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Full text of "University record"

UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARIES 




University S^rcfiivts 

George A. Smathers Libraries 
University of Florida 



Vol. XXXIX, Series 1 

THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Contents 
No. Title 

1. Schedule of Courses, Second Semester 19li3-Ui 

2. Preliminary Announcement, 19hh Summer Session 

3» Bulletin of Emergency Summer Term for In-Service 

Teachers April 2k - June 3> 19hh 
li. Bulletin of the University Summer Session, 19hh 
5. Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial 

Education, 19hh 
7. Scholarships, Loan Funds, Student Employment and 

Awards 

7. Extra No. 1 - Calendar 19hh-h^ 

8. University of Florida Pictorial Review (Bound 
separately) 

9« Schedule of Courses, First Semester 19UU-U5 

9. Extra No. 1 - Financial Report of the University of 
Florida, June, 19Ui| 

10. University Directory, 19lili-ii5 

Part I - Students 

11. Educational Opportunities for Veterans (Bound 
separately) 

11. Extra No. 1 - University Directory, 19UU-h^ 

Part II - Faculty and Employees 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 



Schedule of Courses 

Second Semester 

1943-44 




Vol. XXXIX, Series 1, No. 1 January 1, 1944 



Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
SCHEDULE OP COURSES 

Second Semester 1943-44 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Under the heading Dept . will be found the department name 
abbreviations adopted for official records. 

The following abbreviations have teen used to designate 
buildings : 



AG - Agriculture Building 

AU - University Auditorium 

BA - Benton Annex 

BN - Benton Hall 

BU - Buckman Hall 

OH - Chemistry Building 

DL - Dairy Laboratory 

EG - Engineering Building 

KX - Experiment Station 

EL - Hydraulic Laboratory 



HT - Horticulture Building 

LA - Language Hall 

LW Law Building 

PE - Peabody Hall 

PO - Poultry Laboratory 

PH - Photo Laboratory 

RA - Radio Station 

SC - Science Hall 

SE - Seagle Building 

YN - Yonge Building 



COMPR EHENSl VE CO URSES 



C-1 



DEPT. 



COL'RSE SEC. <'RED. BAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUlTOii 



"~1 



COURSE TITLE 



11 



10 



MTWP 



SC 



215 



Patrick 



Man Social World 



Student wi 



1 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



22 
22 
22 



1 re, 
1 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Ist^r for 
MW 

TTh 
TTh 
TTh 
TTh 
TTh 
WF 



bhe lecture sec 
11 



11 

1 
2 
10 



MWF 
TThS 



3 MWF 



tlon 
CH 
PE 
LA 
LA 
PE 
PE 
LA 



C-2 



and 
AUD 
4 
212 
10 
112 
112 
212 



one discussion 
Staff 
Thomason 
Joubert 
Eutsler 
Maclachlan 
Carleton 
Lalrd 



Gaddum 
Gaddum 



112 Gaddum 



section; 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 



World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 



Man Physical World 
Man Physical World 
Man Physical World 



C-3 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDC. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



Studetit wl 
31 



i:.i 





c 

Stude 



31 



10 
109 



roglat 
4 



«r 



for 
MVTF 
W 



;he discussion 
9 
1-3 



sec 
LA 
LA 



tl 



on 

209 

209 



and 



laboratory 
Wise 
Wise 



section! 

Readng Spekng Wrltng 
Readng Spekng Wrltng 



nt wl^l register for 
til 



laboratory 



roi 
sei 



OKh 



3 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 

32 

32 

32 

32 



33 



1 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
17 
101 
102 

103 

104 

106 

108 



P 

ia 
uv 
uv 

TTh 

MW 

TTh 

TTh 

M 

M 

T 

T 

W 

Th 



the lecture sec 

11 

8 

9 

10 

8 

1 

10 

11 

1-3 

3-5 

10-12 

3-5 

3-E 

3-5 



tlon, one 



discussion section, and one 



1IWP» 



10 



• Laboratoiy pel lod 



to arrange 



ADD 
10 
311 
311 
311 
311 
311 
311 
209 
209 

209 

209 

209 

209 



Staff 

Mounts 

Congleton 

Hopkins 

Walker 

MacLeod 

Morris 

Cons tans 

Morris, Tew 

MacLeod 
Murphree,A A 

Congleton 
Clark 

MacLeod 
Morris 

Haines 
Parr Is 

MacLeod, Tew 



LA 



209 



Congleton 



Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 
Readng 



Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Spekng 
Si>ekng 



Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 



Readng Spekng Wrltng 
Readng Spekng Wrltng 
Readng Spekng Wrltng 
Readng Spekng Wrltng 



Effective Writing 



C-41 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


C 


41 


1 


3 


MffP 


9 




CH 


112 


Wilson, W H 


Man and His Thinking 


a 


41 


2 


3 


MWF 


10 




PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Man and His Thinking 














C-42 








c 


42 


1 


3 


MWF 


10 




PE 


4 


Kokomoor 


Fundamental Math 


c 


42 


2 


3 


TThS 


10 




PE 


4 


Mclnnls 


Fundamental Math 














C-421 








c 


421 




3 


MWF 


2 




SC 


215 


Blake 


Trigonometry 














C-5 








Stude 


nt wl 


LI re< 


rlst 


sr for 


the lecture sec 


tior 


, one 


discussion 3€ 


ction, and one 


inu£ 


Ic ho 


ir: 


















C 


5 


1 




TTh 


8 




CE 


AUD 


Staff 


The Humanities 


C 


52 


10 


4 


TTh 


1 




BU 


101 


Glunt 


The Humanities 





52 


11 


4 


TTh 


10 




LA 


212 


Murphree,C L 


The Humanit ies 


C 


52 


12 


4 


TTh 


11 




LA 


212 


Conner 


The Humanities 


C 


52 


13 


4 


WF 


11 




LA 


212 


Hanna 


The Humanities 


c 


52 


101 




T 


3 




AU 






Music Hour 


c 


52 


102 




S 


11 




AU 






Music Hour 














C-6 








c 


62 


1 


3 


MWF 


8 




SC 


101 


Rogers, J S 


Man Biological World 


c 


62 


2 


3 


TThS 


10 




SC 


101 


Byers 


Man Biological World 


c 


62 


3 


3 ■ 


TThS 


9 




SC 


101 


Hobbs 


Man Biological World 



DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY ACY 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


ACY 


126 




4 


MWP 
Th 


8 
3-5 


CH 
CH 


AUD 
AUD 


Frahm 


Agrlculttiral Chemlstrj 


ACY 


204 




3 


T 
MT 


9 
1-4 


AG 
AG 


208 
101-] 


Prahm 


Analytical Chemistry 


ACY 


432 




4 


TTh 
WP 


8 
1-4 


AG 
AG 


208 
101-1 


Frahm 


Agricultural Analysis 


ACY 


570 




« 


To 


arrange 








Research Agric Chem 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS - AS 



306 

308 

408 
410 

413 

420 

502 
506 



* Variible credit 



TTh 



MWF 



TTh 
F 



TTh 



To 



3-5 



8 
3-5 



11 



10 
1-3 



10 
1-3 



3-5 
arrange 



AG 



AG 



302 
302 



302 
302 



302 



302 
302 



302 
302 



209 
20 9 



209 



Reitz 

Reitz 

Reitz 
Reitz 

Reitz 

Shealy, Noble 

Noble 
Noble, Reitz 



Farm Management 

Marke t ing 

Marketng Fruits & Veg 
Agricultrl Statistics 

Agricultural Policy 

Marketng of Livestock 

Ag Economics Seminar 
Research Farm Mangmt 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING - AG 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDC. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


AG 


302 




3 


TTh 
H 


9 
3-5 


AG 
LAI 


102 


Rogers, F 
Rogers, F 


Farm Motors 


AG 


306 




3 


WF 
W 


8 
1-3 


AG 

LAI 


102 


Rogers, F 
Rogers, F 


Farm Machinery 


AG 


404 




2 


To 


arrange 


AG 


106 


Rogers, F 


Ag Engrng Investgtns 


AG 


408 




3 


MW 


11 


AG 


208 


Thornton and 


Soil Conservation 








M 


1-3 


AG 


208 


Rogers, F 




AG 


501 




2 


To 


arrange 


AG 


106 


Rogers , F 


Ag Engrng Seminar 


AG 


570 




■» 


To 


arrange 


AG 


106 


Rogers , P 


Ag Engrng Research 










1 

AGRONOMY - 


AY 




AY 


324 


1 


3 


TTh 


10 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Forage & Cover Crops 










S 


8-10 


AG 


302 


Senn 




AY 


324 


2 


3 


TTh 


11 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Forage & Cover Crops 










S 


10-12 


AG 


302 


Senn 




AY 


400 




3 


u 


8 


AG 


102 


Senn 


Ag Extension Methods 










s 


10-12 


AG 


302 


Senn 




AY 


422 




3 


MV7F 


9 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Plant Breeding 


AY 


426 




# 


To 


arrange 


AG 


303 


Senn 


Prob Crop Production 


AY 


492 




1 


F 


8 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Crops Seminar 


AY 


570 




*« 


To 


arrange 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Research in Agronomy 


« 3 to 


6 cr« 


dlts 
















# 1 to 


3 ere 


dits 
















** Var 


Lable 


credl 


t 















ANIMAL PRODUCTION - AL 



COURSE SEC 



211 

312 

314 

322 
411 
414 
416 
418 
420 

421 

424 

501 

503 
505 
508 
509 
511 

513 

554 



llA 



llA 



■JHH 



##2 



» 2 to 5 credits 



# 1 to 
«♦ For 
## For 



CRED. 



4 creldlts 
one year c 
two ytear c 



DAYS 



UW 

u 

MWF 
H 

T 

m 

TTh 

m 

MW 

TTh 

MW 

TTh 
11 



HOURS 



11 

1-3 



11 
1-3 



9 

3-5 



11 
10 



10 
1-3 



arrange 
arrange 

arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 

arrange 

arrange 



BLDC. 



104 
104 

102 
102 

104 
104 

102 

308 

104 

102 

102 

209 
209 

104 



INSTRUCTOR 



Glasscock 
Glasscock 

Becker, Moore 
Becker, Mo ore 

Pace 
Pace 

Willoughby 

Glasscock 

Willoughby 

Willoughby 

Willoughby 

Shealy and 
Noble 

Shealy and 
Staff 

Willoughby 

Glasscock 
and Shealy 

Becker 

Willoughby 

Becker 

Marshall 

Glasscock 
and Shealy 

Glasscock 
and Shealy 

Marshall 



ARCHITECTURE AE 



MTWP 
Th 



MWP 



3inpl 
am 



3le 



rtion 
tion 



1-5 
1-3 



1-4 



PE 



302 
302 



302 



Weaver 



Weaver 



COURSE TITLE 



Prin Animal Husbandrj 

Feeds and Feeding 

Livestock Judging 

Animal Breeding 
Bee f Produc t Ion 
Sheep Production 
World Meats 
Breed History 
Marketng of Livestock 

Seminar 

Animal Production 
Adv Animal Produc tn 

Animal Nutrition 
Livestock Records 
Meths Animal Research 
Prob Animal Nutrition 
Prob Swine Produc tn 

Prob Beef Production 

Vitamins 



Fu.n6. of Architecture 



Fund of Architecture 



ARCHITECTURE - AE CONTINUED 



COURSE 



SEC. 



CRED. 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. 



ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



21A 
21B 
31A 

3 IB 
41A 

4 IB 
41C 
51A 
52A 

5 IB 

52B 
52D 
61A 

62A 
613 
VIA 



5 
5 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

3 

3 

3 

2 
2 
4 

3 

4 
16 
PROjtCT 



MTWPS 

MTWFS 

TTh 

TTh 

TTh 
4 hrs 

TTh 
4 hrs 

TTh 

4 hrs 

MWF 
3 hrs 

MWF 
3 hrs 

MWF 

3 hra 

MWF 

TTh 

MWF 
Th 
3 hrs 

MWF 

MWF 



8-11 

8-11 

2-5 

2-5 

1 

To arrange 

1 

To arrange 

1 

To arrange 

3--5 

To arrange 

1-3 

To arrange 

3-5 

Tc arrange 

3-5 

2-5 

1-3 
8-11 

To arrange 

8-11 
1-3 



48 hraj To arrange 
JUDGMEliTS: 



9-12 

PROjicT LaboraiIory (book room 



Dally 
Dally 



8-12 
1-5 



302 
201 
302 
201 
302 

201 

201 

302 

302 

201 

302 

302 

302 
302 

302 
201 
201 

300 



306 
306 



CONSfLTAtriONS CN BOOKS AND RESEARCH IN 
TTh 1-5 PE 306 

WF 1-5 PE 306 

MTWThlS 8-12 PE 306 

M 1-5 PE 306 



Weaver 
Weaver 
Holbrook 
Holbrook 
Harint- ford 

Hannaford 

Weaver 

Hannaford 

Hannaford 

Fulton 

Pulton 
Pulton 
Hannaford 

Hannaford 
Hannaford 
Weaver, Staff 

Staff 



Staff 
Staff 

BOOK ROOM AS 
Hannaford 
Weaver 
Holbrook 
Fulton 



ASTRONOMY - ATY 



301 
305 



MWF 
MWF 



Mead, L V 
Phlpps 



Architectural Desig-i 
Architectural Deslyi 
Frhnd Drwg Wtr Color 
Frhnd Drwg Wtr Color 
Archltectiiral History 

Architectural History 

Decorative Arts 

Mtls Meths Constr 

Mtls Meths Constr 

Mchncl Equip Bldgs 

Mchncl Equip Bldgs 
Wkng Drwgs Bldg Costs 
Strctrl Dsgn Bldgs 

Strctrl Dsgn Bldgs 
Strctrl Dsgn Bldgs 
Thesis 



FOLLOWS: 



Air Navigation 
Marine Navigation 



10 



BACTERIOLOGY BCY 



DEPT. 



COl'RSE 



SEC. 



CRED. 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDC. 



ROOM 



INSTRUfTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



BCY 



BCi- 



301 



304 



BCY 


*306 


BCY 


402 


BCY 


«412 


BCY 


500 


BCY 


570 



BE 



BLY 


102 


ELY 


209 


BLY 


310 


BLY 


416 



BTY 
BTY 
BTY 
BTY 



306 



304 
308 
401 
432 
500 



BTY 

BTY i 555 

BTY ! 570 



» One br the 
# Varliible 



TTh 
WP 



MW 
WF 



WP 
TTh 



9 
1-3 

11 
3-5 

arrange 

10 
1-3 

arrange 

arrange 

arrange 



111 
104 



111 
104 



104 
104 



Carroll 
Cgirroll 

Carroll 
Carroll 

Carroll 

Carroll 
Carroll 

Carroll 

Carroll 

Carroll 



BIBLE - BE 



TTh 



10 



BU 201 



BIOLOGY - BLY 



TTh 
MW 



TTh 
MW 



To 



othdr m^y be o 
•edit 



11 
1-3 



10 
1-5 



10 
1-3 



arrange 



101 
10 



111 
107 



111 

107 



BOTANY - BTY 



MW 

TTh 



TTh 
MP 



TTh 
S 



WP 
TTh 



11 

1-3 



9-12 

10 
3-5 

arrange 

arrange 

arrange 



ffered, dependl 



111 



Byers 
Sherman 
Sherman 
Byers 

Cody 

Cody 

Cody 

Cody 

Cody 
Cody 
Cody 

le oln thel demand . 



Gen Bacteriology 

Pathogenic Bactrlgy j 

Bacteriology of Foods 
Dairy Bacteriology 

Indstrl Bacteriology 
Adv Bacteriology 
Research Bacteriology 



How Understand Bible 

Gen Animal Biology 
Comp Vertbrt Anatomy 
Mammln Anatmy Phslgy 
Animal Parasitology 



General Botany 
General Botany Lab 

Taxonomy 
Tajconomy Lab 

Plant Ecology 
Plant Ecology Lab 

Plant Anatomy 
Plant Anatomy Lab 

Advanced Botany 

Botany Seminar 

Re.?earch in Botany 



BUSINESS EDUCATION - BEN 



11 



COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRl'CTO'a 



COURSE TITLE 



81 
91 
94 



MTWTh 
Tc 
Tc 



arrange 
arrange 



306 
306 
306 



Moorman 
Moorman 
Moorman 



Intro Typewriting 
Intro Shorthand 
Stenography 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - CG 



346 




3 


444 




2 


448 




3 


449 




3 


458 




2 


468 




3 


512 




3 


101 




4 


102 


1 
11 
12 


4 


112 




1 


202 




4 


204 




3 


212 




2 


302 


1 
11 
12 


4 


312 




1 


401 


1 
11 
12 


4 


403 




3 


412 




3 


462 




3 


482 




.5 



TThS 

MT 

MWP 

TThS 

W 

TThS 



Tc 



10 
1-4 
10 
10 
2-6 
9 
arrange 



BN 


108 


BN 


108 


EG 


212 


EG 


212 


BN 


108 


BN 


108 



Chi Ids 

Beialer 

Houston 

Houston 

Morgen 

Morgen 

Belsler 



CHEMISTRY - CY 



MWP 
Th 

MWP 

Th 

P 



m 

m 



T 
MTh 



MWP 

T 

Th 

Th 

MWP 
W 

Th 



Tc 



TTh 
Lab Tc 



1 
1-4 

10 

1-4 

2-5 

2-5 



1-4 



9 
1-4 



Tc| arrange 

9 

1-4 

1-4 

1-4 

8 

1-4 

1-4 



arrange 

11 

arrange 

arrange 
arrange 



CH 



212 
130 

ADD 
130 
130 

130 

110 
114 

110 
114 

114 

212 
230 
230 

230 

110 
204 
204 



110 



Jackson 
Jackson 

Jackson 
Jackson 
Jackson 

Jackson 

Black 
Black 

Heath 
Heath 

Black 

Leigh 
Leigh 
Leigh 

Leigh 

Hawkins 
Hawkins 
Hawkins 

Black 



Heath 
Pollard 



Indstrl Stoichiometry 
Chem Engineering Lab 
Prins Chem Engrng 
Unit Processes 
Chem Eng Plant Design 
Chem Eng Thermodynmcs 
Adv Chem Engineering 



General Chemistry 
General Chemistry 

General Chemistry 
Analytic Chemistry 

Analytic Chemistry 

Analytic Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 
Physical Chemistry 

Water Analysis 
Advanced Chemistry 

Photographic Chem 
Chemical Literature 



j-i; 




CHEMISTRY - CY 


CONTINUED 


DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


CY 


518 




3 


Th 
Lab To 


9 
arrange 


CH 


110 


Pollard 


Adv Organic Chem 


CY 


522 




3 


To 


arrange 






Hawkins 


Adv Physical Chem 


CY 


538 




3 


To 


arrange 






Pollard 


Quantatv Org Chem 


CY 


570 




« 


To 


arrange 






Heath 


Rsrch Inorgc Chem 


CY 


571 




« 


To 


arrange 






Black 


Rsrch Analyt Chem 


CY 


572 




« 


To 


arrange 






Leigh and 
Pollard 


Rsrch Organic Chem 


CY 


573 




« 


To 


arrange 






Hawkins 


Rsrch Physical Chem 


CY 


574 




« 


To 


arrange 






Leigh and 
Hawkins 


Rsrch Naval Stores 


CY 


575 


CI 


« 

V! 


To 

L Er 


arrange 

VJGINEEF 


!IN 


G - 


Black 

CL 


Rsrch Sanitary Chem 


CL 


223 




3 


TTh 
T 


10 
2-5 


HL 
HL 


206 
205 


Reed 
Nye 


Elermtry Surveying 


CL 


226 




3 


MWF 


1 


HL 


303 


Telfair 


Higher Stirveylng 


CL 


326 




4 


TTh 
Six ho 


1 
irs of laborato 


HL 

?7 t 


303 
arr 


Keith 
ange 


Theory of Stmictures 


CL 


327 




4 


MWF 
W 


10 
3-6 


HL 
HL 


302 
101 


Re id 
Staff 


Hydraulics 


CL 


332 




4 


TTh 
S 


9 
9-12 


HL 
HL 


206 
205 


Reed 
Nye 


Highway Engineering 


CL 


423 




3 


To 


arrange 






Staff 


Materials Lab 


CL 


425 




3 


To 


arrange 






Re id 


Water and Sewerage 


CL 


426 




3 


To 


arrange 






Held 


Water and Sewerage 


CL 


434 




3 


To 


arrange 






Keith 


Reinforced Concrete 


CL 


435 




3 


To 


arrange 






Keith 


Structural Engrng 


CL 


436 




3 


To 


arrange 






Keith 


Structural Engrng 


CL 


442 




3 


To 


arrange 






Re id 


Pubic Health Engrng 


• 2 to 


6 ere 


dlts 

















DAIRYING DY 



13 



COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDC. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



318 
412 

416 

418 
420 
520 
521 
523 



TTh 
M 



TTh 

m 



4-6 



11 
S-5 



11 
1-4 



# 
3 



arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
Toj arrange 
To arrange 



101 



104 
102 



101 



Pouts 
Arnold 

Pouts 

Pouts 
Fouts 
Pouts 
Pouts 
Becker 



Judging Dairy Prods 
Milk Production 

Dairy Technology 

/■pprovsd Dairy Pract 
Probs Dairy Technlgy 
Adv Dairy Technology 
Probs Mlk & Mlk Prods 
Probs Dairy Prodctn 



ECONOMICS ^ ES 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BS 



CES 


13 


. 


5 


MWP 


10 






11 




TTh 


10 


CBS 


142 




3 


MWP 


11 


CES 


15 


1 


4 


TThS 


10 






11 




U 


3- 


BS 


312 




3 


mvp 


9 


BS 


313 




3 


MWP 


10 


ES 


321 




3 


MWF 


10 


ES 


322 




3 


TThS 


8 


ES 


327 




3 


MWP 


8 


ES 


335 




3 


MWP 


11 


ES 


351 




3 


TThS 


9 


ES 


352 




3 


MWP 


9 


BS 


361 




3 


TThS 


11 


BS 


402 




3 


TThS 


10 


BS 


403 




3, 


TThS 


11 


ES 


408 




3 


MWP 


11 


BS 


414 




3 


TThS 


9 


BS 


417 




3 


TThS 


10 


* 1 to 


3 cr< 


(dits 








# 1 to 


4 erf 


idits 









PE 


205 


LA 


306 


LW 


105 


LA 


10 


LA 


10 


LW 


105 


LW 


105 


PS 


209 


PS 


209 


PE 


209 


LA 


306 


PE 


209 


PE 


209 


LA 


214 


PE 


209 


LW 


105 


PE 


112 


LW 


105 


LW 


105 

1 



Eldridge 
Dietz 


Econ Poun Modrn Life 


P ights 


Elem Accounting 


Anderson 


Elem Statistics 


Beight"? 


Accounting Prins 


Belgnts 


Cost Accounting 


Dolbeare 


Pncl Organ Society 


Dolbeare 


Pncl Organ Society 


Bfgham 


Public Finance 


Chace 


Econs of Marketing 


Bigham 


Elems Transport atn 


Bigham 


Probs Transportatn 


Chace 


Property Insurance 


Day 


Business Law 


Slagle 


Law of Business Unit 


Eldridge 


Econ Prins & Probs 


Beights 


Fed Income Tax 


Beights 


Governmnl Accountng 



ECONOMICS ES 
^' BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - BS CONTINUED 



DEFT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDC. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


BS 


»422 




? 


TThS 


11 


LA 


306 


Dletz 


Prlns Inveatmenta 


BS 


»427 




3 


TThS 


11 


LA 


306 


Dletz 


Prlns Corp Plnance 


BS 


428 




3 


TThS 


9 


LA 


306 


Dletz 


Probs Corp Finance 


BS 


463 




3 


MWP 


2 


LA 


306 


Eutsler 


Social Security 


ES 


468 




3 


MWP 


11 


LA 


204 


Dlettrlch 


Econ Hist in Making 


ES 


470 




3 


TThS 


9 


LA 


10 


Anderson 


Businesa Forecasting 


ES 


506 




3 


llffP 


2 


PE 


111 


Eldrldge 


Devlpmt Econ Thot 










EDUCATION - EN 




EN 


303 




3 


MWP 


9 


YN 


132 


Oarrla 


Metha Voc Agric 


EN 


386 




3 


Th 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


218 


Crago 


Educ Psychology 


EN 


398 




3 


T 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


118^ 


Williams, W 


Sec Schl Ctirric Inatr 


EN 


408 




3 


MWP 


11 


YN 


122 


Simmons 


High Schl Adminiatr 


EN 


410 




3 


To 


arrange 


YN 


136 


Garria 


Sup Tea in Voc Agric 


EN 


412 




2 


TTh 


10 


YN 


132 


Garrls 


Spec Meths Voc Agric 


EN 


421 




3 


To 


arrange# 


YN 




Mead, A R 


Student Teaching 


EN 


422 




3 


To 


arrang6# 


YN 




Mead, A R 


Student Teaching 


EN 


502 




3 


M 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


140 


Barry 


Elem School Curric 


EN 


509 




3 


F 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


132 


Slnsnons 


Poun of Schl Admin 


EN 


520 




3 


T 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


317 


Wllllama, W 


High Schl Curric 


EN 


566 




3 


S 


9-11:30 


YN 


150 


jarrls 


Probs Agric Educ 


* The 


coursi 


) hav' 


ng ■ 


he gre 


ater enrollment 


wl] 


1 be 


offered. 




# Claa 


sea li 


1 EN ^ 


21 ( 


md EN 


422 will meet t 


tie f 


Irst 


Wedneaday of t 


he aemeater in 


YN 1 


34, a- 


. 4 P 


M. 










■ 





ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ~ EL 



15 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDC. 


ROOK 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


EL 


342 




3 


MffP 


9 


EG 


213 


Smith, E P 


Elems Elect Engrng 


EL 


344 




3 


MWF 


8 


EG 


213 


Smith, E P 


Probs Dlr & Alt Curr 


EL 


346 




4 


MWF 
W 


1 
2-5 


EG 
SE 


213 
11th 
floor 


Smith, S P 


Elect CoEiEunlcatlons 


EL 


350 


1 


1 


T 


1-4 


BN 


106 


Smith, E P 


Dynamo Laboratory 


EL 


350 


2 


1 


T 


3-6 


BN 


106 


Smith, E P 


Dynamo Laboratory 


EL 


442 




1 


T 


11 


EG 


213 


Craig 


Elect Eng Seminar 


EL 


454 




1 


F 


6-9 P M 


RA 




Craig 


Radio Statn Operatn 


EL 


466 




5 


MWF 
Th 

E^ 


9 
1-6 

4GLISH - 


EG 
SE 

El 


212 
11th 
floor 


Tedder 


Radio Engineering 


CEH 


36 




3 


MWF 


8 


LA 


314 ■ 


Parr Is 


Literary Mastrs Amer 


cm 


38 




3 


MWF 


11 


LA 


314 


Robertson 


Literary Mastrs Sng 


CEH 


314 




3 


MWF 


2 


LA 


314 


Murphree,A A 


Mastrpcs World Lit 


EH 


302 




3 


TThS 


10 


LA 


314 


Robertson 


Shakespeare 


EH 


355 




3 


MWP 


1 


LA 


314 


Clark 


Business Writlrg 


EH 


363 




3 


TThS 


9 


LA 


314 


Mounts 


Contemp Lit . Drama 


EH 


402 




3 


MWF 


9 


LA 


314 


Conner 


American Literature 


EH 


444 




3 


To 


arrange 






Morris 


Eng Romantic Period 


EH • 


529 




1 


To 


arrange 






Haines 


eradicate Seminar- 


EH 


530 




* 


To 


arrange 






Staff 


Individual Work 


EH 


544 




3 


To 


arrange 






Morris 


Eng Romantic Period 


* Varla 


ble c; 


•edit 

















ENTOMOLOGY - EY 



COURSE 



SEC. CRED. 



DAYS 



HOIRS 



BLDG. 



ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



201 
304 

408 
450 

501 
504 



220 
309 

310 

313 

318 
320 

410 
412 
416 

420 
431 



♦ 2 to 



5 credits 



MWP 



TThS 
MP 



TThS 
To 



To 



To 



10 



9 

3-5 



10 
arrange 



arrange 
arrange 



308 



308 
308 



308 
308 



306 

306 



FORESTRY - FY 



MW 



TTh 
S 



MW 
T 



TTh 



To 



MWP 



Th 
WP 



MW 

P 



MW 

M 



TThS 
To 



10 

8 
8-12 

8 
1-5 

10 

arrange 



11 

1-5 



10 



11 
1-5 



arrange 



HT 



HT 



HT 



409 



407 
407 



410 
410 



410 

410 



410 



410 
410 



407 
410 



410 
410 



410 



Crelghton 

Crelghton 
Crel^ton 

Crelghton 

Crel^ton 

Carroll 

Raid 

Crelghton 
Tlssot 

Crelghton 
Tlssot 



West veld 

Newins 
Newlns 

Westveld 
West veld 

Westveld 
Westveld 

Zlegler 

Westveld 
Westveld 

Newlns 

Staff 

Zlegler 
Zlegler 

Zlegler 

Staff 



Man and Insects 
Adv Entomology 

Insect Morph Physlgy 
Sanitation 

Meths Rsrch Entomolgy 
Probs in Entomology 



Intro to Forestry 
Wood Technology 

Reforestation 

Farm Forestry 

Forest Utilization 
Silvlcultiore 

Forest Histry Policy 

Seminar 

Forest Management 

Forest Economics 
Forest Probs Seminar 



FRENCH - FH 



17 



DEFT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


CFH 


34 




3 


MWF 


11 


BO 


101 


Atkln 


First Year French 


CFH 


«35 




6 1 


ITffThFS 


8 


BU 


101 


Brune t 


First Year French 


FH 


202 




3 


TThS 


10 


BU 


205 


Bnineb 


Second Year French 


FH 


»205 




6 1 


TWThPS 


8 


BU 


101 


Brune t 


Second Year Frencn 


FH 


306 




3 


MWF 


10 


BU 


101 


Atkln 


Conversatn Compos Itn 


FH 


308 




3 


MWF 


9 


BU 


101 


Atkln 


Maatrpcs French Lit 


FH 


430 




# 


To 


arrange 






Atkln and 
Brune t 


Individual Work 


FH 


530 




# 


To 


arrange 






Atkln and 
Brune t 


Individual Work 










GERMAN - 


GN 






CGN 


33 




3 


MWF 


8 


BU 


301 


Eauptmann 


First Year German 


CGN 


34 


«»1 


3 


MWF 


10 


BU 


305 


Jones 


First Year German 


CGN 


34 


««2 


3 


TThS 


9 


BU 


305 


Hauptmann 


First Year German 


CGN 


34 


3 


3 


TThS 


9 


BU 


301 


Jones 


First Year German 


GN 


202 




3 


MWF 


11 


BU 


301 


Hauptmann 


Second Year German 


GN 


205 




6 1 


[TWThFS 


11 


BU 


305 


Jones 


Second Year German 


GN 


313 




3 


TThS 


10 


BU 


305 


Jones 


Adv Comp and Conv 


GN 


430 




# 


To 


arrange 


BU 


302 


Hauptmann 


Individual Work 


GN 


530 




# 


To 

G 


arrange 

REEK - ( 


BU 

GH 


303 

r 
< 


Jones 


Individual Work 


GK 


34 




3 


MWF 


2 


BU 


204 


Brune t 


First Year Greek 


« The 


course 


havl 


ng 1 


he gre 


iter enrollment 


wll 


1 be 


offered. 




# Van 


able c 


redlt 
















*» For 


scier 


ce 3t 


uder 


ts 













HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HPL 



COURSE 



264 
266 
364 
366 
387 
466 
532 
534 



13 
302 
308 
312 
314 
316 
402 
510 



312 

314 
316 

412 

424 

503 
570 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 



» Variable credit 



MW 

MW 

MP 

TTh 

Th 

TTh 



HOURS 



2 

1 

11 

10-12 

7-9:30 P M 

1-3 
arrange 
arrange 



BLDG. ROOM 



138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
138 
147 
147 



HISTORY - HY 



INSTRUCTOR 



4 


MTV/K 


8 


3 


TThS 


10 


3 


MWF 


9 


3 


TThS 


11 


3 


MWP 


11 


3 


TThS 


8 


3 


MWF 


10 


3 


M 


2-4 



PE 


112 


PE 


112 


PE 


112 


PE 


112 


LA 


10 


BU 


205 


PE 


112 


PE 


112A 



Beard 

Pitman 

Salt 

Salt 

Salt 

Salt 

Salt 

Salt 



Leake 
Leake 
Leake 
Pajrne 

Glunt 
Glunt 
Payne 
Leake 



HORTICULTURE - HE 



3 


TTh 

T 




11 
3-5 


3 


MWF 




9 


3 


TTh 
W 




8 
3-5 


3 


MW 

F 




8 
3-5 


3 


MWF 




10 


1 


Th 




4 


* 




To 


arrange 



Grleenhlouse 



Gr 



senh 

AG 

AG 
AG 

AG 
AG 

AG 

AG 

AG 



ouse 

209 

209 
209 

209 
209 

209 

209 

207 



Abbott 
Abbott 

Abbott 

Abbott 
Abbott 

Wolfe 
Wolfe 

Wolfe 

Wolfe 

Staff 



COURSE TITLE 



Track- and Field 
Baseball 

Tea Phya Ed Sec Sch] 
Thry Pract Phya Act 
Health Education 
Thry Pract Phys Act 
Prfsnl Devlpmt HPL 
Proba Phys Educ 



History Modrn World 
Amer Hist 1776-1830 
Renalssnce & Reformtn 
Eng Hist 1815-1943 
Europe IXa? Mid Ages 
Lat Amer Hist to 1850 
Ancient Civllizatna 
Seminar Amer History 



Vegetable Gardening 

Prina Fruit Productn 
Citrua Culture 

Deciduous Fruit a 

Subtrpcl Tropcl Frts 
Hortlcultiire Seminar 
Reaearch Horticulture 





INDUSTRIAL ARTS 


EDUCATION 


- IN 19 


1 DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDC. 


ROOM 


INSTRUr^OR 


COURSE TITLE 


IN 


112 




2 


MWP 


8-10 


YN 


316 


Strickland 


Mechanical Drawing 


IN 


212 




2 


TThS 


8-10 


YN 


SHOP 


Strickland 


General Shop 


IN 


305 




3 


TTh 


3-5:30 


YN 


SHOP 


Strickland 


Design & Constructn 


IN 


306 




3 


MWF 


11 


BA 


102 


Bohannon 


General Metal Shop 


IN 


401 




3 


MWP 


3-5 


YN 


316 


Martin, J A 


Archltectrl Drawing 


IN 


404 




3 


TTh 
P 


9 

1-3 


AG 
Lab 


102 


Rogers, P 


Parm Motors 


IN 


411 




3 


TThS 


10 


BA 


102 


Bohannon 


Gen Machn Shop Mtl Wrk 



IG 


365 


IG 


366 


IG 


367 


IG 


472 



JM 
JM 
■IM 

m 

JM 
JM 
JM 



LN 
LN 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING - IG 



214 
216 

302 

314 
318 
406 i 
408 
412 



33 

202 



3 


TThS 


3 


MWP 


3 


TThS 


2 


TTh 



9 

10 
11 
10 



PE 


10 


LW 


202 


EG 


212 


EG 


213 



Yeaton 
Yeaton 
Yeaton 
Yeaton 



JOURNALISM JM 



3 


TThS 


3 


MWP 


4 


MW 




TTh 


3 


MWF 


3 


TThS 


2 


TTh 


3 


TThS 


3 


MWP 


3 


To 


3 


To 



9 

9 

8 
2-5 

10 

8 

10 

11 

11 



arrange 
arrange 



LW 


112 


LW 


202 


LW 


107 


LW 


107 


LW 


112 


LW 


112 


LW 


202 


LW 


112 


LW 

^ L 


112 

N 



Skaggs 

Lowry 

Skaggs 
Skaggs 

Lowry 

Lowry 

Skaggs 

Skaggs 

Lowry 



204! Brunet 



204 



Brunet 



Eng Mechncs Statics 
Eng Mechncs Dynamics 
Strength of Materials 
Human Engineering 



Intro to Journalism 
Prina of Journalism 
News Wrltng & Editng 

Mag Wrltng & Editng 

Newspaper Management 

Radio Writing 

Propaganda 

Cont Jrnlstc Thot 



Plrst Year Latin 
Second Year Latin 



20 



LAW - LW 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDC 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


(ouRsi. rm.F 


LW 


302 




5 


MTWThS 


9 


LW 


111 


Trusler 


Equity 


LW 


304 




3 


MWF 


10 


LW 


111 


Teselle 


Contracts 


LW 


306 




1 


P 


9 


LW 


111 


Day 


Marriage & Divorce 


LW 


308 




3 


MWF 


8 


LW 


111 


Crandall 


Common Law Pleading 


LW 


312 




2 


TTh 


11 


LW 


111 


Day 


Property 11 


LW 


406 




4 


TThFS 


9 


LW 


107 


Slagle 


Private Corporatns 


LW 


408 




2 


TTh 


11 


LW 


107 


Prldgen and 
Trusler 


Legal Ethics & Blbllo 


LW 


410 




3 


MWF 


11 


LW 


107 


Prldgen 


Property IV 


LW 


413 




3 


MWF 


10 


LW 


107 


Crandall 


Fla Civil Practice 


LW 


506 




3 


MWF 


8 


LW 


112 


Day 


Negotiable Instrmnts 


LW 


508 




3 


TThS 


10 


LW 


107 


Slagle 


Confllcud 


LW 


518 




2 


MW 


9 


LW 


112 


Teselle 


Trial Practice 


LW 


520 




3 


TThS 


10 


LW 


112 


Teselle 


Creditors Rights 








MAI 


"HEMATK 


zs 


> — 


MS 




CMS 


23 




4 


MWThP 


9 


SC 


202 


Kokomoor 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


24 


1 


4 


MWFS 


8 


FE 


4 


Phlpps 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


24 


2 


4 


MWFS 


10 


PE 


206 


Davis 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


24 


4 


4 


MTWTh 


3 


PE 


206 


Blake 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


24 


5 


4 


MTWF 


2 


PE 


206 


Kokomoor 


Basic Mathematics 


MS 


353 




4 


TWThF 


2 


AG 


208 


Gager 


Differential Calculus 


MS 


354 


1 


4 


MWFS 


8 


EG 


209 


Plrenlan 


Integral Calculus 


MS 


354 


2 


4 


MWFS 


10 


SC 


202 


Simpson 


Integral Calculus 


MS 


421 




3 


TThS 


11 


EG 


202 


Dostal 


Hlghr Math Eng & Phys 


MS 


312 




3 


TThS 


9 


PE 


112 


Plrenlan 


Adv College Algebra 


MS 


430 




3 


T< 


arrange 






Pirealan 


Individual Work 


MS 


530 




3 


Tc 


arrange 






Dostal 


Individual Work 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING - ML 



21 



COURSE 



182 

282 

384 

386 
388 

474 

482 
484 
490 



102 
102 
102 
102 
202 
202 
402 
404 
404 



101 
310 



SEC. 



1 
11 
12 



CRED. 



DAYS 



T 

WTh 

TW 

MW 
M 

ThS 
Th 

MWP 

M 
U 



MWF 

H 

W 



HOURS 



1 

1-3 

3-5 

9 
1-4 

9 
3-6 

11 

2 
3-6 



11 

1-5 

1-6 



BLDG. 


ROOM 


PE 
EG 

EG 


209 
304 
304 


PE 
EG 


10 
300 


EG 
EG 


212 
102 


PE 


10 


EG 
EG 


212 

103 


EG 


212 


EG 


212 


EG 


102 


BA 


101 



INSTRUCTOR 



Frash 

Prash 
Frash 

Flneren 
Flneren 

Eshlenan 
Eshleman 

Thompson 

Thompson 
Thompson 

Ebaugh and 
Staff 

Ebaugh 

Ebaugh 

Leggett 



MILITARY SCIENCE MY 



TTh 

Th 



TTh 
Th 



TTh 
Th 



TTh 

W or Til 



TTh 

W or Th 



TTh 

W or Th 



10 
4 



10 
4 



1-3 
4 



1-3 
4 



1-3 
4 



LW 

Fie 



302 
Id 



LW 
Fielld 



LW 

Fid 



LW 
Fie 



Fie 



302 



302 

Id 



302 
Id 



Armory- 
Field 

Armory 

lid 



LW 



Field 



AG 



Field 



PE 
Fie 



302 



104 



205 
Id 



MUSIC MSC 



Whltehurat 
Rood 



Whltehurst 
Rood 



Whltehurst 
Rood 



Whltehurst 
Rood 



Judklns 
Rood 



Judklns 
Rood 



Judklns 
Rood 



Rood 
Rood 



Whltehurst 
Rood 



MTh 

TTh 



7PM 
2 



'OURSE TITLE 



Descrptv Geometry 

Mechnsm & Klnematcs 

Metallography 

Power Engineering 
Mechanical Lab 

Seminar 

Refgrtn Air Condtng 
Mechanical Lab 
Manufctrng Operatns 



1st Year 
1st Year 
1st Year 
1st Year 
2nd Year 
2nd Year 
4th Year 
4th Year 
4th Year 



Infantry 

Infantry 

Infantry 

Infantry 

Infantry 

Infantry 

Infantry 

Artillery 

Artillery 



Brown, R D I Orchestra Music 

Murphree.C L ! Music Appreciation 

1 
I 



PAINTING - PG 



COURSE 



llA 

llA 
21A 

21B 

22A 
22B 
31A 

31B 
32A 
32B 
4LA 

51A. 
5 IB 
52A 
52B 

61A 



SEC. 



«1 
#2 



CRED. 



4 
6 
6 

4 
4 
4 
2 

5 
5 
4 
3 

16 

PROJECT 

PROJECT 



DAYS 



CON; 



MTWF 
Th 

MWP 

MWP 
3 hra 

Dally 

3 hrs 

12 hrs 

18 hrs 

MWP 
TThS 

Dally 

12 hrs 

12 hrs 

MW 

4 hrs 

Dally 

Dally 

12 hrs 

TTh 
3 hrs 

48 hrs 



HOURS 



BLDC. 



JUDGMEraS 



1-5 
1-4 

1-4 

8-10 

To arrange 

8-10 

To arrange 

To arrange 

To arrange 

10-12 
8-10 

10-12 

To arrange 

To arrange 

5 

To arrange 

2-5 

2-5 

To arrange 

2-5 

To arrange 

To arrange 



PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 



ROOM 



9-12 PE 

LABORAJTORY (BOOK ROOMJ) 



109 
109 

109 

300 
300 

300 
300 

109 

109 

300 
300 

300 

300 

300 

306 
306 

300 

300 
300 
300 

300 



300 



Dally 
Dally 



ULTi! 



« For 
# For 



Cine 

two yelar 



TTh 
ffP 

Dally 
M 



ye|ar co]nplettlon 
coinpletlon 



8-12 
1-5 



TION 0;J BOOKS AND RES;i;ARC:i AVAILABLE IN BOOK 



1-5 
1-5 
8-12 
1-5 



INSTRUCTOR 

Holbrook 

Holbrook 
Holbrook 

Holbrook 

Holbrook 
Holbrook 
Holbrook 

Holbrook 
Holbrook 
Holbrook 
Holbrook 

Holbrook 

Holbrook 
Holbrook 
Holbrook 



Holbrook & 
Weaver 



PE 306 
PE i 306 



306 
306 
306 
306 



Staff 



Staff 
Staff 



(OURSK TITLE 



Pndmtls Plctrl Art 

Fndmtls Plctrl Art 
Pictorial Compos Itn 

Pictorial Composltn 

Commercial Design 
Commercial Design 
Freehand Drawing 

Freehand Drawing 
Freehand Drawing 
Freehand Drawing 
History of Painting 

Oil Painting 
Oil Painting 
Oil Painting 
Water Color 

Thesis 



Hannaford 
Weaver 
Holbrook 
Fulton 



ROOM AS FOLLOWS: 



PHARMACOGNOSY PGY 



23 



DEPT. 

PGY 
PGY 
PGY 
PGY 



COURSE 



222 
342 
522 
526 



SEC. CRED 



PLY 


262 


PLY 


362 


PLY 


452 


PLY 


456 


PLY 


512 


PLY 


517 


PLY 


552 



PHY 


224 


PHY 


353 


PHY 


332 


PHY 


372 


PHY 


402 


PHY 


432 



PHY 
PHY 



PPY 
PPY 
PPY 

» 2 to 



541 
554 



302 
410 
504 



4 cre4lt3 



DAYS 



TThS 



HOURS 



BLDG 



8-10 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 



CH 



ROOM 
316 



INSTRllTOR 



Johnson, C H 

Johnson, C H 

Johnson, C H 

Johnson, C H 



(OIRsi T|||.|r 



PHARMACOLOGY PLY 

TTh 10-12 CH 316 Edwards, L D 

Edwards , L D 



MWP 



9 

1-5 

10 

9 
8-10 

arrange 

arrange 

arrange 



CH 



CH 



400 
400 



316 



316 
316 



400 



Edwards, L D 

Poote 
Poote 

Edwards, L D 

Johnson, C H 

Edwards , L D 



Practcl Phannaoognosy 
Microscopy of Drugs 
Spec Probs Pharmcgnsy 
Drug Plant Analysis 



Applied Physiology 
Pharmcgl Standrdzatn 

Prlns Biologicals 
New Remedies 

kdv Pharmacology 
llnical Methods 
3pec Probs Pharmaclgy 



PHARMACY PHY 



TTh 
Th 

MWP 
TW 

TTh 
MTh 

SJWPS 

TTh 

r 
rw 



11 

1-4 



11 

1-4 



10 
1-4 



10 
11 



9 
1-4 



arrange 
arrange 



CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


316 


CH 


306 


CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


402 


CH 


112 


CH 


402 


CH 


306 



Husa 
Husa 

Poote 
Johnson, C H 

Husa 
Husa 

Husa 

Johnson, C H 

Poote 
Johnson, C H 

Husa 

Poote 



PHILOSOPHY PPY 



MWP 

TThS 

TThS 



11 
11 
11 



PE I 209 [Enwall 

PE i 209 (Enwall 

I 1 

PE ' 209 lEnwall 



Galenical Phannacy 

Orgn & Anlyt Pharcy 

Pracrptna & Dlspnslng 

CoTnmerclal Pharmacy 
Pharmactl Arith 
Adv Drug Analysis 

Manufacturing Pharcy 
Advanced Pharmacy 



Philosophy Religion 
'His try Modrn Philos 
Adv Hist Modrn Philos 



24 






PHYSJCAL EDUCATION 




DFPT. 


rniRSF 


SF,f. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


Horits 


Bi.nc 


RnnM 


INSTRUCTOR 


fOURSK TITl.E 


PFP 




1 




MWF 


8 


Fie 


Id 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 


PFP 




2 




MWF 


9 


Field 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 


PFP 




3 




MWF 


10 


Field 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 


PFP 




4 




TThS 


8 


Field 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 


PFP 




5 




TThS 


9 


Fie 


Id 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 


PFP 




6 




TThS 


10 


Fie 


Id 


Lieb 


Physical Fitness 










PI 


HYSICS 


PS 






PS 


102 




3 


MWF 

Th 


8 
11 


EG 

BN 


202 
203 


Perry 


General Physics 


PS 


206 


1 


3 


MWF 
Th 


11 

11 


EG 

BN 


213 
203 


Perry 


Gen Physics (Engineers 


PS 


206 


2 


3 


TThS 
Th 


10 
11 


EG 
BN 


202 
203 


Perry 


Gen Physics (Engineers 


PS 


208 


1 


1 


M 


2-5 


BN 


304 


Perry & Staff 


Lab for Ps 102 & 206 


PS 


208 


2 


1 


T 


2-5 


BN 


304 


Perry & Staff 


Lab for Ps 102 & 206 


PS 


208 


3 


1 


W 


2-5 


BN 


304 


Perry & Staff 


Lab for Ps 102 & 206 


PS 


208 


4 


1 


Th 


2-5 


BN 


304 


Perry & Staff 


Lab for Ps 102 & 206 


PS 


208 


5 


1 


F 


2-5 


BN 


304 


Perry & Staff 


Lab for Ps 102 & 206 


PS 


406 




3 
PI 


To 

.AN 


arrange 

T PATH( 


DL 


.oc 


Bless 

^Y - PT 


Theoretical Mechanics 


PT 


322 




3 


T 


10 


HT 


407 


Weber 


Vegetable Diseases 










TTh 


1-3 


HT 


407 


Weber 




PT 


423 




3 


Th 


10 


HT 


407 


Weber 


Fruit Diseases 










TTh 


3-5 


HT 


407 


Weber 




PT 


434 




3 


MWF 


3-5 


HT 


407 


Weber 


Mycology 


PT 


523 




« 


To 


arrange 


HT 


407 


Weber 


Adv Plant Pathology 


PT 


570 




« 


To 


arrange 


HT 


407 


Weber 


Resrch Pint Pathology 


« Varl 


ible c 


redlt 

























POLITICAL 


SCIENCE - PCL 


DEPT 


rniRSF 


SEr. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOI'RS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


rOlIRSE TFTI.E 


CPL 


13 




4 


TTh 


3 
9 


LA 
LA 


307 
307 


Laird 


Poltl Poun Mod Life 


PCL 


310 




3 


MWP 


1 


PE 


112 


Carleton 


International Relations 


PCL 


314 




3 


MWF 


2 


PE 


209 


Payne 


Amer Govt & Politics 


PCL 


404 




3 


T 


2 


LA 


307 


Laird 


International Law 










Th 


2-4 


LA 


307 


Laird 




PCL 


412 




3 


MWF 


9 


LA 


307 


Laird 


Public Administration 


PCL 


514 




3 


To 

PC 


arrange 

)RTUGUI 


IS 


E- 


Latrd 

PE 


Seminar Political Soi 


PE 


34 




3 


TThS 


10 


BtJ 


101 


Atkln 


Elemntry Portuguese 






1 1 

POULTRY HU 


SE 


5Ah 


^DRY - PY 


PY 


312 




3 


MW 
T 


9 

1-3 


AG 
AG 


102 

102 


Moore, K 


Adv Incubatn Broodng 


py 


416 




3 


TTh 
M 


9 
3-5 


PC 




Mehrhof 


Poultry Management 


PY 


417 




3 


TTh 


11 
1-3 


PC 




Moore 


Marketng Poultry Prods 


PY 


430 




» 


To 


arrange 


PC 




Mehrhof 


Probs Poultry Prodctn 


PY 


531 




3 


To 


arrange 


PO 




Mehrhof 


Adv Poultry Managemnt 


PY 


570 




« 


To 


arrange 


PC 




Mehrhof 


Poultry Research Probs 


* 1 to 


4 cr< 


dlts 

















26 








PSYCHOLOGY 


PSY 




nFPT 


(OrRSF 


SFf. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


Hnt'RS 


Ri.nc. 


RnniH 


INSTRITTOH 


fOllRSE TITIE 


PSY 


201 


1 


3 


MWF 


11 


PE 


114 


Wlmberly 


General Psychology 


PSY 


201 


2 


3 


TThS 


9 


PE 


114 


Wlllla-..s, 


General Psychology 


PSY 


203 




1 


T 


1-3 


PE 


114 


Hinckley & 
Staff 


Gen Psychology Lab , 


PSY 


303 




3 


TThS 


10 


PE 


114 


Williams, 


Physiploglcal Psych 


PSY 


305 




3 


MWF 


8 


PE 


114 


Williams, 


Social Psychology 


PSY 


310 




3 


MWF 


9 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Abnormal Psychology 


PSY 


401 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Wlmberly 


Read In Exper Psych 


PSY 


409 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Hviman Motivation 


PSY 


430 




« 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Staff 


Individual Work 


PSY 


501 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Wlmberly 


Read in Exper Psych 


?tl 


509 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Human Motivation 


PSY 


530 




» 


To 

s 


arrange 

OCIOLOC 


PE 

3Y 


114 


Staff 

SY 


Individual Work 


CSY 


13 




4 


MW 
TTh 


1 
11 


PE 
PE 


10 
10 


Maclachlan 


Soc Foun Modrn Life 


SY 


344 




3 


MWF 


9 


PE 


1 


Maclachlan 


Mari'lage & Family 


SY 


424 




3 


MWF 


11 


PE 


11 


Thomas on 


Criminology 


SY 


560 




3 


To 


arrange 

SOILS 


SL 


-S 


Maclachlan 


Special Topics 


SLS 


302 


1 
11 
12 


3 


MW 

T 
W 


10 

3-5 
1-3 


AG 
AG 
AG 


208 
202 
202 


Thornton 
Thornton 
Thornton 


Soil Fertility 


SLS 


402 




3 


TThS 


11 


AG 


208 


Smith, F B 


Adv Soil Fertility 


SLS 


408 




3 


MW 
M 


11 
1-3 


AG 
AG 


208 
208 


Thornton 
Thornton 


Soil Conservation 


SLS 


420 




* 


To 


arrange 


AG 


206 


Smith, F B 


Special Problems 


SLS 


502 




3 


Th 
ThF 


10 
1-3 


AG 
AG 


208 
204 


Smith, F B 
Smith, F B 


Soil Chemistry 


SLS 


570 




* 


To 


arrange 


AG 


206 


Smith, F B 


Research in Soils 


» Varl 


able 


;redl1 














1 



SPANISH SH 



27 



fOlRSE 



SEf. 



CRED, 



DAYS 



BLDfi. 


RnOM 


BU 


201 


BU 


201 


BU 


201 


BU 


201 


BU 


205 


BU 


304 


BU 


302 



INSTRUCTOR 



fOURSE TITT.E 



33 
34 
202 
205 
313 
430 
530 



33 
33 
301 
304 
308 
404 
418 



402 

543 
545 



» Varl ible credit 



TThS 

MWP 

TThS 

;TWThPS 

MWP 

To 
To 



11 
11 

arrange 
arrange 



Hathaway 

Hathaway 

Ashton 

Hathaway 

Ashton 

Ashton 

Hauptmann 



SPEECH - SCH 



MWP 

TThS 

MWP 

TThS 



To 



9 

10 

10 
arrange 

9 
arrange 
arrange 



PE 


205 


PE 


205 


PE 


211 


PE 


203 


PE 


205 


PE 


203 


PE 


210 



Hopkins 

Conatans 

Cons tans 

Hopkins 

Hale 

Tew 

Hale 



First Year Spanish 
Plrst Year Spanish 
Second Year Spanish 
Second Year Spanish 
Adv Comp & Conversatn 
Individual Work 
Individual Work 



Effective Speaking 
Effective Speaking 
Adv Public Speaking 
Argumentatn & Debating 
Interpretatn of Literatr 
Dramatic Production 
Corrctn Speech Defects 



VETERINARY SCIENCE VY 



MW 



11 
arrange 
arrange 



209 
102 
102 



Emmel 
Emmel 



Poultry Diseases 
Probs Animl Pathology 
Probs Aiiml Paras tlgy 



D 


e5 

8 E 














<=3 














< 
Q 
























c 






















< 
Q 


eI 

II 






















0/ .o 






















< 

Q 
W 


il 






















=3 
























eI 






















^1 
-1 






















< 
Q 

z 

o 


E-S 
8| 






















^1 






















D 
O 




8 


8 


8 

o 

! 1 


o 
o 

, — 1 


1—1 


o 
o 


CNJ 


CO 


■^ 


LO 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT 
1944 SUMMER SESSION 

First Term: June 8 to July 21 
Second Term: July 20 to September 1 
BOTH TERMS COEDUCATIONAL 




Vol. XXXIX, Series 1 ■ No. 2 Fehruarij 1, 1944 

Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES 

1944 Summer Session 

This preliminary announcement is Issued to assist those 
who expect to attend the 1944 Summer Session at the University 
of Florida in planning their work for the summer. The com- 
plete Summer Session Bulletin will be published as soon as 
possible. It will contain complete information on methods of 
application for admission, curricula, requirements for degrees, 
living accommodations, the time schedule of courses, and In 
general all the information needed by the student in planning 
his work for the summer. A copy of the bulletin will be sent 
on request to those who' may be Interested. 

CALENDAR 

First Term 

Thursday & Friday, June 8 & 9 . .Registration for the first term. 

Saturday, June 10, 7:00 A.M.. . .Classes begin; late registra- 
tion fee of $5.00. 

Tuesday, June 13, 4:00 P.M. . . .Late registration for first 

term closes. 

Friday, July 21, 12 noon . . . .First term ends. 

Second Term 
Thursday & Friday, July 20 & 21 .Registration for the second term, 
Saturday, July 22, 7:00 A.M. . .Classes begin; late registra- 
tion fee of |5.00. 
Tuesday, July 25, 4:00 P.M. „ . .Late registration for second 

term closes. 
Friday, September 1, 12 noon . .Second term ends, 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 

The housing facilities of the Residence Hall System have 
been expanded by including some of the fraternity houses because 
of the probability that the Residence Halls on the campus will 
be used to house soldiers during the Summer Session, Adequate 
space in private rooming houses will supplement the expanded 
facilities of the Residence Hall System. The Director of Resi- 
dence, the Dean of Students, and the Dean of the Summer Session 
will assist students in locating satisfactory living quarters. 
Lists of approved rooming houses will be sent promptly to pro- 
spective students upon request. The list will include informa- 
tion as to location, type of room, and rental. 

Private boarding houses adjacent to the campus will be 
open during the Summer Session. The Cafeteria of the P. K. 
Yonge Laboratory School will operate in much the same manner as 



the University Cafeteria has in former summers. The Univer- 
sity Soda Fountain will give soda fountain service. The cost 
of meals will depend upon the individual's choice of boarding 
accommodations . 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES PER TERM 

Low Average High 
*Registration Fee (Including 

Infirmary Fee) . $20.00 $20.00 $ 20.00 

Room 10.50 15.00 23.00 

Meals (per month--two meals per day). 30.00 36.00 44.00 

Books and Supplies 5.00 10.00 20.00 

TOTAL $65.50 $81.00 $107.00 

■w-For non-Florida students, $30.00. Registration fee for Law 
students will be announced in the regular Summer Session Bulletin, 

SPECIAL FEATURE 

The noted educator WILLIAM HEARD KILPATRICK will offer a 
short course from June 19 to June 30. This course may be taken 
as part of the program of any graduate student in Education. 
It may also be taken for credit by teachers who can be present 
for only the first three weeks. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

All the General College comprehensive courses designed 
for students who have just graduated from high school will be 
available . 

The maximum load for which an undergraduate student may 
register is determined by the Individual's academic average 
for the last term or semester of college work, regardless of 
the institution attended. 

1. An average of "B" or higher 9 hours 

2. An a erage of less than "B" .... 

6 hours, regardless of the number of courses 
or 

8 hours, with a maximum of 2 courses. 
Maximum load is six semester hours per term in the Graduate 
School and seven hours in the College of Law. 

The Summer Session has always made special service to 
teachers a prime objective. This service is provided in 
several ways. Among these are: 

(a) A liberal offering of courses in both subject matter 
and professional fields is given. 

(b) The faculty gives generously of its time for advice 
and counseling on personal and professional problems. 

(c) Niunerous libraries, laboratories and museums are 
available. 



(d) There Is one of the best laboratory schools In the 
nation for observation and student teaching. 

(e) A well equipped placement bureau Is malntainedo The 
bureau can now render better service than ever before 
due to the fact that the State Department of Educa- 
tion now provides month by month a list of all newly 
certificated teachers. The service of the bureau is 
free to students of the summer session. 

The Graduate Council has recently established the graduate 
degree of Master of Education. This degree does not displace 
the Master of Arts In Education but differs from it in that no 
formal thesis is required for the Master of Education. The 
Summ.er Session Bulletin will give a fuller description than is 
possible here, 

C0URSE:S 

It will be noted that some courses carry the title Indivi- 
dual Work or Problems in various fields. These co-urses are 
designed to permit individuals who are qualified to work on 
projects of particular need to them. Students should always 
consult with the instructors or department heads before enroll- 
ing in such courses. 

In several Instances the credit for courses is given as 
variable. This means that one or more credits may be earned, 
depending upon the amount of work completed by the student. 
In such courses the student is required to designate after 
consultation with the instructor and at the time of registra- 
tion the number of credits he wishes to complete » After 
registration the number of credits cannot be changed. 

FIRST TERM 

COMPREHENSIVE COURSES 

C 11 — Man and the Social World. 4 credits. 

C 21--Man and the Physical World. 3 credits. 

C 31--Readlng, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. 

C 41--Man and His Thinking. 5 credits. 

C 42--Pundamental Mathematics. 3 credits. 

C 51--The Humanities. 4 credits. 

C 61--Man apd the Biological World. 3 credits. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

ASTRONOMY 

ATY 302--Air Navigation. 3 credits. 

BIOLOGY 

BLY 101--An Introduction to VerteiDrate Zoology. 3 credits. 
BLY 133 — Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits. 
BLY 210--Vertebrate Embryology. 4 credits. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BEN 81--Introductory Typewriting, 2 credits. 
BEN 91--Introductory Shorthand. 2 credits. 
BEN 97--Handwritlng. 1 credit. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

CG 443--Chemical Engineering Laboratory. 2 credits. 
CG 447--Prlnciples of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. 
CG 449--Unit Processes. 3 credits. 

CHEMISTRY 

CY 101--General Chemistry, 4 credits. 

CY 201--Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits. 

CY 301--0rganlc Chemistry. 4 credits. 

CY 572--Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits. 

CY 574--Research in Naval Stores o 2 to 6 credits. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CL 327 — Hydraulics. 4 credits. 

CL 329 — Higher Surveying. 5 credits. (12 weeks) 

ECONOMICS 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CES 131--Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. 

CBS 141--Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. 

CES 15 --Elementary Statistics. 3 credits. 

ES 240 — The Economic Problems of War. 3 credits. 

BS 311 --Accounting Principles. 3 credits, 

ES 327--Public Finance, 3 credits. 

ES 382--Utilization of Our Resources, 3 credits, 

BS 401--Business Law. 3 credits. 

Courses by Project Method. 

EDUCATION 

GEN 13--Introduction to Education. 3 credits. 

EN 317--Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices, 3 credits, 

EN 385--Child Development. 3 credits. 

EN 401--School Administration. 3 credits. 

EN 421 — Student Teaching. 3 credits. 

EN 422--Student Teaching. 3 credits. 

EN 471--Problems of Instruction, 6 credits, 

EN 490 — Reading Laboratory and Clinic, 2 credits. 

Graduate Courses 
EN 540--Foundatlons of Education. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 541--Problems in Child and Adolescent Growth and Development 

and Educational Psychology. Credit varies; maximum 

credit 6. 
EN 543--Problems in the History and Philosophy of Education, 

Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 



EN 546 --Problems of Curriculum Construction and Teaching, 

Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 547--Problems in Elementary Education, Principles and 

Practices in Grades 1-6. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 548--Problems in Secondary Education. Credit varies; 

maximum credit 6. 
EN 549 — Problems in School Administration. Credit varies; 

maximum credit 6. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EL 541 — Electrical Engineering Seminar. 3 credits. 
EL 349--Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. 
EL 449--Theory of Electric Circuits. 3 credits . 
EL 465--Radio Engineering, 5 credits. 

ENGLISH 

CEH 37 — Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. 

CEH 313--Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 credits. 

EH 301--Shakespeare, 3 credits. 

EH 305 --Introduction to the Study of the English Language, 

3 credits. 
EH 391--Children's Literature. 3 credits. 
EH 401--Amerlcan Literattire. 3 credits <, 

Graduate Course 
EH 530 — Individual Work, Variable credit o 

FRENCH 

CPH 33 — First Year French. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
FH 530--Indivldual Work. Variable credit. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 
GL 301--Chlldren's Science. 2 credits. 

GEOGRAPHY 

GPY 201 --Geography of the Americas. 3 credits, 

GERMAN 

CGN 33 — Pirs-t Year German, 3 credits. 
GN 430--Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
GN 530--Indlvidual Work. 3 credits. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPL 121--Narcotlcs Education. 2 credits. 

HPL 363--Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School, 

3 credits, 
HPL 373 — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. 
HPL 387--Health Education. 3 credits. 

Graduate C our s e 
HPL 531--Gulded Professional Development in Health and Physical 

Education. 3 credits. 



HISTORY 

CHY 13 — History of the Modern World. 3 credits. 
HY 303--American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits. 
HY 401 — Ancient Civilizations. 3 credits. 

Graduate Co\rrse 
HY 509--Seininar in American History. 3 credits. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

IN 111 — Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits. 

IN 112 — Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits. 

IN 211--General Shop. 3 credits. 

IN 305--Design and Construction. 3 credits. 

IN 401 — Architectural Drawing. 3 credits. 

IN 411--General Machine Shop and Metal Work. 3 credits, 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
IG- 365--Engineering Mechanics - Statics, 3 credits, 

LAW 

Law courses will be announced in the regular Summer Session 
Bulletin. 

MATHEMATICS 

CMS 23--Basic Mathematics. 3 credits. 

MS 225 — Arithmetic for Teachers. 3 credits. 

MS 325--Advanced General Mathematics. 3 credits, 

MS 353 — Differential Calculus. 3 credits. 

MS 430--Indlvidual Work. Variable credit. 

Graduate Course 
MS 530 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ML 181- -Engineering Drawing. 2 credits. (12 weeks) 

ML 38 F --Thermodynamics. 3 credits, 

ML 38'/ --Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. 

ML 481--Internal Combustion Engines. 3 credits. 

ML 483- -Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. 

MUSIC 

MSC 103--Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three, 

2 credits. 
MSC 104--Materials and Methods for Grades Pour, Five, and Six 

2 credits. 

PHYSICS 

PS 101--Elementary Physics. 3 credits. 
PS 103 — Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. 
PS 117--Physics for High School Teachers. 4 credits. 
PS 311 — Electricity and Magnetism. 3 credits. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PCL 3 14 --American Government and Politics. 3 credits. 
PCL 405 — History of Political Theory. 3 credits. 

PSYCHOLOOY" 

PSY 201 — General Psychology. 3 credits. 
PSY 310 — Abnormal Psychology. 3 credits. 
PSY 409 — Human Motivation, 3 credits. 
PSY 430 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

Graduate Courses 
PSY 509--Human Motivation. 3 credits, 
PSY 530 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 
SCL 301 — Children's Social Studies. 3 credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 

CSY 13--Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits, 
SY 337 — Cultural Anthropology. 3 credits. 
SY 334--Marriage and the Family. 3 credits. 
SY 424 — Criminology. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
SY 560 — Special Topics. 3 credits. 

SPANISH 

CSH 33 — First Year Spanish. 3 credits. 
SH 201 — Second Year Spanish. 3 credits. 
SH 430--Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
SH 530--Individual Work. 3 credits. 

SPEECH 

CSC 33 — Effective Speakingo 3 credits. 

SCH 417--Correction of Speech Defects. 3 credits. 

SCH 430— Individual Work. Variable credit. 



SECOND TERM 

COMPREHENSIVE COURSES 

C 12--Man and the Social Worldo 4 credits. 

C 22--Man and the Physical World. 3 credits, 

C 32--Readlng, Speaking and Writing, 4 credits, 

C 41 — Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. 

C 421 — Trigonometry. 3 credits, 

C 52 — The Humanities, 4 credits, 

C 62 — Man and the Biological World, 3 credits. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

BIOLOGY 

BLY 102--An Introduction to Invertebrate Zoology. 3 credits. 
BLY 134--Llfe of Florida's Inland Waters, 3 credits. 
BLY 351--Blologlcal Laboratory Technique, 3 credits, 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BEN 94--Stenography. 4 credits, 
BEN 97- -Handwriting. 1 credit, 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

CG 444--Chemlcal Engineering Laboratory, 2 credits. 
CG 448 — Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits, 

CHEMISTRY 

CY 102 — General Chemistry, 4 credits. 

CY 202 — Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits, 

CY 302--0rganic Chemistry. 4 credits, 

Gradxiate Courses 
-^Y 505--0rganlc Nitrogen Compounds. 3 credits, 
«CY 506--Speclal Chapters in Organic Chemistry, 3 credits, 
•5*CY 572 — Research in Organic Chemistry, 2 to 6 credits, 
*CY 574 — Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 credits. 

^The one of these four courses for which there is the greatest 
demand will be given. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CL 329--Higher Surveying, 5 credits. (12 weeks) 
CL 426--Water and Sewage, 3 credits, 

ECONOMICS 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

CES 132 — Economic Foundations of Modern Life, 3 credits. 

CBS 142--Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. 

BS 312 — Accounting Principles, 3 credits. 

ES 335 — Economics of Marketing, 3 credits, 

BS 402- -Business Law. 3 credits. 

ES 446--The Consumption of Wealth in Time of War. 3 credits. 

Courses by Project Method. 



EDUCATION 

EN 305 — Development and Organization of Education, 3 credits. 
EN 386--Educatlonal Psychology. 3 credits. 

EN 403--Prlnclples and Philosophy of Education, 3 credits. 
EN 406 — Administration of the Elementary School, 3 credits. 
EN 471 --Problems of Instruction. 6 credits. 

Graduate Courses 
EN 540 — Foundations of Education. Credit varies; maximum 

credit 6. 
EN 542--Problems in Measurement, Evaluation and Guidance. 

Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 543 — Problems In the History and Philosophy of Education, 

Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 546--Problems of Currlculiim Constinictlon and Teaching, 

Credit varies; maximum credit 6, 
EN 547 — Problems in Elementary Education, Principles and 

Practices in Grades 1-6. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 
EN 550--Problems in School Supervision. Credit varies; maximum 

credit 6, 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

EL 342 — Electrical Engineering Seminar. 3 credits. 
EL 350--r>ynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. 
EL 466--Radio Engineering. 5 credits. 

ENGLISH 

CEH 38 — Literary Masters of England. 3 credits, 

EH 302--Shakespeare, 3 credits. 

EH 399 --Introduction to the Study of Literature, 3 credits, 

EH 402 — American Literature. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
EH 530 — Individual WorkT Variable credit, 

FRENCH 

CFH 34--Pirst Year Prnech. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
FH 530--Individual Work. Variable credit, 

GENERAL SCIENCE 
GL 302--Children' s Science, 2 credits, 

GERMAN 

CGN 34 — First Year German, 3 credits. 
GN 430 — Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
GN 5 30 --Individual Work. 3 credits. 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPL 373 — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credita- 
HPL 387 — Health Education. 3 credits. 

HPL 411--Principles and Administration of Physical Education. 
;5 credits. 

Graduate Course 
HPL 534 — Problems in Physical Education. 3 credits. 

HISTORY 

HY 304--Amerlcan History, 1876 to the Present. S credits. 
HY 364--Latin American History, from 1850 to the Present. 

3 credits. 
HY 402 — Ancient Civilization. 3 credits. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

IN 212 — General Shop. 3 credits. 

IN 301--Sheet Metal. 3 credits. 

IN 306--6eneral Metal Shop. 3 credits. 

IN 401--Architectural Drawing. 3 credits. 

IN 412--6eneral Machine Shop and Metal Work. 3 credits. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

IG 366 — Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics. 3 credits. 
IG 367 — Strength of Materials. 3 credits. 

LAW 

Law courses will be announced in the regular S\unmer Session 
Bulletin. 

MATHEMATICS 

CMS 24--Basic Mathematics. 3 credits. 
MS 354--Integral Calculus. 3 credits. 
MS 430 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

Graduate Course 
MS 530--^adividual Work. Variable credit. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ML 181--Engineering Drawing. 2 credits. (12 weeks) 
ML 386--Power Engineering. 3 credits. 
ML 388 --Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. 

PHYSICS 

PS 102--Elementary Physics. 3 credits. 

PS 104--Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. 

PS 118--Physlcs for High School Teachers. 4 credits. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PCL 3 13 --Am eric an Government and Politics. 3 credits, 
PCL 406--History of Political Theory. 3 credits. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY 201--G€neral Psychology. 3 credits. 
PSY 305--oocial Psychology. 3 credits. 
PSY 430 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

Graduate Courses 
PSY 515--Social Psychology. 3 credits. 
PSY 5 30 --Individual Work. Variable credit. 

SCHOOL ART 

PC 251--Art for the Primary Grades. 2 credits. 
PC 252--Art for the Elementary Grades. 2 credit; 
PC 301--Creative School Art. 2 credits. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 
SCL 302 — Children's Social Studies. 3 credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SY 316--The Field of Social Work. 3 credits. 

SY 442--Applied Sociology. 3 credits. 

SY 443--The American Negro. 2 credits. 

SY 45 2- -American Culture Today. 3 credits. 

Graduate Course 
SY 560 — Special Topics. 3 credits. 

