Paul Peter 

Congdon, Myrtle Irene 

Conrad, James Dignum 

Cooper, Esther Blanche 

Cotton, Charles Allen 

Crosby, Florence Grace 

Cudhea, Lois Eleanor 

Cullis, Robert Edward 

Damon, John Kennan 

Davis, Paul Frederick 

Dean, Clara Harriette 

DeSchuiteneer, Humphrey Edward ^.G 

Donle, Walter Kincaid 

Donnelly, Royston Walworth 

Dooley, Walter Newman 

Dubiel, Joseph Michael 

DuBois, Robert Arthur 

DuRie, John David 

Dyke, John Rand 

Eames, Carl Ernest 

Edgerly, Barbara Eileen 

Evans. Nelson Foss 

Farr, Richard 

Fellows, Robert Stillman 

Fernald, Christine Frances 

Ferrin, Harold William 

Flanders, June 

Flanzbaum, Lester 

Freedman, Jacob 

Furman, Albert 

Giarla, Thomas Charles 

Oilman, Marshall Guy 

Gisburne, John Robert 

Glynn, Robert Sydney 

Godbois, Henry Joseph 

Gonichon, James Jules 

Goodwin, John Floyd 



JUNIORS 




Course 


P.O. Address 


Pre-Med. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


For. 


Saugus, Mass. 


H.E. 


Lincoln 


For. 


Conway 


A.G. 


Enfield 


H.E. 


Nashua 


Gen. Bus. 


Epping . 


Gen. Bus. 


W. Concord, Mass 


Educ. 


Tilton 


H.E. 


Grafton 


ward^.C 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Newport 


Gen. Bus. 


St. Albans, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Hudson 


Chem. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Rahway, N. J. 


Pre-Med. 


Atkinson 


For. 


Errol 


A.G. 


Lincoln 


Chem. 


Rochester 


Gen. Bus. 


Lebanon 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Nottingham 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Soc. Ser. 


Concord 


A.G, 


Winthrop, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G, 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Franklin 


A.G. 


E. Milton, Mass. 


Pre-Med. 


Belleville, N. J. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Agr. 


Alton 


C.E. 


Piermont 



291 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Goodwin, William Henry, Jr. 
Goud, Prescott Lee 
Gozonsky, Abraham 
Grady. John Christopher 
Greenough, Ruth Louise 
Griffin, Dorothy Adele 
Griffiths, Leslie Osborn 
Gruber, Richard Dexter 
Gurley, Robert Clarence 
Ham, Frances Marion 
Hanson, Arthur Francis 
Harden, Henry Clay, Jr. 
Harkaway, Aaron Abraham 
Harmon, Donald Ward 
Harriman, Byron Lynn 
Hart, Robert Thompson 
Hatch, Louise Estelle 
Hayes, Gertrude Agnes 
Heald, Burton Keith 
Heath, Calvin Aldrich 
Henderson, Gordon Kenneth 
Herlihy, Thomas Joseph 
Hersey, William Wendell 
Hewitt, Madeleine Gertrude 
Higgins, Norman Clement 
Hill, Francis Bremner 
Hillier, Donald Thomas 
Holmes, George Allen 
Howard, Eleanor Frances 
Howard, Gertrude Louise 
Hudson, Lois Clark 
Huse, Raymond Addison 
Ingham, George Law 
Janetos, Nicholas Simon 
Jenness, Robert 
Jewett, Ruth Hamlin 
Johnson, Christine Luella 



Course 


P.O. Address 


C.E. 


Andover 


E.E. 


Holderness 


A.G. 


Laconia 


Educ. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Hooksett 


A.G. 


Fremont 


A.G. 


Berwick, Me. 


Pre-Med. 


Brighton, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Durham 


Agr. Tr. 


East Kingston 


Ghent. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Arch. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Warner 


Chem. 


Bristol, Conn. 


H.E. 


Smithtown 


A.G. 


Dover 


C.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


North Woodstock 


M.E. 


Dover 


M.E. 


Wilton 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


For. 


Exeter 


Gen. Bus. 


Deerfield 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


Agr. Tr. 


Charlestown 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Laconia 


E.E. 


Meriden 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Pre-Med. 


Dover 


D.H. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Gorham 


A.G. 


Alstead 


292 





JUNIORS 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Johnson, Doris Mae 


A.G. 


Concord 


Johnson, Fred Hoyer 


M.E. 


Port Richmond, N. F 


Jones, Robert Hayward 


Arch. 


Hanover 


Jordan, Dorothy Anna 


A.G. 


Concord 


Kay, William Jamieson 


C.E. 


Claremont 


Kazienko, Louis Walter 


Educ. 


Manchester 


Kazmirchuk, Annie 


H.E. 


Lincoln 


Kelleher, James Howard 


Pre-Med. 


Durham 


Kelly, Donald Hoyt 


Chem. 


Newton 


Kemp, Robert Ingalls 


E.E. 


Walpole, Mass. 


Kershaw, Robert Morse, 3rd 


For. 


So. Portland, Me. 


Kidder, Robert Wilson 


A.G. 


Laconia 


Kierstead, James Clair 


Chem. 


Lebanon 


Kizala, Bolik 


Agr. Tr. 


Nashua 


Knight, Vesta 


A.G. 


Concord 


LaFlamme, Charles Robert 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Lane, Harold LeGro 


For. 


Conway 


Langley, Bernard Howard 


C.E. 


Gilmanton 


LaPlante, Robert Athol 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


Larkin, Harriet 


A.G. 


Hillshoro 


Laskarzewski, Boleslaus Frank 


D.H. 


Meriden, Conn. 


Lederman, Eli 


Pre-Med. 


Brockton, Mass. 


Lenzi, Gordon Frank 


M.E. 


Rochester 


Leocha, Adolph John 


Educ. 


Claremont 


Lincoln, Edward Hinkley 


A.G. 


Meriden 


Little, Edward William Herbert Pre-Med. 


East Derry 


Littlefield, Harry Young 


E.E. 


Amesbury, Mass. 


Lubchansky, Adelaide 


A.G. 


New London, Conn. 


Lyons, Regis Angela 


A.G. 


Manchester 


McComb, Raymond Morris 


Pre-Med. 


East Kingston 


McCormack, Hazel Isabelle 


A.G. 


Milford 


McKean, Glen "N^^lson 


A.G. 


Haverhill 


McKeigue, John Edward 


Pre-Med. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


McKone, Jean Elisabeth 


A.G. 


Dover 


McLaughlin, Frederick Arthur 


Gen. Bus. 


Dover 


McMahon, James Davis 


C.E. 


Franklin 


McNamara, Elizabeth Mary 


Soc. Ser. 
293 


Manchester 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


McNamara, Frederick Thomas 


Gen. Bus. 


West Lebanon 


MacQueen, George 


EM. 


Penacook 


Macnaughton, Constance Gertrude Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


Mann, Paul Israel 


A.G. 


Greenland 


Marden, Viola Agnes 


A.G. 


Dover 


Marshall, Sumner Eugene 


P.H. 


Penacook 


Martel, Thelma Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Durham 


Martin, Charles Burt 


E.E. 


Danbury 


Martin, Russell Frederick 


A.G. 


Gloucester, Mass. 


Martin, Wendell James 


A.G. 


W. Stewartstown 


Mason, George Knight 


M.E. 


Atkinson 


Matson, Ellen Maria 


H.E. 


New Ipswich 


Maxson, Robert Orville 


C.E. 


Canterbury 


Mendelson, Donald Jason 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Montrone, Alfred Joseph 


Gen. Bus. 


Keene 


Moran, Helen Ann 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Morrill, Barbara Lillian 


A.G. 


Dover 


Morrill, Harry Eugene 


Gen. Bus. 


Winnepesaukee 


Morse, Clara Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Gorham 


Morse, Norma Vivian 


A.G. 


Keene 


Moulton, Verna Emma 


H.E. 


E. Plainfield 


Murphy, James Erwin 


A.G. 


Gorham 


Murphy, Peter Joseph 


Educ. 


Dover 


Myllymaki, William Richard 


Ghent. 


West Concord 


Nellson, Robert Archibald 


A.G. 


Waltham.Mass. 


Norris, Esther Kathleen 


A.G. 


Woodsville 


Norton, Jane 


A.G. 


Dover 


Noury, George Albert 


Gen. Bus. 


Clare mont 


O'Brien, John Joseph 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


O'Brien, Paul Joseph 


E.E. 


Nashua 


Otis, Stanton Clarke 


C.E. 


Concord 


Page, Lillian Josephine 


H.E. 


New Ipswich 


Parker, Conrad Beedy 


For. 


Manchester 


Parker, Mayland Linwood 


Chem. 


Keene 


Pastor, Jackson 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


Patten, George Daniel 


C.E. 


Franklin 


, 


294 





Name 

Pedrick, Dexter Kilborn 
Perkins, Alice Mary 
Perkins, Priscilla 
Perkins, William Lincoln 
Peterson, Carl William 
Photos, Christine Theodora 
Pickett, Wiley Jason 
Pillsbury, Leonard Hobart 
Plaisted, Donald Ernest 
Plummer, Charles Henry 
Pokigo, Boleslaw Henry 
Potvin, Fiorina Marie 
Pridham, Mary Jacquelyn 
Priest, Homer Farnum, Jr. 
Pryor, Charles Edward 
Putnam, Dexter Nevins 
Quinn, George Eliot Birtwell 
Rand, Robert Henry 
Rangazas, Eva Elpinicky 
Raskin, Melvin Newell 
Reid, Dorothy Mae 
Rhodes, Eleanor 
Rice, Carl Sherwood 
Rich, Jane Frances 
Richardson, Charles Elwin 
Ricker, George Winthrop 
Robinson, Ruth Helena 
Rodgers, Mabel Ellen 
Rolfe, Benjamin Curtis 
Rosinski, Francis Joseph 
Rossi, Oscar Louis 
Rowe, Emma Pearl 
Roy, Charles Blake 
Sargent, Neil Edward 
Schiavoni, Frank James 
Scott, Bernard Earle 
Scripture, Mabel Dawson 



JUNIORS 




Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Meredith 


H.E. 


Kennebunkport, Me 


A.G. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Gorham 


Ghent. 


Belmont, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Ghent. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Derry 


For. 


Meredith 


E.E. 


Somersworth 


G.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Soc. Ser, 


Portsmouth 


Ghent. 


Nelson 


Arch. 


Dover 


D.H. 


Wilton 


Pre-Med. 


Concord 


Gen. Bus. 


Plymouth 


Ghem. 


Nashua 


Pre-Med. 


Mattapan, Mass. 


H.E.I. 


Bethlehem 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Lynn, Mass. 


E.E. 


Lynn, Mass. 


M.E. 


Berwick, Me. 


Educ. 


Dover 


H.E.I. 


Temple 


Arch. 


Penacook 


A.G. 


Claremont 


E.E. 


Waterbury, Conn. 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Agr. Tr. 


Bamet, Vt. 


Pre-Med. 


Plymouth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.H. 


Mollis 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 



295 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Scudder, James Henry 
Shapiro, Lester 
Shea, John Richard 
Shepherd, Francis Harold 
Sherburne, Mary Ellen 
Sikalias, John 
Simonds, Lester Elliott 
Skoglund, Winthrop Charles 
Smith, Harold Louis 
Smith, Richard Carlton 
Smith, Ruth Lillian 
Smith, William Lloyd 
Snow, Joseph Ingram 
Snowman. Arthur Vanstane 
Somero, Andrew Leander 
Spaulding, William Rowe, Jr. 
Stenzel, George 
Stevens, Alan 
Stone, Wilbur Arthur 
Strickland, Wallace Albert 
Swansey, Robert Mitchell 
Tanney, Stanley Benjamin 
Terris, George Everett 
Thompson, Lucille Marie 
Thompson, William James 
Thyng, Charles Herbert 
Tilton, Marjorie Augusta 
Tolles, Robert Walter 
Trabucco, Alfred 
Tremblay, Roland Gilbert 
True, Lucile Agnes 
Turci, John Delmo 
Tyson, Victor Eyre, Jr. 
Vannah, Betsey 
Verville, Martin James 
Waters, Warren Edwin 
Wentworth, Elizabeth Hall 



Course 


P.O. Address 


For. 


Durham 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


Tilton 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


D.H. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


P.H. 


Lynn, Mass. 


Chem. 


Chester 


M.E. 


Strafford 


H.E. 


East Barring ton 


Pre-Med. 


Amherst 


A.G. 


Saugus, Mass. 


Chem. 


Lebanon 


Agr. 


New Ipswich 


A.G. 


Wollaston, Mass. 


For. 


Durham 


C.E. 


Medfield, Mass. 


Chem. 


Salem, Mass. 


C.E. 


Lincoln 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Agr. Tr. 


Antrim 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


H.E. 


Lee 


Educ. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Barnstead 


A.G. 


Woodsville 


E.E. 


Terryville, Conn. 


Pre-Med. 


New Hampton 


Pre-Med. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Fremont 


C.E. 


Portsmouth 


Chem. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Pittsfield 


A.G. 


Somersworth 



296 



SOPHOMORES 



Name 
Wentzell, Homer Philbrick 
West, Dorothy Marion 
Whitcher, Lawrence George 
Whitcomb, Percy Robert 
Whyte, Richard Van 
Willard, Howard Stanley 
Wood, Frederick MacDonald 
Zautra, Joseph Anthony 



Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Rye 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


M.E. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Littleton 


A.G. 


Portland, Me. 


For. 


Passumpsic, Vt. 


A.G. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Nashua 



SOPHOMORES 



(Men, 294; Women, 137; Total, 431) 


Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Abbott, George Curwin 


C.E. 


Pelham 


Adams, Elizabeth Mary 


A.G. 


Tilton 


Adams, Everett Mead 


E.E. 


Exeter 


Ahearn, Catherine Christine 


A.G. 


Kecne 


Alexander, Hope Alice 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Allen, George Earl 


Gen. Bus. 


Dover 


Andrews, Donald Augustus 


A.G. 


Bethlehem 


Andrews, Elmer Vincent 


A.G. 


Warren 


Andruchuk, Mary 


A.G. 


Dover 


Arnold, Lloyd Carlton, Jr. 


M.E. 


Manchester 


Atwood, Harry Hibbard, Jr. 


Agr. Ch. 


Manchester 


Baker, Ira Webster, Jr. 


A.G. 


Franklin 


Baker, Sidney R. 


Pre-Med. 


South Tamworth 


Balatsos, Spiros Arthur 


Agr. 


New York City 


Ballou, Wallace 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Barker, Miriam 


Pre-Med. 


Reed's Ferry 


Barrett, Esther Smead 


A.G. 


Littleton 


Bartlett, Edson Orlando 


Gen. Bus. 


Bridgewater 


Bartlett, Kenneth Roby 


A.G. 


