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Full text of "West Pullman and Stewart Ridge, Chicago, Illinois, 1892-1900"

Pullman an* Stewart 

Chicago, ITilinoie 

1892*4900 




. 




U'EST PULLM. l.\ .si 






} " 




West rullman Land Association 



OFFICERS: 

President, JACOB P. SMITH 

Vice- President and Treasurer, - - STEPHEN A. FOSTER 

Secretary, - - VERNE S. PEASE 



DIRECTORS: 

THOMAS S. CRUTTENDEN, STEPHEN A. FOSTER, J. P. SMITH, 

ARTHUR DIXON, W. B. JUDSON, A. J. SMITH, 

L. T. DICKASON, VERNE S. PEASE, GEORGE E. SIMPSON, 

C. B. EVANS T. J. RYAN, THOMAS A. WRIGHT, 

all of Chicago. 

A. M. STONE, of Worcester, Mass.; T. KING and P. E. PRESBREY, of Boston. 



CITY OFFICE: 4O3 Home Insurance Building, 
SUBDIVISION OFFICE: 12OOO Halated Street, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



fM.tr ()/' \\'l-.sr rri.I.MAX AND STEWART Kinci-: MAY /.'/; FOUND AT THE END OF THIS PAMPHLET.) 







CENTRAL PORTION OF WEST PULLMAN 

Looking west front cgrner of Parnel] avenue and i2oth street toward factory district beyond Halsted street. The qld Morgan farm, of 

which this was a part, bad only one bouse upon it up to 1892. 



(a) 







RETROSPECTIVE. 

M November 6, 1891, the West Pullman Land Association, of Chicago, purchased 
the tract of land lying south-west of Pullman and Kensington, that had previously 
been known as the Old Morgan Farm. This tract contained about 480 acres, and 
the purchase price was at the rate of $2,500 an acre. It was a fine piece of rolling 
land, the eastern part of which reached an elevation of 45 feet above the lake and 
was heavily wooded, while the western and southern portions had an elevation of 
from 23 to 30 feet. It had long been known and distinguished by these charac- 
teristics from many other portions of the Calumet region. 
Early in 1892 this property was subdivided, and the work of development begun. The 
higher and wooded portion above referred to, and lying east of Butler street, was set aside 
exclusively for the finer class of residences. This part now constitutes Stewart Ridge, and fur- 
ther account of its advantages as a residence suburb, together with views of its streets and the 
homes there located, will be found in the later pages of this pamphlet. 

Separated by nearly a mile from Stewart Ridge is the portion of the property that was laid 
out for manufacturing plants and the cheaper homes of their employes, and in the intervening 
section, lying between the manufacturing district on the west and Stewart Ridge on the east, 
retail and general business streets were established, and the building restrictions were made less 
exacting than in Stewart Ridge, thus providing for homes of a moderate cost. 



December 1, 1900. 



(3) 



FACTORY DISTRICT. 

All of the industrial plants at West Pullman are located in this section limited on the east 
by Halsted street and on the west by Loomis street, thus having a total length of three-quarters 
of a mile. Here, from time to time since the laying out of the town, manufacturing concerns 
have been located, until we now find the imposing array of the Piano Manufacturing Company, 
the Whitman & Barnes Manufacturing Company, the Chicago Malleable Castings Company, the 
Carter White Lead Company, the Phoenix Shoe Company, the Opaque Shade Cloth Company, the 
Chicago Pail Company, and several minor concerns. 

Eleven manufacturing concerns at West Pullman with capital and surplus of $6,605,000 

Number of hands employed at West Pullman 3, 780 

Number of hands employed at Pullman 6,258 

Number of hands employed at Burnside 2,000 

Total number of hands employed in tl.e vicinity of West Pullman, 12,038 

Yearly pay-roll at West Pullman $2, 000,000 

Yearly pay-roll at Pullman, 3,832,291.98 

Yearly pay-roll at Burnside 1,000,000 

Total yearly pay-roll in the vicinity of West Pullman $6, 832,291. 98 




THE OPAQUE SHADE CLOTH COMPANY'S PLANT 

On Peoria street. 40,000 square feet of floor space; 125 h jrse pjwer. Plans are already perfected for large additions to be made to 

this plant immediately. Blue Island is seen in the distance. 