SPANISH 

CSH 34--First Year Sapnish. 3 credits. 
SH 202--Second Year Spanish. 3 credits. 
SH 430 --Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Graduat e Course 
SH 5 30 --Individual Work. 3 credits. 

SPEECH 

CSC 33--Effective Speaking. 3 credits. 

SCH 403--One-Act Play. 3 credits. 

SCH 430 — Individual Work. Variable credit. 



i 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

EMERGENCY SUMMER TERM 
FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS 
April 24 - June 3, 1944 
COEDUCATIONAL 




Vol. XXXIX, Series 1 No. 3 March 1, 1944 



Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act oj Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office oj Pnulication, Gainesville, Fla. 



TTUIVERSITY OP FLORIDA 
EMERGENCY SUMMER TERM FOR IN-SERVICE TEACHERS - APRIL 24 - JUNE 5 

COBDTJOATIOHAL 



In order to make it possible for those teachers whose 
schools will close before April 24 to get two full terms of 
summer work before their schools open again in August, a 
six-weeks term, beginning April 24 and ending June 3, 1944, 
will be offered. 

The primary purpose of this early term is to offer oppor- 
tunities especially to the teachers in schools of Levy, Gil- 
christ, Bradford and Union counties. Since, however, there 
are other schools in the State that will close before April 
24, admission to teachers of such schools will not be denied. 

Admission 

1. No teacher will be admitted whose school has not 
closed by April 24. 

2. No one will be admitted except teachers or those 
definitely engaged to teach. 

3. No winter session student will be permitted to carry 
any of these courses in addition to his regular load. 

General Information 

FTegistration will be held Saturday, April 22, and Monday, 
April 24. No person will be registered after 4:00 P. M., 
April 24. 

Schedule 

1. Classes will begin at 7:30 A. M. and close at 5:30 P. M. 

2. Classes will run for an hour and twenty minutes, with 
ten minutes for change of classes. (See schedule) 

Fees and Load 

1. The registration fee is $20. 

2. Students who in their previous semester or summer 
term made an average of B may take three courses; 
others may not take more than two. 

Living Accommodations 

The housing facilities of the Residence Hall System have 
been expanded by including some of the fraternity houses because 
of the probability that the Residence Halls on the campus will 
be used to house soldiers during the Summer Session. Adequate 



space in private rooming houses will supplement the expanded 
facilities of the Residence Hall System. The Director of Resi- 
dence, the Dean of Students, and the Dean of the Summer Session 
will assist students in locating satisfactory living quarters. 
Lists of aonroved roominjj, houses will be sent oromptly to pro- 
spective students upon request. The list will include informa- 
tion as to location, type of room, and rental. 

Private boarding houses adjacent to the campus will be 
open durin(j the Summer Session. The Cafeteria of the P. K. 
Yonge Laboratory School will operate in much the same manner 
as the University Cafeteria lias in former summers. The Univer- 
sity Soda Fountain will j^ive soda fountain service. The cost 
of meals will depend upon the individual's choice of boarding 
accommodations . 



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The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Bulletin of 

^he HAniwefsity Summer Session 

1944 

First Term — June 8 to July 21 

Second Term — July 20 to September 1 

(Both Terms Coeducational) 




IMPORTANT 

The time required for registration may be reduced 
considerably by mailing the application blank on the 
back cover prior to June 1. There will be no registra- 
tion by mail. 



Vol. XXXIX, Series I No. 4 April 1, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second^lass matter, 
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The Record Comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins 
of information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and 
reports of the University Officers. 

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for 
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in- 
formation is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, 

University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida 



[2] 



CAMPUS— UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Map of the Campus 3 

Summer Session Calendar 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

Accelerated Program 8 

Admission : 8 

Expenses 10 

Cafeteria 10 

Rooming Facilities ; 11 

General Information 13 

Activities 13 

Placement Bureau 14 

Laboratory School 14 

Extension of Certificates and Certification 16 

General Regulations 23 

Colleges and Schools 26 

Graduate School 26 

School of Architecture and Allied Arts 27 

College of Arts and Sciences 28 

College of Business Administration 29 

College of Education 29 

College of Engineering 31 

General College 31 

College of Law 35 

Guide to Courses 36 

Departments of Instruction (Courses and Schedules) 

First Term 37 

Second Term 54 

Residence Application Blanks 67, 69 

Application Blanks 71, 72 



[4] 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS 

SAVE TIME — Each student who expects to attend the 1944 
Summer Session must fill out the Application Blank on page 
71. Previous attendance at the University of Florida does 
NOT waive this requirement. Fill out the Blank and send it 
to the OflSce of the Registrar if there is any possibility of your 
attending the 1944 Summer Session. Sending in the Blank 
involves no obligation on your part, but it will considerably 
reduce the time it takes to register, if you do decide to come. 

Upon request, additional blanks will be supplied by the 
Registrar. 

There will be no registration by mail. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION 

After arriving at the University: 

1. If room assignment has been made in University-operated housing units, check in at 
the Office of the Director of Residence, Section F, Fletcher Hall. If you have not yet 
made a reservation, but wish to do so, call at this same Office. 

2. For information concerning oflf-campus rooming accommodations, see Dean ©f Students, 
105 Language Hall. 

3. For information concerning social activities among women students, or on any matter 
of interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall. 



[51 



SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

1944 FIRST SUMMER TERM 

June 7, Wednesday, 1 p.m Placement Tests, Room 205, Peabody Hall. 

June 8 — June 9 Registration for First Summer Term. 

June 10, Saturday, 7 a.m Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering 

on this date. 

June 13, Tuesday, 4 p.m. Last day for registration for the First Summer Term, and 

for adding courses. 

June 24, Saturday, noon Last day for making application for a degree that is to be 

awarded at the end of the First Summer Term. 

July 3, Monday Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end of 

the term, to submit theses to the Dean. 

July 4, Tuesday Holiday. 

July 8, Saturday Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at end 

of term to complete correspondence courses. 

July 13, Thursday, 4 p.m Last day for filing application for extension of certificate. 

Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade of E. 

July 19, Wednesday, 4 p.m Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at end 

of term are due in the Office of the Registrar. 

July 20 — July 21 Registration for Second Summer Term. 

July 20, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

July 21, Friday, noon ...„ „ „ First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the Office 

of the Registrar by 4 p.m. 

July 21, Friday, 8 p.m Conferring of degrees, 

SECOND SUMMER TERM 

July 20 — July 21 Registration for Second Summer Term. 

July 22, Saturday, 7 a.m. . — Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering 

on this date. 

July 25, Tuesday, 4 p.m Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term, 

and for adding courses. 

August 5, Saturday, noon Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Examina- 
tions in Second Summer Term. 

August 5, Saturday, noon Last day for making application for a degree that is to be 

awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term. 

August 12, Saturday, noon Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end of 

the term, to submit theses to the Dean. 

August 19, Saturday Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at end 

of term to complete correspondence courses. 

August 24, Thursday, 4 p.m Last day for filing application for extension of certificate. 

Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade of E, 

August 30, Wednesday, 4 p.m Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at end 

of term are due in the Office of the Registrar. 

August 31, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

September 1, Friday, noon Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m. 

September 1, Friday, 8 p.m Commencement Convocation. 

[6] 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

John J. Tigert, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the 
University 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Ph.D., D.Sc, Acting Vice-President of the University and Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, First Term 

James William Norman, Ph.D., Dean of the Summer Session 

Nelle Barmore, B.A., Acting Librarian 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A., Dean of Students 

Perry Albert Foote, Ph.D., Director of the School of Pharmacy 

Klein Harrison Graham, LL.D., Business Manager 

Lester Leonard Hale, M.A., Acting Director of Florida Union 

H. Harold Hume, D.Sc, Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P., Registrar 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Dean of the General College 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Business Administration 

Carl Braden Opp, B.A., Acting Director of Residence 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, First Term 

George Clarence Tillman, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts 

Joseph Weil, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Second 
Term 



1.7] 



8 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

ACCELERATED PROGRAM 

The acceleration of an individual student's program for a degree will be possible if he 
attends a three-month Summer Session as well as the regular nine-month session during 
each school year, thus completing in three calender years (less in some cases) the work of 
four nine-month years. Fortunately the University has had several years experience in 
operating on virtually a year round basis. Since 1935 there has been a two term Summer 
Session in which it has been possible for a superior student to complete practically a 
semester's work. Additional adjustments are being made for the 1944 Summer Session 
which are outlined under the heading, The General College, in this bulletin. 

Another opportunity for reducing the time spent in meeting degree requirements is 
available in the General College which from its beginning has provided for earning college 
credit by passing comprehensive examinations. For some courses students may, through 
independent study, prepare for these examinations. This plan has been operating since 
1936, but in the past only a relatively lew students have applied for this privilege. The 
examinations are not easy and cannot be passed without serious preparation, but superior 
students are encouraged to consider this as one of the ways in which they may accelerate 
their college education. 



ADMISSION 

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by college work wiU be admitted 
to the University of Florida Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO 
CREDIT will be allowed unless our specific admission requirements are satisfied. These 
requirements are: 

1. For students who are entering college for the first time. 

See Admission to the General College. 

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect 
to receive a degree from the University of Florida. 

Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions 
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented 
by students will not suffice.) 

3. For students who wish to enter the College of Law. 

See Admission to the College of Law. 

4. For students who wish to enter the Graduate School. 

See Admission to the Graduate School. 

5. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who 
are attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose 
of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended. 

See Admission of Unclassified Students. 

6. For students attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for 
the purpose of meeting teacher certification requirements, taking refresher 
courses, etc. 

See Admission of Unclassified Students. 



ADMISSION 9 

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in num- 
bers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE 
ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE. 

Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in 
the college in which they were registered. Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable 
semester hours of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or professional 
schools of the University. 

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General 
College : 

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although 
no specific high school units are required. 

2. Consistency of the high school record. 

3. Achievement in high school. 

4. Personal qualities. 

5. Recommendation of high school principal. 

6. Standing on Placement Tests. 

All applicants should submit the Application Blank at the back of this bulletin, and 
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The 
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission 
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar. 

The Placement Tests will be given at 1 P.M., Wednesday, June 7, in 205 Peabody HalL 
All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take these tests before 
registration. 

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Applicants for admission to the College of Law for the duration of the war must have 
credit for at least two years of academic college work meeting the requirements of the 
Association of American Law Schools. Evidence of this work must be presented to the 
Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes to register. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard 
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and 
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major. 

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to 
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration. 

ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

To be admitted as an unclassified student (see page 24, nos. 5 and 6) the applicant 
must submit a statement of honorable dismissal from the institution last attended. 



10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

THE CLASSIFICATION IN WHICH YOU SHOULD REGISTER 

1. If you are entering college directly from high school, or if you have less than two years 
college work and wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, you will register 
in the General College. 

2. If you have more than two years college work but have not received the Bachelor's 
degree and you wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, you will register in 
one of the colleges of the Upper Division. See pages 26 to 31. 

3. If you have received the bachelor's degree and you wish graduate credit (credit that 
may apply on the master's or doctor's degree either at the University of Florida or else- 
where) you may register in the Graduate School, if the specific requirements are met. 

4. If you do not wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, but wish to attend 
the Summer Session to meet some specific need such as to satisfy teacher certification 
requirements or take refresher courses, you will register as an unclassified student. 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES 

Tuition None 

Registration Fees (Florida Students) per term $20.00 

Registration Fees (Non-Florida Students) per term 30.00 

Registration Fees, College of Law, per term 50.00 

*Registration fee, Kilpatrick Short Course 12.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded) 5.(XI 

Diploma Fee 5.00 

EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS 

A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each 
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case 
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned. 

REFUND OF FEES 

Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but 
not after June 6, for first term reservations, or July 15 for second term reservations. 

If before 4 P. M. on Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason 
wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. 
No refunds will be made after this date. 

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL CAFETERIA 

The P. K. Yonge School Cafeteria will be open to University students for the entire 
Summer Session. It is under the direction of an experienced dietitian and a high quality 
of food will be furnished at reasonable prices. 

All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish 
well-prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value 
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase. 



Regularly registeied students do not pay this additional fee. 



ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN 11 

ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Director of Residence: All correspondence and inquiries concerning rooming facilities 
and all room reservation fees should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of 
Florida, Gainesville. 

Facilities: Details are being worked out to bring certain off -campus fraternity facilities 
into the University Housing Program, since the University Residence Halls (Buckman, 
Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree) will be occupied by war training detachments. 
These off-campus facilities, when incorporated in the University Housing Program, wUl be 
operated on the same basis as the Residence Halls proper. 

Equipment and Services: In general, equipment of rooms in the houses under considera- 
tion will approximate the equipment and facilities of the Residence Halls, and in most 
cases more lounging and recreational space will be available. However, each student will 
be required to furnish study lamp, linens, pillows, and other items required for personal 
convenience and comfort. 

Details of unit locations and individual furnishings wiU be announced later, as necessary 
preliminary arrangements and surveys are completed. 

Policies and Regulations : The same regulations as have governed the Residence Halls 
will be in effect in the houses incorporated in this plan. These regulations are based on 
those principles of individual conduct necessary to obtain maximum benefit and comfort 
for all residents. A copy of specific regulations will be posted in each room and residents 
will be expected to observe them without exception. 

All students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in Uni- 
versity operated imits as long as rooms are available for assignment to them. However, 
students whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville shall not be subject to this 
regulation. 

All women students must have their residence approved before registration can be com- 
pleted. 

No student may move from a room in the University units to other quarters without 
the consent of the Committee on Residence. 

A monitor or preceptress will be assigned to each unit and will be responsible through 
the Director of Residence to the Committee on Residence for the maintenance of proper 
conduct — in keeping with Residence Hall regulations — by all students housed in his or her 
particular unit. 

Rooms will be rented for one or both terms of the Summer Session. All assignments 
will be subject to cancellation or change at the discretion of the University in the interest 
of the housing needs of any war training groups. 

The room rent' is due and must be paid in advance at the beginning of each term. 
University registration may be cancelled because of failure to pay rent as required. Checks 
or money orders should be made payable to the University of Florida. 

Rates: Rates for rooms in the newly-incorporated units will range from $8.00 to $15.00 
per month per student, according to the quality and location of the rooms. Detailed 
schedules of rates wiU be announced as soon as such rates are worked out and approved 
by the Committee on Residence. 



12 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Applications and Reservations : Each person wishing to reserve a room in the University 
housing facilities should complete the application form on page 67 and forward it to the 
Director of Residence together with the room reservation fee of five dollars per person. 
Check or money order for this fee should be made payable to the University of Florida. 

All applications validated by the room reservation fee will be acted upon as soon as the 
details of the housing program are arranged, and the applicants will be notified of their 
assignments or other dispositions of their applications. 

In the event that applicants cannot be placed in University operated units they will be 
referred to privately run housing units on the approved list and allowed to complete in- 
dividual arrangements. 

Room reservation fees will be refunded on request to all applicants who cannot be ac- 
commodated in the spaces available. 

Dates: Applications should be made and reservation fees posted as soon as possible in 
order to insure consideration. 

Refunds will be made on reservations cancelled by or before June 6 (for the first term) 
and July 15 (for the second term). Refunds will not be made on reservations cancelled 
after those dates, unless applicant can show sufficient cause for delay. 

Rooms will be available for occupancy not earlier than June 7 for the first term and 
July 19 for the second term. Applicants who will arrive before those dates or after the 
day classes begin for each term should notify the Director of Residence in advance. 

Check-Ins: Students assigned to rooms in University operated units will check in at 
the Office of the Director of Residence, Section F, Fletcher Hall. The services of a cashier 
will be available there for payment of rents only. 

Luggage: Persons desiring to send heavy luggage ahead of their arrival may address 
it to Sledd Hall Archway or, if they have received a definite advance assignment, to the 
address of the unit to which they are assigned. No responsibility will be accepted by the 
University for such advance shipments. 

Room Lists: Lists of rooms available in privately operated off -campus homes will be 
compiled by the Office of the Dean of Students and will be available from that office on 
request. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

ACTIVITIES 

A most unusual opportunity of the Summer Session will be the Kilpatrick short course 
during the first three weeks of the first term. The noted educator William Heard Kilpatrick 
will be the main feature of this short course. He will be at the University the second and 
third weeks of the first term but the first week of the term will be preparatory to his coming. 
Any graduate student in Education may take the course for credit toward the master's 
degree. (See En. 540, p. 43.) 

ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS 

Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi- 
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main 
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory 
School will be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays 
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart- 
ments of Speech and Music. 

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL UFE 

The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading 
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at 
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will 
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection 
with the Student Assembly. 

THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING 

The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Reading, 
recreation, and lounging rooms will supply adequate facilities for social activities and for 
comfortable relaxation. 

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

AU Students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which 
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce- 
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will 
be held responsible. 

11:00 A.M. Wednesday. June 21 

10:00 A.M. Wednesday, July 12 

8:00 A.M. Wednesday, July 26 

10:00 A.M. Wednesday, August 9 

SWIMMING POOL 

The facilities of the swimming pool will be available, without charge to students reg- 
istered in the Summer Session. Those interested should see Mr. Genovar, Gymnasium. The 
pool will be open daily, except Monday, from 1:00 to 6:00 P.M. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University in 
1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the Uni- 
versity at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious breaches of 
discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees. Candidates 
for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of at least 3.00 
(B) on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college, an average 



14 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

of 3.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is necessary that 
he have an average of 3.30 or higher. Graduate students are also eligible for membership. 

KAPPA DELTA PI 

Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of Florida in 1923. 
Kappa Delta Pi has as its purpose the encouragement of high intellectual and scholastic 
standards and the recognition of outstanding contributions in education. In general, the 
scholarship requirement for members in Upsilon Chapter is a scholastic average of 3.00 (B). 
High scholarship alone, however, will not guarantee election to membership. Other qual- 
ities which the person must possess are: desirable personal-social qualities, leadership 
abilities, worthy educational ideals, and continued interest in education. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938. 
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national 
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 15% of the senior class graduating in each semester, 
including both graduating classes of summer session, is eligible for election. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody 
Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for 
all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin boards, and in 
the Orange and Blue Bulletin. 

ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN 

An official mimeographed bulletin is published every other day during the Summer 
Session. It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule, 
meetings, lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members are responsible for 
observance of all official notices published in the Bulletin. 

THE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The Placement Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public service. 
This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates; the Bureau 
considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person in the right 
teaching position. 

There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the 
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On 
request, this information is sent to school officials of the State. 

Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards. 
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them to 
select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned. 

Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of 
the Teachers' Placement Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

LABORATORY SCHOOL 

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct demonstration classes in the kinder- 
garten, elementary and secondary school grades during the first term of the Summer 
Session from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon. Secondary school classes will also meet in the 
afternoon as needed. Provision will be made for four elementary groups: kindergarten. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

combined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth and 
sixth grades, and all subjects in the secondary school for which there is a sufficient number 
of pupils. 

Application for enrollment should be made to the Director of the Laboratory School 
as soon as possible since the number who may be accommodated is limited. 

Pupils will register on Monday, June 12, in Room 230, Yonge Building, from 8:30 to 
10:00 A.M. There are no registration fees for the Laboratory School. Classes will begin 
Monday, June 12, at 9:00 A.M. 

If there is sufficient demand a limited number of elementary groups and secondary 
school classes will be organized during the second term of the summer session. 

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY 

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library will be open for use of teachers attending 
the Summer Session. This library contains about 6000 books for boys and girls from the 
kindergarten through the twelfth grade. These books are available for use in the library 
only and may not be checked out. 

The library will be open during the following hours: 8:30 A.M. to 12:00 noon and 
1:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturdays: 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon. 

The librarian will post hours when she will be available for conference on individual 
library problems. Teachers and principals are invited to ask for whatever help they 
may need. 

FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY 

The Florida Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the P. K. Yonge 
Building. This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart- 
ment of Education, the College of Education, and the Laboratory School of the University 
of Florida. Books and other curriculum materials used in the Florida Program for the 
Improvement of Instruction are available here. 
» 

DOE MUSEUM 

The Doe Museum connected with the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School is located on the 
third floor of the P. K. Yonge Building. The Museum will be open from 9:00 A.M. to 
4:00 P.M. daily, except Saturday, and from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon on Saturday, from 
June 12 through July 22. This Museum houses a unique collection prepared by the Curator, 
Charles E. Doe. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Four libraries on the campus make up the University Library system — the Main Library, 
the libraries of the Experiment Station, the Law College, and the P. K. Yonge School. 

The Main Library building houses over 150,000 books. It has two large reading rooms. 
Those books assigned for reading in the General College and for Upper-Division students 
are in the Reading Room on the ground floor. In the Reading Room on the second floor 
au:e the current magazines, the books of reference, and the card catalog. In the book stack 
there are forty-eight carrels for the use of graduate students in their research work. 

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY 
For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University, funds 
may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made on each 
account, per term. 



16 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students 
through the establishment of certain loan funds — the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the 
College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, the 
R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. N. Sheats Memorial Loan 
Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Loans are governed by the following regulations. 

(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida. 

(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school. 

(3) Applicant must be in need of aid. 

(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term. 

(5) Application must be made directly to the Dean of the Summer Session. 

(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she ia 
teaching at the time of application. 

(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session. 

(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months. 

(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund. 

Upon application to the Dean of the Summer Session, blank forms for application for 
a scholarship loan will be furnished. 

KAPPA DELTA PI LOAN FUND 
Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has established a loan fund available for small loans 
to graduate and undergraduate students who are preparing for the teaching profession. 
Among other eligibility requirements, a student desiring a loan must be a member of 
Kappa Delta Pi and must have a scholarship average of not less than B. Application 
should be made to the Chairman of the Committee on Loan Funds of Upsilon Chapter. 
Further information concerning this loan fund and forms for making application for a 
loan may be secured from the Secretary of the College of Education, Room 120, Yonge 
School, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. , 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES 
The following more important items govern the granting of extension certificates: 

1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended 
and at the time formal application for extension is made. 

2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade is 
below a "C". 

3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for 
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at 
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan- 
guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded. A list 
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language 
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 6 for the First Term and August 
15 for the Second Term. In case of error in this list, students should report 
to the Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension whose 
name does not appear on this list by July 13 for the First Term or August 
24 for the Second Term. Students should indicate exactly the name that 
appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended. 

4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin English, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a 
year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not be 
granted. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



17 



CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

Persons desiring information concerning the certification of teachers are advised to write 
the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Bulletin A on Cer- 
tification of Teachers. This booklet gives all requirements for Graduate and Undergraduate 
Certificates in the various fields as well as instructions concerning applications for cer- 
tificates. 

As a matter of information to students (and with emphasis on the point that certificates 
are granted by the State Department of Education, not by the University) some of the 
requirements listed in the Certificate Bulletin A, April, 1942, of the State Department 
of Education are repeated below with the numbers of the courses offered by the University 
which are designed to meet these requirements. 



Requirements 



For All Certificates: 
Constitution 

General Preparation 
Health Education 
Physical Education 



*University Courses Meeting the 
Requirements 



Two of the following: Hy. 301, 302, 303, 304, 

331, 332; CPl. 13; Pel. 313, 314 
C-1 and &3 and C-2 or C-6 
HPl. 387 (or En. 387 or En. 103) 
HPl. 363, 364, 373 



For Elementary Certificates: 
Child Development 
Educational Psychology 
History and Principles or Introduction 

to Education 
Elementary School Curriculum or 

Methods of Teaching in the 

Elementary School 
Principles and Methods of Teaching 

Reading 
Children's Literature 
Methods of Teaching Science in 

Elementary School 
Methods in Arithmetic 
Methods in Social Studies 
Geography 

Observation and Practice Teaching 
Public School Music 
Public School Art 

Health Education in Elementary Grades 
Physical Education in Oementary 

Grades 
Penmanship 



En. 385 (or En. 203 or En. 319) 
En. 386 (or En. 207) 

CEn. 13 (or En. 101 or 102) 



En. 471 (or En. 308) 

En. 471 (or En. 221) 
Eh. 391 

Gl. 301 or Gl. 302 (or En. 209 or 222) 

En. 471 (or En. 124) 

Scl. 301 or 302 (or En. 201) 

C-2 or Courses in Gpy. 

En. 405 or En. 421-2 (or En. 253) 

Msc. courses 

Pc. courses 

HPl. 387 

HPl. 373 

BEn. 97 (or Hg. 101) 



For Secondary Certificates: 

English 

Mathematics 

Physical Education 

Science: 

Physical Sciences 
Biological Sciences 
Conservation 



*Based uDon present offerings, 
shown in parentheses. 



C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh. 

C-42, C-421 and courses in CMs. and Ms. 

Courses in HPl. 

C-2, Gl. 317, Courses in Ps. and Cy. 
C-6, Gl. 318, Courses in Bly. and Bty. 
C-1 or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 
or Es. 381 or Es. 382 

Discontinued courses which will meet the requirements are 



18 



BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 



Social Studies: 
History 

Political Science 
Economics 
Sociology 
Geography 
Conservation 
General 



Courses in CHy. and Hy. 

Courses in CPl. and Pel. 

Courses in CEs. and Es. 

Courses in CSy. and Sy. 

Courses in Gpy. and Es. 381, 385 

See Science 

C-1 will be counted as 8 of the total hours 

required but will not reduce the specihc 

requirements. 



Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department 
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the 
proper course descriptions for such fields, guide is provided (see page 36). 



fFAR PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES 19 

INFORMATION REGARDING ISSUANCE OF WAR 
PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES 

(The following is a statement of the regulations relating to war provisional teaching 
certificates, reproduced here with the permission of the State Department of Education.) 

The War Provisional Certificate is being issued during the war emergency in order to 
increase the supply in certain subject fields where a critical shortage of teachers exists. 
The requirements for this type of certificate will be in accordance with those established 
for regular teaching certificates issued upon the basis of college work as defined in Certifi- 
cate Bulletin A except where changes have been expressly authorized. 

The authorized changes are of two types: (1) general changes approved by action of 
the State Board of Education (2) other changes in regulations governing general back- 
ground, general professional preparation, and specialization made by the State Department 
of Education as authorized in Section 3, Item (g) of the State Board Regulations. 

War Provisional Certificates will be as acceptable for accreditation purposes as any 
other regular type of Florida certificate based on college training. Since this type of cer- 
tificate is valid for the duration of the war only with the exception noted in Section 1, 
Item (i), extensions will not be necessary. Teachers holding this type of certificate should, 
however, be encouraged to secure additional training through summer courses or corre- 
spondence study whenever feasible. 



General Changes in Certification Regulations Approved by the State Board of Education 
Affecting the Issuance of War Provisional Certificates. 

1. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be authorized to establish (1) a 
War Provisional Certificate for Graduates and (2) a War Provisional Certificate for 
Undergraduates. 

2. An applicant shall be granted a War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or a War 
Provisional Certificate for Undergraduates upon meeting satisfactorily the requirements 
for these certificates as set forth by the State Department of Education under regulations 
prescribed by the State Board of Education. 

3. The following policies shall be observed by the State Department of Education in work- 
ing out the details connected with the issuance of War Provisional Certificates: 

a. Regulations governing the age, citizenship, health certificate, moral character cer- 
tificate, and Constitution requirement of the applicant shall be the same as for 
obtaining other regular teaching certificates in Florida. 

b. Regulations regarding recency-of-credit shall be waived for all applicants for the 
War Provisional Certificate. 

c. Persons who have held Florida certificates which expired more than ten years prior 
to the data of present application and which were based on two or four years of 
college training shall be entitled to a War Provisional Certificate covering the fields 
in which they meet the professional and special field requirements for this type of 
certificate as set forth by the State Department of Education under regulations 
prescribed by the State Board. 



20 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

d. Persons who have held Florida certificates which expired not less than one full year 
nor more than ten years prior to the date of present application and which were based 
on two or four years of college training, without further review of college transcripts, 
shall be entitled to a War Provisional Certificate covering the same subjects and 
teaching range as the original certificate which has expired. 

e. Persons having a total of 60 semester hours credit at any standard institution of higher 
learning as defined in Certificate Bulletin A shall be eligible for the IFar Provisioned 
Certificate for Undergraduates, provided they meet the other general and special field 
requirements set forth by the State Department of Education for this type of certifi- 
cate under regulations prescribed by the State Board. 

f. Persons having a total of 120 semester hours credit earned at the institutions de- 
scribed in Section (e) above shall be eligible for the JFar Provisional Certificate for 
Graduates, provided they meet the other general and special field requirements for 
this type of certificate set forth by the State Department of Education under regula- 
tions prescribed by the State Board. 

g. The requirements for specialization in the subject fields in which a teacher shortage 
exists may be reduced not more than fifty percent. The State Department of Educa- 
tion is hereby authorized to vary the exact percentage of reduction in the various 
subject fields in accordance with teacher supply, provided the percentages established 
shall be applied consistently. 

h. The fee to be paid by an applicant for a War Provisional Certificate shall be the 
same as that paid by applicants for other regular teaching certificates in Florida. 

i. War Provisional Certificates shall be valid for the duration of the present war not 
exceeding two years. Should hostilities cease within less than two years from the 
date of issuance of the certificate and within the limits of a school year, such certifi- 
cates may remain valid until the close of that session of school. War Provisional 
Certificates are valid until the close of the present war only if the war ends within 
two years from the date of issuance of such certificates. If the war continues for a 
period greater than two years, the phrase "not exceeding two years" shall take effect 
and the certificate will become invalid following the expiration of the two-year period 
unless extended in the same manner as that prescribed for extendijag other regular 
teaching certificates. 

4. Two new fields of specialization shall be added to those which may be covered by the 
War Provisional Certificates: Pre-School Education and Pre-Induction Training. Pend- 
ing the development of requirements for certification in these fields on a long-range 
basis, Pre-School Education and Pre-Induction Training may be placed on the face 
of the War Provisional Certificate in accordance with the following regulations: 

a. Pre-School Education: Persons who meet the requirements prescribed above for the 
War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or the War Provisional Certificates for 
Undergraduates and who have completed a two weeks' training course in pre-school 
education and/or have completed a three semester hour course in the care and pro- 
tection of pre-school children shall have entered upon the faces of their War Pro- 
visional Certificates "Pre-School Education." 

b. Pre-Induction Training: Persons who meet the requirements prescribed above for 
the War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or the War Provisional Certificate for 



JFAR PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES 21 

Undergraduates and who present evidence of having passed satisfactorily pre- 
induction courses offered by the Armed Services, by defense training centers operated 
under federal direction, by Civil Aeronautics Administration, and by organizations 
of equal standing shall have written upon the faces of their War Provisional Certifi- 
cates "Pre-Induction Training." 

SECTION n 

Other Changes in Certification Regulations Contained in Certificate Bulletin A Made by 
State Department of Education Through Authority Granted by the State Board of Educa- 
tion. (Effective April 1, 1943.) 

1. Change Item G, Page 4, so that eighteen semester hours credit shall be earned in 
general background courses which should include credit in at least two of the following 
fields: science, English, social studies, and mathematics. 

2. Change Item H, Page 4, for secondary school certification so as to require 12 semester 
hours in Education ; provided that in lieu of the three plans set forth for obtaining class- 
room experience the State Superintendent may at his discretion recognize the practical 
experience presented by mature persons seeking certification in instrumental music, 
industrial arts, commercial subjects, science, pre-induction training, and other critical 
fields and provided, further, that persons coming under the provisions of Section I, 
Items 3c and 3d, above can use past teaching experience without adhering to the three- 
year period limitation set forth in Certificate Bulletin A. 

3. Change Item 5b, Page 6, referring to Stenography to read as follows: "Twelve semester 
hours in commercial subjects including a one-year course in typewriting and a one year 
course in Gregg Shorthand OR a one semester course in typewriting and a one semester 
course in Gregg Shorthand above the high school level where the applicant has earned 
two high school units in typewriting and one unit in shorthand." 

4. Change Item 5c, Page 6, referring to Bookkeeping to read as follows: "Twelve semester 
hours in commercial subjects including six semester hours (first year) course in account- 
ing at the college level OR twelve semester hours in commercial subjects including a 
three semester hour course in bookkeeping at the college level in addition to two high 
school units in bookkeeping." 

5. Change Item 6, Page 6, referring to Elementary School Course to read as follows: "A 
total of eighteen semester hours credit in the field of elementary education including: 
six semester hours in background of elementary education; three to six semester hours 
in practice teaching or some other plan for securing actual classroom teaching experi- 
ence approved by the State Department of Education; six to nine semester hours in 
elementary school methods including work in the teaching of reading." 

6. Change Item 10, Page 8, referring to Industrial Arts so that the requirements shall be 
fifty percent of the hours now required. 

7. Change Item 11, Page 8, referring to Languages Other than English to read as follows: 
"Twelve semester hours in the language to be covered must be earned above the intro- 
ductory level of two high school units or the initial six semester hours college course. 
Two languages wiU be entered where the applicant presents six semester hours in the 
one language and twelve semester hours in the other language above the introductory 
level defined above." 



22 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

8. Change Item 14, Page 9, referring to Mathematics to read as follows: "Twelve semester 
hours in mathematics." 

9. Change Item 15, Page 9, "Instrumental Music will be entered upon the face of a certifi- 
cate when evidence is presented to show that the applicant has the necessary technical 
information and skill for directing school band and/or orchestra work, said evidence to 
consist of a statement from the director of any music clinic which is approved by a recog- 
nized institution of higher learning or by the examining committee of the Florida Asso- 
ciation of Bandmasters. 

The applicant must also show familiarity with the psychology of youth and the place 
of music in the modern school program. This requirement may be satisfied by submitting 
at least three semester hours credit in one or more courses in education which deal with 
the purposes of the school and the nature and needs of the adolescent." 

10. Change Item 16, Page 9, referring to Physical Education to read as follows: "Twelve 
semester hours in health education and physical education of which not more than six 
may be coaching courses." 

11. Change Item 17, referring to Science so that the requirements shall be fifty percent of 
the hours now required. 

12. Change Item 19, referring to Social Studies so that the requirements shall be two-thirds 
of the number of semester hours required at present. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 23 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENT RESPONSIBnJTY 

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and 
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their 
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this, 
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect 
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the OfiFice of the Registrar, formal application for a 
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receiye 
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done. 

Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be 
dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college in which the student 
is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the office of the 
Registrar. Unclassified students must secure the approval of the Dean of the Summer 
Session for this purpose. 

The student is advised to procure a copy of Student Regulations, Part I, and acquaint 
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is directed to the following items: 



The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester 
hour. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two semester 
terms, or one semester and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students 
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University. 
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for 
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University. 

2. For the master's degree two semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy 
the residence requirements, except for the Master of Education degree, where the require- 
ments are two regular terms and one summer term, or six summer terms. 

3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (28 in the College of 
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from 
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon 
written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the 
amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours 
required for a baccalaureate degree. 

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED 

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree 
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take 
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence 
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by 
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will 
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean of the 
college concerned. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. In the College of Arts 
and Sciences no extension work is permitted in the last thirty hours, except by special 
permission. 



24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD 

The maximum load for which an undergraduate student may register is determined by 
the individual's academic average for the last term or semester of college work, regardless 
of the institution attended. 

1. An average of "B" or higher 9 hours 

2. An average of less than "B" 6 hours, regardless of the number of courses 

or 

8 hours, with a maximum of 2 courses. 

Maximum load is six semester hours per term in the Graduate School and seven hours 
in the College of Law. 

Minimum load is four semester hours. At the time of registration loads of less than 
four hours may be approved by the Dean concerned. After registration, loads of less than 
four hours can be approved by the Sub-Committee of the University Senate. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

For regulations in the v£irious colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the 
Catalog. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities earning 
credits to be transferred eventually to their respective institutions, (b) students with 
degrees taking refresher courses, and (c) other students not candidates for degrees. 

2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclassified 
student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the colleges or schools 
of the University, it wUl be necessary for such student to regularize his admission to the 
University (present all the credentials required) and meet the requirements (in eflfect at 
the time of application for candidacy) for admission to the college or school of his choice. 

3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned while an 
unclassified student will be accepted in so far as they apply toward the degree requirements 
(in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the college or school chosen by the 
student. A student must have been registered as a regular student in the college or school 
from which he expects to receive a bachelor's degree for at least three summer terms and 
in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the master's degree. The residence 
requirement of at least five summer terms in the University wiU not be waived in any case. 

4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclassified 
students during the Summer Session. 

5. Each student registered as an unclassified student wUl be given a definite statement 
of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in the various colleges 
and schools. This statement will make clear that credits earned while a student is regis- 
tered as an unclassified student can be applied toward a degree in the college of his choice 
only if under regular procedure this credit wiU apply toward that degree. 

6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the Dean of 
the Summer Session and assistants chosen by him from the faculty. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 25 

ADJUSTMENTS FOR STUDENTS CALLED INTO ARMED FORCES 
DURING A TERM OR SEMESTER 

Each case is handled individually by the University Senate Sub-Committee on student 
petitions. If a student has actually received orders to report for military duty or other 
war activity, this committee will endeavor to make such adjustments as are possible. Such 
a student should consult the Dean of the College in which he is registered, the Dean of 
Students, or the Registrar for additional information or assistance in presenting his case. 
Committee action may authorize instructors to give examinations early or to make other 
adjustments. The committee does not give grades or grant credit. If a student leaves 
before it is possible to take examinations, information on his standing is collected and filed 
as a part of his record so that it may be used to adjust his program in case he later returns 
to the University. Only rarely and upon the unqualified recommendation of the instructor 
is credit granted in such cases. 

REQUIRED PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM 

The problem of physical fitness is one of the major problems of the war emergency. 
Because of this the University of Florida has constructed a physical fitness program to be 
required of all male students under 45 during their stay at the University. It should be 
emphasized that this program, while adopted as a part of the University's complete coopera- 
tion toward winning the war, is at the same time of importance in a sound educational 
program. It should lead to better work in the classrooms of the University as well as to 
better health and living for the individual student. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

Each male student under 45 will be required to furnish a report of physical examination 
on the form provided for this purpose by the University Physician before registration for the 
1944 Summer Session can be completed. (This requirement will not apply to those students 
who were in attendance at the University of Florida during either semester of the 1943-44 
academic year.) Additional physical examinations will be made by the University Physician 
when, in his opinion, such examinations are necessary. 

THE PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM REQUIRED OF ALL MALE STUDENTS UNDER 45 

The program will be conducted in regularly scheduled sections meeting three periods 
per week. The registration forms for a male student under 45 cannot be accepted until he 
has arranged his schedule to include one of the regular sections. It is not possible to choose 
one section for one day and another for the other days. Students certified for restricted 
activity by the University Physician will be given special programs designed to fit then- 
physical condition. Such students register for that section which fits their academic 
schedule and will meet at the time scheduled for the special program assigned for them. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIRED 

The following regulation concerning absences from scheduled meetings of the Physical 
Fitness Program will apply: 

When a student has accumulated four absences which are not properly accounted for 
the student shall be on probation. When the student accumulates six absences unaccounted 
for the student may be reported to the Committee on Discipline with the recommendation 
that he be dropped from the University. 



26 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School offers work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of 
Arts in Architecture. Master of Arts in Education. Master of Science, Master of Science in 
Agriculture, Master of Science in Engineering, Master of Science in Pharmacy and Master 
of Education. In a few fields the Graduate School offers work for the Ph.D. For details 
consult the Catalog. 

Passing grades for students registering in the Graduate School are A and B. All other 
grades are failing. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE EXCEPT PIASTER OF EDUCATION 

ITork Required. — The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a 
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half 
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as 
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course 
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the 
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the 
approval of the Supervisory Committee. 

In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the 
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em- 
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major- 
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer. 

A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely aUied to the major 
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The 
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three 
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term. 

The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion 
of the student's Supervisory Committee. If it is required the examination should be passed 
by the end of the third summer term, or when the work is half completed. 

The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time 
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven 
summers. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Description and Purpose. — Beginning with the Summer Session of 1944, graduate work 
leading to the degree of Master of Education will be available. This degree is designed 
for the professional preparation of teachers, rather than for research. The work will aim 
to develop in public school workers a wide range of essential abilities and to give them a 
broad background of advanced general education, rather than to encourage them to specialize 
narrowly. While not neglecting to add to the qualifications already attained, it will further 
aim to overcome weaknesses in a student's development. There will be a continuous 
integration of fields of subject matter with educational theory and practice and with each 
other. Moreover, a continuous provision will be made for diagnosing students' needs and 
for the planning of individual programs to care for those needs. 

Students in Education who have started graduate work and who wish to study for the 
M.Ed. may do so by arranging with the general supervisory committee to comply with the 
requirements of this program. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 27 

Requirements for Admission. — A student with a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
institution will be admitted to the M.Ed, program whether or not he has previously earned 
any prescribed amount of credits in Education. 

A student from a non-accredited institution may be permitted to register as an unclassi- 
fied student until his standing can be determined. Upon the recommendation of the general 
supervisory committee and the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, credits earned 
while a student is unclassified may count toward his degree. 

Residence Requirement. — A minimum of six summer terms, or two semesters and one 
short summer term, or the equivalent, is required as residence. Any student whose under- 
graduate work does not fit into this program may have to spend more than the minimum 
time to earn the degree. 

Transfer of Credits. — If recommended in advance by the general supervisory committee 
and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may be permitted to study 
with some competent teacher in another institution for one six-weeks summer term. Credits 
earned prior to admission to the University will be governed by the present regulations of 
the Graduate School. 

Work Required. — Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and minors, each 
student will be required to show a reasonable amount of competence in certain areas of 
work as determined by the general supervisory committee. Minimum course requirements 
is 36 semester hours, of which not more than six may be taken in any one summer term 
and not more than fifteen in any one semester. 

Syllabi and directions for study in each of these areas will be prepared and made 
available to students. A great deal of individual work is expected, but not without counsel, 
guidance and instruction. Competence is to be judged (1) by daily association with the 
students on the part of designated instructors, (2) by oral, or written, or both, evaluation 
at the end of each term, and (3) by a comprehensive oral and written examination just 
before graduation. 

A thesis will not be required, but the student will be required to submit a considerable 
amount of written material in the form of reports, term papers, records of work accom- 
plished, etc., all of this written material to be directed toward the integration, adaptation 
and utilization of the student's program. A reading knowledge of a foreign language 
will not be required, but the effective use of the English language is expected of all 
candidates. Admission to the work of this program is not a guarantee that the student 
will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The general supervisory committee wiU 
recommend the student for admission to candidacy as soon after his first semester or 
summer session of work as he has satisfied the committee of his qualifications. 

The candidate must have at least one year of teaching experience prior to the last 
six-weeks summer term. 

Any additional work above the normal residence requirement must be recommended by 
the general supervisory committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The General Supervisory Committee. — Students in this program will be directed by a 
general supervisory committee of five members, with Dean J. W. Norman as chairman. 
Other members of the staff will be called in to aid in individual cases. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 

The Summer Session of 1944 will offer Ae. 71A — Thesis. 

This subject will be taught by the project method in which the student progresses 
individually according to his ambition, previous preparation, natural ability and application. 
Credits are given on acceptable work completed. 



28 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Credits obtained may be applied toward the degrees in Architecture and Building Con- 
struction. For detailed requirements for the several degrees offered by the School the 
student should consult the Catalog. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the 
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular 
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the 
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish 
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institu- 
tions and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences 
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance 
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual 
vigor. 

CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is administered by the Director of the School of 
Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy.) The other curricula above are administered by 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Only students who have completed the 
General College or its equivalent (as determined by the Board of Examiners and approved 
by the Dean of the College) are eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates 
for degrees. 

THE DECREES OF BACHEXOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read 
carefully the description of requirements under the heading College of Arts and Sciences 
in the Catalog. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified 
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of ancient languages, 
Bible, economics, English, French, geography, German, history, journalism, philosophy, 
political science, sociology, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of 
Science will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified requirements and whose 
majors center in one or morei of the fields of biology, botany, chemistry, geology, and 
physics. Some students who major in mathematics or in psychology receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts while others receive the degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree being 
determined by the direction of the student's interests and accomplishments in his major 
work. 

THE PRE-LAW COURSE 

In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers com- 
bined academic-law curricula. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is 
possible to earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent 
in the General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College 
of Law. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 29 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES 

Students who upon graduation from the General College are eligible for admission to 
the College of Arts and Sciences and who have not completed requirements for admission 
to medical and dental schools should continue and complete their pre-professional training 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select courses in accordance with 
requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter, and should corre- 
spond with the dean of that school for information and advice. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The College of Business Administration operates during the Summer Session as during 
the regular terms. The courses offered appeal to students attending the regular terms 
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to 
take courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare 
for teaching social sciences. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

The College of Business Administration offers two degrees: The Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Public Administration. To secure 
the first degree students must complete either the Curriculum in Business Administration 
Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure the second degree they 
must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration. The Catalog should be consulted 
for admission and curriculum requirements. 

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW 

The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the 
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately 
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General 
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have 
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they 
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com- 
plete the course in the College of Law. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

REQinREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a 
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval 
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 
For graduation fP'ith Honors, a student must earn an honor point average of at least 3.2 
in the work of the Upper Division. For graduation with High Honors, a student must meet 
the following requirements: (1) attain an honor point average of at least 3.5 in the work 
of the Upper Division; (2) obtain the recommendation of the Faculty Committee which has 
supervised a special project or program of work for the student. A copy of detailed regula- 
tions governing graduation With High Honors may be obtained from the office of the Dean. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education — Bachelor of Arts in Education 
and Bachelor of Science in Education. For either degree the student is required to com- 



30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

plete 66 semester hours, with an average of "C" or higher, after graduation from the 
General College. 

CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SaENCE IN EDUCATION 

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other 
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit. 

Graduation from the General College. 

Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits 

Children's Social Studies 3 

Children's Science 2 

Children's Literature „ 3 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Health Education 3 

Public School Art 4 

Public School Music 4 

Handwriting or 1 

Education : 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385 — Child Development 

En. 386 — Educational Psychology 

En. 421422— Student Teaching 

En. 406 — Elementary School Administration 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Elementary School) 

•English ...„ _ 15 credits 

Total of at least 66 credits in the Upper Division. 

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years' 
college credit. 

General Background: Credits 

C-1 8 

C-2 or G6 "..'.' ZZ." ""Z13Z.ZZZZ33"ZZZZ1ZZZ'"8 or 6 

C-3 „ 8 

C-41 „...4or3 

Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits 

Children's Social Studies 3 

Children's Science _ _ 2 

Children's Literature _ 3 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Health Education 3 

Public School Art 4 

Public School Music 4 

Handwriting or 1 

Education: 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385^ — Child Development 

En. 386 — Educational Psychology 

En. 421-422— Student Teaching 

En. 406 — Elementary School Administration 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Elementary School) 

*Ejiglish 15 credits 

*Social Studies 15 credits 

Enough electives to make a total of 132 credits 

*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in 
other areas. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 31 

CURMCULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other 
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit. 

Graduation from the General College. 

Health Education 3 credits 

Health and Physical Education 2 credits 

Education: 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385 — Child Development 

En. 386 — Educational Psychology 

En. 401 — School Administration 

En. 421-422— Student Teaching 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Secondary School) 
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 17.) 
Electives, if needed, to make a total of 66 semester hours completed in the Upper Division. 

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years' 
college credit. 

General Background: Credits 

C-1 8 

C-2 or C-6 8 or 6 

C-3 8 

C-41 4 or 3 

Speech 3 or 4 

Health Education 3 

Health and Physical Education - 2 

Education : 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385 — Child Development 

En. 386 — Educational Psychology 

En. 401 — School Administration 

En. 421-422— Student Teaching 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Secondary School) 

Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 17.) 

Electives, if needed, to make a total of 132 credits 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering is making available courses in each department during the 
Summer Session, so that students can graduate in minimum time. 

Unless engineering students take full advantage of course offerings in order to accelerate 
their program, and so graduate within minimum time, they will not be eligible for defer- 
ment by Selective Service Boards. 

Students already enrolled in the College of Engineering and others who contemplate 
doing so at a later date, are urged to confer with the Dean of the College or the various 
department heads, in arranging their schedules. 

THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT* 
The old plan, common in university education under the free elective system, of having 
a freshman register in a particular professional school or college on matriculation day 

*DurinK the war emergency general education is most vital. It still takes at least four years 
for colleges to train engineers, chemists, or other technicians. Preceding its long range objectives, 
general education takes present day ideas and materials to enable one to make desirable next steps. 
The present complexity demands constant appraisal and adjustment. 



32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

created many problems and left others unsolved. A majority of students were not able to 
choose, so they were forced to guess. Indoctrination of a most undesirable type followed 
in many cases. Some departments tried to keep the chance entrant and gave him little help 
in getting correctly placed in another field. Even regulations were adopted that forced 
the student to lose ground if he changed. Narrow specialization followed, and the student 
who continued untU graduation had little opportunity to make an intelligent choice of his 
life's work or to explore his interests and abilities in other fields. Thus while such a 
program was undesirable even from the standpoint of those who continued until graduation, 
it was infinitely worse for those who dropped out before graduation (in American univer- 
sities, about two-thirds of all who enter). This great group carried away fragments and 
foundations of advanced material which remained unknown to them. 

Thus to the administration and the governing board of the University of Florida it 
appears highly desirable that beginning students be given an opportunity to look about, 
explore interests, test capabilities, verify tentative choices, and above all, to get that common 
body of knowledge needed by all citizens of the Republic whether they be doctors, lawyers, 
business men, or engineers. The General College was organized as the university college 
to administer this work for freshmen and sophomores. 

In a recent survey from the United States Office of Education, Higher Education, 
the University of Florida is named along with the University of Wisconsin, the - University 
of Minnesota, and the University of Chicago as being "... key institutions that have had 
great influence on the development of the general college." In the same bulletin, the 
University of Florida, the University of Southern California, and the University of Chicago 
are listed as "typical" of one of the six general patterns now being followed in college and 
university reorganization. It is pointed out further that more than fifty-three colleges and 
universities now have a program of general education; fifty-two per cent of the state uni- 
versities are divided into upper divisions (juniors and seniors) and lower divisions (fresh- 
men and sophomores). 

PROGRAMS AND COURSES 

The program of general education may follow any one of several patterns. There is a 
core of comprehensive areas to be studied by all. These are generally referred to as 
C-courses. Even from the beginning while a student is working in the comprehensive 
fields, he may elect departmental courses to test and discover interest, explore capacities, 
and in a very definite way find evidence to guide his future steps. Many departments 
and colleges have made adjustments and worked out introductory courses which are in 
reality connectives between the C-courses and the highly specialized work of the several 
departments. These introductory courses add to the usual foundations material that ex- 
plains, evaluates, and indicates the significance of what is being studied. 

There is no attempt to survey for freshmen and sophomores these great areas of human 
knowledge and understanding. This would give a very thin spread. However, it is possible 
to use illustrative material, pick out meaningful ideas, and give the student something very 
definite to guide his next steps, whether they be away from the University or deeper into 
professional foundations. These areas are: 

1. Government, Economics, Sociology, and History (known hereafter as C-1). 

2. The Utilization and Understanding of the Physical World (C-2). 

3. Communication: Reading, Speaking, and Writing (C-3). 

4. Straight Thinking, Propaganda Analysis, Mathematics (C-4). 

5. The Humanities: The Culture of Races, the Building of Civilization (C-5). 

6. Fundamental Principles of Biological Development (C-6). 

7. Elective subjects from Upper Division departments of the field or fields 
under consideration for advanced work (total, 22 semester hours). 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 33 

The average student, with due provision for individual dififerences, follows the general 
plan above. Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests in every high 
school of the State to all seniors. Since many high schools are also trying to acquaint the 
student with the common body of knowledge so needed by aU, their records along with 
the placement test results indicate the variation that should be made in the program 
followed by a student at the University. Additional placement tests, similar to the final 
comprehensive examinations required in each of the areas mentioned above, are being 
worked out at the University to be used as a further aid in determining the pattern a 
freshman's program should take. 

GUIDANCE 

Since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, our program absorbs 
much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course of the General College 
program is designed to guide the student. During the time he is studying the several great 
areas of human understanding and achievement, he is also taking special subjects to test 
aptitude, interests, and ability. The program is adjusted to the individual, but there must 
be a more substantial basis for adjustment than just a chance whim of the moment. The 
material of the comprehensive courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary 
function. While, of necessity, we must look forward to distant goals, the General College 
is trying to present materials that are directly related to life experiences and which will 
immediately become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct next 
steps. Thus the whole program — placement tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests, 
selected material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences, provisions for superior 
students, adjustment for individual diilerences, election privileges, and comprehensive ex- 
aminations — all are parts of a plan designed to guide students. 

Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a small staflF. 
The whole drive of the General College program is one of directing the thinking of the 
student. While the necessary correlation and unification is attempted at the General College 
Office, throughout the General College period, students consult Upper Division deans and 
department heads to discuss future work. During the last month of each school year these 
informal conferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference at which each student 
fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year. 

BEGINNING STUDENTS 

Freshmen will be able to complete nearly half of the program for the first year by 
attending the entire twelve weeks of the Summer Session. Suggestions as to Sununei 
Programs are listed below. These should be used in conjunction with the regular University 
Catalog and after consulting the Dean of the General College or a member of the Advisors 
Group. 
1. For the majority of students — any combination of the following 3 and 4 hour courses 

totalling not more than nine hours per term. 

First Term — Second Term — 

C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World 

(cont'd) 
C-21 Man and the Physical World C-22 Man and the Physical World 

(cont'd) 
C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

(cont'd) 
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-421 Trigonometry 
C-61 Man and the Biological World C-62 Man and the Biological World 

(cont'd) 



34 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

(See description of courses, page 37, for number of hours" credit.) 
2. For deviations from the regular program see Program of Studies, page 48 of the Uni- 
versity Catalog, 1943-44. For certain special groups the following courses of study are 
suggested. 

A. Students considering Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Programs: 
First Term — Second Term — 

C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World 

(cont'd) 
or or 

C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

(cont'd) 
or or 

C-61 Man and the Biological World C-62 Man and the Biological World 

(cont'd) 
And one or two of the following each term to make a total of not more than nine hours. 
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-421 Trigonometry 
Cy. 101 General Chemistry Cy. 102 General Chemistry (cont'd) 

Bly. 101 General Animal Biology BIy. 102 General Animal Biology 

B. Students considering Engineering who have completed three or four years of high 
school mathematics: 

First Term — Second Term — 

CMs. 23 Basic Mathematics CMs. 24 Basic Mathematics (cont'd) 

And one of the following: 
C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World 

(cont'd) 
C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

(cont'd) 

These are not inflexible programs; they may be varied upon consultation with the Dean 
or an Advisor if there is a particular need or evidence of ability to carry more advanced 
courses. 

TEACHERS WHO HIXPECT TO TEACH IN GRADES 1-6 

The following courses are required to complete the program of the General College and 
to meet the requirements of the State Department of Education for an Undergraduate 
Certificate in Elementary Education, as stated in the State Department's 1942 Bulletin A, 
Certification of Teachers. 

Completion of the basic comprehensive courses and at least twenty-two semester hours 
from the other courses will entitle the student to the Certificate of Associate of Arts and 
admission to the College of Education, where the remainder of the courses may be com- 
pleted for the Undergraduate Certificate and also apply on the Bachelor's degree. 

Basic Comprehensive Program Minimum Credit 

(Required at University of Florida to meet certificate 

requirements as stated in I, E (page 5) of Bulletin A) 

Man and the Social World, C-1 8 

Man and the Physical World, C-2 6 

Reading, Speaking, and Writing, C-3 8 

Man and His Thinking, C-41 3 

General Mathematics, C-42 3 

The Humanities, C-5 8 

Man and the Biological World, C-6 6 

Courses meeting additional requirements for certification 

as stated in 1, G, 6 (pages 7-8) of Bulletin A 

Introduction to Education, CEn. 13 3 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 35 

Child Development, En. 385 



3 
Educational Psychology, En. 386 

*Problems of Instruction, En. 471 : 6 

Student Teaching, En. 405 or En. 421-2 6 

Children's Science, Gl. 301 or GI. 302 2 

Children's Literature, Eh. 391 3 

Children's Social Studies, Scl. 301 or Scl. 302 , 3 

Public School Music _ 6 

Public School Art „ 4 

Handwriting 1 

Health Education, HPl. 387 3 

Health and Physical Education, HPl. 373, or HPl. 372, or HPl. 371 2 

Geography 3 

**History or Political Science 6 

COLLEGE OF LAW 
The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough scientific and practical 
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in 
this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Simuner Session. Courses 
offered during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular 
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable 
students of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students, 
and the College expects to offer courses during the Summer Session of 1944. 



36 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 



A GUIDE TO COURSES LISTED IN THIS CATALOGUE 

The course offerings are listed separately for each term, the General College Courses 
first, followed by the departmental courses in alphabetical order by department name. 
In registration the student should always use the departmental abbreviation and course 
number, not abbreviations of the course title. 

Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department 
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the 
proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided: 

Elementary Teachers 

General Preparation — the basic comprehensive courses of the General College (C-1, C-2, 

C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6) 
Elementary Science — listed under General Science (Gl. 301) 
General Psychology — C-41 listed under General College courses and CPs. 43 listed under 

Psychology 
Child and Educational Psychology — listed under Education (En. 385, En. 386) 
Children's Literature — listed under English (Eh. 391) 

Social Studies in Elementary Grades — listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Scl. 302) 
Handwriting — listed under Business Education (BEn. 97) 
Health Education — listed under Health and Physical Education (HPl. 387) 

Secondary Teachers 

Commercial Subjects — listed under Business Education and under Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration 
English — C-3 and courses listed under English and Speech 
Mathematics — C-42, C-421, and courses listed under Mathematics 
Science — C-2, C-6, and courses listed under Astronomy, Chemistry, Biology, Bacteriology, 

and Physics 
Social Studies — C-1 and courses listed under Geography, History, Political Science, 

Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology 
Conservation requirement may be met with any of the following courses: C-1, C-2, 
C-6 (listed under General College courses), Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 (not offered 1944 
Summer Session), or Es. 382 (listed under Economics). 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 37 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
First Term 

All classes ordinarily meet for fifty minutes. Classes scheduled to m^et daily meet 
Monday through Saturday. 

Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking 
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with rw 
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule. 

Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register fat 
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School 
and the instructor concerned. 

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES 

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-5, and 
C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms. Students should consult official 
announcements of the Board of University Examiners for details. Credits are indicated 
for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses. 

C-11. — Man and the Social World. 4 credits. 
(Register for one section only.) 

Section 10 7:00 daily and 1:00 M. T. Th. F. Fe-112. JOUBERT. 

Section 11 9:00 daily and 3:00 M. T. Th. F. La-210. PRICE. 

Adapted to include the rise of the Orient in world affairs, new Western Hemisphere relation^ 
ships, and the social implications of total war. 

Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the 
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education, 
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective co- 
ordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made 
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a 
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may 
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved. 

C-21. — Man and the Physical World. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-209. Gaddum. 

An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to 
man's immediate environment ; to show how these phenomena are investigated ; to explain the 
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of 
them ; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical 
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential 
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized. 

C-31. — Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. 

(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.) 
Discussion Sections: 

10 8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-209. HOPKINS. 

11 11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-209. Wise. 



38 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Writing Laboratory Sections: 

101 3:00 to 5:00 M. W. La-209. PRICE and Walker. 

102 1:00 to 3:00 W. F. La-209. Wise and Walker. 

Effective English — Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking and writing necessary 
for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through 
practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of 
form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and voice in speaking. 
Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increas- 
ing their appreciation of literature. 

C-41. — Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-307. Little. 

The straight and crooked thinking of war propaganda will be studied in many exercises. 

Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In this 
course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater 
accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically 
evaluating his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others, 
and (3) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used 
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure practice, many 
illustrations are given, and numerous exercises are assigned. 

C-42. — Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-10. Kokomoor. 

A practical treatment covering the fundamentals of manipulation and analysis in algebra, 
geometry and related fields. The development of computational skills especially recommended by 
both Army and Navy for aviation cadets. Not open to students who have completed General 
Mathematics, Trigonometry, or Basic Mathematics. 

C-51. — The Humanities. 4 credits. 

(Register for the Lecture Section and the Discussion Section both.) 
Lecture Section 1: 12:00 M. T. W. F. AUD. 
Discussion Section 10: 8:00 daily. Bu-101. Glunt. 

Our heritage ; the World Conflict of Philosophies and Cultures. 

A study of man as he has expressed himself in literature, philosophy, the graphic and plastic 
arts, and music. Objectives — that the student shall increase his understanding and enjoyment of 
the arts, learn something of the methods of serious and systematic thinking, gain a more thorough 
understanding of the world in which he lives and of the rich and abundant experience it has to 
offer, and evolve for himself a serviceable philosophy of life. The main body of the course is 
devoted to a consideration of the basic ideas which have been most significant in man's cultural 
development (classicism, romanticism, realism and idealism) as expressed in drama, poetry, fiction, 
music and the graphic and plastic arts. The course is open to all second-year students in the 
General College and to all Upper D'ivision students with the permission of the Dean of the General 
College. 

C-61. — Man and the Biological World. 3 credits. 

(Register for the Lecture Section and the Discussion Section both.) 

Lecture Section 1: 11:00 daily. Sc-101. J. S. ROGERS. 
Discussion Section 10: 5:00 T. Th. Sc-101. J. S. ROGERS. 

The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role as: (1) a living 
individual, (2) a member of a race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes, and (4) a member 
of a socially and economically inter-related complex of living organisms, supply the main sequence 
and material of the course. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 39 

ARCHITECTURE 

THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE 

Ae, 71 A. — Thesis. Hannaford. Prerequisite: Completion of all other require- 
ments for the degree. 

A comprehensive final project in architecture based on a program submitted by the student 
and approved by the faculty. The program must be approved in time to permit not less than 
14 weeks for the study of the problem. The presentation will include the architectural, structural, 
and mechanical equipment drawings, and portions of the specifications. Models and written de- 
scriptions may accompany'the solution. One project. Nominal time, 48 hours a week for 1 semester. 

ASTRONOMY 

Aty. 302. — Air Navigation. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-10. Blanton. 

The geographical, mathematical, and astronomical principles involved in determination of 
position and in guidance of aircraft. Aeronautical instruments, facilities, and procedures of 
navigation and their uses. 

BIOLOGY 

Bly. 101. — An Introduction to Vertebrate Zoology. 3 credits. Co- or prerequisite 
C-6. 

10:00 daily. Sc-101. HOBBS and E. H. GOIN. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-10. 

A laboratory course based chiefly on the morphology, physiology and embryology of the frog. 
Designed to parallel C-6 and with the latter to provide a satisfactory prerequisite for Bly. 209. 
This course in combination with C-6 and Bly. 209 provides the minimum premedical requirement 
in the Biological Sciences. 

Ely. 133. — Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Sc-101. 3 credits. C. J. GOIN. 

Designed to provide a recognition of and an acquaintance with some of the more common 
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question, 
"What animal — or what plant — is that?" Individual work in the field and the making of personal 
reference collections of plants and animals are encouraged. 

Bly. 210. — Vertebrate Embryology. 4 credits. Prerequite: Bly. 209. 
10:00 and 4:00 T. Th. Sc-107. SHERMAN and E. H. GoiN. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-107. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(See Economics and Business Administration) 
BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Note: These courses do not count as credit in Education. 

BEn. 81. — Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits. 
To ai-range. Yn-305. MOORMAN. 

Introduction to touch typewriting : practice upon personal and business problems 

BEn. 91. — Introductory Shorthand. 2 credits. 
To arrange. Yn-306. MOORMAN. 

Introduction to Gregg Shorthand by the functional method. 

BEn. 97. — Handwriting. 1 credit. 

7:00 M. T. W. F. Yn-306. MOORMAN. 

\ 



40 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Cg. 443. — Chemical Engineering Laboratory, 2 credits. The first half of the 
course Cg. 443-444. Corequisite: Cg. 447. 

1:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Bn-108. Beisler. 

Cg. 443-444 : Experiments in chemical engineering operations. 

Cg. 447. — Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. The first half of the 
course Cg. 447-448. Prerequisite: Cg. 346. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bn-104. MORGEN. 

Cg. 447-448 : Fundamental chemical engineering operations. Badger and McCabe, Elements 
of Chemical Engineering. 

Cg. 449. — Unit Processes. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cg. 448 and Cy. 302. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bn-104. MORGEN. 

An introduction to the unit processes. Groggins, Unit Processes. 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy. 101. — General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102. 
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Ch-212. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-130. 

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common 
non-metallic elements and their compounds. 

Cy. 201. — Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Ch-212. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230. 

Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the 
common metals and acid radicals. 

Cy. 301. — Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Ch-212. LEIGH. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230. 

Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Cy. 572. — Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit. Leigh. 
Cy. 574. — Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 hours credit. HAWKINS. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CI. 327.— Hydraulics. 4 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Hl-101. Reid. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. F. Hl-101. 

The principles underlying the behavior of fluids at rest and in motion. The transportation 
and measurement of fluids. 

CI. 329. — Higher Surveying. 12 weeks. 5 credits. Prerequisite: CI. 226. 
1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. and 8 other hours per week to arrange. 
Hl-303. Keith. 

This course runs throughout the 12 weeks, and no credit will be given 
unless the entire course is completed. 

Field and oflBce practice in traverse, topographic mapping, base line measurement, triangula- 
tion, practical astronomy, stream gauging and hydrographic surveying, precise leveling and adjust- 
ments of instruments. Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of Surveying, Volume II. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 41 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Note: Courses designated by Es. are Economics courses, those designated by the letters 
Bs. are Business Administration courses. 

*CEs. 131. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 
Sophomore standing. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-112. ELDRIDGE. 

Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions 
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic 
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and 
interest, insofar aa such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the 
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to 
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

CBs. 141. — Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. 

7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Lw-202. Beights. 

Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of 
business papers and records ; recording transactions ; preparation of financial statements and re- 
ports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-209. ANDERSON. 

The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with 
such fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, 
psychology, sociology, etc. ; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. 
Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

Es. 240. — The Economic Problems of War. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-203. Matherly. 

The nature of war, economic causes of war, manpower requirements of total war, the price 
system under the impact of war, control of production and consumption, the supply of strategic 
materials, foodstuffs and war, war finance, the aftermath of war. 

Bs. 311. — Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CBs. 141-142. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS. 

A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting ; books of record ; accounts ; 
fiscal period and adjustments ; working papers ; form and preparation of financial statements ; 
followed by an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the 
preparation of the balance sheet and income statements. 

Es. 327. — Public Finance. 3 credits. 

7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Pe-101. BiGHAM. 

Principles governing expenditures of modern government ; sources of revenue ; public credit ; 
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems 
of leading countries. 

Es. 382. — Utilization of Our Resources. 3 credits. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-210. 

A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed 
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these 
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation 
with special reference to Florida. 



•This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students 
may take the second term without having had the first term only with consent of the instructor. 
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may 
secure six semester hours credit. 



42 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Bs. 401. — Business Law. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Lw-202. DAY. 

Contracts and agency ; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party ; termina- 
tion of the relationship of agency. Conveyances and mortgages of real property ; sales and 
mortgages of personal property ; the law of negotiable instruments. 

Courses by Project Method. BiGHAM, Beights, Matherly, and Eldridge. 

students may register for certain upper division courses and complete them by the individual 
project method. Information about these courses may be obtained from the office of the Dean 
of the College of Business Administration. 

EDUCATION 

CEn. 13. — Introduction to Education. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-134. W. R. WILLIAMS. 

Principles upon which present day education is based. 

En. 317. — Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. PININGROTH. 

A study of the basic principles and methods of measurement and evaluation of school practices. 

En. 385. — Child Development. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-218. PININGROTH. 

Designed to acquaint the student with the growth and development of children into mature 
personalities. The findings of recent research will be studied through outside reading, class dis- 
cussion and observation. Methods of evaluation of child growth will be included. 

En. 401. — School Administration. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-134. SIMMONS. 

Problems peculiar to schools in Florida ; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation to 
superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community ; adapting the school to the child's 
needs ; business practices. 

En. 421.— Student Teaching. 3 credits. The first half of the course En. 421-422. 
To arrange. NUTTER. 

En. 421-422 : The student is given practice in the art of teaching by actually taking over re- 
sponsibility for the teaching-learning situation and putting into operation under direction and 
supervision the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior 
year through observation and participation. 

En. 422.— Student Teaching. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 421-422. 
To arrange. NUTTER. 

En. 471. — Problems of Instruction. 6 credits. 

9:00 to 11:00 daily and 3:00 to 5:00 T. Th. Yn-150. McLendon. 

An opportunity will be given the teacher for studying curriculum practices and developing 
tentative plans for classroom experience in the community of the particular teachers. Evaluation 
in various fields will be studied. Problems in teaching reading and the language arts will be 
stressed. 

En. 472. — Methods and Organization in Industrial Arts. 3 credits. 
Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Organization of industrial arts materials for the various grades and schools ; planning courses 
of study, selecting equipment and supplies ; study of aims and objectives of industrial arts. A study 
of the utilization of current acceptable teaching techniques and devices. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 43 

En. 490. — Reading Laboratory and Clinic. 2 credits. Conferences to be arranged. 
8:00 daily. Yn-134. BARRY. 

A survey of the field of reading instruction through lectures, discussions, and clinical demon- 
strations. Diagnostic testing, class organization, selection and organization of materials, methods 
of teaching silent reading, the use of instruments in diagnosis and remedial instruction, the 
relation of the course in reading to the English course of study and the curriculum, and final 
testing for mastery will be discussed. Laboratory practices and clinical procedures will be 
demonstrated. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

En. 540. — Foundations of Education. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 

10:00 to 12:00 and 4:00 to 5:00 daily. Yn-315. KiLPATRICK, MEAD, and 
others. 

En. 541. — Problems in Child and Adolescent Growth and Development and Edu- 
cational Psychology. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. Crago. 

En. 543. — Problems in the History and Philosophy of Education. Credit varies; 
maximum credit 6. NORMAN. 

En. 546. — Problems of Curriculum Construction and Teaching. Credit varies; 
maximum credit 6. W. R. WILLIAMS. 

En. 547. — Problems in Elementary Education, Principles and Practices in Grades 
1-6. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. STEVENS. 

En. 548. — Problems in Secondary Education. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 

En. 549. — Problems in School Administration. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 

Students who wish to take only that part of Education 540 given by Professor Kilpatrick 
may do so by registering for the first three weeks of the first term only. Credit for this part of 
the course is 3. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in cooperation 
with Radio Station WRUF. Qualified students can secure practical experience in station 
operation. 

El. 341. — Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The first half of course 
El. 341-342. Prerequisites: One year of college physics, including electricity 
and magnetism; differential and integral calculus; Ml. 182. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-212. E. F. SMITH. 
Electric and magnetic circuits ; electrostatics ; electro-magnetics ; representation of alternating 

currents by vectors and complex quantities ; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase 

circuits ; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy ; characteristics of apparatus ; 

selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment. 

El. 349. — Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The first half of the course El. 349-350. 
Corequisite: El. 341. 

l:00to 3:00 M. W. F. Bn-106. E. F. SMITH. 

Experimental studies and tests on direct current and alternating current apparatus. 

El. 449. — Theory of Electric Circuits. 3 credits. Prerequisites: El. 342, El. 344. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-213. J. W. WILSON. 

Networks ; resonance phenomena ; the infinite line ; reflections ; filters ; inductive interference, 
coupled circuits ; impedance matching. 



44 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

El. 465. — Radio Engineering. 5 credits. The first half of the course El. 465-466. 
Prerequisite: El. 346. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-213. J. W. WILSON. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Se-llth floor. 

The function of high frequency networks ; network theorems, resonance ; the infinite line ; 
reflection ; filters ; coupled circuits ; impedance transformation ; inductive interference ; vacuum 
tubes ; modulation and demodulation ; vacuum tube detectors ; audio video and radio frequency 
amplifiers ; oscillators ; antennas and radiation. Terman, Radio Engineering. 

ENGLISH 

The courses in English, advanced as well as introductory, have one common purpose: 
to enrich the student's experience by intimate association with those writings in our 
language, past and present, which contribute most to meaningful living. The central eum 
is to help persons of all vocations acquire some appreciation of our literary heritage, 
essential to a cultivated outlook on life, and to help persons of all vocations acquire greater 
facility in the knowledge and use of our language. The aim is thus twofold: education 
for enlightened leisure and for enlightened labor. 

Suggestions to Teachers: The Department recommends as the best possible preparation 
for the teaching of English the following fundamental courses, or their equivalents, and 
urges all who have not had equivalent courses to take them at the earliest opportunity: 
CEh. 37-38, CEh. 313-314, Eh. 301-302, Eh. 305, Eh. 399 and Eh. 401-402. In all courses 
intended primarily for teachers, special consideration will be given to appropriate topics 
and problems relating to the teaching of English in public schools. (See the course 
descriptions below.) 