Concord 


Batchelder, Hilda 


H.E. 


Concord 


Batchelder, James Henry, 3rd 


Ghent. 


North Woodstock 


Batley, John William 


E.E. 


Dover 


Baum, Anna 


Soc. Ser. 
297 


Portsmouth 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Baxter, Elizabeth Nowell 
Beary, Bernard John 
Beattie, James Richard 
Beckett, Dorothy Wilson 
Bell, Phillip Richmond 
Bennett, Andrew Williams 
Bennett, Marian 
Bergeron, Isidore Emilio 
Berkovich, Norman 
Berry, Barbara 
Bertagiia, Csesar Joseph 
Bertolini, Guelfo 
Besaw, Charles Kenneth 
Bishop, Arthur Douglas 
Bishop, Howard LeRoy 
Bissell, Ralph Howard 
Blakey, Clarence William 
Blankenberg, Sylvia Constance 
Bohanan, Ashton Jewell 
Boy, Pierre Donald 
Boyd. Margaret Woodbury 
Bozek, Joseph Martin 
Bradley, Robert Franke 
Bremner, Elizabeth Ritchie 
Brown, Elizabeth 
Brown, Grace Rita 
Brown, Ruth Duchesne 
Bruford, Roger Stewart 
Buckley, Ruth Ann 
Bunker, Marion Helen 
Bushway, Henry Thomas 
Cady, George Luther, 3rd 
Caldwell, Madeleine Louise 
Cann, Dorothy 
Carey, William Raymond, Jr. 
Carlisle, Barbara Louise 
Carr, Thomas Eames 



Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Whitman, Mass. 


For. 


Durham 


H.E. 


Bristol, Conn. 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Hingham, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pr.-Med. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Stratham 


E.E. 


Wilmot 


C.E. 


Barre, Vt. 


Gen. Bus. 


Lisbon 


Gen. Bus. 


Lisbon 


A.G. 


Brookline 


For. 


Marlboro 


A.G. 


Concord 


H.E. 


Portsmouth 


Agr. 


Contoocook 


For. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Newton 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


For. 


West Haven, Conn. 


H.E. 


Orleans, Mass. 


H.E. 


Peterboro 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Roslindale, Mass. 


Soc. Ser. 


Arlington, Mass. 


A.G. 


Kingston 


A.G. 


Durham 


C.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


New Boston 


Pre-Med. 


Lazvrence, Mass. 


H.E. 


Concord 


Gen. Bus. 


So. Portland, Me. 



298 



SOPHOMORES 



Name 

Carrier, John Alden 
Carroll, James Walter 
Casey, Louise Mary 
Cassidy, Henry Patrick 
Caulfield, John Lawrence 
Cavaric, Frank Lee 
Chabot, Fred Romeo 
Chamberlin, Nettie Elizabeth 
Chamberlin, Phineas Arthur 
Chapman, John Homer 
Chapman, Mary Helga 
Chase, Muriel Eastman 
Chesley, Donald Burnham 
Clark, Earle Drake 
Clark, Frederick Emery 
Clisham, Barbara 
Coe, Jane Fell 
Cohen, Ruth 
Colby, Elizabeth 
Colton, Ruth Emily 
Conon, Olga 
Couser, James Isaac 
Cram, Barbara Louise 
Craven, Llewellyn Thomas 
Crawford, Marguerita Maria 
Cummings, Philip Edward 
Cummings, Willard Ellsworth 
Currier, Richard Colby 
Currul, Russell Edwin 
Daeris, Claire Cleopatra 
Dalton, Archie Clark Wallace 
Daroska, Estella 
Davenport, Alice Whipple 
Davidson, Alfred Raymond 
Davis, Charles Carpenter 
Davis, Leonard Waldron 
Day, George Clayton 



Course 


P.O. Address 


M.E. 


Passaconaway 


Chem. 


Dover 


Soc. Ser. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Medford, Mass. 


Chem. 


Kingston 


Gen. Bus. 


Whitefield 


Chem. 


Lisbon 


Agr. 


North Haverhill 


E.E. 


Sanbornville 


A.G. 


Groveton 


A.G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Farming ton 


Agr. 


Northwood 


Chem. 


Troy 


Soc. Ser. 


Winthrop, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Winthrop, Mass. 


A.G. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Hinsdale 


A.G. 


Berlin 


Gen. Bus. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


Pre-Med. 


Rye Beach 


Pre-Med. 


Tilton 


For. 


Lyndeboro 


Pre-Med. 


Colebrook 


Chem. 


Amherst 


Educ. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


H.E. 


Pittsfield 


H.E. 


South Danbury 


Gen. Bus. 


Clare mont 


Educ. 


Walpole 


E.E. 


Strafford Bow Lake 


E.E. 


Durham 



299 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Decker, John Henry, Jr. 
desGarennes, Stephen Philip 
Dimock, William Burton 
Dodge, Emma May 
Dodge, Florence Ruth 
Donle, Kenneth Winston 
Doolittle, Herbert Starr 
Dower, Raymond Stanislaus 
Drew, Paul Wesley 
Drowns, Elizabeth Stanwood 
Duffy, Thomas Joseph 
Dupell, Paul Theodore 
Durning, Mary Ruth 
Eastman, Nathan Currier 
Edson, Dean Harding 
Elkins, Peter Graeme 
EUery, Eleanor Dorothea 
Emery, Samuel Benton 
Evans, Allan Venables 
Ewing, Lyle Wilson, Jr. 
Fairweather, Thomas Philip 
Farr, Roger 

Farrell, Lloyd Hammond 
Farris, Martha Winslow 
Faulkingham, Lester Halliday 
Feinauer, Roy Blake 
Fernald, Arthur Thomas 
Ferris, Basil Michael 
Feuer, Reeshon 
Ficksman, Samuel Nathan 
Fitzgerald, Daniel Andrew 
Foote, Richard Ainsworth 
Fortier, Norman Lionel 
Foss, Clayton Smith 
Foster, Barbara Elizabeth 
Frank, Louis Lloyd 
Fraser, Elizabeth 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Gen. Bus. 


PL Washington, N. Y. 


Pre-Med. 


Hill 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


New Boston 


Arch. 


Durham 


Chem. 


Newport 


D.H. 


New Haven, Conn. 


A.G. 


Plaistow 


A.G. 


West field, N.J. 


H.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Reed's Ferry 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Andover 


Pre-Med. 


West Lebanon 


A.G. 


Concord 


Gen. Bus. 


Swanzey 


A.G. 


Sanford, Me. 


Arch. 


Claremont 


C.E. 


Claremont 


Gen. Bus. 


Danville 


D.H. 


Lebanon 


E.E. 


Dover 


H.E. 


No. Attleboro, Mass. 


E.E. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Nottingham 


Pre-Med. 


Lebanon 


D.H. 


Marlow 


A.G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Durham 


Gen. Bus. 


Penacook 


Pre-Med. 


Berlin 


Gen. Bus. 


Portland, Me. 


A. G. 


Lynn, Mass. 


C.E. 


North Woodstock 


A.G. 


Manchester 



300 



SOPHOMORES 



Name Course 

Frazer, Lyle Moore Agr. Tr. 

French, Dorothy Louise A. G. 

French, Margaret Dorothy H.E. 

Fudala, Louise Mary H. E. 

Fuller, Carl Willard A. G. 

Galleani, Mentana Miriam A. G. 

Gardner, Dean Leroy C. E. 

Garland, Martha Louise H. E. 

Garlinski, Virginia H. E. Tr. 

Gelt, Harry A. G. 

Gilgun, Charles Frederick Educ. 

Glebow, Sophie Pre-Med. 

Glennon, Thomas Alfred Pre-Med. 

Glickman, Murray Edward Pre-Med. 

Goldberg, Thelma A. G. 

Goodnow, Leslie Hardy Gen. Bus. 
Gordon, Alexander Hendrickson For. 

Graham, James William Pre-Med. 

Grant, Jack Chester Agr. 

Grant, James White Pre-Med. 

Green, Dorothy Nickerson A. G. 

Green, Jerome Sherman A. G. 

Griffin, Harry Ervin M.E. 

Hall, John Howard Agr. Tr. 

Halladay, Eleanor Stella A. G. 

Handy, Elizabeth Martha A. G. 

Hanson, Robert Varden For. 

Harding, Harold Vernon M. E. 

Harvey, Philip Classon Pre-Med. 

Haseltine, Carroll Edwin, Jr. Chem. 

Haskell, Philip Richard M.E. 

Haubrich, William Palmer Hort. 

Haweeli, Norman A. G. 

Haynes, Arnold Henry A. G. 

Heald, Lewis Franklin A, G. 

Hemenway, Anna Branch A. G. 

Henault, Janet Doris A.G. 

301 



P.O. Address 

Monroe 

Merrimack 

Milan 

Manchester 

Durham 

Durham 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Clare mo nt 

Derry 

Keene 

Boston, Mass. 

Manchester 

Somerville, Mass. 

Colchester, Conn. 

Keene 

Danbury, Conn. 

So. Orange, N. J. 

Buckland, Conn. 

Grafton 

Hingham, Mass. 

Brighton, Mass. 

Canaan 

Monroe 

Claremont 

Saco, Me. 

Newton Hlds., Mass. 

Farmington 

Nashua 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Portland, Me. 

Claremont 

Berlin 

Lancaster 

Littleton 

Manchester, Vt. 

Newport 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name Course 

Henderson, Henrietta H.E. 

Henrich, Ruth Alta Gen. Bus. 

Hepler, Helen Louise Chem. 

Hillier, Frederic Folsom Gen. Bus. 

Hooker, George Richard A.G. 

Home, Paul Edward A. G. 

Huff, Kenneth Purinton Gen. Bus. 

Hujsak, Karol Louis Chem. 

Hultgren, Herbert Nils Gunnar Chem. 

Humphrey, Edward Chester For. 

Hussey, Allen Sanborn Chem. 

Isaacson, Clarence Earl Pre-Med. 

Ives, Delavan Wooster, Jr. M. E. 

Jackson, Carolyn Florence A. G. 

Janetos, Angeline A. G. 

Janetos, Dionysius Simon Pre-Med. 

Jaques, William Everett Pre-Med. 

Jones, Robert Ellis For. 

Kafkas, William Christos D.H. 

Kalil, John Hanna C. E. 

Kaplan, Melvin Saul Pre-Med. 

Kay, Joe Chung C. E. 

Keniston, Edwin Everett A. G. 

Kenney, Harry Ellsworth, Jr. Chem. 

Kerr, David Gushing M.E. 

Kimball, Howard Emory Chem. 

Kimball, George Henry, Jr. Chem. 

Kimball, Melvin Blanchard Gen. Bus. 

Kinion, Ambrose Joseph, Jr. A.G. 

Kirby, Joseph Bernard, Jr. Pre-Med. 

Knowlton, Robert Bunker For. 

Kopka, Mary Sophia A.G. 

Korab, John Joseph Pre Med. 

Korpela, Allan Edwin A.G. 

Korpela, Helvi Ellen A. G. 

Lackey, William Sherman A.G. 

Landry, Donald Honore A.G. 



P.O. Address 

Durham 

Plainville, Mass. 

Durham 

Bridgewater 

Lincoln 

Wolfeboro 

Lynnfield Ctr., Mass. 

Reed's Ferry 

Wohum, Mass. 

Rochester, Mass. 

Lancaster 

Portsmouth 

Walling ford, Conn. 

Portsmouth 

Dover 

Dover 

Newbury port, Mass. 

Lexington, Mass. 

Dover 

Manchester 

Canton, Mass. 

Manchester 

Concord 

Newmarket 

Nashua 

Falm'h Foreside, Me. 

Dover 

Dover 

Pawtuchet, R. L 

Goffstown 

Dover 

Nashua 

Middletovun, Conn. 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Dover 



302 



SOPHOMORES 



Name 

Langdon, Frank Holt 
Lawler, Henry James 
Leary, Frank Joseph 
Leathers, Bertha May 
Leavitt, Earle Elmer, Jr. 
LeBlanc, Juliette Virginia Aimee 
LeClair, Doris Elaine 
Lee, Eleanor Louise 
Leighton, Athalie Davison 
Lennon, John Alexander Luther 
Lessard, Genevieve Anita 
Levine, L Samuel 
Levy, Louis 
Lewis, Ann Frances 
Liberty, James Sherman 
Lincoln, Martyn Hall 
Lippman, Lillian Freda 
Little, Arthur Stanley, Jr. 
Lockard, Dorothea Alcyne 
Lord, Philip Henry 
Lovett, John Robert 
McAllister, Ethel Lillian 
MacAulay, Paul Vincent 
McCarthy, John Dennis 
McCarthy, John Henry, Jr. 
McCaugney, Albert James 
McCrillis, Ruth Medora 
McCrone, Janet Cecelia 
MacDonald, Gordon Adams 
MacEachern, John Kitchener 
McEntee, Doris Chase 
MacGillivray, Ruth Lorraine 
MacGowan, Cynthia 
Macintosh, Maxwell Boyd 
MacKay, Thomas Robert 
McLaskey, Edith Eleanor 
McLaughlin, Laurence Smith 



Course 


P.O. Address 


E£. 


Lowell, Mass. 


Chem. 


Fremont 


E£. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Dover 


Chem. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Fremont 


A.G. 


South Kingston 


A.G. 


Center Harbor 


P.H. 


Dover 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


C.E. 


Hurleyville, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


Chem. 


Durham, 


Arch. 


Farmington 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


New London 


H.E. 


Claremont 


M.E. 


Portland, Me. 


M.E. 


Franconia 


H.E. 


Center Barnstead 


Pre-Med. 


Concord 


aen. Bus. 


Dover 


Chem. 


Manchester 


Educ. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


North Berwick, Me. 


H.E. 


Dover 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Brookline, Mass. 


H.E. 


Newburyport, Mass. 


A.G. 


Pt. Washington, N. Y. 


Soc. Ser. 


Concord 


For. 


Berlin 


C.E. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Dover 


Pre-Med. 


Wohurn, Mass. 


303 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

McLaughlin, Philip David 
McLaughlin, Robert James 
McPhail, George Ernest, Jr. 
Magay, Gordon 
Maillard, Charles Arthur 
Major, Edith Louise 
Makol, James George 
Marinel, Lilyan Thelma 
Marlow, Clifford Radbourne 
Marshall, Henry Francis 
Martin, Gordon Elmer . 
Martineau, Paul Victor 
Mason, Raigh 
Mason, Shirley Elizabeth 
Maynard, William 
Mecklem, Dorothy Ella 
Merrill, Rosamond Heaton 
Merrill, Sylvia Florence 
Miles, Edward Benton 
Miltimore, Barbara Nellie 
Mitchell, Donald Poole 
Monfils, Margaret Louise 
Monfort, Alburta Irene 
Moore, Helen Elizabeth 
Morin, Armand Girard 
Morin, Francis Joseph 
Morris, Robert Joseph 
Morrison, Donna Ivo 
Mulligan, James Joseph 
Mumford, Melba Margaret 
Murray, Ruth Margaret 
Nagle, Edward George, Jr. 
Nash, Robert Mark 
Nathanson, Norman 
Nebesky, Anthony Joseph 
Newcomb, Hermon Freeman 
Nigro, Joseph John 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Medford, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Worcester, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


Arch. 