(4) 




THE CARTER WHITE LEAD COMPANY'S PLANT 
At corner of i2otb and Peoria streets. 160,000 square feet of floor space in plant; 500 horse power, Established 1892. 

(5) 



Jl Tl 




Fronting on i2oth street. 



THE PLANO MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S PLANT 

This building, which is 1000 feet long, is only one of the many large buildings of this plant, which has a total 
floor space of fifteen acres, and uses 1500 horse power. 
(6) 




THE PLANO MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S PLANT 

View from south of Illinois Central. The Piano Manufacturing Company first removed its plant to West Pullman in 1894, and has since 

made large additions to keep pace with the rapid growth of its business. 

(7) 



RAILROAD ^ n preparing f r the location of these great manufacturing concerns, the promoters 
FACILITIES f West Pullman early made provision for unrivalled railroad facilities. The 
Illinois Central Railroad Company soon after the location of the town, constructed 
its Blue Island branch throughout the entire east and west length of the property along One 
Hundred and Twenty-first street, and located three stations Stewart Ridge station between 
Harvard and Stewart avenues, West Pullman station at Halsted street, and the station now 
known as Piano at Center avenue. The Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis (the Pan 
Handle, of the Pennsylvania railway system) already crossed the property from north to south and 
established passenger and freight stations at One Hundred and Nineteenth and One Hundred 
and Twentieth streets. The Chicago, Rock-Island & Pacific Railway Company built in from the 
west, and established its freight station at Morgan and One Hundred and Nineteenth streets. 




THE CHICAGO MALLEABLE CASTINGS COMPANY'S PLANT 

At izoth street and Center avenue. Established 1899. Covers 5j^ acres; 2 smelting furnaces of daily capacity of 12 tons each; 10 

annealing ovens, capacity of 25 tons each The Illinois Central tracks at the right, and the terminal 

tracks operated by the Chicago Terminal Transfer Company at the left. 

(8) 




(4) THE CHICAGO PAIL COMPANY'S 

PLANT 

20,000 square feet of floor space; 100 
horse power. 

(5) THE INGLIS PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLY 

COMPANY'S PLANT 

38,000 square feet of floor surface; 

75 horse power. 

(i) THE PHCENIX BOOT AND SHOE COMPANY'S PLANT 

On Peoria Street. 50,000 square feet of floor space in plant; 

200 horse power. 

(2) CHICAGO BRASS BED FACTORY 
(3) WEST PULLMAN STATION ON ILLINOIS CENTRAL 
at Halsted Street 

The Land Association constructed a system of terminal tracks connecting these 
three trunk lines and reaching all parts of the factory district. This system of termi- 
nal tracks is now owned by a local railroad company the Chicago, West Pullman 
& Southern Railway Company, and is operated by the Chicago Terminal Transfer Company, 
(sometimes known as the Calumet Terminal) which recently secured access to West Pullman. 
This last named Company has established an office there for the purpose of serving more promptly 
and satisfactorily the needs of the manufacturing concerns there located, and a special engine 
and crew attend to all switching. The shipping facilities thus afforded are unsurpassed. 

(9) 



TERMINAL 
TRACKS 



A shipment, whether it be of many car-loads or of so small a part of a car-load as 2,000 
pounds, can thus be shipped by any one of the factories on freight trains of the Terminal Com- 
pany, which will bring the shipment to Chicago and forward over any one of the twenty-six 
Chicago railroads running to all parts of the country at regular Chicago rates. No switching 
charge whatever is made against the consignor, this being absorbed by the road to which the 
freight is consigned, and all truckage charges are also eliminated, as the terminal system of 
tracks runs to the door of each of the manufacturing plants. This item alone has saved one of 
the plants there located over $18,000 annually. Provision has been made for the extension of 
these facilities on the same advantageous terms to any industrial concerns that may hereafter be 
located at West Pullman. 

It should further be borne in mind that West Pullman is right in the territory through which 
practically all of the great Eastern and Southern railway systems pass, and is directly accessible 
to them all for either freight or passenger service. The Chicago and Eastern Illinois, the Mich- 
igan Central, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis, are only a mile distant at 
Kensington; the Baltimore & Ohio, the Erie, the Wabash and the Monon are some two miles 
distant at Burnside; the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, the Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & Chicago 
and the New York, Chicago & St. Louis are readily reached at Grand Crossing; and the Grand 
Trunk and the main line of the Rock-Island are but a short distance west at Blue Island. 