For elementary school teachers the Department suggests Eh. 391, at least one semester 
of CEh. 35-36, CEh. 37-38, or CEh. 313-314, and Eh. 399. 

CEh. 37. — Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-203. A. A. MURPHREE. 

The most interestins and significant English writers from the beginning to the 19th century 
are read and discussed primarily for an appreciation of their art and their outlook on life. For 
teachers, particular attention will be devoted to writers and works stressed in junior and senior 
high school English courses, and to methods of presentation. 

CEh. 313. — Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 credits. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-203. MOUNTS. 

The first half of the course CEh. 313-314. A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint 
the student with some of the greatest books in the world, books which every educated man should 
know. 

Eh. 301. — Shakespeare. 3 credits. 

10.00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-210. ROBERTSON. 

The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays. 
Devoted chiefiy to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including A Midsummer Night's 
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard the Second, 
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting 
features of the Elizabethan sta^e and drama are treated briefly. 

Eh. 305. — Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-306. MORRIS. 

Designed to meet the needs of three types of students : (a) For the general student it offers 
a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good English" is. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 45 

(b) For the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum knowledge 
of the English Language, (c) For the English Major and beginning graduate student it serves 
as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon grammatical 
rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and spoken. 

Eh. 391. — Children's Literature. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-203. Congleton. 

Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school text- 
books, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make 
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form. 

Eh, 401. — American Literature. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-306. Farris. 

A study of American literature from the beginnings to 1850. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Eh. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. STAFF. 

Provision will be made for graduate students who desire work in fields not covered by the 
current course offerings. Such work will consist of directed readings supplemented by frequent 
individual conferences. 

FRENCH 

CFh. 33.— First- Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course CFh. 33-44. 
Open to students who have had no previous work in French. 
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bu-101. Atkin. 

A beginning course basic for further study. The objective is a moderate proficiency in 
reading and speaking the language. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Fh. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. ATKIN. 

Fh. 530 offers graduate students an opportunity to study, for credit, certain phases of French 
literature, language, and civilization for which there are no regular course offerings. Such in- 
dividual work may be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be helped 
to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor for conferences. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Gl. 301. — Children's Science. 2 credits. 
7:00 daily. Yn-142. GOETTE. 

The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated 
program and in the departmentalized school. Consideration given to the interests and experiences 
of children. Investigation of instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school 
to meet the needs of individual children. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Gpy. 201. — Geography of the Americas. 3 credits. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-210. 

A regional survey of the lands and peoples of Anglo and Liatin America ; location, surface 
features, climate, ancient civilizations, European settlement, natural resources and economic develop- 
ment ; an analysis of the growth of present-day nations and their economic, political and social 
interdependence. Introductory to study of geography, history, languages and Inter-American affairs. 



46 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

GERMAN 

CGn. 33. — First Year German. 3 credits. First half of the course CGn. 33-34. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-201. JONES. 

A beginning course basic for further study. The objectives are to read easy German and to 
understand the spoken language. 

Gn. 430. — Individual Work. 3 credits. 
Conference. Bu-303. JONES. 

Readings in special fields. The course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Gn. 530.— Individual Work. 3 credits. 
Conference. Bu-303. JONES. 

Readings and reports in fields chosen by the individual student. Mainly designed for graduate 
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. The course 
may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

HANDWRITING 

(See Business Education) 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPl. 121.— Narcotics Education. 2 credits. (Offered July 3-21.) 
11:00 and 5:00 daily. Yn-140. MiSS LITTLE. 

A factual, scientific, and unemotional approach to the present-day problem of narcotics. A 
study of the nature of alcohol and its relation to the psychological, physical, social, economic, and 
educational aspects of the problem will be considered briefly. Suggestive teaching projects, units, 
and methods for the various age-grade and subject levels will be explored and developed. 

HPl. 363. — Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School. 3 credits. 
To arrange. Yn-147. SALT. 

The program of physical education activities for the secondary school involving team games, 
rhythm, gymnastics activities, individual and dual sports ; together with appropriate procedures 
and methods for conducting such a program, 

HPl. 373. — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT. 

The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group 
play, large group play, directed play, team game units ; together with appropriate procedures 
and methods for conducting such a program. 

HPL 387.— Health Education. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-138. Salt. 

A consideration of the principles underlying health education, together with the organization 
and administration of such a program ; the role of the teacher in health instruction, who shall 
teach health, the organization of materials for instructional purposes, criteria for the evaluation 
of health materials and methods, the role of local, state and national non-ofiicial organizations 
in health teaching programs. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

HPl. 531. — Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Education. 

3 credits. The first half of the course HPl. 531-532. 
To arrange. Yn-147. Salt. 

Designed to give teachers, supervisors, and administrators a broad understanding of the field 
of health and physical education. At the beginning of the course the student and instructor will 
outline a program of professional development in keeping with the needs and interests of the 
student. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 47 

HISTORY 
The prerequisites for all Upper Division courses in History are: 

(1) For students whose Freshman and Sophomore work is taken under the curriculum 
of the General College, satisfactory completion of C-1. — Man and the Social World, 
followed by CHy. 13. — History of the Modern World. 

(2) For students who have not completed the above, Hy. 313-314. Europe During the 
Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 101-102.) 

CHy. 13.— History of the Modern World. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th, Pe-112. Patrick. 

A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time. 

Hy, 303. — American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-112. LEAKE. 

From Jacksonian Democracy through Congressional Reconstruction. 

Hy. 401. — Ancient Civilizations. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE. 

A study of Egyptian, various Semetic, Persian and Hellenic civilizations. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Hy. 509. — Seminar in American History. 3 credits. 
To arrange. LEAKE. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

Courses in Industrial Arts Education will be conducted by the project method. Arrange- 
ments will be made for students to register for any of the courses in Industrial Arts Educa- 
tion regularly offered in the fall and spring semesters if such courses are needed to meet 
certification requirements this summer. 

In. 111. — Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

For industrial arts students. Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projection, geometric 
construction, working drawing and blue printing, care and use of instruments. 

In, 112. — Mechanical Drawing, 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

For industrial arts students. Perspective rendering, tracings and blue prints for a small 
building ; different types of letters, machine sketching, and conventions. Suggestions and plans 
as to the most effective way of teaching a course of this type. 

In. 211, — General Shop, 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

For industrial arts students. Practice in use of hand tools commonly found in school shops ; 
types of construction, design, woodfinishing ; block-printing. Analysis of logical teaching units 
in projects and problems in the various phases of industrial arts. 

In. 305. — Design and Construction. 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Advanced problems in design and construction taken from some area of work in the general 
shop in selected advanced areas in which the student desires major ennphasis. 



48 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

In. 401. — Architectural Drawing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: In. 111-112. 
Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Designed for industrial arts teachers. Study made of building materials, sources and prices ; 
landscaping as to orientation ; plans, elevations, sections, details, conventions ; types and styles of 
domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture. 

In. 411. — General Machine Shop and Metal Work. 3 credits. 
Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Recommended for properly qualified students in the College of Education. It consists of class- 
room study and laboratory practice in pattern work, foundry, and general machine shop operations. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Ig. 365. — Engineering Mechanics — Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205, 
Ms. 353, Ml. 182. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-213. Yeaton. 

Principles of statics ; resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces ; numerical and graphical 
solution of trusses and hinged frames ; couples ; centers of gravity ; forces in space ; and moments 
of inertia. Timoshenko and MacCuUough, Enaineering Mechanics. 

LAW 

The courses offered in law will provide work for entering as well as advanced students. 

Lw. 419. — Air Law. 2 credits. 

9:00 daily. Lw-105. TeSelle. 

Aviation ; air space rights ; interstate commerce ; airports ; insurance ; carriers ; treatment of 
torts, contracts and crimes in relation to aviation. Zollman, Cases on Air Law. 

Lw. 505. — Federal Jurisdiction. 2 credits. 
10:00 daily. Lw-105. Slagle. 

System of courts created under authority of the United States, jurisdiction and procedure 
therein, removal of cases from state courts ; substantive law applied by federal courts ; appellate 
jurisdiction. Dobie, Cases on Federal Procedure. 

Lw. 522. — Admiralty. 2 credits. 

11:00 daily. Lw-105. SlaGLE. 

Jurisdiction ; contracts ; torts, crimes ; maritime liens, ex contractu, ex delicto, priorities, 
discharge ; bottomry and respondentia obligations ; salvage ; towage ; general average. Lord and 
Sprague, Cases on Admiralty. 

Lw. 527. — Suretyship. 2 credits. 

8:00 daily. Lw-105. TeSelle. 

Statute of frauds ; surety's rights and remedies ; subrogation, indemnity, contribution, and 
exoneration ; defenses of the surety. Langmaid, Cases on Suretyship. 

MATHEMATICS 

Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites by 
writing to or consulting the head of the department. 

C-42. — Fundamental Mathematics. (See General College Courses.) 

CMs. 23. — Basic Mathematics. 3 credits. 

Section 1. 10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-101. SIMPSON. 
Section 2. 11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-208, MclNNlS. 

In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession, 
this course offers a sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount of calculus. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 49 

Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command of the subject 
matter should elect both CMs. 23 and CMs. 24. This is also designed for those who plan to major 
in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. 

Ms. 225. — Arithmetic for Teachers. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-10. KOKOMOOR. 

Meaning and cultural values of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and 
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentages, projects and activity programs ; and 
many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter of 
arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon begin- 
ning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunities to investigate. Designed not 
only for teachers of arithmetic, but also for teachers of any science in which familiarity with 
number processes is desirable. 

Ms. 325. — Advanced General Mathematics. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-208. PiRENlAN. 

Designed for high school teachers. Selected topics having a direct and significant bearing npon 
the teaching of mathematics in high school. Consideration of the subject matter itself and its 
relation to adequate reorganization programs, both in the light of general modem objectives and 
experience obtained in the teaching of mathematics in the General College. Ms. 325 is concerned 
with the teaching of general (practical) mathematics and algebra in high schools. 

Ms. 353. — Differential Calculus. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-208. MclNNlS. 

A beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields 
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse oper- 
ation of differentiation. 

Ms. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

To be arranged. PiRENiAN and Staff. 

An opportunity to register for work in any phase of mathematics for which there is no 
course listed. Students may consult the list of departmental offerings on pages 193-196 of the 
Catalog for the year 1943-1944. Students will be given adequate guidance. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Ms. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 

To be arranged. PIRENIAN and STAFF. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Ml. 181. — Engineering Drawing. 2 credits. 
1:00 M. W. Eg-202. FRASH. 
Drawing: 2:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Eg-304. 

Designed to teach the student how to make and how to read engineering drawing. French, 
Engineering Drawing. A prerequisite for practically all engineering courses. 

Equipment costing about thirty dollars is required but will be used extensively in later work. 

Ml. 385.— Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ms. 353-354, Ps. 205-206, 
Cy. 101-102. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-212. THOMPSON. 

Energy equations and availability of energy ; gases, vapors, and mixtures ; engineering applica- 
tions in flow of duids, vapor power cycles, gas compression and refrigeration. Ebaugh, Engineering 
Thermodynamics. 

Ml. 387. — Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. Corequisite: Ml. 385. 
To arrange. THOMPSON. 

The preparation of engineering reports, computation aids, and the measurement of length, 
area, time-speed, pressure, and temperature. Shoop and Tuve, Mechanical Engineering Practice. 



50 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

MI. 481. — Internal Combustion Engines. 3 credits Prerequisite: Ml. 385. 
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-212. Leggett. 

Gas and liquid fuel, internal combustions, hot-air enRines, and gas producers. Automotive, 
aircraft, and Diesel power plants. Streeter and Lichty, Internal Combustion Engines. 

Ml. 483. — Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Ml. 387; Corequisite: 
Ml. 481. 

To arrange. LEGGETT. 

The testing of lubricants, gasolines, automobile engines, aircraft engines, and high and low 
speed Diesel engines. U. S. Government Specifications, Lubricants and Liquid Fuels; A.S.M.E., 
Power Test Codes; Shoop and Tuve, Mechanical Engineering Practice. 

MUSIC 

Msc. 103. — Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 2 credits. 
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Aud. CARSON. 

The child voice ; rote songs ; development of rhjrthm ; sight-singing from rote to note ; develop- 
ment of skills necessary for teaching primary music. 

Msc. 104. — Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 2 credits. 
3:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Aud. CARSON. 

Development of sight-singing ; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades ; part sing- 
ing ; song repertoire ; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades. 

PHYSICS 

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll 
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be 
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made. 

Ps. 101. — Elementary Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of in- 
structor. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-10. PERRY. 

A course in general physics for science students. 

Ps. 103. — Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ps. 101. 
7:00 to 10:00 P.M. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-307. PERRY. 

Laboratory for Physics 101. 

Ps. 117.— Physics for High School Teachers. 3 credits. (The first half of the 
course Ps. 117-118.) 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yonge-142. GOETTE. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are: C-1 and 
CPh 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly Pel. 101-102.) 

Pel. 314. — American Government and Politics. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE. 

State, local and Municipal government in the United States. 

Pel. 405.— History of Political Theory. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Bu-101. Glunt. 

A study of ancient and medieval political theories. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 51 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psy. 201. — General Psychology. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-114. O. WILLIAMS. 

An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of Psychology. Designed to 

provide an understanding of human behavior, approached as a natural phenomenon subject to 

scientific study. The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his 
physical and social environment. 

Psy. 310. — Abnormal Psychology. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. HINCKLEY. 

A study of the abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways by means of which the individual 
develops abnormal habits of thinking and acting. A survey of the signs of beginning maladjust- 
ment and procedures which should be followed to correct these tendencies. Special suggestions 
are given for the prevention and treatment of mental disease. 

Psy. 409. — Human Motivation. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-114. HINCKLEY. 

A detailed account of the factors underlying human motivation approached from both the 
physiological and the psychological viewpoints. 

Psy. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. STAFF. 

Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current course 
offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual conferences. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Psy, 509. — Human Motivation. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-114. HINCKLEY. 

Offered with Psy. 409 with extra readings and reports for graduate students. 

Psy. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. STAFF. 

Provision will be made for students who desii'e work in fields not covered by the current 
course offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual 
conferences. 

SOQAL STUDIES 

Scl. 301. — Children's Social Studies. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-134. BARRY. 

An opportunity will be given to study content material in the social studies field with implica- 
tions for the activity program. 

SOCIOLOGY 

CSy. 13. — Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 
C-1, or consent of instructor. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-101. Maclachlan. 

The outlook for the individual in the modern world. Direct measurement of social effects 
of invention and- technological change in modern America. The effects of the metropolitan epoch 
on social institutions. A review of the American regions as cultural environments and challenges 
to citizenship in the future. 

Sy. 337. — Cultural Anthropology. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-112. Maclachlan. 

Physical anthropology : physical characteristics of prehistoric and modern man ; race distinc- 
tion ; distribution of races ; a critical analysis of racial theories — Aryanism, Nordicism, Nazism. 



52 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Archaeology. Cultural anthropology: the development of culture; a comparative study of repre- 
sentative cultures. The American Indian. The Timucua and Seminole Indians of Florida. 

Sy. 344. — Marriage and the Family. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-101. Beaty. 

The nature and development of domestic institutions. Problems of adjustment to modern 
conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular emphasis on preparation 
fpr marriage. The status of vi^omen and laws pertaining to marriage in Florida. Divorce, family 
disorganization, child training. 

Sy. 424. — Criminology. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-101. ThOMASON. 

Nature and causes of crime ; punishment, treatment, prevention. Sociological aspects of 
criminal law and procedure. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sy. 560. — Special Topics. 3 credits. 
To be arranged. STAFF. 

Special topics in Sociology by arrangement with the instructor. 

SPANISH 

CSh. 33.— First Year Spanish. 3 credits. First half of the course CSh. 33-34. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-301. Hauptmann. 

A beginning course basic for further study. The objectives are to read easy Spanish and 
to understand the spoken language. 

Sh. 201.— Second Year Spanish. 3 credits. First half of the course Sh. 201-202. 
Prerequisites: CSh. 34 or equivalent. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bu-301. HAUPTMANN. 

Readings in representative Peninsular and Latin-American prose of moderate difficulty. 
Practice in conversation. 

Sh. 430. — Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Conference. Bu-302. HAUPTMANN. 

Headings in special fields. The course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sh. 530. — Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Conference. Bu-302. HAUPTMANN. 

Readings and reports in fields chosen by individual students. Mainly designed for graduate 
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This course 
may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

SPEECH 

Students taking courses in the Department of Speech must have completed the equivalent 
of C-3, or have the consent of their dean. 

CSc. 33. — Effective Speaking. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-208. CONST ANS. 

Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration, and practice in speaking 
to learn to talk effectively to a group. The individual needs of the student are given attention. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 53 

Sch. 417. — Correction of Speech Defects. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or 
consent of instructor. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-209. HALE. 

The recognition and correction of common speech defects ; also tJie problems of individual 
language difficulties and of foreign accent. Observing and working with persons in the Speecn 
Clinic. The course is especially designed to aid teachers, or those planning on entering the teach- 
ing profession, in handling cases of speech defects found in the public school classrooms. 

Sch. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. HALE, CONSTANS. 

By means of projects and conferences the student will be given an opportunity to complete 
an undergraduate major or graduate minor in a phase of the field where there are no Bpecial 
course offerings. 

Speech Clinic. No credit. Pe-210. HALE. 

The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in 
overcoming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible 
to Peabody 210. 



54 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
Second Term 

All classes ordinarily meet for fifty minutes. Classes scheduled to meet daily meet 
Monday through Saturday. Course descriptions are not given if the same course was 
offered the first term. See appropriate section of the first term schedule for this informa- 
tion. 

Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking 
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no 
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule. 

Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register for 
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School 
and the instructor concerned. 

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES 

Students should consult official announcements by the Board of University Examiners 
for details concerning comprehensive examinations. Credits are indicated for the benefit 
of Upper Division students who elect these courses. 

C-12. — Man and the Social World. 4 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 M. T. Th. F. La-210. PRICE. 

C-22.— Man and the Physical World. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-209. Gaddum. 

C-32. — Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. 

(Register for the Discussion Section and the Writing Laboratory Section both.) 
Discussion Section 10: 8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-209. WISE. 
Writing Laboratory Section 101: 1:00 to 3:00 W. F. La-209. 

C-41. — Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Ch-212. W. H. WILSON. 

C-421. — Trigonometry. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-10. DAVIS. 

A treatment of plane trigonometry, logarithms, spherical geometry, and spherical trigo- 
nometry. Designed especially to meet the immediate needs of students expecting to enter War 
service and lacking in mathematical training. Should not be taken by students who have had, 
or intend to take CMs. 23. May be taken by those who have completed C-42 or three years of high 
school mathematics. 

C-52. — The Humanities. 4 credits. 

(Register for the Lecture Section and the Discussion Section both.) 
Lecture Section 1: 12:00 M. T. W. F. Aud. 
Discussion Section 10: 8:00 daily. Bu-101. Hanna. 

C-62. — Man and the Biological World. 3 credits. 

(Register for the Lecture Section and the Discussion Section both.) 
Lecture Section 1: 11:00 daily. Sc-101. J. S. ROGERS. 
Discussion Section 10: 5:00 T. Th. Sc-101. J. S. ROGERS. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 55 

BIOLOGY 

BIy, 102. — An Introduction to Invertebrate Zoology. 3 credits. Co- or pre- 
requisite C-6. 

10:00 daily. Sc-101. HOBBS, E. H. GoiN. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-10. 

An introduction to the biology of the invertebrates with special reference to their morphology, 
life histories and classification. This course in combination with Bly. 101 and C-6 required for 
major in Bly. and meets minimum requirement for pre-medical Biology. 

Bly. 134. — The Life of the Inland Waters of Florida. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Sc-101. C. J. GOIN, E. H. GoiN. 

A companion course to Bly. 133 but concerned with the common plant and animal life of our 
streams, pools, ponds, lakes and marshes. Particular attention is given to obtaining an ac- 
quaintance with those species and groups of organisms that comprise the more important, more 
conspicuous, and more interesting members of Florida's rich aquatic biota. Laboratory demonstra- 
tions, field trips and individual projects will form an important part of this course. 

Bly. 351. — Biological Laboratory Technique. Hours and credits (not more than 3). 
To be arranged. J. S. ROGERS, E. H. GoiN. 

A project course in various phases of technique can be provided for qualified students. Approxi- 
mately 6 clock hours per week will be required for each hour's credit. A choice of the following 
techniques is available : the preparation of temporary and of permanent microscopic preparations ; 
the microscope and its accessories for biological use ; basic techniques in medical entomology : 
microscopic and macroscopic preparations useful for high school and undergraduate college biology 
laboratories. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(See Economics and Business Administration) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 
Note: These courses do not count as credit in Education. 

BEn. 94. — Stenography. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BEn. 81 and BEn. 91 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

To arrange. Yn-305. MOORMAN. 

Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting. Designed for those who desire m.ore instruc- 
tion than is given in the elementary or introductory courses in shorthand and typewriting for 
personal use, as well as for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects. 

BEn. 97. — Handwriting, 1 credit. 

7:00 M. T. W. F. Yn-306. MOORMAN. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Cg. 444. — Chemical Engineering Laboratory. 2 credits. The second half of the 
course Cg. 4'43-444. Corequisite: Cg. 448. 

1:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Bn-108. Beisler. 

Cg. 448. — Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. The second, half of the 
course Cg. 447-448. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bn-104. Beisler. 



56 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy. 102. — General Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy. 
101-102. 

7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Ch-212. HEATH. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-130. 

Cy. 202. — Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy. 
201-202. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Ch-212. HEATH. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230. 

Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of 
the common metals and acid radicals. 

Cy. 302. — Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy. 
301-302. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Ch-212. POLLARD. 

Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

*Cy. 505. — Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 3 credits. To arrange. POLLARD. 

*Cy. 506. — Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 credits. To arrange. 
Pollard. 

*Cy. 572. — Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits. POLLARD. 

Cy. 574. — Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 credits. HAWKINS. 

aVIL ENGINEERING 

CI. 329. — Higher Surveying. 5 credits. Prerequisite: CI. 226. Continued from 
1st Term. 

1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. and 8 other hours to arrange. Hl-303. KEITH. 

CI. 426. — Water and Sewerage. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CI. 425. 
11:00 daily and 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. Hl-101. REID. 

Lectures and recitations on water supply systems. Sources of supply, methods of treatment, 
the design of a water supply system, including collection, treatment, and distribution. Steel, 
Water Supply and Sewerage. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Courses preceded by Es. are courses in Economics and courses preceded by Bs. are 
courses in Business Administration. 

fCEs. 132. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-112. DOLBEARE. 



* The one of these three courses for which there is the greatest demand will be given. 

t This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students 
may take the second term without having had the first term only with the consent of the Instructor. 
When the course is com.pleted in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may 
secure six semester hours credit. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 57 

CBs. 142. — Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. 

7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BeiGHTS. 

Bs. 312. — Accounting Principles, 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Lw-202. HEIGHTS. 

Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from 
the legal organization form used by businesses : liabilities ; proprietorship ; partnerships ; corpora- 
tions ; capital stock ; surplus ; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed 
by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements : financial ratios and standards, their 
preparation, meaning, and use. 

Es. 335. — Economics of Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-314. EUTSLER. 

The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular atten- 
tion given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, 
and comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying 
on trade operations ; retail and wholesale agencies ; elements of marketing efficiency ; the cost 
of marketing : price maintenance ; unfair competition ; the relation of the government to marketing. 

Bs. 402. — Business Law. 3 credits. Second half of the course Bs. 401-402. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Lw-202. 

Es. 446. — The Consumption of Wealth in Time of War. 3 credits. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-314. EUTSLER. 

Problems of rationing ; use of family budgets ; price ceilings ; and other problems of interest 
to consumers in a war-time economy. 

Courses by Project Method. Matherly, Dolbeare and Eutsler. 

Sudents may register for certain upper division courses and complete them by the individual 
project method. Information about these courses may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of 
the College of Business Administration. 

EDUCATION 

En. 305. — Development and Organization of Education. 3 credits. 
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Yn-134. A. J. Geiger. 

An attempt to interpret the role of the public school in our rapidly changing society. 

En. 386. — Educational Psychology. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. A. J. Geiger. 

The individual and education. A study will be made of the physical, emotional, mental, and 
social growth of the adolescent. Achievement will be considered in terms of growth. 

En. 403. — Principles and Philosophy of Education. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-140. BARRY. 

An examination of the various theories and philosophies of education ; their relationships to 
education in a democracy. 

En. 406. — Administration of the Elementary School. 3 credits. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-134. SIMMONS. 

The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed in this 
course. Reavis, Pierce and Stulken, The Elementary School. 

En. 471. — Problems of Instruction. 6 credits. 

9:00 to 11:00 daily and 3:00 to 5:00 T. Th. Yn-150. HoUGH. 



58 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

GRADUATE COURSES 

En. 540. — Foundations of Education. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. MEAD. 

En. 542, — Problems in Measurement, Evaluation and Guidance. Credit varies; 
maximum credit 6. CRAGO. 

En. 543. — Problems in the History and Philosophy of Education. Credit varies; 
maximum credit 6. NORMAN. 

En. 546. — Problems of Curriculum Construction and Teaching. Credit varies; 
maximum credit 6. W. R. WILLIAMS. 

En. 547. — Problems in Elementary Education, Principles and Practices in Grades 
1-6. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. STEVENS. 

En. 550. — Problems in School Supervision. Credit varies; maximum credit 6. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

El. 342. — Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of the 
course El. 341-342. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-212. E, F. SMITH. 

El. 350. — Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course El. 349- 
350. Corequisite: El. 342. 

1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Bn-106. E. F. SMITH. 

El. 466. — Radio Engineering. 5 credits. The second half of the course El. 465-466. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-213. J. W. WILSON. 
Laboratory: 1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Se-llth floor. 

ENGLISH 

(See note preceding First Term English Schedule.) 

CEh. 38. — Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. The second half of the 
course CEh. 37-38. May be taken for credit without CEh. 37. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-210. HAINES. 

Eh. 302. — Shakespeare. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-210: ROBERTSON. 

The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays. 
Devoted chiefly to the great tragedies, including Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Anthony 
and Cleopatra. Eh. 301 and 302 may be taken in reverse order, or either one without the other. 

Eh. 399. — Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-311. HAINES. 

A consideration of the nature of literature, its types, forms, content, and values. Designed 
to provide the student with a better critical understanding of literary art. Lectures, wide reading, 
and discussion. 

Eh. 402. — American Literature. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-210. CONNER. 

A general survey of American literature (all types and all regions) from Whitman to the 
present, with the major emphasis upon such writers as Whitman, Howells, James, Twain, Lanier, 
the local colorists, Wharton, Gather, Glasgow, Lewis, Robinson, Frost and O'Neill. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 59 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Eh. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. STAFF. 

Provision will be made for graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses 
by individual reading or investigation under guidance. Students will be helped to plan a definite 
program, and will meet a member of the department staff in frequent conferences. 

FRENCH 

CFh. 34. — First- Year French. 3 credits. The second half of the course CFh. 
33-34. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bu-101. Brunet. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Fh. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. Brunet. 

Fli. 530 offers graduate students an opportunity to study for credit, certain phases of French 
literature, language and civilization for which there are no regular course offerings. Such in- 
dividual work may be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be helped 
to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor for conferences. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Gl. 302.— Children's Science, 2 credits. 
7:00 daily. Yn-142. GOETTE. 

GERIVIAN 

CGn. 34. — First- Year German. 3 credits. The second half of the course CGn. 
33-34. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-201. JONES. 

Gn. 430. — Individual Work. 3 credits. 
Conference. Bu-303. JONES. 

Readings in special fields. The course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Gn. 530. — Individual Work. 3 credits. 
Conference. Bu-303. JONES. 

Readings and reports in fields chosen by the individual students. Mainly designed for graduate 
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This 
course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

HANDWRITING 

(See Business Education) 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPl. 373. — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-138. Salt. 

HPl. 387.— Health Education. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT. 



60 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

HPl. 411. — Principles and Administration of Physical Education. 3 credits. 
To arrange. Yn-147. SALT. 

Fundamental principles upon which the present day program of physical education is based, 
together with a study of the history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. The 
organization and administration of the program pertaining to the playground, gymnasium, swim- 
ming pool, service unit, intramural and interscholastic athletics. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

HPl. 534.— Problems of Physical Education. 3 credits. The second half of the 
course HPl. 533-534. 

To arrange. Yn-147. SALT. 

HISTORY 

Hy. 304. — American History, 1876 to the Present. 3 credits. 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-112. LaFuze. 

From the close of Reconstruction to the present time. 

Hy. 364. — Latin-American History, from 1850 to the Present. 3 credits. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Bu-101. Glunt. 

a survey course covering the period from 1850 to the present. 

Hy. 402. — Ancient Civilizations. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE. 

A study of Roman civilization. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

In. 212. — General Shop. 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Use of hand tools and power machines, with gpecial 
emphasis on the speed lathe ; use, parts and care of machines ; shop equipment and construction. 
In addition to the development of manipulative skills, special emphasis is given to selecting 
projects, and writing the various types of instruction sheets. 

In. 301. — Sheet Metal. 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL. 

Design and construction in sheet metal for industrial arts students. Scope of sheet metal, 
various methods of drafting and construction, shop arrangements and equipment, methods of 
motivation for secondary school students in this phase of work. 

In. 306. — General Metal Shop. 3 credits. 
To arrange. GOTTSHALL. 

Layout and construction in sheet metal. Scope of sheet metal, various methods of construc- 
tion, shop arrangements and equipment. Study made of metals, materials and processes essential 
to oxyacetylene and arc welding ; also forge and heat treating. 

In. 401. — Architectural Drawing, 3 credits. 

Project method. Yn-316. GOTTSHALL, 

Designed for industrial arts teachers. Study made of building materials, sources and prices ; 
landscaping as to orientation ; plans, elevations, sections, details, conventions ; types and styles 
of domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture. 

In. 412. — General Machine Shop and Metal Work. 3 credits. The second half 
of the course In. 411-412. 

To arrange. GOTTSHALL. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 61 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Ig. 366. — Engineering Mechanics — Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365. 
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-213. YEATON. 

Principles of dynamics ; rectilinear, curvilinear, and harmonic motions ; momentum and im- 
pulse ; work and energy ; force, mass, and acceleration ; projectiles ; simple, torsional, and com- 
pound pendulums ; balancing of rigid bodies ; and relative motion. Timoshenko and MacCullough, 
Engineering Mechanics. 

Ig. 367.— Strength of Materials. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-213. YEATON. 

Tension, compression, shear, stress and strain ; combined stresses ; riveted joints for pressure 
vessels and structural work ; torsion ; bending moments ; stresses and deflection of simple, canti- 
lever, and continuous beams ; concrete beams ; curved beams and hooks ; eccentric loading columns ; 
and elastic strain energy. Timoshenko and MacCullough, Elements of Strength of Materials. 

LAW 

Lw. 405. — Equity Pleading. 2 credits. 
10:00 daily. Lw-105. TeSelle. 

Pleading in equity ; parties to, proceedings in a suit in equity ; bills in equity ; disclaimer ; 
demurrers and pleas ; answer and replication ; preparation of bills, demurrers, pleas, answers. 
Keigwin, Cases in Equity Pleading, 2nd edition; Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Florida; 
Statutes of Florida. 

Lw. 407. — Legal Bibliography. 1 credit. 

3:00 M. W. F. Lw-Library. Pridgen. 

The classes of law books ; the location and use of decisions and statutes ; the trial brief ; the 
brief on appeal. Brandt, How to Find the Law, 3rd edition. 

Lw. 430. — Bailments. 2 credits. 

8:00 daily. Lw-105. Slagle. 

Mandates ; deposits ; pledges ; custody and use ; delivery and redelivery ; innkeepers ; carriers ; 
rights and duties of parties ; termination of relation. Elliott on Bailments, 2nd edition. 

Lw. 515. — Mortgages. 2 credits. 

9:00 daily. Lw-105. Trusler. 

Nature ; elements ; discharge ; assignment ; redemption ; foreclosure ; injunction and account ; 
extent of the lien ; priority between mortgage liens and competing claims ; equity of redemption. 
Walsh on Mortgages. 

Lw. 519. — Trial Practice. 2 credits. 

11:00 daily. Lw-105. TeSelle. 

Jurisdiction ; process ; the jury ; instructions ; trials ; verdicts ; judgments. McBaine, Cases on 
Trial Practice, 2nd edition. 

MATHEMATICS 
C-421. — Plane Trigonometry. (See General College Courses.) 

CMs, 24. — Basic Mathematics. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-10. DAVIS. 

A continuation of CMs. 23. 

Ms. 354. — Integral Calculus. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-10. Phipps. 

Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas, 
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems. 



62 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Ms. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. Phipps and STAFF. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Ms. 530. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. PHIPPS and STAFF. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Ml. 182. — Descriptive Geometry. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 181. 
1:00 M. W. Eg-202. FraSH. 
Drawing: 2:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Eg-304. 

The principles of projection and the development of surfaces. Higbee, Drawing Board Geometry. 

Ml. 386. — Power Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 385 or Cg. 467-468. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-212. THOMPSON, 

Steam and internal combustion engine power plants and their auxiliary equipment. Gaffert, 
Steam Power Stations. 

Ml. 388. — Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Ml. 387; Corequisite: 

Ml. 386. 

To arrange. THOMPSON. 

Analysis of fuels, heating value, flue gas analysis, and the testing of boilers, turbines, engines 
and steam plant auxiliary apparatus. Shoop and Tuve, Mechanical Engineering Practice. A.S.M.E. 
Power Test Codes. 

PHYSICS 
Ps. 102. — Elementary Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 101 and 103. 
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-112. Perry. 

A continuation of Ps. 101. 

Ps, 104. — Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ps. 102. 
7:00 to 10:00 P.M. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-307. PERRY. 

A continuation of Ps. 103. 

Ps. 118. — Physics for High School Teachers. 3 credits. 
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-142. GOETTE. 

The second half of the course Ps. 117-118. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Pel. 313. — American Government and Politics. 3 credits. (Formerly Pel. 101.) 
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE. 

The Federal government, its philosophy, organization and functions. 

Pel. 406— History of Political Theory. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-112. LaFuze. 

A study of modern political theories. 

PSYCHOLOGY 
Psy. 201. — General Psychology. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-114. 0. WILLIAMS. 

An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of psychology. Designed to provide 
an understanding of human behavior, approached as a natural phenomenon subject to scientific 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 63 

study. The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his physical and 
social environment. 

Psy. 305, — Social Psychology. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. O. WILLIAMS. 

Influence of the social environment upon the mental, social, moral and emotional development 
of the child, the adolescent, and the adult. General orientation, typical and atypical forms of 
behavior, social stimulations and responses, social attitudes, social adjustments, language develop- 
ment, personality development, and social changes. 

Psy. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. O. Williams. 

Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current 
course offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual 
conferences. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Psy. 515. — Social Psychology. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. O. WILLIAMS. 

Offered with Psy. 305 with extra readings and reports for graduate students. 

Psy. 530. — Individual work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. 0. WILLIAMS. 

Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current 
course offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual 
conferences. 

SCHOOL ART 

Pc. 251, — Art for the Primary Grades. 2 credits. 
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Yn-Shop. 

Activities for the kindergarten, first, second, and third grades that interpret the underlying 
philosophy and the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching. 

Pc. 252. — Art for the Elementary Grades. 2 credits. 
3:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Yn-Shop. 

Activities for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades that interpret the underlying philosophy and 
the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching. 

Pc. 301. — Creative School Art. 2 credits. 
To arrange. Yn-Shop. 

A series of original projects based on the fundamental principles and factors of design. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Scl. 3<V2. — Children's Social Studies. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-134. Barry. 

A continuation of Scl. 301. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sy. 316.— The Field of Social Work. 3 credits. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-101. Thomason. 

Administrative and promotional social work. Detailed study of the growth of public social 
work agencies, 1930-1944. Study of casework techniques, of the range of duties of social workers 
in modern public and private administration. Field analysis of public welfare agencies in Florida. 



64 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Sy, 442. — Applied Sociology. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-101. Maclachlan. 

Theories developed in previous courses applied to a long-term program of improvement. Social 
investigation as the basis of social planning. Especially adapted to the needs of mature students 
who may expect to apply sociological methods and standards to practical affairs in teaching or 
social welfare. 

Sy. 443. — The American Negro. 2 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-101. Beaty. 

Social, economic, and political aspects of racial problems in the United States with particular 
emphasis on the American negro. Brief history of the negro from early days of slavery to the 
present. Contrast between the cultures of the whites and the negroes in the North and South. 
Racial segregation and discrimination. The role of the negro in Southern culture today. 

Sy. 452. — American Culture Today. 3 credits. 

11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-101. MACLACHLAN. 

Advanced study of the regional patterns of social reality in modern America. Close analysis 
of leading questions of public policy as affected by population trends, technological changes and 
cultural adjustments. Readings in major concerns of American citizenship, with emphasis upon 
the role of higher education, of the professions and of public opinion in a metropolitan epoch. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sy. 560. — Special Topics. 3 credits. 
To arrange. STAFF. 

Special topics in Sociology by arrangement with the instructor. 

SPANISH 

CSh. 34. — First-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The second half of the course CSh. 
33-34. 

8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-301. ASHTON. 

Sh. 202. — Second-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The second half of the course Sh. 
201-202. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bu-301. ASHTON. 

Sh. 430.— Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Conference. Bu-304. ASHTON. 

Reading in special fields. The course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sh. 530.— Individual Work. 3 credits. 

Conference. Bu-304. AsHTON. 

Readings and reports in fields chosen by the individual students. Mainly designed for graduate 
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This 
course may be repeated without duplication of credit. 

SPEECH 

Students taking courses in the Department of Speech must have completed the equivalent 
of C-3, or have the consent of their dean. 

CSc. 33. — Eflfective Speaking. 3 credits. 

9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-208. HALE. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 65 

Sch. 403.— One-Act Play. 3 credits. 

10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-208. CONSTANS. 

The reading and evaluation of the best one-act plays especially from the standpoint of pro- 
duction. Special attention 'to the preparation and presentation of material for assembly and 
auditorium programs. 

Sch. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. 
To arrange. Hale, Constans. 

Speech Clinic. No credit. Pe-210. Hale. 

The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to persons desiring aid in 
overcoming speech defects. 



APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION IN UNIVERSITY 
RESIDENCE HALLS 

To be filled out by each person who is planning to live in the University operated 
Residence Halls for the 1944 Summer Session and mailed to the Director of Residence, 
University of Florida, Gainesville, with check or money order — made payable to the Univer- 
sity of Florida — for the Room Reservation Fee of $5.00 per person. 

Write Clearly Date 

Check One: I plan to attend Q 1st Term Only Q 2nd Term Only Q Both Terms 

Mr. 

Miss 

Mrs. (First Name) (Husband's Initials) (Middle Name) (Last Name) 



Address 

(Street and Number) (City) (State) 



Present Mail Address 

(If different from Home Address) 

Have you lived in one of our halls previously? When? Which? 

Birthdate Religious afl&liation or preference 

(Month) (Day) (Year) 

College Vocational Preference 

In case of accident, NOTIFY 

Address — 



ROOM PREFERENCES: State clearly below your preferences as to room type, floor, ex- 
posure, rate, and housing unit (if any). Be clear and concise. 



Name of ROOM-MATE PREFERRED: 



Address _ - -... 

(NOTE: Room-mate must file separate application and pay Room Reservation Fee also.) 

If this application is accepted and I am assigned to a room in one of the University of 
Florida Residence Hall units I agree to abide by the University rules and regulations 
governing student life and to cooperate with the Director of Residence in maintaining the 
best possible living conditions in the Residence Halls. 



Signature of Applicant 



(Use reverse of this application form to give any further information about yourself which 

may affect your residence.) 

[67] 



REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE IN A 
PRIVATE ROOMING HOUSE 

To the Office of the Dean of Students: 

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live in a rooming house not operated by 
the University during first term, second term, both terms, of the 1944 Summer Session. 
(Underscore terms desired.) 

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered: 

1. I am years of age or over. 

2. I have already received a degree and am now taking 

graduate work. 

3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment: 



4. If granted permission to live in a private rooming house, I will live in the house 
appearing on the Approved Rooming House List at the address below: 



(address I (householder) 

5. I desire to room in a private rooming house for the following reason: 



(Signed) 
Address . 



Date 



Approved: ... 
Disapproved: 



[69] 



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[72] 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Bulletin of the 

School of 
Trade and Industrial Education 

1944 



Sponsored Jointly by the University of Florida and the 
State Department of Education 



First Term-June 19 to July S 
Second Term —July 10 to July 29 

Vol. XXXIX, Series I No. 5 May 1, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Bulletin of the 

School of 
Trade and Industrial Education 

1944 



Sponsored Jointly by the University of Florida and the 
State Department of Education 



First Term-June 19 to July S 
Second Term-July 10 to July 29 



The Record Comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the 
bulletins of information, announcements of special courses of 
instruction, and reports of the University Officers. 
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply 
for them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin 
or what information is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, 
University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida 

Research Publications. — Research publications contain results of 
research work. Papers are published as separate monographs num- 
bered in several series. 

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges 
with institutions are arranged by the University Library. Corre- 
spondence concerning such exchanges should be addressed to the 
University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 
The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of 
the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or 
for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should 
be addressed to 

THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS, 

University of Florida, 

Gainesville, Florida 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

School Calendar 5 

Administrative Officers 6 

Faculty 6 

Advisory Committee 8 

General Information 9 

Fees 12 

Expenses 12 

Library 13 

Recreation 13 

Admission 14 

Residence Requirements 15 

The General College 15 

Comprehensive Examinations 17 

The Bachelor's Degree 18 

The Graduate School 19 

Registration 20 

The Master's Degree 20 

Curricula 22 

Time Schedule and Description of Courses . 28 

First Term 28 

Distributive Occupations Education 28 

Trade and Distributive Education 28 

Trade and Industrial Education 29 

Guidance 31 

Special Courses for Defense Training 31 

Second Terra 32 

Distributive Occupations Education 32 

Trade and Distributive Education 32 

Trade and Industrial Education 33 

Special Courses for Defense Training 35 

Application for Admission 37, 39 



4 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



1. All prospective students who plan to enroll at the Summer School of 
Trade and Industrial Education should fill out the application blanks found on 
pages 37 and 39 of this bulletin and mail them to the Registrar, University of 
Florida, Gainesville, Florida, before June 1. Previous attendance does not waive 
this requirement. 

2. Report upon arrival to the Seabreeze High School for all information 
relative to registration, rooms, or apartments. 

Registration will begin on Monday morning, at 8 o'clock. Arrival on Satur- 
day will facilitate registration on Monday. 

3. For further information, write to Robert D. Dolley, Director of the 
School of Trade and Industrial Education, Capitol Building, Tallahassee, Florida, 
or to Dean J. W. Norman, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

4. The usually broad and comprehensive curriculum of the school has been 
somewhat curtailed this year because of the exigencies of war, but the courses 
which have been withdrawn wiU be restored as soon as it is feasible to do so. 



COMMERCIAL WORKSHOP 



A workshop for commercial teachers, which will take the place of the usual 
annual State conference for vocational commercial teachers, will be conducted at 
Daytona Beach on July 10 and 11, in connection with summer school. 

Nationally recognized authorities on filing, bookkeeping, typewriting, and 
shorthand will conduct this commercial workshop, whose objective it is to give 
teachers the latest information on business training and to help them plan their 
curricula for the fall session of school in accord with new methods and devices for 
speeding up learning responses. 

All vocational commercial teachers employed in Florida schools are expected 
to attend this workshop, and an invitation is extended to all business teachers 
employed in private schools, high schools, and colleges to be present for these 
two days. Meetings will be held at Seabreeze High School, beginning at 9 
o'clock on Monday, July 10. 



-_■■ tmmmmv-^f^^tft^fjm 



CALENDAR 



CALENDAR 

1944 First Term 

June 19, Monday, 8 a.m Registration for the First Term. 

June 20, Tuesday, 8 a.m Classes begin. 

June 21, Wednesday Last day for registration for the First Term, for 

changing schedules, or for adding courses. 
Late registration fee $5. 

June 28, Wednesday Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 

July 5, Wednesday Last day to file application for removal of de- 
ficiencies, or for extension of Trade and Indus- 
trial Education Certificates. 

July 8, Saturday First Term ends. AD grades are due in office of 

the Registrar by 5 p.m. 

Second Term 



July 10, Monday, 8 a.m. 
July 11, Tuesday, 8 a.m. 
July 11, Tuesday, 4 p.m. 



Registration for the Second Term. 

Classes begin. Late registration fee $5. 

Last day for registration for the Second Term, 
for changing schedules, or for adding courses. 



July 18, Tuesday Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 

July 24, Monday Last day to file application for removal of de- 
ficiencies, or for extension of Trade and Indus- 
trial Education Certificates. 

July 29, Saturday Second term ends. All grades are due in the 

office of the Registrar by 5 p. m. 



6 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President 
of the University 

COLIN ENGLISH, M.A., LL.D., Ed.D., State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction 

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the Summer Session 

ROBERT D. DOLLEY, M.S., Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Ed- 
ucation 

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S.P., Registrar 

KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, LL.D., Business Manager 

G. B. SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education, Gainesville 



Assistants in Administration 

EMMA WISE, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Gainesville 

JEAN BRADLEY HAMNER, B.S., Administrative Assistant 

LUCILLE T. MOORE, B.S., Librarian 

CHARLES R. HALE, Supervisor of Instruction 

MAUDE GRIFFITH WOODS, Supervisor Continuation Education 



FACULTY 

E. W. ALEXANDER, M. E., Assistant Principal, Hadley Technical High School, 

St. Louis, Missouri 
ARDA TALBOT ALLEN, M. S., Consultant in Vocational Guidance, San Antonio 

Public Schools, San Antonio, Texas 
AUGUST R. ANDERSON, B. S., Director of Vocational Education, Sarasota, 

Florida. 
P. E. BABCOCK, M. A., Assistant State Supervisor, Trade and Industrial 

Education, Georgia 
CHARLES M. EDWARDS, Jr., D. C. S., Professor of Retailing, New York 

University, New York City 
A. M. HAFT, B. S., Assistant Director, War Production Training, Miami, Florida 
CHARLES R. HALE, State Coordinator, Trade and Industrial Education, Florida 

State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida 
CHARLES H. HENDERS, A, B., Interior Decorator, Paterson, N. J., Instructor 

in Interior Decoration at New York University 
HERMAN F. HINTON, B. E., State Coordinator, Trade and Industrial Education, 

State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida 
W. BRIANT HOBSON, A. B., Representative, Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York City 
C. G. LIND, B. S., Director of Vocational Education, Marianna, Florida 
H. M. MacEDWARDS, Coordinator of Diversified Cooperative Training, Lakeland 

High School, Lakeland, Florida 



FACULTY 7 

BYRON J. NELMS, B. S., Coordinator of Diversified Cooperative Training, 

Ketterlinus High School, St. Augustine, Florida 
VIOLETT O'REILLY, M. S., Principal, L. E. Rabouin Vocational School, New 

Orleans, Louisiana 

E. R. PLOWDEN, B. S., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, 
Alabama 

R. ROBERT ROSENBERG, C. P. A., Ed. D., New Jersey State Teachers CoUege 
N. MAE SAWYER, A. B., Director, American Institute of FiUng, Buffalo, New 
York 

C. J. SCHOLLENBERGER, B. E., Training Director, Dan River and Riverside 
Cotton Mills, Danville, Virginia 

JOHN J. SEIDEL, M. A., State Director Vocational Education, Baltimore, 
Maryland 

ELEANOR SKIMIN, A. B., Head of Instruction, U. S. Naval Training School for 

WAVES, Milledgeville, Georgia 
C. W. WHITNEL, M. A., Conference Leader Trainer, Board of Education, Tampa, 

Florida 

ARTHUR B. WRIGLEY, M. A., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial 
Education, New Jersey 



8 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



Special Lecturers 

LAYTON S. HAWKINS, M.S., Chief, Trade and Industrial Education, U. S. 
Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 

E. G. LUDTKE, Southern Regional Agent, Trade and Industrial Education, U. 
S. Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 

M. D. MOBLEY, Ph.D., State Director Vocational Education, Georgia 

C. E. RAKESTRAW, B.S., Consultant, Employer-Employee Relations, U. S. Of- 
fice of Education, Washington, D. C. 

JOHN J. SEIDEL, M.A., State Director Vocational Education, Maryland 



Advisory Committee 

E. G. LUDTKE, Southern Regional Agent, U. S. Office of Education 

W. J. BREIT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Arkansas 

J. B. YINGLING, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Georgia 

G. W. COGGIN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, North 
Carolina 

L, K. COVELLE, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Oklahoma 

J. R. D. EDDY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Texas 

E. R. PLOWDEN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Alabama 

W. A. SEELEY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Tennessee 

B. R. TURNER, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, South 
Carolina 

B. H. VAN OOT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Virginia 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Nature and Purpose of School 

The University of Florida in cooperation with the State Department of Public 
Instruction will open the seventh annual session of the School of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education at Daytona Beach, June 19. 

With the advice and counsel of the State Supervisors, the School is planned 
to serve the entire Southern Region. A comprehensive curriculum especially 
designed to meet the needs of teachers of Trade and Industrial Education and 
Distributive Occupations leading to a bachelor's or master's degree is offered. 

Many vocational teachers with short vacations will find convenient the 
schedule arrangement of two terms of three weeks each: June 19 to July 8, 
and July 10 to July 29. Students may attend one or both terms as they desire. 
Classes are held in the Seabreeze High School Building and meet two hours a 
day, sLx days a week, during each term. 

Advisory Committee 

The State Supervisors of Trade and Industrial Education in the Southern 
Region, headed by Mr. E. G. Ludtke, Southern Regional Agent of the United 
States Office of Education, serve as an advisory committee for the School of 
Trade and Industrial Education. The University is fortunate in having them 
as advisors, and their willingness to serve in this capacity affords a most direct 
means of making courses immediately applicable to local conditions. 

Instructional Staff 

The faculty is selected from the outstanding leaders in vocational education. 
Many are from the neighboring southern states, and are fully acquainted with 
southern problems, hence find it easy to make their courses fit southern needs. 
Others come from more distant states and possess exceptional knowledge of the 
specific fields which they teach. Those attending the school have the opportunity, 
not only of receiving instruction from able men and women, but also of conferring 
with them personally about problems of interest. Members of the faculty devote 
their time while on the campus to the discussion of the problems brought before 
them. It is from such personal contacts that the full benefit of the school is 
realized. 

For VVliom the School Is Intended 

Admission is limited to the following classes of students: 

1. Those engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Edu- 
cation or courses subsidized from Smith - Hughes or George - Deen funds. 

2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all the requirements for certifi- 
cation in accordance with the provisions of the Florida State Plan for 
Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education with the exception of 
the required teacher training courses. 

3. Superintendents or school officials exercising control over a subsidized 
program of Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education. 

4. Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators of Trade and Industrial and 
Distributive Education or other subsidized vocational services. 

5. Those employed in industrial or distributive occupations who wish to 
take technical courses and who are not particularly interested in college 
credit or teaching. 



10 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



6. Those engaged in teaching or supervising any phase of the National 
Defense Training Program. 

To offer educational opportunity to these groups of students is the sole 
purpose of the School, and the courses have been planned especially to take 
care of their needs. Teachers and students interested in other branches of learn- 
ing should attend the regular Summer Session at the University of Florida in 
Gainesville. 

Courses 

Realizing that there is a wide difference in the type of work performed by 
personnel engaged in the various branch services of Trade and Industrial and 
Distributive Education, the University is of the conviction that in order to 
accomplish the objectives of the School with the greatest effectiveness, the 
course content must be based upon the needs and requirements of the personnel 
engaged in the respective branch services. The courses are, therefore, organ- 
ized in groups under the following classifications: Trade and Industries — 
For Day Trade School Teachers; For Evening School Teachers; For Coordina- 
tors and Belated Teachers of Diversified Cooperative Training; For Greneral 
Continuation Teachers; For Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators, and Gen- 
eral Subjects. Distributive Education — For Evening School Teachers; For Day 
Part-Time Teachers; For Coordinators and Belated Teachers Part-Time Co- 
operative Training; Technical Subjects and General Subjects. 

Students will avoid mistakes and errors in selecting courses by studying 
carefully the course descriptions and noting the group classification under which 
the courses are listed. To derive the greatest immediate benefit from summer 
school, students should, before selecting other courses, exhaust the course offer- 
ings planned for the service in which they are employed. 

Specially Designed National Defense Courses 

Specially designed short intensive courses for those engaged in National 
Defense Training will be offered throughout the entire summer session. These 
courses will be particularly appropriate for pre-employment and supplementary 
teachers, Army and Navy instructional personnel, and supervisors of defense 
training programs. 

Societies and Clubs 

T. & I. Club 

The T. & I. Club is a student organization composed of both men and women 
engaged in Trade and Industrial Education. Its purpose is to promote good 
fellowship among its members and the student body. The club sponsors a 
dance and an outing regularly once a week throughout the session along with 
numerous other social functions. 

State Clubs 

There are a number of state clubs the membership of which is composed of 
students from the various states. These clubs are very active during the entire 
summer session in the promotion of activities of aU kinds calculated to help 
students to become better acquainted and stimulate a friendly hospitable atmos- 
phere about the school. 




GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

An interesting feature of the State Clubs' activities is an informal All-States 
dinner held on the second Friday of the second term, in which all faculty and 
student personnel participate. 

Iota Lambda Sigma 

Iota Lambda Sigma is a national honorary professional fraternity for persons 
serving with distinction in Trade and Industrial or Industrial Arts Education. 
To be eligible for membership in the Kappa Chapter of the University of Florida 
one must be outstanding in one of these two vocational fields with a scholastic 
average of B or better. 

Tau Gamma Sigma 

Tau Gamma Sigma is a professional honorary Industrial Education fraternity 
for women. Both the Grand and Alpha chapters are located at the University 
of Florida. The purpose of this fraternity is to recognize high scholastic ability 
and professional attainment in the field of Industrial Education. 

Eta Mu Pi 
Eta Mu Pi is a National Honorary Retailing Fraternity. It is the only re- 
tailing fraternity in existence. Membership to the Gamma Chapter of the Uni- 
versity of Florida is limited to men and women attaining a high scholastic record 
in Retailing and Distributive Education courses. 

Assemblies 

All students and faculty members are expected to attend the general 
assemblies which are held once a week throughout the summer session. Impor- 
tant announcements are made at the general assemblies for the observance of 
which students will be held responsible. 

Announcements 

Important announcements will be posted on the school bulletin board. Stu- 
dents should read the notices on the bulletin board daily. Students are held 
responsible for all announcements made in the General Assembly, posted on the 
official bulletin board, or printed in the school newspaper. 

School News 

The official news of the School of Trade and Industrial Education is published 
each week in a special edition of one of the Daytona Beach daily papers. 
Special news items, notices, and announcements reach the students and faculty 
through this official publication. 

Employment 

The School of Trade and Industrial Education does not maintain an employ- 
ment bureau as such. It does, however, interest itself in finding employment 
for capable qualified individuals and in recommending suitable personnel when 
requested to do so. The School has placed nearly one hundred per cent of the 
students trained. 

Duplicating Service 
Clerical work and duplicating for the school and faculty members is done on 
short notice. Work to be typed or mimeographed is brought to the school office 
for handling. Students may have typing and mimeographing produced at 
nominal cost. 



12 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRLAI. EDUCATION 



Credits 

Students who qualify for entrance in the School of Trade and Industrial 
Education in accordance with the provisions limiting classes of students to be 
served, may take the courses offered for college credit or to satisfy certification 
requirements, or both, or for no credit at all. 

Credits earned in the School of Trade and Industrial Education will apply 
as residence credit at the University towards the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education, with a major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education. 
Students who have attended another institution and now wish to work towards 
this degree at the University of Florida should see the requirements for ad- 
mission to advanced standing. 

The maximum number of credits a student may earn in a single term is four 
for undergraduate students, and three for graduate students. All students 
including those not desiring college credit must comply with the requirements 
listed on pages 14 and 15 of this bulletin. 

Certification 

All courses have been approved by the Florida State Board for Vocational 
Education and may be used towards satisfying teacher-training requirements 
for certification or for extension of certificates. 

Florida teachers who have certification deficiencies or who wish to satisfy 
certification extension requirements should study the bulletin of certification 
requirements for Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education before regis- 
tering. Teachers from other states should consult their State Supervisors 
concerning certification regulations. 

Fees 

A registration fee of $14 a term will be charged each student whether he is 
from Florida or from another state. There is no tuition charge. 

There is a failure fee of $2.50 per semester hour for any course failed* during 
the last period of attendance. This fee must be paid before the student is 
permitted to reregister in the University. A late registration fee of $5 ist 
charged students registering late. See calendar, page 5. 

Auditors: — Auditor permits may be secured for $5 entitling the holder to 
attend 18 regular class periods of any class in the school subject to the approval 
of the respective instructors. Auditor permits are valid throughout the session. 
Individuals will be limited to one auditor permit per term. 

Expenses 

Housing accommodations ar,e ample at Daytona Beach this year, despite 
wartime conditions. Rental rates are practically the same as those in effect 
last year, for both apartments and rooms. 

Food costs are the same as those prevailing throughout the state, and are 
certainly no higher than in other cities in Florida. 

Listings are being made of all available rooms, apartments, and hotel 
accommodations, and will be supplied to all those who desire assistance in 
finding living accommodations. These listings will be available at Seabreeze 
High School from June 16 on. 



*i. e. Courses not passed with a maik A, B, C or D for undergraduates, or courses not passed 
with a mark A or B for graduate students. 



RECREATION 13 



It is suggested that those who wish apartments come to Daytona Beach a 
day or two in advance. 

A lunch room is maintained in the school building for the convenience of 
students. 

Library 

The library of the School contains over 6000 volumes including reference 
books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, year books, periodicals, and government pub- 
lications. These volumes are supplemented with a complete library of reference 
material on Trade and Industrial, Distributive and General Vocational Educa- 
tion. The advantages of the library are made readily accessible through a 
complete card catalog and the assistance of a librarian. 

Hours: — The Library will open Monday through Saturday at 8:00 a.m. and 
close at 7:00 p.m. except on Friday when it will close at 6:00 p.m., and on 
Saturday when it will close at 12:00 noon. 

Training Schools 

A series of three one-week technical courses for peace officers, firemen, and 
hotel managers is usually conducted by the State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion through its vocational division and in conjunction with the School of Trade 
and Industrial Education. These courses are taught by nationally recognized 
specialists and are often of interest to summer school students. 

Special Lecturers 

A series of special lectures by national authorities in Vocational Education 
will be given at convenient intervals during the six weeks' session. The topics 
to be discussed by these lecturers will follow a planned sequence calculated to 
integrate their observations with the current subject matter under considera- 
tion in a number of the courses offered. 

RECREATION 

Because the enrollment in the School for Trade and Industrial Education 
is drawn largely from persons employed twelve months in the year, every effort 
has been made to select a place offering not only the facilities for study but 
those for spending an ideal vacation. Daytona Beach meets these requirements. 

Recreational possibilities abound at Daytona. There is the beach with its 
motoring length of twenty-three miles and low tide width of five hundred feet 
for those who enjoy surf bathing and beach activities. Fishing is excellent 
from the pier, or by boat on the Halifax, or in the inland lakes a short drive 
from Daytona. Golf, tennis, handball, lawn bowling , shuffle board, trap and 
skeet shooting may be enjoyed by those who prefer these sports. 

A number of points of interest, such as St. Augustine, the oldest city in 
the United States — Silver Springs, the largest spring in the world — Tropical 
Jungles — the old mission ruins — the Florida Cypress Gardens — Bok Tower — and 
the Fountain of Youth, are only a few miles from Daytona Beach and can be 
reached by bus in a very short time over some of Florida's most scenic highways. 

In view of the social functions students may be invited to attend, it is sug- 
gested that women bring one or two cotton evening dresses and one afternoon 
dress, and that men bring one white or other light suit. The average sununer 
temperature at Daytona Beach is 79 degrees. 



14 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

ADMISSION 

A, Students wishing to receive college credit must meet the entrance require- 
ments of the University of Florida. The requirements are: 

1. For students who are entering college for the first time. 

See Admission to the General College. 

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who ex- 
pect to receive a degree from the University of Florida. 

Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions 
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented 
by students will not suffice.) 

3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who 
are attending the University of Florida School of Trade and Industrial 
Education only for the purpose of securing credits to be transferred to 
the institution regularly attended. 

A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last attended. 
The standing of each student entering the School of Trade emd Industrial 
ABOVE. 

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined 
in numbers 1, 2, or 3 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT 
WILL BE ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE 
(Blanks for this purpose may be secured from the Office of the 
Registrar. ) 
Education with advanced standing will be considered individually, with the best 
interests of the student always in mind. A program for the completion of the 
work for a degree either through the General College, or in the College of Edu- 
cation, will be determined at a conference with the Board of University Exam- 
iners, and the Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education. 

B. Students not wishing to work toward a degree and who do not desire a 
transcript of work completed must present evidence of their eligibility for ad- 
mission in accordance with one of the provisions limiting the class of students 
to be served by the School (see page 9). 

Admission to the General College 

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the 
General College: 

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, 
although no specific high school units are required. 

2. Consistency of the high school record. 

3. Achievement in high school. 

4. Personal qualities. 

5. Recommendation of high school principal. 

6. Standing on Placement Tests. 

All applicants should submit the Application Blanks at the back of this 
bulletin, and in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent 
to the Registrar. The latter may be secured from high school principals of 
the State. "Applicants for admission from other states may secure an Applica- 
tion for Admission blank by writing the Registrar. 



\ 



THE GENERAL COLLEGE 15 



The Placement Tests will be given once during each term in the Seabreeze 
High School Building. All applicants for admission to the General College are 
required to take these tests. Students will be notified of the time and place 
at which these tests wiD be given. ^ 

Residence Requirements 

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two 
regular semesters, or one regular semester and four three-week summer terms 
or nine three-week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing 
must meet this requirement after entrance to the University. Students who 
break their residence at the University by attending another institution for 
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the 
University. 

2. For the master's degree a minimum of one academic year, or 33 weeks 
in summer sessions, is necessary to satisfy the residence requirement. 

3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours applied 
towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from 
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be 
made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college con- 
cerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work permitted exceed 
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate 
degree. 

Amount of Extension Work Permitted 

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward 
a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be 
allowed to take more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's 
degree by correspondence study or extension class work. No person will be 
allowed to take more than 9 credits by correspondence during the summer 
vacation period. 

Student Responsibility 

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper 
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should con- 
fer with the Director of the school several days before registration regarding 
choice of courses. 

Seniors must file in the Office of the Registrar formal application for a degree 
and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to 
receive the degree. 

Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses 
can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the Director of the school 
and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the Office of the 
Registrar. 

THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the 
freshman and sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning 
students will register in this college. 

The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College 
in two years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter 



16 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



time, and others may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a 
longer period. 

A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this 
program the University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all 
students alike. On this foundation that has meaning and significance to the 
student, he may add the special training of the colleges and professional schools 
of the Upper Division, or drop out of the University with something definite and 
helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The purposes of the General 
College are: 

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the 
guidance needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is 
postponed until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and 
disposition to undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society. 

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing 
for advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper 
Division, thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization. 

3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give 
to college training, and consequently should concern themselves with gen- 
eral viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions 
to special subject matter fields which they may never enter. 

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher gen- 
eral education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The 
subject matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation 
are to be constantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, 
to stimulate his intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, 
and to cultivate the attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship. 

5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed 
to guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sopho- 
more work of former years had little meaning and significance to the 
vast majority. The material studied was preparatory and foundational, 
and became meaningful only when the student pursued additional courses 
in the junior and senior years. The material of the comprehensive 
courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary function. 
While, of necessity, we must look forward to distant goals, the General 
College is trying to present materials that are directly related to life 
experiences and will immediately become a part of the student's thinking 
and guide him in making correct "next steps". Thus the whole program 
— placement tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests, selected 
material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences, provisions 
for superior students, adjustment for individual differences, election 
privileges, and comprehensive examinations — are all part of a plan 

1 designed to guide students. 

Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a 
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of 
directing the thinking of the student. 



THE GENERAL COLLEGE 17 



Comprehensive Examinations 

The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations — 
eight or more — to complete the work of the General College. These examina- 
tions, administered by the Boai'd of University Examiners, will be given in 
January, May and August of each year. General College students who are not 
enrolled in a course at the time the examination is given and who wish to take 
any comprehensive examination, must apply in writing to the Board of Uni- 
versity Examiners for permission at least one month before the announced date 
for the examination. Before the application is accepted, the applicant wiU be 
required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege has 
not been used to avoid the payment of the usual University fees. A student 
must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in 
the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. 
Six hours time, divided into equal parts, will be required for each examination 
covering a full year course. 

Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify 
to repeat the examination by repeating the course, or by further study. Evi- 
dence of additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of University 
Examiners with an application in writing to repeat the examination. 

Graduation 

When a student has completed his program in the General College and has 
passed the comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the 
General College curriculum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certificate. 
Students who pass three-fourths of the comprehensive examinations with the 
standing "Excellent" will, on graduation from the General College, receive the 
certificate of Associate of Arts, With High Honors. 

Notice to All Vocational Teachers 

The comprehensive courses of the General College are of special significance 
and value to the vocational teacher. For the teacher entering college for the 
first time, the General College affords an excellent means of expediting the 
conclusions of the first two years of college study. 

The vocational teacher will find his progress through the General College 
greatly accelerated due to his background of practical work and teaching ex- 
periences. Syllabi on all General College courses are available to students. 
A complete set may be found in the Library of the School of Trade and Indus- 
trial Education. 

Students entering the School of Trade and Industrial Education may com- 
plete their major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education before 
registering for General College courses or they may apply for examinations on 
General College courses any time after registration in the School of Trade and 
Industrial Education. 

Students interested in the General College should consult the Registrar for 
further information during the first week after registration in the School of 
Trade and Industrial Education at Daytona Beach. 



Jk 



18 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Requirements: 

1. Must be regularly admitted to the University. 

2. Must have completed one year of successful teaching experience in an 
approved program of Trade and Industrial Education. This experience 
may be acquired after the student has become a candidate for the degree. 

3. Must have satisfied the residence and other routine requirements of the 
University. 

4. Must have an average of "C" or higher in all work counted toward the 
degree. 

5. Must satisfactorily complete the curriculum requirements outlined below, 

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

I. For those students graduating from the General College of the University of 
Florida, completion of A and B listed below: 

A. General College Program:* 

C-1 Man and the Social World 

C-2 Man and the Physical World 

C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-42 General Mathematics 

C-5 The Humanities 

C-6 Man and the Biological World 

C-7 Electives in Education ,-. . 6 semester hours 

**C-8 Electives 8 semester hours 

**C-9 Electives 8 semester hours 

B. Upper Division Program: 

Education 9 semester hours 

Trade and Industrial Education 22 semester hours 

** Approved Electives 29 semester hours 

Total 60 semester hours in the 

Upper Division. 

n. For those students who do not graduate from the General College of the 
University of Florida (Note: The following program is outlined for the 
convenience of transfer students. The Board of University Examiners may 
waive certain of the following requirements if the record of the student 
warrants special consideration) : 

Physical and Biologica? Science 

English Composition 

^SS^dies- ::::::::::::::::::::: > 48 semester hours 

Psychology or Philosophy 

Mathematics 

Education 15 semester hours 

Trade and Industrial Education 22 semester hours 

** Approved Electives 39 semester hours 

Total 124 semester hours 

•Deviations from this program may be permitted by the Board of Examiners. 
**A minimum of 22 semester hours is required in Trade and Industrial Education for a major. For 
C-8, C-9 aiid approved electives in the Upper Division a person may take additional work in Trade 
and Industrial Education, but not to exceed 18 semester hours, since not over 40 semester hours of the 
entire four-year program can be in Trade and Industrial Education. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Note: The same provisions relating to the bachelor's degree with a major in 
Trade and Industrial Education will apply to the degree with a major in 
Distributive Education except that the major study shall be in Distribu- 
tive Education courses and the experience requirements shall be in the 
Distributive Education field. 

PLANNING PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Procedure : 

1. Become regularly admitted to the University. 

2. Consult the Director of the School about selection of courses. 

3. Secure through the Director a list of courses, approved by the Dean, lead- 
ing to the degree. 

4. In case advanced standing is wished, the applicant should have tran- 

scripts of credit evaluated by the Registrar before consulting the Director 
about list of courses to be pursued. 
Note: Transcripts of credit must be sent directly to the Registrar from the 
Institution in which the credit was earned. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

All graduate study in all of the colleges and schools of the University is 
administered by the Graduate Council. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF TRADE 
AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

1. A bachelor's degree from a standard college or university. 

2. At least one year's continuous employment in an approved Trade and 
Industrial program for those wishing to major in Trade and Industrial 
Education, or one year's continuous employment in an approved Distribu- 
tive Education program for those wishing to major in Distributive 
Education. The programs in which the experience is secured must meet 
all the requirements of the State Plan for Trade and Industrial or Dis- 
tributive Education for the state in which the applicant was employed. 

3. Eight semester hours in approved teacher training courses in Trade and 
Industrial Education of which two semester hours shall be in Supervision, 
two semester hours in survey procedures, and four semester hours in 
courses covering curriculum construction in and bearing directly upon 
the branch of service in which the applicant has been employed. 

4. Three or more years of continuous employment in an approved Trade 
and Industrial or Distributive Education program may upon the discre- 
tion of the head of the department be accepted in lieu of part of the eight 
semester hour requirement. 

5. Presentation of satisfactory evidence that graduate study may be 
pursued with advantage to the University and the applicant. 



20 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

6. Candidates must have completed three years of successful experience in 
an approved program of Trades and Industries or Distributive Education 
before a degree can be conferred. 

Registration 

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be 
transmitted directly to the Registrar's office by the Registrar of the institution 
in which the credits have been earned. Transcripts presented by students can- 
not be accepted. 

The transcript should be in the Registrar's office at least one month before 
the opening of the school. If it appears from the student's record that he is 
eligible for graduate study he will be referred to the Director of the School of 
Trade and Industrial Education who wiU become the professor of the major 
subject and will plan the courses the student is to take. 

Students are urged to file transcripts ahead of the beginning of the schooL 
Under no circumstances will students be permitted to register who have not 
fully complied with this request. Transcripts submitted directly by students 
are not acceptable. Transcripts must be transmitted by the registrars of the 
institutions in which the credits were earned. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree with Major in Trade and 
Industrial Education 

Degree offered. — Master of Arts in Education. 

Residence Requirements. — See residence requirements page 15 this bulletin. 

Transfer of Credits. — Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number 
of credits to the University wiD be allowed. Transferred credits may reduce 
the course requirements but not the residence, and work they represent shall 
be included in the final examination. 

Grades. — Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are 
A and B. All other grades are failing. 

Work Required. — Twenty-four semester hours are required for the degree 
at least one half of which shall be in Trade and Industrial Education and the 
remainder in related subject matter fields. The major study shall be in courses 
numbered 500 and designated strictly for graduates. However, in case of 
related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be taken upon 
the approval of the Director of the School and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The student shall be guided entirely in the research procedure, preparation, 
organization and form of the thesis, by the Supervisor of Research. The student 
should consult the Supervisor of Research immediately after admittance to the 
Graduate School concerning these matters. The thesis problem should be 
selected as soon as possible and be approved by the major professor. A state- 
ment of the problem, the reason for its selection and an outline of the procedure 
to be followed in its solution shall be submitted to the Student's Advisory Com- 
mittee for the committee's consideration and approval. All Graduate students 
are required to register for TDE. 508, Research in Industrial and Distributive 
Education, before or by the time they have completed twelve semester hours of 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 



graduate study. This course carries no credit and may be carried in addition to 
the regular schedule of work. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Whether the student has been provisionally admitted or regularly admitted 
to graduate study, the Supervisory Committee shall review his entire academic 
record at the end of the first semester or summer session of residence work and 
fix definitely the additional residence or course requirements. Upon ratification 
of the action of the Supervisory Committee by a formal vote of the faculty, the 
student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree subject to the approval 
by the Supervisory Committee of the thesis problem selected. 

Supervisory Committee. — The Supervisory Committee shall consist of the 
Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education, the Dean of the 
Graduate School and the Supervisor of Research. 