East Jaffrey 


Pre-Med, 


Lebanon 


A.G. 


No. Chelmsford, Mass 


For. 


New York City 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


Derry 


Soc. Ser. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Plymouth 


H.E. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Soc. Ser. 


Hudson 


Ghent. 


Weymouth, Mass. 


Arch. 


Putnam, Conn. 


Soc. Ser. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Hyannis, Mass. 


A.G. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


H.E. 


Pt. Washington, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Freedom 


Agr. Ch. 


Laconia 


Chem. 


Laconia 


Pre-Med. 


Berlin 


Soc. Ser. 


Lebanon 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Penacook 


Pre-Med. 


Wakefield, Mass. . 


Gen. Bus. 


West Swanzey 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Agr. 


Amesbury,Mass. 


A.G. 


Northwood 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


304 





SOPHOMORES 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Nolan, Joseph James 


A.G. 


East Jaffrey 


Nutter, John Castle 


MM. 


Swampscott, Mass. 


Oakes, Ray Elwood 


A.G. 


Concord 


O'Connor, James Thomas 


Agr. 


Wohurn, Mass. 


O'Leary, Joseph Ranger 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


O'Neil, Charles Henry, Jr. 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 


Osborne, Robert Vincent 


Pre-Med. 


Newton Junction 


Otis, Donald Bartlett 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


Page, Floyd Nelson 


DJI. 


Monroe 


Palizza, Maurice Jean 


E.E. 


Providence, R. I. 


Parker, Truman, Jr. 


Pre-Med. 


Reed's Ferry 


Parrish, Mary Belle 


A.G. 


Marblehead, Mass. 


Parsons, Barbara Terry 


A.G. 


Dover 


Parsons, Louise Marie 


A.G. 


Laconia 


Payne, Robert James 


For. 


Nashua 


Payne, Ruth 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Pease, Harl, Jr. 


Gen. Bus. 


Plymouth 


Penttila, Elma D. 


A.G. 


Rindge 


Perkins, Virginia Abbott 


H.E. 


Charlestown 


Perras, Paul Loren 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pettengill, Audrey Mildred 


A.G. 


Fremont 


Phelps, Dorothy 


A.G. 


Rockland, Mass. 


Pickard, Elizabeth Whittier 


A.G. 


Seahrook Beach 


Pickering, Samuel James, Jr. 


C.E. 


Nashua 


Pickess, Claudia Margaret 


H.E. 


Franklin 


Pickford, Virginia Mary 


Gen. Bus. 


Berlin 


Pierce, Pearl Sherwood 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Platts, Howard Milton 


For. 


Woodsville 


Plumpton, Russell Annis 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Pozniak, Victor 


M.E. 


Claremont 


Pratt, Donna Harriet 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Pratt, Wendell Eldridge 


For. 


Water Village 


Preble, Edwin Springer 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


Presby, Raymond Henry 


Agr. Tr. 


Henniker 


Prescott, Arthur Lee 


A.H. 


Antrim 


Price, Eliot Sewall 


A.G. 


IV. Somerville, Mass 


Price, Herbert Bragg 


Ghent. 


South Hampton 



305 



SOPHOMORES 



Name 

Pullen, Leon Curtis 
Quimby, Lloyd Walker 
Quinn, William Francis, Jr. 
Raleigh, Walter Prescott 
Ramsdell, Frances Nan 
Read, Edward Rowley 
Redden, Gertrude 
Redden, Louise 
Reder, Dorothe Ann 
Reeves, Harold William 
Richards, Mildred 
Richardson, Muriel Rosemary 
Richardson, Russell Beattie 
Riley, Elizabeth Ann 
Ripley, George Sherman, Jr. 
Rivers, William James 
Rocker, Thomas Barr 
Rodrigues, John Gordon 
Rosen, William 
Rowe, Bette Ingred 
Rowe, James Milton 
Rutledge, Esther Ann 
Rutkauskas, John, Jr. 
Safir, Edwin 
Samiec, William 
Sampatacos, Peter Michael 
Sanborn, Russell Theodore 
Schilling, Falko Max 
Schlesinger, Patricia Margaret 
Scott, William Walter 
Scruton, Horace Stedman 
Sculos, John Straty 
Shapiro, Irving Milton 
Shaw, Bernard 
Shea, Leonard Ignatius 
Sheehan, Joseph Denis 
Sheffield, Henry Francis 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


Gen. Bus. 


Portland, Me. 


For. 


Claremont 


A.G. 


Hingham, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Antrim 


A.G. 


So. Berwick; Me. 


Chem. 


Warner 


A.G. 


Dover 


Soc. Ser, 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


A.G, 


Melrose, Mass. 


A.G. 


Concord 


Pre-Med. 


Bradford, Mass. 


Chem. 


Littleton 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Pre-Med. 


Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Rutland, Vt. 


M.E. 


Newmarket 


Pre-Med. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Durham 


C.E. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


A.G. 


So. Norwalk, Conn. 


A.G. 


Claremont 


M.E. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Sanbornton 


E.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Franklin 


C.E. 


Winthrop, Mass. 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


Pre-Med. 


N. Westchester, Cot 


A.G. 


Dover 


Pre-Med. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Agr. 


South Hampton 


306 





SOPHOMORES 



Name 
Sheldon, John Warren 
Shields, Barbara Anne 
Sibley, Frederic Evans 
Sinclair, Robert Young 
Skillin, Russell Thomas 
Small, Gardner Ramsey 
Small, George Franklin 
Smalley. Louise 
Smith, Geraldine Estelle 
Smith, Victor Winston 
Snow, Parker DeWitt 
Spaulding, Robert John 
Spinney, Lewis Charles 
Stanton, Daniel Joseph 
Stearns, Mary Louise 
Stevenson, Gratton Allison 
Stewart, Lawrence James 
Stone, Alton Wallace 
Strout, Donald Leslie 
Swain, Beverly 
Swallow, Lawrence Barr 
Swenson, Karl Eklund 
Swett, Alan Milton 
Tabb, Donald Cameron 
Teague, Adelbert Frederick 
Tenney, Frank Forster, Jr. 
Terrill, William Lester 
Thayer, Thomas Julius 
Thompson, Mildred Eleanor 
Thompson, Paul Raymond 
Thompson, John Reginald 
Thyng. Harrison Reed 
Tibbetts, Gordon Edward 
Tilton, Robert Pierce 
Timberlake, Augusta Grover 
Tinker, Joseph William 
Tondreault, Jeannette Marie 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Gen. Bus. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Berlin 


Pre-Med. 


Bradford, Mass. 


For. 


Gorham 


A.G. 


Portland, Me. 


For. 


Pittsfield 


Hort. 


Maplewood,N. J. 


H.E. 


East Lynn, Mass. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Hinsdale 


Gen. Bus. 


Charlestown 


For. 


Laconia 


For. 


Conway 


Arch. 


Wilton 


Soc. Ser. 


Hancock 


Pre-Med. 


Queens Village, N. Y. 


A.G. 


Center Barnstead 


M.E. 


Exeter 


Pre-Med. 


Keene 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Antrim 


Gen. Bus. 


Penacook 


A.G. 


Mt. Sunapee 


M.E. 


Manchester, Mass. 


For. 


Pittsburg 


Pre-Med. 


Epping 


Chem. 


Sanford, Me. 


Gen. Bus. 


Berlin 


Pre-Med. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Barnstead 


Ghent. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Portland, Me. 


Pre-Med, 


So. Berwick, Me. 


A.G. 


Nashua 



307 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Tower, Gordon Cummings 
Trojano, Harold Domonick 
Tumel, Frances Marion 
Tuttle, Sherwood Dodge 
Uicker, George Bernard 
Upton, Margery Gladys 
Urban, Peter Leon 
VanDyke, Barbara Alice 
Vangjel, Zissi Mihal 
Vanni, Anita Sara 
Waldron, George Franklin 
Ward, Leslie James 
Warren, Albion Wadsworth, Jr, 
Watkins, Arthur Scott 
Webb, Louise Haines 
Weinstat, Judith Esther 
Weisberg, Philip 
Wescott, Benjamin Walter 
West, Rosetta Augusta 
White, William Mansfield 
Whitney, Jean 
Wilcox, HoUis Carleen 
Wilder, Norman Gardner 
Williams, Robert Frank 
Wilson, Wilfred Kelso 
Winer, Samuel Robert 
Winterton, William Baybutt 
Wiskup, Edward 
Wood, Harry Fred, Jr. 
Woodbury, William Walter 
Woodward, Elliot Barnes 
Wright, Glenn Chessley 
Wyatt, Willa Addis 
Wyman, Louis Crosby 
Young, Duane Eugene 
Young, Lavinia Madelyn 
Zagreski, Steve Joseph 
Zeive, Leonard 



Course 

Agr. 

For. 

Educ. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

A.G. 

Chem, 

H£. 

A.G. 

H.E. 

Gen. Bus. 

Agr. 

M.E. 

E.E. 

Soc. Ser. 

A.G. 

Pre-Med. 

D.H. 

H.E. 

Pre-Med. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

For. 

E.E. 

Chem. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

Educ. 

Gen. Bus. 

Pre-Med. 

A.G. 

C.E. 

A.G. 

A.G. 

For. 

A.G. 

M.E. 

Agr. 

308 



P. O. Address 

Lyndeboro 

Laconia 

Concord 

Hancock 

Derry 

Hancock 

Claremont 

Kennehunk, Maine 

Northfield 

Peterboro 

Dover 

Monroe 

Pot tsmouth 

Walpole 

Newmarket 

Claremont 

Chelsea, Mass. 

Contoocook 

Concord 

Smithtown 

Worcester, Mass. 

Concord 

Wakefield, Mass. 

Portland, Me. 

Newton 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Plymouth 

Manchester 

Walpole 

Rochester 

Portsmouth 

Manchester 

Kensington 

W. Stewartstown 

Laconia 

Manchester 



(Men, 361; 

Name 

Actor, Bernard 
Adams, Miriam 
Adams, Ptolemy Arthur 
Adnoff, Esther Lillian 
Aldrich, Waldo Merrifield 
Archibald, John Frederick 
Atwood, Allen Minot 
Ayer, Francis Hall 
Ayer, Franklin Alvin 
Bacon, Mildred Lula 
Bagley, Thomas Roy 
Bailey, Avis Ethel 
Baker, Grayce Elizabeth 
Balch, Charles Russell 
Barkin, David Gabriel 
Barney, Albert Lafayette 
Barney, Bessie Aroline 
Barrett, James Franklin 
Bartlett, George Henry 
Bartlett, Helen Fayette 
Batchelder, Lew Alan 
Bayrer, Ralph Winslow 
Bean, Arthur Edward, Jr. 
Beckingham, Kathaleen E. 
Benner, Stanley Graves 
Bennett, Nelson Archie 
Berkowitz, Regina Claire 
Betley, Phyllis Anne 
Betty, Dorothy Irvina 
Betz, Charles Henry, Jr. 
Bezanson, Robert Osborne 
Bilbruck, James Donald 
Bills, Leon William, Jr. 
Binder, William Harry 
Bissell, Lewis Prouty 



FRESHMEN 




Women, 157; Total, 518) 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Pre-Med. 


Portsmouth 


A.G, 


Derry 


A.G. 


Waltham, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


C.E. 


Keene 


Pre-Med. 


Plymouth 


Agr. 


Franklin 


M.E. 


Stoddard 


M.E. 


Stoddard 


A.G. 


Jefferson 


For. 


Woodsville 


A,G. 


Hafupstead 


A.G. 


Sunapee 


A.G. 


Lyme 


A.G. 


Brookline, Mass. 


For. 


Grafton 


H.E. 


Manchester 


Agr. 


Bristol 


For. 


Grasmere 


H.E. 


Warner 


M.E. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Concord 


Rita A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Manchester 


For. 


Lancaster 


Pre-Med. 


New Rochelle, N. Y 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Woodhaven, N. Y. 


Chem. 


IVoburn, Mass. 


Hort. 


Kittery, Maine 


A.G. 


Milford 


A.G. 


Keene 


For. 


East Wolfehoro 



309 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Bix, Samuel 

Blackwood, John Benjamin 
Blood, Charles James 
Bortas, Leonarda Susan 
Bowen, Bradleigh 
Bowen, Oilman Wells 
Bradlee, Robert Morton, Jr. 
Braun, Richard David 
Breck, Robert Williams 
Briggs, Wilbert Otis, Jr. 
Britten, Leslie Latimer 
Brosius, Donald Joseph 
Brown, Carleton Wesley 
Brown, Raymond Harry 
Buchanan, Creeley Shepard 
Buck, Margaret Marylouise 
Buczynski, Julian Joseph 
Bulger, John Pershing 
Bullock, Clifford Winsor 
Burch, Howard William 
Burns, Louise Geraldine 
Burque, Eloise Jessie 
Burrill, Larkin Hosford 
Burroughs, Ralph John, Jr. 
Burt, Richard Hale 
Calvetti, William Joseph 
Campbell, Maxwell Stewart 
Carey, Franklin Albert 
Carlson, Arthur 
Carpenter, Katharine Lamie 
Carpenter, Mary Eaton 
Carr, Arthur Thomas 
Carruth, Ralph Owen 
Carson, Marie Elizabeth 
Cashman, Sophie 
Chadwick, David Henry 
Chagnon, Maurice Emile 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


For. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Hudson 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Chem. 


Claremont 


Pre-Med. 


Portsmouth 


Gen. Bus. 


Woodhaven, N. Y. 


For. 


Upper Montclair, N. /, 


Pre-Med. 


Warner 


For. 


Brandon, Vt. 


M.E. 


Berlin 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Agr. 


Franklin 


E.E. 


Hudson 


PJI. 


Keene 


M.E. 


Pr ovine etozvn, Mass. 


A.G. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Monroe 


M.E. 


Sanhornville 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


Gen. Bus. 


Milford 


Pre-Med. 


IVilmot 


Gen. Bus. 


Keene 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


A.G. 


Lancaster 


E.E. 


Newport 


Chem. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Noank; Conn. 


A.G. 


East Natick, Mass. 


M.E. 


Sutton 


Pre-Med. 


Nashua 



310 



FRESHMEN 



Name Course 

Chamberlin, Kate Elizabeth A.G. 