During the year ending June 30, 1900, the Rock-Island, Illinois 
AMOUNT OF Central, and Panhandle roads 

FREIGHT HANDLED AT Took into West p u ll man 134,032 tons. 

WEST PULLMAN ... 

Forwarded from West rullman 73.35 tons. 

On the terminal tracks of the Chicago, West Pullman & Southern Railroad, an average of 
46/4 loaded cars a day were handled during the first two and a half months of their operation 
by the Chicago Terminal Transfer Co. 

(10) 




CORNER OF 119TH AND HALSXED STREETS 
Showing tracks of Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad (Panhandle); station at the left. 



LABOR 
MARKET 



Another of the chief advantages that has caused manufacturing enterprises seeking 
locations to prefer West Pullman over other industrial points is the large and 
unfailing market of skilled labor there found. The proximity of West Pullman to 
Pullman and Burnside is a large factor in this connection. According to the annual report of 
President Lincoln, of the Pullman Palace Car Company, the average number of names on the 
pay-roll at Pullman for the past year was 6,258, and the wages paid were $3,832,291.98, mak- 
ing an average of $612.38 for each employe, including men, women, boys and girls. The 
Illinois Central shops at Burnside employ over 2 ooo people, with an annual pay-roll of over 
$1,000,000. Adding these figures to the aggregates given above for West Pullman factories, we 
have a total of over 12,000 employes in this territory of only a few miles square. 




THE WHITMAN & BARNES MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S PLANT 

From the east. When this plant was first established at West Pullman in 1894, this Company had large plants also at Syracuse, 
New York, and Akron, Ohio, but it has since concentrated its business at West Pullman on account of the superior advantages there 
found, the Syracuse plant having been entirely abandoned in 1897, and one department after another having been removed to West 
Pullman from Akron. The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific freight station appears at the right. Morgan Park and Beverly Hills are 
seen in the distance. , , 




THE WHITMAN & BARNES MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S PLANT 
Fronting on izoth street. This front building is 600 feet long; 250,000 square feet of floor space in plant- 1500 horse power. 





WRIGHT BLOCK, on Halsted Street. 



PLUMBER'S STORE, on i2otb Street. 



POPULATION. 



The Federal census of 1900 gives the southern portion of the 34th Ward, includ- 
ing West Pullman, Roseland, Kensington and Pullman a population of 30,0x30 
people. Nearly 8,000 of these are properly credited to the towns of West Pullman 
and Stewart Ridge. 

The growth in population of the southern portion of this city during the last ten years has 
been phenomenal. While the entire city of Chicago has gained, according to the Federal 
census, 598,725 people since 1890 being at the rate of increase of 54.44% a record far 
beyond that made by any of the other large cities of the country, the three southern wards of 
the city lying south of 63rd and 55th streets have gained 124,425 people, or at the rate of 165%, 
which is more than three times the rate of gain of the entire city. Of these three southern wards, 
the 34th in which West Pullman is located, made altogether the largest gain, its population hav- 
ing increased 60,953, or at the rate of 202%; while the 33rd Ward, in which South Chicago is 
located, gained 25,853, or at the rate of 99%, and the 3ist Ward, lying west of the 34th Ward, 
gained 37,619, or at the rate of 193%. 

(14) 




HALSTED STREET 

Looking north across i2oth street. West Pullman Post-Office at the right. Land Association office at the left. 

Tracks of Calumet Electric Street Railway. 

(15) 




KNEELAND BLOCK, on Halsted Street 

A large majority of the residents of the three southern wards are within easy reach of 
West Pullman by the Calumet Electric Railway system, which gives a five cent fare over all its 
lines, reaching east into the heart of South Chicago and west to Auburn Park and Washington 
Heights, as well as covering practically all of the 34th ward. On its West Pullman division 
alone, this Railway Company carries on the average 7,242 people daily, or a total of 2,643,330 
people in a year. 

The Illinois Central suburban express trains give frequent and rapid service to the southern 
portions and to the center of the city. 

(16) 




119TH STREET 

Looking west from Wallace street. Tracks of Calumet Electric Street Railway. Through cars on this road to 63d street, where 
they connect with South Side Elevated and surface roads direct to heart of city. 