General Examinations. — It will be the duty of the Supervisory Committee, 
when all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses 
and the thesis, to conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or both, 
to embrace: first, the thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor or 
minors; fourth, questions of a general nature pertaining to the student's field 
of study. The Committee shaD report in writing not later than one week before 
the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been completed in a 
satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree. 

Work Done in Absentia. — Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No 
courses may be taken for credit by extension or corresp>ondence. 

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 512. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education 
TIE. 501. — ^Industrial and Economic Development in the South 
TDE. 502. — Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training 
TIE. 503. — Administration of Vocational Education 
TDE. 504. — Philosophy o<f Vocational Education 
TIE. 505. — ^Technical Schools — Their Organization and Control 
TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and Labor Relations 
TDE. 507. — Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training 
TDE.' 508.-^Researoh in Industrial and Distributive Education 

Recommended Minors 

DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

DOE. 500. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive 

Occupations 
DOE. 508. — Retail Buying and Marketing 
DOE. 509. — Retail Merchandising 
DOE. 510. — Sales and Merchandise Promotion 
DOE. 511. — Store Management and Operation 



mIhmmi 



22 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



GUIDANCE 

GU. 400. — Org-anization and Administration of Guidance 

GU. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community 

GU. 402-3. — Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN 
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

The same provisions relating to the Master's degree with a major in Trade 
and Industrial Education will apply to the degree with a major in Distributive 
Education, except that the major study shall be in Distributive Education 
courses and the experience requirement shall be in the Distributive Education 
field. 

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

DOE. 500. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive 

Occupations 
TDE. 502. — Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training 
TDE. 504. — Philosophy of Vocational Education 
TDE. 507. — Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training 
DOE. 508. — ^Retail Buying and Marketing 
DOE. 509. — ^Retail Merchandising 
DOE. 510. — Sales and Merchandise Promotion 
DOE. 511. — Store Management and Operation 
TDE. 508. — ^Research in Industrial and Distributive Education 

Recommended Minors 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 512. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and 

Industrial Education 
TIE. 501. — Industrial and Economic Development in the South 
TIE. 503. — Administration of Vocational Education 
TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — Their Organization and Control 
TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and L^bor Relations 

GUIDANCE 

GU. 400. — Organization and Administration of Guidance 

GU. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community 

GU. 402-3. — ^Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance 

CURRICULA 

The courses have been designed for the particular needs of teachers in the 
various fields of trade and industrial education. These are listed below, along 
with the time these courses will be available during the summer session. For 
detailed information concerning the course, see the Time Schedule on pages 28 
to 35. The Time Schedule for the first term will be found on pages 28-31; 
for the second term on pages 32-35. 



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24 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



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28 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

TIME SCHEDULE 

FIRST TERM 

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 

DOE. 205. — Advertising for Retailers. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 14. EDWARDS. 

Special problems in retail advertising; advertising Umitations; organization of the advertisement 
department; preparation of advertising for publication; formulation of an advertising plan; writing and 
the displaying of selling messages. 

DOE. 508. — ^Retail Buying and Marlieting. IV2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. 
Room 18. EDWARDS. 

The buying aspects of merchandising, as distinct from its mathematical aspects, are stressed in 
this course. The subject matter includes: the field of retailing, types of retail outlets, the merchan- 
dising organizations, market organizations, the New York market, the clothing and textile markets, the 
nontextile markets, resident buying, foreign buying, the buying process, group and hand-to-mouth 
buying, private brands, exclusive agency, and price maintenance. 

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

TDE. 221. — Organization for Diversified Occupational Training. 2 credits. 
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 11. ANDERSON. 

Objectives to be attained, organization to attain these objectives, Federal and State requirements, 
social security, insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be studied. 

TDE. 222. — Occupational Surveys. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 11. 
HAFT. 

A study of procedure in making community industrial surveys and of individual industrial plants 
or business concerns to determine community training needs and acceptable industrial concerns in 
which to give training. 

TDE. 223. — Student Counseling and Selection. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. 
Room 8. NELMS. 

The procedure to be followed in securing applicants for training, factors involved in selection 
of students, occupational counseling, training, assignments, compensation, and work contracts. 

TDE. 224. — Industrial Plant Job Analysis. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. 
Room 8. ANDERSON. 

The student must make a complete schedule of work processes in an individual plant. Also 
based upon these processes he must make a schedule of student training, related study, and 
compensation. 

TDE. 225.— Related Study Material. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 
12. MacEDWARDS. 

The source of securing diversified general and specific related subject matter. Organization of it 
for teaching purposes, related classroom layout and organization, theory and methods in teaching 
diversified lelated subjects. 

TDE. 226. — Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. 2 credits. 
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 9. NELMS. 

Coordination aims, purposes, methods of promotion, community and industrial relationships, 
advisory committee organization and function, research problems, trainee follow-up and placement. 



TIME SCHEDULE FIRST TERM 29 



TDE. 248. — Principles and Purposes of the Vocational Acts. 2 credits. 12:30 
to 2:30 daily. Room 15. 

Congressional and legislative acts providing for vocational education of all kinds; the principal 
purposes and influences involved in the formulation of these acts; the extent and scope of vocational 
service provided by means of them. 

TDE. 251. — Supervision and Coordination. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily 
Room 14. BABCOCK. 

Duties of vocational supervisors and the means and methods to be employed in properly dis- 
charging them; special subjects such as laws, promotional methods, public relation, surveys, training 
the teachers in the service placement and supervisory plan organization. 

TDE. 256. — Applied Vocational Psychology. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. 
Room 14. 

The application of fundamental principles of psychology in the solution of human relation 
problems of the director, supervisor, or coordinator of vocational education. 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL, EDUCATION 

TIE. 201. — Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 
daily. Room 16. HALE. 

The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning 
related information in which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for teaching 
purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and 
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 16. LIND. 

The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of such 
methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, charts, films, 
slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, 
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 16. LIND. 

Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment 
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the 
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 2:30 
to 4:30 daily. Room 7. PLOWDEN. 

Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor space, 
light, equipment, supplies, inventories, Federal and State regulations, and record keeping devices. 
Designed to meet .the needs of Trade Shop Teachers and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 214.— Methods and Devices in Teaching Gregg Shorthand. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 3. SKIMIN. 

Methods of presentation to the beginner in shorthand; special teaching procedures designed to 
speed up responses and bring control in writing under time; methods of teaching disjoined prefixes 
and suffixes; de\'ices for speed building. 

TIE. 216. — Secretarial Laboratory. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 3. 
SKIMIN. 

An advanced course in the application of secretarial skills, particularly designed for teachers of 
secretarial, stenographic, and general office work: coordination of instruction in the basic skills which 
are required to produce a marketable product; evaluation of balance and harmony in the finished 
product. 



30 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



TIE. 218. — Thamas Natural Shorthand. 2 credits. 2 :30 to 4 :30 daily. Room 
4. HOBSON. 

Development of secretarial skill in the Thomas system of shorthand; short cuts to speed. 

TIE. 220. — Methods of Teaching Filing. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. 
Room 9. SAWYER. 

Presentation of the newest in methods and materials, with information on variations of the 
decimal system and on ways of adapting filing systems to specific businesses. 

TIE. 246. — Apprenticeship Training. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 
18. BABCOCK. 

The laws affecting apprenticeship agreements, indentures, and training; procedures in the 
organization of apprentice programs within industry and the building trades. Apprenticeship training 
program in cooperation with the Federal Department of Labor's Apprenticeship Committee. 

TIE. 247. — Vocational School Organization. 2 credits. 2:30 to 4:30 daily. 
Room 12. ALEXANDER. 

The characteristics and functions of the vocational school; the groups to be served and the pro- 
visions, organization and plan necessary to render this service. 

TIE. 254. — Tests and Measurements in Vocational Education. 2 credits. 
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 7. PLOWDEN. 

The various measurement tests in vocational education with special emphasis on objectives to be 
attained and methods to be employed in their use. 

TIE. 257. — Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 12. HALE. 

The fundamental purposes and objectives of related instruction. Sources of material, organization 
and methods to be employed in teaching related material. 

TIE. 268.— Training of Women for Industrial Production. 2 credits. 8:00 
to 10:00 daily. Room 8. SEIDEL. 

Methods of determining industrial areas in which training can be given; prerequisite require- 
ments for employment; training procedure; effect on the economic and social status of the worker. 
For Directors, Coordinators and Supervisors. 

TIE. 501. — ^Industrial and Economic Development in the South. 1% credits. 
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 4. O'REILLY. 

The historical transition of economic and industrial growth in the South. Contemporary and 
industrial development. 

TIE. 503. — ^Administration of Vocational Education. 1% credits. 2:30 to 
4:30 daily. Room 15. SEIDEL. 

National, State and local administrative organization, and controls for vocational education. 
Sources and means of procuring and estimating revenue and laws, regulations, principles and plan to 
be followed in spending, a systematic and detailed study of vocational education administrative 
personnel duties and responsibilities. 

TIE. 512.— Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education. IVa credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 11. SEIDEL, 
O'REILLY. 

The provisions and interpretations of the Smith-Hughes and George-Deen Acts as they pertain to 
the administration and organization for Trade and Industrial Education, national, state, county and 
local programs. 



TIME SCHEDULE FIRST TERM 31 



GUIDANCE 

GTJ. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community. 1% 

credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 11. O'REILLY. 

The functions and the objectives of a guidance program calculated to serve individual, school and 
conununity. Special emphasis on such aspects of the guidance procedure as individual functions, 
materials, personnel, practices and coordinated school activities. 

GU. 403. — Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance. 1% 

credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 9. ALLEN. 

Securing, analyzing, and using occupational information. Making industrial, occupational, voca- 
tional, and educational surveys for guidance purposes. Evaluation and measuring of tests and devices 
in guidance for the individual, school, and community. Prerequisite Gu 402. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING 

TIE. 201. — Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 
daily. Room 16. HALE. 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 16. LIND. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 16. LIND. 

TIE. 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 
2:30 to 4:30 daily. Room 7. PLOWDEN. 

TIE. 257. — Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 12. HALE. 

TIE. 268. — Training of Women for Industrial Production. 2 credits. 8:00 
to 10:00 daily. Room 8. SEIDEL. 



32 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

TIME SCHEDULE 

SECOND TERM 

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 

DOE. 215. — Interior Decoration. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 12. 
HENDERS. 

The application of principles of color and design as employed by decorators, architects, and de- 
signers. The following subjects will be covered: Floors, floor coverings, walls, ceilings, fabrics, his- 
torical transition of decoration by period, contemporary decoration and special problems. 

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

TDE. 205.— Graphic Analysis. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 15. 
SCHOLLENBERGER. 

The foimulating of abstract and statistical materials into charts and graphs for rapid assimilation. 
The types of material suited to this analysis, the methods of presenting the material and the prepara- 
tion of material for display. (A set of drawing instruments will be of value to the student in this work.) 

TDE. 206. — Advanced Graphic Analysis. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. 
Room 15. SCHOLLENBERGER. 

Prereqmsite requirements TDE. 205. A continuation of TDE. 205. 

TDE. 211. — Evening Schools — Their Organization and Control. 2 credits. 
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 14. HINTON. 

The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities, and limitations 
of evening schools and classes to the end that the evening school teacher will understand clearly his 
place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and procedures in organization, selection of 
students. Federal, State, and local laws and regulations governing the conduct of evening schools and 
classes. Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 221. — Organization for Diversified Occupational Training. 2 credits. 
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 11. ANDERSON. 

Objectives to be attained, organization to attain these objectives. Federal and State requirements, 
social security, insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be studied. 

TDE. 222.— Occupational Surveys. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 11. 
HAFT. 

A study of procedure in making community industrial surveys and of individual industrial plants 
or business concerns to determine community training needs and acceptable industrial concerns in 
which to give training. 

TDE. 223.— Student Counseling and Selection. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. 
Room 8. NELMS. 

The procedure to be followed in securing applicants for training, factors involved in selection 
of students, occupational counseling, training, assignments, compensation, and work contracts. 



TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM 33 



TDE. 224. — Industrial Plant Job Analysis. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. 
Room 9. ANDERSON. 

The student must make a complete schedule of work processes in an individual plant. Also 
based upon these processes he must make a schedule of student training, related study, and 
compensation. 

TDE. 225. — Related Study Material. 2 credits. 2 :30 to 4 :30 daily. Room 11. 
MacEDWARDS. 

TDE. 226. — Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. 2 credits. 
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 9. NELMS. 

Coordination aims, purposes, methods of promotion, community and industrial relationships, 
advisory committee organization and function, research problems, trainee follow-up and placement. 

TDE. 241. — History and Development of Vocational Education in the United 

States. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 12. ALEXANDER. 

The development of Vocational Education by stages from its be ginnin g to the present time. 

TDE. 244. — Conference Methods. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 8. 
WHITNEL. 

Methods and devices that can be used successfully in leading and managing foremen conferences 
and in the selection of problems afiFecting vocational courses. Designed for Directors, Supervisors, 
Superintendents and Principals. 

TDE. 249.— Safety Education. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 14. 
O'REILLY. 

A general overview of various safety programs including industrial, home, school and recrea- 
tional safety; the need and justification of safety education; its promotion; material for instruction; 
organization methods and administration. 

TDE. 504. — Philosophy of Vocational Education. 1% credits. 10:00 to 12:00 
daily. Room 7. WRIGLEY. 

Basic principles involved in vocational education and the interpretation and application of these 
principles to public education and industrial and economic development in the United States. 



TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL. EDUCATION 

TIE. 201.— Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 
daily. Room 16. HALE. 

The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning 
related uiformation in which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for 
teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, 
and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 202.— Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 16. LIND. 

The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of such 
methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lecmres, conference, instruction sheets, charts, films, 
slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, 
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 16. LIND. 

Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various att ainm ent 
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the 
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 



34 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



TIE. 204 — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 
2:30 to 4:30 daily. Room 15. HINTON. 

Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor space, 
light, equipment, supplies, inventories, Federal and State regulations, and record keeping devices. 
Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 215. — Methods and Devices in Typewriting Instruction. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 3. SKIMIN. 

Special teaching procedures designed to speed up responses and bring control, with development 
of appropriate materials for desired results. The application of skill in typevnriting as applied to 
practical business office work. Films made and used by the U. S. Navy in their war training programs 
will be shown to demonstrate typewriting as done by experts. 

TIE. 216. — Secretarial Laboratory. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 3. 
SKIMIN. 

An advanced course in the application of secretarial skills, particularly designed for teachers of 
secretarial, stenographic, and general office work: coordination of instruction in the basic skills which 
are required to produce a marketable product; evaluation of balance and harmony in the finished 
product. 

TIE. 217. — ^Bookkeeping Laboratory. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 
4. ROSENBERG. 

An advanced course in the application of bookkeeping skills, particularly designed for teachers of 
secretarial and general clerical work. Adapting the curriculum to the secretarial and the non-secre- 
tarial student; making bookkeeping skills stand the office test. 

TIE. 219. — Advanced Teaching Methods in Thomas Shorthand. 2 credits. 
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 3. HOBSON. 

Emphasis in this course will be placed on methods of developing speed in dictation and tran- 
scription. While TIE. 218 is not a prerequisite for this course, the evening school teacher particularly 
will benefit from taking both 218 and 219. 

TIE. 257.— Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 15. HALE. 

The fundamental purposes and objectives of reldted instruction. Sources of material, organization, 
and methods to be employed in teaching related material. 

TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — ^Their Organization and ControL 1^/^ credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 7. ALEXANDER. 

The purpose and limitations of the various types of technical schools, their curricula, organization, 
management, control devices, and desirability from the standpoint of scope in satisfying typical com- 
munity training requirements. 

TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and Labor Relations. IV^ credits. 8:00 to 10:00 
daily. Room 14. WRIGLEY. 

National, state, and labor organization laws regulating and governing apprenticeship in the 
skilled crafts. Aspects of apprenticeship developments in industrial production and construction. 
Compulsory public training through craft unions and organization for apprentice training. 



TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM 35 



SPECIAL, COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING 

TIE. 201. — Org:anization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 
daily. Room 16. HALE. 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 16. LIND. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits. 
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 16. LIND. 

TIE. 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 2:30 
to 4:30 daily. Room 15. HENTON. 

TIE. 257. — Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. 
Room 15. HALE. 



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APPLICATION BLANK 1944 SUMMER SESSION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

(If you wish to attend the School of Trade and Industrial Education, Daytona Beach, Florida, this form 
should be fiUed out completely and mailed to the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, before June 1. 
See also page 37.) 

39 



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40 



University of Florida 



Scholarships, Loan Funds, Student 
Employment and Aivards 




THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

VOL. XXXIX, SERIES I, NO. 7 JULY 1, 1944 

Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 3 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University of Florida does not have large sums of money available for cash 
scholarships. Many of the scholarships availabe to students are awarded directly by the 
donors, and administered through the Business Office of the University and the Committee on 
Scholarships and Loans. However, there are a number of scholarships awarded and admin- 
istered by the Committee on Scholarships and Loans. Also, this Committee collects all 
information relative to the basis of award, the value, and other pertinent facts pertaining to 
scholarships. The Committee also collects information on the applicants and supplies this 
information to donors. In some instances the Committee has been given the authority to make 
awards without consulting donors. 

While scholarship as evidenced by academic attainment is an important feature in making 
awards, it is by no means the only consideration. The student's potential capacity to profit by 
college training and to make reasonable returns to society are important considerations in 
making all awards. 

In addition to the opportunities for scholarship awards at the University, prospective 
students are urged to consult the resources in their home communities. Many civic clubs and 
community organizations are interested in providing means whereby students may attend 
college when they are convinced the investment will be worth while. 

Unless otherwise specified, application for scholarships listed below should be made to 
the Dean of Students, who is Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loans at the 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 



Arthur Ellis Hamm Memorial Scholarship. — Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Hamm in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis 
Hamm, a former student of the University who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on Sept- 
ember 14, 1918. 

Loring Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship maintained by Mrs. William Loring Spencer 
in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring. 

Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is open to students of 
the junior and senior cleisses. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award. 

David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is awarded annually on the 
basis of scholarship, and is open to members of the junior and senior classes. 

The Charles E. Tufts Memorial Scholarship; — The Charles E. Tufts' Estate has provided 
for a scholarship to be awarded to a student or students who are graduates of any high school 
in Hillsborough County, and who shall have demonstrated by their industry and attainments 
that they arc in all respects worthy of such assistance. The amount of these scholarships will 
vary from year to year inasmuch as they are derived from an investment. 

Confederate Memorial Scholarships. — These scholarships were made available by the 
Board of Commissioners of State Institutions under authority of Section (1), Chapter 8505 
(No. 110, Laws of Florida). The amount of the scholarships is $150 per year. Applicants 
must be lineal descendants of a Confederate soldier or sailor. 

The State Board of Education Scholarships. — These scholarships are made available by 
the State Board of Education for the purpose of encouraging students to prepare themselves 
for the teaching profession in the State of Jlorida. The scholarship awards are made by the 



4 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

State Board of Education upon the recommendation of the University's Committee on Scholar- 
ships and Loans. The examinations for these scholarships will be held in April of each year. 
The value of each scholarship is $200 per year. The number of scholarships for each county 
available to University of Florida students is determined by the number of Representatives 
from that county in the State Legislature. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Scholarships. — The American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education has established two scholarships of $200 each at 
the University of Florida. These scholarships are to be awarded by the Committee on Scholar- 
ships and Loans to competent and promising students in need of support to pursue the pro- 
fessional collegiate study of pharmacy. These scholarships are available to undergraduate 
students. Applicants must have completed the equivalent of one year's college work. 

C. M. T. C. Scholarships. — The University of Florida offers a maximum of four scholar- 
ships of $75 each to students who are residents of Florida. Applicants must be graduates of 
an accredited Florida high school, present a proper admission certificate and certificates of 
good character, and they must be recommended by the Corps Area Commander. These 
scholarships are awarded for a period of four years provided the holder maintains a satis- 
factory scholastic average. 

Duncan U. Fletcher Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in memory of the outstanding character of our late Senator, a scholarship of $500 
annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricultural activities. 
This scholarship will not be open in 1944-45. 

James D. Westcott, Jr. Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in memory of the first United States Senator from Florida, a scholarship of $500 
annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricultural activities. 
This scholarship will not be open in 1944-45. 

Sears, Roebuck Scholarships. — The Sears, Roebuck Company has given funds to the 
University of Florida for the establishment of a number of scholarships in the amount of $100 
annually, payable in nine monthly instalments, to students particularly interested in agri- 
cultural activities. 

At the end of each year the Sears, Roebuck Company awards a scholarship in the amount 
of $200 to the outstanding sophomore in the Sears, Roebuck Scholarship group. (The sopho- 
more award has been discontinued for the duration.) 

Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarships. — These scholarships are for the 
benefit of children whose parents participated in World War I or World War II. The Act pro- 
viding for the scholarships is as follows: "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the State of 
Florida to provide educational opportunity at State expense for dependent children, either of 
whose parents entered the army, navy, marine or nurses corps of the United States from the 
State of Florida, and died in that service or from injuries sustained or disease contracted therein 
between the 6th day of April, 1917, and the 2nd day of July, 1921, or who have died since or 
may hereafter die from diseases or disability resulting from such war service; and also the 
dependent children either of whose parents served in any of the military or naval services of 
the United States from the State of Florida during the period from December 7, 1941, to the 
close of World War Number Two; where the parents of such children have been bona fide res- 
idents of the State of Florida for five years next preceding their application for the benefits 
hereof, and subject to the rules, restrictions and limitations hereof." The maximum amount 
to be received by any one student within a period of twelve months cannot exceed $300. 
Applications should be made to the State Adjutant of the American Legion of Florida. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 5 

County Agricultural Scholarships. — Provision has been made by a legislative act for a 
scholarship from each county — to be offered and provided for at the discretion of the Board 
of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by a competitive 
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the dining 
hall and room in the dormitory. Wliether such a scholarship has been provided for by any 
county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or the County 
Agent of the county in question. If it is desired, questions for the examination will be provided 
and papers graded by the University. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships. — The Rehabilitation Section of the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction provides limited assistance to persons who are physically handi- 
capped. Requirements for eligibility for this assistance are as follows: The applicant must 
have a permanent major physical disability, he must be sixteen years old or over, he must 
have a good scholastic record, and must take courses that will prepare him for some vocation 
at which he can earn a living. Applications for this assistance should be made prior to July 1 
for the following school year. Students who wish to apply should write to the State Supervisor 
of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida. 

United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. — Scholarships have been established 
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Applications 
should be made to Mrs. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous Avenue, 
Tampa, Florida. 

Duval High Memorial Scholarship. — An act creating the Duval High School Memorial 
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval County funds as 
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823, 
and was approved May 20, 1927. 

This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and 
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated, 
was established by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Application 
should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jacksonville, Florida. 

Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship. — The Jacksonville Rotary Club maintains a 
scholarship of $250, which is given, at its discretion, to a student meeting such requirements 
as it may make pertaining to the scholarship. Application should be made to the President 
of the Jacksonville Rotary Club, Jacksonville, Florida, 

Florida Bankers Association Scholarships. — The Florida Bankers Association awards 
three scholarships annually; one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and 
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the Annual 
Boys' Short Course. The examination is given and the award is made by the State Boys' Club 
Agent. Applications for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the College of 
Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

The Colonial Dames of America Scholarships. — Eleanor Hopkins Scholarship, $250; 
Crawford Livingston Scholarship, $250; and the Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Scholarsliip, 
$250. Applications for these scholarships should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price. 1 West 
72nd Street, New York City. 

Fairchild Scholarship National. — Mrs. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers 
annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination, 
to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following 
his graduation. Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which are 



6 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

members of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Further information may be 
obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Jacksonville Kiwanis Club Scholarships. — The Jacksonville Kiwanis Club maintains two 
scholarships for Jacksonville boys. Application should be made by letter to Miss Gladys B. 
Harris, Executive Secretary, Jacksonville Kiwanis Club, 603 Hildebrandt Building, Jack- 
sonville, Florida. 



LOANS 

The several loan funds listed below may be divided into two classes: (1) The long-term 
loan fund which allows the student to complete his college education and repay the loan after 
graduation, in instalments over a period of years; and, (2) the short-term emergency loan 
fund which aims to meet the needs of unforseen emergencies that arise in the financing of 
college expenses. As a rule, the short-term loans are for small amounts and are repayable 
within the semester. 

Unless otherwise specified, application for loan funds listed below should be made to 
the Dean of Students, Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loans, University of 
Florida, Gainesville. 



The Amercan Bankers Association Loan. — The American Bankers Association has allo- 
cated to the University of Florida one loan for a student whose major course is in banking, 
economics, or related subjects in classes of junior grade or above. The value of this loan is $250. 

The Woman's Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association Loan Fund. — The Woman's 
Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association has created a loan fund to assist worthy students 
who are the sons of medical doctors who have been members of the Florida Medical Association 
for at least ten years. Loans are made in amounts not exceeding $300 for the school year. 

Tolbert Memorial Student Loan Fund, — Through the efforts of various student organi- 
zations approximately $5,000 has been accumulated for making short-term loans to students 
to meet financial emergencies. These loans are made in amounts not exceeding $50 and for 
periods not exceeding 90 days. 

The Lions Club Agricultural Loan Fund. — The Lions Clubs of the State of Florida have 
set aside a fund to be used in making loans to worthy Florida students who plan to specialize 
in agriculture. In special cases these loans are made to graduate students, but they are not 
available for freshmen. Mr. Harry Schad, a member of the Gainesville Lions Club, is chair- 
man of the committee which passes on all loans. 

Summer Session Executive Council Loan Fund. — Through the efforts of the Student 
Government Organization of the Summer Sessions, a loan fund hsis been set up to take care 
of financial emergencies of summer school students. A total of $900 has been accumulated. 
These loans are made in amounts not exceeding $25 and are repayable before the close of the 
Summer Session. The fund is administered by a committee composed of the Dean of Students, 
the Custodian of University Funds, the President of the Student Body, and the Chancellor of 
the Honor Court. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 7 

Summer Session Miscellaneous Loans. — A total of approximately $400 has been accumu- 
lated as a loan fund. This fund was contributed by the following individuals: The Honorable 
R. A. Gray, The Honorable Doyle E. Carleton, Honorable Harold Colee, Mrs. Elizabeth Skinner 
Jackson, and the Estate of the late State Superintendent of Public Instruction, W. N. Sheats. 

Rotary Loan Fund. — The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of money 
to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend college. 
The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen. Applications 
for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city from which 
the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary Educational Loan 
Fund, Inc., University of Florida, Gainesville. 

The Knights Templar Student Loan Fund. — The Grand Commandery Knights Templar 
of Florida has a revolving student loan fund available to students in the various colleges of 
the State, for their junior and senior years, where satisfactory references pertaining to char- 
acter and scholastic records are furnished. Students should contact local Commandery nearest 
their homes as their first step, and then they will be referred to a committee handling the loan. 

William Wilson Finley Foundation. — As a memorial to the late President Finley and in 
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Company has 
donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000 to be used as a loan fund. No loan 
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, University of Florida, to whom applications should be sent. 

Kappa Delta Pi Loan Fund. — The Kappa Delta Pi honorary educational fraternity at 
the University of Florida has established a loan fund for students who are pursuing work in 
the College of Education preparatory to entering the teaching profession. The fund at the 
present time amounts to $300. Further information concerning this loan fund and forms for 
making application for a loan may be secured from the Secretary of the College of Education, 
Room 120, P. K. Yonge School, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Murphree Engineering Loan Fund. — On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late President, 
Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500 to be used as a revolving loan fund. 
This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial difficulties, 
worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some assistance. 
Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. Applications for 
loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engineering, University of 
Florida, Gainesville. 

Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund. — The Florida Association of Architects has 
created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in Architecture 
who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the Director of the 
School of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Loan 
Fund. — The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida has 
established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered by the 
Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Applications should be made to the 
Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, Language Hall, University of Florida, 
Gainesville. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund. — The Ladies Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical 
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need of assist- 
ance. Further information may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 



8 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund. — Tlie Florida chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary 
scholastic society, has established a $250 annual loan fund for Phi Kappa Phi members. 
Loans will be made principally to students intending to pursue graduate work. Application 
should be made to Mr. B. J. Otte, Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Senior Law Loan Fund. — A loan fund available to needy seniors in the College of Law 
was established by the Law Class of 1938 and has been increased by subsequent gifts. Appli- 
cations should be made to the Dean of the College of Law, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Benton Engineering Loan Fund. — On May 20. 1938, a friend of the late Dean Benton 
gave to the Engineering College $500 to be used as a revolving loan fund. This fund is to be 
used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial difficulties, worthy students would 
be kept from graduating unless they could receive some assistance. Only in special cases are 
these loans made to members of the junior class. Applications for loans from this fund should 
be made to the Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

The University of Florida has long given every possible assistance to young men of 
superior ability who need financial aid in order to attend college. During normal times, over 
one half of the students at the University earn a part of their expenses by working on the 
campus or in the City of Gainesville. 

The following is a resume of part-time student employment at the University of Forida: 

AMOUNT OF EARNINGS 
It is recommended that no individual, in general, attempt to earn more than one half of 
his college expenses if he carries a normal academic load. (See the Catalog for approximate 
expenses, and academic load.) 

POLICY GOVERNING SELF-HELP AWARDS 
There are usually three to four applicants for each University job available. The Uni- 
versity Self-Help Committee, in awarding jobs under its jurisdiction, has consistently ruled 
that, need being equal, the individual student with the superior college record or a higher 
standing on placement tests plus superior high school record shall be given preference. Each 
student who is employed by the University must maintain a C average or better, both for 
his total academic average and for each semester or term of attendance, 

NATURE OF JOBS AVAILABLE 

Every attempt is made to place the student in work that utilizes his training and exper- 
ience and, wherever possible, is related to his field of major study or interest. Students are 
employed as typists, office assistants, library workers, student assistants in the various depart- 
ments, workers in the University Cafeteria, painters, etc.; in fact, work done by students 
ranges from duties demanding special skills to those demanding no skill except a willingness 
to work and learn. 

WHERE TO APPLY 
(1) Each undergraduate student employed at the University of Florida must be certified 
as Eligible for Student Employment. "Certificate of Eligibility" is obtained at 
Room 3, Language Hall, where each individual should request an application form. 
The student should follow the instructions given with the application form. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND AWARDS 9 

(2) For jobs administered by the Self-Help Committee, each application should be 

directed to the Office of the Dean of Students. 

(3) For jobs under departmental, college, or other administration, application may be 
made directly to the prospective employer, or to the Office of the Dean of Students, 
where proper routing will be made. 

Where application is made direct to the prospective employer, an application must be 
filed with the Office of the Dean of Students as directed under (1), immediately above. 

WHEN TO APPLY 

Applications should be made at least thirty (30) days before the opening of the semester 
or term in which employment is desired. However, at any time prior to the opening of a 
eemester or term, or during the academic period itself, any student who needs employment 
should report to Room 3, Language Hall. 

DIRECT INQUIRIES CONCERNING STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND REQUESTS 
FOR APPLICATION BLANKS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: Office of the Dean of 
Students, Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville. 



AWARDS 

Board of Control Awards. — The Board of Control annually awards the following medals: 

1. The General College Declamation Medals, to the two best declaimers of the General 
College. 

2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the junior class. 

3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the senior class. 

Harrison Company Award.— A set of the Florida Reports, Volumes 1-22, Reprint Edition, 
is offered by the Harrison Company to the senior law student doing all his work in this 
institution, and making the highest record during his law course. 

Harrison Company First Year Award. — Redfearn on Wills and Administration of Estates 
in Florida is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law student making the 
highest average in twenty-eight hours of law taken in this institution. 

Redfearn Prize. — For the past five years Hon. D. H. Redfearn of Miami has offered a 
prize of $50 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal reform. This prize 
will be continued in 1944-45. 

Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup. — Mr. F. C. Groover, president of the Groover- 
Stewart Drug Company, has given a large silver loving cup which is awarded to the grad- 
uating class in the School of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average in scholarship 
and is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent graduating class. 

David W. Ramsaur Medal. — Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur of Jacksonville offers a gold medal 
to that graduate of the School of Pharmacy making the highest average in scholarship and 
evincing leadership in student activities. 

Haisley Lynch Medal. — The University is grateful to Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gainesville 
for her gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American history. This medal 
is awarded annually by her in loving memory of her son, Haisley Lynch, a former student 
of the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War I. 



10 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

Gargoyle Key. — Gargoyle Society awards a gold key each year to the graduate of the 
General College, who, in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in scholarship, leader- 
ship, initiative, and general ability. To be eligible for this award the student must have 
completed the fundamental course in Architecture or that in Painting. 

The David Levy Yulee Lectureship and Speech Contest. — Under the provisions of the 
will of Nannie Yulee Noble, a sum of money was bequeathed to the University of Florida, 
the income of which was to be used to bring outstanding speakers to the University to 
deliver lectures to the student body and faculty on the general topic "The Ideal of Honor 
and Service in Politics." 

In addition there is held annually a David Levy Yulee Speech Contest, the purpose 
of which is to stimulate student thought and encourage the creation and presentation of 
orations on a general idealistic theme. The contest is open to all students in the Univer- 
sity and the winners of first and second place receive cash awards of $40 and $25, 
respectively. 

The James Miller Leake Medal. — This is a medal awarded annually for an essay in 
American History. The medal is given by the Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and named for the Head of the Department of History and Political 
Science of the University of Florida. 

Fine Arts Society Award. — ^The Fine Arts Society annusilly offers a gold medal and 
citation to the outstanding student receiving the baccalaureate degree in the School of 
Architecture and Allied Arts in recognition of his scholastic standing and leadership. The 
award is offered only when there are five or more students graduating. 

Phi Sigma Society Scholarship Award. — The Phi Sigma Society, national honorary 
biological society, awards each year a medal to the undergraduate or graduate student 
who is considered to have done the most outstanding research in one of the fields of the 
biological sciences. - 

Sigma Tau Award. — The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal for 
scholastic ability to the sophomore in the College of Engineering who, during his freshman 
year, made the highest average in his scholastic work. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award. — Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic 
fraternity, awards annually a key to ten percent of the students graduating in journalism who 
have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work immediately preceding 
the year in which the nominees are candidates for degrees. 

Dillon Achievement Cup. — Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver loving 
cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in journalism who, 
in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the faculty of the 
Department of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to the press of 
Florida. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. — Each year the Florida chapter of the international 
fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business administration fraternity, awards a gold 
key to that male senior in the College of Business Administration who upon graduation ranks 
highest in scholarship for the entire course in Business Adminstration. 

Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll. — Each year the Florida chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, na- 
tional honorary business administration fraternity, awards a scroll to the junior in the College 
of Business Administration who, during his preparatory work in the General College, made 



PRIZES AND AWARDS 11 

the highest scholastic average of all students who entered the College of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

The Chapter Scholarship Award. — A Certificate of Merit, signed by the President of 
the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Chairman of the Committee on 
Student Chapters, and a student membership badge are given to the junior in Chemical 
Engineering who is a member of the Student Chapter and who has attained the highest 
scholarship standing during his freshman and sophomore years. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Medallion. — Each year Alpha Kappa Psi, international 
professional fraternity in commerce, awards a white gold-bronze medallion to the Senior 
in the College of Business Administration who for his first three years at the University 
of Florida has been most outstanding in scholarship and campus activities and has shown 
the most likely qualifications for a successful business career in the future. 



PRINTED IN U.S.A. BY ST. PETERSBURG PRINTING CO., FLORIDA 



The University Record 

of 

of the 

University of Florida 

Galendar 



IMPORTANT 

The University will not publish a Catalog for 1944-45. In 
lieu thereof, the 1943-44 Catalog will be used with this supple- 
ment. 




Vol. XXXIX, Series I No. 7, Extra No. 1 July 15, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



2 CALENDAR 1944-45 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Spessard L. Holland _ Governor 

R. A. Gray Secretary of State 

J. Edwin Larson State Treasurer 

J. Tom Watson Attorney General 

Colin English, Secretary State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

Henry P. Adair Attorney-at-Law 

1511 Barnett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida 
Chairman of the Board 

Thomas W. Bryant, B.S., LL.B. (Florida) Attorney-at-Law 

Lakeland, Florida 

N. B. Jordan Banker 

Quincy, Florida 

M. Luther Mershon, LL.B. (Florida) Attorney-at-Law 

Miami, Florida 

T. T. Scott Merchant 

Live Oak, Florida 

John T. Diamond Secretary of the Board of Control 

Tallahassee, Florida 
T. W. Blanding Auditor for the Board of Control 

Tallahassee, Florida 

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D. 

President of the University 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Ph.D., Sc.D Acting Vice-President of the University; 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A Dean of Students 

*Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Dean of the University 

Perry Albert Foote, Ph.D Director of the School of Pharmacy 

Klein Harrison Graham, LL.D Business Manager 

H. Harold Hume, D.Sc. Provost for Agriculture and Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P. Registrar 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A Dean of the General College 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D Dean of the College of Business Administration 

Harold Mowry, M.S.A Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

Harold Stephenson Newins, M.F Director of the School of Forestry 

James William Norman, Ph.D Dean of the Summer Session 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A., B.S.A Dean of the General Extension Division 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D Acting Dean of the College of Education 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Arthur Percival Spencer, M.S Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.B Dean of the College of Law 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., F.A.LA Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts 

Joseph Weil, M.S Dean of the College of Engineering 



On leave of absence 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
REGULAR SESSION, 1944-45 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1944 

September 14, Thursday 1944-45 Session officially opens. 

September 14-16, Thursday-Saturday Registration period. 

September 18, Monday, 8 a.m Classes for 1944-45 Session begin; late registration 

fee of $5 for all students registering on or after this 

date. 
September 23. Saturday, 12 Noon Last day for registration for the first semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections in all 

courses, except year comprehensive courses. 
September 30, Saturday, 12 Noon Last day for submittting resignation and receiving 

any refund of fees. 
October 21, Saturday, 12 Noon Last day for making application for a degree to be 

conferred at the end of the first semester. 

November 30, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. Qasses suspended. 

December 7, Thursday, 5 p.m Progress Reports for General College students are 

due in the Office of the Registrar. 
December 7, Thursday Last day for removing grades of I or X received 

in the preceding semester of attendance. 
December 7, Thursday Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E. 
December 20. Wednesday, 5 p.m Christmas Recess begins. 

1945 

January 3, Wednesday, 8 a.m Christmas Recess ends. 

January 5. Friday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 
January 8, Monday, 5 p.m Last day for graduate students graduating at the 

end of the first semester to submit theses to the 

Dean. 

January 15, Monday Final Examinations in Departmental Courses begin. 

January 15, Monday Second semester registration begins for students who 

have previously registered in the University. Late 

registration fee of $5 for not registering according 

to the announcements in the Orange and Blue 

Bulletin. 
January 25. Thursday, 4 p.m First semester ends; all grades are due in the Office 

of the Registrar. 

January 26, Friday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

January 27, Saturday, 10 a.m Conferring of degrees. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 27, Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Second semester registration for students not in 

attendance during first semester. 
Placement Tests, Room 205 Peabody Hall. 

January 29, Monday, 8 a.m Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5. 

February 3, Saturday, 12 Noon Last day for registration for second semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections. 



4 CALENDAR 1944-45 

March 3, Saturday, 12 Noon Last day for making application for a degree to be 

conferred at end of second semester. Last day for 
submitting resignation and receiving any refund 
of fees. 

March 26, Monday, 5 p.m Progress Reports for General College students due 

in the Office of the Registrar. 

l\Iarch 28, Wednesday Last day for removing grades of I or X received in 

preceding semester of attendance. 

.\pril 19, Wednesday, 5 p.m Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E. 

May 4, Friday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 
May 9, Wednesday, .5 p.m Last day for graduate students graduating at the 

end of the semester to submit theses to the Dean. 

May 14, Monday, 8:30 a.m Final Examinations begin. 

May 24, Thursday, 4 p.m All grades for candidates for degrees are due in 

the Office of the Registrar. 

May 25, Friday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

May 26. Saturday, 5 p.m. Final examinations end. 

May 27, Sunday Baccalaureate Address. 

May 28, Monday Conferring of degrees. 

May 28, Monday, 12 Noon Second Semester ends; all grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 5 

ADMISSIONS 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time will be 
considered for admission as follows: 

1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not attended 
college, he will be considered for admission to the General College. 

2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university 
and is presenting less than two years of acceptable college credit for advanced stand- 
ing, he will be considered for admission to the General College. 

3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university 
and is presenting two years or more of acceptable college credit as advanced standing 
toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for admission to the Upper 
Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates the completion 
of college -ivork in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English, the Humanities, 
and the Biological Sciences. 

4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies, and has been graduated from a 
standard college or university, he will be considered for admission to the Graduate 
School. 

Prospective students are referred to the sections below for more detailed information 
on the policies governing and the procedures involved in securing admission to the various 
divisions of the University. 

The prospective student should determine from the preceding paragraphs the 
category in which he may apply for admission to the University. He should then 
write to the OflSce of the Registrar giving his full name and home address and 
stating the unit for which he wishes to be considered for admission. Appropriate 
application forms and instructions will then be mailed to him. 

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

Florida Students. — The following items are considered in admitting students who have 
not previously attended college. 

(1) Graduation from high school.* 

(2) Achievement in high school. 

(3) Personal qualities. 

(4) Recommendation of high school principal. 

(5) Rank on Placement Tests. 

Graduation froib high school is required. No specific high school units are required; 
however, all applicants must pass the Placement Tests before being admitted to the General 



•The Board of University Examiners may in rare cases, when the principal of the high school 
the student has attended recommends such action, permit an exceptional student, before graduation, 
to take the Placement Tests ; if the student passes these tests satisfactorily, he may be admitted 
to the General College. Mature students, lacking a formal high school education, but possessing 
because of some other training the necessary admission requirements, may petition the Board of 
University Examiners for permission to take the Placement Tests and the College Aptitude Test ; 
upon satisfactorily passing the tests, such students will be admitted to the General College. 



6 CALENDAR 1944-45 

College. These tests consist of a general psychologic2il test, and achievement tests in the 
fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attainments in these 
fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not guaranteed by the 
acquiring of certain high school units. 

Certain curricula of the Upper Division require a working knowledge of a foreign 
language. Students contemplating entering such curricula could with profit begin this 
study in high school. 

Students expecting to study engineering need a thorough training in mathematics. An 
effort should be made by such students to obtain the broadest possible mathematical train- 
ing in the high school. 

Students who expect to study architecture or building construction should obtain a 
thorough foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences. 

Non-Florida Students. — In addition to the requirements for Florida students, non- 
Florida students are required to file preliminary credentials satisfactory to the Board of 
University Examiners. The Board then will determine the eligibility of such students to 
take the Placement Tests. However, permission to come to Gainesville to take these tests 
does not guarantee admission to the General College. Students come to Gainesville at the 
risk of being refused admission if the results of the Placement Tests are not satisfactory. 

Transfer Students. — The Board of University Examiners will determine the advanced 
standing of students entering the University from other colleges. In general, the policies 
of this Board will be as follows: 

1. All students must present training equivalent to the work of the General 
College, and in some cases wiU be required to pass the prescribed compre- 
hensive examinations. 

2. Students with poor records from other institutions will not be admitted 
to the University of Florida. A student whose average is below "C" should 
not apply for admission to the University, and a student whose average is only 
"C" is not guaranteed admission. 

3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with 
high or superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the col- 
leges and professional schools of the Upper Division to the best interest of 
the student. 



ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION 

From the General College. — After the student has completed the work of the General 
College and received a certificate of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or pro- 
fessional schools of the Upper Division by meeting the specific admission requirements 
of that college or school. A student remaining in the General College to complete one or 
more specific requirements, may, with the approval of the Dean of the College iie expects 
to enter in the Upper Division, take additional work which may apply on his record in 
the Upper Division. 

The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the Upper 
Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student must 
be certified by the Board as qualified to pursue the work of the college or school he wishes 
to enter. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 7 

In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools 
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are 
listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General College 
may prepare to meet these requirements by taking as electives the courses indicated under 
the various curricula presented. 

Transfer Students. — All students admitted to the colleges and professional schools of 
the Upper Division will be required to meet the requirements for admission to those colleges. 

The manner in which students transferring from other colleges to the University may 
meet the requirements for admission to the colleges of the Upper Division will be deter- 
mined by the Board of University Examiners. In general, the policy of the Board of 
University Examiners will be as follows: 

1. The Board of University Examiners will always bear in mind the aims of the cur- 
riculum of the General College. All students must present training equivalent to 
the work of the General College and may be required to pass prescribed comprehen- 
sive examinations. 

2. Students with average records from other institutions will be required to meet in 
toto the requirements for admission to the Upper Division. 

3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with high or 
superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the colleges and pro- 
fessional schools of the Upper Division, to the best interest of the student. 

Students who, for any reason, are not allowed to return to the institution they last at- 
tended, or have not made a satisfactory record in the work carried at other institutions, will 
be denied admission to the University of Florida. Students luith an average below C need 
not apply for admission. Students with an average of C or higher are not guaranteed 
admission. 

Special Students. — Only by the approval of the Board of University Examiners may 
special students be admitted to the various schools and colleges of the Upper Division. 
Special students are never admitted to the College of Law. Application for admission of 
these students must include: 

1. The filing of satisfactory preliminary credentials. 

2. A statement as to the type of studies to be pursued. 

3. Reason for desiring to take special courses. 

4. Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard 
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity 
and quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major. 
Immediately preceding the description of the graduate courses offered by any department 
will be found a brief statement of the prerequisites for graduate study. The course offer- 
ings are arranged alphabetically by department name in the latter portion of the Catalog. 

If the student is a graduate of a college or university which does not meet standard 
requirements or if the quantity and quality of the foundation in his proposed major field 
is not completely satisfactory, he may nevertheless be permitted to register provisionally, 
and demonstrate by a qualifying examination and a semester's work, his preparation for 
and his ability to do graduate work. Such students often will be required to spend longer 



8 CALENDAR 1944-45 

than the prescribed time in completing the requirements for the degree. It is permissible 
for well-qualified students to take courses in the Graduate School without becoming candi- 
dates for an advanced degree. 

ADMISSION OF WOMEN 

The University of Florida is not a coeducational institution. The State institution of 
higher learning for women is the Florida State College for Women located at Tallahassee. 

Women students are admitted to the University of Florida in the regular session under 
the laws of the State provided they meet either set of the following conditions: 

1. Women who are at least twenty-one years of age and who have received credit from 
a reputable educational institution in at least 60 semester hours of academic college 
work shall be eligible to enroll as students in the University of Florida in such 
subjects and courses as they are unable to obtain in any other institution under the 
supervision of the Board of Control, provided they are able in every way, regardless 
of sex, to meet the admission and eligibility requirements of said University. 

2. Women who present at least 32 semester hours of acceptable college credits may be 
permitted to enroll in the University of Florida as sophomores to study Pharmacy. 
To meet this requirement credits in English, botany, biology, mathematics, physical 
sciences, and psychology are preferable. Such students must be able in every way, 
regardless of sex, to meet the admission and eligibility requirements of the University. 
Women students in the General College, under this regulation, are limited in their 
selection of courses to those which are prerequisite for admission to the School of 
Pharmacy. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 9 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
EXPENSES 

REGISTRATION FEES 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

General College Students, not registered for Military Science ....$33.00 $33.00 

General College Students, registered for Military' Science 34.50 33.00 

Upper Division Students, except in College of Law 33.00 33.00 

Upper Division Students, in College of Law 43.00 43.00 

Graduate School Students 25.00 25.00 

All Non-Florida Students Pay Additional... 50.00 50.00 

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRATION FEES 

Registration Fees listed in the above table include the following: 

Contingent Fee. — A fee of $15 per semester is charged every student. 

Special Fee. — A fee of $2.50 per semester is required of each student for the construc- 
tion and rehabilitation of buildings. 

Infirmary Fee. — All students are charged an Infirmaiy Fee of $7.50 per semester which 
secures for the student, in case of illness, the privilege of a bed in the Infirmary and the 
services of the University Physician and the professionally trained nurses, except in cases 
involving a major operation. 

Student Activity Fee. — A fee of $15.00 is assessed to maintain and foster athletic sports, 
student publications, and other student activities. $7.50 of this fee is paid each semester. 
Student fees are passed by a vote of the student body and approved by the Board of Control 
before they are adopted. 

Swimming Pool Fee. — A fee of 50 cents per semester is charged all students for use of 
the lockers and supplies at the swimming pool. 

Military Fee. — A fee of $1.50 is charged all students registered for basic Military Science. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Fees which apply in special cases only are listed below: 

Breakage Fee. — Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory 
apparatus in one or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book: 
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology, and Soils. This book costs $5.00. A refund will be allowed 
on any unused portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked in his apparatus 
to the satisfaction of the departments concerned. 

Room Reservation Fee. — Students wishing to reserve rooms in the Residence Halls must 
pay a room reservation fee of $10 at the time such reservation is made. 

Special Examination Fee.— A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time 
other than that regularly scheduled. 

Application Fee for Comprehensive Examination. — A non-refundable fee of $1, payable 
on the day of application, is charged for each application for a comprehensive examinatioru 
Applications are necessary only in case the student is not currently registered in the course 
concerned. 



10 CALENDAR 1944-45 

Diploma Fee. — This fee of $5 must be paid at the time the student makes formal applica- 
tion for a degree. This must be done on or before the last day for making such application 
as stated in the calendar for the semester at the close of which the student expects to 
receive the degree. If, for any reason, the student does not receive the degree at this time, 
the fee for subsequent applications for the degree will be $2. 

Special Infirmary Charges. — A student requiring an emergency operation, which is not 
covered by the fee assessed, may employ the services of any accredited physician whom 
he may select, and utilize the facilities of the Infirmary for the operation. To secure this 
medical service the student must report to the physician in charge of the Infirmary. When 
operating room is used a fee of $5 is charged. Board in the Infirmary is charged at the 
rate of $1 a day. 

Library Fines. — A fine of 2 cents a day is charged for each book in general circulation 
which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be checked out 
overnight, and if they are not returned on time the fine is 25 cents for the first hour and 
5 cents an hour or fraction of an hour thereafter until they are returned. No student may 
check out a book if he owes the Library more than 50 cents in fines. 

FEES FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Students who carry nine hours or less will be charged the contingent fee of $15 a 
semester, the infirmary fee of $7.50 a semester and special fee of $2.50 a semester. Such 
students must pay any tuition which their classification specifies. Such students are not 
entitled to any of the privileges attached to any other University fee. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

Fees are payable as a part of the registration procedure except for the Non-Florida Fee 
for the first semester of attendance which must be sent to the Office of the Registrar before 
the applicant may be issued an Admission Certificate; the Room Reservation Fee which 
must accompany the Application for Room Reservation and be sent to the Director of 
Residence; and Special Fees which are payable at the time that the student expects to 
receive the service for which the fee is assessed. Failure to pay fees when due makes 
registration incomplete and will result in assessment of the $5 late registration fee. 

If any remittance is made by mail it must be accompanied by the full name of the 
student concerned and a notation concerning the fee or fees being paid. All remittances 
must be made payable to the University of Florida and sent to the Office of the Business 
Manager except as noted above. The Office of the Business Manager will issue receipts 
for all funds received which will indicate the purpose of payment. Students are cautioned 
to preserve these receipts and have them available for examination by any University official 
concerned. 

REFUND OF FEES 

Students resigning before the dates specified in the University Calendar are entitled 
to a refund of all fees except $5 of the contingent fee. This $5 is the cost of service in 
registering the student and is never refunded. 

OTHER EXPENSES 

Room Rent.—Rent for rooms in the Residence Halls varies from $32.00 to $45.00 per 
student per semester. Remittances for Room Rent should be made in accordance with the 
directions issued by the Director of Residence. (See page 14.) If the student does not 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 11 

reside in one of the units of the Residence Hall System the arrangements concerning rates 
and method of payment are the responsibility of the individuals concerned. 

Meals. — Cost of meals in the University Cafeteria varies with the individual. Books of 
coupons having cash value may be purchased from the Ofi&ce of the Business Manager, or 
meals may be paid for in cash. Meals may be obtained in private boarding houses adjoining 
the campus at reasonable rates. 

Books and Supplies. — Cost of these items varies with the program of the student. It is 
estimated that from $30.00 to $50.00 per year will cover this expense for most students. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 

Minimum Maximum 

General Fees and Course Expenses I 66.00* $ 8600* 

Books and Training Supplies for the Year 30.00 50.00 

Laundry and Cleaning 25.00 35.00 

Room and Board 220.00 360.00 



Estimated Total Expenses $341.00 $531.00 



*Non-FIorida students are charged $100 tuition per year in addition. 



Non-Florida students, including those pursuing graduate work, pay tuition of $50 per 
semester in addition to the fees charged Florida students. 

Classification of Students. — For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classified 
as Florida and non-Florida students. 

A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents have 
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra- 
tion; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and who 
has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents of 
Florida at the time of their death but whose successor natural guardian has been a resident 
of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding the student's registration. 

A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents are resi- 
dents of Florida (or were at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence 
in another state; or (2) who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida for at least 
twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration, provided such residence has 
not been acquired while attending any school or college in Florida; or (3) who is the 
wife of a man who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding her registration; or (4» who is an alien who has taken out his first citizen- 
ship papers and who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding his registration. 

All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students. 

The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first regis- 
tration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case 
of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this State, by maintaining 
such residence for twelve consecutive months. If the status of a student changes from a 
non-Florida student to a Florida student, his classification may be changed at the next 
registration thereafter. 



12 CALENDAR 1944-45 

A fee of $10 will be charged all students registering incorrectly. In the case of non- 
Florida students, this fee will be assessed in addition to the tuition. In the case of Plorida 
students who give an out of state address at the time of registration or any other time, 
this fee will be charged unless the student files a written explanation acceptable to the 
Registrar stating why the out of state address was given and giving proof that his resi- 
dence is Florida. 

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS 

The purpose of the Residence Halls is to provide comfortable student living quarters 
at economical rates. The Halls are self-supporting: the costs of their construction, main- 
tenance, repair, and management, including the salaries of all persons directly concerned 
with their operation, are paid from monies received as rent. There is no other source of 
income. For this reason it is necessary that rent accounts be paid promptly and that 
residents cooperate to the fullest extent in caring for rooms, equipment, and grounds. 

The Office of the Director of Residence was created in 1939 and began operations in 
September of that year. Its purposes are: (1) to supervise the financial and physical 
operation of the Halls; (2) to assist in attaining and maintaining high standards of student 
morale and self-discipline; and (3) to assist in improving conditions of student residence 
within the facilities available. In carrying out these aims, restrictions are held to the 
minimum required by the necessities of group living. All student privileges are based 
upon acceptance of the responsibility for self-discipline; and every effort is made, within 
the limitations imposed by staff size and time, to aid residents in their adjustment to the 
Residence Halls and the University. No resident should hesitate to take up any matter 
with the Director's Office at any time. 

A Committee on Residence, composed of the Dean of Students, the Business Manager, 
and the Registrar, is responsible for supervision of general policy regarding the Residence 
Halls. 

A Student Monitor (or Preceptress) is in charge of each section of the Residence Halls 
and is responsible, through the Director of Residence, to the Committee on Residence 
for the general management of each section and the conduct of its residents. He has the 
authority to invoke or recommend disciplinary measures for conduct detrimental to the 
section or the Residence Halls. 

FACILITIES 

The University of Florida Residence Halls consist of five dormitories: Buckman, Thomas, 
Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls. Each is divided into sections which accommodate 
an average of thirty-two residents each. A bathroom with shower, lavatories, and toilets 
is located on each floor of each section. 

All five Halls have brick exteriors with tile roofs. Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls 
and the remodeled sections of Buckman and Thomas Halls have interior construction of 
steel and tile. The rooms in these sections have composition tile floors, rough plaster 
walls with light finish, built-in dressers, closets, lavatories, and medicine cabinets. Many 
rooms on the first and second floors have bay windows, and all rooms have adequate light 
and air. Steam heat is furnished during the winter months, and there is an ample supply 
of hot water throughout the day. 

The Halls are conveniently located in relation to the University Cafeteria, the University 
Post Office, the gymnasia, swimming pool, playing fields, Florida Union, Infirmary, and 
classrooms. Two large and comfortably furnished lounges are generally available to resi- 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



13 



dents for social activities and the entertainment of friends and visitors. Fletcher Lounge 
is located on the first floor of Fletcher F, and Murphree Lounge is located on the first floor 
of Murphree J. 

Room furnishings consist of single beds, innerspring mattresses, desks, chairs, -waste- 
baskets, and roller shades. Additional equipment, such as upholstered easy chairs, extra 
tables, and similar items, is gradually being placed in the rooms; charges for such items 
are included in the incidental costs listed below. Some of the smaller double rooms in 
Fletcher Hall, as well as several two-room suites for three in other Halls, are furnished 
with commodious double-deck bunks instead of single beds. 

The following types of rooms are available: Single (S.) — one room for one person; 
Double (D.) — one room for two persons; Triple (T.) — one room for three persons; Two 
Room Suite (2RS.) — bedroom and study room for two persons; and Two-Room Suite for 
Three (2RS-3.) — bedroom and study room for three persons. 



BATES AND CHARGES 



The schedule given below indicates the rate per person for each semester of the Regular 
Session. 



Halls: 


BUCKMAN 1 


THOMAS 1 


SLEDD 


FLETCHER 1 


MURPHREE 


Type: 


Rms.! Rate I| Rms.] Rate 


Rms.| Rate 


Rms. 


Rate 


Rms.l Rate 


Single 


13 $38.00 1 


39 $38.00 


6 $42.00 
3 $40.00* 


7 
5 


$45.00 
$40.00* 


— 





Double 


23 1 $32.00 1 


38 $32.00 
12 $30.00** 

1 


— 


14 
6 


$40.00 
$37.50* 


15 


$37.50* 


Triple 


2 1 $24.50 1 


3 $30.00 
2 1 $24.50 


— 




— 





— 




2-Room 
Suite 
for 2 


— 


■ 1 

1 


— ■, 


56 

21 


$40.00 
$34.00* 


63 
22 


$41.00 
$40.00* 


133 $41.00 
30 $40.00* 


2-Room 
Suite 
for 3 


22 


$24.50 


10 $24.50 


8 


$36.00 


4 


$37.00 


8 $37.00 
2 $36.00* 



* Fourth floor rooms. 
** Without lavatory in voom. 

Summer Session rates (per term) are approximately one-third of the amounts shown 
above: e.g., a two-room suite for two renting at $41.00 per person per semester in the 
Regular Session rents for $13.50 per person each term of the Summer Session. 

Room rent and other charges for the term or semester are due and payable in advance 
at the beginning of the period. In cases where necessity is shown, arrangements may be 
made for installment payments of room rent, subject to the approval of the Committee on 
Residence. Such arrangements bear a carrying charge. Failure to pay rent when due or 
as arranged may result in cancellation of University registration. 

Extra electrical appliances (excepting one study lamp allowed each resident and razors 
and clocks j are charged for each item per term or semester. The wiring of all electrical 



14 CALENDAR 1944-45 

equipment is subject to inspection and must meet electrician's standards. The use of 
hot-plates and similar electric heating or cooking devices and radio sending sets is pro- 
hibited. ■ 

Extra equipment, such as easy chairs, extra chairs, extra tables, bookcases and similar 
items, in the rooms is charged for per item by the term or semester. 

Pillows and linens are available for rent in limited quantities only. Residents are 
responsible for exchange or return of such items. Except for emergencies, it is recom- 
mended that residents furnish their own linens, pillows, and blankets. 

MAKING RESERVATIONS 

Anyone desiring to make room reservations should address the OflSce of the Director 
of Residence for application forms and information as to Halls available for the period 
he plans to attend. 

A room, reservation fee of $10.00 per person for the Regular Session and $5.00 per 
person for the Summer Session, must be posted before an assignment can be made. This 
fee is not a payment on rent but is a deposit which is refundable, less any outstanding 
charges, after the student has completed his period of residence and vacated his room, 
and the premises have been checked as to condition. Checks or money orders for this 
fee should be made payable to the University of Florida. 

Each applicant will be given advance notification, if possible, of his exact room assign- 
ment, the earliest date he may occupy his room, the latest date for cancellation of reserva- 
tion without forfeiture of the reservation fee, and other essential information. Assignments 
are made in order according to the date on which the reservation fee is posted. 

Room assignments for men residents are made by a schedule under which certain rooms 
are assigned to freshmen only, and others to upperclassmen only. The purpose of this 
schedule is to distribute the two levels of students evenly throughout all sections. 

During the Summer Session, certain sections of the hall or halls reserved for women 
students are allocated for the assignment of rooms to women students under 21 years of age. 

Residents are responsible for their rooms for the entire Regular Session (two semesters) 
or Summer Session (two terms) unless otherwise arranged. Residents may not change 
rooms or move to quarters off-campus unless such changes are approved, in advance, by 
the Director of Residence or the Committee on Residence. Residents resigning from 
school because of induction into the armed services or because of illness will be gianted 
pro-rata refunds when proper evidence of induction or illness is presented to the Director 
of Residence. 

GENERAL POLICIES 

Statement of Policy for Residence Halls is posted on the inside of the entrance door 
to each room. Each resident is responsible for knowing and observing the principles of 
conduct set forth in this "Statement" and the "Supplement" thereto. The "Supplement" 
is placed behind the "Policy" placard; both bulletins are part of room equipment and 
should not be defaced or removed from the room. 

The "Quiet Hour" Period (7:00 P.M. to 8:00 A.M. daily except Saturday) is the most 
important single point in Residence Halls policy. Its scrupulous observance by all resi- 
dents contributes more than any other activity to the creation of ideal conditions for study 
and rest. 

All students who have had less than one year of college ivork are required to live in 
the Residence Halls as long as spaces are available for assignment to them. This regula- 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 15 

tion does not apply to students whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville or who 
live within daily commuting distance from the University. 

All rooms are subject to inspection by the Director of Residence or his representatives, 
and each resident is responsible for keeping his room in order. Fines may be levied and 
collected for failure to keep rooms neat or for damage to rooms and equipment. Pasting, 
nailing, screwing, or otherwise attaching pictures, hangers, racks, and similar gadgets to 
walls or woodwork is strictly prohibited. Thumb tacks or slip-over picture molding hangers 
may be used. 

University Regulations prohibit the use of firearms or explosives in rooms or the Resi- 
dence Halls area, cooking or keeping food in rooms, and the possession or use of alcoholic 
beverages in rooms or Residence Halls area. 

All equipment is numbered and recorded as to location and condition. Trading, shift- 
ing, or otherwise altering the location or condition of any equipment without permission 
from the Office of the Director is prohibited. Items requiring repair should be reported 
by both equipment and room number. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION AND SERVICES 

Residents must furnish, unless it is otherwise arranged, their own linens, pillows, towels, 
blankets, bedspreads, laundry bags, study lamps, and other special items they may desire 
for their personal convenience. 

Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the name of the resident, 
c/o Sledd Hall Archway. The University assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise 
of reasonable care for any shipments so received. Residents making such shipments must 
sign for them before they will be released from the Archway. 

Residents check in at the Office of the Director of Residence to receive their room keys 
and pay their rent. IMPORTANT NOTE: Residents who will arrive later than the 
opening day of registration, or who will arrive in the evening hours after 5:00 P.M. should 
give advance notification of the date and hour of their arrival. 

After checking in residents should: (1) pin their name cards to their room doors to 
aid in delivery of messages; (2) unpack trunks and heavy luggage preparatory to storing 
such items in the basements; and (3) obtain key case or key chain to aid in preventing 
loss of room key. 

Limited messenger service is provided for delivering telephone messages, long distance 
calls, campus mail, and special delivery letters. Telephone facilities for local calls are 
available in the Office during office hours. 

Repairs and electrical replacements needed should be reported promptly to the Director's 
office. Residents should not attempt to make repairs or replacements themselves; those 
who find any defects in their rooms or room furnishings when they move in should report 
them at once to make certain they are properly recorded. Burned out light bulbs should 
be left in fixtures till replaced by maintenance workers. 

Laundry, newspaper, and dry-cleaning solicitors are allowed to service the Residence 
Halls only after- obtaining a permit from the Director of Residence. 

Valuables, money, watches, and jewelry should be properly safeguarded at all times 
and never left carelessly in any room. All losses should be reported promptly to the 
Director's Office. Room doors should be locked at all times when residents are not in 
their rooms. Loss of room keys should be reported promptly and arrangements made for 
replacements. 



16 CALENDAR 1944-45 

Janitor and maid service is furnished daily, except Sundays, for cleaning rooms, bath- 
rooms, hallways, and stairways. Unless otherwise instructed, residents shall be required 
to make up their own beds daily. 

STATEMENT OF POLICY 

FOR 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RESIDENCE HALLS 

The welfare of all students living in the Residence Halls, the students' residence for 
nine months, makes it incumbent on each individual to observe generally accepted prin- 
ciples of proper group and individual conduct. Each student is responsible for being 
familiar with the University Student Regulations and for the observance of them. 

The Residence Halls are under the supervision of the Director of Residence. Each 
section is in charge of a student monitor. 

The following represent a general statement of policy concerning Residence Hall 
conduct : 

1. Any conduct or actions deterimental to the welfare of the students and to the University 
shall be deemed contrary to Residence Hall Policy. 

2. Quiet hours from 7:00 P.M. to 8:00 A.M. daily except Saturday. Unwarranted dis- 
turbance, rough housing, and excessive noise are prohibited at all times. All radios 
should be kept away from windows and are to be operated always at low volume. 
Practice hours for student musicians are from 12:00 P.M. to 2:00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. 
to 7:00 P.M. The University Auditorium should be used at other times. Special hours 
during examination periods will be observed. 

3. Room cleanliness and care: Each student is to keep his room in order; to utilize the 
proper receptacles for waste paper, trash, etc.; and is to refrain from altering or mar- 
ring equipment or walls in any manner. 

4. On questions concerning room contract, cash deposit or costs for extra appliances 
confer with Office of the Director of Residence. The amount of any damages in room 
or section will be deducted from the student's room reservation fee unless paid for 
otherwise. 

5. The University reserves the right for its authorized agents to enter and inspect rooms 
at any time. 

6. Students' mothers and sisters may visit rooms after written permits have been obtained 
from the Office of the Director of Residence. These permits will be issued only during 
morning and afternoon hours. 

7. In order to prevent pilfering and petty thievery, residents should keep doors locked at 
all times. Valuables such as money, watches and jewelry, should be properly safe- 
guarded, and never left carelessly in any room. 

8. All athletic activities, including diamond ball, baseball, touch football, etc., are re- 
stricted from the Residence Hall area. Athletic fields are to be used for these purposes. 

STUDENT PRIVILEGES ARE BASED ON INDIVIDUAL ACCEPT- 
ANCE OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THESE STATEMENTS OF POLICY 
ARE FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE. YOUR COOPERATION IN THEIR 
OBSERVATION IS EXPECTED. 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Schedule of Courses 

First Semester 

1944-45 




Vol. XXXIX, Series 1, No. 9 September 1, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



UNIVERSITT OP FLORIDA 
SCHEDULE OP COURSES 



First Semester 1944-45 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Under the heading Dept . will be found the department name 
abbreviations adopted for official records. 

The following abbreviations have been used to designate 

buildings ; 



AG - Agriculture Building 

AU - University Auditorium 

BA - Benton Annex 

BN - Benton Hall 

BU - Buckman Hall 

OH - Chemistry Building 

DL - Dairy Laboratory 

EG - Engineering Building 

EX - Experiment Station 

HL - Hydraulic Laboratory 



HT - Horticulture Building 

LA - Language Hall 

LW - Law Building 

PE - Peabody Hall 

PO - Poultry Laboratory 

PH - Photo Labo- -'^-ory 

RA - Radio Station 

SO - Science Hall 

SE - Seagle Building 

YN - Yonge Building 



COMPREHENSIVE 

C-1 



COURSES 



DEPT. 



fOlRSE 



SEC. 



CRED 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



rOURSE Tm,E 



student 

c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 
c 



will 
1 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
1 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



21 
21 
21 
21 



egls 
1 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
2 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 



i'or on 

m 

m 

TTh 

TTh 

TTh 

TTh 

TTh 

WF' 

WF 

WP 

TTh 

TTh 



TThS 
TThS 
MffF 

MVfF 



lecture sectli 

11 

2 

9 

11 

1 

2 

10 

B 

9 

10 

1 

2 



en ard one 



C-2 



AUD 
101 
101 
101 
101 
101 
AUD 
101 
101 
101 

1 
1 



201 
201 
201 
201 



discussion 

Staff 

WeM) 

Maclachlan 

Webb 

Webb 

Oarleton 

Staff 

Thomas on 

Hanna 

Csrleton 

Hanna 

Laird 



Mead, L V 
Gadd\ini 
Kead, L V 
Gaddum 



ction. 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Ifan Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 
Man Social 



World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 
World 



Man Physical World 
Man Physical World 
Man Hiyslcal World 
Man Physical World 



C-3 



DEFT. 

Student 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 
C 

c 

c 
c 
c 
c 

c 
c 



c 
c 
c 

CEh 



COl'RSE 



will regist 



31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 

31 
31 
31 
31 

31 
31 

31 

31 
31 

31 



33 



SEC. 



11 
12 
13 
14 
lb 
21 
22 
25 
24 
25 

101 
102 
103 
104 

105 
106 

107 



CRED. 



er i'oT one 



C8 
1C9 

lie 



*Laboralio37y p 



DAVS 



MWP 
MWF 

luiWF 
CTF 
TThS 
TThS 

TThS 

iTThS 

H 
K 
M 

T 

T 



Th 
rh 



HOl'RS 



discussion sec 
9 



11 
10 



10 



rlod 



MUTF* 



11 

8-10 
1-3 
3-5 
1-3 

3-5 
1-3 

3-5 

10-12 

1-3 

3-5 



to arrange 



BIDG 

tlon 
LA 
LA 
LA 
LA 
PE 
LA 



RonM 

and 
201 
201 
201 
201 
4 
201 



LA 201 
LA I 203 



INSTBKTim ' OIRSK TITI.F 

ne laboratory! section. 
Cons tans I Readng Speakng 
Haines I Readng Speakng 
Murphree, A A Readng Speakng 



LA 1209 



JA 



201 
201 

209 
209 
209 
209 

209 
20S 

209 



209 
209 



Mr.r:f;r 

Hopkins 

Parr Is 

Walker 

Clerk 

Walter 

MciUits 

Mounts .Walker 

Morris ,Parrls 

Clark, Wise 

Haines , 
Murphree, A A 

Hainea,Farris 

Murphree, A Aj 
Hopkins 

Congleton, 
Cons tans 



Readng Speakng 
Readng Speakng 
Reai'r.g Speakng 
Readng Speakng 
Readiig Speakng 
Readng Speakng 
Readng Speakng 



Writng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng' 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 
Wrltng 



Readng 
Readjig 
Readng 
Readng 

Readng 
Readng 



Speakng Wrltng 
Speakng Wrltng. 
Speakng Wrltng 
Speakng Wrltng 



Speakng Writ 
Speakng Wrltng 



Readng Speakng Wrltng 



Clark,Walker Readng Speakng Wrltng 
Mounts, Clark Readng Speakng Wrltng^ 
Walker, MorrislReadng Speakng Writnd 



203 Congleton 



lEffectlve Writing 



C-41 



DEPT. 



rOl'RSE 



41 
41 



42 
42 
42 



421 



SEC. 



Student will register 



5 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 



61 
61 
61 
61 
61 



CRED.' DAYS 



1 

11 

12 

12. 

14 

15 

101 

102 

103 



MWI' 
MWP 



MVfF 
MWF 



MWP 



HOURS 



BLDC. ROOM 



9 
10 



C-42 



10 
10 



C-421 



212 



212 



INSTRl'fTOR 



COURSE Tim 



C-5 

for Ifecture section. 



TTh 
TTh 

TTh 

TTh 

WP 

WP 

S 



MWP 

TThS 

MWF 

TThS 

MWF 



2 

10 

11 
!.l 
2 
9 
2 
2 



10 
11 
9 



PE 



one 
CH 

LA 
L& 
LA 
LA 
LA 



C-6 



disc- 

LVD 

222 

21B 

212 



Wilson, W H 
Little 



Davis 

Mclnnis 

Kokomoor 



McInnls 



isslon section 
Staff 



Webb 

Glunt 

Hanna 
212 Hanna 
212 Haines 
AUD Murpl-iree, C L 



Airo 

AUD 



101 
101 
101 
101 
101 



Murphree , C L 
Murphree, C L 



Byers 
Hobbs 
Byera 

Hubbell 
Carr 



Man and His Thinking 
Mfx and His Thinking 



Fundamental Math 
Fundamental Math 
Fundamental Math 



Plane Trigonometry 



, and one music hour. 
The HiiT'anitles 
The Humanities 
Tlie Humanities 
The Humanities 
The H\:m_anities 
The Humanities 
Music Hour 
Music Hour 
Music Hour 



Man Biological World 
Man Biological World 
ICan Biological World 
Man Biological World 
Man Biological World 



DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY ACY 



DEPT. 