Chamberlain, Ray Young A.G. 

Chapman, Hugh James Agr. 

Chandler, Kathleen Olive A.G. 

Charity, Leon Francis A.G. 

Chase, Barbara Bailey A.G. 

Chase, Joseph Ranlet A.G. 

Cheney, Barbara Ellen A.G. 

Cheney, Hellen Tyrrell Soc.Ser. 

Chretien, Thomas Edward Pre-Med. 

Clement, Shirley Elizabeth A.G. 

Codaire, Margery June A.G. 

Cohen, Judith Sylvia A.G. 

Collins, Alice Marie A.G. 

Colman. Alice Carlton A.G. 

Coplen, Leonard Edward A.G. 

Corbin, Dorothy Mae A.G. 
Corcoran, James Leonard • M.E. 

Cordeau, June Ethel A.G. 

Costanzo, Alfred Orlando Gen. Bus. 

Coutts, Lloyd George For. 

Crane, Dorothy Verda A.G. 

Cree, Margery Janice A.G. 

Cronin, Francis Wright Ghent. 

Crouch, Dorothy Emogene A.G. 
Crowley, Raymond Woodbury M.E. 

Cudhea, Ralph Vernon Arch. 

Cunningham, Phyllis A.G. 

Currier, Cedric Edward Ghent. 

Cushing, Frederick Goss, Jr. Ghent. 

Dane, Andrea A.G. 

Daniels, Olive Louise Pre-Med. 

Dauphin, Albert Philias A.G. 

Davidson, Donald Thomas C.E. 

Davis, Beverley Clara Soc. Ser. 

Davison, Ruth Elaine A.G. 

Davison, Warren Rupert Pre-Med. 

311 



P.O. Address 

North Haverhill 

Watertown, Mass. 

Alton 

Barnstead 

Chester 

Manchester 

Laconia 

Manchester 

Dover 

Portsmouth 

Nashua 

Melrose, Mass. 

Portsmouth 

Somersworth 

Rochester 

Boston, Mass. 

Portsmouth 

Manchester 

Lancaster 

Manchester 

Gon'ic 

Everett, Mass. 

Colcbrook 

Manchester 

Dover 

Franklin 

Nashua 

Merrimack 

Claremont 

Lebanon 

Nashua 

Durham 

Claremont 

Concord 

Mollis 

Manchester 

Melrose, Mass. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Namf 
Demerse, Barbara June 
Diemond, LeRoy Heath 
Dillon, Elizabeth Newton 
Diemond, Stuart James 
Diniak, Albert William 
Drew, Warren Edwin 
Duffy, Eugene Norman 
Duley, George Erwin, Jr. 
Dunlap, Philip Stanley 
Dunn, Raymond Bennett 
Durst, Gus William 
Durst, John Hudson 
Dwyer, Charles Allison 
Dyke, Virginia Harlene 
Eastman, Jay Fred, Jr. 
Eastman, Helen Mildred 
Eaton, Leslie Alvado 
Eckhardt, Doris Josephine 
Edgerly, Albert David 
Egan, Donald Herbert 
Eggleston, John Leonard 
Elgosin, Frederick Joseph 
Elliott, Alma Ethel 
Emery, Priscilla 
Erb, George Leslie 
Ermer, Arthur William 
Evans, Judith 
Fernald, Alfred Elwell 
Ferris, Walter Harrison 
Ferry, Allan Barton 
Fisher, Robert Knight 
Fishman, Beatrice Victoria 
Fisk, Robert Harold 
Fletcher, John Rollins 
Fletcher, Robert Dearborn 
Flint, Gordon Bennett 
Foggett, Charles Malcolm 
Foley, Margaret Jane 



Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Alstead 


M.E. 


Bennington 


A.G. 


At ho I, Mass. 


M.E. 


Franklin 


Pre-Mcd. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Colebrook 


A.G. 


Lebanon 


Chem. 


East Kingston 


A.G. 


Concord 


C.E. 


Concord 


For. 


Winsted, Conn. 


For. 


Wins ted. Conn. 


A.G. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Atkinson 


A.G. 


Simapce 


H.E. 


Dover 


M.E. 


Seahrook 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Agr. 


Pittsfield 


A.G. 


East Hampstcad 


Arch. 


Sunapee 


Pre-Med. 


Whitefield 


A.G. 


Laconia 


H.E. 


Portsmouth 


Chem. 


Newtown, Conn. 


A.G. 


North Salem 


A.G. 


Berlin 


C.E. 


Nottingham 


Gen. Bus. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Alton Bay 


A.G. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Dover 


M.E. 


North IVeare 


Chem. 


Concord 


Chem. 


Concord 


A.G. 


North Newport 


Chetn. 


Intervale 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


312 





FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Ford, William Joseph 


A.G. 


Concord 


Fontaine, Milton 


A.G. 


Peterhoro 


Foster, Warren Curtis 


EM. 


Laconia 


Fournier, Maurice Gerard 


Gen. Bus. 


North Attleboro, Mass 


Franklin, Irving Lloyd 


C.E. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Freedman, Marjorie 


A.G. 


Salem, Mass. 


Freeman, Mary Gaffney 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Fulton, Donald Samuel 


Gen. Bus. 


North Woodstock 


Gaffney, James Gerard 


Pre-Med. 


Winchester, Mass. 


Galanes, Peter Ernest 


E.E. 


Dover 


Gale, Gaylord Charles 


C.E. 


Newport 


Gallyon, Mary Whitmore 


A.G. 


Marblehead, Mass. 


Garabrant, Russell Eugene 


Pre-Med. 


East Jaffrey 


Garbarino, John Joseph 


A.G. 


Brockton, Mass. 


Garvey, James Michael 


Gen. Bus. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Gerrish, Leona Pearl 


A.G, 


Rye 


Gersh, Irving Stan 


A.G. 


Roxhury, Mass. 


Gile, David Albert 


M.E. 


Lochmere 


Gile, Frances Watson 


H.E. 


Lochmere 


Gilman, Louis Samuel 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Goertz, Conrad Thomas Mitchell Chem. 


Alton 


Goldfarb, Eugene Walter 


A.G. 


New Bedford, Mass. 


Goodhue, Natalie Elizabeth 


Hort. 


Wolfeboro 


Goodman, Esther 


A.G. 


Lowell, Mass. 


Goodman, Harold Hardy 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Goodrum, Clyde Amis 


A.G. 


Westmoreland Depot 


Goodwin, Harriett Louise 


Chem. 


Waltham, Mass. 


Goodwin, John Robert 


M.E. 


Enfield 


Gorman Lorraine Ashton 


Gen. Bus. 


Littleton 


Gould, Ernest Morton, Jr. 


For. 


Waban, Mass. 


Gowen, Janice 


A.G. 


Stratham 


Grace, Thomas Mathew, Jr. 


Chem. 


Portsmouth 


Grady, Ruth Marie 


A.G. 


East Derry 


Grasso, Rosario Joseph 


M.E. 


Milford 


Greer, William Edward Rose 


Pre-Med. 


Portsmouth 


Griffin, Gerald Joseph 


Gen. Bus. 


Waltham, Mass. 


Griffin, Roy Goodhue 


Agr. Tr. 
313 


Portsmouth 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Guild, George Herbert 
Hadley, David Carroll 
Hadley, Merle Genevieve 
Hall, Allan Keith 
Hall, Forest Freeman, Jr. 
Halpern, Bertha Lillian 
Hamblett, Maurice Franklin 
Hanlon, John Douglas 
Happny, William Grant 
Hardy, Albert Leonard 
Hardy, Ruth Adelaide 
Harmon, Karl Storer 
Harriman, Elizabeth 
Hartshorn, Earl Dexter 
Haseltine, Robert Chase 
Hay, Richard Henry 
Haynes, Harry Leonard 
Hayward, William Owen 
Heath, Carl William 
Height, Dan Ainslie 
Helin, Taimi 

Henderson, Philip Robert 
Hersey, John Loring 
Hibbert, Leslie Eugene, Jr. 
Hickey, William Colby 
Higgins, Alfred Harrison 
Hillson, Ruth Lillian 
Hirschner, Luella Dorothy 
Hodgdon, Philip Walker 
Hodsdon, Caleb Lawrence 
Holt, Martin Ellsworth 
Honkala, Frederick Saul 
Huddleston, John Sprague 
Hurley, Daniel Benjamin 
Hutton, Mildred Eunice 
Ingram, Alvin Richard 
Isenberg, Jean Ann 



Course 


P.O. Address 


Gen. Bus. 


Nashua 


A.G. 


Henniker 


A.G. 


Haddonfield, N. J. 


For. 


Enfield 


M.E. 


W estvioreland Depot 


A.G. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


M.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Winchester, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


M.E. 


Hudson 


H.E. 


Mollis 


A.G. 


Springvale, Maine 


H.E. 


Providence, R. I. 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


For. 


Portsmouth 


For. 


Chester 


E.E. 


Manchester 


For. 


Winchester 


A.G. 


Milford, Mass. 


A.G. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


M.E. 


Laconia 


M.E. 


Rockville Center, N. Y 


For. 


Exeter 


A.G. 


Maiden, Mass. 


A.G. 


Derry 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


E.E. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Chem. 


Salisbury 


A.G. 


Durham 


A.G. 


Center Ossipee 


A.G. 


Derry 


Chem. 


Enfield 


A.G. 


Dorchester, Mass. 


314 





FRESHMEN 




Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Isherwood, Roland Chapman 


Arch. 


Berlin 


Ivers, Richard Warner 


A.G. 


Pelham 


James, Marion Ella 


A.G. 


Durham 


Jamgochian, Elijah 


Agr. 


Salem Depot 


Jarvis, Robert Colebrook 


Gen. Bus. 


Worcester, Mass. 


Jenkins, Donald Edmund 


A.G. 


Keene 


Jenkins, Everett Kelley, Jr. 


C.E. 


Loudon 


Jennison, Harold Francis, Jr. 


M.E. 


Lee 


Jewett, Prances Mary- 


A.G. 


Reading, Mass. 


Johnson, Herbert Austin 


A.G. 


Putnam, Conn. 


Johnson, Philip Colony 


Chem. 


Wilton 


Johnson, Richard Henry 


Gen. Bus. 


Concord 


Johnson, Thomas Frederick 


A.G. 


Arlington, Mass. 


Johnston, Philip John 


Gen. Bus. 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Jones, Dorothy Virginia 


A.G. 


Lakeport 


Jones, George Edward, Jr. 


Hort. 


West Hartford, Conn. 


Jones, William Brayton, Jr. 


A.G. 


Concord 


Jordan, William Raymond 


For. 


Conway Center 


Kalil, Fred 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Karosas. Louis Peter 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Keefe, Elizabeth Marie 


A.G. 


Dover 


Kelley, Hernaldo Richard 


A.G. 


Provincetown, Mass. 


Kelligrew, Madeline Catherine 


A.G. 


Franklin 


Kenison, Frank Kenneth 


For. 


North Conway 


Kew, John Kendall 


A.G. 


Keene 


Kichline, Thomas Peter 


Chem. 


Durham 


Knight, Alma Frances 


A.G. 


Hillshoro 


Lackey, Donald Pease 


A.G. 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Laflamme, Leo Adrien 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Laighton, Garrett 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


Lamb, Harold Wendell 


Pre-Med. 


Plymouth 


Lamson, Hugh 


M.E. 


Goffstown 


Lane, James Rossell 


E.E. 


Exeter 


Lane, Margaret Mary 


A.G. 


Franklin 


Lankalis, Joseph Michael 


A.G. 


Bridgewater, Mass. 


Lapeza, Chester Robert 


M.E. 


Nashua 


Lapoint, Roger Joseph 


A.G. 
315 


Derry Village 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name Course 

Laramie, George Henry For, 

Larson, Dana Francis A.G. 

Lawson, Donald Alexander Gen. Bus. 

Leavitt, Solomon Gen. Bus. 

Leocha, Victor Stanley Pre-Med. 

Lester, Gardiner Alfred Agr. 

Lewis, Robert Dean Gen. Bus. 

Libbey, Constance Alice A.G. 

Lider, Milton Sidney A.G. 

Livingston, Ralph Chem. 

Loiselle, Donald William C.E. 

Lord, Robert Linwood M.E. 

Lord, Ruth Cora H.E. 

Loughlin, Anne Winifred H.E. 

Lovell, Kenneth Roscoe M.E. 

Lunt, Wilma Florence A.G. 

Lurinsky, Henry Pre-Med. 

McAlpine, Bryant Edgar Gen. Bus. 

McCaffrey, George William Gen. Bus. 

McCartney, Sidney Wicks M.E. 

McClary, Howard Carleton A.G. 

McCrillis, Frances Rachel A.G. 

McCrone, Elizabeth Margaret Pre-Med. 

McDermott, Arthur William Educ. 

MacDonald, Douglas Halliday For. 

McDonough, Louis William Pre-Med. 

McFadyen, Eugene John M.E. 

Mclntire, Rachel Burnham A.G. 

McLaren, Ian Robert A.G. 

MacMartin, Marion Patricia Pre-Med. 

McMaster, Arlene Helen A.G. 

McNally, Frances Loretta A.G. 

McVey, Warren Clarence A.G. 

MacKenzie, Ruth Irene A.G. 

Madden, Arthur John, Jr. Chem. 

Mahoney, Mary Frances A.G. 

Manton, Albert Cecil A.G. 

316 



P.O. Address 

Enfield 

Boston, Mass. 

Stoneham, Mass. 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Claremont 

Reading, Mass. 

Concord 

East Rochester 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Keene 

West Concord 

Somersworth 

Francestown 

Dover 

Portsmouth 

Rochester 

Dover 

Concord 

Lincoln 

Dover 

Salem Depot 

Manchester 

Dover 

Franklin 

Nashua 

Manchester 

Lincoln 

South Essex, Mass. 

Alstead 

Wolfehoro 

Salem 

Attleboro, Mass. 

Laconia 

Newport 

Somersworth 

North Andover, Mass. 

Berlin 



FRESHMEN 



Name 
Maron, Ruth 
Marsh, Charles Smith 
Marsh, Mary Alice 
Marshall, Stuart Arthur 
Martineau, Paul Victor 



Course 

H.E. 
Agr. 
H.E. 
Gen. Bus. 
A.G. 



Mathaisell, Rudolph Adolph, JrM.E. 

Matthews, Margaret Ann A.G. 

Mauricette, Eleanor Florence A.G. 

Maynard, Norman Leland Chem. 

Merrill, Gertrude Margaret A.G. 

Metcalf, Katharine A.G. 

Metcalf , Margar,et Mary Soc. Ser. 

Michaud, Edward Ludger Chem. 

Miliner, Robert Alden Pre-Med. 

Miller, Samuel Stanley A.G. 