(.17) 




CORNER OF BUTLER AND 120TH STREETS 



Moreover, the Calumet region contains, in addition to the large population in the southern 
portion of the city, prosperous and rapidly growing communities outside the city limits. 
Morgan Park is a mile northwest of West Pullman; Blue Island is a mile and a half southwest; 
Harvey is two miles directly south; while Dolton, Hammond and East Chicago lie to the 
southeast. West Pullman, being situated near the center of this district, is in a position to reap 
more than its share of the benefit from the increased inter-communication and inter-dependence 
that is sure to come among these Different sections. 

(18) 



Looking south from ngth 
street. 




STATE BANK OF WEST PULLMAN 

At corner of i2oth street and Lowe avenue. Bank established 1894. 

erected 1900. 



(19) 



New building 



BRANCH OF CHICAGO PUBLIC 
LIBRARY, LOCATED IN THIS 
BUILDING, GIVING DAILY 
DELIVERIES. 




STORE FRONTS ON 120TH STREET. 

(20) 




120TH STREET 

Looking east from Union avenue. 

(21) 




CATHOLIC CHURCH. 



But while West Pullman thus enjoys the advantage of 
being a part of Chicago and within reach of so large a 
laboring population, it at the same time enjoys great 
advantages over many of the more congested sections of 
the city. The laboring people living there own their own 
homes and are contented. No strike or serious labor diffi- 
culty has ever been known in West Pullman. The laboring 
people have their lodges and societies, but aggressive or 
offensive organizations are unknown. There is not a union 
factory or shop in the town. 





RESIDENCE OF REV. FATHER FOLEY. 



PAROCHIAL SCHOOL. 



(22) 




WALLACE STREET 
Looking south from I2oth street. Congregational church in center. 

(23) 




CHURCH OF CHRIST, 




In fact, the western and central portions of West 
Pullman as distinguished from the higher-priced section 
of Stewart Ridge afford every opportunity for cheap, 
good and contented living. The property there is of low 
price, ranging from $350 to $500 per lot; and if a home- 
seeker lacks either the means or the inclination to build, 
a company having capital and surplus of $200,000, and 
especially organized for this purpose, stands ready to con- 
struct such a home as may be desired, to be paid for on the 
monthly installment plan. 
Indeed, there is no dearth 
of capital for developing 
West Pullman, and it is 
already recognized by con- 
servative investors as one 
of the sections of the city 
in which it is safe to lend 
money upon mortgage se- 
curity and at a reasonable 
rate of interest. 




(24) 




PARNELL AVENUE 

Looking north from i22d street. All the houses on both sides of this street built within the last three years and sold 

on monthly installment plan 

(25) 




MARKET AND GROCERY STORE ON 120TH STREET 
Completed November, 1900 

The Pullman Loan and Savings Bank had, October i, 1900: 

Savings Deposits $1,201,316 

Individual " 310,102 



TOTAL $1,5x1,418 

The people not only get cheap homes, but they get cheap living. In this section of the 
town are located excellent markets, groceries and general stores. Marshall Field & Co., the 
Fair, the Hub, Siegel & Cooper's, and the other large down town stores, give daily and 
free delivery in West Pullman and Stewart Ridge. 

(26) 




CORNER 120TH STREET AND LOWE AVENUE 
Looking north. 

(27) 




STEWART RIDGE. 



ADVANTAGES 

OF 

BEING IN 

THE 

CITY OF 

CHICAGO 



When the Old Morgan Farm was purchased by the West Pullman Land 
Association in November, 1891, the larger portion of it was already within the 
corporate limits of Chicago, and the balance of the property was annexed in 
February, 1895. Thus were secured to West Pullman and Stewart Ridge the 
great advantages of the Chicago water supply, of Chicago schools, and of 
Chicago fire and police departments. This also insured Chicago mail delivery and Chicago 
telephone and telegraph rates. A branch of the Chicago public library was there established, 
and is generously patronized. Chicago companies furnish gas for cooking and illuminating 
purposes, and electric lights at the same rate as in other portions of the city. 

(28) 




PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDING 

Corner i2oth street and Parnell avenue. Width, 100 feet; depth, 200 feet. The first building of 8 rooms erected in 1893. 
building of 16 rooms added in 1900. High School (4 years course) established 1900. Manual training 
department established November, 1900. Total attendance October, 1900, 
913 pupils. High School attendance, 117 pupils. 