COl'RSE 


SEC. 


fREO 


nws 


HOI US 


HI DC 1 'MKIM 

--t ' 


IWTMit ■ 
















ACY 


125 




4 


MVfP 
Th 


9 

1-3 


CH AUD 
CH AUD 


Black 


ACY 


203 1 


3 


TT^i 


11 


AG ' 102 


Blscv 










S 


9-12 


AG 1 101 




ACY 


431 




« 


TTh 


8 


AG , 101 


Black 


ACY 


561 




4 


To Arrange 






ACY 


5VC 




« 


To jL.rrajige 


i 


Black 



"ii:-.i ririK 



Aj-T. cultural Chemistr 

I 

'A- :''^-Mcal Chenilstry 

■Agricultural Analysis 
Anirnf.l Bio -Chemistry 
Resej.i'ch Agrlc Chem 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AS 



201 




3 


TThS 


403 




3 


Mm^ 


405 




5 


T'TliS 


409 




3 


MWF 


501 




2 


If 


505 




* 


To 


511 




« 


To 



10 


11 
11 

5-5 
Arrange 

Arrange 



AO 


308 


Hair 11 ton 


A J 


202 


Hamilton 


A.} 


?08 


HsL'.j'ltcn 


AG 


302 


Hamilton 


AG 


302 


Ecble 

Noble, 
Hamilton 

Noble, 
Hami It on 



Agricltrl Economics 
Adv Farm Management 
Agricultural Prices 
j Cooperative Marketing 
jAt: T' f'nomics Seminar ■ 
'Rsrch Probs , Farm Mgt 

iRsrch Probs, Marketng 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING - AG 



* Varl; 

# 3 to 



301 

305 

403 
501 
570 



able ci-edlt 
6 credits 



TTh 
M 



To 
To 
To 



9 
3-5 



8 
1-3 



AG 
LAB 



AG 
LAB 



Arrange 
Arrange 
Arrange 



AG 1D6 



AG |106 iRogers, P 
AG 106 iRogers, F 



102 
:C£ 



Roters 



Rogers, P 



Rogers, F 



^Drainage & Irrigation 

.Farm Shop 

(Ag Engrng Investlgtns 
Ag Engrng Seminar 
Research 











AGRONOMY - 


AY 




DEPT. 


roiRSE 


SEC. CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BIDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRICTOR 


rOI'RSE TITLE 


AY 


321 


1 


3 


TTh 
T 


10 
1-3 


AG 

AG 


302 
S02 


Senn 


Field Crops 


AY 


321 


2 


3 


T 


i;: 

3-5 


A.I 
AG 


302 
302 


Senn 


Field Crops 


AY 


325 




2 


U 


1-3 


AG 


302 


Senn 


E-IrlMtng Judgng Crops 


AY 


329 




3 


MF 


10 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Principles Genetics 


AY 


331 




2 


S 


8-10 

or 10-12 


AG 


302A 


Senn 


Lab Probs Genetics 


AY 


426 




« 


To 


Arrange 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Probs in Agronomy 


AY 


570 




« 


To 


Arrange 


AG 


302 


Senn 


Reseerch Agronomy 



AL 
AL 
AL 

AL 

AL 
AL 
AL 

AL 

AL 
AL 
AL 
AL 

AL 

AL 



ANIMAL PRODUCTION - AL 



309 

511 

413 

415 

4]7 
419 
421 

501 

503 
505 
509 
511 

513 

551 



» Variable cjredlt 



MW 
M 

U 

m 

T 

T 
MW 

TTh 

m 

Th 



11 
3-5 



1-3 

11 
1-3 

8 
1-3 

10 

9 

8 

Arrange 

Arrange 
Arrange 
Arrange 
Arrange 

Arrange 

Arrange 



AG 

AG 
LAB 

AG 

AG 

AG 



ICfc 
103 

302 
102 

508 
102 

102 

102 
102 
102 



Wi;::..ithby 

Marshall 

Shealy 

Glasscock 

Willo\i£hby 

Willoughby 

Shealy and 
Staff 

Glasscock 
and Shealy 

Becker 

Willoughby 

Marshall 

Glasscock 
and Shealy 

Glassoock 
and Shealy 

Marshall 



Fund ArJmal Husbandry 

Elem Nutrition 

Swine Production 

Meat Products 

Breed History 
Horse Husbandry 
Seminar 

Adv Animal Production 

An'tmal Nutrition 
Live Stock Records 
Prob Animal Nutrition 
Prob Swine Prodixtion 

Prob Beef Production 

Adv Animal Nutrition 



ARCHITECTURE - AE 



, iniRSE 



llA 

llA 
21A 
21B 
23A 
SIA 
3 IB 
33A 
41A 

41B 

41C 

51A 

5 IB 

51C 

52B 
61A 

6 IB 

62A 
71A 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 



*1 
#2 



« For 
# For 



3 
16 

PROjfeCT 

proj:<:ct 



JTTWF' 
Th 

MWF 

MTWFS 

MTWFS 

15 hrs 

TTh 

TTh 

6 hrs 

T:fh 
4 hrs 

TTh 
4 hrs 

TTh 

4 hrs 

MWF 
3 hrs 

MWF 

5 hrs 

MWF 
3 hrs 

m 

MWF 

rh 

3 hrs 
MWF 

rh 

5 hrs 

SIWF 
rh 

i8 hrs 



two 



yeur c( 
year 



HOURS 



1-5 
1-3 

1-4 

8-11 

8-11 

To Arrange 

2-5 

2-5 

To Arrange 

1 

To Arrange 

1 

To Arrange 

1 

To Arrange 

S-5 

To Arrange 

3-5 

To Arrange 

S-5 

To Arrange 

8-11 

1-3 

8-11 

To Arrange 

1-3 

8-11 

To Arrange 

1-3 
8-11 

To Arrange 



BI.DG. ROOM 



PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 

PE 
PE 
PE 

PE 
PE 
PE 

PE 
PE 

PE 



JUDGMEllTS : 

9-12 

iJlBORAoloRY (BOOK ROOM) 
Dally 8-12 
1-5 



oiipl 



e;lon 
iple;lon 



PE 



PE 



301 

^01 

301 

2C1 
201 
302 
201 
302 

302 

30fi 

306 
306 

306 
306 

302 
302 

201 
201 

306 

204 

302 

302 
302 
306 

201 
201 
306 

302 

302 

201 



300 



306 



f 



INSTRITTOR 



rOURSE TITLE 



Weaver 

Weaver 
Weaver 
Weaver 
Weaver 



Hannaford 

Hannaford 

Hannaford 

Hannaford 

Fulton 

Weaver 

Fulton 
Hanriaf ord 

Ha-j.e.rord 

Hannaford 



Weaver and 
Staff 



PE 306 



Staff 



Staff 
Staff 



PHind of Architecture 

Fund of Architecture 
Architectural Design 
Architectural Design 
Lardscape Design 
Frhnd Drwg Wtr Color 
Frhnd Drwg Wtr Oolor 
Prlmd Drwg Wtr Color 
History Architecture 

Histoiy Architecture ] 

Decorative Arts 

Mtls Meths Constr 

Kchncl Equip Bldga 

Prfssnl Rltns Meths 

Wkng Draw Bldg Estmta 
Strctrl Design Bldgs 

Strctrl Design Bldgs 

Strctrl Design Bldgs 
Thesis 



ASTRONOMY - ATY 



COURSE SEC 



CRED. 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. 



ROOM 



INSTRl'CTOR 



COI'RSE TITLE 



* Variable c 



TTbS 



10 
10 



Mead, L V 
Phlppa 



1 


4 


BAG 

TTh 


11 




TTh 


12 




WP 


1 


3 


Th 


11 




WP 


12 




TTh 




4 


m 

MW 




» 


To 




« 


1 
To 



BACTERIOLOGY BCY 



9 

3-5 

1-3 

11 
3-5 

1-5 



10-12 



SO 

sc 

sc 


101 
104 

104 


SG 
SC 

SG 


111 
104 
104 


SC 

sc 


1 
104 


sc 


6 


sc 


6 



Carroll 
Carroll 
Carroll 

Carroll 
Carroll 
Carroll 

Carroll 



Carroll 
Carroll 



BIBLE BE 



TTh 



To 



10 

Arrange 



BTJ 



201 



Bristol 
Bristol 



BIOLOGY ^ BLY 



m 

TTh 
TTh 

m 



m 



To 



10 
1-3 

X-3 

9 

1-4 



Arrange 
Arrange 

11 



101 
10 
10 

111 

107 
111 



105A 



Rogers, J S 
Hobbs 
r.cln, C J 

Sherman 

Sherman 

Rogers, J S 

Staff 
Staff 
Rogers, J S 



Air Navigation 
Marine Navigation 



Gen Bacteriology 
Sanitary Lab Practice 

Prin of Immunology 

Adv Bacteriology 
Research in Bactlgy 



How Understand Bible 
Life of Jesus 



Gen Animal Biology 

Vertebrate Embryology 

Genetics & Evolution 
Biol Lab Technique 
Indivdl Probs Biol 
Histoiy of Biology 













BOTANY 


- BTY 




DEPT. 


COIRSE 


SEC. 


fRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRl'CTOR 


fOlRSE TITLE 


BTY 


. 3CS 


1 
11 
12 

i;--. 


3 


MW 
MW 
TTh 
TTh 


8 
3 
2 
3 


SC 
SO 
SC 
SC 


ICl 
£ 
2 
2 


Cody 
Cody 
Cody 
Cody 


General Botany 


BTY 


311 


1 
11 

12 


4 


MF 
MF 
TTh 


11 
1-3 

1-2 


SC 
SC 

SC 


1 

1 
1 


Cody 
Cody 
Cody 


Plant Physiology 


BTY 


431 




4 


TTh 
b To 


8 

arrange 


SC 


1 


Cody 


Plant Histology 


BTY 


500 




4 


To 


arrange 


SC 


1 


Cody 


Advanced Botany 


BTY 


555 




1 


To 


arrange 


SC 


1 


Staff 


Botany Seminar 


BTY 


570 

1 




4 


To 


arrange 


SC 


1 


Cody 


Research in Botany 



BUSINESS EDUCATION - BEN 



81 




2 


MTWTh 


91 




2 


MTWTh 


94 




4 


To 



arrange 



YH 


306 


YW 


305 


YU 


305 



Moorman 
Moorman 
Moorman 



Intro Typewriting 
Intro Shorthand 
Stenography 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - CG 



345 
361 
443 
447 
457 

467 
511 
521 



TThS 
TThS 



2 MT 



MWP 



2 Hf 



TThS 



10 

11 

1-4 

11 

1-3 
3-5 

9 

arrange 

arrange 



BK 
BN 
BN 
BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 



20? 

209 

108 

209 

104 
207 

209 



Tyner 

Beisler 

Beisler 

Morgen 

Beisler 

Morgen 



Indsti-1 Stoichiometry ■ 
Matrls of Engineering 
Chem Eng Laboratory 
Prins of Chem Engrng 
Chem Eng Design 

Chem Eng Thermodynamic 
Adv Chem Engineering 
Spec Tc'iics Chem Eng 



CHEMISTRY CY 



COURSE 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BI.DC. 



ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



101 

111 
201 

204 

211 
215 

262 

301 

311 
401 

411 

481 
517 

521 

534 

1570 

571 
572 

57S 

574 

575 

I 
505 



1 
11 
12 



1 
11 
12 



MWP 
U 

T 



KWF 
M 



TTb 
W 



TTh 
U 

MWP 
TTh 

WNF 

T 

Th 



1!WF 
F 



TTh 



La|b 



PTh 



Lab 



TTh 



Lalb 
3 
2-6 

2-6 
2-6 

2-6 

2-6 

2-6 



MWP 



10 

1-4 

2-5 



9 

1-4 



11 

1-4 



1-4 



10 
1-4 



10 
1-4 



1-4 
1-4 



10 
2-5 

11 
arrange 

arrange 



arrange 

10 
arrange 

arrange 

arrange 

arrange 
arrange 

arrange 

arrange 

arrange 



CH 



AITD 
130 
130 

110 

112 
230 

112 
230 

230 

110 
114 

112 
230 

212 

230 
230 

230 

110 

204 

110 



110 



CH 112 



CH 



110 



Jackson 
Jackson 
Jackson 

Jacks en 

Heath 
Heath 

Heath 
Heath 

Heath 

Black 

Pollard 

Leigh 

Leigh 
Hawkins 

Black and 
Pollard 

Pollard 

Pollard 

Hawkins 

Black 

Heath and 
Jackson 

Black 

Leigh and 
Pollard 

Hawkins and 
Jackson 

Leigh end 
Hawkins 

Black 
Pollard 



General Chemistry 
General Chemistry Lab 
General Chemistry Lab 

General Chemistry 
Analytical Chemistry 

Analytical Chemistry 

Analytical Chan is try 
Water and Sewage 

Organic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 

Organic Chemistry 
Physical ChemistiT- 

Advanced Chemistry 

Chemical Literature 
Adv Organic Chemistry 

Adv Physical Chem 

Adv Sanitary Chem 
Rsrch Inorgc Chem 

Rsrch Analytical Chem 
Rsrch Organic Chem 

Rsrch Physical Chem 

Rsrch Naval Stores 

Rsrch Sanitary Chem 

Orgnc Nitrogn Compnds 



CIVIL ENGINEERING - CL 



DEPT. 



CL 



CL 


327 


CL 


531 


CL 


425 


CL 


433 


CL 


434 


CL 


435 


CL 


440 



DY 



fOl'RSE 



223 



SEC. 



311 



DY 


316 


DY 


413 


m 


420 


DY 


521 


DY 


523 



* Varleble c 



fRED. 



DAYS 



3 


TTh 
T 


10 
2-5 


4 


MWF 
Th 


10 
2-5 


3 


TTh 
S 


9 
9-12 


3 


MW 
M 


11 
1-4 


3 


TTh 
W 


9 

1-4 


3 


P 
WF 


11 
1-4 


3 


WF 
T 


9 
1-4 


3 


MWF 


9 



HOURS 



Bi.m;. 



HL 



ROOM 



302 
205 



302 
101 



.?02 

:--.o I 



302 
304 



.'•^01 



301 
301 



301 
301 



?02 



DAIRYING 



MWF 

T 



TTh 
M 



MWF 
W 



-edit 



10 
3-5 

10 
1-4 

11 

2-5 

arrange 
arrange 
arrange 



DL 
DL 
DL 

DL 

AG 



101 



101 



101 



101 
102 



INSTItK roK 

Reecl 
Reed 

Relc3 
Reld 

Reed 
Rred 

Reld 
Reld 

Keith 
Keith 

Keith 
Keith 

Keith 
Keith 

Reld 

DY 

Fouts and 
Arnold 

Fouta 

Fouts 

Pouts 
Fouts 
Beclrer 



S;i:-.eylng 
HjiCraullcs 

RoMti&j Engineering j 

< 

Water and Sewerage 

T<.VY Reinforced Concrt 
Reii'frcd Concrt Design 
Sti'VLctural Englneerng 
Industrial Hygiene 

Principles Dairying 

Ccndiisd & Dry Milk 

Mkt Mlk & Mlk Pit Prda 

Pro" " Telry Tchnology 
?i-ol:f> Mlk & Mlk Prods 
Prch;; Dairy Productn 



ECONOMICS -ES 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - BS 



DEPT. 



CES 



CBS 
CES 



COURSE 



13 



141 
15 



BS 


311 


ES 


321 


ES 


322 


ES 


327 


ISS 


335 


ES 


351 


BS 


361 


ES 


372 


BS 


374 


ES 


382 


K 


401 


ES 


404 


ES 


407 


BS 


411 


BS 


413 


BS 


414 


ES 


425 


BS 


427 


ES 


454 


BS 


461 


ES 


467 


ES 


469 


ES 


505 



SEC. 



1 
11 
12 



CRED. 



DAYS 



MWP 
TTh 
TTh 

mrp 

TThS 
M 

MWF 

HWP 

TThS 

MWP 

H9F 

TThS 

lOTF 

MTP 

HSF 

TThS 

TThS 

0rF 
ni7 

TThS 
TThS 
KVP 
iWP 
EThS 
VKF 
¥WP 
TThS 
TThS 
IHF 



HOURS 



BLDG. 



10 
11 

1 



10 
3-5 

11 

10 

8 

8 

2 

8 

11 

8 

9 

10 

9 

10 

11 

11 

10 

10 

9 

8 

9 

2 

10 

11 

2 



ROOM 



205 
206 
206 

202 

10 
10 

202 

206 

206 

206 

209 

209 

206 

209 

209 

206 

202 

10 
112 
202 
202 
202 
206 
208 
208 
204 
209 

10 
112 



INSTRUCTOR 



Eldrldge 

Dletz 

Dietz 

Belghts 

Anderson 

Belghta 

Dolbeare 

Dolbeare 

Bighan 

Chace 

Bigham 

Chace 

Chace 

Chaee 

Blgha» 

Day 

Anderson 

Eldrldge 

Belghts 

Belghts 

Belghts 

Dolbeare 

Dletz 

BighaK 

Eutsler 

Dolbeare 

Anderson 

Eldrldge 



COURSE TITLE 



Econ Poun Mod Life 

Elementary Accounting 
Elementary Statistics 

Accounting Principles 
Pnol Orgnztn Society 
Pncl Orgnztn Society 
Public Pinanoe 
Econs of Marketing 
Blemnts Tranaportatn 
Property Ihsuranoe 
Labor EconomicB 
Ind Orgnztn * Mgt 
ntilzatn Our Resroa 
Business Law 
GKrrt Control Business 
Eoon Prins ft Probs 
AdTaneed Accounting 
Adranfied Accounting 
Incone Tax Procedure 
Bankng Prins k Pract 
Corporation Finance 
Public TTtility Boon 
Life Insurance 
Economic History 
Business Forecasting 
Devlmt Econ Thou^t 













EDUCATION 


EN 

■ 




DEPT. 


fOlRSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRITTOR 


fOlRSE TITLE 


CEi; 


13 




3 


MWF 


10 


YN 


134 


Norman 


Intro to Education 


EN 


306 




3 


MP 


9 


Yli 


ISO 


Garris 


Voc; '. i.c ral Education 


EN 


317 




3 


T 


7-9 :cC P M 


YN 


21b 


Crago 


Meas &: Eval Sch Pract 


EN 


385 




3 


MWP 


9 


YN 


134 


Ore yo 


CMjc Development 


EN 


397 




3 


imp 


11 


YN 


134 


Willi aws.W K 


Sec Sch Cur & Instrctn 


EN 


401 




3 


p 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


138 


Sinsnoris 


School Administration 


EN 


403 




3 


TThS 


9 


YN 


134 


Norman 


Prins & Philos Educ 


EN 


409 




3 


To 


arrange 


YK 


150 


Harris 


Supvsd Tchg Voc Agric 


EN 


411 




2 


TTh 


10 


YN 


134 


Garrls 


Spec Keths Voc Agric 


EN 


421 




3 


To 


arrange 




« 


Cumbee 


Studert Teaching 


EN 


422 




3 


To 


arrange 




* 


Cumbee 


Studert Teaching 


EN 


472 




3 


MWF 


8 


YN 


3ie 


Strickland 


Meth & Org Ind Arts 


EN 


501 




3 


11 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


140 


Berry 


Elem Sch Curriculum 


EN 


503 




3 


T 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


21b 


Crago 


Measitrnt & Evaluatn 


EN 


519 




3 


Th 


7-9:30 P M 


YTJ 


134 


Lewis 


Hi J' Scl- Curriculum 


EN 


536 




3 


W 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


218 


Williams ,W R 


Suprvsn Elem School 


EN 


565 




3 


s 


9-11:30 A M 


YN 


150 


Garris 


Pj-cbf. in Agric Educ ^ 


EN 


591 




3 


F 


7-9:30 P M 


YN 


138 


Simmons 


Pub Sch Administratn 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING - EL 



« ClasE 



341 
349 
441 
453 
465 



es in 
In YH 134, 



at 4 



MWF 
F 
F 
Th 

MWF 

Lib To 



P M 



9 

2-5 

1 

6-9 P M 

8 
arrange 



EN 421 and EN 422 will meet the fi 



209 
106 
209 

209 



Smith, E F 
Smith, E P 
Smith, E P 
Moreno 
Moreno 



rst Wednesday of the semester 



Elems Elec Engrng 
Dynamo Laboratory 
Elec Engrng Seminar 
Radio Station Operatn 
R.'idic Engineering 



fOlRSE SEC 



CRED. 



DWS 



ENGLISH - EH 

ROOM 



HOl'RS 



Bi.nc. 



INSTRITTOR 



(OIRSE TITLE 



35 

37 

313 

301 

305 

327 

355 

363 

399 

! 401 

! 443 

501 

529 

530 

543 



301 

304 

405 

420 

503 
507 
515 



1 
11 
12 



* Variable credit 



5 


MWF 




9 


3 


MWF 




11 


3 


TThS 




11 


3 


TThS 




10 


3 


MWF 




3 


2 


TTh 




8 


3 


MWF 




1 


3 


TThS 




9 


3 


MffP 




10 


3 


MWF 




8 


3 




To 


arrange 


3 


MWF 




8 


1 




To 


arrange 


« 




To 


arrange 


3 




To 


arrange 



203 
210 
210 
210 
210 
314 
210 
314 
314 
314 

314 



Haines 

Robertson 

Kurphree , AA 

Robertson 

Morri s 

Farris 

Clark 

Mounts 

Congleton 

Farris 

Morris 

Farris 

Ha ines 

Staff 

Morri p 



ENTOMOLOGY - EY 



TTh 

T 

W 

MWF 
MT 

M 
M 

MF 
T 



9 

3-5 

1-3 

10 
1-3 

9 
3-5 



3-5 

arrange 

arrange 
arrange 



308 
308 
308 

308 
308 

308 



308 
308 

306 

306 

306 



Creighton 
Greighton 
Creighton 

Creighton 



Creighton 

Hixson 

Staff 

Tissot 

Creighton 



Llttrary Mastrs Amer 
Literary Mastrs Eng 
Mastrpcs World Lit 
Shakespeare 
Intro Study Eng Lang 
Ircag Illative Writing 
Business Writing 
Contemp Lit: Drama 
Intro Study of Lit 
Air.erl can Literatvire 
Eng Romantic Period 
Arnerlcan Literature 
Graduate Seminar 
Individual Work 
Eng Romantic Period 



Intro to Entomology 

Advanced Entomology 

Insect Control 

Med Ic Vet ^tomology 

Prots in Entomology 
Adv Insect Taxonomy 
Biol & Nat Control 



FORESTRY - FY 



COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


220 




2 


301 




4 


302 




4 


306 




2 


311 




3 


313 




3 


431 




# 



DAYS 



33 

35 

201 

305 

307 

430 

530 



201 



303 



# 2 to 5 

• Variable 



crec Its 



m 



TTh 
Th 



TTh 
T 



m 



TTh 
F 



m 

M 



HOURS 



10 



8 
1-5 



10 
1-5 



11 
1-6 



11 
3-5 



To arrange 



BLDC. ROOM 



HT 



HT 



412 



412 
412 



412 

412 



412 



412 
412 



412 

412 



INSTRUCTOR 



T 



Newina 
Newlns 

Westveld 

Miller 
Westveld 

TBestveld 

Staff 



FRENCH - FH 



MTP 

MTWThFlS 

TThS 

TThS 

UHF 

Or 

To 
To 



11 

8 

10 

9 

9 
arrange 

arrange 
arrange 



Bn 


101 


m 


205 


BTT 


205 


BU 


101 


EU 


101 



Atkin 

Brunet 

Brunet 

Atkin 

Atkin 



Atkin and 
Brunet 



Atkin and 
Brunet 



GEOGRAPHY - GPY 



CI edit 



3 HHF 



3 mrp 



LA 



204 



Byero 



GEOLOGY - GY 



10 



SC 106 Kubbell 



COURSE TITLE 



Intro to Forestry 
Dendrology 

Forest Mensuration 

Forest Protection 
Pndtna Silvic^^ilture 

Fann Forestry 

Forest Proba Seminar 



First Year French 
First Year French 
Second Year French 
Conversatn Compoaltn 
Mastrpcs French Lit 

Individual Work 

Individual Work 



Geog of the Americas 



General Geology 



GERMAN - GN 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


CGN 


33 


: 


3 


MV>' 


c, 


tl 


.'•05 


Jones 


F?.rst Year German 


CGN 


33 


2 


3 


TThS 


9 


BU 


305 


Hauptmann 


First Year German 


CGN 


35 




6 : 


ITWThPS 


10 


BU 


305 


Jones 


First Year German 


GN 


201 




3 


TThS 


11 


BU 


305 


Hauptmann 


Second Year German 


GN 


205 




6 


W'WThPS 


8 


BU 


305 


Jones 


Second Year German 


GN 


430 




« 


To 


arrange 


BU 


303 


Jones 


Individual Work 


GN 


530 




* 


To 


arrange 


BU 


303 


Jones 


IiKllvidual Work 






GREEK 


- GK 




GK 


33 




3 


MWP 


9 


BU 


205 


Brunet 


First Year Greek 


GK 


201 




3 


MWP 


11 


BU 


205 


Brunet 


Second Year Greek 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION - HPL 



HPL 
HPL 
HPL 

HPL 

HPL 



131 




3 


m 

Th 


231 




3 


MW 
T 


361 




3 


MWP 


411 




3 


MWF 


533 




3 


To 



1 

1-4 
2 

1-4 
10 



arrange 



3B CDurt 



33 CD\irt 



YN 



YN 



YN 



YN 



138 



138 



138 



138 



Lieb & Staff 
Lieb & Staff 



Salt and 
Stevens 



Stevens and 
Salt 



Steveiis and 
Salt 



HISTORY - HY 



CHY 


13 


HY 


303 


HY 


305 


HY 


309 


HY 


313 


HY 


317 


HY 


401 


HY 


403 


HY 


509 



» Variable credit 



4 


MTWF 


8 


3 


TThS 


10 


3 


TThS 


11 


3 


MWF 


9 


3 


MWF 


11 


3 


TThS 


8 


3 


MIITP 


10 


3 


TThS 


9 


3 


To 


arrange 



112 
112 
112 
112 
10 
10 
112 
209 



Leake 
Leake 
Payne 
Leake 
Glunt 
Glunt 
Payne 
Payne 
Leake 



Theory & Practice I 
Theory & Practice III 
Tchg Phya Ed Elem Soh 

Prins Adm Phys Educ 

Probs Phys Educ 



History Modem World 
Amer Hist 1830 - 1876 
Eng Hist to 1485 
Prer.ch Revolution 
Eia'ope Dur Midi Ages 
Lat Amer Hist 1850-1900 
Ancient Civllizatns 
Hist Europe 1648-1714 
Se:ni:ir?- Amer Hist 



HORTICULTURE HE 



DEPT. 


tOl'RSE L SF.r. 


fRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BKIC. 




ROOM 

fiC9 
20 S 


INSTRlCiOR 

Wolfe 
Watklns 


COI'KSh TITIF 


HE 


201 




O 


TTh 
F 


8 
1-3 




AG 
AG 


Pr 1 J £•. Hor 1 1 cu Itur e 


HE 


315 




3 


TTh 
U 


8 

3-5 




AG 
^0 


■fi02 
0( o 


Abliott 


Cltri.s Culture 


HE 


317 




3 


TTh 
T 


11 
3-5 


Gr 


AG 209 

jenhouse 


Abbott 


Plant Propagation 


HE 


423 




3 


MWF 


8 




AG 


209 


Wolfe 


Itf;J Eubtrpcl Fruits 


HE 


427 




3 


TTh 
U 


11 
1-3 


Gr 

Gr 


senhouse 
=:ei^h3use 


Watkl.ns 


E]eM Floriculture 


HE 


429 




3 


F 
TW 


10 
£-5 


Gr 
Gr 


senh 
3enh 


Duse 
Duse 


Wolfe and 
Watklns 
Wolfe and 
Watklns 


Ornam Horticulture 


HE 


503 




1 


Th 


4 




AG 


209 


Wolfe 


Horticultirre Seminar 


HE 


514 




3 


To 


arrange 








Abbott 


Adv Cltriculture 


HE 


570 




« 


To 


arrange , 








Wolfe & Staff 


Rsrch in Horticulture 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION - IN 



111 

112 
211 
305 
411 





2 


To 




2 


To 




2 


To 




3 


To 




3 


To 



arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 



YN 


SHOP 


YN 


SHOP 


TN 


SHOP 


YN 


SHOP 


YN 


SHOP 



Strickland 
Strickland 
Strickland 
Strickland 
Strickland 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING - IG 



IG 


365 




3 


MWF 


10 


IG 


366 




3 


TThS 


9 


IG 


367 




3 


TThS 


10 


IG 


370 




2 


MW 


9 


IG 


463 




3 


TThS 


10 


IG 


469 




4 


MWF 
T 


11 
2-5 


IG 


477 




3 


TTh 
Th 


11 
2-5 


* Varla 


3le cr 


edit 









EG 

|;g 



211 
211 
213 
212 
212 



212 

304 



212 

212 



Yeaton 

Eshleman 

Yeaton 

Yeaton 

Eshleman 



Eshleman 
Eshleman 



Yeaton 

Yes ton 



Mechanical Drawing 
Mechanical Drawing 
General Shop 
Design & Constrctn 
Gen Mach Shop Mtl Wrk 



Eng Mechncs - Statics 

Eng Mechncs - Dynamics: 

Strength of Materials 

Job Evaluation 

Specftns, Eng Rltns, j 
and Indstrl Safety / 

Pint Locatn & Layout 
Motion & Time Study 



JOURNALISM JM 



COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



213 
215 
301 

517 
403 
407 
409 
503 
505 



33 
201 



MWF 

MWF 

MW 
TTh 

TThS 

TThS 

TTliS 

MWF 

To 

To 



TThS 
MWF 



HOURS 



11 

2-B 



10 

11 

10 
arrange 
arrange 



BLDC. 


ROOM 


LW 


112 


LW 


]1£ 


LW 


112 


m 


112 


LW 


112 


LW 


112 


LW 


112 




> 


I,W 


112 



INSTRUCTOR 



Skaggs 
Lowry 



Lowry 

Lowry 

Skaggs 

Lowry 

Lowry 

Ska~KS 



LATIN - LN 



205 



205 



Brunet 
Brunet 



LAW - LW 



301 




5 


MTWTIlF 


303 




3 


MWF 


305 




4 


MTTIlF 


309 




2 


WP 


406 




4 


MWTl-iF 


409 


\ 


3 


TThS 


411 




2 


MW 


509 




2 


W 

P 


513 




5 


MWF 


518 




2 


MP 


520 




3 


TThS 


530 




2 


TTh 


531 




2 


..TS 


601 




1-3" 


To i 



9 
10 



10 

11 
10 

b 

11 

10 

11 

9 

arrange 



105 
105 
105 
105 
204 
204 
204 
111 

111 
111 
111 
111 

111 



COURSE TITLE 



Ihiblic Opinion 
Hist of Journalism 
News Writng & Edltng 

Mechncs Pub^lshng 
Hewspr & Radio Advt 
Intei^reting News 
Law of the Press 
Studies Newapr Prodn 
Studies Pubic Opinion 



First Year Latin 
Second Year Latin 



Trusler 


Torts 


TeSelle 


Contracts 


Pridgen 


Crimnl Law & Proodr 


Lay 


Property I 


Slagle 


Private Corporatns 


Day 


Property III 


Trus ler 


Fla Constl Law 


Day 


Sales 


Crandall 


Property V 


TeSelle 


Trial Practice II 


TeSelle 


Creditors' Rights 


Slagle 


Adml'-iistratv Law 


Crandall 


Equitable Remedies 


Staff 


Legal Research 



MATHEMATICS MS 



DEPT. 


COIRSE 


SEC. 


fRED. 


DAYS 


HOIKS 


nine 


KOOV 


INSTRICTOR 


rOIRSE TITLE 


CMS 


25 


1 


4 


mb'a 


8 


PE 


2 


Dost el 


- 
Baijic Mathematics 


CMS 


23 


2 


4 


MWFS 


10 


PE 


2 


Phlpps 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


23 


3 


4 


TWThF 


1 


PE 


2 


Davla 


Bfas.'c Mathemetics 


CMS 


23 


4 


4 


MTWTh 


3 


PE 


2 


Mc^Trls 


Basic Mathematics 


CMS 


23 


5 


4 


MftlhP 


2 


PE 


2 


Simpson 


P'.Jiic Mathematics 


CMS 


24 




4 


MWThP 


1 


PE 


102 


Dostal 


Basic Mathematics 


MS 


311 




3 


MWP 


11 


PE 


10 


Pirenian 


Advanced Col Alg 


MS 


353 


1 


4 


MWfFS 


9 


PE 


1C2 


Mclnnls 


Differntl Calculus 


MS 


353 


2 


4 


MWPS 


8 


PE 


1(52 


Plreniaji 


Differntl Calculus 


MS 


354 




4 


MTThP 


8 


PE 


11 


Kokoiroor 


Integral Calculus 


MS 


420 




3 


TThS 


11 


PE 


10 


Dostal 


Differntl Equations 


MS 


430 




« 


To 


arrange 






Kokomoor and 
Staff 


Individual Work 


MS 


530 




* 


To 


arrange 






Phlprs and 
Staff 


Individual Work 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING - ML 



ML 

Each s 
by con 

ML 



m. 

ML 
ML 



ML 


481 


ML 


483 


Ml 


489 


ML 


491 



181 

■;udent 
eren< 

281 

685 
387 

473 



* Varliible credit 



reg 
! wit 



is terlng 



te 
h i 



for 
itruct 



MW 
M 



MWP 



TThS 



IJWF 
F 



1 PE 

ML 181 must s«lec 



9 
1-4 



11 



1 
2-5 



1 
2-5 



1-6 



11 
2-5 



EG 



EG 



EG 



BA 



20.'-. I Prash 
two two -hour drawl 



211 
304 



211 



211 
103 



211 



213 



212 
103 



103 



213 
304 



Frash 

Bbaugh 
Ebaugh 

Ebaugh and 
Staff 

Thompson 

Thompson 

LeKgett 
Prash 



Engineering Drawng 
ng periods per week 

Elementary Design 

Thermodynamics 
Mechanical Lab 

Saninar 

Intrnl Combs tn Engns 
Mechanical Lab 

Manufctmg Operatns 
Machine Design 



MILITARY SCIENCE - MY 



DEPT. 



COIRSE 



My 

MY 

MY 

MY 

MY 

IN ADDITION 

TO THE 

MY 

FIRST And seIcond 



101 
101 
101 
201 
201 



FOLLOWING 



140 



XEAB 
THURSDAY WHElN ORDERED 



SEC. TRED 



1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
|T0 TH|E THlEORY 



DAYS 



DRILL SECTION 



HOURS 



3-5 
3-5 

3-5 
3-5 
3-5 

StCTIONS AS 



Ifotc 



Itotc 



LIST]D 



Th 4 D^j-lll 

MILITJBY STUDENTS MU$T A' 
BY TH? P.M.S.&T. 



BLDC. 



Itotov Pari: 
Ibto]' Pari: 
Moto:!' Pari: 
Pari: 
oi* Pari 
AliOVE, 



1(1 



Pie 

TEND 



INSTRUCTOR 



Robinson 
Rollnson 
Humphries 
Jackson 
Jackson 
EACH STUDENT 



AN ADDITIONAL 



MUSIC - MSC 



BJSC 



301 



SISC 310 



M 
TTh 



WP 



7PM 
5 



AUD 
AUD 



AUD 



LePruyn 
DeBruyn 

Murphree, C L 



COURSE TITLE 



1st Year Infantry- 
Is t Year Infantry- 
Is t Year Infantry 
2nd Year Infantry 
2nd Year Infantry 
l|tUST BE ASSIGNED 

1st Bn Infantry 
HOUR AT 5 P M ON 



Rudlmnts Vocal Msc 
Music Appreciation 













PAINTING 


PG 




DEPT 


foi'RSf: 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


mii'Rs 


ni.Di; 


i!(IO-.t ; INSTRIfTOR 


(01 RSK TITLE 


PG 


1 !A 


•1 


6 


MTW 
Th 


1-5 

1-4 


PE |109 1 
PE 109 1 

! 1 


Pncir! f; Pictrl Art 


PG 


llA 


**2 


3 


MWP 


1-4 


PE 


109 


Piuiiitls Pictrl Art 


PG 


21A 




3 


MWP 
3 hrs 


8-10 

To arrange 


PE 
PE 


?,00 
300 




P-:ct/r ] Compos itn 


PG 


21B 




5 


Dally 
3 hrs 


8-10 

To arrange 

8-10 


PE 
PE 


SOU 
500 




Pictrl Composltn 


PG 


22A 




4 


]2 hrs 


To arrange 


PE 


109 




Commercial Design 


PG 


22B 




6 


18 hrs 


To arrange 


PE 


109 




Comi.'iercial Design 


PG 


31A 




6 


MWF 

TThS 

MV/F 


10-12 

8-10 

10-12 


PE 
PE 


300 
300 




I'Veehand Drawing 


PG 


31B 




4 


Daily 
MWP 


10-12 
10-12 


PE 


300 




I^^eehand Drawing 


PG 


32A 




4 


12 hrs 


To arrange 


PE 


300 




Freehand Drawing 


PG 


32B 




4 


12 hrs 


To arrange 


PE 


300 




Preel.and Drawing 


PG 


4M 




2 


MW 

4 hrs 


5 

To arrange 


PE 
PE 


306 
306 




HIst; of Painting 


xKl 


5M 




5 


MTWThP 
MWP 


2-5 
2-5 


PE 


300 




Oil Painting 


PG 


51B 




5 


MTWThP 
MWF 


2-5 
2-5 


PE 


;500 




Oil rfintlng 


PG 


52A 




4 


12 hrs 


To arrange 


PE 


300 




Oil fsinting 


PG 


52B 




3 


TTh 
3 hrs 


2-5 

To arrange 


PE 
PE 


300 
300 




Water Color 


PG 


61A 


PRO 


16 
JECl 


48 hrs 

jddgm: 


To arrange 
3iTS: 


PE 


300 




Thesis 










T 


9-12 


PE 


300 


Staff 








PRO 


JEC1 


LABORj 


ITORY (BOOK ROOl 


I) 
















Daily 
Daily 


8-12 
1-5 


PE 
PE 


306 
306 


Staff 
Staff 


1 


» For 01 


le yea 


T com 


plet 


ion 












** For ti 


fo yea 


tr com 


plet 


ion 













PHARMACOGNOSY - PGY 



DEPT. 



QOLRSE 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDC. 



ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



PGY 


221 


PGY 


242 


PGY 


501 


PGY 


521 


PGY 


525 



PLY 

PLY 
PLY 
PLY 

PLY 



PHY 
PHY 

PEY 

P>Y 

?HY 
PHY 
HY 



>py 

'PY 
f>PY 



301 
409 
503 



MWF 



2 

4 

2 

2-4 



To 
To 
To 



8-10 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 
arrange 



CH 



316 



Johnson, C H 
Ed wards 
Johnson, C H 
Johnson, C H 
Jolmscn , C H 



PHARMACOLOGY PLY 



261 




• 2 


WF 
TTh 


351 




3 


MWF 


451 




3 


MWF 


455 




3 


WF 
F 


551 




4 


To 



8 
10 



9 

10 



11 
1-3 



arrange 



400 

400 

316 

316 
316 



Edwards 

Edwards 
Edwards 
Poote 

Edwards 



PHARMACY PHY 



211 




5 


TThS 
M 


223 




3 


TTh 
T> 


354 




5 


MWF 
TW 


361 




4 


TTh 
MTh 


381 




2 


TTh 


503 




2 


To 


553 




2 


To 



1-5 

11 
1-4 

9 
1-4 

10 
1-4 

11 

arrange 

arrange 



CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


402 


CH 


306 


CH 


316 



Husa 
Husa 
Foots 

HUK'l 

Johnson, C H 

Husa 

Foote 



PHILOSOPHY PPY 



MWF 

TThS 

TThS 



11 
11 
11 



209 
209 
209 



Enwall 
Enwa] 1 
Knwall 



Practcl Pharmacognsy 
Dnig Pint Histology 
Microscopy Drugs 
Probs Pharmacognosy 
Dinig Plant Analysis 



Applied Physiology 

Pharmacology 
Prlns Blologlcals 
riev remedies 

Probs Pharmacology 



T .organic Pharmacy 

Galenical Pharmacy 

Or£ & Anal Pharmcy 

Pr-.^crptns & Dspnsng 

Phamctl Jttrlaprdnc 
Advsriced Pharmacy 
Synt]:c Pharmctcls 



Ethics 

Ancient Philosophy 

Adv Hist Philosophy 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION PL 



COURSE SEC. 



CRED. 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDC. 



Rocn 



INSTRUCTOR 



COl'RSE TITLE 



101 
205 
205 

207 

207 
207 
207 

207 
309 
311 
313 



321 
325 
424 

52S 
570 



♦ Varla'jle credit 



KWF 


9 


MWF 


10 


KWF 


11 


TTl'iS 


9 


TThS 


10 



Id 

ild 
Id 
d 
Id 



vl 



PHYSICS PS 



3 


MWF 
Th 


3 


MWF 
Th 


3 


MWF 
Th 


1 


M 


1 


T 


1 


W 


1 


Th 


1 


F 


4 


To 


3 


MWF 


1 


To 



9 

11 

11 

11 

10 
11 

2-5 

2-5 

2-r- 

1-4 

0_;:, 

arrange 
10 

arrange 



205 
203 

205 
803 

205 
203 

306 

306 

306 

306 

306 

304 

303 

303 



Lleb 
Lieb 
Li eh 
Llet 
Lieb 



?err-i 



Win i fiij son 

Per-?y 

Porry 
Perrj- 
lerry 
Pef.-y 
Perry- 
Swans on 
KnO',7'l<= s 
Rnowlea 



PLANT PATHOLOGY PT 



MWF 
MWF 



T 
TTh 



1-3 
10-12 



9 
1-3 



arrange 
arrange 



407 

407 



407 
407 



407 
407 



Weber 

Weber 
Weber 

Weber 
Weber 



Physical Fitness 
Physical Fitness 
Physical Fitness 
Physical Fitness 
Physical Fitness 



5f.v (.ral Physics 

Gen Physics (Engnrs ) 

G<^ . Physics (Engnrs) 

L .. for PS 101 & 205 
lj<; for PS 101 & 205 
Lab for PS 101 & 205 
L;r. -. "or PS 101 & 205 
Lab for PS 101 & 205 
Ll^t 

Electrcty & Magntsm 
Electrcl Measrmnts 



Plant Pathology 
Forest Pathology 
Field Crop Diseases 

Adv Plant Pathology 
Resrch Pint Pathlgy 







POLITICAL SCIENCE 


- PCL 




DKPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 


3 PL 


IS 




4 


Mff 
TTh 


3 

9 


L& 

LA 


307 
307 


Laird 


Poltl Found Mod Life 


'CL 


309 




3 


MWF 


1 


PE 


112 


Carleton 


Internatnl Relations 


>CL 


313 




3 


MWP 


2 


PE 


208 


Fayne 


Amer Govt 4 Politics 


»CL 


401 




3 


TThS 


9 


PE 


112 


Leake 


Amei- Const tow 


'CL 


405 




3 


TThS 


11 


LA 


307 


Laird 


Hist Political Theory 


'CL 


411 




3 


mp 


9 


LA 


307 


Laird 


PiibiJe Adminlstratn 


»CL 


513 




3 


To 


arrange 






Laird 


Seminar Poltl Science 




P( 


DRTUGUESE 


: PE 




SE 


33 


1 3 

1 


TThS 


10 


BU 101 Atkln 


1st Year Portii^ese 




POUL" 


TRY HUSBA 


NDRY - PY 




T 


301 




Z 


m 

T 


9 
1-3 


PC 
PC 




Koore, K 
Mehrhof 


Pundmls Poultry Prod 


'Y 


415 




3 


TTh 
M 


9 
3-5 


PO 
PO 




Mehrhof 


Poultry Management 


T 


427 




3 


Tit 

M 


10 
1-3 


PO 
PO 




Moore, K 


Poultry Breeding 


T 


429 




• 


To 


arrange 


PO 




Mehrhof 


Poultiry Prod Prohs 


T 


531 




3 


To 


arrange 


PO 




Mehrhof 


Adv Poultry Mgt 


»y 


570 




ft 


To 

PSY 


arrange 

CHOLOC 


PO 

5Y 


- F 


Mehrhof 

^'SY 


Poultry Research 


?SY 


201 


. 1 


3 


m? 


11 


Pii 


114 


Wlmberly 


General Psychology 


?SY 


201 


2 


3 


TThS 


9 


PE 


114 


V/llllams, 


General Psychology 


PSY 


304 




3 


Hff 


1-3 


PE 


114 


WilliOTS, 


Expormnl Psychology 


?SY 


306 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


ffllllaina, 


Applied Psychology 


?SY 


309 




3 


MTP 


9 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Personality Devlmt 


>SY 


410 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Adv Abnormal Psyoh 


"SY 


411 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Wimberly 


Neurl Mechnsms Bhavr 


PSY 


430 




* 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Individual Work 


PSY 


510 




3 ■• 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


Adv Abnormal Psych 


^SY 


511 




3 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Wlmberly 


Neurl Mechnsms Bhavr 


PSY 


530 




« 


To 


arrange 


PE 


114 


Hinckley 


IndividToal Work 


» Varla 


3le CI 


edit 

















SOCIOLOGY SY 



COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


13 




4 


MW 

TTh 


316 




3 


MWP 


344 




3 


WTF 


426 




3 


MWF 


443 




2 


TTh 


447 




3 


To 


560 




3 


To 



HOURS 



BinC. ROOM 



INSTRl'CTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



1 
11 

9 

10 

11 

10 
arrange 
arrange 



Maclachlan 

Thomas on 

Maclachlan 

Tl-iopipson 

Thomas on 

Maclachlan 

Mac]acl Ian & 
Staff 



SOCIAL STUDIES SCL 



301 



MWF 



YN 



134 



SOILS SLS 



301 


1 


3 


MW 




11 




M 




12 




T 


401 




3 


F 
P 


405 




3 


MWF 


420 




« 


To 


491 




1 


H 


501 




3 


Th 


570 




« 


To 



9 

1-3 

S-5 

9 
1-5 

11 

arrange 

4 

11 

arrarige 



AG 


2oe 


A(} 


202 


AG 


202 


AG 


209 


AG 


202 


AG 


209 


AG 


206 


AG 


204 


AG 


204 


AG 


206 



SPANISH ~ SH 



33 
201 
205 
430 
530 



• Varlsble c 'edit 



MWF 

MWF 
ItrWThFS 
To 
To 



9 

11 

10 
arrange 
arrange 



301 
301 
501 
302 
302 



Barry 



Thornton 

Thornton 

Smith, F B 
Smith, F B 
Smith, F B 
Smith, F B 
Smith, F B 



Hauptrnann 
Hauptmann 
Haup tmann 
Hauptmann 
Eauptmann 



Soc Found Mod Life 

Field of Social Worl 
Marriage & Family 
The City in Amer Lil 
The American Negro 
Soc Rarch & Investgt 
Speci.al Topics 



Cliildrn's Socl Stud 



Soils 

Soil Morphology 

Soil Microbiology 
Spec Probs in Soils 
Soils Seminar 
Adv Soil Microbiolo^ 
Research in Soils 



First Year Spanish 
Second Year Spanish 
Second Year Spanish 
Individual Work 
Individual Work 



SPEECH - SCH 



DEPT. 



COURSE 



SEC. 



CRED. 



DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



C3SC 
CSC 
CSC 
SCH 
SCH 
SCH 
SCH 

SCH 



33 
33 
33 
301 
303 
307 
311 

417 



TThS 

MWP 

TThS 

MWP 

MWP 

TThS 

TThS 
1 hr 

MTP 



lab 



8 

9 

10 

10 

11 

9 

10 
to arrange 



10 



4 
205 
205 
209 

1 
205 
208 

208 



Kopklns 

Hale 

Cons tana 

Cons tans 

Hopkins 

Hale 

Hale 

Hale 



VETERINARY SCIENCE VY 



VY 



W 



* Varitble c:'edlt 



301 



543 



TTh 
T 



To 



10 
1-3 



arrange 



AG 



209 



Shealy 
Emrrel 



Effective Speaking 
Effective Speaking 
Effective Speaking 
Adv Public Speaking 
Argmantn & Debating 
Interpratn of Lit 
Speech Tmg Radio 

Corrctn Speech Defcts 



Vetny Anat Phyalol 
Probt Anml Pathlgy 



< 

H 


il 














c 














< 
Q 

S 


il 






















J!2 

03 






















CO 

D 
K 


el 

4 






















c 






















>- 
< 
Q 

CD 

W 

Q 


il 






















=3 






















< 
Q 

W 

D 


^2 




















i 

i 


c 
^1 






















< 
Q 

O 


8| 






















c 
il .2 

Is 






















O 




06 








T— I 




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8 

I— 1 






eg 


CO 


^ 





LO 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Financial Report 

of 

The University of Florida 

June, 1944 




Vol. XXXIX, Series 1, No. 9, extra 1 September 15, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER 



Dr. Jno. J. Tig€i*t, President 
University of Florida 



My Dear Sir: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the 
financial report for the year ending June 30, 1944. 

This report is summarized and includes 
a balance sheet with supporting schedules for the 
University, Experiment Station, Agricultural Exten- 
sion and other subsidiary departments and divisions. 

It is set up, as far as practical, in 
accordance with the general plan for institutional 
accounting as recommended by the National Committee 
on Standard Reports for Institutions of Higher 
Learning . 



Respectfully submitted. 



K. H. GRAHAM 
Business Manager 



Schedule 
Reference 



Exhibit "A" 

Exhibit "B" 

Exhibit "C" 

ExhlMt "D" 

ExhlMt "E-1" 

Exhibit "E-2" 
Schedule "A" 
Sche'rlule "B-1" 
Scl'.e 'i-le "B-la" 

Schedule "B-2" 
Schefli le "B-2a" 
Schedule "B-2a-l" 

Schedule "8-28-2" 

Scheiule "C" 

Schedule "D" 

Sche.uae "E-1" 

Schedvle "E-la" 

Scheli^le "E-2" 

Schedule "E-2a" 

Sche.lule "E-2b" 

Schedule "E-2c" 

Schedule "E-2d" 
Exilic It "F" 



Title 

Condens ed SuBimary 4 

Balance Sheet g.y 

Summary Statement of Current Funds 8 

Summary of Changes In Loan Fund Balance 8 

Summary of Changes In Endowment Funds 8 

Summary of Changes In Unexpended Plant Funds .... 9 

Sunmary of Changes In Investment In Plant 9 

Sumr.ary of Operations of University Funds ... 10-11 

State.-ent of Current Income (By Sources) 12 

Statement of Current Expenditures 

(By Sources of Income) 13 

Summary Statement of Current Expenditures 14 

Distribution of Expense 15-16-17 

Statement of Current Expenditures for 

Agriculture Experiment Station Funds 18 

Statement of Current Expenditures for 

Agriculture Extension Service 18 

Changes In Loan Fund Principal 19 

Summary of Endowment Funds 20 

Steteijent of Unexpended Plant Funds 21 

Expenditures for Plant Addlt Ions 21 

Statement of Investment In Plant 21 

Summary of Land 22 

Inventory of Buildings 23-24 

Improvements Other Than Buildings 25 

Summary of Equipment Inventory 26-27 

Summary Statement of Operation of 

Agency Funds 27 



4 UmVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CONDENSED SmOURT 

INCOMg 

The Income for Educ«tlon«l and Oeneral purposee during 1945-44 amounted to $3,074,390.27 and was derived 
froB Bourcee Itemized In Schedule B-1. Thla anount represents the principal Income of the University, Experi- 
ment Station and Extension Division. A comparison of Income from the same sources during 1942-43 is also 
Included. 





1942- 


:*3 




126,857.06 






i.beH 


521,868.61 






w.szf 


1,826,645.62 






65.90){ 


14,191.99 






•6^ 


282,476.91 






10.19!{ 





1945- 


■44 




50,840.40 






1.66)< 


531,»30.97 






17.305J 


1,765,997.55 






67 . 44iC 


13,048.05 






.42^ 


712,573.32 






23.18)( 



Student Fees 
Federal Appropriations 
State Appropriations 
Endownent Income 
Sales and Services 

Income from AuxlllarT Bnterprlsea and Activities amounted to $802,063.04, from Non-Educational Funds 
$271,658.76 as per Schedule B-1. 

EXPENDITURES 

Educational General Expenditures for the year 1943-44 amounted to $2,775,731.97 as lt«alc«d iB Schedule 
B-2. These expenditures are for the folloirlng general purposes and are compared with similar lt«ma for 1942-43. 



General Administration 
Instruction and Departmental 

Has earch 
Organised Research 
Extension 
Library and Ituseum 
Operation of Physical Plant 
Special Qeneral Expense 

CURRENT BALANCES 

Unezpeadsd funds on June 30, 1944, were as follows i 

Funds in State Treasury 
Board of Control Funds 





1942-43 




104,197.95 




4.42!( 


879,540.57 




56.91< 


759,614.72 




52, 2 W 


405y5e9.'J6 




17.11SS 


82,672.57 




S.5li 


125,328.67 




5. 51* 


12,572.41 




.55)6 



1943-44 



103,908.82 

958,321.26 
846,407.18 
619,613.41 

80,243.53 
155,441.71 

11,796.06 



Z.7i% 

34.53!< 

30.49;t 

22.32% 

2.89!{ 

6.60% 

.43){ 



(Exhlhit "B"): 



507,678.77 
154,900.68 



Penumefit Endowmente created by land-grants of the Federal Oovemment and by private gifts amounted to 
$294,S54.12 on June 50, 1944 and were derived from the following sources: 



822,409.08 
40,000.00 
31,845.04 



Land-Orant Funds 

Private Oift* for Departmental Use 

Private <}lft« for Scholarships 

A detailed atatemeBi appears as Schedule "D" of these funds. 

PLANT PUUDS 

the value of all property held by the University on June 50, 1944, amounted to $10,184,762.27 distributed 
as follows t 



Land 

Buildings and Improvements 

Equipment 

These BBOuats are itemiced in Schedules E-Ea to E-2d. 



400,901.40 
6,190,020.17 
3,595,840.70 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30, 1944 



The Operating Dollar 1943-44 



HOW THE DOLLAR 
WAS PROVIDED 



Per Cent 



Student Fees IM 



Federal 
Appropriations! 7.3( 



State , . 
Appropriations 



57.44 



Endowment Incom; 



Sales and 

Services 23 18 



HOW THE DOLLAR 
WAS SPENT 




By Function 
Per Cent 



ffl 



eral 
ministration 3,7^ 



Instructional 
and Dept. 
Resea^n^h 34 53 



Organized 
Research 30 49 



Extension 22 32 



Library afid 



^useurn 2 89 



Operation of 
Physical Plant 5 60 



By Object 
Per Cent 



Salaries 

and ^ , 

Labor 77.58 



Specal General j 

Expense .43 



Other 
Operating 
Expense 17,79 



Capital 
Outlay 4 63 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



UNIVEBSITY OF FLORIDA 
BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1944 



Exhibit "A" 



Current Funds : 

A. Educational and General 

Funds In State Treasury (Schedule "A") 
State ApproprlatlOT- 
Cash In State Treasury 

Cash In State Treasury 
Temporary Investments 

Due from Other State Departments 
Inventory of Supplies 

University 

Experiment Stations 

Total Educational and General Funds 



36,124.11 
471.554.66 



112,891.01 
80,289.14 



507,678.77 



5,182.47 
25,650.00 



2,550.56 



193,180.15 



734,241.95 



B. Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Cas>- In Banks -Board of Control 
University Petty Cash Fund 
Invested In Bonds 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 



53,460.15 
25,000.00 
13,100.00 



91,560.15 



Non-Educational Funds 
Cash in Banks -Board of Control 
tJnlverslty Petty Cash F\ind 

Total ron-Educatlonal Funds 

Total Current Funds 



48,340,43 
15,000.00 



63,340.43 
889.142.53 



II. Loan Funds 



Cash In Banks-Board of Control 
Notes Receivable 



Total Loan Funds 



9,621.63 
27,827.62 



37,449.25 



III. Endowment Funds 

A. Funds in Trust-State Treasury 
Cash in State Treasury 
Invested in Bonds 



9,659.08 
252,750.00 



262,409.08 



Funds in Trust-Board of Control 

Cash on hand 

Investments 

Total Endowment Funds 



1,745.04 
30.100.00 



31.845.04 



294,254.12 



Plant Funds 
A. Unexpended 

Funds in State Treasury 
State Appropriations 
Cash In State Treasury 

Cash in Banks -Board of Control 
P. W. A. Dormitory Funds 

Total Unexpended Plant Funds 



10,795.28 
106,96 



10,902.24 



1,350.24 
130,216.76 



142,469.24 



3. Invested in Plant 

Land 

Buildings and Improvements 

Equipment 

Total Invested in Plant 



Total Plant Funds 



400,901.40 
6,190,020.17 
5,593,840.70 



10.184,762.27 
10.327.231.51 



Agency Funds 

Cash in Banks -Board of Control 



Total Assets 



18.059.14 
11.566.136.55 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



I'NIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1944 



Current Funds : ^ 
A. Educational and General 
Current Balances : 

UnlTerelty 

Agricultural Experiment Sta. 

Agricultural Extension Serv. 



LIABILITIES 



882,856.86 

183, 80 f.. 55 

44,l>i6.92 



510,229.33 



Accounts Payable 

Reserve for Temporary Investments 

Reserve for Supplies Inventory 



5,182.47 

25,650. 1 

193,180.. J 



Total Educational and General Funds 



734,241.95 



B. Auxiliary Enterprl?es and Activities 
Balances of Accounts (Schedule "A") 



91,560.15 



Total Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 



91,560.15 



Non-Bducatlonal Funds 
Balance of Accounts (Schedule "A" 
Total Non-Educational Funds 
Total Current Funds 



65.340.43 

389.142.63 



II. Loan Funds 

Principal of Funds (Schedule "C") 
Total Loan Funds 



37,449.25 



37,449.25 



111. Endowment F-ujids 

A. Funds In Trust-State Treasury 
0. S. Land Grant of 1862 
Seminary Endowment 
American Legion Endowment 



B. Funds in Trust-Board of Control 

Principal of Scholarship Endowments 



156,345.97 
66,063.11 
40,000.00 



262,409.08 
51,845.04 



Total Endowment Funds 



294,254.12 



IV. Plant Funds 

A. Unexpended 

Fund Balances : 
Special Building Fund from 
Student Pees 

Funds in State Treasury 

Reserve for Retirement of P.W.A. Certificates 



1,350.24 



1^,902.24 
130,216.76 



Total Unexpended Plant Funds 



142,469.24 



B. Invested In Plant 



P.W.A. Revenue Certificates 

Plant Property (Including Donated Surplus) 



429,000.00 
,755,762.27 



Total Invested In Plant 
Total Plant i^inds 



10,184,762.27 
10,327,231.51 



V . Agency Funds ■ 

Balance of Accounts (Exhibit "F") 



18.059.14 



Total Liabilities 



11,566,136.55 



UMIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



S^TITARY STATE" f NT 0; CUr:-EKT ■ OTItS 
rOR THE YEAR F CED J''"'E 30, 1944 



Balance at Be^lnn'ng of Year 

Ai-: 

Current Educational and General 

Income (Schedule "P-1") 
Incorr.e of Auxiliary Enterprises and 

Activities (Scheiule "P-1") 
Income of !lon-Educat'o; al Funds, 

(Schedule "B-1") 

Deduct : 

Current Educational and General 

Expenditures (Schedule "B-la") 
ETper''lture3 of Auxlllarv Enterprises 

and Act'.vltles (Schedule "B-la") 
Expenditures of Non-Educatli^nal Funds 

(Sc. edule "B-la") 

Balance June 30, 1944 

Le?3 : 

State Appropriations revertlnj; June 30, 1944 

Net Balance Carried Forward to 1944-45 

Balance Consists of: 

Funds In State Treasury: 
Unexpended State Appropriations 
Cash In State Treasury 

Board of Control Funds: 

Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Kon-Educatlonal Funds 



3,074,390.27 
802, Of- 3. 04 



36,124.11 
4"1,554.66 



91,n60.15 
■Ja,?4Q.43 



452,863.92 



4,14^,092.07 4,500,955.99 



2,v.o,731.97 
743,938.36 
272, 70.05 



154,900.53 



5, '^91, 990. 38 
&0e,965,61 

140.386.26 
662,57 9.35 



662,579.35 



Exhibit "C" 



suwARY OF cha;;5ES in loai: 7u-r halavces 



Balance July 1, 1943 

Ad.1ustT"ent : 

Addition to Previously reported balances 

Additions during 1943-44: 

S'rerrell Student Loan Fund 

Kaopa Delta PI Loan Fund 

U.S. Office of Education Loan Fund 

Other Donations 

Interest Income 

Balance J ne 30, 1944 



15,9"'3.24 

21.25 15,994.49 



1,415.00 

351.00 

19,480.00 

8.40 

200.36 



Exhibit "D" 



S-'iVMARY OF CHAir-ES II! EyrO'«ME»'T FUNDS 



Balance July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions; 
Balance June 30, 1944 



294,254.12 



294,254.12 



175, 


,347, 


.13 


32 


,877, 


,89 


142, 


,469, 


.24 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Exhibit "E-1" SUMW.RY OF CHANGES IK TOEXPEKDED PLANT FUNDS 

Balance July 1, 1943 X44 509.44 

Additions : 

Per Plant Improvement 3,951.00 

For Retirement of Indebtedness 26,886.69 30,837.69 

Deductions : 

For Plant Improvement 5,517.89 

For Retirement of Indebtedness 27.360.00 

Balance June 30, 1944. 



Exhibit "E-2" SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN PLANT INVESTMENT 

Value of Plant July 1, 1943 10 115 679.52 

Additions : 

From Capital Expenditures 178,516.45 

From Re-Inventories and Re-Valuatlon 15,566.30 194.082.75 

Deductions : 

Transfer of Military Property 125,000.00 

Net Aadltiona: 69,082.75 

Value of Plant June 30, 1944 10 184 762.27 



SUMMARY OP PLANT INVESTMENT 

Land (Schedule "E-2a") 400,901,40 

Buildings (Schedule "E-2b") 5,669,464.17 

Other Improvements (Schedule "E-2c") 520,556.00 

Equipment (Schedule ''E-2d") 3,595,P40.70 10,184,762.27 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Schedule "A" 



SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS OF OTIVERSITY FOUDS 
1943-44 



Balance 
June 30. 1944 



Balance Income Dlebursements 
July 1. 1943 1945 - 1944 1943 - 1944 Reverted 



Carried 
Forward 



I. FCTNDS IN STATE TREASURY 
State Appropriations: 

University! 
Salaries 

Necessary and Regular Expenses 
Special: Emergency Appropriation for 

Leaves of Absence 
Chair of Americanism 
School of Forestry 

Total University State Appropriations 

Radio Station WRUF 
Salaries 
Necessary and Regular Expense 

Total Radio State Appropriations 

Florida Industrial and Engineering 
Experiment Station 

Experiment Stations 
Main Station FMnd 
Vegetable Crops Laboratory 
Gladioli Investigations 
Strawberry Investigations 
Potato Investigations 
Celery Iivagstlgat Ions 
Citrus Station 
Everglades Station 
Everglades Continuing Fund 
North Florida Station 
Sub-Tropical Station 
Watermelon and Crape Investigations 
Weather Forecasting Service 
, Range Cattle Station 
Soil Survey 

North Florida Mobile Units 
Emergency Fund 

Total Experiment Station State 
Appropriations 

Agricultural Extension Service 
Offset for Federal Funds: 
Salaries 

Necessary and Regular Expense 
Continuing Appropriation - Chapter 
19216 

Total Agricultural Extension Service 
State Appropriations 

Total State Appropriations 

II. CASH IN STATE TREASURY 

University 
Incidental Funds 
University 
General Extension Division 

Total University Incidental Funds 

Endowment Funds : 
American Legion Interest 
Agricultural College Fund Interest 
Seminary Interest 

Total Endowment Funds 

Federal Funds 
Morrill-Nelson Funds 
Bankhead-Jones Funds 



Total Federal Funds 

Total University Cash in 
State Treasury 



-0- 


707,790.00 


702,924.58 




-0- 




4,865. 


62 


-0- 


161,660,00 


161,660.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


106,975.00 


2,888.85 


98, 


,086, 


,15 


-0- 




-0- 


2,500.00 


2,495.01 




4, 


,99 


-0- 




-0- 


32,SO0.0O 
1,005,425.00 

5,000.00 


52,499.92 
902,468.16 

1,245.00 


96, 


,091, 
-0- 


.08 
,22 


-0- 




-0- 


4,865, 
S,75.s, 


,62 


-0- 


,00 


-0- 


5,000.00 
10,000.00 

20,000.00 

244,395.57 


3,395.44 
4,640.44 

4,013.69 

2)4,395.37 




-0- 




1,604. 
5,359. 

-0- 


,56 


-0- 




-0- 




,56 


-0- 


15, 


,986, 
-0- 


,31 




-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


33,667.55 


32,386.98 




-0- 




1,280, 


,57 


-0- 


5,000.00 


4,221.01 




-0- 




778, 


.99 


-0- 


6,300.00 


4,483.48 




-0- 




1,816, 


.52 


-0- 


12,000.00 


12,000.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


15,000.00 


11,418.04 




-0- 




3,581. 


.ye 


-0- 


66,830.00 


64,017.85 




-0- 




2,812, 


.15 


-0- 


48,672.00 


48,672.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


26,ft96.00 


26,896.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


23,200.00 


22,251.22 




-0- 




948. 


.78 


-0- 


16,300.00 


11,684.51 




-0- 




4,615, 


.49 


-0- 


20,000.00 


15,521.95 




-0- 




4,478, 


.06 


-0- 


12,500.00 


12,500.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


30,000.00 


19,856.42 


10 


,143, 


.58 


-0- 




-0- 


10,000.00 
5B0.760.92 


-0- 


10, 
20 


,000, 
,143, 


■ 00 
.58 


-0- 




-0- 


540.304.83 


20.312. 


.51 


-0- 


67,980.00 


67,980.00 




-0- 




-0- 




-0- 


40,820.00 


35,233.58 




-0- 




5,58'- 


■ 42 


-0- 


25.000.00 

133,800.00 
1,749,985.92 


12,834.85 

116,048.43 
1,567,475.55 


12. 

12 
146 


,165 

,365 
,386 


.15 

■ 15 
.26 


-0- 




-0- 


5.586 
36,124 


.42 


-0- 


■ 11 



60,512.72 
16,482.03 



588,104.51 
40.460.76 



406,551.12 
30,625.44 



76,994.75 628.565.27 437.176.56 



1.438.91 
■q. 436. 91 



-0- 
-0- 



2,200.00 
7,750.00 
3.098.05 



2,200.00 
7,750.00 
2.839.30 



13.048.05 12.789.30 



25,000.00 
20,827.55 



45,827.55 



25,000.00 
20.827.55 



78,433.66 687.440.87 495.795.41 



242,066.11 
26.517.35 



268,383.46 



1, 


,697, 


.66 


1 


,697, 


.66 


-0- 
-0- 


-0- 


270 


,081, 


.12 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Schedule "A" (cor.t.) 



Agricultural Experiment Station 
Incidental Funds (all Stations) 

Agricultural Extension Service 
Federal Funds : 
Capper-Ketcham Fund 
Smlth-Lever-Bankhead-Jones Fund 
Emergency Farm Labor Program 
Emergency War Food Program 

Total Agricultural Extension Service 
Federal Funds 

Total Oash In State Treasury 

Total Funds In State Treasury 

. CASH IN HANDS OF UNIVIRSITY 
Agricultural Experiment Stations 
Hatch Fund 
Adams Fund 
Purnell Fund 
Bankhead-Jones Fund 

Total Cash In Hands of University 

. Other Funds 

Alachua County Funds for P. K. 
Yonge Laboratory School 

Total Budgeted Funds 

. Board of Control Funds 

Auxlllarj' Enterprises and Activities 
Cafeteria and Soda Fountain 
Residence Halls 
Infirmary 
Bookstore 

P. ¥., Yonge School Cafeteria 
Radio Station WRUF 



Residence Halls (P.W.A.) Projects 
Total Auxiliary Enterprises and 
Activities 

Non-Educational Funds 
Student Activity Funds 
R.O.T.C. Clothing Account 
Louie D. Beaumont Special Fund 
Pharmacy Professional Relations Fund 
Scholarships 
Day Lily Research 
Drug Research Fund 
Sloan Project-Applied Economics 
Civil Aeronautics Authority 
Wood Products Laboratory 
Engineering Experiment Station 
General Education Board-Library Fund 
General Education Board-Nutrltlon 

Project 
General Educational Board-Works 

Simplification Project 
Murphree Memorlan Fund 
Y.M.C.A. Fund 
Engineering Science and Management 

War Training Fund 
Reelonal Advlsor-ESMWT 
Office of Scientific Research and 

Development-Project 2453 
U. S. Army Signal Corps Project 
Office of Production Research and 

Development 
Inter-Amerloan Workshop 
Florida Crippled Children's Society 
Florida Medical Association 
Western Union Sub-Station Account 
Parsons Museum Fund 

Total Non-Educational Funds 

Combined Totals 

« Debit 



164,650.50 148,410.53 150.167.99 



-0- 27,417.72 27,417.72 

-0- 200,653.07 200,653,07 

112,322.57 100,000,00 178,702.41 

-0- 25,000.00 20,039.66 



112,322.57 353,070.79 4 26,812.86 
355,406.73 1,188.922.19 1.072.774.26 
555.406,73 2.936.908.11 2,640.249.81 



15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
34.Vf g.16 



15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
54.762.16 



146.386.26 



-0- 
-0- 



162.B93.04 



-0- 

33,620.16 

4,960.34 



38,560.50 
471.554.66 
507.678.77 



-O- 

-0- 
-0- 



124,782.16 124,782.16 



3ff,406.73 3 


.074.390.27 2 


,775.731.97 


146.386.26 


507.678.77 


«3,310.36 


495,003.72 


473,989.43 


-0- 


17,703.93 


18,274.53 


65,633.92 


53,279.18 


-C- 


30,629.27 


5,139.14 


34,438.91 


33,514.88 


-0- 


6,063.17 


7,880.74 


94,492.56 


98,879.23 


-0- 


3,494.07 


1,52Z.43 


23.441.48 


22,253.79 


-0- 


2,710.12 


3.978.99 


68,338.45 

781,349.04 


41.357.85 
723,274.36 


-0- 


30.959.59 


33,485.47 


-0- 


91,560.15 


-0- 


20,714.00 


20,714.00 


-0- 


-0- 


33,485.47 


802,063.04 
18,374.56 


743.988.36 
28,172.09 


-0- 


91.560.15 


12,389.62 


-0- 


2,592.09 


1,016.61 


16.10 


503.34 


-0- 


529.57 


1,472.25 


-0- 


353.50 


-0- 


1,118.75 


1,090.78 


2,161.95 


2,181.96 


-0- 


1,070.77 


4,761.76 


20,549.34 


17,140.98 


-0- 


8,170.12 


311.00 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


511.00 


117.56 


-0- 


1.08 


-0- 


116.48 


5,496.74 


17,658.61 


18,959.93 


-0- 


4,195.42 


6,451.54 


9,018.29 


5,325.12 


-0- 


10,144.71 


118.75 


-0- 


6.64 


-0- 


110.11 


4,215.32 


10,018.20 


3,921.22 


-0- 


10,312.30 


5,075.15 


20,000.00 


23,561.43 


-0- 


1,513.72 


-0- 


25,000.00 


18,683.90 


-0- 


6,316.10 


1,095.58 


3,500.00 


2,288.54 


-0- 


2,307.04 


3,031.47 


1,723.03 


-0- 


-0- 


4,754.50 


382.87 


-0- 


382.87 


-0- 


-0- 


24,434.94 


83,092.35 


70,581.60 


-0- 


36,945.69 


1,023.59 


1,761.13 


1,257.98 


-0- 


1,526.74 


«10,849.20 


57,096.22 


74,065.73 


-0- 


•27,818.71 


1,942.95 


-0- 


2,773.34 


-0- 


♦ 830.39 


-0- 


-0- 


1,010.93 


-0- 


•1,010.93 


-0- 


650.00 


650.00 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


425.00 


-0- 


-0- 


425.00 


-0- 


38.00 


38. or 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


555.98 


407.87 


-0- 


148.11 


392.24 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


392.24 


63,971.72 


271,638.76 
.148.092.07 3, 


272,270,05 
,791.990,38 


-0- 


63.340.43 


452.863.92 4, 


146.386.26 


662.579.35 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA' 



SchBdule "B-1' 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT INCOME 
(BY SOURCES) 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 



12,500.00 
12,S0O.0O 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
27,417.72 

20,827.55 

34,782.16 

200,653.07 

100,000.00 

25,000.00 

8,250.47 



1,005,425.00 
10,000.00 



I. EDUCATIONAL ART GENERAL 

1. Student Foes (Net, Less refunds of |l,428.26) 

2. Public Appropriations and Tax Levies i 

A. Federal I 

Morrill Acts (1862, 1890) 
Nelson Act (1907) 
Hatch Act (1887) 
Adams Act (1906) 
Purnell Act (1925) 
Oapper-K«tcham Act (1928) 
Bankhead-Jones Act (1935) 

Teaching 

Research 

Bjtteneion 
Emergency Farm Labor Program (1943) 
anergency War Fook Program (1944) 
Smith-Hughes, George-Dean Acts (1917, 1936) 

B. State and County 

University 

Radio Station WRUF 

Florida Industrial and Engineering 

Experiment Station 20,000.00 

Agricultural Experiment Stations 580,760.92 

Agricultural Extension Service 133,800.00 

Smith Hughes Funds 5,311.61 

Alachua County for P. K. Yonge School 10,700.00 

3. Endowment Income 

A. Funds from Private Qlfta 

Interest on American Legion Endowment 

B. Funds from Public Souroes i 

Interest on Seminary Endowment 3,098.05 

n. 3. Land Orant of 1862 (Paid by General 
Revenue Fund) 7,750.00 

4. Receipts from Sales and SerTlces of 

Educational Departments 

Agricultural Sales 

Experiment Station 

General Extension Division 

Miscellaneous Departmental Sales 

Non-Educational Departments 

Rental Income 

Officers Candidate School 

War Training Courses 

Total current Educational and General Income 

II. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 

Cafeteria and Soda Fountain 

Residence Halls 

Infirmary 

Bookstore 

P. K. Yonge School Cafeteria 

Radio Station, WRUF 

Residence Halls (P.W.A. Projects) 

Total Income from Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 

III. Non-Educational Funds 

Student Activity Funds 

R. 0. T. 0. Clothing Account 

Pharmacy Professional Relations Fund 

Scholarships 

Sloan Pro.leot-Applied Economics 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Engineering Experiment Station 

Oenerel Education Board-Library Fund 

General Education Board-Nutrition Project 

General -Education Board-Works Simplification 

Murphree Memorial Fund 

Engineering Science and Management War Training Funds 

Regional Advisor, E.S.M.W.T. 