Mills, Roy Herbert A.G. 

Mitchell, Burton Irvine Chem. 

Mitchell, Harold Newton Agr. 
Mooney, Benjamin William, ]r.A.G. 

Moore, Dorothy June A.G. 

Moore, Merrill Preston Gen. Bus. 

Moore, Rachel Carolyn H.E. 

Moore, Robert Hugh E.E. 

Moore, William Bancroft, Jr. M.E. 

Moran, Winifred Mary A.G. 

Morang, Phyllis Nathalia Educ. 

Moriarty, Mary Qare A.G. 

Morrison, Robert Hugh A.G. 

Mott, Philip Vaughn M.E. 

Muggleston, Frank Albert A.G. 

Mullen, Arthur Thomas, Jr. Hort. 

Mulman, Myer Chem. 

Murray, Marjorie Verna H.E. 

Muzzey, Janice Gertrude A.G. 

Myhre, Carolyn A.G. 

Myhre, Katherine A.G. 

Nason, Maurice Clifton Chem. 

317 



P. O. Address 

Westwood, N. J. 

Ashland 

Ashland 

Or ford 

Manchester 

Tilton 

Troy, N. Y. 

Dover 

Concord 

Littleton 

Newport 

West Springfield 

Rollinsford 

Concord 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

Manchester 

Saco, Maine 

Plymouth 

North Rochester 

Milford 

Manchester 

Peterboro 

Melrose, Mass. 

West Peabody, Mass. 

Woodsville 

Portsmouth 

Durham 

Derry 

Rochester 

Rochester 

West Concord, Mass. 

Manchester 

Dover 

Laconia 

Portsmouth 

Portsmouth 

Rochester 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Nellson, Richard Freeman 
Nichols, Eleanor Frances 
Norton, John Frederick 
Norton, Mabel Elizabeth 
Noseck, Kenneth Alexander 
Noyes, Bernard Bradbury 
Noyes, Eloise Ethel 
O'Connor, Leo Henry 
O'Connor, Raymond Henry 
O'Connor, Regis Edward 
Osman, Seymour 
Otis, Milton Shattuck 
Ozog, Julius John 
Palmer, Donald Clinton 
Parker, Harry Alfred 
Parr, Harry Alfred, Jr. 
Patch, Norman Theodore 
Patten, Raymond Bostwick 
Peart, Mary Dorothea 
Perkins, Robert Warren 
Perkins, Wendell Elmore 
Perras, Irvin Maurice 
Perron, Frank Ernest, Jr. 
Person, Herbert George 
Peterson, Fredericka Maud 
Pettee, Robert Holmes 
Phillips, Barbara 
Pickard, Geraldine 
Pickering, Ervin Malcolm 
Pickford, Virginia Mary 
Pierce, Lester Ward, Jr. 
Pioli, Alfred Otto 
Piretti, Ario Walter 
Pitman, Arthur Leslie 
Plodzik, Edward Walter 
Plumpton, David Chapman 
Poor, Albert Arthur 



Course 


P.O. Address 


A,G. 


Pittsfield 


A.G. 


North Weare 


Chem. 


Dover 


A.G. 


Hampton 


For. 


Winchester 


M.E. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Plaistow 


Gen. Bus. 


Lynn, Mass. 


A.G. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Berlin 


Gen. Bus. 


Salem, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Bradford, Mass. 


A.G. 


Franklin 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Pre-Med. 


Reed's Ferry 


For. 


Hampton 


A.G. 


East Rochester 


Gen. Bus. 


Port Washington, N.Y. 


A.G. 


Derry 


Chem. 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


Pre-Med. 


Franklin 


M.E. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Chem. 


Plymouth 


H.E. 


Colebrook 


A.G. 


Durham 


H.E. 


East Candia 


A.G. 


Seahrook Beach 


Pre-Med. 


Enfield 


Gen. Bus. 


Berlin 


For. 


Rochester 


A.G. 


Peterborough 


For. 


Barre, Vt. 


For. 


Laconia 


A.G. 


Manchester 


A.G. 


Manchester 


M.E. 


Antrim 



Name 
Porter, Arthur Edmund 
Power, Eli Edward 
Preo, Paul Hubert 
Prescott, Norman Francis 
Price, Leslie Frank 
Price, Pauline Priscilla 
Prince, Nathan Dennett 
Pudiack, Susanne Marie 
Pulsifer, Louise Maude 
Putnam, Lillian Medora 
Quinn, John Stephen 
Rackliffe, Janet Gray 
Rainey, John Walter 
Ramage, Archy Plenderleith 
Randall, Carl Osgood, Jr. 
Raybold, Henry Knight 
Raynes, John Charles 
Raynes, Paul Mackintosh 
Reder, Ann 
Reed, Gardner Chase 
Reid, John Adam, Jr. 
Reinherz, Natalie Sylvia 
Richards, Charles Henry 
Richards, Elisabeth 
Richards, Nagella Eunice 
Richardson, Jack Ulmer 
Richardson, John Sammis 
Richardson, Robert Lee 
Riley, Elizabeth Ann 
Robinson, Lillian Lois 
Robinson, Mary Sherman 
Rogers, George Burnet 
Rollins, Byron Benjamin 
Roper, Mark William 
Roper, Robert Lee 
Roulier, Albert Philip 



FRESHMEN 




Course 


P.O. Address 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Gen. Bus. 


Marblehead, Mass. 


Chem. 


Berlin 


A.G. 


Kensington 


Chem. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Salem, Mass. 


M.E. 


Hingham, Mass. 


A.G. 


Binghamton, N. Y. 


H.E. 


Plymouth 


H.E. 


Claremont 


Gen. Bus. 


Hingham, Mass. 


A.G. 


New Britain, Conn. 


Gen. Bus. 


New Boston 


th Pre-Med. 


Lincoln 


Gen. Bus. 


North Conway 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Agr. Tr. 


Chester 


P.H. 


Chester 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Wakefield, Mass. 


Chem. 


West C helms f or d,M(iss 


A.G. 


Chelsea, Mass. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Suncook 


A.G. 


Rochester 


For. 


Tuftonboro 


M.E. 


Stratford, Conn. 


A.G. 


Lakeport 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


H.E. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Falls Church, Va. 


Agr. Tr. 


Northwood Center 


Chem. 


Franklin 


Chem. 


Tewksbury, Mass. 


Chem. 


Tewksbury, Mass. 


A.G. 


Laconia 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Rowell, John Charles 
Roy, Charles Blake 
Roy, Robert Tennyson 
Sanborn, Barbara Laura 
Sanborn, William Edson 
Sanders, Dorothy Louise 
Sanderson, Carroll Emery 
Sanderson, William Rivers 
Sandler, Gwendolyn Phyllis 
Sarson, Mary Elizabeth 
Sawyer, Philip John 
Schwartz, Ivah-Lee 
Scott, Walter Ellsworth, Jr. 
Selzer, Milton 

Senior, Walter Manning, Jr. 
Sewall, Ann Jacqueline 
Shattuck, George William 
Shea, Henry Richard, Jr. 
Sheahan, Edmund Corbett 
Sherbo, Arthur 
Sherburne, Ruth Evelyn 
Sherry, Francis James 
Shmishkiss, Stanley 
Simpson, Carl Leroy 
Sims, Laura Jeanette 
Sives, Charlotte Lucille 
Slater, William Schoonmaker 
Small, Earl George 
Smith, Harold Bryant 
Smith, Louise Charlotte 
Smith, Phil Justin Paul 
Smith, Ruth Zaidee 
Snook, Helen May 
Sopel, Kassie Mary 
Spearman, William Edward 
Spellman, Francis Augustine 
Spence, Robert Caldwell 
Stafford, Edward Raymond 



Course 


P. 0. Address 


Chem. 


Concord 


Agr. Tr. 


Barnet, Vt. 


Chem. 


East Walpole, Mass. 


A.G. 


Exeter 


C.E. 


Fremont 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Agr. Tr. 


Boscawen 


Gen. Bus. 


Mount Vernon, N. 1 


A,G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


A.G. 


Bartlett 


For, 


Concord 


A.G. 


Lawrence, Mass. 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


For. 


Melvin Village 


A.G. 


York Village, Me. 


A.G. 


Pepper ell, Mass. 


A.G. 


Swampscott, Mass. 


C.E. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


A.G. 


Pelham 


Chem. 


Somersworth 


A.G. 


Lynn, Mass. 


Gen. Bus. 


Lakeport 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Londonderry 


M.E. 


New Haven, Conn. 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


C.E. 


Laconia 


Hort. 


Gilford 


E.E. 


Tamworth 


A.G. 


Lincoln 


A.G. 


Portsmouth 


A.G. 


Newmarket 


C.E. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Concord 


A.G. 


Nashua 


M.E. 


Berlin 


320 





FRESHMEN 



Name Course 

Stanley, David Gilbert Chetn. 

Stanley, Fred Donald M.E. 

Stanton, Faith Honoria Gen. Bus. 

Staples, Barbara Pre-Med. 

Stimson, Ruth Geneve H.E, 

Stitt, Richard Thomas Chem. 

Stone, Joseph Louis Chem. 

Stone, Meda Elizabeth A.G. 

Stott, John Graeber Chem. 

Swasey, John Fall, Jr. Gen. Bus. 

Sweet, Dan Frederick Chem. 

Sweet, Harold Aumond, Jr. Chem. 

Sylvester, Russell Lester M.E. 

Szot, Walter A.G. 

Tanner, Harry William A.G. 

Tasker, Leslie Richard, Jr. Chem. 

Taylor, Rebecca Jane A.G. 

Taylor, Robert Ralph M.E. 

Temple, Mary Elizabeth A.G. 

Thayer, Mollie Forbes A.G. 

Thayer, Stuart William M.E. 

Theros, Arthur George A.G. 

Thompson, Herbert Edward M.E. 

Thompson, Wendell Snow M.E. 

Tobin, Helen Howes A.G. 

Toussaint, Paul Arthur A.G. 

Traver, Gordon Anderson Agr. Tr. 

True, Harry Frank C.E. 

Turcotte, Robert Edgar Chem. 

Tuttle, Dorothy Mae A.G. 

Twombly, Robert Williams A.G. 

Tyler, Howard Walter For. 

Underwood, Theodore Arthur A.G. 

Upham, Madeline Elizabeth A.G. 

Vasiliou, Helen Elaine A.G. 

Volinn, Sidney A.G. 

Walden, Eino C.E. 

321 



P. O. Address 

Woodsville 

Conway 

Durham 

Portsmouth 

Dover 

North Wakefield 

Claremont 

Danvers, Mass. 

Sanford, Me. 

Exeter 

Westfield, N. J. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Wolfeboro 

Manchester 

North Bamstead 

Epping 

Lakeport 

Canaan 

Exeter 

LaGrange, III. 

Melrose, Mass. 

Nashua 

Center Ossipee 

Center Ossipee 

Canaan 

Berlin 

Raymond 

Portsmouth 

Lowell, Mass. 

Exeter 

Portsmouth 

Rochester 

Milford 

Reed's Ferry 

Manchester 

Dorchester, Mass. 

Franklin 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 


Course 


P. O. Address 


Walker, Stewart James 


Chehi. 


Penacook 


Walton, Wilfred George 


For. 


South Sutton 


Ward, Robert Royden 


Gen. Bus. 


Kennehunk, Me. 


Warren, Frank Orville 


Pre-Med. 


Manchester 


Waterhouse, Mary Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Stoneham, Mass.- 


iVatson, Ellen Evelyn 


H.E. 


Manchester 


iVebb, Thomas Pemberton 


A.G. 


Dover 


Weden, Norman Charles 


For. 


Woodsville 


Wein, Eber Abraham 


Pre-Med. 


Laconia 


Weinstat, Hertzel 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Weinstat, Judith Esther 


A.G. 


Claremont 


Weir, Margaret 


A.G. 


Durham 


Wendell, Helen 


Gen. Bus. 


Portsmouth 


Wentworth, Cecil Edmund 


M.E. 


Sanbornville 


■Wheeler, Edwin James 


D.H. 


Milford 


Wheeler, Gladys Nellie 


A.G. 


Dover 


Whitcher, Raymond Reed 


M.E. 


Berlin 


White, Dorothy May 


H.E. 


Concord 


Whittier, Royce Ernest 


Pre-Med. 


Concord 


Wiggin, Charles Cartland 


For. 


Newmarket 


Willette, Helen Barbara 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Williams, Dwight Velmore 


Pre-Med. 


Seabrook 


Williams, John Floyd 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Wilson, Sumner Frederick 


A.G. 


Boston, Mass. 


Winterbottom, Frederick Wm. 


A.G. 


Bethlehem 


Wolf, Myer Richard 


Arch. 


Haverhill, Mass. 


Wolfe, Winifred Nora 


H.E. 


New York City 


Woodbury, Kenneth Donald 


A.G. 


Suncook 


Woods, Walter Clarke 


D.H. 


Bath 


Woodward, John Morrill 


Agr. 


Southboro, Mass. 


Woodward, Karl Wilson. Jr. 


For. 


Durham 


Woolner, Gordon Page 


For. 


Manchester 


Worcester, Benj. Fassenden, 2nd M.E. 


Manchester 


Worden, John Cattanach 


E.E. 


Hinsdale 


Wright, Frank Vernon, Jr. 


C.E. 


North Harpswell, Me 


Wyman, Linwood Stanley 


M.E. 


South Berwick, Me. 


Young, Robert Worthen 


M.E. 


Portsmouth 


Zulauf, Gladys Isabel 


A.G. 


Wolfehoro 


• 


322 





SPECIAL STUDENTS 



(Men, 17; Women, 14; 


Total, 31) 


Name 


Course 


P.O. Address 


Baer, Arnold Maurice 


A.G. 


Dover 


Belknap, James Lyman 


Agric. 


Wolfehoro 


Dodge, Mary 


A.G. 


Durham 


Brown, James Butler 


A.G. 


Concord 


Christophil, Louis Basil 


A.G. 


Manchester 


Columbia, Richard 


A.G. 


Canaan 


Curtis, Ruth Sampsell 


A.G. 


Durham 


Fuller, Barbara Dickerman 


A.G. 


Atkinson 


Downey, Paul Milton 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Drake, John 


A.G. 


Dover 


Farrington, Samuel Carlton 


Tech. 


West Claremont 


Oilman. Alice Maude 


A.G. 


Raymond 


Grierson, Harry William 


A.G. 


Rochester 


Haughton, Nancy Creux 


A.G. 


Exeter 


Henderson, Helen 


A.G. 


Durham 


Hennessy, John Joseph 


A.G. 


Newton, Mass. 


Johnson, Philip Edgar 


Agric. 


Durham 


Knight, Ethel Marion 


A.G. 


West Ossipee 


Lapeza, Terry Frank 


A.G. 