(29) 



New 



But the progressive promoters of West Pullman and Stewart Ridge early entered upon 
still greater undertakings for the development and improvement of this property. Two main 
sewers the famous Wentworth avenue sewer, of a diameter of io$4 feet, furnishes an outlet 
for the lateral sewers in the streets of Stewart Ridge while the new Halsted street sewer, with 
a diameter of 4^ feet, takes care of the factory district and the central portion of West Pull- 
man. Sewer and water pipes having been laid, the streets were finely macadamized, and Port- 
land cement sidewalks placed. 

ELEVEN MILES of streets, improved with 
Fine Macadam, 
Portland Cement Sidewalks, 
Sewer Pipes, 
Water Pipes. 
At cost of $345,000 all paid for by the Land Association. 

With its natural advantages thus improved and developed, it was inevitable that West 
Pullman and Stewart Ridge should grow and flourish, in spite of the fact that within a year from 
the date of their founding, the real estate market of Chicago experienced the unprecedented 
depression from which it is just now, with the beginning of the new century, recovering. 

The building restrictions that were imposed on the lots sold were graded ac- 

occTni^Tirkwc cording to the relative merit and value of the different localities. Thus was 
RESTRICTIONS 

given adequate protection to those purchasing in Stewart Ridge, and the build- 
ing of the fine class of homes now found in that portion of the property was thus insured. Each 
year the town made substantial growth. Hardly a season has passed without some 30 or 40 new 
residences being added. New and better stores have been opened. Schools have been enlarged, 

and churches of all denominations erected. 

(30) 




EGGLESTON AVENUE 

Looking north from I2oth street 

(31) 




HOMES ON EGGLESTON AVENUE 
(32) 







Looking south from I2otb street. 



EGGLESTON AVENUE 

Three frame houses and brick apartment built in this block during summer of 1900. 
chapel is now in process of construction here. 

(33) 



Episcopal 




HOMES ON STEWART AVENUE 
(34) 




STEWART AVENUE 
Looking south from izoth street, across Illinois Central tracks. Stewart Ridge station between this street and Harvard avenue, 

(35) 




EGGLESTON AVENUE 

At corner of i2zd street. 

(36) 




RESIDENCE 
At corner of Harvard avenue and izad street, built in summer of 1900. 

(37) 




STEWART RIDGE STATION. 



The Stewart Ridge Station, on 
the Illinois Central, is within five 
minutes' walk of each of the twenty- 
four blocks that make up this sub- 
division, and the Suburban Express 
Service of this road makes thirty-eight 
minute time to the Van Buren Street 
Station, near the heart of the business 
and retail district of Chicago. It is 
expected that this running time will 
be still further reduced to accommodate the increasing patronage at Stewart Ridge. Sixteen 
trains each way, daily, are run by the Illinois Central to Stewart Ridge and West Pullman, and 
further passenger accommodation is afforded by the Panhandle Road, the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois, and the main line of the Illinois Central, all of which are readily accessible by the cars 
of the Calumet Street Railway, which run every ten minutes along the northern boundary of 
Stewart Ridge and West Pullman. 

WILDWOOD PARK. 

The country surrounding Stewart Ridge is very beautiful, and the walks and drives in that 
neighborhood are most charming. 

The Calumet River is but a few blocks south. This wide and placid stream winds between 
picturesque and wooded banks. Perhaps the best known portion of the river is at Wildwood, 
where Col. James Bowen long ago established his country home. 



(38) 




COL. BOWEN'S OLD COUNTRY PLACE AT WILDWOOD 
At the statign of that name on Illinois Central. This is part of the proposed 

(39) 



Members of the Special Park Commission of Chicago, on their recent visit to Wildwood ex- 
pressed keen delight and appreciation of the virgin beauty of this woodland, of its magnificent 
growth of elms, maples, oaks and firs, of its ravines and river bluffs, and of its distant landscapes. 
This property is situated at the south end of State Street and 
Michigan Avenue, and the Calumet Electric Street Railway 
already runs its cars to Gardner's Park, within two blocks of the 
property, while the Illinois Central has a station just to the 
east. Several hundred thousand people are thus within easy 
reach of this property and are hoping that the Special Park 
Commission will succeed in its effort to preserve here a most 
lovely natural park. Indeed, this Wildwood tract, situated as 
it is at the end of Michigan Avenue, the greatest of the city's 
boulevards, should be but a link of a superb park-way, run- 
ning along the bank of the Calumet River, south of Stewart 
Ridge and West Pullman, all the way to Blue Island, and thus 
connecting with the fine rolling country lying south and west 
of the Blue Island and Morgan Park range of hills. 