Office of Scientific Research and Development 

Inter-American Workshop 

Florida Crippled Children's Society 

Florida Medical Association 

Western Union Sub-Station Account 

Total Income from Non-Educational Funds 



50,840.40 



531,930.97 



1.765.997.53 2,297,928.50 



2,200.00 



10.848.05 



1,793.43 

148,410.53 

40,460.76 

5,240.47 

33,703.43 

2,846.00 

13,210.00 

466.908.70 



495,003.72 
65,633.92 
34,438.91 
94,492.56 
23.441.48 
68,338.45 
20,714.00 



18,374.56 

16.10 

2,161.95 

20,549.34 

17,658.61 

9,018.29 

10,018.20 

20,000.00 

25,000.00 

3,500.00 

1,723.03 

83,092.35 

1,761.13 

57,096.22 

650.00 

425.00 

38.00 

555.98 



712,573.32 



3.074,390.27 



802.063.04 



271.638.76 



Combined Totals 



4.148.092.07 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Schedule "B-la" 



STATE^TNT OF CURRENT EXPENDITDRES 

{From Source of Income) 
For the Year Ended June 30, 1944. 



I. ErnCATIONAL AND aEUEfiAL 

1. Expenditures from Student Fees 

2. Expenditures from Public Appropriations 

and Tax Levies : 

Morrill Acta (1862-1890) 
Nelson Act (1907) 
Hatch Act (1887) 
Adams Act (1906) 
Purnell Act (1925) 
Capper-Ketoham (1928) 
Bankhe ad- Jones Act (1935) : 

Teaching 

Research 

Extension 
Emergency Farm Labor Program (1943) 
Emergency War Food Program (1944) 
Smith-Hughes, George-Dean Acts 

(1917, 1936) 

B. State and County 
University 
Radio Station WRltF 
Florida Indxis trial and Engineering 
Experiment Station 
Agricultural Experiment Stations 
Agricultural Extension SeiTrice 
Smith -Hughes Funds 
Alachua County for P. K. Yonge School 

3. Expenditures from Endowment Income: 

A. Funds from Private Gifts 

Interest on American Legion Endowment 

B. F\inds from Public Sources : 

Interest on Seminary Endowment 
Interest on Endowment of U. S. Land 

Grant of 1862 (Guaranteed by State 

Appropriation) . 

4. Expenditures from Sales and Services 

of Educational Departm.ents 

Agricultural 
Experiment Stations 
General Extension Division 
Miscellaneous Departmental Sales 
Non-Educational Departments 
War Training Courses 

Total Educational and General Expenditures 

II. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 

Cafeteria and Soda Fountain 

Residence Halls 

Infirmary 

Bookstore 

P. K. Yonge School Cafeteria 

Radio Station WRDF 

Residence Halls (P. W. A. Projects) 

Total Expenditures of Auxiliary Enterprises 
and Activities 

III. NON-EDUCATIONAL FUJDS 

Student Activity Funds 

R. 0. T. C. Clothing Account 

Louis D. Beaumont Special Fund 

Pharmacy Professional Relations Fund 

Scholars): ips 

Drug Research Fund 

SloVm Project-Applied Economics 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Wood Products Laboratory 

Engineering Experiment Station 

General Education Board-Library Fund 

General Education Board-Nutrition Project 

General Education Board-Works Simplification 

Y. M. C. A. Fund 

Engineering Science and Management War Training 

Fund 
Regional Advisor, E.S.M.W.T. 

Office of Scientific Research and Development 
n. S. Array Signal Corps Project 
Office of Production Research and Development 
Inter-American Workshop 
Florida Medical Association 
Western Union Sub-Station Account 

Total Expenditures from Non-Educational Funds 
Combined Totals 



12,500.00 
12,500.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
27,417.72 

20,827.55 

34,782.16 

200,653.07 

178,702.41 

20,039.66 

6,250.47 



902,468.16 
4,640.44 

4,013.69 
540,304.83 
116,048.43 

5,311.61 
10,700.00 



2,839.30 

7,750.00 



605,673.04 



1.583.487.16 2,189,160.20 



2,200.00 



10,589.30 



1,793.43 

150,167.99 

30,625.44 

5,240.47 

16,549.43 

324,581.88 



473,989.43 
53,279.18 
33,514.88 
98,879.23 
22,253.79 
41,357.85 
20,714.00 



28,172.09 

503.34 

353.50 

2,181.96 

17,140.98 

1.08 

18,959.93 

5,325.12 

8.64 

3,921.22 

23,561.43 

18,683.90 

2,288.54 

382.87 

70,581.60 

1,257.98 

74,065.73 

2,773.34 

1,010.93 

650.00 

38.00 

407.87 



12,789.30 



528.958.64 
2,775,751.97 



743,988.36 



272.270.05 
3.791,990.38 



UNIVERSITY OF FLO HI DA 



Schedule "B-2" 



STATEMENT OF CLRRETJT EXPENDITURES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

JUNE 30, 1944 



Educational and Oeneral 

1 Oeneral UnlTeralty Kxpennoo 

2. Resident Instruction 

Oeneral Expense 

College of Agriculture 

School of Forestry 

School of Architecture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

School of Pharmacy 

College of Business Administration 

College of Education 

P. K. Ycnge Laboratory School 

College of Engineering 

General College 

Graduate School 

College of Law 

Military Department 

Department of Music 

Athletic and Physical Education 

Summer Sessions 

School of Trade and Industrial 

Education 
War Training Courses 

Total Resident Instruction 

3. Research 

A. Departmental Research 

B. Orgflnlzed Research 

Florida Industrial and 

Engineering Experiment Station 
Agricultural Experiment Stations 

Total Research 

4. Extension 

Agricultural Extension Service 
Other Extension 

Total Extension 

5. Library and Museum 

6. Maintenance and Supervision 

7. University Reserve Funds 

Total Educational and General 
Expenditures 

Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Cafeteria and Soda Fountain 
Residence Halls 
Infirmary 
Bookstore 

P. K. Yonge School Cafeteria 
Radio Station WRDF 
P.Vf.A. Dormitory Projects 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises and 
Activities 

Non-Educational Funds 

Student Activity Funds 

R. 0. T. C. Clothing Account 

Louis D. Beaumont Special Fund 

Pharmacy Professional Relations Fund 

Scholarships 

Drug Research Fund 

Sloan Project-Applied Economics 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Wood Products Laboratory 

Etif^ineering Experiment Station 

General Education Board: 

Library Fund 

Nutrition Project 

Works Simplification Project 

Y. V. C. A. Fund 

Engineering Science and Management 
War Training Fund 

Regional Advisor-E. S. M. W. T. 

Office of Scientific Research and 
Development-Project 2453 

U. S. Army Signal Corps Project 

Office of Production Research and 
Development 

Inter-AmerlCHn Workshop 

Florida Medical Association 

Western Union Sub-Station 

Total Non-Educational Funds 
Combined Totals 





SALARIES 


OTrtZr, 






AND 


OPERATING 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 


LABOR 


EXPE^'SE 


OUTLAY 


103,908.82 


77,064.98 


24,683.45 


2,160.39 


11,972.95 


8,874.81 


3,098.14 


-0- 


64,066.62 


58,629.68 


3,507.24 


1,929.70 


33,102.17 


21,728.16 


3,714.59 


7,659.42 


15,552.13 


13,983.49 


447.84 


1,121.40 


144,956.03 


133,991.30 


7,187.66 


3,777.07 


18,917.25 


16,534.30 


1,604.41 


778.54 


29,161.50 


27,674.92 


1,146.58 


340.00 


28,546.21 


26,977.09 


1,569.12 


-0- 


54,134.07 


50,914.74 


2,021.70 


1,197.63 


54,108.89 


41,402.75 


5,456.59 


7,249.55 


28,003.14 


26,119.14 


1,043.94 


840.06 


10,448.86 


5,441.40 


139.02 


4,868.44 


26,098.62 


22,824.79 


54.41 


3,219.42 


3,504.75 


3,391.15 


B1.35 


32.25 


5,181.89 


4,774.61 


292.36 


114.92 


8,560.67 


7,785.18 


775.49 


-0- 


43,022.72 


41,089.95 


1,932.77 


-0- 


7,601.65 


6,836.00 


765.65 


-0- 


371,381.14 


337,252.54 


22,955.68 


11,172.92 


958,321.26 


856.226.00 


57.793.94 


44.301.32 


27,138.51 


25.965.62 


871,04 


301,85, 


4,013.69 


2,986.40 


348.37 


678.92 


815,254.98 


.563,212.89 


213,034.56 


39,007.53 


846.407.18 


592.164.91 


214. 25?. 97 


39.988.30 


542,861.29 


413,790.56 


125,238.81 


3,831.93 


76,752.12 


59,760.43 


15.003.89 


1.987.80 


619.613.41 


473.550.98 


140.242.70 


5.819.73 


80.243.53 


47.392.24 


3,799.11 


29,052.18 


155,441.71 


100.052.22 


50.470.73 


4.918.76 


11,796.06 


7,035.88 


2.667.98 


2,092.20 


2,775,731.97 


2.153.487.21 


493.911.88 


128,332.88 


473,989.43 


86,145.47 


377,547.19 


10,296.77 


53,279.18 


19,133.44 


25,775.71 


8,370.03 


33,514.88 


21,915.20 


11,327.86 


271.82 


98,879.23 


3,914.22 


94,958.01 


7.00 


22,253.79 


3,382.36 


18,546.59 


324.84 


41,357.85 


26,234.35 


14,725.23 


398.27 


20,714.00 


12.170.92 
172.895.96 


8,543.08 

551.423.67 


-0- 


745.988.36 


19.668.73 


28,172.09 


3,073.00 


24,787.59 


311.50 


503.34 


-0- 


503.34 


-0- 


353.50 


-0- 


353.50 


-0- 


2,181.96 


707.60 


1,474.36 


-0- 


17,140.98 


-0- 


17,140.98 


-0- 


1.08 


-0- 


1.08 


-0- 


IP, 959. 93 


11,315.10 


6,278.57 


1,366.26 


5,325.12 


3,335.76 


1,578.36 


411.00 


8.64 


-0- 


8.64 


-0- 


3,921.22 


3,537.18 


282.79 


101.25 


23,561.43 


3,516.56 


-0- 


20,044.87 


18,683.90 


12,476.69 


5,332.70 


874.51 


2,288.54 


-0- 


2,075.34 


213.20 


382.87 


-0- 


264.34 


118.53 


70,581.60 


60,561.31 


8,808.94 


1,211.35 


1,257.98 


484.00 


773.98 


-0- 


74,065.73 


36,392.68 


37,394.57 


278.46 


2,773.34 


2,258.67 


514.67 


-0- 


1,010.93 


889.88 


55.05 


66.00 


650.00 


400.00 


250.00 


-0- 


38.00 


38.00 


-0- 


-0- 


407.87 


407.87 
139.394.30 


-0- 


-0- 


278.370.05 


107,878.80 


24,996.95 


3,791,990.38 


2,465,777.47 


1.153.214.35 


172.998.56 



riw.M iM ini'nirr -i \' '» /'-// 



DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENSE 
1943-44 



Schedule "P-28" 



General University Expense 
President's Office 
Business Office 
Dean of Students 
Registrar 
Publicity 

Printing and Publications 
Travel-Heads of Departments 
Workmen's Compensation 
Tabulating Machine Rental 
Postage Account 

Total General University Expense 

Resident Instruction 
General Expense 

Boerd of Examiners 
Desn of the University 
Florida Union 
Connnencement Expense 
Travel-Deans and Heads of 
Departments 

Total General Ex-^nae 

College of Agriculture 
General Expense 
Agricultural Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Agronomy 
Animal industry 
Botany 
Entomology 
Horticulture 
Soils 

Total College of Agriculture 

School of Forestry 

School of Architecture 
General Expense 
Architecture 
Painting 

Total School of Architecture 

College of Arts and Sciences 
General Extiense 
Bible 
Biology 
Chemi 8 try 

History and Political Sciences 
Journalism 

Language and Llterat'ire 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 
Physics 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Speech 

Total College of Arte and Sciences 

School of Pharmacy 
General Expense 
Pharmacognosy Sr. Pharmacology 
Pharmacy Department 



Total School of Phar 



3cy 



Col]ege of Business Administration 
General Expense 
Economics and Business Administration 

Total College of Business Administration 



ft 


Salaries 


Other 






And 


Operating 


Capital 




Wages 

13,085.50 


Expense 

3,481.28 


Outlaj 


16,S66.78 


-0- 


37,407.43 


31,491.43 


4,549.97 


1,366.03 


12,142.74 


11,298.87 


421.97 


421.90 


18,656.86 


15,381.28 


2,903.12 


372.46 


6,723.12 


5,430.06 


1,293.06 


-0- 


3,734.82 


-0- 


3,734.82 


-0- 


133.31 


-0- 


133.31 


-0- 


851.04 


377.84 


473.20 


-0- 


6,451.35 


-0- 


6,451.35 


-0- 


1,241.37 


-0- 


1,241.37 
24,683.45 


-0- 


103,903.82 


77,064.98 


2,160.39 


4,999.96 


4,H54.97 


744.99 


-0- 


1,276.35 


1,260.00 


16.35 


-0- 


3,489.60 


3,359.84 


129.76 


-0- 


1,050.81 


-0- 


1,050.81 


-0- 


1.156.23 


-0- 


1.156.23 
3.09-'-.14 

740.85 


-0- 


11,972.95 


•8.874.81 
9,326.88 


-0- 


10,.S26.61 


459.08 


3,101.46 


3,007.78 


173.68 


-0- 


1,744.70 


1,724.77 


19.03 


-0- 


1,151.96 


1,149.93 


2.03 


-0- 


13,;126.13 


12,275.28 


936.80 


614.10 


10,311.44 


9,626.9R 


416 . 55 


267.91 


6,017.90 


5,270.76 


473.30 


273.84 


10,000.19 


9,496.66 


419. S3 


84.00 


7. 305.96 


6.750.64 


324,57 


230.77 


64.066.62 


53.629.68 


3,507.24 


1,929.70 


33,102.17 


21,728.16 


3,714.59 


7.659.42 


7,127.42 


6,522.68 


447.24 


157.50 


5,758.11 


4,794.21 


-0- 


963.90 


2,666.60 


2.666.60 
13.983.49 


-0- 


-0- 


15,552.13 


447.24 


1,121.40 


14,H71.17 


14,483.97 


387 . 20 


-0- 


1,013.34 


1,013.34 


-0- 


-0- 


9,824.60 


8,187.66 


1,055.06 


581.88 


30,500.58 


24,129.20 


4,670.86 


1,700.52 


9,694.92 


9,561.46 


5.00 


128.46 


4,700.72 


4,467.53 


28.19 


205.00 


33,631.94 


33,346.54 


211.15 


74.25 


11,958.79 


11,838.49 


120.30 


-0- 


1,782.00 


1,782.00 


-0^ 


-0- 


8,381.73 


6,924.00 


■466. "17 


1,001.56 


5,972.09 


5,850.07 


122.02 


-0- 


5,159.48 


5,107.12 


52.36 


-0- 


7,464.67 


7,299.92 


79.35 


85.40 


144,956.03 


133,991.30 


7,187.66 


3,777.07 


9,049.24 


6,739.21 


1,531.49 


778.54 


5,509.38 


5,488.84 


20.54 


-0- 


4,358.63 


4.306.25 
16.534.30 


52.38 
1.604.41 


-0- 


18.917.25 


778.54 


8,959.32 


7,472.74 


1,146.58 


340.00 


20.202.ie 


20.202.18 
27.674.92 


-0- 


-0- 


29,161.50 


1,146.58 


340.00 



UNIVERSITY OF FIORIDA 



College of Education 
General Expense 
Education 
Agricultural Education 

Total College of Education 

P. K. Yonge Laboratory School 
General Expense 
Instruction 

Total P. K. Yongo Laboratory School 

College of Engineering 

General Expense 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

Total College of Engineering 

General College 

Graduate School 

College of Law 
General Expense 
Instruction 

Total College of Law 

Military Department 

Department of Music 

Athletic and Physical Education 

Sununer Sessions 

1943 Terms 

1944 Terms 

Total Sunmier Sessions 

School of Trade and Industrial Education 

1943 Term 

1944 Term 

Total School of Trade and Indus- 
trial Education 

War Training Courses 
Army Air Forces 

Army Specialized Training Program 
Officers Candidate School 

Total War Training Courses 

Total Resident Instruction 

Research 

Department Research 
Educational Research 
Agricultural Research 
Naval Stores Research 
CurxiculoDi Laboratory 
Vocational Guidance 

Total Departmental Research 

Organized Research: 

Florida Industrial and Engineering 
Experiment Station 

Agricultural Experiment Stations 
Main Station 

Vegetable Crops Laboratory 
Gladioli Investigations 
Strawberry Investigations 
Potato Investigations 
Celery Investigations 
Citrus Experlnent Station 
Everglades Experiment Station 
North Florida Experiment Station 
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station 
Watermelon i Grape Investigations 
Weather Forecasting Service 
Range Cattle Station 



8,048.36 


6,719,94 


1,328.42 


-0- 


16,872,77 


16,872.77 


-0- 


-0- 


3.625.08 


3.384,38 
26.977,09 

2,647,17 


240,70 
1.569.12 

2,021.70 


-0- 


28,546.21 


-0- 


5,866.50 


1,197.63 


48,267.57 


48.267,57 
50,914,74 

6,314,31 


-0- 


-0- 


54,134.07 


2,021.70 
2,486.60 


1,197.63 


12,062.84 


3,261.93 


8,333,48 


5,613,50 


829.54 


1,890.44 


10,071.51 


8,792,31 


826.82 


452.38 


6,628.83 


5,656,23 


476.95 


495.65 


4,151,76 


4,140,56 


11.20 


-0- 


12,860.47 


10,885,84 


825.48 


1.149.15 


54.108.89 


41.402.75 


5.456.59 


7.249,55 


28.003.14 


26.U9.14 


1.043.94 


840,06 


10,448.86 


5.441.40 


139.02 


4,868,44 


11,722.92 


8,449.09 


54.41 


3,219,42 


14,375.70 


14,375.70 
22,824.79 


-0- 


-0- 


86,098.62 


54.41 


3,219,42 


3,504.75 


3,391.15 


81.35 


32,25 


5,181,89 


4.774.61 


292.36 


114,92 


8,560.67 


7,785.18 
29,728.32 


775,49 
1,626,16 


-0- 


31,354,48 


-0- 


11,668,24 


11,361.63 
41.089,95 


306.61 
1.932.77 


-0- 


43,022.72 


-0- 



3,125,45 2,836.00 289,45 
4.476.20 4.000,00 476,20 



7.601.65 


6.836,00 
166,106,86 


76.^.65 
8,150,68 


-0- 


176,887,46 


2,629,92 


194,448,23 


171,100.23 


14,805,00 


8,543,00 


45,45 


45.45 

337,252.54 


-0- 


-0- 


371,381.14 


22,955.68 


11,172,92 


958,321.26 


856,225,00 


57.793.94 


44,501.32, 


10,618.74 


10,213,72 


405.02 


-0- 


7,537,50 


7,537.50 


-0- 


-0- 


1,821.77 


1,722.18 


99.59 


-0- 


4,511.21 


5.875.56 


333.80 


301,85 


2.549.29 


2,6i6.66 
25.965,62 


52.62, 
871.01 


-0- 


27.138.51 


591.85 


4,013.69 


2.986,40 
351,041.32 


348.37 
139,667.46 


678.92 


519,345.52 


28,636,74 


32,386,98 


25,464.34 


5,640.10 


1,282,54 


4,221.01 


3,105,62 


1,109.50 


5,89 


4,483.48 


3,984,00 


499.48 


-0- 


12,000.00 


10,030.41 


1,686.59 


283,00 


11,418.04 


9,435.83 


1,946.76 


35,45 


64,017.85 


49,823.07 


12,013.67 


2,181,11 


53,672.00 


45,590.21 


7,791.51 


290,29 


26,896.00 


19,682.29 


7,154.21 


59.50 


22,251.22 


14,504.95 


6,14b,4y 


1,600.80 


11,584.51 


7,567.72 


4,095,97 


20.82 


15,521.95 


2,330.45 


13,105.88 


85.62 


12,500.00 


7,108,81 


2,493.90 


2,897,29 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



W 



Soil Survey 

North Florida Mobile TTnltB 

Total Agricultural Experiment Stations 

Total Research 

Extension 

Agricultural Extension 
Administration 
Printing and Publications 
County Agent Work 
Boys ' Olub Work 

Home Demonstration Work , 

Food Conservation 
Nutrition 

Home Improvement , 
Clothing and Textiles 
Dairy and Animal Industry 
Farm and Home. Demonstration 
Poultry Husbandry 
Extension Schools 
Agricultural Bconomlca 
Farm Forestry 
Soil Conservation 
Emergency Farm Labor Project 
Emergency War Pood and Conservation 
Florida National Egg Laying Contest 
Continuing Appropriation Chapter 19216 

Total Agricultural Extension 

Other Extension: 

Oeneral Extension Division 
Inter-American Affairs 
Conservation Reserve 
Radio Station WRtIF 

Total Other Extension 

Total Extension 

Library and Museum 
Library 
Museum 
Doe Collection 

Total Library and Museum 

Maintenance and Supervision 
Telephone Exchange 
Janitor Service 
Grounds 
Pest Control 
Electrical Maintenance 
Heat Light and Power 
Building Maintenance 
Drake Laboratory 



Total Melnte 
Reserve Accounts 



ice and Supervision 



Duplication Department 
General University Reserve 



Total Reserve Accounts 



Total Educational and General 
Expenditures 



5,00(r.OO 


3,000,00 


1,934.70 


66.90 


19,856.43 


10,54S.C9 


7,749.54 


1,563.19 


815,254.98 


563.212.88 


213.034.56 


39,0OT.S« 


846.407.18 


592.164.91 


214.253.97 


39.988.50 


12,889.85 


9,425.47 


3,464.38 


-0- 


15,831.43 


7,101.00 


8,730.43 


-0- 


118,937,24 


107,678.70 


10,657.62 


620.98 


10,110.03 


7,168.88 


2,887.11 


54.04 


82,773.01 


74,217.26 


7,496.47 


1,059. 2S 


3,761.50 


2,585.00 


1,176.50 


-0- 


1,038.00 


1,038.00 


-0- 


-0- 


3,086.60 


2,717.20 


369.40 


-0- 


3,875.24 


3,428.15 


447.09 


-0- 


11,741.53 


9,805.60 


1,955.93 


-0- 


41,963.56 


38,853.63 


3,073.07 


36.86 


4,880.86 


3,406.00 


1,474.86 


-0- 


68.35 


-0- 


68.35 


-0- 


13,996.63 


10,578.77 


3,389.86 


28.00 


3,381.06 


1,864,00 


1,497.06 


-O- 


1,287.75 


600.00 


687.75 


-0- 


178,702.41 


99,289.18 


77,380.40 


2,032.83 


20,039.66 


19,553.8.3 


486.80 


-0- 


1,661.73 


1,625.00 


36.73 


-0- 


12,834.85 


12,834.85 
413,790.55 


-0- 


-0- 


542,861.29 


125,258.81 


3.831.93 


59,368.30 


48,194.64 


10,190.98 


982.68 


6,112.86 


5,734.66 


378.20 


-0- 


6,630.52 


4,586.13 


2,044.39 


-0- 


4,640.44 


1,245.00 

59.760.43 

473,550.96 


2,390.32 


1,005.12 


76.752.12 


15.003.89 
140,242.70 


1.987.80 


619,613.41 


5,819.73 


71,242.10 


38,874.24 


3,510.89 


28,856.97 


7,381.43 


6,898.00 


288.22 


195.21 


1,620.00 


1.620.00 
47,392.24 


-0- 


-0- 


80,243.53 


3.799.11 


29,052.18 


8,492.05 


4,204.40 


4,287.65 


-0- 


34,306.41 


29,959.14 


4,347.27 


-0- 


9,677.30 


8,535.00 


982.30 


160.00 


3,040.33 


2,542.57 


497.76 


-0- 


15,738.01 


10,647.95 


5,090.06 


-0- 


38,198.51 


9,549.09 


26,760.20 


1,889.22 


44,467.59 


33,250.04 


8,368.11 


2,849.44 


1.521.51 


1.364.03 


137.38 


20.10 


155,441.71 


100.052.22 


50.470.73 


4.918.76 


9,256.88 


6,895.08 


2,141.85 


219.95 


2,539.18 


140.80 


526.13 


1,872.25 


11,796.06 


7,035.88 


2,667.98 
493.911.88 


2.092.20 


2,775,731.97 


2.153.487.21 


128.332.88 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Schedule "B-2a-l" 



STATEMENT OF CDRREHT EXPENDITURES FOR AGRICULTURAL 
EXPERIMENT STATION FUNDS (MAIN STATION) 











Salaries 


Other 












and 


Operating 


Capital 








Total 


Wftgee 


^xp^nso 


Outlay 


Hatch Fund 






15,000.00 


14,936.12 


63.88 


-0- 








15,000.00 


15,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 


Parnell Fund 






60,000.00 


53,701.71 


4,601.61 


1,496.68 


Bankhead-Jones 


Fund 












Research 






34,782.16 


25,568.30 


7,019.15 


2,194.71 


Station Incidental 


Funds 


150,167.99 


60,034.05 


70,223.26 


19,910.66 


Main E:5perlmen 


it Sta 


tlon 


244.395.37 


•181,601.14 


57.559.54 


f ,034.69 



519.345.52 



551.041.52 



139. 667. 46 ' 



28.636.74 



Schedule "B-2A-2'' 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES OF AORICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 
(BY PROJECT, FUNDS AND OBJECT) 



Pro.lect Nac-^e c i' Prolect 

1 A Administration 

1 B Printing and Publications 

2 County Agent Work 

3 Boys Club Work 

4 Home Demonstration Work 
4 A Pood Conservation 

4 B Nutrition 

4 C Home Improvement 

4 D Clothing and Textiles 

5 Dairy and Animal Industry 

6 Farm and Home Demonstration 

8 Poultry Husbandry 

9 Extension Schools 

10 Agricultural Economics 

12 Farm Forestry 

14 Soil Conservation 

Emergency Farm Labor Project 
Bnergency War Food & Conser- 
vation 

Florida National Egg Laying 
Contest 

Continuing Appropriation 
Chapter 19216 

Total 











Other 






State 


Federal 


Salaries & 


Operating 


Capital 


Total 


Funds 


Fupds 


Wages 


Exoense 


Outlay 


12,889.85 


4,034.42 


8,655.43 


9,425.47 


3,464.36 


-0- 


15,831.43 


5,879.13 


9,952.30 


7,101.00 


8,730.43 


-0- 


118,937.24 


33,880.11 


85,057.13 


107,678.70 


10,637.62 


620.92 


10,110.03 


5,439.15 


4,670.88 


7,168.88 


2,867.11 


54.04 


62,773.01 


30,468.05 


52,304.96 


74,217.26 


7,496.47 


1,059.26 


3,761.50 


1,951.60 


1,809.90 


2,585.00 


l,176.i0 


-0- 


1,038.00 


-0- 


1,038.00 


1,038.00 


-0- 


-0- 


3,086.60 


1,644.40 


1,442.20 


2,717.20 


369.40 


-0- 


3,875.24 


1,447.09 


2,428.15 


3,428.15 


447.09 


-0- 


11,741.53 


4,135.93 


7,605.60 


9,e05.60 


1,935.93 


-0- 


41,963.56 


3,377.18 


38,586.38 


38,853.63 


3,073.07 


36.86 


4,880.86 


1,951.71 


2,929.15 


5,406.00 


1,474.86 


-0- 


68.35 


68.35 


-0- 


-0- 


68.35 


-0- 


13,996.63 


2,962.57 


11,034.06 


10,578.77 


3,389.86 


26.00 


3,381.06 


3,024.41 


356.65 


1,884.00 


1,497.06 


-0- 


1,287.75 


1,287.75 


-0- 


600.00 


687.75 


-0- 


176,702.41 


-0- 


178,702.41 


99,289.18 


77,380.40 


2,032.83 


20,039.66 


-0- 


20,039.66 


19,553.86 


485.80 


-0- 


1,661.73 


1,661.73 


-0- 


1,625.00 


36.73 


-0- 


12,8:^4.65 


12,834.85 


-0- 


12.834.85 


-0- 


-0- 


542,861.29 


116,048.43 


426.812.66 


413.790.55 


125,238.81 


3,831.93 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SUMMART OF HTOCfWlIENT FOTIDS 



Schedule "D" 



Cash on Hand 



Xduoatlonal Endowments i 

U. S. Lend Or ant of 1862 t 
(Aao-uaed by State of Florida) 
Balance, July 1, 1945 
Additions or Deductions: None 

Balanoe, June SO, 1944 

Seminary Sndowment: 

Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions i Hone 

Balance, June SO, 1944 

OnlTSrslty of Florida Share 

iaerlaan Legion Endomsent i 

Balance, July 1, 194S 
Additions or Deductions! None 

Balance, Jtme 30, 1944 

Total Educational Endovments i 

Scholarship SndowBents : 

Albert W. Ollchrlst FUnd 
Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions; None 

Balance, June SO, 1944 

Willlan Lorlng Memorial Fund 

Balance, July 1, 1945 
Additions or Deductions i None 
Balanoe, Jime 30, 1944 

Arthur E. Hamm Fund 

Balaroe, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions: None 

Balance, June 30, 1944 

DaTld Tulae Scholarship Fond: 
Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions; Hone 

Balance, June 30, 1944 

Drrld Tulee Lectureship Fund; 
Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions i None 

Balance, June SO, 1944 

Frank W. Wade Sstate P<and 

Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions; Bone 

Balance, June 30, 1944 

Ranaauer Memorial Fund 

Balance, July 1, 1943 
Additions or Deductions; None 

Balance, June 30, 1944 

Total Scholarship Kndowments t 

Total Endewnent Funds; 



156,345.97 

156.545.97 

132,126.23 

132,126.23 
66,065.11 

40,000.00 

40.000.00 
262,409.08 



147,500.00 



130,500.00 
65,250.00 



40.000.00 
252,750.00 



8.845.97 



1,626.23 

813.11 



10,000.00 






10.000.00 


10,000.00 


-0- 


3,400.00 




3.400.00 


3,400.00 


-0- 


5,000.00 




5.000.00 


5.000.00 


-0- 


5,000.00 




5.000.00 


5,000.00 
3,000.00 


-0- 


3,000.00 




3,000.00 


3,000.00 


-0- 


4,745.04 




4.745.04 


5.000.00 


1,745.04 


700.00 






700.00 


700.00 


-0- 



51. 845. 04 
294,254.18 



282,850.00 



1,745.04 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Schedule "E-1" 



STATK.INT Or UKEXPEKDEI) PLAKT r^-KBS 



Balance, July 1, 1943 

Additions : 

Student Fees for Plant Additions 
Earnings on P. W. A. Projects 

Total Additions 

Total Funds Available 

Deductions : 

Expended for Plant Additions 
{Schedule "E-la") 
Other Improvements 

Total Plant Additions 

Other Deductions: 

Retirement of Revenue Certificates 
Interest Expense 

Total Other Deductions: 

Total Deductions 

Balance, June 30, 1943 



Plant 
Additions 



',951.00 



17,770.37 



Ret l.'cment of 
Indebtedness 



4 


,65.1 


.97 
■ 9? 


5 


,517 


.89 




5, 


,517, 


,89 


12. 


,252, 


^48 



EXPENDITURES FOR PLACT AIDITIONS 



Schedule "E-la" 



130, 


, 'ISO. 07 


26, 


,886.69 


26, 


,•>(=. 69 



Sea^le Building Fund 

Improvement to Building 
yuseum Equipment 

Board of Control Funds 

Addition to Florida Union 

Total (Schedule "E-1") 



Additions to 
Existing Bldgs. 



4,654.97 
4.654.97 



157,5' 6.76 



10,000.00 
17,560.00 

27,360.00 

27,560.00 

130.216.76 



Other 
Improvements 



301.80 
561.12 



144.509.44 



3,951.00 
26. r 86. 69 



4,654.97 
862.92 



10,000.00 
17,360.00 



32.877.89 
142.469.24 



301.80 
561.12 



Schedule "E-2" 

Value of Plant July 1, 1943 

Additions during 1943-44: 

By Expendltuies fror : 

Educational and General Funds 
Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Non-Educational Funds 
Plant Funds 

Deductions : 

Decrease in Military Property due to 
Transfer by War Department 

Other Adjustn-ents : 

Increase in Property Valuations by: 
Museum Gifts and Acquirements 
Re-inventories, re-valuations, stock 
Addltio:s, etc. 

Total Net Additions for Year 

Value of Plant June 30, 1944 



STATElfENT OF INVESTIMF T IN PLANT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1944 



128,332.88 

19,668.73 

24,996.95 

5.517.89 



7,696.80 
7.869.50 



l''8,516.45 



125.000.00 
53,516.45 



l.'i.Scf .30 



10,115,679.52 



69,082.75 
10.184.762.27 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SDMKART OF LiHD 



Sch«*>l« "E-Ea" 



Acre«i^e 



ValuS 



UmVHiSITY 



Main Caminia 

P. K. Tonga Laboratory School 

Y. M. C. A. Tract at L&kB Wauberg 

Biological Laboratory Tract at 

Lake Newtnan 
City of Qalnea-rtlla Tract 



BCPKRIKBHT STATIOH 



Main Station 
Nichols Tract 
Ooldanith Tract 
Brujaley Tract 
Richbourg Tract 
Willlamaon Tract 

BRAHCH 8TATI0HS 

Citrus Station, Lake Alfred 
Everglades Station, Belle Qlade 
Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead 
North Flo Ida Station, Qulncy 
Watermelon Laboratory, Leeaburg 
Potato Laboratory, Hastings 
Tomato Let oratory, Bradenton 
Celery Laboratory, Sanford 
Range Cattle Station, Hardee County 

AGEICnLTTJRiL EXTglSIOK SERVICE 

Florida national Egg laying Contest, ChlpJ.ey 
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Austin Cai7 Memorial Forest 



320. 


126,400i00 




12.93 


9,526.40 




40. 


9,000.00 




9, 


200.00 




5. 


600.00 


145,726.40 


682.30 


65,230.00 




472. 


20,000.00 




5. 


1,300.00 




12.70 


2,000.00 




238. 


8,850.00 




160.- 


• 1.280.00 


98,660.00 


143.60 


50,000.00 




835.42 


26,000.00 




170. 


17,000.00 




658.25 


20,000.00 




.63 


260.00 




1, 


100.00 




105.42 


26,000.00 




6.50 


1,000.00 




LOOO. 


SjOOO.OO 


146,350.00 



10.415.00 



Total (Ejchlblt "E-2a") 



6965.66 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Schedule "E-2b" 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30, 1944 
INVENTORY OF BUILDINGS 



Building 
Number 



Name of Building 



Date Value 

Completed June 30. 1944 



Administrative Building 

Benton Hall 

Engineering Building 

Peabody Hall 

Library Building 

Law Building 

Language Hall 

Science Hall 

Chemistry-Pharmacy Building 

Agricultural Building 

Post Office Building 

Horticulture Building 

Experiment Station Building 

Brick Gymnasium 

Buckman Hall 

Sledd Hall 

Thomas Hall 

Infirmary 

Cafeteria and Kitchen 

Basket Ball Gymnasium 

Experiment Station Cottage 

Storage Building 

"F" Club Building 

Central Heating Plant 

Maintenance Building 

Radio Station Building 

Artillery Unit 

Poultry Houses (15) 

Engineering Storage Building 

Farm Foreman's Dwelling 

Dairy Barn 

Mule Barn 

Testing Machine Shed 

Nutrition Laboratory 

Poultry Plant Storage 
Veterinary Hospital 

Irrigation Shed 

Corn Storage & Supply House 

Machine and Implement Shed 

Supply and Storage House 

Insectary Shed 

Target Range Shed 

Horticulture Greenhouse 

Insecticide and Storage House 

Agronomy Greenhouse 

Quarantine Shed 

Entomology Greenhouse 

Biology Laboratory at Lake Newnan 

Garage and Storage House (S.D.) 

Dietitians Cottage 

Wooden Poultry Shed 

Miscellaneous Storage Building 

Animal Husbandry Cottage 

Experiment Station Farm Foreman's House 

Pump Hous e 

Service Shop 

Fertilizer Warehouse 

Tobacco Barn 

Experiment Station Barn 

Tobacco Grading House 

Cslf Barn 

Implement Warehouse 

Pharmacy Animal House 

Horticulture Tool ^^ed 

Formaldehyde Shed 

Single Greenhouse (State Plant Board) 

SpeotOeraphlc Laboratory 

Horticultirre Offices 

Strrage House 

Chemistry Greenhouse 

Garage and Storage House 

Mule Barn (Cellon Farm) 

Garage and Storehouse (State Plant Board) 

Light Shed 

Forestry Department Garage 

Rabbit House 

Farm Cottage 



1922 
1911 
1926 
1912 
1927-1931 
1914 
1912 
1909 
1927 
1912 
1928 
1927 
1909 

1905 

1329 

1905 

1931 

1912-1936 



1929 
1929 



214,000.00 
96,456.86 
115,000.00 
95,086.51 
230,000.00 
51,750.00 
111,715.39 
113,012.53 
293,626.99 
94,358.55 
3,272.00 
172,969.96 
177,085.53 
51,750.00 
135,405.71 
287,500.00 
205,000.00 
92,000.00 
93,100.00 
48,000.00 
2,400.00 
1,500.00 
5,000.00 
15,000.00 
3,000.00 
IS, 525. 00 
34,400.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
30,000.00 
2,000.00 
400 . CO 
8,500.00 
750.00 
2,000.00 
300.00 
800.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 
250.00 
100.00 
10,000.00 
1,000.00 
8,000.00 
1,000.00 
4,000.00 
3,500,00 
3,000.00 
1,200.00 
400.00 
400.00 
1,000.00 
5,000.00 
100.00 
3,000.00 
4,500.00 
600.00 
13,800.00 
2,000.00 
1,200.00 
4,000.00 
100.00 
1,400.00 
300.00 
5,000.00 
750.00 
5,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,400.00 
1,000.00 
300.00 
100.00 
1,000.00 
200.00 
600.00 
6,500.00 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



79 Agricultural Engineering Machinery Hall 

80 Brick Rifle Shed 

81 Paint and Storage Shed 

82 Greenhousea (2) 

83 Cold Storage Plant 

84 Mule Shed 

85 Rat House 

86 Cold Storage laboratory 

87 Horticulture Laboratory 

88 Fumigation House (State Plant Board) 

89 Double Greenhousea (State Plant Board) 

90 Fumigation Laboratory 

91 Ammunition House 

92 Blacksmith Shop 

93 Wagon and Storage Shed 

94 Paint Building 

95 Sewage Disposal Laboratory 

96 Hay Dryer Building 

97 East Corn Crib 

98 West Corn Crib 

99 Korthweat Corn Crib 

100 Corn Fumigation House 

101 P. K. Yonge Building 

102 P. K. Yonge Oyranasium 

103 P. K. Yonge Building 

104 Cattle, Feeding Barn 

105 Isolation Building 

106 Electrical Maintenance Building 

107 Field Crops Warehouse 

108 Com Crib 

109 Scale Shed 

110 Gasoline Pump & Storage House 

111 Florida Union Building and Annex 

112 John F. Seagle Building 

113 Hurrlcan Laboratory No. 1. 

114 Hurrlcan Laboratory No. 2 

115 Photographic Laboratory 

116 Experiment Station Farm Shop 

117 Poultry Plant (Experiment Station) 

118 Drake Laboratory Building 

119 Observatory Building 

120 Dairy Products Laboratory Building 

121 Medicinal Plants Drying House 

122 Medicinal Plant Barn 

123 Experiment Station Farm Cottage 

125 Pump "and Tool House (Plant Gardens) 

126 Pump and Tool House 

127 Stadium Press Booth 

128 Drying Shed (Experiment Station) 

129 Poultry Houses (5) 

130 New Barracks 

131 Hydraulic Laboratory 

132 n". Y. a. Workshop 

133 Caretaker's Cottage-Lake Wauberg 

134 Duncan U. Fletcher Hall 

135 Albert A. Murphree Hall 

136 Ranger's Dwelling - Austin Cary Forest 

137 Barracks (Austin Cary Forest) 

138 Instmictlon Building - Austin Cary Forest 

139 Dining Hall and Kitchen - Austin Cary Forest 

140 Garage and Bath - Austin Cary Forest 

141 Instructor's Dwelling - Austin Cary Forest 

142 Implement Shed (Experiment Station) 

143 Abattoir 

144 Recreation Building - Lake Wauberg 

145 Boat House - Lake Wauberg 

146 Pump House - Lake Wauberg 

147 Plant Instruction Field Laboratory 

148 Isolation Bam 

149 N. P. Bryan Law Library 

150 Field House 

151 General Storage Warehouse 

152 Soils Storage Warehouse 

153 Agronomy Laboratory 

154 Horticulture Greenhouse 

155 Wood Products Laboratory 

156 Engineering Experiment Station 
Physical Education Improvements 

made available through University Athletic 
Assn. Florida Field Statlum and Graham Field 

Swimming Pool 

Flood Lighting System at Florida Field Stadium 

Total Buildings at Gainesville 
Buildings at Branch Experiment Stations : 
Citrus Station, Lake Alfred 



1929 


;',800.00 




2,500.00 




75. OC 




10,000.00 




15,000.00 




■ 200.00 




1,750,00 




1,500.00 




2,100.00 




500.00 




10,000.00 




1,200.00 




1,000.00 




400.00 




600.00 




250.00 




200.00 




1,300.00 




125.00 




200.00 




200.00 




1,00'^. 00 


1932 


295,991.66 


1932 


C'.g.lOO.OO 


1922 


18,400.00 




1,100.00 




850.00 




625.00 


1940 


.'•,500.00 




IHh.OO 




100.00 




100.00 


1936 


247,384.90 


1937 


415,000.00 




500.00 




500.00 


1935 


18,400.00 


1939 


1,800.00 


1937 


6,000.00 


1957 


9,200.00 


1937 


110.00 


1937 


56,250.00 




400.00 




200.00 


1938 


2,000.00 




150.00 




75.00 


1937 


5,000.00 


1937 


800.00 




1,375.00 


1938 


1,373.10 


1938 


86,250.00 


1938 


1,000.00 


1939 


3,700.00 


1939 


• 288,996.94 


1939 


455,482.09 


1939 


3,000.00 


1939 


3,000.00 


1939 


3,200.00 


1939 


2,500.00 


1939 


2,000.00 


1939 


2,400.00 


1939 


4,000.00 


1940 


1,000.00 


1940 


8,500.00 


1940 


400,00 


1940 


100.00 


1940 


500.00 


1941 


1,500.00 


1941 


60,000.00 


1941 


;sooo.oo 


1942 


2,000,00 


1942 


750,00 


1940 


2,500,00 


1942 


9,000.00 


1942 


10,300.00 


1942 


3,500.00 


1930 


211,900.64 




32,234.01 




29,707.80 




5,322,276.17 




53,925.00 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 

Evergledes Station, Belle Glade 123 200 00 

North Florida Station, Qulncy Se'sTsioO 

S-ub-Troplcal Station, Homestead So'ftfoioo 

Watermelon Laboratory, Leesburg 11*350*00 

Potato Laboratory, Hastlnjjs e'sOoioO 

Florida National Egg-Laying Contest, Chlpley 2o'42s'o0 

Strawberry Laboratory, Plant City '74o!oO 

Vegetable Crops Laboratory, Bradenton XO 60o!oO 

Pecan Laboratory, Montlcello I'oooioo 

4-H Club Camps (Camp McQuarrle, Tlmpoochee, Cherry Lake) 3o'40o!oo 

Range Cattle Station, Hardee County ll'45o!oO 

Celery Station, Sanford 4'o75ioO 

Total Branch Station Buildings 347 188.OO 

Total Buildings 5,669,464.17 

(Schedule "E-2c") IMPROVEMENTS OTHER THAN BUILDINGS 

Heating Plant and Lines In 

Addition to Building 25 171,936.24 

Roads and Walks 134'834!69 

Whlteway System and Underground Wiring 79 147.92 

Campus Walks and Fences 7*200! 00 

Railway Spur Track 16'91o!43 

Tennis and Handball Courts 39'728!21 

Athletic Fields and Stands 14'382!75 

Campus Lawns, Shrubbery, Hedges 30 000.00 

Sprinkler and Irrigation 19'o24[31 

Improvements on Austin Cary Forest 7 391,45 

Total (Exhibit "E-2c") 520.556.00 



UNIVERSITY OF FIORIDA 



Schedule "E-2d" 



SVMMARY or EftUIPHENT INVENTORY 



Bookcases 

Beds 

Berohes 

Black Boards and Bulletin Boards 

Blankets and Bed Spreads 

Chairs 

Stools 

Cabinets, cases, trays and cupboards 

Desks 

Dressers, Washstands, Chlfforobes 

File 

Mattresses 

Stands 

Safes 

Shelving 

Sewing Machines 

Tables 

Clocks 

Miscellaneous Furniture 

Costxraers 

Floor Lamps 

Mirrors 

Pictures and Portraits 

Pillows 

Rugs 

Screens (Folding) 

Smokers 

Sofas 

Office Equipment 

Adding Machine 

Electric Fans 

Ventilators 

Typewriters 

Miscellaneous Office Equipment 



7,776.63 

17,677.04 

1,309.55 

392.71 

758.00 

81,978.72 

3,003.08 

52,468.87 

68,162.85 

5,832.51 

35,5o7.69 

17,654.09 

1,651.07 

5,946.46 

9,890.99 

383.65 

43,968.44 

1,440.92 

5,747.01 

710.93 

3,661.69 

215.67 

1,551.18 

958.25 

3,906.09 

85.39 

69.70 

4.021.76 



18,515.44 

9,095.28 

679.55 

29,417.99 

10.502.99 



376,792.94 



68,211.25 



Printing 

Mimeograph 

Mimeoscopes 

Address ographs 

Agricultural 

Electrical and Radio 

Autos, Trucks, Tractors 

Engines - Motors , 

Metals and Woodworking Machinery 

Testing Machinery 

Power Testing Plant Machinery 

Refrigerators 

Coca Cola Machines 

General Machinery 

Apparatus 

Surveying and Drawing Instruments 

Dairy 

Maps and Charts 

Models 

Charts and Lantern Slides 

Mlscroscope Slides 

Electrical Engineering 

Heating, Ovens, Burners 

Miscroscopes , Telescopes 

Physics 

Photography and Projection Films 

X-Ray Equipment 

Scientific 

Laboratory Hoods 

Surgical 

Weighing 

Stop Watches 

Miscellaneous Apparatus 

Miscellaneous 



10,116.00 

4,377.99 

375.00 

1,303.97 

10,368.10 

64,265.35 

18,932.40 

43,692.83 

25,199.67 

2,271.61 

8,918.11 

21,456.24 

2,677.50 

19,065.45 



11,565.38 

235.58 

3,209.35 

6,493.47 

12,063.61 

2,424.10 

100,273.07 

12,858.48 

33,249.34 

11,942.88 

29,359.49 

2,629.05 

57,904.31 

14,174.52 

5,883.30 

14,678.43 

885.92 

382.46 



233,020.22 



320.212.74 



Wirxiow Shades and Blinds 

Kitchen and Dlnin^ Room Equipment 

Flooring, Linoleum, Tile 

Miscellaneous Equipment 

Sta^e and Staje Li^htin^ Equipment 

Plumbing 

Glee Club 

Musical Band Instruments 



8,385.05 
27,7h4.87 
8,354.37 
4,628.57 
2,519.87 
3,219.72 
251.50 
3,434.70 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1944 



Pipe Organ and Pianos 

Playground Equipment 

Game and Pool Room Equipment 

Fire Extinguishers 

Livestock 

Heating Plant Boilers 

Heating Plant Distribution 

Electric Feeder Line 

Laddert 

Band Dnl forms 

Doe Pars or ^s Museum 

Military 

Books 

Broadcasting Equipment 

Museum-Seagle Building 

Experiment Station 

Equipment 

Books 

Livestock 



61,114.40 

6,608.33 

1,266.83 

1,812.94 

3,780.00 

29,952.83 

4,462.94 

331.13 

447.55 

3,503.65 

77,544.03 

119,685.00 

447,766.83 

95,816.00 

469,822.79 



992,612.67 

144,266.98 

76,230.00 



1,382,493.90 



1,213,109.65 



Total Equipment Inventory 



3,593,840.70 



- 


' :,-ARY STA 


-ElffiNT 


OF OPERATIONS ( 


)} AGENCY FUNDS 






E;.hlbit "I" 
















Balances 


Income 


Total Income 


Disbursements 


Balances 




J'-ly 1, 


1943 


1943-44 


1943-44 


1943-44 


June 30, 1944 


Room Reservations 


3,075 


50 


3,770.00 


6,845.50 


2,725.00 


4,120.50 


University Incidentals 


-0- 




629,993.53 


629,993.53 


629,993.53 


-0- 


Station Incidentals 


-0- 




148,410.53 


148,410.53 


148,410.53 


-0- 


Laboratory Breakage 


2,486 


40 


1,515.00 


4,00] .40 


2,056.07 


1,945.33 


Cash Deposits 


15,401 


<2 


125,071.27 


140,472.69 


128,489.99 


11,982.70 


Swlmmin^ Pool and Locker Fees 


2,200 


50 


14,352.24 


16,612.74 


16,602.13 


10.61 


Victory Tax Account 


1,131 


60 


650.50 


1,762.10 


1,782.10 


-0- 


With'.-oliir^-Tax Account 


-0- 




2,195.30 


2,195.30 


2,195.30 


-0- 


P. W. A. Dornltory Projects 


-0- 




26,886.69 


26,836.69 


26,886.69 


-0- 


Total Ajjency Funds 


24,355 


42 


952,;i',f .06 


977,200.48 


959,141.34 


18,059.14 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 



University Directory 

1944-1945 

PART 1 - STUDENTS 




Vol. XXXIX Series 1, No. 10 



Oetober 1, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class mattei', 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



« «" " <j i 



The University Directory is published in two parts. 

Part I contains information concerning students. 

Part II contains information concerning faculty and employees. 



OFFICERS OF THE STUDENT BODY 

Student Senate Officers 

President » . . » , = » . . . William E. Rion 

Secretary-Treasurer . . « . „ . » . . . William R. Colson 

Members of the Student Senate 

College of Agriculture . . . » . = Eugene R. Felton 

Manuel Pomar 
College of Arts and Sciences .., « o,... Walter C. Kelly- 
David A. Martin 
Walter H. Schuller 

College of Business Administration ,., William B. Caldwell 

College of Education Joe G. Graham 

College of Engineering , James C. Bryan 

Donal 0. Gallentlne 

College of Law , John A. Murray 

Wilkie J. Schell 
Marcia L. Whitney 

General College Edwin R . Brownell 

Henry W. Evans 

William C. Graves 

Arthur H. Hillman 

John E. Walker 

W, Arllng Whittlngton 

PL' PLICATIONS 

Alligator 

Editor-in-Chief Edward L. Kelly 

Managing Editor John E„ Walker 

Business Manager . William B. Caldwell 

Board of Student Publications 
Walter C. Kelly James J. Bowe Albert C. Solnok 

LYCEUM COUNCIL 

Chairman o « Eugene Barof f 

Members ° David A. Martin 

Jerry W. Gaddum 

ATHLETIC BOARD 

Chairman Kenneth E. Hartsaw 

Members . » William H. Wynne 

° Wo Arllng Whlttingto; 



OFFICERS OF THE STUDENT BODY 

HONOR COURT 

Chancellor . . . . , » . . . . » ■....» .Samuel L. Payne 

Clerk . . o o George L. Woss 

College of Agriculture Hernan Bascunan 

College of Arts and Sciences H. Tom Broadstreet , Jr. 

College of Business Administration Albert J. Beer 

College of Education ., Sigsbee C. Prirce 

College of Engineering ...o Charles M. Hunt,Jro 

College of Law „ Louis Safer 

College of Pharmacy o ... ... c James D. Hendrix 

General College Andrew E. Potter 



INTER-FRATERNITY CONFERENCE 

Chairman Walter C . Kelly 

Secretary-Treasurer John B . Benton 



Fraternity Address 

Alpha Tau Omega 311 S. Ninth St. 

Beta Theta Pi 1351 W. Masonic 

Delta Tau Delta 2154 W. University 

Kappa Alpha 1770 W. University 

Kappa Sigma 141 S. Ninth St. 

Phi Delta Theta 239 S. Ninth St. 

Phi Gamma Delta 415 S. Ninth St. 

Phi Kappa Tau 1433 W. Masonic 

Pi Kappa Alpha 1482 W. University 

Pi Kappa Phi 1469 W. University 

Pi Lambda Phi 2050 W. University 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1483 W. University 

Sigma Chi 2030 W. University 

Sigma Nu 221 1^ V/, University 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 1456 W. University 

Theta Chi 1353 W. Union St. 



Inactive Fraternities 

Alpha Gamma Rho 
Chi Phi 
Delta Chi 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Tau Epsilon Phi 



Phone President 

367 Lawrence B. Roe 

311 Herman A. Lee 

9147 John R. Boling, Jr. 

1014 H. Tom Broadstreet, Jr. 

310 Starke Shelby 

228 William E. Rion 

1848 Charles E. Riggs 

1892 Walter C. Kelly 

1660 William D. Mills 

9142 Charles M. Hunt, Jr. 

925 Paul So Furmar 

380 William R. Colsor 

667 Paul B. Acosta, Jr, 
William Ho Williams 

803 James L. Smitl 

9154 C. Joe Adkins, Jv* 



PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY FRATERNITIES 



Alpha Spsilon Delta — Honorary Pre-medlcal Fraternity 

Alpha Kappa Psl — Professional Business Fraternity 

Alpha Phi Omega — Honorary Service Fraternity 

Alpha Psi Omega -- Dramatics Honorary Fraternity 

Alpha Tau Alpha -- Honorary Agricultural Teachers Fraternity 

Alpha Zeta — Honorary Agricultviral Fraternity 

Beta Alpha Psi -- National Honorary and Professional Accounting 

Fraternity 
Beta Gamma Sigma -- Honorary Commercial Fraternity 
Florida Blue Key -- Honorary Activity Fraternity 
Gamma Sigma Epsilon -- Honorary Chemical Fraternity 
Gargoyle Club — Honorary Architectural Fraternity 
Kappa Delta Pi -- Honorary Teachers Fraternity 
Kappa Kappa Psi -- Honorary Band Fraternity 
Los Picaros — Honorary Spanish Fraternity 
Phi Alpha Delta — Honorary Law Fraternity 
Phi Beta Kappa -- Honorary Scholastic Fraternity 
Phi Delta Phi -- Honorary Law Fraternity 
Phi Eta Sigma -- Honorary Freshman Scholastic Fraternity 
Phi Kappa Phi -- Honorary Scholastic Fraternity 
Phi Sigma — Honorary Biological Fraternity 
Pi Gamma Mu -- Honorary Social Science Fraternity 
Rho Chi — Honora]?y Pharmacy Fraternity 
Scabbard and Blade — Honorary Military Fraternity 
Sigma Delta Chi — Professional Journalistic Fraternity 
Sigma Tau -- Honorary Engineering Fraternity 
Sigma Xi — Honorary Scientific Research Fraternity 
Tau Kappa Alpha — Honor ai^ Debating Fraternity 
Thyrsus — Honorary Horticulture Fraternity 



CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

Agricultural Club — Agricultiiral Discussion Society 

American Chemical Society -- Student Affiliates 

A, I. Ch. E. -- American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

(Student Branch) 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers (Student Branch) 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Student Branch) 
American Society of Civil Engineers (Student Branch) 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (Student Branch) 
Bacchus — Freshman Social Society 
Baptist Student Union 

Benton Engineering Society — Literary Engineering Society 
Bishop Barry Club -- Catholic Student Group 
Block and Bridal Club 
Cavaliers — Social Society 
Colonels — "Social Law Society 

Crane Hall (Newman Club) Catholic Student Group 
Debate Club — Student DebatiiTg Society 



CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 



English Club — Literary Society- 
Episcopal Vestry — Episcopal Student Group 
"F" Club -- Athletic Society 

F, F. A. -- Agricultural, Collegiate Chapter 
Pine Arts Club — Architect\iral Society 
Florida Players — Dramatic Organization 
Forestry Club 

Fourth Estate Club -- Journalism Society 
Gator Pep Club 
Glee Club 

International Relations Club 
John Marshall Bar Association -- Junior Members of State Bar 

Association 
Kappa Epsilon Society -- Pharmacy Society for Women 
Language and Literature Club 
L' Apache Club — Social Club 
Leigh Chemical Society 
Mask and Blade -- Fencing Society 
Mortar and Pestle — Pharmacy Literary Society 
Newell Entomological Society 
Pirates — Social Society 
Presbyterian Student Session 
Press Club -- Journalistic Society 
Society for Advancement of Management 
Wesley Foundation (Methodist) 
White Friars — Social Society 
Yovmg Men's Christian Association 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS: If your address and telephone number are not listed 
correctly, please notify the Office of the Registrar, 110 Language Hall. 



The information below is given in the following order: Name 
or School - Gainesville Address - Telephone Number, 



College 



The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 indicate freshman, sophomore, junior, senior 
and special students, respectively, except for the College of Law where 1 2 ' 
and 3 indicate freshman, junior, and senior, respectively. ' ' 

A -- School 6f Architecture and Allied Arts 

AS-- College of Arts arid Sciences 

AG-- College of Agriculture 

B — College of Business Administration 

E -- College of Engineering 

ED-- College of Ekiucatlon 

FY — School of Forestry 

G -- Graduate School 

GC — General College 

L -- College of Law 

P -- School of Pharmacy 



AMAN HINTON ANDREW JR 2GC 
1415 W MASONIC 



AMOS JOHN BtVERLY 



16 C 



ABBOTT JOHN GRAVES IGC 
K A HOUSE 

ACOSTA PAUL B JR 2GC 

S C H U S E 

AGREE RICHARD M IGC 



ANSBACHER JORDAN J IGC 
381 MURPHREE 

ANSBACHER LEWIS IGC 

381 MURPHREE 

APPLEYARD THOMAS J IGC 



ADAIR HAROLD LEROY IGC 
382 MURPHREE 



ADAMS COURTLAND S IGC 
208 FLETCHER 



ADAMS ROGER L 2GC 

330 MURPHREE 



ADKINS CEPHAS JOE JR 3AS 
449R0UXST 198J 



ADKISON HARRY M IGC 

CLOHOUSE 913 



ADLER SIDNEY IGC 

338 MURPHREE 



AGNER WILLIAM MARTIN IGC 
358 MURPHREE 



ARANT THOMAS J JR IGC 
294 FLETCHER 

ARCHER ROSS STEWART IGC 
3 74 MURPHREE 

ARRIETALUISA 2QC 

FLETCHER 

AROSEMENA MANUEL H 3 E 
212 FLETVHER 

ASENJO JOSEPH ALBERT IGC 
362 MURPHREE 

AVILES JOSEPH IGC 

312 FLETCHER 

AZARGUYSyLVIO 4 8 

228 FERNDALE RO 



AKERMAN frank BRUCE IGC 
296 FLETCHER 



ALLEN JOHN SHAW JR IGC 
275 FLETCHER 



8 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



BAILEY JOHN MATTHEWS IGC 
DAIRY BARN 



BAILEY REGINALD D 
1333 W ARLINGTON 



BAMBERG HENRY IVAN 
265 FLETCHER 

BARKER JACK M 
S P E HOUSE 



BAROFF EUGENE 
P K T HOUSE 

BARR LEAL G JR 
393 MURPHREE 

BARRINGTON HUGH H 
1158 W ARLINGTON 

BARROW REUBEN R 
247 FLETCHER 

BARRY RAYMOND L 
255 FLETCHER 



4E D 
1 39 W 



BAKER DAVID LEWIS JR IGC 
P K T HOUSE 

BAKER ROBERT SIDNEY IGC 
293 FLETCHER 

BAKER WILLIAM JOHN IGC 
376 MURPHREE 

BALL OSCAR HARRIS 1 L 
P D T HOUSE 

BALMONO JOHN RICHARD IGC 
390 FLETCHER 



IGC 



26 C 
803 



BARNES CASPER WM JR IGC 
215 FLETCHER 



BATES MARTHA INEZ 
1250 W MASONIC 

BEER ALBERT JACK 
306 FLETCHER 



3G C 
IGC 
16 C 
IGC 
36 C 



BARRY RICHARD WILLIAM 36C 
304 FLETCHER 

BARTLETT HOWARD WM 16C 
304 MURPHREE 

BASCUNAN HERNAN 3AG 

K A HOUSE 

BASH ROBERT LEE 36C 

326 FLETCHER 

BASSETT JERRY WILLIAM 3 B 
WHITE HOUSE H0TE3 



3A G 
4 B 



BEJANO PIERRE ABRAHAM IGC 
273 FLETCHER 



BELDEN DOUGLAS RAY 
386 MURPHREE 



IGC 



BELL CHARLES ROBERT IGC 
385 MURPHREE 



BELL WILLIAM REED 
356 MURPHREE 



IGC 



BENJAMIN EDWARD WADE IGC 
D T D HOUSE 



BENNETT JOSH C JR 
250 FLETCHER 



3 A 



BENTON JOHN ALBERT JR 4AS 
SCHOUSE 667 



BIE NORMAN 
K A HOUSE 

BISHOP HOWARD W 
2035 W COLUMBIA 



BLACK ROBERT L 111 
938 E UNIV AVE 



ONNER DAVID GEO R 



IGC 
G 



BISHOP ROBERT PAYSON IGC 
276 FLETCHER 



16 C 
5 1 



BLAKE ROBERT GEORGE G 
RT 2 BOX 2 5 

BLALOCK CARROLL S JR IGC 
245 FLETCHER 

BLESS ROBERT CHARLES IGC 
41637THST 729M 

BLITCH FENTON A IGC 

261 FLETCHER 

BLUM CHARLES WM JR 3GC 
S A E HOUSE 

BOATWRIGHT OTTIS E IGC 
2533 UNIV STAT 

BOLING JOHN RADFORD 4AS 
D T D HOUSE 

BONEY JAMES WM JR 26C 
227 WASHINGTON S3 

BONGIOVANNI JOSE P G 

2493 UNIV STAT 



IGC 



BOSTAIN RICHARD H JR IGC 
215 FLETCHER 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



BOWE JAMES JOSEPH 
S A E HOUSE 



2G C 



J A ME 
H US 



ARTHUR 



i§ 



BOWYER BENNY 
A T HOUSE 



BOYETTE STANCEL L 
347 MURPHREE 



BRAUN DAVID MARTIN 
284 FLETCHER 



BRONNER ROBERT 
361 MURPHREE 



BROOKS RICHARD L 
NEWBERRY FLA 



BROWN GEORGE EARL 
2 29 FLETCHER 



BROWN LINCOLN 
292 FLETCHER 



BROWNELL EDWIN R 
P BOX 2862 



eruSH JAMES EARL 
FLETCHER 



BUSH WILLARD 
314 FLETCHER 



2 G C 



1 G C 



BOYETTE TRUEMAN EARL IGC 
347 MURPHREE 

BRANTLEY JAMES QUINN IGC 
288 FLETCHER 



3 A S 



BROADSTREET HENRy JR 3AS 
316 FLETCHER 



IGC 
4 A G 
IGC 
IGC 
2 G C 



BRYAN JAMESCLIFTON 4 E 
HIBISCUS PARK 529W 



BRYAN RICHARD THOMAS 2GC 
K A HOUSE 



BRYAN WM JOSEPH IGC 

204 FLETCHER 



BRYANT FREDERICK D 1 L 
642 W BOULEVARD 



BRYANT WM T 
HASTINGS FLA 



BUCK ROBERT CLYBURN IGC 
RT 1 BOX 280 



BUNCH DONALD ROLLIN IGC 
355 MURPHREE 



BURRIS JOSEPH EDWARD 26C 
S C HOUSE 



IGC 
IGC 



CABRERA ANTONIO R 
P K T HOUSE 



2G C 



CADDELL MARION C JR IGC 
S A E HOUSE 

CALDWELL WM BROWN JR 4 B 
S A E HOUSE 

CAMERON EWEN KEITH 4 E 

1 006 WUNION 1342W 



CAMERON JAMES W 
S P E HOUSE 

CAMPBELL DOUGLAS 
N A STAT JACKVILLE 

CAMPBELL RICHARD K 
14 15 W MASONIC 



2G C 
8 03 



IGC 



CARLSON FLORIDA MAY 2GC 
1306 WUNION 1204 M 



CARLTON WILLIAM A 
S A E HOUSE 

CARNEY RICHARD S 
271 FLETCHER 

CARRAWAY SIDNEY M 
287 FLETCHER 

CARSON RUBY LEACH 
413 MURPHREE 

CARTE BALLARD S JR 
389 MURPHREE 

GATES JOHN DONALD 



CAZIN LEON S JR 
298 FLETCHER 

CHACE JAMES E 
1228 KENTUCKY A.VE 



IGC 
IGC 
2G C 

6 
IGC 

6 
IG G 
1 L 



CHANDLER WILLIAM HUGH 3 L 
610 SOUTH 8TH* ST 

CHARLESWORTH ARTHUR R G 
133R0UXST 746R 



CHELLMAN CHARLES W 
233 FLETCHER 



IGC 



10 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



CHENEY HOWARD EUELL IGC 
262 FLETCHER 

CHERRY FLOYD B 3GC 

LAKE BUTLER FLA 

CHESSER JOE EARL IGC 

MURPHREE 

CLARK AVON GILLIAM IGC 
282 FLETCHER 

CLARK ROBERT I 3GC 

212 FLETCHER 

CLARK PHILLIP A 3GC 

T D HOUSE 

CLAYTON JAMES E IGC 

526 N FRANKLIN 

CLEMENTS LOWELL JR 2GC 
233 FLETCHER 

CLEMONS JOHN ELTON IGC 
544 SOUTH 8TH ST 

CLEVELAND ERLE P 2GC 

219 FLETCHER 

COARSEY JAMES M JR 3AG 
K A HOUSE 

COCHRAN JOSE.PH L IGC 

SCHOUSE 667 

COGGlNS JACK THOMAS IGC 
253 FLETCHER 



COHEN ROKALO 
225 FLETCHER 

COLSON WM REDMOND 
S A E HOUSE 



IG C 
3A S 



COMBS CHARLES CLEMENT G 
HIGH SPRINGS FLA 



CONE JOHN LEONARD 
2411 UNIV STAT 



IGC 



CONKLING FREDERIC E IGC 
368 MURPHREE 

CONNJROY IGC 

261 FLETCHER 

CONNER ROBERT M JR IGC 
375 MURPHREE 

COVERSTON DELPhENE E 2 L 
1145 W UNIV AVE 



COVINGTON WM N JR 
332 MURPHREE 



IGC 



^'i ru8^r« 



T J R 



COX WINTON FRASIER 
P K T HOUSE 



CRIBBINS PAUL DAY 
408 WASHINGTON 



CROPPER DAVID 
1606 W UNIV AVE 



IGC 
2G C 



IGC 
6 5 7 



4 A S 



CROPPER RAYMOND C JR IGC 
209 FLETCHER 



CROSS JAMES EMORY 
2701 UNIV STAT 



CROWLEY WILLIAM J 
P K Y N G E 



3 L 



4 A G 



CROZIER ORVILLE LOUIS 1 L 
4304 NORTH 9TH ST 18 18* 



CRUM ROBERT WARREN 
A T HOUSE 



CURRY WILLIAM BRUCE 
380 MURPHREE 



IGC 
IGC 



D 



DALE JACK KYLE 
CHEMISTRY BLDG 



DAMPIER HORACE STEVE 16C 
S P E HOUSE 



DANIEL JAMES NIXON 
208 FLETCHER 



IGC 



DANIEL ROBERT LELANO IGC 
391 MURPHREE 



OAVIES ERNEST A JR 
236 FLETCHER 



IGC 



DAVIS EDGAR LAWRENCE 3GC 
S A E HOUSE 



DAVIS LEO VANCE JR 
285 FLETCHER 



DAVIS PAUL E JR 
K S HOUSE 



DAVIS RODNEY HALL 
226 FLETCHER 



DEAN LESTER HAROLD 
PI K A HOUSE 



IGC 



3G C 
310 



IGC' 