Nashua 


Prescott, Edith Hilliard 


A.G. 


Kensington 


Ridgway, Phyllis Mae 


A.G. 


Bethlehem 


Rollins, Elizabeth 


A.G. 


Dover 


Roberts, Henry Edson 


Agric. 


South Royalton, Vt. 


Ruch, Pauline Otis 


Agric. 


York Village, Me. 


Sheppard, Hannah Wallen 


A.G. 


Dover 


Shively, Audrey Peters 


A.G. 


Andover 


True, Robert Baxter 


A.G. 


Fremont 


Waananen, Arvi Olavi 


A.G. 


Concord 


Webster, Frank George 2nd 


Agric. 


Durham 


Webster, Helen T. 


Agric. 


Durham 


Wiggin, Herbert Leslie 


Agric. 


Newmarket 



323 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS 



Name 
Bean, Joseph Smith 
Bishop, Harold Green 
Brackett, John Roland 
Brett, Kenneth Arthur 
Davis, John Dudly 
Duffill, Herbert Eaton 
Fournier, Albert Oscar 
Keith, Edson Warren 
Klinge, Albert John 
Laughton, Hartford Case 
Leighton, Edgar Lawson, Jr. 
Leslie, Edward Selwyn 
Littlefield, Robert Lowe 
Moriarty, Joseph Bernard 
Pierce, John Chandler 
Rutherford, Richard Roy 
Sawyer, Channing Pierce 
Simpson, Leonard George 
Steele, George Franklin, Jr. 
Taylor, Donald Clifford 
Thompson, Virginia Elizabeth 
Warren, Carl Albert 
Willoughby, Kyle Edson 



First Year 
(Men, 23) 

P.O. Address 

Orford 

Hillsboro 

Greenland 

Tamworth 

Short Falls 

Greenwood, Mass. 

Somersworth 

Norwich, Vt. 

Gonic 

Nottingham 

Temple 
Manchester 

Wells, Me, 

Durham 

Norwich, Vt. 

Plymouth 

Wilmot 

Derry 

Milford 

Berlin 

Wilmot 

Lyndeboro 

Plymouth 



■ Name 
Bruce, Irvin Quimby 
Dagostino, Michael Jules 
Ellison, Robert Lincoln 
Gammell, John Curtis 
Goodwin, Floyd Joseph 
Hill, Daniel Cecil 



(Second 
(Men, 



Year) 

12) 

P.O. Address 

Claremont 

Dover 

Exeter 

Henniker 

Lebanon 

Winchester 



324 



TWO-YEAR AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS 

Name P. O. Address 

Kalil, George Michael Lowell, Mass. 

Keith, Thomas Currier Norwich, Vt. 

Laviolette, Edward Lawrence Stratham 

Perkins, John Cameron Exeter 

Woods, Harry Whitney Bath 

Zoerb, Conrad Franklin Derry 



325 



ENROLLMENT— SUMMER SESSION— 1936 



(Men, 183; Women, 147; Total, 330) 



Name 
Adams, Grace V. 

Adams, Stanley S. 
Aladovich, Edna H. 
Allen, William B. 
Andrews, E. Vincent 
Ayer, Theodore H. 
Bailey, Annie E. 
Bailey, Lewis D. 
Banister, Rolfe G. 
Bartlett, Marion L. 
Bartlett, May M. 
Barton, Philip S. 
Beaven, Theodore 
Bennett, Clare H. 
Bennett, John P. 
Bennett, Marian S. 
Bickford, Gladys C. 
Blackington, Frank H. 
Blanchard, Richard S. 
Blagden, Phyllis 
Bloom, Abraham 
Blossom, Anna H. 
Bond, Thelma K. 
Bourn, Alger S. 

Bourn, Barbara 
Braconier, Harry E. 
Bray, Inez D. 
Brooks, Paul P. 
Brown, Eugenia H. 
Brown, James B. 
Brown, Philip W. 



Coll. and Degree 

Millersville St. 

Teachers' '31 
Keene '34 B. Ed. 
Simmons '36 B.S. 
Bowdoin 
N. H. '39 
N. H. '29 BS. 
Wellesley '13 B.A. 
Keene '30 
N. H. '20 BS. 
Vt. '37 

Wheaton '16 A.B. 
N. H. '28 BS, 
Toronto '17 
Mich. '33 M.A. 
N. H. '39 
Albion '25 
N. H. '20 B.S. 
Bates '21 A.B. 
Yale '36 B.S. 
Nasson and Simmons 
R. I. '34 B.S. 
Brown '26 Ph.B. 
Plymouth '32 
Yale '30 BS., M.I.T., 

'31 MS. 

N. H. '37 

N. H. '36 

Dartmouth '32 A.B. 
N. H. '37 



Address 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Portsmouth 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Cranston, R. I. 

Dover 

Milton Mills 

Katonah, N. Y. 

West Lebanon 

Portsmouth 

Bradford, Mass. 

Sunapee 

Weare 

Manchester 

Spring port, Mich. 

Portsmouth 

Spring Arbor, Mich. 

Gonic 

Keene 

Rochester 

Harpers Ferry 

Providence, R. L 

Hanover 

Derry 

Exeter 

Exeter 

Brockton, Mass. 

Portsmouth 

Greenfield 

Portsmouth 

Concord 

Pittsfield 



326 



SUMMER SESSION, 1936 



Name 

Bruce, Robert E. 
Burns, Frederic L. 
Burrows, William M. 
Button, Clara D. 
Byther, Lynnic P. 
Cady, George L. 
Caldwell, Winston F. 
Carroll, Mary J, 
Casey, Louise M. 
Chace, Dorothy 
Charrier, Frederic E. 
Chase, John Philip 
Child, Doris B. 
Chodokoski, Edward 
Qarke, William H. 
Codaire, Charlotte 
Collins, Louise E. 
Conway, Mary E. 

Corbett, Elizabeth 
Couser, William G. 
Cummings, Clarence 
Cummings, Leslie S. 
Currier, George W. 
Dalzell, Charles D. 
Danforth, H. Raymond 
Davidson, Gaston H. 
Davis, Delia R. 

Davis, Leonard W. 
Davis, Susan T. 
Dennett, Carleton 
DeSchuiteneer, H. E. 
Diman, Mildred 
Dissell, Dorothy G. 
Dissell, Edward E. 
Dodge, Eliot P. 



Coll. and Degree 

A^. H. '29 B.S. 
N. H. '39 



Nasson '34 
N. H. '39 
N. H. '38 

N. H. '38 
Brown '21 Ph.B. 
Bangor Theol. '31 
N. H. '34 BS. 
Keene '29 B.Ed. 
N. H. '37 

N.H. 

Plymouth '33 B.Ed. 

R.I.Coll.ofEd.'31 

B.Ed. 
N. H. '36 

Wesleyan '27 B.A. 
N. H. '23 B.S. 
N. H. '26 B.S. 
Colby '22 A.B. 
R. I. '19 B.S. 
N.H. '28 A.B. 
N.H. '25 A.B. 
Bridgewater State 

Teachers' 
N. H. '39 

Haverford '23 B.S. 
N. H. '38 
Brown '09 A.B. 
Wellesley '35 B.A. 
Williams '37 
Mass. State '26 B.S. 



Address 

Ashland 

Manchester 

Exeter 

Kittery, Me. 

Millinocket, Me. 

Manchester 

Dover 

E. Hartford, Conn. 

Concord 

Northwood Narrows 

San ford, Me. 

Henniker 

Lisbon 

Berlin 

Sanford, Me. 

Manchester 

Laconia 

Westerly, R. I. 

Concord 

Dover 

Colebrook 

Hampton 

West Lebanon 

Wat pole 

Acworth 

Tamworth 

Durham 

Bow Lake 

Summit, N. J. 

Walpole 

Manchester 

Exeter 

W. Hartford, Conn. 

W. Hartford, Conn. 



327 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Dodge, Ruth 
Doe, Ruth Eleanor 
Dolan, Loretto G. 
Dorsey, Eleanor E. 
Douglas, Howard W. 
Doukas, John G. 
Dow, Marion 
DuBuron, Ethel B. 
Ebner, Albert B. 
Edmunds, Sr., Arthur 
Ekdahl, N. Marguerite 
Ekstrom, Stanley E. 
Embody, Alberta L. 

Erickson, Edward I. 
Evans, Charlotte 
Evans, Grace 
Ewing, Donald F. 
Ewing, Lyle 
Fahey, William E. 
Farr, John C. 
Farrell, Lloyd H. 
Ferris, Basil M. 
Flaherty, Edna Grace 
Flocken, Robert H. 
Follansbee, Gladys M. 
Foss, Helen E. 
Fowler, Doris M. 
Eraser, William 
Frederickson, Meta 
Frizzell, Donald 
Frye, John Harvey 
Fussell, Clyde G, 

Fussell, Dorothy S. 
Galleani, Mentana 



Coll. and Degree 

Harvard '32 LL.B. 

N. H. '37 

Ohio Wesley an '28 B.A. 

N.H. 

Vermont '37 

N. H. '36 BS. 

Dartmouth '37 

Keene '23 

Emerson '14 

Brown '28 Ph.B. 

U. of Pa. 

N. H. '34 BS. 

N.H. '34 

State Teachers, 

E. Stroudsburg, Pa, 
Bates '28 B.S. 
Colby '33 A.C.S. 
Colby '33 A.C.S. 
Dartmouth '31 A.B. 
N. H. '39 
Catholic '36 B.S. 
Bowdoin '31 A.B. 
N. H. 39 
N. H. 39 
N.H. '28 B.A. 
Wesley an '12 A.B. 
Keene '29 
Bates '27 A.B. 
N.H. '36 A.B. 
Holy Cross '36 B.Ph. 
Rutgers '35 B.S. 
Keene '34 
Keene '31 B.Ed. 
Middlebury'25A.B. 
Middlebury'26A.M. 
Plymouth 
N. H. '39 

328 



Address 

Simsbury, Conn. 

Durham 

Stratford, Conn. 

Nashua 

Ludlow, Vt. 

New Milford, Conn. 

Keene 

Pittsfield 

Boston, Mass. 

Thomaston, Conn. 

Franklin 

Durham 

W. Concord 

Summit Hill, Pa. 

Milford 

Concord 

Waltham, Mass. 

Keene 

Claremont 

Lewiston, Me. 

Kittery Point, Me. 

Dover 

Lebanon 

Manchester 

Katonah, N. Y. 

Manchester 

Rochester 

Dover 

Manchester 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Keene 

Hollis 

Derry Village 
Derry Village 
Dover 



SUMMER SESSION, 1936 



Name 
Gardner, Alfred E. 
Garvin, Mary A. 
Glynn, Robert 
Goddard, Willard B. 
Godfrey, Eloise R. 
Goodwin, Doris R. 
Gordon, Irvin H. 
Gordon, Samuel L. 
Graham, James Wm. 
Grant, Robert H. 
Gray, C. Maurice 
Grierson, Harry W. 
Grow, Marguerite 
Gunn, Raymond F. 
Guptill, Hazel L. 
Hall, Herbert L. 
Halladay, Dorothy E. 
Ham, Prances M. 
Hanel, Florence G. 
Handleman, Howard P. 
Hanson, Russell S. 
Harding, Stanley L. 
Hartwell, Lillian E. 
Hatch, Osman P. 
Hawkins, Frederick W. 
Hayes, Frederick A. 

Henault, Lillian J. 
Henry, Lee B. 

Heyworth, Margarete M 
Hill, Elizabeth 
Hinds, Doris G. 
Hodgdon, John G. 
Holt, Alfred S. 
Hood, Janet 
Howell, Cecil V. 



Coll. and Degree 

N. H. '38 

N.H. '36 

N. H. '38 

Kent State '29 BS.Ed. 

Rutgers '34 BS. 

N. H. '36 BS. 

Gorham Normal '32 

N. H. '37 

N. H. '39 

Bowdoin '33 A.B. 

Dartmouth '28 A.B. 

Gorham '29 

N. H. '35 B.A. 

N.H. '24 A.B. 

Bates '31 A.B. 

N. H. '30 B.S. 

N.H. '37 

N. H. '38 

Plymouth '30 B.Ed. 

N. H. '36 B.S. 
N. H. '35 B.S. 
Lesley 

Plymouth '31 B.Ed. 
N. H. '35 B.S. 
Gordon '15 
Bangor '29 
Plymouth '34 B.E. 
Amherst '35 B.A. 
N. H. '36 M.E. 



Address 

Plymouth 

Sanbornville 

Belleville, N. J. 

Canton, O. 

Portsmouth 

Pier mo nt 

Gorham, Me. 

Goshen 

So. Orange, N. J. 

Kittery, Me. 

Contoocook 

Rochester 

Bradford, Vt. 

Ashland 

Berwick, Me. 

Plymouth 

Claremont 

Durham 

Manchester 

Worcester, Mass. 

Tilt on 

Farmington 

Nashua 

Lebanon 

Troy 

Penacook 

Newport 



Andover 
Manchester 
Lowell Teachers' '35 B.S'.Milford 

Attlehoro, Mass. 

Berlin 

So. Lyndeboro 

Hartford, Conn. 

Dover 



N. H. '35 B.S. 
Keene '29 B.E. 



N.H. '29 B.S. 
329 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 
Hoyt, Margaret S. 
Hoyt, Raymond A. 
Ives, Delavan W. 
Jamback, Arvo J. 
Johnson, Eva E. 
Johnson, Mabel T. 
Jones, Elsie L. 
Jordan, Barbara C. 
Joy, Clarence L. 
Katz, Rose M. 
Kay, William J. 
Keach, Elliott Wm. 
Kelleher, Marguerite M. 
Kelley, Edith G. 
Keniston, Euna W. 
Kenyon, Barbara 

Klein, Rose H. 
Korab, John J. 
LaBorta, Pearl E. 
LaChance, Loretta M. 
Ladd, Harold 
Ladieu, William H. 
LaPlamme, Charles R. 
Larkin, Harriett 
Larrabee, Carlton H. 
Larson, Roger C. 
Lawrence, Charles P. 
Lessard, Madeleine C. 
Lester, Bernice H. 
Levine, Noah 
Liberty, James S. 
Littlefield, Albion K. 
Lord, Charles Ed. 
Lorentz, John J. 



Coll. and Degree 

Plymouth '06 and Vt. 

N.H.'28 B.A. 

N. H. '39 

N. H. '39 

N.H. 

N. H. '33 BS. 

N.H. '37 

Dartmouth '99 A.B. 
Hunter '38 
N. H. '38 

Springfield '35 B.S. 
R. I. '36 B.Ed. 
Plymouth '29 

R. I. Col. of Educ. '31 
B.Ed. 

N. H. '39 
Keene '26 

N. H. '20 B.S. 

Keene '31 B.E. 