This country is crossed and re-crossed by good roads, 
affording drives of unending variety and charm. Its beauties 
are just beginning to be known to the people 
of Chicago, and the location of the Midlothian 
Country Club, southwest of Blue Island, of the 
Homewood Club at Flossmoorand the Ellersie 
Cross-Country Club at Beverly Hills, are 
attracting seekers for country homes to this 
southern section. All of these clubs are within 
easy driving distance of Stewart Ridge, and 
plans for a local golf club at this subdivision 
are already being made. 

(40) 




OLD BLUE ISLAND AND RIVERDALE ROAD 

This road forms northern boundary of Wildwood property, 
which the Special Park Commission of Chicago has visited and 
recommended as a site for a beautiful natural park. This is half 
a mile south of Stewart Ridge. 




ON THE BLUFF AT WILDWOOD 
Overlooking Calumet River. 

(41) 




WILDWOOD PLEASANCE 




RAVINE AT WILDWOOD 
Banks 20 feet high are hidden by the heavy foliage. 

(13) 



CALUMET RIVER AND HARBOR. 



The Calumet River, as a navigable water- 
way, is already under the control of the Federal 
Government to a point beyond West Pullman, 
and none but swinging bridges are allowed to 
be built across it. When the well matured 
project for deepening and widening this river 
is put into operation, the great natural beauty 
of the stream and its banks can, if care is only 
exercised, be preserved and enhanced. 

The early improvement, for the purpose 
of navigation, of the Calumet River to Blue 
Island and beyond is assured. The Trustees 
of the Sanitary District of Chicago have already 
made plans for the annexation to the Chicago 

Sanitary District of the Calumet region, and for the building of a ship canal across from the 
Calumet River along Stony Creek and the old canal feeder to the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal 
at the Sag. It is admitted that such a tributary canal must be built before the Chicago Canal 
can fulfill the requirements of the state statutes as to the amount of water flowing through it. 

Slips could easily be built from the Calumet River, so improved, to West Pullman, and 
industries there located would have water transportation to Lake Michigan on the east and the 
Chicago Canal on the west. 




WALK AT 

W1LDWOOD. 





CALUMET RIVER BENEATH WILDWOOD 

The river is about 250 feet wide. Proposed ship canal from Lake Michigan via the Calumet River connecting with Chicago 
Sanitary and Ship Canal has been surveyed and approved by Engineers of the United States along this route. 

(45) 



but the development of the Calumet River has still greater possibilities for the Calumet 
region. Agitation for a deep waterway from Lake Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico has recently 
taken on more tangible and agressive form, and the Illinois River Valley Association has been 
organized for the express purpose of furthering this project and of seeking aid therefor from 
Congress. The United States Engineers have from the first recognized that this proposed water- 
way should follow the route above described, via the Calumet River and the Sag. Elaborate 
surveys were made in 1889 under the direction of Congress, and in transmitting these to Wash- 
ington, Major W. L. Marshall, who was long Chief Engineer for the Government at Chicago, in 
his letter of February 28th, 1890, reported as follows: 

"The terminal facilities, * * * * the ample land-locked natural basins, * * * * for the 
construction of a great development of wharves and docks, and commodious harbors, * * * * 
point irresistably to the Calumet region as the proper terminus of a great waterway between the 
Great Lakes and the Mississippi River." 

Ten years further experience and observation have only emphasized the justice of Majo 
Marshall's conclusion. A second survey of this route was recently ordered by Congress, and 
has just been completed by the United States Engineers at Chicago. 

It surely is quite within the possible that a few years time will give West Pullman the benefit 
of a navigable waterway direct to the Mississippi and the Gulf of Mexico. 

Whatever may be thought of the practicability of the effort of the Illinois River Valley 
Association, to secure a fourteen-foot channel down the Mississippi, it is admitted by all that an 

eight-foot channel is entirely feasible. 