IGC 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



11 



OEARMONA ARY «I0SEPH IGC 
CRANE HALL 

DELGADO CONRAO J JR IGC 
277 FLETCHER 

OELGAOO SALVADOR 3QC 

233 FLETCHER 

DELL RALPH CLIFTON 3 L 
1158 M ARLINGTON 

DENNIS FREDERICK A IGC 
295 F LE T OHE R 

DENNIS NORMAN MCLEOD 3AG 
1065 E SEMINARY 



DENNIS W KBE HAMPTON 
A T HOUSE 



OIXON ROBERT EARL 
530 E CHURCH 

DODGE RUGGLES L 
PKTHOUSE 



DOUGLASS LEONARD A 
262 FLETCHER 



DOYLE JAMES V JR 
359 FURPHREE 



OUGGAR J LAVELL 
388 MURPHREE 



2G C 



DESMOND THADDEU8 AMO IGC 
263 FLETCHER 

DESVERGERS WM JEAN IGC 
3 78 MURPHREE 

OINNICK GEORGE M 2GC 

S C HOUSE 

DISALVO ANTONIO IGC 

336 MURPHREE 

DIXON CHARLES EMIL J R IGC 
388 MURPHREE 



IGC 
2G C 



DONALDSON CHARLES Z IGC 
FLETCHER 

DOUGLAS EDWARD LAMAR IGC 
2664 UNIV STAT 



IGC 



DOiLING JOHN ED*ARD IGC 
P T HOUSE 



IG C 



OUBLER RALPH FRANCIS 4AG 
2 18 NORTH 9TH ST 



IGC 



DURRANCE RUTH DUNN 1 L 
1235 «» ARLINGTON 1072 



OYER JAMES AUGUSTA 
248 FLETCHER 



2G C 



EANETT DONALD JOSEPH 2 L 

2050 W UNIV AVE 925 

EAODY KENNETH MCINNIS 2GC 
1243 W UNION ST 



EASSA JACK JOE 
346 MURPHREE 



IGC 
2G C 
EDWARDS WARREN LAMAR ICC 



ECHOLS KENNETH 
1243 W UNION 



EGAN GERALD JOHN jR 2GC 
8C 'house 667 

EICHNER ARTHUR IRVING IGC 
341 MURPHREE 

ELLIOT ROBERT THOMAS IGC 
378 MURPHREE 

EMERSON DAVID LEE JR G 
5 39 WASHINGTON 

EMERSON JACK DREW 4AS 



ENGLISH GEORGE W III IGC 

ENSIGN LORING SABIN IGC 
9 49 W UNIV AVE 

EPSTEIN EDMOND JEROME IGC 
267 FLETCHER 



ESSLINQER RICHARD W 
K A HOUSE 

EVANS HENRY WESTON 
141 SO»TH 9TH ST 



IG C 

3C, C 



FARBER DANIEL 
PI L P HOUSE 



2G C 



FARNELL WENDELL EARL IGC 
228 FLETCHER 



12 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



FARR EARL ORAYTON JR IGC 
K S HOUSE 



FARRIOR J REX 
347 MURPHREE 



IGC 



FELTON EUGENE ROBERT 4AG 
ATOHOUSE 367 



FERGUSON VERNON R 
1634 * UNIV AVE 



4 A G 



FETNER STEPHEN R jR 3 L 
1351 W ARLINGTON 184X 

FILER WARREN OEBREUIL IGC 



FINK ABRAHAM IRA 
PI L P HOUSE 

FLEET ERWIN 
328 FLETCHER 



FLYNN JOHN JOSEPH 
327 FLETCHER 



FORD JOHN HUFF 
240 FLETHCER 

FORD MANSEN M 
CRANE HALL 



2G C 
IGC 



FLEISCHMAN DEAN LEHRE 4 B 
535 ROUX ST 

FLEMING BENJAMIN A 3GC 
K A HOUSE 

FLEMING HARRY D JR 3GC 
S A E HQUSE 

FLETCHER RICHARD D IGC 
2542UNIVST8T 

FLORRIO LESTER H JR IGC 
253 FLETCHER 

FLOYD SAMUEL FULTON 2GC 
5 33 ROUX 



16 C 



FOGARTy jerry EUGENE IGC 
A T HOUSE 

FOKES JAMES CHASTAIN IGC 
244 FLETHCER 

FORBES ROBERT GRABLE IGC 
M URPHREE 



2G C 
2G C 
FOREHAND TILLMAN C IGC 



FOWLER JOHN 
295 FLETCHER 



FREEMAN NEIL W JR 
OCALA FLA 



FRENCH CHARLES D 
14 35 SEMINOLE 



IGC 

6 



IGC 

1 1 02 J 



FRUCHTmAN SAUL JOSEPH IGC 
1034 W UNIV 



FRENCH DAVID ROBERT 
PI K A HOUSE 



2G C 



FURMAN PAUL 8ANF0RD 2GC 
PI L P HOUSE 



FUSSELL CHARLES J 
350 MURPHREE 



IGC 



FUTCH MACK SJSTRUNK IGC 
249 FLETHCER 



GADDUM JERRY WILLIAM 4AS 
HIBISCUS PARK 318M 

GAINES J PENDLETON JR IGC 
333 MURPHREE 

GALATIS TED PETER 3 L 
T C HOUSE 

GALBRAITH LAURA H G 

HIGH SPRINGS FLA 

GALE DONALD MASON IGC 
237 FLETCHER 

GALE JOHN RICHARD IGC 
2 32 FLETCHER 

GALLENTINE DONAL 3 E 
C L HOUSE 

GANG OviD RAYMOND 4 E 
1543 ORANDAGO PL 

GARRETT JAMES S ICC 

226 FLETCHER 

GAY WILLIAM WILEY IGC 
326 FLETCHER 

GEIGER HARVEY A IGC 



FORSLING WALTER CARL IGC 
3 09 FLETCHER 



GEROW GEORGE R JR 
215 FLETCHER 



IGC 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



13 



GIOOENSEARLA IGC 

14 15 W MASONIC 

GIE8E N0R8ERT JOHN IGC 
FLETCHER 

GILLESPIE GEORGE. F JR IGC 
2 16 FLETCHER 

GILMARTIN WM HUGH JR 360 
175 MURPHREE 



GODDARD CAREY F 
PINE PARK 



GOYER JOSEPH IVAN 
322 ROUX ST 

GRAFTON FRANCIS R 
343 MURPHREE 



GRAVES WILLIAM C 
FLETCHER 



GRAY JOHN WESLEY 



GREENBERG JEROME 
269 FLETCHER 

GREENE CLEVELAND R 
8 P E H U E 

GREZ PATRICIO 
FLETCHER 

GROOVER CHARLES WM 
351 MURPHREE 



GUERRA AUGU8T0 
FLETCHER 

GUERRA LUIS 
2882 UNIV8TAT 

GUILFORD HAROLD E 
332 MURPHREE 



3 L 



G0EHRIN6 WM FREDERICK 3 E 
P G D HOUSE 

GOIN COLEMAN JETT Q 

1786 W CHURCH 

GOULDING CHARLES E 6 

15 09 W MECHANIC 



3E 
IGC 



GRAHAM JOSEPH GRAYOON 3E0 
333 MURPHREE 



IG C 
16 C 

aG c 

16 C 
26 C 
16 C 



GROVES FLETCHER L JR 16C 
389 MURPHREE 



36 C 
3 E 

16 C 



GURR OLIVE VALILLIA 6 
MELROSE FLA 



H 



HAAS MARVIN JOEL 
265 FLETCHER 

HAODAO EUGENE 
P D T HOUSE 

HALEY THOMA 8 JOHN 
1515 W COURT 

HALL BRADY BARNETT 
MURPHREE 

HALL KENNETH RAY 
283 FLETCHER 



HAMILTON JAMES K 
282 FLETCHER 

HAMILTON WM HENRY 
340 MURPHREE 



16C 



36 C 
228 



16 C 
160 



HALL WILLIAM PhI FER 36 C 

AT0H9USE 367 



HAMILTON ABDIE V 
707 80MTH 7TH 8T 



3A 6 

16 C 
16 C 



HANCOCK RUBERT CARL 16C 
260 FLETCHER 

HANCOCK WM RUSSELL tSC 

KSHOUSE 310 

HANOLEY WM BOiYER 16C 

234 RAY ST 1096J 

HANSEN JERRY ANTON JR 36C 

1606 W UN I V AVE 347 

HAR6RAVE JOHN ROLFS ItC 
227 FLETCHER 

HARPER CLEMENTS L JR e 
JACKSONVILLE FLA 



HARRIS JOE WORTH 
PI K A HOUSE 



4 8 



HARRIS WILLIAM ELMER 16C 
K A HOUSE 



HARTMAN DORIS MAE 
1306 W UNION 



3 L 



HARTRI96E THEODORE JR 16C 
S A E HOUSE 



HARTSAw KENNETH E 
A T e HOUSE 



36 
367 



14 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



harvey jess andrew igc 
249 Fletcher 

harvey john hkuce igc 

K !> 1-. U S E 

HASKINS HAROLU RAY IGC 
31b FLETCHER 

HUSTON JAMES R JR IGC 
31.8 FLETCHER 

HASTYNORMAN IGC 

STATE THEATRE 

HAVEN NED LEROY 2GC 

532 ROuX ST 

HAYWARD ANDREW J 2 L 

291 FLETCHER 

HEALD CARGYLT ELLIOT 2GC 
A T HOUSE 



HEATH RICHARD LEE 
26 31 UNIV STAT 

HELMS LAFAYETTE 
T C HOUSE 



IGC 
IGC 



HENDRICKS RAIMOND L J 2GC 
A T HOUSE 367 

HENDRIX JAMES 3P 

SPEHOUSE 803 

HENSEL EARL JAMES IGC 
K A HOUSE 

HERMAN ROSELLA L G 

1321 W UNIV AVE 

HER8TE0T LESTER A 3 B 
14 56 W UNIV AVE 

HESTER GRANT BAKER IGC 
MURPHREE 

HEWLETT THOMAS WM IGC 
A T HOUSE 

HE WELL JOSEPH E JR IGC 
2564 UNIV STAT 

HEWETT ERNEST JAMES 1 l 
283 FLETCHER 

HICKS STEPHEN B IGC 

SAEHUUSE 380 

HICKS Th;;MAS WILLIAM IGC 
F L E 1 CHER 



H i L L M A N A « T H U K H 2 G C 

20 SOW UNIV AVE 



H I L L Y E R C H A R L t ;> E II 2 G 
': C H U S F 



H I N S N JAMES W J :v IGC 
268 FLETCHER 



HOBBS RUSSFLL JR 13 



HODNETT JAMES V JR IGC 
PI K A HOUSE 

HOFFMAN WALTER V IGC 

3 38 MURPHREE 

HOFFMAN WM HARVEY JR IGC 
359 MURPHREE 



HOGAN FRANCIS VERNE 
206 FLETCHER 



IGC 



HOLBROOK HENRY LEON 2GC 

2 5 2 FLETCHER 

HiiLOER ELLIS W IGC 

P0B0X296 801M 

HOLDER GEORGE L G 

SUMMERFIELD FLA 

HOLTON EMMETT A 2GC 

A T HOUSE 

HOLTSBERG IRWIN S 2GC 

32 3 FLETCHER 

HOLTSBERG ISIOOR H IGC 

3 28 FLETCHER 

HOLZ EUGENE RUSSELL 3 E 
362 MURPHREE 

HOPE WM HARRY JR 2GC 

PI K A HOUSE 

HORNE GEORGE LYNWOOO 2GC 
FLETCHER 

HORNSBY GEORGE ROYCE IGC 
2 79 FLETC:(ER 

HOUSHOLDER KARLYLE F 2GC 
ATOHOUSE 367 

HOWELL ROBERT EUGENE IGC 
218 FLETCHER 

HUFF CALV.N LEROY 2GC 
K SHU USE 310 



HILL EDWiN LARUE 
1616 SOUTH 9TH 



IGC 
18 32 



HUGHES EWELl i)EAN 
2 9 9 F L E T C H E fi 



IGC 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



15 



HURTADO JOSE R 
2023 LEON ST 

HUNT "HAS MORTON oR 
P< K HOUSt 

HYMAN ROBERT JEFF 
MURPHREE 



1 G C 
G 



3 E 

V 4 2 



1 G C 



IRVING JAMES GARFIELO 
1243 W UNION 



IVEY ROBERT DEWITT 
FLETCHER 



4 E 
2G C 



J p H N b N J F S S I E W 
ALACHUA FLA 

J H ^J S U N M A R 6 A K 1 C 
323 N SMITH 

•J ^' r s AMOS E 

185? North sth st 

jones len stuckey 
214 washington 

^^ONES WILLIAM LEROY 
I K A HOUSE 



JUST ER ROBE RT EDWARO 
368 MURPHREE 



IG :' 
2G C 
IG C 



JOYNER FRANKLIN PERCY 2GC 
1135 W UNION 

JULICH CHESTER NORMAN IGC 
^75 FLETCHER 



IGC 



K 



JACKSUN WILLIAM 
A T HOUSE 



J R 



JACOBS DAVID JOSEPH 
352 MURPHREE 



JACOBS GILBERT 
220 FLETCHER 



JAMES ELMER EARL 
S C HOUSE 



JARVIS THOMAS RUBEN 
MURPHREE 



JENNINGS HARRY 
371 MURPHREE 



JENNINGS THEODORL 
MICANOPY FLA 



JERNIGAN JAMES R 



JOHNS NORMAN J 
LAKE < U T L ER FLA 



JOHNSON CHARLES 
242 FLETCHER 



JOHNSON EDGAR LEO 
P \ K A HOUSE 



IGC 
3 67 

IGC 
IGC 

3 A S 

6 6 7 

2G C 
IGC 
2 G C 
IGC 
G 
IGC 



4 
16 60 



KALISHMAN SIDNEY 



KAPLAN DONALD A 
361 MURPHREE 

KARANDJEFF ROBERT H 
336 ROUX ST 



KATIBA JOSEPH 
244 FLETCHER 



J R 



JOHNSON GROVFR C 
375 MURPHREE 



J R 



2G C 



KAZMIERC2AK ADELA 
1317 W UNION 

KELLY ALLEN ELLISON 
2 542 UNIV STAT 

f-LLLY DOROTHY KEATS 
Id 68 W UNIV AVE 

KELLY EDWARD LEE 
1868 W UNIV AVE 

KELLY WALTER CLYDE 
P K T HOUSE 

KEMP NELSON HARVEY 
313 FLETCHER 

i: t N N E D Y MICHAEL J 
415 SOUTH 9TH ST 

KESSLER WILLIAM J 
HIBISCUS PARK 



IGC 
IGC 
ICC 
IGC 
4 A 
IGC 
G 
4 A S 
3 A S 
lU c 
2 3 
IGC 



16 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



KICKLleHTER CONRAD 16C 
C L HOUSE 

KING HAROLD ORMONO 16C 
222 FLETCHER 

KING WILLIAM OICKEY 3GC 
S C HOUSE 

KINLAV JOHN HANDLEY 16C 
369 MURPHREE 

KNIGHT FR»LEY BLOUNT 16C 
331 MURPHREE 

KNOBLOCK VERNER EVAN IGC 
C L HOUSE 



LEEOY GENE ROBERT 
1422 * ARLINGTON 



2G C 
1 8 35 M 



LEFFLER WM ARMSTRONG 3 E 
138 RAY ST 

LEGGETT ALBERT LEE IGC 
339 MURPHREE 

LEIBSON IRVING A 4 E 

325 FLETCHER 

LEMASTER WILLIAM A 3GC 
415 SOUTH 9TH ST 

LETCHWORTH GEORGE W IQC 
222 FLETCHER 



KOON DONALD KEITH IGC 
2533 UNIV STAT 

KOPP EOWARO CASE 16C 

K A HOUSE 

K0WAL8KE WILLIAM G IGC 
P G B HOUSE 

KOWKABANY GEORGE N 3QC 
311 FLETCHER 

KUHN WALTER PETER IGC 
MURPHREE 



LEVENSON MAURICE E IGC 
220 FLETCHER 

LEWIS RICHARD C IGC 

247 FLETCHER 

LINDSAY WALTER LEE IGC 
294 FN TCHER 

LINK HERBERT CLAYTON IGC 
2546 UNIV STAT 

LIUZZO JOSEPH ANTHONY IGC 
327 FLETCHER 

LIVINGSTON THOMAS F IGC 
32 3 W UNIV 



LACKEY HEIIftlETTA H G 

416 80UTH7TM 1729M 

LANGFORO Afi R I A N E JR 3 L 
1306WCOURT 3 35W 

LANIER WM BUCKNER JR 3 C 
ATOHOUSE 367 



LIZANO EDGAR V 
321 FLETCHER 

LLANO MANUEL 
235 FLETCHER 



LONG ST ERL I NG K 
237 FLETCHER 



3A 3 

G 



LOADHOLTES ROBERT W IGC 
348 MURPHREE 



IGC 



LAN80ALE RICHARB B 3GC 
PI K A HOUSE 

LASSITER VtNTON H 2GC 
1319 W ARLINGTON 

LAWS EBWIN SMITH IGC 

2383 UNIV STAT 



LOUTTIT AMY CLECKLER G 
541 SOUTH 9TH ST 



LOWELL VERNON C JR 
298 FLETCHER 



IGC 



LEE HERMAN ASHTON JR 1 L 
2064 UNIV STAT 



LEE JAMES G I LL I 
K S HOUSE 



LEE SIDNEY E JR 
PI K A H0U8E 



16 C 
310 



36 C 



M; 

MCBRIDE ARTHUR F 4AS 

1011 W MASONIC 

MCCALL WILEY ELI JR IGC 
2612 UNIV STAT 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



17 



MCCALLEY EDWARD WAYNE IGC 
393 MURPHREE 



MCCLENDON JAMES 
252 FLETCHER 



2 G C 



MCCONNELL DUANE F 4 E 

1006 W UNION 1342W 

MCCORKLE ROBERT COOK IGC 
3 22 FLETCHER 



MCCORMICK OAVIO V 
P D T HOUSE 



MCCORMICK HERBERT 
2 722 UNIV STAT 



MCCOY JOEL LEE 
935 N FRANKLIN 



2 G C 

3 A G 



IGC 
9 39 



MCCULLERS EDWARO C JR IGC 
305 FLETCHER 



MCDAVIO RICHMOND T 
A T HOUSE 



MCGAUGHEY RICHARD E 
214 FLETCHER 



IGC 
2 G C 
MCGHIN ANDREW JACKSON 2GC 



MCGOON DOUGLAS 
256 FLETCHER 



IGC 



MCINNIS JULIAN SCAFFE IGC 
221 FLETCHER 



MCKIM LEON B 
2325 UNIV STAT 



MCLEAN ARTHUR EDWIN 
D T D HOUSE 



MCLEAN KENNETH ROY 
364 MURPHREE 



IGC 
2G C 
IGC 



MCLEAN WM RICKERSON IGC 
382 MURPHREE 

MCLEOD ALEXANDER LEE 2GC 

SPEHOUSE 803 

MCLEOD MAURICE CARSON IGC 
385 MURPHREE 

MCMULLEN DANIEL D IGC 
K A HOUSE 

MCNULTy FRED HUGH IGC 
357 MURPHREE 

MCPHERSON GUY A IL 

1121 W COURT ST 14 00 



MACK JAMES LIONEL 
267 FLETCHER 

MAHON JOHN 6 
S A E HOUSE 

MARKHAM THOMAS R 
2354 UNIV STAT 



IGC 



IGC 
380 



2G C 



MARKS CHARLES HENRY 2GC 
323 FLETCHER 

MARTIN DAVID ADAMS 3AS 
1828 W CHURCH ST 

MARTIN JAMES WATSON IGC 

1316 W UNION 1363M 

MARTIN JOHN FLETCHER IGC 

1316WUNI0N 1363M 

MASON DONALD FULTON IGC 



MASSEY MILO CRAIG 
271 FLETCHER 



IGC 



MASTERS JOHN EUGENE 2GC 
CARE OF W R U F 



MASTROGIANAKIS N 
S P E HOUSE 



3 E 

8 03 



MATATICS DONALD EARL IGC 
264 FLETCHER 



MAUNEY JACK EARL 
390 MURPHREE 

MAY ROBERT GERALD 
233 W ORANGE 



3 A 8 
3G C 



MELTON HOLMES M JR 1 L 
251 FLETCHER 



MELVIN JOSEPH E 
286 FLETCHER 

MENDEZ GUSTAVO A 
307 FLETCHER 

MENDOZA ALBERT J 
D T D HOUSE 



2G C 
2G C 



IGC 
9 14 7 



MENTRUP CHRISTIAN R IGC 
314 FLETCHER 

MERRILL MARION DEAN 3 L 
1306 W UNION 1204 M 

METCALFE WILLIE ADELE G 
751 E UNIV AVE 



METHVIN GREGORY W 
384 MURPHREE 



IGC 



18 



STUDENT DIRECTORY. 



MICKLEJACK 16C 

382 MURPHREE 

MILLER AUSTIN ASAY IGC 



MILLER JAMES LAMAR IGC 
891 MASONIC ST 

MILLERJESSM 3A 

891 MASONIC 

MILLIGAN MYRON M IGC 

2 19 FLETCHER 

MILLING SAMUEL T JR 16C 
346 MURPHREE 

M I LL S B R 6 

MACCLENNY FLA 

MILLS RICHARD C IGC 

2 18 FLETCHER 

MILLS DM DEWBERRY IGC 
PI K A HOUSE 

MIRABELLA SAMUEL IGC 

342 MURPHREE 

MITCHELL LINUS D IGC 

365 MURPHREE 

MITCHELL WALLACE J 26C 
2 14 WASHINGTON 



MOLZ HARRY 
2 14 FLETCHER 



MORSE RICHARD F 
1540 W ORANGE 



MORTELLARO JERO 
PI K P HOUSE 



MORTELLARO PAUL A 
303 MURPHREE 



2G C 



MONTGOMERY FRANK S 6 

RT 2 HILL DALE RO 

MOOOYISAACI 3E 

1827WC0URT 480R 

MOODY RALPH EUGENE 36C 
317 FLETCHER 

MOONEY 0TTI8 ALFRED IGC 
382 MURPHREE 

MOORE WM DICKIE 16C 

349 MURPHREE 

MORGENROTH FREDERIC H 8GC 
210 FLETCHER 



4 E 
2G C 
16 C 



MOSS GEORGE LYNN 
308 FLETCHER 



MULLON WILLIAM S 
14 15 W MASONIC 



3 B 

2G C 



MUNOZ LUIS RODOLFO 5 A 
283 FLETCHER 

MURPHY JOSEPH STEPHEN 2GC 
223 FLETCHER 

MURRAY JOHN AIKEN 1 L 

SAEHOUSE 380 

MUS8EAU AOLAI ANTHONY 2GC 

227 WASHINGTON 913 



N 

NARANJO EOUAROO G 

FLETCHER 

NASRALLAH ALFRED 4FY 

408 WASHINGTON 

NASRALLAH ANDREW K JR IGC 
408 WASHINGTON 

NAVARRO VETO FRANCIS IGC 
391 UNlV STAT 



NEBI YUSUF ZIYA 
1 225 W MCCORMICK 



NELSON BRASHER P 
S A E HOUSE 



NELSON CARL ROBERT 
331 MURPHREE 

NELSON THEODOR E R 
325 FLETCHER 

NESBITT WM CLYDE 
MURPHREEE 

NEWMAN FLOYD W JR 
FLETCHER 

NEWMAN JAMES JR 
D T D HOUSE 



NOLTENIUS JULIO 
FLETCHER 

NORTON OSCAR H JR 
342 MURPHREE 



4 A 



SAG 
IGC 
IGC 
IG C 
2G C 
IGC 
NEWMAN LEONARD B JR 3 B 



IGC 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



19 



NUNEZ DEL PRAOO LUIS 3 E 
FLETCHER 



PAUL MELVIN 
335 MURPHREE 



IG C 



ODER WILLIAM GARDNER IGC 
273 FLETCHER 

ODHAM MARSHALL GLENN IGC 
3 79 MURPHREE 



ODOM BRAGG HAMPTON 
236 FLETCHER 



IGC 



ODONALD AUGUSTA MARIE G 
415 MURPHREE 

OLIVER BURTON EUGENE IGC 
FLETCHER 

OLIVER R JAIME A 3B 

280 FLETCHER 

ONEAL BENJAMIN F 2GC 

281 FLETCHER 

ONEALPATW IGC 

2 39 FLETCHER 

ORTIZ OEZEVALLOS F G 
S A E HOUSE 

OSORlOLUISA G 

218 N 9TH ST 

OS TEEN LILLIAN TAYLOR G 
16 35 »» MECHANIC 1228 



OSWALD HARRY 
384 MURPHREE 



IGC 



OWENS JAMES HERBERT IGC 
354 MURPHREE 



PAYNE RICHARD WYChE IGC 
2801 UNIV STAT 

PAYNE SAMUEL L 4B 

280 FLETCHER 

PEACOCKJO SAG 

133 WASHINGTON 

PEARLMAN MARVIN IGC 

352 MURPHREE 

PEMELMAN CHARLES R IGC 
3 72 MURPHREE 

PERO JOE HERBERT 2GC 

SAEHOUSE 3 80 

PERRINE GEORGE A IGC 

434 S VIRGINIA 1391J 

PILCHER WILLIAM J IGC 
263 FLETCHER 

PITTS CHARLES HERBERT IGC 
383 MURPHREE 

PLUMMER DALE CARLTON IGC 
312 FLETCHER 

POAGE THOMAS WARREN IGC 
FLETCHER 

POMAR MANUEL 3AG 

324 FLETCHER 

POOLE DANIEL RdY G 

WILDWOOD FLA 

POTTER ANDREW E JR 2GC 
T D HOUSE 

POWELL CHARLES MEYERS IGC 
D T D HOUSE 



PREVATT RUBERT W 
209 FLETCHER 



IGC 



PRICE WALTER FRANC'S 3AS 

PI K T HOUSE 



PAGE HOWARSP J 
C L house: 



PAINE JOSIE JONES 
16 09 W COURT 



4 A S 



PAGE JAMES HARRISON IGC 
339 MURPHREE 



2 L 

37 1 J 



PALMER KENNETH B IGC 

RT2B0X83A 1694W 



PRICHARD LOYO C 
383 MURPHREE 



IGC 



PRINCE SIGSBEE C JR lED 
53OEUNI0N 1232W 

PRITCHETT WM BERNARD 2GC 



POLLACK IRWIN 4AS 

PHYSICS DEPT 



20 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



ROBERTS HORACE 
S A E HOUSE 



QUINN JOHN 
175 MURPHREE 



B J R 



R 



RABON WILLIAM LEON 
270 FLETCHER 

RACKLEy R.UDOLPH J 
P K Y N G E 

RAMOS ENEIDA MARIA 
124 NORTH 6TH 



RANEY RAYf/IOND 
291 FLETCHER 



J R 



REAMES ELBERT LILE JR 
1023 PALM AVE 

REED LUCIAN CARROLL 
234 FLETCHER 

REEVES VERNON FRANK 



REYNOLDS GEORGE A 
1828 W CHURCH 

RHODES JOHN SERENA JR 
270 FLETCHER 

RICHARDSON CHARLES A 
2 79 FLETCHER 

RICHARDSON JAMES F 
1630 W ORANGE 

RICKENBACH RICHARD V 
P T HOUSE 

RICKETSON DONALD L 
36 3 MURPHREE 

RIGGS CHARLES EDWIN 
P G D HOUSE 

RION WILLIAM EDMUND 
PDT HOUSE 

RIVERS RALPH WILLIAM 
MELROSE FLA 

RIZNER ANDREW ROBERT 
21h FLETCHER 



1 G C 



1 G C 

3 A G 

2 G C 

IG C 

IG C 
. 7 3 R 

1 G C 

IG C 

4 A S 
1 G C 
IG C 



2-G C 

3 4 2 M 



2G C 



IG C 



4 A S 
2 28 



2 G C 



1 G C 



ROBERTSON GEORGE 
305 FLETCHER 



D J R 
C 



ROBINSON CLARENCE D 
211 FLETCHER 

ROE LAWRENCE BRADY 
A T HOUSE 



ROGERS MORGAN 
274 FLETCHER 



HOWARD 



ROMEO JOE ANTHONY 
336 MURPHREE 

ROSE JAMES KENNETH 
FLETCHER 

ROSENBERG MORTON N 
257 MURPHREE 

ROSENBERG REUBEN 
395 MURPHREE 

ROSS HUGH ABRAM III 
217 FLETCHER 

ROTH ROSEBELLE SCHER 
1213 W UNIV 

ROWELL REX 
T C H u S E 

ROUZIE THOMAS J 
S A E HOUSE 

RUSHING HOYTE OEWELL 
K A HOUSE 



RUSSAVAGE AL 
345 MURPHREE 



E R T 



SAFER LOUIS 
2050 W UNIV AVE 

SAFLEY EDNA P. EARL 
8 09 N VIRGINIA 

SAGE DAVID 
STARKE FLA 

SALMON MYRON HERZL 
225 FLETCHER 

SALTER RICHARU S 
3 '^ 1 M U R P H K E E 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



21 



SAMMON PAUL JONES JR IGC 
350 MURPHREE 



SAPP ELONZO B JR 
134 N WILSON 



SCHMIDT PHILIP K 
246 FLETCHER 



SCHNEIDER JOHN M 
1243 W UNION 



SCHRAOER HANS WM 
1239 W UNION 



IGC 



SARGENT WAYNE BRYAN IGC 
301 FLETCHER 

SAUCER CLYDE MILTON IGC 
363 MURPHREE 

SCARBOROUGH EARL M IGC 
367 MURPHREE 

SCHECHTER MORRIS M 2GC 
20 53 UNIV STAT 

SCHELL WILKIE JAY 2 L 
POTHOUSE 228 

SCHIBLEY LOREN MYRON IGC 
268 FLETCHER 

SCHOTT LEWIS MORRIS 2 L 



IGC 



SCHMIDT ROBERT JAMES IGC 
351 MURPHREE 



2G C 



SCHRADER GEORGE F 4 E 
12 39 W UNION 



4 E 



SCHULLER WALTER HARRY 3AS 
408 WASHINGTON 688W 



SCOTT ROGER DAVID 
A T HOUSE 



SCOVELL WM HAMPTON 
A T HOUSE 



SEAY WESLEY H JR 
315 FLETCHER 



SELEM RODOLFO 
293 FLETCHER 



IGC 
3 67 



2G C 
3 67 



IGC 
Q 



SELLERS R'OBERT NESBIT 2GC 
PDThOUSE 2 28 



sever john francis 
1158 w arlington 

sempson jerry 
2050 w univ ave 



2G C 



3 B 
9 25 



SHADE GEORGE ROBERT ±ac 
370 MURPHREE ^^^ 



SHADER CHARLES A 
P I L P HOUSE 



SHAW J A MES GORDON 
NEWBERRY FLA 



IGC 
9 25 



3 A 3 



SHEEHAN JOHN ALLAN IGC 
370 MURPHREE 



SHELBY STARKE 
K S HOUSE 

SHERMAN WILLIAM E 
PI K A HOUSE 



3 E 



IGC 



SHINE WM ROBERTSON JR IGC 
388 MURPHREE 

SHULTZ ORLO MILLER G 

RT 2 GAINESVILLE 



SIEGEL ROBT MURRAY 
2050 W UNIV AVE 

SILVA GASTON JOSE 
232 FLETCHER 

SILVERMAN NORMAN N 
307 FLETCHER 

SIMON GEORGE AID 
CRANE HALL 

SIMMONS LILBURN 
2324 UNIV STAT 



3 A S 



2G C 



2G C 



IG C 
833 



IG C 



SINGLETARY NORMAN E IGC 
261 FLETCHER 

SKINNER JOHN ROBERT IGC 
2154 » UNIV AVE 

SKINNER WALLIS LEE IGC 
S A E HOUSE 

SMITH ARTHUR H JR a CO 
891 « MASONIC 

SMITH BETTY LOUISE 3 L 
1145 UNION ST i7-i3t 



SMITH CLAUDE ALLEN 
256 FLETCHER 



3 G C 



SMITH EARL S 
333 MURPHREE 



jLG C 
IGC 
SMITH JAMES BRYANT IGC 



SMITH FRANCIS GLEN 
217 FLETCHER 



22 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



SMITH JAMES LUTHER 2GC 
S P E HOUSE 

SMITHJESSE IGC 

POULTRY LAB 

SMITH LESLIE D JR IGC 
378 MURPHREE 

SMITH MELVILLE S jR 4 B 
SCHOUSE 667 

SMITH ROBERT EUGENE IGC 
1321 W UNIV AVE 102 

SMITZES LOUIS JAMES IGC 
393 MURPHREE 

SOLER ENRIQUE RAFAEL IGC 
232 FLETCHER 



SOLNOK ALBERT C 
297 FLETCHER 



2 G C 



SOLOMON HENRY DOYLE 2GC 
P D T HOUSE 

SOLOMON NORMAN FRANK 3AS 
1962 HERNANDO ST 

SPARKMAN JOSEPH M 2GC 
FLETCHER 

STAFFORD CARL H 2GC 

PIKPHOUSE 9142 

STANFORD JOHN WM IGC 

355 MURPHREE HALL 

STANLIS FRANK JOHN IGC 
CARE OF W R U F 

STEBBINS JOHN L 2GC 

FLETCHER 

STEPHENS DOROTHY C G 

128RAYST 284M 



STEVENS ROBERT L 
357 MURPHREE 



2G C 



STOBBS THOMAS WILLIAM IGC 
334 MURPHREE 

STODDARD ALBERT A JR IGC 
383 MURPHREE 

STONE DONALD LEROY 2GC 
POTHOUSE 228 

STORMS DON ARTHUR 4AG 
MURPHREE 

STORMS NATHANIEL L IGC 
330 MURPHREE 



STORY JOSEPH B l|| 3 e 
214 WASHINGTON 

STRICKLAND THOMAS W G 
P K Y N G E 

SUAREZ BENNIE JOE IGC 
FLETCHER 

SUMMERFORD HAROLD W IGC 
276 FLETCHER 

SURLES JAMES THOMAS IGC 
354 MURPHREE 

SUTHERLAND JOHN HOLT IGC 
S P E HOUSE 



SUTTON PEDRO 
FLETCHER 



2 G C 



SWANSON RALPH KENNETH 2GC 
PI KT HOUSE 1895 



SYKES CLINTON K 
2154 W UNIV AVE 



2G C 



TARAPANI ABE LEON 
313 FLETCHER 



IGC 



TAYLOR CARLIS ANDREW 4AS 
CLOHOUSE 913 

TAYLOR EUGENE LESLIE IGC 
417 MURPHREE 



TAYLOR PETER J T 
383 MURPHREE 

TERRY WILLIE JACK 
329 FLETCHER 



IGC 
2 G C 



TERZENBACH HAROLD L 4AG 

1634 W UNIV AVE 9174 

THOMPSON KEAT NELSON 2GC 

RT2B0X89 443W 



THOMPSON ULDRIC JR 
2621 UNIV STAT 



2 G C 



TIMMONS DOYAL EDGAR 2GC 
2131 NORTH 9TH 683W 

TISDALE WILLIAM ALLAN IGC 
HIBISCUS PARK 1489 

TOMLINSON THOMAS 3 B 

233 E COLUMBIS 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



23 



TORRES A FERNANDO 
366 MURPHREE 

TOWNSEND RAYMOND C 
380 MURPHREE 

TRACY RICHARD PRATT 
415 SOUTH 9THST 

TRAINA LOUIS L 
296 FLETCHER 



TRAVIS ALLEN 
CL HOUSE 



J R 



TREADWELL EDGAR 
PI K A HOUSE 

TRIBBLE HENRY R 
MURPHREE 

TRULUCK JAMES MCKAY 
MURPHREE 



TUCKER WILLIAM 
K A HOUSE 



H J R 

J R 



TUCKETT NORMAN L 
1243 W UNION ST 

TURNER DAVID WILLIAM 
377 MURPHREE 

TURNER JEROME FRANK 
269 FLETCHER 



TURNER JIMMIE 
337 MURPHREE 



M R R I S 



TURNER RICHARD J 
1243 W UNION 



V 



VACA FERNANDO JOSE 

210 FLETCHER 

VALDES ELMO MANUEL 

211 FLETCHER 

VANDERHULSE KENNETH 
1039 W UNiy AVE 

VENELL DWI'GHT R 
P D T HOUSE 

VEREEN ROBERT HURN 
221 FLETCHER 

VICK CHARLES CONwAY 
PI K A HOUSE 



2 G C 
1 G C 
5 A G 
4 A S 
1 G C 

1 G C 
IG C 

2 G C 

1 G C 

2 G C 
IG C 
1 G C 
1 G C 
4 A S 



2 G C 
IG C 



IG C 
2 28 



1 G C 

2 G C 



VINCENT PAUL E 
335 MURPHREE 

VOIGT JOHN LOUIS 
PHARMACY SCHOOL 



w 



WAOKINS OSC 
2212 UNIV S 



WALDEN CLAR 
S P E HOUSE 



WALKER EOWA 
318 FLETCHE 



A R LEE 
T A 



K E 



R D K 

R 



WALKER JOHN 
S A E HOUSE 



WALKER MARI 
308 FLETCHE 



WALKER ROBE 
2672 BROOME 



WALKER ROBE 
S P E HOUSE 



ELLIOTT 



ON DONALD 
R 



R T D J R 
ST 



R T LEE 



WARD JAMES 
231 FLETCHE 



WEAVER DONA 
P K T HOUSE 



WEBSTER BRU 
356 MURPHRE 



C H E S L E R 
R 



L D RAY 



CE STUART 
E 



IG C 
G 



2 G C 
2 G C 
1 G C 



WALKER ELI GUMMING JR 2GC 
PI K P HOUSE 



WEEKS JACK BARBER 
A T HOUSE 



WEGMAN JAME 
301 FLETCHE 



WELCH WM AU 
299 FLETCHE 



S ROBERT 
R 



B R E Y 
R 



WELLS COLIN 
390 MURPHRE 



CARROLTON 



WENZEL GUST 
S A E HOUSE 



WEST DARYU 
242 FLETCHE 



AVE G 



WADE 
R 



WEST DON MAURICE 
K 8 H u S £ 



2 G C 

2G C 

G 

2G C 

2G C 

IG C 

2G C 

2G C 
3 6 7 

IG C 
IG C 
4 A S 
IG C 

1 G C 

2 G C 



24 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



WESTLING JAMES L 
A T HOUSE 



IG C 
3 67 



WHATLEY THURMAN LEROY IGC 
K A HOUSE 

WHEELER HAROLD AUSTIN IGC 
PI K A HOUSE 



WHEELER JESS H 
328 N ROPER 



3E D 



WHEELER ROBERT HENRY 2GC 
PIKPHOUSE 9142 



WHITE FRED VAUGHN 
323 FLETCHER 

WHITE JACK EDWARD 
333 MURPHREE 

WHITE LEWIS EMIL 
T D HOUSE 



2 L 

IGC 
IGC 



WHITEHEAD BUELL LEE 4 A 
10 34 W DEPOT 



WHITMORE JEAN 
1224 W MCCORMICK 

WHITMORE PATRICIA 
1224 W MCCORMICK 



2G C 



2 L 



WHITMORE THEODORE E IGC 
KSHOUSE 3 10 

WHITNEY MARCIA LOUISE 2 L 
1029 S W BTH AVE 

WHITTINGTON WILLIS A IGC 
348 MURPHREE 

WHITTLE WINTON OZIEL IGC 
387 MURPHREE 

WIOMER FREDERICK W G 

16 06 W UNIV AVE 247 

WILEE LILLIAN M 4AG 

515 S 9TH ST 

WILKINSON MARION 2GC 

D T D HOUSE 

•ILLARD ROSEBUD D G 

315 H 7TH ST 

WILLIAMS BYRON B JR 3 P 
K 8 HOUSE 



WILLIAMS CLAUDE H 
377 MURPHREE 

WILLIAMS DANIEL W 
1415 W MASONIC 



IGC 
IGC 



WILLIAMS EDWARD A JR IGC 
274 FLETCHER 

WILLIAMS JAMES K JR 2GC 
1351 W MASONIC 311 

WILLIAMS MORTON IGC 

FLETCHER 

WILLIAMS WM ALONZO 2GC 
S N HOUSE 

WILSON HAROLD C IGC 

36 6 MURPHREE 

WILSON SANTFORD R JR IGC 
343 MURPHREE 

WINSTON CORNELIUS E 3 E 

413 E COURT 

WINTON CHARLES F IGC 

213 FLETCHER 

WINTON JAMES GREEN IGC 
213 FLETCHER 

WOODLEAMON G 

233 DESOTO 

WOOD OWEN GRAY JR IGC 

414 MURPHREE 

WOOD ROY GLENN '♦AG 

FT WHITE GLA 

WOOLERY RICHARD LARRY 2GC 
PI K A HOUSE 



WOOLF SHIRLEY 
415 MURPHREE 



3 L 



WOOTEN OSCAR DAVID JR IGC 
387 MURPHREE 

WORTH DAVID GASTON 4AG 
K A HOUSE 

WRIGHT JAMES J IGC 

26 FLETCHER 

WYNN MILTON GERARD IGC 
364 MURPHREE 

WYNNE WILLIAM HARLLEE 2GC 
P D T HOUSE 



YERKES FRED G JR 
312 W MAIN S 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 25 



YODER STEWART AYLMER IGC 
2 3 8 RAY 

YOUNG ECKLEDGE S 3AG 

P K T HOUSE 

YOUNG JESSIE LOVE G 

850 E MAGNOLIA 



Z W I C K HERBERT ARTHUR IGC 
369 MURPHREE 



The University Record 



of the 



University of Florida 



University Directory 

1944-45 

PART II - Faculty & Employees 




Vol. IIXIX, Series 1, No. 11, Extra No. 1, November 15, 1944 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class maitt/r 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The University Directory is published in two parts. 

Part I contains information concerning students. 

Part II contains information concerning faculty and employees. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 
ffiNERAL 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 

Telephone 

Number 



EMERGENCIES 



call OPERATOR 
Location 



126 A.A.A. (Agrlcult\iral Adjustment Agency] 

101 A.A.A. ( " " " ] 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

123 Administration 

132 Agricultural Economics Dept 

112 Agronomy Dept 

113 Agronomy Lab 

103 Animal House - Home Ec 

119 Animal Industry Dept 

104 Dairy Barn 

139 Dairy Products Lab 

127 Director 

128 Editorial Dept 

116 Entomology Dept 
(1841) Farm Unit 

133 Filing Room 

107 Food Products Lab 

114 Fumigation Lab 

135 Herbarium 

134 Home Economics Dept 

108 Horticulture Dept 

130 Library 

129 Mailing Room 
137 Nutrition Lab 

117 Plant Pathology Dept 

109 Poultiry Lab 

107 Refrigeration Plant 

102 Soils Dept 

120 Spectrographlc Lab 

115 Veterinary Lab 
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

131 Agricultural Economics 

121 Boys' Club Agent 
(852) County Agent 

136 Dairy Husbandry 
125 Director 

125 District Agents 

128 Editorial 

111 Emergency Farm Labor 

121 Forestry 

136 Livestock Specialist 

121 • Soil Conservationist 



S eagle Annex 
Seagle 705 

Hort 109 

Hort 309 

Newell Hall 312 

Hort Grovinds 

South of Newell Hall 

Newell Hall 212 

S E of Auditorium 

Radio Station Road 

Hort 109 

Hort 215 

Newell Hall 210 

Millard Station 

Hort 123 

Hort Grounds 

Hort Grounds 

Hort 313 

Newell Hall 206 

Newell Hall 310 

Hort 211 

Hort 119 

North of Radio Sta 

Newell Hall 114 

W of Radio Station 

Hort a?ounds 

Newell Hall 119 

Hort Grounds 

S E of Dairy Barn 

Hort 307 
Hort 305 
Seagle 101 
Hort 500 
Hort 105 
Hort 101 
Hort 215 
Hort 410 
Hort 305 
Hort 300 
Hort 305 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



CAMPUS TELEPHONES 



Telephone 
Number 



Location 



20 Agriculture, College of 

(241) Agrlculttire, State Dept of 
DAIRY DIVISION 

20-2 Agronomy Dept, College of Agriculture 

112 Agronomy Dept, Experiment Station 

113 Agronomy Lab 

65 Alligator Office 

48 Alumni Office 

159 American Red Cross 

70 Architecture & Allied Arts, School of 

64 Arts &■ Sciences, College of 

39 Athletic Department, Office 

38 Athletic Department, Ticket Sales 

10 Auditor's Office 

6 Auditor's Pay Check Office 



Ag 107 

Seagle 408 
Ag 302 

Newell Hall 312 
Hort Grounds 
Fla Union 8 
Fla Union 108 
Fla Union 306 
Peabody 200 
Chem 200 -A 
Basketball Court 
Basketball Court 
Language 2 
Language 1-A 



38 Basketball Court 

137 Beef Cattle Barn (Animal Nutrition 
Laboratory) 

34 Biology Department 

110 Biology- Laboratory (U.S. Rat Lab) 

(630) Board of Engineer's Examiners 

167 Board of Examiners 

61 Boiler Room, P K Yonge School 

1 Bookstore, University 

34-3 Botany Department 

15 Business Administration, College of 

7 Business Manager 



No of Infirmary 

No of Radio Station 
Science 106-A 
Hort Gro\inds 
Seagle 702 
Seagle 405 
Yonge 51 

Fla Union No Annex 
Science 102 
Language 200 
Language 102 



87-2 


C-1 Office 


86 


C-2 Office 


96 


C-3 Office 


64 


C-41 Office 


66 


C-42 Office 


83 


C-5 Office 


74 


C-6 Office 


30 


Cafeteria 


30-2 


Cafeteria Cottage 


76 


Cashier 


51-2 


Catalogue Department 



Library 



Peabody 8 
Benton 204 
Language 206 
Chem 200 -B 
Peabody 106 
Buckman 103 
Science 108 
W of Fie Union 
S of Cafeteria 
Language 104 
Library 202 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Telephone 
Niimber 



Location 



80 Chemical Engineering Department Benton 101 

35 Chemistry Department Chera 13 6 

52-2 Circulation Desk, Library Ll'brary 200 

23 Civil Engineering Department Hydraulics 201 

49 Correspondence Study Bureau (General 

Extension) Seagle 905 

(852) County Agent Seagle 101 

(850 ) County Home Demonstration Agent Seagle 403 

168 Curriculum Laboratory Yonge 317 



104 Dairy Earn 

(241) Dairy Division, State Dept of Agri- 
culture 

139 Dairy Products Laboratory 

26 Dean of Students 

44 Dean of the University 

171 Dormitories, Office 

95 Drake Laboratory 

54 Duplicating Department 

42 Dynamo Laboratory 



S E of Auditcritun 

Seagle 408 

Radio Station Road 

Language 105 

Library 301 

Fletcher "P" 230 

Adjoining Heating Plant 

Photo Lab 

Benton 106 



40 E.S.M.W.T. (Engineering Science 
Management War Training) 

21 Education, Agricultural 

22 Education, College of 
(186) Education, State Dect of 

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 
6-2 Educational Loan Corporation 
36 Educational Research, Bureau of 
42 Electrical Engineering Department 
58 Electrical Maintenance Department 
50 Electronics Laboratory 
46 Engineerir^g, College of 
46 Engineering & Industrial Experiment 

Station 
16 ., English Department 
169 _ Entomology, College of Agriculture 
116 " Entomology, Experiment Station 



Benton S E Annex 
Yonge 136 
Yonge 120 

Seagle 707 
Language 1-C 
Yonge 330 
Benton 106 
Service Bldg 
Seagle 1102 
Engineering 208 

Engineering 208 
Language 208 
Ag 308 
Newell Han 210 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



CAMPUS TELEPHONES 



Telephone 
Ntunber 



Location 



Experiment Station (See Agricult-ural) 
46 Experiment Station, Engineering 
and Industrial 
(1841) Experiment Station Farm 

11 Extension Division, General 

Extension Service (See Agricultural) 



Engineering 208 
Millard Station 
Seagle 805 



(1841) Farm, Agricultural Experiment Station 

133 Filing Room, Experiment Station 
Florida (See State) 

85 Florida Union 

107 Food Products Laboratory 

91 Forestry, School of 

121 Forestry Extension Service 

114 Fumigation Laboratory 



Millard Station 
Hort 123 

N W of Hort Bldg 

Hort Grounds 

Hort 401 

Hort 305 

So of Hort Office 



69 Gardens, Agriculture, College of 

71 General College Office 

11 General Extension Division 

92 Glee Club 

14 Graduate School Office 

69 Greenhouses, Agriculture, College of 

114-2 Greenhouses, Experiment Station 

82-2 Grounds Department Office 

38-2 Gymnasium, Old 



East of Dairy Barn 
Language 107 
Seagle 805 
Auditorium 103 
Language 111 
East of Dairy Barn 
Near Fumigation Lab 
Adjoining Heating Plant 
So of Murphree Hall 



H 



82 Heating Plant 

135 Herbarium Department 

(850) Home Demonstration Agent 

103 Home Economics Animal House (Lab) 

134 Home Economics Office 

123 Horticulture Building 

19-2 Horticulture Dept, Agriculture 

108 Horticulture Dept, Experiment Station 

23 Hydraulics Laboratory 

( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



N E of Service 

Hort 313 

Seagle 403 

So of Newell Hall 

Newell Hall 206 

SE of Fla Union 

Ag 207 

Newell Hall 310 

SE of Heating Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Telephone 
Number 



Location 



41 Industrial Engineering 

46 Industrial Experiment Station 

29 Infirmary 

165 Inter-American Affairs, Institute of 

39-2 Intraraurals Office 



Engineering 201 
Engineering 208 
SW of Cafeteria 
Pla Union 501 
Basketball Oourt 



60 
72 



Janitors 
Journalism 



Service Building 
Law College 201 



16 


Languages 




Language 208 


47 


Law, College of 




East of Library 


64 


Library, Chemistry 


Chem 214 


130 


Library, Experiment Station 


Sort 211 


4 


Librai^-, General 


Extension 


Seagle 806 


47-2 


Library, Law 




Law, No Annex 


52 


Librajry Ist Floor 


•-Reserve Desk 


Library 100 


52-2 


" 2nd " 


Circulation Desk 


LibraiT- 200 


51-2 


" 2nd " 


Catalogue Dept 


Library 202 


51 


" 3rd « 


Main Office 


Library 302 


51-3 


" 4th " 


Order Dept 


Library 400 


89 


Lyceum Council 




Peabody 211 



M 

53 Machine Shop, Engineering Benton S Annex 

66 Mathematics Peabody 105 

60 Maintenance, General Service Building 

58 Maintenance, Electrical Service Building 

43 Mechanical Engineering Engineering 101 

Military (See ROTC) 

Milk Inspection (See Dairy Division) 
154 Motor Park (Formerly Artillery Stables )So of Drill Field 

22 Museum, Doe Yonge 300 

(315) Museum, Florida State Seagle 103 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



CAMPUS TELEPHONES 



Telephone 
Number 



Location 



N 



97 Naval Stores Research 
117 Newell Hall 
137 Nutrition Laboratory, Animal 



Chemistry 330 
Weri of Hort Blig 
No of Radio Station 



79 OoS.R.D. (Office of Scientific Research 

and Development) 
38-2 Old Gymnasium 
54 Orange and Blue Bulletin 
51-3 Order Department, Library 



Benton So Annex 
So of Murphree Hall 
Photo Lab 
Library 400 



21-2 P K Yonge Cafeteria 

62 P K Yonge Laboratory School 

115 Parasite Laboratory 

88 Pharmacy, School of 

54 Photographic Laboratory 

86 Physics Department 

22 Placement Bureau, Teachers 

(341) Plant Board, State 

117 Plant Pathology Dept 

(817) Post Office, University Station 

109 Poultry Laboratory 

178 President of Student Body 

12 President's Office 

54 Printing Department 

25 Psychology Department 

48 Publicity Department 



Yonge Basement 
Yonge 230 
SE of Dairy Barn 
Chemistry 320 
SW of Infirmary 
Benton 202 
Yonge 120 
Seagle 504 
Newell Hall 114 
South of Ag Bldg 
W of Radio Station 
Fla Union 310 
Language 103 
Photo Lab 
Peabody 110 
Pla Union 108 



Q 



42-2 Radio Laboratory 

55 Radio Station 

5 Radio Station, Operators' Room 

103 Rat House, Home Ec Dept of Exp Sta 

110 Rat Laboratory, U. S. 

159 Red Cross, American 

107 Refrigeration Plant 

32 Registrar 

( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



Benton SE Annex 
So of Nutrition Lab 
Radio Station 
So of Newell Hall 
Hort Groiinds 
Pla Union 306 
Pood Products Lab)Hort Grounds 
Langua ge 110 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Telephone 
Number 



Location 



R 

79 Research Laboratory (O.S.R.D.) 

171 Residence, Director of 

ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps) 

142 Adjutant 

158 Commanding Officer 

154 Motor Park & Gun Shed 

141 Sergeant Major 

18 Supply Room 



Benton So Annex 
Fletcher "F" 230 

Language 9 
Language 9 
SW of Stadl\im 
Language 9 
Auditorium 1 



50-2 Seagle Building, Custodian 

60 Service Building 

147 Seminole Office 

(2290) Signal Corps Field Station 

87 Sociology Department 

3 Soda Fountain, University 

102 Soils Department 

103-2 Soils Greenhouse 

120 Spectrographlc Laboratory 

(630) State Board of Engineer's Examiners 

(241) State Dept of Agriculture 

DAIRY DIVISION 

(186) State Dept of Education, VOCATIONAL 

REHABILITATION 

(315) State Museum, Florida 

(341) State Plant Board 

89 Speech Department 

178 Student Body, President 

65 Student Publications 

26 Students, Dean of 

140 Sujnmer Session, Dean of 



Seagle Lobby 

SW of Heating Plant 

Fla Union 9 

Hurricane Labs 

Peabody 103 

Fla Union Basement 

Newell Hall 119 

So of Newell Hall 

So of Fumigation Lab 

Seagle 702 

Seagle 408 

Seagle 707 
Seagle 103 
Seagle 504 
Peabody 211 
Fla Union 310 
Fla Union 8 
Language 105 
Yonge 124 



22 Teachers Placement Bureau 
38 Ticket Sales, Athletic 
(343) Tung Field Laboratory 



Yonge 120 
Basketball Court 
Hort Grounds 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



■,^:.^ ■ r 



CAMPUS TELEPHONES 



Telephone 
Nuiig)er 



Location 



u 



(343) U.S. Field Laboratory for Tung 

Investigation 
110 U.S. Fi.3h and Wildlife Service 
115 Veterinary Laboratory 



Hort Grounds 
Hort Grounds 
SE of Dairy Barn 



w 



79 War Research Laboratory 

42 War Training, Engineering Science 

Management 

17 Western Union, Substation 

85 Western Union, Substation 

90 Wood Products Laboratory 

53 Wood Shop, Engineering 

60-2 Wood Shop, Maintenance 



Benton So Annex 

Benton SE Annex 

Fla Union 

Pla Union 

So of Infirmary 

Benton East Annex 

SW of Service Bldg 



66 Y.M.C.A.. 

21-2 Yonge Cafeteria 

62 Yonge Laboratory School 



Peabody 106 
Yonge Basement 
Yonge 230 



( ) OUTSIDE telephone 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



COLLEGES AND DIVISIONS 



AailCULTURAL EXPERIMEMT STATION - Provost: H. H. Hume 
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE - Director: A. P. Spencer 
BOARD OP UNI'/ERSITY EXAMINERS - Chairman: R. S, Johnson 

Acting Examiner: L. W. Blanton 
BUREAU OP VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE - 

Director: E. D. Hinckley 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE - Cgan: H. H. Hume 

Director, School of Forestry: H. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES - Dean: 

Associate Dean: 

Director, School of Pharmacy: 

COLLEGE OP BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION - Acting Dean: 

- Dean; Joseph Weil 
H. R. Trusler 
W. W. Little 
T. Mo Simpson 



S. Newins 

T. R. Leigh 

W. H. Wilson 

P. A. Poote 
Dean: W. J. Mather ly 
G. B. Simmons 



F. T. Hannaford 

L. Schoch 
0. Skaggs 



M- Beard 
J. Lleb 
Col. R. 

Brown 



COLLEGE OP ENGINEERING 
COLLEGE 'OF LAW - Dean: 
GENERAL COLLEGE - Dean 
ffiADUATE SCHOOL - Dean 
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 

Acting Director: 
BEPARTHIINT OF MAINTENANCE - Superintendent: W 
DEPARTIffiNT OF PUBLICITY - Acting Director: A. 
DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION - 

Acting Director: P. 
Head Coach: T. 
DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE - Commandant: Lt . 
DIVISION OF MUSIC - Director: R. D. Brown 
FLORIDA STATE PLANT BOARD - Director: Arthur C 
FLORIDA UNION - Acting Director: L. L. Hale 
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION - Dean: B. C. Riley 
GROUNDS SUPERVISION - Superintendent: C. E. Nelson 
INFIRMARY - University Plyslcian: G. C. Tillman 
INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS - Acting Director 
OFFICE OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER - Business Manager: K 
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS - Dean of Students: R 
OFFICE OP THE PRESIDENT - President: John J. Tlgert 
DIRECTOR OF RESIDENCE - Carl Opp 

OFFICE OP THE REGISTRAR - Registrar: R. S. Johnson 
P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL - Principal 
TEACHERS PLACEMENT BUREAU - Director: A. 
RADIO STATION - Director: G. W. Powell 
STATE MUSEUM - Director: T. Van Hjming 
SUMMER SESSION - Dean: J. W. Norman 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - Acting Librarian: Nelle Barmore 



L. Joyner 



J.F.Martin 
H. Graham 
C. Beaty 



R 



H, G. Lewis 
Mead 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Explanation ; An asterisk (*) before a man's name Indicates 
that he Is married. Surnames printed In capital letters are 
those of persons who are not members of the regular University- 
staff but who are located in University buildings. The informa- 
tion is given in the following order; name, position, Gainesville 
address, home telephone number, campus address, campus telephone 
number. 

The following abbreviations are used to designate buildings: 
AG-Agrl cultural Building; AU- University Auditorium; BA -Barracks ; 
BN-Benton Hall; BU-Buckman Hall; CH-Chemistry Building; DL-Dairy 
Laboratory; EG-Englneerlng Building; EX-Experiment Station; HT- 
Hortlculture Building; LA-Language Hall; LW-Law Building; PE- 
Peabody Hall; PH-Photo Laboratory; RA-Radio Station; SC-Sclence 
Hall; SE-Seagle Building; YN-Yonge Building. 



Abbott, Charles E. - Professor of Horticulture - 1420 W University 
Ave - 591-W - AG 205 - 19 

Abbott, Mrs. Oulda Davis - Home Economics Specialist and Head of 
Department, Agricultural Experiment Station - 423 E Univer- 
sity Ave - 975 -W - NEWELL HALL - 134 

Adair, Miss Polly - Secretary, College of Agrlcult\ire - 937 E 
Court St - 124-J - AG 107 - 20 

»Ahrens, B. P. - Carpenter, Maintenance Department - 521 E Magnolia 
St - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Alderman, Mrs. Claranelle T. - Accountant, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1018 Adams St - HT 113 - 118 

•Alexander, Tom Garrison - Assistant in Dairy Products Laboratory, 
AcTlcultural Experiment Station - Route 3, Box 259 - DL - 
139 

•Alien, John L. - Plumber, Maintenance Department - 219 N Palmetto 
St - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Allen, Samuel Legare - Watchman, Maintenance Department - 213 N 
Oak St - 502-M 

*Ames , Burton Weber - Head, Correspondence Study, General Extension 
Division - 1610 N Sixth St - 1065- J - SE 907 - 49 

•Andersen, Hans 0. - Assistant State Supervisor, Emergency Farm 
Labor, Agricultural Extension Service - 1206 W Union St - 
335 -W - HT 410 - 111 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*Anderson, Montgomery D. - Professor of Economics and Business 
Statistics - 605 E Second Ave - 742-W - LA 6 - 73 R 2 

Apperson, Miss Frances - Documents Librarian, University Library - 
1145 W Union St - 1743-W - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 52 R 2 

*Arbic, Georges - Technician, Engineering and Industrial Experiment 
Station - N Ninth St (Box 300) - BN 108 - 80 R 1 

Arnold, Miss Lillian E - Assistant Botanist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - Palm Terrace - 1470-R - HT 313 - 135 

^Arnold, P, T. Dlx - Assistant Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; Assistant Professor of Animal Industry, 
College of Agriculture - Palm Terrace - 1145-M - NEWELL HALL 
119 

*Atkin, Ernest George - Professor of French - 2540 W University 
Ave - 610-J - BU 102 - 93 

Ayres , Miss C. Irene - Statistical Clerk, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 1838 W Church St - HT 3Q7-A - 131 



B 

Baker, Miss Madge Forsyth - Senior Secretary, Office of the Busi- 
ness ^ Manager - 346 W Mechanic St - LA 102-A - 8 R 2 

*Barber, George Allen - Assistant Curator, Chemistry Department - 
Lindberg Ave - 804-J - CH 112-A - 35 R 2 

Barmore, Miss Nelle - Acting Librarian, Head of Cataloging Depart- 
ment, University Library - 1351 W Arlington St - UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY - 51 

Barry, Miss M. Elizabeth - Acting Associate Professor of Education 
1225-D W McCormick - YN 140 - 21 R 1 

BATEMAN, Mrs. Alberta V. - Clerk-Typist, United States Department 
of Agriculture - 420 E University Ave - SE ANNEX - 126 

*Bates, Walter Eugene - Steamfitter, Heating Plant - 1814 W Leon 
St - 947 -W - HEATING PLANT - 82 

*Beal, John Walter - Mechanician, Engineering and Industrial Ex- 
periment Station, War Research Laboratory - 217 N Roper St - 
•104 or 106 BN ANNEX - 79 or 40 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



wBeale, Clyde Kenyon - Assistant Editor, Agricultural Experiment 
Station and Extension Service - Palm Terrace (Box 2346, 
University Station) - 1315-M - HT 215 - 128 

*Beard, Percy Morris - Acting Athletic I)irector - Hilldale Road - 
1886-J - BASKETBALL COURT - 38 

♦BEASLEY, Cliff 6rd C. - State Supervisor of Case Services, Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation Office - 2015 NW Sixth Ave - 1033-W - 
SE 707 - 186 (outside) 

*Beasley, Robert Gay - Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 1430 W 
Olive St - 1624-W - 79 

*Beaty, Robert Colder - Dean of Students - Palm Terrace - 557-J - 
LA 105 - 26 

♦Becker, R. B. - Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - Hibiscus' Park (Route 2, Box 25-A) - 948-J - 217 
NEWELL HALL - 119 

♦Beers, John L. - Electrician, Electrical Maintenance Department - 
Waldo, Florida - SERVICE BUILDING - 58 

Beights, David M. - Professor of Acco\anting - 2314 W University 
Ave - 1539 -W - LW 108 - 72 R 3 

•Belsler, Walter Herman - Head Professor of Chemical Engineering - 
1268 Cherokee Ave - 788-J - BN 101 - 80 

♦Bell, Charles Edward - Associate Chemist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 234 University Terrace - 837-J - P CLUB BUILDING - 
102 R 2 

♦Bell, E. N. - Assistant Superintendent of Buildings, Maintenance 

Department - 1280 N Ninth St - 1893-R - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Bell, Mrs. Veda B. - Chief Clerk and Assistant Librarian, College 
of Law - 1924 NW Sixth Ave - LW 104 - 47 

Benton, Mrs. Ruth Proctor - Bookkeeper, Duplicating Department - 
325 SE Ninth St - 875-J - PH - 54 

Biddle, Mrs. Augle H. - Relief Operator, Telephone Exchange - 
318 Lafayette St - 1284-M - AU 15 - 1000 

♦Blgham, Truman C. - Professor of Economics - 2309 W Court - 578-J - 
PE 105 - 68 

♦Bllderbeck, J. L. - Technician, Physics Department - 143 E Arling- 
ton St - BN 202 - 86 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Bird, Miss Nancy - Acting Reference Librarian, University Library - 
1145 W Union St - 1743 -W - UKIVERSITY LIBRARY - 52 R 2 

♦Black, A. P. - Professor of Chemistry - 730 Tuscawllla Ave - 903 - 
CH 108 -B - 33 

*Blacklock, Raymond William - State Boys' Club Agent, Agrlcultixral 
Extension Service — Briar Cliff Drive - 829-W - HT 303 - 121 

->Blackmon, C?ulle Hargrove - Horticulturist and Head of Department, 
Agricultural Experiment Station - 332 E Coltunbla St - 1112 - 
NEWELL HALL - 108 

■^ELANDIWG, J. W. - Supervising Auditor, State Plant Board and State 
Board of Control - 1038 W Union St - 1321-W - SE 603 - 
341 (outside) 

*Blanton, Lawton Walter - Acting University Examiner, Board of 

University Examiners - 326 S Roper Ave - 1168-J - SE 405 - 
167 

♦Blaaer, Roy E. - Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - Forest Park - 1827-M - 319 NEWELL HALL - 112 

*Blaze, Robert W. - Electrician, Electrical Maintenance Department - 
1331 Jefferson St - SERVICE BUILDING - 58 

*Bledsoe, Roger W. - Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 613 S Ninth St - 796-W - 317 NEWELL HALL - 112 

Blelwelss, Mrs. Dorothy L. - Clerk-Stenographer, College of 

Engineering - 1034 W University Ave - 303-J - EG 205 - 37 

♦Bless, Arthur A. - Professor of Physics - 416 S Seventh St - 
1729-M - BN 202 - 86 

♦BLITCH, Loonis - County Agent, Agricultural Extension Service - 
Fletcher Terrace - 1563-R - SE 101 - 852 (outside) 

Bllziotes, Miss Patricia - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1109 E Arlington St - 450-W - HT 119 - 129 

♦Block, Seymour Stanton - Associate Research Engineer, Engineering 
and Industrial Experiment Station - 941 S Seventh St - BN 206 

Bogue, Miss Dorothy Ruth - Clerical Assistant, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service - 210 N Smith St - HT 409 - 111 

Bond, George T. - Manager, Duplicating Department - Route 2, Box 
261 - PH - 54 

Boney, Miss Katherlne McKoy - Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 1860 W Leon St - 1498 - NUTRITION LABORA- 
TORY - 137 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



•Bonnell, E'. C. - Painter, Maintenance Department - Box 329 - 
SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Bourke, Norman - Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering - 
451 Washington St - EG 303 - 41 R 3 

Boutelle, Mrs. Margaret White - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory- 
School - 309 N Oak - YN 235 - 62 

Branton, Miss Ella Mae - Clerk, Agricultural Experiment Station - 
656 N Ninth St - 1895-J - HT 209 - 130 

■»Bratley, Homer Eells - Assistant Entomologist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - Melrose, Florida - NEWELL HALL - 116 

•^Bristol, Lorls R. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 234 
Roux St - 246-J - YN 240 - 62 

*Bristol, Lucius Moody - Professor of Sociology on Special Status - 
234 Ro\ix St - 246-J 

Bristol, Miss Mary Cornell - Personnel-Records Clerk, Office of 
the Dean of the University - 1200 E Boulevard - 1036 - 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 44 R 2 

Brooks, Tech. Sgt. Perry C. - Sergeant Major, Military Department- 
Murphree- Hall, University of Florida - LA 9 - 141 

«-BROWN, Arthur C. - Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board - 
Hibiscus Park - 318-J - SE 507 - 341 (outside) 

•!*Brown, C. J. - Carpenter Foreman, Maintenance Department - Route 
3, Box 41 - 1630- J - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

*Brown, Hamlin L. - Extension Dairyman, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 606 Second Ave - 1084 - HT 301 - 136 

»Brown, Richard DeWitt - Director of Music - 2108 Hernando St - 
853 -W - AU 

Brown, Miss Roberta Louise - Tabulating Supervisor, Office of the 
Registrar - 312 E Seminary - 328 - LA 110 - 32 

*Brownlng, CM.- Carpenter, Maintenance Department - 425 N Gar- 
den St - 169-J - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

*Brunet, Joseph - Professor of French - 1343 Tressalla St - 
1368-J - BU 204 - 93 R 1 or 93 R 2 

*Brunk, Max Edwin - Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural 
Experiment Station - 758 NW Ninth Ave - 412-W - HT 311 - 132 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



BRYAN, Miss Pauline - Stenographer, State Plant Board - 512 E 
Hampton Ave - 1713-J - SE 504 - 341 (outside) 

Bryan, Mrs. Ruth D. - Typist, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 2160 
W Court & Osceola - LW - 47 R 2 

Bullett, Mrs. Naomi Prltchett - Stenographer and Record Clerk, 

Agricultural Extension Service - 332 W Mechanic St - 1865 - 
HT 307 - 131 

BURKE, Mrs. Dollie - Clerk, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture - 820 E Magnolia St - SE ANNEX - 126 

wBurnham, Alexander Johnson - Assistant Military Property Custo- 
dian - 2018 Hernando St - AU 1 - 18 

Bussman, Mrs. Estelle Elsie - Clerk-Librarian, General Extension 
Division - 1149 W University Ave - SE 809 - 4 

*Byers, Charles Francis - Chairman of C-6; Professor of Biology - 
1350 Tressalia St - 1283-J - SC 108 - 74 



«Calderwood, Howard Newton - Research Engineer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station - 1054 N Ninth St - 392-R - 
WOOD PRODUCTS LABORATORY - 90 

Calhoun, Mrs. Eunice Zipperer - Acting Teacher, P K Yonge Labora- 
tory School - 610 E Church St - 359 - YN 105 - 61 R 2 

♦Calhoun, Paul W. - Entomologist, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 610 E Church St - 359 - NEWELL HALL - 112 

Callaway, Miss Mary Hester - Multlgraph Operator, Duplicating 
Department - 325 SE Ninth St - 875-J - PH - 54 

Cameron, Mrs. Edith McBrlde - Head, Women's Activities, General 
Extension Division - Archer Road (Box 704) - SE 805 - 11 

Campbell, Jay A. - Labor Foreman, Agricultural Experiment Station- 
Route 2 - 129 

Campbell, Miss Jean Marshall - Laboratory Assistant, Agricultural 
Experiment Station - 1342^ W Arlington - HORTICULTURAL LAB- 
ORATORY - 107 

Canova, Mrs, Eddie B. - Stenographer, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice - 1214 W Masonic St - 1746-J - HT 101 - 125 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Carleton, William Graves - Chairman, C-lj Professor of the Social 
Sciences - 1110 W Masonic - 488 - PE 8 - 87 R 2 

Carlton, Mrs. Thelma L. - Secretary, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - 1220 W Cypress St (Box 723) - 1429-J - HT 109 - 123 

*Carr, Archie F. , Jr. - Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences- 
Route 3, Hartman Lane - 1629-R - SC 7 - 34 R 2 

CARR, Mrs. Minnie P. - Senior Clerk, United States Department of 
Agricultiire - 524 W Court St - SE 708 - 101 

*Carroll, Ralph Elliott - Research Physicist, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 
779 N Franklin St - 642 - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

■»Carroll, William Richard - Professor of Bacteriology - 803 Wash- 
ington St - 1837-J - SC 102 - 34 R 3 

Carson, Miss Cleva J. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1210 W McCormick - 882 - YN 310 - 168 

Carter, Mrs. Bea Bradley - Stenographer, Office of the Registrar - 
1351 W Arlington - 125-M - LA 110 - 94 

Carter, Mrs. Bonnie J. - Assistant State Supervisor, Emergency Farm 
Labor, Agricultural Extension Service - 336 Roux St - 371-J - 
HT 409 - 111 

Carter, Mrs. Dorothy Marks - Clerk-Stenographer, College of Agri- 
culture - 1338 W Arlington St - 796 -J - AG 107 - 20 

Carter, Miss Lilly Isabella - Order Librarian, University Library- 
Pine Park (Box 183) - 1110- J - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 3 

♦Carver, William Angus - Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 604 W Michigan Ave - 799-J - 314 NEWELL 
HALL - 112 

*Chace, James Edward - Associate Professor of Economics and Realty 
Management - 1228 Kentucky Ave - 1689 - PE 5 -A - 56 

Chan, Miss Shuk-Yee - Research Assistant, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 2156 Hernando St - 1261-M - SC 106 - 34 R 3 

Chappell, Cecil Cason - Inventory Clerk, Office of the Business 
Manager - 219 W Masonic - 212-R - LA 1-D - 6 

Chastain, Miss Eula Louise - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 216 N Wilson St - 1152-M - HT 119 - 129 

•Cherry, Henry Spurgeon - Assistant Coach - 526 S Eighth St - 
752-J - BASKETBALL COURT - 39 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Christophers on, Mrs. Lena Gould - Secretary, Board of University 
Examiners - 220 W Arlington - SE 405 - 167 

♦Clark, Fred - Assistant Agronomist, Agricultviral Experiment Sta- 
tion - 1420 Florida Terrace - 810- J - 319 NEWELL HALL - 112 

*Clark, W. A. - Assistant Professor of English - 1224 W McCormick 
St - 1645-W - LA 207 - 96 

♦CLAYTON, Harold G. - Administrative Officer in Charge, United 

States Department of Agriculture - 241 S Wilson St - 279-J - 
SE ANNEX - 126 

CLOVER, Mrs. Ann P. - Assistant Secretary, Florida State Board of 
Engineer Examiners - 205 S Roper Ave - 1432-R - SE 702 - 
650 (outside) 

♦Cody, Madison Derrel - Professor of Botany - 666 E Columbia St - 
896 - SC 102 - S4 R 3 