Dartmouth '38 

N. H. '38 

Clark '27 B.A. 

Norwich '36 C.E. 

N.H. '37 

St. Anselm's '32 A.B. 

N.H. '31 B.A. 

N. H. '37 

N. H. '39 

Colby '29 B.S. 

N.H. '23 B.S. 

Catholic '38 

330 



Address 
Rutland, Vt. 
Woodsville 
Wallingford, Conn. 
Lebanon 
Whitehall, N. Y. 
Northwood Narrows 
Portsmouth 
Windsor, Vt. 
Rochester 
New York 
Claremont 
Milford 

Providence, R. I. 
Dover 
Newmarket 

Ashaway, R.I. 

Hartford, Conn. 

Middletown, Conn. 

East Weare 

Concord 

Bristol 

Newport 

Manchester 

Winthrop, Mass. 

Glenbrook, Conn. 

Swampscott, Mass. 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Pelham 

Boston, Mass. 

Farmington 

North Bcrzvick, Me. 

Gilford 

Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1936 



Name 
Lynn, James A. 
McCaig, Ruth M. 
McCormack, Stewart 
McGirr, Genevieve C. 
McGrail, Marie J. 
Maclvor, Anna 
McKeigue, John E. 
McKenna, Gertrude V. 
McKenney, Harry C. 
MacLeod, Helen P. 

McMahon, James D. 
Mahar, Kathryn E. 
Maitland, Alexander 
Martin, Richard A, 
Martineau, Ramon F. 
Mason, Howard F. 
Matison, Matthew L 
Maxam, Eugene C. 
Maynard, Wm. 
Meader, Elwyn M. 
Merrill, Douglas 
Merriman, Lockwood 
Metcalf, Daniel M. 
Miles, Morey C. 
Miller, Verna E. 
Mills, Muriel 
Mitchell, Dorna 
Morrill, Harold E. 
Morris, Frank A. 
Morris, Robert H, 
Morrison, Dorothy E. 
Morrissey, Margaret 
Morrow, Muriel 
Morse, Clara E. 
Munroe, Ruth K. 
Murphy, William J. 



Coll. and Degree 
Wentworth Inst. '22 

N. H. '37 

Keene '33 B.E. 

N.H. '30 A. B. 

Dalhousie 

N.H. '38 

Vermont 

Bates 

Saskatchewan '28 B.S. 

in Pharm. 
N. H. '38 

Bowdoin '38 
N. H. '43 B.S. 
Keene '33 

Dartmouth '31 A.B. 
N. H. '37 
N. H. '26 BS. 
N. H. '39 
N. H. '37 
N. H. '37 
Harvard '35 A.B. 
N. H. '25 B.S. 
N.H. '34 B.S. 

Colorado '31 B.S. 

Keene 

Keene '31 B.Ed. 

N. H. '37 

Brown '30 A.B. 

Plymouth '28 B.Ed. 



N. H. '38 



Address 

Nashua 

Concord 

Mil ford 

Concord 

Dover 

Campion 

Bradford, Mass. 

Fairhaven, Vt. 

Derry 

Durham 

Providence, R. I. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Thompson, Conn. 

Keene 

Parmington 

Amherst 

Dover 

Rochester 

Plymouth 

Rochester 

Concord 

Meriden 

Alstead 

Claremont 

Kittery, Me. 

Denver, Colorado 

Newmarket 

Charlestown 

Concord 

Monson, Mass. 

Grove ton 

Manchester 

Kittery, Me. 

Gorham 

Dover 

Bristol, Conn. 



331 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Muzzy, Carolyn 
Naughton, Helen 
Neal, Robert 
Neligh, Florence M. 
Newton, John R. 
Ninde, David C 
Norton, Jane 
Norton, William 
Nye, Gertrude E. 
O'Brien, Paul J. 
O'Leary, Maurice J. 
Osborne, Robert V. 
Paine, Katherine G. 
Park, Virginia A. 
Pelletier, Lawrence L, 
Peltonen, T. Ernest 
Perkins, Ernest M. 
Pellerin, Jesse L. 
Perkins, John H. 
Pettengill, James B. 
Pierce, Frances E. 
Pierce, Mildred E. 
Piper, Bertha S. 
Poirier, Wilfred 
Potvin, Claire 
Powers, Charlotte 
Pratt, Helen M. 
Quinn, George E. 
Rand, Olan A. 

Rangazas, Eva 
Rassias, Christine 
Rennie, Jack W. 
Rexford, Dean R. 
Richardson, Charles E. 
Richardson, Roxanna E. 
Rizzi, Paul 



Coll. and Degree 

Wellesley '38 

St. Teachers' '34 B.S.E. 

Williams '37 

Heidelberg '23 A.B. 

Yale '32 A.B. 

Harvard '35 M.A. 

Wellesley 

N. H. '37 

N. H. '29 B.A. 

N. H. '38 

N.H. '28 B.A. 

N. H. '39 

Keene '32 B.Ed. 
Bowdoin '36 A.B. 
Keene '34 B.E. 
N. H. '30 B.A, 
N. H. '27 B.S. 
N.H. '36 
N.H. '12 B.A. 
Keene '31 B.A. 
Gorham '18 
N.H. 
Keene 

Trinity '34 B.S. 
Plymouth '32 
Keene '36 B.Ed. 
N. H. '38 
Washington and Lee 

'26 B.A. 
N. H. '38 
N. H. '38 
Williams '37 
Norwich 
N. H. '38 
Bates '12 B.A. 
Keene '32 

332 



Address 

Wellesley, Mass. 

North Adams, Mass. 

Rochester 

Tiffin, Ohio 

Farmington 

Durham 

Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Hopkinton 

Westvtille 

Nashua 

Rochester 

Newton Junction 

New Hartford, Conn. 

Pittsfield 

Springvale, Me. 

Newport 

Newport 

Farmington 

Pittsfield 

Manchester 

Tamworth 

Kittery, Me. 

Amherst 

Lincoln 

Claremont 

Manchester 

Keene 

Concord 

Derry 

Nashua 

Manchester 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Johnson, Vt. 

Lynn, Mass. 

Northwood Center 

Mil ford 



SUMMER SESSION, 1936 



Name 

Robbins, Ruth H. 
Robinson, Bernard B. 
Roe, Henrietta 
Rogers, George H. 
Rogers, Muriel C. 
Rourke, Eugene E. 
Russell, Cora J. 
Rutkauskas, John 
Sanders, Mina M. 
Saunders, Elizabeth G. 
Sawyer, Russell D. 
Saylor, Grace A. 
Scarbrough, Marvin 
Schilling, Falko 
Shaw, Inez 
Shea, Harold F. 
Sheehan, Wilfred J. 
Shields, Dorothy 
Shuttleworth, Ira V. 

Slayton, Foster H. 
Smith, Charles W. 
Smith, Clyde R. 
Smith, Eugene 
Smith, F. Blanche 

Smith, John Clark 
Smith, Laurence J. 
Smith, Richard 
Smith, Willard H. 

Solomon, Philip 
Spinney, Fannie M. 
Staples, Barbara 
Starrett, Howard M. 
Stevenson, Gratton A. 
Stewart, Donald W. 



Coll. and Degree 

Gorhani '32 

Catholic 

N. H. '33 M.Ed. 

Rollins '35 BS. 

N. H. '29 A.B, 
Wellesley '98 A.B. 
N. H. '39 



Northeastern 

Millersville St. Teachers' 

Duke Univ. 

N. H. '39 

IV heat on '34 A.B. 

Trinity '31 B.S. 
Bates '36 A.B. 
Y.M.C.A. Col. Spring- 
field B.P.E. 
N. H. '28 B.S. 
N. H. '23 B.S. 
N. H. '37 
N. H. '32 B.S. 
Gaucher '32 B.A. 
Columbia '34 M.A. 
N.H 

Emerson '17 B.L.I. 
N. H. '38 

Dartmouth '27 A.B. 
N.H. '35 M.A. 
N. H. '38 
N. H. '22 A.B. 
N. H. '40 
Gordon '30 Th.B. 
N. H. '39 
N. H. '37 

333 



Address 

Kittery, Me. 

Laconia 

Portsmouth 

Dover 

Gloucester, Mass. 

Exeter 

Manchester 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Dover 

Newmarket 

Concord 

Lancaster, Pa. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Manchester 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Lynn, Mass. 

New Britain, Conn. 

Rochester 

Pearl River, N. Y. 
Portsmouth 
Portsmouth 
Newmarket 
New Hampton 

Passaic, N. J. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Franklin, Pa. 
Barnstead 
Exeter 

Franklin 
Dover 
Portsmouth 
Sanford, Me. 
Queens Village, N. Y. 
E. Orange, N. J. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Name 

Stickle, Gertrude W. 
Stiles, William H. 
Street, James C. 
Styring, Wm. 
Sullivan, Catherine F. 
Summerville, George H. 
Sykes, Paul Wm. 
Sylvestre, Naomi R. 
Tebbetts, Florence M. 
Teed, Alice 
Terrill, Roy L. 
Thayer, Olive J. 
Thayer, Patricia A. 
Thomas, Elizabeth 
Thompson, Malcolm H. 
Thompson, Stewart D. 
Tirrell, Alice D. 
Toll, Arthur 
ToUes, Marion E. 
Toolin, Brendan E. 
Torrey, William G. 
Towle, Harriet N. 
Trabucco, Alfred 
Trubenbach, Alfred 
Turner, Ralph W. 
Vail, Doris E. 
Varney, Bertha R. 
Villanova, Elizabeth 
Voigt, Amelia H. 

Waegeneece, Marguerite 
Wagner, Richard D. 
Walker, Emily L. 
Walker, Fred C. 
Walker, Genevieve 
Walsh, Thomas J. 
Wardrop, Irene E. 



Coll. and Degree 

A^. H. '36 
Lafayette '36 
Princeton '36 A.B. 
Trinity '37 

N. H. '26 BS. 
Trinity '31 BS. 
N. H. ''35 BS. 
N. H. '36 BS. 
Emerson '28 B.L.I, 
N. H. '33 BS. 
N. H. '34 B.S. 
N.H. '32 A.B. 
Emerson '21 B.L.L 
Plymouth '37 
Keene '32 
N.H.'25 B.A. 
N. H. '35 

Middlebury '31 A.B. 
N. H. '36 
Hamilton '38 

Wellesley '36 B.A. 
N. H, '38 
N. H. '37 
Harvard '28 S.B. 
Miss Wheelock's 

Plymouth '27 

N. H. '36 

Salem St. Teachers' 
College '27 B.S.Ed. 

Plymouth '32 B.Ed. 

Norwich '34 B.S. 

Wheaton '38 

N. H. '35 BS. 

N. H. '37 

N. H. N. Y. U 

Michigan State '31 

334 



Address 

E. Cleveland, Ohio 

Westfield, N. J. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Southington, Conn. 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Northwood 

Littleton 

Nashua 

Medford, Mass, 

Keene 

Epping 

Epping 

Aurora, III. 

Plymouth 

Hillsboro 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Terryville, Conn. 

Leominster, Mass. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Exeter 

New Hampton 

New York 

Framingham, Mass, 

Manchester 

Bartlett 

Rochester 

Easthampton, Mass. 

Manchester 

Berlin 

Concord 

Dover 

Tilton 

Edwardsville, Pa. 

Amesbury, Mass. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1936 



Name 

Washburn, Alice 
Washburn, Howard 
Watson, Murray H . 
Weare, Louise D. 
White, Dorothy E. 
Whitney, Dorothy L. 
Whitney, Richard M. 
Whittemore, John K. 
Wieners, August 
Williams, Dorothy 
Williams, James A. 
Wilson, Ruth E. 
Winslow, Howard L. 
Wiseman, Israel 
Woodbury, Jane W. 
Wootton, Margaret B. 
Worster, Juliette 
Wright, Philip L. 
Young, Olive L, 
Theriault, J. 



Coll. and Degree 

Hartford Sent. Found. 

Trinity '25 A.B. 

Bates 

G or ham 

Plymouth '33 

Keene '31 B.E. 

N. H. '33 BS. 

N. H. '30 BS. 

Hamilton '37 

N.H.'33B.A. 

Conn. '31 B.S. 

Bates '31 A.B. 

Wesleyan 

N. H. '36 

N. H. '37 

N. H. '37 

Gorham '23 

N. H. '35 B.S. 

N.H. 



Address 

W. Lebanon, Me. 

W. Lebanon, Me. 

Lisbon 

Kittery Point, Me. 

Newport 

Lakeport 

Dover 

Walpole 

Englewood, N. J. 

Dover 

Maynard, Mass. 
Somersworth 
Dover 

Salem Center 
Wolfeboro 
Eliot, Me. 
Nashua 
Manchester 
Haverhill, Mass. 



335 



COMPARATIVE REGISTRATION 



Regular 
Curric- 
ula 



Summer 

School 

and Short 

Curricula* 



Men 
(Less 
dupli- 
cates) 



Women 
(Less 
dupli- 
cates) 



Total 
(Less 
dupli- 
cates) 



1893-94... 

1894-95.. 

1895-96... 

1896-97... 

1897-98... 

1898-99... 

1899-1900. 

1900-01... 

1901-02... 

1902-03... 

1903-04... 

1904-05... 

1905-06... 

1906-07... 

1907-08... 

1908-09.. 

1909-10... 

1910-11.. 

1911-12... 

1912-13... 

1913-14.. 

1914-15.. 

1915-16.. 

1916-17.. 

1917-18.. 

19ia-19t. 

1919-20.. 

1920-21 . . 

1921-22.. 

1922-23.. 

1923-24.. 

1924-25.. 

1925-26.. 

1926-27.. 

1927-28.. 

1928-29.. 

1929-30.. 

1930-31 . . 

1931-32.. 

1932-33.. 

1933-34.. 

1934-35.. 

1935-36.. 