(46) 




THEIGREAT ELM UNDER THE BLUFF AT WILDWOOD 

(47) 



The work of improving 1 the harbor at the mouth of the Calumet River is, in the meantime, 
being vigorously pushed forward by the Federal Government, and the river has already been 
dredged for a distance of several miles to a width of two hundred feet or more, and a depth of 
twenty feet, thus accommodating the largest steamers on the Great Lakes. This harbor is recog- 
nized as the most commodious on Lake Michigan, and General Wilson, Chief of the Engineers 
of the War Department, in his report which will be presented to the next session of Congress, 
advocates an appropriation of $300,000 for the further improvement of the Calumet Harbor, 
and of $60,000 for the Calumet River, and he also advocates an appropriation of $75,000 for the 
Chicago River. 

Major Marshall, in February, 1898, in discussing the navigation interests of Chicago, said: 

"Calumet already has the deep water harbor, and it is by all odds the best place for the 
wheat, coal and lumber in transit, instead of going through the heart of the city. * * * The 
growth of business at Calumet Harbor within the last two years is something surprising." 

And in his report of 1897, Major Marshall called attention to the fact that the average 
registered tonnage of steam vessels arriving at and departing from Chicago Harbor was only 700 
tons, while from Calumet Harbor it was 1,456 tons, which he stated was larger than the aver- 
age steam tonnage at any other port on the globe. 

Commerce at the Calumet Harbor has indeed made tremendous strides since the Federal 

Government began its improvement. 

CALUMET HARBOR. 

1889 J 899 INCREASE. PERCENT GAIN. 



No. Vessels Entering ................. 606 I I S3 547 9 

Total Registered Tonnage Entering ..... 493,928 1,755,782 1,261,854 255 

Average Tonnage of Vessels entering Calumet Harbor, 1,552 tons. 

Compare this with the Chicago River, which has long had the greatest commerce of all the 
harbors on the Great Lakes. 

CHICAGO HARBOR. 

1889 ^99 INCREASE. PERCENT GAIN. 

No. Vessels Entering ................ 9,802 6,984 2,818* 

Total Registered Tonnage Entering. ... 4,521,886 4,582,821 60,935 * 

Average Tonnage of Vessels Entering Chicago River, 656 tons. 
*Decrease. 

(48) 




CALUMET RIVER AT HALSTED STREET BRIDGE 
Three blocks south of Association property. 

(49) 



During the season ending September 3Oth, 1900, the following entrances were made at the 

Calumet and Chicago Harbors respectively, according to the report for September, 1900, of the 
Bureau of Statistics at Washington. 

ENTRANCES. 

CALUMET. CHICAGO. CALUMET. CHICAGO. 

No of vessels 921 5,761 Rye 

Coal, hard 237,626 tons. 595, 102 tons. Iron Ore 1,581,991 tons. 70,464 tons. 

" soft... I 3> 1 35 " 4 2 7o6 " Iron, Pig 60 " 335 " 

Flour I )97 " 31652 " Iron, manufactured .... 4,491 " 11,201 " 

Wheat 467,000 bu. 306,406 bu. Salt 118,349 " 104,766 " 

Corn - 25,055 " Copper 1,944 " 16,255 " 

Oats 1,000 " Lumber 107,740 M ft. 378,546 M ft. 

Barley Unclassified freight.... 123,887 tons. 607,483 tons. 

33 stetl vessels, aggregating 88,108 tons, and costing $5,700,000, were built on the Calumet River 
between 1891 and 1899. Early in 1900, there were under construction at one plant on this river, 
one steamer 450 feet long, a second 466 feet long and a third 475 feet long. 

The managers of the great railroads of Chicago have long recognized the importance of 
the Calumet region, and have been busy securing facilities there. The Chicago Terminal Trans- 
fer Company, which operates the terminal tracks at West Pullman, has two lines running east 
and west, just south of the Calumet River, from Blue Island to Hammond and South Chicago. 
President Thomas of the Western Indiana and the Inner Belt Line railroad companies, in his last 
annual report called attention to the fact that his road had, during the past year, derived a rev- 
enue of $262,336 from industries located in the Calumet region, and went on to predict that, 
"Nearly all the through business will eventually be handled over docks and through warehouses 
located on the Calumet River, or on the Lake in that vicinity." 

Grain elevators with a capacity of over fourteen million bushels have already been con- 
structed on the Calumet and plans are already made for the building of further elevators. 

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CALUMET RIVER 
From Ashland avenue bridge, 

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THE FUTURE. 

