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Full text of "Epaminondas and his auntie"

AND HIS AUNTIE 




SARA CONE BRYANT 



EPAMINONDAS 
AND HIS AUNTIE 

By Sara Cone Bryant 



Poor Epaminondas — he 
tried so hard to do the right 
thing, but he always took the 
wrong time to do it. When- 
ever Epaminondas went to 
visit his Auntie, she gave him 
something to take home, but 
he always carried it the wrong 
way. When the sun melted 
the butter Auntie gave him, 
Epaminondas's mother told 
him how to keep it cool. Then 
Auntie gave him a puppy, 
and what do you suppose 
Epaminondas did ? The wrong 
thing, you may be sure. And 
if you think Epaminondas 
ever changed, you must read 
this story. 

Lavishly illustrated in color 
by Inez Hogan 



< I 



EPAMINONDAS 

AND HIS AUNTIE 




5ARA CONE BRYANT 



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EPAMINONDA5 

And HIS AUNTIE 

SARA CONEr BRYANT 




ILI/U5TRATEI> BY INEZHOGAN 

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN CO. 

BOSTON AND NErW YORK 



COPYRIGHT, 1907, BY SARA CONE BRYANT 

COPYRIGHT, I93S. BY SARA BRYANT BORST 

COPYRIGHT, 1938, BY HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 

HLL RIGHTS RESERVED INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO REPRODUCE 
THIS BOOK OR PARTS THEREOF IN AKY FORM 

SIXTEENTH PRINTING R 



CAMBRIDGE ■ MASSACHUSEn-S 
PRINTED IN THB U.S.A. 



Epaminondas used to go to see his Auntie 'most 
every day, and she nearly always gave him some- 
thing to take home to his Mammy. 

One day she gave him a big piece of cake; nice, 
yellow, rich-gold cake. 




Epaminondas took it in his fist and held it all 
scrunched up tight, and came along home. By 
the time he got home there wasn't anything left 
but a fistful of crumbs. His Mammy said: 




'What you got there, Epaminondas?' 
'Cake, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 




'Cake!' said his Mammy. 'Epaminondas, you 
ain't got the sense you was born with! That's no 
way to carry cake. The way to carry cake is to 
wrap it all up nice in some leaves and put it in your 
hat, and put your hat on your head, and come 
along home. You hear me, Epaminondas?' 

'Yes, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 

Next day Epaminondas went to see his Auntie, 
and she gave him a pound of butter for his Mammy 
— fine, fresh, sweet butter. 

Epaminondas wrapped it up in leaves and put 
it in his hat, and put his hat on his head, and came 
along home. 




'^"•^mi II iiiL 



It was a very hot day. Pretty soon the butter 
began to melt. It melted, and melted, and as it 
melted it ran down Epaminondas' forehead; then 
it ran over his face, and in his ears, and down his 
neck. When he got home, all the butter Epaminon- 
das had was on him. His Mammy looked at him, 
and then she said: 




'Law's sake! Epaminondas, what you got in your 
hat?' 

'Butter, Mammy,' said Epaminondas; 'Auntie 
gave it to me.' 

'Butter!' said his Mammy. 'Epaminondas, you 
ain't got the sense you was born with! Don't you 
know that's no way to carry butter? 



Mmmmmmmmmmmmm 




wttmrnHmnmnitn^ 



'The way to carry butter is to wrap it up in some 
leaves and take it down to the brook, and cool it 
in the water, and cool it in the water, and cool it 
in the water, and then take it in your hands, care- 
ful, and bring it along home.' 

'Yes, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 





By and by, another day, Epaminondas went to 
see his Auntie again, and this time she gave him 
a little new puppy-dog to take home. 

Epaminondas put it in some leaves and took it 
down to the brook; and there he cooled it in the 
water, and cooled it in the water, and cooled it in 
the water; then he took it in his hands and came 
along home. When he got home, the puppy-dog 
W81S almost dead. His Mammy looked at it, and 
sh« said; 



lO 



'Law's sake! Epaminondas, what you got there?' 
'A puppy-dog, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 
'A puppy-dogT said his Mammy. 'My gracious 
sakes alive, Epaminondas, you ain't got the sense 
you was born with! That ain't the way to carry a 
puppy-dog! The way to carry a puppy-dog is to 
take a long piece of string and tie one end of it 
around the puppy-dog's neck and put the puppy- 
dog on the ground, and take hold of the other end 
of the string and come along home.' 




"*«»«Mi«.. 






II 



'All right, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 




12 



Next day, Epaminondas went to see his Auntie 
again, and when he came to go home she gave 
him a loaf of bread to carry to his Mammy; a brown, 
fresh, crusty loaf of bread. 





So Epaminondas tied a string around the end 
of the loaf and took hold of the end of the string 
and came along home. When he got home his 
Mammy looked at the thing on the end of the string, 
and she said: 

'My laws a-massy! Epaminondas, what you got 
on the end of that string?' 

'Bread, Mammy,' said Epaminondas; 'Auntie 
gave it to me.' 

'Bread!!!' said his Mammy. '0 Epaminondas, 
Epaminondas, you ain't got the sense you was 
born with; you never did have the sense you was 
born with, you never will have the sense you was 
born with! Now I ain't gwine tell you any more 
ways to bring truck home. 

14 




'And don't you go see your Auntie, neither. I'll 
go see her my own self. But I'll just tell you one 
thing, Epaminondas! You see these here six mince 
pies I done make? You see how I done set 'em 
on the doorstep to cool? Well, now, you hear me, 
Epaminondas, you he careful how you step on 
those piesf 

'Yes, Mammy,' said Epaminondas. 

Then Epaminondas' Mammy put on her bonnet 
and her shawl and took a basket in her hand and 
went away to see Auntie. The six mince pies sat 
cooling in a row on the doorstep. 

t5 




And then — and then — Epaminondas was care- 
ful how he stepped on those pies! 

He stepped — right — in — the — middle — of 
— every — one. 



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TtBo Favorite Books 
By Sara Cone Bryant 



HOW TO TELL STORIES 
TO CHILDREN 

STORIES TO TELL 
TO CHILDREN 

These two popular books were published 
in smaller form a number of years ago. 
They are now brought out in a very attrac- 
tive manner, with colored jackets. 

The former book contains five chapters 
on choice of stories, preparation for telling, 
and method of teUing. There are thirty-two 
model stories to tell. 

The latter volume includes fifty model 
stories to tell, with suggestions as to choice 
and method, and a chapter on Spoken Eng- 
Ush.