64 

93 

83 

88 

82 

82 

86 

93 

102 

103 

110 

123 

154 

172 

183 

198 

193 

207 

231 

259 

300 

387 

461 

574 

530 

593 

774 

845 

907 

1,036 

1,154 

1,202 

1,348 

1,491 

1,658 

1,553 

1,586 

1,646 

1,712 

1,673 

1,616 

1,520 

1,626 



15 

29 

17 

50 

10 

33 

32 

29 

18 

24 

36 

41 

38 

20 

33 

55 

73 

84 

95 

103 

131 

192 

92 

32 

14 

44 

46 

66 

161 

175 

229 

267 

317 

306 

365 

367 

382 

437 

463 

341 

360 

369 



54 

78 

80 

79 

90 

79 

103 

115 

125 

117 

126 

151 

183 

196 

188 

218 

312 

249 

285 

306 

322 

405 

505 

514 

399 

439 

631 

682 

759 

922 

993 

1,029 

1,143 

1,217 

1,277 

1,294 

1,285 

1,297 

1,354 

1.429 

1,295 

1,212 

1,316 



10 

30 

32 

26 

42 

13 

16 

10 

6 

4 

8 

8 

12 

14 

15 

13 

16 

17 

22 

30 

63 

87 

113 

152 

163 

168 

187 

209 

214 

275 

336 

402 

471 

567 

626 

624 

668 

664 

669 

610 

586 

574 

624 



64 

108 

112 

105 

132 

92 

119 

125 

131 

121 

134 

159 

195 

210 

203 

231 

328 

280 

315 

354 

403 

518 

653 

666 

562 

607 

818 

891 

973 

1,197 

1,329 

1,431 

1,614 

1,784 

1,903 

1,918 

1,953 

1,961 

2,023 

2,039 

1,881 

1,786 

1,940 



* Includes Summer School, Two- Year Agriculture, Poultry Extension and Dairy 
Short Curricula. 

t During 1918-19 there were 1,467 additional men registered for special military 
work under the S.A.T.C. organization. 



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:5 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association welcomes to its active membership all 
two-year and four-year graduates, and all former students are in- 
vited to become associate members. An Alumni Office is maintained 
to serve the alumni, and an Alumni Fund permits alumni voluntarily 
to contribute to some specific University project. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1926-37 

President G. Donald Melville, '20, 20 Northumberland St., 

Springfield, Mass. 

1st Vice-President Frank W. Randall, '07, 46 Congress St., Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 

2nd Vice-President Mrs. Edna Henderson Hersey, '26, 48 Grove St., 

Somersworth, N. H. 

Alumni Secretary Eugene K. Auerbach, '28, Durham, N. H. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

G. Donald Melville, '20, 20 Northumberland St., Springfield, Mass. 

Frank W. Randall, '07, 46 Congress St., Portsmouth, N. H. 

Mrs. Edna Henderson Hersey, '26, 48 Grove St., Somersworth, N.H. 

George A. Bassett, 2-yr. '16, Fremont, N. H. 

Rachel C. Colby, '17, ZZ South High St., New Britain, Conn. 

Dean F. Smalley, '08, 46 Kernwood Drive, E. Lynn, Mass. 

Burnham B. Davis, '29, 11^ Joy St., Boston, Mass. 

Peter J. Doyle, '22, 466 Central Ave., Dover, N. H. 

Frederick L. Robinson, '27, Z2> Newton Place, Framingham, Mass. 

BRANCH ASSOCIATIONS 

Boston Branch. Formed Nov. 15, 1919. 

President Clifford E. James, '28, 70 Barnstable Road, W. New- 
ton, Mass. 
Vice-Pres. Harrison W. Chesley, '34, 17 Larch Road, Lynn, 
Treasurer Mass. 

340 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Secretary Mrs. Margaret Osgood Daniels, '24, 20 Worthington 

St., Dedham, Mass. 

New York City Branch, Formed Oct. 21, 1919. 

President C. Fred Chaplin, x'27, 39 Parkhurst Lane, Manhasset, 

L. I., N. Y. 

Vice-Pres. Perry E. Tubman, '13, 40 No. Milburn Ave., Baldwin, 

N. Y. 

Treasurer Norbert C. Nodes, '29, 186 Herrick Ave., Teaneck, 

N. J. 

Secretary Mrs. Mary Pike Smart, '30, 8701 Shore Blvd., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Connecticut Branch. Formed Nov. 12, 1920. 

President C. Donald McKelvie, '22, 35 Somerset St., Wethers- 
field, Conn. 

Vice-Pres. Arnold J. Grant, '15, 45 Hart Terrace, New Britain, 

Conn. 

Secretary Mrs. Florence Kelley Eriksson, '20, 16 Huntington 

St., Hartford, Conn. 

Treasurer Paul M. Andrews, '26, 48 Barnard St., Hartford, 

Conn. 

Eastern New York Branch. Formed April 16, 1921. 

President H. E. Murphy, '28, 204 Pleasant View Ave., Scotia, 

N. Y. 

Vice-Pres. R. E. Cox, '24, 1495 Country Club Drive, Schenec- 
tady, N. Y. 

Sec.-Treas. B. C. Files, '20, 203 Catherine St., Scotia, N. Y. 



Connecticut Valley Branch. Formed Jan. 21, 1921. 

President W. Raymond Whitehouse, '32, 58 Pearl St., Holy- 

oke, Mass. 

Vice-Pres. Weyman E. Maxwell, '23, 272 Middlesex St., Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Sec.-Treas. James M. Prentice, 'ZZ, 50 Lawler St., Holyoke, Mass. 

341 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Concord Branch. Formed 1921. 

President John W. Zorn, x'34, 13 Fremont St., Concord, N. H. 
Secretary Katherine J. Crowley, '34, 55 Pleasant St., Concord, 

N. H. 
Treasurer Katherine Mclnnis, '33, 2 Walker St., Concord, N. H. 

Cheshire County Branch at Keene. Formed June 13, 1923. 

President Leonard S. Morrison, '10, 30 Marlboro St., Keene, 

N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Dane P. Cummings, '29, Windy Row, Peterborough, 

N. H. 
Secretary Edward J. Hanna, Jr., '33, Main St., West Swanzey, 

N. H. 
Treasurer Eleanor W. Harris, '29, 61 Park Ave., Keene, N. H. 

Durham Branch. Formed Nov. 6, 1923. 

President Richard W. Daland, '28, Main St., Durham, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Ruth Prescott Starke, '23, Madbury Rd., Dur- 
ham, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Heman C. Fogg, '18, Bagdad Road, Durham, N. H. 

Manchester, N. H., Branch. Formed Dec. 12, 1923. 

President H. Thornwell Dickson, '33, 45 Kidder St., Manches- 
ter, N. H. 

Vice-Pres. Vasilios A. Vasiliou, '31, 416 Cedar St., Manchester, 

N. H. 

Sec.-Treas. Mrs. May Eckford Geremonty, '28, 448 Ray St., 

Manchester, N. H. 

Providence Branch. Formed Dec. 9, 1924. 

President Alva C. Niebels, x'31, Main St., Washington, R. I. 

Vice-Pres. Marion A. Hough, '33, 47 Peck Ave., Riverside, R, I. 

Sec.-Treas. A. Herbert Chamberlain, '22, 23 Catlin Ave., Rum- 
ford, R. I. 

Cor. Sec. Alice Gaffield Niebels, '30, Main St., Washington. 

R. I. 

342 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Worcester Branch. Formed May 4, 1925. 

President Donald D. McPherson, x'26, 5 Northampton St., 

Worcester, Mass. 

Vice-Pres. Mrs. Gladys Brown Dexter, '17, 6 Blair St., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

Treasurer Albert R. Neal, '29, 71 Mower St., Worcester, Mass. 

Nashua Branch. Reorganized Jan. 16, 1927. 
President Fred W. Hall, '18, Central St., Hudson, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Ruth A. Milan, '28, 126 Kinsley St., Nashua, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Donald C. Calderwood, '27, 1 Zellwood Ave., Nashua, 

N. H. 

Portland Branch. 
President A. Erlon Mosher, '14, Gorham, Maine. 
Vice-Pres. Robert A. Wilson, '23, 4 Qiff St., Portland, Maine. 
Sec.-Treas. Mrs, Dorothy Block Tobey, '29, East Bridge St., 

Portland, Maine. 

Ohio Branch 
President Alfred L. Richmond, '13, 386 Wildwood Ave., Akron, 

Ohio. 

White Mountain Branch 
President Richard Eustis. '32. Bunker Hill St., Lancaster, N. H. 
Secretary Natalie Stevens, *34, North Stratford, N. H. 

Southern California Branch 

President Russell C. Foster, '20, 115 Meridian Ave., Alhambra, 

Calif. 

Vice-Pres. Eldred L. Sanborn, '16, 1649 N. Normandie Ave., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Sec.-Treas. Mrs. Russell C Foster, 115 Meridian Ave., Alham- 
bra, Calif. 

New Hampshire Agricultural Alumni Association 
President Harold L. Eastman, '16, 116 Clinton St., Concord, 

N. H. 

343 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Vice-Pres. Eloi A. Adams, '18, Madbury, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Francis E. Robinson, '31, 3 No. State St., Concord, 

N. H. 

New Jersey Branch. Formed Dec. 11, 1934. 
President Harry H. Spencer, '23, 6 Prospect Place, Springfield, 
Vice-Pres. N. J. 

& Secretary Rollins Wentworth, '18, 21 Maple Terrace, Verona, 

N. J. 
Treasurer Ralph L. Kimball, x'26, 671 Lincoln Ave., Orange, 

N. J. 

Rochester Branch. Formed March 11, 1936. 
President Maurice J. O'Leary, '28, Box 211, Rochester, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Cecil A. Morrison, '20, 15 Summer St., Rochester, 

N. H. 
Secretary Sara E. Greenfield, '19, 32 Portland St., Rochester, 

N. H. 
Treasurer Eugene C. Maxam, '26, High School, Rochester, 

N. H. 

Boston Alumnae Branch. Formed March 28, 1936. 

President Ruth G. Finn, '26, 90 William St., Stoneham, Mass. 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Margaret DeMeritt Croghan, '11, 574 Chestnut 

St., Waban, Mass. 
Sec.-Treas. Mrs. Margaret Osgood Daniels, '24. 20 Worthington 

St., Dedham, Mass. 

Fall Mountain Branch. Formed June 4, 1936. 

President Mrs. Louise Sprague Danforth, '29. Acworth, N. H. 
Vice-Pres. Mrs. Beatrice Gray Jennison, '29, Walpole, N. H. 
Sec.-Treas. Daniel M. Metcalf, '25, High School, Alstead, N. H. 

Western Massachusetts Branch. Formed December 3, 1936. 
President Edward J. Norman, '16, Dalton, Mass. 
Vice-Pres. Paul A. Morse, '25, Park Building, Lee, Mass. 
Sec.-Treas. Mfs. Helen Healey O'Leary, '25, 29 Pine St., Pitts- 
field, Mass. 

344 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Accounting 148 

Activities, Student 50 

Administration, Officers of 10 

Admission, Requirements for 

College, four-year curricula 56 

Special Courses 65 

Graduate School 66 

Two-year curriculum 251 

From other colleges 65 

Advanced Degrees 66 

Advanced Standing 65 

Aeronautics 207 

Agricultural Chemistry 76, 85, 117 

Agricultural College 74 

Agricultural Economics 119 

Agricultural Education 152 

Agricultural Engineering 26, 120 

Agriculture 

Four-year curricula 56 

Two-year curriculum 251 

Agronomy 120 

Aid, Student 38 

Alumni Associations 340 

Animal Husbandry 27, 11, 86, 124 

Architecture 27, 107, 110, 126 

Art, Survey of 164 

Astronomy 200 

Athletics 55, 227 

Bacteriology 28, 78, 87 

Board 37 

Books 36 

Botany 28, 78, 87 

Buildings 22 

Bureau of Appointments 38 

Business, General 95, 102 

Calendar 7 

Campus Map 5 

345 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PAGE 

Checking Accounts Z7 

Chemistry 28, 107, 112, 133 

Civil Engineering 28, 108, 113, 137 

Coast Artillery 212, 215 

Colleges of 

Agriculture 74 

Liberal Arts 94 

Technology 107 

Contemporary Civilization 177 

Courses, Description of 117 

Curricula 

Four-year 74 

Two-year 251 

Dairy Husbandry 28, 78, 88, 142 

Degrees 

Advanced 67 

Conferred in 1936 262 

Requirements for 70 

Undergraduate 70 

Professional 68 

Dining Hall 2>'7 

Dormitories 24, 36 

Drawing 

Free-hand 130 

Mechanical 203 

Durham 22 

Economics 145 

Education 151 

Electrical Engineering 29, 108, 114. 157 

Employment ■37 

Engineering, Professional Degrees 68 

English 160 

Enrollment 278 

Entomology 78, 89, 168 

P^quipment 26 

Expenses ^5 

346 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Experiment Station, Agriculture 260 

Engineering 109 

Staff 16 

Extension Courses 116 

Extension Service 261 

Staff 18 

Extra-curricular activities 50 

Facilities for Instruction 22 

Faculty, University 11 

Farm 29 

Forestry 29. 80. 90, 170 

Forge Shop; see Shops and Mechanical Engineering 

Fraternities 54 

French 192 

Freshman Week 58 

Geology 30, 173 

German 194 

Graduate School 66 

Graduating Class, 1936 262 

Greek 196 

Health Service ; see Hood House 

Historical Sketch 20 

History 177 

Home Economics 30, 95, 100, 182 

Honor Societies 52 

Honors ; see Prizes 

Hood House 25, 37 

Horticulture 81, 91, 187 

Infantry 211, 214 

Infirmary ; see Hood House 

Languages ; see specific languages, as French 

Latin 196 

Lewis Fields 25, 228 

Liberal Arts, General Curriculum 94, 98 

Library, Collections 30 

Staff 11 

Loan Fund 44 

347 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

PAGE 

Location 22 

Machine Shop ; see Shops 

Mathematics 199 

Master's Degree 67 

Map of Campus 5 

Mechanical Engineering 31, 108, 115, 203 

Meteorology 211 

Methods of Admission 56 

Military Science and Tactics 32, 211 

Music 216 

Organizations, Student 50 

Philosophy 222 

Physical Education 

Men 227 

Women 229 

Physics ^2>, 233 

Political Science 235 

Poultry Husbandry 33, 81, 92, 237 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 96, 103 

Prizes 45 

Awarded in 1936 275 

Psychology 224 

Publications, Student 53 

Religious Activities 51 

R. O. T. C 32, 211 

Residential Halls 24, 36 

Rooms 36 

Room Rents 36 

Scholarships 38 

Secretarial Studies - 149 

Self-support ^^ 

Shops 

Building 23 

Courses 208 

Equipment 32 

Shorthand 149 

Smith-Hughes Work 82, 152, 155 

348 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Social Service 96, 105, 240 

Sociology 240 

Sororities 55 

Spanish 198 

Special Students 64, 323 

Staff 

Agricultural Experiment Station 16 

Extension Service 18 

Library U 

Statistics, Courses in ; see Mathematics 

Registration 278, 337 

Stenography 149 

Students 

Activities 50 

List of 278 

Government 50 

Special 64 

Two-Year 324 

Summer School 116, 326 

Supervised Teaching 154 

Teacher Training 93, 104, 152, 154 

Theses 67, 68 

Trustees 9 

Tuition 35 

Typev^rriting 149 

University Aid 38 

Veterinary Science ; see Annual Husbandry 
Wood Shop ; see Shops 

Y. M. C. A 50 

Y. W. C. A 50 

Zoology 34, 246 



349