In issuing this pamphlet the management 
of the West Pullman Land Association seeks 
to call to the attention of the public such per- 
tinent facts as will enable all who are interested 
in Chicago real estate to form some just idea of 
the conditions now prevailing at West Pullman 
and Stewart Ridge, and of the probable future 
development there. It is hoped that all who are 
so interested be they men of affairs looking for 
manufacturing sites or business opportunities, be 
they home seekers, or investors, will visit these 
subdivisions and verify for themselves the repre- 
sentations here made. 

It is evident that these properties are far removed from the common subdivision property. 
While they can well bear comparison with other suburbs, either as to attractiveness, healthful- 
ness, or accessibility, these subdivisions do not in any sense depend upon suburban residents for 
their future growth. 

With them it is not so much a question of getting Chicago people to go out there to live, 
as it is to get people whose daily occupation takes them to these points, or to other sections of the 
Calumet region, to establish homes and remain in the community. Better street car accommo- 
dation, which is sure to come, between the different sections of this region for instance, 
between South Chicago and West Pullman and Stewart Ridge, and between Pullman and West 
Pullman and Stewart Ridge, will mean the location at the last mentioned points of very many 
people who now live in less attractive sections of this district, or in sections of the city farther 
north, and so more distant from their places of business or employment. 

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Indeed, West Pullman and Stewart Ridge have the essential elements of a city in them- 
selves and they are right in the heart of a district destined to become a great city of itself in the 
near future. 

How strong the trend of the growth of population in their direction is, appears from an 
analysis of the Federal Census returns: 

POPULATION. 

SOME STATISTICS AS TO GROWTH OF SOUTHERN PORTION OF CHICAGO ACCORDING TO FEDERAL CENSUS. 

1890. 

Chicago (entire city) 1,099,850 

Chicago, south of 39th street 182,729 

Chicago, south of 63rd and 551)1 streets (Wards 31, 34 and 33) 75, 188 
34th Ward, in which West Pullman is located 30, 192 



1900. 
'.698,575 
416,153 
199,613 

9'. '45 



Increase. 



233.424 
"24,425 

60,953 



Per Cent. 

54-44 
127. 

165. 
202. 



34th Ward made the largest increase of any ward in the city, gaining 60,953. 
Chicago, south of 39th street has 63,934 more people than Buffalo. 
Chicago, south of 63rd and 55th streets has 67,791 more people than Toledo. 
34th ward has only 10,000 people less than Omaha. 
South of 39th street, there are within twenty thousand 

as many people as the whole city of Chicago had 

in 1878. 



POPULATION OF SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF 34th WARD, 
FEDERAL CENSUS OF iqOO. 

West Pullman and Stewart Ridge 7,896 

Kensington 3,5 19 

Roseland 10,678 

Pullman 7,747 

Riverdale 1,185 



South of looth street. 



31.025 

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This district is making great gains not 
only in population and in industrial and com- 
mercial matters, but along other lines as well. 
The recent action of the Executors of the 
Estate of Geo. M. Pullman, in setting aside, 
pursuant to the terms of the will, a fund of 
some $1,200,000 for the erection and main- 
tenance of a technical and manual training 
school at Pullman, is a most hopeful indication 
of the future of this district. Morgan Park has 
long been known for the excellent academic 
and military schools there maintained, and 
these are being strengthened and enlarged. 
The stability and permanence of West Pullman and Stewart Ridge, and of real estate values 

there, are already assured by the substantial growth shown during the last eight years, and now 

that general conditions have so changed and improved, this growth will gain greater and greater 

momentum. 

Negotiations are now pending for the location there of new manufacturing concerns, as well 

as for the enlargement of some of those already located. 

A great deal of building is now going on, both of business blocks and of private residences, 

and the demand for homes is still much greater than the supply. Everything points to an active 

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market during the next season. The present prices of property are conservative, and nowhere 
in the City of Chicago is better value given, or stronger assurance of satisfactory returns and an 
advance. 

Price lists and plats will be furnished on application and free transportation afforded to those 

desiring to visit the property. 

Respectfully, 

WEST PULLMAN LAND ASSOCIATION, 

403 Home Insurance Building, Chicago. 




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FIRST ADDITION TO WEST PULLMAN 

Development just begun by building of three-foot brick sewer through centre of property. Adapted to cheap homes for working people. 

Blue Island in the distance 



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5'iS 

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