Coleman, Miss Janie Doris - Secretary, Infirmary - 1338 W Arling- 
ton - 796-J - INFIRMARY - 29 

♦Coleman, William Bruckner - Refrigeration Engineer, Agricultural 
ExTierlment Station - Box 2003, University Station - 8106 - 
REFRIGFRATION PLANT - 139 or 107 

Coles, Mrs. Gladys Fairfax - Clerk, Duplicating Department - 200 
S Sixth St - 1269-M - PH - 54 

♦Comar, Cyril Lewis - Associate Biochemist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1434 Livingston St - 1616-W - NUTRITION 
LABORATORY - 137 

Cone, Mrs. Kathrln Wise - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1751 N Grove St - 1220-W - HT 209 - 130 

♦Congleton, James Edmund - Associate Professor of English - 2452 
Broome St - 16B6-R - LA 302 - 63 R 2 

Connally, Krs . Janet Patricia - Desk Assistant, University 

Library - 1545^ W Columbia Ave - 1117 -R - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY- 
51 R 2 

♦Constans, Henry Philip - Head Professor of Speech - 214 College 
Court - 989-J - PE 211 - 89 

♦Conyne, S/Sgt. Jack T. - Supply Sergeant, Military Department - 
'229 E Arlington - 235-W - "_ LA - 141 

Cook, D. F. - Superintendent of Janitors, Maintenance Department - 
319 N Pleat^ant St - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



♦Cooper, J. Francis - Editor, Agrlcultxiral Experiment Station and 
Extension Service - 2520 Fletcher Terrace - 1324 - HT 215 - 
128 

Corr, Miss Alys May - Desk Assistant, University Library - 331 W 
Olive St - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 3 

Cox, Mrs. Margaret Allen - Clerk-Srenographer, General Extension 
Division - 213 N Oak St - 502-11 - SE 907 - 49 

*Crago, Alfred - Professor of Educational Psychology and Measure- 
ments - 1312 W University Ave - 518-R - YN 216 - 62 

*Craig, Palmer Hunt - Supervisor, War Research Laboratory, Engineer- 
ing and Industrial Experiment Station; Head Professor of 
Electrical Engineering - 707 E Colximbia St - 75 - BN 106 and 
BN ANNEX - 79 or 42 

«CrandalI, Clifford Waldorf - Professor of Law - Golf view - 
1519-W ■- LW 2C5 - 47 R 1 

wCreighton, John Thomas - Head Professor of Entomology - Mill- 
hopper Road - 1619 -R - AG 308 - 169 

Cresap, Mrs. Ida Keeling - Librarian, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 542 Washlngtor St - 179-W - HT 209 - 130 

Criswell, Miss Juanlta Catherine - Junior Secretary, School of 
Forestry - 1906 W University Ave - 104-J - HT 401 - 91 

Cutts, Mrs. Emma Lou - Clerk-Typist, General Extension Division - 
1003 W Court St - SE 807 - 4 



D 



Daane, Mrs. Bessie Hill - Junior Secretary, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 728 N Ninth St - 1525-J - 119 NEWELL HALL - 
102 

Dagley, Walter Henry - Night -watcliman. Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 134 E Lemon St - 233-W - 129 

Dakin, Miss Mildred Maria - Stenographer, C-3 Office - 324 W 
Court St - 697 -J - LA 207 - 96 

*Davis, George Kelso - Nutrition Technologist and Biochemist, 

Agricultiiral Experiment Station - 1241 Seminole Ave - 530-W 
NUTRITION LABORATORY - 137 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*Davls, Uri Pearl - Assistant Professor of Mathematics - 1635 W 
Mechanic St - 1228 - PE 9 - 66 R 2 

*Day, James Westbay - Professor of Law - 654 E Columbia - 1358-J - 
LW 201-C - 47 R 1 

Deaton, Mrs. Carrie Jones - Secretary, Department of Publicity - 
1071 E University Ave - 812 - FLORIDA UNION 108-C - 48 

»DeBruyn, John William - Assistant Professor of Music - 446 N 
Roper Ave - 249 -W - AU 3 - 92 

♦DeBusk, E. F. - State Supervisor, Emergency Farm Labor, Agricul- 
tural Extension Service - Hibiscus Park - 1188-J - HT 410 - 
111 

*Decker, Phares - Associate Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 1352 W Court St - 1473-W - 101-A NEWELL 
HALL - 117 

Dedman, Miss Chris - Bookkeeper, Office of the Business Manager - 
Mcintosh, Florida - 3110 - LA 104 - 76 

DeLess, Mrs. Jane - Clerk-Stenographer, President's Office - 346 
W McCormick - 1365-R - LA- 103 - 12 

DEMPSEY, Miss Nell Winn - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 220 Valley Road - 725 -M - SE 708 - 101 

*DENNIS, Robert S. - State Performance Supervisor, United States 
Department of Agriculture - 1065 E Seminary - 1409-W - SE 
ANNEX - 126 R 2 

Diaz, Mrs. Frances Spencer - Stenographer, School of Forestry - 
1906 W University Ave - 104-J - HT 401 - 91 

Dickinson, Miss Sarah Grace - Librarian, P K Yonge Laboratory 
School - 545 S Eighth St - 1579-R - YN 214 - 62 

*Dietz, John W. - Assistant Professor of Business Administration - 
309 E Boulevard - 173-W - PE 12 - 56 

Doe, Charles E. - Curator of Ornithology, Doe Museum - 1 Gaines- 
ville Ct - DOE MUSEUM, YN BLDG - 22 

♦Dolbeare, Harwood Burrows - Professor of Ecorcmics and Business 
Administration - 1052 E Seminary St - 1592- J - PE 5-C - 56 

Donaldson, Miss Eva L. - Mailing Clerk, Agricult\iral Experiment 
Station - 1439 N Grove St - 1281-J - HT 119 - 129 

Dostal, Bernard Francis - Assistant Professor of Mathematics - 
330 N Oak - PE 106 - 66 R 1 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Douglas, Mrs, Jewel Ward - General Duty Nurse, University Infir- 
mary - University Infirmary - UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY - 29 

Duer, Mrs. Margaret Dickinson - Acting Head of Circulation Depart- 
ment, University Library - 1220 E Boulevard - 1763-W - 
UNIATERSITY LIBRARY - 52 R 2 

DUNCAN, Mrs. Gertrude Trixle - Junior Clerk, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture - 2079 W Seminary St - 984 - SE 708 - 101 

Dunn, Miss Charlotte - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 520 
S Dell St - YN 117 - 61 R 2 

*DUNSCOMBE, Aubrey Elsworth - Administrative Assistant, United 
States Department of Agriculture - 1305 King St - 464-J - 
SE 101 - 101 

*Durrance, Charles L. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1156 W Union - 1598-M - YM 231 - 62 

Dykema, Mrs. LaJenia Stake - Clerk-Stenographer, General Exten- 
sion Division - 1318 W Arlington - SE 906 - 49 



Earle, Mrs. Lois M. - Clerk, Office of the Business Manager - 
216 N Wilson St - 1152-M - LA 1-A - 6 

Eastham, Miss Mally Elizabeth - Stenographer, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 1122 W University Ave - 160-W - HT 313 - 
135 

*Ebaugh, Newton Cromwell - Head Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing - 1281 Seminole Ave - 1043-M - EG 101 - 43 

■»Eby, Paul J. - Supervisor of Maintenance, Dormitories - Ocala 
Road - 492-W - SLEDD HALL - 170 

Edwards, Mrs. Helen S. - Secretary and Acting Assistant to the 
Director, Radio Station WRUP - 732 NW Ninth Ave - 1817-W - 
RA - 55 

*Edwards , Leroy D. - Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology - 
Route 2, Hibiscus Park - 1593-R - CH 312 - 88 

Edwards, Mrs. Margaret Brownlee - Stenographer, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 321 N Franklin St - 218 NEWELL HALL - 134 

Edwards, Miss Naomi - Acting Periodical,s and Binding Librarian, 
University Library - 1154 W McCormick - 1497- J - UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY - 52 R 2 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



•Eldridge, John Grady - Professor of Economics - Golf view - 628 - 
PE 111 - 68 

*Elinore, Lynden Lyman - Researcti Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - Box 2235, 
University Station - 616-R - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

*Emerson, David Lee, Jr. - Associate Research Engineer, Engineer- 
ing and Industrial Experiment Station - 539 Washington St - 
HYDRAULICS LABORATORY 307 - 23 R 2 

»Emmel, Mark Wlrth - Professor of Animal Industry, College of 

Agriculture; Veterinarian, Agricultural Experiment Station - 
712 E Boundary St - 1510-W - VETERINARY LABORATORY - 115 

»Enwall, Hasse Octavlus - Professor of Philosophy on Special 
Status - 326 S Roper Ave - 880 - PE 108 - 25 

Erwln, Thomas Church - Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1006 W Union - 1342-W - F CLUB BUILDING - 120 

*Eshleman, Silas Kendrick - Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering - 733 E Lass iter St - 1073-J - EG 201 - 41 

•Eutsler, Roland Byerly - Professor of Economics and Business 

Administration; Director, Bureau of Economic and Business 
Research - Briar Cliff Drive, Golfvlew - 1165- J - LA 202 - 73 

Everett, Miss Bette Joyce - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 154 Florida Court - 308-J - HT 109 - 123 



Farris, L. C. - Associate Professor of English - 322 W University 
Ave - LA 317 - 63 

Paulds, Miss Ruth Alice - Assistant Biochemist, Agricu ltur al Ex- 
periment Station - 1434 Livingston St - 1616-W - NUTRITION 
LABORATORY - 137 

Fawcett, Miss Mary Solte - Dietitian, University Cafeteria - 

University Cafeteria - 8030 R 2 - UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA - 30 

FETNER, Mrs. Hazel E. - Clerk -Stenographer, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture - 1342 W Court St - 1197-R - SE ANNEX - 
12.6 

♦Fineren, Wlllisim W. - Professor of Mechanical Engineering - 21 
Palm Terrace - 1487 - EG 302 - 41 R 3 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Fisher, Mrs. Jessie Thompson - Junior Secretary, School of Archl- 
tectiire and Allied Arts - 1148 E University Ave - 709 - 
PE 204 - 70 

Fleming, Mrs. Ilah W. - Stenographer, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice - 1325 W Masonic St - 1434-J - HT 307 - 131 

Flesh, Mrs. Lillian Steele - Clerk, Department of Entomology - 
440 Colson St - 1231-J - AG 308 - 169 

*Flowers, James - Truck Driver, Grounds Department - General 
Delivery - (210UNDS BUILDING - 82 R 2 

•M-Foote, Perry Albert - Director, School of Pharmacy - 729 S 
Seventh St - 952-W - CH 320 - 88 

♦FOSTER, Robert E. - Apiary Inspector, State Plant Board - 1008 
W Michigan Ave - 1254-W - SE 502 - 341 (outside) 

*Fouts, Everett Lincoln - Dairy Technologist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; Professor of Dairy Manufactures, College of 
Agriculture - Palm Terrace - 1025-M - DL - 139 

*Frash, Edwin Stanton - Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing - 1024 E Franklin, Ocala, Florida - 652 Green - EG 303 - 
41 R 3 

♦Freeman, Theodore Russell - Associate in Dairy Manufactures, 
Agricultural Experiment Station - N Ninth St Extension - 
1230 -R - DL - 139 

♦French, Roland Barnes - Biochemist, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - 1435 Seminole Ave - 1102-J - 220 NEWELL HALL - 103 

Frost, Miss Geneva Kimball - Statistical Clerk, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 1244 W Union St - 715-M - HT 309 - 132 

Fulk, Joseph Richard - Professor of Public School Administration 
on Special Status - 1643 W Orange St - YN 130 - 22 

♦FULTON, Guy C. - Acting Architect to Board of Control - Hlllcrest 
Ave, Golf view - 563-M - PE 204 - 70 

Futch, Mrs. Eva Miller - Clinic Nurse, University Infirmary - 
University Infirmary - UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY - 29 

FUTCH, Miss Marlon Sanchez - Secretary, County Home Demonstration 
Agent's Office - 807 E Main St North - 375-J - SE 403-404 - 
850 (outside) 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



♦Gaddum, Leonard William - Chairman, C-2; Professor of the Physical 
Sciences - Route 2, Hibiscus Park - 318-M - BN 204 - 86 R 1 

•»Gager, Vifilliam Atkins - Acting Associate Professor of Civil 
Engineering - 1308 W Masonic St - 446 - 305 HYDRAULICS 
LABORATORY - 23 

*Gano, Ovid Raymond - Radio Technician, Engineering and Industrial 
Experiment Station - 1543 Onondago Place - 411-J - BN ANNEX 
104 - 79 

Gano, Mrs. Ruth West - Operator, Radio Station WRUF - 1543 Onon- 
dago Place - 411-J - RA - 5 

Garrett, Ifrs . Patricia O'Neal - Stenographer, Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service - 1411 W Union St - 1480 - HT 105 - 125 

GARRICK, Mrs. Mary Brooking - Clerk, County Agent's Office - 627 
Second Ave - 366 - SE 101 - 852 (outsideT 

*-Garris, Edward Walter - Professor of Agricultural Education - 609 
Tuscawilla Ave - 979-R - YN 136 - 21 R 1 

Garris, Miss Minnie Reta - Laboratory Assistant, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 609 E Tuscawilla Ave - 979-R - POOD 
PRODUCTS LABORATORY - 107 

Gay, Mrs. Janet Thornton - Secretary, The Florida State Museum - 
403 N Garden St - 695-R - SE 103 - 315 (outside) 

*Geer, H. W. - Carpenter, Maintenance Department - Box 644 - 
859 -J - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

•5i-Genovar, Frank D. - Swimming Coach - Pine Tree Drive - 1734-W - 
OLD GYMNASIUM - 38 R 2 

GILBERT, Mrs. Julia M. - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 1224 W McCormick St - 1643-W - SE 705 

*Glllisple, Marlon Dudley - Night-watchman, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 211 W 
Magnolia St - 1774-J - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

•K-GIST, M. N. - Agent, United States Department of Agriculture - 
c/o Florida Experiment Station, Agronomy Department - 314 
NEWELL HALL - 112 

*Giasscock, Raymond S. - Associate Animal Husbandman, Agricultural 
Experiment Station; Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry, 
College of Agriculture - 1000 W Masonic - NEWELL HALL - 119 

Glenn, Cpl. Francis L. - Company Clerk, Military Department - 
Marphree Hall, University of Florida - - LA - 141 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Glover, Miss Elizabeth Virginia - Administrative Assistant, 

College of Arts and Sciences - 1967 NW Sixth Ave - 539-M - 
CH 200 -A - 28 

*Glunt, James David - Professor of History and Political Science - 
751 Holly St - 525-W - BU 103 - 83 

♦Godwin, Ernest B. - Superintendent of Electrical Maintenance and 

Te]ephone Exchange - Stadium Road - 8176 - SERVICE BUILDING - 
58 

*Goethe, Sam Paul - Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial 
Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 1057 SW Eighth 
Ave - 993-J - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

«Goette, William Lewis - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
955 S Eighth Ave - 1163-R - YN 148 - 21 R 1 

Goln, Mrs. Elizabeth - Clerk-Stenographer , College of Education - 
634 E Church St - 1199 -R - YN 119 - 22 

Goln, Mrs. Olive Bown - Teaching Fellow, Department of Biology - 
1786i W Church St - SC 12 - 34 R 2 

Goldberg, Mrs. Marjorie ~ Chief Clerk, P K Yonge Laboratory 
School - 1340 Lake Road - 1554-M - YN 230 - 62 

*Goodson, James Brown - Cashier, Office of the Business Manager - 
359 W Olive St - 1113-J - LA 102 - 76* 

♦GOODWIN, J. C. - Nursery Inspector, State Plant Board - 348 N 
Roper Ave - 765 - SE 504 - 341 (outside) 

Goodwyn, Mrs. Mary G. - Stenographer, College of Arts and Sciences 
and General College - 311 Ray St - 1249-J - PE 8 and LA 
208 - 87 R 2 and 16 

Graf, Miss Maxine Katherine - Office Assistant, University 

Library - Kirkwood - 376-R - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 1 

♦Graham, Klein Harrison - Business Manager - 531 E Church St - 
248-J - LA 102 - 7 or 8 

♦Gratz, L. 0. - Assistant Director of Research, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 2646 Broome St - 1573-M - HT 107 - 124 

♦Gray, Leon Archibald - Research Asrociate, College of Education - 
132 College Court - 1739-R - YN 224 - 62 

Green, Miss Eleanor K. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
4015 N Ninth St - 1240-W - YN 233 - 62 

♦Green, W. W. - Painter, Maintenance Department - 340 W Masonic 
St - 644-J - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



♦Greenman, John R. - Professor of Agricultural Economics - 2076 
W Church St - HT 312 - 122 

GRIFFITH, Mrs. Dorothy Best - Secretary, State Department of 
Agriculture - 862 E Tuscawilla Ave - 1621 -W - SE 408 - 
241 (outside) 

Grimes, Miss Rosa Delia - Superintendent, University Infirmary - 
University Infirmary - UNIVERSITY INFIRMARY - 29 

Grubbs, Miss Doris - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - 431 N Oak St - 1693-J - 312 NEWELL HALL - 112 

Guerry, Miss Penny - Clerk-Stenographer, General Extension Divi- 
sion - 440 W Orange - 1532-W - SE 805 - 11 

Garka, Mrs. Lillian Mickles - Soda Fountain Clerk, Florida Union - 
1235 W Arlington St - 1072 - FLORIDA UNION - 3 

Quthery, Miss Evelyn Virginia - Clerk-Typist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1411 W Union St - 1480 - HT 123 - 133 

Gay, Mrs. Reba A. - Stenographer, Office of the Business Manager - 
1906 W University Ave - 104- J - LA 4 - 166 R 2 



H 

♦Haggard, Buford Tillman - Workman, Heating Plant - 1505 W Main St 
South - HEATING PLANT - 82 

♦Haines, Lewis Francis - Assistant Professor of English - HlbiscuB 
Park - 424-J - LA 317 - 63 R 1 

♦Hale, Lester L. - Acting Director, Florida Union; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Speech - 2731 University Court - 1428-M - PE 210 - 
89 

Haley, Mrs. Edna Baker - Assistant Cataloger, University Library - 
1515 W Court St - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 2 

Hall, Miss Georgie Fay - Junior Secretairy, Office of Director of 
Residence - Box 2256, University Station - 2376 - 230 
FLETCHER HALL - 171 

♦Hamilton, Henry Glenn - Professor of Agricultural Economics - 
709 S Seventh St - 952-J - HT 312 - 122 

Hamilton, Mrs. Omaii - Research Assistant, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 905 Second Ave - 1066-M - FOOD PRODUCTS LABORATORY- 
107 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



•KHampson, Charles M. - Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service - 545 S Eighth St - 1579-R - HT 307 - 131 

HAMPTON, Mrs. Paula D. - Clerk-Typist, United States Department 
of Agriculture - Newberry Road - 1593-W - SE ANNEX - 126 

«Hanna, Paul Lamont - Associate Professor of the Social Sciences 

and Humanities - 637 SE Sixth Terrace - 1493 - PE 8 - 87 R 2 

■o-Hannaford, Frederick T. - Acting Director, School of Architecture 
and Allied Arts - 1341 W McCormick St - 1825-J - PE 204 - 70 

Harrell, Mrs. Minna Dunn - Administrative Assistant, Office of 

the Dean, General College - 1135 W University Ave - 659-R - 
LA 107 - 71 

♦Harris, Henry Clayton - Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1404 Florida Ave - 549-J - 317 NEWELL HALL - 
112 

♦Hathaway, William B, - Associate Professor of Spanish - 200 N 
Sevei;th St - 250 - BU 104 - 93 

♦Hauptmann, Oliver Howard - Professor of Spanish and German - 
Golfview - 1268-J - BU 302 - 93 R 2 

♦Hawkins, John Ersklne - Associate Professor of Chemistry; Asso- 
ciate Director, Naval Stores Research - 700 E Tuscawilla 
Ave - 1640-J - CH 101 - 57 R 1 

♦Hayes, Fred H. - Technician, Drake Laboratory - 128 Ray St - 
1552-W - DRAKE LABORA'JORy - 95 

♦Heath, Fred Harvey - Professor of Chemistry - 753 E Columbia St - 
781-J - CH 102 - 57 

♦Henderson, Joseph Russell - Soils Technologist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - Michigan Ave - SOILS GKEENHOUSE - 103 R 2 

Henderson, Miss Wilma Bess - Operator, Radio Station WRUF - 1006 
W Union St - 1342-W - RA - 5 

HENDRIX, Miss Lou Willie - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 420 E University Ave - SE 704 - 101 

♦Henry, John C. - Laboratory Technician, Department of Civil 
Engineering - Route 3 - BN ANNEX - 53 or 79 

Herman, Miss Rosella Lillian - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory 
School - 1321 W University - 210 - YN 201-A - 62 

♦Hlers, William Russell - Technician, Mechanical Engineering 
Department - 1627 W Seminary St - BN ANNEX - 53 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Hlllhouse, Mrs, Josephine Dorothy - Typist, Duplicating Depart- 
ment - Route 2 - PH - 54 

*Hlnckley, Elmer Dumond - Head Professor of Psychology; Director 
of Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene - Box 
2007, University Station - 338 - PE 110 - 25 

*Hixson, Homer - Assistant Professor of Entomology - 1874 W Colum- 
bia - 1056-J - AG 302 - 169 

*Hobbs, Horton Holcombe, Jr. - Associate Professor of Biology - 
303 College Court - 1235-W - SC 9 - 34 R 2 

Hodges, Miss Margaret Seamon - Transcript Clerk, Office of the 
Registrar - 1411 W Union St - 1480 - LA 110 - 94 

*Holll3, R. P. - Painter, Maintenance Department - 960 Tuscawllla 
St - 1243-M - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Holmes, Miss Gwenda Lee - Junior Stenographer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 
955 S Eighth St - 382-M or 1163-R - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

Hough, Mrs. Lillian Page - Instructor in Curriculum Research, 
College of Education - 328 N Roper Ave - 521-W - YN 317 - 
168 

*Hubbell, Theodore H. - Professor of Biology and Geology - Col- 
clough Hill, Kirkwood - 1653-W - SC 110 - 74 

*Hull, Fred Harold - Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station - 
Little Gandy - 759-W - 314 NEWELL HALL - 112 

<Cume, H. Harold - Dean, College of Agriculture; Provost for 
Agriculture - 1205 W Masonic St - 657-M - AG 107 - 20 

Hiimphries, Captain Julian M. - Assistant Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics - 1236 Margaret St - 959-M - LA - 142 

Hunt, Mrs. Rebecca Beatrice - Women's Programs, Radio Station 

WRUF - 635 N Bay St - 1815-J - RA - 78 

HUNTER, Miss Lena R. - Chief Clerk, State Plant Board - 226 S 
Wilson St - 279 -W - SE 508 - 341 (outside) 

«Husa, William J. - Head Professor of Pharmacy - 1124 Margaret 
St - CH 302 - 88 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



♦Jackson, Captain Harry M. - Assistant Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics - Pine Tree Drive - 1151-M - LA - 142 

♦Jackson, Vestus Twiggs - Professor of Chemistry - 625 E Boule- 
vard - 495-R - CH 210 - 28 or 64 

JACOWAY, Mrs. Lillian M. - Junior Clerk, United States Department 
of Agriculture - 1974 Hernando St - 105-W - SE 708 - 101 

♦Jamison, Frank Stover - Truck Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 815 Hilldale Road - 1413-W - NEWELL HALL - 
108 

♦Janes, Byron E. - Aa.'ociate Horticulturist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station ~ 406 Wakulla - 1798-M - NEWELL HALL - 108 

Jennings, Miss Ann^o - Bookkeeper-Stenographer, Office of the 
Business Manager - 1444 N Alabama - 1679 - LA 104 - 76 

Jennings, Miss Edith - Accounting Machine Operator, Office of the 
Business Manager - 1444 N Alabama - 1679 - LA 4 - 166 R 2 

Jernlgan, Mrs. Jeannette B. - Executive Assistant, College of 
Engineering - 924 W Union St - 625 - EG 203 - 146 

♦Johns, Earnest Dewey - Building Superintendent, P K Yonge Labora- 
tory School - Pearl Street Extension - YN 51 - 61 R 1 

♦Johnson, Carl Henry - Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy and 
Pharmacology - 1139 SW Eighth Ave - 663-R - CH 314 - 88 

Johnson, Mrs. Evelyn - Assistant Operator, Telephone Exchange - 
318 Lafayette St - 1284-M - AU 15 - 1000 

Johnson, Mrs. Martha - Acting Chief Operator, Telephone Exchange - 
1050 Penn St - 419 -J - AU 15 - 1000 

♦Johnson, Richard S. - Registrar - 1236 Margaret St - LA 110 - 13 

Jolnes, Mrs. Verna Miller - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
850 E Magnolia - YN 327 - 36 

Jbnes, Miss Anne H. - Office Manager, Office of the Regist' ar - 
1225-B W McCormlck - 1680-M - LA 110 - 13 

Jftnes, Mrs. Aubrey Thompson - Executive Assistant to the Director, 
Agricultiiral Extension Service - 1148 E University Ave - 
709 - HT 105 - 125 

Jones, Miss L. E. - Consultant, School Service Program, P K Yonge 
Laboratory School - 833 N Virginia Ave - 549-W - YN 317 - 168 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*Jone3, Oscar Frederick - Assistant Professor of German - 1252 
Georgia Ave - 1840 - BU 303 - 93 R 2 

Jones, Mrs. Sara Douthit - Senior Secretary, General Extension 
Division - 872 E Second Ave - 421 - SE 903 - 81 

*Joyner, Lt . Col. Ralph L. - Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics - 502 College Park - 1176-R - LA 8 - 158 



K 



Kattman, Mrs. Elizabeth Jane - Stenographer, Office of the Busi- 
ness Manager - 1029^ Margaret St - LA 102 - 7 or 8 

♦Keene, Rupert Aycock - Technician, Engineering and Industrial Ex- 
periment Station - 407 E Orange St - 9135 - BN ANNEX 104 - 
79 

♦Kell, Sgt. Roy L. - First Sergeant, Military Department - Gaines- 
ville Trailer Court - ZA - 141 

*Kelth, Gerald Marcy - Associate Professor of Civil Engineering - 
2695 Broome St - 1534 - HYDRAULICS LABORATORY 307 A & B - 
23 R 2 

Kelley, Mrs. Elizabeth Deane - Assistant to the Director of Resi- 
dence - Hibiscus Park - 753- J - FLETCHJK HALL 230 - 171 

Kelly, Mrs. Dorothy B. - Substitute Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory 
School - 1868 W University - YN 230 - 62 

*Kennard, Samuel Burnett - Campus Night-watchman - 1337 N Grove 
St - AU 1 - 1000 

Kennedy, Miss Priscilla - Chief Clerk, College of Arts and 
Sciences - 561 N Franklin St - 402-J - CH 200 - 64 

♦Kessler, William Joseph - Radio Technician, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station - Route 2, Box 28-C - BN ANNEX 104 - 
79 

Khouri, Alfred Safay - Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering 

and Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 
Box 2436, University Station - 1879- J - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

♦Kllllngei*, Gordon B. - Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 

ti-on - 1428 Livingston St - 1299-R - BIO-CHEMICAL LABORATORY- 
113 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



KIMBRELL, Miss Winnie Lois - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 525 Washington St - 1649-W - SE 705 - 101 

*King, C. A. - Office Manager, Maintenance Department - Box 469 - 
1217 -J - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

King, Miss Dorothy Louise - Chief Clerk, Office of the Business 
ler - 1401 Livingston Ave - 555 - LA 104 - 76 



KING, Mrs. Jewell S. - Clerk-Typist, United States Department of 
Agriculture - Box 469 - 1217 -J - SE ANNEX 126 

Klnzer, Mrs. Patricia - Typist-Bookkeeper, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 1509 W Mechanic - HT 113 - 118 

Kirkland, Mrs. Anna - Night Operator, Telephone Exchange - 1111 E 
University Ave - 151B-J - AU 15 - 1000 

Knight, Mrs. Dorothy L. - Junior Secretary, Office of the Regis- 
trar - 1411 W Union St - 1480 - LA 110 - 13 

*Knowles, Harold L. - Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial 
Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physics - Pine Tree Drive - 1483-W - BN ANNEX 104 - 
79 

*Kokomoor, F. W. - Professor of Mathematics - 1634 W Court St - 
1179-J - PE 106 - 66 R 1 



Lackey, Miss Henrietta Helen - Substitute Teacher, P K Yonge 

Laboratory School - 416 S Seventh St - 1729-M - YN 230 - 62 

*Laes3le, Albert Mlddleton - Assistant Professor of Biology - 1600 
Nassau St - SC 11 - 35 R 2 

♦Lafferty, Captain Jeff D. - Assistant Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics - 730 Second Ave - 1506-M - LA 5 - 142 

*Lalrd, Angus MciKenzie - Associate Professor of History and Poli- 
tical Science - 2310 W Court St - 1816-M - LA 316 - 63 

Laird, Mrs . Gladys 0. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
228 Ferndale Road - 1843-R - YN 239 - 62 

LaMontagne, Mrs. Willie C. - Chief Operator, Telephone Exchange - 
Route 3, Box 290 - 675 -J - AU 15 - 1000 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Lancaster, Charles Holland - Superintendent Heating Plant - 120 
S Seventh St - HEATING PLANT - 82 

*Lang, O-alnea Barrett - Instructor in Mathematics - 231 Ray St - 
578-M - PE 9 - 66 R 2 

Layne, Miss H. Pauline - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 435^ Cedar St - DL - 139 

*Leake, James Miller - Head Professor of History and Political 
Science - 404 S Palmetto St - 684 - PE 112-A - 68 

Ledford, Mrs, Billie June - Clerk-Stenographer, General Extension 
Division - 215 Roux St - 195-R - SE 906 - 49 

*Lei=-gett, James Thomas - Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 539 
Washington St - 1649-R - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

*Leigh, Townes Randolph - Acting Vice-President; Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences; Head of the Department of Chemistry - 
938 E Seminary St - 1757-J - CH 200-A - 28 

*Lep3 , Joseph M. - Acting Research Asso.ciate, College of Education- 
331 E Lass iter - 1290-R - YN 329 - 36 

Leukel, Francis Parker - Machinist, Engineering and Industrial 

Experiment Station - 1631 Nassau St - 904-J - BN ANNEX 104 - 
79 

LEWIS, Mrs. Comfort A. - Junior Calculating Machine Operator, 
United States Department of Agriculture - 1959 Leon St - 
1890-M - SE 708 - 101 

Lewis, Miss Frances Alice - Assistant to Acting Director of Pub- 
licity - 839 Palm Ave - 1871-R - FLORIDA TOION - 85 or 48 

*Lewis, Hal Graham - Professor of Education; Principal, P K Yonge 

Laboratory School - 225 E Court - 906-R - YN 220 and 230 - 62 

Lewis, Miss Melissa Anne - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - Route 2, Box 91 - 492- J - POULTRY LABORATORY - 109 

*Lleb, Thomas John - Head Coach - Route 2, Kirkwood - 999-M - 
BASKETBALL COURT - 39 

Lindsey, Miss Cola Mae - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 432 E Court St - 522-J - 119 NEWELL HALL - 102 

Lippold,' William H., Jr. - Acting Assistant Director of Florida 
Union - 120.S W Masonic St - 106 FLORIDA UNION - 17 

*Little, Winston Woodard - Dean, General College - 1351 W Arling- 
ton - 184-J - LA 107 - 71 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



»Loften, William Travis - Professor of Agricultural Education and 
Itinerant Teacher Trainer - 320 S Dell St - 413-R - YN 143 - 
21 R 1 

♦LOTTSTALOT, Arnaud Joseph - Assistant Physiologist, United States 
Department of Agriculture - 1946 WN Sixth St - 1623-XW - 
343 (outside) 

LOVEJOY, Miss Ellta - Office Assistant, State Plant Board - 135 S 
Roper Ave - 720-R - SE 507 - 341 (outside) 

Lowe, Miss Rachel Estelle - Clerk, Agricultural Extension Service- 
Route 3, Box 66, Suncrest - 1821-J - HT 409 - 111 

*Lowry, William Leonard - Associate Professor of Journalism 
1306 W Michigan Ave - 1272-J - LW 201-A - 72 R 2 

♦LYLE, Clifford A. - Administrative Assistant, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture - 631 S Palmetto St - 1353-M - SE ANNEX - 
126 



Mc 

*McARTHUR, Owen Page - Administrative Assistant, United States 

Department of Agriculture - 500 E Orange St - 59 - SE 703 - 
101 

McBride, Mrs. Beatric-e H. - Clerical Assistant, University Library- 
1011 W Masonic St - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 3 

*McCLANAHAN, H. S. - Grove Inspector, State Plant Board - 1213 W 
Union St - 1387-J - SE 507 - 341 (outside) 

McClenny, Miss Mary Catherine - Desk Assistant, University Library - 
410 S Arredonda - 1285-M - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 2 

McEachern, Mrs . Floy M. - Teacher, P K Yor^ge Laboratory School - 
1637 W Mechanic - 1228 - YN 242 - 62 

McElroy, Miss Erline Lynelle - Stenographer, Agrlcultiiral Exten- 
sion Service - Archer, Florida - 2134 - HT 301 - 136 

McGarrah, Miss Mary Frances - Secretary, College of Business Ad- 
ministration - 1306 W Union St - 1204-M - LA 200 - 15 

McILVAINE, Miss Lucretia - Stenographer, State Plant Board - 
436-A Roux St - 592-J - SE 504 - 341 (outside) 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*McInnis, Sam W. - Assistant Professor of Mathematics - 1417 W 
McCormick St - 1149-R - PE 108 - 25 

McLAURIN, Mrs. Mamie Annie - Clerk, United States Department of 
Ajjriculture - 2156 Hernando St - 1261-M - SE 708 - 101 

*McLendon, H. S. - Assistant State Supervisor, Emergency Farm 

Labor, Agricultural Extension Service - 1006 W Union St - 
1342-W - HT 410 - 111 

*McMullen, Kenneth Smith - Extension Soil Conservatlcnist , Agri- 
cultural Extension Service - 522 DeSoto Ave - 1355-M - HT 
305 - 121 

•i:-McRorie, Thomas Henry^ Jr. - Assistant County Agent, Agricultu-ral 
Extension Service - 844 E Arlington St - 1330-W - SE 101 - 
852 (outside) 



M 



*Maclachlan, John Miller - Head Professor of Sociology - 2122 
Broome St - 1879 -J - PE 103 - 87 

Maddox, Miss Edith Margaret - Operator, Radio Station WRUF - 1006 
W Union St - 1342-W - RA - 5 

Magulre, Miss Lillian - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1210 W McCormick - 882 - YN 218 - 62 

Malcom, Miss Gladys Burgess - Clerk, Alumni Office - 1901 E Uni- 
versity Ave - FLORIDA UNION 108 - 48 

Markham, Mrs. Martha Nan - Stenographer, Office of the Registrar - 
2057 Leon St - LA 110 - 32 

Marshall, Mrs. Helen Smith - Clerk-Stenographer, College of Edu- 
cation - 1711 W Col\imbia - 11?3-J - YN 136 - 21 R 1 

^Marshall, Sidney Paul - Assistant in Animal Nutrition, Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station - 1768 W Church St - 389-R - 
NUTRITION LABORATCRY - 137 

^Martin, John Fletcher - Acting Director, Institute of Inter- 
American Affairs - 1316 W Union St - 1363-M - FLORIDA UNION 
501 - 165 

*Matherly, Walter Jeffries - Dean, College of Business Administra- 
tion - 732 W Boulevard - 748 - LA 200 - 15 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Matheson, Mrs. Edna Eleanor - Soda Fountain Clerk, Florida Union - 
1235 W Arlington St - 1072 - FLORIDA UNION - 3 

*Mathewson, Dana - Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial 

Experiment Station - Box 2513, University Station - 1521-R - 
BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

May, William D. - Associate Research Engineer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 
532 Roux St - BN 102 - 80 R 2 

*Mead, Arthur Raymond - Professor of Supervised Student Teaching; 
Director of Bureau of Educational Research - 225 College 
Court - 1148-M - YN 330 - 36 

*Mead, L. Vincent - Assistant Professor of the Physical Sciences - 
■345 W McCormick St - 583 - PE 13 - 77 

Means, Miss Etta Vernon - Librarian and Stenographer, School of 
Forestry - 3701 N Alabama Road - 1189-R - HT 414 - 91 

Means, Miss Gwynneth P. - Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 638 S Arredonda St - 1639-W - HT 111 - 124 

Mehrhof, Mrs. Margaret E. - Secretary, War Training Coiorses - 

608 S Seventh St - 225-W - 300 UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 44 and 45 

^Mehrhof , Norman Ripley - Professor of Poultry Husbandry, College 
of Agriculture; Poultry Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment 
Station; Poultry Husbandman, Agricultural Extension Service - 
608 S Seventh St - 225-W - POULTRY LABORATORY - 109 

♦MERRILL, G. B. - Entomologist, State Plant Board - 309 Washington 
St - 1355-R - SE 602 - 341 (outside) 

*MERRILL, W. H. - Associate Quarantine Inspector, State Plant 

Board - 815 SW Sixth Terrace - 665-R - SE 5U7 - 341 (outside) 

Messner, Mrs. Helen A. - Forewoman, Duplicating Department - 
Route 2, Box 261 - PH - 54 

Mikell, Miss Ingorie V. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1408 W McCormick - 259-R - YN 117 - 61 R 2 

TJikell, Mrs. Loyce Brigman - Chief Clerk, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 1504 W Thomas St - 423-J - HT 409 - 111 

Miller, Mrs. Ardath Manss - Announcer, Radio Station WRUF - 823 N 
Bay St - 973-R - RA - 55 

•^Miller, James W., Jr. - Assistant Professor of Forestry - Route 1, 
Austin Gary Memorial Forest - Fairbanks 2 - HT 411 - 91 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Mllllcan, Mrs. Grace Thomas - Chief Clerk, General Extension Divi- 
sion - 1652 N Sixth St - ]191-W - SE 906 - 49 

Mllla, Miss Reba H, - Stenographer, Agricul%\iral Experiment Sta- 
tion - -Archer Archer-2262 - HT 119 - 129 

Mitchell, Mrs. Jean 0. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
728 H Ninth St - 1525 -J - YN 206 and 316 - 62 

Mixson. •■•2. Laura Kate - Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 
Service •- 1123 W Arlington St - 225-R - HT 300 - 121 

MO.v-X. .£3 L. Marian - Clerk, Cotmty Agent's Office - Archer - 
Arcner-2263 - SE 101 - 852 (outside) 

Moore, Oscar Keeling - Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 
College of Agriculture; Assistant Poultry Husbandman, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - 542 Washingtor. St - 179 -W - 
POULTRY LABORATORY - 10^ 

*Moonna;-!, John Haynes - Associate Professor of Bu.-iiness Education- 
Hibiscus Park - 1625- J - YN 308 - 168 

Moran . Mrs. Katharine E. - Administrative Assistant, War Training 

Courses - 1945 NW Sixth Ave - 1121- J - 300 ITHIVERSITY LIBRAIY - 
1? 

Moreno, Charles Albert - Research Engineer Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory; 
A Ir.g Assistant Professor of Electria'. Engineering - 
Box 2159, University Station - 1521 K - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

MORGAN, Mrs. Mae Hudson - Stenographer and Piling Clerk, State 

Plant Board - 1522 K Sixth St - 269-W - SE 506 - 341(outside) 

*Mcrgen, Ralph A. - Assistant" Director, War Research Laboratory, 
Engineering and Indus'rrlal Experiment Station; Professor of 
Chemical Engire"" '^- - 2624 Nelson Ave - 727-J - EG 210 - 
80 R 2 

♦Morris, Alton Chester - Associate Professor of English - 1353 
Tressalia St - 1368-M - LA 207 - 96 

*Morrls, William Collins - Research Engineer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 
leO'i W Court St - 457 -ff - BN 102 - 80 R 2 

Moss, Mrs. Margaret Elizabeth - Stenographer, Department of 

Agricultural Economics - 236-A S Wilson St - HT 312 - 122 

MOTES, Mrs. Marguerite Sherouse - Secretary, Vocational Rehabili- 
tation Office - 230 W Mechanic St - 794- J - SE 707 - 186 
(outside) 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



*Mount3, Charles Eugene - Assistant Professor of English - 122 
Perndale Road - 1552-R - LA 315 - 63 R 1 

*Mowry, Harold - Director, Agricultural Experiment Station - 325 
Colson St - 1179-M - HT 109 - 127 

■is-Muhleman, George Washington - Acting Assistant Professor of 

Agricultural Chemistry - White House Hotel - 1223 - AG 101 - 
20 

Mull, Mrs. Carol R. ~ Stenographer, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - 238 Florida Court - 1706-R - HT 111 - 124 

*Murphree, Albert Alexander - Assistant Professor of English - 511 
E Lassiter St - 1199-M - LA 315 - 63 R 1 

Murphree, Claude L. - Associate Professor of- the Humanities; 

Uniyversity Orgunist - 1232 SW Eighth Ave - 1309 - AU - 92 

♦Murphree, Walter E, - Assistant University Physician - 1270 
Seminole St - 355 - INFIRMARY - 29 



N 

NAZWORTH, Miss Nell - Clerk, County Agent's Office - 213 S Wilson 
St - SE 101 - 852 (outside) 

*Neller, Joseph Robert - Soils Chemist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1108 SW Eighth Ave - 1020-W - AG 202.1 - 19 

Nelson, Charles E« - Superintendent of Grounds - 1127 W Masonic 
St - 1451-W - GfflGUNDS BUILDING - 82 R 2 

♦Nettles, William T. - District Agent, Agricultural Extension Ser- 
vice - 1203 SW Eighth Ave - 1384-R - HT 101 - 125 

NEWHALL, Miss Margaret Anne - Operator, United States Department 
of Agriculture - 1605 N Alabama St - 1034 - SE ANNEX - 126 

Newhall, Miss Ruby - Administrative Manager, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station and Extension Service - 1605 N Alabama St - 
1034 - HT 109 - 123 

♦Newins , Harold S. - Director, School of Forestry - 2658 Pearson 
St - 1482 - HT 402 - 91 

-i^Nieland, Louis Theodore - Extension Forester, Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service - 530 E Court St - 732 - HT 305 - 121 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*Nlxon, Julian W. - Campus Postman - 1615 W Columbia - 1511-J - 
LA 1-A - 6 R 1 

*Noble, Clarence Vernon - Head Professor of Agricultural Economics; 
Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Experiment Station - 
1460 N Grove St - 917-J - HT 309 - 132 

*Norman, James William - Dean of the Summer Session; Professor of 
Education - 527 Tuscawllla Ave - 381 - YN 124 - 140 

Nowlckl, Mrs. Marie C. - Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 1430 W Cypress St - 1505-J - HT 409 - 111 

Nutter, Hazen Edward - Associate Professor of Education - 1120 
W Union St - 1598-J - YH 317 - 168 



011venba\am, Mrs. Mintle P. - Clerk-Stenographer, Office of the 
Business Manager - 1144 W Court St - lOSS-J - LA 2 - 10 

*0LLER, Forrest T. - Administrative Assistant, United States 
Department of Agriculture - SE ANNEX - 126 

Olson, Mrs. Clara McDonald - Writer and Visitor, Florida Project 
in Applied Economics, College of Education - 544 S Eighth 
St - YN 317 - 168 

«Opp, Carl Braden - Director of Residence - 1875 NW Sixth Ave - 
539 -R - 230 FLETCHER HALL - 171 or 172 

Osborn, Mrs. Lillian - Secretary to Business Manager - 236 
Osceola St - 1235-J - LA 102 - 7 

*0'Steen, Alva Woodrow - Poultry Husbandman, Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service - 327 S Palmetto - 1271-W - POULTRY LABORATORY- 
109 

Osteen, Mrs. Lillian Taylor - Acting Teacher, P K Yonge Labora- 
tory School - 1635 W Mechanic - 1228 - YN 201-A - 62 

*Otte, Burton John Henry - Associate Professor of Chemistry; 

Curator of Chemistry and L M Drake Memorial Laboratory - 
1325 S Ninth St - 1157 -R - CH 116 - 35 

Owens, Mrs. Anna Watklns - Junior Secretary, Office of the Dean 
of- Students - 528i W Mechanic St - LA 3 - 27 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



♦Pardee, G. P. - Carpenter, Maintenance Department - 1960 N Ala- 
bama St - 1189-W - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Pardue, Miss Irene Faith - Senior Secretary, College of Engineer- 
ing - W Michigan Ave - EG 208 - 46 

Pardue, J. Burwell - Field Assistant, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 1S07 W Michigan Ave - 623-J - 107 

♦Patrick, Rembert Wallace - Associate Professor of the Social 
Sciences - 2427 Seventh Court NW - 1457 -W - LW - 47 R 2 

♦Payne, Ancil Newton - Assistant Professor of History and Political 
Science - 139 Florida Court - 1173-J - PE 203 - 89 R 2 

♦Peaden, P. L. - Assistant State Supervisor, Emergency Farm Labor, 
Agricultural Extension Service - Trenton, Florida - HT 410 - 
111 

Peeler, Miss Ruth B. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
619 E Main St North - 25B-W - YN 101 - 61 R 2 

Pent, Miss Alma Louise - Laboratory Assistant, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 1434 Livingston St - 1616-W - BIO-CHEMICAL 
LABORATORY - 113 

Perry, Miss Irene Erskine - Administrative Assistant, College of 
Education - 436 E Orange St - 1469-M - YN 120 - 22 

Perry, William Sanford - Associate Professor of Physics - 1777 
Pinetree Drive - 1151-R - BN 305 - 86 

Philips, Miss Emily Susan - Cataloger, School of Forestry - 1154 
W McCormlck - 1497 -J - HT 413 - 91 

Philpot, Mrs. Agnes Elizabeth - Stenographer, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 206 N Wilson St - 459-J - NEWELL HALL - 
116 

♦Phlpps, Cecil G. - Professor of Mathematics - 1210 Margaret St - 
916-J - PE 6 - 66 R 2 

♦Pirenian, Zareh M. - Associate Professor of Mathematics - 1203 W 
Margaret St - 1376 -W - PE 106 - 66 R 1 

♦Pitman, Robert Grover - Assistant Coach - 1965 W Columbia St - 
1834-R - BASKETBALL COURT - 39 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Pitts, Miss Edith P. - Administrative Assistant to the President - 
1154 W McCormick - 1497-J - LA 103 - 12 

♦Pollard, Cash Blair - Professor of Chemistry - Newberry Road - 
1619 -M - CH 108-A - 33 

*Powell, Garland Wheeler - Director, Radio Station WRUF - Golfview- 
628 - RA - 78 

Price, Joseph Edwin - Assistant Dean of Students - Box 2893, Uni- 
versity Station - LA 3 - 27 

♦Price, Thomas J. - Head of Accounting Division, Office of the 
Business Manager - Hawthorne Road - 477-W - LA 2 - 10 

Prldgen, Mrs. Ila Rountree - Instructor in Law; Law Librarian - 
1206 W Court St - 335 -W - LW LIBRARY - 47 R 2 

Prince, Miss Vivian - Assistant Cataloger, University Library - 
1351 W Arlington St - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 2 

Pulliam, Mrs. Margaret H. - Secretary,. Florida Union - 505 E 
Mechanic St - 576-W - FLORIDA UNION 106 - 17 

Putnam, Mrs. Jean H. - Clerk-Stenographer, College of Education - 
545 S Eighth St - 1579-R - YN 317 - 168 



R 



Ragsdale, Mrs. Virginia M. - Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 
Service - N Ninth St (Box 657) - 1827-R - HT 217 - 128 

RAINS, Mrs. Ruby C. - Clerk-Typist, United States Department of 
Agriculture - Route 4, Box 100 - SE 703 - 101 

Rathbun, Miss Hellice - Manager, University Bookstore - 634 S 
Roper Ave - 1528-J - FLORIDA UNION - 1 

•M-Reed, Percy L. - Head Professor of Civil Engineering - 1308 W 
Masonic St - 446 - HYDRAULICS LABORATORY 201 - 23 R 1 

Reynolds, Miss Peggy Ruth - Assistant in Dairy Manufactures, 

Agricultural Experiment Station - 636 W Boulevard - 1255 - 
139 

Richardson, Miss Ruth - Clerk-Stenographer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station - 431 N Oak St - 1693-J - 
EG 210 - 80 R 2 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



RIDDICK, Mi's. Eloise - Stenographer, State Plant Board - Box 198 - 
964- J - SE 506 - 341 (outside) 

■»Riley, B. C. - Dean, General Extension Division - 621 N Washing- 
ton - 301 - SE 803 - 11 

*Ritchey, George Edgar - Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion - Little Gandy - 759-R - NEWELL HALL - 112 

Riter, Carl Frederick - Assistant Professor of Painting - 1848 
Leon - 9165 - PE 300-A - 70 

Rives, Miss Betty L. - Stenographer-Clerk, Office of the Business 
Manager - 1306 W Union St - 1204-M - LA 1-C - 6 R 2 

Roberts, Mrs. Jill Spruill - Secretary, Department of Chemical 
Engineering - 946 E University Ave - 1715-J - BN 101 - 80 

Roberts, Miss Marjorie Margaret - Secretary, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 237 W Arlington St - 1536-W - NUTRITION 
LABORATORY - 137 

■^Robertson, Charles Archibald - Professor of English; Acting Chair- 
man of Division of Language and Literature - Palm Terrace - 
1556-W - LA 208 - 16 R 1 

■stRobertson, Sgt. -Milton E. - Motor Sergeant, Military Department - 
229 S Bay St - 1127-J - STABLES - 154 

*Robinson, Lt. William E. - Assistant Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics - 128 Ray St - 1552-W - LA - 142 

4tf{ogers, Frazier - Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering - 
150 S. Palmetto St - 729-W - AG 106 - 20 

*Rogers, J. Speed - Head Professor of Biology - 310 College Court - 
661-W - SO 105-B - 34 R 1 

*Rose, G. Norman - Assistant State Supervisoj?^ Emergency Farm Labor, 
Agricultural Extension Service - 652 N Ninth St - 503-M - 
HT 410 - 111 

«R0THE, H. H. - State Dairy Supervisor - 641 S Seventh St - 782-J - 
SE 408 - 241 (outside) 

Rothfuss, Mrs. Cecile - Clerk-Stenographer, P K Yonge Laboratory 
School - 541 S Ninth St - 752-M - YN 120 - 22 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Saflev, Miss Edna Pearl - Clerk-Stenographer, Board of Examiners - 
809 N Virginia - 863-W - SE 405 - 167 

*Salt, Ellis Benton - Professor of Health and Physical Education - 
2660 Nelson Ave - 853-J - YN 147 - 22 

*Sanders, Dorsey Addren - Veterinarian, Agricultural Experiment 

Station - 811 S Seventh St - 1163-M - VETERINARY LABORATORY - 
115 

*Savage, Zach - Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station; Extension Agricultural Economist, Agrlcul- 
tviral Extension Service -. 1421 Yonge Court - 1028-R - HT 
309 - 132 

Scarborough, Mrs. Dorothy D. - Assistant Librarian, General Ex- 
tension Division - 124 Florida Co-jrt - 1684-R - SE 806 - 4 

Scarborough, Miss Marjorie Nell - Secretary, University Library - 
500 E Orange St - 59 - UNI^/ERSITY LIBRARY - 51 

Scarborough, Miss Wilda Louise - Junior Secretary, Engineering 

and Industrial Exaeriment Station -' 431 N Oak St - 1693-J - 
BN AMEX 104 - 79 

Schaffer, Nile Clarett - Preparator, The Florida State Museum - 
372 W Court St - SE 103 - 315 (outside) 

Schilling, Mrs. Loraine Olman - Continuity Assistant, Radio Sta- 
tion WRUF - 827 Folly St - 88-W - RA - 55 

Schoch, W. Leroy - Superintendent, Maintenance Department - 1428 
W McCormick St - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

*SC0TT, John M. - Chief Dairy Supervisor, State Department of 

Agriculture - 1110 W Masonic St - 488 - SE 408 - 241 (out- 
side) 

Selle, Miss Adelaide Catherine - Bookkeeper, Office of the Busi- 
ness Manager - 744 NW Ninth Ave - 1817-J - LA 104 - 76 

Senn, Pettus Holmes - Head Professor of Agronomy - 532 Roux St - 
AG 302.1 - 20 

»Shealy, Arthur Listen - Head Professor of Animal Industry, College 
of Jtgriculture; Head Animal Industrialist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station and Extension Service - 644 S Seventh St - 
1238 -J - NEWELL HALL - 119 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



•»Sheely, Walter J. - Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Extension 
Service - 1107 S Ninth St - 862 - HT 301 - 136 

Shepherd, C. B. - Head Bookkeeper, Office of the Business Manager- 
628 W Main St South - 597-R - LA 2 - 166 

■J^Sherman, Harley Bakwel - Professor of Biology - 2709 University 
Court - 1428-J - SC 109 - 34 R 1 

SHIPP, Mrs. Edna Lee - Clerk, United States Department of Agri- 
culture - 406 E University Ave - 1896- J - SE 708 - 101 

*SCHULTZ, Orlo M. - Counselor, Vocational Rehabilitation Office - 
Route 2 - 199-J - SE 707 - 186 (outside) 

♦Simmons, Glenn Ballard - Acting Dean of the College of Education - 
522 Roux St - 430-W - YH 122 - 22 

•M-Simmons , Jesse A. - Custodian, Seagle Building - 525 N Ro\jjc St - 
50 R 2 

Simmons. Mrs. Maude Webster - Secretary, School of Architecture 
and Allied Arts - 857 W Michigan Ave - 172-J - PE 204 - 70 

*Simp3on, Thomas Marshall - Dean of the Graduate School; Head of 
the Department of Mathematics - 717 S Ninth St - 332-W - 
LA 111 - 14 

*Slms, Guilford Trice - Associate Chemist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 128|- Ray St - 284-M - AG 204 - 19 

«Skaggs, Allen Orrin, Jr. - Acting Director of Publicity - 805 
Florida Court - 1222-M - FLORIDA FNION - 48 

*Slagle, Dean - Professor of Law - 800 E Second St - 889 - LW 203 - 
47 R 1 

*Smith, Edward F. - Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering - 
707 NW Ninth Terrace - BN 106 - 42 

Smith, Miss Eleanor - Junior Secretary, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 909 N Virginia Ave - 526-J - NEWELL HALL - 108 

Smith, Mrs. Plorine Oliver - Manager, Soda Fountain - 633 S 
Seventh St - 782-W - FLORIDA UNION - 3 

SMITH, Miss Frances I. - Clerk, United States Department of Agri- 
culture - 525 N Oak St - 1092-W - SE ANNEX - 126 

*Smith, Frederick B. - Head Professor of Microbiology, College of 
Agriculture; Head Microbiologist, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - 329 College Court - 608-M - AG 206 - 19 or 102 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*SMITH, J. Fred - County Administrative Officer, County Agent's 
Office - 233 N Ninth St - 303-M - SE - 852 (outsldeT 

*Smlth, J. Lee - District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service - 
451 Washington - 658 -M - HT 101 - 125 

*STnith, Joseph Gordon - Junior Itinerant Teacher Trainer in Agri- 
cultural Education - 320 S Dell St - 413-R - YN 152-B - 
21 R 1 

Smith, Mrs. Wilma A. - Clerk-Stenographer, President's Office - 
1848 Hernando St - 1369-J - LA 103 - 12 

»Sneeringer, Harold L. - Electrician and Cable Splicer, Electrical 
Maintenance Department - 216 Clark Lane - 1632-J - SERVICE 
BUILDING - 58 

■wSnyder, E. E. - Carpenter, Maintenance Department - Route 2 - 
SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Spearman, Miss Bettye Irene - Stenographer, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1306 W Union - 1204-M - NEWELL HALL - 119 

•Specht, Randolph Chillian - Research Engineer, Engineering and 
Industrial Exoeriment Station - 615 Wakulla St - 1798-J - 
EG 201 - 41 or 80 R 2 

»Spencer, Arthur P. - Director, Agricultural Extension Service - 
1108 W Union St - 364 - HT 103 - 125 

*Spurlock, Alvin Harold - Associate Agricultural Economist, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - 728 S Palmetto St - 1528-W - 
HT 309 - 132 

*Stahl, Arthur Louis - Associate Horticulturist, Agricultviral Ex- 
periment Station - 651 E Tuscawilla Ave - 979-W - POOD 
PRODUCTS LABORATORY - 107 

STANLEY, Mrs. Ora Means - Clerk, State Department of Agriculture - 
366 W Mechanic St - 1250 - SE 408 - 241 (outside) 

Stanlis, Mrs. Irene - Program Director, Radio Station WRUF - 
Rocky Point Road - RA - 78 

*Steckert, William H. - Chief Invoice Clerk, Office of the Busi- 
ness Manager - 1135 SW Eighth Ave - 663-W - LA 2 - 2 

«STEENBURG, Arthur Clyde - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 1640 Thomas St - SE ANNEX - 126 

Stephens., Mrs. Dorothy C. - Substitute Teacher, P K Yonge Labora- 
tory School - 128 Ray St - 284-M - YN 230 - 62 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



•Stevens, Blllle K. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 1239 
Yonge Court - 951-M - YN GfYMNASIUM - 61 R 1 

Stevens, Mrs. Grace A. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
Route 2, Hibiscus Park - 1574-R - YN 209 - 62 

Stokes, Mlsa Mellie 0. - Statistical Clerk, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1109 E Court St - 1386-M - ET 311 - 132 

»Stokes , William Eugene - Agronomist and Head of Department, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - 1009 N Myrtle St - 617 - 
NEWELL HALL 311 - 112 

Strickland, Thomas W. - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1353 W Union St - 9154 - YN 145 - 61 R 1 

Stromborg, Mrs. Doris Lillian - Clerk-S enographer. General Ex- 
tension Division - 1530 W Mechanic St - SE 806 - 4 

*Stryker, Howard Z. - Timekeeper, Maintenance Department - Box 
2472, University Station - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Stubbs, Miss Prances Eleanor - Stenographer, Office of the Regis- 
trar - 1306 W Union St - 1204-M - LA 110 - 32 

Swann, Mrs. Elizabeth BurrJaam - Accompanist, Radio Station WRUF - 
1947 Leon St - 608 -J - RA - 55 

*Swanson, Daniel C. - Associate Professor of Physics - 1820 Pine 
Tree Drive - 1390- J - BN 305 - 86 R 2 

*Swartz, Charles Ruddick - Technician, Engineering and Industrial 
Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 820 Hooper St, 
Route 3 - 1388-J - BN ANNEX 102 - 53 

Swearingen, Mlsa Jfyra - Clerk, Office of the Business Manager - 
422 S Arredonda St ~ 787 - LA 1-A - 6 R 1 

«Swearlngen, Thomas J. - Electrician, Electrical Maintenance Depart- 
ment - 500 W Mechanic St - 2218-W - SERVICE BUILDING - 58 

Swords, Mrs. Elizabeth - Manager, P K Yonge Cafeteria - 1319 W 
Arlington St - 1508-W - YN CAFETERIA - 21 R 2 



Taylor, Mrs. Maynie J. - Assistant Dietitian, University Cafe- 
teria - 1243 W Union St - 9121 - CAFETERIA - 30 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



♦Tedder, Paul Mathew - Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 1823 
Hernando St - BN ANNEX 103 - 79 

♦TeSelle, Clarence John - Professor of Law - Golfvlew - 1519-J - 
LW 106 - 47 R 1 

*Tew, Roy Edwards - Assistant Professor of Speech - 908 Holly St -^ 
786-R - PE 203 - 89 R 2 

•K-Thomas , Alex T. - Labor Foreman, Grounds Department - 3172 N 
Ninth St - 616-W - BOUNDS BUILDING - 82 R 2 

Thomas, Miss Betty - Stenographer, Office of the Registrar - 734 
E Seminary St - 743 - LA 110 - 13 

Thomas, Mrs. Clara H. - Statistical Clerk, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 1627 N Ninth St - 623-W - HT 309 - 132 

♦Thomas , Jefferson - Assistant Editor, Agricultural Experiment 

Station and Extension Service - 240 W Main St South - 900 - 
HT 213 - 128 

Thomas, Mrs. Joye Grlner - Auditing Bookkeeper, Radio Station 
WRUE - 331 N Oak St - 171-M - RA - 78 

Thomas, Miss Nadine E. - Junior Secretary, Agrlcultiiral Experi- 
ment Station - 215 Roux St - 195-J - NEWELL HALL - 119 

*Thomason, Oliver Bruce - Assistant Professor of Sociology - 238 
Ray St - 284-J - PE 103 - 87 R 1 

♦Thompson, Pierce John - Glassblower, Department of Chemistry - 
Ocala Highway - 443-W - 42 R 2 or 97 

♦Thompson, Robert Alden - Associate Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering - 823 NW Ninth Terrace - 1828-M - EG 200 - 41 R 2 

♦Thorngate, Bruce Whitfield - Associate Research Engineer, Engi- 
neering and Industrial Experiment Station - 2442 N Seventh - 
1079-M - BN 108 - 80 R 2 

♦Thornton, George Daniel - Assistant Professor of Soils, College 
of Agriculture; Assistant Soil Microbiologist, Agricultural 
Experiment Station - Palm Terrace - 474-J - AG 202.4 - 19 

THORNTON, Mrs. Louise K. - Secretary, County Agent's Office - 
307 Palm Terrace - 474-J - SE 101 - 852 (outside) 

Thorpe, Mrs. Lillian Page - Chief Clerk, Alumni Office - 1414 
Cherokee Ave - 1169-W - FLORIDA UNION 108 - 48 

♦Tiffin, William Truitt - Associate Research Engineer, Engineering 
and Industrial Experiment Station - Hibiscus Park - 1315- J - 
EG 103-A - 43 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



♦Tigert, Jno. J. - President of the University - 1200 E Boulevard - 
1036 - LA 103 - 12 

•Wlllman, George Clarence - University Physician - 408 E Church 
St - 307 - INFIRMARY - 29 

Tilly, John W. - Night Watchman and Technical Assistant, Radio 
Station WRUF - 1959 Leon St - ISQO-M - RA - 5 

»Tiimnons , Doyal Edgar - Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service - 2131 N Ninth St, Route 3 - 638-W - HT 
307 - 131 

*Tisdale, William Burleigh - Head of Department of Botany, Pro- 
fessor of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture; Plant 
Pathologist and Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment 
Station - Hibiscus Park - 1489 - NEWELL HALL 102 - 117 

Tison, Mrs. Jean Pieper - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 
1225-A W McCormick - 5a2-W - YN 207 - 62 

«Tissot, Archie Newton - Associate Professor of Entomology; Associ- 
ate Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station - 1302 
W Court St - 1211-R - NEWELL HALL - 116 

Tolbert, Mrs. Helolse Bowyer - Executive Assistant, Office of the 
Dean of Students - 234 Ray St - 1096-J - LA 105 - 26 

Toph, Mrs. Ellen Edna - Housekeeper, Residence Halls - 115 Sledd 
Hall - 170 R 2 - FLETCHER HALL 230 - 170 

Tousey, Miss Elizabeth - Junior Secretary, School of Pharmacy - 
919 S Eighth St - 1384-W - CH 320 - 88 

♦Trujillo, Vldal - Acting Instructor in Spanish - Box 2073 Univer- 
sity Station - YN 205 and BU 104 - 22 

*Trusler, Harry Raymond - Dean of the College of Law - 840 W 
Boulevard - 672-J - LW 103 - 47 R 1 

Twitty, Miss Martha - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 1243 
W Union St - 9121 - YN GfYMNASIUM - 61 R 1 

Tyner, Mack - Associate Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station - 238 Fletcher Hall - BN ANUEX 105- 
80 R 2 

«Tyre, M. A. - Plumber, Maintenance Department - Route 2, Box 178 - 
SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Tyson, Miss Jsmle Lee - Cataloger-Stenographer, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - 373 W Masonic St - 298-W - HT 209 - 130 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*Van Hynlng, Thoimson - Director, The Florida State Musexun - 322 W 
University Ave - 962 - SE 103 - 315 (outside) 

Vanslckel, Mrs. Rena M. - Junior Secretary, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station - 858 E Fourth Ave - 1389 -W - NEWELL HALL 102 - 
11" 

Vause, Mrs. Winifred Boyd - Clerk-Stenographer, Engineering and 

Industrial Experiment Station - 1358 W Arlington St - 125-R - 
BN ANNEX 107 - 79 

■^VICKERY, Frederick M. , Jr. - Clerk, United States Department of 
Agriculture - 604 E Mechanic - 1797-W - SE ANNEX - 126 

Vickery, Mrs. Hattie L. - Assistant Night Operator, Telephone Ex- 
change - 151 S Roper St - 1172- J - AU 15 - 1000 

*Volk, Gay lord Monroe - Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Static- - 
1769 S Ninth St - 1302-J - P CLUB BUILDING - 102 R 2 



w 



Waid, Miss Frances I. - Clerk, Department of Soils - 306 E Court 
St - 1319-J - AG 206 - 19 

Waits, Mrs. Leafy Vance - Cashier, Soda Fountain - 709 Second 
Ave - 1089 - FLORIDA UNION - 3 

Walker, Biron H. - Instructor in English - 1555 Onondago Place - 
1685-J - LA 213 - 96 

Walker, Miss Julia Ann - Stenographer and Announcer, Radio Sta- 
tion WRUF - 317 N Roper Ave - 1258-W - RA - 55 

*Walker, Robert Dixon, Jr. - Research Engineer, Engineering and 
Industrial Experiment Station - 2672 Broome St - BN 206 - 
80 R 2 

Ward, Mrs. Virginia - Clerk-Stenographer, General Extension Divi- 
sion - 2057 W Leon - 470- J - SE 805 - 11 

Warren, Mrs. Grace Fuller - County Home Demonstration Agent, 

Agricultural Extension Service - 510 N Seventh St - SE 403- 
404 _-■ 850 (outside) 

Warrington, Miss Florence Elizabeth - Assistant Accountant, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - Archer Road - 1841 - HT 113 - 
118 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Waters, Miss Charlotte Rosalie - Desk Assistant, University 
Library - Mcintosh - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 52 R 2 

•"Watkins, John Vertrees - Assistant Professor of Hortlcultur"^ - 
2035 NW Sixth Ave - 431-W - HT GREENHOUSE - 69 

Watson, Joseph Ralph - Entomologist and Read of Department, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - 1236 W Masonic St - 1746-W - 
NEWELL HALL - 116 

»Webb, John Nye - Professor of the Social Sciences - Box 193, 
Melrose - PE 8 - 87 R 2 

♦Weber, George P. - Professor of Plant Pathology; Professor of 
Forest Pathology - 1240 W McCormick St - HT 406 - 91 

Well, Mrs. Elise J. - Secretary, College of Education, Bureau of 
Educational Research - 234 SW Eighth Ave - 220-R - YN 326 - 
36 

*Well, Joseph - Dean, College of Engineering - 624 E Boundary St - 
621 - EG 207 - 46 

Welch, Mrs. Dorothy Louise - Junior Secretary, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - Hilldale Road - 1413- J - NEWELL HALL 312 - 
112 

Welsh, Miss Doris V. - Assistant Cataloger, University Library - 
541 S NiTith St - UNIVERSITY LIBRARY - 51 R 2 

♦West, Erdman - Mycologist, Agricultural Experiment Station - 335 
University Terrace - 387-M - NEWELL HALL 101-B - 117 

♦Westveld, Ruthford Henry - Professor of Silviculture - Route 2 - 
1153-W - HT 403 - 91 

WHITE, Mrs. Corinne Ferrandou - Clerk, United States Department 
of Agriculture - 1306 Kentucky Ave - 1233 -W - SE 705 - 101 

Wllbanks, William Watson - Electrician, Electrical Maintenance 

Department - 212 W Masonic St - 1688 - SERVICE BUILDING - 58 

Wiles, Mrs. Doris C. - Stenographer and Statistical Clerk, Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station - 156 N Wilson St - 459-W - HT 
309 - 132 

Wilkinson, Mrs. Annette Burton - Stenographer, Catalog Department, 
University Library - 666 E Main St North - 1753 - UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY - 51 R 2 

Williams, Mrs. Clara Boozer - Clerk-Stenographer, Office of the 
Business Manager - 307 E Lassiter St - 1635-J - LA 2 - 2 

♦Williams, David - Carpenter, Maintenance Department - Route 3, 
Box 77 - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



*lWllliams , Osborne - Assistant Professor of Psychology - 1131 N 
Franklin - 530-J - PE 107-C - 68 

^Williams, Walter Rollin - Professor of Education - 2640 Pearson - 
1755 -M - YN 118 -A - 22 

«-Wllliainson, Robert Crozier - Head Professor of Physics - Golf 
View - 353-W - BN 202 - 86 

^^Wlllouj^hby, Claude Houston - Professor of Animal Husbandry - 210 
Roux St - 1249-W - AG 103 - 20 

*Wilmot, Royal James - Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station - Palm Terrace - 395-R - FUMIGATION LABORA- 
TORY - 114 

Wilson, Mrs. Bertha Lee - Clerk, Duplicating Department - 442 W 
Arlington St - 722-R - PH - 54 

*Wllson, F. B. - Storekeeper, Maintenances Deoartment - Box 273 - 
362-W - SERVICE BUILDING - 60 

Wilson, Miss Madge - Teacher, P K Yonge Laboratory School - 607 S 
Seventh St - 1486-J - YN 238 - 62 

*Wllson, John Wesley - Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus- 
trial Experiment Station, War Research Laboratory - 233 
Cedar St - 1063-W - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

■M-Wilson, William Harold - Associate Dean, College of Arts and 
Sciences - Box 2227, University Station - CH 200-B - 64 

■5'Wlmberly, Stan E, - Assistant Professor of Psychology - 1117 SW 
Eighth Ave - 1139 -M - PE 107 -A - 68 

*Wingate, H. D. - Auditor, Office of the Business Manager - 
Mcintosh - LA 104 - 76 

*Winsor, Herbert Williams - Assistant Chemist, Department of Solls- 
1240 N Grove St - 1609 - F CLUB BUILDING - 102 R 2 

Wise, Miss Emma M. - Secretary to the Dean of the Summer Session - 
1751 N Grove St - 1220-W - YN 126 - 140 

*Wlse, J. Hooper - Director, War Training Courses; Chairman of 
C-3; Professor of English - 222 College Court - 449-M - 
LA 207 - 96 

*Wolfe, Herbert Snow - Head Professor of Horticulture - 2445 
Brooihe St - 1477 - AG 207 - 19 

Wood, Mrs. Katherlne S. - Clerk-Stenographer, College of Education- 
432 W Main St South - 594-W - YN 317 - 168 



FACULTY DIRECTORY 



Wurster, Mrs. Margaret Jones - Bookkeeper, University Cafeteria 
1324 N Alabama Ave - 1698 - CAFETERIA - 30 

*Wyro3dick, Leon Alcus - Night-watchman, Residence Halls - Route 
4, Box 27 - 1880-W 3 - SLEDD HALL - 170 or 173 



«Yeaton, Philip Osborne - Head Professor of Industrial Engineering- 
University Park - 1096-W - EG 201 - 41 

Yeats, Mrs. Elizabeth R. - Secretarv, Graduate Sphool - 428 Wash- 
ington St - 947 -J - LA 113 - 14 

Yon, Miss Adelaide - Executive Assistant, Athletic Department - 
607 S Seventh St - '7.30 - BASKETBALL COURT - 39 

♦YOUNG, Charles F. - Administrative Assistant, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture - 1340 W Union St - 475-J - SE ANNEX- 
126 

YOOTIG, Miss Julia - Assistant Clerk-Typist, United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture - 320 S Dell St - 413 -R - SE ANNEX - 
126 R 2 



«Zelgler, Henry -Farm Superintendent, Agricidtural Experiment Sta- 
tion - Box 2314, University Station - 8174 - UNIVERSITY 
CAMPUS - 174 

Zenge, Mrs. Sara Dunning - Clerk-Stenographer, Office of the Dean 
of Students - 1342^ W Arlington St - LA 105 - 26 

Zetroaer, Miss Norma M. - Payroll Clerk, Office of the Business 
Manager - 1235 W Arlington St - 1072 - LA 2 - 166 

Zetrouer,. Wallace Feaster, II - Assistant Research Engineer, 

Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station, War Research- 
Laboratory - Rochelle - BN ANNEX 104 - 79 

Zetrouer, Sgt . William C. - Administrative Clerk, Military Depart- 
ment - 502 S Virginia St - 69- J - LA 9 - 141 



ft